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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( May 28, 2003 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 28, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01004

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 28, 2003

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:01004

Full Text



Skimming the news ... Anna Maria Island map in this edition, page 16.


TAnnaMaria


Islander


Basketball moves, page 24.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 11, No. 29 May 28, 2003 FREE


Fireworks expected at CVB meeting Thursday


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Bradenton Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
Director Larry White can expect some unhappy camp-
ers when he meets with Island tourist accommodation
representatives at 10 a.m. May 30 at the Bridgewalk
Resort in Bradenton Beach for review of the CVB's
draft marketing plan for 2004.
That's because White has announced that the
CVB's proposed 2003-04 budget represents a 28.7
percent decrease from last year's spending. Unless the
tourist accommodation tax of 3 percent is increased,


White said funding for some CVB programs will be cut
(The Islander, May 21).
Island and Longboat Key accommodation opera-
tors in Manatee County have already expressed con-
cern about any tax increase and many believe they're
not getting their fair share of return on the revenues,
despite generating nearly 80 percent of those taxes.
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce Trea-
surer Dennis Rauschl said the chamber's board is
"strongly opposed to any increase in resort taxes. In
fact, we believe that a good stimulus to our economy
would be a reduction in the tax."


Full house of mayors
The Bradenton Beach Golden Jubilee drew mayors and guests to honor the 50th anniversary of the city last
Wednesday. Pictured are current and former mayors, from left, Gail Cole, Leroy Arnold, Connie Drescher,
John Chappie, Katie Pierola, Barbara Turner and Billie Martini whose husband, Robert, was the city's mayor
from 1955-57. For more pictures, see inside. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson



Anna Maria parking battle,


er, discussion, tonight


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
What's new in the Anna Maria parking game?
Another city commission meeting on parking may
not be new, but there's one tonight, May 28, with the
first pitch scheduled for 7 p.m.
With another battle among all the factions in the
nearly 80-year-old Anna Maria parking issue expected
- again sentiment could be growing among at least
a few commissioners to discuss the possibility of a
citywide referendum on parking to solve the issue.
The commission is expected to deal tonight with
two possible plans resident only parking, or parking
by permit and took heat from some members of the
public at its May 21 regular meeting for not consider-
ing the alternate-street/alternate-side plan as suggested
by Mayor SueLynn at the May 8 meeting on parking.
"Why did you refuse to consider the alternate
[street] parking plan?" asked Carol Ann Magill of the


commission.
With either resident-only or parking by permit,
commissioners are "giving a black eye to this commu-
nity and it is totally reprehensible. I suggest you think
long and hard before you vote," Magill said.
Not so fast, said Commissioner Duke Miller, a pro-
ponent of permit parking.
Alternate-street parking has been considered on at
least three separate occasions by the commission, but
a motion to include that idea as a solution failed at the
May 8 meeting for lack of a second, he said.
Not one person who lives along a beach-access
road has said they don't want the city to protect them
from the mass of traffic that descends along their streets
on holidays and weekends, Miller noted.
Magill disagreed, saying Elizabeth and Gene Moss
are not opposed to public parking where they live at the
PLEASE SEE BATTLE, NEXT PAGE


Rauschl, who owns the Anna Maria Beach Place
accommodations in Holmes Beach, said many innkeep-
ers are "barely hanging on because rental prices have
not kept up with the appreciated property and operat-
ing costs."
Any increase in the resort tax could cause a loss of
business that might "put some over the edge," he said.
Too much of the CVB budget goes toward main-
land projects, said Rauschl, and not enough ends up on
the Island.
PLEASE SEE TOURISM, PAGE 4



Anna Maria


Bridge repairs


finally start
Long-awaited repairs to the Anna Maria Bridge
have begun and the work should last a month or so.
Florida Department of Transportation spokes-
woman Maryemma Bachelder said work crews with
CEM Enterprises Inc. began work May 27 on the 46-
year-old bridge linking Holmes Beach with Perico Is-
land at Manatee Avenue.
The initial phase of the project will be to replace 19
pile jackets on the bridge's pilings at a cost of more
than $231,000.
"Initially, all work will be performed from the
water, with no impact to traffic," Bachelder said. "As
work progresses, daytime lane closures will be re-
quired. Flaggers will direct traffic through the area
during those times. Traffic will not be shut down com-
pletely, but motorists should expect delays due to the
one-lane traffic across the bridge. Lane closure hours
will be restricted to minimize impacts to traffic, and no
lane closures will be permitted on the weekends."
DOT officials will spend about $7.2 million to re-
pair the bridge, giving it an estimated "life expectancy"
of another 10 years. The current project is the first
phase; the remainder of the electrical and mechanical
work has not been scheduled, according to Bachelder.



Happenings

Thank you Snooks Adams
It's called Kids Day, but the free kids event
at Anna Maria Bayfront Park Saturday should be
Snooks Adams appreciation day, for he's the
man responsible for what has become the signal
of school's end, summer's beginning and a fun
time every year for three generations and nearly
50 years on Anna Maria Island.
The event is sponsored by the Anna Maria
Island Privateers and goes from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., although look for a short visit from "himself"
around 11.
Author Randy Wayne White will be on the
Island for a luncheon/book signing at Ooh La La!
Bistro, and although it is sold out, co-sponsors
Circle Books and The Islander will have signed
editions of White's books at the newspaper office
for purchase from 1 to 3 p.m.
More inside ...


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I; hi C1C~E~de c~L '~SEc~e"ZrP-~P-l~ss~wa~-r srm~ll~U~C IIIL~





PAGE 2 E MAY 28, 2003 M.THE ISLANDER


Parking players


scorecard
It could be difficult to identify all the players in the
Anna Maria parking game without a scorecard at the
meeting tonight.
The lineup:
1. Residents at the south end of Bay Boulevard
want a turnaround and enforcement of no parking on
the right of way in their area.
2. Residents on Fern Street want the city to elimi-
nate parking on the right of way in their area.
3. Residents across from Bayfront Park want the
city to eliminate parking in front of their homes and fix
up the parking lot at the park with clearly identifiable
spaces.
4. Business owners want more public parking and
most are opposed to permit or resident-only parking.
5. Residents on most beach-access streets don't
want any public parking on their streets.
6. Some residents living near the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center want no parking in front of
their homes, but pledge support for the Center.
7. Residents along North Shore Drive and some
adjacent sides streets already have "No Parking" signs,
although many of these signs, if not all, were never
established by ordinance. Previous city administrations
reportedly just handed out the "No Parking" signs to
the loudest complainer.
8. Some residents living on streets in the city's in-
terior want the city to have parking on beach-access
roads for residents only.
9. Some residents living on streets in the city's in-
terior want parking on beach-access roads for every-
one, some want it for just a few.
10. Some residents support permit parking, others
do not.
11. Some residents support resident-only parking,
others do not.
12. Some residents support alternate-street parking.
13. Some residents want compromise on the issue,
others are totally against any compromise. -


Cars gone wild
Parking at Bayfront Park, particularly on holidays and weekends, is just one of the problem areas faced by the
Anna Maria City Commission in attempting to solve the city's parking woes. The above photo was taken


Memorial Day, May 26. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin

Battle for parking continues
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
end of Willow Street.
"Well, if public parking were allowed on your
street, you'd be the first in here screaming," countered
Miller.
"I'm confused," said city resident Dale Powers.
"The proposed parking plans don't seem to be very
friendly. They don't go along with us being a friendly
beach community" as outlined in the recently com-
pleted city visioning statement.
"Very unfriendly," said Shirley O'Day.
"And I'm dismayed," said Ellen Trudelle. "The
city will learn from its mistake," if it passes either sug-
gestion.
With such a divisive issue and a number of special
interest groups each advocating its own version of a
city parking solution, "no one is going to get everything
they want," SueLynn has said. "We need to compro-


mise."
But even with compromise, any parking solution is
likely to leave a bitter taste in someone's mouth.
That's why the mayor, although she no longer has
a vote on the commission, wouldn't mind at least dis-
cussing the idea of putting the issue to the voters on a
referendum.
"I've thought about it before," she said. "It came
up once with the commission and was put down. But I
think it's an idea worthy of more discussion."
"I would discuss a referendum," said Commis-
sioner Linda Cramer. "Maybe we should let the voters
decide. That's how a democracy works."
Commission Chairperson John Quam, who sets the
agenda for the commission, said a referendum may be
a good idea for at least discussion purposes.
Not so with Commissioner Duke Miller.
"It's not something I would propose. We've all
been elected to make decisions. We can make this de-
cision."


Looking for fine


dining, intimate


atmosphere?





A European
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You'll love our pan-seared "cowboy" veal chop
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a porcini wild mushroom sauce. Mmmm.
It's your choice
from 17 dinner
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BRUNCH AND LUNCH Wednesday-Saturday 11-2:30
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Island Shopping Center ~ 5406 Marina Drive ~ Holmes Beach
941 778 5320


ISLAND-WIDE SAFETY SURVEY

During the past several weeks, this
storm drain educational brochure
\ f- has been in distribution on the
entire Island. It's purpose is to
S provide residents with vital
information about our critical
drainage problems and what
we can do to help protect
our persons and property in
\ t. ".serious storms.



We now need your cooperation in the "evaluative" phase of this
project. Please, simply fill out the following questionnaire, along
with your comments and drop it off or mail it to The Islander news-
paper in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach 34217. Thank You.

1. Have you seen and read any of this brochure?
2. Did the brochure increase your awareness of the causes of
our drainage problems?
3. Did you learn about anything you can do to lessen the
severity of flooding during and after major storms?
4. Would you be interested in participation in future projects
such at this?

Name:
Address:
Phone:

Holmes Beach Civic Association





THE ISLANDER M MAY 28, 2003 W PAGE 3


A night at the opera, Cortez village style


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
It was an evening full of villains, tragedies and ex-
aggerations.
No, it wasn't an Italian opera.
It was an impassioned town hall meeting, filled
with Cortezians both shouting and listening intently as
developer Piero Rivolta and his cadre of consultants
tried to persuade residents that their plans for a 20-
room boatel will complement Cortez's historic fishing
community.
"We called this meeting to tell you what we wish
to do with our property," Rivolta told scores of resi-
dents, crammed in a small meeting room at the Cortez
Community Center Wednesday night, May 21.
In what became a contentious and spirited discus-
sion by the attendees, Rivolta calmly told the disrup-
tive crowd why he wished to build on the site of the
former Sigma fish house, which he bought in 1999.
"We think that property is very unique and a lovely
place," Rivolta said. "We changed our theme of the
project, since the last time we were here."
Two years ago, Rivolta sought the support of the
villagers when he brought colorful drawings of a pro-
posed project to build eight waterfront cottages.
Cortezians hooted at Emily Anne Smith, of the
Bradenton Beach architectural firm of Eatman &
Smith, ridiculing the alien-looking renderings of her
"Gucci" gingerbread architecture, a style that has be-
come so omnipotent on Anna Maria Island.
"The last time we were here, we rapidly realized
the style of this place, and that .is why we hired a new
architect, Linda Stevenson," said Rivolta in his brief
welcoming remarks.
As he spoke, more residents were arriving and the
audience swelled to more than 80, eager to hear and see
Rivolto's image of his portion of Cortez.
"We tried very hard to meet the standards and the
quality of the community," said Stevenson, explaining
her role in the designing of the project. "This architec-
tural style is compatible with historic Cortez."
In Cortez, where kids and dogs run free and help is a
shout away, any change to some is abomination. It threat-
ens the very fibre of the village. Many residents are proud
Cortez is derided by outsiders as a anachronism and
they're willing to fight to preserve that epithet.
Rivolta's son, Renzo, who is heading up the Cortez
project, elaborated on why he believes the new plans
are more in keeping with the culture of the village.
"We spent a lot of time respecting and studying the
historic aspect of this community," Renzo told the
crowd.
"And this project will bring in jobs for you."
James "Wyre" Lee, a Cortez commercial fisher-
man, asked,"What about the waterway channels? Will
they be opened?"
Renzo answered by saying his family "supports the
dredging of the channel. It's to our benefit as well as
yours."
Cortezian Ray Pringle strongly attacked Rivolta's
new proposal. "Your plans are not in conformity with
the town's vision plan," Pringle said. "I totally disagree
with your project for our town. Your plans are not go-
ing to make or break our village."
Two years ago, Pringle argued against Rivolta's


Suspect arrested in

Holmes Beach burglaries
Holmes Beach Police arrested a homeless
man May 21 on a charge of burglary and con-
sider him a prime suspect in a number of recent
burglaries around the Island.
Lt. Dale Stephenson of the HBPD said
David Wayne White, 43, with no known ad-
dress, was arrested around noon May 21 in the
200 block of 36th Street after officers, re-
sponded to a report of a possible burglary in
progress.
White was charged with burglary and
armed burglary and taken to the Manatee
County Jail, Stephenson said.
"We are also investigating him as a suspect
for other burglaries along the beach," he said.
White has apparently been homeless for the
past few months, Stephenson said.


New plan
Piero Rivolta explains his newest plan bfor Cortez at a packed community meeting. Islander Photo: Joe Kane


first plan and attacked it as a violation of the town's
vision plan. He said that by trying to change that plan
"you're bringing in the devil."
And in Cortez, there is no more sacred text aside
from the Bible than the Village's 2000 Vision Plan.
After spending more than a year and a half of studying
survey responses from more than 75 percent of the vil-
lage residents, the Cortez Waterfronts of Florida Com-
mittee wrote a vision plan which sought to preserve the
flavor of Cortez's historic fishing village.
However, the vision plan, or guiding document, is
merely a wishbook, and Manatee County commission-
ers have yet to approve land-use regulations or amend
its comprehensive plant to protect the village from
multi-family homes and raised boat-storage facilities.
Artist resident Linda Molto, throughout the tem-
pestuous meeting, relentlessly challenged the sugges-
tions by the developer, the project's proponents and
county officials for offering possible changes to the
vision plan. "We have a vision plan and we should live
with it," Molto said.
Village activist Laura Gray stood up and reminded
everyone of the vision plan's importance.
"All the residents had an input on the vision plan,
and it's not fair to dismiss it," urged Gray. "This is no
place for you to develop. You have plenty of resources
to go elsewhere, instead of this little historic village."
Taken aback by the withering attack, Piero im-
plored residents to try to understand what he wanted to
do in their village.
.. "We like this place," he implored.
_Murmurings of "let the man talk" drifted through
the roorn, as chairs stirred and the relentless jabs con-
tinued.
"Tell us what you want," beseeched Rivolta.
Born and raised in Cortez, Patty Banyas said she
supports what Rivolta is trying to do in the village."I
like his proposal because it conforms to Cortez,"
Banyas said later. "Some of the people think this is a
good project. It upsets me when some people say
'Cortez does not want this.'"
Equally enthusiastic toward Rivolta's plan was
"Plum" Taylor, a long-time Cortez resident. "I like
what they are doing," she said. "I like not having a lot
of big yachts docked there."
Sitting in the back of the room was a row of Mana-
tee County planning officials, witnessing Cortez's fi-
ery independence and struggling to understand the
needs of the residents as well as the developer.
Manatee County Planner Bob Peterson reminded
the crowd that the Rivolta proposal must receive for-
mal approval from his department when hearings,
scheduled to be held in August, are held.
Peterson also wanted to dispel any notion the
county had any influence in drawing up Rivolta's new
proposal.
"This proposal is strictly Mr. Rivolta's and his
agent," cautioned Peterson. "The county is not advo-
cating this proposal. We deliberately don't make rec-
ommendations until after these neighborhood meet-
ings."
Just as the meeting was adjourning, Manatee
County Commissioner Jane von Hahmann, also a
Cortez resident, walked into the room and was imme-
diately asked why she was not present for the Rivolta
presentation. "The county attorney told me it was ille-


gal for me to attend," she quickly replied.
According to Tedd Williams, Manatee County at-
torney, von Hahmann correctly did not attend the meet-
ing, because the future of the project will eventually be
decided by the county commissioners.
"The board of commissioners are judges, and they
should not make up their mind before it is formally
brought before them at a commission meeting," said
Williams. "It's the law."
Unique to Florida is the Synder Law and the
Jennings v. Dade County decision by the Florida Su-
preme Court, which prohibits citizen and elected offi-
cial exchanges if the matter in contention is going to be
brought up before that elected body.
"It's a tremendous barrier between citizens and
their representatives," admitted Williams.
At the end of the hour-long meeting, Piero Rivolta
reflected upon the evening's events. "I was a little bit
hurt, they don't believe I like it here," Rivolta said. "I
don't need the aggravation. But we will talk with the
county, adjust our plans and go in front of the board of
commissioners.
The next battleground will be at the county plan-
ning department, where winning approval is crucial to
backers and killing it is pivotal to opponents.
Thomas "Blue" Fulford, 72 years old and born and
raised in Cortez, likes Rivolta's proposal. "The project
could be a benefit for the community," Fulford said.
"You will never find more wonderful, down-to-earth
people than the Rivoltas."
Karen Bell, a major force in Cortez and life-long
resident, believes Rivolta's first plan was less intrusive
and would have had less impact on the community.
"But what upset me the most was how rude people
were at the meeting," Bell said. "It was totally unnec-
essary, and does not reflect the friendly atmosphere of
Cortez."



Meetings

Anna Maria City
May 28, 7 p.m., special city commission meeting on
parking.
June 3, 4:30 p.m., capital improvement advisory board
meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
May 29, 1 p.m., special city commission work session
on city pier issues.
May 30, 8:30 a.m., city commission-department head
work session.
May 31, 9 a.m., "Understanding Growth Management"
with land-use planner Tony Arrant.
June 5, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
May 29, 9 a.m., board of adjustment meeting.
May 29, 7 p.m., planning commission meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.






PAGE 4 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Island's newest development: 'Bienvenido a mi casa'


By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
When developer Bill Greer moved to Holmes
Beach last year, he had a vision.
Greer wanted to capture on the Island the flavor
and architecture of the Mediterranean casa and villa of
Spain and Italy.
"When I was in Europe I wandered all over visit-
ing churches and villas with the old world charm," said
Greer. "And that has been my goal of my dream project
to retain the village atmosphere with luxurious homes."
Welcome to La Casa Costeria condominiums, to be
built on the 1.5-acre site of the present 22-room resort
Island Plantation at 7300 Gulf Drive.
Greers proposes to build 12 units, each with a mil-
lion-dollar-plus price tag.
"I spent a month driving up and down the coast,
taking pictures, going through magazines, looking
for the style I like," Greer said. "I wanted to retain
the village atmosphere, and that's why there are only
going to be 12 units. What I want is what everyone
else wants, a very nice architecturally designed
home."
Bradenton Beach's architectural firm Eatman &
Smith designed the 2,000-square-foot condos, exhibit-
ing traces of Spanish Mediterranean and Italian
Tuscany styles.
Brent Whitehead's construction company plans to
begin the demolition of the former Island Plantation as
soon as the Holmes Beach City Commission approves
the La Casa Costiera plans.
Even before a spoonful of dirt is turned over, Greer
said he already has deposits on six of the proposed 12
units.


ii


Island Plantation, another resort gone condo. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


When the project seeks approval from Holmes
Beach city officials, one sticky point may be the height
of the structures.
"I want the condos to be high enough to justify the
money the people are paying," Greer said. "Buyers
want high ceilings and sloped roofs and that means
higher buildings."
Island officials in Holmes Beach and the City of
Anna Maria are presently wrestling with requests to


allow property owners to exceed height restrictions.
Most requests are couched on the premise the owners
wish to have aesthetically higher ceiling and pitched
roofs, giving them more room, and perhaps more value
to their investment.
The height battle has polarized Islanders, with
many old timers saying the status quo is fine, thank you
very much; while others wish to recreate old Europe/
Florida with high ceilings.


Redgrave: Longboat Pass Bridge to be closed


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
To the delight of Barrier Island Elected Officials,
Longboat Key Mayor John Redgrave announced at the
May 21 BIEO meeting that the Longboat Pass Bridge
between the key and Bradenton Beach would be closed
this summer.
The delight was short-lived, however.
Redgrave said the bridge is only going to be closed
between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. on some as-yet-undeter-
mined days this summer for maintenance work by the
Florida Department of Transportation.
Redgrave doesn't have the exact dates yet from the
DOT, but expects the work to be done in either July or


Tourism tax hike suggested
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
He cited the Crosley Mansion, the convention cen-
ter, McKechnie Field and the Pittsburgh Pirates spring
training complex as examples.
Only 1 percent of the tax collected comes directly
back to the Island in the form of beach renourishment
and "we all support that," Rauschl noted. "But the ben-
efit derived from the remaining 2 percent is hard to
identify" for Island accommodations and retail busi-
nesses.
The uniqueness of Anna Maria Island is that it's
made up of many small "mom-and-pop" accommoda-
tions and few large resorts, he noted.
The CVB doesn't, bring visitors to the Island, the
accommodation owners do.
"All of us carefully spend money on advertising
and measure its effectiveness. We are the force that
brings people to the Island and our inns and keep them
coming back, not the CVB."
And this is not just a resort issue. Any tax increase
will affect all retail businesses on the Island, he said.
Rauschl said a number of Island accommodation
owners plan to attend the May 30 meeting to see "pre-
cisely what the CVB is proposing" and voice objec-
tions to any tax increase initiative.
Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce Executive
Director Gail Loefgren expressed concern that neither
she nor most of her 34 accommodation members in
Manatee County had received notice of the May 30
meeting.
Loefgren planned to e-mail her Manatee County
members to attend and provide input.


August. The bridge will close for a few hours each
night for the work, and the DOT will make an advance
announcement to local media on the closures.
But Redgrave isn't opposed to closing the bridge
during the day also, just to study the traffic patterns.
"But that's not going to happen," he said with a laugh.
Holmes Beach City Commissioner Don Maloney
suggested -.tongue in cheek closing the bridge
during the winter season to study the traffic pattern.
Maloney also complained about the proliferation of
newsstand racks in Holmes Beach.
During a recent tour of the city, he counted 161
individual newsracks, including 14 at the Holmes
Beach Post Office that are mostly unused and rusting.
"I'd like to get an agreement that it's worth look-
ing at to do away with all newsracks except for news-
papers," said Maloney. Advertising publications are
competing with Island businesses, he said.
Maybe, said Anna Maria City Commissioner John
Quam, but there could be a free-speech issue involved.
Both Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach have
modular newsrack programs designed to eliminate
much of the visual blight caused by free-standing


An appeal of a decision by the building official in
Bradenton Beach has been denied by the city's board
of adjustment.
Resident Ken Lohn, who is also the chair of the
board of adjustment, questioned the issuance of a build-
ing permit at 502 Bay Drive S. by Building Official
Bob Welch. The permit allowed construction of du-
plexes by owners Steven Noriega and Robert Byrne,
and was issued Dec. 16, 2002.
Lohn asked for an appeal of the issuance of the
duplex permit because the new construction will
block his view of the bay. Lohn lives at 500 Bay
Drive S.
However, Welch said that Lohn's request for an
appeal was made after the 30-day window had expired.
Lohn's application for an appeal of Welch's decision
was made March 13.


newsracks on city property, said Quam.
The BIEO also heard a plea from Manatee County
Hazard Mitigation Planner Robert Day for the cities to
have a booth at the Hurricane Preparedness and Safety
Exhibition June 21 at the DeSoto Mall.
Day also asked BIEO member cities to join the
county's local mitigation strategy committee as a means
of qualifying for an upcoming Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency pre-disaster mitigation grant program.
Speaking of disasters and FEMA, said Maloney,
he's concerned that not enough people in Holmes
Beach or the Island are applying to FEMA for funds to
elevate their homes above the flood plain.
Of 75 homes in Holmes Beach eligible for the
funds, only two homeowners made the application.
Maybe that's because there are 21 pages in the
form, said Day.
The Manatee Trolley came in for a "thumbs up"
from Island officials at the meeting. Maloney said
225,655 people rode the free service last year and rid-
ership is going up 10 percent every month.
That keeps a lot of vehicles off Island roads, espe-
cially during the season, he noted.


Board of adjustment members were posed a ques-
tion: Was a letter Welch wrote to Lohn dated Feb. 18
a decision or an interpretation of city codes?
As acting Chair John Burns put it, "Does the let-
ter constitute a decision, or is it an explanation of a
decision made earlier? If it's an explanation, then we
have nothing to review."
And board members agreed, Welch's letter indeed
was an informative letter, not a decision, and the mat-
ter ended.
Maybe. Lohn later told The Islander he filed an-
other request for an appeal.
Noriega told The Islander he had offered numer-
ous concessions to Lohn in an attempt to mediate the
problem, to no avail.
Each time we thought we had an agreement, Lohn
wanted more, Noriega said.


Appeal of building permit


denied in Bradenton Beach





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 N PAGE 5


Turtles busy, so are watchers and police


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
In an ironic twist, Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch,
which has been threatening and pleading with people
to keep the beaches clear, ended up accused of clutter-
ing the beach.
Wasn't so, of course, but it was enough to send Suzi
Fox briefly into orbit. She heads Turtle Watch and holds
the state marine turtle preservation permit for the Island.
Police called to tell her that people had left a tent,
chairs, coolers, beer cans and other items on the beach
that would certainly impede a sea turtle's progress to-
ward her chosen nesting site. It probably would send
her back to sea to wait and later find another place, Fox
said.
Vandals had found the clutter and scattered it
around the beach, and "people accused Turtle Watch of
the dirty work," Fox said. It was definitely vandals,
though, she and police officers asserted.
"It's pretty sad, taking up police time with.trash
like this," Fox said. "They have plenty to do without
foolishness like that. And Turtle Watch volunteers are
spread thin enough as it is, without having to bother
with this kind of thing.
"What are people thinking about, anyway? They
leave private stuff on the public area of the beach over-
night and are surprised when it's vandalized?"
It's not only foolish, it's illegal to clutter up the
beach overnight with things that interfere with nesting
turtles. The ancient animals crawl up out of the Gulf,
dig down a couple of feet, deposit 100 or so eggs the
size of golf balls, cover them and let the sun and sand
incubate them for a couple of months. Anything left on
the beach sentences the tiny Gulf-bound hatchlings to
death.
The Island now is incubating 21 loggerhead turtle
nests, Fox said, most of them so near the water that
volunteers moved them out of danger higher on the
beach. Fox is speculating over the reasons as to why the
turtles are nesting so low on the beach. New beach?
Sand too fluffy?
The periled eggs have to be moved by 9 a.m. the


This dead loggerhead at Bradenton Beach is one of two turtles that ended up on the beaches of Anna Maria
Island after the Memorial Day weekend. The other was a hawksbill on the bay side in Anna Maria. Both were
"turtle teenagers," said Turtle Watch chief Suzi Fox, and both had new boat propellor wounds that indicate
they were killed by boats driven by heedless holidaymakers "a bad end to a decent weekend," said Fox.


morning after they're laid overnight, or moving them
can destroy the life within. Left near the tideline, wa-
ter can fatally drown the hatchlings inside, which un-
like chicken eggs are water permeable.
One mother turtle got around the north end of the
Island to nest in Bayfront Park. Crawls (tracks the
turtles leave in the sand) indicate she was turned back
by a concrete wall in her first attempt across from Rot-
ten Ralph's restaurant, and she went on to a friendlier
beach at the park.
"I'll bet she was born there 40 years ago and came


back to nest, as they do, and found a concrete wall in-
stead of her home," Fox said. She can identify the turtle
from Ralph's as the same as the bayfront nester because
"the crawls are very similar."
Anna Maria Island is the only place in Florida that
has bayside nesting, she said, with about 20 a year dig-
ging in there. The tidal currents are so tricky that few
turtles bother, but Turtle Watch patrols the beach there
regularly. Also, homeowners along the shore are alert
for nests and usually call Turtle Watch without disturb-
ing the nests, Fox said.


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PAGE 6 E MAY 28, 2003 E THE ISLANDER



Oulnion




Get out!
We can't shout it loud enough or emphasize it enough,
but we do want to hint that if a storm threatens Anna Maria
Island, you must evacuate.
You.must also prepare for that inevitability by follow-
ing the tips and suggestions offered in this week's 10th an-
nual special "storm preparedness" section.
Read it and weep, then get busy with a check list and
follow through with all the necessary planning.
Hopefully, you won't need your "hurricane kit," and
many of the measures to ready your home, boat and prop-
erty will be for naught, but we promise, you won't be sorry.
You need to get the trims trimmed anyway, right?
Go on, get ready!

You want it how?
There's a cartoon that comes to mind of four characters
yucking it up while the message is "You want it when?" It
was a promotion for a quick-print facility, so the joke was
on them.
In Cortez, the question begs: You want it how?
Piero Rivolta bought an old defunct fish house, which
would be a struggling operation in the best of times, and first
proposed to put in a mixed-use development of boat works,
cottages and overnight accommodations to go with the ex-
isting marine environment.
It first passed muster, but then met objections. Boo.
Hiss. Said Cortez.
Fast forward to the new plan, including 20 motel rooms,
a restaurant, boat docks and most of the existing bland build-
ings retained, and what's the response from last week's re-
pugnant Cortez crowd?
Boo. Hiss.
It seems to us that Cortez already had the best offer on the
table, but there were factions that were adamantly opposed.
The first design may have had a bit too much ginger-
bread, but the concept the plan was one that provided
very little impact to existing business and residences and
very low intensity.
We heard in May 2001 from the potentate of the com-
mercial fishers: "It looks to me like what's planned is some-
thing we can live with." said Blue Fulford. "It has limited
impact to very few people, no environmental impact, and it
fits in with Cortez. I recommend we support this project."
We agree still. The only thing better than Rivolta's
(original) plan is for the FISH Preserve to acquire the property.
It's unfortunate that the negative crowd always speaks
loudest. Listen up before you get the sour grapes you've-
asked for.
Hear, hear, Rivolta.



The Islander
MAY 28, 2003 Vol. 11, No. 29
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jack Elka
Jim Hanson
Joe Kane
Katharine Wight
V Contributors
Nancy Ambrose
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Jean Steiger
Chris Teofilak
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Melissa Williams
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster

3 Y" 19?.3-01 .



Single copies free. Quanities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1992-03 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 94"1 778-7978


SLICK By Egan





.'-.i'-.. ::: ..&iA.l-.l-2 -.> .,: .: :. : 0-.. ,,: :.::....^a* i ...; .


Royalty on trolley
We are about to leave your lovely Island and we feel
compelled to write. We are hoping this letter goes to the
people intended. We want to say thank you for a wonder-
ful visit.
We live in Houston and visit your wonderful Island
every year. We usually spend two or three weeks going
from place to place and sampling all of your tasty restau-
rants.
This year was an exception. We stayed six weeks and
even now we are leaving reluctantly. We drove frMn
Houston and usually find various parking throughout the
Island. We would often park the car and walk.
This year was such a treat. We parked our car and
then had the great opportunity to ride your trolley. We
stopped at your restaurants from north to south. We had
lunches and dinners everywhere we stopped. We ate
pizza, had ice cream and spent our days having the
most wonderful time.
We are about to leave your sunny Florida but we
will always remember our visit here. We can't wait to
come back next year, hopefully to stay even longer.
Thank you for treating us like royalty and for giv-
ing us the fun-filled trolley rides all over your Island.
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Carlson, Houston

Heaven, for certain
One needs only to pick up a newspaper or turn on
a TV to hear about the lack of integrity and the flagrant
dishonesty which surrounds us in these times. But this
is not the way business is done in Holmes Beach.
When we returned from Anna Maria Island to our
home in California, we realized two rings had been left
in our vacation rental unit. Knowing the unit had been
professionally cleaned and rerented at least once since
our departure, we had very little hope of recovering
these keepsakes, but we made the phone call and spoke
with Patti Marifjeren.
"Yes" she replied, "We have your rings and will be
glad to insure and mail them to you."


We would like to acknowledge the exemplary
character of the businesses we encountered in Holmes
Beach, namely SunCoast Real Estate and C.G.'s Clean-
ing Service. In particular we wish to thank the young
woman whom I believe is named Charlene, who origi-
nally discovered and safely returned the rings.
Your honesty and your high moral values are
greatly appreciated. I sincerely hope you feel tremen-
dous pride about the good people you are. When we
visited your Island, we thought we were in heaveil.
Now that we know the kind of people who live and
work there, we are certain of it!
David and JoAnn Snyder, Truckee, CA

Beach parking fees
I read with great interest of Anna Maria City want-
ing to charge beach parking user fees of $80 for visi-
tors and $10 for. residents.
During the years 1985-1992, when the Beach Ac-
tion Committee was trying to get the funds needed to
restore beaches and renourish the critical erosion that
existed, one of the options was to charge beach user
fees at Coquina, Cortez and Manatee public beaches.
The Anna Maria city officials at that time balked at
that idea, saying that people would flock to their beaches,
thereby stopping the Manatee County commissioners (the
county owns and maintains the public beaches).
It would be very interesting to see if it works for Anna
Maria City, and what the opinions would be from the
county, Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach.
Personally, I hope that it does work, then maybe the
county officials will finally start charging beach user fees
and do the much-needed improvements at the public
beaches.
Anna Maria Island is the last of the free beaches in
Florida.
Finally, what will Anna Maria City do with the funds
collected? Hopefully it will donate the money to the
county (project sponsor of the renourishment event) to pay
back funding for the beach renourished in May 2002.
Katie Pierola, Bradenton Beach


TRE-y 'RG, PREvC


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 N PAGE 7


Inside a Cat. 5: 'Nearer my God to thee'


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Most Floridians have an almost cavalier attitude
toward hurricanes.
Few of us ever prepare for hurricane season and
even if a storm pops up our area, we don't pay it no
mind unless a local hurricane advisory or warning is
issued.
Live through a Category 5 hurricane like Mitch in
1999, and you'll change your mind quickly about hur-
ricanes and preparedness.
I was living in the Cayman Islands in October 1999
when Mitch cranked up in the southwest Caribbean
about 1,000 miles south of Grand Cayman.
In the Caribbean, they take hurricanes seriously.
One storm can wipe out an entire country. As they say
in the tropics, "It's not a question of if, but when" a
hurricane will hit.
Mitch's arrival was front page on the newspaper I
was working for, even though it was only a tropical
storm at that time and forecast to hit Jamaica, about 180
miles east of us. It was still a week away.
But hurricanes don't always follow the predicted
models.
Within two days, Mitch was a Cat. 3 hurricane with
winds above 110 miles per hour, and forecast to move
west-northwest and strike the Cayman Islands.
The various government emergency services were
already holding meetings and putting plans into action.
Public bulletins and press coverage was intense.
As a Florida boy who remembers Hurricane Donna
in 1960, I knew a Cat. 3 could be devastating.
The condominium complex where we lived was on
the south side of Grand Cayman, directly in the path of
Mitch.
Although somewhat protected there from waves by
an 8-foot-high "ironshore" and a 5-foot seawall, own-
ers began boarding up units and stocking up on sup-
plies and first aid equipment.
Most of us already had our hurricane supplies on
hand by June 1, as we did every year.
Everything sold on the island comes out of Miami.
If there's a hurricane, the ships don't sail and the stores


don't have anything to sell. You gotta stock up in ad-
vance.
Then on a Saturday morning in late October, the
weather service announced Mitch had reached Cat. 5
strength and was forecast to pass 65 miles west of the
Cayman Islands within 72 hours.
A Cat. 5, with winds in excess of 150 mph, is no
joke. Witness Miami when Hurricane Andrew struck
in 1992.
While most locals remained calm, visitors to Grand
Cayman panicked.
Nearly 5,000 tourists descended on the island's
only airport on Sunday, looking for any way off that
rock and out of harm's way. That's 5,000 people try-
ing to find space on any one of just 20 international
flights per day leaving from Grand Cayman.
Sunday morning brought a new forecast that the
storm was turning west, toward Belize, but Cayman
would still get at least part of the brunt of the northeast
side of the hurricane, generally the strongest and dead-
liest part of any storm.
The island breathed a collective sigh of relief.
On Monday, Grand Cayman closed down. Some
people went to shelters, others stayed home.
My family and I battened the hatches, boarded the
windows and waited. There was now no other choice.
That night, the winds picked up to gale force. The
power was shut down as a precaution.
We could hear the pounding of the surf against the
seawall like the muffled boom of a ship's cannon ev-
ery time a wave hit.
We held our breath and waited.
Our battery-powered radio said winds had reached
nearly 100 mph, but during the night, we noticed they
were diminishing.
Mitch had turned west sooner than predicted.
Within a few hours, it had turned again, this time to the
southwest with direct aim at Honduras, and away from
Grand Cayman.
Forecast models had given this movement only a
20 percent chance.
Near dawn, we heated water for our coffee over a
container of Sterno and edged out into the eerie dark-


ness.
On the coast near our condo, 20-foot waves were
pounding the ironshore, then crashing over our seawall.
The entire front of the complex was flooded. Trees had
been snapped like toothpicks. The pavilion at the swim-
ming pool had been obliterated into sticks of soaked
firewood.
Despite sandbags and boarding material for protec-
tion, units nearest to the sea had been flooded by nearly
five feet of water.
The undeveloped property adjacent to us was
flooded and nearly 50 feet of vegetation and trees near
the sea was wiped out by the waves. Only a 3-foot-high
wall had saved us from flood waters.
Thankfully, maybe, Grand Cayman is flat. The
highest point is only 60 feet above sea level. There is
no danger of mudslides or rivers flooding. Water just
drains back into the sea.
The pounding continued throughout the day. Later
we would learn that Mitch had caused about $30 mil-
lion in damages. And we were 500 miles from the cen-
ter.
Then, we heard about Honduras.
Mitch, a Cat. 5 hurricane, stalled out over that
country for nearly a week, pumping torrential rains into
swollen rivers, burying towns under avalanches of
mud, killing nearly 10,000 people. The exact number
will never be known. A reported 2.5 million people
were homeless and without food.
A week later, I flew on a relief flight from Grand
Cayman to Tegucialpa, then to Roatan Island, the En-
glish-speaking island about 20 miles off the north coast
of Honduras.
It was a war zone.
The street scene reminded me of the pictures of
Hiroshima after the atom bomb.
There were no trees left, no usable roads, no elec-
tricity or water, and no help. Livable areas had simply
disappeared, as had some people. Cars, trucks and ships
had just vanished in the maelstrom.
Where houses once stood were only a few
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PAGE 8 i MAY 28, 2003 THE ISLANDER .


Tidemark basin work expected June 15 but taxes due


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Developer Nick Easterling of the Tidemark hotel
and condominium project in Holmes Beach expects to
begin work on the basin at the development June 15,
but does not yet have a date for the start of actual con-
struction of the facility.
Easterling said Mike Carter Construction Co. is
doing some engineering work on the lodge building, on
the complexities of fitting three floors of living space
into the design, but the project will be put out to bid
before actual work begins. Carter is expected to bid on
the planned 40-unit development, Easterling said.
In January; Easterling had given a March 2003 date


for the start of construction, but that was revised pend-
ing construction financing approval from the bank.
Easterling said bank financing required 50 percent
of the units to be pre-sold and that figure has now been
met.
Earlier this week, Easterling said he was in discus-
sions with two hotel groups, including one from the
Toronto area, but would not elaborate on the nature of
those talks.
Records available at the Manatee County Tax
Collector's Office show that as of May 27, Tidemark
Partners Limited Liability Company owed $27,045.26
and $3,330.30 respectively in 2002 taxes for the two
separate parcels at 5325 Marina Drive, site of the


planned Tidemark.
The last date for the taxes to be paid is 5 p.m. Fri-
day, May 30.
Efforts to reach Easterling for comment on the tax
bills were unsuccessful prior to press deadline.
The Tidemark will be located at the site of the
former Pete Reynard's restaurant in Holmes Beach.
Plans call for a marina with boat slips, full service
restaurant and meeting room. Individual units will be
rented as hotel rooms, Easterling has said.
Easterling has demolished the restaurant and two
duplexes at the site, but construction has still not yet
begun, although the Holmes Beach City Commission
approved the project in August 2001.


Florence and Ed Hall of the Museum Shoppe in
Anna Maria were first runners-up in the Rookie
Small Busines Person of the Year category, spon-
sored by the Longboat Key Chamber. Pictured with
the Halls is Gail Lofgren of the chamber. Islander
Photo: J.L. Robertson

Islanders win business awards
from Longboat
Two Anna Maria Island business couples were
honored by the Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce
during Small Business Week.
They were chosen from among 20 nominees and
received their awards at the chamber's 10th annual
Small Business Awards breakfast at the Holiday Inn
Hotel & Suites on Longboat.
Ed and Florence Hall of the Museum Shoppe in Anna
Maria were first runners-up in the Rookie Small Busi-
ness Person of the Year category.
Karen and Michael LaPensee of LaPensee Plumb-
ing in Holmes Beach were second runners-up for Small
Business Person of the Year award.
Winner of first place as Rookie Small Business
Person of the Year was Tony Zanoni of Kitchens Di-
rect in Sarasota, while David Gruber of Floors by De-
sign of Sarasota was named Small Business Person of
the Year.
Other nominees from the area were Jack Elka of
Jack Elka Photograhics, Holmes Beach; Giorgio
Oldano, DaGiorgio Ristorante, Holmes Beach; Keleigh
Wendell of A&A Baby and Toddler Rentals, Holmes
Beach; Bonner Joy of The Islander, Holmes Beach;
and Kim Ibasfalean of Captain Kim's Boat Rides and
Charters, Cortez.


Palma Sola Causeway confusion: eligible?


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The Palma Sola Causeway Corridor Management
Entity was confused at its May 21 meeting.
Members thought CME's application to designate
the Palma Sola Causeway as a state scenic highway had
been approved for eligibility and just needed final des-
ignation approval by the Florida Department of
Transportation's Scenic Highway Committee.
Not so, said Bob Herrington of the Manatee-
Sarasota Metropolitan Planning Organization. MPO
Director Mike Guy checked with DOT officials in Tal-
lahassee and learned that the Palma Sola Scenic High-
way application has not been declared eligible.
"It's my understanding that both the eligibility and
the grant approval will be done at the same meeting,"
said Herrington.
Susan King of the DOT's Bartow office was un-
able to attend the meeting, but said last month she
hoped the Palma Sola application would be on the Sce-
nic Highway Committee's May agenda.


Herrington said he would contact King to get the
status of the application and eligibility "in writing."
Manatee County Commissioner and CME co-
chairperson Jane von Hahmann said it was disappoint-
ing not to know if the application met eligibility re-
quirements. "Until we are eligible, we can't really go
forward.
"We are ready and have done everything we've
been asked to and now we are waiting," she said.
The CME did get a report from Ingrid McClellan
of the Keep Manatee Beautiful committee that it has
applied for a $10,000 grant for trees along the cause-
way.
Scott Gasaway of Centex has volunteered his ex-
pertise in landscaping services for Keep Manatee Beau-
tiful as the "matching funds" portion of that grant, and
he'll also volunteer for causeway landscaping when the
CME gets its scenic highway designation.
McClellan also expects to get a $1,500 donation
from Bongo's restaurant on the causeway following a
fund-raising concert last week at the establishment.


Hula girls
Darlene Friedrich's 5- and 6-year-old dance students will perform at 7 p.m. June 7 to "Hawaiian Roller Coaster
Ride "from the "Lilo & Stich" soundtrack at the Island Dance 2003 show. Front row, from left, Holly Darke,
Savannah Mitchell, Hannah Roemer, Emma Bouchard and Samantha Burgess. Back row, from left, Asley Miller,
Jessica Bouchard and G.G. Belsito. The performance will be at the Riverfront Theatre, 102 Old Main Street,
Bradenton. For more information, call Darlene Friedrich at 778-5446. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


10 YEARS


Ten years ago in The Islander
issue of May 27, 1993
The Florida Department of Transportation set
new public hearings on its proposal to replace the
Manatee Avenue Bridge.
Pete Reynard's restaurant in Holmes Beach will
undergo a name change to Shucker's, according to
owner Mike Ritoff.
Manatee County commissioners agreed to pro-
ceed with a grant application for an Island trolley sys-
tem that could start as early as November 1994.


Mitch devastates Central America
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

matchsticks of rubble. The Roatan hospital was re-
duced to a few bricks and mortar. The Roatan beaches
were gone. There was no food, medicine or shelter.
Communication to the outside world was almost non-
existent.
About 5,000 people lined up at the Roatan airport
waiting for a handout from the relief effort of anything
to live on, to survive on, just to make it to another day
and arrival of another relief flight.
Soldiers had to control the crowd, otherwise there
would have been a riot to get to a relief plane.
Roatan was like an Oklahoma tornado had stuck
for a week over a small midwestemrn city. I heard it was


the same all over Honduras.
I asked people on Roatan if they knew what to
expect. No.
Did you think it would be this bad? No.
Were you prepared? No.
Did you worry before the storm? No.
What did you do during the storm? "Prayed."
Some said they sang "Nearer my God to Thee."
What will you do now? "I don't know."
We flew back to "civilization" on Grand Cayman,
where people had food, water, electricity, hospitals and
hope.
I did not return to Roatan.
Grand Cayman was lucky. Honduras was not.
That's what a Cat. 5 hurricane could do to Anna
Maria Island, not "if it hits, but when."


THE BEST





THE ISLANDER E MAY 28, 2003 N PAGE 9


Island land surfers


skate on
By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
Power sliding into fakie, Erik Stahr gets ready to
do a half-cab off the two-step at the First National Bank
in Holmes Beach.
It's sunset and 15-year-old Erik is doing a heel flip
while hanging with friends at one of their favorite skate
spots.
"I'm excited that the skate park is going to be fin-
ished soon," Erik said. "I'm planning to skate there
every day. It will give me something to do after
school."
And that's good news for parents concerned for
their children's welfare.
Perhaps even happier than the Island kids is the
biggest kid of all, Holmes Beach Mayor Carol
Whitmore, who has been working for years to have a
safe and fun spot for Islanders. "I'm glad the city of
Holmes Beach has been proactive for the kids, after for
so many years," Mayor Whitmore said. "This shows
we're thinking of kids, first."
Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Stephenson is also
a major force in bringing the 3,000-square-foot micro-
skate park to the Island. Stephenson can't wait for the
opening of the skate park, located next to the Holmes
Beach City Hall.
"Anything we can do to provide clean fun for the
Island kids, I'm for," Stephenson said. "When the park
is finished, it will keep the mischief away from the li-
brary, the banks and the downtown business area."
A gala opening on June 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
is planned and invitations have been made to all the
mayors in Manatee County. But most importantly, the
Island kids will be there, with their Vans skate shoes,
Powell decks with Spitfire wheels, eager to do an Ollie
off one of the 4-foot ramps.
"Kids are really excited for the park to open,"
Stephenson said. "When I met with the kids recently,
they were really anxious for the park to open."
Thanks to the Island kids, they have a skate park.
Two years ago, Islander Brad Byrant got scores of sig-
natures on a petition asking the city to build a skate
park, proving to any skeptical adult these kids mean
business and that they want a place to safely skate.
"Most injuries happen at curbs and sidewalks,"

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Erik Stahr flies and dad Mike styles the photos. Islander Photo/Graphics: Michael Stahr


Stephenson said. "No question, this skateboard park
will be much safer for kids."
But will the city be liable for mishaps and accidents
at the city's micro-skate park ?
Stephenson says Florida state law protects Holmes
Beach as long as the city maintains the upkeep of the
park, posts rules, and parents sign a waiver agreeing not
to sue the city.
Elected officials off the Island are keeping their
eyes on Holmes Beach's skate board park, Manatee
County's only such facility.
"Manatee County Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment will watch our park very closely," Stephenson
said. "They want to build one at Blackstone Park in
Palmetto, but they want to check out our program first."
The micro-skate park will feature 4-foot and 6-foot
ramps, as well as other structures for the faint of heart.
Special recognition goes out to Islanders Rex and
Helen Hagen for funds contributed to the city, Dan
Hardy for donating the concrete and to Anna Maria,
Bradenton Beach and Longboat Key for funding assis-


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tance.
The park will be open from 9 a.m. to sunset. All
rules will be strictly enforced. All skaters must wear a
helmet, wrist and elbow pads. They must also display
their membership identification on their helmet and
carry the city issued ID card at all times when using the
facility.
Holmes Beach residents will pay $10 a year. Resi-
dents from Bradenton Beach, Anna Maria and
Longboat Key will pay $30 a year. The fees will be put
into a maintenance fund.
Parental waiver forms may be picked up at the
Holmes Beach Police Department beginning June 16.
To purchase decal and ID forms, you may go to the
police department after June 23.
Stephenson said he wants to encourage individual
responsibility at the park and he is implementing a su-
pervisory system, which for the first two weeks will be
maintained by parents, city police and city staff. The
goal is to have kids "grind some rails," while supervis-
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Generous donation
Members of the Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island Inc. unanimously agreed to donate $1,000 to the Anna
Maria Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization to apply towards its purchase of two mobile computer
labs. From left, Woman's Club President Faye Pratt, PTO President Cindy Thompson and Woman's Club
Treasurer Sarah Maloney. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Snooks Adams Kids Day

Saturday at Bayfront
The annual youngsters' bash at Bayfront Park,
Snooks Adams' Kids Day, will see hundreds of Island
and neighboring children gather for hot dogs, pizza and
pop and more from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday
Snooks himself will be there, as he has been since
the first Kids Day he so casually organized in 1954.
That was when he piled a dozen or so young'uns in his
Jeep, took them to Coquina Beach for free treats and
exuberant young games.
It became so popular in the next few years that it
needed a central place and it moved to the public beach,
then ultimately to the roomy Bayfront Park at the north-
east tip of the Island in Anna Maria.
In 1980, after he had retired as Holmes Beach po-
lice chief, Adams turned the event over to other people
who also know how to organize and how to help
youngsters, the Anna Maria Island Privateers.
It's all free for kids, as it was from that first one,
and now parents are welcome too. There will be con-
tests and races and demonstrations, including a new
addition, Kevin Bergquist, demonstrating karate and
maybe breaking a brick or two barehanded. Another
highlight of the day is a pirate look-alike contest with
prizes for all.
Food and beverages for adults is offered for a do-
nation to the Privateers. Further information may be
obtained from the event's chairman, Greg Luzier, 752-
5973.


High flying
New this year at the
Snooks Adams Kids Day
event put on by the Anna
Maria Island Privateers
at Anna Maria Bayfront
Park is a karate demon-
stration. Privateer
Richard "Red Dog"
Cline said the kids need a
break from the games and
the heat during the
demonstration and this is
an excellent way to
entertain them. Islander
Kevin Bergquist, right,
and Stanley G.
Rousonelos II, of
Bradenton, show their
moves here for the
camera. Islander Photo:
Elizabeth "Doc" Christie


White luncheon sold out;
books available, though
Pine Island mystery writer Randy Wayne
White's luncheon Saturday is sold out, but books
will still be available
for sale, including his .
newest novel, "Ever-
glades."
White will be at
Ooh La La! Bistro,
5406 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach for a
luncheon/talk/per-
sonal signing at 1 p.m.
The restaurant, in con-
junction with Circle White
Books of St. Armands
Circle and The Islander, is hosting the event, with
a portion of the proceeds going to the Tingley Me-
morial Library in Bradenton Beach.
"Everglades," White's newest novel, contin-
ues the adventures of characters Doc Ford and
Tomlinson, this time as they explore the "river of
grass."
The book sale will be conducted by Circle
Books at The Islander office, next door to Ooh La
La! at 5404 Marina Drive in the Island Shopping
Center from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m.
For more information, call 778-7978.


I I I I II


I


YOUL CLJ MLP








$100 for your blood next week


An anonymous benefactor has "made our day," or
will this weekend, offering $100 per donor in a blood
drive on the Island Saturday and Sunday.
The $100 will be donated in the blood donor's
name to any or proportioned to all of four charities -
Anna Maria Island Community Center, Wildlife Edu-
cation Rehabilitation of Anna Maria, Anna Maria Is-
land Turtle Watch and Anna Maria Island Privateers.
The Privateers will have their land-navigating pi-
rate ship, the big boat/float, on the Palma Sola Cause-
way both days to remind people to give blood, and
Privateers complete with swords will be at each donor
site.
Gail Straight of the wildlife organization said her
volunteers will have birds and an information table at

Rummage sales planned
next two Saturdays
Rummage sales are scheduled this weekend and
next at St. Bernard Catholic Church activity center, 248
S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
The initial sale will be from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Satur-
day, May 31, featuring jewelry, books and a ide va-
riety or items.
Details may be obtained by calling 778-2993.

Chamber card exchange
due this evening
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will sponsor a business card exchange Wednesday,
May 28, at the office of Dr. Gy Yatros, 3909 E. Bay
Drive, Holmes Beach.

'Playing and Painting'
Artists Guild feature
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will see
and hear -a, demoritration by artist/musician
Graciella Giles % hen it meets at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
June 2.
iThe.general meeting will be at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation hall, 4408 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. It is open to the public.
Giles has followed parallel paths in painting and
music, playing the piano and the Native American
flute as well as other instruments. She said that of-
ten when she has difficulty proceeding with a paint-
ing, she puts it on the piano and then "improvises or
plays the painting" to develop it further.
She was born in Argentina and came to the
United States at age 10. During the 1970s she lived
in Switzerland, moving to Florida in 1986.
Further information may be obtained at 778-
6694.


Sculpture and portraits
at library in June
"The Edge" group and Valeri Rose will present
an exhibition of painting and sculpture and Kevin
Darke will display charcoal and pencil portraits at
the Island Branch Library in June.
Other items on the agenda for the month at the
library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach:
Monday, June 9 Internet class for beginners
at 8:30 a.m., advance registration required at 778-
6341.
Tuesday, June 3, 10, 17, 24 Veterans service
officer to interview clients 1-4 p.m. by appointment,.
749-3030.
Tuesday, June 10, 17, 24 School-age sum-
mer program 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 4, 11, 18, 25 Family
Storytime 6 p.m.
Wednesday, June 11 Friends Book Club
10:30 a.m.
Thursday-Friday, June 26-27 AARP 55 Alive
senior driver brushup course noon-4 p.m., register at
776-1158.
Saturday, June 14 Origami class 10:30 a.m.
The library opens at 10 a.m. daily except Sun-
day, closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urday. Additional details may be obtained by calling
778-6341.


each location to encourage donations.
Blood will be received from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Satur-
day, June 7, and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, June 8. Loca-
tions for the drive:
Anna Maria: Marina Pointe Realty/A Pine Avenue
Salon, 314 Pine Ave.
Holmes Beach: The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive.
Bradenton Beach: Beach House Restaurant, 200
Gulf Drive N.
Sponsoring the blood drive are The Islander,
Tropicana, Pepsi-Cola Co, Marina Pointe Realty,
A Pine Avenue Salon, and the Beach House.
The blood will go to the Manatee Community
Blood Center. Further information may be obtained at
746-7195.


Health screening coming
to chamber next week
A Manatee County Health Department van
will screen for several problems next Wednes-
. day, June 4, at the Anna Maria Island Chamber
. of Commerce, 5313 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
The visit will begin at 8 a.m. and screenings
take 10-15 minutes. Cost is $25 per person. The
procedure will check for cholesterol, triglycer-
ides and blood sugar, to detect signs of heart dis-
ease, stroke, diabetes and "high-risk lifestyle
behavior."
Further information is available at 779-9412.


Registration is still open
for Roser SCUBA
Registration continues for the SCUBA Super
Cool Undersea Bible Adventure vacation Bible
school at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512
Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
The program will be from 9 a.m.-noon June 9-13,
focusing in children 4 years old through fifth grade.
Volunteers are needed as crew leaders, said Kelley
Tribble of Roser. She invites questions, registration and
volunteers at 778-0414.

'Hats Off to Reading'
at library in June
The statewide "Hats Off to Reading" program has
sparked a series of special programs for children at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
The Family Storytime will continue at 6 p.m. ev-
ery Wednesday through the summer.
Other weekly programs will be. Tuesday from 2-
3 p.m.:
June 10 "Hats Off to Animals" featuring dog
trainer Joyce Kesling, who will discuss responsible dog
ownership.
June 17 "Hats Off to Magic" with Lyndell's
Magic Company providing tricks, laughs and audience
participation.
June 24 "Hats Off to Reading" with storytellers
Mary Kay Clune and Flossie Baker visiting from the
Braden River Branch Library.
The library opens at 10 a.m. daily except Sunday,
closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Details are available at 778-6341.

Gulf Writers workshop
Monday at library
The Gulf Coast Writers group will meet for a
workshop at 10:15 a.m. Monday, June 2, at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
-Those attending may bring.original poems and es-
says to read to the group. Details may be obtained by
calling 778-7732.

Variance request withdrawn
A request to the Anna Maria Planning and Zoning
Board for a variance at 101 Palm Ave. has been with-
drawn.
At its May 20 meeting, board members were in-
formed by Mark Barnebey, an attorney representing
owners Palm Properties LLC, that the pending request
had been withdrawn.


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PAGE 12 0 MAY 28, 2003 E THE ISLANDER


City says no variance needed for pool


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
After nearly 18 months, the ordeal of Anna Maria
residents Donna and Gary Perez of 783 Jacaranda St.
to get permission to build their swimming pool a few
feet into the setback behind their home ended in about
one hour's worth of city commission time.
It actually only took City Attorney Jim Dye about
20 minutes following a review of city codes to give his
legal opinion that under the new code adopted in Janu-
ary 2003, a swimming pool and accompanying deck
can be built into the setback area as long as those fa-
cilities are no more than 12 inches high.
Commissioner Chuck Webb, who is also an attor-
ney and assisted in drafting the new setback rules,
agreed. That was good enough for the rest of the com-
missioners, who agreed to dismiss a Perez request for
a variance to build their pool.
The Perezes were appealing a planning and zoning
board recommendation to deny the variance.
Now you don't need a variance, said Mayor
SueLynn. "You can build your pool."
The remaining 40 minutes was spent listening to
the Perez horror story.
"It's been a long journey," said Gary Perez.
Indeed.
The Perezes claimed they were originally given
verbal approval last year by then-city building official
George McKay to build their pool into the setback.
But a few weeks after taking out a $40,000 loan, the
Perezes said McKay called to say he was sorry, but there
had been a mistake. Their building permit was denied.
The Perezes then tried for a city vacation of the
alleyway between Jacaranda and North Shore, claim-
ing the city doesn't use the alleyway and there are al-
ready numerous encroachments in the right of way.
That became too expensive, and they then asked
the city to simply close the alleyway to allow use by the
residents. That was in December 2002, and the com-
mission agreed to have Dye look into closure.
Except that then-Commissioner John Michaels told
Dye there was a problem.
Dye said he never heard back from Michaels, who
did not run for re-election and moved to Amelia Island


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Jacaranda alleyway:

What happened, Chuck?
In 1998, then-Mayor Chuck Shumard reportedly
sent out letters to property owners along the Jacar-
anda-North Shore Drive alleyway advising them to
remove the encroachments, but nothing came of it,
said Donna Perez.
In the Nov. 11, 1998, issue of The Islander,
Shumard promised at a city commission meeting that
"all alleyways would be cleared of all encroachments
and trees," and "all alleyways would have a shell path
installed."
Four and a half years later, said Perez, "nothing
has been done."
There is really no alleyway behind their home to
observe, said Perez. Walking along where the 10-
foot-wide city right of way should be, Perez pointed
out numerous encroachments of fences, shrubs and
tool sheds. One homeowner has even built a pool
deck out into the alleyway, apparently taking up the
entire 10-foot section of city property behind their
house.
"None of these people have ever been told to
move," or remove encroachments, Perez claimed.
"They are enjoying the use of city property and not
paying taxes on that land."


in April.
That led the Perezes to the variance request, which
was originally denied by a 4-2 vote of the planning and
zoning board.
At that time, however, all the board members were
sympathetic to the Perez problem, but interpreted the
setback code for swimming pools differently than Dye.
In fact, Board Chairman Doug Copeland had even
suggested to the Perezes that they could appeal that
decision to the city commission.

Right-of-way violations
While the saga of the Perez pool is apparently over,
the issue of right-of-way violations along the alleyway
in question is not over, said Commissioner Linda
Cramer.


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Encroachments have taken place along the city
right of way between Jacaranda and North Shore Drive
for a number of years. Neighbor has complained about
neighbor, who has complained about neighbor, and
successive city administrations have failed to take ac-
tion (The Islander, Nov. 11, 1998).
Then-Mayor Chuck Shumard's efforts in Novem-
ber 1998 to clear the alleyway failed when the city was
given an estimate that it would cost about $70,000 to
remove all encroachments.
Cramer recommended the commission put discus-
sion of right-of-way encroachments in this area on a
future workshop agenda and Quam said it would be on
the June 12 meeting agenda.

Poor DePorre
The commission again delayed action on a vari-
ance request by Jim DePorre of 801 N. Shore Drive to
build a new house to a height of 42 feet, five feet above
the current building height limit in the city.
DePoore wants to build the house seaward of the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection's
Coastal Construction Control Line and claims there is a
problem with DEP requirements for new construction
seaward of the CCCL and the city's 37-foot height limit.
Quam said the planning and zoning board was to
meet in a special session May 27 and it "would be in-
appropriate to act at this time."
The variance request was tabled to a special com-
mission meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3.
Commissioner Chuck Webb said he had a conflict
of interest and excused himself from the discussions.

Belle Haven
Commissioners agreed to a line-item transfer of
$7,000 requested by Mayoi SueLynn for continued
restoration of the Belle Haven cottage, now situated at
the "historical park" on Pine Avenue.
The mayor said the budget for Belle Haven only
has $4,453 for the remainder of the fiscal year and
needs about $2,346 for continued restoration.
She said further funding for the restoration project
would be raised by the Anna Maria Island Historical
Society through fundraising efforts or grants.
But resident Diane Canniff questioned the transfer,
wondering if the city had a "pig and a poke here?"
Not so, said Carolyne Norwood of the society. "It's
not a waste of money to restore" Belle Haven to its
1920 condition.
Commissioners agreed to the $7,000 transfer to en-
sure enough funds were on hand for the project this year.



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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 13


Obituaries


William E. Dawson
William E. Dawson, 79, of Holmes Beach, died
May 15.
Born in Chelsea, Mass., Mr. Dawson came to
Manatee County from Stoneham, Mass., in 1986. He
was a manager and mechanical engineer for General
Electric for more than 37 years. He served in the U.S.
Army during World War II as part of the Manhattan
Project. He was a graduate of Tufts University, class of
1948. He was a member of the Elfun Society of Gen-
eral Electric Tampa Group. He attended St. Bernard
Catholic Church, Holmes Beach.
Memorial services will be at 10 a.m. June 2 at the
church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach. Memo-
rial contributions may be made to Hospice of South-
west Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL 34238.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home is in charge of arrange-
ments.
He is survived by wife Janet; daughters Linda
Kemp of Spring, Texas, Cynthia Langer of Beverly
Farms, Mass., and Suzanne Zinkand of Darien, Conn.;
son William J. of Cumberland, Maine; sister Harriett
Keyser of Holmes Beach; and nine grandchildren.


Jack Jolley
Jack Jolley, 82, of Anna Maria, died May 21.
Born in Kent, England, Mr. Jolley came to
Manatee County from New Jersey in 1979. He re-
tired as a traffic manager from Johnson & Johnson.
He served in the U.S. Army during World War II as
a captain with the Army Corps of Engineers in Ja-
pan, New Guinea and the Philippines. He was a
member of the American Legion and the Moose
Lodge in Bradenton Beach. He was Methodist.
Memorial services were May 24. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to the American Cancer Society,
600 U.S. 301 Blvd. W., Suite 136, Bradenton FL
34205. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel,
was in charge of arrangements.
He is survived by lifelong companion Emily


Delcamp; nieces Judith Miller of Jupiter, Joanne
Sills of Tacoma, Wash., Peggy Payne of San Diego,
Gail Phoenix of Auburn, Maine, Nancy Reed of
Elkhart, Iowa, and Barbara Mahoney of
Woodbridge, Conn.; and nephew Jim Phoenix of
Raymond, Maine.



William K. Knudson
William K. Knudson, 76, of Bradenton Beach, died
May 23.
Born in Mineola, N.Y., Mr. Knudson came to
Manatee County from Jamesport, N.Y., three years
ago. He was the owner of Knudson Elevator in Long
Island, N.Y. He served in the U.S. Army during World
War II. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge in
Floral Park, N.Y. He attended Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church, Anna Maria.
Memorial services will be held at a later date.
Memorial contributions may be made to the church,
P.O. Box 247, Anna Maria FL 34216. Griffith-Cline
Funeral Home, Island Chapel, is in charge of arrange-
ments.
He is survived by wife Ruth S.; son Robert W. of
Tampa; and sister Nancy Niebuhr of Hicksville, N.Y.



Ethel Wegter Richardson
Ethel Wegter Richardson, 89, of Holmes Beach,
died May 23.
Born in Sheldon, Iowa, Mrs. Richardson came to
Manatee County from Dayton, Ohio, in 1975. She was
a homemaker. She attended Island Baptist Church,
Anna Maria City.
Services will be in Arlington, Va., with burial at
Arlington National Cemetery. Memorial contributions
may be made to Florida United Methodist Children's
Home, P.O. Box 6299, Deltona FL 32728. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, is in charge of
arrangements.




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of Holly Springs, N.C.; sister Catherine Krause of
Hobbs, N.M.; three grandchildren; and three great-
grandchildren.


Arthur 'Art' D. Rufner
Arthur "Art" D. Rufner, 80, of Holmes Beach,
died May 21.
Born in Fort Wayne, Ind., Mr. Rufner came to
Manatee County from there in 1970. He was a re-
tired firefighter. He served in the U.S. Army during
World War II. He was a Mason and a member of the
Scottish Rite. He was Protestant.
There was no service. Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, Manasota Chapel, was in charge of arrange-
ments.
He is survived by wife Kathryn H.; three chil-
dren; and several grandchildren.


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PAGE 14 MAY 28, 2003 U THE ISLANDER


Island schools versus FCAT: Good work!


AME tops itself
By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
SAnna Mfaria Elementary School is ending on a high
note this school Near with the improving results of the
Florida Comprehensi% e Assessment Test, which stu-
- derts.are required to take each year.
The FCAT focuses on reading, writing and math-
ematics skills and is administered in schools statewide
-as a-means to track performance levels. New this year
was the addition of a science test for fifth-graders.
Cindi Harrison, Anna Maria Elementary School's
guidance counselor, said the scores are just one way for
the school to assess whether it is maintaining or im-
proving its own student performance levels, and not a
mode of comparison with other schools.
This year AME students have improved in every
grade level and every subject, said AME Principal
Kathy Hayes.
This year's third-grade students maintained a
mean-scale score of 339 out of a possible 500 in read-
ing, and scored the same in Math, three points higher
than last-year's score of 336.
Harrison said a score in the 300s equates to an in-
dividual student score of a 3 or 4. A score of 3 is aver-
age with 5 being the highest score possible.
Ninety percent of fourth-graders scored 3 or above
in reading, up from 57 percent last year. And in fourth-
grade math, 84 percent scored 3 or above, up from last
year's 64 percent.
Fourth-grade students also take the writing portion
of the FCAT, the Florida Writes! test. Ninety-seven
percent of AME's fourth-graders scored 3 or above on
that test.
In the fifth-grade, 83 percent scored 3 or above on
the reading portion of the FCAT, up from 68 percent
last year. And in math, 70 percent scored a 3 or above,
as opposed to 63 percent last year.
"I feel proud about how the school did overall,"
said Hayes, "but what's most important to me is that
individual students are making gains. That's meaning-
ful."
Hayes said the next step is to get individual student
reports home to parents.
More FCAT information can be obtained on the
Internet at www.firn.edu/doe/sas/fcat.htm.


IMS holds its own
By Diana Bogan: .-..
Islander Reporter
The Island Middle School Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test scores show that its studentss are per-
forming at aniacademic level c comparable to other area
middle schools. .
IMS scores for sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders in
reading and math fall comfortably in the middle, on av-
erage, slightly higher than scores for Sugg Middle School
and slightly lower than scores for King Middle School.
IMS sixth-graders scored higher than the district
average in reading and math and so did the seventh-
graders.
IMS eighth-graders fell a few points short`of the
district average on all counts, including the science


portion of the FCAT, which sixth- and seventh-grad-
ers are not required to take.
Eighth-graders are also required to take the Florida
Writes! exam. The average score for IMS was 3.6 out
of a possible 6.0. The district average is 3.8.
The following is a breakdown of the IMS scores
versus the district average. Scores are on a scale of 100
to 500.
Sixth-grade reading: IMS 311, District 302.
Sixth-grade math: IMS 315, District 303.
Seventh-grade reading: IMS 337, District 302.
Seventh-grade math: IMS 312, District 301.
Eighth-grade reading: IMS 295, District 302.
Eighth-grade math: IMS 304, District 312.
Eighth-grade science: IMS 285, District 288.
More FCAT information can be obtained on the
Internet at www.firn.edu/doe/sas/fcat.htm.


Lobbying trek
Holmes Beach City Commissioners Don Maloney, left, and Rich Bohnenberger call on Florida Rep. Bill
Galvano to drum up support in the Legislature for bills that favor municipalities. The), also met with other
lawmakers representing this area.


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THE ISLANDER E MAY 28, 2003 M PAGE 15


New Perico neighborhood radio station organizing


By Preston Whaley Jr.
Islander Correspondent
Dave Beaton had just reviewed the agenda for the
first organizational meeting of the new low-power
neighborhood radio station LPFM 96.7. Approxi-
mately 12 volunteers and a consultant surrounded a
table at Fogertyville Cafe, the station's headquarters,
when volunteer David Rose placed a radio in the cen-
ter of the table and said, "I defy anyone to find some-
thing on there that has anything whatsoever to do with
Manatee County."
Thick silence indicated everyone got the point,
which, of course, was why everyone was there in the
first place.
The silence didn't last long. It was a lively meet-
ing. Ideas flew around the room. like ocean birds cir-
cling bait fish.
Bradenton resident Bob Schurr attended the meet-
ing to tell station organizers, "I don't want to hear
music I can't stand or self-promotional news," that is,
marketing that passes for news.
He wants a station that'll focus on crises informa-
tion about weather, accidents, fires, and chemical spills
in the river.
Schurr lives in a Bradenton retiree trailer park and
recalled how desperate people were for relevant infor-
mation the last time a big storm passed through town.
He said, "Someone, somehow, should be passing out
information" people need.
Others picked up on Schurr's idea.
Someone said it had been a long time since he'd
heard a traffic report that wasn't about Tampa. Still
others mentioned how helpful it would be to know in
a timely fashion about Island bridge holdups, stingray
invasions, pollution alerts and turtle happenings.
People expressed a strong need for regular local
news service beyond what the weeklies are able to do.
The best thing said about the daily papers referred to
them as "mullet wrappers."
Bob Blanchette attended the meeting because he
wants to cover local sports. Sports is a "big thing in this
county," he said. The audience needs a place to tune in.
Sports events are happening at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center most every week. That, plus the
schools and regular coverage of the Center's coming ex-
pansion, might give the station an appealing debut.
Add fishing reports, surf news, and olfactory read-
ings from the Manatee Golf Course, and you've got a
real program.
Anna Maria resident Charlie Canniff attended the
recent Island talent show and came away impressed by
the diverse personalities. "I want to see a local
WMNF," he said. He believes that type of station
would provide an opportunity to do "some really di-
verse programming."
Ideas are exciting, but the truck must precede the
trailer. The station has practical matters to overcome
before the first day of broadcast namely, the Federal
Communications Commission has to approve the West
Bay Neighborhood Association's application, said sta-


I-~^- - - v*.isi sw______
Married
Veronica Spaziante and Jason Gates of Holden,
Mass., were married at the Sand Pebble Motel in
Bradenton Beach. The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Novakoski of Worcester, Mass., the
bridegroom son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates of
Leicester, Mass.


,- ,I . ,




'Talk radio'
Organizers of the proposed new Perico Island-based FM radio station meet at their "headquarters" at
Fogartyville Cafe in Bradenton. Islander Photo: Preston Whaley Jr.


tion consultant Lee Spinks.
Competitive applications submitted by two reli-
gious organizations are slowing the process. Dave
Beaton said one of the groups will be ruled out because
it filed 60 applications, and the FCC allows only one
application per organization.
The other group, the Assembly of Christian
Churches, may be ruled out if the FCC verifies charges
that it has been broadcasting through a pirate station,
but that's more uncertain.
In the meantime, Beaton has approached the
churches' leadership about working out an agreement
to share airtime. The ACC said it wasn't interested,
although Beaton plans to try again.
This time, Charlie Canniff will go with him and
together they will document the meeting.
If an agreement can be worked out, then the FCC
will process the application sooner. Beaton said ap-
proval could take six to 18 months.
During the former President Bill Clinton's admin-
istration low-power FM was high priority with the
FCC. However, since the change in administration,
coupled with the events of 9/11 and continued opposi-
tion to community radio by such groups as the National
Association of Broadcasters and, ironically, NPR -
groups that do not want competition LPFM has be-
come low priority. And processing has slowed.
The application provides that the station antenna
and transmitter will be located at the south end of
Perico Island just north of the little bridge there, near
the power lines. Station consultant Lee Spinks said the
antenna can reach a maximum height of 27 feet. It's a
low-tech operation with no "eye pollution," he added.
The antenna can be run up a tree, extended from a roof,
or strung up a sailboat mast.
Confusion about the station's broadcast range has
been clarified as a 3.5-mile radius or a 7-mile diameter
primary-service area with an additional 3-mile margin,
within which most radios will pick up the signal. The
area covers Cortez, north Longboat Key, part of West
Bradenton and most of the Island.
Startup costs for the station should range between
$5,000 and $10,000, depending on the sophistication of
the equipment, provisions for remote broadcast, and the
proximity of the studio to the transmitter. The closer the
cheaper. If the studio is located away from the transmit-
ter, Beaton said the station can rent space on a high-
speed telephone line to connect the two, but that will
add to the monthly overhead.
Looking forward, a building permit will likely be
needed to install the antenna.
Also, the WBNA needs to fill out its officer ranks.
The Manatee Radio Project committee, a WBNA sub-
sidiary, also needs leadership.
A petition of support for the station is circulating,
as well, to lend legitimacy to fundraising and grant
writing efforts and also to help obtain a building per-
mit.
Glen Bonaker, Bob Blanchette and Maria Gilmore
agreed to help put together a community survey re-
questing people's broadcast preferences. They also
wanted to know if the local papers might publish the


survey as a community service, or, if not, what the fee
would be for a survey.
Other programming ideas included a swap-meet
call-in show and restaurant reviews. "Yeah, send all of
the snowbirds to the lousy restaurants," someone said.
"No, just send them to the local ones," said Rose.
Beaton said he'd like to see live improvisational
theater and music performances broadcast from the
Fogertyville Cafe.
Rose brought up the need for Hispanic broadcast-
ing. He said, "a lot of Hispanics work on the Island"
and would tune in to targeted programming.
Two people who could not attend the meeting sent
word they'd like to contribute. Islander employee Car-
rie Price wants to do a classic American country mu-
sic show, and local stock broker Chris Whaley offered
to do a progressive new music program.
Whaley said, "I've got all of the music. They don't
have to do a thing." He's ready to go.
The survey should have a lot to say about what
people want to hear. "Be ready for some surprises,"
someone piped up.
The next organizational meeting will be at 6p.m.
June 19, at Fogertyville Cafe, located at 800 17th Ave.
W., Bradenton.
There will be a Manatee Radio Project fundraising
concert featuring Steve Young at 8 p.m. May 31, also
at the Fogertyville Cafe. Young is a performer and song
writer. Many of the famous from The Eagles to Rita
Coolidge to Dolly Parton to Waylon Jennings and Del
McCoury have recorded his songs. Tickets to the
event are $15.
For more information on the Perico radio project,
call Lee Spinks at 587-2509.


Cortez 'bites'

By Joe Kane
Islander Reporter
The "First Lady of Cortez", Ruth Culbreath, will
be 93, June 3. In honor of Ruth's birthday, a party will
be held this summer.
Roger Allen, Cortez schoolhouse coordinator, will
speak on "Traditional boat building ideas for Cortez"
at 7 p.m. Friday, May 30, at the Cortez Community
Center, 4523 123rd Street.
Cortez is losing two gems, Ralph and Lois Fulford,
moving to Cordova Lakes in Bradenton. Ralph, bom in
Cortez, recently celebrated his 75th birthday.
Larry Hinds and Laura Gray have sold Charlie's
Cottages at the south end of 125th Street to Eva and
Peter Thurell of Sweden, part-time Cortez residents for
more than a generation.
Alcee Taylor just turned 80. Alcee and Plum's
house is a living museum of Cortez and was featured
in the movie "Great Expectations."
Cortez will hold a historic home tour and silent
auction March 27-28, 2004. Proceeds will go towards
paying off the remaining $68,000 owed for the pur-
chase of the adjoining 95-acre FISH Preserve in Cortez.
For information, call Karen Bell at 794-1249.





PAGE 16 MAY 28, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


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THE ISLANDER N MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 17


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PAGE 18 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Happy
Birthday!
The city cel-
ebrated its Golden
Jubilee last
weekend with a
'50s-style car
show. Pictured at
left are sisters
Josephine Fresh-
water and Louise
Emmanuel. They
used to manage
the Pines Trailer
Park in the city.
Islander
Photos:J.L.
Robertson


A hula-hoop contest drew a handful of contestents
Saturday. Amont the contestents were Karissa
Fischer, Chelsea Burgess, Sarah Scott, Chase
Stripling, and Christina Baar.


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Live Music 7:30 pm Pianist Skip Cook playing Gershwin,
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Special guest in
Bradenton Beach
The city's big dinner
last Wednesday drew
about 150 people.
Among them was a
special guest: Hope
McKensie, who served
as:the city's third-ever
clerk f 'uIm S .ptn ,,ib
195h to Dt L'nIber
1957. Times were a
little different then,
including the issuance
of a special pin with
the clerk's name on it.
Islander Photos: J.L.
Robertson


Among the
party guests
were, from
left, John
Sandberg,
Mollie
Sandberg,
Charlie
Grace,
Barbara
Turner and
current
Mayor John
Chappie.


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 19

Cucci sprinting

in Mr. Legs race
By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"If he were competing on good looks alone, he'd win
easily," said Maggie Cucci. "As it is, he has to raise money
at a dollar a vote."
She is managing her husband Anthony's campaign to
become Mr. Legs of 2003. He wants to succeed Islanders
who won the title in recent years. They have three months
to pull it off.
The contest is a major fundraiser for the American
Cancer Society in Manatee County. Contestants get one
vote for each dollar they raise for the society, and it's quite
personal for Cucci his sister-in-law Laura died of can--
cer in 1996, leaving five young children.
Cucci is manager of the Beach House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach, doing what he does best in the place he
wants to be: Anna Maria Island. He grew up on the Island,
youngest of seven children; wife Maggie, incidentally, is
one of six. They have three of their own. So far.
He owned Andiano, a small cafe6 in downtown
Bradenton that he closed three years ago to join the Chiles
Group. That gives him more time with his family than
running his own small business, he said.
Maggie will kick off the campaign with a fundraising
event Tuesday, June 10, at the Beach House. Everyone on
the Island is invited at $20 each for hors d'oeuvres and
cocktails.
At the end of June the restaurant will join in the Sand-
bar Olympics, sponsored by another of the Chiles Group
of restaurants, with the proceeds going to Cucci. It will pit
teams in keg rolls, swim around a buoy, volleyball and'
other events, most aquatic.
Meanwhile, Maggie is setting up collection jars at
businesses and other gathering places around the Island,
and putting the arm on friends and other well-wishers.
Another contestant with Island connections has his hat
in the ring as well. He is Harry Soule, supervisor.of the
Manatee County Fairgrounds, whose campaign manager
is last year's Mr. Legs, longtime Privateer Mitch Stewart.
The Cuccis may be reached at 778-1679 and, in his
case, at the restaurant, 779-2222.
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Anna Maria Island B






PAGE 20 0 MAY 28, 2003 E THE ISLANDER


Fifth.grade awards recognize student achievements


Anna Maria Elementary School fifth-graders gath-
ered in the school auditorium for their final elementary
school assembly, which recognized individual student
achievements during the school year.
AME Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison and
Principal Kathy Hayes awarded students who earned
high marks all year, for perfect attendance and for par-
ticipation in the school speech contest and Sunshine
Math program.
Jacob DiMiceli received a special award from
teacher Lynne McDonough for showing the most aca-
demic improvement.
Justin Dearlove, Jay Dee Jackson and Scottie
-Steenstra received the Helping Hands award for their dedi-
cation to raising and lowering the American flag each
school day. This new award will be presented each year
to students who lend a helping hand around campus.
Dearlove and Ally Walstad were this year's recipi-
ent of the Sons of the American Revolution Outstand-
ing Citizenship Award, given to a boy and girl with
strong leadership skills, upright character, patriotism
and dependability.
Anna Maria Island Rotary Club President Don
Fernald also unveiled a new award this year called the
Service Above Self Award. Students have learned about
the Rotary Club motto throughout the school year and the
award is meant for a. student who exemplifies the charac-
teristics upheld by Rotarians worldwide.
The first recipient of the AME Rotary Club award is
Chloe Bertrand. Her name will be engraved onto a plaque,
which will be displayed in the school office and each year
the new recipient's name will be added to the plaque.
Bertrand was chosen, in part, because teachers said
they never heard her utter an unkind word.
Also awarded at the ceremony were certificates for
participation in the Florida Studio Theater Young Play-
wrights Festival. Two students, Krystin Carlson and
Kiisten Whitt, received honorable mention from FST
for their individual plays.
At the close of the ceremony, a video presentation
of this year's graduating fifth-grade class was shown.
Copies of the video can be ordered at Take One Video
on Manatee Avenue for a nominal fee. For information,
call 746-4444.
Fifth-graders will have the opportunity to celebrate
their school achievements with friends and family at
the Beach House Restaurant during a farewell luncheon
May 27.

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Helping hands
Anna Maria Elementary School Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison and Principal Kathy Hayes unveiled a
new award this year for fifth-graders: the Helping Hands Award. This year's recipients, Justin Dearlove, Jay
Dee Jackson and Scottie Steenstra, were chosen for volunteering to raise and lower the American flag each
school day. Harrison said the boys told her "to get with it, because there isn't much time left to train new
people to do the job for next school year." Islander Photos: Diana Bogan


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Ryan Agnew
Chloe Bertrand
Kenneth Burns
Noelani Carver-Mills
Daniel Connelly
Krista Davidson
Amanda Franklin
James Hall
Hilary Hathaway
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Kiera Knope
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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 N PAGE 21


Island Middle School's first commencement


The Island Middle School celebrated the accom-
plishments of its first departing eighth-grade class with
a commencement ceremony at the Island Baptist
Church May 23.
The IMS intermediate band opened the cer-
emony with "Pomp and Circumstance," which was
followed by an invocation read by eight-grader
Emily Salter.
Florida Representative Bill Galvano of Bradenton
was the keynote speaker, encouraging students to never
give up or give in. "The secret to successfully reaching
your goals is perseverance," he said.
Following Galvano's commencement address, stu-
dent achievement awards were presented. Lindsey
Bressi and Winn Haslam received the American Le-
gion Award for scholarship, leadership and commit-
ment to service.
Anna Maria Island Rotary Club President Don
Fernald also presented a Rotary Club Award to
Alexandra Stewart. Stewart is the first recipient at IMS
of the Rotary award, which is given to a student who
puts "service above self" and acts as a role model for
others.
After the ceremony, a reception was held in the
church fellowship hall with a buffet dinner and music
by the Jimi Gee Band.
The first eight-grade class to graduate from IMS is


listed below. Congratulations!
Lindsey Bressi
Catherine Clark
Danielle Cronin
Donald Dinsmore II
James Grantham
Joseph Winn Haslam
Heather Howard
Heather Johnston
Nicole Jones
Ryan McNesky
Karissa Messina


Cory Myers
Brian Nipper
Emily Salter
Alexandra Stewart
Sara Strain
Alisha Ware
Veronica White
Christina Zash


Center's summer
"Under the Sea," marathon, Olympics, soccer,
wiffle everything to keep youngsters constructively
busy for the season is on the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center's summer camp schedule.
The main summer camp starts June 2 and runs for
nine weeks. Titled "Under the Sea," it will have a ma-
rine core and accommodate the interests of the pre-
middle school set. Participants must be going into first-
through sixth-grades this fall, said the camp director,
Gary Wooten.
Running almost parallel with the summer camp
will be the Center's summer sports camp, with some-
thing for everyone interested in sports.
While summer camp attendance varies greatly,
Wooten said that the Center can count on between 50
and 100 kids any given week.
Costs vary, too. It is $15 for initial registration,
$110 for the first week, $80 after that except for field-
trip weeks, which cost $90. Scholarships are available


Original gang
Jeanne Shell recog-
nized eighth-grade
-. .. students who are not
'only part of the first
v graduating class, but
-. are also part of the
first student body to
enroll at IMS when .it
S opened last year.
From left, Kaylee
Clark, Danielle
Cronin, Don
or m c Dinsmore, Winn
Haslam, Heather
Howard, Brian Nipper
and Emily Salter.

camp programs
to youths who need them, Wooten said.
There will be art participation every day, such as
watercolors or music or dance. The Center will partner
with the Island Branch Library every Tuesday for
magic, reading, dance and arts. And there will be such
extras as cookouts, a side trip somewhere and other
activities to keep the children's interest, he said.
The list of activities includes cooking, field trips,
education in biology and geography, sea creatures,
shells, and an array of subjects designed to grab and
hold young minds. The environment will be stressed in
all of it.
Every Friday there will be a field trip, to such at-
tractions as Florida Marina Aquarium, Mote Marine
Laboratory, Busch Gardens, Jungle Gardens, Adven-
ture Island, Salvador Dali Museum and others.
Registration is under way now at the Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, or may be discussed by
calling 778-1906.


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PAGE 22 "MAY 28, 2003 THE ISLANDER








Wednesday, May 28
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.

Thursday, May 29
7 to 8 p.m. Teen GIRLS Forum at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.

* Saturday, May 31
8:30 a.m. Myakka River State Park hike with
the Sierra Club. Information: 484-4113. Fee applies.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rummage sale at St. Bernard
Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
Information: 778-4769.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Snooks Adams' Kids Day:
Free hot dogs, pizza and pop, kid's games, buried
treasure, pirate look-a-like contest, karate demo,
hosted by the Anna Maria Island Privateers at Anna
Maria Bayfront Park, North Bay Boulevard, Anna
Maria.
1 p.m. to 3 p.m.- Author luncheon with guest
Randy Wayne White at Ooh La La! Bistro, Holmes
Beach. Signed editions of Everglades and other White
novels available from Circle Books next door to the
restaurant at The Islander during the luncheon. 5404-
5406 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
8 p.m. Steve Young concert to benefit the


Manatee Radio Project at the Fogartyville Cafe, 800
17th Ave. W., Bradenton. Information: 741-9755. Fee
applies.

Sunday, June 1
7p.m. "Fun at the Center" for Island teens at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.

Monday, June 2
7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Summer Camp begins at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee ap-
plies.
10:15 a.m. Gulf Coast Writers summer work-
shop at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 792-7732.
6:30 p.m. Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island
demonstration by artist/musician Graciella Giles at the
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation hall, 4408 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-6694.

Tuesday, June 3
7:30 a.m. Business Network International
meeting at the Hilton Hotel, 4711 Gulf of Mexico
Drive, Longboat Key. Information: 383-5543.
9 to 10 a.m. Muscles and More with Sherry
Fideler at the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-
1908. Fee applies.
6 to 7 p.m. Pilates with Laura Bennett at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee ap-
plies.
7 to 9 p.m. Teen art program at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. Information: 778-1908.


Wednesday, June 4
7 to 8 a.m. Pier regulars meeting at the Anna
Maria City Pier. Information: 778-7062.
8 a.m. Comprehensive health screening and
wellness program by the Manatee County Health De-
partment at the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce, 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information:
779-9412. Fee applies.
6 p.m. Family storytime at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-6341.
7 p.m. "Marjory Stoneman Douglas: Vision-
ary of the Everglades," starring Peggy Martin at the
Fogartyville Cafe, 800 17th Ave. W., Bradenton. In-
formation: 366-5101 or 366-9596. Fee applies, pro-
ceeds benefit Manatee-Sarasota Sierra Club.

Ongoing:
7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Summer Camp at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.
Art by Marilyn Cassidy at the Artists Guild Gal-
lery, 5414 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, through May
31. Information: 778-1788.
Manatee High School Student Exhibit at the
Anna Maria Island Art League, 5312 Holmes Blvd.,
Holmes Beach, through May 31. Information: 778-
2099.

Upcoming:
Vacation Bible School at Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church June 9-13 with registration now.
Vacation Bible School at Gloria Dei Lutheran
Church July 14-18 with registration now.
Islandwide blood drive June 7-8.
Duets of Distinction concert at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church June 8.


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria
May 14, 9000 block of Gulf Drive, driving with-
out a license. A man was arrested for reportedly driv-
ing with a suspended license.
May 17, 314 N. Bay Blvd., Bayfront Park, informa-
tion. According to the report, deputies were informed of
a fire burning in a wooden trash can. West Manatee and
Fire Rescue responded and extinguished the fire.
May 22, 500 block of South Bay Boulevard, found
property. A swamped canoe was reportedly found in a
canal.
May 22, 9906 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria
Laundromat, domestic battery. According to the report,
a plate glass window was smashed when a man shoved
another man during an argument. He was arrested for
domestic battery and criminal mischief, according to
the report.
May 24, Lake La Vista Canal, information. Ac-
cording to the report, deputies were notified of an in-
jured manatee in the canal. Deputies attempted to find
the manatee but were unable to locate it and contacted
Mote Marine Laboratory with the general location of
the sighting.
May 26, 300 block of North Shore Drive, trespass
warning. According to the report, a man was seen
shouting at a resident's front door. Deputies issued a
trespass warning to the man and, according to the re-
port, he left the scene without further incident.
May 26, 100 feet offshore of the 100 block of
Spring Avenue, pollution. According to the report, a
suspect was observed breaking glass bottles on the side
of a boat and letting the broken glass fall into the wa-
ter close to the beach.

Bradenton Beach
May 15, 2100 Gulf Drive, Coquina Park, drug ar-
rest. Alvin Ducre, 40, of Bradenton, was arrested after


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police verified he was driving a stolen vehicle. Accord-
ing to the report, inside the car officers found slightly
more than 16 pieces of crack cocaine.
May 15, 1801 Gulf Drive N., Runaway Bay con-
dominiums, theft. A bicycle was reported stolen.
May 17, 100 block of 25th Street, loitering and
prowling. While on patrol officers reported seeing three
juveniles loitering in front of a vacant condominium.
According to the report, the boys ran when they saw the
officers, but two were apprehended after officers pur-
sued them. According to the report, the boys said they
ran because one of them had consumed alcohol.
May 20, 1900 block of Gulf Drive, warrant arrest.
According to the report, a woman found sleeping in her
car was arrested on a Polk County warrant.

Holmes Beach
May 16, 200 block of 68th Street, battery. A
woman reported that her boyfriend struck her after she


Anna Maria's Environmental Education and
Enhancement Committee agreed to send a letter to
the city commission asking that Gulffront Park be
designated as public conservation lands.
The EEEC may need that designation to apply
for a state grant next year to remove invasive plants
from the area.
The committee also discussed the yard waste
pickup problem in the city and learned from Com-
missioner John Quam that the city plans to talk
with Waste Management Inc., the city's trash col-
lector, on back-door pickup of yard waste.
It appears that some Anna Maria absentee
property owners clear their yards of waste on the


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found another woman at his home.
May 18, 200 block of South Harbor Drive, bever-
age law. An 18-year-old. was. ar.rosted for underage
possession of alcohol after officers saw him drinking"
a quart of beer in a prohibited public area.
May 19, 100 block of 36th Street, burglary. Ac-
cording to the report, $400 was stolen from a wallet left
in an unlocked residence.
May 20, 28th Street and Gulf Drive, warrant arrest.
A man was arrested on a Manatee County warrant.
May 21, 100 block of 36th Street, burglary. A man
was arrested after two witnesses reported seeing him
steal an 18-pack of beer from a residence.
May 21, 6600 block of Marina Drive, drug arrest.
Christopher Martin, 20, of Bradenton, was arrested on
two outstanding warrants. According to the report, at
the time of this arrest he was in possession of 22.5
grams of marijuana and was also charged with felony
marijuana possession.


weekend and leave the bundles at the curb for
Wednesday pickup, the committee noted.
Quam also said the subject of pro-active code
enforcement on yard waste in the right of way
might be on the city's June 12 workshop agenda.
Jamie Walstad asked if anyone in the city still
uses a septic tank for waste disposal.
She thought if any of those were leaking, that
might be one reason why canal waters are polluted.
Eisler believed only a few septic tanks were
still in use in the city, and suggested Walstad check
with Anna Maria Public Works Director George
McKay or Manatee County to determine if that is
the case.


INSHORE SPORTFISHING CHARTER BOAT


,,peatAt





Captain Steven Salgado
Owner/Operator
Lifetime experience in local waters


Full & Half Day Trips
Custom Trips Available
U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom-built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait &
Tackle Furnished
Anna Maria Island
Florida
778-9712


State grants available for invasive removal





THE ISLANDER E MAY 28, 2003 E PAGE 23


Tarpon time is here at last; reds thick in backwater


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Tarpon season has arrived with a vengeance, fi-
nally.
There are reports of hookups by almost all of the
anglers aiming to catch silver kings, with the best ac-
tion apparently off the beaches and in Tampa Bay.
There are also lots of large sharks, with a few
catches in the 7-foot-long range.
Inshore action continues to feature redfish and
catch-and-release snook.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach out of Catchers Marina said he's
catching and releasing lots of tarpon, with hookups on
almost every trip. He's finding that threadfin herring is
the best bait for the silver kings. Inshore fishing fea-
tures redfish and trout, he said.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business out of Catch-
ers said he's reeling in catch-and-release snook to 35
inches in length, redfish to 27 inches and trout to 22
inches. He's also catching and releasing tarpon to 100
pounds.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of Catch-
ers said he's still going about 100 miles out and getting
great results with big grouper to 30 pounds, snapper to 6
pounds, and a few blackfin tuna to 25 pounds.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said tar-
pon are being reported almost every day off the beaches
and in Tampa Bay. Offshore action includes grouper
and snapper, although they seem to have moved a bit
farther out, in about 100 feet of water. Inshore fishing
features lots of catch-and-release snook, redfish in
Sarasota Bay, and plenty of keeper trout.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said fishers there
are catching mackerel, snapper, one cobia hooked and
lost, a few too-big redfish and tarpon are rolling by the


All smiles
Brendon McLellan, 7, caught this 27-inch-long
redfish while fishing with Capt. Mike Heistand.
Brendon was visiting his grandfather, Dave, of
Holmes Beach, with his dad Don. They're from
Medina, Ohio.

pier every morning right now.
Anglers at the Anna Maria City Pier are catching
pompano, mackerel a few catch-and-release snook and
a few sharks to five feet in length. There are also some
mangrove snapper being reeled onto the dock.


Capt. Matt Bowers on the Outcast in Holmes
Beach said he's getting good catches of red grouper to
20 pounds on several trips, plus he's finding gag grou-
per action to be missed but is catching lots of mangrove
snapper to 4 pounds.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
reports from there include trout and reds on the
seagrass flats and tarpon off the beaches.
Capt. Brian Kisluk said he's been catching lots of
tarpon, with hookups and landings on every trip last
week.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
he's seen more redfish come to the dock in the last
week than anything else, although there seem to be lots
of keeper trout in Terra Ceia Bay. Night fishers report
catching lots of big trout at night in Tampa Bay.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he's catching trout, mackerel, small redfish
to 22 inches and plenty of catch-and-release snook to
27 inches on artificial and live bait. He's getting the
best results in Terra Ceia Bay and Miguel Bay.
On my boat Magic, we've been catching redfish to
30 inches long this week, trout to 22 inches and landed
one 100-pound tarpon.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year fishing guide.
Call him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing report. Prints
and digital images of your catch are also welcome and
may be dropped off at The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, or e-mailed to
news @islander.org. Please include identification for
persons in the picture along with information on the
catch and a name and phone number for more infor-
mation. Snapshots may be retrieved once they appear
in the paper.


Happy hurricane season: you know the drill


And here we go again ...
Hurricane spason kicks off on Sunday. You'll find
all the stuff you need to know in our special section in
this edition of The Islander stuff to get, stuff to se-
cure, stuff to insure, stuff to say goodbye to when
you've gotta get the heck off the Island.
Stuff you should do now.
I hope you know the drill leave when it looks
like a storm is going to hit. Goodness knows we've
been preaching it long enough by now that everybody
should have figured it out. As has been so well de-
scribed by some of our law enforcement-fire service

Center summer routine
includes exercise classes
Adult exercise classes are being offered during the
summer at the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
The summer schedule begins Monday, June 2.
"Muscles and More" with Sherry Fideler will meet at 9
a.m. Tuesday; "Beginners Pilates" with Laura Bennett
will be at 9 a.m. Thursday; other pilates classes will be
at 6 p.m. Tuesday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $4 per class for members, $5 nonmembers.
Details are available at 778-1908.


Anna Mc aria V slan cies

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
May 28 10:32am 2.2 4:02am 1.1 - 5:36pm 0.1
May29 12:44am 1.5 4:26am 1.2 10:51a* 2.3 6:llpm 0.0
NM May 30 1:41am 1.5 4:42am 1.3 l:12a* 2.4 6:50pm-0.1
May 31 2:30am 1.4 4:53am 1.3 ll:40a* 2.5 7:27pm-0.2
Jun 1 3:33am 1.4 s5:llam 1.3 12:10pm 2.5 8:10pm -
Jun 2 - 12:47pm 2.5 8:52pm -0.2
Jun 3 - 1:29pm 2.5 9:40pm -0.2
Jun 4 - 2:18pm 2.5 10:28pm-0.1
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later






CP ,


. 4E~


^^v^. *ii5 -"l B S ^



By Pa Rat,

personnel: "If you aren't evacuating, please give us
your name so we can notify your next of kin."
In one of those white nights, the kind when you lie
awake wondering about the predictions of doom and
gloom that lie ahead of us in hurricane season, I did my
own little personal inventory of stuff. It came up short
and, since I'm one of those more-than-anal-retentive
folks, I'm fearful that y'all are gonna be ever worse off.
Yeah, I've got my Spam. Vienna sausages, too.
And I stockpiled a bunch of weird liquid paraffin
candles a year or so ago, despite everybody saying that
you shouldn't use candles for light if the power goes
out because of the fire potential in the event of gas
leaks. I promise I won't use them. Honest.
Batteries: check.
Water: oops. My backup gallons are dated May 15,

BOATS R RUSS
Sales Service Parts





-- -- re a IWO %u L
2412 9th St. W. Bradenton 748-9648 1W
See Island Resident Don Remig for all your Sea-Doo needs


Captain Doug Moran

* Snook Redfish
* Trout Tarpon

USCG Licensed
Half & Full Day Charters
(941) 792-0035
Cell: (941) 737-3535


2001, and are now down the drain.
Ditto some of the canned tuna. And, oops again,
some of that Vienna sausage. Jeez, did I buy that stuff
in 2000?
So it's time to go to the store, and maybe time for
you to check your pantry and check the stocks. And
stock up.
Oh, and remember Tropical Storm Gabrielle in
2001? I went without power for better than four days,
as did some of my colleagues at the newspaper. I ended
up with a very, very clean refrigerator after about the
second day.
Perhaps it's time to invest in one of those little
generators, you know, the kind that runs off gasoline
and keeps your fridge going if your power is out....
Let's hope for a "Spam feast" come Dec. 1 because
of all the leftover food in our collective pantries, thanks
to a non-eventful hurricane season.

Sandscript factoid
You know how you always tend to mush that first
Vienna sausage as you try to get it out of the can? Next
time, try using a corkscrew to pull the middle wiener out.

Capt. Mike's
Charter Boat

"MAGIC"
Backwater Near Shore Up to 7 miles out in the Gulf
Snook Redfish Trout Flounder Mackerel Snapper
Light Tackle Fishing Reservations a must
Tackle, bait, ice, fishing license provided!
779-9607
1 Capt. Mike Heistand USCG Licensed






PAGE 24 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER


Center's Monster Jam 3-on-3 tourney a blast


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The first-annual Anna Maria Island Community
Center Monster Jam 3-on-3 basketball tournament was
a huge success. The tournament, played Saturday, May
25, at the Center, attracted 37 teams and more than 160
players in six age divisions.
Although no all-Island team brought home a first-
place trophy, a couple of the first-place teams were well
represented with Islander players. Spencer Carper and
Matt McDonough teamed up with Bradenton's Mark
Templeton to claim the age 12-13 division without drop-
ping a game all day. Their Magic team defeated the 30th
St. Ballers 15-11 in the championship game.
In perhaps the most competitive division, the P-Town
Bailers came from behind to defeat Bradenton Christian
17-15 on Joe Morris' two-pointer from beyond the arc.
Bradenton Christian fought its way through the loser's
bracket and had to defeat the Bailers twice.
BC accomplished half of its goal when they beat
them 15-11 to set up a winner-take-all game. The final
game saw BC lead for most of the game and actually
got to game point, but Sam Lott nailed a long jumper
from the top of the key for a two-pointer and a 15-14
lead. BC's Jeff Wehling made a driving layup to tie the
score and set the stage for Morris' game-winning two-
pointer to claim the championship trophy.
Island resident Sam Lott joined fellow Palmetto
High Schoolers Morris and Mistral Raymond as mem-
bers of the P-Town Ballers.
The X-plosion raced past the Defenders by a 15-3
score to complete an undefeated day of 3-on-3 basketball
with a championship trophy in the 8-9 division. Eric
Traber, Tom Barnhardt, Joey Carollo and Tanner
Weigand made up the 8-9 champion X-plosion. They
defeated the Defenders who boasted Islanders Ally
Titsworth, Chris Callahan, Blake Wilson and Daniel
Janisch.
The 10-11 division was easily won by the Gators
who defeated Showtime 15-10 to complete an unde-
feated day. Zachary Beeker, Robert Bowden and
Daniel Magley made up the Gators team.


P-Town Baller Sam Lott dribbles through his legs in
an attempt to get past Bradenton Christian's Chase
Cofer during Monster Jam 3-on-3 basketball
action at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
The 18-29 division was very competitive as Still
Here fought its way through the loser's bracket to claim
the championship by twice defeating 4-Play. Clayton
Lyon, Zach Hicferdine, Nathan Tuttle and Rob Butler
were members of Still Here.
The Kings claimed first place in the "Ben Gay," or 30-
and-over division, by beating (I'm not making this up) The
Last Vestiges of a Dying Society 15-10 to complete an
undefeated day. Jim Maier, Jack Gish, Mark Setsma and
Mike Raimon were the members of the Kings.

Islander leads team to brink
Island resident Clay Orr led the last-seeded Bulls
past two higher seeds to earn a spot in the boys' age 14-
15 championship game of the Manatee County Parks
and Recreation basketball league.
The Bulls struggled to a 1-7 record during the regu-
lar season, but got it together for the playoffs. They
defeated third-seeded Gold Bank 70-50 behind 28
points from Orr to open the playoffs. They followed
that up with a 45-39 win over the second-seeded
Hawks, getting 30 points from Orr.
Orr was on fire in the championship game against
the Heat, but a cheeky foul called with slightly more


than five minutes remaining in the game sent Orr to the
bench for good and did in the Bulls.
With the Bulls clinging to a 44-43 lead, Ben Jack-
son stole the ball and was fouled resulting in a pair of
foul shots. Jackson made one to send the game into
overtime where the Heat outscored the Bulls 7-4 to
claim the championship.
Orr led the Bulls with 20 points in a losing effort.

WMFD drops into loser's bracket
WMFD finally played a game that counted for
something after more than a month of scrimmages
against a variety of teams, but they came out flat and
suffered a 6-4 loss Wednesday, May 21, to Morrish
Orthodontics to drop to the loser's bracket.
WMFD now has its work cut out due to the num-
ber of games they must play to advance, which will
also tax its already thin pitching.
WMFD caught a break in the bracket that matches
them up with American Car Care, a 25-0 loser to Ti-
tan Boats for its second game of the tourney Tuesday,
May 27. A win over American Car Care would pit them
against either Troxler & Smith or American League
champion Marine Corps Thursday, May 29.
WMFD will probably take a chance and start one
of their less experienced pitchers, such as Lance
Burger, Matt Shaffer or Ryan Guerin, to save Jared
McKenzie and Ben Valdivieso for tougher opponents
that await.

Center news and notes
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is host-
ing the Island Sports Marathon Team Challenge, which
consists of seven weeks of competition in seven differ-
ent sports. The action gets started Monday, June 7, for
children of all ages. The winning team will receive a
trip to their choice of Orlando, Fla., amusement parks.
Other events that are upcoming at the Center in-
clude the Island Track & Field, OJympic competition
which gets started Saturday, June 21.
For more information on any of the above, please
give Joe Cheblus a call at 778-1908.


OLD BRIDGE VILLAGE
300 Bay Dnve South
Between 3rd L& 4th Street S.
Bradenton Beach. FL 3421-
(941) 778-0156
www.oldbridgevillage.com


Barentn each CIub


Last two pr&-cor.struc;lon priced townhomes! Nearly 2,000 sq.ft.
of ;.vi ng pacp two-car garage, storage and private elevator.

Located in I' --'- between the turquoise waters of the
Gul o Mexicoand: '.. the BBC is the newest
townhome and condominium resort on Florida's scenic ,"-. '. coast.
: floor.' and choice interior and exterior architectural details
at the include ,: terraces, enclosed garages, optional el-
evatorsr and ...r ... ..' .. :, the ;..-,'.ri-! pools with cas-
,. :i wilderness boardwalk and a 'i.' :. center.
AH am id a : .i'..:.'; .; w ith ,;1.' 1i-,, i ,: -. .ii'', ... your


The Br iV &!i d Obl- Beach Ct[b weEcomeas your visit...
at 17t Street & S. f n e, Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
CaE 778-5983
www.bradentonbeachclub.net


68(





THE ISLANDER N MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 25



IRALARAGSALBAT BAi


COMPLETE COMPUTER system: speakers, moni-
tor, keyboard, mouse, printer. 40-gigabyte hard
drive, 92-megabyte ram. Free internet, free com-
puter lessons. $385. 383-5372.

BEDROOM SET: solid oak in a stateroom style by
National of Mt. Airy. Eight pieces with king-size
headboard, but no beds, $1,400. Pickard China, flo-
ral chintz pattern, service for eight, plus extras,
$200. Oriental rugs, library of classic books printed
before 1900. 792-4274.

ELECTRA-RIDE stairway elevator. New, never
used. Made by Bruno Living Aids. Paid $4,500, will
sell for $2,500. 713-6359.

100 PERCENT PERFECT, just not my thing. RCA
MSN-TV service Internet receiver, keyboard,
printer. $250 value, asking $150. 778-4253.

FANTASTIC AMERICAN COINS! 37 oldies, includ-
ing two and three cent pieces, 21 Indian-head
cents. $75 for all! Call 792-4274.

FREE DELIVERY: SEAFOOD to go. Shrimp, crabs,
native fish. Delivered to your door. Call James Lee,
795-1112 or 704-8421.

BIG BEAUTIFUL HOUSEBOAT $28,500 or make
offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.


GIRL SCOUT COOKIES available at The Islander ,
assorted varieties, $3.50 box. All proceeds to local
a Girl Scout troop.

DONATE BLOOD! Your blood donation to the
Manatee County Blood Center is worth $100 to par-
ticipating Anna Maria Island community organiza-
tions. The blood mobile will be on the Island Satur-
day and Sunday, June 7 and 8. Pick up a card and
choose your charity Anna Maria Island Community
Center. Anna Ma la island Privateers, Wildlife Re-
habilitation and Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch.
Each blood donation will generate $100 for partici-
pating community organization. Three sights to
donate blood: Marina Pointe Realty and A Pine
Avenue Salon in Anna Maria; The Islander in
Holmes Beach and the Beach House Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach. See future Islander issues for
more details!


-tK



- 4BR/3BA pool home on
- canal. $479,900.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP open Tuesday, Thursday
9:30am-2pm, Saturday 9am-noon. Always sales
racks. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.

MOVING SALE: Everything must go! Wednesday-
Saturday, May 28-31, 8am-noon. 223 Oak, Anna
Maria.

MOVING IN SALE Friday-Saturday, May 30-31,
9am-1pm. 622 Emerald Lane, Key Royale.

RUMMAGE SALE SATURDAY, May 31, 9am-1pm.
Jewelry, books. St. Bernard Activity Center, 43rd.
Street, Holmes Beach.



CRITTER SITTER Seven years in pet care, 22 years
as an Island resident. Tender, loving care for your
pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.

FREE TO A good home. Young female dog, short
hair, sweet disposition, easy to train, shots, spayed.
Originally abandoned, I can't keep her. Please call,
778-1183.


1991 MERCURY SABLE wagon, 146,000 miles,
cold air conditioning, keypad entry, alarm, all power,
good rubber, service records. Need motor mount,
Best offer. Call 779-2404.

1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN, cold air conditioning,
has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs great.
$3,100, or best offer. 730-9622.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation
or long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Min-
utes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Capt.
John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting.
BOAT SLIPS FOR sale on Sarasota Bay in
Bradenton Beach. Located on Bay Drive South be-
tween Third and Fourth Streets. Each slip from
$750,000. New spacious 2BR/2.5BA condos free
with purchase. Call Old Bridge Village, 778-0156 or
www.oldbridgevillage.com

FISHING FOR a good deal? Look in The Islander,
778-7978 or online www.islander.org.


Richard...the #1 Source for Island Real
44,


4BR/3.5BA on North
End of Island. $495,000.


and lift. $559,000.


Gulf and bay view duplex.
$750,000. -


"Old Florida" d
to beach $459


BOAT LIFT for lease. Capacity of 7,000 lbs. Located
at a residence in Key Royal, Holmes Beach. Available
immediately. $150/month, payable in 2-3 month
blocks in advance. For details, call 730-1086.

14.5-FOOT SCOUT, 30-hp Yamaha. Trailer and all
equipment included. Great shape. $2,400. 778-
3313 or 730-6349.

HOUSEBOAT FOR SALE. Excellent live aboard,
guest quarters or rental income. $28,500 or make
offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.



EGMONT EXPRESS CHARTERS Second year!
New itineraries sunsets, Longboat, backwater, ca-
nal homes, Sarasota Bay, and Egmont Key and
more. Custom tours available. See dolphins all day.
Hourly, half-day and full day. Call 778-7459 or 447-
5470.

LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on
the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwa-
ter fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle pro-
vided. 779-9607.


BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is
Sarah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child
or $3/pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or
child. Please call 778-7622 or 778-7611.

CHILD SITTER AND PET SITTER. Seventh-grade
male looking for a job. Available after school and
weekends. Call Zachary, 779-9803.

NEED A BABY-SITTER? Or a pet sitter? Our
motto: Anytime, any place, any price! We love kids
and that's all that matters! Call one line and get
connected to six wonderful babysitters, 778-3295.

MENEHUNE SKIM SCHOOL Anna Maria Island
teen will teach your child to skimboard. Four half-
hour one-on-one lessons. For information, please
call Spencer, 778-0944.

BABYSITTER: 15 years old, attends St. Stephen's
Episcopal School. Certified by the Red Cross. Call
Nita, 778-3187.


I Estate! *





luplex. Steps 3BR/2BA Waterfront
,000. with dock. $495.000


.. .. . .. ...Richard.Freema


-' ,a n ;ti-n. .agents... .* ..e ::t




S Outstanding agents... outstanding results


Mike 0g, Simply the Best

Norman'* 25 YEARS

Iealty INC 70+ Gulffront rental units with
a- hundreds more just steps from the beach.

941-778-6696 3101 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach www.mikenormanrealty.com

,E^q/ ^^^^^ If


KITCHEN #1 KITCHEN #2
* Open outside dining plus a retail fish Inside dining: new rustic decor wtih
market loads of charm
* Seating for 60+ Seating for 150+
* On the bay with docking On the bay with great views and lots
* Great lease with options for 20 years of docking
Outside Tiki bar
Great lease with options for 20 years
BUSINESS ONLY ALL EQUIPMENT BOTH FOR $650,000


GULFFRONT CONDO
Walk miles of sandy beach, enjoy glorious sunsets, dL'ps in heated Ol mpic-sIzed
pool. tennis, biking to shops and restaurants Spacious 2BR 2BA. garage, ex-
Ira storage Fully furnished. Low monthly condo fee. Petls okaS $525.000 Call
Yvonne Higgins, 518-9003.


-,. .






PAGE 26 E MAY 28, 2003 U THE ISLANDER


ROTTEN RALPH'S Waterfront Restaurant: Hiring all
positions, all shifts. Rotten hours, rotten pay. Apply
at 902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria or call, 778-3953.
PART-TIME SALES clerk position open at Shell
Land Gift Shop. Weekday, evening and weekend
shifts. Cheerful, beach atmosphere. Retirees wel-
come. Call 778-8607.
NURSES: Long-term home care for spinal injury
quad. Morning and overnight shifts available. Hoyer
lift. Traveling nurses also needed. Call 383-6953.
SATURDAY CLEANERS NEEDED for vacant vaca-
tion rentals. Must be dependable and have own
transportation. Call Sam, 792-9176.
CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org !!!
THE TINGLEY MEMORIAL Library in Bradenton
Beach is looking for volunteers who can work dur-
ing the summer months. Duties include checking
books in and out, reshelving books and generally as-
sisting library patrons. Anyone interested in volun-
teering in our friendly community library can call
Linda Murphy at 779-1208.

DINING ROOM SERVERS: apply Ooh La La! Euro-
pean Bistro. Day and/or evenings. Fine dining expe-
rience preferred. 5406 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Ask for Chef Damon.


'"- REALTOR.
29Years of Professional Service
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
Experience Reputation Results
RESIDENTIAL
TAMPA BAYFRONT 3BR/2BA, 2,506 sq.ft., two
greatrooms, view of pristine islands and Skyway Bridge.
Two lots. $1,900,000.
5400 CONDO Gulfview, ground floor, 2BR/2BA, some
updates, washer/dryer. Priced to sell at $490,000. Call for
weekend open house times.
BAYSHORE CONDO 1BR/1BA, updated, light and bright,
overlooking park-like courtyard. Ideal winter haven. $38,900.
SEASONAL & ANNUAL RENTAL
KEY ROYALE Large 2BR/2BA, pool, spa, boat dock/lift.
MARTINQUE Gulffront 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, elevators.
5400 GULFFRONT complex, 1 and 2BRs, pool.
BEACHFRONT 3BR/2BA home, tastefully furnished.
BEACH TOWNHOUSE 2BR/2BA pool, across from beach.
PERICO BAY CLUB CONDOS waterfront.
CAYMAN CAY 2BR/2BA, pool, gazebo, annual.
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com *www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


GREAT ISLAND

HIDEAWAY






"~- 2







Two separate villas just 300 steps to the
Gulf in central Holmes Beach. Beautifully
furnished, community pool and low
monthly fees. These units have indi-
vidual tax rolls and could be sold sepa-
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Don't miss this super investment oppor-
tunity! Reduced to $329,000.

reen >I
REAL ESTATE .
OF ANNA MARIA
778-0455 t-
9906 Gulf Drive
Visit our website at www.greenreal.com


PART-TIME ISLANDER REPORTER: Journalism
skills a must. Computer literate. Independent
worker. Resumes: E-mail news @ islander.org, or fax
778-9392, or mail/deliver to The Islander, 5404 Ma-
rina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton
Beach is admitting residents. Respite, long term.
Call 779-0322 for details, inquiries welcome.
CALL "CARE COMPANY" for qualified home health-
care aides, caregivers and companions. Twelve
years serving Anna Maria Island and Bradenton.
778-4192.
MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more readers.

SIMPLE SOLUTION to overall wellness and weight
loss formulated for women 40-plus. Increase pro-
ductivity and feel better. Balance hormones. Call
Nancie, 778-7502.
CAREGIVER/COMPANION specializing in
Alzheimer-patient care. Available part-time during
week and over-night shift. Local references. Nancie,
778-7502.
ASSISTED LIVING and daycare in a loving family at-
mosphere. Call Annie or Chris for details, 778-7842.


I Real Estate
SR1..\,'OYOSR .



4307 Gulf Drive Cayman Cay Condos
Two well cared for updated 2BR/2BA condos.
Heated pool, covered parking, screened lanais, in-
terior laundries. Steps to the beach and pets ac-
cepted. Both are furnished turnkey. #208 reduced
to $239,000; #209 $279,000, end unit.
9102 12th Avenue Northwest Hawthorn Park
4BR/2.5BA, two-story pool home with many deluxe
custom features. Dual fireplace, eat-in kitchen,
large family room, circle drive, lanai, all appliances.
Immediate possession. $349,000.

W /Real Estate
REALTORSI.
Please call Carol R. Williams,
Broker/Realtor for more
details or appointment to show.
(941) 744-0700 or (941) 720-7761.
Email: callcarol@juno.com


Buying? Selling? Renting? We Can Help!
DUPLEX WEST SIDE OF GULF
t& _-.- ', DRIVE! Charming duplex, short
half-block to beach. Recent up-
dates include tile floors, exterior
and interior paint, wooden deck.
Large 2BR/1BA and 1BR/1BA.
Great rental history, tenants in
place. A must see! Priced to sell
at $325,000. Call Stephanie Bell,
778-2307 or 920-5156.
CANALFRONT ON PERIWINKLE
ose -. PLAZA in Anna Maria. Elevated
home is on large lot with 212-ft. on
,,, ,, deep-water canal. Private boat
dock, wrap around deck, private
S setting. Two-car garage with work-
shop and storage. Convenient to
S ... -... -.. beach access. Offered at $575,000.
MLS#92314. Call Stephanie Bell,
CALL NOW! 778-2307 or 920-5156.


Ww~fra m- relstate -


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, cabbage -
palms, patio gardens, trimming, clean-up, edgings,
more. Hard-working and responsible. Excellent ref-
erences. Edward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.
COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your
computer misbehaving? Certified computer service
and private lessons. Special $25 per hour- free
advice. 545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.

KATHY & MIKE'S CLEANING Service: Delivering
a standard of excellence for all your interior and ex-
terior cleaning needs. No job too big or small. Great
rates and references, 722-4358.

GERMAN HANDYMAN Tiles, wood flooring, paint-
ing and all other home repair you may need. High
quality, reasonable prices. No job too small! Li-
censed and insured. Mastercard/Visa. 539-7937.

HANDYMAN SERVICES: Scott Fulton contractor.
20 years experience. Island resident, area refer-
ences available. Cell, 713-1907; home, 778-4192;
e-mail: scottfulton636@hotmail.com

AUTO DETAILING BY HAND Spotless inside and
out. I can save you time and money. Island resi-
dent, references. For pricing call 713-5967.


BAY PALMS 2BR/2BA home with 155-
feet of canal on two sides. Corner lot.
Family room plus a Florida room. A must
see home. $449,900. Dial the Duncans at
778-1589 eves.


BIMINI BAY ~ PARADISE ~ PANORAMA




I ...... .. .



Waterview from every room. 245-ft. of protected water-
front. This magnificent two-year-old home is uniquely
wheelchair friendly. $2,500,000. #90163. Owner/Agent


Piroska Kallay Planck 41 I -IJU-~DD


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. -1ulmneo Doach,. FI 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


smith


SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1970


MLS





THE ISLANDER N MAY 28, 2003 PAGE 27



SEVC SCotne SERICS-ontnud AWNAND GARDN Sn


CLEANINGS-R-JOB Will clean your residence, of-
fice, rental or new construction. Island resident of
36 years. Bonded and Insured. No job too big!
Please call 779-9633.
TODD'S MOTHER'S HANDYMAN Service. 15-
years experience. Talented tile work, painting, ap-
pliances, pools, carpentry. All your household
needs. Mother's house perfect! Call Todd for hourly
rates, estimates. 758-2072.
TREE SERVICE BY BREWER Topping, trimming,
shaping, stump grinding and removals. Trim palm
trees. Insured. Call Phil, cell 545-4770.
360eTOUR: Show yourhome or business on the
Internet with a 360-degree virtual tour. Call 778-
4759 or visit us at www.360etour.com.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance service.
Over 30 years experience, self-employed in construc-
tion trades. "I'm handy to have around." 779-9666.

IS YOUR COMPUTER or laptop running slow or
acting up? Call Trevor Kagin at 778-4759.
MAID TO CLEAN I will clean your home. Island
resident, good rates and references. Call Wendy,
778-0321.
MUSIC LESSONS! Flute, saxophone, clarinet. Be-
ginning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray, 792-0160.
SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast
and reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines,
cushions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call Jenifer
Catlin, 727-5873.
BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigeration.
Commercial and residential service, repair and/or re-
placement. Serving Manatee County and the Island
sihceT-987. For dependable, honest and personalized
service, call William iilor, 705 7411. RA005052.

CAROL
CODELLA

S1778-5224
-.... Your Island "Rep" for Bank
of America Mortgages

Refinances Purchases New
Construction End Loans *
Local Resident First Time Buyers Teacher
Loans Doctor Loan Plus...
"Higher Standards" with Bank of America
4 699 Manatee Avenue Holmes Beach
(across from Publix) .




Club Bamboo
Direct Gulffront and poolside
condos priced from
$285,000 $335,000
Econo Lodge Going Condo
Great Rental Opportunity
On-site rental office
Newly renovated
All new furnishings
Now taking contracts
Conversion now in progress


J .,_ I 03,
.T PA. ,I. Y



W CENTRAL PARK REALTY
Call Dennis Girard
941 -809-0041
email: dennis@centralparkrealtycorp.com
www.club-bamboo.net


ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional cre-
ates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 778-2711.
NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing massage
in the comfort of your home. Call today for an ap-
pointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.
PIANO AND KEYBOARD lessons. Call Jack Elka,
778-2711.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn, Mainte-
nance Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn, maintenance, cleanup, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294..
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.
KARAZ LANDSCAPE Lawn Service. Mulch, clean-
ups, power washing, tree trimming and more. Call
779-0851 or cell 448-3857.
ECONOMY CUT lawn service. Professional lawn
care at the kid-next-door prices. Free estimates.
778-5294.
TWO GIRLS AND a Rake. General yard work, leaf
pickup, weeding, etc. Lower rates for senior citi-
zens, disabled, etc. Call Michele, 778-3337.
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling,
cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 807-1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees. Ir-
rigation. Everything Under the Sun Garden Centre,
5704 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. 778-4441.


Mike


Norman


SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $30/yard. Hauling:
all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free estimates.
Call Larry at 795-7775, "shell phone" 720-0770.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL! And when it's not snow-
ing, I specialize in installing shell and rock yards,
driveways and walkways. Rip-rap, sand and mulch
also delivered and spread. Please call David
Bannigan at 794-6971 or cell at 504-7045.
SANDY'S LAWN SERVICE. Celebrating 20 years
of quality and dependable service. Call us for all
your landscape and hardscape needs 778-1345.
STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-rap,
mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reliable and
insured. 727-5066.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.
CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.
OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Dan
Michael, master carpenter. Call cell 320-9274.


Simply the Best

25 YEARS


70+ Gulffront rental units with hundreds
R ealty I 800-367-1617 more just steps from the beach.
3101 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach www.NC 941-77ikenormanrealty.696
3101 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach www.mikenormanrealty.com


CHEAPEST GULFFRONT CONDO
iBR, dir4l Gulffroht Uhit ih Braehtoh
Be&,L. JaSuzzi. Walk to &ll tkz 7ood
r9stsuraihts. $299,000.


NEWER CUSTOM HOME
West side of Gulf Drive, 3BR/2BA,
7yir7e, ry ,e stor7, rool>, Cori.h,
Jkcuzzi tub, ijariv, cehtrlI vcuuhI, lowU
-ihitet

NEW GULFFRONT
4BR/4.5BA luxury baLekfroht pehtlouse.
Ninh-foot ceilih7s, pool, e lvtobr, two-
car 7&r7 e plus extr& coveredl prkin7.






. .




GULFFRONT CONDO
Gre t location hnxt to tle puLlic b69&L
,ah ohe of tL(e l.ost rreferred va~etioh
rntzBAl i vesttk ts oho te Isl, d. 2BR/
28A, Luye pool. $449,000.


$525,oo00.


lls1~9~-~-i~ee~eR~8~s~~





PAGE 28 N MAY 28, 2003 0 THE ISLANDER

d Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
S andy's\ Established in 1983
taw Celebrating 20 Years of
11 Quality & Dependable Service.
Service Call us for your landscape ,
778-1345 and hardscape needs.
__ Licensed & Insured
@@[T[U@]T{@ STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@NT]U@TD@0 CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@N@TU@T0D@B JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@M a@V0U@K@ Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@ Va@UD@(941) 778-2993



Residential Commercial
Check our references: J.
"Quality work at a reasonable price. "
Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
l .atil Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
l Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755

MORENO MARBLE & TILE
Installation & Restoration
'. Quality Work Over 20 Years Experience
Licensed and Insured
795-6615 or 685-5163 moreno.fly@verizon.net


Vinyl Siding & Soffit Specialists
Call for a free estimate Island References
941-713-SIDE (7433)
No commissioned salesmen

ADINA HUSAK, REALTOR
Wagner Realty 7 .,.
Ich spreche Deutsch -
Call me to find your dream home.
(941) 778-2246 (800) 211-2323

ISLAND LUMBER
AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

/ Tile Installations by Cliff Streppone

> (941)587-1649
Beautiful floors and viiaI/s for every room
I I:EN SI.D & iN .NRE E.


Reach more than 20,000 people weekly
with your ad for as little as $16.56!
Call Shona or Rebecca 778-7978

A ? Thie Islander


FIRST FLORIDA CONSTRUCTION


ROOF


ING


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Leak Repairs to
SComplete Re-Roofing
(941) 722-5571
20 Years Experience
Many Island References








CONSTRUCTION
tceWICKERSHAMS





REMODEL *ADDITIONS* CUSTOM HOMES
License # CGCO43438 383-9215 Insured


I l h A ; LAN.R L [ST IFTIEDS
HOE MPOEMNTCntnud l-ENAS Cnine-


TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call Neil,
726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT Interior/exterior paint-
ing, pressure washing and wallpaper. For prompt,
reliable service at reasonable rates, call Kevin at
704-7115 or 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheetrock, popcorn, doors, bi-folds, trim,
moldings kitchen remodeling, general repairs.
Homes, rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.
COMPLETE BATHROOM REMODELING Drywall,
repairs, texture coating, painting. Custom shower
stalls, tub enclosures, fixtures, cabinets, tile. Unique
Options, 752-7758 or 545-6141 cell.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Building contractor. New
homes, additions, renovations. Quality work and fair
prices. Call 795-1947. Lic #RR0066450.
ARTHUR GUIDE'S Home Repairs from A-Z. Car-
penter, electrician, plumber. Free estimates, inte-
rior/exterior, no job too small. Call 749-0454. Sat-
isfaction and quality guaranteed.

DEZIEL CONSTRUCTION Specializing in water-
front redesigns, additions and remodeling. License
#CGC1505535. Call 761-3931.
MARK SAMPSON Artistry in Wood. Custom home
theater, office, library, wainscoting. Attention to
detail. Now accepting commissions. Call 228-5955.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR and Lawn Care: Light
carpentry, plumbing, electrical, grass cutting, tree
trimming, light hauling. Call 778-6170.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more.
Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a free in-
home consultation. Island references, 15 years
experience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.



ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available now.
Beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No pets, non
smoking. Priced from $800month, $450/week, $85/
night. 794-5980. www.divefish.com.
SUMMER, AUTUMN, WINTER rentals available
weekly, monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Estate
Co., 778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across
from beautiful beach, $350 to $450/week. Winter
and spring dates available. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, 778-2374.
HOLMES BEACH annual. 3BR/2BA steps to
beach. No pets. $900/month. 725-4190.
ANNUAL RENTALS: Half duplex, 2BR/2BA, new
ceramic floors, $750; 2BR/1BA, stackable
washer/dryer hookup. $725; New tile floors,
stove, refrigerator, 1BR/1BA, $650. Dolores M.
Baker Realty, 778-7500.


KEY ROYALE BEAUTIFUL canalfront home 2BR/
2BA, tropical pool area with hot tub, dock with two
boat lifts, completely updated. Now through Sep-
tember, 2003, $2,100/month. Previous deal for
2004 fell through! January-April, 2004, $3,500/
month. 730-1086.

SPACIOUS WATERFRONT, upper, sundeck,
dock. Panoramic view, furnished, Key West-style.
2BR/2BA, washer/dryer. Pet considered. 778-0349
or 794-5980.

TURNKEY FURNISHED 1 BR/1 BA with full kitchen.
Walk to beach or downtown Holmes Beach. Small
pet OK. Available now, $500/weekly or $300 for
three nights. Call 778-0554.

NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Four spacious
3BR/2BA homes with all conveniences. Please call
778-2541 and leave message or call (813) 752-4235.

ANNUAL AT MARINER'S Cove. Bayfront 3BR/
2.5BA with 2,158 sq.ft. of living space. Gated com-
munity with pool, tennis, elevator and 36-ft. deep-
water dock. Available now, unfurnished. Call Dave,
778-2246 or 778-7976 evenings.

NEED EXTRA STORAGE space? For convenient on-
Island storage, call Anna Maria Storage. 779-0820.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1BR/1BA or 2BR/1BA with pool. Walk to beach,
shopping and restaurants. 778-3875.

ANNA MARIA BEACHFRONT Furnished 2BR/2BA.
Incredible view. North Shore Drive, weekly/monthly.
Call 778-3645.

HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 2BR/1.SbM tbuvwnom,
Sundeck with Gulf views. Steps to Gulf. Washer/dryer.
$795/month. 758-1899 or cell (203) 417-2331.
PARADISE BAY ESTATES: Annual, 55 plus, 1BR/
1 BA furnished 34-ft. trailer with large Florida room.
$500/month, utilities included. First, last and deposit
required. Credit check, no pets. Call 798-3673.

VACATION RENTAL Charming 1BR/1BA fully fur-
nished, across from beach. Call 778-8211.
CORPORATE APARTMENTS, large pool, one block
to beach. $300/week. Call 778-1915 or 748-2084.
RENTALS RENT fast when you advertise in The
Islander. Check us out www.islander.org.


E| N- JOY MARIANNE CORRELL
EN-JOY Realtor
CLEANING The Big
CLEANINPicture
-* Commercial Pcu
l *Resident al It's all
SVacation about
RentalsReal
Call Joy or Laura N Estatef
25 Years experience
(941) 812-2485 (941)




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ISLANDJ; iJER LS FE4DIS
RNALSCotiud -RNALCotne9


WATERFRONT KEY WEST-STYLE annual, unfur-
nished, 2BR plus bonus room with dock available
June 15. $1,600/month. One and a half blocks to
beach. www.divefish.com or call 794-5980.

VACATION & SEASONAL Private beach, some lo-
cations. Book now for 2004. Units are complete,
most have bikes, two TVs and VCR, fully-equipped
kitchens, dishwashers, washer/dryer, gas grills,
beach chairs and more. Rates seasonally adjusted.
$375-$775/week, $975-$2,275/month. (800) 977-
0803 or 737-1121 or www.abeachview.com.

LONGBOAT KEY Furnished efficiency available for
annual rental. Easement to beach. Close to restau-
rants and shopping. Quiet area. No pets! $5,50/
month, includes water. First, last, security of $250.
387-9252.

ANNUAL RENTALS Elevated home, apartments,
condos. 1 and 2BR properties. Prices range from
$650-$1,250/month. Call Fran Maxon Real Estate,
.778-2307 for details.

BRADENTON BEACH GULFFRONT, annual 2BR/
1BA, condo, furnished. No pets, 55 plus, $895/
month, plus utilities. (813) 247-3178, weekends
(813) 927-1632.
HOLMES BEACH Immaculate stilted duplex. 2BR/
2BA, light and bright. Washer/dryer, screened lanai.
Lease, $900/month. call 795-3838 or 228-7878.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA elevated duplex in Bradenton
Beach. One block to beach. $795/month. No pets.
778-4665 or 794-1103.
QUIET HOLMES BEACH area. Two unfurnished
1BR/1BA apartments. One block to beach. $600/
m._ onth, pluc utilities. Call 778-5181.

PERICO I.Q11 ^D Dicid fl new dfV/2BA, two-car
garage. Maintenance-free home. Lakefront, all ap-
pliances, amenities, clubhouse and pool. Annual
lease. $1,450/month-$1,350/month. Call 798-3885.

CHARMING 1BR/1BA furnished apartment on ca-
nal. Phone, washer/dryer, very private yard with
pond. Available now through December and next
March and April. 778-5405.

1 BR/1 BA ANNUAL with new kitchen, French doors.
Small pet OK. $650/month. Call 302-0779.
BRAND NEW HOME 3BR/2BA, greatroom, two-car
garage. Seven minutes to Gulf, no pets. $1,400/month,
annual lease. Call 761-0898 or (970) 923-4680.
CONDO FOR RENT: Turnkey ready, six-month
lease. $1,150/month, plus deposit. Utilities included.
Gulf view. Call 761-9530.
VACATION RENTALS Anna Maria Gulffront apart-
ments, large, fully furnished, comfy, tropical set-
tings, lovely interior, porch, sundeck, no pets.
Owner, call 778-3143.


SEASONAL RENTAL: Holmes Beach, 4BR/3BA,
house on canal, heated pool, designer furnish-
ings. Bright and tropical. $1,200/week, $4,200/
month. Call 713-4805 or e-mail:
gamiller@tampabay.rr.com.
ANNUAL RENTALS: Cortez, 2BR/1BA house, ca-
nal/dock, $975/month; 103 23rd St., 2BR/1.5BA
cottage, furnished, $900/month; Longboat Village,
1BR/1BA cottage, $950/month; Longboat Key,
2BR/2BA condo, water view, $1,800/month; Perico
Bay Club, 2BR/2BA condo, pool, $1,000/month.
SunCoast Real Estate, 779-0202.

BAYVIEW 2BR/1BA, two blocks to beach, great
neighborhood, washer/dryer, annual, $850/month.
Call 778-2836 or 730-6349.
BRADENTON BEACH FURNISHED Gulffront du-
plex, 2BR/1.5 BA, $900/month. First, last, security
deposit. Call Tamara, (863) 853-9664.
CENTRAL HOLMES BEACH, 2003 rental. Four
rooms furnished, clean, neat, central air. No pets.
$275/week, $900/month, utilities furnished. Call
778-2651.
SPACIOUS 1BR APARTMENT with screened
lanai, close to beach and shopping. $605/month,
plus utilities. Call 518-1530.
ANNUAL 2BR/1.5BA duplex in Holmes Beach.
Available June. $825/month, plus utilities. Owner
pays lawn and trash. Call (773) 793-8599.
3BR/2BA HOLMES BEACH annual, unfurnished,
newly remodeled. 1 BR/1BA unfurnished apartment
also available. No pets. Call 778-7039.
GULFFRONT: Annual only. 2BR/1BA, pets al-
lowed. $1,150/month, Call 792-2779.

2BR/1BA NEWLY renovated apartment in excellent
location. $650/month. 748-0888.

ANNUAL BEACH rental. 2BR/1BA $800/month,
plus utilities. Washer/dryer. Unfurnished. 650-3552
or 778-0292.
WOULD YOU LIKE to live at the beach? Then our
beautiful Island location will amaze you. 1 BR apart-
ment homes start at only $640! Lots of extras. One
mile to the beach. Bring in this ad and get an extra
$50 off first month rent. Call today, 795-4899. Cer-
tain restrictions apply.


LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty
parking spaces, contemporary design, great vis-
ibility. $14/square foot. Can divide. Owner/Real-
tor, 388-5514, or call 809-4253.
ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe on line with our secure
server? Check it out at www.islander.org. And view
Wednesday's classified Tuesday!


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be paid in advance.
We accept ads by fax with credit card information, 778-9392, at our Web site (secure server) www.islander.org, and by
direct e-mail at classifieds@islander.org. Office hours: 9 to 5, Monday-Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are sorry,
but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please
be prepared to FAX or e-mail your copy with your credit card information. (see below)
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
--- ------- I-------- --- --- -I- ----- ---- --- --- ---- --- -----

2
3
Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: J No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:__
Billing address zip code: _House no. or post office box no. on bill

islander.org Islad r Fax:941 778-9392
5404 Marina Drive JjJI l a n d e i .L LI Phone: 941 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 34217 __ __ __ E-mail news@islander.org
L- -- -- -- -------- -------- ------ ------ ----------- ----------


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 29
You'll be glad you called.
2, YVONNE HIGGINS P.A.
778-7777 or 518-9005
WRMlKGulfstream Realty
"1 work the Islands & the Inlands"

PYIfJ/AVTIlaVG E/iefe,,6ffh
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. P i7 QJ./ After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 0'~-5-"T 778-3468

Custom Painting
Wallpaper Hanging
/ Interior/Exterior Design
sv* ,* Pressure Cleaning
SCall Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed & Insured


VWACNEQDQEALTY -
....a 227 Ill.r DDIVtE NODTII [ISDADENION M5ACII. frL 34217 -.
ASlCi 11 '
HAQOLD SMALL REALTOR. -
Office: (941) 778-2246 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.com



in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome


The Paver Brick Store
8208 Cortez Road W. Bradenton 34210 (941) 794-6504
9:00 AM til Noon, or by Appointment
Pool Deck, Patio and Driveway Renovations
Design Build


't Reach more than 20,000 people weekly
With your ad for as little as $16.56!
Call Shona or Rebecca 778-7978
Islander


CHISTIES1SNCE 197
P C S


LP GAS
$10
PER FILL
201b cylinder


NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
= RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL '
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
BACK FLOW DIVISION


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
\- Residential \ Commercial
B Restaurant %4W Mobile Home
B Condo Assoc. Vac and Intercom
\A^ Lightning Repair %W Service Upgrades


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

SERVING THE BEACHES SINCE 1978



Lic # ER0006385


I





PAGE 30 M MAY 28, 2003 M THE ISLANDER


REALESTE-C ontiueRALEACot i _


NEW 2BR/2.5BA condos, each with private boat
slips. Located on Sarasota Bay in Bradenton Beach
on Bay Drive South, between Third and Fourth
Streets South. Greatrooms, media rooms, screen
porches, spectacular views, swimming pool, lush
garden, etc. From $750,000. Call Old Bridge Village,
778-0156 or www.oldbridgevillage.com.

BEACHFRONT North Shore Drive. 2BR/2BA,
newly remodeled with incredible beach view. 869
N. Shore Drive. $1,089,000. Brokers protected.
Call 778-3645.

LAKEFRONT CONDO 2BR/2BA in perfect shape.
Great location. $99,900. Call Bill, 518-9300.
SELL IT FAST! In The Islander.


*WAOGNLE REALTY











DIRECT BAYFRONT ON BRADENTON BEACH
3BR/3BA totally renovated home with gorgeous view
of the bay. Lush tropical landscaping. Dock with lift.
Room for pool. Call Deni Dillon (941)232-3126
5360 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key, FL
383-5577 or 800-352-0637


OFFERING NEAR AND
GULFFRONT PROPERTIES
TO BUYERS PRICED
$679,500 TO $949,500.

T7c 6ac4 tCe .., u ftenz4$tL
atttewtoa, 4wwCe awid ekfre !

We 4RS the 'Ilad!


S Since
MARIE LIC. EAL A STATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.net
Web site annamariareal.com


PRISTINE TURNKEY FURNISHED Gulf-bay
mid-rise 2BR/2BA unit. $429,900. Weekly rentals
possible. www.Latitude27Realty.net or call 744-
2727.
HARBOUR LANDINGS: Lot for sale with boat slip
in exclusive gated waterfront community. Room
for 40-foot boat, easy access to Intracoastal.
Offered at $259,900. Piroska Planck 730-9667,
or Susan Hollywood 726-6125. Coldwell Banker
Residential Real Estate.

SELLING OR BUYING a house? Need extra
space? Budget Self Storage can help. Daily,
weekly, monthly specials. Boxes and packing
supplies. 795-5510.


FOR SALE BY OWNER, one-of-a-kind Holmes
Beach duplex, $389,000. See it at
HolmesBeachDuplexForSale.com or call Lee at 302-
0779.
PRICE REDUCED! Island's best condo buy! Cute,
cozy and convenient 2BR/1 BA, plus one-car garage.
840 sq. ft. Zoned professional or residential. Seller
anxious. Just $167,900. Call Chris Shaw, 778-6066.
Island Real Estate.
HOUSEBOAT FOR SALE. Excellent live aboard,
guest quarters or rental income producer. $28,500 or
make offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.
THE ISLANDER. The best news on Anna Maria Is-
land since 1992.


DAVE JONES -,
ISLAND SPECIALIST

Paradise Realty 1
778-4800
800-237-2252 .
www.paradiserealty.com
5201 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 -
Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation.


CO D 41 (91 5115
I. KM0 80 7884


No bridges to Tampa Bay
and the Gulf. IB 90367

6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.cbflorida.com


D(
I.




2f^-


enise Langlois
Dedication and Experience
You Can Count On ...
$339,900-
PLAYA ENCANTADA
Exceptional value for this well-
maintained 2BR/2BA unit located
on tennis court side of outstanding
Gulffront complex. Turnkey
furnished. New appliances, Corian
counter top, A/C, tile and carpet.
Enjoy the beach, the pool or the
tennis court! IB88068.


$699,900 MANATEE RIVER
LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Panoramic view of
the Manatee River with direct access to the Gulf of Mexico.
3BR/3BA, 3 car garage, private dock with davits, room for a
pool on a half acre lot with beautiful tropical landscaping.
IB90545



See virtual tours and
all available MLS listings at
www.BradentonAreaHomes.com
(941) 751-1155 (800) 778-8448






THE ISLANDER U MAY 28, 2003 0 PAGE 31


2501 Gulf Dr. Suite 101, Bradenton Beach


Rarely on market, one and two bedroom Westbay
Cove models. Poolside and bayfront. Upgraded
and close to all services. Open most days from
11am. From $215,000.


2BR/2BA Upper, end unit with greenbelt and wa-
ter view. $298,900.

Call 778-3377
After hours Sharon Annis 778-3730 or 713-9096


JIM ANDERSON
REALTY COMPANY
SALES VACATION RENTALS
(941)778-4847
toll free 1-800-772-3235
4018 Pine Avenue
Anna Maria, FL 34216-1789
www.jlmandersonrealty.com
Email: jlmsrealtyco@aol.com


ISLAND DUPLEX OR LARGE HOME
-L-uunrlg for a large pool home on the Island? This
updated duplex could easily be converted to a
4,000 so.ft i;tejo faii iy t iome. Large caged pool,
two two-car garages, lots of storage, eight bed-
rooms, four baths. Great central Holmes Beach lo-
cation. Three blocks to beach. $685;000. Reduced
to $659,000. Call Gayle Schulz at 778-4847 or 812-
6489 for an appointment.






Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"






SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


CONDOMINIUMS
Parico Bay Club
Perico Bay Club
Marlinique South
Sunbow Bay
Sunbow Bay
Island Village
Residential


NW Biadenlon
Anna Mana
W. Bradenlon
Lakewood Ranch


1121 Edgewater Circle 2BR/2BA
1259 Spoonbill Landings3BR/2BA
5200 Gulf Drive 3BR/3BA
3705 East Bay Dnve 2BRi2BA
3801 East Bay Drive 3BR/3BA
4255 Gull Drive 2BR/2BA


5240 Riverview Blvd
526 Kumqual
4504 21st Ave. W
6311 Yellowlop


4BR/2 5BA
4BR/2 5BA
4BR/2BA
2-3BR/2BA


$279 000
$309.000
$619.000
$309,000
$309 000
$259 000

$940 000
$995.000
$145.000
$189.500


ROSE SCHNOERR
www.roseschnoerr.com cODNueLL
(941) 730-3376 Scott Dunlap m!SSS
(941)751-1151 E-mail roses5@gte.net


CHECK US OUT AT www.islander.org


Marina Pointe

Realty Co.

314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732




FEATURED LISTINGS
OF THE WEEK


Melinda Bordes
Realtor


Bob Fittro
Realtor






Wendy Foldes
Realtor






Richard Freeman
Realtor






Alan Galletto
Broker/Salesperson






Jon Kent
Broker/Salesperson






Tom Nelson
Realtor






Nick Patsios
Broker/Salesperson


SPACIOUS, tastefully and totally
remodeled canal home with won-
derful water views on the widest
canal in Key Royale and beautiful
golf course views from the front of
the home. Large square footage
with open and split floor plan. New
barrel tile roof, windows, doors, hot
water heater, electrical box, two-
zone A/C, ductwork, tile, carpet
and much more. Room for a pool.
Great curb appeal, but even more
I breathtaking inside a must see.
WATERFRONT HOMES
& LOTS
861 North Shore Dr......... $1,950,000
510 72nd St................. $559,000
524 71st St ............... $1,440,000

4212 Redfish Ct. LOT ..... $575,000

307 Iris .......................... 495,000
536 Key Royale Dr......... $878,400
106 Gull Dr. .................. $629,000
112 Pelican Dr.............. $589,000
524 77th St .................. $689,000
507 77th St................... $649,000
508 Key Royale Drive ..... $479,900
606 Dundee Ln. .............. $549,000
616 Hampshire Ln. ......... $799,900

ISLAND HOMES,
CONDOS & LOTS
Westbay Pt Moorings #86. $395,000
4915 Gulf Dr ............. $1,715,000
Beachwalk Townhomes H up to. $569,000
Westbay Pt. Moorings #268 $339,000
308 55th St. Lot .............$197,500
Sun Plaza West #201 ..... $399,000
315 58th St., B ................ $167,900
1205 N. Gulf Drive #100 .. $439,000
408 Pointsetta Rd ........... $495,000
710 North Shore. Lot ..... $279,000
747 Jacaranda. Lot ......... $389,000
Water's Edge #110N ....... $759,000
Sun Plaza West #202 ..... $409,000
404 80th St................... $875,000
104 7th St. S................. $459,000
Ocean Park Terrace #203.. $649,000
233 85th St. .................... $339,000
100 7th St. S.................... $750,000
Bayou Condo 5C ........... $298,000

COMMERCIAL
3014 Avenue C #1&2. .... $259,000
Southern Breeze........... 1,450,000


MAINLAND
2418 90th St. NW........ $2,995,000
1280 Spoonbill Landings Cir.... $314,000
9905 E. Spoonbill Rd ........... $675,000
Chatoraw 11336 Perico Isles Cr............ $329,000

12607 Safe Harbour Dr. Lot .... $325,000
7504 NW 15th Ave. ........ $154,900
9920 Sebastian Ct .......... $162,000
11434 Perico Isles Cir. ... $349,000
Marilyn Trevethan Stop by and use our talking
Realtor window 24-hour information center.


SPECTACULAR GULF VIEWS!
One house from the beach. Custom-built home
by Whitehead. 3BR, plus den, 3BA, gourmet
kitchen, separate dining room, deck, patio and
two-car garage. Walls of windows to enjoy the
sunsets. $1,295,000.


ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT
2BR/2BA elevated contemporary island home
with sundeck overlooking natural canal and pri-
vate boat dock. Lots of storage, close to fishing
pier, restaurants and shopping. 2 car garage resi-
dential area. $499,900


DUPLEX NEAR BEACH INCOME
2BR/2BA each. West of Gulf Drive, just steps to
one of the island's finest beaches. Very quiet
residential area. 2 garages, 2 carports. Excellent
rental. $595,000.


ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

.. MLS S
REAL ESTATE LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


This beautifully remodeled duplex offers two spacious bed-
rooms and two baths on each level, plus a cozy den or third
bedroom with French doors. Amenities include Spanish-tiled
floors, white tiled baths, fully equipped kitchens with knotty
pine cabinets and breakfast bars, textured ceilings with fans
and Hotpoint washers and dryers on each level. Adorable
shabby chic furnishings and whimsical wall coverings and
borders create a cozy and carefree beach ambiance, while
easy-care vinyl siding and oyster-shell landscaping make
maintenance a breeze. Located just one short block to the
Gulf, this endearing hideaway won't last long! Priced at
$615,000 furnished.


: VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE


Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com


Frank Davis
Broker


c'


r


I


~ib~b,






PAGE 32 E MAY 28, 2003 E THE ISLANDER

By Nancy NichON PURPOSE do513141516E7 5 5 1 2 1314 tz 5 16 1
By Nancy Nicholson Joline / Edited by Will Shortz L120-1 -1 1 61 E r 1 -11821-- 1


Across
1 Shells and twists
7 Fund-raiser's target
13 Site of Sim6n Bolfvar
Airport
20 In
21 French satellite-
launching rocket
22 Rigid
23 What stool pigeons do?
25 What blowhards lack
26 up (in the bag)
27 School appointment
28 Skedaddles
30 Swell party
31 Article in a gazette
32 Enthusiastic drinker at
an old English inn?
35 Patriots' grp.
38 Similar
42 Completely
43 F.D.R.-era agcy.
44 Actress who was born
Margaret Hyra
46 Meeting needs
50 Movement including
astrology and
aromatherapy
53 Cheesy snacks
58 Draw out
59 Novelist who wrote the
screenplay for "Gunfight
at the O.K. Corral"
60 Suffix with verb
62 Aborigine of northern.
Japan
63 Workers with green
cards
64 'Thanks a !"1
65 Bit part in "Law and
Order"?
68 Maintain
69 Central Park's __
Fountain
71 Diminutive suffix
72 Discouraged


76 They may get into hot
water
77 Member of the
Ivanhoe Chorale?
80 'Whoopee!"
81 'The English Patient'
setting
83 Comment of betrayal
84 Always, archaically
85 Spoonful, say
86 Too
87 Was far from respect-
ful
89 George and Elizabeth
91 Haunt
93 Trattoria order
96 Sellout
97 Seven-time N.L.
batting champ
102 Agreements
106 Madras mister
107 French lottery ticket?
110 Same old, same old
111 Author/critic John
113 Seasonal song word
114 'The fix _"
116 Catalan-born Surreal-
ist
117 Opposite of charge
120 Chicken dish for Adm.
Peary?
123 Set apart
124 Level
125 Not level
126 Signaled
127 Noted libertine
128 Like some speakeas-
ies

Down
1 Skip
2 Parthenon figure
3 "Psycho" set
4 Out of (away)
5 Commercial suffix with
roller


6 Dispatch 23 24---
7 How flies are attracted-
to a Venus's flytrap 26 27
8 Padua's Chapel, 31 32
with a renowned
Giotto fresco 38 39 40 41
9 The Everly Brothers' 44
I Kissed You" B
10 Water softener brand 50 51 52
11 Consecrate 59
12 How "12" is expressed 6_4 __
in Chinese 65 66
13 Engine part 69 --
14 Building material -
15 Kind of screen
16 Infamous Aldrich 81 82
17 What the Vegas __
winner took aboard
the plane? 91 92
18 Tunneler
19 Sloppy pen 9 -
24 Put on hold T0 107 108
29 Idled 111 112
33 Actress Gershon
34 Overseas broadcast- 117 118 11
ing service: Abbr. ----- ---
36 Delicate
37 Ensembles 126
39 One of a Latin trio------
40 Turkey part 66 Themes
41 Bigger than med. 67 Some sisters
45 Once again 70 Attends, as a recital
47 Cold dessert 73 Devon river
48 Football team 74 See 115-Down
49 Big-uranium exporter 75 Colors
50 Unfeeling 78 Letter from abroad
51 Great Lakes port 79 Tony-winning
52 Big cheese of basket- Thompson
ball? 81 Campus group,
54 Unfeeling informally
55 Trail sight 82 To have, in Le Havre
56 Plastic__ Band 85 Anthropologist
57 Easter, e.g. Fossey
60 Chicago airport letters 88 Magazine with a
61 Floods palindromic
65 Big name in eyewear name


89 Friday, e.g.: Abbr.
90 "Gimme !" (part of a
Duke cheer)
92 Laura Bush's alma
mater: Abbr.
94 Vacation destination
95 Caper
98 notch
99 __ up (like some
jalopies)
100 Smitten
101 Boggles
103 Surveyor's equipment
104 One Fodor's guide
105 Very high
107 I.R.S. target
108 Be on a cobphox


109 Stale
112 Author/poet Bates
115 With 74-Down, part
of Asia
116 49-Down neighbor
117 Free
118 Computer attach-
ment?
119 A Kennedy
121 Santa__
122 Jeff Davis's cause:
Abbr.

Answers to this weeks
puzzle can be found in
this weeks paer4.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Vica orMasterCard.
ri I-I


WAGNER REAL]
email: ami@wagnerrealty.com website: wagnerrealty.com


2217 GULF DR. N.
[y BRADENTON BEACH
L (941) 778-2246
(800) 211-2323


VACATIN&ANNAL


RNALSAV*-AIAL


DIRECT BAY FRONT Bradenton Beach UNIQUE WATERFRONT DUPLEX SAILBOAT WATER This 3BR+office
lull bay view 1iom this updated 38R'2BA 3BRt3BA has 2400 sf+- with bay views, home is close to the beach. Cedar ceil-
home. Beautiful landscaping anrd private 2Bi/3BAhas 1700 sf+- with partial Gulf ing in family room, spa in caged lanai,
setting Boat dock with davits. Short dis- views. Each has private two-car garage, fireplace and room for a pool. Becky
tance to beach. Deni Dillon. 383-577, Just a short walk to the beach. Dave Smith or Elfi Starrett-778-2246. #91566.
#237567. $1,399,000 Moyatihar. 778-2246. #91438. $519.000.
$83M9,00.


" "_imI.._ -.^ |T '


KEY ROYALE CANALFRONT Spa-
c*ous 38R 28A canatlronu r, Key Royate
with pen spin lir plan. Separate dining,
large farly room, room for a pod,. New
seawall cap, ew roof, fresh paint Dave
Mcyihan. 778-2246. #90395.
@4e9j00.


GULF FRONT TOWNHOUSE Fabulous
Gulf views from this well maintained fully
furnished 2BR12.5BA townhome on
Anna Maria Island. Excellent second
home or investment property. Dave
Moynihan. 778-2246. #87065.
$359,500.


ISLAND CONDO Affordable Island living
in Bradenton Beach, top-floor comer,
2BR/1 BA, with pool. Weekly rentals and
short one block to beach. Furnishings are
available. Dave Moynihan. 778-2246.
#92631. $189,900.


Adorable Cottage near Historic
Bridge Street, This nicely
decorated 1BR/1BA cottage in
Bradenton Beach is conve-
niently located close to
shopping and restaurants, and
is available for your summer
rental.

Stunning Bay Views! From this
beautiful 2BRF2BA condo with a
pool, Updated unit available
for weekly or monthly rentals.
Enjoy the awesome views of the
Intracoastal Waterway, close to
the beach.

Spend the Summer at the
Beach! This 2BR/2BA condo
with a pool is located close to
the Manatee Public Beach, with
shops and restaurants. Large
unit with plenty of room for the
family.


Large 3BR/2BA house in Holmes Beach.
Gorgeous lake views. $1,250/month.

3BRI2BA triplex in Bradenton Beach. Recently
remodeled and lovely. A must see!

2BR/1 BA duplex in Holmes Beach, close to
Island schools. $775 a month. Call for details,
2BR/2BA condo in Holmes Beach.
Centrally located for the area,

1BAM/BA condo in a 55+ community in
Bradenton Beach, $700 a month. Call for details,


_I I II


R







SPECIAL SECTION: STORM READINESS


SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30, 2003


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PAGE 2 0 2003 STORM SPECIAL N THE ISLANDER


More storms, more powerful storms, for 2003


By Paul Roat
Although hurricane experts may be squabbling
over exact numbers, the consensus isn't good for the
2003 Atlantic hurricane season:
We should have a lot more storms this year than
usual.
Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration are predicting 11-15 tropical storms,
with six to nine becoming hurricanes and two to four
becoming major hurricanes winds in excess of 130
mph.
Dr. William Gray, a Colorado State University
meteorologist who has been looking at and predicting
storms in the Atlantic and Caribbean for more than 20
years, said in his April prognosis that there would be
12 named storms, eight hurricanes, and three of those
hurricanes becoming severe.
The average for the past 100 plus years is for there
to be 10 tropical storms, six of them developing into
hurricanes, and two becoming severe.
Gray will offer an updated forecast late next week.
NOAA scientists are basing their higher-than-nor-
mal predictions on a curious weather pattern in the
central Pacific Ocean. "A transition to La Nifia is al-
ready under way in the equatorial Pacific," NOAA of-
ficials state. "La Nifia favors increased hurricane activ-
ity by reducing the vertical wind shear over the Atlan-
tic hurricane basin's main development region."
And the long-range outlook isn't very good for the
Eastern Seaboard, either, according to NOAA.
"The period 1995-2002 is the most active in the
reliable historical record (dating back to 1944)," the
agency states on its Internet site. "Since 1995, North
Atlantic sea-surface temperatures have been above
normal, and the West African monsoon circulation has
been stronger than normal. These conditions have been
associated with reduced vertical wind shear and weaker
trade winds in the main hurricane development region,
and with a configuration of the African easterly jet that
is more conducive to hurricane development from
tropical disturbances moving westward from the Afri-
can coast."
Add all those factors together and NOAA folks
state that what's out in the Atlantic this year "produces
conditions most conducive to hurricane and major hur-
ricane formation. This combination is known to favor
very active hurricane seasons with potential levels of


From the top down
This three-dimensional graphic shows how updrafts from

activity in the upper portion of our predicted range, or
even higher."
Gray, speaking last year at the Governor's Hurri-
cane Conference in Tampa, did little to allay the gloom
of even last year's prediction, which was also above
average.
"Florida has been the most spared state in the coun-
try in the last 30 to 40 years," Gray said, adding that
Florida was hit by one major storm in the last 35 years,
Hurricane Andrew in 1992. In the previous 35 years,
Florida had 11 major storm landfalls, and 17 in the
previous 50 years.
"A landfalling hurricane is the greatest natural di-
saster the United States faces," he said, adding that in
the next 35 years, hurricane landings "will produce 10
times the economic loss of that in the last 35 years."
Gray and his team of researchers, plus the NOAA
experts, study global factors to determine Atlantic hurri-
cane activity. Much of the basis of their predictions comes
from the "great ocean conveyor belt," a Mobius strip-like
series of surface and deep-ocean currents that upwells in
the South Atlantic, flows along the surface to the Labra-
dor Sea in the North Atlantic, then dives deep and flows


.' Ilander
Graphic:
.Aelisa
1i.ilhamns







the ocean, in red, provide power to a hurricane.

southeast until upwelling in the Indian Ocean.
The conveyor belt mixes salinity of seawater.
Greater salinity means warmer temperatures and more
Atlantic storms; lesser salinity means colder seawater
and fewer storms.
The salinity, and water temperature, of the North
Atlantic has been rising in the past few years, hence the
increase in storm activity.
Weather patterns in Africa are also a key factor in
Atlantic storm development. When the region there is
wetter than usual, hurricane formation in the Atlantic
is generally increased.
Also thrown into the mix is the temperature of the
waters off the United Kingdom and in the western Pa-
cific Ocean. In the 1950s and '60s, a period of time that
saw more tropical storms in the Atlantic, waters
warmed there. Starting in the '70s, those water tem-
peratures dropped, as did storm activity. In the mid-
1990s, the water began to warm and storms began to
form.
"It's shifting again," Gray has said, "and we're
entering a higher mode of hurricane activity, especially
with major storms."


Leave early to avoid becoming a statistic


By Paul Roat
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Andrew or Opal and everyone has a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get away from
the flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch
the storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the build-
ing and washed onto the road in a rush of swirling
water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with



Tropical
Storm
Gabrielle -
in 2001
pounded
Anna
Marina
Island, -
swamping .. .
this boat at
the
Bradenton
Beach
Marina.
Islander
Photo: .-
Paul Roat -


frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going
out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One
more inch and it would have been inside the house -
and this was a storm that no one expected to amount to
anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the


beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is not
meant for humans in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell, Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20
billion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and 15 dead
are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Closer to our Gulffront homes, Hurricane Opal
cleared a swath of shoreline in the Panhandle in 1995.
And we all remember the fright Hurricane Georges
gave us several years ago when we realized for the first
time in a long time what it was like to pack up every-
thing and head to high ground, thankfully to return
home to find virtually no damage.
Yet, despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, belongings and price-
less mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years are scattered
across what's left of the neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Local disaster preparedness officials have probably
the best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the
Island in the face of a major storm.
As they go door to door warning residents to
evacuate, they ask for names of those remaining and
names of next of kin so they can be contacted to iden-
tify any remains.
When hurricane evacuation orders come to this
part of the coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.


- - ~'- -q '?~~'-*~~
I
-





THE ISLANDER B 2003 STORM SPECIAL 0 PAGE 3


For storm insurance, get aboard now


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
If you don't have hurricane insurance now, hurry
up and sign on you can't get it when a storm is near
enough to remind you to get a policy or renew your
current one.
"The box" won't let you insure when a storm is
within several hundred miles, said Christian Huth of
Oswald Trippe and Co. Inc., one of the larger insurance
agencies along this part of the Gulf Coast.
Huth explained that "the box" is a huge territory
within imaginary lines, and it includes the southeastern
United States, the Caribbean, Bahamas and everything
between. It rules the insurance decisions, and it is prac-
tically inviolable.
If there is a tropical storm or hurricane within the
box, most insurance companies won't write a policy.
No agency can influence a company to change that -
it's policy, and everyone knows the finality of that
phrase.
Insurance policies that are in force now are all
right, as long as they don't fall due for renewal during
the storm season, June-November. If they do, they
chance coming up while there's a storm in the box, and
renewals won't be accepted then any more than new
policies.
All that doesn't apply if there is no storm anywhere
within the box, Huth said, and he and other agencies
would be happy to write a new policy or renew an ex-
isting one then.
The touchiest part of the storm season is some way
off, so there is likely to be time for such policies if your
timing is right and there are no storms anywhere
around. Angust, September and October are the most
active storm months, and it's best not to rely on being
able to slip between storms in the box then, Huth said.
Another thing, don't assume your homeowners policy
covers everything. It doesn't insure you against "rising
water," for example. Flood insurance is written through
federal agencies, and it's expensive. But not, Huth added,
as expensive as being flooded without insurance.


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Think outside the box
Insurance carriers won't issue a policy for any storm, tropical or hurricane, inside the dark box pictured above.


Windstorm insurance likewise is a government
matter. If you live within 1,000 feet of the Gulf of
Mexico, homeowners insurance doesn't cover it, so the
state sells windstorm coverage.
If you live more than 1,000 feet from the Gulf,
homeowners is required to cover wind damage. That's
why such a large portion of homeowners insurance
premiums hereabouts is for wind insurance.
"Insurers are more concerned with wind damage
than fire and theft," Huth said, and that's based on com-
panies' expensive experience.


"The box" likewise is based on hard-bought expe-
rience. The reason companies adopted the box years
ago is that they quickly tired of having to pay out for
damage from storms that impended just before the in-
sured bought a policy. They want owners to insure their
properties the year around, not just against a storm
that's approaching.
Huth and his Anna Maria Island office knows in-
timately the insurance business as it affects barrier is-
lands his father started the agency in 1958, and son
Christian has been with the agency since 1987.


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Manatee County Dept. of Public Safety...........748-4501
Manatee County Special Needs Registration* ... 748-4501
*REGISTER if you need assistance with transportation during an
evacuation due to age, disability or special needs.

American Red Cross..................................... 792-8686
Citizens Information Line (when activated) ........745-3700
Florida Power & Light............................... (800) 226-3545
Tampa Electric Co........................ (877) 832-6747

NOAA Weather Information Radio Station:
24-hours 162.400mhz

Clip this notice and post it in a
prominent place for easy reference.

For further information, call your city hall:
Anna Maria ... 708-6130 Bradenton Beach ... 778-1005
Holmes Beach ... 708-5800.


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PAGE 4 N 2003 STORM SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER


Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island


Hurricanes are categorized based on the power of
the storms. Storm categories allow emergency manage-
ment officials to determine need and time of evacua-
tion.
The Manatee County Emergency Management
Division notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
more water."
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely dif-
ficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 mph -
24 mph less than even a Category 1 storm.
There's also a good chance officials will close the
bridges to vehicles trying to evacuate Anna Maria Is-
land before winds reach hurricane force, providing yet
another reason Island residents should plan to evacu-
ate early.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale," called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, to
assign storms into five categories. Rated from least to
most powerful, the five categories and damage poten-
tial are detailed below.
It's important to note, though, that Tropical Storm
Gabrielle in 2001 caused massive flooding and damage
to the area with winds of about 70 mph not even a
hurricane.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to shrub-
bery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile homes. Some
damage may occur to poorly constructed signs. Storm
surge is expected to be 4 to 5 feet above normal. Flood-
ing is expected on barrier islands. Low-lying coastal roads
may be inundated. Expect minor pier damage and small
craft to be torn from exposed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in damage.
Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category 1 storm, caus-
ing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage, mostly to cen-
tral Florida. Also, Hurricane Allison and Hurricane Noel
of 1995 were Category 1 hurricanes at peak intensity.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-
structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to
piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
ages. Storm surge is expected to be 6 to 8 feet above
normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage. Also, Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was
a Category 2 storm when it passed through the Virgin
Islands.

Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will topple.
Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
down. Expect structural damage to small buildings.
Many mobile homes may be destroyed. Storm surge 9
to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along barrier
islands and coastal areas. Large exposed buildings will
be damaged, and smaller structures will be destroyed
by wave action and floating debris.
Low-lying escape routes will be cut off by rising
water three to five hours before the arrival of the hur-
ricane center. Terrain continuously lower than 5 feet


Down ... and out
Power lines will go out in even a tropical storm, as happened on the Island during Tropical Storm Gabrielle
in 2001. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


above mean sea level may be flooded inland to a dis-
tance of eight or more miles.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.
Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm,
killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in damage
to eastern Caribbean islands. That same year spawned
Hurricane Roxanne as a Category 3 storm at landfall on
the Yucatan Peninsula.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline and on
barrier islands due to flooding, waves and floating de-
bris.
Terrain lower than 10 feet above sea level may be
flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential
areas as far inland as 6 miles.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Hurri-
cane Donna.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sus-
tained winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than
175 mph. More than 60,000 homes were destroyed,
200,000 people were left homeless, more than 2 mil-
lion people evacuated, 15 people died and damage
was estimated at $20 billion. Hurricane Andrew was
the third most intense hurricane this century, and
caused the greatest loss of property of any hurricane


in the United States.
Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4
storm, killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in
damage, mostly in the Panhandle, although some
damage occurred on Anna Maria Island as the storm
tracked to the north. Also in that year, Hurricane
Luis was a Category 4 hurricane while moving over
the Leeward Islands, as was Hurricane Felix. Hurri-
cane Georges in 1999 was at one point a Category 4
storm, killing more than 500 people and causing
more than $2 billion in damage. Hurricane Floyd,
also in 1999, was at one point a Category 4 storm as
it passed through the Bahamas, but had weakened
before its eventual landfall in North Carolina.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
There will be major damage to lower floors of all
structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and
within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation
of residential areas on low ground within 10 miles of
the shoreline may be required.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane. Hurricane
Camille in 1969 was a Category 5 storm, and Hurricane
Gilbert of 1988 was a Category 5 hurricane at peak
intensity.
Hurricane Mitch was a Category 5 hurricane, and
was the third-deadliest storm on record, with more than
10,000 deaths in Central America.


Hurricane myths versus facts


Just because you've always done something
doesn't mean it's is right.
There are several myths about hurricanes that
we've probably believed for years and years. Un-
fortunately, we've wasted a lot of time doing
things that are pretty useless. Here are some myths
and facts about hurricane season.

Taping windows protects the glass
Taping windows will do little or nothing
against a storm. It is a waste of effort, time and
tape. The tape provides little additional strength to
the glass and no protection against flying debris.


Once a hurricane warning has been issued, spend your
time putting up shutters or plywood over your windows
and doors.

Open windows for protection
Some believe opening windows on the lee side of
the storm to balance air pressure will prevent the house
from exploding.
The difference in air pressure between the inside of
your house and outside in the storm does not cause the
house to blow up, since no house is built airtight. Hur-
ricane winds are intense and variable, and open win-
dows, even on the lee side, can allow flying debris to


enter. Once a window or door is shattered, intense
winds can enter and rip the house apart trying to
get out.

Any emergency shelter will do
Storm shelters for evacuation will open de-
pending on the severity of the storm. Not all shel-
ters may open. Check the radio or television for
shelters that are open. Remember that shelter space
is not adequate for the population, and conditions
are somewhat primitive, so the best course of ac-
tion is to stay with friends who live far away from
the coast or low-lying areas.





THE ISLANDER 0 2003 STORM SPECIAL N PAGE 5


How hurricanes came to be named, 2003 storm names


Andrew, Hugo, Floyd and now Gabrielle are famil-
iar names to weather watchers, but the naming of
storms is a relatively new aspect in the science of
studying whirly weather.
An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge, was
the first to use female names in describing tropical
storms in the late 1800s, although he also named sev-
eral after politicians whom he particularly disliked.
Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up the prac-
tice during World War II, naming storms after their
wives and girlfriends.
In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
designate storms, using common military titles of Able,
Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, female
names became the norm, with the first two hurricanes
dubbed Alice and Barbara.
Complaints poured into the National Weather Bu-
reau from women upset that they were being singled


Web sites for

emergency information
Want up-to-the-minute information about what's
happening in the world of weather? Join the Emer-
gency Email Network.
Go to www.emergencye.com and type in some
information and you can get the details of what's hap-
pening sent to you as it's happening.
"The Emergency Email Network forwards weather
and emergency information directly to your pager, cell
phone or computer e-mail the instant it is released by
official agencies," according to the Web site.
Here's a few other favorite Web sites:
www.nws.noaa.gov this site gives you historic
plus up-to-date information on what's happening in the
weather world.
www.nhc.noaa.gov probably the best of the
storm sites, this address gives you those invaluable "dis-
cussion" sections, where the forecasters describe the vari-
ous results from the various computer models run to de-
termine storm tracks. There's also a historical site here that
offers informatio- from storms dating back to 1492.


out in describing wicked weather, but the practice con-
tinued until 1978, when hurricanes in the eastern Pa-
cific were alternately named for men and women. In
1979, nomenclature for Atlantic hurricanes followed
suit, with Hurricane Bob the first "male" storm.
Six bisexual lists of hurricane names have been
developed by the World Meteorological Organization.
The names are short, easy to remember and commonly
used names from the English, French and Spanish lan-
guages. To receive a name, a tropical low-pressure
center must, at the east, develop into a full-fledged
tropical storm with wind speeds at 39 mph.
The lists are repeated every six years.
The only time there's a change in the list is when
a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its
name on a different storm would be inappropriate for
reasons of sensitivity.
According to NOAA, "Several names have been


changed since the lists were last used. Four names from
the 1995 list have been retired. On the 2001 list,
Lorenzo replaced Luis, Michelle replaced Marilyn,
Olga replaced Opal, and Rebekah replaced Roxanne.
On the 2002 list, Cristobal replaced Cesar, Fay replaced
Fran, and Hanna replaced Hortense."
2003 hurricane names for the Atlantic Ocean:
Ana Larry
Bill Mindy
Claudette Nicholas
Danny Odette
Erika Peter
Fabian Rose
Grace Sam
Henri Teresa
Isabel Victor
Juan Wanda
Kate


And then the rains came
Tropical Storm Gabrielle came ashore near Venice to the south and swamped Anna Maria Island in 2001, as
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PAGE 6 E 2003 STORM SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER




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PAGE 8 E 2003 STORM SPECIAL E THE ISLANDER


Know your shelter, where and when


All the emergency shelters are on the mainland and
may be unfamiliar to Islanders and West Bradenton
residents. It's good to know the locations of shelters,
the best routes to them, and the order in which they are
likely to open.
Barrier islands such as Anna Maria and Longboat
Key are the first to be evacuated, the residents there are
the first to need shelters. Nobody wants to need one,
but it's reassuring that one will be available if the need
arises.
Laurie Feagans, Manatee County's chief of
emergency management, and her staff have identi-
fied shelters and seen to their preparation for an
emergency. They have devised a color-coded system
of phased shelter openings, green first, then blue,
finally red.
Feagans strongly advises people not to go to a shel-



Save millions,


trim trees now

By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Those lovely trees for which Florida is envied
around the country can become our deadly enemies in
a heavy storm. So trim them beforehand. Like now.
Laurie Feagans, chief of emergency management
in Manatee County, likes trees and other plant life, but
she likes safety more. Downed trees., and their boughs
get in the way of emergency crews in a storm, interrupt
electric power and they cost taxpayers millions in this
county alone.
Clearing up the debris after Tropical Storm
Gabrielle in 2001 cost Manatee County more than $2.5
million, not including incorporated areas such as
Bradenton. Not all of that money went into clearing
trees and foliage damaged buildings claimed their
share.
That can and should be prevented, Feagans said.
Companies and business places and homeowners need
to start right now trimming vulnerable parts off trees.
Especially branches that stretch over houses, Feagans
said, for they are very real threat.
There are other aspects to falling trees electric
power interruptions, for example, and stalled emer-
gency vehicles and possibly cutting down the life of the
county's landfill.
Gabrielle's depredations cut power to 125,000
people in Manatee County, 250,000 total in the Mana-
tee-Sarasota counties area. That meant no radio and TV
communication, food spoiling in refrigerators, water
shortages and a lack of everything dependent on elec-


ter until officials announce through the media that it
is open. She noted that shelter openings may vary
with each emergency, so stay tuned to local media.
The shelters, all in public school buildings, in or-
der of opening by phase:
Green
Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Bradenton.
Seabreeze Elementary, 3601 71st St. W., Bradenton.
Haile Middle, 9501 State Road 64 E., Bradenton.
Lincoln Middle, 305 17th S. E., Palmetto.
Tillman Elementary, 1415 29th St. E., Palmetto.
Kinnan Elementary, 3415 Tallevast Road, Sarasota.

Blue
Rowlett Elementary, 3500 Ninth St. E., Bradenton.
Manatee High, 1000 32nd St. W., Bradenton.
Braden River Elementary, 6215 River Club Blvd.,


Bradenton.
Bashaw Elementary, 3515 Morgan Johnson Road,
Bradenton.
Witt Elementary, 200 Rye Road, Bradenton.

Red
Johnson Middle, 2121 26th Ave. E., Bradenton.
Southeast High, 1200 37th Ave. E., Bradenton.
Braden River Middle, 6215 River Club Blvd.,
Bradenton.
Lakewood Ranch High, 5500 Lakewood Ranch Blvd.,
Bradenton
Oneco Elementary, 2000 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton.
Feagans stressed that shelters should be a "last re-
sort" for residents, and that staying with a friend or
relative on the mainland is the best option during an
evacuation.


Timber!
Former Bradenton Beach Public Works Director Buddy Watts took to the city tractor to remove trees from
Bay Drive South after Tropical Storm Gabrielle hit the Island in 2001. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


tricity.
The county landfill was not overtaxed, unlike those
in South Florida after Hurricane Andrew 10 years ago.
There, officials estimated that getting rid of debris used
up 15 years of the landfills' life.


Checklist to get you ready


If a hurricane strikes the coast of Southwest
Florida, expect to be away from home if there is a
home to come back to for at least three days. Maybe
a week, or longer.
There won't be power, water, telephones, ice: or a
nearby convenience store. You'll need to stock up on
what you need to survive and wait it out.
Here's a list of items experts suggest you have to
weather a storm, in no particular order.
Fire extinguisher.
Clean containers to storm water, one gallon per person
per day..
Food, canned or dry.
Manual can opener.
Hand tools: hammer, nails, ax, knife, pliers, handsaw,
screwdrivers.
Electric drill with screwdriver bits to install bolts for
window protection.
Unscented bleach to purify water (eight drops per gal-
lon).
Soap.
One flashlight per person with spare batteries.
Battery operated radio.
First aid kit: bandages, gauze, scissors, petroleum jelly,
antiseptic spray, hydrogen peroxide, antacids, aspirin,


thermometer, rubbing alcohol.
Extra prescription medicine.
Matches, preferably wooden.
Disposable eating utensils and plates.
Toilet paper.
Mosquito repellent.

Below are some things that will prove useful, but
are deemed to not be essential.
Gallon-size plastic freezer bags to fill with water to
make ice.
Needle and thread.
Whistle and air horn.
Disinfectant.
Grill or Sterno stove with extra fuel.
Oven mitts.
Lantern with extra fuel.
Garbage bags.
Rope or heavy cord, 100 feet.
Tarpaulin to make temporary roof repairs.

And finally, here are some items classed as "luxu-
ries."
Chainsaw and extra fuel.
Backup generator and extra fuel.


Prepare. Keep trees trimmed. Keep a stock of non-
perishable foods. Keep a supply of drinking water.
Keep a supply of batteries in easy reach for flashlights
and radios.
Keep calm.





Special needs

suggestions from

Manatee County
For Islanders with special medical needs,
"pre-registration is a real good thing," accord-
ing to Manatee County Emergency
Management's Steve Simpson.
Manatee County has established a data-
base of more than 700 people who have spe-
cial needs that would require special assistance
during any type of storm evacuation.
Simpson said those people on the list will
be assessed as to the extent of their needs. If
an evacuation is ordered, the people are called
and asked if they need assistance. If the answer
is yes, he said, then Manatee County Area
Transit makes arrangements to transport them
to a shelter.
To pre-register, call 748-4501 and ask for
a special medical needs form and one will be
mailed to you.





THE ISLANDER E 2003 STORM SPECIAL N PAGE 9


Living in a post-disaster world on Anna Maria Island


"When life gives you lemons, make lemonade."

By Paul Roat
"There is little doubt about it sooner or later,
another big hurricane will come. Atmospheric scien-
tists and emergency planners agree that it's just a
matter of time before some portion of Florida is
struck by another catastrophic hurricane. No one
knows when or where it will strike, but we do know
that eventually it will blast ashore somewhere and
cause massive destruction perhaps even greater
than that caused by Andrew. Since there is nothing
anyone can do to alter that foreboding reality, the
question is: Are we ready for the next great hurri-
cane?"
That quote is from Jay Barnes' book, "Florida's
Hurricane History." Unfortunately, his assessment is
true, especially for residents of Anna Maria Island.
Islanders have been spared the direct hit of a hur-
ricane in recent years. Historically, five hurricanes
passed across the Island, one of the worst in October


Hurricane factoids
Below are some unusual facts about hurricanes.

Biggest hurricane ever
On the planet Jupiter, a whirlwind-looking event is
called the Great Red Spot. It was first seen by Galileo
300 years ago. It is about three times the diameter of
the Earth.

Clockwise-comunterclockwise
North of the equator, hurricanes spin counterclock-
wise. South of the equator, they spin clockwise. So the
question is: Which way does a hurricane spin if it stays
on the equator?

Deadliest
In 1972, an East Pakistan cyclone killed 200,000-
500,000 people.


1921. That storm turned the area north of Pine Avenue
in Anna Maria into a shallow sandbar. Today, that's the
largest land area of the city. Passage Key, just north of
the Island, once had a fishing village and freshwater
lake. Since the storm, Passage Key has been little more
than a sandbar.
That storm was a moderate Category 1 hurricane,
with winds of about 100 mph. Imagine what a Category
5 storm with 155-mph winds would do.
Damage would be in the tens of millions of dollars
if a major storm made landfall on the Island. If evacu-
ation orders are not heeded, loss of life would be hor-
rific.
But the challenge will come through redevelop-
ment. Do Islanders want to rebuild the Island as it looks
today, or is there a better way to develop on this nar-
row strip of sand?
Those questions have been partially answered in
the "Islandwide post-disaster redevelopment plan for
Anna Maria Island," prepared by the Tampa Bay Re-
gional Planning Council.
The plan is the result of hundreds of hours of work
by elected and appointed officials, staff members and
citizens, all peering into crystal balls in an attempt to
come up with some vision of the Island in the literal
wake of a hurricane.
Taking into account existing land uses and poten-
tial redevelopment, transportation, drainage and other
issues, officials have produced a document that will
serve as a springboard for rebuilding the Island.

After the storm
When the winds have abated and the water has re-
ceded, post-disaster planning begins. There are three
stages to this process:
Immediate emergency period. Debris will be
cleared, search and rescue operation undertaken and an
initial assessment of damages to the Island will take
place. This process is expected to take several days.
Short-range restoration period. Minor or moder-
ately damaged structures may be repaired, plus damage
assessments are made of all buildings. This process is


expected to take several weeks or months.
Long-range reconstruction period. This period
will allow for full restoration of services, reconstruc-
tion of all structures and total infrastructure repair. This
process could take several years.

Crystal ball
Although the post-disaster redevelopment plan
offers a broad-brush approach to rebuilding the Island,
it also offers some "opportunities" for making things
better than today. Among the thoughts which could be
placed under consideration are the following.
Consider the overall redevelopment of the Island,
rather than just one community or one neighborhood.
Consider compatibility when redevelopment oc-
curs. One ground-level house in a neighborhood of stilt
homes is an example of an incompatible neighborhood.
With widespread destruction comes an opportu-
nity to rid the Island of exotic plant species, such as
Brazilian pepper and Australian pine and replace non-
native trees with traditional Florida plantings.
Development of an Islandwide bicycle and pedes-
trian pathway should be considered.
With massive property loss comes an opportunity
to acquire sensitive lands for the public. While officials
in all three Island cities agreed not to use municipal
funds for such acquisition, state or federal funds could
be used to add more public beach or bay access.

A look ahead
Here's an interesting footnote to post-disaster plan-
ning from the Virgin Islands.
In 1995, Hurricane Marilyn struck the Caribbean
islands, killing 11 people and causing $1.2 billion in
damage. Islanders repaired their homes, businesses and
resorts.
In 1998, Hurricane Georges struck the Virgin Is-
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PAGE 10 N 2003 STORM SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER


Visualizing the Island after the 'Big One'


By Stan Zimmerman
Special to The Islander
A flood insurance wrinkle by the Feds several
years ago has interested Islanders in pondering their
land-use future after "the Big One." Federal officials
say if a post-disaster plan is not in place for fragile
barrier islands, there is a good chance federal funding
won't be forthcoming for redevelopment after a hurri-
cane strike.
Anna Maria Island produced one of the first such
plans around, and it was good enough to win awards for
its thoroughness.
Since the feds kick in a huge chunk of post-disas-
ter money, Islanders had a pretty strong incentive to
begin thinking about land use after the Big One.
Most of the planning is pretty much status-quo
thinking, replacing what may be destroyed with about
the same thing. Maybe it's time to expand the thinking
to include what folks would like to see happen, instead
of staying with the same-old same-old.
A major storm I'll nickname it Hurricane Brillo
- would wipe out all structures within the high veloc-
ity zone to seaward. Everything west of Gulf Drive, and
100 feet east, would be a memory.
Depending on storm surge, tide and wind direction,
the retreat of the storm surge from the swollen bay
could decimate bayside structures, too. Considering
Anna Maria and Longboat are long and slender, the
marine assault from both sides may leave little stand-
ing.
The worst-case scenario would see the Island
scrubbed clean, creating a literal tabulaa rasa," or clean
slate, for post-storm development. This creates the
opportunity for folks to create "the Island we've always
wanted."
For ecology fans, that would be an uninhabited
nature preserve, of course. A place where turtles and
terns could frolic, eagles could soar and snook could
snuggle along the mangrove shoreline.
For developers, the Island could become a huge
"planned-unit development," like South Seas Planta-


tion that covers Captiva Island to the south. Wage-earn-
ers need not apply.
For political troglodytes, every shotgun shack
would be replaced, every fetid bar restored, every tacky
tourist trap rebuilt even gaudier. This is the "grandfa-
ther" school of planning and eschews anything for-
ward-looking.
One fact is clear. Any new construction will sit
high off the ground. Everything else is open for discus-
sion.

What could it look like?
Relax and let your mind wander, for it isn't every
day you get to plan the community of your dreams.
Everybody has dreams, and sometimes those dreams
are shared widely enough to become with a little
work and organization a reality.
So let's pull out a clean sheet of paper and assume
the Anna Maria we've known and loved is gone, swept
clean by Hurricane Brillo.
We could, if we wanted, give a bigger hunk of the


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southern part of the Island back to nature. Expand Co-
quina Beach to a length of several miles. Put the man-
groves back along the bayside, establish a boardwalk
and nature trail, and put native vegetation to work feed-
ing and attracting native critters.
On the northern end of the Island, why not create
a visitor/commercial district? Put the inevitable motels
along the Gulf, and design an attractive (dare I use the
word "upscale?") commercial center along the bayside.
It could be as tacky as Fort Myers Beach, or as snooty
as Worth Avenue or St. Armands Circle.
The objective of this "fun zone" is not only to pick
Euro and Yankee pockets, but also to provide an alter-
native to the "we work in Bradenton and play in
Sarasota" syndrome. The north bridge would serve the
fun seekers nicely.
Locals would live in the middle of the Island,
served by the Cortez Bridge. A small shopping cross-
roads would address the necessities of daily living, with
community centers, local cultural facilities, churches
and other necessities located nearby to form a real vil-
lage center. This would also allow co-location of park-
ing, so the Saturday grocery shopper could park in the
same spot to attend Sunday worship or a Friday night
play.
If these ideas aren't wild enough, let your pencil
roam even further. Use the eraser to eliminate the south
bridge to Longboat, or all the bridges entirely. Instead,
institute a ferry service and ban gas-powered private
vehicles on the Island. Buy 500 golf carts and 1,000
bicycles and leave them around for anybody's use.
Start an electric trolley to provide free service up and
down the Island. No pollution, less noise, fewer acci-
dents anybody interested?
The point here is not for me to play dictator-for-a-
day and sketch out the Island's future. The point is, the
feds have demanded we produce a post-Hurricane
Brillo plan. This has been done. But now is the time for
us to take the time, care and opportunity to ensure the
new Anna Maria Island a remarkable place to live, play
and visit.


*


I


F.





THE ISLANDER E 2003 STORM SPECIAL 0 PAGE 11


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Hurricane safety tips


Right now
Before hurricane season you should:
Enter hurricane season prepared. Recheck
your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perish-
able foods and other equipment you'll need to se-
cure your home and prepare yourself for evacua-
tion from the area, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival
Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a
two-week supply); special dietary foods that are
non-perishable; blankets, pillows, and sleeping
bags; flashlight and lots of batteries; portable ra-
dio and lots of batteries; extra clothing; lightweight
folding chairs, cots; personal items; infant neces-
sities; quiet games or favorite toys for children;
important papers; and snacks.
Develop a plan for where you'll go if you
need to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland
or hurricane shelter locations should be identified
and a route to the safe shelter plotted.

If a storm threatens
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a threatened region, pay attention to local
weather broadcasts for further updates, and:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a
safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect
them with tape or storm shutters. Remember, dam-
age to small windows is mostly caused by wind-
driven debris; damage to larger windows may
come from debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings,
lawn ornaments and anything that can be moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside.
Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch fur-
niture and other harmless items become missiles in
hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disturbed for
days or longer after a hurricane. You should have
one gallon of water per person per day, and you
should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
that electricity may be off for days or longer and
cooking may be difficult, so make plans to prepare
food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to
make sure you have a non-electric can opener.
Check all battery-powered equipment and
stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recom-
mending you not use candles due to the threat of
fire. An untended flashlight won't start a fire, but
a candle or lantern might.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buck-
ets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet.
Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals
will have to be kept with friends or at a kennel.

If landfall is predicted here
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a possible landfall for a hurricane, begin mak-
ing preparations for the storm:
Board all windows, or secure with tape or se-


Don't wait as long as these Bradenton Beach boat
owners to secure your boat if severe weather is
forecast. (Hurricane Gordon, 2000)
Islander Photo
curity shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leav-
ing the Island will be worse than you can imagine.
Hurricane authorities predict it will take 12 to 17
hours to evacuate the Island, so plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
shelter openings.

If officials order

an evacuation:
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate it. If possible, remove the pump, other-
wise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where
you're going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.

After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and live power lines, and emergency crews will
need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure
you have a re-entry tag (when they are issued by
your city government) or two forms of valid iden-
tification showing your local address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't
sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency
vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that
may have sought higher ground to avoid flood
waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


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