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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( November 21, 2001 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: November 21, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00918

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: November 21, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00918

Full Text





Skimming the news ... Happy Thanksgiving from the staff of The Islander!


T Anna Maria



The


Islander


Island conducting, inside.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island"


ISLANDER


Volume 10, no. 2, Nov. 21, 2001 FREE


'Ballpark' $2.1 million for Center expansion


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Cost of expanding the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center to meet the growing needs of the commu-
nity will be in the region of $2.1 million, give or take
a few hundred thousand on each side of that figure,
board members learned last week.
Center board chairman Andy Price cautioned that
this figure is just a "conceptual estimate," a "costing-
out estimate" and does not include furniture, architec-
tural fees and a few other odds and ends.
"We won't have a true figure until it is bid out,"
said Price, "but this is a starting figure, a figure for our
fundraising goal."


The'final cost could be as low as $1.6 million, or
as high as $3 million, he said.
The initial concept is for the Center to add a sec-
ond-floor section above the present administration area
for more classrooms and storage areas. The ground
level would be expanded and the playground would be
moved east, adjacent to the stadium. The gymnasium
would remain essentially intact with no second story.
Construction would be done in phases, Price said,
so that all programs could be maintained during the
estimated two to four years to complete the project.
"We definitely don't want to lose or stop any programs
because of this," he said.
While gearing up for expansion, the board will be


Thanksgiving
Prelude
The scene to be seen
at on Thanksgiving
Night on the Island
will be Bridge Street
in Bradenton Beach.
The Christmas
Prelude, a family
focused event, has
drawn upward of
5,000 people to sing,
laugh and commence
the holiday spirit,
Island-style. The
prelude begins at
6:30 p.m. The event
features choral
groups and sing-
alongs. Be sure to
bring a lawn chair.
For more informa-
tion, call 778-3113.


Anchorage plan

presented to county
After almost 18 months of deliberation by Bradenton
Beach officials, Manatee County Commissioners have
crept forward toward regulating a fledgling anchorage
southeast of the Bradenton Beach City Pier.
But while a management plan for that part of Anna
Maria Sound is being drafted, county commissioners ap-
proved a request to Manatee County Sheriff Charlie Wells
that Bradenton Beach Police be authorized to enforce ma-
rine laws for boats moored in the area.
Anna Maria Sound just south of the city pier is
outside Bradenton Beach boundaries, hampering any
law enforcement of boats moored there by city police.
A key element of developing a management plan is to
allow policing of the area by city officers rather than
the stretched-thin marine patrol officers within the
sheriff's office.
Still to be worked out is just what sort of manage-
ment plan should be developed.
Managing the anchorage could call for the city to
install blocks on the bottom with chains to the surface.
Buoys would be needed to keep the chains at the sur-
face. Regular inspections of the blocks and chains
would be needed, probably at least annually, and any
PLEASE SEE ANCHORAGE, NEXT PAGE


doing "needs assessment" in the coming weeks to "find
out how best the new building can meet as many needs
as possible," Price said.
"We want to make sure what we build fits the
needs of the community. We get many requests each
week for programs that right now, we just don't have
the space for," he said.
Strategic planning for the project has begun and a
number of committees have been formed to work on
the expansion. Initial committee reports will be submit-
ted in January, including a broad-based plan from the
fundraising committee.
No target date for the start of construction has
been set.


Island readies for

holiday, visitors
By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Get ready Islanders, visitors are coming.
Following a slight two-month tourism slump
caused by the Sept. 11 terrorism attacks, Island tourism
accommodations and restaurants are gearing up for a
rush of visitors this Thanksgiving weekend that will
signal a return to "normal."
And based upon advance reservations at Island
accommodations and the return of winter residents,
business is looking up for this weekend after the "doom
and gloom" of September and October.
"We anticipate a near normal Thanksgiving," said
Susan Stoepker of the Manatee County Visitors Bu-
reau. And while a few "pockets" might be off from last
year's arrival figures this weekend, Stoepker does nct
think tourism to the Island will be affected significantly
by the terrorism attacks on Sept. 11.
"Many of our visitors at this holiday time are repeat
and they feel very comfortable coming here now," said
Stoepker.
That wasn't the case in the first two months after
the attacks. Occupancy figures at countywide accom-
modations fell 20 percent in September and 10 percent
in October. Stoepker hopes a solid Thanksgiving week-
end will boost occupancy rates back to about 66 per
PLEASE SEE ISLAND HOLIDAY, NEXT PAGE



happenings

Ecumenical Thanksgiving
service 7 p.m. Nov. 21
The traditional ecumenical Thanksgiving
service will be at the Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21.
The service will be by pastors and choirs
from all the Anna Maria Island churches. Spe-
cial musical numbers will be performed by
hand-bell ringers and Island flutist Suki Janisch
and pianist Karen Batey.
Open to all Island residents and visitors, the
annual service is sponsored by All Island De-
nominations, an organization of all seven Island
churches.


e s
ThIe""" nderf
A VERY SPECIAL SECTION NOVEMBER 21, 2001
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2001 Wish Book, this issue








Arson conviction in

DeSoto Memorial fire
A Bradenton man has been convicted of setting a
fire at DeSoto National Memorial that resulted in
$30,000 worth of damage.
Arris "Bo" Chandler, 20, was sentenced to 45
months in prison and five years probation in the Feb.
20 fire at the memorial in Northwest Bradenton. He
was charged with second-degree arson upon his arrest
March 2.
The fire destroyed the Living History Camp.
"This was truly a multi-agency cooperative investiga-
tion," said West Manatee Fire & Rescue Capt. Ernie Cave.
Besides the fire department, officials with the state fire
marshal's office, the National Park Service, the U.S. De-
partment of the Interior, Manatee County Sheriff's Office,
Bradenton Police Department and school resource offic-
ers at King Middle School and Manatee High School were
involved in the investigation.
DeSoto National Memorial Superintendent Charles
Fenwick estimated a 25-percent attendance loss to the
park was also attributed to the fire.


Bradenton Beach swears in new mayor, commissioners
A mayor and three commissioners were sworn into office in Bradenton Beach Monday night. Pictured from left are
Mayor John Chappie, Ward 4 Commissioner Mollie Sandberg, Ward 3 Commissioner Ross Benjamin and Ward I
Commissioner Bill Arnold. Sandberg was selected to serve as vice mayor. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Anchorage starts
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


damage would need to be replaced. Shoreside ameni-
ties would need to be built as well.
Or the management plan could just call for an oc-
casional boat visit by a city police officer.
The anchorage has been a pet project of Mayor
Gail Cole, who appeared before the county commission
Tuesday requesting the management plan.
County commissioners appeared mostly supportive
of developing a management plan in conjunction with
the city. Future meetings will probably include presen-
tations of other anchorages in the state.

Island holiday
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
cent for November, the near-normal figure.
November is also the month when winter residents
return to Bradenton and Anna Maria Island and
Stoepker sees that as another sign of normalcy in the
area tourism industry.
Near normal occupancy on Anna Maria Island
means 80 percent occupancy and higher at most ac-
commodations this weekend along with packed restau-
rants for Thanksgiving.
The 54-unit Econo Lodge Surfside in Bradenton
Beach, the only franchise motel on the Island, was
booked at nearly 80 percent for Thanksgiving last week


and should be even higher by the holiday.
"I think occupancy is going to be right up there
with a normal Thanksgiving," said manager Tom Ernst.
And while he admits this holiday is sometimes a sell-
out at his property, he's not discouraged with 80 percent
or higher. For the first holiday of the winter tourist season,
particularly following the terrorism attacks of Sept. 11,
"this is a good, strong weekend," he said.
Ernst pointed out that approximately 50 percent of
his occupancy at Thanksgiving will be Florida resi-
dents, a statement backed up by other accommodation
managers on the Island.
"People stay three or four days," for Thanksgiving,
said Ernst, and many of them drive from Tampa, Orlando
and Lakeland. It's a short getaway to a nice island, he said.
Joyce Ware of the Coconuts Beach Resort in
Holmes Beach agreed. "For Thanksgiving, we'll have
a mixed crowd of midwestern people and Floridians."
Ware expects a "close to normal" weekend with occu-
pancy exceeding 80 percent.
There have been some cancellations, she said, but
these few have been largely for economic reasons, not the
fear of terrorism. Some Canadians are not coming this
year because of the unfavorable exchange rate, currently
at around 1.5 Canadian dollars for one U.S. dollar.
The Beach Inn in Holmes Beach was at 71 percent
occupancy for Thanksgiving last week and staff were
expecting many more calls for rooms as the holiday
drew closer. "A normal Thanksgiving is usually a 100
percent occupancy," said a front desk staff member. "I


think we'll be right there by Thursday. A lot of calls are
still coming in."
With 1,192 available accommodation rooms on the
Island and an 80 percent occupancy rate, local businesses
can expect approximately 4,000 stay-over visitors here for
the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, using arrival figures
supplied by the CVB. Anna Maria draws an estimated
280,000 visitors each year, according to the CVB.
The upcoming holiday weekend of arrivals and the
return of winter residents also spells good news for
Island restaurants.
"If the motels fill up, we'll be really busy," said a staff
member at the Cafe on the Beach. "As long as the weather
holds up, too," and there are no terrorism threats, he added.
Thanksgiving specials are planned for Thursday and the
restaurant should be full all day, he said.
Damon Presswood, chef/owner of Ooh La La! res-
taurant in Holmes Beach is also planning on a big
Thanksgiving, complete with dinner specials.
"We've seen a lot of our regular customers return,
so the winter residents are back," said Presswood.
"And if the visitors are also here, we'll have a solid
Thursday and weekend." Friday is usually a shopping
day for visitors and residents, he said, but the weekend
should be busy for all Island restaurants.
"I would expect every restaurant to have a good
weekend," he said.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Sam Speciale said
he expects quite a bit of traffic this weekend and urged
motorists to drive safely and enjoy the holiday.



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Charter county blasted by cities


By Paul Roat -
City officials and county constitutional officers
made it very clear Monday: no charter government for
Manatee County.
"The best way to counter this is to lobby the county
commissioners not to implement a charter," said Sher-
iff Charlie Wells. "I don't believe a charter is good for
this county, There are too many horror stories from
charter counties."
County Commission Chairman Joe McClash
broached the idea of Manatee County becoming a char-
ter county earlier this year. He argued that charter coun-
ties have greater home rule powers than non-charters, and
proposed having countywide impact fees and minimum
land-use laws implemented within the proposed change.
McClash has hoped to have the issue placed on the
ballot for the voters to decide in fall 2002.
But city officials apparently fear the charter form of
government will encroach on their own home rule pow-


Belle Haven cottage

moving next week
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society
said at its regular meeting Nov. 19 that the long-
awaited move of the Belle Haven cottage in Anna
Maria from its present Palmetto Avenue location
to city-owned property on Pine Avenue is sched-
uled for Nov. 27-28.
The cottage, which had originally been slated
for demolition, was saved through the volunteer
efforts of Anna Maria City Commissioner Linda
Cramer and the AMIHS. A donation fund was
established to save the building and move it to the
site, which is adjacent to the society's museum
and the old city jail.
AMIHS administrator Carolyne Norwood
said previously that the society needed about
$15,000 to save the building, move it to its new
location and restore the structure.


ers. Monday's informal meeting drew representatives
from all six municipalities in Manatee County, plus the
constitutional officers: the sheriff, tax collector, clerk of
courts, supervisor of elections and property appraiser.
The group unanimously agreed to lobby against the
charter proposal to individual county commissioners in
addition to passing resolutions from each respective
city in opposition to the charter.
Perhaps the most telling question on the proposed
charter came from Holmes Beach City Commissioner
Don Maloney. He asked charter expert Ken Small, with
the Florida League of Cities, "Is there anything good
for cities with a charter?"
"Not really," Small replied.
Small said there are 17 charter counties in Florida.
Almost all of those counties have what he called a
"starter charter," which provides a minimum of change
to existing government.
The problems arise over time, Small said, as re-
forms to government are made by special interest
groups or others intent on changing the way govern-
ment acts usually in reaction to a specific issue.
In Polk County, Small said, citizens were angered
over a county commission action and changed the char-
ter to limit county commission terms to eight years.
County commission salaries were also cut in half.
In Volusia County, Small continued, a charter change
calls for a countywide comprehensive planning commit-
tee that must approve all amendments to the long-range
growth management plans outside of city or county con-
trol.
"Once you get a charter in place," Small said, "you
don't what's going on down the road."
"It's pretty obvious, looking at the group here to-
day, that the municipalities are dead set against it," said
Palmetto Mayor Pat Whitesel.
"I believe the time is now to nip it in the bud," said
Supervisor of Elections Bob Sweat. "Otherwise, by a
4-3 vote of the county commission, we'll have to raise
a lot of money and spend the next year of our lives
fighting it."
County commissioners will be addressing the char-
ter proposal in January.


TE J1JWI ANP PO,.,21,. QO,O,P4GA, 3.

Meetings


Anna Maria City
Nov. 26, 7:30 p.m., planning and zoning board meeting.
Agenda: Beach renourishment ordinance, Bowes variance
request for 402 S. Bay Blvd.
Nov. 27, 7 p.m., special city commission meeting. Agenda:
First reading and public hearing on zoning changes to permit
beach renourishment and discussion of parking and rights of
way.
Nov. 28, 4:30 p.m., code enforcement board organizational
meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.
Bradenton Beach
None scheduled.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.
Holmes Beach
Nov. 26, 6 p.m., public meeting on seawall at 28th Street and
Avenue B.
Nov. 27, 7 p.m., city commission meeting followed by work
session.
Nov. 29, 10 a.m., code enforcement board meeting.
Nov. 29, 1 p.m., planning commission meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.
Of Interest
Nov. 26, 9:30 a.m., Sarasota-Manatee Metropolitan Planning
Organization meeting, USF-New College campus, Sudakoff
Center, Sarasota.
Nov. 28, 6 p.m., Barrier Island Elected Officials meeting,
Longboat Key Town Hall, 501 Bay Isles Road, Longboat Key.
Holiday Closings
The city offices in Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach,
Holmes Beach and Longboat Key will be closed Nov. 22-23
for the Thanksgiving holiday.
Garbage pickup will be unchanged for Bradenton Beach.
Thursday garbage pickup will be on Saturday for Anna Maria,
Holmes Beach and Longboat Key.
The Island Branch Library will be closed Thursday and
Friday but will be open Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tingley Memorial Library will be closed on Thursday but
open Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.


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PAGE 4 0 NOV. 21, 2001 M THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria commission meetings back to 'normal'


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
As Frank Sinatra sings it, "Start spreading the
news."
After the events of the special Anna Maria City
Commission meeting on the city's charter Nov. 15, you
can start spreading the news that the "normal" sparks,
tempers and controversies have returned to the com-
mission and its meetings. Forget what happened at the
"civil" Nov. 8 session.
Confusion as to the reason for the Nov. 15
meeting, questions over why such a meeting was


State attorney begins

Skoloda investigation
Assistant State Attorney Peggy Bullweg said Tues-
day she has begun her investigation into a complaint
filed by the Manatee County Sheriffs Office against
Anna Maria Vice-Mayor Tom Skoloda.
Bullweg said she has begun the process of inter-
viewing witnesses, but does not expect to make any
decision on whether or not to file charges until next
week.
The complaint stems from a Sept. 21 incident af-
ter normal office hours at Anna Maria City Hall in
which Skoloda allegedly removed an audio tape of the
Sept. 20 city commission meeting without authoriza-
tion.
The state attorney's office is following up on the
investigation of the incident already completed by the
MCSO, which has submitted its recommendations on
the case to the state attorney. The outcome of that in-
vestigation has not been made public and the state at-
torney is not obligated to follow any MCSO recom-
mendation.



DUI alert in

Bradenton Beach

this weekend
Bradenton Beach police will be at a heightened
state of awareness for motorists driving under the
influence of alcohol this holiday weekend.
Police Chief Sam Speciale said officers
would be on the lookout for impaired drivers
during the Thanksgiving weekend. There will
not be roadside sobriety checkpoints, Speciale
said, but officers will be alert during routine traf-
fic stops headlights out, tags expired and the
like for potential DUI offenders.
"We want people to know we're going to be
out looking for DUIs this weekend," Speciale
said. "Please don't drink and drive."



Key Royale contest

opens for holiday lights
A contest seeking out the best-decorated Key
Royale home is under way, with decorations to be in
place for judging on Dec. 16.
It will include all of Key Royale itself on "the other
side of the bridge" plus Key Royale Drive to Marina
Drive on the main Island, said Lisa Baker, one of the
key organizers.
She and Karen Zimmerman undertook getting the
competition uniler way "just recently," she said, and
next year will "make it mesh with the boat parade." The
Anna Maria Island Christmas Lighted Boat Parade's
course takes the vessels past the Key Royale bridge,
where the judges' stand is set up.
Decorations around the front of a house will be
judged, Baker said. But she strongly encouraged resi-
dents in the 316 homes on Key Rovale to decorate on
the water side as well. Gift certicates from local mer-
chants and restaurants will be awarded for prizes.
Decorations need not commemorate Christmas, she
added, but may note the holidays any way people wish.
Further information may be obtained at 778-2094
or 779-9301.


necessary, the need to have a special item added to
an already special agenda, the need to have a special
resolution added to the next meeting's agenda to do
what could have been done at this meeting, the need
to rehash what had already been decided at a previ-
ous meeting, and you begin to get the picture. Oh,
add in maybe a hint of, political posturing and name
calling.
Sound normal, or familiar?

Beach renourishment ordinance
The special meeting didn't even start with the


planned issue to establish a review of the city's char-
ter but beach renourishment a special agenda item
to a special meeting.
Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh said the item had to be
brought up because the city needed to have the first
reading of a special ordinance granting exemptions to
the beach renourishment contractor from three Anna
Maria ordinances regarding lighting, driving on the
beach, and excessive noise.
The first reading would be Nov. 27 and the item
PLEASE SEE 'NORMAL' NEXT PAGE


Center gets new board
Newly elected members of the Anna Maria Island Community Center board of directors are, from left, Chair-
man Andy Price, Treasurer Tom Breiter, Secretary John Home and Vice Chairman Scott Kosfeld. Islander
Photo: Courtesy Andy Little



Much of Island closing tomorrow


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Thanks will come hard this year, but we'll all give
thanks Thursday for positive reasons in a negative time.
Give it a chance: 5,000 people died in the World
Trade Center, but 25,000 lived; 400 or more
firefighters and police officers died saving them, but
save them they did. Thanks.
Among the 5,000 were their killers. Thanks.
You can read this, so you have eyesight and lit-
eracy. Thanks.
You read it on the Island we've all chosen above
all other places we could be. Thanks.
Except for our own firefighters and police, most of
the rest of us can spend the national day of thanks with-
out reporting to work, among people we care about.
The Island will be pretty well closed down, not
only Thanksgiving Day but the day after, Friday. Not
to mention the rest of the four-day weekend. And not
to mention the rest of the country.
Many retail stores will be open for business the day
after Thanksgiving, a big day that retailers hope will
match last year's sales records.
The government offices of all three cities will be
closed Friday, with arrangements made for picking up
trash another day than Thursday: Friday in Bradenton
Beach, Saturday in Holmes Beach, Anna Maria City
and Longboat Key.
Schools will be closed until Monday.
The Island Branch Library will be closed Friday,
open Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tingley Memo-
rial Library, though, will be open both Friday and Sat-
urday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Banks will be open Friday, and so will the Island
Chamber of Commerce and most of the businesses it
represents real estate agencies, restaurants and re-
tail stores- for this holiday traditionally launches the
great Christmas shopping binge that merchants need
every year, especially this one.
Manatee County Area Transit buses will be in the


garage Thursday, but out again Friday and on the week-
end for regular service.
Anna Maria Island Community Center will close
Friday, reopen Saturday for its regular schedule 9 a.m.-
9 p.m., close again Sunday.
A final thanks: Turkey and trimmings, a pleasant
place for the eating, and people who matter to share it all.

Another guilty in 2000 Island,
key carjacking
A Bradenton man has pleaded guilty to charges of
carjacking, robbery and battery in a Jan. 18, 2000, in-
cident on Longboat Key and Bradenton Beach.
Nickolas Masias, 20, was sentenced to a 23-year,
eight-month prison term. He was one of five men ar-
rested after the incidents.
The five men began their crime spree on Longboat
Key when they accosted a couple returning to their
home in Buttonwood Harbor.
One of the suspects placed a gun to the husband's
head and ordered the couple into their vehicle, which
one of the suspects drove north on the key.
The suspects left the victims at Emerald Harbor
unharmed, but the wife was forced to strip her clothing
and the husband was struck in the head with a gun.
Longboat Key police saw the vehicle traveling
north and attempted to stop it, then called for backup
from Bradenton Beach and followed the suspects to
Seventh Street South where the suspects fled on foot.
Police captured Ramirez in Bradenton Beach,
while the other four suspects found another victim who
was exiting his car. They pushed him onto the passen-
ger seat and drove south on Gulf Drive to St. Armand's
Circle, took the victim's wallet and left him.
Edward Sanchez, 18, was sentenced to a four-year
term for the incident after he agreed to testify against
his companions. Still awaiting trial are Freddie Lee
Hernandez, 22; Alberto Oliva, 18; and Alberto
Ramirez, 20.







'Normal' city meeting
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4
had to be advertised to the public 10 days in advance,
hence the need to place that item on the special agenda.
Commissioner Jay Hill complained that this is just
another example of the "emergency of the day." One
of the chief criticisms he hears from citizens is that the
administration continually comes up with emergencies
to be placed as agenda items. "This is not a good way
to do things."
Vice Mayor Tom Skoloda questioned the need to
start beach renourishment in January. He wondered if
the county could proceed without Anna Maria.
The subject of public parking, which had been dis-
cussed at the Nov. 8 meeting, was brought up. Hill said
a lot of input was needed as some people believed the
city would be under federal parking restrictions once
the agreement for beach renourishment is signed.
Commissioner John Michaels said county repre-
sentatives are due at the Nov. 27 meeting with specific
numbers and details on how much city public parking
near the beach is required by the county under the
beach renourishment plan.
If the county doesn't have the details, Michaels
said it may have difficulty getting his vote to proceed.
County officials said previously there are no problems
with Anna Maria's public parking for the program.
Commissioners voted to start the Nov. 27 meeting
at 6:30 p.m. with the first agenda item the reading of
the special ordinance. The Nov. 27 meeting is itself a
special commission meeting on parking.

Charter review
This special meeting took on all the taste of a sour
orange when Skoloda said the reason the charter review
was even brought up at this time was because "this
commission voted to interpret the charter to where the
vice mayor runs the commission," and that's the "crux
of the whole issue."
The city had to change procedure at commission
meetings, said Skoloda, when "the meetings were run-
ning out of control because the mayor wasn't able to
run them," and he "continues to demonstrate he's not
able to run or administrate."
That was enough for Deffenbaugh, who angrily
claimed a point of order. "We're not here for that," said
an upset Deffenbaugh. "You've said that too many
times already."
Skoloda replied that was the "crux" of the issue and
Deffenbaugh countered by saying, "You're the crux."


This tit-for-tat exchange could have gone on fur-
ther but cooler heads prevailed. Commissioner Linda
Cramer jumped in to say that this "display" of animos-
ity is "even more proof of the need to have a charter
review commission. We can continue all night point-
ing fingers."
Even the suggestion for a charter review commit-
tee was not without a squabble.
Hill said at the start of the meeting he thought the
purpose was to get public input about charter review
and discuss the issue, not to approve a charter review
committee of five people presented by the mayor. Re-
view of the city's charter is not due until 2003, he said.
"Once again, we seem to have gotten way ahead of
ourselves," Hill said.
Skoloda wanted each commissioner to submit
names for the committee, rather than approve a list of
appointees from the mayor, although the charter gives
this authority to the mayor.
He did not want so much "power and authority"
placed in the hands of the committee, particular if
some are not going to be here. He also thought the com-
mission was getting ahead of itself. "It's still not clear
why we are here," Skoloda said.
Deffenbaugh reminded the commission that the
charter review committee has no power to act on its
own. It only holds public meetings, gathers input, and
makes recommendations to the city commission. The
city commission then votes on what recommended
charter changes it wants presented for a public vote.
Michaels said it was time to "stop beating around
the bush." Many people in Anna Maria thought the
commission was interpreting the charter wrong. He
called for a "full-scale review" of the charter, includ-
ing "our form of government. That's our major prob-
lem."
Resident Mady Iseman, who organized a petition
of more than 200 signatures calling for a charter re-
view, said the problem is not the personnel in govern-
ment, "it's the process."
One area of agreement among commissioners was
that they want any charter review committee to study
alternative forms of government. Some consider the
present mayor-commission form of government a
problem, saying an alternative could be a city manager-
commission form of government.
When a motion was made to approve the charter
review committee membership as presented by
Deffenbaugh, Hill objected, saying not enough of the
public were present and the meeting, which was not
billed as a vote on an issue, was only to obtain public


THE ISLANDER E NOV. 21, 2001 0 PAGE 5
input. While he didn't have a problem with voting now,
a "lot of people would like to be here."
Skoloda agreed, saying 200 people signed Eisner's
petition, but only 13 showed up.
More confusion. There was also discussion about
what does the charter say about when any charter re-
view recommendations should be put to a public vote,
and what is the meaning of three-quarters vote when
there are five people on the review committee.
Eventually, the motion to approve the five names
for the committee was withdrawn and Michaels moved
that City Attorney James Dye draft a resolution to be
read at the next city commission meeting to form a
charter review committee.
But even that created a problem.
Resident Shirley O'Day wondered why the city
was always paying Dye to draw up resolutions when
there were other capable people on the commission.
Michaels agreed to write the resolution, which will
state the committee should present its findings to the
city by July 31, 2002.
So ended just another "normal" session of the
Anna Maria city commission, right? Wrong!

Public comments
The meeting then opened up for public discussion on
any topic, and that included the subject of beach
renourishment, which had already been discussed at the
Nov. 8 meeting and at the opening of this special session.
Some city residents said they are worried about
losing control of their public parking to the federal
government in the plan, although county officials
stressed at the Nov. 8 meeting this was not the case.
Other residents wondered why the process is even
going forward. There was also concern for the start date
in January when April was an option.
Michaels noted that beach renourishment was rec-
ommended by the majority of voters in a recent city
election.
In other discussion, Public Works Director George
McKay said he had met early in the week with repre-
sentatives of Waste Management Inc. over garbage
pickup problems.
Hill and Skoloda told McKay that in the future they
would like a memo from McKay on problems such as
this.
Resident Randall Stover reminded commissioners
that under the current charter, they are supposed to look
to the mayor for what his staff is doing.
The meeting then adjourned.


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I F0A-'1 11 0 1OO L .17 O 1 'C HNa 1ZAjP a1'1
PAGE 6 E NOV. 21, 2001 N THE ISLANDER







So much to be thankful for
It is the time of year to think wistfully of our
friends and, as in past years, our Thanksgiving issue
includes our "Wish Book."
This ninth annual edition of the Wish Book con-
tains many needs for the service organizations near and
dear to the Island. All are, of course, wishing for peace
on earth and goodwill to men and women. All also wish
for more volunteers and donations.
But sometimes there.are more earthly, essential
needs.
Office supplies. Music CDs and cassettes. Paint.
Glue. Puzzles. File cabinets. Staples. Hand tools and
power-tools. An answering machine. Rubber gloves.
Stuff that isn't very glamorous or exciting, but all items
one:or another nonprofit organization needs to get
through the year:
Please, take a few minutes to read our "Wish
Book" and keep in mind the items your favorite Island
organizations need. While you're out shopping for
family members and friends, shopping for just one item
from this year's Wish Book could mean a big differ-
ence in fulfilling the needs of Islanders.
And while we're being thankful, we offer gratitude
to the Wish Book sponsors, who make publishing this
special edition possible. Please thank our advertisers.
Please find the spirit of giving in your heart. The
joy of the season will surely be your reward.
As we looked back over nine years of publishing
for our anniversary last week, we came across some
touching words from our past.
In 1994, we published a portion of the Thanksgiv-
ing message to Floridians from Gov. Lawton Chiles,
who has since passed away. Both son Ed and widow
Rhea live here now.
His words are even more poignant today, given our
world situation since Sept. 11, and we share them with
you, again.
"As we observe our national day of Thanksgiving,
we should recall this past year as a time of great re-
newal and progress for Florida.
"As Florida enjoys growing prosperity, we should
pause to remember those who are less fortunate. As we
enjoy the fruits of peace, we should reflect on those
touched by the horrors of war. As we face the chal-
lenges of living in a free society, we should be thank-
ful always for the opportunities that our freedom gives
us."
Indeed, we should be thankful for every day we
enjoy together.
Happy Thanksgiving, y'all.




The Islander
Nov. 21, 2001 Vol. 10, No. 2
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Rick Catlin
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


anhr dinira;


ISLANDERI Al
Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
2001 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK


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Opinion1011
^S siS^.^Xs~ s^ ^..^ 'JijL-'~i"~kv ,-.^'i-.-*.*~t^a-.. :.. .**. .*-.*'..;.ai& ;^ .-,,^ L''^'..M 4<^S; '-{-iika aS


Why that ending?
I have read the flyer referred to in The Islander
article "Campaign turns snippy," Nov. 14, a couple of
times and find nothing offensive, unethical or demean-
ing about it. In fact, it proposes policies strongly pro-
moted by The Islander in its Oct. 31 editorial.
When the flyer was offered to me for use in Gail
Cole's campaign, I rejected it because it did not meet
legal requirements. The facts cited in the article clearly
show that the Cole campaign had nothing to do with
this material.
So why did Roat end the article by implying that
a commissioner had violated the Pledge of Public Con-
duct? Was he referring to John Chappie's silly call for
an investigation of this meaningless flyer or the integ-
rity of Gail Cole, who had nothing to do with it?
Kenneth J. Lohn, Bradenton Beach, Cole cam-
paign manager

What is this world coming to?
A company that I had some connections with from
living in Atlanta was pulling out of the Atlanta market
and decided it wouldn't be cost effective to ship their
heavy, outdoor brass items to their headquarters in
California. So the very generous company donated the
items to the Anna Maria Public Butterfly Park.
When I was in Atlanta recently, I carried some
items back in my suitcase, but I was flying so couldn't
take the bigger, heavier pieces.
My husband David and I took two days off work and
drove all the way to Atlanta to get the items only to find
out when we got there that someone had stolen them.
We talked to everyone that afternoon and no one is
responsible, so the garden is out $1,400 in donated items.
It was interesting. The lady who was storing the things
for us had also sold me something and the piece I bought
was still there, but all the things that were donated were
missing and there were many classics. The pieces that
were stolen had my name on them and people there knew
that they were donated to us and they were in a locked


storage room, so someone just doesn't have a conscience,
as who in the world would steal from a non-profit orga-
nization?
It was not only that the person storing the things and
the person with the key to the showroom were so rude to
David and I yelling at us for wanting to go to the stor-
age room to check and screaming at us, "Who cares about
a little metal?" and to "Shut up and get out of their faces."
We spent the afternoon contacting all the right
authorities and no one wants to take responsibility. The
Atlanta Merchandise Mart says they are not responsible
as it was in space that they leased, the people who had
the key said they were not responsible because they
usually don't store things for people.
So the trip to Atlanta was a complete waste and a
very sad day in my life, to realize that someone would
do something like this.
Nancy Ambrose, Public Garden Chairperson, North
American Butterfly Association-Manasota Chapter

Tower replica?
In 1889, work on Gustave Eiffel's tower was com-
pleted in Paris, France.
A petition of 300 names including those of Guy de
Maupassant, Emile Zola and Dumas the Younger-pro-
tested its construction. They felt it would destroy the am-
biance of Paris, and people would weep at its sight.
Everyone knows the result. The commercial inter-
ests won out, the Eiffel Tower was built, and this
abomination remains to offend us to this very day.
I hope the good people of Anna Maria are more
successful in stopping the cell phone tower in Anna
Maria. In the event that they are successful, I suggest
that they stay organized and spearhead an effort to re-
move the Eiffel Tower and return Paris to the way it
was before they moved to Anna Maria.
In the event that the Anna Maria cell phone tower
is not stopped, perhaps our cell phone tower could be
a replica of the Eiffel Tower.
Bill Diamant, Anna Maria


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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 U PAGE 7


Opinion


Response to 'snippy'
I believe insinuations have been leveled by The
Islander in its article "Campaign turns snippy in
Bradenton Beach" that tar some people without having
even had the courtesy to ask for their answers or re-
sponse prior to publication.
That same article quoted John Chappie as saying
he would request all candidates sign a letter to the su-
pervisor of elections requesting an investigation related
to some issues in the election that were also cited in the
article. To me it smacks of sensational journalism and
pure politics without regard to balance.
Let's clarify a few of the issues:
The "bright red flyer" On Sunday afternoon,
Nov. 4, two days before the election, I was handed an
envelope by Anna O'Brien that contained the "bright red
flyers" referred to in the Islander article. There were also
two other "flyers" in the envelope: "It's a Hot Time in
Historic Old Town" and "Bradenton Beach Neighborhood
Poll." Neither I nor any of my campaign workers distrib-
uted any of these flyers to anyone during our campaign.
Since it was handed to me five minutes before the
end of our last door-to-door get-out-the-voter walk
through town that day, I set the envelope aside without
reading the flyers inside. Once shown a flyer taped on
a bus stop pavilion on election day, I was told it was the
same flyer as the ones in the envelope.
Angry, I e-mailed Anna that afternoon and said that
what was written on the flyer was absolutely false, a lie,
smacked of dirty politics, and I felt it not only probably
would hurt my campaign but Mayor Gail Cole's even
worse.
I received an e-mail back with the exact same state-
ment subsequently quoted in The Islander article that
acknowledged that neither Mayor Cole nor I contrib-
uted to or endorsed any of the "mud slinging" materi-
als, etc., and I hoped the controversy was finally over
and it would die out. How naive I was.
The Anna Maria Newsletter I consider the
Anna Maria Newsletter no different than The Islander


or Sun, except that the newsletter is an Internet daily
publication that has daily weather forecasts, editorials,
ads, international, domestic and local news, and The
Islander and Sun are weekly publications without, in
my opinion, as extensive coverage.
It is a hard fact of modem technology that many,
many newspapers in this country, including this publica-
tion, are now being published and read on the Internet.
I assume the reporters for each news entity on this Is-
land gather their information, double-check it, and when
they make a mistake, respond with a correction. Whether
or not the information in the Anna Maria Newsletter was
correct, I do not know. I do know the Sun quoted me as
saying I was in favor of "spread-sheet budgeting," which
I never said, and I personally believe The Islander took
parts of some issues I raised out of context, and the
Bradenton Herald made an error in one of its editions. But
they did not publish a correction.
I really believed freedom of the press did not have
to be endorsed or approved by anyone. But then I heard
that someone apparently felt my handing out copies of
the Anna Maria Newsletter that endorsed me as a can-
didate, but also included an endorsement of Mayor
Cole and Bill Arnold without getting their specific per-
mission, was a violation of campaign laws. If it was,
then I plead absolutely guilty.
But isn't that awfully petty? I really wonder if we
handed out The Islander or Sun with both endorsing
my opponent, if that same person would have raised the
same issue. I doubt it.
I think we've castigated Anna O'Brien enough.
How much more do some want? I believe it's time to
stop the name-calling. It's time to stop the accusations.
And I believe it's time for this city's officials to get on
with what our citizens have an interest in, are worried
about, and voted for.
Do we really believe we need to go on and on with
this? What will it accomplish except to open the
wounds further, divide us more and more, and fan the
frustrations that are simmering below the surface.


To call for an "official" inquiry of all this smacks
of pure, unadulterated politics, and I believe it's a poor
excuse by some to try to soothe someone's wounds and
their ego.
If that's what other candidates want, then sign it.
But I don't think that's what my constituents want me
to spend my time on, so my answer [to Chappie] is
unequivocally "no."
Ross Benjamin, Bradenton Beach commissioner,
Ward 3
Who are the phonies?
A letter published in The Islander on Nov. 7 titled
"Clown college?" was highly critical of the Anna
Maria City Commission, of which I am a member.
The writers, Alan and Delores Sobel of Anna Maria,
used a broad brush to paint everyone on the commission
as "phonies and malcontents," among other things.
As an elected official I realize I have to be prepared
to take a hit every now and then and I'm willing to listen
to honest criticism and learn from it. However, when I get
chewed out but don't understand what has gotten under
someone's skin, I like to get to the bottom of it.
I don't know the Sobels and can't remember hear-
ing from them at any city meetings, so I thought I
would call them to find out what's on their minds.
Unfortunately, there is no phone number listed for any-
one named Sobel in Anna Maria. They must have an
unlisted number, so I decided to write them a letter.
I checked with the Manatee County property
appraiser's database on the Internet to get their mail-
ing address, but no Sobels own property in Anna
Maria. I guess they rent.
Last chance. I just purchased an address list of reg-
istered voters from the county elections office, so I
looked there. Whoa, Nellie! They aren't registered.
Well, how about that? They make fun of the
clowns "we elected" but they don't vote at all.
Now, who are the real "phonies" here?
City commissioner John Michaels, Anna Maria


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PAGE 8 M NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER



0O Q


Wednesday, Nov. 21
12:30 to 3:30 p.m. -Duplicate Bridge Group at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: Bar-
bara Parkman, 778-3390. Fee applies.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Dr. David Rosensweet holistic
presentation at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Informa-
tion: 778-1908.

Thursday, Nov. 22
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.- Christmas Prelude of holiday
music and lights, Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach.

Saturday, Nov. 24
10:30 a.m. -Learn about peacocks at the Pelican
Man's Bird Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thompson Park-
way, Sarasota. Information: 388-4444.

Sunday, Nov. 25
10a.m. --Sunday school at the Church of Annun-
ciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Informa-
tion: 778-1638.

Monday, Nov. 26
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. -Longboat Key Center for the
Arts Annual Member Exhibit, 6890 Longboat Drive
South, Longboat Key. Information: 383-2345.
By Appointment Detect early signs of stroke,
arterial disease, aneurysm, osteoporosis and
prostate cancer at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Infor-
mation: 1-888-667-7585. Fee applies.


Tuesday, Nov. 27
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. -Longboat Key Center for the
Arts Annual Member Exhibit, 6890 Longboat Drive
South, Longboat Key. Information: 383-2345.
6 to 8 p.m. Scholastic "Books are Magic" Book
Fair at Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: Julie Barth,
778-7685.
7:15 to 8 p.m.- The Magic of Manatee Sweet
Adeline's Christmas caroling chorus rehearsal at
the Bradenton Christian School, 3304 43rd St. W.,
Bradenton. Information: Jeanette Rothberg, 778-
5499 or Marilyn Shirley, 794-6438.
7:30 p.m. The Florida String Quartet all
Beethoven concert at Temple Beth Israel, 567 Bay
Isles Road, Longboat Key. Information: 383-3428.
Admission fee applies.

Coming up:
St. Bernard Christmas party, Nov. 30.
Lighted Boat Parade, Dec. 1.
Art demonstrations at Island Gallery West,
Dec. 1.
Pelican Man wild bird rescue training class,
Dec. 1.
Return of the Red Snapper Lecture at Mote
Marine Laboratory, Dec. 5.

To include your events in the "Islander Calendar,"
fax 778-9392 or e-mail news@islander.og. All
announcements must be received by Friday noon,
the week prior to the event.


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unwilling to vacate

Fourth Avenue
Mike Carter of Mike Carter Construction requested
that the City of Holmes Beach consider vacating Fourth
Avenue between 42nd and 41st streets.
Carter represents Mary Menendez, who owns the
property on either side of the right of way, to pursue the
street vacation and develop the property.
The right of way is currently undeveloped and not
utilized by the city. The street vacation would allow the
Menendez property to be unified, and according to
Carter, would become a tax-paying asset to the city.
Menendez wants to develop the property with four
more buildings with a total of 16 new units, in addition
to the four existing buildings on the property. Fourth
Avenue would be used for a swimming pool, cabana
and landscaping.
At last week's city commission workshop, several
residents expressed concerns regarding the street vaca-
tion with the two key points against the street vacation
being its lack of benefit to the city and increased traf-
fic congestion.
In a letter to the commission, real estate agent David
Moynihan wrote, "Throughout the city there are numer-
ous locations where the city owns platted streets, which
have never been improved. In most cases these locations
will never be needed by the city and should be vacated and
made available at market value to the contiguous property
owners. The revenue should be specifically marked for
city improvements. The thought of giving land to the prop-
erty owners is like handing them a winning lottery ticket."
Carter contends that the improvement of the right
of way in coordination with the development of the
Menendez property would bring in needed tax dollars
to the city.
Commissioner Sandy Haas-Martens disagreed.
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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 20010 PAGE 9

Variance denied for sideyard setback in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
A request by Kathy and Donald Brown to have a
four-foot sideyard setback at their house has been de-
nied by the Bradenton Beach Board of Adjustment.
The Browns live at 111 Seventh St. S. in an older
wood-frame house. Most of the east side of their home
is six feet from the property line; city codes now re-
quire a 10-foot setback.
The Browns hoped to extend the house back 12 1/
2 feet to enclose a small area and turn it into an ex-
panded bathroom. "It's a tiny bathroom," Donald
Brown said, "and we want to expand it."


Vacation rejected
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8


"I'm not for vacating anything. It's a platted street and
I can't see giving it away to someone making money
off of it. We should keep our rights of way in case we
have use for it."
Mayor Carol Whitmore expressed an interest in in-
vestigating options that would allow the right of way
to be incorporated into the Menendez development
without giving up ownership, such as utilizing it for
parking or open space, but not a swimming pool.
Residents also expressed concerns about the traf-
fic flow in and around the development, especially
when combined with Bob Perryman's development
along Fifth Avenue, from 42nd Street to a dead-end
point short of Manatee Avenue.
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Building Official Bob Welch said he issued a
stop-work order on construction at the Brown home
Oct. 2 when he discovered work was being done
without a permit.
"The applicant is working to supply appropriate
engineering and Federal Emergency Management
Agency 50 percent rule conformance documentation to
allow for a review of the construction that has taken
place," Welch said. "At this time, the one major non-
conformity discovered during the review is that the new
addition is non-conforming to the side setback. Until this
non-conformity is resolved, it remains the major hurdle


Fifth avenues along 41st Street and a retention/deten-
tion area between Fifth and Sixth avenues along 42nd
Street. Residents asked the commission not to look at
Carter's request without considering Perryman's devel-
opment of Fifth Avenue.
William Dunn lives near the proposed develop-
ment and told the commission that, with Fourth Av-
enue vacated, that would leave only Fifth Avenue to
access 42nd Street, which is shut off, leaving only Sixth
Avenue to get to Gulf Drive.
"Consideration should be given to allowing right-
hand turns from 41st Street. Sixth Avenue takes a lot of
traffic now and often requires a police officer to handle
traffic," said Dunn. "To abandon Fourth and Fifth, we're
going to have one road leaving all these units. Consider
putting a road over the swale to let traffic in on Sixth, or
keep Fourth and Fifth as access roads.
"I'm not opposed to development, but I hope we
get good functional flow for the traffic."
The majority of the commissioners, however,
voiced opinions against vacating any city street, forc-
ing Carter to go back to the drawing board for the
development's plans.


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to issuance of a permit for the construction work."
Board of adjustment chair John Bums said members
of the board were required to determine a number of points
in issuing the variance. Key of those points was whether
or not the variance should be issued because of "substan-
tial practical difficulties and hardships in carrying out the
strict letter" of the law, and whether those hardships "are
due to existing special conditions and unique circum-
stances which are peculiar to the specific property."
Donald Brown admitted that the variance would
make the bathroom expansion more convenient. "The
house was built in 1935," Brown added, "and there was
a six-foot setback required at that time."
Bums was joined by adjustment board member
Greg Watkins in voting to deny the variance request.
Board members Ken Lohn and Dick Cloutman both
voted in favor or granting the variance. In the case of
a tie vote, the matter was denied. Board member Anna
O'Brien was not present at the meeting.


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Announcements


'Secret Shop' for kids
at art league Saturday
The annual "Secret Shop" of the Anna Maria Is-
land Art League will be at the league's quarters, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24.
Children shop there every year for hand-crafted
holiday gifts to give to family, teachers and others.
Parents await their children, who are assisted in shop-
ping by volunteers, outside. While the youngsters are
shopping, adults may purchase bake sale goods and
enjoy coffee in the gallery's courtyard. Details are
available at 778-2099.

Youngsters delivering food today
for Meals on Wheels
Children who attend the TLC after-school program
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center are deliv-
ering food Wednesday, Nov. 21, to the Meals on
Wheels program of Manatee County.
They have collected the canned goods "to help
needy families during the Thanksgiving holidays," the
Center said. For further information, call 778-1908.

Pancake breakfast Sunday
at St. Bernard center
The first pancake breakfast and bake sale of the
winter season will be from 8 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday,
Nov. 25, at the activity center at St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
On the menu with the hot flapjacks are sausage, or-
ange juice and coffee or milk, $3 for adults and $1.50
for children under 12. Details are available at 778-
4769.

Peafowl Saturday at Pelican Man
Peacocks and the multiple uses for their tails will
be topic of the free Saturday at the Sanctuary program
Nov. 24 at the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary oh City
Island, off the south ramp of the New Pass Bridge from
south Longboat Key.
Details may be obtained at 388-4444.

Burned Bishop Planetarium
will be closed indefinitely
The Bishop Planetarium, destroyed by fire in Au-
gust, will remain closed "for an indefinite future," the
Bradenton institution's office has announced.
The two other components of the complex will
remain open. They are South Florida Museum and
Parker Manatee Aquarium, 201 10th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Bishop, part of the north end of the museum com-
plex that also housed education and administration fa-
cilities, suffered severe fire, smoke, water, heat and
soot damage to its structure and-projection and light-
ing equipment.
Since the fire the facility's board has found the
planetarium was vastly under-insured, and that rebuild-
ing would take 24 months, it was decided to fire the
planetarium director and leave the institution as it is -
out of it.
Renovations of the museum, under way for some
time, will go on to completion, said the complex's ad-
ministration.
Further information may be obtained at 746-4131.

Beethoven concert Tuesday
at Longboat temple
The Florida String Quartet will bring an all-
Beethoven concert to Temple Beth Israel, 567 Bay Isles
Road, Longboat Key, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27.
The program, presented by the Temple Men's
Club, is open to the public. A reception will follow the
performance. Details may be obtained at 383-3428.


AARP seeking volunteers
AARP Tax-Aide is seeking volunteers of all ages
who want to learn tax law and help prepare tax returns
from Feb. 1 through April 15, 2002.
Some program-related expenses are reimbursed. For
further information and to volunteer, call 907-1224.


Woody: All about art
Woody Candish, with one of his new mermaids, lives
and breathes art. Friends of Candish say there's
hardly a conversation with the Anna Maria artist if it
isn't about art. For an exhibit at the Island Branch
Library, Candish invited friends to display their
works as well. They include Richard Thomas, Susan
Curry, Jean Blackburn, Joan Voyles, Roger
McMillan, Carrie Price, Hannah Price and Rick
Rice. The exhibit will be in the Walker-Swift room
through November. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


Entries are due next week
for Longboat art show
Artworks for the annual members' art show will be
received from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Tuesday,
Nov. 26 and 27, at the Longboat Key Center for the
Arts, 6890 Longboat Drive.
The exhibit's opening reception and awards pre-
sentation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7, in the
Joan M. Durante Pavilion. Awards totaling $1,650 will
be presented. Judges will be Paul Stewart, painting, and
Leslie Uguccioni, three-dimensional. Details are avail-
able at 383-2345.

Chamber business card exchange
next Wednesday
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will host a business card exchange from 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at Chapae Boutique, 119 Bridge
St., Bradenton Beach. Details may be obtained at 778-
1541.


German class under way
A course in German language for beginners, la-
beled "Guten Tag," will meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 23, and subsequent Fridays at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria City.
Instructor is Betina Sego, who said she will stress
conversational German, including phrases that may
help travelers. Registration is required at 778-1908.

'Ask the Doctor' tonight
at community center
Dr. Daved Rosensweet will have another free in-
formal "Ask the Doctor" session from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center.
The physician will give a presentation and then
open up the forum to questions regarding illness or
health. Topics may include but are not limited to nutri-
tion, new testing methods, emotions and their relation-
ship to health and illness.
The Center is at 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria
City. Further information may be obtained at 778-1908.



















h




.1'


Rotary, chamber to honor
best in 'four-way test'
The Island businessperson who best represents
Rotary's "four-way test" for ethics and community
outreach will be honored at a meeting next month.
The honor is sponsored jointly by the Anna
Maria Island Rotary Club and the Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce. The victor will be an-
nounced at the chamber's annual meeting Dec. 17.
Rotary President Jim Dunne said the person hon-
ored will be the one on the Island "who best exem-
plifies the tenets of the Rotary business practice
statement."
He cited Rotary's "four-way test," developed in
1932 by a Rotarian who took over a company facing
bankruptcy, used the test as a guide for sales and
customer relations.
It states, "Of the things we think, say and do: Is
it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build
goodwill and better friendship? Will it be beneficial
to all concerned?"
A three-member chamber committee will select
the honoree. Further information may be obtained at
778-1541.


Lucky listener tunes in prize vacation
Chrissy Coons is the lucky winner of two round-trip
tickets to anywhere in the continental United States,
Canada or the Caribbean. Coons logged onto
wjst.com and entered the WSJT 94.1 radio "Trip-a-
day give-away" contest and has been tuning into the
radio station for the past three months to hear the
winners announced. Coons said the day her name
was announced as winner in the call-in contest, was
the one day she didn't turn the station on. However,
she wants to thank everyone who called her at the
Anna Maria Post Office where she works to tip her
off. Coons plans to use the tickets for a trip to
Atlanta or California. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan.


Getting
ready for
flu season
Michele Duffy
serves up a flu
shot to George
Glassmyer of
Holmes Beach
at Publix Nov.
3. Islander
Photo: J.L.
Robertson


Reviewers
Reviewing nominees for the Island Businessperson of
the Year award are Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce members. The chamber and the Island
Rotary Club are co-sponsoring the award to the
businessperson best exemplifying Rotary's test for
ethics, honesty and community spirit. Left to right
are Christian Huth, Oswald Trippe & Co. manager,
chamber director and Rotarian; Carol A. Duncan,
vice president, First National Bank & Trust, and
chamber director; and Alan A. Galletto, Island Real
Estate broker and chamber president. The award
will be made Dec. 17 at the chamber's annual
meeting.


Island's MacGregor starts
at maritime academy
Scott MacGregor, son of Scott and Linda
MacGregor of Anna Maria City. has started his classes
at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Cape Cod.
The cadet is a graduate of Anna Maria Elementary
School, King Middle School and Manatee High
School. His father teaches at Palmetto High and mother
at King. She explained that the academy is similar to
the Coast Guard Academy, but a graduate may enter
the military service of his choice or go into private
work.



Obituaries


Emily Susan Eriksen
Emily Susan Eriksen, 12, of Bradenton, died Nov.
16.
Born in Sarasota, Miss Eriksen was a fifth-grade
student at Orange Ridge-Bullock Elementary School.
She was a member of the Girl Scouts-Brownie Troop
No. 60. She was a member of the Rip Van Winkle Sat-
urday Morning Bowling League. She was Methodist.
A Celebration of Life will be held at 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, at Faith United Methodist
Church, 4215 First Ave. W., Bradenton. Inurnment will
be at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria. Memorial contributions may be
made to the American Brain Tumor Association, 2720
River Road, Des Plaines, IL 60018.
She is survived by mother Karen and grandmother
Marian.


THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 E PAGE 11


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PAGE 12 0 NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Island trolley plans, delays, problems


The Manatee Trolley has been slowed by a late
delivery date from the manufacturer, but the fact-
finding and promotional opportunities committee
charged with making recommendations to get the
trolley going is rolling full speed ahead.
Headed by Manatee County Area Transit Market-
ing Manager Susan Hancock, the committee met last
week to discuss the trolley delivery schedule, consider
festivities to announce the trolley schedule commence-
ment, advertising costs and placement of signs and
benches along the trolley route on the Island.
The first trolley isn't expected until January,
"and that makes February iffy," Hancock said. There
are a total of five trolleys, and the manufacturer is
expected to ship one every week after the first one.
Each trolley has to undergo safety checks and be
outfitted with radios and other local equipment upon
arrival, which will also take time, Hancock noted.
"We can't run every 20 minutes with three trol-
leys. We're looking at late February or a March start
date," she said.
Hancock noted the county legal department will
be looking at penalty clause options in its contract
with the manufacturer due to the late delivery.
As for promotions, Hancock said the Manatee
County Convention and Vistor's Bureau is setting up
links on its Web site for the trolley. The Anna Maria
Island Chamber of Commerce is adding the trolley
logo to its published information.
The park-and-ride on Sundays from K-mart at
75th Street in Bradenton is expected to operate on
the same schedule as the regular daily bus routes,
probably 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. No plans are included in
the current funding cycle for a Cortez Road park and
ride, she said.
Some promotional activities suggested include
free rides during the Springfest art and craft show in
March, with north and south tours on the trolley
route. Another possible tie in is with the Anna Maria
Island Community Center home tour including prize
drawings for inaugural rides.


Ad rates for signage inside the trolley will likely
be $100 per month with 20 percent off for a full
year's contract. Sign production costs are separate.
Hancock said persons interested in positions
driving the trolley should contact the county human
resources department. Four MCAT drivers have
signed up to transfer to the trolley system when it
starts up.
There was plenty of discussion about bus stops
and signage. Hancock explained the trolley signs
will replace the bus signs at the existing stops, al-
though one of the Island cities removed its bus signs
and trashed them.
"That's destruction of government resources,"
Hancock said, "and we don't want to see that any
more, but we didn't pursue it because we knew we'd
be putting up the trolley signs soon." The signs are
required to comply with the Florida Department of
Transportation requirements and the trolley grant,
she said.
The committee discussed the sign size and de-
sign, but in the end Hancock said, "We pay only if
it's our sign, and we think from a marketing stand-
point it's best to have all the signs the same."
Committee member Glenn Newman of Anna
Maria asked, "If you have dollars for signs, why
can't you pay for the type sign we want? Wouldn't
that be cooperative?"
Hancock said, "We have to do bus stop signs
that are approved by Manatee County government.
If Anna Maria doesn't agree to the plan, I'll have to
handle that in a different situation. I'm hoping to do
it in a nice cooperative way."
The signs must depict a trolley and state that
there is service every 20 minutes and be visible,
Hancock said. "You could put a medallion on the
back of the bench, and pay for that, but it has to de-
pict a trolley and state every 20 minutes. It's best if
it's consistent."
Hancock says MCAT needs written approval
from the three Island cities for the trolley sign design


and placement by December to order the signs.
She also stated emphatically that MCAT has
nothing to do with benches at the trolley stops. "If
the cities choose to have them or not, it's their de-
cision."
Hancock said the three Island public works di-
rectors were supposed to be informed by their may-
ors to be part of the trolley committee, but none at-
tended.
With the bus system, "one city threw out all the
bus signs. That city later called and wanted new
signs because the bench stenciling didn't work,"
Hancock said. "I want to be sure what government
pays for doesn't get trashed. This is one system to
serve the entire island, if one faction or infighting is
going to cause the system to be fragmented, we'll
have to reconsider the service."
Hancock said she'd already made presentations
to the cities and provided a complete list of the route
stops, but no letters of approval have been forthcom-
ing. She wrote the three cities and again included the
bus stop list, requesting approval.
"We are asking each city to send us this letter
within 10 days," so that as city administrations and
sign ordinances come and go, the trolley signs will
remain, she said in her Nov. 16 letter to the three
Island cities.
Other marketing ideas were discussed, including
a contest to pack as many people as possible in a
trolley, flyers, festival displays, site visits to busi-
nesses and paying the Privateers $500 to have the
Manatee Trolley logo placed on the back of the coins
they "toss" at parades.
Everyone is welcome to attend the next trolley
committee meeting at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 4 at Anna
Maria City Hall.
Hancock is hoping for input from Island mer-
chants, hotel/motel operators and residents about the
future trolley service. She can be contacted at 747-
8621, extension 227, or e-mail
susan.hancock@co.manatee.fl.us.


'
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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 M PAGE 13


Alachua County 'satisfied' with cell consultants


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
While the search is on in Anna Maria to find quali-
fied consultants to assist the city, if necessary, in re-
writing its cellular communications ordinance, one
name that seems to be on everyone's informal list of
contenders is the San Francisco area cellular commu-
nications consulting firm of Kreines and Kreines.
And that's probably because these guys make
that a guy and a gal (Ted and Susan Kreines) appar-
ently have a known track record in Florida, at least
according to Alachua County (Gainesville) Attorney
David Wagner.






Go safely
Zach Geeraerts of
Holmes Beach
practices
manuevers on his -
go-ped in the .
family's drive-
way. Islander
Photo: Bonner
Joy








"



















'No Go' for pi

Law enforcement officials in all three municipali-
ties on Anna Maria Island are putting the brakes on mo-
torized scooters known as go-peds.
Lt. Dale Stevenson of the Holmes Beach Police
Department said the go-peds, which are popular with
the younger generation, are not supposed to be ridden
on any public street or right of way. Florida laws re-
quires that these vehicles must be licensed and the
driver also licensed in order to be driven on public
streets.


Holmes Beach charter
The Holmes Beach charter review committee held
its second session on Nov. 16 and continued its pains-
taking but necessary "line-by-line" review of the char-
ter. Items the committee feels need further examination
are put on its "short-list" of subjects to come back to,
once the initial charter review is complete.
Items the committee placed on the short-list at this
session included emergency ordinances and appropria-
tions and initiative, referendum and recall.
There was discussion of a previous referendum
petition in Holmes Beach that was thrown out by the
city on legal grounds. The committee will look at the
charter review recommendations of five years ago to
determine if that committee had any recommendations
on initiative, referendum and recall.
A very serious item the committee looked at was
the office of the mayor and duties of the mayor. The
question many committee members had was: "Do we


For more nearly two years, the Kreines firm
worked with the Alachua County government in writ-
ing its "Wireless Master Plan" and cellular communi-
cations ordinance, said Wagner.
And while the ordinance is more than a year old,
it seems to be working. The county has been sued twice
by U.S. Cellular Co. over denial of a permit for a cell
tower and accompanying service, and has won both
cases, Wagner said. "So we're very satisfied as relates
to Kreines."
One fact that stood out in the county's selection of
Kreines was "the [cellular] industry didn't seem to like
him and we thought that was good," said Wagner.


eds on Island

HBPD officers along with Bradenton Beach police
and Manatee County sheriff's deputies on patrol. in
Anna Maria will stop anyone on a go-ped on a city
street and issue a warning. After several warnings, they
could confiscate the go-ped until the arrival of a par-
ent, or issue a summons.
Stevenson said his department will also answer any
question a parent has about the legality of these scoot-
ers. For further information on the use of a go-ped, call
the HBPD at 708-5804.


review continues study
want the mayor responsible for administration of all
city affairs?"
This item was added to the short-list for further
review and will be included in the committee's discus-
sions of the current mayor-council form of government
as opposed to a city manager-council form. The com-
mittee has indicated it will likely take several meetings
alone just to deal with the topic of any change in the
Holmes Beach form of government.
Those meetings will take place once the commit-
tee completes its "line-by-line" review and establishes
its final "short-list."
The final recommendations of the committee will be
forwarded to the city commission for a vote and public
discussion on what items to place on a citywide ballot.
The next Holmes Beach charter review committee
meeting is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 8 a.m. and the
public is invited to attend.


"He came here and said things the wireless indus-
try doesn't want elected officials to hear."
One of those "things" the cell tower companies
don't want people to know is that a permit can be de-
nied for a tower "if it is too big and too ugly" to fit a
community, said Wagner.
Obviously, there has to be substantive justification
in the ordinance for this kind of denial, but after suc-
cessful defense of two lawsuits against the Kreines
ordinance and master plan, Wagner is confident.
So is Alachua County Commissioner Penny
Wheat, who said Kreines and Kreines are
knowledgablee professionals" who taught the commis-
sion what the cellular industry did not want it to know.
The fact that the industry "despises" the firm is just one
indication of "how well they do their job" for the pub-
lic, she said.
Although Wagner said he could talk for hours
about cell towers and phones and considers himself a
"semi-expert" on cell-tower law and construction, the
knowledge didn't come easy. He spent numerous pri-
vate sessions with Kreines in addition to 11 public
workshops and three public hearings to craft the ordi-
nance and plan into adoption in August 2000.
He now gives speeches and lectures to other mu-
nicipalities about Alachua's cellular-communications
ordinance and master plan.
Kreines' cell-tower knowledge doesn't come free,
nor is it cheap.
Ted Kreines said his firm does not do free presen-
tations or give free advice, but does an initial public
workshop for $2,500, plus expenses. Cell tower and
communications companies are also invited. Anything
after the workshop with a municipality is under an in-
cremental contract.
The workshop outlines a step-by-step plan for lo-
cal governments to write master plans and accompany-
ing ordinances, and educate elected officials, attorneys
and city workers on the issues and the law.
While their clients are normally city and county
governments, Kreines does occasional work with pub-
lic interest groups as in Sanibel Island last year.
But he did provide one bit of "free," if somewhat
cryptic, advice. Cellular-communications carriers have
rights under the Federal Communications Act. The
construction companies that build these towers do not.
He also "advised" that "maybe you can't keep
them out, but you can write an ordinance to keep them
[towers] short." With the right ordinance, municipali-
ties will have control of where and how high a tower
should be built.
Neither Kreines nor his wife is a lawyer, but col-
lectively have more than 50 years experience in city
and community planning and political science. The
past six years, they have devoted to the cellular com-
munications industry and have made an exhaustive
study of the 17 federal appeals court cases involving
cell towers and communications.
"We have to know what we are doing," he said.
Kreines said he did not want to mention other
municipal work currently in progress in Florida, but did
say he was working in the Tampa Bay area.
Other consultancy work in Florida includes assist-
ing a group of citizens in Sanibel Island to prevent con-
struction of an excessively high cell tower. The group
was successful in reducing the height of the tower, said
Kreines.
Efforts to reach a spokesperson for the citizens
group in Sanibel were unsuccessful.
The citizens committee in Anna Maria preparing a
list of proven cellular communications consultants is
scheduled to present its findings at the Nov. 20 city
commission meeting.

Cell towers in Alachua County
Although there is technically no height restriction
on a cell tower in the Alachua County wireless ordi-
nance, there are certain requirements for construction
of any cell tower, including a fall zone.
The county does require that a cell tower conform
to the needs and looks of the community, and this can
be the basis for a denial, although most cellular com-
panies prefer to work within the ordinance.
The county's environmental department does a
study on a proposed tower location to assess impact
and beauty in addition to a series of photo simulations
to show commissioners and the public how the tower
would look in the area, if built.





PAGE 14 M NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER

Start beach renourishment Jan. 30: Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
Bradenton Beach officials are urging the county
commission to proceed with all due haste in starting the
beach renourishment project on Anna Maria Island.
City commissioners agreed to send a letter to
Manatee County commissioners asking them to enter
into a contract with a dredging company that will start
work in late January. Bids that have been sent to seven
dredging companies include two alternate start-up


dates Jan. 30 or April 15.
Manatee County Ecosystems Manager Charlie
Hunsicker told city commissioners the county has "all the
permits and permissions we need to proceed" almost
- and that the bids will be opened Nov. 27 and the county
commission will select a dredging company Dec. 4.
"On Dec. 4, we will bring our recommendations to
the county commission," Hunsicker said, "and it will
be up to the commission to determine a contractor,


Library listening
Estelle Scholtz and Paul and Elly Deising of the Anna Maria Orchestra performed at the Island Branch Public
library prior to a "Friends of the Library" program. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


based on cost."
It is anticipated that the bids for the April 15 start
date will be less than the Jan. 30 bids, Hunsicker said,
because the later date would better allow the contrac-
tor to fit the Island renourishment project into other
work that may be ongoing.
The "almost" part of the permits and permissions
lies in the hands of the three Island cities. Hunsicker
said the beach renourishment project will take place 24
hours a day, seven days a week. For the project to take
place, the noise, lighting and beach vehicle ordinances
within the three cities will have to be amended.
"I believe we will need a special ordinance to op-
erate outside of your existing ordinances," Hunsicker
said.
City commissioners authorized the city attorney to
research what needs to be done to facilitate the
renourishment project and bring back for a first read-
ing any necessary ordinance at the Dec. 6 city commis-
sion meeting. Final decision on the matter, following
a public hearing, will take place Dec. 20.
The estimated $9.75 million beach renourishment
project will place a 300-foot-wide stretch of sand along
most of the west side of Anna Maria Island. Sand will
be taken from an offshore site at the north end of the
Island and be piped ashore.
County beach consultant Rick Spadoni, with the
firm Coastal Planning and Engineering, said the sand
which will be placed on the Island will be whiter and
have less shell than the previous renourishment in
1992-93.
Hunsicker said citizens and business owners were
encouraged to attend the Dec. 4 county commission
meeting to offer their thoughts on the beach
renourishment start-up date. "The decision will not be
based just on cold, hard cash," he said.


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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 0 PAGE 15


Miller wants park plan on botanical preserves


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria's sometimes controversial but al-
ways exciting citizen of the year and long-time en-
vironmental activist Mike Miller made an impas-
sioned plea before the city's environmental enhance-
ment and education committee on Nov. 13 for the
committee to work with him in developing a plan for
a citywide park system.
Miller presented a working paper for the short-
and longterm development of what he calls the Anna
Maria Barrier Island Native Botanical Preserves. He
identified four current public parks in the city as bo-
tanical preserves in his plan.
1. City Pier Park a bayshore native preserve.
2. Historical Park (Pine Avenue) a mangrove
shore native preserve.
3. City Hall Park a maritime forest native pre-
serve.
4. Gulf Front Park a beach dune native pre-
serve.
The fiery Miller, however, has lost none of his
passion for independent thinking and volunteerism.
Either the EEEC will "cooperate" with him or there
will be "conflict," he said.
The goal of Miller's plan is simply the charac-
ter of Anna Maria. "Everyone has their own idea of
what Anna Maria is, was, should be or could be,"
said Miller, and defining Anna Maria's character is
"so complex that no one has mastered it."
If the committee does not define what it means
by "preserving the character of Anna Maria," said
Miller, "then you will be just like every other beau-
tification committee."
Miller envisions a four-part plan for city parks


The Island's own





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that includes as a starting point the complete inven-
tory of all trees, plants and shrubs.
The final phase would be legislation, but not
your run-of-the-mill ordinance or resolution.
Miller contends successive city governments
have destroyed the tropical-island, village character
of Anna Maria when they were supposed to be pro-
tecting the city. Thus, new environmental legislation
is needed to "protect us from the protectors. One that
allows such parties to pass in and out of office to
processiall their ambitions and dreams for Anna
Maria without doing more harm than good."
Miller closed his presentation by asking commit-
tee members to "never make a single judgment about
anything." In other words, keep an open mind about
this plan.
In keeping with an open-mind policy, committee
members will take a tour of the four parks with
Miller in the very near future to see work already
done by Miller and what he envisions for the future.
Following Miller's presentation, the committee
turned to other matters, most notably the fact that
there are now two vacancies to fill as SueLynn has
resigned from the EEEC to run for the office of
mayor. There were no volunteers from the audience.
Committee member Jean Murray volunteered to
take over the duties of SueLynn regarding purchase
of holiday decorations. The purchase has been ap-
proved by the city commission.
Murray said she will see if she can find volunteers
to organize a holiday decorations contest for residences
and businesses on Pine Avenue. Diane Caniff men-
tioned that several artists in Anna Maria have told her
that with a longrange plan for a holiday decorating
contest, they're very interested in developing the con-



Thanks To The Voters

I want to take the opportunity to
thank all of the voters of Bradenton
Beach for the great turnout on
Election Day, and most especially to
those that supported me.
I am determined to live up to your
level of expectations during my term
in office.
Thank you again.
Ross Benjamin
Commissioner Elect, Ward 3
This ik a pd. pol. adv. Paid for by the llR.s sBe njamin (ainpllaigl. Approved by Hoss Ben jamnin.


test for next year. Kitty VanZile volunteered to assist
Murray with her subcommittee.
Turning to the subject of memorial benches,
committee chairman Tim Eiseler said he has done a
survey of current benches, but not those with a me-
morial plaque. His view was that there were plenty
of benches, but some are in need of replacement. He
suggested that any proposed memorial bench simply
replace an existing bench.
During discussion on the subject, Vice Mayor
Tom Skoloda suggested an inventory of benches:
those currently with a memorial plaque and those
without. He also suggested looking at beach access
points to determine a need for a benchs.
Murray said there is a particular case now where
a family has purchased a bench for a memorial at
Bean Point. The committee will check those benches
to determine if one can be replaced with this memo-
rial bench. However, the committee viewed this as
a bit "after-the-fact" as there was no authorization
for this particular memorial.
Karen DiCostanzo suggested a moratorium on
future memorial benches until the EEEC develops a
plan for memorials and plaques.
A suggestion was made to establish a memorial
fund for future donations. Diane Caniff made the
point that the city did ndt want to engage in memo-
rial planning. Skoloda said the city was looking for
guidance from the EEEC.
The committee tabled a motion by Cindi
Maisour on replacing i specific bench at Bean
Point, instead putting |a moratorium on future
benches until the EEEC formulates a plan. The mo-
tion will be discussed at the next EEEC meeting
Dec. 3.
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RECYCLING PICKUP SCHEDULE

Waste Management of Manatee County will not be picking
/up garbage or recycling on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday
November 22, 2001. Thursday's garbage and recycling
will be picked up on Saturday, November 24.

Thank you and enjoy a safe weekend.


WASTE MANAGEMENT
of Manatee County
For more information, call 753-7591.






PAGE 16Players NOSmoke and1, 201 MirroHE DRrs opens Nov. 30


Island Players 'Smoke and Mirrors' opens Nov. 30


The Island Players of Anna Maria will present
"Smoke and Mirrors" by Will Osborne and Anthony
Herrara Friday, Nov. 30, through Sunday, Dec. 9. The
play is co-produced by AA Electric S.E., Inc.
Smoke and Mirrors is aptly named. At the opening,
the movie director, the writer and the handsome star are
rehearsing a big scene. The gun fires. The star drops on
cue trouble is, he stays dropped!
Each time the scene changes, the players think they
have it all in hand until something else doesn't quite fit.
Never fear, Sheriff Leroy Lumpkin, in his quiet, re-
laxed way, then steps in to fan away the smoke.
Jerry Finn plays the part of Hamilton Orr, Mona
Upp is Barbara Orr, Bob DeCecco is Clark
Robinson, John Durkin is Derek Coburn, and Bill
Nixon is Sheriff Lumpkin.
The director is Geoffrey Todd, whose association
with the Island Players stretches back more than 20
years so far back he's lost count of the plays he has
appeared in or directed for the theater group.
"I doubt if Agatha Christie herself could have
come up with something better than Smoke and Mir-
rors," Todd says. "All the classic requirements are here,
the plot and counterplot, the twists and turns, and the





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Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. Curtain times
are 8 p.m. except for Sunday matinees, which start at 2
p.m. There are no performances on Monday. Tickets are
$14 each. For tickets, please call the box office at 778-
5755. The box office is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily
and one hour before the start of each performance.

Baskets galore
Gloria Hall Cropper of Anna
Maria demonstrates the art of
handcrafted baskets at the Artists
1 <. Guild Gallery in Holmes Beach.
f 'Cropper studied at Miami
S University and has exhibited work
in galleries in the United States
and abroad. She is one of the
founders of the Anna Maria
SArtists Guild. Looking on, from
:' , left, are Faye Nierman of
S :. Bradenton, Donna Bednarz of
Bradenton and Dawn Haskins of
Bradenton Beach. Islander
Photo: J.L. Robertson


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THE ISLANDER I NOV. 21, 2QQ 1 PAGE 17


The chorus performs under the direction of James
Forssell.


Maestro Alfred Gershfeld, artistic director of the Anna
Maria Island Community Orchestra and Chorus.


Entertainment extraordinaire
The season opening event of the Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and Chorus Nov. 18 was a "sell-
out," the first overflow crowd ever in November, according to President Joseph Bracken. The program
included music by such masters as J.S. Bach, T. Albinoni and George Gershwin. The nonprofit organization
was founded in 1992 and performs at the Island Baptist Church for donations. The next concert will be Dec.
15 and will feature G.F. Handel's Messiah, PartI, and Hallelujah Chorus.


Sailboats joining Lighted Boat Parade


Whew! For a fairly long nervous time it appeared
the power boats would have all the glory this year, but
at least two sailboats will parade Dec. 1. More would
be welcome.
The co-chairmen of the 141t annual Anna Maria
Island Christmas Lighted Boat Parade, Chuck Stealey
and Don Schroder, had been quite concerned about the
absence of tall masts in the parade.
But then two sailboat skippers came along, bring-
ing the total entries to 14 boats. Stealey was delighted.
First and second prizes will be awarded in four
divisions: Boats under 25 feet long, over 25, commer-


cial, and sailboats. Commercial entries are those spon-
sored by businesses.
The skippers' award ceremony will be at 6 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 2, at the Beach House restaurant in
Bradenton Beach.
In case of unfriendly weather the festivities will
take place the following Saturday, Dec. 8, on the same
schedule, said Schroder.
There is still time for boats to join the parade, said
Stealey. Entry forms are available at the parade's main
sponsor, The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, or by calling 778-3907 or 778-2200.


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PAGE 18 E NOV..21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


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Patriotic day for Island school kids
Members of the Kirby Stewart American Legion Post 24, led a flag-raising ceremony and gun salute at the Anna Maria Elementary School Nov. 13.
1;v `~ T --1 4Pci,:4- .&


A. *~%.. ...


Students Tyler Fitzgerald, 11, and Shelby Daniels, 10,
raise the flag as AME students and veteran Bill Field
salute. Islander Photos: J.L. Robertson


Caught in the WAVE
Anna Maria Elementary School students recognized for civic achievements Nov. 16 at the We Are Very
Exceptional "WAVE" awards include: Trevor Bystrom, Lindsey Bell, Tommy Matney, Molly Slicker, Tyler
Fitzgerald, Sarah Platt, Mathew Shaffer, Nani McKenzie, Shelby Daniels, Emily Hostetler, Madison
Easterling and Flannery McClung. Recipients of the WAVE award receive a coupon for a free serving of ice
cream at Mama Lo 's in Anna Maria. Islander Photo: Diana Bogan


Parents start patrolling grounds at Island elementary school


The Parent-Teacher Organization is launching a
new program, "Parents On Patrol," to help keep stu-
dents safe at Anna Maria Elementary School.
Parents Alison Stripling, Deborah Scott and


Anna Maria Elementary
School menu
Monday, Nov. 26
Breakfast: French Toast Sticks with Syrup, Yogurt,
Cereal
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets with Roll or Junior Cuban
Sandwich, Oven Potato Rounds, Fresh Fruit
Tuesday, Nov. 27
Breakfast: Sausage with Toast, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Beef-A-Roni with Roll or Breaded Chicken
Patty Sandwich, Seasoned Green Beans. Mixed
Fruit
Wednesday, Nov. 28
Breakfast: Pancake with Syrup, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Grilled Cheese Sandwich or Peanut Butter
and Jelly Sandwich, Green Grocer Salad with Ranch
Dressing, Fresh Apple
Thursday, Nov. 29
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs with Toast, Yogurt,
Cereal
Lunch: Baked Chicken or Breaded Pork Patty, Roll,
Seasoned Green Beans, Chilled Pineapple Tidbits
Friday, Nov. 30
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Breaded Fish on a Bun,
Tossed Green Salad with Ranch Dressing, Chilled
Applesauce Cup
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


Holmes Beach Police Officer Pete Lannon created the
program after the three observed children crossing the
back playground on their way to and from school.
"We realized that there was no one there to watch
these students," said Scott, "and we decided to start a
parent patrols to help kids stay safe."
POP will consist of parent volunteers who will re-
port any suspicious activities or people to the school
office. They will also be on the lookout for dangerous
or speeding drivers.
POP volunteers will report on safety violations,
and not take law enforcement into their own hands.
In addition to patrolling the school grounds during


Island Middle School menu
Monday, Nov. 26
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Corndog, Chef Salad with
Dressing, Fresh Broccoli and Cauliflower, Fruit
Tuesday, Nov. 27
Lunch: Hoagie Sandwich, or Grilled Chicken Patty
on Bun, Chef Salad with Dressing, Tater Tots, Fruit
Wednesday, Nov. 28
Lunch: Chicken and Noodles with Roll, or Ham-
burger, Chef Salad with Dressing, Seasoned Green
Beans, Fruit
Thursday, Nov. 29
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Fish Sandwich with Chips,
Chef Salad with Dressing, Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Friday, Nov. 30
Lunch: Nachos with Beef and Cheese Sauce, or Two
Egg Rolls with Sweet and Sour Sauce, Chef Salad
with Dressing, Sweet Corn Niblets, Fruit
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


arrival and dismissal times, volunteers may be asked to
assist the school's administrative staff in an emergency.
For example, if the school was to be evacuated, volun-
teers would help ensure all the students remained ac-
counted for.
Anyone interested in volunteering for POP can
pick up an application form in the school's administra-
tive office. For more information, Scott and Lannon
can be reached through the school at 708-5525.


Watch your speed
New 5 mph signs were posted in the Anna Maria
Elementary School parking lot to remind visitors to
slow down. The parking lot is a busy area during ar-
rival and dismissal
times and the signs ...
were erected after par- *
ents expressed con-
cerns for the safety of
the students.
In addition, the : '.M,.
school asks that visitors .
not use the circular '
driveway in front of the "k
school from 7:30 to
8:15 a.m. and 2:30 to 3 "
p.m. Buses enter and .,
exit during these times .
and cars can block their' ,
path if using the drive-" : '
way.


.* I


-71^





4"&1- 200trPA 21


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports available.

Bradenton Beach
Nov. 8,2600 Gulf Drive S., Coquina Beach, burglary.
A computer was reportedly stolen from the trunk of a
rental car.
Nov. 9, 1801 Gulf Drive N., Runaway Bay condo-
minium, criminal mischief. A vehicle was driven on a
pedestrian bridge on the property, causing damage to the
bridge and hand rail.
Nov. 10, 200 block of Bridge Street, warrant. A man
found sleeping on a public bench was arrested on an out-
standing warrant.
Nov. 10, 1800 Gulf Drive S., Coquina Park, city or-
dinance. A man was issued a citation for driving his truck
on the beach. Officers discovered the man sleeping in his
vehicle after it got stuck in the sand.

Holmes Beach
Nov. 10, 5700 block of Marina Drive, driver's license.
Officers stopped a vehicle for operating without a tail
light. Upon checking the driver's identification, officers
found that his license had been revoked.
Nov. 11, 67th Street beach, criminal mischief. The
wooden slats of two public benches were damaged.
Nov. 11, 503 56th St., Island Cove Marina, lien. A
customer was accused of taking a boat from the marina
property without paying for the repair work that had been
done.
Nov. 12,6100 block of Holmes Boulevard, theft. Two
ornamental copper frogs were removed from the side yard
of a residence.
Nov. 12, 600 block of Key Royale Drive, theft. Ac-
cording to the report, a high school student threw a large

1, .


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CERTIFIED COUNSELOR
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(941) 794-1492


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Don't leave the
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10 days out, new cop car gets
crunched in Bradenton Beach
In this "duel" of duo new cars, both lost.
Bob McNeill, 66, of Powell, Wyo., was driv-
ing a brand new Thunderbird when he collided
with a brand new Bradenton Beach police car, a
Crown Victoria, driven by Officer Thomas Ferrara
last Friday. Ferrara's car had been on the road for
less than two weeks, one of three new vehicles the
police department had acquired.
According to reports, McNeill was eastbound
on Third Street North. Ferrara was southbound on
Highland Avenue, came to the intersection and
noticed McNeill was to the left of the center. He
started to shout to McNeill, who then noticed the
police car and tried to swerve. The swerve didn't
work, and the two cars collided.
Damage to McNeill's Thunderbird was esti-
mated at $1,000; the police car sustained about
$500 in damage. McNeill was charged with driv-
ing to the left of the center of the road.

party while her parents were away for the weekend. Dur-
ing the party, another student allegedly stole the
homeowner's jewelry.
Nov. 13, 3900 East Bay Drive, Publix, theft. A man
posing as a Pepsi employee stole money from the
company's vending machine.


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(Between Publix and'Crowder Bros)


Publix Pepsi bandit
A man posing as a Pepsi truck driver emptied the
money from a Pepsi vending machine in the Publix
store lobby located at 3900 East Bay Drive.
Store manager Tony Tramontana told Holmes
Beach police that he was in the lobby at the time but did
not question the man because he was wearing the same
blue shirt the regular Pepsi truck drivers wear.
According to the report, Brad Roberts, the delivery
man for Coca-Cola, witnessed the suspect exit the store
but did not see a Pepsi van or truck in the parking lot.
He followed the suspect and saw him drive away in a
white 1993 Oldsmobile station wagon. He then notified
the Publix manager.
A spokesperson from Pepsi advised police that the
key used to access the front door of the vending machine
is exclusive to Publix vending machines, but the key used
to open the money box is standard for all machines.
Police officers have the store surveillance tape, among
other leads, to work from. Pepsi is considering changing
the locks on its Publix vending machines in the area.

Nov. 13, 3900 East Bay Drive, Publix, worthless
checks. Publix received two worthless checks for approxi-
mately $400 each.
Nov. 13, 611 Manatee Ave., Eckerd, fraud. An at-
tempt was made to pass a forged prescription for dilaudid.
Nov. 14, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee Public Beach,
burglary. A wallet was stolen from the console of a Jeep
parked at the beach.


GY YATROS, D.M.D.

General and Cosmetic Dentistry


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office visit! That's right no more waiting.
Dr. Yatros is the first dentist in the Bradenton area to offer this new tech-
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more than traditional crowns. Don't wait, call today for more information.

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Our office is closed
for lunch from
12 to 1 pm daily






PAGE 22 0 NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Sarah Thomas Manatee High's 'most athletic girl'


Manatee High School senior Sarah Ann Thomas,
a resident of Anna Maria, was voted "most athletic
girl" at the school for the 2001/02 school year as part
of the school's senior no-
tables program. Four girls
Thomas, Her-icane
(girl's soccer) teammates
.Michelle DeSaulniers and
Mo Davila, and track ath-
lete Emily Sharf were
nominated for the award
through a vote of students
and staff last week before a
final vote Nov. 14 with
Thomas coming out on
top.
Thomas also one of four nominies for the
"most laid-back award" which is fitting seeing as
how she is a life-long Islander has been involved
in year-round athletics since she was very young.
She played soccer, basketball, and baseball in addi-
tion to taking dance lessons through fifth grade.
After that, Thomas concentrated on just playing soc-
cer, first with the Manatee Magic before playing for
the Manatee "Her-icanes" varsity soccer team, start-
ing as a freshman, in addition to being a member of
the varsity track team. She has continued to play for
Manatee and is just starting her senior season with
new coach Kevin Cassidy (a former Islander, and
sports writer for The Islander). i
Athletics isn't the only area in which Thomas ex-
cels. She boasts an impressive 3.8 overall grade-point
average in her four years at Manatee High School and
plans to attend college next fall.
Speaking of the Her-icanes, they got their season
off to a good start with a 9-0 road win over district foe
Pinellas Park High on Nov. 13, thanks to strong pay
by the trio of Islanders.
Freshman striker Skyler Purcell notched the first
two goals of her high school career and freshman
goalie Naomi Osborne recorded her first shut t.
Former Islander Alex Bouziane recorded three goals
and two assists, while junior midfielder Priscilla


Kenny Randall Sportsmanship award winner
Miranda Massey
Henriques added two goals and two assists. Senior
midfielder Thomas played solidly for the 'Canes,
who play host to Southeast High School Nov. 20
before traveling to Ft. Myers on Wednesday.
Catch a home game against Venice Nov. 30 at 8
p.m., or Dec. 1 against Martin County at 2 p.m. The
Her-icanes appear at home again against Sarasota on
Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. Games are played at Manatee High
School's stadium.

Island soccer ending: awards,
ceremonies, Al-Star games
The Anna Maria Island Community Center's 2001
soccer season came to a close with All-Star games
played Nov. 12 in Division I, II and III.


The games were followed by an awards ceremony
at the center iov. 14, where league players were
awarded trophies for having the best record in each
division. In addition, the Dennis Grandstad Most Valu-
able Player award, the Kenny Randall Sportsmanship
award and the most improved player award were
handed out.
Miranda M ssey took home the coveted Kenny
Randall Sportsmanship award, while Blake Tyre
grabbed the Dennis Grandstad MVP trophy. Skyler
Purcell won the most improved player award.
Team wise, the Division III Anna Maria Spirit,
Division II Mr. Ones, and Division I LaPensee Plumb-
ing won their respective league titles.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


-" --
.% ',.,
,.--.
', ?


FREE HOME W ISLAND A MARIA CALL 778-7978
Sorry, we cannot deliver single copies to condominium units or mobile homes.



































Most improved player Skyler Purcell

Sports
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22


Blue dominates Division III All-Star game
The Division III Blue All-Stars jumped in front by a

Welcome Back Snowbirds!



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We aren't just for the birds!
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4-0 score before the White All-Stars knew what hit them.
Stephen Thomas and J.D. Jackson each notched a
pair of goals to jumpstart the Blue team. Jackson would
have had another goal were it not for the effort of White
keeper Kevin Callahan, who made a nice save of a shot
off the foot of Jackson.
The White team finally broke through-early in the
second half when Alex Wright hit a cross inside to
Broderick West, who poked it under the charging
keeper to cut the Blue lead to 4-1. A few minutes later,
West stole the ball deep in the Blue end, but his shot
was just wide.
The White squad continued to apply offensive
pressure, almost getting a goal from Wright. Wright
received the ball at the top of the box where he turned
and unleashed a left-footed rocket, but Blue keeper
Garrett Secor made the save. Unfortunately for Secor,
the ball rolled out to Miles Hostetler, who fired a shot
that richochetted off the far post and into the goal to
halve the Blue lead.
The Blue team scored on their next possession to
thwart any hopes of a dramatic White comeback when
Sewall intercepted a clearing pass and lofted a shot
over the defense and the keeper for a 5-2 Blue lead.
Garrett Waiters then helped to ice the game when
he stole the ball on the left side where he crossed the
ball into Thomas who easily beat the keeper with a shot
just inside the far post for a 6-2 lead.
West accounted for the final goal on the night
when he volleyed a throw in from 30 yards out past the
keeper to end the game with Blue on top by a 6-3 score.
Thomas led the Blue team with three goals and one
assist while Jackson added two goals. Sewall notched
one goal and Waiters had one assist for the Blue team



' -OUD LVTU P TI ,

V,- NDLUKN( O .-


THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 0 PAGE 23
which got strong defensive play from Brooke
Fitzgerald and Secor in goal.
West led the White charge with two goals while
Hostetler scored once and Wright garnered an assist.
White slides past Blue in Division II.
The White and Blue All-Star teams waged an epic,
back-and-forth battle in the Division II All-Star game,
with the Blue squad falling behind by two goals in the first
half before staging a second-half rally that saw them tie
the score 3-3. A pair of late goals by the White secured the
5-3 victory for the White All-Stars to end a fantastic game.
Spencer Carper helped stake his White team to an
early 2-0 lead. He got the White team going when he
spotted Andrew Fortenbury outside. Fortenbury took
the pass and launched a high shot into the far corner of
the goal. Two minutes later, Carper carried the ball up
the left side where he cut back and fired a rocket that
beat the keeper to the far post for a 2-0 White lead. .'-
Ben Valdivisio and Alex Phillips teamed up to
halve the score a few minutes later when Valdivisio
carried the ball up the left side where he crossed inside
to a hard-charging Phillips, who easily beat the keeper
making the score 2-1 White.
Carper just missed scoring on a long free kick that
barely went over the crossbar to keep the score at 2-1.
Carper helped extend the lead to 3-1 with a perfect
corner kick that Will Osborne headed into the goal as
the half came to a close.
The Blue team almost cut into the White lead when
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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i Jw -" for private parties. .
Call us to arrange
your holiday
get-togethers!
CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY!
Lunch Tues-Fri 12-3 pm Dinner Mon-Sat 5-9:30 pm
Anna Maria Island Centre 3246 E. Bay Drive
Holmes Beach 778-1320 RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED


CkLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY
i .G LINCUFES! 'IG ALS!







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Open Mon. thru Thurs. 11:50-9
Fri. & Sat. 11:30-10 Sunday Noon-9
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PAGE 24 E NOV. 21, 2001 N THE ISLANDER
Sports
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23
Phillips got loose up the right side. He crossed the ball
inside to Max Marnie, but White keeper Jake Wood
was there to deny Marnie. Mamie got some redemption
a few plays later when he beat two defenders up the
right side before hitting a beautiful chip to Bryant, who
headed it past Wood to cut the White lead to 3-2.
Three minutes later, Marnie took a throw-in and
found Valdivisio sprinting up the middle. Valdivisio
finished off the scoring chance to tie the game 3-3.
The White team came right back down the field
and almost came up with the go-ahead goal, but Blue
keeper Tim Villars came off of his line to turn
Fortenbury away "empty footed."
The White team got the game-winner when
.Osborne stole the ball and carried it forward before
passing inside to Carper, who finished for a 4-3 lead.
Kyle Schoonover added an insurance goal a few min-
utes later when he launched a free kick from 40 yards
that somehow squirted through traffic and into the goal
to give the White squad a 5-3 lead.
Carper finished with two goals and two assists to
lead the White team, who also got goals from
Fortenbury, Schoonover and Osborne.
Valdivisio led the Blue team with one goal and one
assist. Bryant and Phillips each added a goal while
Marnie chipped in with two assists.

Blue edges White in Division I
The Blue team eased past the White team 3-2 in the
Division I All-Star game behind goals from Sarah
Clausen, Brent DeLeon and season MVP Blake Tyre.
The Blue team was led by goals from Kyle Dale and
Max Gazzo.
The Blue team jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the
game's opening minutes when DeLeon fired a shot that
White keeper Naomi Osborne just got a hand on, send-



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ing it off the crossbar to Clausen, who poked it past
Osborne to give the Blue team the early lead.
The Blue extended its lead to 2-0 when DeLeon got
loose up the right side where he hit a rocket that found
the upper left corner of the goal.
The White team meanwhile was getting opportu-
nities, but its shots were either off the mark or were
saved by erstwhile keeper Skyler Purcell.
The White team finally broke through when Dale
stole the ball and outran everyone up the middle to
halve the score. The White team had a couple of golden
opportunities, but Blue goalie Nick St. John came up

PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


Basketball
tryouts draw
enthusiastic
youngsters
More than 200
Island youngsters
showed up at the
Anna Maria Island
Community Center
Saturday for tryouts
in the Center's 2001-
02 youth basketball
league. Here, boys
and girls in the 8-9
age group display
their skills in free
throw shooting and
two-on-two play. The
season starts Nov. 29
with the Tipoff
Dinner at the Center.
Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Nov. 17 horseshoe games were
Tom Skoloda and Bill Starrett, both of Anna Maria.
Runners-up were Jack Cooper of Holmes Beach
and George Landraitis of Bradenton.
Winners in the Nov. 14 games were
Frangaus Van Mechelan of Belgium and Karl
Thomas. Runners-up were Herb Puryear of Anna
Maria and Neil Sweerus of Bradenton.
The weekly contests get under way every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park,
10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership fees
and everyone is welcome to join in.

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THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 E PAGE 25


Anna Maria students win second round athletic contest


Several students from Anna Maria Elementary
School were among the winners in the National Punt,
Pass and Kick Sectional competition held at G.T. Bray
Park in Bradenton.
The competition offers boys and girls in third
through fifth grade the opportunity to compete,
matching their skills in punting, passing and place-
kicking against their peers. A combined score in the
three skills is used to determine who advances to the
next round.
The first round of competition takes place during
gym class, where students compete against classmates.


Sports
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24
with saves to preserve their slim lead.
Tyre gave the Blue team some breathing room






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The top three winners from each class move on to the
second round, where they compete against the winners
from other schools in the county.
From AME, the following students won at the sec-
ond round of competition: Kyla Secor finished third in
the age 12-13 division and Nonie McKenzie finished
third in the age 10-11 division.
In the boy's age 8-9 division, Heath English was
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Amanda Hopf won first place in the girl's age 8-9
division with a punt of 65 feet, three inches, a pass of
28 feet, five inches and a kick measuring 56 feet, 11


midway through the second half when he stole the ball,
beat two defenders and finished near post for a 3-1 lead.
With time running down, Gazzo one-timed an at-
tempted clearing pass 35 yards out into the back of the
net to cut the Blue lead to 3-2, which stood until the
final whistle blew.

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inches for a grand total of 150 feet, seven inches.
Hopf will now advance to the third round of com-
petition, which will be held prior to the Dec. 9 Tampa
Bay Buccaneers home game at Raymond James Sta-
dium in Tampa.
Gatorade and the National Football League spon-
sor the competition.

Season-opening dinner set
for Center's basketball
A dinner inaugurating the 2001-02 basketball and
cheerleading season of the Anna Maria Island Community
Center is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29.
The dinner at the Center, 407 Magnolia Ave. Anna
Maria City, is open to everyone at $6 for adults, $5 for
children under 16. Take-out meals are available.
Beach Bistro and Bistro at Island's End will cater
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PAGE 26 K NOV. 21, 2001' TIHFE ISLANDER '


Hurricane thoughts as season comes to end


Dr. William Gray appears to be right in his hurri-
cane prediction for 2001. Unfortunately.
Dr. Gray is the Colorado State University weather
forecaster who specializes in predicting Atlantic Ocean
hurricanes. Last spring he said he expected the next 20
years to be more active hurricane periods, based on
historical data.
The 1950s and '60s were busy times in the Gulf, At-
lantic and Caribbean for storms. Things slowed in the
1970s and '80s; it got busy again in the mid-1990s, and
should continue for another couple decades, Gray figures.
"It's shifting again," Gray said, "and we're enter-
ing a higher mode of hurricane activity, especially with
.i,,najor storms."
Unfortunately he seems to have figured right. The
2001 hurricane season tied the record in fifth place as
being the most active storm year on record. And the
records go back to the late 1800s.
Hurricane season ends Nov. 30.

A different kind of 'perfect storm'
All Islanders are, or should be, minor experts on
hurricanes. I just stumbled on a non-fiction account of
the worst hurricane to hit the United States in history,
and it's not Andrew.
In early September 1900, a minor gale crossed
Cuba and entered the Gulf. The fledgling weather ser-
vice members predicted the storm would veer east and
cross Florida near Tampa Bay.
Instead, the hurricane strengthened to unbelievable
levels and smashed into Galveston, killing more than
-"6,000 unaware people and wiping out almost half the city.
"Isaac's Storm," by Erik Larson, is the account of
the storm from the viewpoint of Isaac Cline with the
U.S. Weather Bureau. Through voluminous correspon-
dence and records, Larson was able to piece together
faux pas after faux pas committed during the preamble
of the storm track.
Some of the politics of the time were fascinating.
Weather service folks were discouraged from offering
forecasts, for instance. Based on some of the weather
service employees, that may have made some sense.
For example, Larson writes, "A fondness for extended
fishing trips caused the head of the Rocky Mountain dis-
trict to engage in some long-range forecasting. He would
create a week's worth of weather observations, then un-
load them at the telegraph office with instruction to the




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operator to send them one by one over the following week.
This worked fine, apparently a testament either to the
consistent character of Rocky Mountain weather or the
observer's real forecasting savvy until an inspector
dropped in without warning. Finding the office vacant, the
inspector went to the telegraph office and there discovered
a neat stack of timed and dated weather reports awaiting
transmission."
Oops.
Or how about this one, from 1888: New York City
weather for March 12 was predicted to be "colder, fresh
to brisk westerly winds, fair weather." What actually
happened was the Blizzard of '88, which dumped 21
inches of snow on the city. The storm killed 200 New
Yorkers, with a Northeast death toll of 400.
As Larson dryly writes of the weather service view
by the public: "This did not help. Not at all."
During the 1900 hurricane, Cuban weather service
officials warned that the storm was a potential killer.
Weather service officials were miffed at the Cubans,
though, and refused to believe their predictions. Of
course, the Cuban weather service had only been sci-
entifically studying hurricanes for 30 years.
One of the biggest problems Galveston faced is a
situation similar to the Island. The city has the Gulf on
one side, Galveston Bay on the other, although the
city's Gulf-bay orientation is north-south rather than
Anna Maria Island's east-west lineup. When the 1900
hurricane came on a straight track to the city, the wa-
ter in the bay was driven into the city by the strong
winds, inundating the northern part of the city.
The winds kept the storm surge out in the Gulf until
the storm got close and the winds clocked. Then the
winds drove the huge wall of water through the city
from the south and pretty much overwashed every-
thing. Cline survived by riding on the roof of a pass-
ing house as it swept past.

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The storm surge was estimated at 15 feet during the
Galveston storm.
You would think that the weather service would
have learned its lesson in 1900, but the head of the ser-
vice later wrote that "Galveston should take heart, as
the chances are that not once in a thousand years would
she be so terribly stricken.
Of course, another intense hurricane then hit
Galveston in 1915. Then there were the storms in 1919,
1932, 1941, 1943, 1949, 1957, 1961 and 1983.
Galveston officials built its famous seawall in the
aftermath of the 1900 storm. The 1915 storm tossed a
schooner and her crew over the wall.

Sandscript factoid
We all know that winds are a significant danger in
any hurricane. A minimal hurricane will have 75 mph
winds; I know from experience that I have a hard time
walking in 45 mph winds.
In the past few decades, hurricane experts have
been stressing the danger of storm surge. An intense
hurricane can produce a storm surge of up to 18 feet,
not counting any waves on top. That figure means a
two-story house on the Island would pretty much be
overwashed.
But it's just been in the past few years that officials
are pointing out that rainfall-produced flooding inland
is a huge, lethal problem.
No kidding. Here's how it's reported in "Isaac's
Storm."
"In 1979, a tropical storm named Claudette blew
off the Gulf of Mexico near Galveston and deluged the
town of Alvin, Texas, with 42 inches of rain in 24
hours, still the U.S. record for sheer intensity. A Phil-
ippine typhoon holds the world's record, dropping
73.62 inches in 24 hours. Total accumulations have
been higher, however.
"Ninety-six and a half inches of rain once fell on
Silver Hill, Jamaica, over four days. That's eight feet.
Hurricane Camille, which came ashore on the Gulf
Coast in August 1969, was still flush with water two
days later when it reached Virginia. With no advance
warning from the National Weather Bureau, it jetti-
soned 30 inches of rain in six hours.
"Camille's rain fell with such ferocity it was said
to have filled the overhead nostrils of birds and
drowned them from the trees."


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THI;EA(SApPL t Y(j). 21, 2001 Q! PAGE 27 !


Winter fishing starts: switch from shiners to shrimp


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Winter fishing is starting to hit the area. The king-
fish run offshore is starting to move through the near-
shore water, but biting fish are still a little scarce. Grou-
per fishing remains strong, and there are still good re-
ports of snapper coming from the Gulf.
In the backwater, redfish and snook are the best
bets, with large catch-and-release trout also a good bet.
And look for pompano in the passes.
Whitebait is getting harder and harder to find, so
it's best to switch to shrimp to tempt those big ones.
Capt. Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II out of
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez said fishing is start-
ing to change to winter patterns: snook action is slow-
ing down and sheepshead and redfish are starting to
take shrimp better than shiners.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said to
start looking for pompano in the passes and trout on the
seagrass flats. Snook fishing is fair to excellent right
now. Offshore, kingfish are out there but are slow to
bite, but grouper action is only getting better by the
day.
The Anna Maria City Pier reports fishing has
been pretty good there, with small gag grouper and a
couple of keeper grouper. Sheepshead are starting to
show up, plus a few flounder, some small snook, large
ladyfish and some pompano.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business said he took
Mike Mott and associates out on a charter last week and
ended up boating six keeper snook, releasing two that
were too big. One of the too-big ones stretched out to
38 inches.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
he's hearing reports of lots of trout being caught -
naturally, since the season is closed plus black drum
in the cut and plenty of reds being landed from the
Manatee River.
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach said fishing has been tough with all the
wind, but dock anglers are still catching up to 10 reds
per trip and lots. atch-and-release trout.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said







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Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's'Repair on Cortez
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Nov 23 4:24 1.7 8:06 1.6 12:28 0.4
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PAGE 28E NOV. 21, 2001 U THE ISLANDER

SBusiness-


Dr. Yatros completes
advanced dental course
Dr. Gy Yatros of Holmes Beach has completed the
"continuum level I" course at Pankey Institute for Den-
tal Education at Key Biscayne.
The Island dentist said the course is "a week-long,
highly interactive class designed for dentists desiring
to shape a more proactive relationship-oriented practice
and to learn advanced dental techniques."
Different kind of AIDS
is local doctor's topic
The kind of AIDS he was talking about, Dr. Tho-
mas A. Quinn of Holmes Beach told a national confer-
ence, was Attorney Induced Disability Syndrome.


As medical director of Independent Physicians
Services in Holmes Beach, he sees his share of it, he
told the annual conference of the American Osteo-
pathic College of Occupational and Preventive Medi-
cine in San Diego.
His firm is a network of physicians that provides
independent medical opinions on .disputed workers
compensation claims and is coordinator for work injury
cases.
Some indicators of workers comp abuses include
intensification of complaints with legal representation,
psychiatric complaints when original complaint was a
minor injury, attorney/medical provider combination
with multiple disabled patients.
Abuses result in "loss of workforce and increased
costs to maintain people on disability," he said.


Realty raves
Harold Small and Yvonne Higgins were leaders in
new listings and sales, respectively, in September at the
Anna Maria Island Office of Wagner Realty. Tops at
the Longboat Key office were Dorothy Cook, listings,
and Berndt Wolpers, sales.
Arvida Realty Services has Ron and Laure
Baldwin as leading in listings and Ryan Hendricks in
sales at the Longboat Key office during September.
Robert St. Jean was the leader both in new listings and
sales during October at the Holmes Beach Office of
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. Other leading listers were
Mike Migone and Tina Rudek, Longboat Key, and Karen
Ankerstar, Avenue of the Flowers office. Others who were
tops in sales were Lynda Melnick, Longboat Key, and
Ankerstar.


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PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander pays $50 to the person with the
most correct game-winning predictions. Col-
lect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
-from tying entries. The decision of The Is-
lander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
* All advertisers must be listed on the entry to
be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1
2 ______ ______


Winner
3


Advertiser


6
7
8
9
10
10 __________________________


Mail or deliver to The Islander 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Address


* Phone


0


* We Get All NFL and
College Football Games!
*10 Satellites 35 TVs!


(941)795-4551
4401 Cortez Road West
Washington at Miami


0


HIGH & DRY ISLAND
STORAGE SPECIAL




CLIMATE-CONTROLLED
UNITS
5305 Manatee Ave. W.*
Bradenton 941 795-5510
Miami at Buffalo


0



Chfocoates
fine Homemade Candies


Fresh Roasted Nuts Available
Shipping available to all 50 states
761-1500 800 761-1771
7200 Cortez Rd. West
Bradenton
Georgia at Georgia Tech



0



TAILGATE PACKS
To go in a reusable cooler,
chicken and your choice of
BBQ pork or spare ribs.
Includes coleslaw, BBQ
beans, rolls and chips.
Feeds 4 or more!
$21.99
Hot Stays Hot!
795-1856
6696 Cortez Rd. W.
Seattle at Kanscis City


0



CAR WASH
24-HOUR SELF
SERVE CAR WASH
COMPLETE AUTO
DETAILING
QUICK LUBE
2395 MOST CARS
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON-FRI 8-5PM* SAT 8-12PM
S Atlanta ait Carolina


0





PPFBT' Hi Kl 11 i 11BKilr1^B


Deicius ITdFashiond ffloidafo




S* i Francisco -.,,, ,,Fz . ,


0



f..',
& ,


U



The Largest and Best
Selection of Homemade
Ice Cream and Fudge!
o *990 Hot Dogs
Pressed Cubans
Espresso
S *Cappuccino
Games
778 0007'219 GULF DR. S.
BRADENTON BEACH
6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge
S Pittsburgh at Tennessee


0





Sunny Side Up Cafe
Breakfast Lunch
Daily Specials
SMOKE FREE
Open M-F. 7am 2pm
Sat. Sun. 7am-1pm
5360 Gulf Dr Holmes Beach
778-4140
Take Out Available
Baltimore at Jacksonville


0


Custom Tile Work Available



Great Selection of Carpet!
rr Free
Estimates!.
4224B 26th St. W. Bradenton
(off Cortez Rd) -941-748-2187
New Orleans at New EnglandI


* Name


1 .1





THE ISLANDER M NOV. 21, 2001 0 PAGE 29


L ^A N D E7R C L A S S I FmI E Dj

ITES FR ALEANNUCMET-oniud AAE AECotne


FUTON SOFA BED: ALL OAK, honey finish, no
metal, mission frame with recline. Nine-layer foam
mattress, still in box. Cost $525, sell $325. Can de-
liver. 761-2344.

WANTED: Team dual trike, please call 778-0372.

SIX-PERSON SPA for sale. Ten years old, like new.
Complete package, including top. John, 778-4401.

SALE: STERLING SILVER rings, bracelets, neck-
laces, charms 50% off. Select gifts for Christmas
50% off. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 24-25, 10am-
5pm. Niki's Island Treasures, 5351 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. Next to Time Saver.

U.S. MINT SEALED BAGS of 100 Anthony dollars.
1979 and 1980 Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco.
$125 per bag. 792-4274.

CREDIT CARD MACHINE. Like new Verifone Tranz-
330, $95. 749-6433.


ATTENTION ISLAND MUSICIANS! Guitarist wants to
meet other musicians interested in starting a weekly
jam. Rock, blues, folk, country, whatever. Also, inter-
ested in song writing and recording. David, 778-3006.

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE for psychotherapist.
Great location, reasonable rent. For more informa-
tion, call 953-8515.


-I


0-4
k/\


1A.ni


S


Resort-Style Uving at
TOWN & COUNTRY
PERICO
FEATURING:
Spacious 1 & 2 BR Apartments
Attractive Island Location
Pool & Spa
t*Fitness Center
Lake or Nature Views
Optional Garages
Free Boat Parking*
Roman Tubs
Small Pets Welcome

S *.i^ii',^tmv


IA P- AR- T NT SI*M
TOWN & COUNTRY PERICO

941-795-4899
HOURS: Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5
Direcins From U.S. 41, travel west on Manatee
Avenue (SR 64) and acros Plmar Soo Causewa/
to Peico Isand. Town & Couity Pedco
wi be on the left.
www.tchome.com
ULnmited time offec certain restrictions apply.
Size restrictions apply.


ISLAND PLAYER'S PECAN SALE: Mammoth
halves! New crop. $6.95 lb., chocolate covered $7.95
lb. Available at SunCoast Real Estate and The Is-
lander Newspaper located in the Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach. Proceeds benefit the Island
Players. For information call: 779-0202.



ROSER THRIFT SHOP open Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 9:30am-2pm. Saturday, 9am-noon. Wednesday,
9am-11 am, donations only. Always sales racks. 511
Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 779-2733.

HOME FURNISHINGS SALE: Saturday, Nov. 24,
8am-2pm. Furniture, lamps, pictures, dishes and
more. 214 Chilson Ave., Anna Maria.

YARD SALE: Friday and Saturday, Nov. 23-24. 9am-
2pm. Dresser, daybed, clothes, miscellaneous. No
early birds. 3005 Avenue E, Holmes Beach, between
30th and 31st streets.

HUGE SIDEWALK SALE: Saturday and Sunday, Nov.
24-25, 9am-5pm. Tons of jewelry, gifts, baskets, books,
Christmas decorations. Large table of new jewelry, gifts,
and great $1 Christmas Gifts. 5351 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, in front of Niki's Island Treasures.

GARAGE SALE: Saturday, Nov. 24, 8am-2pm.
Kitchen items, small appliances, household goods.
2908 Avenue B, Holmes Beach.


SUNNY SHORES CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Saturday,
Dec. 1, 8am-2pm. Lunch served 11 am-1 pm, $5 do-
nation. Gifts, treasures, jewelry, crafts, boutique,
bake sale, raffles, trash and treasure. Sunny Shores
Mobile Home Park, Off Cortez Road. at 115th Street
West and 38th Avenue. Busy Bees Women's Club.

HUGE YARD SALE: Friday and Saturday, Nov. 23-
24. 8am-4pm. Women's, men's, children's clothing.
New 18-foot boat and boat parts. Numerous miscel-
laneous. 715 Holly Rd., Anna Maria.


CRITTER SITTER Six years in pet care, 21 years as
an Island resident. Tender, loving care for your pets
with in-home visits. 778-6000.

HOUSE OR PET SITTING. You can trust us while
you are on vacation! References available. Call for
appointment, 795-7719.

COCKATIEL: Lost Nov. 15 on Pine Street, Anna
Maria. Sweet, tame, missed. 778-1687.

DOGSITTING in my northwest Bradenton home.
Fenced yard, quiet, dead-end street. TLC. $15/day.
761-8536.

DACHSHUND adoption and rescue (D.A.R.E.). Call
Shona at 761-2642 for information.
www.daretorescue.com.




;,(LANPt A
VACATION -
PROPERTIE6, LLC
SALES AND RENTALS
Ann (Harmon) Caron
TO BUY ... TO RENT ... TO SELL ...
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
941.778.6849 1.800.778.9599
www.islandvacationproperties.com


WATERFRONT HOMES
2306 Canasta Drive .............................$1,095,000
201 North Harbor Drive. .........................$899,000
615 Ivanhoe Lane ........................... NEW $729,000
407 N. 20th Place......................... NEW $639,000
619 Ivanhoe Lane ..................... NEW $629,000
722 Key Royale Drive ............................. $569,000
ISLAND HOMES CONDOS & LOTS
Bradenton Beach Club ..................from $500,000
210 67th St....................... REDUCED! $399,000
Beachwalk Townhomes New Project .... from $434,900
411 Spring Ave .................................NEW $380,000
2903 Gulf Drive................................... NEW $369,000
4002 6th Ave. .....................................$389,000
5619 Gulf Drive.............................. NEW $349,000
501 70th Street............................ NEW $329,000
West Bay Point & Moorings ........... NEW $319,000
710 North Shore lot................................$299,000
212 75th St................................... NEW $285,000
107B 73rd Street ................ NEW $239,000
DUPLEXES
100 7th St. South ......................... NEW $625,000
104 7th St. South ......................... NEW S349.000
204 65th St................................... NEW $299,000
FOUR-PLEXES .
V 106 7th St .......................................... $849.000
. MAINLAND
12418 90th St. NW ................................S3.495,000'
% 4 l-


SASOAL ANDANNALRENAL
(941) 778-6066 TkOLLFEEu:4up:{e6eJflrne:ie
.6101 MainaDrve Hlms eahFL 32


arina Pointe

Realty Co.


314 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
(941) 779-0732 Toll Free: (866) 779-0732

Island Properties For Sale
2BR/2BA, 1BR/1BA, ground-level duplex
................................................. .. $ 2 5 7 ,5 0 0 .
Island West (LBK) Gulffront condo. ....... $550,000.
2BR/2BA bayfront home with 3BR/2BA guest
house. ....................................................... $949,500.

Island Seasonal Rentals
Available for upcoming season.
* 2BR/1 BA Ground-level duplex ............... $1,800 mo
* 2BR/1 BA Single-family home............. $2,100 mo
* 2BR/2BA Canal home with dock.......... $2,600 mo
* 2BR/2BA Elevated duplex
with spa : $2,600 mo
2BR/2.5BA Pool nome orn
Bimini Bay...........$3,500 mo
2BR/2BA Townhouse with pool,
,close to beach ........... ................... $870 week

Annual Rentals
* 2BR/2BA Holmes Beach Duplex........... $850 mo.
* 3BR/2.5BA Bimini Bay home with pool. $2,000 mo.
* 3BR/2BA Palma Sola home with pool .. $1,200 mo.

SALS RNAL MANA


.L-




PAGE 30 E NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


R N P R A IO yH L A N E o t n edIH A T AR o t n e


STORAGE: Boat, trailer, motor home or car. In and out
anytime. Also, wood-structure 24-by-16-foot workshop
available. 4518 119 St. W., Cortez. 761-7471.



BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation or
long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Minutes
to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Captain John's
Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting, rentals.

PRIVATE CHARTERS. Fishing, snorkeling,
sightseeing, Egmont Key. U.S.C.G. License. Captain
Keith Barnett. 778-3526 or 730-0516.

232-SPORT CRAFT with 305-Chevrolet block. Volvo
out-drive, dual prop. Well maintained. Good offshore
fishing boat. $6,600 or best offer. 778-3960.

PRIVATE DEEP-WATER 40-foot dock in protected
bayou. Safe car parking. Water and electricity.
Northend of Longboat Key. 383-5372.


ISLAND SITTERS. We sit animals for $3/hour and
kids for $5/hour. Please call Sarah 778-7622, or
Merrily 778-0361.


RECEPTIONIST: Full time, light typing, excellent
phone skills, friendly, outgoing and able to handle
front desk duties. Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm.
SunCoast Real Estate, 779-0202.




ulf-Bay Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.

778-7244
1 (800)771-6043
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Key West Perfection
S' Overlooking beautiful Lake Lavista
this Anna Maria treasure offers
mnLa I i much to the discerning buyer: A 50-
.. g I foot wrap-around deck, lofty ceilings,
fireplace and a delightful open floor
plan, all in a uniquely private tropical
setting. Priced to sell at $559,000.

You won't feel cramped in this 1400
t sq.ft, 2BR/2BA condo with a large
eat-in kitchen, screened lanai, heated
pool, roof-top sun-deck all in a
Si friendly 4-unit complex just steps to
J the beach. $ 372,000
email: gulfbay@gate.net www.gulfbayrealty.com


HELP WANTED for all positions. Rotten hours, rotten pay.
Call Rotten Ralph's at 778-3953, or apply in person.

LICENSED REAL ESTATE agents. Boutique
Longboat Key sales office. Work from home or office.
Generous commission split. Call Ted for a confiden-
tial interview, 383-3840.

LITERACY MANAGER: Part-time for nonprofit lit-
eracy center in Bradenton. 798-9355 or 792-7765.

FULL-TIME PREP and line cook wanted with people/
customer skills for open kitchen. Maitre d'/server with
fine dining experience. Call Chef Damon at Ooh La
La!, 778-5320.

CERTIFIED PEST CONTROL operator for local land-
scape maintenance company. Fax resume to 383-
9620.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial.Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-
6247.


REGISTERED NURSE looking for private duty. Ex-
perience with the elderly and children. 778-5167.



YOUR SOURCE FOR TH
ARVID


$420,000-WOW! WHAT A VIEW!
Direct Gulffront, 2BR/2BA condo in
a well maintained complex. Slate floor
entry. Heated pool, carport, utility
area in unit. Close to everything.
IB77433.


$225,000 LaLENAIRE ISLES.
Accessible by boat only, this bayfront,
acre+ lot on Jewfish Key in Sarasota
Bay will provide serene living. Great
bay view from one of 13 parcels on a 26-acre island.
Water, septic and electric at site. Community dock, sandy
beaches. IB77890.

1810 59th Street West, Bradenton
(941) 778-0766 (800) 778-8448
Visit our website at www.ArvidaRealty.com


YOUR HOMETOWN REALTOR SINCE 1939


WAGNEL REALTY
- E-MAIL AMI@WAGNERREALTY.COM WEBSITE: WAGNERREALTY.COM


~m


PERICO BAY direct bayfront condo with
spectacular sunset views overlooking Anna
Maria Sound. Furnished 2BR/2BA unit in
excellent gated community just minutes from
Gulf beaches. $259,500. Dave Moynihan
778-2246 or 778-7976 eves.


I


4,,
*11 a,


ISLAND'S BEST BUY! 2BR/1 BA condo
with garage (and automatic door
opener), plus extra parking spaces.
White tile floors, except in bedrooms.
Only $144,900, so don't wait too long!
Call Harold Small 778-2246.



LE' N [V, 7LnIV


THE BIRD'S NEST! A rare offering of
four spacious turnkey furnished
townhomes with unobstructed Gulf
views. Open floor plans, several balco-
nies make this one-of-a-kind. Call Dave
Moynihan 778-2246 or 778-7976 eves.

BAYFRONT LOT in gated commu-
nity with deep-water dockage for 40-
foot boats on Palma Sola Bay. Build
your home with water views over pro-
tected mangroves. $265,000. Call
Dave Moynihan 778-2246 or 778-
7976 eves.


CARETAKER WANTED. Experience with the eld-
erly required. January through April, eight or more
hours/day. Write to LaVonne Moody, 4234 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, Longboat Key FL 34228.

C.N.A. COMPANION will provide TLC in your home
sweet home. References. 778-2613.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gar-
dens, trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-
working and responsible. Excellent references. Ed-
ward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIEDS- The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

COMPUTER TRAINING: Microsoft-certified sys-
tems engineer available to assist with in-home
computer training. Basic to advanced training for
software, Internet, e-mail, digital photography.
Installing software programs, hardware. Senior
discounts! Gift certificates available. Call 778-
9436, or cell 704-7662.

SOS SERVICES. Full-service cleaning/organiza-
tion for your entire home. Professional, experi-
enced, and references. Free estimates. Call
Sharon, 920-1992.


Hannerle


SMoore.
REALTORO
ONE OF THE KEY'S

NATURAL RESOURCES


KEY WEST-STYLE HOME IN ANNA MARIA
Anna Maria is the spectacular backdrop for this charm.
new Key West-style 4 bedroom home that is nesded ( -
canal just 1 1/2 blocks from a white sandy beach. Picture this
- warm summer breezes, lush Florida fauna, a beautiful
yellow exterior with bright white trim, soft island colored
interior paint, Bimini shutters, warm hardwood floors, soar-
ing ceilings, screened Florida room, a sumptuous master
suite, maple cabinetry and a boat dock with lift. Go to
www.hannerle.com for a virtual tour. $875,000.
Call Hannerle Moore at:
Bus. (941) 383-6411 Res. (941) 778-1096
Mobile (941) 302-8537 800-910-8728
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Inc.
201 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Suite 1, Longboat Key, FL 34228


WATERFRONT HOME AND LOT
on Intracoastal. One acre plus and
196 feet waterfront. Extended
deep-water dock. 4BR home plus
buildable lot valued at $300,000.
Fabulous sunset views! $865,000.
Anne Miller 778-2246.


2217 GULF DRIVE NORTH BRADENTON BEACH, FL 34217
941 778-2246 800 211-2323 ..


IJL
iv .1






THE ISLANDER M NOV. 21, 2001 M PAGE 31



SEVIESCntnudSEVIE CntnedLANAND GARDN- onine


COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your com-
puter misbehaving? Certified computer service and
private lessons. Special $15 per hour- free advice.
545-7508

CLEAN WINDOWS! Wouldn't that be nice? Local li-
cense, insured. Chris' Window Cleaning, 725-0399.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs, hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.

HURRICANE PROTECTION for your home. Choose
shutters or Glass Sentinel, a super-strength protec-
tive shield. Call ESP Island Shutters. Licensed, in-
sured, free estimates. Call 778-2840

TODD LASOTA TILE and handyman service. Tile
work, painting, some electrical, appliance repair,
automotive, maintenance, odd jobs, miscellaneous
repairs. Call 383-5623.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reason-
able and reliable. Free estimates, licensed and in-
sured'.778-0944.

QUALITY, DEPENDABLE, GUARANTEED! Lawn
maintenance, including tree work, clean-ups, land-
scaping. Commercial/residential. Free estimates.
Call Midwest Mowing at 779-0939.

PROPERTY CARETAKER. I will look after your resi-
dential, rental or commercial property in terms of
security, regular upkeep, light maintenance, tidiness,
etc. Dependable. References. Call 778-7462.

MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance service.
Over 30 years experience,- self-employed in con-
struction trades. "I'm handy to have around." 779-
9666. -

JACKSON HOLMES PAINTING Interior, exterior,
waterproofing. Residential/commercial. Life-time lo-
cal resident. Fully insured. 224-1560, cell.

FURNITURE UPHOLSTERY, cushions, etc. Repair
and restoring antique specialist. Island Upholstery.
121 Bridge St. Free estimates. 778-4335.


KEY WEST WOODSHOP: Custom Bahama shut-
ters and Caribbean- style railings, marine work. 778-
9143 or 224-0997.

CHAMBERLAIN PROFESSIONAL CLEANING.
Residential and condos. Free estimates. Experi-
enced, affordable, dependable and honest. Local
references. 545-5510.

ROYAL MAID SERVICE. Licensed, bonded, in-
sured. Professional, experienced maids. Free esti-
mates, gift certificates available. Call now; 727-9337
or 72-SWEEP.

TWO CHEFS PERSONAL CHEF SERVICES. Ca-
tering to your every need. Holidays, special occa-
sions, private dinners, packages. Gift certificates
available. 778-4532. www.two-chefs-catering.com.

JUDY'S HOLIDAY CLEANING. Fast, efficient, reli-
able. 779-0140.

NOTARY PUBLIC, civil marriages and renewal of
wedding vows. Sunset beach setting or where ever.
Norman R. Veenstra. 778-5834.

HOUSE CLEANING service available. I do windows!
Call Sally, 779-2427.

STRANZ HAIR SALON. Manicure $12, pedicure
$25; by Della. 792-2874. 5139 Manatee Ave. W.,
Bradenton.

HOMES CLEANED. Furniture refinished by a de-
pendable, honest hard-working woman. Excellent
references. 746-3535.

PHOTOGRAPHY. Holiday specials! Professional
wedding day photos, and glamour or family portraits
at reasonable rates. Gift certificates available. 704-
7283, or 778-9436. www.hometown.aol.com/
jlrobertsonphoto/photo.html


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Maintenance.
Residential and commercial. Full-service lawn main-
tenance, clean-ups, tree trimming, hauling,
Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent references.
778-5294.


The Islander
To subscribe.
Call 778-7978.


ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it
is broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior dis-
count. Call 778-2581 or 713-0676.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.



PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees.
Irrigation and pest control service. Everything Under
the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $27/yard. Hauling:
all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free estimates.
Call Larry at 795-7775.

GILLIS & GILLIS ENT. Crushed, washed shell, top-
soil, landscaping services. We install shell driveways.
Serving Sarasota and Keys since 1978. Fully li-
censed and insured. 753-2954 or 376-2954, cell.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING. Installations,
clean-ups, pruning, irrigation, trees, edging, rip-rap,
mulch, rock, patios, shell, seawall fill. Reliable and
insured. 727-5066.



VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill, 795-5100 or cell 809-3100. "

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling con-
tractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed and insured.
Many Island references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free estimates.
35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at 778-1730.

CHRISTIES PLUMBING Island and off-Island service
since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free estimates,
no overtime charges. Now certifying back flow at water
meters. (FL#RF0038118) 778-3924 or 778-4461.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more by
Hunter Douglas and other major manufacturers. Life-
time warranty. Call Island resident Keith Barnett for
a free in-home consultation. Many Island references,
15 years experience. 941-778-3526 or 730-0516.


521Gl Driv, HlesBacrg42780-3725


SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue Anna Maria, Florida P 0 Box 2150 (941) 778-2291
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

May you enjoy

a bountiful
Thanksgiving!








EXPANSIVE WATERFRONT RETREAT
This ultra spacious three or 4BR/2BA waterfront home offers a cheerful
southerly exposure on a protected, natural canal with deep-water
boat dock facility plus davits. Features include new range, newer
refrigerator, wood-burning fireplace, white pine cabinets, many built-in
bookcases and drawers, nine ceiling fans, new heat pump for central
air/heat, lush tropical landscaping, automatic sprinkler system for front
yard, acrylic hot tub with new pump, new storage shed and outdoor shower,
plus more! Wonderful family home with lots of potential and views of
Intracoastal Waterway from backyard! Priced at $389,000.
Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


3BR/2BA ISLAND HOME turnkey furnished
with a dock. Front and rear decks. Catch every
breeze. $285,000. Call Ed Oliveira at 778-4800
or 705-4800.


WESTBAY PQINT & MOORINGS Updated
2BR/2BA turnkey furnished condo in very pri-
vate tropical setting. Fully enclosed and air con-
ditioned lanai with view of heated pool and peek
of the bay. Priced to sell at $260,000. Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones at 778-4800.







KEY ROYALE Beautifully maintained 3BR/2BA
canal home with boat dock, new ceramic tile and
carpet steps to golf course. $469,900. Call Lynn
Hostetler at 778-4800.


S... -" j j siii'-
.


COMPLETELY REMODELED canal home in
prestigious Key Royale. 3BR/2BA luxury pool
with full cool deck. New appliances and A/C.
Large eat-in kitchen. Priced at $499,000. Call
Quentin Talbert at 778-4800 or 704-9680.







ELEVATED ISLAND DUPLEX 2BR/2BA each
side. Excellent location, walk to beach or bay.
$289,000. Call Ed Oliveira, 778-4800 or 705-4800.







|- - | -a

UNOBSTRUCTED GULF VIEW from this his-
toric beach cottage. 2BR/1 BA turnkey furnished
with deeded boat dock. $279,900. Call Jane
Grossman at 778-4800 or 778-4451.


ALL PRO PRESSURE CLEANING Inc. Homes and
commercial buildings. Pool decks and cages, drive-
ways and walks. Tile roofs and shingles (no pres-
sure). Free estimates. 756-0102.





PAGE 32 K NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER
Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
r'l \ We Monitor Irrigation Systems
S service INSURED* GUARANTEED LOWEST
\778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
_^ -Established in 1983
@@] ha@T'D@G STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@Ni f@UT''0@ CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@NR @(Trl@ND JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@ND9@RU@TI@Dfl Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@ 'TU@T'ii]@N] (941) 778-2993



Residential Commercial
Check our references:
"Quality work at a reasonable price."
12 Ucensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761 -8900

Paradise Improvements 778.4173

Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755



Water Damaged Drywall Tiling Painting
HAND AND SPRAY TEXTURE
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
Fred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141 W

MARIANNE CORRELL, REALTOR
ISLAND, CONDO AND DUPLEX SPECIALIST
"Personal Service is Myl First Name!"
7 (941) 778-6066



0na Maria Storage *
Only a few spots left!
413 Pine Avenue 778-5354
















MILESTONE

m HOMES, INC

A General Contracting Company

Remodels Decks Driveways
Additions Replacement Windows

941-779-0551 Based in Holmes Beach


I Don't worry, Ma'am, le won't bu9 uou anmrCore! I


TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile sup-
plied and installed. Quality workmanship, prompt,
reliable, many Island references. Call Neil, 726-
3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates,
call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodeling,
repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths. Free
estimates. Lic#CGC061519, #CCC057977,
#PE0020374. Insured. Call 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

B&D SEAMLESS aluminum gutters, 5 or 6 inch
available. Insured, free estimates. Dean Guth,
owner and operator, 729-0619.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Contractor. Remodeling,
additions, new homes, design service. Free esti-
mates. Call 795-1947. Lic #RR-0066450.

MIKE McCALEB, ARCHITECT, P.A. 10-year Island
resident, 25 years experience. Remodels, new
homes, commercial. FEMA, DEP, waterfront. #AR-
0014004. 778-5560.

MASON with 25-years experience. Glass, block,
cinderblock, brick, tile. Walls built and repaired.
Cement repairs. Chris, 795-3034

HANDY ANTHONY. Jack of most trades. Home re-
furbishing and detailing, 778-6000.



ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

STEPS TO THE BEACH. 2BR/1BA with washer/
dryer, screened lanai. $750/month, utilities not in-
cluded. 778-1345.

BEACHFRONT North Shore 2BR/2BA, newly re-
modeled, furnished stilt-home on beach. Incredible
panoramic view, great fishing. Available December-
April. Minimum three-month rental. $3,600/month.
778-3645.

ANNA MARIA PROPERTIES desperately needed!
Immediate waiting list for rental units, especially
3BR/2BA. Call Tracy at Wedebrock Real Estate
778-6665.

AUTUMN SPECIAL 1 BR/2BA, furnished, clean, steps
from beach, Anna Maria Island. Pets welcome. $298/
week; $998/month, plus tax. Call 778-1098.

HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT home. 2BR/2BA
furnished home, garage, laundry, dock, many ex-
tras. Available monthly/weekly. Open now through
Dec. 31. Call for cost and details, (813) 286-9814.

BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks. Turnkey,
beautiful views, breezy, quiet area. No pets/smok-
ing. Priced from $700/month, $350/week. 941-794-
5980. www.divefish.com.

BEACH COTTAGE: 2BR/2BA. Close to Rod and Reel
Pier. Available October through December. 778-7253.

CANALFRONT HOME, beautifully furnished. 3BR/
2BA. Available now though January 2002, and again
April-December 2002. $1,750/month, plus utilities
and tax. Located at 524 75th St., Holmes Beach.
Days call 920-1558, or after 5pm 485-1373.


UNFURNISHED 1 BR/1 BA units on west side of Gulf
Drive. Near beach and both attractive. Choice of
Anna Maria or Holmes Beach location. $700/month
and $725/month, includes water. No pets, first, last,
security. Anna Maria Realty, 778-2259.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Large screened lanai, carport,
washer/dryer hookup. 404 79th St., Holmes Beach.
Utilities plus, $850/month or $900/month with lawn
service. First, last, security. 794-9990, or (703) 691-
2526.

VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across from
beautiful beach, $350/week. Fall and spring dates
available. Almost Beach Apartments, 778-2374.

PANORAMIC BAY-VIEW, ground-floor triplex, fully
furnished, new ceramic tile. 1BR and 2BR. Very
nice, quiet with beautiful view. Steps to Gulf. Sea-
sonal or possible annual. Non-smoking, no pets.
778-7107.

WATERFRONT BEACH HOME available all winter.
Turnkey furnished, upscale Key West style. Sweep-
ing panoramic views. Pets on approval. $2,300/
month. 794-5980. Website: www.divefish.com.

SEASONAL, NEW 2BR/2BA. Steps to beach. $800/
week or $2,600/month. Bark and Co. Realty, 778-
5900.

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY! Holmes Beach 2BR/
1 BA canalfront, elevated home. Upscale furnishings,
newly decorated. Private dock and just steps to
beach. Prefer seasonal renters. $2,500/month. 216
S. Harbor Drive. Call (813) 971-7999 day or 813-
920-3845 evenings.

ANNUAL RENTAL: 2400 Avenue C. Unfurnished
2BR/1 BA, newly painted, washer/dryer in unit, cable,
water, heated pool. 100 yards to Gulf. $825/month,
first, last, $500 deposit. Mike Norman Realty, 778-
6696.

HOLMES BEACH RENTAL: Great 3BR/2BA open
floor plan, ranch-style home. Kitchen, laundry, ga-
rage, lanai. Available Dec. 1 with security and refer-
ences. $1,350/month. Vinnie, 545-6118.

SEASONAL FURNISHED new home in Anna Maria.
2BR/2BA elevated. One block to beach. Available
now through April. (813) 251-9201.

ANNA MARIA KEY ROYALE Canalfront. 2BR/2BA
upgraded home. Family room, sunset terrace, dock,
garage, laundry. Bright and open. $3,200/monthly.
(813) 991-5462.

STEPS TO BEACH. 3BR/2BA home, two-car ga-
rage, fully furnished, washer/dryer, quiet neighbor-
hood, small pet considered, non-smoking. Pictures
available. (813) 684-2644.

HOLMES BEACH 1BR/1BA seasonal/annual du-
plex. Close to beach and shopping. From $600/
month. 779-2114.

HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL 3BR/3BA
townhouse. Beautiful decor, great location overlook-
ing nature preserve. Heated pool, washer/dryer,
garage and much more! 713-0096.

VACATION RENTAL available January-April. 2BR/
2BA with den. Just steps to beach. Like new. $2,500/
month. 778-0817 or 739-7735.


OT T A WAS S U:BOA 0 P T I MIA L
PH AR AI OH S E I N EiB E AIN ER Y
REPT I L E H A L T ER E D S T A T E


L EGS M 0 G U L C L A N G S A NiE
AScNADUSTOF AN L L E R
E V A H A R B OM 1D A Y S T Y
EDRRLNN EACMU BP ETAPNS
TI D A T E A RST H E H A RETAIL
CA L M A R DUA, 0 ME NS ASTO


HOM IPROEMNT oninud*ENALSCotiue


"Tropical Bugs Need A Tropical Service"
CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
778-1337 778-1913
Full Service Exterior and Interior
State Certified/Licensed and Insured
Erny Keller, Island Resident,
Owner-Operator


Island Pest Control Inc.
SERVING THE ISLANDS 20 YEARS








IS ANDE CLSSIIED


BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED 1BR/1BA Holmes
Beach. Across from beach. Utilities, cable television
included. Available now through April 30. 778-8211.

HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 2BR/2BA, new appli-
ances, including washer/dryer. Clean and updated.
Ground level. $850/month. Marina Pointe Realty
Co., 779-0732.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB direct Gulffront 2BR/
2BA. Cancellation makes this exceptional unit availl-
able Jan. 1- Feb. 17. Hurry, this won't last! Frank,
(716) 454-7434.

WATERFRONT 1 BR annual apartment. Cable tele-
vision, water included. $750/month, plus $750 secu-
rity deposit. Call C.J., 741-8688.

CORTEZ VILLAGE SEASONAL furnished 2BR/1 BA
home. No pets. $1,600/month, utilities included.
794-2170 or e-mail: barbbart.caron@aol.com.

GULFVIEW UNFURNISHED ANNUAL, large 1BA/
1BA with Jacuzzi tub, washer/dryer, dishwasher,
spacious sundeck. $850/month, 778-1345.

HAVE A BOAT? Play tennis? We have the place for
you! Newly redecorated 2BR/2BA townhouse on
deep-water canal with dock on Flamingo Cay. View
spectacular sunsets from one of two screened
lanais. Fully furnished and supplied. Sleeps six.
$2,300/month seasonal Mike Norman Realty, 778-
6696.

ANNUAL NEAR BEACH 2BR/2BA with laundry
room and garage, $1,100/month. Also, 2BR/1BA
with laundry room, $975/month, and ground level
with nice large yard; both have new tile and paint
throughout. Large and nice. Pet considered. 308
57th St., Holmes Beach. 713-3098 or 779-1801.

ANNUAL ONLY 1BR/19BA directly on Gulf in
Bradenton Beh.1 $1,000/month, assurity/security
roran ed with contract. 792-2779.

FALL ACCOMMODATIONS SPECIAL: Efficiency
(cooking) units. One person, $200/week; Two
people, $250/week. $25 deposit. Larger units avail-
able. Special ends Dec. 15. Haley's Motel, 8102
Gulf Drive, 778-5405.

BEACH HOUSE: Annual 2BR apartment across
from beach. Available now, $850/month. 104 Sev-
enth St. S., Bradenton Beach. Call Russell, 378-
4530 evenings, or 954-1718 days.

BEST VALUE! Sandpiper Mobile Resort, turnkey
furnished, senior park. Steps to beach. All utilities,
including cable television and telephone. Seasonal.
779-0555, or (330) 686-8765

SEASONAL RENTAL in Holmes Beach. Large 1 BR
apartment with heated pool. Steps to beach. Avail-
able December-February. 778-4499.


ROOM AND BATH in Holmes Beach, seasonal.
Light use of kitchen, laundry. Utilities included. One
block to Gulf. Minimum one month rent in advance.
778-4192.

BRADENTON BEACH waterfront. 1BR and 2BR
apartments with balcony. Newly renovated, fully-
furnished. Very clean, private. Week, month, sea-
son, or long-term. 778-4555.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB. Available March
through April. 2BR/2BA with elevator. Two week
minimum, $1,100/week. (813) 781-7562.

SEASONAL HOLMES BEACH 2BR/1BA. Quiet
area, block to beach, nice back yard. Laundry, cable
television, DVD player, grill, hammock and more.
$2,300/month or $700/week. 779-9549.

SEASONAL DUPLEX 2BR/2BA. Furnished,
washer/dryer, central heat and air conditioning. Utili-
ties included. Three to four month minimum rental.
$1,500/month. 218 Palmetto #B, Anna Maria. (813)
949-6891.

ANNUAL/SEASONAL RENTAL. Holmes Beach
2BR/1 BA unit, short walk to beach. First, last, secu-
rity. 778-1193.

ANNUAL 4-5BR/3BA canalfront home with pool and
dock. Lots of room, $2,500/month. Gulf-Bay Realty,
778-7244.

BRADENTON BEACH 1 BR/1 BA vacation cottage
with yard. Very private, clean, cozy. Pets OK. Now
available. $350/week or $950/month. 779-9504.

VERY NICE ANNUAL. 2BR/2BA elevated home.
Sundeck, new carpet, paint, tile. Steps to beach.
Gulf-Bay Realty, 778-7244.

DIRECT GULFFRONT CONDO. 3BR/2BA available
for holiday rental. Heated pool, tennis, Jacuzzi. 794-
8877.
SEASONAL LONGBOAT KEY Village 2BR/2BA
ground-level home. Nicely furnished, very afford-
able. 383-6272.

ANNA MARIA DUPLEX available March through
April. Furnished 2BR/1 BA, garage, lanai, patio,
washer/dryer. Utilities, cable television included.
$1,800/month. 778-8456.

SEASONAL COTTAGE 200 feet to beach. Available
December through April. Spacious 1BR/1.5BA,
sleeps four. Pet, maybe. $1,600/month, Three
month discount. 778-8571.

CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA luxury condo. Very
spacious. Direct access to Gulf and bay. Fire-
place, heated pool, cathedral ceilings. Power and
light to private boat slip. $1,200/month. 725-2826
or 798-3518.


------------------------------------------U

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance- or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.


THE ISLANDER E NOV. 21, 2001 E PAGE 33

YVONNE HIGGINS 4
\X'AGNER REALTY --
Call me [co ind th.
Best P'ropertiei of the Island
- 8-2 ,:,r S( 1- 211- 2323

",/I7 TX/VG7 ( 6yE/7felbe ffb,6i.u/i
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778 -559 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured .7-5594 778-3468





T Trust the professionals*
Island Discount Tackle 941 778-768



in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome








NU-Weatherside of Florida
CLAC286523 SINCE 1948

WINDOW REPLACEMENT
778-7074 Financing Available

1:Islan Ctsto0m Tops
-_l-: Complete Corian Counter Top Service
Commercial Residential
'." Dupont Certified
: Dave Spicer 778-2010

ADINA HUSAK
Wagner Realty
Ich spreche Deutsch .
Call me to find your dream home.
(941) 778-2246 (800) 211-2323


ISLAND LUMBER
AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


IF1II ~ : c-seI~i lI1 6


NOW CERTIFYING BACK
FLOWS AT WATER METERS
Z RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL |
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION.
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
BACK FLOW DIVISION

Fb~m N i' ?, m


We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.


2
3
Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: L_ J 1 No.
Exp. Dare Name shown on card:
Billing address zip code: House no. or post office box no. on bill

I 5404 Marina Drive axde r : 941 778-9392
Phone: 941 778-7978
Holmes Beach FL 3421 7JI l-7 .1 L- E-mail. | news@islcnder.org
---1 ------- ------------------- ------ --- -------- .-----I


I


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
-* Residential Commercial
%-- Restaurant \ Mobile Home
-\.4 Condo Assoc. Vac and Intercom
-\-4W Lighaling Repair Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978


m


E





PAGE 34 E NOV. 21, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER



R d E AFR L S T C t uIH T A V T-


KEY ROYALE VILLA on an estate-size lot. Pool,
gazebo. Comfortable 4BR/4BA home. Sale or lease
purchase, $449,000. Towne and Shore Realty, 383-
3840 or 302-3840.

HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX for sale by owner, 2BR/
2BA and 1 BR/1 BA. Principals only. $275,000. 779-
0470.

LONGBOAT KEY Gulffront condo. 2BR/2BA split
design. Turnkey furnished, sandy beach, pool, on-
site management. Only $419,000. Towne and Shore
Realty, 383-3840 or 302-3840.

,THREE PROPERTIES by owner: 2BR/2BA Gulffront
condo, prerenovation $340,000. 2BR/2BA bayfront
condo, prerenovation $230,000. Holmes Beach lot,
west of Gulf Drive, $139,000. 778-4523 or (800) 977-
0803.

WATERFRONT YOU can afford! Canalfront home to
Tampa Bay. 1,123 square feet. Great investment or
fisherman's home. 30 minutes to Bradenton.
$135,400. (813) 625-4137.


DEEP SALTWATER CANALFRONT home with
dock, clean/crisp. $329,900 and choice deep saltwa-
ter lot with full seawall, $229,000. Both very close to
Lemon Bay, no bridges, located just south
Englewood/Manasota Key. It's what "Anna Maria Is-
land used to be 20 years ago". Owner (570) 943-
2516.

SUNBOW BAY CONDO. Waterview, extensively
updated 2BR/2BA. $248,500. Shown by appoint-
ment, 779-9288.

www.Florida-Lifestyles.com

OPEN HOUSE: San Remo Shores. Deep-water ca-
nal home with dock and vertical boat lift. 4BR/2BA,
two-car garage. Pool with new screened cage. Com-
pletely tiled, new roof, air conditioning, appliances.
Very private, across from mangrove trees. For sale
by owner, $289,000. Must see! Sunday, Nov. 25, 1-
5pm. 4008 Bamboo Terrace. 101st St. and Cortez
Road, 761-0510.




The Islander
Don't leave the Island without
taking time to subscribe.
'INGSOONCall 778-7978.


DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wednesday publi-
cation. UP to 3 line minimum includes approximately
21 words $9. Additional lines $3 each. Box: $3. Ads
must be paid in advance. Stop by or mail to 5404
Marina Drive., Holmes Beach FL 34217. We're lo-
cated next to Ooh La La! in the Island Shopping Cen-
ter. More information: 778-7978.


EQUAL
HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY
SAll real estate advertising herein is
subject to the Fair Housing Act,
which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limita-
tion or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to
make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will
not knowing accept any advertising for real estate which is
in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the-heeaing im-
paired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


MJ ichael Su e & Companyf^.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Licensed Rea^ l EtaeB roker^^^^^^^H^^^H^


I OPENING DOORS TO


ENCHANTED ANNA MARIA ISLAND RE-
TREAT on Bimini Bay. Serene tropical grandeur
is displayed throughout the grounds and interior
of this striking residence. Heated pool and 35 ft.
dock with lift. $1,430,000. Sandy Drapala, 749-
5797 or Kathy Marcinko, 713-1100. 76167

WATERFRONT
VIEW OF RIVER AND POOL. Near library, restau-
rants, Old Main Street, marina, shops, etc. Many
amenities. Enjoy sunsets on the river from commu-
nity dock. $119,900. Ruth Lawler, 856-0396.78954
ALL THE CHARM and mystique of the Manatee
River awaits the buyer of this wonderful waterfront
residence. Water and sandy beach views. Gourmet
kitchen, wood floors, fireplaces, pool, covered dock,
separate guest house. $1,250,000. Sandy Drapala,
749-5797 or Kathy Marcinko, 713-1100. 78763


MANATEE COUNTY


SPECTACULAR PAFnORAMIC Tampa Bay
views. Located at the tip of a nn ..-,,; Island.
An enchanted tropical world. This wondenui
area has kept a quaint tranquil atmosphere.
Enjoy strolling the beach, shelling, boating,
fishing and cycling. $434,900. Kathy Marcinko
713-1100 or Sandy Drapala 749-5797. 79116
MAINLAND
COUNTRY ELEGANCE with great views of
lake from the pool. Two family rooms make this
a great home for a family. Everything is three-
years new. $329,000. Steve Georgie, 374-3632
or Chuck West, 374-3211. 78980
DOWNTOWN TWO-STORY 5BR ideal for bed
and breakfast, restaurant, boutique, antique
shop, offices or downtown residence. Updated
plumbing. $250,000. Don Lewis, 308-7777.
79059


440 aatee Avenue*S Wes,BradntonFloria340
1A 94 78-30 w wmcaelsauderscoI


I ,














IlIMMIL 2 .M 2/ Years of Professional service
OUR LISTINGS DON'T EXPIRE, WE SELL THEM!
ANNA MARIA Exclusive turnkey furnished 3BR/2BA, covered deck.
enclosed lower level, two-car garage plus room for boat.$395,000.
RIVER OAKS 2BR/2BA. Clubhouse, htd. pool, tennis. $124,900.
PERICO SHORES LAKEFRONT 3BR/2BA quality home.
Room for pool. Furniture included. $324,900.
COMMERCIAL
STYLING SALON 8 station, established over 35 years. $39,000.
WALGREENS Triple Net. Good CAP. $2,650,000.
SUPERMARKET Plus rental income and inventory. $3,150,000.
VACANT CONVENIENCE STORE SITE Sarasota. $419,000.
RENTALS
ANNUAL IMPERIAL HOUSE 2BR, Gulf to bay
5400 GULF DRIVE IBR, Gulfviews (3 month min.)
1BR/1IBA duplex (Jan. & Feb.)
2BR duplex (Jan., Feb., March)
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA newer home with elevator.
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
tdy41@aol.com *www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com

Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"


^yT0


REALTORS


LONGBOAT KEY LAGUNA YACHT VILLAGE UNDER
CONSTRUCTION Three bedrooms plus sitting room/office,
three bath home to be completed approximately 2/2002. Luxury
appointments, 2,471 square feet of living area plus extra large
double garage and three screened lanais. Hardwood, ceramic
tile and carpet flooring, central vac, security system, intercom,
granite counter tops and much more. Assigned boat dock, com-
munity heated pool and spa, short walk to the Gulf of Mexico.
Priced at $679,000. Please call Carol Williams, Broker for floor
plan and details. 941-744-0700 after hours.
A N UAL "RE--


Holmes Beach. Pristine 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom elevated
home. Large living room and family room. Covered
garage. Private boat dock.
Perico Bay Club.Renovated 2/2+loft townhouse. View on
mangroves. Tennis, pool and clubhouse. Gated community.


Anna Maria 2BR/2BA home on the beach.$3,600
Holmes Beach 2BR/2BA home.on beach. $3,500/mo.
Holmes Beach ~ 2BR/2BA home.on canal. $3,000/mo.
Holmes Beach Sandy Point.2BR/3BA+ Den Townhouse.
On bay. pool. $3,800/mo.
Bradenton Beach KWest 2BR/2BA. Next to the beach.
$3,800/mo.
Longboat Key ~ 1BR/1BA. Villa. Pool. Tennis. Boat dock.
$1,800/mo.
Call Michel Cerene, Realtor, 941-778-0770.


[smiths I


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
E mail: info@smithrealtors.com
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden

MLS [3 1.


Gloria Schorpp Helen White Mary Ann Schmidt
PERICO ISLAND
2BR/2BA Perico Island. Just listed! Excellent condi-
tion. Screened porch, two-car garage. Short drive to
beach and shopping. $225,000.
PALMA SOLA BAYFRONT
3BR/4.5BA contemporary cedar ho anoramic
ciew ofPalm i % .' .rjTT'_iSG ft. of liv-
ing area. ~A.E _r, family room,
den, pool.. pa, decl and boat dock. $699,900.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX PLUS
2BR/2BA, 2BR/1BA plus 1BR/1 BA guest quarters.
Freshly painted and beautifully landscaped. Double
lot, short walk to beach, restaurants and shops. Gen-
erates good income. $449,900.
HOLMES B
3BR/2B S LE 4 0 f FDrive.
Near gor large yard. $249,000.
SUPER DUPLEX
2BR/1.5BA Holmes Beach duplex. Immaculate! Freshly
painted, newer A/C and appliances, ceramic tile, Berber
carpeting, ceiling fans, screened porches, large lot, elevated,
short walk to beach. Great rental. $329,900.
ISLAND FAMILY HOME
4BR/2BA in Holmes Beach. Family room, fireplace, eat-
in kitchen, deck, outdoor shower, storage/workshop, close
to beach and shopping. $429,000.


Julie Gilstrap-Royal


Patti Marifjeren


ANNUAL RENTALS
2106 Ave. B 1BR/1BA duplex $700 month
Northbeach Village 3BR/2BA townhouse,
two-car garage, pool. $1,500 month
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Homes Weekly/Monthly
from $500 week / $1000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434

ANNA MARIA

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Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
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9'"7 A. 3%-," IT-{CP f ( coo '*.A 7-1 f LF, 70PA"
THE ISLANDER 0 NOV. 21, 2001 N PAGE 35


DICK MAHER
AND
DAVE JONES
ISLAND SPECIALISTS



Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation.
'C M


mommommoor







PAGE 36 M NOV. 21, 2001 M THE ISLANDER
A"f_________________________________________________________


Across
1 Go out
4 White poplars
10 Inn name
16 Peep for Bo-Peep?
19 Blemish
20 Original host of
TV's "A Current Affa
21 Shows feeling
22 Band's need
23 Years __
24 Florist lady?
26 Kind of artist
27 Slight, in a way
29 1997 Nicolas Cage
thriller
30 Like events on a
time line
32 Romantic lady?
34 Part of a theater
35 Genre of 49-Across
36 Run for
37 Elevator firm
38 Place for a
gimlet or screwdrive
39 Turkish money
40 Reebok competitor
42 Unchanging lady?
46 Old joke
49 Noted Indian music
51 Off-guard connector
52 Le _, France
53 Like butter
54 Gift from above
57 __ advantage
58 It teaches freedom
from desire
59 Golfer Ballesteros


WOMEN OF THE EAR
by Joe DiPietro / Edited by Will Shortz
60 Try (for)
61 Smidge
62 Focused lady?
65 Time
66 Embitterment
67 Bringer of bad luck,
in legend
air" 68 "Gulliver's Travels"
brutes
69 TV psychic Miss __
70 It may be entered
by a fluke
72 Subside
74 Dinner course
75 Watch word?
76 Pays part of
77 Exhibitionist's challenge
78 Religious lady?
81 Part of a spy organization
82 Reunion goers
83 First name in horror
84 Muhammad al-Mahdi,
for one
86 Oklahoma tribe
*r 90 Prefix with -gon
91 Farm female
92 74-Across lady?
96 Times out?
98 Any .corn
an 99 Important market
100 Tropical bird
101 Academic lady?
104 Big Ten sch.
105 "I am, like, _stupid!"
106 Prompt
107 High-stakes maneuver
108 Portuguese king
109 Coastal bird
110 High
111 Girlfriend or boyfriend
112 Lexicon abbr.


P- 'STUMPED? No. 1111


Down
1 Contents of some
in-boxes nowadays
2 Food preserver
3 Olympics award
4 In two
5 Mining passage
6 Start of a race?
7 Often-dried fruit
8 Sound technicians'
worries
9 "The Astonishing
Elephant" author
Alexander
10 Like many cigars
11 Cupid
12 Trim
13 Showed humility
14 Clear of, as vermin
15 Sec'y
16 Opera-going lady?
17 Diverse blend
18 Propitiate
25 Partner of above
28 Woodland plant with
triangular fronds
31 Pops up
33 Seventh chapter of a
fraternity
34 TV's Jack
38 Small fastener
39 Credit source
41 Suffix with winter
42 Gas producer
43 First female to sign
with a 103-Down team
44 It gets picked in Hawaii
45 Camel features
46 Theoretical
47 1962 John Wayne film
48 Impending lady?
49 Riverboat danger
50 Quatre + quatre


53 About 3 grains ir
weight
54 Mount
55 Start of many a
workday
56 Figure out
58 Brown v. Board of
Education city
59 Puts away
62 Spiral shells
63 Angry with
64 Deck call
69 Deals on wheels sites
71 Offer?


72 "Jurassic Park" actress
73 "See care!"
74 Bando of baseball
76 Arabian sailing vessel
77 Lunatic
78 Extreme illness
79 Joseph P. Lash book
"_ and Franklin"
80 Near
81 Pac Ten school,
informally
84 Cry of accomplishment
85 Art of training and riding


horses
English royal family
"The Plough and the
Stars" playwright
Spangle
Dead tired
Washed (down)
CPR pro
Plasters
Appetizing
Stirs
British title
Miller mistress
Warriors' grp.


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any three clues by touch-
tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. Reference puzzle number shown. There is a charge of 95o per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge itto Visa or MasterCard.

.. .- : & : : .~ -, --: .-. . '_. ..... ,... :_ f< ,'_- *.'. . . . _


- UW


cowwci
iBMWR 0m













Anna Maria

AA/ he CIslanderR 2
A VERY SPECIAL SECTION NOVEMBER 21, 2001


Please make a wish come true


# It's the holiday time of year -
time to take an extra moment to
give someone a smile or send a
rL' greeting ... pause to give a quiet
hug or a word of praise.
iy l The holidays are special for
friends, family and Islanders.
t In our ninth annual
Islander Wish Book, we take a
l^ B .moment to present stories and
pictures about organizations in
our community that deserve attention.
These community service organizations are
dedicated to providing assistance to families and
individuals, teaching and mentorihg our children,
helping the elderly and less fortunate, making Anna
Maria Island a better place to live for everyone.


H py


With The Islander Wish Book, organizations offer a
special way for you to share the holiday spirit.
We've included a list of needs wishes from
each one. Your donation, however small or grand,
will be deeply appreciated.
Please take a moment to select a gift from these
lists to add to your shopping list.
It's The Islander's way of saying thanks for the
support we've received for the past seven years and
a chance for all of us to give something back to our
community. A small contribution can make a big
difference.
We offer a special thanks to the sponsor advertis-
ers for making this project possible.
We hope you receive something from the Islander
Wish Book ... the joy of giving.
Happy holidays and best wishes for 2002!


rolidavs





PAGE2 U Nov. 21, 2001 M TheI7A1a.ier


Island Community Center


Anna Maria


Elementary


School: gem


of Island
Anna Maria Elementary School is the
educational home of 326 students in
kindergarten through fifth-grade,
serving families from north Longboat Key to
Anna Maria City.
Adult involvement is a key element to the
school's success. At any hour, you'll find par-
ents and volunteers from the community on
campus involved in the learning process.
Islanders who are unable to volunteer on
campus and want to help can do so by provid-
ing needed "extras" to make something great
even better.
The Islander wish list for Anna Maria Island
Elementary School is:
Numerous electric pencil sharpeners.
Television for the cafeteria to broadcast
morning announcements.
* DVDs.
CD/tape player/radio.
Portable tape players with headsets for
children.
MacIntosh computer programs.
Several VCR machines.
Early childhood and classical music CDs.
Writable/recordable CDs.
Electronic and regular microscope.
MacIntosh i-Book computer.
Science and social studies videos from 100
percent Educational Videos Inc.
Digital camera.
Large overhead projector and black
"projector" pens.
30 plastic protractors.
Hose, hoe and small lawn sprinkler.
12-by-12-inch dry-erase boards.
Crayons, colored pens, markers, pencils.
Construction paper.
Notebook paper.
Pencils.
Watercolor paint sets.
White or colored lunch sacks.
Calligraphy pens.
Craft books.
Holiday pencils and other small school
supplies to fill holiday stockings.
Five-gallon buckets.
Large paperclips.
Storage containers with covers.
Books for third-, fourth- and fifth-grade
reading levels including Nancy Drew, The
Hardy Boys, Beverly Cleary, Judy Blume, etc.
Paperback books for third- and fourth-
grade.
Holiday sprinkles for cookie-making.
Shelving.
Wall-mounted television stand.
Jolly Ranchers.



F R.A 1,MAh


-SALES RENTALS 4
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
S1-800-306-9666 *
As Serving the Island Since 1970!
ML Serving the Island Since 1970! [3I


The Center, located in Anna Maria City, is
one of the most revered institutions on
the Island, serving all ages from all parts
of the Island and beyond.
It has cultural, educational, recreational and
social programs, and figures that last year its
staff and 300 volunteers provided nearly two
million hours of service. Its programs start for
pre-schoolers and go on through teens, young
adults, adults and seniors.
The Center's wish list for 2001:


A paper cutter.
Office furniture for its expanding facilities.
Office supplies.
Character-building books and reading
materials for children ages 5 to 11.
Donations to the AMICC Endowment
Trust.
Volunteers to work with children with
special needs in the After School Program.
Contact: Pierrette Kelly, executive director, 778-
1908.


There are always projects going on at the Island Elementary School, like this engineering project.




Anna Maria Island Privateers


The Anna Maria Island Privateers was
established as a nonprofit organize
tion in 1971 by a group of Island men
interested in supporting Island youth
programs. Its goals are to promote activi-
ties for the betterment of youth and to
render altruistic services to the community.
Funds raised through the Privateers'
special events, thieves' markets and
mullet smokes, support youth programs
at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, the Cortez Community Center,
the Rubonia Youth Center, the Privateers'


"Body Bob."
Tile and installation in front office entry.
Button-making machine.
Electric three-hole punch.
Pedestal floor fan.
Large crockpot with removable pot.
12-foot aluminum ladder.
Six small beanbag chairs.
Six pairs of big, old shoes.
Boxes of tissues.
Plastic sandwich bags.
Handpainted mural for the clinic.

The new art department, headed by Gary


Jim Mixon Insurance Inc.

B. Holiday Greetings with
Every Good Wish for
the New Year


778-2253
5412 Marina Dr Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach


scholarship fund and various other
community needs.
The Islander wish list for the Anna
Maria Island Privateers is:
A 6- or 7-foot artificial Christmas tree.
Lots and lots of strands of Christmas
lights for the float/boat.
Donations to purchase toys for the
700 children who will attend the annual
Privateers Holiday Parade and Santa Toy
Giveaway at Coquina Park on Dec. 1.
Contact: President Mitch Stewart, 748-
2143.


Wooten, furnished the following wish list:
35-mm cameras, darkroom equipment.
Grease pencils, 11-by-17-inch paper,
sketch books.
Wood frames, 14 by 18 inches
Two-foot-high stools
Computers, monitors, discs, copier, mouse
pads, scanner, adding machines.
Ergonomic chairs, tables, bookshelves, file
cabinets and a brochure holder.
Postage stamps.
Office supplies or gift certificates to
purchase office supplies, in volume.
Contact: Anna Maria Elementary School, 708-5525.


Richey's Chocolates
Fine Homemade Candies

Holidays are the
time for giving.
Hope to see you soon!

Shipping to all 50 states available Closed Sundays
7200 Cortez Rd W, Bradenton 761-1500 800 761-1771


CNihAi A alsllauider WihBookik 2001






NiAthAtuatWalideia er WrVhOBook,2001


Island Turtle

Watch
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch
is a nonprofit organization whose
goal is to protect and preserve the
marine turtles nesting on Anna Maria
Island's beaches.
The group is in service the year around,
but is very active during the May-to-
October sea turtle nesting season. Then
volunteers walk the beaches in the very
early morning to locate turtle nests and
keep a sharp eye on the nests through the
incubation period. Volunteers frequently
await.the hatching to assure that the babies
aren't lured from the beach to stray into
traffic and become endangered by man-
made obstacles on their way to the Gulf of
Mexico.
The Islander wish list for Anna Maria
Island Turtle Watch is:
Boxes of latex gloves.
Small television set with built-in VCR
for training videos.
Phone cards for cellular telephones.
Volunteers to paint stakes.
Yellow road-striping paint and
brushes.
Large five-gallon plastic pails.
Contact: Suzi Fox, 778-5638.


One of the proudest achievements of the village of
Cortez has to be the pending public acquisition of the
property east of the old schoolhouse grounds in
Cortez. The first of three payments has been made on
the tract of land.

Cortez Waterfronts

Florida
Formed under the Waterfronts Florida state
program, this energetic outfit is dedicated
to "creating a community vision to pre-
serve the best elements of Cortez and respond
to the needs of the community," said manager
Janet Hoffman.
The task is to help the historic fishing village
realize its goals. Cortez Waterfronts Florida
went a long way towards achieving that goal
with the design and installation of a statue
honoring fishermen.
The Waterfront's Islander wish list includes:
Folding tables and chairs.
Someone to help format and design a
newsletter.
Tape recorder.
Contact: Janet Hoffman, 708-5949.


Wishing you and yours
a happy holiday season!
From the
Wedebrock Team
3224 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
941-778-6665 or 800-615-9930
Serving your Sales & Rental needs throughout
Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key, Manatee & Sarasota Counties
www.WedebrockRealEstate.com


The'Islander Nov. 21, 2001 0 PA(GE 3

Tingley Memorial Library offers

check-out privileges to all


This is the only facility in these parts that is
a privately supported public library. It is
a major beneficiary of the estate of Beulah
Tingley, but a great part of its support comes
from fundraising activities and its work is done
by volunteers.
The Tingley Library Islander wish list in-
cludes:


Book racks for book sales.
Clean used books.
A volunteer to paint the front steps
yellow.
Landscape maintenance.
Magazine subscriptions.
Contact: John or Mollie Sandberg, 778-6247, or
the library, 779-1208.


Friends of the Island Branch Library


Friends of the Island Branch Library is a
volunteer organization that lends addi
tional support to the branch by purchas-
ing books and equipment and sponsoring
educational programs for adults and children.
Membership fees start at $5.
The Friends of the Island Branch Library
sponsor an annual program series in the winter
season on the second Tuesday of every month
at 3 p.m. in the Walker-Swift meeting room. A


FISH struggles to
The Florida Institute for Saltwater Heritage
is a non-profit, grassroots organization
dedicated to the promotion and preserva-
tion of the cultural and environmental integrity
of Florida's traditional maritime communities.
One of the chief missions of FISH is to
acquire a museum site in Cortez and to collect,
research, interpret and conserve the historic
resources of the commercial fisheries of Florida.
Cortez has remained a fishing community with
fourth- and fifth-generation fishers still working
and living in the historic village.
Protection of marine resources and the
fisheries industry, collection and interpretation
of the material culture and folklife of traditional
fishing communities is another important goal.
One of FISH's most challenging efforts to


schedule of dates and programs is available at
the library. The group also holds an annual
book sale.
The Islander wish list of the Friends of the
Island Branch Library is:
A collapsible wheelchair to give library
patrons better access and more convenience in
using library services.
A display easel for large portraits or signs.
Contact: Joe Bracken, 778-4012.


Book sales at Tingley
Memorial Library in
Bradenton Beach always
S.. bring out scores of people
: .to browse through the
reasonablyy priced books
for sale. Proceeds from
S ". the sales go toward
expanding the library's
... collection of publica-
tions.





preserve Cortez
date is the purchase of the Schewe property, 72
acres of wetlands and 23 acres of uplands on
Sarasota Bay, now slated for public use. For
hundreds of years this property has been an
important fish habitat for the Cortez area of
Sarasota Bay known as "the kitchen."
In April 2001, FISH made the first of four
$60,000 annual payments on the property.
Funds were raised from donations from ordi-
nary citizens and conservation-minded compa-
nies located all over the country.
The Islander FISH wish list is:
A volunteer grant writer.
Support for the holiday fundraiser.
Help paying off the remaining balance of
the FISH preserve.
Contact the FISH Preserve office, 794-8275.


ManaSota-88: 30 years of eco-protection


ManaSota-88, an environmental organi
zation, has spent nearly 30 years
fighting to protect the environment.
Its commitment to safeguard air, land and water
quality is aggressive and uncompromising. The
organization has successfully worked to reduce
the millions of pounds of pollutants emitted
into the air and water each year.
Contributions to ManaSota-88 all come from
private individuals and go 100 percent to


Age Has Its Benefits
-*- Unforgettable Service for more than 60 years
T 4_____N


sm~itl


REALTORS


W Fishing you and yours a
wonderful holiday season!
*-- 5910 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 -
'I' Sales (941) 778-0777 Rentals 778-0770 1-800-741-3772 '1'
www.smithrealtors.com email: info@smithrealtors.com


operating revenues. ManaSota-88's attorney,
who is presently working to block Arvida's
proposed development on Perico Island, is the
only person to receive compensation.
The Islander wish list of ManaSota-88 is:
Help with legal expenses to battle the
massive development of Perico Island.
Fundraising ideas and volunteers.
Contact: President Glen Compton, 941-966-
6256.


-' "- d .. ..i


Wishing you a safe and joyful holiday season!
The Bradenton Beach Club
1699 N. Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach (941)778-5983


I





PAGE 4 0 Nov. 21, 2001 N The'Islar+er









Pelican Man:


friend to


wildlife
Dale Shields, the "Pelican Man," has
devoted himself to the rescue and
rehabilitation of pelicans and other
wild birds. He is founder, president and chief
volunteer of the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary
in Sarasota.
Each year, more than 5,000 birds and other
wildlife are rescued. More than 60 percent of
these are rehabilitated and returned to the
wild by the 300-plus dedicated Pelican Man
volunteers and 20 staff members.
The sanctuary is visited by more than
100,000 people each year, including thousands
of school children. It offers education pro-
grams to school and community groups.
Islanders who find an injured bird can call
the Pelican Man, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or drop off
an injured animal at the sanctuary's hospital
entrance, next door to Mote Marine Labora-
tory on City Island, Sarasota.
Anyone interested in helping can call
Joanne Davis, volunteer coordinator at 388-
4444.
Rescue training and volunteer orientation
are held each month on Saturdays. Call the
sanctuary for date and time. Volunteers are
always needed.
The Pelican Man's Islander wish list in-
cludes:
Food items, including raw peanuts,
chick starter and scratch, mixed wild-bird
seed, dry dog food (Science Diet, canine
maintenance or growth-small bites, Esbilac
powder puppy milk replacer.)
Kitchen supplies, including pet dishes,
crockery water dishes and plastic dish pans.
Hardware, including a lawnmower,
wheelbarrow, heavy-duty garden hoses, resin
stack chairs, stainless-steel cabinets and
tables, rakes, shovels, clippers and power
tools.
Cleaning supplies, including Dawn
detergent, paper towels and tissues, laundry
detergent, bleach, antibacterial liquid hand
soap, new or used towels, plastic garbage
bags, large sponges, mops and brooms.
Miscellaneous items such as 1-cc sy-
ringes without needles, new or used pickup
truck, plastic terrariums, pet carriers, fishing
poles and nets, plastic cat litter trays, heating
pads, scissors, bungee cords, Jon boats and
video cameras.
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary is
located at 1708 Ken Thompson Parkway, City
Island, Sarasota. (Cross the Longboat-to-Lido
south bridge and turn left at the base of the
bridge.)
Contact: Pelican Man, 388-4444.


N iAth A pwVtal/ Islter WhvBcok 2001


Anna Maria Island



Historical Society


The Anna Maria Island Historical Society is
a nonprofit educational organization
dedicated to the study and preservation
of all materials relating to the early history of
the Island.
Volunteers staff the Island Museum at 402
Pine Ave. in Anna Maria City. The building,
constructed in the 1920s as an ice house, now
has displays of old photos, maps, newspaper
clippings, records, books and videos, taped in
recent years by society members of interviews
with early residents.
Recently, the AMI Historical Society ac-
quired historic Belle Haven cottage and is
installing it near the museum on city-owned
property. It will be restored and furnished as an
original, Island "cracker house."
Admission to the museum is free, and


adult membership is $10 per year. The histori-
cal society raises money through sales of T-
shirts, books, calendars, holiday cards, art
work, photographs and other museum-related
items.
The Islander wish list of the Anna Maria
Island Historical Society is:
Vintage furnishings from the early 1920s
to furnish the living room, dining room, bed-
room and kitchen of Belle Haven cottage.
Funding and volunteers to restore Belle
Haven.
Sturdy rocking chairs for the museum's
front porch.
Anna Maria Island artifacts for display.
A garden hose.
Contact Anna Maria Island Historical Society
Inc., 778-0492, or George Norwood at 778-1514.


Real snowbirds
flock in
Large numbers of white
pelicans (Pelecanus
erythrorynchus) visit Anna
Maria Island each winter.
Unlike their brown cousins,
white pelicans do not dive
for food. Rather, they round
up the bait and take turns
scooping them up at the
surface. They have a nine-
foot wingspread, almost
twice the size of a brown
pelican. You can almost set
your watch by these migrat-
ing birds because they tend
to show up in Florida
shortly after the first fall
cold front. The white pelican
breeds in summer and can be
found as far north as
Manitoba and British
Columbia. They also are
found in North Dakota,
Wyoming, Utah, California
and on the Texas and
Louisiana Gulf coasts. A
number of white pelicans
usually winter around the
spoil islands south of Cortez
in an area known as "the
kitchen."


Wildlife Education & Rehabilitation Center


The Wildlife Education and Rehabilitation
Center Inc. began in 1986 with the aid to
an injured duck. Today, the Bradenton
Beach-based organization spends more than
$30,000 or more a year to feed, house and
provide medical care for injured animals and
birds. They respond to more than 4,000 rescue
calls a year. The organization also provides
educational presentations for schools and other
groups.
Over the years, the center has aided white-
tail deer, otters and bobcats, as well as just
about every kind of sea bird, song bird and bird
of prey. Less exotic creatures such as owls,



CABINETSUnlimited
Visit our showroom

Have a Very Happy
Holiday Season!

8700 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton 792-8656


kestrels, hawks, squirrels, raccoons, ducks and
loons have also been assisted.
The Islander wish list of the center includes:
Property for housing rescued animals and
birds.
Someone with carpentry skills to build
cages.
Esbilac formula for animals.
Dry dog and cat food.
Fruit.
Towels.
Digital camera.
Volunteers.
Contact Ed or Gail Straight, 778-6324.







BEN COOPER., E.A.ltlillm


Kevin Shonkwiler
General Manager and Island Resident



'E JEWELERS
'I,^^f^y^^m^
'I' ^ ^^~


Downtown Bradenton Financial Center
1401 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton 1st Floor Lobby
941-708-9663 FREE PARKING





NC irvAn uaalsgIdarcer WiChBoCok 2001


The
Island
Players,
at Pine
Avenue
and Gulf
Drive in
Anna
Maria
City, is
celebrat-
ing its
53rd
season.


Island Players celebrate 53rd season


The Island Players, with its theater at the
corner of Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue in
Anna Maria, is now in its 53rd season.
This charming playhouse seats 137 theatergoers
at five productions and more than 100 perfor-
mances each year.
The building has been remodeled several
times since the original small house was barged
over from the mainland many years ago to
serve as an office for the developers of Anna
Maria. During the ensuing years, it has been a
city hall, community center, women's club, and
a church and garden club, before it became a
community theater, with the first production in


1948.
A participating board of directors governs
the Island Players. Members include actors,
directors, set designers, production workers,
costume designers and ushers. Shows are
directed by a rotating group of guest directors.
The theater is supported by local subscribers,
supporters such as the Off Stage Ladies, ticket
sales and grants.
The Islander wish list of the Island Players is:
A copy machine.
Gift certificates to Sam's Club.
A paper-folding machine.
Contact: President Marilyn Moroni,778-0030.


ThelLaarider E Nov. 21, 2001 U PAGE 5

West Manatee


Fire & Rescue


Volunteers
West Manatee Fire & Rescue District
volunteers assist the district's profes
sional firefighters. The district serves
the Island communities and northwestern
Bradenton and Cortez.
West Manatee Fire & Rescue District now
has three stations manned 24 hours a day with
28 career firefighters/emergency medical
technicians. There are 11 professionals on each
shift.
The district volunteers own and operate a
fourth fire station in Bradenton Beach. They
raise money through annual fund drives,
pancake breakfasts, donations and a Halloween
haunted house.
WMFR volunteers never solicit donations
over the phone and want Islanders to know that
if they get a call asking for donations, it doesn't
come from them.
The Islander wish list of the West Manatee
Fire & Rescue volunteers is:
An architect/engoneer to draw up plans
for the renovation and modernization of the
volunteer fire station in Bradenton Beach.
Drawings of the building.
Conscientious and physically fit volun-
teers and support personnel.
Contact: Mark J. Paloski, president, West
Manatee Fire & Rescue volunteers, 741-3900.


Off Stage Ladies keep lights bright
T he Off Stage Ladies is a support group Island Shopping Center in Holmes Beach.
for Island Players in Anna Maria City. A very important function of Off Stage
he ladies are a talented and gregarious Ladies is to prepare and serve dinner for the
group who help paint sets and act as costum- cast of a show during "Long Sunday." That's
ers, make-up artists, ushers, lighting assistants the Sunday before a show opens when the
and stage managers and perform any other actors and technical crew have a long rehearsel
task to help a director produce a good play. getting the show perfected.
Improvement of the theater is a goal of the The Islander wish list for the Off Stage Ladies


Off Stage Ladies, who raise money by sponsor-
ing fundraising events, including the sale of
holiday-packaged pecans available for $6.95, or
chocolate covered pecans for $7.95 from The
Islander newspaper office and from Helen
White at SunCoast Real Estate, both in the


Large paper plates for Long Sunday
dinners.
Paper cups for hot or cold drinks.
Individually wrapped plastic silverware.
Contact: Peggy Cole, 795-8753.


Anna Maria Island Rotary Club


Rotary provides an opportunity to build
lifelong friendships and experience the
personal fulfillment of providing volun-
teer service to others.
An organization of business and profes-
sional leaders, Rotary provides humanitarian
service, encourages high ethical standards in all
vocations and builds goodwill and peace in the
world.
Rotary began in Chicago in 1905 and flour-
ishes today with some 27,000 clubs and 1.2
million men and women as club members
providing community service in virtually every
nation and territory in the world.
Anna Maria Island Rotary meets every
Thursday morning.
Rotarians support several scholarship

"Wishing you and your
familythe very best holidays ever!"



LaPENSEE
PLUMBING
778-5622 LIC. #RF0049191
5362 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach


programs, including several that support
students going abroad for an academic year or
summer.
This year, Anna Maria Island Rotary will
prepare holiday gift baskets for Island people in
need. The baskets will be delivered just before
Christmas. This program has been undertaken
jointly by Rotarian Chuck Lester and the club.
The Islander wish list for the Rotary Club of
Anna Maria Island is:
Donations to purchase solar cookers.
Non-perishable food items for holiday
baskets.
Nominees for overseas graduate and
undergraduate scholarships.
New members.
Contact Jim Dunne at 778-4060.


Get in the spirit! You're invited
to join us Friday, Dec. 7,
at 6 p.m. for holiday
music performed on
our sidewalk by the *
Manatee High School
Chamber Orchestra.
The Islander
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Island Shopping Center


West Manatee Fire & Rescue volunteers collect
funds during "boot drives." This year money was
raised for the families of firefighters and police
officers who lost their lives in the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks.


Warmest Holiday Wishes


1SunCoast"
REAL ESTATE, INC.
Helen A. White & Mary Ann Schmidt
Julie Gilstrap-Royal, Patti Marifjeren
5402 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach 779-0202


aI





PAGE 6 W Nov. 21, 2001 U TKe'I 7 ls er








Anna Maria


Art League
he Anna Maria Art League is dedicated to
community. The league is an education
and networking resource for artists of all ages
and levels of ability. It allows them to meet
fellow artists, utilize classrooms and take
advantage of gallery exposure to reach a wider
audience whether to teach or take classes.
The Islander wish list of the Anna Maria Art
League is:
Art supplies, including paper, pencils,
paints of any kind, charcoal, etc.
Cans of red or orange upside-down spray
paint to mark booth spaces at shows.
Endowments.
Contact Ginger White, director, 778-2099.



Longboat Key


Center for


the Arts
Founded in 1952 as a nonprofit educational
organization, the center has expanded its
commitment to Longboat Key to include
visual as well as fine arts.
The art center has 1,000 members, a faculty
of 30 and 80-100 volunteers. It depends largely
on the generosity of its surrounding communi-
ties for monetary and in-kind support.
The Islander wish list for the Longboat Key
Center for the Arts:
Sponsorship for art exhibits.
Students who want to enrich themselves
by learning to express their creative abilities.
Hand and power tools.
A window air-conditioning unit.
Refrigerator.
Metal shelving.
Metal storage cabinet.
Contact: Diane Monaghan, director of opera-
tions, 383-2345.



Happy ,. ,
holidays
from Santa! '
Don't forget
to help make .0
a wish come
true. A,


NWirAthAvnr al Isamer W hC'/Book'2001

Anna Maria Artist Guild


supports all the
The Anna Maria Artists Guild was
founded about 12 years ago and now is
167 members strong. Members are a
diverse group of people who are making a
creative contribution to the Island community.
Local artists and people who support the cre-
ative process are also members.
A major focus of the group is the Artists
Guild Gallery located in the Island Shopping
Center in Holmes Beach.
The guild meets monthly for a program,
networking and sharing. The organization
supports art programs in area schools, includ-


arts
ing a field trip to the Ringling Museum for
Anna Maria Elementary School third-graders.
An area of the gallery is dedicated to the dis-
play of student art works.
The Islander wish list of the Anna Maria
Artists Guild is:
A large parrot/bird cage.
Computer and printer.
Pedestals for displaying art.
Floor covering for the gallery, such as tile
or carpeting.
Contact: President Nancy Sullivan, 753-6139,
or Phyllis Cogan, 792-8591.


..w-


Art shows throughout the year hightlight Island artists.


Anna Maria

Island Chamber

of Commerce
The Island-wide organization of, by and
for business on Anna Maria Island now
has nearly 350 members. Among its
offerings is a visitor service where tourists and
other newcomers may obtain information about
the Island and what it has to offer. The chamber
office and visitor information center is at 5337
Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
The chamber's mission is to "serve the
membership and the community through
proactive leadership, by building a positive
business climate, while enhancing and perfect-
ing the quality of life for all."
The chamber's Islander wish list:
A fish tank.
A vacuum cleaner.
Any office supplies.
Artificial plants.
Small personal copier.
Wall decorations.
Contact: Mary Ann Brockman, 778-1541.



Seasons Greetings
from
Island Starter and Alternator
COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR
3014 Ave. C, Holmes Beach 778-0818


Meals on Wheels
n addition to providing meals for shut-
ins on the Island and throughout
Manatee County, Meals on Wheels is
collecting small items to brighten the
season for the elderly and homebound.
On its Islander wish list this year are
small packages of tissues, combs, brushes,
socks, knee-high stockings, razors and
other items that can fit in a gift bag.
Contact: Ellen J. Campbell, 747-4655.


GALATI WarSt
H lidcay Wishes

vIking Tiara Cuisers CABO
Florida's Premier West Coast
Full-Service Marina
New & Brokerage Yacht Sales (941) 778-0755


From all of us at the Gulf Drive Cafe ...
"We wish you a
Happy and Safe Holiday!"--
-CLOSED THANKSGIVING

( Gulf Drive Caf6
900 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach
Open 7 Days 778-1919 7 a.m.-9:30 p.m.






N tirhA nrlaInwLderI WLhoBacok 2001


Save the


Manatee Club
Save the Manatee Club Inc. is a nonprofit
organization founded in 1981. Its Adopt-
A-Manatee program is its primary funding
source, with proceeds dedicated to manatee
awareness projects, education programs, re-
search and rehabilitation efforts, as well as
lobbying for the protection of the manatee and
its habitat.
To help the Save the Manatee Club continue
its work to protect the manatee and their habi-
tat, the club's Islander wish list includes:
Computers, monitors, laptop computers,
scanner, slide scanner, mouse pads, wrist pads
and other computer accessories.
Bookshelves.
Brochure holder.
Laser printer.
Office chairs, file cabinets.
Work table.
Desk-top copy machine.
Cork boards.
Gift certificate or highlighters, pens, pencils,
computer discs, paper clips, binders, tape, post-its,
stamp pads, staples, white out, adding machine
and tape, paper, colored copy paper, rubber
bands, red and black Sharpie markers, manila
envelopes, business envelopes, padded mailing
envelopes, binder clips, hanging file folders, chair
pads, rulers, ink cartridges, Rolodex, letter open-
ers and garbage cans.
Contact: Save the Manatee Club, Inc., 500 N.
Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751,1-800-432-5646.

Key Garden Club
The Longboat Key Garden Club is a 180-
member organization dedicated to
"stimulating knowledge of gardening,
teaching people how to garden in the sandy soil
of Longboat Key, and encouraging the preserva-
tion of the key's wildlife, birds and the purity of
the water."
A major club program is the annual Home
and Garden Tour, in which visitors are admit-
ted to six outstanding homes on the key.
The Longboat Key Garden Club's Islander
wish list includes:
Rain.
Better use of Florida native plants.
More community involvement and par-
ticipation.
Contact: Gillian Busard, 383-1588.

All Island Youth
This largely unsung organization provides a
meal a week for two dozen or more young
sters and has monthly fellowship meetings
for youths 12 to 18 years of age from the Island
and mainland.
Sponsored by Roser Memorial Community
Church and Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, it
provides much of its own support for programs
so money is always needed, said one of its
mainstays, Carol Clements.
Its wish list for 2001:
Food in many forms, with restaurant
donations especially helpful but individual help
very much appreciated
A set of youth Bibles
Video recorder
CD player and Christian music on CDs
Contact: Carol Clements, 778-7430.


QUALITY BUILDERS
New Construction Remodeling Custom Design

---'-._ Wishing everyone a safe
[ _and happy holiday season!

GREG OBERHOFER President
5500 Marina Dr.* Holmes Beach __
778-7127* Mobile: 720-0932 LI*C. CCO047915


TheIsl~ander Nov. 21, 2001 N PAGE 7
Manatees
I. . ashore
it Apodof
manatees came
-..-- i into the surf
l l -.arizone of the-

S|of theManatee
Public Beach in
Holmes Beach
last July,
looking for love.
You can help
the gentle
marine mam-
mals through
the Save the
Manatee Club.
Islander Photo:
Paul Roat


Women's Guild of St. Bernard


The St. Bernard Catholic Church
Women's Guild is an organization that
adheres to Catholic principles. The
group meets the second Thursday of the
month in Welsmiller Hall at the church at
12:30 p.m. for light refreshments followed by
a business meeting and program. New mem-
bers are welcome.
The Guild raises funds with its annual
Poinsettia Bazaar and with dinners. Funds are
donated to the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, Hospice of Southwest Florida,


Habitat for Humanity, SOLVE, Mother Teresa
and former pastor Father Welsmiller's orphan-
age in Colima, Mexico.
The Islander wish list of the St. Bernard
Women's Guild is:
A flag pole-stand to hold the Guild ban-
ner.
Plastic tablecloths in white or neutral
colors.
A 100-cup coffee pot.
Contact: Marilyn Van Winkle, president, 778-
7865.


Roser Community Church Men's Club


T he purpose of the Roser Men's Club
is to seek the Christian way of life
and to bear witness to it in business
dealings and social contacts.
Proceeds from the group's two annual pancake
brunches are used to support a variety of activities
and organizations, including summer camp
scholarships, church needs and community
organizations such as the Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary, Southeast Guide Dogs, Sheriff's Youth
Ranch, Salvation Army, Loving Hands Ministry,
Jim Russo Prison Ministry and All Island Youth.


T he Longboat Key Recreation Center,
which overlooks Sarasota Bay, was
formed to provide affordable recreation
for the entire Longboat Key community -
children, adults and seniors. About 1,000 people
participate in organized activities ranging from
table tennis and bridge games to baseball.
The center's campus includes a public park
that is utilized by residents and guests for a
variety of active and passive activities, includ-


The Aids Council of Manatee Inc., located at
2703 19th St. Ct. E., is a division of Manatee
County Rural Health Services Inc. The organiza-
tion serves people with HIV disease and AIDS
who live in Manatee County.
The council's mission is to act as a community
consortium to assist in making health care for
AIDS patients easily accessible and cost effective.
Anonymous HIV testing is available at the
council office each Monday from 1 to 4 p.m. at


Roser Men's Club meets at noon on the
third Tuesday of the month from October to
April. Luncheon is served and guest speakers
talk on a variety of subjects. All men of the
church, the community and guests are invited.
The Islander wish list of the Roser Men's
Club is:
A commercial refrigerator.
Non-perishable food items to feed needy
families.
o Pots and pans for kitchen use.
Contact: President Jack Williamson, 778-1866.


ing a fitness program, youth sports, special
events, educational classes and a summer day
camp.
The Islander wish list for the center:
a More people to take advantage of the
center.
More people to come and picnic or just sit
and enjoy the view.
Conference tables.
Contact: Mark Litwhiler, director, 316-1980.


no charge.
The Islander wish list of the AIDS Council of
Manatee is:
Donations of nonperishable foods, per-
sonal hygiene products and cleaning supplies.
Christmas gifts for adults and children.
Volunteers to assist with the food pantry.
A bingo master.
Contact: Executive Director Eltna Settle, 744-
9204.


Get in the spirit! You're invited
to join us Friday, Dec. 7,
at 6 p.m. for holiday
music performed on
our sidewalk by the
Manatee High School
Chamber Orchestra.

The Islander
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Island Shopping Center


~C


'I'
'I,


JOHN E NORMAN, DDS
-^- Holmes Beach
-7 7JqQQ '


I/ / 0) / I (I)


LKey RecjreatLion Center
', '< ..


Aids Council of Manatee Inc.,




,PA~iE8E AJov.21,2001 U The.'I-ytde4 Nh'Ai'wu~w).,I~-La41x~~e4- Vt)&~-7v~Book,2OO1


Everyone's


i,
S
1


vitecl!


All three Island cities' residents, officials,
school representatives, parents, kids, grandparents.


Absolutely


everyone s


invited


to Family Fun Day.


Please, join us for an old-fashioned
family gathering of the
Anna Maria Island Family.


- Chuck and


Joey Lester


FUN


&


RAFFLES


GAMES


&


Bingo


* Dunk Tank


* Ball Toss


* 25( Hot Dogs


* 50( Hamburgers (all old-fashioned prices!)
Big and small raffle prizes including
packaged fixin's for 100 turkey dinners!


A Big-Screen TV donated by


The Islander!


and much, much more!
Family Fun Day ... Just like old times!
Anna Maria Island Community Center


407 Magnolia


Ave.,


Anna Maria


Saturday


* Dec. 15


* Noon-5


p.m.


This advertisement is sponsored as a community service by The Islander.


PAGE 8 Nov. 21, 2001 0 The/I7sadaer


Nbn ith Anrtual isder WiSh Book/2001


PRIZES