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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( June 9, 2004 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: June 9, 2004

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01057

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: June 9, 2004

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01057

Full Text




Skimnming the news ... An la Mm riu Islalnd nmap in this edition, page 20.


T Alnna aria


Islanlder


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


www.islander.org


Volume 12, No. 31 June 9, 2004 FREE


Island election qualifying just five weeks away


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Islanders thinking about seeking public office in
the November elections better speed up their thinking.
Supervisor of Elections Bob Sweat has moved the
qualifying period for candidates from its traditional
September period to July 12-16.
That gives prospective candidates just five \Xeeks
to get their packets and qualify.
Sweat said the early qualifying date is because the
November voting will also be for state and national
elections and his office needs to know well in advance
what to place on the ballot. In addition, the office has
to prepare a primary ballot for Aug. 31.
"I know it's early, but we have to start planning
now. We need to know who has qualified to determine
the size of the [November] ballot," he said.
But qualifying packets aren't even available yet at
her office, said Holmes Beach City Clerk Brooke
Bennett, nor in Anna Maria or Bradenton Beach.


Anna Maria plans

its own D.Day
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn has set Friday, June
18. as D-Day for city hall and staff to be moved into
temporary quarters at the Island Baptist Church while
city hall undergoes a long-overdue remodeling. The
remodeling project by contractor Southern Cross Con-
struction of Sarasota will begin Monday, June 21.
"We may even work over the weekend, but we'll
be ready by that Monday," the mayor predicted.
The mayor will present the lease with Island Bap-
tist for commission approval at the June 10 special
meeting. The commission voted 4-1 at its May 27
meeting for the remodeling contract and other phases
of the project to proceed.
During the expected three-month remodeling pe-
riod, city commission meetings will be held at the
Holmes Beach City Hall. The first commission meet-
ing to utilize the Holmes Beach chambers is scheduled
for 7 p.m. Thursday, June 24.
The mayor said budget hearings will also be held
in Holmes Beach. The first hearing on the 2004-05
budget is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, July 1.
That's assuming Anna Maria commissioners will
sign the lease.
After a bitter, six-month fight over increasing costs
outside of the remodeling portion, commissioners ap-
proved the project by a 4-1 vote when Commissioner
Carol Ann Magill said essentially, "enough was
enough" and she wanted the entire remodeling and
maintenance project to go forward.
Commissioner Linda Cramer wouldn't give her ap-
proval until she got other commissioners to agree to find
the estimated $25,000 for a new roof, rather than waiting
until the 2004-05 budget cycle. Commissioner Dale
Woodland maintained his opposition to the project.
The remodeling contract with Southern Cross is
$151,000, but needed maintenance and mitigation for
asbestos and mold removal, a new roof, and some new
air conditioning compressors, among other items, have
pushed the total project cost to nearly $235,000. The
city has budgeted $210,000 for the project.
The special meeting June 10 is to approve two change
orders and other needed maintenance associated with the
project and already approved architectural plans.
In preparation for the renovation project and to
move to the Island Baptist Church, Anna Maria City
Hall will be closed Friday, June I1, and Thursday and
Friday, June 17 and 18 respectively.


Once those are available, candidates in Holmes
Beach can submit their qualify ing material to Bennett.
while Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach candidates can
get packets at their respective city halls, but must make
the trip to the Superv\isor of Elections Office at 305
I 5th St. W. in Bradenton to submit their completed
packet.
"I would say anyone considcringe running for mInul-
nicipal office should start orglni i ng low.\\" saicld S\\ cat.
The Juily qualifying dateCs ;are the sample Ifor all munici-
palities in the county, he added.
In Anna Mlaria, the commission seats currently
held by Duke lMiller and Linda Cramer will be uip for
election, as will the office of mayor now held by
SueLvnn.
Holmes Beach voters \will go the polls to vote onil
a mayor and the two commission seats currently held
by Roger Lutz and Sandy Haas-Martens. Carol
Whitmnore is the current mayor.
In Bradenton Beach, the terms of City Commnis-


sioner Lisa Marie Phillips and Anna O'Brien will ex-
pire in November. Phillips was elected last fall to fin-
ish the remaining one year of Commissioner Dawn
Baker's term. Baker had resigned to run for mayor.
One of the early candidates throwing their hat into
the ring is WVhitmore. who said she will definitely seek
re-election.
Mayor SueLvnn. however, said she had not yet
made a decision to seek another term, but will pick up
a packet.
She \\ as originally elected to a two-year term in
February 2002. but a charter revision later added an-
other nine months to her current term, moving election
of the mayor and all commissioners to a November
ballot.
Changing the qualifying dates from September to
July "creates a number of issues for myself and every-
one thinking of running for public office," SueLynn
observed. "That July date is really pushing us to decide
to run nearly four months before the election."


r' 1. .. ;._'l_.,I -im, W/d iLP ZiN '
'Top Notch' first for Toilette
"How muiich is that doggie in the wimlowu?" asks TiomTolle, te in descr(ibiiig his i'iviing photo taken at
Geraldson's Farm Market in noorthli'est IBradentoli. Judges commnlenited onl the color, and, of 'course, the cute
terrier on the window ledge. Weekly 'iiner's in the eight-w'eek contest receive a coveted "More rThan a
Mullet Wrapper" Islander T-shirt and $50 f)'om the newspaper. 77 e photo will iow go into a pool with other
weekly winners eligible Jor the contest grand-prize package, including $100 from 7'The Islander and a variety
of gift certificates. More inside, page 8.


Ely family arrives at dream vacation

destination Anna Maria Island


Following his tour of duty in Afghanistan and his
letters to Anna Maria Island students, U.S. Army Maj.
Rick Ely and his family have arrived at Anna Maria
Island for a vacation arranged and paid for by the gen-
erosity of Islanders.
Ely and wife Joelle, daughter Kayla, and son Alec
will stay on the Island through Sunday, spending loads
of gift certificates to Island eateries and enjoying some


fun outdoor activities.
On Saturday, a community welcome for the fam-
ily sponsored by The Islander will be held from 10
a.m. to noon, in the auditoriunL of Anna Maria El-
ementary School.
Local officials are expected to deliver welcomes
PLEASE SEE MA,J. ELY, NEXT PAGE


I -19 I I -LI I r


~FIZ131 la~lrl~ r III'I~' II






PAGE 2 0 JUNE 9, 2004 M THE ISLANDER


Two short-listed for Ward 3 commission seat


By Paul Roat
And now there are two.
Bradenton Beach city commissioners deadlocked
on two candidates to join their ranks last week to fill the


Maj. Ely, family visit Island
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
and proclamations of Anna Maria Island's official
Major Rick Ely Week during a program that will be-
gin at 11:30 a.m., and Ely has planned a speech of his
own for the event finale. Musical entertainment will
include local students. There will be refreshments and
a good time for all.
Local businesses and folks have offered accommo-
dations and services to the family and Fantasy Travel
of Bradenton is providing a travel package.
They have a rental car compliments of Paul and
Pierrette Kelly and accommodations for the family are
split between the Tortuga Inn and Gulf Stream Resort/
Diamond Shores Realty. And compliments of
Longboat Limo, Rick and Joelle will ride in style to a
romantic dinner donated by Euphemia Haye.
The family spent Tuesday at Mote Marine
Aquarium, including a behind scenes tour, and a visit
to Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary, including a bay cruise
aboard the Peli-boat.
Other donations have included some generous
amounts of cash, a banner for the welcome from Signs
Made Here, dining certificates to Minnie's Beach Cafe,
Paradise Bagel, Capalbo's, Beach City Market, the
Chiles Group restaurants, Beach House, Sandbar and
Mar Vista, Mama Lo's, the Old Salty Dog, certificates
from Island Scooter Rentals and Bradenton Beach Boat
Rentals, and a half-day fishing trip with Capt. Brian
Kisluk of Out of Line charters.
Also donated is a family beach portrait by Jack Elka
Photograhics. Other certificates were offered by Mama
Lo's and Moore's Stone Crab, and the Anna Maria Island
Moose Lodge will be offering a family dinner.
Joe Hutchinson of Beach-Style Boutique and The
Islander provided custom, commemorative T-shirts


vacant Ward 3 seat on the board, causing a pause in the
selection until June 17.
Mayor John Chappie and Commissioner John
Shaughnessy both favored applicant Tammy Barr, wife


Maj. Rick Ely and fiunily are on the Island this week.
Islander Photo: Nancy Ambrose
which will be offered for sale at the newspaper office
and at Saturday's event for a nominal $6.
Sunday brunch for the family, compliments of
Chef Damon Presswood of Ooh La La! Bistro, will
include the chef's favorite dish for kids of any age -
"real French toast."
Nancy Ambrose of The Islander newspaper and
the Rev. Bill Grossman of Harvey Memorial Commu-
nity Church can be contacted for more information.
Contact Ambrose at 518-4431 or 778-7978, or
Grossman at 224-8608, or stop by The Islander, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


of former Ward 3 Commissioner Scott Barr, for the
post left vacant last month by Peter Barreda's sudden
resignation.
Vice Mayor Anna O'Brien and Commissioner Lisa
Marie Phillips opted for candidate Rob Nachtigal.
With a two-two vote, commissioners opted to post-
pone a decision until the next regular commission
meeting. If neither side flinches, the city charter pre-
scribes that the city clerk "shall draw by lot" a winner
for the vacant seat.
Barr is co-owner and manager of Surfside Realty
in Bradenton Beach. She has a background as a
medical health technician for Manatee Glens Corp.
and Charter Hospitals. She has been a member of
Westminster Presbyterian Church since age 8, and
sits on the Missions Committee, manages the Parents
Night Out Program, and is a Sunday school teacher
there.
She also serves on the board of directors for Safe
Place Inc., and The Circle of Compassion Inc.
Nachtigal is a sales representative for Ward Oil Co.
Inc. in Tampa. He has been a territorial manager for
several petroleum companies in Florida and the south-
east in the past few years, and is a former program ad-
ministrator for the Manatee County School District. He
is a U.S. Navy veteran, and received a bachelor's de-
gree from the University of West Florida.

Idso approved as city

clerk in Bradenton Beach
Bradenton Beach city commissioners have unani-
mously offered the job of city clerk to deputy clerk
Nora Idso.
Idso, who has served in the No. 2 spot in the city
for five years, is expected to take the reins of office
June 23 in the wake of the resignation of Pat Grizzle.
Still to be resolved is the compensation package
and pay scale for Idso, matters that are expected to be
resolved at the June 17 city commission meeting.
Grizzle is leaving the post she has held for 11 years
to be closer to family in Michigan.


On behalf of the sponsors, the charities

and the Mancatee Comminity

Blood Center ... Thankymjo!







arina Pointe i-:. 'z--. --?
Realty Co.
Pine
-Avenue
w Salon
Benefiting ...







Thank oiA for the generous donation of more than 250
individuals who gave theirtime, energy and blood, to make the
2004 Anna Maria Island Blood Drive a success.
We received 220 2anits of blood.

The $100 per donor "reward" totaed 22,000


Thanks again,

and see you next year!




THE ISLANDER M JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 3


Island blood drive nets $22,000 for nonprofits


The Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center
came out on top again in the fourth annual Islandwide
blood drive over the weekend.
Of the 255 hopeful donors, a total of 220 pints of
blood was collected at three locations, and donors des-
ignated a good share of the charity money for Wildlife,
for $10,500. An anonymous benefactor gave $100 to
charity from among four chosen charities for every pint
of blood given.
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will


receive $4,550, West Manatee Fire and Rescue volun-
teers $3,750, Anna Maria Island Privateers $3,200.
Manatee Community Blood Center brought their
staff, a crew of volunteers and three blood mobiles to
the Island for the event. The receiving charities helped
promote the event at each of the three locations, and the
fire volunteers posted an antique firetruck at Publix,
while the Privateers manned their float/boat at Kingfish
Boat Ramp both days.
Blood was taken Saturday and Sunday at sponsors


Marina Pointe Realty and A Pine Avenue Salon, The
Islander, and the Beach House Restaurant, one location
in each Island city. Each city's commission last week
issued a proclamation urging support for the drive.
Donors received commemorative T-shirts, and all
got orange juice and/or water from Tropicana and
Pepsi, plus a cookie baked for the event by Meals on
Wheels courtesy of the sponsors.
The charities will receive their proceeds at a bar-
becue hosted by the sponsors this month.


Take my blood, please
Donor Pain Fortenberry, left, is assisted by Manatee Community Blood Center
staff member of 24 years Carol Mersch, Leslie Laguerre, while Eleni
Rousonelos, Island Fitness Center trainer, right, also gives a pint. Islander
Photo: Bonner Joy


New Island trolleys coming


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The purchase of up to four more trolleys for use by
the Manatee County Area Transit on Anna Maria Is-
land was recently approved by the county commission,
and MCAT's Ralf Hessler hopes to have the new trol-
leys by January 2005.
One thing's certain, however. Hessler doesn't plan
to use the same company that sold the county the five
trolleys MCAT currently utilizes on the popular Island
trolley route.
Those "lemons" have been continually undergoing
maintenance and repairs since a few weeks after they
arrived in March 2002, and are a lot noisier than
MCAT and Islanders expected.
Of the original five trolleys purchased from Arkan-
sas Bus Co., three are currently out of service, forcing
MCAT to use a bus to operate the trolley route.
"Our purpose is to get some spare trolleys that
operate because the ones we have are constantly
down," he noted. In addition, county officials are
*studying the possibility of extending the service to
Longboat Key, and more trolleys would be needed for


that servicec.
Hcssler and the MCAT staff will now draw up
specifications tor the new trolleys and it's a safe bct
they'll be looking at a less noisy engine.
"The design will essentially be the same as the ones
we have now, but we're looking for a lot quieter engine,
and one that can handle the wear and tear," he said.
MCAT will hold public meetings with Islanders
for input before the specificaitons are submitted to the
Florida Department of Transportation for approval.
The DOT is funding 50 percent of the purchase.
Once approved by DOT and the county commis-
sion, the contract will then go out for bid.
"I expect the bid process to take months, and it
will then take at least 12 weeks to get the first trolley
from the manufacturer, once the vendor is selected,"
Hessler noted.
Don't count on Arkansas Bus Co. being in the
mix.
MCAT has experienced a lot of "down time" on
the five current trolleys and Hessler agreed it's fair to
say MCAT and county officials have not been happy
with the service and maintenance provided.


Privateers elect, schedule parade


Eric "Axmon" Rushnell has been elected president
of the Anna Maria Island Privateers, to take office Aug.
I along with other officers.
Meanwhile, plans are moving along well for the
organization's annual Fourth of July parade, and the
Privateers are seeking participants.
Elected with Rushnell were Bruce Witton, vice
president; Elizabeth Christie, re-elected treasurer; Tom
Owen, captain; and Cathy Ensign, secretary.
Rushnell will succeed Gregory "Shiprek"
Davidson as president.
The parade will cover the length of the Island,
starting at 10 a.m. at Coquina Beach and moving
through all three cities to end up at Bayfront Park in
Anna Maria.
A traditional Fourth of July picnic and party will
follow the parade. It will begin at 12:30 p.m. at Cafe


on the Beach at the Manatee Public Beach, where
Manatee Avenue hits the Gulf of Mexico. Picnic food
and refreshments will be available, and live music is
planned.
The parade is far too long for marchers, said Rushnell
and Tim Thompson, who are chairing this year's parade.
So paraders are limited to motor vehicles, bicycles, mo-
torcycles, floats anything with wheels.
The units must be decorated in "colors and style
befitting the spirit of Independence Day," said the
chairmen, and include a sign or banner indicating
whom or what they represent.
There is no fee for participation, but for liability
reasons the Privateers would like entrants to register
with the organization. Forms and further information
are available from Ruslincll at 721-4075 and Thomp-
son at 729-9039.


TODAY I
* I



Donate Blood
i Here Today


Hawking blood
TrYving to bring in the donors at the Anna Maria bloodmobile location were Ken
Broiw'n, attired in Manatee Community Blood Center's "Bloodhound" doggy
costllue, and Privateer Rick Maddox. Islander Photo: Courtesy Tobin Rader


Meetings

Anna Mlaria City
June 9, 6:45 p.m., Environmental Education and En-
hancement Committee meeting.
June 10, 6 p.m., special city commission meeting on
city hall.
June 10, 7 p.m., city commission work session.
June 10, 8:30 p.m., special city commission meeting on
rights of way.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
June 9, 4 p.m., special city commission work meeting
on budget.
June 9, 5 p.m., special city commission work meeting
on proposal by M.T. Causley, Inc., for building official
services.
June 9, 6 p.m., Citizen Advisory Committee For Re-
view and Updating of the Comprehensive Plan and
Land Development Code For Bradenton Beach meet-
ing.
June 10, 4 p.m., special city commission meeting on
ballot issues.
June 10, 5 p.m., special city commission meeting on
emergency operations.
June 15, 1 I. i., scenic highway committee meeting.
June 16, 4 p.m., special city commission meeting on
budget.
June 17, I p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradentmo Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
None scheduled.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
.une 9, 1 I a.m., Island Emergency Operation Center
meeting, Fire Station No. 1, 6001 Marina Drive,
Ilolmes Beach.
June 16, 3 p.m., Coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials meeting, Longhoat Key Town Hall, 501 Bay
Isles Road, Longboat Key.





PAGE 4 0 JUNE 9, 2004 T THE ISLANDER


Board of adjustment grants Moreland variances


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Board of Adjustment granted
two requests from Moreland Marine Development for
variances at a hearing May 27. -
Moreland Marine is planning to redevelop the
Holmes Beach Marina at 202 52nd St. to provide "first-
class, high-end condominiums" Mark Barnebey, the
attorney representing Moreland, told the board.
The property has been rezoned from commercial to
residential and the proposed redevelopment of the 1.68
acres includes nine condo units.
The board granted Moreland Marine's request for
a 3-foot front-yard setback to provide relief for the sec-
ond story of unit nine, which would be located adjacent
to 52nd Street.
Barnebey said the variance ensures that the build-
ing will not be too close to the road and it will allow a
uniform front for all the buildings. He said that since
there is no traffic along 52nd Street, the impact of the


variance to the public is small, although it relieves
Moreland of the financial hardship of redesigning one
building.
Moreland was also granted a height variance for
the fence located along 52nd Street. The property cur-
rently has a 6-foot chain-link fence surrounding the
property, which was permitted under its previous com-
mercial zoning.
Residential fence heights are permitted to be 4 feet.
Moreland plans to maintain a 6-foot fence, but will
replace the chainlink with a masonry-type wall covered
with decorative stucco.
Barnebey said they believe neighbors to the north
of the property will consent to the 6-foot fence along
their property line, and the city allows a 6-foot fence
to be erected between commercial and residential lots.
And Moreland is adjacent to commercial property at its
west property line, therefore it was not required to ob-
tain a variance for that property line.
The board granted both requests unanimously.


In other board business, attorney Stephen Thomp-
son advised the board that his law firm, Porges,
Hamlin, Knowles and Prouty, will be seeking reconsid-
eration of the board's decision last month to deny a
variance request for property owners of 106 74th St.
Thompson said the purpose of the request is to
address a number of issues, including traffic, that were
raised at the hearing in May.
"In reviewing the record, it appears that there were
a number of issues raised by the board that can be ad-
dressed," Thompson said.
He told the board a lawsuit will be filed.
Finally, board Chairman Hugh Holmes Jr. an-
nounced his resignation from the board.
"It's time for some new blood up here," he told the
remaining board members. He said he lost track of the
number of years he served on the board and believes
"we made some good decisions."
Holmes has been a member of the board of adjust-
ment since June 1985.


Ad hoc committee moving forward on land-use map


Anna Maria's ad hoc comprehensive plan review
committee met May 25, to share the final data members
have collected to update the city's existing land-use
map.
Committee members have canvassed the city col-
lecting information to determine the types of lots and
structures within the city and have almost completed
updating the existing land-use map.
"You've done a fantastic job of collecting data for
an existing land-use inventory," said committee facili-
tator Tony Arrant. "The map is pretty complete. I'm
impressed."
Arrant told the committee it's time to decide what
to recommend to the planning and zoning board for the
land-use map. The committee has collected more de-
tailed data than the land use map is required to show.
For example, instead of labeling an area "residential,"
the committee has data that specifies which lots are
single-family or multi-family uses.
Arrant warned the committee that the only down-
side to including so much data is that some of it is in-
terpretive data and will likely be challenged by some
residents.
Once the committee has an official up-to-date land-
use map to work with, it can move forward and begin
preparing recommendations for the city's future land-
use map.
A final element the committee's updated map
needs to show is the jurisdictional boundary of the city.
Arrant said he would work on plotting the boundary
using an aerial photograph of the city.
"At some point you need to move forward," Arrant
told the committee. "I feel you've invested a tremen-
dous amount of time and you will never get 100 per-
cent accuracy. To move forward to reviewing pieces of
the land-use elements, you need to say this is as good
as it gets."
Members volunteered to rewrite specific sections
of the comprehensive plan, then present their work to
the entire committee for review.
Charles Canniff will write the housing element,
while Doug Copeland was assigned to infrastructure.
Chuck Webb is writing the coastal and conservation


Mapping Anna Maria
Members of the Anna Maria Comprehensive Plan Ad Hoc Committee, Chuck White, Chars Char anniff Suzanne
Douglas, Dale Woodl d a nd Doug Copeland, discuss the final details needed to update the citv's existing
land-use malp. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


element while Chuck White is doing double duty, writ-
ing the elements for both recreation and open space and
capital improvements. Suzanne Douglas was given the
intergovernmental coordination element.
Arrant agreed to write the elements for traffic, pub-
lic participation, and monitoring and evaluation.
Arrant said he would like the committee to present
their work to the planning and zoning board in pieces
so the commission can begin reviewing it and moving


forward.
The P&Z will then hold a public hearing on the
plan and forward its recommendations to the city com-
mission, which must hold another public hearing be-
fore adoption.
The revised plans and code are due to the Florida
Department of Community Affairs by March 2005.
Committee members agreed to hold two meetings
in June, at 6 p.m. with the next one June 22.


Solution for Oak, Tarpon: City pays $9,000 more


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
APAC paving contractors of Sarasota and Anna
Maria city engineer Tom Wilcox of Baskerville-
Donovan Inc. have finally agreed to a possible solution
to the long-standing problem of the allegedly shoddy
paving job APAC did on Oak and Tarpon avenues last
year. And it will only cost the city $9,000 more than the
$30,000 it's supposed to pay APAC per the contract.
Wilcox reported to the capital improvements advi-
sory committee June 2 that the proposed agreement had
been "a long time coming."
Originally, the two sides were about $14,000 apart,
and Wilcox had refused to budge.
Under this agreement, which still needs city com-
mission approval, APAC will essentially "cut and re-


place" sections of Oak and Tarpon that have buckled
since the repaving APAC did last August.
APAC will also put down a prime coat and base in
those sections and replace some sections with one-and-
a-half inches of hot mix asphalt.
"This seems to be as good a deal as we are going
to get," said Wilcox.
CIAC member Chuck White agreed. "The
$9,000 is far less than I thought the city would have
to pay."
le recommended the CIAC approve the "deal,"
and send it to the city commission for review and ap-
proval, but stipulated that in the future, the city will
always have "oversight" of capital improvement
projects, even if it requires hiring BDI1 for such ser-
vices.


The CIAC had opted not to retain BDI to oversee
the Oak and Tarpon paving project, believing at the
time that the $30,000 project cost did not justify an
additional $5,000 for BDI inspection services.
Wilcox and other CIAC members have claimed
that APAC failed to put down a "tack coat" as required
by the contract, causing the problems.
Because the APAC contract was "piggy-backed"
with an existing Manatee County contract, there was no
performance bond issued by APAC before paving the
two streets.
The CIAC voted unanimously to recommend that
hie city commission pay the additional $9,000 to
APAC. The company has not received any of the
$30,000 due for the Tarpon-Oak paving.





THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 5


Commissioner, fire chief square off on ad valorem tax


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria City Commissioner Duke Miller has
vowed to lead the charge against the ad valorem tax ref-
erendum requested by the West Manatee Fire & Rescue
District that will be on the Aug. 31 ballot for district vot-
ers.
Although the district is only requesting a maximum
village rate of 1.0 mills for funding, Miller said using ad
valorem taxes to fund the district's budget shortfall is
unfair.
"It's not equitable," said Miller. "To say that I
should pay more in fire taxes because my home is val-
ued higher than another is absurd. Do I pay a higher
rate per kilowatt hour for electricity? Do 1 pay more per
gallon of water consumed?" he asked.
The ad valorem tax would be in addition to the
current assessment, which is based upon square foot-
age of a structure. The assessment system, claimed
Miller, is fair.
But a house with the same square footage as Miller's
in another area of the district might be worth just half of
his house, simply because Miller lives on Anna Maria


Tidemark gets bankruptcy
reorganization extension
The federal bankruptcy court in Tampa on May 28
gave developers of the Tidemark hotel/condominium/
marina project in Holmes Beach until July 15 to come
up with a reorganization plan. And if necessary, said
the court, Tidemark could have up until Sept. 15 to file
the plan.
Approval came despite an objection from Brasota
Mortgage Co. of Bradenton, which is owed $4.3 mil-
lion by Tidemark.
The court has already given Tidemark an addi-
tional 45 days to amend its financial disclosure state-
ment a separate motion from the reorganization plan,
and won't hold a hearing on that issue until on or
after July 15. court documents said.
The proposed 40-unit Tidemark project, just north
of the Wachovia Bank in Holmes Beach, was approved
by the city commission in August 2001.
Tidemark filed for bankruptcy protection in Janu-
ary 2004, citing debts of approximately $5 million.


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Island, where property values are considerably higher than
many areas of the district on the mainland.
"Should I pay twice as much for the same service?"
If the district has a funding problem because of the
assessment cap imposed by the state legislature, then
the district "should present the issue to our legislative
delegation and prevail upon them to increase the cap."
That's better than the "unfair plan you are advocat-
ing."
Miller said he understood the need for the WMFR
budget to be increased to meet the "two-in, two-out"
rule, but is wasn't too long ago that the Island had an
all-volunteer fire department. Now, the WMFR budget
is more than $3 million, and growing annually.
"All we're asking is that the legislature change one
tax in lieu of layering on another- one that is clearly
inequitable by anyone's standard," Miller concluded.
West Manatee Fire & Rescue Chief Andy Price
noted that "no matter which method of taxation" (as-
sessment or ad valorem) is used, "there will always be
people who feel the other method is more fair depend-
ing on their own circumstance."
A few years ago, a number of residents approached
the WMFR board and asked them to change from assess-
ment to ad valorem, said Price. At that time, the board did
not think the idea feasible, but "times have changed."
The fact, said Price, is that most fire districts in
Florida are no longer using the assessment method for
funding, but have opted for ad valorem taxes.
No matter what the WMFR board does, someone
will be upset, he said. "We will never make everyone
happy as you well know, being a city commissioner,
but you must make the right decision even though it
may not be the most popular."
Price also observed that two years ago, several lo-
cal fire districts tried to get an assessment increase
through the legislature, but Gov. Jeb Bush vetoed the
bills, saying tax increases should be dealt with at the
local level.
"Therefore," said Price, "these districts were
forced to go to referendum to get the ad valorem tax
approved, which three areal districts already have."
The chief also said that most fire districts in the
state use ad valorem taxation for revenue, and the av-
erage rate is 2.5 mils.
Because of limited growth in the district, the as-
sessment method does not provide enough revenue
pI


each year, he noted.
With the passage of new state and federal standards
for fire service, such as the "two-in, two-out" rule, "We
are faced with increasing the number of
firefighters needed for each fire truck. This means we
must hire additional personnel to meet these standards
as well as meet new OSHA safety standards adopted by
the state," Price claimed.
It would be nice if the WMFR district covered only
Anna Maria Island, he added, but it doesn't.
"Most people think we cover only the Island but
we actually provide service up to 34th Street West in
Bradenton (just west of Manatee High School) and
south to 27th Avenue, including all of Cortez and Tidy
Island. For an area this size and population, the cost for
fire service is low," he said. Approximatey 40,000
people live in the district, and only about 8,000 are on
the Island.
But times have changed since Price's mother and
father were volunteers to the Island fire service.
"I have been a part of this district for more than 25
years and was here when it was all volunteer and have
seen and been a part of the change from volunteer to
career firefighters," said Price.
The decision to seek an ad valorem tax for fire ser-
vice was not an easy one, but the Island has changed
and property values have skyrocketed, he said. That
forced most of the volunteers to move off the Island.
In addition, said Price, training standards for vol-
unteers have increased dramatically, and fewer people
are willing to go through the extensive training to be a
firefighter unless it is a career.
"This fire board has been very fiscally responsive
to its job and has balanced the needs
of providing quality firefighting services with levying
reasonable taxes," said Price. "I believe they have done
an admirable job," he added.
The August referendum calls for a 1.0 mil cap on
ad valorem taxes for WMFR. A similar referendum in
March 2004 would have allowed the district up to a
3.75 village rate, but was defeated in the district by
128 votes.
Price has said he anticipates that if the present ref-
erendum passes, the district would need only a .5 mill-
age rate to meet its obligations.
If adopted, the 1.0 village rate could not be changed
except by another referendum to district voters.


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PAGE 6 E JUNE 9, 2004 0 THE ISLANDER




Opinion


Missed opportunity?
This week the environmental organization ManaSota-
88 asked the Manatee County Board of Commissioners to
consider public acquisition of the property on Perico Island
proposed for development by Arvida Corp.
The statement by Islander Joan Perry on 88's behalf
says "public ownership, instead of high-rise development,
helps protect the integrity of Manatee's environmental
resources.
She noted that in one of the fastest growing counties
in Florida, there are few opportunities remaining to pur-
chase waterfront property for recreational purposes.
And, Perry said, protecting natural areas is the No. I
goal identified by the county's recently enacted Imagine
Manatee visioning plan.
Also, Joan told commissioners the proposed Perico
development will cause delays in hurricane evacuation, is
incompatible with surrounding neighborhoods, will de-
grade scenic vistas and have negative impacts on natural
resources.
"Perico Island is unique and it has become rare," she
said.
While the purchase would be expensive, she admit-
ted, public ownership would no doubt enhance the qual-
ity of life for many future generations of Manatee res.i-
dents.
ManaSota-88 is asking the county to aggressively
protect Perico Island from "inappropriate high-rise devel-
opment."
And just insert Tidemark or Pine Avenue marina/
store in Perry's comments where you read Perico.
What a missed opportunity for the City of Anna
Maria to scoff at a pricetag of $500,000 for the eyesore
that was once the marina/store on Pine Avenue sits. The
choice for some retail-office-residential development
enveloping the waterfront and towering over Pine Avenue
versus an enhanced historical park will slip away for what
someday will seem a pittance.
Likewise for Holmes Beach, where the city
commission's inquiry into public purchase from the on-
again, off-again Tidemark development, now in bank-
ruptcy, appears to have gone nowhere. A passive water-
front park for fishing, a splash pool for kids, plenty of
boat dockage and fishing opportunities could he had if the
Trust for Public Lands and the eventual owner are
convinced of the greater good.
If we need any encouragement to create a legacy over
shame, then look at the west end of Bridge Street, where
once upon a time Bradenton Beach folks hoped but didn't
pursue purchase of the property south of the Moose
Lodge (now condos) for much needed public parking and
a long public pier into the Gulf of Mexico.
Missed opportunity?



Th "'Islander
JUNE 9, 2004 Vol. 12, No. 31

V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy, bonner@islander.org
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor, paul @islander.org
Diana Bogan, diana@islander.org
Rick Catlin, rick@islander org
Jack Egan
Jack Elka
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy, kevin@islander.org
Doug Dowling
Steve Huntington
Robert Noble
J.L. Robertson
Preston Whaley Jr., news@islander.org
V Advertising Sales
Nancy Ambrose, nancy@islander.org
Rebecca Barnett, rebecca@islander.org
V Offfice Manager
Julia Robertson, julia@islander.org
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price, carrie@islander.org
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster
(All others: news@islander.org)

...i.. ,3 4.
Sd 1993-03 \
W Newspapr e

Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1992-2004 Editorial, sales and production offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
WEB SITE: islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


Sinion

",-lB.. :1


Tootsie says thanks
To all of those who helped in getting Tootsie
back to us safely.
Our family 'ives in Holmes Beach on 62nd
Street and we have the sweetest 13-year-old rat ter-
rier. She is half-blind but runs really fast ioi\ :! .
cause of the glucosamine I give her.)
Somehow Sunday, Tootsie escaped out -i. ,ir
fenced-in-back yard. I received a phone call Iromn
Diane Calderon on Monday saying she may have
Tootsic. I want to thank her very much for her kind-
ness in taking Tootsie for the evening and showing
her so much love.
My daughter was with me at the lime we picked
Tootsie up. It was evident how much she was missed
and you certainly can not believe the love those two
have for each other. Mrs. Calderon told me many
people were involved in helping to bring Tootsie to
safety. I want to thank them all from the bottom of
my heart. It wasn't until I received a call from Anne
Marie, who went into great detail regarding the ad-
venture that Tootsie and everyone involved had that
sunny/rainy Sunday. Thanks to the couple in the
truck, Diane, Anne Marie, Bonner, the guy with the
net, the corralers and everyone who participated in
bringing her home. What great people we have on
this Island to show so much concern for a small ani-
mal who is very much loved by us. Thanks again.
Julie, Grace and Margaret Sainver, Holmes Beach

Woodland's stand
As the parking issue is still unresolved despite a
concerted effort by our commission to deal with this
issue, I would like to take this opportunity to sum-
marize and restate relative comments I have made in
the last six months.
The first step in solving a problem is clearly de-
fining the problem. In the last 10 years the biggest
parking problems have resulted from haphazardly
erecting "No Parking" signs in our city, specifically


on Gulf Boulevard, Gladiolus Street and Beach Av-
enue.
I believe the parking problems that do exist are
normal and routine and can best be handled with
vigilant law enforcement.. Remember that today a
majority of our beach access streets have open park-
ing and our problems are minimal.
I have proposed or supported three parking op-
tions (and still do> which include removing the "No
Parking" signs, provide alternate side of the street
parking, or allow\ individual property owners to
maintain the right of way adjacent to their property
to allow or prohibit parking.
Additionally I h\ve proposed Gulf Boulevard be
handicap parking and a loading/unloading area. 1
also agree with the Willow Avenue residents who
want their street left as it has been for the last 50-
plus years.
I opposed Plan X because I feel it is too restric-
tive, too divisive and too complicated; our recent
meetings certainly reveal many residents agree with
this point. I agree with others who suggest Plan X
creates sign pollution and sends an unfriendly mes-
sage to our neighbors and visitors.
Each commissioner should look at the options as
to what each commissioner could live with or could
not live with. That m ma make it easier for us to reach
a consensus and be able to move forward.
Dale Woodland. Anna Maria city commissioner


Thanks to Rick
The "Our Opinion" column of May 26 regarding
"Memorial Day memories," as written by Rick
Catlin, was truly outstanding and thought provoking.
He not only reminded us of what the true meaning
of the Memorial Holiday is about, but he also helped
us to place today's headlines in their proper perspec-
Sive.
Lou Gutierrez, Holmes Beach and Lake Wales.
Fla.











Opinion
.. ......;. . a-Aja. .oLi

A visitor on parking
I was going to write you a letter about my last visit
to Anna Maria Island, when my wife and 1 picnicked
at Bayfront Park and I explored Bean Point. In that let-
ter I was going to bring up several issues that your pa-
per has covered before. Included was the issue of beach
access zone parking.
But now, since there have been new developments,
I want to address the parking issue itself.
I am a mainlander who has been coming to Anna
Maria Island with my wife since our first date at Co-
quina Beach 22 years ago. We love the coastal village
atmosphere and the great beaches.
After reading your illuminating article on the poor
living on Anna Maria Island, I realized that I too am a
member of the working poor. I would love to live there,
but don't see how I could, nor when, if ever, I could. So
all I can do is come and visit whenever I can afford it.
My father, Ron Johnson, was also a longtime visi-
tor who loved to fish at the Anna Maria City Pier,
catching trout with jigs and mackerel with a hook and
a piece of straw. I used fish to with him often. But since
his passing I don't fish much because I hate to fish
alone. So I am content to explore and watch.
When we last visited the Island, I drove through the
four-way stop at Gulf and Pine, taking the curve from
Snapper to Coconut to North Shore Drive. Turning left,
I followed North Shore around, approaching Bean
Point from the south.
As I drove I noticed that most of the "No Parking"
signs had been removed along most of the streets, but
when I came to the entrance to the walkway to Bean
Point, there were signs all over the place, on both sides
of the road and along North Bay Drive.
By then I was totally confused as to where I could
or couldn't park, so I continued on to Bayfront Park.
There I found a handicapped spot for my wife. We had
our picnic at the nearest covered table.
Then I left my wife with her craft work, gathered


my binoculars, and walked out to the beach. I walked
west along the tide line until I arrived at the Rod & Reel
Pier. There 1 crossed over to North Shore Drive be-
cause the tide was high and I did not feel like climbing
over those bloody rocks further up along the beach.
Now, if Plan X for parking in the Beach Access
Zone had been approved, there might have been a
handicapped parking space by the walkway to Bean
Point so that my wife might have been able to travel the
walkway in her scooter.
But now I read that a commissioner has changed
her vote and there is no longer a parking plan! Now it's
back to the drawing board and the lowly, poor main-
lander is left out. Yes, your city is slowly becoming
expensive and elitist.
Thank you very much for making me feel like I am
not welcome in your community.
Tim Johnson, Bradenton
Manatee wins
The Protect Our Reef license plate was introduced
in February of this year. During April, Mote Marine
Laboratory sponsored a Protect Our Reef plate sale
between the Manatee, Sarasota and Hillsborough coun-
ties' tax collector's offices.
We are happy to announce that Manatee County
won the contest. We sold more plates than the larger
counties and Mote didn't even need to use the popu-
lation formula they had devised for the contest.
Mote Marine, located on Longboat Key in
Sarasota County, is one of the designated recipients
of funds generated by the reef plate sales. Mote has
established itself as one of the premier marine sci-
ence institutions in research, education, aquaculture
and rehabilitation. We are proud to be a contributing
partner in its continued excellence.
One again the people of Manatee County
showed their community spirit and pride. Well done
and thank you.
Ken Biurton Jr., Manatee Conntv tax collector


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 7




TM der



Ten years ago, the June 9, 1994,
issue of The Islander announced that:
Engineers began designing $160,000 worth of
repairs on the Key Royale Bridge in Holmes Beach
after getting approval from Superintendent of Public
Works John Fernandez.
The Florida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection sent a letter to the Department of Transportation
expressing its continued concern for the proposed new
65-foot, fixed-span Anna Maria Island Bridge. The
DEP has refused to issue a permit to the DOT, citing
concerns for the loss of seagrass beds and mangroves.
A committee in Anna Maria has begun studying
the possibility of re-zoning the city's commercial dis-
trict to allow single-family homes. The new zoning
district would combine residential-office-retail with
commercial and be called multi-use general.


STUIRGEION


GENERAL 'S


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you the news!
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. feet way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island. .
" More than 1.400 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid subscribers are already
* receiving The Islander where they live ... from Alaska to Germany and
* California to Canada.
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happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
* tate transactions ... everything you need if your "heart is on the Island." We're "
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S3W/I t-OM .,6 I(', r : t f, l A f I ;T


PAGE 8 0 JUNE 9, 2004 M THE ISLANDER


Former P&Z chair concerned about Pine development


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Former Anna Maria planning and zoning board
chairman Doug Copeland has expressed concern about
the board's recent approval of an application by Nikki
and Robert Hunt of 303 Pine Ave. for a development
in the retail-office-residential district.
Copeland said he was "surprised and shocked" to
learn that the plans call for three levels of occupancy.
His interpretation of the city's comprehensive plan and
land development regulations is that only two levels of
occupancy would be allowed in the ROR.
He said he checked with Building Official Kevin
Donohue, who said his interpretation was that three
levels of occupancy were allowed.
"If, indeed, his conclusions are correct," Copeland
said in a letter to Mayor SueLynn and city commission-
ers, "I believe development along Pine Avenue would
eventually result in a corridor of three-level buildings
that would give a canyon-like appearance to this
street."
He asked the commission to determine if develop-
ment of three-level structures in the ROR is allowable
and, if not, then halt the project.
However, if such structures are allowed, then "re-
view and change our codes to prevent future develop-
ment of this kind," Copeland concluded.
The board voted unanimously at a public meeting
May 24 to approve the development. There was no
public opposition to the project.
Board members found general favor with the site
plan and architecture, and board chairman Bob Barlow
said the site plan followed the city's visioning state-
ment.
The Hunts were unable to proceed with their
project from December 2003 to April 2004 because of
a building moratorium in the city.


But Commissioner Linda Cramer said she had
some concerns about the project, along with the build-
ing official's interpretation of the code. She said she's
not sure if the structure conforms to the adjacent prop-
erties.


"It's a big concern and I intend to raise some ques-
tions when comes before the commission," she said.
Commission Chairperson John Quam said the P&Z
recommendation on the Hunts property should be on
the June 24 meeting agenda.


L* '


Stomping the beach
Christine Jennings, retired Sarasota Bank president, community leader and Democratic Party candidatefor
Congress, brought her message to the beach Memorial Day, May 31, to greet voters, including Dan Doegele
of Bradenton, left. She walked the length of Coquina Beach with a team of campaign workers, asking
beachgoers to vote for her in the Aug. 31 primary. Jennings is seeking to unseat 13th District Congresswoman
Katherine Harris. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


'Top Notch' photo contest under way in June


If you've got a great snapshot, we've got a contest
you could win.
The Islander photo contest will begin publishing
weekly winning photos on June 9. Eight weekly win-
ning pictures will be featured on the cover of The Is-
lander and one snapshot will be a grand prize winner
with prizes and gift certificates awarded by the news-
paper and local merchants.
The weekly deadline is noon Friday throughout the
contest with the first deadline June 4.
Judging begins by a selection of pictures that may
include abstract photos, still life pictures, landscapes
and scenics, candid unposed snapshots, action, holi-
days, humor and animal pictures. Nothing is over-
looked, including great kid pics, sentimental moments
and moments of personal triumph.
Send or deliver your favorites (no limits) weekly
to Top Notch Contest Editor, The Islander, 5404 Ma-


rina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
Digital contest entries should be submitte4din the
original JPG format via e-mail to
topnotch@islander.org or on CD. No retouching, en-
hancements or computer manipulation is allowed.
Complete rules and entry forms for the contest are
published below. Please attachia photo contest label to
each photo or CD you submit.
E-mail entrants must submit the label information
in the text of the e-mail, one photo attachment per e-
mail.
Photos without entry forms will be disqualified.
Additional photo labels are available at the newspaper
office or they may be copied.

Top notch Flipper photo
SS i~ii'tv',Yafs" tao? thit tPvtyire of an appar-
ently ihapy dolphin in July 2202.


'V


Islander photo contest rules
1) The Islander Newspaper's Top Notch Photo Con-
test is strictly for amateur photographers. Amateur photogra-
phers are those who derive less than 5 percent of their income
from photography.
2) Black-and-white and color photographs taken after Jan.
1, 2003, are eligible. This allows for extended eligibility. Pho-
tos previously published (in any format/media) or entered in
any Islander or other competitions are not eligible.
3) Photographs may be taken with any make of camera.
No retouching or other alteration (except cropping) is permit-
ted of negatives, prints or electronic photo files; no compos-


NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


ite pictures or multiple printing will be accepted. Digital photos
may be submitted in their original JPG file format (via e-mail or
disk) or a printed photograph. Slide (transparency) photos are not
accepted.
4) Entrant's name, address and phone number must be writ-
ten clearly, in ink, on the contest label and affixed to the back of
each print, or listed similarly in the e-mail message along with the
digital photo attachment. One e-mail per photo submission. Mail
entries to The Islander Top Notch Photo Contest, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217. E-mail digital entries to
topnotch @islander.org.
5) Entrants by their entry agree that The Islander may publish
their pictures for local promotion. Entrants must be able to furnish


NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


the original negative or original digital image if requested by the
contest editor. Alt photos subrnitted~become the property of The
Islander. Photos will not be returned. The Islander and con-
test sponsors assume no responsibility for negatives, diskettes,
CDs or photo prints.
Entrant must know the name and address of any recogniz-
able persons appearing in the picture and those must be en-
closed/attached With the entry.
6) Employees of The Islander and their immediate family
members are not eligible to enter the contest.
7) Any taxes on prizes are the sole responsibility of the
winners. Any cash prize won by a minor will be awarded to a
parent or guardian. Prize rights are not transferable.


NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


I




THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 9


AMI SALUTES MAJOR ELY










U.S. Army Major Rick Ely Week
June 7-13

COMMUNITYWELCOME
10-Noon Saturday Anna Maria Elementary
Meet Maj. Ely and family! Refreshments! Music!
Presentation Program at I 1:30 a.m.
Join us in saluting Maj. Ely for his remarkable contribution
to the U.S. Armed Forces and his thoughtful attention
and grateful letters to Anna Maria Island youths through the
Harvey Memorial Community Church's Soldier's Heart program.
Thank you to everyone who made generous contributions
to his family's trip to Anna Maria Island.

Anna Maria
The Islander
941 778 7978
news@islander.org





PAGE 10 0 JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER


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By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The mother of an 8-year-old Holmes Beach girl
who went swimming in the waters off Bayfront Park in
Anna Maria in late May said her daughter developed
a mysterious itch and fever that had Blake Medical
Center and county health officials baffled.
A doctor at Blake eventually sent the child by ambu-
lance to All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg where
the girl was diagnosed with salmonella poisoning.
"She was itching bad and had diarrhea and stom-
ach cramps, and was vomiting and had a fever," said
Sharla Capitano. Three other girls on the same field trip
also developed an itch after swimming, but no other
symptoms, she said.
Doctors at All Children's told Capitano that the
poisoning could have come from food the girl ate,
something she drank, contact with an infected person,
or possibly contaminated sea water.
Her daughter is home now after a week-long stay


in All Children's, but Capitano is concerned that oth-
ers might bathe in Bayfront Park waters and come
away with the same problem.
County health officials the past two years have is-
sued occasional advisory warnings to bathers in the
area that high levels of bacteria had been detected that
could cause a rash, itching or diarrhea, but no such
warnings were in effect at the time of the field trip, the
woman said.
"We even checked with the county. They said the
waters were OK. It's strange," Capitano noted.
County health official Charles Henry said testing
of Bayfront Park waters the past few weeks has not de-
tected any high levels of bacteria, leading him to be-
lieve the problem could have been high algae levels or
jellyfish larvae in the water.
"We only test for bacteria, but there are other
things in the water that can cause problems for people,"
he said. "All our beach testing the past few weeks has
shown clean water" for bacteria, Henry added.


Rummage
'sale.ing'
A rummage
sale with
"everything at
half price"
Saturday at St.
Bernard
Catholic
S Church in
Holmes Beach
saw plenty of
shoppers,
including
Caroline
r Malfese, left,
and Eva
.... Pringle, right.
Si. Islander
Photo: Nancy
Ambrose


Turtles slow, as some beach people


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By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"Everybody knows turtles are slow, but this is ri-
diculous," said Suzi Fox as she totted up only 12 nests
almost six weeks into the 2004 season.
It's not disturbing her, not yet anyway, for "they're
out there in the Gulf swimming around on the surface
and getting ready to come ashore in hordes.
"When they come in, it will be like an invasion.
That's OK, we'll handle it. It's their business, they
know best. But I wish they'd get a move on."
Fox is director of the Island's Turtle Watch and holds
the state permit for marine turtle preservation. One of her
main frustrations every nesting season May I -Oct. 31
- is keeping the Island's beaches clear of litter.
And that makes her think it may be just as well the
turtles are holding off, for the beaches are littered with
chairs, blankets, cans, even tents that people have
brought, used and left.
When a loggerhead turtle encounters even a small
object, the 300-pound reptile turns around and goes back
to sea. It doesn't know what the object is, whether it's a
threat, what it's all about. This is not a house pet that sim-
ply maneuvers around things. Loggerheads come ashore
only to nest, and it's very unfamiliar territory.
The marine turtle chooses the better part of valor
and heads back out to safe territory water -
somtimes dumping its clutch of eggs. Sea turtles
haven't survived millions of years by rushing into the
unknown.
Fox hasn't found an instance where beach clutter


has thwarted a nest, but it's bound to happen and she
wants to avoid it "It's so easy."
"People have to reach down in their hearts and see
what they want to do, leave a three-pound lawn chair
on the beach or help save an endangered species," she
said.
The clutter is up and down the beach in all three
cities, she said,, but Holmes Beach may out-clutter the
other two cities because it doesn't have a law prohib-
iting it. Turtle Watch figures if an article is not used for
a week, its owners have left town and abandoned it. So
someone else has to clean up after them: Turtle Watch
volunteers, who have better things to do such as search
out nests.
Even so, one more turtle found her way up the
beach Sunday night and beach patrollers found her nest
at 65th Street. "I'm pleased that there was no debris on
that beach," Fox said. "So are the people there, many
came up to me and said 'We just brought our tent in.'"
Otherwise, turtles are getting uncommon respect
this year. There are few lighting problems, which usu-
ally are the bane of Turtle Watchers' lives. Nesting
moms and newly hatched turtles, digging up to the
nest's surface at night, instinctively head for light. For
millions of years that meant the sparkle of the sea, but
now human lights are distracting them upland, very
often to their death. So lights visible from the beach
have to be shielded or turned off during the season.
To report turtle activity or human interference, call
778-1435 or 232-1405, or come to the Turtle Watch
Education Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


- I.


Mystery itch at Bayfront Park


is salmonella poisoning




























Brown-Dean wed
Mrs. Julia Brown and Mr. Trov Dean were mar-
ried and had their reception at the Beach House
Restaurant on Tuesday. May 14. 2004. The couple
resides in Brandon. Islander Photo: Courtesy of
Marsha Garlinger


Bruggner.Rose wed
Sarah Bruggner and Matthew Rose were married at
the Sandbar restaurant in Annia Maria June 5. Sarah
works in the administration office at New Gate
School in Sarasota and Matthew is a. firefighter at
Cedar-Hammock Fire & Rescue.


Cook-Richardson wed
Genova Cook and Paul Richardson were married atr
the Sandbar Restaurant in Anna Maria. Sihe is a
researcher for the University of Washington andl he
teaches drmrn corps. They are living now in
Maplewood, Mo.


Lykens-Sapuppo wed
Amber l kens and Shoutwn Sii"qu>/( w)rc/'<' lnrried i't
the Saniuilhr resltairanlt 1on June 6. A\,nhcr is a 2000()
,c,,radutlce of UBavshorc Hil.' School uuandl is employ
at Blake Medical Center. Shawn is a 1997 gr'adtuate
of Bayshore High School and is 'employed at laFnou.s
Craft.


Garner heads FISH, Shore joins board


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Allen Garner promises "with luck, more of the
same" for his term as president of the Florida Institute
for Saltwater Heritage in Cortez.
Garner succeeds Blue Fulford, who is now presi-
dent emeritus. Officers and board members were
elected at the annual meeting of the organization,
which has become the focal point of action in Cortez.
The main focus at the moment is seeking proposals
from contractors to finish restoration work on the old
Cortez school building, Garner said, and getting exotic
growth off 23 acres of uplands in the FISH Preserve.
Newly elected to the board of directors is Chips
Shore, Manatee County's clerk of the circuit court,
whose jurisdiction includes all things to do with his-
toric preservation. A major project of FISH is restora-
tion of the 1912-built schoolhouse and its conversion
to a community center and base of the new Florida Gulf
Coast Maritime Museum, and Shore has been a strong
supporter of the project.
Fulford, retired commercial fisherman and long a
force in his trade as well as in Cortez, will remain a di-
rector. He had been president of FISH since he helped
found it in 1993. He has guided it through triumph and
controversy as it grew into the nerve center of much of
the civic activity of the historic fishing village.
Garner is a longtime activist there, descendant of
a long line of fishermen and a strong advocate of any-
thing that will benefit Cortez and relentless foe of
things Cortez deems harmful to its interests condo-
miniums particularly. He lives in West Bradenton but
still headquarters in Cortez, where his landscape engi-
neering company has offices in the Star Fish Co. build-
ing a business he formerly owned.
Elected with him were Richard Culbreath, vice


president: Karen Bell. longtime treasurer: Jeri
Culbreath, corresponding secretary: and Debbie
Hoffman,. recording secretary.
New directors along with Shore are Mark
Ibasfalean. Marianne Norman-Ellis and Tim Caniff.
They join incumbents Patty Banyas. the Culbreaths,
Maxine Myford. Capt. Zach Zacharias, Linda Molto,
Garner, Bell, and Judy Breuggeman. who is finishing
the term of her late husband Ernie Whitney. Fulford
will continue on the board.
The meeting cheered the final payment on the
FISH Preserve, 95 acres that FISH bought from the
Shewe estate to provide a permanent buffer against
condo development.
The organization decided to begin negotiations to
purchase two vacant lots within the Preserve's bound-
aries on Cortez Road.



Bridge repairs

continue
Two bridges to the Island will be undergoing
repair work this week.
At the Anna Maria Island Bridge on Manatee
Avenue, crews will be doing regular maintenance
through June 10. The work will be at night be-
tween the hours of 9 p.m.-5 a.m., and motorists
should expect intermittent lane closures, accord-
ing to the Florida Department of Transportation.
At the Longboat Pass Bridge, an ongoing re-
habilitation project will continue with intermittent
lane closures, and one sidewalk nmay be closed to
pedestrians.


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 11


778-4751


800-771-7163
5312 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
www.island-florist.com



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PAGE 12 0 JUNE 9, 2004 E THE ISLANDER

CME studies


newsrack


ordinance
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Members of the Bradenton Beach Scenic High-
way Committee Corridor Management Entity agreed
to study adding more modular newsracks in the city
after learning that the free-standing racks on 13th
Street North were in disarray.
CME Chairperson Judy Giovanelli told the board
at its June I meeting that the original newsrack pro-
gram only funded six modular units, and the
newsracks on 13th Street were not included.
"So, we need to follow up on adding more," she
suggested. Members agreed, but decided to study a
proposed ordinance governing newsracks and forward
a recommendation to the city commission.
The current six modular newsrack locations in
Bradenton Beach were put together under a
"gentlemen's agreement" among the various media
organizations operating in the city.
Board member Bill Shearon, however, pointed
out that without an ordinance, there is nothing to stop
the smaller publications from placing newsracks
wherever they can find a location.
In other business, CME members reviewed the
county's planned multi-use path from Fifth Street
South through Coquina Beach on the west side of
Gulf Drive, and learned to their dismay that many
Australian pines will be removed for the path.
"You're going to get a lot of opposition to remov-
ing those pines," said Giovanelli.
Maybe, noted Shearon, but the county said it
would replace those pines with native Florida trees.
The actual number of pines to be removed is unknown
at this time, he added.
The CME will also ask the county to consider
extending the path from its current beginning at Fifth


Butterfly dance
Toddlers Lauren George, Kiana Kern and Rhvanna Gilnan will perform at the "Steppin' Out 2004"
dance exhibition at the Riverfront Theatre June 12. Dancer Emmnie Gallagher is not pictured. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan


Tykes dance at Riverfront Theatre


Dance Director Darlene Friedrich and her
students will take the stage at the Riverfront The-
atre at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 12, for their
"Steppin' Out 2004" dance performance.
Friedrich teaches dance at the Island Fitness
Center in Holmes Beach and Saturday's perfor-
mance will feature dancers from age three to

Street South back to Fourth Street South to accommo-
date a trolley stop there.
Shearon also observed that the Manatee County


adult.
Advance tickets cost $9 for adults and $5 for
children 10 and under. The day of the perfor-
mance tickets increase $1.
The Riverfront Theatre is located at 102 Old
Main St., Bradenton.
For more information, call 748-4476.

Area Transit promised in 2000 to add four to six bus
shelters in Bradenton Beach within three years, but
have not done so to date.


City of

-Holmes Beach


PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a GENERAL
ELECTION will be held in the City of Holmes Beach on
Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

This election is being held for the purpose of electing two
(2) City Commission members and one (1) Mayor for two-
year terms of office each.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that petitions may be
filed to have the names of candidates placed on the ballot from
12:00 noon on July 12, 2004, to 12:00 noon on July 16, 2004.
Candidate qualifying information may be obtained at City
Hall, 5801 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida. All candi-
dates must comply with the Florida Public Disclosure Law at
the time of filing.
PRECINCT 92 will vote at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida. PRECINCT 93
will vote at St. Bemard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive,
Holmes Beach, Florida.
Voter registration books will close Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2004,
at 5 p.m.
City of Holmes Beach
Brooke A. Bennett
City Clerk


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THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 13


Island Biz


"

::I-;;~.
1
i. Ri


,,
I,


Lee's Oasis for women
Lee Levandoski of Island Physical Therapy in the
Island Fitness building in Holmes Beach opened the
Oasis Fitness for women yesterday. Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin

An 'Oasis' for women
Lee and Melanie Levandoski opened The Oasis
fitness center for women yesterday in the Island Fitness
Center building at 5319 Gulf Drive in Holmes Beach.
The Oasis is adjacent to Island Physical Therapy,
which the Levandoskis also own and operate, and has
access to the Island Fitness Center.
"We wanted something supportive of the female
environment with all amenities," said Lee.
The Oasis will allow women to "get fit, have fun,
lose weight and change their lives," he added. Oasis
membership is $25 per month, said Lee.
Oasis members will be able to join many of the
classes such as yoga and aerobics at Island Fitness
Center at a discounted price.
For more information on The Oasis or Island
Physical Therapy, call Lee or Melanie at 778-5446.


Amy is a native
Bradenton native and Bradenton Beach resident Amy
Talucci and "D-O-G" recently purchased the
Restless Natives art shop in the Holmes Beach
Shopping Center at 5314 Marina Drive. Islander
Photo: Rick Catlin

Amy is now a restless native
Long-time Bradenton Beach resident and
Bradenton native Amy Talucci recently realized her
dream when she purchased the Restless Natives art
consignment shop in the Island Shopping Center at
5314 Marina Drive in Holmes Beach.
"It was something I've always wanted to do," said
Amy, who is the daughter of Island residents Jo Ann
and Don Meilnor, volunteers with a number of local
projects.
"I love art," said Amy, "and I will have some of
my own work on display, but we have more than 90
artists represented in the shop."
Artist contributions include jewelry, pottery,


~m __~j_


L*-


IT


prints, photography, hand-made clothes, refurbished
and repainted furniture and antiques, to name just a
few.
Amy is always looking for new, local artists and
invited anyone with unusual designs or artwork to visit
the store.
A grand opening is planned from 5-8 p.m. Friday,
June 18, with live guitar music and some great cheese
and wine.
"And lots of friendly artists and folks," Amy prom-
ised with a laugh.
Store hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday.
To learn more about Restless Natives, call Amy at
779-2624.

Ansleys now a Richard's
Richard's Whole Foods of Sarasota has pur-
chased the Ansley Health Food store at 5344 Gulf
Drive in the S&S Plaza in Holmes Beach and reopened
yesterday under the new name.
Richard's was founded in 1979 and now has I I
locations in the Bradenton-Sarasota area.
The new store will carry its own brand of health
food products, in addition to a number of leading lables
of health products. The store will specialize in selling
bulk items to customers.
For more information, call Richard's at 778-4322.









J-


Parrish Gallagher


Top guns at Cannons
David Miller, owner of Cannons Marina at 6040
Gulf of Mexico Drive on Longboat Key, recently an-
nounced the promotions of Benny Parrish to marina
manager and Jim Gallagher to assistant manager.
Parrish has earned many awards and certificates
during his 22 years at Cannons, including a Yamaha
Masters Degree in product training and a five-star ser-
vice certificate from Yamaha Outboards. He is also a
recipient of the Service Technician and Product Spe-
cialist certifications from Grady-White Boats.
Gallagher, an 18-year staff member at Cannons,
has also received the Product Specialist certificate from
Grady-White Boats.
"Thanks to people like Benny and Jim, Cannons
Marina is celebrating our 49th year in our original lo-
cation on Longboat Key," said Miller.
For more information on Cannons, call 383-1311,
or visit the marina Web site at Cannons.com.

Galati to host

cruiser meeting
Galati Yacht Sales on South Bay Drive in Anna
Maria has been selected to host the annual meeting of
Cruisers Yachts International dealers in St. Petersburg
July 23-28.
Boat dealers from around the world will be at the
annual meeting and Cruisers Yachts will display its
new 2005 models at the Vinoy Yacht Marina in front
of the historic Renaissance Vinoy Hotel in downtown
St. Petersburg.
Galati Yacht Sales also operates a marina/sales
office in St. Petersburg on Gandy Boulevard.
To learn more about the meeting and Cruisers
Yachts, call 778-0755.

Designer joins O'Brien

architectural firm
Noted Island home, business and condominium
designer Emily Anne Smith has joined O'Brien Ar-
chitects of Bradenton. Smith was formerly with
Eatman and Smith of Bradenlon Beach.


Sandy Oldlhai and daughter, Sarah, 10, stand by the
rnew deli counter iat the rejuvenated Pine Avenue
(;Gneral Store. Islander Photo: Heather Beddow

Pine Avenue General Store

reopens in Anna Maria
After days of painting, decorating and cleaning,
Pine Avenue General Store, located at 307 Pine Ave.
in Anna Maria, is ready for business and so is the deli.
Island residents can't believe the transformation
and are excited about the new look. The convenience
store is the only one located on the north end of the
Island, which makes trips to the store for much needed
items more convenient for north-end Island residents.
Sandy and Steve Oldham are the new owners of the
store and have successfully given the building some
"old Florida charm."
Painting and renovating took 10 days, Sandy said,
and people were amazed.
Several fish decorations are positioned above the
entrance of the newly painted building; there are new
teal shutters and a picnic table to welcome customers.
"I love it," real estate agent, Barbara Sato, of
nearby Betsy Hills Real Estate said. "It was a much
needed improvement of Pine Avenue."
The store provides "curbside" service for handi-
capped persons and a sign out front reads, "Honk for
Service."
Sandy said she wants Pine Avenue General Store
to be handicap accessible and she said they also provide
call-ahead service.
The Oldham's two daughters, Sarah, 10, and
Michelle, 9, are very helpful in the store and enjoy
spending the day with their parents.
Michelle said she likes the store to stay busy and
her favorite part is running the cash register by the deli
counter.
The deli counter was also renovated within the
store and arrays of sandwiches are priced between
$3.99 and $6.99. The Oldham's use Boar's Head deli
products and Sandy noted that the Cuban sandwich is
very popular.
The hours are Monday through Thursday 7 a.m. to
9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., and
Sunday 9 a.m. to 8 p.n.


No Seafood Shack sale
Ham Jones, owner of the Seafood Shack in
Cortez, said reports of the sale of the restaurant are
totally untrue.
"1 have not sold the Seafood Shack, the Showboat,
or anything else," said Jones, who added with a laugh
that these "rumors" have been around for years.
A similar report that the Keyway RV park on
Cortez Road near the Seafood Shack had been sold is
also untrue, according to park residents, although there
appears to an offer pending, said one resident.


Realty raves
Geoff Wall led both in obtaining new listings and
in making sales during May at the Holmes Beach of-
fice of Wedebrock Real Estate Co. Other top sales-
people at the office were the team of Missi Watkins and
Lee Kinworthy. Leaders in the Longboat Key office
were Tina Rudek in new listings and Cindy and Gary
LaFlamme, Karen Ankerstar and Rudek in sales.
Marianne Correll got more new listings than
anyone else at Island Real Estate during May, while
Liz Blandford and Richard Freeman shared top sales
honors.





PAGE 14 E JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER


Holmes Beach considers


residential landscaping site plan


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Stung by the apparent decline in "greenery" in
Holmes Beach, the city's parks and beautification com-
mittee has begun preparing a landscaping site plan or-
dinance that would affect all new single-family homes
and duplexes and remodeling of such structures.
The city's current landscape ordinance requires
a landscaping site plan only for major projects, and
excludes single-family homes and duplexes. The
only vegetative landscaping requirement for new
single-family homes and duplexes is to provide six
small bushes and two trees. Once a certificate of
occupancy is issued, those bushes and trees could die
or even be removed, Building Official Bill Saunders
noted, and that's a code enforcement issue.
Member Debbie Heger showed pictures of prop-
erties, mostly rental duplexes, where all the shrub-
bery and grass had been removed and replaced with


Find the friendly

Anna Maria skies
Anna Maria's environmental education and en-
hancement committee is inviting the public to attend a
presentation at 7 p.m. tonight on "Night Skies and
Environmentally Friendly Lighting."
Speakers include George Fleenor, Florida section
leader of the International Dark Sky Association, and
Rick Parker of Beeman Lighting Co. in Bradenton.
Fleenor's organization is dedicated to "preserving
and protecting the nighttime environment" and the
heritage of dark skies through "quality outdoor light-
ing," an EEEC press release said.
Beeman Lighting is a local company "that pro-
duces innovative alternative low wave-length outdoor
lighting," the release added.
The meeting will take place at Anna Maria City
Hall at 10005 Gulf Drive.
For more information, call 708-6130.





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1 .


just rocks.
Exactly the problem, said Saunders. Owners of
such units want minimal maintenance costs, and the
answer is a rock yard and garden. Some properties, he
said, may not be fulfilling the basic landscaping re-
quirement of six shrubs and two trees after getting a
certificate of occupancy, and that's back to code en-
forcement.
Saunders agreed with the committee that the cur-
rent code on landscaping is "fragmented."
As an example, the current 12-unit condo-
minium project on the six lots formerly occupied by
the Christian Science Church on Marina Drive does
not have to submit a landscaping site plan, although
the developers have indicated extensive landscaping
in their advertising. Those lots are zoned for single-
family homes or duplexes, and the development does
not have to submit a landscaping site plan under the
current ordinance.
At the same time, however, the proposed condo-
minium project where the Holmes Beach Marina is
located will have to provide a landscaping site plan
because it plans to build nine units oil a single lot.
Members also discussed the rerlno\'al of trees on
private property, but Public Works l)irector Joe
Duennes pointed out that thllere is no permit required by
a homeowner to remove a tree on his or her property,
and no replacement required.
The committee is also concerned about water con-
servation and Heger presented a Sarasota County ordi-
nance for water conservation for new homes and con-
struction. She would like any new landscaping site-plan
ordinance to tie in with water conservation.
Committee Chairman Jim Gloth suggested mem-
bers write down what they would like included in a
landscaping site-plan ordinance for new homes, du-
plexes and remodeling projects, and bring those to the
August meeting.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, ELCA


me ,vww.gloriadeilutheran.com
"&, 6608 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
s -778-1813


AN INTERDENOMINATIONAL COMMUNITY CHURCH
HARVEY MEMORIAL
i .'~ PASTOR BILL GROSSMAN
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300 CHURCH AVE. BRADENTON BEACH
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VWatercolors hv Doana Taylor such as this one will
he on exihiit throughll Jlune 19 at Gallery West, 5368
Gulf Drive. Holmes Beach. The Gulfport artist has
heen painting tropicalJ flowers and seascapes for 25
years. Gallery hours are O1 a.m.-5 p.mi. Monday-
SaturdayI. Details at 778-6648.
Once the committee has prepared a draft ordi-
nance, it will present it to the city commission as a rec-
ommendation.
The commission would have to review such an
ordinance and hold public hearings before it could be
passed into the municipal code.
Gloth pointed out that existing homes and struc-
tures could be given educational materials on planting
non-invasive and native vegetation to beautify the lo-
cation, and would not fall under the landscaping site-
plan ordinance.

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THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 M PAGE 15


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports.

Bradenton Beach
May 30, alcohol violation, 900 block Gulf Drive
North. Officers were checking several cars parked
near a closed business when open containers of al-
cohol were observed in one of the vehicles. When
the car's occupants appeared, they were determined
to be under 21 years of age. The driver of the vehicle
was issued a summons.
May 31, traffic, 1600 block Gulf Drive South.
Officers stopped a vehicle that was emitting a large
cloud of black smoke and, after checking the driver's
license and registration, determined the license was
suspended and the tag was seized and the driver is-
sued a citation.

Holmes Beach
May 28, theft of vehicle, 2900 block Avenue C.
The complainant said that he had moved his motor
home so the grass growing under it could be mowed,
left the keys in the vehicle, and when he returned the
next day the vehicle was gone. Bradenton police
later recovered the missing mobile home.
May 28, theft, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee Public
Beach. The complainant said someone stole a back-
pack left on the beach. Credit cards within a wallet
in the pack were used a several locations in the city.
June 2, domestic, 200 block Haverkos Lane. Po-
lice were called to intervene in an argument between
a girlfriend-boyfriend that escalated into the woman
being struck in the face by her friend, according to
the report. She decided to spend the night elsewhere.
June 2, suspicious vehicle, 30th Street. Officers
responded to a report of a suspicious vehicle. The
registered owner was contacted, explained to police
that she had sold the car and did not know it was still
listed in her name, and code enforcement was con-
tacted to deal with the matter.


Holmes Beach Police on Friday arrested
Rhonald C. Gupton, 38, of the 5600 block of
Guava Street after he allegedly exposed himself in
the presence of persons under the age of 16.
According to Lt. Dale Stephenson of the
HBPD, officers were called to the area around 7:55
p.m. after witnesses reported that Gupton had ex-
posed himself to persons younger than 16 who


Obituaries


Aletha Grace Garbacz
Aletha Grace Garbacz, 80, of Holmes Beach, died
June 3.
Born in Indiana, Mrs. Garbacz moved to Holmes
Beach from Michigan City, Ind., in 1999. She was a
bookkeeper. She was Catholic.
A gathering of friends was held on June 6. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, was in charge of
arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Ann Glick of Michi-
gan City and Nina Waldron of LaPort. Ind.; sons
Daniel and William, both of Michigan City, and Tom
of Anna Maria: four sisters: one brother: six grandchil-
dren: and two great-grandchildren.
Vadis F. Hull
Vadis F. Hull, 67, of Holmes Beach, died May 30.
Born in Sand Gap, Ky.. Mrs. Hull was a small-
businesswoman, sold real estate, and worked with the
Addicted to Christ Organization of Bradenton.
Services will be private. Covell Cremation and Fu-
neral Center of Bradenton was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by children Daryl Spencer and
Tereasa Bowery of Richmond, Ind., Christine Custer of
Cambridge City. Ind., and Alex of Holmes Beach: sis-
ters lona Turner and Beulah Watson of Richmond. Ind.,
and Lillian Irwin of Indianapolis, Ind.: adopted children
Steven of Richmond, Jefri Ann Bengal of Hamilton,
Ohio, and Kim Carter of Elkton. Ky.: 13 grandchildren:
and several great-grandchildren.


were playing in the street near his home.
After investigating the complaints, Gupton was
arrested and charged with three counts of a lewd
and lascivious offense, each carrying a $10,000
bond.
Gupton has a prior arrest record for various
traffic offenses, including reckless driving, fleeing
a police officer and driving under the influence.


Blanche Amelia Murphy
Blanche Amelia Murphy, 100, of Bradenton, and
formerly Tampa and Holmes Beach, died June 3.
Born in Brown County, Ind., Mrs. Murphy was a
homemaker. She was a member of Bayshore Baptist
Church, Tampa.
Memorial services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
June 23, at the church, 3111 Morrison Ave., Tampa.
Garden of Memorial Funeral home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
She is survived by daughter Grethel Marie Davis;
son Kenneth; eight grandchildren; and four great-
grandchildren.
Jill K. Niss
Jill K. Niss, 71, of Anna Maria, died June 5.
Born in Washington, D.C., Mrs. Niss came to
Manatee County from there in 1993. She was a retired
office manager for the federal government. She was a
member of the American Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals of Manatee County and the Hu-
mane Society. She was a lifelong Democrat.
No services will be held. Memorial contributions
may be made to Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955
Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL 34238, or Bishop Animal
Shelter SPCA of Manatee County, 5718 21st Ave. W.,
Bradenton FL 34209.
She is survived by husband Norton of Anna Maria;
sons Logan Dixon of Miami and Craig Dixon of Phoe-
nix. Ariz.: and five grandchildren.


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PAGE 16 0 JUNE 9, 2004 N THE ISLANDER

Longboat hurricane

party tomorrow

evening on key
The second annual free "hurricane party" on
Longboat will be from 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 10,
at the Hilton Beachfront Resort,4711 Gulf of Mexico
Drive.
Reservations at 387-9539 are advised, for this
popular party sold out last year and prospective patrons
were left out. Everyone will finish the evening with a
hurricane preparedness manual and a "goodie bag," the
sponsoring Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce
promises.
Speaker will be Max Mayfield, director of the
Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center
in Miami.

Family caregiver support group
plans meeting
The Meals on Wheels family caregiver support
group will meet from 1 to 2 p.m. Friday, June 18, at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
It is designed for anyone caring for an older adult
friend or family member with chronic health or
memory problems, including Alzheimer's disease.
Details are available at 747-4655.


St. Bernard Bible school
registration under way
St. Bernard Catholic Church has begun signing up
youngsters for its "Lava Lava Island" vacation Bible
school.
The school will be 9 a.m.-noon June 21-25 and is
designed for children from preschool age through fifth-
grade. It will include Bible stories, games, snacks,
crafts and "fun activities."
The program will be free of charge. Registration
may be made by phone at 778-4769, or at the church,
248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.


Graduate
Lou and Lorie Hagele of
Bradenton Beach with
daughter Aleisha Ann at her
graduation from Western
Illinois University,
Macomb, Ill. She earned a
bachelor of science degree
in law enforcement and
justice administration with
a grade-point average of
4.0 and is on the National
Dean's List, where only
one-half of one percent of
U.S. students end up. She
plans to live in Springfield,
Ill., and work for the
sheriff's department there.
Her parents own Health &
Wealth International.


Recruiting coffee Tuesday
at Mote Marine
A coffee designed to recruit volunteers will be
from 10 a.m.-noon Tuesday, June 15, at Mote Marine
Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota, on
City Island off the south ramp of the New Pass Bridge
from Longboat Key.
The expanded aquarium requires more volunteers
to greet, assist and inform visitors, said Andrea Davis,
director of volunteer services. Especially needed are
volunteers with customer service or retail experience.
Davis will provide additional information at 388-
4441.


'Summit' on homelessness
is Monday morning
A "summit" meeting for local officials titled
"Shedding Light on Homelessness" is being called for
9 a.m.-noon Monday, June 14.
Manatee County Commissioner Pat Glass has ar-
ranged the meeting at the Bradenton City Center, 1005
Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton. Mary Ruiz, president of
Manatee Glens. will moderate a discussion of ap-
proaches developed by other communities.
Further meetings will be scheduled, Glass said.
More information may be obtained by calling 745-
3700.


Water off Thursday along Gulf Drive
Water will be shut off in certain Holmes east to Holmes Boulevard and on Gulf Drive from
Beach locations between 8 a.m. and I p.m. Thurs- 56th Street south to 53rd Street during those
day, June 10. hours.
Manatee County Utilities Operations said The county is replacing and installing water
water will be off on 56th Street from Gulf Drive valves, officials said.













OOOQOO

Wednesday, June 9
9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
Noon to 2:45 p.m. Swim lessons with Jerry Cole
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee
applies.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Thursday, June 10
Noon to 4 p.m. AARP driver safety course at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 776-1158.
5 to 7:30 p.m. Longboat Key Chamber of Com-
merce "Hurricane Party" at the Longboat Key
Beachfront Resort, 4711 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key. Information: 387-9519.

Friday, June 11
Noon to 4 p.m. AARP driver safety course at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 776-1158.

Saturday, June 12
8:30 a.m. Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island
meeting at Cafe on the Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee Public Beach, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-
0355.
9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
10 a.m.-noon The Islander-sponsored commu-
nity welcome for U.S. Army Maj. Rick Ely and family,
Anna Maria Elementary School auditorium, 4700 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. Refreshments, music and wel-
come program. Information: 778-7978.
7p.m. Darlene Friedrich's "Steppin' Out 2004"
dance recital at the Riverfront Theatre, 102 Old Main
St., Bradenton. Information: 748-4776. Fee applies.

Monday, June 14
9 a.m. to noon "Shedding the Light on
Homelessness" summit with local officials at Bradenton
City Centre, 1005 Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton. Infor-
mation: 745-3704.

Tuesday, June 15
10 a.m. to noon- Volunteer recruitment coffee at
Mote Marine Laboratory, Buchanan meeting room,




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1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota. Information:
388-4441, ext. 438.
1 to 4 p.m. Veterans service officer at the Is-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Appointments: 749-3030.
2 to 3 p.m. "Get Hooked on Boats and Fishing"
children's program presented by Capt. Zach
Zacharias at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-6341.

Wednesday, June 16
9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Ongoing:
Vacation Bible School at Gloria Dei Lutheran
Church, 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, through
June 11. Information: 778-1813. Fee applies.
Watercolor paintings of Gulfport artist Donna
Taylor at Island Gallery West, 5368 Gulf Drive N.,
Holmes Beach, through June 19. Information: 778-
6648.
Cortez Kitchen golf outing for B.J. Lipke at
Manatee County Golf Course June 19.
Swim lessons with Jerry Cole at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria, through June 29. Information: 778-1908. Fee
applies.
Meals on Wheels family caregiver support group
meeting, 1 p.m. Friday, June 18, at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 747-4655.
Oil and acrylic paintings by Joan Valenza at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, through June 30. Information: 778-6341.
Power Yoga for Kids with Cindy Phillips at the
Island Fitness Center, 5317 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, through July 8. Information: 778-5446. Fee
applies.
Retrospective exhibit by Florida photographer
Clyde Butcher at the South Florida Museum, 201 10th
St. W., Bradenton, through August. Information: 746-
4131. Fee applies.
"Road Trip to Mars and Beyond" summer camp
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, through Aug. 6. Informa-
tion: 778-1908. Fee applies.

Upcoming:
Emerson Point bioluminescence night paddle
with the Sierra Club June 19.
"Aqua-Critters" family program at Mote Marine
Laboratory June 19.
Rally for the Reef at Mote Marine Laboratory
June 19 and 20.





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'I got you babe!'
Proud momr Peggi Davenport of the Duffy's Tavern-
Geyer clan, brought newborn Madelyn Ann (born
May 13) to the burger joint last week for first look
last week at her future playground and introductions
to loads of affectionate patrons. Madelyn is the
granddaughter ofpropietors Pat "Miss Duffy" and
Ed Geyer. Peggi's husband Bruce was busy filling in
behind the bar, where it's truly a "family affair."
Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

"Snakes and Things" at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center June 22.
Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce Business
After Hours at Euphemia Haye June 22.
Selby Gardens-Sarasota Bromeliad Society
Show & Sale, Selby Botanical Gardens, June 25-27.
Anna Maria Island Privateers Fourth of July pa-
rade, picnic and party. Parade Coquina Beach to Anna
Maria at 10 a.m., July 4, party 12:30 p.m. at Cafe on
the Beach at the Manatee Public Beach. Information:
Eric Rushnell at 721-4075, or Tim Thompson at 729-
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1fI ,If ;- r A 0qV 4 tml' It r f' 17;p,! .
PAGE 18 0 JUNE 9, 2004 0 THE ISLANDER




I ".


by Preston Whaley Jr.


Today's music

of the spheres
Graham Edge, Jerry Wexler, Kenny Soderblum, Joe
Perry, Chick Corea, Lucky Peterson, various members of
the Allman Brothers Band and Cheap Trick's Robin
Zanderarejust a few of the distinguished names highlight-
ing the Tampa Bay Area's musical community.
Add electronic music composer Bill Rhodes, who
moved to Anna Maria last month, to the list.
Rhodes is an icon of electronic music.
He has recorded, performed and consulted with
many keyboard and synthesizer-oriented groups, such
as Yes, Alan Parsons, Tangerine Dreams, Larry
Coryell and Toto. He's been a consultant to electronic
music companies Kurzweil, Korg, Akai, Kawai and
presently FBT Pro Audio. He was a professor of mu-
sic at Monmouth University, N.J., from 1988 to 1994,
and he's a prolific composer, having recorded more
than 28 albums since 1978.
His television, radio and film credits include the
Lillehamer Olympics for European broadcast, numer-
ous projects on German independent cable TV, epi-
sodes for the television program JAG and the History
Channel.
The Hal Leonard publication, "Pioneers of Elec-
tronic Music," features Rhodes as a standout.
Electrogenesis magazine writes, "Bill Rhodes is
the Amadeus of the 21st Digital Century."
So what's he doing on Anna Maria?
Three months ago he visited Island residents and
parents of musical colleague Gary Griffith. "I fell in
love with it," he says. "It reminds me of some of the
quieter areas of Palm Beach, without the social haugh-
tiness. It's a close community."
And Rhodes would like to be a contributor.
"I'd love to get something going on the Island," he
says. "There's so much talent here such an interest-


New old 'Tales of Cortez' on video


" I--"x`~~~'~~"I""-x`~"~l~~^YI


-: : Ir i,, ~~, u~;rlim!~ur-r Itxr, -rlr
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Electronic maestro
Composer Bill Rhodes is a recent addition to the Island's musical iconography. Islander Photo: Prieston


Whaley Jr.

ing community of musicians. I think you could really
draw people in. The Island needs someone to kick its
butt, someone with real passion for the music."
He envisions present venues diversifying their of-
ferings, but also a new venue featuring different genres
on various nights --jazz, new age, classical, progres-
sive rock and hybrids and fusions of the same.
Easy to say, but likely harder to do.
"We need a renaissance," says Rhodes. "Most
people under 30 think Emerson, Lake and Palmer is a
law firm."
Of classical music, jazz, electronic and progressive
rock, Rhodes says, "There's a need to get the word out
about the music boomers grew LIp on music of the
spheres. It's as important as classical music . emo-
tional and thought-provoking. It paints a sonic land-
scape that encourages introspection. The audience


needs to be more educated,'but the political climate
isn't conducive to musical education. We can go to
Iraq, but we can't educate our people."
Rhodes was born in Germany, and adoptive par-
ents brought him to the United States, where he grew
up in central New Jersey. He's been playing music and
composing for almost 50 years.
Presently, Rhodes performs and records solo piano
and leads two music groups.
Jazzical is a trio in the jazz and classical music tra-,,
dition of David Brubeck, the Modem Jazz Quartet and
much of the jazz-song tradition, which benefited gen-,
erously from the musical patterns of classical music.
Rhodes' second group, Rhodeworks, is a quartet',
fusing electronic, jazz, classical music and rock 'n'.;
roll think Moody Blues, ELP, Yes, and the like. Al-:
four in the group are electronically accomplished,bl.tIe
the basic instrumentation features Rtipdesbir~-key-
boards, Gary Griffith on bass, Brian McIndoe on gui-
tar and Rick Bailey on drums.
The group's compact disk "Rhodeworks Vol. 1"
will soon be available online, along with 15 other
Rhodes CDs, at an under-construction, independent,
music-buying Web site called "Feed Your Ears."
Of such Web sites, Rhodes says, "They're the
wave of the future for independent non-commercial
artists. You can't get your music in stores, so down-
loading is important on legitimate sites where the art-
ist gets paid. Right now the little'guy gets4aken advain- i
tage of on the internet.'" .,
Aid -today's environment is tough on; .working
ii f i .
For e\itnpll;, Rhodes ,ay,. club todia\ ay Ki bnds.
the same ameulliuiL ot moneul Ihey.. ere paying in Ithv
1970s and 80s. Worse, karaoke, DJs andone-persqpo
bands with a laptop and a keyboard have displaced'
multi-person bands for a fraction of the cost.
:"The technology is a double-edged sword," says
Rhodes. "It's great for recording, but it has put musi-
cians out of work."
So Rhodes is about educating musicians iand audi-
ences and establishing institutions that will help musi-
cians create and prosper.
But most of all he's about making music.
He recently composed and performed the elec-
tronic orchestral work "Musical Offering 2004" for the
Royalty Theater in Clearwater. It's heady stuff a
four-part composition of multiple electronic instru-
ments and choir, epic in scale, shot through with a
gamut of emotions, ultimately positive, and featuring
solo vocalist Michelle Griffith. It's the first track on
Rhodes' most recent CD, "Bill Rhodes: Compositions
for a Digital Orchestra." It'll take three listens to get
your ears around it.
As for the Island, Rhodes says, "1 like it for the
quiet and community. It's good for the creative juices.
I think it's conducive to composition in a different way
fronim mnlore frenetic settings. The beach and ocean are
good for inspiration."
Rhodes can he contacted by e-mail at
wctb243qtlpveri/zon.net.


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"Much of the gloom and doom the net ban
caused is replaced by the more upbeat, new
Cortez," producer David Clarke said of his new


Daughter Mary Fulford Green tells of him and
of life in the village, as do such peers as Paul Tay-
lor, Vernon Mora, Richard Culbreath, Ralph
Fulford, Alcee Taylor and Wyman Coarsey. The
new generation is eloquently represented by Karen
Bell.


version of "Tales of Cortez."
He reflects it right, for the 2004
Cortez has a much brighter outlook
than the historic fishing village of
1998 when he made his first
"Tales." The hated net ban was still
fresh then, and Cortez justifiably
felt its very existence threatened.
That ban is still covered in the
new "Tales," as it must be since it
has had such a profound and ter-
rible effect on the village. The vot-
ers of Florida in 1995 had voted to
ban netting mullet, the fish that
made Cortez.
The ban is still with us, of
course, and the bitterness it
brought. But Cortez lives on with


It was Coarsey who unwit-
tingly inspired Clarke to do a film
history of Cortez, Clarke's friend
Gordon Grove has: a home in
Cortez and lie let Clarke use it on
vacation. His next-door neighbor
turned out to be Coarsey.
"He has a distinct Florida-
cracker type voice," Clarke said,
"and I just had to document his
hometown." That was in 1997-98,
and the TV crew worked hard in-
terviewing colorful Cortezians
and filming their colorful setting.
Clarke has a totally TV
background, starting with ABC-
TV in Miami in 1964, leaving
launch his own production business


I~'" `~"


its vigor revived and its hard-working people mus-
tering a new kind of optimism for their lives.
Some of those stalwarts form the backbone of
the video, and they do it with a flair that their evi-
dent modesty can't mask. The black-and-white
photos from the really old days are intermingled
with modern video action to form a memorable his-
tory of a way of life that almost died, but revived
on its own strengths.
One old-timer featured in absentia seems to
epitomize the village and the way ol' life he helped
build, through his work and his generosity and his
descendants. That is the late Tink Fulford, legend-
ary fisherman, Fulford Fish House founder, patri-
arch of a large extended family.


there in 1980 to


and making more than 1,000 documentaries alto-
gether. His company is International Video Projects
Inc. in Lakeland. "I've been all over the world in this
business," he said, "But my roots remain in Florida
and its history."
This production is brand new, for all its historic
subject, and is available for sale on video tape or
DVD at Annie's Bait & Tackle, 4334 127th St. W.,
at the mainland end of the Cortez Bridge; Cortez
Cafe, 12108 Cortez Road; and the Star Fish Co.
Seafood Market & Restaurant, 12306 461h Avec. W.,
on tlhe Coriez Waterfronl.
Clarke can be reached toll free at (800) 852-
0662.





THE ISLANDER M JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 19


AME fourth-grader countywide speech winner


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Elementary School fourth-grader
Trina Rizzo's speech about how she discovered her
passion for acting took top honors among her peers.
Rizzo went on to compete in the countywide
speech contest for fourth- and fifth-graders sponsored
by Tropicana and 4-H in May.
Rizzo placed first among AME fourth- and fifth-
graders and again at the county competition in Palmetto
with her speech, "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart
Makes." She asked the audience, "What do you want
most in your life?"
Rizzo said she began to discover her dream at
AME participating in class plays. After auditioning for
"Annie" last year, she knew her dream was to be a
'Broadway star.
"What is your dream?" she asked, suggesting also


that you might need to go find it.
"Seek new challenges," Rizzo suggested, "and if
you find you love doing something you thought would
be challenging you've found it."
Other AME speech contest finalists include fifth-
graders Chandler McClung and Patrick Facheris.
McClung placed second with her speech "Price-
less," and Facheris placed third with "My Alien."
Kara Nelson was also recognized with an honorable
mention for her speech "Oh Brother, I Think I Have
a Brother."
Twelve fourth- and fifth-graders competed in the
schoolwide competition after placing in the top three
in classroom competitions.
Judges were Alisa Bennett from Bennett Con-
tracting, George Vensel from the Manatee County
School Board and Charlene Doll from the local
Publix store.


Students' speech topics were at times humorous,
such as Facheris' translation of his dad's diction -
what sounds like knees means nose, soup means soap,
and chez means cheese. And others were informative,
like Molly McDonough's speech on superstitions,
Adina Dicus' tour of the White House and Dylon
Riley's account of how to catch a grouper.
Family members were ever present in many of the
speeches especially brothers. McClung concluded
that being the youngest of five is "priceless," Emma
Barlow bemoaned the fact that she is the only girl born
on her father's side in the past 150 years and she has
not one, but five older brothers.
Nelson had brotherly woes in her speech.and sug-
gested John Gray, author of "Men Are From Mars,
Women Are From Venus," write a book on how to live
with a brother and not go insane. "I've been waiting 10
years," said Nelson.



. d


rairol COOKOUI
Anna Maria Elementary School fifth-graders who participated in
the safety patrol program throughout the school year were
rewarded with a barbecue lunch for their hard work. The stu-
dents patrol the school during drop-off and dismissal times,
helping to ensure students get to and from class and their trans-
portation safely. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


Scientific ride
Using one hand to crank a lever, students are able to pull fellow fifth-graders piled atop a
platform across the courtyard. Anna Maria Elementary School volunteer Phelps Tracy devised
several pully-and-lever systems to demonstrate the power of simple machines to Anne
Kinnan 's fifth-grade class.


Getting acquainted
Anna Maria Island Community Center summer camp counselor Nicole Murray
gets acquainted with Luis Fernandez, Samantha Howes, Jazmine Ravera, Julia
Ware, Sarah Green, Josh Zowistoski and Josh Sclhmidt on the first day of
camp.


Camp colors
Aeryell Dunnuck, 6, and Chris Goulet, 7, color space drawings during a craft
session at the Center's summer camp.









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THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 21


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PAGE 22 0 JUNE 9, 2004 3 THE ISLANDER
.- "., 1 ,.: ..:.L:',:- -- :-- ""-'--



.--: -= -: .


Check presentation
Fifth-graders graders Chris Perez, Jenna Duvall and Sarah Oldham present Anna Maria Elementary school
guidance counselor Cindi Harrison with a reimbursement check for items purchased for Wheeling to Give, the
nonprofit organization run by Lynn McDonough 's class. Students sold coin purses and collected donations to
raise money for the International Wheelchair Foundation. They raised enough money to buy five children
wheelchairs. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


Official check
Sarah Oldham writes the first company check for
Wheeling to Give, Anna Maria Elementary School's
nonprofit organization operated by Lynn
McDonough 'sfifth-grade class.


Lunch mixer
Third-grade pen pals from Anna Maria and Stewart elementary schools met for
lunch and educational activities at DeSoto National Memorial. Clockwise are
Jamie Steele, Kierstin Baucom, Claudia Hynds, Jordan Swigert, Alyssa King and
Lindsey Bell. The students have exchanged letters throughout the school year.
Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


History walk
Third-grade pen pals Hallie Mattick, Jazmynv Howell, Shelby Manson, Jasmine
Crawford, Neasa Calleja and Jessica Lacke from Anna Maria and Stewart
elementary schools conduct several observation activities along the DeSoto
National Memorial trail with parent Leah Manson.


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THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 23


A look back at history of Island Middle School


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
"Bittersweet" is the word most students and staff
members used to describe their last moments at Island
Middle School, which closed its doors May 25.
IMS lost its charter status in the Manatee County
School District in March when the school board chose
not to renew its three-year contract with the charter
school.
A charter school is a public school run by a non-
profit corporation under contract with a sponsor, in this
case the local school board.
IMS was unanimously approved by the Manatee
County School Board in April 2001 and opened its
doors in August that year following many months of
planning and visioning by members of the Island com-
munity.

The vision
IMS was the vision of Island parents Marlene West
and Noranne Hutcheson, who enlisted a committee of
community members inrereted in providing an alter-
native school that could capitalize on using the Island
as a learning environment.
The charter school committee's mission statement
for the Island Middle School focused on providing an
educational environment that allowed students to suc-
ceed and grow academically by acknowledging and
accommodating different learning styles.
The founding committee believed this could be
achieved with a curriculum that integrated the visual
and performing arts into the core academic curricu-
lum.
The purpose of the school was to create a unique
educational- opportunity that fostered and encouraged
a ''zest for learning that transcends a lifetime," and to
encourage students to develop their personal attributes
and relationships in order to become leaders in our
community.
IMS adhered to the "Mosaic Curriculum" utilized
by all county middle schools as a guide, and its core
academic courses met the same requirements as those
throughout the district.


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At the start
The school board unanimously approved the IMS
charter in April 2001 and the school welcomed 50
sixth- and seventh-graders through its doors on Aug.
13.
After an exhaustive search for an Island location,
the IMS board rented facilities from the Island Baptist
Church on 85th Street in Holmes Beach and, by its
second year of operation, the school occupied the sec-
ond floor of the church's education building and an-
other building on the property.
IMS opened with founding board member
Hutcheson as the part-time executive director and
Jeanne Shell as the school's director. Shell came to the
school with 30 years of experience in the Manatee
County School District and was responsible for over-
seeing the daily operation of the school.
Hutcheson resigned from her position one month
after the school opened, leaving Shell at the helm for
the first two years.
In its second year, IMS expanded to include eighth-
grade and almost 80 students.
The first graduating class of IMS comprised 19
students.
In its third year, the school reached its peak enroll-
ment at 114 students, although the student body
dwindled to 75, nine of whom had attended the school
for all three years of operation.
The final graduating class of 28 students celebrated
its commencement at the Sandbar Restaurant.

Academics
Throughout its three years, the staff at IMS strived
to give students a unique learning environment that
utilized its community resources.
Students participated in a national debris-monitor-
ing program and conducted regular beach cleanup.
They saw a variety of special guest presentations,
including local musicians Koko Ray, Mindy Simmons,
Leon Merian and more. They were visited by members
of the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch. Pelican Man's
Bird Sanctuary, Soulspeak and Sea Reflection.
Students participated in programs about drug resis-



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tance, tolerance and abstinence. They made trips to the
Florida Studio Theater, the Sarasota Film Festival, and
aboard the Schooner Quest.
Through a partnership with Florida Marine Re-
search Institute, Mote Marine Laboratory, local artists
and scientists, IMS pulled together a comprehensive
marine science curriculum that focused on manatees.
Students were also encouraged to give back to the
community through schoolwide community service
projects during the national Make A Difference Day
and were recognized by USA Today Magazine for their
effort. Others raised money for the Southeastern Guide
Dogs, planted a butterfly garden and performed an
educational play for Anna Maria Elementary School.
The best emergence from IMS was the Conch Frit-
ter Band, led by professional musician Jimi Gee. The
group played at more than 30 events during the current
school year and took the stage at music festivals
throughout the bay area.
The band placed first in the jazz band category of
the World Festival Tours Competition held in Orlando
the past two years and placed third the first year. Gee
noted that in the history of the competition, the judges
have awarded six outstanding soloist awards and five
of them were awarded to IMS band members.
In addition to its hands-on educational approach,
students were held to the same standards as their peers
attending other public schools, including the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment Test.
IMS students held their own on the FCAT. Last
year, IMS students scored slightly higher than scores
for Sugg Middle School and slightly lower than scores
for King Middle School. If the school had been
awarded an overall grade, scores suggest they would
have ranked as a B school.
This year's scores were among the top in the
county, with students consistently ranking in the top
three.

Consistent change
One of the elements that hindered the renewal of
the IMS charter was the revolving faculty, administra-
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PAGE 24 E JUNE 9, 2004 S THE ISLANDER

IMS: A history of a school
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23
tion and board of directors.
It was consistent in thaitit was constantly changing.
More than 20 teachers taught at IMS.
Among the administrative staff was a handful of
consultants, parents and fulltime staff.
Community members who served on the IMS
board included Marlene West, Kimberly Holmstrom,
Pam Fortenberry, Chuck Webb, John Monetti, Cindy
Jennis, Scott Bassett, Genie Salter, Noranne
Hutcheson, Shellie Hodges, Jim Ferguson, Pam
Bertrand and Ed Upshaw.

Future for the staff
The remaining staff members are looking for new
positions now that the school year is finished.
IMS secretary CaTina Robles is looking forward to
spending a vacation in Oregon.
Robles said in the final days of the school year she
had parents calling several times a day just to hear her
trademark greeting, "It's a great day at IMS."
Art teacher Mylene Zerr is also in the process of
deciding her next step. Prior to working at IMS, Zerr
had been an elementary school teacher and discovered
she enjoys teaching art at the middle-school level.
Science teacher Sandy Brousseau is seeking an
administrative position.
"I'm sorry to see the school close," he said. "We
were just getting to a place where we had a stride and
we were capable of doing more."
Brousseau said he believes it would be a good idea
to pursue opening another Island school. "I enjoyed
working with the kids," he added. "They were third in
the county in FCAT that's not too shabby."
Ashley Ellis, a language arts teacher, said she gave
each student her e-mail address at the end of the school
year along with a final project that had surprising re-
sults. Each student was to write down one compli-
ment for each person in the school, including staff.
Before the last day of school, Ellis compiled the
compliments and distributed them.
Ellis said a lot of the comments were really surpris-
ing and flattering.






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Ellis will be working at the Island Fitness Center
during the summer and when school resumes in the fall
she will begin teaching language arts again. She has
been offered a position at North Port High School.
Lori Guerrin taught physical education at IMS and
later transitioned into an assistant principal position to
assist IMS shutdown coordinator Larry Fowler in pre-
paring the school for closing.
Guerrin said she is in the process of getting her
teaching certification and is considering pursuing a
master's degree in education leadership, which would
allow her to work in school administration as well.
Guerrin also supports opening another Island
school, and said she would be the first to apply for a
position.
Music teacher Jimi Gee is planning to retire from
full-time teaching, although he will be working with
other schools to establish bands similar to the Conch
Fritter Band.
Larry Fowler, the Islander who stepped up to help
the school meet the county requirements for closing its
doors, will return to retirement.
Before he can begin to enjoy the beach and golf
course again, Fowler said there is still work for him to


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.' .. .... hIn the final performance
of the school year, Anna
S.. :Maria Elementary
School fifth -graders
performed a medley of
Broadway tunes includ-
S tk ing: "Mame, "Getting
to Know You, "Hello,
Dolly!" "Oklahoma, "
"Memory" and "One."
Students gave two
performances, an
afternoon assembly for
fellow students and an
evening performance at
the Parent-Teacher
Organization meeting in
May. Islander Photo:
Diana Bogan

finish. Administration tasks, such as the final payroll,
writing the annual report, and turning over all assets to
the county, must be completed.
District representatives have already collected the
textbooks and furniture from the school.
Fowler said the building is currently being re-
painted and will be turned back over to the church on
June 15.
Fowler is not opposed to the idea of opening an-
other charter school on the Island and said he would be
willing to get a new school up and running in its first
year.
He supports a charter philosophy that encompasses
all types of learning styles, not just project-based learn-
ing.
Fowler said anyone interested in starting a new
school would need to start working on it now and sub-
mit a letter of intent to the county in the next 30 days.
Fowler said Fran Padgett, the district charter-school
liaison, would be the appropriate contact person for
more information.
Fowler said he saw the students blossom at IMS
and believes there should be a middle school on the
Island.


"1anatee Counry Area TNura it

GULF BEACHES


RIDE 7 DAYS: 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

The Islander





THE ISLANDER M JUNE 9, 2004 0 PAGE 25


"i~t-,'~ ,,t 3( ,n


Surf's up
Second-graders William Hellem and Jonah Caster
make themselves comfortable with pillows and
sleeping bags for an afternoon of reading at Anna
Maria Elementary School's Readathon. Carter's
reading choice is a book titled, "Suif's Up." Is-
lander Photos: Diana Bogan


uroup reaa
AME secretary Cheryl Bennett was a guest reader
during the second-grade Readathon. Students
gathered in the auditorium with blankets, pillows
and sleeping bags to spend the afternoon reading.


Top 5 percent at King Middle
Anna Maria Island residents, Gabrielle Westerman, Kaci Kennedy, Heather Dearlove and Amber Wright
finished eighth-grade at King Middle School in the top 5 percent of their class. The four Islanders all
graduates of Anna Maria Elementary School --finished with grades in the top 18 out of374 students at King
Middle. Each received a medal for academic achievement.


I. EUPHEMIA'S ROAST DUCKLING A complimentary
glass of Pinot Noir and tossed greens in a grain
mustard vinaigrette will accompany each order
of Euphemia's Roast Duckling. ................. $29.50
II. SPICY SHRIMP OR CHICKEN CAESAR Signature,
Caesar salad topped with char-grilled
jumbo spicy shrimp or chicken breast
served with a glass of complimentary
Pinot G rigio................. ....... ................ $17.5 0
III. PRIX FIXE $29 per person.
All prix-fixe dinners include a melior of Venezuelan coffee,
decaf or tea and choice of dessert from Euphemia Haye's
award-winning dessert display.
Sunday
Caesar Salad Grecian Lamb Shank
Potato du Jour or Sicilian Brussels SproLut
Monday
Spinach and Arugula Salad Chicken Parmesan
Garlic Angel Hair Pasta or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
Tuesday
Black Bean or White Bean Hummu111s 1 i.. I,,.-, Crusted
Yellowtail Snapper on Key Lime Jalepeho Beurre Blanc
with i PFilaf
Wednesday
Spring Mix of Greens with Grain Mustard Vinaigrette
Prime Sirloin and Tenderloin Tips Marsala
White Rice or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
Thursday
Chef's Pate Fresh Horseradish-Crusted Salmon with
Sour Cream Horseradish ISauce
Potato du Jour or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
First come, first serve seating.
Tax and nratuitv not included. No substitutions.


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PAGE 26 M JUNE 9, 2004 M THE ISLANDER



Historical society presents Island wildlife


The Anna Maria Island Historical Society wel-
comed Wildlife Education and Rehabilitation Center's
Volunteer Director of Education David Sadkin to speak
at its final meeting of the season.
The Wildlife Education and Rehabilitation Center
is located on Avenue B in Bradenton Beach and Sadkin
says they help more than 4,000 animals each year and
serve Manatee, Sarasota and DeSoto counties.
The number of animals coming to the center is
growing as counties continue to experience tremendous
population growth. Sadkin explained every time gal-
loping development clear-cuts the land, thousands of
animals are displaced. "Deer, possum, raccoons, squir-
rels, owls, you name it," said Sadkin.
At the Wildlife Center, volunteers work to rehabili-
tate and release the animals back into a natural habitat.
People won't stop coming to Florida or building,
Sadkin admits, but one role rehabilitation centers can
play is as an advocate for wildlife. Sadkin said they
work with the legislature to find a rational trade-off.
And there are alternatives to clearing land for de-
velopers. For example, Sadkin noted that 10,000 ani-
mals were displaced when Lockwood Ridge Road was
extended five miles and the forest was clear cut. How-
ever, another area developer made an effort to leave
every possible oak he could on his land and market
them as an amenity in his housing development to
people who enjoy living in harmony with nature.
Sadkin said wildlife rehabilitators are also in a
position to provide data on diseases because they are
among the first to see trends. For example, Sadkin said
rehabilitators are seeing more animals with nerve dam-
age thought to be caused by pesticides.
Sadkin said the center had a bird they called
Gilligan because every time he was released, he
"couldn't get off the Island."
Sadkin said Gilligan ate a mouse that ate a grub
that ate from a fertilized landscape and now Gilligan
can't feel his feet due to nerve damage.
This problem could be reduced if people chose
organic landscaping methods.
Rehab centers also work as an advocate for do-
nated land such as the FISH Preserve in Cortcz and the
Phelps Preserve in Palmetto to keep some areas forever
wild.
The center no longer does its own animal rescues
anymore, Sadkin said. They work with a wildlife res-
cue organization that visits the center as often as four
S times a day.
When animals arrive at the center they are given a
medical exam and diagnosis. When the animal is well
it goes into a release program. Sadkin said the animals
aren't just released on the Island, they are released in
appropriate habitats throughout the state.


Angel
Wildlife Volunteer Education Director David Sadkin uses Angel, a barn owl from the Wildlife Rehabilitation
Center, as an educational tool during his presentation to the Anna Maria Island Historical Society. Angel's
heart-shaped face acts as a dish facilitating her ability to pinpoint sound. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Sadkin noted that there are some things people can
do to help if they find an injured or orphaned critter.
Don't give the animal food or water. According to
Sadkin, the animals have complex needs. Blue jays
don't eat what owls eat, and without knowing what the
animal's diet is or its injuries, you can harm it.
And, if you believe an animal is orphaned, observe
it for 24 hours before calling a rescue organization.
Sadkin said many times people "kidnap" animals while
the mother is hunting for food.
"Most we get are not really orphaned," Sadkin
admitted. "Don't be real quick to snatch what you think
is an abandoned baby."
Sadkin brought three of the center's resident birds
that are unable to live in the wild to aid his discussion
with historical society members.
"Rambo," an eastern screech owl, was shot with a
paintball pellet and is blind. Sadkin said it took two
weeks to get the paint out of Rambo's feathers and he


has been at the center for one year.
"Esprit" is a kestrel falcon that was shot with a
pellet gun, injuring his wing. "Angel" is a barn owl and
was hit by a car and has been at the center for three
years.
Sadkin and other volunteers use these birds to help
educate the public at events and schools.
Owners Gail and Ed Straight founded the wildlife
rehab center in 1988 and Sadkin said they are outgrow-
ing their home on the Island.
They are looking for land locally to open a new
facility to meet growing needs. The center is a non-
profit organization and Sadkin said he volunteers be-
cause it is a work of conscience.
"We cause a lot of the problem," Sadkin said.
"Through our work we can provide a lot of data."
For more information on the wildlife center, call
778-6324. or log onto www.wildlifeinc.org.
To report an animal rescue, call 950-9453.


Young Islander honored by Sarasota theater


B'. !)i;n; Hogan
i.vlhm,:i Reporter
Bradenton Beach fourth-grader Daniel Miller s
creative talents havc placed him among the winning
script writers in the Florida Studio Theater Young Play-
wrights Festival.
Miller received an honorable mention for his play,
"The Seasick Dog." He was one of two students from
the Center for Education Montessori School in
Bradenton to gain recognition.
"The Seasick Dog" explores one couple's desire to
adopt a child. The play opens with the couple feeling
discouraged about not yet having a child to adopt and,
through the play, they evolve into a family.
Adoption is not an unfamiliar topic for Miller,
who was adopted as an infant by parents Mary and
Garreth Miller. Other elements in the play that re-
semble Miller's real life include Rupert, a sltl fed
English springer spaniel toy, and his love for saiiing.
Writing is only one of Miller's passions. Ile is
already a multi-talented musician, playing piano,
flute and drums. He :sed to play violin, but gave it
up to pursue other interests and hopes to learn to play
Sthe saxophone.
Miller also has an active interest in architecture.
iic enjoys building things like space stations of
Legos, and said he usually forgoes following direc-
tions. When it comes to building he likes to work


rni his own intuition.
He said he is likely to write another play next year
and was surprised he won an award this year. It's his
first writing award.
The festival receives 5,000 plays from students in
kindergarten through sixth-grade each year. FST actors
read all of the plays, and packets were made available
for the public to read and evaluate.
Winning plays are performed by the Florida Stu-
dio Theatre's playmakers and winning authors receive
a certificate.
Following is a copy of Miller's play, "The Seasick
Dog."

The Seasick Dog
Characters: Wilma/Willie, the mom;: John, the dad:
Timmy, a 6-year-old boy; and Rupert, a 3-year-old En-
glish springer spaniel.
Setting: A house on the Manatee River. Mom and
Dad are talking about how much the wish they had a
child.
John: 1 suppose we didn't hear anything again to-
day froll the adoption agency'?
Willie: No and I'm really getting discouraged. It
seems like we've been waiting forever.
John: It does seem that way. lThree years is a long
time to wait. Maybe we're just not goill to be chosen.
I think we're pretty nice people. don't you'?


Willie (smiling): Of course, we are. But there are
a lot of other nice people waiting just like we are. We
just need a little luck I guess.
John: Willie, you're going to think I'm nuts, but
today I stopped by the Humane Society and I almost
brought home a dog. There was a really cute English
springer spaniel that seemed to be asking me to take
him home.
Willie: Well, actually I do think you're nuts. Still,
it is awfully quiet around here. Maybe a dog would
liven things up.
John: That sounds like a yes! I'll stop in tomorrow
and see if he's still there.
The next evening:
Willie: Did I hear a bark?
John: Woof, woof! Here he is.
Willie: He's so cute! What shall we name him?
John: Well, he answers to Rupert. And since he's
already 3, we probably shouldn't change it.
Willie: That's a different name. But, why not?
Come here Rupert, you sweet thing.
The next day:
The phoe rings.
.ohn: Willie would you mind answering the
phone?
Willie: Ilello. Yes, this is Wilma. You what? Well,
PI'l.ASF S I PLAYWRIGHT, NEXT PAGE





THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 27


Congratulations to all Island graduates
I I I r.


'j t~ .;, ,

- ,r ;4


Geza Bantukv will be pursuing a Chris Brooks will be playing football
degree in engineering at the Univer- at the University of Jacksonville and
sitv of Florida. Bantukv relieved a received a Bright Futures scholar-
Bright Futures scholarship. ship.


Hunter Green will be attending
Wittenberg Universityl in Springfield.
Ohio, playing football. Green said he
will major in business and pursue a
career in hospital administration.


Jessica Hickerson received a portfolio
scholarship and will major in photog-
raphy at Atlanta College of Art.


Ginny Mazza, Bayshore High School
valedictorian, will attend Stetson
University and pursue a degree in
math and education. She received the
Golden Herald A ward for Mathemat-
ics and a Presidential Scholarship.


Nicole Murrayv will pursue iher
associate's degree from Manlatee
Coimnunity College and continue Ihcr
education at either Florida State
University or the University of'South
Florida. Shie will he majoring, in
elielmtlary education.


Natalie Powers received a Bright Sarah Soutlhwick will attend New
FuItures and Presildential scholarship. College and received a Bright Futures
Pow-ers will b attending Rollins Scholarship. Her major is undecided.
College and wilc l major in physics.


Island graduates looking forward to bright futures


By Heather Beddow
Islander Intern
All graduation hats are off and so are the stu-
dents. The senior graduates of 2004 are setting off
into the next chapter of their lives and, for many Is-
land students, this means full scholarships and a
move to bigger cities and big universities.
Memorial weekend gave students an opportunity


to reflect on the past four years of studying and test
taking and many were able to enjoy a relaxing week-
end at the beach.
With hard work and dedication. Island grads
have learned what it takes to succeed and will
achieve great things.
Future engineers, teachers, athletes and artists
will be venturing into the next stages of their lives


to pursue their dreams and goals.
Manatee High School teacher and Island resident
Lauren Sato said she is very proud of her students
and looks forward to them giving back to the Island
community.
The Islander congratulates all Island graduates
and recognizes them for their academic achieve-
ments.


Playwright
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26


yes... yes. How old? OK. A boy? Wow! Could you
hold a moment? I need to talk with John. Thank you.
John: What's going on?
Willie: The agency says they have the sweetest
little boy for us.
John: A baby?
Willie: Well, not really. He's 6-years old.
John: That's not what we were expecting, but who
cares? Let's meet him anyway.
Willie: I agree. (Speaks into the phone) We're ex-
cited. Where is he? What's his name? When can we see
him? OK, OK, OK great! Thank you so much. We'll
be there in half and hour.
John: So what's the deal? I'm so nervous and
excited.
Willie: He's at the agency. His name is Timmy.
We can bring him here for a day or so to see how we
might get along.
John: Fantastic! Let's go!
Willie: This is pretty amazing. A dog yesterday and
a boy today. I thought we'd have a puppy and a baby.
But now we have a 3-year old dog and a 6-year old boy.
Oh well, who cares?
Several hours later:
John: Timmy, would you like some ice cream?
Want to play catch? Shall we go fishing?
Willie: John, slow down. Let's just get to know
each other a little bit.


Island writer
lFourth-grader Daniel Miller received an honorable
mention in the Florida Studio Theater's Young
Playwrights lF'estival for his play "Thie Seasick
I)og. Miller lives in Bradeinton Beach and attends
the Center fr Edlcationi Montessori School.


John: You're right.
Rupert: Bow-wow.


Timmy: I don't really like dogs that much.
John: We're just getting used to Rupert ourselves.
We just got him yesterday.
Timmy: Does he bite?
Willie: No, he's very sweet.
Timmy: I'm not sure I like him.
John: Let's go to bed and see how we feel tomor-
row.
The next day:
John: TimmIy, it's Saturday. Willie and I thought
we'd take you and Rupert out on our sailboat.
Timmy: Ok, but does Rupert have to go?
Willie: Well, we just got him, so lie might be kind
of lonely if we left him.
Timmny: Alright. I guess it's OK.
On the boat:
Tilmmy: This is fun. But why is Rupert lying over
in the corner? He's been there a long time.
Willie: That's a good question. I think maybe he's
sick.
John: Can dogs get seasick?
W illie: It sure looks like it.
Timmy: I don't feel sick, but Rupert doesn't look
so good.
Willie: Why don't you go pet him?
Timuny: OK. I'll try to help him feel better. (Goes
over and sits with Rupert.) I think he needs me.
Willie: I think we all need each other.
John: Let's go home. (Smiles at Willie.)


i; I.:





PAGE 28 JUNE 9, 2004 d THE ISLANDER


'Regina' moves along bureaucratic journey; Got life jackets?


The "Regina" has taken another step toward its
journey of becoming Florida's 10th underwater archeo-
logical preserve.
State officials have completed mapping the "sugar
barge" that sank off Bradenton Beach 64 years ago and
have produced a 31-page proposal that goes to the
Florida Department of State for final ratification.
The proposal will also be used to nominate the
wreck to the National Register of Historic Places.
If approved, the "Regina" will be the only offshore
wreck listed from Florida's Gulf Coast.
The story of the wreck of the barge reads like a true
sea drama.
It was a bad night March 8, 1940, when the
"Regina" was under tow from Havana, Cuba, to New
Orleans. The 247-foot-long converted steel steamer,
built in Belfast, Ireland, in 1904, was carrying 350,000
gallons of molasses.
Molasses, by the way, was not only used to distill
rum, but was also used by animal feed manufacturers
in the Midwest, and New Orleans was a major port for
the transfer of the sweet stuff for transport up the Mis-
sissippi.
Anyway, a strong nor'wester was ripping across the
Gulf of Mexico, and the barge and its tug, the "Minima,"
were having a rough time of it in the 12-foot seas and gale-
force winds. The tug and barge attempted to make shel-
ter in Tampa Bay, but somehow the tow lines parted near
Egmont Key and the barge began to drift.
Gene Birney, manager of the Gulf Trailer Park -
now the Sandpiper Mobile Resort spotted the adrift
barge and reported it to the U.S. Coast Guard in St. Pe-
tersburg. The Coast Guard mobilized a ship and air-
craft, but the barge grounded about 200 yards off Ninth
Street North in Bradenton Beach.
With the heavy seas, the "Regina" began to
break apart as night approached. The crew of eight,
wary of the high surf, tried to take refuge in their
quarters, but water reached their shoulders before [the
night was out.
Islanders lit fires on shore to offer some comfort to
the crew to let them know that they were not alone.
The Coast Guard, determined that a rescue from
shore was the best approach to save the crew, and Coast
Guard Gunner's Mate Frank Barnett was dispatched to
a dock on the east side of Anna Maria Island with a
line-throwing gun.
Barnett was met by Islanders and taken to the
shore, where, at 1 a.m., he attempted to fire a line to the
sinking or already sunk barge. The shots fell
short time after time.
At daybreak, a Coast Guard aircraft circled the
barge twice to drop life preservers, but the wind drove
all but one of the jackets out of reach of the barge.
The barge's cook, Seferino Canneciras, became fed
up with the situation and jumped overboard to swim to
shore. His German shepherd followed him. Local resi-
dent Eddie Giant swam out to meet the cook and almost



Tips offered on s
It's baby bird time again, the Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary reminds us, and passes along information on
how to care for a feathered baby that needs help.
The advice comes as the sanctuary is basking in the
success of its annual "baby bird shower," where birds'
friends brought gifts of baby food, paper and cleaning
supplies.
Advice from the experts on what to do with a baby
bird you happen to encounter:
If it has fallen from a nest, put it back there and
don't worry about the parent's rejecting it because of
your scent; it won't happen. If you can't find the nest,
fashion a substitute from a flower pot or hanging plant
and put it in a safe area near where you found the baby.


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MAJOR CREDIT CARDS & DEBIT CARDS ACCEPTED


reached him when Canneciras disappeared under the
seas. Their bodies were later recovered on Coquina
Beach.
Barnett secured a nine-foot dinghy and rowed out
to the barge, trailing a line. He took off Capt. Jose
Urquida and almost made it back to shore before the
small boat capsized. A human chain was quickly
formed and the two were dragged from the water.
The locals then took over. Furman Smith manned
the dinghy and made it back to the "Regina." With a
line secured, he and Billy Parker and Clayton Adams
were able to safely rescue the remainder of the crew.

How you can help
Letters of support for the listing of the "Regina
Preserve" are encouraged. Address the letters to:
JuDee Pettijohn, Deputy Secretary of State for Cultural
and Historical Programs
Florida D)epartment of State
R.A. Gray Building, 500 S. Bronough St.
Tallahassee FL 32399-0250,
or e-mail to jpettijohn"@dos.state.fl.us

Grim boating statistics
Speaking of boating mishaps, the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission has compiled a
profile of a typical marine fatality.
He yes. it's a he is a 22- to 50-year-old who
is an experienced boater. If he sustained an injury, it
was not life-threatening. If he did not survive the in-
jury, he drowned. He was not wearing a life jacket be-
cause it was "uncomfortable, unbecoming or un-nec-
essary, even if he didn't know how to swim," accord-
ing to the FWC.
Boating accidents in Florida clai med 64 fatalities
in 2003. Seventy percent of those who died in Florida
boating accidents drowned, and the U.S. Coast Guard
estimates 85 percent of those who die in boating acci-
dents would have survived if they had worn a life
jacket.
I'm still trying to figure out the concept of boaters
going out on the water without a life jacket if they don't
know how to swim.

... and another grim mishap
FWC Commissioner David Meehan found himself
in some hot political water recently.



having baby birds
If you see a well-feathered little fledgling on the
ground, leave it there the ground is where it learns
to fly. Its parents will be around to feed and care for it
before sundown.
If it seems injured or orphaned, contact the sanc-
tuary at 388-4444.
Other ways to help both baby birds and their adult
cohorts:
Keep bird baths and bird feeders filled.
Wait until after June to prune underbrush, trees and
shrubs. If you cut down a tree or bush that has a nest,
drive a post into the ground near the original location
and attach the nest to it.
Keep pets on a leash or indoors.


-xr Holmes p
R TBeach PURE

.. < .:i; ard I-.r .-eStation
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779-0487
[at the corner of Gulf and Marina Drive]


He and friends were fishing for tarpon in Boca
Grande Pass last week when he was discovered to be
violating a law he had recently passed that banned the
use of more than three fishing lines per boat in the pass.
He and his buddies had four hooks in the water from
their boat.
"I'm sorry but I was just mistaken about which
rules were in effect at the time," he said.
Yeah, it's real confusing, Commissioner.
See, the FWC passed a rule in February limiting all
tarpon fishers to no more than three lines in the water
while fishing the pass. That rule was amended in April
to limit all fishers, not just tarpon fishers, to no more
than the three hooks in the pass.
Oops. No word on whether Meehan will be fined
or not, but there were photos.

The swarm
It's termite and flying ant swarming time in
Florida.
Flying ants make a mess but are mostly harmless.
Termites will eat your house. They look an awful lot
alike.
According to University of Florida/IFAS Manatee
County Extension Agent Jane Morse, "The easiest way
to tell if it's an ant or a termite is to look for a waist.
Ants have narrow waists while termites are straight
bodied. Ants also have bent antennae and their front
wings are longer than their hind wings, whereas ter-
mites have straight antennae and wings of equal size
that are twice as long as the termite body."
The three main types of termites in Florida are the
subterranean, dampwood and drywood. Subterranean
termites cause the most damage and are the most com-
monly found termite in Florida, and most subterranean
termites swarm in the spring.
Morse offers this perky little tip: "Swarms in a
house or finding a pile of wings means the house is
probably infested.
"Mud tubes along the house foundation or any-
where inside a house are another good clue that the
house is infested. Swarms or piles of wings in the house
are a bad sign."
If you've got a sign, get in touch with a pest con-
trol company. Be sure to keep a few of the carcasses for
inspection, because treatment methods vary depending
on the type of bug you've got.
"If drywood termite damage is localized, it may be
controlled by removing and replacing the damaged
wood or by the application of an insecticide," Morse
said. "Extensive and advanced infestations will require
tenting so the whole building can be fumigated. Sub-
terranean termites will require soil treatment with pes-
ticides around and under house foundations, or termite
baits."
I've been living with termites for the past few years
now. I thought I'd knocked them down two years ago
after a borax-like treatment in the walls, but they seem
to have come back. The jury is still out on whether the
house will have to be tented or not something to
look forward to later this summer, I guess.

Sandscript factoid
There's tourism, and then there's apparently niche
tourism, and that niche is filling nicely with lots and
lots of money for Florida.
According to the "Regina" proposal, the proposed
underwater preserve site fits nicely into three some-
what under-reported categories: recreational tourism as
a watersport destination, heritage tourism as a histori-
cal site reflecting local maritime heritage, and eco-tour-
ism."
"Heritage tourism," according to a recent study,
produced more than $3.7 billion in expenditures in
2000 in Florida.
Who said people don't want to look at the past?


Call Cathy Schmidt

for Golf Instruction
Former tour player, LPGA Class "'A" reaching professional


Driving

Ider's Driving Range






THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 29



Tarpon action picking up by the day


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Here's the hit parade for this week: Tarpon, per-
mit and cobia.
Silver kings are finally starting to start coming
onto the bait, with reports of 80- and 100-pound fish
coming in. Permit are thick around the offshore
reefs, and there are good cobia reports as well.
Backwater fishing for big trout continues, as
well as catch-and-release snook, but redfish action
is still slow.
And for those willing to get a little farther off-
shore, there are some sailfish that are willing to be
jumped.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on
Cortez Road said he's finding lots of big trout in
Terra Ceia Bay, as well as catch-and-release snook,
but redfish are still hard to hook.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
trolling for the pelagics is starting to produce real -
reel? results. Hot action reports are coming in on
catches of wahoo, dolphin and even a few sailfish
out in the Gulf of Mexico. Bottom fishing for grou-
per and snapper has moved farther offshore into the
80-foot depths. Closer to the Island, tarpon fishing
is starting to really pick up, with some silver kings
being hooked at better than 100 pounds and one
large catch from the beach. There are also some
good reports of really big trout coming in from the
backwater.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said he's back
from open heart surgery and is feeling fine. Fishing
is fine, too, with good catches of redfish. Permit are
all around the pier, and tarpon too, but they don't
seem to want to come close to a hook yet.
Cliff Alcorn at the Anna Maria City Pier said
anglers there are catching lots of mackerel, big yel-
lowtail jacks, a few flounder, barracuda and cobia.
There was one tarpon hookup last week that made it
to the dock before being released, and the silver
kings are really starting to work the water around the
dock.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House
said tarpon are moving around the Sunshine Skyway
Bridge, with mackerel still around the rocks in front
of Terra Ceia Bay. Redfish up to 27 inches are be-
ing caught in Terra Ceia Bay, and big trout are ap-
parently hungry near the deeper seagrass flats in the
backwater.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business out of
Catchers Marina in Holmes Beach said he's catch-
ing lots of permit off the artificial reefs, plus mack-
erel, snapper and some good-size grouper offshore.
Inshore action includes lots of big trout and some
redfish, with some cobia.
At Perico Island Bait and Tackle, permit ap-
pear to be pretty thick at the 3- and 7-mile reefs off-
shore. Tarpon are working along the beaches, in the
passes and near the Skyway. Cobia are moving
through the seagrass flats in the bays, as well as
snook, trout and redfish starting to hang out in the
potholes in the backwater. Offshore, grouper and
snapper fishers are doing well in the 80-foot depths.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach out of Catchers said he's catching


We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and pictures
are welcome at The
Islander. Just give us a
call at 778-7978 or stop
by our office in the
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


$35 UNTIL NOON
GREEN FEE AND CART
$2750 Noon-4:30
GREEN FEE AND CART
$18 Twilight/4:31pm
*+TAX
GREEN FEE AND CART

BIG SUMMER CARD
$24 & $20*
UNTIL NOON AFTER NOON
*+ TAX, GREEN FEE AND CART



Cal 7 479432
Tee TimesNOW


.
s i:- ......- :. ._

Beach tarpon
Suzette Schonl caught more than slie expected last week a huge tarpon caught off the beach at 72nd Street
in Holmes Beachl. Fishiing at night witll a mullet as bait, she caught the silver king and, with help from Rob
Dellenger, fought the fish for more than two hours before getting it close enough to shore for a couple of


pictures before letting it loose.


permit and some cobia, with a few catches of better
than 40 pounds. Backwater fishing continues to be
good for catch-and-release snook, redfish and trout.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's catching
a few errant kingfish, mackerel, bonito to 12 pounds,
permit to 25 pounds, triggerfish and banded
rudderfish. He's also finding snapper fishing to still
be good.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said lie's catching trout to 24 inches, redfish
to 28 inches, catch-and-release snook to 32 inches,
as well as bluefish, ladyfish, Spanish mackerel and
a few keeper-size grouper.
On my boat Magic, we caught one 80-pound tar-
pon last week, as well as trout to 24 inches, redfish
to 27 inches and lots of mackerel.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year-plus fishing
guide. Call him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing re-
port. Prints and digital images of your catch are also
welcome and may be dropped off at The Islander,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmnes Beach, or e-mailed to
news@islander.org. Please include identification
for persons in the picture along with information on
the catch and a name and phone number for more in-
formation. Snapshots may be retrieved once they
appear in the paper.






e "







Capt. Mike's

S Charter Boat

Z "MAGIC"
Backwater Near Shore Up to 7 miles out in the Gulf
Snook Redfish Trout Flounder Mackerel Snapper
Light Tackle Fishing Reservations a must
Tackle, bait, ice, fishing license provided!

779-9607
Capt. Mike Heistand USCG Licensed


Moon Date AM HIG
LQ. Jn 9 7:52 1.6
Jun 10 S:14 1.8
.Ilul 1 8:38 1.9
Jun 12 9:01 2.1
Ji ll 13 9:25 2.2
Ihi 14 9:50 2.3
Jui 15 1:04 1.4
Jun 16 10:45 2.5


PM HIGH PM LOW
5:42 2.0 11:37a* 1.3
7:14 1.7 1:18 I.I
8:56 1.5 2:43 0.8
10:31 1.4 3:43 0.5
11.54 1.4 4:35 03
5:17 0.1
10:15a* 2.4 5:56 0.0
S 6:34 -0.1


* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


TOWING
FOR MEMBERS

F ~~- ------ --
$119 peryear

756-3422



WOOD DOCK


& SEAWALL
CUSTOM DOCKS SEAWALLS BOAT LIFTS
Design Build Permitting
Sales Service Supplies

792-5322
792-5322 0State CeRt.C
12044 Cortez Rd., W. CRC049564


I


. 'w il r'. ,-.
rb^' i) cna^ no ;'






PAGE 30 M JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER



Summer sports: Dog days start to set in


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
Summer hit Anna Maria Island this weekend. No,
not the actual date of summer, or the real dog days of
August, but the sweltering heat that drives the Geyers
to turn on the air conditioning at Duffy's Tavern.
Along with the stifling heat comes the end to eas-
ily finding sporting events to cover for this weekly
column, (much to my publisher's chagrin). It's just
kind of hard writing a story about going to the beach
fora swim, though photography at the beach wouldn't
be all that bad from my perspective.
The big story right now (as I'm writing this Mon-
day morning) is the Stanley Cup playoffs where the
Tampa Bay Lightning are playing game seven against
the Calgary Flames. When you're reading this on
Wednesday, the members of the Lightning will be tak-
ing turns taking Lord Stanley's Cup home, as is the
custom.
And, also by Wednesday, I should be fully recov-
ered from what I think will be the greatest sporting
moment that I, along with friends Brett Mclntosh. Bill
Romberger and Lance Bieker have had the pleasure to
experience. Look for a report on the game and our ex-
periences at the finals (yes, we have tickets!) in next
week's column.
Go Bolts!

Lady Spartans bring basketball title
to Island
SThe Lady Spartans defeated the Lady Wildcats 26-
24 on Monday, May 24, to win the girls' 8-9-10 divi-
sion basketball championship at G.T. Bray Recreation
Center in Bradenton. The Spartans were pretty much an
all-Island team, with Emma Fridenberg the lone
Bradenton team member. Islanders on the team were
Ally Titsworth, Kelly Guerin, Emma Barlow, Halley
Dearlove, Molly McDonough, Ashley Waring and
Martine Miller.
The Lady Spartans dominated in going through the
entire regular season and playoffs with a perfect 10-0
record, outscoring their opponents by a 277-105 mar-
gin.
In the championship game against the Wildcats,
the Lady Spartans jumped on top early and led 16-8 at
the half. The Lady Wildcats battled back in the third
period, outscoring the Spartans 12-10 to pull to within
26-20. The Lady Spartans were unable to add to their
lead in the pivotal fourth period, but hung on to win by
two points.
Balanced scoring carried the Lady Spartans as
eight of the nine team members scored at least two
points, with six points each from Ally Titsworth and
Emma Barlow. Ashley Waring added four points.
while Sarah Howard, Emma Fridenberg, Hailey
Dearlove, Molly McDonough and Martine Miller each
finished with two points.
The Lady Wildcats were led by Jessica Fischer's
14 points and seven points from Sienna Bonner. Alexis
Reback added two points, while Sadie Montanus fin-
ished with one point in the loss.

Lady Spartans 30, Renee 5
The Lady Spartans over-exposed Photography by
Renee with a 25-point victory in the first-round play-
off game Wednesday, May 19, behind nine points from
Emma Barlow. Molly McDonough, Ashley Waring
and Sarah Howard each scored four points for the Spar-
tans, which also received two points apiece from Ally
Titsworth and Martine Miller in the victory.
Sarah Schields led the Photogs with three points,
while Hannah Welch added two points in the loss.

Meet the Center's new athletic director
If you're considering signing up your child for
whiffle ball, soccer or basketball, then you are going to
get to talk to Andy Jonatzke, the new athletic director
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Jonatzke's been on the job as athletic director since
March when he replaced Joe Chlebus, who married and
left the Center to move to Illinois. Jonatzke hopes to
improve upon the already-established sports like soc-
cer, baseball and basketball, while also introducing
Island youth to other sporting activities like hockey and
ultimate Frisbee.
Jonatzke, 22, was born and raised in Niles, Mich.,


A. -,'


Martin Miller, Mollv McDonough, Kelly Guerin, Ashley Waring, Sarah Howard, Coach Ron McDonough,
Emmna Barlow. Ennma Fridenberg and All/ Titsworth pose with their first-place trophies outside the G.T. Bray
Park gnymtnasihtn. Islander Photo: Courtesy Keith Dearlove


New Anna Maria Island Communlity Center athletic director Anuv Jonatzke and his wii/'f April are expecting a
little girl sometime in August.


where he lived until he was 18 years old. From there
it was off to Tri State University in Angola. Ind. After
two years there, Jonatzke moved to Bradenton to help
care for his mother, who suffers from Adison's Dis-
ease.
.lonatzke is a recent newlywed and, along with wife
April, they are expecting their first child sometime in
August.

Whiffle ball returns
The third-annual Island Whiffle Ball League is
starting Tuesday, July 6, and continues until Friday,
Aug. 6 in three age divisions. Players ages 8-10, I 13
and 14-17 will compete inside the Center's air-condi-
tioned gym.
You can sign tup an entire team or as an individual
at a reasonable cost of $20 per player, which includes
a team T-shirt. All teams are guaranteed at least 10
games and a championship tournament.
For more information, call the center at 778-1908,
or stop by to sign up in person.

Skimboard contest set for August
The third-annual EZ Skimmers Back-to-School
Skimboarding Contest is now accepting applications
for the extremely popular event which will take place
Aug. 21-22 at the Beach House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach.
If you haven't had the pleasure to attend, you're


missing out on some serious good times. Last year the
contest drew more than 125 contestants, creating a fan-
tastic atmosphere with good boarding by skimmers of
all ages along with some interesting commentary, good
music and a nice beach view.
Cost for the contest is $25 for an amateur and $75
for professional boarders, with each contestant receiv-
ing an EZ Skimmers T-shirt and a grab-bag filled with
skimboarding essentials. Age groups range from the
Minis (8 and under) up to the Masters (25 and up) in
male/female divisions.
FZ Skimmers is also looking for sponsors for the
two-day event which already boasts the Beach House,
West Coast Surf Shop, ZAP Skimmers, Native Rent-
als, Fun & Sun Parasail, Sticky Bumps, Block Surf,
Skim East, Australian Gold, Oakley, NXTC Surf-
boards, Timesaver Convenience Store, Skinny's,
Dakine, Skim USA and 77e Islander as sponsors.
Get on board for the most exciting event of the
summer!
Registration forms may be obtained at West Coast
Surf Shop, 3902 Gulf Drive, or The Islander office,
5404 Marina Drive, both in Holmes Beach. Completed
forms and the entry fee should be mailed or delivered
to the Beach House Restaurant, P.O. Box 1478, Anna
Maria FL 34216. Checks should be made payable to
the Beach House.
For more information, call West Coast Surf Shop
at 778-1001.


_ i __


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:fr'~I'





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 9, 2004 M PAGE 31


Project Sea Turtle locates, marks, cares for nest


By Heather Beddow
Islander Intern
Little faces lit up on the beach last week as Anna
Maria Island Turtle Watch Director Suzi Fox reached
down in the sand to pull up a turtle egg from freshly
laid loggerhead turtle nest.
Turtle Tuesday was the kickoff for the first day of
Project Sea Turtles, a kids' day camp that began with
a trip to see the Island's third turtle nest of the May-
October season at the north tip of Anna Maria Island.
It was nested the night before.
Seven children, ages 7 through 12, from Project
Sea Turtle day camp helped Fox block off a nest by
hammering stakes into the sand and wrapping them
with yellow tape to mark the turtle nest. Fox explained
to the kids the importance of designating turtle nesting
areas.
Project Sea Turtle is a camp sponsored by Medal-
lion After-School Program and Turtle Watch. The
young campers participate in daily activities that help
them learn about the environment and about the signifi-
cance of taking care of the world in which they live.
After the kids finished helping Fox with the nest,
they looked at charts to determine when the nest would
hatch. They estimated that the nest would be ready to
hatch in 55 days.
"I loved watching the kids," camp counselor Chris-
tina Swosinski said. "It only takes that one moment for
them to remember something for a lifetime."
Swosinski said she would enjoy bringing the kids
back to the nest with their parents when the nest is
ready to hatch.
The children are kept busy at the camp, with events
scheduled every day. Other activities will include a
snorkeling trip, a tour of Wyland Art Gallery to study
environmental art, and also a trip to the Tampa
Aquarium.


Project Sea Turtle participants, sponsored by Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and the Medallion After-
School Program. visit the Islaml's third nest fbr Turtle Tuesda'v. Stzi Fo.x, cdirectortfbr Turtle Watch, reaches
into the nest to show the Ptroject Sea Turtle children a turtle egg.Islander Photo: Heather Beddow


Fox said she enjoys having the kids participate in
the nesting and was happy to take part in educating
them about sea turtles.


Fox also said that more nests would be coming in
the next few weeks, hopefully in time for the next
Turtle Tuesday.


TURN BACK TIME
Personalized sales and rental services remain
p e r en c ed
our specialty. Our expertise reflects an established
Island office and we've personally experienced
Island growth, zoning changes and building
requirements since 1957. Buying, selling,
renting or just visiting -
stop by and see us!
--i:r'*4i',. .... .- -
-.G in 4



r,;n 1957
MAN, ; LG. PIL 6 STAr
"NKLIN REALTY BRO'.
'We ARE ine Isiand
980f Gu. Ollre* PO Box 83") Anrlna Maria FO Il ji g-1,
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.nel
Web site www.annamariareal.com


Not just mriodwr rel estate br.01<01. We specialize wit"i,
buyei-s whio inivest inl re-sidenitial aind cornm~er-cil', prc-
together with our ffiliated offices in the UK, Otrla!
also offer business opportunities for irnmigrationj
Residential Real Estate
Commercial Real Estate
Property Management ..
Immigration Consultant ._
Mortgage Consultant


10%r


Gulf Coakst island ,ginlty:ihc
3220- Ea.t;ayj Drive ; olmes Beach, FL 34217
Phone 779-04 I I Fax 926-9297 E-mail: info@gulfislandrealty.biz


,cWI2)IN(J- GULt' DbEACH VIEW
9 Income Producing Duplex ,
'PAW- if Steps to Coquina Beach
7 Built in 1998 a
Turnkey Furnished
0-8 1New Carpet andT lel r
SBayviews From Top floor
9 0;M:Asking .$795 c000


fitwrsce Hparrison
or Brian Heavrin 9 941 758-7777 RW/AM ,,r,
View our website: YourManateeHome.com


check Lct tkes e G:rect

I(slarnd Pvropcrties
.& ,f,)t r t~l ,.,'(~, (ll~ ,., ,'.h.( ,.- [l ~, (Ih,. 1( If If,, iJ,4 ql, 1,,' r rlil.
('4It"' (. 1. wr,r J14iL I,.r ,' H -rr ,fi;.

R Wl1t1fr ,ti r, I,,1 rG f I t il1 I, 1,ij .l4 n. W d1-. II o ( ill thF. fjr,
B( ,ll II .
kI ,1,,. I,',. [ r fir, 1ri t t. l i,,1, t r i l-, II I t, llr, j.:11.-"i'. -."I,(.i ( -l


iM ,illnlt 1 r ir.l l l (.1r'1 IIfrrniiit(' r lull,.1i. Ji lj iio .

SYVONNE HIGGINS Ii.L' 941-51-90035





PAGE 32 -JUNE 9, 2004 E THE ISLANDER


ITEMS OR SAL 1= GAAGE SAES CotinuedI KIDSFOR HIE Continue


BEAUTIFUL ETHAN ALLEN Queen Anne-style
chair, light floral pattern with claw-style legs, excel-
lent condition. Asking $500. Call 795-4163.

KRAKAUER UPRIGHT PIANO, good condition,
$500 or best offer. 778-0019.

USED 1200-POUND Mantowoc ice machine with
bin, good condition, works great, $1,650. Call Bill,
795-7411.

GIRL SCOUT COOKIES available at The Islander,
assorted varieties, $3.50 box. All proceeds paid to
local Girl Scout troop.

Fish tank: 150-gallon with hand-made oak cabinet,
fully equipped, $1,000 or best offer. Call Bill, 795-
7411.

BOOKS FOR SALE! Come visit Tingley Memorial
Library, 111 Second St. N, Bradenton Beach and
see our ongoing sale of books, magazines and
puzzles. Open Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-3pm.
779-1208.

CAR COVER: Toyota Supra, like new, $50. Call
Bill, 795-7411.

FREE DELIVERY: SEAFOOD to go. Shrimp,
crabs, native fish. Delivered to your door. Call
James Lee, 795-1112 or 704-8421.


BICYCLE RENTALS: Tour the Island by bike.
Great weekly rates, includes helmet. Adults, $45/
week; children, $25/week. 778-3441.

DVD AND VHS new for 2004 Tales of Cortez, the
Totch Brown series. Manatees, Panthers, Fish
Key West and more. (800) 852-0662 or
www.videoprojects.tv.

SALE! NIKI'S ANTIQUE Mall, 5351 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. Dolphin glass-top end tables and
lamps; 40 percent off select art work, antiques 25
to 40 percent; sterling jewelry 50 percent off. 7
days. 779-0729.

LONGBOAT KEY HISTORY "From Calusas to
Condominiums" by Ralph B. Hunter. Signed cop-
ies available at The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open Tuesday, Thurs-
day, 9:30am-2pm; Saturday 9am-noon. Half-price
sales rack. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.
GARAGE SALE: Friday and Saturday, June 11-
12, 8am-noon. Furniture, bric-a-brac, pictures,
cooks, luggage. 511 72nd St., Holmes Beach.


INSIDE SALE: Friday and Saturday, June 11-12,
8am-3pm. Collectibles, sterling, vintage and cos-
tume jewelry, books, bric-a-brac. Come on up-
stairs, stay cool. 218 84th St., Holmes Beach.


LOST COCKATIEL: June 4 in Anna Maria. Please
call Robin, 778-0836.


CRITTER SITTER nine years in pet care. 24
years as an Island resident. Lots of TLC for your
beloved pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.

ADOPT: PIT BULL/BOXER mix puppies, male
and female. Ready for adoption. Please call 922-
0774.

ADULT CATS in desperate need of loving homes.
All are current on vaccines. All applicants
screened. Please call 922-0774.


1998 HONDA CIVIC: 81,000 miles, CD player,
electric windows/locks, five-speed, cruise control,
regularly maintained. Asking $5,400. 795-7047.

1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN, cold air condition-
ing, has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs
great. $2,000, or best offer. 778-1102.


BOAT DETAILING: Interior and exterior. Does
your boat need a good teak job or waxing? I can
come to you. 724-0874.

MODULAR FLOATING DOCK system: Custom
drive-on docking solutions by Versa Dock. Main-
tenance free, 20-year warranty. (941) 685-7648,
Anna Maria area.


EGMONT EXPRESS CHARTERS: Seek out se-
cret water paradise. Sunsets, back water, Egmont
or custom trips. See dolphins and manatees. Call
778-7459 or 720-5470.

LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on
the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwa-
ter fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle pro-
vided. 779-9607.


CHILD SITTER AND PET SITTER. Eighth-grade
male looking for a job. Available after school and
weekends. Call Zachary, 779-9783.

CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!


NEED A CHILD or pet sitter? Call one number and
get connected to three wonderful sitters! Tiffany,
Kari, Holly. 778-3275 or 779-0793.

BABYSITTER: RED CROSS babysitting and first-
aid certified. Enjoys playing with kids. Call
Alexandra, 778-5352.

SPENCER'S SKIM SCHOOL for beginners and
intermediates. Free skimboard use with lessons.
$10 per half-hour lesson, three lessons recom-
mended. Local teen, team competitor. Call 778-
0944.

PETSITTER, DOG WALKER, 12-year-old
mother's helper, odd jobs. Call Kendall at 779-
9783 or 779-9803.

BABYSITTER WITH EXPERIENCE and CPR li-
cense, 13 years old, friendly and responsible. 778-
2469.

TUTORING: Junior high honor student tutors all
elementary grades during summer vacation.
Hourly, daily or weekly in mathematics, reading,
writing and science. Read-out-loud available upon
request. Call 778-2469 after 5pm for schedule and
prices.


REAL ESTATE: Tired of paying office fees? Two
experienced agents needed for fast paced, high
traffic Island office. Top splits, sign-on bonus. Call
Wedebrock Real Estate today! "Personalized, not
Franchised." Call Joe Pickett, 383-5543.

DOMINO'S PIZZA: Now hiring delivery driver.
Able to work until lam for closes. Average pay
$15-$18/hour. Tips and milage. Mileage paid
nightly. Pre-employment drug test and good driv-
ing record a must. Apply 5604 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.

LONGBOAT KEY CONDO/hotel. Friendly, busy
place on the beach. Office assistant, 5-10 hours
per week. Maintenance person, 10-20 hours per
week. PO Box 8245, Longboat Key, FL 34228.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER: Advertising layout and de-
sign for weekly newspaper, some Web site pro-
duction. Knowledge of advertising design and lay-
out with a strong understanding of typography,
composition and copy writing. Qualifications in-
clude proficiency in PhotoShop; knowledge of II-
lustrator/PageMaker/Acrobat a plus. Minimum
one-year experience required and associate's
degree or technical school certificate preferred.
Resumes: e-mail news@islander.org, fax 778-
9392, or mail/deliver to The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.






THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 33


Countrywide Home Loans is close by and ready
to help you get the home of your dreams.
[ Competitive rates
rA Local experts with the power to say "YES" to
your home loan
[ Up-front approval* at the time of application
[A As little as no-to-low down payment options
available to make qualifying easier
[ Fast service of VA/FHA and all loan programs
[ Construction financing available


Pam Voorhees
Home Loan Consultant
401 Manatee Ave. W. Holmes Beach
pam_voorhees@ countrywide.com

SCountrywide
HOME LOANS
(941) 586-8079


EQUAL HOusING LENDER 2003 COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. TRADE/SERVICE MARKS ARE THE
PROPERTY OF COUNTRYWIDE FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND/OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES. ADO APPROPRIATE
STATE, LEGAL. UP-FRONT APPROVAL SUBJECT TO SATISFACTORY PROPERTY REVIEW AND NO CHANGE IN
FINANCIAL CONDITION. SOME PRODUCTS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. PRICES AND GUIDELINES
ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. RESTRICTIONS APPLY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


WEST OF GULF DRIVE 131 White Ave. Duplex on corner
lot, two-car garage, two carports, screened lanai, lots of
decks, over 3,900 sf. under roof. 150 steps to beach ac-
cess. Just listed at $699,000. For more details call
Stephanie Bell, Broker,778-2307 or 920-5156.
HOLMES BEACH TWO
.' -. LOTS EACH 70-BY-100-
^- Bl BLOCK TO BEACH. One
lot has a duplex and the
other is vacant. Asking
$800,000 for both parcels.
Call Frank Migliore at
778-2307, or Stephanie
Bell 920-5156, for details.


^ ^ SiA A Anql^ ;^ ^
0 ai-n ai 6i -iBupnt
jBIH S -- SMBI


SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1970


MLS


Thanks for saving "I saw it in The Islander"

ISLAND INVESTORS:
This is the one! $343,000! '
Duplex c.: nirflv I.:.,:i-a on 'i '
Guilt Dr,.e Ui,- e-Ara.Elarge
Ironra3qe lor pierIV l pa -rl',r,: .
SOssIlIh .es G raD I before l's
OLc'lale' O r'er irnar.ng .n' g ..
ai alable Call Anrin Huber ,,' : .
S7!3 98.3,5 TO 'VIEW. '

TRUE BAYFRONT
BEAUTY WITH EXTRA -
LOT! $749,000 .-. .,


Let Anne's 15 years
of local experience
work for you!
Call 941-713-9835


I~C~~~
Iu I I I


DICK MAHER
AND
DAVE JONES
ISLAND SPECIALISTS


Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation,


a
-


;i
MLI
.* r
.
I'
t '
i
r.


Simply the Best


DUPLEX 5BR/5BA, two blocks to beach.
Very large. A must see. $429,000.


Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"

111 Pelican Anna Maria Canalfront Home








1,792 sq II ,t Ili.ing are-a, isil air condl, ori, dj is 3BR'
2BA and 2,628 sq.ft. under roof (sfur) includes a
screened-in canalfront lanai and oversized two-car ga-
rage 75-by-100-foot seawalled lot with dock at the end
of cul-de-sac. $650,000 furnished that will include a
Zodiac-type boat and motor.

Doug Dowling Realty
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
S E-Mail: dougdowllng@earthlink.net
wwwdougdowling.com



ANNA MARIA
S*^ ISLAND II" I


SmiiiCoast
REAL ESTATE LLC
VILLAGE GREEN
4BR/2BA great family home! Good schools, ceramic
tile, split plan, screened lanai, fenced yard, beautiful
landscaping, room for pool, barrel-tile roof, two-car
garage. $239,9)0.
BAY HOLLOW PRIVATE DOCK
2BR/2BA, updated condo with deeded boat dock.
Eat-in kitchen, wood-burning fireplace, walk-in clos-
ets, Jacuzzi tub. Carport and heated pool. $359,900.
ANNA MARIA CITY
2BR/2BA charming home in lush, private, tropical set-
ting. Vaulted ceiling, fireplace, ceramic tile, brick deck.
One block to bay and piers. Near beautiful beach.
$498,900. Owner is licensed real estate agent.
OWNER FINANCING
4BR/2BA Village Green home, split plan, screened
lanai, walled patio, new carpet, fresh paint inside and
out, shutters, new verticals. Owner is licensed real
estate agent. $219,900.
WATERFRONT CONDO
2BR/2BA plus den. Furnished open plan with fire-
place. On sailboat water with large deeded boat
dock. Heated pool, carport, short drive to beach.
$329,900.
KEY ROYALE
4BR/3BA canalfront home with dock and davits.
Direct access to Tampa Bay and Intracoastal Water-
way. Large master suite, charming airy family room
opens onto caged pool and Jacuzzi. Barrel-tile roof.
Turnkey furnished. $779,000.
ISLAND TRIPLEX
2BR/1.5BA plus 1BR/1BA and 2BR/1BA. Great
investment! Watch the sunset as you collect rent
from these charming units. Easy to see, call for ap-
pointment. Just steps to beautiful beach. $749,000.

ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month


779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

0 MiS S iiCoast
REAL ESTATE LLC
Island Shopping Ccnter 5402 Marina Drive
IHolmcs Beach, Florida 3/i217 www.suiicoaistilnc.cofi


WEST OF GULF DRIVE Location, location.
Newer 3BR/2BA, very close to beach. Corian
countertops, Jacuzzi tub, alarm, central vac., single-
car garage and storage room. $549,000.



,. ,

.pi( s..-.u8 i. ....e.

GULF SANDS Corner unit directly on the Gulf
next to the public beach. 2BR/2BA, completely
updated with tile floors throughout and all new
furniture and completely turnkey.


GULFFRONT SIX UNITS
Directly on the Gulf. Great rentals. Remodeled,
white ceramic tile floors, swimming pool.


COMMERCIAL Located across from the beach on
Gulf Drive in Bradenton Beach. Almost 3,000 sf,
zoned C-2. Completely upgraded block building with
newer A/C, electrical, plumbing, three bathrooms,
12 parking spaces. Real estate only. Call for details.


GULFFRONT Rarely available 2BR/2BA Gulffront
end unit at Coquina Beach Club. Solid rental
history, turnkey furnished, heated pool. $775,000.

100+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.


Mike

Norman


Realty


1NC


3101 GULF DRIVE HOI
www.mikenormanre


800-367-1617
941-778-6696
.MES BEACH
*alty.com .


CORTEZ KITCHEN RESTAURANT As fun as
can be with wonderful food and old-time atmosphere.
You just don't find open dining anymore, especially
with seating for 60+ and a boat dock. Business only.



^t FS^i,






PAGiE 34 JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER

S. U R CSD

HEP ATE .oniue SRICSCotnud EVIE Cnine


HELP WANTED: Part-time chef/sous chef and
servers. Apply at Ooh La La! Bistro, 5406 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.

JOURNALIST: Part-time reporter sought for city
beat and features writing by The Islander. Must
have journalism education, experience or back-
ground relevant to government reporting. E-mail
resumes to news@lslander.org, fax 778-9392 or
mail/deliver to office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach FL 34217.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world?
Are you interested in learning the history of Anna
Maria Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria
Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria. We need you! Call 778-0492.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, cabbage
palms, patio gardens, trimming, clean-up,
edgings, more. Hard-working and responsible.
Excellent references. Edward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Car Service. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your
computer misbehaving? Certified computer ser-
vice and private lessons. Special $30 per hour-
free advice. 545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.



Clo.Jf" I CrPri


BEAUTIFUL BAY PALMS 3BR/2.5BA canalfront
home recently updated to include a coral-appointed
remote-controlled gas fireplace, new windows,
pavers, boat hoist and more. Enjoy luxury living in
this ranch-style home with more than 2,650 sf of
living area. $725,000.

Marina Pointe

Realty Co.

314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
Summer Rentals Available


ALMOST ON THE BEACH!


P"' I I X ", F--);1

' .,*. ;1:- ..' :'" *

-- .1 n ; f*- -------


Completely updated 2BR/2BA condo
wood floors, Italian-tiled master show
updated bathrooms and kitchen
screened lanaisl Great location and j
o the beach! $385,000.

SCompletely furnished 3BR/2.5BA, ove
with two-car garage. Beautiful waterfi
with association pool, tennis courts,
exercise room! $1,700/month.

/ Call Sue Carlson,
S720-2242
An Island Place Realty Inc
- I


with hard-
r, new AC,
and two
ust a block

-r 1,900 sf,
ront setting
sauna and


CONNECT-ICON Your local computer specialist.
Experienced certified technician for communication
electronics offers wireless and cable networks,
upgrades, maintenance, repairs, tutoring and train-
ing. Call Robert, 778-3620.

McEVOY PAINTING: Frank McEvoy owner. Inte-
rior and exterior work. Free estimates. Call 750-
8467 or cell, 713-1208.

COMPUTER SERVICE and repair. Training,
maintenance, virus and Spyware protection. Is-
land native. Web site: www.matrixPConline.com.
Call John Baird with Matrix PC, 708-6541.

IMPERIAL TRIM: Carpentry, interior trim, crown
molding, chair rails, baseboards, doors, finish
work. Doug Ewing, 737-9115.

NOTARY PUBLIC: Civil marriages and renewal of
wedding vows, sunset beach setting or wherever.
Norman R. Veenstra, 778-5834.

BAREFOOT ESTATE MANAGEMENT: Weekly
maid service, deep-cleaning service, vacation
rental cleaning, departure cleaning, carpets, tile,
grout. Servicing private homes, condos, rentals,
seasonal homes and commercial properties.
Bonded/Insured. Free estimates. 761-3000.

HANDYMAN SERVICES Scott Fulton, owner, Is-
land resident. "Get the job done right." Free esti-
mate, many references. 713-1907 cell, 778-4192
home.

I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Affordable,
dependable cleaning. Chamberlain Professional
Cleaning, 778-7770. References available.

PROFESSOR/COMPOSER Bill Rhodes accept-
ing piano students. Call 779-0752.
IN-HOME TUTORING: Experienced certified
teacher. Summer and after-school tutoring avail-
able for K-12. Call Raya, 224-0229.


Gayle Sintyson Schulz...


Trust a professional with more than
20 years experience to handle your
real estate needs.

Home Sales
Property Management
Commercial Leasing


Vacation Rentals
Jim Anderson Realty Company
PO Box 1789 401-[; ine Avenue Anna Maria, FL 34216
941.778.484' oll free 1.800.772.3235
w w w i i mrn c c e r s o n r e a I t y c o m
e-mail: i I eaoltyco@ aol .co m



wwwslanero' rg


STOP! DON'T CALL your attorney. For instant
pre-paid legal service and identity theft protection
call Steve Katie, 704-8336.

PAINTING: SUMMER PRICES. Free estimates,
local references. One room or complete house. In-
terior or exterior. Call John, 778-3713.

CLEANING SERVICE Residential or commercial.
Daily, weekly, bi-weekly, move-ins, move-outs.
Excellent references. Call 750-8366.

PERSONAL SHOPPER: Need someone to pick
up those prescriptions or groceries? I'm your girl!
Please call Claudette, 778-3713.

AUTO DETAILING by Island native. Only top-
quality products including high powered shop-vac
and buffer. Call about multi-wash packages. 724-
0874.

EXPERT CERAMIC TILE installation. Prompt and
reliable service, reasonable rates, excellent refer-
ences. If quality counts, call David, 792-2552.

DISCOVER PILATES: On-going class at Anna
Maria Island Art League, 6-7pm Wednesdays, $8/
class, drop-ins welcome. Call 778-2099 for infor-
mation. Also at G.T. Bray Activity Center starting
March 16. Call 742-5974 for information. Certified
Pilates Instructor Preston Whaley Jr.

MUSIC LESSONS! Flute, saxophone, clarinet. Be-
ginning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray, 792-0160.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrig-
eration. Commercial and residential service, re-
pair and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County
and the Island since 1987. For dependable, hon-
est and personalized service, call William Eller,
795-7411. RA005052.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 778-2711.


Dial DEBBIE DIAL
.. : .:., (914 1! 7 7 .1-1S :._- : (941) 100-1171

.-d a, -
*./ .d










mpeccaole 3 BR,2B4
I *Partial bay ews
3 car Garage
SNorth end
A ;'* NO bridge
S. $615,000

(941) 778 1537


One of lie biggest
in Imortgages is
your ownM back

,, _,,,, ,,,,. i. ,,,


.[ lrdU.es
right in
.viud. |

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. . . ., -; : ..,
l i i I ,. I .. I 1 I I. '' *.M ''^

i I .. .. ,,, ..,,. \.. I

i 1 ,i l I, m .l l l l "...
11 a l1\. "
e-!

L -CHASE _.
:: r :; ; :,. :-- -"


YOUR NEIGI BOIRI ()O RIAL 1SITATE SI OP'1)1".
tExperi, ,, R'epttation Results
AZALEA PARK 3BR/2BA, i r,. exclusive listing $280,000.
5400 GULFFRONT V\i to sand beaches and sunsets.
1BR/1BA, new p)aim anu carpet. Reduced to $265,000.
MARTINIQUE SOUTh C:ULF BEACH VIEW 2BR/2BA, bright, light,
attractive decoiuitl !triikey finished. Elevator, tennis,
healed Ipol, cabana. $469,000.
4 UNITS ANNA MARIA Some bayview. One 2BR, three 1BR,
room for pool Great investment $870,000.
VACATION, SEASONAL & ANNUAL RENTALS
MARTINQUE Gullliont 2DR/2BA, pool, tennis, ulevalois.
5400 GULFFRONT complex. 1 and 2BRs, pool.
BEACHFRONT 3DR/2BA ihomi, taieslully decorated.
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com www.tdollyyoungrcalestate.comi


1~






THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 35


ISLA E U N W N ; WN N D
S I CteA A G E oHE


NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing mas-
sage in the comfort of your home. Call today for
an appointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.

SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast
and reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines,
cushions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call Jenifer
Catlin, 727-5873.

TILE AND MOSAIC custom installation, 20 years
experience. References available. For a reason-
able price call Sebastian, 704-6719.

AUTO DETAILING BY HAND Spotless inside
and out. I can save you time and money. Island
resident, references. For pricing call 713-5967.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, cleanup, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair.
If it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Se-
nior discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.

KARAZ LANDSCAPE Lawn Service. Mulch,
clean-ups, power washing, tree trimming and
more. City of Anna Maria resident. Cell 448-3857.

CLOUD 9 LANDSCAPING: Quality lawn service,
landscape cleanup, plantings, pruning, tree in-
stallation, shell, more. Insured, references, free
estimates. 778-2335 or 284-1568.

LOOKING FOR A GOOD DEAL? You can read
Wednesday's classified at noon on Tuesday at
www.islander.org. And it's FREE!





$379,000 ISLAND CONDO
Spacious ground-floor IBR/IBA
end unit at 5400. Steps to beach
and pool. Kitchen with lots of
S goodies. Washer/dryer. IB101731
' $425,000- BUILD YOUR ISLAND
DREAM HOME Canalfront
lot available in Holmes Beach!
IB90367
6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.floridamoves.com


Friends and family that
live afar will surely
appreciate keeping in
touch with what's
happening on Anna Maria
it'sjust like a letter
from home. Keep in touch
weekly with a gift
subscription. You can
charge it to your
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us
online: islander.org or
stop by 5404 Marina
Drive, Island Shopping
Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978
NOW ONLINE:
www. islander.org


BAREFOOT LAWNS & GARDENS: Providing
the total TLC for your landscape requirements.
Lawns, trees, shrubs and gardens. Design, in-
stallation and service. Call 761-3000 for free con-
sultation.

BRADENTON TROPICAL LAWN and garden.
Specializing in landscaping lawns, decks,
entryways, butterfly gardens, ponds. Also, year-
round maintenance. 795-2877.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, haul-
ing, cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 807-
1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation. Everything Under the Sun Gar-
den Centre, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
778-4441.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-
rap, mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reli-
able and insured. 727-5066.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $35/yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 795-7775, "shell phone"
720-0770.

DESIGN, PLANTING, EDGING, pruning, mulch
and stones. Reasonably priced commercial and
residential. University of Florida School of
Landscape Architecture student. Call Robert,
962-7175.



; unique individuals.
To find the right mortgage for you. call your
, Chase Home Finance Mortgage Specialist today.
Pat Shahinian
1450 59th Street W Bradenton, FL 34209 d CHASE
(941) 761-9808 or (800) 559-8025 m
vll iu:'. 4 1 plp'iiui.' ;a.l Ioi..isii 3vi t i i n ,l i.Toi l: n o a r ac un o 01i" inw n s
ow~l,) A n I [s oeri h C,3 th' nl'halta Mor'qee Cworpo.'tlon
"CM ". rr-oi u cdrs: 343 T'i o i :3 Strert. E isc., New I v 0887:
732) 205.ai'0 -. P V Ciri -! 4 ,. t 46920 MG;.


Tfie Islander
The best news on Anna
Maria Island is now
online: islander.org


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodel-
ing contractors. In-house plan designs. State li-
censed and insured. Many Island references.
778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free es-
timates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal
at 778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island
service since 1975. Repairs and new construc-
tion. Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now
certifying back flow at water meters.
(FL#RF0038118) 778-3924 or 778-4461.

OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim.
Dan Michael, master carpenter. Call 778-6898 or
cell, 518-3316.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call Neil,
726-3077.


ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.

CUSTOM RENOVATION/RESTORATION ex-
pert. All phases of carpentry, repairs and painting.
Insured. Member of Better Business Bureau. Paul
Beauregard, 779-2294.



I wanna have Jesse's life! Great opportunity! Be your
own boss! Jesse's Beach Lounge, beer, wine, food.
Seats 25. Low Overhead! Partial Gulf view Walk
to beach! Seller motivated bring offers! The usual:
Appointments a must! Confidentiality agreement
required for financial. $89,900.
Call Laura McGeary, 941-704-3708
Coldwell Banker Residential ReallEstate


y /iWs C/leal &tate, z.
SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Ave., Anna Maria FL 34216 PO Box 2150 (941) 778-2291
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

.. ENCHANTING
COTTAGE NEAR
,THE SEA





T i

This captivating 3BR/2BA hide- -L.,
away is located on the secluded
north end of Anna Maria, within
steps of the prettiest beach in
the world! The spacious
split- bedroom design is complimented by French doors, ceramic tiled
floors and a wonderful open kitchen with oak cabinets and white ap-
pliances. Other amenities include vaulted ceilings in the charming
master suite, walk-in closet, paddle fans and lush tropical landscap-
ing, including several Grecian Urn Royal Palms and a spectacular
Royal Poincianna tree. Don't miss this captivating Island retreat, priced
at $685,000 furnished.

S VIDEO TOUR W s
BROCHURE Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


NORTH SHORE BEACHHOUSE just steps to the Gulf. This
well-designed remodeled 2BR/2BA home includes a Jacuzzi and
separate shower in the master bath, maple Shaker kitchen cabi-
nets with tile floors throughout and built-in entertainment cen-
ter. Open floor plan makes this cottage feel large and spacious.
Outdoor tiled shower and a nice little deck off kitchen. Private
front entry is great for growing lush, tropical plants. Call Green
Real Estate today for the finer points on this property. $625,000.
Ken Jackson 778-6986 Kathy Geerearts 778-0072
Maureen Dahms 778-0542 LaRae Regis 779-1858


-. : reen
j REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA


7t8-.01455 9906 Gulf Drive
Visit our Web site www.greenreal.com






AGE 36 M JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER

-/ iSandy's Lawn Service Inc.
fS-ady'S\ EsabfUshed a1983 I


ASInalcy a DepeaMble service.
1 sericeCall s for yor landscape
U77 345 hscapeneeds.
Licensed & lasured

DESIGN & REMODELING CONTR ACTOR S


WWW.ANNAMARIACONTRACrOR.COM
STATE & WASURED41
SCRC 035261 EPER CED (941) 778-2993


IN1 (i1H I PIIHTIHG
ResikdentioI Cominnmercil
Check our refeircwes: *
"Qualify wor at a reasonable price.-
Lcensednsred Senr minAno Moia IladlSIrnCe 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaleza Andrew Chennault
.- Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755


*WAGNEQ QEALTY

HAWOLD MAII REALTOR. I 1. JL
Office- (941) 778-2246 792- 8628 j
E-mai: haroldsmaliwagTne.reay.com

Ckriste's tCleaih i Service 141-1715
Commercial & Residential
Daily Weekly Bi Weekly Monthly
Move Ins Move Outs Deep Cleans
Licensed Bonded Insured


The Paver Brick Store
8208 Cortez Road W. Bradenton 34210 (941) 794-6504
9:00 AM til Noon, or by Appointment
Pool Deck, Patio and Driveway Renovations
Design Build

: ... .- .
-: .


CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Inc Building contractor.
New homes, additions, renovations. Quality work
and fair prices. Call 795-1947. Lic#RR0066450.

WALLS BEAUTIFIED. Drywall fixes, painting in-
side and out. Conscientious work. Call Drew
Hudson, 812-5073.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and
more. Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a
free in-home consultation. Island references, 15
years experience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


PALM ISLAND WATERFRONT escape. Se-
cluded, private dock, access by ferry/boat. Fish-
ina, shelling. wildlife, canoeing. $125/night; $800/


d nicely fur-
x with cheer-
o the beach.
restaurants in
Phone, pre-
'dryer. Small
)ting reserva-
'month, $550/
6ek. E-mail:
-5626.

it. Short-term
ate entrance,
3 beach. Call


almetto Ave.
utilities, avail-
Call Tampa,


ANNA MARIA BAYSIDE cottage across the beach
from the city pier. 2BR/1BA. Summertime rates.
weekly or monthly. Pet friendly. 778-0542.

VACATION RENTAL: Charming 1BR/1BA, fully
furnished, across from white sandy beach. Call
809-3714.

118 52ND ST., Holmes Beach, townhouse, 500
feet from the beach. Annual rental, 2BR/1.5BA,
all new appliances, completely remodeled.
$1,150/month. (330) 757-7670.

RENTAL HOME: Remodeled, two blocks to
beach, 3BR/2BA, spacious with fireplace, pool
and outside spa, two porches, front and back,
rnmmlotal\i nrir/vta fanr'c Availahle immediatelvlv


SUMMER, AUTUMN, WI
weekly, monthly, season;
S'1 tate Co., 778-6665 or (80

VACATION RENTALS:,
From beautiful beach, $37
ww.islandreal.co and spring dates available
ments, 778-2374.

wI( lA4Aww L 1j ( ?, VACATION & SEASON/


anyone can take -..--
a picture.
A professional
creates a portrait.


ELKA -
PHOTOGRAPHGCS,


941-778-2711 1
ww.jackelka.com -


S-.. are complete.
*jj $975/week, $9
,, or 737-1121.


NORTH SHOF
cious 3BR/2BA


ESR oR M N I| short blocks to beach
R N A L I SM microwave, washer/
X SA X E S month, $550/week.
I E R aalmengual@msn.cc
r WR I T E
IAT H AT I BEACHFRONT: NOI
S R H level all-view hom e.
3 P LE WH 1 month, $1,500/week
EEL II ER
S LBAYFRONT ANNU/
R0D 1INID Y
0U s g nis, pool, cable, w
3 P L E W H 0 cluded. Old Florida
K A SH E N Sharon 778-3730.
AT T I CA SHORE Drive on th,
E R A T T N Bean Point area. $


IIIUsiL see. ail I tJ~JtI 3J.


ER rentals available ANNI
Vedebrock Real Es- carpet
149-6665. beac


UAL BRADENTON E
et. Carport and store
h, glimpse of Gulf. 6:


EACH 2BR/2BA, new
ige. One block from
5-2889 or 276-2011.


ANNA MARIA GULFFR


$500/week. Winter Spacious 2BR apartment, enclosed porch private
most Beach Apart- e patio, sundeck, tropical beach setting, garage,
immaculate. 778-3143.

ANNUAL RENTAL: 3BR/2BA bayfront home,
Private beach. Units $2,500/month; 3BR/2.5BA, direct bayfront home
ally adjusted. $425- with heated pool, totally renovated, everything
nth. (800) 977-0803 new, ready for immediate occupancy. Call Betsy
ew.com. Hills Real Estate. P.A., at 778-229i.

I ANNUAL 2BR/1BA DUPLEX recently retur--
achtront. Four spa-
iac ronveniees. Now bished. $950/month. Available Junei 3. Security
l conveniences. Now
ease call (813) 752- deposit required. Call 586-8041
.AhhSeaBreeze.com
.AhhSeaBreeze.com WEEKLY/MONTHLY RENTALS condos and
houses from $500/week, $1,500/month. Many
HOUSE just con- Gulffront. SunCoast Real Estate, (800) 732-6434.
rty. 2BR/1 BA, com- www.suncoastinc.com.
shed. New washer/
minute walk to beach.
$1,500/month. Call ANNUAL RENTALS: 2104 Avenue B, 1BR/1BA
duplex, no pet, furnished $700/month or $650/
month unfurnished; 211 82nd St., 2BR/2BA du-
I/1BA duplex, three plex, fenced yard, pet OK, $985/month; 640
9, premium cable TV, Broadway, Longboat Key, 3BR/2BA house, pet
sleeps four. $1,800/ OK, $1,200/month; 6980 Poincetta, Longboat Key,
307-5627 or e-mail: 1BR/1BA cottage, pet OK, $850/month; Perico
Bay Club, 2BR/2BA villa, garage, $1,100/month;
Perico Island 2BR/2BA condo, first floor, pond
10RE Drive, ground- view, pet OK, carport, includes water, pest, cable
Point area. $3,500/ TV, $1,100/month. SunCoast Real Estate, 779-
om, (559) 760-1331. 0202. www.suncoastinc.com.

JTAL 2BR/2BA, ten-
ewer and trash in- ANNUAL 3BR/2BA HOME on canal in Key
/ Co., 778-3377, or Royale with pool. $1,900/month. Security de-
CHSIDE: NORTH posit required. Call 586-8041.
Behind our house. 1BR/1 BA ON GULF Drive. $675/month plus wa-
month, $900/week. ter and electric. 778-4941 or (813) 659-0370.


lalv a II n A iR lcV idIN H = A!Ioll I!A-lA i elo nl ;, all i m l, too f k t u- i


















































































Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
PaUla
Richard
Shary
Tomas
virgillie
Walter


ANNUAL 2BR/2B DUPLEX with updated kitchen,
garage, tile throughout. West of Gulf Drive. $975/
month. Security deposit required. Call 232-2216
or 586-8041.

ANNUAL RENTALS! Island townhome, 2BR/2.5BA
across from beach with pool, $1,300/month; 3BR
canal home, Bradenton Beach with garage and
dock, $1,200/month; Island duplex, 2BR/2BA, el-
evated, $750/month; Island home, 3BR/2BA,
$1,150/month. Call Cristin Curl, Wagner Realty,
778-2246.

ANNUAL RENTAL 1BR/1BA duplex in Holmes
Beach, newly remodeled, new everything. Across
from beach. Smith Realtors, 778-0770.

ANNUAL 2BR/1 BA duplex in Holmes Beach. 800
sq.ft. Smith Realtors, 778-0770.

POOL HOME AVAILABLE for vacation let. Near
Holmes Beach, 3BR/2BA with all amenities.
Please contact, 753-8709, ext. 2.

HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX in great location, 210
Haverkos Ct.. 2BR/1.5BA ground-level with car-
port, shared washer/dryer. $900/month, plus
cable, phone. First, last and $300 security deposit
required. Call Gayle Schulz, Jim Anderson Realty.
778-4847 or cell, 812-6487.

IMMACULATE HOLMES BEACH: Clean, up-
dated, 1BR/1BA, new carpet, paint, appliances.
Nonsmoking, no pets. First, last and deposit. An-
nual. $650/month, includes some utilities. Mature
individual. 778-1544.

ANNUAL 2BR RENTALS available now. Small dog
OK. Don't miss out on great move-in specials. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

ANNUAL RENTAL 3BR/2BA home with garage in
Holmes Beach. Small pet with deposit. Call 778-
7039.

SIZZLING SUMMER SAVINGS. Reserve your
place in paradise today! Call Duncan Real Estate,
779-0304.

BRADENTON BEACH/CORTEZ area: Spacious
1BR/1BA, fully furnished, resort style. Utilities,
cable included. Shared laundry room. $950/
month. First, last, security. 761-2725.

POINTE WEST VILLA: Updated 2BR/2BA. Car-
port, washer/dryer. $900/month. Call Duncan
Real Estate, 779-0304.

ANNA MARIA 2BR/2BA, July 4 holiday.
Canalfront duplex with dock. $495 per week. 778-
5793.

CHECK US OUT online at www.islander.org !


NEW SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA villa, one-car garage,
screened porch, pool, five minutes to beach.
$900/month. 730-4190.

ANNUAL BRADENTON BEACH 2BR/2BA el-
evated duplex, 18-by-12 ft. bonus room, fenced
yard, washer/dryer/dishwasher, central heat and
air conditioning, garage, one block to beach, new
carpet/paint. Nonsmoking, no pets, first, last, se-
curity. $900/month. Also, 2BR/2BA, $775/month.
713-1390.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED DUPLEX available
July 1. 2BR/2BA, washer/dryer hookups, close to
beach. Aposporos & Son, 758-3939.

IMMACULATE HOLMES BEACH: Clean, up-
dated, 1BR/1BA, new carpet, paint, appliances.
Nonsmoking, no pets. First, last, security. Annual,
$650/month, includes some utilities. Mature indi-
vidual, 778-1544.

ANNUAL RENTAL APARTMENT in Sunny
Shores, 1BR/1BA, $340 security deposit. $735/
month, includes utilities. Small pet allowed. Call
Jerry, 224-8850.

VACATION RENTAL: Holmes Beach canalfront.
2BR/2BA fully furnished. Garage, laundry, dock,
many extras. $750/week, $2,000/month. Call
(813) 286-9814.

ANNUAL RENTAL APARTMENT in Sunny
Shores, 3BR/2BA, $680 security deposit. $1,200/
month, includes utilities. Small pet allowed. Call
Jerry, 224-8850.

HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL steps to Gulf, large
2BR/2BA, den, laundry hookups. First, last, se-
curity. $950 plus electric. (585) 473-9361, or
778-5412.

ANNUAL DUPLEX RENTAL 2BR/2BA, Florida
room, carport, $950; 2BR/1BA, carport, $750/
month; 2BR/2BA, $750/month; 1BR/1BA, $650/
month. Dolores M. Baker Real Estate, 778-7500.

ANNUAL RENTAL: Direct Gulfview 1BR/1BA el-
evated apartment, covered parking, $670/month.
Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307.

NORTHWEST BRADENTON 2BR/1BA, walk to
Palma Sola Bay, fruit trees, all appliances,
washer/dryer hookup. $975/month plus deposit.
587-2748.

ANNUAL RENTAL: Spacious 3BR/2BA on Bimini
Bay. Boat dock, two-car garage, screened lanai.
$1,400/month. No pets. Fran Maxon Real Estate,
778-2307.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED ADS can be found
online at www.islander.org.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be paid in advance.
We accept ads by fax with credit card information, 778-9392, at our Web site (secure server) www.islander.org, and by
direct e-mail at classifieds@islander.org. Office hours: 9 to 5, Monday-Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $10 for up to 20 WORDS. Additional words: Each
additional word over 20 is 500, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are sorry,
but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please
be prepared to FAX or e-mail your copy with your credit card information. (see below)
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge of 20 words.



3

Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: N[o .'_ J _E No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:___
Billing address zip code: House no. or post office box no. on bill
E-Mail address: [for renewal purposes only]
The Islander Fax: 941 778-9392 |
5404 Marina Drive T Islan derl Phone: 941 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 34217 E-mail classifieds@islander.org


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 37









"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 After 5 Cal
1 Licnsed and Insured 778.3468
- I


I .

loaoks A America's Best

ls Lawn Care Inc.
Professional Affordable Insured Free Estimates
224-1153









nWA NI E Dn ALTY
ADINA HUSAK, REALTOR ,
Ich spreche Deutsch ,
Call me to find vour dream home.
(941) 778-2246 (800) 211-2323


ISLAND LUMBER

ANr HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


- r Vw*1


Alterations Mending Custom
Work Some Leather
Wed.-Sun. 10am-6pm
Bradenton Outlet Mall
6605 Manatee Ave. W.
or call 727-1277, leave message


aoorI'eties,
CLEANING SPECIALITIES
15 year Business in Massachusetts .
Specialist in "no wax" vinyl floor restoration -
don't replace it! We recreate the original clean
and high-shine finish. That actually repels stains,
Sand heel marks. ,
The shine can last years with little care "
Bonded Insured References
Ideal for: Homes Offices Motels Boots RVs


SWATERIN( Rl'STICTIONS
Rules in effect for Manatee County:
L lawn and landscape watering is limited to two days
* a \\cck.
S- Addresses ending in even numbers (or A M):
Tuesday and Saturday.
>- Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N Z):
* Wednesday and Sunday.
* *
* Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ir-
rigation with treated waste water allowed any time.)
()oners can wash llheir vehicles anytime as long *
as they use a hose with a shut-off nozzle. (Pull the
e car on the lawn to wash!)
* '- Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors is al-
SIlowed for ten minnIes daily.
* 0
-^ lland-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, is permit-
* ted any day. *
Questions or coiiiiiirnens? Call the Soulthwest IFlorida Waler
* ManagemiiI eil District (Swi'ltmudn ) loll-free: 1-S(X)-423-1476.
O 0O .O0 OOOOOOOO0 OOOOOOOOOO0


Inc.4

2 2


? by Cliff Streppone
(941) 587-1649
* Tile, Stone, Morble etc.
* Removal, Preparation, Installation
* Exceptional Sales & Service


Just visiting
paradise?


Tle Islander

Don't leave the island without
taking time to subscribe.
Visit us at 5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach
or call 941-778-7978
or visit Islander.org


SIX bisexual lists Of 111-11-1-1CMIC names have been
developed by the World Meteorological Organizat'
I - 1 1011.
The names are short, easy to remember and commonly
used names from the EnI-lish, French and Spanish lail-
Pages. To receive a name, a tropical low-pressure
center must develop at least into a full-fledged tropical
storm with wind speeds at 39 mpli.
The lists are repeated every six years, altlIOLI-11 the
names ofkIller storms are rctired fl'0111 use.
2004 IWITIcane names for the Atlantic Ocean:


Alex
Bonnie
Charley
Danielle
Earl
Frances
Gaston
Herinine
Ivan
Jeanne
Karl


Just because you've always done sornething
doesn't mean that thing is right.
There are several myths about hurricanes that
we've probably believed for years and years. UnfOrftl-
nately, we've wasted a lot of tirne doing things that are
pretty useless, such as:

Taping windows protects the glass
Taping windows will do little or nothing to prevent
breaking in a storm. It is a waste of effort, time and


%ne


.




tasie




glas andno potecion gaist fyingdebrs. O ce


hurriane w rninghas ben isued, pend iLIItil$1





PAGE 38 E JUNE 9, 2004 U THE ISLANDER


RETL C I Int


2BR/1 BA HOME, completely furnished, two short
blocks to Gulf. Annual or six months minimum.
$1,000/month plus utilities. 795-8626.

SMALL STUDIO north Longboat Key, $100/
weekly. 383-4856.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA Holmes Beach. One block
from Gulf, $800/month plus utilities, first, last, se-
curity. Credit check. (860) 227-5142.

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY Ground-level 1BR/
1BA duplex. $675/month, steps to beach, pet
friendly. A Paradise Rental Management, 778-
4800.

ANNA MARIA: 200 feet to Rod & Reel Pier,
ground-floor, 2BR/1BA, fully furnished, washer/
dryer, all amenities, utilities included. $500/week-
$1,200/month. 387-8610.

ANNUAL RENTAL: 3BR/2BA, gorgeous pool home
with hot tub, close to beach with boat slip. $1,800/
month. Call Deborah Thrasher, 518-7738, Re/Max
Excellence. E-mail: DebMThrash @aol.com.

ANNUAL FURNISHED PERICO Island water-
front! 3BR/2.5BA, with two-car garage! Associa-
tion pool, tennis courts, exercise room. $1,700/
month, plus utilities. Please, call An Island Place
Realty, 779-0733.



Sr-VPM
VACATION
I PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
:.. INCORPORATED
HARRIET SOTO Nowo's a great titme to
International Sales Director piirciast a vacation
20 years experience i
1501 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
(941) 779-2800 Fax (941) 778-9382 800-544-2164
h.soto@vacationet.com


PALMA SOLA BAY furnished 2BR/2BA
townhouse. Boat slip, pool, cable, utilities in-
cluded. $500/week, $1,500/month. Also,
Longboat Key 2BR/1 BA updated furnished home.
$1,200/month, includes utilities. Real Estate Mart,
745-1090.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1 BR/1 BA or 2BR/1 BA with pool. Walk to beach,
shopping and restaurants. 778-3875. Web site
2spinnakers.com



HARBOUR LANDINGS: Lot and dock. Beautiful
12,100 sq.ft. homesite offered by owner/Realtor.
Gated community in Cortez. $265,000 includes
dock for boat up to 35-feet Longview Realty, 383-
6112, or George Noble, 685-3372.

THREE LONGBOAT LOTS on General Harris
Street, total of 1.3 acres (MOL). Offered at $400K
each. Longview Realty, 383-6112.

DOH IS WHAT Homer Simpson said when asked
if this home was a great buy. Come on by and see
why. 509 59th St., Holmes Beach. Asking
$519,000. 778-4773.


CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !


LAGUNA YACHT VILLAGE: Tranquil waterfront
community offers everything you've been looking
for. Deep-water boat docks, short walk to gor-
geous beaches, tropical setting and carefree liv-
ing. Two brand new quality built homes with spa-
cious floor plans and many upgrades starting at
$638,500 and three homesites starting at
$240,000. Call Tina Rudek or Mike Migone of
Wedebrock Real Estate, 383-5543.

NORTH END 2BR/2BA near Gulf beach. Sun deck,
screened porch, working fireplace, solar. $490,000.
Call 778-2665.


THE SEA OATS Bradenton Beach. Townhouses
and villas for sale at pre-construction prices. Con-
tact Jane or Dave Guy, 284-5469 or 284-5461.


ALL UNREASONABLE OFFERS refused! That's
right for the right offer you can buy this wonder-
ful 2BR/2BA, single-car garage canalfront home
with bay views. 509 59th St., Holmes Beach.
$519,000.778-4773.

BRADENTON BEACH/CORTEZ area. Beautiful,
well-maintained, elevated duplex. 1.5 miles to
Bradenton Beach. Community boat ramp.
$375,000. 761-2725.



Mike

S Norman

Realty me
3101 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(941) 778-6696 Office
(941) 778-4364 Fax
Kathy Caserta 1-800-367-1617 Toll-Free
Realtor, GRI. CRS (941) 778-6943 Home
(941) 704-2023 Cell


TERRA CEIA BAY CLUB 2-3BR/2BA unit on
fifth floor overlooking the entire Terra Ceia
Bay and Skyway all the way to Anna Maria. Is
a secured complex and has clubhouse, eleva-
tor, exercise room, golf course and heated
club pool. $279,000. Quentin Talbert, 778-
4800 or 704-9680.


.' "-. ,,




STATELY ISLAND HOME on sailboat water
canal. New in 2000. 5BR/5.5BA, large pool,
coral fireplace, 3,700 sq.ft., 3 A/C zones.
Three stories of living area. $995,000.
Quentin Talbert, 704-9680.


UPDATED UNIT Unit is redecorated with new
tile throughout, new appliances (range, fridge,
micro, washer/dryer) and completely repainted
throughout. Direct Gulffront views, heated pool,
elevator, covered parking and extra storage bin.
Nice beach area and condo owns beach front.
Agent has owner interest. $398,000. David
Vande Vrede, 778-4800 or 725-4800.

," .... .




FLAMINGO CAY Immaculate 2BR/2BA
single-story condo, updated and on deeD-
water canal. Open floor plan and block patio
unique to this unit. Rare find in this highly
sought after area only minutes from the
Island. $259,900. Mary Fallen, 720-3400.


GULF AND BAYVIEWS THIS UNIT HAS IT
ALL! 2BR/2BA with two balconies and views of
the bay and Gulf. Turnkey furnished. Totally
updated and cleaner than new. Enjoy the
heated pool and private boat dock. Great
rental income. $379,000. Call Denny Rauschl,
725-3934 or 778-4800.







FISHERMAN'S PLAZA All units triple net with the
exception ol Post Office. Can build approximately
11,000 sq. ft. addition. Major traffic count flom Island
and north end of Longboat. Long and good leases.
Laundry mat expires end of year. $1.500,000.
Quentin Talbert, 778-4800 or 704-9680.


Gabe Buky


F L -I T F

op .1% W\orld ide
Charles Buky


T'eatredProyeriy of the week


Relax in the cabana beside the coral and marble-decked pool as you
gaze at views across Tampa Bay and the Skyway Bridge. Italian tile and
elegant wood flooring. Attached 2BR/1BA guest suite. Large cook's
kitchen with custom maple cabinets, natural granite and stainless-steel
appliances. Mature landscaping includes hibiscus, azaleas and Medi-
telanean fig trees. Huge lot more than one-half acre. $849,000.


Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate Inc.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


LOT Prime buildable lot in
very desirable area of Anna
Maria City on Pine Avenue.
Zoned for residential/office/re-
tail. Owner financing available.
$275,000. Call Susan Hatch,
Realtor, 778-7616 eves.


Ca i clliai Properties
Vacation Rentals & Property Managem'ent
www.camelliaproperties.com
More than 35 Gulffront rentals to choose from.
Call us last! Best rates on the beach!


LaCosta condominium Marbella Condominium
Family Friendly Gulffront Luxury
2-Bedroom Condominiums 2 & 3-Bedroom Condomilniums
One-Week Minimum
Call For Rates and Availability
866-661-6622 or 778-8000


on desirable Tarpon Street in Anna Maria. Sits on a nice-
sized lot on a deep-water canal. Price $650,000.
Call Pat Staebler, Lic. Real Estate Broker
778-0123 or 705-0123

7I &~fljS 6 rzICh
',."' ,; -. t.,; ?n, Irc. :"-


I


[snu, ;


I I






THE ISLANDER U JUNE 9, 2004 U PAGE 39


& I # 1 L J! 1 = ! r [ ~ l f Z t T : f E } Z ,] I i i


LOWEST PRICE 2BR/2BA single-family home in
Anna Maria. Good rental potential. Great curb ap-
peal. Big lot, room for pool. Located on a quiet
street of fine homes. Close to Bayfront Park.
Glimpse of the bay and Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
Walk to restaurants, shopping. Boat access. Priced
to quick sale. $457,000. 920-4539.

RARE OPPORTUNITY to own third house from
the beautiful sandy beaches! Quiet north Holmes
Beach street. Gulf views! $557,000. 778-4675.

VILLAGE GREEN: 4BR/2BA great family home.
Ceramic tile, split plan, lanai, fenced yard, beau-
tiful landscaping, two-car garage. Call Helen
White, SunCoast Real Estate, 779-0202.

I.. ..^^t .'" ,-' .-.: . ..F.


VILLAGE GREEN: Panoramic golf course view.
4BR/2BA with family room, plus screened lanai.
Like-new inside, completely remodeled! Call, look,
make offer. $279,900. Exclusive Real Estate Mart,
756-1090.

BAYVIEWS WITH ROOM to expand. Come with
this 2BR/2BA canalfront home. Single-story, one-
car garage. 1,764 sf. Mature landscaping. Half-
block to Holmes Beach city park, city hall, library
complex. 509 59th St., Holmes Beach. $519,000.
778-4773.

FISHING FOR a good deal? You can catch it in The
Islander, online or in print. It's the "best news on
Anna Maria Island.


All real estate advertising herein is subject to the
Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination Familial status
includes children underage of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18. This news-
paper will not knowingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD
toll-free at (800) 669-9777, for the hearing impaired
(0) (800) 543-8294.


4


Anna Maria Island's Most Prestigious Residential Income Producing Address


Lf r,. S S!;i. :


hv?-
t" uc iiiiIi


4i"
I- -x


GEOFFREY WALL, G.R.I. P.A. 1 1 -, :' ....
Realtor Sales Associate
Fr our; c-,-as st-i-s .o Formal Qualifications
w'e y-i "- 33 Years Experience Same Price
Mobile: 941-545-0206 Also Commercial and Tax 1031 Deferred Exchanges
Office: 941-778-0700
www.AussieGeoff.com
e-mail: islander@AussieGeoff.com


S_: -. .- ..- ..-.

;- .






. . . ,- . .- . .
I --~ ,

:r;-


LOCATED ON THE SUGAR WHITE SAND
BEACHES of Anna Maria Island 10 effi-
ciency unils and a 2BR. IBA apartment In-
estors:, developers this i, ill $2 350 000
MLS# 100849




flB^WiiS-p^-.-i. --* MU
'-4,.




GREAT VIEWS & GREAT BUY! Listen to ihe
..'a.es of the Gulf waters feel the sand be
hveen .our 1. ee Mole righil in1 $58 000
MLS 1 00392

F' e '


50 FEET TO THE GULF ...il-, fania,l..: Gulf
.ie..s This totally ren.,.aled qracioui
Gulfe'.-. home has iI all $T7_c 000
t.'LS# 102I -


,t r.- ; -


Cash Flow Cash Flow Cash Flow Cash Flow Cash Flow
-." T- ; ; .:.- \., ': .. : ,l
-.. 11-0 I, r, ; ,, ,. :.. ,,c r.l, 1l.[ ,,, ,- y ..: 3 .:.- ,3J: r, ir :.r ,,3, r.: i r, ar .hr..
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i-" T ,r3_ ,l .3 r. i.../. .' ,,3iF ..ilr. .. t,:<.. .-,3 1 :.]I ,i,-,1, ,'.-, t-,. .. 1I,' -.,_ tF r .. :.:<'T ,e >3.
n i,, I 2 ,31: .i -' 'nii ,:.-j,:r
Check out the stellar bookings and management at
www annamana.com


R~p~td


J~~r


OWN BEAUTIFUL BEACHFRONT PROPERTY
..iith (J) 1BR 1BA units Zoned Ri Some of
Ihe nicesi beoa.:h on the island $1 ''9o0 .000
t.LS# 10109"


BIG, BEAUTIFUL, CANALFRONT A super
clean and neoal JBR 3BA home pli t.'.o-.Car
garage $659 000 MLS# 9"7200


3BR/2.5BA ELEVATED CUSTOM HOME ,. ith
o.er 2 300 sf Ilcated on Ihe norlh end of
Anna taria lao nd lij:,t stepss io ihe beoch
$..1, i.00',: ttLS# '9'51 o


2 OR 3BR HOME .. ih over 3 o00 sf under
roof Home is unique immaculate and qual-
it, built throughout on deep.,valer canal .i,!h
boat docki $84.9 000 M.\LSf 4oJ48






i" J ^.l1(


A BEAL
per le.e
I\O b.a
views $


HISTORY
Manatl
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man/
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JTIFUL BEACH FRONT 2BR/2BA up
el end-unit condo direct Gulifronl \lth
Iconies proiding open Gull to ba> '...
585 000 MLS#100193

S,









IC RIVERFRONT ESTATE on the
e Ri.er Toltall, remodeled main
aos 500 if with 6BR 6 58A plus
li,.i.iroijs feati.ires $1 490 000
9038
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* 1


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'I







PAGE 40 M JUNE 9, 2004 0 THE ISLANDER


By B CRITIQUING THE CRITed by Will Short 1 1 9 11 I I 11 14
By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz 1--- 11 19111=1-11 1 11- -2-1 -


Across
1 Carrier to Kyoto, in brief
4 Strike gently
8 Voice
15 Map lines: Abbr.
18 Liberal D.C. group
19 Actor Morales
20 Woodcutter in folklore
21 Leave in a hurry, with
"out"
22 Start of a quote by 102-
Across
24 Carpenter, at times
25 Present opener?
26 Inner: Prefix
27 Impose (upon)
29 Quote, part 2
31 Slobber
33 "Wassup?!"
35 Base lines
36 Lab sights
37 Whiskey_
39 Spat
43 Quote, part 3
48 Least ruddy
49 Sayings of Jesus
50 "Take _!"
52 Stretches
56 Pell-mell
57 S,&:iidiile
58 Fragrance used in
perfumes
59 Fix at the blacksmith's
61 Szczecin's river
63 Conoco rival
65 Monet oil '.'elheuil en

66 Quote, part 4
71 Father's talk: Abbr.
72 Furnish
73 Greek goddess of war
74 More squirmy
75 Where troops camp
after a day's march


77 Rebellion of 1857-
59
79 Tex's friend
82 Annual May event, for
short
83 Insect nests
84 Stroke in calligraphy
85 Kind of membrane
87 Quote, part 5
94 River through Toledo,
Ohio
95 Kindle
96 Showing.evidence of
fright
97 "The Boondocks"
cartoonist McGruder
100 Like some college
volleyball
101 Theseus' land
102 Source of the quote
107 Ed who played Santa
Claus in "Elf"
110 Abbr. on an envelope
111 Whistler's whistle
112 Pigged out
114 End of the quote
116 Collectibles source
117 Upwardly mobile type
118 "Mi chiamano Mimi,"
e.g.
119 Letters of success
120 Snitch
121 Pooh-pooh
122 "Potpourri for 1,000,

123 Count in a full count

Down
1 King of Scotland,
1567-1625
2 Keats, to Shelley
3 Exciting time at 82-
Across
4 A pop
5 Stars and Stripes land,


for short
6 Chalupa alternative
7 Kind of torch on
"Survivor"
8 Waited patiently
9 World Cup cry
10 Martial arts expert
11 "Peek- !"
12 Half of a TV alien's
send-off
13 One with a handle
14 Rake in
15 New version of a song,
maybe
16 Doltish
17 Pares pounds
21 A field may have one
23 Patterned fabric
28 Demonstrates
30 Ruthless boss.
perhaps
32 Letters on a cognac
bottle
34 -hoo!"
37 breve
38 Orders to plow horses
39 Reading pen
40 "Sense and Sensibil-
ity" director, 1995
41 "Yes"
42 Eero Saarinen's
Terminal at J.F.K.
44 Prepared without meat
or milk
45 The cloth
46 Added for free
47 Drove to hiding in the
ground
51 It's just an idea
52 Up
53 Like some traits
54 Spanish highway
55 See 57-Down
57 55-Down donkey
58 Blemish


60
62
64
67
68


Heraldic border with a cane 104 Get (bronze)
Go extinct 86 Narrow strip 105 Noel
Accelerated 88 Place for a turret 106 Make way?
Line of clothing 89 Spanish bear 108 Sweet 16 org.
1924 Olympics star 90 To be, in Toledo 109 Peer
Gertrude 91 Like the best-lookino 113 whim


69 Internet annoyances
70 Quarterback Man-
ning
76 Fund for a little fun
78 Toll road
80 Maple genus
81 Rip off
84 Good name for a
flight attendant?
85 Advertising figure


teeth
92 Land measure
93 Endlessly
97 Label on a certain
advertising photo
98 Oranjestad's island
99 Rushed
100 Humor, with "to"
101 1970's sitcom
103 Blasts with a ray gun


115 Line on a cash
register receipt


Answers to the puzzle
are located in this edition
of The Islander


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


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WAGNER REALTY

e-mail: ami@wagnerrealty.com web site: www.wagnerrealty.com


2217 GULF DR. N.
BRADENTON BEACH
(941) 778-2246
(800) 211-2323


DIRECTLY ON THE BAY Spectacular views
of the Intracoastal. Updated 3BR/3BA home.
Rare true point location with water on three
sides. Boat dock with lift. Must see. Peggy
Henger or Mary Wickersham, 383-5577.
#255157. $2,400,000


RIVERFRONT COMMUNITY Custom built new
home in small friendly waterfront community with
pool, tennis, clubhouse, fishing dock. Top qual-
ity construction by Divald USA Inc. with 25 year
of experience. Pre-construction. Becky Smith or
Elfi Starrett, 778-2246. #99266. $448,000


JEWFISH KEY WATERFRONT Elevated cy-
press home with wrap-around decks on two
levels. 70 ft. dock, 4+ acres. Included vested
interest in mainland community property with
docking. Anne Miller, 778-2246. #100997.
$1,950,000


DEEP SALTWATER CANAL Direct bay ac-
cess. Beautiful Coral Shores. Extra large cor-
ner lot with room to expand, add pool. 2BR/
2BA, Florida room. Freshly painted inside/out.
New roof. Come see. Sandy French, 761-
3100. #102012. $429.000


SNEAD ISLAND & DOCK! Just slip your yacht
into the canal and head for the bay. Spanish-
style home, 2BR/3BA, huge family room, with
wet bar, garden courtyard and screened pool.
Norm Barker, 722-2246. #100501. $695,000


LUXURY PRIVACY SECURITY A million dol-
lar view for an unbelievable price. A rare find.
Private Island. State of the art design. Every-
thing new. Owner/agent. Victor Rosenfeld,
778-2246. #103004. $329,000


ANNA MARIA HIDEAWAY Delightful 3BR/
2BA on canal near the tip of the Island. Private
porch overlooks dock and charming double lot.
Enjoy that special island lifestyle. Ann &
Berndt Wolpers, 761-3100. #100000.
$495,000


NW/W BRADENTON LOCATION This single
family home is minutes to Gulf, tennis, marina,
schools, parks, restaurants and shopping. A
must see. Laurie Dellatorre, 778-2246.
#102396. $209,000


i CONCEPTUAL RENDERING


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