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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( 08-21-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
Islander
Publisher:
Bonner Joy
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates:
27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00074389:01103

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
Islander
Publisher:
Bonner Joy
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates:
27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00074389:01103

Full Text







Ranked
Florida's '-'
Best
Community
Weekly
by FPA
AMI Chamber of
Commerce 2012 Medium
Business of the Year


' ,I --


-/'-.; -a ^ -:


Lemon

Aid to the

rescue.

Page 7


Top

Notch

pet pics.

Page 13


Back to

school.

Pages

16-17

L .^


BB-FDLE death investigation nears finish line


rr r
AsTheWorld Terns pay
the toll. Page 6

Island resort tax collec-
tions rise. Page 2

Anna Maria discusses
toll gate, paid parking.
Page 3

HB-Mainsail media-
tion on shaky ground.
Page 4


The government calen-
dar. Page 4

HB takes path to domes-
tic partner registry.
Page 5

AM nixes HB law
enforcement plan.
Page 8

HB gears up for parking
restrictions. Page 9

Hrqiings
Things to do. Event cal-
endar. Pages 10-11

Save the date for Labor
Day events. Page 12


Island police blotter.
Page 14
authorr,
author.
Page 18


Indoor soccer champs
crowned. Page 20
Anglers find structure.
Page 21

HB debuts model turtle
ordinance. Page 22


Sea MAItle numbers
as of Aug. 16:
354 turtle nests.
365 false crawls.
4,310 hatchlings.


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
The death investigation of Sheena Morris,
22, who died New Year's Day 2009 in a Bra-
denton Beach motel room, is close to a conclu-
sion.
Bradenton Beach Police
Chief Sam Speciale said
Aug. 15 that rumors the case
was closed were untrue, but
that the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement has
Special concluded its interviews and
turned over specific informa-
tion to the 12th Judicial Circuit state attorney's
office in Manatee County.
"FDLE has finished their interviews,
but they still have other things to do," said
Special. "As of right now, the case is not


,closed."
Assistant State Attorney
/ WO Art Brown does have part of
*,, the case, but not all of it.
S\ Speciale would not spec-
ulate when Brown will have
Morris the entire case file, at which
time the state attorney's office
will review the FDLE and
BBPD findings and make a
determination as to whether
Morris' initial ruling of sui-
cide was correct.
Genoese Morris was found dead
in her BridgeWalk Resort
motel room on Bridge Street, hanging from
the shower head by a dog leash.
BBPD Lt. Lenard Diaz is the lead investi-
gator on the case and found no evidence of foul


play. A Manatee County Sheriff's Office crime
scene investigation unit came to the same con-
clusion, and 12th District medical examiner,
Dr. Russell Vega, ruled the death a suicide.
Morris' mother, Kelly Osborn, has never
agreed with that ruling and hired forensic
specialist Dr. Michael Berkland in 2011 to
review the case file. Based on his opinion that
the crime scene photos may have been staged,
Berkland convinced Vega to change the cause
of death to undetermined.
Berkland was discredited in 2012 when he
was arrested for illegally storing human organs
in a Pensacola storage shed. During the course
of that investigation, information surfaced that
Berkland was twice fired from medical exam-
iner duties.
In September 2012, FDLE conducted a
PLEASE SEE BB-FDLE, PAGE 2


Flawed petition to retain tree house moves forward


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
While the Holmes Beach Code Enforce-
ment Board July 30 found a tree house built
at Angelinos Sea Lodge, 103 29th St., to be
in violation for building without a permit and
building seaward of the erosion control line,
the issue continues due to a petition filed by the
owners and the process the city must follow.
The tree house owners, Richard Hazen and
Lynn Tran, initiated the petition drive that, if
successful, will force commissioners to take
an up or down vote on a special ordinance to
grandfather the tree house.
Tran and Hazen were able to gamer signa-
tures from registered voters needed to force the
vote, and, if voted down, the city would then
required to hold a special election and voters
would decide on the matter.
However, in a registered letter to Hazen
and Tran dated Aug. 7, city clerk Stacey
Johnston found the petition to be insufficient
because of an omission on the petition, which
requires a count of signatures on each page.
"The charter requires you to note the
number of signatures on each petition," said
city attorney Patricia Petruff at an Aug. 13 city
commission meeting, and it was blank.
Petruff said she received a letter from

Cortez in
tourism
spotlight ,
Cortez has "
been ranked ..'... .
among the top .
coastal vil-
lages in North
America by
SmarterTravel.
com. Pictured
is part of the
working fleet
on the water-
front. Story,
page 2.


Tran saying there was some confusion and she
didn't understand that needed to be done.
"Trying to do an initiative under the char-
ter is a very detailed process where i \ W. i lng
counts," said Petruff.
However, she recommended commission-
ers accept the amended petition filed by Tran,
who resubmitted the petitions with the required
information.
"I don't think it's worth getting into a big
dispute," she said, while noting that even if
commissioners agreed not to kill the petition
over a technicality, the petition would again
be deemed insufficient because it is about 10
signatures short of the requirement.
If commissioners agree to accept the
amended petition, Tran then would have a
certain number of days to garner the remain-
ing needed signatures.
Petruff said the city has legal standing to
conclude the tree house matter and the accep-
tance of the amended petition would be a good
faith measure on the city's part to continue the
process.
She acknowledged, however, that leaving
the number of signatures blank was not the
city's problem.
"They had a lot of opportunities that if
they didn't understand the form, they could


have contacted us before they turned it in with
big blanks," she said.
Commissioner Pat Morton said he could
not agree to accept the amended petition.
\ly whole stand on this tree house is it
shouldn't have been built," he said. "Now we
are jumping through all kinds of hoops with
these people. And now they are coming to us
saying 'I didn't know.' It seems like a pattern
to me. I disagree with giving them what they
are asking for."
Commissioner Marvin Grossman agreed
with Morton, but also didn't want to take
advantage of a technicality.
PLEASE SEE TREE HOUSE, PAGE 3

November election

qualifying kicks off

this week and next
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria citizens who want to run for a
seat on the city commission in November, have
until noon Friday, Aug. 30, to submit qualify-
ing papers.
The qualifying period for three of the five
two-year seats on the commission that expire
in November began Aug. 19.
Incumbent Commissioner Dale Wood-
land wasted no time in submitting his qualify-
ing papers to serve a sixth two-year term to
the Manatee County Supervisor of Elections
Office, 600 U.S. 301 Blvd. W., Bradenton. The
supervisor's website lists Woodland as a quali-
fied candidate, the only one as of Aug. 17.
Incumbent Commissioner Gene Aubry has
declared he intends to run and is in the process
of compiling his paperwork and signatures.
Commissioner Doug Copeland, who
was appointed June 13 to the commission,
said before the Aug. 15 city meeting that he's
made a decision, but was not ready to make an
announcement.
"Part of me says to run, then realization
PLEASE SEE ELECTION, PAGE 4





2 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER

Islandwide resort tax increase correlates to tourism hike


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Island resort development tax collections
for June were up 7.8 percent from the same month last
year, a good indication that tourism to the area increased
almost 4 percent for the month.
That's because for 25 of the past 26 months, the per-
cent of tourism increase to Anna Maria Island has been
about half the percentage increase of resort tax collec-
tions.
The resort development tax is the 5 percent collected
by Manatee County on rentals of six months or less.
For June 2013, resort tax collections hit $797,117
compared with $739,150 for June 2012.
Total resort tax collections also called the bed tax
- for fiscal year 2012-13 are at $7.22 million, and, with
three months remaining in the fiscal year, are on pace to


surpass the record of $8.1 million set in 2011-12.
Resort tax collections have jumped significantly the
past two years since the collections department of the
Manatee County Tax Collector's Office became proactive
in finding property owners that had been renting their
properties, but were not registered with either the tax
office or the state of Florida.
The resort tax collections office began field inspec-
tions of popular vacation rental areas, including Anna
Maria Island, and brought many property owners into
compliance with the resort tax laws.
Property owners found not in compliance had to pay
past due resort taxes on their rental properties, in addition
to any past due sales tax.
For the June resort tax collections, Anna Maria Island
cities contributed $457,962, or 59.7 percent of the total.
Holmes Beach collected $258,911 in June resort


Travel site lists Cortez among top villages


The website SmarterTravel.com, in a travel feature,
listed Cortez Village as one of its "Most Unforgettable
Villages in North America."
In its comments about Cortez, the website says the
fishing village in Manatee County "comes with a side of
historical local lore. Claiming to be the oldest remaining
fishing village in Florida, Cortez dates back to the late
1800s, and many of its current inhabitants are descen-
dants of early settlers from North Carolina.
"Today, commercial fishermen in the village still
make their livings catching fish and crabs in Sarasota
Karen Bell, at work
at A.P. Bell Fish Co.,
is pleased to hear
Cortez has been
ranked among "most
unforgettable"
villages in North
America. Islander
Photo.: Rick Catlin


Bay's blue-green waters."
The website says visitors can learn more about the
area's history by visiting the Florida Maritime Museum,
which "displays historic vessels, houses a research
library, and even runs boat-building programs."
The website also lists several restaurants in Cortez
that offer fresh-caught local seafood.
Karen Bell, owner of A.P. Bell Fish Co. and the Star
Fish Co. Market & Restaurant in Cortez, said she was
surprised to learn of the ranking.
Bell, whose family roots go back to the early settlers,
said she was pleased the village has been recognized.
"I was surprised and shocked. It's quite an honor
to be recognized as one of the great villages in North
America," Bell said.
"We're glad to share our history with others who
come to visit," she said.
Bradenton Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
marketing director Deb Meihls said she found the rank-
ing to be "wonderful and exciting."
This confirms what we already knew, "what a special
place Cortez is," Meihls said.


taxes, while Anna Maria brought in $122,188. Bradenton
Beach collected $76,863.
When combined with the $90,000 collected on Long-
boat Key, the barrier islands contributed $547,962 in June
resort taxes, or 68.7 percent of the total.
For the past four years, the three island cities and
Longboat Key have brought in about 62 percent of the
annual resort tax collections.
The resort tax began in the 1989-90 fiscal year as a
result of a state statute. The initial tax in Manatee County
was 3 percent and $1.427 million was collected the first
year.
In 2003, county commissioners increased the tax to 4
percent. That year, $2.9 million was collected on accom-
modations.
The present 5 percent resort tax rate was approved
by county commissioners in June 2009.
BB-FDLE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
, 1 \Rk panel review of the BBPD investigation after
months of Osborn's public campaign to have her daugh-
ter's case reopened.
While FDLE found no wrongdoing in Diaz's inves-
tigation, the panel came up with 15 recommendations to
follow up on and offered BBPD assistance.
Special administratively reopened the case and Diaz
and the FDLE agents have been following through on the
SMART panel recommendations, which include further
interviews and a review of Morris' computer and medical
records.
The case stalled in November 2012 when Osborn
refused to release her daughter's computer and medical
records, but relented in December at the behest of FDLE
Special Agent in Charge John Burke, who wrote a letter
to Osborn outlining the importance of her cooperation.
The forensic investigation into Morris' computer
has been attributed to the long delay in closing the case,
which was expected to be completed earlier this year.
Special would not comment on the investigation,
as it is still active, but has consistently maintained confi-
dence in Diaz's conclusions. He stands behind the initial
ruling of suicide.


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TREE HOUSE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
"They may do it, but I think we may need to be
bigger than that," he said. "We have enough reasons to
turn it down."
Commissioner Judy Titsworth asked what would
happen if commissioners voted to kill the petition.
Petruff said the city would likely be taken to court
and, while the city has standing, judges typically don't
like ruling on a technicality and would probably allow
Tran and Hazen to move forward with the initiative.
Commissioners agreed to accept the amended peti-
tion, with Morton opposed.

Holmes Beach to initiate court proceedings
Ultimately, city officials don't believe an election on
the matter will change the fate of the tree house.
A city cannot create an ordinance that is contradictory
to state law and the violation of the tree house being built
beyond the erosion control line is a state violation.
Petruff also said she discovered language in state
statutes regarding a development order, which directly
relates to comprehensive plan amendments.
"A building permit and special exceptions have
always been deemed a development order," she said.
"We had building activity on a parcel of land."
Petruff said she will recommend commissioners vote
against the ordinance once the petition has been verified
by the city and the Manatee County Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office, but also suggested that the city resolve the
matter before a special election is needed.
Petruff said the language she described has yet to be
litigated and could end the matter if the city asks for a
declaratory judgment.
"Then it's the city that controls the litigation," she
said. "It's our opportunity to lay out the facts the way
we see them, as opposed to reacting to someone's com-
plaint."
Commission Chair Jean Peelen asked for a motion
to authorize Petruff to proceed with drafting a lawsuit to
ask for a declaratory judgment.
Titsworth moved to authorize Petruff to proceed
and Morton seconded the motion. The motion passed
4-0 with Commissioner David Zaccagnino absent with
excuse.


THE ISLANDER U AUG. 21, 2013 E 3

Anna Maria discusses toll, paid parking


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria commissioners unanimously agreed
Aug. 15 that some form of paid parking must be estab-
lished to control the number of day visitors driving into
the city.
What they could not agree on was how to implement
a plan that exempts residents and long-term visitors.
Mayor SueLynn, however, said she and city staff
have been discussing such a plan. She said she would
prepare a draft of her plan and have Commission Chair
Chuck Webb schedule a work session when it's ready.
Commissioners received information on paid parking
from city resident Bob Inserra, who is a park ranger at
Fort DeSoto Park in Pinellas County. Inserra maintains
the park's five paid parking kiosks.
"Since we established paid parking, we've elimi-
nated the joy-riders, the people who just wanted to cruise
through the park and throw their garbage anywhere,"
Inserra said.
"These machines are used all over the world for paid
parking," Inserra said. "You can buy as much time as you
want."
Inserra said the machines kiosks can easily be
moved and, because they operate on solar power, can be
implemented just about anywhere. Fort DeSoto Park's
machines handle several thousand cars on holidays and
weekends.
Commissioner Gene Aubry said parking kiosks also
worked well in Galveston, Texas, where he lived before
moving to Anna Maria Island.
Commissioner Dale Woodland said the idea had
some merit, but he wanted to keep any paid parking plan
as simple as possible.
"We never had this parking problem before the influx
of day visitors. It's only been in the last few years that
we've seen cars parked everywhere," he said.
Commission Chair Chuck Webb suggested hiring
part-time employees to work weekends and holidays to
sell parking passes at beach access locations.
Aubry, however, was concerned with limiting park-
ing on rights of way. He suggested a booth at the Gulf


Drive entrance to the city from Holmes Beach, where
day visitors would be required to purchase a parking pass
before entering the city.
Commissioner Doug Copeland said that could create
"major congestion" on Gulf Drive, particularly on week-
ends and holidays. Residents and vacation renters with
parking permits in hand would be stuck in line waiting
for others to purchase a permit.
"The problem is getting parking passes to the day
visitors without causing congestion," he said.
Mayor SueLynn said she and staff have discussed a
plan where "every property owner gets a permit to park
on their property and anywhere in the city. A landlord
would get one permit per property to give to a rental
person," she said.
Copeland said it was obvious to him from the ensuing
discussion that "this is going to be an involved process
and take some time. Is there anm llilng we can do now?"
he asked.
The mayor said commissioners could pass an ordi-
nance allowing illegally parked vehicles to be towed and
increase the parking fine.
"We could do that in a few weeks while we work on
a long-term parking plan," she said.
SueLynn said she and staff would prepare a draft of
a paid parking plan and bring it back in a few weeks to
commissioners.
"Some of you are not going to like parts of the plan,
but at least it's a start," the mayor said.

Anna Maria resident
Bob Inserra attends
an Aug. 15 commis-
sion work session
to discuss how the
Khpaid parking system
works at his job at
Fort Desoto Park
in Pinellas County.
Islander Photo: Rick
Catlin





4 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER


Holmes Beach-Mainsail mediation on unstable ground


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Much like the vacant property that sits near the inter-
section of Gulf and Marina drives, the grounds for media-
tion between Holmes Beach and the Mainsail develop-
ment team is riddled with obstacles.
Mediation on the proposed development that includes
a lodge, marina and multiple two-and-three-story housing
units is scheduled to resume at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Sept.
4, at CrossPointe Fellowship, 8605 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.
However, after an Aug. 15 city commission work
session, it is unclear if progress made thus far through
ongoing negotiations will go any further.
Since the initial round of mediation in June, Mainsail
has made several concessions to the site plan that was
revoked in March in a 3-2 vote a decision Mainsail
attorney Robert Lincoln contends was an illegal vote.
The developers have eliminated Building A, which
was situated on the peninsula that juts into the basin,
reduced Building B, which sat partially on the penin-
sula and downsized Building D, which sits adjacent to
Sunrise Lane yet another controversial subject in the
proposal.
In exchange, developers are seeking concession from
the city on its height restrictions. To make up for lost
housing units, which the developers say are the primary
revenue generator of the project, they want to add units
to the upper floors of the lodge.
Commissioners Marvin Grossman, Judy Titsworth
and Pat Morton have opposed the site plan from the
beginning and want the developers to start from scratch.
While pleased with the concessions being offered, the
trio does not appear to be budging from any concessions
on setback requirements and height restrictions.
Building official Tom O'Brien reminded commis-
sioners during his Aug. 15 "progress report" that every-
thing being discussed is merely a conceptual plan and not
set in stone.
"This is just a topic for discussion," he said. "Don't
get hung up on the details of the conceptual plan."
While there was a lot of back-and-forth discussion
on the project's setbacks based on a partial seawall con-
structed by the original developer in 2001, O'Brien said
the more significant concession is removing buildings
from the peninsula.
Mainsail is now proposing two-story buildings over
ground-level parking, and to put lodging under the roof
of the buildings as a compromise.
Commission Chair Jean Peelen asked if the pro-
posal can be done under the city's height restrictions,
and O'Brien said that was currently being studied.
"I think we are making good progress on the issues
we wanted them to improve," said O'Brien. "With some
encouragement, I hope to continue to make progress."
However, not a lot of encouragement was forthcom-

ELECTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
sets in," but he declined to elaborate.
Planning and zoning board member Carol Carter has
said she plans to seek commission seat.
For a city commission election to take place in Anna
Maria Nov. 5, at least four candidates are needed.
If only three candidates qualify, each would auto-
matically be elected.
An Anna Maria commissioner is elected to a two-
year term and earns $400 per month.

Bradenton Beach has two races
Bradenton Beach voters will have their first contested
city election this year since 2010.
Qualifying officially begins Aug. 26, but already
former Commissioner Bill Shearon has declared he will
run for the two-year term against incumbent Mayor John
Shaughnessy, who confirmed he will seek re-election.
Shaughnessy is a former Ward 1 commissioner, who
served six years on the dais before term limits forced
him out of office in 2009. He took two years off before
making a successful run for mayor when the incumbent
mayor declined to run for the seat.
Bradenton Beach Ward 3 Commissioner Ric Gate-
house declared July 29 he will seek a term on the dais.
Gatehouse assumed office in February 2012 after no
one stepped forward to run for the seat vacated by Ward 3
commissioner Janie Robertson, who termed out of office
after six years on the dais in November 2011.
Three city commissioners and Shaughnessy eventu-
ally appointed Gatehouse to the seat.


ing from the dais.
"I would not approve a four-story building in the
center of Holmes Beach," said Titsworth.
Grossman agreed, saying, "There is no way our citi-
zens are going to want us to change the height restric-
tions. It would be foolish to even think about it."

War of words
Mediation appears to be complicated by views from
both sides that written communications have threatening
implications.
In a letter dated Aug. 14 to Mayor Carmel Monti and
city attorney Patricia Petruff, Lincoln once again reiter-
ated his client's legal position, but also acknowledged his
letter may be viewed as a threat.
"While some members of the city commission and
the community may view what I have to say as a threat, I
provide the following in order to inform city commission-
ers, so they may understand the issues from Mainsail's
point of view when considering their assessment of what
is best for the city," he wrote.
Lincoln went on to outline what Petruff said is likely
his legal position should the matter end up in litigation.
"I don't see it as a threat," said Petruff. "I do wish
that Mr. Lincoln had not sent the letter, however."
Commissioners opposing the Mainsail proposal did
view it as a threat.
Grossman challenged Mainsail "to bring it on," and
offered a u'IP.'liOin that the city drop mediation and
initiate litigation.
"If it's wrong, it's wrong," he said.
Peelen, a supporter of continuing to work matters out
with Mainsail, said the city should continue the process
and that the process is working.
"This is not the time to give up on that process," she
said. "It's give and take and no time to say 'come on and
get us.'"
Grossman said it's Lincoln making threats.
"I want a change," he said. "I thought we were
coming here to work together, not be threatened. I believe
we are right and I think if we went to court, they would
lose. I'm not afraid of that. I want to work with them, but
I don't want to be threatened."
Morton agreed, saying Lincoln's letter was clearly a
threat, but Titsworth then took it one step further.
"His letter is basically his opinion on c \ .i il ing we
did wrong up here," she said.
Petruff said commissioners are getting caught up in
things that don't matter and the goal is whether or not to
move forward until such a time an impasse is reached.
Monti agreed, saying the intent all along was to move
forward in good faith.
"You are not going to have 100 percent on both sides,
but you can come up with a good compromise," he said.
"I feel they have moved forward in good faith and each
time we've met with them, they have come up with good


This will be his first run for election and he faces the
very person who vacated the Ward 3 seat Robertson.
Robertson said she wants her seat back because, "It
seems as if my desire to make things work as best they
can is beyond my control and I can't stay out of it any-
more."
Robertson began her service to the city on the com-
prehensive plan committee in 2004 and held various vol-
unteer board positions before serving as commissioner.
A third seat up for election is the Ward 1 seat pres-
ently held by Commissioner Gay Breuler, but since she
married recently, she has been more absent than not from
meetings.
John V. "Jack" Clarke has declared his intention to
run in Ward 1.
Bradenton Beach commissioners must reside in
wards, but the vote is citywide.

Holmes Beach election wide open
Holmes Beach incumbent Commissioners Pat
Morton, Jean Peelen and David Zaccagnino, are up for
re-election in November.
All three officials have told The Islander they intend
to seek retention, but as the qualifying period inches
closer, none have taken the necessary steps at the Mana-
tee County Supervisor of Elections Office.
And, thus far, no challengers have come forward,
although there is no lack of rumors circulating.
Note: Candidate qualifying information for the three
island elections can be found at www.islander.org.


attributes to their plan."
Monti said commissioners should stop responding
"to puffery in a letter from an attorney and not take a
cavalier attitude and say 'Let's just go to court.' As stew-
ards of the city, that's not very responsible."
Titsworth disagreed, saying Lincoln is implying he
has all the rights and if Mainsail doesn't get its way,
"He'll see us in court. I don't want to spend $4,000 on
mediation until we see a better plan."
Lincoln stated in his letter: "If the city asserts that
Mainsail has no entitlements ... Mainsail will have no
choice but to file a legal action to judicially establish its
rights."
He concluded his letter to the city by writing, "I set
forth this information to clearly inform the city of the
unavoidable consequences of the failure to settle this
dispute in an acceptable manner."
Commissioners took no official action, which leaves
the plan in place to move forward with mediation on
Sept. 4.



MetinAgs

Anna Maria City
Through Aug. 30, qualifying for municipal elec-
tions.
Aug. 21, 6 p.m., budget workshop.
Aug. 22, 6 p.m., city commission.
Aug. 29, 6 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 3, 6 p.m., planning and zoning.
Sept. 10, 6:30 p.m., EEEC.
Sept. 11, 6 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 12, 6 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 25, 6 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 6, 6 p.m., city commission.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-708-
6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 26-Aug. 30, qualifying for municipal elec-
tions.
Sept. 5, 1 p.m., pier team.
Sept. 5, 1:30 p.m., CRA/CIP.
Sept. 5, 7 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 19, noon, pier team.
Sept. 19, 1 p.m., city commission.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N., 941-
778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 26-Aug. 30, qualifying for municipal elec-
tions.
Aug. 27, 7 p.m., city commission.
Aug. 29, 7 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 4, 9 a.m., mediation, Mainsail, CrossPointe
Fellowship, 8605 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Sept. 9, 1:30 p.m., traffic congestion forum.
Sept. 10, 7 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 12, 7 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 19, 10 a.m., code enforcement.
Sept. 24, 7 p.m., city commission.
Sept. 26, 7 p.m., city commission.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive, 941-
708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

Manatee County
Aug. 27, 9 a.m., county commission.
Sept. 10, 9 a.m., county commission.
Sept. 10, 6 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 16, 9 a.m., commission work session.
Sept. 19, 6 p.m., budget hearing.
Administration building, 1112 Manatee Ave. W, Bra-
denton, 941-748-4501, www.mymanatee.org.

West Manatee Fire Rescue
Sept. 19, 6 p.m., fire commission.
Administrative office, 6417 ThirdAve. W, Bradenton,
941-761-1555, www.wmfr.org.

Of Interest
Aug. 21,3 p.m., Coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials, Anna Maria.
Sept. 2 is Labor Day. Government offices, and some
business offices, including The Islander newspaper, will
be closed.
Send notices to calendar@islander.org and news@
islander.org.





THE ISLANDER E AUG. 21, 2013 U 5

HB takes groundbreaking step toward domestic partner registry


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach commissioners agreed at an Aug.
13 city meeting to move forward with the creation of a
domestic partnership registry for city residents.
The program is making a successful run around the
state and recent adoption by the Manasota League of
Cities to encourage registries prompted a presentation
by the program's promoters, Ken Shelin and Grace Carl-
son.
Commission Chair Jean Peelen heard the presenta-
tion at a league meeting and invited the pair to present
the concept to Holmes Beach.
Shelin told commissioners the registry is gender neu-
tral, meaning it can apply to same-sex and opposite-sex
couples who share both a residence and a relationship.
He said the registry does not provide every bene-
fit typically associated with a legal marriage, but does
strengthen some basic rights for domestic partners.
The rights strengthened by the registry when adopted
within a state, county or city include:
Health care facility visitation: There are times when
a domestic partner will be prevented from visiting a part-
ner because hospital policies allow only "family" visita-
tion rights. A domestic partnership registrant would be
afforded that right.
Health care decisions: A registrant could be desig-
nated as a partner's health care surrogate, so that person
could make decisions for a partner.
Funeral/burial decisions: A registrant would have
the same authority as a spouse to follow through with
a decedent's post-life wishes, unless the decedent has
written instructions to the contrary.
Correctional facility visitation: A registrant would
have the right to visit a partner at a correctional institu-
tion with the same rights afforded a spouse. The visitation
rights would extend to the partner's relatives.
Pre-need guardian designation: A domestic partner
shall not be denied serving as a plenary guardian of his
or her partner.
Participation in education: A registrant would have
the same rights to participate in a partner's child's educa-


tion if the other parent, if he or she retains parental rights,
does not object.
Carlson added, "It's about two people watching each
other's back and wanting respect and acknowledgement
that they are committed to each other."
Shelin said when domestic partners register, it is essen-
tially a legal contract and, unlike the complications of dis-
solving a marriage, only requires a written letter to the city
clerk where they are registered to have it terminated.
Without the rights afforded under the registry, even a
power of attorney to someone who is not a blood relative
or spouse can be easily challenged, Shelin said.
\ly point is that you may think you can get certain
legal rights under a power of attorney, but it's not always
accepted," he said.
Carlson commended commissioners for being open
to the concept.
"I can tell this is a community that has a great deal
of pride in diversity and the live-and-let-live attitude,"
she said. "A domestic registry would enhance and enable
your economic development resources and enhance com-
munity pride."
Shelin said one of the factors economic development
resources look at is a community's tolerance.
An affidavit is required at the time of registry that
states the two partners are competent adults, neither
person is married, are not blood related, and each con-
siders themselves to be a partner to the other.
Shelin said the process is inexpensive and cities typi-
cally charge around $30 to cover the expense of office
materials used to document the partnership and create a
domestic partnership identification card.
Commissioner Judy Titsworth said it would be better
for Manatee County to initiate the registry, considering
there are no hospitals in Holmes Beach.
Shelin said a county ordinance would likely only
apply to the unincorporated areas of the county and that
cities would then have the option to participate.
In the meantime, he asked, "Do you wait until some-
body else does something or do you do it now while you
have the power to do something?"
Peelen said, "Sometimes the way to get larger entities


to act is by smaller entities acting."
She said the average age of Anna Maria Island resi-
dents is about 62.
"I know a lot of people in domestic partnerships and
don't want to get married for very good reasons," she
said. "A lot of those reasons are financial. I think it's a
wonderful idea."
Shelin also explained that if domestic partners reg-
ister in Holmes Beach, the ordinance would include a
reciprocity clause that would extend the domestic part-
nership rights to every city and county that has adopted
a similar registry.
Sarasota recently adopted a registry. So has Tampa,
Venice, Orlando and several other cities and counties in
the state.
Commissioners agreed 4-0 to authorize city attorney
Patricia Petruff to proceed in drafting an ordinance. Com-
missioner David Zaccagnino was absent with excuse.

Sex offender moves to

Bradenton Beach
A man convicted of a sex offense in Polk County in
1995 moved earlier this month to the 1600 block of Gulf
Drive North in Bradenton Beach.
According to the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement website, the 66-year-old man was convicted
of sexual battery by an adult with a victim under 12 and
sexual solicitation of a minor.
Florida law requires sexual offenders to register their
address with the FDLE and local law enforcement.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Sam Speciale said his
department is aware of the offender's location and has
spoken to him.
Another convicted sex offender lives in the 2500
block of Avenue C in Bradenton Beach.
In Holmes Beach, a convicted sex offender resides
in the 6400 block of Flotilla Drive.
One sex offender is listed in Cortez in the 4200 block
of 129th Street West.
No sex offender is listed by the FDLE as residing in
Anna Maria.


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6 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER




)pi1l0ion


Paying the toll?
Many times in the past we've heard suggestions that
Anna Maria should have a toll gate and charge a fee to
enter the city.
We joked that folks might get their tickets validated
at restaurants, where customers could be credited the
toll amount on their tabs for dining and drinking while
visiting the city.
Certainly, it would be unique.
Visitors to places like Slims Place, the Waterfront,
the Sandbar, the Anna Maria City Pier Restaurant and
any other establishments where they imbibe and spend
money if they're willing to join the validation system
- would be grateful.
Certainly at larger hotels and shopping and dining
establishments in big cities, folks look forward to having
their parking "validated."
Residents could breeze through the gate, similar
to bypassing the Sunshine Skyway Bridge toll with a
SunPass. Visitors could be directed through CrossPointe
Fellowship's parking lot, where a share of the toll and
parking lot fees could benefit the church. The church
already offers parking for people taking the fare-free
trolley to their destinations on Anna Maria Island.
But is it really necessary? Is the situation so dire?
It reminds of us that saying about locking the door
behind you once you've secured your place inside.
Don't let the door hit you in the ---.
Jimmy Buffett likes to croon a message, wondering
where all the faces and all the places have disappeared
in his song Changes in Latitudes, Changes inAttitudes.
"Nothing remains quite the same."
Buffett says he didn't ponder the question too long,
he got hungry and went out for a bite.
Seems like there is no shortage of folks in need of
comfort and distraction on Anna Maria Island.
But no one defines what disappeared, what changed
or how they came to lose what is defined as quality
of life: personal satisfaction (or dissatisfaction) with
cultural or intellectual conditions under which a person
lives distinct from material comfort.
Life here is grand. The white sand beach, the rip-
pling waves on the Gulf of Mexico, the dolphins jump-
ing, the weather ... it's all still great.
Are islanders so fanatical that they can't endure an
occasional wait in traffic or other people enjoying what
we came to call paradise?
Are we less cultured? Less competent? Less toler-
ant? A toll gate to enter Anna Maria City?
Like Buffett said, "If we weren't all crazy, we
would go insane."
Yep. Screwballs.

SI ,.:'


Publisher and Editor -
Bonner Joy, bonnerlelander.org -.-.
V Editorial 2 ;1r.
Neffcopyedtor ... ...:..
Joe Bird r .
Kevin Camslidy, kovnOlslander.org '
lick Calin, rlokilander.olg I
Jack Ellka, jack@jackelka.com
Jennifer Glenfleld, jennferollander.org
Mark Young, markyalelander.org.
CarolBrenneman.
Jesse Brleson t'
Kaoem RFlay-Love
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Mike Quinn I NewmManat e.om
V Adverbing Director' .
Toni Lyon, tonltlslander.org


Use Williams, manager, IIfeaawsander.org
Janice Dlngman, pier plank coordinator
classlifled@islander.org L
aubecrlptionllslander.og .
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Single ooples free. Quantluue of five more* 25 cents each
-. 0 1992-2018 Editorial, sames and production of,: oes
leland Shopping Centr 5604B Mauina drve ,
WEBSITE: www.Ialander.org


Resist pressure
Perhaps it's because we love our Manatee River,
with its abundant mangroves that house water birds
and marine life, or perhaps it's because we agree with
a recent article headlined, "Manatee County expands
on nature," that many of us in the northeast county
wholeheartedly support the efforts of those in the south-
west county to save the coastline on Long Bar Pointe.
Preserving waterfront locations is critical to our
future in Manatee County. So let's resist all pressure
to turn Sarasota Bay into just another site that can take
its place with the overbuilt East Coast of Florida.
Carol Ann Breyer, Ellenton

Something you should know
The Tiger Bay Club of Manatee County holds itself
out to be an august group of people that gather to learn
more about local issues. Its members allege to be movers
and shakers of the community and they welcome those
people interested in the topics proposed.
From the club's website: Manatee Tiger Bay Club is
a non-partisan organization formed to present exciting,
stimulating and thought-provoking programs.
So we think of nonpartisan, as not having an
opinion, right? Not aligned with a political group, no
agenda.
A meeting scheduled for Sept. 5 will be about Long
Bar Pointe, with three presenters: Carlos Beruff, John
Henslick, and Jane von Hamann.
Let's look at the dynamics of the speakers.
Beruff, as we know, is deeply entrenched politically
with all but one of our county commissioners, Gov.
Rick Scott and many members of the Tea Party/Repub-
licans. Von Hamann is a past county commissioner who
was involved in the 2004 approval of Long Bar Pointe
and opposed the amendments discussed at the Aug. 6
county meeting. John Henslick is an eco-consultant for
the developer.
Apparently, when asked for someone on the panel


opposing the project, one of the Tiger Bay board mem-
bers who spoke at the meeting in favor of the develop-
ment, deemed it unnecessary.
I call that a stacked deck.
Now when we look at this open forum, we know
the stacked deck applies, not the nonpartisan Tiger Bay
Club's claim. It's obvious Long Bar Pointe is holding
the cards.
But you can attend this meeting by signing up
online at www.manateetigerbay.org, and you can be
vigilant in contacting our county commissioners with
your concerns.
Our future environmental health is at stake.
Holly Clouse, Bradenton

To all our island friends
I would like to express my appreciation for every-
one's prayers, support and generosity for my son,
Joey.
Words cannot even express how I feel that so many
people came out to help support Joey.
I would like to especially thank the Back Alley for
having the Aug. 1 fundraiser and everyone who donated
their time and talents, and for your incredible gifts. Your
personal commitment was incredible.
Also, a special thanks to all of our Bridge Street
merchants and friends. You all have been so wonderful
with your gracious donations and support.
You all have touched our hearts. We are truly
blessed to have friends like you in our lives.
Thank you again for your kindness, time and gen-
erosity.
Kelly Thiel, Bradenton


E Find us on

Facebook
www.islander.org













I I, 1j~
ii


:~ --~
,E.aI., Av~


When the good folks at Dogs for the Earth, Arts
for the Earth of Holmes Beach told Tiffy, the offi-
cial spokesdog for Dogs For The Earth Organic Dog
Food, that MoonRacer No Kill Animal Rescue needed
help to fund some critical needs for its dogs, Tiffy and
owners Annie Weir and Kathy Spawn jumped into
action.
Dogs for the Earth contacted friends in the island
community for help. They emailed, called, texted and
posted on Facebook, asking for help.
Thanks go to canine friends Famous Finley, Mac
and Gabby, Bailey, Atticus, Kylie, Ziggy, Salty Dog
and Cocobella, who barked their message around the
Island.
They managed to get lots of folks involved, includ-
ing the Lemon Aid Kids, brothers Jackson and Nicolas
Cutler, who made organic lemonade and bracelets and
sold their wares Aug. 16 landside at the Anna Maria
City Pier, 100 N. Bay Blvd. and donated all their


Nicolas Cutler, 6, left, and
brother Jackson Cutler, 9, of
Anna Maria spend Aug. 16
- one of their few remaining
days of summer vacation -
landside at the Anna Maria
City Pier selling lemonade.
The "Lemon Aid" project came
about through friends with
Arts for the Earth-Dogs For
The Earth of Holmes Beach,
who decided to help home-
less pets with a fundraiser.
They squeezed 40 lemons,
served lemonade and talked
with people about donating to
rescue pets that might other-
wise be killed. Their slogan:
"Buy a cup, save a pup!"
Islander Photo: Annie Weir


proceeds to the cause.
Jammin' Jackson also entertained on guitar and
the pair raised almost $400 in two hours.
By the end of the week, Tiffy had rounded up
$3,000 in donations for MoonRacer from among her
bighearted friends.
Dogs for the Earth owner Weir asked, "Isn't it
wonderful to know that not only do we live on the
most beautiful Island but we share it with the cutest
dogs and the most generous people?"
Lisa Williams, MoonRacer owner and Islander
staff member says, "Yes. And a big thank you to
everyone. It's amazing to see everyone leap into action
to help homeless pets."
MoonRacer rescues the neediest dogs, those sure
to be killed at Manatee County Animal Services.
Dogs for the Earth is at 5345 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, and can be reached at 941-243-3818. Moon-
Racer can be reached at 941-896-6701.


THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 E 7
Anna Maria

Tlhe Islander

10 yeavirs agu
Headlines from Aug. 20, 2003
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch director Suzi Fox
said an environmental specialist from the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service would be on the island to check on
reports of illegal lighting that was affecting turtle hatch-
lings. Fox requested the specialist because some beach-
front residents failed to abide by local turtle-friendly
lighting ordinances. She said hatchlings instinctively
crawl toward the reflection on the water and building
lights were leading them in the wrong direction.
Owners of a duplex at 5620 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, sued the city for granting variances to move
a single-family residence at 5622 Gulf Drive to Har-
rington House Bed & Breakfast Inn at 5626 Gulf Drive,
making way for a four-unit condominium on the land
vacated by the house. The lawsuit claimed proper
notices of the variance meetings were not provided.
The Manatee County School District board of
commissioners agreed to study compromise proposals
for the construction layout of the future Anna Maria
Elementary School. The proposals were made at a meet-
ing with parents of AME students, island residents and
assistant superintendent of schools Bill Horton. The
major complaint from parents and residents pertained
to the entry and exit patterns for vehicles.

TIEMPS AND DROPS ON AMI
Date Low High Rainfall
Aug. 11 75 93 0
Aug. 12 -76 .93 0
Aug. 13 75 91 0:01
Aug. 14 78 91 0
Aug. 15 -76 88 0
Aug. 1'6- 77 90 0.32
Aug. 17 75 92 0.31
Average area Gulf water temperature 89.6
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading daily at approximately 5 p.m.


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND SINCE 1992
Island Shopping Center 5604B Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
CHARGE BY PHONE 941.778.7978
ONLINE (secure server) www.islander.org
E-MAIL subscriptions@islander.org


Summer twist: Lemon Aid to the rescue


CITY


PLEASE, TAKE NOTE!














The Islander office moved!

After 21 years in the same
Holmes Beach shopping
center, the "best news on AMI
has packed up and moved to a
groovy new, convenient loca-
tion. We're now on the "main
drag" at 5604-B Marina Drive,
across from the library and
next to Domino's and Island
Fresh Market. So stop by and
check out our new office.
We're ready to serve you!
Soon we'll resume our
community art
shows and receptions
...better than ever!

S Te Islander





8 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Anna Maria sticking with sheriff's service, tax increase


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria commissioners at their Aug. 14 budget
work session agreed informally to continue contract-
ing with Manatee County Sheriff Brad Steube for law
enforcement services.
Mayor SueLynn had been directed by the commis-
sion last month to ask Holmes Beach Mayor Carmel
Monti about the Holmes Beach Police Department pos-
sibly providing law enforcement to Anna Maria.


Monti submitted a written proposal with associated
costs and SueLynn reported to the commission that the
city would save $130,000 in the first year of service from
Holmes Beach.
However, the level of service from HBPD would
differ from that of the sheriff's office, including reducing
coverage to one patrol officer in Anna Maria.
Under the present contract with the MCSO, SueLynn
said, there is a sergeant in charge who is available to
assist deputies, plus two deputies on duty during the day


BB approves first reading of cell tower lease


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Negotiating politics is rarely a straight path and more
often a long, winding road, but Bradenton Beach, at its
Aug. 15 city meeting, turned another corner in what has
been a long journey to improve cellphone service.
City attorney Ricinda Perry presented a five-year
land lease agreement with the option to extend the lease
for nine successive five-year periods to commissioners on
behalf of Ridan Industries, the company spearheading the
cellular communications tower at the city's public works
facility on Church Avenue.
Perry said the land-lease ordinance was going to be
presented later in the process when Ridan approaches
the city with a land development application, but Ridan
"requested that it was presented beforehand so they can
begin negotiations with their sub leases for the tower."
Former Commissioner Janie Robertson, who recently
declared herself a commission candidate in the November
election, asked when commissioners intend to address the
city charter's height restrictions.
"I don't remember that ever happening," said Robert-
son. "When attempting to make a change to the charter,
there are other procedural issues to address."
Kevin Barile, from Ridan, said the city has exemp-
tions in its charter for each of its zoning districts and cer-
tain items like bell towers, church towers and cell towers
fall within those exemptions.
However, city planner Alan Garrett was asked to look


into Robertson's query and Mayor John Shaughnessy
assured her that proper procedures would be followed.
Robertson asked about the city's recent agreement
with Ridan to fund testing the former fueling site, which
is the future location of the proposed cell tower.
The city took the steps to have the old gas tanks filled
some 30 years ago, but the permit was never closed and
the city must now test the site and clean it if necessary.
Initial samplings show no contamination, but the work
is projected to cost $30,000.
Ridan agreed to pay the cost and deduct it from its
rent payments once the cell tower is operational.
Robertson asked if the city would have to pay that
bill if the cell tower project somehow fails.
Barile said that question was easy to answer.
"If the tower is not built, basically we get stuck
with the bill," said Barile. "The agreement states that
the $30,000 will be deducted from the rent payment once
rent payments start. If the rent doesn't start, then there is
nothing to deduct from."
Barile said it would be no different from the other
$40,000 Ridan has already invested into the project.
"It's called dead-site costs," he said. "You invest
money into a site as the process moves forward and, if it
doesn't happen, you basically lose those site costs."
Commissioner Ric Gatehouse moved to approve the
first reading of the ordinance, which was seconded by
Vice Mayor Ed Straight. The motion passed 4-0 with
Commissioner Gay Breuler absent with excuse.

-------l NNl/StS


L0k6im9 for the
perfed o tir9?
LeeOOk oe frther...
THe Islander
www.islander.org


and evening hours. Coverage is increased when large
crowds are expected.
Commission Chair Chuck Webb said he "didn't
see any benefit" to having Holmes Beach provide law
enforcement services.
Commissioners Dale Woodland and Doug Copeland
agreed the city should retain the sheriff's office.
The proposed MCSO contract for 2013-14 is
$615,000 and must be approved as part of the budget.
Commissioners agreed to vote on the contract at their
Aug. 22 meeting.
Commissioners also discussed whether the antici-
pated $350,000 one-time payment from Ridan Industries
to erect a cell tower in the city should be included in next
year's budget.
The contract has not been signed, building official
Bob Welch said, and city attorney Jim Dye is presently
reviewing the proposal. Once his review is complete,
negotiations to sign the contract will begin, Welch said.
Ridan already has agreed to the $350,000 payment.
In addition, the city anticipates about $2,500 per
month in revenues from cell tower usage. That money
also is in the 2013-14 budget.
Commissioners agreed to keep that revenue in the
budget, but made no provision for spending it.
Woodland said it would be "better to wait until we
have it" before spending it.
The 2013-14 budget is $3 million, based on an ad
valorem property tax increase to 2.10 mills. That's an
increase of 0.05 mills from the current 2.05 rate and gives
the city an additional $31,000 in revenue.
Without the cell tower revenue and a $149,500 grant
from the Southwest Florida Water Management District
for dredging Lake LaVista, the proposed budget would be
$2.54 million. The 2012-13 budget was $2.45 million.
Copeland said it was the commission's duty to cut
some expenses to keep the millage rate at 2.05, and Wood-
land agreed. He did not want any property tax increase
for residents.
At a 2.0 millage rate, a property owner with a house
valued at $400,000 would pay $800 in property taxes.
At a 2.05 millage rate, the same owner would pay $820,
while a 2.10 rate would see an ad valorem tax of $840
on the property.
"It's our job to reduce the budget" to keep the millage
at 2.05, Woodland said.
But the established rollback rate for the coming
budget year is 1.9507. That's the rate that would give the
city the same amount of ad valorem revenue in 2013-14
as it received in 2012-13. If the ad valorem rate of 2.05
is adopted, it would be a 5 percent tax increase.
Commissioners agreed to scrutinize line-by-line the
proposed revenues and spending at their next budget
work session to retain the 2.05 millage. The commis-
sion has adopted a tentative millage rate of 2.10. That
rate may be lowered, but it cannot be raised.
That budget work session will be held at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 21, at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005
Gulf Drive.


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CITY OF ANNA MARIA

10001 Gulf Drive, PO Box 779 Anna Maria FL 34216


PUBLIC NOTICE TO ALL
CITY OF ANNA MARIA RESIDENTS
CAN WE FIND YOU IN AN EMERGENCY?
In an emergency, police, fire and rescue workers depend on house num-
bers to find YOU as quickly as possible. Finding your home especially
at night can be challenging if address numbers are unreadable, hidden,
unlighted or have missing numbers and may delay emergency responders
from getting to you as quickly as possible.
According to the City's Code, house numbers must be affixed and vis-
ible. Code Enforcement will be enforcing these rules, and begin issuing
citations after September 30, 2013, if these stated rules are not adhered to.
Please follow the guidelines below to make sure your house number is
easy to read:
1. Residential one- and two-family dwellings. Each number shall be a
minimum of 4 inches in height.
2. Nonresidential buildings. Each number shall be a minimum of 6
inches in height. Individual units within multi-unit structures shall have
numbers not less than four inches in height.
3. Standards. Numbers and letter shall be plain, and in an easily readable
style. Script or cursive characters shall not be used. Numbers and lettering
shall contrast with the background upon which they are mounted. Address
numbering shall be posted where they are clearly visible from the street or
streets where the structure is located. Structures located on more than on
street (e.g., through lots or corner lots) shall post their street numbers on
each street frontage.
4. Waterfront structures. All waterfront structures, including gulf, bay
and canal fronting structures, shall post their addresses on their waterfront
sides in addition to posting their addresses on their street frontages. Water-
front addresses shall be in accordance with the standards established herein,
but shall also include the name of the street upon which the property is
located.
If you have questions about these guidelines, please, call Anna Maria
City Hall at 941-708-6130, ext. 29.
Chapter 74, Article XII, Sec. 74-333. Manner of affixing numbers.





THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 E 9

HB restaurant parking restrictions pass 1st reading


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
The first reading of an ordinance amending the
Holmes Beach land development code to increase the
ratio of parking spaces based on indoor seating capacity
for any future restaurants, bars and places of assembly
passed Aug. 13 4-0.
Commissioner David Zaccagnino was absent with
excuse.
If the second, final reading passes, the amendment
will change parking restrictions from one parking space
for every five indoor seats to one space per every three
seats for new restaurants and bars. Existing establish-
ments will be exempt from the new restrictions.
Passage returns the land development code language
to what it read before a 2010 change when a former city
commission voted to relax the requirements in an effort
to make the city more business friendly.
The city planning commission unanimously recom-
mended approval of the amendment May 30, but also
added a sunset provision eliminating an exemption after
a business is sold, meaning a new owner would have to
comply with new parking restrictions.
Commissioners rejected that notion at the Aug. 13
vote, reiterating that the amendment was meant to address
new businesses only.
"In reading Sue Normand's recommendation for the
sunset provision, I don't want to hurt a restaurant that is
already able to have the decreased parking requirements
and wants to sell," said Commissioner Judy Titsworth.
"A new buyer wouldn't have the same number of parking
spaces, which is why we didn't want to include a sunset
clause when we discussed this."
Based on the recommendation, Titsworth suggested
that if a restaurant was vacant for a set period, possibly
180 days, then perhaps the city could consider requiring
a new owner to come into compliance.
City attorney Patricia Petruff said there are too many
complications with that u h'P'.liiOn and that the land
development code defines nonconformity issues, such
as if a restaurant is foreclosed on and the property is not
sufficiently marketed as a restaurant, then its defined use
would change.
Petruff said an abandonment provision could then
apply, but also suggested that city staff establish a data-
base of restaurant locations.
"When this is adopted, someone needs to be sent
where the restaurants are, count all of their parking and
figure out their level of nonconformity," she said. "We
need a complete understanding of what we have at the
point in time when we change the rules."
Petruff said it will be easier to enforce if a restaurant
owner becomes creative with additional seating.
Commissioners initially hesitated on passing the first
reading because building inspector David Green wanted


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to address the commission regarding enforcement issues,
but was not available.
However, they moved forward with the passage of
the first reading, saying discussion can take place at the
final reading and public hearing, which is expected at the
Aug. 27 city commission meeting, at Holmes Beach City
Hall, 5801 Marina Drive.

Resort housing parking
Another area needing a database of information is
resort housing parking, or short-term rentals.
Petruff said no action from commissioners was
needed at this time, but cautioned that the issue is in the
pipeline.
"As the city begins inspections on resort compli-
ance for parking, the issue is about what is retroactive,"
said Petruff. "When we passed that law in 2007, at that
moment in time, a certain number of our resort housing
units became legal nonconforming."
Petruff said she suspects that resort housing in the
Residential-4 district in the southern part of the city is
going to be a problem as inspections begin.
"While I applaud the inspections, we need to under-
stand that for any given resort unit, the city has to do
research of when it became a resort housing unit and
what parking requirements were in place at the time,"
she said. "So if I have two spaces for three bedrooms and
have continuously been resort housing since 2007, then
I do not have to come up with other parking spaces and
extra landscaping."
Petruff said if a single-family homeowner decides
that resort housing is the way to go for their property, then


they will have to comply with the one-parking-space-per-
bedroom rule when they apply for a business tax receipt
from the city a required step in the process.
She said a database is needed and the city doesn't
have adequate enforcement power without a proper
record to draw from, because "If the city made a mistake
in issuing permits in the past, we need to figure out how
to deal with those and put them in our database."
Any unit that has been conducting resort business
after 2007 must come into compliance, but the city
acknowledges that permits may have been incorrectly
issued in the past and will review them on a case-by-case
basis.
"If someone has to add one parking space, I think
they can do that," said Petruff. "The city is going to have
to use its regulatory power appropriately and wisely."
Petruff said everyone should come into compliance,
"but if that's impossible, then building official Tom
O'Brien needs to come and explain what their unique
situation is with respect to how that property got into
that situation."
Petruff said the city should start the database using
the 2007 cutoff date as the benchmark and progress from
there.
O'Brien said he is currently drafting the procedure,
but it does not address all of the issues.
"We aren't doing any renewal inspections right now,"
he said. "That's what we are trying to implement. It will
be up to the owner to have their inspection done and
have all of their documents prepared before they renew
the business tax receipt."
No action was taken at the Aug. 13 meeting.

Campers
take bows at
playhouse
Summer drama
camp students at
the Anna Maria
Island Community
Center perform
in late July at the
Island Players
theater in Anna
Maria. Camp
r director was
Pamela Sikkema
- and stage man-
ager was Emily
Burns. Islander
Photos: Courtesy
Karen Riley-Love


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10 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER


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AMI Women's Giving Circle liaison Carol Carter
presents Cassandra Holmes, development director of
Manatee Community Foundation, her group's original
initiative. Islander Courtesy Photo


Happy
'bark, bark'
Doc Walker, a
retired veterinar-
ian residing in
Holmes Beach,
celebrates his
94th birthday
with a doggie,
friends and family
party at home.
Islander Photo:
Nancy (daughter)
Ambrose


00000o.0


Making plans...
Getting ready for the 2013-14 season? The Islander encour-
ages publicists for local groups and events to send 2013-14 calen-
dars to calendar@islander.org.

Wednesday, Aug. 21
6 p.m. Mana-Tweens craft session, Island Library, 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-6341.
8:03 p.m. Official sunset time.

Thursday, Aug. 22
8:02 p.m. Official sunset time.

Friday, Aug. 23
2 p.m. -Alzheimer'sABC Course, Island Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-6341.
8:01 p.m. Official sunset time.

Saturday, Aug. 24
3:30 p.m. -A meet-and-greet and book-signing with Florida
author Tim Dorsey, Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 941-778-6341.
8:30 a.m. Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island breakfast and
meeting, Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe, Manatee Public Beach,
4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-1383.
8 p.m. Official sunset time.

Sunday, Aug. 25
10 a.m. Music concert with Sunday sermon at Roser Memo-
rial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Information:
941-778-0414.
7:30 p.m. Island Players auditions, "An Act of the Imagina-
tion," 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Information: 941-778-6878.
7:59 p.m. Official sunset time.


Monday, Aug. 26


Charitable giving matters to many people, and par-
ticularly to a group of women on Anna Maria Island.
Giving Matters, a program sponsored by the South-
west Florida Chapter Association of Fundraising Profes-
sionals and its annual Gems of Philanthropy luncheon,


which was co-sponsored in April by the Community
Foundation of Sarasota County, inspired Carol Carter to
start a giving circle.
Carter recruited 17 women to join her as charter
members of the Anna Maria Island Women's Giving
Circle.
The group is a donor-advised fund under the Manatee
Community Foundation umbrella. MCF, in partnership
with the Community Foundation of Sarasota County, will
collect, invest and manage the circle members' pooled
philanthropic gifts and make grants on their behalf.
Carter says the circle's mission is to "focus our
resources to make life better for people and to support
causes in the communities on and near Anna Maria
Island."
The group will make limited grants to nonprofit
organizations of their choosing. Circle members plan to
identify organizations among their personal interests and
study grant-giving opportunities.
"This is an exciting and innovative way for a group
of dedicated Island women to come together for good
and to make a difference in the quality of life in our com-
munity," says Carter.
Local women interested in learning more about the
philosophy and requirements for membership in the AMI
Women's Giving Circle can call Carter at 941-770-9553
or email cacarter416@aol.com.

Island cancer survivor to
advocate in D.C.
DATE???
Cancer survivor Nancy Ambrose plans to again travel
to Washington, D.C., to advocate for cancer issues and
palliative care on behalf of the American Cancer Society
Cancer Action Network.
To further her goal and capture the attention of law-
makers, Ambrose is seeking sponsors for a banner display
and luminaria, that will be lit at a night-time event.
She has bags available at Creations by L, 5500
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, which can be purchased
and decorated, emphasizing she can do the decorating for
donors or they can add their own message to the bags.
She can be reached at 941-799-2181.

7:58 p.m. Official sunset time.

Tuesday, Aug. 27
Noon Rotary Club ofAnna Maria Island meets, BeachHouse
Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach. Information: 941-
794-8044.
7:56 p.m. Official sunset time.

Wednesday, Aug. 28
7:55 p.m. Official sunset time.

Off-island
Saturday, Aug. 24
5 p.m. O'Connor Bowling Challenge to benefit the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, AMF Lanes, 4208 Cortez Road,
Bradenton. Fee applies. Information: 941-778-1908, ext. 9200.

Ongoing
Through Aug. 31, Bradenton Marauders regular season base-
ball, McKechnie Field, 1611 Ninth St. W., Bradenton. Fee applies.
Information: 941-747-3031.
Wednesday and Saturdays, 9 a.m., horseshoes pitched,
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Information:
941-708-6130.
First Wednesdays and third Wednesdays, Mana-Tween Book
and Culture Club, Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Information: 941-748-5555, ext. 6318.
Second Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Think+Drink science night,
South Florida Museum, 201 10th St. W., Bradenton. Information:
941-746-4131.
Fourth Wednesdays, 7 p.m., star talk, South Florida Museum,
201 10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-4131.
First and third Thursdays, 2 p.m., knitting group meets, Island
Library, 5701 Marina Drive. Information: 941-778-6341.
Most Fridays, Senior Adventures, low-cost field trips from
Annie Silver Community Center, 103 23rd St. N., Bradenton Beach.
Fee may apply. Information: 941-962-8835.
Friday, 5:30-8:30 p.m., sunset drum circle, Anna Maria
Island Beach Cafe, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information:
778-0784.
Saturday, 4 p.m., family night, South Florida Museum, 201


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THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 11


Young vio insist to perform for Roser congregation


Roser Memorial Community Church will host a
violin concert at its morning service at 10 a.m. Sunday,
Aug. 25.
Joy Chatzistamatis, 16, who began violin lessons at
age 3, will perform for the congregation.
According to a release from Bev Shepperson of Roser
Church, Joy is a two-time winner in 2011 and 2013 of the
Sarasota Orchestra Edward and Ida Wilkof Young Art-
ists Concerto Competition, and the 2011 winner of the
Anna Maria Island Concert Chorus & Orchestra Young

Young violinist
Joy (Ch,,.- -
tamitis will
perform Aug.
25 during
the Sunday
service at
Roser Memo-
rial Commu-
nity Church,
Anna Maria.
Islander Cour-
tesy Photo






Butterfly brick order
in final stages
Anyone planning to order an engraved brick for the
Anna Maria Island Butterfly Park adjacent to Holmes
Beach City Hall needs to organize and submit an order.
Nancy Ambrose, park organizer, says it has taken
almost two and a half years to accumulate a minimum
number of brick orders, and she plans to place the engrav-
ing order Sept. 2.
A single two-line brick is $50, and a three-line brick
is $60.
To order a brick for placement on the path at the
park, contact Ambrose at 941-799-2181 or email nancy.
ambrose @ outlook.com.

Roser to host back-
to-school party
Calling all kids!
Roser Memorial Community Church is inviting
children ages 3 to fifth-grade to celebrate being back in
school with treats, games and prizes 6-8 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 24.
The church is promoting the "after-dinner" event as
a fun party, suggesting everyone bring "spare change"
for a giving food pantry game.
More information can be found on the church's Face-
book page, or by calling the office at 941-778-0419 or
email info@roserchurch.com.
Roser Memorial Community Church is at 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria.


10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-4131.
*Third Saturdays, 11 a.m., stress management through breath-
ing, Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive. Information: 941-778-6341.
Weekends, through Oct. 20, ranger-led kayak tours, De Soto
National Memorial, 8300 De Soto Memorial Highway, Bradenton.
Information: 941-792-0458, ext. 105.
Monday, 12:45 p.m., bridge games, Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Doors open at 12:15
p.m. Information: 941-778-0414.
First Mondays, 7 p.m., Florida Institute for Saltwater Heritage
board meets, Fishermen's Hall, 4515 123rd St. W, Cortez. Informa-
tion: 941-254-4972.
Tuesday, noon, Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island meets,
BeachHouse Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach. Infor-
mation: 941-794-8044.

Coming up
Aug. 31, FitFest at Coquina Beach.
Aug. 31-Sept. 1, Sarasota Sailing Squadron 67th Annual
Labor Day Regatta.


Artists Solo Competition. This is her seventh year with
the Sarasota Youth Orchestra, where she is concertmaster
of the youth philharmonic.
For the three summers, Joy has attended the Flaine
International Music Academy in France, while this year,
she attended the summer Masterworks Festival in Winona
Lake, Ind.
She is a frequent soloist at her church, Fellowship
Baptist Church of Bradenton, where older brother David
Chatzistamatis is the church's volunteer pianist. Joy is an
11lth-grade home-school student with plans to major in
college in music performance.
David will set the tone for the Roser service, per-
forming Debussy's piano piece, "Clair de Lune." Also
during the service, Joy and David will perform a duet,
"The Prayer," and, following the sermon, Joy will per-
form "The Way of the Cross," accompanied by David.
The siblings' mom, Tammy, said David and Joy per-
form often together in church.
"Joy is fortunate to have a live-in accompanist.
Although David doesn't get the exposure that Joy does,
I'm sure everyone will enjoy his playing. He plays with
passion and sensitivity and I'm so fortunate to hear them
practice every day," Tammy Chatzistamatis said.
The community is welcome, including families and
children. Children will be invited to a special program
after a children's message at the service. A nursery also
is available.
Roser is at 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
For more information, call the church office at 941-
778-0414, email info@roserchurch.com, visit online at
www.roserchurch.com or on Facebook at www.facebook/
roserchurch.

Auditions set for 1st-of-
season Island Players play
The first Island Players production of the 2013-14
season will be "An Act of the Imagination."
The auditions will be at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25,
at the theater, 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
Gareth Gibbs is directing the play, set to open Oct.
10 and continue through Oct. 20.
For more information, go to theislandplayer.org.

Manatee Players
present one-acts
The Manatee Performing Arts Center, 502 Third Ave.
W., Bradenton, will host two evenings of one-act plays.
Performances will take place at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug.
23, and Saturday, Aug. 24.
The director is Russ Carthy, who has performed with
the Island Players.
The cast includes Caroline Cox, Dan Coppinger,
Alice Cotman, Amy Dop, Jay Poppe, Bob Weintraub,
Laura Morales, Philip Croome, Miriam Ring, Jo Kendall,
Fatima Paula and Juliana Ortiz. Some of the actors also
have appeared on the Island Players stage.
Dessert and coffee will be served at intermission.
Tickets are $15 and available from the box office at
941-748-5875.


*Aug. 31-Sept. 2, 28th annual NKE Rich Salick Pro/AM Surf
Festival, Cocoa Beach, to benefit the National Kidney Foundation.
Sept. 2 is Labor Day.
Sept. 23, Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce Golf
Tournament.

Save the date
Oct. 18-19, Bayfest.
Nov. 2, Feeding Children Everywhere.
Nov. 8-10, ArtsHop.
Dec. 6, Holmes Beach Downtown Holiday Open House.
Dec. 7, Anna Maria Island Privateers Christmas Parade.
Dec. 14-15, WinterfestArts & Crafts Festival.

Calendar announcements
Send calendar announcements to calendar@islander.org.
Please include the time, date and location of the event, a brief
description and a contact via email and phone. The deadline for
submissions is the Wednesday a week before publication. High-
resolution photographs welcome.


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12 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Save the date: Labor Day weekend 'must do' events


Sail regatta
The Sarasota Sailing Squadron will host its 67th
annual Labor Day Regatta race and celebration Aug.
31-Sept. 1 at the squadron facility on City Island, at the
southern tip of Longboat Key across New Pass.
It is a signature event for the SSS, drawing hundreds
of competitive sailors from across the United States and
Canada, according to a news release.
"This event is well-known for the hospitality pro-
vided by the SSS, the camaraderie among sailors and
reminds us all that Sarasota Bay is our most unique
and valued community asset," stated event chair Donna
Hillmyer.
Friday's schedule includes a check-in and a fun race,
while Saturday kicks off with an opening ceremony and
races, followed by a dinner party.
This year more than 300 competitors are expected to
participate sailors ages 8 to 80, in all classes of sailing
vessels.
For 10 days before the weekend festivities, youth
groups are collecting non-perishable food for All Faiths
Food Bank in Sarasota County. The winners of a food-
drive contest will be announced at the opening ceremony
for the event, where they will receive a $200 gift certifi-
cate from Annapolis Performance Sailing store.
Donors can bring food items before 2 p.m. Satur-
day.
Following the 11 a.m. opening ceremony Saturday
will be the first race, followed by a barbecue dinner and


a T-shirt contest for sailors including farthest travel
to the regatta and most unique use of regatta shirts.
Event activities include racing on five courses, live
music and an awards ceremony at 4:30 p.m. Sunday.
Race participants can register at www.sarsotasailing-
squadron.org or at the club, 1717 Ken Thompson Pkwy.,
Sarasota.
For more information, call SSS, a nonprofit founded
in the 1930s by young adults who couldn't afford the
higher dues of yacht clubs, at 941-388-2355 or email
sss@ sarasotasailingsquadron.org.

Florida Fit Fest
Florida FitFest's treasure run and fitness competition
will take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at Coquina
Beach, 2650 Gulf Drive S., Bradenton Beach.
The events include a walk run or crawl" to the
finish on a 5K course.
The fitness competition will start at 10 a.m. and
include a tire roll and tug of war in different divisions.
The event will raise money for the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Manatee County. Registration is $35.
For more information, call Mark Ibasfalean at 941-
920-4371 or go online to www.floridafitfest.com.

East coast surfing benefit
The 28th annual NKF Rich Salick Pro/Am Surf
Festival will return to Cocoa Beach for the Labor Day
weekend.


The festival, in memory of Anna Maria Island surfer
Rich Salick, will take place Aug. 31-Sept. 2 on the Atlan-
tic coast.
The competition will begin Aug. 31 at the Cocoa
Beach Pier and continue through the weekend, with finals
on Labor Day. Surfers will compete in teams, female and
male age groups and pro divisions.
The event was co-founded by twins Rich and Phil
Salick, who grew up on Anna Maria Island, learning to
surf in the Gulf of Mexico waves. Their sister Joanie
Mills resides in Holmes Beach with her family.
In 1974, Phil Salick donated a kidney to save his
brother's life and, after making some innovations to pro-
tect his transplanted kidney, Rich surfed again.
Phil and Rich also continued to build festival and
promote the National Kidney Foundation of Florida, even
as Rich battled illness he underwent a second transplant
surgery with older brother Channing as the donor and a
third transplant from younger brother Wilson.
Rich Salick died last summer at the age of 62, after
40 years of riding waves and battling odds.
The event he co-founded has raised more than $5
million for kidney foundation programs since 1985.
Festival sponsors include Ron Jon Surf Shop, the
Cocoa Beach Pier, Hilton, Pepsi, Salick Surfboards and
others.
A number of Anna Maria Island businesses are donat-
ing prizes to be awarded at a gala auction event.
For more information, go online to www.nkfsurf.com
or call 321-784-5661.


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Cleanup to open up post-Labor Day
The Roser Guild Thrift Shop in Anna Maria is closed this month, but volunteers
Mary Lechleidner, left, Trudy Horigan, Darlene Headd and Daryl VanOstenbridge
are busy cleaning. Volunteers also are receiving clothing, books and other donation
items on Wednesdays getting ready to re-open Tuesday, Sept. 3. The store, across
from Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., is open varied hours for
shopping Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Islander Photo: Peggy Nash


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THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 13


top notch


PHOTOGENIC PETS

AND PALS
The Islander concludes its annual Top Notch contest
with awards for pet photography. Pet winners can claim
an Islander "More Than a Mullet Wrapper" T-shirt at
newspaper, 5604 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


Natasha Joffer of west Bradenton wins for her capture
of the longing eyes of a boy and his dog.


John M. Lafferty of Holmes Beach was a Top Notch
weekly prize winner with this underwater shot of
Aces diving for a football. He received front-page
placement and an Islander T-shirt.


OPEN Mon.-Fri. 73oam-7pm
Sat., Sun., Holidays 730am-5pm
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10009 Gulf Drive & Pine Avenue, Anna Maria


ABOVE: Natasha Joffer also earns recognition for her
nicely lighted photograph of Ruca and Michael Stull.

LEFT: Rochelle Bowers wins for her photograph,
which she titled "Sailor Scooby Bowers." She
says the pup likes to go kayaking with pop Mark
Bowers.


U


V4. 1I


ACCOMMODATIONS
Tortuga Inn Beach &
Tradewinds Resorts
90 well-appointed rooms, apts., suites
with kitchens, wi-fi, pools, beach, more!
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941-778-6611
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Haley's Motel
An Island jewel with 1950s charm and
21st century amenities. Perfect for all
weddings and reunions.
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DIRECTLY ON THE BEACH!
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800-779-3601
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BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Acqua Aveda Salon Spa Store
Hair, nails, makeup, skin and massage
for the bride and the entire bridal party.
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941-778-5400
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Jack Elka PhotoGraphics
The finest wedding photography, since
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MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT
Chuck Caudill Entertainment
Beach weddings and events. DJ service,
live guitar and more from an
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CATERING
Banana Cabana
Caribbean Grill & Restaurant
We'll cater your affair with
Caribbean flair! 941-779-1930
www.bananacabanaseafood.com
JEWELRY
Bridge Street Jewelers
The Island's full-service jewelry store.
129 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
941-896-7800


BRIDAL ATTIRE
The Beach Shop
11904 Cortez Rd W.
Pretty white dresses for a
casual Island wedding.
Dresses for moms, too!
Open daily.
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Now offering catering
and banquet facilities
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14 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER


Attempted burglary at city pier nets felony charge


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
A 23-year-old Bradenton man was arrested Aug. 11
after attempting to enter the freezer at the Anna Maria
City Pier, 100 S. Bay Blvd.
According to the probable cause
affidavit, John Sprameli was observed
by a witness trying to enter the freezer.
The freezer alarm was activated and
Sprameli fled the scene with two other
males.
Sprameli The witness followed the men to
the parking lot and watched them get
into their vehicle and drive away, as a Manatee County


Streetlife

Island police blotter
Anna Maria
Aug. 3, 500 block of Alamanda Road, suspicious
incident. A Manatee County Sheriff's Office deputy
observed a vehicle driving slowing through the neigh-
borhood and stopping in front of rental units. The deputy
made contact with the driver, who said he was looking for
a friend's house on Longboat Key. After being informed,
he was in Anna Maria and unable to provide an address
for his friend, the man said he was going to drive back to
the interstate. The deputy ran his name for warrants and,
finding none, allowed the man to leave.
Aug. 3, 100 block of Magnolia Avenue, suspicious
incident. An MCSO deputy was on foot patrol when he
saw a large sailboat on the beach. He ran the VIN number
for ownership, which came back to a man in Neptune
Beach, but the craft had not been registered in two years.
The deputy reported that if the proper owner could not
be located, he would have the boat towed.
Aug. 5, 5800 block of Marina Drive, suspicious
incident. An MCSO deputy observed a suspicious vehicle
towing a trailer and continued to follow. When the trailer
began swaying in and out of the lane, the deputy initiated
a traffic stop. The driver was working on the island. He
was cited for failure to maintain equipment due to low
tread on the trailer tires.
Aug. 7, 300 block of North Bay Boulevard, assist.
While on routine patrol, an MCSO deputy was flagged
down by a woman who said her grandson was stung by
a stingray. EMS was contacted and treated the child.
Anna Maria is policed by the MCSO.
Bradenton Beach
No new reports.
Bradenton Beach is policed by the BBPD.
Cortez
Aug. 9, 4300 block of 127th Street West, petit theft.
A woman reported she let a friend borrow her bicycle to
ride to a local store. When her friend exited the store, the
bicycle was gone. The pair drove around and spotted a
man on what appeared to be her bike, but he claimed he
purchased the bike at a Bradenton pawnshop and refused


Ak


II
CHRIST CHURCH
OF LONGBOAT KEY
PRESBYTERIAN (U.S.A.)


1 0 l fo v 3 .8 Swwo r u of


Sheriff's Office deputy was arriving at the scene.
The witness pointed out the suspect's vehicle, at
which time the deputy called the Holmes Beach Police
Department for assistance. An HBPD patrol officer initi-
ated a traffic stop and detained the suspect for witness
identification.
Sprameli was identified and he was taken into cus-
tody and charged with felony burglary.
He was transported to the Manatee County jail and
held on $1,500 bond. According to jail records, Sprameli
posted bond and was released from custody.
He is scheduled to be arraigned at 9 a.m. Friday, Aug.
29, at the Manatee County Judicial Center, 1051 Manatee
Ave. W., Bradenton.

to relinquish it. A description of the suspect and photos
of the bike were turned over.
Cortez is policed by the MCSO
Holmes Beach
Aug. 7, 3200 block of East Bay Boulevard, leav-
ing the scene of an accident with damage. A 23-year-old
Bradenton man was arrested after running into a parked
vehicle in the 7700 block of Palm Drive causing more
than $500 in damages. The suspect fled the scene and was
arrested at the listed address, at which time he was also
charged with driving without a valid driver's license.
July 29, 7500 block of Gulf Drive, burglary.
Unknown persons broke into a construction trailer and
stole tools valued at $975.
July 29,8300 block of Marina Drive, criminal mis-
chief. Unknown persons broke into a construction trailer,
but nothing was reported missing.
July 29, 2900 block of Avenue E, burglary. While
moving from one house to another, a complainant reported
someone entered her unlocked residence and stole three
satellite TV systems valued at $300.
July 30, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee Public Beach,
theft. A complainant reported that someone stole her
wallet out of her bag while at the beach. She told police
she did not notice it was missing until she got home. The
wallet contained $60.
July 31, 3700 block of Gulf Drive, criminal mis-
chief. A complainant reported that someone vandalized
a rented scooter. The seat was lifted up and wires were
torn out. Damages were estimated at $50.
Aug. 1, 100 block of 49th Street, vehicle burglary.
Someone entered the complainant's unlocked vehicle and
stole a GPS unit valued at $200 and the vehicle's keys.
Aug. 1, 100 block of 51st Street, vehicle burglary.
Someone entered an unlocked vehicle and stole a purse
containing various gift cards.
Aug. 3, 3200 E. Bay Drive, Walgreens, theft. A
customer witnessed someone stealing several boxes of
liquor and followed two suspects in their vehicle off the
island. The witness provided tag numbers and broke off
contact before the suspects crossed the Skyway Bridge.
An ensuing investigation revealed that one dark-skinned
male distracted the store clerk with conversation while
a second dark-skinned male made off with the liquor.




Serving Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key and West Bradenton




St ee/lawae irpot 7I


Jack A. Bishop Jr.
Jack A. Bishop Jr. of Bradenton, formerly of Anna
Maria Island, died Aug. 1. He was born in California Jan.
18, 1929.
Mr. Bishop was a veteran of the Korean War. He
graduated Union College in California with a degree in
mining and engineering. He worked for many years for
Aranco in its New York City office and later for Midland
Glass Co. in Clifford, N.J., as an auditor for the engineer-
ing department. He retired to Barnega Light, N.J., and
later to Anna Maria Island.
He volunteered for the Island Players of Anna Maria
and at Freedom Village of Bradenton.
A family service is planned for a later date in South
Amboy, N.J. Memorial donations may be made to South-
eastern Guide Dogs, 4210 77th St. E., Palmetto FL34221,
or Freedom Village Scholarship Fund, 6501 17th Ave. W.,
Bradenton FL 34209.
Mr. Bishop is survived by his son, Bruce; former wife
Joan; cousins Charlotte Horne, Joan Moore and Shirley
Johnson, all of California; and friend Joe Vona of Bra-
denton.

Fredrick Zimmerman
Fredrick Zimmerman, 78, of Holmes Beach, died
Aug. 11. He was born in Elizabeth, N.J.
Mr. Zimmerman was an Anna
Maria Island resident for 29 years,
where he and his wife owned the Drift-
wood Motel on Gulf Drive in Holmes
Beach.
S' _" Mr. Zimmerman served in the U.S.
Zimmerman Air Force and was a retired mechani-
cal engineer. He enjoyed spending time
and caring for his family. He was an avid sports enthusiast
and enjoyed coaching his girls in soccer, playing golf and
traveling, and spending time with his dog, Annie.
Services will be private. Memorial donations may be
made to the city of Holmes Beach dog park, 5801 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217. Arrangements were by
All Veterans-All Families Funerals & Cremations., Sara-
sota.
Mr. Zimmerman is survived by his loving wife of 55
years, Karen; daughters Debi and husband William Rose
Chaffee, Nikki and husband William Rivellini, Donna
and husband Tony Elmore, and Suzi and husband Rick
Connor; brother Gene; eight grandchildren and one great-
grandchild.
Obituaries are provided as a free service in The
Islander newspaper to residents and family of resi-
dents, both past and present, and to those people with
ties to Anna Maria Island.

According to the report, it may not be the first time the
pair targeted the store. Police have suspects in the case
and are continuing the investigation.
Holmes Beach is policed by the HBPD.
Streetlife is based on incident reports and narratives
from the Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach police
departments and Manatee County S', ,itff's Office.


HOLMES BEACH

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
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Electrical Systems Tune-UpsBrakes & MoreA


Flat-rate pick up on Anna Maria Island *
or Longboat Key to/from any location, from $15 5333 Gulf Drive
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islandsedan@gmail.com Gulf & Marina Drives
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Sunday Service 10:00 AM

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Visitors & Residents Welcome


oser Community Church 'ak to o ,hul CD ibratioa
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THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 15


AM seeks compliance on

street numbering
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Tape measure? Check. Address numbers? Check.
Anna Maria residents and business owners better
make sure they have a proper address sign posted on their
structure by Sept. 30. Otherwise, they could be facing a
code citation and potentially an appearance before the
city's special magistrate.
The city has mailed notices requiring that house num-
bers be "affixed and visible" from the street, and is giving
residents until Sept. 30 to comply.
After that date, code enforcement officers will be
issuing citations, a news release from the city said.
The release said finding an address in an emergency
is important, particularly at night.
"If numbers are unreadable, hidden, unlighted or have
missing numbers, it may delay emergency responders
from getting to you as quickly as possible," the release
said.
City code requires that residential one- and two-fam-
ily dwellings, as well as individual units in multi-unit
structures, have address numbers that are a minimum of
4 inches tall.
Non-residential buildings must have an address
number a minimum of 6 inches tall.
Numbers and letters must be plain and in an "easily
readable style," continued the release. Script and cursive
characters are not permitted.
Structures located on more than one street, such as a
corner lot, are required to post street numbers "on each
street frontage."
Waterfront lots must post addresses on both the
waterfront side and street frontages.
Mayor SueLynn said, "If someone has an emergency,
we have to be sure fire our medical units can find their
address quickly and easily."
SueLynn discussed the problem with code enforce-
ment officer Gerry Rathvon and building official Bob
Welch, also a code enforcement officer, before sending
out the notices.
Most structures in the city comply with the code,
the mayor said, but she suggested residents and business
owners check to see if an address is properly posted and
visible from the street.
For more information, call Anna Maria City Hall at
941-708-6130, ext. 29.

S II I I


I I l i :Il, Il

5412 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach 941.778.2253



SIsland
PEST and TERMITE
CONTROL INC.
.


HB chief warns: 'zero

tolerance' in school zone
By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Police Chief Bill Tokajer said that
with Anna Maria Elementary School students back in
classrooms, speeding through the school zone at 4700
Gulf Drive will net "zero tolerance."
Tokajer also announced the department is participat-
ing in an ongoing statewide Labor Day Impaired Driving
Crackdown, which will last through Labor Day.
Patrol officers will be mindful of possible drivers
under the influence, seatbelt enforcement, child safety
equipment and speeding.
Tokajer also is reminding visitors and residents that
no alcohol, bicycles, golf carts or pets are allowed on the
beaches.
His safety tip for the month focuses on parking rules
in Holmes Beach, including parking where prohibited by
sign, parking on sidewalks, crosswalks, bicycle paths,
within 30 feet of a stop sign and within 30 feet of an inter-
section with a traffic light, stop sign or flashing signal.
Parking is prohibited within 15 feet of a fire hydrant
and 20 feet of a crosswalk.
Tokajer reported to the city commission that 140
parking tickets were issued in July.
There also were 13 arrests in July, including an aggra-
vated battery, a DUI and a theft, as well as a juvenile who
was arrested for narcotics.
Officers also arrested two people on outstanding war-
rants.
The police department received 979 calls on its non-
emergency line. The calls requiring a responding officer
were reported to be 334, including 81 emergency 911
calls.


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Holmes Beach Police Department Sgt. Mike Pilato,
left, record clerk T-Rex Ogle and patrol officer Brian
Copeman, behind the sign on Marina Drive, check
settings on an electronic traffic aid that alerts drivers
on the road of their speed. A sign displays the speed
limit. Pilato said the device would be deployed at Anna
Maria Elementary School at 4700 Gulf Drive during
the first week of school. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy



We are accepting new clients for our
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16 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Back to school: Why choose AME? Why not!
The halls of Anna Maria Elementary were filled Manatee County can claim a waterfront setting. "You
with students, parents and staff Thursday night for Back can see water from the window in the classroom," said
to School Night. New students and returning students Quinby.
hustled through the hall ways looking for this year's
classroom. Among the many bright and shiny faces is .
kindergartner Caden Quinby.
Caden lives with his family in west Bradenton. His
district school is Miller Elementary, but his parents chose :
to send him to Anna Maria Elementary. "They're a grade '
A school, and a small community school," Susan Quinby,
Caden's mother said. "It was kind of a last-minute deci- -
sion. We thought, do want the convenience over the
grade. Ultimately we decided to go to a better school."
Boasting high student test grades and an "A" school .o-.-
district grade wasn't the only attractive feature to the ......'.;v.
Quinbys. Susan Quinby attended a small community ... .-
school in her hometown, just outside of Gainesville, Caden Quinby, 5, discovers his kindergarten play-
Fla. Anna Maria Elementary averages between 250-300 ground at the Aug. 15 AME-PTO Back-to-School event.
students and is one of the only small schools left in Mana- Islander Photos: Jennifer Glenfield
tee County. "I'm sure that influenced our decision," she -
said. a


Caden landed in Melanie Moran's class, one of the
two kindergarten teachers. Caden and his family found
his new classroom, met his new teacher and set out to
explore the grounds. The playground was of particular
interest to Caden and younger sister.
Beyond the allure of an "A" school and a small,
involved community is the location. No other school in


Anna Maria Elementary School administrative staff
greet parents at the Aug. 15 back-to-school event,
where families were able to purchase school sup-
plies from the Parent Teacher Organization, find their
classrooms for the 2013-14 school year and meet their
teachers.


Center pairs program to AME
The Anna Maria Island Community Center didn't
miss the opportunity to spread the word about its after-
school program at Thursday night's Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School back-to-school event.
Center staff handed out fliers in the cafeteria along-
side AME Parent Teacher Organization members holding
a school supply sale.
The center's program, TLC Before School and After
School Care, is a Florida Department of Children and
Family Services-licensed program, enrolling students
in kindergarten through fifth-grade. TLC Before School
Care provides homework time, games and activities in the
school cafeteria. Enrolled TLC students can be dropped off
at school 6:45-8 a.m. The cost is $10 per week.
TLC After School Care begins when school is let out,
and runs until 6 p.m. Students are bused from the AME
to the center at 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. The
program offers homework time, group games, crafts,
hands-on learning with science and math, sports, tutoring,
Life Skills Junior Achievement and a reading program.


Student and parents explore inside and outdoors on the
grounds of Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf
Drive, during the Aug. 15 Back-to-School Night event
that allows students and families to become familiar
with the school following summer break.

After school care costs $15 per day per student.
The center offers a teen program for middle and high
school students, where they can get help with homework
or research projects in the computer center, play video
games, pingpong, air hockey and football and watch
movies. Group trips are included in the program, includ-
ing one in September to Universal Studios and in October
to Busch Gardens' "Howl-O-Scream." The teen program
is free, but there are charges associated with outings and
trips.
The center offers discounts for prepaying for After
School Care by the week or month. Center staff says no
child is ever turned away from center programs due to the
family's inability to pay and scholarships are available.
For more information, call the center at 941-778-
1908, or stop by 407 Magnolia Ave.


1ME1


Harry's Restaurant & Deli will be on vacation
starting August 19th and will reopen Thursday, October 3rd
Harry's Corner Store will remain open
and Catering Staff is available
i h to plan your Fall & Holiday Parties
O KE(941) 383-0777


Downstairs at the Bridge Street Bistro on the roundabout!
111 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach 941-782-1122
ICW marker 49 www.islandtimebarandgrill.com


l: T-[ i. ].l l Tm .1ll!.[= 'M rMi.





THE ISLANDER AUG. 21, 2013 E 17




AfiME



H. m/,nes Beach Police Chief
Bt/i Tokajer greets the first bus-
A/ 0,,/of students arriving Aug.
Iv t. ,r the first day of class in
thi ,ew school year at Anna
.11, a Elementary School,
4 -1 1Gulf Drive, Holmes
B ,-h. Islander Photos:
hJ iifer Glenfield











Holmes Beach Police
Chief Bill Tokajer and
guidance counselor
Cindi Harrison give stu-
dents wristbands on the
first day of school. The
wristbands designate
how students will be
going home, which bus
they ride, if they walk or
are picked up by family.
Rio Rice, center, when
asked how she would go
home, said in a worried
tone, "I don't know."


Wednesday, Aug. 21
Breakfast: Egg and Cheese Bagel or Sausage and Cheese Bagel, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Mac and Cheese, Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Honey Glazed Carrots, Mini Romaine Salad,
Fresh Fruit Cup. Featured Salad: Chicken Caesar
Thursday, Aug. 22
Breakfast: Biscuit, Sausage Patty, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Nachos, Burrito, Black Beans, Lettuce and Tomato Cup, Strawberries and Bananas. Taco Salad
Friday, Aug. 23
Breakfast: Pancake on a Stick, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Pizza, Breaded Beef Sandwich, Corn, Carrots with Dip, Applesauce. Featured: Chef Salad
Monday, Aug. 26
Breakfast: French Toast Sticks, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Maxx Sticks with Marinara, McManatee Rib Patty, Steamed Green Beans, Baked Fries,
Mixed Fruit. Featured: Chef Salad
Tuesday, Aug. 27
Breakfast: Burrito, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Popcorn Chicken, Turkey Gravy, Garlic Dinner Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Honey Glazed Carrots,
Strawberry Cup. Featured: Vegetable Garden Salad
Wednesday, Aug. 28
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs, Sausage Patty, Toast, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Calzone, Refried Beans, Lettuce and Tomato Cup, Peaches. Salad: Popcorn Chicken Caesar
Juice and milk are served with every meal

G F ",ea a A -P .


. ..".
^g^KKKIIII^ ,


on the Gulf Coast"
*, ^


Come Upstairs to Enjoy.. Our Summer Prix-Fixe Menu
# 3 Courses for $35 at The Haye Loft!
Items you may choose from include:
. Appetizer:
.i Caesar Salad, Sweet N' Spicy Shrimp and Snails Leslie
S' Entree:
Famous Roasted Duckling, Gamberetti e Capellini and Eggplant PR
Dessert:
Signature Apple Walnut Crumble Pie, Coconut Cream Pie and Choc


armesan

olate


i hanac Cakec
To see the full Prix-Fixe menu, got to EuphemiaHaye.com.
Please note: The Prix-Fixe special is only served upstairs in the Haye Loft and is
for our walk-in clientele, and is only available throughout the summer on
Sunday Thursdays, from 6 9 p.m.

941.383.3633
www.EuphemiaHaye.com
-- s5540 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


x


ffOu





18 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Author pitstops in familiar territory: Anna Maria Island


By Cheryl Nordby Schmidt
Islander Feature Writer
As a Tampa Tribune reporter working in the Braden-
ton bureau in the late 1980s, Tim Dorsey used to spend
free time on Anna Maria Island. He had a Sunday-morn-
ing ritual of ordering coffee and clam chowder at the Rod
& Reel Pier, while he relaxed and read the paper.
Since becoming a best-selling author, Dorsey, who
lives in Tampa and is promoting his 16th absurdly funny
crime novel, regularly visits the area with his family. And
the island, its beautiful scenery and interesting trivia,
occasionally wind up in his writing.
Dorsey will sign copies of "The Riptide Ultra-Glide"
and talk about his work 3:30-5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at
the Island Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
He'll also be at the Braden River Library, 4915 53rd Ave.
E., Bradenton, that day at 1 p.m.
"I've been to the island library (for book signing)
at least four times in the past," Dorsey said in a recent
telephone interview. It's time to come back."
His talks are pretty freewheeling. "I open with some
remarks, I have certain anecdotes that I want to tell.
People start asking questions, I'll get sidetracked and I
basically find that I run out of time."
Sometimes he discusses or reads from the book
he's promoting but sometimes "that's another thing I
lose track of. I get up and I'm just rolling with the audi-
ence."
Dorsey's appearances are well attended, said Jona-
than Sabin, information specialist for the Manatee County
Public Library System, so people might want to arrive
early for a seat.
"He could get up there and just smile and wave and
they'll be thrilled that they got to sit in a room with Tim


Save the date for Serge:
Author Tim Dorsey will sign copies of "The
Riptide Ultra-Glide," and talk about his writing at
3:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at the Island Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
He'll also be at the Braden River Branch Library,
4915 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton, the same day at 1
p.m.
For more information on Dorsey's work, go
online to www.timdorsey.com.


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Tim Dorsey lurks for a book signing.

Tim Dorsey lurks for a book signing.


Dorsey," he said. "It's a very informal situation, almost
like going to someone's house and having a chat in the
living room over coffee."
"He is the least ostentatious person you'd ever want
to meet. He is very down-to-earth. He's very funny, and
he kills people in such creative ways," Sabin added. "But
he only kills bad guys."
By "he kills people," Sabin means Dorsey's main
character, Serge A. Storms, the star of 16 novels so far.
Storms is a mentally ill serial killer who gets involved
in crime capers while crisscrossing Florida. His victims
usually more than deserve to die.
Serge made his first appearance in "Florida Roadkill"


Author Tim Dorsey
will talk and sign
copies of his new
work, The Riptide
Ultra-Glide, Aug.
25 at the Island
Library, Holmes
Beach.


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in 1999. Dorsey wrote the novel while still working at
The Tampa Tribune, and the day it went on sale was his
last day at the newspaper.
At first, Dorsey struggled with the stories he wanted
to tell. From about 1990 to 1998, "I'd probably written
the beginning of a whole bunch of novels," he said.
He didn't think he wanted to write mystery novels,
but then something clicked: "I've covered crime beats
for so much of my newspaper career, I realized I could
just use the weirdest stuff that actually happened in Flor-
ida."
It all fell into place, Dorsey said, especially once
he added in his love of traveling the back roads of the
Sunshine State.
Dorsey estimates he puts 40,000 miles a year on
his cars exploring Florida's "locales and trivia and folk-
lore."
It is all fodder for his novels. "I basically start with
places and figure out how I can flow the plot through
them. When I pick a spot, I want people to go and check
it out and enjoy it with me after the fact."
Most of the action in "The Riptide Ultra-Glide" takes
place in Southeast Florida, including Riviera Beach,
where Dorsey grew up. But Anna Maria Island has had
some mentions in prior novels.
In "Gator A-Go-Go," Dorsey's 12th novel, Agent
Mahoney, one of Storms' frequent pursuers, stays at the
Rod & Reel Resort and eats at the restaurant counter on
the pier.
Dorsey includes this historic side note: ..."from the
tiny pier, just a few swimming yards from shore, on June
28, 1973, a then-record 1,386-pound hammerhead shark
was landed. The jaws used to hang on a plaque in the bar,
but now they're at a museum up the street."
Dorsey knows this because during one of his trips
to the island he noticed that the jaws he used to see at
the Rod & Reel had disappeared. "I thought somebody
who worked there took it home, but then I was at the
(Anna Maria Island Historical) museum and I rediscov-
ered it."
After the success of "Florida Roadkill," Dorsey
quickly wrote his second novel and now releases about
one a year. His style is often compared to Florida authors
Carl Hiaasen and Dave Barry; and his fan base grew
outside the state.
"I started doing national tours on my fourth book and
there was already a built-in audience. I had never been
west of the Mississippi and I go to a bookstore in Seattle
DORSEY CONTINUES NEXT PAGE


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Teaser.
Next up in Tim
Dorsey's collec-
tion of writing
will be Tiger
_ih i1p Tango.

and there's a room full
of people," Dorsey
said. "I felt so lucky
and blessed."
He now averages
more than 100 live
scheduled events a
year.
He said, "I'm still pinching myself" at
the realization of success, "when all I wanted to do was
just drive around Florida and have fun."
When a new book comes out, as "The Riptide Ultra-
Glide" did in January, he'll do a book tour through the
state, often with two or three appearances on weekends.
Next comes the national tour, when Dorsey, unlike
some authors, opts out of a publisher-supplied driver and
fancy hotels. He likes to rent a car and stay in budget
hotels, always watching out for real people and events
that can work their way into his plots.
In "Riptide," the plot revolves around Patrick and
Barbara McDougall, recently laid-off teachers from Wis-
consin.
"It was actually a couple of years visiting Madison,
Wis., on the book tour and seeing the protests and talking
to residents at the book events that gave me the idea,"
Dorsey said.
Of course, the McDougalls cross paths with Serge,
and his whacked-out sidekick Coleman, who are trying to
develop a reality show in Florida. According to the book
cover, questions that arise include: "Are the McDougalls
safer with Serge or should they take their chances on the
mean streets? ... Can pelicans be used as murder weap-
ons?"
Once the national book tour ends, Dorsey returns
home for a smattering of appearances within driving dis-
tance of Tampa, like the one Aug. 24 at the library. He
also gets going on his next novel.
He is about "two drafts done with the next book,"
which is called "Tiger Shrimp Tango," Dorsey said, "So
if they want to talk about that, that's OK."
Cheryl Nordby Schmidt is a freelance writer based
in Holmes Beach.


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THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 19

County issues food bank challenge


Manatee County is asking the community to help
raise food and money for the Food Bank of Manatee.
A county press release said local food pantries are
"again reaching a severe shortage." The release said
Manatee County Commissioners Carol Whitmore and
Vanessa Baugh and state Rep. Jim Boyd are asking
people to step up and help.
The three were to hold a news conference at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 21, at the Food Bank of Manatee, 811
23rdAve. E., Bradenton, to issue a Grand Challenge for
each participant to raise 1,000 pounds of food, $1,000
or a combination of cash and food.
In last year's Grand Challenge, nearly 150 local
groups collected more than 21 tons of food and more
than $50,000 to help feed local families.
This year's challenge asks for the same effort, with
an emphasis on items for infants.
"We're especially low on dry baby food, formula,
diapers and wipes," said Maribeth Phillips, chief execu-
tive officer of Meals on Wheels Plus of Manatee, which
operates the food bank. "These are items the average
person doesn't have in the pantry to donate and they can
be very expensive."
A collection barrel can be obtained by calling 941-
747-FOOD or 941-749-0100, and food drive kits can are


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From in,\\ iliigiiolh September, a participating group
can take donations and then call the food bank to retrieve
supplies in the collection barrels.
More than 100,000 pounds of food was distributed
in last year's Grand Challenge.
The Grand Challenge began last year when word
started to spread about the food bank's shortage.

Islander needs help filling food barrel
The Islander newspaper, 5604B Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, is participating in the Grand Challenge
with a collection barrel at the newspaper office.
Islanders are encouraged to drop donations at the
new office location, opposite the Island Library and
alongside Domino's Pizza and Island Fresh Market.
For more information on the effort, call 941-778-
7978.


WMFR budget passes
unanimously
West Manatee Fire Rescue district commissioners
at a public meeting Aug. 15 unanimously approved a
$5.65 million budget for 2013-14.
WMFR Chief Andy Price presented his proposed
2013-14 budget July 18, noting it was the seventh
consecutive budget year in which spending increases
were limited to staffing and service levels.
Of the $5.65 million, 85 percent ($4.83 million)
is for salary and benefits, Price said.
WMFR is funded by assessments on district prop-
erties. The annual fee increase is limited by state stat-
ute to 2.4 percent. The 2013-14 budget increases the
fire assessment from the previous year's budget by
1.9 percent.
The base assessment for residential property is
$172.55 for the first 1,000 square feet and $0.102 for
each square foot above the first 1,000. Commercial
properties have a base rate of $407.19. If the property
exceeds 1,000 square feet, the assessment for each
additional square foot is $0.176.
Commissioner Scott Ricci said the budget was
"as lean as possible with the available income."


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20 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Champs crowned in AMICC indoor youth soccer league


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Reporter
The list of awards won by Beach Bistro and Eat
Here sports teams for restaurant owner Sean Murphy
grew longer Aug. 16 as both teams won the champion-
ship games in their respective age division in the Anna
Maria Island Community Center's summer indoor soccer
league.
Beach Bistro upset regular-season champ LPAC 6-5
in the 8-10 division championship game behind a game-
high five goals from Tyler Brewer and single goals from
Jeremiah Sculco and Shane Solletti. The Bistro team
also received strong play and hustle from Ana Gonzalez,
Travis Bates, German Rivera, Javier Rivera and Tuna
McCracken in the victory.
Beach Bistro defeated Air & Energy 6-3 Aug. 14 to
advance to the championship game. Brewer again led the
Bistro, this time notching four goals, while Javier Rivera
added two goals in the victory. Sam Bowers paced Air &
Energy with two goals while Gianna Sparks added one
goal in the loss.
Regular-season champs Eat Here won its 11-13
championship with an exciting 4-3 victory over Island
Dental Spa Aug. 16. Carter Reemelin, Dunn Reemelin
and Robbie Fellowes scored first-half goals as Eat Here
jumped out to an early 3-0 lead, but a goal by Luke
Marvin with six minutes to play in the half pulled Island
Dental Spa to 3-1.
Scoring chances were pretty even for both teams in
the half, but Eat Here goalie Zach Fernandes was out-
standing, making several strong saves to keep Eat Here
in the lead.
The second half was more of the same with Fer-
nandes and Island Dental Spa goalie Joe Rogers both
coming up with strong saves. Carter Reemelin scored
again early in the second half to give Eat Here a 4-1
lead, but midui a hiinough the second half, Dylan Joseph
scored on a header that saw him, Dunn Reemelin and
I MIIIM niE nWHMMHA~mun ea.i


Beach Bistro, 8-10 Champs
Jeremiah Sculco, S/,iii,' Solletti, Tyler Brewer, Ana
Gonzalez, Travis Bates, German Rivera, Javier Rivera,
Tuna McCracken and coach Pedro Gonzalez. Islander
Photo: Matt Ray


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Fernandes all wind up in the goal.
Both teams continued to battle when with just over 3
minutes to play, Joseph picked off an attempted clearing
pass by Conal Cassidy and scored to pull to within 4-3.
Eat Here whittled the remaining time down to zero
to close out the 4-3 victory.
Eat Here was led by Carter Reemelin's two goals and
single goals from Dunn Reemelin and Robbie Fellowes.
Fernandes was supported defensively by Cassidy, Reagan
Nevin and Gauge Nevin in the victory.
Eat Here advanced to the finals by rolling past Bark
& Co. Realty 9-1 in the semifinal played Aug. 14. Carter
Reemelin led the way with three goals, while Fernandes
and Dunn Reemelin added two goals apiece. Cassidy and
Robbie Fellowes completed the scoring with one goal
each in the victory. James Whyte scored the lone goal
for Bark in the loss.
Joseph scored two goals and Luke Marvin added one
goal to lead Island Dental Spa, which received strong
play from Brooke Capparelli, Shelby Morrow and Luke
Greaves in the loss.
Island Dental Spa advanced to the finals with an
exciting, come-from-behind victory over LPAC in the
second semifinal game Aug. 14. LPAC jumped out to a
3-0 lead on single goals from Gavin Walker, Nate Bettger
and Preston Walker.
Island Dental Spa came back to win the game behind
a pair of goals from Brooke Capparelli and single goals
from Joseph and Shelby Morrow.

Flag football playoffs under way
And then there were four teams that is. Four teams
are still in pursuit of a Super Bowl championship in the
NFL Flag Football League at the center.
The opening round of playoffs took place Aug. 15
and three out of four games were blowout victories for the
higher seeded team. Top-seed Discount Signs & Wraps
Seahawks easily dispatched Beach to Bay Construc-
tion Dolphins 32-13, while No. 2 Slim's Place Broncos
handled Jessie's Island Store Jaguars 35-19. Third seed
Agnelli Pool & Spa Giants crushed The Feast Falcons

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r Eat Here,
11-13 Champs
Coach/sportswriter Kevin
V Cassidy, Conal Cassidy,
SDunn Reemelin, Gauge
Nevin, Zach Fernandes,
Carter Reemelin, Reagan
Nevin and Robbie Fel-
lowes. Islander Photo:
Jillian Cassidy








54-18.
The only game that had a lower-seed come out victo-
rious and was a close game was the Waterfront Restaurant
Raiders' 34-33 victory over Sato Real Estate Browns.
Raiders' quarterback Chris Gillum completed 19
of 28 passes for 268 yards and four touchdown passes.
Brother Mike Gillum was his favorite target with 10
receptions for 132 yards, including a touchdown and
3 extra points. Jason Hoffmeister caught six balls for
92 yards and four touchdowns, while Lindsey Weaver
finished with five receptions for 39 yards and an extra
point.
Hoffmeister and Chris Gillum led the Raiders with
three flag pulls each, while Billy Malfese added two pulls
and an interception in the victory.
Sato Real Estate Browns was led by quarterback
Jason Sato's big game. He completed 17 of 23 passes
for 247 yards, including three touchdown passes and
a pair of rushing touchdowns. Eric Gledhill was his
favorite target, finishing with seven catches for 98 yards,
including a touchdown and an extra point. Caleb Rob-
erts added three catches for 56 yards and two touchdown
receptions.
Gledhill paced the Browns' defense with a pair of
interceptions and three flag pulls, while Jason Sato led
all players with six flag pulls in the loss.

Horseshoe news
Only two teams managed a 3-0 pool-play record
during Aug. 14 horseshoe action at the Anna Maria City
Hall horseshoe pits and were left to battle for the cham-
pionship. The team of Ron Pepka and Sam Samuel out-
lasted Tim Sofran and Hank Huyghe 21-17 to earn the
day's bla-in,- rights.
Huyghe and George McKay were the only team to
earn a 3-0 record in pool play during Aug. 17 action and
were outright champs.
Play gets underway at 9 a.m. Wednesday and Sat-
urdays at the Anna Maria City Hall pits. Warmups begin
at 8:45 a.m. followed by random team selection.
There is no charge to play and everyone is wel-
come.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, PAGE 22



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THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 21

Anglers: Get a little structure in your life


By Capt. Danny Stasny
Islander Reporter
Inshore fishing around Anna Maria Island is shaping
up for the month, especially around structures. Just about
any structure you can find is holding mangrove snapper.
Whether you're fishing bridges, piers, artificial reefs or
wrecks, now is the time to catch your limit of this tasty,
hard-fighting fish.
Small live shiners or shrimp are working well,
although small pinfish are good when you feel it's time
to switch baits. Sometimes the snapper will get wary of
the same bait being presented to them. So keep a few
tricks up your sleeves.
Since we're talking about inshore structure, we should
bring up flounder. The voracious flat fish are taking up
residence in the same sort of spots under structure. Fish
up to 24 inches are not uncommon, although you should
expect to catch more of the 14-18 inch fish. Either way,
when the flounder are biting, it's hard to pass them up.
Another species inhabiting inshore structure is
Spanish mackerel. Most structures will have macks on
patrol. Pull up in a boat and throw a few chummers, and
you'll see what I mean. It's not uncommon. Remember,
if you're fishing live bait, use a long shank hook. These
hooks will save you from having to tie a new rig every
other bite or so.
Capt. Warren Girle is fishing structure just off the
beaches of Anna Maria Island with water depths ranging
from 25-45 feet. By free-lining live shiners behind the
boat, Girle's clients are hooking up with limitless Span-
ish mackerel and jack crevalle. Of course, when this bite
is occurring, it is sure to alert any sharks in the vicinity.
Blacktip and spinner sharks up to 60 pounds are being
caught on fresh-cut chunks of either Spanish mackerel
or jack crevalle.
Once the mackerel bite winds down, Girle is switch-
ing tactics and bottom fishing. Again, live shiners are
the bait of choice, although small pinfish are working.
Mangrove snapper in the 16-inch range are being caught
along with flounder up to 18 inches.
Moving inshore, Girle is fishing shallow grass flats
with an abundance of potholes in search of redfish. By
casting live or fresh-cut pinfish into the holes, Girle's
clients are reeling in slot-size fish.
On deeper grass flats, Girle is catching numerous
spotted seatrout on live shiners. He is either free-lining
the baits or using a popping cork. Trout measuring 12-18
inches are the norm.
Capt. Rick Gross of Fishy Business Charters is fish-
ing the flats of southern Tampa Bay with good results on
catch-and-release snook. He's warming up his techniques
for season opening on Sept. 1.
Gross is finding fish ranging 20-26 inches are the
norm, although snook exceeding 30 inches are attainable.
To catch these preseason linesiders, Gross is fishing one
of two rigs. When fishing deeper flats, Gross is free-lining
live shiners with a stretch of 20-pound fluorocarbon con-
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Roger Danziger of Holmes Beach hoists a large amber-
jack caught Aug. 1 the first day of greater amberjack
season aboard his boat offshore of Anna Maria.

on shallow flats, Gross is using the same rig, but adding
a small cork a couple of feet above the hook. Using a
cork in shallow water aids in keeping the shiner out of
the grass.
On the same flats, Gross also is finding redfish and
spotted seatrout. Keeper-sizes of both species are being
caught in between snook bites. Obviously, the same to
rigs are being used with live shiners for bait.
Mangrove snapper and flounder are on the menu for
Gross' clients. He's leading his anglers to limits with live
shiners on a knocker rig.
Dave Sork at the Anna Maria City Pier says Span-
ish mackerel and jack crevalle are dominating the bite.
Pier fishers using artificial, such as white crappie jigs
or silver spoons, are reeling in fish as fast as they can
cast their bait. Those using natural baits are i .-,inii- live
shiners on a No. 2 shank hook to get in on the action.
Keeper-size macks are being caught, although, he says,
the big mackerel have yet to show in good numbers.
Mangrove snapper can be caught at the pier by
bottom fishing around the pilings with live shrimp, shin-
ers and pinfish. Most fish being caught are in the 8- to
12-inch range. Along with snapper, expect to hook up an
occasional flounder or juvenile grouper.
Steve Leonardy at the Rod & Reel Pier says you need
to arrive early to cash in on the Spanish mackerel bite.
The peak of the bite is 7-9 a.m. After that, the macks are
moving to other areas. Gotcha plugs or white speck rigs
will get you connected. Mixed in with the morning macks
are jack crevalle and ladyfish.



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Fishers in search of tablefare are dropping live shin-
ers under the pier for mangrove snapper and flounder.
Keeper-sizes of both species are common, but plan on
catching many shorties. Keep your ruler handy, and don't
get caught with undersized fish.
Finally, small blacktip and bonnethead sharks are
being caught from the pier. Chunks of squid or shrimp
are getting the bite. On light tackle, these fish are exciting
to catch. Just rig with a small piece of wire leader and
either a long shank or circle hook.
Johnny Mattay at Island Discount Tackle is finding
good action on catch-and-release snook by fishing the
beaches. During the past week, he caught snook more
than 30 inches, as well as plenty measuring 20-24 inches
on live shiners, pinfish, mullet and whiting.
Mangrove snapper are next on the list for Mattay.
Most catches are 10-14 inches on inshore structure, while
fish up to 18 inches are attainable.
Finally, he's finding macks at the piers, passes and
beaches, working white jigs and silver spoons.
Capt. Mark Howard of SumoTime fishing charters
says fishing for his clients this past week has been hot
and action-packed, just like the weather. Redfish, spot-
ted seatrout, mackerel, flounder, mangrove snapper and
catch-and-release snook have been feeding with reckless
abandon on live shiners, according to Howard. "The key
to productive fishing is to find moving water," he says.
Redfish have been scattered and are chewing shiners
and pinfish rigged under a popping cork. Toss your bait
offering tight to the mangroves on a high tide and let the
current sweep your bait along the edge.
Howard predicts the redfish will start schooling and
feeding heavily under the Aug. 21 full moon.
Catch-and release snook are still on the beach and
near the passes, and will continue to spawn until the Sept.
1 season arrives. They also finding snook staging on the
outside bars of Tampa Bay waiting for the full moon.
For the bigger-sized linesiders, fish away from the well-
known holes and spots as they receive a lot of pressure
and the bigger fish will avoid these areas.
Looking forward, the fishing will remain strong for
the full moon and the corresponding tides will provide
some major currents. He says to be on your fishing spot
when the current is strongest to increase your chances of
landing dinner.
Send fishing reports to fish@islander.org.




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M '.,, ,,-',.- .. .: ..,, ,. l, ,.J.- ... l l.:.. .. I 1 )11., , ,


Where Men Shop for Gear and Women Shop for Men
END-OF-SUMMER SALE ON SELECT FLY GEAR
PATAGONIA RUNNINGWEAR IN NEW FALL COLORS

Quality Fly & Spin Gear, Kayak Guides, Fishing Charters
505 Pine Ave Anna Maria 941.254.4996
9-6 daily www.amioutfitters.com





22 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER


sftdBiz

By Rick Catlin







Chamber hosts events
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce was
opening its Aug. 19 expo at CrossPointe Fellowship at 9
a.m. as this week's edition of The Islander was being dis-
tributed. Latecomers can pay $30 at the door to attend.
Later this month, the August mixer will be a luau
party 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 28, at the Hancock Bank,
5324 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Attendees are asked to dress in luau-appropriate attire
and a costume contest will again be part of the annual
event.
Big Jim Allen will entertain with his ukulele, The
Feast Restaurant is catering and door prizes will be
awarded.
The cost is $5 per person and reservations are
requested.
Members are encouraged to bring a guest and anyone
interested in joining the chamber is invited.
For more information or to make a reservation, call
941-778-1541.


Sign up now for golf tourney
The annual Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce golf tournament to raise funds for its scholarship
program is set for a shotgun start at 12:30 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 23, at the Bradenton Country Club.
The entry fee is $125 per golfer, w ilhi ignups as four-
somes or a single. The format is a scramble and a number
of prizes will be offered in various award categories.
Cost of the tournament includes the awards banquet
following completion of play. Non-golfers may attend
the banquet for $35.
Proceeds go to the chamber's scholarship program,
which annually awards scholarships to three local high
school seniors planning to major in business at college.
For more information or to register, call the chamber
at 941-778-1541.


Realty raves
Wagner Realty, with an office at 2217 Gulf Drive N.,
Bradenton Beach, recently named Rae Ellen Hayo as its
top producer and top sales person for July at the Anna
Maria Island office.
Does your business have a new product or service,
an award or an anniversary to celebrate? If so, email us
at news@islander.org.


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
It may soon be lights out for Holmes Beach, after a
state survey on turtle lighting ordinances put the city low
on its ranks.
The University of Florida Law Conservation Clinic
Sea Turtle Friendly Lighting Report indicates the Holmes
Beach turtle lighting ordinance needs improvement.
The school recently conducted a review of turtle
lighting ordinances across the coastal sections of the state
and graded each ordinance up to 100 points.
Sarasota scored the highest at 89, while Holmes
Beach ranked in a lower percentile with a score of 21.
"They put together a model ordinance and sent it
to the coastal cities and counties around the state with a
t ''' lit i to look at it," said city attorney Patricia Petruff
at an Aug. 15 city work session.
While Petruff said she didn't dig too deep into the
issues the law school students found, she said, "Anytime
someone is helping out with ideas to upgrade ordinances,
it's wise to take a look at it."
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shorebird Mon-
itoring executive director Suzi Fox said Holmes Beach is
typically the busiest for nesting of the island cities.
She said of the 354 recorded sea turtle nests this
season, 171 were laid on the city's beaches while 61 nests
were recorded in Anna Maria and 122 nests were laid in
Bradenton Beach.

SPORTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20
Sign up now for bowling challenge
The annual O'Connor Bowling Challenge is set for
6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at AMF Lanes, 4208 Cortez
Road, Bradenton.
Cost is $25, including bowling shoes and three
games.
Participants can register at Duffy's Tavern, 5858
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Prizes will be awarded for low game, high game, low
series and high series at a post-party at the Anna Maria
Oyster Bar, 6696 Cortez Road, Bradenton.
Proceeds of this event benefit the center.

Signups ongoing at AMICC
Registration for adult and youth sports is ongoing
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. The center
is offering soccer, basketball and dodgeball leagues for
adults, while the youth will be playing soccer.
To register or to get more information, call Troy
Shonk of the center at 941-778-1908 or email troy@
myamicc.com.

AMICC adult flag football
Aug. 21 7 p.m. Waterfront vs. Discount Signs
Aug. 21 8 p.m. Slim's Place vs. Agnelli Pool
Aug. 22 7 p.m. Pro Bowl TBA
Aug. 22 8 p.m. Super Bowl: TBD vs. TBD


Fox said disorientations in Holmes Beach is on the
decline and credited Police Chief Bill Tokajer for taking
a proactive stance, bringing residents and businesses into
compliance with the city's lighting ordinance.
"The magic wand has been the chief," said Fox. "He
comes with me to talk to people I've been trying to get to
comply for years and after one talk with him, they change
their lights the next day."
Fox endorsed the UF model ordinance, but also pro-
vided copies to commissioners of both Anna Maria's and
Bradenton Beach's ordinances. She said she had input
on the model ordinance, and she may approach the other
cities about adopting it.
Petruff said k l, ,1 .'\ and a better understanding of
sea turtle biology have rendered some ordinances obso-
lete.
Commissioners said they would review the model
ordinance with an eye toward improvement.

Building department fees updated
Also at the Aug. 16 workshop, building official Tom
O'Brien presented proposed additions to the building
department's fee schedule.
"I'm bringing this forward for the number of services
provided on a regular basis that have no compensating
revenue and consume a lot of resources and staff time,"
said O'Brien.
He wants to charge $100 for address changes related
to splitting property, such as when a lot changes from a
single address to more than one unit, and no less than 14
agencies have to be notified.
Re-inspection/failed inspection fees are proposed to
be set at $75.
Resort rental inspection fees are proposed at $50 per
year and it's something the city has been discussing in
terms in relation to resort rental business licenses.
O'Brien said it's an inspection for all the basic
requirements for the rental unit, such as trash and park-
ing, but also a general safety inspection.
"The land development code requires annual inspec-
tions" he said. "The fee is to fund those required inspec-
tions."
A final proposal was to charge an $80 annual contrac-
tor registration fee.
O'Brien said the city is required by the state to make
sure a contractor's license is valid before issuing a permit
and said his department is setting up a database system
that will "red light" a contractor if there is a flaw in his
license or insurance.
PLEASE SEE TURTLE REGS, NEXT PAGE


(,,0 l EXPERIENCE
-L REPUTATION
^';P REACTOR. RESULTS
37 Years of Professional Service
to Anna Maria Island and Bradenton
Heron Harbour 2/2 furnished condo, hid pool, tennis. $117,000.
RENTALS
GULFFRONT Vacation/Seasonal 5/4 Home.
GULFFRONT Luxury Villas 2/2 and 1/1.5 Vacation/Seasonal
BOOKING NOW FOR 2013 SEASONAL/VACATION RENTALS
HOLMES BEACH- 941-778-0807
tdollyl@yahoo.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


HB reviews turtle lighting regs, parking fees






Commissioners directed Petruff to draft an ordinance
to enact the new fees.

Parking fines to climb
The city has been seeking ways to stem illegal park-
ing and ease congestion islandwide, and Tokajer sug-
gested increasing parking fines and violations.
"Presently in the ordinance there are six different
items noted as to what the violations are," said Tokajer.
"I'm listing 13 violations, essentially adding seven more
to come more into line with the state."
Some of the violations have to do with parking within
30 feet of stop signs, an intersection with a traffic signal
and crosswalks and within 15 feet of a fire hydrant.
Tokajer is recommending the city increase parking
fines from $20 to $35 and to double the handicap park-
ing violation from $100 to $200. He also is suggesting
increasing the fine late penalty from $5 to $15, but is
increasing the grace period from three days to five.
Commissioners directed Petruff to draft an ordinance
amendment.
In other matters, commissioners agreed to extend
the employment contract with Mary Buonagura for an
additional six months.
The city contracted Buonagura in March to under-
take several duties, including reviewing job descriptions,
updating policies, conducting work-flow studies and
organizational charts as well as any other duties directed
by Mayor Carmel Monti.
Commissioners agreed to have Petruff draft the con-
tract extension that is expected to take effect Sept. 1.

I NEED LISTINGS!
Call or email me for a .-
FREE market analysis.
JASON HRNAK
941-773-6572-
jhrnak@gmail.com -.
Mike
Norman
Realty INC 3101 GULF DR, HOLMES BEACH


THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 23


9- 9-CAS IF ED


TWO SINGLE BEDS including mattresses and
matching box springs. $100/set. Like new. Call
Sandy, 941-447-7863.
DARK BROWN LEATHER couch/chaise.
Length 112 inches. Like new, $600. 941-224-
0188.
WHITE PANTRY: 3x5 foot, $15, car-top carrier,
$20, two pet crates, $10 and $20. 941-730-
0444.
ANTIQUES, ART, and collectibles. Local and
Haitian artworks. Signed 1st edition books.
View at The Islander store, 5604B Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View
and purchase online: www.jackelka.com



Real estate transactions
Jesse Brisson is on vacation this week.


Cindy Quinn P.- Poh.li:. ,'DPE
Cell: 941-780-8000
www islanalcnncmcrici corn
. ... --, .\ -. 7 ... -..


A
(A


r- I I_, l


Individuals may place one free ad with up to
three items, each priced $100 or less, 15 words
or less. FREE, one week, must be submitted
online. Email classifieds@islander.org, fax toll-
free 1-866-362-9821. (limited time offer)


THE HIVE: GIFTS & Arts at Bridge Street,
Bradenton Beach. Local hand-made unique
jewelry including our very popular Mermaids
Range, Tibetan jewelry and goods, plus Pan-
dora-style charms and various gift items from
around the world. 941-730-1745.
WANTED: WORKOUT DVDs and XBox, Wii
units with games for Ministry of Presence in
Haiti. Deliver to The Islander, 5604B Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
Turn the page for more announcements.


Jess-e risson Fro Assow gJ
941-713-4755 100-771-6043


ANNA MARIA
ISLAND
CLUB: Gulffront
-- 2bed/2bath condo.
This unit has it all:
S amazing, sweeping
views of the Gulf of
Mexico, elevator,
pool and spa, covered parking, storage and great
rental history. $749,000. Call Jesse Brisson for more
info @ 941.713.4755.


_- --"hSnkyoii-for your support in making our family
No. I in sales in Manatee and Sarasota counties!


ALES & RENTALS


LORIDA DREAMS REALTY
of Ami.INC
1-941-462-4016
2501 Gulf Drive N. #101, Bradenton Beach
www.florida-fgeams.coni
Facebool


-p


Charles Buky
Cell: 941-228-6086


www.teambukyrealestate.com
201 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Suite 1
Longboat Key FL 34228


ii'


Visit us on Pine Avenue or online for many more listings and rental info.
ISLAND FACES...SELLING ISLAND PLACES


. S




F


The new Islander newspaper office is at
5604-B Marina Drive, across from
the library and next to Domino's Pizza.

ThTe Islander


11 1 1


'41





24 E AUG. 21, 2013 U THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
Sandy's Established in 1983
Lawn Residential and Commercial
'Full service lawn maintenance
Service Landscaping Clean-up
7781345 Hauling tree trimming
11 78-35Licensed & Insured

Paradise Improvements 941.792.5600
l Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED ISLAND REFERENCES
LIC#CBC056755

RDI CONSTRUCTION INC.
Residential & Condo Renovations
\Kitchens Bath Design Service
SCarpentry Flooring Painting
Commercial & Residential
^ aReferences available 941-720-7519


ING- Bed: A bargain!
sc'rr K!!! (Q icc!i Fill &Twin,
ii n i.. i! ,l 0 new/used.

c li.l.


AMI TAXI
professional, metered, on-call, gps, cards accepted
www.amitaxi.com amitaxi4u@gmail.com
holmes beach, bradenton beach, anna maria
800.301.4816
airports shops dining

METRO DOOR & SUPPLY INC.
Primary Doors & Glass Inserts
Custom Prep/Cut Downs
Fiberglass, Aluminum, Steel, Vinyl
*FREE ESTIMATES: Call 941.726.2280


ANSWERS TO AUG. 21 PUZZLE
S H A M S FL|E|A AJ J E A FAR|AD
CABOT POUND LO| G AB I DE
R I A A U N C E ASi T U P ON
AFTERALLAH ORC ATTEST


J USTSAYNOAH REARS A Y
S A|0 v AO LNSEA
US T N D V -OL A S N EPA
POES IDA "MER GER
HOOKAH L I NEANDSIN K E R
B IGK I D E VER JOLTS
STREET ABSOLUTE PELT
I TER OWENS VIUS TUTIE E
DES ITINA LE FTBAHRAIN
ERS MANO FIRESALES
UPiHLSTER TAB CSA
CUATRO AD AUNT IEAHEM
O N T HEEDGE ETH YLAC E R B
W I R E G R E ST A V E
RI R E YE A SH T T |ER



ADOPT-A-PET


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JIELWNiEJ;C4WAt1ESE4L1


PUBLIC AUCTION OF entire contents of a
vacation rental home. Preview of items at 9
a.m., auction at 11 a.m. Each item in the home
will be auctioned to highest bidder Aug. 28.
Home located at: 703 South Bay Blvd. Anna
Maria Island. Can see pictures: www.manatee-
auctions.com. Please, call 941-527-6571 for
information. Florida Auction Licenses, AU4284
AB3263.

ATTENTION VETERANS AND active military
from Anna Maria Island. Crosspointe Fellow-
ship wants to hear from you in order to wel-
come you to a Nov. 16 patriotic Thanksgiving
event. Call the Rev. Ed Moss at 941-778-0719
to provide your contact information.

TERRY HAYES, REALTOR. Premier Sothebys.
941-302-3100. Terry.hayes@sothebysrealty.
com. Discoverannamaria.com.

WANTED: YOUR OLD cell phone for recycling.
Deliver to The Islander, 5604B Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.

FISHING GEAR WANTED: The Privateers
and The Islander are collecting new or used,
repairable fishing poles and reels, nets, tackle,
buckets, etc. to give to children. Donate your
gear at The Islander newspaper office, 5604B
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Child-
safe, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission and Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment. Pick up at The Islander office, 5604B
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Don't be sorry,
be safe.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Closed for the month
of August, but still accepting donations on
Wednesday, 9 -11 a.m. We will reopen Sept.
3. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 941-779-2733.

STEFF'S STUFF ANTIQUES: Consignment
sale 20-50% off, open daily. The Centre Shops
on Longboat Key. 5380 Gulf of Mexico Drive.
941-383-1901.

BIG FURNITURE SALE at Haley's Motel. 9
a.m.-noon Saturday, Aug. 24. Tables, chairs,
futons, bed frames, dressers, framed pictures,
lamps and more. See photos on Craigslist.
8104 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.

MOVING SALE: AREA rug and pad, 8x1 1 feet
(black with fruit motif),

two nightstands, two modern crystal lamps
with shades, glass-top table and four wicker
chairs. Miscellaneous items. 941-761-4657.


LOST OAKLEY SUNGLASSES in drawstring
grey case. Please, call 941-962-0581.

LOST: CARRERA PRESCRIPTION sunglasses.
Gulf Drive and Eighth Street, Sunset Landings,
Bradenton Beach. $25 reward. Mike or Stacey,
941-201-4052.


WELL-MANNERED RESCUED dogs (and
kittens!) are looking for great new homes or
fosters. Please, call for information, 941-896-
6701.


BIMINI BAY SAILING: Small sailboat rentals
and instruction. Day. Week. Month. Sunfish,
Laser, Windrider 17 and Precision 15. Call
Brian at 941-685-1400.

PONTOON BOAT RENTAL Create life-long
memories, call 941-518-3868 or see boatflor-
ida.weebly.com.


POWER NOLES CUSTOM 11.5-foot fiberglass
tunnel hull with bass seats. Very stable! Great
for fishing-stand on the side without tipping,
go in really shallow waters. Very fun boat for
anyone who wants to get on the water! 2001
25-hp Mercury 2-stroke, plus a trolling motor
with battery. Must see! $2,150 obo. Call Toni,
941-928-8735.


PART-TIME WEEKEND CNA/RN needed for
elderly man with dementia. Anna Maria Island.
603-707-1325.

SEEKING AN INDIVIDUAL with maintenance
experience for a weekend part-time posi-
tion, 12 hours per week total. Please apply
in person: Blue Water Beach Club, 6306 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach.


LOCAL ISLAND STUDENT babysitter available.
CPR and first aid-certified, early childhood
development major. Emily, 941-567-9276.

RED CROSS-CERTIFIED babysitter and dog
sitter. Reasonable rates for both. Call 941-527-
5051.

NICOLE AND HALLIE'S babysitting, pet sit-
ting and pet walking. Red Cross certified, good
with animals. Hallie, 941-773-6317, Nicole,
941-370-7981.

RESPONSIBLE ISLAND STUDENT available
for babysitting and pet sitting. Red Cross-
certified babysitter. Isabel, 941-545-7995 or
941-405-4194.

KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three
weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for
work. Ads must be placed in person at The
Islander office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.


MALE CNA WITH 10 years experience. In-
home care and facility. Able to transfer and
help with daily routines. References available.
Please, call 941-518-8408.



TOASTED COMPUTER SERVICES. Your home
and business specialist. On-site service, virus/
spyware, cleanup, system setup, upgrades,
diagnosis and repair, internet/wireless network-
ing, custom system design. 941-224-1069.

More ads = more readers in The Islander.


Anderson & Associates Insurance
Your Island Insurance Specialist
WORKING TO SAVE YOU MONEY
941-729-7355


ASAP REPAIRS
Jim Basiley, LLC
Engineer turned Handyman
free estimates --no service charge-- no job too small
Electrical, Plumbing, Carpentry, Air Conditioning/Heating
Call Jim at 941-448-7806 or email: jimbasiley@gmail.com

DON'T SWEAT THE SMALL STUIJFF
Need computer help? Chances R, I can help.
And if I don't have the answer, I know someone
who will. Start to finish hardware, software,
network setup and repair, printer help, continu-
ing support... Give me a call. If it's broke, I can
usually fix it. Cell phones, too.

t-SdtlckSlutiviS business network / computer solutions
Socko Pearson, 941-799-1169, sockopearson@aol.com
ISLAND REFERENCES AVAILABLE


359-1904
"Movers Who Care"
TWO MEN AND A TRUCK,










I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Profes-
sional, friendly cleaning service since 1999.
941-779-6638. Leave message.
ISLANDER HANDYMAN SERVICE: 23-year
Island resident, references. The Flying Dutch-
man LLC. We do all repair, interior and exterior,
carpentry and more. Peter, 941-447-6747.
CLEANING BY LAURA offers everything on
your list from kitchen and bath cleaning to
dusting and emptying wastebaskets. 941-
539-6891.
ALL AROUND PAINTING: Quality work. Free
estimates. Licensed, insured. Call native
islander Jim Weaver, 813-727-1959.
ISLAND COMPUTER GUY, 37 years experi-
ence. On-site PC repairs, upgrades, buying
assistance and training. Call Bill, 941-778-
2535.

TRANSPORT SERVICE: LET me drive you to
the airport or anywhere in Florida. Flat rates.
Reasonable. Call Mike, 941-567-6634.

PRESSURE WASHING: RESIDENTIAL, com-
mercial, resorts, roof, lanai, etc. Also windows,
lawn services, also. 941-756-4570.
CLEANING RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL and
resort. Love what we do, love to work. 941-
756-4570.
JUST THAT CLEANING service: We will clean
your home like our own. We offer organic
cleaning products. Free estimate. Call Jenise,
941-730-6773.
INTRODUCTORY OFFER! BUY one, get one
free music lesson. manateemusic.net or 941-
741-8832.
TRUEBLUE33 COMPUTER REPAIR Service,
LLC. On-site computer service, reasonable
rates. Contact Anthony at 941-592-7714 or at
941-727-6780.
COMPUTER SERVICES: I can fix it. Virus
cleanup, system upgrade. Hardware, soft-
ware and network repair. FBI virus cleaned and
removed. Cell phone repair, support. Replace
broken camera, screen, etc. Give islander
Socko a call: 941-799-1169.
BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD's Window
Cleaning looking for storefront jobs in Holmes
Beach. I make dirty windows sparkling clean.
941-920-3840.


ISLAND MERMAIDS CLEANING and Co.:
38-year Islanders. Rentals our specialty. 941-
778-3046.
BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrig-
eration. Commercial and residential service,
repair and/or replacement. Serving Manatee
County and the Island since 1987. For depend-
able, honest and personalized service, call Wil-
liam Eller, 941-795-7411. CAC184228.
ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.
RELAXING MASSAGE IN the convenience
of your home or hotel. Massage by Nadia,
more than 19 years on Anna Maria Island. Call
today for an appointment, 941-518-8301.
MA#0017550.MA#0017550.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential
and commercial. Full-service lawn mainte-
nance, landscaping, cleanup, hauling and
more! Insured. 941-778-5294.
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLERS repairs and
installations, watering the island for 15 years.
Jeff, 941-778-2581.
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming,
hauling, cleanup. Island resident 25 years.
Call 941-807-1015.


STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE. Specializing
in old Florida seashell driveways and scapes.
Free estimates. Call Shark Mark, 941-301-
6067.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. $50/yard.
Hauling all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with
free estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-7775,
"shell phone" 941-720-0770.

TOP NOTCH LAWN Care: Residential and
commercial. For all your landscaping needs.
941-932-6600.

NATURE'S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design
and installation. Tropical landscape specialist.
Residential and commercial. 30 years experi-
ence. 941-729-9381, 941-448-6336.


Turn the page for more Islander ads...


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Windows & Doors
941-730-5045
WEATHERSIDE LLC

CALL THE ISLAND'S FINEST...
MORE THAN 2,500 LARGE AND SMALL
PROJECTS ON AMI SINCE 1988!
We provide design plans-You preview 3-D drawings

WASH FAMILY CONSTRUCTION
941.725.0073
Darrin J. Wash State Lic. CBC1258250
LOCALLY OWNED AND FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1988


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ELKAcom
/I Commercial
PHOTOGRAPHY
315 58th St
Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Real Estate
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Studio
Product
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Stock Pictures
Web
Printing
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941-778-2711


THE ISLANDER i AUG. 21, 2013 i 25

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Residential
Family Owned and Operated since 1975
New Construction Remodeling
All Phases of Plumbing Repair & Service
778-3924 or 778-4461 5508 Marina Drive, Holv,-:, 1,.: ii" Sat.

BOAT, RV & TRAILER STORAGE
Wash Down Easy Access Clean Security Cameras
941-232-9208 Rates starting at $40
Centrally located off Cortez Road 4523 30th St. W.
Warehouse/Workshops also available

AN'S RESCREEN INCH
o":L :,GES, LANAIS, PORCHES, WINDOWS, C:"R
N: I :b TOO BIG or Too SMALL. Free Estima .:
Call Dan, 941-713-3108

Junior's Landscape & Maintenance
Lawn care PLUS native plants. .,'"
mulch, trip, hauling and cleanup. '
Call Junior, 807-1015 AN

S HONEY DO HOME REPAIR
Handyman Service
Let us put our 35 years of experience to work for you!
Joesoh LaBrecque *Carpentry *Drywall *Flooring *Painting *Siding *Tile
941.896.5256-office Free Estimates Licensed
941.807.5256-cell Ask about our 10% guarantee & Insured





26 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER

IL AAD


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial,
interior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper.
Island references. Bill, 941-795-5100. www.
vangopainting.net.

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 941-726-3077.

CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All phases
of carpentry, repairs and painting. Insured.
Meticulous, clean, sober and prompt. Paul
Beauregard, 941-730-7479.

GRIFFIN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabi-
nets and wood flooring. Insured and licensed,
941-748-4711.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry, handy-
man, light hauling, pressure washing. Jack
of all trades. Call 941-778-6170 or 941-447-
2198.

SOUTHBAY HOME REPAIRS: If it's broken,
stuck, loose, leaks, needs paint, etc. I'll fix it.
Affordable quality work. 941-720-2906.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN LLC: Professional
tile roof restoration. Call Peter for free estimate.
23-year Island resident, references, insured.
941-447-6747.


SOUTHWEST HOME IMPROVEMENT: Michi-
gan builder, quality work guaranteed. Afford-
able, timely, within budget. Call Mike, 1-616-
204-8822.

CARL V. JOHNSON Jr., Building contrac-
tor. Free estimates and plans. New houses,
porches, decks and renovations. Fair prices.
Hire a Florida licensed contractor. Call 941-
795-1947 or cell, 941-462-2792.



WEEKLY/MONTHLY/ANNUAL rentals: wide
variety, changes daily. SunCoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202, or 1-800-732-6434. www.sun-
coastinc.com.

2BR/2BA HOLMES BEACH waterfront condo:
Fully furnished with views, pools, Jacuzzi,
tennis, boat dock. Seasonal, November. Call
818-620-0901.

VACATION RENTALS: GREAT location near
boat ramp and everything on Anna Maria
Island. Free WiFi, cable. 941-779-6638.

BRADENTON BEACH: SEASONAL rental
2BR/1BA. $875/week. www.gulfbeachrental.
net or 941-778-4731.

HOUSE FOR RENT: Annual, 3BR/3BA canalfront,
Oak Avenue, Anna Maria. Spacious and bright,
pets OK. $2,200/month. 941-538-9328.
BRADENTON BEACH: SEASONAL 2BR/1 BA.
Steps to beach. No pets. $875/week. 941-778-
4731.
3BR/2BA: CANAL, FURNISHED. Internet.
dvanworm@earthlink.net. 407-927-1304.


BAYFRONT! BEAUTIFUL LOCATION on the bay.
3BR/2BA unique and interesting layout. $799,000.


ANNA MARIA COTTAGE Adorable, vintage cottage
located west of Gulf Drive for easy beach access. 3BR/2BA,
great screened porch, single car garage. Selling "turnkey"
furnished. $449,000.


RUNAWAY BAY Recently updated 2BR/2BA condo
with great amenities and direct beach access. Asking
$289,000.

Mike 800-367-1617
Norm n 941-778-6696
Norman 3101 GULF DR
Realty INC HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com
sales@mikenormanrealty.com


ANNUAL RENTAL: CITY of Anna Maria,
3BR/2BA with large private yard near City Pier
on Crescent Avenue, steps to the bay beach
and Pine Avenue shops. Pets OK. $1,800/
month. 941-321-5454.

ADORABLE GULFFRONT COTTAGE: 100 feet
from Gulf. 2BR, large bath. Seasonal, three-
day minimum. Call for further information, 863-
660-3509 or email: mememersh@aol.com.

WATERFRONT 2BR/2BA in exclusive Perico
Bay Club. Great water views, gated commu-
nity, pools and tennis courts, covered parking,
one mile from beach. Sorry no pets allowed.
$1,100/month. 941-720-0092.

PRIVATE ROOM FOR one! North Longboat
Key, washer and dryer, utilities included, $130/
week. 941-383-4856.

VACATION RENTALS: BRADENTON houses or
condos. Weekly or monthly. Call 941-962-0971
or 941-794-1515. www.coastalpropertiesrealty.
com. Suzanne Wilson, broker.


PLEASE CALL ME if you are interested in sell-
ing. I am looking to purchase a home close to
the beach or on the beach. 941-779-6158. No
Realtors.

WE'RE LOW, LISTINGS needed. Are you curious
as to how much your home could be worth? Call
us for a free professional consultation. Call Lynn
at Edgewater Real Estate, 941-778-8104.

VILLAGE GREEN VILLA: 2BR/2BA over-
size two-car garage, secluded end cul-de-
sac.1,913 sf, 10x30-foot enclosed lanai.
Granite kitchen, maple cabinets. Immaculate
move-in condition. Friendly neighbors, heated
pool. $165,000. 941-792-4438.

2BR2BA CONDO IN Bradenton Beach. Steps
to beach, very nice. Owner motivated and
priced below market at 215,000, firm. Call
813-245-0428.


BIG FISH
REAL ESTATE


Pr


TERRA CEIA BAYFRONT CANALFRONT POOL HOME
Ti.,rnkev ,.J1aed L-'BA -'BA E-..:eple,.:,nal t.i.iv Upda
Alllll 1D.-n E v I,, s. San H, m,: .- ,.,.,.,. Call
S.a11,','r ':4 1 -*"Ji,:r .,:ir,5,r,':i ', J :. ,24 1


JMR


SABAL PALMS
1BR 1 '". BA Turrn lurrir,:hej
,updJa1ld .:rl Ol,..: I,: Ih
Si 3.:1.:'.: Br,:,i r 94. ., .:'...^,' ,,


.'.H _.A bunqI.:n:w Lenilr
SI3nj lI:.oca'i.:n T:ons : C.:i.'larm
$ ,.-r-' ,:,:,:, C ll i.:.:,l S .,.:
PBro-ker 941.7 *". '* ^,:,


NW WATERFRONT GULFFRONT COMPLEX
i.0 l-l t ,iOu Iroi'r a1- Gull : Ir.:.m ihl briihl
:'eB 1BA t.uri li,, wh u. led3 2BRI BA ,: ,rd: Turn.
poler'iial '. 1 l l rn er, I ,, llurri.:h pri,:r In.:. .:-ell 31
P'e .:.ld HIj ll.:,r *4i 1.: .?.J.:' '.k .2 ,4 .: ', ,: L 11 i,,:,:,le i ,..
B1r.: .- r 941. 3, .'.. ,.j.:,r,
5351 Gull Drive No. 4. Holmes Beach
www.gobiglishreally.com 941-779-2289






THE ISLANDER 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 27


ADDED SATISFACTION By Dan Schoenholz / Edited by Will Shortz


O




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U

Qj




bf)
-.






>U,


Across
I Phonies
6 Cat nipper'?
10 1977 double-
platinum Steely
Dan album
13 Capacitance
measure
18 Newfoundland
explorer
19 16 23-Acrosses
20 Input for a mill
21 Tolerate
22 Vaquero's rope
23 See 19-Across
24 Eat heartily
26 Where most things
rank in importance
to a Muslim'?
28 Foe of Frodo
29 Ccrtify (to)
30 Fannie
31 Mid sixth-century
year
32 Casts doubt on
35 Low notes'?
38 lHaunted house
sound
39 Bathroom
installation
42 Webster's directive
to the oi0erly
formal?
45 Raises
46 ___ raise
47 Folder's declaration


Answers:
page 24


48 Plaintit e
49 Upper _i_
50 Single
51 Madam
52 Exciting matches?
55 Series of measures
57 Burns books'?
59 Fancy
61 F\change news?
62 Equipment list for a
hashish-smoking
fisherman?
67 Baby no longer
68 "Do I _!"
69 News of disasters,
e.g.
70 One might be mean
or cross
71 Total
74 Hide
78 Way, in Pompeii
79 Berlin Olympics
hero
82 Word on either side
of "A"
83 One getting special
instruction
84 ___ Plaines
85 1986 rock
autobiography
86 Departed from
Manama. may be?
89 Sounds often edited
out for radio
90 Hand for a mariachi
band'?
91 "Everything must
go" e cnts
92 Cover, in a way
94 One may be kept
running in a bar


95 The South. once:
Abbr.
98 Ntimero of countries
bordering
Guatemala
101 Subsidy
102 Niece's polite
interruption?
106 Close to losing it
108 Antiknock additive
109 Caustic
110 Current carriers
I I I Throwaway
publication
112 Get the old gang
together
113 Part of a barrel
I 14 Commotions
115 Common symbol
in hieroglyphics
116 Depleted of color
1 17 Strength of a
solution

Down
I "Skedaddle!"
2 Eastern
Mediterranean port
3 Lessen
4 Speck
5 Space specks
6 Fair alternative
7 Moon goddess
8 "Whole" thing
9 Cooler
10 Actress Woodard
11 Old ad figure with a
big nose
12 Turkish big shot
I 3 Prepares to eat,
perhaps


14 Is against
15 Ready (for)
16 Commotions
17 Bumper bummer
19 Organized society
25 Welcome look from
a Bedouin?
27 Jessica of
"Valentine's Day"
28 Special ___
33 Not so hot
34 Slather
35 Game for those who
don't like to draw
36 Hip
37 Contemptible one
39 Mooch
40 German W.W. II
tank
41 Annually
42 Foresail
43 Thurman of "Kill
Bill"
44 Miss piggy?
45 1953 A.L. M.V.P. Al
49 Ancient Hindu
scripture
50 Often-blue garden
blooms
52 What many Bay
Area skiers do on
winter weekends?
53 Kosh B'Gosh
54 Levels
56 Festival setup
58 1930s migrant
60 Tinkers with
62 Pitch recipient
63 Mate for Shrek
64 Trump, for one


76 Hawaii's ___ Day
77 Big or top follower
80 One type of 66-
Down
81 Historic exhibit at
Washington Dullcs
airport
83 Beauty's
counterpart
85 Blow away
86 "A ___ cannot liec":
Martin Luther King
Jr.


87 Clash
88 Jai ___
91 Blossoming
business?
92 King Arthur's father
93 Military blockade
95 Bamboozle
96 Dish (up)
97 Insect trapper
98 Intimidates
99 Battalion, e.g.


100 Italian bell town
103 "No way!"
104 "30 Rock" setting.
briefly
105 When Stanley
cries, "Hey.
Stella!" in "A
Streetcar Named
Desire"
107 Beats by ___
(headphones brand)
108 Historical period


CSLL THL FLiP-FLOP




COMPANY FIRST...

TO FiND THe PeRF6CT VaCaTiON R8NT8Li



to choose from.









SAC.,mc04 Miat&m, I.




315 Pine Avenue Anna Maria


941-779-0733
www.annamariaparadise.com
www.annamariaparadise.com


Historic 1926 Old Floricia GulfView Cottage


3 Bedroom/3 Bath Oversized 75x1 45, 10,875 sf Lot

Location: 104 Magnolia Ave.; 1 lot from Gulf of Mexico;

1 block to Sandbar Restaurant and Ginny's & Jane E's

4- This historic beach cottage offers 3 suites, each
with private full bath, wrap-around porch with
Gulf views, tongue-and-groove wood ceilings,
hardwood floors, custom closet systems, recessed
lighting and much more.

Custom kitchen features solid-wood cabinets,
marble counter tops and stainless steel appli- ,.
ances. '
44- Cottage is fully furnished and decorated, fea- .. -
turing historic Anna Maria art.
44 Additional ground-floor structure with detached garage and alley
access provide plenty of storage and opportunities for expansion.
4- With lot size of 75 by 145 feet (10,875 sf), this property allows for
future expansion and expansive Gulf views.
4- Broker fee protected.


A truly rare find on AMI. This won't last long.

$1,350,000.00

For more details: www.annamariacottage.com

egajd@aol.com or 727-510-0340


65 Birds' beaks
66 One who's all wet?
67 Queen's "We Will
Rock You," to "We
Are the
Champions"
72 Extends too much
credit'?
73 Quaker cereal
75 Determinant of
when to do an
airport run. for
short


www.islander.org





28 0 AUG. 21, 2013 0 THE ISLANDER