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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( August 13, 2003 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: August 13, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01015

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: August 13, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01015

Full Text



Skimming the news ... Anna Maria Island map in this edition, page 18.


S Anna Maria



The


Islander


Whiffleball fun, page 28.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 11, No. 40 Aug. 13, 2003 FREE


Last chance for input on AME design Thursday


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Elementary School new construc-
tion team will be holding a public meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 14, in the school auditorium.
The purpose of the meeting is to gather community
input on the aesthetic design of the new school build-
ing, which may then be incorporated into the final de-
sign of the school.


Manatee County School District project team co-
ordinator Larry Roemer and Director of Construction
Services Sherry Dowling have said that the footprint
of the new school building will not be altered.
The input from the community is meant to help the
project team define "Island style" and apply it to the
school building so that it fits the community.
Some of the design ideas that have been suggested
include a pitched roof, Bahama shutters, superimposed


Lapping it up
This young pup gets his kicks in the grass in Monterrey, Mexico, where photographer Jose Granados of Nuevo
Leon, Mexico, snapped this digital image. His is thefinal weekly winner in the eight-week-long contest and his
award is a coveted "More Than a Mullet Wrapper" Islander T-shirt and $50 with a few dog biscuits
thrown in the package. His photo will now go into a pool with other weekly winners eligible for the contest
grand-prize package, including $100 from The Islander and gift certificates from Mister Robert's Resortwear,
Ooh La La! Bistro, Robyn's Nest, and Decor Gallery & Framing. Next week: the ultimate winner and the
judges' picks for runnersup.


Fight to save 'sacred' homes


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
It's a developer's nightmare.
Frank Davis wants to build a four-unit condo-
minium on the site where he presently owns a Gulffront
single-family home at 5622 Gulf Drive in Holmes
Beach, but it will apparently not be without opposition.
Davis proposes to move the single-family home to
a lot directly in front of his Harrington House bed and
breakfast inn at 5626 Gulf Drive and incorporate the
home into his hotel rentals there and build a new four-
unit structure on the home site.
At the Holmes Beach City Commission work ses-
sion Aug. 12, Davis planned to appear to discuss the
site plan.
However, neighbors of the proposed four-unit
complex are fighting the project and were prepared to
speak against allowing the city to approve the plans.
The McLean and Coloney families co-own a du-
plex at 5620 Gulf Drive, on the south side of the sub-
ject property and south of the Harrington House.
Davis has rented the three-bedroom home at 5622
Gulf Drive as an "annex" to Harrington House for sev-


eral years, although it is separated from the inn by an-
other single-family home. Prior to Davis' purchase of
the home, according to the attorney representing the
McLeans and Coloneys, it functioned for many years
as a single-family residence.
The Coloney family has vacationed at its first-floor
Island duplex for more than 35 years.
One of the three children from the McLean family,
Susannah, summers in the second-floor unit of the du-
plex. She is married to John Shubin, a Miami land-use
lawyer whose firm, Shubin and Bass, has offered legal
counsel or participated in more than 350 land-use mat-
ters on behalf of a wide variety of clients, a majority of
which involve opposition to proposed development.
"This land is sacred ground for my wife,
Susannah," said Shubin. "We are not prepared to ac-
cept that the proposal is permissible. There are many
legal problems with this request."
Shubin said his wife was shocked when on June 30
she found out that the city's board of adjustment on
Feb. 27, apparently without any notification, approved
setback and height variance requests from Davis.
PLEASE SEE HOMES, PAGE 3


graphics of fish on the building exterior and a South
Seas look with a generous roof overhang.
West Manatee Fire and Rescue Fire Marshal Kurt
Lathrop has been invited to attend the meeting to dis-
cuss water flow and pressure issues in relationship to
the design and construction of the new building.
Construction should begin in October and the Aug. 14
meeting will be the final opportunity for the community
to reach a compromise, according to team members.



Decision near


on bed tax hike
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
A proposal by the Bradenton Area Convention and
Visitors Bureau to the Manatee County Commission to
boost the resort tax from 3 to 4 percent seems "to be on
course for almost certain passage," said Anna Maria
Island Chamber of Commerce President Alan Galletto.
But the chamber still wants to hear from its mem-
bers before taking a final stance on the issue to the
CVB, he said.
"The chamber initially took a position as being
opposed to the increase, based on input from our mem-
bers," said Galletto.
That was in May when the CVB first announced it
needed the tax hike to meet its budget because of de-
clining tourism and the loss of hotel rooms on Anna
Maria Island and the Manatee County portion of
Longboat Key to condominium projects.
Since then, however, Galletto said three of the
"larger accommodations members" have indicated sup-
PLEASE SEE BED TAX, PAGE 3


A: '-


P
^ *T~~i, 4.'/ t

:1'


Goodbye hug,
hello first day of school
Kindergartner Alexia Yavalar couldn't start her
first day of school Monday at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary without giving Grandpa Lynn Probst a big
hug. For more school news, see inside. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan


- *~1--______________


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PAGE 2 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Lots of water, little damage in soggy weekend


By Paul Roat
Anna Maria Island dodged a slippery, wet bullet
over the weekend, with reports of no significant dam-
age due to three days of off-and-on, mostly on, rain.
An upper level trough of wet weather began to
creep across the region Friday, finally oozing its way
through the region Monday. Rainfall amounts on the
Island reached to the 6-inch level, prompting some
flooded streets but no real problems.
Bradenton didn't fare as well, with parking lots
flooded to the level of car fenders at Desoto Square
Mall and road closures in the area Saturday.
To the south was also a different story, with U.S.
41 near downtown Sarasota closed to traffic for much
of Friday morning, and access to St. Armands Circle at
Bird Key shut down Saturday afternoon for several
hours due to floodwaters.
Upwards of 12 inches of rain were reported in parts
of Sarasota.
Homeowners on the Island should pay special at-
tention to non-native trees which may be impacted by
the soggy ground. Shallow root structures of many
trees, such as Australian pines, could become unstable
after all the rain and are susceptible to toppling if any
winds occur before the ground dries.
"We didn't have anything bad," Bradenton Beach
Police Chief Sam Speciale said. "We had some streets
flood, like Avenue A near 25th Street, and put up some
barricades. We were watching at the high tides, but
there was nothing special that happened except for a lot
of rain."
"We had some minor damage, but nothing serious
at all," said Holmes Beach Public Works Director Joe
Duennes. "We didn't have any real wind, and no beach
erosion. It was nothing serious."
Ditto for Anna Maria City: Public Works Director
George McKay said "there was no need to break out
the snorkels. We fared well. The tides worked in our
favor, and there was nothing unusual other than a lot of
rain."
Manatee County Emergency Management acti-
vated a shelter Saturday at Lee Middle School on 53rd


-I I


Stormy weather dumped better than 6 inches of rainfall on the Island last weekend. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Avenue West, Bradenton, for anyone seeking relief
from the high waters. Health department officials have
also urged residents who use well water to boil the
water before drinking if flood waters covered the well-
head.
County emergency management officials are ask-
ing business owners who were adversely impacted by
the stormy weather to call the Economic Development
Council of the Manatee Chamber of Commerce at 748-


3411 to report physical damage caused by the storm.
"We need a complete as possible damage assess-
ment in order to pull in needed recovery resources,"
said Charlie Roberts with Manatee County Emergency
Management. "Our window to report this data is only
through Wednesday [Aug. 13], so I encourage busi-
nesses to contact the EDC as soon as possible."
Only notification of actual flood damage roofs,
walls, flooring, or stock warrants the call, he added.


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Bradenton Beach should be governed by
people who live in Bradenton Beach, city com-
missioners unanimously agreed last week.
The commission approved an ordinance
which calls for members of the city's planning
and zoning board and board of adjustment to be
a "qualified elector" in the city in other
words, a resident.
A similar ordinance is expected to be adopted
next month calling for residency of the city's code en-
forcement board and any personnel appeal boards that
may be called.
City laws previously allowed property own-
ers to serve on the city's advisory boards. The
change in the ordinance will force the resigna-


Bed tax hike feedback sought
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
port of the proposal, while the opposition has been
"very silent."
While the CVB might believe this indicates
AMICC support for the increase, Galletto said that
from "casual conversation" with some AMICC mem-
bers, "this is not the case."
Before any final AMICC position on the issue,
however, Galletto wants input from all members, either
for or against.
"We would like to take a position on this issue that
fairly reflects the opinion of the majority of our mem-
bers," he said.
The CVB has indicated the 1 percent tax hike
would boost its revenues by nearly $1 million annually.
Of that amount, however, only $90,000 would be


Home-to-condo proposed
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
The fact that Davis and the McLean and Coloney
families are neighbors legally requires the city to indi-
vidually notify all abutting neighbors, contends
Shuban.
That's not the city's policy, says Russell Olson,
vice chairman of the Holmes Beach Board of Adjust-
ment and the only dissenting vote against Davis' vari-
ance request. "When a variance is asked for, the prop-
erty must be posted for a certain number of days prior
to a public hearing," said Olson.
Not good enough, argues Shubin.
"The ordinance requires 'due public notice' and
that does not necessarily mean that individual notice is
not required by law," said Shubin. "It only means that
the city code does not specifically require individual-
ized notice. My opinion is that 'due public notice' of
a variance does require individual notice to abutting
property owners to ensure compliance with due pro-
cess."
And because the board of adjustment is a quasi-
judicial body, they must comply with the "due process"
clause of the U.S. Constitution, Shubin contends.
"The city should be ashamed of itself for not re-
quiring notice like most every other city," said Shubin.
"This is particularly true where you have seasonal resi-
dents who might not personally observe posted notice.
Even worse, a neighbor could file an application and
seek a hearing when they know their neighbors are not
in town."
Not being notified about the variance request con-
cerns the two families.
But, there's still a matter of Davis' property violat-
ing the city's land development code.
The property is zoned A-1, which in the code book
is defined, "multi-family residential and seasonal tour-
ist district," requiring a minimum frontage of 80 feet.
The Manatee County property appraiser's office
records show the frontage to be 67 feet at Davis'
homesite.
The Feb. 7, 2003, Holmes Beach building permit
application signed by contractor Brent Whitehead
states a frontage width of 68.02 feet, although no vari-
ances have been applied for or granted to vary the re-
quired frontage.


tions of planning board members Susan Kehne
and Pete Milazzo.
A packed commission chamber of citizens sup-
ported the residency requirement.
"It's a good ordinance for the city," resident
Janice Dingman said. "To serve on a board and not
be a resident of the city is ludicrous."
"You need to have a vested interest in
Bradenton Beach" to serve on a board, said resident
Lisa Marie Phillips.
"It's grossly unfair to have people represent-
ing the city without living here," said Bob
McClane.
"If you don't live here, you should not sit on
our boards," said Ellen Benjamin.


spent on an advertising campaign directed at Island
accommodations.
The CVB said the additional $1 million would be
divided as:
$250,000 set aside as an emergency reserve for
bad years.
$50,000 spent on information and sports marketing.
$90,000 for information exchange.
$16,000 for public relations in tourism and eco-
nomic development in Great Britain and Germany.
$52,000 provided to CVB staff to travel to trade
and consumer shows.
$30,000 spent on a small-meeting sales program.
$34,000 paid to a public relations firm for a pub-
lic relations effort.
$26,000 earmarked for research studies measur-
ing the effectiveness of the CVB programs.
$332,000 diverted to an additional advertising fund.


Residence requirement on city


boards OK'd in Bradenrton Beach


Home hung on blocks
Frank Davis' home at 5622 Gulf Drive in Holmes Beach, utilized as an "annex" to his Harrington House Bed
& Breakfast at 5626 Gulf Drive two properties north, is on blocks, awaiting a move to the lot in front of
Harrington House. Davis' planned four-unit condominium at the site is being challenged by neighbors of the


development. Islander Photos: Bonner Joy

Shubin wrote in a July 9 letter to Bill Saunders,
assistant superintendent of public works, that the Davis
property "... does not possess the requisite frontage
required under the A-1 zoning district," adding, "...
you must refrain from issuing a building permit for any
new construction on the property which exceeds the di-
mensions and square footage of the structure currently
on the property."
The present one-story wood frame house is re-
corded at 1,842 square feet. The building permit ac-
knowledges the fourplex would have 8,606 square feet
of living space.
Shubin, in his letter to Saunders, also said, "... the
property's continuous use as a hotel/motel effectively
pre-empted any potential claim by the property owner
that it had some legal basis to continue to utilize the
property as a multi-family residential use."
Further complicating the venture is Shubin's asser-
tion that should Davis move the existing structure off
the land, he "voluntarily forgoes further nonconform-


ing use of the property."
Nonconforming structures, parcels and lots were
lawful before the ordinances adopting the LDC in 1989
and 1990.
The property is appraised at $720,000 and the
project had all the markings of a done deal. Soil has
been turned and a house on blocks awaits removal from
the site.
The $620,000 project designed by Eatman & Smith
and to be built by Whitehead Construction now awaits
city approval.
Bradenton attorney Mark Bamebey is representing
Davis. In a July 24 letter to Saunders, Barnebey ex-
plained that the proposed four condominiums would
each have three bedrooms and shared access to a swim-
ming pool, spa and patio.
"We are prepared to fight, if necessary, to uphold
a position that we believe is right," said Shubin. "We
are fighting for a way of life, and we will go to every
length possible to air our views."


THE ISLANDER E AUGUST 13, 2003 E PAGE 3


Meetings

Anna Maria City
Aug. 13, 6:45 p.m., Environmental Education
and Enhancement Committee meeting.
Aug. 19, 6 p.m., city commission budget work
session.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 13, 1 p.m., scenic highway committee
meeting.
Aug. 14, 1 p.m., city commission work session
on capital improvements and sanitation.
Aug. 20, 1 p.m., city commission work session
on budget.
Aug. 20, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning board
meeting.
Aug. 21, 1 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 14, 7 p.m., planning commission meeting.
Aug. 21, 10 a.m., code enforcement board meet-
ing.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
Aug. 13, 10 a.m., Island Emergency Operation
Center meeting, Fire Station No. 1, 6001 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
Aug. 20, 3 p.m., Manatee County Emergency
Management meeting, Holmes Beach City Hall.
Aug. 20, immediately following county emer-
gency management meeting, Coalition of Bar-
rier Island Elected Officials Forum meeting,
Holmes Beach City Hall.






PAGE 4 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 E THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria eyes 'conservative' budget financing


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria city commissioners at their Aug. 6
budget workshop shied away from a long-term $1.8
million bond program that could have financed capital
improvement projects in the proposed 2003-04 budget
and beyond (see separate story).
Financing capital improvements with a bond issue
would have reduced the proposed 2003-04 budget from
$2.3 million to $1.9 million, but would have saddled
the city with an annual debt payment estimated at
around $125,000 for the life of the bond.
Instead, commissioners asked Mayor SueLynn to
come up with a revised budget that will consider just
$200,000 of capital improvements during the coming
budget year, paid for from reserves if necessary.
At the same time, however, the commission also
asked for a long-term capital improvements plan, in-
cluding cost estimates, and suggested the priority items
in the plan could be financed by a line of credit, rather
than a city bond program.
Commissioners agreed several weeks ago with
SueLynn's suggestion that the city investigate estab-
lishing a line of credit, and the mayor already has three
proposals from financial institutions that the commis-
sion will consider at its Aug. 28 meeting.
The revised budget presented Aug. 6 eliminated
paying for most capital improvement projects in the
coming fiscal year, replacing those costs with a bond
payment of about $100,000, based upon a $1.8 million
city bond through the Florida League of Cities.
The mayor had considered about $900,000 in capi-
tal improvements during the 2003-04 fiscal year if the
commission approved the bond issue.
Commissioner Tom Aposporos, who had origi-
nally suggested bond financing for capital improve-
ments at the July 29 workshop, said a $1.8 million bond
might be "too much to deal with" at this time.
As a working model, he suggested there might be
$200,000 in capital improvements in the 2003-04 bud-
get with the funding drawn from reserves. Another
$400,000 worth of capital improvements could be fi-
nanced with a line of credit, if commissioners approve
the additional projects.
With a line of credit, the city only uses what it
needs. Under a bond issue, the city would be obligated
for the total amount authorized, he observed.
"I would rather maximize city contributions to
capital improvements and minimize borrowing,"
Aposporos said. "The line of credit may be the way to
go" until the city can get an actual cost figure of pro-
jected capital projects in future budgets. At that time,
the city could consider a bond issue.
"Let's approach this budget conservatively," he
said, but be mindful that the city has many needed capi-
tal improvement projects that won't get any cheaper to
fix.
Commission Chairperson John Quam said he was
"leery" of the bond issue, while Commissioner Linda


In reserve: How much

is enough?
According to Ken Small, a tax, budgeting
and financial expert with the Florida League of
Cities, the recommended "minimum" for a city
reserve fund is 15 percent.
"But put as much in reserves as you can," he
added.
The "vast majority of municipalities in the
State of Florida have less than 30 percent set
aside" in a reserve fund, he added, and it's com-
mon to see 15 to 25 percent in reserves.
"For a barrier island" municipality such as
Anna Maria, "30 percent would be a reasonable
amount to set aside," Small said.
And the reserve fund should be based on
"budgeted expenditures" for the year and not
include capital expenditures, he concluded.


Cramer indicated she favored a line of credit, "unless
someone can show me bonding is better."
A $1.8 million bond issue might be "going a little
too fast," Aposporos said, and he apologized for bring-
ing the idea to the forefront at the previous budget ses-
sion.
"Don't feel bad," said Commissioner Duke Miller.
"You gave us an idea of how to pay for expensive
projects."
The commission also agreed city reserves need
only be about 35 percent of the operating expenses, not
the total budget that includes capital improvements.
Quam said he's reconsidered his position on city
reserves and now believes that a 30 to 35 percent re-
serve "on the operating side" would be sufficient to
cover the city and is in line with recommendations by
the Florida League of Cities for barrier island munici-
palities the size of Anna Maria.
Miller agreed.
"There's no reason to hang on to 50 percent of our
budget" in a reserve fund, he said.
The mayor, who will now revise the proposed bud-
get, was happy to reduce borrowing without ignoring
long-term city problems.
"I would not want the city to borrow any money,
but our problems can't be ignored," she said.
The $1.8 million bond proposal was just that, a
proposal, a starting point, she said.
She was to revise the 2003-04 budget for the Aug. 12
workshop based upon city reserves of 35 percent against
the operating budget and include $200,000 of capital im-
provements paid in the budget from reserve funds.
The mayor will also establish how much a
$400,000 line of credit would cost the city, should com-
missioners decide on further capital spending during
the 2003-04 fiscal year.
The Capital Improvements Advisory Committee is


--- ---u --
.....-- -.... ...





New rest room under way at Coquina Beach
Workers are constructing a new rest room facility at Coquina Beach in Bradenton Beach to replace the
structure demolished in late 2001. According to Manatee County Facilities Manager Sam Love, the $160,000
structure should be completed by October. Work on the building stalled when permits from the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection lagged, then was delayed further when design additions were
suggested by the Bradenton Beach Scenic Highway Corridor Management Entity. The handicap-accessible
facility is located adjacent to the turnaround site for the Manatee Trolley. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


currently establishing a priority list of capital improve-
ment projects.

Line by line
The commission revisited all the line items in the
budget, slashing some spending while increasing some
revenue estimates and expenditure figures.
Cramer was concerned that the city is paying
$15,000 to make the city pier compliant with the
Americans with Disabilities Act.
She thought the lessee was "clearly responsible"
under the lease for those improvements.
"We need to hold the tenant responsible," she said.
The city commission last year had agreed to split
the cost of getting the pier ADA compliant, but Cramer
said she was "never in agreement" with that idea.
She questioned the current city pier lease and said
the city needs to hold City Attorney Jim Dye "to the
fire" and have him follow up on things.
Quam wondered why the city is spending so much
money on road improvements. "If it was my money, I
wouldn't spend it," he said.
If the city doesn't want to spend money on road
improvements, then why have a Capital Improvements
Advisory Committee and why have a city engineering
firm?, responded the mayor.
Cramer said she "didn't get" spending $26,000 to
identify public parking locations.
She also questioned why exotic plants on city prop-
erty haven't been removed, and asked why the city is
giving Holmes Beach $500 to help maintain the skate-
board park.
"Why do our kids have to pay $30" when kids in
Holmes Beach only pay $10 to use the park? she asked.
"Do we charge their kids more to come to the com-
munity center? I don't agree with $500. It irritates me,"
she added.
Quam reminded her that the $500 is just a proposal.
"Well, I don't mind the $500, but I just want a
maintenance interlocal agreement [with Holmes
Beach] and in return, they lower the admission for
Anna Maria kids," she replied.
Commissioners also discussed hiring a combined
building official/code enforcement officer and lowered
the maximum salary for a building official from
$55,000 to $50,000.

Public comment
At one time, said resident Dale Woodland, the city
had one person as the building official, public works
director, and code enforcement officer.
Now, the city wants three people for these jobs.
"Combine some of these positions," he said.
"You are building a bureaucracy and I really think
the commission needs to move slower and cautiously,"
he said.
"This city has never been put into debt and you
may be premature" on borrowing. "You also don't
have my permission to borrow anything," he added.
Resident Randall Stover said the city "needs a
wake-up call. This is not monopoly money" and now
the city is talking about borrowing. "Spend our money
wisely," he said.
Jim Conoly noted that the cost for law enforcement
services from the Manatee County Sheriff's Office is
$511,000, the largest single item in the budget and
about 25 percent of the total.
"Their service is great, but do we really need seven
officers out here? There's not a lot of crime in Anna
Maria."

Villa Rosa
Commissioners also discussed income from build-
ing permits.
If the planned 17-unit Villa Rosa housing develop-
ment begins construction this year, that could bring a
significant increase in permit revenues, Quam ob-
served.
Public Works Director George McKay said the
"bottom-line" cost for new construction permits is
about $8,500.
Better not touch the estimate, said Miller. "Let it be
a surprise."
Commissioners eventually agreed to raise the rev-
enue estimate for building permits from $115,000 to
$120,000.
The next budget workshop is scheduled for 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 12.





THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 5


Holmes Beach property owners speak on budget


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Can the dog days of summer get even more taxing?
A 17-percent increase in this year's proposed
Holmes Beach budget has some property owners
steaming mad.
"The city has had a tax increase every year since
1992," said Holmes Beach City Commission Chairper-
son Rich Bohnenberger. "Each year the city commis-
sion has done its best to not increase the millage rate
and allow the additional revenue derived from the in-
creased property values to balance the budget."
Residents were perplexed when city commission-
ers unanimously voted to ignore Mayor Carol
Whitmore and City Treasurer Rick Ashley's recom-
mendation to lower the property tax rate, which would
have saved a typical property owner $100.
Instead, commissioners decided last week to keep
the same rate millage raising more than $235,000
in revenue than Ashley's proposal, increasing the total
proposed budget to $7,227,539.
"I wasn't upset with the original budget as it lowered


the tax rate," said resident Joan Perry. "With offsets from
new revenue in the form of a communication tax and the
new stormwater utility fee, taxpayers will see a rise in out-
of-pocket expenditures without changing the rate."
Budget hearings as a grandstanding sport trail far
behind such controversial issues as school prayer, de-
struction of sacred oak trees, building heights, and
high-rise bridges, which predictably draw standing-
room-only audiences.
However, a budget represents the projected priori-
ties of a community. So when Commissioner Roger
Lutz on July 22 led the movement to keep the same tax
rate, he struck a nerve. "There's no hardship here. We
have a rare opportunity to get things done we've
needed done," he said.
Lutz told commissioners that the funding could
provide an extra night police patrolman, additional
streetlights could be installed, and maybe the city could
begin buying some fragile beachfront property.
Commissioner Don Maloney said he understood
the proposed budget reflected the needs of the city's
department heads, "but 6,000 citizens might want to get


something done."
A loud dissenting voice on the commission's ac-
tions is Russell Olson, vice chairman of the city's board
of adjustment. "I am one of the 6,000 residents of
Holmes Beach who feels the budget requests of depart-
ment heads are more than adequate and if we can ab-
sorb any lessons from past performances, they are
probably grossly inflated," said Olson. I suggest a
zero-based budget and make every item stand the scru-
tiny the taxpayers deserve."
Olson, the city's poet laureate, composed an epi-
gram reflecting his feelings.
"Overheard in the barbershop
The trickle up theory.
Valuations go up
Taxes go up
Rents go up
The price of haircuts go up"
The Islander wants to hear from you regarding
your budget concerns. E-mail news@islander.org, or
write to us at 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL
34217.


007 plan could solve Anna Maria capital improvement woes


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Faced with meeting a record $2.3 million budget
without increasing taxes, and at the same time financ-
ing capital improvement projects that have been ig-
nored for years by successive administrations, Anna
Maria Mayor SueLynn and city commissioners might
someday turn to Bond (see related budget story).
Not James Bond, but a "Pooled Bond Program"
operated by the Florida League of Cities that allows
several cities to "share their proportionate cost of
the moneys loaned to them as a bond," said
SueLynn.
Following the commission's directive at the city's
initial budget session July 29, the mayor investigated
"alternative financing" methods for capital improve-
ment projects (see related budget story).

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The mayor already had three financial institutions
lined up to provide the city with a line of credit, but the
FLC's pooled-bond program seemed to be a good so-
lution for long-term financing of capital improvements,
she told commissioners in a one-way memo.
"The city can borrow any amount (up to $10 mil-
lion) based upon planned projects," said the mayor.
The city then has three years to "draw down" the
amount loaned and makes interest-only payments dur-
ing the three years. Principal payments can be made
over an extended period of time such as five, 10, or
even 20 years.
The FLC can approve an application in about two
weeks and the city has immediate access to the funds,
even before the bond process is completed.
"There's no need for the city to hire an underwriter
or bond counsel," the mayor said.
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She said the FLC is providing sample resolutions
and ordinances to the city to "use as a model for our
own legislation," and FLC representatives will "walk
the city through" the process, step by step.
The mayor will present a total of $843,000 in capi-
tal improvement projects to city commissioners along
with an estimate of payments based upon a 10-15 or 20-
year payback plan. She'll also include an additional
$121,000 as the inflation cost of projects completed in
the second and third year of the three-year plan, but
estimated at current prices.
The "alternative-financing" idea was proposed by
Commissioner Tom Aposporos at the July 29 budget
session when commissioners were faced with paying
for long-overdue projects in a single budget cycle that
would have trimmed city reserves to just under
$500,000 without a property tax increase.








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PAGE 6 E AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER




Opinion


Budget, bond vs. borrow?
Anna Maria city commissioners have been shopping
recently for some creative financing to meet residents de-
mands for capital improvements. Improved streets,
stormwater drainage and more.
This, in spite of property tax revenues up 23 percent
compared with last year, and commission intent on keep-
ing the millage the percentage of tax paid on property
based on appraised values the same as last year.
It translates to more funds available, but the city's cur-
rent needs have exceeded that level of spending.
The commission now must maintain last year's millage
rate since the deadline has passed for "Trim" notices, esti-
mated tax notices mailed to city taxpayers.
The original budget proposal for the 2003-04 fiscal year
increased spending 30 percent over last year's $1.78 million
budget and commissioners unanimously approved the record
$2.3 million budget.
A revised budget on Aug. 6 eliminated paying for most
capital improvement projects in the coming fiscal year, re-
placing those costs with a bond payment of about $100,000,
based upon a $1.8 million city bond through the Florida
League of Cities.
The mayor had originally considered about $900,000 in
capital improvements for the year if the commission ap-
proved the bond issue.
It appears now the commission's "conservative" financ-
ing is headed away from bonds and toward a line of credit
combined with spending a portion of the city's reserve fund-
ing for capital improvements, still maintaining a minimum
35 percent reserve.
Former Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh says he worked hard
to build the reserves to 50 percent and he hates to see the
fund depleted.
Is it prudent? According to the Florida League of Cit-
ies, a barrier island city should maintain 30 to 35 percent
reserves "on the operating side" of its budget excluding
capital improvements.
Mayor SueLynn is reluctant to borrow any money, but
she agrees that the long-standing problems resulting from no
spending in the past "can't be ignored."
And so the mayor will now gather information on estab-
lishing a $400,000 line of credit and what it would cost the
city, should commissioners decide on further capital spend-
ing but for what?
They don't yet have a a priority list of capital improve-
ment projects or the related costs.
While we agree improvements are needed, we also
think it's time to get some hard numbers on paper.
We could easily find a multitude of ways to spend
taxpayer's money, but for taxpayers to agree with higher
spending, it must be accountable.



e Islander
AUGUST 13, 2003 Vol. 11, No. 40
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jack Elka
Jim Hanson
Joe Kane
Katharine Wight
V Contributors
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Jean Steiger
Christopher Teofilak
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Nancy Ambrose
Rebecca Barnett
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Melissa Williams
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster
,tt, tM1,



Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1992-03 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan




01inio0n


Kudos for eco-reporting
Thanks to The Islander for speaking out in a
thoughtful and insightful manner about the potential
conditions which stand to threaten the valued and trea-
sured commodity of our area tree and plant life.
All too often this type of discussion presents itself
in a form of hindsight regarding what should have been
or could have been.
Meanwhile, it becomes bogged down in verbal
gymnastics and the situation continues to deteriorate.
It is refreshing to find local coverage presented in a
cutting-edge fashion.
Reporting, which finds itself equally balanced by
being informative and accurate, while gently remind-
ing us all of the compassion that must somehow be
reintroduced for the restoration and preservation of our
unique environment.
The Islander is apparently aware of the pressing
need to follow these issues closely and should be com-
mended for including fresh, concise and critical subject
matter.
Subject matter presented in a fashion that sheds
some long-needed light on a topic that is close to the
hearts of all who inhabit and visit our local piece of
paradise. Be it in the form of people, plants or wildlife,
all need a caring, watchful eye.
Hopefully, many others will follow in the footsteps
of the special volunteers who are taking their time to
protect our Island. Many will benefit for years to come
from their hard work, passion and dedication.
Please continue to keep us all informed. Hopefully
we will never find that it has become too late to be
educated on the subject of protecting and maintaining
one of our most values assets our own backyard.
Debbie Blackwood, Bradenton

Stand up for AME Aug. 14
Our new school is clearly designed to support the
staff's educational goals, which ensure the best for our
children. While that will always be our no. 1 priority,
one vitally important purpose is missing, fostering a


sense of community.
In a time when a school's community involvement
is so important to succeeding, we certainly don't want
to trivialize the long-standing relationship between our
school and our community.
All we are asking as a community is to design a
school that inspires community pride. We do not want
a school on our Island with the intimacy and architec-
tural distinction of a Wal-Mart or Publix, surrounded
by a parking lot.
We are not asking to stop or slow down the process
to get this school built as currently planned, only that
within the timeframe allowed, we complete the aes-
thetic design process not yet addressed.
We are a community school and we want to be
engaged in the process to determine how our school
will look.
Please stand with us Thursday, Aug. 14, at 5:30
p.m. to ensure our say in the aesthetics of the new
school. The site and the building need to fit within our
unique Island environment. We can all unite to show
the school board that one final effort is all that is needed
to continue to ensure the relationship that has made our
school one of the best for generations.
This is not the first, neither will it be the last time
that communities will need to be more involved in the
decisions about their schools if keeping schools as
"centers of communities" is a real priority.
Help convince the school board that by working
with us they can show their commitment to involving
communities in children's futures.
Maria Facheris, AME School Advisory Committee
chairperson

Thanks, officers
Mike Normal Realty would like to thank the Anna
Maria unit of the Manatee County Sheriff's Office for
all of its help. Sgt. John Kenney has gone beyond the
call of duty. We will continue to support thier efforts
to keep Anna Maria Island safe and beautiful.
Mike Norman, Holmes Beach





THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 M PAGE 7


When the Grumpy Old Man read that the property
evaluation of Holmes Beach had increased by 20.7
percent, his first thought was, "Hang onto your saddle
horns," fellow taxpayers, because our elected officials
will take us for a wild ride of increased taxes on our
homes and they will be using smoke and mirrors to
keep us confused and will tell us that even though they
are spending more it is not a tax increase.
Grumpy says that recent action by those officials
show that his fears were well founded. They have opted
to keep the levy at the same level, bringing in $1.2
million more, which will add $1.2 million to our prop-
erty taxes.
But wait the treasurer has proposed to slash that

After 25 years, visitor gets feet wet
James Turner of Lake Wales waded along the
beach and fished on two feet for the first time in 25
years while on a visit to Anna Maria Island.
He is an amputee and before now has been limited
to one foot when he tried to walk anywhere wet, includ-
ing the beach, his wife Pat said, for his prosthesis
couldn't stand water.
Recently he obtained a "shower prosthesis" de-
signed to let him get safely in and out of the shower.
If it's shower-proof, it must be sea-proof also, he rea-
soned, so he tried it out on a trip to the Island.
Sure enough, it worked. He waded along the beach
looking for sea shells and waded out into deeper wa-
ter to cast his line for fish.
He found some shells but didn't catch any fish.
That was OK with him, for it let him stand on two
feet while enjoying the beach. And he was able to wear
sandals, said his wife.
"We love Anna Maria Island," she added.


MAN


On two feet
James Turner of Lake Wales wade-fishes in Anna
Maria Island waters, a landmark for him.


increase by $235,000. They call that a tax cut but they
really mean that the added revenue will be about a
million, most of which will come from increased taxes
on our homes.
Grumpy realizes the need for city services and
property taxes but that tax levies should be based on the
needs of the citizens, not the size of the valuation or the
whims of elected and appointed officials.
The national administration has opted to cut taxes
and put more money into the hands of citizens in an
effort to boost the economy, but Grumpy doubts very
much if they had in mind allowing local governments
to take these funds back out of taxpayers' hands and
spending them on local programs.
A bright spot for those under the Florida Home-
stead Act: A valuation cap of 3 percent gives these
folks protection but commercial property, new con-
struction and those not under the Homestead Act will
absorb a whopping share of tax increases.
Grumpy has many friends and neighbors who are
experiencing reductions in income and increased costs,
and he says they will not look kindly on increased prop-
erty taxes.
(Grumpy is Russ Olson, former lieutenant gover-
nor of Wisconsin.)


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We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... everything you need if your "heart is on the Island." We're
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he Islander

I Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 3421 7
! IT BY PHONE: (941) 778-7978
)R ONLINE AT islander.org


Re e br* ..0salas0FE EE o oro '


Headlines in the Aug. 12, 1993, issue of
The Islander announced that:
Anna Maria Public Works Director Frank
Tyndall announced his retirement effective Sept. 30,
ending a long period of controversy with the city com-
mission over his job performance. He had been hired
in March 1989.
Holmes Beach City Commissioner Rich
Bohnenberger was concerned about Commissioner
Billie Martini's abstention on a commission vote to fire
Police Chief Rick Maddox. Martini wrote a letter to
City Clerk Leslie Ford saying she had a personal and
private conflict with voting on the issue.
An advertisement in The Islander noted that a
two-bedroom, three-bath canalfront home with a sea-
wall and dock for sale in Holmes Beach was reduced
in price from $180,000 to $175,000 after no offers were
made at the former amount.


Temps ..

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on A.M. I.

Date Low High Rainfall
Aug. 3 73 92 .40
Aug. 4 80 92 0
Aug. 5 78 91 Trace
Aug. 6 80 94 0
Aug. 7 79 92 .30
Aug. 8 77 86 .20
Aug. 9 76 78 2.70
Average Gulf water temperature 850
24-hour accumulation with reading at approximately 5 p.m. daily.


THE BEST<


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PAGE 8 E AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

Anna Maria committee

wants comp-plan

amendment first
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Faced with at least two years of work before a new
comprehensive plan for Anna Maria will be ready,
members of the city's ad hoc comp-plan review com-
mittee decided at their Aug. 4 meeting to push forward
an amendment to the plan that will likely restrict den-
sity and future growth in the city.
Tony Arrant-of the Florida Institute of Govern-
ment, hired by the city to "facilitate" the two-year pro-
cess, said the committee can prepare an amendment to
the current comprehensive plan that would also be in-
corporated into the new plan, due March 2006 to the
Florida Department of Community Affairs.
"If that's what you want," the city can do it as an
annual comp-plan amendment, said Arrant.
Committee member Dale Woodland said he
wanted to move density and growth to the top of the list
and other members agreed.
The six-person committee is composed of Wood-
land, Charles Canniff, Doug Copeland, Suzanne Dou-
glas, Chuck White and Sandy White. City Clerk Alice
Baird represents the city, while Commissioner Chuck
Webb is the city commission representative.
"It seems that a common theme here is to control
and slow growth," and to protect single-family resi-
dences in the city, Arrant observed.
Absolutely, said Webb. "Nobody disagrees with
protecting what we have, what we disagree on is how
to go about it. The current comp plan doesn't protect
us" from big developers.
Agreed, said Arrant, and trying to control develop-
ment and density through zoning changes is not the
way to go. Changing the comprehensive plan and land-
development codes through the legislative process is,
and that's what this committee will do during the next
two years or more.
Arrant had no problem moving zoning and devel-
opment to the top of the "to do" list, but reminded the
committee to "not get bogged down on one issue."
Members agreed that their meetings, while open to
the public, would not become public forums to debate
issues.
"Otherwise, you will never get done in two years,"
said Arrant, who spoke from his experiences with other


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The informal gatherings at the Manatee Public Beach are hosted by educators/Anna Maria Island Turtle
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exhibits related to the protected species of marine turtles that nest on Anna Maria beaches. Join AMITW
anytime from 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


municipalities that tried that approach.
Public input comes later, after the committee sends
its recommendations to the planning and zoning board
for public hearings.
After P&Z makes its recommendations, there are
further public meetings with the city commission on
the new comp plan and the commission has to adopt the
plan before it's submitted to the DCA.
"It's a long, drawn-out process," repeated Arrant,
and members have to commit to reading and under-
standing large volumes of material prior to each meet-
ing and come prepared to make recommendations on
the agenda topics.
For the September meeting, Arrant wants commit-
tee members to read Florida Statute 163 and section 9J5
of the Florida Administrative Code.
"Read and familarize yourselves" with these docu-
ments, Arrant told the committee. Section 9J5 "spells
out everything that must be in your comprehensive
plan."
"It's going to be the basis for everything that will
happen in the city for the next 10 to 20 years," he said.
In other words, if it's not in the comp plan, you
can't do it. If it is in the comp plan, you can do it.


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In addition to those documents, committee mem-
bers need to read the city's current comp plan and
land-development codes, and familiarize themselves
with the present Future Land Use Map and compare
it to what has actually been built in the city since
1989.
But finding a current FLUM may be a problem
because the city is not sure if it has a copy of the map
that was submitted to the DCA in 1989, the last time
the comp plan was revised.
In addition, the new FLUM that will be included in
the revised comp plan has to be "digitalized" and the
new comp plan must be "keyed" into a computer. Ar-
rant estimated those two items together would cost the
city about $10,000.
While city staff searches for a current FLUM, Ar-
rant said he would check with the DCA in Tallahassee
to see what map they have on file for Anna Maria.
If a current FLUM is found, the committee will
tackle zoning and land use at its September meeting.
Otherwise, recreation and open space and the environ-
ment will be discussion topics.
The next committee meeting is 6 p.m. Sept. 9.


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Rack 'em up

After nearly 18 months of effort on the part of lo-
cal media organizations, including The Islander news-
paper, and the City of Anna Maria, modular newsracks
were finally installed at three locations in the city Fri-
day, Aug. 8.
Installation was done by. Gold Eagle Distributors
Inc., and the modular racks replaced the numerous free-
standing racks that had brought on "visual blight" in the
city, according to some residents.
Racks were installed at the City Pier, Anna Maria
City Hall and the Sandbar restaurant parking lot on
Gulf Drive.
Media organizations that joined the program will
now remove the free-standing racks replaced by the
modular units, but single racks on private property are
unaffected by the modular program, which was origi-
nally brought to the city's attention by The Islander
newspaper.
A similar modular newsrack program is under way
in Bradenton Beach and installation of the seven
planned units is expected to begin later this month.
A single location at the S&S Plaza in Holmes
Beach will receive a modular unit within the next
month.
That site is private property and the modular unit
replacement along the exterior wall of the Holmes
Beach Post Office was negotiated with the plaza's man-
agement by The Islander.


Board receives primer

on variance policies
By Joe Kane.
Islander Reporter
School started early for members of the Holmes
Beach Board of Adjustment.
In an extraordinary workshop July 31, scheduled
before the beginning of the usual monthly variance
hearing, City Attorney Jim Dye explained again the
criteria for issuing variances.
"There are very few properties applicable to being
issued a variance," Dye told board members in the 20-
minute pre-hearing workshop.
Slowly and clearly, Dye reminded board members of
the core principles determining a valid request for a vari-
ance. Dye listed some of the questions board members
needed to be asking when considering a variance request.
Is the property owner suffering unnecessary hard-
ship because of the city's codes? Does the request by
the property owner meet the spirit of the law?
Attorney Dye was very careful to explain why
these questions were so important because of the threat
of costly legal appeals from an applicant denied of a
variance.
"Has the city ever been sued by a failed variance
applicant?" asked board member Russell Olson.
"No," answered Susan Corsi, Holmes Beach Pub-
lic Works clerk, who has worked for the city for more
than 11 years.
The back-to-school session for board members
follows the board's action in the spring allowing two
proposed new homes to be 5 feet higher than the
present limit of 36 feet above the crown of the road.
The same controversy raged in the city of Anna
Maria, when a couple asked to build their dream home
5 feet higher than that city's legal limit of 37 feet above
the crown of the road.
Residents and city officials in Holmes Beach were
so angry that a month ago the city commission took the
extraordinary steps of considering eliminating the


By Paul Roat
With little fanfare and no comment from a
packed house of citizens, Bradenton Beach city
commissioners unaninimously extended a con-
struction moratorium for 12 months.
The city has been under a ban on street vaca-
tions, property rezonings and comprehensive-plan
amendments since May 2002. City commissioners


THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 9 PAGE 9


Modular newsracks for Anna Maria
Above, Anna Maria Public Works Director George McKay, left, and Scott Birge of Gold Eagle Distributors
inspect the modular newsrack installed at city hall Friday, Aug 8. Gold Eagle also installed a modular unit at
the City Pier and at the Sandbar restaurant parking lot on Gulf Drive at Magnolia Avenue, below. Islander
Photo: Rick Catlin


board altogether.
The board members were given a reprieve and a
lecture on their responsibilities, and their fast-learning
skills were demonstrated as they went to work on their
meeting agenda items.
They methodically questioned Mike LaPensee,
who proposes to develop vacant commercial property
and relocate his plumbing business. He requested to
lower, from 13 to seven, the needed parking spaces in
front of the proposed plumbing office to be located at
a vacant lot on Gulf Drive between the office of den-
tist Dr. John Norman and the Bizzy Bee daycare cen-
ter.
LaPensee convinced board members he needed
less parking spaces because all of his service trucks are
out on jobs during the day.
After 20 minutes of discussion, the board approved
the variance request, but not before a little humor at the
expense of the city attorney.
Olson, vice chair of the board of adjustment, told
members that when he was in the Wisconsin Legisla-
ture from 1961 to 1978, lawmakers would issue
amendments in any form or fashion, even on toilet pa-
per. Olson, chafing at the seemingly cumbersome pro-
cedures instituted by Dye that day, slowly and formally
read his motion, causing laughter among members and
the two dozen spectators, while Dye remained poker
faced and preoccupied with a legal document.
Then the 14-ton elephant appeared, disguised as a


nonconforming structure. There is perhaps no more
volatile issue at city hall than how to deal with homes
built before the codes were updated.
Property owner Robert Stewart sought a 2-foot
setback variance for a proposed remodeling of his per-
sonal home at 2907 Avenue C.
After answering board members' questions for 25
minutes, it appeared there was little standing in the
property owner's way of receiving a variance.
Then resident Joan Perry asked the board mem-
bers, "Is this case an expansion of a nonconforming
structure?"
Expensive lawyers define nonconforming struc-
tures as either being legal, lawfully built when con-
structed, or illegally built when constructed.
The number of nonconforming structures in
Holmes Beach is baffling and no one can come up with
a solid number of these nonconformities. The concern
for some residents and officials is that owners of these
nonconforming structures may exploit their age by
bending the city code because of "hardship" or
"safety."
And as the real estate prices continue to defy grav-
ity, going up and up, the fear is more and more
homeowners will want to increase their home size to
increase their home value.
Attorney Dye suggested the request be continued
so he could research the case.
Another request for a variance was continued when
Perry asked the same question and Dye requested time
to determine if the structure is nonconforming.
The next matter of business was a request from
Justin Harlow for a variance to decrease the setback in
the rear of his property from 25 feet to 20 feet.
Board member Jeff Hostetler, a surveyor who has
worked for the owner requesting the variance, reclused
himself from voting on that variance request and it was
then approved unanimously by the remaining board
members.
Throughout the two-hour hearing, chairman Hugh
Holmes Jr. went to exceptional lengths to dispel any criti-
cism the board was not heeding the advice of its attorney.
"Be open minded," cautioned Dye to board mem-
bers, "but be skeptical."


decided the moratorium was needed in order for
them to create a "vision" for future development in
the city, a process that was completed earlier this
summer but still awaits implementation.
"There's no big line of people out there" waiting
for the moratorium to end, Building Official Bob
Welch has said previously, adding that "I don't think
if a moratorium is extended it will hurt anyone."


Partial Bradenton Beach building

moratorium extended another year






PAGE 10 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

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Bradenton Beach police are slightly red-faced af-
ter missing a drug arrest which could have netted the
department more than $34,000 in cash and at a
minimum a $32,000 vehicle.
Officer Doug Marston had responded to a call at
about 1 a.m. June 24 at Coquina Beach when he no-
ticed a fast-moving white sport-utility vehicle pass
him heading south with a flat tire. He advised
Longboat Key police that the vehicle was traveling at
a speed greater than the posted speed and at an exces-
sive speed considering the flat tire, and a Longboat
Key patrol officer stopped the vehicle just south of the
Longboat Pass Bridge.
Officer Matthew Buehler said that when he
stopped the vehicle on Broadway Street, he noticed a
smell of alcohol on driver Martin J. Brooks, 58, of
Pine Street, Longboat Key.
Capt. George Turner responded to the call as well
and said Brooks appeared to be "highly intoxicated"
and "was very disorientated." -
Police decided to have the vehicle towed, accord-
ing to policy, and began to make a vehicle inventory
of the SUV. They noted extensive damage to the right
side of the vehicle, apparently due to a vehicle crash.
Police also noted a box filled with packets of cash
in the back seat, and "while inspecting the box of U.S.
currency," Turner said in his report, "I noticed a very
strong odor of vegetative and/or harvested marijuana
within the vehicle."
He and Buehler later determined that the smell


Patrol ready for first day of school
Anna Maria Elementary School fifth-graders Justin
Garcia and Kegan Vandermolen were on campus
early to greet students walking or biking to school.
The safety patrol is organized by AME coach Gene
Burr and the group ensures students safely navigate
their way to class. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


came from a duffel bag containing about six pounds of
marijuana. The cash amounted to $34,170.
Police charged Brooks with DUI, sale of cannabis
and possession of cannabis.
They also found Brooks to be in possession of
"handwritten notes" indicating "calculations" in the
same pocket with a pocket calculator.
At approximately 4 a.m., officers went to Brooks
home and were invited inside by wife Deborah, who
was then advised of her husband's arrest.
She agreed to be interviewed and granted permis-
sion for a "search of the home for marijuana, money,
and/or related items," according to the report.
LBK police reported finding more paperwork in
the "same type writing" with calculations and numbers
on a desk in Brooks bedroom, which were secured in
evidence. Police also reported finding numerous hand-
guns, rifles, shotguns and ammunition, and a locked
closet safe, although attempts to open the safe were un-
successful.
Under Florida drug laws, property involved in drug
arrests may be confiscated by law enforcement agen-
cies involved in the arrest. Longboat Key has filed a
civil lawsuit to confiscate the 2000 Toyota Landcruiser
and the cash.
Bradenton Beach lost out on the bust and the rev-
enue.
"He couldn't have done anything else," Bradenton
Beach Police Chief Sam Speciale said of Marston. "He
was on another call."


Big start
Emma Bouchard arrives in time to start the school
year with kindergarten teacher Katie Boesen at


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Code Enforcement Officer Gerry
Rathvon was trying to be a "nice guy," er, "girl" when
she handed out 87 warning notices Aug. 8 to residents
who had forgotten to bring in their trash containers
after the normal Wednesday pickup.
Rathvon was recently directed by Mayor SueLynn
with consensus of the city commission to become
"proactive" regarding enforcement of trash cans and
yard waste left along the roadside. She wanted to give
residents a "heads up" that the city may, "in the near
future," begin issuing fines for containers found in the
right of way on successive occasions, in violation of
the city's ordinance.
The city is presently amending its trash and yard
waste ordinance to say that containers shall be placed
for collection "no earlier than 5 p.m. the day prior to
scheduled pickup" and must be removed from the curb
"not later than 7 p.m. the day of the collection." The
amendment also includes yard waste containers left


out for pickup.
But of the 87 warnings given Aug. 8, "more than
half were to renters," who were unaware of the ordi-
nance.
"A lot of these people said they were never in-
formed by the rental agent" of the city's ordinance on
trash collection and containers, she said.
One renter chased Rathvon for two blocks, de-
manding an explanation.
"Once I told him, he was very nice and said he was
a renter and nobody ever told him he had to bring in the
trash can," Rathvon said.
That news was a bit disturbing to Rathvon and
SueLynn, who have continually sent rental agents in-
formation to pass on to property renters about the
placement and pickup of trash containers and yard
waste.
"So agents, please check your renters and your
properties," said Rathvon.

PLEASE SEE TRASH, NEXT PAGE


'Nice girl' effort on trash


container ordinance


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Before. and after-school

care scheduled
Care for Island pupils this school year has been
expanded to both mornings and afternoons and moved
to the Anna Maria Elementary School cafeteria.
The Anna Maria Island Community Center said the
2003-04 TLC program will be from 7 a.m.-8:20 a.m.
and 2:30-6 p.m. Both will be for youngsters from kin-
dergarten through fifth-grade.
Costs are: Morning program, $10 per average
week; afternoon program, $35 per average week; ad-
ditional child from the same family, $5 discount in both
programs; add $15 when school is out all day, $7 when
it's out half a day; a one-time registration fee is $15.
Both programs will meet at the Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria, on days school is out or on
holiday and for summer camps. Advance registration
is required at the Center from 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-
Saturday or at the school cafeteria during the morning
or afternoon program.
The after-school program will offer computer
classes, art and music, sports, recreation, homework
and tutoring.
It is a continuation of the "Time for Learning Cre-
atively" program, and is supervised by Gary Wooten,
who may be reached at 726-3769, or at the Center, 778-
1908, for further information.


New after-school teen

program set at Center
A new program for teens, a follow-on to TLC care,
is starting at the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter from 4-6 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Students in grades 6-8 are welcome in the new of-
fering, said the Center, with the first week of enroll-
ment free and the cost thereafter $10 per week.
The Center will provide bus service for Island
Middle School students only, but the program is open
to all middle school students on and off the Island. The
bus will be at IMS at 4:15 p.m. daily. The Center is
open until 9 p.m. so youngsters may stay until then if
they wish.
Teen volunteers are needed to plan weekly calen-
dars of events.
Every other Friday evening will be an off-site trip
to such spots as JP Igloo, Florida Wheels, movie the-
aters, bowling and so on, and special events such as
lock-ins, dances and community service projects are
planned.
The Center explained that the program is similar to
the "Time to Learn Creatively" after-school program
for elementary students, but tailored to older students.
With the younger kids TLC program offered now at the
Anna Maria Elementary School, there's finally room
for teens at the Center.
Registration forms as available now at the Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Detailed information
is available at 778-1908.


Trash pickup nets 87 warnings
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

Rathvon's warning notice also says that Waste
Management Inc., the city's garbage collection service,
has rear-door pickup service for $7.26 per quarter for
absentee landlords or people who only come to their
Anna Maria home on weekends.
But be advised that the rear-door pickup is only for
solid waste and recyclable items, not yard waste.
Rose Quinn-Barr of WMI said the company does
not do rear-door yard waste pickup for any of its clients
in Manatee County, including those with a handicap.
Rathvon said she's explained this to many offenders
and said this problem can be solved by absentee landlords
who clean their property on a weekend by placing the trash
near the curb, but not on the city right-of-way.
But WMI may be ignoring efforts by some resi-
dents to get rear-door pickup.
Ted Bahn of 868 N. Shore Drive said he asked
WMI for rear-door pickup in May and the additional
charge was added to his monthly bill.
Unfortunately for Bahn, WMI never picked up the
trash, despite collecting his money for the service.
Bahn said he's complained to WMI four times
about the problem, but it's not yet been corrected.
"I suggest the city ensure that these services are
really performed by Waste Management," before it


Mr. Legs ready for

showdown;

Ms. Legs too
By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
It's all over but the bare-legged cavorting in
front of hundreds of people as the Anthony
Cuccis prepare for the Mr. Legs showdown Sat-
urday night.
And then, rest. Sort of.
Cucci is on the er last leg of the 2003
Mr. Legs competition, hoping to have raised
enough money for the American Cancer Society
to keep the Mr. Legs title on Anna Maria Island.
This is the annual fun event with the serious
purpose of helping the fight against cancer. Contes-
tants raise money through various means for the
society, each dollar of donation equal to one vote.
The tallying-up is still being done, but Cucci
figures he'll end up with between $6,000 and $7,000
for the cause, which is quite personal to him because
his favorite sister-in-law died of cancer.
Doing the tallying, as she has done so much
of the demanding work of fundraising over the
past few months, is the contestant's wife, Maggie.
"She's about out of steam," Cucci said, al-
though she denied it with notable energy. In ad-
dition to arranging money events, squeezing
funds out of friends and strangers alike, and keep-
ing it all straight, she has done her usual job of
rearing three children. They reside in Holmes
Beach, and he is a manager at the Beach House
Restaurant in Bradenton Beach.
Cali Smith won and didn't win the Bahamas
cruise. The Apollo Beach man who commutes to
his job at the Beach House turned over 473 votes
to Cucci and was the apparent winner of the
three-day cruise to Nassau. Maggie had bought
the Carnival cruise at a special bargain rate
through Ship-to-Shore Cruises on Longboat Key.
Before the Cuccis could get to Longboat to
pick up the tickets, Marcus Francis of Bradenton
turned in his results in that contest 687 votes,
enough to win hands down. He's in an enviable
position, Cucci said: 22 years old and single with
a cruise for two in hand.
Smith gets second prize, tickets to Sea
World, and Kristin Prendergast of Bradenton
wins third, dinner for two at Bonefish Grill.
The last two Mr. Legs have been Islanders: last
year Mitch Stewart, longtime Anna Maria Island
Privateer, won, and the year before than Dr. Scott
Kosfeld of Holmes Beach took top honors.
Cucci will get the word Saturday night, Aug.
16, at the Tennis Shoe Ball at the Bradenton City
Auditorium, 1005 Barcarrota Blvd. Featuring
tuxedos and tennis shoes, it will start at 7 p.m.
Tickets are still available at $75 through 745-
1214, extension 21.
The upper half of Cucci will be tuxedoed, the
lower half in shorts and tennis shoes so his hopefully
winning legs will be on display. And Maggie will
compete in the tennis shoe decorating contest.
"This is all extremely pleasing," he said. "It's
such a good cause, and it all stays here in Mana-
tee County."



makes this service mandatory for absentee property
owners, he said.
Rathvon said she is investigating Bahn's com-
plaints about WMI for the mayor, who will likely bring
the WMI issue up at a future commission meeting.
SueLynn said she was meeting with WMI officials
Monday, Aug. 11, to discuss pickup service dates and
other problems.
The city's garbage pickup days are Monday and
Thursday, while yard waste is collected on Wednesday.
A number of city property owners only visit on
weekends and clean their yards at that time, leaving the
waste in bags and containers along the road on the city
right of way for a Wednesday pickup, although the
owners left the city on Sunday or Monday, the mayor
has noted previously.
Just keep the trash bags off the right of way and
there won't be any problem, Rathvon said.


THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 11


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Canal dredging

may be in


Anna Maria's future
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
It's time Anna Maria started looking at a main-
tenance dredging program for the city's numerous
canals, engineer Bo Conerly of Baskerville-Donovan
Inc., the city's engineering firm, said at the Aug. 5
meeting of the capital improvements advisory com-
mittee.
"We don't know if the canals have ever been
dredged, so you may have a lot of catching up to do,"
he said.
First things first, however.
The "key" to a maintenance dredging program is
for the city to apply to the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection for a maintenance dredge per-
mit. BDI can put that application package together for
about $30,000, Conerly said.
He admitted that the cost to dredge all city canals
could be "a lot" over several years of dredging, but at
this time he had no cost estimates. He suggested there
might be state and federal grant money available for
dredging.
But there's a problem, said City Commissioner
Chuck Webb, who sits on the CIAC as the commission
liaison.
"Who owns all the canals is the first problem to
solve," and that could take some time, he said. Some
of the canals are not owned by the city, but by private
landowners.
That becomes a political issue, added Webb, be-
cause the city must decide if it even wants to be respon-
sible for privately owned canals. In addition, property
owners not on a canal might not want to have the city
pay for dredging a privately owned canal.
Currently, only Lake LaVista, which is not pri-
vately owned, is dredged at city expense on an annual
dredging permit from the DEP.
Tom Wilcox of BDI said in his experience in other
areas of Florida, canal owners often pay into a special
taxation district fund to dredge the canals.
CIAC chairman Larry Albert said the city will
"have to answer someday for all the stuff that's been
put in the canals."
Conerly said he's had many complaints about wa-
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teacher, Toni Lashway, and little brother Alex's kindergarten teacher, Katie Boesen. From left are Alan,
Ryan, Alex, Rhyanna and Anna Gilman. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


of canals.
He's also had some complaints about seawalls col-
lapsing, but Webb said that's a matter for private prop-
erty owners, not the city.
Webb said the CIAC can make a recommendation
to the city commission that the city pursue canal dredg-
ing, but committee member Glen Fausset suggested
deferring the matter until after the city adopts its 2003-
04 budget.
"It's so involved, let's wait until after the budget
to discuss any recommendation," he said.
Committee members agreed.
In other CIAC business, members discussed the
committee's priority list of drainage and road-paving
projects for the 2003-04 budget.
If the city follows through on a bond issue (see
separate story), the priority projects scheduled in the
2003-04 budget should be completed, Albert said.
"And the city is very serious about the bond issue,"
Webb said, and he suggested the CIAC complete its
priority list for the coming fiscal year.



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THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 13


Art will be on display
at library in August
Oils, watercolors and daguerreotypes will be on
exhibit through August at the Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Cheryl Moody's oil landscapes will be featured,
along with watercolors by Sue Lynn Cotton and Pat
and Doug Copeland's pictures made by the pioneering
photographic process called daguerreotype.
Other highlights of the library's program for the
month:
Monday, Aug. 11, internet class for beginners, 8:30
a.m. (advance registration required by calling 778-
6341).
Tuesday, Aug. 5-26, veterans' service officer will
interview client from 1-4 p.m. (by appointment, 749-
3030).
Wednesday, Aug. 13, Friends of the Library Book
Club, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday and Friday, Aug. 21-22, AARP driver
safety course, noon-4 p.m. (advance registration re-
quired, 776-1158).
Saturday, Aug. 9, origami class, 10:30 a.m.
The library opens at 10 a.m. daily except Sunday,
closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Additional information may be obtained by calling
778-6341.
Blood donors may gather
at three locations
Blood donations will be accepted in the next few
days at three locations notable to Islanders Anna
Maria Oyster Bar, Beach House Restaurant, and Anna
Maria Island Community Center.
On Friday, Aug. 15, the Manatee Community Blood
Center's bloodmobile will be at the Oyster Bar, 6906 14th
St. W., Bradenton, from 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Each donor
will get a free appetizer compliments of the restaurant.
Saturday, Aug. 16, the bloodmobile will be at the
Beach House Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach, from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., with each donor receiving a
coupon for a half-price dinner at the restaurant.
Monday, Aug. 18, the mobile blood unit will be at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria, from 8 a.m.-noon.
The blood center notes that blood is accepted from
persons 18 and older, new donors are to bring a photo
ID, and all should eat a meal and drink plenty of flu-
ids before donating.
Additional information may be obtained from the
blood center at 746-7195.


Honored
women
Honorary
chairperson for
the 2003
Women's
Equity Day
Celebration
Rhea Chiles,
left, with guest
speaker Sandra
Dengler of the
Tampa Bay
Devil Rays and
Anna Maria
Mayor
SueLynn.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Joy


Islanders stand out on Equity Day
Islanders stand out on Equity Day


Hundreds of women, a small number of men and
children, converged on the Bradenton Civic Audito-
rium Saturday for the Women's Equity Celebration,
marking the 83rd anniversary of the ratification of the
19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting
women the right to vote.
The Honorable Mayor SueLynn was seated at the
head table with other dignitaries and following greet-
ings from Diana Moreland, chairperson of the Mana-
tee Commission on the Status of Women, she read a
proclamation from the City of Anna Maria.
SueLynn said she grew up in the "era of protest
marches and burning bras" and understood what it was
like to fight for a cause.
The proclamation, signed July 24 by the mayor,
"recognizes and supports the acknowledgement of this
important milestone in American History."
It further proclaims Aug. 9 as "Women's Equity
Day in the City of Anna Maria and encourages all resi-
dents to recognize this historic event, and to respect,
support and further the cause of protecting the rights of
equity regardless of gender."
Rhea Chiles of Holmes Beach, honorary chairper-
son of the event, former First Lady of Florida and
founder of the Lawton and Rhea Chiles Center for
Healthy Mothers and Babies, spoke of the importance


Please tell 'em, "I saw it in The Islander."


le B

TBE
Brador.on, FMor:'c


"It's not fair! Soccer
practice is the same day
as Hebrew School!"


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a Hebrew Language Lab program that's
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of the occasion and, in closing, said, "It is, I think,
most telling that in America statues of Justice, Freedom
and Liberty are clothed in the symbols of woman-
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Though unacknowledged, She did not leave me.
She stayed the distance as I ran my race.
Then when Her rivals all had left the course
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To make her presence known and challenged me
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Mrs. Chiles comments were followed by the fea-
tured guest speaker, Sandra Dengler, the Tampa Bay
Devil Rays director of Major League Administration.
Dengler is the wife of Anna Maria's longtime pa-
trol officer, Deputy Julius Dengler of the Manatee
County Sheriff's Office.
She shared information about women in sports, on
the field and in the office, and the distance and strides
they have made in major league sports and baseball in
particular- and the significance of their contributions.


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PAGE 14 N AUGUST 13, 2003 N THE ISLANDER

Obituaries

Col. Carlton J. Martin
Col. Carlton J. Martin, 90, of Holmes Beach, died
Aug. 9.
Born in Fort Wayne, Ind., Col. Martin came to
Manatee County from Gainesville in 1970. He was
retired from the U.S. Air Force after 30 years in service,
and also served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was a
graduate of Purdue University, receiving a bachelor's
degree in economics and later a master's degree. He
also received a bachelor's degree in horticulture from
the University of Florida.
A service will be held at 1 p.m. at Griffith-Cline
Funeral Home Island chapel, 6000 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, with visitation to follow from 1:30-3
p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the
Audubon Society, P.O. Box 14550, Bradenton FL
34280, or to St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Har-
bor Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
He is survived by wife Elizabeth; brother Leslie of
Versailles, Ky.; and several nieces and nephews.
James A. Sackett
James A. Sackett, 61, of Anna Maria, died at home
Aug. 11 following a three-year battle with cancer.
Mr. Sackett was born in Detroit, Mich., and moved to
Anna Maria Island 19 years ago with wife Joan, a second-
grade teacher at Anna Maria Elementary School.
He was a retired teacher who took up inventing and
developed a shallow-draft floating boat lift. He gradu-
ated from Eastern Michigan University with a master's
degree in education administration.
He served in the U.S. Navy during the Cuban cri-
sis in the 1960s.
A memorial mass will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday,
Aug. 16, at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Har-
bor Drive, Holmes Beach.
Memorial contributions may be made to H. Lee
Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, 12902
Magnolia Drive, Tampa FL 33612-9497, or Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 3355 26th St. W., Bradenton FL
34205.
He is survived by wife Joan; daughter Dana of


New patients welcome!


New members join IMS board of directors


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Four remaining Island Middle School board mem-
bers quickly filled the seats vacated by the resignations
of Chuck Webb, John Monetti and Cindy Jennis at their
August meeting.
Since the resignations that followed the withdrawal
(less than a month ago) of the applicant for the school's
executive director position preferred by the three former
board members, board chairman and parent representative
Scott Bassett received applications from Noranne
Hutcheson, Genie Salter and Carol Codella to fill the va-
cancies. Marlene West, Pam Fortenberry and Bassett
unanimously voted to elect Salter and Hutcheson to the
board, effective immediately.
Bassett then announced his resignation from his

Anna Maria; sons David of Bradenton and Rafe of
Anna Maria; and four grandchildren, Amber, Saige,
Isabelle and Emily.

Louise R. Wallace
Louise R. Wallace, 96, of Anna Maria died Aug.
10 at her son's summer home in Saluda, N.C.
Born in Agawam, Mass., she was a graduate of
Harvard University and was a student at the Sorbonne
in Paris and was at LeBourget Field when Charles
Lindbergh landed there after his historic transatlantic
flight. While her husband served overseas in World
War II she worked with the Red Cross to transport
wounded soldiers to hospitals in Massachusetts.
A winter visitor of Anna Maria Island since 1948, she
moved here permanently in 1992. She was a deaconess of
the Roser Community Memorial Church and a lifelong
gardener.
Surviving are her son, Gordon Alan Wallace of Anna
Maria; a niece, Marilyn Pond Haynes of Wilbraham,
Mass., and several great-nieces and -nephews.
A graveside service will be at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug.
15, at Agawam Center Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
Agawam Congregational Church, 745 Main St.,
Agawam, Mass., 01001.


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position as the parent representative to the IMS board
and simultaneously sought nomination and election as
a regular board member.
Bassett said he made the decision "in order to pro-
mote stability on the IMS board and to assure that our
contract with the Manatee County School District and
the founding committee's vision of the IMS charter is
properly and fully implemented."
Bassett was elected to fill the third vacant seat.
The only remaining board vacancy is that of the
parent representative, which is filled annually at the
meeting of the IMS corporation. This meeting is sched-
uled for Sept. 2 at the school.
The board will also elect new officers at the Sept. 2
meeting. In the interim, Bassett is serving as president,
Salter is vice president and Hutcheson is secretary.
Hutcheson was involved with starting IMS and co-
wrote the school's charter with West. She has also been
hired by the school to serve as a consultant in develop-
ing the IMS curriculum.
"I'm excited to be involved again and part of the
staff," said Hutcheson. She is looking forward to help-
ing the school "reach its vision and blossom."
Salter is the parent of Emily, who graduated from
IMS last year. She also chaired the parent committee
seeking to add a ninth-grade class and served last year
as the vice president of the IMS Parent-Teacher Orga-
nization.
All board members will be attending a Florida
Charter School Governing Board training course at the
Charter School Accountability Center in Tallahassee
Sept. 18. The training is designed to help governing
boards provide effective leadership.
Six to eight months following the workshop, a cer-
tified trainer will visit the school. During the visit, the
trainer will meet with the board's chair to review a self-
assessment of the school's governance and help de-
velop a plan for continued learning.
Anyone interested in serving as the parent repre-
sentative to the board should plan on attending the an-
nual meeting of the IMS corporation, and will be in-
vited to attend the training session. For more informa-
tion, call 778-5200.


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THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 N PAGE 15

Parent orientation class schedule at IMS


Ready to watch
L.D. 's Jewelry and Watch Repair owner Dean
Brown with staff members Joanne Monti, left, and
Jackie Robinson, recently added the Citizen Eco-
drive watch collection to the store's selection of
watches. Islander Photo: Nancy Ambrose

Watch the master
L.D.'s Jewelry and Watch Repair at 7358
Cortez Road W. recently added the Citizen Eco-drive
Stiletto and the Citizen Disney Eco-drive watches to its
sales collection, making it the only area jewelry and
watch store to carry the line. The store also carries a
large selection of Hirsch/Speidel watch bands.
Master jeweler and watchmaker Dean Brown,
who has more than 20 years experience in the business,
said that many customers don't realize that the store
also creates and sells its own line of jewelry.
Brown, who opened the store in 1995 after a num-
ber of years at the DeSoto Mall Sears store, said the
store's certified jewelers, Dean and Jackie Robinson,
custom design jewelry for clients and also offer ap-
praisal services.
L.D.'s also has an estate jewelry showcase featur-
ing many consignment items.
For more information, call 798-9585.

Meals on Wheels
Curves fitness center at 3878 Manatee Ave. E.
will sponsor a food drive for the Meals on Wheels Plus
Foodbank program from Aug. 18 to Aug. 30.
Nonperishable food items may be dropped off at
Curves from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to
7: p.m. Monday through Thursday, on Friday until 6
p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Collected items will be picked up by Meals on
Wheels staff and sorted for distribution, said Meals on
Wheels Operations Director Jennifer Springer.
Each week, between 50 and 80 food baskets for
families in need are prepared and distributed by Meals
on Wheels, Springer said.
Anyone interested in donating to the program or
volunteering to assist Meals on Wheels is asked to call
747-4655.


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ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH!


Parents of students attending the Island Middle
School are required to attend both an IMS charter edu-
cation course and a parent-involvement course by the
end of August.
The school charter stipulates that parents will at-
tend a six-hour educational class, which new executive
director Gary Hughes has implemented for the 2003-
04 school year.
The educational course has been divided into three
separate two-hour sessions. The first session was the
parent orientation held last Thursday.
Parents will be given three opportunities to attend

Anna Maria public meeting
on drainage
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn and the public works
department will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 20, to get resident input on the
planned drainage improvement project prepared by
Baskerville-Donovan Inc., the city's engineering firm.
For further information, call Public Works Direc-
tor George McKay at 708-6132.

Baker to hold
town hall meeting Thursday
Bradenton Beach City Commissioner Dawn Baker
has scheduled a "town hall" meeting for 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, at the Sandpiper Mobile Resort, 2601
Gulf Drive.
She said she will have copies of the proposed
2003-04 city budget and the proposed capital improve-
ment program for attendees. "I want to ask the citizens
what they want the excess tax money spent on," she
said.
For more information, call 778-2991.

Some vacancies remain
in watercolor class
There are still a few places open in the Anna Maria
Island Community Center's watercolor class led by
local artist Susie Cotton, the Center has indicated.
The class is 10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Tuesday at the
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. It is for both
novices and experienced painters. Cost for each
monthly four-week schedule is $60 for members, $65
nonmembers. Details are available at 778-1908.

Senior driver refresher course
registry open
Registration has begun for the AARP driving-
safety program for drivers over 50, the course sched-
uled from noon-4 p.m. Aug. 21-22 at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Drivers may register and obtain additional infor-
mation by calling 776-1158.




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the required courses. Hughes told parents at Thursday's
orientation that failing to attend the classes will result
in the dismissal of their child from IMS.
The charter education course, which gives parents
a better understanding of the school's charter, will be
taught by IMS board members from 2 to 4 p.m. Aug.
17, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Aug. 20, and 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 25.
The parent-involvement course, which gives par-
ents information about how to fulfill the required 25
parent involvement hours, will be taught by Hughes
and assistant director Kelly Parsons from 6 to 8 p.m.
Aug. 13, 9 to 11 a.m. Aug. 16, and 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 22.
Hughes said that if both parents can't make the
course, it's OK for one parent to attend. Hughes said
parents with concerns should call him at the school
office, 778-5200.
Next year, Hughes said the three-part orientation
series will be offered to parents prior to accepting stu-
dent applications.
Completion of the six-hour course will also be
counted toward the required parent involvement hours,
said Hughes.


Anna Maria Elementary School
menu
Monday, Aug. 18
Breakfast: French Toast Sticks with Syrup, Cereal,
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Fruit
Lunch: Cheese Nachos, Hoagie or Peanut Butter and
Jelly Sandwich, Tossed Salad, Glazed Carrots, Juice
Bar, Fruit
Tuesday, Aug. 19
Breakfast: Yogurt, Grilled Cheese, Cereal, Fruit
Lunch: Turkey Gravy with Mashed Potatoes, Ham-
burger or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Tossed
Salad, Tater Tots, Fruit
Wednesday, Aug. 20
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs and Toast, Peanut Butter
and Jelly Sandwich, Cereal, Fruit
Lunch: Beef-a-Roni with Roll, Chicken Tenders or
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Tossed Salad,
Celery Sticks with Dip, Fruit
Thursday, Aug. 21
Breakfast: Yogurt, Chicken Tender with Roll,
Cereal, Fruit
Lunch: Italian Dunkers, Turkey and Cheese Sand-
wich or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Tossed
Salad, Broccoli, Cucumber Coins, Fruit
Friday, Aug. 22
Breakfast: Large Orange Muffin, Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs and Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Pizza Sticks, Fruit, Yogurt and Muffin Plate
or Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, Corn, Tossed
Salad, Fruit
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


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PAGE 16 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 U THE ISLANDER
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THE ISLANDER U AUGUST 13, 2003 M PAGE 17


Time for waiting in marine turtle world


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
It's waiting time in sea turtle preservation wait-
ing for more babies to hatch, waiting for people to con-
trol their lights so the hatchlings survive.
After last week's fiasco when lights disoriented
more than 200 hatchlings in Holmes Beach and lured
them to death, the problem settled down a bit with only
one nestful of hatchlings led astray, and most of them
saved by Turtle Watch volunteers.
Still, hatchlings from a total of six nests have been
misled by exposed lights and that's far too many, said
Suzi Fox, head of the Island Turtle Watch and holder
of the state's marine turtle preservation permit for Anna
Maria Island.
Holmes Beach officials, including Mayor Carol
Whitmore, walked the night beach during the weekend
and the mayor said she was shocked at how many light-
ing law violations she saw. The violators are being
warned and will have only a few days to get into com-
pliance, and "then it's citation time in Holmes Beach,"
she told Fox.
Although Fox said Tuesday that Code Enforce-
ment Officer Walter Wunderlich told her on Monday
he would not be citing any property owners until he had
a chance to speak to them directly and that appar-
ently has not occurred, she said.
Fox said she rode the beach on her Turtle Watch
ATV Tuesday morning between 4:30 and 5:30 a.m.
and the noncompliant lights were still glaring at her
from the shoreline.
Turtles at birth instinctively scramble for light
when they dig up out of the nest to the beach's surface.
Until the advent of man-made artificial lights, the ba-
bies went to the sparkle of the sea. Now almost.any
light they see can lure them upland to death.
Turtle Watch volunteers have been fighting the
light problem since before nesting began May 1 and
most of the offenses have been corrected, but Fox said


she has seen no progress at all lately.
"Everyone says they're working on it and that
makes us all happy," she said. "I'm waiting. I get calls
from the public offering to help, but what we need is
for the violators to help by changing their visible light
bulbs to turtle-friendly bulbs which we will give
them free at the Turtle Watch center (5498 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, phone 778-1435), or turn them
off."
Nest No. 200 showed up at Bradenton Beach Fri-
day, a late-arriving surprise. That compares with 93
nests all last year. Fifteen nests made about two
months ago are due to hatch any time, Fox said, and


Another
stranding
Marine turtle permit
holder Suzi Fox
records data re-
quired of her by the
^ state on'a dead
loggerhead turtle
discovered last week
on the beach on Anna
Maria Island.
Islander Photo:
Courtesy Jo Anne
Meilner












volunteers are watching them closely.
The heavy weekend rain apparently did no harm to
turtle nests, Fox said, though the sea washed over a nest
at about 52nd Street in Holmes Beach; it seems OK,
she said. Eight more babies left behind in a hatched nest
were turned over to the Mote Marine Laboratory,
which will put them with other orphans and release all
of them at once at the weed line out about a mile in the
Gulf.
There seems to be some security in numbers, Fox
said.
To report anything about marine turtles, call her at
778-5638 or 232-1405.


It's mosquito time: Get yourself dry


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The more rain, the more mosquitoes. Oddly, the
Island with all its water is nearer mosquito-free than
most of Manatee County.
There's nothing easy about mosquitoes, said Rob-
ert Frommer, entomologist with Manatee County Mos-
quito Control: "You have to fight them all the time,
especially after rain."
It's not hard to beat them, it's the constant vigil in
a damp climate that's wearing.
Frommer said his outfit's watchword is "When in
doubt, dump it out." Anything outdoors that will
hold even a few drops of water should be up-
ended, lest it become a mosquito maternity ward.<_
Starting right now, he said, "walk around the
grounds of your house. Have the kids help find things
that collect water. Make it like an Easter egg hunt."
Buckets, cans, tires, toys, tarps, bromeliads, potted
plants and the saucers under them, rain gutters that clog


with leaves ("mosquitoes go bonkers with joy there"),
and be sure to check under the house if it's built up.
Make a map of the property, Frommer advises, and use


h it to track down the insects. While you're doing all
this, slather on the insect repellent.
"We'll treat 'em," he said, "but most of it is the
homeowner's responsibility."
His workers treat standing water with bacteria that
kill mosquito larva, instead of with the chemicals of old
that got into the Gulf through stormwater runoff. They
also use "mosquito-specific growth regulators."
They spread these treatments by the department's
three helicopters, five fogging trucks and half a dozen
larvicide vehicles.
Though they're busiest after heavy rains, the mos-
quito control people are working all year keeping track
of threats with 60 traps around the county, simple little
mechanisms that attract mosquitoes and let the ex-
perts know what's at hand and threatening.
West Nile virus worries them, though the
great remains minimal, said Frommer. "We keep
70 chickens at 12 sites and test them diligently. No dan-
ger right now, but we don't let up."


Fireworks meeting produces few sparks


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
County and municipal residents concerned about
the proliferation of unauthorized fireworks, particularly
around July 4, held an informal meeting July 17 with
Manatee County Commissioner Ron Getman,
Bradenton City Councilwoman Marianne Barnebey
and police, fire and emergency officials to discuss the
problem and possible options.
Manatee County residents, particularly Islanders,
said they were concerned about the increasing number
of fireworks set off indiscriminately around the July 4
and New Year's holidays.
They're worried about their own safety, not to
mention possible damage to their residences and ve-
hicles, they told Getman.
Unfortunately, in the absence of any state ban on
the sale of fireworks, there's not a whole lot Manatee
County or its municipalities can do to stop the problem.
Florida law allows the sale of fireworks for agricul-


tural purposes, but Manatee County and most county
municipalities prohibit individuals from setting off fire-
works without a permit.
To enforce the law, however, would have taken
600 officers making arrests the July 4 weekend, and
nobody wants to spoil anyone's fun, Getman said.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn agreed, but the prob-
lem on the Island has gotten "out of hand."
She said there were literally thousands of people on
the beach over that weekend setting off fireworks illegally.
But the problem has gone beyond law
enforcement's ability to arrest everyone, she said. The
fault lies with an unenforceable state law.
"You can't allow people to purchase fireworks, but
not use them," she said. What's needed is a uniform
state law banning the sale of fireworks, she said.
"A statewide ban is easily enforceable, but nobody
wants to be the party-pooper," Getman said. At the same
time, however, local governments have to address the is-
sue, he said.


Suzi Fox of Anna Maria Turtle Watch also ad-
dressed the meeting, and presented pictures of the more
than 500 garbage bags of fireworks trash collected by
volunteers on the beach that weekend.
She was also concerned about turtle safety and
false crawls from all the noise and lights.
Law enforcement officials at the meeting said they
try to halt the illegal use of fireworks on the days be-
fore and after the holiday, but it's impossible on July
3 and 4. So they just hope nobody gets hurt or injured,
but they do respond to complaints, Major Jeff Lewis of
the Bradenton Police Department said.
In the absence of a comprehensive state law, said
Getman, it's up to the various governing bodies to de-
cide if they want to enforce their own ordinances ban-
ning the discharge of fireworks.
He noted Manatee County is currently revising its
ordinance on the sale of fireworks to make purchase
more restrictive, but that won't stop people from going
to other counties to buy those items.



























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PAGE 18 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


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PAGE 19 M AUGUST 13, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


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PAGE 20 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

Didgeridoo, creator Dank, discovers music is medicine


By Preston Whaley Jr.
Islander Correspondent
Times were tense for Lindsey Dank three years
ago. He was living in Indiana with his mother, who was
suffering from liver disease and awaiting a transplant.
She was in pain and afraid. Her anxiety fed into her
son's uneasiness. Stress and pressure seemed to be rat-
tling him every day and Dank was searching for relief.
Since he was a young boy, his mother had taught
him to be open to the benefits of seeking out a spiritual
path not necessarily a prefabricated spiritual path,
but something you could take to heart as part of who'
you are.
One day he was listening to the ambient-music
composer Steve Roach when he heard not a dogma, or
even a message, but the low-pitched, drone-like sound
of the didgeridoo that would help change his life, and
help his mother, too.
Dank immediately bought himself a didgeridoo,
but he didn't know how to play it. He didn't know what
it could do for him. He was still searching, and so he
hit the road to the southwest and California.
As for his mother, who was critically ill, rather than


Medicine
man,
musician
Lindsey Dank
creates sounds
of peace and
well-being
from an 11-
foot .. ..' .
didgeridoo he .
created. '-.... -
Leaning
against the -*-. .- -
tree are two of
Dank's more
easily handled
examples of
the instrument.
Islander
Photos:
Preston
Whaley Jr. _

3232 East Bay Drive
Next to Walgreens
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'..by Preston Whaley Jr.

sit around the house and fret while she waited for news
of an available transplant, she traveled with him.
When they got to Sedona, Ariz., Dank met John
Dumos, who not only knew how to play didgeridoo,
but also knew how to make them. Dank was hungry for
knowledge and Dumos generously served up a feast.
He taught Dank how to tongue the instrument and
how to breathe through it in a circular fashion, inhaling
and exhaling in a way that produces an effortless, constant
tone. The breathing technique allows the instrument to
become part of the body and extends its expression.
Dank said the didgeridoo "helps you breathe" in a
way that "oxygenates the blood and releases endor-
PLEASE SEE DIGERIDOO, NEXT PAGE


Handcrafted didgeridoos
These are two of many dozens of didgeridoos
Lindsey Dank has created for himself and others.
They sound off with a hypnotic, bass drone that many
people find have a soothing, even healing, affect.


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THE ISLANDER I'AlUGUST 13,i 2003 I(P E 21


Four new teachers join IMS faculty


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Four new teachers have been added to the faculty
at Island Middle School for the 2003-04 school year.
Micheline Grenier-Jones will be teaching visual
arts, Jim George will be teaching math, Jocelyn Greene
will teach Marine Science and Cynthia Dake will be the
school's performing arts teacher and Spanish teacher,
reading instructor and school nurse.
Grenier-Jones has experience as commercial de-
signer/artist in Connecticut and New York City:until
1984. She has taught high school art history, elemen-
tary and middle school art classes and French in Mana-
tee County schools.
George hails-from Michigan and is a state-certified
history teacher. Prior to joining the staff at IMS, he
taught all subjects to 10th- through 12th-grade students
with ADD and ADHD at the Center Academy High
School in Bradenton. He has also taught middle-and
high school math at the Center Academies.
Dake has been a Bradenton resident for three years
and also hails from Michigan. In addition to being a
nurse and health educator, she has many years of ex-
perience in theater.
Dake is a playwright and owns her own production
company. She operated a community theater in Michi-
gan and established a partnership program between
local schools, business and the arts.
She said her approach to teaching is by example,
enthusiasm and encouragement.
Greene has been an Island resident for three years
but spent time as a regular visitor while conducting
research with Mote Marine Laboratory. She has taught
at the college level and at a summer camp. In addition
to teaching the marine science elective, she may offer
a computer course as another choice elective.
Returning to IMS this year to teach the daily core
subjects are Sandy Brousseau, John Friedricks, Kelly
Parsons, Janet Toy and Jimi Gee.
Life skills teacher Gary Hughes is now serving as
the school director and Kelly Parsons is assistant direc-
tor. Hughes and Parsons will be splitting duties teach-
ing life skills.
Brousseau will be teaching science, Toy will teach
social studies and Friedricks will teach language arts
once again.
Gee will be teaching band, but this year music will
be an elective class instead of a core requirement. Gee
will still offer beginning, immediate and advance band
and there is some talk about even offering a student/
parent ensemble.
The only faculty member who will not be return-
ing to IMS this year is Michelle Easterling. Easterling

Digeridoo creator on Island
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20
phins. It creates a euphoria to where I've actually come
out of my body."
The origins of the didgeridoo begin with the Aus-
tralian Aboriginal culture, where it's ritually used to
bring people into balance with themselves, each other
and the earth. Now it can be found the world over, but
unlike high-financed and mass-marketed McDonald's
franchises and Wal-mart warehouses, the didgeridoo
has crossed geographical boundaries largely through
cultural exchanges, personal travel and word of mouth.
Dank just returned from a two-week hiking trip in
Peru where he said he ran into at least a dozen people
packing the instrument. He said the people in and
around the city of Cusco, where he was based, were
using the didgeridoo in their ritual ceremonies and
meditation.
"I fell in love with the culture right away," he said.
Dank's open attitude and the hypnotic sound of the
didgeridoo pushed the language barrier aside and
helped him create an immediate rapport with people, so
much so that one family took him in for a couple of
days.
Dank plays the didgeridoo most every day. He
said, "The connection it gives me with the earth is im-
portant, but the connection it gives me to myself is
much more important."
The liner notes of the Steve Roach compact disk
contain the words "music is medicine," said Dank,
"and I have definitely found that to be the case. I've
made some breakthroughs with sound that have


Team IMS
The faculty at the Island Middle School is excited about the year ahead. Back row, left, are Sandy Brouseau,
science, John Friedricks, language arts, Janet Toy, social studies, Jocelyn Greene, marine science, Noranne
Hutcheson, curriculum consultant, Jim George, math, and Cynthia Dake, performing arts. Front row, left,
Kelly Parsons, assistant director/life skills, Beverly Beaver, secretary, Jimi Gee, music, Micheline Grenier-
Jones, visual arts, and Gary Hughes, executive director/life skills.


was the school resource teacher and she has since taken
a position teaching kindergarten at the Manatee School
for Arts and Science in Bradenton.
With the additional staff talent, students will have
the opportunity to take elective courses such as stage
movement and dance, puppetry and imagery, art appre-
ciation, American sign language and guitar.
Hughes said Pete Lannon, school resource officer
from the Holmes Beach Police Department, will also be
returning this year. Lannon said he has a new and im-
proved drug-resistance education program that is more


interactive and engaging for middle school students.
Several faculty members said that although they
felt some trepidation in returning to school after the
former director chose not to return, the staff consensus
is that everyone is excited and ready to work as a team.
Friedricks summed it up by saying, "It's not what was,
but what is."
To that, an IMS board member added that it's
"what will be."
The faculty consensus was that it will be the best


The Island Middle School charter requires that
the school tap "into the wealth of experienced, tal-
ented and educated people that make up the commu-
nity" in order to enrich the learning experience pro-
vided to students.
To facilitate hiring individuals who are ex-
perts in a specialized field, the IMS board has
adopted a new policy on the recommendation of
the Manatee County School District.
The policy states that IMS may employ or
contract with skilled professionals or experts who


changed me. I think it's in the sound."
Dank said he doesn't need to ease his anxieties
with food, drink or drugs. The didgeridoo "keeps me
full."
After the southwest trip, Dank and his mother,
Julie Ann Burris, moved to Florida, where Burris re-
ceived a liver transplant. She's still in recovery.
She says she loves the didgeridoo and her son's
music. "It's helped keep me alive. It helps me with my
pain and my meditation. It helps ground me and moti-
vate me. It puts me in that state of well-being where I
like to be." And if Dank's not available to play, she
listens to recordings.
In the three years since discovering the didgeridoo,
Dank has created close to 50 of them all differently
shaped, sized, marked and decorated. A carpenter by
trade and always artistic he's been a quick study
of the craft. A number of people have sought out and
purchased his didgeridoos.
He usually uses agave wood, which is available in
the North American desert, throughout South America,
and also Florida. Dank splits the wood down the cen-
ter and hollows it out with a knife. He tapers the ends
from narrow to wide, in order to give the instruments
a "nice aesthetic," said Dank, and also for the sound.
He coats the interior with epoxy or some other finish
before gluing the two pieces back together. Then he
paints them with symbolic colors and figures of spiri-
tual meaning.
For example, one of the didgeridoos is shaped like
the letter "S" and is elegantly marked with the so-called
chakras, which symbolizes the different energy centers
of the human body.


may not be certified teachers, but who have spe-
cialized knowledge and experience in areas rel-
evant to the school curriculum.
These experts-in-field may provide direct in-
structional services to students and may also assist
a regular member of the IMS teaching staff.
All experts-in-field will be required to be fin-
gerprinted and submit to a standard background
check by the Manatee County School District.
Anyone interested in lending their talents to
IMS may contact the school at 778-5200.


Another of the instruments is 11 feet long and
wrapped by a 30-foot, ornate, hand-painted serpent,
which he says signifies natural cycles, rebirth and
unity.
Dank is as musically proficient on this python-
sized didgeridoo as he is on the smaller 4- or 5-footers.
If you go out to the Holmes Beach shoreline near the
2900 block of Gulf Drive near sunset, you might see
him playing it.
The sound is a amazing. Usually registering the
musical tone "E" or "E-flat," it's a trance-like oscil-
lation, a bottom-end groaning, as if from the core of the
planet.
Dank is involved with two didgeridoo collectives.
One is called the Didg Revolution and the other is a
two-man act called Dragonfly. The groups give work-
shops and perform, for example at the "Festival of the
Heart" last February, which was sponsored by
Sarasota-based Natural Awakening magazine. They
also performed at the Tampa Bay Performing Arts
Center's "Art and Spirituality Festival" in April.
Just before leaving for his Peru trip in June, Dank
and his colleagues worked with kids at camp at Moc-
casin Lake Park in Clearwater.
Dank plans to stay busy performing and teaching
people how to play and make didgeridoos.
You can search him out at sunset, or reach him at
his local cell number, 773-7699.
He's had opportunities to record, but believes the
time wasn't right. "I'll probably make a CD in the next
two years," he said, "but I don't want to be in a rush."
Dank's got time. At 26, he says he's discovered the
"fountain of youth."


IMS sets hiring policy for experts


I






- PAGE 22 AUGUST 13, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


Jackson Gray: The convoy of democracy


Anna Maria resident Jackson Gray grew up around
Long Island Sound and working on a U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers boat in that area as a seaman when the
United States entered World War II following the Japa-
nese attack on Pearl Harbor.
"I probably could have stayed as a seaman with the
Corps," said Jackson. "But when the war started, my
friends and I all wanted to join up and go overseas."
Figuring his nautical experience would help him,
he applied to the U.S. Merchant Marine's officer can-
didate school and, by early 1943, found himself a
newly commissioned officer on board a cargo ship
-bound for North Africa.
"We were in a convoy with a destroyer escort, but
the convoy was attacked constantly by German subma-
rines," he said.
On his first convoy, however, everything went
fairly smoothly until the ship docked in North Africa
at Bone.
"The German planes came over every night and
strafed the ships in the harbor. We were right in the
thick of things," Jackson said.
A lot of ships got bombed and sunk, but Jackson's
vessel was lucky.
Although a cargo ship, his vessel carried a small
U.S. Navy crew that manned the ship's 20-mm cannons
and 3- and 5-inch guns.
"Every time the Germans came over, we'd fire
back at them. It was pretty scary."
Jackson made numerous trips around the Mediter-


Jackson Gray at age 87 still enjoys fishing every day
at the Anna Maria City Pier. Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy of Jackson Gray


ranean. On one voyage, the ship carried about 2,000
German prisoners of war of Rommel's Afrika Corp
from the front lines to a POW camp in Tangiers.
His ship landed cargo during the invasion of Sic-
ily and then transported about 400 Italian POW's back
to America.
"What we did wasn't anything special, but we were
concerned because we were in a lot of action, espe-
cially in port in North Africa. During convoys, we were
always worried about submarine attacks," he said.
While his ship didn't get hit, he was in a few con-
voys where the German subs managed to penetrate the
destroyer escort and blow up a few ships.
"We just did our jobs the best we could and prayed
a lot. Once you left on a convoy, you were considered
in a combat zone and a convoy through the North At-
lantic was no country club picnic, I can tell you."
What was a bit upsetting to Jackson was that mem-
bers of the merchant marine weren't considered war
veterans until an Act of Congress in 1980.
"Now, we are all official veterans and get benefits.
I really don't deserve any special recognition, but I'm
just thankful that our service was finally recognized,"
he said. Thousands of merchant mariners went down
with their ships during the war, he added.
Jackson was on a cargo ship in the Pacific when the
war ended.
He later left the merchant marine, but stayed in the
boating industry and spent 14 years with General Dy-
namics in New London, Conn., building nuclear sub-
marines.
"My service was just doing what I could do to help
the country. Everybody was in some kind of service,
doing what they could. I'm proud of our contribution
as mariners in combat zones and the recognition the
merchant marine finally got for our war efforts."
At 87, Jackson lives quietly now in Anna Maria,
his home for the past 25 years.
He still enjoys fishing every morning at the Anna
Maria City Pier, although he says the fish just aren't
biting the way they used to.

"The Greatest Generation" column is for Island,
Longboat Key and Cortez veterans, man or woman,
who served in the uniform of any allied country (U.S.,
Britain, Canada, Holland, Norway, France, the
Phillipines, Australia, New Zealand, etc.) during World
War II. We'd like to hear from you. Please call Rick
Catlin at 778-7978.


Jackson Gray as a U.S. Merchant Marine officer in
1944. Note the campaign ribbons fobr convoy duty
through the Atlantic to Africa, the Mediterranean
and the Persian Gulf Islander Photo: Courtesy of
Jackson Gray


HBPD seeks protection

from weapons

of mass destruction
By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Police Department is
seeking city approval to outfit nine first re-
sponders with personal protection equipment
kits in the event of an attack by means of weap-
ons of mass destruction.
At the city commission meeting Aug. 12,
Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine sought
commission approval to authorize Mayor Carol
Whitmore to seek this protective gear.
"The equipment is purchased with federal
funds," said Romine, and "the requirement for
each agency to receive their allotment is to
agree to the provisions with the inerlocal agree-
ment with the Florida Department of Law En-
forcement."









Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 1, South Bay Boulevard, Bayfront Park, in-
formation. According to the report, a man found a
World War II mortar shell in chest-deep waters off
Bayfront Park.
Aug. 3, South Bay Boulevard, Bayfront Park, in-
formation. A man drove his truck onto the beach and,
according to the report, into the bay.
Aug. 3, 100 block of Bay Boulevard, alcohol vio-
lation. A woman was reportedly cited for having an
open bottle of beer in an area posted "no alcohol."
Aug. 3, 200 block of Elm Avenue, violation of in-
junction. A woman reported receiving several calls
from a man she has a temporary injunction against.
Aug. 4, 200 block of Magnolia Avenue, vandalism.
The rear window of a woman's laundry room was re-
portedly broken.

Bradenton Beach
July 29, 501 Gulf Drive, Bridge Port condomini-
ums, neighbor problem. Three women filed a com-
plaint against a member of the condo association and
his wife for allegedly making verbal threats and ob-
scene hand gestures toward them. According to the
report, two of the women also asked for restraining
orders against the man and his wife.
July 29, 2400 block of Avenue C, domestic dis-
turbance. According to the report, a dispute ensued
between a husband and wife when the husband re-
fused to give his wife money. According to the re-

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port, members of the family believe the wife has a
substance-abuse problem. The husband requested
information on the Baker Act, and according to the
report, went to the Manatee County Courthouse to
file the paperwork necessary to have his wife taken
into custody following the incident.
July 30, 1700 Gulf Drive, DUI. James Braun, 50,
of Bradenton, was arrested for reckless driving and
driving under the influence of prescription drugs and
alcohol after another driver witnessed Braun driving
recklessly and called police.
Aug. 2, 1801 Gulf Drive, Runaway Bay condo-
miniums, domestic battery. According to the report, a
woman became aggressive and physically abusive with
her ex-husband and daughter for no apparent reason.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 3, 3000 block of Avenue E, missing person.
A woman reported her teenage daughter missing when
she left the home without permission. According to the
report, the woman called later to confirm her daughter
had returned home.
Aug. 3, 200 block of 58th Street, dog attack. Accord-
ing to the report, a man was bitten and attacked by a dog
running loose in the front yard of a home. According to
the report, officers responded to the location and while
waiting for someone to respond to the front door, one of
the officers was bitten on the foot by the dog. The dog was
seized by Manatee County Animal Services and the owner
was cited for letting her dog run loose.
Aug. 3, 6200 block of Holmes Boulevard, traffic
violation. According to the report, a Bradenton juvenile
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THE ISLANDER E AUGUST 13, 2003 M PAGE 23




loaned his mother's car to his friends without her
knowledge. While one of his juvenile friends was driv-
ing the car through North Beach Village, the car slid on
the gravel path and hit a tree. According to the report,
the car was towed and the juvenile driving the car was
arrested for driving without a license, careless driving
and leaving the scene of an accident.
Aug. 4, 5600 block of Gulf Drive, criminal mis-
chief. According to the report, someone sprayed a car
with a fire extinguisher.
Aug. 4, 5600 block of Gulf Drive, theft. A man
reported his bicycle missing.
Aug. 4, 6000 block of Gulf Drive, criminal mis-
chief. Officers responded to a report that someone had
sprayed several cars with a fire extinguisher.
Aug. 4, 4200 block of Gulf Drive, burglary. A
woman reported finding her vehicle unlocked and the
glove box open, but did not report anything missing.
Aug. 5, 5311 Gulf Drive, Amy Dodge Salon, civil
matter. A contractor alleged that someone from the salon
used his company letterhead to file false contracts.
Aug. 5, 5704 Marina Drive, Everything Under the
Sun, criminal mischief. According to the report, someone
tampered with the outdoor message sign to change the
advertisement for "Mexican pots" to "Mexican pot."
Aug. 5, 3800 block of East Bay Drive, criminal
mischief. A woman reported the tires to her bicycle had
been slashed.
Aug. 7, 3600 block of East Bay Drive, theft. A man
reported three of his bicycles stolen. According to the
report, one of the bikes was already in possession of the
police department and was returned.to the owner.


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PAGE 24 E AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER







Wednesday, Aug. 13
10:30 a.m. Friend's of the Library book club at
the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 778-6341.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Island Middle School parent-
involvement education class at IMS, 206 85th St.,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-5200.
7p.m. Loop Old Salt Fishing Tournament cap-
tains' meeting at Longboat Key Moorings, 2600
Harborside Drive, Longboat Key. Information: 383-
8383.

Thursday, Aug. 14
5:30 p.m. Final Anna Maria Elementary School
new construction meeting at AME, 4700 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 708-5525.
6 to 8 p.m. Soccer registration at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.

Friday, Aug. 15
11:30 a.m. to 6:30p.m.- Blood drive at the Anna


Realty raves
Missi Watkins and Gail Tutewiler led the
July honors list at Wedebrock Real Estate Co.'s
Holmes Beach office, Watkins as tops in obtain-
ing new listings and Tutewiler in sales.
At Wagner Realty, David Moynihan aced the
competition in the Anna Maria Island office,
leading in new listings, sales and closed volume.
Other Wagner winners included Dorothy Cook in
listings, Cathy Meldahl in sales, and Don Carey
in closed volume at the Longboat Key office.
Island Real Estate winners were Tom Nelson
and Richard Freeman, who shared listing honors,
and Marianne Correll as tops in sales.


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mation: 746-7195. Free appetizer with donation.

Saturday, Aug. 16
9 to 11 a.m. Island Middle School parent-in-
volvement education class at IMS, 206 85th St.,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-5200.
10 a.m. Kids' camp at the Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota. In-
formation: 388-4444. Fee applies.
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Blood drive at the Beach
House Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach. Information: 746-7195. Dinner coupon with
donation.
7 p.m. Tennis Shoe Ball benefit for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society at the Bradenton City Center. In-
formation: 745-1214, ext. 21. Fee applies.

Sunday, Aug. 17
10 a.m. "Turtle Talk" with Anna Maria Island
Turtle Watch volunteers at the Manatee Public Beach
(south picnic tables), Manatee Avenue at Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-1435.
Noon Loop Old Salt Fishing Tournament weigh-
in at Longboat Key Moorings, 2600 Harbourside Drive,
Longboat Key. Information: 383-8383.
2 to 4 p.m. Island Middle School parent's char-
ter education class at the school, 206 85th St., Holmes
Beach. Information: 778-5200.

Monday, Aug. 18
8 a.m. to noon Blood Drive at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. Information: 778-1908.
7 to 8 p.m. Soccer tryouts for 5- to 7-year-olds
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.

Tuesday, Aug. 19
7:30 a.m. Business Network International meet-
ing at the Hilton Beachfront Resort, 4711 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, Longboat Key. Information: 383-5543.
Noon to 3:30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.
1 to 4 p.m. Veteran's Service officer at the Is-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Appointments: 749-3030.
7 to 8 p.m. Soccer try-outs for 8- 9-year-olds at


the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magno-
lia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.

Wednesday, Aug. 20
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Island Middle School parents'
charter education class at the school, 206 85th St.,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-5200.
7 to 8 p.m. Soccer tryouts for 10-11 -year-olds
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.
8 to 10:30 p.m. Whalehead music group at Java
n' Jive, 811 Eighth Ave., Palmetto. Information: 723-
5080.

Ongoing:
Banyan Theater Company presents "The Price"
at the Sainer Pavilion at New College of Florida, 5313
Bay Shore Road, Sarasota, through Aug. 24. Informa-
tion: 358-5330. Fee applies.
Cortez artist Cecy Richardson's exhibit at the Arts
Council of Manatee County, 926 12th St. W.,
Bradenton, through Aug. 28. Information: 746-2223.
Porcelain art by Helen DeForge at Island Gallery
West, 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, through Aug. 31.

Upcoming:
Immunization van at Beachway Plaza K-Mart
Aug. 21.
Soccer tryouts at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center Aug. 21.
AARP safe drivers course at the Island Branch
Library Aug. 21-22.
"Women of Color Cabaret" at the Riverfront The-
atre Aug. 22-24.
"Jammin for Joints" Arthritis Foundation benefit at
Woodson Brothers' Seafood Grille Aug. 23.
Rotary Club meeting with State Rep. Bill Galvano
at the Beach House Restaurant Aug. 23.
Children's Summit at the Manatee Civic Center
Aug. 23.
Butterfly Gardening for the Beginner at Flutterby
Gardens Aug. 23.
Youth auditions for "How to Eat Like a Child" at
the Riverfront Theatre Aug. 24-25.
Adult and teen auditions for "The Adventures of
Tom Sawyer" at the Riverfront Theatre Aug. 24-25.


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THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 M PAGE 25


'My boys' help her celebrate 90th year


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The fire department is her family and "my boys"
will host a blowout at the fire station next Wednesday
to celebrate Mazie Ulmer's 90th birthday.
It's been that way for more than 30 years. There
will be a big cake that for once she won't make, pre-
sents from "boys" and the Longboat Key Fire Depart-
ment and her many friends, and a whole lot of good
old-fashioned fun.
That will be at 2 p.m. Aug. 20 at the north fire sta-
tion, 5490 Gulf of Mexico Drive. Everyone is invited,
said Ann Lathrop, administrative assistant to the de-
partment and Chief Julius Halas.
Mazie Ulmer came to the key in 1967 with her
husband Alfred, when he retired as an electrical engi-
neer with RCA in New York. He died in 1970 and
without family here she adopted the firemen and they
her. "It gave her purpose after he died," said longtime
friend Barbara Cooney.
She appreciates firemen, thinks they work very hard
and are underappreciated. She expresses her gratitude with
food. "I cook a lot," she said. "Always have. I love to share


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it with neighbors and friends and most of all my boys."
They in turn appreciate her, for her food and for her
thoughtfulness and especially for her appreciation of
them. It's mutual high regard and a mutual adoption.
"The guys love her," said the department's Lathrop.
She doesn't specialize, she's a generalist in the
kitchen. But she is partial to pies, especially apple, and is
renowned for her cheesecakes. Her barbecue is a "quite a
hit," she said, and she roasts the occasional turkey,
chicken, and pork ribs, and lots of cakes and pies.
Mazie shops in quantity, so that checkout clerks at the
grocery store comment, "This must be for your boys."
Cooney, who lives in Sarasota, calls every day to
see that her friend is OK, and drives her to the store
every week. Mazie gave up driving herself two years
DeForge's porcelains
Gallery West centerpiece
The works of Helen DeForge of Holmes Beach
will be featured from Aug. 17-31 at Island Gallery
West, 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Her exhibition
will succeed the watercolors of S. Rush Dean, the cur-
rently showcased artist.
The artists' cooperative gallery is open from 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Additional details may
be obtained by calling 778-6648.
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ago on doctors' advice.
Over the years, firemen have given her all manner
of mementoes, from fire hats to axes to photographs,
and she keeps them all in a special place in her house
and her heart.
She doesn't plan to move away from her "family" any
time soon. "I hope to live in my house for another 50
years," she said. Given what Cooney describes as her
"strength of character," she is sure to give it a good run.


Helen DeForge and her porcelains.


Don't dine out

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Holmes Beach
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PAGE 26 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Stormy weather, stormy water baywide


The wet, wet weather of last weekend has caused
visions of stormwater runoff to run streaming through
my head.
OK, so I don't have much of a life.
Stormwater runoff, for the uninitiated, is the water
that flows into the bays and Gulf of Mexico after it
rains. In a perfect world, the runoff would be a good
thing, since it lowers the salinity of the bays and near-
shore Gulf and creates a kinder, gentler habitat for ju-
venile critters that like to grow up in estuaries.
Stormwater runoff in our imperfect world isn't all
that great.
The gunk we put on our yards spreading fertil-
izer to keep the grass green, tamping poison into those
mounds to kill ants, spraying Round-up-like stuff to kill
weeds all ends up in the water after it rains, and all
that stuff ends up hurting the marine critters in one way
or another.
The fertilizer that makes plants grow makes marine
plants blossom and flourish. Unfortunately, the plants
that like the nitrogen-rich fertilizer are greedy, gobble
the stuff down, breed like crazy, and then suck up the
oxygen that the other plants need to survive. Fish, too.
All the poisons carried into the bays through
stormwater runoff also damage marine life. And don't
forget the goop that oozes from cars, the lead from
gasoline-powered vehicle exhausts, lead-based powder
from grinding brake linings, chemicals from dripping
radiators it's a smorgasbord of crap that ends up in
what should be our pristine waters.
Add in the cans, bottles, Styrofoam cups and other
litter than flow downstream everything flows down-
stream, remember and we've got a real mess in the
bays right now, after the 6-plus inches of rain we had
in three days.
According to 11-year-old data from the Sarasota
Bay National Estuary Program, "surface runoff ac-
counts for about 45 percent of the total phosphorous
and total nitrogen loads [mostly fertilizer], more than
90 percent of the lead load [mostly car emissions], and
25 percent of the zinc load."
As construction build-out continues, stormwater
runoff increases, too, so those numbers are probably
today and will get even greater as Lakewood Ranch
City continues to grow. And don't forget that we had
what probably amounts to what stormwater experts will
eventually refer to as a "50-year flood" last weekend.

More problems
There's other bad stuff beside chemical contami-
nants out in the waters right now. Think of Spot the dog
and Fluffy the cat and that voodoo that they do out in
your yard, multiply by oh, say, 500,000, add in a
gazillion cows, chickens and goats, and guess what?
That's ending up in the bays, too.
My colleague Bob Ardren tried for years to get
Manatee County to implement beach- and bay-water-
quality testing when he wrote for The Islander. It
wasn't until after he left the paper that things finally
happened.
I remember a few of the quotes from county com-
missioners that he wrote that ran along the lines of,
"Our waters are pristine. We don't need to take no


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stinking samples of water, man! We're pure!"
To their credit, county officials also said back then
that there were no baseline data for beach water-qual-
ity monitoring that could readily be compared one-on-
one to give anybody any kind of idea of what should
be considered a "clean" beach versus one that wasn't.
Consider it like this: I think my house is clean. A
doctor who compares it to an intensive care unit of a
hospital may disagree. Who's correct?
Well, in August 2002, a saltwater sampling pro-
gram called for the collection of weekly samples in all
Florida coastal counties.
The tests are run for fecal coliform and entero-
cocci, both enteric bacteria that normally inhabit the
intestinal tract of humans and animals. "The pres-
ence of enteric bacteria is an indication of fecal pol-
lution, which may come from stormwater runoff,
pets and wildlife, and human sewage," according to
a county Web site. "If they are present in high con-
centrations in recreational waters and are ingested
while swimming or enter the skin through a cut or
sore, they may cause human disease, infections or
rashes."
Charles Henry is the environmental health director
with the Manatee County Health Department. He's the
beach water-quality guy. His crews go out every Mon-
day and sample water from places like Bayfront Park,
Cortez Beach, Coquina, Whitney Beach and Palma
Sola Bay, then run the tests and shoot them off to the
state.


Mote's school admission
program runs all month
A special program to raise school sup-
plies for needy children is planned for all of
August at Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600
Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota.
Donors of a school item to Mote this
month receive a free admission to the
aquarium for a youngster accompanying a
paying adult.
All supplies will go to the Sarasota Boys
and Girls Club, said a Mote spokesperson.
Admission prices for the aquarium, which is
open 10 am.-5 p.m. daily, are $12 for adults,
$8 for children 4-12, free under 4.
Details may be obtained by phoning 388-
4441, or visit the Mote Web site at
www.mote.org.










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If the numbers reach levels that the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency believe are too high for ei-
ther of the pollution triggers, Henry issues a health
advisory warning of the risks of swimming in the area
of concern.
Our "pristine" beach at Bayfront Park has been
closed several times. Ditto Palma Sola Bay along the
causeway on Manatee Avenue.
Henry is rightfully concerned about one wrinkle
within the EPA's criteria as it relates to an average
reading. Since 2002, Henry said he's had to issue 23
health "advisory" warning for beaches based on EPA
testing on a five-week average. If a beach is OK one
week, then has a bunch of gunk in it the next, but still
is OK for the EPA five-week average, it stays open.
More gunk Week 2, maybe it's closed. Even more
gunk Week 3, probably closed.
"It would make more sense to me to warn people
after heavy rains not to swim at the beach, and try to
work with the citizens," Henry said.
He added that there has been no health warning
advisory for samples reaching levels so high in a one-
week reading that any beaches should be closed to
swimming.
Be sure to check the post-Monday readings after
our wet, wet weekend.

The sky is falling! Sorta
By the way, not all nitrogen comes from the run-
off of stormwater. Folks in Massachusetts are finding
that "atmospheric deposition" of nitrogen carries a sig-
nificant load of the stuff in the water up there.
Remember the numbers quoted above for nitrogen
loads in our waters? Up there, with all the cars, power
plants and other stuff, atmospheric deposition is among
the highest in the United States and contributes some-
thing like 40 percent of the load into the coastal waters,
"Atmospheric nitrogen, however, has the same
impact on water quality as the more common sources
of nitrogen agriculture, faulty septic tanks, and lawn
and garden fertilizers," according to "Coastal Services"
magazine, published by the National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration.
They've found a pretty good way to deal with the
problem, too trees.
"One of the things we knew early from the research
is that growing trees intercept nitrogen from the atmo-
sphere," said Christine Gault, manager for the Waquoit
Bay Reserve. Her group has bought about 1,600 acres
of property and planted a slew of trees to help the
coastal areas.
They're also doing some bonehead simple things
like turning off lights in rooms, car pooling, or other
energy saving measures to lower electrical use and
thereby lower power-plant emission levels.

Sandscript factoid
Charles Henry mentioned an old axiom that is
worth repeating: "The solution to pollution is dilution,"
a practice that is being used with the Piney Point phos-
phate mine in its attempt to dump something like 300
million gallons of water far out in the Gulf diluting
the discharge from the mines in its vast expanse.
















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STowing You Can Trust.
Boat U.S. members enjoy FREE towing AND
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374-5745 387-8716


CAR WASH
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MAJOR CREDIT CARDS & DEBIT CARDS ACCEPTED





THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 27


Wet weather dunks fishing, but red action strong


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Rain really put a damper on local fishing during
the weekend, but before the rain came action for red-
fish and trout in the backwater was red-hot.
Offshore fishing for grouper and snapper contin-
ues to be terrific. Sharks are still producing night ac-
tion in Tampa Bay, and although the tarpon frenzy has
mostly ended, there are still a few lonely silver kings
lurking in Tampa Bay.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle told me
he has heard good reports of lots of redfish catches in
the bays, mackerel along the beaches, sharks in Tampa
Bay and red grouper and mangrove snapper offshore.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's catching
Spanish mackerel to 5 pounds, bonita to 10 pounds,
barracuda to 20 pounds, all in about 40 feet of water
offshore. Farther out, in the 100-foot range, he's doing
well with legal-size grouper and snapper.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said he's putting his charters onto reds, trout,
mangrove snapper, flounder and some small gag grou-
per, with some of the reds going to 32 inches in size.
Notables are some trout to 25 inches and some big
mackerel, too.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
boaters from the marina report limit catches of man-
grove snapper along the Intracoastal Waterway, and
trout action still remains good on the seagrass flats,
along with lots of redfish and catch-and-release snook.
Capt. Mark Bradow said there are still a few tar-
pon hanging around, but the rough weather and murky
water are making them more and more difficult to hook
up.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said Sarasota Bay is producing lots of oversize
redfish for his charters, plus catch-and-release snook
to 27 inches. He was able to limit out on reds most
trips, he added.
I Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
he's also getting good reports of redfish in Miguel Bay,
sharks out in front of Terra Ceia Bay, black drum in the
cut and a few really big catch-and-release snook
around the docks in the Manatee River.
- Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business out of
Catchers Marina in Holmes Beach said redfish are his
best bet right now, with up to 20 fish per trip not at all
unusual, most within the slot limit but with a few "su-
persized." He's also hooking up with some catch-and-
release snook to 30 inches.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach out of Catchers said bad weather kept
him in port most of the week, although he still man-


In-off-nearshore fishing

tourney this weekend
The seventh annual Pete Turner Memorial
Fishing Tournament, with three $5,000 prizes,
will run Friday-Sunday, Aug. 15-17, with reg-
istration now well under way.
Included will be inshore, offshore and
nearshore fishing, each of which carries a first-
place prize of $5,000. Payouts are guaranteed
for first through third place. There is a grand
slam trophy and trash can slam cash awards.
There is an active junior division as well.
Presented by the Palmetto Kiwanis Club, it
will be hosted by the Regatta Pointe Marina.
Registration forms'are available at Turner Ma-
rine Supply, 826 13th St. W., Bradenton, phone
746-3456.



Capt. Mike's

Charter Boat
"MAGIC"
Backwater Near Shore Up to 7 miles out in the Gulf
Snook Redfish Trout Flounder Mackerel Snapper
Light Tackle Fishing Reservations a must
Tackle, bait, ice, fishing license provided!

779-9607
Capt. Mike Heistand USCG Licensed


aged to get into some big redfish.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of
Catchers said he fished with Capt. Scott Greer out of
Cortez and placed second in the Desoto Fishing Tour-
nament last week, with gag grouper to 44 pounds and
warsaw grouper better than 100 pounds.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said night fish-
ing is producing excellent catches of redfish and man-
grove snapper. Morning seems to be the time to catch
those hungry catch-and-release snook, but the rain over
the weekend really put a damper on the fishing action.
Anglers at the Anna Maria City Pier report lots
of snapper on outgoing tides, with mackerel a good hit
in the mornings and snook seeming to hit at night.
On my boat Magic, we have been limiting out on
redfish on every trip, plus catching trout to 22 inches
and one 18-inch flounder.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year fishing guide.
Call him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing report. Prints
and digital images of your catch are also welcome and




BRIAN WOOD
CONTRACTING INC.
CUSTOM DOCKS SEAWALLS BOAT LIFTS
Design Build Permitting
Sales Service Supplies


Super
snook
Kevin
Park
caught
and
released
this 29-
inch
snook
while
fishing
with
Capt.
Thom
Smith at
Angler's
Repair.











... and
big red
Scott
Dalton
did well
with big
reds with
Capt.
Smith,
too.


may be dropped off at The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, or e-mailed to
news @islander.org. Please include identification for
persons in the picture along with information on the
catch and a name and phone number for more infor-
mation. Snapshots may be retrieved once they appear
in the paper.


qnnMOM W V ZsonKaPTJles

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Aug 13 2:46am 1.6 6:15am 1.2 12:56pm 2.7 8:02pm 0.2
Aug 14 3:01am 1.6 7:08am 1.1 1:42pm 2.5 8:31pm 0.4
Aug 15 3:13am 1.7 7:57am 1.0 2:27pm 2.3 8:56pm 0.6
Aug 16 3:31am 1.9 8:49am 0.9 3:20pm 2.1 9:18pm 0.8
Aug 17 3:49am 2.0 9:45am 0.8 4:16pm 1.9 9:40pm 1.0
Aug 18 4:14am 2.1 10:47am 0.7 5:20pm 1.7 10:01pm 1.2
LQ Aug 19 4:43am 2.2 11:56am 0.7 6:47pm 1.5 10:10pm 1.4
Aug 20 5:18am 2.2 - 1:19pm 0.6
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later






PAGE 28 M AUGUST 13, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


Open house wreaks havoc on whiffleball playoffs


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
Back-to-school night and student orientation
Thursday, Aug. 7, at the Island schools caused one for-
feiture at the Anna Maria Island Community Center's'
summer whiffleball tournament, while also forcing the
rescheduling of the age 11-13 finals, although, through
it all, three champions were crowned in each division.
The Barracudas captured the age 8-10 division
with a perfect 9-0 record, though the players would
rather have played a real game to claim the champion-
ship.
- Members of the age 8-10 champion Barracudas
include Alex Burgess, Chandler Hardy, Emily White,
Joey Hutchinson, Jordan Sebastiano, Justin Suca and
Rachel White.
The rescheduled age 11-13 whiffleball champion-
ship was played Friday, Aug. 8, and was won by the
Magic, which defeated the Heat by a 22-15 score. The
Magic never trailed in the game, but the Heat kept
hanging around, pulling to within 6-5 in the second
inning and 12-11 in the fourth.
The Magic pulled away with five runs in the fifth
inning, one in the seventh and four more in the eighth
while the Heat were only able to manage two more runs
in the both the fifth and eighth innings in dropping a
22-15 decision.
The Magic, which received a pair of home runs
from Kyle Bellingar, finished the season with a 7-2
record while the loss dropped the Heat to 6-4 for the
season.
Members of the champion Magic team include
Jared Bellingar, Brenton Weiskopf, Jessica Smith,
Ryne Smith, Jimmy O'Neil, Kat Pfahlert, Kyle
Bellingar and Travis Bell.
The Cubs captured the age 14-17 championship
game in a back-and-forth contest with the Devil
Rays. The Cubs jumped out in front with three runs
in the first, but the Rays fought back to tie the game
in the bottom of the second inning. The Cubs
scratched out a single run in the third and opened up
a 12-3 lead with four more runs in the fourth, but the
Rays came back in the bottom of the inning with
nine runs punctuated by a grand-slam home run by
Lorenzo Rivera, which was followed by a solo shot
from Sean Pittman.
The Cubs came right back in the top of the fifth,
scoring five runs to take a 13-12 lead they wouldn't
relinquish on the way to a 22-17 victory.
Members of the champion Cubs include Keith
Jaudon, Jay Jaudon, Jimmy Campos, Evan Herkert,
Mike Alderson, Tripp Pierce, Jake Campos, Taylor
Chadsey and Jimmy Chadsey.

Soccer season on the horizon
The Anna Maria Island Community Center's fall
soccer season is just around the comer and the Center
is presently accepting registrations.
Boys and girls must be at least age 5 and no older
than 14 by Aug. 18 to be eligible for Center league
play. The Center will hold two registration nights Tues-
day, Aug. 12, and Thursday, Aug. 14, both from 6-8
p.m. with Saturday, Aug. 18, the last chance to regis-
ter to play the Center's 2003 season.
Registration fees for Center members is $40 for the
first child and $35 each for any additional children in
the same family. Nonmembers fee is $50 for the first
child and $45 each for any additional children in that
family.
There will be mandatory tryouts at the Center for
all age groups and teams will be selected at the conclu-
- sion of the scheduled tryout.
Ages 5-7 tryout, Aug. 18, 7-8 p.m.
Ages 8-9 tryout, Aug. 19, 7-8 p.m.
Ages 10-11 tryout, Aug. 20, 7-8 p.m.
Ages 12-14 tryout, Aug. 21, 7-8 p.m.
The Center also is in need of coaches for the 2003
_ season. Call Joe Chelbus at the Center, 778-1908, to
volunteer your time or for more information.

More soccer
The Manatee Area Youth Soccer Organization
(MAYSO) will be holding its first fall registration from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, at the Manatee
Convention and Civic Center in Palmetto.
To register, new players must bring a government-
issued birth certificate, a recent photo, health insurance


Jimmy
Campos
makes a
slick play
for the
Cubs in
age 14-17
whiffleball
action at
the Anna
Maria
Island
Community
Center.
Islander
Photos:
Kevin
Cassidy


Jordan Sebastiano shows good form on this swing Joey Hutchinson attempts to tag a player during the
during age 8-10 whiffleball playoffs at the Anna Anna Maria Island Community Center's whiffleball
Maria Island Community Center. championship action.


information and a parent or legal guardian to sign the
required paperwork.
Returning players don't need the birth certificate,
but do need the rest of the items in order to register.
Registration fees for this league depends on the age
of the players. For more information, please call the
MAYSO hotline at 795-5925, or e-mail MAYSO at
maysofutbol@aol.com, or visit the Web site at
www.mayso.org.

EZ Skimmers skimboard contest looms
EZ Skimmers presents its second annual back-to-
school skimboard contest, held once again at the Beach
House Restaurant in Bradenton Beach, Saturday and
Sunday, August 23-24.
Last year's contest drew more than 100 competi-
tors and hundreds of spectators, and this year, with
additional sponsors on board, the contest is expected to
bigger and better than ever.
In addition to EZ Skimmers and the Beach House,
other sponsors include West Coast Surf Shop, The Is-
lander, ZAP Skimmers, Native Rentals, Fun & Sun
Parasail, Sticky Bumps, Blocksurf, Australian Gold
and Dakine.
Cost to register for the skimboard contest is $25 for
amateurs and $75 for professionals on or before the
Aug. 16 deadline. Late registration will cost partici-
pants an additional $10. "No Exceptions!" says EZ. All
participants must complete an entry form and sign a
waiver.
Completed registration forms, along with the entry
fee, can be mailed or dropped off at the Beach House
Restaurant, P.O. Box 1478, Bradenton Beach FL
34217. Checks should be made payable to the Beach
House Restaurant.
There will be age divisions from the Minis (8 and


under) up to Masters (25 and up), along with a appro-
priate professional competitor's divisions.
For more information, call the West Coast Surf
Shop at 778-1001.

Dolphin Football gets
under way Saturday
The 2003 Anna Maria Dolphin football season gets
under way at 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, at the Police
Athletic League complex at 202 13th Ave. E.,
Bradenton, when the Dolphins will take on the Bron-
cos in a varsity contest.
The Dolphins are a vastly different team than a
year ago when they lost only one game on the way to
winning the PAL Superbowl title.
For starters, they're rather thin with only 16 play-
ers signed up to date, including returning starters on the
offensive and defensive lines, Andrew Burgess, Sean
Price, C.J. Wickersham and Curtis Reynolds.
Newcomers John Gregory, Zach Geerearts and
Joey Kruse will also see action there. Corey
Williamson, Charlie Woodson and Dylan Frank also
return and will see time on both sides of the ball.
Starting quarterback Nick Sato returns and has all-
purpose back Chad Richardson again in the backfield.
Richardson is being counted on to rack up rushing
yards. Sato will have Connor Bystrom back at wide
receiver to throw to as well.
Other newcomers include Jimmy Campos, who
will see time at running back, and Corbin Kitchen, who
will play wide receiver. Tight end Nick Ross rounds
out the roster for the Dolphins, who would still like an-
other player or two to round out the roster.
If you have a story idea or sports news to report,
call the Islander at 778-7978, or e-mail me at
sportspg@tampabay.rr.com.


I





THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 M PAGE 29


830 & 832 N. Shore Dr., Anna Maria
Two platted lots overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. One house
of 3BR/3BA, one-car garage. The house used to be too nice
to tear down to take advantage of the two building lots but
not any more. $975,600 Reduced to $720,000 Individual lots
for sale at $360,000.

Doug Dowling Realty
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
www.dougdowling.com

Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"

ANNA MARIA



REAL ESTATE LLC




*. 1 " i









kitchen, separate dining room, deck, patio and
two-car garage. Lush tropical landscaping, fenced

$1,295,000



Nice residential area, close ng, gooda
SPECTACULAR GULF VIEWS!
One house from the beach. Custom-built home
by Whitehead. 3BR, plus den, 3BA, gourmet
kitchen, separate dining room, deck, patio and
two-car garage. Lush tropical landscaping, fenced
and gated. Walls of windows to enjoy the sunsets.
$1,295,000

PALMA SOLA PINES
3BR/2BA great family home in PalmRICOola Pines.
Nice residential area, cs _..Gng, good
schools2BR/2BA, one-car garage with Large eat-
vie Located on quiet vaulted ceiling, solar
heated i und pool, fenced yard, 2 car garage.
$239, 900.
PERICO BAY CLUB
2BR/2BA, one-car garage with very private
views: Located on quiet cul-de-sac and close to
pool $239,900.

PERICO ISLAND
2BR/2BA, ground floor, turnkey furnished end
unit. Community pool and clubhouse. Close to
beaches and shopping. $189,900.


ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

S, Ms SiiCoast
REAL ESTATE LLC

Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


LIZ CODOLA
Property Manager Realtor
941.779.0304 866.779.0304

* : A ".-. a

-' 1D!UNCAN:
R- eal Estate, -n..
.liz@tearrfduncan.c Qm,
www.t~amduripan.com


E i SOT Twwilaneog


Simply the Best


BAYFRONT CONDO
sBeutiful views froi, tkis irect Byfroatt ui0it.
Elevator, cover-J pirkit%7, pool. Fully fur-
aisleJ rt J Leutiful 2BR/2BA. $339,00ooo


j


NEW GULFFRONT
4BR/4.5BA luxury be&cfront penttLouse.
Nite-foot ceilii7s, pool, elvevtor, two-char
7&r&e7 plus extr& covered pxrkih7.


,r



BEST BUY ON THE ISLAND
Totally rehov>ted, bri7t &td it-ts-cul.te
iBR/IBA vilk oh & q uiet 2dedJ-eJd street.
$164,900.

70+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.

Mike

Norman .i
800-367-1617
RBealty INC 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com


* PICTURE PERFECT RETREAT *


i-,'. r",' -,r'^ *".._ v 11 .










3BR/2BA, HEATED POOL, GARAGE
3810 6TH AVENUE, HOLMES BEACH $425,000
3818 6TH AVENUE, HOLMES BEACH $440,000
FOR MORE DETAILS: www.reachrichard.com


Realtor


Bob Fittro
Realtor






Wendy Foldes
Realtor





Richard Freeman
Realtor






Alan Galletto
Broker/Associate






Jon Kent
Broker/Associate






Tom Nelson
Realtor






Nick Patsios
Broker/Assocate





Chris Shaw
Realtor


Frank Davis
Broker






Melinda Bordes
Realtor


816 Audubon Dr........... $214,000
867 Audubon Dr. .......... $225,000

p

MariynTrehan Stop by and use our talking
Realtor window 24-hour information center.


GREAT LOCATION close to
beach, shopping, restaurants
and trolley stops. Recently up-
dated unit that overlooks the
pool and greenbelt. Ideal is-
land getaway. Easy to show!
MLS# 95187

WATERFRONT HOMES
& LOTS
524 71st St. ............... $1,250,000

4212 Redfish Ct. LOT ..... $575,000

307 Iris St. .................... $495,000
536 Key Royale Dr......... $849,900
106 Gull Dr. .................. $599,000
508 Key Royale Drive ..... $479,900
606 Dundee Ln. ............. $549,000
511 59th St .................. $595,000
10432 W. Sandpiper Rd.. $749,700

ISLAND HOMES.
CONDOS, LOTS & DUPLEXES
Westbay Pt Moorings #86. $395,000
4915 Gulf Dr ............. $1,715,000
Beachwalk Townhomes II up to. $539,000
308 55th St. Lot ........... $219,000
Sun Plaza West #201. ..... $399,000
1205 N. Gulf Drive #100 .. $439,000
408 Pointsetta Rd. ........... $495,000
710 North Shore. Lot. ..... $279,000
747 Jacaranda. Lot ......... $389,000
Water's Edge #110N ....... $759,000
Sun Plaza West #202 ..... $409,000
404 80th St................... $875,000
3818 Sixth Ave. ............. $440,000
3810 Sixth Ave. ............. $425,000
Bayou Condo 5C ........... $298,000
Spanish Main #702 ....... $235,000
6925 Holmes Blvd. ........ $299,900
Westbay Cove #226. ....... $199,000

COMMERCIAL
3014 Avenue C #1&2. .... $259,000
Southern Breeze......... $1,450,000
427 Pine Ave ................ $695,000

PERICO ISLAND/MAINLAND
2418 90th St. NW........ $2,995,000
11434 Perico Isles Cir. ... $349,000





PAGE 30"^AUGUST 13; A20L3" THE ISLANDER


AIRLINE TICKETS Southwest Air. Fly today, no re-
strictions. $340/round-trip, $180/one way. Call
778-4523.

1991 CADILLAC Brougham, 45,000 miles,
$4,500; Jazzy electric wheelchair, used three
months, has lift for car, both for $3,000; conven-
tional wheelchair, $75; Adjusta twin beds, 3
months old, $1,000; two lever chairs, one
leather, one fabric Lazy-Boy, $1,500. Call 779-
1213 for information and location.

DESIGNER FURNITURE like new. Sofa and
matching loveseat, $275; two end tables and cof-
fee table, glass top, $100; matching recliner $50;
complete white-wash set with two twin beds,
dresser with mirror, end tables and all linens, $275;
two bar stools, $20. Call 778-4451.

COMPUTER DESK, $100; computer, $95; ste-
reo, $85; XL men's shirts, lots of miscellaneous.
778-1012.

EMBROIDERY: We offer quality embroidered
promotional T-shirts, caps and golf shirts. We
can digitize your custom logo for your organiza-
tion or business, or help you create one.
www.islandstitch.com or call 778-8338.

BEDROOM SET: solid oak in a stateroom style by
National of Mt. Airy. Eight pieces with king-size
headboard, but no beds, $1,400. 792-4274.

CLASSIFIEDS ADS can be found on line at
www.islander.org.
I-


4 -""' REALTOR.
29 f, a"., .f'.,,....,I. Jsen .
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
E.xpe ience Reputation Reiuhlr




J., A

S- ^^
5400 CONDO Gullview, ground Iloor. 2BR'28A, updales.
washer/dryer partially furnished Surideck 2 pools. Priced to sell
at $515,000. Call for weekend open house times.
SEASONAL & ANNUAL RENTALS
KEY ROYALE Large 2BR/2EA pool, spa. boal dock, ill.
MARTINQUE Gulllront 2BR.'2BA. pool tennis, elevators
5400 GULFFRONT complex 1 and 2BRs. pool.
BEACHFRONT 3BR/2BA home. lasleluIlv lurnisned
CAYMAN CAY 2BR.'2BA. pool, gazebo, across trom the Deacri
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yreall7@aol.com *www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com




New L co!
1BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA duplex located very
close to AMI Community Center. Loads of
potential on a street with active property im-
provements underway. $379,900


FREE DELIVERY: SEAFOOD to go. Shrimp,
crabs, native fish. Delivered to your door. Call
James Lee, 795-1112 or 704-8421.


ISLAND APPLIANCE SERVICE has relocated on
Anna Maria Island. To our loyal and new custom-
ers, please call us for all your needs, 778-6126.


DEMOLITION SALE Saturday and Sunday, Au-
gust 16-17, 9am-4pm. Everything must go!
Signs, furnishings, plants, building materials,
etc. Island Breeze Apartments, 2516 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach.

MOVING SALE inside house, Sunday Aug. 17,
9am-1 pm. Like new living room and bedroom set,
lamps, barstools, jewelry, bric-a-brac, recliner. 220
84th St., Holmes Beach.

MULTI-FAMILY yard sale, Friday and Saturday,
Aug. 15-16, 9am-4pm. Household furnishings,
clothes, miscellaneous, 23rd Street and Avenue B
and Avenue C.
L STAN N D ,

LOST GLASSES: Women's prescription sun-
glasses lost in the Gulf near 700 Block of N. Shore
Drive. Glasses were swept away by swift current
towards Bean Point. If found, please call 778-2375
or collect, (407) 846-0328.

CLASSIFIEDS ADS can be found on line at
www.islander.org.



EQUAL

HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


All real estate advertising herein Is subject to the Fair
Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limilation or discrimination based on race.
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national
origin, or intention to make any such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination." Familial status includes children
under age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians,
pregnant women and people securng custody of chil-
dren under 18. This newspaper will not knowing accept
any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby Informed that all dwellings
advertised In this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-tree at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing im-
paired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


ANNA MARIA'S NORTH END
I ----- *----... ..,
.. ;...,.-..,


--



PRICE REDUCED on this beautifully maintained
home with direct deeded Gulf access. Located on
Anna Maria's northern end with pristine natural beach
50-ft. away! Open design provides over 2,000 sq.ft.
living area plus enclosed garage. Must be seen inside
to see the potential for your beach home. We call this
"almost" Gulffront! Call for appointment today. Now
$650,000.
We AIE the Island


S since 4
1957
MARIE UC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.net
Web site annamariareal.com


$20 REWARD! Lost: old, rusted, three-speed girls
bike. Lights, generator, bell. Plastic lizard on rear
fender. See Spencer, Drift-In, Bridge Street.

LOST: MEN'S prescription sunglasses and case.
Near west end of small bridge on Bean Point Fri-
day, July 18. Please call 758-9916 and leave mes-
sage.


CRITTER SITTER nine years in pet care. 24 years
as an Island resident. Lots of TLC for your beloved
pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.


1994 BONNEVILLE SE, 89,000 miles, all power,
AM/FM/cassette, air conditioning. Clean, great.
$4,995. Call 962-3535 or 795-8662.

1998 MALIBU LS 70,000 miles, all power, air con-
ditioning, AM/FM/cassette/CD. Great condition.
$5,995. 962-3535 or 795-8662.

1995 LINCOLN Town Car. See it at 312 58th St.,
Holmes Beach. $2,895. Call 778-5840.

1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN, cold air conditioning,
has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs great.
$3,100, or best offer. 730-9622.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vaca-
tion or long term. Private ramp, wash-down ar-
eas. Minutes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants,
bait. Capt. John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom
painting.


PIROSKA PLANCK...

.'/ The TOP
SW Closing Agent for the
? Month of July!
Please Call Piroska Planck For All
Your Real Estate Needs 730-9667
Office Number 778-2261
RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE, INC.


SALES AND RENTALS



REAL ESTATE .
OF ANNA MARIA

9906 Gulf Drive 941 778-0455
Anna Maria www.greenreal.com




TDUNCAN
Real Estate, Inc.

$50,000 PRICE REDUCTION


.v: ~JEI


~;'-~i4tAl"4~;;


Marina Pointe

Realty Co.


Climate Controlled
Self-Storage
Reserve Now!
314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
S SRE LS AN


ATTENTION TO DETAIL I, h i t fvcu il, ird in iril co)mpleley reiur-
b,zrneai Ilian.a reaiaenie ir A a European tIuch Tradaerine lAcrs gran.
ile sKyllghts porcneE mosaici.ie lciidoucor shower and rnuch more
You must see inside ihis residence to appieciale all ol ts exquisite
ameri ls. Prce reaucea 1o $5-19 900
CALL!

IDARCIEDUNCAN
CRS, GRI, Broker
k 94,779-0304
I 310 PllR Avenie P .Box 1209* Annma R.FL34216
'. Offte 779-0304 Fa 779-030k, Tn Free 866-77-304
www.teamduncan corn
Noa 0 K4"ow h IsndLik4 A NAt




" r'THE ISLANEM R 'fAUGUSgT 1"3; 20031 PAME 31


1995 SEADOO JET-SKI. Good condition, looks
great. $2,700. Call Mike, 795-1962.
BOAT LIFT for lease. Capacity of 7,000 Ibs. Lo-
cated at a residence in Key Royal, Holmes
Beach. Available immediately. $175/month, pay-
able in 2-3 month blocks in advance. For details,
call 730-1086.
BOAT SLIP for rent. Deep water. North area of
Anna Maria. Call 794-8877 or 730-5393.
1999 GRADY WHITE 19.2 Tournament with 1999
150-hp Yamaha, one owner, well maintained. Ex-
cellent condition. Book value, $19,000-$16,000.
Call 778-3126.


EGMONT EXPRESS CHARTERS. Summer spe-
cial: fifth and sixth person free with four paying
customers. Sunsets, snorkeling, Sarasota Bay,
Egmont Key and more. Custom tours available.
See dolphins all day! Hourly, half-day and full day.
Call 778-7459 or 720-5470.

LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand
on the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day
backwater fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait,
tackle provided. 779-9607.


Buying, Selling, Renting? we can Help!
1212 64TH STREET, NW.

justoff Riverview Blvd. Close
to Warner's Bayou. Updated
0 2BR/2BA home in wonderful
neighborhood. Newly land-
scaped, freshly painted, new
'" ": - .tile and carpet. Easy to show
and priced to sell at $199,500. Contact Bonnie Bowers direct at
350-1300 or 778-2307 for details. MLS# 94789.
out 2910 GULF DRIVE
.on DUPLEX WESTSIDE OF
GULF DRIVE! Charming du-
plex, short half-block to
beach. Continue using as du-
plex or convert to larger
single-family home. Recent
updates include tile floors,
exterior and interior paint, newer A/C, wooden deck. Large 2BR/
1BA and 1BR/1BA. Great rental history, tenants in place. A must
see! Priced to sell at $325,000. Call Stephanie Bell, Owner/Agent
778-2307 or 920-5156. MLS# 93114.


GR


SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1970 MLS


BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is
Sarah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child
or $3/pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or
child. Please call 778-7622, 778-7611 or 447-8593.
RESPONSIBLE PET SITTER, dog walker, certified
babysitter. Eighth-grader, available after school
and weekends. Call Zachary, 779-9783.


ISLAND SPORTS BAR: All-year clientele. Beer/
wine, good lease, smoking OK. $85,000. Call
Longview Realty, 383-6112.
PACKING AND SHIPPING: Palmetto business
with great potential, motivated seller. $59,900.
Longview Realty, 383-6112.


THE TINGLEY MEMORIAL Library in Bradenton
Beach is looking for volunteers who can work dur-
ing the summer months. Duties include checking
books in and out, reshelving books and generally
assisting library patrons. Anyone interested in vol-
unteering in our friendly community library can call
Eveann Adams at 779-1208.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!



Club Bamboo
Direct Gulffront and poolside
condos priced from
$285,000 $335,000
Econo Lodge Going Condo
Great Rental Opportunity
On-site rental office
Newly renovated
All new furnishings
Now taking contracts
Conversion now in progress

.- L.~i2I
',r,-



SCENTRAL PARK REALTY
Call Dennis Girard
941-809-0041
email: dennis@centralparkrealtycorp.com
www.club-bamboo.net


CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world?. Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. We
need you! Call 778-0492.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton
Beach is admitting residents. Day care and drop-
offs. Respite, long term. Call 779-0322 for details,
inquiries welcome.
OUR ISLAND HOME Assisted Living Facility: We-
are committed to creating the warmest and most
loving homes. We have an English RN living on
the premises. We offer respite and daycare and
always have space available for your long-term
needs. Call Annie, Maria or Chris for more infor-
mation. 778-7842.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, cabbage
palms, patio gardens, trimming, clean-up,
edgings, more. Hard-working and responsible.
Excellent references. Edward 778-3222.



' ~lf-Bay Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.
4 778-7244
1 (800)771-6043
5309 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
[Next to the Chamber in the Island Fitness Building]
MARTINIQUE NORTH
Rarely avalaible at the price!
j ". Direct gulffront Martinique
condo, gorgeous views, pool,
"' e tennis and garage. Only
*'",.".... $359,000.. Call JesseBrisson
..-.... @ 713-4755 or Call Robin
Kollar(@ 713-4515.

CHARMING ISLAND COT-
TAGE Bright and cheerful 2BR/
S1 BA with room for a pool. Lo-
cated west of Gulf Drive, one
short block to beach. Great in-
n.vestment opportunity! Must
., see! $359,000. Call Heather
Absten for a viewlnll
807-4661.
SIX-UNIT RESORT
Architectural design, almost
Gulffront, beautifully refur-
bished. A must see for the
savvy investor. Owner financ-
ing. $1,650,000. Call Robin
Kollar @713-4515 or Jesse
Brisson @713-4755


I/ We're Totally Global!

In fact, we're mailed all over the planet! More than 1,400 PAID subscribers
receive The Islander out of town, out of state and out of the United States
annually. We go to Alaska, England, Germany, Canada, Hawaii and
nearly all points in between. These news-hungry subscribers can't wait to
get their hands on "the best news on Anna Maria Island." And now avail-
able with "limited news," early classified and a secure server on the

World Wide Web: islander.org


TIe Islander

SINCE 1992

Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217 941 778-7978 e-mail news@islander.org





PAGE 32 E AUGUST 13, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

S' an.' Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
Sandy'S Established in 1983
Law Celebrating 20 Years of
SSerice- Quality & Dependable Service.
Call us for your landfsape
778.1345 and hardscape needs.
Licensed & Insured

DESIGN & REMODELING CONTRACTORS

JCOlSTRUCTIOI` -'. '
STATE LICENSED & INSURED (941I 778 OQ9
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED (941) 778-2993j


Residential Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price."
Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Mariao Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
,Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755I

SHUTTER-VUE Inc.
8 WINDOW REPLACEMENT C
0 8799 Cortez Road, Bradenton 745-2363 -
M-F 9am 5pm, Sat by appointment
5 Windows Hurrican Protection Room Enclosures Service


Check IS. O'L 11 Bat wwisa nd 1 ~ I1er]org


E N-JOY | MARIANNE CORRELL
Realtor

CLEANING The Big
Commercial Picture
Residential 1s all
Vacation about
Rentals Real
Estate"
Call Joy
25 Years experience
(941) 812-2485 ( ,






Anyone can take ---
a picture. .
A professional t
creates a portrait. 4;.-.'


44 ELKA -


LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Car Service. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your
computer misbehaving? Certified computer ser-
vice and private lessons. Special $25 per hour-
free advice. 545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great re-
sults, wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough,
reasonable and reliable. Free estimates, licensed
and insured. 778-0944.

KATHY & MIKE'S CLEANING Service: Delivering
a standard of excellence for all your interior and
exterior cleaning needs. No job too big or small.
Great rates and references, 722-4358.

AUTO DETAILING BY HAND Spotless inside and
out. I can save you time and money. Island resi-
dent, references. For pricing call 713-5967.

TANYA WILLIAMS ESTATE & Fine Art Apprais-
als offers professional valuation and inventory
services for your personal property without a
view to buy or sell. Video documentation of your
household or business, fine art and household
content appraisals, consultation services. 355-
8456. www.artappraisals.org

LIKE IT DIRTY? Then don't call me. Clean is my
business! Residential and commercial. En-Joy
Cleaning, (941) 812-2485.

PERSONAL ASSISTANT will take you to appoint-
ments, run errands, watch your home while you're
away, wait for service people while you're at work.
Light cleaning and medical assistance. Call
Sandy, 794-2301 or 920-1364 cell.
RESIDENTIAL HOUSE CLEANING Bi-weekly,
great references. 12 years experience. Insured,
now accepting new clients. Call 792-3772.

EXPERT CLEANING personalized service!
Many excellent references. Call Kris, 750-8366.

HANDYMAN MARINE & EDDIE. Maintenance is-
sues, yards, fencing, painting, reliable, good ref-
erences. 447-2497 or 722-4866.

ISLAND LIMO Airport Transportation: Fast ser-
vice, new vehicles, best prices. Fully permitted at
all airports. Call 779-0043.

HOUSE CLEANING Permanent weekly or bi-
weekly. Experienced, reliable. Call for a free es-
timate and ask for Marieta, 722-4866.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance ser-
vice. Over 30 years experience, self-employed
in construction trades. "I'm handy to have
around." 779-9666.

JACK'S POOL CLEANING: Weekly cleaning and
chemical service. Residential and commercial.
Call 748-2929.

EMBROIDERY: We offer quality embroidered pro-
motional T-shirts, caps and golf shirts. We can
digitize your custom logo for your organization or
business, or help you create one.
www.islandstitch.com or call 778-8338.

MUSIC LESSONS! Flute, saxophone, clarinet.
Beginning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray,
792-0160.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrig-
eration. Commercial and residential service, re-
pair and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County
and the Island since 1987. For dependable, hon-
est and personalized service, call William Eller,
795-7411. RA005052.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 778-2711.


NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing mas-
sage in the comfort of your home. Call today for
an appointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.

PIANO AND KEYBOARD lessons. Call Jack
Elka, 778-2711.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-ser-
vice lawn maintenance, cleanup, tree trim-
ming, hauling, Xeriscape. Island resident. Ex-
cellent references. 778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair.
If it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Se-
nior discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.

KARAZ LANDSCAPE Lawn Service. Mulch,
clean-ups, power washing, tree trimming and
more. Call 779-0851 or cell 448-3857.

ECONOMY CUT lawn service. Professional
lawn care at the kid-next-door prices. Free es-
timates. 778-5294.

WANTED: MONTHLY LAWN maintenance ac-
counts. Please call Wayne at 750-0112 and leave
message.

TROPICAL TROUBLES? Landscape cleaning,
weeding, trimming, general maintenance, after-
storm care, weekly or monthly schedules avail-
able, affordable rate, thorough and dependable.
Call 755-1155.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, haul-
ing, cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 807-
1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and
installation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs
and trees. Irrigation. Everything Under the Sun
Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $30/yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free es-
timates. Call Larry at 795-7775, "shell phone"
720-0770.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL! And when it's not
snowing, I specialize in installing shell and rock
yards, driveways and walkways. Rip-rap, sand
and mulch also delivered and spread. Please call
David Bannigan at 794-6971 or cell at 504-7045.

SANDY'S LAWN SERVICE. Celebrating 20 years
of quality and dependable service. Call us for all
your landscape and hardscape needs 778-1345.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-
rap, mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reli-
able and insured. 727-5066.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodel-
ing contractors. In-house plan designs. State li-
censed and insured. Many Island references.
778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more readers.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free es-
timates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal
at 778-1730.
CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island
service since 1975. Repairs and new construc-
tion. Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now
certifying back flow at water meters.
(FL#RF0038118) 778-3924 or 778-4461.


( PHOTOGRAPHIC
941-778-2711
www.jackelka.com


MALIC LASSO GOOD SNAP
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I.SLANDER CLASSIFIED~j


I








IS ANDERC ASSFIDS
HOEIMRVEET otnud- F RNALSCoTi .e


OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim.
Dan Michael, master carpenter. Call cell 778-6898
or cell, 320-9274.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT Interior/exterior paint-
ing, pressure washing and wallpaper. For prompt,
reliable service at reasonable rates, call Kevin at
704-7115 or 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remod-
eling, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and in-
stalled. Why pay retail? Island resident, many ref-
erences. Free estimates, prompt service. Steve
Allen Floor Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheetrock, popcorn, doors, bi-folds, trim,
moldings kitchen remodeling, general repairs.
Homes, rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Building contractor. New
homes, additions, renovations. Quality work and
fair prices. Call 795-1947. Lic #RR0066450.

MASON: 27 YEARS of experience. All masonry
work and repair. Cinderblock work, brick work,
glass block work, paver and brick driveways. Call
Chris, 795-3034. Lic.#104776. Insured.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR and Lawn Care: Light
carpentry, plumbing, electrical, grass cutting, tree
trimming, light hauling. Call 778-6170. .

ROSCOE'S RENOVATIONS: Tile, wood floors,
drywall, texture, kitchens, bathrooms, paint (inte-
rior/exterior), pressure cleaning. Quality work, fair
price. Call 812-0227 or 812-0454.

RANDY BOYD REMODELING: Framing, drywall,
texturing, knockdown, orange peel, skip trowel.
Call 778-0540 or 320-2506.

MINOR HOME REPAIRS Great rates, references.
Call Rick, 750-8366.

HANDY ANTHONY. Jack of most trades. Home
refurbishing and detailing, 778-6000.

ISLAND HOME REPAIRS: Carpentry, drywall
hanging, texturing, electric plumbing, painting. No
job to small! Ceiling fans, screen repairs. Low
prices. Call 504-2027.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more.
Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a free in-
home consultation. Island references, 15 years ex-
perience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available
now. Beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No pets,
nonsmoking. Priced from $800month, $450/week,
$85/night. 794-5980. www.divefish.com.

RENTALS RENT fast when you advertise in The
Islander.


SUMMER, AUTUMN, WINTER rentals available
weekly, monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Es-
tate Co., 778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across
from beautiful beach, $350 to $450/week. Winter
and spring dates available. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, 778-2374.

ANNUAL RENTALS: Half duplex, 2BR/2BA, new
ceramic floors, $750; 2BR/1BA, stackable
washer/dryer hookup. $725; New tile floors,
stove, refrigerator, 1 BR/1 BA, $650. Dolores M.
Baker Realty, 778-7500.

NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Four spa-
cious 3BR/2BA homes with all conveniences.
Summer rate, $1,200/week. Please call 778-
2541 and leave message or call (813) 752-4235.
E-mail: SeaBreezeNShore@aol.com

CHOICE OF 3 and 5BR houses, all with heated
pools, on the water. Long or short term rentals.
www.hartwellvillas.co.uk or e-mail:
Barbara@ hartwellvillas.co.uk. Call 011-44-1256-
473469.

ANNUAL RENTALS: Brand new beautiful 3BR/
2BA home, two-car garage, minutes to beach,
$1,400/month. Also available 2BR/2BA apart-
ment, short block to beach, $750/month. Both
units, no pets and nonsmoking. Call Fran Maxon
Real Estate, 778-2307 for details.

PERICO ISLAND Brand new 3BR/2BA, two-car
garage. Maintenance-free home. Lakefront, all
appliances, amenities, clubhouse and pool. An-
nual lease. $1,550/month-$1,450/month. Call
798-3885.

$500/WEEK, $1,400/month. 211 72nd St.,
Holmes Beach. 2BR, one block to beach, new
inside, tranquil yard, bikes, fishing poles, grill,
hammock, satellite, complete furnishings. Call
779-9549.

SPACIOUS WATERFRONT, upper, sundeck,
dock. Panoramic view, furnished, Key West-
style. 2BR/2BA, washer/dryer. Pet considered.
794-5980.


ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe on line with our se-
cure server? Check it out at www.islander.org.

HALF-BLOCK TO beach, half-block to bay with
dock. 2BR/2BA furnished condo. Washer/dryer,
sleeps six, covered parking. Short/long-term
lease. (402) 421-1999 or e-mail inquires to
Lindaywilson @earthlink.net.


HOW TO PLACE


THE ISLANDER 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 33
Yodfiieifb called. -
^, YVORNE HIGGINS P.,
41 778-7777' 0051




"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured '*0 ?5 778-3468


Custom Painting
Wallpaper Hanging
Interior/Exterior Design
Pressure Cleaning
Call Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed & Insured


"'Tile Installations by Cliff Streppone
(941) 5874i'",9
Beautiful floors and wallslrevey room.
S LICENSED & INS lJ --.53 -


Gulf Coast i Rm aers, LLC
Shopping Pel Silting Seaeliil Serviceso Courier
www.gulfcot .mkien .com



Reach more than 20,000 people
weekly with your ad -
for as little as $20.00!
Call Rebecca or Nancy 778-7978

The Islander


J.A.T. HANDYMAN
SERVICES
Home Remodeling
Kitchens &BOathe
/ F[Painting
Power washing
Roof Repaires & more
Island Residents Doing a
Nice Job at a Fair Price
(941) 705-0528
-enior8Ciizn 9i -, 9


NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
S RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL | A.
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES 2003 Reader's
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING Preference Winner
BACK FLOW DIVISION


A CLASSIFIED AD


DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be paid in advance.
We accept ads by fax with credit card information, 778-9392, at our Web site (secure server) www.islander.org, and by
direct e-mail at classifieds@islander.org. Office hours: 9 to 5, Monday-Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are sorry,
but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, lease
be prepared to FAX or e-mail your copy with your credit card information. (see below)
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.


2
3

Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash _
For credit card payment: U '- J No. _
Exp. Date Name shown on card: _
Billing address zip code: House no. or post office box no. on bill
E-Mail address: [for renewal pur es only]
The Islander ...Fax: 9 778-9 92
5404 Marina Drive ThIe Islan der Phone: 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 34217 T e sm der, E-mail classified ander.org
-Lot- - - sea-c - - - -- I


50% OFF
Frame with
Framing Order
Lees Fnv
747-7534
2931 Manatee Ave. W
INexd loFoodway.luinor :ir


--


I-W5


I----






PAGE 34 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 U THE ISLANDER


FURNISHED 2BR/2BA. Spectacular sunrise view
in Holmes Beach with dock. September-Novem-
ber, $800/month, plus electric and phone. (941)
224-6521 or (970) 879-5531.

WATERVIEW! Perico Bay Club. 2BR/2BA luxury
condo in gated community. Turnkey, pool, Jacuzzi,
tennis. Nonsmoking. Seasonal, $2,600/month,
plus tax and cleaning. 778-3320.

1BR UNFURNISHED annual lease Holmes
Beach. Two blocks to beach. $575/month. Call
(727) 461-3384 or (727) 656-3384.

HOLMES BEACH Steps to Gulf, 2BR/1BA, an-
nual, washer/dryer, screened lanai. $795. First,
last, security. Call 778-5412 or (585)473-9361.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1 BA, large decks, cathe-
dral ceilings, lush landscaping. One block to
beach, clean, very nice, washer/dryer. Bradenton
Beach, $950/month. Call 779-0121.

TURNKEY FURNISHED 2BR/2BA condo with ga-
rage. Perico Bay Club, seasonal or annual. Gated
community, pool/spa. Call 761-3788.

HOLMES BEACH Clean 2BR home with Gulf
views. 50 yards to beach. Annual rental, no pets,
nonsmoking, good credit. $975/month. 3103-A Av-
enue F. Call (800) 894-1950.

LOOKING FOR A GOOD DEAL? You can read
Wednesday's classified at noon on Tuesday at
www.islander.org. And it's FREE!

LONGBOAT KEY Annual, unfurnished, 1BR/
1 BA, $600/month, includes water. Furnished ef-
ficiency available now, $585/month, includes
water, bayside, beach access, shopping, restau-
rants, quiet area, first, last. $250 security. No
pets. Call 387-9252.


U~.1


ANNUAL RENTALS: 103 23rd St., Bradenton
Beach, 2BR/1.5BA cottage,, furnished, $900/
month; Longboat Key 2BR/2BA condo,
waterview, $1,700/month; 208 64th St., 2BR/
2BA duplex, garage, $1,150/month. Call
SunCoast Real Estate, 779-0202.

LONGBOAT KEY furnished 2BR/2BA. Annual
lease. Pool, beach access. Call 383-3151.

VACATION RENTAL Charming 1 BR/1 BA, fully fur-
nished, across from white sandy beach. Call (941)
809-3714.

SEASONAL RENTAL: Holmes Beach canalfront,
2BR/2BA, completely furnished, newly renovated,
two-car garage, laundry, dock, walk-in closets.
$2,200/month. Call (813) 684-3319.

SEASONAL RENTALS: Holmes Beach furnished
1BR/1BA or 2BR/2BA condos. Walk to beach,
washer/dryer, covered parking. From $1,000/
month. Call (407) 846-8741.

GULFFRONT AND BAYFRONT condos, 3BR/2BA
and 2BR/2BA. Great location, pool, tennis, special
owner discounts, weekly and seasonal. Call (901)
301-8299 or e-mail: captko452@aol.com.

150 STEPS to Gulf. Seasonal, immaculate 2BR/
2BA ground-level home. Nonsmoking, no pets.
Call (813) 961-6992, or e-mail:
ghowcrof@tampabay.rr.com.

SMUGGLER'S LANDING: 3BR/3BA luxury
townhouse available for annual lease. Near pool
and workout room. 40-foot deep-water dock with
boat slip. Near Anna Maria Island. Just five min-
utes to Gulf beaches. Call Jim LaRose, A Paradise
Realty, 729-2381.

RENTALS RENT FAST in The Islander.


3001 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
941-778-6849
Toll Free: 1-800-778-9599


BRADENTON BEACH DUPLEX. Direct Gulfview.
2BR/2BA on both floors, 1000 sq. ft. each. Two car
garage with a great rental history. $848,000.
Call Ted Schlegel at 778-6849 or 518-6117


DEAD-ON GULFVIEW, RIGHT ON SAND in TWO BALCONIES FOR VIEWS OF THE ACROSS FROM ANNA MARIA CITY PIER
complex that has it all a beachfront heated GULF AND BAY! 2BR/2BA Bay Watch condo. This 2BR/1BA canal view unit with boat dock
pool, recently refurbished and proximity to Top floor unit has great views and brightness, is in The Bayou, the only condo complex in
shops, restaurants and transportation. Popu- Complex has 16 well maintained units on the Anna Maria City. Rare opportunity to live in
lar rental. Great price at $539,000. Call Dave bay with heated pool. $359,000. Call Dave this upscale, quiet and desirable area. Call
Jones at 778-4800. Vande Verde at 725-4800. Quentin Talbert at 778-4800 or 704-9680.


|_- I M ,, .II ... .
ISLAND'S BEST BEACH is steps away! This ISLAND STYLE TURNKEY FURNISHED
2BR/2BA remodeled house features new ce- ONLY $259KI 2BR/2BA Sunbow Bay condo
ramic tile throughout and a new kitchen with near beach. Complex has great amenities. El-
natural maple cabinets. Nestled in a quiet evator, heated pool and tennis courts.
neighborhood. Large yard, room for a pool. $259,000. Call Jane Grossman or Nicole
$407,000. Call Dennis Rauschl at 725-3934. Skaggs at 778-4800 or 795-5704.


WESTBAY POINT AND MOORINGS Up-
stairs 2BR/2BA end unit. Move right in. Par-
tial Bay and greenbelt view from glassed in
lanai. Perfetly maintained grounds. On-site
management and staff. $298,000. Call Dave
Jones and Dick Maher at 778-4800.


KEY ROYALE BEAUTIFUL canalfront home
2BR/2BA, tropical pool area with hot tub, dock
with two boat lifts, completely updated. Now
through September, 2003, $2,100/month. Previ-
ous deal for 2004 fell through! January-April,
2004, $3,500/month. Unit #: 27150.
www.vrbo.com. 730-1086.

CONDO FOR RENT or sale. Turnkey Holmes
Beach, 2BR/2BA, two pools, tennis, one block to
beach. Principals only. Call 756-0132.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1 BR/1 BA or 2BR/1 BA with pool. Walk to beach,
shopping and restaurants. 778-3875.

CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!

SEASONAL RENTALS. Perico Bay Club, 2BR/
2BA off-season rentals now $1,100/month; 2004
season, $2,500/month. Book now! Longboat
Key, north-end 2BR/1 BA village house for 2004
season, $2,300/month. Real Estate Mart,
756-1090.

AUGUST SPECIAL! Steps to beach, spacious,
fully furnished, 1 BR apartment, Anna Maria Island,
cable television, washer/dryer, phone, only $425/
week. Call 778-1098 or 330-2411.

LONGBOAT KEY Village home. 3BR/1BA free-
standing. Large two-car garage. Updated, new
roof and air conditioning. $409,000. Real Estate
Mart, 756-1090.

VACATION GULFFRONT APARTMENTS Large
2BR tropical furnished interiors, porches,
sundecks, immaculate. Convenient, Anna Maria,
no pets, owner. Call 778-3143.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA house in Holmes Beach on ca-
nal. $1,400/month. Partially furnished. Call Smith
Realtors, 778-0770.


BEST VALUE ON PERICO ISLAND!

S3BR/2BA home, high
-. ceilings, brand new
tile throughout, two-
S' car garage, glassed-
in lanai, private set-
ting. $319,000.


Call Sue Carlson
[941] 779-0733

413 Pine Ave. Anna Maria






$499,000- WATERFRONT LIVING
Key West style, elevated pool
home on deep water canal in Fla-
mingo Cay with direct access to
S intercoastal. Split bedrooms, tile
... floors, updated kitchen. IB94587
He ------------------II Im i I
$599,000 ISLAND FOURPLEX
Excellent investment for this well-
maintained island fourplex! Only a
half of a block to the Bay and three
blocks to the Gulf. Each unit has
central heat & air, refrigerator and
range and its own electric meter.
IB93309.

$425,000 BUILD YOUR ISLAND DREAM HOME
Looking for a place to build your home? Here is one
of the few canalfront lots available in Holmes Beach!
No bridges to Tampa Bay and the Gulf. IB90367.
6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.cbflorida.com


S(LAND- 111.
VACATION " PROPERTIES, LLC


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


LOT Prime buildable lot in very desir-
able area of Anna Maria City on Pine
Avenue. Zoned for residential/office/re-
tail. Owner financing available.
$275,000. Call Susan Hatch, Realtor
778-7616 eves.


p B h0
[smimtr


I I -PII


I"






THE ISLANDER M AUGUST 13, 2003 0 PAGE 35

IA D


COMMERCIAL LEASE: Prime commercially
zoned space on Anna Maria Island located on a
major artery. Great visibility. Approximately
2,800 sq.ft. Attractive building fronting on two
streets. Excellent parking. For information call
owner/Realtor, 745-0959 or 794-8991.

ANNUAL 1 BR/1 BA duplex in Holmes Beach. Close
to beach. $650/month, unfurnished. Call Smith Re-
altors, 778-0770.

ANNUAL EFFICIENCY furnished, half block to
beach. $500/month. Call Joan Zak, T. Dolly Young
Real Estate, 778-0807.

AVAILABLE NOW 2BR/2BA bayview condo near
Publix, public beach. Unfurnished, Old Florida Realty,
778-3377.

CASTLE ON BEACH Avenue in Anna Maria. Re-
stored 1924 French Normandy 4BR/3BA house.
Quiet street, walk to beach. $850/week, $2,800/
month. Call 794-8202.

VACATION & SEASONAL Private beach, some lo-
cations. Units are complete. Rates seasonally ad-
justed. $375-$775/week, $975-$2,275/month. (800)
977-0803 or 737-1121. www.abeachview.com.

ANNUAL RENTAL: 1 BR/1 BA canal/dock. $795/
month. 387-0990.


LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty park-
ing spaces, contemporary design, great visibility. $14/
square foot. Can divide. Owner/Realtor, 388-5514, or
call 809-4253.


NORTHWEST BRADENTON Executive 4BR/2.5BA
pool home. Many deluxe features. Dual fireplace, eat-
in kitchen, large family room, formal dining room,
circle drive, immediate occupancy. $349,000. Carol
R. Williams, C & C Real Estate, 744-0700.

BEAUTIFUL CANALFRONT home, spacious deck,
dock with boat lift. 3BR/3BA, den, upper master
with adjoining room. $775,000. 520 56th St.,
Holmes Beach. 778-6063.

GULF WATCH: Gorgeous 2BR/2BA turnkey fur-
nished unit with Gulf views.$419,900. Weekly rent-
als OK. www.Latitude27Realty.net or 744-2727.

PERICO BAY CLUB Charming 2BR/2BA lakefront
Spoonbill Court home. Two-car garage on rarely
available 16-unit cul-de-sac location. Steps to pool.
Call for additional information and price. Shown by
appointment only. No brokers please. Call 795-1151.

MORE FOR THE MONEY. Northwest Bradenton.
4BR/2BA, two-car garage. Caged pool and spa.
Beautiful panoramic view on lakeside lot. Updated,
clean and nice. Cathedral ceilings. Minutes to Gulf
beaches. $320,000. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.

PRIME LOCATION near Cortez and Anna Maria Is-
land. Large lot, screened lanai, Jacuzzi, garage, 2BR/
2BA, beautiful trees. For sale by owner at $169,000.
For this valuable property, call 795-5241.


REAL SATECotiue

NORTHWEST BRADENTON Hawthorn Park,
4BR/3BA, pool and spa, outdoor kitchen, too many
amenities to list. Model condition. $394,500.
Owner/broker, 795-2623.

DUPLEX FOR SALE one-half recently renovated.
Enjoy the tax benefits of a rental without the
hassle. $50,000-plus income per year. Call Tom at
726-1898.

2BR/2BA LAKEFRONT CONDO in
Meadowcroft. All updates, enclosed lanai. Con-
tact Dan at 518-9303.

WATERFRONT LIVING: Great views from all liv-
ing areas. Updated 1 BR/1 BA Mt. Vernon condo.
Age restricted. Call Anne Huber, Rawlings Real
Estate, 752-7770 or 713-9835.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Aug. 17. 11AM-4PM.
2918 Avenue C, Holmes Beach. Mint condition
2BR/2BA elevated home. Only two blocks to
beach. $379,000. For sale by owner, 545-8716.


DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wednesday
publication. UP to 3 line minimum includes ap-
proximately 21 words $9. Additional lines $3
each. Box: $3. Ads must be paid in advance.
Classified ads may be submitted through our
secure Web site: www.islander.org, or stop by or


SPACIOUS 1 BR/2BA condo on prestigious mail to 5404 Marina Drive, Holme
Longboat Key. Light and bright turnkey furnishings. 34217. We're located next to Ooh I
Excellent investment in very rental-friendly tennis Island Shopping Center. More
resort. Don't miss this one, won't last at $239,000. 778-7978.
Call Nicole Skaggs or Jane Grossman at A Para- CHECK US OUT: www.islander.org
dise Realty, 778-4800. CHECK US OUT: www.islander.org


es Beach FL
La La! in the
information:


SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Ave., Anna Maria FL 34216 PO Box 2150 (941) 778-2291
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


Impeccable Key West-Style Hideaway


Just Listedl


This charming 3BR/3BA home is tucked away on the tranquil north
end of Anna Maria on a lushly landscaped, oversized lot within easy
walking distance of both the bay and the Gulf! Amenities of this in-
viting residence include high, textured ceilings with fans, ceramic
tile floors, many French doors with fanlight windows above and de-
lightful custom wall and window coverings. There are three
screened porches plus several shady verandas, perfect for catching
the Gulf breezes and glimpses of Tampa Bay! The spacious, fully
equipped kitchen features white cabinetry with whimsical seashell
pulls, and the elevated master suite includes a sumptuous bathroom
with oval soaking tub, separate shower and his-and-hers vanities.
An automatic sprinkler system waters the beautifully landscaped
grounds, which feature several travelers palms, queen and Christ-
mas palms, citrus trees, buttonwoods, jasmine and mandevilla.
There is a fully enclosed outdoor shower plus parking for an RV or
boat. Vinyl siding makes maintenance a breeze! Come enjoy the
carefree Island style! Priced at $795,000.
( VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com






PAGE 36 0 AUGUST 13, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


CATCH- ALL
By Jim Page / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 Like the acid in apples
6 Neckline?
11 Deserving a thumbs-up
15 Certain cookie
19 Idealized view of a
parent, say, in psychol-
ogy
20 Oil-well capper Red__
21 Morales of "La Bamba"
22 What an imp never
wears
23 chairman
24 Hero after whom eight
U.S. counties are named
25 __ the Great, juvenile
detective
26 Ties around the middle
27 "The nerve!"
29 High-level course
planners?
32 General assembly?
36 Alice who won an Emmy
for "Bewitched"
37 Waggle dancer
38 Nutritional info
40 Trinity component
41 Dramatist Fugard
45 William Kennedy
Pulitzer-winning novel
48 Coin with the image of
St. George the Warrior
53 Servant
55 Take care of
57 Prefix with lateral
58 East Indian sailors
59 Sulphur Island, for short
60 Makes flush
61 Dilutes
62 One attacking a colony,
maybe
67 Taliban mullah and
others
68 Metric liquid meas.
69 It may have big ears
70 Mine


71 Swiped a mink?
73 English court
74 Port in the Punic Wars
76 Kind of probe
77 Feel queasy, e.g.
78 Dwellers along the Bay
of Biscay
80 Encourage, in a way
81 1904 Olympics site
85 Thief
86 Superlatively festive
88 Envelope stuffer
90 Lies
91 Meyers of "Kate & Allie"
93 Los Angeles suburb
next to Torrance
95 Get battle-ready
98 "You __!"
101 One who can't cope
106 A small price to pay
109 Like many fish and
mountains
110 All over the media
111 __ so'i (at home): Fr.
112 "Alice" director, 1990
116 Zoo critter
117 List part
118 On earth
119 Satisfy, in a way
120 Blockheaded
121 Like some football
passes
122 Flanders river
123 Overblown
124 Some curlicue parts

Down
1 Take off on
2 Company named after
its hometown
3 Put on
4 at the office"
5 Rival of Ajax
6 The Clintons' Buddy,
e.g.
7 Flap


8 __Tiago (one of the
Cape Verde islands)
9 Old jug
10 Certain cookie
11 Rap or country
12 Noted cave-dweller,
informally
13 "Colorado Serenade"
and others
14 "Just for the taste of it"
sloganeer
15 "Git!"
16 Bigwig
17 Correspondently
18 It might be mounted in
the West
28 Widescreen choice
30 In turmoil
31 Recent: Prefix
33 Jumbles
34 One of the Kennedy
clan
35 __ Tour
39 Milk supplier
41 Sports org. with the
Calder Cup
42 Just so
43 Counterpart of a
speaking fee?
44 Swing
46 Daily V.I.P.
47 Woman's marriage gift:
Var.
49 Tavern owner, e.g.
50 Algebra work
51 Stage assistant
52 Rodin sculpture, with
"The"
54 Abbr. in real estate ads
56 Norse goddess of fate
60 It's classified
62 For a bit
63 Kevin of "S.N.L." fame
64 Toe count
65 Hidden element in this
puzzle's theme


66 It gets to the point
quickly
69 "Git!"
71 Refuse to get rid of
72 Band member
74 Two-time Art Ross
Trophy winner
75 Turn profit
78 One Israel party
leader
79 Yearbook inkers:
Abbr.
81 Elastic
82 Bruin athlete
83 Pier grp.
84 Salt pork
85 Digital-display types


87 Kemo __
89 White stuff, in
Dundee
92 They're produced by
hives
94 Cayes, Haiti
95 Greenfly, e.g.
96 Way to go
97 John D. MacDonald
sleuth Travis __
99 Like une amie
100 Stereotypical
fraternity member
102 Troubles
103 Philosopher Watts
and others
104 Pick up


105 Head starts
107 Shawn of the N.B.A.
108 Band-Aid site
113 Baby seat?
114 Just make, with
"out"
115 Nascar racer Jarrett

Answers to this puzzle
are located in this
edition of the The
Islander.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


iGNe.co REALTY

email: ami@wagnerrealty.com website: wagnerrealty.com


2217 GULF DR. N.
BRADENTON BEACH
(941) 778-2246

(800) 211-2323


BRADENTON BEACH BAYFRONT
4BR/2BA home on 2 lots with fantastic
views of bay. Stone fireplace, hardwood
floors, open beamed ceilings. Block to
beach and Gulf. Cathy Meldahl, 383-
5577. #238933. $1,200,000


ISLAND DUPLEX IN BRADENTON
BEACH Best priced Island duplex, 1BR/
1 BA each side, vaulted ceilings, Terrazzo
floors. Short distance to beach. Tenants
in place. Dave Moynihan, 778-2246.
#92955. $275,000


-IC


ANNA MARIA BAY FRONT Lush tropi-
cal bayfront setting with 3BR/2BA older
home on a large 75 by 198-ft. lot with
deep water dockage. Short distance to
beach. Remodel or build new. Dave
Moynihan, 778-2246. #93749. $945,000


JEW FISH KEY ISLAND Custom el-
evated 2BR/3BA with a special ambi-
ance. Secluded, private with views of
Sarasota Bay. Great room, 22x18', din-
ing room, game room, boat dock. Anne
Miller 778-2246. #88820. $1,775,000


TOTALLY RENOVATED Impeccable
3BR/2BA residence and only one block to
beach. Improvements include new roof,
A/C, windows, doors, electric, Mexican
tile and more. Dave Moynihan, 778-2246.
#90350. $389,900










5 LAKES VILLA Outstanding attention to
detail, cathedral ceilings, split floor plan,
enclosed A/C lanai. Offered turnkey fur-
nished. Secure storage for RV $100/yr.
Elfi Starrett or Becky Smith, 778-2246.
#92423. $149,000


BAYSIDE CONDOMINIUMS THE HIBISCUS
Four Mediterranean-style condos under construction!
Located bayside w/boat dock, and near the beach,
two units per building with private elevators, marble
or wood floors, granite countertops, two car garage,
brick paved gated driveways & bayside pool.
779-2700. #94176 Starting at $795,000.





4: HISTORIC CORTEZ VILLAGE
2BR/2BA + den. Great home, won-
derful location! Close to the fishing
:. -' docks, with many other local attrac-
._. tions. Available for the summer.

1BR/1BA condo in Bradenton Beach. 55+ com-
munity. $700/month.

2BR/2BA Duplex in Holmes Beach. Close to ev-
erything. $675/month.

2BR/1BA duplex in Holmes Beach. Great loca-
tion! $775/month.


L AL


.1


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