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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( September 11, 2002 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 11, 2002

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00960

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 11, 2002

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00960

Full Text




Skimming the news ... Anna Maria Island map in this edition, page 18.


IslanderLI Ipg
Soccer starts, page 25.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island Since 1992"


Volume 10, no. 44, Sept. 11, 2002 FREE


Charter board considers adding high school


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Island Middle School Charter Board members
have their minds on the future. Is it feasible, they won-
der, to add high school grade levels 9 through 12?
The subject of adding on a ninth-grade class for the
next school year arose after IMS Director Jeanne Shell
mentioned that she has had at least 12 parents inquire
about the school's plans.
The board is reviewing its charter for amendments
that may need to be made, and members agreed that
this might be the time to make provisions for adding


Bradenton Beach

to DOT: No signs
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
A proposal by the Florida Department of Transpor-
tation to establish changeable message signs at five
permanent locations on Anna Maria Island, including
three in Bradenton Beach, met with about as much
enthusiasm from that city's Scenic Highway Corridor
Management Entity as a new, four-lane, high-rise
bridge from Cortez would get.
What's the point? wondered CME Chairman Harry
Brown. -
"We don't need any more signs on the Island," said
Bradenton Beach City Commissioner Mollie Sandberg
at the CME meeting with
"We don't need DOT officials Brent
any more signs Wiggins and Barbara
on the Island." Combs, who presented the
proposal.


Bradenton
Beach Vice
Mayor Mollie
Sandberg


In fact, said
Sandberg, the city is trying
to get rid of some of its
signs and now the DOT is
coming up with a plan to
add more.


The signs would have changeable messages such
as "Anna Maria Bridge closed," or "Coquina Beach
parking lot full," for motorists to glean information
from, said Wiggins.
Two types of signs are proposed. One would be
similar in size to those found on Interstate 75 and over-
hang Gulf Drive. Other "smaller" signs would be about
12 feet by 18 feet on a single post on the side of the
road. The smaller signs would display simple mes-
sages, but all signs would be radio-controlled and
changed from a central location.
"Why do we even need signs?" asked CME mem-
ber Judy Giovanelli.
"To eliminate confusion," replied Wiggins.
"Well, the Island has worked just fine for a long
time without signs," said Giovanelli, "and I don't see
the need for changeable message signs on the Island."
She suggested the DOT consider putting them on roads
leading to the Island such as the Palma Sola Causeway
and Cortez Road.
Brown said the impetus came from the City of
Holmes Beach and Manatee County agreed to fund the
project Island-wide when it found itself with some left-
over funds from a cancelled road project.
Hold on a minute, said Mike Guy of the Sarasota-
Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization. "I'm


PLEASE SEE SIGNS, NEXT PAGE


grade levels in the future.
Shell said she believes the addition of a high school
would be a great alternative for children who prefer
smaller class sizes or even to those previously home
schooled.
Although Shell said there is still unused space
available at the school's current location at the Island
Baptist Church, everyone agreed a permanent location
for the school would be ideal but difficult to come by.
Life skills teacher Gary Hughes said he would like
to see the board begin planning for a permanent loca-
tion for the school regardless of whether it includes


high school.
Hughes recommended putting together a commit-
tee to focus on finding a location.
Hughes said that with the community behind the
project, it would take little to build a school similar in
size to the building it currently occupies, but land
would be a key issue.
Hughes suggested the school might be able to oc-
cupy space in Holmes Beach next to city hall.
Founding Boardmember Marlene West also sug-
PLEASE SEE CHARTER, NEXT PAGE


Peace practice for 9/11
The front yard of Anna Maria Elementary School was a flurry of color as students practiced for the Sept. 11
commemorative ceremony being held at 8:30 a.m. in the school's courtyard. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Water meters out

for Key Royale;

gazebo out to bid
By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Parks and Beautification Com-
mittee met to discuss several ongoing beautification
projects, including the Key Royale adopt-a-spots and
the city gazebo.
City Commissioner Roger Lutz serves as a liaison
to the board and reported efforts by the Key Royale
Resident Owners Association to install three water
meters to irrigate 13 medians has been stalled by Mana-
tee County.
According to Lutz, the county first told him that the
request for a permit was refused due to a lack of \water
pressure. Lutz said, however, that when he questioned
PLEASE SEE WA i ',-_20 METERS, PAGE 3


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|^IB^^I'^|Anna Maria

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PAGE 2 E SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER
Charter school going high?
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
gested the old school house in Cortez village or work-
ing on a plan with the Anna Maria Island Community
Center for space.
"We need to start with a plan and move towards it
in order to succeed," said Hughes.
West suggested that the board plan town meetings
to see if the community supports having a high school.
Chairman John Monetti said he would approach
the school board for advice on how to proceed with
adding grades since board members were at least open
to considering the possibility.
In other matters, the board is reconsidering offer-
ing hot lunches to students since Shell said most com-
plain about the quality and the quantity of the food pro-
vided by King Middle School's cafeteria. Other char-
ter schools do not offer lunch, leaving it up to students
to bring their own. Shell recommended finding out the


parents' preferences on this issue at the next Parent
Advisory Committee meeting at 7 p.m. Sept. 12.:
Shell said plans are being made to invite the fifth-
grade teachers from Anna Maria Elementary School to
visit the campus and learn more about what IMS has to
offer.
Fundraising plans are also in the works. Board
members have asked Hughes to further develop a
fundraising idea he presented.
Hughes told the board he plans to publish a new
entertainment coupon book for the Island. He pro-
posed that IMS students would have the opportunity
to sell the books exclusively during the first month
of each printing and would receive 40 percent of the
proceeds.
After the first month, books would be sold at other
locations and the school would receive 20 to 30 percent
of the proceeds.
Board members approved of the concept but asked
Hughes to outline the details for the Oct. 2 meeting.


Signs debated on Island
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


confused."
Guy claimed the county only wanted simple vari-
able message signs, not some huge monstrosity.
"Well, we just wanted to know if a big sign over
the roadway would be a problem for the beach," said
Wiggins.
On Anna Maria Island?
Wiggins said he hadn't been back to the county
with the idea, he was just canvassing Island municipali-
ties first.
"We're not in a position to proceed until we find
out what the locals want," he said.
Guy indicated the DOT was a bit misguided. The
county had only been thinking about small signs for the
mainland, before a motorist got to the Island, and there
now appeared to be some confusion about where the
signs would be located, how many and how big.
To get "everyone on the same page," Guy said he
would contact the county transportation department to
see if the DOT proposal was concurrent with the
county's idea of traffic-information signs. Guy will
report back to the CME.


The DOT has proposed signs (large or small) in
Bradenton Beach in front of the Summer Sands prop-
erty, between First Street North and Bridge Street at the
Circle K store, and across from 10th Street South.
But big or small, Bradenton Beach doesn't want
any more signs, said Sandberg. "We don't even want
the smaller signs."
Put a sign on Longboat Key, suggested Brown.
In fact, the DOT has proposed a large sign over-
hanging the roadway at Binnacle Point Drive on
Longboat Key to inform motorists heading north to
Anna Maria Island of impending traffic, bridge or park-
ing difficulties.
In other actions, the CME discussed the architec-
tural style of the county's proposed new rest-room fa-
cility at Coquina Beach and concluded there was not
enough "Bradenton Beach" or "Old Florida" design in
the style and that it didn't fit the city's Scenic Corridor
Management Plan. The CME's comments will be for-
warded to Mayor John Chappie, then to the appropri-
ate county official.
The CME also recommended to the city commis-
sion that it accept the offer from the Bradenton Herald
to install and maintain modular newspaper boxes at
various locations.
A CME survey found 26 sites around the city


Judicial forum
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
hosted a candidate forum for candidates vying for
two circuit court judge seats including, Diana
Moreland, Ed Nicholas, Susan Chapman, Adam
Tebrugge, Cynthia Evers, Laurie Zimmerman,
Charlie Roberts and Preston DeVilbiss Jr. at Holmes
Beach City Hall a week before the primary election.
The judicial race is decided in the Sept. 10 primary.
Islander Photo: Diana Bogan

where newspaper racks are presently located. The
CME priority list named the concession stand at Co-
quina Beach, with 26 free-standing racks, as the first to
get a new modular rack.
Other locations on the priority list were at the
Beach House parking lot, the east side of Gulf Drive at
24th Street North, Bridge Street at Bay Drive South,
Gulf Drive at Eighth Street South, Gulf Drive at Co-
quina Beach north bus entrance, the Island Inn and the
Gulf Drive Cafe.
The CME also recommended elimination of the
"eyesore" boxes at the bayside Coquina boat ramp
where many free standing boxes are either no longer
used or in need of repair.


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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 M PAGE 3


-Anna Maria official McKay fights back


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Deposed An naMaria Building Official George
McKay is fighting back in an effort to clear his name
and obtain his Florida building inspector's license.
McKay, who is still the city's public works direc-
tor, was removed as the building official two weeks ago
by Mayor SueLynn after she learned McKay's appli-
cation for a provisional building inspector's license to
the Florida Building Code Administrators and Inspec-
tors Board was denied in August 2001. The mayor said
she was forced to remove McKay after the head of the
Florida Department of Business and Professional
Regulation, which oversees tie BCAIB, said McKay
could iio longer operhte as a building official because
ofthe denial.
But McKay wants to clear his name and he's ask-
ing the DBPR and the BCAIB for an explanation and
copies of the minutes of the Aug. 17, 2001, BCAIB
meeting at which he was denied a provisional applica-
tion as a building official.
He also wants to know why he never got a letter of
denial, although state officials claim the letter was
mailed to his Anna Maria address.
McKay, who has held a Class-A building
contractor's license in Florida for 19 years, believes his
reputation has been challenged. "I think a lot of people
have jumped to conclusions. It's sad that some people
think you are guilty until proven innocent. Nobody
wants to be embarrassed."
McKay said he would have immediately informed
the city and appealed the decision if he had ever re-
ceived the denial letter.
He wants to know the criteria the BCAIB used to
deny his application, and he believes his 19 years ex-


Seven nominated

for Anna Maria

Citizen of the Year
The Anna Maria Citizen of the Year Com-
mittee has nominated five individuals, one
couple, and one informal group of residents for
the city's Citzen of the Year award with final
voting by the committee ,scheduled for 10:30
a.m. Sept. 23 at city hall,
Those nominated are George Norwood,
Tom Turner, Gene and Elizabeth Moss, Mady
Iseman, Maggie Field and Mayor SueLynn. A
group known as the "Watchdogs" of Anna Maria
has also been placed in nomination.
The "Watchdogs" are those concerned citi-
zens who show up at all public meetings, ask
questions of city commissioners, and volunteer
their time and effort on city working committees,
according to the nomination.
The Sept. 23 meeting is open to the public.



Water meters nixed for medians
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
whether Key Royale's water pressure had actually been
measured the story changed.
Lutz said that he was later informed that the per-
mit was denied because of a countywide policy that no
more medians will be permitted to be irrigated regard-
less of where the funds come from.
"It sounds suspicious to me," said Lutz, "and I plan
to get to the bottom of it."
Superintendent of Public Works Joe Duennes said
he was also told the county was no longer issuing per-
mits for potable water irrigation, but admits he has not
seen anything come through his office in writing.
The Key Royale Resident Owners Association was
funded $10,000 from the city's parks and beautification
budget and was in the process of raising additional
funds from residents and grant money for the project.
According to Lutz, the entire project is currently on
hold.
The committee also discussed its plans to build a
gazebo next to city hall. Plans were recently stalled
when only one contractor bid on the project and that bid


perience meets the state's requirements for a provi-
sional license.
"I've been told I needed experience plus supervi-
sory experience and I have all of that. There seems to
be a misunderstanding. I hope what comes out is that
mine is a rare case."
Based upon what information the BCAIB provides
him, he may appeal that August 2001 decision, but he's
not waiting around.
McKay originally applied for the city's building
official position, not the public works director, but
when former Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh hired him last
year, it was for both positions.
McKay's expertise, however, is in construction and
he's scheduled to take the first of two state tests this
November on the way to becoming a fully licensed
building official. The entire process of tests and certi-
fication should take about five months, he said.
While McKay prepares for that test, ironically, the
state is moving against him.
Mayor SueLynn said DBPR officials have told her
that their department has filed a complaint against
McKay, based upon information provided by the city.
The DBPR's Investigative Services Division is now
conducting an investigation and will likely send agents
to Anna Maria as part of the investigation, the mayor
said.
Efforts to reach DBPR Executive Director Alan
Spivey or the Investigative Services Division were
unsuccessful prior to press deadline.
Building official duties in Anna Maria, including
inspections and plans review, are now being conducted
by building officials from Holmes Beach and
Bradenton Beach, per an interlocal agreement between
Island cities.


Splish splash Saturday night
Little Madison Dubois, 15 months, granddaughter of
Mike and Terry Cappello of Holmes Beach, took a little
playtime Saturday at Island Shopping Center, splishing,
splashing and sitting in the puddles left after a ferocious
thunderstorm swept across the Island near dinnertime
Saturday. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

came in $50,000 over budget.
Duennes said he is currently accepting new bids from
contractors to build the gazebo and would ideally like to
work with an Anna Maria Island-based contractor.
The city has $130,000 in the budget for the gazebo,
and Duennes said that if a reasonable bid was not re-
ceived this time, the public works department will
build the gazebo.
Bid offers must be received the week of Sept. 16.
For more information, call the public works department
at 708-5833.
In other matters, Duennes said he will be seeking
an Island artist to paint murals on bunker walls facing
Flotilla Drive and city hall in an effort to beautify the
public works area.
The next parks and beautification meeting will be
held at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2.


McKay wants money

back
After George McKay was removed as the city's
building official Aug. 29, the city commission voted
to lower his salary by $6,000 annually and McKay
doesn't think that's fair.
In a letter to Mayor SueLynn and city commis-
sioners, McKay said that City Commissioner John
Michaels said his salary should be reduced because he
did not have the experience of people in the same po-
sitions in Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach.
"The concern I have is that there were no facts
shown, and no other information shared," said
McKay.
His experience includes 25 years in the construc-
tion industry, possession of a Florida general
contractor's license for more than 19 years, and as a
25-year resident of Anna Maria and former city com-
missioner, he has extensive knowledge of the city's
planning and zoning ordinances.
McKay said he's had the opportunity to build and
remodel numerous commercial, residential and ma-
rina projects .in Florida; has worked with architects,
engineers and building officials; knows how to lay out
and clear sites for roads, sewers, stormwater drainage
and parking; and knows how to review plans, estimate
materials and costs and how to bid-out for subcontrac-
tors.
McKay said his base salary of $44,800 should
stand along with the percentage increase authorized in
the 2002-03 budget.
But McKay's salary was not lowered because of
any lack of experience, said Michaels, it was lowered
because he had been paid extra to be the building of-
ficial.
When McKay was hired in June 2001, the city
commission voted to pay him an additional $6,000 a
year to also be the city's building official.
Lowering his salary simply moved McKay to the
salary level of the public works director, Michaels
noted. It had nothing to do with his experience,just the
fact that McKay no longer wore "two hats," he said.


Election results next week
Due to delays in election results caused by events
in South Florida Sept. 10, The Islander did not hold the
newspaper to include final election totals. The results
will be in the Sept. 18 edition of the newspaper.


Meetings

Anna Maria City
Sept. 12, 7 p.m., city commission work session
Sept. 17, 7 p.m., visioning work session, Roser Memo-
rial Community Church, 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
Sept. 18, 7 p.m., final public hearing on city budget.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 11, 7 p.m., first public hearing on city budget.
Sept. 12, 6:30 p.m., board of adjustment meeting.
Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning board meet-
ing.
Sept. 19, 1 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 19, 10 a.m., code enforcement board meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
Sept. 12, 3 p.m., mayor's meeting with Manatee
County Commission Chair Amy Stein, Administrative
Center, Suite 903, County Administrative Center,
Bradenton.
Sept. 16, 3 p.m., Island Transportation Planning Orga-
nization meeting, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
Sept. 19, 6 p.m., West Manatee Fire & Rescue District
Commission meeting on appeals for calculation of fire
assessments for 2002, fire station No. 1, 6001 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.






PAGE 4 M SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Haas-Martens to seek reelection in Holmes Beach


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Current Holmes Beach City Commissioner Sandy
Haas-Martens will seek re-election to another two-year
term this November, but she may have an easy time of
it. Nobody else seems interested in the job.
As of 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, no other candidates
for either of the two commission seats up for election
had picked up qualifying packets at city hall, accord-
ing to Holmes Beach City Clerk Brooke Bennett, who
is the city's election qualifying officer.
Prospective candidates have until noon Sept. 17 to


file a completed election packet with her office and
become qualified, Bennet said.
The commission seat of Roger Lutz is also up for re-
election and Lutz has remained mum on his plans. Efforts
to reach Lutz for comment have been unsuccessful to date.
Haas-Martens said she was seeking her third term
in office because she believes that while the city is run-
ning well, there is much more work to be done.
"We work well together, but we don't always
agree," she said. She believes she adds a level head to
commission proceedings, helping to keep the commis-
sion and the city on a proper course.


Trailer permit
Anna Maria city officials say a permit for this construction trailer at the Villa Rosa subdivision site on South
Bay Boulevard on Sept. 9 has not yet been issued. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin


Permit may be needed for


Villa Rosa trailer, activity


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
A double-wide construction trailer that was moved
on to the Villa Rosa subdivision site on South Bay Bou-
levard in Anna Maria Sept. 9 has already produced a
code enforcement complaint from a resident that no
permit has been issued for any activity at the site, said
Gerry Rathvon, the city's code enforcement officer.
Representatives of GSR Development brought in
a permit application to the city Sept. 10, but Mayor
SueLynn said that application contains numerous
changes from what was originally approved by the city
commission.
"And that trailer has not been permitted by the
city," she confirmed.
But the city is in a quandary. To follow through
with the complaint and issue a stop-work order pend-
ing resolution of any permit application questions, the
city needs a licensed building official. Public Works
Director George McKay, however, no longer has au-
thority from the Florida Department of Business and


Professional Regulation to act as a building official and
all building inspections and site plan reviews must be
referred to building officials in either Holmes Beach or
Bradenton Beach.
Mayor SueLynn said she called Bradenton Beach
Building Official Bob Welch Tuesday morning for an in-
spection of the Villa Rosa site and possible stop-work
order, but she had not heard back from Welch by press
deadline.
The mayor is also trying to set up a meeting with her-
self, GSR representatives and Welch to resolve the issues
contained within the Sept. 10 application from GSR.
Iri the interim, however, workers at the Villa Rosa
property have cleared land, moved in equipment and
the trailer and given every indication they are ready to
begin construction.
The controversial 17-unit Villa Rosa subdivision
project was approved hurriedly and reluctantly in July
by the city commission after numerous threats of a law-
suit from Villa Rosa attorneys if the application was
delayed or rejected.


Her political future might include a bid for the
mayor's post, said Haas-Martens, but not in this elec-
tion. She and current Mayor Carol Whitmore "work
well together. Right now, the city is not broken, so
don't try to fix it."
The race for mayor of Holmes Beach has already
drawn two declared candidates: incumbent Whitmore
and local political activist Joan Perry. Both have picked
up their qualifying packets, Bennet said.
The seats held by current City Commissioners Pat
Geyer, Roger Bohnenberger and Don Maloney are not
up for re-election this year.


Anna Maria city

commissioner won't

seek re-election
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
With little fanfare, Anna Maria City Commissioner
John Michaels has let the word out that he won't seek
to retain his commission seat in the February 2003 city
elections.
Speaking at the Sept. 4 city commission budget
hearing, Michaels was talking about what should be in
the 2003-04 budget. He said that he "would not be
around" for that discussion.
After the meeting, he confirmed that he would not
seek re-election.
"I have no intention of running again. I always in-
tended to only do one term and I made that promise to
my wife," he said.
In addition to Michaels' seat, City Commis-
sioner Linda Cramer will complete her first two-year
term in February 2003. Cramer has not yet indicated
if she will seek another two years as a city commis-
sioner.
The commission seats currently held by Mayor
SueLynn, John Quam and Chuck Webb will not ex-
pire until February 2004 under the present city char-
ter.

Qualifying next week for

two commission seats in

Bradenton Beach
The five-day qualifying period for Ward 2 and 4
positions on the Bradenton Beach City Commission
starts Monday.
From noon Sept. 16 until noon Sept. 20, candidates
may file the necessary paperwork and pay the $48 fil-
ing fee on the candidate's election account.
To date, incumbent Commissioner Mollie
Sandberg has said she intends to seek re-election. Resi-
dent Anna O'Brien has also indicated she will chal-
lenge Sandberg for the Ward 4 seat.
Incumbent Commissioner Dawn Baker has also
said she will seek re-election to her Ward 2 seat.
The Bradenton Beach election will be Nov. 5.


Custom prevails on Cortez streets


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The public rights of way on abandoned streets
in Cortez will stay in their traditional code-strain-
ing usage, and officials will get to work to make
the Cortez customs legal.
That is the decision of the Manatee County
Commission after many years of intermittent
squabbling and an hour or more of hearing
Cortezians at a commission meeting.
At issue were a few street ends that run to the
water's edge in the historic commercial fishing
village. The street ends have never been used by
traffic, it was pointed out, but they have been used.
Fishermen have used some of these plots of
ground for the better part of the village's 113-year
life as temporary storage places for boats, nets and


other fishing gear.
They are the strip between A.P. Bell Fish Co. and
Star Fish Co., another that has had a stilted house on it
since before a photo was taken in 1932, and the piece
that has the house alongside where the movie "Great
Expectations" was filmed; its stairway encroaches on
the public right of way.
Some residents, led by Sue Maddox, have asked
over the years that the rights of way be cleaned up and
perhaps used as parks or areas for relaxation, with
benches placed by the county and signs pointing the
way.
But the apparent majority of villagers want to keep
them as they are, used in their historical ways and not
developed any way.
A survey conducted by the county in 1997 and
another by Cortez Waterfronts Florida a couple of


years ago included questions on use of the pub-
lic land. The responses by Cortezians were
emphatically in favor of keeping the small plots
as they are, noted Commissioner Jane von
Hahmann, who represents that district and lives
in Cortez.
She pointed out that the street-ends' custom-
ary use is provided for in changes to the county
code developed by Cortez Waterfronts, which is
not yet adopted by the county. Further evidence,
it was indicated, of how most Cortezians want
their village to be.
Ultimately the commission accepted Com-
missioner Joe McClash's suggestion that the tra-
ditional use be continued but that it be made le-
gal. County planners now are to arrange that con-
tinuation in ways that do not violate the code.


I





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 5


Charter recommendations praised by expert


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The new charter proposed by Anna Maria's char-
ter review committee has received a glowing "thumbs
up" from Dr. Larry Walker, a noted political scientist
and author of numerous municipal charters in Florida.
The charter is due for presentation to the city commis-
sion by Sept. 30.
Walker, who teaches political science at the Uni-
versity of West Florida, said in a letter to the commit-
tee that he holds the proposed charter in "high regard,"
and in his opinion, "it's a good piece of work."
While Walker suggested a few improvements, he
noted that the proposed charter "sets a clear line be-
tween the legislative and executive functions. It pro-
vides for a strong mayor, but at the same time, properly
limits the mayor by denying him or her a leadership
role on the city commission. It thereby provides for an
independent and therefore stronger city commission."
The proposed charter, continued Walker, "makes
it clear the mayor is responsible for the administration
of municipal affairs, but leaves to the commission the
enactment of municipal policies."
Walker said the language and organization of the
proposed charter is "clear with no ambiguity" and "is
consistent with current good practices in Florida mu-
nicipal government."
Although Walker suggested reducing the proposed
two-year residency requirement to run for public office
in the city to a lesser period, the committee at its Sept.
5 meeting decided to keep the two-year requirement.
There was also discussion of a transition time and
City Attorney Jim Dye wrote a special section to cover
this, in the event the charter is approved by voters.
Charter review committee chairperson Tom
Aposporos said the earliest the matter could go before
the voters is the February 2003 elections.
There was-a suggestion by committee member Bob
Barlow to include an effective date for the charter of
November 2003, if the charter passes in February. One
of the charter proposals is to move all city elections to
November to coincide with other county, state and


* national elections, which will save the city money.
Aposporos said he would check with Dye on
Barlow's suggestion and other refinements and defini-
tions in the transition language, but it appeared that a
person elected as commissioner in February 2003
might serve an extra nine months until the November
2005 elections.
Other suggestions in the transition statement that
will be decided at the final charter review committee
meeting are to extend the current, term of the mayor an
additional nine months until November 2004 along
with the terms of the commissioners elected in Febru-
ary 2002.
Walker also said he had no problem with the cre-
ation of a city administrator position in the charter. The
charter language is clear that this position is subordi-
nate to the mayor, must first be budgeted by the mayor
for city commission approval, and can only be filled by
the mayor subject to city commission approval. Walker
said many smaller Florida cities operate with an admin-
istrative assistant, who is often the city clerk.
The committee decided to change the proposed
charter language regarding the city clerk to state that
the clerk may also hold the office of city treasurer and/
or city administrator.
Major components of the proposed charter are to


remove the mayor from the city commission, making
that person the chief executive of the city, but with no
power to vote; adding a fifth commission seat; moving
the elections from February to November; creating the
post of city administrator; allowing a mayoral veto
which can be over-ridden by four votes of the city com-
mission; and allowing the commission to elect its own
chairperson, who would serve as the deputy mayor in
the absence or disability of the mayor.
The mayor would prepare the budget, handle the
day-to-day affairs of the city, and be responsible for
personnel. The mayor would attend commission meet-
ings and participate in discussions, but would not vote.
The city commission would set its own agenda for
meetings and formulate policy and plans for the city.
Aposporos said it might take a special city com-
mission meeting to discuss the proposed charter with
commissioners and the public and that the review com-
mittee will be available to answer questions at such a
meeting.
The proposed city charter must be presented to the
city commission on or before Sept. 30. Aposporos said
he hopes to bring the document to the Sept. 26 city
commission meeting.
The committee will meet again at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, Sept. 11.


Budget hearing in Bradenton Beach Sept. 11


The first public hearing on the 2002-03 budget for
Bradenton Beach will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 11, in city hall.
A tentative city property tax rate of 2.7470 mills,
up from the current year's 2.6816 mills, is being pro-
posed, although commissioners have repeatedly said
they hope to pare that figure down.
A mill is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value of
property, less any exemptions, meaning that the most
a city property owner would pay in city taxes for a
home valued at $225,000 and claiming a homestead ex-
emption would pay $549.40, up from the current tax
rate of $536.32, an increase of $13.80.


Last month, commissioners cut out some capital im-
provement projects to lower the property tax to match the
current millage rate and discussed ever further cuts.
Tentatively deleted was $5,000 earmarked for devel-
opment of an anchorage just south of the city pier, $10,500
for seawall projects, and $3,825 for street-end improve-
ments.
Commissioners also discussed cutting an addi-
tional $28,000 from next year's budget for city hall
improvements, mostly remodeling within the building
and development department.
Total budget proposed for the next fiscal year is
$2.244 million, up from the current $2.075 million.


MANATEE COUNTY PUBLIC BEACH



Manatee Ave. @ 75th St. W. T --


749-7116
www.co.manatee.fl.us (click transit)


| lil i 'U, |I CONNEM TS TO T E AINI
* Coquina Beach hourly (Mon to Sat) to Cortez Road/Circuit City/Petsmart
* Manatee Public Beach hourly (everyday) to Beachway Plaza


MD


BUS
6AM-7PM
MON-SAT


RIDE MCAT BUS FREESEPT. 13! Trolley and Shuttle always FREE! 1-i










O111101pinion


'Official' problems
There is a new spate of problems in Anna Maria due
to the lack of a building official as evidenced at the site
of the Villa Rosa development on South Bay Boulevard.
At presstime Tuesday, city officials were scram-
bling to determine if a construction trailer, which was
recently located at the site, was permitted. Apparently
not, was the answer, but Anna Maria officials were
making efforts to contact Bradenton Beach Building
Official Bob Welch, who thanks to an interlocal agree-
ment, is reviewing the developer's plans.

Happy feet?
If you've seen (and chuckled at) the campaign
commercials depicting Democrat gubernatorial pri-
mary candidates Janet Reno and Bill McBride tap
dancing across a stage as an announcer depicts their
soft (shoe) stance on issues, you ain't seen nothing' yet.
It was just a warmup for what's to come ... more
commercials, more negative advertising. Lots more.
You can expect the Republican primary winner for
Florida Senate District 21, either Mike Bennett or Mark
Flanagan, to come out swinging against their Demo-
cratic opponent. There was allegedly a particularly
nasty forum at Lakewood Ranch where Flanagan and
supporters, including his wife, stood and screamed
slurs at his opponent.
We've got elections in both Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach in November a first for the Island
where previously city elections were staggered over
several months.
Hopefully, our city elections will remain polite.

Seeing dollar signs?
If you haven't checked your tea leaves or the real
estate prices lately, look again. Both are telling us that
the "land grab" is officially on in Anna Maria.
Terms like unbuildablee" and undevelopablee" may
disappear from the vocabulary if the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection is willing to trade minimal
mitigation efforts for building on wetlands, as evidenced
by a permit issued to bayfront property owners in Holmes
Beach and reported in last week's cover story, "Fluke
mitigation proposal draws Sierra Club opposition."
Speculation will run high, especially based on the
"fluke example" of a lot purchased five years ago for
a mere $1,000.
Hang on to your wallets.



The Islander
Sept.11, 2002 Vol. 10, No. 44
V Publisher and Editor
BonnerJoy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
J.L. Robertson
V Contributors
Nancy Ambrose
Matthew Barnes
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Andrea Dennis
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Jean Steiger
Lisa Williams
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Tracy Komor
Carrie Price
V Distribution
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts
Mary Stockmaster




IISLANDE A
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FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK




Opinion
4 ,,


$1,600 for soccer kids
I would like to thank Sean Murphy and Island's
End restaurant for providing the food for this year's
"Kick Off the Season" soccer fundraising dinner. This
year's dinner helped raise more than $1,600, which
goes directly into the Anna Maria Island Community
Center soccer program.
Every year for the past eight, Sean and the staff
from either the Beach Bistro or Island's End have do-
nated their valuable time and the food to ensure a suc-
cessful start to our sports seasons. Sean and his restau-
rants do these dinners for kids three times a year. I hope
the children and families in this community appreciate
what a huge asset Sean and his restaurants are.
So, on behalf of the more than 400 people involved
with our soccer season, I extend a heartfelt thanks to
Sean, his staff and all of the parents, children and vol-
unteers who made the kickoff dinner such a fantastic
night. It's events like this that have allowed us to give
out more than $500 in soccer scholarships this year.
What a start to a "kicking" great year.
Scott J.E. Dell, AMICC
Manatee doing its best
My name is "MaT" and I am the manatee waving
to you from the back window of the Manatee Trolley.
Someone showed me the letter concerning the trolley
in The Islander of Sept. 4 and it really hurt my feelings
since I am trying to do the best I can to give everyone
a free ride and to be as quiet as I can.
My keepers have asked my makers if they can pos-
sibly add some sound insulation or do something some-
where to keep my bodily functions quieter, but they are
afraid my body temperature could get too hot and in-
jury could result horrors!
My keepers fear my warranty might even be invali-
dated if surgery is performed. So I just keep on plug-
ging, doing the best I can, giving more than 1,000
people a ride each day, keeping about 750 cars off our
crowded Island road that we all share.
The letter was right about one thing, for sure. I am


running frequently, about every 20 to 30 minutes, but hey!
I'm trying to do a good job. I am extremely proud of my
employee evaluation and of my customer service review.
Manatee County Area Transit has ordered a little
credit card-size map that folds out to eight inches, and
also printed an information page for hotels and busi-
nesses to frame or display to tell even more people all
about me and what I do, 20,000 copies. Free to every-
one while they last. The Anna Maria Island Chamber
of Commerce and Manatee County Convention and
Visitors Bureau have offered to help get them to you
when they are delivered in late September or October.
Thanks to my Island friends for putting up with me
and for making my first review period such a success-
ful one. See ya around the Island.
MaT (as dictated to Susan Hancock of MCAT)
Commission doing a good job
In your Sept. 4 edition, a front-page article alludes
to another "crisis" in Anna Maria. I am not aware that
there has been even one single "crisis" since the new
city commission was seated.
When a company or a city or any other kind of
organization is staffed by intelligent people, acting re-
sponsibly, using their collective intellect in a knowl-
edgeable fashion (regardless of what might be thrown
at them), no situation need really be a "crisis." I daresay
our current building official situation is under control,
with no inspections having been missed, and that it
lacks any of the criteria for "crisis."
Without exception, our current city hall staff per-
sons are each qualified to explain to the public what has
and is taking place (in a very orderly fashion, it might
be stated) to resolve a problem that is not of this
commission's own making, nor unusual for any city to
experience. A problem has existed, been found, and is
being resolved.
Crisis? I think not. Press on, folks. You are doing
a better job of running our city than has been done in
many, many years. Integrity is a great thing to have.
Chuck White, Anna Maria




THE JSLANDE ,SEP,SET.. 11, 2002, PAGE 7


'Cracker' makes stand on cancer, twice


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The Island's Gibby and his son had twin
colonoscopies, twin cancers, twin surgeries and now
twin recoveries.
They even have a twin name, Gilbert Bergquist and
Gilbert Bergquist, the latter a Jr. In the strongest pos-
sible words from both of them:
Get a colonoscopy. Beat this silent cancer.
Gib the elder, retired FBI agent and longtime Is-
lander, is featured in the current Florida Health Care
News, which details the Bergquists' unique case. They
had no symptoms, no pain, but their doctors suspected
something wrong and sent them to colonoscopies.
Gib said his only warnings were sudden weight
loss, a growing weakness and sudden diarrhea, but he
thought they were just signs of age at 77. His doctor
scheduled him for a colonoscopy.
Then his son, a professor at Florida State Univer-
sity, called to tell him he was having a colonoscopy the
next morning. So was Dad, each unbeknownst to the
other until then.
Gib the younger had a small cancer which was re-
moved, and Gib the elder had one the size of a baseball.
It had been growing for five to eight years, estimated
his surgeon, Dr. Paige Pennebacker of Bradenton Sur-
gical Associates. It completely blocked his colon.
"Gib was lucky," said the doctor. "Despite the age



Visioning dates set
The City of Holmes Beach has hired the
Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council to con-
duct three visioning sessions with the community.
The dates set for each session are scheduled
for 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6, Nov. 20
and Dec. 4.
These sessions are an opportunity for the
community as a whole to meet and discuss future
development of Holmes Beach.


and size of his tumor there was no indication that it had
spread." To make sure, he put his patient on chemo-
therapy, a "miserable six months," recalls Bergquist.
"It knocks you for a loop, but it's better than the alter-
native."
The doctor noted that colon and rectal cancers are
the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United
States, called the silent cancer because both sneak up
with no obvious symptoms. Bergquist reassured that,
contrary to widespread fears, only one percent of such
patients need the dreaded colostomy bag.
"Getting stronger and stronger every week now,"
Gib said he is back mowing his lawn but not any closer
to keeping ahead of it than he ever was.


'Second Chance'
The Cracker's friend, Nick Baden, lives in the
outer reaches of the Palma Sola area of Bradenton,
which is a perfect place to commune with nature. Some
of the denizens of the woods still make their home
there, still unaffected by approaching suburbia. It is not
uncommon to see rabbits, opossums, raccoons and an
occasional fox or bobcat.
Nick was pulling out of his driveway bright and
early one morning and spied what appeared to be an
empty parrot cage tossed on the edge of his lawn. He
thought this to be strange but did not take time to in-
vestigate. Later in the day, he was returning home with
his daughter Heather and, as they were approaching the
driveway, she observed a small animal near the aban-


When he was asked if he would do an interview for
the health newspaper, Gib said he would "do anything
to help people beat colon cancer." He knows about in-
terviews, as "The Cracker" columnist for The Islander
and author of the book "Cracker's Crumbs."
He has been given a second chance, he said, and
believes he is fully recovered. The striking coincidence
of father-son simultaneous colon cancers convinced
him that it is likely hereditary.
"Everybody needs a colonoscopy," he said. "Get
that? Everybody. Get that colonoscopy! Go! Go!"
With a stroke behind him and several congestive
heart failures, he said "I'm back to being just a heart pa-
tient."


doned cage. At first she thought that the animal was a
large rat, but her dad recognized it as a ferret.
Now, we all know that ferrets are not indigenous
to Palma Sola and are not even native to the United
States. This one had to be an abandoned pet that had
spent the day in the hot sun but had finally freed itself
from its cage. This dehydrated and bedraggled mem-
ber of the weasel family followed Nick up the driveway
and into the family barn, then into a cage that Nick set
down for him. Proffered food and water were eagerly
consumed.
Nick immediately noticed that the poor animal was
working alive with fleas from head to tail. Following
his veterinarian's instructions, he administered a de-
fleaer used on cats. The ferret went into a deep sleep.
When it awoke, there was a near-perfect silhouette of
the animal, including the tail, on the floor of the cage
made by the fallen vermin.
The ferret now had a new lease on life and rapidly
improved in health and appearance. For obvious rea-
sons, Nick named it "Second Chance" and gave it to a
niece as a present.
The Cracker has recently named himself "Second
Chance," having every reason to believe that he has
beaten colon cancer. If you haven't done so lately, the
Cracker implores you to schedule a colonoscopy. It
could well save your life!


Our hearts go out

to all the victims

and survivors of 9-11


September is customer

appreciation month 4f


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT


FISH AND CHIPS


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you the news!

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PAGE 8 M SEPT. 11, 2002 U THE ISLANDER


Record Anna Maria budget gets first approval


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission approved a
record $1.779 million budget Sept. 4, despite objec-
tions from several residents who called on commission-
ers for some tax relief, either by lowering the millage
rate or transferring funds from the city's reserve ac-
count. The budget is a 15.6 percent increase from last
year, according to Mayor SueLynn.
At the first of two required hearings to approve the
budget, city commissioners were told by former City
Commissioner Bob Barlow that instead of increasing
taxes, they should transfer funds from the city's reserve
account to cover capital improvements that never seem
to get done, despite previous allocation.
Last year, $225,000 was budgeted for projects that
were never started. The money just slips back into the
reserve account, which is now about 92 percent of the
total budget, he said.
Barlow, who helped initiate a city tax-relief peti-
tion in August signed by 252 property owners, said
money should be transferred from the reserve account
instead of "charging the taxpayers more."
Projects such as Spring Avenue drainage are al-
ways budgeted but never get done, he claimed. "We are
continually paying taxes on the same issue."
Barlow said the Anna Maria taxpayers who signed
the petition are very concerned about the continuing
increase in taxes.
But SueLynn said the city is transferring funds
from the reserve account. By the time all projects are
accounted for, the estimated reserve fund balance will
be $981,978, or aboit 55 percent of the budget.



Trolley a


worthwhile


investment

By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The Manatee Trolley is helping keep locals and
visitors out of vehicles on Anna Maria Island and re-
ducing traffic that might otherwise clog Gulf Drive and
other roads on the Island, says Manatee County Area
Transit Marketing Manager Susan Hancock.
Stung by recent criticism of the trolley by a few
Island residents, Hancock defended the free trolley,
noting that a recent survey of trolley users found 73
percent of the 101 people interviewed would have used
a car to reach their Island destination without the trol-
ley service.
With a current daily average of 1,035 passengers
utilizing the trolley, Hancock said traffic on the Island
would increase by 756 vehicles every day without the
trolley.
"And this is not even measuring the increased fuel
consumption, pollution and parking" if those trolley
users instead took a car to their destination.
The survey was taken in August 2002, said
Hancock. During the winter tourist season, use of the
trolley will "increase dramatically." At the end of the
past winter season, the trolley averaged 1,600 riders
per day,' she said.
And none of the trolley users interviewed had
negative comments about the service, Hancock noted.
"The statements were of praise and satisfaction for the
service and friendly operators.
"It is evident that the trolley serves the community
as a whole, and has created a positive impact to the
quality of life for residents of the Island and the
county," she said.
But the free ride may not last forever. At some
point in the future, county commissioners may decide
to charge a small fare or obtain direct funding and "the
results of this survey should be clear that it would be.
a worthwhile investment," she said.
The Manatee Trolley is currently funded by a grant
from the Florida Department of Transportation of
$535,000 annually for the next three years. The county
commission recently voted to cover any cost over-run
for the trolley in its 2002-03 budget.


She said the Florida League of Cities recommends
a barrier island such as Anna Maria keep a reserve ac-
count above 50 percent. In the event of a hurricane, the
city would have a lot of expenses to cover from the
reserve account.
"I hope it never happens, but the reality is we live
on a barrier island," said the mayor.
And there's not a whole lot of money left for a tax-
payer rebate, as suggested by the tax-relief petition, the
mayor said. If she took the amount of the reserve fund
above 50 percent of the budget and gave each Anna
Maria property owner a refund, it would amount to
only about $59 per owner, SueLynn said.
Resident Carol Ann Magill, however, said the
needs of the community are still not being met in the
new budget, particularly the age-old Anna Maria prob-
lems of drainage, rights of way and parking.
Former City Commissioner Jay Hill agreed.
Money budgeted yearly for priority projects such as
drainage never gets spent. Projects are never com-
pleted.
He was also concerned about the $143,200 bud-
geted for city hall improvements. Property taxes are up
300 percent from 1994, yet the inflation rate from that
year to the present is only 23 percent, he said. Addition-
ally, Longboat Key reduced its taxes two consecutive
years recently.
The commission needs to spend money wisely,
Hill said, and he's very disturbed about money being
spent on city hall improvements when people are tired
of money not getting spent on drainage, roads and
rights of way.
"That's why you have 250 signatures, and I think


they are right," he said.
Former Vice Mayor Tom Skoloda added that it's
been a "failure of administration" that many capital
projects in last year's budget have not been accom-
plished.
One resident asked if the mayor still had confi-
dence in Public Works Director George McKay. The
mayor said that question did not concern the budget
and she would not respond.
However, she said she would do everything pos-
sible to ensure that capital improvements in the 2002-
03 budget get done.
Commissioner John Michaels defended the bud-
get and the commissions' actions, noting that the 2.0
millage rate is the lowest of the Island municipali-
ties and Longboat Key and the same as last year's
rate. On a per capital budget share, the Anna Maria
taxpayer pays $970 annually in taxes, while in
Holmes Beach that figure is $1,173, and $1,359 in
Bradenton Beach.
The real problem with taxes is "the county and the
school board," Michaels said. Anna Maria only gets 9
percent of the taxes paid. The rest of the money goes
elsewhere.
But Barlow said property taxes are up 17.9 percent
this year and the commission should still lower the
millage rate "to a level that will nbt increase every
property owner's taxes."
Commissioner Linda Cramer suggested the com-
mission cut down on the amount budgeted for city hall
remodeling by 50 percent and increase the amount for
drainage projects, but the proposal fell on deaf ears.
The final budget hearing will be at 7 p.m. Sept. 18.


Challenged fritters
Island Middle School Band Director Jimi Gee and the Conch Fritter school band prepared to play several
tunes at Palmetto High School's Challenge Day event, but were stopped short by heavy rainfall. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan


Rivolta dredging project permitted


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Dredging of Cortez Cove Marina and its approach
channel has been approved by the state and awaits only
selection of a contractor.
Another Cortez dredging project, meanwhile, is in
limbo pending a decision on how to dispose of the spoil
the dredge will collect from the sea bottom. That
project is to deepen the channel that runs along the
waterfront.
At Cortez Cove, no plans have been confirmed yet
for handling the spoil, said Richard Storm of the
Rivolta Group, owner of Cortez Cove. He pointed out
that the four-acre property has considerable vacant land
which might be suitable for drying the spoil until it is
moved elsewhere.
The marina is at the old Sigma fish house, which
Piero Rivolta acquired two years ago. The automaker/
financier/entrepreneur initially saw the property as a


key piece in his boat-building program, including a
small village-type residential area for boat owners.
He developed the main building there as Cortez
Wood Design for outfitting the sports cruisers he was
building at Port Manatee. He also rebuilt much of the
dockage with an eye to turning the marina into a yacht
haven.
Cortez protested vehemently against anything that
might change the character of the historic fishing vil-
lage, and Rivolta moved his boat-building facilities to
another location.
He will go ahead with the dredging, said Storm,
because "he loves the place and the village, and he is
going to find a way to use the property in a manner
acceptable and helpful to the area."
Dredging will allow easy access to existing boat
slips of the marina and restore both the approach chan-
nel and the boat basin "to historically permitted
depths," he said.





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 9


Ordinance to be drafted to regulate news racks


Bradenton Beach city commissioners have in-
structed the city attorney to draft an ordinance target-
ing the restriction of free-standing newspaper boxes in
the city.
The ordinance is expected to be modeled after
similar laws in Sarasota, Boca Raton or Sanibel. Cit-
ies cite the need of such ordinances as a means to limit
the uncontrolled placement of boxes in public areas.
The Bradenton Beach Scenic Highway Corridor
Management Entity began discussing the need of such
regulations last January, but only in the past few weeks
has the group acted upon the matter. CME Chairman
Harry Brown, in a letter to the city commission, said
there were newspaper boxes at 26 locations in the city,
with the numbers of boxes per location ranging from
two to 26.


"Many were in obvious disuse or in need of main-
tenance," Brown wrote. "From a 'scenic highway' per-
spective, most were an eyesore."
Ordinances elsewhere in the state often generate a
firestorm of controversy, as newspaper publishers ar-
gue First Amendment rights with officials. In the city
of Sarasota, for example, the eventual ordinance regu-
lating newspaper boxes took three years to write and
generated a number of lawsuits.
Vice Mayor Mollie Sandberg, who has been coor-
dinating the newsrack issue between the Scenic High-
way group and the city commission, said publishers
spearheaded by representatives from the Bradenton
Herald have agreed to place six modular newspaper
racks at various locations in the city as recommended
by the city commission.


Modular newsracks offer "pockets" to individual
publications within a unit with a common color shell
and are installed on pedestals in a concrete base.
Permissions need to be granted by either the city,
property owner or Florida Department of Transpor-
tation for the modular racks, Sandberg said, and the
boxes will be installed by Gold Eagle Enterprises
Inc.
"The whole idea is to eliminate the huge number
of single boxes and all the bunches of boxes in the
city," said Mayor John Chappie.
Commissioners unanimously approved the drafting
of an ordinance regulating newsracks.
John Lochner, representing the Bradenton Herald,
suggested the city "strongly look at the Sarasota ordi-
nance," adding that "it is one we can live with."


Mixed-use zoning in the works for Holmes Beach


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission is al-
most ready to forward guidelines for amending the
comprehensive plan and land development code to al-
low mixed-use zoning in Holmes Beach.
According to Chairman Sue Normand, the com-
mission began working on drafting guidelines for
mixed-use zoning at the request of the city commission.
Mixed-use zoning allows housing above shops or
office space above heavier commercial business uses,
and Normand believes this type of development is a
viable trend nationwide.
Although some mixed use exists in the city now,
Normand said the city has never had an ordinance in
the past to either restrict or guide its mixed-use devel-
opment and the areas have subsequently become
blighted. In 1989, the city eliminated mixed use alto-
gether, Normand said.
Mixed-use developments help redevelop an urban
core, Normand said. "It brings life and value back to


the downtown area, which would be positive for
Holmes Beach."
Instead of creating a new set of rules for mixed-use
zones and requiring property owners to rezone, the
commission instead chose to create an overlay district
to encourage commercial property owners to rede-
velop.
The creation of an overlay district would allow any
commercial property owner to apply for a combination
of commercial, office and residential uses. The prop-
erty would then need to be a planned development and
meet all current codes and requirements of the city's
building department. Applications would be reviewed
by the planning commission, which would make its
recommendations before forwarding it on to the city
commission for final approval.
Normand said the planned development process
would give the city some control over what will be
developed and ensure its compatibility with surround-
ing areas.
The commission is suggesting that the C- 1 and C-


2 zones be permitted to have housing above commer-
cial businesses and the C-3 district would be permitted
to add office "space, but not housing above its more
intense commercial uses.
Commission member Sylvia Harris said mixed use
provides "more bang for the buck." It should bring in
more tax revenue for the city and increase the value and
income for the property owner. "I think it will benefit
everyone," Harris said.
The commission has drafted a section to add to
the city's comprehensive plan and the land develop-
ment code and update for the Holmes Beach code of
ordinances.
The next step for the commission is to pull to-
gether all the changes for review to ensure it is ready
to go to a public hearing and to the city commission.
The next planning commission meeting will be
held at 3 p.m. Sept. 26. The commission will review
suggestions from Governmental Services Coordinator
Gerald Smeldt of the Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Commission'and finalize its work.


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Golf tourney response
'tremendous'
John Home's annual golf tournament is a re-
sounding success and it isn't even being played
until Friday.
It's the Anna Maria Oyster Bar and Lazy Lob-
ster, sponsored tournament to benefit the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, which raised
more than $25,000 last year and hopes to go be-
yond that this week.
The tournament is Friday, Sept. 13, at El Con-
quistador Country Club, 4350 El Conquistador
Pkwy., Bradenton. It starts with lunch at noon fol-
lowed by a shotgun start at 1 p.m.
It's filled up, said sponsor/restaurant owner
John Home, "and I'm keeping a waiting list that's
growing longer by the day.
"If a golfer drops out because of an emergency
or for other reasons, there will be an opening there,
and we'll fill it from the list.
"This is just great, having such a tremendous
response. But it is reasonable, I guess you have
a great event for a great cause and people re-
spond."


Marine mechanics course
starts Monday evening
Manatee Technical Institute will launch its first
course in basic marine mechanics Monday, Sept. 16, at
the MTI Marine Laboratory, 5603 34th St. W.,
Bradenton.
The 20-session course will be Mondays and
Wednesday from 6 to 9 p.m. through Nov. 20. Fee is
$160 per student. The course is "designed with the boat
owner in mind," said MTI.
To register and receive further information, call
751-7900, extension 1092.


Artist Burlin honored
at Gallery West
Painter Patricia Burlin will be honored during Sep-
tember by Island Gallery West, where several of her
works will hang until Sept. 21.
A new member of the gallery, she will resume her
regular space at the gallery after that, the gallery said.
The gallery is at 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Burlin studied at Philadelphia College of Art and
worked with Valfred Thalin, Tony Van Hasslet and
Catherine Chang Liu, among others, and with Thalin
wrote the book "Watercolor, Let the Medium Do It."
She has taught at Wesleyan College, Port Charlotte
Cultural Center and Back Porch Artists. She is a resi-
dent of Sun City Center.
Further information may be obtained at 778-6648.

Butterfly class
Connie Hodsdon will lead a free class in "Butter-
fly Gardening Basics With Plants That Love Florida"
from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, at the
Butterfly Garden Center, 30902 Taylor Grade Road,
Duette. Reservations may be made and details received
by calling 776-1480.


55 Alive driving class
registration under way
Registration has opened for the AARP 55 Alive
refresher course for drivers 50 and older, scheduled
Sept. 19 and 20 at the Island Branch Library, 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The classes will be from noon to 4 p.m. each day.
A certification that can earn a reduction in auto insur-
ance premiums will be awarded to drivers who attend
both days. Registration may be made and information
obtained at 776-1158.


Beginner 'pilates' program
starting at Center
A "pilates" class for beginners is being developed by
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magno-
lia Ave., Anna Maria, starting Thursday, Sept. 12.
Laura Bennett will instruct this additional class at
10:30 a.m. Further information is available at 778-
1908.


Wolfe demonstrates
whittling Friday
Doug Wolfe will show how whittling is done in
demonstrations Friday, Sept. 13, at the gallery of the
Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island, 5414 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
The artistic show will be from 10 a.m. until noon
and is open to the public.
Wolfe, a native New Yorker who moved to the Is-
land 30 years ago, said he "found a pocketknife and
started putting points on sticks." His work evolved until
he now does intaglio bar relief and two- and three-di-
mensional carvings, from hand-held to wall size.
Details are available at 778-6694.

Prayer workshop Saturday
A workshop on "Centering Prayer" is scheduled
from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, at Saints
Peter and Paul Catholic Church, 2850 75th St. W.,
Bradenton, by Janet Gallagher and Bob Fasulo. A $10
donation is requested. For registration or further infor-
mation call 778-3091 or 795-3991.

Volleyball on Thursdays
at Community Center
Adult volleyball play is ongoing from 7 to 8:30
p.m. on Thursdays at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
From mid-November until February, however,
volleyball will be in abeyance while the Center's youth
basketball program uses the gymnasium nightly. Fur-
ther information may be obtained from Barbara
Parkman at 778-3390.

Corbino on Longboat,
has rotating exhibitions
Rotating exhibitions of American and Latin Ameri-
can artists will be at the Corbino Galleries, 5350 Gulf
of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key, through October.
Featured are the works of Mario Bencomo, Ramon
Carulla and Leonel Matheu, whose work is now on
exhibit at the University Gallery in Gainesville. Details
may be obtained by calling 383-0822. ---..


Blood drive Tuesday
at Community Center
The Manatee Community Blood Bank's bloodmo-
bile will visit the Island Tuesday, Sept. 17, to receive
donations to help replenish depleted blood supplies.
It will be at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Donors must be 18 or older with a photo ID,
and should drink plenty of fluids. The goal is 15 donors
for the day. Appointments may be made and details
obtained at 778-1908.


'Garden Stepping Stone' classes
next week
A two-morning course in making "Garden Step-
ping Stones" will be taught by artist Glen LeFevre next
week at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
He will instruct in cutting and grinding glass,
routing and polishing from 9:30 a.m. to noon Mon-
day, Sept. 16, and 9:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17.
Cost is $15 for members and $20 non-members, plus
$40 for materials.
Registration is under way at the Center. Details
may be obtained by calling 778-1908.

Ralleyball organizing at Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is de-
veloping a Team Tennis Ralleyball program for young-
sters from kindergarten through fifth-grade.
Aimed at enhancing basic tennis skills, it will help
"beginning through intermediate players bridge the gap
from lessons to match play," said the Center. Starting
Oct. 1, it will meet three days a week for six weeks at
$60 for members, $70 non-members. Deadline for
signup is Sept. 26.
In conjunction with that program the Center is giv-
ing parents the option of having their children attend its
after-school program on the days of their tennis lessons
for $6 per day.
Details may be obtained at 778-1908.






THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 11, 2002 PAGE 11


Turtles as indicators, adoptees


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"'Sea turtles tell us how we stand in our environ-
ment," Suzi Fox said. "The numbers of nests are down
all over the state, including Anna Maria Island.
"Is that a measure of the environment over all? Are
we being as careful as we need to be?"
She was ruminating on her role as chief sea turtle
advocate for Anna Maria Island, head of Turtle Watch
and holder of the state's turtle preservation permit for
the Island.
"A beach north of Clearwater was closed to pub-
lic use last week. That's the sixth one in the state this
summer to be closed because of pollution. It's scary."
She went on to remind turtle admirers that there are
still 27 nests unhatched on the Island's beach, and that
makes for 27 nests available for "adoption."
And that means something like 2,700 baby turtles
yet to come out of their eggs and be "adopted" by ad-
miring humans.
The Adopt-A-Nest program will tail off soon, she
noted, with the end of the nesting season. But there are
plenty of nests are still incubating and waiting for the
human touch a donation of $100 and up to Anna
Maria Island Turtle Watch makes an individual or or-
ganization the "head of household" for a nest.
The Adopt-A-Hatchling program is in full swing,
and continues throughout the year. That's a $15 dona-
tion to Turtle Watch. "Parents" even get to name their
babies on their very own birth certificate.
Adoptions in either program may be done at Turtle
Watch's business partner The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach, phone 778-7978.
Adoptive parents of nests thus far are:
Turtle Watch volunteers adopted the only green
turtle nest on record on the Island and they're expect-
ing it to hatch about Sept. 20.
Other nest adoptees include:
Charlene and Rick Doll, the Anna Maria City Pier
Turtle Cheese Cake Fund, The Marino family, Temple



Center dance classes
postponed
Creative dance for students 4- to 18-year-
olds will be offered three days a week starting
Monday, Sept. 23. Originally scheduled to
start Sept. 9, the startup has been postponed by
teacher Sara Tanner.
Classes will be by age group in creative
dance, ballet, tap and jazz. Class fees are $5
per session. Monday, Thursdays and Satur-
days at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. De-
tails are available at 778-1908.


A happy sight for turtle volunteers and sea turtle
lovers little tracks of hatchlings scampering
across the sand to the Gulf of Mexico.

. Beth El, north Life Guard Stand No. 2, Norman and
Lea Hay, Rebecca Smith and Mike Norman Realty.


Manatee/Island cleanup
scheduled for Oct. 5
Exercising its weather-optimistic option, Keep
Manatee Beautiful has scheduled its major coastal
cleanup campaign for Oct. 5 for Manatee County and
Anna Maria Island.
The rest of the state is cleaning up Sept. 21, said
Ingrid McClellan, executive director of the Manatee
organization. Manatee decided to hold off for two
weeks to "try to beat the weather," she said. "We hope
that weekend will see less threat of a tropical storm."
It will be part of the massive Florida Coastal
Cleanup, which is in conjunction with the Ocean
Conservancy's International Coastal Cleanup. Details
may be obtained from McClellan at 795-8272.


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Obituaries


Robert W. Dougan
Robert W. Dougan, 79, of St. Petersburg, died
Sept. 4.
Born in Canonsburg, Pa., Mr. Dougan graduated
from Canonsburg High School and Randolph-Macon
Military Academy. He served in the U.S. Navy from
1942-46, was a longtime member of Alcoholics
Anonymous and St. Mary, Our Lady of Grace, St. Pe-
tersburg.
There were no services. Memorial contributions.
may be made to Alcoholics Anonymous, the American
Lung Association, 1740 Broadway, NY 10019.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Homes was in charge of ar-
rangements.
He is survived by daughter Patrice Armbrust of
Richmond, Va.; sons Michael of Canton, Ohio, Dan of
Columbus, Ohio, and Robert of Granville, Ohio; seven
grandchildren; and friends Fred Herr and Dave
Hartmus of Anna Maria.

Matthew H. Duffy Jr.
Matthew H. Duffy Jr., 62, of Bradenton, died Sept.
8.
Bom in Providence, R.I., Mr. Duffy came to Mana-
tee County from Cranston, R.I., in 1990. He was a de-


tective in the Bradenton Beach Police Department from
1990-2002. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was a de-
tective with the Cranston
Police Department from
1966-90. He was a member
of International Brother-
hood of Police Officers and
the Benevolent and Protec-
tive Order of Elks Lodge 14
in Cranston.
Visitation will be from
2 to 4 p.m., Wednesday,
Sept. 11, at Brown & Sons Dfy
Funeral Home, 604 43rd St. ffy
W., Bradenton, with services at 4 p.m. at the funeral
home. Burial will be in Gate of Heaven in East Provi-
dence, R.I. Memorial contributions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, 600 U.S. 301 Blvd. W.,
Suite 136, Bradenton FL 34205.
He is survived by wife Margaret; daughter Doreen
A. of Cranston; stepdaughters Nina Bisceglia of
Cranston and Jenifer Bisceglia of Gainesville; sons
Matthew T. III of Boston, Kevin A. and Michael S.,
both of Cranston; sisters Rose Helen Barrie of Cranston
and Barbara Stanley of Warren, R.I.; and one grand-
child.


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PAGE 12 M SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Renourishment 'OK' says former opponent


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria resident Jack Dietrich was never op-
posed to the recently completed Manatee County beach
renourishment project in Anna Maria and other Island
cities. He was opposed to granting the county an ease-
ment through his property.
"We just didn't want the county to get a foothold"
on the property, said Dietrich. "I was never against
renourishing the beach, although our beach has always
been here."
He and three other Anna Maria residents Wiley E.


Vacancies on Holmes

Beach boards
The city of Holmes Beach is looking for candidates
to fill a position on the code enforcement board and a
position on the planning commission.
An alternate member is needed for the code en-
forcement board due to the resignation of board mem-
ber Joan Perry. First alternate member DuWayne
Dzibinski will take Perry's seat and a new alternate
member will be appointed.
Applicants must be residents of Holmes Beach and
will be appointed to the board by the mayor and ap-
proved by the city commission.
Members should have experience or an interest in
architecture, business, engineering, general contract-
ing, subcontracting or real estate.
The alternate member will be called upon to fill in
when a regular board member can not attend a sched-
uled meeting.



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6608 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1813


"Gene" Moss, Frances Rowland and Steve Newhouse -
filed a lawsuit last year to stop the county from
renourishing the Anna Maria portion of the beach. That
lawsuit was unsuccessful and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection eventually issued a permit for
the county to proceed with beach renourishment on the
Island. The project finished in May.
"Since they did [renourishment], it seems to have
worked out all right," said Dietrich, who lives on the
beach.
His concern was the county would have control
over a part of his property with access to the beach, and


Two cases scheduled to be reviewed by the
Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Board last week
have been postponed until Sept. 19, so that all
parties involved can be properly notified.
The first case involves a boat docked at the
residence of Earl Hieronimus in the 500 block of
72nd Street. According to Code Enforcement Of-
ficer Walter Wunderlich, the boat encroaches
within 10 feet of the adjoining property and city
codes state that no part of the mooring area is to
be within 10 feet of the side lot line.
The second case involves property at 526 56th


In addition, the city is seeking a new member for
its planning commission due to the resignation of mem-
ber Dolly Young. Although still working on the Island,
Young is moving to a residence outside of Holmes
Beach and can no longer serve on the commission.
Members of the planning commission are ap-

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could install bollards and boardwalks and create recre-
ational areas for beachgoers. Thankfully, that hasn't
happened, said Dietrich.
At present, Dietrich has about 150 feet of beach in
front of his house, from the dune line to the mean-high-
water mark. The beach just south of his property, which
was not renourished, has about 70 feet of beach be-
tween the high-water mark and the dune line.
"That's about where the beach used to be in front
of our house, before they renourished," said Dietrich.
"The beach seems fine now, but of course, it will
eventually wash away."


St. owned by Robert Byrne, which Wunderlich has
cited for use as a duplex in a single-family residen-
tial zone. The property owner told Wunderlich that
the house has been a two-family, non-conforming
home for 25 years. However, the matter will still
go before the board.
A third case, involving Island Starter and Al-
ternator, located on Avenue C, was also scheduled
for the August meeting. The business has been
operating without an approved site plan, although
it has been submitted. As a result, the issue will be
put on a future city commission agenda.


pointed by the city commission, and the applicants
should not hold any other public office or position
within the city.
Members serve a three-year term and must be a
resident of Holmes Beach. For application information,
call city hall at 708-5800.



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Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"


,A N *HA3 3R
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Code enforcement hearings delayed to Sept. 19


cm-elll






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 13


Coach rests hectically between seasons


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
From the pressures of National Football League
coaching to the ghosts of Scotland to the charms of
Europe to laid-back Anna Maria Island, Mike Deal
does it all and has it all, every year.
He's between seasons for now, relaxing at his Is-
land home when he's not scouting NFL games for play-
ers of his own or plotting next year's mayhem against
his opponents.
He is offensive line coach for the Scots Claymores
of Glasgow in the National Football League Europe,
the NFL-owned and operated offshore league. His sea-
son runs from March to June.
His off-season is almost as demanding as the play-
ing season, for every year he has to recruit his offen-
sive line from among players the NFL makes available.
So far he has scouted Tampa Bay, Miami, Jacksonville
and New Orleans, has been in their camps and watched
their pre-season games and will see the season's games
starting about now.
All from the home in Holmes Beach. He has been
coming here for 25 years, visiting with his wife's par-
ents at their home here. They now own the house her
parents had. Deal's father Russ, another coach, lived on
Longboat Key.
The younger Coach Deal played his college foot-
ball at the University of Indiana, then coached high
school in Indiana for seven years before going into
college coaching in 1978.
He is a living testament to the itinerant nature of big-
time coaches: He coached at Wabash College, Davidson
College, Marshall University, Kansas State, University of
Illinois, University of Texas and Vanderbilt.
For the past two years he has been with the NFL
Europe and the Claymores, which finished 5-5 for the
season. The league's best record was 7-3 and the worst
3-7, so he doesn't feel badly about it.
As he explained it, the NFL owners own NFL Eu-
rope, with teams in Frankfurt, Rhineland, Amsterdam,
Barcelona, Berlin and Glasgow. NFL provides all the
players, all of them rookies or second- or third-year
professional players. Each team must put at least six
.players into the NFL Europe pool.
Deal has a nearly new line every year, for players
move to the NFL as soon as they prove themselves. He
tracks players who may become available, watches


players he has coached who are now playing NFL foot-
ball, keeps track of.some he coached in college.
He is 6 foot, 3 inches, and weighs more than 200
pounds, but his linemen make him look average. They
weigh somewhere between 300 and 320, and "they're
really quick and agile," said Deal. "It's amazing."
The season starts with the player draft in mid-Feb-
ruary after the NFL has wound up its schedule. Then
all six teams come to Tampa for a giant training camp,
with many exhibition games. "We play each other here,
then in Europe, so we get to know each other pretty
well," he said.
As for football in Europe, "from a coach's stand-
point it's exactly the same as U.S. football." Crowds
get every bit as excited as those in the United States,
and there are large crowds. Many games draw from
30,000 to 50,000 fans. The Claymore average for home
games is 16,000, a lot of Scots.
The game is becoming familiar to Europeans, he
said. The people have seen enough football on TV to
become interested, so by the time they get to a stadium


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Painting I,, Kenny Smith
Custom Finishes C: 941 224-1527
Trim Installation John Kreiter
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Light Remodeling Michael Diehl
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Big 'uns
Coach Mike
Deal of
Holmes
f .. Beach with
the hometown

some of his
National
Football
S'League
Europe
linemen, none
of them under
300 pounds.
ST. They are at
w s :f t. .n .t hm the
Bannockburn
.- ~battlefield
where Robert
the Bruce
defeated the
English in
1314.

they can be pretty rabid, though not so rabid as
Europe's soccer fans.
Deal lives in a hotel in Glasgow, complete with the
traditional Scot ghost. This one is on the sixth floor and
seems friendly, Deal said, although "some pretty odd
things happen there."
His wife Nancy visits when possible, though her
teaching job at Bradenton Academy keeps her pretty
much Florida-bound. She did spend the last three
weeks of the season with him, then they puttered
around Europe for another couple of weeks before
coming home.
What's next in the career of this man on the move?
"It all depends on what comes up," he said. "The
timing is everything. I may stay there, go to the NFL,
back to college ball I don't know right now. Right
now I'm really happy where I am."
One thing is for sure, life won't be dull. With the
variety of recruiting, spring training, the playing sea-
son, "it changes all the time," said Deal. "It's all fun,
it never gets old."


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Tlh Islander

Friends and family that
live afar will surely
appreciate keeping in
touch with what's
happening on Anna Maria
it's like a letter from
home. Keep in touch
with a gift subscription.
You can charge your
subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


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AGEi 14 W 'SEp T. 11, 2002 THE ISLANDER


Lightning season perilous time for Islanders


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
If you need convincing, nature is providing an
abundance all too frequently: We live in the lightning
capital of the hemisphere.
There are fatalities every year, and drastic changes
for the many more whom it strikes but leaves alive. It
causes tens of millions of dollars worth of damage to
buildings, property, and equipment and lands where it
ignites wildfires.
Lightning struck Manatee County 22,022 times last
year, and many of those bolts hit Anna Maria Island
because the Island sees more thunderstorms than the
mainland.
There's a reason for that "thunderstorm" designa-
tion. Thunder is lightning's voice and lightfiing forms
through the actions of the particles that make storm
clouds. Swirling particles become charged with static
electricity. Lighter, positive-charged particles rise,
negative particles cluster at the bottom of the cloud.
The negative charge is attracted to the ground, and
a positive streamer shoots up from the ground to meet
it. When they meet, they become visible as lightning.
It heats the air around it to 50,000 degrees, and that
instant heating makes the noise we call thunder.
Dan Noah is warning coordination meteorologist at
the National Weather Service station in Ruskin, and he
lives with lightning as well as other aspects of violent
weather.
He said that in addition to air-ground lightning,
there are inter-cloud and intra-cloud lightning, but that
affects only aircraft. The bolt hits the plane, travels
around its outer shell and goes on its way.
It is truly dangerous when it snaps from cloud to


Teen back-to-school

dance at Center
A back-to-school dance for youngsters 12
to 17 years of age will be.held Friday, Sept. 13,
from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria.
The $5 price includes pizza and soda as
well as the dance. Further information may be
obtained at 778-1908.


'jr.


ss'~~ ~
::~.*-.,--. -- ~

- -S~


_. -


John L. Barker took this picture of a lightning strike in the Gulf of Mexico off 52nd Street in Holmes Beach.
His picture was submitted during The Islander Top Notch Photo Contest in July.


ground. It can hit miles from a storm two people were
killed and several injured a few years ago on the Siesta
Key beach by lightning that sought them out from a
storm 10 miles or more away.
"If you can hear thunder, you can be struck," said
Noah. "Most of it, though, occurs where and while rain
is falling."
Ruskin has records of eight deaths in Manatee
County since 1959, when such records began.
Hillsborough County to the north has had 32 fatalities,
including a fisherman killed in July. Saiasota to the
south has had four deaths by lightning. The whole
United States has recorded 400.
The incidence of lightning varies year by year,
according to data provided by Vaisala Co. in Tucson,
Ariz. In Manatee County it ranged from 15,634 strikes
in 1995 to a 10-year high of 24,255 in 1999.
You don't have to put up with it, except for the
noise and the moments of terror when it lands nearby.


Noah said a car is a safe shelter, not because the
tires insulate it from the ground but because the body
is a protective shell. Buildings are OK, too, except for
those made of reinforced concrete, whose iron rebar
rods conduct the electricity of lightning: Get away from
those walls. Unplug appliances, computers, TVs. Don't
talk on the phone.
Outdoors, stay away from fences and railroad
tracks and trees, all of which attract lightning; every
year brings its toll of cows that hung out near a fence
during a storm. Isolated trees are especially dangerous,
and so are isolated people who remain upright curl up
on the ground and wait it out.
Many of lightning's victims are macho men who
stay out working or playing despite lightning. Golf-
ers, for instance, are vulnerable because they're
holding a lightning rod in the form of a metal club
while wearing cleats that quite efficiently ground
lightning.


SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY

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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not le based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.





Do you have questions about cremation?
Our new booklet What you should know about cremation explains
all aspects of the cremation process and talks about the wide range
of memorial options available to commemorate a life lived.
To receive your free copy, call us at 778-4480 or send this coupon.
We serve all families regardless of their financial circumstance.



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FUNERAL HOMES AND CREMATION SERVICE
When caring more counts the most.
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5412 Marina Drive
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(941) 778-2253
Our office is closed
for lunch from
12 to 1 pm daily






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 E PAGE 15


Anna Maria P&Z recommends zero lot line ordinance


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Attempting to address a "technical violation" of the
city's setback rules, Anna Maria's planning and zon-
ing board on Aug. 26 recommended that the city com-
mission adopt a "zero lot line" ordinance as revised by
City Attorney Jim Dye.
The ordinance would allow the owner of two ad-
joining lots to have the entire parcel considered as a
single building site, thereby allowing the owner to ig-
nore the internal lot line for setback purposes.
The owner, however, would have to complete cer-
tain steps before receiving such consideration, includ-
ing obtaining a single tax identification number and, in
some cases, a new survey and legal description.
As Dye pointed out, it's been a common practice


in the city to allow construction of a single unit on two
adjoining lots. The ordinance solves the technical prob-
lem of the current setback requirements.
City Commissioner Chuck Webb, who originally
raised the issue, wanted the ordinance to go further,
requiring the owner to combine the two lots and replat
the property.
Webb said he was concerned about the growing prob-
lem of redevelopment in the city. People were buying
adjoining lots, tearing down the small homes on the prop-
erty, then building a larger structure to cover the two lots.
Board member Charlie Daniel pointed out the
property owner could still only build a house on 35
percent of the land.
True, conceded Webb, but that still represents a big
house if the owner bought two adjoining lots, each 75


feet by 100 feet. "Our real issue is to control future de-
velopment in the city," he said.
Board member Charles Caniff said the board could
get into a long, drawn-out discussion on that issue, but
that's not what the ordinance is about.
"This is just an interior lot-line ordinance. It should
not address other areas," said Caniff.
Those "other areas" can be addressed by the up-
coming visioning process in the city, said board chair-
man Doug Copeland.
"This is the simple fix. Let's not complicate
things," Copeland said.
Dye agreed that the visioning process is a "safe"
vehicle to address the redevelopment issue and the city
may want the advice of a professional city planner af-
ter the visioning process is completed.


Island inventor makes 'hand-held impact tool'


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
A wrench so powerful yet so undemanding of
muscle that a 6-year-old child can loosen frozen wheel
lugs has been built by an Anna Maria Island man,
James R. Barnes.
He said it is "a hand-held impact tool that is effec-
tive on the toughest nuts, virtually without strength
expended." He has patented the simple device and is
marketing the first 500 units himself.
He calls it a "lug hammer." It is a 12-inch solid
steel shaft one inch thick, he said, with a half-inch-
drive socket at one end. A cylinder on the shaft has
three handles, Barnes said, and a metal key.
As he describes it: "With one hand on the free end
of the shaft, hold the lug hammer securely against the
wheel lug. With the other hand, gently rotate the
handles clockwise as far as possible.
"Now place the fingertips on the end of one of the
three handles and give it a quick spin in the opposite
direction. Repeat this until the wheel lug nut breaks
loose, usually two or three times."
It's the radial hammering action that does the job,
he said. It works on all nuts, he added, not just on lugs.
He made 10 prototypes to validate the patent, then
farmed out initial production to a Polish firm that so
mishandled the job that it took him eight months to
bring the 500 units up to his standards. He is market-
ing those perfected units now for $39.95 each.
And he's looking for a buyer/manufacturer from
among the 80 approaches he has made to companies,


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician ,-,
Healthcare the .
gentle natural way i

761-0210 4),
q ..... .
501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 West Bradenton
(1 block east of Albertson's Manatee Ave )

Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"


Dr. Joseph Acebal & Dr. KathleenGoerg
ISLAND CHIROPRACTIC
Complete Family Care from Children to Seniors
Chronic and Difficult Conditions
Immediate Emergency Care
Monday thru Friday 8:30 to 5
778-0722
3612 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(Between Publix and Crowder Bros)
L ----- --- --- - - - ------ A w -- I I


Snap On Tools already expressing interest.
The patenting process cost him about $13,000, he
said, but he was prepared for that: He had already pat-
ented a device to fasten cutting tools on a metal-work-
ing lathe, but it was too expensive to manufacture to fit
his budget.
He has a couple of other ideas he'd like to patent,
one a tool for planting grass plugs and the other a tool


LONGBOAT CARDIOLOGY
COLLEEN M. HEALY, M.D.
BOARD CERTIFIED CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
Colleen M. Healy, MD New Patients Welcome
Caring staff in an inviting atmosphere.
Just a short drive onto the Key.
Lonoat (941) 383-7300 5650 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
ad iO y Longboat Key Monday-Friday 8-5


Islander
John
Barnes
has a nifty
new "lug
hammer."
Islander
Photo:
Bonner
Joy


for plumbers. "When I couldn't get a pipe loose, I made
a tool that did the job," he said. "A plumber offered me
$20 for it on the spot."
At 78, he has had broad experience in his field as
a machinist/toolmaker, working lately in a machine
shop at Ybor City.
He and his wife live in Holmes Beach, where he
may be reached at 778-5073.


"Tropical Bugs Need A Tropical Service"
CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
778-1337 778-1913
Full Service Exterior and Interior
State Certified/Licensed and Insured
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SERVING THE ISLANDS 20 YEARS


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AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
FPL PARTICIPATING e I
CONTRACTOR
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WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS
778-9622 Holmes Beach
In Memory of the events of Sept.11, 2001,
We honor our fallen heroes.


I


....
I -
,-- "** "' ,- '






PAGE 16 E SEPT. 11, 2002 E THE ISLANDER


Student history fair workshop
set for Sept. 14
It is time to begin preparing for the Manatee
County History Fair.
Students in grades four through 12 have an
opportunity to do original historical research and
present their findings at the fair in November.
A workshop to help students prepare will be
held from 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 14 at the Manatee
County Central Library located at 1301
Barcarrotta Blvd., Bradenton.
At the workshop students will receive help
choosing a topic, starting their research and pull-
ing their presentation together.
The registration deadline is Oct. 25. For more
information, call the Manatee County Historical
Commission at 749-7165, or log onto the Internet
Web site at www.manateeclerk.com.




Island Middle School menu
Monday, Sept. 16
Traditional Meal: Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Garlic
Breadstick, Green Beans, Tossed Salad with Dress-
ing
Basket Meal: Hamburger with Fries, Fruit Juice Bar
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Ham and Cheese
Sandwich
Tuesday, Sept. 17
Traditional Meal: Two Egg Rolls, Fried Rice, Mixed
Vegetables, Carrot Sticks with Dressing
Basket Meal: Pizza Sticks with Sauce, Pretzels, Jello
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Tuna Salad Sand-
wich
Wednesday, Sept. 18
Traditional Meal: Frito Pie, Green Peas, Tossed
Salad with Dressing, Fruit Cup
Basket Meal: Hot Dog with Fries
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Fruit, Cheese and
Muffin
Thursday, Sept. 19
Traditional Meal: Beef and Noodles with Roll,
Cooked Carrots, Tossed Salad with Dressing
Basket Meal: Sloppy Joe with Baked Chips
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Turkey and Cheese
Sandwich
Friday, Sept. 20
Traditional Meal: Burrito with Salsa, Corn, Tossed
Salad with Dressing
Basket Meal: Fish on a Bun with Goldfish Crackers
Lighter Side: Salad Sensations or Fruit, Muffin-and
Yogurt
Juice and milk are served with every, meal.


Picture day at IMS
Island Middle School students will ha'e their
school photos taken beginning at 1 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 13. Students will be able to purchase photo
packages at this time.
For more information, call 778-5200.

Anna Maria Elementary menu
Monday, Sept. 16
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit, Cereal,
Juice
Lunch: Chicken Nugget Basket or Two Egg Rolls,
Broccoli, Fried Rice, Fruit, Fortune Cookie
Tuesday, Sept. 17
Breakfast: Egg and Cheese Biscuit, Fruit Cup,
Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Two Italian Dunkers or Cheeseburger Basket
with Fries, Garden Salad, Fruit
Wednesday, Sept. 18
Breakfast: Dannon Danimals Yogurt, Fruit, Cereal,
Juice
Lunch: Macaroni and Cheese or Fish Sandwich,
Green Beans, Fruit
Thursday, Sept. 19
Breakfast: Breakfast Pizza, Fruit Cup, Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Chicken Sandwich or Chili Con Carnie with
Fritos, California Blend, Fruit
Friday, Sept. 20
Breakfast: Pancakes with Syrup, Fruit, Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Nacho Pizza Sticks or Shaker Salad, Corn,
Fruit
Milk and juice are served with every meal.


Life at
the beach
Island Middle
School students
have been learning
to play volleyball
at the Manatee
Beach during their
Life Skills class
with teacher Gary
Hughes.


Beach service
Don Dinsmore, an
eighth-grader at
the Island Middle
School, prepares
to serve a smiley-
faced volleyball
during a game at
the Manatee
Public Beach.
Islander Photos:
Diana Bogan


Fine feathered friends
Third-grade students at Anna Maria Elementary
School were surprised to learn it's against the law to
keep feathers from birds like this red-tailed hawk.
Getting caught with a feather carries a hefty fine of
$500, according to special guests Gail and Ed
Straight of Anna Maria's Wildlife Education and
Rehabilitation Center. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan.


DR. GYYATROS
Restorative, Esthetic and Implant Dentistry
Smile Restoration for the Discriminating Patient


* Cosmetic and General
Dentistry
* Porcelain crowns in one
visit, NO temporaries
* Latest whitening products
* Implants, the alternative to
dentures and partial
* Bonding
* Periodontal therapy
* Cracked or chipped teeth


. -c .--
r.,
New patients welcome!
778-2204
www.islanddentalspa.com


"ISLAND/"
DENTAL SPA


Relax in our spa atmosphere
* Headphones
* Massage chairs
* Nitrous oxide
* Blankets & pillows
" Refreshments


3909 East Bay Drive
(near corner of Manatee Ave., across from Publix)
Convenient to Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key


Just



visiting



paradise?

You can keep up on
Island activities with a
subscription to
"the best news on
Anna Maria Island"
The Islander
You'll get news about
three Island city
governments, Island
people and more. Call
(941) 778-7978 and
charge it to
MasterCard or Visa.
Or visit our office and
subscribe
in person -
5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach.


Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

REMEMBERS SEPT. 11
r -- -- -- -- -- ---- i
BEDROOM CARPETS
CLEANED ONLY $9.11 EACH
When we clean your living room
and dining room carpets.
OFFER GOOD THRU 9-30-02
CHAIRS CLEANED -
ONLY $9.11 EACH
When we clean your
sofa and love seat.
OFFER GOOD THRU 9-30-02
L----------------J
Every $9.11 fee collected during the month of
September will be donated to the Manatee
County Red Cross Disaster Relief.

-' 778-2882 or 387-0607
5400 Marina Drive., Holmes Beach


I











Inventory ., : -. -:

PRICES WILL NEVER BELOWER!
Trade-ins Accepted Excellent Financing Available *


m-oUUIt cUUI,
month*


19-foot bay, 115hp Yamaha 4-stroke, trailer and bimini.
$193.15 per month*


17-toot dual console, 50hp Yamaha,
trailer. An ideal boat!


YAMAHA
When you want the best


* 2002 170 C.C., 70hp Yamaha with,
trailer. $13,995 or, 159.48iper
month* :.,
* 2002 174 C.C., 9Q. iAmahwith
trailer.m $15,595w '.6 ,7 5per
month* i Th -
* 2003 188 CC.., 115hp,4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. .$21,695 or
$219.46 per month*.
* 2003 198 C.C., 115hp;4.-stroke
Yamaha with trailer.: $22,495 or
$227.55 per month*
* 2003 198 D.C., 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $23,495 or
$237.67 per month*
* 2003 206 C.C., 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $23,495 or
$237.67 per month*
* 2002 216 C.C., 200hp Yamaha with
trailer. $30,995 or $313.54 per
month*
* 2002 234 W.A., 200hp Yamaha with
trailer. $37,695 or $320.23 per
month'*
* 2002 236 C.C., 225hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $41,795 or
$355.06 per month"*
* 2002 266 C.C., twin 225hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha and trailer. $63,950 or
$543.27 per month**
* 2003 266 C.C., twin 1!15hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha and trailer; ,$5t, 195 or.
$434.91 per mdhthi.. 7 :
* ;With.approved c ,d .
:- ', :,: ,,/- : ; ., ... ... ,.,0.A


17-foot center console, 60hp Yamaha,
trailer and bimini. $121.87 per month*


THE fSLANDEI i0 SEPT. 11, 2WOi2 i PAGE itI




* 2001 12-ft Open, no motor or trailer.
$1995
* 2002 12-ft Open, no motor or trailer.
$2495
* 2003 15-ft Cool, 50hp, 4-stroke,
Yamaha, with no trailer. $11,250 or
$128.20 per month-
* 2002 17-ft S.M., 40hp Yamaha with
trailer. $6995
* 2002 17-ft D.C., 50hp Yamaha with
trailer. $9695
* 2002 17-ft C.C., 60hp Yamaha with
trailer. $10,695 or $121.87 per
month*
* 2003 19-ft Bay, 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $17,735 or
$200.04 per month*
* 2003 19ft Bay, 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $17,125 or
$193.15 per month*
* 2003 19-ft Bay, 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $17,125 or
$193.15 per month*
* 2003 19-ft Bay, 115hp, 4-stroke
Yamaha with trailer. $17,125 or
$193.15 per month'
* 2003 21-ft C.C., 150hp Yamaha with
trailer. $26,990 or $304.43 per
month*
*With approved credit and 10% down.


Inventory Sale

PRICES WILL VERBE WER!
Trade-ins Accepted Excellent Financing Available*


26-foot center console, twin 115hp Yamaha 4-stroke,
trailer. $434.91 per month**


" . 0 -. ....


19-foot dual console, 115hp Yamaha
4-stroke, trailer. $237.67 per month*


--4


r1t *" -'..1J
*,,11 -1
4


23-foot walk-around, 200hp Yamaha, trailer. $320.23 per
month*


K - -.;.:3
. . j,,, '. '. a-."1 "
_..- . ". ;' . ... ; .* . ..
; .-: *" *


18-foot center console, 115hp Yamaha
4-stroke, trailer. $219.46 per month*


17-foot center console, 70hp Yamaha,
trailer. $159.48 per month*


When you want the best


Marine for the best deal of the summer!


A


=t, ,!.,


A'.-.. _







PAGE 18 M SEPT. 11, 2002 M THE ISLANDER


READER'S RE F
Shells Je elri Gilt



Stop b'v and see
Wilbur, ori he'll
sad! But he has ",
days off, so plea -
keep checking!

New! Glass Beads and Supplies!
Hand-designed Christmas Ornaments
Beautiful Shells, T-shirts, Candles and More
5508 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-3211
(ACROSS FROM THE LIBRARY)


--Tv VLO


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PAGE'20 sPT. 11, 2002 M THE ISLANDER




A year later, horror persists


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"Run, run, the building is falling!" yelled the fe-
male cop.
"I can't, my foot's in a cast."
"Run, you sonofabitch, or you're dead!"
Sam Kinney ran, cast or not. It was the only time
he felt fear during the whole World Trade Center hor-
ror, he said: "I thought the building would fall on me."
It collapsed into itself instead.
He was one of 8,000 Port of New York employees
in the WTC the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, one of
30,000 people in the two towers destroyed by terrorists
flying commandeered airliners. Of them, about 3,000
died, 75 of them port employees, most of them Port
Authority police, said Kinney.
He would be on Anna Maria Island right now, if
the press of business permitted it. A good friend of the
Jack Egan family of Anna Maria, he has visited the
longtime Island resident and Islander cartoonist every
September for eight years, he said.
A year ago today he was in an elevator letting
people off on the 64th floor at the plane's impact, and
"the building swayed so far I thought it was falling.
"I hobbled to a window and saw things falling from
higher floors, parts of the aircraft and the building, and
bodies. Bodies seemed to just float down.
"We kept people out of the elevators," Kinney said.
"One was stuck, and a window washer used his squee-
gee blade to open the door, and got out to help others."
Kinney helped herd people into a stairwell, most of
the people calm and orderly. They had to move aside
from time to time to let firemen go up.
"I had been through the bombing in 1993, on the
64th floor then, too, and this one was easier for getting
out. The emergency lights mostly worked, and even in
dark areas the wall paint glowed in the least light."
Halfway down he found he was still carrying half a
bagel and a piece of sausage.
One woman was petrified, he recalled, and he kept
her moving and tried to calm her "I told her, 'No mat-
ter what, your hair looks good.' Her hair never moved.
"We lost 18 people on our floor. One good friend
was going the wrong way and I told her to get over to
the stairs. She went to the command center instead, and
died there. She's still not identified."
On the street finally, a medic saw his foot in a cast
from an injury days before and told Kinney to go to the
ambulance. "I saw a woman badly burned, her hair all
gone, walking toward the ambulance and I thought if
she can do that and I can get down 64 flights of stairs


Artists, poets, friends unite after 9/111
"It is with honesty and integrity that we can produce
great art. And with that we can fight back." Artist
Susan Curry, 70 or so artists and friends of the arts
were inspired to gather at The Islander newspaper
office last year following the terrorist attack on
America by Curry. Her painting symbolized the
occasion and now hangs for all to enjoy in the
newspaper office. At the reception closing, Sam
Kinney, who was at work on the 65th floor of the
World Trade Center at the time of the attack, rose to
speak, telling the rapt crowd of his experience and
the outpouring of humanity he witnesseLd.

I can get to the subway."
He got one block when the woman cop started yell-
ing at him to run, the building was falling.
He made it to another building and could see
people through the glass, but they had locked their
doors and wouldn't let anyone else in.
"It was total confusion. I got into a door and a
woman ran up and asked 'Is there room for me?' I said
yes, and told her to get into a comer and cover her face.
'What with?' I told her, 'Your blouse, I won't peek.' I


covered my mouth and nose with my handkerchief
from the smoke and dust.
"In a minute we were in dead darkness. I thought
I was alone, but the woman was still there. She held
onto my belt loop and I went outside. We went through
a sprinkler, and we had ashes three-quarters of an inch
thick plastered on us."
A policeman told him to go to Brooklyn and
Kinney, disoriented, retorted "Are you nuts? Get out in
the open and let them get a clear shot at me?"
The woman disappeared about then, and he never
learned who she was. He went to nearby Chinatown.
"Our building was still standing. Then I saw the
giant antenna start to move as the building started to
fall. I watched 20 years of my life disappear."
At a Chinese church and school on the corner,
women handed out bottles of water and Kinney washed
his filthy handkerchief. "I really wanted gum, for the
taste of anything but the smoke and ashes."
He walked to his apartment where a neighbor let
him in. He handed Kinney a cell phone, but he couldn't
remember how to use it. The neighbor offered to dial
Kinney's sister for him, but Kinney couldn't remem-
ber any phone numbers. "I started to cry then," he said.
The Port Authority began at once to regroup, he
said, but "we had nothing at first, no pencils, no paper
clips, no computers."
He is in the planning group, which lost all of its
drawings and records. He is in charge of the photo li-
brary, and lost thousands of pictures and negatives.
Last week he and Port Authority friends went back,
but they couldn't orient themselves "It's just so vast,
and so barren now. It's not a graveyard, it's clean,
there's nothing at all there. I was sick to my stomach.
"The identification crews are like magic. They stand
by conveyor belts and they can pick a fingernail or a small
piece of bone from among all that debris going by. They
ID about three bodies a day from fragments."
He's not bitter, exactly, but he's not happy, either,
that "we've been forgotten, the ones who lived through
it. Relatives of the dead are called survivors. They get
all kinds of help, and they deserve it.
"We're the survivors, too. We don't get help or
even any recognition for what we went through. We are
here, and that counts. But we resent being overlooked.
"I remember. I don't need reminding. I'm glad it's
not forgotten or ignored, and that on this 9/11 there are
memorials.
"But I won't be participating. I don't need to lis-
ten to a bunch of politicians who weren't there, telling
us how it was. I remember."


'Hat's off to American people'


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"My hat's off to the American people, especially
New Yorkers," said Englishman Michael Daly. "It was
fantastic to see people pull together without panic.
"It must have been like that in the blitz in the
1940s," when German bombers were bent on destroy-
ing England.
Daly is an investment banker who saw the whole
-' Sept. 11 catastrophe first-hand at ground zero. The ter-
rorist attack cost him his passport, his clothing and ul-
timately his job.
He was an executive with Deutsch Bank, the giant
- British investment house, in New York for a confer-
ence. He was at a management meeting in a building
adjacent to the South Tower the morning of Sept. I 1,
2001.
They thought the first explosion was thunder, un-
til they got instructions to leave.
"We evacuated the building by stairway, and ev-
eryone in the building was calm. Out a lobby window
I saw debris float down like ticker tape, no idea some
of it was bodies."
He and colleagues left the building by a rear en-
trance and got to Battery Park, he said, from where he
could see both towers aflame.
"There was no reality to it. It was like a big movie set.
I saw the first tower fall and thick black smoke rolled to-
ward us. Thousands of people were running but still or-


" S .. ..


derly. We didn't know what was inside the smoke. We
covered our noses and eyes with any kind of cloth, hand-
kerchiefs, shirt tails. People inside businesses locked the
street doors and wouldn't let anyone in."
He made his way to another Dcutsch office, and along
the streets saw bottles of water and juice being given out
in the street so people could clean their eyes anid noses and
slake thirst --- "those guys were just super."
Days after the attack Times Square x\as a; ghost
town, he said, and in a restaurant evCerone Iro'1/e heln


Family
affair
Gordon
Blakey of
Holmnes
Beach and
England,
second from
left, with
dangliter
Mcalnie, s1on-
in-law
MAlichael and
their dauglt 1-
tir Ca ndice,
11now of
England.


B. mC-A
a plane flew over. He had left his passport in his hotel
and it is still there, along with his clothing. He got an
emergency passport from the British consulate and a
quickly issued American Express replacement card.
After Sept. I I the financial structure tottered and
closed in on itself, restructuringi so tightly that
Dcutscih alone shed I5,()(X() employVees. Including I)aly.
On the positive side, it gave huim time to bring his
wife anid dmn'lghter to visit liis fatlher-in-la\\ Gordon
1la[ke\ ul oldies !mce i ch.





THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 21


'Tribute to Heroes' is under way today


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The "Tribute to Heroes" commemorating the ca-
lamity of Sept. 11, 2001, continues today, Wednesday,
and will conclude with a 21-gun salute and then a can-
non salute this evening.
The formal salutes will be part of the Tribute's
closing ceremonies at Bradenton City Hall, which fol-
low the parade from 6 to 7 p.m. from Third Street along
Manatee Avenue, 15th Street, Barcarrota Boulevard,
and 10th Street.
Special evening services are scheduled in three Anna
Maria Island churches 5:30 p.m. at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes,
Beach; 7 p.m. at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Ma-
rina Drive, Holmes Beach; and 7 p.m. at Roser Memorial
Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
The Holmes Beach City Hall staff will have a brief
memorial service at noon "to remember our fellow citi-
zens, fire fighters and police officers who lost their


Anna Maria to hold
brief 9/11 memorial
The City of Anna Maria and the City of Holmes
Beach will hold short memorial services at noon
Sept. 11 at the flagpole in front of each city hall to
honor those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001.
The public is invited to attend the ceremonies.


lives on 9/11." A similar ceremony will take place at
the flagpole at Anna Maria City Hall, also at noon.
Tributes will be rendered during the morning at the
fire station here, along with all other fire stations in
Manatee County. The all-day, countywide "Tribute to
Heroes" is organized by the Manatee County Fire
Chiefs Association.
The Tribute luncheon at the Bradenton City Cen-
ter promises ceremonies by an honor guard, and law
enforcement, fire, EMS and military speakers discuss-
ing Sept. 11 events.
Manatee Community College will pause for contem-
plation during the moving. The Florida West Coast Sym-
phony will present a free commemorative chamber mu-
sic concert in Sarasota. A memorial Jaws of Life
fundraiser "Triumph Over Tragedy" dinner and ceremo-
nial is scheduled from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at Robarts
Arena, 3000 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Marie Selby Bo-
tanical Gardens and Historic Spanish Point, both in
Sarasota, will offer free admission all week. A one-hour
documentary "In Memoriam" will show continuously all
week at the Florida International Museum, 100 Second
St., St. Petersburg.

Star-spangled banner
The events of Sept. 11, 2001, have strengthened the
resolve and unity of Americans. This photo was
created by Bill Pruitt of Bradenton and inspired by
patriotism following a Labor Day fireworks
display at Bongo's on the Palma Sola Causeway.


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PAGE 22 E SEPT. 11, 2002 E THE ISLANDER



(QO0OQQ:Q

Wednesday, Sept. 11
8:30 a.m. Longboat Key Chamber of Com-
merce 9/11 commemorative ceremony at Joan M.
Durante Park, Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat
Key. Information: 387-9519.
8:54 a.m. "May Peace Prevail on Earth"
commemorative ceremony at Anna Maria El-
ementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 708-5525.
6 p.m. Tribute to Heroes parade in down-
town Bradenton along Manatee Avenue.
7p.m. Memorial and thanksgiving service
at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-1813.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult basketball at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee
applies.


HCLL[VWCOOC
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2 Eggs, Fruit and Toast. Excluding
Any Menu Breakfast $2.99 Sundays
CORTEZ ROAD LOCATION ONLY
GARY IS BACK!
4765 Cortez Road W. (Pinebrook Commons) Bradenton 795-5656
Tues-Sat 8-8 Sun-Mon 8-3

Remember to say "I saw it in The Islander"


Thursday, Sept. 12
10:30 a.m. Beginners Pilates with Laura
Bennett at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Informa-
tion: 778-1908. Fee applies.
2:50 to 3:25 p.m. Baton twirling class at
Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. Information: 752-9425. Fee ap-
plies.
6 p.m. Abstinence education program par-
ent preview at Island Middle School, 206 85th St.,
Holmes Beach. Information: 778-5200.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult volleyball at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Information: 778-3390. Fee applies.

Friday, Sept. 13
10 a.m. to noon- Whittling demonstration by
Doug Wolfe at the Artist's Guild Gallery, 5414 Ma-
rina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 778-6694.
Noon Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter Charity Golf Tournament at the El Conquista-
dor Country Club, Bradenton. Information: 758-
7880 or 761-7797. Fee applies.
7 to 9 p.m. "Back to School" teen dance at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-
1908. Fee applies.

Saturday, Sept. 14
10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Butterfly gardening
basics with Connie Hodson at Flutterby Gardens,
30902 Taylor Grade Rd., Duette. Information:
779-1480.
1 to 3 p.m. History fair workshop at the
Manatee County Central Library, 1301 Barcarrotta
Blvd., Bradenton. Information: 749-7165.

Monday, Sept. 16
9 a.m. to noon Stepping stones class with
Glen LeFevre at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Infor-


Minted Lamb Chops $16.95
Tender, succulent lamb chops
marinated in our own freshly
made mint sauce, then grilled.
Served with Charlotte potatoes
and a fresh, crisp, mixed
green side salad.



S111 Gulf Drive at Bridge Street,
Bradenton Beach, ("The Yellow Building")
(Trolley Stop North#6/South#73)
Reservations 782-1122


mation: 778-1908. Fee applies.
7:30 p.m. Adult volleyball at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. Information: contact Barbara
Parkman at778-3390.

Tuesday, Sept. 17
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Blood drive at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Drive, Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908.
9:30 to 11 a.m. Stepping stones class with
Glen LeFevre at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Infor-
mation: 778-1908. Fee applies.
Noon Island Bridge Club meets at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Information: contact Hubert
Mitchell at 792-6133. Fee applies.

Wednesday, Sept. 18
7 to 8:30 p.m. Adult basketball at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 778-1908. Fee
applies.

Ongoing:
"Take a Closer Look" photographs by Shirley
Foor and paintings by Charles Sierra at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Hours: 778-6341.
Community Harvest program at all Columbia
restaurant locations. Five percent of all checks will
be donated to charity.

Upcoming:
AARP 55 Alive's driver's refresher course at
the Island Branch Library Sept. 19 and 20.
Family Caregiver Support group at Anna
Maria Island Community Center Sept. 20.
South Florida Museum re-opening celebra-
tion Sept. 20.
"Kid's Day America" at Island Chiropractic
Sept. 21.
"Eat That Frog" seminar at the Longboat Key
Chamber of Commerce Sept. 23.

La Coperie
Serving our delicious buckwheat and
eet crepes, croissants, French toast...
Stuffed buckwheat crepes and
chocolate delights for lunch!
BEER and WINE!
: Evening Private Parties available.
Hours Tues.-Sun 8:30 am-2:30 pm
127 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach 778-1011


100ay Blvd. Anna Maria --7


,,a~ d p grnw


q67hi..01901






THE ISLANDER SEPT. 11, 2002 U PgGE 23.


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 29, 700 block of Gladiolus Street, suspicious
circumstances. A delivery man from DeSears reported
that he attempted to make a scheduled delivery and
found no one home and -a key in one of the doors.
Deputies secured the property.
Aug. 30, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria City Hall,
lost property. A deputy reported loosing his uniform
badge issued by the Manatee County Sheriffs Office.
Aug. 31, 412 Pine Ave., Island Marina, burglary.
Fishing and electronic equipment was reportedly sto-


len from several boats.
Sept. 1, 875 N. Shore Drive, Rod & Reel Pier, bur-
glary. According to the report, five empty beer kegs
were stolen and the lock on the restaurant's beer cooler
was damaged.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 29, 1800 Gulf Drive S., Coquina Park, lewd
and lascivious. A female reported seeing a man fondle
himself in the parking lot.
Aug. 31, 2100 Gulf Drive S., Coquina Park, sus-
pended license. According to the report, a man stopped
for speeding was arrested for driving without a license.


In French Quarter
Relaxing -in New Orleans' French Quarter with The Islander during the city's jazzfestival are Jo Anne
Chmielewski of Longboat Key and Mary Lou England, Norma Rushing, Lorraine McDermott and Connie
Pratt of Bradenton.


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Aug. 31, 2219 Gulf Drive N, Island Discount
Tackle, trespass warning. According to the report, a
man who appeared to be drunk was given a trespass
warning after he argued with store clerks.
Sept. 2, 118 Bridge St., Sports Lounge, warrant
arrest. According to the report, officers responded to a
fight in progress at the bar and, after running back-
ground checks on both men involved, found that there
were two Valusia County warrants out for one of the
men.
Sept. 2, 200 block of Bay Drive North, domestic
disturbance. According to the report, officers stood by
while a woman took her belongings from a home after
a domestic argument.
Sept. 2, 100 block of Fifth Street North, found
property. A man turned in a wallet found in the street.
Sept. 4, 700 Gulf Drive S., Cortez Beach, lost prop-
erty. A man reported losing his wallet after he placed
it on top of his car before driving away.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 4, 5347 Gulf Drive, Holmes Construction,
criminal mischief. According to the report, $1,000
worth of damage was done to a vehicle parked behind
the property. The vehicle's windows, mirrors and head-
lights were reportedly broken and the tires were
slashed.
Sept. 4, 5000 block of Gulf Drive, drug arrest.
Larrame Luter, 22, and Aimee Wensink, 23, both from
Bradenton, were arrested for possession of illegal drugs
and paraphernalia. According to the report, the defen-
dants were stopped by police after making an illegal
left turn. Luter was found in possession of crack co-
caine and Wensink was found in possession of mari-
juana.




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PAGE 24 i'SEPT. 11, 2002 THE ISLANDER

Island Biz


Restless natives get ready
Islanders, from left, Cheryl Moody, Debbie Hall and
Jeannie Bystrom, get their artand gift shop "Rest-
less Natives" ready for its grand opening Monday,
Sept. 16, in the Island Shopping Center in Holmes
Beach. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin

These natives are restless
When Island native Jeannie Bystrom went on va-
cation to the British Virgin Islands recently, she was
amazed to find no locally made gifts. Everything was
made in Taiwan or China.
That.gave her and life-long friends and Island na-
tives Cheryl Moody, Debbie Hall and Cherri Rigney
the inspiration for "Restless Natives," the Island's
newest art and gift shop scheduled for its grand open-
ing Monday, Sept. 16, in the Island Shopping Cen-
ter in Holmes Beach.
"This is locally made art and our own art," empha-
sized Jeannie. "These are things you don't find in your
usual T-shirt shack. This is Island art.and gifts."
Indeed, the restless girls have come up with beau-
tifully created paintings, ceramics, wood and metal
sculpture and glass. There's some original Island-style
hand-painted furniture, mosaics and jewelry, not to
mention an old surfboard that helps maintain the Island
flavor of "Restless Natives."


"We're a little bit of everything, but we maintain
the Islandstyle in the art and designs," said Cheryl.
"When you go on vacation; you want to find a gift
made locally that reminds you of the local area and we
have that here," added Debbie.
These "natives" have been friends for years and
grew up on the Island. While not giving away any se-
crets, they've known each other since they were all
kids, through high school, marriage, their own kids and
now "Restless Natives."
The "soft" opening on Sept. 16 will be followed in
a few weeks by a real grand opening party, said
Jeannie.
The store will be open Monday through Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For further information on Rest-
less Natives, call 779-2624.

Island girl here,
Elvis still in Memphis
Memphis-transplant Jackie Lepley of Island Girl
Interiors in the Island Shopping Center has con-
firmed that Elvis is still in Memphis.
"But I'm here now and I love this place," said
Lepley, who will host her grand opening at 5 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 12, with Anna Maria Island Chamber
of Commerce officials and members attending. "Unfor-
tunately, I couldn't bring Elvis with me."
But she did bring her 15 years experience as an
interior designer and she's excited about designing and
creating interiors to fit the Island atmosphere and
lifestyle.
Lepley can supply a turn-key operation for an
empty house, apartment or condo, or can add style and
flair to an already-furnished home. It's whatever the
customer wants and Lepley works very well with set
budgets, she said. She's excited about her line of
"seagrass" furnishings and the store is already chock-
full of accessories and furniture.
Her shop will also have a complete workroom for
making custom draperies and other fine items for the
home.
"I like to do something different with an interior.


Island Girl
Jackie Lepley of Island Girl Interiors in the Island
Shopping Center in Holmes Beach will host her
grand opening at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12. Islander
Photo: Bonner Joy

Something that's not ordinary, that no one else has. I
like to design a fun experience."
Indeed, having done interior designs for major
commercial properties, she's looking forward to the
laid-back atmosphere of Island living.
"I came here last year on vacation and said this is
the place for me," said Lepley.
A life-long Memphis resident with a degree in in-
terior design from Memphis State University, Lepley
has been featured in such magazines as Southern Liv-
ing and Southern Home.
"But now I'm an Island girl and really looking for-
ward to meeting and working with the people here,"
she said.
For more information on Island Girl Interiors, call
778-0805.






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 25


Wyatt
Easterling
dribbles
the ball
for his
Morgan
Stanley
team as
Morgan
Greig and
Hayley
Smith
give
chase.
Islander
Photos:
Kevin
Cassidy


Jamboree kicks off soccer season at Center


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The Anna Maria Island Community Center hosted
its annual soccer jamboree Sept. 7 with mini-games
being played all day in four age divisions. At the same
time, team and individual photos were taken and soc-
cer kids and their families participated in an assortment
of fun activities.
There's no way to forecast how the season will go
based on Saturday's mini-games, but there promises to
be plenty of action throughout the season.
Division III (ages 8-9) got the soccer action started
on the big field, followed by Division II (ages 10-11)
and Division I (ages 12-14), while the instructional
league got down to business with six mini-games on
the short field.
Martine Miller showed why she's considered one
of the better young players, scoring three goals to lead
Jessie's Island Store past Gateway Solutions by a 3-1
score. Air & Energy followed and handed Gateway
Solutions a 3-0 loss behind goals from Sarah Howard,
Daniel Janisch, and Mackenzie Kosfeld.
Justin Garcia and Sage Geeraerts each scored one
goal to lead the Bistros past Jessie's Island Store in the
third game of the day. Air & Energy and Danziger
Allergy & Sinus battled to a 1-1 tie in the 11:30 game.
Mackenzie Kosfeld notched the lone goal for Air &
Energy, while Jordan Sebastiano scored the equalizer
for Danziger.
Danziger Allergy & Sinus drew its second game as
well when they battled to a scoreless tie against the
Bistro's in the last Division III game of the day.
Harry's Continental Kitchens and Mr. Bones
fought to a 1-1 tie in the Division II opener as Jay Dee
Jackson scored one goal for Harry's and Will Osborne
notched a single goal for Mr. Bones.
Mr. Bones followed up its 1-1 tie with a 3-1 vic-
tory over Island Real Estate. Kyle Sewall scored two
goals and Will Osborne added one to lead Mr. Bones,
while Joseph Karasiewicz found the net for Island Real
Estate.
Air America opened with a 2-1 victory over
Harry's behind two goals from Celia Ware while Jay
Dee Jackson scored the only goal for Harry's. Ware
added another goal in Air America's next game, but it
wasn't enough as Island Real Estate received a hat trick
from Stephen Thomas and one goal from Max Marnie
to record a 4-1 victory in the last Division II game on
the day.
Division I was plagued by attendance problems so
Island Pest Control and LaPensee Plumbing combined
forces to take on West Coast Refrigeration. Spencer


Sage Geeraerts carries the ball forward during the
Division III jamboree at the Center.

Carper scored two goals to lead West Coast to victory
in the last game of the day.
The instructional league for players age 5-7 also
participated in mini-games that were extremely com-
petitive affairs for a variety of reasons.
For a lot of these very young players, this is the
first time they've set foot on an athletic playing field
- and so a few nerves and out-of-control emotions are
the norm. Players crying, running off the field, or re-
fusing to enter the playing field are a few of the quirks
that go along with the 5- to 7-year-old league. And the
coaches are "in the game" with the kids, coaching on
the field and helping them all the while.
For all those reasons, the focus in the instructional
league is basic-skill instruction not wins and losses


- as no official score is kept. But when the final
whistle blows after these games, everyone knows who
won the game and who lost. It's just not the focal point
that it becomes when they graduate to the big field.
The regular season gets under way on Thursday,
Sept. 12. Get on out to the Center and catch some of the
action. It's all good soccer and good fun.

Rain puts damper on Dolphin football
Torrential rains canceled another weekend of youth
football at the Police Athletic League in East
Bradenton. Weather permitting, the teams will be back
at it next week.
The Dolphin Mitey Mites have a 10 a.m. kickoff
against the Raiders Saturday, Sept. 14,, while the Jun-
ior Varsity Division Dolphins take on the JV Raiders
at 4:30 p.m.
Come on out to PAL, at 202 13th Ave. E., and
catch some of the hard-hitting action barring another
downpour.

Kevin Cassidy is publisher of Sports Page, a free pub-
lication focusing on youth sports and distributed
countywide, coach for Manatee High School female
soccer, and a full-time teacher/parent.

Anna Maria Island Community

Center Soccer League
Instructional Division (ages 5-7)
Date Time Team vs. Team
Sept. 12 6 p.m. Island Animal vs.
Longboat Observer
7 p.m. Sun vs. Morgan Stanley
Sept. 17 6 p.m. Island Animal vs.
W.C. Surf Shop
7 p.m. Galati Marine vs. Sun


Division III (ages 8-9)
Sept. 12 6 p.m. Gat
Sept. 13 6 p.m. Air8
Sept. 16 6 p.m. Bist
Sept. 17 6 p.m. Bist

Division II (ages 10-11)
Sept. 13 7:15 p.m. I
Sept. 16 6 p.m. A


eway Solutions vs. Jessie's
& Energy vs. Bistros
ros vs. Gateway Solutions
ros vs. Danziger A&S


Harry's vs. Mr. Bones
Air America vs. IRE


Division I (ages 12-14)
Sept. 12 7:15 p.m. LaPensee vs.
W.C. Refrigeration
Sept. 17 7:15 p.m. LaPensee vs. Island Pest
Sept. 19 7:15 p.m. W.C. Refrigeration vs.
Island Pest






PAGE 26r W 11, 2002 TH E ISLAND ER R


New Norwegian definition of 'island lifestyle'


Trust the Norwegians to come up with a totally
new concept of island living.
That country's newest "island" floats.
And moves.
The World is the first floating condominium. For $2
million to $7 million a unit, residents can sail around the
world aboard the 644-foot-long vessel, visiting 140 ports
in 40 counties in a perpetual around-the-world cruise.
There are 110 units aboard the ship, ranging from
two to six bedrooms each. The ship has the usual cruise
line amenities of restaurants, shops, casinos and spas,
as well as a 24-hour grocery store.
Of course, the maintenance fees are a little steep -
figure hundreds of thousands of dollars a year and
don't expect to pass your unit down to the grandkids,
since the life of the ship is contracted for 50 years.
The World is pretty much a floating city, albeit a
small one. It averages 340 people, and the community
offers advice to the captain on ports of call and other
issues. But the captain, and the company, are the final
arbiters of issues at sea. It really is like a condo: you
own the space within your unit, but that's about all you
own.
Residents have to have a non-floating permanent
address, too, and the demographics of the population
is pretty much mid-age nouveau rich folks.
The ship is the first of its kind in the world, but
other companies are planning similar ventures. You
may remember a "Sandscript" a year or so ago about
Freedom Ships of St. Armands, which apparently is
still moving forward with its plans to build an $11 bil-
lion, 25-story mega-boat that will float the high seas
with an airport, parks, schools and hospital. That ves-
sel will truly be a floating city, with its 40,000 popu-
lation aboard.
So The World is probably the first full-time cruise
liner afloat, not the first floating city, but the concept of
bringing a new definition to "island lifestyle" is the same.

Election grins
With the first round of elections finished, and mo(e
to come Nov. 5, political junkies have a huge amount
of campaign rhetoric in store for them in the weeks
ahead.
As the political cycle comes upon us, I always dust





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off my Ross Thomas novel, "Seersucker Whipsaw," to
get into the mood of the political season. It is probably
the most wonderful treatise on running a campaign I've
ever read. How could it not be: our heroes are running
a three-way presidential campaign in Africa against
one candidate who is backed by the CIA.
But there's a new political thriller due out soon
(and I've previewed from an advance edition) that is as
good as "Whipsaw," if not better, by my friend Shirish
Date. He's the Tallahassee bureau chief for the Palm
Beach Post and has tracked the antics in the state capi-
tal for more than a decade.
Date's "Black Sunshine" tells the tale of a
Florida gubernatorial race circa 2000. Remember
that election, filled with butterfly ballots and a race
too-close-to-tell that catapulted the Sunshine State to
the most-laughed-about area of the country? Well,
Date has twisted the events into a story of dark hu-
mor that we all have got to love.
In a nutshell, Big Oil decides to drop $12 million
on a candidate for oil and gas rights to most of the
coastal waters off the Gulf coast. The candidate reneges
on the deal, Big Oil has him killed and props his brother
up as a last-ditch candidate.
There's a strong Southwest Florida connection to
the book in the form of Clarissa Hightower, Florida
secretary of state, who bears an uncanny resemblance
to Our Katherine Harris. I'm anxiously awaiting Our
Katherine's lawsuit against Date over her portrayal in
"Black Sunshine," especially the part where she ap-
proves a Palm Beach County ballot that looks like a
boll weevil and is so confusing that it allows 3,000
Jewish voters there to cast their ballots for the Nazi
candidate for governor.
Here's an excerpt from an advanced reader copy of
"Black-Sunshine," due out in October. It's talking
about Clarissa as Florida secretary of state.
"The only reason she had even run for the job was
that the title and job description sounded vaguely dip-


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lomatic. Secretary of State. Keeper of the state seal,
chief elections officer, chief cultural officer. Cultural
officer, she had assumed, meant gallery openings and
wine and Brie and rubbing shoulders with the beauti-
ful people. Maybe a junket to Paris or London now and
again. Sort of the minor leagues of ambassadorships,
a place to idle until her party retook the presidency and
she could get the real thing.
"So she'd taken her family's millions, raised mil-
lions more from her old Bennington friends long since
returned to their homes in Beverly Hills and Winnetka
and Shaker Heights, handily beaten the Deniocratic
candidate, and then left her sheltered existence in Boca
Grande to move to Tallahassee to become the state's ...
chief mullet and possum officer.
"She took a deep breath, smile still frozen in place,
and opened her mouth and threw back her head to join
in with the crowd's laughter at the emcee's attempt at
humor. At least, she thought, the smiling part was easy
now. For the first few years after taking office, she'd
suffered nightly mouth cramps from all the smiling she
had to do all day. Smiling at library openings, smiling
at museum award ceremonies, smiling at 4-H festivals.
It was, she figured out quickly, more than 90 percent
of her job, and it was driving her nuts.
"The solution had come to her one day as she was,
conveniently enough, sitting in the waiting room of her
surgeon. She was thumbing through a back issue of
'Enhance' when she discovered that it was possible to
tighten up the skin around one's mouth to improve
one's smile, when the idea had simply popped into her
head: If it was possible-to improve a smile through
modem science, why not simply create one?
"Her surgeon had been skeptical at first but ulti-
mately was happy to accommodate her. He was plan-
ning to tighten up under the chin a bit anyway, so he
was more or less already in the area.
"A week later, when the bandages came off, voila!
World, meet Clarissa Highstreet, the most pleasant,
most amicable politician Florida had ever seen. Always
a smile, no matter how difficult the subject."
Date'll be in the area Dec. 8 at Circle Books on St.
Armands, and perhaps at the Sarasota Reading Festi-
val in November. The book is due out in October.

Sandscript factoid
Date has written five books to date. Probably his
most popular was called "Smoke Out," featuring the
battle between Big Tobacco and Gov. "Strolling"
Boiling Rollings.
Sound familiar a la Gov. "Walking" Lawton
Chiles?



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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002, PAGE 27


Reds tops inshore; look for snapper, grouper in Gulf


By Capt. Mike Heistand
As summer fades into the beginning of fall, fish-
ing continues to be terrific. Redfish are the highlight of
the backwater action, with catches of 32 inches pretty
much the norm right now.
Snook action is spotty, but linesiders are definitely
out there and ready to take a bait.
Offshore action for grouper and snapper continues
to be great, and for those willing to venture farther off-
shore, look for amberjack and blackfin tuna.
Capt. Sam Kimball on Legend charters out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said he's finding lots
of mackerel, barracuda, bonita, mangrove snapper, red
grouper, lane snapper and triggerfish for his charters.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's said he's catching lots of redfish in Sarasota
Bay up to 30 inches, a few keeper-size snook, and
mangrove snapper around virtually every type of struc-
ture in the bays.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
mackerel are still hanging around the beaches and
piers, with good reports of shark coming in as well. In
the Gulf, look for continued excellent grouper fishing,
while backwater anglers are finding redfish to be the
hot ticket right now.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business said he's
getting lots and lots of redfish, most within the 18-27
slot limit, but with some being too big to keep. He's
also getting into some good-size snook.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach said he's finding mackerel off the arti-
ficial reefs, redfish off Longbar Point in Sarasota Bay,
plus good-size trout on the seagrass flats just about
anywhere in the bays.-
Capt. Doug Moran told me he's doing well with
keeper-size snook, good catches of redfish and he's
also continuing his run on big grouper in Tampa Bay.
Capt. Eric Bergan on the Kattina said he's catch-
ing plenty of red grouper about 25 miles out in the Gulf
of Mexico, and mangrove and lane snapper to 4 pounds
out about 15 miles.


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Snook season starts
This 30-inch snook and fisher were captured at the
Anna Maria City Pier by Gary Munn.

Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
snook are being caught off the beaches, good-size
mangrove snapper to 16 inches around the piers, and
reds and starting to school on the seagrass flats.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
black drum up to 15 pounds are a good catch coming
to his dock, as well as keeper-size trout, snook off the
cut. Snook action has been slow due to all the rain
we've had of late, but bonnethead sharks and blacktips
are still being hooked in Terra Ceia Bay.
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier said fishers there
report good catches of black drum, mackerel, snapper,
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At the Anna Maria City Pier, look forward to
good catches of mangrove snapper, mackerel, big
snook, barracuda and big yellowtail snapper.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he's catching mostly slot-limit reds and
trout, all on artificial: gold spoons, Mr. Twisters, Ex-
ude and Cotee jigs.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of
Holmes Beach said he's reeling in amberjack to 50
pounds, a few blackfin tuna, plus a mixed bag of grou-
per, Warsaw, gag and red snapper, plus mangroves to
5 pounds.
On my boat Magic, we have still been catching up
to 20 redfish per trip, running into one school last week
that all were more than 32 inches in length, plus lots of
mangrove snapper up to 16 inches long and trout to 22
inches.
Good luck and good fishing.
Capt. Mike Heistand is a 20-year fishing guide. Call
him at 779-9607 to provide a fishing report. Pictures of
your catch are also welcome and may be dropped off at
The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Please
include identification for persons in the picture along with
information on the catch and a name and phone number
for more information. Pictures may be retrieved once they
appear in the paper.

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Sept. 7 horseshoe games
were Ron Pepka of Bradenton and Bill Starrett
of Anna Maria. Runners-up were Jesse Brisson
of Holmes Beach and Chris McNamara of
Bradenton.
Winner in the Sept. 4 games was Jack Coo-
per of Holmes Beach. Runner-up was Starrett.
The weekly contests get under way every
Wednesday and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna
Maria City Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive. There
are no membership fees and everyone is wel-
come.


(Anna Maria Zslan3 ti&es

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Sep 11 2:57 2.4 9:49 0.3 4:58 1.8 9:00 1.3
Sep 12 3:33 2.5 11:02 0.3 6:40 1.6 9:05 1.5
FQ Sep 13 4:19 2.6 - 12:25 0.3
Sep 14 5:14 2.5 2:01 0.3
Sep 15 6:29 2.4 3:20 0.3
Sep 16 8:06 2.4 4:20 0.2
Sep 17 12:20 1.7 2:42 1.6 9:30a* 2.4 5:06 0.2
Sep 18 12:28 1.8 3:49 1.5 10:31a* 2.4 5:37 0.3
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


We'd love to hear your
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are welcome at
The Islander. Just a call
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at


ATCHER


505 56th St. Holmes Beach
Offering:
Engine repair and maintenance Electrical repairs
Bottom painting Electronics installations


Mon.- Fri. 8-5
941-778-2873
Mobile 920-3709


778-9712


STILL PROVIDING( DOCKSIDE SERVICE IE!


_I-r






PAGE 28 E SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


Simply the Best












ENTT& PAopRAM IC. 6ey VIE IS VOM tlS ENDED
LAWT TOP FcLO. 8OC0 CO /kEfmTO 4 COVUEaED
l,(. N uL. HLL u-RlS5rt5D + 5*DECDPoTOR PO6RF.T-
2,6P 2.-15- LA \T. ,S58150o 0.


GuLF fFRoNIr CorDOS
NEw.eg 3 BR 2 BR. L4tTS l0TL.6 FLOOCZS.
TURtAKFy fURMIsteD. P>LL DIR'Cr utF T7IZT.
FRzoM 4 485,000





41.": .. k





GREft-T LOCATION JU-ST hO/TH OF 7tI6
CO(ANT 6fbefC+ 4 O ME OF ThE MODSF
?R6'ERfED FOR. VACATION RE JT1.S
2 CB- 2 6A. HUCE POOL. T % 000.

70+ Gulffront rental units with hun-
dreds more just steps from the beach.
vi-
Mike

Norman
R ealt 800-367-1617
R ealtyINC 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
WWW. MIKENORMANREALTY.COM


REALTOR.
28 Years of Professional Service
OUR LISTINGS DON'T EXPIRE, WE SELL THEM!
FLAMINGO CAY CONDO CANALFRONT. Boat Slip, 2BR/2BA. Htd
Pool. $155,000.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX with parent quarters, 3BR/2BA, IBR/1BA,
new roof, newer appliances. Walk to beach. $439,000.
DEEDED BOAT DOCK 3BR/2BA, wood decks, clear views down
canal to bay. Elevated with bonus area. $350,000.
DIRECT GULFVIEW Beach Cottage. Completed rehabed.
2BR/2BA Home with boat-slip $278,000.
COMMERCIAL
STYLING SALON 8 station, established over 35 years. $39,000.
WALGREENS Triple Net. Good CAP. $2,650,000.
ANTIQUE & ART GALLERY Old Main Street. $69,000
5 APARTMENTS Steps to Gulf/bay. $475,000.
MOBILE HOME PARK 71 spaces, lakefront. 10 percent cap.
See our classified ads We're booking 2003 rentals now!
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
yrealt7@aol.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com





YOUR HOMETOWN REALTOR SINCE 1939

WAGNEQ REALTY
Email: wagnerfl@gte.net www.wagnerrealty.com

HOLMES BEACH -- ,
RESIDENCE Just '--
listed, this 3P F1 2PA -el
evated home .ai bill -
in 1998. Off,,rs 1 Ja O.' z ,J
s.f. of living spa.:- .s,-s n r I x I
open floor plan ,.. r, i. "i
large screern.e, p,-,:r. h .. -rtil .
and garage parking lor "- .:
$339,500. Call Dave Moynihan 778-2246 or 778-7976 eves.
MAGNIFICENT
BAYFRONT! Re- --. ,
cently built byor
Whitehead, this
5,450 s.f. bayfront
home is most luxuri- .
ous. Both Gulf and
bay views from sev- --
eral levels. Lush,
tropical setting, pool and docks. $2,750,000. Call Dave
Moynihan, 778-2246 or 778-7976 eves.
La lR l- TROPICAL
BAYFRONTNT HIDE-
... tected dockage.
h4BR/2.5BA, den,
plus guest quarters.
Two fireplaces, hard-
wood floors, solar
heated pool, metal
roof, lush, tropical landscaping in very secluded setting.
$1,150,000. Call Yvonne Higgins, 778-2246 or 720-3879.
SUNBOW BAY Spa-
cious, updated town-
home with 2 or 3BR/
3BA overlooking
lovely lagoon. Two
pools, tennis and
small boat access to
bay. Offered at ,
$315,000. Call Dave
Moynihan, 778-2246 or 778-7976 eves.

CONDO! Popular
v yground-floor Pine-
brook condo with
IfL_.al2BR/BA totally reno-
vated and beautiful
view of the golf
course from the
glass lanai. Priced to
sell at $119,500. Call Dee Jorcyk 778-2246 or 778-8550.


VACATION RENTALS
Reserve your Island getaway

NOW!
www.wagnerreality.com
2217 Gulf Drive N. Bradenton Beach FL 34217
778-2246 800-211-2323


DICK MAHER
AND
DAVE JONES
ISLAND SPECIALISTS..




Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation.





THE ISLANDER N SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 29


TROPICAL DINING TABLE, four chairs and buffet.
$600. 778-5181.
BIG BEAUTIFUL HOUSEBOAT $45,000 or make of-
fer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open Tuesday, Thursday
9:30-2 and Saturday 9-noon. Sales racks. Two cribs
for sale. Donations accepted Wednesday mornings.
511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.
MULTI FAMILY: Friday-Saturday, Sept. 13-14, 9am-
2pm. Bicycles, jewelry, clothes, tools, collectibles,
baseball cards, household items, Christmas items.
205 Gladiolus St., Anna Maria.
SEPTEMBER CLEARANCE SALE! 50 percent off
everything but furniture. "Housewarmings by
Horigans" located in Under the Sun Antiques, Holmes
Boulevard, Holmes Beach.

Advertising works fast in The Islander.


YARD SALE: Friday-Saturday, Sept. 13-14, 8am-?
Rain date is Friday-Saturday, Sept. 19-20. 408 N.
Shore Drive, Anna Maria.
GARAGE SALE: Saturday. Sept. 14, 8:30am-?
Household and decorative items, small television,
stereo, air conditioning unit, fans, headboard and
more. 540 67th St., Holmes Beach.


YOGA CLASSES with Harmony Ananda. Now on
Tuesday and Thursday, morning and evening. Is-
land Fitness Center. To enroll, call 921-0074


LOST PARROT: Blue-front Amazon. Please call
Sun and Surf, 778-2169. Reward!


CRITTER SITTER Seven years in pet care, 22
years as an Island resident. Tender, loving care for
your pets with in-home visits. 778-6000.


DACHSHUND adoption and rescue (D.A.R.E.). Call
Shona at 761-2642 for information or visit our Web
site: www.daretorescue.com.


AUTOS FOR SALE: Two 1988 Mercedes: 420
and 300. $4,900 and $5,900. Must sell! Call Ted,
302-3840 or 378-7653.
1990 ECONOLINE 150 VAN. 135,000 highway miles,
cold air conditioning. Runs top! Has towing package.
Ready for travel. $3,100, or best offer. Will consider
trade for pickup truck of equal value. 730-9622.
TRUCKS FOR SALE: 1998 S10 pickup, $4,900, or-
best offer. 1997 Cheyenne truck, $7,995. Call Ted,
302-3840 or 378-7653.


BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation
or long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Min-
utes to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Capt.
John's Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting.


ANNUAL RENTALS
* 2BR/2BA bayfront bungalow with dock/lift. Washer/
dryer included and small pet OK. $1,300/month.
* 3BR/2BA elevated home in Anna Maria. Cathedral
ceilings, large master suite, washer/dryer, carport and
storage. Walk to beach. $1,500/month.
* 2BR/2BA lakefront villa in Bradenton. Loft, washer/
dryer, one-car garage. $1,100/month
SEASONAL RENTALS
* 3BR/2BA ground-level home within steps of the beach.
Laundry, two-car garage, neat as a pin. $2,700/month.
* 2BR/1 BA elevated cottage with pool/spa. Walk to bay
and beach. $1,000/week or $3,000/month.
* 3BR/2BA canalfront home in Key Royale. Caged pool.
$2,700/month.
* 2BR/1 BA ground-floor condo, heated pool, walk to
beach. $2,000/month.
* 3BR/2BA renovated duplex just a short walk to beach.
$2,700/month.



TURN BACK TIME

Still doing
business as in
the past by
W ,( giving personal
attention and
_7 service to all


The tragic events of September 11, 2001, united
our nation again with emotional contact be-
tween us that somehow was lost while we were
consumed- in our goal to live the "American
Dream." Let us all seek solace on this first year
anniversary by remembering those Americans
personally affected by this tragedy.


The Island's

Teall te O ...
Company listings, classified for sale and rent,
completed transactions including FSBOs and
a weekly mailing to 1,400-plus out-of-town,
out-of-state real estate-hungry subscribers!
The Island's most respected newspaper since 1992.

The Islander
Call 778-7978 or e-mail news@islander.org for advertising information.


REALTORS


* 2/1 Unfurnished duplex in Holmes Beach.
Steps to the beach. $850/mo.
* 2/1 Condo on Canal. Cortez Road. $850/mo.
* 3/2 SF home w/dock in Bradenton Beach.
$1,300/mo.
SUMM R R IAL


* 1/1 Steps to beach
* 2/1 Pool and steps
to beach
* 1/1 Steps to beach
* 1/1 Pool and steps to
beach
* 2/2 On beach
* 3/2 Steps to beach
* 2/2 Pool, on beach
* 2/2 Bay, pool, steps
to beach
* 2/1 On beach
* 2/2 Pool


* 2/1.5 Lake, steps
to beach
* 2/2 On golf course, spa
* 2/2 Steps to beach
* 2/1 Dock
* 3/2 Steps to beach
* 2/2 On canal
* 3/2 On Canal
* 2/2 Pool, steps to
beach
* 2/1 Steps to beach
* 1/1 Pool
* 3/2 Pool, steps to beach


Call Michel Cerene, Realtor
941-778-0770.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
E mail: info@smithrealtors.com
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden
MLS E 1


I C f fI or a l P i e


INVESTORS Do you think you'll ever see an Island
duplex priced this low again? Make your move now
and own a piece of paradise with steady income.
1 BR/1 BA each side. $229,000.


SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR/2BA, turnkey furnished
condo in a Gulffront complex offering pool, tennis,
covered parking and more. $425,000.


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Two buildings, ground-
level duplex on Pine Avenue. Room for expansion.
Front building zoned for retail, office or residential.
-$34999-0. Reduced to $329,000




Marina Pointe

Realty Co.

31-4 Pine Avenue Anna MarT.a
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732
SSA o T I M


.^10


[Smit





PAGE 30 K SEPT. 11, 2002 M THE ISLANDER



BOT &BAIN otiudHEPWNTDCntne r HALTH* CARE*Cotinue


BOAT SLIP with davits for rent in Holmes Beach.
778-7039.

15-FOOT STARCRAFT 35-hp Mercury and trailer.
$1,500. 748-3868.

2001 16-FOOT CAROLINA Skiff. 18-hp motor with
tiller steering. Blue bimini top. Like new! $5,000, or
best offer. Cell, 713-5967.
17-FOOT SPORT JET, 175 hp, 50 mph. Like new, only
200 hours. Instrument panel, Hummingbird live bait, ski
tow, trailer, etc. $9,000, or best offer. 729-2110.
BOAT SLIP in Holmes Beach. New dock, water, bait
board. $100/month. 778-6696. Evenings, 778-5556.
HOUSEBOAT FOR SALE. Excellent live aboard,
guest quarters or rental income producer. $45,000 or
make offer. View at Web site: geocities.com/
houseboat_sunseeker or call 778-3526.


LET'S GO FISHING! Call Capt. Mike Heistand on the
charter boat "Magic." Full or half day backwater fishing.
USCG licensed. Ice, bait, tackle provided. 779"-9607.
PRIVATE CHARTERS. Fishing, snorkeling,
sightseeing, Egmont Key. USCG License. Capt.
Keith Barnett. 778-3526 or 730-0516.


CHILD SITTER and pet sitter. Seventh-grade male
looking for a job, Friday afternoons and Saturdays.
Call Zachary, 779-9803.
BABY-SITTING AND PET-SITTING My name is Sa-
rah, I am 14-years old. Hourly charge: $5/child or $3/
pet, $2.50/hour for each additional pet or child.
Please call 778-7622 or 778-7611.


DRIVERS: Island Transportation Inc. Fun job, good
money. Dependable, honest work ethic required.
Week end work required. 779-2520.

NEW CONSTRUCTION
THE VILLAGE
AT HOLMES BEACH
LUXURY CONDO TOWNHOUSES
Model Open! 3800 Sixth Ave., Holmes Beach



.





3BR/2BA 1,700 sq.ft. Living Area Heated Pool
Elevator Available Large Private Garage
Steps to Beach/Shopping Starting at $375,000
Call: Jon Tipton, 941-779-9464
Visit us at WWW.ABOUTTHEVILLAGES.COM


ASSISTANT MANAGER. Part time needed for small
Longboat Key resort. Work manager's days off.
Manage front desk, clean rooms, etc. Great atmo-
sphere for team player. Retirees welcome. Call 383-
1636.
TEACHERS/COUNSELORS needed at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center for after-school pro-
gram (kindergarten through fifth-grade). Work Mon-
day through Friday 2 to 6:30pm. Must be a team
player in an exciting positive environment. Pay is $7-
9/hour depending on experience/education. Accept-
ing applications through Sept. 20. Call Mary Metcalf,
778-1908.
PART-TIME ISLANDER REPORTER: Journalism
skills a must. Computer literate. Independent
worker. Resumes: E-mail news@islander.org, or fax
778-9392, or mail/deliver to The Islander, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-
6247.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.


ASSISTED LIVING: Haven Home Bradenton Beach
is admitting residents. Respite, long term. Call 779-
0322 for details, inquiries welcome.
ISLAND LICENSED CNA with local references.
More than15 years experience. Will provide loving,
personal care, including meals and transportation.
Call 778-5394, leave message.
CARE IN THE COMMUNITY. Assisted living facili-
ties: Annie's Home for the Elderly and Our Island
Home/Marella House are now offering "Care in the
Community." Our licensed nurse and caregivers will
visit you or a loved one in your own home to offer
assistance. Call Annie, Maria or Chris, 778-7842.
Buy it, sell it, fast in The Islander classified.


.


~I


$139,900 LOOK EAST
Do you need to be closer to 1-75
than to the Gulf? Consider this
affordable 3BR/2BA pool home
in the northeast area close to the
Interstate. Split bedroom design,
family room, indoor utility room,
fenced back yard and just a short
walk to the Manatee River.
IB85389.


6016 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton
(941) 778-0766 (800) 778-8448
Visit our Web site at www.cbflorida.com


NADIA'S EUROSAGE now accepting new clients.
Massaging residents and visitors more than eight
years. Call today for an appointment, 795-0887.
MA#0017550.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gar-
dens, trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.
COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your com-
puter misbehaving? Certified computer service and
private lessons. Special $15 per hour- free advice.
545-7508

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured. 778-0944.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs, hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.
TAMBOURINE LESSONS! Also available: flute,
saxophone, clarinet lessons. Beginning to advanced.
Contact Koko Ray, 792-0160.
SEWING: Get your sewing alterations done fast and
reliably. Hems, zippers, sleeves, waistlines, cush-
ions, etc. Reasonably priced. Call 727-5873.
ASAP DIVORCE INC: Starting at $195. Adoptions,
name changes, deeds, wills, living trusts, incorpora-
tions. Modification of child support, alimony, custody,
etc. 756-7005.
CLEANING: Honest, dependable Island woman
will clean your home at reasonable rates. Deborah,
778-2581.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!



W 1111,1 0:' 1.1i 1 '1






Our new office; it's a secret location
Our new office is in Anna Maria. It has more facilities that the old
office at 409 Pine, which CP'd in April and sold for $275,000
June 10. Today is Sept. 11. If my old office has since doubled
in value, then does not that say something for us one year later?
I hope good things because a year ago it was all bad. "Damn the
torpedoes: full steam ahead."
0Doug Dowling Realty
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
www.dougdowling.com


t | Single-family homes from
" nthe $190s, including homesites.

Island lifestyle with off-Island convenience!
W ATCH Just a five-minute ride to the beach!
WVATCHJ


5 Different Floor Plans
All open & spacious ...
3BR/2BA & 4BR/22BA
OPEN DAILY 12-5 PM
Directions: Cortez Road to
86th St. W., turn south on
86th St. W. Entrance to Heron's
Watch is 1/2 mile on the right.


QUALITY BUILDERS INC.
For information call 77b-7127


SyeciaT Notice to affl nna 'Maria 'sCandvacationer: \
Autumn getawa

COUPON OFFER .
. __- ., __ .._ i-- - - i"y ,..^ ^ i -- i .
I Island Vacation Properties is offering a special on selected
I rentals from September 1- December 15, 2002

| Simply mention this "AUTUMN GETAWAY" coupon when
I reserving your vacation rental and receive a
$100 DISCOUNT OFF your rental fee.
I One coupon per customer. One coupon per rental
Occupancy must occur between September 1 and December 15, 2002
In -- Coupon must be mentioned when making reservation. I
-,- -. .- -..-- -- -:
LANSALES .
AND -, '
VACATION <,-.. -
PROPERTIE3, LLC RENTALS -" ",
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217 -
PHONE: 941.778.6849 TOLL FREE: 800 778 9599 FAX: 941 779 1750
www.islandvacationproperties.com rentals@islandvacationproperties.com






THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 11, 2002 U PAGE 31



S E -, tine LW NDGRDNLNDCPIGCntne


BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigera-
tion. Commercial and residential service, repair
and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County and
the Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and
personalized service, call William Eller, 795-7411.
RA005052.
ORIGINAL HUSBAND/WIFE team for general
house cleaning with the personal touch. Local resi-
dents. Dependable, trustworthy. Satisfaction guar-
anteed. References. Ask about our "Homewatch"
service. Call Ginny, 727-8329.
THE ROYAL MAID SERVICE Licensed, bonded,
insured. Professional experienced maids, free es-
timate, gift certificates available. Call now, 727-
9337 (72-SWEEP).
TREE SERVICE BY BREWER. Topping, trimming,
shaping, stump grinding and removals. Trim palm
trees. Insured. Call Phil, 778-6014 or cell 545-4770.
MAID TO CLEAN: Island resident, professional
house cleaning services. References available.
Call Wendy, 778-0321.
HOUSE CLEANING Permanent weekly or bi-
weekly. Experienced, reliable. Call for a free esti-
mate and ask for Marieta, 722-4866.
ISLAND TO AIRPORT September special: Tampa
$69, Sarasota $29, up to four people. Flat rates
anywhere. Saylor Sedan, (941) 685-3233.
MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance service.
Over 30 years experience, self-employed in construc-
tion trades. "I'm handy to have around." 779-9666.
COMPUTER: Learn to use your computer as easy
as your telephone. Free Internet, free long distance
phone calls, free vacation. 383-5372.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, clean-ups, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294.
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior
discount. Call 778-2581 or 962-6238.
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling,
cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation and pest control service. Everything
Under the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-4441.
GILLIS & GILLIS ENT. Crushed, washed shell, top-
soil, landscaping services. We install shell drive-
ways. Serving Sarasota and Keys since 1978. Fully
licensed and insured. 753-2954 or 376-2954, cell.
SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $27/yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free es-
timates. Call Larry at 795-7775, cell 720-0770.
FREE SNOW REMOVAL! Everything else costs
extra. Crushed, wasted shell, gravel, mulch, dirt,
and rip rap delivered and spread. If you're looking
for the lowest price, call any Tom, Mark or Larry. If
you want the job done right the first time, call David
Bannigan, 794-6971, cell phone 504-7045.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED: The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service.


STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-rap,
mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reliable and
insured. 727-5066.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Dan or Bill, 795-5100
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.
CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at-water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.
OVER THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. In-
terior, exterior, doors, stairs, windows and trim.
Have sawmill, will travel. Dan Michael, master car-
penter. Call, 745-1043 or cell 962-4068.
WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more by
Hunter Douglas and other major manufacturers.
Lifetime warranty. Call Island resident Keith Barnett
for a free in-home consultation. Many Island refer-
ences, 15 years experience. 778-3526 or 730-0516.
TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile sup-
plied and installed. Quality workmanship, prornipt, re-
liable, many Island references. Call Neil, 726-3077.
Buy it, sell it, find it faster in The Islander. 7787978







SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


Adorable Cottage near Beach
This charming 2BR, 1BA cutie pie comes com-
plete with a cozy white brick fireplace and fully
equipped kitchen with greenhouse window.
Neat as a pin both inside and out and only steps
to Gulf! Zoned R2 with lots of potential for ex-
pansion. Includes fully fenced back yard.
Priced at $329,900 furnished.


Vintae Islandc Hldeawao
This charming 3BR, 2BA cottage features origi-
nal pine floors and a cozy white brick wood burn-
ing fireplace. Other amenities include high ceil-
ings with fans, cheerful new kitchen with white
cabinetry and new appliances, oversized utility
room with washer and dryer, sunny Florida room
and fully fenced front and back yard. So close to
the Gulf that you can hear the surf!
Priced at $395,900


VIDEO TOUR
BROCHURE


Visit our Website at www.betsyhills.com


MAKE YOUR MOVE

WITH MARILYN!

















EXCLUSIVE LISTING
New on the market!
Rarely available 2BR/2BA with 2-car
garage Lakefront Villa.
1243 Spoonbill Landings.
$235,000 Firm.


ANNA MARIA



REAL ESTATE, LLC
ISLAND VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, professionally condo.
Furnished, heat ets, tennis,
across-V- ^, c ose to everything.
$294,
ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME
3BR/2BA home in central Holmes Beach.
Large lot with room for a pool. Immaculate,
short walk to beach. Garage.$329,900.
SARASOTA 28 UNIT MOTEL
1.4 acres on US-41 prime location. Located
near the Ritz, airports, colleges and Van
Wezel. NT-zoned, many other property uses.
In the "Enterprise Zone" = tax incentives.
$1,500,000.
KEY ROYALE POOL HOME
4BR/3BA Key Royale "500" block, split-plan,
canalfront, 4,000 lb. boat lift, caged pool,
family room, two blocks to great beach.
$519,000.

ANNUAL RENTALS
From $700 / month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condos/Homes: $500 week / $1,000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

SMLS SiiCoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com





PAGE 32 E SEPT. 11, 2002 1 THE ISLANDER
Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sndy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn [Hauling By the cut or by the month.
I A We Monitor Irrigation Systems
Service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
lv^___ Established in 1983

3]U'[a()@N0] STATE LICENSED & INSURED
TT@N]' n)D CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
IN@TfU@ia NDI JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@B9@U@0@G Building Anna Maria since 1975
3@T'@N'oBa (941) 778-2993



Residential Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price."
Ucensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
-Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755



Water Damaged Drywall Tiling Painting
HAND AND SPRAY TEXTURE
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
Z Fred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141 I


SEASCAPE PAINTING
Residential Interior Exterior Pressure Washing
Roof Coating Insured 29 Years Experience
Rick Tanner 941-798-6985
4203 76th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209


Ista Cmstom Tops
Complete Corian Counter Top Service
Commercial Residential
Dupont Certified
Dave Spicer 778-2010

Please mention you saw it in The Islander.


ML i ,


** *** * * ." CLIP AND SAVE * *

WATERING .
0s
*r r 0


Rules in effect for Manatee County:
> Lawn and landscape watering is limited to two
days a week.
> Addresses ending in even numbers (or A M):*
Tuesday and Saturday.
-*
S> Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N Z):
Wednesday and Sunday.
:. > Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Irrigation with treated waste water allowed any
| time.)
Owners can wash their vehicles anytime as long *
as-they use a harnd-held hose with a shut-off nozzle. *
.(Pull the car on the lawn to wash!)
Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors is al-
e lowed for ten minutes daily.
S> Hand-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, is permit-
ted any day.
Questions or comments? Call the Southwest Florida Water
Management District (Swiftmud) toll-free: 1-800-423-1476.


GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates,
call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.
ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens,
baths. Free estimates. Lic#CGC061519,
#CCC057977, #PE0020374. Insured. Accepting
MasterCard/Visa. 720-0794.
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.
KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

MASON: 26-years experience. Glass-block,
cinderblock, brick, tile. Walls built and repaired. Ce-
ment repairs. Licensed and insured. Chris, 795-3034

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

WINDOW AND DOOR SILLS. Have cracked, crum-
bling, broken cement sills? Will rebuild all sills
promptly. 26-years experience. Chris, 795-3034.
HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry,
painting, sheet-rock and popcorn, doors, bi-folds,
trim, moldings and general repairs. Homes, condos,
rentals. A.J. Winters, 713-1951.
COMPLETE BATHROOM REMODELING Drywall,
repairs, texture coating, painting. Custom shower
stalls, tub enclosures, fixtures, cabinets, tile. Unique
Options, 752-7758 or 545-6141 (cell).
HANDY ANTHONY. Jack of most trades. Home re-
furbishing and detailing, 778-6000.


ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.
BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks available.
Turnkey, beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No
pets, nonsmoking. Priced from $750/month, $400/
week, $80/night. 941-794-5980. www.divefish.com.
CONDO 2BR FURNISHED, beachfront, heated
pool, fishing dock, seasonal, three-month minimum.
Age 55 and older. (813) 247-3178 or week ends
(813) 927-1632.
VACATION RENTAL 2BR/1BA, $1,800/month. Walk
to beach, fine restaurants and shopping. 202 56th
St., Holmes Beach. 778-3875.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL. Large 2BR ground
floor. Just steps to beach, fully furnished. Bikes, cable,
washer/dryer. $475/week. 704-7650 or 447-6797.
BAYFRONT TRIPLEX annual. Large 2BR/1BA,
$1,000/month and large 1BR/1BA, $850/month.
Washer/dryer hookup, full kitchen, newly reno-
vated. First, last, security. Steps to Bradenton
Beach. Realtor/owner. Home (352) 243-7916, of-
fice (352) 242-0167.
SUMMER, FALL, WINTER rentals available weekly,
monthly, seasonal. Wedebrock Real Estate Co.,
778-6665 or (800) 749-6665.
ANNUAL ONLY 2BR/1BA, directly on Gulf in
Bradenton Beach. $1,050/month, assurity/security
required with contract. 792-2779.
. PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA condo in gated com-
munity, pool, tennis, carport, washer/dryer and lake
view, $950/month, plus utilities. Sunny Shores, 1BR/
1BA, furnished apartment, washer/dyer, close to
beach, $1,000 includes utilities. Peacock Lane, 2BR/
2BA, furnished duplex, washer/dryer, $1000/month,
plus utilities. Wedebrock Real Estate Company, 778-
6665 or (800) 749-6665.
UNFURNISHED ANNUAL Bradenton Beach.
Steps to the beach. Large 1BR/1BA with Jacuzzi
tub, washer/dryer, large sundeck with great views.
$850/month. By appointment only, call 778-0292
or 650-3552.
ANNUAL CANALFRONT HOME unfurnished (pets
OK, non smoking). Renovated 2BR/1BA, $2,250/
month, with optional 1BR/1BA apartment. Available
Oct. 1,779-2217.


HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT home, 2BR/
2BA,completely furnished, garage, laundry, dock,
many extras. $650/week, $1,800/month. Now avail-
able. Call (813) 286-9814.
ANNUAL 2BR/1 BA, clean, remodeled, great neigh-
borhood. Close to beach and shopping. $800/
month. Call 737-8555.
VACATION & SEASON. Private Beach. Walk to
everything. New kitchen, washer/dryer, dishwasher,
phone. VCR, grill, bikes bring your toothbrush!
$375-$775/week and $975-$2,275/month. Please
call 737-1121 or (800) 977-0803.
BEACHFRONT ANNA MARIA, North Shore Drive.
Currently being remodeled, 2BR/2BA, living room
with fireplace, kitchen, large enclosed porch with
incredible panoramic view. Fully furnished. Avail-
able November 2002 through May 2003, minimum
three months. 778-3645.
STEPS TO BEACH: 1-2BR, newly remodeled, fully
furnished, TV, telephone, kitchen, microwave.
$395/week or $1,250/month, plus tax. Call 778-
1098.
LONGBOAT KEY CONDO Banyon Bay Club, 2BR/
2BA, first-floor unit. Heated pool, tennis, fishing
dock, steps to beach. Available monthly, seasonal
or annually. (203) 481-0000.
CANALFRONT HOME Holmes Beach, 2BR/2BA,
nicely furnished, garage, large screened lanai,
peaceful, nice view, new dock. No pets, non smok-
ing. Weekly, monthly, seasonally. 779-2005.


FREE ESTIMATES !!!
S*No Service Call Chargel A
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Performance Appliance Vai
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5.- -- -- -..-- -- -- ---..

Sun Set-Screens
^ Snand more!
SUN^ Specializing in re-screening.
Sil 4 years local experience. Lic. & Ins.
Q OWNER 720-2742, MANAGER 720-1063


TIT Islander
Don't leave the Island
without us!



NOW HIRING
ALL POSITIONS
Kitchen and
Wait Staff
ALL SHIFTS
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
APPLY IN PERSON
OR CLL 778-3953



ROTTEN
RALPH'SS

902 S. Bay Blvd.,
Anna Maria


Lock Around
the Clock





24-Hour Service
Island Locksmith
778-1661


V IE I
BRAG M OLLS ASKIT 0 AMEN
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ISANDER CASSFID
HOM IPRVEMNTCotined l-ENALCotneI











WALK TO BEACH fully furnished 2BR/2BA home in
beautiful Anna Maria. Non smoking, no pets, please.
Weekly/monthly/seasonally. (810) 695-6379.
BREATHTAKING VIEW OF GULF. 2BR/2BA
ground-floor condo, heated pool, friendly commu-
nity. Clean and turnkey furnished. Carport. Three-
month minimum. (734) 665-4641.

EXCEPTIONALLY NICE: 3BR/2BA unfurnished
home with two-car garage and dock. 6601 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. $1,800/month. (941) 725-4488.

CANCELLATION! Now available Jan. 1. 3BR/2BA
west of Gulf Drive. Totally remodeled. Tile through-
out, new appliances. Clean, bright and airy. $2,975/
month seasonal, (813) 785-5678.
HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 2BR/2BA screen
lanai, garage, dock. remodeled in Island style and
colors, tropical landscaping. Nice, quiet area, no
pets, non smoking, $950/month. Also, available fur-
nished. 776-1789.
CONDO: HOLMES BEACH furnished 2BR/2BA,
vacation, seasonal or annual, non smoking, close to
everything. Heated pool, tennis court, fishing dock.
795-5845.
KEY ROYALE: Bayfront home offers 3BR/3BA,
lovely gourmet kitchen, two-car garage, heated
pool, dock with boat lift and bay views from every
room. Annual, unfurnished, available now. $2,300/
month. (941) 587-2213.
NORTH SHORE DRIVE beachfront. Two spacious
homes both 3BR/2BA with all conveniences. One is
$4,500/month, the other is $3800/month. 778-2541
or (813) 752-4235.
TURNKEY FURNISHED 1BR/1BA. Available Octo-
ber to February. Full kitchen. $500/week or $1,000/
month. Small pet OK. Walk to beach or downtown
Holmes Beach. Call 807-5626.
STELLAR CONTENTMENT: 2BR/2BA condo with
trariqUil-rake view. Two pools/spa. Tennis. Fur-
nished, washer/dryer, other amenities, $950/month,
minimum seven-month lease. 748-9238.
KEY ROYALE: Bayfront home offers 3BR/3BA,
S.lovely gourmet kitchen, two-car garage, heated
pool, dock with boat lift and bay views from every
room Annual, unfurnished, available now. $2,300/
month. Call (941) 587-2213. VACATION RENTALS:
2BR apartments across from beautiful beach, $350
to $450/week. Fall and winter dates available. Al-
most Beach Apartments, 778-2374.
CANAL HOME in Anna Maria Island. 70-foot dock
with full shore power service on deep-water canal.
Fully remodeled 3BR/2BA home. Master suite with
office/library overlooking water. Sliding glass doors
open to trellis and 1,600 square feet of decking
down to dock. Fully fenced back yard. Pets wel-
come with deposit. $1,750/month with annual lease.
Contact owner at 776-0075 or 748-3087.
LARGE ANNUAL: Bradenton Beach, 2BR/2BA,
duplex, carport, storage room, washer/dryer
hookup, new carpet. Glimpse of Gulf. $850/month.
(941) 625-2889.


ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, duplex in Bradenton
Beach. Newly renovated with more to come.
Washer/dryer hook-up, covered parking. $850/
month. Call (813) 300-8543 or (813) 990-8543.
ROOMMATE WANTED Bradenton Country Club
area, 3BR/3BA, furnished, pool, office, family/living
room, etc. Utilities included. References required.
Call 886-7122 or 750-9281.
TRADE FOR one-two weeks. 4BR Lake Erie house
for Gulffront house. www.woodsideinn.net or call
(419) 433-3685.
PANORAMIC VIEWS of Gulf and bay. 3BR/2BA
ground-floor home with screened lanai, two-car
garage. Home on large lot with boat dock. Sea-
sonal: $3,000/month with three-month minimum.
Annual, $1,500/month (boat dock not included).
779-9074, cell (730) 587-4675.
ANNUAL 1 BR/1 BA Duplex. New kitchen, tile floors,
washer/dryer, carport. Water and garbage included.
Clean, sober adults only. $700/month, plus security.
779-0470.
BAYFRONT HOME with beach. City of Anna Maria.
Furnished 3BR, immaculate. Available September
and October 779-2241.
ANNUAL RENTAL Spacious 2BR/2BA villa, at-
tached garage, large utility room, sunny den, fruit
trees, quiet neighborhood, walk to beach. $1,100/
month, plus utilities. 778-1589.
Charming 2BR/2BA waterfront villa in "homey"
Holmes Beach. Fantastic view and dock with great
fishing. Annual $900 to $1,000/month. Call (970)
846-8466 or e-mail slloydevans@cs.com.
LARGE BAYFRONT home in Holmes Beach. 3BR/
2BA, two-car garage. Boat davits, 100 feet on the
water. Beautiful view. $3,500/month. Mike Norman
Realty, 778-6696.

BRADENTON BEACH: Avenue A, very large 2BR/
1 BA. Tile throughout. Across from Intracoastal, two
blocks to beach. No pets. $820/month with annual
lease, all utilities included. Call evenings only. Todd,
778-0568, or Daniel, 778-4734.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, duplex in Bradenton
Beach. Newly renovated with more to come.
Washer/dryer hookup, covered parking. $850/
month. Call (813) 300-8543 or (813) 990-8543.

SEASONAL: Ground-level duplex, close to beach.
Updated with nice amenities. No pets, non smoking.
Available December to May. 2BR/1 BA: January-
March $5,700 or $2,200/month. 1 BR/1 BA: January
to March $4,500 or $1,800/month. Call (813) 928-
5378 for details and dates.

FURNISHED VILLAGE COTTAGE. 2BR, screened
lanai, steps to bay and restaurants. Available now
through November, $1,500/month. Season rate,
$3,200/month. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.
ANNUAL DUPLEX: Bradenton Beach. 2BR/1BA.
Carport, laundry room with washer/dryer hookup.
First, last, security. $775/month. 778-2918.
Buy it, sell it faster in The Islander classified.


---------------------------------------n
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located next to Ooh La La European Bistro. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES- BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
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I For credit card payment: L U LJ = No. ______
Exp. Date Name shown on card:
Billing address zip code: House no. or post office box no. on bill

5404 Marina Drive T | TIIa n 1 rh Fax: 941 778-9392
Holmes Beach FL 34217 Tm lr Phone: 941 778-7978
Hm Ba F 2 ------E-mail news@islander.org
L- -- -- -- ---------- ---- ------ ------ -------- ------ --------1


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NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
= RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL 40
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EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
BACK FLOW DIVISION


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
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%4W Restaurant % Mobile Home
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COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385


Serving the Beaches Since 1978


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 33.
"I make buying and selling so much easlerl"
YVONNE HIGGINS P.A.
Gulfstream RW I
778-7778 or 518-9003
"I work the Islands & the Inlands"_j

JPX JVTflJVf E'fan'e I effen6auA'
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 785 778-3468

SNU-Weatherside of Florida
CLAC286523 SINCE 1948
WINDOW REPLACEMENT
We have code compliant impact
windows and patio doors!
778-7074 Financing Available

/ Custom Painting
.. Wallpaper Hanging
/ J Interior/Exterior Design
4 s a*'. JA Pressure Cleaning
Call Bill or Dan 941 795-5100
Licensed & Insured


Jeff's Rescreen
Pool Cages Porches Repairs
Serving Anna Maria & Longboat Key Free Estimates
17-Years Experience *704-7590 Lic#MC00195

SELL FASTER
without closing hassles and for the right price. Isn't
t at what you want? That's what I do- call me.
778-6066
tieon I"Hotline" 713-0766


in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special- Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome


.WAGNEQQ EALTY .

iHA rOLD (s ALL REALTOR.o
Oftice. (941) 778-2246 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealry.com


CHRISTIES SINCE 1975
PLUMBING CO. OPEN SATURDA'YS


m


I






PAGE 34 E SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


CANALFRONT CONDO with dock. 2BR/2BA. $900/
month. T. Dolly Real Estate, 778-0807.
PERICO BAY VILLA. 2BR, pool, tennis, one-car
garage. Now $1,200/month. Season rate, $2,600/
month. Real Estate Mart, 756-1090.
SEASONAL/VACATION: Martinique condos. All
updated, north and south buildings. One-month
minimum. Also, Perico Bay Club condos: 2BR/2BA
waterfront, beautifully furnished. T. Dolly Real Es-
tate, 778-0807.
ANNUAL RENTAL in gated Perico Bay Club. Fur-
nished. View of Sarasota Bay. $1,300/month, in-
- cluding all utilities except electricity and phone. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
2BR/2BA ANNUAL. Elevated over carport. Nice
view on lake. Washer/dryer, dishwasher, central air
conditioning, lanai, fruit and flowers. No pets. $800/
month, first, last. 952-1592.
CHARMING 1 BR/1 BA on canal. Furnished, washer/
dryer -$850/month. alr-utilities included. Available
Oct. 1 to Dec. 31. 778-5405.
ANNUAL RENTAL: Steps to beach, unfurnished
1BR/1BA. Newly tiled and painted. $700/month,
owner pays water and waste. $1,400 gets you in.
No pets. 761-7705 or 704-6354.

ANNUAL COZY 2BR/1BA, near Bayfront Park.
Large shady private garden, refrigerator, new
kitchen cabinets, washer/dryer, garage, trash ser-
vice. Spotless. Non smoking, no pets. Available
mid-October, $1,100/month. 778-5349.

Island Real Estate of
Anna Maria Island Inc.
6101 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
1-800-865-0800 (941) 778-6066


WI


SEPTEMBER 11, 2001
Remembering our
fallen heroes.


Bordes, Realtor@


WANTED ANNUAL RENTAL: 2BR on Island, Oc-
tober forward. Unfurnished, reasonable price. Mid
30s couple with cat; company relocating. Please
call Van Claas Bros. Inc. (904) 501-7599, fax
(904) 825-3627.


SELLING OR BUYING a house? Need extra
space? Budget Self- Storage can help. Daily,
weekly, monthly specials. Boxes and packing
supplies. 795-5510.
LONGBOAT KEY former bank building, 4,700
square feet, zoned office/professional. Twenty
parking spaces, contemporary design, great vis-
ibility. $14/square foot. Can divide. Owner/Real-
tor, 388-5514 or call 809-4253.

FOR SALE BY OWNER Steps to beautiful beach
on north end of Anna Maria. 2BR/3BA, over 2,000
square feet under air conditioning, two-car ga-
rage, enclosed porch, large living room and sepa-
rate dining room. 788 N. Shore Drive. $689,000.
Shown by appointment only, call Lori, 322-8335.

ANNA MARIA 4,300-square-foot, multi-use resi-
dential/retail office. 2,200 square-foot elevated,
2,160-square-foot ground level. Built 1983.
$549,900. Offers 761-2457.
ANNA MARIA CITY: 3BR/2.5BA waterfront home, no-
bridge access to bay. Large screened decks, dock with
12,000 lb. lift. Open plan, many extra features, excel-
lent condition. Asking $649,000. Robert Loomis, li-
censed broker. Call 779-9200 for appointment.


Just visiting

pa rad6ise?



The Islander

Don't leave the Island
without taking time
to subscribe. Visit us
at 5404 Marina Dr.,
Island Shopping
Center, Holmes
Beach or call
941-778-7978.


CANALFRONT over 2,000 square feet under air.
2BR/1BA, plus 1BR/1BA in-law apartment. Lush
tropical yard. Renovated with tile floors. $579,000.
779-2217.
SECLUDED DEEPWATER Canalfront house, 44-foot
dock, huge pool and lanai. Must sell! Terms or trade.
730 Penfield, north end of Longboat Key. 302-3840.
LOT FOR SALE: 75 by 115 feet, zoned ROR. Walk
to beach or bay. Corner of Pine Avenue and North
Shore Drive, Anna Maria. $299,000. 746-2863.
250-FOOT FRONTAGE deep-water canal custom
home. Vaulted ceilings, 3-4BR/3.5BA. granite kitchen
counters, Roman spa, exceptional porch for enter-
taining. Landscaped, palm trees. 631 Foxworth Lane.
$998,500, open to reasonable offers. 778-7837;:

WATERVIEW, newly redecorated with beach-style
furnishing, 3BR/2BA in Holmes Beach with boat slip,
great landscaping, fenced back yard, two blocks to
beach and trolley. $342,000. Owner, 778-08.05 or
962-6056.

.MANATEE RIVERFRONT condo. 2BR/2BA with
dock and lift. Covered parking for two. $180,000.
Denise Fleese, licensed real estate broker, 504-5211.
Gulf-Bay Realty.
ISLAND LIVING YOD (CAN AFFORD! Turn kej fur-
nished 1 BR/1BA mobile home. Elevated ceiling in liv-
ing room, eat-in kitchen. Large outdoor shed. Peek of
Gulf, steps to beach. Located in Sandpiper Mobile
Resort senior park, (905) 623-0881.
BRAND NEW 2BR/2.5BA condo on golf course at on
Tobago Island. Call Rick at 778-1102 or 727-5873.


53 YEARS OF DISTINCTIVE ISLAND SERVICE

)/ l jd b / k 3224 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales: 941-778-0700 Rentals: 778-6665
I_ __I__' __ _ __ 1-800-749-6665 www.Wedebrock.com
REAL ESTATE COMPANY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


CAN'T FIND YOUR DREAM?
Build it here. Exclusive northwest
Bradenton. $70,000 Becky
Smith or Elfl Starrett, 778-0700.


BAYVIEW TERRACE 2BR ground-
floor unit in (rarely available) bayfront
complex. Steps to beach. $175,000.
Gail Tutewiler 778-0700.


RARELY AVAILABLE Updated SPACIOUS ISLAND HOME
Shell Point 2BR/2BA condo. Tile, 4BR+ den. Close to beach. Boat
carpet, parquet flooring. $298,000. slip available. $439,000. Gall
Geoff Wall, 778-0700. Tutewiler, 778-0700.


BRING YOUR BOAT! Spectacular
unobstructed water view. Unique
1BR/1BA condo in Palma Sola
Harbor. Dock your boat at your
back door. $150,000. Becky
Smith & Elfl Starrett, 778-0700


AFFORDABLE NAUTICAL LIV-
ING Garden villa, split 2BR/2BA,
deep-water docking available. Min-
utes to Gulf beaches. Move right in,
maintenance free! $110,250, Geoff
Wall, 778-0700.


ISLAND DOLL HOUSE. 2BR/1 BA
with boat dock and boat a block
away. Close to beach. $334,500.
Gall Tutewiler, 778-0700.


LAUREL OAK PARK 4BR/3BA
pool home. Cul-de-sac, private,
lakefront location. $357,353. Elfl
Starret & Becky Smith, 778-0700


NORTH SHORE DRIVE Own a
piece of north Anna Maria Island
with this 3BR charmer just one
block from the beach. Rent or reno-
vate. $485,000. Gary or CIndy
LaFlamme 778-0700


Wedebrock Distinctive Annual Rentals


M1 ,. .:-'Z ." ,A ,i F- IWuW i-a -
Steps to the beach Bay Viewl Sandy Pointe
2BR/2BA house with den, 2BR/2BA spacious duplex with 2BR/2BA first-floor unit with man-
Jacuzzi, open lanai with view, lots gorgeous bay views, one block to grove view, heated pool, close to
of undercover parking. $1,500/ beach, kitchen with bar, open shopping and beach with covered
month. lanai and covered parking. parking. $950/month.
$1,400/month.


03S


Pardie eat

Parcdiseleclty~oti 778480

5201Gul DrveFloliesBeah, l, 3217800237225


.. Imy gir shatf P"! M I"
Ig .5 noI tIoI l n kiN rII


BEACHFRONT CONDO at Anna Maria Is-
land Club. 2BR/2BA with wide-open Gulf
view. Turnkey furnished. Heated pool and
sauna. Great rental history. $549,000. Call
Dave Jones or Dick Maher at 778-4800 or
800-237-2252.


GREAT VACATION OR RENTAL HOME
2BR/2BA with views of Gulf from huge
deck and master bedroom. Nicely updated,
including Mexican tile. Great location and
is in move-in condition. $399,000. Call Ed
Oliveira at 778-4800 or 705-4800.


26 ACRES OF TROPICAL SPLENDOR at COMPLETELY RE-DONE TRIPLEX A
Westbay Point & Moorings. Upstairs canalfront stone's throw to the beach. Upstairs unit has
2BR/2BA with deeded boat dock. Many up- wonderful Gulf views. Not a penny spared with
grades: domed kitchen, tiled entry, kitchen, the updates. Tons of charm and character.
baths and lanai. Heated pool and hot tub, ten- $559,000. Call Jane Grossman or Nicole
nis courts. $310,000. Call Dick Maher or Dave Skaggs at 778-4800 or 795-5704.
Jones at 778-4800 or 800-237-2252.


I





THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 11, 2002 0 PAGE 35


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Arkansas


8
9
10


* The Islander pays $50 to the person with the most a copy of the form. Be sure to include name, address 3
correct game-winning predictions. Collect prize in per- and phone number. 4
son or by mail. All advertisers must be listed to be eligible to win. 5
* Entries must be postmarked or hand delivered to the ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON, PER WEEK. 6


newspaper by noon Saturday weekly.
* A winner will be drawn fromtying entries. The decision Winner
of The Islander football judge is final. 1
* All entries must be submitted on the published form or 2


Advertiser


Your correct score prediction for the week's Buccaneer game could
win you $50. Drawing in the event of a tie. Rollover if there's no,
weekly winner! BUCS _vs
-SCORE RAVENS/SCORE


* Contestant Name


Address/City


Phone


<.>... ., '_ .',- .. ', -

^,- *. "- -, S t p l,-l jt f'
, .."

TI' i


'. -it.-t.1- .'
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Mail or deliver to T Islandr 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FIL 34217 FAX 778-9392
Mail or deliver to The Islander,, 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 FAX 778-9392


ONE ENTRY PER
PERSON/TWO
PER HOUSE-
HOLD! MUST BE
OVER AGE 18.


$50 PICK TH I WINRER0ITEST
PICK THE GAME WINNERS e COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK e $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


$,50 BUCKS ClN I I78







PAGE 36 E SEPT. 11, 2002 0 THE ISLANDER


O MAGIC 8-BALL ...
By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 City of anciQnt lonia
7 Better
14 Sea World attraction
19 Pig's feet
20 Priest who warned the
Trojans not to accept the
wooden horse
21 Singer Morissette
22 Unwelcome obligations
23 Big bundle
24 Writer's device
25 Animation
26 ... are you all-knowing
and all-seeing?
29 60's fashion style
30 Twin in Genesis
32 Solitary
33 Occurred
34 Hollywood job
35 Synthetic rubber
ingredient
37 Toast choice
42 Talk show that debuted in
1987
44 Avis-like?
45 Built to take it
46 Spawning fish
47 On target
50 Composer Albeniz
51 Command to an attack
dog
53 Holdover
54 ... do you have a limited
number of possible
responses?
59 Quaint poem
60 Archive docs.
61 __ Offensive
62 Laddie
63 Liberal arts field: Abbr.





w t Q-, .
r ~ *' .. .
~-~a.-'-- ^


64 "So that's your
secret!"
65 They're exchanged at
parting
66 Floors
67 Klutz
68 Football Hall-of-
Famer Mix
69 Danish architect
Jacobsen
70 Breathalyzer
attachment
73 Hwy. turnoffs
74 Songwriter
Bacharach
75 ... are you made out
of plastic?
79 Strength
80 Phoenix neighbor
81 Firefighter's need
82 Skillfully subtle
84 One who lends a
hand
85 Fellowship
86 Kind of iron
87 It stands for
something
91 Absolutely nuts
92 Theater of the
Absurd pioneer
95 Sneaky tactic
96 Variety
98 500 letters
99 River in Belgium
100 Bean cover
101 ... do you ever
temporize when
answering?
108 Health org.
109 Early film effect
111 Precook
112 "Wait a minute!"
114 "The King of
Comedy" star, 1983
115 Anthropoid
116 Contemporary of


Martina and Billie Jean
117 Energizes
118 Makes flush
119 Stops

Down
1 Is unruly in a crowd
2 Single-minded theorizer
3 ... will all questions
receive a ready
answer?
4 Camp sights, for short
5 Bad straits
6 When
7 Buoy
8 Undercover person
9 Genus of 115-Across
10 First Amendment
defender, for short
11 Chime time
12 Mackintosh, e.g.
13 Supply (with)
14 Incision
15 Mugger
16 Brute
17 What to call an English
nobleman
18 Familiar with
21 ... are you a modern-
day Delphic oracle?
27 Charlotte-to-Winston-
Salem dir.
28 Faultfinder
31 RNA component
34 Prefix with biology
36 Lexicographer
Partridge
37 Jacksonian detractor
38 Lacks
39 Eliminate
40 Change to suit
41 Longtime maker of the
Magic 8-Ball
43 Bookmaker's odds?
47 A__ (already
conceived)


48 Violent, as anger
49 Condensed meaning
51 Wales's highest peak
52 ... can you be held
legally responsible for
bad advice?
55 Japanese immigrant
56 Struts used in gratings
57 Trick-taking game
58 Sprinkled
60 ... do you have any idea
what you're talking
about?
65 Desperado
70 Lotto variant


71 Give as a bonus
72 Razzle-dazzle
74 Billy the Kid's
surname
76 Rebellion of
1857-59
77 Designer
78 Jerk
79 Willingly
83 Intact
87 Crop-damaging
insects
88 Table red
89 Twisty pasta
90 Jan. honoree


92 Fortune 500 inits.
93 Make firm
94 Addresses the crowd
97 Certain sorority
woman
98 Corporate department
101 Makes known
102 Habiliments
103 Oratorio segment
104 Many PC's
105 Japheth's father
106 Miller offering
107 Be itinerant
110 Churchill, for one
113 Blouse, e.g.


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any three clues by touch-tone phone:
1-900-285-5656. Reference puzzle number shown. There is a charge of $1.20 per minute for the call. Answers for puzzle # 0901.


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