Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)

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Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
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Creator:
Islander
Publisher:
Bonner Joy
Publication Date:

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Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00074389:01144

Full Text


N9



oCOM .
Ranked
Florida's
Best

Community
Weekly
by FPA

AMI Chamber of
Commerce 2012 Medium
Business of the Year


As l ne viora I erns oad
up the bus. Page 6


Paid parking push on.
Page 4


The government calen-
dar. Page 4


The Islander editorial,
guest opinion. Page 6

Pine Avenue park may
go up for sale. Page 8


Community events,
announcements. Pages
10-11



Make a date, join a
group. Pages 10-11


Bradenton Beach
approves stormwater
tax increase. Page 16


Sheriff's detective on search for Sabine: 'We're not giving up'
By Rick Catlin and is being held in the Manatee County jail
Islander Reporter without bail.
Manatee County Sheriff's Office depu- He entered a not guilty plea and a trial
ties will continue their search of private prop- is scheduled for the week of Oct. 14.
erty near Galati Marine in Anna Maria for Kenney said the search of the residen-
the body of Sabine Musil-Buehler, although tial property owned by Jack Fiske on South
so far, in two weeks of clearing brush, dig- Bay Boulevard came after an inspection of
ging and searches by cadaver-sniffing dogs, cellphone records the night of Nov. 4, 2008,
there has been no apparent success. revealed "the possibility Musil-Buehler
Musil-Buehler has been missing since might have been in this area."
Nov. 4, 2008, and MCSO Detective John For Kenney, the search for her body has
Kenney believes her remains are on Anna been ongoing.
Maria Island. At the time of her disappear- Search for Sabine: Manatee County Sher- I've been involved in this case for
ance, she was living in Anna Maria with iffs Office deputies take a closer look at an almost six years," Kenney said. "It won't
her boyfriend, who has been arrested and area after digging on private property in be over for me until we find her body."
charged with her murder. Anna Maria. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin At the time of her disappearance, Musil-
I'm convinced we'll find her out here. Buehler was co-owner of Haley's Motel in
We're not giving up," Kenney said. liam Cumber, in October 2012, while he was Holmes Beach with her estranged husband,
Kenney headed the MCSO-Anna Maria jailed in Charlotte County Correctional Insti- Tom Buehler.
substation when Musil-Buehler disappeared. tute for a probation violation on an unrelated The investigation took another twist
He is now a homicide detective and still arson conviction, when an arson fire broke out at Haley's
working on the case. Cumber has since been charged with Motel Nov. 16, 2008.
The MCSO arrested the boyfriend, Wil- the second-degree murder of Musil-Buehler No arrest has been made for the arson.

Speculation builds for Holmes Beach election


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
Speculation over the November Holmes
Beach election is building.
Bob Johnson, who currently serves as the
chair of the Holmes Beach
Charter Review Commit-
tee and also has served on
the traffic committee, col-
lected a candidate packet
at city hall but declined
Zaccagnino to comment on a possible


candidacy.
The candidate packet includes informa-
tion and forms that must be filed for either a
commission or mayoral seat during the June
16-20 qualifying period.
Meanwhile, Commis-
sion Chair Judy Titsworth,
whose term is up in Novem-
ber, is hedging on whether
she will run for re-election
or take a run for mayor
Titsworth against David Zaccagnino,


who has declared his intent to resign his
commission seat with a year remaining in his
term in order to run for the mayor's seat.
"I don't want him to run unopposed, so
I'm waiting to see how it all plays out," said
Titsworth, referring to Johnson's possible
PLEASE SEE HB ELECTION, PAGE 2


Island cities, officials 'on track' for hurricane season


Officials from Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach attended the 28th annual
Governor's Conference on Hurricanes in
Orlando May 16-18.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Bill Shearon,
along with BBPD Lt. John Cosby, public
works superintendent Tom Woodard and
Commissioner Jack Clarke attended the con-
ference. So did Holmes Beach Police Chief
Bill Tokajer and superintendent of public
works Tom O'Brien.


L v N WE Shearon said he was happy with what
er prepares he learned as a first-time attendee: "It was
very amazing to learn all the factors figured

d Biz in an evacuation. There's a lot of behind-the-
scenes activity and preparation."
Page 23 He said Cosby has prepared the city's
evacuation and emergency plans for a
d celebra- number of years.
"We went just to make sure our plan was
updated. We have it ready, and Cosby is very
experienced. We're on track with what the
conference said we should have," Shearon
said.
"One thing I did learn is that prepared-
portunities: ness is important. Not just the city, but resi-
it gets. dents. I can't stress enough that residents
should have their hurricane supplies. The


A boat batters the Historic Bridge Street
Pier during the passage of Tropical Storm
Debby in the Gulf of Mexico in July 2012.
Nine boats broke anchor nearby and
crashed into the city pier, which suffered
substantial damage. Islander File Photo

conference said three days of food and water,
but I'm going to have seven days," he said.
"And evacuate when you are told. Help
may not be there if you stay and the island
gets flooded. This entire island is a flood
zone.
Shearon said the conference stressed a
number of issues, including evacuation of
people with special needs, availability of law
enforcement to direct an evacuation and to


check for returning residents after a hurri-
cane, and availability of a cleanup company
to remove debris from city roads.
"After attending the conference, I'm sat-
isfied with our plan as it is," he said.
Holmes Beach has had a hurricane
evacuation and emergency plan in place for
years.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn said no
one from that city attended, but she and
public works supervisor George McKay
have attended previous conferences, and
went to Manatee County's emergency opera-
tions center May 22 for hurricane planning.
Officials of all three island cities were at
the EOC for the event in advance of storm
season, which begins June 1.
"We have a hurricane emergency plan
ready if needed and we're pleased it's up to
date," she said.
All three island cities will govern from
a facility at the State College of Florida in
Bradenton in the event of an island evacua-
tion, SueLynn said.
Forecasters attribute the low number of
hurricanes predicted for this season to El
Nino, which creates a westerly wind shear
PLEASE SEE HURRICANE, PAGE 4


NYTimes crossword.
Page 16


Island police blotter.
Page 19

46 -1- Io


AME teach
for retirement


Honors anc
tions.


Fishing op1
As good as
Page 25


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2 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER
HB ELECTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
run for office.
Holmes Beach residents interested in becoming a
candidate for mayor or commissioner must collect a
candidate packet from city hall or the Manatee County
Supervisor of Elections Office in Bradenton.
The packet contains the "how-to" for candidates,
regulations and forms necessary to get on the Novem-
ber ballot.
Prospective candidates must fill out a statement of
candidacy, declaring the position for which they are
running, collect signatures from at least 15 registered
voters in the city of Holmes Beach and open a cam-
paign account with an assigned treasurer.
The city presently has 3,087 voters.
Prospective candidates also must complete a can-
didate's oath of office and verify residency. Holmes
Beach candidates must have resided in Holmes Beach
for at least two years.
All of the necessary forms are contained in the
packet, which must be turned into city hall during the
qualifying period. The qualifying period opens at noon
June 16 and closes at noon June 20.
Candidates also must pay a qualifying fee, which is
equal to 10 percent of the income of the office sought.
Running for mayor comes with a $120 qualifying fee,
and commissioners $64.

AM election: Yetter 'yes,'

other incumbents, 'maybe'
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anyone interested in a political career in Anna
Maria may be hiding among the sea oats along the
Gulf of Mexico.
With 10 days to go before qualifying begins for
an elected office in the November election, only Com-
missioner Nancy Yetter has announced her intention
to seek another term in office.
Two commission seats and the mayor's post are
up for election Nov. 4.


"I had to think about it, but I believe the city is
moving forward and I want to be involved in getting
things done and keeping Anna Maria a great place to
live," Yetter said.
Yetter's husband Mike is her campaign treasurer,
although no funds have been deposited in her cam-
paign account.
Commissioner Chuck Webb remains in limbo. He
has said he is "definitely a maybe" to seek a fifth con-
secutive term.
Mayor SueLynn had said she will make an
announcement not later than June 9, the first day of
qualifying in Anna Maria.
No other candidates have appeared on the political
scene in the northern city on Anna Maria Island.
Anna Maria presently has 1,255 active voters,
according to the Supervisor of Elections Office.
The city's qualifying period is noon June 9 to noon
June 20. Election packets are available at city hall,
10005 Gulf Drive.
Election fees and qualifying papers must be sub-
mitted to the Manatee County Supervisor of Elections
Office, 600 301 Blvd., No. 108, Bradenton.
The qualifying fee to run for mayor is $96, while
to seek a commission seat the fee is $48. Fee waiver
forms are available at the SOE office.
Anna Maria commissioners are paid $4,800 annu-
ally, while the mayor receives $9,600 in annual com-
pensation for the job.

BB commissioners seek
3rd final terms
By Merab-Michal Favorite
Islander Reporter
The two Bradenton Beach commissioners whose
terms are up for election Nov. 4 will run for third
terms.
So far, no challengers have shown interest in the
seats held by incumbents Ed Straight in Ward 2 and
Jan Vosburgh in Ward 4.
However, residents have until June 20 to qualify


for the ballot.
Both Vosburgh and Straight ran unopposed in
2012.
The commissioners said they have picked up their
2014 registration packets.
"I should have my account set up soon, so I can
begin accepting campaign donations," Straight said.
Bradenton Beach officials are limited to serving
three consecutive terms in office, but with a hiatus of
one term they could run again and reclaim a seat on
the dais. Or they can run for mayor when that seat is
on the city ballot.
"I've served on the commission for almost four
years," Straight said. "I believe my experience is
important to keep congruency going; I'm thinking in
the long term."
Straight won his seat in 2010 after three decades in
public service as Manatee County's Emergency Medi-
cal Technician chief, emergency management chief,
911 emergency response center chief and as a reserve
deputy sheriff.
When he's not examining city policies, he helps
his wife operate Wildlife Inc., a rehabilitation center
for birds and small animals, from their home.
Straight plans to look to his hometown of St.
Petersburg to gain insight on the parking problems
that came to light in his second term.
He said he is excited to see some of the projects
he and other commissioners have worked on coming
to fruition after several years, most notably, the con-
struction of a cell tower, the pier reconstruction and a
series of stormwater upgrades.
Vosburgh said she uses her experience as a stor-
eowner, caretaker and problem-solver when looking
at city issues.
"I take care of my people in Ward 4," she said.
I've always been a problem solver."
Originally from Wisconsin, Vosburgh found her-
self in unfamiliar territory when she and her husband
moved to Utah to adopt and raise five nieces and neph-
ews after their father unexpectedly died.
PLEASE SEE BB ELECTION, NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0E3

Trash piles, problems building at beach accesses


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
One Holmes Beach resident has been trashed. And
it's not the first time.
"Trash is not being picked up on Fridays. By
Sundays the can is overflowing with trash all over the
ground and blowing back onto the beach," resident Lori
Schlossberg wrote in an email about the waste bins at
her beach access. "I've made numerous calls to Waste
Management and the city of Holmes Beach. After all
my calls, this is still what I'm dealing with."
Schlossberg included photos of overflowing bins,
trash strewn and stacked on the ground.
Schlossberg sent her email to Suzi Fox, execu-
tive director of Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and

BB ELECTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2
"We didn't know what to do for work out there,"
she said. "But I had always liked interior design so we
decided to open a furniture store."
After running a business for nearly 30 years,
Vosburgh chose Bradenton Beach as her home in
1986.
She began her political career when she was
drafted by the commission to fill the seat held by Bob
Bartelt, who took over as mayor in August 2010.
After a few months at the dais, she decided to run
for Ward 4 commissioner and won the majority vote.
Candidate packets are available at the city clerk's
office at city hall, 107 Gulf Drive N., or at the Manatee
County Supervisor of Elections Office, 600 301 Blvd.
W., Bradenton.
The city presently has 768 voters.
Applicants are required to have established resi-
dency within the city for 90 days and be registered to
vote in the ward for which they qualify.
The candidate must pay a qualifying fee equal to
1 percent of the annual salary for the office sought -
$96 for mayor, $48 for commission seat and obtain
10 petition signatures of voters residing in the city.


Shorebird Monitoring, due to concerns the trash could
blow onto the beach and possibly impeding a nesting
sea turtle.
Schlossberg's email worked its way to city hall as
Fox forwarded it to Holmes Beach code enforcement
officer David Forbes, along with photos of the trash-
strewn area of 46th Street.
Forbes forwarded the email to Mayor Carmel
Monti and Commissioner Pat Morton.
Monti contacted Manatee County Commissioner
John Chappie, who explained the problem on Holmes
Beach streets is not the county's responsibility.
Morton, who is the Waste Management liaison for
the city, had better luck.
"We're really putting a lot of effort into getting
these things fixed, because it's just wrong," said
Morton.


Becoming a voter
Voters can check their registration status by
going online to VoteManatee.com, or at the Mana-
tee County Supervisor of Elections Office, 600
301 Blvd., W., Suite 108, Bradenton.
Registered voters in Manatee County must:
Be a citizen of the United States.
Be a legal Florida resident.
Be at least 18 years old.
Convicted felons may not vote without first
having their civil rights restored.
Manatee County residents must register to
vote 29 days before an election. To vote in the
statewide Aug. 26 primary, voters must be regis-
tered by July 28.
To vote in the November election, registration
must be completed by Oct. 7. Voter registration
forms can be filled out online, requested by phone
at 941-741-3823, or picked up at the supervisor
of elections office, driver's license offices, public
libraries, city halls and chambers of commerce.


Morton said there are several problematic loca-
tions among the beach-access points in Holmes Beach.
Morton attributed the problem to too many visitors and
too few trash cans.
He also noted that often Waste Management
cannot reach the trash cans if cars are parked too close.
However, Waste Management is supposed to contact
a supervisor, who notifies the city, and public works
then follows up on the pickup problem.
Morton met with Waste Management and Holmes
Beach public works foreman Gary Blunden May 21 to
address the trash problem.
Morton said a dumpster will be placed at the 46th
Street beach access over the Memorial Day weekend
as a test.
"This one is a trial to see how people react. After
our meeting, I think we are starting to get our stuff
back together," said Morton. "It's a new problem with
the amount of people coming to the island and we have
to learn from it."
Trash sur-
rounds a
Waste Man-
agement
container
after trash
pickup at
the 46th
Street beach
access point
in Holmes
Beach May
22. Islander
Photo:
Cour-
tesy Lori
Schlossberg


MR GHERITA PIZZA





4 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

Island officials agree: paid parking is needed


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
It might be hard for some longtime Anna Maria
Island residents to believe, but the three island cities
finally have agreed on something, if only unoffi-
cially.
The agreement to have some form of paid parking
in all three cities was arrived at May 21 during the
Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials meeting,
where Holmes Beach Commissioner David Zaccag-
nino presented his broad view of paid permit-parking
and invited comments.
"This is a brainstorming session. If nothing comes
of this, at least we can say we tried. I realize we nor-
mally can't agree on anything, but this is a serious
issue," he said.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn, Holmes Beach
Mayor Carmel Monti and Bradenton Beach Mayor
Bill Shearon agreed with the concept.
SueLynn said it's a "good point to start with that
each city has permit parking of some form."
Others at the meeting, including Anna Maria Com-
missioners Dale Woodland and Nancy Yetter, said they
didn't care if the Manatee County Tourist Develop-
ment Council or the Bradenton Area Convention and
Visitors Bureau like the idea or not.
Yetter added she didn't care what county commis-
sion thinks of the idea. "People need to realize there's
not enough parking space out here for everyone."
She said the TDC could help fund a traffic and
parking study that encompasses all three cities, but
SueLynn wasn't keen on that idea.
"I have no hopes the TDC will fund any study on
the island, even if it's to benefit tourism in the long
run. I will have to beg them, please, help us keep our
island and quality of life," she said.
Zaccagnino said all the tourism promotion of the
island by the TDC and the Bradenton Area Convention
and Visitors Bureau is killing the golden goose known
as Anna Maria Island by bringing some unwanted visi-

HURRICANE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
that slows hurricane development.
"If we have a robust El Nino, then the numbers
will be much lower, and this could be one of the least
active years in recent memory," Accuweather.com
senior meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.
Accuweather predicted five hurricanes of category
3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale for the 2014
season.
But Shearon said forecasters at the conference said
the eastern Gulf of Mexico is "particularly vulnerable"
if a tropical storm or hurricane comes up from the
Caribbean.
"It only takes one storm," SueLynn added. "And
it's all about being prepared. The city is ready, and we
want residents to be ready."
She noted that from 2001-10, a number of hurri-
canes passed many miles west of the island and struck
other Gulf coast states, including Hurricane Katrina in
2005.
"We've been lucky, but the storms eroded a lot of
beach area and we had significant debris that had to
be cleaned up. And those storms were several hundred
miles from the island."
She agreed with Shearon that island residents
should have a "be prepared" list of items in case of a
weather event.
"Obviously, you need flashlights, batteries, drink-
ing water, canned and non-perishable foods and other
emergency items," she said. If there are babies in the
house, disposable diapers are a must.
Other items on a household hurricane list include
first-aid supplies, and storage of important documents,
such as passports, birth certificates, deeds and titles,
the mayor added.
SueLynn said she believed the last tropical storm/
hurricane to come ashore near the island was Septem-
ber 2001, when Tropical Storm Gabrielle made land-
fall near Venice, about 25 miles south of Anna Maria
Island.
"There was a lot of beach erosion, downed trees
and damaged structures, and that was just a tropical
storm," she said.
"Let's be ready for a hurricane."


- U/
Holmes Beach Commissioner David Zaccagnino
outlines his concept for islandwide paid parking
for officials attending the May 21 meeting in Anna
Maria of the Coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin


tors, especially from nearby counties.
"Just look at the license plates of cars. You'll see
a lot of plates from Florida counties other than Mana-
tee," he said.
Yetter agreed with Zaccagnino, saying that many
problems are caused by "day-trippers who come from
other counties."
SueLynn also agreed. The majority of vehicles
parked at Anna Maria locations on a weekend are from
outside Manatee County, she said.
Zaccagnino said island cities have to pay for law
enforcement for the thousands who come to the island
for a day visit, trash pickup of all the garbage left by


City fees for businesses in Holmes Beach are set to
increase on a schedule set by a 2012 ordinance.
The city adopted the ordinance, based on a state
statute allowing the city to raise the business tax by
5 percent every two years. It's been 11 years since a
business tax increase in Holmes Beach.
City clerk Stacey Johnston presented a staff report
to the commission May 15 for consideration. The
commission agreed to authorize city attorney Patricia
Petruff to draft an ordinance adopting the new fees.


Anna Maria City
June 26, 6 p.m., city commission.
July 24, 6 p.m., city commission.
Aug. 28, 6 p.m., city commission.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-
708-6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
May 29, 1:30 p.m., budget committee.
June 2, 3 p.m., Scenic Waves.
June 4, 1 p.m., commission workshop.
June 4, 10:30 a.m., CIP.
June 4, 11 a.m., pier team.
June 5, 6 p.m., city commission.
June 10, 1:30 p.m., budget committee.
June 11, 3 p.m., planning and zoning.
June 12, 1 p.m., department heads.
June 17, 10:30 a.m., special city commis-
sion.
June 17, 1 p.m., commission workshop.
June 18, 11 a.m., pier team.
June 19, noon, city commission.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
941-778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
May 29, 7 p.m., city commission.
May 30, 1 p.m., police retirement board.
June 17, 11 a.m., city center.
June 18, 9 a.m., charter review.
June 19, 10 a.m., code enforcement.


weekend visitors and maintain roads that were not built
for such heavy use.
Anna Maria Commission Chair Chuck Webb said
getting all three island cities to agree on something has
"never happened before, but this has a commonality.
I'm hopeful."
Zaccagnino asked attendees to discuss the "broad
view of some form of paid permit parking" at future
city meetings.
"We have to do something together," he said.
"Maybe not every city has the same ordinance, but
each ordinance should be similar."
Members agreed the next meeting will be a work
session devoted to the issue.
But paid parking is not the only area where the
three island cities are being asked to agree.
SueLynn proposed all three cities contribute to
fund a $125,000 study by the Urban Land Institute of
Washington, D.C. and Hong Kong.
She said she talked to the ULI representative and
he said studying just one island city would not make
sense because of the inter-relationship of the munici-
palities. And the cost would be the same, regardless
of how many cities participate.
SueLynn said TDC board member/Holmes Beach
Commissioner Jean Peelen, who was unable to attend
the BIEO meeting, has asked the TDC to fund the ULI
study for the island. The mayor said Peelen told her
she has not yet had a response.
Island cities also are being asked to agree to a
common street-sweeping contract for State Road 789/
Gulf Drive. Public works superintendents of all three
cities are going to meet and draft a contract, Shearon
said.
The next BIEO meeting will be at 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 18, at Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf
Drive N.


The fee increase reflects a difference of $1-$6,
depending on category. Johnston said the increase is
expected to generate $10,000 more in revenue than the
past year's collection for the city.
The new fees will be reflected on 2014-15 business
tax receipt renewal forms. The renewals are accepted
by the city July 1-Sept. 30.
The ordinance was expected to have a first reading
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at city hall, 5801 Marina
Drive.


June 24, 6 p.m. city commission.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
941-708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

Manatee County
June 3, 9 a.m., county board.
June 4, 1:30 p.m., budget presentation.
June 10, 9 a.m., budget presentation.
June 12, 9 a.m., budget presentation.
June 17, 9 a.m., county board.
June 18, 2 p.m., tourism development coun-
cil.
Administration building, 1112 Manatee Ave. W.,
Bradenton, 941-748-4501, www.mymanatee.org.

West Manatee Fire Rescue
June 19, 6 p.m., commission.
Administrative office, 6417 Third Ave. W., Bra-
denton, 941-761-1555, www.wmfr.org.

Of Interest
June 16, 2 p.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
June 18, 2 p.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach.
June 23, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization, TBD.
July 4 is Independence Day. Most government
offices and The Islander will be closed.
Send notices to calendar@islander.org and
news@islander.org.


Holmes Beach business tax to increase 5 percent





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 U 5

Would you believe Anna Maria Island is underrated?


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Some residents and officials say Anna Maria Island
is over-promoted and publicized, but did you know it
is underrated?
At least the patrons of one travel advisory website
believe so.
Tripadvisor.com has listed Anna Maria Island as
one of America's five most underrated beach towns,
with Siesta Key in Sarasota County also on the list.
Although Tripadvisor apparently overlooked the
nuance of three towns more properly, three cities
on Anna Maria Island, the mistake is understandable,
according to Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce vice president Deb Wing.
"The only thing that separates an island city is a
street," she said. "The entire atmosphere of old Florida
is found in every island city. I think it's really nice that
we got that 'old Florida' comment from Tripadvisor.
That's what we are."
Tripadvisor said on its website that "The 7-mile
long island just across from St. Petersburg sits just
north of the more famous Longboat Key on the Gulf
of Mexico. The 'old Florida' feel of this laid-back,
less-developed island seems to be what keeps people
coming back here."
Wing said "old Florida describes us perfectly. It's
what we always want to be. We're not Panama City,

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Daytona Beach, Fort Lauderdale or South Beach in
Miami. We're laid-back, old-fashioned, old Florida-
Anna Maria Island and we like it that way."
Chamber president Mary Ann Brockman said she
tells potential visitors: "If you're looking for peace
and quiet, beautiful beaches and relaxation, this is the
place.
"If you want the night life and man-made attrac-


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Looking north
toward Holmes
Beach and Anna
Maria from
Bradenton Beach
at the BeacH-
house Restaurant,
it's easy to see
the beauty of the
expanse of beach
on the 7-mile
long Anna Maria
Island, ranked by
Tripadvisor.com as
one of America's
five most under-
rated beaches.
Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin

tions, that's not us, and we like it that way. I think it's
great that Tripadvisor has found out who and what we
are.
Joining Anna Maria Island and Siesta Key in the
Top 5 was Sanibel Island near Fort Myers, and Cannon
Beach and Bandon, both in Oregon.
Tripadvisor said it determined its rankings from
the comments of more than 1,880 travelers who use
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6 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER




P1111011

Sage advice
Our "other" season starts later this week, and it's
a season that we hope produces no visitors to Anna
Maria Island.
The Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1 and
runs through Nov. 30.
Islanders are a pretty savvy lot when it comes to
storms. We should be, what with the practice we've
had, after a brush with Tropical Storm Debby and
other near misses, and lessons learned from the dev-
astation caused in 2004-05 by Charley, Frances, Ivan,
Jeanne, Katrina, Rita and Wilma.
So we've figured out the part about batteries,
canned food, lots of water and, most important, leav-
ing the island if an evacuation is ordered.
We know by now that we shouldn't expect to
return to the island any time soon if the "Big One"
hits. We know to find accommodating friends on the
mainland rather than endure cramped confines and
crabby companions at a shelter in some school gym
or church activity center.
But here are some things you may not have
thought about when it comes to storms:
We did a totally unscientific poll of a few folks on
what should be in a hurricane kit with interesting
results.
For example, you might need heavy work boots
and gloves for after-storm cleanup.
It makes perfect sense: What good are you going
to be if, after the first few minutes of cleanup, you're
injured by nails or sharp metal objects and you can't
stomp through the yard or hold a shovel?
Cover up. No flip-flop cleanups.
In the same vein, you'll need big, heavy-duty
plastic bags for debris. Get a lot, just in case the worst
happens and you've got to bag a yard or houseful of
scrap for removal.
Another thought was to get one of those convert-
ers that plugs into a socket in your vehicle to charge
a radio, lamp, fan, small frig or a cellphone.
There also was a suggestion to add to our kit a
heavy-duty battery-powered screwdriver to install
and remove plywood easier. A lot easier. But don't
forget batteries for your cleanup gear. And make sure
you know where to find your drill bits and chucks.
Also in the mix are chainsaws and generators.
Both can be dangerous, but necessary in a post-hur-
ricane world.
We hope you don't need our advice for the "other"
season but, please, review it and PREPARE.
-By the late Islander editor Paul Roat, 2007


Tribute to longtime editor Paul Roat, who kept his VW bus "emergency ready" year-round.







Knowing your duty, public service circa 1950s


Who can say what the duties of the mayor are?
I can only relate to what my husband, Bob Martini,
thought they were.
Neither of us had been to a council meeting
nor were we interested in politics. So when the
mayor and three council members in Bradenton
Beach, each Bob's fellow volunteer firefighters,
and a fourth who was not running again, asked
him to run for council, it was a surprise. At his first
meeting, he was selected vice mayor.
Bob was instructed by the outgoing mayor,
council members and city clerk on how the city
was run and he never deviated.
We had no phone, so the only way to find out
what was going on was to talk to citizens and spend
time at the city office, which was a rented store on
Bridge Street.
After a big fight on island incorporation,
which my husband and father were involved in
(and a whole other story), the mayor and city clerk
resigned and Bob became mayor July 1955-
December 1957 with a new city clerk who new
nothing about the position.
So what did Mayor Martini think a mayor
should do?
The city had no maintenance department but
it had a truck in case of emergency. Since the city
had no property, the truck was stored in one of our
carports. Each night in the summer before going to
bed, Bob would check to see how bad the mosqui-
toes were. Often he would load the truck and spray
every street and vacant lot in Bradenton Beach -
at no cost to the city.
When rough weather would come, it would
tear up Gulf Drive south of Trader Jack's restau-


rant. While the county worked on it in the daytime,
many stormy nights he would sandbag that spot in
order to keep the road open in the event an evacu-
ation was needed.
Bridge Street had a bad drainage problem, so
the city contracted a company to put in a storm-
drain system. Bob left home every morning in work
clothes and boots with a shovel. He worked with
the crew for no wages. Why? So if anything hap-
pened during a storm, he would know what to look
for and could take care of it.
The city needed some street markers and Bob
offered, but the council voted to pay for them. How
much? I don't know. The concrete markers were
delivered to us, and Bob put about three coats of
paint on each and stenciled them with the appropri-
ate street names. He borrowed a post-hole shovel
and we loaded the markers on the truck. I dug
the holes and Bob put the posts in and filled the
holes.
His thanks? A recall petition instigated by the
city clerk after he fired the clerk with approval of
the city council.
He was asked to run again about a year later. I
think because of me, he lost by about 17 votes -
yet another story.
With the dedication of the council and mayor to
the city of Bradenton Beach,
much was achieved at little
cost to the citizens.
-- Billie P. Martini, former
city commissioner, Holmes
Beach









By Will Corr
Islander columnist
One Thursday evening last year in November,
my wife and I were craving the Stoney Mac and
Cheese that's offered on the menu down at the Blue
Marlin.
It was a fairly chilly night, dropping to the
low 50s. As we were getting dressed, I was having
a dilemma deciding what shirt and pants to wear.
Once I had it all dialed in, I realized that footwear
was never even a thought in my mind. Flip-flops, of
course!
I don't care if it is 90 or 50 degrees, I'm going
to hear that slapping rhythm on the base of my heels
as I stroll down Bridge Street.
I prefer Rainbows (there's always a good selec-
tion at the surf shop) and I have three pairs that I keep
in rotation. The newest ones are my dress shoes, the
second pair is for everyday island life and the oldest
I reserve for work boots. Once the work boot-flip-
flops get a little too trashed, they get tossed. That's
when I head to the surf shop and a new pair enters
the rotation.
Now everybody has a preference. Some people
swear by Reef sandals. Others prefer Flojos, Quick-

Will Corr per-
forms at the Blue
Marlin Trap Yard in
Bradenton Beach.
Maybe it's Jimmy
Buffett's "Marga-
ritaville" the part
where he croons,
"I blew out my
flip-flop, stepped on
a pop top, cut my
heel, had to cruise
on back home."


silver, Billabong, etc. And the queen of all women's
thongs, the Havaianas in Hawaii it is "locals."
I lived on Maui in the mid- 1990s, when you could
buy Havaianas at Long's Drugs for $2.50. And those
sandals were all you needed, even for hikes deep in
lao Valley.
Whichever flavor you prefer, we all know that
feeling on your sun-warmed feet when you slide into
a pair and guide your foot through the post between
your big toe and the second one. Pure island living.
Whether it's a day at the beach, a cruise on the
boat or a quick trip to Publix, the trusty old slippers
- flip-flops are comfort at their finest. You can
wear them to work or sport them at an art opening -
and I've even been known to wear them to the Beach
Bistro.
Then you have the judgmental high-brow visi-
tors, sporting the new Tommy Bahama shirt and styl-
ish leather sandals. They would never stoop to my
level and wear the rubbery things I find so comfort-
ing.
But I've got my buddy in Virginia who has a
brother who's lived in Manhattan for more than 30
years. He's a blue-chip, Wall Street executive who
talks with that annoying straight-laced, upper-crusty
voice. You know, the type the ones who barely
open their mouth. It's sort of a monotone sound
coming through clinched teeth.
Anyway, the tightly buttoned-up brother says one
day to his brother a flip-flop junky "David, I
just don't get people these days. A guy was wearing
flip-flops on the subway!"
What? Should everyone be dressed in Perry Ellis
and penny loafers?
So, next time you pull up your britches and button
up that aloha shirt, try slipping on some flip-flops.
Trust me, it can change your outlook.
Share your enthusiasm for flip-flops with The
Islander on Facebook: facebook.com/islandernews-
paper.


Dress shoes? Oh yeah, island-style


We'd love to mail


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 U 7


TIMr Islander


WOyears ago
Headlines from May 26, 2004
The West Manatee Fire Rescue district board
voted to again place an ad valorem tax measure on the
ballot for district voters in August. If passed, the mea-
sure would allow the district to tax property owners
up to 3.75 mills in addition to the assessments already
on tax bills to meet the WMFR annual budget. Voters
defeated a similar measure in March.
County commissioners sent Arvida Corp., the
owner-developer of a planned 686-condo unit proj-
ect on north Perico Island, a letter stating the county
would not provide water to the project unless Arvida
reduced the number of units and lowered the height of
buildings to 37 feet. "Providing water for 686 condo
units is not in the county's long-range plan," County
Commissioner Jane von Hahmann said.
Manatee County Environmental Systems man-
ager Charlie Hunsicker said the county had dropped
the idea of using sand dredged from Holmes Beach
canals to renourish Palma Sola Causeway beaches
after learning the Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection placed too many restrictions on the pro-
posal. "We would only have been able to renourish a
few, small areas of beach," Hunsicker said.


TIEMIS ANI) i)ROIS ON AMI
Date Low High Rainfall
May 18 62 88-0
May 19 64 88 0
May 20 66 89
May21 65 86 0
May,22- 66 85 0
May3 8 85% 0
May 24 68 86 0
Average area Gulf water temperature 83.80
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading daily at approximately 5 p.m.


CITY


Credit card: J] []J= No.


Name shown on card:





8 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

AM commissioners begin talks on selling 'white elephant' park


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Many Anna Maria residents might be surprised to
know of a white elephant in the city.
Merriam-Webster's online dictionary defines
"white elephant" as "a property requiring much care
and expense and yielding little profit."
If so, then the six vacant lots at the east end of Pine
Avenue certainly qualify.
Speaking at the May 22 commission meeting,
Mayor SueLynn said the city has been paying $225,000
per year for three years, and the property, recently
named the City Pier Park by the commission, is noth-
ing but sand and trees. And some of the trees are dying,
she added.
"It's an eyesore. It's time for the commission to
do something," she said. "This is money that could be
well spent on other projects needed in the city."
The city purchased the property in October 2011
for $2.8 million. In 2012, the commission approved
a plan to build a park with public bathrooms and 15
spaces for cars with the aid of private donations.
A new commission in late 2012 rejected that plan


Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn presents a proclama-
tion for National Safe Boating Week to U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary Unit No. 81 Cmdr. Rick Owen at the
May 22 commission meeting. The unit has patrolled
Anna Maria Island waters for 75 years. Islander
Photo: Rick Catlin

Island roadwatch
An eight-month long maintenance and repair
project on the Cortez Bridge is in progress, the
Florida Department of Transportation said.
Crews will work on the east side in Cortez on
seawall and piers under the bridge. Work on this
project includes general maintenance and repairs
to the bridge span, beams, piling, seawall and
bridge-tender house. Quinn Construction Inc. is
the contractor.
While there is some daytime work, the DOT
said most of the work would be from 9 p.m.-5 a.m.
weeknights. Bridge closings will last no more than
15 minutes, the DOT said.
The project is slated to conclude in January
2015.
DOT improvements and repairs to Manatee
Avenue West/State Road 64, from the Perico Bay
Club to 75th Street in Bradenton, also is ongoing.
Crews are resurfacing the roadway, making
sidewalk and drainage improvements and install-
ing new signage and pavement markings. Expected
project completion is summer 2014. The contrac-
tor is Ajax Paving Industries of Florida LLC.
Any lane closures will be accompanied by a
flagging operation to keep vehicles moving, the
DOT said.
On Manatee Avenue/State Road 64, at the
Anna Maria Island Bridge, there will be intermit-
tent eastbound and westbound lane closures from
9 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Thursday, May 29, for bridge
maintenance. Motorists should use caution in the
area and expect possible delays.
A maintenance project on Gulf Drive from
Cortez Road to 28th Street to replace a power pole
may cause northbound lane closures from 9 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. through Friday, June 6.


and the donations, but no other project and no improve-
ments have been proposed.
"We need to do something," the mayor said.
"Either turn it into a paid-parking lot or sell it."
Commissioner Carol Carter doesn't mind selling
the property, but said she worries more vacation rentals
would be developed there.
That can't happen with a sale, city attorney Jim
Dye said, as the property has been rezoned to open
space. The commission would have to rezone the park
to either retail-office-residential, commercial or resi-
dential for a buyer to have a revenue stream.
Commission Chair Chuck Webb said he was
against buying the property three years ago because
"the price was too high."
He eventually voted for the purchase to prevent
more resort housing. While Webb had no objection to
improving the park for public use or selling the prop-
erty, he is opposed to a parking lot. He also noted that
island property values have increased significantly
since 2011, and that the property may be worth more
than $2.8 million.
Webb suggested the land could be a commercial
site.
Commissioner Nancy Yetter said immediate action
is needed. "Either we come up with a plan that will
encourage visitors and residents to use the park, or
we sell the property. But let's do something. I'm tired
of continually talking about issues and nothing gets
done."
SueLynn said commissioners should consider ideas
such as a sale or a park and bring suggestions back to
the next commission meeting. She wants to fast-track
the matter.
Commissioner Dale Woodland agreed with selling.
"I don't think either our residents or visitors would use
a park. They'd much prefer to cross the street and look
at the water."
The issue will be on the June 12 commission
agenda.
In other business, commissioners agreed the house
at 246 Gladiolus St. is a duplex, violating city code
because the owner lives there and rents a portion of
the home to vacationers.
Building official Bob Welch presented evidence the

Paid permit-parking special meeting
Commissioners were scheduled to hold a spe-
cial work session at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, on
paid permit-parking. The subject was an agenda
item at the May 22 regular commission meeting,
but commissioners agreed there was not sufficient
time to thoroughly discuss the issue that evening.



WE LIKEL IKES


Architect and former Anna
Maria Commissioner
Gene Aubry looks over the
vacant lots at Pine Avenue
and North Bay Boulevard.
Aubry provided a design
for the park with park-
ing and restrooms that
spawned a donation from
resident Rex Hagen to help
_-.fund the improvements.
Following his tenure, a new
board of commissioners
rejected the parking ele-
ment and agreed to refund
donations, including funds
expended by Pine Avenue
Restoration. Islander File
Photo: Bonner Joy

owner, Scott Hart, is advertising a vacation rental.
City attorney Jim Dye said two separate kitchens
makes it a duplex, and development of duplexes has
been prohibited by the city since 2008.
SueLynn said she was concerned "this could
become a flood in the future of people trying to cir-
cumvent our code."
Welch said he gets only one or two building appli-
cations a year for a guest cottage or "mother-in-law"
quarters, and none include a kitchen. A certificate of
occupancy would be denied if an application called for
two kitchens, he said.
Commissioners instructed code enforcement offi-
cer Gerry Rathvon, to proceed with a code violation
case. At the same time, city planner Alan Garrett will
work on new definitions regarding dwellings and resi-
dences in the city.
Residents of Blue Heron Drive scored a victory
when half of the eight residents on the drive spoke
against a no-parking provision for the small traffic
island on the street that is owned by the city.
Commissioners agreed to remove the no-parking
provision from a traffic ordinance amendment, but
SueLynn said a sign saying "Caution, children" is
needed because the city needs some liability protec-
tion.
Also in the amendment, commissioners agreed to
remove the first parallel parking space at the southeast
corner of the Spring Avenue/Gulf Drive intersection,
and at the southeast corner of the Magnolia Avenue/
Gulf Drive intersection.
"This will create a better visibility triangle for
motorists accessing Gulf Drive," Garrett said.
The public hearing on the amendment was con-
tinued to 6 p.m. Thursday, June 12, at city hall, 10005
Gulf Drive.
Commissioners also continued the public hearing
on amendments to the sign ordinance to 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 26, while Garrett and Dye revise the ordi-
nance and the special exception procedures for busi-
nesses to have an A-frame or sandwich board sign.
The special exception currently states an applicant
must show "special conditions and circumstances" to
receive the exception. The amendment includes a pro-
vision exempting properties in the public recreation
area and public semi-private zoning areas from remov-
ing non-electric changeable signs. Changeable signs
such as those at city hall, Island Players and Roser
Memorial Community Church will be allowed to
remain.
The mayor said the ban on A-frame signs will not
be enforced while awaiting special exception approval
by the commission.




WE ROCK0ON0INE





IM- if9if





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0E9


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10 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


How will you tell your family story?






Creating gorgeous photos
of your family vacation



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frlsl


Holmes Beach Commissioner Pat Morton donates
blood during a past Island Blood Drive. This year's
drive will take place June 7-8. Islander File Photo


Mote makes waves with
World Oceans Day
Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in
Sarasota will celebrate World Oceans Day with a
Dr. Seuss-themed family festival.
The Mote celebration will take place Saturday,
June 7.
World Oceans Day is officially celebrated June
8 and was created in 1992 at the Earth Summit
and declared a holiday by the United Nations in
2009.
Each year, Mote makes a splash with family-
focused games and crafts that promote green prac-
tices, teach marine science and celebrate conserva-
tion.
The festival will take place 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at
the aquarium, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway on
City Island across the bridge at the south end of
Longboat Key.
Attendance is included in the price of admis-
sion to Mote.
For more information, call Mote at 941-388-
4441 or go online to www.mote.org.







Wednesday, May 28
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
2 p.m. Local author Jay Myers talks about "hitting the curve
balls" in business and life, Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
8:21 p.m. Official sunset time.

Thursday, May 29
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:21 p.m. Official sunset time.

Friday, May 30
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
10 a.m.-1 p.m. Senior Adventures book sale, Annie Silver
Community Center, 103 23rd St. N., Bradenton Beach. Information:
941-538-0945.
8:22 p.m. Official sunset time.

Saturday, May 31
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:22 p.m. Official sunset time.

Sunday, June 1
Today is the start of the Atlantic hurricane season.
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:23 p.m. Official sunset time.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND



INDOOR & BEACH MASSAGE
SKIN CARE [i M i
INTUITIVE READINGS

42.779.6836


Set back. Roll up a sleeve. Sip some OJ. And
donate.
The 14th annual Island Community Blood Drive
benefiting local nonprofits and building the blood
supply will take place June 7-8 at St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
Hours will be 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.., and the first 250
donors receive a free T-shirt.
For each blood donation, an anonymous cash
donor will contribute $100 to a participating charity.
The blood donor can select a favorite nonprofit from
the list of four to receive all of the $100 or choose to
share the $100 among the nonprofits.
The participating island-based groups are:
Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Anna Maria Island Privateers.
West Manatee Fire Rescue Auxiliary.
Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation.
An announcement said donors who select the
center as a favorite charity can receive a free three-
month membership at the center or a $25 discount on
registration for a sport. The donations will go toward
youth scholarships.
The Privateers also will put donations toward
youth scholarships, which will be awarded to college-
bound students July 4, following the AMIP Indepen-
dence Day Parade July 4.
WMFR Auxiliary to restore its 1951 ladder truck
and to maintain the firefighters' recreation hall.
And Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation, which
is located in Bradenton Beach, rescues and cares for
wildlife.
Gail Straight of Wildlife Inc. said, "We really need
the money. Almost 850 critters so far this year, tons
more coming in every day."
There are restrictions on who can donate blood.
For donor requirements or to schedule an appointment
for the blood drive, go online to www.oneblood.org.
The event code is MTFFO.
Potential donors also can call 800-682-5663.

Extension service offers

summer classes
The Manatee County Agriculture and Extension
Service invites kids to "bee" smart and learn about the
world of bees at the Island Library.
The service will hold a program about bees and
beekeeping at the library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 9.
For more information, call Cindy Mozeleski at
941-4524.



Monday, June 2
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:23 p.m. Official sunset time.

Tuesday, June 3
6:32 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:24 p.m. Official sunset time.

Wednesday, June 4
6:31 a.m. Official sunset time.
8:24 p.m. Official sunset time.

Coming up
June 7-8, Islandwide Blood Drive, Anna Maria Island.
June 14, 2014 Florida State League All-Star Game, Braden-
ton.
June 15 is Father's Day.

June 21 is the first day of summer.

Save the date
July 4, Fourth of July parade, Anna Maria Island.
Sept. 1 is Labor Day.

Posting in the calendar
Send calendar announcements to calendar@islander.org.
Please include the time, date and location of the event, a brief
description and a contact via email and phone. The deadline for
submissions is the Wednesday a week before publication. High-
resolution photographs welcome.


I Share the fim. I


Island blood drive June 7-8


































Islander Sarah Howells introduces a "Weird
Animal" she found in a hallway of Roser Memorial
Community Church. Islander Courtesy Photo

'Weird Animals' settle into
Roser summer program
Roser Memorial Community Church will host
Weird Animals Vacation Bible School June 16-20.
The announcement from the church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria, said that during the Monday-Fri-
day week, "Kids will learn about some of God's most
creative creations. They'll participate in memorable
Bible-learning activities, sing catchy songs, play
teamwork-building games, make and dig into yummy
treats, experience cool Bible adventures."
The program is open to children ages 4 to fifth-
grade.
Hours will be 9 a.m.-noon each day.
Registration is taking place at the church office 9
a.m. -3 p.m. weekdays or online at roserchurch.com.
For more information, call the church at 941-778-
0414.








Calendar of ongoing

events, activities
Through...
Through July 7, DaVinci Machines Exhibition, the Bradenton
Auditorium, 1005 FirstAve. W., Bradenton. Fee applies. Information:
888-674-0107.

Wednesdays
Wednesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m., horseshoes pitched,
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Information:
941-708-6130.
First Wednesdays, 6 p.m., Mana-Tweens book club, Island
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-
3209.
Second Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Think+Drink science night,
South Florida Museum, 201 10th St. W., Bradenton. Information:
941-746-4131.
Third Wednesdays, 6 p.m., Mana-Tweens club, Island Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-3209.
Fourth Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Star Talk, South Florida Museum,
201 10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-4131.

Thursdays
First and third Thursdays, 2 p.m., knitting group meeting,
Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive. Information: 941-778-6341.
Third Thursdays, 10 a.m., Island Library Book Club, Island
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-
3209.
Third Thursdays, 10 a.m., guardian ad litem, Island Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-3209.
Last Thursdays, Seaside Quilters, Island Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 312-315-6212.

Fridays
Most Fridays, Senior Adventures, low-cost field trips from
Annie Silver Community Center, 103 23rd St. N., Bradenton Beach.
Fee may apply. Information: 941-962-8835.


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 11





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Dimensions in Blue sax players. The ensemble
will perform at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center on Saturday, June 7. Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy www.bandofthewest.afmil


Big band buzz in Anna Maria
The U.S. Air Force's Band of the West touches
down in Anna Maria Saturday, June 7. The big band
jazz ensemble Dimensions in Blue will perform a con-
cert at 7 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center.
Tickets to the free concert are first come, first
serve. They are available at the center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., with a limit of four tickets per person.
The band features 18 musicians from around the
country and, each year, logs more than 30,000 miles
to entertain more than a million people.
Dimensions in Blue, according to a press release,
"has kept the 1940s Glenn Miller Army Air Corps
sound at the center of its musical focus." The band
also incorporates some current sounds "inspiring audi-
ences of all ages."
The band performs in the "Blues" of today's Air
Force and the vintage "Pinks and Greens."
For more information, call the center at 941-778-
1908.

Fridays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Mike Sales' sunset drum circle, Anna
Maria Island Beach Cafe, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-0784.

Saturdays
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m., Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island
meeting, Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe, Manatee Public Beach,
4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-1383.
Saturdays, 4 p.m., family night, South Florida Museum, 201
10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-4131.
Second Saturdays, 10 a.m., origami club, Island Library, 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-3209.
Third Saturdays, 11 a.m., stress management through breath-
ing, Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive. Information: 941-778-6341.

Mondays
Mondays, 12:30 p.m., bridge games, Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Doors open at 12:15
p.m. Information: 941-778-0414.
Mondays, 6 p.m., open gym basketball, Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information:
941-778-1908.
First Mondays, 7 p.m., Florida Institute for Saltwater Heritage
board meeting, Fishermen's Hall, 4515 123rd St. W., Cortez. Infor-
mation: 941-254-4972.
Third Mondays, noon, Anna Maria Island Democrats meeting,
Mannatees Sports Grill, 7423 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton. Informa-
tion: 941-779-0564.
*Third Mondays, 7 p.m., U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 81
meeting, 5801 33rd Ave. Court Drive W., G.T. Bray Park, Bradenton.
Information: 941-779-4476.

Tuesdays
Tuesdays, 10 a.m., children's storytime, Island Library, 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-6341.
Tuesdays, noon, Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island meeting,
Bridge Street Bistro, 111 Gulf Drive S., Bradenton Beach. Informa-
tion: 941-794-8044.
Announcements
Send announcements of ongoing activities, as well as updates
to schedules, to calendar@islander.org. Also, if you coordinate
events for your group, please let The Islander know of any changes
to details.


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12 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


Rallying for the relay
The Relay for Life of Anna Maria Island is
held each year in May, drawing cancer survivors,
caretakers, friends, family and activists to the beach
for an 18-hour overnight walk-a-thon.
This year's event, held May 17-18 at Coquina
Beach in Bradenton Beach, raised more than
$45,000 for the American Cancer Society.
The funds raised stay in Manatee County.
Seventeen teams participated, keeping at least
one person on the relay track through the night.
The relay committee included Kim "Red" Bard,
Russ Winterbottom, Nancy Ambrose, Gretchen
Edgren, Maribel Gomez, Danielle Gray, Lorie
Hagele, Lisa Henderson, Peyton Jones, Mallory
Lapp, Gloria Long, Brittany Richardson and Mike
Warren.
A number of local businesses provided spon-
sorship cash and in-kind to raise money and
also make sure the relayers enjoyed the evening of
walking, playing and camping.
For more information about the relay or pro-
grams of the American Cancer Society, contact
Calaina Goodyear at calaina.goodyear@cancer.
org or 941-328-3757.


Members of Team
Liberty show their
support at the Relay
for Life of Anna
Maria Island, which
was held overnight
May 17-18 in Bra-
denton Beach. The
theme was "Passport
for a Cure" and each
team chose a country
and decorated its
campsite to represent
that country.





The top teams and
individual achievers
for the Relay for Life
of Anna Maria Island
gather for a pho-
tograph during the
fundraiser, held May
17-18 at Coquina
Beach in Bradenton
Beach. Donations
are still accepted at
relayforlife.org/amifl.
Islander Photos:
Nancy Ambrose



Holmes Beach Commis-
sioner David Zaccagnino
welcomes the crowd to
the annual Relay for Life
of Anna Maria Island in
Bradenton Beach. He is
joined by Anna Maria
Mayor SueLynn and Bra-
denton Beach Mayor Bill
Shearon all the island
cities issued Power of
Purple Day proclama-
tions.


LEFT: Cancer survivor Dan Lord delivers a speech during the opening cer-
emonies of the Relay For Life of Anna Maria Island. Cancer survivors took the
first lap and then caregivers joined in a second lap, followed by the 17 teams
keeping at least one person on the track for the next 18 hours.


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Island Photography
Beautiful and creative photography
to treasure for a lifetime.
Dara Caudill 941-778-5676
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JEWELRY
Bridge Street Jewelers
The island's full-service jewelry store.
129 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
941-896-7800


BRIDAL ATTIRE
The Beach Shop
11904 Cortez Road W.
Pretty white dresses for a
casual island wedding.
Dresses for moms, too!
Open daily. 941-792-3366
BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Acqua Aveda Salon Spa Store
Hair, nails, makeup, skin and
massage for the bride and
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0








Children can dive into archaeology and encounter
crocs at the Island Library this summer.
From June 12-July 31, the library at 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, will host a series of guest pre-
sentations and special events for school-age children.
The events will take place at 10 a.m. Thursdays.

Outpost opens curtain
The Theatre Odyssey will stage a reprise of the
winner of its ninth annual Ten-Minute Play Festival
Friday, June 6, in Anna Maria.
The performance of "Wine, Bites and A Bottle of
Vodka" will take place at the Anna Maria Olive Oil
Outpost, 401 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
The evening will begin and end with heavy appe-
tizers and wine.
The cost to attend is $20.
Reservations are required.
For more information or reservations, email
kelly@oliveoiloutpost.com or call the store at 941-
896-3132.

AGAMI goes fishing
The Artists' Guild of Anna Maria Island cast out
for fishing-themed art and hooked more than enough
to fill its gallery window in June.
The Artists' Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, is changing its window each month in
the summer. June is "something fishy."
Artists invite people to stop by early in the month,
because the turtle-themed art featured in May sold
quickly.
For more, call the gallery at 941-778-6694.

Squadron seeks students
The Anna Maria Island Sail and Power Squadron
continues its training efforts in June, with a two-part
boating education course and seminars.
The programs are held at the squadron building
located at 1200 71st St. N.W., Bradenton.
America's Boating Course will be taught Satur-
day, June 7, and Saturday, June 14. This basic boating
course will begin at 8:45 a.m. both days and lasts until
3 p.m. on Day 1 and 12:30 p.m. on Day 2. The cost to
enroll is $45 for individuals, $70 for couples.
Completing the course and passing the exams
qualifies students to receive a Florida Boating Cer-
tificate. Anyone born after Jan. 1, 1988, is required to
have the certificate and a photo ID to operate a boat.
Also, the squadron will present a seminar in nauti-
cal charts at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 10, and a seminar
in GPS use will be taught at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June
17. The enrollment fee for the seminars is $15.
Pre-registration is required. For more information,
call Gloria Potter or Walter Haug at 941-795-0482, or
email iitwhaug@gmail.com to register.


The lineup includes:
June 12, "Dive into Archaeology" with the Flor-
ida Public Archeology Network.
June 19, "Crocodile Encounters."
June 26, "Mad Science."
July 3, "Didgeridoo Down Under."
July 10, Earthlings."
July 17, an Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and
Shorebird Monitoring talk.
July 24, "All About Bugs" presented by Manatee
County Parks and Natural Resources Department.
July 31, Lego Day.
The library partnered with the Friends of the Island
Library on some programs.
Seating will be available on a first-come basis.
For more, call the library at 941-778-6341.

Library invites teens
in for a 'drive'
The Island Library is inviting teens to take a
test drive in the AAA Driving Simulator at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, June 11.
The program is the first in a series of teen pro-
grams this summer at the library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
Other programs, also set for Wednesday eve-
nings, include:
6 p.m. June 25, creating recycled paper.
5 p.m. July 9, movie night.
For more information, call the library at 941-
778-6341.


Library invites kids to dive into summer


Bonjour, islanders
Glen and Janis Loudermilk of Holmes Beach took a
week-long Viking River Cruise in France and made
a visit to the Eiffel Tower. That's The Islander they're
reading, not Le Monde. Islander Courtesy Photo


THE ISLANDER U MAY 28, 2014 0 13

Island Library sets up

June activity calendar
June brings summer and summer brings
along an array of special programing and activi-
ties at the Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
The calendar released by the library includes
ongoing programs, such as:
Children's storytime at 10 a.m. Tuesdays.
Mana-Tweens Book Club meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, June 4, and the Mana-Tweens Craft
Night at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 18.
The knitting club at 10 a.m. Thursday,
June 5, and 2 p.m. Thursday, June 19.
The origami club at 10 a.m. Saturday, June
14.
The quilting club at 2 p.m. Thursday, June

26.
Also on the calendar at the library:
2 p.m. Wednesday, June 11, Alzheimer's
Association program on celebrating the holi-
days.
6 p.m. Wednesday, June 11, a driving simu-
lator program for teens.
10 a.m. Thursdays, June 12, June 19 and
June 26, summer programs for children.
2 p.m. Friday, June 13, Alzheimer's Care-
giver Support session.
2 p.m. Wednesdays, June 18 and June 25,
special summer programming for children.
1 p.m. Friday, June 20, help with using
eReader tablets.
2 p.m. Tuesday, June 24, a program on the
first fishers in Florida in partnership with the
Florida Maritime Museum.
6 p.m., Wednesday, June 25, crafts for
teens.
10 a.m., Thursday, June 26, "Mad Science"
for children.
For more information about the library,
which is open Tuesday-Saturday, call 941-778-
6341.

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14 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

It's stingray s
By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
Warm waters and beautiful beach days are attract-
ing more than swimmers to the shoreline waters.
April to October is stingray season and the warm,
calm waters surrounding Anna Maria Island bring vari-
ous species of rays close to shore, according to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Several species travel in schools of hundreds or
thousands as their seasonal migration takes them into
the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast.
Stingrays are non-aggressive and pose little threat
to people with the exception of a venomous barb at the
base of the ray's tail. The barb is used for defense.
People typically get stung when they step on the
ray's barb, as it hides, resting under a thin layer of sand
in shallow water near the shore.
Beach swimmers can avoid a sting by doing what
locals call the "stingray shuffle" sliding the feet
across the sandy bottom, which not only prevents step-
ping on the barb, but creates vibrations and alerts the
rays to swim away.


;eason: Time to do stingray shuffle
The sting from the ray's barb can be painful, If increased swelling and redness occurs beyond
although usually it can be neutralized by putting the a small hole at the puncture site, seek medical atten-
affected area in hot water very hot water or wrap- tion.


ping hot towels around the sting. Keep the area clean
and make sure the tip of the barb does not remain under
the skin.


Anyone stung near the public beach locations
where lifeguards marine rescue personnel are
present, can seek help from them.


A school of cownose
rays swims in the shal-
low waters near the
Anna Maria City Pier
in Anna Maria. Islander
Photo: Jennifer Glen-
field


and observe summertime manatee cautions


Many Floridians and visitors to the Sunshine
State will be heading to the water in the summer days
ahead.
The Save the Manatees Club is reminding boaters
that manatees and other wildlife will be enjoying the
waterways, too. So keep a watchful eye out for them.
A variety of free public awareness materials from
the club are available to Florida's boating community
and shoreline property owners to protect endangered
manatees.
Bright yellow, waterproof boating banners easily
and quickly alert other boaters to "Please Slow, Man-
atees Below," when the often difficult to spot slow-
moving marine mammals are sighted in a high-traffic
boat area.
Also available at no cost are yellow dock signs
with a similar message for shoreline property owners
in Florida, as well as boating decals and waterway
cards that feature the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission's hotline number -1-888-404-
3922 for reporting manatees in distress.

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"The free materials that we provide help these con-
cerned citizens to be proactive in protecting manatees,
and that's a winning situation for everyone involved,"
says Katie Tripp, the club's director of science and
conservation. "Boat traffic on Florida waterways usu-
ally increases dramatically on holiday weekends in
the summer, putting manatees at greater risk from
watercraft strikes if boaters are not careful and com-
pliant with posted speed zones while out recreating on
Florida's waters."
Steven Smith from Palm City, Florida, posted the
Club's free dock signs on his property located on his-
toric Bessey Creek.
"I have signs facing east and west, so hopefully
boaters traveling either direction will go slow and real-
ize they're not the only ones using the waterways,"
said Smith.
He also said he saw an adult manatee and a calf
swim by when he was posting a sign.
"I was amazed," he said. I said, 'We need more
of these signs posted now."'


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The Save the Manatees Club is reminding boaters
that manatees and other wildlife will be enjoying the
waterways, too. So keep a watchful eye out for them.

For more information about manatees or to down-
load the manatee alert app for iPhones and iPads, go
online to www. savethemanatee.org/boatertips.htm.
For free Save the Manatee Club materials, email
education@ savethemanatee.org.
If you see an injured, dead, tagged or orphaned
manatee, or a manatee being harassed, call the FWC at
888-404-3922 or #FWCor *FWC on a cellular phone,
or VHF Channel 16 on a marine radio, or message tip@
myfwc.com.

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THE ISLANDER U MAY 28, 2014 0 15

Memorial Day weekend goes to the birds


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
Memorial Day weekend in Bradenton Beach went
to the birds literally.
The Manatee Audubon Society teamed up with
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shorebird Moni-
toring for an annual bird-watching outreach event.
Audubon member and volunteer coordinator Dee
Hanny took the lead, gathering more than 20 volun-
teers to run the operation from 8 a.m.-8 p.m., May
24-26.
A canopy provided a go-to location for the bird-
watchers at the marked nesting grounds at the 2500
block of Gulf Drive in Bradenton Beach. The stakes
and colored twine initially marked off a few least tern
nests, but was expanded to accommodate the nearly
40 least tern nesters and the flock of black skimmers
that joined their migratory fellows.
"It's good to see the least terns here. We haven't
had least terns nest on the island in four years," said
Hanny.
According to Hanny, a least tern nesting site four
years ago was decimated by some crows and gulls, and
the terns haven't returned to nest on the island until
now.
The coupling of the much larger and more aggres-
sive black skimmers at the nesting site will help ward
off aviary predators, said Hanny.
Inclement weather also can have a negative impact
on the nesters. Hanny said storms in the past two years
have wiped out a number of nests.
"We're keeping our fingers crossed and watching,"
he said.
Hanny has coordinated the holiday bird-watching
effort for five years and said the previous year they
attracted 700 people. Curious passersby and purpose-


ful attendees were encouraged to look through a scope
and watch the nesting and mating shorebirds, as well
as become educated on how to approach and treat the
seasonal guests.
"We have the most impact on the beach. Our pri-
mary goal is to educate people," said Hanny.

Sea turtle talks start
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shore-
bird Monitoring soon will begin offering informa-
tional sea turtle tours of island beaches, while Mote
Marine Laboratory has begun its series of talks.
Suzi Fox, executive director of AMITW, said
walks and talks on Anna Maria Island will begin
June 17.
Mote's tours are on Longboat Key. The educa-
tional stroll on the beach is free and led by Mote-
trained volunteers.
All ages are welcome and children must be
accompanied by an adult. Walks are at 6:45 a.m.
every Saturday in June and July
Participants should meet at the public beach
access where parking is available at 4795 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, Longboat Key.
Participation in the free AMITW tours is limited
and times and location may change. To sign up for
the AMITW tours, call Glenn Wiseman at 248-982-
5600.


Manatee Audubon
Society volunteer
Dee Hanny watches
black skimmers
and least terns May
21 at the marked
nesting grounds in
the 2500 block in
Bradenton Beach.
Hanny was the vol-
unteer coordinator
for the bird lookout
over Memorial Day
weekend. Islander
Photo: Jennifer
Glenfield





Fox had expected several of the least tern nests
to hatch by the weekend, giving spectators a unique
look into the process. Meanwhile, their black skimmer
mates have been displaying signs of mating behavior,
although eggs have yet to be spotted, she said.
If nests are present July 4, another bird-watching
event will take place. Hanny expects the black skim-
mers to take the spotlight in July. The skimmers are
expected to lay eggs soon that will hatch in 20-25
days.
Newly hatched skimmers will spend another 3-4
weeks on the ground at the nesting site before taking
flight.
Fox said she plans on enlisting the help of the
Bradenton Beach Police Department during the July
4 holiday to educate beachgoers on fireworks restric-
tions.
Fireworks are prohibited on all island beaches and
can be detrimental to nesting and fledgling birds.
The shorebirds are protected under the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Migratory Bird Treaty Act and other
laws.

FUN FACT
Male least terns will court their female counter-
parts by bringing them small fish. If the female least
tern shows interest in accepting the free meal, the male
will taunt her with his offering. Only after they have
mated, will the male turn over the fish.


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16 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


Bradenton Beach approves 15 percent stormwater tax increase


By Merab-Michal Favorite
Islander Reporter
If you own property in Bradenton Beach, your
stormwater bill will increase July 1.
Commissioners unanimously approved a reso-
lution at their May 22 meeting that will raise city
stormwater utilities by 15 percent and eliminate an
outdated tax credit that many property owners have
been utilizing since 2005.
Combined, the increases could cost property
owners thousands of dollars.
Multiple-residential development and multiple
unit motel owners like Angela Rodocker, co-owner
of Bridgewalk, 100 Bridge St., would see the most
significant increase.
Rodocker said her bill would go from about
$1,200 to nearly $13,000.
"This hurts hotels like mine, where my partner
and I are the only ones to bill," Rodocker said. "Not
only do I find this difficult to swallow, but it's almost
unfathomable that you would expect that from us."
David Teitelbaum, who also owns multiple
developments in the city, said he is in favor of a tax
increase over time, but said the purposed increases
were too much too soon."
The commission compromised and decided to
extend the deadline for multi-unit developments to
March 30, 2015. All other property owners in the city
will be billed July 1 and provided with a 30-day due
date.
Funding is needed for the completion of an ongo-
ing stormwater capital improvement project that the
city has been working on since 2005.
According to Lynn Townsend, of LTA Engineers
LLC, which is contracted to work for the city, the


project includes replacing old infrastructure with
updated ground filtration to better prevent stormwa-
ter from polluting area waters.
Townsend said time is of the essence and if the
project is not completed by December 2016, the city
will lose funds provided by the Southwest Florida
Water Management District and may have to pay
back years of reimbursements already allocated to
the city.
Currently Swiftmud reimburses 50 percent of
what the city spends on stormwater improvements.
An annual stormwater fee collected from property
owners funds the improvements.
However, Townsend said the projected costs for
the remainder of the project are much more than is
being collected from taxpayers.
"We still have to do the improvements from
Bridge Street to 12th Street North," Townsend said.
"There is just no way to make it work."
She said the underfunded budget is mostly due
to outdated tax credits and tax rates.
"It is necessary and reasonable to increase these
rates. Fifteen percent reflects a nominal 1.5 percent
increase over the past 10 years," she said.
Townsend said that some residents are utilizing a
fee credit they received for optional environmentally
beneficial components that now are mandated by state
standards.
"Some residents, like me, are writing off upward
of 90 percent off their stormwater bills," Mayor Bill
Shearon said. "It's not fair to allow us to keep doing
that when new construction projects have to include
those same improvements and do not receive the
credits."
Vosburgh said she believed some of the deficiency


is due to uncollected debt.
"We have always had a problem with collections,"
Commissioner Janie Robertson said. "We are looking
into the possibility of having the bills collected by the
county."
Robertson said the change would be a more effi-
cient means of collection.
Commissioners also want to revaluate the rating
system.
Currently the property owner is taxed based on
the number of units on the property, not the size of
the lot or the building.
"So basically a landowner with small one-bed-
room apartments would pay twice as much as some-
one with two-bedroom apartments even though they
have the same footprint," Robertson said.
Rodocker vehemently opposed the fee sched-
ule.
"The number of units on a piece of property is


not an indicator of the impact," she said. "When rain
falls or a storm comes, it is the same on my property
whether I have 28 units, 50 units or a large restau-
rant."
Commissioners said they would revisit the fee
schedule at their Sept. 30 work session after
Townsend has a chance to evaluate the possible
changes.
Along with a bill, Bradenton Beach residents will
be receiving an insert asking for their input on imme-
diate and long-range projects they would like to see
happen within the city. Commissioners are asking
them to provide a list in order of priorities.
Survey recipients also will be asked if they would
like to see the city include a newsletter on its web-
site.


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'God Only Knows'


Visitors & Residents Welcome


o 4 0 f *fI *. s o bk r


OH, WHO?
BY JOE DIPIETRO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Pat
4 Nosed around
9 Univ. divisions
14 Early third-century
year
18 Univ. in Troy, N.Y.
19 Quarter back,
possibly
20 Like some workers
21 Edison's middle
name
22 Irish chemist?
24 Irish arborist?
26 Harvey of
Hollywood
27 China's Zhou
28 How pastrami is
usually ordered
29 Serenaded
30 "Scary Movie,"
for one
31 Love letters?
32 Irish secretary?
36 Targets for a
delivery
39 One may take
you in
41 Mists
42 Bird on a Canadian
dollar
43 All-human bridge?
44 Barely bite
46 When the day's
done, to Donne
47 Irish algebra
teacher?
51 Missile Command
maker


Answers:
page 28


52 Noodges
54 Big name in
restaurant reviews
55 "Hard !"
(nautical
command)
56 Digs of pigs
57 When the day's
done, to Denis
59 End of a game?
61 Long, angry
complaint
63 Irish woodworker?
67 Lie
70 Part of a
dishwasher
71 California county or
its seat
72 Beat
75 Jack-in-the-pulpit,
e.g.
76 Finger-pointer
79 City
(Baghdad area)
81 Lie
83 Irish mountain
climber?
86 Family nickname
87 Canadian blockhead
88 Suffix with zinc
89 Victory goddess
90 Set crowd, maybe
93 Where the Storting
meets
94 Light reddish-
brown horses
96 Irish dogsled racer?
99 1979 Roman
Polanski film
100 Places for fuel
101 Places for panels
104 Fall shade
106 Some investment
bonds, for short


107 Band with the
1974 No. 1 hit "The
Night Chicago
Died"
110 Irish health care
worker?
112 Irish painter?
113 Do sometimes
called a "natural"
114 Support
115 "So true"
116 Yard filler, maybe
117 Snorkeling locale
118 Director von
Sternberg
119 Put up with
120 not!"

DOWN
1 Ties
2 Problem in bed, for
some
3 Like some bands
with only
modest Western
popularity
4 Light quanta
5 Burning sensation?
6 Calvary inscription
7 Richard of "A
Summer Place"
8 Bums
(Brooklyn
Dodgers
nickname)
9 Suddenly strike
10 Novel ending
11 Rice dish
12 Anklebones
13 -Caps (candy)
14 Steal, as a vehicle
15 Chaucer work that
invokes the book of
Job, with "The"


16 Tony-winning
actress Judith
17 Still-life subject
19 Jai alai basket
23 Johansson,
1959-60 world
heavyweight
champion
25 AAA service
27 Protestant denom.
30 One who bugs
people?
31 Riddles with bullets
33 Christmas Day
urging
34 Compact
35 Positive principle
36 Versatile bean
37 Pith helmet
38 Voiced some
pleasure
39 Breeze
40 Quote
42 Advantage,
with "up"
45 "Tony n'
Wedding"
48 Springfield Plateau
area
49 Pour
50 Numismatist's
classification
53 Preinstalled iPhone
browser
58 Setting set
60 Montreal suburb
C6te St.-
62 Hard drive
malfunction
63 Pear or quince
64 Utah city
65 One of the Gandhis
66 Foot bone
67 Indian princesses


68 Orphic hymn
charmer
69 "Let's shake!"
72 Prepare the first
course, say
73 Pitcher Hershiser
74 Lighting expert?
77 "Great" birds
78 Marie Curie, e.g.:
Abbr.
80 About


82 Got sick
84 "I'll be right
with you"
85 Some distance
races
91 Marks (out)
92 Depressed-looking
95 Cover with new
shingles
96 She married Bobby
on "The Sopranos"
97 Social welfare org.


98 Eastern wrap: Var.
100 Bonito relatives
102 Possible water
contaminator
103 Tailored
104 Barbra's "Funny
Girl" co-star
105 noir
106 "The Hunter
(Catalan
Landscape)"
painter


107 Fertilizer
ingredient
108 Bit of stagnant-
water growth
109 Lucrative
Internet biz
111 War on Poverty
prez
112 What can
open files?


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 17

Cortez Fishing for Freedom attends protest, appellate hearing


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
As workers in Tallahassee prepared for a day in the
appellate court, two Cortez fishers packed their bags.
Mark Coarsey, president of the fledging Mana-
tee County chapter of Fishing for Freedom, began
making plans to travel to Tallahassee when he first
heard Florida's 1st District Court of Appeal would hear
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's challenge to 2nd Judicial Circuit Judge Jackie
Fulford's ruling on a statewide ban on gill nets. The
circuit ruling was issued in October 2013.
The constitutional amendment restricting gill nets
and mesh sizes of nets rocked the commercial fish-
ing industry in Cortez and other commercial fisheries
across the state when approved by Florida voters in
1994. The ban took effect in 1995.
Fulford's ruling in Wakulla Commercial Fisher-
men's Association v. Florida Fish and Wildlife over-
turned the net ban, making it ineffective. Her order
triggered an appeal from the FWC.
The now 20-year legal battle over the ban is seeing


an emergence of a grassroots collective representing
fishers across the state.
Cortez fishers Coarsey and Nate "Toasty"
Meschelle met up with other representatives from
around the state of the Fishing for Freedom group in
Tallahassee May 15 to attend a protest and a hearing.
Coarsey said 50-60 people attended the demonstra-
tion outside of the FWC building, most wearing their
FFF T-shirts. The shirts, on the back, stated, "Biology
versus Politics."
Following the protest, FFF members filled the
courtroom for the hearing.
"We represented Manatee County. Is it important
we went up there? Yes," said Coarsey. "They're taking
out a species of fisherman."
The net ban was intended to promote sustainable
fishing practices, and it almost exclusively affects
commercial mullet fishers. The FWC contends the rule
is intended to protect fish populations by preventing
over-fishing. The Wakulla Commercial Fisherman's
Association, the group facing the FWC in court, says
the amendment does not achieve its intent.


3'oiki


6


Adventures in Shopping ...


Coarsey says limiting the mesh size of the nets
means it is more difficult for fishers to net legal-sized
fish and, instead, many juvenile fish are caught, pro-
ducing a bycatch that the net ban was supposed to
prevent.
"Let us go catch our fish, you won't have the
bycatch we've been having, and you won't have the
junk in our bays," said Coarsey. "Commercial fisher-
men are out to protect our resource."
A three-judge panel listened May 15 to testimony
from attorneys representing the Wakulla group and the
FWC.
If the panel of judges sides with the Wakulla group,
the Fulford ruling will be upheld and the net ban will
be lifted.
However, the FWC could appeal a loss to the
Florida Supreme Court.
Meanwhile, Cortez fishers are hopeful hoping
to go back to the practice of many generations before
them that put food on the table.
For photos at the protest in Tallahassee go online
at www.islander.org







Kittg b


lqw
Eel the heat! It may still be spring, but summer
temps are here! Why not just forget spring clean-
ing and go "sale-ing?" Just hop in the car and get
going. Our Tiki-Kitty stores are handpicked for
their unique items, great customer service and
super bargains. For sure, we know where to shop.
Just grab your Islander and head out the door.
May is sizzling! Why not go browse in air-con-
ditioned comfort at the Antique Orphanage, where
fresh inventory arrives daily? Spring into summer
here! And don't forget. They also buy antiques -
fine porcelains, sterling, glass and unusual items.
Appointments preferred.
Giving Back in Holmes Beach donates to
charitable causes, so redecorate, refurnish or find
personal items for yourself and your friends while






antiques & collectibles
An Eclectic Approach To Collecting
Specializing in inkwells, Smalls, Lotton Glass
11- 4 Wed-Sat and by appointment
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5125-B Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton
941-761-8000


Antiques, Art-Tiques and Chic Boutiques!


helping others in the community. It's a win-win for
all. The owner also is offering booth space, so check
that out, too.
Tide and Moon on Pine Avenue is another must-
do. There's no better way to remember paradise than
the signature Anna Maria Island Pearl Pendant hand-
crafted by Laura Shely only available at Tide and
Moon.
At Steff's Stuff, it's always a good time to shop
for vintage jewelry and other accessories for your
wardrobe. Steff is having a consignment sale, offer-
ing 20-50 percent off. And she's open daily at 5380
Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key.
The temperatures are rising and the girls at Retro
Rosie's and Cobweb's have done some major spring
cleaning, making way for tons of "hot" new bargains


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world of old, the retro and the antique.
What a Find! is a fabulous quality consignment
shop where customers say they find just what they're
looking for. With more than 1,000 consignors and
daily appointments for more, the shop is constantly
changing. You'll soon say, "Wow, What a find!"
The Community Thrift Shop is having its
annual sale June 6-7, and then will be closed for
summer hiatus until Aug. 11. Be sure to stop by for
the great deals before they wind down and mark
your calendar to return for some big surprises when
they reopen.
Don't forget to say, "The Islander sent me."

Commttnily


Thrift Shop
Bradenton's Original
Thrift and Consignment Shop
Large selection of
Home Decor, Furniture,
Collectibles, Fine Jewelry,
Clothes for the whole family!
Books and more!
Accepting quality Mon-Sat
consignments. 10-4
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18 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

HB planners recommend denial of residential rezone


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
The plans for a change in zoning in Holmes Beach
got a no-go reaction from the planning commission.
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission met
May 21 for a continued public hearing on a small plan
amendment and a rezone application for 214 54th St.
Emily Anne Smith, the conceptual designer for the
applicant, Lizzie Lus Retreat LLC, delivered a plea for
her design to the commission. Agent Monica Simpson
argued her case for the application, as did contrac-
tor Greg Ross, and Lizzie Lus owner Ben ten Haaf
addressed the commission. All sought approval.
City planner Bill Brisson also addressed the com-
mission, outlining his staff report. He recommended
denying the application.
While commission members said they were
impressed with the presentation, four of the five mem-
bers agreed with Brisson that the application does not
align with the city's comprehensive plan.
Simpson argued against Brisson's points, saying
the application works with the city's comp plan, pro-
viding commissioners with visual aids and information
in booklets.
I'll admit your presentation was very good, and I
was swayed," said Commission Chair Sue Normand.
"However, we've all put a lot of time into reviewing
this and I just don't think it aligns."
One part of the application sought to extend the
mixed-use overlay district that exists within the com-
mercial district, which is east and south of the property
at the corner of Holmes Boulevard and 54th Street,
to the residential site. Simpson argued the corner lot
is unique, in that in could create a transition from the
high-density commercial area where it meets the resi-
dential area.


YOUR COMFORT ZONe.


turn to the experts


She said the proposed plan could reinvigorate the
commercial area in a positive way, while also blocking
residents' views of businesses and dumpsters.
Brisson said the mixed-use overlay provision was
intended to invigorate the commercial district, and was
not meant to encroach into the residential area.
The property is in the Residential-2 duplex zone,
not in the commercial district.
But extending the mixed-use overlay is necessary
for the applicant to create resort housing and office
space on the site.
Ross of Ross Built Construction in Holmes Beach,
the ten Haaf's contractor, also addressed the commis-
sion concerning the second part of the application,
which seeks to rezone the area from residential, R-2,
to low-density commercial, C-1.
Ross said the property's current zoning allows


E
TWEETI


TOOD


The Holmes Beach
Planning Commis-
sion views visual
aids of the proposed
plans submitted by
applicant Lizzie Lus
LLC during a public
hearing May 21.
Islander Photo: Jen-
nifer Glenfield









resort housing at a higher density than what the appli-
cant is seeking.
The current R-2 zoning would allow a three-story
mega-duplex" of two units with multiple bedrooms
on each side.
"That could be done right now, with just a building
permit and not a public hearing like this," Ross said.
Brisson agreed with Ross as to what could be built
in the R-2 zone, but cautioned commissioners about
combining commercial businesses with resort hous-
ing.
"I think most residents are willing to accept the

devil they know now, than the one that may pop up
in the future," Brisson said. "You have to be afraid of
what could happen when you rezone an area."

Public comments
Residents' comments at the May 21 hearing were
more muted than at the first hearing April 2, but the
sentiment was the same.
"We want no commercial zoning in our residen-
tial areas," said neighborhood resident Dick Motzer.
"Please heed the advice of Mr. Brisson."
Residents listed their concerns: an encroach-
PLEASE SEE HB ZONE, NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 19

BB divided on city pier bids, contract decided by 3-2 vote


By Merab-Michal Favorite
Islander Reporter
Two contractors faced-off May 22 in Bradenton
Beach for a chance to reconstruct the Historic Bridge
Street Pier.
Representatives from Duncan Dock and Seawall
and Pac Comm Inc. defended their bid proposals as
Bradenton Beach city attorney Ricinda Perry ques-
tioned them during the commission meeting.
The commission voted 3-2 -with Commission-
ers Jan Vosburgh and Janie Robertson opposed to
award the contract to Duncan Dock and Seawall. Dun-
can's bid is $150,000 more and has a longer projected
time duration than Pac Comm's bid.
"Our main concern with Pac Comm was not the
cost but the time and duration of the construction," city
official Steve Gilbert said. "Almost all of these compa-
nies were between 140-175 days for their construction
schedule. Pac Comm is committed to 100 days."
Gilbert said 100 days is not a viable schedule
during hurricane season.
"We are going to have thunderstorms in the after- mer
noons and you don't operate cranes in the water when of t
there is lightning," Gilbert said.
However, John Huit, senior project manager of Pac elect
Comm, defended his schedule. for
"We've run the numbers and we know what we
can do in the allotted time," he said. hay
Huit said the time frame would require an exten- pre'
sion in the event of a hurricane or tropical storm but
would not require additional time for thunderstorms. pre:
Steve Libel, co-owner of Duncan Dock and Sea- on t
wall in Sarasota, said his schedule included "storm
days" and, if the weather permits, the company could ZN
finish early. the
Gilbert also was concerned that Pac Comm planned mei
for eight employees to be on the job per day, whereas
Duncan Dock and Seawall guaranteed 18-35 work- tim,
ers. was
Huit answered that "only so many people can fit 22.
on a barge at once."
When the bids were opened April 21, Pac Comm Tan
was the front-runner, with the lowest bid of five com-


panies.
But, Duncan ascended to the top when pier team


rdf -T ,I 1 I I I
The Historic Bridge Street Pier in Bradenton Beach.
Islander File Photo


resI
thei
res1
Gill

bec
sioi

Coi
to r

sioi


rmbers learned Duncan would include installation
he electrical elements on the pier.
In the interim, Pac Comm said it would do the
ctrical as well, but Duncan submitted a bid proposal
the work.
Duncan also is locally based and its representatives
ve worked with Bradenton Beach public works on
vious projects.
Pac Comm is based in Miami, but has had a local
sence in the area for the past year while working
the Wares Creek-Bradenton dredging project.
Gilbert and pier team member Karen Wilson of
S Engineering conducted a series of interviews with
company representatives before making a recom-
undation to commissioners.
Although Pac Comm had the lowest bid, shortest
e duration and qualified for a local preference, it
s not among the two companies recommended May

Members of the pier committee recommended
npa Bay Marine of Gibsonton and Duncan.
"We are comfortable with both companies
ponses during the interview and particularly with
ir attention to detail in formulating both the bid
ponses as well as their work and staging plans,"
bert said.
Commissioners dismissed Tampa Bay Marine
ause there was no representative at the commis-
n meeting.
William Sowa, an attorney representing Pac
ram, made a presentation during public comment
put Pac Comm back in the running.
Sowa asked the commission to postpone its deci-
n.


"We understand we are not being recommended
and we object," Sowa said. "We were the most quali-
fied bidder based upon a matrix (ZNS Engineering)
generated, and we believe we are the best choice for
the job."
Robertson expressed disappointment that the pier
team had recommended two companies instead of
one.
"I'm not really qualified to decide this, you were

supposed to make the recommendation," she told Gil-
bert.


HB ZONE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18


ing commercial district, the loss of annual rentals,
increased traffic and more commercial rezones in the
future.
"I believe when Jack Holmes had the idea for
developing this area he wanted it to be a middle-class
community where people could live and play and enjoy
themselves and be middle-class. This isn't Longboat
Key," said Nancy Deal, a residential neighbor of the
subject property.
Deal argued developments such as the applicant's
proposal drive annual residents off the island, adding
"share our dreams, don't shatter them."
Ross, Simpson, Smith and Ben ten Haaf addressed
the residents of the neighborhood in their presentation
and also during public comment.
"People look at us and they call us investors. We
are a small business. We don't have anyone backing


us," said ten Haaf. "We want to be part of the com-
munity. We think it's the perfect spot for an office if
it's something the community wants."
Smith took to the podium a second time and
expressed surprise that residents were against the pro-
posal.
Normand responded, saying, "We base our deci-
sion on the comprehensive plan. We would make the
same decision if neighbors loved it."
The commission voted 4-1 to recommend deny-
ing the small-plan amendment, with Don Ferguson
dissenting. The commission voted 5-0 to recommend
denying the rezone request, which was dependent on
the passage of the small-plan amendment change.
The application and recommendations from Bris-
son and the planning commission will go before the
city commission for another hearing and a vote.


William Sowa, left,
an attorney repre-
senting Pac Comm,
and Steve Liebel of
Duncan Dock and
Seawallfield ques-
tions from Braden-
ton Beach commis-
sioners about their
pier construction
bids during the
May 22 commis-
sion meeting at city
hall, 107 Gulf Drive
N. Islander Photo:
Merab-Michal
Favorite




Vosburgh leaned toward awarding the contract to
Pac Comm, but asked to table the decision.
However Commissioner Jack Clarke and Mayor
Bill Shearon said they wanted to make a decision to
prevent any further delay.
"Well it might be delayed, but Pac Comm would
have it done a lot faster," Vosburgh said.
"I don't know how much more due diligence we
can do," Shearon said. "By the time we do more inter-
views we are going to be a month behind and instead of
starting at the beginning of hurricane season, it would
be the height of hurricane season."
Clarke made the motion to award the contract to
Duncan and it passed.
"Pac Comm invested a lot of time on this and did
everything above and beyond what was required,"
Sowa said. "We are disappointed that the commission
chose the third- or fourth-highest bidder instead of us.
We had the lowest bid and we are also local."
The pier renovation will be funded through a joint
effort by the Bradenton Beach Community Redevelop-
ment Agency and Manatee County government.
The Manatee County Tourist Development Council
recommended spending up to $1 million in matching
funds for the project from tourist development tax, also
known as the bed tax. It is a 5 percent tax collected on
accommodations in the county of six months or less.




Island police blotter
Anna Maria
May 18, 200 block of Gladiolus St., theft. A
person allegedly stole a bicycle and abandoned another
bike in the front yard at a residence.
Anna Maria is policed by the MCSO.
Bradenton Beach
May 19, 100 block Gulf Drive, arrest. A man was
arrested after he allegedly violated a trespass warn-
ing.
May 11, 600 block of Gulf Drive, property
damage. A woman reported a brick planter in her yard
had been damaged. She estimated the damage to be
$4,000. BBPD officers confiscated a piece of plastic
they believed to be part of a bumper from a Chevy
Silverado. The incident is under investigation.
May 8, 2400 block of Avenue C, battery arrest.
A 36-year-old man was arrested after he allegedly
started a fight while intoxicated with another male in
the middle of an intersection. He was taken to the
Manatee County jail.
Bradenton Beach is policed by the BBPD.
Cortez
May 19, 4400 block of 125th Street West, grand
theft. A woman told the MSCO someone stole several
items valued at $2,869 while she was out of town. The
incident is under investigation.
Cortez is policed by the MCSO.
Holmes Beach
No new reports
Holmes Beach is policed by the HBPD.
Streetlife is based on incident reports and narra-
tives from the BBPD, HBPD and MCSO.





20 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


Bonnie Birke
Bonnie Birke, 85, of Anna Maria Island, died May
15. She was born Nov. 25, 1928, in Detroit.
Mrs. Birke was a devoted educator who taught in
Hastings, Michigan, for 25 years. On retiring to Anna
Maria, she took up art and became an accomplished
watercolor artist. She enjoyed many dear and special
friends in the area.
No service is planned. Brown & Sons Funeral
Homes & Crematory 43rd Street Chapel was in charge
of arrangements. Condolences may be made at www.
brownandsonsfuneral.com.
Mrs. Birke is survived by her husband, Robert J.,
and daughter Roberta.

Gordon Gottschalk
Gordon Gottschalk, 93, of Holmes Beach, died
May 17. He was born in LaCrosse, Wisconsin. He
came to Anna Maria Island in 1986.
He was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin.
In 1948, he married Jane Shannon.
He worked for Firestone in Akron, Ohio, Ford
Motor Co. in Iron Mountain, Michigan, and later they
moved to Sylvania, Ohio, for 30 years.
Mr. Gottschalk was an avid outdoorsman, fishing
many locations in the United States and Canada.
No local service is planned. Burial will be in
LaCrosse.
Mr. Gottschalk is survived by wife Jane; children
David and wife Chris of Sylvania, Ohio, Peter and wife
Holly of San Rafael, California, and Mary and husband
Larry Jordan of Waconia, Minnesota; six grandchil-
dren; and one great-granddaughter.

Evelyn Kay Mitchell
Evelyn Kay Mitchell, 75, of
Reed City, Michigan, and formerly
of Holmes Beach, died May 18. She
was born June 19, 1938, in Reed City
as the third child of eight to Earl and
Matilda Mitchell.
Mitchell Mrs. Mitchell worked at Pio-
neer Publications in circulation and
accounting. In 1976, she moved to Anna Maria Island,


where she was employed as a service representative in
various banks. She was a real estate agent with Mike
Norman Realty, Coldwell Banker and later with Green
Realty.
She married the late Robert "Clam Bob" Mulhol-
land in 1985.
Friends knew her as Evy, and her infectious smile
and laughter filled the lives of so many who shared her
company. She was a lifelong member of the Women of
the Moose in Reed City and at the Bradenton Beach
Moose Lodge. She was a member of the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
She had hoped to be a retiring resident at Moose
Haven in Florida but she moved instead to Reed City
to be near family.
A celebration of life will be held at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall in Reed City, Michi-
gan, June 8. Memorial contributions may be made to
the Women of the Moose for a one-time scholarship
award. Arrangements were by the Mohnke Funeral
Home in Big Rapids. Condolences may be made at
www.mohnkefuneralhome.com.
Mrs. Mitchell is survived by her children, Roger,
Susan and husband Norman Carpenter of Reed City,
Steven of Paris, Sandra and husband Douglas Ander-
son of Paris, and Scott of Saranac; nine grandchildren;
nine great grandchildren; siblings, David and wife
Betty, Delores and husband David VanPeeren, all of
Reed City, Paul and wife Suzanne, and Jerry and wife
Lynn, all of Hersey, and Luin of Georgia.

Georgene Frances Rabren
Georgene Frances (Zink) Rabren, 52, of Braden-
ton, died May 17. She was born June 17, 1961, in
Schenectady, New York.
She lived in Ballston Lake, New York, and Glen-
mont, New York, before moving to Adamo Acres,
Florida. She worked at the Seabreeze Restaurant and
Uni-First before moving to Bradenton in 2003.
A celebration of life and memorial service took
place May 24 at the VFW Post 10141 in Bradenton.
Memorial donations may be made to Breast Cancer
Awareness.
Mrs. Rabren is survived by her children, Stacy
Lipson and David Rabren; mother Evelyn Zink; sis-
ters Donna Leach, Laura Angier, Katherine Feuquay;
brother David Zink; grandmother Ethel Kniskern;


grandchildren Charlene, Noah and Hannah; many
nieces and nephews; and her best friend, Matthew.

Mary Tenney 'Cecy'
Richardson
Mary Tenney "Cecy" Richardson, 74, of Cortez,
died May 21. She was born April 18, 1939, in Concord
Mass, California, and spent most of her life in Charle-
voix, Michigan, where she raised her family.
She graduated in 1960 from North Western Uni-
versity in Chicago. She put herself through nursing
school while raising her two daughters. She specialized
in neonatal intensive care at UCLA County Harbor,
Los Angeles.
Her first love was art, for which she was naturally
talented and she concentrated on her artwork the last
10 years of her life.
She was a member of Singles On the Go, a travel
group, a 12 year-volunteer at Mote Marine Laboratory,
and a hospice volunteer.
She was a member of Island Gallery West, a
co-op gallery in Holmes Beach where she marketed
her work. She was a featured artist at the Cortez Com-
mercial Fishing Festival, having claimed the prize in
the festival poster contest several years in a row.
Fellow IGW artist Shirley Dean Rush said, "I met
Cecy almost 20 years ago in a printmaking class we
took at the Longboat Key Art Center with Jean Black-
burn. We joined Art Uptown (in Sarasota) at the same
time and then Cecy encouraged me to join Island Gal-
lery West."
Dean recalled working on projects together over
the years and they spent time as "tent neighbors" at
PLEASE SEE RICHARDSON, NEXT PAGE


Cecy Richardson
prepares to hang her
artwork for a Novem-
ber 2013 show at
Sidebar Gallery at
The Islander newspa-
per. Islander Photo:
Bonner Joy


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 21


Cecy Rich-
ardson's
watercolor
butterfly
was fea-
tured at
Sidebar in
the Novem-
ber 2013
ArtWalk.


RICHARDSON CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20
many of the Anna Maria Island Art League outdoor
shows and at the Cortez Commercial Fishing Festi-
val.
"We painted the mural on the building next to the

gallery with the help of other members. She won many
prizes and 'Best of Show' awards at local art shows,
including AMI Art League, Art Center Manatee, Long-
boat Key Art Center and Sarasota Art Center. She also
showed regularly at Longboat Key Town Hall.
"Cecy was always sketching and working on a
project she was the most prolific artist I knew,"
Dean said.
She attributed Richardson's quest to learn more
about art to her nursing background. "It was probably
because she was not formally trained as an artist that
her work was so original and interesting," Dean said.
She added that Richardson's work will remain
throughout 2014 at Island Gallery West, 5368 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach, where friends will help fill her
obligation to staff the gallery.
A service will be held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
May 28, at Toale Brothers Funeral Home, 40 N. Orange
Ave., Sarasota, with a reception to follow. Memorial
donations may be made to the Humane Society, Ameri-
can Red Cross or Hospice.
Mrs. Richardson is survived by daughter Holly
Chappuies and grandson Logan Chappuies of Sara-
sota.


Cecy Richardson found her home in Cortez inspiring

Glenn Schwanberg to her passion for art.


Glenn Schwanberg, 89, a longtime winter visitor
to Anna Maria Island, died May 11. He was born April
22, 1925, in Milwaukee to Milton and Betty Schwan-
berg.
Mr. Schwanberg graduated from University of
Wisconsin, Lacrosse, after serving in
the U.S. Navy in World War II.
He had a passion for life that he
passed on to his children and his many
friends. He was married to Suzanne
Miller for 42 years. They made their
Schwanberg home in St. Cloud, Minnesota. He
loved to fish, play tennis, read, dance
and travel. His love for the outdoors led him to fishing
and canoeing expeditions to northern Minnesota and
Canada. His love for tennis continued throughout his
life.
A service will be held May 31 at St. John's Episco-
pal Church, 1111 Cooper Ave. S., St. Cloud. Memorials
may be made to the American Cancer Society.
He is survived by his children, Jennifer and Jeff
of St. Cloud, Jerry and wife Paula of Boise, Idaho, Jon


and wife Tammie of Rochester, Minnesota, and Jackie
and husband Jeff of Orlando, Florida; grandchildren
Tori, Alexis, Benjamin, Sophie, Sadie, Hannah, Lind-
say, Allison, Sam, Izabella and Mika Glenn.

At your service
Obituaries are provided as a community ser-
vice in The Islander newspaper to residents and
family of residents, both past and present, and to
those people with ties to Anna Maria Island.
Content is edited for style and length. Photos
are welcome. Paid obituaries are available by call-
ing 941-778-7978.


Community notices, events
The Islander welcomes notices of your events and
projects on Anna Maria Island and encourages you to
submit both news and photographs on a regular basis.
Send press releases and photos with detailed cap-
tions to news@islander.org. Remember to include
complete contact information for more information
and for publication.


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22 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

Longtime AME teacher set to retire, cruise, volunteer


By Jennifer Glenfield
Islander Reporter
A familiar face at Anna Maria Elementary will say
goodbye to her school of 29 years.
"It's been a privilege to live and work here," said
fourth-grade teacher Marcia Brockway. "Every day I
drive to school and I think, 'What could be better than
this?"'
Brockway came to AME in 1985, after teaching
fifth- grade in her home state of Michigan for 11 years.
She said her family vacationed on the island for years
before deciding to make the move.
Brockway and her husband bought a small motel
on the island, Sea Isle, and Brockway applied for the
position of second-grade teacher, hoping the move
would work out. Soon she received news from then-
principal Jim Kronus that she had the job.
The family's newly founded business began to
flourish, and the Brockways assimilated into the Anna
Maria Island community.
"I have mixed feelings about leaving, but it's time
to pass the torch," she said.
Brockway looks back at her time at AME with







Attention: Parents, teachers, friends ofAME, submit
school news to jennifer@2islander.org

AME Calendar
12:30 p.m. Friday, May 30, early release.
5 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, PTO dinner, AME cafeteria.
7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, kindergarten play.
Wednesday, June 4, field day with coach Terry Ruise.
Thursday, June 5, Becky Demo's class picnic and field-
trip to Anna Maria Island Historical Society Museum.
Friday, June 6, Marcia Brockway's class picnic and field-
trip to Anna Maria Island Historical Society Museum.
Monday, June 9, early release 1:15 p.m.
Monday, June 9, last day of school.
AME is at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. For more
information, call 941-708-5525.

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fondness for the lives she
has touched along the way.
"The great thing is
the community and to have
touched a small portion of
a student's life. It's a joy
for me to instill a joy for
learning (in a student)," she
sid.
Brockway sees some
Brockway students she taught as adults,
and then she sees their chil-
dren in her classroom at Anna Maria Elementary.
She also was able to teach at the same school her
children, now parents themselves, attended.
As a fourth-grade teacher, Brockway was involved
with instructing students in writing. She has seen good
writing in her classroom, and knows of a former stu-
dent who works for the school newspaper at the Uni-
versity of Central Florida.
"If you can leave with one student a love for read-





Wednesday, May 21
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs, Pork Sausage Patty, Toast.
Lunch: Mini or Large Corn Dogs, Popcorn Chicken, Chicken
Caesar Salad, Baked Doritos, Roasted Veggies, Cucumber
Slices with Dip, Fresh Watermelon Cup.
Thursday, May 29
Breakfast: Sausage Patty Biscuit
Lunch: Beef and Cheese Nachos, Beef and Bean Burrito,
Taco Salad, Black Beans, Lettuce and Tomato Cup,
Strawberry and Banana Cup.
Friday, May 30
Breakfast: Pancake on a Stick.
Lunch: Pizza, Breaded Beef Sandwich, Chef Salad with Egg,
Steamed Corn, Cucumber Slices with Dip, Applesauce.
Monday, May 26
Memorial Day, no school.
Tuesday, May 27
Breakfast: Cheese Omelet, Buttermilk Biscuit.
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Tangerine Chicken, Vegetarian
Garden Salad with Egg, Brown Rice, Japanese Green Beans,
Fresh Veggie Cup, Mandarin Oranges and Pineapple Tidbits.
Wednesday, May 28
Breakfast: Sausage and Cheese or Egg and Cheese Bagel.
Lunch: Macaroni and Cheese, Breaded Chicken Sandwich,
Chicken Caesar Salad, Honey Glazed Carrots, Mini Romaine
Salad, Fresh Fruit Cup.
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


ing and an inspiration to go farther, it's been a good
year," she said.
One of Brockway's favorite AME stories came
from her early years, while teaching second-grade. A
student approached her at the beginning of the year
and asked her name. After telling the student, "Mrs.
Brockway," the student exclaimed, "That's my favorite
vegetable!"
Brockway has no immediate plans following her
retirement, but said she is hoping she and her husband
will take a European cruise in the fall. She also said
she is looking forward to volunteering at the school,
as well as relaxing and enjoying the island life in her
Anna Maria home.
"I've always felt good citizenship, kindness and
respect for others is just as important as academics. It's
something that's really had a bearing on the success of
the students at Anna Maria," Brockway said.


Party for Brockway
The Parent Teacher Organization will host a
retirement party for Marcia Brockway that is open
to the community.
The event, including refreshments, will be
6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, June 5, in the Anna Maria
Elementary auditorium, 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.


Final AME-PTO dinner and

student play set for 2013-14
Anna Maria Elementary School kindergartners
will perform "Bugz" for students, families and friends
Tuesday, June 3, as the final student play of the school
year.
Moore's Stone Crab Restaurant on Longboat
Key is providing the dinner prior to the performance.
Adult dinners are $8 and students dine for $5. Dinners
include chicken or shrimp fettuccine alfredo, salad and
a roll.
The FO dinner is 5-7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, in
the AME cafeteria. Dinners can be pre-ordered until 3
p.m. Monday, June 2. Those who pre-order dinners are
entered into a raffle for a $25 gift certificate to Moore's
Stone Crab Restaurant. Guests also can purchase the
night of the dinner for take-out or dine-in at the AME
cafeteria.
The kindergarten play begins at 7 p.m. in the AME
auditorium.
AME is at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
For more information or to pre-order dinner, call
AME at 941-708-5525.


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 23


:sl dBiz
By Rick Catlin







Green village honored
by Manatee chamber
The Manatee Chamber of Commerce recently
named the Anna Maria Historic Green Village as the
winner of its 2014 Green Business Award.
The village, located in the 500 block of Pine
Avenue in Anna Maria, was developed by Lizzie Vann
and Mike Thrasher.
The businesses there use recycled water for bath-
rooms and solar panels for energy. There also is a
recharge station for battery-operated vehicles.
Several older Anna Maria homes including a
1935 Sears kit-house and the Angler's Lodge, origi-
nally built around 1911 were relocated to the site,
and renovated to house businesses.
A press release from the village owners said
the five buildings have achieved U.S. Green Build-
ing Council Platinum certification, the highest level
of LEED certification. The campus is also Net Zero
Energy, generating as much energy as it consumes.
The Historic Green Village is one of the handful of
projects in the world to achieve both accomplishments,
the release said.


More honors
Creations by L, a jewelry store at 5500 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, was honored by the Manatee
Chamber as one of the 14 finalists for the chamber's
annual Small Business of the Year awards.
Owner and jewelry designer Lois Manza, who


came to Holmes Beach eight years ago to open her
business, said it was a "great experience to be nomi-
nated. I'm honored to be in the finals and among such
great area businesses."
To reach Manza, call 941-779-0799.
Duncan Real Estate at 3 10 Pine Ave., Anna Maria,
recently received the Manatee Chamber of Commerce
Small Business of the Year Award for under $1.5 mil-
lion.
Owner Darcie Duncan, a Manatee County native,
said she was pleased and honored to receive the award,
and gave credit to her staff for their hard work.


Ed Chiles addresses guests
from the Anna Maria Island
and Longboat Key chambers of
commerce May 22 at his remod-
eled BeacHhouse Restaurant,
200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach. Chiles spoke before a
ribbon-cutting ceremony about
his dedication to quality, farm-
fresh and sustainable ingredi-
ents and the substantial invest-
ment made to see it happen.
There's more remodeling- a
new two-story deck at the
BeacHhouse. Islander Photo:
Bonner Joy
LEFT: Owner Tricia Graziano is ready to greet
guests at the second anniversary party and open
house for Aluna Wellness Center and Spa, 4-8p.m.
Thursday, May 29, at 2219 Gulf Drive N., Braden-
ton Beach, Islander Photo: Rick Catlin

BeacHhouse springs
new look, menu
Ed Chiles, owner of the BeacHhouse Restaurant,
200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach, had plenty to
smile about at the May 22 ribbon-cutting by the Anna
Maria Island and Longboat Key chambers of com-
merce to celebrate renovations at the restaurant.
The six-month project resulted in a new bar and
dining area, new kitchen, a new gift shop and front
entry and upgrading the outdoor patio, he said.
"We're just in time for the summer season, and our
winter visitors put up with the project nicely," Chiles
said at the ribbon-cutting.
He said "there's more to come," including plans
for a two-story, stadium-style outdoor deck.
Chiles also owns the Sandbar Restaurant in Anna
Maria and the MarVista Dockside Restaurant and Pub
on Longboat Key.


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24 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

Youth basketball standings tighten, adult soccer action


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Reporter
As the youth basketball season at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center moves closer to the postsea-
son, the standings are tightening, even in the two-team
8- 10 division where Island Real Estate finally broke
through with a victory May 21.
IRE rolled to a 17-8 win over previously unbeaten
Beach Bums behind 10 points from Shawn Balvin and
3 points from Luke Bisio. Anthony Nguyen and Ben
Brashear completed the scoring with 2 points each in
the victory.
Sean Rodriguez paced Beach Bums with 4 points
while Michael Pears and Will Batey each scored 2
points in the loss.
The standings are really tight in the 11-13 division
after the Sandbar upset first-place Eat Here 29-27 May
24. Eat Here sits at 4-2 with BridgeTender Inn and
Sandbar with matching 3-4 records both two games
back in the loss column.
Sandbar upset Eat Here behind strong games from
Brooke Caperelli and Joe Rogers. Rogers scored 10
points and grabbed nine rebounds, while Capperelli
added 9 points, 12 rebounds and two assists. Alex
Rodriguez and Hannah McCracken rounded out the
Sandbar scoring with 4 points each.
Paige Charron paced Eat Here with 12 points and
five rebounds, while Andrew Proctor chippped in 10
points and a game-high 14 rebounds. Noah Heskin
completed the Eat Here scoring with 5 points and nine

For photos and center sports schedules,
visit sports online at www.islander.org.


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rebounds in the loss.
The 14-17 division teams are packed tightly in the
standings with Dips Ice Cream and Beach Bistro tied
for first place on matching 5-2 records. Walter & Asso-
ciates follows at 4-4 with West Coast Air Conditioning
right behind at 3-4. Heritage Paper brings up the rear,
but Heritage managed a 59-53 upset against first-place
Beach Bistro for its first victory on the season May
19.
Burke Hill went off, scoring 30 points, grabbing
eight rebounds and dishing out four assists to lead Her-
itage, which also received 8 points each from Cameron
Brauner and Mikey Ellsworth, and 7 points and seven
rebounds from Sam Cuva in the victory.
Alex Gilman led Beach Bistro with 17 points and
seven rebounds, while brother Ryan Gilman added
16 points and six rebounds. Chris Johnson also had
a strong game, scoring 8 points and grabbing 14
rebounds in the loss.

Adult soccer continues
Adult soccer at the center moved into the fourth
week May 22 with three close games and one blow-
out by first-place Jessie's Island Store over last place
Beach to Bay Construction.
Island Pest Control kept pace with Jessie's thanks
to a 1-0 victory over third-place Sato behind a strong
game from goalie Ray Gardner, who made 14 saves,
and a game-winning goal from Andrew Turman.
LaPensee Plumbing remained in fourth place as it
improved to 2-2 after edging Slim's Place 3-2 behind
goals from Jeff Christenson, Aaron Dudukes and Joe
Ciasullo, while Adam Mott notched six saves.
Slim's Place was led by Danny Anderson's two
goals and 15 saves from goalie Will Case in the loss.
The third match of the evening saw Ross Built and
Agnelli Pool & Spa battle to a 1-1 tie. Matt Kretzman
notched the lone goal for Agnelli, while Adam Bujarski
scored for Ross.
Jessie's rolled past Beach to Bay Construction in
the final game of the night behind two goals each from
Aaron Parkin and BJ Grant. Shawn Stanley, Danny
Burton and Chelsey Hoffner each notched a goal, while
Pedro Gonzalez added six saves between the pipes.
Damir Glavan scored for Beach to Bay, which
received 11 saves from goalie Ryan Moss in defeat.

Magic soccer
The U 14 girls have put the Magic back in Manatee
Magic. It's been four seasons since MAYSO revived


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its competitive program, and it keeps getting better.
The U14 girls, coached by island soccer product
Brett McIntosh, have proven their fierce competitive
spirit and love of the game. The team has 23 wins,
nine draws and five losses since its 2011-12 inaugural
season, when they placed first in their division. The
team also has been a semi-finalist and finalist in several
regional and holiday tournaments.
The team now moves into the senior U15 division
for the 2014-15 season, where players plan to play
competitively and, hopefully, get a look from college
coaches in some showcase tournaments. Many of the
players are also competing for high school teams.
The Magic also has a U14 boys team, coached by
former Island Football Club player Neil Fellowes. His
team posted a 7-3-4 record in USA League's second
division and advanced to the Region C Cup final four
during the 2012-13 season.
The U12 boys coached by your sports colum-
nist, also an island soccer product finished in third
place in the second division and advanced to the round
of 16 in the past two Region C Cup tournaments.
The club also includes U12 girls, Ull boys and
U10 boys teams.
The Magic organization is looking to expand its
stable of teams for the 2014-15 season, which gets
started with tryouts next week.
Tryouts are May 28-31 at G.T. Bray Park, Braden-
ton, on the south side near the concession stands.
There is no cost to tryout, and payment for the
season isn't due until just before the first game.
For a full tryout schedule, go online to www.
mayso.org or email info@mayso.org.

Key Royale golf news
The Key Royale Club women took the course for
a nine-hole, individual-low-net golf match May 20 in
two flights. Fran Barford carded a 3-under-par 29 to
earn first place in Flight A by three shots over Phyllis
Roe. Heather Blane, Jean Holmes and Meredith Slaven
came in a shot back in a three-way tie for third place.
Roxann Koche fired a 6-under-par 26 for the low-
net round of the day and first place in Flight B. Sue
Wheeler was three shots back, while Kathy Porter was
another shot back in third.
The men also had golf outings, including a nine-
hole, individual-low-net match May 19. Bob Dickin-
son carded a 6-under-par 26 to take first place by one
shot over Omar Trolard, alone in second place.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, PAGE 26



MB MARINE
Electronics / Electrical
Installation & Service

~(941) 920-1169

P0 Box 1064
Ift Cortez, Fl 34215
mbowers@tampabay.rr.com


FISHING CHARTERS
Capt. Warren Girle

Inshore Offshore
Redfish Snapper
Snook Grouper
Light Tackle Fly
Over 30 years experience in local waters USCG Licensed
Full / Half Day Trips 941.387.8383 (H) 941.232.8636 (C)





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 25

AMI fishing opportunities: As good as it gets


By Capt. Danny Stasny
Islander Reporter
If the fishing remains as good as the weather has
been, we all should be able to catch fish now and
again.
Whether you're fishing inshore or nearshore, there
are endless opportunities to bend a rod. With calm,
clear water and cool light breezes, fishing conditions
can't get much better unless the fish start jumping
in the boat.
Fishing the flats is proving prosperous during the
early morning hours before the sun gets real high in
the sky. If you can add a good moving tide to the equa-
tion, you're in for some great fishing. Spotted seatrout,
redfish and catch-and-release snook are responding to
live shiners free-lined under mangrove roots and across
sandy potholes. Keep in mind to use a lively bait, as
the fish seem to be responding better to something they
can chase and devour.
While taking a little break from fishing the flats,
I've been cruising the beaches in search of variety.
Areas that contain structure are producing spotted
seatrout and flounder. Redfish and catch-and-release
snook also can be found in these areas. To get a hookup,
my clients are casting live shiners and shiners with cut-
off tails right along the structure. The tail-less baits are
primarily for the reds, although flounder are respond-
ing to them.
Moving to the nearshore bite, I'm seeing Spanish
mackerel swarming glass minnows along the whole
7-mile length of Anna Maria Island. Schools of macks,
jack crevalle and even some bonito are being spotted
within a mile of shore. I like using small white or pink
crappie jigs to target these fish. The small crappie jigs
seem to mimic the glass minnows enough to trigger a
strike.


Ed Kruse of Northbrook, Illinois, shows off his
27-inch redfish, caught on a shiner while on a recent
charter with Capt. Danny Stasny.


Jason Mertt of Laramie, Wyoming, hols onto hlis
100-pound tarpon catch long enough for a photo.
He caught the silver king May 19 off Longboat Key
while on charter with Capt. Warren Girle.

Prize tarpon
The first local AMI area angler to report
a tarpon catch is Capt. Warren Girle. His photo of
a tarpon hookup last week has earned him a "More
than-a-mullet-wrapper" Islander newspaper T-shirt
tie-dye or white.

Tarpon are beginning to make a showing, although
the real numbers of silver kings have yet to arrive. A
lot of the fish I'm seeing are 50-80 pounds. Check the
usual spots beaches and passes to find cruising
fish. Again, be patient. The May 28 new moon should
bring more and bigger fish to our waters.
Capt. Warren Girle says he's having good results
fishing offshore for snapper. By using fresh-cut pieces
of shiner as bait, Girle is attracting a bite from two spe-
cies of snapper mangrove and yellowtail. These fish
are being caught on ledges and hard bottom starting at
depths of 45 feet.
Girle also is catching grouper both gag and
red grouper on live pinfish and shiners dropped to
the bottom. Although the gags are catch-and-release,
keeper-size fish are being caught and photographed.
Another grouper that Girle is catching is the larg-
est of all grouper, the goliath. By dropping live jack
crevalle to the bottom, Girle's clients are reeling up
200- to 300-pound goliaths. Although these fish are
protected from harvest, they make a great adversary
on heavy tackle. And they are an awesome catch.
Moving inshore, Girle is targeting tarpon. By using
either live pass crabs or threadfin herring, his clients
are managing to achieve some hookups. He says,
tarpon are a little on the scarce side, but that should
change upon arrival of the new moon.


Capt. Aaron Lowman at Island Discount Tackle is
fishing nearshore structure with success. By using live
shiners as bait, Lowman is reeling up mangrove snap-
per and plenty of catch-and-release gag grouper. Mixed
in are Key West grunts, flounder, jacks and macks.
To get the bite, Lowman is using a knocker rig
with 30-pound fluorocarbon, a 1/4-ounce egg sinker
and a 1/0 circle hook.
While fishing nearshore structure, he's also
encountering predatory fish, including bull sharks and
goliath grouper. Although neither of these fish can go
in the cooler, they do provide good photo ops.
Moving inshore, Lowman is catching redfish and
catch-and-release snook on live shiners. Free-lining
these baits throughout the flats and under the man-
groves is producing a bite.
Finally, spotted seatrout are rounding out the fish
box for Lowman. Limit numbers of keeper-size fish
are being caught on live shiners.
Jim Malfese at the Rod & Reel Pier says there's
a variety of fish to catch this week at the pier, and the
type of bait will determine what you catch.
To start, pier fishers using shrimp are catching
mangrove snapper. Whole, live shrimp fished on the
bottom and around the pilings of the pier is a great
way to target these tasty little fish. Along with snapper,
expect to catch flounder and black drum.
Redfish are making an appearance at the pier, too.
The first red of the season came in at 30 inches and
had to be released. To target the reds, live shrimp,
pinfish and small blue crabs cut in half can provide a
hookup.
Finally, night fishing for snook is heating up.
Although snook remain out of season until Sept. 1,
your chances of catching a trophy fish are pretty good.
Live ladyfish drifted along the shadow line can result
in fish exceeding 40 inches.
Capt. Mark Howard of SumoTime Fishing Char-
ters reports some red-hot rallies and a variety of fish
landed when the conditions are right.
Spotted seatrout and redfish found feeding on the
flats are coming to the dinner table for Howard's cli-
ents. His bait of choice is a lively shiner rigged with
a 2/0 circle hook on a 30-pound fluorocarbon leader
under a popping cork. His clients are casting to the
sandy potholes on the flats and finding success.
He reports catch-and-release snook are scattered
all over from inshore potholes and mangrove shore-
lines to the swash channels of the beaches. To target
the large snook requires a change of presentation, says
Howard. Instead of using a smaller shiner, Howard
likes to use the biggest shiners live or dead. He
smashes the dead shiner like a pancake. His clients
then cast it into the potholes and wait for the big one
to chew.
Send fishing reports to fish@islander.org.


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Interperative Sail Tours
Aboard 1800s-Design Custom
Work Boat Built in Cortez by
Whisper Captain & Naturalist
Geoffrey H. Kendrick
Dolphins Manatees Birds
Accommodates up to 6 people
4528 119th St. West., Cortez
NEXT TO SWORDFISH GRILL


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26 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


Business news
Does your business have achievements to cel-
ebrate? Maybe you've just opened a business or
your business received an award or special recog-
nition.
If so, we'd like to hear from you.
To be considered, email your "who, what,
where, when and why" to news@islander.org.
Hi-res photos also are welcome.




law Bsson &* ssit4 Gq
941-713-4755 800-771-6043

DUPLEX FOR SALE: 300 block of 65th Street on
a conforming duplex lot. Lovingly maintained, new
windows, room for a pool, great rental history and
potential. $519,000.
5BED/3BATH DUPLEX: West of Gulf Drive, just
steps to the beach this relaxed living duplex is cur-
rently a successful vacation rental. Excellent rental
history and confirmed future bookings. Turnkey
Furnished $940,000.
4BED/2BATH DUPLEX:: Location, Location, Loca-
tion. Across from public beach and off of Gulf Drive,
this duplex comes turnkey furnished! $365,000.
SNEAD ISLAND: Built in 2006 on over half an acre,
this 4bed/3bath home features 14-ft ceilings, crown
moldings, kitchen with black granite counter tops,
Grand views saltwater pool with waterfall feature,
200-ft new dock. Much much more $949,000.
FLAMINGO TOWNHOME: Totally redone from
head to toe, this 2bed/1 bath condo is conveniently
located close to Robinson Preserve, Anna Maria
Island and with a pool and docks, what more do you
need?! $175,000.
POOL HOME WITH SLIP: This elevated 2bed/2bath
pool home built on an oversize lot also includes a
deeded boat slip. Inviting layout takes full advantage
of blending indoors with outdoors. $589,999.


SPORTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24
Later in the day, the men got back out for a nine-
hole, modified Stableford match. Quentin Talbert and
Nelson Eagle both carded plus-6 to take first place
in the individual category, while the team of Art
McMillan, Dan Richardson, Dave Richardson and
Ron Vandeman combined on a plus-4 to win the team
competition.
The men were back on the Key Royale Club track
May 22 for a nine-hole scramble. Three teams negoti-
ated the par-32 course at 5-under-par 27 to finish in
a tie for first place Dan Richardson, Randy Clark,
Dave Ling and Bob Longwood; Tom Nelson, Dave
Richardson, Dieter Burckhardt and Dick Grimme;
and Merritt Fineout, Tom MacMillan and Nelson
Eagle.



Perico Bay Club
Gated Community
2br/2ba, 1,248 sf
$275,000

This beautiful condo, completely updated in 2013,
is a first-floor end unit with private entrance with
high-impact windows. The oversized living room
has cathedral ceilings; updated kitchen has stain-
less appliances.
Contact: Arnold Desmarais, 605 Estuary Drive,
Bradenton FL 34209, 508-840-9010.
Arnoldandpatti@gmail.com


Island real estate transactions
By Jesse Brisson
Special to The Islander
4410 SecondAve., Holmes Beach, a 1,942 sfla/2,416
sfur 3bed/2bath/2car Gulffront pool home built in 1936
on a 75x200 lot was sold 05/01/14, Bird to Galanti for
$1,995,000.
407 20th Place N., Bradenton Beach, a 2,339 sfla
2,751 sfur 4bed/2bath bayfront pool home built in 1960
on a 125x93 lot was sold 05/02/14, Class to Bossenbroek
for $1,115,000.
5300 Gulf Drive, Unit 108, Martinique South, Holmes
Beach, a 1,057 sfla / 1,169 sfur 2bed/2bath/ Icar Gulffront
condo with shared pool built in 1971 was sold 05/05/14,
MBRH Properties LLC to Schwartz for $560,000; list
$560,000.
6250 Holmes Blvd., Unit 59, North Beach Village,
Holmes Beach, a 1,536 sfla / 2,055 sfur 3bed/2'2bath/2car
condo with shared pool built in 1990 was sold 05/09/14,
Deehan to Newman for $417,000; list $449,000.
6500 Flotilla Drive, Unit 216, Westbay Point & Moor-
ings, Holmes Beach, a 1,264 sfla / 1,377 sfur 2bed/2bath
condo with shared pool built in 1979 was sold 04/28/14,
Weener to McGranachan for $305,000; list $325,000.
2601 Gulf Drive N., Unit BIS, Sandpiper Resort
Co-op, Bradenton Beach, a 960 sfla/992 sfur Ibed/Ibath
mobile home with share was sold 05/05/14, Defrancesco
to Romas for $181,000.
Jesse Brisson, broker/associate at Gulf-Bay Really
of Anna Maria, can be reached at 941-778-7244.


4 DEAS0W
o Ami.INC
1-941-462-4016
941.4 2.40 6 W ai island
T U


3 bed 1 2 bath $599,000


3 bed I 3 bath $785,000 4 bed I 3 bath $869,000


4 bed 1 3 bath $798,000


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1PM-4PM


2 bed I 3 bath $599,500 3 bed I 3 bath $494,000


3 bed 1 3 bath $619,000


4 bed 12/1 bath $679,000





"Old Florida with a New Twist"

The first step in selling or buying a
house is successfully choosing the
right agent.

In the past six months we have on
average sold a house every 4 days!

"2013 Sales of 42 Million"

Providing the very best customer
service by always putting the
customers first!

Come in and visit us at the office...

5702 Marina Drive #104, Holmes
Beach, 34217


Or give us at call at... 941-567-5234


K


2


MME.0101-





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 27


ISA N I -CA SIIE


GRACO BENTON WHITE fixed-side convertible
crib/mattress/linens. $150. 941-794-3736.

QUEEN-SIZE BED: Mattress, headboard, box
spring. Clean. $50 each. Holmes Beach. 941-
209-0475.


Individuals may place one free ad with up to three
items, each priced $100 or less, 15 words or less.
FREE, one week, must be submitted online. Email
classifieds@islander.org, fax toll-free 1-866-362-
9821. (limited time offer)


WANTED: WORKOUT DVDs and retired but
working XBox, Wii units with games for Ministry
of Presence for kids and teens in Haiti. Deliver
to The Islander, 5604B Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.

WANTED: YOUR OLD cellphone for recycling.
Deliver to The Islander, 5604B Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.

ANTIQUES, ART, and collectibles. View at The
Islander store, 5604B Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.


I NEED LISTINGS!
And I'll give you 100 T
percent effort.
JASON HRNAK
941-773-6572
jhrnak@gmail.com

Mike
Norman
Realty IC 310 GULF DR, HOLMES BEACH


ANONCMNT on

AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View and
purchase online: www.jackelka.com.

FISHING GEAR WANTED: The Privateers and
The Islander are collecting new or used, repair-
able fishing poles and reels, nets, tackle, buck-
ets, etc. to give to children. Donate your gear
at The Islander newspaper office, 5604B Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.

FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Childsafe,
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion and Holmes Beach Police Department. Pick
up at The Islander office, 5604B Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Don't be sorry, be safe.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.
Donations, 9-11 a.m. Wednesdays. 511 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria. 941-779-2733.

STEFF'S STUFF ANTIQUES and Consignment.
steffsstufflbk.com. Open daily. 941-383-1901.


LOST CAT: GRAY tiger, white paws, no tail. 66th
Street, Holmes Beach. Roe, 941-524-0465.

FOUND KEYS: KEYS on keychain, found on Ala-
manda Road, Anna Maria. Claim at The Islander
office, 5604-B Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


SUPER dogs (and cats!) rescued from death row
at animal services are looking for new homes or
fosters. Call for information, 941-896-6701.
TRANS.ORTATIO

CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE: 2000,
ONLY 46,000 MILES, LIKE NEW, $7,500. 941-
356-1456.

ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe online with our
secure server? Check it out at www.islander.
org.


2/2 ground-level home,
1-car garage. $430,000

SOLD


Call Marianne TODAY for
your free market analysis.
Selling your home is
important to me.
Marianne Correll, Realtor
U mariannebc@aol.com
941-725-7799


I


ISLAND
6101 Marina Dr Holmes Beach 34217


taylormorrison.com 1 941.761.0587 17335 Skybird Road, Bradenton, FL 34209


taylor
morrison .
Homes Inspired by You





28 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
SondIs Established in 1983
tawn Residential and Commercial
Full service lawn maintenance
Service Landscaping Clean-up
778-1345 Hauling tree trimming
Licensed & Insured

Paradise Improvements 941.792.5600
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
E Replacement Doors and Windows
Andrew Chennault
*FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED
Island References Lic#CBC056755

RDI CONSTRUCTION INC.
Residential & Condo Renovations
Kitchens Bath Design Service
Carpentry Flooring Painting
Commercial & Residential
*, References available 941-720-7519


Bed: A bargain!
King, Queen, Full & Twin,
pre-owned from $30 new/used.
941-922-5271
www.sleepking.net


HURRICANE

Windows & Doors
941-730-5045
WEATHERSIDE LLC

AMI TAXI
professional, metered, on-call, gps, cards accepted
www.amitaxi.com amitaxi4u@gnail.com
holmes beach, bradenton beach, anna maria
800.301.4816
airports shops dining


HANDYMAN
Jim Basiley, LLC
Engineer turned Handyman
free estimates -- no service charge -- no job too small
Electrical (lights, ceiling fans, receptacles), Carpentry, Power Wash
Call Jim at 941-448-7806 or email: jimbasiley@gmail.com



ADOPF-A-PET
Carmen is a 2-year
old bull terrier mix.
She is healthy, happy
and would love to
live forever with a
fun, active family!
Carmen is a friendly
lovebug and great
with other dogs. She
is spayed, up to date
on shots and microchipped. Moonracer No Kill
Animal Rescue Inc, 941-896-6701. IslandLisa44@
aol.com. Visit The Islander for more info about
Carmen and other rescued, adoptable pets.


SPONSORED BY T Islander


ANSWERS TO MAY 28 PUZZLE
DAIB MP R I E D D EP TS C CI V
RPI CHANGE API AN ALVA
ANG I EOGRIAM wILLOTREES
EI N S TEIN EN0LARYT

JEAINOTPISTO
SAM SPRAYS L N TOO
N AT EIlNE C EOGIAIPIHI
AARI NAGS ZAGA ALEE
PEN NUIT ALAi SRE
REPOS RCKNA TOP
ARM NAMR SAIDR STR
NAESUMT S'1S HOE
T IKE EXT R AS OL

TE IS IS TAKS D S E S
CH R E MNS PAE AC E

A BR AC E IGEE AL E
REEF 0S E F SAD D ID


BIMINI BAY SAILING: Small sailboat rentals and
instruction. Day. Week. Month. Sunfish, Laser,
Windrider 17 and Precision 15. Call Brian at 941 -
685-1400.

PONTOON BOAT RENTAL Create life-long
memories. Call 941-518-3868 or see boatflorida.
weebly.com.

BOAT SLIP WITH davit, up to 25 feet for rent.
Holmes Beach. 941-778-7039.

BOAT FOR SALE: Proline 2950 1999, Twin Mer-
cury 225 EFI outboards, Great condition. $24,500.
Can be seen at Seafood Shack Marina. Call 863-
701-9198 and leave message if interested.



PART-TIME SALES position: Gift shop located
on Anna Maria. Must be available weekends and
evenings. Retirees welcome. 941-840-4235.
PROPERTY MONITOR FOR condo complex,

eight hours per week, $12/hour. 941-778-1390.

KI.SF ORH IR

LOCAL ISLAND STUDENT babysitter available.
CPR and first aid-certified, early childhood devel-
opment major. Emily, 941-567-9276.

RESPONSIBLE RED CROSS certified babysit-
ter. Honor student. Call or text Isabel, 941-545-
7995.

KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three
weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for
work. Ads must be placed in person at The
Islander office, 5604-B Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.



LPNS NEEDED FOR active quadriplegic using
Hoyer lift. Morning shifts, 4-5 hours starting at
7 a.m. Overnight shifts, 9:30 p.m.-7 a.m. 941-
685-5213.



TOASTED COMPUTER SERVICES. Your home
and business specialist. On-site service, virus/
spyware, cleanup, system setup, upgrades, diag-
nosis and repair, internet/wireless networking,
custom system design. 941-224-1069.

I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Profes-
sional, friendly cleaning service since 1999. 941 -
779-6638. Leave message.

ALL AROUND PAINTING: Quality work. Free esti-
mates. Licensed, insured. Call native islander Jim
Weaver, 813-727-1959.

ISLAND COMPUTER GUY, 37 years experience.
On-site PC repairs, upgrades, buying assistance
and training. Call Bill, 941-778-2535.

TRANSPORT SERVICE: LET me drive you to the
airport or anywhere in Florida. Flat rates. Reason-
able. Call Mike, 941-567-6634.

CLEANING RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL and
resort. Love what we do, love to work. 941 -756-
4570.

U FLY I drive your car anywhere in the USA. Air-
port runs, anywhere. 941-746-5651, 941-545-
6688.

PRESSURE WASHING AND windows: Com-
mercial, residential and resorts. Roofs, buildings,
houses driveways etc. 941-251-5948.

JOHN "THE FIREMAN" Island Cycle & Scooter
Repair. 25 years experience. Affordable prices.
918-639-5002 or 941-276-1414.

CLEANING BY LAURA offers everything on your
list, from kitchen and bath cleaning to dusting
and emptying wastebaskets. 941-539-6891.


D.L. HAYES CLEANING: Bonded and insured.
Rachael Bidwell/ Sheila Darcy, 941-932-5347 or
941-224-1486. For all your cleaning needs.

ISLAND COASTAL CLEANING: Residential, busi-
ness, rental properties. For "divine" results, call
John and Nan, 248-802-7802.

JUST THAT CLEAN: We will clean your home like
our own! Free estimate. Many years of service.
References available. Call Jenise, 941-730-6773,
Brad, 941-704-5609.

WILDLIFE REMOVAL AND relocation: Problem
solving for all animals, big and small. Call Joe,
Westcoast Nuisance Wildlife Service. 941-720-
4152.

HOUSECLEANING SERVICES: YEARS of experi-
ence, licensed. I'd love to clean your home. Call
Sheryl, 573-826-5675.

PROOF, POST, PUBLISH: Local editor-writer
available for consulting, draft editing, final proof-
ing and copywriting, as well as social media
management for your group or business. Email
Lisa Neff at Imneff@me.com.

BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD's Window Clean-
ing looking for storefront jobs in Holmes Beach.
I make dirty windows sparkling clean. 941-920-
3840.

ISLAND MERMAIDS CLEANING and Co.: 38-year
Islanders. Rentals our specialty. 941-778-3046.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair
and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County
and the Island since 1987. For dependable,
honest and personalized service, call William
Eller, 941-795-7411. CAC184228.


E
TWEETl~l


TOO


A Lending
Hand, Inc.


" Caregivers/Companions
" Hourly 24/7 Care
" Transportation
" Social Outings/Or. Appts.
" Housekeeping
" Meal Preparation
" Assistance With Daily
Living Activities
" Respite Care
Phone: 941.809.3725
HCS #230506 NR #30211577


359-1904
"Movers Who Care@"
TWO MEN AND A TRUCK,


1 1 C I g A 4
We Come To You p Full Warranty
* Windows Locks
*Mirrors Door Handles 941-780-1735
ALLPOWERAUTO.COM SINCE 1995 1 FREE ESTIMATES FL MV-46219


JISL A NDERCL ASS IF I ED SI











ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.

RELAXING MASSAGE IN the convenience of your
home or hotel. Massage by Nadia, more than
19 years on Anna Maria Island. Call today for
an appointment, 941-518-8301. MA#0017550.
MA#001 7550.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential and
commercial. Full-service lawn maintenance, land-
scaping, cleanups, hauling and more! Insured.
941-778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLERS repairs and instal-
lations, watering the island for 15 years. Jeff,
941-778-2581.

SUN MAINTENANCE & SERVICE: Full-service
lawn care, pool care, maintenance work, land-
scape and design, tree trimming, pressure wash-
ing, mulch, shell. Marine waxing, detailing. Free
snow removal. Call Travis, 941-779-8389.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, haul-
ing, cleanups. Island resident 25 years. Call 941 -
807-1015.



STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE. Specializing in
old Florida seashell driveways and scapes. Free
estimates. Call Shark Mark, 941-301-6067.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. $50/yard. Haul-
ing all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-7775, "shell
phone" 941-720-0770.

TOP NOTCH LAWN Care: Residential and com-
mercial. For all your landscaping needs. 941-932-
6600.

NATURE'S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design and
installation. Tropical landscape specialist. Resi-
dential and commercial. 30 years experience.
941-729-9381, 941-448-6336.

HOE IMPROVEMENT

VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Bill, 941-795-5100. www.vangopaint-
ing.net.
CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All phases of
carpentry, repairs and painting. Insured. Meticu-
lous, clean, sober and prompt. Paul Beauregard,
941-730-7479.


HOEIMRVMNe

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 941-726-3077.


GRIFFIN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc. Handy-
man, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets and
wood flooring. Insured and licensed. 941-722-
8792.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry, handyman,
light hauling, pressure washing. Jack of all trades.
Call 941-778-6170 or 941-447-2198.

HANDYMAN SERVICE: 25-year Island resident.
We do all repair, interior and exterior, insured. The
Flying Dutchman, 941-447-6747.

SOUTHBAY HOME REPAIRS: If it's broken, stuck,
loose, leaks, needs paint, etc. I'll fix it. Affordable
quality work. 941-720-2906.

PRESSURE WASHING: RESIDENTIAL, commer-
cial, roofs, driveways, house, lanai, pool area.
The Flying Dutchman, 941-447-6747.

PROFESSIONAL TILE ROOF restoration. Call
Peter for free estimate, references, insured. The
Flying Dutchman, 941-447-6747.

PAINTING: DONALD PERKINS Painting LLC. Inte-
rior, exterior. 40 years experience. Fully insured
with references. 941-705-7096.

ISLE TILE: QUALITY installation floors, counters,
backsplashes, showers. Licensed, insured. Call
Chris at 914-302-8759.



WEEKLY/MONTHLY/ANNUAL rentals: wide vari-
ety, changes daily. SunCoast Real Estate, 941 -
779-0202, or 1-800-732-6434. www.suncoastinc.
com.


DUPLEX TO SHARE: $500/month includes power,
water, your own bathroom. 75th Street at Cortez
Road, Bradenton. 941-538-2700.

PROFESSIONAL SEEKING ANNUAL rental: Bra-
denton Beach, Holmes Beach, Longboat Key.
Quiet person, excellent references. 941-730-
5363.

VACATION RENTAL BY private owner. Nice
3BR/2BA. Holmes Beach. Monthly, $3,500. 941-
744-7889.

Turn the page for more island rental ads ...


r-----------------------------------------------------

CLASSIFIED AD ORDER


CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $12 for up to 15 WORDS. 16-30 words: $20. 31-45 words: $40.
BOX ad: additional $4. (Phone number is a "word.")

The deadline is NOON Monday every week for Wednesday's paper.


Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date
Credit card payment: J1 = No.
Name shown on card:


House no. or P.O. box no. on cc bill
Your e-mail for renewal reminder:
Web site: www.islander.org
5604B Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 3421 7


Ck. No.U


or TFN start date:
Cash J


card exp. date
Billing address zip code


E-mail: classifieds@islander.org
Fax toll free: 1-866-362-9821
Phone: 941-778-7978


I-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------J


II.SOL A NDER CL ASS IF I ED SI


Real Estate
E LKAcom Aerial
Commercial Studio
PHOTOGRAPHY Product
315 58th St Interior
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 A itero
Architectural
Stock Pictures
Web
Printing
Post Cards
Brochures
Headshots

941-778-2711


Th- Islander


THE ISLANDER i MAY 28, 2014 iE29

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING &Reomntial
Family Owned and Operated since 1975
New Construction Remodeling
All Phases of Plumbing Repair & Service
778-3924 or 778-4461 5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach *Open Sat,


BOAT, RV & TRAILER STORAGE
Wash Down Easy Access Clean. Security Cameras
941-232-9208.e Rates starting at $40
Centrally located off Cortez Road., 4523 30th St. W.
Warehouse/Workshops also available

DA'S RESCREEN INC

OL CAGES, LANAIS, PORCHES, WINDOWS, DOO
No Job T0 BIG or Too SMALL. Free Estimates.
Call Dan, 941 -71 3-3108


Junior's Landscape & Maintenance
Lawn care PLUS native plants, ,.
mulch, trip, hauling and cleanup
Call Junior, 807-1015
HONEYDO HOME REPAIR
HHandyman Service
Let us put our 35 years of experience to work for you!
Jeesph LaBrecque *Carpentry *Drywall *Flooring *Painting *Siding *Tile
941 .896.5256-office Free Estimates Licensed
941.807.5256-cell Ask about our 10% guarantee & Insured

Cleaning by LAURA
For honest, reliable and
friendly service ...
Contact me today.
C I1: 941-539-6891
or email 24-hour Emergency Service
cleaning bylaura@ Sewer & Drain Cleaning
hotmail.com Water Heaters
New Construction
,od Bless You! Kitchen and Bath Remodeling
www.coderedplumbinginc.com











CALL THE ISLAND'S FINEST..
MORE THAN 2,500 LARGE AND SMALL
PROJECTS ON AMI SINCE 1988!
We provide design plans-You preview 3-D drawings

WASH FAMILY CONSTRUCTION

941.125.0013
Darrin J. Wash State Lic. CBC1258250
LOCALLY OWNED AND FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1988





30E0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


ISA N DERA SIDS


WATERFRONT 2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE on
Palma Sola Bay. Pool, patio, cable, washer and
dryer, fishing pier with boat slip. Lease, minimum
six months. $950/month furnished or not. No
pets. Call 941-538-8622.

2BR/ 1.5BA TOWNHOUSE: Close to Island,
water access. Call Kat at Big Fish Real Estate,
941-779-2289.

ANNUAL: 2BR/2BA NW Bradenton home. Fur-
nished. $1,800/month. $1,000 deposit. 941-448-
7119.

ISLAND VACATION RENTAL: 2BR/2BA, Steps to
beach. $750/week. Realtor, 941-356-1456.

ANNUAL 3BR/2BR WATERFRONT on canal with
boat dock, boat lift. Two miles east of Island on
Cortez Road in Coral Shores. $1,850/month.
Available July. mbcorle@aol.com. 443-309-
4068.


FOR SALE BY owner: Palm Court off of El Con-
quistador Parkway. 4816 61st. Ave. Drive W.,
Bradenton. Move-in ready, 941-524-6977.

REAL ESTATE: BUY, sell, invest. Enjoy. Billi Gart-
man, Realtor, Duncan Real Estate. 941-545-8877.
www.AnnaMariaLife.com.

WE'RE LOW, LISTINGS needed. Are you curious
as to how much your home could be worth? Call
us for a free professional consultation. Call Lynn
at Edgewater Real Estate, 941-778-8104.

DEEP WATER CANALFRONT home. 3BR/2BA on
corner lot. Between Manatee Avenue and Cortez
Road. One block to Intracoastal, one block to
beach. $475,000. Owner may finance. 941-778-
7980 or 941-778-7565.

KNOCK OUT CONDO! Revel in paradise of beau-
tiful bay to Gulf 55- plus property. 2BR/1 BA, stun-
ning granite, stainless-steel kitchen and magnifi-
cent bath. First floor, handicap features. Fabulous
and convenient location. Pool, turnkey. $189,000.
412-498-4127.



FOR EXPERT ADVICE ON ISLAND PROPERTIES
CALL THE ISLANDERS
(941) 778-6066
WWW.CALLTH EISLAN DERS.COM
SJ 0H NACALLTH EISLAN DERS.COM

I SLAN D
REAL ESTATE


Joh vn Znd


SUNBOW BAY 2BR/2BT end unit with lagoon view. Com-
plex offers two heated pools, tennis, elevator and covered
parking. $269,000


GULF BEACH PLACE Spacious, 2 BR/2BT condo located
(literally) just steps to the beach. Panoramic views of the Gulf
from the roof-top deck. Heated pool, two lanais, covered
parking. $379,900.


Li~JcPrT0


CANALFRONT HOME Totally updated in 2008. 3BR/3
BT home located on a private canal with scenic mangrove
views. Sailboat water, dock with boat lift and a straight shot
to Bimini Bay and open water. $689,000.

Mike 800-367-1617
Norm anlftle: 91",17786696
Norman 3101 GULF DR
Realty INC HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com
sales@mikenormanrealty.com


LAKEFRONT MODERN 3BR/2BA, two-car garage
home in West Glen. Six miles to beach, $180,000.
Realtor, 941-356-1456. Real Estate Mart.

PRESERVE ANNA MARIA: Rent annuals, we care
and vote. Want two bedroom, ground-level house
or duplex, long term: 17 year resident. 941-778-
3390.

GREAT LITTLE HOUSE, great big view. Gor-
geous open water view of bay, Perico and AMI
Bridge, 1950s cottage, all block construction,
pine accents. New appliances, etc. An island
treasure. $849,500. FSBO. 941-730-2606 (leave
message).

EQA. O SING'OPPORUNITY

All real estate advertising herein is subject to the Fair Hous-
ing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention
to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination
Familial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is
in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free at (800) 669-9777, for the hearing impaired (0)
(800) 543-8294.


',, 1' EXPERIENCE
REPUTATION
RESULTS
40 Years of Professional Service
to Anna Maria Island and Braden ton
FOR SALE
Belair Bayou: Unique 3/2 home with 2,632 sfla, man cave, pool, lanai
with fireplace and stone table with grill and much more. $316,000.
RENTALS
GULFFRONT Vacation/Seasonal 5/4 Home.
GULFFRONT Luxury Villas 2/2 and 1/1.5 Vacation/Seasonal
BOOKING NOW FOR 2014 SEASONALA/ACATION RENTALS
HOLMES BEACH- 941-778-0807
tdollyl @yahoo.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


BIG FISH
REAL ESTATE


SPACIOUS
ISLAND
CHARMER
Waterfront never
had it so good.
Built in 2001,this
3BR/3BA has well
over 3,200 sf under
air. Deep-water
canal, no bridges to the bay. Gourmet kitchen. 4-car garage.
$1,200,000. Call Nicole Skaggs, Broker, 941-773-3966.

rJr


LAKEI1U SOUTH SERENITY ON THE LAKE
Light, Bright, Updated3BR!2BA. Gorgeous lakefront 2BR!2BA
Priced right. $149,414. Call condo with rental history.
Nicole Skaggs, Broker, 941- $134,900. Call Nicole Skaggs,
773-3966 Broker, 941-773-3966.


ISLAND BREEZE CANALFRONT W/POOL
Picture perfect 3BR/3BA 3BR/2BA bungalow. Central
canalfront, pool, large lot. island location. Tons of charm.
$924,000 Call Nicole Skaggs, $639,000 Call Nicole Skaggs,
Broker 941 -773-3966. Broker. 941-773-3966.
5351 Gulf Drive No. 4, Holmes Beach
www.gobigfishrealty.com 941-779-2289





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2014 0E31


Come see the amazing natura beauty of the Pa ma So a Bay C ub and

our uxurious waterfront community with 2 and 3 bedroom condominiums.


EXTRAORDINARY LIFESTYLE & LOCATION


" Minutes from beautiful beaches

" Outdoor track, putting green and dog park

" Minutes from IMG Sports Academy Sarasota and Tampa

" Community pool and bar entertainment area


EXTRAORDINARY VALUE


0 Luxury baths

0 Gourmet kitchen

0 Exterior finishes

0 Private balconies


PALMETTO7


ANNA MARIA
ISLAND


BRADENTON RIVERWALK
MAN/-EE AVE.


4 rloa CCHNE"

c0 ORTE-Z c
'MGACADAMY
3 D AVE.


ELLENTOI

EXIT
224I ELLENTON OUTLFT MALL
.......... iiiii%



.EXIT
220



BRADENTCN


Gulf of Mexico


Sarasota Bay


LONGBOAT
KEY


clI
0

UU
BENDERSON ROWING &
AQUATIC SPORTS PARK


FRUITVILLERD E
.


BAHIAVISTA


STARTING IN THE LOW $300'S *


941.761.7349 Call Today



www.palmasolabayclub.com


HOA PAID FOR ONE YEARWHEN YOU BRING IN THIS AD.


3400 75th Street West, Bradenton, Florida 34210

On 75th Street between Cortez & Manatee Avenue


Models Open Daily 10a.m. to 5p.m.


MANATEE
PUBLIC BEAG]1


Oral representation cannot be relied upon as correctly stating representations of the developer for correct representations, make reference to this brochure and to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statues, to be
furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. The developer reserves the right to make changes or substitutions for pricing, plans, specifications, features, materials and equipment without notice. Sotheby's International Realty and
the Sotheby's International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. Equal Housing Opportunity. This is not an offer to sell for informational purposes only.




32 0 MAY 28, 2014 0 THE ISLANDER


David Teitelbaum- Liz Codola
Sales Associate 419 Pine Ave Broker Associate
941-812-4226 Anna Maria 34216 941-812-3455








































N


1$





2 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER

Get ready, get set, get gone


Hurricane Jones, with bruising winds in excess
of 130 mph, blew into Florida more than two weeks
before the start of the 2014 Atlantic season as a cat-
egory 4 storm.
More than 500 members of the state's storm team
- first-responders, medical experts, planners, utili-
ties technicians and aid volunteers reported for
duty in the simulated category 4 storm, which had a
landfall in the lower Keys with winds between 130
mph and 156 mph. The next night of the exercise,
Hurricane Jones made a make-believe second landfall
near Collier and Lee counties in Southwest Florida,
bringing a simulated storm surge estimated between
10 and 13 feet.
The team, as it went through the four-day train-
ing exercise, was flexing and toning its muscle in
preparation for the season, and also seeking to remind
Floridians:
Hurricanes strike Florida.
Be prepared.

Get ready...
Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batteries,
non-perishable foods and other equipment needed to
secure your property.
Restock your survival kit, including medicines,
special dietary foods, blankets, pillows, sleeping
bags, flashlight, lots of batteries, a portable radio,
clothing, lightweight folding chairs, cots, personal
items, quiet games and toys, important papers and
snacks. If you have a pet, include its needs as well.
Review a plan for where you'll go if you need
to leave home. Friends on the mainland or hurricane


shelter locations should be identified and routes to
safe shelters considered.

Get set ...
When advisories list Southwest Florida as a
threatened region, pay attention to weather broad-
casts and:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Collect your hurricane survival kit.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them
with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to
small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven
debris; damage to larger windows may come from
debris, as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors patio furniture, potted plants,
lawn ornaments and anything that can be moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be moved.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,


When the order comes to go, secure the residence, secure the boat and hit the road. Islander Courtesy
Photo: Wikimedia


Miller Electric is locally owned and operates on Anna
Maria Island and Longboat Key and in Bradenton and
Sarasota, providing quality and excellent
electrical services to all our clients.


9r-~

U


As you all know, severe storm events can
occur here, and it's important that your
generator is ready to go at all times. Miller
Electric can set up your panel to maximize
your generator no matter how big or
small. Call us today!


MILLER ELECTR 1




WWW.MILLERELECTRICFL.COM

6992 Iris St., Sarasota 9 Call 941.747.1530 or 941.383.1008
LIC#EC13003233 www.millerelectricfl.com


bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disrupted for days
or weeks after a hurricane. You should have a gallon
of water per person per day, and you should have at
least a seven-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
that electricity may be off for days or weeks, so make
plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten
cold. Check to make sure you have a manual can
opener.
Check all battery-powered equipment. Hurri-
cane experts caution against candles due to the threat
of fire.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buckets,
towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Pet-
friendly shelters will open in Manatee County, but the
animal must have all its shots and paperwork and be
in a carrier.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as
a possible landfall for a hurricane:
Board all windows.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving
the island will be worse than you can imagine. Hur-
ricane authorities predict it will take 12-17 hours to
evacuate the island.
Watch or listen to local news.

Get gone...
If officials order an evacuation:
Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise
cover the pool.
Turn off electricity and water to the property.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where
you' re going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.
Leave.

After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and live power lines, and emergency crews will need
time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, and make sure you
have valid identification.
Do not drive unless you must.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may
have sought higher ground to avoid floodwaters.
Re-enter your home with caution.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


MANSON ROOFING INC


Rains, High Winds &
Powerful Storms. It's
that time of year again.

Be prepared to protect your
most important assets.

Commercial /Residential
Reroof, Repairs &
Maintenance

HAVE CONFIDENCE IN A ROOFING CONTRACTOR WITH THE SAME NAME,
SAME OWNERS AND HAS SERVED THE COMMUNITY FOR OVER 37 YEARS.

mansonroofing.com (941) 748-5547
Florida Certified Professional Roofing Contractor
FL State Certification CCC 026478 & CCC 045924





THE ISLANDER 0 2014 STORM PLANNER U 3

Evacuating from home to shelter


Got a friend with a big house, swimming pool
and a big-screen 3-D TV offering shelter out of harms
way? Or want to build up some big points on the hotel
rewards card?
If there's an evacuation ordered on Anna Maria
Island, kindly accept the friendly offer or take a hur-
ricane holiday. Emergency management officials
encourage residents to consider options other than
public shelter, including hotels or other lodging or
stays with family or friends out of the evacuation
zone.
In the event public shelter is the only option, turn
to local media for openings, including which shelter
will serve as a pet-friendly location and which shelter
will serve people with special needs. The designated
special needs shelter opens in advance of others, but
the site can change depending on storm predictions.
Manatee County's shelter roster:
Bashaw Elementary School, 3515 17th St. E.,
Bradenton.
Bayshore Elementary School, 6120 26th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Bethany Baptist Church, 26604 State Road 64
E., Myakka City.
Braden River Elementary/Middle schools, 6215
River Club Blvd., Bradenton.
Braden River High School, 6545 State Road 70
E., Bradenton.
Buffalo Creek Middle School, 7320 69th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Daughtrey Elementary School, 515 63rd Ave.
E., Bradenton.
Freedom Elementary School, 9515 State Road
64 E., Bradenton.
Gullett Elementary School, 12125 44thAve. E.,
Bradenton.
Haile Middle School, 9501 State Road 64 E.,
Bradenton.
Johnson Middle School, 2121 26th Ave. E.,
Bradenton.


Kinnan Elementary School, 3415 Tallevast
Road, Sarasota.
Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Bra-
denton.
Lincoln Middle School, 305 17th St. E., Bra-
denton.
Manatee High School, 1000 32nd St. W., Bra-
denton.
Manatee Technical Institute East, 5520 Lake-
wood Ranch, Lakewood Ranch.
Manatee Technical Institute Main, 5603 34th
St. W., Bradenton.
McNeal Elementary School, 6325 Lorraine
Road, Bradenton.
Miller Elementary School, 4201 Manatee Ave.
West, Bradenton.
Mills Elementary School, 7200 69th St. E., Pal-
metto.
Myakka City Elementary School, 37205 Mana-
tee Ave., Myakka City.
Nolan Middle School, 6615 Greenbrook Blvd.,
Bradenton.
Oneco Elementary School, 5214 22nd St. Court
E., Bradenton.
Prine Elementary School, 3801 Southern Park-
way, Bradenton.
Rogers Garden Elementary School, 515 13th
Ave. W., Bradenton.
Rowlett Elementary School, 3500 Ninth St. E.,
Bradenton.
Seabreeze Elementary School, 3601 71st St. W.,
Bradenton.
Tillman Elementary School, 1415 29th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Trinity United Methodist Church, 3200 Mana-
tee Ave. W., Bradenton.
Williams Elementary School, 3404 Fort Hamer
Road, Parrish.
Willis Elementary School, 14705 The Masters
Ave., Bradenton.


In an evacuation, emergency management officials
encourage people to seek shelter with friends or
family, but public shelters also are opened on an as
needed basis. Islander File Photo

Witt Elementary School, 200 Rye Road, Bra-
denton.
Note: The Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, is a designated
emergency shelter, but would not be a shelter in the
event of an island evacuation for a storm.
Source: mymanatee.org.



201 C-ve-Ar:Je]i





4 E 2014 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER

Story weather


The critical number is 74, as in miles per hour.
That's when a storm has matured into a hurri-
cane.
Typical hurricanes are about 300 miles wide,
although they can vary considerably in size. The eye
at a hurricane's center is a relatively calm, clear area
about 20-40 miles across.
The eye wall surrounding the eye is composed
of dense clouds that contain the highest winds in the
storm.
A storm's outer rain bands often with hur-
ricane or tropical storm-force winds are made up
of dense bands of thunderstorms ranging from a few
miles to tens of miles wide and 50-300 miles long.
Hurricane-force winds can extend outward to
about 25 miles in a small hurricane and to more than
150 miles for a large one. Tropical storm-force winds
can stretch out as far as 300 miles from the center of
a large hurricane.
Frequently, the right side of a hurricane is the
most dangerous in terms of storm surge, winds and
tornadoes.
A hurricane's speed and path depend on com-
plex ocean and atmospheric interactions, including
the presence or absence of other weather patterns.
Do not focus on the eye or the track hurri-
canes are immense systems that can move in complex
patterns that are difficult to predict. Be prepared for
changes in size, intensity, speed and direction.
The buildup to the big storm:
Tropical cyclones are low-pressure systems that


have thunderstorm activity and rotate counterclock-
wise.
A tropical cyclone with winds of 38 mph or less
is termed a tropical depression.
When the tropical cyclone's winds reach 39-73
mph, it is upgraded to a tropical storm.
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale defines
hurricane strength by categories, but the category of
the storm does not necessarily relate directly to the
damage it can inflict.
Lower category storms and even tropical storms
can cause substantial damage depending on what
other weather features they interact with, where they
strike and how slow they move.


Whistling in the wind...
In wind speeds of:
1-3 mph, smoke drifts, small ripples
appear on water.
8-12 mph, leaves move on land, crests
start to break on the water.
25-31 mph, large tree branches move,
telephone wires "whistle" and umbrellas pull
away.
32-38 mph, large trees sway and it can
be difficult to walk. On the water, large waves
develop.
47-54 mph, shingles are blown off roofs.
On water, there's high waves and rolling sea.
Excess of 74 mph, there is some destruc-
tion on land. And on water, waves more than 14
meters high and the air is filmed with foam and
spray.


fBoaters: brace against- rind, waves


A hurricane hasn't made landfall in Florida since
the record season of 2005 and the wrath of Wilma,
which caused $20.6 billion in damages in the Sun-
shine State.
But that doesn't mean storm systems haven't
caused damage in recent years on Anna Maria Island.
Most of the harm has come from boats banging about,
breaking loose and battering docks and the Historic
Bridge Street Pier in Bradenton Beach.
So some tips and cautions for boaters in hurricane
season:
If an anchorage/mooring plan calls for moving
vessels and there is sufficient notice, a boater should
relocate at least 48-72 hours before a storm.
Make sure fuel tanks are full, fuel filters are
clean, batteries are charged, bilges are clean, cockpit
drains are clear, fire-fighting equipment is working
and lifesaving equipment is in good condition.
Remove or secure deck gear, portable gear, radio
antennas, outriggers, fighting chairs, deck boxes, tops
and side canvas/curtains, sails, boom, extra halyards,
canister rafts and dinghies. Make sure hatches, ports,
doors, lazarettes and sailboat rudder are secure.
If a vessel is moored, it is possible that with an
additional 5-10 feet or greater storm surge, the vessel
will pound against the dock or crash into pilings.
The best mooring to ride out a storm is in the
center of a canal or narrow river where doubled
mooring lines can be secured to both shores, port


and starboard, fore and aft.
Do not raft vessels together at moorings or
docks, especially if larger and smaller vessels are
involved. The probability of damage to the vessels
is greater than if they are moored singly.
If the vessel must remain dockside at a private
dock or marina, heavy-duty fender boards should be
used on a bare-wood center piling. Lines should be


S ..A boat
stranded by
Hurricane
Wilma on the
shoreline in
Key West.
Is lander File
Photo: Jocelyn
Augustino/
FEMA











doubled and even tripled in length where necessary
to hold a vessel in the center of a berth or off seawall
or dock pilings.
Do not stay aboard a vessel during a storm.
Sources: National Hurricane Center, Florida
Division of Emergency Management, American
Boating Association.
Sign up to get news alerts at www.islander.org.


Stormy stories
The Islander's recommended summer reading list:
Fiction
John D. MacDonald, "Condominium." Welcome to
Florida's Golden Sands, the dream condominium complex
built on a weak foundation and dirty secrets. It's the home
of shortcuts, crackdowns, breakups, oversights and payoffs.
The new coastline community modeled after Longboat
Key doesn't stand a chance against the Big One. Mac-
Donald was living on Siesta Key when he wrote the novel.
Ernest Hemingway, "To Have and Have Not." The dra-
matic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into
running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of
keeping his crumbling family financially afloat.
Patrick D. Smith, "A Land Remembered." The story of
three generations of the MacIveys, a Florida family who battle
the hardships of the frontier to rise from a dirt-poor Cracker life
to the wealth and standing of real estate tycoons.
Carl Hiaasen, "Stormy Weather." When a hurricane rips
through southern Florida, the con artists and carpetbaggers waste


no time in swarming over the disaster area.
Nonfiction
Sheri Fink, "Five Days at Memorial." This is Pulitzer Prize-
winner Sheri Fink's landmark investigation of patient deaths at a
New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina and her
suspenseful portrayal of the quest for truth and justice.
Erik Larson, "Isaac's Storm: A Man, A Time and the Deadli-
est Hurricane in History" Using Isaac Cline's own telegrams,
letters and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and
a modern understanding of the science of hurricanes, Erik
Larson builds a chronicle of one man's heroic struggle and
fatal miscalculation in the face of a storm of unimaginable
magnitude.
Les Standiford, "Last Train to Paradise." Les Standi-
ford's book is a fast-paced and gripping true account of
the extraordinary construction and spectacular demise of
the Key West Railroad one of the greatest engineer-
ing feats ever undertaken, destroyed in one fell swoop
by the Labor Day hurricane of 1935.





THE ISLANDER 0 2014 STORM PLANNER U 5


Storm names: Short, distinctive


Aunt Ingrid and Uncle
Mitch will not see new hurri-
canes churning up the Atlantic
under their names. But Nana
just might, depending on the
activity this storm season.
Nana is one of the 21
names reserved for storms in
the 2014 Atlantic hurricane
season, which is from June
1 -Nov. 30.
As for Mitch and Ingrid?
Well, those names have been
retired, a practice started by


the National Weather Ser- of widely scattered stations,
vice back in 1955 after Carol, coastal bases and ships at sea,
Edna and Hazel hit hard in the according to the National Hur-
Northeast. ricane Center.
The use of short, dis- Since 1953, Atlantic tropi-
tinctive, assigned names is cal storms have been named
quicker and less subject to from lists originated by the
error than use of latitude-lon- NHC.
gitude identification methods The first lists featured
for storms. only women's names. Then,
These advantages are in 1979, men's names were
especially important in introduced. They alternate
exchanging detailed storm on the list with the women's
information between hundreds names.


Storm factoid:
Did you know

Superstorm Sandy in October 2012 was
the deadliest hurricane to hit the northeastern
U.S. in 40 years and the second-costliest in the
nation's history.
The storm's effects reached far and wide,
according to a National Hurricane Center report.
While Sandy visited devastation on the East
Coast, principally New Jersey and New York,
it created wind gusts as far west as Wisconsin
and as far north as Canada and caused water
levels to rise from Florida to Maine.
The hurricane center attributed 72 U.S.
deaths directly to Sandy, from Maryland to New
Hampshire more than any hurricane to hit
the northeast since Hurricane Agnes killed 122
people in 1972, according to the records since
1851.
The deadliest hurricane in U.S. history hit
Galveston, Texas, in 1900 and killed 8,000-
12,000 people.


Rene Marc


The only time there is a
change in the pre-set list is if
a storm is so deadly or costly
that the future use of its name
would be inappropriate and
insensitive.
In the event the number
of named tropical cyclones
occurring in the Atlantic basin
in a season exceeds 21 storms,
additional storm names will be
taken from the Greek alpha-
bet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma,
Delta and so on.


I


o Kyle


Hanna FaywB,


E ouard Bertha


The storm
names for the
2014 Atlantic
hurricane
season are:
Arthur (AR-thur)
Bertha (BUR-thuh)
Cristobal
(krees-TOH-bahl)
Dolly (DAH-lee)
Edouard (eh-DWARD)
Fay (fay)
Gonzalo
(gohn- SAH-loh)
Hanna (HAN-uh)
Isaias
(ees-ah-EE-ahs)
Josephine
(JOH-seh-feen)
Kyle (KY-ull)
Laura (LOOR-ruh)
Marco (MAR-koe)
Nana (NA-na)
Omar (OH-mar)
Paulette (pawl-LET)
Rene (re-NAY)
Sally (SAL-ee)
Teddy (TEHD-ee)
Vicky (VIH-kee)
Wilfred (WILL-fred)


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6 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER


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Proof of vaccinations Carrier or cage
Two week supply of food and water
Food/water bowls/can-opener
Medications Cat litter and pan Trash bags
Island Animal Clinic
Full-Service Veterinary Clinic, William Bystrom, DVM
5343 Gulf Drive, Suite 900, 941-778-2445


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Copyright 01 4
The Islander
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.i r
941.77:8.7978
Toll-free fax 86 6 .821
www.island:er.o







DISCOUNT
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NFAi a
PE lander
N B
___ NS _______


2014 Atlan ic
Murric ane sev son
Na Tnes Date former
Art hur AZORES
Ber"tha
Cris tobal
Dolly
Edouard
BERMUDA
Fai F
Gonzalo 30 N
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
___________ __________ 25-.N
Lai j ra
Ma rco
Nana
Onar 2-
S. ANGU Pa, lette
ST. MARTIN
U.S.
V.I. ST. KrrS ANTIGUA Ren
nd NEVIS rUADE OUpE Sally
DOMI CA
I, NMAE TedIdy
ST.,LA B V icky
SBARBADOS
GRENADA Wilfred
a
RI DAD

RIN 10-N II ,
JELA
65-w 60-~W -55-VWU 50-w 45-w 40-w 357w 30-W
~N f ~ IN


We've experienced many hurricane seasons on AMI.
Personal advice from three Island natives: Prepare.
Don't panic. Possessions are replaceable.


C


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941.778.2259 Fax 941.778.2250
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HARDWAR,

CHECK LIST
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:


J Lanterns & Fuel
J Flashlights
J Batteries
J Candles
J Tapes
J Plastic Bags
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J Can Openers
J Portable Radios
J Coolers
J Sandbags
J Propane Cylinders
for Stoves & Grills


We'll help you with all the supplies you
need to be "storm ready."
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THE ISLANDER 0 2014 STORM PLANNER U 7

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8 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER

Pet-frien.dly planner


When residents exited New Orleans in a man-
datory evacuation Aug. 28, 2005, many left much
behind. They left possessions and they left pets,
expecting they would return home in a few days.
But many didn't return home for weeks, if at
all.
Hurricane Katrina struck Aug. 29, 2005. More
than 50 levees eventually were breached. The damage
was catastrophic. The loss was tragic. Among the
tragedies: An estimated 600,000 animals were killed
or stranded.
Any disaster that threatens humans also threatens
animals. So making arrangements for pets among
the most vulnerable in a storm must be part of any
household disaster planning.
Some recommendations:
Make sure your pet has current immuniza-
tions.
If planning to go to a motel, determine in
advance whether pets are welcome and what rules
apply. A good resource is www.petswelcome.com.
If planning to board a pet, check whether the
veterinarian will be boarding in an emergency. There's
a chance the local vet's office will be evacuating.
Friends or relatives in a safe area are the best
choice for sheltering you and your pet.
Pack a pet survival kit that includes an ID collar
and rabies license tag, leashes, water and food bowls,
medications, food to last about two weeks, newspa-
pers/plastic bags for waste disposal, toys and comfort
items. And treats!
Pets should have secure carriers or collapsible
cages. Carriers should be large enough for pets to
stand comfortably and turn around. Familiarize pets
with the carrier ahead of time, because the carrier
should be a comforting refuge if the animal is required
to live in it for days or weeks after the storm. Pets
evacuated to a designated county pet-friendly shelter
are required to remain in the owner's kennel.


Baby Bird, a cairn terrier, stocks her kennel with a
few of her favorite things. Islander Photo: Bonner
JOy

On the web
For more information about disaster plan-
ning for a household with pets, go to www.
humanesociety.org.


Throughout an evacuation, your pet will need
calm and reassurance. Keep as close to a pet's normal
routine as possible and speak to the animal regularly
in a calm voice.
After the storm passes, take precautions if allow-
ing a pet outdoors. Familiar scents and sights may be
altered or gone, disorienting the animal. Additionally,
debris, insects, wildlife and water present hazards.


Dogs displaced by Hurricane Ike are sheltered at a center set up by the Humane Society. Islander Photo:
Jocelyn Augustino / FEMA


The National Hurricane Center is a twitter. So
too is NASA, NOAA and the National Weather Ser-
vice.
The 2014 storm season is at hand, and govern-
ment agencies are using social media tools to keep
populations informed.
@NASAHurricane is tweeting regularly, as is @
NHC Atlantic.
NOAA is getting "likes" on Facebook, as is the
Federal Emergency Management Agency and the
popular Weather Underground.

Web resources
Manatee County Emergency Management:
www.mymanatee.org.
Florida Division of Emergency Management:
www.floridadisaster.org.
NOAA hurricane hunters: www.aoc.noaa.gov.
National Climatic Data Center: www.ncdc.noaa.
gov/oa/climate/severeweather/hurricanes.html.
FEMA: www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/.
National Flood Insurance Program: www.
floodsmart. gov.
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.
gov/.
U.S. Coast Guard storm center: www.uscg.mil/
news/ stormcenter/.
Weather Underground: www.wunderground.
com/tropical/.
The Islander: www.islander.org.

Print resources
The Islander has contingency plans to continue
publishing through a storm, as do local daily news-
papers, including the Bradenton Herald and Sarasota
Herald-Tribune.
In the event of widespread and lengthy power
outages, these resources may be the most reliable
form of communicating information.

TV resources
Local television stations will report breaking
news and updates in the event of a storm, and Bay
News 9 provides 24-hour news.

1I NASAHurrcane NASAHurncane May 14
El Nino affects Hurricane seasons In the Atlantic Ocear
IS AN EL NINO DEVELOPING NOW?
Data from... fb.me/1 m Iv4JArw
Expand

NtASAturrican 'tNASAHurricane May 13
Once again.. there am currently no tropical cyclones o
lIkely to develop Into a tropicaL.. fb.me/163CmXtV
Expand 4% Reply t4 Re

NASAHurricane May 12
Taking a look at the rest of the world's tropical areas t
tropical cyclones or tropical... fb.me/1 e9zU9Zol
Expand

Storm-casting agencies are turning to Twitter and
Facebook to deliver up-to-the-second information.
Islander Photo: Screenshot@NASAHurriane


Get your huirric ane onI .... The Islander

nmore-than-a-muillet-wrapp er" tie-die


shirt is the closest thing .... AND.


o---A- AeMI to a Hurricane

~ORhm4~-neiixt to IffuxsiricanmeWw

Haksthat is*

I1 SLANDER4R


Wee3M~g inI
the iim





THE ISLANDER 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 9


Categorizing 'canes


In the United States, forecasters use the Saffir-
Simpson Hurricane Scale for categorizing hurricanes.
In general, damage rises by a factor of four for every
category increase.

Category 1
Wind: 74-95 mph.
Surge: 4-5 feet.
Effects: No real damage to building structures.
Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes,
shrubbery and trees. Also, some coastal flooding and
minor pier damage.

Category 2
Wind: 96-110 mph.
Surge: 6-8 feet.
Effects: Some roofing material, door and window
damage. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile
homes, etc. Flooding damages piers and small craft


in unprotected moorings may break its moorings.

Category 3
Wind: 111-130 mph.
Surge: 9-12 feet.
Effects: Some structural damage to small resi-
dences and utility buildings, with a minor amount of
curtain-wall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed.
Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures
with larger structures damaged by floating debris.
Terrain may be flooded well inland.

Category 4
Wind: 131-155 mph.
Surge: 13-18 feet.


Wilma, the last hurricane to make landfall in
Florida, was a Category 5 storm when NASA's
Terra satellite took this image at 12:40 p.m. Oct.
19, 2005. Winds around the eyewall of the storm
were raging at 175 miles per hour.


Effects: More extensive curtain-wall failures with
some complete roof-structure failure on small resi-
dences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may
be flooded well inland.

Category 5
Wind: 155 mph and more.
Surge: 18 feet and more.
Effects: Complete roof failure on many resi-
dences and industrial buildings. Some complete
building failures with small utility buildings blown
over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower
floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive
evacuation of residential areas may be required.
Source: National Hurricane Center


Hurricane
survivor Katelin
Burkey looks
at damage
around her Port
Charlotte home
following Hur-
ricane Charley.
Charley was a
Category 4 hur-
ricane that was
forecast to make
a direct hit at
Anna Maria
Island, but
made landfall to
the south near
Port Charlotte.
Islander File
Photo: FEMA/
Andrea Booher


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10 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER

Near-normal season predicted


The anticipated development of El
Nino is driving the experts to predict a
near-normal or below-normal Atlantic
hurricane season.
The season is officially June 1-Nov.
30 but remember: hurricanes, like tur-
tles and tourists, don't always arrive in
season.
The outlook from the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra-
tion Climate Prediction Center released
May 22 said El Nino causes stronger
wind shear, which reduces the number
and intensity of tropical storms and hur-
ricanes.
El Nino can also strengthen the trade
winds and increase the atmospheric
stability across the tropical Atlantic,
making it more difficult for cloud sys-
tems coming off of Africa to intensify
into tropical storms.
"Atmospheric and oceanic con-
ditions across the tropical Pacific are
already taking on some El Nino charac-
teristics," Gary Bell, lead seasonal hur-
ricane forecaster with NOAA, said in a
news release. "Also, we are currently


NOAA's
Climate
Prediction
Center is
forecasting a
near-normal
or below-
normal
Atlantic
hurricane
season.












Storm damage
to boats can be a
severe problem.
Not only are boats
damaged, but sea-
walls and docks
can suffer when
a vessel crashes
and pushes at
its mooring. For
information about
securing a boat
before a storm, go
to www.boatsafe.
com. Islander File
Photo


seeing strong trade winds and wind shear
over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA's
climate models predict these conditions
will persist, in part because of El Nino.
The expectation of near-average Atlantic
Ocean temperatures this season, rather
than the above-average temperatures
seen since 1995, also suggests fewer


Atlantic hurricanes."
The NOAA outlook called for a
50 percent chance of a below-normal
season, a 40 percent chance of a near-
normal season and only a 10 percent
chance of an above-normal season.
For the six-month hurricane season,
NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood


Humberto was
the first of only
two Atlantic
hurricanes in
2013. It reached
peak intensity,
with top winds
of 90 mph, in
the far east-
ern Atlantic.
Islander Image:
Courtesy NOAA







of eight to 13 named storms, with winds
of 39 mph or higher. Of those storms,
three to six could become hurricanes,
with winds of 74 mph or higher, includ-
ing one to two major hurricanes Cat-
egory 3, 4 or 5- with winds oflll1
mph or higher.
These numbers are near or below the
seasonal average of 12 named storms,
six hurricanes and three major hurri-
canes, based on 1981-2010.
NOAA's outlook is not a hurricane
landfall forecast. It does not predict how
many storms will hit land or where a
storm will strike.
And, whether it is a normal, near-
normal, below-normal or intense season,
emergency officials emphasize that it
only takes one storm to have disastrous
impact.
"Just last month, Pensacola, Florida,
saw 5 inches of rain in 45 minutes -
without a tropical storm or hurricane,"
stated Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate
administrator for response and recovery.
"We need you to be ready. Know your
risk for hurricanes and severe weather,
take action now to be prepared and be an
example for others in your office, school
or community."


Lisa Williams, office manager at The Islander
and owner-operator of MoonRacer No Kill
Rescue, volunteered at a Mississippi pet shelter
following Katrina. She helped feed and walk the
many lost pets that were sheltered in makeshift
tents, and helped reconnect them with their
owners.
Her first dog, a large shepherd-greyhound
mix, became attached to her there and the feeling
was mutual.
She applied to adopt him, and when he went
unclaimed, she became his owner, naming him


Barry, for her favorite singer, Barry Manilow.
The love affair didn't end there.
Williams was inspired to save homeless pets
in Manatee County, and she rescues many of the
dogs that are on the "kill list" at animal services.
They are often sick often with curable
heartworm or mange or unwanted because
they are pit-mixes or large dogs.
She now has a large group of foster families
that care for her rescues "pre-adoption," and many
happy families and success stories as a result of
her efforts. And we applaud her.


FEMA encourages people to prepare for
natural disasters. For more information
about disaster readiness, go to ready.gov.



Island

connection
To get storm updates related to Anna Maria
Island, become a registered user or subscribe to
the website e-edition online at www.islander.org.
Also, a link to The Islander's Facebook page and
Twitter feed can be found online at www.islander.
org. Once you're connected, you'll receive valu-
able news alerts.


Storm factoid: Did you know?





THE ISLANDER 0 2014 STORM PLANNER 0 11

Decipherirnx g storm terminology TIME TO CHANCE THE SIGNS


The National Weather Service
in New Orleans issued this bulletin
Aug. 28, 2005: ... DEVASTATING
DAMAGE EXPECTED... HURRI-
CANE KATRINA....A MOST POWER-
FUL HURRICANE WITH UNPREC-
EDENTED STRENGTH... RIVALING
THE INTENSITY OF HURRICANE
CAMILLE OF 1969."
That's clear and concise. But
throughout the storm season, the various
agencies tasked with monitoring storms,
reporting the weather and coordinating
emergency responses issue bulletins
containing terminology that can require
some deciphering.
A look at some of the terms used
- hopefully not too often during the
Atlantic hurricane season:
Closest point of approach or CPA:
The point where the hurricane eye comes
closest to shore without making land-
fall.
Coastal flood warning: A warning

that significant wind-forced flooding is
expected along low-lying coastal areas.
Coastal flood watch: An alert
that significant wind-forced flooding is
expected along low-lying coastal areas.
County Division of Emergency
Management: The local government
agency created to discharge emergency
management responsibilities and func-
tions of the county.
County Emergency Operations
Center or EOC: The county facility that
serves as a central location for the coor-
dination and control of all emergency
preparedness and response activities.
Emergency public shelter: Gener-
ally, a public school or other such struc-
ture designated by county officials as a
place of refuge.
Evacuation time: The lead-time
that a populated coastal jurisdiction must
have to safely relocate all residents of
vulnerable areas from an approaching
hurricane.
Flood warning: Indicates the
expected severity of flooding, as well
as where and when the flooding will
occur.
Forward Speed: The rate of move-


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ment of the hurricane eye is stated in
miles per hour or knots.
Gale warning: Is defined as sus-
tained winds within the range 39-54
miles an hour (34-47 knots), either
predicted or occurring. Gale warnings
are not normally issued during tropical
cyclone situations.
Hurricane: The term is used when
winds reach constant speed of 74 mph
or more. These winds blow in a large
spiral around a relatively calm center of
extremely low pressure known as the
eye of the hurricane.
Hurricane advisories: Notices
numbered consecutively for each storm,
describing the present and forecast posi-
tion and intensity of the storm.
Hurricane eye: The relatively calm
area near the center of the storm. In this
area, winds are light and the sky is often
partly covered by clouds.
Hurricane eye landfall: The point
in time when the eye, or physical center
of the hurricane, reaches the coastline
from the hurricane's approach over
water.
Hurricane path or track: Line of
movement of the eye through an area.
Hurricane warning: An alert added
to a hurricane advisory when hurri-
cane conditions are expected within 24
hours.


Hurricane watch: An alert added to
a hurricane advisory covering a specified
area and duration. A hurricane watch
means that hurricane conditions are a
real possibility; it does not mean they
are imminent.
Public Information Officer or PIO:
An individual appointed by the EOC to
be responsible for the formulating and
coordinating of the dissemination of
emergency public information.
SLOSH or sea, lake and overland
surges from hurricanes: A computer-
ized model which is able to estimate
the overland tidal surge heights and
winds that result from hypothetical hur-
ricanes with selected characteristics in
pressure, size, forward speed, track and
winds.
Squall: A storm with a sudden
increase of wind speed by at least 18
mph (16 knots) and rising to 25 mph (22
knots) or more and lasting for at least
one minute.
Storm surge: The high and force-
ful dome of wind-driven waters sweep-
ing along the coastline near where the
eye makes landfall or passes close to the
coast.
Source: University of Florida IFAS
Extension. Register for news and storm
alertsfrom the trusted island source for
news at islander.org.


=r


I


rUmn)


Back to AYII
With the arrival of the 2014 Atlantic
hurricane season, you should be asking
yourself, "Where's my hang tag?"
The arrival of hurricane season is a
good time to make sure the hang tag is
handy and hasn't been appropriated for
a bookmark or crumpled in the glove
compartment.
Island residents need the re-entry
tags to return after an evacuation. The
hang tags are distributed at each of the
three city halls. One hang tag is issued
per residence to applicants with photo
identification and proof of residency.
Residents who already have hang tags
do not need a new tag.
Anna Maria residents seeking addi-
tional information can call city hall at
941-708-6130.
In Holmes Beach, call the police
department at 941-708-5807.
In Bradenton Beach, call city hall at
941-778-1005.


"Siri, where is Hurricane
Arthur?"
If Arthur is out there, the knowl-
edge navigator built into Apple iOS
devices will know where the storm is
and where the storm is headed.
Plus, more than a dozen apps
exist for tracking hurricanes and other
severe weather for smartphones and
other mobile devices.
A number of apps can be down-
loaded for free, including:
Hurricane by American Red
Cross, which contains storm track-
ing and alerts, but also step-by-step
instructions to prepare and respond.
The Weather Channel, which fea-
tures radar maps and severe weather
alerts.
NOAA World Radar, with storm
forecasts that includes wind speeds,
wind quadrants and predicted paths,
as well as NOAA alerts.
WunderMap by Weather Under-
ground, with radar, satellite, current
conditions and forecasts from more
than 33,000 personal weather sta-


A number of apps available for
free or a few bucks track storms,
deliver forecasts and offer advice.
Islander Graphic: Screenshot iTunes

tions.
Top-ranked for-sale apps include
Hurricane Tracker, CaneCast, NOAA
Hurricane Center and Fantasy Storm,
which is a game in which players test
their forecasting skills against those
of the experts.


Islanders are fond of telling new-
comers and vacationers that for what-
ever reason karma, geography or luck
- Anna Maria Island has not suffered a
direct hurricane strike.
Islanders cannot say the same about
flooding. On a barrier island, flooded
streets and sometimes flooded homes
- can come with a simple occurrence
of a fast, hard rain event at high tide.
Driving through flooded streets can
damage vehicles, as well as threaten
health and safety of people.
Consider:
Floods are the most common haz-
ards in the United States.
Floods can be local impacting
a neighborhood or community as can
be the case of thunderstorm-associated
floods; or they can impact an entire
region, as can be the case in a hurri-
cane.
Most cars will float and can be
swept away in 18-24 inches of moving
water.
Trucks and SUVs do not fare much
better, with only 6-12 more inches of
clearance.


Flooded road bottoms can wash
away, making the water much deeper
than it appears.
If you drive through high water,
you should quickly wash the car and its
undercarriage.
Precautions:
Keep any vehicle well-maintained
and outfitted with emergency supplies.
In a ground-floor home on the
island, consider raising expensive furni-
ture, appliances and electronics, as well
as the indoor AC air handler indoors and
the outside condenser.
Look around a property to keep
drains clear and remove any vegetation
that might clog the stormwater drainage
system.


Did you know?
Hurricane Katrina, which
made landfall along the Louisiana
coast Aug. 29, 2005, killed 1,833
people in the United States and
cost an estimated $108 billion.
Katrina was the costliest tropical
cyclone in U.S. history.


Tracking apps


Caution: No wake


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ki










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MEN


Stocking up fox- storms


The Islander took an informal poll and found
residents claim the tastiest item they could think of
to stock in their hurricane kit would be a Duffy's
hamburger.
But it's more likely that by Day 3 of an evacu-
ation, maybe even Day 2, that all-the-way burger
will be way gone. Heck, it would be gone in min-
utes!
So be sure to pack another protein one
person we know insists on Vienna sausages and
at least plan to stock products with a longer shelf
life.
And, since emergency management experts
recommend storm kits contain five days worth of
supplies, also include:
Water, smaller bottles for drinking and gallon
containers for cleaning up.
Beverages.
Non-perishable foods, especially ready-to-eat
items. (Remember, the microwave won't be work-
ing.)
Disposable utensils and plates.

Toiletries and laundry detergent.
Cash, including a roll of quarters and small
bills. Do not rely on credit, debit or bitcoin.
Important papers, including birth certificates,
passports, wills, insurance documents, prescrip-


tions, pet vaccination documentation.
Cooking pan.
Grill and grill fuel or charcoal.
Medications and pain relievers.
First-aid kit.
Small tools.
Pocket knife.
Flashlights and batteries.
Candles.
Matches.


Sales tar holiday
The state of Florida declared a sales tax holiday
for the purchase of certain hurricane-related sup-
plies. The holiday was to begin May 31 and last for
nine days. Islander Photo: Courtesy Roman Oleinik


Clothing.
Bedding.
Trash bags.
Lawn chairs.
Games and activities don't forget the
Legos.
Battery-powered radio, earphones and bat-
teries.
Solar charger for smartphones and devices
and a converter for auto chargers.
Cleaning supplies and rubber gloves.
Florida road map.
Pet kennel, medications, food and supplies.
Reading materials.
Batteries, batteries, batteries.


Storm factoid:
Did you know

Damage caused by Superstorm Sandy was
estimated at $50 billion, greater than any U.S. hur-
ricane except Katrina, which in 2005 caused $108
billion in damage, or $128 billion adjusted to 2012
dollars. Hurricane Andrew in 1992 caused $26.5
billion in damage in Florida, or the equivalent of
$44 billion today.


12 E 2014 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER