<%BANNER%>

Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( June 2, 2004 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: June 2, 2004

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01056

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: June 2, 2004

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01056

Full Text




Skimming the news ... Help with Island blood drive this weekend, see page 4.


Anna Maria



The


Islander


Hurricane section, inside.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


www.islander.org


Volume 12, No. 30 June 2, 2004 FREE


Almost parking: Cramer yes, no, maybe


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Game over.
Well, it was over for about 10 minutes.
After 27 years of debate on a parking plan for this
city so divided on the issue, the Anna Maria City Com-
mission in a 3-2 vote May 27 finally approved the com-
promise Plan X parking solution authored by Commis-
sion Chairperson John Quam, and asked City Attorney
Jim Dye to draw up the accompanying ordinance. Plan
X would govern only parking and signage within the
designated beach access zone.
Finally, a parking plan, right?


City clerk resigns

in Bradenton Beach
By Paul Roat
The city clerk is the newest in a long string of de-
partment heads who have resigned in Bradenton Beach.
Pat Grizzle, who started in the clerk's office 11 years
ago as an assistant and rose to department head status,
announced her resignation to city commissioners and the
mayor Tuesday. Her last day will be June 23.
"I've been offered an opportunity in Michigan near
my family and I've accepted that offer," she said. "I'll
be leaving Florida in mid-July."
Grizzle is the sixth official to leave city employ in
almost as many months.
Bob Welch announced his plans to leave his city
post as building official in January, citing "actions by
public officials have made it impossible for me to con-
tinue working for the city."
Code Enforcement Officer Dawn Betts resigned in
February, stating at the time that "due to lack of man-
agement support, company structure and low morale,
I find it necessary to serve notice of resignation."
Commissioner Peter Barreda stepped down from
his seat on the dais last month for health and business
reasons. Commissioners are expected to select a re-
placement for his Ward 3 position on June 3.
The city attorney and planner were both dismissed
by the newly elected commission at its first meeting
last November.


Last day
Some of the staff at Bradenton Beach's Gulf Drive
Cafr posed for a picture on the last day under Tomi
Chipain's management. Pictured, from left, are Jodi
Syring, Chipain, Eric Friedmnan, Vicki Fisher and
Doris Fisher. More inJormation, page 8. Islander
Photo: Paul Roat


Incorrect, next contestant, please.
The approval and compromise on Plan X lasted
only until Commissioner Linda Cramer claimed she
had been confused on the motion and wanted to change
her vote.
That brought a round of applause from many in
the audience, who were as befitting any Anna Maria
meeting on parking divided among those who favor
the Plan X for parking in the beach access zone, those
who favored permit parking, those opposed to permit
parking, and those who oppose any parking plan.
Cramer insisted she thought that while Plan X
would designate parking within the BAZ, it would al-


low residents to get a special exception permit to park
in front of their homes, even if there was no designated
space.
Not so, said Commissioner Duke Miller, who had
supported Plan X as a compromise solution, even
though he favors permit parking.
A special exception under Plan X, said Quam,
would only be granted to a homeowner as a "one-day"
guest pass for visitors, or to those owners who do not
have a driveway in front of their homes.
"I think it's crazy," said Cramer, who claimed she
had thought that discussion of Plan X the past six
PLEASE SEE PARKING, PAGE 3


*Tribute to
veterans
Memorial Day
became a celebration
for living World War
II vets who danced
and dined at the
Kirtby Stewart Ameri-
.."" "- can Legion Post 24,
commemorating the
de'licationl of the
."-""/VII memorial iii
Wt1tashulington, D.C.
Left to right,. Toni
Quinmi, Peg Millard,
Sheila Cassidv and
Justin Case a-re seen
here recr-eating some
7ood times of the era
of the Andrews
Sisters arnd the Benny
Goodmana band.
.$-. .5Islander Photo:
Holme Beach s-e-e-ks.K NRoa annc Amlbrose



Holmes Beach seeks Key Royale solution


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Faced with continued funding delays for a new
Key Royale Bridge by the Florida Department of
Transportation, Holmes Beach Mayor Carol Whitmore
and the city commission are looking at a state program
that would allow the city to pay for a new bridge now,
then get reimbursed in a future DOT budget.
The latest DOT estimate had put funding for a new
bridge into the 2007-08 budget and that was "unaccept-
able" to Whitmore. The DOT had previously scheduled
a new bridge for 2004-05.
"I wanted a solution now," she told commission-
ers at their May 25 meeting, and a possible remedy is
a DOT program that allows the city to build the bridge
with its own funds now, then get reimbursed from the
DOT.
"This is a program that the state has never not paid
out. It's guaranteed," claimed Whitmore. "Without
this, we are in the 2007-08 budget."
The city could get a bond issued for the estimated
$1.25 million construction cost through the Florida
League of Cities to finance the project now, she told
commissioners.
Go for it, said Commissioner Roger Lutz.
"I've been advocating this type financing lfor sev-
eral years," he said. With interest rates this low, the


FLC bond issue seems like a good deal. "I'd say do it
as soon as you can."
Commissioners agreed and Whitmore said she
would start the "wheels rolling" and report back at the
June 8 commission workshop.
In other business, Whitmore said the bids for the
seawall repairs along Marina Drive across from the
Tidemark property would be opened on June 15.
She also suggested that instead of a board of adjust-
ment, commissioners consider using a "special master"
to decide variances.
There's too much conflict with a local board of
adjustment, she said, while a special master is a trained,
independent attorney who hears cases and makes deci-
sions based upon city codes.
Commissioners agreed to discuss the issue further
at their June 8 workshop.
The commission also unanimously approved an
ordinance for the city to use the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection's erosion control line to
determine the required building setback along the
coast, rather than the mean high water line. The new
ordinance will require a 50-foot setback from the
ECL. The current ordinance requires a 100-foot set-
back from the MHWL.
PLFASF SEE KEY ROYALE, PAGE 3


I I-J"I I-; ~IC~~ ' II r` I


~II~I C1.1 ~ II- I






PAGE 2 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M THE ISLANDER

I-


Memorable
", *,. , (.- "./**. .*; group
This group photo
was taken Saturday
at the the Kirby
Stewart American
S. Legion Post 24, 2000
_4: l'. a ,t A: ... B 7radenton, where
they welcome all
m.s i fx-p c WWII vets to sign
l tu m their registry, which
VU will be placed in a
iVeterans Day Nov.
11. Islander Photo:
Nancy Ambrose


Commissioners expected to


select new member Thursday


Bradenton Beach city commissioners are sched-
uled to select a new member Thursday to fill the Ward
3 seat vacated by the resignation of Peter Barreda last
month.
The field numbers five.
Former City Commissioner Ross Benjamin has
thrown his hat back into the ring in an effort to regain
a seat he vacated through resignation in July 2002.
Also in the running is Tammy Barr, wife of former
Ward 3 Commissioner Scott Barr, who lost his election
bid last fall to Barreda. Tammy Barr is owner-manager
of Surfside Realty, sits on several non-profit boards and
formerly worked at Manatee Glens Corp. and Charter
Hospitals.
Joan Gelinas is a former registered pharmacist in
Rhode Island and has done volunteer work for Senior
Friends of Bradenton.
Rob Nachtigal is a sales representative for Ward
Oil Co. Inc. in Tampa.
And George B. Turner is a police officer with 27


years experience in New York and Florida who cur-
rently holds the position of captain in the Longboat Key
Police Department.
Deadline for applicants was Tuesday.
The Thursday city commission meeting is sched-
uled to start at 7 p.m.

City Pier T-shirts at museum
A shipment of Anna Maria City Pier T-shirts has
arrived to join other unusual shirts for sale at the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society museum.
Carolyne Norwood, director of the society and the
museum, said the new shirts are pigment-dyed cotton
in all sizes and many colors, with an "historic" draw-
ing of the city pier. They are on sale now at the mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
The museum also has T-shirts depicting the
Egmont Key lighthouse, turtles, the old city jail, and
aerial views of the Island. Details may be obtained at
778-0492.


UNCH
ay 11-2: k
FAST AND LUNC
DI Rl Wed.-Sun. from 5:
(Cl. ed'Monday/Tuesday)
tiond' Shopping Center
tMarlnd Drive ~ Holmes Beach -
941 778 5320 ,.

P ,OuOD MEMBER. OF


Scuba fatality off

Longboat Key
The Florida District 12 Medical Examiner's
Office will conduct an autopsy on a man who
died Monday afternoon at Blake Medical Cen-
ter after scuba diving off Longboat Key.
U.S. Coast Guard officials said the incident
took place around 12:45 p.m. when Robert
Terrell, 40, of the Bradenton area, stopped
breathing while scuba diving with another man
about 11 miles off Longboat Key.
Units from the Manatee County Sheriff's
Office, the Longboat Key Police Department
and the Coast Guard responded to the call for
assistance and brought Terrell to shore. He was
transported to Blake Medical Center where he
was pronounced dead.
An autopsy will be performed to deter-
mine the actual cause of death, the spokesper-
son said.


Jo4r blood coAld be



worth $100!







arina Pointe
ealty Co.
Pine
The Islander Alen
Salon
Benefiting ...







Come give blood June 5-6.Your blood donation is
worth $100 to local community service agencies.
Every pint of blood collected at the Islandwide Blood Drive is worth $100! Yes, $100!
Blood donors may designate from the organizations listed here, any or all of them, to
receive the $100 donation. The Manatee Community Blood Center is the blood recipi-
ent. Everyone wins! Come give blood, help fund the needs of local agencies. Bring a
friend or twol Bloodmobiles will be at the sponsor locations both days: Marina
Pointe Realty and A Pine Avenue Salon in Anna Maria; Beach House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach; and The Islander in Holmes Beach.
PLEASE GIVE BLOOD JUNE 5-6







Key Royale Bridge quick fix plan?
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Because of beach renourishment, the mean high
water line has moved farther away from the coast,
building official Bill Saunders noted. That new MHWL
could allow developers an advantage to build closer to
the water than the city wants, he said. The ECL is a
fixed line, while the MHWL is constantly changing,
said Saunders.

Savings clause ordinance
Commissioners approved the first reading of the
"savings clause" ordinance by a 2-1 vote, with Lutz
abstaining, citing a conflict of interest.
Lutz said his firm recently hired an attorney who
was in the process of completing some work for
Holmes Beach resident Frank Davis, who has property
that might be affected by the ordinance. Lutz added that
his firm has not and will not accept any payment from
Davis for that work, and the attorney in question,
former Anna Maria City Commissioner Chuck Webb,
has resigned from the case. The appropriate conflict of
interest papers were filed by Lutz.
The ordinance essentially allows owners of lots
that now lack the required frontage to build in their
particular zone what they were allowed to build in
1989 before the current comprehensive plan was
enacted. No savings clause was put into that plan or
accompanying code, and commissioners believe this
was simply an error.


The city has issued building permits for those non-
conforming lots since 1989.
Planner Bill Brisson had said in a prior meeting
that his research found this savings clause ordinance
would affect only 12 lots where 22 additional units
could be built.
Lot owners still have to meet setback and density
requirements, but Brisson conceded that on a few lots
under the ordinance, a duplex, triplex or fourplex could
be built where currently only a single-family home can
be constructed. The ordinance, however, does elimi-
nate any possibility of a variance.
Resident Joan Perry objected to the ordinance. "It
looks like my fellow citizens are asleep at the switch.
There's no need for a savings clause," she claimed. The
ordinance is increasing density in a high-impact hurri-
cane evacuation zone and that's against the comprehen-
sive plan, Perry said.
Commissioner Pat Morton voted against the mea-
sure because he believes it would increase density.
Commissioner Don Maloney was absent from the
meeting.
The second reading of the ordinance is scheduled
for the June 8 meeting.
Other issues on the June 8 workshop agenda will
be the Sunrise subdivision boat slips, a draft ordi-
nance regulating and defining motels, and a pro-
posed new contract with Waste Management Inc.,
the city's contracted trash-hauling service, that
would call for automated truck pickup using new
containers from WMI. The company would charge
a higher price for the service.


Trolley touring
Jeff and Ilona Kenrick, owners of Marina Pointe Realty Co. in Anna Maria, and winning bidder for The
Islander and Trolley Systems of America donation to the Anna Maria Island Community Center spring auc-
tion, invited visitors representing a variety of charities to Anna Maria from around the world to share their
prize a two-hour trolley tour and case of champagne last week. The Kenricks are "imbedded" in the
group. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


Parking in Anna Maria stymied
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
months would include a special exception for BAZ
resident parking.
"I want to take my vote back," cried Cramer, who
lives on Palmetto Avenue in the BAZ.
"I don't understand," said Miller. "This is what
we've been talking about all along.
"I still want permit parking," he said, "but we've
all compromised on this [issue] except for [Commis-
sioners] Woodland and Magill."
Now, Cramer is changing her mind, he observed.
"If we don't compromise, we'll never solve the issue.
I've been listening to these same arguments for the past
two-and-a-half years."
Miller and Cramer want permit parking, but Quam,
Woodland and Magill are opposed. Woodland wants
open parking, but Quam, Miller and Cramer are op-
posed. Magill wants alternate street parking, but Miller,
Cramer and Quam are opposed. Quam and Miller want
Plan X, but Woodland, Magill and now Cramer are
opposed. Nobody can compromise on any plan.
"Good government is a compromise," argued
Miller, but his plea fell on deaf ears.
Cramer called for a motion to reconsider the pre-
vious vote on Plan X, and the new vote defeated the
measure, with Cramerjoining Woodland and Magill in
their opposition to the plan.
Commissioners then rehashed all the previous
ideas discussed the past two years or more for a park-


ing solution.
Those included alternate street parking, alternate
day parking, parking by permit for residents only, open
parking throughout the city, buying property for pub-
lic parking lots, and all the multitude of other ideas
presented since 1977, when the city first formed a com-
mittee to come up with a parking solution.
Eventually, commissioners agreed, as have count-
less other city commissions the past 27 years on this
issue, to table discussion of a parking plan for "further
study."
"Maybe we can come up with a better solution,"
said Cramer.
The commission set no date for Plan X to return to
the agenda.
A number of residents who live in the BAZ, how-
ever, said that Plan X was preferable to no plan at all.
"I'll take the signs of Plan X over the parking chaos
on my street," said Bill Cunningham of Fern Street.
Palmetto Avenue resident Robin Wall said that
while she favors permit parking, at least Plan X seemed
to be "progress," and a "compromise."
Al DiCostanzo said Plan X seems to have been the
best choice after commissioners voted down resident-
only parking.
But be warned, added resident Bill Diaz. Develop-
ers in east Manatee County are building tens of thou-
sands of homes, and telling each home buyer that the
beach is just minutes away, he said. The eastern inva-
sion is coming to Anna Maria, and the commission
better start planning now for the future.


THE ISLANDER N JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 3



Objection

Attorney John Shubin sent the city a letter
May 24 objecting to the proposed "savings
clause" ordinance.
Shubin, who represents property owners
Barbara Colony and Ruth McLean at 5620 Gulf
Drive, said that any attempt by the city "to ap-
ply this ordinance to the pending legal disputes"
between his clients and Frank Davis of 5622
Gulf Drive would "constitute an unconstitu-
tional attempt to deprive the judiciary of its ju-
risdiction" to hear the case.
In addition, claimed Shubin, Davis' deci-
sion to get a variance to develop 5622 Gulf
Drive "waived any rights he may have had to
take advantage of the subject ordinance, if it is
enacted."
The proposed "savings clause," said
Shubin, is not being enacted in connection with
any amendment or modification of the city's
land development code to support the city's
claim that it is grandfatheringg" certain noncon-
forming properties by the proposed amendment.
In short, alleged Shubin, the city is permit-
ting a "de facto" variance without affording due
process to neighboring property owners.
Peter Mackey, the attorney representing
Davis in the litigation brought by Shubin, said
he had no comment on the Shubin letter.







Anna Maria City
June 2, 4 p.m., Capital Improvement Advisory Com-
mittee meeting.
June 8, 6 p.m., ad hoc comprehensive plan committee
meeting.
June 9, 6:45 p.m., Environmental Education and En-
hancement Committee meeting.
June 10, 6 p.m., special city commission meeting on
city hall.
June 10, 7 p.m., city commission work session.
June 10, 8:30 p.m., special city commission meeting on
rights of way.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
June 2, 4 p.m., city commission work meeting on bud-
get, salaries.
June 3,7 p.m., city commission meeting. Agenda: Pub-
lic comment, final discussion on ballot language, attor-
ney invoice discussion, appointment of commissioner
for Ward 3, citizen request for use of city property for
restoration project, Non-Point Discharge Elimination
annual report, sharing of street sweeping equipment
with other Island cities discussion, adoption of resolu-
tion on drug testing for employees, regional transpor-
tation membership apportionment plan discussion,
building official invoice discussion, 2004 election ser-
vice agreement, staff step plan ordinance review, dis-
cussion on staff meeting reports, agenda backup due
date discussion, consent agenda, commission reports
and scheduling review.
June 9, 4 p.m., city commission work meeting on bud-
get.
June 9, 6 p.m., Citizen Advisory Committee For Re-
view and Updating of the Comprehensive Plan and
Land Development Code For Bradenton Beach meet-
ing.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
June 2, 5 p.m., parks and beautification committee
meeting.
June 8, 7 p.m., city commission meeting with work
session to immediately follow.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 580] Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
June 9, 11 a.m., Island Emergency Operation Center
meeting, Fire Station No. 1, 6001 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, 741-3900.






PAGE 4 M JUNE 2, 2004 THE ISLANDER



Brasota wants Tidemark project now


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Brasota Mortgage Corporation has objected to the
federal bankruptcy court request by Tidemark Devel-
opers LLC of Holmes Beach that it be given an addi-
tional 45 days to file a bankruptcy reorganization plan.
Tidemark wants an extension until July 15, and if nec-
essary, Sept. 15 to file the plan.
But that's too long for Brasota to wait, according
to Brasota attorney Peter Mackey. Brasota, which is
owed $4.3 million from Tidemark, has filed its own
motion asking the court for permission to proceed with
a foreclosure action in circuit court.
Mackey said the proposed Tidemark refinancing
plan is just "pie in the sky," and Brasota "can't wait"
another three or four months for its money.


"We want to move forward on the foreclosure so
Brasota can sell the property and get its money," he said.
The bankruptcy court will now schedule a hearing
on Brasota's countermotion to the Tidemark request for
an extension.
The court on May 18 already gave Tidemark an
additional 45 days to amend its financial disclosure
statement a separate motion from the reorganization
plan and won't hold a hearing on that issue until on
or after July 15, court documents said.
In its application for the deadline extension of the
reorganization plan, Tidemark said it would be "cost
effective and in the best interest of all parties" for an
extension. That would allow Southstar Development
Partners Inc. of Coral Gables and Tidemark to "estab-
lish an agreement" to provide exit financing and fund-


ing to complete construction of the Tidemark hotel/
marina/condominium.
According to court documents, Southstar was
given court approval April 26 to provide Tidemark
with $170,000 of short-term financing to allow the
company to continue with daily operations while it re-
organized.
Mackey discounted the latest financial reorgani-
zation plan, claiming Tidemark has already rejected a
refinancing offer by Brasota that would have allowed
the company to come out of bankruptcy court.
The proposed 40-unit Tidemark hotel/condo-
minium/marina, just north of the Wachovia Bank in
Holmes Beach, was approved by the city commission
in August 2001. Tidemark filed for bankrupcty protec-
tion in January 2004.


We want


your blood,


others profit

A pint of blood from a donor will be worth $100
to local Island charities in the Islandwide blood drive : -
Saturday and Sunday, June 5-6.
It is the fourth annual blood drive, and the largest
blood collection event all year for the Manatee Com-
munity Blood Center.
An anonymous benefactor will again donate $100 .
per blood donor to one of four Island groups, or shared
among the charities, for each pint of blood collected.
Receiving groups include the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, the Anna Maria Island Privateers,
the West Manatee Fire and Rescue Volunteers and
Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education. All four groups
are based on Anna Maria Island. :. ..
The Island charities are "rallying" their supporters
this year and the benefactor has removed the 100 do-
nor, $10,000 donation ceiling and the "sky's the limit."
Blood will be taken from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday
and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday at three Island locations: In
Anna Maria, at sponsors Marina Pointe Realty and A Physically fit
Pine Avenue Salon, 314 Pine Ave.; at Holmes Beach Islander Stephen Thomas is the only sixth-grader at King Middle School in the past two years to receive the
sponsor The Islander newspaper office, 5404 Marina Presidential Physical Fitness Award. To qualify for the award, students must meet scores from the 85th
Drive; and in Bradenton Beach at the sponsoring Beach percentile nationwide in five fitness tests: mile run, sit and reach, shuttle run, pull-ups and sit-ups. The award
House Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N. encourages youth to become active in their everyday lives. Thomas said he stays active playing soccer with the
The first 300 donors will receive commemorative Manatee Magic and baseball in the American Little League at G.T. Bray Park. Thomas also achieved straight
-shirts. All donors receive orange juice and/or water As for the entire academic year at King. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan
from Tropicana and Pepsi, and a cookie baked for the
event by Meals on Wheels courtesy of the sponsors.



Commission approves city hall remodeling contract


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
After more debate than a congressional hearing,
Anna Maria city commissioners May 27 approved the
$151,000 contract with Southern Cross Construction of
Sarasota to remodel city hall.
But the approval almost didn't make it out of the
commission meeting.
Commissioners nearly decided to postpone a deci-
sion to its June 10 meeting. They wanted Mayor
SueLynn to first come up with cost estimates and
change orders on approximately $85,000 more in
needed maintenance, along with $25,000 for a new roof
for city hall.
The mayor, however, told commissioners that
Southern Cross can't continue to agree to hold the line
on its Feb. 4 winning bid as other costs such as fuel and
concrete continue to rise. She needed an approval that
night, or the entire deal might be lost.
That would have meant a new round of bids and a
higher construction cost, and probably a completely
new set of blueprints at city expense.
"This is frustrating," the mayor told commission-
ers as they argued over the project and costs.
The commission "can't keep making a decision,"
then changing its mind as happened earlier in the meet-
ing with the parking issue (see separate story), she ob-
served.


"I need to know tonight. Do you want Southern
Cross to continue to work with us or not?" she asked.
The prospect of even greater costs for needed re-
pairs, such as mold and asbestos removal and new air
conditioning systems, seemed to sway the majority of
commissioners.
Commissioner Carol Ann Magill, who had been
opposed to the project because of continued increases
in cost estimates for maintenance work associated with
the project, said she "wasn't too happy" about the to-
tal cost, but decided to swing her vote to approve the
contract.
"I just don't want to see this thing go on and o'n,
and I say 'let's go ahead.'"
Not so for Commissioner Linda Cramer. At least
not until commissioners reluctantly agreed to have the
mayor find the estimated $25,000 for a new roof in this
year's budget. Cramer had said she wouldn't approve
any contract without a new roof for city hall. She said
it was stupid to remodel and improve city hall at that
price, but not address the structural issue.
Commission Chairperson John Quam and Com-
missioner Duke Miller had argued that the new roof
could wait until next year's budget, but Cramer was
adamant.
Commissioners considered an alternative to the
entire project, but the $88,000 estimate for mainte-
nance work alone, along with $25,000 for Cramer's


roof, did not seem to be cost effective. The city would
have also wasted the $15,000 already paid to the archi-
tect for the remodeling plans, had the commission
adopted the alternative.
City Attorney Jim Dye reminded commissioners
that only the $151,000 contract with Southern Cross
was pending. Everything else is maintenance costs that
the commission can approve with change orders.
The city already has $204,000 set aside in the cur-
rent budget for remodeling and maintenance, and only
needs an additional $6,000 to fund the entire mainte-
nance portion ol the project. That figure does not, how1 -
ever, include the $25,000 estimated cost for a new roof.
The mayor said she would scour the current bud-
get for the $25,000 and report back to the commission
at a special meeting at 6 p.m. June 10 for the city hall
project.
Commissioner Dale Woodland refused to change
his stance on the remodeling project, and voted against
approving the contract in the 4-1 approval vote.
In other business, commissioners:
Approved a line item transfer of $8,800 to repub-
lish the city codes and put them on compact discs.
Adopted the Manatee County Fireworks Ordi-
nance.
Agreed to adjust the salaries of the two adminis-
trative assistant positions within the city to make them
more equitable.






THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 5

viW~~!


'Our blood, his guts'
The 60th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied inva-
sion of occupied Europe is Sunday, June 6, 2004.
Frank "Zeke" Zacchero of Holmes Beach didn't
land in France on June 6, 1944.
But his unit, the 95th Infantry Division, came
through Omaha Beach on Aug. 17, 1944, from England
as part of General George Patton's newly formed U.S.
Third Army.
"You could tell there had been a lot of action at
Omaha," said Zeke. "You kinda wondered how the
guys managed to break through the defenses, but they
did."
The men in his unit wondered what combat would
be like, and they didn't have to wait long to find out.
The 95th was ordered into action in late August for
Patton's drive against Metz and into Saarlauten, just a
few miles from the German border.
Zacchero's odyssey to the Third Army began in
Pittsburgh. He was a student at Duquesne University
when World War II started, and he was given a defer-
ment that allowed him to finish his education, then
enter the Army.
But by mid-1943, the Army was in desperate need
of soldiers and they sent Zacchero a letter giving him
24 hours to report for induction.
He was assigned to the 95th, a National Guard unit
from Illinois that had just been called to active duty.
Zeke learned to operate a bazooka for anti-tank de-
fense.
After nearly nine months of training, the division
landed in England in early August 1944 and were then
shipped to France and Patton.
"He gave us a speech that we were going to kick
some you-know-what and go get the Germans. That
kinda fired us up," Zeke remembered.
A member of the platoon guarding division head-
quarters, Zeke spent the first few weeks about five
miles behind the front lines. Then, Patton ordered an
all-out attack on Saarlauten, and everyone, including
Zeke and the headquarters platoon, went into action.


Frank "Zeke" Zacchero in 1944 as a member of the
95th Infantry Division, part of General George
Patton's Third U.S. Army.


Old "blood and guts" General George S. Patton visits the 95th Infantry Division near Metz, France.


"Patton thought we were too slow because we
didn't have as many casualties as the other divisions,
so he threw everybody into the assault. It was his guts
and our blood, I guess, but that's what we called him."
The fighting was house-to-house and often hand-
to-hand. One day, Zeke was next to a sergeant who got
hit by a sniper and fell into the street.
"We yelled for a medic, but nobody came. We
didn't want to leave him in the street, so we ran out to
get him. The sniper waved at us that he wasn't going
to shoot while we got that guy out of there. If he had
shot, I probably wouldn't be here today. That was
something."
On another occasion, Zeke was behind a sergeant
climbing the stairs in a building when they came under
heavy fire and the sergeant was shot.
Later that day, his platoon captured three German
Waffen S.S. soldiers inside the building.
"One of them had the exact pistol that our sergeant
carried, so we knew he had shot the sarge, then taken
the gun as a souvenir.
"Our lieutenant ordered this guy named 'Chief,'
who was a Cherokee Indian, to escort this S.S. guy
back to the holding area. About two minutes after they
left, we heard some shots. Chief came back and said the
prisoner tried to escape and he had to shoot him. That's
just how it was in combat," Zeke said.
Another time, Patton decided to visit the division
and everyone was told to keep it quiet because there
were still snipers in the area.
"Of course, Patton comes up in ajeep with the si-
ren wailing and a red light flashing. So much for se-
crecy. He was a character. We didn't know whether to
be more scared of him than the Germans."
By mid-September, the Third Army was only a few
miles from Germany, and Zacchero firmly believes
they could have punched through easily to the German
heartland and the Rhine River.
Instead, Patton was ordered into a defensive posi-
tion as Eisenhower moved all supplies and gasoline to
the British Army for its ill-fated advance through Hol-
land.
The division later participated in the Battle of the
Bulge by relieving the 101st Airborne at Bastogne, then
moved into the Ruhr, the industrial heartland of Ger-
many.
Back with the headquarters defense platoon by
March 1945, Zeke was now a corporal and he and his
comrades began to think they might survive the war.
"We started capturing these 14-year-old soldiers,
or really old men. We knew Germany was almost fin-
ished."
But young kids and old men weren't the only
people the 95th captured. They also took Hitler's for-
eign minister Fritz von Papen as a prisoner of war.
After the war in Europe ended, the 95th was
shipped back to the United States to prepare for the
invasion of Japan. Then, Japan surrendered after the
atom bombs were dropped, and the 95th was alerted for


occupation duty in Japan, but that idea was eventually
scrapped.
The 95th was never sent to Japan, and Zeke was
discharged from the Army in December 1945.
He returned to college and earned his degree. He
met his wife, Francis, while working for the LaRosa
Macaroni Company as a salesman.
Eventually, he became an investigator for the
Pennsylvania Welfare Department, retiring after 35
years of service.
He and his family first came to the Island in 1978,
and purchased property here in 1986.
Zeke stayed active in the 95th Division association,
and still maintains contact with as many of "the guys"
as are still alive. "I miss the camaraderie, the shared ex-
perience. It's something only a combat soldier can
understand. We've never forgotten each other. I was
just lucky to make it back."
As so many other veterans have said, Zeke insists
he wasn't a hero. "But I served with a bunch of heros.
I would have done anything not to let my buddies
down."

"The Greatest Generation" column is for Island,
Longboat Key, Perico Island and Cortez veterans, man
or woman, who served in the armed forces of any al-
lied country (U.S., Canada, Britain, Holland, Norway,
France, Poland, Australia, New Zealand, the Philip-
pines, etc.) during World War II. We'd like to hear
from you. Please call Rick Catlin at 778-7978.


x.r


Today. Frank Zacchero lives quietly in Holmes
Beach with his wife Fran.







PAGE 6 0 JUNE 2, 2004 E THE ISLANDER




inion011


Cortez does it
Whew! It was a two-year cliff-hanger, but Cortez
has made it, $163,736 from the state to complete the
renovation of the old schoolhouse.
Gov. Jeb Bush signed a budget that included a pro-
vision for art and historic preservation, redeeming him-
self for his veto of a similar proviso a year ago. Cortez,
thankfully, is among the beneficiaries.
Its original proposal was a year in development and
it appeared assured, only to founder in the 2003-04
budget. Another year of indecision and insecurity and
tension was needed to push it through the legislature
and ultimately the statehouse.
It was a Cortez triumph from start to finish, but
there was a lot of outside help along the way. Florida
State Rep. Bill Galvano, for one. He didn't have to
keep the pressure on for a relatively minor project in
a monstrous state appropriation bill. But he did,
never letting up on his fellow legislators and the
governor.
Another semi-outsider who was key was Chips
Shore, Manatee County clerk of the circuit court. His-
toric preservation comes under his huge umbrella, and
Cortez is a favorite of his. He even led a group to Tal-
lahassee to lobby the legislature.
But it is Cortezians themselves who have earned all
recognition for their perseverance and faith in the face
of discouragement. Chief among them are Blue
Fulford, Mary Fulford Green, Karen Bell, Roger Allen,
all leaders in civic and professional matters in the his-
toric fishing village. They kept on keeping on every
step of the way.
This in Cortez, not an easy place to lead anything.
It's a village of such bull-necked independence that it
was the only place in the United States to reject any
kind of outside help during the awful challenges of the
Depression "didn't want no help from nobody," as
one who was there put it.
The attitude lives on, along with recognition that
nothing gets done solo in this complex, interdependent
world. That is what enabled this tiny village to raise a
quarter of a million dollars over the past four years to
buy 95 acres adjacent to its eastern edge to keep out
condos and strip malls. It is what took Cortez to Tal-
lahassee for support to rejuvenate the old school.
Now the 1912-built building will be put in shape
again and made over into a community center and the
Florida Gulf Coast Maritime Museum as Galvano
put it, "turned into what-it should be."



The"' Islander
JUNE 2, 2004 Vol. 12, No. 30

V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy, bonner@islander.org
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor, paul @islander.org
Diana Bogan, diana@islander.org
Rick Catlin, rick@islander.org
Jack Egan
Jack Elka
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy, kevin@islander.org
Doug Dowling
Steve Huntington
Robert Noble
J.L. Robertson
Preston Whaley Jr., news@islander.org
V Advertising Sales
Nancy Ambrose, nancy@islander.org
Rebecca Barnett, rebecca@islander.org
VQtOfffice Manager
Julia Robertson, julia@islander.org
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price, carrie@islander.org
Melissa Williams, melissa@islander.org
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster
(All others: news@islander.org)
PR're
a 99-03 ~



Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1992-2004 Editorial, sales and production offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
WEB SITE: islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


A better one
I have spent a career dealing with builders, contrac-
tors, architects, designers and suppliers. They make
their living in a unique world of competition where
large sums are usually spent in a short period.
In Southwest Florida, many builders and other c
the industry have grown complacent and arrogant,
since there is such a large demand for their services.
Some refuse to bid competitively and accept only re-
imbursable work. Others simply ignore requests be-
cause they have so much work in the pipeline.
It is refreshing to find a builder with a following of
suppliers and subcontractors that still tries to work with
an owner to deliver a dollar's worth for a dollar spent.
Anna Maria's own Paradise Improvements is that
builder. Andrew Chennault and Steven Kaluza focus
primarily on the difficult area of renovations.
They recently completed one for Ius, and they were
consummate professionals. Experience has taught me
to understand that builders, designers etc. require an
honest attempt by the owner to define what is required
and respond promptly when asked for clarification.
Paradise Improvements knows how to work with such
an owner to complete a trouble-free, ininu itm-cost
project.
My congratulations to both Andrew and Steven.
Their quality work is an asset to the local community
and is exceeded only by their attention to detail and to
their clients' requirements.
Forrest D. Bogart, Anna Maria

AME says thank you
The Anna Maria Elementary Parent-Teacher
Organization's "Dancing in the Streets" committee
would like to thank the parents, community businesses
and restaurants that participated in making our event a
huge success.
As a result, a book order has been made for tilhe
Literacy Library that the teachers will use to help all
AME students.


-: -.~


The outpouring of love and dedication towards our
children is incredible and fantastic. From the beginning
of the year, our goal was to support our teachers, meet
new friends and welcome new parents into our little
school by the bay. It warms the heart to receive such
generosity from our wonderful community.
We would like to thank the following committee
members for their time and hard work: Mary Gallagher.
Donna Perez, Christine Callahan, Cindy Thompson,
Pete and Debbie Lannon, Shawn Carper, Lynda Hicks,
Lynn Watts, Kyra Valadie. Denise Tedesco, Laura
Keegan, Joy Murphy and Sue George.
You all made working hard fun and we grateful for
your friendship.
Sharon Alexander and Jamie Valsta(ld, event co-
chairpersons

Commissioners ignore the people
The Bradenton city council members have ignored
the "will of the people" by giving Arvida their approval
to develop five 10-story high rises for a total of 686
condos on Perico Island.
Somehow, I have a gut feeling that Island resi-
dents never had a chance. The entire deal was
"carved in stone,' even before the annexation. For
two years, the Manatee County commissars, govern-
ments of Anna Maria, Holmes Beach, ManaSota-88
and residents have critically opposed the high-rise
since its inception. It's good-bye to what is left of a
little spot of old Florida-Island life and a dangerous
decision.
There will be a "price to pay," if not in accidents,
possible deaths and the loss of a special quality of life.
Don't believe for one minute that your taxes won't in-
crease. That is an outrageous assumption. We're just a
money machine to Arvida and they won't ever give up.
The Bradenton council and the mayor have defied
the "will of the people." We won't forget that on elec-
tion day.
V. Pittman. Bradenton


TIAE-Y (RR PE,: ~ I

kjzczk CAVI SEASota.
,D O I. n s0VE C ,1
\}JACOUAMTIOt 0tLAt

sunc.








d ;1

....BB










Opinion


In defense of Australian pines
The Australian pine has been demonized by mem-
bers of the parks and beautification committee in
Holmes Beach and, in our judgment, unfairly. Let us
examine the facts rather than "purist" statements often
taken out of context.
Anna Maria is an Island better than 95-percent built
out and not a pasture or state park. We are told that the
seeds of the Australian pine are spread by either birds or
wind, and will germinate with disaster to the native flora
on this Island. Precisely where it will germinate, I am not
sure, but I am sure that in most parts of the Island it will
be cut or rooted out at a very young stage.
The statement that permitting continued growth of
Australian pines is "a choice to get rid of everything
else" is alarmist and irresponsible. The pines have been
here for more than 50 years and the Island enjoys a
diverse variety of both native and cultivated plants.
Additionally, not all exotic "non-native" plants on
the Island are created equal. A prime example is the
Brazilian pepper plant. This plant does grow like wild-
fire and may displace our native mangroves and other
plants at a rapid pace.
We have also been told native plants will not grow
in the shade of the Australian pine and it will take over
and displace native species. Have you taken a walk
recently along the beach and noted the sea grape and
sea oats growing in its shade? You might be interested
in seeing these phenomena on the beach at 70th or 73rd
streets, just a couple of locations where the pines have
been permitted to grow.
Another misconception is that birds do not coex-
ist with the Australian pines. More than one resident
has confirmed that yellow-crested night herons made
their nests in the pines at 77th Street and Marina Drive
before the city cut them down. There are other nesting
birds in the Australian pines in both Anna Maria and
Holmes Beach.
One thing is certain: birds do not nest in palm trees!


The Australian pines on the shoreline have done a
good job of stemming erosion and produce shade for
those of us who need sun protection in the height of
summer while enjoying Gulf views.
We must insist that no further destruction of the
tree canopy is permitted, and suitable specimen canopy
trees are planted to replace these pines which have been
cut down. Let us lead the way with a proactive tree-
preservation program. This will enhance the canopy,
which will reduce our energy consumption and contrib-
ute to the beauty of the Island, in turn enhancing prop-
erty values and the environment in which we live.
John B. Molyneux, Mary S. Robertson, Holmes
Beach
Serve the residents
This is in regard to the Thursday, May 27, Anna
Maria City Commission meeting. Though Plan X for
parking was somewhat controversial, it was a compro-
mise and was a step forward for the city.
I am not upset, however, that a commissioner
changed vote or that the plan was ultimately tabled.
From my perspective, the commission should first and
foremost look out for the welfare of the city and its
residents and property owners.
Anna Maria is a residential community and our
leadership should fight to ensure that it is maintained
for the residents before making parking available on
our streets to the public.
With coordination with the county I am confident
that public parking can be found in the city's commer-
cial zone to facilitate visitors. Relief is needed on many
of our beach-access streets and this is the best solution.
Certainly, opening up all streets is not in anyone's best
interest because it would erode the quality of life for all
Anna Maria residents.
This is not an elitist community, nor am I an elit-
ist. If I were, I would be living in a gated community
elsewhere.
George Lotr. Annaz Maria


THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 7




Th I -der
The : _




Ten years ago, the June 2, 1994,
issue of The Islander
announced that:
At an Island Hurricane Forum, Manatee County
Emergency Operations Center Director Karen Windon
advised Islanders that the most important step they can
take at the start of hurricane season is to be prepared.
An Islandwide committee studying the possibil-
ity of an Islandwide police force agreed to disband af-
ter its study found each city preferred to keep its own
police force, despite the cost benefit to each city of a
single police force.
The Anna Maria Fire Commission adopted its
1994-95 assessment rate, a rate that represents no in-
crease from the previous year.


Remember ...sl y


The results are in!
Rotten Ralph's Waterfront
Restaurant takes multiple
"top honors' in the latest
"I'm the Best at Everything"


* Best Ice Cubes
* Best Tarter Sauce
* Most Chips with the All-You-Can-
Eat Fish and Chips
* Best Buns!
* Widest Soup Spoons
* Most Number of Ashtrays in the
Smoking Section
* Least Number of Ashtrays in the
Non-Smoking Section
* Best Place to Watch PBS's 'Colo-
nial House" on a Big-Screen TV
* Most Handsomest Restaurateur
* Best View of the Sky
* Best Place to Spot Someone
With a Really Bad Toupee


f, ?
* Best Cocktail Onions
* Best Place to Sport your
"Black Socks-and-Sandals'
Footwear Ensemble
* Best Napkin Accessibility
* Best Place to Bring Your
Burdensome House Guests
* Best Place to View Inept
Boaters Trying to Dock
* Best Bartenders to Listen to
Your Troubles and Tell You
What Your Problem Is!


ROTTEN RALPH'S
/ 0o WATERFRONT DINING
LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS FULL BAR SERVICE
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria
o o Located at Galati Marina 778-3953
ROTTEN .
\RALPH'S ulofM-
0ONTo0v E Gulf of Mt ico

ALLYU CAN-AT FIH& HPS
ALL AY EER AY$79


We'd love to mail

you the news!

We mail The Islander weekly for a nominal $36 per year. It's the per-
. fect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island. .
More than 1,400 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid subscribers are already
* receiving The Islander where they live ... from Alaska to Germany and
SCalifornia to Canada.
* We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
Happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
. tate transactions ... everything you need if your "heart is on the Island." We're
the only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
* The Islander is distributed free locally. But if you don't live here year-
* round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please use
This form or log on to islander.org for secure e-mail transmission.
S BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
C One Year: $36 O 6 Months: $28 O 3 Months: $18
U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
S O One Year: $140 D 6 Months: $87.50 L 3 Months: $52
S L Single Issue: $3 FIRST CLASS MAIL, U.S. ONLY, Maximum Four Weeks
S Call for mail rates to Europe or other countries.
* MAIL TO: -
S ADDRESS -
: CITY _STATE ZIP __
Credit card payment: L rl7 D Li No. ___
Exp. Date Name shown on card: ___
MAIL START DATE: ____


The Islander
S Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 3421 7
I I CHARGE IT BY PHONE: (941) 778-7978 W
OR ONLINE AT islander.org
IIIIIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIE IIE






PAGE 8 E JUNE 2, 2004 E THE ISLANDER


Gulf Drive Cafe



changes hands

By Paul Roat
One of the longest continually operating restau-
rants on Anna Maria Island has changed owners in a
seamless transition that allowed employees and patrons
to never miss a day's beachside dining.
Tom Chipain sold the business of Gulf Drive Cafe,
900 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach, to property
owner Wendy Kokolis. Chipain's final day was Mon-
day, Memorial Day; Kokolis's first day was Monday.
"We were on and off and then on again," Chipain
said on his last official day of "work," although he
added he would stay around for a few days to ease
through the transition process.
"We finally got the deal done last week," he added.
"It wasn't the money that held things up, but the tim-
ing, and then it just happened. It's good for every-
body."


Lineup
The crowds seemed to lineup, rain or shine, for Gulffront seating at the Gulf Drive Cafe. Islander Photo:
J.L. Robertson


praised both employees and patrons for their dedica-
tion during the years.
"There are 40-45 employees that depend on us,"


and I think it will be nice for the community.
And how many of those wonderful Belgian
waffles has he sold over the years?
"nh a ,w I c 't lkn M. .kI,,, b., h lf mi;ll;n n


Chipain declined to reveal the selling price for the Chpi ad adw'egtjs rmnoslcl-u ,gstcntKo .my~ afr
business, which he has operated for 24 years, but clientele. Now, the legacy we created can continue, so?" Chipain said with a grin.


Belle Haven gets work; summer hours start


Restoration of the Anna Maria Island Historical
Society's historic Belle Haven cottage is progressing
well enough that the search is on for historic furnish-
ings.
Meanwhile, summer hours have started at the
society's museum. The building and its exhibits at 402
Pine Ave., Anna Maria, will be open Tuesday, Wednes-
day, Thursday and Saturday from 10 a.m.-noon.
Carolyne Norwood, director of the society and the
museum, said volunteers are at work on the interior of
Belle Haven, the cottage that fell into the bay in 1926
and was rescued to become a home for several succes-


sive people in Anna Maria. It is on the museum
grounds now, undergoing restoration.
Personal planks will form much of the decking
around the cottage, 100 of them bought already by pa-
trons of the society at $100 each. There are plenty more
available, awaiting the names of future patrons to be
engraved on them. Forms for them are available at the
museum.
Wood ruined by termites in the cottage is being
replaced by volunteers, and they are painting the
smaller room and preparing the front room for further
work. The front room will become a general store and


bait shop, the smaller room will be furnished as the
shopkeeper's home.
Needed soon are antiques, nothing fancy but suit-
able for the Anna Maria of 70 and 80 years ago: Small
pot-bellied wood stove, wooden counter with glass,
hooked rug, rocking chair, crates, barrels, wooden
wash stand and bowl, linens and dishes. And a wood
rowboat, not for interior use, Norwood said.
Anyone with such items and others suitable for an
old store and home should call the museum at 778-
0492, Norwood said "Don't bring it to the museum
quite yet."


'Top Notch' photo contest under way in June


If you've got a great snapshot, we've got a contest
you could win.
The Islander photo contest will begin publishing
weekly winning photos on June 9. Eight weekly win-
ning pictures will be featured on the cover of The Is-
lander and one snapshot will be a grand prize winner
with prizes and gift certificates awarded by the news-
paper and local merchants.
The weekly deadline is noon Friday throughout the
contest with the first deadline June 4.
Judging begins by a selection of pictures that may
include abstract photos, still life pictures, landscapes
and scenics, candid unposed snapshots, action, holi-
days, humor and animal pictures. Nothing is over-
looked, including great kid pics, sentimental moments
and moments of personal triumph.
Send or deliver your favorites (no limits) weekly
to Top Notch Contest Editor, The Islander, 5404 Ma-


rina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
Digital contest entries should be submitted in the
original JPG format via e-mail to
topnotch@islander.org or on CD. No retouching, en-
hancements or computer manipulation is allowed.
Complete rules and entry forms for the contest are
published below. Please attach a photo contest label to
each photo or CD you submit.
E-mail entrants must submit the label information
in the text of the e-mail, one photo attachment per e-
mail.
Photos without entry forms will be disqualified.
Additional photo labels are available at the newspaper
office or they may be copied.

Yearning to fly
C vde Dickey, a subscriber to The Islander in his home
state Texas, \was a "Top Notchl" winner in July 2003.


Islander photo contest rules
1) The Islander Newspaper's Top Notch Photo Con-
test is strictly for amateur photographers. Amateur photogra-
phers are those who derive less than 5 percent of their income
from photography.
2) Black-and-white and color photographs taken after Jan.
1, 2003, are eligible. This allows for extended eligibility. Pho-
tos previously published (in any format/media) or entered in
any Islander or other competitions are not eligible.
3) Photographs may be taken with any make of camera.
No retouching or other alteration (except cropping) is permit-
ted of negatives, prints or electronic photo files; no compos-


NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


ite pictures or multiple printing will be accepted. Digital photos
may be submitted in their original JPG file format (via e-mail or
disk) or a printed photograph. Slide (transparency) photos are not
accepted.
4) Entrant's name, address and phone number must be writ-
ten clearly, in ink, on the contest label and affixed to the back of
each print, or listed similarly in the e-mail message along with the
digital photo attachment. One e-mail per photo submission. Mail
entries to The Islander Top Notch Photo Contest, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217. E-mail digital entries to
topnotch @islander.org.
5) Entrants by their entry agree that The Islander may publish
their pictures for local promotion. Entrants must be able to furnish

NAME
ADDRESS__
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


the original negative or original digital image if requested by the
contest editor. All photos submitted become the property of The
Islander. Photos will not be returned. The Islander and con-
test sponsors assume no responsibility for negatives, diskettes,
CDs or photo prints.
Entrant must know the name and address of any recogniz-
able persons appearing in the picture and those must be en-
closed/attached with the entry.
6) Employees of The Islander and their immediate family
members are not eligible to enter the contest.
7) Any taxes on prizes are the sole responsibility of the
winners. Any cash prize won by a minor will be awarded to a
parent or guardian. Prize rights are not transferable.


NAME


ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
PHONE
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:


I have read the contest rules and affirm that this en-
try is in compliance with them.
SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT:


--I


1IIon11 Uor





THE ISLANDER M JUNE 2, 2004 M PAGE 9


Island property sales, values still booming


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The word is out that Island property is still one of
the best values along Florida's Gulf Coast, and that
there's a great lifestyle on Anna Maria Island.
Thanks to continued low interest rates and an "Old
Florida" lifestyle, the volume of home sales on Anna
Maria Island was nearly double from the same month
last year.
In fact, according to the Florida Association of
Realtors, the Bradenton-Sarasota area had the highest
percentage increase in sales from April 2003 to April
2004 of any state metropolitan area, climbing from 762
homes sold last year to 1,299 this year, a 70 percent
jump.
At the same time, the median sales price of a home
in the area was up 24 percent, from $189,700 last April
to $235,700 in April 2004.
On Anna Maria Island, however, the current aver-
age asking price of a single-family home, not includ-
ing condominiums, is around $880,000, according to
figures supplied by local real estate agents.
That's a 21 percent jump from the $730,000 aver-
age that agents reported in April 2003 and a near-100
percent climb from the April 2002 average of
$450,000.
Of course, location is everything. Gulffront homes
are at the top of the sales price list with nearly all sell-
ing for more than $1 million. Next in price are
canalfront and bayside homes, followed by inland
properties.
But there are still "good values" to be found on the
Island, according to Gail Tutewiler of Wedebrock Real
Estate in Holmes Beach, especially if the buyer looks
for an off-water property. A few Island homes listed are
in the $300,000 range, and there is a small, one-bed-
room home in Bradenton Beach with a $255,000 ask-
ing price.
"I don't expect those to last too long," she said.
Fact is, Tutewiler anticipates that with continued
low interest rates, great prices compared with other
Florida barrier islands, and the "old Florida" lifestyle


The Manatee County area leads the state in increased sales of homes from April 2003 to April 2004: A 70


percent jump. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin

on Anna Maria Island, demand for Island real estate
will remain high this summer.
"There were a lot of inquiries this past winter and
it was a great season," she said. There are always fewer
people in the summer season, she added, "but those
people are usually serious buyers.
"I see a very good summer sales season," con-
cluded Tutewiler, who was the leading sales agent at all
Wedebrock offices in 2003.
And there are still good values in condominium
sales, but only one unit is currently listed for under
$200,000.
Gulffront condos are mostly selling around the
$700,000 range, but a number of off-water units are
listed in the mild-S300,000. and those are good values.


Compared to other Gulf Coast barrier islands such
as Marco, Captiva and Sanibel, Anna Maria Island
home prices are a value, Tutewiler said.
But Island real estate isn't just about price and
increasing real estate values.
"You can't find our lifestyle anywhere else," said
Mary Ann Brockman, executive director of the Anna
Maria Island Chamber of Commerce.
"We're still a small, old Florida community and you
just don't find that on the other Islands. People always tell
me they fell in love with the Island and bought here be-
cause of our charm and laid-back lifestyle."
Indeed, said Debbie Dial at Diamond Shores Real
PLEASE SEE REAL ESTATE, NEXT PAGE


.., . -.. .. CLOSE-OUT
.-----, -SALE
ALL 2004 MODELS

H HURRY!
S -LIMITED
SSTOCK
AVAILABLE
__ INCLUDING
GRADY-WHI1TE
SCOUT
YAMAHA OUTBOARDS

WE'RE CELFBRATING 49 YEARS IN 1HE SAME lOCATION ON LONGBOAr KrY!


A CANNONS
'S# MARINA
COMPETITIVE QUALITY COMMITMENT SINCE 1955


6040 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key
(2 Miles From North End)
Open 7 days a week, 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
cannons.com 941-383- 1311
We're worth the triple


O YAMAHA


DISCOUNTED TICKETS TO ORLANDO

NOW AVAILABLE ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
,., [ I Save time and


YOU WANT IT? WE'VE GOT IT!
^--A .--- i r-^'\ -^ "\ \ -"^'\
2005 2006 2007 2008 009

20 0 0202j2\ 20220


10-YEAR ALL PARTS AND LABOR WARRANTY
Because Amana gives you quality at a price you can afford.
AMANA MEANS QUALITY SINCE 1934.

+ 1 WEST COAST
REFRIGERATION
SJ^ AIR CONDITIONIi
& & HEATING &(A


B Baiggl g & Air Conditioning

Built Better Than It Has To Be


778-9622


CAC044365
FPI PARTICIPATING CONTRACTOR


I






PAGE 10 0 JUNE 2, 2004 N THE ISLANDER

Master Stylist & Colorist


kay Thibaut
^ is now at Looks Salon
7455 Manatee Ave. West
(next to Albertsons)
Call 792-4999
713-7223






Finally... a health club

just for you!
Easy 30-minute program for total fitness.
Personal instruction for every member.


: &I7- L THC CLAU
For Every Body Over 40
6737 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton 798-9993





ril0 i -i : 'i d i


"Award-Winning"
Grooming
All Natural,
All Organic,
and All Holistic
Never Tranquilized -
Just Lovedl


FEATURING
* Solid Gold
* Wellness
* Innova
*Pinnacle
* Cal. Natural
* Avo


,. Eagle
Advantage & .' Canidae
Frontline Flea ,. ...and mo
Protection .

761-WOOF (9663) *7338 Cortez Road West, Bradenton


re!


Remembertosay"Isawitin The slander."


Wagner Realty celebrates 65th year


The Wagner Realty office at 2217 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach, housed Anna Maria Island's first real
estate office, which opened in 1939 as Silver's Real
Estate.
Granddaughter Dorothy and husband Dick Wagner
took over the company in 1955 and renamed it in 1958.
Dorothy sold the company to David Eckel in 1995,
having operated the business for two years after Dick's
death in 1993.
Eckel, broker/owner, is the driving force behind
the new Wagner Realty. The agency has seen impres-
sive growth under his commitment to customers and
community service. Today, Wagner Realty includes


nine branch offices, 193 agents and nine property man-
agement offices. Four brokerage companies have
joined forces with Wagner Realty and a strong agent
recruiting program.
Eckel sees the future of Wagner Realty being con-
tinued growth while remaining true to its core values
of service and customer satisfaction.
"This year of celebration will mark many new
milestones for Wagner," said Eckel, including a new
branch office on U.S. 301 in Parrish, a branch office
move on State Road 64 East, increased representation
of developers and builders and more business from
Sarasota and Pinellas counties."


Owner, founder celebrate 65th anniversary
Founded in humble beginnings in a small office in Bradenton Beach with the help of Dorothy Wagner, right, a
much expanded Wagner Realty and its owner Dick Eckel, left, and wife Joann, center, celebrated its 65th


anniversary at the Bradenton Country Club with some
Islander Photo: Nancy Anibrose


Real estate values soar again
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Estate in Holmes Beach. Feedback from her clients
indicates the "laid-back lifestyle and great attitude of
residents," is a major factor in "lookers" becoming
"buyers."
"I've had many clients who say they've visited a
lot of places in Florida, but when they got there, they
said 'this is it.' They can go to a lot of places in just a
few minutes, but they can always come back to the
quietness of our Island."
Dial also sees the condominium market as continu-
ing to boom. "I've had more condominium inquiries
than for single-family homes recently, and condos are
still value-priced for the Island. A lot of people are
buying those units for investment."
But if you're thinking of buying Island real estate,
better act fast. Prices will never be lower said Dial, and
Tutewiler agreed. "I say that every year, but it's still
true," she said.
Doug Dowling of Dowling Real Estate in Anna
Maria also agreed prices for Island real estate aren't
going down any time soon.
"Nobody can predict where it will stop, but it won't
be soon," he predicted. By the same token, however,
"nobody wants to be the last person to pay too much,"
he added.
"Condo sales are so hot now, it's unbelievable,"
Dowling observed. "Who would have ever thought that


160 agency associates, business associates and friends.


on the Island?"
Many condominiums are being bought by inves-
tors, he said, because of the low maintenance factor,
and price doesn't seem to be an object of concern, he
suggested.
"Million-dollar condominiums are selling ahead of
time," he said.
In fact, it seems the more expensive the condo, the
more demand there is to buy it, Dowling believes.
"But even with a lot of condos on the market, they
are still a hot item and I think they are going to sell very
well this summer," he concluded.

Going up fast on the Island
Excluding condominium sales, the average sale
price of a single-family home on Anna Maria Island in
April 2004 was $884,000, a 96 percent increase from
the June 2002 average price of $450,000, according to
figures supplied by Island real estate agents.
In January 2003, the average Island asking price
for a single-family house was $712,400.
The price of a single-family house listed for sale in
May 2004 on the Island ranged from a low of $370,000
(exclusive of a lone one-bedroom unit in Bradenton
Beach for $255,000) to a high of $2.7 million.
By comparison, asking prices in January 2003
ranged from $215,000 to $2.5 million.
There are currently 97 single-family residences
listed for sale on Anna Maria Island with 20 new list-
ings in the past 30 days.


"IT TAKES A FISHING VILLAGE"

,The rich history
i. -and bright future
S of the village
,. is told in this
one-hour
video.

We ship DVD $21.95
to your S&H $5
friends '"Pickup at
up north. -, ...'- .Annie's,
Cortez Cafe
or Star Fish
The quaint fishing village of Cortez, Fla., is
alive and well, and in this second edition of
"Tales of Cortez," new 2004 footage has been
added. It's a bright future for this slice of
paradise. Experience the living history of
Cortez, and share it with friends.
Call for free catalog or place order: 800-852-0662
Visa, MasterCard, Checks Accepted
INTERNATIONAL VIDEO PROJECTS INC.
6700 S. Florida Ave. #28, Lakeland, FL 33813





THE ISLANDER M JUNE 2, 2004 M PAGE 11


778-4751


Lynette Eveleth and some of the goodies earmarked for Iraq.


Tiny Cortez Baptist Church


big in Iraq


800-771-7163
5312 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
www.island-florist.com



W EUROPEAN DREAMS

June 30 NCL Dream 12 Nights, Scandinavian, London/
London, Outside w/Miami Air from $2,789 pp

July 27 16 days, Holland America, Copenhagen to Athens,
w/FREE Air from Tampa, Outside from $2,999 pp



Expert Hair and Nails from
the Professiqnals...




0 0 0


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
As churches go, Cortez Road Baptist is tiny. As
hearts go, they don't come any bigger.
Tomorrow, June 3, members of the church will
assemble 34 boxes of helpful items for soldiers in
Iraq, three soldiers' gift packets per box. Next day,
Friday, they will mail the boxes to Iraq.
This will be the fifth such mailing, totaling now
individual packages for 397 soldiers. Strangers all,
at least at the beginning. They seem to become per-
"sonal friends soon, said Lynette Eveleth, who initi-
ated the generosity and keeps it rolling. She is the
wife of the pastor, the Rev. Mark Eveleth.
Their church has from 40 to 100 members, de-
pending on the season. Not exactly a huge base for
caring for 397 soldiers and counting.
Cortez Baptist started the program in conjunc-
tion with two other groups in Sarasota, but interest
dwindled down south and the Cortez congregation
ended up going it alone.
It's not as hard as it looks, Lynette insists. In ad-
dition to many individuals who help out, 15 busi-
nesses give such items as snacks, socks, and sun-
dries. And flea collars especially flea collars,
which the soldiers covet to wear on their ankles to
ward off the ferocious Iraqi desert fleas. Others


bring specialty items: for instance, dentists give bag-
fuls of things to care for teeth.
The service people are appreciative and articu-
late and lonely, said Lynette. They write to express
gratitude and to make some kind of contact with
"regular people." She reads their letters to the con-
gregation during Sunday worship services, and a
special bulletin board in the church displays their
pictures.
Some are Manatee natives, some have relatives
here, most are strangers. Cortez Baptists make sta-
tionery to make it easier for them to write, and banks
donate pens.
She started the endeavor when a favorite
nephew, Christopher Knouse, was deployed to Iraq
with his Army Airborne unit. The family wanted to
do something for him and his comrades, collected
useful things and mailed them for Christmas. Then
more gifts, more mailings.
Now 100 more military people will get useful gifts
and word from "home" by the Fourth of July. Even at
the U.S. Postal Service's most advantageous rates, a
mailing of this scope costs $400, and cash is no easier
for Cortez Baptists to come by than anyone else. Any
help would be appreciated, she said. Just call Lynette
to arrange details, 792-3279, or mail it to the church at
4411 100th St. W., Bradenton FL 34210.


Annunciation gives $11,000


to Habitat for Humanity


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The relatively small Episcopal Church of the An-
nunciation has come up big for the Habitat for Human-
ity, and church members give their priest much of the
credit.
The church at 4408 Gulf Drive in Holmes Beach
is giving $10,000 to the "All Island Home" to be built
in Palmetto for a needy family. And the church's Epis-
copal Churchwomen are adding $1,000 of their own.
The house will be sold to a needy family for pay-
ments of $300-$325 per month. It will be built by All
Island Denominations in the Village of the Palms along
with 33 other Habitat houses at 12th Street and 11th
Street Drive in Palmetto.
Jan Pettus, parishioner who handles much of the
church's outreach program, said Annunciation's rector,
Father Harry Parsell, had a very large hand in the gen-
erous donation.
"We will soon be joyfully celebrating the one-year
anniversary of Father Parsell," she said. "He came to
Annunciation in June 2003 with energy, enthusiasm


and a vision.
"Part of that vision was to reach out into the com-
munity, not only Anna Maria Island but the surround-
ing areas of Bradenton and Sarasota as well. His mis-
sion was to involve Annunciation in community needs
not only spiritually but financially.
"When he learned that the churches of the Island,
through their All Island Denominations, were support-
ing Habitat for Humanity, this was a most welcome
opportunity for Annunciation to also become a part of
this important ministry."
AID said its share of the financing for the home
will be $30,000, none of it coming from established
AID funds: It will be raised in a separate fund drive,
and the Annunciation contribution is a "tremendous
boost."
The fund drive goes on, reminded its principal
leader, the Rev. Gary Batey, pastor of Roser Memorial
Community Church. He said donation checks should
be made out to Habitat for Humanity with the notation
"For All Island Home" and mailed to Habitat at 1005
Third Ave. W., Bradenton FL 34221.


New eordlir6





DAYCARE
Ages 6 weeks t6 5 yrs
Monday thru Friday
7am-6pm
Meals Included






5382 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-2967


LU Presenting
S" -_ STILETTO
< ..in solid



ment
buckle ...
and it's water-resistant.
It's the world's thinnest,
light-powered watch.
Priced from $215.
Great Grad
or Father's
Day Gift! CITIZEN


Jewelry & Watch Repair
7358 Cortez Rd. W.
798-9585 -i
Mon-Fri 10-6 Sat 10-4
Accepting all major credit & ATM cards






PAGE 12 E JUNE 2, 2004 U THE ISLANDER


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 22, 877 N. Shore Drive, Rod & Reel Pier,
theft. A man reported his fishing rod and reel stolen.
May 23, Bean Point Beach, open container. A
woman was cited for having an open container of beer
on the beach.
May 23, Bean Point Beach, open container. A man
was cited for having an open container of beer on the
beach.
May 24, 300 block of North Bay Boulevard, crimi-
nal mischief. The windshield of a parked vehicle was
reportedly smashed with a rock and the front tires were
slashed.

Bradenton Beach
May 21, 1100 Gulf Drive S., Cortez Beach, bur-
glary. A woman reportedly found another woman go-
ing through the belongings inside her.vehicle. She con-
fronted the suspect, who fled on foot. An off-duty po-
lice officer from Polk County witnessed the confron-
tation and pursued the suspect, catching her behind a
nearby residence and bringing her back to the scene of
the burglary until local police arrived.
May 22, 2300 block of Avenue B, battery. A man
was pushed to the ground by his son's friend. The fa-
ther told police he asked the friends to leave when he
found them drinking in his yard late at night.
May 22, 200 Gulf Drive S., Cortez Beach, trespass
warning. A man was given a trespass warning after
disturbing several people at the beach.
May 23, 500 Gulf Drive S., Cortez Beach, alcohol
violation. Two teenagers were found with alcohol at the
beach by officers after the posted closing time.
May 25, 2100 block of Avenue B, domestic bat-
tery. According to the report, a woman was given a
domestic violence packet after she told police her hus-
band grabbed her by her hair.
May 25, 100 Gulf Drive N., Circle K Parking lot,


Our Mission: To provide our patients with
state of the art radiation therapy services of the
highest quality in a caring and compassionate
environment.

Our Services:
3-D Conformal and Intensity Modulated (IMRT)
Radiotherapy
Prostate Seed Implantation using real-time com-
puter planning
BAT Ultrasound Prostate Targeting System for
external beam radiotherapy
Stereotactic Radiosurgery for brain tumors
High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for lung, esoph-
ageal and gynecologic cancers
Access to clinical trials through national coopera-
tive research groups

Our Board Certified Doctors:
Dr. Graciela R. Garton trained in Radiation
Onocology at Mayo Clinic and was a faculty mem-
ber at Mayo Medical School.
Dr. Stephen J. Patrice former chief resident at
Harvard Medical School with Masters in Public
Health from Harvard.
Dr. Larry N. Silverman former chief resident in
radiation oncology at the Medical College of
Virginia and winner of Roentgen Fellow Research
Award.
Dr. Sarah E. Hoffe- trained in radiation Oncology
at Duke University and Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center, New York City.

Ot Sarasota Office: (941) 364-8887
3210 Fruitville Road
Bradenton Office: (941) 308-1050
6665 Cortez Road


drug arrest. According to the report, officers responded
to a report of a suspicious person. The suspect, Guy
Randall Gordon, 46, of Palmetto, was confirmed to be
wanted on an exparte order signed by a district judge.
During the arrest, Gordon was found to be in posses-
sion of marijuana under 20 grams and paraphernalia,
and a capias request was issued on drug charges.
May 26, 200 Gulf Drive N., Beach House Restau-
rant, defrauding an innkeeper. A man was arrested
when he attempted to leave the restaurant after dining
and his credit card was declined twice. According to
the report, the man was also wanted on a Manatee
County warrant for violation of parole.

Holmes Beach
May 21, 400 block of 80th Street, disturbance.
According to the report, a man interrupted work on a
construction site. The foreman was advised to call the
police to issue a trespass warning if the man returned.
May 22, 100 block of 51st Street, trespass. A man
reported receiving threats to himself and his work crew
from a man disturbing another construction site earlier
in the week.
May 22, 4100 block of Sixth Avenue, criminal
mischief. A metal mailbox was reportedly damaged.
May 24, 100 block of 51st Street, burglary/crimi-
nal mischief. According to the report, approximately
$5,000 in damage was done to supplies, parts and la-
bor at an unoccupied structure. An employee reporting
for work found water running down the exterior walls
of the building from the second floor, the front door
knob was cut off, there was a hole in the water heater,
bedroom doors were pulled off the hinges, and there
was water damage to supplies.
May 24, 2712 Gulf Drive, Cedar Cove Resort,
theft. A man reported his white 1999 Ford pickup sto-
len.
May 25, 3101 Gulf Drive, Mike Norman Realty,
assault. An employee reported a man threatened to











Dr. W. Alvin McElveen
Board Certified Neurologist






We are looking for volunteers over the
age of 40 with early Parkinson's Disease
who are qualified to participate in this
5-month clinical research study of an
investigational drug for early
Parkinson's Disease.

Qualified participants will receive:
Complete Neurological Exam
Laboratory Testing
*ECGs
Physical Exam
o Cognitive and Neuropsychological
Assessments
Up to $505 for completion of study

For more information or if you qualify,
please call:






tl t m il i~~~A ;i~ii~i Si

A *g


S--- i
Kunzie.Sangermino wed
Mrs. Amy Kunzie and Mr. Jeremy Sangermino were
married at the Beach House Restaurant Friday, May
6, 2004, with friends and family in attendance. The
couple resides in Orlando. Islander Photo: Courtesy
Marsha Garlinger

harm her when she told him she was unable to remove
his friend's name from a lease. According to the report,
the man was acting "wildly," causing the employees
anxiety.
May 25, 3800 block of Fourth Avenue, burglary.
According to the report, several rental units were bro-
ken into and evidence suggested an unauthorized per-
son stayed in the rental units.
May 26, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee Public Beach,
theft. A woman reported her purse stolen.
May 26, 200 block of 67th Street, assault. A man
was arrested after he reportedly hit his girlfriend and
broke a window.
May 27, 3300 block of Sixth Avenue, battery. A
man was arrested for reportedly punching his daugh-
ter in the face, causing her lip to swell and nose to
bleed.


Matthew Walters
B'cri .lie F rr *ul Irir.n 'r




personal health concepts
1702 Oak Streel
Sarasola. FL 34236
94 -1504 394-


LaPENSEE

PLUMBING

941 778-5622 nc. Co

Z 5362 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach HI


sPBIP*I~B~U~'~lrl~OBRMs~i~s~1U11i~f.S` ;r'.:;r~-. ~ ~JIWPl.r':1L i~9'-;'~ !I~!r '- ~;__u*;~,,~i~,~I;~,~,~E~~.L,


... .. ... . ,-. .. . ............ -.,.









At last,


governor OKs


Cortez money

By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
State grant money to finish rebuilding the old
Cortez school building and converting it to civic use,
in limbo for more than a year, has been approved by
Gov. Jeb Bush.
State Rep. Bill Galvano said the "special catego-
ries" funding in the state's 2004-05 budget survived the
governor's busy line-item veto pen last week.
The Cortez school is No. 4 on a list of projects for
arts and historic preservation, and Galvano said his
understanding is that everything on the list through No.
24 is covered. The Cortez share is $163,736.
It is the same project that was approved for fund-
ing last year, when it was 22nd on a list of 57. But Gov.
Bush vetoed the entire "special categories" section of
the budget so Cortez and a host of other areas went
without.
It was touch and go again this year, with the Leg-
islature unenthusiastic about spending and then the
governor's intentions unknown. But a lobbying effort
was launched by a Manatee County contingent led by
Clerk of the Circuit Court Chips Shore, who is respon-
sible for historic preservation among myriad other du-
ties for the county.
He and Cathy Slosser, who heads historic re-
sources for him, and Roger Allen, coordinator of the
school restoration and of the museum program, went to
Tallahassee late in the Legislature's session.
They talked with everyone they could find, they
said, and came home provisionally reassured that they
had a chance, especially with Galvano pressing their
cause with key legislators and then the governor.
The money will have to work its way through the
state machinery before it gets to Manatee County for
use in Cortez. Galvano has promised to keep an eye on
Centre ShoPamela. Letts M.D.
|h n

it so it doesn't "fall through a crack."
It will permit completion of the school project, where
volunteers have done all the work they are capable of
doing, Allen said. That progressed through use of the lo-
cal matching funds from county, Shore's office, the
Florida Institute for Saltwater Heritage, the Cortez Village
Historical Society, and private contributions.
The volunteers and the matching money were com-
mitted to work on the exterior of the 1912-built struc-
ture, and the state grant will go to replacing the ceiling,


Work on the Longboat Pass Bridge on State Road
789 continues this week and into fall. Expect intermit-
tent lane closures (one-lane, two-way traffic) with
flaggers while crews repair piles and deck joints. The
sidewalk may be closed to pedestrians.
On State Road 64, the Anna Maria Draw Bridge


LONGBOAT CARDIOLOGY
COI LLN M. HEALY, M.D.
BOARD CERTIFIED CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
New Patients Welcome
Caring staff in an inviting atmosphere.
Just a short drive onto the Key.
Lon boat (941) 383-7300 5650 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Cafdioloy Longboat Key Monday-Friday 8-5


THE ISLANDER E JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 13
New
Kiwanian
I Phyllis
IBohnenberger,
president of the
i Anna Maria
Island Kiwanis
Club, and
sponsoring
member Russ
SOlson welcome
David Sandoro
k tas the newest
member of the
club.
Bohnenberger
and Olson live
in Holmes
Beach, Sandoro
on Longboat
Key.




most of the roof, floor of the stage, all doors and win-
dows and renovation of the electrical and air-condition-
ing systems.
The building has been vacant since the death in
1995 of Robert Sailors, famed artist who used it as a
studio and home. The county bought it in 1999, shar-
ing the $420,000 purchase with the Florida Communi-
ties Trust.
"It will be great to see it turned into what it should
be," Galvano said.


will undergo a maintenance project Tuesday, June 8,
through June 10, that will include general mainte-
nance repairs from. This work will be done at night
between 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. Motorists should
expect intermittent lane closures on Manatee Av-
enue.


upen Mon.-F.'r. 'r(oam-rlpm
Sat., Sun., 8e Holidays 7o3am-Spm
SWalk-ins Welcome
We're available to tend to your
urgent care needs
) ever/Infections Minor Lacerations
Simple Fractures Sprains
PINNACLE MEDICAL CENTER
315 75th Street West Bradenton
941-761-1616


Dig ity'


Serving you with five locations ...
Anna Maria Island Oneco Ellenton
Bradenton Manatee Avenue Bradenton Cortez Road

We have a FREE gift for you.
A Valuable Emergency Planning Portfolio.
It provides the answers your family needs ... when they're needed the most.
Vital Personal Statistics. Can You Answer These
Emergency Numbers. Important Questions?
1. Do you know the exact location of
Family History. your vital information and papers?
Social Security/Veterans Info. 2. Do you know what your Social
Memorial Instructions. Security or Veteran's benefits are and
Insurance/Will Information. EXACTLY how to collect them?
No Obligation. 3. Do you know the 124 things that
MUST be done on the most difficult
No Purchase Necessary. day of your family's life?

Mail this coupon to: Griffith-Cline Funeral Homes
P.O. Box 9420 Bradenton, FL 34206-9420
Or call Today 748-1011 or 778-4480
YES, I am interested in receiving the FREE Emergency Planning Portfolio.
I would also like information on:
I Affordable funeral pre-planning O Out-of-state arrangements
S0 Cremation O Burial and Memorialization
Name Phone
Address I
City State Zip
L - - - -


Single Visit Crowns
Fix your cracked or chipped tooth today.



ISLAND/
DENTAL SPA 1


Oral Health Restoration and
Smile Reconstruction for the
Discriminating Patient
Bye--bye uncomfortable temporaries. Natural looking
ceramic crown 'while you wait. No second visit required.
Tooth restoration never looked this good or was so easy!


New patients wIIecoimc!


Experience total comfort with
plenty of personal pampering
from our /-iedly staff. Enjoy our
complimentary refreshment
bar with coffee, soda, wine and
beer. Immerse yourself in music
or video and let a therapeutic
hand wax treatment take your
cares away.


778-2204 www.is..landdeItalspa.corm
Creating beautiful smiles on Anna Maria Island & Longboat Key


Bridge work continues, more starts up


FUNERAL ES AN C REMAT
FUNERAL HOMES AND CREMATION SERVICE





/. I UI C S T T 1 T T -, I1I
PAGE 14 E JUNE 2, 2004 0 THE ISLANDER
Half-price rummage sale
Saturday at St. Bernard
A rummage sale is scheduled from 9 a.m.-l p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 5, at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248
S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
The sale will feature "everything at half price,"
said the church women who are conducting the sale,
"except for the jewelry." Details may be obtained by
calling 778-4769.


Longboat's 'Art Smart' camp
to begin Monday
The "Art Smart" summer camp in the creative arts
for children 8-12 will begin Tuesday, June 7, at the
Longboat Key Center for the Arts, 6860 Longboat
Drive.
Classes designed "to foster creativity and imagina-
tion in a friendly, safe environment" run in two-week
segments of eight classes each, $70 for each two weeks.
All are 10 a.m.-noon at the center. They are:
Monday and Tuesday, Kids and Klay; Wednesday,
Painting, Drawing, Cartooning and Printmaking;
Thursday, Mixed Media.
Additional information may be obtained by calling
383-2345.

Longboat lining street
with flags at $50
"An old-fashioned Fourth of July celebration" on
Longboat Key will see Bay Isles Road lined with
American flags, and the key's chamber of commerce
is looking for sponsors at $50 per flag.
The third annual Freedom Festival will be all day
Sunday, July 4, centering on Bay Isles Road. It will be
a family-oriented festival, the chamber said.
Persons wanting to sponsor a flag or flags may call
the chamber at 383-2455 or e-mail at
kheintz@longboatchamber.com.


Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, ELCA
Saturday 5pm Service of Praise
Sunday 9.30 am Worship Service
Nursery Available at 9:30am

w. vw.gloriadeilutheran.com
6608 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1813


In exhibit
To hang in the Edge Coalition's show opening
Friday is "House on Alma Drive" by Tonya Clay.


Big everything promised
at Edge Art Show
Big art, big music, big food, big fun are promised
for the "big show" by the Edge Coalition at its show
opening Friday, June 4, at the Art League of Manatee
County, 209 Ninth St. W., Bradenton.
The exhibit's "big opening reception" will be Fri-
day, June 4, from 6-9 p.m. at the league's quarters. On
hand will be artists and musicians.
Exhibiting will be Island artists Tonya Clay and
Carrie Price, and they plan to be at the opening recep-
tion, which is open to the public.
The show will run through July 23. Edge is made
up of cutting-edge artists from abound Tampa Bay.


3. I co Island6Counseling I S Svc


Improved the' Q ality Y
ofYcau, Life /*
Carol Greer Siemaszko
B.A. Ed.. M.A. PSych.
CERTIFIED COUNSELOR
AND LIFE COACH
Perico Island Bradenton
(941) 794-1492 ICH SPRECHE DE(


UTSCH!


MULLE


q


b--' *r* ,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
941-778-7978.
% i I ;l r,1, r.;r,,rI


Gulf Coast Writers unit
meets Monday morning
The Gulf Coast Writers group will meet at 10:15
a.m. Monday, June 7, at the Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Participants are to bring original poems, essays or
short fiction to read. Details may be obtained by call-
ing 778-7732.
Auditions for musicals
planned at Riverfront
The Manatee Players will have auditions this
month for two musical shows, both auditions and the
shows to be at the Riverfront Theatre, 102 Old Main
St., Bradenton.
Auditions will begin at 7 p.m. June 16 for the or-
chestrated version of"Les Miserables, School Edition"
but individual audition times should be arranged by
calling 748-5875. It has been re-scored for youth
voices, said the Players. Musicians of all ages will be
auditioned. It will be presented Sept. 10-26.
At 7 p.m. June 20-21 auditions for all ages will be
at the theater for "Broadway Memories," to be per-
formed at the theater Aug 12-22.
Details are available at 748-0111.

Date set for AME ground breaking
Manatee County School District has set a date for
the Anna Maria Elementary School ground-breaking
ceremony.
Ground-breaking for the new construction project
will be held Aug. 17, when students and faculty will be
back on campus for the 2004-05 school year.
The community is invited to attend the ground-
breaking ceremony, which will also be attended by
school board members and local officials.
The existing AME facility is scheduled to be re-
placed by a new two-story block building designed by
Educational Design Associates and landscaped with a
natural amphitheater designed by arborist and land-
scape architect David Jones.


Pawsitively

Pets & ProPerty Services Inc.

Quality Pet Sitting Services in Your Home
Property Services Duing Your Absence
Bonded & Insured

Jane & Steve Futch
761-7511


MY SECURE HOME
"Horne/Business Checking Services"
We check inside and out
Commercial alarm key holder services
George Harris. Owner
Retired Sheriff's Lieutenant
Phone: 737-1049 Fax: 750-0324
We are not a security service


"Knob, Knob."

"Who's there?"


,' 4


Mr. Conch,

Ms. Seahorse,


Mrs. Turtle is nesting!
See our huge collection of cabinet hardware ...



'ai #e~iIS, l= 'l ~l1: oI


WILLS TRUSTS PROBATE

JAY HILL
Attorney-at-Law


778-4745
Anna Maria, Florida


I





THE ISLANDER U JUNE 2, 2004 U PAGE 15


Sea turtle nesting


gains momentum
At long last, marine turtles appear to be in a nest-
ing mood along Anna Maria Island.
Three nests were found Monday morning and three
more Tuesday morning by Island Turtle Watch volun-
teers patrolling the beach at dawn, said Suzi Fox, who
holds the state sea turtle preservation permit and heads
Turtle Watch.
Added to two nests last week, the total number of
loggerhead nests verified now stands at eight, along
with a dozen false crawls reported by Turtle Watch on
Anna Maria Island beaches.
The false crawls are the oversize zipper-like tracks
left by turtles who have come up the beach to nest and
changed their minds.
Of the six new nests, one was so near the Gulf
waterline that it would likely flood in a storm so Turtle
Watchers dug up the eggs and moved them. The new
nest is away from the water a couple of blocks down
the beach from the original, to match the sand.
It had the normal egg count of about 100 eggs per
nest, a far cry from the 144 eggs moved last week in a
nest found by Mary Ellen Lalomia.
The nesting rate is still behind the norm, Fox said,


ii:a


-' a-
'" a s- -.


but the water is warming nicely to the kind of environ-
ment turtles seem to prefer for their eggs. Other
beaches to the north and south of the Island report in-
creased activity too.


Early
morning
nester
This mother
turtle came
ashore just
before daybreak
to nest at Co-
quina Beach
Lifeguard Station
7. She was
reported to
Turtle Watch
Director Suzi
Fox just in time
for a few photos
before she slid
into the Gulf
Islander Photo:
Suzi Fox


Additional information may be obtained by calling
Turtle Watch Education Center at 778-1435 or visiting
the center at 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
To report nesting activity call 232-1405.


Turtle license plate grant shared here


The sea turtle special vehicle license plate
fund has awarded a $4,946 grant to the Anna
Maria Island Turtle Watch, Suzi Fox has an-
nounced.
She is director of Turtle Watch here and
holds the state permit for marine turtle preserva-
tion. She also is a former member of the entity
that annually disburses the special funds.
She was on the board of directors of the
Marine Turtle Grants Committee of the Carib-
bean Conservation Corp. for the first three years
of its life, dropping out this year. She didn't ap-
ply for a grant in previous years because she


didn't feel comfortable disbursing funds to her own
organization, she said.
This year, though, she felt perfectly free to apply,
and asked for and is getting money to fund educational
material brochures and light-switch stickers warning
people that it's "Lights Out for Sea Turtles" on the Is-
land until the end of the nesting season Oct. 31.
Turtle Watch will develop and produce the bro-
chures for distribution to hotels, motels, rental agents,
cities and Manatee County to pass along to visitors
explaining the sea turtle program and why lights must
be shielded or turned out.
Marine turtles instinctively head for light when


they are born at night. For thousands of years that
meant the sparkle of the Gulfs surface, but now
man-made lights attract the baby turtles upland,
usually to their death.
The material will be prepared for the 2005
nesting season, she said. Details may be obtained
by calling the Turtle Watch Education Center at
778-1435.
The turtle license plate is disbursing $200,000
to various organization and institutions this year.
Altogether the license plate has generated more
than $3 million toward sea turtle protection, said
Caribbean Conservation.


Coming Soon to
Anna aria \s\andx


CMrve3


Call about our
Summer
Specials**
* School Board Employees
* Mother/Daughter Student
CALL Now 794-2878
4228 60th St. W. Bradenton
Closest Club to the Islands!
*Some Restrictions May Apply
"This Location Only


Accounting Services
Financial Statements
Free Consultations


Payroll & Payroll Taxes
Income Tax Preparation
Flexible Hours


BEN and KAREN COOPER
Ben Cooper and Associates Inc.


3909 E. Bay Drive, Suite 110
Holmes Beach, FL, 34217
(Located across from Publix)


(941)778-6118
Fax:(941)778-6230
benacooper@aol.com


and Operated
Sunny Bower Bradenton
Marella House radenton
Our Island Home Anna Maria
(941) 778-7842
Assisted Lving Facltty Nos. 5178.9577. 10140


Hme


FEEL LIKE A DAY ON THE TOWN?
Find out what's going
on in TiTe Islander



Our fast claims service

is "No Problem."

ur agency is well known for providing fast,
efficient and fair claims service. That's because
te we represent Auto-Owners Insurance, which,
according to a national consumer's
magazine, ranks consistently
as one of the top insurers .. --
in the country. That's
why we are known as the -
"No Problem" People. -
Ask us about our great -
service today! .AUo-I c ,.rs ..wma

Jin Mixon Insurance Inc.
5412 Marina Dr.* Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
(941) 778-2253
OUR OFFICE IS CLOSED FOR LUNCH NOON-1 DAILY.


You can lose weight f
Free trial program ',
for one-month supply.
Call Loretta '. .
778-2658
or visit -www.oloreta.amsonline.com
American Stock Exchange AMM


Assisted Living
Accommodations
for Seniors
Famih \ Owned


Oy ith Avnversfr1 P0lg!




'
-0 '.'- .


L .: Love '.oR...

, ,, ,:-. j i'^MSId ^forever,

., ... ." ^ l


Massage Therapy Also Available!
778-0722
3612 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(between Publix and Ace I-rlrdwarc)
Visit our web site: www.islandchiro.com


~


I






PAGE 16 E JUNE 2, 2004 L THE ISLANDER


School year wraps with award ceremonies


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Elementary School students con-
cluded the 2003-04 school year celebrating their aca-
demic and personal achievements.
Ceremonies for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders
were held to recognize students for earning straight A's
and B's, perfect attendance, good citizenship, athletic
achievements, and participation in speech contests,
playwright festivals and "Sunshine Math."
Special awards for service and leadership were also
presented by the Sons of the American Revolution and
the Island Rotary Club.
Several students were also recognized by Duke
University's Talent Identity Search. In third- and
fourth-grades alone, 18 students were eligible to apply
for Duke University's student newsletter and young
talent program. To qualify, students must score among
the 90th percentile nationwide on standardized tests.
Students were also recognized for excelling on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, including
fifth-grader Jourdan Howell, was earned a perfect read-
ing score.
Students with perfect attendance this school year
include Glen Bauer, Joe Garvas, Nicole Pierce,
Courtney Schenk and Taylor Zebracki.
The Parent-Teacher Organization purchased scien-
tific calculators for the graduating fifth-graders, which
were distributed at the awards ceremony.


Obituaries


Thomas V. Coons
Thomas V. Coons, 70, of Bradenton, died May 18.
Born in Jersey City, N.J., Mr. Coons came to the
area from there 31 years ago. He started with the
Longboat Key Police Department in 1973 and retired
in 1996 as chief. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army,
serving in Vietnam. He was a member of American
Legion Kirby Stewart Post No. 24, Loyal Order of
Moose; BPOE No. 1511, and Fraternal Order of Police.
He was Catholic.
Memorial services were May 22. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to Our Daily Bread, 1426 14th St.
W., Bradenton FL 34205. Shannon Funeral Home was
in charge of arrangements.
"He was my hero," said son Tom.
He is survived by wife of 46 years Joan; sons Tho-
mas W., Chris and Michael, all of Bradenton; daugh-
ter Lyn Mattas of Bradenton; sister Betty Goldberg of
New York; and seven grandchildren.


Outstanding FCAT
Among the recipients ofJoutstanding achievement awards for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test include
Anna Maria Elementar' School third-graders Megan Aston, Jasmine Howe, Mallory Kosfeld, Dakota Lacey,
Michelle Olhhl, Chase Stripling and Madeline Wilson. FCAT achievement awards were given to third-, fourth- and
fifth-grade students who scored the highest in reading, Iath and writing. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


Good citizens
Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School fifth-
graders Sarah
Balducci, Christo-
pher Callahan,
Adina Dicus, Rainia
Lardas, Lauren
Woodson, Emnla
Barlow, Jenna
Duovall, Forrest
Schield, Molly
Slicker and Kristi
Wickershamn were
selected by their
teachers ftor citizen-
ship awards.


Mary E. Deck
Mary E. Deck, 90, of Holmes Beach, died May 28.
Born in Higdon, Ariz., Mrs. Deck moved to Mana-
tee County from Hamilton, Ohio, five years ago. She
worked in the nursery at Mercy Hospital in Hamilton.
She was a member of Mellville Church of the Nazarene
in Hamilton and attended Island Baptist Church. She


was a member of the Salvation Army Auxiliary.
There were no local services. Griffith-Cline Fu-
neral Home was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Lois Mills of Holmes
Beach and Doris Yeakle of Hamilton; son James of
Hamilton; twin sister Marie Blaechle of Hamilton; four
grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren; and two great-
great-grandchildren.


jrlp Al1cJUeg axcl 2 0 \


From Anna Maria to Ellenton and points inbetween, you're sure to find hunting for art, antiques and collectibles as much fun as the
discovery. There are so many places to go "antiquing" that you're certain to find the treasure you're looking for.


Now Selling Loose Beads & Supplies

-* '7* '

o ****


B.A..Ed. -A P^Jch
Pearls, Turquiose, Glass, Bone and Wood Beads
Ask about our free bead classes!


Unique and whimsical art and gifts
Featuring works by 90 local artists







5314 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Island Shopping Center 779-2624


The Olde Post Office -
,,\nllqucs jnd Elcdilblc ,. ,-
Nui.scrv Rockers li. t
Four-Poslcr Spool Bed ",.-[
Deco Screen Poor '
Cool Ruslic Slull Crecal Furniiiiture
HlI A l.l, i,il.', ". tIl II t i l I-.lt[d" i l lrlli.n
f,. ,in .',ll Ilii, ll-*.l' l] h iuli N o,) l-, i ||j
708-3500 A


IHTHE MUSEUM SHOPPE

OFFERING
FINE ANTIQUES MARINE ART UNIQUE GIFTS

BAYVIEW PLAZA
101 SOUTH BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA
ACROSS FROM THE CITY PIER, ABOVE THE POST OFFICE
94 1.779.0273
Once the committee has prepared a draft ordi


II I





THE ISLANDER M JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 17


First test of Anna Maria procedures pass


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The first test of Anna Maria's new site-plan-review
procedures took place at the May 24 planning and zon-
ing board meeting where board members reviewed an
application for new construction in the retail-office-
residential zone.
By all accounts, this "first time" went smoothly for
both the board members and the applicants, Robert and
Nikki Hunt of 303 Pine Ave.
The Hunts had to wait nearly six months before
submitting their site plan as they were caught in the
city's building moratorium from December 2003 to
April 2004.
But as Shakespeare said, "All's well that ends
well," at least for now.
The Hunts answered a number of questions for the
board that were posed by outside consultants Joel
Freedman and Tom Wilcox of Baskerville-Donovan
Inc., the city's engineering firm, and agreed to the sug-
gested changes.
The proposed structure will have four small units
for retail-office space on the first two levels with the
Hunts' residence above those units.
One change that couldn't be made, however, was
a suggestion by board member Frank Pytel that the
Hunts consider a circular drive for parking, rather than
straight-in parking.
We'd love to, replied designer Emily Anne Smith
ofO'Brien and Smith, the architectural and design firm
responsible for the plans, but there isn't enough room
for a circular driveway, just 11 parking spaces.
Pytel was concerned about traffic backing out onto
Pine Avenue and North Shore Drive, particularly large
delivery trucks such as FedEx or UPS. Smith pointed
out that, regrettably, this is how vehicles enter and exit
at nearly all Pine Avenue and Gulf Drive businesses.
The Hunts did agree to post a sign that delivery


ER Our customers
n, rlW say we are the
#1 Ice Cream Parlor
C U Regular and
Sugar-Free
Old-Fashioned
Ice Cream &
since 1984 Waffle Cones
794-5333 Made on Location
OPEN DAILY NOON TO 10 PM Soft-serve Yogurt
11904 Cortez Road West (Surfing World Village)


trucks use one of the three parking spaces along North
Shore Drive.
Board members agreed with that condition, but
noted that their approval of the parking is "site spe-
cific." Future applicants that have enough space may
have to consider alternatives to parking that require an
exiting vehicle to back onto a right of way.
Board member Jim Conoly said he was upset that
the fees for the outside consultants to review the Hunt
project were waived by Mayor SueLynn.
Building Official Kevin Donovan said that because
this was the "'test case" of the procedures, he and the
mayor could not give the Hunts any estimate of how
much those consultants would cost. "All future appli-
cants will have to pay," said Donohue, as the city now
has a good idea of what the consultants will charge.
"Well, 1 still don't like it," replied Conoly, but he


-,1 N
"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer .
this side of Heaven."
- iaiss 5luffu -
Pat Geyer, Proprietress OPEN 11-8 Closed Tues
59TH & MARINA DR. HOLMES BEACH 778-2501


, - i- . . -


S I -


^gL .?Pit J
,* f i in a i i _: .d ,(m .in
1i i I l I l .- '" i" i

. iilw- .' i. ,' .
Lm ',I,- . .- .


jH Col9s


Early Bird 3-Course
PrixFixe $19.95
5:00 5:30 PM


....I .1.., ,


EAT-IN OR 00
TAKE-OUT $10 OFF
I r>, ,e Any Size Pizza I
S FREE DELIVERY!

I OOMA PIZZA
I, & I'TIrLIAN IREIST'I TTRANT
Specializing in Veal Chicken Fish Pasta
Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
"1 Open 7 Days. 11AM to Midnight
i i 1 201 N. Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach
L 778-0771 or 778-0772 .




-_ -- 12.
Market Grille

SERVING GOURMET MEALSf
*`vVEEKLY BUSINESS CARD DRAWING*
Authentic Mexican .uRward-Winning Key Lime
Pie & Crabcakes Fresh Gtltf Seafood
Chowders Stews Quiche
Lobster Tails Prime Rib
Beer Wine Desserts
EAT IN, CALL AHEAD, PICKUP OR DELIVERY
We're really cooking!

",l1, vIs Daily Specials
All Occasion Catering

1701 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach 778-303 I
OPEN Tues-Sat I IAM-IOPM CLOSED Sun/Mon


Fitting for Anna Maria
I The proposed retail-office-
' residential unit at 303 Pine
.L" i Ave. in Anna Maria won
L,., high praise from planning
Oi.._IOp. and zoning board members
for "fitting" with the city's
!'flll i visioning statement for
. ..f.ii... ._ . architectural design. Draw-
Sing: Courtesy of
II Emily Anne Smith



agreed that future applicants should be charged.
Board members, however, found general favor
with the site plan and architecture.
Board members unanimously voted to recommend
the city commission approve the Hunts' site plan.
Donohue reminded the board that no building per-
mit for the project will be issued by his office until all
required permits and/or approvals from outside agen-
cies such as the Southwest Florida Water Management
District, West Manatee Fire & Rescue District, and the
Manatee County Utilities Department, are received.


Searching for real Beef We lington?





CONTINENTAL '
BISTRO

RUI'iC QnH rd LUIlcli'H Wednesday-Saturday 11 to 2:30
SUlDAY BREAKFAST and lll ICH 8 to 2:30
-ijE _oiNif'C Wednesday-Sunday from 5:30 p.m.
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach -.. 1. 1 c- 72


." .. ,


\\v\h .h:lrr\'skiichl .' triiln






Robler-Boyle
wed
Lyn Robler and
Wayne Boyle of
Palmetto are honey-
mooning on a cruise
.<;- "~' to Nassau after their
wedding at the Beach
House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach.
f' I She was surprised by
"" ''"" a visitfrom her
father, Bernie
.*" .& ; Pribish of Chicago,
; l'f? who gave the bride
away. Also joining
S / them were friends
4^_ "' Michelle Kilgore and
4^^ '' Richard Andreen of
g Michigan, who
married at the Beach
Jj< : House thesame
evening.

8:30 a.m. Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island
meeting at Cafe on the Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee Public Beach, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-
0355.
9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rummage sale at St. Bernard
Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
PLEASE SEE CALENDAR, NEXT PAGE


Ocean Star
Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar
Beer Wine Sake
Lunch Mon-Fri 1130.2
Dinner Mon-Thurs 5-10
SFri & Sat 5-11
Sun 5-930

3608 East Bay Drive 778-1236 IBetween Publix and Ace Hardware)


Kilgore-Andreen wed







Wednesday, June 2
7 to 8 a.m. Pier regulars meeting at the Anna
Maria City Pier, 100 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria. Informa-
tion: 778-7062.
W 3232 ast Bay Drive
Next to Walgreens
778-7878

I 'NYA Y99I1
FOOT-LONG |
I IS
SUBS .. ir, this coupon.
Val-d thru 06/08/04

L ,. ...'

iBradenton's
nicki's "est Kept Secret"
Entertainment Nightly
Happy Hour
Uwest 59th Sunset Specials

tb ob 3-G(3o-ut&Ww StW-nvewt Sl o oUai
Monday Saturday 11 lam-6pm Starting at $7.95
First Course: Soup or Salad
Second Course: Entree (Items such as sirloin steak,
coconut shrimp, broiled snapper, lamb shank,
BBQ ribs, catfish, crab cakes and more ...)
Third Course: Dessert choice of two daily!
This menu is perfect for parties small or large.
0ItJ330 59th Street West 795-7065.
S ", t St W\N just north of Blake Hospital in Blake Par3.
'-n"oburs: Mon-Sat 11-11 Sun 5-9 ,,


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Kitchen 11:30am-10pm Full Bar 11:30am til late nite
Full food and liquor service
and daily Specials that'll
BLOW YOU AWAY!
778-5788 5346 Gulf Drive, in the S&S Plaza


a.p. BeLL fiSH compaNyiNc.

Fresh Seafood Since 1910
Great selection of locally caught
Grouper, Snapper, Shrimp,
Panfish and much more.
o Planning a fishing trip? Call about our
0o big selection of frozen bait!
DISCOUNT PRICES EVERYDAY,
See you at our docks!

794-1249
",1 l 400 124th St. W.
S.? ....Cortez, Florid.- .
m--i-..~.... .


Th-e Islander Since 1992


PAGE 18 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M THE ISLANDER


9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Saturday, June 5
Sunrise to noon Nature walk at Felts Audubon
Preserve, 4600 24th Ave. E., Palmetto. Information:
518-4431.







Calendar
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18
Information: 778-4769.
9 a.m. to 5p.m. Islandwide blood drive at Ma-
rina Pointe Realty and A Pine Avenue Salon, 314 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria; The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach; Beach House Restaurant, 200 Gulf
Drive N., Bradenton Beach. Donations benefit: Anna
Maria Island Community Center, Wildlife Education
Rehabilitation of Anna Maria, West Manatee Fire and
Rescue Volunteers and Anna Maria Island Privateers.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hurricane Preparedness and
Safety Expo at the DeSoto Square Mall, 303 U.S. Hwy.
301 Blvd. W., Bradenton. Information: 749-3070, ext.
6837.
10:30 a.m. Wild bird training class at the Peli-
can Man's Bird Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thompson
Pkwy., Sarasota. Information: 388-4444.

Sunday, June 6
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Islandwide blood drive at
Marina Pointe Realty and A Pine Avenue Salon, 314
Pine Ave., Anna Maria; The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach; Beach House Restaurant, 200
Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach. Donations benefit:
Anna Maria Island Community Center, Wildlife Educa-
tion Rehabilitation of Anna Maria, West Manatee Fire
and Rescue Volunteers and Anna Maria Island Priva-
teers.
10:15 a.m. Gulf Coast Writers meeting at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 778-7732.

Monday, June 7
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Vacation Bible School begins


at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-1813. Fee applies.

Tuesday, June 8
1 to 4 p.m. Veterans service officer at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Appointments: 749-3030.
2 to 3 p.m. "Florida Citrus: The Big Squeeze"
children's program presented by Travis Seawright at
the Island Branch.Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 778-6341.

Wednesday, June 9
9 a.m. Horseshoe games at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
Noon to 2:45 p.m. Swim lessons with Jerry Cole
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee
applies.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Ongoing:
Vacation Bible School at Gloria Dei Lutheran
Church, 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, through
June 11. Information: 778-1813. Fee applies.
Watercolor paintings of Gulfport artist Donna
Taylor at Island Gallery West, 5368 Gulf Drive N.,
Holmes Beach, through June 19. Information: 778-
6648.
Swim lessons with Jerry Cole at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria, through June 29. Information: 778-1908. Fee

ALL PINE AVENUE
NEW! GENERAL STORE
307 PINE AVENUE ANNA MARIA
779-9200



COffee and

Muffin or Danish

$125
Valid 7 to 9am Wed. 6/2 thru Tues. 6/8
Wine Beer Grocery Deli Open 7 Days


Where the locals bring their friends!

CAFE ON THE BEACH
TACO & FAJITA BUFFET
Evejipesday 4pm-8pm All-You-Can-Eat

1 $ $ 95 Music by
6 R ie Boyd


*f)uj *erman buffet


Draft Beer
S* ***


FISH
with fries an
All-you-can-ea


4:30-8 pm Thursday June 3
SKnockwurst Bratwurst Carved Pork Loin
Pork & Sauerkraut Potato Pancakes
German Potato Salad
Vegetables and Dessert

S8PL95

$1.75 Music by Tom Mobley
see.. .... O~ 7 :.



T: AII-YOU-CANEAT
FRY PANCAKE BREAKFAST
d slaw 7-12 AM- Weekdays
at $8.95 7-1 Weekends
All-U-Can-Eat Pancakes
e and Sausage $4.95
0 Early Bird 7-9am
Monday-Friday $3.95


OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK BEER & WINE
Casual Inside Dining or Heated Outdoor Patio Dining
Plenty of Parking Fishing/Observation Pier
Live Entertainment Wednesday thru Sunday
On, hraIiliIA l M (iit,'w 11 i wIren'A M naItee A I '. 'n,/Is.a n 1/ 1 (the I ( //ll /e',gi nI.'
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-0784

Vist ur oq ina eac Lcaton


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 19
applies.
Oil and acrylic paintings by Joan Valenza at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, through June 30. Information: 778-6341.
Power Yoga for Kids with Cindy Phillips at the
Island Fitness Center, 5317 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach,
through July 8. Information: 778-5446. Fee applies.
Retrospective exhibit by Florida photographer
Clyde Butcher at the South Florida Museum, 201 10th
St. W., Bradenton, through August. Information: 746-
4131. Fee applies.
"Road Trip to Mars and Beyond" summer camp
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria, through Aug. 6. Information:
778-1908. Fee applies.

Upcoming:
Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce Hurricane
Party at the Longboat Key Hilton June 10.
AARP driver safety course at the Island Branch
Library June 10 and 11.
Volunteer recruitment coffee at Mote Marine
Laboratory June 15.
"Get Hooked on Boats and Fishing" children's
program at the Island Branch Library June 15.



Capalbo's,

House of Pizza

Buffet Special

I with the 0
S3 JJ purchase of
3 a soft drink.
I
792-5300 10519 Cortez Rd. W.
Mon.-Sat. 11am-1Opm Sun. 12pm-9pm
PLEASE PRESENT COUPON Expires June 30, 2004
L----------------J


I. EUPHEMIA'S ROAST DUCKLING A complimentary
glass of Pinot Noir and tossed greens in a grain
mustard vinaigrette will accompany each order
of Euphemia's Roast Duckling. ................ $29.50
II. SPICY SHRIMP OR CHICKEN CAESAR Signature
Caesar salad topped with char-grilled
jumbo spicy shrimp or chicken breast
served with a glass of complimentary
Pinot G rig io. ................. ......................... $17.5 0
III. PRx FIXE- $29 per person.
All prix-fixe dinners include a melior of Venezuelan coffee,
decaf or tea and choice of dessert from Euphemia Haye's
award-winning dessert display.
*Sunday
Caesar Salad Grecian Lamb Shank Potato du Jour
or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
Monday
Spinach and Arugula Salad Chicken Parmesan Garlic
Angel Hair Pasta or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
Tuesday
Black Bean or White Bean Hunlus Pistachio Crusted
Yellowtail Snapper on Key Linlme Jaleperio Beurr'e Blanc
with Rice Pilaf
Weednesday
Spring Mix of Greens with Grain Mustard Vinaigrette
Prime Sirloin and Tenderloin Tips Marsala White Rice
or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
Th ursday
Chefs Pate Fresh Horseradish-Crusted Salmon with
Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce Potato du Jour
or Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
First come, first serve seating.
Tax and aratuitv not included. No substitutions.


SCHNITZELHAUS
The Best German Restaurant on Florida's West Coast
FRIDAY SPECIAL NEW NEW NEW NEW
Oven-Fresh Thursday and Friday
Bavarian Haxen FISH SPECIALS
Reservations a must! 778-1320
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 5-9:30PM
Anna Maria Island Centre 3246 E. Bay Drive Holmes Beach


I DiySeil I






PAGE 20 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M THE ISLANDER


Trying to reason with hurricane season ... again


For a state with such a temperate climate, Florida
seems to have an awful lot of different seasons.
Tourist season.
Stone crab season.
The annual mullet run.
The May-and-October time for locals only al-
most.
And, of course, hurricane season.
The Atlantic and Caribbean storm season began
June 1. Predictions by the august Dr. William Gray and
the National Hurricane Center indicate we're in for
more storms than usual, with more of them intense
rather than average.
- Residents of barrier islands are especially vulner-
able to high winds and flooding. Just look at what hap-
pened to Anna Maria Island Sept. 14, 2001, when
Tropical Storm Gabrielle blew past with minimal
winds and waves and left many of us without electric-
ity for four to five days. It wasn't even a true hurricane.
The Islander's annual hurricane section is included
in this edition. Veteran Islanders know the drill: Leave.
dammit; get plenty of batteries, flashlights; stock up on
canned goods and lots of water; make sure you've got
a plan so friends and family can get in touch: and stay
calm.
New residents should be sure to pay attention to the
details included in the section, especially the insurance
aspects. Now is really the time to make sure you have
adequate coverage for your home and its contents. Take
a few minutes to review your policy and update the
coverage as needed;
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles Bronson has offered a
few new twists to hurricane season preparedness that
really do hit home.
"Many people are diligent about stocking up on
batteries, non-perishable food and water in the event of
a hurricane," he said, "but there are other critical steps
that must be taken to prevent loss of life and property."
Some of this information may be redundant, but
Bronson has gleaned a few new ideas for us all to keep
in mind. His highlights include:
Turn off the propane tank service and shut-off
valve on all appliances before you evacuate.
Have all appliances inspected after you return if
you think they've been flooded.
Stock up on foods that need no preparation to eat.
Any food that is not canned should be disposed
of if there has been even the threat of flooding.
Bleach every cooking surface, can of food, appli-
ance or cookware before using it if your house has been
flooded.
Figure out how much potable water you think
you'll need, then double it.
Store lawn chemicals and fertilizers off the
ground and as far away from floodwaters as you can.
Think about this one for a minute: You've got how
many pounds of yard stuff in your garage? Multiply
that by how many houses on the Island. The floods
come, and how much of all of that gunk is going to end
up in Anna Maria Sound or the Gulf of Mexico to hang
out with our turtle and dolphin friends?
Be sure all pets have got I.D. tags on them, and
add the vaccination lists to your "documents to bring"
package.
If your critters are anything like mine, they freak
out in even a thunderstorm a hurricane will drive
'em crazy and the thought of chasing down a flooded
street after an un-collared pet isn't high on anybody's
to-do list. Consider keeping your pets leashed during
a storm.
Add a pet-survival kit to your evacuation pack-
age, with food, water and medications good for at least
two weeks.
Make arrangements now for boarding your pets
during any Island evacuation. Human shelters don't


take pets, and lots of hotels are iffy about having crit-
ters. Check out what you can and can't do now.
Florida law doesn't allow for price gouging dur-
ing a disaster. That means that excessive prices for
food, ice, water, gasoline, lumber and even lodging is
illegal. Bronson said that any question on such activi-
ties should be reported immediately by calling 1-800-
HELPFLA.
Post-disaster scams are rampant. Check refer-
ences on any contractor doing work for you either
through the state or local building officials.
There are also lots of "charity scams" that start up
to help the so-called needy after a storm. Make sure
you're writing a check to an organization that you've
checked, never to an individual.

Got flood insurance?
Everyone does know that you need a separate flood
insurance policy to handle water damage, don't you?
Maybe not, based on a study by the Allstate Insur-
ance Company, which indicates that something like
750.000 homes in coastal hurricane states didn't have
proper flood insurance.
According to the company. 22 percent of the hur-
ricane-related claims in 2003 were for water damage.
The average flood-insurance claim during Hurricanes
Isabel and Claudette last year was $18,727, and Allstate
officials offered this somewhat no-brainer question:
"H-lomeowners need to ask themselves if they could
afford that expense without flood insurance."
Dig out your insurance policies and check them,
please.

Trim time
On Day 3 after Tropical Storm Gabrielle knocked
out all our power, I found myself standing out in the
street talking to neighbors when a power company
crew brought in from North Carolina came by.


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Visitors, police and Islanders gave it their desper-
ate best, but a dolphin was too severely wounded to
survive. It died in their arms.
The spotted black dolphin was seen to be in trouble
in Gulf waters just off 33rd Street, Holmes Beach, Sun-
day, May 30, and Leslie Fry and Robert Oliver
struggled to keep it afloat until help arrived.
A Holmes Beach police patrol boat couldn't come
into the shallow water, but the officer radioed head-
quarters to alert rescue agencies. The dispatcher called
Suzi Fox, Turtle Watch director who handles stranded
turtles.
Fox arrived with turtle rescue equipment and took
a sheet out to the two rescuers, hoping to keep the ani-
mal wet and prevent sunburn. They held its breathing
hole above water despite the dolphin's weakening
struggles.



FUN COAST MARINE
2903 B 9th St. W., Bradenton
It's where you'll find
Certified Sea-Doo Tech
[and island resident]
CHRIS REMIG
Call Chris for all your
Sea-Doo service needs!
747-4779


"Jeez, look at all the trees in the power lines," one
guy said. We all looked up and, sure enough, branches
had pretty much entwined the power lines.
"You should have had all that cut back a long time
ago," the guy said, shaking his head.
Perhaps it's time to do a little judicious pre-hurri-
cane season tree trimming around your property to
avoid power loss or to prevent a fire, eh? And call
FP&L to trim near power lines.

Eat more wild Florida shrimp!
"Florida shrimpers are suffering from the abun-
dance of foreign shrimp coming into the United
States," according to the Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services, and the federal govern-
ment has approved a "fishery disaster assistance fund-
ing" to the tune of $7 million last year to help consum-
ers become more aware of Florida shrimp.
As if we don't all love those little guys anyway.
"Shrimp is the most popular and valuable seafood
in the United States and hundreds of species are har-
vested from freshwater and saltwater," according to the
state, which said there are four species of commercial
value in the Gulf, with pink shrimp being the most
common.
Pink shrimp found along the Atlantic coast are
usually brown; those found along the northern Gulf
coast are often lemon-yellow; and those found in the
Florida Tortugas are pink. White shrimp are grayish-
white with a green, red or blue tinge on the tail and legs.
Royal red shrimp are usually deep red but are some-
times grayish pink.
Most shrimp spawn offshore in deep water from
early spring through early fall. Young shrimp are car-
ried by currents into coastal estuaries to mature. In
Florida, shrimp are harvested with trawls which are
cone-shaped nets towed along the bottom in waters
near shore. Turtle excluder devices and by-catch reduc-
tion devices are used, as required by law, to minimize
the capture of non-target marine turtles and fish.
I'm getting hungry. Got shrimp?

Sandscript factoid
Shrimp are sized and sold by count, or the number
of shrimp per pound, either whole or headless. For
example, headless shrimp of 16-20 count means there
are 16 to 20 headless shrimp per pound. Counts for
headless shrimp range from under 10, the largest
shrimp, to 300-500, the tiniest.


Police officers helped Mote Marine Laboratory
rescuers through the heavy Sunday traffic. Dr. Charles
Manire, Mote veterinarian, and his crew got the dol-
phin aboard their rescue truck.
It stopped breathing about this point, said Fox, and
Manire swiftly supervised getting it onto a stretcher and
back into the water. "He injected it to get its heart beat-
ing again," Fox said. "But we were just too late and our
dolphin was too sick."
Fox said there was a five-inch gash in the dolphin's
side under its dorsal fin, a "cookie cutter" kind of
wound made by something Fox and Manire couldn't
identify. They did rule out the usual culprits, boat pro-
pellers and sharks.
"I could see the muscle tissue," Fox said. "It should
have been red and it was white. That tells me the dol-
phin had lost a lot of blood or was anemic, maybe from
infection from the wound."
PLEASE SEE DOLPHIN, NEXT PAGE



Anno a3ario XsloanTes


Moon Date
FM Jiu 2
Jun 3
Jun 4
Jun 5
Jul 6
Jun 7
Jun 8
1.0Q Ji 9


AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM
1.29 1.5 4:12 1.4 10:52a* 2.8 6:38
11:31 2.9 7:33
12:16 3.0 8:29
- 1:08 2.9 9:28
2:07 2.8 10:22
- 3:13 2.5 11:17
7:37 1.5 9:38 1.4 4:25 2.3 -
7:52 1.6 12:03 0.1 5:42 2.0 11:37a*


LOW
-0.5
-0.6
-0.6
-0.5
-0.3
-0.1
1.3


. Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


Wounded dolphin beached



in Holmes Beach, dies





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 E PAGE 21


Tarpon time is here at last off Anna Maria Island

By Capt. Mike Heistand Holmes Beach out of Catchers said he's catching per-
Big news this week is that tarpon have finally l mit, cobia, a few kingfish and mackerel in the Gulf, and
started to show up in force, but aren't responding to reds and trout in the bays.
hookups just yet with only a few catches being re- Capt. Matt Denham out of Catchers said he's
ported. catching amberjack to 50 pounds, red grouper to 25
Inshore action features lots of big trout and catch- w. .. pounds, a few American red snapper and mangrove
and-release snook. -- snapper, plus gag grouper to 15 pounds.
Out in the Gulf of Mexico, the best reports are for Capt. William Wimpy told me he jumped a sail-
mackerel, with some cobia roaming around and a few fish just 30 miles off Anna Maria Island last week, and
big amberjack being caught farther out. also caught lots of grouper and snapper.
Capt. Thorn Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez Capt. Ray Markham on the Flat Back said he
Road said he's been catching some big trout, a few had mixed action last week, with lots of catch-and-re-
keeper redfish and some catch-and-release snook. lease snook, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, small gag
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said off- f grouper, black seabass, and a few flounder, plus some
shore action includes good catches of amberjack, snap- / redfish in the Terra Ceia Bay area.
per and grouper, and the pelagic species are starting to 4 Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
move closer to shore: dolphin, wahoo and even a few A\ Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's put his
billfish are being caught out in the Gulf. r charters onto bonita to 10 pounds, mackerel and lots of
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said Spanish both lane and mangrove snapper. Grouper fishing is
mackerel, redfish and jacks are coming to the pier fish- still stable, Capt. Sam said, and he's finding a few co-
ers. Tarpon are finally being spotted rolling by almost bia hanging around.
daily, but there haven't been any hookups yet, and there Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
is a lot of bait under the pier. Annie's said he's catching mackerel off the beaches
Cliff Alcorn at the Anna Maria City Pier said and big trout in the bays. He's also caught some red-
fishers there are catching a lot of mackerel and a couple B fish to 27 inches and catch-and-release snook.
of keeper cobia have been caught in the past few days. On my boat Magic, we've caught several trout of
Tarpon are starting to show up at the pier, too, with one 20 inches or better, some up to 25 inches long, plus
hookup that got away. catch-and-release snook to 31 inches, redfish to 27
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said inches, a few mangrove snapper and flounder to 18
trout are coming on strong in Terra Ceia Bay, big jacks Look Ma, first fish! inches in length.
are coming through the cut and a few redfish are being John David Thompson, 3, holds up the first-ever fish Good luck and good fishing.
caught near the docks in the bays. he has caught, a mackerel, off the Island. Moni Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year-plus fishing guide.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business out of Laura said "he was sooo proud and wanted me to Call him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing report. Prints
Catchers Marina in Holmes Beach said he's been send in his picture!" Way to go! and digital images of your catch are also welcome and
having motor problems, but when he was able to get may be dropped offat The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
out he caught lots of mackerel, snapper and permit ers are catching trout to 24 inches and a few redfish on Holmes Beach, or e-mailed to news@islander.org. Please
from the Gulf, and snook, redfish and trout in the back- the outgoing tides. Boaters are still reporting lots of include identification fbr persons in the picture along with
water. mackerel, small sharks and snapper coming off the ar- infoiJmation on the catch and name and phone number
At the Perico Island Bait and Tackle, wade fish- tificial reef systems. for more information. Snapshots may be retrieved once
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in they appear in the paper.

Wild bird rescue class
is Saturday morning A nice try
A training class in rescuing wild birds is Leslie Fr
planned for 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 5, at the Oliverfht
Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary, 1707 Ken Th- ', Olver
.... to keep a
ompson Pkwy., Sarasota, on city Island off the
south ramp of the New Pass Bridge to wounded and
Saying spotted
Longboat Key. The class is free and open to ba doi n
anyone over 18. ba l i
The sanctuary said it also needs volunteers afloat off
in several of its activities, with details available 33rd Street in
i ;Holnes
at 388-4444. Beach.Ho
Beach.
Islander
Dolphin dies off Island Photo:
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 ; Courtesy
It was a nasty moment for everyone, she said. Suzi Fox
Oliver was here from the Orlando area on vacation, and
Fry had just driven here from Michigan and had gone
to the beach for a nap.
"I'll tell you," Fox said, "holding that lovely young
animal in my arms while it was taking its last breath
was hard." L

r/eat TOpWINGa
LcPfe expe FOR MEMBERS

S$35UNTIL NOON
Captain Steven Salgado GREEN FEE AND CART
INSHORE $2750 Noon-4:30 756-3422, L c .
SPORTFISHING GREEN FEE AND CART
CHARTER BOAT 1$8 Twilightl4:3lpm Capt. Mikes a0 D
Owner/Operator ^TAX




Custom-buiat~riva tee isadeSnook RedfishT* Trout Flounder Mackerel* Snapper D design Build Perm hitting
Light Tackle Fishing Reservations a must
Fishing License, Ice, Bait & Sales Serice Supplies
Tackle Furnished Tackle, bait, ice, fishing license provided!
AnFia nn a 779-9607 l..a792-5322n :Sae
778-9712 j Capt. Mike Heistand USCG Licensed 12044 Cortez Rd., W. CRC049564






PAGE 22 1 JUNE 2. 2004 U THE ISLANDER


Playoff win adds exclamation to girls' softball season


By Kevin Cassidv
lslanltder Correspondent
A o-3 Island Family Physicians win over the
Bradenton Elks on Saturday, May 22, culminated a
fantastic softball season for the 10-and-under Island
girls. They finished the regular season on top of their
division with a 15-2 record before sweeping two play-
off games to claim the postseason title.
In the title playoff game, IFP jumped on top of the
Bradenton Elks for five runs in the bottom of the first.
Hailey Dearlove and Martine Miller led off with
singles and, after moving up the bases on a passed ball,
Dearlove scooted home with IFP's first run of the game
on an RBI ground-out by Emma Barlow. A single by
Ally Titsworth brought Miller across the plate, while
hits by Ashley Waring and Paige Morris were sand-
wiched around Molly McDonough's grounder that got
booted for an error to produce runs by Titsworth, War-
ing and McDonough effectively putting the game
out of reach of the Elks.
The game was out of reach largely because IFP
pitchers Barlow and Dearlove limited the Elks to only
two hits and three unearned runs. Barlow started and
pitched to seven batters, allowing one hit and two runs
before giving way to Dearlove with no outs in the sec-
ond. Dearlove allowed only one run the rest of the way
to close the game out.
Titsworth went 2-for-2 with one run scored to pace
the IFP offense, which also received a single and one
run scored from Dearlove, Miller, Barlow and Waring.
Morris and Kristi Wickersham each contributed singles
to the offense, while McDonough added one run scored
in the victory.
The playoffs were a continuation of the accom-
plishments that IFP had during its regular season. That
is, they won games because they had a timely offense
and played tough defense behind a trio of talented
pitchers. Titsworth, Barlow and Dearlove made Coach
Julie Dearlove's job much easier. If one of them was
off her game, having two other pitchers available that
could throw strikes proved to be invaluable.
Barlow and Dearlove led the team with six wins
apiece with Barlow throwing 21 innings and Dearlove
pitching 24 innings. Titsworth added five wins in 24
innings of mound work for the IFP team.
IFP received strong defensive play from a variety
of players who got a chance to play more than one
position in the field. Miller played first base along; with
Titsworth, who also played third or outfield when she
wasn't pitching, while Kelly Guerin, Waring, Kristi
Wickersham, Savannah Schield and Dearlove logged
time at second base and in the outfield.
Nicole Botero, Guerin and Morris handled the hot
corner, while Barlow was the primary shortstop. When
she pitched, Dearlove ably filled in for her.
McDonough was the catcher in all 19 games and made
several outstanding plays at home during key moments
in a couple of close games.
Offensively IFP was led by Titsworth and Barlow,
who led the team in hits while compiling a hefty .780
on-base percentage. Botero, Guerin and Dearlove fol-
lowed with a .630 on-base percentage while
Wickersham, McDonough, Morris and Schield each
had key hits during their playoff run.
"We had a great year because we had a great group
of girls," stated Coach Dearlove. "These girls have a lot
of talent and were able to dominate the league because
of their athletic ability."
Coach Dearlove went on to say that IFP had good
support from parents and coaches like Steve Titsworth
and Ron McDonough. Coach Titsworth served as the
"ball four" pitcher during games, while Coach
McDonough pitched batting practice and coached first
base for IFP.
Congratulations to all of the players, parents and
coaches.

Anna Maria Center day
at the Trop is tops
Nose bleeds and vertigo issues aside, Anna Maria
Island Community Center day at Tropicana Field in St.
Pete was a blast for a couple of reasons. No. I, the
Center earned $2,100 for selling 300 or so tickets a
crowd of fans for the May 30 game against the New
York Yankees. No. 2- No. I as far as this writer is
concerned is the fact that the Devil Rays came away
with an exciting 7-6 victory in front of 26,000-plus
fans, including the resident Yankee fans who somehow


Island Family Physicians catcher Molly McDonough was behind the plate for each of the 19 gaines that IFP
played this season.


..d.i
h Qt,


Jimmy Stewart got to throw out the first pitch thanks
to the generosity and support fronl his Manatee
Adult Baseball League members. Stewart, who was
recently diagnosed with liver cancer, sold 82 tickets
to his baseball buddies.

flip to become Rays fans if the Rays pull out a win.
Last but not least is the fact that while the Island
was teaming with tourist beachgoers, broiling in the 94-
degree heat, the people who took in the game were
basking in 72-degree comfort, enjoying good stadium
food and drink and an exciting game that saw the Rays
hit three home runs two by Aubrey Huff in a 7-
6 triumph that knocked the Yankees out of first place.
No. I ticket seller Jimmy Stewart threw out the
first pitch to Raymond the Rays' mascot and threw it
right down the pike for a strike while the hundreds of
Islander fans that made the trip all seemed to have a
great time.
As for the nose bleeds and vertigo, that is attributed
to our seats in Section 302 which is the third level up
directly behind home plate. Though the view from the
seats (way) up there isn't bad, I'm much more comfort-
able in my usual spot, 20 rows up from the Rays dug-
out.
A big thanks to Scott Dell and Andy Jonatzke of
the Center for the invitation and tickets and a big thanks


Izzy, Giorgio and Raul Gomez enjoyed Anna Maria
Island Community Center Day at the Trop.


to the Devil Rays and Barry Jones who helped put the
trip together and arranged for pre-game field passes and
a game photographer's pass. My sister-in-law Erin
Canniff, who accompanied me to the game, was just a
little excited to be that close to Yankee shortstop, lady-
killer Derek Jeter.

AMI Little League season awards
The Anna Maria Island Little League held its sea-
son-ending awards ceremony on Monday, May 24, at
the Center. Kyle Bellinger won the Joe Maggio MVP
for his strong all-around play. He batted close to .400
while also serving as one of the primary pitchers for
first-place Duncan Real Estate.
Duncan teammate Cory Wash won the Lou
Fiorentino Award for leading the majors in batting with
a robust .509 average, while WMFD's Wyatt
Easterling captured the rookie of the year award.
Island Lumber's Cameron Ellsworth won the cov-
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M PAGE 23


Sports
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22
eted Bill Ogden Sportsmanship award to culminate the
awards ceremony.

Ultimate Frisbee
Ultimate Frisbee is at the Center. If you're not fa-
miliar with the game, it's an exciting non-contact sport
played by thousands of people around the world. It
mixes the best features of sports such as soccer, basket-
ball, football and netball into a simple-yet-exciting
game.
The simplicity of the rules means it's easy and fun
for newcomers to play. Pick-up games will be made
with 5-7 players. Bring your friends and get ready to
experience Ultimate Frisbee!
Cost is $5 per player per day. For more informa-
tion, contact the Center at 778-1908.

Roller hockey starting at Center
Starting June 5, and continuing every Saturday
until Oct. 30, the Center gym will be open for roller
hockey. Cost per player will be $35 which includes 22
Saturday.
Players are responsible for providing their own
hockey sticks and protective equipment, which consists
of a helmet, elbow and knee pads and wrist guards.
Drills will be taught before each game in three age
divisions. Players ages 9-11 will have the gym from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m., ages 12-13 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and 13-
16-year-olds will play 3-5 p.m.
For more information, call 778-1908.


Island Family Physicians
Front left to right, Kelly Guerin, Ally Titsworth. Emmna Barlow and Savannah Schield; standing left to right,
HaileY Dearlove. Nicole Botero, Aslley Waring, Molly McDonough, Kristi Wickersham and Paige Morris.
Not pictured: Martine Miller.


Unique mortgages for
unique individuals.
S To find the right mortgage for you, call your
Chase Home Finance Mortgage Specialist today.
Pat Shahinian
1450 59th Street W Bradenton, FL 34209 0 CHASE
(941) 761-9808 or (800oo) 559-8025
ki: ons are ubj~i to creli! .0! picpets .ippcovl. Pro'am telms aid codi!laws a'e StCl 10t diante
vtlliit) noiC. 't1 lI produces a(e a siiable in all slates o or s al! lc a anscun:s. Othe resltioa a
i*ntat:.r .-' v1. I: I, :. rilxl, o l thr',r:h Chise Manltallia n Mctgj9ae Corpolrtiol
i'" MMC") , i..... : r :..* Ti.m ll Str t, Edison. New jery- 08837;
(732) 205-0600. 204; i P .i.'ia C.j & Co.' i Rl s'w- R? id. C.C4 620 C''


/-N~ ix ...


zz -I r


Not just another real estate broker. We specialize with
buyers who invest in residential and commercial p.
together with our affiliated offices in the UK, O
also offer business opportunities for immigration
Residential Real Estate
Commercial Real Estate
Property Management -
Immigration Consultant
Mortgage Consultant






3320F : -Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Pboi, 779-04 1 Fax 926-9297, E-mail: info@gulfislandrealty.biz


AsK the expert

We've got 10 top reasons for yo
to advertise in The Islander, pro
success stories, a targeted m
and expert advice for achieving s.
Ask the experts with 11 years ded
service to Anna Maria Islan


The Islander


Call Nancy or Rebecca to arrange a (/ f(-f7) W Rs '
visit to your business 778-7978. Rebecca Barnei( Nar


r-VPM
VACATION
-e PROPERTY
i MANAGEMENT
F I INCORPORATED
HARRIET SOTO Now's a great time to
International Sales Diretor purchase a7 vacation!
20 yeam experience
1501 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach. FL 34217
(941) 779-2800 Fax (941) 778-9382 800-544-2164
h.soto vacalionet corn


EXECUTIVE ISLAND HOME


.: This custom-built
home is tucked away
..) ."- 'on a Lake La Vista
S. canal on the north end
of Anna Maria. This
one-of-a-kind Island
home is located in a
lllllgorgeous neighbor-
hood. Park-like
grounds, lots of decks,
dream workshop and
RV garage. This
exceptional home has
it all! Offered at
$749,000.

reen
Visit our website "
REAL ESTATE www. reenreal.com
OF ANNA MARIA
778-0455 9906 Gulf Drive ,


-


-- -m


' .. .


--7-7-





PAGE 24 JTUNE 2. 2004 U THE ISLANDER


Final IMS assembly highlights student achievement


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Island Middle School completed its 2003-04
school year with a ceremony highlighting the achieve-
ments of its remaining sixth- and seventh-graders.
IMS shutdown coordinator Larry Fowler said stu-
dents had great opportunities and a lot of fun despite
the worrisome times.
"This is a unique group of students," Fowler said.
"For their maturity alone, I would reward them all."
The last day of school, May 25, was bittersweet for
many IMS students and staff because it was literally the
final day of school at IMS before the school is officially
closed by the Manatee County School Board.
Students left on an uplifting note as the remaining
teachers acknowledged students for making individual
strides as well as those who excelled in physical fitness,
citizenship, the Florida Comprehensive Assessment
Test and perfect attendance.
The Parent-Teacher Organization recognized Ben
Dickson for raising the most money for the school's
"Walk-the-Island" fundraiser. He was given a $50
Wal-Mart certificate.
Music teacher Jimi Gee recognized several out-
standing performers in his beginning and intermediate
bands. Those who ended the year with advanced mu-
sic skills were Cory Wash, T.J. Nuckett, Bailey
Heeman, Chloe Bertrand, Kristen Turner, Marissa
O'Brien, Lesli Price and Laura Mills.
In social studies Chloe Bertrand, Jasper Curry and
Jackie Howell were given citizenship awards.
Demonstrating a strong work ethic in math were
Dale Sexton and Bailey Heeman.
Science teacher Sanford Brousseau cited Kyle Arit,
Chloe Bertrand, Holly Clay, Jasper Curry, Bailey Heeman
Gabby Pace, Marley Auerbach, Michael Freeler, Jackie
Howell and Marissa O'Brien for consistently completing


. ,.. '. T t . , .. '.-, - .


Last staff standing
The final faculty members of Island Middle School include Lori Guerrin, Jim Howarth, Jimi Gee, Sanford
Brousseau, Marilyn Kelly, Ashley Ellis, Mylene Zerr, Larry Fowler, Mark Mason and Ken Kiersey. Not
pictured are Beverly Beaver and CaTina Robles. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


quality work and helping their fellow students.
Ashley Ellis handed out the "survivor" award for
those students who tried hardest to improve in language
arts. Survivor recipients were Kelsey McGary, Dale
Sexton, Corbin Kitchen and Celia Ware.
The art achievement awards went to Ben Dickson,
Stephanie Ferguson and Marley Auerbach.
The award of excellence in physical fitness was
given to Kyle Arit, Gabrielle Pace, Corbin Kitchen and
Jackie Howell for their willingness to participate and
provide good examples to others.


Those who excelled on the FCAT included Jasper
Curry, Jackie Howell, Holly Clay, Marissa O'Brien,
Gabby Pace, Matt Harrod, Jackie Howell, Amanda
Franklin, Brittany Juda and Kyle Arit.
Kristen Turner was singled out for her perfect at-
tendance and Marley Auerbach was chosen by staff as
the recipient of the Anna Maria Island Rotary Club's
"Service Above Self' award.
Finally, IMS founder Marlene West showed her
appreciation for the remaining staff members by pre-
senting each of them with a framed inspirational poem.


INVEST NO FNFTR


Anna Maria I









GEOFFREY WALL, G.R.I. P.A.
Realtor Sales Associate
For your private showing or to.
sell-your property fast call
"Island Aussie Geoff"
Mobile: 941-545-0206
Office: 941-778-0700


-,.1 {, -. ; ,Tii 3:
.2#ds ~i~ri


"-4 ,..,-


i u~' fn k~r ;


Island's Most Prestigious Residential Income Producing Address
--.-T F------ ---r*- '-\ '-A D1- -' ------ VI-'-; -.. "-


..... ... ...' .. --




'Cash Flpw Cash-Flow. Cash Flow Cash Flow Cash Flow -
LAST THREE l'r ''.7 \R.'V!iX1_, F(.r L,.. 1
New in 2003. these imposing Mediterranean vacation villas set the benchmark for Island investing.
Features and Appointments: three double suites, sunken dining area, Maple flooring, imported furnishings
(turnkey], solar-heated pool, widow's walk with views forever and only one block to everything, Incompa-
rable at $879,000 each.
Check out me stellar bookings and management at
www.annamaria.com


* rW


I I.


-GuL-F BEACH VII
IN 'AoV bngDuplex:: :
-'.' fept'. Si'6" Coqfuia Beach
l Bdil.n] 998 B
0- *'Turnkey Furnished
-I' *.New CrpliW nd Tile
il' B .imr6 pFloor i .



at Clt1BFuce Harrison
or Brian Heavrin 941 758-7777 R OMI
View our website: YourManaleeHome.com


-?

B""^
I'
I',


chech oz cIt Thiese
I (sla vA .Pro-pevties


RV/MWi
i i I lll i l


41 rem '
.1,?.41,

, Jh.


J Adirallr ,Jir ,lu,". c,',pr to I u ( lf.. f h ht q jrij iyur hiJdt ,'.lip.
SJc:"1 i i, L CI). (jr in r ':ar brliri-, offuirt

S',ulffri-Iri, 0orir, iri f UIf to t',, .iOrifml<. W alk Io all thf hfu r
p[l:rr':.. El,'r 'tor, |"ool, tr; ',t fhurr,, ;i j jnrj, r j. 5 '_1 C -.


,B Cuirilp l lrr.li rrlnoridild Gulifronr rundr, c ri thp ,'popcorr,
cilinv, rrpliard. ,wIihlw turrrky, furnikhpd. -419,000.

I YVONNE HIGGINS PA.Z[L-O 941-518-9005


I. $1 15C ,OCO-^.
Formal Qualifications
33 Years Experience Same Price
Also Commercial and Tax 1031 Deferred Exchanges
www.AussieGeoff.com
e-mail: islander@AussieGeoff.com

22; East 5a. Dn',, "e n-^.,ise-^- Be?.--


__ _~I___ UII_~ _r I


I -.~--~C~-------.-~p.------------~n~-m~ .~F~-e-S~JF)+~FIB~s~Ps~i~j~~mW~nC~!


Iomm


I --- u


^ -


cjp '


u


I 1 L.11


m, 1


Ew<





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 E PAGE 25

L A N E F I EDS


CREAM SOFA $600; green double sleeper sofa
$300; glass/brass coffee table $75; end table $50;
beige chandelier $50. Call 794-5994.
USED 1200-POUND Mantowoc ice machine with
bin, good condition, works great, $1,650. Call Bill,
795-7411.
GIRL SCOUT COOKIES available at The Islander,
assorted varieties, $3.50 box. All proceeds paid to
local Girl Scout troop.
Fish tank: 150-gallon with hand-made oak cabinet,
fully equipped, $1,000 or best offer. Call Bill,
795-7411.
BOOKS FOR SALE! Come visit Tingley Memorial
Library, 111 Second St. N, Bradenton Beach and
see our ongoing sale of books, magazines and
puzzles. Open Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-3pm.
779-1208.
CAR COVER: Toyota Supra, like new, $50. Call
Bill, 795-7411.
FREE DELIVERY: SEAFOOD to go. Shrimp, crabs,
native fish. Delivered to your door. Call James Lee,
795-1112 or 704-8421.


BICYCLE RENTALS: Tour the Island by bike. Great
weekly rates, includes helmet. Adults, $45/week;
children, $25/week. 778-3441.


DVD AND VHS new for 2004 Tales of Cortez, the
Totch Brown series. Manatees, Panthers, Fish Key
West and more. (800) 852-0662 or
www.videoprojects.tv.
DONATE BLOOD! Your blood donation to the Mana-
tee County Blood Center is worth $100 to participat-
ing Anna Maria Island community organizations. The
blood mobile will be on the Island Saturday and Sun-
day, June 5 and 6. Pick up a card and choose your
charity Anna Maria Island Community Center, Anna
Maria Island Privateers, Wildlife Rehabilitation and
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch. Each blood donation
will generate $100 for participating community orga-
nization. Three sights to donate blood: Marina Pointe
Realty and A Pine Avenue Salon in Anna Maria; The
Islander in Holmes Beach and the Beach House Res-
taurant in Bradenton Beach.
LONGBOAT KEY HISTORY "From Calusas to
Condominiums" by Ralph B. Hunter. Signed copies
available at The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open Tuesday, Thursday,
9:30am-2pm; Saturday 9am-noon. Half-price sales
rack. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.

RUMMAGE SALE SATURDAY, June 5, 9am-lpm.
Everything half-price (except jewelry). St. Bernard
Activity Center, 43rd. St., Holmes Beach.


SELL it fast wtih an ad in The Islander.


MOVING SALE: Friday, June 4, 9am-2pm.
Swarovski, cut glass, curio, Oriental rug, sterling
tea set and flatware, bookcase, king headboard,
pottery, chests, two swivel chairs, twin beds, patio
set, pictures, bar stools, Airdyne bike, planters,,silk
plants, grill, copper wall sculpture, vacuum, /ater-
colors, lamps, books, stereo, televisions, amps,
tools, pressure washer, jewelry, ladies' clothes,
linen and kitchen. 560 Halyard, County Club Shore,
Longboat Key. Sale by Julie McClure.


CRITTER.SITTER nine years in pet care. 24 years
as an Island resident. Lots of TLC for your beloved
pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.
PURE BREED GERMAN Shepherd puppies for
sale. Ready July 2. Nine total, black/cream. $850.
Call (941) 343-9552.
CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!
ADOPT: PIT BULL/BOXER mix puppies, male and
female. Ready for adoption. Please call 922-0774.
ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe on-line with our se-
cure server? Check it out at www.islander.org,
where you can read Wednesday's classified at
noon on Tuesday.
ADULT CATS in desperate need of loving homes.
All are current on vaccines. All applicants
screened. Please call 922-0774.


OLD BRIDG



i4" ~ -


THe Islander


E VILLAGE ON SA

el A Great Place to Live.
A .1 ondcful U vII oJ 1 o '.
.111, 1 l 'l Ir ,. I L -I II [ -.,h. ,lii F .it v 1 .1 1 lh i
1,1 l .i 11 ..I I.l. *- .1 t III I I -l , 1 l l I
i. .. I II. n Im th I ( l .I 1 I .lI_ :W inr .1 lu h11
FLnd, i a]Jin v. ih I..1.11u.i.1 ..1 41i r I Ip
p In .i al a .p., A pri. ate b' '.i 'lip on iht
In z.ca. ,l .\.I t rw i ,i s u. ludi .t. .. II it .t.I h
11 l3 L. n .I t r1u.' inl .'pci pl.ni lit. I i, n' .inJ
L .I. r'. I. p it tIrI lilk 'i,. .n iPI, lIIs( r, IUIIl
r.I aii PI I 'IcA 1 id` I 5- (i, U1)(i.
i^;^; ,,^^ > *^.


RASO


TA BAY
N. s


^8e4714 9/leal &tate, K
SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Ave., Anna Maria FL 34216 PO Box 2150 (941) 778-2291
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

BEACHFRONT

HIDEAWAY





The magical seeing of this charm- *.
Ing 3BR,2BA recently refurbished ,
beachfront cottage is truly unsur-
passed! Sand dunes, sea oats and
shorebirds abound on this most pristine stretch of shoreline located on Anna
Maria's secluded north end. Amenities of this cozy and inviting retreat include
beamed vaulted ceilings of tongue-in-groove knotty pine, built-in bookcases,
sunny Gulfside kitchen with breakfast bar, ceiling fans, comfortable screened
lanai overlooking the ocean and a wonderful split bedroom design
complimented by two beautifully tiled baths with glass blocks and soaking
tub. There are lovely tiled floors, French doors, and lush tropical landscap-
ing enhanced by a brick paved courtyard entry. The spellbinding views of
sea, shore, and sky are the finest to be found this side of paradise! Don't miss
this rare opportunity to live the island dream! Priced at $1,795,000.
VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


One of the biggest names
in mortgages is right in
your own backyard.


of products offered by one of the
nation's top mortgage lenders.
Plus, the knowledge of loan
officers like Ron Hayes who
are familiar with and dedicated
to your local community. I
So, whatever your mortgage RON HAYES
needs fixed rate, adjustable race, jumbo, govern-
ment, call Ron locally for a free consultation at
(941) 761-9808 (24 hours) or (800) 559-8025.

g CHASE i
Monhatton Mortgage Corporation
Z1 -92: -- nllS -'-a = .* 7


ROLANDO RUBI


Mike Norman Realty takes
great pride in welcoming
Rolando Rubi as a Real-
tor with the company.
Rolando was raised in
Bradenton and has re-
4 turned to the area from
) Atlanta. Rolando is fluent in
Spanish and is excited to
give 100% to provide you with professional and
courteous real estate service. To his many friends
he says, "Come in and say hello." We wish
Rolando lots of fun and success!

Mike
Mike 778-6696

Normnan *.^ 1-800-367-1617
Realty 3101 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
WWW. MIKENORMANREALTY.COM


--L I- --






PAGE 26 L JUNE 2, 2004 E THE ISLANDER


P E C tu 0 FISA HI HKI o


NEEDED: A loving home for a young, gray tiger
kitty. Please call, 778-6000.



1998 HONDA CIVIC: 81,000 miles, CD player, elec-
tric windows/locks, five-speed, cruise control, regu-
larly maintained. Asking $5,400. 795-7047.

1990 ECONOLINE 15Q VAN, cold air conditioning,
has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs great.
$2,000, or best offer. 778-1102.



BOAT DETAILING: Interior and exterior. Does your
boat need a good teak job or waxing? I can come to
you. 724-0874.

MODULAR FLOATING DOCK system: Custom
drive-on docking solutions by Versa Dock. Mainte-
nance free, 20-year warranty. (941) 685-7648, Anna
Maria area.

CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!

SEA DOO: GTX 4-TEC 2003 Bombardier, three-
seater, triple crown series edition with tow package
and trailer. $6,500 or best offer. Ben, 778-1736.

SAILBOAT: 16-FT HUTCHINS compact sailboat.
Complete. 778-3359.

SELL it fast wtih an ad in The Islander.





^-9S RIEALTOR.
29Years ofProfessional Serice
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
Experience Reputation Results
AZALEA PARK 3BR/2BA, pool, exclusive listing. $280,000.
5400 GULFFRONT White sand beaches and sunsets.
1BR/1 BA, new paint and carpet. Reduced to $265,000.
MARTINIQUE SOUTH GULF BEACH VIEW 2BR/2BA, bright, light.
attractive decorating, turnkey furnished. Elevator, tennis,
heated pool, cabana. $469,000.
4 UNITS ANNA MARIA Some bayview. One 2BR, three 1BR,
room for pool. Great investment. $870,000.
VACATION, SEASONAL & ANNUAL RENTALS
MARTINQUE Gulffront 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, elevators.
5400 GULFFRONT complex, 1 and 2BRs, pool.
BEACHFRONT 3BR/2BA home, tastefully decorated.
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com www.tdollyyoungreatlestate.com


3224 EAST BAY DRIVE HOLMES BEACH

Gail Tuitewiler

941-705-0227
(Tb_ oll Free 1-866-587-8559 *OPODU
GLEMlTECicRENY GuilT @ol.com tcREPRODU

JUST OVER THE BRIDGE
NORTHWEST BRADENTON Look what your money can buy a few miles off the island in
popular Azolea Park. A beautiful 4BR/2.5BA home with cathedral ceilings, fireplace, inground
pool and party deck with a huge back yard. Only $369,000

GULF FRONT
BREATHTAKING GULFVIEWS From this second floor 2 BR/2BA unit in Anna Maria Island
lub. Heated pool and hot tub, secured entrance. Inside utility room. Turnkey furnished. Great
vacation rental. Small pets wekome. $849,000
ABSOLUTELY STUNNING RENOVATIONS In this direct Gulffront corner unit in Martinique
South. Kitchen redesigned, A/C, windows, doors, furniture.., everything is new! Garage and
extra storage room induded. Amenities include heated pool, clubhouse, secured lobby, tennis
and private beach. $734,000.

CLOSE TO GULF
ISLAND VILLAGE 2BR/2BA unit with newly i that opens to master bed-
room, guest bedroom and living I.o veliest units in the complex.
Complex features lush andsc nis courts. Small pets welcome. S339,000
BAYVIEW TERRACE Your own "beach condo' oy view in this bayfront cnm-
plex just steps to the beach. En' ythe bay and the island lifestyle
for only S204,900. Not ge-r
IMPERIAL HOUSE Spacious 1BR condo in a true Gulf to buy complex. Very well maintained,
recently pointed, turnkey furnished. Amenities include a very social clubhouse, fishing dock and
polio on the boy and o private beach across the rood. All this for S189,000. 55+ community.
CORTEZ VILLAGE
A SINGLE PLUS A DOUBLE lot in the quaint village of Corlez, just over the drawbridge on
124th Street. Zoned commercial (residential permitted). Totol of 150 ft. of road frontage.
$125,000 and $175,000.


EGMONT EXPRESS CHARTERS: Seek out secret
water paradise. Sunsets, back water, Egmont or
custom trips. See dolphins and manatees. Call 778-
7459 or 720-5470.

LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on
the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwa-
ter fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle pro-
vided. 779-9607.



CHILD SITTER AND PET SITTER. Eighth-grade
male looking for a job. Available after school and
weekends. Call Zachary, 779-9783.

NEED A CHILD or pet sitter? Call one number and
get connected to three wonderful sitters! Tiffany,
Kari, Holly. 778-3275 or 779-0793.

BABYSITTER: RED CROSS babysitting and first-
aid certified. Enjoys playing with kids. Call
Alexandra, 778-5352.

SELL it fast wtih an ad in The Islander.

SPENCER'S SKIM SCHOOL for beginners and in-
termediates. Free skimboard use with lessons. $10
per half-hour lesson, three lessons recommended.
Local teen, team competitor. Call 778-0944.

PETSITTER, DOG WALKER, 12-year-old mother's
helper, odd jobs. Call Kendall at 779-9783 or 779-9803.


Si- ".- s4
V 1957 Llf R
MA5 Li.Ui. ALLIATL
FM REALTY ""B
"We ARE the Islano "
9i805 Gull Drive PO Box 8Z5 A"r& Mrra FIonan 342 I,
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.net
Web site www.annamariareal.com


ISLAND INVESTORS:
This is the one! $343,000!
Duplex centrally located on
Gulf Drive with extra-large
frontage for plenty of parking. r
Build out or up for endless .-.
possibilities. Grab it before it's
too lately Owner financing .. -
available. Call Anne Huber @ -
713.9835 TO VIEW.

TRUE BAYFRONT
BEAUTY WITH EXTRA


Let Anne's 15 years
of local experience
work for you!
Call 941-713-9835


fc748=8888
R*A II


BABYSITTER WITH EXPERIENCE and CPR li-
cense, 13 years old, friendly and responsible.
778-2469.

TUTORING: Junior high honor student tutors all
elementary grades during summer vacation. Hourly,
daily or weekly in mathematics, reading, writing and
science. Read-out-loud available upon request. Call
778-2469 after 5pm for schedule and prices.



REAL ESTATE: Tired of paying office fees? Two
experienced agents needed for fast paced, high
traffic Island office. Top splits, sign-on bonus. Call
Wedebrock Real Estate today! "Personalized, not
Franchised". Call Joe Pickett, 383-5543.

DOMINO'S PIZZA: Now hiring delivery driver.
Able to work until 1am for closes. Average pay
$15-$18/hour. Tips and milage. Mileage paid
nightly. Pre-employment drug test and good driv-
ing record a must. Apply 5604 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.

WANTED: PART TIME maintenance person at small
Longboat Key condo association. Call Mark, 756-5540.

HOUSEKEEPERS NEEDED: Part-time days,
mostly weekends. Transportation a must. Call
Rhonda after 5pm, 779-0793.

INTERVIEWING for grounds maintenance position for
condo on Longboat Key. Must have prior experience
and references. Call 383-3571 between 9am-3pm.


Camellia Properties
Vacation Rentals & Property Management
www.camelliaproperties.com
More than 35 Gulffront rentals to choose from.
Call us last! Best rates on the tehcch!




--~L~a-

L.Costa conldoinium Marhellai Condominium
Family Friendly Gulffront Luxury
2-Bedroom Colndomiiniums 2 & 3-Bedroom Condominiulms
One-Week Minimum
Call For Rates and Availability
866-661-6622 or 778-8000







THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2004 0 PAGE 27



HLWATDCS I tu C SEVIE Con i'n


HELP WANTED: Part-time chef/sous chef and
servers. Apply at Ooh La La! Bistro, 5406 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.

JOURNALIST: Part-time reporter sought for city
beat and features writing by The Islander. Must
have journalism education, experience or back-
ground relevant to government reporting. E-mail
resumes to news@lslander.org, fax 778-9392 or
mail/deliver to office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach FL 34217.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. We
need you! Call 778-0492.



MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, cabbage
palms, patio gardens, trimming, clean-up, edgings,
more. Hard-working and responsible. Excellent ref-
erences. Edward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Car Service. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your
computer misbehaving? Certified computer service
and private lessons. Special $30 per hour- free
advice. 545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.


CONNECT-ICON Your local computer specialist.
Experienced certified technician for communication
electronics offers wireless and cable networks, up-
grades, maintenance, repairs, tutoring and training.
Call Robert, 778-3620.







$379,000 ISLAND CONDO
Spacious ground-floor IBR/IBA
end unit at 5400. Steps to beach
and pool. Kitchen with lots of
goodies. Washer/dryer. IB 101731
$425,000- BUILD YOUR ISLAND
DREAM HOME Canalfront
lot available in Holmes Beach!
IB90367
6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.floridamoves.coin





Countrywide Home Loans is close by and ready
to help you get the home of your dreams.

1 Competitive rates
5 Local experts with the power to say "YES" to
your home loan
F Up-front approval* at the time of application
1 As little as no-to-low down payment options
available to make qualifying easier
SFast service of VA/FHA and all loan programs
SConstruction financing available

Pam Voorhees
f Home Loan Consultant
a L 401 Manatee Ave. W. Holmes Beach
pam_voorhees@countrywide.com

SCountrywide
HOME LOANS
(941) 586-8079
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER 2003 COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. TrLADE/SERVICE MARKS ARL THE
PROPERTY OF COUNTRYWIDE FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND/OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES. ADD APPROPRIATE
STATE, LEGAL. UP-FRONT APPROVAL SUBJECT TO SATISFACTORY PROPERTY REVIEW AND NO CHANGE IN
FINANCIAL CONDITION. SOME PRODUCTS MAY NOT DBE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. PRICES AND GUIDELINES
ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. RESTRICTIONS APPLY. Al.L RIGHTS RESERVED.


McEVOY PAINTING: Frank McEvoy owner. Interior
and exterior work. Free estimates. Call 750-8467 or
cell, 713-1208.

COMPUTER SERVICE and repair. Training, main-
tenance, virus and Spyware protection. Island na-
tive. Web site: www.matrixPConline.com. Call John
Baird with Matrix PC, 708-6541.

IMPERIAL TRIM: Carpentry, interior trim, crown
molding, chair rails, baseboards, doors, finish work.
Doug Ewing, 737-9115.

CLEANING SERVICE: Residential or commercial.
Daily, weekly, bi-weekly, move-ins, move-outs.
Excellent references. Call 750-8366.

NOTARY PUBLIC: Civil marriages and renewal of
wedding vows, sunset beach setting or wherever.
Norman R. Veenstra, 778-5834.

BAREFOOT ESTATE MANAGEMENT: Weekly
maid service, deep-cleaning service, vacation
rental cleaning, departure cleaning, carpets, tile,
grout. Servicing private homes, condos, rentals,
seasonal homes and commercial properties.
Bonded/Insured. Free estimates. 761-3000.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance service.
Over 30 years experience, self-employed in construc-
tion trades. "I'm handy to have around." 779-9666.

CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!

AUTO DETAILING by Island native. Only top-qual-
ity products including high powered shop-vac and
buffer. Call about multi-wash packages. 724-0874.

EXPERT CERAMIC TILE installation. Prompt and
reliable service, reasonable rates, excellent refer-
ences. If quality counts, call David, 792-2552.

DISCOVER PILATES: On-going class at Anna Maria Is-
land Art League, 6-7pm Wednesdays, $8/class, drop-ins
welcome. Call 778-2099 for information. Also at G.T. Bray
Activity Center starting March 16. Call 742-5974 for infor-
mation. Certified Pilates Instructor Preston Whaley Jr.


"Dial Debbie Dial"
Realtor
,o c,


Buyers are
staying at our
house, let us


* show them
your house.


RelyIc


WEST OF GULF DRIVE 131 White Ave. Duplex on corner
lot, two-car garage, two carports, screened lanai, lots of
decks, over 3,900 sf. under roof. 150 steps to beach ac-
cess. Just listed at $699,000. For more details call
Stephanie Bell, Broker,778-2307 or 920-5156.
[ HOLMES BEACH TWO
l ~-be. LOTS EACH 70-BY-100-
S-B a (FT., SHORT HALF-
m < BLOCK TO BEACH. One
lot has a duplex and the
other is vacant. Asking
$800,000 for both parcels.
Call Frank Migliore at
778-2307, or Stephanie
Bell 920-5156, for details.



Fo frterinoratoncal r ist s6nlne
L 1-8:0,030 966 782 7
wwwframaxnrelesateco


SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1970


MLS


EYEDESIGN CREATIVE SERVICES. Specializing
in business cards, flyers, postcards, rackcards,
doorhangers, brochures, custom greeting cards,
logos and design services. Phone us 778-2523.

MUSIC LESSONS! Flute, saxophone, clarinet. Begin-
ning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray, 792-0160.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair
and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County and
the Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and
personalized service, call William Eller, 795-7411.
RA005052.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional cre-
ates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 778-2711.

NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing massage
in the comfort of your home. Call today for an ap-
pointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.

SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast
and reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines,
cushions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call Jenifer
Catlin, 727-5873.

TILE AND MOSAIC custom installation, 20 years
experience. References available. For a reason-
able price call Sebastian, 704-6719.

AUTO DETAILING BY HAND Spotless inside and
out. I can save you time and money. Island resi-
dent, references. For pricing call 713-5967.



CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, cleanup, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294.

CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.



i^ IHIf-Bay Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.
778-7244
nf' tfS e &* t "so edt daed4 "

S GULFVIEW CONDO Spa-
cious 1 BR condo with spec-
tacular Gulf views. Move
right in to this turnkey fur-
nished third floor unit in a
wonderful complex located
S west of Gulf Drive. Elevator.
Gulffront pool, covered parking space, secured building. Enjoy your
Gulfview from the living room and bedroom. What a great value at
$417,400! Call today for your private viewing.
ENJOY THE CONVENIENCE
.of this ground-level Gulffront
' I designer-decorated condo.
. i Stroll out your glassed-in lanai
.1 to the pool or pristine beach.
Take the fun to the tennis
courts or bring your own
boat. $649,000.

LARGE HOMEIDUPLEX Bet-
ter than a house! 4BR/3BA
with a pool! Front unit is 3BR/
mi 2* 2BA with an oversized single-
S car garage. Rear unit has been
totally renovated and is a very
large I BR/]I BA with two sets of
French doors leading to the
pool. The pool has been completely renovated plus new landscaping, new
stucco and paint, new fencing, and a new paver entry and patio area for
rear unit. Large 90x100 lot zoned R-2. Offered at $539,900.
PRIME BUILDING LOT75-
... by-106. Build your dream
S home for glimpses of the
S Gulf, endless possibilities.
S .-" Offered at $399,000.



Call Today!
1 (800)771-6043 (941)778-7244
5309 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


I


F






PAGE 28 E JUNE 2, 2004 0 THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
Sandy' Established in 1983
Lawn Celebrating 20 Years of
Se ce quality & Dependable Service.
iCall us for your landscape
778.1345 and hardscape needs.
Licensed & Insured

DESIGN & REMODELING CONTRACTORS
Co nvaiswyC-o ,
CONSiTRUaI"CTO1
WWW.ANNAMARIACONTRACTOR.COM
STATE UC SED & INSURED Ir*A i 778-2993
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED (941) 7782993



Residential Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price. "
Ucensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755


*WAGNERQQEALTY
2217 CULY DQlVE NO ll* DBAWILN) N IEAC(:Ill. rFt L 1742
IIAQOLD SMALL REALTOR
Office: (941) 778-2246 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.comr

Christine's Cleaning Service *747-1715
Commercial & Residential
\ Daily Weekly Bi Weekly Monthly
Move Ins Move Outs Deep Cleans
Licensed Bonded Insured


EXCLUSIVE MULLET SHIRTS
Mlore than a mullet wrapper!



Islander Ts $ica ll1for maii order infolprice.
941-778-7978 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217






Anyone can take~
a picture.
A professional
creates a portrait.


ELKA
PHOTOGRAPHIC


941-778-2711
www.jackelka .com




EAS REND ALNR0 ASI NI
BATHMANANDR 0RB1N PATERR
T ITAN PI A RANGE SHE
SEAT MAMB S N R B A
R RAZ RS FTHE LDVS ARK

DAN N 0 N SA W HETIT SLED
THEBREAKFASTSCRUB
AREA MYRRH GOR ILLAN
GAZETTE 0DETS UNPLU GS
HER NE AHEAP AGEE
PERMS01FENDEARMENTT
PAST SAFER MDS R 0ARAT
OBLADI ABA AMY SSS

T 0 V STAR TSTRAP L IBS
D R E C O1 L A AR WA G EE
A R R AU WISH YI0 U WE RE H A R
T E E NS ASTER MALT TUNSA
ETDD Y S YESES AXIS STE W


KARAZ LANDSCAPE Lawn Service. Mulch, clean-
ups, power washing, tree trimming and more. City
of Anna Maria resident. Cell 448-3857.

CLOUD 9 LANDSCAPING: Quality lawn service,
landscape cleanup, plantings, pruning, tree instal-
lation, shell, more. Insured, references, free esti-
mates. 778-2335 or 284-1568.

BAREFOOT LAWNS & GARDENS: Providing the
total TLC for your landscape requirements. Lawns,
trees, shrubs and gardens. Design, installation and
service. Call 761-3000 for free consultation.

BRADENTON TROPICAL LAWN and garden. Spe-
cializing in landscaping lawns, decks, entryways,
butterfly gardens, ponds. Also, year-round mainte-
nance. 795-2877.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling,
cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 807-1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees. Ir-
rigation. Everything Under the Sun Garden Centre,
5704 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. 778-4441.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-rap,
mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reliable and
insured. 727-5066.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $35/yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free es-
timates. Call Larry at 795-7775, "shell phone"
720-0770.



VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Dan
. Michael, master carpenter. Call 778-6898 or cell,
518-3316.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call Neil,
726-3077.


ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794. Continued

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements Inc.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.


TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 792-1367, or 726-1802.


MASON: 27 YEARS of experience. All masonry
work and repair. Cinderblock work, brick work,
glass block work, paver and brick driveways. Call
Chris, 795-3034. Lic.#104776. Insured.

MORENO MARBLE & TILE Installation and resto-
ration. Quality work. Over 20 years experience. In-
sured. Call Javier at 685-5163 or 795-6615.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR and Lawn Care: Light
carpentry, pressure washing, handyman, plumbing
and electrical, light hauling, tree trimming. Call 778-
6170 or 447-2198.

SIDING AND SOFFIT at a great low price or con-
vert your old screen room to an acrylic room it
looks like a glass room for thousands less! Call
713-SIDE.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Inc Building contractor.
New homes, additions, renovations. Quality work
and fair prices. Call 795-1947. Lic#RR0066450.

WALLS BEAUTIFIED. Drywall fixes, painting inside
and out. Conscientious work. Call Drew Hudson,
812-5073.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more.
Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a free in-
home consultation. Island references, 15 years
experience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


PALM ISLAND WATERFRONT escape. Secluded,
private dock, access by ferry/boat. Fishing, shelling,
wildlife, canoeing. $125/night; $800/week. 778-
8168. www.divefish.com.


SPRING, SUMMER. AUTUMN.r.entals available
weekly, monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Re~tl-stae...
Co., 778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.


VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across
from beautiful beach, $375 to $500/week. Winter
and spring dates available. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, 778-2374.

VACATION & SEASONAL Private beach. Units are
complete. Rates seasonally adjusted. $425-$975/
week, $975-$2,975/month. (800) 977-0803 or 737-
1121. www.abeachview.com.


NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Four spacious
3BR/2BA homes with all conveniences. Now book-
ing for this season. Please call (813) 752-4235, or
view Web site: www.AhhSeaBreeze.com

BEAUTIFUL TROPICAL HOUSE just converted to
a two-unit property. 2BR/1BA, completely reno-
vated and furnished. New washer/dryer, micro-
wave. Three-minute walk to beach. Off season,
$500/week $1,500/month. Call Ron, 795-2656.

VACATION RENTAL: 1 BR/1 BA duplex, three short
blocks to beach. Phone, premium cable TV, micro-
wave, washer/dryer, sleeps four. $1,800/month,
$550/week. Call 807-5627 or e-mail:
aalmengual @ msn.com.

BEACHFRONT: NORTH SHORE Drive, ground-
level all-view home. Bean Point area. $3,500/
month, $1,500/week. Call Tom, (559) 760-1331.

BAYFRONT ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA, tennis,
pool, cable, water/sewer and trash included. Old
Florida Realty Co., 778-3377, or Sharon 778-3730.
BEACHSIDE: NORTH SHORE Drive on the beach
behind our house. Bean Point area. $2,500/month,
$900/week. Call Tom, (559) 760-1331.

ANNUAL 3BR/2BA, washer/dryer hookup, $900/
month; 1BR/1BA, $650/month; 2BR/1BA, washer/
dryer hookup, carport, $850. No pets. Dolores
Baker Realty, 778-7500.

ANNUAL RENTALS 2BR/1 BA house, one block to
beach, $1,100/month; 3BR/2BA, pool, hot tub, one
block to beach, $2,000/month. RE/MAX Excel-
lence, Debbie Thrasher 518-7738, or e-mail:
DebMThrasher@ aol.com.


L IA NDEIRI CL ASl D
LAW AD ARDN oniue S HMEIMRVEEN onine


1 -





HE ISLANDER M JUNE 2, U004 M* AUrE t U


Y l g y a

ISL________ASSIFI.DS
AYVONNE AI-GINSP.A.


front home,
nt home with
g new, ready
A, half duplex
/month. Call
191.


ANNA MARIA DUPLEX 218-B Palmetto Ave. 2BR/
2BA, furnished, washer/dryer, utilities, available WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2005 season. $1,800/month. Call (813) 949-6891, houses from $500/wE
Tampa. Gulffront. SunCoast RE
Tampa.


JSI II uu lull Iit;) U ul 1 11O I tO, O


ITALS condos and
$1,500/month. Many
state, (800) 732-6434.


VACATION RENTAL: Charming 1BR/
nished, across from white sandy beach. (

sAsc5NAL RENTALS Anna Maria
Lido Key. Call Deborah Thrasher, RE
lence, 518-7738 or


, fully fur-
309-3714. ANNUAL 3BR/2BA HO
with pool. $1,900/montl
and and Call 586-8041.
,X Excel-
e-mail ANNUAL 2BR/2B DUP
garage, tile throughout


>n canal in Key Royale _^ "
curity deposit required.
CLEANING SPECIALISTS
" I .I r""


586-8041. The shine can last years wilh hide care.
I 52ND ST., Holmes Beach, townhouse, 500 Ideal for: Homes Offices Motels Boats RVs
From the beach. Annual rental, 2BR/1.5BA, all SRFPRFF RPAIOnlUlS PC00 home 4RR/2RA Bonded Insured References


Siaw appllJ d i e sJ, L,;Ui IJ Iteily I I ImUUciU. p I, I U/
month. (330) 757-7670.

RENTAL HOME: Remodeled, two blocks to beach,
3BR/2BA, spacious with fireplace, pool and outside
spa, two porches, front and back, completely pri-
vate, fence. Available immediately, must see. Call
773-0975.


C.ALL SUSAN 1o I -L 0

Thanks for reading the best
news on Anna Maria Island!

SThi Islander
SINCE 1992


cUdIUe.L. UdIUUI[L dlllU [Od dU e. u[ie VIuOK roli DI-CKlTAI C D-qPITC 1 wo,I- ,.,ks.n. qrii".. t.,qi,. iI Thn _\-- --~ U I N ...O f-I N I


ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT w
-:m.. on ort, nn -j -n- --


tio, sundeck, tropical beach setting, garage, im-
maculate. 778-3143.

------------------------

HOW TO PLACE
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESD,
We accept ads by fax with credit card information, 778-939
direct e-mail at classifieds@islander.org. Office hours: 9 tc
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimu
additional word over 20 is 500, Box: $3, One- or two-line
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge yo
but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified
be prepared to FAX or e-mail your copy with your credit ce
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One wore






Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Plec
For credit card payment: J -B J = No.
Exp. Date _Name shown on card:
IBilling address zip code: House no.
E-Mail address:
The Islander
5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217 ---- T


indicate: Ck. No. or Cash



post office box no. on bill
[for renewal purposes only


ider


Alterations Mending Custom
Work* Some Leather
Wed.-Sun. 10am-6pm -
Bradenton Outlet Mall
6605 Manatee Ave. W.
or call 727-1277, leave message LIZ Codola
Realtor
rihe Islander 941-779-0304
www.teamduncan.com









CONSTRICTION
tscWICKERSHAMS





REMODEL ADDITIONS CUSTOM HOMES
33-92155


America's Best
Lawn Care Inc.


I A IKII IAI DI:rMTAI gir


unfurnished;
yard, pet OK
Key, 3BR/2E
Poincetta, L(
$850/month;
$1,100/mon
floor, pond vi
cable TV, $
779-0202 w


(2,300 sf) in historic village. Two separate master
and guest bedroom wings, great for shared rental!
Half-block from bay with public boat dock and
charming restaurants just across from the best
Longboat Key Gulf beach. Pool and lawn, deluxe
barbeque provided. $2,500/month, furnished if de-
sired. Children and pets welcome! Available annu-
ally or monthly. 387-1387.





PAGE 30 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M THE ISLANDER


I R N_ C 0 TAL T


GROOMED BEACHES 3BR/2BA condo, 1,535 sf
under roof, few blocks to Gulf beach and shopping,
directly above heated pool, turnkey furnished, top
corner unit, tennis courts, $2,000/month for three to
six months; $2,500/month. (941) 224-4640.

ANNUAL RENTALS! Island townhome, 2BR/2.5BA
across from beach with pool, $1,300/month; 3BR ca-
nal home, Bradenton Beach with garage and dock,
$1,200/month; San Remo condo, 1BR/1BA dock,
$800/month; Island duplex, 2BR/2BA, elevated, $750/
month; Cortez Village home, 2BR/2.5BA on canal,
$1,350/month; Island home, 3BR/2BA, $1,150/month.
Call Cristin Curl, Wagner Realty, 778-2246.

ANNUAL RENTAL 1BR/1BA duplex in Holmes
Beach, newly remodeled, new everything. Across
from beach. Smith Realtors, 778-0770.

ANNUAL 2BR/1BA duplex in Holmes Beach. 800
sq.ft. Smith Realtors, 778-0770.

ANNUAL 2BR RENTALS available now. Small dog
OK. Don't miss out on great move-in specials. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

SUMMER AND FALL savings. Reserve your place in
paradise today! Call Duncan Real Estate, 779-0304.

POOL HOME AVAILABLE for vacation let. Near
Holmes Beach, 3BR/2BA with all amenities. Please
contact, 753-8709, ext. 2.

POINTE WEST VILLA: Updated 2BR/2BA. Pet OK.
Call Duncan Real Estate, 779-0304.
I -------------_


A BEAUTIFUL BEACHFRONT
2BR/2BA, 1,500 sf, upper level, end unit
with direct Gulffront views from two lanais.
Heated pool, elevator plus much more!
MLS#100193. $585,000.
501 Gulf Drive N., Unit 201, Bridgeport
Call Liz Blandford at 1941M224-3304


HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX in great location, 210
Haverkos Ct.. 2BR/1.5BA ground-level with car-
port, shared washer/dryer. $900/month, plus cable,
phone. First, last and $300 security deposit re-
quired. Call Gayle Schulz, Jim Anderson Realty.
778-4847 or cell, 812-6487.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1BR/1BA or 2BR/1BA with pool. Walk to beach,
shopping and restaurants. 778-3875. Web site
2spinnakers.com


HARBOUR LANDINGS: Lot and dock. Beautiful
12,100 sq.ft. homesite offered by owner/Realtor.
Gated community in Cortez. $265,000 includes
dock for boat up to 35-feet Longview Realty, 383-
6112, or George Noble, 685-3372.

ALL THE BEAUTY of the Island just across the
Cortez Bridge. Palma Sola bayfront and near
Cortez Village. Two story, 4BR/2BA with canal,
dock and boathouse. Million-dollar views can be
had for $639,000. 794-3010 or 374-0528.

THREE LONGBOAT LOTS on General Harris
Street, total of 1.3 acres (MOL). Offered at $400K
each. Longview Realty, 383-6112.

LAGUNA YACHT VILLAGE: Tranquil waterfront com-
munity offers everything you've been looking for.
Deep-water boat docks, short walk to gorgeous
beaches, tropical setting and carefree living. Two
brand new quality built homes with spacious floor
plans and many upgrades starting at $638,500 and
three homesites starting at $240,000. Call Tina Rudek
or Mike Migone of Wedebrock Real Estate, 383-5543.

r .. f I orClaPi


NORTH END 2BR/2BA near Gulf beach. Sun
deck, screened porch, working fireplace, solar.
$490,000. Call 778-2665.

THE SEA OATS Bradenton Beach. Townhouses
and villas for sale at pre-construction prices. Con-
tact Jane or Dave Guy, 284-5469 or 284-5461.

ANNA MARIA BEACH/BAYFRONT: Two homes on
one lot. White sand beach. $1,699,000. Also, avail-
able for rent. Gabe Buky, Coldwell Banker, 374-5772.

ELLENTON'S OAKLEY 3BR/2BA pool home on
wooded perimeter lot. $279,900. Open Sunday, 2-
5pm. 5605 31st Ct. E., just north of mall. 721-7646.

HOLMES BEACH tropical paradise. Two fully fur-
nished 2BR/2BA attached homes. Lush land-
scaped pools and Jacuzzi. Outdoor kitchen dining
and living room. Owner/Broker, 778-4441.

NEW PRICE KEY ROYALE canalfront 3BR/2BA with
dock, davits and in-ground, caged, solar-heated pool.
Recent upgrades include appliances, air conditioning
and water heater. Barrel-tile roof. $625,000. Contact
New Concepts Properties, 792-9314.

INDIANA HOME for sale. On approximately 44
acres in Southern Freedom, Ind. Three-car garage,
3BR. $180,000. (941) 343-9552.

GROOMED BEACHES 3BR/2BA condo, 1,535 sf
under roof, few blocks to Gulf beach and shopping,
directly above heated pool, turnkey furnished, top cor-
ner unit, tennis court. $322,000. (941) 224-4640.

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, June 5, 1-4pm. 2BR/1BA
half-duplex. New carpet and vinyl flooring.
$231,000. 424 62nd St., Holmes Beach.


BEAUTIFUL BAY PALMS 3BR/2.5BA canalfront
home recently updated to include a coral-appointed
remote-controlled gas fireplace, new windows,
pavers, boat hoist and more. Enjoy luxury living in
this ranch-style home with more than 2,650 sf of
living area. $725,000.

Marina Pointe

Realty Co.

314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
Summer Rentals Available


Gabe 1 ,. ,.... Charles

TeaturedProyert of the Week










Relax in the cabana :eside mte ccrjl and marble-decked pool as you
gjae jl views ac: ro Tampa Bay and the Skyway Bridge. Italian tile and
elegant wood flooring. Attached 2BR/1BA guest suite. Large cook's
kitchen with custom maple cabinets, natural granite and stainless-steel
appliances. Mature landscaping includes hibiscus, azaleas and Medi-
terranean fig trees. Huge lot more than one-half acre. $849,000.

-41 J l7e --Vl d46
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate Inc.


I .









rffff REALTORS

5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


NEW LISTING AT NORTH END
Great opportunity to own a 2BR/
2BA house in the heart of the north
end of Anna Maria, just steps to the
bay and a few blocks from the Gulf.
Large lot with room for pool located
close to restaurants, trolley, shops
and fishing piers. Priced to sell at
$457,500. Call Susan Hatch, Real-
tor, 778-7616 eves.


Advertising works fast in The i!:w,


COMMERCIAL
3,000 sf across from the beach in Bradenton
Beach. Over 12,000 cars pass daily. Zoned C-
2, completely renovated with new A/C, electri-
cal, plumbing, etc. Full kitchen, three baths, pri-
vate office, 12 parking spaces. Call for details.

e -.
BL !g.W2 --.
NormIa~n kiw


Realty iC So-367-1617
3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com


TH"US'WV Jd: C'F H" 'i 1E" 'HI.EE "'D-REj'H
SWWW.MICHAELSAUNDERS .COM


I '. `PgrsL~IW~~l :" /. -r ~ .I a
PRIVATE &PRISTINE RIVERFRONT ES- ULTIMATE DIRECT BEACHFRONT
TATE. Approx. 300 ft. of water frontage CONDOI Spectacular Gulf views from this
on 1.6 acres. Granite kitchen counters, turnkey3BR/2.5BAopen plan penthouse.
guest quarters, pool bar, elevator, private professionally decorated w/fabulous de-
dock & great views. $3,200,000. Cindy tails! $1,790,000. Victoria Horstmann,
Pierro, 748-6300 or 920-6818. 99843 748-6300 or 518-0278. 98392


... ..... ..



EXCEPTIONAL WATERFRONT w/100 BUILDERS OWN HOME. Superior ap-
ft. on Palma Sola Bay. This newer pointments including hardwood floors &
custom home offers over 3500 SF, crown molding. 4BR,s, pool & ample
10-car garage, pool, boat dock & lift. outdoor areas. Over 4/10 of an acre.
$1,690,000. Kathy Valente, 748-6300 $439,000. 748-6300. Ruth Lawler, 587-
or 685-6767. 100210 4623 or Dani Lolli, 725-2112. 102718
EXTRAORDINARY VIEWS! 4BR/3BA home on a 1-acre lot w/pool & dock. $1,250,000.
748-6300. Kathy Marcinko, 713-1100 or Sandy Drapala, 725-0781.100112
EXCEPTIONAL VIEWS of Warner's East Bayou. This home offers a workshop, pri-
vate dock & davits. $749,900. Jody Shinn, 748-6300 or 705-5704. 100811.
MANGO PARK 4BR/3BA home at end of street offers a fireplace, pool w/jacuzzi &
3-car garage. Agent owned. $419,000. Cindy Pierro, 748-6300 or 920-6818.103618
VINTAGE 4BR/3BA home has a great backyard & open patio areas. $364,000. 748-
6300. Kathy Marcinko, 713-1100 or Sandy Drapala, 725-0781.103608
BEAUTIFUL PANORAMIC VIEWS of Terra Ceia Bay from this top floor 2BR/2BA
unit. $310,000. Debbie Capobianco, 748-6300 or 704-2394. 101867
PRIVATE NW 3BR/2BA pool home on a cul-de-sac. Great house for entertaining
& large get-togethers. $259,900. Joanne Jenkins, 748-6300 or 228-7878.102181
MANATEE RIVER VIEWS. 2BR/2BA condo w/pool & garage parking. $249,900.
748-6300. Kathy Marcinko, 713-1100 or Sandy Drapala, 725-0781. 103466
NW 3BR/2BA ranch home. Fenced yard w/gorgeous pool & patio. Enjoy the main-
tenance free yard. $244,900. Kathy Valente, 748-6300 or 685-6767. 103482
TOTALLY REMODELED 3BR home w/wood floors. Maintenance free w/commu-
nity pool & lawn care. $225,000. Kathy Valente, 748-6300 or 685-6767. 103412


''II '* I I I'


Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islaner"


I a
Canalfront with dock and 1,424 sq.ft. of living area, 2,654 sq.ft. un-
der roof, 3BR/2BA, three-car garage home with caged, heated pool
built In 19\, o Quality Builders on a 75-by-1i00-ft. lot, for sale for
$i,,.0:l:li. luili and gorgeously furnished to the nines,

Doug Dowling Realty
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
1 E-Mail: dougdowling@earthllnk.net
1 www.dougdowllng.com



ANNA MARIA o s



SmiifCoast
REAL ESTATE LLC
ANNA MARIA CITY
2BR/2BA charming homn ical set-
ting. Vault Ir Q UC[ deck
One bli arcC e-_.-i-rqg'eutiful beach.
$498,90 reTs I rl ate agent.
VILLAGE GREEN
4BR/2BA great family home! Good schools, ceramic
tile, split plan, screened lanai, fenced yard, beautiful
landscaping, room for pool, barrel-tile roof, two-car
garage. $239,900.
WATERFRONT CONDO
2BR/2BA plus den. Furnished open plan with fire-
place. On sailboat water with large deeded boat
dock. Heated pool, carport, short drive to beach.
$329,900.
KEY ROYALE
4BR/3BA canalfront home with dock and davits.
Direct access to Tampa Bay and Intracoastal Water-
way. Large master suite, charming airy family room
opens onto caged pool and Jacuzzi. Barrel-tile roof.
Turnkey furnished. $779,000.
OWNER FINANCING
4BR/2BA Village Green home, split plan, screened
lanai, walled patio, new carpet, fresh paint inside and
out, shutters, new verticals. Owner is licensed real
estate agent. $219,900.
ISLAND TRIPLEX
2BR/1.5BA plus 1BR/1BA and 2BR/1BA. Great
investment! Watch the sunset as you collect rent
from these charming units. Easy to see, call for ap-
pointment. Just steps to beautiful beach. $749,000.
BAY HOLLOW- PRIVATE DOCK
2BR/2BA, updated condo with deeded boat dock.
Eat-in kitchen, wood-burning fireplace, walk-in clos-
ets, Jacuzzi tub. Carport and heated pool. $359,900.
ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month


779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

12 MLS SBAiNDCoxst
REAL ESTATE LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 2, 2004 U PAGE 31
.-. *. :. . '. ...-_,.;l' -^,:..
'. ''
71: a;.,_:... '.
...
'_.


WALK TO THE BEACH Very
nice half duplex in a small com-
plex. 2BR/1.5BA and views
from the screened back porch
of Spring Lake. $289,000.
MLS# 100881.


Melinda Bordes
Realtor





Marianne Correll
Realtor





Bob Fittro
Realtor



n

Wendy Foldes
Rcaltor





Richard Freeman
Realtor





Alan Galletto
Broker/Associate

5



Jon Kent
Broker/Associate





Tom Nelson
Realtor
j





Nick Patslos
Broker/Associate





Chris Shaw
& John
van Zandt
Realtors





Marlhlyn Trevethan
j Realtor


4212 Redfish Ct............... $575,000
307 Iris St ....................... $495,000
243 Willow Ave................ $849,000
229 Gladiolus St.............. $659,000
1102 Riverside Dr......... $1,490,000
530 Key Royale Dr........... $749,900
2908 Avenue E(4-plex).. $1,999,000
Bridgeport #201.............. $585,000
Martinique North #101..... $595,000
La Casa Costiera #11.... $1,200.000
5400 Condos #32............ $580,000
516 56th St..................... $599,000
609 Concord Ln.............. $559,000
Waters Edge #109S.......... $899,000
631 Foxworth Lane ....... $1,375,000
623 Foxworth Lane ......... $689,000
2500 N. Gulf Dr. p ........ $2,600,000
5609 Gulf Dr ................... $769,000


." ". .% t-, ; : ..... : .
..... a.--
3603 4th Ave ............... $1,099,000
104 7th St So.(Duplex) .... $599,000
2914 Avenue E............. $1,595,000j
6909 Holmes Blvd........... $289,000
747 Jacaranda Rd. (Lot)... $389,000
412 Bay Palms Dr............ $499,900
100 7th St So.(Duplex) .... $750,000
727 Jacaranda................. $699,000
402 71st. St .................... $475,000
411 Spring Ave.............. $599,500
111 75th St..................... $775,000
213 76th St..................... $439,000
218 Gladiolus .................. $495,000
The Terrace #6 ................ $425,000
204 78th St..................... $475,000
401/403 Clark (Duplex) ... $549,000
305 63rd St..................... $490,000



Business Only .................. $295,000
427 Pine Ave................. $695,000
Business Opportunity .... $2,490,000
Palmetto House B&B..... $1,490,000
877 No. Shore Dr......... $2,350,000
Business and Real Estate ... $1,690,000

.... *. ':r- 'W .--:-'- ,: '*- *; " W -7--
-*, ' *. : i .' ,' .' ,," 'f ',": '.
*.* ',.* ",'*'*f ,c -'%r..! 'v.. :""f "-;. ,** -'* ,,R.';? "!4-..---
.'" ".-.- 4 , 0 ,' i ,

555 Gulfstream Ave 150so3... $495,000

Stop by and use our talking-window
24-hour information center.


I wanna have Jesse's life! Great opportunity! Be your
own boss! Jesse's Beach Lounge, beer, wine, food.
Seats 25. Low Overhead! partial Gulf view Walk
to beach! Seller motivated bring offers! The usual:

Appointments a must! Confidentiality agreement
required for financial. $89,900.

Call Laura McGeary, 941-704-3708
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate


i;.




~j~ZR~;i'~' ;~I f?' Z):LQIJ~:lf~jl


- %







PAGE 32 0 JUNE 2, 2004 M THE ISLANDER



By Deb Amlen and Nancy Salomon / Edited by Will Shortz 19 -


Across
1 "The Lucy- Comedy
Hour"
5 Preppy sportswear label
9 Set in concrete, so to
speak
14 Lhasa (dogs)
19 Airline info, for short
20 French film director
Clement
21 Oldsmobile sedan
22 Surgeon's insert
23 1997 action film about a
spa duo?
26 Devonshire dad
27 Saturn's largest satellite
28 Journalist Lindstrom
29 Statistical measure
31 Filly, but not a billy
32 Candidate's goal
33 Latin hip-shakers
36 Former queen of Jordan
37 Neck feathers?
38 1981 thriller about
bygone blade holders?
42 Return addressee
45 Dash alternative
46 Safety org.
47 Hatch
48 Yoplait competitor
50 Grasped
53 Butler of fiction
56 Spill producer
57 1985 teen movie about
morning washup?
61 Turf
62 Biblical gift
63 Thug
67 Journal
70 "Awake and Sing!"
playwright
73 Removes from power?
75 Wonder Woman, for one
77 Scads


79 Philip who wrote a
1975 C.I.A. expos
80 1983 tearjerker set at
a salon?
85 Over
89 "60 Minutes" corre-
spondent
90 "ER" roles, briefly
91 Consider extremely
funny
92 Start of a Beatles title
94 Suit makers' org.?
96 Novelist Tan
97 Draft letters
98 1998 war film about a
beard?
105 Yom (Jewish
holiday)
106 Standout
107 Woman's shoe type
108 Ad
111 Hip-hop's Dr.
112 They're effervescent
114 Aries or Taurus
115 "Shucks!"
116 Pianist Claudio
118 1987 British film about
a balding man's
lament?
123 Cold forecast
124 Frostflower
125 Brewer's stock
126 Sushi fish
127 Singers Nelson and
others
128 Assents
129 1940's foe, with "the"
130 Slow-cook

Down
1 One. who is thrown a
ball
2 Divisions politiques
3 "Three Pieces in the


Shape of a Pear"
composer
4 Babylonian love
goddess
5 A theocratic republic
6 Kind of state
7 Even (with)
8 Casual wear
9 Wide's partner
10 U.N. workers' grp.
11 Neighbor of Colo.
12 French rocket
launcher
13 Exiled dictator with a
palindromic name
14 Bad-mouth
15 Class-conscious grp.
16 Puts a price on
freedom
17 Small and insignificant
18 Barely ran
24 Charge dodger
25 Olivia of "The
Wonder Years"


30 Favor
33 Clever c
34 Away
35 Turn on
39 Defense
40 Gloaters
41 Sports b
42 Name pr
43 Gung-ho
44 Sternuta
49 Bull or C
50 It's above
51 Jimi Hen
52 Charge
54 Ticker ta
55 Corps de
58 Egyptian
universe


comment


type
' cries
ar staples
ovider

tion
av
e the horizon
ndrix's do

ape?: Abbr.
e ballet
god of the


59 Bundle
60 Marceau's everyman


64 Wool producer
65 Some pistols
66 Gemini rockets
68 Go over
69 Connects with
71 Outsiders
72 Fax function
74 Small paving stones
76 Techno-funk band
with the 1991
#1 hit "Unbelievable"
78 Pitches
81 Burn
82 Circle
83 Group of companies
84 Formal pronoun


85 Prepare for later, in
a way
86 Couldn't stand
87 Drooled
88 Hebrew letter
93 Hash out
95 School communica-
tion depts.
96 Surrealist Jean
99 Irish county or port
100 Kudos
101 1960's-70's record
label
102 It comes as a shock
103 Canal buildup
104 When some guards


work
109 Humdinger
110 lie de la Cite locale
113 Former J.F.K. sights
115 Song and dance
117 Whatever
119 Half a laugh
120 Sr. and jr.
121 Samuel's
teacher
122 Green

Answers to the puzzle are
located in this edition of
The Islander.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.

-I Ii1


,-C-




WAGNER REALTY

e-mail: ami@wagnerrealty.com web site: www.wagnlerrealty.com


2217 GULF DR. N.
BRADENTON BEACH
(941) 778-2246
(800) 211-2323


DIRECTLY ON THE BAY Spectacular views
of the Intracoastal. Updated 3BR/3BA home.
Rare true point home with water on three
sides. Boat dock with lift. Must see. Peggy
Henger or Mary Wickersham, 383-5577.
#255157. $2,400,000


SNEAD ISLAND & DOCKI Just slip your
yacht into the canal and head for the bay.
Spanish-style home, 2BR/3BA, huge family
room with wet bar, garden courtyard and
screened pool. Norm Barker, 722-2246.
#100501. $695,000


. i0 3 I . ,


-~ tu ll l r1
e '


SNEAD ISLAND ESTATE Exquisite two-story
custom- designed home with separate guest
house all on a landscaped acre. Gorgeous
Manatee River views. Deep water and boat
dock with lift. Jane Tinsworth, 761-3100.
#101721. $2,200,000










HOLMES BEACH BEAUTY! Spacious family
home or vacation retreat! Corner lot with circu-
lar drive, two deeded boat slips, enclosed
Florida room with office space, solar heated
pool and spa. Gina & Peter Uliano, 358-7990.
#102985. $535,000


SUNSET HARBOR A rarely available oppor-
tunity to own a Key West-style home with 3BR/
2.5BA, dramatic Intracoastal views. Two
screened decks, pool, deep water dock. Sandy
Greiner, 794-2246. #100940. $995,900


ANNA MARIA HIDEAWAY Delightful 3BR/
2BA on canal near the tip of the Island. Pri-
vate porch overlooks dock and charming
double lot. Enjoy that special island lifestyle.
Ann & Berndt Wolpers, 761-3100. 1100000.
$495,000


PANORAMIC BAY VIEWS Enjoy views of the
Sarasota skyline and Longboat Key from this
large 3,630 sf 3BR/loft condo in Tidy Island.
Three-car garage. Elevator, gated community,
24-hour security. Jane Tinsworth, 761-3100.
#100565. $879,000


RUNAWAY BAY N. GULF DR. 2BR/2BA
condo near pool in excellent condition, turn-
key furnished. Rents in season for
$3,300/mo. On-site rental office. Harold
Small, 778-2246. #101812. $369,000


I


I


( ( 'a~ulcr Y /I






SPECIAL SECTION: STORM REILDINESS

I l~f~8~91~F ~ a 5.1~


i4


: Bt
p ,
.~.i
F
r


1*


i,


(i
'4


ig ready for the storm




Sxt stom. eFats, tips,
,,, ~ ..,.

"; 4


,1nd residents!


J ,

~:' ~


SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30, 2004


.*ft~ffl


S '3


,aKKL2


-
,;;a~- :~



~ .
.




i-?

:
i.

na
-R
'rl
*` *-
;.c ~'
~'i~F~= r;*.-~
p-
----~
I -~


:I:Las P


; 1
FAF'i-I-~,
~
;i~a-


*dc~wlc ,"u


d





PAGE 2 E 2004 STORM SPECIAL E THE ISLANDER


Most Islanders


don't have


hurricane


experience

By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
It's been 44 years since the last major hurricane to
strike the Manatee-Sarasota area, that at a time when
only about 20,000 people lived in Manatee County, and
the Tampa Bay metropolitan area population numbered
around 500,000 residents.
That was September 1960 when Hurricane
Donna, packing winds of up to 150 miles per hour,
came ashore near Naples and headed straight up the
Gulf coast.
Today, with nearly 3.5 million people in the Tampa
Bay area, including nearly 300,000 in Manatee County
and another half-million in Sarasota, such a hurricane
would cause major problems, just for the coastal evacu-
ation alone.
Few people now living in our area now have ever
experienced a major hurricane, or any hurricane for that
matter.
Tropical Storm Gabrielle in September 2001 was
just that. With maximum winds under 74 mph,
Gabrielle still caused wide-spread flooding on the Is-
land, power outages and extensive damage. Gabrielle
to Donna was like a passing shower compared to a
thunderstorm. Imagine if Donna were to come through
our area today.
But as they say in the tropics about a hurricane, it's
not a question of "if," but "when."
The eye of Donna passed over the Manatee-Hardee
county line, just about 60 miles east of the Island.
Winds in Lakeland reached more than 100 mph, and
the storm dumped nearly 7 inches of rain on that city.
Donna killed 86 people, including 13 in Florida.
Damage was estimated at $350 million, and that was in
1960 dollars.
As a young kid in Clearwater that September, I
remember how the wind blew down our palm and or-


k' '

i ;
I
i -- -




w- ~ ,; I '.-. la l
"*2 r )~- :' 'i "


:; :"In .'e

I'i
S ',,," '-
I'..

..


Donna sliced up Floriida
The map shows the path of the eye of Hurricane
Donna in September 1960 as it bisected Florida. Top
winds were reported at 150 mph, while winds in the
Tampa Bay area, about 70 miles from the eve of the
storm, reached 75 mph.

ange trees, how grandmother had to evacuate her beach
house because of the flooding danger although some
idiots stayed in their canalfront homes and got trapped
on the island when the causeway flooded how all the
windows on the Publix supermarket near our home
were blown out, how many power lines were down.
how nothing was working except my bicycle and the
police cars.
People were told to stay home and wait. The wa-
ter was shut off and broken glass was everywhere.
We lived in the middle of Clearwater and did not
have to evacuate. We just had to wade through the 2-
foot-deep lake surrounding our house, replant the palm
and orange trees and replace portions of the roof.
Thankfully for Clearwater, the major concentration
of winds and strength in any hurricane is the northeast


I


Know your shelter, where, when


All the emergency shelters are on the mainland,
much of which is unfamiliar to Islanders and West
Bradenton residents. The locations of shelters, the best
routes to them, and the order in which they are likely
to open, are good things t know before they're needed.
Barrier islands such as Anna Maria and Longboat
are the first to be evacuated, their residents the first to
need shelters. Nobody wants to need one, but it's reas-
suring that one will be available if the need arises.
Laurie Feagans, Manatee County's chief of emer-
gency management, and her staff have identified shel-
ters and seen to their preparation for an emergency.
They have devised a color-coded system of phased
shelter openings, green first, then blue, finally red.



Local emergency Web

is in business
Manatee County has an emergency Web
page established, said Laurie Feagans, chief of
the county Emergency Management Division.
It has a disaster survival guide, suggestions
for preparation to meet an emergency, up-to-
date information on such matters as bridge
closings and above all, data that may bear on
any natural or manmade disaster.
The Web page is www.co.manatee.fl.us
The division's e-mail address is
emergency.management@co.manatee.fl.us


Feagans strongly advises people not to go to a shel-
ter until officials announce through the media that it is
open. She noted that shelter openings may vary with
each emergency, so stay tuned to local media.
People with special needs in assistance in evacua-
tion should register withe the West Manatee Fire &
Rescue District, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, or
by calling 741-3900.
The shelters, all in public school buildings, in or-
der of opening by phase:

Green
Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Bradenton.
Seabreeze Elementary, 3601 71st St. W., Bradenton.
Haile Middle, 9501 State Road 64 E., Bradenton.
Lincoln Middle, 305 17th S. E., Palmetto.
Tillman Elementary, 1415 29th St. E., Palmetto.
Kinnan Elementary, 3415 Tallevast Road, Sarasota.

Blue
Rowlett Elementary, 3500 Ninth St. E., Bradenton.
Manatee High, 1000 32nd St. W., Bradenton.
Braden River Elementary, 6215 River Club Blvd.,
Bradenton.
Bashaw Elementary, 3515 Morgan Johnson Road,
Bradenton.
Witt Elementary, 200 Rye Road, Bradenton.

lied
Johnson Middle, 2121 26th Ave. E., Bradenton.
Southeast High, 1200 37th Ave. E., Bradenton.


Aerial graphic of Hurricane Andrew at landfall in
South Florida in 1992.

Braden River Middle, 6215 River Club Blvd.,
Bradenton.
Lakewood Ranch High, 5500 Lakewood Ranch Blvd.,
Bradenton
Oneco Elementary, 2000 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton.

Feagans stressed that shelters should be a "last re-
sort" for residents, and that staying with a friend or
relative on the mainland is the best option during an
evacuation.


quadrant, which put Lakeland and surrounding areas
directly in harm's way as Donna slowly churned
through central Florida.
In 1960, Lakeland probably had about 25,000
people in the entire area, while Orlando was just a cit-
rus town of 80,000 residents.
I do not know what damage there was in Orlando
or Lakeland from Donna, but a lot of Islanders grew up
in Lakeland and I'm sure there are a few who remem-
ber those two days in September 1960.
Most Islanders, however, have a difficult time re-
lating to a major hurricane like Donna, or Andrew that
came through Miami and South Florida in 1992.
Sure, you see hurricane reporting on the Weather
Channel, or hear about the effects, but until you've
lived through such a storm, you probably don't really
take those precautions at the start of the hurricane sea-
son to heart until the hurricane warning flags go up,
that is.
SMany people will put off stocking up on canned
goods, water, batteries, Sterno, first-aid supplies, lan-
terns and all the other goodies in a hurricane kit, and
some won't even bother. Most people probably don't
even know where they would evacuate to if such an
order were issued for the Island.
"It won't happen here," or "maybe not this year,"
seem to be the passwords.
Sooner or later, it will happen here and you'd bet-
ter be prepared for the emergency, the evacuation and
the return to confront the damage. If you thought
Gabrielle was something, remember a major hurricane
would have twice that strength at a minimum.
This is a barrier island just a few feet above sea
level. The tidal surge in Clearwater during Donna was
4 to 7 feet.
That same surge would put most of Anna Maria
Island under water.
Certainly, many canalfront homeowners in Holmes
Beach could set their crab traps in their living room
before they evacuated. The beach renourishment
planned for 2009-10 might begin a few years earlier
because a lot of Island beach would probably be lost in
the storm surge.
Think it can't happen here?
Ask the people who experienced first-hand Hurri-
cane Andrew in 1992 if they think that? Think they
now take hurricane season seriously?
And in 1960, only about 3.5 million people lived
in Florida. Today, there are nearly 18 million folks in
the Sunshine State, and it's a safe bet that at least 60
percent of them, if not more, have never experienced
a hurricane directly or indirectly.
Let's hope those people don't get that opportunity
this year, but to be forewarned is to be forearmed.
Remember: It's not a question of if, but when.




THE ISLANDER 0 2004 STORM SPECIAL U PAGE 3


'Active' storm season predicted for 2004


By Paul Roat
Hurricane experts predict an "active" storm season
for 2004, with 14 named tropical storms forming be-
tween June 1 and November 30. Eight of those storms
are expected to produce 74 mph winds, and three of the
storms are predicted to be severe.
That's the word from Dr. William Gray, a Colo-
rado State University meteorologist who has been pre-
dicting the outcome of hurricane season in the Atlan-
tic and Caribbean for the past 21 years, based on a
variety of weather conditions around the globe.
An average hurricane year sees nine-10 named
storms, six of them becoming hurricanes and two of
them severe.
"The probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall is
estimated to be 40 percent above the long-period average,"
Gray said. "This May 28 forecast is based on a newly
devised extended-range statistical forecast procedure
which utilizes 52 years of past global reanalysis data."
"Florida has been the most spared state in the coun-
try in the last 30 to 40 years," Gray has said, adding that
Florida was hit by one major storm in the last 35 years,
Hurricane Andrew in 1992. In the previous 35 years,
Florida had 11 major storm landfalls, and 17 in the
previous 50 years.
"A landfalling hurricane is the greatest natural di-
saster the United States faces," he has said. With ram-
pant growth and development in the state, a hurricane
hitting the state's shores "will see 9/11-type shocks in
terms of economic loss," he said. In the next 35 years,
hurricane landings "will produce 10 times the eco-
nomic loss of that in the last 35 years."
Gray said that a "new era" of storms beghn in 1995.
"In the past seven years, we've had more storms than
in any period on record."
Gray and his team of researchers study global fac-
tors to determine Atlantic hurricane activity. Much of
the basis of their predictions comes from what he calls
the "great ocean conveyor belt," a Mobius strip-like
series of surface and deep-ocean currents that upwells
in the South Atlantic, flows along the surface to the
Labrador Sea in the North Atlantic, then dives deep and


flows southeast until upwelling in the Indian Ocean.
The conveyor belt mixes salinity of seawater.
Greater salinity means warmer temperatures and more
Atlantic storms; lesser salinity means colder seawater
and fewer storms.
The salinity, and water temperature, of the North
Atlantic has been rising in the past few years, hence the
increase in storm activity.
Another element of the global weather pattern that
Gray and his team monitor to make storm predictions
are weather patterns in Africa. When the region there
is wetter than usual, hurricane formation in the Atlan-
tic is generally increased.
Another key element in Gray's forecast is the tem-
perature of the waters off the United Kingdom and in
the western Pacific Ocean.
Gray said the North Atlantic was warmer in the


Storms tend to
toss things
around like
matchsticks, as
this Bradenton
Beach boat
owner learned
in 2000. Be
sure to secure
all beach gear
before any
storms ap-
proach during
what is de-
scribed as an
"active" storm
season is upon
us. Islander
Photo:
BonnerJoy


1950s and 1960s, a period of time that saw more tropi-
cal storms in the Atlantic. Starting in the 1970s, those
water temperatures dropped, as did storm activity.
In the mid-1990s, though, the water began to warm
and storms began to form.
"It's shifting again," Gray said, "and we're enter-
ing a higher mode of hurricane activity, especially with
major storms."
Other factors Gray and his group take into account
in the forecast include a high-pressure ridge located
near the Azores in the North Atlantic, temperature and
pressure readings in West Africa, Caribbean sea-level
pressure readings, temperature readings about 54,000
feet above Singapore and wind speed globally at about
40,000 feet.
His predictions may be accessed on the Internet at:
www.tropical.atmos.colostate.edu/forecasts/


Your storage solution

No Lease
Rent the size space you need, when you need it, without a long-term lease.


Features
* No deposit
" Professional storage consultants
on staff
" Fully carpeted, climate-controlled
units
* Video monitoring system
" Free use of our platform dollies
" 24-hour computerized gate access
" We sell boxes, locks, and packing
supplies
" Fully fenced and lighted property
" Monthly pest control
" All major credit cards accepted


spore yfO(
g90r


' FIRST MONTH
I I I


I IBRADENTON
-- 6801 Cortez Rd. West
941-761-9304
S* Nuw tonants only
SOne coupon por o sonli
I Not vahd wilh any ollhr coupons or (hscounts
ww.storageprosonline.com
www.storageprosonline. corn


Clvne


FUNERAL HOMES AND CREMATION SERVICE


Serving you with five locations ...
Anna Maria Island Oneco Ellenton
Bradenton Manatee Ave. Bradenton Cortez Road

(941) 748-1011

Important Emergency Management Numbers
to Keep Handy During Hurricane Season:


Manatee County Dept. of Public Safety............. 748-4501
Manatee County Special Needs Registration*... 748-4501
*REGISTER if you need assistance with transportation during
an evacuation due to age, disability or special needs.

American Red Cross ........................................ 792-8686
Citizens Information Line (when activated) ........ 748-4501
Florida Power & Light............................... (800) 226-3545
Tampa Electric Co .................................... (877) 832-6747


NOAA Weather Information Radio Station:
24-hours 162.400mhz

Clip this notice and post it in a
prominent place for easy reference.

For further information, call your city hall:
Anna Maria ... 708-6130 Bradenton Beach ... 778-1005
Holmes Beach ... 708-5800.


-- ~- I-~ ------~R-"""~-""~"I~----~xy--""a"~sl"-~"


ih ? q 0#


q~p~l
^1^^ '





PAGE 4 E 2004 STORM SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER


Leave, and


avoid becoming


a statistic

By Paul Roat
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Andrew or Opal or even Tropical Storm
Gabrielle and everyone has a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get away from
the flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch
the storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the build-
ing and washed onto the road in a rush of swirling
water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves
- against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Is-
land."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going
out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One
more inch and it would have been inside the house -
and this was a storm that no one expected to amount to
anything."
"We didn't get our power back for five days."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew or Isabel comes call-
ing.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is


*Ae







:I


Warm ,oean Water


Moist Air


; .... __ 310-1,242 miles
Stru'ltre moi 'l of 11 hIrrii.an ty MA 'li/s.a \\ illiuis


not meant for humans imni times of high winds and
waves.
Hurricane experts w arn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all \ watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell, Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20
billion in damages, 200,000) left homeless and 15 dead
are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Closer to our Gulffront homes. Hurricane Opal
cleared a swath of shoreline in the Panhandle in 1995.
And we all lremelcmber the fright Hurricane Georges
gave us years ago \\when \\we rcali/.cd 'for the first time
in a long time what it w\\as like to pack up everything
and head to high ground, thankfully to return home to
find virtually no damage.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will


How hurricanes came to be named


Andrew, Hugo and Floyd are familiar names to
hurricane watchers, but the naming of storms is a rela-
tively new aspect in the science of studying whirly
weather.
An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge, was
the first to use female names in describing tropical
storms in the late 1800s, although he also named sev-
eral after politicians whom he particularly disliked.
Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up the prac-
tice during World War II, naming storms after their
wives and girlfriends.
In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
designate storms, using common military titles of Able,
Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, female
names became the norm, with the first two hurricanes
dubbed Alice and Barbara.
Complaints poured into the National Weather Bu-
reau from women upset that they were being singled
out in describing wicked weather, but the practice con-
tinued until 1978, when hurricanes in the eastern Pa-
cific were alternately named for men and women. In
1979, nomenclature for Atlantic hurricanes followed
suit with Hurricane Bob the first "male" storm.


Six bisexual lists of hurricane names have been
developed by the World Meteorological Organization.
The names are short, easy to remember and commonly
used names from the English, French and Spanish lan-
guages. To receive a name, a tropical low-pressure
center must develop at least into a full-fledged tropical
storm with wind speeds at 39 mph.
The lists are repeated every six years, although the
names of killer storms are retired from use.
2004 hurricane names for the Atlantic Ocean:


Alex
Bonnie
Charley
Danielle
Earl
Frances
Gaston
Hermine
Ivan
Jeanne
Karl


Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter


Hurricane myIths versus facts


Just because you've always done something
doesn't mean that thing is right.
There are several myths about hurricanes that
we've probably believed for years and years. Unfortu-
nately, we've wasted a lot of time doing things that are
pretty useless, such as:

Taping windows protects the glass
Taping windows will do little or nothing to prevent
breaking in a storm. It is a waste of effort, time and


tape. The tape provides little additional strength to the
glass and no protection against flying debris. Once a
hurricane warning has been issued, spend your time
closing up shutters or putting up plywood over your
windows and doors.

Any emergency shelter will do
Storm shelters will open depending on the sever-
ity of the storm. Not all shelters may open. Check the
radio or television for shelters that are open.


look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house. belongings and price-
less mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years are scattered
across what's left of the neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those remaining behind, and
names of next of kin so they can be contacted to iden-
tify the body.
When hurricane evacuation orders come to this
part of the coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.



Don't forget


the critters

If you're frightened by a hurricane, think for
a minute about what your pet may have to go
through.
Some officials based in California are.
United Animal Nations' Emergency Animal
Rescue Service wants us all to include the fam-
ily cat, dog, bird or any other animal companions
you care for in our disaster plan.
"Many animals are injured or killed during
disasters simply because no one thought about
their welfare when planning for a disaster and
there was no time to do so when disaster struck,"
said UAN President Mercedes Flett.
"We've seen too many animals left behind, dogs
tied in a backyard when their families fled wild-
fires, cats abandoned in a house with rising wa-
ters and horses trapped in burning barns."
Her tips:
Make sure all animals are wearing identi-
fication on them, such as a collar or tag;
Identify temporary living arrangements for
animals in advance, such as a friend or family
member, a kennel or motel that accepts animals,
so that animals don't have to be left behind when
an evacuation is necessary; and
Always keep photos of animals on hand for
identification if the animals are lost during a di-
saster.
Disaster supplies lists for dogs, cats, birds
and horses, which detail the supplies you should
keep on hand to care for your animals during
disasters, are available through UAN's Web site
at www.uan.org.


Release of
Latent Heat





THE ISLANDER U 2004 STORM SPECIAL U PAGE 5


Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island


Hurricanes are categorized based on the power of the
storms. Storm categories allow emergency management
officials to determine time and need of evacuation.
The Manatee County Emergency Management Divi-
sion notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill you just
as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the exception that in a
Category 5 storm you will be under a lot more water."
There's also a good chance officials will be forced
to close the bridges to vehicles due to high winds be-
fore evacuating Anna Maria Island is completed, pro-
viding yet another reason Island residents should plan
to evacuate early.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale," called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, to
assign storms into five categories. Rated from least to
most powerful, the five categories and damage poten-
tial are detailed below.
It's important to note, though, that Tropical Storm
Gabrielle caused massive flooding, power outages and
damage to the area with winds of about 70 mph in 2001.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
signs. Storm surge is expected to be four to five feet
above normal. Flooding is expected on barrier islands.
Low-lying coastal roads may be inundated. Expect
minor pier damage and small craft to be torn from ex-
posed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in damage.
Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category I storm, caus-
ing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage, mostly to cen-
tral Florida. Also, Hurricane Allison and Hurricane Noel
of 1995 were Category I hurricanes at peak intensity.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-
structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to


piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
ages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight feet
above normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage. Also, hurricanes Erin and Marilyn in
1995 were both Category 2 hurricanes when Erin's
eyewall hit the Florida Panhandle coast and when
Marilyn passed through the Virgin Islands.

Category 3;
Winds of 11 1-130 mph. Large trees will topple.
Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
down. Expect structural damage to small buildings.
Many mobile homes may be destroyed. Storm surge
nine to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along
barrier islands and coastal areas. Large exposed build-
ings will be damaged, and smaller structures will be
destroyed by wave action and floating debris.
Low-lying escape routes will be cut by rising wa-
ter three to five hours before the arrival of the hurricane
center. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above
mean sea level may be flooded inland to a distance of
eight or more miles.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm that
killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage. Hurri-
cane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm, killing eight
people and causing $ 1.5 billion in damage to eastern Car-
ibbean islands.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone. Ex-
tensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with most
roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete destruction ex-
pected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-15 feet above
normal. Major damage is expected to lower floors of struc-
tures near the coastline or on barrier islands due to flood-
ing, waves and floating debris.
Terrain lower than 10 feet above sea level may be
flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential
areas as far inland as six miles.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm that
killed 50 people and caused $500) million in damages to


Florida. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Donna.
Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4 storm,
killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in damage, mostly
in the Panhandle, although some damage occurred on
Anna Maria Island as the storm tracked to the north. Also
in that year, Hurricane Luis was a Category 4 hurricane
while moving over the Leeward Islands, as was Hurricane
Felix. Hurricane Georges in 1999 was at one point a Cat-
egory 4 storm, killing more than 500 people and causing
more than $2 billion in damage. Hurricane Floyd, also in
1999, was at one point a Category 4 storm as it passed
through the Bahamas, but had weakened before its even-
tual landfall in North Carolina.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
There will be major damage to lower floors of all
structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and
within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation
of residential areas on low ground within 10 miles of
the shoreline may be required.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane. Hurricane Camille
in 1969 was a Category 5 storm, and Hurricane Gilbert of
1988 was a Category 5 hurricane at peak intensity.
Hurricane Mitch was a Category 5 hurricane, and
was the third-deadliest storm on record, with more than
10,000 deaths in Central America.
Hurricane Andrew, recently reclassifed from a
Catagory 4 to Category 5 storm, came ashore on
Florida's east coast August 25, 1992. Sustained winds
topped 155 mph, with gusts more than 175 mph. More
than 60,000 homes were destroyed, 200,000 people left
homeless, more than 2 million people evacuated, 15
people died and damage was estimated at $20 billion.
Hurricane Andrew was the third most intense hurricane
last century, and caused the greatest property loss of
any hurricane in the United States.


It's the People Who


Make the Difference


Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dodge, Freedom Village Residents
"After visiting several retirement communities,
we decided Freedom Village was exactly what
we were looking for that was 11 years ago.
They say time flies when you are having fun.
Moving to Freedom Village was the best deci-
sion for us and it could be for you, too."
Freedom Village residents have peace of mind
knowing there is full continuum of care on-site if
ever needed. Witllh security for the future, residents
can continue their independence and make new
friends each and every day, without ever worrying
about becoming a burden to their family.


Come and see for yours:elf- call Firedom Village t loday
and learn how you too canenjoy the rest of your /if.

N-






1r/eecom Uii/aye



(941) 798-8122 or (800) 841-4676 2
This is the life.
6501 17th Avenue West Bradenton, i-' '., 34209 w r ', P. .,; ,..:..: .. ,-
.. .. .. .. ...... .. . .... .. .. I I .. .


pyL~I kIllill kill h~1 Ii iti~ii IRE
Iii Ill II I


$7'4e e{N~t~nlate&.L


S4224B 26th St. W. Bradenton
(off Cortez Rd) 941-748-2187
ruiit.h' o ,I ,.IH / it op t, lf't 'I


WIIT (OBIT ~RPIIBND TI1I





PAGE 6 0 2004 STORM SPECIAL E THE ISLANDER

0"7m e, ba.1,
32 years serving the Island communities ~
There must be a reason!
During any emergency, we're there to serve you!
WEST COAST
REFRIGERATION
AIR CONDITION
& HEATING
FPL PARTICIPATING W
CONTRACTOR CACO44365
5347 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-9622


Call for details.
'mnttioan his ad. for a special tfawlt. bems

life4 1tnp a ^ okefw' opt ">
795-3900 Toll Free 800 741-4390 |
6630 Corlez Rd. West Bradenton E-mail: fantasy.travel@gte.net


H AThe Islander

adcc


SQLER VISION
V WINDOW TJIN 1NO |
HURRICAI# SECURITY FILH1
TjiE ULTIMAtE GLASS PROTECTION
SYSTEM SINCE 1986
Protects Against Violent Storms
Blocks Heat & Glare (Pays for Itself)
Lifetime Warranty!
.* Free Storm-Protection Analysis
With Obligation


BO% OFF
CANE SEASONWlEN YOU MENTION 1HIS AD

ve. W. 364
ve. W. enton


bright house
NETWORKS
Be prepared this hurricane season with the
most up-to-date local news and weather
24 hours a day with Bay News 9
and Bay News 9 EspaFol -
only on Bright House Networks.


Call
748-1829
to subscribe
today!


~spano


.,.e



Don't panic during Hurricane Season. Rely on our
personal advice and t.ijrmn experience since
1957. Let's hope for a quiet season.





941-778-2259 Fax 941-778-2250
Email: amrlty@gte.net
Web site: annamariareal.com


t Prepaired for
Hurripicane Season!l


.9.


GENERATORS
AND CHAIN
SAWS IN STOCK


BRADENTON LAWN & FUN
Family Owned and Operated
6004 43rd Ave West Bradenton 792-1122
(Behind R J. Gators)
Mon.-Fri, 8-5 Sat, 8-Noon
lyb= --r r r ,, .. .. . . .. ...


II- '
























TRACK INGr 2P
Copyright The Islander 2004


. "


HURRICANE & SECURITY PRODUCTS
V Roll Shutters v Accordions / Storm Panels
/ Impact Windows v Impact Films
Bradenton: 745-2363
Showroom: 8799 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton
Lic #CGCO61513


wrn
;. ,- .(
I


-Your Prlt, tion-$ ..-...


Fp r 5 d n i I - t .. ,. r .- I


/i
1^ 1.k-
j*^*
'""w 1

11


Open
McovFn A ND
$SEai 8 o 12" HARD WARE
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR STORM NEEDS:
Plywood cut to size to cover windows
*Sandbags/Sand
*Free Island Delivery (orders over $50)
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center
.. . ... .I I III II -nl I II [~ I


.,, Amerson Nurseries Inc.
.,, 360 T-r,..l Cia Road
J/ -Terra Ceia, Florida
i, i 722-0226 800-,94-',-,9
' .W Just Call Roy
65 Acre ''":1 i,' Buy Grower L'lrc anrd Save!
Retail Wholesale Landscapers
Welcome
LANDSCAPING & IRRIGATION
Comliplete Sl'. I' .o
Residential
i C;.Qi[ri irc., kil
Repair
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Complete Landscope i fok eovers
Free Designs Free Estimates
Largest Selection on the West Codst


THE ISLANDER N 2004 STORM SPECIAL E PAGE 7

BEN COOPER
AND ASSOCIATES INC.
Year Round Tax Service & Accounting
Income Tax Preparation Payroll & Payroll
Taxes Preparation of W-2s & 1099s Monthly
Financial Statements Civic & Homeowner
Associations Flexible Hours & Delivery
BEN COOPER, E.A.
3909 E. Bay Drive, Suite 110, Holmes Beach
(941) 778-6118
Fax (941) 778-6230 E-mail: benacooper@aol.com
CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION


Luxury Suites & Apartments
in //I lea ,tisIistoric A ,lui 'larii \
941-778-2000
www. Si ala reso rt. co n
Daily \ Weekly


",-'- REALTOR.
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
Experience Reputation Results

L 14 P4Y ... T4.4 4


A H"4rane-Fre aSeao!
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com *www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


HOME
HARDWARE iz
- CHECK UST
FOR STORM
J 7 PREPARATIONS:
I Lanterns & Fuel U Hand Tools
" Flashlights U Can Openers
O Batteries iJ Portable Radios
T Candles i Coolers
i3 Tapes U Sandbags
i Plastic Bags L Propane Cylinders
L Nails for Stoves & Grills
We'll help you with all the supplies you
need to be "storm ready."
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 8 to 6 Sunday 10 to 4





PAGE 8 E 2004 STORM SPECIAL U TIlE ISLANDER


Hurricane


safety tips

Right no1v, as hurricane scasonl begins:
Enter the hurricane season prepared. Recheck
your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable
foods and other equipment you'll need to secure your
home and prepare yourself for evacuation from the
area, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit.
The kit should include: medicines (at least a two-week
supply); special dietary foods that are non-perishable;
blankets, pillows, and sleeping bags; flashlight and lots
of batteries; portable radio and lots of batteries; extra
clothing; lightweight folding chairs, cots; personal
items; infant necessities; quiet games or favorite toys
for children; important papers; and snacks.
Develop a plan for where you'll go if you need
to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland or hurri-
cane shelter locations should be identified and a route
to the safe shelter plotted.

Ifhurrieane advisories list Soutlhwest
Florida as a threatened region, pay
attention to local weather broadcasts for
further updates, anld:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe
mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them
with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to
small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven debris;
damage to larger windows may come from debris as
well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings, lawn
ornaments and anything that can be moved. Secure out-
door objects that can't be taken inside. Garbage cans, gar-
den tools, toys, signs, porch furniture and other harmless
items become missiles in hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water. Re-
member, water service may be disturbed for days or
longer after a hurricane. You should have one gallon of
water per person per day, and you should have at least


_:-, ,L -. ,, .,r'^"lP"
..... ..-;t^'. .'L, < .d,1,:
..--' ;. -..
-n . X I

-


a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember that
electricity may be off for days or longer and cooking
may be difficult, so make plans to prepare food or have
food that can be eaten cold. Check to make sure you
have a can opener that can be operated w\vithout elec-
tricity.
Check all battery-powered equipment and stock
up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recommending
you not use candles due to the threat of fire. An
untended flashlight won't start a fire, but a candle or
lantern might.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buckets,
towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Re-
member, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will
have to be kept with friends or at a vet.

If hurricane advisories list Soutlnhwest
Florida as Ia possible lanmdtfll fir a
hunrr'icane, begin making p al)'cln'ations
fior tlihe storm:
Board all windows, or secure with tape or secu-
rity shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Recmem ber. traffic leaving
the Island vwill be worse than you can imagine. Hurri-
cane authorities predict it \will take 12 to 17 hours to
evacuate the Island, so plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for shel-
ter openings.

If officials order ian evacuiation:
Leave.


" l8 Tropical
rStorllt1
s" atrielle
hammered
the Island
with strong
winds and
torrential
rain in
2001,
c~ausinlg
power
outages for
ttp, tO four
Says in

- *A' locations.
? Islander
Photo:
Paul Roat


Leave your swimming pool filled and super chlo-
rinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover
it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where you're
going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have a
safe, timely ride out of the area.

After tlhe hurricane
threat passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be lim-
ited and you may not be able to return to your home
immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees and live
power lines, and emergency crews will need time to
make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you
have valid identification showing your proper local
address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't sightsee.
Roads should remain clear for emergency vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Bew\\are of snakes, insects and animals that may
have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open windows
and doors to let air circulate and dry out the house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked the
area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures and
contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


~I-4i


*1*


_'"pr s COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR

., .,', '


iiy <^ift' -".S ^S i s s -'' .....** ,,** ..,-^ ..'-'a _..^*t*'.,; "_ '. ~< *-S ^
;' ; "T '',,--' t "V


'\'
.1 II
~:,,, '~.
A'. V


,'" lin J lducim U WrE. Rak, ltot

.-.. . . -- I t G L i


When The Weather Outside Is Frightful..
stay inside and admire your good
taste in window treatments!





IL m^ f Il~ll mmtimoum a
,. u mnm mm -m
s. .
--- -- -' -



he, Hnt :er~uas

%"~ ~ ml q-'ll~ I

Call Keith Barnett for free in-home design service.
(941)778-3526 Mobile 730-0516


CONTINENTAL
BISTRO


Fabulous European cuisine featuring specialties such as
Beef Wellington. Dover Sole. Rack of Lamb and
Boulliabiasse at dinner ... and incredible brunch items
such as Eggs Benedict and Ooh La Garlic.
soups, salads and sandwiches for brunch!
And don't miss Sunday breakfast...
our French toast is "to die for!"
5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-5320


i ~F~t~SU"d~Blg
E911Bll llla
""A~s~'i
~ J


I _t




THE ISLANDER M 2004 STORM SPECIAL M PAGE 9


Hurricane tips

for boaters
Big storms can mean big trouble for boaters.
The best advice to secure your boat, be it large or
small make sure your boater insurance is up to date.
Other precautions to take include the usual advice
for anyone used to Florida's often-stormy summer
storms:
Is your bilge pump operating correctly?
Is your battery fully charged to run your bilge
pump correctly?
If your boat is stored out of the water, have you
removed the drain plug?
If your boat is on davits, do you have the boat
high enough out of the water to ensure it won't float
away in high tides?
Have you secured your boat with extra lines to the
dock or seawall, with adequate fenders and rub-protec-
tion to ensure the boat won't break free?
Have you removed all extra gear from the boat?
Extra stuff can become missiles in high wind, or could
collect in the bilge and foul the pump.
Don't try to trailer your boat off the Island dur-
ing an evacuation make plans to get the boat to
safety well before the storm comes.


Checldist
If a hurricane strikes the coast of Southwest
Florida, expect to be away from home if there is a

Hurricane factoids
Biggest hurricane ever
On the planet Jupiter, a whirlwind-looking event is
called the Great Red Spot. It was first seen by Galileo
300 years ago. It is about three times the diameter of
the Earth.

Clockwise-counterclockwise
North of the equator, hurricanes spin counterclock-
wise. South of the equator, they spin clockwise. So the
question is: which way does a hurricane spin if it stays
right on the equator'?

Deadliest
In 1972, an East Pakistan cyclone killed 200,000-
500,000 people.

Worst in United States
In 1900, a hurricane struck Galveston, Texas, and
basically washed the city away. About 15 percent of the
population drowned.


Bradenton Beach
Police Department
Call our communications number
for evacuation assistance

778-6311
If you need further information
call city hall at 778-1005.



Chances are you're not

covered for a flood!
our home and business insurance probably
doesn't cover damage from floods, and floods
represent nearly 75% of the damage caused by
natural disasters. We urge you to plug that hole in your
insurance protection with flood insur-
ance from Auto-Owners Insurance -,
Company. Contact us today!

,Auto-Owners Insurawnce
Life Home Car Business

Jim Mixon Insurance Inc.
5412 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Island Shopping Center
(941) 778-2253


/(' sure to secure' our boat l fore the storm comes to avoid incident. like this. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


to get you ready for
home to come back to -- for at least three daxs.
Maybe a week, or longer.
There won't be po\\wel, water telephones, ice or
a nearby col\'nenience store. You'll need to stock up
on \\hat you need to survive and \wait it out.
Here's a list of items experts suggest you havIe to
weather a storm, in no particular order.
Fire extinguisher.
Clean containers to store water, one gallon per person
per day.
Food, canned or dry.
Manual can opener.
Hand tools: hammer, nails, ax, knife, pliers, handsaw,
screwdrivers.
Electric drill \\ith screwdriver bits to install bolts for
window protection.
Unscented bleach to purify water (eight drops per gal-
lon).
Soap.
One flashlight per person with spare batteries.
Battery-operated radio.
First-aid kit: bandages, gauze, scissors, petroleum
jelly, antiseptic spray, hydrogen peroxide, antacids.
aspirin, thermometer, rubbing alcohol.









forEVAUAIONASISTA C


the worst


l-itra prescription medicine.
Matches, preferably wooden.
Disposable eating utensils and plates.
Toilet paper.
Mosquito repellent.

Below are some things that will prove useful, but
are deemed to not be essential.
Gallon-size plastic freezer bags to fill with water to
make ice.
Needle and thread.
Whistle and air horn.
Disinfectant.
Grill or Sterno stove with extra fuel.
Oven mitts.
L.antern with exira fuel.
Garbage bags.
Rope or heavy cord, 100 feet.
Tarpaulin to make temporary roof repairs.

And finally, here are some items classed as "luxu-
ries.
Chainsaw and extra fuel.
Backup generator and extra fuel.




of~, An ,


A


I __ : I Marlet e Grile

Doin"rt be caught of guard!

Stock up on Beach City

gouirmet items!
Let us cater your Hurricane Party!

Rflithentic Mexican Rwurd Winning Keo
Lime Pie & Crctbeaes Fresli Ggtf Soafoo
Beer & Wine Homemade Dessert
WaNUM ItrDaily Specials
b a Catering for all occasions
1701 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach 778-303 I
REGULAR HOURS Tues.-Sat. I IAM-10PM CLOSED Sun. & Mon.





PAGE 10 N 2004 STORM SPECIAL N THE ISLANDER








Save millions,


trim trees now

By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Those lovely trees for which Florida is envied
around the country can become our deadly enemies in
a heavy storm. So trim them beforehand. Like now.
Laurie Feagans, chief of emergency management
in Manatee County, likes trees and other plant life, but
she likes safety more. Downed trees and their boughs
get in the way of emergency crews in a storm, interrupt
electric power and they cost taxpayers millions in this
county alone.
Clearing up the debris after Tropical Storm
Gabrielle in 2001 cost unincorporated areas of Mana-
tee County $2,624,000. Not all of that money went into
clearing trees and foliage damaged buildings
claimed their share.
That can and should be prevented, Feagans said.
Companies and business places and homeowners need
to start right now trimming vulnerable parts off trees.
Especially branches that stretch over houses, Feagans
said, for they are very real threat.
Florida Power & Light came in for some sharp
criticism after Gabrielle. Manatee County Commis-
sioner Jane von Hahmann told the company it must do
"a better job maintaining trees around power lines."
"And the same goes for homeowners." Von
Hahmann said she had the trees trimmed around her
Cortez home after Gabrielle "and they need it again
already, and they'll get it."
There are other aspects to falling trees electric
power interruptions, for example, and stalled emer-
gency vehicles and the possible reduction of the life of
the county's landfill.


-< - ---.-
t [lliei .. .o i, pi-


Gabrielle's depredations cut power to 125,000
people in Manatee County, 250,000 total in the Mana-
tee-Sarasota counties area. That meant no radio and TV
communication, food spoiling in refrigerators, water
shortages and a lack of everything dependent on elec-
tricity.
The county landfill was somewhat overtaxed, not
unlike those in South Florida after Hurricane Andrew
12 years ago. There, officials estimated that getting rid
of debris used up 15 years of the landfills' life.
Both Feagans and von Hahmann pointed out that
Gabrielle wasn't of hurricane strength and didn't even
make landfall here, and that last year's perilous condi-
tions exist now too: Extremely dry soil with weakened
root systems after a long drought.
Prepare, both said. Keep trees trimmed. Keep a
stock of nonperishable foods. Keep a supply of drink-
ing water. Keep a supply of batteries in easy reach for
flashlights and radios. Keep calm.


S lCiassic Travel
:.i! L;:. :ibeck-out the great vacation deals at www.clastrav.com


I IA'.: .6 "
Cabinets unlimited turns your dreams into reality. We provide
knowledge, premium quality cabinetry that is beautiful,
functional and represents a value that will last a lifetime.
The possibilities are endless.
Let us customize your kitchen to fit your life.
Visit our showroom of 24 different kitchen displays.
(941) 792-8656 8700 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton



Get 'em while it's hot!


Judicious
tree
trimming
before the
hurricanes
come can
not only
save the
tree, it can
also save
thousands
of dollars
of damage
to homes
and
property.
Islander
Photo:
Bonner
Joy


Hurricane factoids
Strongest
In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert had recorded
winds of 218 mph when it made landfall in
Northern Mexico. The pressure in the storm was
the lowest ever recorded.

MEOW and SLOSH
Storm surge is the biggest threat hurricanes
produce in Florida. Two computer models are
used to determine risk for coastal areas. MEOW
is Maximum Envelope of Water, and used to
gauge the amount of water likely to be pushed
ashore by a storm. SLOSH is the Sea, Lake and
Overland Surge from Hurricanes and is used to
produce maps showing what degree of flooding
is expected from storms.


CABIN ETS Unlimited
Serving Our Coinmiuityl Since 1969


Cool down in lightweight Island "mulletwear." Sizes S-XL $10, XXL $12.
Add $3.50 for mail order. Visa and MasterCard accepted.
The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217. 941.778.7978
ONLINE: www.islander.org







For emergencies:

First-In Teams
Fast, agile teams of experts have been developed
in Manatee County to be the first ones at a disaster site,
with the tools to relieve the initial strains of the emer-
gency.
Fittingly called First-In Teams, they include people
from the various emergency disciplines who can
swiftly and expertly assess a situation, render initial
aid, and determine what is needed for full relief.
They know what kind of help is available from all
governmental and private entities, and how to apply it
to any given disaster. It has been determined that up to
six First-In Teams are needed to cover "clearance
routes" to a site in any kind of emergency, whether
natural disaster or terrorist-inspired. They are to assure
first of all that "hospitals, special needs shelters and
critical roadways are cleared of debris" and kept pass-
able for vehicles. Designated critical roadways are SR
64, SR 70, U.S. 41, U.S. 301 and Interstate 75.
Assigned to a team are emergency medical profes-
sionals, public works experts and machinery, workers
and equipment from Florida Power & Light and
Verizon, law enforcement and firefighting personnel.
They will stage before a storm hits and go to work
as soon as it is reasonable, take care of life-threatening
situations until more help arrives, passing the word by
radio, computer and video as to what is needed, and the
command center will delegate appropriate resources.


Websites for

emergencies
Want up-to-the-minute information about what's
happening in the world of weather? Join the Emer-
gency E-mail Network.


Doubt the power of'a hurricane? This piece of
lumber went though a palm tree during Hurricane
Andrew in 1992.
Go to www.emergencye.com/ and type in some
information and you can get the details of what's hap-
pening as it's happening.
"The Emergency Email Network forwards weather
and emergency information directly to your pager, cell
phone or computer e-mail the instant it is released by
official agencies," according to the Web site. "You
receive the news at the same moment it's given to the
local media. And if you have TEEN set up on a pager
or cell phone, it's likely that you will continue to re-
ceive alerts even when the power is out at your home


THE ISLANDER U 2004 STORM SPECIAL 0 PAGE 11


Emergency alert

phone system
An automated emergency alert notification
system has been inaugurated by the Manatee
County Emergency Management Division.
It's not just for natural disasters, emphasized
the chief of the division, Laurie Feagans, but for
any kind of emergency, including man-made ca-
tastrophes such as terrorist activities.
The alert system is a personal computer struc-
ture of phone lines that allow the division to send
a voice message to all phones in any area selected
for an alert.
"For instance," said Feagans, "if we wanted
to get a message to Anna Maria Island citizens, we
could draw a circle around that area on our map,
record a phone voice message and press 'send.'
"The system then would dial all the listed
phone numbers for that area. We could give the
phone subscribers a warning or an action they
need to take."

or office."
There's also a Hurricane Information area -
208.184.24.125/hurricane.html they suggest you try.
Here's a few other favorite Web sites for weather
information:
*'www.nws.noaa.gov/ this site gives you his-
toric plus up-to-date information on what's happening
in the weather world.
www.nhc.noaa.gov/ probably the best of the
storm sites, this address gives you those invaluable "dis-
cussion" sections where the forecasters describe the vari-
ous results from the computer models used to determine
storm tracks. There's also a historical site here that offers
information from storms dating back to 1492.


S.buaIity


(_ (Custom Desigii
N I Ion.it


Ie can build the home ryou 'e always dreamed about,
We can build the home you've always dreamed about,


AV


IsFV778-71 27 5500 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach


The best news anywhere...


_ AVO -Ma _,JM m m t m


Ir;l* r. ~n~YZ~c~i~tr~W*n... i~--7.!*f..*II p~~i. 'r.r.h.'. .r..l ri~ ' .-;- ...n.l.lr~),.-~ hrr ;..'~I ~-.~)r..rr"r.~l r~lr--z`' ~L*r~


~T~lrais


)




PAGE 12 E 2004 STORM SPECIAL E THE ISLANDER


WESTMINSTER COMMUNITIES OF BRADENTON


*Villas Midrise Park Homes
* Not-For-Profit/Church Related
* Ownership Stability
* Investment For Your Future
* Peace of Mind
* Mission Driven Organization
* Social Opportunities-Friendship
* Low Monthly Fees
* Waterfront Apartments




* Computer Technology Center
* Arts and Crafts Rooms
* Continuing Education Opportunities
* Maintenance Free Living
* Bible Study and Writers Groups
* Exercise/Fitness Centers
* Barber and Beauty Shops
* Scheduled Transportation
* Elegant Chef Prepared Meals
* Heated Swimming Pools


Westninster Courr'ard
222 1thS. WV.
749-7472


* Flexible Dining Choices
* Continuing Care Plans
* Rental Residency


U ~


SPets Welcome
Planned Activities & Events
Westminster Shores
1700 3rd Ave. W. "
748-1700

WESTMINSTER CoMIUNI IES OF BRA DENTON



9 The Manor The Towers & Courtyard The Shores
WWw.w estminsterretirelmelnt.corn