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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( September 26, 2001 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 26, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00910

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: September 26, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00910

Full Text




Slkinmtt ing the news ... Anna Maria Island map in this edition, page 16.


Ti Anna Maria



The


Islander


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island"



Pier repairs


resume amid


commission


fireworks

By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
It originally looked like a done deal. At the Sept.
20 city commission meeting, there was a unanimous
vote to authorize Jeff Murray to continue repairs he had
begun at the city pier in the wake of Tropical Storm
Gabrielle.
Murray undertook the repairs at the direction of
Mario Schoenfelder, who holds the city's lease on the
pier. He did the remodel work when Schoenfelder took
over, extensively updating the facility and overseeing
work to the structure.
The city and Schoenfelder first assumed the lease
for the pier required the tenant be responsible for re-
pairs.
But when City Attorney Jim Dye checked the
lease, he found that the city was responsible for repairs
caused by storm damage.
Dye then advised Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh to get
several bids to satisfy the requirements of the city's
insurance carrier.
Murray was asked to stop work until the bids could
be gathered and the insurance company could authorize
the repairs.
Oops. No coverage for storm damage to the city-
owned pier. Apparently, the facility is not insurable
against "acts of God."
By unanimous vote, Murray was authorized by the
city commission to make repairs up to $13,000.
Schoenfelder agreed by fax to cover an additional
$3,000 for a total of $16,000 in repair costs.
That was Sept. 20 and Murray went back to work.

Stop work order issued
The following day, the mayor, the staff and several
commissioners discussed the fact that there was an-
other bid for the city pier repairs.
At the time, Deffenbaugh thought the city was in
need of several bids for the insurer and Building Offi-
cial/Public Works Director George McKay asked an-
other contractor, Mark Kimball, to submit a bid.
Kimball contacted LaPensee Plumbing and Com-
munity Electric and came up with a bid of $9,500 with
a clause allowing 10 percent more, if needed.
Kimball gave the bid to the deputy clerk just prior
to the meeting and asked her to give it to McKay.
The envelope containing the bid was placed on the
corner of the city clerk's table in the commission cham-
bers prior to the Sept. 20 meeting.
Enter Vice Mayor Tom Skoloda, who picked up
the bid and opened the envelope before passing it to
McKay, but the bid didn't come to the attention of the
commission at the meeting.
The city attorney said the city was not under an
obligation to put the repairs out to bid since the lease
holder preferred to use Murray's services and since the
repair of the pier was an emergency.
David Sork, manager of the City Pier Restaurant,
PLEASE SEE PIER, PAGE 4


ISLANDER


Volume 9, no. 46, Sept. 26,


2001 FREE


Rod & Reel
Pier
.> "damages
'substantial'
^^- r -r -i r l Tropical Storm
-'r 'i. Gabrielle left
I4 behind a
S*crippled Rod &
'r-rf '- Reel Pier in its
-f"' .t wake. Manager
_...--. David Sork said
.... ^lU Ihe hoped to
have the pier
Repaired and
'roc e. reopened to

diners within a
couple of weeks.
Support beams
, _-and decking on
S.... .... '~ ."the east side of
N081" .the pier bore
obvious dam-
age, while
newly replaced
stairs and
windows were
n (also victims of
: the storm. For
more informa-
tion, see page
"- 16. Islander
Photo: Bonner




Grassy Point purchase


proceeds toward closing


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The long-awaited purchase of Grassy Point could
happenany time now. Rick Ashley told Holmes Beach
city commissioners that a contract for the purchase of
the core parcel is finally in hand.
Before proceeding, however, commissioners were
informed by Ashley that in preparing for the closing an
environmental assessment turned up a concern regard-
ing a prior fuel leak from the gas station southwest of
the property.
City Attorney Pat Petruff advised commissioners
that the station was enrolled in a state-funded program
to clean up the fuel leak, but since the contamination
on the property was minimal, the property was given
low priority.
Due to the possibility that some of the contamina-
tion may be on the parcel the city intends to purchase,
the state requires that the city issue a letter acknowledg-
ing the contamination and that it may be liable for.
cleanup efforts.
The consensus of the commission was to move
ahead with the purchase of the property in light of the
fact that the source of contamination is 120 feet from
the parcel and that if the contamination had been of
concern to the state for potential damage to the bay, it
would have been given a high priority.
Ashley advised commissioners that state environ-
mentalists have had the opportunity to look over the
matter and don't have any problems or concerns with


moving forward.
For more than two years, Holmes Beach has been
planning to acquire 37 acres along Anna Maria Sound
and turn it into a public nature preserve similar to Leffis
Key on the south end of Anna Maria Island.
The Grassy Point acreage is pristine mangrove
PLEASE SEE GRASSY POINT, NEXT PAGE


Bradenton Beach vigil
Almost 200 people attended a candlelight,
flaghearing vigil on Bridge Street last Sunday
evening. Among the participants with an American
flag was Bradenton Beach City Commissioner
Berneitta Kays. For more pictures, see inside.
Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


!11~2~Y~ -'


- L I -II _I


'L 'Vlqbl E T D^






PAGE 2 E SEPT. 26. 2001 M THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria storm damage approaching $600,000


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
Cleanup from Tropical Storm Gabrielle continued
all week in the City of Anna Maria. The northernmost
city was the hardest hit of all the Island communities.
City crews were out making a tally of the damages
to forward to the Manatee County Emergency Manage-
ment office, and members of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency were in town to help assess the
situation. Early estimates of damages in the city were
expected to top $600,000.
And estimates do not include the cost of damages
and repairs made by Florida Power and Light, Verizon
and Time Warner.
What it does include is an estimated $319,500 in
damages to private property and $248,750 worth of'
damages to city property. Also included in that amount
are salaries, gasoline, equipment rental, supplies and
purchases and food and beverages for city workers
during the cleanup.
With the declaration of a disaster by Gov. Jeb
Bush, President George Bush is expected to approve
disaster funding and the city will be eligible to recover
87.5 percent of the monies spent on the storm and its
aftermath.
At the Sept. 20 city commission meeting, which
was continued from Sept. 13 when the approaching
storm forced an early end to the meeting, commission-
ers authorized the city to have Grubbs Emergency
Management Inc. begin hauling and cleaning debris
from city streets. The city has a contract with Grubbs
for emergency cleanup services and in the event of a
declared emergency, Grubbs is reimbursed for its fee
by FEMA.
Building Official/Public Works Director George
McKay said there is also some cleanup he'll ask
Grubbs to do in the bayous around the city.

Coastal cleanup here nets

more than 4 tons of trash
The annual coastal cleanup, postponed by tropical
storm Gabrielle's depredations, brought 9,841 pounds
of trash to Dumpsters on Anna Maria Island and the
Palma Sola Causeway.
And it's not over yet, said Ingrid McClellan, ex-
ecutive director of Keep Manatee Beautiful, which
sponsors the annual effort in Manatee County some
organizations have until the end of the month to com-
plete their pickup.
She said that 234 volunteers cleaned up 23.5 miles
of beaches and highways here, and none of the trash
was debris from Gabrielle. Cleaning up storm-caused
junk was the job of other workers.
The volunteers spread out from four meeting
places Saturday to collect trash which they deposited
in Dumpsters in strategic places.


According to Laurie Feagans, Manatee County
director of emergency management, the Island caught
a lucky break when the storm came ashore south of
Sarasota.
"This should be a wake-up call for the Island.
Things could have been a lot worse, and we need to use
this experience to be ready for the 'big one' that will
hit one day.
"We always tell people to prepare to be without
power for at least 72 hours. People need to have food,
water, candles, flashlights, batteries, battery-operated
radios and all prescription medications they will need
on hand well in advance of any storm," Feagans said.
She added the damage was actually heavier in the
unincorporated eastern areas of the county with this
storm.
Anna Maria City Commissioner John Michaels
echoed Feagan's comments in a memo to fellow com-
missioners urging the city to use the storm as a learn-
ing experience.
Michaels said he was concerned about the lack of
manpower at city hall, saying, "There was nobody
there to take calls from citizens during and after the
storm and there was no power, and as a result, no tele-
phone service for most of that time. People who called
city hall heard the phone ring and ring and that's all
they heard. We let them down."
The city's switchboard is dependent upon electric-
ity to operate, and when the power went out, so did the
phones.
Michaels said he thinks the city should invest in a
generator to maintain some lighting and keep the phone
system on at city hall.
He also suggested the city establish a volunteer
group to cover the phones when there are weather
emergencies.
Michaels also had praise for the way city crews


handled the storm. "For the most part, I heard praise,
primarily for our public works department. George,
Gary, Jeff and Brent did a fantastic job. They were on
duty day and night.... They were there for our residents
and deserve special thanks from all of us."
McKay said he was especially concerned about some
of the special needs residents in the city. "I thought the
county handled the special needs people, but they don't,
so we need to know who they are, where they are and what
their needs are so we can take care of them."
He asked that anyone with special needs, or any-
one who knows of a person with special needs, contact
city hall so a list can be made of those persons.
Resident Jim Conoly also spoke in praise of the
city workers' response to the storm. "We had damage
to our new house on North Shore. We have had to pull
up the flooring and replace it, but it could have been a
lot worse if [Vice Mayor] Tom Skoloda hadn't come
over and pulled the door shut after the wind blew it
open. George [McKay] came by, too. The city is to be
commended. They were great," Conoly said.
Feagans said county residents, particularly Island-
ers, need to be aware that these storms are unpredict-
able, and everyone should be prepared.
"Tropical storms are particularly hard to predict.
They are like ping-pong balls, and they are influenced
by every current and front and wind shift. They are
almost impossible to predict with much accuracy.
"Prediction is more difficult with tropical storms
than it is with hurricanes. If the tropical storm is a ping-
pong ball, the hurricane is a bowling ball. It is heavier,
bigger, the cloud tops are higher, and once it gets go-
ing, it is less subject to changes in its environment.
"The point is, prediction is an inexact science, so
residents, especially those on the Island, need to be
prepared for anything to happen," Feagans said.
She added we were lucky with this storm. "It could

Bets\v Bray
andl Sue
S ,Gibbon,
~. embers of
: 'the Junior
League of
., -Bradentonr.
cleaned 1)p
the area

Kingfish
Boat Ramp
4;in 1Hohnes
i Beach.
Islander
,, Photo: J.L.
.'Roblertson


-- e- .e."- -d" ..
Volunteers in Bradenton Beach for the cleanup were
Joanne Casleton-Day, kneeling, and from left John/
Chappie, Connie Drescher, Berneitta Kays and Ed
Straight.


Grassy Point
CONTINUED FROM PAGE I
wetlands on the bayfront south of the Anna Maria Is-
land Bridge and opposite Walgreens on East Bay
Drive.
Florida Communities Trust has been handling the
process of making offers to land owners and negotiat-
ing prices.


Bradenton Beach storm damage: $170,000


Cost estimates for cleanup after Tropical Storm
Gabrielle in Bradenton Beach are $170,000.
That's the word from Bradenton Beach Police Lt.
John Cosby for damage from the Sept. 14 storm that
pounded the Island with 70-mph sustained winds and
almost 8 inches of rain.
Cosby said the biggest damage occurred to a house
on Bay Drive South, where a tree damaged the foun-
dation of the structure.
Other notable damage was to the roof at the
Bradenton Beach City Pier.


Details will remain confidential until after any deal
is closed, said Ashley, who is handling the city's side
of the transaction. All parties were required to sign a
non-disclosure agreement. The city will get title to the
land, assuming the deal goes through. It was antici-
pated to close within the next few weeks.
Landowners of the desired Grassy Point parcels are
Nora Hames, R.L. Davis, Martha and Lawrence Wald,
Josephine Frisco and the law firm Zewadski & Smith.


Probably the biggest headache to residents was the
incredible amount of downed tree debris in the city.
Public Works Director Buddy Watts estimated up to 70
tons of yard waste would be collected before the ordeal
is over, but he had crews working on their off days to
collect the trash and said most of it was picked up by
late last week.
In all, the city fared well during the storm, which
suddenly lurched ashore earlier than forecasters pre-
dicted. Police Chief Sam Speciale said all officers and
reserve officers were called into work Friday. When the
power went out on the Island, the city's generator next
to the police station was.started and supplied emer-
gency workers with light.
City phones were out for a short period of time,
Special said, because the generator was producing too
much electricity for the system, although he problem
was corrected.
Another glitch was the wiring in the police depart-
ment to run the air conditioning system, which went
only to the second floor offices, not to the first floor
where the command post was located. That glitch will
be corrected shortly, Speciale said.





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 0 PAGE 3


Bradenton Beach election slate Meetings


For the first time in years, there will be an actual
full-bore city commission election in Bradenton Beach.
Seven candidates for four seats have filed to appear
on the Nov. 6 ballot no, make that three seats on the
ballot.
Mollie Sandberg has already won a seat on the
commission to serve Ward 4. As the lone candidate,
she won by unanimous acclaim.
Mayor Gall Cole and Vice Mayor John Chappie


Commissioners Don Maloney, Rich Bohnenberger
and Pat Geyer will continue serving on the Holmes
Beach City Commission in light of the fact that they
were the only candidates to qualify for election.
Commission Chairman Roger Lutz attributed this
to a "perception of-competence, rather than apathy" on
the part of city residents.
However, there were no qualified applicants for the
charter review committee election, leaving city com-
missioners with two options.
According to City Attorney Pat Petruff, the city can
choose to do nothing and accept that there will not be
a charter review committee, or an ad-hoc committee of
citizens can be selected to provide recommendations to
the commission. This committee would not have the


will face off for the mayoral seat.
In Ward 1, incumbent Commissioner Bill Arnold
is challenged by Harry Brown.
In Ward 3, former commissioner and mayor
Connie Drescher is on the ballot with political new-
comer Ross Benjamin.
Candidates for the district seats must reside in their
ward but are elected citywide. Mayoral candidates may
live anywhere in the city and are also elected citywide.


same authority as an elected committee.
Should the commission agree with the ad-hoc
committee's recommendations, they may need to be
initiated by an ordinance, said Petruff.
Commissioner Bohnenberger suggested that the
charter review committee be removed from the election
process altogether and subjected to an appointment
process instead.
The consensus that many of the commissioners
received in speaking to citizens is that they were not
willing to go through the ballot process to become a
member of the charter review committee.
'Commissioners agreed to bring names of candi-
dates that they recommend be appointed to review the
charter for discussion at the next city meeting.


Anna Maria budget passes without fanfare


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
The final public hearing on Anna Maria's 2001-02
budget went by with no fuss and no fireworks.
The budget was approved in marked contrast to last
year's hearings when angry residents packed the com!nis-
sion chambers to express dissatisfaction with the pi ',. ..
The total budget is expected to be $1,337,5'-n)
The property tax.rate is set at 2 mills. That means a
homeowner with a house valued at $225,000 and claim-


ing the $25,000 homestead exemption will pay $400.
Commissioner John Michaels said, "I just want to
point out that Anna Maria's property tax is the lowest
of all the Island cities."
The smooth passage of the budget was largely at-
tributed to the budget process developed by the city's.
administrative procedures committee.
Brenda Holland was the committee member re-
sponsible for researching and drawing up the plan Flor
the budget process.


Anna Maria City
Sept. 26, 7 p.m., Environmental Enhancement and
Education Committee meeting.
Sept. 27, 7 p.m., city commission meeting. Agenda: up-
date on Belle Haven, building department inspection dis-
cussion, update on no-parking ordinance, approval of
Patricia Wagner memorial bench, discussion of city man-
ager form of government, appointment of code enforce-
ment members, Swiftmud discussion, agenda discussion,
discussion of resolution in support of terrorist victims,
request to lease or purchase chipper and citizen comment.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.
Bradenton Beach
Sept. 28, 8:30 a.m., city commission-department head
work session.
Oct. 1, 6:30 p.m., city commission special meeting with
scenic highway committee.
Oct. 4, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.
Holmes Beach
Sept. 27, 9 a.m., board of adjustment meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.


Temps

& Drops

on A.M.I.


Date
Sept. 16
Sept. 17
Sept. 18
Sept. 19
Sept. 20
Sept. 21
Sept. 22
Average


Low Hic
72 8;
74 86
76 81
77 88
70 81
78 9(
78 81
Gulf water tempera


I I ir I






gh Rainfall
2 0
6 0
8 0
3 0
3 0
0 0
8 0
iture 820


w. -
k.


Congratulations!


It's a turtle!


Adopt-A-


Hatchling Birth

Certificates

are available


1- - --


at


Thi Islander

It's a wonderful gift for young or old ...
$15 PER ADOPTION
All proceeds to
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch Inc.
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
For information, call The Islander, 778.7978,
or AMITW, 778.5638.
Mail order to The Islander (no charge for postage/handling)

Sponsored by The Islander


OOH























It's our way of sayit


/1


A EUROPEAN BISTRO


ALA


OPEN WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY
BRUNCH AND LUNCH
11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
SUNDAY BREAKFAST AND LUNCH
8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
DINNER Wed.-Sun. from 5:30 p.m.
(Closed Monday/Tuesday)


Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Please call in "special" reservations in advance. Offer ends Sept. 30.
941 778 5320


... while Holmes Beach considers options

in absence of election, charter candidates


I


r: .i
Rlrarr






PAGE 4 E SEPT. 26. 2001 0 THE ISLANDER

Pier prompts arguments
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

told commissioners it was Schoenfelder's wish that
Murray complete the repairs since he was already fa-
miliar with the job.
"We want to get this done as quickly as possible
and get our people back to work," Sork said. There are
currently 40 people out of work due to the closing of
the pier.
The following day, the existence of Kimball's bid
and the failure of Skoloda and McKay to inform the
commission of its existence caused the mayor to issue
a stop work order and he asked both McKay and
Deputy Clerk Diane Percycoe to fill out incident re-
ports about the second bid.
Percycoe's report stated Kimball gave her the en-
velope and asked her to pass it to McKay. She said he
asked her to have McKay call him after the meeting.
"I saw Mr. Kimball taking to Vice Mayor Skoloda
prior to the meeting and then Mr. Kimball left.
"Vice Mayor Skoloda came over to my table and
asked for the envelope that Mr. Kimball presented to
me. I showed Vice Mayor Skoloda the envelope and he
took it to the dais.
"I did see Vice Mayor Tom Skoloda open the en-
velope, look at the contents, and I believe he showed
the contents to Commissioner [Jay] Hill."
McKay's report confirmed Skoloda handed him
two envelopes, both containing bids for repairs to the
city pier. He stated one was from Murray and the other
was from Kimball.
Deffenbaugh said he was unclear why no one
spoke up when he stated at the Sept. 20 meeting that
the only bid was from Murray.
He called for a special meeting to determine why
both bids were not brought to the attention of the com-
mission.

Special meeting
Before the Sept. 24 special meeting got under way,
there was discussion between Deffenbaugh and
Skoloda over who was to chair the meeting, because
Deffenbaugh had called for the meeting.
Skoloda prevailed, saying, "The vice mayor is to chair
all meetings with the exception of budget hearings."
The vice mayor began the meeting by handing out
a memo which contained a partial transcription of the
Sept. 20 meeting, including Dye's statement that it was
not necessary to go to bid for the pier work.
Skoloda's transcription states, "At this point, the
mayor argued strongly to proceed with the repairs since
there was unlikely to be a significant enough differen-
tial in bids to warrant delaying repairs and that Mr.
Murray was the tenant's contractor of choice."
Skoloda also wrote, "Since the city had not gone
through a formal bidding process, the city attorney in-
dicated that no bidding process was necessary, and the
mayor asked the commission to 'eliminate any further
bidding on this particular project,' it was inappropri-
ate to bring forth any unauthorized bids."
After he finished reading his memo, Skoloda
called for the removal of the mayor from office. "I
think everyone is being caught in the middle of the
mayor's incompetence."
Deffenbaugh said he was only trying to protect the
city by making certain Kimball's bid came to the atten-
tion of the full commission.
Skoloda said there was no need to address the bids


since it was determined there would be no formal bid-
ding process. "I don't think those bids should have even
been opened."
Skoloda called for the resignation or removal of the
mayor no less than five times throughout the meeting.

Murray irate over delays
Murray said he was upset by the delay, and he was
out the $3,200 he paid to a subcontractor before he was
first ordered to stop work, plus additional money with
the second stop work order.
"I've never had a stop work order in 32 years of
doing business."
There was some discussion about the legality of the
order. According to city code, stop work orders are to
be issued only in cases where there is "a substantial
ongoing problem with the contractor ... or a threat to
life or safety."
Murray said McKay apologized when he came to
issue the second stop work order, saying his "head was
on the block" if he didn't issue the order.
A visibly upset Murray said, "I just want to remind
the City of Anna Maria and the commission that a stop
work order is a serious thing. I haven't had time to con-
sult an attorney. We will see what course of action will
be pursued."
Murray said he would pull his equipment off the
city pier and move on to repairing Schoenfelder's Rod
& Reel Pier, and then move on to his next job.
Deffenbaugh told Murray he was sorry, but he
hadn't been aware of the second bid, and he wanted to
protect the city.
Commissioner Linda Cramer also was concerned
that she wasn't informed of the second bid. "I voted
in good faith because I thought Jeff [Murray] was the
sole bidder.
"I spoke to Gerry Hammond at the Florida Depart-
ment of Legal Affairs, and she said we should refer the fact
that a bid was withheld to the state attorney's office.
"This was a public record. You had an obligation
to bring it forward," she told Skoloda.
Skoloda asked Cramer, "Did Mr. Deffenbaugh
strongly ask this commission to strongly ignore the
bidding process. Yes or no?"
Cramer said, "With one sole bid present, as we
believed, yes. That's my point."
Skoloda again called for the resignation or removal
of the mayor.
Several citizens came forward to ask the commis-
sion to come to a resolution so the pier repairs could get
under way and employees could return to their jobs.
Shirley O'Day said, "You have a problem. Doesn't
anybody have a solution?"
Ed Spring asked, "What about all these employees?
Everybody is sitting here fighting and Murray is pull-
ing his stuff off the pier. It could be open in two weeks.
If they have to start over, it'll be more like six weeks.
Get off your duffs and get things done."
Hill commented to Spring that he agreed with him,
to which Skoloda remarked to Hill, "address the chair."
Hill refused Skoloda, saying he'd talk to Mr.
Spring if he chose to.
"We don't have to take bids for work under
$100,000," Hill said. "I didn't know there was a bid. I
didn't see Mr. Murray's bid. Every document that
comes in is supposed to be copied and distributed to
everybody.
"We have a stop work order with no cause. That's
as illegal as can be," Hill said.
Resident Georgia Van Cleave asked the commis-


'Trying year' for turtles nearing end


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
"It's been a very trying year" for Anna Maria Is-
land Turtle Watch volunteers, Suzi Fox said this week
as the sea turtle hatching season neared its end.
The total number of nests on Island beaches was
lower than usual, she said, and the storm in July washed
away the stakes that marked many nests so that volun-
teers lost track of some.
"Gabrielle was a piece of cake in comparison," she
said of the tropical storm that raked the Island Sept. 14.
The final count showed 168 nests and 172 false
crawls, the tracks female loggerheads left when they
came up the beach to nest but changed their minds.
That compares with 207 nests and 164 false crawls a
year ago.
Fox suspects there may be as many as 50 nests her


volunteers couldn't locate with certainty. She holds the
state marine turtle preservation permit for the Island.
All but nine of this year's nests have hatched, she
said, and the last one will be awhile incubating those
eggs were laid Aug. 16, so they're not expected to
hatch until the third week of October.
The Adopt-A-Hatchling program is turning out to
be a success, she said, with 72 hatchlings "adopted" by
turtle-friendly folks for a fee of $15 each and some
"parents" donating beyond that.
The program is sponsored by The Islander newspa-
per, where certificate packages are available in person or
by mail. Stop in the newspaper office at the Island Shop-
ping Center during business hours, or write to The Is-
lander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 3421 7.
Next on the Turtle Watch agenda will be the annual
Volunteers Appreciation Banquet Oct. 24.


sioners to return to the issue of getting the city pier
repairs under way.

Murray hired, again
The commission voted unanimously to ask Murray
to return to the job and Murray said he would love to
go out tomorrow, but he was distressed by the mayor.
"I'll finish the damned pier, but it will be something
else with Gary next week or next month," Murray said.
Following the meeting, Sork said he was relieved.
"I am not interested in placing blame. I am interested
in getting my people back to work and getting the res-
taurant up and running again."

Missing tape
Cramer then attempted to bring up the matter of
Skoloda's removal from city hall of an official city
record, the recorded tape of the Sept. 20.
"I think this is relevant, because you obviously got
the city attorney's quotes off that tape, and you did in
fact remove it...."
At that moment, the vice mayor gaveled Cramer to
silence.
"You called the staff. You placed a call to the
deputy clerk at her home on Friday night...." Cramer
attempted to continue.
"Commissioner Cramer, you are out of order," said
Skoloda.
Canniff then asked Skoloda to remain impartial.
"We have seen Commissioner Cramer gaveled down
and not allowed to continue: We have seen Cornmis-
sioner Hill openly defy you and continue a discussion
you asked him to stop.
"This is not equitable treatment for the chair, and
I would like to see you handle the meeting in an equi-
table manner."

Anna Mariagate
On Friday, Skoloda asked for the tape of the Sept.
20 meeting and was refused.
City Clerk Alice Baird, who according to the char-
ter is the custodian of city records and by state statute
must protect those records, specifically told Skoloda he
could not remove the tape from city hall.
Nonetheless, Skoloda apparently took the tape Fri-
day night.
Concerned for the security of the tape, Percycoe
contacted Deffenbaugh, who met her at city hall at
about 9 p.m. Friday, to put the tape in the safe, but it
was gone.
Skoloda arrived with the tape while Percycoe and
Deffenbaugh were at city hall awaiting a sheriff's
deputy to report the missing tape.
On his arrival, Skoloda said he had not altered the tape
and he couldn't understand what all the fuss was about.
Prior to the meeting, the vice mayor was ques-
tioned about the tape by a resident and he replied that
he had done nothing wrong. He said it was just another
attempt by the mayor to make trouble, and that he had
a right to take the tape from the clerk's office.
"I am a commissioner, after all," he said.
When Baird attempted to speak, Hill said, "There
have been times when the city clerk erased tapes.
There's no great control of the tapes. You guys are sit-
ting in there erasing tapes."
"I protect all records. That tape was an official
record. The minutes weren't even made yet," Baird
said.
The city attorney was not in attendance at the meet-
ing due to a scheduling conflict. Reached after the
meeting, he said he didn't think Skoloda's failure to
produce the second bid nor the removal of the tape
from city hall were illegal.
"The city needs to get straight on their procedures
and then respect the procedures once they're set in
place, but I don't think it's a legal problem," Dye said.
He also said he didn't think there was a breach of
ethics in either case. To have an ethical violation,
someone has to profit and that is not the case here, Dye
said.
In terms of the tape removal, the attorney said,
"Skoloda is an elected official. She [Baird] is the cus-
todian of the records.
"Unfortunately, her words weren't respected, but
I can't really say it's a legal problem. The law doesn't
get into the chain of command in city hall. That's an in-
house issue, a procedural matter."
Dye said he hopes they send all this over to the
administrative procedures committee.
"I hope they abide by those procedures once they
are established," he said.





THE ISLANDER E SEPT. 26, 2001 0 PAGE 5


The following editorial was broadcast several years ago

in Toronto by Gordon Sinclair, a Canadian television

commentator. Mr. Sinclair died a few years ago, but his

words are as valuable today as they were then.

America: The Good Neighbor.
"This Canadian thinks it is time to speak up for the Americans as the most generous and possibly
the least appreciated people on all the earth. Germany, Japan and to a lesser extent Britain and Italy
were lifted out of the debris of war b\ the Americans w\ho poured billions of dollars and forga\e other
billions in debts. None of these countries is today paying e\en the interest on its remaining debts to
the United States.
When France was in danger of collapsing in 1956, it \as the Americans who propped it up. and
their reward % as to be insulted and swindled on the streets of Paris. I was there. I saw it.
When earthquakes hit distant cities, it is the United States that hurries in to help. This spring. 59
American communities were flattened by tornadoes. Nobody helped.
The Marshall Plan and the Truman Policy pumped billions of dollars into discouraged countries.
Now newspapers in those countries are writing about the decadent warmongering Americans.
I'd like to see just one of those countries that is gloating over the erosion of the United States dollar
build its own airplane. Does an\ other country in the world have a plane to equal the Boeing Jumbo
Jet. the Lockheed Tri-Star, or the Douglas DC10? If so. why don't they fly them? Why do all the
International lines except Russia fly American planes?
\Why does no other land on earth even consider putting a man or woman on the moon? You talk
about Japanese technocracy and you get radios. You talk about German technocracy and you get au-
tomobiles.
You talk about American technocracy and you find men on the moon not once, but several times
and safely home again. You talk about scandals and the Americans put theirs right in the store \win-
do\ tfor everybody to look at.
Even their draft-dodgers are not pursued and hounded. They are here on our streets and most of
them, unless they are breaking Canadian laws, are getting American dollars from ma and pa at home
to spend here.
When the railways of France. Germany and India were breaking down through age, it was the
Americans who rebuilt them. When the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Ne\w York Central \\ ent broke.
nobody loaned them an old caboose. Both are still broke.
I can name you 5,000 times when the Americans raced to the help of other people in trouble. Can
you name me even one time when someone else raced to the Americans in trouble'. I don't think there
was outside help even during the San Francisco earthquake.
Our neighbors have faced it alone and I'm one Canadian who is damned tired of hearing them get
kicked around. They will come out of this thing with their flag high. And when they do. they are
entitled to thumb their nose at the lands that are gloating over their present troubles. I hope Canada
is not one of those."
Stand proud, America!

This heartfelt message is reprinted courtesy of the management
and staff of Rotten Ralph's Waterfront Restaurant. The events that
took place on September 11, 2001 are not just an American crisis.
Let us all unite to rid the world of the scourge.






PAGE 6 SEPT. 26. 2001 m THE ISLANDER




Opinion

Monkey business ...
It's enough to make government officials in other
Island cities anywhere, in fact appear sane.
Yes, it's Anna Maria, again.
Ask two attorneys, get two opinions. Anna Maria's
city attorney says that although Vice Mayor Tom
Skoloda was not authorized to remove city records from
city hall a tape recording of the Sept. 20 meeting
which had not yet been transcribed it wasn't illegal.
In his opinion.
Another attorney, Don Hadsock, noted for his Florida
public records expertise, thinks it amounted to theft.
"A person commits theft when he or she knowingly
obtains or uses, or attempts to use, the property of an-
other, either temporarily or permanently, or attempts to
prevent others from the use of the property. Theoreti-
cally, a complaint could be filed for theft of the tape,"
he said.
A representative at the Florida Ethics Commission
said they'd never heard of such a thing.
And what sort of thing is it?
It seems the vice mayor felt compelled to possess
the tape of the Sept. 20 meeting, and entered city hall to
take it after hours on Sept. 21. He was told "no," in no
uncertain terms, when he requested the tape Friday.
In fact, when Skoloda called the deputy clerk at
home Friday evening, she in turn called the clerk at
home to confirm the response to Skoloda's request.
Clerk Alice Baird is the custodian of the city's records,
and it's ajob she takes seriously. She's keenly aware of her
responsibility to the city and the public she serves.
The original tape had not been copied or transcribed
and Skoloda, who persisted, was told "no."
Later Friday evening, the deputy clerk had misgiv-
ings about not storing the tape in the safe at city hall and
called the mayor to meet her there.
On arrival at city hall, they discovered the tape was
gone and while they awaited the arrival of the sheriff's
deputy to file a report on the missing property, in walked
Skoloda with the tape, obviously hoping to have his
"borrowing" go unnoticed.
What purpose could Skoloda have had?
It only became apparent when at the special meet-
ing of the city commission on Sept. 24 Skoloda passed
out a partial transcription of the Sept. 20 meeting. He
wanted to prove he wasn't guilty of wrongdoing by
withholding a contractor's bid for repairs to the city pier.
And he obviously hoped to fortify his repeated re-
quests to have Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh resign or be
removed from office.
Skoloda got the response he deserved for his she-
nanigans.
Deffenbaugh says he has no intention of resigning.
Stay tuned.


Th.e Islander
Sept. 26. 2001 -Vol. 9. No. 46
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy
V Editorial
Paul Roat. News Editor
Diana Bogan
Gretchen Edgren
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
Laurie Krosney
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
J.L. Robertson
Mike Shannon
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting. Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Julia Robertson
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


ISLAND I im



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Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
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E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


inion
lnl10n1


An open letter to bin Laden
from an American housewife
It's Sept. 18, 2001, and I still struggle with the
enormity of the events of the past week. Mr. bin Laden,
Mr. Terrorist, how do you imagine to justify your
slaughter of thousands of innocents?
You proclaim "Holy War." All that is holy reviles
your actions and attitudes. All religions preach peace,
love and hope.
You practice war, hate and hopelessness. Are you
so frantic with your mouth-frothing fanaticism that you
are a rabid dog attacking, not even at will but as you
breathe? Do you imagine Allah, a god who loves, con-
dones and applauds your hate?
These are questions I imagine you will probably
never see and probably wouldn't care about if you did!
However, you will be made to answer not only to God,
but also to the American people.
The American people will never be cowered or de-
feated by a pathetic waste of human life such as your-
self and your followers! May God send you where you
belong! And quickly.
Lori A. Guerin, Anna Maria

Sleeping giant has risen
After the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I thought I
would write about what I felt the day after. After the
deluge ofinformation on Tuesday, I was overwhelmed
and outraged. I had a knot in the pit of my stomach the
size of a softball.
I felt anger toward the Muslims, but I would not let
that immediate emotion affect me. I had to think of the
BIG picture. Then it hit me.
I saw it. I realized it. This is one of those points in
history. Not just American history but world history.
The chain of events created by those selfish acts of
cowardice have not weakened America, they have
strengthened it.
Those lost Tuesday will not have died in vain.
Their souls have.already risen from the ashes to bring


us all together. Hearing of all the people lined up at the
recruitment offices, blood banks, and the acts of hero-
ism on Flight 93 in Pennsylvania, as well as the people
of New York tearing off their clothes to use as ban-
dages and tourniquets for the injured, made me prouder
than I have ever been to be an American.
I want to offer my condolences to the families and
friends of those lost as well as those who experienced
the attack on Pearl Harbor. I could not comprehend the
hatred and anger that they experienced after that event
until now. I feel I can speak for every American in say-
ing that we will not forget those that died in New York.
We will rebuild and restructure our nation in their
honor as well as seek justice, not revenge.
We are not savages. I feel this is an amazing time
for this country. Even though the tremendous loss of
life, I feel that in the end this will be our shining mo-
ment as a planet. Unified against terrorism. Everyone
that was alive after the attacks is now changing the
world as we know it. I am honored and pained to be a
part of this pivotal point in world history.
Such events as the Holocaust, World War II, the Revo-
lutionary War and the Civil War have made great
strides in humanity as a whole. Unfortunately at the
cost of many lives. All moments in history, such as this
one, we need to look ahead, to the BIG picture.
Where will we be? Who will we be? And what
have we done to prevent acts like this? This is a grow-
ing pain. A very unfortunate one. But we have learned,
and will not make the same mistake again.
To those cowards who hide in the shadows, the sun
always rises. You will be found. The sleeping giant has
risen from his slumber.
Robert Kimsey, Tampa

Cheese and whine
I have only one question for Judy Maccioli of Ohio
and for everyone else who has recently complained
about Anna Maria Island and the surrounding areas.
Would you like some cheese with that whine?
Manr Reilly, Cortez






THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 26, 2001 M PAGE 7


n n i ininn n



An open letter to he who hides behind the casket of innocents


By Randy Wayne White
Special to The Islander
On Tuesday morning, Sept. 1, 2001, you deliv-
ered onto our nation yet another public invitation, and
then, characteristically, fled into the shadows. Because
your invitation was written on the flesh of innocents,
and with the blood of our heroes, it demands a re-
sponse.
A week ago, most of us would have declined out
of indifference, out of ignorance. We were an insulated
people, secure in the triumphs of our forefathers.
Not today. Not ever again. In the last few hours, we
have aged a generation. Our indifference lies beneath
rubble in a great city, so your invitation as much as
we loath your methods is now most welcome. We
welcome it because you have forced us to understand
that the event which you press upon us is inevitable and
unavoidable. You have invited us to a Day of Reckon-
ing. We accept. That Day of Reckoning will soon
come.
If our response seems unexpectedly strong, it may
be because we were never the people you thought us to
be. You have said publicly that you believe Americans
to be weak, spoiled by our own wealth. You have said.
that we lack courage, resolve and morality. You have
said that we are a mongrel nation, a nation divided by
racial hatred and class warfare.
Perhaps it would be good to explain to you who we
really are, and so thereby remind ourselves exactly
what our heritage now demands of us.
We are the sons and daughters of every race, all
religions, the world's yearning masses, joined between
two oceans and by a passion for self-determination and
freedom. Don't assume, because we use hyphens as
identifiers, that a hyphen can divide us. A hyphen also
connects. Our own history proves, again and again, that
in times of national emergency, we are all defined by


one word, not two: American.
In us runs the blood of revolutionaries and explorers,
of farmers, immigrants and Algonquin statesmen, of train
barons and train robbers, and of individuals who, though
chained to slave.ships, refused to bow down as slaves. We
are people who risked the gallows to create a sanctuary on
earth that, for the first time in mankind's history, guaran-
teed religious freedom to all, as well as life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness. A mongrel nation? Absolutely. You
may have forgotten the first time you spoke those words.
It was in Berlin, 1939.
We forgot, too, for a time. Thanks for reminding
us.
Do we lack courage, resolve and morality? You
will soon curse the day that you doubted. We are the
50,000 who took our strong convictions to earth at
Gettysburg. We are the thousands of white crosses that
rest where poppies grow at Flanders Field in Belgium.
We are Doolittle's Raiders and Patton's blood and guts.
We are the 101st Airborne Screaming Eagles who para-
chuted into Normandy my own father among them
- and we are the body of a lone Army Ranger that
your followers dragged naked through the streets of
Somalia.
We are the 7th Cavalry who perished at Little Big
Horn. We are Apache warriors who refused to run, and
so stood awaiting death while chanting a powerful re-
frain: "Your bullets stand no chance against our
prayers!"
To understand us? Read Thoreau and Emerson,
Martin Luther King and the speeches of Tecumseh. We
are not an easy people. We love a winner and despise
a coward. Courage is our national cornerstone, and we
are at our best when we demonstrate courage as indi-
viduals. Our reverence for self reliance has never been
equaled, nor will it ever be. We are Teddy Roosevelt
charging up San Juan Hill on horseback and exploring


rain forest rivers by canoe. We are Lou Gehrig saying
a fearless farewell. We are Rosa Parks, with tired feet,
refusing to move to the back of the bus. We are John
Wayne, standing tall, fighting cancer, and we are a
great American Muslim named Muhammad Ali, de-
voted to his beliefs of right and wrong.
Tough? Send a boxing team to the Olympics. Bet-
ter yet, send your strongest to Manhattan. We have
some heroic firefighters there who'd purely love to
meet your best. Don't bother bringing gloves.
No. You cannot possibly know who we are, what
we are, or you would not have risked the delivery of
your cowardly message.
The difficult question for us as Americans, though,
is not will we triumph, but how? Our quandary is this:
In any conflict, the boundaries of acceptable behavior
are defined by the party which cares least about moral-
ity.
You have defined the boundaries, and there are
none. The lives of the innocent, of women, children and
good men, are meaningless. You hide weapon factories
beneath day care centers. You hide collectively behind
the caskets of innocents. You have no morality, no
character, no conscience, while we Americans are
blessed and burdened by all three.
No matter. We will find a way. Americans always
have. As Americans, we always will. Your invitation
to us was written in the blood of our own heroes, so we
have no choice but to accept. Your Day of Reckoning
is near. If there is any justice, a century from now, his-
tory will still hear the weeping of your widows. The
world will agree that those of us who died that terrible
Tuesday did not die in vain.
Your cowardice cannot stand in the face of our
resolve. Your evil has no chance against our prayers.
Randyv Wayne White is an author and friend of
The Islander from Pine Island, Fla.


SMusic by Larry Reich

Thurs. and Fri. Sept. 27 & 28
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PAGE 8 M SEPT. 26, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


ISLANDERS REACT TO WAR ON TERRORISM


Chamber collection tins
hit the street
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce is
collecting donations for the American Red Cross.
Students at Anna Maria Elementary School hand-
painted empty paint cans, which the chamber has dis-
tributed to the following restaurants and businesses to
collect funds.
Anna Maria City: White Egret, Mama Lo by the
Sea, Island Kitchen and Market, Bistro at Island's End,
Sandbar Restaurant and Anna Maria Island Sun.
Holmes Beach: Island Real Estate, Jessie's, Anna
Maria Island Fire Station, Ginny's, Home True Value
Hardware, Ooh La La, The Islander, Hurricane Hanks,
Brian's Sunny Side Up Restaurant, D.Coy Ducks,
Duffy's, Publix, Crowder Bros. Hardware and Paradise
Bagels.
Bradenton Beach: Gulf Drive Cafe, Drift In and
Bridge Tender Inn. Cortez: Star Fish, Tyler's Ice
Cream and Cortez Kitchen. And, Jennifer's in
Bradenton.

WMFR to help with funding
West Manatee Fire & Rescue has received many
calls concerning fundraising for the World Trade Cen-
ter disaster, according to Chief Kenneth "Andy" Price.
In response, Price said WMFR is accepting dona-
tions at two local stations. Funds can be donated at
Station No. 1, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, or
at Station No. 4, 407 67th St. W., Bradenton.
The proceeds will be forwarded directly to the
newly created "New York City Fire & Emergency Ser-
vices Relief Fund." This fund was established to ben-
efit firefighters and other emergency workers affected


by the Sept. I I tragedy.
Checks should be made payable to "Florida Fire
Emergency Service Foundation Inc." for the benefit of
NYC Fire & Emergency Services Relief Fund.
Donations are tax deductible.
The following are other funds that the fire district
has recognized:
* Florida Fire & Emergency Services Foundation Inc.
NYC Fire & Emergency Service Relief Fund
(Donate at any SunTrust Bank)
821 N. U.S. 1, Suite B, Ormond Beach FL 32174
(386) 676 2744
* Uniformed Firefighters Association Widows and
Children's Fund
204 E. 23rd St., New York NY 10010
(212) 545-6977
* IAFF New York 9-1 1 Relief Fund
1750 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006-


Helping hands
Third-grade students at Anna
Maria Elementary School
Decorated empty paint cans
with patriotic images Jor.the
A. n Anna Maria Island Chamber
of Commerce. Several local
n restaurants and businesses
have agreed to display the
tins to help the chamber
collect donations fr the
American Red Cross. Is-
lander Photo:
SDiana Bogan.



5395
SAmerican Red Cross
1-800-435-2669 or www.redcross.org

Sept. 11 remembrance planned
An Island-wide gathering to remember the victims
and rescue workers who died at the World Trade Cen-
ter and the Pentagon on Sept. I I is being planned.
The ceremony will be held on the steps of Holmes
Beach City Hall at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. Ii, one
month after the attack.
Island clergy have promised their participation, as
has West Manatee Fire & Rescue.
Someone is sought to plan and lead music for the
event, and people with organizational skills and ideas
are also needed.
Anyone interested in helping should call SueLynn
at 778-3557.


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Light a Candle!
In memory of the victims of terror missing and those reported
dead in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, we want to
encourage everybody to light a candle outside their homes between
8:00 and 10:30 p.m. every night (or as often as possible), until
those responsible have been brought to account.
To help the families of the victims we decided to have
a special sale on cash & carry candles between now and
Christmas with the revenue of the sales going to World
Vision Funds (info: www.worldvision.org), which supports
families affected by the September 11 tragedy.
The U.S. has been hit by terrorism beyond imagination! The whole
world has thereby been attacked and has to give an answer now.
Birgit and Herbert Sesterhenn


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Lemonade funds soothe kids, victims
After witnessing the catastrophe in our country on
Sept. II. Stephanie Schenk and her friend Shannon
Warring, both second-graders at Anna Maria
Elementary School, decided to do their part in a fund
drive for victims of the "Attack on America. They
created little red, white and blue ribbons and passed
out lemonade and collected $62 for their efforts in a
matter of two hours. Islander Photo: Courtesy Mike
Schenk

Flags remain at half-staff
The West Manatee Fire & Rescue will be flying the
American flag and the fallen firefighters remembrance
flag at half-staff until Oct. 1 1.
The International Association of Fire Chiefs has
requested that America's fire services continue to fly
their flags at half-staff and shroud their badges until
Oct. 11 to mark a formal 30-day period of mourning.
Fire departments normally fly their flags at half-
staff until the funeral of a fallen firefighter has been
held. In this case, however, with so many firefighters
not yet found and no plans for funerals, it is believed
the 30-day period will be most respectful for those
families of the fallen.
Other flags were allowed to return to full mast on
SMonday, Sept. 24.

Island pastor called
to active duty
The mobilization to fight terrorism in the wake of
the attacks on the Pentagon-and the World Trade Cen-


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ter has come home to the Island.
Pastor Ed Northrup of Island Baptist Church has
been called to active duty at MacDill Air Force Base
in Tampa. Capt. Northrup serves with a reserve unit
based in Palmetto.
He is attached to a hospital unit and has received
specialized training in critical-incident stress debrief-
ing.
Shortly after the Sept. I 1 attack, Northrup said he
was not worried about being called up. "That's what
it's all about. We sign up to serve," he said.
The Islander is interested in hearing from bther
Islanders called to duty for the "War on Terrorism" in
an attempt to keep friends and neighbors up to date.


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THE ISLANDER U SEPT. 26, 2001 U PAGE 9
Trade Center prayers
ow- Anna Maria Islanders
gathered for an ecumenical
prayer service at St.
Bernard Catholic Church
the night of the World
STrade Center calamity.
Praying Jfr victims and
.. *families of the attack were
some 250 Islanders, which
''- a church spokeswoman said
was an impressive turnout
S.tfor mere word-of-mouth
Notice. Islander Photo:
Courtesy Francis Tully

Fallen Firefighters Day dinner
planned at Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
honor Island firefighters and police officers "our
community heroes" at a dinner Saturday, Oct. 13.
The event will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City. Cost is $25 for
adults, $10 for youngsters under 12, free for those un-
der 5.
Proceeds are to go to the benefit of the Uniformed
Firefighters Association Widows and Children's Fund
in New York City. Details may be obtained at 778-
1908.


Patriotism
on parade
Bridge
Street was
filled with
patriotic
feelings
Sunday in
memory of
events Sept.
II. Almost
200 people
were present
with Ameri-
can flags
and candles.
Islander
Photo: J.L.
Robertson


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'Remembering Our Heroes'
bake sale here Saturday
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is
sponsoring a "Remembering Our Heroes" bake sale
Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Publix store on East Bay
Drive in Holmes Beach.
The sale will begin at 8 a.m., with members of the
Center's after-school and teen programs doing the bak-
ing and Publix donating the supplies. The event is open
to other volunteer bakers, who may join by baking and
donating their efforts. To get involved, call the Center
at 778-1908.
Proceeds will go to the "Uniformed Firefighters
Association Widows and Children's Fund" in New
York City.

Gourmet detective author
visits library
The Friends of the Island Branch Library invite the
public to attend the first event in its 2001-02 program
series at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Peter King, author of "The Gourmet Detective"
book series, which incorporates his Cordon Bleu train-
ing and writing talents, will discuss his new series of
novels set in San Francisco's Barbary Coast. The leg-
endary Jack London is featured as a main character in
this new series.
King has written articles on fbod, art, travel and
wine, which have appeared in numerous magazines.
The program is free and tickets will not be neces-
sary this season. Seating will be on a first-come, first-
serve basis; no reserved seating will be available. All
attendees should be seated by 2:55 p.m.
Art and crafts on display at the library through the
month will be watercolors by Dee Engler, digital im-
agery by Sandy Melcher, and beading by Ginie Smith,
Irene Murphy, Betty Gillis and Betsy Smith.
Other October events at the library:
Monday, Oct. 1-29, Internet for Beginners, 8:30
to 10 a.m., registration required by calling 778-6341.
Tuesday, Oct. 2-30, veterans' service officer inter-
views clients, I to 4 p.m., appointment only, 749-3030.
Wednesday, Oct. 3-31, Family Storytime, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 10, Friends Book Club, 10:30
a.m., information available at 778-4672.
Saturday, Oct. 13, origami class, 10:30 a.m.
The library opens at 10 a.m. daily except Sunday,
closing at 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
For more information, call the library at 778-6341.
The library is located at 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.

'Welcome Back' scheduled for
Island Woman's Club
The season's "Welcome Back" meeting of the
Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island will be at I p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 3, at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City.
Marilyn Moroni, president of the Island Players,
will give a preview of the Players' 53rd theatrical sea-
son, and reports will be given on the Florida Federation
of Women's Clubs convention.
Hostesses will be Bette Carr, Marguerete Thomp-
son, Beverly Long, Lavinia Eichorn, Helen Intile,
Louise Johnson and Veronica Callahan. Details may be
obtained from Ernestine Basler-Lawton at 778-3898.

Yoga and meditation series
will begin on Tuesday
A new series of yoga and meditation classes will
begin Tuesday, Oct. 2, at the Island Fitness Center,
5345 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Harmony Ananda Feldman will instruct the classes,
as she has done on Anna Maria Island for nine years.
Classes will meet on Tuesdays through Dec. 5, she
said, on this schedule: Advanced beginners at 2 p.m.,
new students at 4 p.m., mixed levels at 5:30 p.m.
Feldman also is starting a "TriYoga Teacher In-
ternship" program on Oct. 7. Details may be obtained
at 921-0074.

Mote's 'Critters' rescheduled
Tropical Storm Gabrielle forced postponement of
Mote Marina Laboratory's "Critters" program, which
now will be from 9 to I 1 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, with
registration open through Thursday, Sept. 27, at 388-
4441. The program will be at the laboratory on City
Island, off the south ramp of the New Pass Bridge.


In charge
The auction committee chiefs for the gala for St.
Joseph Catholic School on Oct. 20, left to right, Ann
Marie Nicholas, Laura Hahn and Kathleen CLcci.

Ticket sales open
for St. Joseph gala
Tickets are available now for the 17th annual din-
ner/auction/gala for St. Joseph Catholic School, sched-
uled for Saturday, Oct. 20.
The event will feature such prizes as a trip to New
York City, tickets for the Gator Bowl, fishing trips, and
parties ranging from cocktails for 40 at Cafe L'Europe
to a party for 20 folks at Duffy's Tavern.
It will be from 5:30 until midnight at St. Joseph
Parish Center, 2990 26th St. W., Bradenton. Black tie
optional and celebrity costumes are encouraged, said
Ed Nicholas, who with wife Ann Marie is chairing the:,'
affair.
Theme will be "A Night at the Oscars." The cen-
ter will be transformed into Hollywood's Shrine The-
ater, complete with spotlights and celebrities. In addi-
tion to the live auction there will be a silent auction,
martini bar, cigar bar, dinner and dancing to the Sha-
man band. Professional football great Henry Lawrence,
now a singer, will make a guest appearance, said
Nicholas.
Tickets at $65 each may be obtained through Jo
Anne Klement at 755-6420.


St. Bernard parishioners
are back in their church
Thanks to a generous communicant, St. Bernard
Catholic Church has sparkling new floors and its pa-
rishioners are participating in Mass in the church
again.
Services have been in the church activities center
for more than two months while the old carpeting was
removed from the church and replaced with tile. The
center has room for 350 persons, said office manager
Paulette Kazor.
The new floor is the gift of a generous parishioner
who "couldn't stand looking at the old worn carpet any
longer," she said. He asked the pastor, the Rev. John
Ellis, to take a look at replacing it with tile, and donated
the funds to replace the entire floor.
It is sandstone in color and the entire church is fin-
ished except for the area around the altar, which will
be completed soon, Kazor said.
Masses returned to the church proper starting last
Saturday, and will be celebrated there from now on, she
said. St. Bernard is at 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes
Beach.

Writers meet Monday
at Island Branch Library
The Gulf Coast Writers Group will meet at 10:15
a.m. Monday, Oct. I, at the Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Members are to
bring origin poems and essays to read. Details may
be obtained at 778-7732.


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Butterfly park much appreciated
The North American Butterfly Association-Manasota Chapter received a certificate of appreciation in recog-
nition of conmunniity commitment and dedication to the environment from Keep Manatee Beautiful for its work
creating the Anna Maria Island Butterfly Park. From left, Kathy McClain, Ruth Stauffer, Russ North, Nancy
Ambrose, Karen Lanese and Candy Clerkin were on hand for the presentation.


Islanders among
award recipients
Keep Manatee Beautiful recently announced the
Manatee County recipients for outstanding beautifica-
tion efforts.
Anna. Maria Island recipients include Michael
Miller, the Anna Maria Island Butterfly Park and the
Island Branch Library. They were feted at a luncheon
at the Manatee Civic Center.
Miller received an "Outstanding Personal Contri-
bution" award for single-handedly, volunteering to
maintain the landscaping at Anna Maria City Hall and
the adjoining Island Players playhouse for the past 10
years.
SThe Anna Maria Island Butterfly Park and the Is-
land Branch Library were both recognized for their
landscaping, which surpass the norm for design,
maintenance, neighborhood enhancement, commu-
nity awareness and use of native and drought-resis-
tant plants, according to Keep Manatee Beautiful.



Awana clubs will resume
meetings at Island Baptist
The Awana club will begin its third year of Island
meetings Sunday, Sept. 30, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the
Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria
City.
The clubs are structured by age groups, from 3
years old through sixth-grade, the organization ex-
plained. Awana is "an international, nondenomina-
tional, Bible-centered youth ministry providing weekly
clubs with a format of object lessons, memory verses,
games and awards."
Registration will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 29, at the church. Further information is available
at 778-0719.


'Festive Fall Colors' theme
of Gallery West exhibit
Island Gallery West will open an exhibit
titled "Festive Fall Colors" Friday, Sept. 28, at
the gallery at 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
The exhibit, which will run through Nov.
29, will feature local and regional artists' works
in watercolors, acrylics, porcelain, raku, pho-
tography, Indian beadwork, quilting, stained
glass, mosaic, stone, wood and clay sculpture.
The artists' cooperative gallery is open
from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday. Details may be obtained at 778-
6648.

'Raving Fans' workshop set
A "Raving Fans" workshop providing tips and
techniques to turn customers into "raving, spending
fans" will be sponsored from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
2, by the Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce.
The workshop at the chamber's quarters, 6854
Gulf of Mexico Drive, will be presented by Dr. Tom
Davenport of Manatee Community College. The $65
cost includes a copy of the book "Raving Fans" by Ken
Blanchard, author also of "The One-Minute Manager."
Information may be obtained and registration made
at 387-9519.

Auxiliary schedules boat course
Flotilla 81 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will
start a boating skills and seamanship program Tuesday,
Oct. 2, at the Manatee Technical Institute, 5603 34th St.
W., Bradenton.
The program will be at 7 p.m. on seven consecu-
tive Tuesdays and Thursdays. Cost of $25 per partici-
pant includes all materials. Details are available at 778-
6768 or 795-6189.


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 M PAGE 11
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Obituaries


Dorothy M. Hall
Dorothy M. Hall, 92, of Bradenton, died Sept. 1 8.
Born in Alliance. Ohio. Mrs. Hall came to Mana-
tee County from Canton, Ohio. in 1977. She was a
switchboard operator at Sears for many years. She was
a member of Ladies of the Moose No. 1601, Bradenton
Beach. She was active in the American Red Cross dur-
ing World War II. She attended Christ United Method-
ist Church.
Visitation and services were Sept. 22, with a ritual
service by the Ladies of the Moose preceding services.
Burial was at Mansion Memorial Park, Ellenton. Memo-
rial contributions may be made to Christ United Methodist
Church, 5512 26th St. W., Bradenton FL 34207. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by husband Ray; sons Mike of
Bradenton and Fred and Jeff of Kansas City, Kan.; two
grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.


Edyth P. Johnson
Edyth P. Johnson, 78, of Anna Maria, died Sept.
23.
Born in Noxpater, Miss., Mrs. Johnson came to
Manatee County from Whiteford, Md., in 1986. She
was Baptist.
A memorial gathering will be held from 3-5 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 26, at 51 1 South Drive, Apt. B.,
Anna Maria. Memorial contributions may be made to
Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd.,
Sarasota FL 34238. Brown and Sons Funeral Home
was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Barbara "Bobbi"
Thompson of Anna Maria and Dona of Port Charlotte;
stepdaughter Linda Windon of Delta, Pa.; son Ernest
Martin Suess of Quincy; sister Janie Reyburn of Mem-
phis, Tenn.; brother Truett Permenter of Chula Vista,
Calif.; and five grandchildren.


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PAGE 12 SEPT. 26, 2001 THE ISLANDER


No parking fines in Anna Maria yet


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
Go ahead and park wherever you want in the City
of Anna Maria, because fines may not be legal, accord-
ing to the city attorney.
Commissioners and residents heard from City At-
torney Jim Dye that the placement of any no-parking
signs or any action that could result in a parking fine
must be done by ordinance.
"The charter has a provision that if you establish
something that carries a penalty, you have to go
through the ordinance procedure," Dye said. None of
the no-parking signs in the city, which carry a fine for
violations, were established by ordinance.
That was when the question arose about the legal-
ity of collecting fines for violations in other no-park-
ing areas.
To the amusement of commissioners and residents
in attendance at the meeting, and amidst general chuck-
les from all corners of the room, commissioners real-
ized no one could recall any no-parking areas being
established by ordinance.
Dye said he didn't know what had been done be-
fore he came on board as city attorney, but he had
brought the issue before previous administrations with-
out result. He said Manatee County takes care of this
type of ordinance on a quarterly basis.
When asked what to do about existing no-parking
zones, especially if someone contests a fine, Dye said
the city should probably review the situation on an in-
dividual basis.
The subject came up in response to a request from
Building Official/Public Works Director George
McKay. He asked commissioners to consider installing
no-parking signs on the west side of South Bay Bou-
levard between Pine Avenue and Spring Street.
McKay said he has received complaints about the
danger at the post office exit. "Sometimes you can't see


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to go out on the street because of parked cars. I've expe-
rienced it myself, and I have heard complaints from sev-
eral citizens."
McKay said he spoke to the owners of South Bay
Plaza and the Waterfront Restaurant, directly to the
south, and neither had any objection to parking restric-
tions there.
Commissioner John Michaels said he has heard
similar complaints about safety in that area.
The commission also approved the 2001-02
$418,692.75 contract with the Manatee County
Sheriff's Office for law enforcement services.
In other business, McKay asked commissioners for
permission to check into a solution to speeding problems
in the area of the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Most commissioners favored using speed humps, the
sort used frequently in Sarasota. Humps installed on some
roads there have a gentle slope and are about four feet
wide and post warning signs in advance of humps.
McKay said he will investigate and get back to the
commission with a recommendation on speed humps.
McKay was also authorized to check into getting
a blanket permit for canal maintenance.
In addition, commissioners authorized him to go
before the city planning and zoning board to discuss a
possible reduction of the front setback requirement
from 20 feet so homeowners can build carports or ga-
rages closer to the street.
There was a discussion of Christmas decorations.
Both Commissioner Linda Cramer and Vice Mayor Tom
Skoloda offered information about decorations from the
recent Florida League of Cities meeting they attended.
They will turn the information over to the Environmen-
tal Enhancement and Education Committee.
Resident Georgia VanCleave said she thinks it is
important to use the term "holiday decorations." She
said she thinks it is more sensitive to the beliefs of all
residents and commissioners agreed.





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Members were appointed to the newly reorganized
Environmental Enhancement and Education Commit-
tee, including SueLynn, Tim Eiseler, Diane Canniff,
Cynthia Mansour and Karen DiCostanzo.
The meeting was adjourned at 8:50 p.m. without
the opportunity for public comment at the end, al-
though public comment had been heard throughout the
meeting on each issue.
In spite of verbal protest from resident Richard
DeFrank, who wanted to comment at the end of the
meeting, commissioners voted 4-1 to adjourn.
Commissioner Jay Hill cast the lone dissenting
vote, indicating he thought public comment should be
taken, but the other commissioners wanted to adjourn
to hear President George W. Bush address the nation.



Holmes Beach budget

given final OK
Holmes Beach city commissioners unani-
mously approved the final reading of the 2001-02
budget.
The millage rate will remain at 2.25 mills. A
mill is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value of
property less any exemptions.
The budget amount is $5,003,868, which in-
cludes reserves and carryover amounts from the
2000-01 budget. The actual operating expenses are
$3,503,868, up more than $300,000 from last
year's $3,270,583.
The $1.5 million reserve reflects an increase
from last year of $300,000. According to Holmes
Beach City Treasurer Rick Ashley, the increase
was recommended by the city's auditors during
last year's audit.


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Artists, friends unite
Thanks to an inspiration by artist Susan Curry, 70
or so artists and friends of the arts gathered at The Is-
lander newspaper office Sunday to share various works
that were created as a result of the terrorist attack on
America on Sept. I 1.
Their expressed emotions were evident at the close
of the event when Joan Voyles read a poem she was
inspired to compose, architect Art Ballman read his
letter to the mayor of New York regarding a living
memorial at the site of World Trade Center, and finally,
Sam Kinney, a survivor of the attack on the WTC, rose
to speak.
Kinney works for the N.Y. Port Authority, for-
merly on the 65th floor of "Tower One." He is also a
survivor of the 1993 bomb attack. In both instances, he
led fellow victims to safety through the maze of stair-
ways, to ground level.
Kinney is visiting Anna Maria Island with his fam-
ily and when he stopped to see his friend, Islander car-
toonist Jack Egan, he was invited to the event.
He thanked everyone for the outpouring of human-
ity, which was obviously still overwhelming to him.
The art show is being continued in the window of
the Artists Guild Gallery through October. Included in
the display is a stained-glass piece by Sissy Quinn that
will be raffled to benefit victims of the Sept. 1 1 attack.
Tickets are available at the gallery, located in the Island
Shopping Center. 5414 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

American spirit exhibit
at guild gallery
An exhibit of artwork produced by various artists
as a result of the Sept. 1 I terrorist attack on America
will be displayed through October at the gallery of the
Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island, 5414 Marina
Drive. Holmes Beach.
A public reception for the exhibiting artists will be
at the gallery from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5.
Included among the artists are Susan Curry,
Woody Candish, Si:ssy Quinn, Mary DuCharme, Gloria
Hall Cropper, Zoe Von Averkamp and Joan Voyles.
Further details are available at 778-6694.


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Inspired moments, work
Art Ballnu/an speaks at a gathering (tf fellow artists
andl friends of the arts at The Islander's reception
Sunday honoring victims of the Sept. II terrorism
attack. Islalndert Piitos: Bonner Jo.a

Mote's season will feature
variety of sea programs
Mlote Marine Laboratory will open its autumn
season with a couple of "tales" next Wednesday and
Saturday, Oct. 3 and 6, on its campus on City Island,
off the south ramp of the New Pass bridge from
Lonhgoat Key.



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Island
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THE ISLANDER SEPT. 26,:2001 PAGE 13'
"Tales From Mote's Dolphin and Whale Hospi-
tal" will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 3, with registration
required by Tuesday, Oct. 2. The event is open to
anyone aged 18 or over, at a cost of $15 for Mote
members, $20 for nonmembers.
"Fish Tales" from 8 to 10 a.m. Oct. 6 will be
open to all ages, with registration required by Friday,
Oct. 5. It will feature underwater living in the imagi-
nation. Cost is $14 for members, $18 nonmembers.
Adult community programs are conducted at
Mote the first Wednesday of the month from 6 to 9
p.m., $15 for members, $20 nonmembers. Topics
include "Mote's Dolphin and Whale Hospital," "Red
Tide," "Return of the Red Snapper," "Dolphins,"
"Giant Squid" and "Sawfish." Registration is re-
quired.
For more information or to register, call 388-
4441.

Time for artists to apply
in Anna Maria
Applications are being accepted now for the
third annual Celebrate Anna Maria Art Show, says
the spark plug of the event, Rick DeFrank.
The festival will be the entire length of Pine Av-
enue all day and into the night Oct. 20. Pine will be
closed off to traffic from Gulf Drive to Bay Boule-
vard and the city pier, he said.
The juried art show will be from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m., with the rest of the celebration continuing un-
til about 9 p.m. and followed by fireworks by
Holmes Beach resident Jim Taylor and his crew -
Taylormade Pyrotechnics aboard his barge.
In addition to all that art, the celebration will
have reggae music practically from dawn to dusk,
and food for every taste and appetite, organizers
said.
The festival's theme is "All Just for Fun." Pro-
ceeds will be distributed to local charitable organi-
zations again this year.
Application forms and further information may
be obtained from Jason Cimino at 779-0143. Writ-
ten inquiries and completed forms may be addressed
to P.O. Box 400. Anna Maria FL 34216.



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PAGE 14 0 SEPT. 26. 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Island Players open 'Blithe Spirit' Oct. 5


Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" will come to Anna
Maria Island Friday, Oct. 5, presented by the Island
Players at their theater at Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue
in Anna Maria City.
Running until Oct. 14, the play's curtain times will
be 8 p.m. except for two Sunday matinees which will
start at 2 p.m. The theater is quiet on Monday.
Coward's classic play features Charles
Condomine, a writer who wants to learn the jargon
of the occult so he can use it in a derogatory way in
a book he is writing. He invites a well-known me-
dium, Madame Arcati, to dinner with his wife and
other guests.
Seeking details of the medium, he intends to make


his character a complete humbug, which he assumes
Madame Arcati to be. He pleads with the others not to
laugh at her.
She gives them plenty to laugh about and a lot
more, conjuring up his first wife and getting his current
wife killed, so the beset husband argues with the spir-
its of both his ex-wife and his current wife.
Is Madame Arcati an expert in the occult, or sim-
ply lucky?
Charles Condomine is played by Mark Woodland,
his wife Ruth by Pam Hopkins Sikkema, and his
former wife Elvira by Beth Mencher.
Barbara Fleming plays Madame Arcati, Hugh
Scanlon plays Dr. Bradman, a guest, and Gail Canterro


is Mrs. Bradman. The maid, Edith, is played by
Heather Gulling.
The play is being co-produced by Eleanor C.
Sauers.
Stage manager is Ruth Stevens, John Flannery
designed the set and Don Bailey designed the cos-
tumes. Lighting is by Chris McVickers and sound is by
Walt Schmidt and Bob Grant.
Tickets are $14 each. The price of the five-show
season ticket is $60. Further information may be ob-
tained and tickets purchased at 778-5755. The box of-
fice at the theater is open from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. week-
days before and during the play run and one hour be-
fore each performance.


Past, future meet at Cortez session


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Memories of a small school where feet
were bare and learning shared and the principal
courted the teacher were lived again at a meet-
ing called in Cortez to look at the school's fu-
ture.
Cortez Waterfronts Florida hosted the
meeting, where architect Linda Stevenson dis-
played drawings of the school and asked
Cortezians for their memories and artifacts.
She is the restoration architect who is pull-
ing together the history and the future of the
Cortez school building built in 1912. It is now
in Manatee County's hands to be restored for
public use.
At the meeting she asked Cortez people to


share their memories of school days and to tell her
what uses they preferred to develop for their old
school.
The consensus was that the auditorium section
was added by Works Progress Administration work-
ers in the 1930s, that grades 1-3 were in one room
and 4-6 in the other.
Many recalled that the sixth-graders were en-
listed as teacher helpers to read to the smaller kids
under a great old oak tree. A few told of Principal J.
Hartley Blackburn courting the teacher, marrying
her and later becoming Manatee County superinten-
dent of schools.
One man said he moved away, came back years
later with a family and had his son advise him that
he was going to school barefoot "because everyone
else does."


As for the school's future, Cortezians
seemed to settle on using the auditorium for
meetings, weddings, small concerts and other
pleasant events. They would devote part of it to
a museum, keeping traces left by Robert Sail-
ors, the renowned artist who made the building
his home for many years until his death in 1995.
The playground should be restored, they
felt, Australian pines and Brazilian pepper trees
removed and the large pond reconnected with
Sarasota Bay.
Stevenson noted that the brick building is 3,200
square feet, though it appears larger from the outside.
She will check it, determine what will be needed to
bring it up to current standards for public buildings,
and bring the project back before the community at
another meeting this winter.


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THE ISLANDER U SEPT. 26, 2001 U PAGE 15


Elementary School gets some financial support


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Commission, the Anna
Maria Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization
and an anonymous donor have pitched in to alleviate
some of the financial burdens placed on the school after
a countywide budget cut.
Due to inadequate funding from the state, the Mana-
tee County School Board recently.developed a budget
reduction plan. Each school was asked to reduce its dis-
cretionary budget by I 0 percent. Anna Maria Elementary
School decided to cut money earmarked for field trips and


Anna Maria Elementary
School menu
Monday, Oct. 1
Breakfast: Breakfast Pizza, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Breaded Beef Patty with Roll, or Bean and
Cheese Burrito, Winter-Mix Vegetables. Cinnamon
Apples
Tuesday, Oct. 2
Breaktfst: Breakfast Muffin, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Chicken and Noodles with Roll, or Fish on a
Bun, Steamed Fresh Broccoli with Cheese Sauce,
Applesauce Cake
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Breakfast: Pancake on Stick with Syrup, Yogurt,
Cereal
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy or Chicken Patty, Mashed
Potatoes, Mixed Vegetables, Fresh Mixed Fruit
Thursday, Oct. 4
Breakfast: Cheese Toast, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch: Nachos with Beef and Cheese or Hotdog,
Fresh Broccoli with Ranch Dressing Dip, Pear
Halves,
Friday, Oct. 5
Breakfast: Breakfast Pocket, Yogurt, Cereal
Lunch. Baked Fish on a Bun or Pepperoni Pizza,
,Tossed Salad with Italian Dressing, Applesauce Cup
1 Juice a'di iilk are served with every meal.


school supplies.
Holmes Beach Commissioner Don Maloney lobbied
for a $1,500 donation from the city to help with the pur-
chase of a computer and software for the school's media
center an item cut from the school's budget.
After protests from Commissioner Sandy Haas-Mar-
tens and Mayor Carol Whitmore that the school should
find the money elsewhere, or that all three cities should
split the donation equally, a compromise was ultimately
reached and Holmes Beach will donate $1,000.
The school's PTO has also stepped up to the plate,
adjusting its 2001-02 budget to accommodate the school's
financial shortfall with $400 for each teacher's supplies.
According to Principal Tim Kolbe, the 10 percent cut
in the school's supply budget amounted to approximately
$28 per teacher.
PTO President Lori Guerin said she has seen teach-
ers "shelling out their own cash at Wal-Mart and Kmart
for supplies."
Financial support has also come from the community.


Island Middle School menu
Monday, Oct. 1
Lunch: Burrito with Salsa or Baked Chicken, Chef
Salad or Tossed Salad with Dressing, Steamed Rice,
Fruit
Tuesday, Oct. 2
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Corndog, Chef Salad with
Dressing, Fresh Broccoli and Cauliflower, Fruit
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Lunch: Grilled Chicken Patty on a Bun or Hoagie
Sandwich, Chef Salad with Dressing, Tater Tots,
Fruit
Thursday, Oct. 4
Lunch: Chicken and Noodles with Roll or Hot Dog
on a Bun, Chef Salad with Dressing, Seasoned Green
Beans, Fruit
Friday, Oct. 5
Lunch. Fish Sandwich with Chips or Cheese Pizza,
Chef Salad with Dressing, Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Juice and milk are served with every meal.


An anonymous donor has given the school $500.
"The county is having a shortfall this year so the fund-
ing has been drastically reduced," said Guerin. "There
may be further cuts, and with our help hopefully teachers
won't have to dig so deeply into their own pockets."


Anna Maria

Elementary School

victim of hoax, safety

program planned
Anna Maria Elementary School received a state-
ment from the Manatee County School Board's risk
management department on Thursday alerting staff
an attempt was made to abduct two students at Palma
Sola Elementary School.
AME enacted its safety plan and alerted teach-
ers about the warning. Students were brought in-
doors and kept under close supervision.
By noon, staff got word that students at Palma
Sola had fabricated the story and the rest of the
school day proceeded as normal.
Parents who have questions or concerns about
child safety at school should plan to attend the Par-
ent-Teacher Organization meeting at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 2 for a special presentation called "Child
Lures" given by the Manatee County Sheriff's De-
partment.
Principal Tim Kolbe said, "It's an eye-opening
program about people who prey on children and how
to defend our children against them. It's something
that all parents need to know."
Children under age 18 will not be permitted in
the auditorium during this presentation. Supervision
will be provided for children in a separate room
where they will be treated to movies and popcorn.
For more information about the meeting, call the
school's administrative office at 708-5525.


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PAGE 16 N SEPT. 26, 2001 N THE ISLANDER


Fishermen's memorial due in Cortez any day


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The cast bronze monument that will memorialize
commercial fishermen who have died at sea or in war is
scheduled to arrive in Cortez about the middle of this
week.
It will be installed on a concrete base which Cortez
folks have set up on the shore between A.P. Bell and
Star fish houses where 123rd Street Court runs into
Sarasota Bay.
Dedication ceremonies will be held there Oct. 27, said
Janet Hoffman, manager of the Cortez Waterfronts Florida
organization which spearheaded development and cre-
ation of the monument. The ceremonies will include fish-


ermen from around the state and dignitaries up to Gov. Jeb
Bush if his schedule permits, she said.
The long-awaited art work is coming via truck to
be delivered personally by the artist, John Ward, who
has been working on the memorial for months at his
studio in Canton, Ga.
He was selected from among four artists who sub-
mitted proposals. In addition to having the design
Cortezians liked best, he has his own forge, which cut
the cost considerably, said Hoffman.
He sculpted the monument and cast it at cost, she
said, which was $50,000. The other offers approached
$100,000.
It is 10 feet long and about 7 feet high, she said. It


depicts a brawny fishermen from the 1930s or '40s
hauling mullet ashore in a net, with fish at his feet -
"fish in the net would be too easy for vandals to tear
off."
The artist at first had the fisherman barefoot and
bare to the waist, until Cortezians pointedly advised
him that commercial fishermen worked in shirts and
boots in those pre-sunblock days.
This will be a memorial for commercial fishermen
everywhere lost at sea, Hoffman said, and she would
like to have anyone who knows of-such local fishers to
get the information to her. "They would be from 50
years ago or more," she said. "I've got the names of the
more recent ones." She may be reached at 708-5949.


Serious storm damage at Rod & Reel Pier


Damage to the Rod & Reel Pier and Restaurant
resulting from Tropical Storm Gabrielle is greater than
was earlier estimated but it's not beyond repair.
The landmark location is owned by Mario
Schoenfelder, a German businessman who holds the
lease for the city pier, and managed by David Sork.
Sork is intent on getting both operations up and
running again in quick order. He especially wants to get
his employees back to work.
"All told, between the two restaurants, we have 70
employees out of work. That's a lot of people without
a paycheck," Sork said, although some workers have
been called back to spruce up.
Schoenfelder contracted with Jeff Murray last
week to repair both facilities, and Murray went right to
work. He subcontracted with a company for the re-
placement of some damaged pilings at the city pier and
ordered lumber for the decking. (See related story
about repairs to the city pier.)
Both Murray and Sork said it will take quite a
while to get the Rod & Reel open. They agreed there's
quite a bit of damage to the building itself, but there
appears to be no actual structural damage.
"Of course we won't know for sure until we get
under there and get a good look, but so far, we think the
structure is OK," Murray said. No damage estimates
for the Rod & Reel Pier are available yet.
Meanwhile, Building Official/Public Works Diiec-
tor George McKay said he spoke to representatives at
the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
and no special permits are required for the Rod & Reel
repairs because the work falls under the category of
maintenance and repairs.


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A ..n-. MRR Pie o a o d iT i l So :__ G I d .Ph B n o


Bay Drive South street vacation approved


By Paul Roat
With much support and little voiced opposition, the
Bradenton Beach City Commission has unanimously
approved the vacation of a platted but undeveloped
street along Anna Maria Sound.


'Get to Know Your Bay'

theme of boat tours
Three aquatic entities are joining in a pro-
gram to encourage people to learn about Sarasota
Bay on "Get to Know Your Bay Day" Saturday,
Sept. 29.
On the program are an educational boat tour
of the bay and a visit to Mote Marine Aquarium,
both on one $5 ticket. It's a $30 value, said Mote.
Bay Explorer boats will leave from Mote at
10 and 1 1:30 a.m. and at 12:30, 1:30, 3 and 4 p.m.
on that day. Tickets may be purchased in advance
at the aquarium, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway
on City Island just off the south ramp of the New
Pass Bridge, or by calling Sarasota Bay Explor-
ers at 388-4200.
Seating will be on a first-come, first-served
basis. If the boat rides are canceled due to rain,
30-day rain checks will be issued.
Mote, Explorers and the Sarasota Bay Na-
tional Estuary Program are sponsoring the event.
Further information may be obtained by phone
from the Explorers.


Residents along the undeveloped Bay Drive South
from Fifth Street South to 13th Street South began ne-
gotiations with the commission last April to have the
road turned over to them. Residents have complained
that a lack of police protection, litter and city mainte-
nance along the city thoroughfare is a detriment to their
properties.
Another factor in the resident's request was the
deteriorating seawall along the Sound. Since the sea-
walls are on city property, residents were reluctant to
repair or replace the structures. City estimates to build
a new seawall in the area approach $800,000, about
one-third of next year's city budget.
Mark Souders, spokesperson for the South Bay
Association, said simply, "I hope you will grant this
vacation request," adding that many work sessions had
been held on the matter already.
Cliff Waters, an attorney representing the South
Bay Association, said Bay Drive South "largely
doesn't exist, and it was never accepted or used or
maintained as a road. The homeowners have a no
man's land in front of their property. The city does not
own the property, but the city does have the right to use
the property as a road. You're not deeding the property
to these folks it's already their land and due to
erosion there isn't enough land there to put in a road
anyway."
Resident Jan Vosburgh said the land "has no mon-
etary value to the city, so there is no benefit for us not
to have it for ourselves."
Not everyone was in favor of the proposal. Resi-


dent Harry Pracht said he "was opposed to this petition.
I think there are lots of people who like to walk up and
down the bay."
"Please, vacate my street, too, because people drive
up and down it and look at my house," resident Anna
O'Brien pleaded. "This is about people receiving mil-
lion of dollars of waterfront property."
Vice Mayor John Chappie, whose commission
ward includes the area, said he "talked to a lot of people
in my ward, and it surprised me that they, for the most
part, wanted the city to give the property up. They don't
want strangers in their neighborhood. The property is
dedicated for the purpose of transportation only. It's
not city property, and it was never used for what it was
intended, which is a road."
Commissioner Dawn Baker said she had walked
the property and "I didn't see more than a few inches
of 'roadway.' It was dedicated as a roadway and to take
the city's liability out of it is to give it to the property
owners.
Commissioner Bill Arnold said the cost to build a
seawall along the whole property would be close to $1
million "and the city doesn't have $1 million, but we
have the responsibility to build it."
The property vacation includes only the land
fronting waterfront homes. The city retains the public
accesses along Anna Maria Sound at the street ends.
Commissioners in the past agreed to place seawalls
at the street ends if adjoining properties were walled.
There are no cost estimates for placing seawalls along
the seven or so public street ends.






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 E PAGE 17

Cell towers, historic home get attention in Anna Maria


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
In two special meetings sandwiched around the
final budget hearing, Anna Maria city commissioners
dealt with cell towers and moving homes.
In the first of the two meetings, commissioners had
the first reading of an ordinance that would allow build-
ings to be moved from one site to another within the
city, something that has been prohibited in the past.
The change was proposed to allow historic Belle
Haven Cottage to be moved from 109 Palmetto to the
Anna Maria Island Historical Society complex on Pine
Avenue.
Commissioners also voted to donate $1,814 to help
move the building and construct a foundation at its new
location. The amount represents $1 for each city resi-
dent. The other Island cities have also donated $1 per
resident to help offset the total projected cost of $9,000.
At the second meeting, commissioners heard from
City Attorney Jim Dye that the city's existing cell
tower ordinance all but prohibits the construction of

Island composer Moerk opens
guild season Monday
"Creativity in Music" will be discussed Monday,
Oct. 1, by Island composer Alice Moerk to open the
season of the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island.
The event will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Episcopal Church
of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Moerk's works have been performed in Europe,
South America and the United States, and have won her
the National League of Pen Women's Music Award.
A specialist in medieval and 20th century idioms
in music, she is to speak of her creative processes and
present examples of her work. Details are available at
778-7923.

Weekend 'Boot Drive'
benefit countywide
West Manatee Fire & Rescue will participate in a
traditional fireman's fundraiser 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday and Sunday, Sept. 29-30, to benefit victims of
the Sept. 1 I terrorist attack on America.
Firefighters and rescue workers from WMFR will
collect donations in firemen's boots at 75th Street and
Manatee Avenue in Bradenton and at Cortez Road and
Gulf Drive in Bradenton Beach.



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cell towers within city limits, which is contrary to fed-
eral law.
According to the existing ordinance, a tower has to
be located at least 200 feet from other property lines.
Dye said that given the close proximity of lots in the
city, there is no area that could meet that limitation.
Commissioners held the first reading of an ordi-
nance to require that cell towers be located where they
will cause the least intrusion into a neighborhood and
that they be constructed to protect all property if they
are damaged in a storm.
The existing ordinance allows cell towers on city
or church property, and members of Roser Memorial
Community Church are currently working with Tech
Tower Inc. to have a tower constructed on their prop-
erty on Pine Avenue.
The proposed tower would be 120 feet tall and
would resemble a cross. The Roser membership ap-
proved the location of a cell tower last week.


Fishing for prizes
Rvan Agnew, 10, Kvla Secor, 12, Brendan Porrier, 9, and Mychael Dittmeier, 9, were among the small crowd
of patient anglers at the Bradenton Beach City Pier for the annual fishathon, sponsored by VFW Post 8199.
Only fuir fish were caught, but all the kids were winners. Islander Photo: J.L. Robertson


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Holmes Beach will

help move

historical home
Holmes Beach commissioners have agreed
to donate $5,000 to the Anna Maria Historical
Society to help save a historic cottage.
SThe historical home is located at 109 Pal-
metto St. in Anna Maria and the historical soci-
ety plans to have it moved to city property along-
side its museum on Pine Avenue.
Commissioners agreed with Jim Kissick,
Bradenton Beach representative for the historical
society, when he said that this is an Island-wide
project. "History applies to all of us," he said.


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More -hrnr a restaurant... more than a bookshop!

Going on vacation for the month of
September. See you in October!

779-2665 m 5910 1.lorina Drive Holmes Beach
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25O% EE PLEASE PRESENT AD FOR DISCOUNT.
25% u O F F EXPIRES 10/10/01
4, 6, 9 Hour Trips
Bait, license & tackle included.
Reservations reccomended
We wish to extend our heartfelt sympathy to
all the family, friends and victims of the Attack
on America. Now is the time to come together
with renewed pride in our great nation and the
knowledge that we will triumph. God bless the
service men and women who will defend our
country. The Staff of Cortec Fleli(

794-1223 ^
4330 127th St. W.(at Cortez Rd.)
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Fresh local grouper with
French fries and cole slaw.
They call it an entree
and charge $17.95.
We call it a basket
and charge $8.95.

..... : i : great Food

-a teAffordable
-." Prices!
itSUSE VIEW FROM OUR DECK
Bait Shop open 7 Days 5:30 am -9:30 pm
Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-8pm Sat and Sun 6:30am-8pm
4334 127 St. W., Cortez 794-3580
SC8 NE of Cortez Bridge Come by boat or car
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Star Fish Company
Seafood Market and
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cool, smoke-free
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out our daily specials!


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I SUMMER SAVINGS SPECIAL I
I uy any breakfast or lunch entree, get the
second at 50% off with a beverage purchase.
Valid thru 10/09/01 Dine in only
5360 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-4140
536Q01Gulf Drive -Holmes De~ach -775-4140


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*\ Rentals Property Management
ANNA MARIA
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PATTI JULIE
MARIFJEREN B4 REAL ESTATE, INC. GILSTRAP-ROYAL
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 779-0202


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THE ISLANDER SEPTEMBER 26. 2001 M PAGE 19


'The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
tlis side of Heaven. "B5
iss i luff,2
Pat Geyer. Proprietress
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 lam-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


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PAGE 20 0 SEPT. 26. 2001 M THE ISLANDER


ii














By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
In the wake of recent events, students at the Anna
Maria Elementary School and Island Middle School are
busy with plans to send a message of their own a
message of peace and friendship.
Anna Maria Elementary School is adopting a
school in New York and the Island Middle School is
participating in a program called Art for Peace.
AME students have a personal interest in adopting
New York's PS-96, an elementary school with 13,000
students. On Se4t. 1 I, two students from PS-96, Nikki
and Julian Botero. began their first day at AME.
AME Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison con-
tacted the counselor at PS-96 and told him that they
would like to do something to help.
"The kids at PS-96 are trying to reach out to their
community and at first Mr. Stegner, the school counselor,
thought I meant that we wanted to help the firefighters."
said Harrison.
"He seemed touched when I told him we wanted to
do something for the students. In the midst of everything,
his students are thinking about how they can help their
community when many of them have lost people they
love."
AME students plan to make an iMovie, a school
flag, friendship bracelets, drawings and write letters.
Harrison hopes students will be able to stay connected
throughout the year.
The friendship bracelets will be made with red,
white and blue beads and beads with the letters
"AME." Harrison says that parents are currently on the
search for beads and that they would like some help
finding the colored beads in size "E."
Harrison said that overall students are handling the


news well. "They have the facts straight about what
happened and the kids are saying they don't think we
should respond with violence."
On the other end of the Island, IMS students are
also working on promoting world peace.
Through a program called "Students' Art for
Peace" students are creating watercolor pieces that rep-
resent their concept of peace.
Language arts instructor Mary Mazza asked stu-
dents to draw what they feel and to think about what
they can share with other students.
Mazza planned to introduce the project later in the
year. but after recent events thought it would be an
appropriate project to begin now.
"It gives us a way to begin to mend and to have
some control." said Mazza. "This program promotes
peaceful images from one country to another."
When the students complete their artwork it will be
sent to students at schools in Portugal, Japan and Den-
mark that are also participating in the program. Then
students from those schools will reciprocate by send-
ing their images of peace to IMS.
Art for Peace is a global program based on the idea
that even one child s artwork may be worth a thousand
angry words.
The program is based in Bradenton and was
founded by Richard Riley Conarroe in 1999.
In addition to school connections, Conarroe pro-
vides the name and address of political leaders in the
same countries as the schools, so students may also
send their pictures to world leaders.
Mazza's students are taking the time to perfect
their artwork, keeping in mind the importance of only
using visual images a universal language everyone
can understand.


Island students begin projects


promoting peace, friendship


One groovy gang
The Island Middle School held its first school dance, organized by a group of students called themselves the
Party Organization of Anna Maria, as part of its Life Skills class. Students formed three companies, one of
which is the school dance company run by Joey Webb, Donna Matney, Jessie White and Lori Manaly. Stu-
dents decorated the cafeteria, provided refreshments, and downloaded music onto compact disks from the
Internet with teacher Ron Henkle's guidance. Webb said the most important item at the dance was the fog
machine. Islander Photos: Diana Bogan.


Pizza prize
Students had a dance competition to see who would
take home the remaining pizzas from the school
dance. Heather Howard and Joev Webb split half a
pie as runners-up to first place winners Jacob
Hutcheson and Jamie Schinde'wolf


Tips for parents visiting students at lunch time at elementary school


By Deborah Scott
Special to The Islander
As a second-year mother at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School, I've learned through trial and error many
things about eating lunch with students that may help
other parents.
Parents are welcome to eat lunch with their student
any day of the week at AME. Just sign in for a visitor's
pass at the front office and remember, lunch times run
on a tight schedule.
Parents and students can eat lunch in the cafeteria
or outside at covered tables. Parents are welcome to
bring their own lunch or purchase one from the school.
Student lunch money should be sent to school in an
envelope with the teacher's name, child's name and a


breakdown of the amount to be used for lunch, snacks
and ice cream. Ice cream prices are 50 to 75 cents, and
snacks cost 25 to 75 cents.
Snacks should be paid for in the morning. Almost
every day there are great cookies that can be purchased
for snack time..Students can't purchase them at lunch
time, but adults may buy them for their own child.
If you plan to purchase a school lunch, try to get
at the end of the line with your child's class and have
your money ready before you get to the register. If you
eat with your child frequently, you can get your own
pre-paid account.
If you have kindergarten lunch passes, they must
be used together when your child is purchasing a lunch.
It works out to be a "buy one lunch, get the parent's


lunch free." But be prepared to share one cookie, or
purchase an extra one for 25 cents.
Salad and tea are available for parents at lunch.
Also, extra servings of the entrees are available for
$1.10. Parents should try to anticipate these extra
servings and add money to their child's lunch ac-
count.
Parents can tune into AM-1610 radio for a daily
update on the AME lunch menu.
Questions and concerns should be directed to
Principal Tim Kolbe at 708-5525, or Lunch Manager
Renee Harper at 708-5524.
The opportunity to eat with your children is a
privilege. Your child will feel special to have a fam-
ily visitor at lunch.


THE ISLANDEIIR SEPT. 20. 2001 PAGE 21




IMS's


Hutcheson


resigns

Noranne Hutcheson, part-time executive
director and founding board member for the Is-
land Middle School, has resigned her position.
"Since I have accomplished my goal of
creating a charter school for the community,
by the community, I felt it was the right time
to let the school take on its own identity," said
Hutcheson. "For the last year and a half the
founding board has spent many hours working
toward this goal and I would like to thank them
for their dedication."
IMS Director Jeanne Shell said, "Although
the school has experienced some growing
pains, all new schools face them and IMS
plans to carry on with projects that have been
in development."
The school also received a resignation
from band director Kim Connelly, which is ap-
parently unrelated to Hutcheson's resignation.
IMS is currently accepting applications for
the band director's position. For more infor-
mation on submitting a resume, call the
school's administrative office at 778-5200.
IMS is also accepting student applications
for sixth- and seventh-grade students.







PAGE 22 N SEPT. 26. 2001 N THE ISLANDER


Community Center Soccer season under way


The Anna Maria Island Community Center's recre-
ational soccer season is now officially under way after first
enduring a rain and lightning storm during the jamboree
and then dealing with the effects of Tropical Storm
Gabrielle. The weather is back to normal now and there
is some great soccer action going on at the Center.
The small field plays host to the instructional league
for 5- to 7-year-old players. Island Animal Clinic, The
Bistro's, Longboat Observer, Danzinger Allergy & Sinus,
Anna Maria Island Sun and the West Coast Surf Shop
make up this division where no official scores are kept,
with the focus on learning the basics and having fun. Three
other age groups or divisions play on the big field at the
center. The 8- to 9-year-old league or Division III is
comprised of Jessie's Island Store, Galati Marine, Air
America, A.M. Island Spirit and Oden-Hardy Construc-
tion. Palm Tree Villas, Island Real Estate, Mr. Bones and
Air & Energy make up Division II, the 10-11 year old
league.
Veterans of the league are the 12- to 14-year-olds who
play in Division I. Four teams LaPensee Plumbing,
West Coast Refrigeration, Island Pest Control and Mr.
Repair-It-Man will be battling it out for first place.
The season runs until early November. The all-star
game will be played on Monday, Nov. 12, and the awards
presentation is Wednesday, Nov. 14. There will only be
playoffs in the event of a tie for first. Games are being
played on almost every night of the week so get out and
catch some of the action.

Jessie's Island Store 4, Galati Marine 2
Broderick West scored two second-half goals to
lead Jessie's to a 4-2 victory over Galati Marine on
Wednesday, Sept. 19 in Division III action.
Galati took an early lead in the game when Garrett
Waiters dribbled past several defenders before ripping
a shot into the back of the net for a 1-0 lead. The lead
didn't last long because West, who finished with a hat
trick on the night, hammered home a rebound to tie the
score at I Austin Martin scored a nice goal when he
launched a shot that found the back of the net from 20
yards out, but Martin Miller notched the equalizer
when he pounced on the bouncing ball to tie the score
at 2-2.
West took care of business in the second half with
two goals to ice the game for Jessie's. West gave
Jessie's the lead for good on an 18-yard, tough-angle


shot to the far post. West later beat several defenders
down the right wing before unloading a rocket for his
third goal on the night and gave Jessie's an insurmount-
able 4-2 lead.

Island Real Estate 5, Palm Tree Villas 3
Island Real Estate outlasted Palm Tree Villas
thanks to some outstanding goal keeping from Kyle
Schoonover, who made several spectacular saves in the
game. Island Real Estate also got plenty of offense
from Kyla Secor, who scored two goals, and Zach
Meshes, who tallied two goals and assisted on two oth-
ers, while Cameron Moroz added a goal and one assist.
Island Real Estate jumped out t,.an early lead
when Moroz took a pass from Chris Martin and beat
the Palm Tree Villas goalie near post for a 1-0 lead.
Palm Tree Villas looked like they were going to tie the
score minutes later after Ben Valdivisio stormed
through the middle of the Real Estate defense and


,, .. Jessie's
5t. Island Store
.player
S.' <, Dylan King
4 --, tries to cut
S'. back against
Nicholas
SGalati
during
Division III
soccer
action at the
SConmullnity'
Center.














ripped a rocket that was headed for the corner of the
goal, but Schoonover made a spectacular lay-out save
to tip the ball just wide of the goal and preserve the
Island Real Estate lead.
Several minutes later, Palm Tree Villas got the
equalizer when Ian Douglas launched a high-arcing
shot over Schoonover's outstretched hands from 35
yards out to make the score 1 -1. The tie was short lived,
thanks to some hard work by Meshes. Meshes had the
ball stolen from him by a Palm Tree defender, but he
hustled back and stole the ball back. He then carried the
ball up the right wing and hit a nice pass inside to
Secor, who hammered the ball just inside of the post for
a 2-1 lead and half-time.
The second half opened with Max Marnie making
a nice run up the left side before hitting a quality shot
that had goal written all over it. Schoonover had other
ideas though, as he made another diving stop tp-prte-'
PLEASE SEE SPORTS.~NEXT PAGE


Sept. 11, 2001, will be remembered as a tragic moment in American history.
Our country is torn by grief and united in its resolve to end terrorism.
Please display our pull-out full page American flag with pride in your window.
Our thoughts and prayers go to all affected by the Sept. 11 tragedy.
























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Ben Valdivisio races upfield with the ball as Islandl
Real Estate mid fielder Celia Ware gives chase.
SPORTS, FROM PAGE 22
serve the Island Real Estate lead.
Marnie got loose up the left side again a few minutes
later, and this time his left-footed shot was too much for
Schoonover, tying the score at 2-2. Palm Tree Villas al-
most took the lead a few minutes later when Douglas hit
a point-blank shot off of a feed from Valdivisio, but
Schoonover again came up big with the save.
Island Real Estate regrouped and started moving
the ball on offense the way they had in the first half.
Moroz carried the ball up the left side and passed in-
side to Secor, who poked it past the keeper for a 3-2
lead they wouldn't relinquish. They added to their lead


when Celia Ware a workhorse in the midfield all
gan!e passed the ball inside to Moroz, who easily
finished for a 4-2 lead.
Moroz got into the act again when he picked off an
attempted clearing pass and hammered it into the goal
for an imposing 5-2 lead. Palm Tree Villas added a late
goal on an indirect kick from 10 yards out. Douglas
touched the ball for Valdivisio who pummeled the ball
into the upper-right corner of the goal to complete the
scoring for the game.






S 3 525 St. Judes Drive
(5700 Block GMD)
Longboat Key
e urer to w.larosryskiedchn.com 383-0777
New Summer Hors Closed on Mondays 383-0777


OLD HAMBUIRQ

SCHNITZELHAUS


Best German Home Cooking
on Florida's West Coast
* Owner-Chef Brigitte
* Homemade Desserts
* German Beer on Tap


Celebrating

Beginning Friday' Sept. 28 I. ,
Fri. & Sat. Dinner Special
IBravarianl Pork Knu[ckles -L
Lunch Tues-Fri 12-3 pm Dinner Mon-Sat 5-9:30 pm
Anna Maria Island Centre 3246 E. Bay Drive
Holmes Beach 778-1320 RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED


Anna Maria Island Community
Center soccer standings
Division I
Team Record Points
LaPensee Plumbing 2-0-1 7
Mr. Repair-It Man 1-1-0 3
West Coast Refrigeration 0-1-1 1
Island Pest Control 0-1-0 0

Division II
Team Record Points
Air & Energy 2-1-0 6
Mr. Bones 1-0-0 3
Palm Tree Villas 0-2-0 0
Island Real Estate 0-2-0 0

Division III
Team Record Points
Anna Maria Island Spirits 3-0-0 9
Jessie's Island Store 2-0-0 6
Air America 1-1-0 3
Oden-Hardy Construction 0-2-0 0
Galati Marine 0-3-0 0


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26. 2001 U PAGE 23

Center soccer schedule
Division I (12-14 years old)
All games start at 7:30 p.m.
Date Teams
Sept. 27 West Coast Refrigeration vs. Island Pest
Control
Oct. 1 LaPensee Plumbing vs. Mr. Repair-It Man
Oct. 2 LaPensee Plumbing vs. Island Pest Control
Oct. 4 West Coast Refrigeration vs. Mr. Repair-
It Man

Division II (10-11 years old)
Date Time Teams
Sept. 26 7:30 p.m. Palm Tree Villas vs. Mr.
Bones
Sept. 28 7:30 p.m. Mr. Bones vs. Island Real
Estate
Oct. 2 6 p.m. Mr. Bones vs. Air & Energy

Division III (8-9 years old)
All games start at 6 p.m.
Date Teams
Sept. 26 Air America vs. Oden-Hardy Construction
Sept. 27 Galati Marine vs. A.M. Island Spirits
Sept. 28 Jessie's Island Store vs. Oden-Hardy
Oct. 1 Air America vs. Jessie's
Oct. 4 Galati vs. Oden-Hardy

Instructional League (5-7 years old)
Date Time Teams
Sept. 27 6 p.m. The Bistros vs. Danziger Al-
ergy & Sinus
7 p.m. Island Animal Clinic vs. Sun
Oct. 3 6 p.m. The Bistros vs. West Coast
Surf Shop
Oct. 4 6 p.m. Island Animal vs. Longboat
Observer
7 p.m. Danziger vs. Sun



Capalbo's
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Back-to-School

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I $t 99 YI2
with the purchase of a soft drink. I
PLEASE PRESENT COUPON ,
Expires Oct. 3, 2001 i
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Mon.-Sat. 11am-1Opm Sun. 12pm-9pm
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The Islander


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WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY
BRUNCH AND LUNCH Wednesday-Sunday 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
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ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST. NORTH LONGBOAT KEY








Caught in the WAVE
Anna Maria Elementary School students recognized
for civic achievements Sept. 21 at the We Are Very
Exceptional "WAVE" awards include: Jennifer
Walstad, Jordan Wilks, Sarah Scott, Dylan Fasy,
Karissa Fisher, Kelly Guerin, Chandler Hardy,
Cameron Ellsworth, Chris Perez, Zach Evans,
Maargaret Sawyer, Haleigh Ker, Maria Price, Donna
Barth, Daniel Connellv. Justin Dearlove, Nathaniel
Ellsworth, Flanner, McClung, Shelby Daniels, Celia
Ware,.Cameron Moroz, Dylan Quattromani, Lance
Burger and Max Marnie. Recipients of the WAVE
award receive a coupon for a free serving office
cream at Manma Lo's in Anna Maria and a coupon
for a Subwayv Kids Pack.


1 The Islander




$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander pays $50 to the person with the
most correct game-winning predictions. Col-
lect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Is-
lander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
* All advertisers must be listed on the entry to
be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1
2


Winner


4
5
6
7
8
9
10


Mail or deliver to The Islander* 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Name_


SAddress


* Phone


d


* We Get All NFL and
College Football Games!
S10 Satellites 35 TVs!



(941)795-4551
4401 Cortez Road West
7am/' tin y ll Miincsuia









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C ocolates
Fine '.Homemade Candies


Fresh Roasted Nuts Available
Shipping available to all 50 states
761-1500 800 761-1771
7200 Cortez Rd. West
Bradenton
t s lllc (Itt l O ,klnil U



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PAGE 24 04 SEPT. 26. 200 Y THE SLANDER


Advertiser


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-----~-----------






THE ISLANDER M SEPT. 20. 2001 U PAGE 25


Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports available.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 10, 100 block of Gulf Drive North, traffic
crash/DUI. Deborah Hudson, 33, of Bradenton, was
arrested for driving under the influence after a traf-
fic incident. According to the report, witnesses
stated they saw the defendant's vehicle cut off an-
other vehicle on the road, swerve into the oncoming
lane and up onto the curb, hitting a wooden post.
According to police, Hudson then turned around and
drove to Bridge Street, leaving car parts at the scene
and dragging bushes and dirt onto the roadway.
Sept. 12, 1200 block of Cortez Beach, burglary.
A woman reported that $2,600 was stolen from her
purse, which she left in her van while she was at the
beach.
Sept. 14, 2513 Gulf Drive N., Circle K, battery.
A man who was previously issued a trespass warn-
ing entered the store .and attacked the store clerk,
hitting him with his fists. According to the report,
the man told police he had a problem with the clerk
and would do it again.
Sept. 16, 2100 Gulf Drive S., Coquina Park,
warrant. A man was arrested on two warrants from
Pinellas and Hillsborough counties.
Sept. 18. 100 block of Sixth Street North, aban-

---


doned vehicle. Police found a vehicle abandoned on the
roadside with the keys in the ignition. The vehicle was
towed to a lot until the owner could be found.
Sept. 19, 100 block of Fourth Street South, infor-
mation. A woman asked to file a report with police
because she felt her former neighbor was behaving
strangely.
Sept. 19, 500 Gulf Drive S., Cortez Beach, bur-
glary. A woman reported $50 was stolen from her
parked car.
Sept. 20, 1500 Gulf Drive S., warrant. A man
was arrested on outstanding warrants from Manatee
and Sarasota counties.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 14, 6800 Gulf Drive, criminal mischief. A
condo owner reported seeing two juveniles chipping
away at some screening block under her condo.
Sept. 15, 100 block of 81st Street, burglary. An
empty house was reportedly broken into. Police
found empty beer bottles in the bathroom and no-
ticed that the shower had been used.
Sept. 16, 100 block of 29th Street, missing per-
son. A woman reported her teenage son is missing.
According to the report, the woman believes he may
be with another boy in the Tampa area.
Sept. 17, 5800 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
City Hall, theft. A tag from a city dump truck turned
up missing. According to the report, it was later



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Sept. 17, 50th Street beach access, lewdness. A
woman reported that a man fondled himself in view
of where she was sitting on a bench.
Sept. 17, 3801 East Bay Drive, Sunbow Bay,
burglary. A cell phone was reported stolen from a
vehicle.
Sept. 18, 500 block of Key Royale Drive, theft.
A woman reported someone took her dock box,
which contained $600 worth of fishing equipment
and tools.
Sept. 18, 3900 East Bay Drive, Publix, counter-
feit. Police confiscated two $50 bills that proved to
be counterfeit.
Sept. 19, 300 block of 61st Street, theft. A man
reported that several checks were stolen from his
checkbook and that he has been receiving demands
for payment from several stores where the checks
were used. According to the report, 32 checks total-
ing $4,600 were forged.
Sept. 19, 200 block of 71st Street, burglary. A
man reported witnessing two men walk into a
neighbor's carport and steal two bicycles.
Sept. 20, 500 block of 68th Street, theft. A man
reported that the fishing poles he left on his boat are
missing.
Sept. 20, 3803 east bay Drive, Sunbow Bay,
burglary. A man reported his wallet was stolen from
his vehicle.


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PAGE 26 M SEPT. 26. 2001 U THE ISLANDER


Happy/sad stories of terror tragedy; red tide notes


The stories are starting to trickle in on the events
of Sept. I 1. Some are horrific, some heartwarming.
Here are two tales I've heard in the past week.
My friend Myriam was flying to Washington,
D.C., that Tuesday morning from a family reunion in
Brussels. The captain announced about halfway across
the Atlantic that he was experiencing some technical
problems with some of his electronic instruments and
asked the passengers to turn off their pagers and cell
phones.
Then he started a very. very gentle turn back to
Brussels. No one on the plane seemed to notice they
were heading east instead of west.
Myriam said 25 minutes before they were sched-
uled to land in Washington the captain made another
announcement. "I want you all to know that there is
absolutely nothing the matter with this airplane," he
said. "We're just fine."
Airplanes had crashed into the World Trade Cen-
ter, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, he told them.
U.S. air space had been closed to all aircraft. He had
opted to return to Belgium rather than a Canadian des-
tination, and hoped the passengers would understand.
They did. Myriam finally got home Friday, just in
time to learn that her and husband Stan's sailboat had
broken its mooring and was wrecked, a total loss. But
at least she made it home.
Another friend's son was working in one of the
sub-levels of the World Trade Center Tuesday morn-
ing when the building shook. He raced outside to find
the sky filled with falling debris. He took refuge in the
nearest safe building the other tower.
About 15 minutes later he realized that perhaps he
hadn't made such a good decision when a plane
crashed into the upper floors of his refuge. He raced out
again and took off in the general direction of
Greenland.
But he had the presence of mind to start calling
everyone he could think of on his cell phone to tell
them he was all right, and his brother was able to get
ahold of Mom and Dad on board a boat they were va-
cationing on off the coast of Maine.
The captain of the vessel called all the passengers
into the salon for an announcement. "I have something
very serious to tell you." he said to the passengers, "but
before I say anything else, Mollie and Ronnie: Your
son is just fine."
He then recapped the morning's events.
What I like about both stories is that the people in /
authority made their first priority the reassurance of the
people in their care before recounting the terrible trag-
edies of the day. Maybe that's what defines "authority."


One more terrorism impact
Robert B. Parker was scheduled to wrap up a book
tour for his new novel "Death in Paradise" in Sarasota
Oct. 28. In light of the events of Sept. 1 1, Parker has
canceled all signing that require air travel. Since train
travel from Boston to Sarasota is deplorable, the sign-
ing here has been scratched.
However, I understand he may be back in March
to sign copies of his new "Spenser" novel.

From red tide to compost
The folks at START are trying something old-but-
new in their continuing battle against red tide. Jeremy
Whatmough, president of Solutions To Avoid Red
Tide, tried a pilot program to keep dead fish off the
beach during the most recent bloom.
Whatmough said START and others received a
Florida Department of Environmental Protection per-
mit to turn the dead fish into fish meal while the fish
are still floating in the Gulf of Mexico. They contracted
with a Miami-based oil spill recovery ship to scoop up
the fish, dump them via conveyor belt into a huge chop-
ping device, then spew the remains back into the Gulf
where, they hope, the pieces will sink to the bottom and
add to the food chain.
The program sort of worked, Whatmough said,
although there were a few glitches. Eels are one of the
first fish species to succumb to the red tide toxins, and
they found that the long, skinny creatures just sort of
slipped between the blades of the chopper.
They also found that there was an incredible vol-
ume of seagrass that was mixed in with the dead fish.
Ever dumped spinach into a garbage disposal? If you
have, you know the result is a ball of twine that jams
up the blades, and the same problem occurred off-
shore.
Whatmough said they have another half-day re-
maining on their DEP permit, and hope to give the fish
mulching program another shot later.
Hmmm, I thought to myself. Floating seagrass is
home to the little sea turtle hatchlings after they take to


the water after crawling out of their nests on the beach.
I wonder if Suzi Fox of Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch knows about this?
She didn't. And she didn't like it.
"Floating seagrass harbors sea turtles for 10 years,"
Fox said, adding that she would check with the DEP
turtle people soon to find out more about START's
program anid the permit DEP issued.
By the way, Whatmough said there are still high
levels of red tide offshore. A friend on Casey Key told
me Sunday that he had dead fish on his beach and the
throat tickle, so we may be in for more cleanup on Is-
land beaches this week.
As they say, stay tuned.

Can you see me?
Researchers have found that dolphins can see
themselves in a mirror, and recognize who they are. It's
an ability that only humans and apes have.
"The ability suggests a self-awareness that some
experts believe is reserved only for the higher pri-
mates," researchers said. "Attempts to demonstrate this
ability have failed for other animals, including mon-
keys, lesser apes and elephants."
OK, we know that dolphins are pretty smart, so the
ability to see and recognize themselves in a mirror isn't
too big a stretch. But what about a dog?
A buddy of mine just got a new dog, a Shiba inu
named Eddie. The breed is a herding dog from Japan,
weighs about 30 pounds and is described as the most
cat-like canine you can find. They're also very smart.
And Eddie seems pretty vain, too, since he just
loves to look at himself in the mirror. He knows.it's
himself, too, and not another Shiba.
I tried the trick with a mirror and the mutt that lets
me feed her. Characteristically, she was afraid of the
mirror. Of course, the Doberman was also afraid of her
new water dish for a few days.
Go figure.

Sandscript factoid
Red tide, Karenlia. hrevis, is named after. Dr.
Karen Steidinger of St. Petersburg, a world-re-
nowned researcher of the algae bloom. She discov-
ered that the algae we're finding in the.Gulf was
somewhat different that what was found elsewhere
under a different name and gave a talk in Sweden
about it. Apparently a group of scientists over there
also had reached the same conclusions and were able
to get the information published before Steidinger
could, but were kind enough to name the algae after
her.


National beach volleyball teams coming to Island

Nationally recognized volleyball players will be on il ,
the sand of Coquina Beach Saturday and Sunday, Sept.
29 and 30, for the EVP Pro-Aiii Tour National Beach I itl Exlect
Volleyball Championships. ,"s .Np
The weekend activities include special events, con- ol
tests and plenty of volleyball matches for ailIatlcu" le-
doubles and fours teams. "'If you're into the social i, ball
game, enter a restaurant or bar team," said Joe Pickett, aon
organizer of the event. '"This tour stop expects to have X:. 4,; -oqk lin
the largest bar volleyball challenge in Florida. On ceni- Beach
ter court, the EVP Pros will keep you on yourII feet. iI this
- addition, teams from Chicaeo, New York. Tampa and r . c k'n
Miami are scheduled to compete." as the
The beach volleyball event is for everybody in- EVP
clulding local amateur players, spectators and corporate o
teams, Pickett said. Amateur entry fee is $25 per player 01 our
if paid before Sept. 28 at www.evptour.com. The cost Naliona
increases by $5 oil site. The' ntrv fee includes an off i- Beach
cial T-shirt, player pass to the post-games party and .. Vole
plenty of volleyball action. -General seating is lice to I ball
the public. Champi

The games will taile: place from 9..a.m. to 4 p.m. both coine to
days. the
Beach volleyball started inI the early 1970s wheii sev- Isla d.
eral organizations offered entertainment to millions of
players and fans from the West Coast to the East Coast. +
In 1998, the Extreme Volleyball Professionals began its
leap into the national sports entertaininent industry. Some
of the games have been televised nationally. ,
For further details, call Pickett at 756-5343. -
1i a~ i t Z , -, -I'. _r . : .4- I6t48,16 -.. . . ... . ::..


)I1
(I












i-
)/






STHE ISLANDER SEPT. 26. 2001 PAGE 27


Fishing keeps getting better, but watch for red tide


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Fishing picked up last week, as cooler weather
dropped the water temperature and turned on the hun-
ger pains in fish.
In the bays. look for redfish and trout. Snook are
still a little leery of the hook, but the action should pick
up in the coming weeks. Offshore grouper fishing re-
mains excellent, as is the response from lane and man-
grove snapper.
We saw evidence of red tide past Longboat Pass
and signs mullet swimming in fast circles that
didn't look good.
Capt. Curt Morrison and Capt. Ryan Hackney
on the Neva-Miss said offshore fishing is excellent
right now. with plenty of red and gag grouper to make
any client happy. There are also lots of mangrove and
lane snapper out there, plus a few kingfish farther out
in the Gulf.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
mackerel are thick along the beaches. In the backwa-
ter, look for redfish. Snook are still a little slow, but
should pick up when the water starts to cool. Offshore,
grouper fishing remains excellent in about 100 feet of
water.
Capt. Rick Gross on Fishy Business said he's get-
ting "tons" of mackerel up to 28 inches long. They're hit-
ting on live sardines. In the backwater, he's doing well
with small snook, some redfish and flounder.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
Billie Mclnnis caught a 31-inch snook in Miguel Bay
and a pair of nice-sized redfish. Bait is starting to show
up in Terra Ceia Bay, and reds are common neai- the
docks in the Manatee River. One lucky angler also
brought a legal-sized cobia to the dock last week.
Capt. Tom Chay.a on the Dolphin Dreams in
Holmes Beach said he's getting charters onto mackerel,
flounder, trout and reds.
Lee Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
he's getting some nice redfish, trout around the man-
grove islands and flats and good-sized bait is easy to
get. In short, fishing right now is excellent.
'Capt; Thor Smith at Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said redfish are thick in Palma Sola Bay and he's
getting into a few snook and some keeper trout.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip-Tide out of
Holmnes Beach said he's getting red grouper to 20
pounds, lane snapper to 4 pounds, yellowtail snapper
to 4 pounds and a few 8-pound scamp.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's getting some good-


James G. Annis
LICENSED WATERFRONT CONTRACTOR
& ,f II & I, 1 1-11j Itd2


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778-4771
P.O.BOX 1353, Anna Maria, FL 34216
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~8~g~il '


One after another
This lone fisher Saturday, Sept. 22, had already reeled in and released eight snook, and a redfish was on the
line. He was 't alone for long. Capt. Mike Heistand said later in the day he saw nnuerous boats.fishing
around the Anna Maria piers, and reasoned the fish were cooperative because the piers were so quiet, having
been closed for repairs resulting from Tropical Storm Gabrielle damages.


sized trout on the seagrass flats, redfish around the
docks and mackerel on the beaches. Fishing in the
backwater is getting better by the day, he added.
On my boat Magic we have been catching snook,
redfish and mangrove snapper. Ramon and Nancy

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ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDES

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Sep26 6:36 2.2 11:45 1.7 3:33 0.5
Sep 27 8:37 2.2 1:59 1.6 11:45 1.7 4:22 0.4
Sep 28 9:58 2.2 3:23 1.5 5:04 0.5
Sep29 12:03 1.8 4:16 1.3 10:54a* 2.3 5:32 05
Sep30 12:18 1.8 4.59 1.1 11:32a* 2.3 5:58 0.6
Oct I 12:30 1.9 5:34 0.9 12:11 2.2 6:16 0.8
FM Ocl 2 12:33 1.9 6:09 0.8 12:46 2.2 6:38 0.9
Oct 3 12.36 2.0 6:45 0.6 1:25 2.1 6:53 1.0
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


Marra of Bradenton Beach went out with me last week
and we caught mackerel to 27 inches and Nancy caught
two 26-inch redfish. We also got into some big trout
and flounder.
Good luck and good fishing.


IJ J a ~ :J7 -
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FISH TALES WELCOME
We'd love to hear your fish stories, and pictures a
are welcome at The Islander. Just give us a call
at 778-7978 or stop by our office in the
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.


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I







PAGE 28 0 SEPT. 26. 2001 U THE ISLANDER


Dolphin defense drowns Bears, 27-0

The Anna Maria Island Dolphins defense limited
the Bayshore Bears to 75 yards of offense, helping the
team to an impressive 27-0 shutout win, the Dolphins'
second football victory of the season. .
The Dolphins also turned in an impressive perfor- .
mance on offense, getting another big game from work- -: ,'-. .. -" "
horse runner Sam Lott and also significant contribu- _
tions from wide receiver Connor Bystrom, fullback -
Andrew Sutton and quarterback Greg Lowman. K''' -e' ; -
The Dolphins took the lead for good on their sec- :
ond play of the game. After Lott was stopped for three .
yards on first down, Coach Tom Moore called his num-
ber again and Lott responded with 52-yard touchdown 'IS" '
run. Lowman then passed to wide receiver Bystrom for ,
the extra point and a 7-0 lead.
Bayshore took the ensuing kickoff and looked like
they would be able to move the ball on the Dolphins :'. ..
defense behind the running of bruising tailback Jason "
Bottoms. Bottoms carried twice for 12 yards and a first .V. ., .
down before the Bears tried to mix things up with a .
pass play. Defensive end Eric Whitley broke through .
to sack Bears' quarterback Kevin Northcutt and strip
him of the ball, which was recovered by Lott.
On first down, Lowman dropped back and threw. -
a beautiful fade pass to Bystrom who went high into
the air to make the catch for a first down. A 21-yard
run on a counter play by Lott was followed by an I 1-
yard run up the gut by fullback Sutton. Lowman got
the call on quarterback keepers on the next two plays .
e cl on q k o t n t Dolphin defenders harassed the Bear's quarterback all game long.
and found pay dirt with a nine-yard touchdown run.
Lowman ran the same play to score the extra point, .,
giving the Dolphins a 14-0 lead as the first quarter
came to a close.
Bayshore ran Bottoms on first down for 12 yards
before Northcutt gained four yards on a quarterback
keeper. Two false-start penalties pushed the Bears "
back 10 yards. The Bears attempted to run a sweep ,
to Bottoms, but Dolphin defenders Sean Price and
Curtis Reynolds laid the lumber on him, forcing a '
fumble that was recovered by defensive tackle Tan- . S'
ner Pelkey.
The Dolphin offense took advantage of their de-
fenses' gift by putting together an impressive 67-yard
drive that saw four different players contribute. Lott ran "
for two yards on first down before Bystrom caught the 1.

Srun on a reverse. Lowman then executed a play-action
pass to perfection when he connected with Lott on a 27-
yard screen pass that would have gone for a touchdown
had it not been for a shoestring tackle by Bottoms.
Lowman carried for three yards on first down, fol-
lowed by a four-yard gain on a dive play by Sutton.
Lott swept around the left side for nine yards before
Lowman snuck it into the end zone from one yard out.
Lowman again found Bystrom with a pass to score the ,.. .
extra point and give the Dolphins a 21-0 lead. '
The Dolphins added another touchdown late in the .
third quarter that was set up by a 20-yard run by reserve ,
tailback Mikey Schweitzer which took the ball down to
the ..Bear 10-yard line. Schweitzer's run set tup Connor Bvstrom races -arund the left end on a Mikey Schweitzer follows his blockers on the way to
Lowman's I -yard touchdown pass to Lott to complete reverse good for 23 yard's. a 20-arcl run.
the scoring in the game.
Lott finished with 86 yards rushing on five carries,
including the 52-yard touchdown run. Lott also caught Defen-
two passes for 38 yards and a touchdown, while record- sive end
ing eight solo tackles and recovering a fumble. Most of Eric
SLott's tackles on Bayshore's bruising tailback Jason Whilev
Bottoms had Lott as the last person standing between i corrals
Bottoms and the ,oal line. p agtS T e Be
Lowman turned in perhaps his most impressive quarter-
performance at quarterback, completing three of four ack
passes for 56 yards, including an I I-yard touchdown Kevin
pass to Lott and a 23-yard completion for a first down NorthcutKevi
to wide receiver Bystrom. Bystrom added an I8-yard
gain on a reverse in addition to catching an extra point
pass from Lowman. Sutton provided powerful running '
between the tackles, carrying the ball seven times for
38 yards.
The Bears were led by Bottoms, who was the Bears
only viable offensive threat, gaining 65 yards on eight
carries. ,- .I .
Coach Moore took the win in stride, saying, "We
played well today, but we'll need an even bigger effort
on Thursday when we take on the Cowboys."
Get out to Police Athletic League field at 202 13th
Ave. E. and catch some of the Dolphin action. The next
game is at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27.









Real Estate


Island real estate sales
523 68th St., Holmes Beach, a canalfront 1,766 sfla
3bed/2bath/2car/pool home built in 1970 on an 87x 108
lot, was sold 7/26/01, Garner to Meyer, for $465,000;
list $479,000.
618 Dundee, Holmes Beach, a canalfront 1,607
sfla 3bed/2bath/2car/pool home built in 1968 on a
95x 115 lot, was sold 7/26/01, Handley to McGuire, for
$370,000; list $395,000.
104 Second St. N., Bradenton Beach, a 1,248 sfla


DICK MAHER
AND
DAVE JONES '"
ISLAND SPECIALISTS









T ^41j Resort-style Living at
TOWN & COUNTRY
i aPERICO
FEATURING:
*i Spacious 1 & 2 BR Apartments
Attractive Island Location
Pool & Spa
Fitness Center
Lake or Nature Views
Optional Garages
SFree Boat Parking*
Roman Tubs
Small Pets Welcome





A P- ARTt-E -N T-S
TOWN & COUNTRY PERICO

941-795-4899
HOURS: Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5
Directions From U.S. 41 travel west on Manatee
Avenue (SR 64) and across Palma Soa Causeway
to Perco sand. Town & Country Perico
wilt be onthe left.
www.tchome.com
Limited time offer certain restrictions apply.
'Size restrictions apply.


Topical ,
Properties


5500 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, FL
941-779-2580
Fax: 941 779-2602
After Hours:
Larry Albert 725-1074
Greg Oberhofer 720-0932


. -

723 KEY ROYALE DRIVE
Bayfront with incredible view of Tampa
Bay. 3BR/3.5BA (two master suites.) Gour-
met kitchen, fireplace, dock, boat lift and
seawall. $1,085,000.

BUILD YOUR NEW ISLAND BEACH HOUSE
Two great lots: 803 Gladiolus St. $340,000
303 South Bay $295,000
^ -*


2bed/lbath home built in 1974 on a 50x103 lot, was
sold 8/1/01, Mendoca to Green, for $280,000; list
$299,000
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 291 Runaway
Bay, a 1,080 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1998, was
sold 8/2/01, Viars to Lukas, for $215,000.

Compiled bh Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, 778-1222, exclusively.for The Islander. Copy-
right 2001.



Kl5LANP -^^' Hk
VACATION
PROPERTIES, LLC
SALES AND RENTALS
Ann (Harmon) Caron
TO BUY ... TO RENT ... TO SELL ...
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
941.778.6849 1.800.778.9599
www.islandvacationproperties.com


E mail: info@smithrealtors.com
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


COMMERCIAL. Unique opportunity to invest in a nine
unit income producing commercial property located in
a very desirable area of Holmes Beach. Three apart-
ments with some Gulf views, hair salon, daycare, two
storage units and two workshops. Records of the many
upgrades, renovations and repairs upon request.
Owner willing to hold some financing. $765,000. Call
Susan Hatch, Realtor 778-7616 eves.


LONGBOAT KEY SINGLE FAMILY LOTS. Nine-home
subdivision on 6.53 acres with only five lots remaining.
Boat docks, community pool, near beach access.
Priced from $230,000. Call Carol Williams, Broker or
Clarke Williams, Realtor for details, 744-0700 eves.


WEEKLY OR MONTHLY RENTAL 2BR/2BA house with gor-
geous Gulf/bay view from a large living room. Right on the
beach. Fully equipped. See www.smithrealtors.com in residen-
tial The Wilson House. Call Michael Cerene, Realtor (941) 778-
0770 or (800) 741-3772 or email rentals@smithrealtors.com.
1BR/1BA Condo, first floor, refurnished. Pool. $1,500/mo.
2BR/2BA Condo on the beach. Furnished. Monthly, $3,600/mo.
2BR/2BA House on the bay with private dock. Monthly,
$2,300/mo.
2BR/2BA House on the beach. Furnished, new tile. View of
the Gulf. Monthly, $3,500/mo.
Call Michel Cerene, Realtor, 941-778-0770.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden
MLS 1l


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 E PAGE 29

SFIAN MAXON 1
REAL ESTATE Inc.",0
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
(941) 778-2307 9701 Gulf Drive Anna Maria
VACATION RENTALS
Call for our color brochure 800 306-9666
or visit us at www.franmaxonrealestate.com
Bradenton Ironwood Condo. Pool, golf, clubhouse,
furnished. Annual $850/month;
six-month seasonal $1300/month.
ANNUAL RENTALS
1BR/1BA Gulf view ~ $625/month
2BR/1BA Gulf view ~ $850/month
S2BR5/1BA North Shore $700/month


Advertising works fast in The Islander.


ANNA MARIA


REAL ESTATE, LLC
REAL ESTATE, LLC


Gloria Schorpp


Helen White Mary Ann Schmidt


PALMA SOLA BAYFRONT
3BR/4.5BA contemporary cedar home. Panoramic
ciew of Palma Sola Bay. More than 5,000 sq. ft. of
living area. Cathedral ceiling, elevator, loft,'family
room, den, pool and spa, deck and boar dock.
$699,900.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX PLUS
2BR/2BA, 2BR/1 BA plus 1BR/1BA guest quarters.
Freshly painted and beautifully landscaped. Double
lot, short walk to beach, restaurants and shops. Gen-
erates good income. $449,900.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS CONDO
2BR/2BA immaculate, turnkey furnished. View of
lush landscaping and heated pool. Ceramic tile and
Berber carpeting, glassed-in lanai. $289,900.
BEACH HOUSE
4BR/4BA turnkey furnished beach house west of
Gulf Drive in historic Anna Maria City. Large lot,
great rental. $495,000.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB
2BR/2BA oLed condo.
Gorgeous SO-Leared pool,
excellent rental income. $475,000.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEXES
3BR/2BA & 2BR/1BA duplex west of Gulf Drive.
Near gorgeous beach. Large yard. $249,000.
2BR/2BA each. Close to beach, new roof and
carpeting. Large lot. Excellent rental. $299,900.


Julie Gilstrap-Royal


Patti Marifjeren


ANNUAL RENTALS
308 63rd STREET
2BR/2BA duplex, garage W8'0t month

SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and I-Homes Weekly/Monthly
firom $500 week / $1000 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA


MS SiCoast
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


[sith


I.C


L






PAGE 30 E SEPT. 26, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


ITM FRSAEGRAESAETANPRTTO


TWO MCGREGOR PUTTERS: 1920 Hickory shaft
and 1950 glass shaft. $75 for both. Call 792-4274.

SHARP Hi8 VIEWCAM. Model 875. Three-inch color
LCD screen, 220x digital 200m, hi-fi audio, touch
screen controls, extra battery, charger, AV hook-ups.
Less than one year old, in mint condition. Asking
$300. 748-6222.

TALL WOOD CABINET with five shelves, $75. Call
Chef Damon, 778-5320.

TWIN-BED MATTRESS, Box-spring, and frame. Like
new, $60. Perico Bay Club. 798-9641.

CABLE BOXES. View your favorite movie channels.
One-year warranty. (877) 827-3316.



YOGA AND MEDITATION with Harmony Feldman.
Classes begin Tuesday, Oct. 2. Beginners- 4pm,
advanced beginners- 2pm, mixed levels- 5:30pm.
921-0074.

FREE KITTENS to good home. Three to choose
from: Two orange males, and one gray-striped fe-
male. 778-6304.


WATERFRONT HOMES
201 North Harbor Drive....... ................ .899.000
2306 Canasta Drive ......... ................ $895.000
722 Keu Royale Driee ........... ............. 569.000
122 Hammock Rd .............................. 405.000
525 Bauview Place............ ................... 395.000
ISL._ND.I _OA_!.S_ AND. CQNDOS
100 7th St. S .................. ..... ... 569.000
Bradenron Beach Club ................... From S500.000
Beachualk Tounhomes New Project ... from S434.900
210 67th St...................... .. .......S449.000
203 North Harbor ............................... .439.000
308 57th Street ................................5S369.000
4002 6th Ave ..................................... 369.000
DLPLE.XES
2500 Gulf Drive .. ................................ S825.000
308 57th St ...................... ................S... 369.000
FOUR-PLEXES
106 7th St. ............................................. 849.000
104 23rd Street North ............................. 5599.999
MAINLAND
2418 90th St. NW ............................ S3.495.000
7419 8th Ave. NW .............................. 229.900
Regatta Pointe Condo ....... ......... ...S199.000







Simply the Best


Mike Sally Lisa Marianne Rochelle

Largest Selection of
Rentals on Anna Maria!

70+ Gulffront Units
m Hundreds more just steps
from the beach
Four full-time rental agents


Mike
Norman
Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617
3101 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217


ROSER THRIFT SHOP open Tuesday and. Thurs-
day, 9:30am-2pm. Saturday, 9am-noon. Wednesday,
9am-11am, donations only. Always sales racks. 511
Pine Ave., Anna Maria.

GARAGE SALE. Now through Oct. 1. House being
demolished. Windows, garage doors, furniture. 1606
Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach. Mark: 228-0822.

MAKE AN OFFER! Friday, Sept. 28, 9am-3pm. Bring
a bag or box to fill. Some furniture, a few antiques, lots
of household items. 111 Los Cedros, Anna Maria.

YARD SALE. 8am Friday, Sept. 28, and Saturday, Sept.
29. Kids' clothes, toys, educational stuff, tools, fishing pools,
furniture. 105 Fourth St. S., Bradenton Beach.



FOUND FERRET: Call 748-2860.



CRITTER SITTER Six years in pet care, 21 years as
an Island resident. Tender, loving care for your pets
with in-home visits. 778-6000.

ANIMAL LOVER? Foster, adopt or help transport
dachshunds for coast-to-coast dachshund rescue.
Call Shona at 941-761-2642 for information.
www.c2cdr.org.



FRESH MULLET SALE
ore than a mullet wrapper




The Islander
Mullet T-shirts M,L,XL $10 XXL $12
Mail order add $3 for postage and handling.
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217


i fi


Why settle for less with an older remodeled Gulffront
home at same or higher price than your brand new home
situated on this breathtaking location! Panoramic views
and private beach is yours on this state and city
approved Gulf lot. Reduced to $849,500.
We also have other "near" and "Gulf" listings too!


SM 4
K- Since
MARIE 1957 LIC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gull Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


1990 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD. Good condition.
$2,000, or best offer. 778-3597.



FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander, 778-7978.

LARGE AND LUXURIOUS houseboat for sale,
$62,000. Shown by appointment only. Call for more
information. 704-4133.

BOAT/TRAILER STORAGE/DOCKAGE. Vacation or
long term. Private ramp, wash-down areas. Minutes
to Intracoastal, Gulf, restaurants, bait. Captain John's
Marina. 792-2620. Bottom painting, rentals, service.

BOAT SLIP for rent. Convenient to 63rd Street boat
ramp, Seaside Gardens. Call 778-5719.

27-FOOT PONTOON with 1999 Honda 9-HP engine,
excellent condition, 8-by-10-foot full enclosure, new
seats, new bottom paint. 778-2761.

H W

SPORTS AND FEATURE writer for thriving weekly
newspaper. Journalism experience a must. Mail, fax
or e-mail resume to The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL. 34217. Fax 778-9392, e-mail
news @islander.org.






SA IA




( )8 6 O F 8 8 0
611Maia rve -ole BahF 32.


The Islander

Don't leave the Island
without taking time
to subscribe. Visit us
at 5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping
Center, Holmes each
or call
941-778-7978.


nv


SREALTOR.
27 Years of Professional Service

Let us pray together for peace.

OUR LISTINGS DON'T EXPIRE, WE SELL THEM!
RIVERFRONT 2BR/2BA condo. Boat dock.
clubhouse. elevator. S 124.900.
DIRECT IGULFFRONT 2BR/2BA. sunsets, turnkey
furnished. North Holmes Beach. Call Dolly Young. S425.000.
PERICO SHORES LAKEFRONT
3BR/2BA quality home. room lor pool. Furnished. S324.900.
COMMERCIAL
WALGREENS Triple net. AAA. good CAP. S2.65 million.
SUPERMARKET Plus rental income and inventory. S3.150.000.
VACANT CONVENIENCE STORE Sarasota. S419.000.
STYLING SALON Eight stations. 35+ years. 539.000.
RENTALS
VACATION SEASONAL ANNUAL
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
tdy41@aol.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


I www.mikenormanrealty.com


~Q~Z






THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 0 PAGE 31



H n ndH W I 7 .. V C


OPPORTUNITIES: HONEST, DEPENDABLE, ener-
getic people. Waitress, breakfast daily; cleaning, bed
and breakfast and motel; laundry. Call 778-6335.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.

LONGBOAT KEY CENTER for the Arts is seeking a
computer-knowledgeable, front-desk receptionist.
POS experience desirable; will train. Full-time, or
negotiable part-time hours, October through April. $8/
hour. Call Diane Harrison, 383-2345, or send resume
and letter of interest to LBKCA, 6860 Longboat Drive
S., Longboat Key. FL 34228.

MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT: Part-time, depend-
able, responsible person to work 7am to noon, Mon-
day-Friday, $7/hour. Anna Maria Island Community
Center. Call Bill, 778-1586.

ISLANDER NEEDED for part-time position (8:30am-
1pm) as office assistant/appointment setter. Please
respond to West Coast Refrigeration, 5347 Gulf Drive
#4, Holmes Beach FL 34217. Phone: 778-9622.


415 SPRING AVENUE, ANNA MARIA
Annual Rental
3BR/2BA home $1,000 month

Doug Dowling Realty
409 Pine Ave. Anna Maria, FI 34216
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
www.dougdowling.com



-Al IAR~
ID Y URSOUCEFR H


GARDENER WANTED part-time, 10 to 20 hours per
week. Call John at Key Royale Club: 778-4598.



MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gardens,
trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-working and
responsible. Excellent references. Edward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

BATHROOM REMODELING. Water damaged dry-
wall, tiling, texturing, painting. Reliable, over 20 years
experience. Call Fred, 752-7758 or 545-6141, cell.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your computer
misbehaving? Certified computer service and private les-
sons. Special $10 per hour- free advice. 545-7508.

SOS SERVICES. Full-service cleaning/organization
for your entire home. Professional, experienced, and
references. Free estimates. Call Sharon, 920-1992.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs-hardware,
software, network, commercial, private. Call 778-8473.

KATHY'S CLEANING SERVICE. I will clean your
home to your satisfaction. Negotiable rates. Call 722-
4358.



One of the biggest names
in mortgages is right in

your own backyard.

ire guaranteed by a variety
of products offered by one of the
nation's top mortgage lenders.
Plus, the knowledge of loan
officers like Ron Hayes who
are Fl niliar with iand dedicated
to your local community.
So, whatever your mortgage RON HAYES
necds fixed ratre, adjustable rate, jumbo, govern-
ment, call Ron locll. for a fi-ee consultation at
(941) 761-9808 (24 hours) or (800) 559-8025.

H.CHASE M
Manhatton Mortgoge Corporoation


HURRICANE PROTECTION for your home. Choose
shutters or Glass Sentinel, a super-strength protec-
tive shield. Call ESP Island Shutters. Licensed, in-
sured, free estimates. Call 778-2840.


ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results, wash
away mildew, dirt and salt. Thorough, reasonable and re-
liable. Free estimates, licensed and insured. 778-0944.

TODD LASOTA TILE and handyman service. Tile
work, painting, some electrical, appliance repair,
automotive, maintenance, odd jobs, miscellaneous
repairs. Call 383-5623.

TWO CHEFS PERSONAL CHEF SERVICES-Cater-
ing to your every need. Holidays, special occasions,
private dinners, packages. 778-4532. www.two-
chefs-catering.com.


HOUSECLEANING reliable. Call 795-1112.

WEST COAST NUISANCE Wildlife Service. Call us.
for problems with raccoons, snakes, possums or any
nuisance animals. Lic. by F.W.C. On call 24-hours,
call 941-778-3455.

NEED HELP? Retired police chief and Island resi-
dent offers to repair, paint, clean, etc., anything in
your house. No job too small. 778-4256.






-, Es:. *e. II n c

Office9177 030"Fx94 -7 0 8 Toll FreeI866-779-030


The best kept secret in town is this adorable 2BR/1BA home with
more than 1,300 sq. ft. of living area. Features include open plan
with tile through out, laundry room, one-car garage, outdoor shower
and best of all it has a deeded boat dock. Asking $279,900. Dial
Darcie Duncan at 779-0304 to see this great property.


'I.


$420,000 WOW! WHAT A
VIEW! Direct Gulffront, 2BR/2BA
condo in a well maintained com-
plex. Slate floor entry. Heated pool,
carport. utility area in unit. Close to
everything. IB77433.
$359,000 ONE OF THE
FEW... Gulffront condos available.
2BR/2BA with security entrance, el-
evator and heated pool. Bonuses are
a one-car garage and extra storage
space. Turnkey furnished. Appli-
ances have been updated. IB75628.


$525,000 ANNA MARIA SAIL-
BOAT WATER No bridge to open
bay. Very private, large property in
Anna Maria. Short walk to the most
beautiful beaches. Crystal-clear caged pool. Wonderful
tiles in living/dining room. Very open with tons of
possibilities. IB74199

1810 59th Street West, Bradenton
(941) 778-0766 (877) 924-9001
Visit our website at www.ArvidaRealty.com


IS


2217 GULF DRIVE NORTH BRADENTON BEACH, FL 34217






-PAGE 32 0 SEPT; 26, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER

Commercial Residential.* Free Estimates
Sandy'S Lawn Mowing. Trimming. Edging
Lwn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Lawnte We Monitor Irrigation Systems
Service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
Established in 1983

o', ja-'v riivo', STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@ av'uj[iJi 'i CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
6, LeU'_@Tci JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
L@@L9T3U@ITD!I.L Building Anna Maria since 1975
@'@NiBUif'VC<., (941) 778-2993



Residential Commercial
Check ourr relrences': '*
"Qualiy wrk at a reasonable price. "
Licensed/insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900


Paradise Improvements 778-4173
S Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
I11Mm -- Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755



Water Damaged Drywall Tiling Painting
HAND AND SPRAY TEXTURE
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20 years experience
Fred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141

















RoluL. Complete Corian Counter Top Service
Commercial Residential
Dupont Certified
Dave Spicer 778-2010


1We're



Totally

Global!

In fact, we're global times 1,400 plus!
More than 1,400 PAID subscribers receive
The Islander out of town, out of state and
out of the United States. We go to Alaska,
England, Germany, Canada, Hawaii
and nearly all points in between.
These news-hungry subscribers can't wait
to get their hands on
"the best news on Anna Maria Island."



Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive
S Holmes Beach FL 34217
941 778-7978 email: news@islander.org

S****** CLIP AND SAVE '- *********
0*
": WATERING RESTRICTIONS :
S Rules in effect for Manatee County:


" Lawn and landscape \walcrill is limited 10 one d;ay a
week.
SAddresses ending inI even nimbehrs(or A M): Tuesday. L
S,-\ldre-lc.' iir' n! odd n11umbers (or N Z): Sunday. 0
Irrigation not al lwed lfrIOInI 10 a. to 4 p.m. Irri.galion
with treated wastIe 'S..i1 allowed any time.)
Owners cain wali.their vehicles anytime as long as they
use a hand-held hosewith a shut-off nozzle. (Pull the car onl
the lawn to washh)
Rinsing boats and Ilushing of boat motors is allowed for
ten minutes daily.
SHand-watering of plants. NOT LAWNS, is permitted
any day.
Questions or comments? Call the Southwest Florida 0
Water Manaigement District (Swiftmud) toll-free: I1-800-
423-1476.


I S ANDER C ASS9I


PROPERTY CARETAKER. I will look after your resi-
dential, rental or commercial property in terms of se-
curity, regular upkeep, light maintenance, tidiness, etc.
Dependable. References. Call 778-7462.

GOLF LESSONS. Learn to play or fix your swing.
Call for appointment and rates. Carol Codella,
USFTF, 779-2429.

PHOTOGRAPHY. Experienced Island husband/wife
team offer professional wedding day photos, and
glamour or family portraits at reasonable rates.
Please call 778-9436, or 704-7283, leave message.
www.hometown.aol.com/jlrobertsonphoto/
photo.html



ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If
it's broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior dis-
count. Call 778-2581 or 713-0676.

CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING and Lawn Mainte-
nance. Residential and commercial. Full-service
lawn maintenance, clean-ups, tree trimming, haul-
ing, Xeriscape. Island resident. Excellent refer-
ences. 778-5294.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching; trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.



PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and in-
stallation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and
trees. Irrigation and pest control service. Everything
Under the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. 778-4441.

SHELL DELIVERED and spread. $27 a yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 795-7775.

BAY-AREA LAWN CARE. Residential and commer-
cial. Inside and out. Licensed and insured. All work
guaranteed. Call Jonathan, 778-3078.

STRAIGHT-SHOT LANDSCAPE Service. Installa-
tions, Koi ponds, clean-ups and hauling. Shell
delivered and installed as low as $26.50 per yard.
727-5066.



VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill, 795-5100 or cell 809-3100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993.
Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free estimates.
35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at 778-1730.

CHRISTIES PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction.
Free estimates, no overtime charges. Now certify-
ing back flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more by
Hunter Douglas and other major manufacturers. Life-
time warranty. Call Island resident Keith Barnett for a
free in-home consultation. Many Island references, 15
years experience. 941-778-3526 or 730-0516.

THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. Interior, ex-
terior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Have sawmill,
will travel. 745-1043 Dan Michael, master carpenter.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile sup-
plied and installed. Quality workmanship, prompt, re-
liable, many Island references. Call Neil, 726-3077.


0 00000 *0000000000*0000000 000


GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates,
call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodeling,
repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths. Free
estimates. Lic#CGC061519, #CCC057977,
#PE0020374. Insured. Call 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, depend-
able restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine
finishing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist.
Repairs, painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

B&D SEAMLESS aluminum gutters, 5 or 6 inch
available. Insured, free estimates. Dean Guth, owner
and operator, 729-0619.

TILE, CARPET, LAMINATE supplied and installed.
Why pay retail? Island resident, many references.
Free estimates, prompt service. Steve Allen Floor
Coverings. 383-5381, or 726-1802.

CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Contractor. Remodeling,
additions, new homes, design service. Free esti-
mates. Call 795-1947. Lic #RR-0066450.

HANDY ANTHONY. Jack of most trades. Home re-
furbishing and detailing, 778-6000.

MIKE McCALEB, ARCHITECT, P.A. 10-year Island
resident, 25 years experience. Remodels, new
homes, commercial. FEMA, DEP, waterfront. #AR-
0014004. 778-5560.

BEST HOME IMPROVEMENT. Repair and remod-
eling. 20-years experience, references; free esti-
mates. One-year warranty on all labor. Forget the
rest, call the best. 779-9032.

UGLY MAILBOX? Mailbox makeovers, curb-appeal.
Special: standard aluminum mailbox, four-by-four
post; sealed, painted, planted, $65. Deluxe/custom
available, 778-0944.



VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across from
beautiful beach, $350/week. Fall and spring dates
available. Almost Beach Apartments, 778-2374.

ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

SEASONAL 3BR/3BA Holmes Beach townhouse.
Beautiful unit, great location, heated pool, washer/
dryer, garage, much more! 713-0096 for more infor-
mation.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB: Direct Gulf front 2BR/
2BA. Great fall rates! August-December 2001. Ask
about our Fall 2001 and May 2002 Golf Special.
Frank (716) 454-7434.





SEWON NORATHPOFLE CODED
LREO E O MNACRERGA KN AEG LE
MCAN STATES AHEEH R T ER
ODA Y T R IA RL0ER OCTE
I F IAT S SHORTENED H E P TO
AN T SPR E R COO S L O B
T THE LANG RESTSUP AR S
GHETT 0 S R E T RO TR E N T E
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STEPS TO THE BEACH. 2BR/1BA with washer/
dryer, screened lanai. $800/monthly, utilities not in-
cluded. 778-1345.

ANNA MARIA ANNUAL 2BR/2BA large, open floor
plan, tastefully decorated, new appliances, washer/
dryer, ground level. 142 Cresent, Anna Maria.
$1,200/month or $1,400/month with six month
lease. Call Bob, (813) 839-3800.

2BR/1BA DUPLEX with large screened lanai in
Anna Maria. Annual lease required, no pets. First,
last and security. 792-8817.

ANNUAL ONLY 2BR/1BA directly on Gulf in
Bradenton Beach. $1,000/month, assurity/security
required with contract. 792-2779.

ANNA MARIA CANALFRONT HOME. 2BA/2BA Fur-
nished and completely updated with new kitchen and
baths. Boat dock, large fenced in yard. Pets OK. $2,750/
month. Available month/season. (813) 258-6405.

ANNA MARIA PROPERTIES desperately needed!
Immediate waiting list for rental units, especially
3BR/2BA. Call Tracy at Wedebrock Real Estate
778-6665.

AUTUMN SPECIAL 1BR/2BA, furnished, clean,
steps from beach, Anna Maria Island. Pets wel-
come. $350/week; $1,198/month. Call 778-1098.

HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT home. 2BR/2BA
furnished home, garage, laundry, dock, many ex-
tras. Available monthly/weekly. Open now through
Dec. 31. Call for cost and details, (813) 286-9814.

2BR/2BA with three-car garage and bonus room,
storage. Walk to beach, shopping. No pets. $1,200/
month furnished/unfurnished. Call Vicki Tessmer
after hours, 779-0239. T. Dolly Young Real Estate.

BAYFRONT COTTAGES with docks. Turnkey,
.beautiful views,breezy, quiet area. No pets/smok-
ing. Priced from $700/month, $350/week. 941-794-
5980. www.divefish.com.

SEASONAL FURNISHED new home in Anna Maria.
2BR/2BA, elevated. One block to beach. Available
now through April. (813) 251-9201.

BRADENTON BEACH BAYFRONT. 1BR/1BA, one
block to beach. $700/month, first, last and security.
779-9074.

BEACH RENTAL 2BR/1BA, completely furnished.
One house from Gulf. No pets. Available October-
Dec. 15. Two-week minimum. (813) 689-0925.

BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED canalfront home 3BR/
2BA. 524 75th St., Holmes Beach. Available now
thru January. $1,750/month, includes tax. (941)
920-1558 or (941) 485-1373.


ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach 1BR/1BA $600/
month. Also, 2BR/1 BA $750, Available immediately.
First, last and security. 795-7805.

SAN REMO SHORES. 2BR/2BA on canal. One car
garage, annual rental. Available now. First, last,
security. 795-7805.

526 56th ST., HOLMES BEACH, on water. 2BR/
1BA, $750/month. 741-8688.

WANTED TO RENT month of February, Anna Maria
area. 1BR or 2BR condo or house, no stairs. King-
size master bed, pool, waterview (canal, bay,
beach). Quiet location. Contact (952) 474-1392. E-
mail, JD1927@aol.com.

SEASONAL FURNISHED RENTAL Holmes Beach.
2BR/1BA elevated house. $1,200/month, plus tax.
Available through December 2001. 778-5908.

ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH. 1BR/1BA, steps to
beach, newly remodeled, new paint, ceramic tile,
very clean. $598/monthly. (941) 410-4466 or 924-
5199.

2BR/2BA ANNUAL UNFURNISHED. Bright and
spacious, new kitchen, appliances, tile, washer/
dryer, etc. Quiet, secure neighborhood close to
beach. $895/month, first, last, and security. Small
pet considered, non-smokers preferred. 778-9798,
778-4573, or (305) 296-1127.

1BR AND 2BR SEASONAL. $1,600 to $1,800/
month. Call T. Dolly Young Real Estate, 778-0807.

HOLMES BEACH STUDIO apartment. Separate
entrance and porch. Two blocks to beach, close to
library and shopping. 778-7039.

ANNA MARIA 2BR upstairs apartment. Available
now through March. Nicely decorated. Located
fourth house from shore. (616) 754-6349.

3BR/2BA DUPLEX ANNUAL. Central air-condition-
ing, washer/dryer hook-up. Pets OK. Near beach,
low utilities. Shady porch, fenced yard. Available
now, $795/month. 778-7431.

STEP BACK IN TIME, updated, historic, furnished
home. 150-feet from beach. 4BR/2BA, screened
porch, wood floors. $1,500/month. (813) 251-3105
or (813) 220-0916.

HOLMES BEACH TOWNHOUSE. Steps to beach.
Annual 2BR/1.5BA, washer/dryer, ceiling fans, cen-
tral air-conditioning, quiet area, central location, no
pets, $795/month. 778-6743.

NEEDED: SMALLER HOUSE in Anna Maria for
annual rental. Local references. Must move in be-
fore Dec. 1. 778-4991.


THE ISLANDER E SEPT. 26, 2001 0 PAGE 33

YVONNE HIGGINS
WAGNER REALTY
Call me to find the .,,
Best Properties of the Iland t
778-2246 or 800 21 -2323 'A



"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 7781 /9 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 778-3468


=* f S gll


+ Trust the professionals
Island Discount Tackle 941 778-7688



in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 835-4340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome









tI[ NU-Weatherside of Florida
CLAC286523 SINCE 1948
S WINDOW REPLACEMENT
-I
778-7074 Financing Available


ISLAND LUMBER
AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


MILESTONE

m HOMES, INC
A General Contracting Company

Remodels Decks Driveways
Additions Replacement Windows
941-779-0551 Based in Holmes Beach





:PLU BIN .. ----OPNATU- RDAYS


---- --------------------------------------
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES- BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 forup to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 foreach
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CQNVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
------------------- ------------------T

2
3
Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
IFor credit card payment: -i U No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:
Billing address zip code: House no. or post'office box no. on bill

g 5404 Marina Drive dFax: 941778-9392
Holmes Beach FL 34217 T e ISlander Phone: 941 778-7978
E-mail news@islander.org
L------------------------------------------


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
%.N Residential Commercial
*-\. Restaurant Mobile Home
N- Condo Assoc. '% Vac and Intercom
~-. Lightning Repair \ Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978





PAGE 34 SEPT. 26. 2001 T THE ISLANDER


RENALSC tinuedRE s coninuSTA


CLEAN AND UPDATED 2BR/2BA ground-level,
annual rental near beach in Holmes Beach. $850/
month. Marina Pointe Realty Co., 779-0732.



WATERFRONT HOME $62,000. It's a large 1BR/
1BA houseboat. Jacuzzi on top deck. Must see to
appreciate. Call 778-3526 for appointment.

WATERFRONT TRIPLEX. 502 South Bay Drive,
Bradenton Beach. All kinds of possibilities.
$455,000,741-8688.

DUPLEX HOLMES BEACH, 1BR/1BA per unit.
Newly remodeled, newer roof, storage shed, ce-
ramic tile throughout, parking. $198,500. (941) 410-
4466, cell phone.

GULF WATCH CONDO 2BR/2BA, direct bayfront.
Premium upgrades. One of a kind, and below mar-
ket. 601 Gulf Drive N., 720-3400.

LONGBOAT KEY CANALFRONT 3BR/1 BA home.
100-by-75-foot lot, easy bay access. One-year
warranty includes roof. Priced below appraisal at
$299,000. Call Rich Bohnenberger Realty,
778-0355.


PALMA SOLA PARK pool home, 4BR/2BA, two-car
garage, 2,450 square feet. Shown by appointment,
by owner. Call days, 809-3100, or evenings, 795-
5100.

OPEN HOUSE. TWO DUPLEXES ON CANAL.
Short walk to beach and beautiful view of canal/
bayou. Lush, tropical landscaping. Quiet, private
setting. Great for rental or family compound.
$579,000. Open Sunday, Oct. 1, from 1pm-4pm.
604 North Shore Drive, Anna Maria. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Wagner Realty, 720-3879.

2BR/2BA CONDO. Overlooks Grassy Point.
Washer/dryer, ceramic floors. Close to shopping
and beach. Clean, unfurnished annual, $1,050/
month. 778-1179.

OPEN HOUSE: bayfront 2BR/2BA condo. Walk to
beach. Laundry room, ceramic tile, fresh paint,
newer appliances, turn-key furnished. Unit and com-
plex in great shape. $259,000. Open Saturday,
Sept. 30, and Sunday, Oct. 1, from 1pm-4pm. Unit
301, Bridgeport Condominiums, 501 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach. Call Yvonne Higgins at Wagner
Realty, 720-3879.


INCOME PROPERTY DUPLEX. 2BR/2BA and
1BR/1BA. Updated Island duplex near beach and
north of Manatee Avenue. $257,000. Marina Pointe
Realty Co., 779-0732.



DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wednesday publica-
tion. UP to 3 line minimum includes approximately 21
words $9.00. Additional lines $3.00 each. Box: $3.00.
Ads must be paid in advance. Stop by or mail to 5404
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217. We're located next
to Ooh La La! in the Island Shopping Center. More infor-
mation: 778-7978.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising
herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimi-
nation." Familial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing
custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the
hearing impaired (0) 1-800-543-8294.


Vacation Rentals


-'V
' -
'~' -


&


Residential


, T -


Sales


Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key
Manatee and Sarasota Counties

ww .WedebrockRealEstate.com

941-778-6665 or 800-749-6665









SALES & RENTALS

419 Pine Ave., Anna Maria FL 34216 PO Box 2150 (941) 778-2291
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

Magnificent

M o oMediterranean
g Mansion








This impeccable or 4 BR .3 5BA
waterlroni rerreat offers the finest
amenities and appointments through-
out. Situated on an expansive, high and dry canalfront lot located at the open end of
the channel, this superlative Key Royale home offers 260 feet of deep, seawalled,
navigable waterfront with a boat dock and 12,000-lb davits! Other amenities include a
spacious split level floor plan complimented by soaring vaulted ceilings with fans, track
lighting, crown molding and a stunning brass chandelier. All bedrooms have private
baths, one with sumptuous Roman-style spa with gold plated fixtures. There are top of
the line tinted Pella windows and lovely, white ceramic tiled floors throughout. There is
a spacious gourmet kitchen with JennAir range and handy center island, cozy brick
fireplace, stereo sound system, direct satellite dish, four-zone central air and heat,
12-zone automatic sprinkler system, brand new Mediterranean-style barrel-tile roof.
Many specimen palms and a dazzling Royal Poincianna tree complete the picture per-
fect! Truly in a class by itself. $925,000.
Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


OPENING DOORS TO MANATEE-COUNTY


DRAMATIC AND EXCEPTIONAL DIRECT
BAYFRONT HOME. 180-degree view from
north of Longboat to downtown Sarasota, near
bird sanctuary. Charm and character highlight
this wonderful setting. Short walk to beach.
$1,275,000. John Zisman, 504-2393. 204862


WATERFRONT
OLD SOUTHERN ACREAGE with many large
live oak trees. This lot offers privacy, fresh
water on one border and salt water canal on an-
other. $169,000. Janet Orr, 792-7363. 74229
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME on Warner's
Bayou. Sought-after buildable lot in northwest
Bradenton. 1.5(+/-) acres with 256-foot (+/-)
frontage on Riverview Boulevard, 100-foot (+/
-) on Warner's Bayou. $750,000. Joanne
Jenkins, 795-3838. 76973.


ENCHANTED ANNA MARIA ISLAND RETREAT
on Bimini Bay. Serene tropical grandeur is displayed
throughout the grounds and interior of this striking
residence. 5BR, wonderful kitchen, music/family
room, office and separate exercise room and sauna.
Heated pool and 35 ft. dock with lift. $1,430,000.
Sandy Drapala, 749-5797 or Kathy Marcinko, 713-
1100.76167
MAINLAND
ANTIQUE TREASURE. Lovingly maintained by
same family for over 70 years. Gracious two-story
home built in 1925, a vestige of the past. Burgeon-
ing area near Manatee River. $105,000. Ruth Lawler,
856-0396. 77468
GRANDEUR OF YESTERDAY in this circa 1914
vestige of the past. Over 3,800 sq.ft. built by skilled
artisans. Stained, leaded glass windows, rich
beamed ceilings, over-garage efficiency apartment
included. $275,000. Ruth Lawler, 856-0396. 77707


. ,..il



COMPLETELY REMODELED canal home
in prestigious Key Royale. 3BR/2BA luxury
poll with full cool deck. New appliances and
A/C. Large eat-in kitchen. Priced at
$529,000. Call Quentin Talbert at 778-
4800 or 704-9680.







EXPANSIVE BAYFRONT VIEWS of the
out islands and Skyway Bridge from this
stunning 3BR/2BA home. Boat dock with
davits and huge lot. $879,000. Call Jane
Grossman at 778-4800 or 778-4451.


ISLAND GETAWAY 2BR/2BA condo with
Gulf views. Turkey furnished in complex
with many amenities. Owner is motivated.
$399,000. Call Quentin Talbert, 778-4800
or 704-9680.


KEY ROYALE Beautifully maintained 3BR/
2BA canal home with boat dock, new
ceramic tile and carpet steps to golf
course. This one won't last long at
$469,900. Call Lynn Hostetler at 778-4800.


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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 26, 2001 M PAGE 35
.._________________________- ------ ----------------------------------------------


RATIONAL NUMBERS
hy Zais / Edited by Will Shorl/
Across 55 Noted Schubert piece
1 TMC competitor in F major
4 Proceeds here and 56 Disney design
there 57 Hip parts
8 It's shot 59 Opportunity,
12 Small amount metaphorically
16 Cache 60 __ Pedro
18 Cut_ 62 Munchkin
19 "Harold 63 Refusals
(old comic strip) 64 Type widths
20 Rundown 65 __Clinic
21 Wasted gas 66 Baba
22 Vanquish 69 Big inits. in trucks
23 Foe of the Iroquois 70 Farrow and Hamm
24 One sought for advice 71 Last thing said before
25 Piccolo alternatives dinner?
26 Bacon feature 72 Masefield play
27 Doodler's aid "The Tragedy of __
29 Regulated, as property 73 Pigeonhole
31 Crackers 77 English town next to
34 Cause of a blown Banstead Downs
engine, maybe 79 Prefix with arrange
35 Spanish babes 80 Not hunched
36 Taste-testers' turndowns 82 Spooky
37 See 107-Down 83 Relinquish, as rights
38 Alpine river 85 Posit positively
41 First assembly-line 86 Hardly a quick trip
carmaker 88 Foreign language topic
43 Yom Kippur observer 91 Bit of dinero
45 1983 David Bowie 92 Urgent message
#1 hit 93 They can make a suer
47 Drink whose name suffer
is a homophone of 94 Git
48-Across 95 Actor John
48 Like some socks 97 Start of an oath
50 Is rife 99 Prefix with linguistics
51 Several czars 100 Beaten down
53 Crowbar 103 Examines
54 Take away 106 -jongg
108 Previously, once
109 "Plain Language From
Truthful James" writer
N 9 I 110 Shin
111 Fast talk




STUMPED? No.0916


112 Store selection
113 Basket material
114 known ..."
115 1944 Bing Crosby hit
116 Place for a comb
117 Kind of column
118 Word following clue
114-Across
119 Part of an inheritance?
120 Itch

Down
1 <
2 Arrives jauntily
3 Like some favorites
4 Talkathon
5 Restricted
6 Sign of an indifferent
homemaker
7 O'Rourke, e.g., of"F
Troop": Abbr.
8 Mushroom producers
9 Exclamation akin to
"Whew!"
10 A founder of the state
of Israel
11 <
12 Indian state
13 Mars
14 Just a thought
15 Founder of Little
America
16 Perry Como player
17 God of war, magic and
poetry
20 <
28 Dactylitis locale
30 Teachers' org.
32 "The Night of the
Hunter" screenwriter
33 <
37 Hosp. readouts
39 #1 position
40 Staff symbol
41 Chilled


42
44
45
46
49
52
53
58
59
61

65


True
Gumbo vegetables
Pseudologue
Former regulatory org.
Perot


Actor Herbert
Cornerback Sanders
Always, to
Shakespeare
Martin and Matalin


66
67 Tie-ups


68 Prelude
70 Religious title: Abbr.
73 Staying power
74 Old magazine ___
Digest
75 Place to order
une biere
76 Article in Die Welt
78 Name of 12 popes
79 Silent treatment?
81 Rat-a-tat
84 Cut off (from)
87 Bank-to-bank
transactions: Abbr.
89 Diner sign


90 Ukr., formerly
94 Visit briefly
96 Warm and comfy
98 Made a scene?
99 Conservatory piece
101 "_ Tu" (1974 hit)
102 Capone captor
103 Ah follower
104 Place for a padlock
105 One with a rain check?
107 37-Across was its
first earl
111 Spree


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any three clues by touch-
tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. Reference puzzle number shown. There is a charge of 95c per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


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COLD&UeL





PAGE 36 E SEPT. 26, 2001 THE ISLANDER

DEAL OF

STORAGE SPECIAL TE EEK

UP TO TWO MONTHS .


1998 Donzi 16 Classic
$14,888


X-m


Marker #54 just minutes from Tampa Bay and the Gulf
. a 4. : i :i ^4 ,.j' f .


of Mexico


PERIOD HARBOR


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A4


Valid thru 11-30-01 f
Mus prn lmcup nmnon"uwic" Is yourri


Fall Service Special I
S10% off all parts and labor
Validthru 11-30-01
Must present coupon when you schedule your service. I
-0* .st, rZJ a> ind ,a % r


Great deals in our parts department!
Mercury Premium
2.Cycle
Outboard Oil
Reg. $18.20

$12.99
Gallon containers only


LMS-3
Maximum
resolution ani


5 i:. 9' --
z:- 8-:- : "'



No Payment for 60 Days
(For a limited time only)


I! LOWRANCE
50A Now only
power,
d visibility. $399
While supplies last.


S Reg. $859


SHUMMiNNIRD Now only
RADIO m LF $99
MARINE VEEF5 $
:-, Supply is limited. Sorry no rainchecks Reg. $235


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