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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( September 18, 2002 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 18, 2002

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00961

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 18, 2002

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00961

Full Text




Skimming the news'... Island biz: Island's only Chinese restaurant, page 18.


iAnna Maria



Thlle


Islander


Soccer starting up, page 20.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 10, no. 45, Sept. 18, 2002 FREE


Anna Maria Island living can be taxing


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
In what is certainly no shock to any property owner
on Anna Maria Island, Islanders pay on a per-person
average nearly double the annual ad valorem taxes that
mainlanders pay, according to the 2001 tax collection
figures from the Manatee County tax collector's office.
Using the population figures from the 2000 United
States census, each man, woman and child living on
Anna Maria Island paid an average of $358.52 per per-
son in ad valorem taxes in 2001, compared with an
average of $174.63 for people living in the cities of
Bradenton and Palmetto combined.
The taxes paid on average by each person living in
the surveyed cities in 2001 were:
Bradenton Beach ............... $407.88.
Anna M aria........................ $362.29.


Holmes Beach.................... $305.41.
Palmetto ............................. $196.70.
Bradenton .......................... $152.55.
The average tax paid in the foregoing survey would
only be ad valorem taxes returned to the city by the
county and do not include such taxes paid by Islanders
and other county residents for library operations,
children's services, substance abuse programs, capital
improvements, fire and rescue services, and Southwest
Florida Water Management District taxes, among other
services.
The survey also did not include the Manatee
County portion of Longboat Key, where each person
there paid, on average, $814.29 in 2001 ad valorem
taxes.
Additionally, only permanent residents were
counted in the 2000 census figures for Manatee


Big bucks for Center
Fred Hurly, of the Anna Maria Oyster Bar, the Island Community Center's Pierrette Kelly, and Oyster Bar/Lazy
Lobster owner and golf tourney sponsor John Home enjoyed the fiuits of their labor and a big, big check for the
Center at the awards party following play at the El Conquistador. Islander Photo: Courtesy Erin Egan


DEP could force costly stormwater

drainage system on Island


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Florida's Department of Environmental Protection
is concerned that stormwater drainage is adding to the
pollution of the Tampa Bay estuary that includes
Sarasota Bay and the Perico Bayou, said Rob Brown,
water quality administrator for Manatee County's En-
vironmental Management Department.
Speaking at the monthly county commissioners
meeting with municipal mayors, Brown said the really
bad news is that the DEP could come to a barrier island
city such as Anna Maria or Longboat Key and mandate
that the city replace its existing stormwater drainage
system and install one that doesn't contribute to the
water pollution problem. That could include building


massive retention ponds for stormwater that allow pol-
lutants in the water to be filtered prior to discharge.
How expensive is that?
Enough to "bankrupt the smaller cities," said
Longboat Key Town Manager Bruce St. Denis, whose
city has been dealing with this issue for some time.
But a city can prevent the DEP from "forcing the
issue," claimed Brown, by joining the Tampa Bay Es-
tuary Program's consortium of public and private part-
ners which are working together to keep stormwater
from adding to the pollution problem and seeking al-
ternative methods of dealing with wastewater.
The bottom line is that Manatee County and its
PLEASE SEE DEP, NEXT PAGE


County, and not absentee land owners, who also pay ad
valorem taxes.
But Anna Maria residents may have had a point
when they complained at the city's Sept. 10 visioning
process meeting that rising taxes could make the city
unaffordable to some longtime residents and families
in the future. Despite having the lowest millage rate of
any Manatee County municipality at 2.0, Anna Maria's
projected ad valorem taxes for 2002 are just over
$800,000, up about 17.7 percent from the $679,662
collected in 2001.
Anna Maria isn't alone in the jump in ad valorem
taxes. Holmes Beach expects to collect $1,707,000 in
those taxes in 2002, a 17.6 percent increase from the
$1,451,585 figure of 2001. The initial budget presentation
in Bradenton Beach would indicate a rise in ad valorem
collections for 2002 of approximately 8 percent.


Holmes Beach

commission seats

decided, two in

mayor's race
Current Holmes Beach City Commissioners Sandy
Haas-Martens and Roger Lutz will be unopposed in the
upcoming November city elections for the two com-
mission seats they presently hold and will be returned
to two-year terms in office.
No other candidates met the 12 p.m. qualifying
deadline on Sept. 17, City Clerk Brooke Bennett said.
In the Holmes Beach mayor's race, however, local
political activist Joan Perry will square off against cur-
rent Mayor Carol Whitmore for the position.
Bennett said no other candidates qualified to run for
mayor by the noon deadline, although attorney Chip Rice
did pick up a qualifying packet, but it was never returned.
The mayoral election in Holmes Beach will be held
Nov. 5. A political forum, sponsored by The Islander,
will be scheduled in October.



Happ nings

'Kids Day' health alert free
event Saturday
"Kids Day America/International" will be
sponsored on Anna Maria Island Saturday,
Sept. 21, at Island Chiropractic, 3612 E. Bay
Drive, Holmes Beach.
From noon until 3 p.m. Drs. Joseph Acebal
and Kathleen Georg will provide free screenings,
information on disease prevention, balloons and
snacks for youngsters. Holmes Beach police of-
ficers will fingerprint children for parents who
want it, and Island firefighters will bring Penny,
their arson dog, to join the Tampa Bay Devil
Rays mascot, Raymond, at the event.
Any donations at the free event will be for-
warded to the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.
Details may be obtained by calling 778-0722.

IiSLANDERl
Since 1992


W .- -t.4. T


WE ...,M.9-..NOW






PAGE 2 E SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Ham Jones has purchased the property south of his Seafood Shack, something he has been seeking for more than 30 years. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


Ham Jones buys more Cortez waterfront


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Ham Jones has bought a substantial piece of the
Cortez waterfront adjacent to his Seafood Shack. He
just wants to clean it up, he said.
For 30 years since he founded the famed restau-
rant he has chafed at the clutter of the property next
door, bothered that it detracts from the neatness on
which he has insisted for the restaurant and its con-
siderable boat moorage.


DEP warns of stormwater woes
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

cities must now start thinking how to re-use surface
water rather than have it simply flowing into Tampa
Bay, Sarasota Bay, the Manatee River or Perico Bayou.
Becoming a member of the consortium will show
the DEP a city is.working to solve its stormwater drain-
age problem because the DEP has said the TBEP meets
"reasonable assurance" that its consortium members
are not adding to the "nutrient impairment" of the es-
tuary, Brown said. If a city doesn't join, it could be at


His new property is 1.5 acres, 711 feet of water-
front, home for years of the Miss Cortez fleet and of
Annie's Bait and Tackle, both considered landmarks on
the waterfront adjacent to the Cortez Bridge.
Miss Cortez is down to one boat now, and it is for
sale, Jones said. Annie's Capt. Bruce Shearer has a
lease that has considerable time to run, he said, and he
didn't anticipate changing that.
Jones bought the property from Bay Boat Co.,
which is owned by Capt. Jim Berry and family. They


the mercy of the DEP, he indicated.
If it sounds confusing, it is.
Anna Maria Mayor SueLynn said she didn't even
know the DEP had a problem with stormwater runoff in
small, barrier island cities contributing to water pollution.
But not to worry. Brown said the TBEP will hold
a workshop in November for Manatee County cities
and private companies interested in joining the consor-
tium to discuss the problems of water pollution, which
the TBEP prefers to call "nutrient impairment." Also
on the agenda will be a discussion of strategies to deal
with the DEP, benefits of joining the consortium, allo-
cation of pollution and financial aid for small cities.


also own the Miss Cortez fleet.
Jones declined to reveal what he paid for the acre-
age, saying that some rumored and published reports of
the sale price "are dead wrong." Berry could not be
reached for comment.
He has no plans for development, Jones said, just
a massive cleanup. The land will be used for overflow
parking for the restaurant's patrons.
The property "has needed cleaning up for 30 years,"
he said. "It's going to look as good as the Seafood Shack."
He has been there for 32 years, buying the land in
1970 and building the original Seafood Shack in 1972.
It seated 150 diners in 3,700 square feet.
It was almost. too successful "people waited in
line for as much as three hours to eat there." So it was
remodeled in 1976 and expanded to 6,000 square feet
with 212 seats.
Gradually the waiting line grew again, so Jones
expanded again in 1980 to 700 seats.
Sounding somewhat exasperated, he said that for
years he has fought reports that the highly successful
business was for sale. Rumors even had it listed for sale
in the Wall Street Journal and on the Internet.
Not so, Jones said. It is not for sale and never has
been for sale and won't be for sale. Well, unless some-
one should come up with a really lot of money.


Looking for fine

dining, intimate


atmosphere?


FRENCH
CONTINENTAL
BISTRO


It's all right here. And where else can you
enjoy fine dining amenities, a French bistro
atmosphere
or gracious
service for lunch
S .and dinner?


. -


Chef/Owner Damon Pres


Sunday brunch?
2 Shh, let's keep it
"our little secret."

AWARD-WINNING
iswro FINE DINING WITH
sswood INTERNATIONAL FLAIR!


BRUNCH AND LUNCH W\A/ O T 2wy 11-2:30
';1Inr" O C-2:30
DINNE \ .,u (Closed Monday/Tuesday)
Bistro dining without surfside pricing!
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive ~ Holmes Beach
941 778 5320


ADOPT-A-NEST
I \i 4


I ~AQ~\)~~'-'4'1


L SI


I.',.
.1

~ Li


'.' -

. . ,, v ', A..- -


New this year, a sea

turtle nest can be yours!
QUICK! Before the sea turtle hatching season gets into full swing,
adopt-a-nest from Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and await the arrival
of your own baby loggerheads as many as 100 little hatchlings will
have a better chance of survival thanks to you and your support of
AMITW. For $100, you will receive a full-color, framable adoption
certificate and the specific location and information pertinent to your
nest. And if you're dilligent, you may even see them emerge
and make their way into the Gulf of Mexico.
Call AMITW at 778-5638, or visit or call The Islanderto apply ...

The Islander
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 34217 (941) 778-7978
AMITW's Adopt-A-Nest and Adopt-A-Hatchling programs are offered in partnership with The Islander.


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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 3



Swift, rare green hatchlings hit Gulf


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Anna Maria Island's first nest ever of the rare green
sea turtle has hatched and sent "the fastest little turtles
we've ever seen" hurtling into the Gulf of Mexico.
The nest had 132 eggs, a surprisingly large num-
ber to people accustomed to the loggerheads common
to the Island's beach, whose nests contain more like
100 eggs.
Of that large number, 95 percent hatched, said Suzi
Fox, who heads the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch
and holds the state's marine turtle preservation permit
for Anna Maria.
"That's an extremely high percentage," she said.
"We've been averaging 65 percent in our loggerhead
nests this year."
The green nest hatched Saturday night and most of
the hatchlings emerged at that time and were "es-
corted" to the Gulf by Turtle Watch. The area at Sev-
enth Street South on the beach where the nest was laid
apparently had light problems and the group scooped
all the turtles into a bucket and released them later the
same night at Coquina Beach with a fanfare of Turtle
Watch volunteers.
After waiting the customary two days to give late-
comers a chance to get out on their own, Fox and Turtle
Watch volunteers excavated the nest Monday night.
The number of eggs in the nest is verified for state-
mandated record keeping.
They found a small handful of barren unhatched
eggs and the two late-hatching babies.
"We had a bucketful of loggerheads that hatched
Sunday night in a caged nest, so we had to gather them
and hold them for safe launching," Fox said.
"We decided to hold the little greens, thinking
they'd have a better chance if they had a group to go
with.
"It took the loggerheads maybe 15 minutes to
scramble down the beach into the water. We turned the


Green turtle hatchlings, at left and top right, hatched Saturday. It was the first green turtle nest on the Island


in decades. Islander Photo: Courtesy Morris Emigh
greens loose and they whizzed right in, beat the others
by a turtle nose."
The season, which officially runs through October,
is nearing its conclusion already, Fox said. Only 10
nests remain on Anna Maria, most of them at the north
end of the Island. Only one is caged, near the Manatee
Public Beach, and it is due next week.
"We'll just wait 'em out," she said. "We'll go on
monitoring them every day and every night, help the
hatchlings if they need it or just watch over them while


Bridge repairs again Wednesday night


"Intermittent lane closures" are expected on the
Anna Maria Bridge Wednesday from 8:30 p.m. to 5
a.m. Thursday, Sept. 18-19, according to the Florida
Department of Transportation.
A gear in the main lift mechanism of the draw
needs to be replaced, according to DOT spokesper-


High.tech improvements
West Manatee Fire & Rescue District has received
a $98,069 grant for some high-tech improvements from
the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
The funds will be used in three areas. Mobile data
terminals will be installed in several fire trucks, which
will enable firefighters to store about 1,400 "pre-plans"
of homes, businesses and condominiums within the
district, which encompasses Anna Maria Island, Cortez
and Northwest Bradenton. The terminals will also al-
low officers to track crews on scene.
The grant will also be used to improve the fire sta-

Islander named top Maryland
environmental regulator
Maryland Gov. Panris N. Glendening has named
Richard F. Pecora as Maryland secretary of the envi-
ronment.
Pecora and his wife, Anne, have a home in
Bradenton Beach at Gulf-to-Bay Moorings and are
active in ManaSota-88, a local environmental group
which is currently attempting to halt construction of
condominiums on Perico Island.
Pecora has been the deputy secretary at the Mary-
land Department of General Services since 1999.
Pecora came to DGS from the Maryland Department of
Transportation, where he served in the Office of Real
Estate Development as assistant to the secretary of
transportation from May to December 1999. While at
MDOT, Pecora also served as the special assistant for
planning and business development at the Maryland
Port Administration from June 1996 to May 1999. In
1987, he was appointed the assistant secretary for op-
erations at the,Maryland Department of the Environ-
ment before beginning his first stint as deputy secre-
tary of DGS from 1991-1996.


son Maryemma Bachelder, prompting the traffic
delays.
The bridge will not open to boat traffic while un-
dergoing the repairs, she added.
Motorists are advised to use the Cortez Bridge to
avoid the expected traffic delays.


approved for fire district
tion alert system. Currently, tones are broadcast over
speakers in the fire stations. The new system will have
the sirens modulate from low to high "that would
greatly reduce firefighter stress, enhancing firefighter
safety within the fire station."
The grant is part of the Assistance to Firefighters
Grant Program, which has allocated $360 million to
more than 5,000 fire departments in the United States
in 2002. West Manatee Fire & Rescue is one of only
10 departments in Florida to receive funding through
the program this year.


Holmes Beach recycling

phone books
The Holmes Beach recycling bin for old tele-
phone directories is now open on the east side of
city hall at 5801 Marina Drive by the public
works department.
With the delivery this week of the 2002-03
Verizon telephone directory, all Island residents
are asked to help with recycling and drop off their
old telephone books in the Holmes Beach bin.
Old phone books placed a resident's curbside re-
cycle bin can will not be accepted, but instead are
taken to the county landfill.
The Holmes Beach bin is open 24 hours a day.
For more information, call at 708-5800.


A native of Baltimore, Pecora received a bachelor
of science degree from the University of Maryland in
1967 and earned his law degree from the University of
Baltimore School of Law in 1970.


they paddle into the Gulf."
With the super-successful green hatch and the
hatching of 96 loggerhead nests thus far this season,
"we're very happy."



Meetings

Anna Maria City
Sept. 18, 7 p.m., final public hearing on city budget.
Sept. 23, 10:30 a.m., citizen recognition committee
meeting.
Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m., planning and zoning board meet-
ing.
Sept. 24, 7 p.m., visioning meeting, Roser Memorial
Community Church, 511 Pine Ave.
Sept. 26, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning board meet-
ing.
Sept. 19, 1 p.m., city commission meeting. Agenda:
public comment, first reading of parking fine increase
ordinance, contract changes in parking fine collection
contract, discussion of pier renovations, presentation
on community rating system annual report, city invest-
ment proposal, budget amendment request, planning
and zoning board visioning report, Christmas Prelude
special event request, Anna Maria Island Chorus and
Orchestra banner request, arts and crafts show to ben-
efit Wildlife Education and Rehabilitation Center ban-
ner request, consent agenda and commission reports.
Sept. 24, 1 p.m., scenic highway committee meeting.
Sept. 25, 7 p.m., final public hearing on city budget.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 19, 10 a.m., code enforcement board meeting.
Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m., final public hearing on city budget.
Sept. 24, 7 p.m., city commission meeting with work
session immediately following.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m., Barrier Island Elected Officials
meeting, Holmes Beach City Hall, CANCELED.
Sept. 19, 6 p.m., West Manatee Fire & Rescue District
Commission meeting on appeals for calculation of fire
assessments for 2002, fire station No. 1, 6001 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
Sept. 23, 9:30 a.m., Sarasota-Manatee Metropolitan
Planning Organization meeting, Sudakoff Hall, USF-
New College campus, Sarasota.


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PAGE 4 M SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Vision of Anna Maria's future: clear but cloudy


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
One thing seemed clear to the 50-plus people who
attended the opening session of the Anna Maria vision-
ing process at Roser Community Memorial Church
Sept. 10. The future vision of Anna Maria is cloudy.
The first of three workshop sessions conducted by
the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council in the vi-
sioning process served to identify strengths and oppor-
tunities in Anna Maria in addition to weaknesses and
threats that attendees believed important.
By far the biggest "threat" to the future of the city,
according to a vote by the participants, is the "rapid
increase in property values in the city recently, making
the future cloudy for working families to stay in Anna
Maria."
At the same time, the No. I strength of the city is
clearly that it's "one of the last remaining reflections
of an Old Florida beach community."
TBRPC representative Avera Wynne, who con-
.ducted the meeting, found out quickly that in Anna
Maria, one person's idea of strength could well be
another's vision of weakness.
Jim Depoore said a major threat is over-regulation
by the city government. Charlie Daniel said a major
weakness is the city's building codes are not strong
enough.
One resident said Bayfront Park was a strength
of the city, while another complained that parking at
that location was a weakness. Another resident said
the numerous rental units and renters help diversify
the city, while another said renters and absentee
owners don't care about the city. One person com-
plained about the trolley, another said it was great
for kids on the Island and for helping to reduce the
number of cars on the roads. The recent beach
renourishment project was a threat to one person, a
boon to another who nearly lost her house to the Gulf
of Mexico.
Hey, this is Anna Maria.
But the one "clear" message from the vast ma-
jority in attendance was the fear that rising property
values and taxes are threatening to drive out resi-
dents, particularly families, eventually turning Anna
Maria into nothing more than a rental community for
absentee owners. Unfortunately, said Wynne, city


Getting the vision
Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council representative Avera Wynne listens to Anna Maria residents voice
concern for the future of their city at the first of three planned workshops Sept. 10 to help the TBRPC prepare


a vision plan for the city. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin

residents have little control over their property val-
ues and county tax rate.
One resident said he pays $4,000 a year in taxes for
his 800-square-foot home in Anna Maria, but pays only
$800 a year for his 5,000-square-foot home in Sarasota.
Wynne did his best to steer clear of specific issues,
but this is Anna Maria. Everyone's got a pet peeve and
some people tried to bring up personal problems with
garbage service, loud music and unruly bar patrons.
Wynne, however, said the first meeting is simply
to air SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
threats). At the Sept. 17 meeting, residents identified
specific strategies to deal with the issues facing the city
in the future.

Strengths and opportunities
After "Old Florida beach community," other


Golf carts, service animals may


be permitted in Holmes Beach


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach city commissioners have come to
a consensus to start off modestly and allow golf carts
to be used on 71st and 77th streets and White Av-
enue.
A request to use a golf cart on these roads by
Holmes Beach resident Dan Hardy sparked the discus-
sion among commission members, although Holmes
Beach Police Chief Jay Romine continues to voice
opposition based on safety concerns. Hardy wants to
use his golf cart to get to the beach from his home.
Romine agreed to address the commission with a
list of roads he believes golf carts should not travel
upon. These roads include high traffic areas such as
Gulf Drive, Palm Drive and the main drag of Marina
Drive where the speed limit is 35 mph.
Additionally, Florida laws do not permit golf carts
to be driven on state roads without special permission
from the Florida Department of Transportation. This
would exclude SR 64 and SR 789 from golf cart use.
Florida requires that all golf-cart-accessible roads


have proper signage. It also states that golf carts may
not be operated after sunset without headlights, brake
lights, turn signals and a windshield.
Finally, golf carts must be equipped with efficient
brakes, reliable steering, safe tires, a rearview mirror
and red reflectorized warning devices on the front and
rear. Golf carts may not be driven by anyone under the
age of 14, Romine noted.
Commissioner Roger Lutz said he never antici-
pated golf carts would be permitted on busy streets, but
he questioned Romine's concern since bicycles and
mopeds are both permitted.
Romine said the public has an expectation to share
the road with mopeds and accommodate bicycles in the
bike path, however golf carts can't keep up with traf-
fic. He indicated that may just further frustrate the
driver who isn't willing to wait behind the trolley
In other matters, the commission discussed
whether service animals, such as seeing-eye dogs, are
permitted on the beach. Although city ordinances do
not permit animals on the beach, in this case the state
statutes would take precedence.


Island Bayfest opens booths for participants


Participants are being sought for the 2002 Island
Bayfest community festival Oct. 19, with booths being
offered now and exhibitors being signed up.
The festival, subject of controversy since it was
organized in 1999 with the help of Anna Maria resi-
dents, will be on Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce has assumed sponsorship, along with
the Anna Maria Island Community Center.


It will have "Taste of the Island," featuring food
from local restaurants; art works by area artists; retail
booths by area businesses; children's play area; sports
and marine exhibitions; live music; and draft beer,
bottled water and soda for sale.
Vendors in art, food and entertainment may call
Cindy Thompson at 761-4766; retail exhibits, Jennifer
Scott at 792-6695; and not-for-profit exhibitors and people
with general questions, Mary.Ann Brockman at 779-9412.


strengths and opportunities identified by Anna Maria
residents were:
*Open spaces.
*Soothing vistas of the bay and Gulf.
*Easy access to larger communities.
*Clean water and the beaches.
*Low crime rate.
*Socio-economic balance.
*Island Players theater.
*Anna Maria Island Community Center.
*A finite land area making it impossible for the city
to grow bigger.
*The Anna Maria Island Historical Society, city
pier and Island orchestra.
*Bayfront Park.
*Community-sized businesses and buildings.
*Small, single-family homes.
*Slow pace of life, lifestyle.
*Friendliness of residents.
-Community support for children.
*Low density of construction.
*Island elementary and middle school.
-Island trolley.
*Parking an opportunity to develop a parking plan.
*Beach renourishment.

Weaknesses and threats
In addition to rising property values and taxation,
other weaknesses and threats identified were:
*Over-regulation by the city.
*Lack of affordable housing for employees.
*Out-of-scale house designs.
*Too many renters who are not part of the commu-
nity.
*Absentee property owners.
*Low water pressure.
*Drainage, impervious surfaces.
*Parking, lack of a city plan.
*Weak city codes and enforcement.
*County government.
*Island trolley.
*Lack of full emergency medical service by the
county.
*City dominated by a small group of people who
are against the rich.
*Bayfront Park parking.
*Need for proper public and private landscaping.
*Beach renourishment.
*Beach erosion at Bean Point.
*Older homes being torn down for new construc-
tion.
*Advertising efforts by county and chamber of
commerce to "sell" the Island to visitors and new
county residents, resulting in more and more people.
*Influx of east county residents to city's beaches.
*Destruction of natural habitat for native species.
*Many city government decisions done out of
fear.
*Arvida-Perico Island project.





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 M PAGE 5


Transition period for elections in proposed charter


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria's charter review committee is headed
down the home stretch with a proposed new charter for
the city and committee chairperson Tom Aposporos
fully expects to deliver the completed document to the
city commission Sept. 26.
"We are awaiting some language from City Attor-
ney Jim Dye on the section dealing with the mayor's
ability to hire and terminate personnel," said
Aposporos. "Once that's included, we should take our
vote on Sept. 23 and submit the document to the city
commission on Sept. 26. Everything else is done."
The committee did, however, hit a slight snag at its
Sept. 11 meeting over language in the new charter regard-
ing a transition of February elections to November.
The new charter also proposes to remove the
mayor from the city commission and create a fifth com-
mission seat for a total of six elected officials. To get
three officials elected in an even-numbered year and
the remaining three in an odd-numbered year, it would
be necessary to extend or shorten some of the current
terms of elected officials.
If the new charter is put to a vote in the February
2003 elections and, if approved, under the charter's
transition language the two commissioners elected at
that time would serve 21 months until the November
2004 elections. The current term of office for the mayor
would be extended nine months, from February 2004
to November 2004, at which time three elected posi-
tions, two commissioners and the office of the mayor,
would be up for election to a two-year term.
The term for the two commission seats that expire in
February 2004 under the current charter would be short-
ened to expire in November 2003 under the transition lan-
guage, at which time those seats would be up for election.
Further, if a new charter is adopted in February
2003, the new city commission, now composed of just
four members, would elect the fifth commissioner ac-
cording to the charter section on filling vacancies on
the commission. This particular commissioner would
only serve nine months until the November 2003 elec-


tion, at which time the term would expire and the seat
would be up for election for a normal two-year term.
"This puts everybody on the same page," said
Aposporos. "Three people would be elected in Novem-
ber of 2003 and three elected in November 2004 and
so on," he said.
The term of the mayor could be shortened under
the transition language to expire in November 2003,
but "that would mean four officials elected at that elec-
tion and only two the following November,"
Aposporos observed.
The committee also didn't want a new city com-
mission to elect a temporary city commissioner for a


Neighbors of the future Tidemark Lodge in the
5400 block of Marina Drive will be allowed to
voice their opinions of the revised site plan at a
public hearing scheduled for Sept. 24.
Due to a lawsuit filed against the City of Holmes
Beach by Dan and Tina Howe and Lance Spotts dur-
ing the initial hearings for zoning and site plan ap-
proval of the Tidemark Lodge, amendments were
made to the site plan as part of an overall settlement.
The terms of the settlement between Tidemark
and the Howes and Spotts are confidential.
The changes to the site plan going before the
,commission for approval include a 50-foot setback
from the Spotts home, the construction of a 6-foot-
high concrete wall along the property line between
Spotts and Tidemark from the seawall to northern
end of Sunrise Lane, and the construction of a 4-
foot-high wall around the pool area fronting the
canal to prevent noise from traveling across the
basin.


21-month period. A nine-month term seemed satisfac-
tory for a city commissioner elected by the city com-
mission to fill a vacancy created by a new charter.
Aposporos stressed that the committee could not
"pre-suppose" that the charter would pass if presented
to the voters. Hence the need for transition language in
the new charter itself.
City commissioners are expected to schedule a
special workshop session on the proposed new charter,
once it is received from the review committee.
The committee deadline to complete its review of
the charter and submit recommendations to the com-
mission is Sept. 30.


Additional stipulations include planting a con-
tinuous vegetative screen of cedar trees taller in
height than the wall adjacent to Spotts' property;
the prohibition of outdoor music with the exception
of four special events per year, which must also end
by 10 p.m.; prohibition of an outdoor beverage fa-
cility; and limitation of the pool use to the hours of
8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Tidemark developer Nick Easterling said that
with the permission of the city, the revised site plan
should appease everyone involved.
Units lost by the removal of one building to ac-
commodate the 50-foot setback for Spotts will be
added to other buildings, according to Easterling, and
the main lodge will now have 10 units instead of nine.
The Tidemark Lodge will remain a 40-unit
condominium-hotel modeled after the Rod & Gun
Club in Everglades City even with the revisions. It
will also include a 130-seat restaurant, lounge and
meeting space.


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PAGE 6- SEPT. 18, 2002 U THE ISLANDER








Chart-A-Rama
It's not surprising that citizens on the Anna Maria
Charter Review Committee are looking at changes to
the city's charter.
You only had to be around for the previous
administration's ordeals and hardships including
whether the mayor or vice mayor should run meetings
- to expect changes.
When the majority on the commission ruled that
the vice mayor run meetings, charter changes became
eminent and imminent.
Whether changes proposed by the committee will
be accepted and passed on to the voters in the next city
election remains to be seen and heard.
The proposed changes would radically alter the
makeup of the city government and city administration.
It would remove the mayor from the commission. The
number of commissioners would become five, and they
would choose among themselves a deputy mayor.
It's illogical to change the mayor into a city man-
ager, largely because although it will address the city's
perceived need for an administrator, it doesn't take into
account the qualifications and compensation that
should go with that job.
It also leaves open for "discussion" who will be
annointed to perform ribbon-cuttings. And we all know
Anna Maria loves a good discussion.

It's an election
In Holmes Beach, we have an election. Barely.
We have a race for mayor, if only barely, because
incumbent Mayor Carol Whitmore, who previously
(and adamantly) stated she would not seek re-election,
is running now, and only because she says she is dis-
satisfied with her opponent's qualifications.
That opponent is Joan Perry, who threw her hat in
the ring several weeks ago. And, Perry has credentials
that lead us to think she is qualified.
In her posturing, Whitmore said Perry "would be
a good commissioner, but the mayor's office is more
about relationships and getting things done."
Indeed, Whitmore previously said she would only
run if Sandy Haas-Martens chose to run for mayor,
which leads us to think she doesn't want the job, but
she doesn't want anyone else to have it either.
So, yes, we have an election in Holmes Beach. And
it could be interesting.


SLICK By Egan




Opinion


Trolley problems
I would like to comment, reinforce and amplify the
comments of B. Richard in The Islander (Opinion,
Sept. 4) referring to the noise, lack of lay-bys and other
general comments on the "free" Island trolley.
In all my travels in almost every part of the world
I have never seen a public bus service without lay-bys.
Has anyone ever considered the amount of man-hours
wasted and the inconvenience of having to wait behind
a trolley at every stop the length of the Island?
And as Richardson commented, what'll happen
during the season? We need to think about the waste of
fuel, the air pollution created and the additional danger
to passengers debarking the bus.
And then there is the question of the so-called
"free" trolley service. Free to whom? Let's face it, we
are all paying for this service through our county taxes.
And who benefits the most? Not the full-time, or-
dinary citizens of the Island. If anything, they/we are
faced with a more congested traffic situation and higher
taxes.
And now the county wants to put shelters at many
of the stops. More taxes. Shelters from what? The cold
wind, sleet and snow? If it might rain, bring an um-
brella, or sing and dance in it, a very joyous liberating
pastime.
I have discussed this with many of my neighbors
and we all agree on the points I've raised. It is a waste-
ful and dangerous situation that should be corrected be-
fore something terrible happens. What can/shall we do?
To whom do we address these concerns?
Albert Ames, Holmes Beach,

Australian pines
I understand Mayor SueLynn of Anna Maria is
doing an excellent job as mayor and she should con-
tinue to stay in the political field and out of the envi-
ronmental field.
The draw to this Island is the beaches and the Aus-


tralian pines, which we are lucky to have. They grace
the north end, Coquina Beach and our Island in general.
Even the million-dollar homes. If you walk down the
beaches of Anna Maria, it is the Australian pines and
the dunes that capture the heart and soul of visitors and
residents alike.
As far as them not being native to the Island ...
What is? Most of the vegetation on the Island is not
native to it. It may be native to Florida, but not the Is-
land. Look at the pictures at the museum of what the
Island looked like before our forefathers brought in
these trees to protect and shade the Island.
Most of our flowers and trees come from other parts
of the world, let alone Florida. I have a Middle Eastern
olive tree. As far as the depths of the roots, not many plants
in Florida like salt water and have a shallow root base,
including the palm trees. During a hurricane, they will take
off like a pinwheel and land on your house.
I agree with Mike Norman on the benefits of the
trees shade, beauty, shade, unique to the Island,
shade. We don't need more sun, any of us.
Worried about hurricanes? Why live here? Noth-
ing is going to stop a hurricane, including the deep-
rooted ficus. My neighbor can attest to that.
Look at the pictures of the Island from all angles,
including air shots, and imagine how it would look
without those trees, especially at Bean Point.
Carol Codella, Holmes Beach

Shabby treatment
I feel the treatment of George McKay is unreason-
able and uncalled-for, especially when you have such
a responsible and dedicated person as George is, and
you should do everything in your power to help him
acquire the job of building official.
Looking back a few years to some ex-building of-
ficials of this city should give you a clue to what we had
and what potential we have now with George McKay.
Herb Ditzel, Anna Maria


The Islander
Sept.18, 2002 Vol. 10, No. 45
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
J.L. Robertson
V Contributors
Nancy Ambrose
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy,
Andrea Dennis
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Jean Steiger
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Tracy Komor
Carrie Price
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster






Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
@2002 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978





THE ISLANDERIL SEPT. 18, 2002 PyAGEI7


Reynard's and Rotary
I enjoyed more than 1,000 meals at Pete Reynard's
Yacht Club. The Anna Maria Island Rotary Club met
there the first 25 years of its history, starting in 1966,
up through Back Bay Boathouse and Marina Bay. Pete
Reynard was a charter member of the club. We unex-
pectedly lost him on a trip to Greece in 1975.
We met in at least four different areas within the
restaurant during those years. Two of the areas weren't
even there until after the fire.
For the vast majority of the years we were a sup-
per club. Since this was before women were allowed to
join Rotary as members, we arranged separate tables
for "Rotary Anns." After all, the ladies also wanted to
go to Reynard's if the men did. This also allowed
Reynard's to prepare a few more meals.
We were always treated quite well and because
Reynard's was a favorite evening restaurant, we had
quite a number of make-ups Rotarians who couldn't
attend their own club during the week simply made up
their obligation at ours.
After settling in, we averaged about 30 members.
So with the addition of Rotary Anns, make-ups, speak-
ers and prospective members, our attendance averaged
about 45, sometimes considerably more.
One thing that held up the attendance was dancing
that followed a number of programs. We were fortunate
to have girls play the piano for us. I well remember Donna
Holmes, Debbie Holmes and "Sam" Taylor, always just
"Sam" (Sam is a her), livening up the evening.
Everybody remembers the revolving salad bar. A
partition separated it in halves, half in the kitchen to be
filled and half for the customers to empty. Certainly
kept things fresh.
But the salad bar was only a warm-up to the "re-
ally big show." After the fire did heavy damage to the
building, they had the revolving room added to the
eastern side of the restaurant.
This was a difficult undertaking. The revolving
room continually turned, but slowly enough that you
could step into it and out of it without special trouble,
especially after the first time. Although I know some
of the people wouldn't chance it, for other people it was
definitely their favorite. Pretty good view also.
Actually the revolving room was the central part of


We knock 'em down
Gary's Hauling finished tearing down the former Pete
Reynard's with the exception of one area of the build-
ing, which contains electric and phone connections
necessary to operate the developer's sales trailer and
the Anna Maria Boat Club temporary trailer, also
located at the site of the future Tidemark condo/hotel.
Pictured are trachoe operator Rich Chivers (with his
Islander T-shirt) and Gary Parks, owner of Gary's
Hauling, right, and members of their crew.


a rectangular room that also had stationary tables. You
could have a conversation in pieces with a stationary
person as you completed each circular trip.
As so many people did, I experienced considerable
nostalgia as I watched Eleanor (Reynard) Tatakis tak-


September is

customer

. appreciation month



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Null and void
Franz d'Zurilla shows off the "credit card" no. 759
issued him in April 1953 by "Pete Reynard, Manager"
of Pete Reynard's Yacht Club Restaurant and Cocktail
Lounge, Holmes Beach, Florida. The restaurant
changed hands almost 10 years ago and the building
was demolished this year, prompting d'Zurilla to share
his memento. Islander Photos: Bonner Joy

ing part in the demolition. Thankfully, however, I've
been seated by Eleanor a few times at work at Nicki's
West 59th Restaurant in Bradenton. Her graciousness
never fails.
Gene Moss, Holmes Beach


love to mail


you the news!

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I BREAKFAST DAILY AT 7 AM .1






PAGE 8 E SEPT. 18, 2002 U THE ISLANDER


Peace sign
Before heading to class on Sept. 11, fifth-graders at Anna Maria Elementary School posted flags and a banner proclaiming "May Peace Prevail On Earth" in front of
the school. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


Elementary School

remembers 9/11
Anna Maria Elementary School students devoted
the entire week including Sept. 11 to promoting peace.
Declaring Sept. 9-13 "Peace Week," the morning
news crew began each school day with special peace-
oriented presentations.
Jim Dunne, president of the Anna Maria Island
Rotary Club, made a guest appearance on the morning
news show to talk about the Rotary Club's "Four Way
Test" of the things we think, say or do. The test encour-
ages students to act with sincerity.
A peace quilt made by students at New York City
Public School 69 was hung in the cafeteria where it will
remain on permanent display.
AME connected with P.S. 69 when two students
from the New York school transferred to Anna Maria
last year on Sept. 11.
The week's main event took place the morning of 9/
11 and began with a special video presentation put to-
gether by Holmes Beach Police Officer Pete Lannon and
parent Julie Dearlove. The video was a tribute to all the
local firefighters, police officers, U.S. Coast Guard, para-
medics and lifeguards working on the Island.
Before heading to class, students gathered in the au-
ditorium to sing songs and reflect on the day's historic
events.
Guidance counselor Cindi Harrison asked students
to think about how they can make a difference by re-
sponding to tragedy with kindness and tolerance, and
above all let peace prevail over violence.
Several other special events also took place
throughout the week, such as an online chat with stu-
dents from P.S. 69 and an international dress-up day.


Anna Maria remembers
City officials and residents of Anna Maria gathered
at the city hall flagpole at noon Sept. 11 for a brief
ceremony to remember those who died on Sept. 11,
2001. MCSO Deputy Mike Zambelle sang "The Star
Spangled Banner" as part of the ceremony. Islander
Photo: Rick Catlin


Center stage
Local service personnel, including Holmes Beach Police Officer Pete Lannon and West Manatee Fire & Rescue
District firefighter Donna Braun, Lt. John Flinn and firefighter Nathan Bergbom, took center stage at Anna Maria
Elementary School's 9/1.1 commemorative ceremony. Also pictured on stage are fifth-graders Steven Thomas,
Jarrot Nelson, and Kayla Jennis, who recapped the events of 9/11. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Peace!
Anna
Maria
Elementary
School
students
raised their
voices in
song and
showed
their
enthusiasm
for peace
at a special
ceremony
commemo-
rating 9/
11. Is-
lander
Photo:
Diana
Bogan






THE ISLANDER SEPT. 18, 2002 U PAGE 9


Pledge
Students and guests began the ceremonies at the elementary school with a pledge to the flag.
Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


Chime in
Firefighter Donna Braun of the West Manatee Fire & Rescue
District was the official bellringer at Station No. 1 in Holmes
Beach for the 9/11 tribute. Braun rang the station bell with three
sets of five chimes at 10:05 a.m., the time of the World Trade
Center South Tower's collapse. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Silent reflection
Paramedics Greg Hackett and James Larsen, Lt. John Flinn and firefighters Donna Braun, Nate
Bergbom, Julie Pritchard and Lori Fournier gathered around the flagpole at the West Manatee Fire
& Rescue Station No. I to remember the victims of 9/11. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


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Moment of silence
Jim Dunne of the Anna Maria Island Rotary Club, principal Tim
Kolbe and guidence counselor Cindi Harrison share a moment of
silence on 9/11. Islander Photo Bonner Jov


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Island Starter and Alternator
For the past two years Island Starter and Alternator has been operating at the two front units of 3014 Avenue
C. The Island business is seeking a site-plan review and special exception for its automobile lift from the city
commission. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan



Public hearing set for auto


business' petition


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Donald Belmont and William Carlbert have filed
a joint petition for a special exception for use of the
property at 3014 Avenue C in Holmes Beach.
Belmont owns and leases the two units fronting
Avenue C to Carlbert, who owns and operates Island
Starter and Alternator, a full-service auto repair shop.
Carlbert said he has been working out of the two
front units since January 2001 and prior to that ran his
operation out of a single front unit and a unit behind it
fronting the alley in the unit formerly occupied by Big
Jim's Auto Repair.
The location is currently zoned commercial, C-3,
and this block of Avenue C includes a mixture of resi-
dential and commercial properties.
The building at 3014 Avenue C is divided into four
separate units, each comprised of ground-level com-
mercial space and an elevated unit. Each of the units
can be owned individually and Air & Energy currently
operates out of one of the rear units of the building.
Carlbert said he originally moved his business to
the units on Avenue C from 3001 Gulf Drive, where he
had an approved site plan which permitted him to per-
form rebuilding vehicle starters and alternators.
Carlbert said that as his business grew, he began to
get complaints at the Gulf Drive location and moved
his business to the alley unit behind Avenue C where
Big Jim's Auto Repair used to be, and the adjoining
front unit. According to Carlbert, he was told by Assis-
tant Superintendent of Public Works Bill Saunders that
he could do complete auto repair work since the loca-
tion had previously housed a similar business.
In January 2001 Carlbert moved from the back unit
to the second front unit along Avenue C. However, he
said he never changed the nature of his business and to
his knowledge, had not done anything wrong by
switching units.
As long as he has been located at Avenue C,
Carlbert said he has been working on cars in front of
his business and has maintained an automobile lift on


the property.
Carlbert believes that the complaints filed by Sue
Normand, a resident of Avenue C, are part of a "per-
sonal vendetta against him to run his business off her
street."
Carlbert said he runs one of the cleanest shops in
the state and a recent inspection by the Manatee County
Environmental Management Department turned up no
problems.
Neighbors Darlene Doran and Normand filed a
complaint, which prompted the visit from EMD. The
neighbors reported seeing Carlbert spill antifreeze and
dumping oil in the ditch at the end of the road.
According to the EMD report, the investigator did
not find any evidence of spillage on the property or in
the ditch at the end of the road. Overall, the report
stated that the business appeared clean and organized.
Carlbert said he does not keep cars at his business
for any length of time as he delivers same-day or next-
day service on auto repairs.
Because Carlbert switched units within the same
building, he has been asked to file a new site plan and
to apply for a special exception to maintain the lift
outside the building.
Carlbert said he operates the same type of business
as two other repair shops in Holmes Beach, both of
which are permitted to have outdoor lifts and that he
believes his request is consistent with the city's com-
prehensive plan.
One stumbling block Island Starter faces, however,
will be meeting the code requirements for parking.
Saunders told the city commission that the problem is
not specific to Island Starter, but that any business op-
erating out of that building will have a difficult time
meeting parking requirements.
The commission will consider the site-plan and
special exception at its Oct. 22 meeting.
Carlbert said that he has the support of neighbor-
ing businesses and residents of the adjacent duplexes,
all of whom are willing to attend the public hearing to
voice their support.





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 M PAGE 11


Autumn officially

arriving Tuesday
By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Given the weather, it may seem unlikely and
in fact may never be recognizable here, but autumn
begins Tuesday, Sept. 23.
That's the day of the autumnal equinox, when
the sun moves across the equator from the north-
ern hemisphere to the southern. The spring, or ver-
nal, equinox is the opposite, when the sun moves
north.
The days will shorten steadily until the short-
est day of the year, which comes on Dec. 21 or 22
annually. It's the 21st this year, which is also the
first day of winter. The longest, incidentally, is
June 21 or 22.
If the equivocal dates are confusing, consider
that the autumnal equinox itself varies annually
from Sept. 21, 22 or 23. All that variance is be-
cause of our 365-day year, which is not a whole
number. The equinox was first noticed, by the way,
by Hipparchus in 120 B.C. and explained by Sir
Isaac Newton in 1687.
There are festivals galore based on this day,
celebrations of harvest. The Germans' is best
known, for they celebrate Octoberfest for two
weeks until the first Sunday in October. The Is-
land, with this fine excuse to celebrate, notes the
festival in various gatherings.
The great American autumn festival, though,
is Thanksgiving, and it has hardly anything to do
with the equinox.
In our corner of the world, autumn or no au-
tumn, the fishing is still great, the seas are usually
calm, you can still get a sunburn without going
snow skiing.
Never mind that hurricane season doesn't
wind down until Nov 3.


Library Internet classes
have openings weekly
The basic Internet classes at the Island Branch Li-
brary have room for four persons every week, meeting
from 8:30 until 10 a.m. every Monday.
The library said this is a one-time lesson intended
for people who have never used a computer and want
a general understanding of the Internet. Interested per-
sons may register at the library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, or by phone at 778-6341.

'Eat That Frog' seminar Monday
on Longboat Key
A seminar titled "Eat That Frog" is planned from
5 to 9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23, at the Longboat Key
Chamber of Commerce office, 6854 Gulf of Mexico
Drive.
Aim of the seminar is to minimize procrastinating
and help people tackle challenging tasks and prioritize,
said Gail Loefgren, chamber president. Instructor will
be Tom Davenport of Manatee Community College.
Cost of the seminar is $65. Reservations may be
made and further information obtained at 387-9519.

Bloodmobile on Longboat
next Wednesday
The Manatee Community Blood Bank's bloodmo-
bile will be on Longboat Key Wednesday, Sept. 25,
from 7:30 until 11 a.m.
It will be at the office of the sponsoring Longboat
Key Chamber of Commerce, 6854 Gulf of Mexico
Drive. Reservations may be made and information ob-
tained at 387-9519, and drop-ins are welcome, said the
chamber's president, Gail Loefgren.

Peli-Boat
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary offers tours
aboard the Peli-Boat on Thursdays from 9 to 11 a.m.,
Saturday are luncheon tours from noon to 2:30 p.m.
On Friday, Sept. 20, a trip to Egmont Key is planned.
The tours begin at the Holiday Inn Marina, 7150 N.
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. Reservations may be made
and information on prices received at 388-4444.


Jennifer Lee Cicchetto and William Douglas Tuthill.

Cicchetto-Tuthill marriage vows
are exchanged
Jennifer Lee Cicchetto of New Hampshire and
William Douglas Tuthill, son of Betty and Joseph Gillis
of Holmes Beach and Philip Tuthill of Groton, Conn.,
were married in a ceremony at Deerfield, N.H. They
plan a Caribbean honeymoon.
The bride is a graduate of the University of New
Hampshire and the bridegroom of Worcester (Mass.)
Polytechnic Institute. He is a hardware engineer with
Enterasys Networks, Rochester, N.H.

Legion applications sought
The competition is open for the 64th annual Na-
tional High School Oratorical Contest, sponsored lo-
cally by Kirby Stewart American Legion Post 24.
The contest is open to any high school student, said
Dr. Len Sirotzki, contest chairman. The Legion will
award cash prizes for first, second and third places. The
post competition is the first step to scholarships
awarded at the state and national levels of the Legion.
Detailed information is available at high schools or
from Sirotzki at 761-3324, or
len3000@tampabay.rr.com. Contestants must notify
Sirotzki of their intent to participate by Oct. 8.

Caregivers meet Friday
The Family Caregiver Group of Neighborly Senior
Services of Manatee is sponsoring a meeting of
caregivers Friday, Sept. 20, from 1 to 2 p.m. at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Details are available at 758-9969.

Volunteers sought
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary is seeking vol-
unteers in almost every phase of its operation, with
training to be provided. Further information is available
from the volunteer coordinator, Joanne Davis, at the
sanctuary on City Island, off the south ramp of the New
Pass Bridge, or by calling 388-4444.



Obituaries


John C. Cobleigh
John C. Cobleigh, 78, of Anna Maria Island, died
Sept. 8.
Born in Goodland, Ind., Mr. Cobleigh came to
Manatee County from San Jose, Calif., in 1988. He
was a manufacturing engineer.
Memorial services were Sept. 14 in Sarasota. Me-
morial contributions may be made to Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL
34238.
He is survived by companion Norma Rogers of
Sarasota; daughters Dot Petrone of Lake Tahoe, Calif.,
Jan Cobleigh-Thompson of Orland, Calif., and Jenni-
fer Kern of San Francisco; stepsons Dan Morgan of
San Jose and David Morgan of Portland, Ore.; sister
Oma Halsema of Lafayette, Ind.; brothers Larry of
Monon, Ind., and Michael of Earl Park, Ind.; and five
grandchildren.


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PAGE 12 M SEPT. 18, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Deja vu! Usual Anna Maria problems discussed


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Deja Vu was the title of a song and hit album by
Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young in the early 1970s.
"We have all been here before," sang CSNY on the
title track. That could easily apply to public issues in
Anna Maria, such as the big three of parking, drainage
and rights of way.
The Anna Maria City Commission dealt with a
number of topics at its Sept. 12 workshop, but when
discussion turned to drainage problems, many people
in attendance might have been thinking "deja vu." Been
here, done that and bought the T-shirt!
Commissioners again discussed a proposal from
Ed Barber and Associates engineering firm to study the
drainage problem on Spring Avenue.
That opened the "flood gates."
Commissioner Linda Cramer wanted to know who
was making the priority list for drainage projects in the
city.
"We've had North Shore and South Bay Drive
(drainage) in the budget," and those were never done,
she said. "Now, Spring Avenue is ahead of them.
What's the priority list?" she asked.
She said the city is supposed to have a capital im-
provements plan and a capital improvements commit-
tee and it doesn't. "I'm frustrated."
Commissioner John Michaels said Public Works
Director George McKay had "rejected" drainage
projects included in last year's budget because he
didn't like them. Spring Avenue drainage wasn't even
on that list. Former Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh had also
rejected some drainage projects, he said.
"It's good we're doing something, but we need a
priority plan," Michaels said.
"And what constitutes a priority," added Cramer.
Commissioners were near to agreeing on the Bar-
ber proposal, but resident Carol Ann Magill objected.
Many other drainage projects have been on the list
longer and those should be addressed first, she said.
Cramer advocated hiring an engineering firm to
create a priority list and Commissioners Chuck Webb
and John Quam agreed. "There are too many piecemeal
projects," such as Spring Avenue, said Webb.


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In the end, commissioners agreed to hire a consult-
ant engineering firm as the city engineer and Mayor
SueLynn will advertise for engineering companies with
expertise in drainage to submit proposals. The first
priority of the firm hired will be to create an overall
drainage plan with a priority list, said the mayor.
"So the Spring Avenue project is on hold until the
city gets an engineer," SueLynn said.
Cramer said it's doubtful any engineering firm can
develop a city drainage plan in time to meet the South-
west Florida Water Management District Dec. 7, 2002,
deadline for submission of grant applications for fund-
ing of drainage projects. That means any drainage plan
submitted to Swiftmud after the December deadline
won't be funded for another two years, she said.
"That's one reason I'm frustrated," said Cramer. The
city held a special meeting with Swiftmud officials last
October and commissioners subsequently passed a motion
by Cramer directing McKay to find a qualified engineer-
ing firm for the city to hire to develop a drainage study in
time for the December 2002 deadline, she said.

Parking
When commissioners discussed the possibility of
reducing the $30 fine for parking on a right of way, a
discussion ensued on what constitutes a vehicle being
on the right of way. Is it when a tire is two inches, six
inches, 18 inches or two feet on the roadway?
The mayor said many visitors, particularly those
from foreign countries, were unaware of the violation
until they were ticketed. She thought warnings should
be issued first.
Commissioners suggested that MCSO deputies in
Anna Maria use "common sense" on the parking issue.
But the Anna Maria parking problem is more than
just how far a tire extends onto the right of way. It's one
of the "big three."
SueLynn and the commission scheduled a special
commission meeting on parking for 7 p.m. Oct. 16 to dis-
cuss hiring a consultant to develop a master parking plan.
Deja vu?
Whenever parking is discussed in Anna Maria,
however, another "big three" issue, rights of way, can't
be far behind. Commissioners agreed to hear requests


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from residents at that meeting for exceptions to right of
way violations.
The commission will also discuss how the city
should handle anonymous code enforcement com-
plaints at that meeting.

Turtle ordinance
Commissioners again discussed the proposed turtle
lighting ordinance that would also restrict items left over-
night on the beach, whether public or private property,
during the turtle nesting season from May 1 to October 31.
Turtle Watch Director Suzi Fox presented photo-
graphs of dead turtles ensnared in furniture along with
pictures of items left on Anna Maria beaches overnight.
She said there are really only 11 houses on what
could be considered private beach in Anna Maria af-
fected by the ordinance.
Fox also disputed any claim that she's advocated
turtle rights over people rights. Most people are happy
to voluntarily comply with removing items from their
beach at sunset.
But one resident who was complaining was Shirley
Perez, who said a lot of the items in the pictures were
on her property, which she rents to others. Her neigh-
bors often leave items on the beach overnight, but Fox
did not take pictures of those infractions.
She said she is "being singled out" and "it's a per-
sonal thing."
The final reading of the ordinance is Sept. 26.

Other business
The mayor reported:
*The city is still working on a legal agreement with
West Coast Inspection Services for building inspec-
tions and plans review.
*Advertisements for a certified building official for
the city have gone out to local daily newspapers and
national trade publications.
*There are now three vacancies on the code en-
forcement board and anyone interested in being on the
board can apply at city hall.
*A meeting with city businesses is scheduled for I
p.m. Sept. 25 at city hall to discuss how the city can
better support its business community.


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THE ISLANDER U SEPT. 18, 2002 M PAGE 13


Budget tentatively approved in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
With virtually no public comment, Bradenton Beach
city commissioners approved a pared down budget of
$2,244,212 for fiscal year 2002-03, which begins Oct. 1.
Commissioners have proposed a property tax rate
of 2.6750 mills, down from the current 2.6816. A mill
is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value of property,
less any exemptions. For a home valued at $225,000,
less the $25,000 homestead exemption, city taxes for
next year would be $535, down from the current $536.
The commission shifted some funds during its
Sept. 11 meeting. A $28,000 line item for city hall
renovations within the planning and development de-


apartment was deleted and $20,000 was allocated to-
ward implementation of goals established during the
visioning process earlier this year. The remaining
$8,000 of the renovation funds was allocated to cover
computer software and associated costs within the ad-
ministration department.
Commissioners also deleted $5,000 previously al-
located for anchorage improvements, $10,500 for sea-
wall repairs, and $3,825 for street-end improvements.
There were also changes to the funding for various
not-for-profit organizations. As proposed now, the fol-
lowing organizations will receive a total of $12,200:
Anna Maria Island Community Center, $4,000; Anna


Holmes Beach approves first


reading of 2002-03 budget


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach commissioners approved
the first of two readings of its 2002-03 budget,
with one amendment.
Commissioners unanimously agreed that it
was not necessary to set aside a $70,000 sal-
ary in the contingency fund for a possible ad-
ministrative assistant for the mayor. Instead
the money will be placed into a stormwater-
utility fund.
Commission Chairman Rich
Bohnenberger said that the mayor had failed to
produce a job description for the proposed
position. He believes most of the grant infor-
mation available to the city can be researched
in the 2002-03 Financial and Technical Assis-
tance for Municipalities book and said it won't
cost $70,000 for someone to read it.
Fellow commissioners agreed that the
money could be better spent and after little dis-
cussion chose to set up the stormwater-utility
fund as a separate line item from general capi-


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tal improvement funds.
The entire proposed budget amount is
$5,961,794, which is an increase from last
year's $5,003,868 budget. The actual operating
expense proposed is $4,176,794.
The budget includes the added salary of a
building inspector, recently hired in the public
works department, and a 3 percent cost of liv-
ing raise for all employees.
The maximum millage rate will remain at
2.25 mills.
A mill is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed
value of property less any exemptions. This
rate can be lowered through the adoption of the
budget at the second budget hearing, but it can-
not be raised by elected officials.
Holmes Beach homeowners with a home
valued at $225,000, and claiming a $25,000
homestead exemption, will pay $450 in city
taxes next year.
Residents will be allowed to comment on
the proposed budget during the final public
hearing at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24.


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Maria Island Turtle Watch, $1,000; League of Women
Voters, $100; Solutions To Avoid Red Tide, $750;
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce, $500;
American Red Cross, $500; Annie Silver Community
Center, $600; Keep Manatee Beautiful, $1,000; skate-
board park, $2,000; Christmas Prelude, $750; and
Tingley Memorial Library, $1,000.
The contributions garnered the only public com-
ment at the hearing, with Jeremy Whatmough speak-
ing on behalf of START and John Sandberg for the
Tingley Memorial Library.
The final public hearing on the budget will be at 7
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.



Bradenton Beach

election candidates

have until noon Friday

to qualify
As of noon Tuesday, only one candidate had
qualified to run for office in Bradenton Beach.
Both the Ward 2 and Ward 4 commission seats
are on the ballot this year. Incumbent Commis-
sioner Dawn Baker has indicated her willingness to
serve for another term for Ward 2; Vice Mayor
Mollie Sandberg has also said she will run for of-
fice again, and resident Anna O'Brien has said she
will oppose Sandberg.
As of Tuesday, only Sandberg had qualified to
run for office.
Bradenton Beach city commissioners earn
$4,800 a year. To run for office requires a $48 fil-
ing fee, signing several documents and providing
the supervisor of elections with a petition signed by
15 electors within the city.
The deadline for qualifying for office is noon
Friday, Sept. 20.
The election if there is to be one will be
Nov. 5.



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PAGE 14 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Villa Rosa seller/buyer dispute may lump city in middle


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
In what some might consider just another strange
twist in a city that frequently deals with strange behav-
ior, the seller of the controversial Villa Rosa subdivi-
sion property in Anna Maria has informed the city his
family still owns the bottom land in the canals adjacent
to that property and the city should not issue any per-
mits to the buyers for "construction such as docks,
wharves, piers, seawalls, drainage pipes, etc., that
would impact on our property."
The letter by Steve Lardas states that the Lardas/
Lacios family "is the owner of the land under the ca-
nals" adjacent to the property, now owned by GSR


Villa Rosa trailer can stay
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
That double-wide trailer parked at the Villa
Rosa property on South Bay Boulevard in Anna
Maria can stay, city officials have told Steve
Noriega of GSR, developers of the subdivision.
The controversial trailer was parked on the
property early last week and immediately drew
fire from some irate citizens, who filed a com-
plaint with the city's code enforcement officer
that the trailer had not been permitted.
The city agreed to accept an after-the-fact
permit application from GSR and approved the
trailer in a Sept. 11 letter to Noriega.
City approval came with several conditions.
GSR must meet all federal, state and local
codes during placement, construction and use of
the temporary field trailer; the sales part of the
temporary field trailer will cease upon completion
of the first model or residential home; and signage
and noise must be kept to an absolute minimum
and every effort made to minimize the impact of
the temporary trailer on the surrounding residents.
The letter to GSR was signed by George
McKay as the city's public works director.



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Development LLC, which bought the land from "the
Lardas family" in June 2002 for a reported $3.1 mil-
lion. Ownership documentation has been provided
to the city, Mayor SueLynn said.
Where that puts construction of the planned 17-unit
Villa Rosa single family home subdivision is unclear
because part of GSR's approval for the estimated $20
million project by the Anna Maria City Commission in
July was to obtain a permit from the Southwest Florida
Water Management District for a stormwater-drainage
system that includes construction of a seawall.
Efforts to reach either Robert Byme or Steve Noriega,
the principals of GSR Development, were unsuccessful.
But City Attorney Jim Dye said who owns the ca-
nal bottom is not an issue for the city and the Lardas

Players opening season
There's something new this year at Island Players
and it's not visible on stage, it's not in the sound room,
and it's not in the cast or staff, it's a new opening night
and a one-night expansion of the performances for each
show.
New for the 54th season of Island Players is
a Thursday night opening night for all five
plays, thereby adding a full night of tickets
and one more (potentially) full audience
for what often has amounted to sold
out shows in the past.
Island Players are deep into
rehearsals for their season-open- I B
ing dramatic comedy "Mother
Hicks," scheduled Oct. 3 to 13.
Tickets for the five-show season are
$60, while individual show tickets are $14.
Orders are accepted at the box office from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. weekdays starting Monday, Sept. 23, at
the theater, 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria, or by
phoning 778-5755.
The play by Susan Zeder is set in a small Midwest-
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family does not have the legal right to tell the city to
whom it can and cannot issue a permit.
"They can't tell the city not to permit it, but it may be
prudent for the city to go slow and have the two parties
figure out who can do what, and not put the city in the
middle," said Dye. If might, however, take a lawsuit by
one of the two private parties to settle the issue, he said.
At this point, Dye said he does not have all the
details of the letter or the issues involved, but SueLynn
said she would ask Dye to research the title question
and determine the city's legal position.
The Lardas family sold the property along South
Bay Boulevard to GSR in early June for a reported $3.1
million in a two-day closing that was considered
"stormy" by some of those involved.

with new opening night


tough for everyone, especially for three outsiders.
They are a foundling girl, a deaf boy and an eccen-
tric recluse. They appear to other townspeople to be
different enough to be a bit scary, so neighbors find
it handy to blame them for all their woes, said di-
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The outcasts' travails on the way to
discovering themselves and each other
combine elements of American folk-
lore and sign language, Woodland
said.
Michael Vogt, Heather Kopp
Sand Barbara Fleming lead the
cast, with other significant players
Zachary Yowarski, Heather Gulling,
Joseph Shedrick, Michael Malat, John
Durkin and Diana Shoemaker.
Anne Fasulo and Carol Cozan are stage man-
agers, John Flannery set designer, Chris McVicker
lighting designer, Walt Schmidt and Bob Grant sound
directors, and Don Bailey costume designer.
Curtain times are 8 p.m. except for two Sunday
matinees at 2 p.m.
The theater is dark Monday.


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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 15



Big times loom for Island Privateers


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
With a new skipper and mostly new quarterdeck
roster, the Anna Maria Privateers are charting a season
full of work, action and enjoyment.
Newly in charge is Greg "Shiprek" Davidson,
president, succeeding Mitch Stewart in an organization
that traditionally is heavy on nicknames; and he does
know how to spell shipwreck, he said, he just got tired
of its propriety. And after all, it's his nickname.
Joining him at the helm are Eric "Axmon"
Rushnell, vice president; Elizabeth "Doc" Christie,
treasurer; Greg "Wigger" Luzier, captain; Ron "Bones"
Baker, secretary; Rick "Mad Dog" Maddox, past presi-
dent; and Richard "Red Dog" Cline, liaison.
They intend to "get back to basics," starting with more
Anna Maria Island participation by businesses and other
organizations as well as Privateers themselves.
More involvement with the Sahib Shriners and
their works for children is in the works, and more ac-
tive participation with the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center and the Boys and Girls Club.
A membership drive is coming soon, Davidson
said, to augment the 35 "black shirts," full-fledged
members, and half a dozen "gray shirts." The latter,
said Davidson, are probationary members deciding if
they like all the work the organization entails and "not
just the parades."
By-laws will be updated and revised, a process now
in committee and ultimately to be voted on by the mem-
bership. The pirate ship boat/float, built on a bus chassis
by Privateers themselves, will be improved and returned
to the outfit's original colors of black, red and gold.
They plan to upgrade the scholarship program,
which this year provided a $2,500 scholarship and five
of $500 each. They'd like to raise those to $1,000.
Another youth project, the very successful
Privateens, is due for expansion, too. A year old at
Manatee High School, it has a couple of dozen mem-
bers who work on Privateers projects and earn commu-
nity service credit for it in school several have put
in 100 hours or more, said the Privateer advisor to
Privateens, Liz Christie. The president is Ben Miller of
Holmes Beach. Christie, who teaches accounting at
MHS, said anyone interested in joining or aiding the
program should call her at 714-7300, extension 2916.


With the dust mostly settled in the wake of the
Sept. 10 election fiasco, Islanders and Floridians
have until Nov. 5 to work out for whom to cast their
next batch of ballots.
Problems with touchscreen voting machines in
Miami-Dade and Broward counties caused Gov. Jeb
Bush to extend polling hours by two hours statewide
to allow everyone time to vote. Locally, no serious
problems materialized at the polls.
Results of the election included:
For 12th Judicial Circuit Court, Group 5, Charlie
Roberts will face off against Susan Chapman Nov.
5, defeating candidates Adam Tebrugge and Laurie
Zimmerman.
In the 12th Judicial Circuit Court, Group 19
election, voters will again go to the polls in Novem-

I ,- I I f


Temps

& Drops

on A.M.I


Date
Sept. 8
Sept. 9
Sept. 10
Sept. 11
Sept. 12
Sept. 13
Sept. 14


Low
80
80
81
76
75
76
78


I'



*


High Rainfall
92 0
93 0
92 '0
80 1.10
79 1.80
82 .40
88 Trace


Average Gulf water temperature 840
24-hour accumulation with reading at
approximately 5 p.m. daily.


Shiprek and a wooden likeness of himself Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


One new development that cheers all of the offic-
ers is a central contact point Post Office Box 1238,
Holmes Beach FL 34218. "Please, please use it,"
pleads "Shiprek."
The Privateers have a full schedule laid out al-
ready, and it's far from complete, Davidson said.
September is quiet, with a meeting Wednesday, Sept.
18, at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradenton Beach firehouse, 107
Second St. N., and a work detail on the ship Sept. 21.
Davidson stressed that all meetings are open to the pub-
lic. They are on first and third Wednesdays of each month.
October is a busier story. Members will help the
Coastal Cleanup on the Island Oct. 5, have a mullet
smoke in the Publix parking lot Oct. 12, help Shriners
with their fundraiser on Oct. 12 and "capture" the
Shrine Temple in Sarasota the next day, and put up
their scary "haunted house" at the firehouse later in the
month. On Oct. 19 they and, so far, 200 friends will
take a one-night party cruise aboard the Regal Empress
out of Port Manatee; there's plenty of room for more
partygoers, who may sign up through Fantasy Travel


at 795-3900.
There will be mullet smokes at Publix nearly ev-
ery month, several "thieves markets" which will be on
the Island alongside the Holmes Beach City Hall, many
Christmas-related events, the annual Kids Day, and
parades, parades, parades.
Privateers lend their exuberant presence to parades
from Punta Gorda to New Port Richey, 30 parades a
year in all.
The organization was incorporated in 1971, founded
to help the community and especially its youngsters and,
while they're at it, have some fun, said Davidson. Its
membership includes men and women, Islanders and
mainlanders, professionals and working people presi-
dent "Shiprek" is a heavy equipment mechanic at Woo-
druff & Sons in Bradenton.
Early on it took over the special Kids Day that Snooks
Adams, now retired police chief, had launched with a
Jeepload of youngsters. That end-of-school festival of
youth remains a mainstay and source of pride for the Pri-
vateers.


Officers find human skull

during Holmes Beach

arrest
A fight at the Anchor Inn in Holmes Beach led
police to a man with a human skull in his apartment
early Thursday.
Holmes Beach Police Officers responded to a
disturbance at the Anchor Inn caused by a man with
a knife. According to witnesses 25-year-old Aaron J.
Van Sickle hit a man at the bar with a chair, and af-
ter being escorted outside by the bartender, pulled out
a large knife.
By the time police arrived at the scene Van
Sickle had fled on foot.
While searching for Van Sickle officers encoun-
tered a man who claimed to have seen him tearing up
his apartment and armed with a rifle and knives.
According to the report, when officers arrived at
Van Sickle's apartment they found him lying on the
floor with some furniture piled on top of him.
Officers reportedly saw numerous knives lying
about, including one which had been driven into the
door of the refrigerator.
After taking the defendant into custody, officers
found ammunition, a rifle, knives, narcotics and a hu-
man skull.
Van Sickle's girlfriend reported that she believed
he was under the influence of the drug ecstasy.
His girlfriend also told police that Van Sickle has
had the human skull for quite awhile and that he told
her he stole it.
According to the report, Van Sickle kept the
skull mounted on a pedestal in the living room.
Van Sickle was charged with two counts of ag-
gravated assault, one count of resisting arrest and one
count of violation of storage and preservation of hu-
man remains.


ber to decide between Preston DeVilbiss Jr. and Ed
Nicholas, who topped Diana Moreland and Cynthia
Evers.
The School Board District I election was won by
incumbent Barbara A. Harvey, who defeated chal-
lenger David M. Bailey. The school board's District
3 seat also went to the incumbent, Larry Simmons,
over challenger Jacob Ruscoe.
On the Democratic ballot, Bill McBride appears
to have defeated challengers Janet Reno and Daryl
L. Jones for governor, facing Gov. Bush in the fall.
In the four-way race for the U.S. Congress, Dis-
trict 13, Jan Schneider defeated Candice Brown-
McElyea, Patrick Feheley and Charles S. McKenzie
Jr. She will face Katherine Harris, who defeated
John Hill, in the fall.
For state attorney general, Democrat Buddy
Dyer won the race over Walt Dartland, Scott
Maddox and George Sheldon. He will face Charlie
Crist in November, who defeated challengers Lock
Burt and Tom Warner.
Commissioner of agriculture was won by David
Nelson, who defeated challengers Mary L. Barley
and Dr. Andy Michaud.
The Florida Senate District 21 seat was won by
Republican Mike Bennett, who defeated Mark
Flanagan for the seat. Bennett will fact C.J. Czaia in
the fall.
In the Florida House of Representatives District
68, Bill Galvano defeated challengers Benjamin
Milks, Dave Miner and Brian Murphy. Galvano will
face off against Democrat Arlene Sweeting and Lib-
ertarian James Wallace in the fall.
And at-large Manatee County Commissioner Pat
Glass defeated Ginki Miller for the Republican
nomination, and will face write-in candidate David
Daugherty in November.


Results in Sept. 10 election of interest






PAGE 16 E SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Parents preview abstinence program at IMS


Parents of Island Middle School students had an
opportunity to preview a seven-week abstinence pro-
gram, which students will be participating in as part of
the Life Skills curriculum.
The abstinence program is designed to teach teen-
agers the value of waiting for marriage to have sex and
the dangers they may face if they choose to engage in
risky behaviors.
Abstinence Program Director Lynda May from
Carenet Manasota Pregnancy Center in Bradenton will
be conducting the course. At the preview, May shared
statistics with parents to demonstrate the need for ab-
stinence education at the middle-school level.
For instance, May said, the Manasota Pregnancy
Center has taken in pregnant girls as young as 11, and
in Manatee County there were 168 teen pregnancies
reported in 2001. Of those, 16 pregnancies were girls
age 14 and under.


"That's 15 students per high school getting preg-
nant," said May. "Fifteen students is half a classroom."
Manatee County was also ranked number two in
the state for the number of repeat teen pregnancies, this
year the county ranks number 1 1.
Two of the seven sessions will focus on the reper-
cussions of sexual activity, such as pregnancy and
sexually transmitted diseases.
Students will be divided by grade level and sex for
these sessions, and May told parents that every effort
will be made to keep the discussion on track, consid-
ering the age and maturity levels of the students.
The remainder of the program will focus on build-
ing self-esteem, life goals, refusal skills and empower-
ing students so that they have the strength to say no,
May said.
"Most middle school girls between the-spring of
eighth-grade and fall of ninth-grade decide if they


Library orientation
Students from Karen Newhall's second-grade class walked from Anna Maria Elementary School to the Island
Branch Library to meet with Laura Beard, who told the class about resources available for researching


projects. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Island Middle School menu
Monday, Sept. 23
Traditional Meal: Beef-A-Roni, Garlic Breadstick,
Green Beans, Tossed Salad with Dressing
Basket Meal: Chicken Nuggets, Goldfish Crackers,
Jello
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Ham and Cheese
Sandwich
Tuesday, Sept. 24
Traditional Meal: Nachos with Beef and Cheese,
Broccoli, Tossed Salad with Dressing
Basket Meal: Pizza and Pretzels
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Tuna Salad Sand-
wich
Wednesday, Sept. 25
Traditional Meal: Grilled Cheese with Soup, Green
Peas, Tossed Salad with Dressing
Basket Meal: Barbecue Pork on Bun, Baked Chips,
Jello
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Fruit, Yogurt and
Muffin
Thursday, Sept. 26
Traditional Meal: Baked Chicken with Mashed
Potatoes, Roll, Mixed Vegetables
Basket Meal: Cheeseburger with Fries
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Turkey and Cheese
Sandwich
Friday, Sept. 27
Traditional Meal: Pizza, Veggie Pick-Up with Dip,
Corn on the Cob
Basket Meal: Manager's Choice and Fruit Juice Bar
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Fruit, Muffin and
Cheese
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


will have sex. This is the time when they lose their
virginity," said May. "We need to address the issue
at this age, when they are forming their opinions and
values."
According to May the program is not anti-sex, but
rather promotes that sex is wonderful within the proper
boundaries that being marriage.
Through the program, May said students who are
already actively engaging in sex are encouraged to
make a change and abstain.
Although the sex-education sessions utilize a de-
gree of fear as a deterrent, May believes the balance
offered with the relationship and communication-skill
building has made the program successful in changing
the minds of other teens.
"Everyone has a choice," May said. "We need to
equip them with the information to make those
choices."


Island Middle School

parents set goals
The Island Middle School Parents Advisory Com-
mittee held its first meeting of the new school year and
set some goals.
Fundraising was one of the main topics of discus-
sion among parents.
IMS Director Jeanne Shell told parents that stu-
dents would be bringing home pledge sheets to partici-
pate in a "Math-A-Thon" to raise money for St. Jude's
Children's Hospital in Tennessee.
Students will seek sponsors willing to donate
money for every math problem they solve of a maxi-
mum 200 math problems.
Although students are not required to participate,
Shell said that this is an opportunity for the students to
give back to a community.
Joann Frieler-Baker, PAC fundraising chair, spoke
to parents about some of the ideas she plans to move
forward on.
Frieler-Baker is going to put a collection box in the
school administrative office to collect box tops for edu-
cation, which can be found on a variety of General
Mills food products. She also plans to collect
Campbell's soup education labels.
Both of these collections will help raise funds and
bring needed materials into the school. With the box
tops for education labels, Frieler-Baker said, the school
could raise up to $20,000. And the Campbell labels can
be used to order products from an educational cata-
logue.
Attendants at the PAC meeting also unanimously
approved Frieler's fall fundraiser to sell food products
from the Red Wheel fundraising catalogue. A variety
of food products, from burritos to pumpkin pies, will
be available through the company, based out of
Myakka City.
Parents were also asked to consider putting to-
gether a band booster club to help raise funds for the
Conch Fritter band, which has been invited to play sev-
eral off-Island events.
"The band wants to go, go, go," said PAC Presi-
dent Julie Krokroskia, "and it's not free, free, free."
Parents also discussed the quality of the school
lunch program. All were in favor of asking the Mana-
tee County School Board to release IMS from its obli-
gation to provide lunches prepared by King Middle
School.
Many of the parents have heard complaints from
their children about the quality and the quantity of the
food.
Parents said they would be agreeable to providing
lunches for their own children, but it was also sug-
gested that the school look into working with a vend-
ing machine company to provide cold drinks and pos-
sibly sandwiches.
Finally, Shell reminded parents of girls attending
the school to check that shorts and shirts are falling
within the guidelines of the Manatee County School
Board's dress code. Shell said a number of girls are
wearing clothes that are too short.
Parents also discussed the option of having gym
uniforms for students to wear during the Life skills
class. Students are currently given the option to bring
PLEASE SEE IMS GOALS, NEXT PAGE


Anna Maria Elementary
School menu
Monday, Sept. 23
Breakfast: French Toast Sticks with Syrup,
Fruit, Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Chef Boyardee Ravioli with Roll or
Nachos, Garden Salad, Fruit
Tuesday, Sept. 24
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit,
Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Hot Dog or Fruit, Cheese and Muffin
Plate, Baked Beans, French Fries, Fruit, Juice
Bar
Wednesday, Sept. 25
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs and Toast, Fruit,
Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy or Breaded
Chicken Patty with Mashed Potatoes, Sea-
soned Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Thursday, Sept. 26
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit,
Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Spaghetti with Meat Sauce and Garlic
Stick or Turkey Stack Basket with Goldfish
Crackers, Green Beans, Fruit
Friday, Sept. 27
Breakfast: Large Orange Muffin, Fruit,
Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Tuna Salad Sand-
wich, Peas and Carrots, Lettuce and Tomato
Salad, Fruit
Milk and juice are served with every meal.





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 M PAGE 17


AME making plans for walk-to-school day


Members of the Parents-On-Patrol safety watch
group at Anna Maria Elementary School have begun
making plans to participate in National Walk Your Kid
to School Day.
The event is held annually on Oct. 2 and a variety
of activities are being planned to teach students bicycle
and pedestrian safety.
POP is a volunteer watch group of parents who
patrol the campus during arrival and dismissal times.
Manatee County Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordina-
tor Troy Salisbury met with POP volunteers to outline
some of the activities that could be incorporated into
the event.
POP coordinator Deborah Scott suggested that
parents and students walk through Holmes Beach to the
school, perhaps parking or taking the Manatee Trolley
to a location nearby and walking the remainder of the
way to the school.
Salisbury suggested that one parent might volun-
teer to walk a group of children from the same block
or neighborhood to school together.
The purpose of the event is to teach children how
to look for strangers, watch for cars and cross the street
safely. In addition to parents talking to their children
about safety as they walk, Salisbury suggested that
POP solicit local sponsors to set up information booths
or watering stations along the way.
Another idea Salisbury suggested is getting per-
mission from the city to mark the safest paths to school
with chalk outlines of the school mascot, a dolphin, on
the pathway.
Salisbury said that he would be able to provide
stickers, safety brochures and activity books. He also
offered to donate approximately five bicycle helmets to
be given out on a first-come, first-serve basis to stu-


IMS goals
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16


a change of clothes, and although the school does not
have shower facilities, it does have bathroom stalls in
which students can change for gym activities.
Krokroskia suggested that having a gym uniform
would make the school more identifiable when students
go to the beach or other Island locations for class ac-


.4.


iI~I:,,~l


~


.7,'


Manatee County Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator Troy Salisbury details how the county can help with
National Walk Your Kid to School Day at Anna Maria Elementary School for members of Parents-On-Patrol.
Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


dents who might not otherwise be able to afford one.
In order for the event to be a success, however,


tivities.
Shell and Hughes agreed to research options with
the staff and bring information back to the next PAC
meeting for parent input.
Parents were told that they could keep up with IMS
news monthly with the director's report that is mailed
home at the beginning of the month.
Also, the school is in the process of putting to-
gether its Web site. Some information is currently
available at www.isandmiddleschool.org.


Salisbury said that it would take the support of parents,
local police officers and the school staff.


Judges needed for

Manatee County History Fair
Volunteer judges are needed for this year's Mana-
tee County History Fair.
The fair takes place Oct. 30, is open to students in
grades four through 12.
Adult volunteers must sign up with Melinda
Holcomb by Sept. 30. Volunteers can decide to judge
student papers, documentaries, project boards or per-
formances. For more information, call 749-7165.


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PAGE 18 M SEPT. 18, 2002 M THE ISLANDER

Island Biz


Shining stars
David and Bonnie Leung of Golden Star Chinese
restaurant in Bradenton Beach are celebrating 16
years as husband and wife owners of the Island's
only dine-in Chinese restaurant. Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin

These stars are golden
David and Bonnie Leung of the Golden Star
Chinese restaurant at the corner of Gulf Drive and
Seventh Street North in Bradenton Beach are celebrat-
ing 19 years of marriage and 16 years as the owners of
the Island's only Chinese restaurant.
In fact, David has been at Golden Star since 1980
when he first arrived from Hong Kong.
In 1986, he and Bonnie took over as sole owners
and the popularity of Golden Star has been increasing
since.
"We have a very friendly atmosphere," said
Ronnie. "Every winter we have our regular customers
who show up and tell us how much they miss our food
and friendly service. They say we have the best Chi-
nese food at the best prices."
Islanders, too, know a good Chinese restaurant
when they find one. After 16 years, the Leungs know
many of their regulars as personal friends.
"We've grown up with many Island families who
are regulars," said Bonnie. "We've seen little ones
grow up with mom and dad. Our customers are like our
family."
But good food also helps and David, the head chef,
likes to vary his Chinese, serving Mandarin-and-


Cantonese-style foods mixed in with a few American
dishes.
"Usually, people like the Mandarin style because
it's a little more spicy. I think Mandarin chicken and
seafood are the most popular items."
Don't forget the Peking roast duck, which David
says is very popular with winter visitors.
David and Bonnie aren't the only Golden Star fam-
ily. There's daughter Helen, an honor student at King
Middle School, who helps mom and dad, and Charlene,
an Island resident who's been serving David's finest
cuisine at Golden Star for 13 years.
"We're a family business and people come for the
family atmosphere," said Bonnie.
"And I'd like to thank all the Islanders and visitors
who have supported us all these years and keep com-
ing back," she added.
Golden Star is open from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Monday through Thursday and until 9:30 p.m. on Fri-
day and Saturday. Sunday hours are from 3:30 p.m. to
9 p.m. The restaurant also does takeout orders.
For more information on Golden Star, call 778-
4688.

Realty raves
Dave Jones and Dick Maher led in obtaining prop-
erty listings for sale during August at A Paradise Re-
alty. Leading sales personnel for the month were Jane
Grossman and Nicole Skagg.
The team of Cindy and Gary LaFlamme in August
made the largest single family home sale in the 53-year
history of Wedebrock Real Estate Co. history, a $4
million property on Longboat Key. The LaFlammes
also led the firm in August for new listings and sales,
along with Mike Migone and Tina Rudek. Leading
lister at the Holmes Beach office was Geoff Hall, while
leading in sales at the Island office was Lee Kinworthy.
At Avenue of the Flowers, Teresa Bradford led in list-
ings and Karen Ankerstar in sales.
Allan Galletto was top listing agent and Tom
Nelson leading sales agent during August at Island
Real Estate.
Wagner Realty's Anna Maria Island office had
David Moynihan as leading in both new listings and
sales once again in August. Dee Dee Burke and Vera
Freeman were top listers at the Longboat Key office,
with Jack McCormick leading in sales.

Island real estate sales
3705 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 116 Sunbow Bay
3, a 1,121 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1980, was sold

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$169,900.
506 Bayview Dr., Holmes Beach, a canalfront
1,632 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car home built in 1991 on a
75x120 lot, was sold 6/5/02, Schwob to Hill, for
$720,000; list $789,000.
628 Hampshire, Holmes Beach, a canalfront and
golf course frontage 2,517 sfla 3bed/2.5bath/2car/pool
home built in 1973 on a 95x105 lot, was sold 6/3/02,
Galati to Guerin, for $665,000.
756 N. Shore Dr., Anna Maria, a 1,014 sfla 3bed/
2bath/lcar home built in 1964 on a rhombus-shaped
50x 100 lot and purchased 11/02 for $275,000, was sold
6/3/02, Benalcazar to Beach 1, for $420,000; list
$449,000.
2310 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 202 Shell Cove,
a Gulffront 507 sfla condo built in 1972, was sold 5/29/
02, Vissa to Eldridge, for $229,000.
3007 & 3009 Avenue E, Holmes Beach, two du-
plexes of 4bed/4bath each both built in 1970 with 1,512
sfla each on 50x105 lots, were sold 5/28/02, Florida
Island Investments to Ark Assets LLC, for $635,000.
3705 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 114 Sunbow Bay
3, a 1,121 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1980, was sold
5/28/02, Slay to Serra, for $146,000.
412 Spring, Anna Maria, a 948 sfla 2bed/2bath/
2car duplex built in 1935 on a 52x145 lot, was sold 5/
29/02, Squires to Beard, for $225,000; list $245,100.
601 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 116 Gulf
Watch, a 2bed/2bath 1,282 sfla condo built in 1982,
was sold 5/29/02, Fallon to Proul, for $299,900.
7106 Palm Dr., Holmes Beach, a 1,505 sfla 2bed/
2bath/lcar home built in 1958 on a 1/4 acre lot, was
sold 5/28/02, Martin to JN LLC, for $265,000.
1007 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 214 Summer
Sands, a 1,259 sfla 2bed/2.5bath condo built in 1982,
was sold 6/11/02, Sandidge to MacConel, for
$291,900; list $299,900.
208 71st St., Holmes Beach, a 1,669 sfla 2bed/
2bath/lcar home built in 1972 on a 65x105 lot, was
sold 6/12/02, Varon to Wood. for $339,900; list
$339.900.
2306 Canasta. Bradenton Beach, a bayfront 2,383
sfla 3bed/3bath home built in 1998 on a 50x180 lot,
was sold 6/10/02. Perryman to Gaprop Inc., for
$450,000.
3801 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 204 Sunbow Bay
4, a 1,146 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1981, was sold
6/10/02, Comes to Fumo, for $205,000.
Island real estate sales is compiled by Doug
Dowling, licensed real estate broker, 778-1222, exclu-
sively for The Islander. Copyright 2002.





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Wednesday, Sept. 18
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult basketball at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.
6 to 7:30 p.m. Parent support group with Shirley
Romberger at the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-
1908. Fee applies.

Thursday, Sept. 19
10:30 a.m. Beginners Pilates with Laura
Bennett at the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-
1908. Fee applies.
Noon to 4 p.m. AARP 55 Alive driving refresher
course at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Registration required: 776-1158.
2:50 to 3:25 p.m. Baton twirling class at Anna
Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 752-9425. Fee applies.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult volleyball at the Anna Maria


Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Informa-
tion: 778-3390. Fee applies.

Friday, Sept. 20
Noon to 4 p.m. AARP 55 Alive driving refresher
course at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Registration required: 776-1158.
1 to 2 p.m. Family caregiver support group at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magno-
lia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: contact Susan
Horton, 748-3001.
6 to 8 p.m. Opening reception for "Natural
Florida: Paintings from the George Percy and Debbie
Geiger Collection" at the South Florida Museum, 201
10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 746-4131 ext. 35.
Fee applies.

Saturday, Sept. 21
Noon to 3 p.m. Kid's day at Island Chiropractic,
3612 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-
0722.

Monday, Sept. 23
5 to 9 p.m. "Eat That Frog" management semi-
nar with Tom Davenport at the Longboat Key Cham-
ber of Commerce, 6854 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key. Information: 387-9519. Fee applies.

Tuesday, Sept. 24
Noon Island Bridge Club meets at the Anna


THE ISLANDER N SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 19
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: contact Hubert Mitchell at
792-6133. Fee applies.

Wednesday, Sept. 25
7:30 to 11 a.m. Blood drive at the Longboat Key
Chamber of Commerce, 6854 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key. Information: 387-9519.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult basketball at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee applies.

Ongoing:
"Take a Closer Look" photographs by Shirley
Foor and paintings by Charles Sierra at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Hours: 778-6341.
Community Harvest program at all Columbia res-
taurant locations. Five percent of all checks will be
donated to charity.

Upcoming:
Sierra Club FISH Preservation kayak trip Sept.
28.
Team tennis ralleybal) at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center Oct. 1.
Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island welcome
back meeting at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center Oct. 2.


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria
No reports available.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 6, 500 block of South Bay Drive, informa-
tion. Officers helped resolve a dispute between a ten-
ant and property owner.
Sept. 6, 2500 block of Gulf Drive North, warrant
arrest. A man was arrested on a warrant issued out of


Walton County.
Sept. 6, 3200 E. Bay Drive, Anna Maria Island
Plaza, assist other agency. Officers arrested two juve-
niles after an adult witnessed them steal cologne from
Walgreens.
Sept. 8,200 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach Pier Restau-
rant, assist fire department. Officers responded to a struc-
ture fire caused by an electrical cord that shorted out.
Sept. 8, 3700 block of Gulf Drive, domestic bat-
tery. A man was arrested after a physical altercation
with his daughter's boyfriend.


Holmes Beach
Sept. 6, 7700 block of Marina Drive, vessel
crash. According to the report, a man was trans-
ported by helicopter to Bayfront Medical Center af-
ter a boating accident.
According to the police, the man was pulled
from the water unconscious after the 21-foot Cen-
tury vessel he was in struck a marker.
Sept. 9, 3501 Gulf Drive, Pirate's Den motel,
fraud. The motel owner reported that a woman did not
pay the balance of her bill before leaving.


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Spy vs. Spy
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Rock Steady
OCT. 2
Democracy
OCT. 9

Vine Street Rumba Band
SEPT. 21 a 2-6
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PAGE 20 K SEPT. 18, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Rain puts damper on soccer startup

By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent Magic
Due to heavy rains that moved through Manatee goalie
County last week, only two games in the Anna Maria Michael
Island Community Center's soccer league were played. Wallen
Monday, Sept. 9, was the only evening that the collides
weather cooperated enough to even try getting the with
games under way as more than 4 inches of rain pelted Rage
the area, rendering the fields unplayable at more than forward
one sports venue. Kyle
Hopefully the weather will clear up, paving the Wilkins
way for a bevy of soccer action to come at the Center. while
Danziger Allergy & Sinus got the action started in defending
Division III (ages 8-9) when they outscored Gateway a corner
Solutions 5-3 behind a pair of goals from Joey kick.
Hutchinson. Danziger's Tayler Uselton, Jordan Islander
Sebastiano and Zachary Evans each added one goal to Photos:
the victory. Kevin
Blake Wilson matched Hutchinson with two goals Cassidy
of his own, while Peyton Phillips chipped in with one
goal for Gateway Solutions. '
The second game of the evening saw Division II
(ages 10-11) Island Real Estate double up on Mr.
Bones by a 4-2 score. Max Marnie led the winners with
two goals, while Stephen Thomas and Patrick Watts


Anna Maria Island Community Center

soccer league schedule
Instructional Division (Ages 5-7)


Date
Sept. 19

Sept. 24

Sept. 25

Division
Sept. 19
Sept. 24


Time
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
6 p.m.


III (Ages 8-9)
6 p.m.
6 p.m.


Division II (Ages 10-11)
Sept. 20 6 p.m.
Sept. 20 7:15 p.m.
Sept. 23 6 p.m.
Sept. 23 7:15 p.m.

Division I (Ages 12-14)
Sept. 19 7:15 p.m.
Sept. 24 7:15 p.m.


Team vs. Team
Longboat Observer vs. Morgan Stanley
Island Animal Clinic vs. Galati Marine
Observer vs. Sun
W.C. Surf Shop vs. Morgan Stanley
Galati Marine vs. W.C. Surf Shop

Air & Energy vs. Jessie's
Jessie's vs. Danziger

Harry's vs. Air America
Mr. Bones vs. Island Real Estate
Harry's vs. IRE
Air America vs. Mr. Bones

W.C. Refrigeration vs. Island Pest
LaPensee Plumbing vs. W.C. Refrigeration


each notched one goal.
Will Osborne paced Mr. Bones with
the loss.


two goals in


Mitey Mite Dolphins
learning hard lessons
Bad weather has also hampered youth football ac-
tion at the Police Athletic League field in Bradenton,
which saw two straight weeks of action postponed.
Despite much of the field resembling a mud bog,
PAL played most of its scheduled games Saturday,
Sept. 14.
In Mitey Mite (ages 9-11) action, Keith Brooks
rushed for two touchdowns and added a kick return for
another touchdown to key the Bears to a 34-0 romp
over the Dolphins.
Quarterback Tim Carico and running back A.J.
Dreier each added touchdowns for the Bears, which
also got a dominating performance from its defense in
holding the Dolphins to one first down for the game.

Magic boys suffer 5-2 loss
In other soccer action, the U15 Manatee Magic,
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 21


Magic defender Daniel Miller and Rage forward Alex Caudrone battle for the ball during the Rage's 5-2 victory.

Sports Bill Starrett of Anna Maria City.
The Sept. 11 games were rained out.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 The weekly contests get under way every Wednes-
which boast Islanders Daniel Miller, Michael Wallen day and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
and Sean Pittman as starters, dropped an uninspired 5- Park, 10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership fees
2 decision to the Braden River Rage on Saturday, Sept. and everyone is welcome.
14, at G.T. Bray Park in Bradenton. Kevin Cassidy is publisher of Sports Page, a free
The Rage jumped on top in the fifth minute when publication focusing on youth sports and distributed
sweeper Seth Richards headed a comer kick from the countywide, coach for Manatee High School female
18-yard line past Wallen for a 1-0 lead. soccer, and a full-time teacher/parent.
The Magic tied the score three minutes later when ,/
Neven Subotic stole the ball from Richards and hit a / d
long diagonal pass that sent the Rage keeper and the '' -'
Magic's Robert Armstrong scrambling for the ball. The ,-' ?'
Rage keeper dove on the ball as Armstrong arrived and ,, ^, *- ^ i e .
the ball squirted free. i 'L ..
Armstrong then gained control of the ball and !
dropped it back to Jeff Heargraves. Heargraves set up WT = ._, -
to attempt a shot into the vacant goal, but a challenge
from his blind side sent the ball forward to Armstrong.
With his back to the goal, Armstrong one-timed a high,
curving shot into the goal to tie the score. ,., ,,
The Rage retook the lead in the 14th minute when -
a through ball got past the Magic defense forcing
Wallen off his line. Wallen collided with Wilkins and
the ball squirted through and slowly rolled into the
goal.
Two quick goals in the 38th and 39th minutes put
the game away for the Rage, which improved to 3-0-1
on the season as the loss dropped the Magic to 1-3. '.,. .. ;

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Sept. 14 horseshoe games were ,..,.
George Landraitis and Ron Pepka, both of Bradenton. .
Runners-up were Jim Spencer of Holmes Beach and


Denver Hardy is all business as he dribbles the ball
forward during soccer action at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.


Jack
Titsworth (or
is that Connor
Bystrom six
years ago?)
cuts back
during recent
soccer action
at the Center.


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PAGE 22 M SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


'Needles of death' spearing migratory birds?


Communication towers, those gangly metal struc-
tures that most Islanders love to hate, have been tar-
geted by another tangent of the population for vilifica-
tion for reasons far beyond aesthetic considerations.
The new group opposed to the tall towers: birders.
Three environmental groups have petitioned the
Federal Communications Commission to implement a
moratorium on cell towers along coastal Gulf of
Mexico from Texas,to Florida. The groups claim that
the towers act as an in-air roadblock to migrating birds,
and estimate that between 5 and 50 million birds a year
die after slamming into the towers or the guy wires
supporting the structures.
There are something like 70,000 communication
towers in the United States, with about 5,000 a year
being built. About 6,000 of the metal things line the
coastal Gulf area, smack in the middle of all those mi-
grating birds. Florida has one of the highest-density
tower rates per square mile in the country, and is on the
flight path for lots and lots of birds moving from north
to south, or back.
The environmental groups American Bird Con-
servancy, Friends of the Earth and Forest Conservation
Council claim that the flashing lights atop the tow-
ers act as a beacon to attract birds, which then slam into
the metal and die. The groups want the moratorium so
further studies can be conducted to assess bird mortal-
ity and come up with some hard data on the bird-tower
interaction.
Those data apparently are pretty spotty. There were
some accurate bird mortality statistics kept on a tower near
Tallahassee from 1955 to 1980. Researchers found that
42,384 birds of 189 species had collided with the tower
and died in that 25-year period. On one overcast night,
4,000 birds slammed into the WCTV tower and died.
The groups appear to have a good lever to block the
towers in the form of the Migratory Birds Treaty Act,
which apparently protects birds from undue human in-
tervention. Whether or not towers fit the test of "undue
human intervention" will probably have to be deter-
mined in court.
Back many, many years ago, Bradenton Beach's
Jim Kissick was involved in an effort to block construc-
tion of huge communication towers in eastern Mana-
tee County. The "needles of death" were a hazard to
airplanes, I seem to remember as the critical argument,
and Jim tried to stop the construction of a farm of
1,000-plus towers on behalf of the aviation industry.
Some people thought the argument against the
towers was for the birds. Today, it seems that the
merits against high communication towers may rest


Golf tournament

$30,828 worth of

'tickled pink'
John Horne is "tickled pink" that his 2002 golf
tournament beat all records and raised $30,828, the net
from which will go to the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center. The net turned out to be $28,515 after all
the bills were paid.
Rained out Friday, Sept. 13, the tournament went
to its "rain day," Saturday, and 136 golfers went the
course. A few others had to drop out because of sched-
uling conflicts, said Horne, owner of the sponsoring
Anna. Maria Oyster Bar and Lazy Lobster.
"We had golfers fly in from Boston and Detroit and
Miami," he said. "We only lost three teams because of
scheduling conflicts."
Some of Friday's volunteers, too, had to pull out
because of other commitments on Saturday, but Horne
PLEASE SEE GOLF TOURNEY, NEXT PAGE


with the fate of the birds.

Resume whale harvesting?
New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof has
proposed what environmentalists abhor: resumption of
the whale fishery.
All commercial killing of whales in the world's
oceans was banned in 1986 after various species were
brought to the brink of extinction. Only Japan and
Norway continue to kill whales for oil, blubber and
meat.
Blue whales, which once numbered more than
200,000 worldwide, now number less than 10,000.
On the other hand, sperm whales remember
"Moby Dick?" have a population of more than 2
million. There is a significant population of sperm
whales in the Gulf of Mexico, a historic roaming
ground for sperm whales prior to the mid-i1800s when
the whaling industry was in its heyday and overfishing
was the norm.
Kristof brought forward some interesting thoughts
about whaling, though. Take the minke whales, for ex-
ample. There are more than 1 million of the smallish spe-
cies out there, and since they eat the same food as the
larger blue whales, and since blue whales are dwindling
in numbers probably as a result of a lack of food, Kristof
postulates that a limited harvesting of smaller whales
would increase the population of larger whales.
As he put it:
"There is no longer a 'save the whales' imperative
for a moratorium on commercial whaling of all species.
The only remaining argument to oppose commercial
hunting of common species such as the minke and per-
haps the sperm and gray is to say that whales are such
magnificent creatures that no one should be allowed to
kill them.
"But that is dangerous ground. It is culinary impe-
rialism for us to tell Norwegians and Japanese that
because we like whales, they must not eat them. We
can disapprove, just as we wince as Koreans or Chinese


eat dogs, but what right do we have to forbid them from
eating an animal that is not endangered but simply lov-
able. So are lambs and deer.
"So yes, it makes sense to save the whales that are
endangered. Indeed, we should do more to help blue
whales, like launching an international initiative to
identify and protect their breeding grounds. But it's
also time to allow some species to be harvested again."
And before you begin picketing The Islander office
and start calling for my head, no, I'm not advocating
the return of Capt. Ahab.

Oops
Shirish Date will be at Circle Books at 2 p.m. Oct.
27 to sign copies of his new book, "Black Sunshine."
An incorrect date for Date was listed last week.

Randy is hot, hot, hot
On another literary front, kinda, Southwest Florida
novelist Randy Wayne White received a new forum for
his new venture by way of the St. Petersburg Times the
other day.
Randy has branched out into the hot sauce busi-
ness, and went into a taste-off with Jeff Klinkenberg.
White, author of "Sanibel Flats" and "Twelve Mile
Limit," started marketing hot sauces a year or so ago.
He ran into a guy in Cartagena, Colombia, who was
making some pretty tasty stuff, and the new venture
was launched.
I like the Tomlinson Colombian Gold myself, but
the Doc Ford Green Flash is pretty good, too. Both are
available on-line at www.docford.com, or
randywaynewhite.com. Enjoy.
A short e-mail from White in response to our no-
tation of the Times cover story produced this reply:
"Very hot here on the island withOUT sauce. R"

Sandscript factoid
Peppers are ranked by heat through something
called the Scoville scale, named after Wilbur Scoville
in 1912. A bell pepper is a zero on the scale, a jalapeno
at 2,500, and a Scotch bonnet pepper is something like
250,000.
Something called the red savina habanero is ranked
at 850,000.
And then there is something called "The Source,"
a pepper sauce that is supposed to hit the 7.1 million
mark on the Scoville scale. I assume it is sold in a lead-
shielded container and should only be handled by
people wearing full-body protection.


. .... .
.-,:--. .. .. .... .


,\...-'.
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54'.
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~


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Watch the Birdie
Mike Manning of Bradenton coaxes a birdie putt toward the cup on hole No. 3 during the Anna Maria Island
Community Center benefit and four-man scramble held Sept 14 at El Conquistador Country Club. Manning
made this attempt to put his team in a temporary tie for the lead. Islander Photo: David Futch


FREE,

TOWI NG

FOR MEMBERS



756-3422


INSHORE SPORTFISHING CHARTER BOAT


j1eat A




Captain Steven Salgado
Owner/Operator
Lifetime experience in local waters


Full & Half Day Trips
Custom Trips Available
U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom-built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait &
Tackle Furnished
Anna Maria Island
Florida
778-9712


MARINE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
s "All Your Waterfront Needs"
BOATLIFTS DAVITS DOCKS SEAWALLS
New Installs or Repairs Free Estimates
792-5685 1-888-371-4777
Lic#ML00105 Anna Maria/Cortez


I


, I^





THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 18, 2002 M PAGE 23


Rain slows fishing, but reds still a good bet


By Capt. Mike Heistand
The rain last week slowed the fishing excursions
somewhat, but the anglers willing to get a little wet
were still able to reel in lots and lots of redfish and
mangrove snapper. Snook season is off to a slow start,
but there are still some big ones out there to be caught
- one fisher reeled up a 42-inch-long linesider off
Rattlesnake Point.
Offshore action continues to be good for grouper
and snapper.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's pulling in
red grouper from about 80 feet of water, plus mackerel,
bonita and mangrove snapper.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said he's catching lots and lots of redfish up
to 31 inches, plus trout, flounder and snapper.
Capt. Matt Bowers on the Outcast in Holmes
Beach said snook are hitting along the beaches, man-
grove snapper are still thick along the Intracoastal
Waterway, and redfish are schooling on the seagrass
flats. Offshore action seem to be red grouper and man-
grove snapper, both within 30 miles of shore.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business is really reel-
ing in redfish. On one trip last week he was able to
catch more than 70 reds, most within the slot limit.
He's also catching a few keeper snook on every trip
out.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach said he's been targeting snook, redfish
and trout with excellent results, although he said last
week's rain slowed his fishing excursions.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
wade fishers are doing well with redfish and trout on
the slower tides. Anglers on boats are catching lots of
mackerel and mangrove snapper, he added.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
one lucky fisher caught a 42-inch snook last week off
Rattlesnake Point last week. Other action includes
black drum in the cut, mangrove snapper at Bird Key
and redfish in Miguel Bay.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said pier anglers
are catching lots of redfish, a few mangrove snapper,
some black drum, mackerel and "tons" of ladyfish.
At the Anna Maria City Pier, fishers are catching
lots of snook at night, mackerel in the morning, man-
grove snapper during the rest of the day and big yellow-


Golf tourney
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22


"sent out the call and other volunteers responded like
champs. It was terrific."
All of the net $28,515 goes to the Center, he said,
after the El Conquistador Country Club is paid for use
of its course and some other incidental expenses. That's
not counting nearly $20,000 worth of prizes donated by
businesses. Last year the tournament raised $25,000-
plus.
"When the result is so great, all the effort is worth
it," Home said. "We were all absolutely thrilled."
Four golfers representing Wilbur Boyd Insurance
& Investments won the scramble with a 16-under par
56. The top dogs for the day were Pat Osburn, Larry


Captain Doug Moran
Snook Redfish
Trout Tarpon

USCG Licensed
Half & Full Day Charters
(941) 792-0035 '
Cell: (941) 737-3535

Capt. Mike's
-,Charter Boat

"MAGIC"
Backwater Near Shore Up to 7 miles out in the Gulf
Snook Redfish Trout Flounder Mackerel Snapper
Light Tackle Fishing Reservations a must
Tackle, bait, ice, fishing license provided!
779-9607
Capt. Mike Heistand USCG Licensed


Lunker linesider
It took both Randy Todd Lane, left, and J.D. Jackman to hold up this 45-inch-long snook Lane caught while
fishing near Longboat Pass. The fish was released.


tail jacks are tearing up the bait around the pier.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he got out one day last week and caught lots
of trout to 18 inches, redfish up to 24 inches and some
small snook, using artificial bait.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of
Holmes Beach said he was only able to get out one day
last week because of the weather, but was still able to
bring back amberjack, red grouper, mangrove and lane
snapper.
On my boat Magic, we also were only able to get


McGary, Chris Sager and Jimmy Vollenweider.
Second place went to the Banana Factory team of Joe
Harrish, Dick Hersman, Ken Seman and Jim Collins.
People Leasing team members Bret Gardner, Rick Bibler,
Gary Bibler and Gary Morgan rounded out the top teams.
Closest-to-pin prizes went to Wade Morgan, Ken
Butler, Marc Skinner and Tom Jamer. Longest drive
(male and female) on two holes were made by Rick
Bibler and Karen Lacey on hole No. 2, and Rick Bibler
and Paul(ette) Rosche on hole No. 10.
Closest to the Budweiser "Suitcase" was Rich
Lencioni and Chuck Vrabel took the prize for
"straightest drive."















BRIAN WOOD
CONTRACTING INC.
CUSTOM DOCKS SEAWALLS BOAT LIFTS
S Design Build *Permitting
Sales Service Supplies

792-5322
tAnna Maria/Cortez45
tate Cert. CRC049564


out one day last week because of foul weather, but still
caught 15 redfish, three trout and some flounder.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year fishing guide. Call
him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing report. Pictures of
your catch are also welcome and may be dropped off at
The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Please
include identification for persons in the picture along with
information on the catch and a name and phone number
for more information. Pictures may be retrieved once they
appear in the paper.



Aonno fDorTl 7lon3aYj.ies

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Sep 18 12:28 1.8 3:49 1.5 10:31a* 2.4 5:37 0.3
Sep 19 12:40 1.8 4:38 1.3 11:17a* 2.5 6:01 0.4
Sep20 12:45 1.8 5:17 1.1 11:53a* 2.4 6:24 0.5
FM, Sep 21 12:53 1.9 5:56 0.9 12:31 2.4 6:44 0.7
Sep 22 1:01 2.0 6:32 0.8 1:08 2.3 7:04 0.8
Sep23 1:13 2.1 7:11 0.6 1:48 2.2 7:24 1.0
Sep24 1:28 2.2 7:50 0.5 2:33 2.1 7:41 1.1
Sep 25 1:52 2.3 8:31 0.4 3:23 1.9 8:06 1.2
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


WE'RE GIVING

YOU THE SHIRT

OFF OUR BACK!

o, Columbia
j I F SportswearCompany


FISHING SHIRTS 15 T-SHIRT DESIGNS
PRINT SHIRTS ISLANDER SANDALS
SLATE SLIDE SANDAL
(of same type product) (of equal or lesser value)
OFFER GOOD THRU TUES., SEPT. 24, 2002





PAGE 24 E SEPT. 18, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


Frank Davis
Broker





Mellnda Bordes
Realtor






Marianne Correll
Realtor
6




Bob Fittro
Realtor





Richard Freeman
Realtor






Alan Galletto
Broker/Salesperson






Bill Jones
Broker/Salesperson






Jon Kent
Realtor






Tom Nelson
Realtor






Nick Patsios
Broker/Salesperson






Chris Shaw
Realtor


'r;


Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor


WATERFRONT HOME & LOTS

618 Hampshire Ln........... $595,000

657 Key Royale Dr ......... $1,199,000


503 67th St. ....................

622 Emerald Lane. .............

909 N. Shore Blvd .............

505 67th St. .....................

616 Emerald Lane .............

525 67th St .................

632 Key Royale Drive. ...

509 68th St .................


$439,500

$539,000

$899,500

$439,000

$559,000

$499,500

$529,000

$439,000


715 Holly Rd ............... $594,900


510 68th St. .................

623 Foxworth Ln. ..........


$489,000

$575,00,0


12106 Gulf Drive Lot. ..... $750,000

ISLAND HOMES,

CONDOS & LOTS


Sun Plaza West #201. ....


$425,000


140 50th St.................. $489,500

509 S. Bay Blvd ........... $659,000


308 55th St. Lot ..........


$199,500


1103 Gulf Dr. South. ......... $535,000

Bridgeport #113............... $298,900

Sunbow Bay #204........... $259,000

Beachwalk Townhomes New Project from ... $499,900


6925 Holmes Bvld ..........


$229,000


214 83rd Street ............ $339,000

710 North Shore lot ........ $299,000

MAINLAND

116 22nd St. W. ............ $239,000

3948 Mariners Way......... $439,900

2418 90th St. NW........ $2,995,000

6506 W. 38th Ave. ........ $129,000

2+ Acre Estate .............$1,490,000

934 Sandpiper Cr......... $185,000

11332 Perico Isle Cir ......... $325,000

1100 Imperial Dr, #201....... $375,000

8811 51st Ave W..... NEW $239,500


FRESH MULLET SALE


J.Yore than a mullet_ Wrapper!


The Islander

Duffy stuff, too.

Shirts, coozies, hats!
Visit our office for all the "best souvenirs."
Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
941 778 7978




YOUR HOMETOWN REALTOR SINCE 1939
WAGNEQ DELTY
Iy _- Email: wagnerfl@gte.net www.wagnerrealty.com


EXCLUSIVE JEW-
FISH KEY! Seclu-
sion and privacy in
This island retreat!
2,300 sq.ft. on 1.7
%" ^"^ :"""-_ acres. Lots of glass
*.*. _...** 4"' ^ for fabulous water
views, coral stone
fireplace in master
bedroom and living area. Reduced to $1,950,000. Call Anne
Miller, 778-2246 or 792-6475.
I S L A N D
TOWNHOME! Re- IF
cently updated 3 or 'i.- '
4BR/3BA townhome I
at Sunbow Bay with
lovely lagoon view
and close to 2,000 dlI
sq.ft. of living area. l i.
Tennis, two pools, .1.... *
fishing pier, dock, short walk to beach. Offered at $307,900.
Call Dave Moynihan, 778-2246 or 778-7978 eves.
PINEBROOK
CONDO! Popular
ground-floor Pine-
brook condo with
te i ' 2BR/BA totally reno-
vated and beautiful
view of the golf course
from the screened in
lanai. Priced to sell at
$119,500. Call Dee Jorcyk 778-2246 or 778-8550.


2217 Gulf Drive N. Bradenton Beach FL 34217
778-2246 800-211-2323


DICK MAHER
AND
DAVE JONES
ISLAND SPECIALISTS

7840
1 -80 -2725


Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation.


$50,000
COUNTRY HOME SITE
Want privacy? Enjoy the beauty
of the country and the wildlife
when you build a home on this
6.78 acre site located 22 miles
east of 1-75 on State Road 64.
IB85539


6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 778-0766 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.ArvidaRealty.com







Simply the Best

Ininn Jesi t




N'jilongrt


GUvF VId
aC2F-UT-IFL-LL, 6RUcD UcjCm ViI-
2 BEDRooM I-S SA-TH Toti-sKose UJWITH
C41)KPl NCW F-S.tslit&s$ AN'P APLp.IAfces.
4305, 000


ISLu DUPLEX
OF_ of FLF r/ AZD uSrT
BLo O B ~DC To eH-c-. AP
i. l-0oCrfTED li rOLMeC5 6E9C .
.31r3000
70+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.

Mike

Norman
800-367-1617
Re2altyNC 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
L WWW. MIKENORMANREALTY.COM


I





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 25



ITEM FO SAL I ARAG SAES Cntiued r RANSORTTIO


POOL TABLE for sale. $500, firm! New felt, new
slate. Bar size. Very nice. Must see. 779-9752.

QUEEN-SIZED MATTRESS set $100; large swing
with canopy $100; baby crib complete $40; desk
with chair $125. All items are "best offer." 778-3433.

BEDROOM SET: large butcher block-style, four
pieces with box spring and mattress, $200. 778-1209.

CARPET TEXTURED BERBER 12-by-8-foot. Brand
new, shades of taupe. $200. 778-5532.

BIG BEAUTIFUL HOUSEBOAT $45,000 or make
offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open Tuesday, Thursday
9:30-2 and Saturday 9-noon. Sales racks. Two cribs
for sale. Donations accepted Wednesday mornings.
511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.

SATURDAY SEPT. 21, 10am-2pm. Furniture, bed-
ding, TVs, appliances, beds, more. 118 Fourth St.
S., Bradenton Beach.

YARD SALE FRIDAY & Saturday, Sept. 20 & 21,
8am-2pm. Lots of goodies, Beahie Babies, garden
tools, glassware. 308 60th St., Holmes Beach.

ESTATE SALE SATURDAY, Sept. 21, 9:30am-
2pm. Old wicker and wrought iron patio furniture,
China cabinet, piano, table and chairs, Belleek,
kitchenware, lamps, lots of miscellaneous. 507 72nd
St., Holmes Beach. Sale conducted by Palma Sola
Sales.

GARAGE SALE FRIDAY & Saturday, 8am. Moving
- furniture and more! 811 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria.

Islander Classifieds: The best news in town and the
best results from classified and service advertising.






NVREALTOR.
28 Years of Professional Service
OUR LISTINGS DON'T EXPIRE, WE SELL THEM!
FLAMINGO CAY CONDO CANALFRONT. Boat Slip, 2BR/2BA. Htd
Pool. $155,000.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX with parent quarters, 3BR/2BA, IBR/I BA,
new roof, newer appliances. Walk to beach. $439,000.
DEEDED BOAT DOCK 3BR/2BA, wood decks, clear views down
canal to bay. Elevated with bonus area. $350,000.
DIRECT GULFVIEW Beach Cottage. Completed rehabed.
2BR/2BA Home with boat-slip $278,000.
COMMERCIAL
STYLING SALON 8 station, established over 35 years. $39,000.
WALGREENS Triple Net. Good CAP. $2,650,000.
ANTIQUE & ART GALLERY Old Main Street. $69,000
5 APARTMENTS Steps to Gulf/bay. $475,000.
MOBILE HOME PARK 71 spaces, lakefront. 10 percent cap.
See our classified ads We're booking 2003 rentals now!
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


ESTATE SALE FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 9am-2pm. Victo-
rian chests, secretary, four-poster bed, three twin
beds, mirrors, sofa/love seat/chair set, lamps, desk,
sewing machine, cherry bed, patio set, drop-leaf
table, linens and kitchenware. 221 85th St., Anna
Maria. Sale by Julie McClure.


YOGA CLASSES with Harmony Ananda. Now on
Tuesday and Thursday, morning and evening. Is-
land Fitness Center. To enroll, call 921-0074


LOST GRAY TIGER cat, large, 12 years old. An-
swers to Kiki or Keekers. Lost Tuesday, Sept. 10,
vicinity of 200 block in Holmes Beach. Very lovable
and trusting. Call 778-5497.


CRITTER SITTER Seven years in pet care, 22
years as an Island resident. Tender, loving care for
your pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.

FREE GOLDFISH! All sizes, bring a bucket. 779-
0462.

DACHSHUND adoption and rescue (D.A.R.E.). Call
Shona at 761-264'2 for information or visit our Web
site: www.daretorescue.com.

Buy it, sell it, find it fast in The Islander classified.





Marina Pointe

Realty Co.

314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
S *EA L 1A


1998 HONDA CRV Like new inside and out! Only
39,000 miles. Teal green, power everything. Must
sell! $11,900. Call 730-7564.

1991 FORD TAURUS wagon. Good condition.
New air conditioning and tires, runs great! $2,100
or best offer. See at 118 Maple, Anna Maria, or
call 778-9161.

1989 LEBARON convertible, sporty, red. Runs
good, good brakes, needs air conditioning work,
other minor issues. $950, or best offer. 778-5102.

1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN. 135,000 highway
miles, cold air conditioning. Runs top! Has towing
package. Ready for travel. $3,100, or best offer. Will
consider trade for pickup truck of equal value. 730-
9622.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation
or long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Min-
utes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Capt.
John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting.

BOAT SLIP with davits for rent in Holmes Beach.
778-7039.

17-FOOT SPORT JET, 175 hp, 50 mph. Like new,
only 200 hours. Instrument panel, Hummingbird live
bait, ski tow, -trailer, etc. $9,000, or best offer. 729-2110.


10006 Gulf Dr, Anna Maria, is a Gulf view two-
story commercial fourplex with two custodial
suites upstairs overlooking the Gulf. $550,000.

0Doug Dowling Realty
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
www.dougdowling.com








SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632. FAX (941) 778-2294



On Anna Maria's
Pristine north end,
this lovely 3 or 4
bedroom, two bath
,i, S s beach house of-
'* fers spellbinding
rl views of Egmont
and Passage
Keys! Great room
Floor plan, oak
floors, two water-
side sundecks,
white tiled kitchen,
Jennair range,
breakfast bar, built-in desk and adjoining dining
nook. The third level master suite with vaulted ceil-
ings and incredible views of sea and sky. Spacious
dressing room, Jacuzzi tub, vinyl siding, double
pane thermal windows, cultured marble vanities
and oversized utility room. $950,000.


& VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE


Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com


EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS!
Vacation and Annual Rentals
(941) 778-6066 TOLL FREE 800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217


REALTORS


PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA villa with lovely
lake view. Vaulted ceilings, neutral carpet, five
fans, screened lanai, plus open deck. Breakfast
bar and walk-in closets. Detached one-car ga-
rage, courtyard entry. Won't last! $215,000. Dial
the Duncans at 778-1589, eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
E mail: info@smithrealtors.com
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden

MLS 19


^^^^^^^^^^t^^0 ^^^
[snut


[Smit





PAGE 26 M SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER
/ ~



BOT & BOTN Cotne HEPWNTDCntne


FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels and everything else
in The Islander, 778-7978.
HOUSEBOAT FOR SALE. Excellent live aboard,
guest quarters or rental income producer. $45,000 or
make offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.


LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on the
charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwater fish-
ing. USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle provided. 779-
9607.
PRIVATE CHARTERS. Fishing, snorkeling,
sightseeing, Egmont Key. USCG License. Capt. Keith
Barnett. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


CHILD SITTER and pet sitter. Seventh-grade male
looking for a job, Friday afternoons and Saturdays.
Call Zachary, 779-9803.
BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is Sa-
rah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child or $3/
pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or child. Please
call 778-7622 or 778-7611.


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial
Library. Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or
778-6247.

Moving In?
Moving Out?
?- f Moving Up?
Sf, Call Karen Day
... 778-6696
Evenings: 779-2237
) Mike Norman Realty, inc.
3101 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach

The best news on Anna Maria Island
Since 1992 The Islander.

ANNA MARIA


SuiCoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC

KEY ROYALE POOL HOME
4BR/3BA Key Royale "500" block, split-plan,
canalfront, 4,000 lb. boat lift, caged pool,
family room, two blocks to great beach.
$519,000.
SARASOTA 28 UNIT MOTEL
1.4 acres on US-41 prime location. Located
near the Ritz, airports, colleges and Van
Wezel. NT-zoned, many other property uses.
In the "Enterprise Zone" = tax incentives.
$1,500,000.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME
3BR/2BA home in central Holmes Beach.
Large lot with room for a pool. Immaculate,
short walk to beach. Garage.$329,900.
ISLAND VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, profession ondo.
Furnished sO a pets, tennis,
across c close to everything.
$294,0 0.

ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

SM SNDCoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


PART-TIME ISLANDER REPORTER: Journalism
skills a must. Computer literate. Independent worker.
Resumes: E-mail news@islander.org, or fax 778-
9392, or mail/deliver to The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton Beach
is admitting residents. Respite, long term. Call 779-
0322 for details, inquiries welcome.
GREAT NEWS! OUR ISLAND HOME is now offer-
ing "Care in the Community." Our licensed nurse and
caregivers will visit you or a loved one in your own
home to offer assistance. Call Annie, Maria or Chris,
778-7842.
ISLAND LICENSED CNA with local references.
More than15 years experience. Will provide loving,
personal care, including meals and transportation.
Call 778-5394, leave message.
NADIA'S EUROSAGE now accepting new clients.
Massaging residents and visitors more than eight
years. Call today for an appointment, 795-0887.
MA#0017550.

NEW CONSTRUCTION
THE VILLAGE
AT HOLMES BEACH
LUXURY CONDO TOWNHOUSES


...






3BR/2BA 1,700 sq.ft. Living Area Heated Pool
Elevator Available Large Private Garage
Steps to Beach/Shopping Starting at $375,000
Call: Jon Tipton, 941-779-9464
Visit us at WWW.ABOUTTHEVILLAGES.COM



Hannerle


< Moore-
REALTOR
ONE OF THE KEY'S

NATURAL>P RESOURCES





Ilk



KEY WEST-STYLE HOME IN ANNA MARIA
Anna Maria is the spectacular backdrop for this charming,
new Key West-,-vle -ibedroom home thar is nestled on a
canal just 1 1/2 blocks from a mhite sandy beach. Picture this
- warm summer breezes, lush Florida fauna, a beautiful
yellow exterior with bright white trim, soft island colored
interior paint, Bimini shurners, warm hardwood floors, soar-
ing ceilings, screened Florida room, a sumptuous master
suite, maple cabinetry and a boat ddok with lift. Go to
wwyw.hannerlemoore.com for a irrual tour. $839,000..
Call Hannerle Moore at:
(941) 387-1862
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Inc.
201 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Suite 1, Longboat Key, FL 34228


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gar-
dens, trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.
COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your com-
puter misbehaving? Certified computer service and
private lessons. Special $20 per hour- free advice.
545-7508

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs, hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.
TAMBOURINE LESSONS! Also available: flute,
saxophone, clarinet lessons. Beginning to advanced.
Contact Koko Ray, 792-0160.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


3800 Sixth Ave., Holmes Beach


TURN BACK TIME
Vw.I ( '


Still doing business as in the past
by giving personal attention
and service to all clients.
We are the Island!




1957 4
MARIE .C REAL ESTATE
FRAN'.LIN REA LTY BROER
"We ARg the Island."
9805 Gult Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 31216
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
Email amrlty@gte.net
Web site annamariareal.com


Model Open!






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 E PAGE 27



SERVICESoninedISERICSCotu


SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast and
reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines, cush-
ions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call 727-5873.

CLEANING: Honest, dependable Island woman
will clean your home at reasonable rates.
Deborah, 778-2581.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair and/
or replacement. Serving Manatee County and the
Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and per-
sonalized service, call William Eller, 795-7411.
RA005052.

ORIGINAL HUSBAND/WIFE team for general
house cleaning with the personal touch. Local resi-
dents. Dependable, trustworthy. Satisfaction guar-
anteed. References. Ask about our "Homewatch"
service. Call Ginny, 727-8329.

TREE SERVICE BY BREWER. Topping, trimming,
shaping, stump grinding and removals. Trim palm
trees. Insured. Call Phil, 778-6014 or cell 545-4770.

MAID TO CLEAN: Island resident, professional
house cleaning services. References available. Call
Wendy, 778-0321.

HOUSE CLEANING Permanent weekly or bi-
weekly. Experienced, reliable. Call for a free esti-
mate and ask for Marieta, 722-4866.

ISLAND TO AIRPORT September special: Tampa
$69, Sarasota $29, up to four people. Flat rates
anywhere. Saylor Sedan, (941) 685-3233.

THE ROYAL MAID SERVICE Licensed, bonded,
insured. Professional experienced maids, free esti-
mate, gift certificates available. Call now, 727-9337
(72-SWEEP). .
BEACH APPLIANCE REPAIR Services every brand
and model of major appliances. Call today for a free
estimate. 778-0056.

Buy it, sell it fast in The Islander classified.


Meet Kathy
Geeraoerts
Kathy has been a sales consult- -.
ant with Green Real Estate since
1988. Originally from Peoria, Ill.,
Kathy moved to the Island in
1983. She's active in St. Bernard
Church, Anna Maria Elementary School, A.M.I.
Community Center and youth sports programs.
Kathy is particularly qualified in helping families re-
locate to Anna Maria. Kathy and her husband Ted
have three children, Lindsey, 17, Zack, 12, and
Sage, 9. Stop in and say "Hi" to Kathy.














SUEASIMDE CWOTTwAGE
Attention Artisans, Craftsmen, Jewelers.
Don't miss this chance to work from home in
this very special cottage built in 1912, Just
steps from Tampa Bay and the historic Anna
Maria City Pier. This is the perfect spot for
your small business. Unlimited possibilities.
Call for details. Offered at $485,000.



REAL ESTATE .,
OF ANNA MARIA


9906 Gulf Drive
Visit our website at www.greenreal.com


SUZIE HOMEMAKER! She cooks and cleans. Ex-
perienced chef and professional housekeeper.
Single mom needs work. Island resident, refer-
ences. 962-2553 or 778-0898.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, clean-ups, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation and pest control service. Everything
Under the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-4441.

GILLIS & GILLIS ENT. Crushed, washed shell, top-
soil, landscaping services. We install shell drive-
ways. Serving Sarasota and Keys since 1978. Fully
licensed and insured. 753-2954 or 376-2954, cell.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $27/yard. Hauling:
all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free esti-
mates. Call Larry at 795-7775, cell 720-0770.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL! Everything else costs
extra. Crushed, wasted shell, gravel, mulch, dirt,
and rip rap delivered and spread. If you're looking
for the lowest price, call any Tom, Mark or Larry. If
you want the job done right the first time, call David
Bannigan, 794-6971, cell phone 504-7045.
Advertising works fast in The Islander. 778-7978


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim.
Have sawmill, will travel. Dan Michael, master car-
penter. Call, 745-1043 or cell 962-4068.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more by
Hunter Douglas and other major manufacturers.
Lifetime warranty. Call Island resident Keith Barnett
for a free in-home consultation. Many Island refer-
ences, 15 years experience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call Neil,
726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable
rates, call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.


53 YEARS OF DISTINCTIVE ISLAND SERVICE

3224 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales: 941-778-0700 Rentals: 778-6665
S1-800-749-6665 awww.Wedebrock.com
REAL ESTATE COMPANY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


BRING YOUR BOAT! Spectacular un- RARELY AVAILABLE Updated Shell
obstructed water view. Unique 1BR/1BA Point 2BR/2BA condo. Tile, carpet,
condo in Palma Sola Harbor. Dock your parquet flooring. $298,000. Geoff
boat at your back door. $150,000. Wall, 778-0700.
Becky Smith & Elfi Starrett, 778-0700


BAYVIEW TERRACE 2BR ground-floor
unit in (rarely available) bayfront com-
plex. Steps to beach. $175,000. Gail
Tutewiler 778-0700.


ISLAND DOLL HOUSE. 2BR/1BA with LAUREL OAK PARK 4BR/3BA pool
boat dock and boat a block away. Close home. Cul-de-sac, private, lakefront lo-
to beach. $334,500. Gail Tutewiler, cation. $357,353. Elfi Starret & Becky
778-0700. Smith, 778-0700


Wedebrock Distinctive Annual


L~frii


Bay View!
2BR/2BA spacious duplex with gor-
geous bay views, one block to beach,
kitchen with bar, open lanai and covered
parking. $1,400/month.


nu n iRn nunc uHivO own a piece oT
north Anna Maria Island with this 3BR
charmer just one block from the beach.
Rent or renovate. $469,000. Gary or
Cindy LaFlamme 778-0700






CAN'T FIND YOUR DREAM? Build it
here. Exclusive northwest Bradenton.
$70,000 Becky Smith or Elfi Starrett,
778-0700.


AFFORDABLE NAUTICAL LIVING
Garden villa, split 2BR/2BA, deep-water
docking available. Minutes to Gulf
beaches. Move right in, maintenance
free! $110,250, Geoff Wall, 778-0700.
Rentals
L sAI U


Sandy Pointe Steps to the beach!
2BR/2BA first-floor unit with mangrove 2BR/2BA house with den, Jacuzzi, open
view, heated pool, close to shopping and lanai with view, lots of undercover park-
beach with covered parking. $950/ ing. $1,500/month.
month.






PAGE 28 E SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER

Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
tawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
We Monitor Irrigation Systems
n Service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
_Established in 1983

@@@T'RUa@'o@ STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@G'8@ @0@Tlo@N CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@ i@[lU@T[O@l JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@Gl8 U'[@0@TDK Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@BMg@ U@T0@G (941) 778-2993



Residential Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price.
Ucensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900


Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755



Water Damaged Drywall Tiling Painting
HAND AND SPRAY TEXTURE
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
Fred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141 '*


SEASCAPE PAINTING
Residential Interior Exterior Pressure Washing
Roof Coating Insured 29 Years Experience
Rick Tanner 941-798-6985
4203 76th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209


Sun Set Screens
if Su and more!
Specializing in re-screening.
cam 4 years local experience. Lic. & Ins.
OWNER 720-2742, MANAGER 720-1063

Please mention you saw it in The Islander.


I i MAAE SALBUIESFTE ER


* * CLIP AND SAVE **

WATERING(


RESTRi(TIONS

Rules in effect for Manatee County:
>- Lawn and landscape watering is limited to two
days a week.
> Addresses ending in even numbers (or A M):
Tuesday and Saturday.
>- Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N Z):
Wednesday and Sunday.
>- Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Irrigation with treated waste water allowed any
time.)
>- Owners can wash their vehicles anytime as long
as they use a hand-held hose with a shut-off nozzle.
(Pull the car on the lawn to wash!)
)- Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors is al-
lowed for ten minutes daily.
Hand-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, is permit-
ted any day.
Questions or comments? Call the Southwest Florida Water
Management District (Swiftmud) toll-free: 1-800-423-1476.


25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

MASON: 26-years experience. Glass-block,
cinderblock, brick, tile. Walls built and repaired.
Cement repairs. Licensed and insured. Chris,
795-3034

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

WINDOW AND DOOR SILLS. Have cracked, crum-
bling, broken cement sills? Will rebuild all sills
promptly. 26-years experience. Chris, 795-3034.

HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheet-rock and popcorn, doors, bi-folds,
trim, moldings and general repairs. Homes, condos,
rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.

COMPLETE BATHROOM REMODELING Drywall,
repairs, texture coating, painting. Custom shower
stalls, tub enclosures, fixtures, cabinets, tile. Unique
Options, 752-7758 or 545-6141 (cell).

JANE OF ALL trades. Specializing in tile designs and
mosaics. Tub surrounds, countertops, back splashes,
"mock tile rugs". Furniture to pools. 962-2553.




ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available.
Turnkey, beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No
pets, nonsmoking. Priced from $750/month, $400/
week, $80/night. 941-794-5980. www.divefish.com.

CONDO 2BR FURNISHED, beachfront, heated
pool, fishing dock, seasonal, three-month minimum.
Age 55 and older. (813) 247-3178 or week ends
(813) 927-1632.

VACATION RENTAL 2BR/1BA, $1,800/month.
Walk to beach, fine restaurants and shopping. 202
56th St., Holmes Beach. 778-3875.

HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL. Large 2BR ground
floor. Just steps to beach, fully furnished. Bikes,
cable, washer/dryer. $475/week. 704-7650 or
447-6797.

BAYFRONT TRIPLEX annual. Large 2BR/1BA,
$1,000/month and large 1BR/1BA, $850/month.
Washer/dryer hookup, full kitchen, newly reno-
vated. First, last, security. Steps to Bradenton
Beach. Realtor/owner. Home (352) 243-7916, of-
fice (352) 242-0167.

SUMMER, FALL, WINTER rentals available weekly,
monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Estate Co.,
778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

ANNUAL ONLY 2BR/1BA, directly on Gulf in
Bradenton Beach. $1,050/month, assurity/security
required with contract. 792-2779.

PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA condo in gated com-
munity, pool, tennis, carport, washer/dryer and lake
view, $950/month, plus utilities. Sunny Shores, 1BR/
1BA, furnished apartment, washer/dyer, close to
beach, $1,000 includes utilities. Peacock Lane,
2BR/2BA, furnished duplex, washer/dryer, $1000/
month, plus utilities. Wedebrock Real Estate Com-
pany, 778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.

STEPS TO BEACH: 1-2BR, newly remodeled, fully
furnished, TV, telephone, kitchen, microwave. $395/
week or $1,250/month, plus tax. Call 778-1098.


SOSOSOSS OS...... 505005555555555


UNFURNISHED ANNUAL Bradenton Beach.
Steps to the beach. Large 1BR/1BA with Jacuzzi
tub, washer/dryer, large sundeck with great views.
$850/month. By appointment only, call 778-0292
or 650-3552.

ANNUAL CANALFRONT HOME unfurnished (pets
OK, non smoking). Renovated 2BR/1BA, $2,250/
month, with optional 1 BR/1 BA apartment. Available
-Oct. 1, 779-2217.

VACATION & SEASON. Private Beach. Walk to ev-
erything. New kitchen, washer/dryer, dishwasher,
phone. VCR, grill, bikes bring your toothbrush!
$375-$775/week and $975-$2,275/month. Please
call 737-1121 or (800) 977-0803.

WALK TO BEACH fully furnished 2BR/2BA home in
beautiful Anna Maria. Non smoking, no pets, please.
Weekly/monthly/seasonally. (810) 695-6379.


ISLAND LUMBER

AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


NOW HIRING
ALL POSITIONS
Kitchen and
Wait Staff
ALL SHIFTS
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
APPLY IN PERSON
OR CALL 778-3953


902 S. Bay Blvd., (941)
Anna Maria 778-6066


FREE ESTIMATES
=^ A $35 Value!
_' No Service Call Charge!
~ _ o* No Trip Charge!
Servicing Every Brand and Model
io Major Appliance.
-Highly Skilled, Factory Trained
o Technicians.

Beach Appliance Repair

I 778-0056
-----------------

CARPET CLEANING
,._ .- ., *c "'7.:,.,
..... CL -




TILE CLEANINGTOO!
M 778-2882


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HOME IMPRO VEMEN T Continued RENTALSCfont inued-I


The Islander
Don't leave the Island
without us!


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ISLAND R-9LA SI -E9


BEACHFRONT ANNA MARIA, North Shore Drive.
Currently being remodeled, 2BR/2BA, living room with
fireplace, kitchen, large enclosed porch with incredible
panoramic view. Fully furnished. Available November
2002 -May 2003, minimum three months. 778-3645.
LONGBOAT KEY CONDO Banyon Bay Club, 2BR/
2BA, first-floor unit. Heated pool, tennis, fishing
dock, steps to beach. Available monthly, seasonal
or annually. (203) 481-0000.
CANCELLATION! Now available Jan. 1. 3BR/2BA
west of Gulf Drive. Totally remodeled. Tile through-
out, new appliances. Clean, bright and airy. $2,975/
month seasonal, (813) 785-5678.
HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 2BR/2BA screen
lanai, garage, dock. remodeled in Island style and
colors, tropical landscaping. Nice, quiet area, no
pets, non smoking, $950/month. Also, available fur-
nished. 776-1789.
KEY ROYALE: Bayfront home offers 3BR/3BA,
lovely gourmet kitchen, two-car garage, heated
pool, dock with boat lift and bay views from every
room. Annual, unfurnished, available now. $2,300/
month. (941) 587-2213.

NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Two spa-
cious homes both 3BR/2BA with all conveniences.
One is $4,500/month, the other is $3800/month.
(813) 752-4235.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across from
beautiful beach, $350 to $450/week. Fall and winter
dates available. Almost Beach Apartments, 778-2374.
ANNUAL RENTAL Spacious 2BR/2BA villa, at-
tached garage, large utility room, sunny den, fruit
trees, quiet neighborhood, walk to beach. $1,100/
* month, plus utilities. 778-1589.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, duplex in Bradenton
Beach. Newly rpeovatoed wirt more to come.
Wa oier/dryer hookup, covered parking. $850/
month. Call (813) 300-8543 or (813) 990-8543.
FURNISHED VILLAGE COTTAGE. 2BR, screened
lanai, steps to bay and restaurants. Available now
To' hTogh' November, $1,500/month. Season rate,
$3,200/month. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.
PERICO BAY VILLA. 2BR, pool, tennis, one-car
garage. Now $1,200/month. Season rate, $2,600/
month. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.
WANTED ANNUAL RENTAL: 2BR on Island, October
forward. Unfurnished, reasonable price. Mid 30s
couple with cat; company relocating. Please call Van
Claas Bros. Inc. (904) 501-7599, fax (904) 825-3627.
SEASONAL/VACATION: Martinique condos. All
updated, north and south buildings. One-month
minimum. Also, Perico Bay Club condos: 2BR/
2BA waterfront, beautifully furnished. T. Dolly
Real Estate, 778-0807.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share half duplex in
Bradenton Beach. Half block to Gulf. $450/month
and half of utilities. Non smoking. Call 778-3320.
CANALFRONT CONDO with dock. 2BR/2BA. $900/
month. T. Dolly Real Estate, 778-0807.


2BR/2BA ANNUAL. Elevated over carport. Nice
view on lake. Washer/dryer, dishwasher, central air
conditioning, lanai, fruit and flowers. No pets. $800/
month, first, last. 952-1592.
ANNUAL 1BR/1BA Duplex. New kitchen, tile floors,
washer/dryer, carport. Water and garbage included.
Clean, sober adults only. $700/month, plus security.
779-0470.
BREATHTAKING VIEW OF GULF. 2BR/2BA
ground-floor condo, heated pool, friendly commu-
nity. Clean and turnkey furnished. Carport. Three-
month minimum. (734) 665-4641.
LARGE ANNUAL: Bradenton Beach, 2BR/2BA,
duplex, carport, storage room, washer/dryer
hookup, new carpet. Glimpse of Gulf. $850/month.
(941) 625-2889.
EXCEPTIONALLY NICE: 3BR/2BA unfurnished home
with two-car garage and dock. 6601 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. $1,800/month. (941) 725-4488.
LARGE BAYFRONT home in Holmes Beach. 3BR/
2BA, two-car garage. Boat davits, 100 feet on the
water. Beautiful view. $3,500/month. Mike Norman
Realty, 778-6696.
Charming 2BR/2BA waterfront villa in "homey"
Holmes Beach. Fantastic view and dock with great
fishing. Annual $900 to $1,000/month. Call (970)
846-8466 or e-mail slloydevans@cs.com.
ANNUAL DUPLEX: Bradenton Beach. 2BR/1BA.
Carport, laundry room with washer/dryer hookup.
First, last, security. $775/month. 778-2918.

BRADENTON BEACH: Avenue A, very large 2BR/
1 BA. Tile throughout. Across from Intracoastal, two
blocks to beach. No pets. $820/month with annual
lease, all utilities included. Call evenings only.
Daniel, 778-4734.

ANNUAL RENTALS: Beautiful 2BR/2BA half duplex,
steps to beach, new ceramic floors, new stove and re-
frigerator, washer/dryer hookup, new carport, no pets
$900/month. 2BR/2BA half duplex, new ceramic floors,
$750/month. 2BR/1BA stackable washer/dryer
hookup, $725/month. 1 BR/1 BA, neat clean, no pets,
$650/month. Dolores M. Baker Realty, 778-7500.
TURNKEY FURNISHED 1 BR/1 BA. Available Octo-
ber to February. Full kitchen. $500/week or $1,000/
month. Small pet OK. Walk to beach or downtown
Holmes Beach. Call 807-5626.
HOLMES BEACH GULFVIEW 3BR home only 50
yards to beach. Ground level, located at 3105 Av-
enue F. No pets. Good credit. $1,150/month and
security. (800) 894-1950.
ANNUAL GULFFRONT, private beach. Great view,
newly remodeled 2BR/2BA, tile and hardwood
floors, vaulted ceiling, skylight. Washer/dryer,
decks. Beautiful must see! $1,450/month, includes
utilities. 778-1086.
BRADENTON BEACH 2BR/1BA, two houses from
beach and two houses from Intracoastal, pier. Decem-
ber-March or January-April, $3,000/month. Off season,
short term, vacation rates. Log onto
www.floridabeachcottage.com or cell (863) 447-2577.


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 18, 2002 E PAGE 29
You'll be glad you called. -
2, YVONNE HIGGINS P.A.
^4 778-7778 or 518-9003
R/WMKGulfstream Realty
"I work the Islands & the Inlands"

AfyVTI7VG6 E/,'eeffing/
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 7 78-5594 778-3468

NU-Weatherside of Florida
CLAC286523 SINCE 1948
WINDOW REPLACEMENT
We have code compliant impact
windows and patio doors!
778-7074 Financing Available

* Custom Painting
,-* Wallpaper Hanging
Interior/Exterior Design
l tA" Pressure Cleaning
Call Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed & Insured


Jeff's Rescreen
Pool Cages Porches Repairs
Serving Anna Maria & Longboat Key Free Estimates
17-Years Experience 704-7590 Lic#MCOOi95

SELL FASTER
without closing hassles and for the right price. Isn't
that what you want? That's what I do call me.
778-6066
g[en et| "Hotline" 713-0766


in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome


> 'WAGNLE QLALTY
Z v 52-217 1IXlllIr 'IlCIV N0Q11k- IbADM tNON 1b .CIlF t', 14217
lHAQOLD MALL REALTOR
Office: (941) 778-2246 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.com


[ CHRISI ES SINC 1975I~


NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
PRESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL ]Q
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
E YCNOER F SRVIV FREE ES TIMATES


1. W i .....1 I'Jnder, WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD iBACKFLOW DIVISION
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person AI H-cct :;
and paid in advance-or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. I
We are located next to Ooh La La European Bistro. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually). =


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sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
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5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


The Islander


Fax: 941 778-9392
Phone: 941 778-7978
E-mail news@islander.org


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
-\.W Residential N Commercial
%.U Restaurant N Mobile Home
\.U^ Condo Assoc. '\ Vac and Intercom
*N Lightning Repair -\.W Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978


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PAGE 30 M SEPT. 18, 2002 M THE ISLANDER



I Ra S -Ia SENoR AiREAE TCn


CANALFRONT WITH DOCK 2BR/1 BA duplex. Yard
and trash included. $850/month. No pets. 778-5793.

SEASONAL GROUND-LEVEL duplex, close to
beach. Quiet Holmes Beach neighborhood. Non
smoking, no pets. Available December-May. 2BR/
1 BA, $1,900/month. 1 BR/1 BA, $1,500/month. Call
(813) 928-5378 for more information.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA ground-level unit in great con-
dition in Holmes Beach. Close to shopping and
beach. Marina Pointe Realty Co., 779-0732.
BAYFRONT HOME with beach. City of Anna Maria.
Furnished 3BR, immaculate. Available weekly,
monthly or annually. 779-2241.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY in Anna Maria. 675 s.f.
office or retail space available on Pine Avenue.
Good visibility. Marina Pointe Realty Co., 779-0732.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1 BA, elevated apartment in
Anna Maria City. Updated interior, open deck, close
to beach, quiet location. $700/month. No pets. Call
Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307.
2BR/1BA ANNUAL UNIT in Holmes Beach. Short
walk to Gulf. Central heat and air conditioning. New
appliances. Some utilities included. $650/month,
plus security. Call 778-1193.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED DUPLEX across from
beach. 2BR/1BA each side, freshly painted.
Aposporos and Son, 795-6216.
IDEAL FOR ONE: Holmes Beach annual efficiency
apartment, west of Gulf Drive, only steps to beach.
Furnished with utilities. $500/month. Quiet complex.
Wagner Realty, 794-2246.
VACATION/SEASONAL private Gulf beach apart-
ments. Lovely, spacious interior, sundeck, porch,
patio. Tropical setting, great location, Anna Maria.
No pets. 778-3143.
HISTORIC CORTEZ VILLAGE annuals:. 1 and
2BR apartments near beaches. $600-$750/month
includes water, sewer, trash. Wagner Realty,
794-2246.


"WALK WITH ME..."
in paradise at


I can make your
Sr island dreams come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
Sales & Rentals Since 1981
-' Office 778-4800 Cell 705-4800
S- 5201 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach, Fl
S- a 34217


HOLMES BEACH north end. Seasonal/annual,
beautifully furnished. 2BR/2.5BA, two-car garage.
Photos and floor plan available. (614) 792-7535.
PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA, overlooking expan-
sive bay views. Available annually. Small pet
friendly. $1,400/month. Wagner Realty, 794-2246.
SEASONAL AVAILABLE NOW (2002-03) Gulffront,
private beach. Great view. Newly remodeled 2BR/
2BA. Tile and hardwood floors, vaulted ceiling, sky-
light, washer/dryer, decks. Beautiful must see!
$2,600/month, includes utilities. 778-1086.
SEASONAL DECEMBER-APRIL Light and airy sec-
ond-floor unit in Holmes Beach, west of Gulf Drive
and only steps to the beaches. 1BR/1BA, plus
queen sleeper, hydro tub, skylight, turnkey fur-
nished, open-air deck with Gulf view, washer/dryer
in unit. $1,700/month. Wagner Realty, 794-2246.



SELLING OR BUYING a house? Need extra
space? Budget Self- Storage can help. Daily,
weekly, monthly specials. Boxes and packing sup-
plies. 795-5510.

LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty
parking spaces, contemporary design, great vis-
ibility. $14/square foot. Can divide. Owner/Real-
tor, 388-5514 or call 809-4253.

FOR SALE BY OWNER Steps to beautiful beach on
north end of Anna Maria. 2BR/3BA, over 2,000
square feet under air conditioning, two-car garage,
enclosed porch, large living room and separate din-
ing room. 788 N. Shore Drive. $689,000. Shown by
appointment only, call Lori, 322-8335.

ANNA MARIA 4,300-square-foot, multi-use residen-
tial/retail office. 2,200 square-foot elevated, 2,160-
square-foot ground level. Built 1983. $549,900. Of-
fers 761-2457.
Buy it, sell it, find it fast in The Islander Classifieds.


Just visiting
paradise?



Tie Islander
Don't leave the island without
taking time to subscribe.
Visit us at 5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach
-or call 941-778-7978.


'~ParaiseReap.
PaaielatVo 778480

50 ;lfDi ve o i s BahF. 3427.80-27-25


SECLUDED DEEPWATER Canalfront house, 44-
foot dock, huge pool and lanai. Must sell! Terms or
trade. 730 Penfield, north end of Longboat Key.
302-3840.
LOT FOR SALE: 75 by 115 feet, zoned ROR. Walk
to beach or bay. Corner of Pine Avenue and North
Shore Drive, Anna Maria. $299,000. 746-2863.
250-FOOT FRONTAGE deep-water canal custom
home. Vaulted ceilings, 3-4BR/3.5BA, granite kitchen
counters, Roman spa, exceptional porch for entertain-
ing. Landscaped, palm trees. 631 Foxworth Lane.
$998,500, open to reasonable offers. 778-7837.
ANNA MARIA CITY: 3BR/2.5BA waterfront home,
no-bridge access to bay. Large screened decks,
dock with 12,000 lb. lift. Open plan, many extra
features, excellent condition. Asking $649,000.
Robert Loomis, licensed broker. Call 779-9200 for
appointment.

DUPLEX IN HOLMES Beach. Current owner will lease
back long term. All the tax benefits of income property
without the headaches. Call Tom at 779-2217.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND canal waterfront lot. No
bridges, deep water. 75 by 125 feet with boat
ramp. $375,000. First In Real Estate Vicky
Goggin, (813) 478-0909.
GATES CREEK (East County) 3BR/2BA, two-car
garage, wood floors, new carpet, big corner lot, built
in 1997. Could have fourth bedroom. 1,812 heated
square feet, $170,000. Yvonne Higgins, PA, Re/Max
Gulfstream Realty, 778-7777 or 518-9003.
CAYMAN CAY 2BR/2BA ground-level pool side
condo. Steps to beach, heated pool, covered park-
ing, pets accepted, $249,900.. Carol R. Williams,
Broker, C & C Real Estate. 744-0700.
ISLAND LIVING YOU CAN AFFORD! Turn key fur-
nished 1 BRF/1 BA-.mnb e home. Elevated ceiling in
living room, eat-in kitchen. Large ouitoor chad. Peek
of Gulf, steps to beach. Located in Sandpiper Mobile
Resort senior park, (905) 623-0881:
Thank you for reading The Islander classified.


GREAT INVESTMENT Five-units in
Bradenton Beach. Four 1BR units and a
darling historic 2BR/2BA house with hard-
wood floors. Less than a block from the
beach. $629,000. Call Jane Grossman or
Nicole Skaggs at 778-4800 or 778-4451.






RARE OPPORTUNITY Westbay Point
and Moorings 3BR/2BA first floor, end unit
with deeded covered parking. Pool, hot
tub, tennis and 26 acres of tropical splen-
dor. Don't miss this one! $350,000. Call
Dick Maher or Dave Jones at 778-4800.


GREAT VACATION OR RENTAL HOME
2BR/2BA with views of Gulf from huge
deck and master bedroom. Nicely updated,
including Mexican tile. Great location and
is in move-in condition. $399,000. Call Ed
Oliveira at 778-4800 or 705-4800.


TROPICAL HORIZONS Large 2BR condo
in choice Holmes Beach area. Walk to
shopping and restaurants. Very close to
the beach with some Gulf views. Rooftop
sundeck. $415,000. Call Denny Rauschl at
778-4800, 725-3934.


1 Single-family homes from
SH the $190s, including homesites.
\Island lifestyle with off-Island conveni e ie!
W ATCH Just a five-minute ride to the beach!


5 Different Floor Plans
All open & spacious ...
1 53BR/2A & 4BR/2BA

OPEN DAILY 12-5 PM
Directions: Cortez Road to
... 86th St. W., turn south on
86th St. W. Entrance to Heron's
Watch is 1/2 mile on the right.


QUALITY BUILDERS INC.
For information call 778-7127





THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 18, 2002 0 PAGE 31


PICK WINNER 9





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GULF DR. S., BRADENTON
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$50 PICK THE WINNERS CONTEST
PICK THE GAME WINNERS-* COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE
* The Islander pays $50 to the person with the most a copy of the form. Be sure to include name, address 3
correct game-winning predictions. Collect prize in per- and phone number. 4 _
son or by mail. All advertisers must be listed to be eligible to win. 5
* Entries must be postmarked or.hand delivered to the ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON, PER WEEK. 6
newspaper by noon Saturday weekly. 7
* A winner will be drawn from tying entries. The decision Winner Advertiser 8
of The Islander football judge is final. 1 9
* All entries must be submitted on the published form or 2 10


$50 BUCS CONTEST


Your correct score prediction for the week's Buccaneer game could
win you $50. Drawing in the event of a tie. Rollover if there's no
weekly winner! BUCS _____vs __________
SCORE RAVENS/SCORE


* Contestant Name


Address/City


ONE ENTRY PER
PERSON/TWO
PER HOUSE-
HOLD! MUST BE
OVER AGE 18.


/11


Anna Maraia

SThel Islander

Mail or deliver to The Islander- 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 FAX 778-9392


Phone


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PAGE 32 E SEPT. 18, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


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Across
1 Us Weekly subject
6 Little cases
11 June birthstone
16 Go up in the middle
19 "South Pacific" hero
20 Symbol of brightness
21 Kentucky college or its
town
22 Blaze, to Blaise
23 Hue for cowardly
insurgents?
25 Poles, e.g.
26 Away's partner
27 Kind of set
28 Like some airports: Abbr.
30 Changing pitch
32 Cabinet dept.
33 Point
35 Salad topping
37 From the kitchen, say
38 Tete-A-t&te lead-in
41 Healthy tree?
44 Attention getters
45 Often
47 Cuban pianist Jorge
48 Supposed crop circle
makers, for short
49 Monthly bill
51 Delight
52 One of the Balearic
Islands
54 "Take_
55 Favorable time to invest?
58 Peddle
61 Wimps
63 Heckles
64 Family nickname
66 Solvent made from coal
tar
67 Oohs and aahs


ROWING PAINS
ch Norris / Edited by Will Shortz

69 Apple polishers
72 Carbon compound
73 Togo's capital
74 It's not all done on
the ground
75 Hostage situation
acronym
77 Hiding place for a
home run hitter?
80 Chemical suffix
81 Community group
since 1915
83 Cafe lightener
84 "The Great Forest"
painter
86 Pitches between
innings
89 Virtuous
90 "Earth in the
Balance" author
91 Journey segment
92 Bedding with an
aftertaste?
95 Knave
100 Prima ballerina
101 Author Rand
102 Phone button
103 Prince Valiant's son
104 Menace
107 Discrimination
watchdog: Abbr.
109 Ballerina Makarova
112 First product of 53-
Down
113 Taxonomic subdivi-
sions
115 Emanation from a
wide chimney?
117 .0000001 joule
118 Bred winners?
119 Company that
merged with BP in
1998
120 Wild West outlaw's
comeuppance
121 Turn red, maybe


TUMPED? Answ
1-900


122 Aio starter
123 Ward off
124 Put in stitches

Down
1 Morning course
2 Surface
3 "I'm free!" for example?
4 Utility co. output
5 Whack
6 Popular TV chef
7 Business card abbr.
8 Dark
9 Airs
10 Made certain
11 "Mystery!" broadcaster
12 Sushi fish
13 "I don't give _!"
14 Book coverer?
15 Desperate
16 Warm
17 Divide up in a new way
18 Alaska nesters
24 Tranquil discipline
29 Actress Ullmann
31 Puppeteer Baird
34 Ancient Scandinavian
poets
36 Instinctual desires
39 Scale part
40 Fly with a long
proboscis
41 MGM Studios founder
42 Things to avoid
43 Healthy look
46 Stone Mountain
honoree
49 Title for Dumas's
Edmond Dantbs
50 Negative particles
51 Rubberneck
52 Alphabetical run
53 Kroger competitor
56 Guidry of the 70's-80's
Yankees
57 "The Master Builder"


77 Powerful D.C.
lobby
78 Squander
79 Old Egypt-Syr.
alliance
82 Lost appeal over
time
85 "Michael Collins"
actor, 1996
86 Falsified ID's for,
perhaps
87 Flustered
88 Attic use
90 Turned
93 Draw


94 Soap-making
ingredient
96 Straight shooting
97 Sadat, e.g.
98 Songlike
99 Like some steak bones
102 Dart
105 Rochester's love
106 Red or Card
108 "Coffee, Tea __
(1960's best seller)
110 Anchovy containers
111 Cosmetic additive
114 Flap
116 Big heart?


ers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any three clues by touch-tone phone:
0-285-5656. Reference puzzle number shown. There is a charge of $1.20 per minute for ,ho.ai11. Answers for puzzle # 0908.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge it to Visa or IVlasterCard.:




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PERICO' BAY CLUB Direct bay view from glass-
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HOLMES BEACH 5359 Gulf Drive. Marvelous


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ISLAND VILLAGE W OW o :.:n ,,. :.n it-.,: I-. SUNBOW BAY ..i,, ,: .,c llni .-. i,:r .'. : ,:11.
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INCREDIBLE VIEW C F. Irn, .:,l3 .' L: .
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-7rPr -,. - 'ii" L'.P __: '-u Tr H .:. ,
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ANNA MARIA ISLAND OFFICE

:ast Bay Drive Holmes Beach 778-2261 1-800-422-6325


playwright
59 Where hogs mourn?
60 Presses, folds and
stretches
62 Landed peasant in pre-
1917 Russia
65 So far
67 Thug
68 Old Testament prophet
69 Sharp
70 Bear in Bolivia
71 Too
73 City, Hawaii
74 One doing clerical work
76 Not shot all at once


S I I f r