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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( August 27, 2003 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: August 27, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01017

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: August 27, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01017

Full Text




Skimming the news ... Anna Maria Island map in this edition, page 18.


Anna Maria



The


Islander


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 11, No. 42


AUGUST 27, 2003 FREE


SKIMMERS ...
x


RULE!


Steve Kraus, above,
catches some air in the
second annual EZ
Skimmers Bach-to-School
Skimboard Contest.


Islander Photos: Kevin Cassidy


... while Joel Reed, above, also wowed the judges and the 125 participants Satur-
day and Sunday, as did Blake Smetts, above right. For more details, see page 28.


School playground: Wood no good, or is it?


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
A question of liability attached itself to the play-
ground equipment purchased by the community for
Anna Maria Elementary School once it was installed on
school board property three years ago.
The Manatee County School District's construc-
tion team removed the playground equipment as part of
its summer pre-construction work because the play area
was going to be relocated to make way for the school's
new building.
During the removal process, certain equipment was
stockpiled for removal from the school, while some
equipment was determined to be relocated.
Since then, the team has decided to maintain the
old kindergarten/first-grade playground site as a tem-
porary playground, but maintains the old equipment
can't be reused due to several factors, including poor
condition and because components were made with
Chromated Copper Arsenate-treated wood, frequently
called pressure-treated wood.
According to Mike Carlson of Educational Design
Associates, the architectural team chosen to design the
new school, the construction team based its determina-
tion on which equipment could be reused after an in-
spection was made by Eric Hazelton, a certified play-


ground inspector licensed by the National Playground
Safety Institute.
Carlson said the team must follow current codes
for playground equipment and fall zones outlined in the
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's Hand-
book for Public Playground Safety.
But the construction team is not interested in re-
using CCA-treated wood in the new playground de-
sign, due to the possibility that it may cause cancer.
Bob Barlow, who headed the AME playground
equipment committee in 1999, said that the items pur-
chased from Kompan and installed by the community
were in pristine condition, adding that he inspected the
equipment thoroughly as recently as May and believes
the community should have been allowed to re-install
it elsewhere.
It is still undetermined how harmful CCA-treated
wood may be for children, and there is some disagree-
ment whether or not AME's equipment contained the
treated materials. Barlow's recollection at the Aug. 14
AME construction meeting was that it was made of
white pine which was not CCA treated.

AME's loss
Three pieces of equipment purchased from
Kompan in 1999 for AME have been determined by


High.density restriction referendum OK'd


By Paul Roat
It took a former mayor to kick-start long-standing
attempts by Bradenton Beach city commissioners to-
ward a long-standing goal of slowing growth in the
city.
Commissioners last week agreed to place a non-
binding referendum question on the Nov. 4 ballot ask-
ing voters something along the lines of this:
"Do you wish to do away with multi-family, R-3
density, in perpetuity?"
The plea was made by former Mayor Katie Pierola
and approved unanimously by commissioners.
The zoning category addresses the highest residen-
tial use in the city. According to city codes, R-3 is
multi-family, tourist use, which allows up to 28 hotel-
motel units per acre, or 22 efficiency, one- or two-bed-
room uses per acre excepting three-bedroom units,


which are capped at 16 units per acre.
"Even though the city has progressed because of
the huge increase of property value and fabulous con-
struction and beautiful buildings," Pierola said, "I only
heard of the fear of over-development. Anna Maria
City did away with R-3 decades ago, and it didn't hurt
property values. Holmes Beach, the largest city on the
Island, reduced their density to 10 units per acre.
"You've got a serious problem within this city."
Commissioner Dawn Baker said she would like to
see the city change its zoning "so you can only replace
with what is there now. Anything this big, I think it has
to go on the ballot."
Commissioner Anna O'Brien agreed, adding that
she wanted to also place on the ballot referendum is-
PLEASE SEE DENSITY, NEXT PAGE


Hazelton's inspection to be made of pressure-treated
wood the skygame, overhead wave ladder and the
climbing wall.
Although Kompan discontinued its use of CCA-
treated wood and utilized an arsenate-free treatment in
September 2001, the company maintains that customers
who purchased equipment prior to 2001 should remain
confident that the equipment meets CPSC, EPA and the
American Society for Testing and Materials standards.
According to Kompan, its pressure-treated wood is
free of surface residue, eliminating excess exposure to
CCA. The company states that its wood underwent a spe-
cial manufacturing process to comply with added stan-
dards set by the American Wood Preservers Association
that specify treated wood should be visibly free of resi-
dues.
According to Kompan, "Independent tests have been
conducted [on its pre-2001 wood components] that prove
the amount of arsenic present is one-tenth the level the
government has determined to be safe for wood play-
ground equipment. In addition, samples of Kompan
BigToys wood components were independently tested by
CPSC and were found to be well within the acceptable
limits specified by its own scientists."
In its Handbook for Public Playground Safety the
CPSC acknowledges the discontinuation of manufac-
turing CCA-treated woods, but it does not make any
recommendation on the use of pre-existing CCA-
treated woods other than to suggest possible surface-
coating treatments.
PLEASE SEE PLAYGROUND, PAGE 4




Have afe and happy

Weekend



'ih Islander

The "best news on Anna Maria Island" since 1992.


2tI -iS A Z W


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PAGE 2 N AUGUST 27, 2003 N THE ISLANDER

Waste Management
collection Saturday
Labor Day will see a holiday schedule for
waste collection in cities served by Waste Man-
agement Inc.: Anna Maria, Holmes Beach and
Longboat Key.
There will be no solid waste or recyclable
collection on the holiday, Sept. 1, in the two
northern cities and on the key, although both trash
and recycle bins will be collected on Saturday,
Aug. 30.
Bradenton Beach, which provides waste col-
lection for its residents, will pick up as usual on
Monday.


Density reduction proposed
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

sues dealing with building heights.
Commissioner Scott Barr also concurred with the
referendum issue on density.
Vice Mayor Bill .Arnold balked at the proposal.
"This is a surprise, and I'd like to have further discus-
sion on it. I'd rather see this come up for discussion
rather than be placed on the ballot."
He was the lone "no" vote on the matter. Mayor
John Chappie was not present due to recent surgery.
Commissioners earlier this year agreed to two
other items to be placed before voters in November:
The concept of paid parking in the Bridge Street area,
and purchase of another parking lot in the same area of
the city.
Referendum language has to be approved and pre-
sented to the Manatee County Supervisor of Election's
office by noon Sept. 15 to appear on the Nov. 4 ballot.
Referendum issues are on the agenda for a special
work meeting of the city commission Friday, Aug. 29,
beginning at 9 a.m.


Big whoops
The driver of this 1996 four-wheel drive Explorer went too far in his attempt to load his personal watercraft at
the north end of Coquina Beach after experiencing motor problems. He waited more than three hours for a
tow truck one that would attempt the removal with cables rather than risk driving on the beach and
luckily the tide was going out. Bradenton Beach Officer John Tsakiri cited Joey Penichet, 18, of Thonotosassa,
with driving on the beach. He pulled onto the beach at 14th Street South between two posted signs stating
"emergency vehicles only." Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


;.ti.OJT f; (t/;.l !'~ d SMt!A,. !J
6:00AM 7:00PM I EACH WAY
DISCOUNT PASSES
$25.00 -ADULT MONTHLY PASS
$14.00 -STUDENT, ELDERLY. DISABLED
PUNCH PASSES
$8.50 10 RIDE, EASY RIDER, ADULT
$6.00 10 RIDE, EASY RIDER, STUDENT
$4.0010 RIDE, EASY RIDER, SENIOR
BASIC FARE.......... ..................$1 .0
SENIOR CITIZENS & DISABLED...........$.5
CHILDREN (1 YEARS & UNDER).........$.50
BABE IN ARMS .........................FREE
TRANSFERS BETWEEN
MANATEEE BUSES......................_FREE
FIRST TRANSFER TO SCAT BUSES..... FREE
WE are MCAT BUS riders,
but who are WE? What do WE think?
The survey said:
We. ihe MCAT BUS ride.ru
are about equality of the sexes:
hall women and halt men ride MCAT,
Weekdays it's more of a girl thing:
56% Female,
On Saturday, guys:
It's mostly about you: 58% Male
We are celebrating diversity on every trip,
with rider populations about:
55% White, 23% African American,
15% Hispanic,
6% Asian, Polynesian, Indian
Half of the MCAT BUS riders are 18 to 44
years old; only 11% of are under 18, and
17% are over 55 years of age.
Only 20%
use the BUS
for errands
or shopping;
68% home
from work an
and 17%
home from
school; .
40% ride . 1 k,., uru
to work and
17% ride '
to school.
SO, MCAT
BUS says,
"Thanks["
and "Enjoy
your Ride:
Any BUS,
Anytime,
Anywhere. s9sM. .0 r.%-. ',
MCAT BUS
will take COUNTY
you there, TRANSIT
safely
and with
SsMIrle


BY APPOINTMENT


MANATEE COUNTY AREA TRANSIT


MCAT
THE COMMUNITY
TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR



E





MCAT BUS








MANATEE TROLLEY


OnformatOon
- 30 44: 749-7116
mit,7/^ /I ,s 74 -8621


DAILY: 6AM-10:30PM FREE


a service of manatee counlyv government


CATCH theFREE


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Public Beach to
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Unlimited Ride

Monthly Bus Pass
25Adults


$14


Seniors
Students
Disabled

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THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 3


Elementary school site plan alternative studied


An alternative site plan for the new Anna Maria
Elementary school offered by Island architect Gene
Aubry is presently being studied by Manatee County
School District staff.
The plan, which would keep the buildings and fa-
cilities much the same as proposed by the district's
contracted architectural firm, would allow more open
bayfront space on land that is prized for its waterfront
vista and is reported to be one of only two waterfront
schools in the state.


At the least, the plan would save the remaining five
oak trees where 17 were bulldozed the catalyst of
the community's outrage and preserve the oak ham-
mock in the present kindergarten play area.
In the absence of the vacationing Aubry, and
pressed for time with ongoing development of the new
school, the concept was presented last week to school
board member Harry Kinnan and Superintendent of
Schools Roger Dearing by Islander publisher Bonner
Joy and school proponent Judy Titsworth.


Meetings


Anna Maria City.
Aug. 27, 6:45 p.m., Environmental Education and En-
hancement Committee meeting.
Aug. 28, 7 p.m., city commission meeting. Agenda: Con-
sent agenda, reports and updates, mayor's update and
announcement, Florida Rep. Bill Galvano legislative ses-
sion update, first reading on swimming pool setback or-
dinance, second reading and public hearing on occupa-
tional license tax ordinance, first reading on trash con-
tainer ordinance, first reading on high grass-junk vehicle
ordinance, line of credit police discussion, disposal of
obsolete equipment, Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection consent order settlement, skateboard park
interlocal agreement discussion, $5,400 transfer to city
beautification commission, commission appointment to
capital improvement advisory committee, citizen of year
committee appointment, setting date for next parking
meeting, and public comment.
Sept. 2, noon, qualifying for city commission seats
begins.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 28, 6:30 p.m., board of adjustment meeting -
CANCELED.
Aug. 29, 9 a.m., city commission work meeting.
Agenda: Public comment, referendum issues, discus-
sion regarding board residency, sanitation discussion,
recycling discussion, recycling vehicle discussion,
capital improvement project discussion, general bud-


get discussion, and request for budget amendment for
payment of attorney fees.
Sept. 3, 6:30 p.m., board of adjustment meeting.
Agenda: Approval of minutes, request for variance for
separation between businesses serving alcohol by
Oliver Rose at La Creperie, 127 Bridge Street; request
for variance for sideyard setbacks at 107 Sixth St. S.;
and board comments.
Sept. 4, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 28, 10 a.m., code enforcement board meeting.
Aug. 28, 7 p.m., planning commission meeting.
Sept. 2, noon, qualifying for city commission seats
begins.
Sept. 3, 5 p.m., parks and beautification committee
meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Holiday Closures
Government offices in Anna Maria City, Bradenton
Beach, Holmes Beach and Longboat Key will be
closed Monday, Sept. 1, for Labor Day.
There will be no solid waste or recyclable collec-
tion on the holiday in the two northern cities on the Is-
land and on the key, whose wastecollection day will be
Saturday, Aug. 30. Bradenton Beach garbage collec-
tion will be uninterrupted.


The plan is based on "flipping" the current foot-
print of the classroom building toward Gulf Drive,
shortening the bus driveway, and eliminating construc-
tion east of the present school buildings.
Aubry's plan calls for construction west of the
current campus and would require a portable for the
office and cafeteria, or alternative use of the audito-
rium, during construction. The present classrooms
would not be disturbed during construction, according
to Aubry's plan.
Dearing and Kinnan were receptive to the idea, if
not intrigued, and Dearing asked to take the plan to
staff for further study.
Kinnan said the decision to present a new plan to
the school board rests with Dearing.
Dearing focused on the cost, asking what price
would be considered too much to remain responsible to
the district taxpayers.
According to one Island real estate specialist, the
"development value" indicates its worth to the school
board. The site is 6.742 acres, and with a limit of 10
PLEASE SEE SCHOOL PLAN, NEXT PAGE


Celebrate Mrs. Tingley's birthday
Mrs. Tingley's birthday is Friday, and everyone
is invited to the party.
The late Beulah Hannah Hooks Tingley was
born 110 years ago Aug. 29. A voracious reader and
longtime volunteer at the Bradenton Beach Library,
she left the city a large sum of money in her will
upon her death in 1986 for the creation of a "public
reading room for the citizens of Bradenton Beach
and beyond."
Her bequeath became reality in 1994 with the
creation of the Tingley Memorial Library.
A birthday cake and light refreshments in honor
of Mrs. Tingley will be offered, compliments of a
benefactor of the library, all day Friday at the li-
brary, 11l Second St., .Bradenton -Beach. Library
hours Friday are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Further informa-
tion may be obtained by calling 779-1208.


Lights out for sea turtles!


a AnVra ,Mania



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center,



i-nvrronen+a( exhUTts

4ucatlona( Programs
Funir) for a(( ages!

; Treat yourself to an environmental
odyssey at AMI's Turtle Watch
Education and Environmental Center
in Holmes Beach at the
Island Shopping Center.
It's a delightful adventure!

ANNA MARIA ISLAND

T 9-RM 1 2 T Z


-, .5408 Marina Drive
778-1435
For Turtle Emergencies: 232 -1405
www.islandturtles.com
Turtle Watch store partners: The Islander and Ooh La La! Bistro
Community service advertisement courtesy: The Islander


i:;'


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DINNER Wed.-Sun. from 5:30 p.m.
(Closed Monday/Tuesday)


Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Please present this "special" ad to your server. Expires Sept. 3.
941 778 5320






PAGE 40 AUGUST 27, 2003 U THE ISJ UNDER


Bed tax increase proposal heads to county commission


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
A proposal to increase Manatee County's tax on
hotel room rentals from 3 to 4 percent now heads to the
Manatee County Commission after it was recom-
mended to the commission by the county's Tourism
Development Council in a 4-2 vote at its Aug. 18 meet-
ing.
The proposal has been spearheaded by Bradenton
Area Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Direc-
tor Larry White.
White has argued that the CVB is losing bed tax
revenue and faces a budget shortfall because of the
increasing number of accommodations on the Island
and Longboat Key converting to condominium units,
the continuing drop in visitors from a poor economy
and the lingering effects of 9-11.
At the TDC meeting, however, representatives of
the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce said a
poll of members showed nearly all its members were
opposed to the increase.
"Our members have whole heartedly been against
increasing the tax," said AMICC Executive Director
Mary Ann Brockman.
"Based on member input, we took a stand against
it at the TDC meeting," she observed.
White has claimed that the increase will bring in an
additional $1 million in revenue to the CVB, and Island



Playground destruction needed?
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Maria Facheris, AME's school advisory committee
chairman and a community representative on the construc-
tion team, said that if the equipment is not damaged she
would like to see the school board return it to the commu-
nity so it can be used at an alternative site.
Carlson questioned whether the equipment belongs to
the school board, since it was installed on school board
property, and was unsure if the school board could be held
liable if the equipment were used elsewhere.
Plans for AME's new playground will be based on
designs with equipment from Playmore, which is made
from metal and plastic and contains no wood.

EPA actions
On Feb. 12, 2002, EPA Administrator Christine
Whitman announced a voluntary decision by manufac-
turers to discontinue treating wood for consumer use
with arsenic compounds by Dec. 31, 2003.
Beginning in January 2004, the EPA will not allow
CCA products to be sold for any residential uses.
Manufacturers agreed to begin phasing out its
CCA-treated wood and shift to alternative treatment
methods. The EPA plan to gradually phase out CCA-
treated wood includes provisions to continue selling the
product until existing supplies are exhausted.
According to a CPSC report, this means CCA-
treated wood will not be available for most consumer
uses, although it is predicted this wood will not be com-
pletely out of the market pipeline until mid-2004.
Both Whitman, in her 2002 public announcement,
and Housenger in his testimony to CPSC, assert that the
EPA has not concluded at this time that CCA-treated
wood poses unreasonable risks to the public and "does
not believe there is any reason to remove or replace
existing structures, including playground equipment.
EPA is not recommending existing structures be re-
moved or replaced."
Further, the CPSC and EPA report that, while
data is still limited, studies suggest applying certain
penetrating coatings such as an oil-based stain on an
annual basis may reduce the migration of wood-pre-
servative chemicals from existing CCA-treated


School plan change proposed
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

units per acre in Holmes Beach, 67 units could be ac-
commodated on the site. Calculated at $200,000 per
unit (the last big condo deal reportedly averaged this
price to the developer, not the unit buyer) and the re-
sult is a $13.4 million land value.
Aubry and others who support his proposal believe
the district would better serve the school by maintain-


accommodations will get back about $90,000 for joint
advertising.
"Yes, we need that advertising money," noted
Brockman, "but when our members say 'no,' the cham-
ber can't be for something when the members say oth-
erwise."
Brockman also noted that Island accommodations
account for only 40 percent of all rooms in the county,
but generate nearly 70 percent of all tax revenues for the
CVB. Many chamber members, she said, don't feel
a 9 percent return on $1 million worth of income gen-
erated by the tax increase is a fair value to the Island.
The CVB supports its entire budget from the bed tax,
in addition to funding the Crosley Mansion,
McKechnie Field, the Pittsburgh Pirates spring train-
ing facility and other area projects.
Of more than 70 chamber members polled, only
three Wedebrock Real Estate, Island Real Estate,
and BridgeWalk Resort were in favor of the tax in-
crease, said Brockman.
Barbara Rodocker of BridgeWalk, a TDC member,
voted for the tax increase.
In fact, all three Island members of the TDC
(Rodocker, Ed Chiles and Holmes Beach City Com-
missioner Sandy Haas-Martens) voted for the proposal,
while County Commissioner Joe McClash and
Bradenton City Councilwoman Marianne Barnebey
were against the measure.


Haas-Martens, a former president of the AMICC,
said she voted for the proposal to get increased rev-
enues to the chamber for more advertising opportuni-
ties and assist it with other marketing expenses.
More funding from the CVB, she said, is what the
chamber has been asking for years and this is an oppor-
tunity to assist the chamber and its members.
Some chamber members, however, are worried
that if the bed tax is raised to 4 percent, visitors will
face "double digit taxation" because the bed tax is in
addition to the county sales tax, already at 6.5 percent.
"And that 10.5 percent would be much higher
than Sanibel Island, which is still at 9 percent total
tax," observed Brockman. "And they are a direct
competitor for the Island and we are pricing our-
selves above them. We can't keep raising our rates
and our taxes."
County Commissioner Jane von Hahmann, who
represents Cortez and Anna Maria Island, attended the
meeting to get more input prior to the commission dis-
cussion of the proposal scheduled for Sept. 16.
"I'm just concerned that we don't have enough
input from non-accommocation owners," she said. "I'd
like to hear what owners of restaurants and other busi-
nesses say before I have to vote on the proposal."
Brockman said she and chamber representatives
would attend the Sept. 16 meeting to speak against the
recommendation.


S ..
., .. /-.. .. . 7 .. . -




Incarcerated, busted playground equipment
Playground equipment purchased with $60,000 in contributions from the community just two and a half years
ago lies in a jumble, busted figuratively and literally, at the Anna Maria Elementary School behind a chain-
link fence after workers removed the equipment earlier this summer. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


wood structures.
Because arsenic is a known human carcinogen, the
EPA believes "any reduction in the levels of potential
exposure is desirable," said Whitman.
Carlson, as a member of the AME project team,
said he believes it is a wise decision not to reuse the old
playground equipment based on the possible effects of
CCA. "There's no sense in taking that risk," he said.

What is Chromated Copper Arsenate?
CCA is a chemical preservative that protects
wood from rotting due to insects and microbial
agents. Pressure-treated wood is produced by plac-
ing the wood inside a cylinder-shaped vacuum,
which removes the air from the wood to make it
easier for the chemical preservative to infiltrate the
structure of the wood.
CCA has been used to pressure-treat lumber for
decks, playground equipment, fences, gazebos and boat
docks, and more, since the 1940s. According to the
American Wood Preservers Institute, CCA was used in
about 98 percent of the pressure-treated wood produced
for residential uses as recently as 2001.
According to CPSC industry sources, pressure-treated
wood lasts 10 to 20 times longer than untreated wood.


ing as much open bayfront as possible and his proposal
would allow almost two-thirds of the school's water-
front land to remain open for students and others to
enjoy.
Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Support
Services Bill Horton confirmed Tuesday that the dis-
trict is researching the pros and cons of Aubry's plan
and were putting together a list of costs associated with
the changes.
A meeting of district personnel and Aubry is ex-
pected to take place later this week.


What's the harm in CCA?
On May 22, 2001, the Environmental Working
Group and the Healthy Building Network petitioned
the CPSC to ban the use of CCA-treated wood in play-
ground equipment and review the safety of its general
use.
The petitioners asserted that the ban was necessary
because new information on arsenic, including a study
by the National Research Council and the National
Academy of Sciences, concluded that it is a more po-
tent carcinogenic than previously recognized and the
organizations believe long-term exposure to traces of
arsenic in the residue of treated wood may lead to blad-
der and lung cancer.
According to testimony given to CPSC March 17,
2003, by Jack Housenger, associate director of the an-
timicrobials division office of pesticide programs at the
EPA, the agency currently has three studies under way
to evaluate the risk of CCA to children.
The first study examines the surface arsenic resi-
dues to estimate how much can be absorbed by the
body from the wood. The second study estimates the
potential arsenic dose absorbed from soil contact and
incidental ingestion through the mouth by children. The
third test estimates the potential exposure when a hand
comes in contact with treated wood.
Housenger reported that the EPA expects to have
its data ready for review by its independent Science
Advisory Panel in December 2003 and it should be
publicly available on the EPA Web site in 2004.
The CPSC is waiting for the EPA to finalize its
study before making its final determination on the pe-
tition to ban CCA.
The AME construction services department has
said it will schedule another community meeting to
address the playground equipment, although a date has
not been set.





THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 M PAGE 5


City board: Key Royale home too tall


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
In a stunning vote Aug. 26, the Holmes Beach
Board of Adjustment unanimously denied, a height
variance for a virtually constructed home.
The home at 693 Key Royale Drive was found to
be 3 feet 6 inches above the city's height limit of 36 feet
above the crown of the road.
Owner Robert Taylor, who bought the bayfront prop-
erty two years ago, spent $412, 000 to add a second story
to his home facing the Key Royale Country Club.
For more than an hour the board wrestled with
what to do about what was characterized as an expen-
sive "mistake."
At the start of the one-hour debate over how to
resolve this controversy, Hugh Holmes Jr., whose busi-
ness, Holmes Construction Co. Inc., is the contractor
for the project and who is the chairman of the board of
adjustment, asked to be recused due to conflict of in-
terest.
"Basically the problem was miscommunication
between the contractor and designer," Taylor told
board members. "Six weeks ago, the foreman for the
contractor discovered the back portion of the roof to be
too high. We got here by accident, and we are not try-
ing to point fingers at anyone."
Looming over the controversy is the two past issu-
ances of height variances, which were voted for by
chairman Holmes. There is no more controversial issue
currently in Holmes Beach than whether to raise the
height limit in the city.
By denying the variance, the first appeal recourse
is for Taylor to go in front of the city commission.
According to City Attorney Jim Dye, the code allows
the applicant to appeal the board's decision to the city
commission within 30 days of Tuesday's vote.
Should the applicant fail to get approval from the
city commission, he can seek recourse through legal
venues or correct the problem knock down or oth-
erwise alter the structure to meet code.
In the variance application, Taylor stated, "The


property has an existing house that, when built, was
raised above the crown of the road by 10 feet, with fill
dirt making the home 8 feet 10 inches above the other
homes on the same street. Other neighbors are allowed
standard second-story additions, but this property
makes it really impossible with the standard addition
and roof pitch, which is far less than originally
planned."
Holmes told board members that there were several
homes in the neighborhood that were taller than the
present height of the Taylor home. "However," Holmes
admitted, "Two wrongs don't make a right."
Sitting in as chairman was vice chairman Russ
Olson, who spoke of the concerns of citizens' anxiety
over raising the city's height limit.
"I worry about people trying to build the biggest
house on the Island," said Olson. "If we deny your re-
quest, Mr. Taylor, what will you have to do?"
Taylor told the board that the costly corrections of
removing the roof and insulation would be an unfair
burden to him.
When Olson began asking who was at fault, Dye
reminded board members they were not in the fault-
finding business but strictly reviewing the criteria of
granting the variance.
The home designer, Bob Hebb of Bay Area De-
sign, said no one was trying to be deceitful. "It's admi-
rable the owner is here today before you," said Hebb.
The designer then showed photos to board members of
homes he said are in the same neighborhood that are
taller than the Taylor home.
Board member Jeff Hostetler expressed concern
for what he believed to be an uncertified survey of the
building. "The variance you are requesting may not
accurately project the final outcome of the structure,"
said Hostetler.
Resident Bob Jorgensen strongly objected to the is-
suance of the variance. "What is going on in the city?"
asked Jorgensen. "There is a conflict of interest with Mr.
Holmes being the contractor and chairman of this board.
So many thing are loosey-goosey in this city."


Linda Lutz, who with husband Roger, a city commis-
sioner, lives next door to the Taylor home, said she had
no objections with the height of her neighbor's roof.
Steve Snyder, who lives a few blocks from the
Taylor residence, urged board members to deny the
variance, saying it would demonstrate a "special privi-
lege" issued to the applicant.
"It should not be granted," said Snyder. "Commit-
ting a misdeed and rewarding them by just saying
'don't do it again' is wrong. It should be denied."
Holmes defended his roles as a contractor and
board chairman. "I have not talked to anyone on the
board," said Holmes. "And I don't expect any special
treatment. We are not trying to hide anything. The first
people I called when I discovered the mistake were the
owner and [assistant superintendent of public works]
Bill Saunders."
In a last-ditch effort, homeowner Taylor asked the
board to understand there are other homes in the area
that are taller. "And we're not asking because we ad-
mitted a mistake, we just want to let you know it was
not done intentionally," said Taylor. "It's just unfortu-
nate we have to come at this point to ask for a vari-
ance."
Board member Peter Ereg praised Holmes' repu-
tation, but cautioned board members to not approve the
variance. "If we justify this on the basis of a mistake,
where then do we draw the line?" asked Ereg.
Hostetler acknowledged there were "mathematical
mistakes" on the project and made a motion to deny the
variance, which was unanimously approved.
"I'm glad the board finally decided to enforce our
code," said Olson.
A stenographer attended-the meeting on behalf of
the McLean and Coloney families, who contend that a
Feb 27 setback and height variance approved by the
board for their neighbor Frank Davis is illegal because
they were not informed of the variance hearing.
The families filed suit Aug. 19 against the city,
which has essentially stalled Davis'multimillion-dollar
project.


and 7-Year Anniversary Celebration
Thursday Aug. 28 thru Monday Sept 1

Savings from 20% to 70% OFF
Everything in the store on sale!
Including "French Dressing Jeanswear"
and "December Diamonds"
Register to Win Last big sale before
$100, $50 and $25 Christmas! Hurry in fc
Gift Certificates best selection of new
Enjoy our refreshments Christmas items!


HOLIDAY GARBAGE AND RECYCLING

PICKUP SCHEDULE

Waste Management of Manatee County will not be picking
up garbage or recycling on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 1st.
Monday's garbage and recycling will be picked up on the
Saturday prior to Sept. 1st, which is Aug. 30th.

Thank you and enjoy a safe weekend.





WASTE MANAGEMENT
of Manatee County
For more information, call 753-7591


SALE IN PROGRESS! HURRY IN!
*Dresses Fashion Jewelry
* Blouses Nautical Gifts
* Swimsuits Southwest Turquoise
*Cover-ups Dolls and much more...
Don't Miss This Sale!

e 4jBqsh Shop


The Beach Shop Next to Cafe on the Beach at Manatee County Beach
4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach ** 778-5442 Hours: Mon-Tues 9-5, Wed-Sun 9-8


or
m




V c!A(I R .;00 2 .T' TjJUOjA hi .qYrl F j/p1?l qfl
PAGE 6 E AUGUST 27, 2003 E THE ISLANDER







Our little secret?
In terms of tourism promotion, we're no secret,
we're it.
The Manatee County Tourism Development Coun-
cil hopes to increase from 3 to 4 percent its tax on tour-
ism accommodations.
The proposal is being spearheaded by Bradenton
Area Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Direc-
tor Larry White, who has said he will be forced to cut
back his marketing budget by at least $312,000 with-
out the increase.
So how about that increase?
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce mem-
bers polled about the increase sent a resounding "no"
back to the chamber.
While the Island's accommodations account for
only 40 percent of the "rooms," they provide 70 percent
of the "bed tax" revenue collected. Top that off with a
9 percent return to the Island of the $1 million income
generated by the tax.
It doesn't appear to be a fair return, especially
when pleas to fund a visitor center here go unheeded.
Many accommodation owners fear the double-digit
tax (6.5 percent sales tax plux 4 percent bed tax) will
scare off potential visitors.
White says that if hotel rooms continue to be con-
verted to condominiums and tourism continues to de-
cline, cuts can be expected in future budgets.
So how about those lost hotel rooms?
We learned recently that in Bradenton Beach,
where condo construction and motel buyouts are ram-
pant, there's been a significant loss of year-round resi-
dents and voters.
We're drawn to conclude that the majority of the new
condos are purchased for investment and a vast num-
ber of them are rentals that will contribute to the bed tax.
"These are serious cutbacks," White has said,
which will cause the CVB to reduce its advertising
budget $146,000 next year.
So how about that advertising budget?
Has anyone considered that much more "our little
secret" advertising, referring to the years-old ad cam-
paign that exclusively promotes the beaches, is going
to burst the Island's quaint village-like bubble?
And how will Island taxes support the infrastruc-
ture improvements needed to continue the present
growth rate if the secret continues to be widely publi-
cized? Certainly more folks come here to play on the
Intracoastal than the Interstate.
The ultimate decision and maybe our fate -
rests with the Manatee County Commission at its Sept.
16 meeting.


The Islander
AUGUST 27, 2003 Vol. 11, No. 42
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Began
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jack Elka
Jim Hanson
Joe Kane
Katharine Wight
V Contributors
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Jean Steiger
Christopher Teofilak
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Nancy Ambrose
Rebecca Barnett
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Melissa Williams
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
C 1992-03 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mali: i!ews.. ; i.id.dei.or g
| . . . . . . . . . . . .


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By Egan


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Still waiting for bike path
I had almost made it to the safety of Holmes Beach.
I know the risks. I ride my bike for pleasure, transporta-
tion and shopping regularly from home to St. Armand's
Circle and all the way through to the north end of Anna
Maria, so I knew what danger lurks in Bradenton Beach,
the only Island municipality without a bike path.
I was riding on the sidewalk going north on Gulf
Drive when a car came out of 12th Street North and hit me.
The driver, in all fairness, could not have seen me easily
due to overgrown foliage from a thriving sea grape tree on
the intersection comer.
The car was going slowly (fortunately) when we col-
lided. I thank God I was not seriously hurt, in part because
I don't like pain, but also because I would have felt ter-
rible for the woman who hit me. After assuring each other
the damage to body, bike and car was minimal, we both
said, "Oh my gosh, what if it had been a child on a bike."
My bruised knee would have been a child's cracked skull!
There are several lessons to be learned. Property
owners are obliged to keep their landscaping from becom-
ing a hazard. Motorists should enter intersections with
caution. Cyclists should wear helmets. Prudent behavior
can alleviate some risk.
But the real problem is the lack of a bike path in
Bradenton Beach. Cyclists are forced to share a sidewalk
where they do not belong. Sidewalks are for pedestrians
and those in wheelchairs. Bikes generally travel between
15 and 30 miles an hour slow enough to be a colossal
nuisance to the private and commercial vehicles that use
busy two-lane Gulf Drive and fast enough to plow into
strollers and beach-goers who are the rightful owners of
the sidewalks.
In Bradenton Beach there are blocks where there is
absolutely no shoulder or the shoulder and/or sidewalk is
covered in deep sand (an impossibility for a normal bike
to negotiate).
0R ; !1 ; ,: fJr o ... ; I l -
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walk, and cyclists find themselves on the wrong side of the
road with no way to safely cross over.
We have been waiting for a proper bike path in
Bradenton Beach for years. Will it take the death of a
child?
Mary Ann MacCartney, Holmes Beach

'Not good enough'
Thank you for providing a forum for those of us in
Holmes Beach who are outraged by the continuing empire
building of "our" city commission. We had considered
writing to the commission when the proposed budget was
first publicized, but didn't because we thought the com-
missioners would ignore our letter, as they appear to ig-
nore the wishes of other residents who believe in a limited
city government.
The city department heads have submitted their re-
quested budgets, which have apparently been accepted at
face value. Guidelines should have been given to them
which would allow the city's overall outlays not to be in-
creased. Do the proposed budget increases represent any
belt tightening in these hard economic times? The com-
missioners seem to feel that the additional revenue from
higher property values is "manna from heaven." Roger
Lutz said, "There's no hardship here." Commissioners
should realize that the ever-increasing property values,
while gratifying when property is being sold, do result in
higher county taxes which cause hardship to the residents,
especially those on fixed incomes. To increase our city
taxes is to add to that burden.
The mayor and city treasurer were "right on" in rec-
ommending lowering the city tax rate. Even so, that would
only tend to offset the tax increases caused by separate
items such as the new stormwater utility fee.
There will always be new projects that the city will
want and/or need (such as the well-received skateboard
park). However, new taxes must always be fully justified
to the public. Instead we have a vague statement by [Com-
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THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 7


S- 'T '. '-. I



by Rick Catlin

'Snooks' Adams

and five brothers
Willis "Snooks" Adams of Holmes Beach is a na-
tive Floridian from Cortez and he's probably best
known to Islanders as the "Chief" in Holmes Beach,
having retired from 20 years as police chief in 1978.
What Islanders may not know is that Snooks was
one of six brothers who served in the U.S. armed forces
in World War II, four in the U.S. Navy and two in the
Army.
Snooks joined the Navy immediately after Pearl
Harbor. His brother Cleveland was already in the Navy
and was stationed at Pearl on Dec. 7, 1941, when the
Japanese attacked.
As a Cortez fisherman, Snooks figured his knowl-
edge of the sea would help him in the Navy.
"We all wanted to do our part," said Snooks. "I
wanted to get in and do what I could. I wasn't looking
to be a hero, but all my brothers and my friends were
joining up."
Brothers Leon and William later joined the Navy,
while Henry went into the Army. Brother Clyde joined
the U.S. Army Air Corps and was shot down over Ger-
many, eventually becoming a prisoner of war.
In 1985, the U.S. Congress recognized the Adams
family of Cortez for its service during WWII with an
official entry into the Congressional Record.
Snooks served as an electrician's mate on a num-
ber of ships in the Pacific Theater, but his most memo-
rable moment came on June 6, 1944, during the Battle
of the Philippine Sea, what historians now call the
"Great Marinas Turkey Shoot."
Snooks was a crew member of the U.S.S. Twining.,
a destroyer assigned to Task Force 58, the largest na-
val task force in WWII. T.F. 58 comprised 535 ships,


Snooks Adams as a U.S. Navy seaman during World
War II.
including 10 aircraft carrier groups and numerous
"pocket" carriers.
During the battle, Snooks saw a Japanese torpedo
bomber heading straight for the Twining.
Incredibly, the plane managed to get through the
maelstrom of anti-aircraft fire.
"At the last minute," said Snooks, "he turned and
headed for a nearby battleship. He was so close, I could
see his face and he looked straight at me."
Then, a second before it would have hit the battle-
ship, the plane exploded in a fireball.
Snooks figured he and the Twining got lucky be-


Snooks Adams, center, at his birthday party in April.

cause the Japanese pilot wanted the bigger target.
Later that day, on the other side of the world, the
Allies would come ashore at a remote French beach in
Normandy to begin the liberation of Europe.
After the war, Snooks returned to his roots in the
family's fishing business and got married.
In 1954, he joined the Manatee County Sheriffs
Office and was appointed the Holmes Beach Police
Chief in 1958, a post he held for 20 years.
These days, Snooks still likes to drive around town
"on patrol" every day, just to say "hi" to old friends.
He still remembers his naval days.
"We weren't heroes. We were all just doing our
jobs. But I'm proud of my service and proud that our
family was recognized by the government."

"The Greastest Generation" column is for Island,
Longboat Key, Perico Island and Cortez veterans, man
or woman, who served in the armed forces of any al-
lied country (U.S., Britain, Canada, Holland, Norway,
France, the Phillipines, Australia, New Zealand, etc.)
during World War II. We'd like to hear from you.
Please call Rick Catlin at 778-7978.


WORLD FAMOUS ,

SJAY CR WFORD
Friday saturday
Au.2 21 ,30 & 31 f ^

/ Jay will be singing songs
and telling stories of his
., / recent voyage to Key West,
Which was intended to be a
sail to the Abacos, but
during his long and some-
times lonely cruise, he
S- J became confused about
Y --the purpose of the sextant
~--,
and ended up in the Keys.



ROTTEN RALPH'S
WATERFRONT DINING
LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS FULL BAR SERVICE
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria
-- Located at Galati Marina 778-3953


Gulf of Mexico
ALLYO AN-AT IH&*HP
I ALL AY EER *AY$791


We'd love to mail


W you the news!

We mail The Islander weekly for a nominal $36 per year. It's the per-
* fect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
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round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please use
this form or log on to islander.org for secure e-mail transmission.
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CHARGE IT BY PHONE: (941) 778-7978
OR ONLINE AT islander.org
MM .H .....M. WWEEU ME EU EEE EUEU EUE E I


E~i






PAGE 8 E AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Early school



start brings



tourism



'Grinch'

By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Island accommodations were enjoying a solid
summer tourist season until the Grinch came early
and stole three weeks of summer vacation.
"July and August were terrific," said Kent Davis
of the Siam Garden Resort in Anna Maria.
"But as soon as school started, there was a big
drop-off. Sunday [Aug. 10] was like an exodus and
there's not a lot on the books the rest of the month,"
he noted.
"Labor Day looks good, as does late September,
but we're really losing out with the early start of
school."
That's a sentiment echoed by a number of other
Island accommodations, including the Surfside
Econolodge in Bradenton Beach.
"We absolutely dropped when school started
back," said manager Marge Moran. "June and July
were pretty fair, considering the construction we
have taking place."
"But the early start of school really hurt us," she
added. "We used to be booked solid with families
right up through Labor Day. Now, we've got a three-
week lull, although Labor Day will be a sellout."
Same thing for Judy Giovanelli at the Sand
Pebble in Bradenton Beach.
"Things got very slow after school started," she
observed. "We had a great June and July was the
same as last year. It's now like we are losing three
weeks of our summer season."
Many vacationers come from the Lakeland area,
Giovanelli said, and students in that county (Polk)
went back to school Aug. 6.
Barbara Rodocker of BridgeWalk Resort and the
Silver Sands also noticed a slight drop in occupancy
after school started, but occupancy figures re-
bounded later in the month.
"We actually did pretty close to what we did last
year in August at the Silver Sands," she said.
"BridgeWalk was new last year, so we really don't
have a lot of years for comparisonn"
As with other Island accommodations, Rodocker
expects the Labor Day weekend to be a sellout at
both resorts.
For many Florida students, including Manatee
County, the "Back-to-School Grinch" came Aug. 11
instead of the traditional early September opening
day of classes, a change mandated by the Florida
Legislature two years ago.
The early August start of school is cause for con-
cern, said Susan Estler of the Bradenton Area Con-
vention and Visitors Bureau.
"The school start date concerns us and other
tourism destinations in Florida very much," she said.
The Island summer tourist season relies heavily
on in-state visitors, many of them with families, she
said, and the loss of three weeks of the season has to
hurt Island accommodations and businesses.
"We've voiced our concerns to Gov. Jeb Bush
and he's promised to look into the problem. We told
him it's not just the Bradenton area that gets hurt,
it's across the state."
Bush told the CVB that the legislature changed
the start date of school in order to end the first se-
mester for students at the same time the Christmas
break begins. Each school district, however, can still
set its own starting date.
Even with the Grinch stealing three weeks of a
kids summer vacation, "many members reported the
summer season was better than anticipated. It
seemed to be solid, especially on the Island," noted
Estler.
She said other Florida destinations, particularly
Orlando, are still down significantly in visitor arriv-
als since the events of 9-11.


Perfeci aay ror dUCKS,
granddaughters, rainbows
Arlene Purdum e-mailed this rainbow photo to The
Islander, saying, "We thought your readers might
enjoy seeing the aftermath of the big rain Saturday
afternoon. Isn't this rainbow over the Manatee
Avenue bridge beautiful?" She said her visiting
granddaughters were enthralled by the event and "in
fact there were two, side by side." The shot was
taken from her Holmes Beach condo at Westbay
Point and Moorings.

Condo project

proposal OK'd in

Bradenton Beach
By Paul Roat
With little board discussion and no public com-
ment, planners in Bradenton Beach have approved a
14-unit condominium project on the Gulf of Mexico in
the 2500 block of Gulf Drive.
GSR Development LLC has received major devel-
opment approval for the Rosa Del Mar project. It will
house its 14 units in two buildings, displacing 10 rental
units in four free-standing "home" structures on the
1.2-acre tract. GSR's Steve Noriega and Robert Byrne
paid $7.9 million for the clustered parcels in late May,
and sale price for the condos will start at $1.5 million
and go to $1.7 million, Noriega has said.
Planning and zoning board members offered stipu-
lations on the project to include relocation of one of the
project's 31 parking spaces, addition of more landscap-
ing on the site, removal of decks and concrete from the
former units and approval of county and regional offi-
cials regarding adequate water, sewer and other utility
services.
Planners also directed Building Official Bob
Welch to review the ground-level storage provisions of
the site plan to assure that it meets federal require-
ments.
Major developments also are only under the pur-
view of the planning and zoning board. Usually an
advisory board to the city commission, planning and
zoning board decisions on major development propos-
als are about the only applications the board has sole
discretion on, according to city land development rules.
Noriega and Byrne acquired the properties of
Shelly Wheeler, Merritt Fineout's Whispering Sands,
George Sinclair's Breakers, and Roland Vildostegui's
Island Breeze, all within the 2500 block of Gulf Drive.
The four planning board members present act-
ing chair Pete Milazzo, Rick Bisio, Joe Garbus and
Ginnie Neill voted unanimously for the Rosa Del
Mar project.
Noriega said after the meeting that demolition of
the two remaining buildings on the site should com-
mence next week.


Key Royale


Golf Club


expansion plan


under fire

By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Key Royale Club members have been planning and
hoping to expand their clubhouse for some time now,
at least since 1991. They just didn't have a plan until
now.
With a design and architectural plans in hand, they
propose now to add a golf-cart storage building adja-
cent to the clubhouse, which would also free up space
in the present clubhouse for the dining facility.
However, at an Aug. 12 presentation to the Holmes
Beach City Commission, club president Bob Kral ran into
some opposition from a neighbor.
In his presentation to the commission, Kral ex-
plained that the expansion of the clubhouse would en-
tail constructing a somewhat large cart-storage facility,
which the club anticipates will eventually include riding
carts, a feature that has been prohibited at the club in
the past.
The proposed structure, behind the current club-
house on the southeast comer, is directly in front of 604
Hampshire Lane, home to Lynn and Charles Maclver.
With his attorney Peter Kelly, Maclver explained to the
commissioners that the building would block his view
of the golf course.
For almost 45 minutes, both sides to the proposal at-
tempted to persuade the commission to their point of view.
Commission Chairperson Rich Bohnenberger en-
deavored to convince both parties that only arguments
addressing "issues of law," in particular as to whether the
proposed plan complies with city codes, could be taken
into consideration.
Kral told commissioners that the storage building
would increase the size of the facility from 2,200 square
feet to 3,000 square feet and "Would not in any way look
like a garage-looking building, but rather would look
nice."
Showing the club's blueprints and plans, Kral de-
fended the proposal, saying, "We want to be good neigh-
bors." He contended that Maclver will lose only 25 per-
cent of his present view of the club.
MacIver said the club's plans were flawed because of
the rampant on-street parking by members which
would increase with accessibility issues from the club's
parking lot on Key Royale Drive.
Maclver claims more golfers will park on Hampshire
Lane when the carts are stored on that side of the golf
course farther from the parking lot than at present.
"Right now there is proliferate street parking,"
MacIver told commissioners. '"They don't and.won't park
in the parking lot. There's also a real issue with emergency
and garbage truck access because of the parking on the
street."
Commissioner Roger Lutz, who lives in Key Royale
opposite the club parking lot, said he is very familiar with
his neighborhood.
"I live across the street, and you are wrong saying they
don't use the parking lot," said Lutz. "If the parking on the
street does not allow fire trucks on the street or causes
blocking of a private driveway, now that's an intolerable
situation."
A discussion between Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay
Romine, Mayor Carol Whitmore and commissioners in-
terrupted the process as they attempted to find a remedy
for street parking.
"If there are cars on both sides of the street and they
are blocking and impeding the traffic, we can ticket them,"
said Romine. He added that prohibiting parking in front
of one or two homes would not be an appropriate solution.
And the commission determined that street parking
issues were not pertinent to the club proposal.
MacIver repeatedly suggested that the club consider
moving the storage-cart facility to an area closer to the
parking lot to alleviate what is already a problem for him-
self and his neighbors.
Further discussion of the Key Royale Club expansion
is scheduled for the 7 p.m. Sept 11 commission meeting
at city hall.





THE ISLANDER N AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 9


Mayor's hiring plan questioned by commissioner


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria City Commissioner Linda Cramer has
questioned Mayor SueLynn's plan for hiring a city build-
ing official through a committee composed of some city
staff members, saying city employees "should not be in-
terviewing their potential department head.
"I'm concerned about the process," said Cramer. "I
believe the mayor could bring us a recommendation by
herself."
Maybe, said SueLynn, but there are some good
reasons for the selection mechanism.
"I think this is a very important position and there
has to be a deliberate, thoughtful process, forcing us to
think about the individual and the criteria set for the
job," she said.
She defended her idea of a selection committee,
noting it includes a representative of the city commis-
sion, a local contractor, and city staff who will work
with, or under, the new building official.
"It's important to have people involved in the se-
lection process who are going to be working with this
person. It's much better to get input (on the selection)
from qualified people who will act and interact with the
building official on a daily basis."

Holmes Beach Marina

rezone hearing Aug. 28
By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Will townhouses replace a marina?
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission wants to
know what the neighbors of the Holmes Beach Marina
think about the owner's wishes to tear down the marina
and replace it with luxury townhouses.
The 1.6-acre site of the Holmes Beach Marina, lo-
cated' at 202 52nd St., may be the site for nine
townhouses, should city officials agree with the
owner's request.
Brian Quartermain, a director of the owner corpora-
ti6n, is seeking to change the present land use from com-
TJhercial, C-3, to residential, R-2, as well as amending the
city's comprehensive plan to accommodate the proposal.
By law, surrounding neighbors of an applicant's re-
quest for zoning change must be individually notified.
Residents unable to attend the hearing may write
their concerns to the Holmes Beach City Planning
Commission, Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
The zoning change meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 28, at city hall.








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Under the mayor's plan, building officials from the
Holmes Beach Public Works Department will first pre-
pare a short list of the top three to five candidates from
among the 21 submitted.
That list will then be turned over to a "Building
Official Candidate Interview Committee" composed of
Code Enforcement Officer Gerry Rathvon, Public
Works Director George McKay, a city commissioner
to be selected by the city commission, PWD Adminis-
trative Assistant Carol Baker, and a licensed contrac-
tor that the mayor will select.
The committee will meet according to Florida's
"Government in the Sunshine Laws" for an organiza-
tional meeting and select a chairperson.
Candidates will be then be interviewed "in the sun-
shine" and ranked in order of preference by the com-
mittee. A recommendation list will be submitted to the
mayor after all interviews are concluded.
SueLynn said she'll then make the final choice and
present the individual selected for the position to the
city commission for approval.
"I think this is a fair process and we should have
input from as many qualified people as possible in the
selection," she added.
Cramer, however, saw it differently.


T ZiT'TI 1 1 )


The mayor is supposed to make the selection, not
a committee, and the commission has to approve the
candidate, she said.
"I don't see why we need city staff involved in the
selection process," Cramer contended, particular staff
who will be working under the building official hired,
"I have a real problem with that concept."
So does Commissioner Duke Miller, who sug-
gested the mayor bring the top three candidates to com-
missioners and let them decide who should be hired.
That would be contrary to the new city charter
adopted in February 2003 which gives the mayor the
power to hire city staff, SueLynn noted.
Cramer also believes there is a misunderstanding
from the Aug. 12 budget workshop among commis-
sioners about keeping a part-time code enforcement
officer on staff after the city has hired a building offi-
cial, who will also be code enforcement qualified.
"It was my understanding at the Aug. 12 meeting
the consensus among commissioners was to combine
the two positions" in the 2003-04 budget, Cramer said.
"We need to get this ironed out and clarify the con-
sensus reached" immediately when the commission
meets for the first reading of the budget on Sept. 16, she
concluded.


Jammin'
The theme was Mardi
Gras madness at the
Jammin 'for Joints
event held at Woodson
Brothers' Seafood
Grille Saturday night.
The Arthritis Founda-
tion put on the special
fundraiser to create
awareness for arthri-
tis. Pictured are
Bobby, left, and Burt
Woodson with Bridget
Gennett, executive
director of the south-
west region of the
Arthritis Foundation.
According to Gennett,
more than 300,000
children in the Untied
States have the disease
and for some it is
potentially fatal.
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Two incumbents, political newcomer


to seek Anna Maria commission so far


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Current Anna Maria City Commissioners John
Quam and Chuck Webb will seek re-election to their
posts in the city's November elections, while political
newcomer Carol Ann Magill has also announced her
candidacy for a seat on the commission.
Former Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh has picked up an
election packet for a commission seat, but said he is
still undecided on his candidacy.
Resident Dale Woodland confirmed he is consid-
ering a candidacy for a commission seat, but has not yet
picked up a qualifying packet.
Commissioner Tom Aposporos, however, said he
is definitely not running for office.
Aposporos was elected to a commission seat by the
city commission in February 2003 after voters ap-
proved a new city charter creating a fifth commission
seat and removing the mayor as a voting member of the
city commission.


Magill has been a member of several city commit-
tees, but has not previously run for election.
Woodland is presently a member of the planning
and zoning board.
Quam and Webb were unopposed when elected to
office in February 2002.
Under the new charter, three commission seats are
up for election this November while the terms of the
remaining two commissioners and the office of mayor
will expire in November 2004.
The qualifying period for the November elections
runs from noon Sept. 2 to noon Sept. 16. Packets may
be picked up at the Anna Maria City Hall, or at the
Supervisor of Elections office at 305 15th St. W. in
Bradenton.
Candidates for the Anna Maria city commission
must have at least two years residency in Anna Maria
and obtain a minimum of 10 signatures from city resi-
dents verifying residency. In addition, candidates must
pay a $48 qualifying fee and take a loyalty oath.


By Bonner Joy
It's off to the races in Holmes Beach, with the
city's Nov. 4 election.
Qualifying officially begins at noon Tuesday, Sept.
2.
Three cor-,-ission terms are up in November,
those of Commissioners Rich Bohnenberger, Pat Geyer
and Don Maloney.
Contrary to his statement in August last year,
Maloney said he is "definitely running. Why not? The
group now works well together and I think we should
continue."
Maloney was first elected to the commission in
1995 and has remained undeafeted or unopposed since.


Happy Grandpa
Rex Roberts of Holmes Beach revels in grandfatherly
affection for grandchildren Jordan and Madison
McGelligott, who were visiting him with their
parents, Rex and Shannon, of Silver Spring, Md.



Thrift shop is reopening at Roser
The Roser Thrift Shop, 511 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria, is to reopen Tuesday, Sept. 2, after being closed
for a month. It will be in business from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays and 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays,
with donations accepted 9-11 a.m. Wednesday. Addi-
tional information may be obtained by calling 778-
0414 or 779-2733.


Geyer said, "Yes, ma'am, I'm running again."
As owner of Duffy's Tavern, Geyer frequently
applies her longtime business operator's common sense
to issues and a straight forward practicality to commis-
sion business. Geyer served on the commission from
1978 until being elected mayor in 1990. She chose to
run for commission in 1994 and served until 1996
when she lost her re-election bid, but regained her seat
in 1997.
Geyer said, "I think the history needs to be brought
into the meetings and certain issues, and there's a few
things need to be done yet."
City Clerk Brooke Bennett said only Geyer and
Maloney have picked up qualifying information, al-
though Bohnenberger said this week he intends to run
for another term. He served on the commission in 1993,
as mayor 1994-96, and was elected again to the com-
mission in 1999.
"Yes, I expect I will run again," he said. "I would
like to address the infrastructure needs of our city with
a comprehensive capital improvement plan in the form
of a resolution."
That resolution will contain three major elements,
a prioritized drainage plan, dredging plan and general
infrastructure needs such as the Key Royale Bridge,
seawalls, and more. Bohnenberger said his plan will
include cost estimates and projected funding sources.
"The city cannot rely on the Florida Department of
Transportation to replace the bridge in a timely man-
ner," he said. "We must be prepared to pay for this. If
we can keep the bridge project in the DOT five-year
plan, we can work out a joint project, replace the bridge
before it becomes a crisis and recover our money from
FDOT at a future date."
Challengers have until noon Sept. 16. to qualify for
a two-year term on the commission, which will begin
with a swearing-in on Nov. 16. Each commissioner's
salary is $4,800.
A candidate must be a U.S. citizen, a registered
voter in Manatee County and a resident of the city for
two years prior to qualifying for office. Qualifying
packets are available at city hall. Packets include finan-
cial disclosure forms, a loyalty oath and oath of candi-
date, petitions and affidavits.
A candidate can qualify by paying an election as-
sessment fee equal to one percent of the annual salary
of the office, submitting a petition with signatures of 15
voters residing in the city and filing a candidate resi-
dency affidavit, or by filing an "undue burden" oath,
which eliminates the fee, along with a petition with
signatures of 15 voters residing in the city.
Qualifying packets are available at Holmes Beach
City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive, or from the Manatee
County Supervisor of Elections office, 305 15th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Residents of Holmes Beach have until Oct. 6 to
register to vote in the city election. Registration forms
and absentee ballot information are available at city


Holmes Beach commissioners


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Environmentalists OK AME construction site


Specialists from Environmental Affairs Con-
sultants in Palmetto have conducted an ecological
evaluation of Anna Maria Elementary School to
assess the potential for native habitats and presence
of wildlife that may be disturbed due to the planned
construction of a new school building.
According to the letter submitted to school
architect Tom Cardinal of Educational Design
Architects, the site inspections took place on
July 14 and 23.
The environmental evaluation noted the pres-
ence of live oak and cabbage palm trees in the
northeast comer of the campus, which was not con-
sidered a native habitat. According to the report,
"no groundcover or understory vegetation indica-


tive of native habitats was observed in this area."
EAC staff said it did observe the "common,
non-native, Quaker parrot perching in the trees, but
no other wildlife was observed utilizing the site."
The staff also inspected the antenna tower for
evidence of bird nesting and determined that the
tower appears to be unsuitable for nesting by
birds such as osprey due to its size and lack of a
platform at the top.
The report notes that evidence of nesting
would include nesting materials, food droppings
and other waste on or below the tower.
EAC determined that no native habitats or
wildlife will be disturbed by the new school con-
struction.


Obituaries


THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 27, 2003 M PAGE 11


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David I. Austin
David I. Austin, 72, of Bradenton Beach, died Aug.
21.
Born in Reading, Mass., Mr. Austin moved to
Anna Maria Island in 1983.
He was the former owner of
the Broken Glass Shop in
N Holmes Beach and Island
'- Inn Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. He was associated
with the Felters Corp. and
S .. U.S. Oil Corp., and owned
SBogart's Pub in Providence,
R.I. He was a craftsman and
i specialized in antique auto-
Austin mobile and boat restoration.
He was an avid sailor. He
was a member of the Masonic Shrine and the Unitar-
ian Church.
Memorial services will be held at a later date.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Bishop
Animal Shelter, 5718 21st. Ave. W., Bradenton FL
34209.
He is survived by wife Sandy; daughters Tracy
Austin Cunningham of Connecticut, Jamie of Virginia,
and LeeAnn Smith of Bradenton; six grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.

Dorothy L. Farrand
Dorothy L. Farrand, 79, of Bradenton, died July 18.
A memorial mass was held Aug. 23 at St. Bernard
Catholic Church, Holmes Beach. Inurnment will be in
the memorial garden at the church. Shannon Funeral
Home, Town Chapel, was in charge of arrangements.

Richard J. Kelly
Richard J. Kelly, 83, of Bradenton, died Aug. 21.
Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Kelly came to Manatee
County from Ruskin in 1973. He was the owner of
Kelly's Bar and Restaurant in Ruskin, worked at the
Oasis Bar of Bradenton and Galati Marine in Anna
Maria. He served in the U.S. Army during World War
II. He was a former member of Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 81 and a lifetime member of the Showman's
Club. He attended Church of the Annunciation.
Memorial services will be at 3:20 p.m. Friday at the
church, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Memorial
contributions may be made to the church, 4408 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217, or to Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL
34238. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Cortez Road
Chapel, is in charge of arrangements.
He is survived by companion Jeanne Colwell of
Bradenton; daughters Patricia Hendricks of
Coatesville, Pa., and Michele Stampa of Sebring; son
Richard A. of Longwood; six grandchildren; and a
great-grandchild.

Linda L. Mills
Linda L. Mills, 54, of Bradenton, died July 2.
A memorial service will be held at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, Aug. 27, at the beach at Magnolia Avenue, Anna
Maria City, with services in the event of rain planned
at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria City. Toale Brothers Funeral Home, South
Chapel, is in charge of arrangements.


Allen Yarn
Allen Yarn, 81, of Bradenton, died Aug. 17.
Born in Lamount, Fla., Mr. Yarn moved to Mana-
tee County from there. He was a maintenance worker
with the Anna Maria City Public Works Department
from 1974-1993. He served in the U.S. Army in Europe
during World War II. He was Baptist.
Visitation was Aug. 22 at Riggins and Daughter
Funeral Home, Bradenton, and services Aug. 23 at St.
John's First Baptist Institutional, Bradenton. Burial
was at Adams Fogartyville Cemetery, Bradenton.
He is survived by wife Vera Mae; daughters
Paulette Washington, Brenda Conley, Roxanne
Goolsby, Priscilla Swilley, Dr. Pamela Davis, and
Sharon Calhoun, all of Bradenton; sons Allen "Ricky"
Jr. of Palmetto, Stanley L., Dwight L., Ijentra Owens
and Kellas Owens, all of Bradenton; sisters Essie May
Brown, Rossie Yarn, Bertha Clemons, of Bradenton,
and Fanni White and Sylvia Richardson, of Palmetto;
brother Johnny of Palmetto; 42 grandchildren; and 41
great-grandchildren.

Remembering Allen Yarn
By Elizabeth Moss of Anna Maria
Allen was always the earliest one to report for the
day's work at Anna Maria City Hall. By the time Direc-
tor of Public Works and Building Official Charlie Kehm
arrived, Allen had raised the flag, opened the offices and
seen that all was in good order. Allen, the city's mainte-
nance man, would ask, "Mr. Kehm, what's on the menu
today?" and they would drive off, Allen receiving the
"menu" from Mr. Kehm, and cautioning him about his
driving. "That was on my side, Mr. Kehm."
Allen was a very dedicated worker and followed all
of Mr. Kehm's instructions very carefully. He was
proud of the city equipment tractor, mower and
truck and took good care of them.
All the townspeople liked him, his courtesy, en-
deavor to please, and his ability to do a good job.
The city clerk and I thought highly of him too, and
became good friends. We celebrated all birthdays, the
four of us (Allen, Charlie, the city clerk and I). This
meant a dash to the IGA for a Sara Lee cake and some
ginger ale for a quick party.
One spring during President Jimmy Carter's ad-
ministration, Allen and I planted peanuts in the city hall
front yard. We raised so many peanuts that we im-
plored city hall visitors to please pull up a plant when
they left.
Allen worked for the city for 19 1/2 years, from
1974-93. Before this Allen was an employee for the
Cipriani Brothers. He helped to clear land for the new
Anna Maria Elementary School back in the late 1940s
and early '50s.
Allen was patriotic, taking pride in raising and low-
ering the flag each day. He served in the U.S. Army in
Europe during World War II.
After Allen's retirement, he never forgot us. Al-
though he lived out in east Bradenton, he would drive
up to Mr. Kehm's house to see him at least once a year.
He came to see Gene and me too, bringing fish he
caught or collard greens his wife grew, and we visited
their home as well.
He was on kidney dialysis for the past three years.
Even though he became weak, changing from a strong,
robust man to a very thin one, he still drove out to visit us.
He was a very good friend, and we miss him.


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PAGE 12 M AUGUST 27, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


Some family
The Busciglio family is at it again, a huge get-together in Anna Maria and a wide-angle pose in the "family pyramid." Original family members vacationed here from
the late 1940s, says spokeswoman Debbie Busciglio Kilichowski of Tampa. In the early '50s Joe and Angie Penton bought a vacation home in Anna Maria and it's still
in the family and in heavy use for the annual reunion 78 people this year. Another relative through marriage, Ernie Cagnina, had the Island IGA store for many
years.



Whitmore will seek lower skate park fees


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Carol Whitmore has agreed
to present a resolution to the city commission calling
for a standard $10 registration fee for all Island resi-
dents to use the skate park facility at city hall, not just
those from Holmes Beach, as is presently the case.
Because Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach did not
sign a proposed interlocal agreement on the park,
Whitmore and the Holmes Beach commission had
charged $30 for nonresidents to register to use the park.
That higher fee prompted an outcry from Anna Maria
Mayor SueLynn and City Commissioner Linda Cramer
because the city had approved $500 in its 2003-04 bud-
get to Holmes Beach for park maintenance, but city resi-
dents weren't getting the Holmes Beach rate to use the
park.
The problem started when the Anna Maria City
Commission refused to sign the interlocal agreement
because it could not get a "hold harmless" clause added
by Holmes Beach in the event of injury at the park.


Islander assistance available
The Islander newspaper has a financial assis-
tance program to help needy youngsters meet the
costs of registration at the skateboard park and
the accompanying equipment.
To learn more about the program, call
Bonner Joy at 778-7978.


What do you do when a boy from Bradenton
Beach can't afford the $30 to register at the skateboard
park, let alone pay for all the required safety equip-
ment?
In Whitmore's case, you open up your pocket-
book.
Whitmore said she recently had noticed a
young boy about 15 years old skateboarding around
the park, but the youth didn't go inside, just hung
around the fence.
One day, said Whitmore, "He came up and
asked me how much it cost to join since he lived in
Bradenton Beach. When I told him $30, he just
sighed and said he didn't have that much money be-
cause he had just moved here and he was working


Without an interlocal agreement, Whitmore recom-
mended and the Holmes Beach City Commission
agreed to charge the higher rate for non-city residents.
But after Whitmore explained to Cramer and
SueLynn at the Barrier Island Elected Officials meet-
ing Aug. 20 that the interlocal agreement is only for
park maintenance, not for insurance or liability,
SueLynn agreed to bring the issue back to the city com-
mission.
"Anna Maria was concerned that if someone got
hurt, it could be sued by signing the interlocal agree-


to help out his mom.
"What else could I do?" she said. "I pulled out
my checkbook."
Whitmore paid for the youngster's registration
out of her own pocket and got the youth outfitted
from West Coast Surf Shop in Holmes Beach, also
at her own expense.
"It was the least I could do," Whitmore said, al-
though she was reluctant to discuss her assistance.
"I did it just as anyone would who wanted to help
kids. I don't really want publicity."
And she's not worried that other Island youth will
follow the rainbow to the end of her purse strings.
The youth, who asked not to be identified, said
he really appreciated Whitmore's effort.


ment," said Whitmore. "I explained that the interlocal
is for maintenance only, that we have the liability in-
surance, although the county is paying the premium. Of
course, anybody can sue anybody."
That seemed to satisfy Cramer and SueLynn and
the mayor said Anna Maria City Commission Chair-
person John Quam has agreed to place the skate park
interlocal agreement with Holmes Beach on the Aug.
28 commission agenda for further discussion.
"Hopefully, we can get this [interlocal] approved,"
said Mayor SueLynn.


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THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 13


Conversation with HB Treasurer Rick Ashley


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Rick Ashley joined the City of Holmes Beach staff
as city treasurer in 1998, following a 24-year career in
local government as a top administrator and accountant
with the Manatee County Clerk of Circuit Court.
For more than 20 years, Ashley has managed gov-
ernment operations in a supervisory capacity, includ-
ing the establishment and monitoring of internal con-
trols for financial processes and operational data-sys-
tems development.
Ashley's experience includes supervising contract
administration, personnel functions, statutory compli-
ance and purchasing administration.
Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Ashley has lived
in Manatee County since 1960, graduating from South-
east High School, Manatee Community College and
Florida Atlantic University, where he obtained his de-
gree in business administration.

Question: What is your job?
Ashley: As chief financial officer of the city, my
job is to account for the city's money and provide the
financial information needed for the operation of the
city. Although the current mayor has asked me to co-
ordinate certain additional functions under her guid-
ance, my overall job duties have not changed a lot.
Every department head and every city employee is
at times asked to wear a lot of different hats. In addi-
tion to my city treasurer responsibilities, I perform
tasks, such as, facilitate weekly department head meet-
ings, review the mayor's daily mail and assist the
mayor in any way to help the city run smoothly by
overseeing projects or daily operations as needed.

Q: What is the budget process?
Ashley: My responsibility is to assemble and as-
similate the numbers needed to put together the over-
all budget of the city based on the requests of the other
three department heads and the priorities of the mayor.
The department heads are the ones that run their
respective areas and the experts are the best in their
fields. They provide me with their best estimates of
what it will cost to do what they need to do.
When it comes to the number crunching for more
identifiable costs, such as salaries, benefits, and insur-
ance, I am the number cruncher and the one to put the
final proposal together.
The overall budget preparation is accomplished as
a team effort, working together to examine the needs
and costs of providing the services to the residents.

Q: Why is code enforcement separated from public


Follow the money
Holmes Beach City Treasurer Rick Ashley, the
architect of Mayor Carol Whitmore's 2003-04
proposed city budget. Islander Photo: Joe Kane

works this year?
Ashley: The reason code enforcement was broken
out separately in this year's proposed budget is because
it's the one function that has undergone some major
changes. We recently have added a code enforcement
clerk that has increased the efficiency .of the code en-
forcement officer and allowed him to spend more time
in the field working on complaints and less time doing
office paperwork.
Also the mayor removed code enforcement from
the public works department and put it under her scru-
tiny so she could be more responsive to the complaints
she was receiving.
Separating the budget in this manner delineates the
cost of the code enforcement function and these
changes that were made, making it clearer and more
accountable to the public and commission.

Q: Does that mean the PW budget has increased
over and above what the proposed PW budget re-
flects?
Ashley: Yes. The code enforcement officer's sal-
ary and expenditures that relate to him would need to




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past budgets.

Q: What is your job's biggest challenge?
Ashley: Every day and every job has challenges. I
guess one of my biggest challenges is leaving this job
at the door as I head home at night, but I am doing my
best to do so. I am just the type of person that takes
things seriously as a rule and looks to the long-term
solutions in general.

Q: Which personnel do you supervise?
Ashley: I don't directly supervise any individual
city employees; it is more of a team effort.

Q: What is it that the public may not know about
your job?
Ashley: That is a hard question. In general, I think that
the citizens that I deal with tend to have a pretty good
handle on what my job function and responsibilities as city
treasurer are. What they usually need is a more detail level
of explanation on certain processes and financial facts
relating to the city. I do try to operate with an open-door
policy though, and I am always willing to talk to any citi-
zen to help clarify any question they may have. They have
a right to know the facts about how their city government
operates and it's financial condition.

Q: What about family?
Ashley: My wife Valerie and I met in high school
and have been married for 32 years. She is definitely
the most wonderful and important part of my world.
We have raised two sons, Chris and Erik

Q: Proudest achievement?
Ashley: I would have to say at this point in life, my
proudest achievement would have to be the fact that I
have been able to maintain my perspective of the im-
portance of family and personal values.


Scrapbooking registration
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Registration is open now for the Creative
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Signup is at the Center or by phone at 778-
1908. The class will begin Sept. 11 and run for
six consecutive Thursdays from 10 a.m.-12:30
p.m. Cost is $10 per person per class. Instructor
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PAGE 14 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Alternative to toxic Gulf dumping found, refuted


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Islanders and marine life received some good news
this week.
A company wants to take the wastewater from the
Piney Point phosphate mine on 3,800 acres adjacent to the
phosphate holding ponds and disperse over its sod fields.
Should the deal go through, it means that future
wastewater from the plant would be sprayed on sod
grass compatible with the solutions rather than dump-
ing it in the Gulf of Mexico.
The Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion first dismissed the proposal as too questionable and
too late. Just two days after the plan was offered, the
DEP refused it, although a spokesperson said the idea
may have long-term benefit.
The race against a potential disaster seems to be the
premise of DEP's rejection of the plan.
For a month, the barge named "New York" has
carried loads of 7 million gallons of wastewater to a site
120 miles out in the Gulf. The wastewater, a byproduct
of phosphate fertilizer production, contains cobalt,
lead, iron, nickel, radium and titanium six times the
limits set by the federal government for dumping.
The new plan's backers believe it will be ulti-
mately accepted after the urgent November deadline to
reduce the wastewater passes.
E.D. "Sonny" Vergara, an officer of Mainstream
Companies, has asked the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection to consider the offer of his com-
pany for an alternative dumping process.
In a five-page letter to Allan Bedwell, assistant
secretary of DEP, Vergara wrote, "Our proposal is to
receive 1 to 3 million gallons per day of treated process
water from the existing Piney Point gypsum stack and
apply it over an appropriate number of acres in a man-
ner that will cause maximum evaporation."
Vergara proposes to pipe the wastewater from ad-
joining holding ponds and spray it at "... higher eleva-
tions above ground than normal to optimize evapora-
tion before reaching ground level. At ground level, the
treated process water would provide irrigation of salt-


tolerant grasses (most likely Coastal Paspalum)."
The property proposed for use is adjacent to the
east of the Piney Point phosphate property and stretches
beyond Interstate 75. Presently, the 3,800-acre site is
used for cattle pasture or sod production.
One of the most persuasive reasons to dump this
wastewater on grass rather than in the Gulf is the po-
tentially catastrophic consequences should the barge be
caught in a storm and cause a spill near shore.
There's real concern for the fishing industry amid
concerns the wastewater's mega-nutrients could spawn
red tide and otherwise devastate the area's tourist in-
dustry.
Recent heavy rains in this area have environmen-
tal officials concerned that the holding ponds will over-
flow and flood into Tampa Bay, causing a potential en-
vironmental disaster in Tampa Bay.
It's a race to stay ahead of the rainfall. The DEP
wants 200 million gallons of the toxic byproduct re-
moved from phosphogypsum stacks by November.
That would still leave 500 million gallons of wastewa-
ter in vulnerable holding pits.
According to the St. Petersburg Times, the Tampa


Bay area typically receives 7 inches of rain during the
summer months. Should a hurricane or severe storm
drop 18 to 20 inches in a month, which has occurred in
the past, a possible catastrophe is in the making.
Attempts to reach officials from DEP were unsuc-
cessful.
The proposal offers an alternative disposing
method that could possibly be safer than dumping into
the Gulf, and come closer to approaching DEP's objec-
tives for, "eliminating the current dangers associated
with the volumes of water now contained in pools atop
the stack," wrote Vergara to DEP.
"We are determined not to have any adverse effects
on the groundwater," said Vergara.
The alternative destination for this wastewater,
Vergara said, would speed up the closing down of the
stacks, as well as safely manage the level of wastewa-
ter in stacks as they are emptied on adjoining grassland.
Vergara, former executive director of Southwest
Florida Water Management District, has two prominent
Floridians, Hugh E. McGuire, formerly an attorney
with Holland & Knight, and John Falkner of Falkner
Farms, as partners in Mainstream Companies Inc.


,i4: Speaking
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State Rep. Bill
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i the guest
Speaker at the
Anna Maria
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S... .L at Cafe on the
-. ., . Beach Satur-
day. Islander
Photo: J.L.
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THE ISi, ANDER AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 15


Anna Maria turtle crisis averted


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
A looming confrontation over lights and turtles in
Anna Maria was averted this week with the flick of a
switch.
James Toomey, owner of the Bayview Plaza shop-
ping center on the Anna Maria waterfront, did the flick-
ing as soon as he heard of the problem, said Gerry
Rathvon, city code enforcement officer.
The lights at the building threatened to stall the
Lake LaVista dredging project when Turtle Watch di-
rector Suzi Fox told the city she couldn't OK spread-
ing sand on the beach south of the city pier as long as
the offending lights were "on."
The sand had been dredged from the shallows of
the inlet and piled just north of the pier to await the
hatching of sea turtle nests from the area where the
sand is destined to go. The last nest will hatch in mid-
September, and the city would like to start moving the
sand then. But the rule is no sand there until the nest-
ing season ends Oct. 31.
Residents along the water want the unsightly pile
cleared from their view right now. George McKay, city
public works director, told them he couldn't move it and
Fox said she couldn't see her way clear to ask the state for
more liberal treatment as long as the lights were there.
"They'll be creating habitat which will allow en-
dangered turtles to nest there in the future," she said.
"Bayview's lights would be a fatal attraction to
hatchlings."
At birth turtles instinctively head for light, in mil-
lennia past the sparkle of the sea. Now manmade lights
compete successfully with that sparkle, and turtles of-
ten fail to find the water and quickly die.



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Watching for turtles
Dredged sand from Lake LaVista in Anna Maria has been stockpiled just north of the humpback bridge at
Bayfront Park while the city's public works department awaits word from Suzi Fox of Anna Maria Turtle
Watch that several turtles nests along the shore near the city pier are clear of hatchlings. Lake LaVista is
dredged annually and the dried sand is spread along the beach area near the pier, PWD Director George


McKay said. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson.

Rathvon met with Toomey late Monday, outlined
the problem and suggested shielding the lights or trad-
ing bulbs for turtle-friendly ones.
"What if I just turned them off right now?" he
asked, and flipped the switch that will leave the water
side of his building lightless after dark until the end of
the turtle-nesting season.


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Rathvon said she was delighted.
That still leaves the shoreside residents with a hill
of sand along the water, and leaves McKay trying to
explain why he can't clear their view overnight.
He and Fox now can look into the possibility of
asking the state for consideration of the turtle season's
deadline.


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Te Islander

Don't leave the Island
without taking time to
subscribe. Visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
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Holmes Beach or call
941-778-7978.


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T'I a39A'q' '0 T TSD UA R HaTiAJLHiHl f
PAGE 16 .AUGUST 27, 2003 U THE ISLANDER


Island turtle hatch nears halfway point


By Jim Hanson
i Islander Correspondent
: With two months to go in the nesting season, Anna
Maria Island's sea turtle nest progress is nearing the
halfway point in terms of nests and numbers.
Of the 198 confirmed nests on the Island's beach,
75 have hatched 4,254 of the total 7,278 eggs laid, said
Suzi Fox. She directs the Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch and holds the state's permit for marine turtle
preservation here.
The hatch's lesser number is due to unfertilized
and damaged eggs, natural deaths of hatchlings, and
several hundred hatchling deaths caused by illegal
lights in businesses and residences ashore. The lights
lure baby hatchlings from the sea to almost certain
death upland.
Fox and other Turtle Watch volunteers are able to


THE


10 YEARS


Headlines in the Aug. 26, 1993, issue
of The Islander announced that:
The Florida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection questioned the safety and alignment of a pro-
posed new 65-foot-high Anna Maria Island Bridge by
the Florida Department of Transportation and asked the
DOT to undertake a further study of the need for a new
bridge.
Despite a sparse turnout, Islanders at a public
hearing expressed support for a proposed trolley bus
system from the north end of Anna Maria Island to
Lido Key. The system would be funded by a state grant,
but the Manatee County Commission had already re-
jected the proposal once.
Residents living near the Sandbar restaurant in
Anna Maria hired an attorney to stop efforts by owner
Ed Chiles to expand the outdoor dining area and park-
ing lot at the facility.


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count the eggs and hatchlings fairly accurately because
they dig into nests after the hatchlings leave, hopefully
for the Gulf. The Turtle Watchers count the emptied
eggs and often give a boost to the sea to hatchlings left
behind in the sand.
The 7,478 eggs validate experts' calculations of an
average 100 eggs per loggerhead nest.
A federal agent is still on the Island working on rec-
ommendations for Island cities, particularly Holmes
Beach, to overcome problems with lights visible from the
shoreline Turtles instinctivelyhead for light at birth. Until
mankind came along, the light was the sparkle of the sea
surface.Now, lights ashore mislead them to death on dry
land, mostly from dehydration or predators.
Fox and her volunteers have made considerable
headway getting residents and businesses to turn off or
shield lights visible from the beach, but Holmes Beach
continues to have problems, she said.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service official who
has walked the beach several nights is expected to com-


Roser is signing up kids
for Joyful Noise Choir
Enrollment is under way for the Joyful Noise
Choir, Roser Memorial Community Church's musical
experience for youngsters in first- through fifth-grade.
Choir practice will be 3-4 p.m. every Wednesday
starting Sept. 3 at the church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria. The church van will pick up students at Anna
Maria Elementary School and convey them to the
church.
There they will have a snack before practice be-
gins. The church said parents are invited to attend and
participate. Kindergartners are also welcome "if they
have a helper attending with them."
Students may be registered for the program by
calling Susan Crumpler or Kelley Tribble at 778-0414,
or at the church office from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Fri-
day.



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plete this week her report on lighting conditions and
suggestions for how to correct problems, Fox said.
A Brownie troop of 20 Tampa area 7-year-olds
helped volunteers release some rescued hatchlings over
the weekend and excavated and evaluated some nests
with AMITW coordinator Jo Ann Meilner.
The youngsters each received AMITW's new tem-
porary turtle tattoos and then helped other volunteers
run the Turtle Watch booth at the Children's Summit
at the Manatee County Civic Center over the weekend.
For the next several weeks, nominees for the an-
nual Sadie award will be evaluated. The award will go
to the person or organization who the judges feel con-
tributed most toward marine turtle preservation during
the year.
It is named for the turtle injured in a fall from a
seawall in Bradenton Beach some years ago, rescued
by Turtle Watch, treated by Mote Marine Laboratory,
and ultimately released in the Gulf.
Past Sadie winners are Claudia. and Glenn
Wiseman, Frank Almeda, Bonner Joy, Arlene Byrnes,
Jerris Foote and Fox, and they will be doing the judg-
ing for this year's winner.


Temps ^ 'i-

& Drops |

on .M.I. -

Date Low High Rainfall
Aug. 17 77 91 .80
Aug.18 78 93 0
Aug. 19 79 91 .20
Aug. 20 75 91 0
Aug. 21 78 91 Trace
Aug. 22 79 92 .20
Aug. 23 80 90 0
Average Gulf water temperature 86
24-hour accumulation with reaclingat approximately 5 p.m. daily.








The Islanders football contest is
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For the best contest advertising ...

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THE ISLANDER U AUGUST 27, 2003 U PAGE 17


'TOP NOTCH' PHOTO CONTEST RUNNERS.UP


Hundreds of people sent in their favorite pictures for The Islander's "Top Notch" photo contest. Although
Clyde Dickey of Texas captured our grand prize last week, there were just too many of your excellent photo- Laurie Adams of Holmes Beach snapped a picture of
graphs for us to ignore, so here are some of the runners-up. Above, Peggy Nash of Anna Maria took a great a delicate magnolia.
shot of a snowy egret.


Gary Guy of Bradenton took to the air in an ultralight to
photograph the Rod & Reel Pier in Anna Maria.


Anthony Rizzo of Holmes Beach found this colorful critter resting on his boat.


The kids took to the water in ships er, boats and Katherine Coleman of Holmes Beach was
there to catch the action.


Katerina Brosda couldn't help snapping a picture of this bubbly
pooch in a tub.


'9





PAGE 18 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


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Come see us at the Cortez Fishing Center dock
,' or visit our Web site for photos and info:
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PAGE 19 E AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


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PAGE 20 AUGUST 27, 2003_M THE SLANDER


Billy and George throw Island's best bowling party!
Some 280-plus bowlers and 100 or more friends and social butterflies showed up at the 13th annual O'Connor Bowling
Challenge at AMF Bradenton Lanes on Cortez Road to raise money for kids' sports programs at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center. Islander Photo: Rebecca Barnett


Peg "Duffy"
Davenport
was honored
by Billy and
George
O'Connor
for five years
of "outstand-
ing TV raffle
ticket sales"
at the 13th
annual
bowling
challenge.
Islander
Photo:
Bonner Joy


Dave Huggins, left, and David
Bannigan show off their shoes, con-
trasting their luauu" themed attire.
Islander Photo: Rebecca Barnett


.-


.^ :; -


Rene Bannigan, right, was all "hugs and squeals" when her prize
ticket was called out for the 32-inch TV donated by The Islander. Peg
Davenport, left, handles the ticket sales and hugs each year for
the tourney. Billy 0 is "squeezed out" behind the ladies. Islander
Photo: Bonner Joy


jp "l When Wh the (isttt*e you enjoyed esu(c4ainj (ordi-sty(fe
I. OVE6LOOKI 4 EAUJ ATrL iAMrSA Y THE 4VLr orF4 MExo
|eks I w.


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.~5f" ;


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Coil 941.778. 515 or visit wuuu.the oterfrontrestouront.net
The Waterfront is open everydoay for breakfast (8-11), lunch (11-4:30) and dinner (4:30-9)


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TUESDAY ~ CAJUN NIGHT!
Gumbo, Etouffee, Jambalaya, Crawfish, Dirty Rice, Fried Okra and more!
Zydeco tunes by The Gumbo Boogie Band, 7-9 pm
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rinine (ut tcniuht?
S ;" .,'. Find out
'', "- where
S- ,. to go in
The Islander


SUMMER

SIZZLES!
Cool off with our wine speclall
Buy one dinner entree and a
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the second entree ...

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Wed.-Sat.11 to 2:30
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lad, Dad cruise with Navy


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Turn an 11-year-old boy loose aboard a warship at
sea and you've created a recipe for pure joy.
Patrick Watts spent seven days aboard the landing
assault ship USS Tarawa, en route home from a long
combat deployment to Iraq. He ran and climbed and ate
and fantasized his own heroic combat, capturing hearts
from captain to seaman.
He was with his father, John Watts of Holmes
Beach, as guests of the U.S. Navy and his uncle, Lt.
Cmdr. Tom Matula. Not to mention the 2,000 Marines
and 1,500 Navy crew aboard.
It was part of the Navy's program to welcome
ships' families on the final leg of a vessel's return to the
States from a combat assignment. Matula arranged it
for brother-in-law Watts and nephew Patrick.
It was seven days of heaven from Pearl Harbor to
San Diego, said John Watts. When the Tarawa deliv-
ered its Marines to Camp Pendleton, Calif., it was
joined by Patrick's 9-year-old sister Jill, for the final
day to San Diego homeport. She loved it too but "I
don't think she'd have been enthralled for the whole
seven days," said the youngsters' mother, Lynn.
The families had the run of the ship, and "run" was
the operative word for Patrick, said his father.
From bridge to bilge and stem to stern, all 850 feet
of the warship was open to the inquisitive youngster,
challenging even his 11-year-old exuberance to expe-
rience all of it. Available to him were all six Harrier
vertical-takeoff-and-landing warplanes and all 50 he-
licopters aboard. He studied the Marines' mechanical
equipment such as Humvees and landing craft and ar-
tillery. He even got to hold a rifle and watch a whole
range of weaponry fired in battle drill between Hawaii
and the mainland.
He became the lion of the chow line. His appetite
made him the darling of the cooks and the marvel of the
crew.
"He loved the food," said his father, "first in line
and he must have eaten six meals a day. They finally
put him behind the counter serving-food."
This was the flagship of a group of six LHA land-
ings helicopter assault ships and had on boar'dihe .15th
Marine Expeditionary Unit. It landed its combat troops
in'Kuwait from where they secured oil fields and refiri
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Cruising
Jill Watts, father John, uncle Lt. Cmdr. Tom Matula
and Jill's brother Patrick Watts aboard the USS
Tarawa in the Pacific.
series in southern Iraq. It was extremely hot and uncom-
fortable there, Marines told him, wind-driven powdery
sand clogging everything from mouths to machinery.
Watts, who owns an insurance agency in Tampa,
even found a semi-neighbor in the skipper, Capt. Jay
Bowling, whose permanent home is on Tampa's Davis
Island.
"These are a serious group of people, all of them,"
said Watts. "They are justifiably proud of what they've
done, and they feel that the people of Iraq are grateful.
I couldn't admire them more."


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... 7am.-9pm Enjoy our Air-Conditioned View of Tampa Bay


State here to help

in emergency
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Members of the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials got an update at their Aug. 20
meeting by the Florida Division of Emergency
Management on all the wonderful programs
available from state and federal sources follow-
ing an emergency.
That was the good news for the BIEO. The
bad news is that Craig Fugate, head of the Florida
Department of Emergency Management, said all
requests for assistance by a municipal govern-
ment must be channeled first to the appropriate
county emergency agency, then to the state.
"So, there really wasn't a whole lot in that
meeting for Island officials," said Anna Maria
City Commission Chairperson John Quam.
"It was nice to know all those programs are
available, but the meeting was really for the
county people," he said. "We still have to go to
them first for assistance."
The meeting, however, was attended by a num-
ber of representatives of Manatee County's Emer-
gency Management Services division, various fire
district officials and elected officials who will be
involved in a first response to a declared emergency.
And the first response to any emergency such
as a flood, hurricane or fire is always the munici-
pal government, Fugate said.
He did note that Florida now has a State
Emergency Response Team SERT which
is activated by the governor to deal with any lo-
cal or state emergency.
SERT and the DEM have contingency plans
to deal with a wide range of emergency situa-
tions, Fugate said, including terrorism, bio-terror-
ism, mass migration, hurricanes, floods, hazard-
ous materials and wildfires.
"We have plans for response," Fugate told
the meeting. "It's up to local officials to first ac-
tivate their emergency plan, then go to the county
as your first line of support."
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn said Island cit-
ies need to cooperate more, particular during an
emergency.

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The Islander.






PAGE 22 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

Island Biz


La Plage is the place for luxury
La Plage condominium developer Ron Chovan
stands proudly in front of his complex at 6500 Gulf
Drive in Holmes Beach. Units at the upscale devel-
opment are now on the market through Mike Norman
Realty in Holmes Beach. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin
La Plage 'most luxurious'
Island condominiums
Arguably the Island's most luxurious and upscale
condominiums are nearly completed and for those
who've already purchased units at La Plage on Gulf
Drive in Holmes Beach, the wait for this exclusive
"community" has been well worth it.
Fact is, developer Ron Chovan has kept one of the
11 units for himself.
Originally from the Chicago area, where his father
Joseph founded Chovan Construction in 1947, Ron has
been visiting the Island for many years and always
wanted to live on the Island.
"I knew going in that I loved this area and wanted
a unit for myself," said Ron, who also developed the
Gulf Breeze condominium units in Bradenton Beach.
La Plage is not your ordinary Island condominium
complex.
The average size of all units is 2,460 square feet,
with the largest at 4,200 square feet.
Units are either two-bedroom or three-bedroom
along with two and a half or three bathrooms and all
have a library/den area. A fireplace option is available.
Each unit has a direct view of the Gulf of Mexico.
The entire complex is gated and secured with out-
door video surveillance, and includes an interior ga-

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rage, two elevators, a swimming pool and spa and is
landscaped with traditional Florida plants and trees.
Granite counter tops and marble floors are standard
throughout, kitchens come complete with all top-of-
the-line appliances and each unit has an alarm system.
If that's not impressive enough, all plumbing and
floors are soundproof, Chovan added.
"You can walk in high heels and the people below
you won't hear a thing," he beamed.
Interior design is up to the individual buyer, al-
though Chovan has done his unit in the "Tommy
Bahama" style appropriate to the Mediterranean archi-
tecture of the complex.
"Each unit is unique in its own way, and we think
these are the most luxurious condominiums on Anna
Maria Island," said Chovan. "We've spared no expense
to bring the best quality of Island living to La Plage
residents."
Indeed, even though the units have just been put on
the market and there were no pre-sales or reservations,
two clients have already purchased units.
Prices range from $1.5 million to $2.275 million.
Mike Norman Realty in Holmes Beach is the lead
agency for La Plage, and for more information, call
778-6696.

Curves to you
Bradenton Beach resident JoAnn Swan is the
owner of Curves fitness center for women at 4228 60th
St. W. in Bradenton, and as the closest fitness club to
the Island, has many Island residents as members.
Among those are Charlene Doll, who works part-
time at Publix.
"When I joined the club in May, my husband said
I could use my money from Publix for the membership
because he didn't think I would stick to it," Doll said
with a laugh.
Now, after losing 15 pounds and 13 inches from
her waist, "my husband has been so impressed that we
can now pay for membership from our joint account."
There are other success stories at Curves, but
Curves is not for everybody, said JoAnn.
"No men, no mirrors, no makeup and no attitude
problem" at Curves, she bragged.
The program is based on strength training, some-
thing every woman can do, noted JoAnn.
"We specialize in a 30-minute fitness workout for



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Curves fitness club for women at 4228 60th St. W.
is owned by Bradenton Beach resident JoAnn
Swan, center, and members, from left, Joan
Drackett, Charlene Doll, Swan, Sanchia Adye, and
Erika Hambly are getting back their curves.
Islander Photo: Nancy Ambrose

strength training and cardio-vascular improvement. It's
the most popular workout among our members.
"You can burn up to 600 calories in a single, 30-
minute workout," she said.
"I agree," added Doll.
For more information on Curves, call 794-2878.

White Egret flying to Gulfside
Island residents will soon see a white egret flying
from Anna Maria's bayside to the Gulf side.
That's because John and Barbara Yeager, own-
ers of the White Egret boutique and gift shop in the
Bayview Plaza in Anna Maria, recently purchased the
former Island Appliance building near the Gulf Drive
and Pine Avenue intersection in Anna Maria.
Plans call for a White Egret Gulfside at the new
location, which is currently being renovated, said Bar-
bara.
"We are hoping for a soft opening around Oct. 1 for
the White Egret Gulfside," said Barbara. "And we'll
then have White Egret Bayside and White Egret
Gulfside."
The Gulfside location will have more products for
PLEASE SEE ISLAND BIZ, NEXT PAGE


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Have a Happy and
Safe Labor Day
Weekend from the
The Islander


- IIL-III -





THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 M PAGE 23


'Early Days' of Island history published


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
It took Carloyne Norwood 47 years to put her Is-
land into a book.
That's how long she's been on Anna Maria Island,
soaking up local lore and historical facts and general
ambiance.
Now "The Early Days 1893-1940" is securely be-
tween covers, a definitive record of the Island for most
of the first half of its life. Well, more than that: It goes
back to the beginning of Island time, when the barrier
islands were formed 4,000 years ago.
Our Island as we think of it started in 1893. George
Bean came here then, the first homesteader. He claimed
land from what was called North Point to today's Mag-
nolia Avenue. The Cobbs came four years later, and
settlement began.
It was preceded by Indians, Conquistadors, pirates
and shipwrecks and various fishermen. Along the way
it picked up its name, from an explorer, a religious
base, or by the federal government, take your pick. It
wasn't Anna Mar-ee-ah until 1948, progressing from
Anna Mar-eye-ah. Don't ask read the book.
It's full of the facts and oddities of history, with
surprises along the way. Maybe the most interesting of
all is the section detailing Island characters. That's the
part Norwood most enjoyed doing, she said.
She might qualify as an Island character herself,
starting her life here with childbirth.
She came here with husband George and three chil-
dren when he decided to leave his job with a heating
company in Maryland. The Norwoods knew one hu-
man who lived in Florida, guess where. So they came
here in 1956 on the friend's recommendation and never
left.
Well, there she was, nine months pregnant and
George still in Maryland selling their house when baby
decided it was time. Carolyne drove to Bradenton
across the rickety bridge at Bradenton Beach,, and to
Manatee Memorial Hospital.
It was called Veterans Hospital then and it had no


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Carolyne Norwood, author of Anna Maria Island
history "The Early Days, 1893-1940." Islander
Photo: Bonner Joy
air conditioning and it was hot: "You could smell
Tropicana."
She started reporting for the St. Petersburg Times,
the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and the old Islander, 20
years in journalism and getting more and more inter-
ested in her Island's history.
Norwood formed the Anna Maria Island Historical
Society in 1990. Along with others, she started gather-
ing artifacts from old-timers and their descendants.
That called for a museum, and the society was up
for that challenge too, creating the museum where it re-
mains, at 402 Pine Ave. in Anna Maria, open 10 a.m.-
noon Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday.


A


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Gulf Drive Anna Maria
(941) 779-0034


Cortez

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Open at 5:30 am
Try our Daily Specials
Homemade Soups Gyros
Sausage Gravy Er Biscuits
Omelettes Free Drink Refills
and much, much more!

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Offer Expires 9/30/03

Open Daily 5:30 am 2 pm
12108 Cortez Rd. Cortez Village


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Ar Aw o.. -,w- aw.4 w.w-w


.,a.


Author signing Sept. 6
The author will sign her books from 10:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sept. 6 at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Copies will be on sale there for the signing.

Last November George Norwood died, and his
wife needed something to take her mind off it. What
better way to dull her grief than create the book she and
George had talked about so many times?
She had too much information and too many pic---
tures and documents to fit into one book, so she took
the Island from its first permanent settlers to 1940. Her
next book will bring the Island up near present times.
Andrew Clyde Little re-created many of the old tattered
photos through computer enhancement, and Betsy G.
Atkinson put it all together on her computer.
The book is on sale now for $12.95, tax included,
at the museum; the Sandbar restaurant, 100 Spring
Ave., Anna Maria; Beach House Restaurant, 200 Gulf
Drive N., Bradenton Beach; Ginny's Antiques & Art,
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach; and the Barefoot
Traders Beach Shop, 5432 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Phone purchases are handled by the museum, 778-
0492, or, when the museum is closed, by Norwood at
home, 778-1514.

Island Biz
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22
home decor along with some larger items, in addition
to boutique clothing and gifts available at both loca-
tions.
"We plan on a grand opening for the Gulfside later
in October, once we're up and running," Barb said.
"We hope all our loyal customers and friends will
come visit us in the new location, once we've opened."
For more information on the White Egret, Gulfside
or Bayside, call 779-0527.

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PAGE 24 M AUGUST 27, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


IMS parent involvement opportunities


Parents of students attending Island Middle School
were given a three-page list of opportunities to fulfill
the 25 required parent-involvement hours at informa-
tion sessions held throughout August.
Parents can work in the classroom as a homeroom
parent, teacher's assistant or tutor, and in the mentoring
program or on special projects.
Assistant Director Kelly Parsons, who will be in
charge of keeping track of parent involvement, said
homeroom takes place every morning from 9:30 to 10
a.m. and is a good opportunity for parents seeking to
be a mentor.
Teacher assistants help with anything the teacher
needs from filing to grading papers, and a teacher's
tutor can help teach small groups or work individually
with a student.
Opportunities are also available to work with stu-
dents out of the classroom. Parsons said there is a need
for student supervisors from 9:15 to 9:40 a.m. while
students are arriving and prior to their first-period
classes.


AME 2003-04

commemorative tiles for

sale now
All kindergarten and new students in other grades
at Anna Maria Elementary School may purchase and
make a commemorative hand tile to be installed on the
walls of the school.
The Parent-Teacher Organization requests parents
with children creating hand tiles donate $25 for each tile.
Addition tiles for home use can also be ordered for $25.
In the past, some people have purchased and deco-
rated tiles to represent the entire family or to show their
business support for the school.
A $100 donation is required for business tiles and
artist Debbie Hagstrom will create a unique design for the
tile.
The hand tiles have become an AME tradition and
a community fundraiser for the PTO.
For more information, contact Jim Callahan at 778-
0917. Order forms are available in the AME adminis-
tration office.
.Picture day reminder
Lifetouch will be on campus at Anna Maria El-
ementary School Thursday, Aug. 28, to take student
portraits.
All students will be photographed for the yearbook,
but only students paying at the time of their portrait
sitting will receive a portrait package.
Photo-package information will be sent home with
students. For more information, call the school admin-
istrative office at 708-5200.


Anna Maria Elementary

School menu
Monday, Sept. 1
Labor Day Holiday
Tuesday, Sept. 2
Breakfast: French Toast Glaze, Peanut Butter and
Jelly Sandwich, Cereal, Toast, Fruit
.,Lunch: Cheeseburger, Chef Salad or Peanut Butter
and Jelly Sandwich, Potato Smiles, Tossed Salad,
Fruit
Wednesday, Sept. 3
SBreakfast: Orange Muffin, Chicken Tender Roll,
Cereal, Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Salisbury Steak with Mashed Potatoes, Fish
on a Bun or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich,
Tossed Salad, Green Beans, Fruit
Thursday, Sept. 4
Breakfast: Yogurt, Churro, Cereal, Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Chicken Bites with Tater Tots, Yogurt, Fruit
and Muffin Plate or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sand-
wich, Steamed Broccoli, Tossed Salad, Fruit
Friday, Sept. 5
Breakfast: Belgian Waffle Sticks with Syrup, Cereal,
Toast, Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Fruit
Lunch: Cheese Pizza, Turkey and Cheese Sandwich
or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Capri Blend,
Tossed Salad, Fruit, Juice Bar
Sflun iii. miljl tii D- >fi. ^i n / ll i:- j fj in-al ~ I


Parsons said student schedules will soon include
one full day every three weeks devoted to student clubs
and organizations. Parents are being asked to supervise
clubs, such as chess, yearbook, gardening, fishing,
yoga, photography and more, to give teachers the day
to work together as a staff.
There will also be opportunities to chaperone
dances and class field trips. Parsons said this year there
will be fewer schoolwide field trips and more of a fo-
cus on class field trips. For example, she said, the art
class may visit an art museum.
Parents can also fulfill their required hours in the
office answering phones and tending to other clerical
duties. Fundraising is another key area where parent in-
volvement is needed.
IMS will be manning carnival games at the street
festival in Anna Maria Oct. 18 as a school
fundraiser. They will also be planning community-
service projects in October, which will culminate
with one large project on National Make A Differ-
ence Day Oct. 25. Parsons said those projects


haven't been finalized yet, but parents will certainly
be needed to help out.
This year, Parsons told parents that they will not
receive credit for attending Parent-Teacher Organiza-
tion meetings. She said the parent contract already re-
quires that they attend seven of the nine PTO meetings,
although, hours can be earned by helping to set up the
meeting hall or planning PTO dinners.
PTO dinners will be held the third Thursday of
every month and Da Giorgio Ristorante will be cater-
ing the first PTO dinner at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 18.
Finally, parents unable to spend time at the school
can earn hours by doing work at home, such as stuff-
ing envelopes, baking for special events and PTO meet-
ings or making phone calls.
Time can also be earned through donations of art
supplies, food or supplies for the school store, or shar-
ing a special interest with students.
A parent sign-in book will be kept in the adminis-
trative office for parents to log their hours at the school.
For more information, call the school at 778-5525.


Children's summit
Billy Malfese and Brian Faasse help Gary Wooten set up a booth where kids will color artwork and parents
will be offered information about the Anna Maria Island Community Center at the Children's Summit held
Aug. 23 at the Manatee Convention and Civic Center in Palmetto. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Parent member needed for IMS board


The annual meeting of the Island Middle School
charter corporation will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 2, when parents will be asked to elect their rep-
resentative to the school's board of directors.
The parent representative seat was left vacant in
August when Scott Bassett was elected by the board to
serve as a regular member. The parent representative

Accountability report available
Anna Maria Elementary School's Public Account-
ability Report is available for public review in the
school's administrative office.
The "No Child Left Behind" federal legislation
requires school districts to produce the report prior to
students returning to school. This report serves as the
school's report card on the following areas:
Student demographics.
Student performance information.
School safety and environment.
Teacher qualifications.
Adequate yearly progress.
School performance grade.
Lottery dollar expenditures.
The report should also be available at public librar-
ies. For more information via the Internet, log onto
fldoe.org. Click on "No Child Left Behind" and then
,1A P x o- ri' sI J >i . "i *.ae 1. e* 'i.i


serves a one-year term.
Following the annual meeting of the IMS corpora-
tion, the board of directors will hold its regular monthly
meeting and elect new officers.
Anyone interested in serving as the parent repre-
sentative to the board should plan on attending the an-
nual meeting and be familiar with the school's charter.


IMS school store opening
The Island Middle School will be opening
a school store offering school supplies, drinks
and healthy snacks.
The store will be open before homeroom
and possibly during lunch in the cafeteria/band
room.
The store will offer the supplies teachers
have requested students bring at the start of the
school year, such as graph paper, calculators,
composition books, portfolios and pencils.
In addition to school supplies, the school
store will offer an assortment of breakfast foods,
including granola bars, cereal bars, all-fruit bars
and oatmeal squares. Juice will also be offered.
The store will be staffed by a Parent-
Teacher Organization representative and pro-
ceeds will benefit IMS.










OoOoOo@Q




Wednesday, Aug. 27
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Thursday, Aug. 28
7 p.m. Boy Scout sign-up at Anna Maria El-
ementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. In-
formation: 936-8072.

Friday, Aug. 29
11 a.m. to 2p.m. Blood drive at Republic Bank,
10 Ave. of the Flowers, Longboat Key. Information:
746-7195.
4 to 7p.m. Blood drive at Bonefish Grill, 7456
Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton. Information: 746-7195.

Monday, Sept. 1
6 to 8 p.m. Line dancing lessons at American
Legion Post No. 24, 2000 75th St. W., Bradenton. In-


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 15, 200 block of Pine Avenue, information.
A man reported receiving two phone calls that, al-
though not threatening, made him feel uncomfortable.
Aug. 15, 100 block of Bay Boulevard, driving
without a license. A man was arrested during a routine
traffic stop. According to the report, the driver had 13
suspensions on his license, which constitutes a habitual
felony. Deputies also discovered a Monroe County
warrant for the driver for fishing without a license.
Aug. 17, 300 block of Tarpon Street, criminal mis-
chief. Someone broke the driver's side taillight and
review mirror of a parked vehicle.
Aug. 17, Bay Boulevard, Bayfront Park, posses-
sion of alcohol. A man was cited for having an open
bottle of beer in an area where alcohol is prohibited.
Aug. 17, Bay Boulevard, Bayfront Park, possession
of alcohol. Another man was cited for having an open
bottle of beer in an area where alcohol is prohibited.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 14, 100 block of Bridge Street, possession of
alcohol by a minor. According to the report, officers
stopped a driver for having a tag on the car not regis-
tered to that vehicle. Officers found open containers of
beer in the car and only one of the three passengers was
old enough to be in possession of alcohol. The driver
was cited for a suspended license and one passenger
was cited for open alcohol container. According to the
report, officers were called back to the scene by the
tow-truck driver and told that the teenage passenger
had taken the remaining beer from the vehicle. Offic-





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Tuesday, Sept. 2
7:30 a.m. Business Network International meet-
ing at the Hilton Beachfront Resort, 4711 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, Longboat Key. Information: 383-5543.
Noon to 3:30 p.m. -Friendly bridge at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.
1 to 4 p.m. Veteran's Service officer at the Is-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Appointments: 749-3030.
4:45 to 6:15p.m. Traditional Arts class for ages
10-16 at the Anna Maria Island Art League, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach. Information: 778-2099.
Fee applies.
7 to 9 p.m. Boating-skills class begins at the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, 5801 33rd St. Ave. Ct. W.,
Bradenton. Information: 778-2495.

Wednesday, Sept. 3
7 to 8 a.m. Pier Regulars meeting at the Anna
Maria City Pier, Pine Avenue, Anna Maria. Information:
778-7062.
3 to 4 p.m. Joyful Noise Youth Choir at the
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-0414.


ers found him on the Cortez Bridge. According to the
report, the defendant began throwing the bottles of beer
into the water below before being arrested.
Aug. 14, 100 block of Gulf Drive, disorderly intoxi-
cation. While on patrol, officers reportedly found the
couple who had been cited for alcohol violations earlier
in the evening, half nude near the Moose Lodge parking
lot. According to the report, the male subject was dropped
off at a residence in Cortez, but the woman refused to
cooperate with officers. According to the report, she be-
came physically violent toward the officers and was then
transported to the Manatee County jail.
Aug. 17, 2300 block of Avenue C, trespass warn-
ing. A woman was given a trespass warning after she
and her husband got into an argument. According to the
report, the couple is separated and the husband re-
quested information in order to file a restraining order.
Aug. 17, 400 block of 20th Place North, hit and
run. A woman reported witnessing a man back out of
his driveway and run over a log that was on his yard.
The woman reported that the man continued to drive
with the log stuck under his van. She told police he then
drove off the road and hit a power pole guide wire.
Officers found the suspect at the Anchor Inn and ques-
tioned him regarding the accident.
Aug. 17, 2500 block of Avenue C, found property.
A purse was found and returned to the owner.
Aug. 17, 1600 Gulf Drive, Coquina Park Boat Ramp,
criminal mischief. According to the report, someone
slashed the tires of a pickup truck and boat trailer.
Aug. 18, 120 Bridge St., Drift Inn Lounge, disor-






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THE ISLANDER E AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 25
5 to 6:30 p.m. Creative Arts and Crafts for ages
5-10 at the Anna Maria Island Art League, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach. Information: 778-2099.
Fee applies.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Ongoing:
Cortez artist Cecy Richardson's exhibit at the Arts
Council of Manatee County, 926 12th St. W.,
Bradenton, through Aug. 28. Information: 746-2223.
Porcelain art by Helen DeForge at Island Gallery
West, 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, through Aug.
31.
Photography by Joe Fletcher at Island Gallery
West, 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, through Sept.
13.

Upcoming:
Carolyne Norwood book signing at the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society Sept. 6.
Gulf Coast Writers meeting at the Island Branch
Library Sept. 8.
Internet class at the Island Branch Library Sept. 8.
Friend's of the Library book club at the Island
Branch Library Sept. 10.


derly conduct. A man was arrested for disorderly con-
duct after he refused to go home when the bartender
reportedly refused to serve him any additional alcohol.
Aug. 18, 120 Bridge St., Drift Inn Lounge, warrant
arrest. While officers were on another call, they ar-
rested another customer for violation of probation from
DUI charges.
Aug. 19, 1800 block of Gulf Drive, driving with a
suspended license. A man was cited for driving with a
suspended license during a routine traffic stop.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 14, 3400 block of Gulf Drive, theft. A man
reported his kayak stolen.
Aug. 16, 700 Manatee Ave., Kingfish Boat Ramp,
criminal mischief. According to the report, a man
backed his vehicle into another man's boat twice fol-
lowing a verbal disagreement.
Aug. 17, 5424 Marina Drive, Jessie's Island Store,
burglary. A woman reported her purse stolen from her
vehicle.
Aug. 18, 5800 block of Marina Drive, information.
A man reported that someone had cashed a check that
was charged against his credit card.
Aug. 20, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee Public Beach,
burglary. A man reported a credit card was stolen from his
wallet and, while still at the beach, he received a call from
the credit card company inquiring about the legitimacy of
a $4,000 purchase made in St. Petersburg with his card.






PAGE 26 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


Similar, different problems from around country, world


News from afar often strikes a familiar chord.
Marie Donahue of Bradenton Beach dropped off a
copy of Solares Hill, a community newspaper from
Key West, at the office the other day. It's a pretty little
short-tab paper filled with lots of interesting stories
about the southernmost of the Florida Keys.
The article that Marie found interesting was one
about the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection's apparent recent practice of scaling back its
enforcement of "Florida's hazardous-waste program,
solid-waste program, clean-water act, and dredge-and-
fill cases where the state's precious wetlands are threat-
ened," according to editor Dennis Ethridge, based on
information provided by the Florida Public Employees
for Environmental Responsibility.
As with many things governmental and bureau-
cratic, it all rests in the forms.
If the DEP finds an offensive environmental act, it
can apparently fill out a long form that goes to civil
court and can eventually call for sanctions, including
cease-and-desist of the offensive action, remedial
cleanup, fines and more.
Then there is a short form which is not addressed
through the courts and merely levies a notice-of-viola-
tion to the eco-offender, who then pays a fine. Ethridge
calls it a "parking ticket."
About 10 years ago, the DEP was using more long
forms than short. In the past 10 years, short-form us-
age was about five times more prevalent that the
harsher long form.
As Ethridge puts it, "The short form is the least
aggressive enforcement tool the department has and is
by far the most used."
Now, I'm sure that the DEP will respond that the
state's environmental regulations are being met in such
a swell manner that there is no need for the stronger en-
forcement tools it has at its disposal. Everything is right
as far as the environment is concerned in the Sunshine
State, right?
Right.
As Marie mentioned in a note included with the
Solares Hill newspaper, "We have met the enemy and
it's the DEP!"

Out with residents!
I was surprised that Marie didn't mention another
little article in the paper regarding some cities in the
Jersey Shore area of New Jersey that are trying to do


I-..



By Paul. Rpat

the exact opposite have fewer permanent residents
- of what some folks are striving for in Bradenton
Beach.
Bradenton Beach is one of the few cities in our
fast-growing state that actually lost residents, based on
the 2000 census. It's not that the city is shrinking in size
- a drive along Gulf Drive will show you the burgeon-
ing recent and new construction but that the people
filling up the new condos and trophy houses are not
claiming full-time residency there.
Some Bradenton Beach officials have been work-
ing for more than a year to figure out a way to stop the
population-trend shift from residential to seasonal.
Not so in New Jersey, where some city officials
want fewer permanent residents and more seasonal
folks.
It's all about the children up there, apparently.
According to the Solares Hill article, quoting a
New York Times piece earlier this month, "In the fast-
growing Jersey Shore area, Ocean County has attracted
scores of developments for retirees. Ventnor, a shore
town that sends its high school students to Atlantic City
at a cost of $12,000 a year each, recently started offer-
ing owners of apartment buildings $22,000 to convert
year-round rentals to seasonal."
Apparently other towns up there have passed
zoning changes that stop construction of new homes
of more than two bedrooms, also in the hope to dis-
courage people with school-age children from mov-
ing in.
You gotta love this quote about the resident-sea-
sonal shift, from a professor at Rutgers University: "A
desirable development is now considered to be one that
doesn't have smokestacks and doesn't generate chil-
dren."

... and growth issues closer to home
The St. Petersburg Times ran an Associated Press


Island Branch Library sets month's schedule


Handmade porcelain and counted cross-stitch will
be featured in exhibits during September at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The porcelain display will have works by Marie
Ewing and the cross-stitch exhibit will be by Barbara
Carrier.
Other highlights during September:
Monday, Sept. 8, Internet class for beginners, 8:30
6m. (advance registration required, call 778-6341).
Monday, Sept. 15, Friends of the Library program,
"The Tragedy of School Shootings," presented by the
Holmes Beach Police Department, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept 2-30, Veteran's Service officer













a778-477 IS




amesP.O.BOX 1353, Anna Maria, FL 34216


available for discussions, 1-4 p.m. (appointment nec-
essary, call 749-3030).
Wednesday, Sept. 3-24, Family Storytime, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 10, Friends Book Club, 10:30
a.m.
Thursday and Friday, Sept. 25-26, AARP safe-
driving course, noon-4 p.m. (advance registration nec-
essary, call 776-1158).
Saturday, Sept. 13, origami class, 10:30 a.m.
The library opens at 10 a.m. daily except Sunday,
closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Further
information may be obtained by calling 778-6341.


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article the other day about Cocoa Beach and its efforts
to control unbridled growth in its Space Coast commu-
nity of 13,000. To date, voters have approved four ref-
erendums to limit growth, ranging from height restric-
tions to zoning changes to lower density.
Many of the referendum issues to limit growth
passed by a 2-1 margin.
It sounds good until you get into the details of the
matter.
Cocoa Beach's height restriction dropped allow-
able construction from 85 feet to 45 feet. Nearby
Surfside, a city of 5,000 people just north of Miami, has
also enacted height restrictions and no longer grants
variances to its 120-foot-high building laws.
For comparison, the highest buildings on the Island
are the 70-foot-tall Martinique condos in Holmes
Beach.

Gone to the dogs
A friend gave me a copy of the Bartow Trader -
"A yard sale in a book" from Cartersville, Ga. It's
a pretty grim-looking short-tab community newspaper,
and it's pretty obvious that not much is going on in
Cartersville.
Anyway, the big deal in the Bartow Trader in the
issue I have is the fifth-annual "Strut Your Mutt" fes-
tival, a day-long event featuring dogs and people. High-
light was a walk-a-thon. I knew the event was the big
deal because the article about it took up the entire front
page of the paper.
It also appears that political correctness hasn't
reached the hinterlands of Cartersville. There was the
"Top 10 signs your Amish teen is in trouble," article,
for example, and the "Airport potty" story.
I wanted to show you a rather odd picture of two
girls and a dog, but my boss overruled me on grounds
of The Islander's policy of not including explicit ele-
ments within its pages.
By the way, the "yard sale in a book" newspaper
had only one yard sale ad.

Mars looms
Don't forget to stroll outside one clear night this
week to take a look at the planet Mars. You'll never see
it closer to the Earth than it is right now, at least not for
another 200-plus years.
It's easy to spot, since outside of the sun and the
moon, Mars is indeed the brightest thing in the sky.

Sandscript factoid
Oslo, Norway, has just been ranked by a Swiss
banking group as being the most expensive city in the
world, usurping, in order, Hong Kong, Tokyo and New
York.
It costs, in U.S. dollars, $1.32 to go to the toilet,
$4.89 for a gallon of gasoline and $6.88 for a pint of
beer.
"I drink beer to forget what it costs me to pick up
and deliver appliances," the AP reported an appliance
repairman as saying.
Minimum wage in Norway is $8.59 an hour, by the
way.
And the cheapest cities in which to live are Buenos
Aires, Argentina, and Mumbai, India.


bnno (orTlaoVona c iiakes

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
NM Aug27 1:35am 1.7 5:28am 1.3 12:06pm 2.7 7:08pm 0.2
Aug28 1:47am 1.7 6:17am 1.1 12.51pm 2.6 7:37pm 0.3
Aug 29 2:02amn 1.9 7:06am 0.9 1:44pm 2.5 8:05pm 0.5
Aug 30 2:23am 2.0 8:00am 0.7 2:40pm 23 8:31pm 0.8
Aug 31 2:48am 2.2 8:57am 05 3:43pm 2.0 8 56pm 1.0
Sep I 3:20am 2.4 10:02am 0.4 4:55pm 1.8 9:14pm 1.3
Sep 2 3:55am 2.5 11:16am 0.3 6.38pm 1.5 9:20pm 1.4
FQ Sep 3 4:38am 2.6 12:42pm 0.3
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


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THE ISLANDER N AUGUST 27, 2003 0 PAGE 27


Summer fishing: reds small, snook season starts Monday


Slow, steady summertime fishing is definitely here.
Between chasing thunderstorms and dodging the dark
water running out of the creeks and rivers, fishing is
sporadic but occasionally good.
About that runoff: fish don't seem to like it, prob-
ably because the baitfish they feed on avoid the lower-
salinity water from places like the Manatee River.
Snook and redfish aren't bothered by those sudden
freshwater "pulses" of water, but trout avoid it and,
without bait, the other fish don't hang out in the dark
water.
Mangrove snapper action continues to be good, as
is the hunt for red and gag grouper offshore. There
were a few catches of big barracuda last week, and
mackerel are near the beaches and in Tampa Bay. Trout
action is spotty but fairly steady.
And after the long hiatus, snook season finally re-
opens Sept. 1.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
lots of snapper are being caught off Bradenton Beach
and near the Kingfish Boat Ramp in Holmes Beach.
There are lots of redfish on the seagrass flats, he said,
but they seem to be running undersize, although he
heard a report of a fisher jumping a 25-pound red not
too far from Gilligan's Island just north of the Anna
Maria Bridge. Mackerel are also still thick in Tampa
Bay and near the beaches.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he's been fishing in Miguel Bay, Terra Ceia
Bay and Tampa Bay, putting his charters onto mack-
erel to 13 inches, trout to 21 inches, and lots of reds
"but nothing huge, most in the 22- to 25-inch range."
Whitebait is working best for him, he said, although
trout are hitting on artificial. He's seeing lots of mack-
erel popping up around the Sunshine Skyway Bridge,
but no big swirls that would indicate feeding tarpon,
indicating the run is definitely over for this year except
for the resident silver kings. Mangrove snapper are also
out there, especially by Longboat Key and along the
Intracoastal Waterway, Capt. Thom added.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
he's hearing of lots of reports of reds in Terra Ceia Bay,
but they're pretty much on the small side. There are
some small catch-and-release snook being caught, too,
but they're also small. "It's been pretty quiet, probably
because it's so hot," Dave said.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's catching
lots of bonita up to 12 pounds, barracuda to 25 pounds,
Spanish mackerel to 5 pounds, and gag and red grou-
per to 12 pounds. Lane and mangrove snapper are still
a mainstay, with the mangroves going to 2 pounds.
"It's steady, it's summertime, and it's hot," Capt. Sam
said.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said he's catching lots of mangrove snapper to
16 inches, trout to 22 inches, and reds to 30 inches.
"The tides weren't good last week," he said, "but fish-
ing was steady." He's also getting into some catch-and-





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Big red for Big Thom
Capt. Thornm Smith out of
Angler's Repair, above,
caught this big redfish while
fishing in earlier this month.
Redfish action continues to
be good this time of year.


Boating.skills program
planned by flotilla
Flotilla 81 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary has
scheduled a four-week boating-skills and sea-
manship program starting Tuesday, Sept. 2.
Convening from 7-9 p.m. every Tuesday
and Thursday until Sept. 25, it will be at the
auxiliary building in G.T. Bray Park, 5801 33rd
Ave. Ct. W., Bradenton. The class is free, the
textbook costs $30.
Additional information may be obtained by
calling 778-2495 or 795-6189.

release snook to 32 inches and bringing in some floun-
der and gag grouper off the beaches.



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Shark!
Josh Sucec, I1, from
Wheaton, Ill., and Anna
Maria, left, caught this 4 1/2-
foot-long bull shark while
fishing on the Riptide with
Capt. Matt Denham.

Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said fishers there
are catching a lot of really big reds, most too big to
keep. "They must have reeled in a half-dozen of them
this morning alone," he said, plus lots of smaller reds
to 31 inches are also being caught, and lots of snapper,
small mackerel, a few pompano and permit. There are
also some reports of small catch-and-release snook,
plus black drum, and Bob said he hasn't see a tarpon
in at least two months.
Cliff Alcorn at the Anna Maria City Pier said
pier fishers there are seeing a lot of mackerel, but most
are small. There are lots of good catches of mangrove
snapper and an occasional pompano, he said, and still
lots of catch-and-release snook, including some big
oversized linesiders. "There are a lot of people out fish-
ing," Cliff said, "and those who know how to catch fish
are catching fish."
Good luck and good fishing.














UNCLE PETE WANTS YOU

TO DRIVE A
CLEAN CAR!

24 hour self-serve car wastr
Complete auto detailing
Quick lube
Come by or call
for an appointment

AMERICAN CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach 778-1617
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS & DEBIT CARDS ACCEPTED




(,,( IT N " A'' -, ( f,( ,(. r-" l rll Ir I 1, V (I C r ,r T < 2 J L '"


PAGE 28 M AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Wild weekend sports, bowling to skimboarding


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The second annual EZ Skimmers Back-to-School
Skimboard Contest drew hundreds of interested on-
lookers to the host Beach House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach for two days of loud music, some in-
teresting commentary and a lot of good "boarding" by
the 125 skimboard enthusiasts who competed in the
weekend event.
The contest is a joint venture between EZ Skim-
mers skimboard-production magnate Chris Ambut and
several other sponsors, including the West Coast Surf
Shop, Beach House Restaurant, The Islander newspa-
per, ZAP Skimmers, Native Rentals and Fun & Sun
Parasail.
Ambut noted several individuals who made this
year's contest happen, including Ed Chiles and Mike
and Becky Shannon of the Beach House. Others who
helped out include Jim and Doreen Voeste from
boardheads2.com and announcers Drew Danielo and
James Casper from Jream Clothing, who both kept the
crowd going with pinpoint analysis on the actual
skimboarding and even on some random chicken fights
farther out in the water between skimboard heats.
Ambut also wanted to give a shout out to X-M
Satellite Radio for its help with the tourney that raised
$300 for Mote Marine's red tide research.
Ambut promises a bigger and better event next
year. "We've got more sponsors lined up, which will
translate into bigger purses for the professionals and
better prize packages for the younger competitors."
Contestants were judged on a 1-10 point system for
their consistency, technique, and nailing some radical
power moves like a "shove it 1800," or on getting some
"backside air."
Day 1 of the event featured elimination rounds in
10 divisions that saw two or three contestants advance
from each heat, which included four or five skimmers.
Divisions ranged from the minis for skimmers age 8
and under, up to masters for ages 25 and up, in addi-
tion to girls, women's and professional divisions.
Local products Giorgio Gomez and Austin Frische
battled it out in the mini division with Gomez claim-
ing the first-place prize and Frische taking second.
The menehune division saw Holmes Beach resi-
dents Michael Harrington and Trevor Bystrom finish in
first and second respectively, followed by Brett Ellis
and Matthew Unzicker.
The boys' 12-14 division had a competitive final
heat with Venice's Taylor Brothers coming out ahead
of Brad Domke, who hails from the east coast.
The men's division went to Venice's Danny Gay
followed by Dion Davis, Dave Armstrong and Cole
Johnson of Bradenton, while the women's division
went to Raquel Rivera, who edged Katie Murray in the
finals. Senior division went to Travis Johnson of
Holmes Beach, while Jim Voeste brought home the
masters title.
Girls' division winner was the multi-talented
Emily Roff. On Friday Roff was in Atlanta trying out
for a spot on the next American Idol series. Roff didn't
make it, though, so she was back in time to win the
girls' division over Heather Short and Chea Connor.
The junior boys' final had to be the most competi-
tive of the divisions with defending champion Travis
Ward going up against Blake Tyre, Dustin Holland and
Chris Ross. Ross pulled off the upset win to finish
ahead of a bloody Tyre, who cut his hand on his first
attempt in the final heat with Ward and Holland finish-
ing third and fourth overall.
The professional winner was Drew Danielo, who
pocketed $600 for his effort, while Pete Anderson took
home $250 for second place. Austin Bleeweiss com-
pleted the money winners in the pro-division with $150
for his third-place finish.

O'Connor Bowling Challenge
brings out a crowd
The 13th annual O'Connor Bowling Challenge
once again brought out throngs of Island folks and
friends for three games of bowling Saturday night at
AMC Lanes on Cortez Road in Bradenton.
The tourney drew 284 registered bowlers, plus an-
other 100 or so onlookers who didn't want to miss the
"social event of the season."
Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, which has received


Blake Tyre gets some serious air during elimination round action on Saturday afternoon. Islander Photos:
Kevin Cassidy


~?' ~ 7


more than $100,000 since the O'Connors first began
the event in 1990.
Bowling abilities range from very good to not so
good, but nobody really cares who wins in this tourney.
There's no big prize for top bowlers. It's the television
raffle that people set their eyes on, with a big-screen
TV donated by tourney cosponsor The Islander every
year.
This year's winner is Rene Bannigan, who
squealed with excitement at the post-bowling party at
Cortez Kitchens, where raffle prizes were announced.
There were some good bowling scores turned in by
a few people led by Rich Guiton, who turned in the
high game with a 236 and also had the high series with
an impressive 660.
Darlene McNamara's 197 was good for high game
among the women, but she was edged for high series
by Mikey Pletscher's 527 score.
The most impressive battle may have been the duel
for Gutter King and Queen. It appeared that Heather
Romberger had wrapped up the Queen slot with an im-
pressive score of 32, but Katie Holmes "kicked it down
a notch" to claim the title (previously captured by sis-
ter Jessica) with a 20. On the men's side, Tom Reith
thought his 49 had the men's gutter title wrapped up,
but he was done in by Herb Tillion's 34.
Now we all must sit back and wait another year
before we take to the lanes again. That's one year to
soothe those sore muscles, eh?
See ya next year.

Dolphins drop opener
The Anna Maria Island Dolphins fell 6-0 to the
Raiders in its opening football game of the 2003 Police
Athletic League Saturday.
The defense did a pretty decent job in holding the
Raiders to only six points, while the offense came
through with a couple of nice counter plays on the
ground. Quarterback Nick Sato and tight end John


- ,


A.
I.


David
Bryant
carves up a
wave
during the
EZ Skim-
mers Back-
to-School
Skim-
boarding
Contest.


Gregory hooked up for a couple of nice pass plays over
the middle, but overall the team still has a way to go
before it approaches last year's magical season.
Next up for the Dolphins is a 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
30, matchup with the Broncos, who defeated the Fins
12-0 in the Kickoff Classic. Come on out to PAL com-
plex in Bradenton and catch some of the action.

Calling all Manatee Magic Islanders
Manatee Magic soccer has started for teams in age
divisions from U15 to U18 and the start of the regular
season for the rest of the age groups is just around the
corner.
We want to know about Islanders who are playing
competitive soccer and we'd like to cover some of your
games. Please give The Islander a call at 778-7978,
drop off your schedule, or call me at 750-8959.

More soccer news
The Anna Maria Island Community Center held
drafts for its recreational soccer league, with teams
spending the next few weeks practicing for the pre-
season jamboree, which takes place all day Saturday,
Sept. 6, starting at 10 a:m.
Also occurring on the day of the jamboree will be
team and individual photos an hour before the start of
the games throughout the day. The regular season gets
under way Monday, Sept. 8.
To kick the season off in grand style, the Center
will once again host a preseason soccer banquet catered
by Sean Murphy. Schedules and uniforms will also be
distributed on this night. The banquet begins at 6:30
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4. Call Joe Chelbus at the Center,
778-1908, for more information.

Give us a call
If you have a story idea or have sports news to re-
port, call The Islander at 778-7978 or e-mail me at
sportspg@tampabay.rr.com.





THE ISLANDER E AUGUST 27, 2003 E PAGE 29



IT M S FO A LETAING & CHART ERS I;I


AIRLINE TICKETS Southwest Air. Fly today, no re-
strictions. $340/round-trip, $180/one way. Call 778-
4523.
RAINY DAY SALE Storewide 10 to 70 percent off at
Niki's Treasures, 5351 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Sterling jewelry 50 percent off, select gifts and vin-
tage jewelry 50 percent off, shell craft 60 percent off.
Visit our antique mall 7 days, 9:30am-5pm.
HANG-UPS INVERSION TABLE, new, $275;
Orbitrek with video, excellent condition, $100; new
food dehydrator, $45; manual meat grinder, used
once, $40. Call 778-1498.
SECTIONAL SOFA, coffee table and end tables,
lamp table, four padded chairs, telephone stand,
wicker chair and miscellaneous items. Call 778-
5944.
EMBROIDERY: We offer quality embroidered pro-
motional T-shirts, caps and golf shirts. We can digi-
tize your custom logo for your organization or busi-
ness, or help you create one. www.islandstitch.com
or call 778-8338.

BEDROOM SET: solid oak in a stateroom style by
National of Mt. Airy. Eight pieces with king-size
headboard, but no beds, $1,400. 792-4274.

FREE DELIVERY: SEAFOOD to go. Shrimp, crabs,
native fish. Delivered to your door. Call James Lee,
795-1112 or 704-8421.


LABOR DAY SALE! Hurry to Niki's Island Treasures,
5351 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Select gifts, an-
tiques, vintage jewelry 50 percent off; all sterling jew-
elry 50 percent off; hand-crafted shell craft, 60 per-
cent off. Visit our antique mall, open 7 days, 9:30am-
5pm. Call 779-0729.
EARLY CLASSIFIED AD deadline due to Labor
Day. Ads must be submitted by noon Friday, Aug.
29, for Wednesday, Sept. 3, publication. For infor-
mation call, 778-7978 during business hours or visit
our Web site: www.islander.org.
HAPPY LABOR DAY!


ESTATE SALE FRIDAY and Saturday, Aug. 29-30,
7am-?. House full, plus more! Take Manatee Av-
enue to 53rd Street, north to dead end, right to 5401
First Ave. Drive N.W.

MOVING SALE Friday and Saturday, Aug. 29-30,
9am-1pm, rain or shine. 7508 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.
GARAGE SALE SATURDAY, Aug. 30, 9am-1pm.
Good stuff. 207 75th St., Holmes Beach.
CLEARANCE SALE: 15-40 percent off. Aug. 26-Oct.
1 at Fancy Free, a gift, art boutique shop at 406 Old
Main St. in Bradenton.

MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more readers. Sell it
fast in The Islander.


FOUND FERRET: Sable, young. Found Aug. 12.
Call 778-1558.
FOUND CAT: Gray in Anna Maria on Aug.10. Call
778-1498.
LOST CAT: Very fluffy dark and light gray one-year-
old cat.. His collar has his name and an old phone
number. Please call Janet Mixon at 778-3671.


CRITTER SITTER nine years in pet care. 24 years
as an Island resident. Lots of TLC for your beloved
pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.

FREE TO A good home. "Abby" a four-year-old fe-
male Lhasa Apso, house broken, spayed, shots up
to date, prefers to be an only child. Call 779-2228
or 704-5239.


GOPED: GAS POWERED, B16 Big Foot, rides on
street or terrain. Goes 25 mph. Everything like new.
Less than a month old. Hardly used. $400. Call 721-
0582.

1988 CADILLAC SEDAN Deville. Great Island car,
towing package, $700. Call 779-1091, or 779-2041.

1988 DODGE DYNASTY, clean Island car, awe-
some air conditioning, great stereo. $800 or best
offer. Call 812-3455.
1988 CUTLASS SIERRA, ice-cold air, very reliable,
towing package. $550. Call 779-1091 or 779-2041.
1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN, cold air conditioning,
has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs great.
$3,100, or best offer. 730-9622.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation
or long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Min-
utes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Capt.
John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting.
1994 19-FOOT Key West console fishing boat with
1992 150-hp Johnson motor. Bimini top, 70-lb.
Thrust-trolling motor, fish finder, solidstate radio,
three batteries, plus many other features. $9,000.
Call 779-9101.
BOAT LIFT for lease. Capacity of 7,000 lbs. Located
at a residence in Key Royal, Holmes Beach. Avail-
able immediately. $175/month, payable in 2-3
month blocks in advance. For details, call 730-1086.


EGMONT EXPRESS CHARTERS. Summer spe-
cial: fifth and sixth person free with four paying
customers. Sunsets, snorkeling, Sarasota Bay,
Egmont Key and more. Custom tours available.
See dolphins all day! Hourly, half-day and full day.
Call 778-7459 or 720-5470.

FISHING FOR a good deal? Look in The Islander,
www.islander.org.


LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on
the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwa-
ter fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle pro-
vided. 779-9607.


BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is
Sarah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child
or $3/pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or
child. Please call 778-7622, 778-7611 or 447-8593.


ISLAND SPORTS BAR: All-year clientele. Beer/
wine, good lease, smoking OK. $85,000. Caf
Longview Realty, 383-6112.


HIRING: Positive people for nail tech, esthetician
and hairstyles for our Longboat Key and Anna
Maria salons. Call Amy Dodge Aveda Salon,
387-0773.

NEEDED WEEKEND OFFICE and housekeeper
for small resort. Call 778-7153.

ACE HARDWARE of Holmes Beach seeks perma-
nent full-time and part-time cashiers and sales as-
sociates. Retired trades people welcome. Apply in
person, 3352 E. Bay Drive.

THE TINGLEY MEMORIAL Library in Bradenton
Beach is looking for volunteers who can work dur-
ing the summer months. Duties include checking
books in and out, reshelving books and generally
assisting library patrons. Anyone interested in vol-
unteering in our friendly community library can call
Eveann Adams at 779-1208.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. We
need you! Call 778-0492.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED at Turtle Watch.
AMITW is seeking volunteers with customer ser-
vice or retail experience. Greet and inform visitors
at our education center and/or to help with nest-
ing activity on our beaches. Training is provided,
please contact the Turtle Watch Education Cen-..
ter for more information. Amy Talucci or Suzi Fox,
778-1435.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton
Beach is admitting residents. Day care and drop-
offs. Respite, long term. Call 779-0322 for details,
inquiries welcome.

OUR ISLAND HOME Assisted Living Facility: We are
committed to creating the warmest and most loving
homes. We have an English RN living on the pre-
mises. We offer respite and daycare and always hav6#
space available for your long-term needs. Call Annie,
Maria or Chris for more information. 778-7842.


EARLY CLASSIFIED DEADLINE


NOON FRIDAY Aug. 29

for classified ads that will appear in

the Sept 3 issue of The Islander.

Ads must be received at our office no later than

noon Friday, Aug. 29, for Sept 3 publication.

Fax 778-9392, e-mail news@islander.org or visit us at

5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

Our office will be closed Monday, Sept 1, in observance of Labor Day.


The0 sad er


I OIE* ERYDEDIE *NOIE*ARYD DLE* I





'"PAGE S30 E'AUGUSTt27, 2001 *THE ISLANDER

FA 5 -


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, cabbage
palms, patio gardens, trimming, clean-up, edgings,
more. Hard-working and responsible. Excellent ref-
erences. Edward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Car Service. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your
computer misbehaving? Certified computer service
and private lessons. Special $25 per hour- free ad-
vice. 545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.

KATHY & MIKE'S CLEANING Service: Delivering
a standard of excellence for all your interior and
exterior cleaning needs. No job too big or small.
Great rates and references, 722-4358.

AUTO DETAILING BY HAND Spotless inside and
out. I can save you time and money. Island resi-
dent, references. For pricing call 713-5967.


CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!


RESIDENTIAL HOUSE CLEANING Bi-weekly,
great references. 12 years experience. Insured,
now accepting new clients. Call 792-3772.

EXPERT CLEANING personalized service! Many
excellent references. Call Kris, 750-8366.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance ser-
vice. Over 30 years experience, self-employed in
construction trades. "I'm handy to have around."
779-9666.

WINDOWS AND MORE! Residential and commer-
cial care including yard care, gutter cleaning, deck
cleaning, pressure washing, house cleaning,
Christmas lights, home deliveries, paintings and
general electrical work at an affordable rate. Call
779-0876 for more information or a free estimate.

ATTENTION TO DETAIL! Auto detailing is our
specialty. We do cars, fleet vehicles and RV's.
Experienced, local and reliable. We come to you!
Call 779-0876 or 778-8578 for a free estimate.

THE ROYAL MAID Service, licensed, bonded, in-
sured. Professional, experienced maids, free es-
timate, gift certificates' available. Please call
727-9337.

GILLIGAN'S HOUSE CLEANING and errands.
Kitchen and bathroom cleanup, dusting, vacuuming,
grocery shopping and more. Island resident, licensed,
free estimates, references. Call 778-2831.

S"ALMOST" GULFRONT


PRICE REDUCED on this beautifully maintained
home with direct deeded Gulf access. Located on
Anna Maria's northern end with pristine natural beach
50-ft. away! Open design provides over 2,000 sq.ft.
living area plus enclosed garage. Must be seen inside
to see the potential for your beach home. We call this
"almost" Gulffront! Call for appointment today. Now
$650,000.
We A4E h4e 'sad/


MrIw w \Since V 1
MARIE w LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.net
Web site annamariareal.com


VACUUM REPAIR 15 years experience, call
778-3390.

EMBROIDERY: We offer quality embroidered
promotional T-shirts, caps and golf shirts. We
can digitize your custom logo for your organiza-
tion or business, or help you create one.
www.islandstitch.com or call 778-8338.

MUSIC LESSONS! Flute, saxophone, clarinet.
Beginning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray,
792-0160.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair
and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County and
the Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and
personalized service, call William Eller, 795-7411.
RA005052.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional cre-
ates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 778-2711.

NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing massage
in the comfort of your home. Call today for an ap-
pointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.

PIANO AND KEYBOARD lessons. Call Jack Elka,
778-2711.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Maintenance.
Residential and commercial. Full-service lawn main-
tenance, cleanup, tree trimming, hauling, Xeriscape.
Island resident. Excellent references. 778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.

MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more readers.


$499,000- WATERFRONT LIVING
Key West style, elevated pool
home on deep water canal in Fla-
mingo Cay with direct access to
intercoastal. Split bedrooms, tile
floors, updated kitchen. IB94587
$599,000 ISLAND FOURPLEX
Excellent investment for this well-
maintained island fourplex! Only a
half of a block to the Bay and three
blocks to the Gulf. Each unit has
central heat & air, refrigerator and
range and its own electric meter.
IB93309.

$425,000 BUILD YOUR ISLAND DREAM HOME
Looking for a place to build your home? Here is one
of the few canalfront lots available in Holmes Beach!
No bridges to Tampa Bay and the Gulf. IB90367.
6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.cbflorida.com


Club Bamboo

Direct Gulffront and poolside
condos priced from
$285,000 $335,000
Econo Lodge Going Condo
Great Rental Opportunity
On-site rental office
Newly renovated
All new furnishings
Now taking contracts
Conversion now in progress

I -


*,-- I,' -,



',l CENTRAL PARK REALTY
Call Dennis Girard
941 -809-0041
email: dennis@centralparkrealtycorp.com
www.club-bamboo.net





"' ttiIS'lNT'l E A itA'UGTST: 272003 M'PA'G'E31


Marina Pointe

Realty Co.



Climate Controlled
Self-Storage
Reserve Now!
314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732



CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org

R E W Your rental listing
_on our Web site!

Owners, we do not demand exclusivity with our rental
listings! We work with owners to maximize occu-
pancy; you rent when you can, we rent when we can!
Check out www.annamariaparadise.com...
and call Sue Carlson at

"Anna Maria Island

413 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
[941] 779-0733 [866] 264-2226






Simply the Best


BEST BUY ON THE ISLAND
Totally rehov&ted, bri7lt a&td ihculate
iBR/iBA vill& ohn & uiet diea-eJd str~et.
$161,000ooo.


TWO FAMILY
Nestles in tbetweet, hay exotic fruit trees MJ
orhl~& et&ls, tlis elevated Juplex Ls l,.ost
2,000 sJ.ft. of livii &rre&. Botl uhits sit &Love
7&r&7es &hJ u7e stor&7e &re&s. Walk to beck.L
Askih7 $425,000.

70+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.

Mike ZV

Norman &
800-367-1617
R ealty INC 941-778-6696

www.mikenormanrea\ty.comr


Get to know us!
Our property
1. ,i ..l manager Carol
_ I .Saulnier has been
.. .. with Green Real
Estate for more than
15 years. Her
-, : :- -"" continuing goal is to
. ..- ., i earn your trust, your
confidence and your
business. Call Carol
-- today and find
exactly what you've
been looking for in a
________ _property manager.



Sreen...
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MGMT.
9906 Gulf Drive 941 778-0455
Anna Maria www.greenreal.com


Reach more than 20,000 people
weekly with your ad -
for as little as $20.00!
Call Rebecca or Nancy 778-7978
TIe Islander


ANNA MARIA



REAL ESTATE LLoast
REAL ESTATE LLC


SPECTACULAR GULF VIEWS!
One house from the beach. Custom-built home
by Whitehead. 3BR, plus den, 3BA, gourmet
kitchen, separate dining room, deck, patio and
two-car garage. Lush tropical landscaping, fenced
and gated. Walls of windows to enjoy the sunsets.
$1,295,000


PERICO BAY CLUB
2BR/2BA villa in secure gated community on
quiet cul-de-sac with very private views. Close
to pool, garage. $239,900.


PERICO ISLAND
2BR/2BA, ground floor, turnkey furnished end
unit. Community pool and clubhouse. Close to
beaches and shopping. $189,900.


ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

MLs Si Coast
REAL ESTATE LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
I 2 '


Frank Davis
Broker





Melinda Bordes
Realtor


Bob Fittro
Realtor





Wendy Foldes
Realtor



mo F


UNDER CONSTRUCTION Two
3BR/2.5BA townhouses. Luxury fea-
tures include crown molding with
nine-ft. ceilings Corian countertops,
tile and carpet, upgraded appliances,
security system, central vacuum sys-
tem, and two-car garage. Enjoy the
wonderful Florida weather from your
screened back porch. 413 79th Street
has a view of Tampa Bay and the Sun-
shine Skyway Bridge. $499,000 -
$539,000. MLS#90911.
WATERFRONT HOMES
& LOTS
524 71st St ............... $1,250,000
4212 Redfish Ct. LOT ..... $575,000


307 Iris St .....................
536 Key Royale Dr..........
106 Gull Dr. ...................
508 Key Royale Drive .....
606 Dundee Ln. ...............
511 59th St....................
10432 W. Sandpiper Rd..


$495,000
$829,900
$599,000
$479,900
$549,000
$595,000
$749,700


ISLAND HOMES,
CONDOS, LOTS & DUPLEXES


Realtor Westbay Pt Moorings #86. $395,000

4915 Gulf Dr ............ $1,715,000
Beachwalk Townhomes II up to. $539,000
308 55th St. Lot .......... $219,000'-
Sun Plaza West #201 ..... $399,000
Alan Galletto
Broker/Associate 408 Pointsetta Rd. ............ $495,000

710 North Shore. Lot...... $279,000
747 Jacaranda. Lot ......... $389,000
Water's Edge #110N ....... $759,000
Jon Kent Sun Plaza West #202 ..... $409,000
Broker/Associate
3818 Sixth Ave ............ $440,000
S3810 Sixth Ave............... $425,000"
Bayou Condo 5C .......... $298,000
Spanish Main #702 ......... $235,000
Tom Nelson 6925 Holmes Blvd. ....... $299,900
Realtor
Westbay Cove #226. ...... $199,000


Nick Patsios
Broker/Associate

r^-1


COMMERCIAL
3014 Avenue C #1&2. .... $259,000
Southern Breeze........ $1,450,000
427 Pine Ave. ................. $695,000

PERICO ISLAND/MAINLAND


] 2418 90th St. NW........ $2,995,000
11434 Perico Isles Cir. ... $349,000
Realtor 816 Audubon Dr............. $214,000
867 Audubon Dr .......... $225,000
S Have a safe Labor Day
weekend from your friends
^ at Island Real Estate
lMarikn Trhevean ~op by ana use our talking


R


I





PAGE 32 E AUGUST 27, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
andy's Established in 1983
SLawn Celebrating 20 Years of
SeArie Quality & Dependable Service.
eCall us for your landscape
778 1345 and hardscape needs.
Licensed & Insured

DESIGN & REMODELING CONTRACTORS
STnvarsky .. :

WW.ANNAMARIACONTRACTOR.COM
STATE LICENSED & INSURED ( 1 778
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED (941 778-2993



Residential Commercial o
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price. "
Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
l!. (Replacement Doors and Windows
ualy Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
(l Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755


SHUTTER-VUE Inc.
WINDOW REPLACEMENT J
8 8799 Cortez Road, Bradenton 745-2363
I I M-F 9am 5pm; Sat by appointment
-1 Winds Hurrican Protection Room Enclosures Service


Qu ry Women's Knit Clothing
SDesigned for Travel
E )(; N 7 MQty Dinueei 779-14-76
Sseamnom@mrnindspting.com


...... .-, r ~ i .- ", .

TOP QUALITY WORK
*Faux Finishes *Pressure Washing
S*Comrnputerized Color View
20 Years Experience
4 'oN- Lr *Pcn zL
.. 761-7414 730-7170


EXCLUSIVE MULLET SHIRTS
more than a mullet wrapper!




The Islander
Islander Ts $10, call for mail order info/price.
941-778-7978 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217


EN J0Y [MARIANNE CORRELL
SEN JO Y Realtor

CLEANING
Commercial Picture
S* Residential It's all
Vacation about
Rentals Real
Call Joy I e
25 Years experience
(941) 812-2485 (941)
778-6066


A DC t eH IPC i

I -.I _e I


KARAZ LANDSCAPE Lawn Service. Mulch, clean-
ups, power washing, tree trimming and more. Call
779-0851 or cell 448-3857.

ECONOMY CUT lawn service. Professional lawn
care at the kid-next-door prices. Free estimates.
778-5294.

TROPICAL TROUBLES? Landscape cleaning,
weeding, trimming, general maintenance, after-
storm care, weekly or monthly schedules available,
affordable rate, thorough and dependable. Call
755-1155.

GILLIGAN'S LAWN MAINTENANCE: Mowing,
edging, trimming, bush and small tree trimming and
more. Island resident, licensed, free estimates, ref-
erences. Call 778-2831.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling,
cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 807-1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation. Everything Under the Sun Gar-
den Centre, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
778-4441.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $30/yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 795-7775, "shell phone"
720-0770.

SANDY'S LAWN SERVICE. Celebrating 20 years
of quality and dependable service. Call us for all
your landscape and hardscape needs 778-1345.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-rap,
mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reliable and
insured. 727-5066.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Dan
Michael, master carpenter. Call cell 778-6898 or
cell, 320-9274.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT Interior/exterior
painting, pressure washing and wallpaper. For
prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates, call
Kevin at 704-7115 or 778-2996. Husband/wife
team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remod-
eling, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured.
Accepting MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.

?.aMiijfX.PERIENCE, hig~,~i4la4,depend-
able restoration renovation expert, carpenter,
fine fiIshinrrg contractor. Kitchen/bathroom spe-
cialist. Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard,
779-2294.


KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheetrock, popcorn, doors, bi-folds, trim,
moldings kitchen remodeling, general repairs.
Homes, rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Building contractor. New
homes, additions, renovations. Quality work and fair
prices. Call 795-1947. Lic #RR0066450.

MASON: 27 YEARS of experience. All masonry
work and repair. Cinderblock work, brick work, glass
block work, paver and brick driveways. Call Chris,
795-3034. Lic.#104776. Insured.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR and Lawn Care: Light
carpentry, plumbing, electrical, grass cutting, tree
trimming, light hauling. Call 778-6170.

MINOR HOME REPAIRS Great rates, references.
Call Rick, 750-8366.

ISLAND HOME REPAIRS: Carpentry, drywall hang-
ing, texturing, electric plumbing, painting. No job to
small! Ceiling fans, screen repairs. Low prices. Call
504-2027.

HANDY ANTHONY. Jack of most trades. Home re-
furbishing and detailing, 778-6000.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more.
Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a free in-
home consultation. Island references, 15 years ex-
perience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available now.
Beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No pets, non-
smoking. Priced from $800month, $450/week, $85/
night. 794-5980. www.divefish.com.

SUMMER, AUTUMN, WINTER rentals available
weekly, monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Estate
Co., 778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across
from beautiful beach, $375 to $500/week. Winter
and spring dates available. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, 778-2374.

ANNUAL RENTALS: Half duplex, 2BR/2BA, new
ceramic floors, $750; 2BR/1BA, stackable washer/
dryer hookup. $725; New tile floors, stove, refrigera-
tor, 1BR/1BA, $650. Dolores M. Baker Realty,
778-7500.

NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Four spacious
3BR/2BA homes with all conveniences. Summer
rate, $1,200/week. Please call 778-2541 and leave
message or call (813) 752-4235. E-mail:
SeaBreezeNShore@ aol.com



BESS ATPAR ATAT B01SO01M

ACRE MILITIAMENELEIVEE
SHEEN PEN INSULA LEERS
IN 1NT PAG E 2 L INIE 3 M M E
LAME 7 LL E TSTAC Y S EP A

0 DEAR R R GTT R 0 SCTA S





ST AULM EA ANAT









RENTALSContinuedRETALCni nued


CHOICE OF 3 and 5BR houses, all with heated
pools, on the water. Long or short term rentals.
www.hartwellvillas.co.uk or e-mail:
Barbara@ hartwellvillas.co.uk. Call 011-44-1256-
473469.

PERICO ISLAND Brand new 3BR/2BA, two-car
garage. Maintenance-free home. Lakefront, all ap-
pliances, amenities, clubhouse and pool. Annual
lease. $1,550/month-$1,450/month. Call 798-3885.

SPACIOUS WATERFRONT, upper, sundeck, dock.
Panoramic view, furnished, Key West-style. 2BR/
2BA, washer/dryer. Pet considered. 794-5980.

FURNISHED 2BR/2BA. Spectacular sunrise view in
Holmes Beach with dock. September-November,
$800/month, plus electric and phone. (941) 224-
6521 or (970) 879-5531.

WATERVIEW! Perico Bay Club. 2BR/2BA luxury
condo in gated community. Turnkey, pool, Jacuzzi,
tennis. Nonsmoking. Seasonal, $2,600/month, plus
tax and cleaning. 778-3320.

LONGBOAT KEY Annual, unfurnished, 1BR/1BA,
$600/month, includes water. Furnished efficiency
available now, $585/month, includes water, bayside,
beach access, shopping, restaurants, quiet area,
first, last. $250 security. No pets. Call 387-9252.

ANNUAL RENTALS: 103 23rd St., Bradenton
Beach, 2BR/1.5BA cottage, furnished, $900'/
month; Longboat Key 2BR/2BA condo, waterview,
$1,700/month; 208 64th St., 2BR/2BA duplex,
garage, $1,150/month. 305 66th St., 2BR/1.5BA
duplex, pet OK, $900/month. Call SunCoast Real
Estate, 779-0202.
VACATION RENTAL Charming 1 BR/1 BA, fully fur-
nished, across from white sandy beach. Call (941)
809-3714.
SEASONAL RENTAL: Holmes Beach canalfront,
2BR/2BA, completely furnished, newly renovated,
two-car garage, laundry, dock, walk-in closets.
$9.200/month. Call (813) 684-3319.
GULFFRONT AND BAYFRONT condos, 3BR/2BA
and 2BR/2BA. Great location, pool, tennis, special
owner discounts, weekly and seasonal. Call (901)
301-8299 or e-mail: captko452@aol.com.

150 STEPS to Gulf. Seasonal, immaculate 2BR/
2BA ground-level home. Nonsmoking, no pets. Call
(813) 961-6992, or e-mail:
ghowcrof@tampabay.rr.com.

SMUGGLER'S LANDING: 3BR/3BA luxury
townhouse available for annual lease. Near pool
and workout room. 40-foot deep-water dock with
boat slip. Near Anna Maria Island. Just five minutes
to Gulf beaches. Call Jim LaRose, A Paradise
Realty, 729-2381.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1BR/1BA or 2BR/1BA with pool. Walk to beach,
shopping and restaurants. 778-3875.
VACATION GULFFRONT APARTMENTS Large
2BR tropical furnished interiors, porches, sundecks,
immaculate. Convenient, Anna Maria, no pets,
owner. Call 778-3143.

AVAILABLE NOW 2BR/2BA bayview condo near
Publix, public beach. Unfurnished, Old Florida Re-
alty, 778-3377.

VACATION & SEASONAL Private beach, some lo-
cations. Units are complete. Rates seasonally ad-
justed. $375-$775/week, $975-$2,275/month. (800)
977-0803 or 737-1121. www.abeachview.com.

ACCOMMODATIONS TO SHARE: Beautiful!
Bradenton Beach. Private courtyard, heated pool,
steps to beach. $450/month. Single person, sorry, no
pets. Call 779-9146 or 224-2031.

EARLY CLASSIFIED AD deadline due to Labor
Day. Ads must be submitted by noon Friday, Aug.
29, for Wednesday, Sept. 3, publication.


BRADENTON BEACH ANNUAL rental. Beautiful
3BR/2BA home, private courtyard, heated pool,
steps to beach and Intracoastal, tiled floors, bal-
conies, great school district. $1,500/month, pets
OK. Call 779-9146 or 224-2031.

ADORABLE CANALFRONT newly renovated Anna
Maria home. 2BR/2BA, washer/dryer, garage. One
block to Gulf. $1,400/month. Six-month minimum.
Call 778-2880.

COMMERCIAL LEASE: Prime commercially zoned
space on Anna Maria Island located on a major ar-
tery. Great visibility. Approximately 2,800 sq.ft. At-
tractive building fronting on two streets. Excellent
parking. For information call owner/Realtor,
745-0959 or 794-8991.

SEASONAL RENTALS. Perico Bay Club, 2BR/2BA
off-season rentals now $1,100/month; 2004 season,
$2,500/month. Book now! Longboat Key, north-end
2BR/1BA village house for 2004 season, $2,300/
month. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.

CASTLE ON BEACH Avenue in Anna Maria. Re-
stored 1924 French Normandy 4BR/3BA house.
Quiet street, walk to beach. $850/week, $2,800/
month. Call 794-8202.

KEY ROYALE BEAUTIFUL canalfront home 2BR/
2BA, tropical pool area with hot tub, dock with two
boat lifts, completely updated. Now through Sep-
tember, 2003, $2,100/month. Previous deal for
2004 fell through! January-April, 2004, $3,500/
month. Unit #: 27150. www.vrbo.com. 730-1086.

CONDO FOR RENT or sale. Turnkey Holmes
Beach, 2BR/2BA, two pools, tennis, one block to
beach. Principals only. Call 756-0132.

HOLMES BEACH Clean 2BR home with Gulf views.
50 yards to beach. Annual rental, no pets, nonsmok-
ing, good credit. $975/month. 3103-A Avenue F.
Call (800) 894-1950.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED DUPLEX clean, 2BR/
2BA, half-block to Gulf, washer/dryer hook-up, large
enclosed porch, no pets. 5611 Guava, Holmes
Beach. $850/month. Call 778-9378.

2BR/1BA VILLA, 55 plus, exceptional, furnished
or unfurnished, washer/dryer, carport, no pets,
nonsmoking. Nice community. $675/month. Call
751-1440.

ANNUAL RENTAL one block to beach. Elevated
3BR/2BA, freshly painted, new carpet, cathedral
ceilings, full size washer/dryer, two open porches,
large storage in carport available. Now $1,400.
Duncan Real Estate, 779-0304.
NEW FOR SEASON: Bayfront 2BR home with
dock, $3,000; Elevated 2BR villa, pets OK, $2,400;
Palma Sola Harbour, 2BR condo with dock, $2,100.
Call Duncan Real Estate, 779-0304.

RENTALS RENT fast in The Islander.


THE ISLANDER N AUGUST 27, 2003 E PAGE 33
You'll b- glad you called. :.
YVONNEHIIGGINS ,RA
S778-?77 .518-9006
SI Crulftrseam
"I work the Islands & the

P.JlVfl .AVTG b,.7ffiaeeJ 'e6ba,, ,/,
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 Aer5 Call
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468

Custom Painting
Wallpaper Hanging
/ ,J ,, Interior/Exterior Design
Pressure Cleaning
AI Call Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed& Insured


r ( >Tile Installations Cliff y Streppone

(941) 587-4649
Beautiful floors and-wicu Wor fery room.
iactFNStDInsuI ni 75g -: ]


Check us out at www.islander.org

Gulf Coast EmidRunner, LLC
Shopping Pet Sifting Sweeral Services Courier
www.gulfcoasIunridrunners.com

5044824


Custom Shower Stalls Tub Enclosures Fixtures *
Cabinets Tiling Drywall Texture Coating Painting
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
Fred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141


Frame with
Framing Order
LceS't inbi
747-7534
2931 Manatee Ave W


NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
B RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL W,
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES 2003 Reader's
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING Preference Winner
BACK FLOWDIVISION 0


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be 'a! advance.
We accept ads by fax with credit card information, 778-9392, at our Web site (secure serve rg, and by
direct e-mail at classifieds@islander.org. Office hours: 9 to 5, Monday-FriditiO
CLASSIFIED RATES- BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minim ttional words: $3 for each J
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line heaI
WE ACCEPT MASTE CAD0*our classified advertising in person or by phone. We are sorry,
but due to t 1jBea o take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please
be prepare i your copy with your credit card information. (see below)
USE THIS ORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
------- ------ -----------------------


2
3
Run issue date(s) _
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash _
For credit card payment: D LJ = No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:
Billing address zip code: House no. or post office box no. on bill
E-Mail address: [for renewal purposes only]
The Islander. Fax: 941 778-9392
5404 Marina Drive Ih Isla nd er Phone: 941 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 34217 E-mail classifieds@islander.org


Reach more than
20,000 people weekly
with your ad -for as
little as $40.001
Call Rebecca or Nancy
778-7978
THe Islander





PAGE 34 0 AUGUST 27, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


HOLIDAYS AVAILABLE, seasonal 2BR furnished
canalfront duplex. Dock, near marker number 1 in
Tampa Bay, $495/week. Three-month minimum
January-May, $1,950/month, inclusive. Nonsmok-
ing, no pets. Call 778-5793.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA house in Holmes Beach on ca-
nal. $1,400/month, partially furnished. Call Smith
Realtors, 778-0770.

DESIGNED FOR YOUR enjoyment, 3BR water-
front, fantastic water view from huge living/dining
area, floor to ceilings plate glass windows and 30-
by-12-ft. screened deck fronting beach, bay and
park for a stroll and swim. Gulf beach in easy walk-
ing distance along with free trolley nearby. Unfur-
nished annual in north Anna Maria. See for your-
self. Call 748-5334 for details.

ANNUAL 1BR/1BA DUPLEX in Holmes Beach.
Close to beach, $650/month, unfurnished. Call
Smith Realtors, 778-0770.

EARLY CLASSIFIED AD deadline due to Labor Day.
Ads must be submitted by noon Friday, Aug. 29, for
Wednesday, Sept. 3, publication. Call, 778-7978.


***A MUST SEE ***


NEW & Luxious
3BR/2BA, HEATED POOL, GARAGE
3810 6TH AVENUE, HOLMES BEACH $425,000
3818 6TH AVENUE, HOLMES BEACH $440,000
FOR MORE DETAILS: www.reachrichard.com


SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
S(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

Have a Sale and Happy

** abor Day**.

I IHPECCALE 1SLAN DULIPLEX


This beautifully remodeled duplex offers two spacious bed-
rooms and two baths on each level, plus a cozy den or third
bedroom with French doors. Amenities include Spanish-tiled
floors, white tiled baths, fully equipped kitchens with knotty
pine cabinets and breakfast bars, textured ceilings with fans
and Hotpoint washers and dryers on each level. Adorable
shabby chic furnishings and whimsical wall coverings and
borders create a cozy and carefree beach ambiance, while
easy-care vinyl siding and oyster-shell landscaping make
maintenance a breeze. Located just one short block to the
Gulf, this endearing hideaway won't last long! Priced at
$595,000 furnished.

VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE

Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com


ANNUAL RENTALS: 8 Palm Harbor Drive, 3BR/2BA,
fireplace, four-car garage, $2,000/month; Perico Bay
Club, waterfront, 3BR/2BA, $1,500/month; Heron's
Watch, new, 3BR/2BA, upgrades, $1,400/month. Call
T. Dolly Young Real Estate, 778-0807.

ANNUAL RENTALS: Furnished apartments, Holmes
Beach, 1 BR, $700/month, 2BR, $800/month. $500
security. No pets. Call (407) 846-8741 or 778-0794.

ANNUAL RENTALS Brand new, beautiful 3BR/2BA
home, two-car garage minutes to beach. $1,350/
month. Nonsmoking, no pets. 1 BR/1 BA apartment
directly across street from beach. $580/month. Call
Fran Maxon Real Estate at 778-2307 for details.

BRADENTON BEACH Homes for sale or rent.
Seasonal or annual, 1 BR apartment, unfurnished,
$700/month includes utilities. Sandpiper Mobile
Resort 778-1140, or e-mail:
SandpiperResort@aol.com.

HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX, tropical 2BR/2BA,
garage, screened lanai, remodeled, shady, quiet,
unfurnished. Nonsmoking, no pets. $975/month
annual. Call 776-1789.


Denise Langlois
Dedication and Experience
-. You Can Coant On ...


PLAYA ENCANTADA
Turnkey furnished 2BR/
2BA Island condo in
Holmes Beach. Enjoy the
heated pool with spa, white
sandy beach and tennis
courts. Great location!
$339,000. IB88068


See virtual tours and
all available MLS listings at
www.BradentonAreaHomes.com

(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448







Buying, Selling, Renting? We Can Help!
1212 64TH STREET, NW.
S '. NORTHWEST BRADENTON
just off Riverview Blvd. Close
to Warner's Bayou. Updated
2BR/2BA home in wonderful
neighborhood. Newly land-
scaped, freshly painted, new
A- tile and carpet. Easyto show
and priced to sell at $199,500. Contact Bonnie Bowers direct at
350-1300 or 778-2307 for details. MLS# 94789.
2910 GULF DRIVE
0o .-t .ss. DUPLEX WEST SIDE OF GULF
^- DRIVE! Charming duplex, short
-' half-block to beach. Continue
using as duplex or convert to
larger single-family home. Re-
cent updates include tile floors,
exterior and interior paint,
newer A/C, wooden deck. Large 2BR/1 BA and 1 BR/1BA. Great rental
history, tenants in place. A must see! Priced to sell at $325,000. Call
Stephanie Bell, Owner/Agent 778-2307 or 920-5156. MLS# 93114.
-._. 210 CHILSON AVENUE
CANALFRONT ON CHILSON
-sio A AVENUE in Anna Maria.
Ground floor home on 74 by
... 148 foot lot on deep-water ca-
nal. Private boat dock, large
screened lanai, oversized one-
car garage. One short block to
beach! Offered at $520,000. Exclusive in-house listing. Call Stephanie
Bell, 778-2307 or 920-5156.


I2


SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1970 MLS


OFFICE: 300 SQ.FT. currently set up for two-chair
hair salon. 112 52nd. St. W., Holmes Beach. $450/
month. Call 746-8666.

GULFVIEW 1 BR/1 BA with dining room or office.
Large porch, new appliances, cabinets, tile floor,
paint, washer/dryer, central air, half-block to
beach, above Busy Bee Day Care. $990/month.
Call 746-8666.

ANNUAL RENTALS: 1BR/1BA duplex, $575/
month, most utilities included; 1BR/1BA duplex
with covered parking, walk to Gulf, $625/month,
most utilities included; 2BR/1BA duplex, walk to
Gulf, pets welcome, $760/month; 2BR/1.5BA du-
plex with one-car garage, new carpet, new paint,
$960/month; Perico Bay Club, 2BR/2BA condo,
furnished, water views, $1,100/month, most utili-
ties included. Take advantage of great move-in
specials. Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

ANNUAL RENTALS 1BR/1BA, canal/dock, some
utilities, $795/month. Call 387-0990.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER SPECIAL 1BR/2BA fur-
nished, spacious, steps to beach on Anna Maria
Island, cable, washer/dryer. Only $395/week, plus
tax. Call 778-1098.

RENTALS rent fast in The Islander.


S1!.-" I" REALTOR.

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD RLAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
EXpc'i i'-, L RAli/rarwi Re'siir




IJ-
'- ":; .. . -- . -'.:- .,''z 4

5400 CONDO GulIn'ew grounjra ilior 2BR'2BA ,viel
'.a.' ner dr ,'r p riall,', turnrzhed Surin ec, 2 pools Pricei 11
jl S51 ( 000 Callr weeiend open nseuSifeS
SEASONAL & ANNUAL RENTALS
KEY ROYALE Larilge'FR BA pool. Sp. toal a0cklit
MARTINOUE GuulrTruni 2BR 2BA. pool, tennis. levators.
. 5400 GULFFRONT counpl'- 1 and BRs. pool
BEACHFRONT -.BR 26A ,:Ame ia.telull' forriished
CAYMAN CAY 2BR 2BA poul igl-ebo. across Iromihe beach
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7,iaol.com www.Idollyyoungrealestate.com



SUf-Bay Realty
S i of Anna Maria Inc.
S778-7244
le a 1 (800)771-6043
5309 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
[Next to the Chamber in the Island Fitness Building]
MARTINIQUE NORTH
Rarely avalaible at the price!
S, Direct gulffront Martinique
S" condo, gorgeous views, pool,
tennis and garage. Only
''. $359,000.. Call JessBrisson
-saB y @ 713-4755 or Call Robin
Kollar @713-4515.

CHARMING ISLAND COT-
.. TAGE Bright and cheerful 2BR/
.. 1 BA with room for a pool. Lo-
Imwfi too B cated west of Gulf Drive, one
*s short block to beach. Great in-
.... vestment opportunity! Must
; ,, .,. see! $359,000. Call Heather
Absten for a viewlnll
807-4661.

SIX-UNIT RESORT
Architectural design, almost
Gulffront, beautifully refur-
bished. A must see for the
sawvvy investor. Owner financ-
ing. $1,650,000. Call Robin
Kollar @ 713-4515 or Jesse
Brisson @ 713-4755


L.






THE ISLANDER U AUGUST 27, 2003 U PAGE 35,.



RNASCniudRAL-ESTATECotiue RAL SATECotiue


HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2.5BA, townhouse, new
white tile, washer/dryer, Gulfview from sundeck.
$835/month. Call 758-1899, or cell (203) 417-2331.


LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty
parking spaces, contemporary design, great visibil-
ity. $14/square foot. Can divide. Owner/Realtor,
388-5514, or call 809-4253.

NORTHWEST BRADENTON Executive 4BR/2.5BA
pool home. Many deluxe features. Dual fireplace, eat-
in kitchen, large family room, formal dining room,
circle drive, immediate occupancy. $349,000. Carol
R. Williams, C & C Real Estate, 744-0700.

NORTHWEST BRADENTON Hawthorn Park,
4BR/3BA, pool and spa, outdoor kitchen, too many
amenities to list. Model condition. $394,500.
Owner/broker, 795-2623.

GULF WATCH: Gorgeous 2BR/2BA turnkey fur-
nished unit with Gulf views.$419,900. Weekly rent-
als OK. www.Latitude27Realty.net or 744-2727.

2BR/2BA LAKEFRONT CONDO in Meadowcroft. All
updates, enclosed lanai. Contact Dan at 518-9303.

EARLY CLASSIFIED AD deadline due to Labor
Day. Ads must be submitted by noon Friday, Aug.
29, for Wednesday, Sept. 3, publication. For infor-
mation call, 778-7978 during business hourser.org.


The Islander

Don't leave the
Island without us!


MORE FOR THE MONEY. Northwest Bradenton.
4BR/2BA, two-car garage. Caged pool and spa.
Beautiful panoramic view on lakeside lot. Updated,
clean and nice. Cathedral ceilings. Minutes to Gulf
beaches. $320,000. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.

HARBOUR LANDINGS: Lot for sale with boat slip in
exclusive gated waterfront community. Room for 40-
foot boat, easy access to Intracoastal. Offered at
$259,900. Piroska Planck 730-9667, or Susan Hol-
lywood 726-6125. E-mail:
pkplanck@coldwellbanker.com Coldwell Banker
Residential Real Estate.

LONGBOAT KEY Village home. 3BR/1BA free-
standing. Large two-car garage. Updated, new roof
and air conditioning. $409,000. Real Estate Mart,
756-1090.

DUPLEX FOR SALE one-half recently renovated.
Enjoy the tax benefits of a rental without the hassle.
$50,000-plus income per year. Call Tom at 726-1898.

BAYFRONT CONDO Terra Ceia Golf and Tennis
Club, 2BR/2BA, gated community, gorgeous views
of Sunshine Skyway Bridge. Heated pool.
$235,000. Call 722-4800 evenings.

TOTALLY REMODELED elevated home. Holmes
Beach, deeded boat slip, private beach access. 2BR/
2BA, vaulted greatroom. New kitchen, beautiful! Must
see. $354,000. For sale by owner. Call 922-0292.


srmiith, r
*^mn0


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com
... -;'L :i5:
SALES'"1!, : .


ISLAND HOME 3-4BR/2BA home in quiet area of Holmes
Beach. Florida room, one-car garage. Room for a pool. New
deeded boat slip. Furniture available. Priced for quick sale.
$451,900. Call Michel Cerene, Realtor, 792-6546 eves.


3224 EAST BAY DRIVE HOLMES BEACH

Gail T'utewiler


941-705-0227
1-866-587-8559
REALESHACOMPAN gailtutere@aol.com
AFFORDABLE BEACH/BAY CONDO
You must see this light and bright
ground floor condo with an updated
kitchen (even a dishwasher) in wonder-
ful bayfront complex, just steps to the
beach. Turnkey finished. Pool by the
bay. $196,900.
ATTENTION BOATERS! Beautifully --" -
updated end unit in small complex just
2 miles to the beach wtih deeded boat '
dock. Two screened porches. New
A/C. Turnkey furnished. Great rental.
$163,500.
CANAL FRONT 3 BEDROOM Interior
4 designed by architect. You must see
inside this updated 3BR/2BA villa on a
double canal. Carport and extra stor-
age included. Community has 2 pools,
clubhouse, exercise room, tennis and
more. Reduced to $309.900.
PANORAMIC VIEWS OF GULF AND
BAY See the water from every window
in this updated corner unit in Bay View
Terrace of Bradenton Beach. Rare
2BR/1.5BA, largest model with new
carpet and tile, new furniture.
$264,900.
BRADENTON BEACH HOME YOU
CAN AFFORD Adorable island home re-
S -. gently updated, new A/C, large fenced
!;i backyard. Just across from beach. Room
S .- for pool or expansion. Perfect rental. Just
'., _reduced to $298,900.


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA condo, completely re-
modeled in 2003. All new appliances, ceramic tile
throughout, washer/dryer and more. Partial bay
view. A must see $289,900. Call (312) 321-7501
or (847) 707-3859 cell.

BRADENTON BEACH 2BR/2BA turnkey fur-
nished unit on Intracoastal and one block to the
beach. Located in a six-unit building with docks.
Priced for immediate sale, $329,000. Contact
Roger at (941) 650-7580.

HIDEAWAY BAY Longboat Key private water-
front home featuring 3BR, new boat dock with lift,
32-foot pool, spa and tropical landscaping.
$1,099,000. Owner anxious. Call Bob Huff,
Michael Saunders & Co., 780-4016.

COUNTRY CLUB SHORES Longboat Key water-
front. 3BR, new boat dock, deeded beach ac-
cess, $617,500, owner will consider holding sec-
ond mortgage. Call Bob Huff, Michael Saunders
& Co., 780-4016.

BY OWNER Beautiful waterfront condo, 5BR/
3BA, private dock, three levels. Sunbow Bay in
Holmes Beach. $350,000. Call 737-8458 or
www.isoldmyhouse.com.

EARLY CLASSIFIED AD deadline due to Labor
Day. Ads must be submitted by noon Friday, Aug.
29, for Wednesday, Sept. 3, publication. For in-
formation call, 778-7978 during business hours or
visit our Web site: www.islander.org.

Happy Labor Day!

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


REALTORS


5fL~

.'~.a.' -. A- -. ~....
:*:- ~
-~ ~.. ~ 2. -.7. \-. ~ _______







PAGE 36 U AUGUST 27, 2003 T THE ISLANDER


By ElizabethCLL Go sKEYED UP 1 b5 6 Will Shortz12
By Elizabeth C. Gorski / Edited by Will Shortz 11 1_1_1_TrI I II_-r_-_1


Across
1 "I Loves You, Porgy"
singer
5 How some stocks are
sold
10 Rat-_
14 Intimate
19 From scratch
20 Ready to read the riot act
21 "A Treatise of Human
Nature" writer
22 Mojave plant
23 Many a homestead
spread
24 Reservists
26 Bank that may be created
by the government
27 Radiance
29 Part of Florida
30 Creepy looks
31 Chant
32 Where a newspaper
index often appears
33 "Married filing separately"
on an I.R.S. form 1040
35 Lady of la maison: Abbr.
36 Unconvincing
37 Annex
38 Actor Keach
39 Salt shaker?
40 No longer sharp
41 Have a canyonlike effect
44 Gossips
46 Greek theaters
47 "Bingo!"
50 Places with a bird's-eye
view
52 Miniseries segment
54 Rest
57 "Thumbs up" response
59 Like some internships, in
length
60 Howard _, "Mayberry
R.F.D." character
62 Packing
64 Raipur raiment


65 "Evil Woman" grp.
68 & 69 Bygone phone
message
71 Cook's abbr.
72 Brown & Williamson
brand
74 Shows inconstancy
75 Some opening night
theatergoers
77 World Series finale
79 Tempe inst.
80 Women's dress sizes
81 Skittles
85 Minnesota twin?
87 It may be balding
89 Sculpture student's
subj.
90 Big name in book
publishing since 1818
92 "My Eyes Have Seen"
singer
96 "Veni ..."
97 Hardly likely to streak
98 Certain 111-Downs
101 Discount rack abbr.
102 Repeated cry while
waving a hand
103 High ball?
104 Entry in a spaceship log
105 Low visibility figure
107 Hits repeatedly
108 It may arrive with
attachments
110 One may be picky about
these
112 Skater Hughes
114 Style
115 Fortuitous
117 Cops and robbers, e.g.
118 Hollywood family
119 Lot
120 Cold shoulder treat-
ment?
121 Egyptian solar deity
122 Causes dissolution of
cells


Apportion, with "out"
Wished
Mouth, so to speak


Down
1 Pastoral sounds
2 "Big" one
3 One who sings to the
balcony
4 Sugar-covered nuts,
bonbons, etc.
5 Ambition
6 Fall guy?
7 Pub order
8 Like skin, after a facial
9 Tighten one's laces, say
10 Sounds of discoverers
11 Kerfuffle
12 Title woman in a Joni
Mitchell song
13 Holding of land
14 Call that may complete
a full count
15 Curved molding
16 Latecomer's plea
17 Dominates
18 1980's attorney general
25 Halved
28 "Thanks, but don't
bother"
34 Observer
38 Soak
39 Tucks (away)
40 Fashion plate
42 Fishing baskets
43 R & B group with the
1991 #1 hit "I Like the
Way"
45 Carbon, to a lab worker:
Abbr.
48 Zimbabwe's capital
49 "Laugh-In"
regular on old TV
51 LP flaw
53 Tea time, maybe
54 Small drum


55 Discriminating person
56 Civilization, to Hesse
58 Ancient Brits: Var.
61 W.W. II heroes: Abbr.
62 Bow (to)
63 Agnus .
65 Ticker tapes?
66 In an offensive way
67 Oktoberfest entertain-
ers
70 Big jet
73 60's guru
76 "Star Wars" and the
like
78 Old "You like it, it likes
you" sloganeer
80 Year that Augustus


exiled Ovid
82 Juliet, to Romeo
83 Cooperate with the
feds, say
84 Qu6bec map abbr.
86 Make advances?
88 Aurora's counterpart
91 Corot painting style
93 Connect with
94 Place with a bird's-
eye view
95 Picture show?
96 Shuts up
99 Right this minute
100 Garfield, for one
103 Kind of advice
104 Completely black, in a


105 Focused (in on)
106 Word said with a
slap
109 "Dies__
111 Beachcomber's
concern
113 teeth
116 Outranked

Answers to this puzzle
are located in this edi-
tion of the The Islander.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge itto Visa or MasterCard.

ii -ii


email: ami@wagnerrealty.com websitee: wagnerrealty.com


2217 GULF DR. N.
BRADENTON BEACH

(941) 778-2246
(800) 211-2323


ANNA MARIA BAY FRONT Lush tropi-
cal bayfront setting with 3BR/2BA older
home on a large 75-by-198-ft. lot with
deep-water dockage. Short distance to
beach. Remodel or build new. Dave
Moynihan, 778-2246. #93749.
$945,000.


BAYFRONT DUPLEX Wonderful
bayviews from this updated elevated
Duplex with a city park between the build-
ing and bay. Both units 2BR/1.5BA, could
convert to single family. Dave Moynihan,
778-2246. #94771. $459,000.


UNIQUE WATERFRONT DUPLEX
3BR/3BA has 2,400 sq.ft. with bay
views. 2BR/3BA has 1,700 sq.ft. with
partial Gulf views. Each has private two-
car garage. Short distance to the beach.
Dave Moynihan, 778-2246. #91438.
$795,000.


TOTALLY RENOVATED Impeccable
3BR/2BA residence and only one block
to beach. Improvements include new
roof, A/C, windows, doors, electric,
Mexican tile and more. Dave Moynihan,
778-2246. #90350. $389,900.


KEY ROYALE GEM Floor plan designed
for entertaining! Lead glass front door,
tiled living/dining room, family room with
sliders to the large lanai, with wetbar &
Jacuzzi. Becky Smith or Elfi Starrett, 778-
2246. #93435. $539,500.










ISLAND DUPLEX IN BRADENTON
BEACH Best priced Island duplex, 1BR/
1 BA each side, vaulted .:.:iiri.-: Terrazzo
floors. Short distance to beach. Tenants in
place. Dave Moynihan, 778-2246.
#92955. $275,000.


THE VILLA ROSA
Custom-built single-
family homes in gated
community on canals
in Anna Maria. Start-
ing at $1,500,000.


I

THE ROSA DEL MAR
Gulfside condomini-
ums, pool, approxi-
mately 1,900 sq.ft.,
gated parking, deluxe
am e n it i e s.
Preconstruciton pricing
starts at $1,500,000.



THE HIBISCUS-Four
bayside condomini-
ums with boat dock
and pool. Starting at
$795,000.
For details please call
779-2700


Not too early to plan your winter rental!
Many condos, homes and cottages to
choose from! Credit cards accepted!
CALL 800-211-2323 or 778-2246.


n


m-'. --~


m


- -, ---~