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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( May 30, 2001 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 30, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00893

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 30, 2001

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00893

Full Text






Skimming the news ... School is out for summer happy summer vacation!


Anna Maria


Islander


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island"


ISLANDER


-I


Volume 9,


no. 29, May 30, 2001 FREE


Welch accepts ."



Beach building

official post.
By Paul Roat *
It's official: Bradenton Beach has a
new building official Bob Welch,
soon to be the former building official in -*'
Anna Maria.
Welch, 47, will start work within .
two weeks. Negotiations regarding sal- _
ary and benefits with Mayor Gail Cole
were concluded last Friday, and Welch
accepted the position.

$41,130, the same amount as heis cur-
Srently making in Anna Maria. After 30

$42,000, with another salary review to .'
be conducted on his 90-day anniversary.
He will be on probation for 150 days. I
Welch will also receive what
amounts to a "signing bonus" of $2,300, A



employment in Bradenton Beach. e

Bradenton Beach, permits and inspec-




ier this month to take a similar position A. : -
in Palmetto.ing f ry a s chl e -

Zoning for charter school unresolved


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The sands of summer vacation are sifting through
the hourglass, and every moment counts if the Island
Middle School is going to open in August for the 2001-
02 school year.
Attorney Chuck Webb. a charter school founding
board member. represented the school before the
Holmes Beach City Commission to request that the
middle school be allowed operate in a commercial dis-
trict.
"We have looked throughout the Island," said
Webb, "and there isn't an area to put the school that
isn't commercial."
A charter school is a public school run by a non-
profit corporation under contract with a sponsor, in this
case the local school board.
The charter school committee has signed a lease
for Loggerhead Junction 401 Manatee Ave., but it is
contingent on zoning.
Loggerhead Junction is zoned C-1, which includes
professional services such as doctor, lawyer and real
estate offices.
The school committee hopes the commissioners
would consider the charter middle school similar
enough to a daycare or preschool, both of which are
allowable in the C-1 zone.
"I get the sense that no one is against the school,"
said Chairman Roger Lutz. "My concern is that there
is already a section of the code that is designated spe-
cifically for schools. So what's before us is whether the


definition of child care or preschool can include middle
school."
Webb countered that, "It isn't whether we fall
within the definition, but whether we are like it."
"I have a problem saying 11-, 12- and 13-year-old
kids are similar to daycare," said Commissioner Pat
Geyer.
According to City Attorney Jim Dye, there are
three options available to resolve the conflict.
The quickest way would be for the property owner
to have the location changed from C-l to PSP-1 zon-
ing. This amendment would take two or three months.
It would take four to six months to amend the defi-
nition in the comprehensive plan to allow for a charter
school or include a special exception.
According to Dye, the best way to go would be to
amend the comprehensive plan with a text amendment
and address the neighbors' concerns with a site plan.
"To amend the ordinance and the comprehensive
plan would take too long. I think we'll miss the open-
ing of school," said Webb. "We lose funding if we
don't open in August."
The school has already been approved by the
Manatee County School Board, and the school commit-
tee has also filed an application for a start-up grant in
the amount of $70,000 from the department of educa-
tion.
"Had you come here first, this would not be an is-
sue," countered Commissioner Don Maloney. "The
SEE CHARTER, NEXT PAGE


Time out for


TideMark


Public

hearing
By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The first public hearing for the
S. TideMark zoning issue did not get off
the ground smoothly. Holmes Beach
Commissioner Don Maloney opened the
S work session with a protest. He asked
that the city work session follow the
S regular meeting as it customarily does.
"The work session gives commis-
sioners and citizens the time to reflect,"
Maloney said. "The TideMark is one of
the most important issues we have had
to discuss since I took my seat on this
commission. The reversal of the meet-
"' ings leaves only a few minutes between
S meetings to think things through. We
have spent more time considering things
such as raising chickens and pigs. The
reversal of the meetings can be viewed
as railroading, allowing us to vote on an
t issue minutes after the work session.
' VA Time out, please."
Maloney moved to have the meet-
S ings switched back to the proper order
^" SEE TIDEMARK, NEXT PAGE



-appenings

Bash Saturday

first of many
What is hoped to be the first annual summer
festival will take over the big parking lot at the
old Marina Bay restaurant from midmorning into
the night Saturday, June 2.
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce event will begin at 10 a.m. and run at least
until 9 p.m. in the parking lot on Marina Drive
just north of where it meets Gulf Drive.
Alan Galletto, first vice president of the
chamber and chairman of the festival, said the
organization plans to make this an annual event
on the Island.
The theme is "The Summer of the '60s," and
much of the music will reflect that era, he said.
Two bands will play, the Distractions from noon
until 4 p.m. and Pan Magic from 5 'til 8 p.m.
They will be using the Anna Maria Island
Privateers' boat/float as a bandstand. There will
be a beer tent, margarita bar, arts and crafts
booths, kids' games, and food, food, food.
Proceeds from the event will go to the cham-
ber, Anna Maria Island Community Center, and
the innovative World of Work program at the
Anna Maria Elementary School, Galletto said.


LI~ s-- -~L-il~l~t ~b~L-~L~L~"-~


PLlsllllL113lllllslsslllePllllar~ll~~






PAGE 2 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Turtle watchers denied use of vehicle in Holmes Beach


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Despite being "all for turtles," Holmes Beach
Commission Chairman Roger Lutz and fellow com-
missioners denied Suzi Fox and the Anna Maria Island
Turtle Watch volunteers permission to use an all-ter-
rain vehicle on the beach.
"We can't ignore the law," said Lutz.
Fox requested permission to use the vehicle be-
tween dawn and 9 a.m. to relocate turtle eggs that will
be disturbed by the beach renourishment project.
Vehicles are prohibited on the beach, although they
are permissible in cases of emergency when life or
property is endangered.
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch Inc. holds a
$300,000 liability policy, according to Fox.



Charter school zoning debated
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
burden is put on our shoulders now, but I would hope
our attorney will guide us on how to handle this."
Dye and the commissioners will be working to-
gether to seek both an ethical and legal resolution to the
zoning issue.
Another possibility the school committee would
like commissioners to explore is whether or not its sta-
tus as a nonprofit organization would allow them to use
the commercial property.
In his presentation, Webb also addressed some of
the concerns the committee believes the community
might have.
The school's focus is on academics, and outdoor
activities will not take place at Loggerhead Junction,
Webb said. Arrangements would either be made to use
the Anna Maria Island Community Center or the pub-
lic beach for physical education programs if they are
added in the future.
Traffic would be kept to a minimum with
carpooling, kids who walk or bike and busing with
school hours taking place in off-peak hours.
"The school hours will be 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.,"
said Webb. "Our hours overlap with the elementary
school and with people trying to get to work."
Another point brought up regarding traffic flow is
that Anna Maria Elementary School accommodates
close to 400 students. The charter school's maximum
capacity will be 150 students.
Two petitions have been submitted to city hall, one
for and one against the location of the school.
"We have a petition opposing the school," said
Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger, "but it doesn't state
what the opposition is. I want to hear from them."



TideMark hearing June 12
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
and the commission unanimously agreed, delaying the
first public hearing on the TideMark Lodge project
until June 12.
Residents who packed city hall past capacity were,
however, given the opportunity to voice their opinions
during a review of the project the work session follow-
ing the regular meeting.
Developer Nick Easterling of Carlingford Devel-
opment is asking the city to change the R- I single-fam-
ily, residential zoning of the two lots at the east end of
the former Pete Reynard's/Marina Bay restaurant prop-
erties to C-3 zoning. The R-l property currently has
two duplex buildings on it and the change in zoning
would allow it as part of the TideMark project.
Within C-3 zoning uses, there is no residential use.
However, a marina is allowed and the city code defines
a marina to include the rental of uncovered boat slips
or dock space or enclosed dry storage space, marine
fuel and lubricant sales, onshore restaurant, onshore
lodgings, onshore sundries and onshore sanitary facili-
ties.
Given the zoning change, Easterling plans to build
a lodge with nine hotel rooms and 31 rental condo-
minium units and a 120-seat restaurant and lounge.
"It's all about economics," said Easterling. "Eco-
nomics is going to drive the plan no matter who uses
the property. I'm trying to utilize the land in a way that
marries well with the character of the Island."
Although ;;,o;t residents agree that they don't want


"Anna Maria City has given us permission and
asked that we list them on the policy as 'additionally
insured,'" Fox told the commission.
Bradenton Beach has also accepted Fox's request
and other counties including Sarasota and Pinellas al-
low persons with marine turtle protection permits to
use vehicles on their beaches.
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch has a contract
with the county to monitor the beaches from Bradenton
Beach to Anna Maria City and within the scope of the
beach renourishment project provides state mandated
protection for marine turtles.
That protection includes the relocation of all turtle
nests within that area to Coquina Beach. The relocation
of nests must be done quickly in order to have as little
effect as possible on the nest of hatchlings.


Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Officer Walter
Wunderlich pointed out "We allow construction and
maintenance vehicles on the beach. If anyone should be
allowed a vehicle on the beach, it should be Turtle
Watch. No one respects beach property as much as they
do."
Commissioner Don Maloney suggested Fox call
the police department for assistance, but Fox replied
that volunteers sometimes have a long wait before po-
lice can attend to their needs.
It was even suggested that the city deputize Fox
and allow her to serve as an off-duty cop, but Lutz
didn't find that feasible either.
"I understand your need," said Lutz, "but I can't
overlook the law. I don't think we can help you here
today."


Good day Bradenton Beach
WTVT-FOX 13's Russell Rhodes of the morning show "Good Day Tampa Bay" visited Bradenton Beach last
week, beaming a broadcastfrom the city pier. The morning show also included views of Gulf Drive and the
roundabout and information on the naming of the roadway as a Scenic Highway. City Commissioner John
Chappie and Susan King of the Florida Department of Transportation look on from a table in the back, while


Rhodes prepares to sample goodies from the Bridge St.
Photo: Bonner Futch


to see a marina, service station or boat-storage facility
built in place of Marina Bay, some concerns were
raised about the TideMark project.
Density is a core issue on the minds of concerned
residents. Easterling says he is allowing for approxi-
mately 10 units per acre and if the R-1 zoning change
goes through there will no longer be any residential
property, only commercial.
Residents living on 56th Street along the canal/water-
way opposite the north side of the development are con-
cerned because to one side they will face the proposed
Arvida Perico Island project and on the other side they will
gaze upon the three-story buildings at the TideMark.
The canal doesn't provide any way of buffering the
noise and density for the homes on 56th Street, they
say. Outdoor dining and music as well as general use
of a swimming pool would create noise that would be
easily carried to homes in the area.
Traffic and parking are also concerns. An agree-
ment has been made with First Union Bank to share 20
parking spaces. However, the lease between the two
establishments is for a 10-year period. When that lease
ends, there is nothing that will guarantee the TideMark
can provide adequate parking.
Easterling has mentioned widening the canal, but
opponents question where the landmass will be deleted
from the available acreage to widen the canal. Use of
the canals brings up environmental concerns as well.
Marina development is prohibited in C-3 zoning if
a manatee habitat exists. According to residents, mana-
tees are frequently seen in the canal basin, but a deter-
mination has not officially been made declaring the


Pier restaurant with manager Georgia Meier. Islander



basin as a manatee habitat.
Commissioner Maloney's concern was whether the
project could move forward using the land as it is currently
zoned. "I've been stung before by single exceptions," he
said. "They're never single exceptions."
"I've used my best judgment to come here and ask
for something I don't think is unreasonable," Easterling
said in reference to removing the residential properties.
"Seven or eight units is 25 percent of this property. It's
a significant portion."
Resident Jane Earley asked the commission not to
accept this project. "We have a hotel district. Now we
are bringing up the same issue the charter school is fac-
ing. We have a space zoned for hotels and we have to
use the same argument used against the school. We
can't go around the code just because we like the idea."
"I don't think I oppose the project itself," said
Kendra Presswood, a resident of 56th Street. "It's the
scope of the project, and I'm concerned by what I'm not
hearing. The commission is being told it's not feasible
to do anything else and it seems like a scare tactic. Let's
see the numbers."
"It's unrealistic to think you can't look at rezon-
ing," said John Balseto. "You're elected to make case-
by-case decisions."
Commissioners won't have to weigh their decisions
until the rescheduling of the first public hearing, which
will be during the regular meeting at 7 p.m. June 12. At
that time, the commission will have a first reading of
two ordinances and a resolution that will amend the
city's comprehensive plan, the future land-use map and
approve the TideMark site plan.




THE ISLANDER E MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 3


It was quiet week in Anna Maria Meetings


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
It was a quiet week in Anna Maria, where the com-
mission didn't meet and the building official
wentsouth.
The City of Anna Maria has been uncharacteristi-
cally quiet of late. Not unlike Garrison Keillor' s Lake
Wobegon.
The city commission meeting scheduled for May
24 was canceled due to lack of a quorum.
Several of the commissioners are on vacation, but
Commissioner Jay Hill sent in a memo saying he was

Boating, seamanship class
will begin on Tuesday
Flotilla 81 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary will con-
duct classes on boating skills and seamanship starting
Tuesday, June 5, at the Manatee Technical Institute,
5603.34th St. W., Bradenton.
The classes will run for seven consecutive Tues-
days and Thursdays from 7 to 9 p.m. The only fee is the
cost of materials. Interested persons may register and
receive further information by calling 798-9544 or 795-
6189.


Tree trimmers needed
in Bradenton Beach
Wanted: tree trimmers in Bradenton Beach.
City officials are accepting bids to cut down 25
Australian pine trees, remove 29 stumps and whack
two bushes from city property throughout the city.
The trees have been judged to be a safety
hazard, according to Bradenton Beach Police Lt.
John Cosby, and should be removed. Australian
pines are classified as "exotics" (non-native spe-
cies) in Florida.
S Bids for the tree work will be accepted until
Monday, June 4.


"ready, willing and able to attend the meeting."
Meanwhile, the city and staff are trying to get used
to the idea of the imminent departure of Building Of-
ficial Bob Welch, who agreed last week to take a simi-
lar position with Bradenton Beach.
City Clerk Alice Baird said things are not very
cheerful around city hall. "The entire staff will miss
Bob Welch tremendously. He is never too busy to help
each and every one,'regardless of what department. He
is extremely professional, and the City of Anna Maria
truly lost a good and valuable employee," Baird said.
Commissioner John Michaels sent a memo to
Welch saying he had been contacted by "half a dozen
people with regard to your potential departure."
Michaels said, "I just want you to know that the
people like you and appreciate the good work you have
been doing. I've heard from builders and citizens alike
and everyone I have heard from would regret it if you
leave us."
Michaels advised Welch not to make a job move
just because of one or two people. "You are likely to
find people just like them in your next professional
stop."
And also in Anna Maria, the apparently moribund
idea of a dog beach gave a little gasp of life when a
memo to the mayor arrived from resident Richard
Moller. Moller's wife, Cindy, has been instrumental in
the drive to establish an area in the city where dogs and
their owners could gather on the beach.
Moller's memo questions whether the city would
consider leasing a section of beach to a dog organiza-
tion that would be responsible for policing and main-
taining a dog area.
In the memo, Moller proposes a fine of up to
$1,000 for people who do not clean up after their ani-
mals or who do not have their animals under proper
control. He also asks if the city would consider hav-
ing an area that would be open to dogs on designated
days for limited hours.
The idea appeared to be dead after the commission
refused to place the item on its agenda. A survey' by
Vice Mayor Tom Skoloda showed residents are gener-
ally opposed to the idea of a dog beach.


Anna Maria City
May 31, 1:30 p.m., administrative code committee.
June 4, 7:30 p.m., planning and zoning board meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
708-6130.
Bradenton Beach
June 4, 1 p.m., sealed bid opening on tree trimming.
June 5, 1 p.m., scenic highway committee meeting.
June 7, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
June 5, 1 p.m., planning commission meeting.
June 7, 9 a.m., board of adjustment meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800. .


And that's all the news from Anna Maria, where
the staff is sad, the commission is on vacation and the
dogs are all panting.


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PAGE 4 N MAY 30, 2001 E THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria's Sandbar encroaches on rights of way


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
It is pleasant under the palm trees just to the east
of the Gulffront deck at the Sandbar restaurant in Anna
Maria.
It's also great to sit on the small "lookout" deck
just west of the house on the former Glans property,
purchased recently by restaurant owner Ed Chiles. Al-
most as great, a seat at one of the many tables in front
of the home next door.
Questions were raised recently about the use of the
property for restaurant seating. The Sandbar itself is in
a part of Anna Maria that is zoned commercial there
is no question about that. But the property just north of
the restaurant is zoned commercial with a
grandfathered residential use.
The property can be used for residential purposes
as long as the owner wishes. If the owner of a property
such as this wants to change the use to commercial, it
can be done with very little difficulty. However, once
it is designated for commercial use, it can never be used
for residential purposes again.
Rumors were that the property could not be used
for both purposes simultaneously. There is a family and
another tenant living on the property.
Building Official Bob Welch said that Chiles' use
of the property is proper and in compliance with the
codes. He said it is a commercial district, and Chiles
can use the land surrounding the house for his restau-
rant even though the house is still being used for resi-
dential purposes.
Residents also raised questions about the place-
ment of a decorative boat and some benches in alleys
- city rights of way that crisscross the property.
The hostess station is also moved into the city alleyway
during operating hours.
Two alleys run across the parking lot north and
south, one with numerous encroachments that include
the planters and parking along the east side of the Sand-
bar building.
An east-west alley runs between the residential home
and the Sandbar deck and parking lot to Gulf Drive.
Chiles said questions about the use of the alleys
have come up before. "Seven or eight years ago, I
asked for an alley vacation and offered a like-sized strip
of property farther east to the city in exchange," Chiles
said. Nothing came of that offer, however.
Meanwhile, Welch said the use of the alleyway by
the restaurant is not by any means a clear-cut issue. "It
is one of those things that is at the pleasure of the com-
munity," Welch said.
"The alleyways in this city are filled with storage
buildings, oversized trees and other plantings, and in


In the right of way
A decorative boat, benches and the hostess stand are all in the right of way outside the Sandbar in Anna
Maria. Islander Photos: Laurie Krosney


many cases by actual houses."
The alley that runs east to west between Spring and
Pine avenues is an example. That alley is platted as a
straight line on maps, but the actual roadway curves.
"Some of the alley is now on private property as it
curves around structures that have encroached into the


Seating at the Sandbar
The Sandbar now has seating
' at tables under the trees on
-'. the recently purchased prop-
X-' gerty just north of the restau-
rant.








right of way," Welch said.
The whole issue of rights of way in the city is
something that Welch said he has advised city commis-
sioners they need to take a look at in the future. "The
city needs to establish a consistent policy for the use or
non-use of these areas," he said.


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THE ISLANDER E MAY 30, 2001 N PAGE 5


Holmes Beach's Captain's Marina requests rezone


Marc and Lynn Modisett say they hope to correct
a longstanding zoning conflict at their marina at 5501
Marina Drive in Holmes Beach.
They have requested that a portion of the property
on 56th Street be rezoned, which will be considered by
the planning commission when it convenes at 1 p.m
Tuesday, June 5.
The boat storage lot located behind the repair shop
is presently zoned for single-family residential use, al-
though it has been used for many years to store boats
for out-of-town clients.
Besides the Modisetts' marine shop in the building
fronting Marina Drive, the commercial-zoned property
includes several other businesses: a parasail rental com-
pany, a Remax real estate office, an arts and craft shop
and a personal watercraft rental business.
The boat repair shop, a separate building on 56th


Street, is also rented, in this case to Quinton Concilus
of Islands Cove Marina.
Of special interest is the fact that the marina prop-
erty was at one time included as phase two in the pro-
posed development of TideMark Lodge, a stone's
throw across the basin to the north. It called for eight
more cottage units where the marina and boat shed now
stand.
The Modisetts say they do not presently have a
contract with TideMark developer Nick Easterling, but
earlier said they think Easterling's project is a good
idea.
"We look forward to the development of the
former Pete Reynard's property," the Modisetts said.
"We feel that Nick has a viable project proposal worth
pursuing."
The Modisetts said they depend on the income


from their business, but there has been a mistaken im-
pression they're going out of business due to the pub-
licity surrounding Easterling's plans. They say that is
not the case.
Easterling said it's his group's intent to work with
the Modisetts. He said there was previously a contract
with the Modisetts to purchase Captain's Marina for
the development, but it was withdrawn.
"I think the world of Marc and Lynn," Easterling
said. "We don't have a contract, but I think we can
work with them. Hopefully, we can come to an agree-
ment that's a win for the Modisetts and for TideMark."
If the Modisetts' rezone request is granted, resi-
dents opposed to TideMark's intrusion into the abutting
residential area say it could clear the way for phase two
on 56th Street or allow Captain's Marina continued
use of the lot for boat storage.


Police believe wrong house targeted in Courtney break-in


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach police believe three men who com-
mitted a home invasion robbery at former City Com-
missioner Luke Courtney's home had the wrong house.
However, police added that Courtney's daughter
Lucina knew at least one of the suspects.
Police say they know the identity of one of the
men, but wouldn't release his name because they
haven't yet made an arrest. Police say they also
know the first name of another of the suspects.
They requested a capias warrant from the state
attorney's office, which will investigate the person
named on the warrant.
Police also said they believe the three men have
fled Florida and are headed to the west coast of the
United States.
Holmes Beach Detective Nancy Rogers said that
when the three men entered the home about 10:30


p.m. May 17, Lucina and two friends were eating
pizza and watching television. The suspects turned
out the lights, she said.
Rogers said the men described by the victims
as young and white with one brandishing a silver
handgun tied the hands and feet of the two friends
behind their backs in a manner known as "hog tied."
They only tied Lucina Courtney's hands behind
her back because they ran out of rope, police said.
She was able to break free after the thieves left and
called police at 11:59 p.m., Rogers said.
Each of the men was wearing a dark-green or
black, long-sleeved shirt, long pants and black
shoes, Rogers said. Each was wearing a bandanna
over his mouth and a hooded, pullover sweatshirt,
she said.
"When the three suspects came in, they said,
'Where's the dope?' and Lucina told them they had
the wrong house," Rogers said. "They said, 'We


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here and you'd better give it to us.'"
After searching and not finding any drugs, the
three men took Lucina's ATM card, a guitar and a
DVD player.
"There was no dope, and they took these things
as an afterthought," Rogers said. "We think they had
the wrong house and that somebody may have given
them the wrong address. From the description of
what they were wearing, they planned this out. They
just had the wrong place, though we don't know of
any house in the area where any drug activity is tak-
ing place. But you just never know."
The suspect whose name is known to police did
all the talking and is described as 5 feet 7 inches tall
and scrawny. The second man is 6 feet tall and thin
and the third suspect could not be identified because
he stood in the background and acted as a lookout,
Rogers said.



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PAGE 6 0 MAY 30, 2001 E THE ISLANDER




1 Opinion


Really, we're not kidding
You should be preparing your storm survival kit -
now.
You should be making your evacuation plan -
now.
It's official. It's that six-month-long nail-biting time
Islanders always dread. Hurricane season is upon us.
Dr. William Gray, the Colorado State University
weather guru who has an uncanny knack of pretty
much accurately predicting the number and intensity of
Atlantic hurricanes, says we should be in for an "above
average" year of storms again this year.
We should see about 10 named storms, with six of
them evolving into hurricanes and of those, two will
likely become severe, according to Gray.
It's time to find a friend in Lakewood Ranch or
some other place way, far away from storm surges and
rising tides. Take time now to invite yourself to spend
some time with inland friends in the event a hurricane
comes calling.
Make sure you've got enough food and water, bat-
teries and other supplies to weather a not-so-bad storm
here on the Island.
Do you have enough insurance coverage for your
home and belongings? Have you taken pictures of your
house, inside and out, and of your valuables, to facili-
tate insurance claims if needed? It's time!
It's a lot easier to spend a couple of afternoons ret-
rofitting the windows and doors for the quick addition
of plywood wind barriers than to stand in line at the
store, and then work all night in the rain boarding up
the house as a storm barrels toward us.
Better yet, spring for security shutters or apply the
new super-strength glass shields to windows. It's far
better protection than masking tape.
Take time to check this week's special section and
get busy. These are things to do now not when the
storm is imminent. We've been taken by surprise too
often by quick-forming, torrential tropical storms.
We've told Islanders about the need to prepare for
many, many years. Maybe you've heard it all before.
But we've got lots of new friends moving to the Island
every year, and every year there are more and more
people here who have never spent an entire night glued
to the TV waiting for updated storm reports, listening
to the wind howl, the surf crash and wondering if the
Island will still be the same come dawn.
Let's hope for the best, pray the good Dr. Gray is
way, way off on his predictions and that the Island
weathers another threatening storm season unscathed.
We would, however, appreciate a little rain.


The Islander


May


30, 2001 Vol. 9. No. 29


V Publisher and Editor
Bonner J. Futch
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Diana Bogan
Gretchen Edgren
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Laurie Krosney
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Kent Chetlain
Doug Dowling
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Accounting, Classified
Advertising and Subscriptions
Dee Ann Harmon
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


IISIANDEP, iI l li
Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
2001 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan




Opinion


Stupefied
Excuse me? Holmes Beach won't help start a new
school for children but will help Nick (Easterling, de-
veloper of TideMark) make a million bucks? I bet if
you asked Nick, he would be as stupefied as I over this
discrimination.
Jim Smith, Anna Maria

Flapper valves don't work
After owning property and visiting here 44 years,
we became permanent residents of this beautiful island
six weeks ago.
The past 25 years, home has been a waterfront
community in St. Petersburg's Venetian Isles. The
community itself was well elevated, however, we had
to drive several miles through the Shore Acres neigh-
borhood to get to any of the main streets.
About 20 years ago, the City of St. Petersburg al-
located tens of millions of dollars to install flapper
valves where all the storm sewers drained into the bay.
The reason was every time it rained during high tide,
we literally could not get through Shore Acres. In fact,
EVERY time the slightest of storms struck, the media
flocked to Shore Acres for instant news fodder.
For the next 15 years the roads remained 100%
impassable during storms. The valves NEVER worked
and were very soon jammed by barnacle infestations
and accumulated sand and debris.
After reading that our city is about to spend
$10,000 of our precious budget on flapper valves, I'm
compelled to implore you to contact the City of St.
Petersburg's Public Works Department to verify my
claims. Otherwise, it will be $10,000 "down the drain."
Duke Miller, Anna Maria City


Kudos to Anna Maria Public
Works employees
May 21-25 is National Public Works Week. Ac-
cordingly, the City of Anna Maria wishes to express


appreciation to the hard-working staff of our public
works department. Gary Thorpe and Wesley Warren
are commended for the upkeep of our fair city in a com-
petent and friendly manner. Thanks, guys!
Bob Welch, Anna Maria City Building Official-
Public Works Director

Return it no questions
Please, whoever took my brown leather briefcase
from my car outside my house on North Bay Boulevard
on May 14: Can you return it and its contents? It means
so much to me and is worth nothing to you. No ques-
tions asked. Call 778-7616.
Susan Hatch, Anna Maria City

Consolidate and/or privatize
Anna Maria departments?
Numerous small cities and municipalities including
the City of Anna Maria contract with the "private sector"
and other municipalities for their municipal needs.
The city currently contracts with Manatee County
for police protection and we contract with the private
sector for 1. disaster recovery services from Grubbs; 2.
legal services from Jim Dye; 3. trash removal from
Waste Management; and 4. operation of the city pier,
restaurant and bait shop with Mario Schoenfelder.
The city's public works and building departments are
currently in a state of change, and perhaps this would be
an excellent opportunity for the city commission to gather
information and discuss the privatization and/or consoli-
dation of these departments. Discussion could include
contracting with the private sector, contracting with other
municipalities or consolidation of these functions with
other municipalities on a fee basis.
While I am not necessarily advocating these
changes, I believe the city could possibly provide bet-
ter service to its citizens at a lower cost. I believe this
issue deserves, at a minimum, some discussion by the
present commission.
Bob Barlow, former Anna Maria Commissioner





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 7


inion


We've been heard
We live in a representative democracy. Last fall we
elected a political unknown, Jane von Hahmann, be-
cause she was committed to oppose the Bradenton
"done deal" of desecrating Perico. We voted for her
and incumbent Joe McClash because we agreed with
them and sent the message loud and clear.
Her mandate was, and is, to protect the county
from unhealthy, uncontrolled growth. She should no
longer need our continued visible support on this mat-
ter. We have made ourselves clear.
We, the citizenry, should have the time and energy
to address other matters. Such as Rep. Mike Bennet's
dumb height-restriction proposal in Tallahassee. Well,
that one is so dumb that it died quickly.
But what about Aquifer Storage and Recovery
(ASR)? That is one that passed both Florida houses and
has only been delayed because of many letters of op-
position to the governor. The governor has directed the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection to
review the plan and seek more scientific input.
The ASR plan has a lot of appeal. If it could work, it
would go a long way in solving Florida's water problems.
But that is a very big IF. It could possibly foul our
water supply for generations. Can we be sure that it
wouldn't?
Hopefully the scientific experts being brought in
will address the subject in the most cautious manner.
We must be alert to assure that the deck is not loaded
and we are not just presented with more hired support-
ers to justify continuing with this project.
Several years ago we were all very proud of a
project draining that swamp known as the Everglades.
Now we ask, "Who knew?"
We are a little smarter now. We should not foul our
water supply and then later ask "Who knew?"
If the idea is scientifically sound, we should go for
it but if there is the slightest chance that it could
contaminate our water supply, we must reject it.


And to be on the safe side, we must also be sure
that the experts are honestly objective and not just
brought in for support.
And, Jane Von Hahmann, we gave you our sup-
port. Use it courageously and proudly.
Bill Diamant, Anna Maria

Art appreciation
The third-grade teachers at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School would like to.thank the Anna Maria Artists
Guild for the wonderful support it has given us with our
art program.
Every year the guild provides a morning for our
students to visit its gallery and learn about the differ-
ent types of media that artists utilize. Demonstrations
are set up and the children are allowed to experiment
with different mediums.
The guild also pays for buses to send the students
to the Ringling Museum of Art for a tour and program.
Many of our children have never been exposed to the
arts in.this manner and become enthusiastic art patrons
due to their participation.
Thanks for all your support. We couldn't provide
these opportunities without you.
Kathy Grandstad, Angelica Mannino and Karen
Newhall, Anna Maria Elementary School

Grateful for coaches
Another season of baseball is over and I would like
to thank our coaches Sean Murphy and David Futch for
all the time and patience they devoted to our children
when I know how valuable their time is.
Sean always seemed to remember that this whole
thing was about kids learning and having fun. David
imparted quite a bit of his baseball knowledge to our
children. This showed in the fact that our team im-
proved tremendously from the beginning of the season.
There were, though, as always, some good coaches
and some bad coaches in our league, but fortunately we


had a couple of good guys for our players.
We all need to remember, myself included, that
this is not about winning at all costs and using any
means necessary, even to the detriment of our kids, to
achieve this goal. It is not about the adults, it is about
the children. It is not for fighting and back-stabbing and
stressful hurt feelings.
It is about teaching good sportsmanship, good at-
titude, respect, and love for our American game of
baseball. It is about being fair and supportive of your
teammates, and teaching fair play to our children. It is
about our children learning to use those talents they
were born with, being proud of the little things they
accomplish and learning through self-control how to
accomplish almost anything they set their minds to.
I am trying to teach my son that it is more important
to play your best with a good attitude and hustle than to
win the game. When he plays hard and still loses, yet he
hustles to shake hands after the game instead of showing
temper and attitude, then I tell him he is a success.
I am so proud of the people who take the time and
love to teach my son the same values we are trying to
teach him, because I know from experience it can be a
frustrating and ongoing challenge. But we never give
up because they are our kids and can become great
adults if we always try to channel their energies and
distinct personalities in the right direction.
It is not always easy but as my husband reminds me,
some of the toughest and most intense children can be-
come with love and guidance some of the greatest adults.
Thank you to the Little League board members
who do this for the children and give so much of their
time and energy to the cause. I know it has not been
easy, but everyone on the board seemed to resolve the
conflicts for the best possible results.
It does take a community to raise a child and I hope
we all hang in there to achieve the best possible results
for our kids.
Susan B. Thomas, Anna Maria


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PAGE 8 N MAY 30, 2001 T THE ISLANDER-


Beach chairs, tents problem for turtles on Island


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
More sea turtles on Anna Maria Island's beaches,
along with a pair of rare birds, are all nesting and all
welcome.
Much less welcome are beach chairs left out over-
night. They are so unwelcome, in fact, that soon Turtle
Watch will make names of the offenders public.
"Volunteers have had to pull numerous chairs off


the beach at dawn most days," said Suzi Fox, who
holds the state marine turtle preservation permit for the
Island. "In a week-or two there will be lots of turtles
every night, and they don't need to be bumping into
chairs. There's also a large number of beach canopies,
especially in Bradenton Beach."
Also unwelcome was the Holmes Beach City
Commission's refusal to let the Turtle Watch all-terrain
vehicle operate on the beach there, although Anna Maria


,/ < -. ..
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Volunteers check out a sea turtle nest on Anna Maria. Female turtles come ashore from May through Novem-
ber to lay eggs in the sand. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


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City and Bradenton Beach have given full approval.
With nest relocation a necessity of the pending
beach renourishment, and time being of the essence to
the process, Turtle Watch deems the use of the ATV an
emergency need.
"That's a lot of beach," said Fox, "and the differ-
ence between covering it by ATV and on foot is the dif-
ference between 10 minutes and two hours."
There is good news from the lighting front: fewer
business and residential lights are visible from the
beach this year than in the past, and there is a new prod-
uct available on the Island to cut those offenses further.
Fox said Crowder Bros. Ace Hardware has avail-
able a new inexpensive heat-resistant bubble wrap for
shielding lights that turtles may follow to their deaths
upland, rather than heading into the Gulf of Mexico.
As for the turtles themselves, the Island had 20
nests as of Monday, a bit behind the rate of some pre-
vious years. But slow is the way it is up and down the
Gulf Coast, according to word Fox received from Jerris
Foote, turtle specialist at Mote Marine Laboratory.
Five nests have been moved to safety on Coquina
Beach from the area of beach to be renourished, a
project which will interfere with sea turtle nesting.
On Egmont Key to the north, two loggerhead
nests and many false crawls have been found by park
rangers, which indicates to Fox that the renourished
beach there is less inviting to turtles than she and
others had hoped.
Fox and Joan Dickinson found an even more rare
nest during their beach check on the north end of the
Island. "We found an oyster catcher making itself a
home there in the sea oats on top of a dune," Fox said.
"It dive bombed us when we got near, or we'd never
have known about it.
"This is an endangered species, and we staked and
roped off the nest for its protection. If people get intru-
sive, it will abandon the nest. If we leave it alone, it
may attract other oyster catchers."

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THE ISLANDER i MAY 30, 2001 M PAGE 9


Island, Cortez sites nominated for state birding trail


By Laurie Krosney
Islander Reporter
Black skimmers, Forster's terns, willets, yellow
crowned night herons and many kinds of gulls, plovers
and sandpipers are common sights in our area.
Now, Chiko Haramaki, immediate past president
of the Manatee County Audubon Society, has nomi-
nated several local sites for inclusion on the Florida
Birding Trail. Haramaki has asked the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission to consider adding
two Anna Maria Island sites, Bean Point and Leffis
Key. He also submitted applications for Beer Can Is-
land, the "kitchen area" alongside Cortez and the Buf-
falo Creek Golf Course for inclusion on the trail.
Haramaki said he has been interested in birds "all
my life, but especially in the past seven or eight years."
He said the birding on the Island is just great. "We did


the spring bird count and saw yellow-crowned night
heron nests in the Norfolk pines around the elementary
school. Wonderful!" Haramaki said.
"We also saw some blue-crowned parakeets there,
which we've never seen before," he said. "I thought it
would be good for everyone to have the chance to see
the wonderful birds that abound in this area."
The applications for inclusion in the Florida
Birding Trail are currently under consideration, accord-
ing to Julie Brashears, who is the state's birding trail
coordinator.
"We will be coming sometime next spring to
'ground truth' the places that have been nominated,"
Brashears said.
She explained that means the properties will be
surveyed to make sure they have public ownership, that
they have educational and ecological significance and


that there is physical and legal access.
She also said the site has to have the ability to with-
stand public use. "Fragile ecosystems or habitats with
sensitive species would not be included in the trail,"
Brashears said.
The northern leg of the trail opened about six months
ago. It runs from Tallahassee to near Gainesville, accord-
ing to Brashears. "It has been enormously popular," she
said. "We've handed out 25,000 birding guides since we
opened that section of the trail."
The Florida Birding Trail has a Web site at
www.floridabirdingtrail.com.
Brashears said birders are ideal visitors. They tend
to be quiet and careful of the environment. Haramaki
agreed, and said he hoped the local areas would be in-
cluded on the trail as they offer exciting opportunities
to see birds rarely seen elsewhere.


Island officials consider possibility of separating politics, administration


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Could there possibly be a more efficient way to
run city government? This was the focus of a presen-
tation by Range Rider member Richard G. Simmons to
the Barrier Island Elected Officials at a recent meeting.
Range Riders is a group of retired city and
county managers sponsored by the Florida City and
County Management Association. Members offer
cities information on how professional management
can help handle relations among commissioners,
selection of department managers, charter questions,
financial and budgetary concerns and questions of
professional ethics.
At the invitation of Holmes Beach Commis-
sioner Don Maloney, Simmons discussed the coun-
cil-manager form of government. This form of gov-
ernment offers a separation of policy and adminis-
trative powers.
Simmons said the council-manager form of gov-
ernment combines the strong political leadership of
elected officials with the strong managerial leadership
of an appointed professional manager to effectively
provide for the needs of the community.
It would be up to the elected officials to hire a pro-
fessional administrator based on his or her education,
training, experience and expertise. Simmons recom-


Just



visiting


You can keep up on
Island activities with a
subscription to
"the best news on
Anna Maria Island"
The Islander
You'll get news about
three Island city
governments, Island
people and more. Call
(941) 778-7978 and
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Or visit our office and
subscribe
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Holmes Beach.


mends choosing a candidate affiliated with the Florida
City and County Management Association because
members maintain high ethical standards and follow a
strict code of ethics.
"The manager is hired by all the commissioners
and answers to all the commissioners," said Simmons.
"It levels out the playing field."
Elected officials retain the authority to terminate
the manager at any time based on his or her perfor-
mance. An effective manager, however, can reduce
operating costs, increase efficiency and productivity
and improve revenue, according to Simmons.
The elected officials would be able to spend less
time on administrative tasks and devote their time to
policy issues and community goals.
Some of the manager's duties include implementing
the policies adopted by the elected officials, preparing
comprehensive annual budgets, applying for funding and
grants and managing municipal services.
"City government today increasingly requires pro-
fessional management," said Maloney. "I believe the
time is here for professional management."
Holmes Beach Mayor Carol Whitmore noted that
she doesn't have time to do as much for the city as
she'd like. "I don't have time to commit 100 percent to
researching grants. I'm not happy about it, but this isn't
my full-time job."


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According to Simmons, a good manager should
earn the equivalent of his salary in grant money for the
city. "If he can't, then he isn't worth his salary!"
Longboat Key is one of the cities currently using the
council-manager form of government. Town Mayor Ken
Legler said that although it pays an approximate salary of
$100,000, he thinks the city gets its money's worth.


Birthday cards are sought for
Snooty Bash contest
Birthday cards for Snooty the manatee are
being sought from youngsters from preschool
through sixth grade for entry in Snooty's 53rd
Birthday Bash, with prizes galore.
Deadline for the cards is 5 p.m. July 16, and
prizes will be awarded in each age category at
noon Saturday, July 21, at Snooty's bash at the
Parker Manatee Aquarium in Bradenton.
Each entry must include name, home address,
telephone number, age and child's grade for the
2001-02 school year. Entries may be mailed or
brought to the aquarium at 201 10th St. W.,
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obtained by calling 746-4131.


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PAGE 10b MAY 30, 2001 U THE ISLANDER

Island Massage Store and D 4
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Announcements


Kids Day, blood drive

at Bayfront June 9
By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Snooks Adams, Privateers, kids and a blood drive
will combine in one grand event Saturday, June 9, at
Bayfront Park in Anna Maria City.
It's the annual celebration of kids and fun that the
Island's venerable and venerated Snooks Adams
started in 1954 when he was Anna Maria Island's only
policeman. It has grown to an Island tradition that an-
nually attracts 500 or so children, not to mention par-
ents. Adams hasn't missed one yet.
An addition this year will be a $100-a-pint blood
drive that sponsors hope will bring 300 pints of much-
needed blood to the Manatee County Blood Bank in
honor of Father's Day, eight days later.
The Snooks Adams Kids Day events will be from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., but Privateers and the bloodmobile
will be at the park from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m., said Stan
Weyman, Privateers treasurer.
A $100 contribution per donor will be given to the
Privateers by a generous sponsor. Marina Pointe Realty
Co. and the Anna Maria Coffee Company will provide
juice, cookies and coffee mugs to donors.
For the kids on Snooks day there will be games, a
treasure hunt, pirate dress-up contest, the Privateers
new boat/float, prizes, free hot dogs and pizza and so-
das. Adults can eat and drink too, but not free.
Adams started the event in 1954 by loading a
bunch of his young admirers into his Jeep, wheeling
down to Coquina Beach, feeding them hot dogs and
sodas, and helping them in all the kids' games he could
handle.
He retired from law enforcement in 1978 and
turned the festival over to the Anna Maria Island Pri-
vateers in 1980, the nonprofit organization that helps
kids and has fun doing so. Kids Day this year is at
Bayfront Park in Anna Maria City.
In addition to the Privateers, the $100 donation per
pint of blood may be designated for the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, Turtle Watch and Wildlife
Rehabilitation. Blood donors may specify which char-
ity they wish to receive their $100 donation.
Bloodmobiles also will be at the Center, 470 Mag-
nolia Ave., and the Coffee Company, 314 Pine Ave.,
both in Anna Maria City.
Prospective donors are advised to eat and drink
plenty of fluids before giving blood. Donors must pro-
vide photo identification.

Watercolor demonstration
at guild gallery Friday
A demonstration of painting in watercolors will be
given by Island artist Barbara Singer from 10 a.m. un-
til noon Friday, June 1, at the gallery of the Artists
Guild of Anna Maria Island, 5414 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Further information may be obtained
by calling 778-1330.


Bishop assists in adult education
The Rt. Rev. John Lipscomb, Bishop of the Episcopal
Diocese of Southwest Florida, assists Bill Moore in
teaching a Bible study class at the Church of the
Annunciation on the Island May 27. Islander Photo:
Laurie Krosney
Straight prevails
Scott E. Straight of Bradenton Beach, a home inspec-
tor with Straight Inspection Service for three years, has
passed a comprehensive home inspector examination in
"standards of practice and code of ethics." It is one of two
difficult tests required before achieving full membership
in the American Society of Home Inspectors, said Michael
D. Conley, also of Straight Inspection.
Huffine earns culinary degree
Adam Huffine, son of Tom and Janet Huffine of
Holmes Beach, received his associate degree in culi-
nary arts in ceremonies at Johnson & Wales University
in Miami. He said he plans to go on to earn his
bachelor's degree.
He was named student liaison and was on the uni-
versity staff as admission tour guide. The eight weeks
before graduation he spent on an internship at Mr. B's
restaurant in New Orleans. He was on the dean's list for
scholarship.
Island library's June show
is 'counted cross stitch'
An exhibition on "counted cross stitch" by Leslie
Taylor will be at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Ma-
rina Drive, Holmes Beach, during June.
A Miami native, Taylor came to Manatee County 20
years ago with her husband, George. In addition to
"counted cross stitching," she crochets and plays bridge.
The library opens daily at 10 a.m., closing at 8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesday, 6 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Details may be ob-
tained at 778-6341.

Writers meet Monday
The Gulf Coast Writers Group will meet at the Is-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, at 10:15 a.m. Monday, June 4. Members. may
bring original poems and essays to read. Details are
available at 792-5295.


Brains on the beach
Holly Littlefield, Lisa Alley, Virginia Neidert, Morgan Grimes, Alyssa McClish and Misty Harris kicked back
at the Beach House Restaurant in Bradenton Beach for a lazy day in the sun. The girls from Palmetto High
School joined 80fellow graduating seniors from Manatee County public schools for the Manatee County
School Foundation's Annual Academic Beach Bash. The event recognizes the top 4 percent of graduating
seniors for their outstanding achievements with a day at the beach sponsored by Blake Medical Center and the
Manatee Herald-Tribune. The Beach House provided food, volleyball and place to enjoy the sun. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan.


1
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i









Street life


Island police reports
Anna Maria
May 22, 400 block of Pine Avenue, traffic.
Three men pulled over in a car for speeding. A rou-
tine search of the car was made with the passenger's
consent.
May 22, 100 block of Cedar Avenue, theft. A
lady's bike was reported stolen, but was later re-
turned by a neighbor who had borrowed it.
May 23, 200 block of Gladiolus Street, informa-
tion. On the advice of the phone company, a woman
reported that she has been receiving several "hang-
up" phone calls.
May 24, 400 block of Alamanda Road, domes-
tic disturbance. Domestic packets were left with a
couple who confessed they had been arguing. There
were no signs of violence.

Bradenton Beach
May 18, 500 block of Gulf Drive North, drunk
pedestrian. A woman attempting to ride a bicycle ap-
peared to be intoxicated. Police escorted her to
Manatee Glens pursuant to her request to enter a re-
habilitation program.
May 19, 400 block of Highland Avenue, infor-
mation. Police picked up a 911 tape recorded by
Manatee County Dispatch. Contents of the tape are
unknown.
May 19, 1700 block of Gulf Drive South, bur-
glary. A woman reported her car keys were stolen
from her beach bag on the beach. Police found the
keys in the driver's door of her car. Some compact
discs and her purse were missing from the car.
May 19, 301 Gulf Drive South. Shell Land Gift
Shop. battery. A woman was taken to Blake Medi-
cal Center after police saw her run from a semitruck
parked at the gift shop. According to the police re-
port, the woman had been beaten by her husband and
a warrant has been issued for his arrest.
May 20. 1325 Gulf Drive North, Tortuga Inn,
criminal mischief. Four water fountains and a plant
were extensively damaged sometime overnight.
May 20, 301 S. Gulf Drive. Shell Land Gift
Shop, suspicious person. Officers asked a man to
leave the property after the store clerk advised po-
lice she felt unsafe with him hanging around.
May 20, 100 Gulf Drive North, Circle K, infor-
mation. A man was asked to leave the property be-
cause he was panhandling and bothering customers.
May 20, 1325 Gulf Drive North, Tortuga Inn,
drug violation. Officers responded to a call report-
ing that the occupants of a room were not respond-
ing to a knock on the door. Police knocked on the
door and identified themselves. When the occupants
opened the door, police discovered two bags con-


training marijuana on the table. Ryan Dietsch, 18, and
John Goebel, 18, both of Brandon, were given a no-
tice to appear.
May 21, 1700 block of Gulf Drive South, juve-
nile problem. Two female passengers in a vehicle
stopped for a traffic violation were delinquent from
Bayshore High School. Officers transported the girls
back to school.
May 23, 300 block of Bay Drive South, suspi-
cious person. Due to recent boat burglaries in the
area, Police approached two men sitting and talking
on the pier. The men left the pier after officers fin-
ished a background check and advised them of the
situation.
May 23, 200 Bridge St., Bridge Street Pier Cafe,
false alarm. A burglary alarm showed an open door.
It was found that a circuit breaker had blown and the
alarm was reset.
May 24, 3000 block of Gulf Drive, wooded area,
assist other agency. Officers assisted Holmes Beach
Police Officers in attempting to locate a burglary
victim.
May 25, 2310 Gulf Drive North, Shell Cove con-
dominiums, domestic disturbance. Police responded
to a complaint about a verbal argument between a
husband and wife.

Holmes Beach
May 20, 4000 block of Gulf Drive, noise com-
plaint. A man filed a complaint against the noise pro-
duced by the weekly drum circle on the Manatee
County Public Beach. According to police, the group
has grown so large that the sound from their drums
can be heard more than three-tenths of a mile away.
May 21, 2900 block of Avenue E, theft. A sprin-
kler timer for the irrigation system was reported sto-
len from the service box at a construction site.
May 22, 5600 block of Marina Drive, traffic. A
pedestrian was struck by a three-wheel motorized bi-
cycle.
May 24, 2800 block of Gulf Drive, criminal mis-
chief. A man reported damage to the windshield and
tires of his car, which was parked in front of his resi-
dence.
May 24, 4000 block of Gulf Drive, assist EMS.
Police responded to assist with a possible drowning
incident. A boy from Palmetto High School was
transported to the hospital. He was at the beach on
a school trip.
May 25, 5300 block of Gulf Drive, suspicious
person. A man reported a suspicious person ap-
proached him while he was making a deposit at the
bank. Officers found the person and attempted to
question him. The man resisted questioning and was
taken into custody.


Obituaries


Gerald D. Black Sr.
Gerald D. Black Sr., 90, of Sandwich, Ill., and for-
merly Holmes Beach, died May 22.
Born in Detroit, Mr. Black was a teacher and prin-
cipal at Disco Elementary School and George F. Rob-
erts Elementary School, both in the Utica, Mich.,
school district. He retired in 1975 after 26 years of
teaching. He was a scout leader, a member of the
Kiwanis Club, the Masonic Lodge, and other profes-
sional organizations.
Services were private. Memorial contributions may
be made to VNA Hospice Program, Visiting Nurse
Association of Fox Valley, 1245 Corporate Blvd.,
Aurora, IL 60504. Turner Funeral Home, Somonauk,
Ill., was in charge of arrangements.
He is survived by wife Loraine; sons Gerald D. Jr.
of Oxford, Mich., and James A. of Sandwich; eight
grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

Tine DeJong
Tine DeJong, 86, of Bradenton, died May 25.
Born in the Netherlands, Mrs. DeJong came to
Manatee County from Rockford, Ill., in 1977. She was
a homemaker. She was a member of Moose Lodge


2188, Bradenton Beach, and was an avid china painter.
There were no services. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home,
Manasota Chapel, was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by husband Dutch; daughter
Shirley Leondhart of El Paso, Texas; son John of Rock-
ford; sister Grace Vanderwal of the Netherlands; six
grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.


Shirley Mae Tressler
Shirley Mae Tressler, 71, of Bradenton Beach, died
May 24.
Born in Horseheads, N.Y., Mrs. Tressler came to
Manatee County from Elmira Heights, N.Y., in 1972.
She was a hairdresser. She was a member of the Dis-
abled American Veterans, the Elks Lodge and the
American Legion. She was Presbyterian.
There were no services. Ellenton Funeral Home
was in charge or arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Vickie Stahley of
Bradenton Beach and Kathie Foster of Bradenton; sons
Terry of Bradenton and Robert Jr. of Murrells Inlet,
S.C.; sister Beatrice Murphy of Elmira, N.Y.; brothers
Richard Farr and George Farr, both of Horseheads; and
four grandchildren.


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 11

S [Z. 4. Jewelry & Watch Repair
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Open every day from 9am-5pm







PAGE 12 0 MAY 30, 2001 E THE ISLANDER


Island School ranks high on Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Elementary School has received
its first set of scores on the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test that students are required to take
each year.
The FCAT focuses on reading, writing and
mathematics skills and is administered in schools
statewide as a means to track performance levels.
The fourth- and fifth-grade scores are used by
the county to track a school's academic improve-
ment from year to year.
Cindi Harrison, Anna Maria Elementary


An Interdenominational Christian Church
Rev. Gary A. Batey Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Worship Services 10 am
1 Sunday School
9:30 am Children
10 am Teens
Transportation & Nursery Available
S512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414
www.roserchurch.com




Walk-Ins Welcome Open 7 days 7:30am-8pm
Available to tend to your urgent care needs:
Fever / Infections Minor Lacerations
Simple Fractures Sprains

PINNACLE MEDICAL CENTER
315 75th Street West Bradenton
941-761-1616


School's guidance counselor, said, "We aren't a busi-
ness so this isn't about whether one school is better
than the other. The question is whether we are making
progress. We care about whether or not the school is
improving."
Although the scores are not yet complete, some
information regarding the school's performance is
available. The school ranked highest in Manatee
County for fifth-grade reading and second for fifth-
grade math skills.
The Island school ranked highest in the county for
fourth-grade math and tied for second with Braden
River Elementary School in reading. In the Florida


Improve thel Q vailty
of Your Life
Carol (reer Sie4 fo
B.A. Ed.. M.A. Psych.
CERTIFIED COUNSELOR
AND LIFE COACH
Perico Island Bradenton
(941) 794-1492 ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH!




5 ^-
Island
Chiropractic
778-0722
(Between Publix & Crowder Bros.)
3612 East Bay Drive
Dr. Joseph Acebal Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Writes portion of the test, the school score went up
marginally from last year. With 6.0 as the highest
possible score, the average score for Anna Maria
was 3.6.
Students are expected to score a 2.0 or higher
on the writing exam. According to Harrison, last
year 83 percent of the students scored above a 2.0
and this year 96 percent scored higher than 2.0.
"We met our objective to improve our writing
scores this year," said Harrison. "We're in pretty
good shape. We're doing a goodjob at educating
students and they are doing a good job at applying
what they've learned to the test,"


NEW MULLET SALE
dore than a mulletwrapper!



The Islander
FRESH MULLET T-SHIRTS! S,M,L,XL $10
Mail order add $3 for postage and handling.
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217
941-778-7978 Fax 778-9392


Financial Planning & Investment Services

Michael D. Brusso
Financial Advisor
Morgan Stanley Dean Witter
1401 Manatee Avenue West, Suite 1110
Bradenton, FL 34205
MORGAN STANLEY DEAN WITTER
(800) 488-8420 (941) 714-7917
Morgan Stanley Dean Wilier is a service mark of Morgan Stanley Dean Wilier & Co. and services
are onered through Dean Wilier Reynolds Inc., member SPIC. Dean Wilier Reynolds Inc.


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Civil and Ct
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Inve t Mt Sex, Age, Disability, Pregnancy
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Tom Breiter
Complimentary Consultation 778-1900 749


SGy YD.M.D. 3909 EAST BAY DRIVE
y 3 YatrosU D.M.D. Holmes Beach (Across from Publix)


rm
0--
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778-2204



General Dentistry
New Patients Welcome


Do you have questions about cremation?
Our new booklet What you should know about cremation explains
all aspects of the cremation process and talks about the wide range
of memorial options available to commemorate a life lived.
To receive your free copy, call us at 778-4480 or send this coupon.
We serve all families regardless of their financial circumstance.




FUNERAL HOMES AND CREMATION SERVICE
When caring more counts the most.

~ - - ---- -I


Name


Phone


Address City State_ Zip
Mail to: Griffith-Cline Pre-Arrangement Center 6000 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician
Healthcare the
gentle natural way

761-0210
501\ lue Gre- Pmi,-I,,
Suite 1I- E:l Brajent.:. r
(1 block --l .:. 1 ..:i;:..',. M 1jl .i. I .


'1'


"The Best News"

Ilk


More

Island

news

than any

other

source.


SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY

LUTZ, WEBB & BOBO, P.A.

Some of the largest corporations in the country call
us when serious legal issues arise, and you can too.
One Sarasota Tower
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Lutz, Webb & Bolio, P.A. is rated "AV" by Martindale-Hublell,
the nationally recognized law firm rating service.
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not he based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


OFFICE OF
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Law and Appeals
criminal Appeals
, Race, National Origin, Marital Status
xual Harassment Wage & Hour
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9-6433


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Providing complete family care Accepting new patients
Now accepting Medicare, CCN Health Network, Manatee
County Government and School Board Employees.
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- 3






THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 13


No place like home
Dorothy (Kaci Kennedy) is welcomed to Munchkin Land by Glinda the Good Witch of the East (Amy Costa)
and several munchkins.


Musical starlet
Kaci Kennedy took a packed house over the
rainbow to a land called Oz with her role as
Dorothy in the Island school's production of
"The Wizard of Oz."


Whirlwind performance by Island fifth.graders


Anna Maria Island Elementary School closed out the
year with a stellar performance of "The Wizard of Oz."
Fifth-grade teachers Anne Kinnan, Mary Miller and
Joyce Ellis co-produced the musical production, which
was performed after a recent Parent-Teacher Organization
meeting by the graduating fifth-grade classes.
Kaci Kennedy took the lead role of Dorothy and


transported a packed house somewhere over the rain-
bow into the land of Oz.
Kennedy was accompanied down the yellow brick
road by Tyler Schneerer as the Cowardly Lion, Kelsey
Taylor as the Tin Man and Josh Scheible as the Scare-
crow.
Glinda the Good Witch of the East, played by Amy


Costa, played a positive role in Dorothy's journey.
However, the Wicked Witch of the West, played by
Lauren Cappello, melted onto the scene with a ven-
geance.
The performance showcased the talents of Anna
Maria Elementary's graduating class and the volunteers
who helped bring the setting and costumes to life.


\ 1/
-~ C


From Anna Maria to Ellenton and points in between, you're sure to find hunting for
art, antiques and collectibles as much fun as the discovery. There are so many
places to go "antiquing" that you're certain to find the treasure you're looking for.


AnTIIQULS & ART
d "ak" 1


Monday-Saturday 10-5:30pm Sunday 1 4ish
5600 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 779-1773
geaneoaoesame(OeegiOGsG*.oGtsgoerge>os~ev,)aerneaGer s agt*fsV6 I

WHITFIELD EXCHANGE INC
Consignment Shop "Simply the Best"
8,000 Square Feet of Quality Furniture,
Deco Items, Housewares, Glassware,
Collectibles, Antiques and More!
Accepting Quality Consignments
by Appointment
751-4045 6807 14th Street West Bradenton
Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 10-5 pm
SWed 10-8 pm Sat 10-4 pm


DEALERS WANTED!
Feature your business here -
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Call \'OllU aclVertising sales
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(Exit 43 -1 mile West of 1-75)
(941) 729-1379
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Gallery/Sculpture Garden
Fine Contemporary Sculpture,
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for Home, Garden and
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ANTIQUE MALL
"10,000 feet of air-conditioned showroom"
WE BUY AND SELL ESTATES
1250 10th St. E. Hwy 301 N. Palmetto 729-5282
Dennis Dick, Proprietor Open Mon-Sat 10-5* Sun noon-5
td


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II cr an er2 arket
""" ANTIQUES & ART V L
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PAGE 14 0 MAY 30, 2001 E THE ISLANDER


Catching the WAVE
Anna Maria Elementary School students caught in the WAVE this week include Samantha Hendrickson, Alex
Burgess, Kara Nelson, Kevin O'Brien, Pose Pendergraft, Garrett Waiters, Mellissa Johnson, Brooke
Fitzgerald, Justin Dearlove, Paige Carper, Karl Schoonover and Kevin Vandermolen. Also caught in the
WAVE were the classes of Mrs. Loveland, Mrs. Moran, Mrs. Newhall and Mrs. Granstad. All fifth-graders
were caught in the WAVE, as were Mr. Wooter and Mrs.. Harrison. All receive a WAVE certificate and a
coupon for a free serving of ice cream at Mama Lo's in Anna Maria. Islander Photo: Laurie Krosney


a.p. BeLL fisH compaNyiNc. N BUOS PIs
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Fresh Seafood Since 1910 792-5300
Great selection of locally caught
Grouper, Snapper, Shrimp,BUFFET HOURS: 11AM-9PM SUNDAY Noon-8 PM
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King for a day
Anna Maria Elementary School's longtime custo-
dian, Joe Lightner, spent his day in the cafeteria
May 18. He is retiring after 20 years at the school
and plans to move to Illinois to be near family. Here,
he enjoys a special lunch provided by Beach Bistro
of Holmes Beach owner Sean Murphy. He is sur-
rounded by cards from the students and gifts from
faculty and staff The school's Parent-Teacher
Organization presented Lightner with a farewell
cuckoo clock. Islander Photo: Laurie Krosney


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 U PAGE 15


Chalk up double fun
Twins Maxwell and Madison Driscoll visited the science fair at Anna Maria
Elementary School with friends and chalked up messy hands, pink and blue, from
the chalkboard outside the auditorium. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


It pays to read
Several students in Ms. Lashway's second-grade class at Anna Maria Elementary
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As a result, they were treated to a cookout at lunchtime. Wayne Lashway, the
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~-~






PAGE 16 N MAY 30, 2001 N THE ISLANDER


Comeback kids take
LL championship
The West Manatee Fire & Rescue District baseball
team did what they've been doing all season in the
Anna Maria Island Little League major division.
Down 5-1 in the bottom of the sixth inning,
WMFD roared back from what looked like a sure de-
feat May 22 to beat Haley's Motel 6-5 for the Island
championship.
And 150 fans screaming their approval at the end
put the exclamation point on what may have been the
finest game played in 2001 for players age 10-12.
WMFD manager Andy Price said it didn't surprise
him his squad won the game and title.
"It's been like this all year," Price said. "They get
down and then in the fifth or sixth inning they get
untracked. This is one of the best group of kids I've
ever had in the nine years I've been coaching. Some-
times it takes them a while to get going, but they never
give up."
Haley's pitcher Steve Faasse was cruising along
and pitching one of his best games of the year when the
heart of the WMFD lineup came to bat in the bottom
of the sixth.
WMFD catcher Zach Geeraerts bounced an infield
single and beat out the throw from Haley's second
baseman David Bryant by sliding into first base.
Greg Lowman then singled to center to bring home
Geeraerts and make it 5-2.
Kris Klotz walked, and Lowman and Klotz moved
up to second and third on a wild pitch.
WMFD shortstop Sean Price came up and crushed
a double to the base of the fence just out of the reach
of right fielder Jordan Pritchard. Price's clutch hit
knocked in Klotz and Lowman.
With the score 5-4, Patrick Cole reached on an er-
ror and Price went to third. Mark Spence flew to
Pritchard in right who made a good catch to keep the
tying run from scoring.
Then young Ben Valdivieso a future all-star in
this league hit a shot down the first-base line to
score Price and tie the game at five apiece. Faasse got
South of the inning by striking out the last batter, but the
damage was done and the tide turned.
Because Little League pitchers can only throw six
innings in a one-week period, Cole came on in relief of
Lowman.
The first batter he faced was league batting
champion Faasse, who promptly crushed a single to
right. Cole got the always-dangerous hitter Matt
Bobo to fly to short, then he walked Shane Pelkey.
Faasse and Pelkey moved up to second and third
when WMFD wasn't paying attention, but Cole


~4


Tag, you're it
Haley's Motel shortstop Kevin Kirn catches West Manatee Fire & Rescue District runner Lance Burger trying
to steal after taking an on-the-money throw from catcher Tanner Pelkey. Second baseman David Bryant backs
up the play. WMFD beat Haley's 6-5 May 22 for the Anna Maria Island Little League major division champi-
onship for players age 10-12. Islander Photo: David Futch


struck out the final two batters to end the threat.
Shane Pelkey came on in relief of Faasse, getting
two strikes on Nick Sato and appearing as if he would
mow him down.
But Sato lashed Pelkey's third pitch into left field
for a single. Then Geeraerts singled up the middle to
put runners on second and third.
Lowman hit a sacrifice fly to right to move the
runners up to second and third, setting up some hero-
ics by Klotz and smart base running by Sato.
Klotz hit a lazy fly over the head of Faasse, who
was playing first base. When Sato noticed the ball
would put Faasse in an awkward throwing stance, he
tagged and flew home with the winning run.
It was all over but the shouting, which came from
fans and players alike.
Haley's manager Evan Bordes was in shock over
the comeback and said, "It was a heartbreaking loss."
In the beginning, it looked as if Haley's would be
the heartbreakers.
Faasse gave up one hit in the first five innings -
a single by Geeraerts in the first and struck out seven
before the sixth inning did in Haley's.
Lowman was equally effective through two in-
nings, allowing no runs, no hits and striking out five.
In the third, the speedy Pritchard led off with a
walk and Faasse was hit by a pitch.
Cleanup hitter Matt Bobo came to the plate and
launched a 2-2 pitch to deep left center, scoring


We are the champions
West Manatee Fire & Rescue District celebrates moments after beating Haley 's Motel 6-5 in extra-innings
May 22 to win the Anna Maria Island Little League major division championship for players age 10-12.
" Islander Photo. David Futch
- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - - -


Pritchard and Faasse. Bobo reached third on a throw-
ing error that got away from third baseman Sato and
rolled into left field. An alert Bobo saw the ball
dribble away and raced home for a 3-0 Haley's lead.
Haley's tacked on another run in the fourth on three
consecutive walks and a fielder's choice sacrifice to
second that scored Mike Schweitzer.
In the bottom of the fourth, WMFD got on the
board when Faasse walked four straight batters and
Lowman scored a run.
At the start of the fifth, Haley's scored after David
Bryant singled and Tyler Fitzgerald laid down arfeect
bunt for a single to bring him in to put Haley's on top
5-1.
In the bottom of the fifth, Faasse struck out the first
two batters and WMFD's Sato came to the plate and
drove a blue-darter line drive to right, but Pritchard
made a fine catch to end the inning.
Haley's could do nothing in its half of the sixth and
WMFD batters came to hit and performed their magic.
As Sean Price said to his dad, Andy, after all the
cheering and yelling had stopped, "WMFD Winning
Manatee Fire District."

Waterfront nips Bistros for title
Talk about a slugfest.
The Anna Maria Island Little League AAA cham-
pionship game May 23 for players age 8-11 produced
scoring synonymous with a football game.
It wasn't a case of wide right that gave Waterfront
Restaurant the championship and Bistros a stunning
defeat.
It was a case of Waterfront Restaurant's Miles
Hostetler slapping a single to right field with one out
in the bottom of the sixth inning to give Waterfront a
17-16 come-from-behind win that also gave Hostetler's
squad the AAA title.
Bistros went into the bottom of the sixth leading
16-13 and had Waterfront on the ropes until Heather
Howard hit a single up the middle that was followed
by another sharp single to left field from the speedy
Lauren Barth, perhaps the fastest base runner in
AAA.
Alex Wright then drew a walk to load the bases.
Scott Steenstra tied the game when he sent a deep
drive in the gap to left center field for a triple that tied
the game at 16-16.
On the next pitch, Hostetler lined a single to right
to score Steenstra with the winning run.
Waterfront players then mobbed and piled on top
of coach Lori Guerin in a victory celebration as the
stunned Bistros players walked off the field.
The game was a see-saw battle from the start.
Bistros came to bat in the first and Steve Thomas
and Carmine Galati led off with walks.
Ben Murphy hit a sharp liner up the middle that the
PLEASE SEE SPORTS RAP, NEXT PAGE







THE ISLANDER E MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 17


SPORTS RAP, FROM PAGE 16


center fielder misplayed and Bistros went up 2-0. How-
ever, a double play ended the Bistros threat.
Waterfront tied the game in the bottom of the first
on walks to Hostetler and Ryan Guerin followed by a
two-run double by Boak.
Bistros went up 3-2 in the second on singles from
Justin Dimiceli who went to third on two passed balls
and an RBI single from Alicia Ware.
Three walks and two errors led to two more Wa-
terfront runs in the bottom half of the second to give
Waterfront a 4-3 lead.
Bistros turned it on in the top of the third, when
Galati and Murphy both singled and Max Marnie
singled in Galati to tie the game.
Ed Shaw then hit a triple to right to make it 6-4
Bistros and Shaw scored when Dimiceli hit a slow
roller to the first base side to make it 7-4.
Waterfront came roaring back with five runs and
a 9-7 lead on five walks, a double by Howard and two
singles.
Bistros scored three and took a 10-9 lead on a
walk to Thomas, a fielders' choice that Galati beat
out, a two-run double from Murphy and a sacrifice
fly by Marnie.
Waterfront eased ahead 11-10 in the bottom of
the fourth on a walk and singles by Guerin and Boak.
Bistros scored five in the top of the fifth to go up
15-11 on a single from Kala Garner, an error, a two-
run single from Ware, a walk to Galati, an RBI
single from Murphy and an run-scoring sacrifice off
Marnie's bat.
In the bottom of the fifth inning, Alex Wright
walked and Steenstra crushed a two-run home run
down the right field line to make it 15-13 Bistros fa-
vor.
Bistros tacked on another run in the top of the
sixth when Shaw reached on an error and Jimmy
Lease brought him in two batters later with a single
to right.
-With Bistros up 16-13, Waterfront worked its
magic and Hostetler came through in the clutch for the
biggest win of the year for the AAA champions.


This way, then that way
Haley's Motel left fielder C.J. Wickersham gets turned around on this long fly ballfrom West Manatee Fire &
Rescue District slugger Sean Price, but is able to make an acrobatic catch. WMFD beat Haley's 6-5 May 22
for the Anna Maria Island Little League major division championship for players age 10-12. Islander Photo:
David Futch


Awards ceremony set for May 31
The Anna Maria Island Little League will hold its
year-end awards ceremony May 31at the Community
Center's field, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.


The 6 p.m. event will feature awards for the major
league and AAA division champions as well as tro-
phies for the major league's most valuable player, bat-
ting champion and sportsmanship award winner.






PAGE 18 0 MAY 30, 2001 W THE ISLANDER


Scary reading for start of hurricane season


At the start of every hurricane season I make it a
point to dig out my battered copy of John Barnes' book
"Mother of Storms" to scare myself into getting ready
for the next few months.
Barnes' science-fiction novel tells the tale of a se-
ries of calamities that cause a huge change in the
Earth's climate. Ocean temperatures rise. Rainfall to-
tals reach epic proportions. Dams break as a result of
the extra water, flooding vast parts of the world.
But the real killers are the hurricanes. Barnes de-
scribes in layman's terms the results of more numerous
and stronger hurricanes than have ever been seen be-
fore.
"The real numbers show something more like 70
hurricanes, and many of them far beyond historical
scale," Barnes writes. "There's no drought, but the rain
cycle accelerates tremendously they're going to lose
some big dams, and many of the dry lake basins in the
West will begin to fill. Between the storms and the
change of climate, they can expect major blight out-
breaks in the world's forests, and plenty of crop fail-
ures. It probably isn't possible to save the Netherlands,
and it is definitely not possible to save Bangladesh or
most of the world's delta populations. There's no ques-
tion that they'll lose some populated Pacific Islands
entirely, and it looks suspiciously like in the Southern
Hemisphere the Antarctic glaciers will grow rapidly all
through southern winter and then melt even more rap-
idly in October and November.
"The real numbers show deaths running to 270
million worldwide by September."
Sure enough, Hurricane Clem forms in the Pacific.
It gets bigger and bigger, then does the unheard-of and
crosses Mexico into the Caribbean. The storm builds,
then does what the characters in the book feared would
happen: the hurricane winds reach Mach 1. As the
storm moves into the Gulf of Mexico well, here's
Barnes' description:
"Within hours storm surges are large enough to

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the May 25 horseshoe games
were John Bennett and Bill Starrett, both of
Anna Maria. Runners-up were Ron Pepka of
Bradenton and Tom Skoloda of Anna Maria.
Winners in the May 23 games were Gracie
Pepka of Bradenton Beach and Ron Pepka. Run-
ners-up were Jack Cooper of Holmes Beach and
Pete Watson of Anna Maria and England.
The weekly contests get under way at 9
a.m. every Wednesday and Saturday at Anna
Maria City Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive.



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rage right across Florida. Those who couldn't or
wouldn't evacuate before now are drowned by the
waves, tens of meters high, that pour over the peninsula
one after another; the mangroves that have held the
land give way, concrete crumbles, steel bends and
breaks, and the surface of Florida is washed off into the
Atlantic to thunder down the continental slope in a
great avalanche. More and more follows; there will be
little land left by morning.
"Winds reach speeds of 100 mph as far north as
Memphis, and cities and forests are flattened.
"And yet all this pales beside the effects of the new
storm's outflow jets. Sucking up seawater like a giant
vacuum cleaner, mixing far more efficiently and thus
using more of the available energy, the great hurricane
dumps more than a thousand tons of water per square
acre the equivalent of 10 inches of rain all over
the eastern third of the United States in the nine hours
before the storm abruptly veers to roar across the At-
lantic, gaining energy before it mauls its way into Eu-
rope, still dropping saltwater three days later as far in-
land as Kazakhstan.
"The Mississippi is briefly as wide as Lake Erie;
the James River carries all of Richmond out to sea, and
running water rises 70 feet on the Washington Monu-
ment."
Pretty scary stuff, huh?

Geography wiz
A 14-year-old Washington youth has won the 2001
National Geographic Bee in geography, and I'm em-
barrassed to admit that I was zero for 10 on the same
questions that were aced by the kid.
And I even took some geography courses in col-
lege.
Here's the question he won with:
Below the equilibrium line of glaciers there is a
region of melting, evaporation and sublimation. Name
this zone.
The answer, of course (?), is the zone of ablation.
How about this one? The Nile Delta is to Egypt as
the Irrawaddy Delta is to what country? Answer:
Myanmar, or Burma. Hey, at least I remembered that
Burma is now called Myanmar.
And finally, how about this Keith Wilmott has
discovered more than 50 new species of butterflies near
Cotopaxi National Park in which South American
country? The answer is Ecuador. I would have guessed
Costa Rica.


The kid goes onto compete in the International
Geographic Olympiad in Canada next August. Good
luck.
Beach' R' Us
Well, not really US, but our neighbors to the south
and north have received accolades from Dr. Beach for
their sandy shores.
Dr. Stephen Leatherman is a Florida International
University coastal geologist who annually compiles a
list of the best beaches in the United States. As a result
of his rankings, he has earned the nickname of Dr.
Beach.
This year, Siesta Key Beach was ranked at number
13, up two marks from last year. Fort DeSoto Park, on
the south shore of Tampa Bay in Pinellas County, was
ranked at 6.
Florida did well, with seven beaches on the top-20
list. I was pleased to note that I've visited all but one
of Florida's best beaches, and I'll have to make it a
point to go to Cape Florida one of these days.
Number 1, by the way, is Poipu Beach Park on the
Hawaiian island of Kauai. Dr. Beach says it was
Numero Uno because of its classic sandy beach-moun-
tain combination.
Florida's best beaches and their ranking, according
to Dr. Beach, (with my descriptions) are:
2 St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. This place
has some of the most majestic sand dunes you'll find
in Florida, with wide beaches, no people, and water that
is so pristine that wading across 20 feet of seagrass
beds resulted in spotting 20 scallops.
5 Caladesi Island State Park. A boaters' para-
dise, reached only by ferry or boat, this beach is the
definition of sugar sand.
6 Ft. DeSoto Park. I've never been able to fig-
ure out why this park isn't packed with people, not that
I'm complaining.
9 Cape Florida. I'll give you a report when I get
back from there.
13 Siesta Key Beach. This has gotta be the best
walking beach in the state, with white hard-packed
sand along its entire three-mile length.
16 St. George Island State Park. The dunes
aren't as big as at St. Joseph, but the beach is just as
gorgeous and civilization is closer. It's just 10 minutes
from the park to a seaside joint that sells adult bever-
ages.
17 Perdido Key. Another sugar sand.beach on
the Florida-Alabama border.

Sandscript factoid
Kudos to Randy Wayne White for his stellar suc-
cess at Saturday's author signing on St. Armands. We
counted more than 75 people patiently waiting in line
for his autograph, and the folks at the bookstore said
they sold 246 copies of his new novel, "Shark River."
If you missed the signing, they've still got a batch of
signed copies at Circle Books.














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THE ISLANDER E MAY 30, 2001' f PAGE 19


Kimball, Pride wrestle 200-pound tarpon; jewfish now goliath


By Capt. David Futch
Enough complaints have been lodged over the
years that the American Fisheries Society has buckled
under the pressure and renamed the jewfish, the larg-
est of grouper.
For decades, the Society's Committee of Names of
Fishes has been petitioned by people who felt the name
jewfish was offensive to Jews.
In a rare move, the group responsible for nam-
ing fish in the Americas has changed jewfishh" to
"goliath grouper."
In a May 24 Sr. Petersburg Times article, Names
of Fishes Committee chairman Joseph Nelson said his
group resisted the change for years because the com-
mittee believes in the overriding principle of stability
in fish names.
This is only the second time that the name of a fish
has been changed. The first came in the 1990s when the
squawfish of the American northwest became the
pikeminnow.
No one knows for sure how the jewfish got its
name, though there are several theories and some
tasteless stories about the name of the fish that can
weigh over 600 pounds.
One theory is that when people started eating jew-
fish, they found its flesh clean, like kosher food.
Two less pleasant theories came about in the
1800s. One states that jewfish were trash fish and
people declared it was only fit for Jews.
The second and even more tasteless theory is that
because the jewfish is difficult to clean and fillet.
people called it ajewfish because "it was hard to skin."
Any way you look at it, he's big and powerful. But if
you ever catch one, you can't keep it. They're a federally
protected species and you have to throw them back.
There are plenty of them hanging around deep-
water channels like the Tampa Bay shipping channel or
Southwest Channel off Egmont Key.
Kim Shearer of Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez
said Capt. Sam Kimball on the Legend reported an
outstanding week of fishing that produced some great
catches and near misses.
On one trip, Kimball was fishing with Junior Pride
of Cortez and Pride hooked into a tarpon over 200
pounds. After a six-hour fight, the line broke and


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your fish stories,
and pictures are welcome
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or stop by our office in the
Island Shopping Center,
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U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom-built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait
& Tackle Furnished
Anna Maria Island, Florida


778-9712


- -- a.._. -.s_ ,.
... ---- S- -' .- .- ...

.. -- .

S---
7-- *..-- -?-.--=t-> .- -.* ., -..
. .- -- -. .









Kimball and Pride had a good story to tell. Other trips
on the Legend produced permit to 20 pounds, amber-
jack in the 10- to 15-pound range, a few kingfish,
bonita and a lot of Spanish mackerel.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
snook fishing is very good from Whale Key just south
of Cannon's Marina on Longboat Key north to Perico
Bayou. Live bait tends to work best, but there's no
problem using a lure, he said.
Pompano are along the beaches and anglers who
regularly fish Longboat Key beaches said the snook are
starting to gang up along the shoreline, Lowman said.
R.C. Gause at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said
the tarpon are on the beach. Cobia are on the flats and
following stingrays. If you find the rays, you'll find
cobia. There are a lot of big trout on the flats south of
the Anna Maria Island Bridge and pompano are being
caught on jigs tipped with shrimp or sand fleas.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip Tide out of
Holmes Beach has been getting red and gag grouper
and dolphin in water 80 to 120 feet deep.
"We got some hog red grouper to 25 pounds on


OFFSHORE FISHING CHARTERS ABOARD

ZULU MAMA
31-FOOT BERTRAM


FOR INFO CALL: Capt. Paul at (941) 778-3013


The Islander


Trout time
Charlie Hill
of Tampa
couldn't
believe his
S2-d ..-eyes when he
Caught this
S.- ^' < 27-inch
-- spotted sea
trout while
Fishing with
Capt. Tom
-. -Chava on the
Dolphin
.. ,- Dreams
S" charter
vessel.




Sunday," Denham said. "Then we came in to about 60
feet and caught lane snapper and black sea bass."
Bob Kilb at the Rod & Reel Pier in Anna Maria said
pompano are around for the taking and some snook are
being caught along with bluefish and Spanish mackerel.
Capt. Steve Salgado on the Compleat Angler
said snook are cooperating along with trout and the
occasional redfish. He said he's also nailing the tarpon
along the beaches.
Capt. Curt Morrison on the Neva-Miss said he's
catching amberjack, gag grouper, red grouper, man-
grove snapper, lane snapper .nd black sea bass.
"If you want to chum for kings with a free line
while you're fishing for grouper, they're still out
there," Morrison said.


Anno &adro V osl/nc i9TTes

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
May 30 8:32 1.8 1:00 0.1 6:56 1.9 1:05 1.2
May 31 9:04 1.9 1:50 0.3 8:40 1.7 2:33 0.9
Jun 1 9:30 2.1 2:32 0.5 10:07 1.6 3:42 0.6
Jun 2 9:55 2.2 3:06 0.8 11:23 1.5 4:36 0.3
Jun 3 10:18 2.4 3:35 1.0 5:25 0.0
Jun 4 12:26 1.5 4:00 1.1 10:40a* 2.5 6:08 -0.1
FM Jun 5 1:22 1.4 4:15 1.2 11:05a* 2.6 6:50 -0.2
Jun 6 2:24 1.4 4:34 1.3 11:33a* 2.6 7:29 -0.2
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


It is Said that Life Should be
a Balance of Work and Play.

Been Boating Lately?


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Cannons 2001 Model Year Closeout Sale*
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by dependable Yamaha motors. And keep your balance all summer long
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cannonsmarina.com 941-383-1311 _____ "m W&W S |


SKeilly's

Automotive
Complete Auto Repair
Foreign Domestic Diesels
John Keilly, Owner ASE Certified Master Technician
(Formerly with "All Work Guaranteed"
4523Holmes Beach W.,BP)d. A Bradenton 941 756-7854
4523 30th St. W., Bid. A Bradenton 941 756-7854






PAGE 20 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Real Estate


Island property sales
617 Emerald Lane, Holmes Beach, a canalfront
1,669 sfla 2bed/2bath/2car home built in 1969 on a
95x115 lot, was sold 4/10/01, Kirby to Escobar, for
$339,000; list $339,900.
6400 Flotilla, Holmes Beach, 97 Westbay Point &
Moorings, a 985 sfla 2bed/2bath bayfront condo built
in 1978, was sold 4/9/01, Kelley to Mateer, for
$250,000; list $250,000.
1301 Bay Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 2-A Bay
Watch 1, a 1,079 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1982,
was sold 4/10/01, Griffith to O'Harrow, for $230,000;
-list $239,000.
308 Spring, a 1,587 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car home
built in 1994 on a 52x145 lot, was sold 4/11/01, Steele
to Stoltzfus, for $295,000; list $299,900.
3607 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 104 Sandy Pointe
2, a 976 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1996, was sold
4/12/01, Dellenger to Carlson, for $150,000.
107 12th St. N., Bradenton Beach, a 1,020 sfla
2bed/lbath/lcar home built in 1963 on a 55x103 lot,
was sold 4/16/01, Zagame to Mincieli, for $196,900.
207 Coconut, Anna Maria, a 680 sfla 2bed/l bath/
cp home built in 1945 on a 52x100 lot, was sold 12/12/
00, Horn (who owned since 1931) to Cina, for
$212,000; list $234,900.
262 S. Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach, a 1,500 sfla
3bed/2bath/2car home built in 1992 on a 50x100 lot,
was sold 4/20/01, Shuford to Dacus, for $265,000;
list $274,000.
2817 Avenue C, Holmes Beach, a 980 sfla 2bed/
2bath home built in 1972 on a 50x100 lot, was sold 4/
18/01, Oliveria to Weissman, for $249,000; list
$265,000.
311 66th St., Holmes Beach, a 1,120 sfla 2bed/
3bath/lcar home built in 1963 on a 92x105 corner lot,
was sold 4/18/01, Bauman to Canger, for $205,000; list
$219,000.
3607 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 110 Sandy Pointe

g Moving In?
Moving Out?
Moving Up?

Call Karen Day
778-6696
Evenings: 779-2237
SMike Norman Realty, inc.
3101 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach






$225,000 BAYFRONT ON A PRI-
VATE ISLAND! Own a little over an
acre of land on Jewfish Key, in Sarasota
Bay, accessible by boat only. Great bay
- view from one of 13 parcels on this 26
S acre island. Water, septic and electric at
's site. Community dock, sandy beaches.
IB73855.
$179,000 200 FEET LAKE
FRONTAGE and great view from
this 3BR/2BA home. Large open
rooms include a den and family room. Deck, fireplace and
separate mother-in-law apartment. IB45903.

$525,000 LOTS OF POSSIBILI-
TIES In this very private 3BR/2.5BA
home on large lot in Anna Maria. No
bridges when you sail from your dock
to the Bay. Crystal-clear caged pool.
SShort walk to beautiful beach. Very
y open. IB203115.





Top Listing Agent for April Ken Richards
Top Selling Agent for April Denise Langlois

5350 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
(941) 778-0766 (877) 924-9001
Visit our website at www.ArvidaRealty.com


2, a 980 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar condo built in 1966, was
sold 4/16/01, Struber to Sciara, for $122,500.
3801 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 103 Sunbow Bay
4, a 2516 sfla 2 story townhouse condo built in 1981,
was sold 4/16/01, Molinaro to McCaw, for $210,000;
list $215,000.
4109 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, two lots, 100x100
each with a 32-year old duplex on both lots were sold
4/17/01, Gonzalez to Menendez, for $450,000; list
$489,000.
5800 Imperiore, Holmes Beach, a 1,020 sfla 2bed/
lbath/lcp home built in 1968 on a 52x101 lot, was sold
4/17/01, Laade to Lumpkin, for $221,900.
600 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach, 241
Westbay Cove, a 1,187 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built
in 1977, was sold 4/20/01, Willet to Knight, for
$207,000.
214 Chilson, Anna Maria, a canalfront 1,888 sfla
4bed/2bath/2car home built in 1982 on a 72x148 lot,
was sold 4/23/01, Castro to Bayless, for $440,000; list
$469,000.
231 Willow, Anna Maria, a canalfront 1,979 sfla
3bed/2.5bath/pool home built in 1974 on an 80x148
lot, was sold 4/24/01, Delisio to Wendel, for
$340,000; list $354,900.
413 63rd St., Holmes Beach, Seaside Gardens, a
'900 sfla 2bed/2bath/cp half duplex built in 1972 on a
25x97 lot, was sold 4/27/01, Carroll to Gonzalez, for
$134,900; list $134,900.
6301 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, a 1,680 sfla 4bed/
4bath duplex built in 1976 on an 85x1 10 lot, was sold


4/24/01, Mitchell to Rogers, for $238,000; list
$249,900.
6500 Flotilla, Holmes Beach, 144 Westbay Point
& Moorings, a 1,114 sfla 2bed/2bath canalfront 23-
year-old condo overlooking the bay, was sold 4/23/01,
Almquist to Purdum, for $251,000.
710 Jacaranda, Anna Maria, a canalfront 2,216 sfla
3bed/3bath/cp home built in 1977 on a 50x150 lot, was
sold 4/25/01, Leech to Neilson, for $375,000.
714 Jacaranda, Anna Maria, a canalfront 2,242 sfla
home built in 1969 on two lots measuring 100x150 and
recently remodeled, was sold 4/26/01, Watts to Finold,
for $515,000.
901 Gulf Dr. S., Bradenton Beach, 7 Pelican Cove
Resort 1, a 962 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1983,
was sold 4/27/01, Schau to Tracy, for $250,000; list
$269,000.
1007 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 207 Summer
Sands, a 1,252 sfla 2bed/2.5bath condo built in 1982,
was sold 4/30/01, Fraser to Miller Real Estate, for
$274,000; list $279,500.
109 13th St. S., Bradenton Beach, a bayfront tri-
plex of 1,800 sfla, 1,348 sfla, and 1,080 sfla built in
1983, 1952, and 1960 on a 100x!00 lot, was sold 5/4/
01, Steger to Walker, for $775,000.
110 Mangrove, Anna Maria, a 50x1 10 lot, was sold
5/1/01, Lockwood Holding to Hildebrandt, for
$259,000; list $269,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real es-
tate broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Islander.
Copyright 2001.


Professionalism Times Two...

"- DON and KAREN SCHRODER
'. 5-YEAR RECIPIENT OF THE PRESTIGIOUS
RE/MAX INTERNATIONAL 100% CLUB AWARD
4 Providing the highest levels of professional experience and
local knowledge you require when buying or selling property.
lR/AA'/~ GULFSTREAM REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated
Call the Schroders: 778-2200


Choice Gulf lot available
and other "soon to be
listed" Gulf properties.

Call for details!




MARIE 1 \LIC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250

N W-1 ,iO1 jI I "j"g


Resort-Style Living at
TOWN & COUNTRY
PERICO
FEATURING:
Spacious 1 & 2 BR Apartments
Attractive Island Location
Pool & Spa
Fitness Center
Lake or Nature Views
Optional Garages
Free Boat Parking*
Roman Tubs
Small Pets Welcome


~C~- *


4
4

k


IA- P A- R *T' M-E N -T S
TOWN & COUNTRY PERICO

941-795-4899
HOURS: Mon-Fri 9-5, St 10-5, Sun 12-5
Directions From U.S. 41, travel west on Manatee
Avenue (SR 64) and across Palma Sola Causeway
to Perico land. Town & Country Perico
will be on the left.
www.tchome.com
Limited time offer certain restrictions opply.
*Size restrictions ooalv.


Just visiting
paradise?



The Islander
Don't leave the Island
without us. Mail-order:
941-778-7978.





















GULF SHORES CONDO Spacious 2BR/2BA and den, cathedral
ceilings and beautiful Gulf views Call Michel Cerene 792-6546 eves.

T REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK






jIetSyS W/ll& Real states,
SALES & RENTALS
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294




Ion


-mm



PERFECT LAND BEACH HOLSE!
S STEPS TO EAN POImT!
This impeccable 3BR/2BA bath residence is
sheer perfection! Amenities include gleaming
Mexican-tiled floors, vaulted, textured ceilings
--ith fans and recessed lighting, white gourmet
kitchen-with breakfast bar and glass-top range,
leaded glass front door with entry foyer, whirlpool
tub, screened lanai and sundeck with glimpses of
the Gulf and enormous six-car garage! Being
offered fully furnished at $525,000!
Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


Simply the Best


CANAL HOME
Locateb in Holmes Deach, this 3DR/2BA
home feAtmres A large porch, fireplace,
fenced yArb AnMb A two-CAr SarAge.
$350o,ooo.



SA I
it twI l rilm Flhm 101" al ,r -U
,/R~~ ..... =,., ,I ',
It Hin R "M 1"Val ff ,' -

: ?i.. . .. .


GVLFFRONT
Anna Maria Islant Club 2DR/2BA conto.
Excellent vacation rental. Turnkey fur-
nishetb. Lar5e heatce pool, secure en-
trance, elevator. Price rebucet to $399,900.


NEAR GVLF ANNA MARIA
Lar5e buplex on 1.5 lots on quiet street.
2BR/2BA each site with large living anb
family rooms. Owner financing.


BAYFRONT BEAVTY
Extrai bi$ bafront 3BR/2BA home with
pool. isi ft. of seawall, protected mooring
with 1000 lb. bavits, beep water AMb no
brit5cs to the Gulf. Vptateb designer
complimented with Italian ceramic
throV5ihout. Plenty of room to grow.


Mike Sally Lisa Marianne Rochelle
Largest Selection of
Rentals on Anna Maria!
70 Gulffront Units
~ Hundreds more just steps
from the beach
Four full-time rental agents

Mike

Norman
Realty 800-367-1617
R ealtyINC 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
WWW. MIKENORMANREALTY.COM


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 21


ANNA MARIA
S*^ ISLAND

S RiACoastS
REAL ESTATE, LLC


Gloria Schorpp


Helen White Mary Ann Schmidt


ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB
2BR/2BA Gulffront turnkey-furnished condo.
Gorgeous Gulf view, beautiful beach, heated pool,
excellent rental income. $475,000.
BERMUDA BAY CLUB
3BR/2.5BA turnkey furnished. Bright attractive
condo with view of Gulf from two balconies.
Two-car attached garage. Heated pool and spa.
$328,000.
SPECTACULAR VIEW BIMINI BAY
4 bedrooms, three luxurious baths. Split-plan
home hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen, screened
porch. Inground pool, three-car garage. $795,000.
ANNA
4 r" .'t) ( iful
b SAL ades,
d enti area. $574,900.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS CONDO
2BR/2BA immaculate, turnkey furnished. View of
lush landscaping and heated pool. Ceramic tile and
Berber carpeting, glassed-in lanai. $289,900.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEXES
3BR/2BA & 2BR/1BA duplex west of Gulf Drive.
Near gorgeous beach. Large yard. $259,000.
2BR/2BA each side. Central Holmes Beach. Close
to beach and shopping. Good rental. $285,000.
2BR/2BA each. Close to beach, new roof and
carpeting. Large lot. Excellent rental. $299,900.
KEY ROYALE
3BR/2BA furnished home on sailboat water with
direct access to Tampa Bay. Split plan, two-car
garage, caged pool, nicely landscaped. $ 395,000.
BEACH HOUSE
4BR/41BA turnkey furnished beach house west of
Gulf Drive in historic Anna Maria City. Large lot,
great rental. $495,000.
PERICO ISLAND
2BR/2BA Perico Island condo with view of pond.
Screened porch, walk-in closet, washer/dryer,
second floor end unit. Great location! $137,900.


Julie Gilstrap-Royal Patti Marifjeren
ANNUAL RENTALS
623 DUNDEE
3BR/2BA house on canal. Two-car garage.
Available May 1 $1,800 mo.
6814 PALM DRIVE
2BR/1.5BA duplex, carport. Available Now! $850
607 NORTH BAY BLVD.
3BR/2BA house, two-car garage. Available Aug. 1 $1,300
7104 MARINA
3BR/2BA house, pool, garage $1,500
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Homes Weekly/Monthly
from $500 week / $1000 month
779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA

L LS SIslQI3. nNO s
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


RENTALS
Annual / Seasonal / Monthly / Weekly

SEASONAL RENTAL


E mail: info@smithrealtors.com
Web site: www.smithrealtors.com


BRADENTON PROPERTIES
NEW LISTING GLENN LAKES. "As-new" im-
maculate 3BR/2BA home. Large open floor plan
overlooking pond. Eat-in kitchen, screened
lanai, oversized garage. Homeowners associa-
tion. Priced at $159,900. Call Clarke Williams,
744-0700 eves.

ARBOR OAKS. Tastefully decorated 3BR/
2.5BA home in upscale neighborhood. Ameni-
ties include bonus room/loft, cathedral ceilings,
clerestory windows, central vac, oak cabinets,
screened lanai, double garage, lawn service
and community pool. Close to shopping and
hospital. One year home warranty. $175,000.
Call Carol Williams, 744-0700 eves.

MIRROR LAKE. Well-kept 2BR/2BA condo in de-
sirable location, overlooking lake and steps to
pool. Fireplace in living room, split bedroom de-
sign. Tennis, heated pool, sauna, exercise room.
$74,900. Call Martine J. Moore, 795-2983 eves.


n> REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS I lr


[sImith






PAGE 22 MAY 30, 2001 THE ISLANDER .



AG A RAA L o nI& A I


BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love
seat $399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129;
futons (sofa by day, bed at night) frame and mattress
$199; daybed (white with brass finials) including two
mattresses and pop-up unit $285. Can deliver. Call
753-7118.

COINS FROM Royal Mint, non-circulated, presenta-
tion case with Princess Di and Prince Charles silver
crown, $45; Elizabeth II 25th Jubliee Crown $10;
Festival of Britain 1951 silver crown $20; silver 50
nobles, celebrating Drakes conquest, $10. 792-4274.

WORLD PHILATELIST: More than 50 new pre-
stamped envelopes from the USSR. Each has a great
commemorative picture of a significant person or event
in history. From Tverskaya Post Office. $50. 792-4274.

REALLY NEAT utility trailer bed, 4 by 6 feet, heavy-
duty aluminum with fold-down side doors. $25, bring
your own wheels. 711 N. Shore Drive, Anna Maria.
778-3470.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP open Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 9:30am-2pm. Saturday, 9am-noon. Wednesday,
9am-11am, donations only. Sales racks. 511 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria, 779-2733.

ESTATE SALE Bayfront, Friday-Sunday, June 1-3,
9am-5pm. Two cream bamboo bedroom sets, white
sofa, love seat, three dolphin tables, dining room and
den sets. Lots of antique furniture, armoire, desk,
chest, wrought iron, antique prints, porcelains, crys-
tal. Lots of jewelry, bric-a-brac, kitchenware. Mower,
stove, miscellaneous. Everything half price on Sun-
day. Take General Harris off Gulf of Mexico Drive on
Longboat Key, left on Norton, park on right side of
street. Don't block driveways or park in vacant lot
next to house.




JULIE McCLURE
Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
SPersonal
Property
Appraisals

S Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
mean I can offer you a qualified service to help in
the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send you
a resume and references.
(941) 746-2,100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


YARD SALE, Saturday-Sunday, June 2-3, 8am-2pm.
Many quality clothes, working electronics, some fur-
niture and lots more. 7206 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.

MOVING SALE, Saturday, June 2, 8am-noon.
Kitchen set, dinning room set, gueen size bed and
miscellaneous. 518 72nd St., Holmes Beach.


LOST: GRAY COCKATEIL, male, orange cheeks.
Answers to "Hey Norman." Lost Haverkos Court
area, Holmes Beach. 779-9382.

REWARD FOR THE return of brown leather brief-
case and contents taken from my car on North Bay
Blvd. Call Susan, 778-7616.

LARGE, GRAY, tiger-stripe male cat answers to Jake.
Lost in the vicinity of 75th Street, 200 block, Holmes
Beach. Please call 778-8486 with any information.


CRITTER SITTER Six years in pet care, 21 years as
an Island resident. Tender, loving care for your pets
with in-home visits. 778-6000.

FREE KITTENS (2) and momma kitty to good home.
Will separate if needed. Like to stay outside. Please
call 778-9722.



1994 Dodge Mark II. Luxury model. Loaded, low
miles. Must sell. Call Phil 778-8281.

1999 SATURN-SL/4DR. Emerald green, under
16,000 miles, air, radio, cruise. Book value $12,000,
asking $11,400. Must sell. Call Mel, 792-3092.

FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander, 778-7978.



SAMPLE ISLAND VACATION RENTAL PROPERTIES


"One of three medium (three bedroom) houses to rent in
the city of Anna Maria. Gulffront and views."

Doug Dowling Realty
409 Pine Ave. Anna Maria, Fl 34216
Phone & Fax: (941) 778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
www.dougdowling.com


Thanks for saying "I saw it in The Islander"


SUMMER SANDS SUPER DUPLEX .:r o EXCEPTIONAL DUPLEX
.:.r ,ildrr...i w lh rea1 e.: th, 13 ,.I, r,.:,m e 1r .11' to ii u. nts :. p.p r
-,, ip, a- p r .: .ere: great ,a e ErA 1 l ..r plar. .e'..-. ,
::,3rl .'n,_ Turnr e, lur. each i,, :le .' l. 1,un' r,,,r .,. 1 r,:, , ,r, rae
nished. $269,500. Call dries, screened lanai parking. Onerea at
Dave Moynihan at 778- and heated spa in- $397,500. Call Dave
2246 or 778-7976 eves. cluded. $259,500. Call Moynihan 778-2246 or
Ron Cornette, 778-2246. 778-7976.
2217 GULF DRIVE NORTH BRADENTON BEACH, FL 34217
941 778-2246 800 211-2323


OFFSHORE CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Glenn
Corder aboard Deep South. Half & full day. For infor-
mation call 778-1203 or mobile 713-5900.

OFFSHORE AND BAY fishing, nature and special
charters aboard Zulu Mama. Contact Captain Paul at
778-3013.

DOCK RENTAL near boat ramp. 63rd Street, Sea-
side Gardens. Weekly/monthly/annual. Call 778-
5719.


CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.

OPPORTUNITIES: HONEST, DEPENDABLE, ener-
getic people. Waitress, breakfast daily; cleaning, bed
and breakfast and motel; laundry. Call 778-6335.

FREE SODA CANS! Now that we got your attention-
Yes! We take free empty soda cans at the Bradenton
Beach Recycling Center at Coquina Bayside. We
also take newspaper and corrugated cardboard.
Open 7 days a week, 8:30 am 1pm. Staffed by val-
ued volunteers. Call and become one at 778-1005
ext. 0 or 778-3947. Let's save our Earth Recycle!

DON'T FEEL LIKE fighting the traffic? No parking?
Not sure where the address is? Take a taxi and ar-
rive safely. $1.50 to get in, $1.50 per mile. Clean,
friendly, serving all of Manatee and Sarasota coun-
ties. Island Transportation 7am-3am. 737-0336.




DICK MAHER
AND "
DAVE JONES
ISLAND SPECIALISTS



Simplify Your Search!
Call anytime for a consultation.


SALES AND RENTALS

' ILANP
VACATION -<-
PROPERTIES, LLC
COME IN TODAY AND
MEET OUR FRIENDLY STAFF
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
941.778.6849 1.800.778.9599
www.islandvacationproperties.com







REALTOR.
27 Years of Professional Service
OUR LISTINGS DON'T EXPIRE, WE SELL THEM!
RESIDENTIAL
DUPLEX Anna Maria. Steps to beach. 2BR each side. S390,000.
IMPERIAL HOUSE CONDO 2BR. Gulf to bayfront. Gulf view
from porch. Heated pool. Turnkey furnished. $130,000.
DIRECT GULFFRONT 2BR/2BA. sunsets, turnkey furnished.
North Holmes Beach. Call Dolly Young. $425,000.
LOT IN NW BRADENTON Deed Restrictions. $79,000
PERICO SHORES LAKEFRONT 3BR/2BA. Quality home,
room for pool. Furnished. $324,900.
COMMERCIAL
STYLING SALON Eight stations, established 35+ years. $39,000.
WALGREENS Triple net. AAA, good CAP. $2.65 million.
SUPERMARKET plus rental income and inventory. $3,150,000.
VACANT CONVENIENCE STORE SITE Sarasota. $419.000.
RENTALS
VACATION AND SEASONAL AVAILABLE
GULFFRONT CONDOS, HOMES, APARTMENTS
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
tdy41 @aol.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2001 E PAGE 23



HEPWNTDCnine EVIE oniudSEVCSCotne


HELP WANTED: Dining room servers. Lunch and
dinner shifts. Call Chef Damon at Ooh La La! or ap-
ply in person at 5406 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.



MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, patio gar-
dens, trimming, clean-up, edgings, more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs-hardware,
software, network; commercial, private. Call 778-8473.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, shaping, remov-
als. Trim palm trees. Call Phil Brewer Tree Service,
746-6678 or pager 252-3300.

WALL & CEILING REPAIR Water damaged drywall,
hand-and spray texture, professional painting. Reli-
able-over 20 years experience. Call 795-1645, leave
message or call 545-6141.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING for great results,
wash away mildew, dirt and salts. Start exterior spring
cleaning today. Free estimates 778-0944. Lic/ins.


MR. BILL'S HOME REPAIR/maintenance service.
Over 30 years experience, self-employed in
construction trades. "I'm handy to have around."
778-1022.

WEST COAST NUISANCE Wildlife Service. Call us
for problems with raccoons, snakes, possums or any
nuisance animals. Lic. by F.W.C. On call 24-hours,
call 941-778-3455.

ANNA MARIA APPLIANCE & TV SERVICE. Honest,
reliable repairs for major appliances, home electron-
ics, computers, garage-door openers, marine elec-
tronics. 779-1779.

TIRED OF FIGHTING TRAFFIC? No parking? Can't
read the street signs at night? Not sure where the
address is? Take a taxi and arrive safely. $1.50 to get
in, $1.50 per mile. Clean, friendly service. Island
Transportation, 7am-3am. 737-0336.

NEED A RIDE? Will take you anywhere. Call now:
941-723-7871. 48-hour notice for Sarasota,
Clearwater, Tampa airport pick-ups or deliveries.

COMPUTER TUTOR: Certified professional. 40
years experience. I teach more than anyone. Your
home, your convenience, free software. Computer
repairs. 383-5372.

BRYAN LOVE, Licensed Massage Therapist, M.A.
#30231. Swedish massage, deep-tissue release,
reflexology. Whitney Beach Plaza, 387-9807. Call
today, feel better tomorrow.


SIMPLY BLUE POOL Maintenance. Full or chemical
service, Dependability guaranteed. Free estimate,
call 795-2052.

COMPUTER OBEDIENCE TRAINING. Is your com-
puter misbehaving? Certified computer service and
private lessons. Special $10/hour Free advice! 545-
7508.

LITTLE ANGELS Learning Academy. Enroll now for
summer camp. Also enrolling, ages 1 to 5. Also en-
roll for before and after care for fall.

CLEANING, WEEKLY bi-weekly. Reasonable, hon-
est. Call Carol 792-1104.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, if you are not totally
satisfied with your rental income, call Bruce Skorupa,
property manager, T. Dolly Young Real Estate, 778-
0807.

HAVING A MAC ATTACK? Call for help with Mac or
PC. Training, internet, hardware selection and instal-
lation. Call Ed, 2553.



JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL Shell, dirt, mulch or stone
delivered and spread for a small fee. Yard clean-up.
Dump truck for hire. Free estimates. Call Dave
Bannigan, 794-6971.


Paradi seRat
para.iscaltc 778-4800


NEW LISTING Turnkey furnished Island
duplex. 1BR/1BA each side and a stone's throw
to the beach. Great rear-yard with lots of native
landscape. Excellent buy. This one won't last long.
$209,000. Call Nicole Skaggs, Realtor 778-4800
or 795-5704.








2BR/2BA CONDO Enjoy beautiful Gulf views
from your living room in your new Island get-
away. This unit is tastefully furnished and the
complex has many amenities including club-
house, pool and tennis courts. $399,000. Call
Quentin Talbert 778-4800 or 704-9680.


TOTALLY UPDATED CANAL HOME 2BR/
2BA. New seawall, dock, boat lift, pool and cage
with partial Intracoastal views. Easy-care home.
$449,000. Call Ken Rickett, 778-4800 or
778-3026.









NEW LISTING Island Village condo. Spacious
and tastefully appointed 3BR/2BA condo in
Holmes Beach. Enclosed lanai overlooking
heated pool with extra wooden deck. Complex
has lush landscape and is meticulously
maintained. Totally updated, plush carpet and
ceramic tile throughout. $239,000. Call Nicole
Skaggs, Realtor, 748-4800 or 795-5704.


Denis aushl 779134 JoAne *rta 75-705 aveJoes.61-13
QeiTlr 749taae
JimLa[o se 761-44551 N,1 ico tJle Skaggs 795-5704 V lerieh"Fietal 518-8120

521GlIrvHle ech L327-802725






PAGE 24 N MAY 30, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER

Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service We Monitor Irrigation Systems
INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
Established in 1983

@@i'@'i'r@UO STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@N]'i@STD@ CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@OlaR@T@ND@l JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@M Vl(U'@0i'D@ Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@M@VBUB@TG@ (941) 778-2993


AN 1 PAlINTINW
Residential Commercial
Check our references: '
"Quality work at a reasonable price."
Ucensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900


Paradise


se Improvements 778.4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755


RICK BOYCE CONSTRUCTION
From the smallest repairs to major overhaul ...
I do it all and you SAVE.
778-5075 798-0078 PAGER
20-years Island experience Insured Lic.# CGC038546



Water Damaged Drywall Hand & Spray Texture
PROFESSIONAL PAINTING
Clean, Honest, Reliable More than 20-years experience
SFred 752-7758 Cellular 545-6141 O,




II











A TO Z INTERIOR FINISHING
Painting I Kenny Smith
Custom Finishes John Kreiter
Texturing 941-792-4761
Trim Installation 941-730-6422
Door Hanging Free Estimates
Cabinet Installation 50-Years Total
Ceramic Tiling Experience
Light Remodeling State Registered
Repairs Partnership

* * * * Ik- CLIP AND SAVE 0%- * * * *
WARING REIIIST'RICTIONS
S Rules in effect for Manatee County:
*> Lawn and landscape watering is limited, to one
day a week.
> Addresses ending in even numbers (or A M):
* Tuesday.
> Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N Z):
* Sunday.
Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
SIrrigation with treated waste water allowed any
time.)
* > Owners can wash their vehicles anytime as long
Sas they use a hand-held hose with a shut-off nozzle.
S(Pull the car on the lawn to wash!)
S> Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors is
allowed for ten minutes daily.
> Hand-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, is
permitted any day.
Questions or comments? Call the South-
* west Florida Water Management District
(Swiftmud) toll-free: 1-800-423-1476.
000'00000000000000000


LAWNANDARDENCotinuNAS


ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it's
broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior discount.
Call 778-2581 or 713-0676.

TOP NOTCH LAWN CARE Year'round or one time.
Mowing, clean-ups, sprinkler repair. Call Jason, 744-
5167 or 284-3333.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees.
Irrigation and pest control service. Everything Under
the Sun Garden Centre, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. $27 a yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free esti-
mates. Call Larry at 795-7775.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE Service. Installa-
tions, koi ponds, clean-ups and hauling. Shell deliv-
ered and installed as low as $26.50 per yard. 727-
5066.


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill, 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993. Lic#
CRC 035261.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 35-year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

CHRISTIES PLUMBING Island and off-Island service
since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free
estimates, no overtime charges. Now certifying back
flow at water meters. (FL#RF0038118) 778-3924 or
778-4461.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

B&D SEAMLESS aluminum gutters, five or six inch
available. Insured, free estimates. Dean Guth, owner
and operator, 729-0619.

WINDOW SHADES, BLINDS, shutters and more by
Hunter Douglas and other major manufacturers. Life-
time warranty. Call Island resident Keith Barnett for
a free in-home consultation. Many Island references,
15 years experience. 941-778-3526 or 730-0516.

THIRTY YEARS craftsman experience. Interior, ex-
terior, doors, stairs, windows and trim. Have sawmill,
will travel. 745-1043 Dan Michael, master carpenter.

TILE TILE TILE. All variations of ceramic tile sup-
plied and installed. Quality workmanship, prompt,
reliable, many Island references. Call Neil, 726-3077.

GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/ paper services: Inte-
rior/exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpa-
per. For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates,
call Kevin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths.
Free estimates. Lic#RC0058589, #RG0058589,
#PE0020374. Insured. Call 720-0794.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE, highly skilled, dependable
restoration/renovation expert, carpenter, fine finish-
ing contractor. Kitchen/bathroom specialist. Repairs,
painting. Paul Beauregard, 779-2294.

KEN & TINA DBA Griffin's Home Improvements.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets
and shutters. Insured and licensed, 748-4711.

THE WALLPAPER WIZARD, 20 years experience.
Call Mary, 794-0455. Also, interior faux painting.

MASON 25-YEARS experience. Waterfalls, foun-
tains, paver driveways and terraces. Paths of all
sizes. Stone work, cinder block and cement repairs.
Call Chris, 795-3034. Lic.#104776.


Drywall Ceiling Repair
Custom Wall Finishing Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Cell 650-7871 Eves 778-9506




A CCOL A D E S P ATTI LAMBS
SO A PO P E R A AIC H E IA T A RI
HA M O M E L E T T H E RM OM E T E R
E TSEMS I C C H I 0 S RO A S T S
SOSA T A EME GUS
U M P S BRAVES A R E N AS
FROMTH I SMOMEN TON AGA
LI L A L I U AR T A L IB A N
ALGERNON S STER EMOTE
L AN ET AME N HM MEMBER
RADO TAD PUB OSV I
GUMMOMARX P ISA NEE D E D
A L 0 0 N TAI P A N REA S S U R E
E N T R E AT R Y E GMC RII B
-LAO GU GL I E LMOM ARCO NI
SER BII A RAVELS AN N20
O'CS ANA ASP AL PS
STAGES V'OT ES LAT L AR
CA MIO M I LE TEA S U M O M A T C H
AK ITA ALTER SIT INERAR Y
RERAN MYERS POSSESSES


VACATION RENTALS: 2BR apartments across form
beautiful beach, $350 per week. Fall and spring dates
available. Almost Beach Apartments, 778-2374.

ANNUAL RENTALS, several to choose from. Big
ones, small ones, and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

FURNISHED, SECURE 2BR/2BA condo. Deep-wa-
ter dock, covered parking, pool, spa, tennis, recre-
ation, workout rooms. Near beaches, perfect for boat-
ing family. No smoking/pets. $3,000/month. 798-
2000.

1BR/1BA WESTBAY COVE. Tjrnkey, shopping,
beach, heated pool and tennis. February, March and
April. Old Florida Realty, 778-3377.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Club: Direct Gulffront 2BR/
2BA, great rates! May-December 2001. Deal direct
with owner. Frank 716 454-7434.

MAY-OCTOBER 2001, 2BR/1BA, furnished sea-
sonal. All utilities, cable, no pets, no smoking. Near
Gulf. 778-2891.

HOLMES BEACH canalfront home, 2BR/2BA, fur-
nished, garage, laundry, dock, many extras. Avail-
able monthly/weekly. Open 2002 season. Call for $
and details. 813 28.6-9814.

BRADENTON BEACH large annual 2BR/2BA, car-
port, storage shed, washer/dryer hook-up, glimpse of
Gulf. $775/month. 941-625-2889.

OFF SEASON RENTALS opening up now! 1BR,
2BR, 3BR, completely furnished, ready to move into.
For more information, phone 720-2242.

ANNUAL ONLY 2BR/1BA directly on Gulf in
Bradenton Beach. $1,000/month, assurity/security
required with contract. 792-2779.

SEASONAL 3BR/3BA Holmes Beach townhouse.
Beautiful unit, great location, heated pool, washer/
dryer, garage, much more! 778-0167 for more infor-
mation.

CHARMING ISLAND HOME On deep water canal.
2BR/2BA, completely furnished, garage, laundry,
dock, many extra's. $600/week, $1,800/month. Avail-
able May 1. (813) 286-9814.

SENIOR NON-SMOKING responsible female looking
for two bedroom rental, February/March 2002. Local
references available. Anna Maria Holmes Beach pre-
ferred. Call 1-952-944-2740.



ptla Maria Storag
Only a few spots left!
413 Pine Avenue 778-5354


U


Wilson Walls IN
STUCCO SPECIALIST








A a
JS ANDE CL SSIIE


VACATION RENTALS 2BR apartments across from
beautiful beach. $350 per week. Summer dates still
available. Almost Beach Apartments 778-2374.

ANNUAL RENTAL Bradenton Beach. 2BR/2BA, el-
evated duplex. New carpet, one block to beach.
$775/month, plus security deposit. No pets. 794-
1103.

VIEW GULF from deck: 2BR/1.5BA townhouse
apartment. Steps to beach, laundry hook-up, air con-
ditioned, dishwasher. First, last, deposit, $775/month.
779-1586

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA WATERFRONT. Seaside Gar-
dens villa, furnished. Available June 1, $800/month.
Fantastic view. Call Captain Steve, 545-7967 or
slloydevans@cs.com.

HOLMES BEACH TOWNHOUSE. Spacious 2BR/
2.5BA, across from beach. Gulf view, swimming pool,
washer/dryer. No pets. Annual, available June 1.
$1,100/month. Call 792-6029 or 545-6118.

ANNUAL 1 BR waterfront apartment for rent, includes
water and cable. Available now. Rent $750, plus se-
curity deposit of $350. Call 779-2148, after 5pm.

HOLMES BEACH GULF VIEWS 3BR/1BA home.
Annual lease, non-smoking, no pets allowed. Great
location on dead-end street located at 3105 Ave. F.
$1,075/month. Call 1-800-894-1950/days, 1-508-
336-2201/evenings.

SPRING SPECIAL 1BR/2BA, furnished, steps from
beach, Anna Maria Island. Pets are welcome. $350/
week; $1,250/month. Call Gulf Drive Apartments,
778-1098.

ANNUAL RENTAL, 1 BR/1 BA Bradenton Beach. One
block to beach/bay, 203 Second St. N.. #3 and #4.
$625 month, $625 deposit. 813-258-2411, available
May 1st.
-SUMMER RENTAL, 2BR/1BA house. Screened
porch. Completely furnished. Central A/C, cable, no
pets. 112 81st St.. Holmes Beach. Two-week mini-
mum. 813-689-0925.

ANNUAL FUR-NISHElD_ waterfront apartment.
1BR/1BA, $795/month includes all utilities, phone
and cable. Quite neighborhood. Boat dock included,
779-2217.

HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA duplex. Very clean,
freshly painted, new carpet, no pets, short walk to
beach. $875/month. 722-2742.

SEASONAL RENTAL: 2BR/1BA, view of Gulf, steps
to beach, no pets. $500/weekly, $1,300/monthly til
December, 722-2742.

ANNUAL RENTALS! 2BR/2BA elevated duplex,
dishwasher, garage, utility room, washer/dryer hook-
up, open deck, $825/month. 1BR/1BA duplex across
from beach, central Holmes Beach location, $550/
month. Call Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307.


ANNA MARIA AND Longboat Key beach rentals
available by week, month or season.
www.wedebrockrealestate.com or 941-778-6665.

BEAUTIFUL, TROPICAL house just converted to. a
two unit property. Each side is 2BR/1 BA. Completely
renovated, new washer/dryer, microwave. Three-
minute walk to beach. $1,150/month for large side
and $850/month for smaller side. Call 941-761-3609.

ANNUALS: 3BR/2BA home, pool, Jacuzzi, 2BR/1 BA,
small pets, $975/month. T. Dolly Young Real Estate,
778-0807 or 795-0303.

HOLMES BEACH large 2BR/1 BA with walk-ins. Stor-
age, washer/dryer supplied. Fenced yard, patio, very
clean. Pet considered. First, last, security $750/
month. Jim, 779-2068.

SEASONAL, 1BR/1BA, furnished, steps to beach,
$550/week or $1,400/month. T. Dolly Young Real
Estate 778-0807 or 795-0303.

ANNUAL NEWER DUPLEX elevated, stairs. Unfur-
nished with laundry room and dishwasher. Clean and
modern, steps to beach. $735/month, 924-5199 or
941-410-4466 (cell).

3BR/2BA, 806 Jacaranda. North Anna Maria resi-
dence available June 1 for annual rental. $1,200/
month plus security. 761-1182.

SEASONAL 2BR/2BA. Two-car garage, fully fur-
nished, including utilities, new appliances, non-smok-
ers, no pets. $2,300/month. 779-2805.


260 FEET on Palma Sola Bay, zoned RDD4.5., Re-
duced $199,000. Call Sam Watkins, Coldwell Banker,
321-8323.

ESTATE-SIZED LOT $199,900, 2.3 acres in town.
$50,000 below appraised price. Trades considered.
Town & Shore Realty, 383-3840.

OFFICE FOR SALE or lease. Great for accountant,
mail-order, computer business, etc. 779-9761.

BRADENTON BEACH five units, four 1BR/1BA and
one 2BR/1BA cottage with wood floors. Renovated,
very cute, great area. 203 Second St. N./106 Church
St. $399,000, owner financed with 20 percent down.
(813) 223-9193.

BRADENTON BEACH, 5 units, 4-1BR/1BA, plus
2BR/1 BA cottage with wood floors. Renovated, very
cute. Great area. 203 Second St. N. $399,000. 813-
223-919-3.

ISLAND GETAWAY. 3BR elevated canalfront home. Pri-
vate dock. Large lot. $349,000. Call Bob Bumett or Den-
nis Beauchamp, Michael Saunders & Co., 383-7591.

3BR/2BA POOL, west side. Brokers ok. Three miles
to beach. Lush tropical setting, nine fruit trees. Pos-
sible lease/option or financing available. $154,900.
Leave message, 794-2491.


THE ISLANDER E MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 25

YVONNE HIGGINS .
W\AGNER REALTY
Call me to find the
Best Properties of the Islandi .
7-: -22-o or 8I 2 1 1--21 23 1 A


jI .VTf/G6.y Ea/,e,,', fe,,bafff/1
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 770" 55/4 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 778-5594f 778-3468


NU-Weatherside of Florida
S CLAC286523 'SINCE 1948
WINDOW REPLACEMENT
778-7074 Financing Available

A


STrust the professionals
Island Discount Tackle 941 778-7688



in a pump as described by Dr. John R. Lee
Special Prices Free Tapes with First Purchase
(218) 8354340 wwwpaulbunyan.net/users/mlzeller
Healthcare Professional/Wholesaler Inquiries Welcome


Perfect gift?
A mail subscription to The Islander for
family and friends away from the Island.


I ?%STEUE ELLEn
FLOOR COUERIIGS
A wide range of carpet, ceramic tile and vinyl for
all your flooring needs. Shop at home from our mobile
showroom. Islander owned and operated.
Residential Commercial Licensed Insured
Call for a free estimate 383-5381 or 506-3297












XANT *UHE RES


T------------------------------------~

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES- BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 25o per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
--------------- ------------------------




Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: E- LJ No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:

5404 Marina Drive T Islr Fax:941778-9392
Holmes Beach FL 34217 LIhlA jkLslanLder Phone: 941 778-7978
L ----------- ---------------------------


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
\-\ Residential \4 Commercial
NI Restaurant % Mobile Home
\-js Condo Assoc. N Vac and Intercom
\-B Lightning Repair \ Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978





PAGE 26 U MAY 30, 2001 E THE ISLANDER

A D E A D


SINGLE-FAMILY HOME with apartment. 3BR/2BA
newly remodeled west of Gulf Drive. Large lot. Close
to school, beach and shopping. $315,000. 778-5482.

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME. 2BR/2BA On 300-feet-
wide, serene canal. Newly remodeled, zoned com-
mercial and residential. Hunter fans, jetta stone
counters, tile throughout. Large garage. $399,000.
778-5482.

FIND GREAT DEALS on absolutely everything in
The Islander, 778-7978.


DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wed. publica-
tion. UP to 3 line minimum includes approxi-
mately 21 words $9.00. Additional lines $3.00
each. Box: $3.00. Ads must be paid in advance.
Stop by or mail to 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217. We're located next to Ooh La
La! in the Island Shopping Center. More infor-
mation: 778-7978.



The Islander


-EAL 30,A201 Co nTHEISAnuedER


Open 7 Days a Week For Your Convenience!
Also ... 24 hours a day on the world wide web at www.islandreal.com
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


THIS IS DEFINITELY NOT A DRIVE
BY! Beautiful inside and out, updated and
tiled to perfection. Endless possibilities with
this duplex close to beach and shopping.
$369,000. MLS#75287


''... i
I *.1 Ij


THIS PROPERTY is in a fabulous location
just steps to one of the best beaches any-
where. Fourplex with three 2BR/2BA units
and one 2BR/1BA unit. In-ground heated
pool. Great views. All this and more on a
100 by 100 ft. lot. Tons of possibilities with
this one! $849.000. MLS#75471.








BUYER'S LOSS IS YOUR GAIN! Waters
Edge condo on the beach, turnkey furnished.
Great rental potential. Heated pool and ten-
nis. $246,000. MLS#43760


TO




BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA HOME opens to a
spacious lanai and 24 by 14 ft. pool. Surrounded
with exceptional tropical landscaping. Preferred
southern exposure. Spilt-bedroom design. Formal
and informal dining areas. Extra wide 40 ft. dock
and new boat lift. Two-car garage. Mature citrus
trees. $479,000. MLS#74175


REMODELED CANAL HOME! 4BR/
3BA with ceramic tile and terrazzo through-
out and includes all new windows, doors,
new kitchen, updated bathrooms, new inte-
rior wall surfaces, new stucco and paint on
exterior wall and the list goes on! Nice views
of Bimini bay. $449,900. MLS#75148








TOWNHOUSE-STYLE DUPLEX with Gulf
and Intercoastal views. 1,900 sq.ft. one side and
has wood burning fireplace, oak cabinets. 9 ft.
ceilings and great views. Other side had 1,700
sq.ft. and has ceramic tile. Great location, great
views! $949,000. MLS#75108


OPENING DOORS TO MANATEE COUNTY


ELEVATED OCTAGONAL BEACH HOUSE
and artist studio. Fabulous screened lanai.Pri-
vate lot overlooking the water. Loaded with
charm and character. $349,000. Bob Burnett,
376-1312. 74537

WATERFRONT
ONCE IN A RARE WHILE a home such as this
will appear on the market. A custom built ex-
ecutive home overlooking Sarasota Bay with
stunning kitchen, incredible master suite. In a
guarded community. $950,000. Bob Hall or
Penny Hall, 749-5981. 71717
SAVOR THE SUNSETS. Penthouse overlook-
ing Sarasota Bay, large deck for viewing nature
at it's best. Hurricane shutters, custom-made
doors, upgraded appliances. $299,900. Carol
Greenwald, 962-1148. 72760


DRAMATIC CONTEMPORARY HOME on Anna
IMajra Island Captl.aling Gull view kor.m-.is
cusltomrdesigned home by renowned archrlect
Gene Leedy Jusl sltps to ahiie sandy, beaches ol
the Gull of Mexico $999.000 Sandy Drapala,
749-5797 or Kathy Marcinko 252-1618.44232

MAINLAND
ENCHANTING 3+ ACRES along SR 70 corridor
with alluring palm-lined drive, pond and walk-
ways. Large 2BR/2BA home, property also has
back entrance. $299,900. Cindy Pierro, 252-
0771.70720
UPDATED HOME. 4BR with barrel tile roof and
two-car garage. 13-inch tile, country kitchen,
gigantic family room. Fruit trees galore.
$219,900. Joanne Jenkins, 795-3838 or Susan
Matteoh 356-1335. 71889


,,0a eeA 5,,, \ : .,




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ATTENTION PROPERTY OWNERS When you rentyour home you are placing your manage-
ment company in charge of your valuable asset. Why not place your home in the hands of people
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Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217 941 778-7978 email news@islander.org


EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate adver-
tising herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which
makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make
any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Famil-
ial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which
is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the
hearing impaired (0) 1-800-543-8294.


I

Is


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We're Totally Glob4al!

In fact, we're global times 1,400 plus! More than 1,400 PAID subscribers receive
The Islander out of town, out of state and out of the United States. We go to Alaska,
England, Germany, Canada, Hawaii and nearly all points in between. These news-hungry
subscribers can't wait to get their hands on "the best news on Anna Maria Island."


The Islander


~ i''''"~'






THE ISLANDER N MAY 30, 2001 0 PAGE 27


SWITCHING SIDES 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 11 12 13 14 15 116117 18
by Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by Will Shortz II


Across
1 Drink with milk
6 Anchor
10 "America Undercover"
airer
13 It may put you out
19 Says so
20 Life"
(Beatles song)
21 Item in a lock
22 Get a lungful
23 Paganini's birthplace
24 Capital of Yemen
25 Subject of testing
26 "A Life for the Czar"
composer
27 Math tool at a
construction site?
31 Gillette product
34 Union with 21/2 mil.
members
35 France's de
Noirmoutier
36 Solo of "Star Wars"
37 Government scandal?
45 It may be buttonholed
46 Station
47 Grind
48 A bit
50 Best two-pair poker
hand
52 Feminist?
57 Abbr. after a colonel's
name, maybe
58 Fountain order
61 Road marker
62 For_ (cheap)


i *


63 Kingdom whose people
descended from 5-Down
65 Go out
66 Major League league: Abbr.
67 Suffix with names of hours
68 Bridal shop?
74 Stab
75 Geezer
76 Scale part
77 Lamented
80 Obloquy
83 Who's who
85 Medium for a medical
sample
87 Title of respect, abroad
88 Diet fad involving cooked
duck?
92 Raid
94 Inspectors' grp.
95 Musical dir.
96 Surveil, in a way
99 Hiding, with "up"
100 "After you, Father." e.g.?
106 Luth. or Episc.
107 Hosp. units
108 "The X-Files" extras
109 Dali output
110 March in Atlantic City?
118 "Beats me"
119 Antique coin
120 Buzzing source
121 Gretzky, once
125 Newspaper feature
126 Exclusively
127 Pete Sampras, at times
128 "El Capitan" composer
129 Skips off (with)
130 Prized
131 Revolution opposer
132 Apprehension


SNo. 0520

STUMPED?


Down
1 Production problem
2 Hail, to Caesar
3 Large amount
4 What a double hitter gets
5 See 63-Across
6 Trick
7 Out (with)
8 Where the Hawks used to
play
9 Famous fastballer
10 Stir
11 Piece of rodeo equipment
12 It may get a licking after
dinner
13 Certain farm help
14 Less likely to be hit by a
hurricane
15 In
16 Konigsberg philosopher
17 Nevada county
18 Wine info
28 "The Highwayman" setting
29 End of a card game
30 Big bills
31 Blazing
32 Copied
33 Ski lift
38 Urban blight
39 Mindspring or Yahoo!:
Abbr.
40 Gumbo
41 Like a ghost ship
42 G.I. entertainment
43 "Juke Box Baby" singer,
1956
44 Govt. agent
49 Henry Hudson explored
for it: Abbr.
51 Rice
53 Words between be
and be


54 Torino (old Ford
model)
55 Drilling grp.
56 "Where ?"
(digression closer)
59 Year in Claudius's reign
60 Old phone call cost
64 Shea goer
67 Mallorca y Tenerife
69 Half of sechs
70 Top prize
71 Wind
72 Plant
73 Cozy one
78 Druid, e.g.


79 Woodstock wear
80 Prefix with pressure
81 Large pear
82 Menu option
84 "C6mo usted?"
86 1922 Physics Nobelist
89 Climacium, familiarly
90 Kind of seat
91 Dean's companion in
Kerouac's "On the
Road"
93 One day, astronomically
97 Get slippery
98 Nightly news topic
101 Homme's home


102 It keeps its head down
103 Secret
104 Secrets keeper: Abbr.
105 "What's the ?"
110 Squeakers
111 Favorite
112 Ring sport
113 Impertinent one
114 Acquire
115 Very fine, in slang
116 Man in Manilow's
"Copacabana"
117 1998 baseball M.V.P.
122 Car nut
123 Hook shape
124 Singer?


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


RESIDENTIAL REAL
.i -;--.


'i
ES'lnlr. INC I.. ...

5 ' '
-.~:, ,~~_ .~~ -j:il, ;.
?9ti
...- c-~ :-I-;*;~~


RIVER YACHT CLUB Fantastic Manatee Riverfront condo.
Refurbished unit with two balconies. Subtract $40,000, "as
is". Underbuilding parking, secure lobby and elevator.
$205,000. MLS#75361. Doug Newcomer 778-2261.






,alm -




PALMA SOLA BAY Queen Anne style home! 4 or
5/BR/5.5 BA, three living levels, elevator, pool,
three-car garage. NW Bradenton long lot sub.
$829,000. Rose Schnoerr 778-2261. MLS#41757


Li


Ip~


_.. ,
i '
. .


PERICO BAY CLUB 3BR/2BA condo has direct bay view.
Lots of privacy in this end unit. Glassed lanai with A/C vents
plus screened in second porch. Carpet, tile, mirrors and
spa tub. $299,900. Rose Schnoerr 778-2261. MLS#73319.







. ,, -
To.i. .*,* *'- ., -- -


CORDOVA LAKES Updated 3BR/2BA, plus garage.
Freshly painted in and out. Tile and all new carpet, appli-
ances, A/C and roof. Glass enclosed lanai and great yard.
$139,000. MLS#75021. Jim & Barb Vitale, 778-2261.


RENTAL LISTINGS NEEDED

1 or 2BR furnished units needed north
or south of the river. I have tenants for
four to eight months, off season rentals.

Barbara Parrish 778-9611
or toll free 1-877-651-0123.


EAST BRADENTON Two houses and huge double
three-car garage on 7.3 acres, 4.8 acres commercial and
2.5 acres residential. Great opportunity with lots of poten-
tial. $349,900. MLS#74930. Chard Winheim, 778-2261.


WESTBAY COVE SOUTH. Upstairs end-unit. Pan-
oramic view of Intracoastal, where Anna Maria meets
Sarasota Bay. Pool, tennis courts. $235,000. Bobye
Chasey, 778-2261. MLS#73159


PALMA SOLA AREA REDUCED Charming country home
with city location west side on cul-de-sac street. Split-level
great-room plan has one bedroom on first level, tiled kitchen
and baths. $156,400. Jan Schmidt, 778-2261. MLS#73090


f r4 i.PA ,Ir,-j CrT






Patricia Stump
Honduras,
Central America






AA Team Vitale
Barb and Jim
Lancaster. PA


2"'"


Wall Schnoerr
Ohio
Republic of Panama


Rose Schnoerr
Ohio
Republic ol Panama


Laura McGeary Noreen Roberts Shelia Kidd Doug Newcomer Jan A. Schmidt


Susan Hollywood
Providence, RI








Carol M. Tucker
Walertown. NY


WILDEWOOD SPRINGS Most desirable 1700 villa with
carport and lovely 600 sq.ft., walled garden patio. Move-
in condition including all appliances. Steps to pool.
$124,900. MLS#75060. Barb & Jim Vitale, 778-2261.


8


8


" `'"" S: -


-J ,


Piroska Kallay Cheryl Ann Shoultz
Buri .:. H,,-&. S .-..i : ... i-


Kitty Frost Pamela Hayhurst




PAGE 28 0 MAY 30, 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


Full-Service
Marina L
Sales Service J
Dry Storage


BLOW


visit our
First ClaSs

NA ServPice
UDepartien"


-OUT PRICINiG!


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LPEWW RO PERICO HARBOR MARINA IC.A
MA a 12310 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton 795-2628 M.IA







SPECIAL SECTION: PREPARING FOR STORMS

' w v _* "- t


SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30, 2001
.--.m'. ..7' .


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~.


--W--. -.- '.'.





PAGE 2 N STORM SEASON 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


'Above average' storm season predicted for 2001


By Paul Roat
Hurricane experts predict an "above average"
storm season for 2001, with 10 named tropical storms
forming between June 1 and November 30. Six of those
storms are expected to produce 74 mph winds, and two
of the storms are predicted to be severe.
Dr. William Gray, a storm forecaster from Colo-
rado State University, bases his predictions on a vari-
ety of weather conditions from around the globe. Al-
though still smarting from a botched prediction of
much more activity that actually occurred in 1997,
Gray is usually very accurate in his prognostications.
Gray's above prediction is dated from early April.
He %% illimake another estimate of Atlantic storms June
7, and another in early August, just prior to the tradi-
tional heavy hurricane months.
Among.tethnthgs Gray and his team monitor to
make storm iipredictions are weather patterns in Africa.
When the region there is wetter than usual, hurricane
formation in the Atlantic is generally increased.
Another key element in Gray's forecast is the tem-
perature of the waters off the United Kingdom and in
the western Pacific Ocean.
Gray said the North Atlantic was warmer in the
1950s and 1960s, a period of time that saw more tropi-
cal storms in the Atlantic. Starting in the 1970s, those
water temperatures dropped, as did storm activity.
In the mid-1990s, though, the water began to warm
and storms began to form.
"It's shifting again," Gray said, "and we're enter-
ing a higher mode of hurricane activity, especially with
major storms."
The storm prediction is judged to be above average
for the Atlantic and Caribbean; a typical year brings 9.3
tropical storms, 5.8 hurricanes with 2.1 intense storms.
Gray said that a "new era" of storms began in 1995.
"In the past six years, we've had more storms than in
any period on record." There have been 23 storms since
1995.
Gray and his team of researchers study global
factors to determine Atlantic hurricane activity.
Much of the basis of their predictions comes from
what he calls the "great ocean conveyor belt," a
Mobius strip-like series of surface and deep-ocean
currents that upwells in the South Atlantic, flows
along the surface to the Labrador Sea in the North
Atlantic, then dives deep and flows southeast until
upwelling in the Indian Ocean.
The conveyor belt mixes salinity of seawater.
Greater salinity means warmer temperatures and more
Atlantic storms; lesser salinity means colder seawater
and fewer storms.
The salinity, and water temperature, of the North
Atlantic has been rising in the past few years, hence the
increase in storm activity.
Other factors Gray and his group take into account


in the forecast include a high-pressure ridge located
near the Azores in the North Atlantic, temperature and
pressure readings in West Africa, Caribbean sea-level
pressure readings, temperature readings about 54,000
feet above Singapore and wind speed globally at about


40,000 feet.
Gray will issue another hurricane forecast for the
season June 7. His predictions may be accessed on the
Internet at:
www.colostate.edu/Depts/PR/releases/news/


Big storms
Although the bulk of Hurricane Floyd missed Florida, while Hurricane Andrew his the state, the comparison between the size of the two storms is dramatic, as these
satellite images from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration illustrate.





THE ISLANDER N STORM SEASON 2001 0 PAGE 3


Leave, avoid becoming a statistic


By Paul Roat
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Andrew or Opal and everyone has a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get away from
the flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch the
storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the building
and washed onto the road in a rush of swirling water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going
out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One
more inch and it would have been inside the house -
and this was a storm that no one expected to amount to
anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is not
meant for humans in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell, Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20
billion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and 15 dead
are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Closer to our Gulffront homes, Hurricane Opal
cleared a swath of shoreline in the Panhandle in 1995.
And we all remember the fright Hurricane Georges
gave us three years ago when we realized for the first


time in a long time what it was like to pack up every-
thing and head to high ground, thankfully to return
home to find virtually no damage.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, belongings and price-
less mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years are scattered
across what's left of the neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those planning to stay, and
names of their next of kin so they can be contacted to
identify bodies after the storm.
When hurricane evacuation orders come to this
part of the coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.



Hurricane myths

versus facts
Just because you've always done something
doesn't mean that that thing is right.
There are several myths about hurricanes that
we've probably believed for years and years. Unfortu-
nately, we've wasted a lot of time doing things that are
pretty useless. Here are some myths and facts about
hurricane season.

Taping windows protects the glass
Taping windows will do little or nothing against a
storm. It is a waste of effort, time and tape. The tape
provides little additional strength to the glass and no
protection against flying debris. Once a hurricane
warning has been issued, spend your time putting up
shutters or plywood over your windows and doors.


Hurricane Andrew s winds were strong enough to
drive lumber through palm trees.


CITY CENTER FURNITURE


Name brands such as Ashley Broyhill Fortune Rattan Harden
Stanley Capris Millenium Master Design Universal Wicker and more!


S MINESS


737 8th Ave. W. Palmetto, FL 722-5700
ONE MILE NORTH OF THE GREEN BRIDGE NEXT TO BLOCKBUSTER


I-) ~P~






PAGE 4 0 STORM SEASON 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


McKinna recalls 150-mph typhoon first-hand


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
It's been 40 years since Anna Maria Island has had
to deal with a major hurricane.
Most of the folks who currently live on the Island
can't fathom the power of a major storm.
In many cases, veteran hurricane watchers who sat
out some bad storms in the past say they don't plan to
evacuate. But a big storm is something no one should
ignore.
Gorden McKinna of Holmes Beach knows exactly
what 150-mph winds can do.
World War II had been over for two months, and
a good portion of the U.S. Navy fleet in the Pacific was
still at anchor near Okinawa when a typhoon came
bearing down on its position. (In the South Pacific, a
hurricane is termed a typhoon.)
McKinna was a radio operator aboard one of doz-
ens of ships in Buckner Bay, Okinawa.
The radio dispatches during the storm had a lasting
impact on McKinna especially the ones transmitting
pleas from sailors about to go down with their ship.
"People were begging for help," McKinna said.
"Ships were stuck on reefs. On our ship, we had two
anchors down and the engines going full-speed ahead
and the ship was still slipping back."
McKinna and shipmates were the lucky ones. They
survived.
Here's what came across McKinna's telegraph
Oct. 9-10, 1945, as his ship fought its own battle
against a typhoon. McKinna provided us with what he
heard over a four-hour period. The signals can only be
described as frantic.
(Note: When you see things like Yoke Oboe 122
or KVBA, those are call signs of ships, each of those
ships hundreds of feet long and weighing hundreds of
tons. The time after each message is in military time.)
Yoke Oboe 122 We are going on beach. By old
merchant ship which is tied up. 0600 hours.
Flyboot 9 We are adrift. No power Just
passed LST 7. 0600 hours.
SOS/Ylke Oboe 111 We are aground. Last po-
sition was in berth Love 163. 0600
SOS/KVBA Aground berth Baker 174. Please
send boat to stand by. Please QSL. 0621 hours.
SOS Yoke Oboe 111 We are on reef. Any sta-
tion receiving this please relay to NDI. Monroe Victory
- ammunition ship about to ram this vessel us-
ing engines to avoid crash. 0626
SOS/KVBA William Ralston aground near
berth Baker 174.


Powerful messages
Gorden McKinna of Holmes Beach holds two messages signaling the end of World War II. McKinna was a
radio operator on a ship in Okinawa when he received the telegraph signals that said Germany and Japan had
surrendered. Prior to leaving the South Pacific island two months later, McKinna endured the brunt of a
major hurricane. Islander Photo: David Futch


SOS/KVBA Repeat of previous message. 0630
SOS/CROKUS 7 We are 1,000 yards from reef.
Need assistance. 0635
SOS/KVIH Barge hit stern send assistance.
Damage steering engines. Going on beach. SOS / SOS
/SOS/
(Much interference from ships jamming network
with SOS traffic) 0710
SOS / Berth 208 Send assistance or going
aground. 0713
SOS / William Ralston Again repeating SOS.


Sunset at the eye of a hurricane, compliments of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.


SOS / KVBA William Ralston aground near
berth Baker 174 Please send boat to stand by. 0715
KVIH / KWCT Navy has been advising ships
in distress that they are on their own until storm abates.
Hold tight. 0716
Scoffer 7 Drifting into reef-- SOS / SOS. 0718
SOS / WGRX Both anchors carried away, drift-
ing. 0720
XXX / KFBY At least three men drifting by
berth Baker 77 in Buckner Bay. 0720
(Next come a series of scary distress signals.)
SOS / Aground. Aground. Aground on reef. Send
assistance. 0723
SOS / Aground south of B-172 in danger of break-
ing up Will stand by ship. 0730
SOS / KHRJ Aground Buckner Bay Berth 87
- Need immediate assistance. Breaking up. 0730
SOS/KVSA Aground off China Saki Point.
Have stopped engines. Unable to get off. Pounding
badly visibility zero Require assistance. 0732
(Now we move on two hours later as the teeth of
the storm batter the fleet.)
SOS/KKHA Off reef, sinking. Need immediate
assistance to save crew of 60 men. 0912
(Some of the last messages McKinna received
went as follows.)
SOS Mast is gone, eight tanks are ruptured con-
taining nearly all fuel and water. Lost anchor and cable.
Pitch control is out. Limited maneuverability.
SOS Have no engines. Cargo shifting. Be on
lookout for us. Man overboard.
To all ships from Control. Maneuver cautiously in
Okinawa area. Lookout for men and ships in assis-
tance.
These are but a few of the distress calls during this
typhoon, McKinna said. Many others went unheard
because of poor radio procedure and operation, he said.
The period of distress was more than two days and
many ships, Navy and merchant, went aground or sank
from heavy seas and high winds, he added. The barom-
eter fell to 28.37 at its lowest point and winds reached
a velocity of 120 knots with gusts greater at times, he
said.
For those who think they'd like to stick around the
Island and party when a hurricane approaches, keep in
mind McKinna's story. There may not be anyone
around to save you when the doo-doo hits the prover-
bial fan.














Hurricanes are categorized based on their intensity.
Storm categories allow emergency management offi-
cials to determine time and need for evacuation.
The Manatee County Emergency Management Divi-
sion notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill you just
as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the exception that in a
Category 5 storm you will be under a lot more water."
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale," called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, to
assign storms into five categories. Rated from least to
most powerful, the five categories and damage poten-
tial are detailed below.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
signs. Storm surge is expected to be four to five feet
above normal. Flooding is expected on barrier islands.
Low-lying coastal roads may be inundated. Expect
minor pier damage and small craft to be torn from ex-
posed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in dam-
age. Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category 1
storm, causing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage,
mostly to central Florida. Hurricane Allison and Hur-
ricane Noel of 1995 were also Category 1 hurricanes
at peak intensity.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-
structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to
piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
ages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight feet


above normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage. Also, hurricanes Erin and Marilyn in
1995 were both Category 2 hurricanes when Erin's
eyewall hit the Florida Panhandle coast and when
Marilyn passed through the Virgin Islands.

Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will topple.
Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
down. Expect structural damage to small buildings.
Many mobile homes may be destroyed. Storm surge
nine to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along
barrier islands and coastal areas. Large exposed build-
ings will be damaged, and smaller structures will be
destroyed by wave action and floating debris.
Low-lying escape routes will be cut by rising wa-
ter three to five hours before the arrival of the hurricane
center. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above
mean sea level may be flooded inland to a distance of
eight or more miles.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.
Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm,
killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in damage
to eastern Caribbean islands. That same year spawned
Hurricane Roxanne as a Category 3 storm at landfall on
the Yucatan Peninsula.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.


THE ISLANDER E STORM SEASON 2001 0 PAGE 5
CF - '0


Terrain lower than 10 feet above sea level may be
flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential
areas as far inland as six miles.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sustained
winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than 175 mph.
More than 60,000 homes were destroyed, 200,000 people
left homeless, more than 2 million people evacuated, 15
people died and damage was estimated at $20 billion.
Hurricane Andrew was the third most intense hurricane
this century, and caused the greatest loss of property of any
hurricane in the United States.
Hurricane Georges in 1999 was at one point a Cat-
egory 4 storm, killing more than 500 people and caus-
ing more than $2 billion in damage.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
There will be major damage to lower floors of all
structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and
within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation
of residential areas on low ground within 10 miles of
the shoreline may be required.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane. Hurricane Gilbert
of 1988 was a Category 5 hurricane at peak intensity.
Hurricane Mitch was a Category 5 hurricane, and
was the third-deadliest storm on record, with more than
10,000 deaths in Central America.


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PAGE 8 0 STORM SEASON 2001 0 THE ISLANDER


In a hurricane evacuation, take your pets along


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Hundreds of Manatee County people in 17 groups
interested in animal welfare are being organized to help
animals survive a disaster.
The chief organizer is Ed McAdam, president of
the Manatee Animal Disaster Preparedness Coalition
Inc. and of the principal riding club in the Manatee-
Sarasota county area.
Devoted to animals since childhood in Massachu-
setts, McAdam went to work in earnest after Hurricane
Andrew, which devastated the area near Miami in
August 1992. He took a trip to the area and spent days
studying what happened there to animals and people,
especially those who wouldn't leave their pets behind.
He was struck by their unnecessary suffering.
Looking further into the matter, he found "there are
many different initiatives in Florida to help save pets,
but they're fragmented. I decided Manatee County
could do better."
The county Animal Services Division has primary
responsibility, McAdam said, "but there are only a few
dog control officers and in a disaster several hundred
animals need help.
"There are a lot of excellent animal organizations,
though, doing their good deeds every day."
So he started bringing them together into a program
that could handle any animal, since "no one is an expert
on every animal." When he got enough people together,
it became evident that an overall organization was needed.
That's the coalition they ended up forming.
McAdam brought in his own basic organization,
the Myakka River Riders Equestrian Club, which has
about 100 members. The Manatee Cattlemen's Asso-
ciation came in with its 150 or so members, as did
Florida West Coast Avian Society with its 100 mem-
bers.
The Bishop Animal Shelter, Manatee Humane
Society, Manatee in Defense of Animals, Wildlife
Rehabilitation Center Inc. of Anna Maria Island, Mana-
tee County Off Leash Association, Guide Dogs for the
Blind, Manatee Herpetological Society (to take care of
snakes) all are part of the coalition. Uncounted in-


dividuals, ranging from veterinarians and public offi-
cials to garden-variety pet lovers, have also joined.
Getting the word out to the public is pure joy, ac-
cording to McAdam, for the best messengers are sec-
ond-grade students. They can be depended on more
than anyone else to bring information home and insist
that it be paid attention, especially where pets are in-
volved.
There are 2,940 second-graders in the county, said
McAdam, and he is planning a 32-page coloring book
for them when school resumes in late summer, with
plenty of hurricane season left.
For that he needs financial support, and he's tak-
ing donations now at 776-3421.
His volunteers, dedicated people gaining expertise
in each others' specialties, train twice a month at the
county fairgrounds in Palmetto. They have established


an animal MASH-type unit Mobile Ambulance
Support Hospital there.
During an emergency, the MASH unit will have a
fully manned receiving department, veterinarians to
evaluate and treat injuries and a containment section to
hold animals until owners pick them up.
In any disaster, McAdam indicated, it's up to own-
ers to see that their pets survive. Most accommodations
accept pets in an emergency, he said. The Red Cross
won't allow pets in its shelters, so the coalition is try-
ing to find room for them in nearby properties.
He advises Islanders and other potential evacuees
to arrange with friends inland, east of 1-75, to stay with
them until the emergency is over. Meanwhile, he said,
the coalition is arranging for 30-by-30-inch signs at the
Island end of the bridges reminding people:
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THE ISLANDER 0 STORM SEASON 2001 a PAGE 9


After the 'Big One' comes


A flood insurance wrinkle OK'd by the Feds a
couple of years ago has forced Islanders to ponder their
land-use future after "the Big One." Federal officials
say if a post-disaster plan is not in place for fragile
barrier islands, there is a good chance federal funding
won't be forthcoming for redevelopment after a hurri-
cane strike.
Anna Maria Island produced one of the first such
plans around, and it was good enough to win awards for
its thoroughness.
Since the feds kick in a huge chunk of redevelop-
ment money, Islanders had a pretty strong incentive to
begin thinking about land use after the Big One.
Most of the planning is pretty much status-quo
thinking, replacing what may be destroyed with about
the same thing. Maybe it's time to expand the thinking
to include what folks would like to see happen, instead
of staying with the same-old same-old.
A major storm I'll nickname it Hurricane Brillo
- would wipe out all structures within the high veloc-
ity zone to seaward. Everything west of Gulf Drive, and
100 feet east, would be a memory.
Depending on storm surge, tide and wind direction,
the retreat of the storm surge from the swollen bay
could decimate bayside structures too. Since Anna
Maria Island and Longboat Key are long and slender,
the marine assault from both sides may leave little
standing.
The worst-case scenario would see the Island
scrubbed clean, creating a literal tabulaa rasa" or clean
slate for post-storm development. This creates the op-
portunity for folks to create "the Island we've always
wanted."
For ecology fans, that would be an uninhabited
nature preserve, of course. A place where turtles and
terns could frolic, eagles could soar and snook could
snuggle in the mangroves.
For developers, the Island could become a huge
"planned unit development," like South Seas Plantation
that covers Captiva to the south. Wage-earners need not
apply.
For political troglodytes, every shotgun shack


would be replaced, every fetid bar restored, every tacky
tourist trap rebuilt even gaudier. This is the "grandfa-
ther" school of planning and eschews anything for-
ward-looking.
One fact is clear. Any new construction will sit
high off the ground. Everything else is open for discus-
sion.

What could it look like?
Relax and let your mind wander, for it isn't every
day you get to plan the community of your dreams. Ev-
erybody has dreams, and sometimes those dreams are
shared widely enough to become with a little work
and organization reality.
So let's pull out a clean sheet of paper and assume
the Anna Maria we've known and loved is gone, swept
clean by Hurricane Brillo.
We could, if we wanted, give a bigger hunk of the
southern part of the Island back to nature. Expand Co-
quina Beach to a length of several miles. Put the man-
groves back along the bayside, enlarge the Leffis Key
boardwalk and nature trail, and put native vegetation to
work feeding and attracting native critters.
On the northern end of the Island, why not create
a visitor/commercial district? Put the inevitable motels
along the Gulf, and design an attractive (dare I use the
word "upscale?") commercial center along the bayside.
Perhaps it could be as tacky as Fort Myers Beach, or
as snooty as Worth Avenue or St. Armands Circle.
The objective of this "fun zone" is not only to pick
Euro and Yankee pockets, but also to provide an alter-
native to the "we work in Bradenton and play in
Sarasota" syndrome. The bridge at Manatee Avenue
would serve the fun seekers nicely.
Locals would live in the middle of the key, served
by the Cortez Bridge. A small shopping crossroads
would address the demands of daily living, with com-
munity centers, local cultural facilities, churches and
other local necessities located nearby to form a real
village center. This would also allow co-location of
parking, so the Saturday grocery shopper could park in
the same spot to attend Sunday worship or a Friday


night play.
If these ideas aren't wild enough, let your pencil
roam even further. Use the eraser to eliminate the south
bridge to Longboat, or all the bridges entirely. Instead,
institute a ferry service and ban gas-powered private
vehicles on the Island. Buy 500 golf carts and 1,000
bicycles and leave them around for anybody's use.
Start an electric trolley to provide free service up and
down the Island. No pollution, less noise, fewer acci-
dents anybody interested?
The point here is not for me to play dictator-for-a-
day and sketch out the Island's future. The point is, the
feds have demanded we produce a post-Brillo plan.
This has been done. But now is the time for us to take
the time, care and opportunity to make the new Anna
Maria Island a remarkable place to live, play and visit.



Hurricane myths

versus facts
Open the house windows on the lee
side of the storm to balance air
pressure or the house will explode
The difference in air pressure between the in-
side of your house and outside in the storm does
not cause the house to blow up, since no house is
built airtight. Hurricane winds are intense and
variable, and open windows even on the lee side
can allow flying debris to enter. Once a window
or door is shattered, intense winds can enter and
rip the house apart trying to get out.


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PAGE 10 E STORM SEASON 2001 U THE ISLANDER


Hurricane forecasting still not exact science


By Paul Roat
Magic wands, crystal balls and animal entrails have
been replaced by airplanes, satellites and computer
models in forecasting the tracks of hurricanes.
But it's still not an exact science, and although
strides have been made in the past 20 years, there's still
room for improvement in predicting the intensity and
direction of storms. A lot of room.
That's the word from Max Mayfield, director of the
National Hurricane Center.
Mayfield said the center can predict a storm's in-
tensity between 20 to 22 mph 72 hours before it makes
landfall. That mile-per-hour difference is about the
same difference among storm categories as determined
by the Saffir-Simpson Scale. In other words, three days
before landfall the hurricane center may predict a Cat-
egory 2 storm will hit but, at landfall, it may become
a Category 3 hurricane.
"We've made no significant improvements in our
intensity forecasts in the past few years," Mayfield
said.
The hurricane center is accurate to between 200-
225 miles in its predictions as to where a storm will
strike land at a 72-hour prediction, accurate to 100
miles at a 24-hour prediction, and accurate to 40 miles
at a 12-hour prediction.
That means that if a hurricane's landfall is forecast
on Anna Maria Island and evacuation orders are issued
24 hours before predicted landfall, the actual storm
track could place landfall anywhere between Boca
Grande and New Port Richey.
"It's important to remember that there is wide-
spread rain and damage away from the skinny line of
a track," Mayfield said. "Some storms are 100 miles
across and have hurricane-force winds many miles
away from the eye."
Mayfield said that despite computer models and
information gathered from sea buoys and airplanes that


How hurricanes came

to be named
Andrew, Hugo and Floyd are familiar names to
hurricane watchers, but the naming of storms is a rela-
tively new aspect in the science of studying whirly
weather.
An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge, was
the first to use female names in describing tropical
storms in the late 1800s, although he also named sev-
eral after politicians whom he particularly disliked.
Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up the prac-
tice during World War II, naming storms after their
wives and girlfriends.
In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
designate storms, using common military titles of Able,
Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, female
names became the norm, with the first two hurricanes
dubbed Alice and Barbara.
Complaints poured into the Weather Bureau from
women upset that they were being singled out in de-
scribing wicked weather, but the practice continued
until 1978, when hurricanes in the eastern Pacific were
alternately named for men and women. In 1979, no-
menclature for Atlantic hurricanes followed suit with
Hurricane Bob the first "male" storm.
Six bisexual lists of hurricane names have been
developed by the World Meteorological Organization.
The names are short, easy to remember and commonly
used names from the English, French and Spanish lan-
guages. To receive a name, a tropical low-pressure
center must develop at least into a full-fledged tropical
storm with wind speeds at 39 mph.
The lists are repeated every six years, although the
names of killer storms are retired from use.
2001 hurricane names for the Atlantic Ocean:
Allison Lorenzo
Barry Michelle
Chantal Noel
Dean Olga
Erin Pablo
Felix Rebekah
Gabrielle Sebastien
Humberto Tanya
Iris Van
Jerry Wendy
Karen


fly into a storm, sometimes the forecasts and the actual
path of a hurricane don't jibe at all.
A good example was 1999's Hurricane Harvey. It
was targeted to hit just north of Tampa Bay at 10 p.m.
Sept. 20. All the computer models were in agreement
with the exception of one model, which called for the
storm to make a dramatic turn south and enter the
Florida Straits.
At midnight, the storm did just that, and the Tampa
Bay area was spared.
Although Islanders have much to fear from storm
surge, the biggest killer in hurricanes nationwide is
inland flooding, Mayfield said.
Storm surge is basically a huge dome of seawater
that rises and inundates coastal areas. Storm surge dur-
ing a Category 5 hurricane with winds in excess of 150
mph is 15 feet. Add whatever height the waves would
be and expect the Island to be covered with saltwater.
Mayfield said 59 percent of the people killed in
hurricanes are inland dwellers who drown. But those
statistics are nationwide, Mayfield cautioned. "The
greatest threat in this state is storm surge."
Mayfield said the state and nation are due for
greater hurricane activity in the next 20 years.
"People tend to confuse memory with history," he
said. "For example, in Palm Beach, there have been no
storms in the past 50 years. In the 50 years preceding
that time, though, Palm Beach had six hurricanes."
The core issue behind hurricane forecasts is to pro-
vide emergency managers with information to deter-
mine when, or if, residents should be evacuated to safer
areas. Hurricane evacuation has been under closer scru-
tiny in Florida for the past year after Hurricane Floyd
took aim at Southeast Florida, then swooped up the


eastern seaboard to make landfall in South Carolina.
"Our computer models said it would go up the
Florida coast starting at Cape Canaveral," Mayfield
said, "and it would have gone up the coast like a
weedeater. Then the models indicated it would stay
offshore. We were pretty sure the later models were
right, but we just couldn't take the chance and evacu-
ation orders were issued."
Floyd's threat caused the largest evacuation in the
country's history. More than 2 million people left their
homes. At Oak Island, 240 homes were destroyed when
Floyd eventually made landfall.
"Our greatest fear is if an evacuation order is is-
sued, people are stuck in their cars in a traffic jam when
the storm hits," Mayfield said. "Our second worst
nightmare is if people don't leave the coastal areas
because they are afraid of being stuck in their cars, and
the storm hits them in low-lying homes."
Mayfield said one of meteorologists' concerns in
the past few years has been the discovery of changes
in wind speed at differing altitudes.
"You can have a Category 4 storm at the surface,
but at 300 or 400 feet it can be a strong Category 5
storm," Mayfield said. "There can be tremendous dam-
age to the higher floors of some of the taller buildings
in metropolitan areas. The solution is that we need to
build better and stronger buildings."
Although forecasting is far from an exact science,
Mayfield said improvements are being made. A new
hurricane hunter aircraft with better instrumentation to
gather better readings in storms has taken to the skies,
and new satellites have been launched to provide more
information about hurricanes.
"I believe we can continue to improve," he said.


Hello, Florida
Hurricane forecasters best tool for predicting the course of storms is information relayed by satellite.


Hurricane factoids


Biggest hurricane ever
On the planet Jupiter, a whirlwind-looking event is
called the Great Red Spot. It was first seen by Galileo
300 years ago. It is about three times the diameter of
the Earth.

Cloeikise-countereloekwvise
North of the equator, hurricanes spin counterclock-
wise. South of the equator, they spin clockwise. So the
question is: which way does a hurricane spin if it stays
right on the equator?

Deadliest
In 1972, an East Pakistan cyclone killed 200,000-
500,000 people.

Worst in United States
In 1900, a hurricane struck Galveston, Texas, and
basically washed the city away. About 15 percent of the
population drowned.


Strongest
In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert had recorded winds of
218 mph when it made landfall in Northern Mexico.
The pressure in the storm was the lowest ever recorded.

MEOW and SLOSH
Storm surge is the biggest threat hurricanes pro-
duce in Florida. Two computer models are used to de-
termine risk for coastal areas. MEOW is Maximum
Envelope of Water, and is used to gauge the amount of
water likely to be pushed ashore by a storm. SLOSH is
the Sea, Lake and Overland Surge from hurricanes, and
is used to produce maps showing what degree of flood-
ing is expected from storms.

Stay alert!
Hurricanes can intensify very, very quickly. In 1992,
Hurricane Andrew went from a Category 1 to a Category
4 storm in 36 hours. In 1969, Hurricane Camille went
from a Category 1 to a Category 5 storm in 48 hours.








Living in a post-disaster world


on Anna Maria Island


THE ISLANDER U STORM SEASON 2001 U PAGE 11


"When life gives you lemons, make lemonade. "

By Paul Roat
"There is little doubt about it sooner or later,
another big hurricane will come. Atmospheric scien-
tists and emergency planners agree that it's just a
matter of time before some portion of Florida is
struck by another catastrophic hurricane. No one
knows when or where it will strike, but we do know
that eventually it will blast ashore somewhere and
cause massive destruction perhaps even greater
than that caused by Andrew. Since there is nothing
anyone can do to alter that foreboding reality, the
question is: Are we ready for the next great hurri-
cane?"
That quote is from Jay Barnes' book, "Florida's
Hurricane History." Unfortunately, his assessment is
true, especially for residents of Anna Maria Island.
Islanders have been spared the direct hit of a
hurricane in recent years. Historically, five hurri-
canes passed across the Island, one of the worst in
October 1921. That storm turned the area north of
Pine Avenue in Anna Maria into a shallow sandbar.
Today, that's the largest land area of the city. Pas-
sage Key, just north of the Island, once had a fish-
ing village and freshwater lake. Since the storm,
Passage Key has been little more than a sandbar.
That storm was a moderate Category 1 hurricane,
with winds of about 100 mph. Imagine what a Category
5 storm with 155-mph winds would do.
Damage would be in the tens of millions of dollars
if a major storm made landfall on the Island. If evacu-
ation orders are not heeded, loss of life would be hor-
rible.
But the challenge will come through redevelop-
ment. Do Islanders want to rebuild the Island as it looks
today, or is there a better way to live on this narrow


strip of sand?
Those questions have been partially answered in
the "Islandwide post-disaster redevelopment plan for
Anna Maria Island," prepared by the Tampa Bay Re-
gional Planning Council.
The plan is the result of hundreds of hours of work
by elected and appointed officials, staff members and
citizens peering into crystal balls in an attempt to come
up with some vision of the Island in the literal wake of
a hurricane.
Taking into account existing land uses and poten-
tial redevelopment, transportation, drainage, and other
issues, officials have produced a document that will
serve as a springboard for rebuilding the Island.

After the storm
When the winds have abated and the water has re-
ceded, post-disaster planning begins. There are three
stages to this process:
Immediate emergency period. Debris will be
cleared, search and rescue operation undertaken and an
initial assessment of damages to the Island will take
place. This process is expected to take several days.
Short range restoration period. Minor or moder-
ately damaged structures may be repaired plus damage
assessment of all buildings. This process is expected to
take several weeks or months.
Long range reconstruction period. This period
will allow for full restoration of services, reconstruc-
tion of all structures, and total infrastructure repair.
This process could take several years.

Crystal ball time
Although the post-disaster redevelopment plan
offers a broad-brush approach to rebuilding the Island,
it also offers some "opportunities" for making things
better than today. Among the thoughts to be considered


are the following.
Consider the overall redevelopment of the Is-
land, rather than just one community or one neigh-
borhood.
Consider compatibility when redevelopment
occurs. One ground-level house in a neighborhood
of stilt homes is an example of an incompatible
neighborhood.
S* With widespread destruction comes an oppor-
tunity to rid the Island of exotic plant species such
as Brazilian pepper and Australian pine and replace
non-native trees with traditional Florida plants.
Development of an Islandwide bicycle and pe-
destrian pathway should be considered.
With massive property loss comes an opportu-
nity to acquire sensitive lands for the public. While
officials in all three Island cities agreed not to use
municipal funds for such acquisition, state or federal
funds could be used to add more public beach or bay
access.

A look ahead
Here's an interesting footnote to post-disaster plan-
ning from the Virgin Islands.
In 1995, Hurricane Marilyn struck the Caribbean
islands, killing 11 people and causing $1.2 billion in
damage. Islanders repaired their homes, businesses and
resorts.
In 1998, Hurricane Georges struck the Virgin Is-
lands. This time, though, no one was killed, and dam-
age was estimated at $55 million. The difference was
credited to stringent building codes that ensured stron-
ger and safer new homes that were better able to with-
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PAGE 12 0 STORM SEASON 2001 E THE ISLANDER


JESSIE'S
ISLAND STORE

CONVENIENCE
DELI GAS
778-6903
5424 Marina Dr.

HOLMES BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
708-5804
POLICE DISPATCH
If you need further
information call
708-5800
CITY ADMINISTRATION


Why get

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We are carpeting, leather and
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Dry foam dries
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o


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-- Owner/islander Jon Kent.
Call today for
your appointment.
778-2882
or 387-0607





Be sure to
get your

Resident

Evacuation

Vehicle

Hanging Tag

at your
local
city hall.




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Right now
Before hurricane season you should:
Enter hurricane season prepared. Recheck
your supply of boards, tools, batteries, nonperish-
able foods and other equipment you'll need to se-
cure your home and prepare yourself for evacua-
tion from the area, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival
Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a
two-week supply); special dietary foods that are
nonperishable; blankets, pillows, and sleeping
bags; flashlight and lots of batteries; portable ra-
dio and lots of batteries; extra clothing; lightweight
folding chairs, cots; personal items; infant neces-
sities; quiet games or favorite toys for children;
important papers; and snacks.
Develop a plan for where you'll go if you
need to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland
or hurricane shelter locations should be identified
and a route to the safe shelter plotted.

If a storm threatens
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a threatened region, pay attention to local
weather broadcasts for further updates, and:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a
safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect
them with storm shutters. Remember, damage to
small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven
debris; damage to larger windows may come from
debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plants,
lawn ornaments and anything that can be moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside.
Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch fur-
niture and other harmless items become missiles in
hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disturbed for
days or longer after a hurricane. You should have
one gallon of water per person per day, and you
should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
that electricity may be off for days or longer and
cooking may be difficult, so make plans to prepare
food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to
make sure you have a non-electric can opener.
Check all battery-powered equipment and
stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recom-
mending you not use candles due to the threat of
fire. An untended flashlight won't start a fire, but
a candle or lantern might.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buck-
ets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet.
Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals
will have to be kept with friends or at a kennel.

If landfall is predicted here
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a possible landfall for a hurricane, begin mak-
ing preparations for the storm:


Hanging car tags are
available for Anna Maria
Island residents to
facilitate re-entry after an
evacuation is ordered.
Call your city hall for
more information about
registering for a re-entry
vehicle tag.


Board all windows, or secure with tape or se-
curity shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leav-
ing the Island will be worse than you can imagine.
Hurricane authorities predict it will take 12 to 17
hours to evacuate the Island, so plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
shelter openings.

If officials order
an evacuation
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate it. If possible, remove the pump, other-
wise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where
you're going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.

Aii'oc" h Ii rricane passes
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and live power lines, and emergency crews will
need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure
you have a re-entry tag (when they are issued by
your city government) or two forms of valid iden-
tification showing your local address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't
sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency
vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that
may have sought higher ground to avoid flood
waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


Hurricane safety tips


ANNA MARIA
ISLAND





REAL ESTATE, INC.

IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER

We're here all year, however the four winds blow.

Sales Rentals Property Management

779-0202 Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217


BRADENTON BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311 POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-1005 CITY HALL



THE CITY OF
ANNA MARIA
Call our
Communications
Number for
Evacuation Assistance
708-6130
CITY HALL




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