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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00970

Full Text




. '~: :' nini the news ... Island Dolphins win PAL football Super Bowl, page 29.


Travelers, page 22.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 11, no. 3, Nov. 27, 2002 FREE


Bridge decision: Repair, not replace


By Paul Roat
"The Florida Department of Transportation has
decided to proceed with the rehabilitation with no wid-
ening alternative, defined as routine maintenance and
major repair of the existing Anna Maria Bridge."
"Fantastic!" was the comment from "no-new-
bridge" proponent Bunny Garst of Save Anna Maria on
that announcement by the DOT last week.
The most recent round of the megabridge battle brew-
ing on the Island was won by Islanders before it started.
DOT officials have agreed to spend $7.2 million


over the course of the next 20 years to repair the 45-
year-old bridge linking Holmes Beach to Perico Island.
Initial repair will cost $6.4 million and will be done
next year. with work starting after Easter.
The repair work will include repairs to the concrete
piles including installation of special protective jack-
ets. replacement of the joints, patching and sealing the
cracked areas and repairs to delaminated portions of the
bridge, plus addition of a sealant coating.
The protective jacket option has gained popularity
in the last few years, DOT officials have said, as a


means to protect the concrete piles from corrosive im-
pacts caused by saltwater.
Other repairs will include a complete replacement
of all electrical components on the bridge and extensive
overhauls of mechanical and structural elements.
Why is the bridge now repairable when it was
deemed 'functionally obsolete" and in need of replace-
ment 10 years ago?
DOT documents indicate that better testing and
PLEASE SEE BRIDGE, NEXT PAGE


Island real estate

in demand; value

increases slowing
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Island real estate is still very much
in demand, according to several Island
real estate agents, and that's good news
for property owners looking to sell.
"People are still buying on Anna
Maria Island," said Doug Dowling of
Dowling Real Estate. "It's a solid market."
But there seems to be a slight "slow-
ing" of the 15 to 30 percent annual in-
crease in Island property values Dowling
has seen during the past five years.
"I think it's stabilized," he said. "I
think we're now back to our normal 8 to
15 percent increase each year, depend-
ing upon location," he added.
Gulffront and waterfront properties
still have the highest value increase,
while land-locked property values will
climb about 8 to 10 percent this year, he
predicted.
"Waterfront property is still in high
demand, but we seem to be off in the
number of sellers," said Dowling.
On the downside for Island resi-
dents, however, is that many of the buy-
ers recently seem to be investors looking
for rental property or opportunities to re-
develop, he said.
And there still seems to be a shortage
of homes on the Island for sale. With only
70 residential homes for sale at present,
demand is higher than the supply.
Brenda Boyd May of Boyd Real
Estate said Island real estate is still in
demand and sellers are eventually get-
ting their price.
"Island properties are still selling
within 1 percent of the asking price if
they sell within 30 days," she said.
But there is a shortage of listings,
she said, particularly for properties sell-
ing between $300,000 and $500,000.
"Anything in the $300,000 range
usually sells immediately," Boyd said.
Homes selling for more than $500,000
usually require a different type of buyer.
And the condominium market, long
overlooked by Island real estate inves-
tors and incoming residents, is now
booming, said Dowling.


With an average sale price the past
five months of just under $330,000, Is-
land condominiums are in demand, he
said.
In the past five months, 52 condos
were listed with local real estate agents
and 48 of those sold.
"Gulffront condos are doing very
well," said Dowling. "The entire condo
market is doing good. I'm seeing some
condo values up as much as 50 percent
the past year," he added.
For residential properties on the
Island, 61 homes have sold since June
at an average sale price of $460,000
while 112 were listed during the same
time period.
The minimum sale price for any
single-family Island home the past six
months was $210,000 while the top-
priced home sale was $1.25 million.
The last single-family home listing
under $200,000 on the Island disap-
PLEASE SEE VALUE, NEXT PAGE


Musical


Christmas


Prelude


Thursday
Ride the trolley if you can, bring
chairs and have a wonderful musical
Prelude to Christmas on Thanksgiving
evening in Bradenton Beach.
Lee Ann Bessonette of the sponsor-
ing Legacy III issued the trolley advi-
sory this week, for convenience of Pre-
lude participants and to relieve any traf-
fic and parking congestion.
The event will begin at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 28, following opening
music by the Island Middle School band
at 5:30. From then on it's music and
enjoyment until everyone runs out of
steam.
According to Bessonette, more than

PLEASE SEE PRELUDE, PAGE 4


Anna Maria
Bridge crash
The driver of this
1979 GMC Cabal-
lero apparently lost
control of the
vehicle, crashed
and fled the scene
on the Anna Maria
Bridge at approxi-
mately 5:11 a.m.
Thursday, Nov. 21.
Anyone with
information about
the crash or the
driver should call
the Bradenton
Police Department
at 708-6273.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Jo\


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PAGE 2 E NOV. 27, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER
Bridge option: Repair, not replace
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
more public involvement in the most recent bridge
hearings have brought about the sea change to repair
rather than replace, although DOT officials continue to
state that the bridge inspections will continue and there
is a good chance a replacement will be needed in 20
years.
However, that replacement will be two-lane, al-
though the height is still to be determined.
The results of the $1 million inspection work and
analysis of the span end any uncertainties many Islanders
had regarding the fate of the bridge. The 3,123-foot-long
bridge was the focus of one of the longest-running battles
in Island history, as Save Anna Maria successfully took
DOT to court to block the agency's plans for a 65-foot
center-clearance fixed-span replacement bridge.
The effort took years and cost millions in legal fees.
"The defeat of the replacement of the Anna Maria
Bridge sends a message to those who want to change
the image of this beautiful Island," said SAM President
Katie Pierola.
"One only has to go see the Ringling Bridge under
construction [in Sarasota] and realize that the awesome
concrete structure is not what anyone wants for the ap-
proach to an area that has fought for decades to preserve
and protect a 7-mile-long island that is not a mile wide and
has no high rises!
"God speed to DOT."
It remains to be seen whether the loosely organized
"Build Our.Bridge" group, proponents of a megabridge
replacement, will oppose the new plan.


Values slow in Island property
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
peared in mid-2001, said one local real estate agent.
"You won't find anything under $200,000 now,
and if you see something below $250,000, it's not go-
ing to last for more than a few days, if that."
A decent non-waterfront home purchased in 1995
for $150,000 on the Island can now command a sale
price of about $400,000 said the agent. "And easily get
it," he added.


While a steady stream of real estate inquiries and
sales this summer on Anna Maria Island may be good
news for Island real estate agents, it's somewhat bad
news for Island population figures.
Islanders are selling out to investors and winter
visitors people who aren't full-time residents and
moving to the mainland with their profits, Island
elected officials have claimed.
Registered voter figures from the Manatee County
Supervisor of Elections office would seem to confirm
that the Island is losing its permanent population.
In the two-year period from the November 2000
elections to this year's voting, the number of registered
voters dropped 8.1 percent Islandwide, according to the
election office. Anna Maria lost 106 voters, Holmes
Beach dropped 329 and Bradenton Beach was down
106.
For this past election, Anna Maria had 1,529 reg-
istered voters, Holmes Beach 3,599 and Bradenton
Beach 1,030.
Holmes Beach Mayor Carol Whitmore has said the


time is now for Island cities to start thinking of their
cities as residential communities for permanent resi-
dents, not a cash cow for mainland investors.
Holmes Beach City Commissioner Don Maloney
said a lot of Island residents have their retirement fi-
nanced in their property.
"I could sell my house now for upwards of
$400,000," claimed Maloney, pay off the mortgage,
buy a new home for cash in east Manatee for around
$160,000 and have a considerable amount of money
left in the bank to live on. "And people-are doing that,"
he said.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn has been concerned
for some time about the declining population in her
city, while the number of outside real estate investors
seems to be increasing.
Real estate agents surveyed, however, said that with
Island homes still affordable compared to other Florida
barrier islands and a quiet lifestyle, Anna Maria Island is
likely to continue to be a favorite location for northern
investors and winter vacationers to buy property.

S Santa's 'berry
merry' helpers
Sarah Fors, Annie
?-4 Simmons, Barbara
,Vedder, Mary
Saunders, Paula Tripp,
Bettylee Marquis-Kral
Sand Peggy Potter were
some of the volunteers
at the 39th annual
Holly Berry Bazaar
tradition at the Church
of the Annunciation.
Proceeds go to various
church and community
projects. Islander
Photo: J.L. Robertson


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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 3


MCAT hears trolley complaints Meetings


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Manatee County Area Transit representatives got a
dose of Island trolley criticism at two public meetings in
Holmes Beach Nov. 22, mostly for the loud engines and
early morning and late evening hours the trolley operates.
At the same time, however, even many of those who
found fault with the eight-month-old service admitted they
often use the trolley and enjoy its convenience at times.
But comments and criticisms were what MCAT
Marketing Manager Susan Hancock was there to hear, she
said.
Anna Maria resident Shirley McNulty said while she
often rode the trolley, she wondered about the noise level
from the trolley.
"Don't get me wrong. I love the trolley and often ride
it," she said, but it can be loud.
That's been a common complaint, said Manatee
County Director of Community Services Fred Loveland,
who also lives in Anna Maria.
"It's a lot louder than we thought it would be," said
Loveland, who admitted he can sometimes hear the trol-
ley from his Anna Maria residence.
"When I first heard it, I wondered about its use in
Anna Maria," he said.
"But we are working on a solution. We're not any
more happy with it than you are. The problem is, if we
alter the engine, we'll void the warranty," he said.
Loveland and county auto specialists will do some-
thing, however, and they'll first attempt to fiber-insulate
the engine with a covering device to reduce the noise.
If that doesn't work said Mike Guy of the Sarasota-
Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization, he would
ask traffic engineers in other Florida cities to see if they
have a similar noise problem with their trolleys.
MCAT doesn't have a solution to the noise yet, con-
ceded Loveland, "but we are trying to do something."
Susan Hatch of Anna Maria was concerned about the
6 a.m. starting time for the two trolleys with service until
10:30 p.m.
Anna Maria is a residential community and most
people are still asleep at 6 a.m. and often in bed by 9 p.m,


and the trolley route takes it down Gulf Drive and Pine
Avenue, both heavily populated with residences, she said.
Is there any chance MCAT can change the operating
hours?
Hancock said the Manatee County Commission can
change the service hours and MCAT will begin studying
usage during early morning and late evening hours after
March 17, the one-year anniversary of the service.
"We'll also look at seasonal time tables for service,"
said Loveland, and make recommendations to the com-
mission.
Hatch said it often appeared that MCAT was ignor-
ing complaints of citizens and this was the first time she
had heard of any MCAT effort to reduce the trolley's
noise, despite several complaints.
That's one purpose of these meetings, said Hancock,
to get feedback and comments from members of the pub-
lic and see what changes are needed.
"That's why we are here. To listen to you," and im-
prove the trolley's operation, Hancock said.
While she has had some e-mails from Island residents
who don't like the trolley, Hancock said most people on
the Island are pleased with the service and e-mails are run-
ning about 20 to 1 in favor of the trolley.
Hancock also said the trolley is taking an estimated
400 cars per day off Island streets and, for the first eight
months of service, is averaging 876 riders per day. By
comparison, the old MCAT bus service on the Island
which cost $1 per ride averaged only 65 riders per day.
During its first eight months of service, the trolley has
had 236,354 passengers and transported 3,095 bicycles
along with 122 wheelchairs, she said.
Hancock also noted that the trolleys cannot be char-
tered for private use or special events.
She would like anyone who can translate to another
language, particularly German, Spanish or French, to con-
tact her at 747-8621 to assist in producing a multi-lingual
brochure, map and video.
Members of the audience said they were glad MCAT
had come to the Island to hear concerns and Hancock
promised more public meetings about the Island trolley in
the future.


Anna Maria City
Dec. 2, 7 p.m., planning and zoning board workshop.
Dec. 4, 7 p.m., town hall meeting on bay erosion.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
Dec. 5, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
Dec. 4, 6 p.m., visioning meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Holiday Closures
City halls in Anna Maria City, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach and Longboat Key will be closed for Thanksgiving on
Thursday and Friday, Nov. 28-29.
Garbage, trash and recycling collection in Anna Maria City,
Holmes Beach and Longboat Key will not take place on Nov.
28. Alternate pickup date will be on Saturday, Nov. 30. There
will be no interruption of service in Bradenton Beach.


Traffic delays expected

next Wednesday
Expect some traffic tie-ups in southern
Bradenton Beach next Wednesday, Dec. 4.
Florida Power and Light will be conducting
maintenance work on the power grid, prompting
a detour for northbound traffic at Third Street
South through city streets from 8:30 a.m. to
noon, according to Bradenton Beach Police
Chief Sam Speciale.
Other work will hamper northbound traffic
at Cortez Road and Gulf Drive from noon to
about 4:30 the same day, Speciale added, al-
though that work will only block the right-turn
lane onto the Cortez Bridge.
The morning detour will direct traffic onto
Third Street South, then onto Bay Drive to First
Street, where motorists may re-enter Gulf Drive.


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PAGE 4 0 NOV. 27, 2002 U THE ISLANDER


Proposed state fire.safety code change costly
-mop I


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
West Manatee Fire and Rescue District's board of
commissioners got a mild jolt at their Nov. 21 meeting
in Holmes Beach when Fire Chief Andy Price told
them the state fire marshal's office wants to implement
changes, changes that would eventually cost Florida
and Island taxpayers more money for fire service.
Price said he had just received the list of impend-
ing changes that day from the state fire marshal's of-
fice, but his initial review is that "these will have a tre-
mendous effect all over Florida."
Essentially, the new regulations would require ev-
ery fire station in Florida to have all firefighters certi-
fied as either a No. I or No. 2 firefighter. A No. 1 des-
ignation requires- 160 hours of training, while a No. 2
designation takes 400 hours.
That means volunteer firefighters who used to
qualify with only 40 hours training would no longer be
allowed as firefighters anywhere in the state.
Although the WMFRD changed its requirements
about two years ago to 160 hours of training for all its
firefighters, Price said this rule would have a devastating
effect on rural firefighting districts that rely heavily on
volunteers.
Additionally, the new regulation would require all
stations to establish a health-and-safety program ap-
proved by the state. That means taking one firefighter
away from fighting fires and making that person the
health-and-safety officer to meet state requirements
and to process the necessary paperwork.
"It's an extra burden on us," said Price, and he's
not so sure just one officer could handle all the duties,
requirements and paperwork the state would demand.
There may be additional staff needed.
If passed, this new addition to the Florida Admin-
istrative Codes would also establish an enforcement
division.
"More bureaucracy," said board member Larry


New fire and rescue commissioners
Newly elected members of the West Manatee Fire and Rescue District Commission were sworn in by Chief
Andy Price at the board's Nov. 21 meeting in Holmes Beach. Larry Tyler, left, and Mike Mulcyk, center, were
re-elected, while John Rigney, right, is serving his first term. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin


Tyler.
But the new codes are not a done deal. The state fire
marshal's office will establish four locations around the
state to hold public hearings to accept comments before
making a final decision. The codes, however, do not have
to be passed by the state legislature, Price noted. He does
not yet know the meeting dates and locations.
The Florida Association of Fire Chiefs is opposed
to the new requirements, Price said.
In other matters, the board also approved use of a
part-time consultant for quality assurance to analyze
incident reports. Price said he knows a former


firefighter with experience in quality assurance who
can perform the services needed.
Price said hiring a part-time consultant was less
expensive in the long run than creating an internal po-
sition within the district.
The board also elected Jesse Davis as its chairman
for the coming year with Mike Mulcyk as vice chair-
man and Jack Emery as secretary-treasurer.
After three years as board chairman, Tyler said it
was time to step down, although he plans to continue
his efforts to establish one fire district for all of Mana-
tee County.


Anna Maria parking issue divides city


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Following decades of inaction by successive city
commissions, Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn and current
commissioners are resolved to finding a solution to the
city's parking woes.
Judging from public discussion at the
commission's Nov. 19 workshop on the issue, it might
be easier if commissioners were trying to split the
atom, build a spaceship to reach the stars, find a cure
for world hunger, or solve the Mideast crisis.
Business owners in the city want public parking,
even on the right of way, retained. Most private prop-
erty owners want resident-only parking. Everyone's
got an opinion or two or three, and everyone is passion-
ate in their views as the vocal exchanges Nov. 19
proved.
As Anna Maria public meetings on complex issues
go, however, this one was fairly civil. No one threat-
ened, no one booed, and no one asked for directions to
the parking lot.
And in fact, there was one item everyone seemed
to agree upon. "No one is going to get 100 percent of
what they want" in a parking solution, SueLynn said.
There was no dissension on that statement.
But even a compromise solution to maintain the
public parking in the business districts, have limited
public parking on beach-access streets, and issue resi-
dent-only parking stickers met with some disfavor.
To restrict public parking would be a "threat to
businesses," said city pier restaurant operator Mario
Schoenfelder, and changes Anna Maria "from an open
society to a closed society." It sends a message that the
city is now a "gated community."
Sandbar restaurant owner Ed Chiles said it's a dif-
ficult issue to solve and has been coming up again and
again in the city since he was a young boy.
"I think banning public parking in Anna Maria is
a mistake," he said. It sends a signal to people not to
come here because the city is elitist.
Glenn Neumann, who owns a Pine Avenue busi-
ness, suggested a compromise. "We can work this out.
You don't have to restrict parking on every street."
But homeowner Joe Perricone said commissioners


have a duty to protect the people who live here from
outsiders parking on the rights of way, leaving trash on
the street or on someone's property, urinating in pub-
lic, and blocking property owners from getting their
own vehicle out of their driveway.
One of the problems is fairness, conceded
SueLynn. Some streets are completely no-parking
zones while some streets such as Fern Street, sand-
wiched in an area of no parking, bear a burden because
public parking is allowed on a relatively short street.
The biggest parking problems seems to occur on
weekends and holidays, said Commissioner John
Michaels, when the city is invaded by mainlanders
heading for the beach.
Commissioners Linda Cramer and Chuck Webb
agreed that beach-access streets could have just one or
two public parking spaces in addition to a loading zone,
but even this might be unfair said SueLynn. "How do
you designate what streets get parking spaces and how
many?"
"Correct," said resident Nigel Brown. "No one will
be happy with that" because some beach access streets
are already completely no parking. "The equality issue
is a major problem," Brown said.
That's it, said the mayor. "It all goes back to fair-
ness."
Is it fair for people who live along the Gulf to have
10, 12 or 15 cars parked illegally on their street every
weekend? "They must feel invaded," she said.
Fairness is great, said Chiles, but he sees a public
parking ban as simply pushing beachgoers into busi-
ness parking lots. "I don't see the fairness [there]," he
said.
"You then put it on me to boot people out and I
don't want to do that," Chiles added.
Some property owners thought another parking
committee should study the issues, but SueLynn re-
jected the idea. The city has been doing that for more
than 20 years with the same discussions and the same
emotions, she said.
Margaret Jenkins suggested a compromise in
which the city allows public parking in designated ar-
eas, leaves the commercial district parking as it is now,
and issues resident-only parking stickers. Additionally,


the commission should actively seek to purchase prop-
erty now for public parking.
Other issues discussed included paid parking
spaces and lots, routing more traffic to Bayfront Park
where public rest rooms and showers are in place, ask-
ing the city's two churches (Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church and Island Baptist Church) to lease space
in their lots for public parking, routing the Island trol-
ley along North Shore Drive for beach access, creating
different parking zones within the city to address park-
ing needs in that particular area, and establishing open
public parking on all city streets.
Eventually, commissioners did reach a compro-
mise consensus that established several points to ap-
prove or reject as agenda items at a regular commission
meeting, prior to establishing a new parking ordinance.
Those were:
Control the number of parking spaces on each of
the city's 34 beach access roads. Some streets might
have no parking at all.
.* Continue to allow parking on the right of way in
the city's commercial district.
Establish no public parking on bike paths.
Issue parking permits to city residents and prop-
erty owner.
Enact a parking ordinance.
When SueLynn asked the estimated 65 people in
attendance if this plan would be fair, the answer was a
resounding "no" from all sides.
"Well, I doubt if we can solve everyone's problem
in a single ordinance," said Commissioner Chuck
Webb, but at least this establishes a framework.
City Attorney Jim Dye conceded that the parking
issue could go before the voters in a citywide election
if the commission decided to place recommendations
on the ballot.
SueLynn said she would try to get items discussed
on the Nov. 26 commission agenda, but more likely,
the parking issue would have to wait for the
commission's regular monthly meeting in December.
Nearing a solution to the city's nearly 80-year-old
parking problem, the mayor and commissioners prom-
ised to create a plan to end world hunger for their en-
core.





THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 27, 2002 M PAGE 5


BIEO concerned Vision Manatee ignores Island


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Members of the coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials expressed concern at their Nov. 20 meeting
that the upcoming Imagine Manatee countywide vi-
sioning process may not fully address or understand the
transportation problems of Anna Maria Island and
Longboat Key.
Bradenton Beach City Commissioner Dawn Baker,
who attended a workshop on Imagine Manatee earlier
that day, said representatives of APC Inc., the company
running the process for Manatee County, didn't seem
to know much about the Island or the impact of tour-
ism to the Island and Longboat Key, particularly dur-.
ing the winter season.
"It seemed like it was news to them the serious-
ness of the impact to the Island of 50,000 more people
[residing in Manatee County] in eight years," said
Baker.
"I was surprised at how little data they had on the
Island," said Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn.
Both Baker and SueLynn urged Island and
Longboat Key residents and elected officials to attend
the Island visioning session at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 27,
2003, at the Island Baptist Church.
"We as Island cities should participate in the vi-
sioning process," Baker added.



Lesters' Family Fun

Day on schedule
Island benefactors Chuck and Joey Lester are
inviting their Anna Maria Island family the
whole Island, actually to "an old-fashioned
family gathering" on Saturday, Dec. 14.
No special reason, simply a way to express
their love of the Island and its people "just like old
times."
Santa Claus will be there, along with 50-cent
Duffy burgers, 25-cent hot dogs and sodas and
other gastronomic goodies prepared by the
Duffy's Grill Team and Ooh La La! restaurant.
Plus music, bingo, ball toss, raffles including
30 turkeys, a big-screen TV from the event spon-
sor The Islander, singalongs, cookie decorating,
wreath and ornament making, reading and a whole
lot more, said the Lesters. It will be from 11 a.m.-
2 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, as a benefit
for the Center.
The Lesters are winter residents of Holmes
Beach who have contributed regularly to the Cen-
ter, having established the foundation fund, and to
the Island in many other ways. This is the latest,
and certainly not the last.


Traffic
The BIEO also discussed efforts to have the U.S.
Coast Guard reduce the raising of the Cortez and
Longboat Pass drawbridges from three times each hour
to twice hourly, particularly for the winter season.
SueLynn, who chaired the meeting, suggested the
Island cities consider hiring a firm to do an "all-Island
and Longboat Key" traffic study and she will do some
research and report back on available firms and the
cost.

Comprehensive plan review
SueLynn suggested an "all-Island" comprehensive
plan workshop prior to each city reviewing its compre-
hensive plans.
Longboat Key Mayor John Redgrave said his town
had just finished its comprehensive plan review and an
expensive new plan is not needed. Town Manager
Bruce St. Denis was able to get approval by the Florida
Department of Community Affairs and the Florida
League of Cities to do simple changes and corrections,
rather than a complete rewrite at a cost of $600,000.
He suggested other Island cities could "piggy-
back" on this process and save a lot of time and money,
rather than creating an entirely new plan.

Water facilities
Holmes Beach City Commissioner Don Maloney
said Florida cities that obtain all public water from an
outside source have to have a water supply facilities
plan in place by January 2005. He suggested the Island
mayors get together now to discuss creating a common
plan and ordinance, rather than different plans and or-


Prelude Thursday
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

5,000 people attended last year's Prelude, and the spon-
sors expect the crowd to top. that this year, what with
fine weather predicted and the winter season having a
good start.
"The trolley is operating for the holiday,"
Bessonette said. "It only make sense to use it instead
of driving, if it's at all convenient to those attending."
In fact, parking is at a premium in the Bridge Street
area in spite of relaxed enforcement promised by the
Bradenton Beach Police Department.
Prelude will be all Christmas music, rendered by
such diverse musicians as Jimi Gee's Island Middle
School band and the Manatee County Brass Ensemble
and Bradenton City Council member Marianne
Barnebey.
The IMS choir will sing with its Conch Fritter band
backing. The Sweet Adelines of the Magic of Manatee
Chorus will sing. The brass ensemble will not only
play, its members will sing Christmas songs. The Rev.


dinances.
Sample ordinances will be provided to each city by
Maloney for review.

Recovery ordinance
Each city needs a recovery ordinance following an
evacuation or emergency such as in September 2001
when Tropical Storm Gabrielle struck, said Maloney.
Otherwise, whatever plan the city may have might not
be valid, he said.

Hazardous waste collection
Manatee County's hazardous waste collection day
for the Island and Longboat Key will be Jan. 25 from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Holmes Beach. Each city has to pro-
vide two workers to assist the county, SueLynn said.
The county will also schedule an "E-waste" day
next year for the collection of old electronic equipment
such as computers, terminals and keyboards.

Sister cities
There was also discussion among officials about
the SisterCity program. SueLynn said Anna Maria Is-
land and Longboat Key should join as one entity, not
four separate cities. This would reduce costs, but ensure
maximum exposure and publicity. She will look into
the program and provide information at the next BIEO
meeting.
Maloney suggested each city have a special day to
celebrate foreign visitors or residents from a particular
country such as Great Britain or Germany.
The next BIEO meeting was scheduled for Jan. 15,
2003, in Bradenton Beach.


William Grossman of Harvey Memorial Church will
lead prayers of Thanksgiving, and also play with the
brass ensemble. Barnebey is scheduled to sing half a
dozen seasonal favorites.
And the thousands attending as audience will lend
their voices to the celebration of thanks, also, as they
have every year.
Winners of the citywide holiday lighting contest
will be announced during Prelude, five categories in
residential and commercial decorations. The founding
members of Legacy III Bessonette, Emily Anne
Smith and Mayor John Chappie will have driven
every street in the city to determine winners of cash
prizes.
Also on the agenda are awards to some in the au-
dience, from the longest Island resident to the oldest at
the event, the youngest and to the one who came the
farthest.
If the trolley doesn't appeal, the city commission
has voted to open side streets to parking, but not to
include blocking residents' driveways. Bessonette said.
Further information may be obtained by calling
778-3113.


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PAGE 6 0 NOV. 27, 2002 N THE ISLANDER'




Opinion


Bye, bye turkey
To many, the "turkey" was and has been the proposed
megabridge replacement for the Anna Maria Bridge.
Well, that "turkey" is off our backs for now -
and left to possibly a future generation of Islanders and
the Florida Department of Transportation to contest.
The news this week is that the DOT has determined
the present bridge will suffice for 20 more years.
The Islander's editorial in January 1993 summed
up some of what Islanders felt at that time about the
proposed replacement bridge, ie: frustration.
From that editorial, "Bridge the gap.:
"Following the Friday evening public hearing,
DOT representative Bryan Williams asked The Is-
lander why people on Anna Maria don't want the 65-
foot bridge ... we offered what we felt is the passion
of the opponents of the Megaa bridge,' that it would
overwhelm, overshadow, and forever change the char-
acter of our Island community.
"Williams said that was the best, and possibly the
most compelling reason he had heard that could per-
suade them to change'the plan. To preserve the char-
acter of the Island."
Could and would were two different things to the
DOT, however. It took a great deal of effort (and ex-
pense) from Bunny Garst and the grassroots organiza-
tion she supported, Save Anna Maria.
Spawned by a disagreeable DOT district director who
pointed his finger and shouted, "You will have that [65-
foot] bridge," Islanders banded together to fight his plan.
The lawsuit eventually was heard by an adminis-
trative judge who decided against the DOT, primarily
over environmental concerns. SAM celebrated.
Flaws in the DOT hearing process were also the
DOT's undoing those dam hearings where they told us,
rather than asking us, what sort of bridge we would have.
Ten years in the making, SAM has a real victory
of which to be proud. The process this time around was
thorough. The DOT was a great deal more considerate
and there was at last thorough engineering and
testing, proving once and for all that Anna Maria Island
can maintain its quiet ambiance and its drawbridge on
Manatee Avenue.
A replacement bridge will come someday, espe-
cially with another study and more hearings in 10 years
to address that issue. Build Our Bridge supporters?
Sorry, for now.
It may not have been our opinion or even popular
opinion that won. But we'll take the win nonetheless.
We hope your turkey dinner is delicious and that
you have a wonderful Thanksgiving Day.
We're take time off to do the "Bunny Hop."



Th Islander
Nov. 27, 2002 Vol. 11, No. ;
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
J.L. Robertson
V Contributors
Nancy Ambrose
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Tracy Komor
Carrie Price
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster

1993-0oi%.
-'



Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1992-02 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


Who can live here?
Every time I read about a new housing or condo
development being built on Anna Maria Island I note
that the prices range from $500,000 to $1 million each
- and, of course, in most cases quite a bit more.
It surprises me that our three mayors and commis-
sioners and lawyers who are charged with representing
all the people on this Island cannot find a way to insist
that when a builder/developer erects these high-priced
homes, that entity should also be asked to build an
equal number of "affordable" housing so that most of
the lifelong residents of this Island and others can also
afford to live here as well.
There are 30 (at least) real estate companies on
Anna Maria-who sell and resell, rent and rerent homes
and apartments. They have over the past few years
driven up the prices of homes and apartments, clearly
pricing them out of the reach of folks who do not have
hundreds of thousands of dollars to play with.
These companies, it seems to me, are in a position
to decide who lives here and who cannot afford to live
here.
This Island is rapidly becoming "gentrified" to the
detriment of all but the most well off.
John Gilroy, Holmes Beach
Note to Watch Dogs
I would like to invite the citizens of Anna Maria
who don't attend city commission meetings to come
see for themselves the disruption that occurs. I do not
believe you elected these officials with the intent that
they should have this constant interference from such
a small number of individuals.
During the past 2-plus years of attending the city of
Anna Maria City Commission meetings, it has become
apparent to me that a small group of individuals con-
stantly hold the progress of the meetings hostage with
their negative comments to the commission. This "Watch
Dog Group," as they call themselves, believe that they
represent the citizens of the city of Anna Maria.
I for one do not want to be represented by these


individuals. I do not want to be known as being hate-
ful, paranoid, and as a vigilante to my city government
of neighbors.
I do not want to be part of a filibuster which draws
out the meetings past the appointed time often mak-
ing it impossible for the commission to deal with im-
portant issues facing our community.
I want to be known as a person who will present
solutions for issues I don't agree with, not as a person
who sets up roadblocks. I want to be known as a per-
son who volunteers to help work on the solutions.
The issues that this commission is presently ad-
dressing are not all that new, i.e., parking, rights of
way, cell towers and drainage. Past administrations
have been unable to settle these issues. Now is the time
for all of us to work together to come to some agree-
ment. I believe the voters of Anna Maria elected this
administration to solve the problems facing the city.
I ask why is it this "Watch Dog Group" is unable
to be civil and respectful of the commission? What are
the motives for this group behavior?
Looking toward future-elections of officials, what
honest, dedicated possible candidate in their right mind
would want to run for mayor or commissioner in Anna
Maria with this group waiting each meeting to attack?
I for one, and I am sure the other 1,500-plus registered
voters and/or residents, would appreciate it if the Watch
Dog Group would make peace with both present and fu-
ture commissions and be more respectful of all elected
officials. We certainly all want what is best for the future
of our city.
Madlyn Iseman, Anna Maria

Thanks friends
It is with the most sincere gratitude that I wish to
thank all my Island friends for their support and helpful-
ness in my time of sorrow. The loss of such a deal soul as
Butch Kiwior is a hole in the heart of all who knew him.
The kindness and selflessness has brought me great com-
fort.
Jan Welch, Holmes Beach





THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 7


Abandoned Island cat finds a home


By Jean Steiger
Islander Correspondent
While our three children were growing up, our
family had almost every kind of pet one could imagine:
a series of dogs and cats, a white rat, hamsters, chick-
ens, a duck, rabbits, tropical birds even, for a short
time, an orphaned baby skunk that we fed until it
reached adulthood and left for broader horizons (thank
goodness). Most often, the dogs and cats were strays
brought home by our children.
A year and a half ago, the last animal we had in-
herited from our children before they left home, a much
beloved 17-year-old calico cat, succumbed to kidney
failure. My husband and I missed her terribly but we
were also in the middle of a double move to Florida
for the winter and to our cottage on Honeoye Lake in
upstate New York for the summer. So we put the
thought of another pet out of our minds for the moment
and, we thought, perhaps forever. We decided our new
lifestyle would make it too difficult to care for an ani-
mal.
Then, the temptations began. Our daughter in Syra-
cuse, N.Y., called early last May and informed us she
had rescued a kitten wandering in the middle of the
road. Did we want it? Before we could make a decision,
she changed her mind because, she said, we wouldn't
be back for another three weeks and she had already
grown too attached to it to give it away. We were
spared.
This summer, a feral cat wandering the neighbor-
hood caught my attention. I weakened and considered
taking it in. Then, the neighbors who had been feeding
it decided to keep it and I was spared pet ownership yet
again.
Soon after we returned to our home on Perico Is-
land, we drove by the Humane Society of Manatee
County. On a whim, I asked my husband to stop.
"We'll just look," I said.
He gave me a look that said it all. I was tempting
fate.
The cats (we kept going back to the cats) were all


nice and one calico was especially friendly. The atten-
dant suggested we stop at Animal Services in Palmetto
because that was a facility that couldn't keep the ani-
mals indefinitely and we would be saving a life.
This was all I needed to hear. We were on our way
to the outlet shopping center anyway. It would just take
a few minutes to stop.
What a mistake. We were drawn to two gray and
white kittens, litter mates, who seemed to want to be-
long to us but we left without them and for the next two


S Lost and
found!
Perico
Island
resident
Sheila
Gronseth
plays with
T-Bone
/ ](alias T.W.),
"' the aban-
doned cat
she rescued
at the Sand
Dollar gift
shop in
Holmes
Beach.
Islander
Photo: Jean
Steiger








days I agonized, thinking about all those cats without
homes, wanting to save them. We even started out to
the facility again but, just before we reached it, we
talked ourselves out of taking the cats.
It would be too hard. How would we travel across
country twice a year with two cats? What about other
trips? This was just not the right time in our lives to
have one pet, let alone two.
PLEASE SEE CAT, NEXT PAGE


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you the news!

We mail The Islander weekly for a nominal $36 per year. It's the per-
* fect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
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S We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
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The Islander is distributed free locally. But if you don't live here year-
round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please use
this form or log on to islander.org for secure e-mail transmission.
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PAGE 8 E NOV. 27, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER
Cat finds new home
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7
"All of our cats and dogs have been strays," I told
my husband. "Eventually a stray will end up on our
doorstep and that will be the time to take on a pet."
Then, last week, our time ran out. I answered a
knock on my door and found my neighbor, Sheila
Gronseth, standing there, a mixture of excitement and
apprehension on her face.
"I've just come from Anna Maria Island," she ex-
plained. "And someone had left a cat in a carrier in
front of the Sand Dollar gift shop in Holmes Beach. It
was there when the store opened. Everyone was look-
ing at it but no-one could take it. I just couldn't leave
it there."
She stopped, and looked at me. "I knew you were
thinking of getting a cat, so I thought I'd ask. But oth-
erwise I'll take it to Bishop Animal Center."
I sighed, already knowing how this was going to
end. "Where is it?" I asked.
"In the car," she said. "Really, I'll just take it to
Bishop."
"Let's go see it," I said, the sense of finality clos-
ing around me. And there he was, a chubby orange cat,
surprisingly calm despite his ordeal. He looked at me,
meowed softly, and rolled a little in the carrier. Fate
had literally arrived on my doorstep. And with it, all the
reasons we shouldn't have a pet.
We brought the carrier into our lanai and Sheila
went for kitty litter and cat food. Before she left, she
handed me a note that had been taped to the carrier. The
neat handwriting on the outside of the folded paper
read:
"MEOW.... My name is T.W. I need a good home.
Mommy and Daddy had to move and couldn't take me
with them. Can I live with you?"
On the inside of the fold, another message:
"Please help. He is a good kitty. Has all his shots,
is fixed and loves other animals and people. He's
declawed and loves kids. Thank you very much! He is
like our baby but, unfortunately, we could not take him
with us."
I watched the cat as he ran from one window on the
lanai to another, a frantic, frightened look in his eyes. He
was obviously healthy and well cared for. There was a
fuzzy green and white cat toy on the towel that had been
carefully folded on the floor of the carrier. How could
anyone care for an animal like this and then just abandon
him? They must have been desperate, I thought.


Happy holidays.
There was food, fun, and crafts at this year's Poinsettia Bazaar at St. Bernard Catholic Church Saturday,
Nov. 16. Some of the busy volunteers included Nina Compton, Clara Kojak, Carol Nunn, Dee Flanagan,
Bazaar chairperson Marian Van Winkle and crafts chairperson Florence Tulley. Islander Photo: J.L.


Robertson

The message on the note was right. Even though he
was frightened and disoriented, T.W. was immediately
affectionate. He greeted each new face warmly and
climbed almost immediately into our laps. But he had
no interest in food for several days and then only
picked at the pricey, healthy dry food I offered.
Finally, a guest in our home saw him take off like
a shot when I ran the electric can opener in the kitchen.
Mystery solved! He was accustomed to canned food.
We decided to rename him but I felt the new name
should have a "T" sound since he was apparently used
to it. And while the kids or I had done all the naming
in past years, I told my husband this was his turn. In a
few minutes, he came up with "T-Bone" and the name
felt right.
But we wanted to know more about our new T-
Bone. How old was he and when were his shots due?
I began calling all the veterinary offices on the Island


and in Bradenton, asking each one if they could access
an animal's records from its name without the name of
the owner.
All but one had the capability to do this although
no one came up with his records.
If anyone knows anything about a large (approxi-
mately 12 pound) orange cat previously named T.W.
who is probably under 2 years old (he still chases his
tail and shreds toilet paper), please call me at (941)
761-0585 or e-mail: jsteiger@tampabay.rr.com. The
only information we really need is.his age and the date
of his last shots.
Meanwhile, T-bone is settling into his new home
and we're getting used to having a cat again. We plan
to take him on many car rides to get him used to the
cross-country trip he'll have to take in the spring. And
I'm planning to stay away from all further cat tempta-
tions!


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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 9


Wooten named Center's education director


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
No stranger to the Anna Maria Island Community
Center not at least to Anna Maria Elementary
School students Gary Wooten will fill the education
director's position at the Center starting Monday, Nov.
25.
"I'm looking forward to starting and the kids at
school are excited, too," Wooten said. "They keep ask-
ing me when I start at the Center."
Wooten has a degree in art and psychology from
Otterbrein College in Ohio and moved to the area in
1986.
Wooten has worked with staff at the Center in vari-
ous capacities through the years, helping with
fundraisers, including the annual auction and special
events. He served on the Center's board of directors for
three years, but resigned in 2000 to work at the Center's
summer camp.
In 2001, Wooten took a part-time position at AME
as the school's art teacher and currently teaches there
three days a week.
School Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison is
thrilled Wooten will be working at the Center.
"The kids know him and love him," Harrison said,
"He'll provide a very good, tangible link for the kids
between the school and the Center. It's just a natural
choice."
The Center's Executive Director Pierrette Kelly
has met with Harrison and AME Principal Tim Kolbe
to discuss how the school and Center can work together
and strengthen the after-school "Time for Learning
Creatively" program.
"Ideally, we'd like to offer more programs offsite,
at the school, so that we can free up more space at the
Center for our teens," Kelly said. "But, we understand
that we are all stretched for resources, which is why we
all need to work together for the benefit of the kids."
The TLC program currently offers students tutor-
ing and help with homework that they might not get at
home, as well as activities such as dance and tennis.
Wooten hopes to infuse the program with more of


the arts, including music.
"The after-school program gives kids someplace to
go other than being home stuck in front of the televi-
sion," Wooten said.
Most importantly, Wooten said he will emphasize
the tutoring aspect of the program and aims to see stu-
dents stay ahead in the classroom. Part of his respon-
sibilities as education director will be to train counse-
lors and teach them classroom management skills.
Wooten will also be responsible for developing the
teen Reach program, overseeing teen counselors and
the summer camp programs.
Kelly said that dance instructor Sarah Tanner has
volunteered to work with the teen girls. Many of the


Art and
- J education,
S. familiar face
t i3 Gary Wooten,
: center, will be
the new educa-
S,', tion director at
the Anna Maria
Island Commu-
nity Center.
I, Wooten also
teaches art the
Anna Maria
". Elementary
School and is
tn i" te l pictured here
with AME
Guidance
Counselor Cindi
Harrison and
student Daniel
Pimental.





teens in the program also have a vested interest in see-
ing that the program not only survives, but grows.
Participants in the teen program have expressed an
interest in forming a "Coffee Club," where they can
share ideas, poems, music and more. Kelly said she is
actively looking for a location where the teens can
meet.
Wooten will continue to work at the elementary
school in addition to working at the Center. He is fill-
ing the position left vacant by Mary Metcalf and, for
the time being, also the position of site director, left
vacant by the resignation of Fred Rosario.
For more information about the TLC program, call
the Center at 778-1908.


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CHRISTMAS PRELUDE

"A celebration of light, life and music!"

( '" \ Under the stars at the clock
tower on historic Bridge
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6 ri Nov. 28

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A






PAGE 10 0 NOV. 27, 2002 U THE ISLANDER




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Mammoth pecans

going on sale
The Island Players' pecans, an annual holiday treat
somewhat delayed this year, are here and available at
their usual bargain rates.
They are on sale at The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, and next door at SunCoast Real
Estate, 5402 Marina Drive, both in the Island Shopping
Center.
These are the biggest pecans available, said Helen
White, Players board member who drives the sale each
year. That's why they're "mammoth," an official des-
ignation of size in the pecan trade.
They're also the very freshest, this year's crop so
new it couldn't be picked until very recently due to rain
in South Carolina where the pecans thrive.
And, a super-treat for chocolate deviates of the sort
who abound at the newspaper, chocolate-covered -
thickly covered mammoths are available too. They
come in a holiday bag at $7.95, the uncovered ones in
a plainer bag at $6.95.
White said she ordered 360 bags of the chocolate
specials and twice that many bags of the chocolateless
nuts.
This is the eighth year for pecans to help finance
the Players, White said. The first year, she tried three
nut producers and none came close to Golden Kernel
at Cameron, S.C., where she has shopped ever since.
The proceeds from the sales will go into new seats
for the Players-Theater in Anna Maria, and various
other improvements there.
Details may be obtained at 778-0202.


Historical society coffee
for volunteers Monday
Volunteers who help the Anna Maria Island Histori-
cal Society will be feted at a coffee at 10 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 2, at the historical museum at 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria.
Docents, bread bakers, phone committee members
and others who lend a hand throughout the year are
invited, as are prospective volunteers. Details are avail-
able at 778-0492.

Artists guild election, dinner set
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will have its
Christmas potluck dinner and election of officers Monday,
Dec. 2, starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Episcopal Church of the
Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Christmas entertainment will be provided by fifth-
grade students and piano music by Jean Tourte. Offic-
ers will be elected after the dinner and entertainment.
Details may be obtained at 778-6694.

Yule symbols' spiritual meaning
topic at Roser
Children in Roser Memorial Community Church's
December program will learn "the spiritual meaning
behind popular Christmas symbols, such as stars, an-
gels, lights, etc.," the church said.
It will be the focus for the month for the Children's
Church School Sundays at the church. 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. Each symbol will get its workshop art,
cooking, geography, science and a series-ending puppet
workshop.
The program is open to all Island children ages 4
through fifth-grade from 10-11 a.m. For sixth-grade
and up youth class is 9-9:30 a.m., and an adult Sunday
School is 9-10 a.m. with worship service 10-11. Details
are available at 778-0414.

Woman's club schedules
Christmas charity luncheon
The annual "Christmas cheer charity luncheon" of
the Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island will be at
noon Wednesday, Dec. 4, to benefit Hacienda Girls
Ranch.
The luncheon will be at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
It will feature a program by Casey Spiey, 10th-grade
student at Bradenton Academy.
Members are to bring a wrapped $5 gift for the "grab
bag" and a dish to share along with table service. Host-
esses will be Cornelia Zenetti, Delia Ayala, Dorothy
Keene, Barbara Cook, Janet Clark and Marguerite Th-
ompson. Further information is available at 778-3898.


Winner
Sarah Howard accepts her new bike from Kate Boyd,
who judged the Publix contest which gave Sarah the
bike. The 9-year-old Islander, fourth-grader at Anna
Maria Elementary School, is daughter of Mark and
Dot Howard of Holnes Beach. Publix also gave her
a certificate for all kinds of edible goodies, which
Mom said may have thrilled Sarah as much as the
bike.
Chiles Christmas for Kids
organizing for Dec. 17 bash
The late Gov. Lawton Chiles' generosity will be
remembered anew with the ninth annual Christmas for
Kids party sponsored by his son Ed and his Chiles
Restaurant Group.
The party will be Dec. 17 and Chiles and helper
Patti McKee are lining up food baskets, lunch, games,
gifts and special guest Santa Claus. It all takes money,
so they are asking Islanders to participate by donations.
The gifts should be noted with McKee at the corpo-
rate office, 778-1691, or just by checks made out to the
Sandbar Restaurant with a notation that it's for the Kids'
Christmas, and mailed to P.O. Box 1478, Anna Maria FL
34216.
The party has grown from 25 youngsters in 1994 to.
75 last year, and Chiles noted that for many of them "this
is the only Christmas they receive." At the Chiles party,
they will get shoes, clothing and toys, and their families
will get a basket with turkey dinner and the trimmings.
Hours for the party will be 10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. at
the Sandbar, 100 Spring Ave., Anna Maria, and every-
one is invited, Chiles said.

Publix throwing Holiday Fest
Publix is bringing "food & fun" to its Anna Maria
Island customers at a Holiday Fest Tuesday, Dec. 3,
from 4-8 p.m.
The blast will be at the store at Manatee Avenue
and Bay Drive, where "we'll be serving samples of
many of our special holiday foods."
The store also announced its holiday schedule -
regular hours Wednesday, Thanksgiving eve; closed
Thanksgiving Day; open until 10 p.m. Dec. 16-23 pre-
paring for Christmas; open until 7 p.m. Christmas eve;
closed Christmas Day; closed at 9 p.m. New Year's
Eve; closed at 7 p.m. New Year's Day.

Reception Sunday opens
guild's new exhibit
A public reception Sunday, Dec. 1, from 11 a.m.-
3 p.m. will open the December exhibit of the Artists
Guild of Anna Maria Island at 5414 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
Two artists will be featured: Sue Allen of Brandon,
who displays traditional and abstract works in water
media and collage; and Cheryl Jorgensen, native of
Trinidad who works in oils and watercolors.
Hours at the gallery are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Fri-
day, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun-
days. It also will open from 5:30-7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6.
Further information may be obtained by telephon-
ing 778-6694.









































Fashionable lunch
Members of the North American Butterfly Association-Manasota Chapter supported the Florida West Coast
Symphony Orchestra at a fashion show luncheon at the Lakewood Ranch Country Club, including front row,
from left, Erna North, Marguerite Klein and June Harrington. Back row, from left, are Fay Murphy, Jean
Malcolm, Nancy Ambrose and Jeanette Moore. The centerpiece is a butterfly hat decorated by NABA members
and later auctioned.


Island butterfly park gets fountain


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The long-awaited fountain for the butterfly garden
is here, installed and enjoyed "It's beautiful," said
Nancy Ambrose. It's the latest of several additions to
the garden.
The drinking fountain is of cast iron and brass, and
at 300 pounds made "a huge job" for volunteers who
put it in place. The garden is in the 5700 block of Ma-
rina Drive between Holmes Beach City Hall and the
Island Public Library.
Ambrose, of Holmes Beach, spearheaded the cre-
ation of the garden under the auspices of the Manasota
Chapter-North American Butterfly Association.
Another feature new to the garden is a birdbath
painted by Debbie Hagstrom and donated by The Is-
lander. It will be used as a butterfly "puddling area"
with enough sand added to make the water suitably
shallow for butterflies.
An antique arbor is newly in place, too. It is from
Ginny's Antiques & Art and includes two special "but-
terfly chairs."
Ambrose and other butterfly fans had been waiting
more or less patiently for many months for the new
fountain.


Doing the extremely heavy and free work of
installing it were Mike LaPensee of Lapensee Plumb-
ing Inc. and his crew. They put it into place at a spot
prepared by Ambrose's husband David, a civil engi-
neer.
The fountain was made to order by Murdock Inc.,
Cincinnati, Ambrose said. It was financed by donations
and a grant from the Manatee County Neighborhood
Enrichment program.
She expressed gratitude to the county and individu-
als who helped financially, and to her husband and
LaPensee and crew "for all their time and the materi-
als needed to place the fountain."
"It looks like an old-time park fountain, just what
we have wanted to have here,"she said.
Next on the agenda will be the final installment of
personalized bricks, inscribed with the names of people
who pay $40 for a two-line inscription or $50 for a
three-liner. She has to get the bricks in lots of 100, she
said, and she has about 50 orders for inscriptions 50
more to go, in other words. Personalized bricks may be
arranged at 778-5274 or with order forms available at
The Islander.


Obituaries
I II I


Mary Kay Adams
Mary Kay Adams, 65, of Holmes Beach, died Nov.
25.
Born in Coshocton, Ohio, Miss Adams came to
Manatee County from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1990. She
was a teacher in Forest Hills District Schools in Ohio
for 30 years. She was a member of Save Anna Maria.
Memorial services will be held at a later date.
Memorial contributions may be made to Save Anna
Maria Inc. Legal Funds, P.O. Box 906, Anna Maria FL
34217.
She is survived by sister Anne A. Jeschke of Muir
Beach, Calif.; brother Thomas R. of Bradenton; and
father Robert of Bradenton.
Robin Litton
Robin Litton, 64, of Anna Maria, Woodstock,
N.Y., and La Tour D'Aigues, Provence, died Nov. 20
in Albany, N.Y.
Born in Rice's Landing, Pa., Mr. Litton was a 1960


graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and
named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year in 1982. He
worked as program coordinator for ABC-TV Entertain-
ment during the 1970s and was Senior Program Con-
troller for Special Events for ABC-TV News during the
1980s. He was a member of Kappa Delta Zho social
fraternity and Phi Mu Alpha Sintonia professional
musician's fraternity. He served as member of the
board of directors for Maverick Concerts in Woodstock
and was Benefactor of the Museum at Indiana Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania.
Internment will be at Woodstock Artist's Cemetery
in Woodstock, N.Y. Memorial gifts may be made to
Maverick Concerts or the Museum at Indiana Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania.
He is survived by sister Joyce Krause of Pennsyl-
vania; brother John Krajnak of Pennsylvania; several
nieces and nephews from Pennsylvania; and was pre-
deceased by longtime companion, actor-writer Joseph
Leon, in 2001.


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PAGE 12 0 NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Craft and clutter
sells at
Gloria Dei
Girl Scout Troop No.
187, based at Gloria
Dei Lutheran
Church, sells soft
drinks and snacks to
overheated shoppers
at a "yard sale" at
the church Saturday.
Pictured are Clara
Griffith, Bradenton,
Alexander Stemm of
Holmes Beach,
Rebecca Moore of
Bradenton. The girls
are all 8 years old.
Islander Photo: J.L.
Robertson


... -^ ,
- 1.


v ~

rltil 'I


.- -ar.. -.
* .: .,-.


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-f v .




Caroline Malfese of Anna Maria displays her wares as Grace Cooper of Holmes
Beach shops for treasures. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 27, 2002 M PAGE 13


Harassing phone calls under investigation


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The 12th Circuit of Florida State Attorney's Office
of Manatee, Sarasota and Desoto counties is investigat-
ing Anna Maria property owner Peter Zent for alleg-
edly making several possibly harassing telephone calls
and threatening e-mails recently to Anna Maria Mayor
SueLynn and city commissioners.
Manatee County Sheriff's Office Sgt. John
Kenney, the officer in charge of the Anna Maria MCSO
station, confirmed the investigation.
"We think Peter Zent has called all the city com-
missioners [except the vacationing John Quam] at least
several times recently and sent e-mail requests de-
manding legislative changes," said Kenney.
The telephone calls and e-mails may have been
inappropriate, said Kenney, and they have been for-
warded to the Bradenton the State Attorney's Office for
investigation.
Attorney Ed Nicholas of the Bradenton SAO con-
firmed his office has received a complaint of an alle-
gation of extortion, but could not comment further.
"We received the complaint on Nov. 20" from Sgt.
Kenney of the MCSO in Anna Maria, Nicholas said.
While there is no time frame for the investigation
to be concluded, Nicholas said his office "generally



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likes to either file [charges] or dispose of the matter
within 90 days."
Without commenting on any specific case, Anna
Maria City Attorney Jim Dye said recently it is against
Florida law for anyone to attempt to coerce a public
official into making a decision.
In a Nov. 6 e-mail to the Anna Maria City Hall and
City Commissioner John Michaels, Zent said that
people living on Fern Street in the city "will be taking
the law into our own hands" over the parking issue on
that street.
"Starting today," said Zent, "we will be calling
your homes and exercising our First Amendment rights
every night."
Zent further said that if city commissioners wanted
to stop the phone calls, they had two options: fix the
parking problem on Fern Street or change their tele-
phone numbers.
He also said drug dealers would be hired to steal
parking signs as bounty.
"We will not stop until a solution is found," Zent
claimed in his e-mail.
SueLynn said she had a number of "strange" tele-
phone calls one night, as did Michaels.
The mayor said she could not discuss details pend-
ing the results of the investigation, but confirmed


phone calls from Zent.
Reached at his Colorado home, Zent seemed elated
by news of the Anna Maria investigation. "Great, now,
I'll become a martyr. That's wonderful," he said.
Zent himself is no stranger to investigations.
In March 1999, the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission accepted an "offer of settlement" from
Zent and the investment firm of Kidder Peabody & Co.
for generating $3.5 million in "wrongful profits" from
a complex financial deal with the City of Tampa in
1993.
Kidder agreed to return $2.5 million from the deal
to the federal government. Zent was a senior vice presi-
dent at Kidder in Tampa at the time, according to the
SEC.
In effect, said the SEC in its report, Zent and an
associate "colluded to rig the bidding" for the city's
escrow reinvestment agreement, eventually resulting
in approximately $2.5 million in profits from that
agreement that should have gone to the federal gov-
ernment, but instead went to Kidder and another
company.
While Zent did not have to admit guilt in the "of-
fer of settlement," the SEC said he had to pay a civil
penalty of $20,000 and was suspended from any asso-
ciation with any securities broker or dealer for one year.


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PAGE 14 E NOV. 27, 2002 U THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria code board hearing decibel meters


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Moving closer to the possible return of decibel
meters to establish an enforceable noise ordinance, the
Anna Maria code enforcement board Nov. 18 discussed
the Manatee County noise ordinance that utilizes sound
measuring devices.
Board member George Atkinson said the county's
ordinance is clear and simple and should give the board
a "good idea" of what to establish in the city's noise or-
dinance. The county's ordinance requires use of a deci-
bel meter to determine if noise levels are acceptable.
City Attorney Jim Dye suggested that a Manatee
County Sheriffs Office deputy who deals with enforc-
ing the noise ordinance make a presentation to the
board before members adopt any of the county proce-
dures.
Dye also said a violation of the county ordinance
is a misdemeanor and is processed through the county


judicial system, while any violation of the city's noise
ordinance is currently handled through Anna Maria's
code enforcement procedures. The board might want to
consider either changing an offense to a misdemeanor
or retaining its own enforcement procedures.
Board chairman Duke Miller said Dye's sugges-
tion was valid and he asked Code Enforcement Officer
Gerry Rathvon to speak with an appropriate MCSO
deputy prior to the next board meeting.
The board also discussed the city's high grass and
weeds ordinance, also called the nuisance ordinance.
Rathvon said the ordinance is vague on what con-
stitutes a "nuisance" and does not establish height re-
strictions on growth.
If she finds a property she believes is overgrown
with vegetation, she's got to find animals such as
snakes and rodents living in the brush before she can
issue a citation.
Rathvon acknowledged that there are only about six


to eight vacant lots remaining in the city that are a prob-
lem, and only one of those could be serious. Most city
property owners want to keep their land in good shape.
"So the central issue is, if you bring someone be-
fore the board, what do we have to work with?" asked
Miller.
Not much, replied Rathvon.
Following a suggestion by Dye, board members
agreed to examine the International Property Manage-
ment Code that Bradenton Beach uses as its nuisance
ordinance for weeds and grass.
Board member Jim Fara, however, said the board
should not dictate to people what "you can grow" in
your own yard.
But Rathvon said some height restriction on weeds
and brush should be established by the city. That would
make enforcement a lot easier.
Board members will review the IPM code prior to
the next board meeting on Dec. 16.


Holmes Beach continues visioning process


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
A handful of residents attended the second visioning
session in Holmes Beach and participated in several ac-
tivities designed by the Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council to gather information and opinions.
In the first exercise, facilitator Avera Wynne,
TBRPC planning director, showed the group images of
various Island neighborhoods and shopping centers and
asked participants to discuss what they liked or disliked
about the images.
Overwhelmingly participants favored areas with in-
teresting architectural details, mature trees and landscap-
ing, lower building heights, adequate parking and uni-
form commercial signage.
Some of the Island areas participants favored in-
cluded Bayview Plaza at the end of Pine Avenue in Anna
Maria, the shops along Bridge Street in Bradenton Beach
and the North Beach Village community on Holmes Bou-
levard.
The surf shop at Gulf Drive and Manatee Avenue got
mixed reviews and the shopping plazas on nearby Marina
and Gulf drives got poor reviews.
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tatious houses, overhead utility lines, areas lacking side-
walks and poorly landscaped homes and businesses.
Next participants were asked to identify some strate-
gies that might lead to the type of community envisioned.
Participants strongly believe the city's code enforce-
ment needs improving and suggested that the city be more
proactive rather than reactive.
Suggestions were made to hire more staff for code
enforcement or to deputize volunteers.
Residents said they want to see more affordable hous-
ing created to attract younger families to the city. It was
also noted that apparently police officers, teachers and
firefighters who serve the community can no longer afford
to live in the city.
One resident suggested the city offer developers in-
centives to dedicate a portion of their construction to af-
fordable housing.
Residents would also like to see more gathering
places, both indoors and outdoors. For example, partici-
pants liked a neighborhood they were shown which had
a gazebo and outdoor seating with parking close by.
Finally, residents would be open to sharing services
with the other Island cities and would like to see more
intergovernmental coordination.





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The final visioning workshop will build upon the in-
formation gathered at the first two workshops. Participants
will discuss community values and objectives.
The workshop will be held at city hall from 6 to 8:30
p.m. Dec. 4.


Book fair coming
The Anna Maria Elementary School Parent-
Teacher Organization is calling all cowpokes,
parents, children, teachers, grandparents and
book lovers to its annual Scholastic Book Fair.
The public is welcome to "come lasso a
book" from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2,
through Friday, Dec. 6.
A special family event will be held from 6 to
8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4, featuring guest ap-
pearances from popular book characters, door
prizes and games.
Proceeds will be used to purchase essential
classroom resources and books, and also, accord-
ing to the PTO, books make a holiday perfect gift.
For information, call Julie Barth at 778-7685.




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Consignment Boutique
SIZES 14 AND LARGER
PRE-SEASON SALE
EVERYTHING 30%, 50% or 75% OFF
Fri. & Sat. ONLY, Nov. 29 & 30
Tues.-Fri. 10-5:30 Sat. 10-3
4208 20th St. W. 753-2883 (Behind Smugglers Cove Adventure Golf)


Some annuity owners lose 70 percent of the value of their
annuity to taxes! Will this happen to you?
It's true. Annuities and IRAs can be double-taxed assets
(income taxes up to 38 percent PLUS estate taxes up to 50 per-
cent on an estate exceeding $1 million). After estate taxes and
income taxed, there can be as little as 30 percent of the value
remaining.
You can learn how to help avoid the loss in the FREE edu-
cational booklet "Annuity Owner Mistakes." The booklet
shows how to help avoid double taxation and get more ben-
efits from your existing annuity value.

Call 1-800-216-8844 (24 hours)
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240 S. Pineapple Ave., No.710
Sarasota, FL 34236


HOLIDAY GARBAGE AND

RECYCLING PICKUP SCHEDULE

Waste Management of Manatee County will not be picking
up garbage or recycling on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday
November 28, 2002. Thursday's garbage and recycling
will be picked up on Saturday, November 30.

Thank you and enjoy a safe weekend.





WASTE MANAGEMENT
of Manatee County
For more information, call 753-7591.





THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 27, 2002 U PAGE 15


Time short to register for Dec. 7 parade


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Christmas time seems to come faster on the calen-
dar than most of the rest of the year, and the annual
parade is no exception.
So get with it. Turn in your application. Register.
Move!
That's the attitude of Greg "Wig" Luzier, ship cap-
tain of the Anna Maria Island Privateers and skipper of
the Privateers-sponsored parade Saturday, Dec. 7.
Everyone with wheels that can be Christmas-deco-
rated is welcome, he said. The wheels are a key: The
seven-mile parade route is too much for marchers or


Anna Maria City Commissioner John
Michaels told the city commission Nov. 13 that
he and his wife plan on moving from the city in
April 2003 and he asked commissioners for
"guidance" on whether or not he should complete
his term of office or resign now. His term as a city
commissioner ends with the city elections in Feb-
ruary 2003.
Although there are no legal problems with him
completing the term he was elected for, Michaels
said "there will be nay-sayers" who will suggest
ulterior motives. He wanted to announce his deci-
sion now rather than allow rumors to circulate in the
city.
The unanimous consensus among commission-
ers was for Michaels to complete the remaining two
months of his term.
Michaels, who some months ago had an-
nounced he would not seek another term, later ex-


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even casual strollers.
The Privateers much prefer that entrants be re-
corded via an application form, both for liability rea-
sons and for keeping track for the next parade. Forms
are available at The Islander office, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, or by calling Luzier at 752-5873. Or
parade vehicles can sign up at Bayfront Park in Anna
Maria before 9:30 a.m. for assignment to a parade po-
sition.
The parade will launch at the blast of the Privateers
ship's cannon at 10 a.m. and arrive at Coquina Beach
about 11:30 for Santa Claus, hot dogs, presents and
youngsters' party.


plained that he and his wife will really be taking
retirement and moving to Amelia Island northeast
of Jacksonville.
The decision to leave Anna Maria is "not an
easy one," said Michaels, but when he and his
German-born wife moved from that country to
Anna Maria 10 years ago, "I had promised her I
would retire, we would live on the water and
travel, and I haven't lived up to that promise."
The decision to move is based upon econom-
ics and location, said Michaels. Living on Amelia
Island puts them five hours closer to their summer
cabin in Virginia and a host of relatives and
friends. He said he has no plans to enter politics in
his new home.
Amelia Island is an unincorporated residential
area located about 10 miles northeast of Jackson-
ville, on the north side of the St. John's River near
the Atlantic Ocean.


Route of the parade from Bayfront is Pine Avenue,
then Gulf Drive to Palm Drive, Marina Drive back to
Gulf Drive at the Island Shopping Center, south down
Gulf to make a left on Manatee Avenue, right again on
East Bay Drive to reconnect finally with Gulf Drive
and onward to Coquina.
The literally hundreds of gifts that Santa will distrib-
ute at Coquina come from gifts and donations from mer-
chants and supporters all over the Island and the mainland.
Kids 12 and under will have that part of Christmas to
themselves, along with hot dogs and sodas. Donations are
accepted for food and drink from adult partygoers. The
festivities are expected to be over about 2:30 p.m.

Arnold new Bradenton Beach
vice mayor
City Commissioner Bill Arnold was unanimously
appointed vice mayor of Bradenton Beach.
The position was formerly held by Mollie
Sandberg but became vacant when Sandberg was
bested in the city election by Anna O'Brien.
Mayor John Chappie originally nominated O'Brien
for the post. "I'd like to see Anna as vice mayor,"
Chappie told commissioners last week.
An apparently shocked O'Brien countered, "I'd
like to see Bill Arnold as vice mayor," her first state-
ment as an elected official.

Legion breakfast
American Legion Post 24 Honor Guard will serve
breakfast from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 1, at the
post, 2000 75th St. W., Bradenton. The $4 menu fea-
tures eggs, biscuits and gravy, french toast, sausage,
bacon, potatoes, grits and music. Details may be ob-
tained at 794-3489.

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PAGE 16 E NOV. 27, 2002 ILTHE ISLANDER

Tingley Library dinner tickets
go on sale
Tickets are on sale now for Tingley Memorial
Library's annual fundraising dinner, scheduled Dec. 7.
The tickets at $10 per person may be bought at the
library, 111 Second St., Bradenton Beach, during regu-
lar hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays, and 3-5 p.m.
Thursday.
The dinner will be at the Moose Lodge, 110 Gulf
Drive, with happy hour from 5-6 p.m. and dinner 6-8
p.m. Beef and chicken are on the menu. There will be
a silent auction, raffle and door prizes, all to the music
of Scott Blume.
All proceeds will go to operation and stocking of
the library, which receives no funds from any govern-
ment.
Further information may be obtained by phoning
779-1208.

Writers to meet Monday at library
The Gulf Coast Writers group will meet at 10:15
a.m. Monday, Dec. 2, at the Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The meeting is open to all writers, and those at-
tenditig are to bring original poems, essays or short sto-
ries to be read there. Details may be obtained at 761-
9036.

FISH Preserve cleanup Saturday
The first autumn cleanup of the FISH Preserve in
Cortez will be from 8 a.m.-noon Saturday, Nov. 30, and
anyone interested in environmental improvement is
welcome to show up ready to work.
The Preserve is being bought by the Florida Insti-
tute for Saltwater Heritage as a buffer between the his-
toric fishing village and rampant development. It is 95
acres at the east end of the village, bordering Cortez
Road and Sarasota Bay.
So much trash and garbage has been dumped there

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over the decades that Cortezians have taken to calling
it "our 21st-century midden," after old Indian mounds
built up with discarded junk. Cleanups began last
spring, interrupted by summer's heat and many clean-
ers' absence "up north."
Volunteers are to bring gloves, shovels, rakes, gar-
bage bags, rope, wheelbarrows, chainsaws, bug spray,
trucks and manpower.
Operations will headquarter at the old Cortez
schoolhouse on 119th Street. In charge of the cleanup
is Allen Garner, who will provide further information
at 794-0280.

Genevieve the papillon at library
Genevieve will bring her two-legged buddy Den-
nis Fried to the Island Branch Library Saturday, Nov.
30, for a workout in irreverent humor for Friends of the
Island Library and the public.
The papillon will begin her program at 2 p.m. at the
library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, with free
seating on a first-come, first-served basis.
Fried started his retirement in Osprey three years
ago, and his wife and son started a long argument to get
a puppy. That was the little papillon breed of spaniel.
Fried is an ex-software developer, physicist, pro-
fessor and stand-up comic, and he wrote a lively ac-
count for Genevieve of her first birthday party. His
wife Katrina posted it on the Internet and they were
pressed for more Genevieve stories.
So he helped the pup write "Memoirs ofa Papillon:
The Canine Guide to Living With Humans Without
Going Mad," and they've been busy expanding on the
book's fun ever since. Paul Harvey liked it, as did Dick
Clark and other media types.
Details on the program may be obtained by calling
778-6341.

Banner gone bring it back!
Bring back that banner, you banner bandit, and
long let it wave for the good of music.
The 10-foot banner announcing concerts for the
Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra & Chorus at


Wishing all our friends
and neighbors a happy and
healthy Thanksgiving Holiday.






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the Manatee Avenue entrance to Holmes Beach is
missing, said Willem Bartelsman, founder and board
member of the organization.
It simply advises drivers coming onto the Island of the
orchestra's next concert, Dec. 15, at Island Baptist Church.
Bartelsman noted that the banner is of no use to anyone
but the orchestra, but a member of the chorus reported
seeing a man taking it down. The banner is reused and
updated for each concert, and will be costly to replace.
Bartelsman thought maybe the city of Holmes Beach
removed it as some sort of nuisance or code-breaker, but
Code Enforcement Officer Walter Wunderlich said it isn't
so. He's as mystified and indignant as anyone.
Whatever the reason it was taken, bring it back,
Bartelsman pleaded, and all is forgiven. Just let him
know at 778-6517 and he'll come get it.

'Nunsense' at Riverfront Theater
"The latest installment on the 'Nunsense' hit se-
ries" is about due at the Riverfront Theater, and tick-
ets have gone on sale there.
This presentation is "Nuncrackers," with the
"nuns" mixing songs among the laughter. They are try-
ing to tape their Christmas special in the basement of
their convent, and everything goes wrong.
Debra Baron is director and Betty Henderson di-
rects the music. The cast includes Diana Clooney,
Valerie Westfall, Dawn Burns, Dawn Dougherty, Bill
Peace, Caitlin Longstreet, Brittney Brooker, Trina
Rizzo and Maritza Tovaf.
The production will open Dec. 5 and run through
Dec. 22, with curtain times 8 p.m. except for Sunday
matinees at 2 p.m. Tickets at $18 adults, $9 students
may be purchased at the box office between 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m. Monday-Friday, or by phone at 748-5875.

55 Alive course
Registration has opened for the AARP 55-Alive
refresher course for senior drivers from noon-4 p.m.
Dec. 5-6 at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Participants are required to reg-
ister by calling 776-1158.


A TO Z INTERIOR &.EXTERIOR
Painting Kenny Smith
Custom Finishes C: 941 224-1527
Trim Installation John Kreiter
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Repairs Siding Free Estimates
Roof Repair Decking state Registered
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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 17


Imagine Manatee coming to Anna Maria Island


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Representatives of ACP Vision, the firm hired by
Manatee County to conduct the Imagine Manatee vi-
sioning process, met with city and county elected of-
ficials Nov. 20 for a "dog-and-pony show" to discuss
the principles, direction and meeting structure ACP
will use in the process.
ACP and the county plan to complete the vision-
ing process through a series of public meetings around
the county that will project how people want the county
to develop during the next 50 years.
Of 12 planned meetings in the county for vision-
ing input, the only scheduled meeting for Anna Maria
Island and Longboat Key residents is 6:30 p.m. Jan. 27
at the Island Baptist Church.
Gianni Longo of ACP presented data gleaned from
the 2000 U.S. census and other federal, state and local
reports and determined that Manatee County will grow
by 50,000 people by 2010 while the Island population
is declining. The vast majority of that population in-
crease will be along the 1-75 corridor.
That's just great, said Holmes Beach City Com-
missioner Don Maloney. How many of those new resi-
dents are going to impact the Island?
"My concern is that people used to come to Florida
to die," said Maloney. "Now, they're not dying like
they used to, they're moving here for jobs and bring-
ing kids," he said, getting a nice laugh from the audi-
ence.
But Maloney was doing more than making jokes.
He wanted a breakdown of the 50,000 people into re-
tirees, families with children, single people, etc.
"We have to be prepared for the impact," said
Maloney.


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Although ACP representatives at first did not seem
to understand the concern of Island officials over the
impact more residents and tourists- will have on
Anna Maria, they got a quick education.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn said population fig-
ures for the Island are misleading because the Island
population increases two, three or four fold in just a few
months. And all of those new residents in east Mana-
tee sooner or later are going to head to the Island for the
beach, sightseeing or dining.
"I was surprised at how little information on the
Island and tourism they had," she said. "At first, they
didn't seem aware of our concerns that the Island is
different than east Manatee or Bradenton. They didn't
realize the Island is the attraction for residents and visi-
tors."
Bradenton Beach City Commissioner Dawn Baker
asked ACP to do a seasonal study of population be-
cause Longo had noted that the population of
Bradenton Beach had declined since 1990.
ACP needs to account for vacation and transient
residents and the seasonal nature of Bradenton Beach
and the Island, said Baker.
The Island's transportation system is extremely
affected by the rise in visitors during the season, she
said, and the season now seems to stretch from Octo-
ber through August. Indeed, Longo presented figures
that by 2010, it will take a Manatee County resident 23
percent longer than now to travel to locations in the
county.




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"It seemed like news to them of the serious impact
50,000 more people will have on this Island in eight
years," said Baker. "It seemed like they were only con-
cerned about people, developments and transportation
in east Manatee," she added.
She urged all Island residents and those living in
the Manatee County portion of Longboat Key to attend
the Island Vision Manatee meeting at the Island Bap-
tist Church and provide input.


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PAGE 18 0 NOV. 27, 2002 U TIHIE ISLANDER


AME considers future enrollment options


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Elementary School Advisory Com-
mittee members have been discussing the outlook
for the school's future enrollment.
AME's student population currently draws pre-
dominantly from the Island, with the exception be-
ing school choice applicants from neighboring areas,
according to Principal Tim Kolbe.
AME's enrollment has not been growing in the
last few years and SAC members are brainstorming
possible avenues to draw more students to the
school.
Kolbe told the SAC members that the school dis-
trict is attempting to strike a socio-economic balance
of students within Manatee County schools.
"AME is kind of left out of it due to distance,"
Kolbe said. "However there are rumors that kids
from Cortez may be brought here to fill declining en-
rollment."
Approximately 50 students living in the village
of Cortez attend Sea Breeze Elementary School lo-
cated at 3601 71st St. W., Bradenton.
Another option being discussed is adding a
sixth-grade class. Kolbe will be meeting with his
district supervisor, Tom Walker, and school board
statistician Brenda Bayly to determine if sixth-grade
would be a feasible long-range goal.
"It's not something that would be in place next
year," Kolbe said. "We're just brainstorming solu-
tions to problems. It's only one possible solution and
I'd have to be convinced it's in the best interest of
the students to move forward."
SAC members gave the addition of a sixth-grade
their "vote of confidence," yet Kolbe realizes that it
could be problematic. He said that the elementary
school would not be equipped to offer many of the
same programs, such as electives, as do the existing
middle schools.
Currently there are no plans to proceed with
sixth-grade or the addition of students from Cortez,
Kolbe said, but the discussion arose briefly in rela-
tionship to the preliminary school construction meet-
ings held last year.
Kolbe updated the SAC on construction plans
and said that the master team planner, architect Ernie
Dreher of SMRT, who drafted preliminary plans for
the school's construction is no longer with that firm.
The good news, he said, is that Dreher has
opened his own architectural firm and will be bid-
ding on the AME project.
The next SAC meeting will be held in January.


School board seeks to


supplement AME enrollment


Manatee County School Board member
Harry Kinnan says the board is concerned with
Anna Maria Elementary School's dwindling
population.
Ten years ago the enrollment at the Island
school was 450 students and three classrooms
crowded the auditorium. The past two years have
been the first use of the auditorium exclusively as
an auditorium in at least 30 years.
The school's enrollment is slightly more than
300 students now and the school board's concerns
appear to have merit.
It's economics, indicated Kinnan. The reason
the population at the school has dwindled is di-
rectly related to escalating real estate prices and
accompanying rentals. "Many young families


with children can no longer afford to live there."
Kinnan indicated the school board would be
interested in bringing approximately 50 students to
the school from Cortez, students who are currently
bused to Seabreeze Elementary School.
"We think they'd be a logical addition for the
Island school population," He said.
Students from the Flamingo Cay and Perico
Island neighborhoods, a short distance from the
school, may also be considered for the Island
school, he said, and the move would possibly re-
duce their bus time.
Kinnan indicated the future population of the
school is important to the board when it looks at
spending construction dollars and in seeking to
preserve the existing auditorium.


."i..* ": ,- "
"--- '-- ,6:. -'-


Record keepers
Anna Maria Elementary School's yearbook staff is already busy creating collages for the 2002-03 yearbook.
The student staff meets with parent-volunteer Lori Guerrin weekly. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


From Anna Maria to Ellenton and points in between, you're sure to find hunting for art, antiques and collectibles as much
fun as the discovery. There are so many places to go "antiquing" that you're certain to find the treasure you're looking for.


Anna Maria Island's
Largest Antique Mall


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9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria 779-2501


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5600 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 779-1773


VISIT

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Antiques
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Custom Stained Glass Made to Order
Stripping & Refinishing
406 Old Main Street Bradenton 745-1223


beach-style
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f:


i

1
,,i





THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 19


Fifth.graders training to troubleshoot technology


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Three Anna Maria Elementary School fifth-grad-
ers are learning to troubleshoot common technology
snafus.
Georgia Gibbons, Michael Dittmeier and Ally
Walstad were chosen by AME technology specialist
Pidge Taylor to form a student team of technical help-
ing hands known as Students Working to Advance
Technology.
This is the first year Taylor has formed a SWAT
team and so far, she said, it's working well.
The group meets once a week before school and
learns how to install software, check computer hook-
ups, change ink cartridges and perform other common
computer functions.
The students also help Taylor respond to work or-
ders submitted by teachers.
Taylor said she chose this year's SWAT members
because they not only showed a knack for technology,
but they are responsible and trustworthy.
The SWAT members are sometimes called off the
playground to help a technologically stumped teacher,
but Taylor said that students are not pulled out of class
for calls for assistance.
The SWAT members also test drive new software
programs and Web sites, giving Taylor valuable feed-
back she can use in her lesson plans.
"Sometimes what you think students will like, they
don't. And what you think they won't like, they do,"
she said.
Taylor said she is using the students in the computer
lab more than she initially thought she would when the
program started. To date, SWAT members have installed
all of the computer programs used in the lab.
Although Taylor trusts her SWAT team with the
school's Macintosh computers and PCs, the students
sing a different tune when it comes to the family com-
puter at home.
"I don't mess with the computer at home!" Gib-
bons said.



, .





C 0o0l



Mahi mail
The Island Middle School has its own streetside
mailbox. The school mascot is the Mahi, and its
mailbox has been painted with a school offish on
one side, and a saxophone-playing fish on the
flipside. Artist Micheline Grenier, who is currently
working with IMS art students on various projects,
painted the mailbox. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Anna Maria Elementary menu
Monday, Dec. 2
Breakfast: French Toast Sticks with Syrup, Fruit,
Cereal
Lunch: Chef Boyardee Ravioli with Roll or Nachos,
Garden Salad, Fruit
Tuesday, Dec. 3
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit, Cereal
Lunch: Hot Dog or Turkey Stack Basket, Baked
Beans, French Fries, Fruit, Juice bar
Wednesday, Dec. 4
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs and Toast, Fruit, Cereal,
Juice
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy or Breaded Chicken Patty,
Mashed Potatoes, Seasoned Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Thursday, Dec. 5
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit, Cereal
Lunch: Chicken Fries or Fruit, Cheese and Muffin
Plate, Goldfish Crackers, Green Beans, Fruit
Friday, Dec. 6
Breakfast: Large Orange Muffin, Fruit, Cereal
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Tuna Salad Sandwich, Peas
and Carrots, Lettuce and Tomato Salad, Fruit
Milk and juice are served with every meal.


SWAT team
Georgia Gibbons, Michael Dittmeier and Ally Walstad are Students Working to Advance Technology at Anna
Maria Elementary School. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Both Walstad and Dittmeier do find occasional
opportunities to help out their parents. Walstad said she
helps her mom, and Dittmeier's dad has his own com-
puter business.
The students say they enjoy "teaching the teachers"
and may consider taking more tech-related courses
when they reach middle school.
Dittmeier already plans to major in computer en-


gineering when he reaches college.
Next year Taylor said she hopes to have six stu-
dents involved and she'll be accepting applications
from interested students at the end of this school year.
Taylor said she will also accept fourth-graders next
year so that there is some continuity from year to year.
SWAT has been a big help, Taylor said, and the
students are working well together.


Bat facts
Heath
English
passes on
information
he has
gathered on
the Internet
about bats to
his first-
grade buddy
from Joan
Sackett's
AME class,
Anthea
Rokop.
Islander
Photos:
Diana
Bogan



Reading
buddies
While waiting
for a com-
puter station
to free up,
Matt Bauer
reads a
Mexican fable
called "Little
Red Ant,
Great Big
Crumb" to
AMEfirst-
grader
Stephen
Cline.


; ;----.
-c~~
c;- -.r..l,..Crrr
i "






PAGE 20 0 NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Islanders participate in County History Fair


Entries to this year's Manatee County History Fair
ran the gamut from "The History of Denim" to "Rights
and Responsibilities of the Second Amendment."
The fair is open to students in the fourth- through
12th-grade and this year students were asked to base
projects on the theme "Rights and Responsibilities in
History."
Students had their choice of writing a paper or
creating a project display board, documentary or per-
formance.
Some students stuck to this year's history fair
theme, writing about the women's suffrage movement
or Pearl Harbor, while others chose to research topics
of general interest, such as the history of the jellybean,
Walt Disney and Alaskan huskies.
Closer to home, three of the project board entries
focused on Anna Maria history.
Drake DeVos of Bradenton chose to create a
project board on the History of the Island Players. His
board showed the history of the theater at Gulf Drive
and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria.
Jill Koenig, also of Bradenton, displayed the his-
tory of Anna Maria Island on her project board. She
included fun facts and a copy of the Anna Maria Island
Fun Map.
A third entry based on the Island covered the his-
tory of the Island postal system, which was done by
Kimberly Kuizon of Holmes Beach.
Several other students living on the Island partici-
pated in this year's festival.
Aaron Lowman, of Holmes Beach and an 1 th-
grader at Manatee High School, worked with three
other students on a documentary iMovie.
Lowman and AP environmental science class-
mates Megan Bauer, Kimberly Duncan and Kenny
Hergraves shot footage of Wares Creek and inter-
viewed locals about living on the waterway and the
responsibilities that come with maintaining it.
Bauer said they also tested the water, and :she was
surprised to learn the water had a high level of nitrates,

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Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"


Hundreds of students entered the Manatee County History Fair. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


making it unhealthy for drinking or swimming.
Bayshore High School freshman Miranda Massey
also participated in this year's fair as a requirement of
her world history class. She created a project board on
the history of women's soccer in the United States.
Massey, who lives in Bradenton Beach, said she
chose her topic because soccer has been her favorite
sport since she was in kindergarten. She has played on
the Anna Maria Island Community Center's soccer
teams and was voted most valuable female player re-
cently.
Massey said she would have preferred to make a
skit for the performance category, but the teacher as-
signed her class to the project board category and she


I lr *'/rlk A "", "T, I, i


said she enjoyed seeing what some of her fellow class-
mates put together their entries.
Students projects are judged by community volun-
teers who evaluate each project based on historical
quality, relation to the theme, clarity of presentation
and basic rules such as size or word limit.
In addition to prizes awarded for Manatee County,
Florida, American and World histories, special prizes
were also awarded in a number of categories at the
county level, which include Anna Maria Island history
and Cortez history.
Some students who do well at the county fair will
be selected to enter the Florida State History Fair held
in Tallahassee in May.




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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 M PAGE 21


Fifth.graders get a lesson in writing plays


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Students in each of the fifth-grade classrooms at Anna
Maria Elementary School used their collective imagina-
tions to write a class play with guidance from Beth Duda.
Duda visited each of the classrooms with a lesson
plan aimed to inspire and teach students how easy it can
be to write a short play.
Duda is an actor, director and playwright with the
Florida Studio Theatre in Sarasota. She has been with
FST for 10 years and some of the students recognized
her from her roles in "The Lion, The Witch and The
Wardrobe" and "James and the Giant Peach."
Each year FST holds a Young Playwrights Festi-
val and students from across the country can write and
submit their own plays.
Duda said last year FST received 6,000 plays. A
team of actors and avid theatergoers read each of the
plays and select about 40 of them to be performed at the
Young Playwrights Festival in the spring.
During her visit, Duda guided each class in writ-
ing a play by first helping them establish characters
and a conflict.
Then the plays unfolded as she simply asked stu-
dents "Who speaks first and what do they say?
"What's important about playwriting," Duda told
students, "is to ask yourself who speaks next and what
they say, not 'what happens next.' That will keep the play
moving."
Students worked as a class with Duda to write a
play, which she said she will submit to the festival


judges. Duda said that good plays offer good charac-
ters, interesting plot lines, an unusual point of view or
are packed with emotion.
Students in Joyce Ellis' class wrote a play about a
boy who overcame his fear of swimming and Anne


Play time
Beth Duda,
an actress
from the
Florida
Studio
Theatre,
gives fifth-
grade
students at
Anna Maria
Elementary
School a
lesson in
play writing.
Islander
Photo:
Diana Bogan







Kinnan's class wrote about a dragon that learned to
breathe fire from a magical flying hamster.
Later this month, students will take a field trip to
FST to see a professional performance of the play
"'Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing."


... and here are

the plays


A.C. Learns to Swim
Written by Joyce Ellis' fifth-grade class
A.C. is a 12-year-old boy who is afraid to swim. He
is at the pool with his friend Bob and his I I-year-old sis-
ter Jenna.
Jenna: A.C. can't swim.
A.C.: Be quiet!
Bob: Jenna, you shouldn't say that.
Jenna: You are such a chicken.
Bob: You're not helping.
Jenna: Since I'm his sister, I can say anything I
want!
A.C.f Alright, I'll go in the pool.
Jenna: I bet you'll chicken out.
Bob: Let's teach him how to swim. I wouldn't talk
Jenna, since you still sleep with a night light.
Jenna: Alright fine. Let's teach him how to swim.
Why are you scared of the water anyway?
A.C.: Because I got hit by a big wave when I was
little and I got hurt.
Jenna: I don't remember that.
A.C.: You weren't there. I nearly drowned.
Bob: Now, let's teach him how to swim. Let's start
out with water wings.

Deli delight
Lynn Drolet took
her first-grade
class at Anna
Maria Elementary
School for a tour
of the Holmes
Beach Publix.
Students learned
about the store's
bakery, deli and
storage facilities.
Deli Manager
Susan Aultman
treated the class
to ham and
cheese rolls.
Islander Photo:
Diana Bogan


A.C.: No way!
Bob: OK. Let's start at the shallow end.
Jenna: Put your feet up and move your hands and feet.
(A.C. goes under water and Bob pulls him up.)
Bob: I'm so sorry.
A.C.: Maybe I need to relax more.
Jenna: Oh yeah, sure. You just don't want to do it.
A.C.: Oh yes I do!
Bob: Stop teasing him. Start doing the dog paddle
and we'll hold you up.
(As A.C. begins to paddle Jenna and Bob slowly
let go.)
A.C.: I can do it. Just keep paddling, he says to
himself. Keep holding me up! I think I might go down.
Jenna: We're not holding you. You're doing it by
yourself.
A.C.: You're kidding! I'm really doing it! Thank
you.
Bob: Now we should try it at the beach.
A.C.: No. I'm not going to the beach yet. Let's
have a barbecue to celebrate.
Thanks to the help of his sister and friend, A.C.
grows up to be an Olympic swimmer.

A play by Anne Kinnan's

fifth-grade class
In a mythical land called Cedarwood, there lived an
old dragon named Charlie that lost his ability to breathe


fire, and a magical flying hamster named Dusty.
The scene opens with Dusty eating an ice cream
cone and sobbing.
Dusty: I'll never get any friends.
Two hamsters passing by: You can fly. You're not
ordinary. We don't like you. You're too weird.
Charlie enters: I'll never blow fire anymore.
Fred the mean dragon follows: You can't be our
friend anymore because you can't blow fire like the rest
of us.
Dusty: That's not very nice.
Charlie: Just because I can't breathe fire doesn't
mean I don't have feelings.
Dusty notices.Charlie: What's the matter?
Charlie: They're making fun of me because I can't
blow fire anymore.
Dusty: I feel the same way. My friends make fun
of me because I can fly.
Fred: You and your little goofy friend are weird.
You need to go play someplace else. Go run away with
your little fluffball.
Mean hamsters: Yeah, go run off with your friend
super-geek.
Fred: No one needs you here anymore.
Charlie: Don't listen to them.
Dusty: You're right.
Charlie: We don't need you bossing us around so
we will go.
Fred & hamsters: We can boss you if we want to.
(The two new friends go to Charlie's cave.)
Dusty: I like the way you've decorated your cave.
Charlie: Thanks. Do you want to be friends?
Dusty: OK. Hey why don't we make a deal? You
can teach me to make friends and I can teach you to
breathe fire again.
Charlie: If you will really teach me to blow fire, I
will help you.
Dusty: We better get started.
(Dusty grabs the dragon's hands and transfers all
of his magical powers to him.)
Dusty: Now try to breathe fire.
Charlie: Why not?
Dusty: Fire in the hole!
Charlie: Wow! I never thought I could do this
again. Thank you Dusty.
Dusty: I can't fly anymore. Yippee, I'm normal. .
Charlie: Let's go show our friends.
Fred: Hey look who it is! Charlie is breathing fire
and Dusty isn't flying. Wanna be friends?
Charlie and Dusty: No thanks: We're happy being
friends together.
Hamsters and Fred: I wish we'd been nicer to them.
Charlie and Dusty found themselves surrounded by
a new group of dragon and hamster friends who were
nice to them.






PAGE 22 E NOV. 27, 2002 N THE ISLANDER


Island Travelers



----------------p^








S. ..
1t" ""







A-,-











Recliner
Julie and Michael Royal check their native Anna Maria Island's news from afar, in front of the Reclining
Buddha in Bangkok, Thailand.
Buddha in Bangkok, Thailand.


Royal read
Bob and Sue Moderhak of Holmes Beach make sure
they don't miss anything at home while they visit the
royal palace in Brussels, Belgium.


Monumental Islander
Islanders Bob Cooper and Caryn Hodge landed at the
Wright Brothers National Memorial Park in North
Carolina with their Islander newspaper in hand.


Underwater Islander
Capt. Keith Barnett of Anna Maria hunts lobster and brings his own news along, diving off Lucaya Beach,
Grand Bahama Island. Who took the submarine photo? Why, his wife, The Islander's Rebecca.


Rocky Mountain high
The Schindlers ofAnna Maria and Wolcotts of Perico
Bay Club and Colorado Springs with The Islander at
9,500 feet above sea level near Boulder, Colo.: left to
right Kent Wolcott, Hildegard and Robert Schindler,
Inge Wolcott.


Wisconsin Lesters
Joey and Charles Lester of Holmes Beach take a side trip from their summer home in Wisconsin, not forget-
ting the Island's news as they tour. They are at Taliesin National Historic Landmark, which preserves the
- works of architect Frank Lloyd Wright.


Dogging it in Alaska
Sarah, Heather, mom Dot and dad Mark Howard of
Holmes Beach take The Islander dog-sledding in
Alaska while on a chilly trip.


III


nnbr;l





THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 23


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Nov. 16, criminal mischief, 400 block Pine Av-
enue. The complainant called deputies after observing
paint balls splattered on his home and a fleeing vehicle.
Officers stopped the vehicle at Manatee Avenue and
East Bay Drive, took custody of the paint gun and took
the juvenile suspects into custody until their parents
were notified.

Bradenton Beach
Nov. 16, criminal mischief, 2400 block Avenue A.
Unknown persons broke two windows and screens to
gain entry to a vacant house. Nothing was taken.
Nov. 19, theft, Bridgewalk Resort, 111 Gulf Drive
S. The complainant said someone took a British flag
from the building:
Nov. 20, property damage, 100 block Third Street
South. The complainant said that house movers
knocked a tree limb down onto her truck.

Holmes Beach
Nov. 15, burglary, 2700 Gulf Drive. The complain-
ant reported that someone entered her locked car and
took her purse and cell phone.
Nov. 15, fraud, 500 block Manatee Avenue. The
complainant said he was approached by a man offer-
ing stock in a company that was expected to go public
and, according to the solicitor, when that occurred, his
restricted stock could be traded for normal stock. The
complainant bought $25,000 of the stock, but the com-
pany never went public. He contacted the man who
offered the stock and was refunded $23,000. The com-
plainant believes he was "scammed."
Nov. 17, information, 600 block Emerald Lane.
The complainant said someone placed debris in his


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Skippers, merchants, even the weather and tides
are all cooperating to make the 2002 Christmas Lighted
Boat Parade a dazzler.
A dozen skippers have committed their boats, said
Don Schroder, who heads the event this year. He ex-
pects quite a few more, for he is wooing owners of
boats already decorated for the Bradenton parade Dec.
6, the night before Anna Maria Island's event on Sat-
urday, Dec. 7.
"There has been tremendous support from the
business community to make sure the fireworks
show is financed and there are plenty of prizes," he
said. The parade-climaxing fireworks show will be
by Jim Taylor and his Taylor-Made Pyrotechnical
firm.
The weather promises to be clear, if cool, Schroder
noted, and the tide that evening is to be two feet above
normal. That's especially encouraging news for boat-
ers in the shoal waters of Anna Maria Island.


dumpster.
Nov. 18, burglary, 200 block 65th Street. The com-
plainant said his vacation home had been vacant for a
month, yet he had received very high telephone bills
while it was unoccupied. The officer discovered an
unlocked door with a slit in the screen, dirty dishes in
the kitchen, a full trash can and the appearance of slept-
in beds. Fingerprints and photographs were taken.


Boats will rendezvous at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 7 in
Bimini. Bay to form the parade line. At 6 p.m. the
Christmas lights will go on and the lighted boats will
begin their colorful parade up the canal to Gloria
Dei Lutheran Church, back past the Key Royale Bridge
for judging of their decorations, north along the bay
shore to the Rod & Reel Pier, finally back to the Anna
Maria City Pier to watch the fireworks starting there
about 7:30.
Winning boats in the decorative lighting contest
will be announced and prizes awarded at a party the
next evening, starting at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8, at
the Beach House Restaurant in Bradenton Beach.
Boaters still have time to register for the parade and
get their decorations in place, Schroder said. They may
do so through parade captain Chuck Stealey at the pa-
rade hotline, 778-6715, or Schroder at 778-2200. Cap-
tains' packets are available at marine centers and busi-
nesses.


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Parade boats lining up,


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PAGE 24 N NOV. 27, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER







Wednesday, Nov. 27
7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Longboat Key Chamber of
Commerce blood drive at 6854 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key. Information: 387-9519.
Noon to 3:30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magno-
lia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-3390. Fee
applies.

Thursday, Nov. 28
6 to 8:30 p.m. Christmas Prelude on Bridge
Street, Bradenton Beach. Information: 778-3113.

Saturday, Nov. 30
10:30 a.m. "Edible Native Plants" with Laurel
Schiller at the Pelican Man Bird Sanctuary, 1708
Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota. Information:
388-4444.
Noon to 2:30 p.m. Peli-boat educational tours
with the Pelican Man at the Holiday Inn Marina, 7150
N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. Information: 388-4444.
Fee applies.
2 p.m. "Genevieve" and author Dennis Fried
at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-6341.

Sunday, Dec.1
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday breakfast at the
American Legion Post No. 24, 2000 75th St. W.,
Bradenton. Information: 794-3489. Fee applies.
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Artists' reception for water-
colorists Sue Allen and Cheryl Jorgensen at the Art-
ists Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 778-6694.
1 p.m. "Beach Jam" benefit concert for the
Boys & Girls Club of Manatee County at Coquina
Beach, Bradenton Beach. Information: 761-2582.
Donation appreciated.


Monday, Dec. 2
8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Anna Maria Elementary
School book fair at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Information: 708-5525.
10:15 a.m. Gulf Coast Writers meeting at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 761-9036.
7 to 8 p.m. Artists Guild Christmas party at the
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-6694.

Tuesday, Dec. 3
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. "'Twas the Night Before
Christmas" by the Patchwork Players, Neel Audito-
rium, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 752-
5252. Fee applies.
4 to 5:30 p.m. 'Three Weeks in Cortez" land-
scape drawing class with Ginger White and the Anna
Maria Island Art League, 5312 Holmes Blvd.,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-2099. Fee applies.
4 to 8 p.m. Holiday Fest at Publix featuring
sample servings of holiday specialties. 3900 E. Bay
Drive, Holmes Beach.

Wednesday, Dec. 4
S7:15 to 8 a.m. Pier Regulars buffet breakfast
meeting at the Anna Maria city pier. Information:
778-7062.
Noon Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island
Christmas Cheer Charity Luncheon at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-3898.
Noon to 3:30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-3390. Fee applies.
6 to 8 p.m. Anna Maria Elementary School
book fair family night at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 708-5525.

Ongoing:
"Open Exhibit" at the Anna Maria Island Art
League, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, through
November. Information: 778-2099.
Watercolors by Carl Voyles at the Artists Guild
Gallery, 5414 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, through
November. Information: 77&-6694.


"Natural Florida: Paintings from the George
Percy and Debbie Geiger Collection" at the South
Florida Museum, 201 10th St. W., Bradenton,
through January. Information: 746-4131
Jack Dowd and friends at Kaos Gallery South,
1122 12th St. W., Bradenton's Village of the Arts
District, through Dec. 15. Information: 747-0823.
"American Patriotism Exhibit" courtesy of the
Manatee County Veterans Council at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach,
through November. Information: 778-6341.
"My Women" by Liz Epstein at the Joan Peters
Gallery, Village of the Arts, 1210 11th Ave. W.,
Bradenton, through Dec. 28. Information: 741-8056.

Upcoming:
Classical conditioning class at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center Dec. 6.
Digital Fine Arts Association exhibit at the Anna
Maria Island Art League Dec. 6.
Celebration of Christian Unity Ball at Bradenton
Tropical Palms Dec. 6.
Island Shopping Center holiday open house 5-
8 p.m. Dec. 6 featuring the Manatee High School
chamber orchestra at 6 p.m. at The Islander office,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Canine Christmas Festival at G.T. Bray Park
Dec. 7.
Privateers Christmas Parade at Bayfront Park
Dec. 7.
Christmas lighted boat parade along Bimini
Bay and fireworks at Anna Maria City Pier Dec. 7.
Tingley Memorial Library fundraising dinner at
the Moose Lodge Dec. 7.
Pianist Janice Weber at Neel Auditorium,
Bradenton Dec. 8.
Butterfly gardening class at Flutterby Gardens,
Duette Dec. 9.
Off Stage Ladies Auxiliary of the Island Play-
ers luncheon Dec. 11.
The Lesters' Family Fun Day at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center Dec. 14.
Island of Paradise Festival including live music,
seafood and an arts and craft sale Jan. 11-12. For
vendor information, call Anna Maria Island Priva-
teers, 747-4953 or 778-8519.


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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 M PAGE 25


Library celebrating '20-year friendship'


Friends of the Island Branch Library are inviting
everyone on the Island to a party "celebrating a beau-
tiful 20-year friendship."
The library's anniversary party will include a
Christmas blast with music and Santa and activities for
children. It will be from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8, at the
library at 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The Island Middle School band will bring music of
welcome to open the party, the Island Community Or-
chestra string quartet will play, Santa is due from 3-4
p.m., Y.B. Limited Barbershop Quarter will sing,
Michael Tucci will render piano selections, author
Eleanor Boylan will be there, Laura Beard will show
the youngsters face painting, and a children's art gal-
lery display will be open.
The birthday cake will be sliced up and served, and
refreshments are promised.
The Friends of the Library record a long struggle
to get the library here in the building it occupies now.
The first hint of library service was the bookmobile,
then in 1970 the first stationary library was established



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in a storefront in Holmes Beach Shopping Center, not
far from the present library building.
Friends of the Library organized themselves in
1965 and began pressing for a "real" library. "Over the
years," the organization noted this week, "and in the
face of a rapidly increasing clientele, it was evident that
a new building was needed."
That drive got just the person it needed to kick off
the effort: Eleanor Walker, first president of Friends,
conducted a strong and long campaign to raise funds
for the building.
"With the combined efforts of the city of Holmes
each, which donated the land, state aid, Selby founda-
tion funds and literally hundreds of interested citizens,
ground was broken on April.26, 1982," the Friends'
birthday brochure notes.
The new, and current, library building opened Dec.
15, 1982. Improvements since then include vision
magnifiers for the sight-impaired, computers, a spa-
cious checkout area, expanded visual-aid and sound
system in the big meeting room, "closed-hours" book

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depository and many others. The Friends organization
has developed a Focus on Florida series, Friends Book
Club, the annual book sale and other features to serve
the library and its patrons.
The library opens daily except Sunday at 10 a.m.,
closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Further information is available at 778-6341.

Wildlife wood carvings featured
Wildlife wood carvings in relief and in-the-round
by Tom Thompson will be the featured exhibit during
December at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
Thompson, of Bradenton, recalls that he came to
the Island library to find books on drawing Florida
animals, but watching a wood carver made him change
the subject and he found books on that subject and be-
gan his avocation.
Further information may be obtained by calling
778-9341.


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PAGE 26 M NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Critter killing new growth industry in Southeast?


They're killing critters out there. Lots of them,
from Florida to Louisiana.
Lakeland city fathers and mothers have hired
Shorty Carter to trap feral pigs that are ravaging city-
owned wetlands and an adjacent golf course. We aren't
talking little porkers here, either: feral pigs grow to
something like 5 feet in length and can weigh hundreds
of pounds.
The hogs root through the brush and sod, leaving
tractor-like scars in the wetlands. The piggies are also
ripping up berms that keep the treated wastewater from
entering the nearby Alafia River, creating a potential
pollution problem.
Shorty has set his traps, baited with corn, and will
pay the city $10 for every pig he catches. He said the
swine is pretty tasty, "not like what you get in the gro-
cery store these are lean."
There's no census on the Lakeland feral pigs, but
one thing is certain: a well-fed pig is an amorous pig,
and on the loose the swine population can sometimes
triple in nine months if the animals are not "con-
strained" in some manner.
Officials in Louisiana are also suffering from a
nuisance critter. Nutrias are an exotic creature origi-
nally from Argentina that look like a 4-foot-long rat,
with a long tail and webbed feet. Imagine a really big
beaver without the paddle tail and with bright orange
teeth and you've got a good idea of what a nutria looks
like.
The critters were first introduced in the States in
the 1930s for their pelts, which were valued by Euro-
pean furriers. However, the demand went south in the
1970s, and in the meantime some nutrias escaped from
their farms and flourished in the wild.
Like the feral pigs here, nutrias root through the
native vegetation along creeks and streams, exacerbat-
ing erosion along the banks. Wildlife officials estimate
something like 100,000 acres of Louisiana marshland
has been damaged by the rodents.
So the state is offering $4 a tail to trappers in the
hopes they can diminish the herd by 400,000 this win-
ter.
The bounty on the big rats is only for the tail right
now. Officials are stroking the Asian food markets in
hopes of interesting China in the nutria meat market,
but sales are sluggish. It's not that the meat isn't tasty
it apparently tastes a lot like rabbit and is good in
gumbos, sausages and jerky but, hey!, who wants to
carve up a roast rat on Thanksgiving?
As one trapper put it, "I'm sure they're good to eat.
It's just that it's not a pretty animal. Of course, pretty
shouldn't mean anything. You're not going to eat a cat
and that's pretty."
So for now, the only hope is to reduce the popula-
tion and let the trappers deal with the meat, of which
about the only application now is alligator farmers,
who grind up the meat at the tune of something like 25
cents a carcass.
Feral pig and nutria trapping: the next big growth
industry in the Southeastern United States?

Driving tales
As more and more out-of-state license plates begin
showing up on Florida roads, Sunshine State natives
are often wont to shout out to our winter friends while
driving. Of course, Islanders never inquire of visitors
that happy question, "Why don't you learn to drive!?!,"
but it is an oft-heaid refrain.
In England, that "learning to drive" issue is no
laughing matter. It's virtually impossible to pass the
driving test in Great Britain in one visit, and driving
examiners call spending $900 to get a license "cheap."
The problem with the test is its exhaustive written
exam and the 40-minute-long driving requirement. To
say that the examiners are the worst of bureaucrats
appears to be a typical British understatement.


cinno tDorOo 1slnQcriies
.S A n n o

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
LQ Nov27 402 2.0 11:41 0 7:13 1.6 1:6 1.2
Nov 28 5:40 .8 7:38 1.7 12:32 0.3
Nov 29 7:23 1.7 1:09 0.8 8:06 1.9 1:21 0.5
Nov 30 8:54 1.6 2:17 0.4 8:33 2.1 2:06 0.7
Dec I 10:17 1.6 3:16 0.0 9:02 2.3 2:38 0.9
Dec2 11:28 1.6 4:06 -0.3 9:34 2.5 3:10 1.1
Dec 3 0:03p* 2.6 4:55 -0.6 12:38 1.5 3:42 1.3
NM Dec 4 10:42p* 2.6 5:44 -0.7 1:41 1.4 4:07 1.3
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


Apparently you'll flunk the test is you pull up to
a red light and use your foot brake you're supposed
to use the hand brake. Never cross your hands when
turning the steering wheel. Always look into your rear-
view mirror before using a turn signal.
The test is so difficult and expensive that the Driv-
ing Standards Agency had a $5.8 million surplus in
funds last year despite the fact that the number of
people taking the test dropped. That last statistic is
bolstered by the estimated half-million unlicensed
motorists on the roads in England they just couldn't
pass the test, or couldn't pay the price.
So as we enter our busy winter driving season,
remember it could be worse: we could be in England.

Tops on my holiday list not!
Here's a new toy that you can ask Santa about this
holiday season an $8,000 Internet refrigerator.
Walter S. Mossberg with the Wall Street Journal
did a review of the fridge a while back, calling it


"probably the largest least-mobile digital gadget in the
world.'.'
By day it is a simple 26-cubic-foot brushed-tita-
nium refrigerator. By night, it has a 15-inch color flat-
panel computer screen on the door, which is the display
for either TV, videos or the Windows PC computer
with 20-gig hard drive. It also is Internet-compatible,
has a digital camera mounted just above the screen that
allows you to leave a video message for family mem-
bers no more refrigerator magnet-held messages -
and a built-in 100-recipe cookbook in the hard drive
that also has nutritional value of most foods.
You can play and downplay MP3s, too.
Mossberg described it as an "amusing, even
slightly silly, toy for the rich." Part of the silliness
comes from a feature that allows you to type in all the
food you've got in the icebox and the date of purchase,
and the fridge will tell you when the food may be go-
ing bad. Duh?

Sandscript factoid
Here's a couple odd fishing factoids from the In-
ternational Game Fish Association.
Quota for Unalaska bait herring fishery is 1,468
tons. Amount of herring actually caught was 2,600
tons. Length of time it took to catch.the 2,600 tons was
20 minutes.
Percentage of decline of Pacific leatherback turtles
in the last 22 years is 95 percent.
And the price paid for top-grade bluefin tuna is
"only" $195 per pound.


Cortez boat basin being dredged


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
A deliberately slow-starting project to dredge
the Cortez Cove Marina boat basin has gotten un-
der way.
A backhoe aboard a sizable barge is inching its
way through the basin, scooping muck from the
bottom for removal to another part of the four-acre
Rivolta Group property. There it will drain until
dry enough to be trucked to a landfill, said Renzo
Rivolta.
He is chief of Cortez Wood Design, which origi-
nally used the main building on the property to outfit
the boats whose hulls were built by the Rivolta Group
at Port Manatee. Crowded out of the port by construc-
tion there, Rivolta moved boat-building operations
first to Sarasota and later to Tampa.
The dredging is permitted to bring the boat
basin to its original depths at various sections,


Rivolta said, ranging from 5-7 feet below mean
low tide. A decrepit barge that has been there for
years, rotted now and silted in, will be removed in
pieces, he said. Duncan Seawall, Dock and Boat
Lift Inc. of Bradenton is the contractor, with Steve
Leible in charge.
Rivolta said the project has been started slowly
by design, and is to be completed in 45 days.
Piero Rivolta, the automaker/financier/entre-
preneur and father of Renzo who bought the old
Sigma fish house property two years ago, had
hoped to turn it into a yacht haven including a
small village type residential area for boat owners.
Cortezians protested against anything that
might change the character of the historic fishing
village, and Rivolta moved on.
"We're not sure what we will do ultimately
with the property," Renzo Rivolta said. "After it's
dredged, we'll see."


Commander
Lt. Col.
David W.
Hall has
assumed
command of
the 415'"
Base Support
Battalion in
Kaiserslautenz,
Germany.
The Air-
borne/Ranger
officer is son
of Barbara
Hall of Anna
Maria.


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THE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 27


Welcome to winter: snapper in Gulf, reds in bays


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Winter fishing, and cooler water temperatures due
to the fronts, have slowed fishing a bit, but there are
still good reports of redfish and sheepshead in the bays
and an occasional snook.
Offshore action for kingfish is pretty much over as
the run has moved on, and Spanish mackerel are an
occasional catch. But grouper and snapper fishing re-
mains good, and there are some reports of cobia of
some size.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business out of
Catcher's Marina in Holmes Beach said trolling for
grouper about five miles out in the Gulf is putting his
charters onto some big fish. Backwater action is still
good for redfish, with some catching going better than
27 inches in length.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach out of Catcher's said he's catching a
few cobia, plenty of mackerel and sheepshead are start-
ing to show up. He's also starting to get into some of
those big redfish around the docks on the bayside of the
Island.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of
Catchers said it's been a bit rough out in the Gulf, but
he's still been putting his charters onto red grouper to
25 pounds and gag grouper to 10 pounds, plus snapper
to 5 pounds and lane and mangrove snapper and, every
once in a while, some margate and mutton snapper.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
kingfishing has really slowed, but there are still Span-
ish mackerel out there for anyone willing to troll the
Gulf of Mexico. Grouper fishing is improving by the
day, with good results in 50 to 70 feet of water. Inshore
action for sheepshead and reds is still the best bet, Bill
added.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said the first part
of last week was about as good as it gets for fishing:
sheepshead, black drum, redfish and mackerel. He's
finding that mackerel and snook are almost all gone
right now, and added that the pier will be closed from
Dec. 2 through Dec. 16 for repairs.
Anglers at the Anna Maria City Pier concurred
that pier fishing is slow right now due to the cold
weather, but there are a few snapper, flounder and
sheepshead still being docked.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez also said weather
changes are starting to produce changes in fishing.
Grouper are moving closer to the Island, with good

















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reports coming from only 40 or 50 feet of water, and
backwater fishing is great for sheepshead.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said he's catching cobia to 25 pounds and he's
finding that the mackerel and redfish action is coming
on strong as the weather and water cools. Sheepshead
are a good bet right now, and he's also getting into a
few pompano.
Capt. Matt Bowers on the Outcast in Holmes
Beach said he's been doing well targeting grouper just
12 miles out in the Gulf, with limit catches on one trip
- mostly reds up to 8 pounds.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
fishing has been slow around his shop, but some of the
ardent fish hunters are catching a few reds. Whitebait
is almost all gone now, but shrimp are still available
and seem to be the best bait for sheepshead off the
Anna Maria Bridge.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
he's hearing good reports of sheepies being caught off
the Sunshine Skyway Pier reefs, and one lucky angler
brought home a 26-inch-long gag grouper off the
bridge system. Black drum and snook are still being
caught off the cut, he added.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he's been fishing the south bays Tidy Is-
land, Longbar Point and points south and has been
catching reds to 26 inches, some undersize snook,
catch-and-release trout to 12 inches, and flounder to 16
inches.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year fishing guide.
Call him at 779-9607 to provide fishing report. Pic-
tures of your catch are also welcome and may be
dropped off at The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Please include identification for per-
sons in the picture along with information on the catch
and a name and phone number for more information.
Pictures may be retrieved once they appear in the pa-
per.

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Nov. 23 horseshoe games were
Tom Skoloda and Bill Starrett, both of Anna Maria.
Runners-up were John Crawford of Bradenton and
Adin Shank of Anna Maria.
Winners in the Nov. 20 games were Shank and Jim
Spencer of Holmes Beach. Runners-up were Jack Coo-
per and Jessie Brisson, both of Holmes Beach.





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It


U-
Grouper action is good
Cindy Woodall of Palmetto caught these red grou-
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Landings. Some of the grouper went better than 10
pounds, she reported.


The weekly contests get under way every Wednes-
day and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
Park, 10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership fees
and everyone is welcome.


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PAGE 28 0 NOV. 27, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER



Dolphins earn PAL Superbowl title


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The Anna Maria Island Dolphins JV youth football
team defeated the Jaguars 16-6 to claim the 2002 PAL
Superbowl title and complete an incredible 11-1 sea-
son.
The seeds for the title were planted last season,
starting with a 41-0 drubbing by the Packers in a pre-
season game played at Birdie Tebbetts Field at Holmes
Beach. The Island boys learned a valuable lesson that
afternoon and carried it to a respectable 5-5 season.
This year, the Fins came into the season knowing
they could play and save for a 70-yard fumble return
for a touchdown by Lafaron Burch of the Jaguars, they
might be celebrating an undefeated season.
As they have all season, the Dolphins relied on an
experienced offensive line and a punishing ground
game led by bruising tailback Eric Whitley.
Whitley rushed for 97 yards and touchdowns of 25
yards and one yard.
The Dolphins struck first when they recovered a
Jaguar fumble deep in Jaguar territory. Whitley got the
call and broke three tackles to complete the 25-yard
touchdown run. QB Nick Sato then found Chad
Richardson with the extra-point pass to give the Fins
a 7-0 lead.
The Jaguars fought back when quarterback Breon
Bryant connected with Andrew Young on an 80-yard
touchdown pass to pull to within 7-6. The Dolphins
defense came through to block the Jaguars' extra-point
kick to stay on top by one point.
Late in the first half, the Dolphins drove the ball
deep into Jaguar territory, but were stopped on downs
at their one-yard line. With 13 seconds remaining in the
half, Jaguar quarterback Bryant dropped back looking
to pass, but was dropped for a safety by Sean Price to
up the Dolphins lead to 9-6.
The second half was a seesaw battle waged be-
tween the 20 yard lines until the six-minute mark of the
fourth quarter. There the Dolphins put together a
"championship" drive.
The Fins called Whitley's number seven consecu-
tive times and he responded by running the ball right
down the Jaguars' throats. Whitley completed the 50-
yard drive when he ran it in on a fourth and one to give
the Fins a 15-6 lead. Richardson ran in the extra point
to provide the final margin.
Coach Tom Moore was ecstatic. "This victory was
a total team effort and is the culmination of a lot of hard
work by these boys."
Monday, Nov. 25, the Dolphins got together for a
celebration of their great season and handed out season-
ending awards.


Alamnate High gIrl' soccer goalie Naomi Osborne goes laugh iii thei a/i to, Jeny a Martin County Hig.h School
player during the Her-icane's 1-0 victory Nov. 23 in Stuart, Fla.
sbohnrne l eads Manatee Hiah airls


As expected, Dolphin tailback/linebacker Whitley
received the team most valuable player award while
MVP of the offensive line was Andrew Burgess. De-
fensive line MVP was shared by Pat Cole and Sean
Price.
Other award winners were Chad Richardson, who
won the offensive back award, and Connor Bystrom,
who won the defensive back award. Most improved
player was quarterback Nick Sato, while most im-
proved defensive player was defensive end Curtis
Reynolds.
The 110 percent award winner was defensive back/
kick returned Jordan Pritchard.
It was truly an exciting season of football.
Congratulations to all of the players, coaches and
fans!


I -C~ ,h


Hold that pose
The Anna Maria Island Community Center hosts three non-stress Pilates exercise classes weekly with in-
structor Laura Bennet. Pilates was developed in the 1920s by legendary physical trainer Joseph H. Pilates. It
focuses on increasing flexibility and strength to build more defined, leaner muscles. Classes are $5 per
session and, as you can see, fill up quickly. For information, call 778-1908. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


to 2.1 start
Island resident and MHS sophomore goalie Naomi
Osborne has helped Manatee High's girls' varsity soc-
cer team to a 2-1 start on the season.
Osborne has allowed only one goal to date this
year, which came during a 2-1 loss to Sarasota High on
Nov. 21.
She earned shutouts against Venice High on Nov.
19 and most recently during a 1-0 victory over Martin
County High School in Stuart, Fla., on Nov. 23.
Alex Bouziane scored the eventual game-winner in
the 1Oth minute, but Osborne made the goal stand up
with several outstanding saves late in the game. None
was bigger than in the 10th minute when a Martin
player got loose in the box where she fired a point-
blank shot to Osborne's right. Osborne was up to the
challenge, making an incredible reaction save to make
a winner out of MHS.

Sign up now for the ninth annual
indoor soccer tourney
Regisration for the ninth annual Anna Maria Island
Community Center indoor soccer tournament is ongo-
ing. The event will take place from Dec. 15 to 23 and
will have four age divisions for both male and female
players. Girls and boys teams will be competing for
division titles in (under age) U8, U10, U12, and U14.
Cost is $100 per team with a maximum of 12 play-
ers per team and the deadline for entering a team is
Dec. 11 at 9 p.m.
Due to the increased popularity of the indoor tour-
nament, the Center is accepting only the first six teams
in each age group on a first-come basis.
Call Scott Dell at the Center for more information
at 778-1908.

Basketball registration draws 175 kids
Approximately 175 kids turned out for the Anna
Maria Island Community Center's basketball season try-
outs, giving the Center's league 24 teams in five age
groups.
The regular season gets under way Jan. 6, but there is
a preseason banquet planned for Dec. 5 for all players and
cheerleaders. The Bistros will again sponsor the spaghetti
dinner, which will cost $6 for adults and $5 for children.
Alsoon tap for the league is a preseason tourney
Dec. 9-14 for Division III and up.
For more information, call Joe Cheblus at the Cen-
ter, 778-1908.





THE ISLANDER U NOV. 27, 2002 U PAGE 29


.t:J *:-


Sam Sato and the 2002 JV Dolphins PAL Superbowl Champions
Jordan Pritchard, Nick Sato, Chad Richardson, Corey Williamson, Eric Whitley, Heath English, Jarrod McKenzie, Tim Bouziane, Charlie Woodson, C.J. Wickersham,
Tanner Pelkey, Jimmy Lease, Shane Pelkey, Sean Price, Pat Cole, Curtis Reynolds, Andrew Burgess, Scottie Steenstra, Dillon Frank and Conner Bystrom. Coaches:
Tom Moore, Brad Lisk, Andy Price and Scott Steenstra.





PAGE 30 M NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


PICK WINNER 11/20: Joyce Tarr, Bradenton* BUCS WINNER: Joyce Tarr!


$50 PICK THE WINNERS CONTEST
PICK THE GAME WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander pays $50 to the person with the most a
correct game-winning predictions. Collect prize in per- ar
son or by mail. *
* Entries must be postmarked or hand delivered to the *
newspaper by noon Saturday weekly.
* A winner will be drawn from tying entries. The decision
of The Islander football judge is final. 1
* All entries must be submitted on the published form or 2


copy of the form. Be sure to include name, address 3
id phone number. 4
All advertisers must be listed to be eligible to win. 5
ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON, PER WEEK. 6
7


Winner


Advertiser


$50 BUCS CONTEST


* Contestant Name


ONE ENTRY PER
PERSON/TWO
PER HOUSE-
HOLD! MUST BE
OVER AGE 18.


Your correct score prediction for the week's Buccaneer game could
win you $50. Drawing in the event of a tie. Rollover if there's no
weekly winner! BUCS vs
SCORE SAINTS / SCORE


Address/City
WEEK 13 $50 PRIZE FOR SCORE!



The Islander


Phone


f \ Mail or deliver to The Islander* 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 FAX 778-93'3-





THIE ISLANDER M NOV. 27, 2002 M PAGE 31


Chess ~ .
mates ':
Islander
Jack
Cooper, far "
right, is
teaching '
interested
fifth -
graders at
Aiila
Maria
Elementary
School how Meur
to o :tha- T

another in A, Ar J1
the ganze of
chess.
Islander -,
Photo: 4_
Diana .
Bogander starts 'elementary' chess club




Islander starts 'elementary' chess club


Island resident Jack Cooper is sharing his love for
chess with students at Anna Maria Elementary School.
Once a week Cooper meets with interested fifth-
graders to teach them how to play chess.
Approximately 20 boys and girls meet with Coo-
per for a half hour. They've been learning about the dif-
ferent game pieces, how they move on the chess board,
and how to "think ahead" of their opponent.
Cooper said he began playing chess when he was


11 years old and the main
concentration.


LookinQ for. the
perfect gift?



TheIslander

Friends and family that live
afar will surely appreciate
keeping in touch with what's
happening on Anna Maria -
it's ';. .1 letter from home.
teap.in touch with a gift
subscription. You can
I r1.,:" your- .
subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5404 Marina Drive, Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


thing required for play is


P IRE REALTOR.
Your Neighborhood
Real Estate Shoppe
SEASONAL RENTALS
Martinique Gulffront
A.M. Beachfront, 3BR/2BA
Perico Bay Club Villas
Holmes Beach Duplex
5400 Condo, 2/2,
Efficiency, 500-ft. beach
ANNUAL RENTALS
2/2 Canalfront Home
2/2 Canalfront Condo
Efficiency 500 ft. to beach
2/2 Perico Bay Club
Brand New 3/2 Home
Phone 778-0807
Email: yrealt7@aol.com
www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


,_/Xk iulf-Bay Realty
S\of Anniia Maria inc.
\ia~i~ a(^ 77&7244
1 (800)771-6043
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
INCOME PROPERTY
Beautifully refurbished, six-unit Island resort. Sold turn-
key furnished, architecturally designed, with a splashing
fountain and lush botani-
cal exotics. Offering con-
sists of four 2BR/2BA..
units, and two spacious .
1BR units. Showings by --
appointments only. ...
$1,650,000.
Call Robin Kollar, Broker, (941) 713-4515


DUPLEX
Best buy on Island. Two
3BR/2BA units, com-
pletely refurbished, new
appliances. Heated pool
and walk to the beach.
Only $389,000.
Call Ursula Stemm,
Realtor, 545-6426.


I .. -
L .! l i'ii ~ &

vim
LI-r._ilow


"It's not a real difficult game," he said. "The more
you play the better you Lget.
Cooper says he hopes to start a chess club for Is-
land Middle School students as well.



Moving In?
;, Moving Out?
Moving Up?
4 Call Karen Day
778-6696
Evenings: 779-2237
Mike Norman Realty, inc.
3101 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach


"WALK WITH ME..."

-.. in paradise at
.'. 3*.'

I can make your
Island dreams come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
Sales & Rentals Since 1981
Office 778-4800 Cell 705-4800
-' . ? 5201 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach, Fl
34217


MAKE YOUR MOVE

WITH MARILYN!





4,.
i=





NO BRIDGES TO THE MAINLAND
Exciting single-family home with pool and
security system. 3BR/2.5BA, two-car
garage. Open and spacious. Mint condi-
tion. 11332 Perico Isles Circle. $325,000.
Furniture package available.


ANNA MARIA


SuiiiCoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC
KEY ROYALE POOL HOME
4BR/3BA Key Royale "500" block, split-plan,
canalfront, 4,000 lb. boat lift, caged pool,
family room, two blocks to great beach.
$499,000.
SARASOTA 28 UNIT MOTEL
1.4 acres on US-41 prime location. Located
near the Ritz, airports, colleges and Van
Wezel. NT-zoned, many other property uses.
In the "Enterprise Zone" = tax incentives.
$1,500,000.
GREAT STARTER HOME
2BR/1BA West Bradenton home near Wares
Creek. Close to downtown, hardwood floors,
eat-in kitchen, wood deck, fence. $128,900.
LARGE DUPLEX NEAR BEACH
2BR/2BA each side. Just steps to one of area's
best beaches. Quiet secluded street in North
Holmes Beach. Very residential area. Two
garages and two carports. Excellent rental.
$695,000.

ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

SB MLS SwiACoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


I ,






PAGE 32 M NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY.
From your friends at Island Real Estate


Frank Davis
Broker





Melinda Bordes
Realtor






Marianne Correl
Realtor






Bob Fittro
Realtor





Richard Freeman
Realtor






Alan Galletto
Broker/Salesperson



..

Bill Jones
Broker/Salesperson






Jon Kent
Broker/Salesperson






Tom Nelson
Realtor






Nick Patsios
Broker/Salesperson






Chris Shaw
Realtor


513 69th St. ................


$599,000


618 Hampshire Ln............ $595,000

657 Key Royale Dr. ........... $1,099,000


505 67th St. ......................

616 Emerald Lane.............


$439,000

$539,000


608 Key Royale Dr. ......... $489,000

509 68th St. ................ $439,000

510 68th St. ............... $489,000

524 71st St ................ $1,490,000

623 FoxworthLn. .......... $575,000

ISLAND HOMES.
CONDOS & LOTS


233 85th St. ...............

140 50th St. ...............

308 55th St. Lot ..........

Sun Plaza West #201....

Bridgeport #113..............

Sunbow Bay #204. .........


$349,900

$489,500

$197,500

$399,000

$298,900

$239,000


BeachwalkTownhomes-1 Left. $499;900

6925 Holmes Bvld ........ $229,000


214 83rd Street. ...........

710 North Shore. Lot .....


$332,900

$299,000


747 Jacaranda. Lot........ $389,000

405 Bay Palms Dr. ........ $329,900

MAINLAND

634 Estuary. ......... NEW $210,000

1276 Spoonbill Landings Cr. $249,999

8809 12th Ave. NW. ..... $239,900

Vizcaya #31C. .............. $134,900

3948 Mariners Way..... $439,900

2418 90th St. NW.......... $2,995,000

6506 W. 38th Ave....... $129,000

11332 Perico Isle Cir ........ $325,000

Sarasota Bay Club, #201.... $359,000

1310 Perico Pt. Cr....NEW $280,000

1275 Spoonbill Landings Cr. $219,000
Stop by and use our talking
window 24 hour information center.


DICK MANER
AND
DAVE JONES









NEW CONSTRUCTION
THE VILLAGE

AT HOLMES BEACH
LUXURY CONDO TOWNHOUSES

Model Open! 3800 Sixth Ave., Holmes Beach










3BR/2BA 1,700 sq.ft. Living Area Heated Pool
SElevator Available Large Private Garage
Steps to Beach/Shopping Starting at $375,000
Call: Jon Tipton, 941-779-9464
Visit us at WWW.ABOUTTHEVILLAGES.COM



AFFORDABLE

ISLAND LIVING


S' i-, '




ISLAND'S BEST BUY
Look no further! This 2BR/2BA condo has it all.
Pool, tennis, community and boat dock. Turnkey
furnished and ready to go for season. Great cen-
tral Island location. Walk to shopping, dining and
the Gulf beach. Priced to sell at $229,000.

SEASIDE BUNGALOW
1BR villa with Florida room and screened porch.
Turnkey furnished and already rented for season.
300 steps to the Gulf beach in a nice complex com-
plete with community pool. Offered at $195,000.


CUTE ISLAND GETAWAY
1 BR villa, turnkey furnished, only 300 steps to the
beach! This cozy unit would make a great "Island
getaway". Located in a quiet complex complete
with pool. Low maintenance fees! Offered at
$179,000.

Call Kathy Geeraerts 778-0072
LaRae Regis 779-1858
Ken Jackson 778-6986


reen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA

778-0455
9906 Gulf Drive


"



.- -'9 *,,,- VS"


Visit our website at www.greenreal.com


BEACHWALK TOWNHOME
ONLY TWO BLOCKS
TO THE BEACH -
i New townhome with
O T' 3BR/2.5BA, private back
yard, elevator tower in
place, screened lanai,
". : E e-M hurricane impact window
M.-. upgrade and 2-car garage.
$499,900.
.- r b Call Bob Fittro today
to see this magnificent
newly constructed
townhome! 778-6066.


R R S


$224,900 -
POOL HOME
Choice location for this 3BR/2BA
with a den or fourth bedroom
located in Glenn Lakes. Great
room, caged pool area, two-car
garage. Pantry and laundry area
add to your convenience. Close to
schools and shopping. IB84366.


6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 778-0766 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.cbflorida.com


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL.34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770 "
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com
HAVE A HAPPY
THANKSGIVING!

ANN AL- RNAL


i 7-- .


1BR/1BA duplex. One
block to the beach. Unfur-
nished. $700/month.



2BR/2BA house. On deep
canal. Holmes Beach.
$1,400/month, plus utilities.


ISASOAL RENALI


I 9,r'l


3BR/2BA HOUSE on
deep canal. Caged
heated pool. Flamingo
Cay. Two-car garage,
washer/dryer.

3BR/2BA HOUSE. On
Gulf Drive. Open heated
pool. Washer/dryer.
Holmes Beach.

2BR/2BA HOUSE on
deep canal. North of Anna
Maria. Washer/dryer.



3BR/2BA HOUSE on
deep canal. North of Anna
Maria. Washer/dryer.


3BR/2BA CONDO on the
beach. Second floor.
Private elevator. Washer/
dryer. Holmes Beach.


AN M OR


THIS 4BR/3BA custom built home
offers tile floors, ornate trims, high
ceilings and an open concept with
endless views of the Gulf and bay.
3,518 sf. of living area under one
roof. One of a kind! $1,950,000.
MLS#87774.
WATERFRONT HOME & LOTS

861 North Shore Dr. ........ $1,950,000


Carol S. Heim
751-1559
Eves 78-r0


C.i'^n0





TUE ISLANDER E NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 33

SA 11 CA S
ITEMFOSALAAGSAL


WHITE WICKER ARMOIRE 70-inches high, 36-
inches wide, 24-inches deep, three drawers, beau-
tiful, $450. White-washed kitchen table, six chairs,
$150.779-2039.
CHILD'S FANTASY bunk bed. Double folding doors,
create Victorian hideaway complete with windows.
$1,500, or best offers. 779-0153.
FABULOUS FINDS ANTIQUE sale. 50 percent off
on select antiques, glassware and treasures. Mon-
day-Saturday, 9:30-5pm. 5351 Gulf Drive, Dolphin
Plaza, Holmes Beach.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND Video: A Musical Tour. As
featured in The Islander! Now available direct by
calling 761-3001 or at AMI Video, 3213 East Bay
Drive, 779-0880.
BIG BEAUTIFUL HOUSEBOAT $28,500 or make
offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat sunseeker or call 778-3526.



ISLAND PLAYER'S PECAN SALE: Mammoth
halves! New crop. Holiday bags $6.95 lb., choco-
late covered $7.95 lb. Now available at SunCoast
Real Estate and The Islander newspaper located
in the Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.
Proceeds benefit the Island Players. For informa-
tion call: 779-0202.



ROSER THRIFT SHOP Open Tuesday, Thursday
9:30am-2pm and Saturday 9-noon. Always sales
racks.-511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.
Place your classified ads online at islander.org.


YARD SALE: Saturday, Nov. 30, 9am-5pm. TV
stand, microwave, pictures, clothes and miscella-
neous. 3005 Avenue E Holmes Beach, south of
Walgreens.
GARAGE SALE: Saturday, Nov. 30, 8am-1pm. Mis-
cellaneous items, including desk, chair, coffee table,
linens, other. 207 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, near
city pier.
TWO GARAGE SALES: Saturday, Nov. 30, 9am-
4pm. Assorted household items and miscellaneous,
clothes. Both sales located between Avenue C & B
at 23rd Street, Bradenton Beach.
GARAGE SALE: Friday, Saturday, Nov. 29-30,
8am-3pm. Tools, boating, fishing, housewares,
clothes, gas grill, bicycles, tent, furniture, leather
jacket. 2915 Avenue C, Holmes Beach.


FOUND: Friendly orange-and-white cat with flea
collar. Found Nov. 22, vicinity of 82nd Street,
Holmes Beach. Call 778-5497.


CRITTER SITTER Seven years in pet care, 22
years as an Island resident. Tender, loving care for
your pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.
AIN'T THEY CUTE! Adorable free kittens available
for loving homes. Call now, 778-2153.
DACHSHUND adoption and rescue (DARE). Call
Shona at 761-2642 for information or visit our Web
site: www.daretorescue.com.
Find great deals in The Islander classified. The
best results from classified ads and service adver-
tising. 778-7978.







Simply the Best


Sui& 6
_-r-o, PAFpORAMIC BAY Vi-IS FRor, THIS
EID TOP FL-OO.R OU1 Wl ELeVA-TbOR
COVERED PARKCII6I. T-OR4RCS U7RtIISHeD
SDECtRTOK PE~FECT 2- BP- 2- BA OI.0
$ 3"4,q9.0


ISLAND DtFL-X


w~srT oF (GOL- DRNE\ AND JOST O'6
BLOCK TbO &ec-. 2/2. AD I/i
Room FoR P POOL AN kUA/ rllCorA.
? 359500
70+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.

Mike t1^I
AmhO


Norman

Realty INC


800-367-1617
941-778-6696


3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com


1981 MERCEDES WAGON turbo diesel. $3,900.
778-3523.
1969 VW BUG Strong engine, new battery and
braking system, sturdy floorboards, four-speed, tan.
$999, or best offer. 807-0041, leave message.
1999 BUICK PARK Avenue with prestige option
package. 19,300 miles. Like new! $12,900. Call
778-5033.
1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN, cold air conditioning,
has towing package. Ready for travel. Runs great.
$3,100, or best offer. 730-9622.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation
or long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Min-
utes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Capt.
John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting.
STORAGE FOR BOATS, cars, RVs. Long and
short term. Transportation available to the airport.
Resident manager. 4518 119th St., Cortez. Call
761-7471.
80-FEET OF canal dockage on seawall for rent
near Holmes Beach City Hall. $125/month. Call
725-1222.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels and everything
else in The Islander, 778-7978.
HOUSEBOAT FOR SALE. Excellent live aboard,
guest quarters or rental income. $28,500 or make
offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.







SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


May you enjoy

4 a bountiful

Thanksgiving


An,, MHr chFd H /o*e
This beautifully remodeled 3BR/2BA residence
has been tastefully refurbished with gorgeous ce-
ramic tile floors, textured ceilings with crown moul-
ding, brick fireplace, home movie theater and a
gorgeous free-form swimming pool and spa with
changing room and cabana area, all located di-
rectly across the street from the sparkling Gulf of
Mexico! Other features include leaded-glass front
doors, built-in bookshelves, custom bathroom fit-
tings and fixtures and enclosed outdoor shower
with hot and cold running water. Truly in a class by
itself! Priced at $975,000.


VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE


Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com


lrlarina Pointe

Realty Co.


314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
A A A A ,


FEATURED RENTAL
2BR/2BA townhouse-style units with heated
pool and only one block to the beach.
Weekly, monthly or seasonally.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA canal home
with dock. $2,600/month.
Available Jan.-April, 2003.
ANNA MARIA 2BR/1BA home, one block
to bay, $2,000/month.
Available now through season.
HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA home,
$2,000/month.
Available Jan.-March, 2003.
C I No fI o .rla "






PAGE 34 0 NOV. 27, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


IFIS IN-EL- C I HE LT ICA ECu 1d


LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on
the charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwater
fishing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle provided.
779-9607.

PRIVATE CHARTERS. Fishing, snorkeling,
sightseeing, Egmont Key. USCG License. Capt.
Keith Barnett. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is
Sarah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child or
$3/pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or child.
Please call 778-7622 or 778-7611.

CHILD SITTER AND PET SITTER. Seventh-grade
male looking for a job. Available after school and
weekends. Call Zachary, 779-9803.


WANTED: HOUSEKEEPER for Longboat Key re-
sort. Must be honest, dependable and sober. Good
starting pay and friendly working atmosphere, 15-25
hours per week, including weekends. Call 383-2431,
between 9am-6pm on Tuesday-Saturday.

NURSERY ATTENDANT NEEDED Sunday morn-
ings at local church. Call weekdays, 778-1813.

NANNY/HOUSEKEEPER needed immediately.
Dependable, healthy, energetic, trustworthy and
experienced for 8-month-old infant in my Island
home for at-home working mom. 11 am-3pm, Mon.-
Fri., Sat. night and weekend day shift occasionally.
Pleasant job requires flexible schedule for $7/hour.
Application, references, background check required.
779-1121.

CAN YOU SEW?
Do you have a machine at home? Can you stitch
little doll clothes in your spare time at home? Fab-
ric and styles supplied. Call 383-5919, all calls will
be returned.


CLEANERS NEEDED: Great per-room rate, mostly
weekends, experienced preferred but not required.
Transportation a must. 960-5993, after 5pm.

TWO SIDES OF NATURE Anna Maria Island's larg-
est little beach shoppers have immediate part-time
retail sales position available. Great store, great pay
and great fun! Flexible hours, part-time evening shift
Available 4:30-8:30pm, Wednesday-Sunday. Apply
in person at the Bayview Plaza location, Two Sides
of Nature, 100 S. Bay Blvd., Unit A-1, Anna Maria

MODEL WANTED: Island artist seeks vacationing
female for sketching. 545-6213.

SERVERS AND KITCHEN help apply Ooh La La!
European Bistro. Fine dining service, days and/or
evenings. Will train dishwasher/prep help. 5406
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Ask for Chef Damon.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

PART-TIME ISLANDER REPORTER: Journalism
skills a must. Computer literate. Independent
worker. Resumes: E-mail news@islander.org, or fax
778-9392, or mail/deliver to The Islander, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton Beach
is admitting residents. Respite, long term. Call 779-
0322 for details, inquiries welcome.

COMPANION AIDE: Companionship with compas-
sion. Rides to grocery, doctor, or just. plain visiting,
light housecleaning, etc. Call Claudette to discuss
cost, 448-6185 (cell).


^^ > iltiuulilu I 3| m REALTOR.
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SHOPPE.
U Experience Reputation Results
: RESIDENTIAL
l TAMPA BAYFRONT Double lot, 3BR/2BA, two greatrooms,
2,506 sq.ft. living area, ceramic floors, garage. $1,900,000.
2317 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach LAURELOAK PARK Acacia model, pool and upgrades.$382,000.
Gulfview, two-story residential triplex with two DEEDED BOAT DOCK 3BR/2BA, wood decks, clear views
down canal to bay. Elevated with bonus area. $350,000.
units of 2BR/1BA down and one unit of 1BR/ COMMERCIAL
1 BA up, overlooking the Gulf. $550,000. STYLING SALON -8 station, established over 35 years. $39,000.
WALGREENS Triple Net. Good CAP. $2,650,000.
Doug Dowling Realty ANTIQUE & ART GALLERY Old Main Street. $69,000
MOBILE HOME PARK 71 spaces, lakefront. 10 percent cap.
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
SE-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net See our classified ads We're booking 2003 rentals now!
E-ailougdowlingeahlink.net 5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
www.dugdowlyrealt7@aol.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


)


-~..


Private Waterfront
524 71 st St. Holmes Beach, ::


Al 1-


Estate On Bimini Bay


direI:t :c ss .;im t:n ; B !- ~p f y ,:[.,,- t-.), : f "I" .r, rI I ;
,-^ ,-, r,. 'v, 'i ,1 rI, i',. :r'".Atl r', i,. ',,ilh ?' n ; irc',lh i:dr,ii >,nilr'% ,:n. I ;*
SllOo '- K.o-Cei Vvtii, w h i I iL',. I 'l J.i.. V" iL'.:: C ,*',":,', tr i., i ir' 'C, L c'v..' "o'i, i. t .....
WVind n, st,air-C se lo i..., uros )S i siL. '' i '''oo ')i ,. i.c'. T pQ"i s I- O .: d'',,
Indoor pc, ] el i 39' x .:i' .in;:i. Thrc,:e b-:1ro1-- ,ls, f:b.:r ]nj :1 I'-,' ,th ll- lv/o-ca' -

ISLAND
Christine T.Shaw, Realtor 6101 Malrina Drive I- -s Beci, FL 34217 .
941-778-6066 FAX 778-6306 *Toll Free 600-86-. :0 Chris @ IslandReal.conm R E A L t ESTA TE
O ANOf A NMARLA ISLAND. INC.


CERTIFIED NURSES AIDS: experienced, reliable
CNAs available for home care. Safety, respect, pri-
vacy. Please call Abigail or Bob, 778-1176.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gar-
dens, trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-
working and responsible. Excellent references. Ed-
ward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your com-
puter misbehaving? Certified computer service and
private lessons. Special $20 per hour- free advice.
545-7508.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evenings, weekends. For any computer needs,
hardware, software, network, commercial, private.
Call 778-8473.

BOOKKEEPING: We can invoice your clients, pay
your biiis, reconcile your bank accounts. We pro-
vide appropriate financial reports; working with your
accountant at tax time and much more. Local, expe-
rienced. 778-9436.

MUSIC LESSONS! Also available: flute, saxophone,
clarinet.. Beginning to advanced. Contact Koko Ray,
792-0160.

SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast and
reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines, cush-
ions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call 727-5873.
BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair and/
or replacement. Serving Manatee County and the
Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and per-
sonalized service, call William Eller, 795-7411.
RA005052.


OPEN YOUR CHRISTMAS

I SENT EARLY!
Purchase your home
through our office
and we'll make your
First mortgage pay-
ment. Call us
for details. Hurry,
This offer ends
Jan. 15, 2003.

JUST STEPS TO
S"' THE BEACH fr-
updatped, .,ine
S0iV'IyDrivel
S~Ol .r1/2BA, with a
t SO S large, screened
a lanai. Room for a pool!
-" .*". Turnkey furnished
." at $599,900.

-,I ~GULFVIEW VILLA
'Just steps to the beach!
i j Brand new, spacious 2
S. : or 3BR/2BA with
garage. Corian
SI countertops, stainless-
1 I steel appliances and
S more. $465,000.
Call Mark, 518-6329.


---





THE ISLANDER U NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 35


L A NWD E R CIL A S; WS U.LF UIE
S V SI S


JACK'S HANDYMAN SERVICES No job too small.
Home repairs, painting, textures, tiling, property.
maintenance. Phone (941) 724-1958.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

SOS SERVICES Professional cleaning and organi-
zational services for your home. Free estimates,
Island references. Call Sharon, 920-1992.

LARGE FUNDING COMPANY
Pays cash for owner-financed mortgage notes, court
settlements and lottery winnings. Call or fax us to-
day, 751-1905 or pager, 506-0221.

THE ROYAL MAID SERVICE Licensed, bonded,
insured. Professional experienced maids, free esti-
mate, gift certificates available. Call now, 727-9337
(72-SWEEP).

FIREWOOD, SEASONED hardwoods, delivered,
stacked. Call Jeff, 809-7930.

GERMAN HANDYMAN Tiles, wood flooring, paint-
ing and all other home repair you may need. High
quality, reasonable prices. No job too small! Li-
censed and insured. 539-7937.

JACK OF ALL TRADES Carpentry, home repair,
yard work, painting, cleaning, home audio, car
alarms, automotive headliners. Scott, 761-2416.

NOTARY PUBLIC Civil marriages and renewal of
wedding vows. Sunset beach setting or wherever.
Norman R. Veenstra, 778-5834.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance ser-
vice..Over 30 years experience, self-employed
in construction trades. "I'm handy to have
around." .779-9666.

KATHY & MIKE'S CLEANING Service: Delivering a
standard of excellence for all your interior and exte-
rior cleaning needs. No job too big or small. Great
rates and references, 722-4358.

CLEANINGS-R-JOB Will clean your residence, of-
fice, rental or new construction. Island resident of 35
years. No job too big! Please call 779-9633.

TAYLOR MADE CLEANING Services. Local Island
references, free estimates, professional and reli-
able, best rates. Bonded. Call 779-0184 and ask for
Jennifer.

Buy it, sell it, find it fast in The Islander classified.


LIGHT(EN) UP YOUR holiday season. Call the Holi-
day Hotline, 721-4354. Supply the decorations and
we'll hang them. Take advantage of our wide vari-
ety of holiday services.

NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing massage
in the comfort of your home. Call today for an ap-
pointment, 795-0887. MA#0017550.

MAID TO CLEAN: Island resident, professional
house cleaning services. References available. Call
Wendy, 778-0321.



CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, cleanup, tree trimming, hauling,
Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent references.
778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 807-1015.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation and pest control service. Everything
Under the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-4441.

GILLIS & GILLIS ENT. Crushed, washed shell, top-
soil, landscaping services. We install shell drive-
ways. Serving Sarasota and Keys since 1978. Fully
licensed and insured. 753-2954 or 376-2954, cell.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $27/yard. Hauling:
all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free esti-
mates. Call Larry at 795-7775, cell 720-0770.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL! Everything else costs
extra. Crushed, washed shell, gravel, mulch, dirt,
-and rip rap delivered and spread. If you're looking
for the lowest price, call any Tom, Mark or Larry. If
you want the job done right the first time, call David
Bannigan, 794-6971, cell phone 504-7045.

Find great deals in The Islander classified. The
best results from classified ads and service adver-
tising. 778-7978.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill, 795-5100

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. Inte-
rior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Have
sawmill, will travel. Dan Michael, master carpenter.
Call, 745-1043 or cell 705-1422.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates,
call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGCO61519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.


TWO BEDROOM ON GULFSIDE ISLAND TOWNHOME LONGBOAT HARBOUR
\ wonderful beach getaway yet close Sunbow Bay townhome recently up- Beautiful wide canal view recently up-
o everything. Turnkey furnished, 2BR, dated with 3BR/3BA, lagoon view and dated with new windows, lanai enclo-
ust made for relaxation and play. Sun 1,995 sf. of living area, two pools, tennis sure, bathroom fixtures, appliances, ce-
Ind sand and you. Betty Anne Petitt, and small boat access to bay. Dave ramic tile. Fresh paint throughout. Don
'51-0670. #85020. $325,000. Moynihan, 778-2246. #85068. Carey, 383-5577. #228073. $199,900.
$289,000.

VACATION AND ANNUAL RENTALS AVAILABLE
(941) 778-2246 (800) 211-2323 2217 GULF DRIVE NORTH BRADENTON BEACH





PAGE 36 E NOV. 27, 2002 N THE ISLANDER
Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy'\ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
lawn Hauling By the Cut or by the month.
We Monitor Irrigation Systems
service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
tEstablished in 1983
@@ [Tr'BU@'U@3 STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@ 'i.WU@T[V@O CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@N @TOM O@N JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@IBflU@I~0 Building Anna Maria since 1975
@NBaOTI 'D@o J (941) 778-2993


UI( HM Nll PIINTIKG
Residential* Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price.
Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Hl Replacement Doors and Windows
Ful, Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
i Lic#CBC056755



Water Damaged Drywall Tiling Painting
HAND AND SPRAY TEXTURE
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
SFred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141 =,


SEASCAPE PAINTING
Residential Interior Exterior Pressure Washing
Roof Coating Insured 29 Years Experience
Rick Tanner 941-798-6985
4203 76th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209












Reach more than 20,000 people weekly
with your ad for as little as $16.56!
Call Shona or Rebecca 778-7978

e The Islander









CONSTRUCTION
ckeWICKERSHAMS
unwmu~umr c rowoma ~PI


HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheetrock, popcorn, doors, bi-folds, trim,
holdings kitchen remodeling, general repairs.
Homes, rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.

COMPLETE BATHROOM REMODELING Drywall,
repairs, texture coating, painting. Custom shower
stalls, tub enclosures, fixtures, cabinets, tile. Unique
Options, 752-7758 or 545-6141 (cell).

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more.
Lifetime warranty. Call Keith Barnett for a free in-
home consultation. Island references, 15 years ex-
perience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.

GREG HOWLE dba Howle Homes. New, remodels,
additions, tile, painting. Free estimates.
Lic#RB29003120. Insured. 761-3053.

WINDOW AND DOOR SILLS. Have cracked, crum-
bling, broken cement sills? Will rebuild all sills,
promptly. 26-years experience. Chris, 795-3034.




ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available.
Turnkey, beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No
pets, non smoking. Priced from $750/month, $400/
week, $80/night. 794-5980. www.divefish.com.

CONDO 2BR FURNISHED, beachfront, heated
pool, fishing dock, seasonal, three-month minimum.
Age 55 and older. (813) 247-3178 or week ends
(813) 927-1632.

FALL, WINTER, SPRING rentals available weekly,
monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Estate Co.,
778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

VACATION & SEASON. Private Beach. Walk to
everything. New kitchen, washer/dryer, dishwasher,
phone. VCR, grill, bikes bring your toothbrush!
$375-$775/week and $975-$2,275/month. Please
call 737-1121 or (800) 977-0803.

TURNKEY FURNISHED 1BR/1BA. Available now
through February. Full kitchen. $500/week or
$1,000/month. Small pet OK. Walk to beach or.
downtown Holmes Beach. Call 778-0554.

ANNA MARIA: Quiet north end, three-minute walk
to beach. 3BR/2BA, sleeps four. Beautifully fur-
nished. January-April, $2,900/month; $700/week,
other weeks during the year. Call 795-5500 or e-
mail: jewels29@tampabay.rr.com.

NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Two spacious
homes both 3BR/2BA with all conveniences. One is
$4,700/month, the other is $4,300/month. Photos
available upon request. Please call (813) 752-4235.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across
from beautiful beach, $350 to $450/week. Winter
and spring dates available. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, 778-2374.

ANNUAL CANALFRONT HOME unfurnished (pets
OK, non smoking). Renovated 2BR/1 BA, $2,250/
month. Available now, 779-2217.

CHARMING 1 BR/1 BA on canal. Furnished, washer/
dryer. $850/month, all utilities included. Available
now through Dec. 31. 778-5405.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, duplex in Bradenton
Beach. Newly renovated, more to come! Washer/
dryer hookup, covered parking. $850/month. (813)
300-8543 or 265-3458.

HOLMES BEACH Weekly, monthly, seasonal.
Large modern, new 1BR, ground-floor, just steps to
the nicest beach on Anna Maria Island. Fully fur-
nished, washer/dryer, dishwasher. 778-4555.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB January, February
2003. Non smoking, 2BR/2BA, no children. Four-
week minimum. Beachfront. Call (813) 781-7562.


VACATION RENTAL: Open, airy 3BR/2BA, loft,
two porches. Immaculate, two blocks to North
Point beach. $3,000/month, including taxes. (813)
969-3344.

HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL rental. Updated,
very clean, close to beach. Available monthly, De-
cember-May. 2BR/1BA, $1,800/month; 1BR/1BA,
$1,500/month. Call (813) 928-5378.

ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. 2BR/1BA, totally
remodeled, tile floors, carpeting in bedrooms. Non
smoking, no pets. Washer/dryer hook-up. $900/
month. Will work with first, last and security deposit.
730-5118.

ATTENTION SEASONAL RENTERS! Beautiful,
modern 2BR/1.5BA, elevated home on canal in
Holmes Beach. Newly renovated, upscale furnish-
ings and appliances with washer/dryer, private out-
door shower, patio and dock. Just steps to the
beach. $2,500/month. 216 S. Harbor Drive. Call
(813) 9Ti-7999 day or (813) 920-3845 evenings.

DIRECT GULFFRONT 2BR/1 BA condo. Bradenton
Beach. Fully renovated with new furniture. $1,000/
week or $3,000/month, seasonal. 713-4187, leave
message.

JANUARY RENTAL Anna Maria Island Club, unit
26. Offered Jan. 4-15. Toll free, (800) 237-2252.
www.geocities.com/annamariaic26/index.html

Place your classified ads online at islander.org.


The Islander
Don't leave the Island
Without uLl

MARIANNE CORRELL
Realtor
The Big
Picture
It's all
about
Real
Estate

(941)
778.6066


Curtis Clark & Assoc. Inc.
Vinyl Siding & Storm Panel Specialist

(941) 713-SIDE
SC-C056780


,l SHUTTER-VUE eC.
'~~ i U License #G CG C061513
Be prepared to meet new code requirements!
Replacement Windows Doors
Hurricane/Security Shutters
Room Enclosures

8106 Cortez Road W. Bradenton
(941) 745-2363



TON I S N AL 0 T F LAGS SAFE
O VINE B AR I NIC C RUX
G ULFCOURSE NUT FORH IRE

AD 0S CDDAS DEUS
ORATE PALER ROOMMATE
MUL E C 0 R N T H ECUB F AA
A LA S OIW E S EA S T A T M IS
HER NUNSTARTER CREPE
ARMHOLES COOLS CORRAL
C0 ED SHUNS SO0 R 0 S
MAL 0 NE LATEST S 0 ME WHAT
ACUTE BOSTONPUPS UNO
R 0 CS POOR ALSO ECT
RK FUNDMEMO R I ES SK IT
ENSCONCE V IS T B SCH
AL E HELMS B 0 AT
SHIRES T RS0 T 0 RRENTS
HUBBYHRRSE SUBST 0 R IIES
OLE 0 E IX T S I R A N 1 N E R
WAX Y R 0 0 ST S R S SCAMS


NOW HIRING
ALL POSITIONS
Kitchen and
Wait Staff
ALL SHIFTS
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
APPLY IN PERSON
OR CALL 778-3953



ROTTEN
RALPH'S

902 S. Bay Blvd.,
Anna Maria


REMODEL ADDITIONS CUSTOM HOMES

License CGC043438 33-9215 Insured


ISLANDE R DECLASSIFIED
HOME IMPROVEMENT Continued RENTALS Continued I


I MANATEE SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR!
1999-2002 Reader's Preference A wardsl I









IT C In d I T Cue


SEASONAL RENTAL Anna Maria, 200 feet to Rod
and Reel Pier. Ground floor, 2BR/1BA. Completely
remodeled, washer/dryer. Available now. 387-8610.
VACATION RENTAL AVAILABLE now! 2BR/1BA,
pool, walk to beach, shopping, restaurants. $1,800/
month. 778-3875.

BEACHFRONT 2BR/2BA, large-glass enclosed liv-
ing room, kitchen with fireplace. All new furniture
and appliances, phone and cable. 778-3645.
HOLMES BEACH annual. 3BR/2BA steps to beach.
No pets. $900/month. 725-4190.
RANCH-STYLE DUPLEX, Holmes Beach, 2BR/
1.5BA, laundry hook-ups, stove and refrigerator.
Annual, $750/month. No pets, 778-0032.

ANNUAL CANALFRONT, ground level with dock.
Non smoking, 2BR/2BA, Florida room, carport. Easy
walk to north-end beaches. $1,200/month. Available
12/1/02. (610) 692-4773.
ANNUAL RENTALS: Half duplex, 2BR/2BA, new ce-
ramic floors, $750; 2BR/1 BA, stackable washer/dryer
hookup. $725; New tile floors, stove, refrigerator, 1 BR/
1BA, $650. Dolores M. Baker Realty, 778-7500.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA, Holmes Beach. Screened lanai,
new carpet and appliances, washer/dryer hookup.
$900/month, plus utilities. First, last and security
deposit. 737-6484 or (703) 691-2526.
BRADENTON BEACH COTTAGE for rent. Dec. 21-
28. Three minutes to beach, 2BR, non smoking.
$550/week. 778-7370.
2BR CONDO Gulfview, beach access. Fully fur-
nished, available until Jan. 15, 2003. Off season
special, $400/week, holidays $100 higher. Call 761-
9530 or P-mail: tlernst@juno.com
VACATION RENTAL: You can have the warm west
coast Florida sun with beautiful white sand outside
your door. IBM, located at Resort 66, Holmes
Beach, on Anna Maria Island. Full housekeeping
with kitchen, cable TV, pool, ocean. Fully furnished.
$900/weekly. Available March: 1-8, 8-15, 15-22, 22-
29. Call (315) 894-2304.

SUNNY AND SPACIOUS annual canalfront home in
city of Anna Maria. 3BR/3BA, new paint, carpet, tile.
$1,600/month. 779-2241.

BAYFRONT HOME with beach. City of Anna Maria.
Furnished 3BR/2BA, garage, immaculate. Available
weekly, monthly or annually. 779-2241.


FURNISHED STUDIO APARTMENT in Holmes
Beach. Two blocks from beach. $1,200/month, mini-
mum three months. 779-0041.
SEASON/VACATION 2BR and 3BR, Gulffront apart-
ments, lovely furnished interiors, private beach, patio,
sundeck, porch, no pets. Tropical setting. 778-3143.

We have the Island's most comprehensive real es-
tate section.


GRANNY'S BEACH VACATION Property Manage-
ment: We have vacation rentals available for De-
cember, January, and March. Call Pat Staebler, Li-
censed Real Estate Broker, 778-0123 or 705-0123.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR duplex. Immaculate, fully
furnished, dishwasher, TV, telephone, washer/dryer,
garage, balcony. Three minutes to beach. Weekly,
$350; monthly $1,350-$1,800. November 2002 -
January 2003. 778-6310.
SEASONAL RENTAL 1 BR apartment. 300 steps to
beach, heated pool. $1,150, plus tax, 778-4499.
ANNUAL GROUND-LEVEL duplex in Holmes
Beach. 2BR/1BA, lanai, unfurnished. Steps to
beach. $875/month. Security, first and last. No pets,
non-smoking. 778-7665.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA Holmes Beach ground level-
unit, newer paint, tile and appliances, including
washer/dryer. $775/month. Marina Pointe Realty
Co., 779-0732.
NEW SEASONAL ground-level, canalfront home in
Anna Maria, 2BR/2BA. Available December-May.
One block to beach. $2,600/month. 778-2880.
ANNUAL RENTAL Westbay Cove, at light by Publix.
2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, cable, water/sewer paid.
$1,200/month. Old Florida Realty Co., 778-3377.
2BR/1BA FURNISHED COTTAGE. $1,650/month.
Log onto www.floridabeachcottage.com or cell (863)
447-2577.
A FEW UNITS available for 2003 at Westbay Cove
condo. Turnkey furnished. Season and single
month. Old Florida Realty Co., 778-3377.

SEASONAL RENTALS AVAILABLE Gulffront,
canalfronts and several close to the beach. Prices
range $1,350-$3,400/month. Call Fran Maxon Real
Estate 778-2307 for details.

ANNA MARIA BEACH West of Gulf Boulevard,
3BR/2.5BA. Attractively furnished, eight-years old.
Three-month minimum rental, no pets or children.
110 Maple Ave. Dec. 1 to April 30. $2,850/month,
plus electric. Call (813) 335-3825 for appointment.
SPACIOUS 1BR/1BA, resort-style furnishings, el-
evated duplex. Bradenton Beach/Cortez location.
$900/month with six-month minimum, or $1,200/
month seasonal. 761-2725.
ANNUAL CANALFRONT with 20-foot dock, 2BR/1BA,
spacious rental. Washer/dryer, yard service, trash
pick-up included. $900/month. No pets. 778-5793.
1BR CONDO Annual, unfurnished, all tile, one
block to beach, large pool. Very nice! $750/month.
778-1915.


BRADENTON BEACH CONDO 2BR seasonal, three-
month minimum. Attractively furnished, bay views,
pool, steps to beach. $1,400/month. 794-0763.


THE ISLANDER i NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 37
You'll be glad you called.
1~ YVONNE HIGGINSP.A.
778-7778 or 518-9003
SRBWMlKGulfstream Realty
"I work the Islands & the Inlands"


I./IJVTJi/VG & ELv,,e Ifrf,,a,,h
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 778-3468


S * Custom Painting
-'"*- Wallpaper Hanging
Interior/Exterior Design
Pressure Cleaning
9 Call Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed & Insured


ISLAND LUMBER

ANp HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12



in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome


WACGNEQ REALTY [ \
^.A 22I7 )III I, \ NO.T' I )','MTX N IVACII. "ri "34217 ., ; '
"HA OLD SMALL REALTOR
Office: (941) 778-2246 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.com


EN-JOY CLEANING_
Commercial Residential Vacation Rentals
Call Joy or Laura
25 Years experience
(941) 812-2485 Free Estimates


CARPET CLEANING



,, : 2 :


TILE CLEANING,TOO!
778-2882





:PLU I O P------------- - -


10-BY-20-FOOT secured garage space for rent
near Holmes Beach City Hall. $125/month. Call
725-1222.


---------------------------------------------------------
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DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be paid in advance.
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islander.org I lrdr Fax: 941 778-93921
5404 Marina Drive Phone:941 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 34217 E-mail news@islander.org
L ----------


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
\- Residential % Commercial
%\. Restaurant Mobile Home
\. Condo Assoc. \4W Vac and Intercom
%. Lightning Repair -\ Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978






PAGE 38 E NOV. 27, 2002 U THE ISLANDER



R9E ENTALSCotinuedENTALedREALESTATEC ne


ANNA MARIA ANNUAL rental. 2BR/2BA, spacious,
attractive, half-block to beach, 1,400 sq.ft. 142 Cres-
cent. Mr. Glaser, (813) 839-3800.
ANNUAL 1BR/1BA canalfront suite for rent near
Holmes Beach City Hall. $400/month, plus utilities.
Call 725-1222.

CHARMING FURNISHED 3BR/3BA home, one
house from Gulf with great views of the water. Due
to cancellation available January or February. Dig
your toes in the sand and enjoy Island living. $3,000/
month. Won't last call now! 778-0733.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL 3BR/3BA. Remod-
eled, new to market, 1,150 sq.ft., steps to beach.
$2,500/month. 778-5412 or (585) 473-9361.
HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL. Remodeled, 2BR/2BA
with office. 1,150 sq.ft. Steps to beach. First, last,
security, $950/month. 778-5412 or (585) 473-9361.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA Anna Maria City, lo-
cated on waterway, one short block to beach. $725/
month. Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307.
ANNUAL DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, steps to beach, large deck,
washer/dryer, Holmes Beach. $825/month. 778-0837.
SEASONAL BEAUTIFUL 2BR house on canal in
Holmes Beach. Heated pool, garage, washer/dryer,
etc. Available January and February 2003. $2,600/
month, plus tax. Call (813) 645-0577.
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA home with screened lanai,
deck, washer/dryer. French doors and more. You
have to see it! Annual, $1,150/month, plus all utili-
ties and deposit. Call Lee, 302-0779.
SEASONAL Beautiful North Beach Village, 3BR/
2.5BA, two-car garage, pool, close to beach, very
nice. John Zirzow, Markey Realty, 778-9171 or
753-1620.

Buy it, sell it, find it faster in The Islanderclassifieds.


CHARMING 2BR/1.5BA with washer/dryer, tile
floors, dishwasher and a deck. Small pet OK. An-
nual $845/month, plus all utilities and deposit. Call
Lee, 302-0779.
ST. ARMANDS 2BR/2BA, furnished house, marble
floors, fireplace. One block to Circle, walk to beach.
$2,800/month annually or $3,200/month seasonally.
388-3389.
COZY CLEAN fully furnished, 1BR/1BA, mobile
home across from Gulf. $650/week or $950/month
seasonally. Annual negotiable. Age 55-plus park.
Call 778-1251.
SEASONAL TURNKEY 2BR in Bradenton Beach.
Steps from beach, all condo amenities, ground floor.
Three-months minimum, age 55-plus. Call 756-4345.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND 1-2BR, steps to beach. Fully
furnished, washer/dryer, cable, VCR, phone. Still avail-
able for winter season. $395-$595/week and $1,250-
$1,850/month. 778-1098 or e-mail: 2florida@usa.com.
BRADENTON BEACH on the bay. Ground-level effi-
ciency with dock. Non smoking. $500/month. 228-0822.

HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA upstairs or downstairs
duplex. Porch, washer/dryer, newly renovated. Steps
to beach. $2,300/month, seasonally. 724-0025.


SELLING OR BUYING a house? Need extra space?
Budget Self Storage can help. Daily, weekly, monthly
specials. Boxes and packing supplies. 795-5510.

LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty park-
ing spaces, contemporary design, great visibility.
$14/square foot. Can divide. Owner/Realtor, 388-
5514, or call 809-4253.
ANNA MARIA 4,300-square-foot, multi-use residential/
retail office. 2,200 square-foot elevated, 2,160-square-foot
ground level. Built 1983. $549,900. Offers 761-2457.


HOUSE ON BAY For sale by owner. 3BR/2BA.
$665,000. 526 56th St., Holmes Beach. 232-3665.
TOTALLY RENOVATED 3BR/2BA ground-level
home. One block to Gulf. Must see to appreciate.
For sale by owner. $375,000. Call (813) 300-8543
or (813) 265-3458.
BEAUTIFUL CANALFRONT LOT in prestigious
northern Anna Maria. Direct bay access, no bridges.
Quiet cul-de-sac. 75-by-151-foot lot (11,350 square
feet). 516 Kumquat. For sale by owner, $419,000.
E-mail: OliverZorn@web.de

LEARN TO INVEST in rental properties. No up-front
capital. One day course. Free coaching. L&R Prop-
erties. 779-9549 or 704-7650.
DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, one garage each side. Upper
Holmes Beach, built in 1978. Excellent rental history.
Private owner. $325,000 U.S. currency. 721-3649.

DUPLEX FOR SALE by owner. Call 302-0779 or visit
www.HolmesBeachDuplexForSale.com $359,000.

NORTHWEST STEAL: 2BR/1BA, plus den. New air,
roof and appliances. Large private yard with
sundeck, close to beaches and river. 4415 First Ave.
Drive N.W. $124,900.

UPDATED 3BR/2BA ground-level Holmes Beach
home. Workshop, excellent landscaping, three blocks
to Gulf. For sale by owner. $349,900. Call 778-1489.
PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA condo, immaculate,
split design, bay/lake views, fully turnkey furnished.
$220,000. Call 761-1557.

DUPLEX: Just 300 feet to Gulf. 2BR/1 BA and 3BR/
2BA, tile, newer roof and appliances. 205 69th St.,
Holmes Beach. Agents welcome, 778-3173.
ISLAND LIVING YOU CAN AFFORD! Turnkey fur-
nished 1 BR/1 BA mobile home.1Higntceiing-ia-i.ng
room, eat-in kitchen. Large outdoor shed. Peek of
Gulf, steps to beach. Located in Sandpiper Mobile
Resort (senior park). (905) 623-0881.


Real Estate ,a

REALTORS


HAWTHORN PARK -
NORTHWEST BRADENTON
NORTH T BRAD N WEST OF GULF DRIVE Luxury Island
4BR/2.5BA, 2 story pool home retreat with Gulf views. Top of the line
with many deluxe features. Dual throughout, exquisitely turnkey furnished.
fireplace, eat-in kitchen, family One large master suite, sitting room or li-
room, all appliances, lots of brary and two baths. Oversized two-car
storage. Immediate possession. garage, two screened lanais, open deck.
$349,000. Over 1,770 sf. of living area. $650,000
1, Carol R. Williams, Broker/Realtor, 744-0700 720-7761
E-mail: callcarol@juno.com






-.:Igg


UPDATED 3BR/2BA turnkey furnished Is- WESTBAY POINT AND MOORINGS
land home. Great canal view, boat slip, lush 3BR/2BA first floor, end unit with deeded
and private backyard. Won't last! $349,000. covered parking. Pool, hot tub, tennis and
Call Nicole Skaggs or Jane Grossman at 26 acres of tropical splendor. Don't miss
778-4800 or 795-5704. this one! $350,000. Call Dick Maher or
Dave Jones at 778-4800.
r 1


I IHUIIAL MUHILUNS Large 2MH condo
in choice Holmes Beach area. Walk to
shopping and restaurants. Very close to
the beach with some Gulf views. Rooftop
sundeck. $399,900. Call Denny Rauschl at
778-4800, 705-4800.


--, ) ., ,-.1.;.
I .



MOST REASONABLE PRICED TOWNHOUSE
at Sunbow! Roomy Island condo close to
beach and shopping. 2BR/2BA on main level
and hobby room/bedroom/den and one bath
downstairs. Quiet, well maintained complex
with two pools and tennis. $299,000. Call Ed
Oliveira at 778-4800 or 705-4800.


Single-family homes from
n the $190s, including homesites.
: Island lifestyle with off-Island convenience!

W ATCH Just a five-minute ride to the beach!

5 Different Floor Plans
All open & spacious,..
<'i 3BR/2BA & 4BR/2BA
OPEN DAILY 12-5 PM
Directions: Cortez Road to
L --.. .P..P 86th St. W., turn south on
S86th St. W. Entrance to Heron's
Watch is 1/2 mile on the right.

d. HOMESITES. ONLY 8 LEFT!
uali For inform on call 77-7127
For information call 778-7127







THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 27, 2002 0 PAGE 39


By Richard and

Across
1 Writer Morrison and
others
6 Scads
10 Parts of some pins
15 Not out
19 Like Bo-Peep's charges
20 Animal that may charge
21 Kind of order
22 Central point
23 Biloxi to Galveston,
e.g.?
25 Manic cabbie's sign?
27 Dish that often has a
filling
28 Parts of an athletic
schedule
30 Ampules
31 Hubbubs
32 Epilogues
33 Mars, e.g.
34 Play to a C-Span
camera
37 Less ruddy
38 Unwelcome snorer
42 Slipper
43 Result of Sammy Sosa
wearing a tight shoe?
46 D.O.T. org.
47 Pitying cry
48 Runs a tab
49 Bridge position
50 Places of withdrawal
51 Old what's- -name
52 Novitiate?
56 Kind of sole
57 Where sleeves come
from
59 Sits on a windowsill,
say
60 Capture
61 Emulated a dove
62 Gives wide berth to
63 Hungarian-born
financier/ philanthropist
64 "Cheers" name


U- TURN
judith Martin / Edited by Will Shortz


66 1948 event dubbed
"Operation Sand-
stone"
67 A bit
70 Life-threatening
71 Young New England
terriers?
73 Dos preceder
74 Birds of the Arabian
Nights
75 Meager
77 What's more
78 Start to morph?
79 Rub the wrong way
80 1990's soaring asset
values?
84 "Laugh-In" segment
85 Settle securely
87 Come by
88 "Garden of Earthly
Delights" painter
89 "That's !"
90 1960's-70's C.I.A.
chief
91 Launch
93 "The Hobbit" locales
96 Trunk
97 Deluges
101 Stallion?
103 "The Hunt for Red
October" and others?
105 Imperial or Blue
Bonnet
106 Stage directions
107 Neighbor of Armenia
108 CBer's number
109 Like some floors
110 Nightstick?
111 Old-fashioned letter
opener
112 Hustles


Down
Not for here
Breakfast item in old
Rome?


3 Where young Moses
was found
4 Exaggerates
5 Be a union buster?
6 Touches
7 Old stories
8 The U.S. and Can. are
in it
9 Relative of vibrato
10 Renoirs, Botticellis, etc.
11 Lummoxes
12 Myrmecologist's study
13 Computer file suffix
14 Eyeball
15 The Protestant
Reformation, e.g.
16 Greek nymph with a
musical-sounding name
17 Prepare for storage, as
papyrus
18 Ones who may not be
on speaking terms
24 Ear: Prefix
26 Curve on the surface of
a sphere
29 Land west of Nod
32 "Thou make me
clean" (leper's words to
Jesus)
33 E.R. figures
34 City across the river
from Council Bluffs
35 Monarch, for one
36 Sounds heard when a
fox enters a henhouse?
37 Fourth estate
38 Parents
39 When you might hear
"gee whiz"?
40 Home of Busch
Gardens
41 Art prop
43 Grand
44 Had
45 Items of dressy attire
50 Pointer


52 Who "ever loved you
more than I," in song
53 Heart afflictions
54 Get up
55 Scout rider
56 Nuclei
58 Relatives of raspber-
ries
60 Sane, briefly
62 Rush
63 Lush
64 Poe's "The Mystery of
Roget"
65 Some kind of a nut
66 Dwelling
67 Champagne container


68 Buffoonish
69 Baby_
72 Nose part
75 Spanker, e.g.
76 Popular story start
78 Incomprehensible
80 House speaker before
Gingrich
81 High point
82 Wire units
83 Learning method
86 Container for
acid
88 Tycoons
90 Letterman, Leno, etc.
91 Cable managers, for


short
92 Table scrap
93 It's just a little out of
place
94 Outdoor party entertain-
ment
95 Wild goat
96 The Stooges, e.g.
97 Slopes lift
98 Craft of 1492
99 Swarm
100 Old political divs.
102 Tic-tac-toe loser
104 Mentalist Geller

Answers on page 36.


Want to keen in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941-778-7978 or visit islander.org online!


......|.' .V^ T .. .-'- . -



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BAYOU ESTATES Quel prn.ail cuI- .: '.
Ire- an., ,:ijr, 11 a in |r,- po.:. ,pular Erij.-
,",Ilh ari r .;..- l r ,-", h plan i- ur, I,,::1l,-, ,- ; mr.,1

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HOLMES BEACH Mar..rloius pporiunll, i,, te
SO CIC,e 10 IhP i e3:ch 3BR 2A .'o lirel.ac-...
newer klichEn and launor-,' ,nsijd Ro,.nm i:,r a
p:.'ool jl314.1'0i 0 rLS#868l,5 C rol Tu-I.,: r
78.-2261


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ANNA MARIA CITY 4BR -BA ,1u j -r r ,,ir, i1 -.
i' Be ,:s tI,:,-.'c 4t.1ak i:, I .c n ipr. nmI h73i r
.1an, pp.:.runii,, In: ',,: AL.. 'i ,,- 1h r,'i,r i.- i .
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-. r'L;,8M "I :'. L.aura r.l,:,je r., "" ..c :.i


----77-^




..... ....

SMUGGLER S LANDING B-.auiIu, r,.,:,
.i "''il. ;: .'(d). r I -ir i dI ,:,,'. ,cn ,e e l'. ;r
," ai"51 i.l [ r.-:' vl,:r,:rr mir, ',,,r'n rl .rJ j-i 1 .

~'*'j~9'.90I .L ti 4; 14 P- F -rr L D i .-a 1.


COVE SOUND YACHT CLUB Tr,,: i.E i e.-u t.r,i.
r-,mnie Th 3 .a .. nn .r.. ',:.-l.:.r, .nlrar,,:- 3BR in,:hj:lu.
inrr.: j rei rr y, rnl .s_- r _:url rt ,' R -,jliI-r] i.1 ,Ir,
De'-r.p .atier '.,c- n,.:.unjrd :,p 3 ar lu ur, v -_..-:
,835.100' r.L5L86t8, ti ri:,reenRoberl'ns 778--..c











WESTFIELD C.'.-r,,,: e.-r,In-,'i L r-.-
IoI .: er c,[ ,r i.:,. :.r p.",,i -EH r n,:.ie ,iiir up
,tra.1 o lk i r,- rii -i L.3 at rh 1e,-'3 1ul l rr.1 ,,-,,


ANNA MARIA ISLAND
3614 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach Next to Publix


I ---,- ,. -., ..


WEST BRADENTON e.--l.-,,e 3BR 2.."
:,ia m ,,ri Up:r .3 F ,lr I .. ,r-,n t.r ar.3,i n rr,.:,r, .V'3rr,
. '.,' : .I: -:,r iuQ : ETlu i ,i- T I j._jir i ii..-r,' jr
L -r. l r..:?.] a r.3 r r,:,,, :,r ] r a p .:,,:,I .' 1 ; .:
1L B." ;.,6 L -ur, r. ,:,:-,,. ar, -- ._ l


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ISLAND VILLAGE Trii, iurn,.-, ,urnin.riEjd i:ird
,:,.r,:,, i: 1.,:;il d a.:- r,:, irron ire [ .t _.' zr,.,ri
1. i, i ". ,-,ippn,.:: I.l-,rei lran 1 3i'ji I Lupt -n j .,
.in elI.-llmRin. ai ri3 urnil n: 1.21"'-i1,IJ
.iL38.3376 IL,- e 'S:,,rhn,,rr 7 6- i2.,


SUNBOW BAY .i- . Ier..leni 4. r- ir..,:,1 la
'1.:..:'r i r-,, ir iri;,: tr.%l ',,ri. ,r ', .ER ',B I-
11- il: n :, 1 -1 ,, ,:, .:,. T ,',:, l,:,,:l. I,, lin l




OFFICE
*778-2261 1-800-422-6325


)AT KEY 6t-aufjul ,ireci Gulf b.iew s
Ihir, II,:,,:,r 1 -r. : .1 ,.v-il mr n in ineae
- I -l,:,r ,,: ,r,.. ri | I nir e R i r i l
r, ,-1 ni I :-C.D I,,-d '1 71 1






























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PAGE 40 E NOV. 27, 2002 M THE ISLANDER



53 YEARS OF DISTINCTIVE ISLAND SERVICE

3224 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach
SSales: 941-778-0700
Rentals: 778-6665
7 Toll Free: 1-800-749-6665
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


-, L i S -*-. NIPANY


h-Wi;hpy T; -#a giving!

jqiYh~;-C you a bountiful year.


* f 4 wilt' t+w+d {I+ho+rPhit4:,4.M t "
2 2.- ., .' ",
Law do;;k Ibel


BREATHTAKING GULFVIEWS Totally up-
dated, perfectly decorated, ground-floor unit.
One of the most desirable complexes on the
Gulf. Turnkey furnished. Gourmet kitchen. Two
pools. Shows like a model. Must see, won't last
long. Marc Turner, 778-0700.


ISLAND BARGAIN Large 1BR condo in Gulf
to bay complex. Peaks of the bay from lanai.
Enjoy the heated pool, clubhouse, fishing pier
and private beach. $140,000. Gail Tutewiler,
778-0700.


SAN REMO CANALFRONT 3BR/2BA home,
private dock, pool, two-car garage, bay view.
$450,000. Larry Smith, 778-0700.


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE Can't decide if you
want a house or condo? This is it! Rarely avail-
able 3BR/2.5BA townhouse with two-car ga-
rage. Low maintenance fee for cable TV, lawn
care, pool, etc. New hardwood floors and carpet.
Large screened porch. Close to beach. You'll
love it! $415,000. Gail Tutewiler, 778-0700.


ISLAND VILLAGE TREASURE Spacious end
unit updated with European designer touches.
2BR/2BA offers huge master suite, open living
areas. Terrace with private spiral staircase to
pool and bay views. Short walk to everything.
$299,900 Tina Rudek or Mike Migone
383-5543
p vA7


WHITNEY BEACH Gorgeous views of Bishops
Bayou from this rarely available, second-floor
1 BR Whitney Beach condo. This unit has never
been rented. Walk to the area's most pristine
beach. $219,000 Gary and Cindy LaFlamme
383-5543.


--
F-.~.


VILLAGE GREEN CONDO Beauti-
fully updated 2BR/2BA, two-garage
in Village Green condo. Tile through-
out. Sunny Florida room overlooks
lush greenbelt and pool. Bonus office
off kitchen. Light, bright and very
clean. Mike Faber 778-0700


SUNBOW BAY BEAUTY! Wonderful
views down the lagoon to the
Intracoastal from this beautiful 2BR/
2BA condo. Totally renovated from top
to bottom! Nothing else like it!
$274,500. Gail Tuteweiler 778-0700


SHAWS POINT Traditional brick colo-
nial, 4BR/2.5BA. Plenty of privacy and
room for pool. Wood floors and shut-
ters, custom built-ins, French doors.
Great for family home! $259,900. Tina
Rudek or Mike Migone, 778-0700.


CONDO SWEET CONDO! 2BR/2BA
creampuff! Updated, poolside, with all
new windows, tile and Berber carpet.
Turnkey furnished. $135,000. Marc
Turner and Geoff Wall 778-0700











CHARMING VILLA IN BOATING
COUNTRY Tastefully remodeled and
decorated 2BR/2BA condo. Deeded
boat access and protected sail boat
docks. Enchanting water views from
the large lanai. $299,000. John Hines,
383-5543.



-
:4 .' .;- .





ADORABLE TANGELO PARK Beau-
tifully landscaped, 2BR 1BA, living and
family room, garage converted to third
bedroom. Nice back porch. $112,900
Marie Franklin- Paulins 778-0700


BAYFRONT CONDO Rare direct upstairs GINGERBREAD FAMILY HOME Nestled on
bayfront condo at Imperial House of Bradenton huge double lot. Cape Cod wood shingles, open
Beach. 2BR/2BA end unit, updated kitchen, fireplace. 3BR/2BA, plus separate guest house.
Social clubhouse, heated pool, fishing pier, Savvy investor or family compound. $1h5,000
bayside patio and private beach. 55+ commu- Geoff Wall, 778-0700.
nity. Gail Tutewiler, 778-0700


WORK PULLS OWNER FROM
DREAM HOUSE Renovated from top to
bottom: tile floor, crown molding, central
vac. and new appliances. Tropical set-
ting accents 40-ft. lap pool with turbo
cleaner. $269,000. Tim Strzelczyk or
Maria Schmandt, 383-5544.


ATTENTION'INVESTORS! 3BR/2BA,
ranch beauty. Great location and
schools. New tile! 8-ft. privacy fence
with room for a pool. What a steal!
$120,900. Marie Franklin-Paulins,
778-0700.


LARGE HOLMES BEACH home.
2,800 sq.ft., 4-5BR/2.5BA, two blocks
to the beach, boat slip available.
$439,000 with $6,000 allowance for
paint/decorating. Gail Tutewiler,
778-0700.


PANORAMIC BAY VIEW 2BR/2BA, gorgeous
upstairs unit, one block to beach. Available
weekly, monthly for season! Call today to re-
serve. Debbie Trasher, 778-6665


IMPERIAL HOUSE Steps to beach! 2BR/1BA.
Heated pool, nicely furnished. Annual or sea-
sonal rental. Debbie Trasher, 778-6665


OLD FLORIDA Gulffont home, 3BR/2BA,front
porch overlooking gorgeous Gulf of Mexico,
great for large family. Weekly/monthly. Debbie
Trasher, 778-6665


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PET SUPPLY AND GROOMING BUSI-
NESS Super Bradenton location, large clien-
tele, inventory included. Be your own boss!
$30,000. Great opportunity. Marie Franklin-
Paulins, 778-0700.
SEVEN UNITS ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Two pools and private spa. Rent daily,
weekly or monthly. Steps to the beach.
$900,000. Gross over $140,000. Jim Fos-
ter, 383-5543.
SIX-UNIT OFFICE COMPLEX
West Manatee Ave. corner. Long- term ten-
ants, owner motivated. $69,000 NO I, Asking
$725,000. Jim Foster, 383-5543.


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Please make a wi


It's the holiday time of year -
time to take an extra moment to give
someone a smile or send a greeting
... pause to give a quiet hug or words
of praise.
; The holidays are special for
S ? friends, family and Islanders.
A, -- In our 10th annual Islander
Wish Book, we take a moment to
present stories and pictures about
organizations in our community
that deserve special consideration.
These community service organizations are dedicated to
providing assistance to families and individuals, teaching
and mentoring our children, helping the elderly and less
fortunate, all with the goal of making Anna Maria Island a


better place to live for everyone.
With The Islander Wish Book, organizations offer a special
way for you to share the holiday spirit. We've included a list
of needs wishes from each one. Your donation, how-
ever small or grand, will be deeply appreciated.
Please take a moment to select a gift from these lists to
add to your holiday shopping list.
It's The Islander's way of saying thanks for the support
we've received for the past 10 years and a chance for all of us
to give something back to our community. A small contribu-
tion can make a big difference.
We offer a special thanks to the sponsor advertisers for
making this project possible.
We hope you receive the same return as we have each
year from the Islander Wish Book ... the joy of giving.
Happy holidays and best wishes for 2003!


Ai MEaria


A VERY SPECIAL SECTION NOV. 27, 2002


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10th/AvArwua l ILaL er Wih Book- 2B-2


Island Middle


School
he Island Middle School opened its doors
at the Island Baptist Church in Anna
Maria Aug.13, 2001. Currently in its
second year, the school has more than 90 sixth-,
seventh- and eighth-graders.
A charter school is a public school run by a
not for profit corporation under contract with a
sponsor, usually the local school board. The
Island school is operated by Island Middle
School Inc. and has a board of directors and an
approved three-year contract with the Manatee
County School Board.
The mission statement for IMS is to create a
unique educational opportunity that fosters and
encourages a "zest for learning that transcends
a lifetime," and to encourage students to de-
velop their personal attributes and relationships
in order to become leaders in our community.
According to the school philosophy, students
will be encouraged to pursue individual areas of
interest in order to develop higher-level thinking
skills and the real-life application of these skills.
IMS aims to infuse the arts as well as science
and technology into its curriculum to foster the
inigriih"'oh' aid 'creativity of its students, states
the school purpose.
IMS uses the Mosaic Curriculum utilized by
all Manatee County public middle schools as a
guide and reference, and its core academic
courses meet the same requirements as those
throughout the district.
This year IMS will be offering elective
classes in addition to its core curriculum, which
include home economics, Spanish, art and
marine-and-environmental studies.
The Islander wish list for the Island Middle
School is:
Six 27-inch wall-mounted televisions.
Six video cassette recorders.
Video camera and tripod.
Portable compact disk and cassette tape
player.
Art prints of famous paintings.
Subscriptions to Time and Newsweek
magazines (student versions, if possible).
Volunteer art instructors.
Financial support for the facilities fund.
Philanthropist to underwrite the music
program.
Volunteer grant writer.
12 lighted microscopes with slides and
slide covers.
Laptops for teachers.
Old/broken colored tiles or colored glass
for mosaics.
Tennis rackets and softball gloves.
Coat rack.
Science and social studies related articles
from magazines.
Small personal tape recorders to be used
for student projects.
Audio tapes.
35mm film and cameras.
Blank video tapes.
Contact the Island Middle School at 778-5200.



Jim, Amixon 1In ra 1


1 '( ,
e n i::


778-2253


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II -4 P m. .- FingmUrerw r..a U.;.. a ammiu a.
Peace prevails year 'round at Anna Maria Elementary School. Last year's peace pole dedication was her-
aided again this year at a special assembly for the community. Students raised their voices in song and
showed their enthusiasm for peace at a special ceremony commemorating 9/11.



Anna Maria Elementary School


.A nna Maria Elementary School is the
S educational home of 300 students in
S. kindergarten through fifth-grade,
serving families from north Longboat Key to
Anna Maria City.
Adult involvement is a key element to the
school's success. At any hour, you'll find par-
ents and volunteers from the community on
campus involved in the learning process.
Islanders who are unable to volunteer on
campus and want to help can do so by provid-
ing needed "extras" to make something great
even better.
The Islander wish list for Anna Maria El-
ementary School is:
Markers, colored pencils.
Red pens.
Rulers.
Scissors.
Yarn, ribbons, glitter and buttons.


Small paint brushes.
Construction paper.
Classroom set of calculators for fifth-grades.
Portable cassette tape and compact disc
player.
Potting soil, a small garden sprinkler, and
trellis material for the student garden.
Wall paper books.
Seeds.
20 six-inch clay pots.
Small plastic butter containers with lids.
Games for children 5 to 7 years old.
Picnic table with attached benches.
Stacking bins to hold paper.
Stuffed animals or beanie babies.
Kick balls.
Magnets.
Youth golf equipment, or money to pur-
chase.
Contact: Anna Maria Elementary School at 708-
5525.


Anna Maria Island Community Center


T he Center, located in Anna Maria City, is
one of the most revered institutions on
the Island, serving all ages from all parts
of the Island and beyond.
It has cultural, educational, recreational and
social programs, and figures that last year its
staff and 300 volunteers provided nearly two
million hours of service. Its programs start for
pre-schoolers and go on through teens, young
adults, adults and seniors.
The Center's wish list for 2002:
6'x4' Bulletin board on a stand.
Electric pencil sharpener.


Two holster-style tool belts.
Office furniture.
Previously owned computers & printers to
be refurbished for needy children and their
families.
Office chair.
Two headsets for multi-line phone system.
Vacuum cleaner.
Rotor-tiller.
Desk organizers.
White and color paper
Character-building books and reading
materials for children ages 5 to 11.
Donations to the AMICC Endowment


* Trust.


Please offer your special thanks to the sponsors
of the annual Wish Book our advertisers!


9


Holidays are the
time for giving.
Hope to see you soon!


Shipping to all 50 states available Closed Sundays
7200 Cortez Rd W, Bradenton 761-1500 800 761-1771


Donations to the AMICC Building Fund.
Volunteers to work with children with
special needs in the after school program.
Volunteers to help with our Tour of
Homes, "An Affaire to Remember" Auction,
Family Fun Festival and other fundraisers.
Contact: Sandee Pruett, 778-1908.


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\oje// Ccnst'> 3 *oA" L'' 3'jiouign

I wI;;g < everyone a safe
4 fl and harp;-,. holiday. season!

-'crEG OBERHOFER President
*u 5500 Manna Dr. t Holncl Beach
-776-7127 720-C ucc


PAGE 2 E Nov. 27, 2002 TRheIabdwer


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10thA vAr Iwu aslcwIder LWiaBook 2002


Island


Players

r e Island Players, with its theater at
the corner of Gulf Drive and Pine
SAvenue in Anna Maria, is now in its
54th season. This charming playhouse seats
137 theatergoers at five productions and
more than 100 performances each year.
The building has been remodeled several
times since the original small house was
barged over from the mainland many years
ago to serve as an office for the developers of
Anna Maria. During the ensuing years, it has
been a city hall, community center, women's
club, and a church and garden club, before it
became a community theater, with the first
production in 1948.
Immediately following the summer 2003
Shakespeare production, the theater will be
replacing old seats and carpeting with new.
A limited opportunity to have your
name placed on the seat for a donation of
$125 is being offered, and what better
holiday present for a friend or a memorial.
Two names on one seat: $150.
Island Players annual pecan sale is
officially ongoing the arrival this week of
holiday-packaged pecans for $6.95, or
chocolate covered pecans for $7.95 from The
Islander newspaper office and from Helen
White at SunCoast Real Estate, both in the
Island Shopping Center in Holmes Beach.
They make perfect holiday hostess gifts,
White reminds us.
A participating board of directors gov-
erns the Island Players. Members include
actors, directors, set designers, production
workers, costume designers and ushers.
Shows are directed by a rotating group of
guest directors. The theater is supported by
-local subscribers, supporters such as the Off
Stage Ladies, ticket sales and grants.
The Islander wish list of the Island Players
is:
Donations for new carpeting and
renovation materials.
Shop tools.
Office equipment.
Donations for lighting and sound
equipment upgrades.
Contact: President Alice Doeden, 778-8462.


Friends of the Library
F friends of the Island Branch Library is a
volunteer organization that lends addi
tional support to the branch by purchas-
ing books and equipment and sponsoring
educational programs for adults and children.
Membership fees start at $5.
The Friends of the Island Branch Library
sponsor an annual program series in the winter
season on the second Tuesday of every month
at 3 p.m. in the Walker-Swift meeting room. A
schedule of dates and programs is available at
the library. The group also holds an annual
book sale.
The Islander wish list of the Friends of the
Island Branch Library is:
A collapsible wheelchair to give library
patrons better access and more convenience in
using library services.
Contact: Joe Bracken, 778-4012.



Ja i:. 'v holiday season!




941-77b .7LtO0 or *'il-.;-.15-930

www.WedebrockRealEstate.com


The Ia lndsw -r a Nov. 27, 2002 U PAGE 3


Anna Maria Island Privateers


uIhc Anna Maria Island Privateers was
Established as a nonprofit organization in
1971 by a group of Island men interested
in supporting Island youth programs. Its goals
are to promote activities for the betterment of
youth and to render altruistic services to the
community.
Funds raised through the Privateers' special
events, thieves' markets and mullet smokes,
support youth programs at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, the Cortez Commu-
nity Center, the Rubonia Youth Center, the
Privateers' scholarship fund and various other
community needs.
The Privateers have sponsored both a
Christmas and Fourth of July parade and the


" ." .


Snook Adams Kids Day at the end of the school
year for many years.
The Islander wish list for the Anna Maria
Island Privateers is:
Lots and lots of strands of Christmas
lights and decorations for the float/boat.
Donations to purchase toys for the 700-
plus children who will attend the annual Priva-
teers Holiday Parade and Santa Toy Giveaway
at Coquina Park on Dec. 7.
Parade participants.
Vendors for food, drink, arts and crafts,
for the new Island of Paradise Festival, Jan. 11
and 12, 2003.
Contact: President Greg "Shiprek" Davidson,
747-4953.


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Helen White and
Mary Ann
Schmidt are "nuts
for Island Play-
ers." White
sponsors a
fundraiser for the
theater group
annually, selling
fresh-picked
pecans and
chocolate-covered
pecans in holiday
wrappers. The
nuts are available
from White and
q Slnl oidna.
SSunCoast, Real,;
Estate and at
The Islander
newspaper office,
both in the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


Tingley Memorial Library


T ingley Memorial Library operates on the
interest received from the Beulah Tingley
bequeath. The library, at 111 Second St.,
Bradenton Beach, does not receive any local,
county, state, or federal funds.
The Islander wish list for Tingley Memorial
Library includes:
Subscriptions to the Wall Street Journal or
Investor's Business Daily, or subscriptions to


magazines of popular interest.
Audio cassette books.
Video's for children and adults. '
.- ,- ', .. v "\ V
Late model, good condition used books.
Monetary donations are always welcome
as are profits from yard sales, bequeaths, or
memorial donations.
Gifts of time in the form of volunteering.
Contact: Linda Murphy, library clerk, 779-1208.


West Manatee Fire & Rescue volunteers


West Manatee Fire & Rescue District
volunteers assist the district's profes
sional firefighters. The district serves
the Island communities and northwestern
Bradenton and Cortez.
West Manatee Fire & Rescue District now
has three stations manned 24 hours a day with
28 career firefighters/emergency medical
technicians. There are 11 professionals on each
shift.
The district volunteers own and operate a
fourth fire station in Bradenton Beach. They
raise money through annual fund drives,
pancake breakfasts, donations and a Halloween
haunted house.

I Wishing you a safe .endoy1ti .. ;I seas,,on
S iled with : .',-c r send and t-ue ies.

UO .....


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WMFR volunteers never solicit donations
over the phone and want Islanders to know that
if they get a call asking for donations, it doesn't
come from them.
The Islander wish list of the West Manatee
Fire & Rescue volunteers is:
Labor and materials for new entryway
doors.
Labor and materials for new overhead bay
doors.
Contractor and materials for new air
conditioning ducts.
Cable ready television for kid's room.
Contact: Rhoda Paloski, West Manatee Fire &
Rescue volunteers, 708-6233.



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PAGE 4 I Nov. 27, 2002 E Tihew'Iaxdvuer


All Island


. Denominations
formed by and for all seven churches on
Anna Maria Island, All Island Denomina
tions acts as a clearinghouse to help needy
Islanders with rent, food, fuel, utilities and the
like; distributes food packages at Thanksgiving,
Christmas and Easter; and provides scholarship
help for worthy students.
Acting through pastors or directly with
individuals and families, AID is "the first resort
for help" until other agencies take over.
AID's main wish for 2002:
To assure that everyone who needs to be fed,
gets fed. And that is best served with donations.
Contact: Gladys Martineau, president, 778-4808.


Roser Church

Men's Club
The purpose of the Roser Men's Club of
Roser Community Memorial Church is to
seek the Christian way of life and to bear
witness to it in business dealings and social
contacts. Members do not have to belong to the
church.
Proceeds from the group's two annual pan-
cake brunches are used to support a variety of
activities and organizations, including summer
camp scholarships, church needs and community
organizations such as the Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary, Southeast Guide Dogs, Sheriff's Youth
Ranch, Salvation Army, Loving Hands Ministry,
Jim Russo Prison Ministry and All Island Youth.
Roser Men's Club meets at noon on the third
Tuesday of the month from October to April.
Luncheon is served and guest speakers talk on a
variety of subjects. All men of the Island com-
munity and guests arem invitd.
The wish list of the Roser Men's Club is:
More participation from men living on the
Island.
Non-perishable food items to feed needy
families.
Pots and pans for kitchen use.
Contact: President Robert Meyland, 778-1866.

Harvey Community

Church Choir
The musical aggregation at the longtime
church in Bradenton Beach is gearing up for
its busy winter season, with Betty Simches
as choir director and organist. Its membership
varies from Sunday to Sunday and it grows
during the season, but not fast enough or far
enough to suit Simches.
The church at 300 Church St. is in good
condition and so is its congregation, said the
Rev. Bill Grossman, pastor.
As for the choir, its wish for 2002:
More voices of every kind, to form a
bigger and better choir.
Contact: Betty Simches, 778-2192.
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rom a modest beginning when Willem
Bartlesman walked from door to door 10
years ago seeking musical Islanders, this
organization has matured to a first-class concert
ensemble unique in the area.
It is truly an integrated orchestra/chorus,
the only one around here, with the two ele-
ments practicing separately, then coming
together to rehearse as one and finally to bring
the Island an accomplished and gratifying
concert. It presents those concerts once a month


S"CABINETSUnlimrited
Visit our showroom --

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10thv AnrLad Ista+ider WidhB3oo-k,2002
Paul Todd's concert
Last October thrilled
the audience and
S filled the St. Bernard
Catholic Church
sanctuary with
contemporary
Christian music,
favorite hymns and
show-stopping
Broadway, pop and
original tunes. The
two-plus hour
concert Sunday
Afternoon endeared
Todd to his audience
and left them
R- applauding for more
more of his
beautiful, smooth
vocals and amazing
keyboard talent.
Todd is music
director of St. John
the Evangelist
-,I Catholic Parish in
.I Naples and a resi-
_. dent of Cape Coral.


L~. -


All Island Youth


T his is a ministry of two churches, Gloria
Dei Lutheran and Roser Memorial Com
munity. It is made up of Christian youths
who explore issues of life that affect them
particularly, from parents to drugs.
A special and very popular activity is the
"cookie ministry" through which young members
visit homes, sing with guitars, discuss faith and
pray together with the residents. When they walk


in the door, they offer their hosts cookies and
flowering plants. Both the youngsters and their
older hosts learn from each other, said a member.
There are many other activities, including
sports. Thus the organization's Islander wish for
2002:
Volleyballs and some volleyball standards
for the nets.
Contact: The Rev. Danith Kilts, 778-1813.


Women's Guild of St. Bernard


ck St. Bernard Catholic Church Women's
Guild is an organization that adheres to
Catholic principles. The group meets at
12:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month in
Welsmiller Hall at the church for light refresh-
ments followed by a business meeting and
program. New members are welcome.
The Guild raises funds with its annual
Poinsettia Bazaar and with community dinners.
Funds are donated to the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, Hospice of Southwest
Florida, Habitat for Humanity, SOLVE, Mother
Teresa and former pastor Father Welsmiller's
orphanage in Colima, Mexico.


The Islander wish list of the St. Bernard
Women's Guild is:
A flag stand to hold the Guild banner.
Plastic tablecloths in white or neutral
colors.
A 100-cup coffee pot.
Stuffed animals for kids of all ages, toys
for babies, and toys and books for kids ages 5
and under.
Cash donations.
Food items.
Volunteers.
Contact: Marilyn Van Winkle, president, 778-
7865.


during the winter season, the next one coming
Dec. 15.
The concerts are Sundays at Island Baptist
Church after rehearsals Saturdays at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church.
The orchestra/chorus wishes for 2002:
Musicians of all ages and persuasions who
will contribute as part of a group rather than in
front of a mirror.
Singers in every range.
Contact: Joe Bracken, 778-4012.


Anna Maria Island Community

Orchestra and Chorus





10 th A Y*wU tl/ land.-er W ivh/ B ook 2002

Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch


7heIsla1 der 9 Nov. 27, 2002 M PAGE 5


Wildlife


The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch is a
nonprofit organization with a goal to
protect and preserve the sea turtles
nesting on Anna Maria Island's beaches.
The group is in service the year around, but is
very active during the May-to-October sea turtle
nesting season. Then volunteers walk the beaches
in the very early morning to locate turtle nests and
keep a sharp eye on the nests through the incuba-
tion period. Volunteers frequently await the
hatching to assure that the tiny hatchlings aren't
lured from the beach to stray into. traffic and
become endangered by man-made obstacles on


their way to the Gulf of Mexico.
The Islander wish list for Anna Maria Island
Turtle Watch is:
Boxes of surgical gloves.
New or used metal detector.
Someone to build and paint stakes.
Reams of white copy paper.
Yellow road-striping paint.
White spray paint.
Large black permanent-ink markers.
Rolls of brightly colored ribbon to mark
nests.
Contact: Suzi Fox, 778-5638.


More than 100 volunteers help protect sea turtles like this little loggerhead on Anna Maria Island.



Anna Maria Island Butterfly Park


This is a newly established park that
remains a work in progress just south of
the Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina
Drive. Part of its walkways are of "personalized
bricks," specially made and engraved at $40 and
$50 per brick, depending on inscriptions, and
the final order for the bricks is going in soon.
New among the butterfly-attracting shrubbery
are a butterfly "puddling" area where they can


drink, a people's drinking fountain, arbor, trash
receptacles, butterfly chairs, plant signs and art.
The garden's wishes for 2002:
Orders for personalized bricks.
Weeders, volunteers to battle the un-
wanted plants.
Landscape company to work a couple of
times a month.
Contact: Nancy Ambrose, 778-5274.


Save-the Manatee Club


S ave the Manatee Club Inc. is a nonprofit
organization founded in 1981. Its Adopt-
A-Manatee program is its primary funding
source, with proceeds dedicated to manatee
awareness projects, education programs, re-
search and rehabilitation efforts, as well as
lobbying for the protection of the manatee and
its habitat.
To help the Save the Manatee Club continue
its work to protect the manatee and their habi-
tat, the club's Islander wish list includes:
Computers, monitors, laptop computers,
scanner, slide scanner, mouse pads, wrist pads
and other computer accessories.
Bookshelves.
Brochure holder.
Laser printer.

"Wishing you and your
Se,' ,i ey best holli . i

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IF. IF.


Office chairs, file cabinets.
Work table.
Desk-top copy machine.
Cork boards.
Gift certificate to Office Depot or
highlighters, pens, pencils, computer discs, paper
clips, binders, tape, post-its, stamp pads, staples,
white out, adding matching and tape, copy paper,
colored copy paper, rubber bands, red and black
markers, manila envelopes, business envelopes,
padded mailing envelopes, binder clips, hanging
file folders, chair pads, rulers, ink cartridges,
Rolodex, letter openers and garbage cans.
Contact: Nancy Sadusky, Save the Manatee
Club, Inc., 500 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL
32751, 1-800-432-5646, or visit the Web site at
www.savethemanatee.org.



Happy holidays to one and all from Chef Damon and staff


/A EUROPEAN
BISTRO



5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-5320


Education and


Rehabilitation


Center
T he Wildlife Education and Rehabilita
tion Center Inc. began in 1986 with
the aid to an injured duck. Today, the
Bradenton Beach-based organization
spends more than $30,000 or more a year to
feed, house and provide medical care for
injured animals and birds. They respond to
more than 4,000 rescue calls a year. The
organization also provides educational
presentations for schools and other groups.
Over the years, the center has aided
white-tail deer, otters and bobcats, as well
as just about every kind of sea bird, song
bird and bird of prey. Less exotic creatures
such as owls, kestrels, hawks, squirrels,
raccoons, ducks and loons have also been
assisted.
The Islander wish list of the center in-
cludes:
Paper towels.
Bleach.
Produce.
Dog and cat food.
Storage sheds.
Storage bins.
Small bottles of water, soda, juice and
snacks for volunteers.
Photo paper. .. ?i-,,mf.
Office supplies.
LCD projector for presentations.
30-gallon, heavy duty garbage bags.
Seamstress for sewing projects.
Someone to build cages.
Monetary donations.
Land acquisition.
100-foot heavy duty hoses and
nozzles.
Contact Ed or Gail Straight, 778-6324.



ManaSota-88
-I i rf,,f vy r!T
ManaSota-88, an environmental organi
zation, has spent more than 30 years
fighting to protect the environment.
Its commitment to safeguard air, land and water
quality is aggressive and uncompromising. The
organization has successfully worked to reduce
the millions of pounds of pollutants emitted
into the air and water each year.
Contributions to ManaSota-88 all come from
private individuals and go 100 percent to
operating revenues. ManaSota-88's attorney,
who is presently working to block Arvida's
proposed development on Perico Island, is the
only person to receive compensation.
ManaSota-88 is currently working to have
the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers hold a public
hearing for the proposed plan by the Perico
Harbor Marina to dredge more than three acres
of bottomland and enhance its dock space at its
Perico Island location.
The Islander wish list of ManaSota-88 is:
Help with legal expenses to battle the
massive development of Perico Island.
Fundraising ideas and volunteers.
Contact: President Glen Compton, 941-966-6256.





PAGE 6 a Nov. 27, 2002 N Th eIsndwer


lOthA Ar tdLE- /IsaLder Wih'B3ook 2002

Cortez Village Historical


Society


Anna Maria


Island Historical


Society
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society is
a nonprofit educational organization
dedicated to the study and preservation
of materials relating to the early history of the
Island.
Volunteers staff the museum at 402 Pine
Ave. in Anna Maria, a 1920s building origi-
nally an ice house. It houses displays of old
photos, maps, newspapers, records and
books, plus videos taped in recent years of
interviews with early residents. It is always
open to more artifacts.
Associated with the museum are the old
jail, roofless and doorless and barless, and the
Belle Haven historic house that has been
moved on the museum grounds for restora-
tion.
On Wednesday the museum volunteers
sell "old settlers bread" baked by members of
the society.
The main wishes for The Islander's list:
Photocopier and office paper.
DVD player.
.New: garden hose with wand.
"Sticky" note pads.
Three-hole plastic sheet protectors to hold
photos and documents in albums.
Contact: Betsy Atkinson, 778-0492.



Longbeach


Village


Association
V illagers at the north end of Longboat
Key have developed this community
organization over the years to the point
that it is now a dynamic part of village life.
The village is the original settlement on
Longboat and the association is devoted to
keeping up the historic values of the commu-
nity. Volunteers beautify the village, trim
shrubbery and trees, maintain yards whose
owners aren't able to do so, take care of the
needy and sick, transport people to medical
appointments, help clean up after storms -
"just enhance and protect what we have on
this island." It is now working on a new
directory for the village.
The Islander wish list for the village:
Means to move coconut palms that have
grown so successfully that they now threaten to
intrude on power lines.
Landscaping of some areas that volunteers
aren't equipped to handle.
Contact: Dutch Arends, president, 383-6235.


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--- ~




5 X 10 and srrn.!k r k
Don't ler the kids sneak c eak!
7 .I ManaltLe Ave W. -'


-f' he Cortez Village Historical Society is
dedicated to the preservation of the
.. historic fishing village as it has been for
100 years and more, and to assemble and ex-
hibit physical and recorded mementos of its
long and colorful history.
The society was instrumental in having
Cortez designated as a historical district, which
is key to keeping out condominiums and other
undesirable elements. It encouraged and helped
the writing of "Finest Kind" and "Fog Coming
In," and organized the videos "Cortez Then and


Now" and "Commercial Fishing Through the
Centuries."
Its wishes for The Islander wish book:
Historic artifacts of all kinds of the
village's.history, and "historic" in this context is
50 years old or more.
Museum cases, that is, any case or cabinet
or armoire that can store and display artifacts.
Assistance and donations for moving the
old waterfront store to the museum grounds at
the 1912 school.
Contact: Ralph Fulford, 794-1844.


The historic Belle Haven cottage in Anna Maria was on the move in November 2001 down Gulf Drive to its
new home adjacent to the Anna Maria Island Historical Society museum on Pine Avenue. Volunteers, city
workers, a moving company and utility workers helped coordinate the move. Volunteer efforts raised nearly
$9,000 to save the building that dates to 1900. Beach citiCs chipped in with donations of their owzn.


Anna Maria Island Art League
F wounded in 1989 by local artists, the league day-Friday from 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Its principal
has grown to a significant part of and fundraising events are the annual Winterfest
contributor to the Island. It sponsors and Springfest arts and crafts festivals held in
many classes in the arts, from painting to Holmes Beach.
photography to stepping stones to tiles and Its wish list for 2002:
other media. A favorite is the on-site landscape Art supplies of all kinds and all quantities.
drawing class, which takes artists to many Paper towels.
parts of the Island and to the mainland. Paper or plastic plates, cups and utensils.
It has an active scholarship program for Paper tablecloths.
adults and children. Its gallery at 5312 Two large wheeled trash cans.
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, is open Tues- Contact: Ginger White, director 778-2099.


Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island


This art-dedicated organization was
formed in 1988 by Genevieve Novicky
Alban and half a dozen other "starving
artists" meeting at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center.
Now it has its own co-op gallery at 5414
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, and 124 members

,,, -

Please offer you t lcl,:el tiJ., 1 t, tl sponsors
of the annual Wish Book our advertisers!

BOATS ',-ORS a CK, STOPF'


drawn from an 80-mile radius. It is dedicated to
"promoting interest in the visual and other
creative arts" and its interests and membership
include writers. Among its many programs it
works with schools and has an active scholar-
ship program.
Its wishes for the 2002-03 season:
Decorative easels.
Oil and acrylic paints.
Watercolors and pastels.
Canvases.
All kinds of art supplies for children.
Contact: Phyllis Cogan, president, 792-8591.


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ARM A P N A
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"92-2620 12444 Cortez Rd. West
, .. .-'. ; : -. IIwater One block to Intracoastal


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(yvwacl/ IUllder W ihS Book 2002

Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce


This Islandwide organization comprises
businesses doing business on and for
Anna Maria, boasting a record 370 mem-
bers. Among its services is a visitor center
where tourists and other newcomers may
obtain information about the Island and what it
has to offer. It is at 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, but will move soon to new, more visible
and efficient quarters nearby at 5317 Gulf Drive.
The chamber's mission is to "serve the
membership and the community through pro-


active leadership by building a positive busi-
ness climate while enhancing and perfecting the
quality of life for all."
The chamber's Islander wish list:
To move soon to the new offices.
Office equipment for the new digs.
A microphone, public-address system.
New chairs all around, especially a new
desk chair.
A new desk to go with the chair.
Contact: Mary Ann Brockinan, 778-1541.


Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce


his is a busy organization that will cel
ebrate its 45th birthday next year, with
600 members representing just about every
business on the key plus others off the island.
It is unabashedly business-oriented and
business-promoting, with aggressive network-
ing programs and special instructional seminars



Veterans of Foreign

Wars Post 8199
T he post and its parent organization are
devoted to assistance and service to U.S.
veterans, especially those who have
served overseas. It also provides other services
to the Island through sponsoring sports teams
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
school flag instruction including flags for
libraries, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and
firefighters. The Fish-A-Thon, a kids fishing
tournament held at the Bradenton Beach City
Pier every year, is a hit with youngsters and
parents.
The only wish of the post is for expanded
membership so it can do more for veterans and
the community.
Contact: Mort Wexelbaum, post commander,
792-5336.


to help businesses. A major focus is tourism,
though other aspects of business are an integral
part of its services.
Its wish for 2002:
A large color television and VCR for
business seminars.
Contact: Gail Lofgren, president, 383-2466.



Annie Silver

Community Center
J'h1w center at the corner of 23rd Street
and Avenue C in Bradenton Beach is
a nonprofit organization founded by
Island entrepreneur Annie Silver in the
1950s. Its purpose is to promote friendship
and entertainment for neighbors and
friends in the city and on the Island.
During the winter season the center's
activities include monthly potluck dinners
with music and singalongs, bingo, shuffle-
board and the annual yard sale. Everything
is done by volunteers.
The Islander wish list for the center:
New tables and chairs.
A public address system.
Contact: Muriel Thayer, 383-3036.


I. ''', "
ji

V2. '







P,-q.; i z;


Thousands lined Pine Avenue in October for the Bayfest, sponsored by the Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce.


,.-T >

THE BOAV TRF-R, P 03
Only lV-'5 for a .^ -^_ "
years membership
free towing ilicluefd. I. c
756-3422 '
<- -"=- --'7-' . ..


TheI~wca4tder Nov. 27, 2002 0 PA(GE 7


The Legacy


III Inc.
1"T-his is an organization formed to
organize Bradenton Beach's Christ
a. s Prelude, the annual musical
kickoff for the holidays.
Described by its creators as "a celebra-
tion of light and life, a musical celebration
under the stars on Thanksgiving night" on
Bridge Street, it is a family event with
professional musicians and soloists and
singalong holiday music.
Its lone wish for 2002:
Donations to fund the 2003 Prelude,
mailed to P.O. Box 333, Bradenton Beach
FL 34217.
Contact: Lee Ann Bessonette, 778-3113.


Off Stage Ladies
5 1 L 'I.- Off Stage Ladies is a support group for
|Iland Players in Anna Maria City.
S The ladies are a talented and gregarious
group who help paint sets and act as costumers,
make-up artists, ushers, lighting assistants and
stage managers and perform any other task to
help a director produce a good play.
Improvement of the theater is a goal of the
Off Stage Ladies, who raise money through a
theater "porch sale" in the fall;. -
A very important function of Off S'tag
Ladies is to prepare and serve dinner for the
cast of a show during "Long Sunday." That's
the Sunday before a show opens when the
actors and technical crew have a long day of
rehearsel getting the show perfected.
The Islander wish list for Off Stage Ladies is:
Large paper plates for Long Sunday
dinners.
Paper cups for hot or cold drinks.
Individually wrapped plastic silverware.
Soft drinks and other beverages.
Contact: Marge Ebel, 792-7818.


Longboat Key

Center for Arts
T his large and growing organization is in
its 50th year in 2002, and is expanding
into renovated and new buildings so that
"it has a real campus look" said a longtime
member. Its facilities have more than doubled
in the past two years.
It has expanded also in its interests, includ-
ing visual arts as well as the fine arts. It has
more than 1,000 members, a faculty of 50, and
100 to 120 regular volunteers.
The center's Islander wish list:
A new telephone system.
New copying machine.
Folding tables.
Pottery wheels.
Easels.
Table saw.
Planer.
Drill press.
Electric hand tools.
Contact: Maggie Noble, operations manager,
383-2345.

F,-rom. all of us at the Gulf D'iv' Cae








Open 7 Da S 199 7 a. .-9:3 p.m.
Open 7 Days -7S-1919 7 a.m.-9:30 p.m.


-7- an4'Lyu-fAF u L.t 4 ft.1..(fo,7_
i, ,fg-reat-year'! .
-4- from, /eeyo-n~& at... '
JESSIE'S ISLAIBD STO&0
- .- CONVlr-JiLr..riE DELI ( .,.




PAG 8E l'hv 27 202U 1Illu~t~~r10h/rIQAtd11'VIL~vByL 20


i


All three Island cities' residents, officials, kids,
parents, grandparents Everyone!


Absolutely


everyone's invited to Family Fun Day.
Please, join us for an
old-fashioned gathering of the
Anna Maria Island Family.
Chuck andJoey Lester


THE LESTERS' FAMILY FUN DAY


Saturday


* Dec. 14


11-2 p.m.


MUSIC FUH b AMES
PRIZES


Santa Claus


is


* 50( DUFFY bu


coming to Fun Day, too!
trgers "25 Hot Dogs & Sodas


All old-fashioned prices! All prepared by the
Duffy's Grill Team and Ooh La !
Big and small raffle prizes including 30 TURKEYS!
A BIG-SCREEN TV -- donated by The Islander!
and IllucJi, 1i1I 11 101uor!


Family Fun Day


i... st like old times


Anna N aia Island nin uity C-inter
t07 hlagiolia. A., Anna laria


Presented by Chuck & Joey Lester to benefit the Anna Maria Island Community Center. This advertisement is sponsored as a community service by The Islander.


10th/ Aw nwua Islarer Wi v Book 2002


PAGE 8 N Nov. 27, 2002 0 TheIkacwwer


v ted!


Everyone's