Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title:
Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
Islander
Publisher:
Bonner Joy
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates:
27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00074389:00837

Full Text



Skimming lthe news ... Special Section this issue: Hurricane Season 2000.


Islander


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Hurricane season begins.


"The Best News on Anna Maria Island"



Signal,


pedestrian


crosswalk


proposed

By Paul Roat
Transportation improvements through the year
2005 are under review by regional transportation plan-
ners and the Florida Department of Transportation.
The draft document is scheduled for approval by
members of the Sarasota-Manatee Metropolitan Plan-
ning Organization June 26.
Of interest to Islanders is a proposal for a signalized
pedestrian crosswalk at Gulf Drive and Ninth Street North
in Bradenton Beach for fiscal year 2000-01.
The idea of crosswalks along Gulf Drive came up
several years ago from the Bradenton Beach Civic Asso-
ciation. Engineers with the DOT studied traffic patterns
and agreed pedestrian and traffic patterns warranted cross-
walks at Cortez Road and Ninth Street North.
However, the proposed $94,625 signalized pedes-
trian crosswalk came as a surprise to the city commis-
sion and Police Chief Sam Speciale.
Special said what was expected was pavement
markings and a flashing yellow light informing motor-
ists that pedestrians may want to cross the street.
What is proposed is a green-yellow-red signal
that will cause cars to stop to allow pedestrians to
cross the road.
PLEASE SEE SIGNAL, PAGE 4


ISLANDER


Volume 8, no. 29, May 31, 2000 FREE


All that
glitters
It was all smiles,
sparkle and
sequins for Linda
Davis, right,
accepting the
Island Players'
Harold Igo award
for her longtime,
outstanding
contribution to the
theater from
outgoing board
president Peggy
Faarup at the
Players' annual
awards banquet
held last week at
the Seafood Shack.
Also at the event,
Faarup turned
over the reigns to
new president
Marilyn Maroni,
who accepted a
$1,500 check from
Offstage Ladies
and treasurer Sam
McDowell.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Futch


Trolley idea resurrected on Island


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Manatee County Commissioner Joe McClash be-
lieves a trolley system for Anna Maria Island is a good
idea. and the man who has the ability
to make it happen thinks so, too. "We're at w
At a Sarasota-Manatee Metro- because as
,. .because as 1
politan Planning Organization meet-
ing May 23, Florida Department of to build out
Transportation Secretary Tom Barry people are g
said he understands there is a traffic to go to the
crunch on the Island and a trolley this affects t
could alleviate the problem. Coz1tv
"A trolley is something that
makes ai lot of sense," Barry said. "It
could be a system that gets people to
the Island and when they're there could get them
around the Island."
A trolley system is expected to cost $1 million to
buy rubber-wheeled trolleys and build trolley shelters.
When a trolley was proposed in May 1998, the cost
of the system was pegged at $1.27 million with oper-
ating costs between $520,000 and $605,000 a year. The
Island cities share of operating expenses was set at
about $250,000.
McClash said he visions a system that would run
from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. with stops every 20 minutes at
certain points around the Island.
"We could encourage people to keep their cars at


it's
we
eas
roil
bea
'he
Coi
Jo


their motel and hotel and use the trolley when they go
to a restaurant," McClash told Barry and other mem-
bers of the MPO. "Then when they want to go home,
a trolley would be there for them for the return trip.
____ ~ "Anna Maria is a unique barrier Is-
end land, but it's very congested. We're at
wit's end because as we continue to
build out east those people are going to
st those want to go to the beach and this affects
ig to want the Island. This is not an Island prob-
tich and lem. It's a regional problem."
Island." Holmes Beach Mayor Carol
nfissioei i Whitmore has been pushing the idea of
mnissioner ,
a trolley for years.
)e McClash However, the idea was shot down in
1998 when Manatee County refused to


pay the full $66,000 in earnest money to get a $2.5
million DOT grand for the system. The three Island
cities declined to fund the project as well.
Now a new funding source for the trolley would
pay 100 percent of the cost of the project including its
operation.
Whitmore said she is prepared to do what it takes
to get the system going.
"I've always thought a trolley system would
work," Whitmore said. "I also think it's a good idea to
charge as little as possible if anything at all to
PLEASE SEE TROLLEY, PAGE 4


happennmgg

'Lights Out' Turtle Watch
benefit Sunday evening
"Lights Out," an event to raise awareness of
the threat of lights to turtles and to benefit Turtle
Watch, will be at 6 p.m. Sunday, June 4.
The menu will be grilled chicken Alfredo over
fettuccini and the entertainment will be the intro-
ductory showing of two turtle videos one of
hatchlings on the beach and the other of the initial
rescue of Anna, the 850-pound leatherback which
stranded (twice) on Anna Maria Island.
The event will be at Chapters on the Island
Cafe and Bookshop, 5910 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Tickets at $19.95 must be pur-
chased in advance through 779-2665.
Suzi Fox, who heads Turtle Watch and
holds the state permit for turtle preservation on
the Island, noted the "Lights Out" program "pre-
vents hatchlings from being drawn to the lights
of people's homes instead of heading toward the
moon's reflection on the ocean."
Profits from the dinner and sales of shirts,
hats, visors, turtle books and a first-edition
Turtle Watch poster will go to the organization's
program for further community education.


. . . .....


lBYTv lDE


r I Anna Maria


The,





PAGE 2 E MAY 31, 2000 N THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria pier owner awarded franchise


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
Mario Schoenfelder rolled the dice and landed on
the city pier.
Some are saying Schoenfelder, owner of the Rod
and Reel Pier and Motel, now has a monopoly on piers
since on May 25 Anna Maria commissioners accepted
his offer to run a restaurant at the city-owned pier.
However, Schoenfelder's move was more strategy
than luck. In exchange for a lease, Schoenfelder offered
to fix the aging structure, relieving the city of its finan-
cial burden.
It was a bid unmatched. Only two others were re-
ceived by the May 19 deadline and only one bidder,
Tom Chipain, offered to fix the pier, but wanted a
credit towards his rent.
Vice Mayor Bob Barlow said Schoenfelder's pro-
posal met all of the city's requirements and the other
bidders fell short.
Initially, Schoenfelder will pay $5,000 a month and
six months advance rent. Over the course of the 10-year
lease, the rent will increase by 10 percent every two
years. He will be required to shell out what's estimated
to be $200,000 for repairs before the grand opening of
his restaurant and maintain the same throughout the
term of the lease.
One of the bidders, Ralph Russell, owner of Rot-
ten Ralph's restaurant, was gracious in defeat.
"It's a helluva fine deal," Russell said. "Under the
conditions he bid and the fact that he'll remain respon-
sible for all future repairs, I've now come to the con-
clusion that it's not a bad deal for the city. I just want
people to know there's no sour grapes on my part. I
wish you and Mr. Schoenfelder well."
In his bid offering, Russell proposed to give $500
a month to the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Chipain, owner of Gulf Drive Cafe in Bradenton
Beach, was less polite. Calling the city "a spoiled child,"
Chipain said he doesn't think city officials have exhausted
all means to get the funds to repair the pier and have
awarded it to the person with the deepest pockets.
He said the city should accept some responsibility


,- ANNA MARIA A STEI BAR
1, 1%, 1 ...... . . h I, h I,, , 1 !
Iml. ... .. - "--
I ,.


Is the controversy over the Anna Maria City Pier
finally over?
for the operation of the pier. The city doesn't want to
fix it, maintain it or insure it, he said.
Because of this, Schoenfelder may ask for favors
somewhere down the line, Chipain said.
Former Vice Mayor Robert McElheny, along with
fellow commissioners on the previous seated commis-
sion, spent a great deal of time drafting a new lease for
the city pier.
He said the city's new specifications for a bid
seemed to be a "clone" of the proposal made by
Schoenfelder prior to the bid process.
McElheny said the city could make a greater return
on its investment by securing a percentage of sales in
addition to a base rent.
"At six percent of sales, you're turning down what
could amount to $600,000 over the course of 10 years.
I recommend you look at it again. There must be some-
thing there for Schoenfelder to put up the money to
repair the pier," he said.
Commissioner Doug Wolfe said he, too, has con-
cerns about the rent and that he wanted to get the big-
gest return for the city.
He said a gamut of ideas have been explored by the
commission including everything from replacing the
entire structure to the city running the restaurant.
Schoenfelder's proposal is somewhere in between,
he said.


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And the city will be getting twice as much in rent
as it was receiving before, Wolfe said.
Barlow said he's not willing to encumber future
taxes for the city pier. "We're fortunate we have some-
one to put the money up front. I feel it's a win-win situ-
ation for the citizens."
Residents had mixed reactions. Shirley O'Day
asked the commission not to "send away the goose
that's laid the golden egg."
Barbara Moerk wanted assurance from the com-
mission that the pier would be maintained and not ne-
glected as it was in the past.
Barlow said the city will have independent inspec-
tions performed and the tenant will have to abide by the
results of the report.
Contacted at his residence in Germany,
Schoenfelder said he's "very happy" to be awarded the
city pier franchise. He said he doesn't yet have a name
picked out for the restaurant, but plans to offer the same
type of food that was served there before.
He said he will begin repairs to the pier after the
lease is finalized.
Schoenfelder said he plans to charge a fee to fish
as he does at the Rod and Reel.
It would appear that at least one commissioner had
his mind made up before arriving at the meeting. Vice
Mayor Bob Barlow read the city's acceptance of
Schoenfelder's proposal when making his motion.
Following the meeting, he said he prepared his state-
ment in advance just in case he needed to use it.
The mayor, away on vacation, didn't instruct him
to accept the offer, he said.
Barlow said the prepared motion was contingent on
the views of the other commissioners.
The vote passed unanimously with Commissioner
Jay Hill abstaining from the vote because he's
Schoenfelder's attorney. Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh was
absent.
Commissioners directed the city attorney to nego-
tiate a draft copy of a lease with the franchisee and his
attorney that will be presented Thursday, June 8, for
their approval.


*eft


9, ~c&Ai






THE ISLANDER E MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 3

Anna always was beyond saving Meetiigs


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Anna the leatherback never really had a chance,
despite valiant efforts of Islanders and others to save
her life.
The huge rare turtle died last week, nearly three
months after she:first came ashore at Holmes Beach
with her left.front flipper rotting off, cut off from the
rest of her body by discarded line.
Anna Maria Island volunteers wrestled her into a
van that took her to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium.
The flipper was amputated when it couldn't be saved.
She was treated and twice released into the Gulf of
Mexico, and twice she again made her way ashore.


The third time she went back to the aquarium to
stay, biologist Glenn Harman devoted hours a day to
coaxing her to eat squid to replace her regular diet of
jellyfish, and treating her with antibiotics.
On Tuesday, May 23, she was found dead in her
pool.
"She seemed all right the day before," Harman
said. "She ate 14 pounds of food and her weight was
up to 886 pounds. But it turned out nothing would have
helped. She had infection from the beginning."
A necropsy revealed that before amputation infec-
tion had spread from her flipper into her body cavity,
into her lungs and spleen and bladder "their organs
are basically the same as ours," said Harman.


Bradenton Beach pier bids total 5


By Paul Roat
Five proposals have been submitted to manage the
restaurant and bait shop at the Bradenton Beach City Pier.
The city requested sealed bids by Tuesday, May 31.
Those bids must include monthly payments to the city of
at least $1,000 per month or 12 percent of the gross re-
ceipts of the pier businesses, whichever is greater. There
is also a one-time payment of $2,000 to the city once a
concessionaire is chosen. Terms for the successful bidder
will be for three years with two two-year extensions pos-
sible.
The bidder offering the city the greatest amount of
revenue is DiGiovanni's Professional Caters and Food
Service of Sarasota. Frank DiGiovanni, president of the
company, proposes a sliding payment scale to the city. If
revenue is between $1 and $999,000, the city would get
15 percent of the gross receipts. If revenue is between $1
million and $1,149,000, the city would receive 20 percent.
If receipts were more than $1,150,000, the city would re-
ceive 25 percent of the revenue.
DiGiovanni operates "take home" operations in Ari-
zona, Orlando, Winter Haven, Sarasota and Ft. Myers.
Bradenton Beach Food Handlers is comprised of
Michael Rappaport, John Joseph and Susan Royals.
Rappaport is owner of Big Olaf Ice Creamery in
Bradenton Beach and would handle the overall operation


of the pier. Joseph will manage the restaurant operation
and has been food and beverage manager at the Moose
Lodge in the city. Royals will operate the fishing pier.
Bradenton Beach Food Handlers proposes paying the
city $5,000 per month or 15 percent of gross receipts,
whichever is greater. The group will also pay the city 15
percent of revenue generated from special events. They
plan to allow charter fishing guides to operate off the pier
and will pay the city 15 percent of the revenue generated
from charter business. They will also pay the city a one-
time $10,000 franchise fee. A check for that amount made
payable to the city was included in their bid.
Wallace and Bryan is comprised of Dave Bryan,
Paula Bryan, Phil Wallace and Joyce Wallace. All worked
at the pier for varying times in various capacities, with
Dave Bryan serving as kitchen manager for three years.
Wallace and Bryan propose paying the city $1,000
per month or 15 percent of their gross receipts, whichever
is greater. They also propose to expand the bait and tackle
operation at the pier.
Raul Mendonca has owned and operated Rebecca's
Bistro in Bradenton Beach for three years. His bid is for
$1,000 per month or 14 percent of gross receipts, which-
ever is greater. He will pay the one-time $2,000 fee.
Current pier franchise holders and equal partners
Georgia Meier and Dr. Fred Bartizal are again seeking to


Anna Maria City
June 8, 7 p.m., Commission meetirig.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
778-0781.

Bradenton Beach
June 1, 7 p.m., city commission meeting. Agenda: no-
tice of public hearing at a later date for street vacation
request at 109 13th St. S., city pier piling survey report,
discussion of National Hurricane Conference atten-
dance, discussion of participation in action against
Perico Island development, Fourth of July fireworks
request from Beach House Restaurant, consent agenda
and public comments.
June 2, 8 a.m., city commission work session on pub-
lic works department.
June 5, 3 p.m., special city commission meeting on city
pier bid proposals.
June 8, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning commission
meeting on the Gazebo restaurant major development
plan.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
June 1, 7 p.m., Planning Commission.
June 5, 7 p.m., Parks and Beautification Advisory
Board.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.
operate the pier operations. They pointed to the increases
they have brought to the pier and the increased revenue to
the city generated through their six years of operation.
In 1995 they had revenue which totaled $118,619. In
1999 that amount was $1,025,513. Revenue to the city
went from $8,348 to $128,216 during that same period.
SMeier and Bartizal propose paying the city $1,000 per
month or 12 percent of gross receipts, whichever is
greater. They will also pay the city a $2,000 one-time fran-
chise fee.
City officials will discuss the pier franchise bids at a
special meeting at 3 p.m. Monday, June 5 at city hall.


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PAGE 4 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER

Signal proposed at Ninth St. N.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

"Traffic will come to a stop, and during the season
cars will be backed up across the bridge," Speciale said.
DOT spokesman Gene O'Dell confirmed that there
would be a full stop of traffic at both locations on Gulf
Drive with the proposed pedestrian crosswalks.
"We received letters from the Bi'adenton Beach
Civic Association, the city commission and the police
chief asking for a crosswalk," O'Dell said. "We
weren't thrilled about it, but that was what the commu-
nity wanted and we did it."
O'Dell said "painting stripes on the road will not
provide safety for pedestrians."
Mayor Gail Cole said he was opposed to the stop-
go pedestrian crosswalk. "We've got a really, really big
traffic problem out here, and this will just magnify it."
Cole said he planned to contact the MPO in an ef-
fort to either modify the crosswalk or delete it from the
work plan, and would perhaps request a special meet-
ing of the Island Transportation Planning Organization
to address the issue.
Other items of interest to Islanders in the five-year
transportation plan include:
Preliminary design and study of a replacement for
the Anna Maria Island Bridge at Manatee Avenue in
fiscal year 2000-01. Once the $690,000 study is com-
plete, preliminary design will take place in fiscal year
2002-03 at a cost of $2.2 million.
Repair and rehabilitation of the Longboat Bridge
between Bradenton Beach and Longboat Key from
2002-2004 at a cost of $2,627,965.
Replacement of the Key Royale Bridge in fiscal
year 2004-05. Total cost is estimated at $1,331,210.
Bike lanes in Holmes Beach in fiscal year 2001-
02. The $203,969 project will add lanes on both sides
of Gulf Drive from Manatee Avenue to 85th Street.
Bike lanes in Bradenton Beach in fiscal year
2004-05. The $270,000 project will add lanes on both
sides of Gulf Drive from 27th Street to the Longboat
Bridge.
Construction of an additional turn lane just east
of the Cortez Bridge at 119th Street in fiscal year 2001 -
02. The project is estimated to cost $802,014.


Volleying for a trolley
Manatee County Commissioner Joe McClash, right, talks with Florida Department of Transportation Secre-
tary Tom Barry about a trolley system for Anna Maria Island while the DOT's District One Secretary David
Twiddy of Bartow ponders the ramifications. Islander Photo: David Futch


Trolley surfaces again for Island
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

ensure people use it. If people know they won't have
to pay anything, or at least not more than 25 or 50 cents,
it will be used."
She added that she sees the system much in the
same light as McClash a trolley operating con-
stantly so people enjoying themselves at a resort or
shopping center in Holmes Beach could hop on a
trolley and go to Bridge Street in Bradenton Beach


or the pier in Anna Maria.
In the past when a trolley was brought up, there
were obstacles one of them a non-supportive county
commission. The other problem was trying to convince
Longboat Key officials, who couldn't get past the vi-
sion of "toonerville trolleys" and tourists finding their
hidden beach accesses, to approve.
In 1994, the county returned money for a trolley
when Longboat Key officials objected and because the
county argued the Island cities should bear the brunt of
the operating expenses while the cities said the county
should pay.


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CLOSED

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THE ISLANDER N MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 5


Anna Maria building official's salary slashed


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
Two months after reorganizing the city's internal
departments, Anna Maria commissioners adjusted the
salaries of two of its employees.
Building Official Phil Charnock's pay was de-
creased by $4,152.20 and that amount was applied to
the salary of city's recently promoted public works
director, Anne Beck.
At one time, Charnock was the city's building of-
ficial, public works director and code enforcement of-
ficer. He was stripped of his public works duties and
the position of code enforcement officer Feb. 22 fol-
lowing the seating of the newly elected commission.
Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh said Charnock's salary
would eventually be adjusted to reflect the change.
At that same meeting, the mayor promoted Beck
and directed Commissioner Tom Skoloda to draft em-
ployee job descriptions and to compare salary figures
with other similar-sized municipalities.
When asked how the $4,152.20 decrease-increase
was derived, Skoloda said he didn't know. He said the
mayor arrived at the figure.


Charnock was earning $43,152.20 per year. He
will now earn $39,000 annually, while Beck's pay,
formerly $28,606.50, will be bumped to $32,758.70
annually.
Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh was not present for the
May 25 meeting, but in a May 19 memo to the city
clerk, he states the changes are to take effect May 31.
Beck will be classified as an exempt employee at
that time, which according to Vice Mayor Bob Barlow
means she will no longer earn overtime pay.
Former Vice Mayor Robert McElheny said at the
meeting that he was glad to hear this because the city
has paid Beck more than $5,000 for 227 hours in over-
time since March 1, 1999.
McElheny questioned the city's resolution pertaining
to which department heads will receive exempt status.
He asked if the mayor could rewrite the resolution
because the building official and city clerk are the only
two employees who are exempt.
City Attorney Jim Dye said a labor attorney at his
office reviewed the mayor's memoranda and had no
objection. He further said the issue of who's exempt is
decided under federal employment law.


"I think this is sort of a vendetta," McElheny said.
"It was announced in campaign issues as to what the
commissioners are going to do with city employees and
I think it's terribly wrong."
Resident Jeff Murray said he's lived in the city for
26 years and during that time he's worked in the con-
struction trade in Anna Maria as well as the surround-
ing counties and Island cities.
"By far, I feel that Phil's one of the most knowl-
edgeable persons in the building industry. I would hate
to lose a man of his caliber and see the city put in a
difficult position," he said.
Barlow said the city isn't trying to trying to detract
from Charnock's qualifications.
Tom Turner, chairman of the city's planning and
zoning board, also disagreed with the mayor's decision
to reduce Charnock's pay. He said for five years
Charnock had done a "tremendous job" as both build-
ing official and public works director.
Advised by the city attorney that the mayor's decision
was an administrative one and didn't need concurrence
from the commission, commissioners nonetheless voted
unanimously to accept the mayor's changes.


Holmes Beach City Commission denies dock expansion


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Saying it more closely resembles a deck than a
dock, Holmes Beach city commissioners recently de-
nied a resident's request to expand her dock.
In April Helen Cotter of 446 63rd St. in Seaside
Gardens asked to increase the size of her dock from 2.5
feet by 11 feet to 9 by 11 feet. Commissioners put a
hold on the request until they could get comments from
other property owners in the subdivision.
The subdivision is unique because of its narrow
parcels, Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger explained.
Residents have been permitted to build docks to the
property line rather than adhere to the city's 10-foot
setback requirement.


Cotter said she wants to make the dock square so
she can pull a boat across the end of it instead of dock-
ing it on the side.
"You can hardly get a boat on the side," Cotter said.
Chairman Roger Lutz said he was only concerned
with comments from Cotter's neighbors who would
"have the dock built in their front yard."
John Horigan, whose corner lot faces Cotter's lot,
said, "There are two people on the corner. The Diesings
face north and I face west. I have approximately 20 feet
of frontage. The proposed dock would be eight feet
from my seawall. This would devalue my house and
take away my privacy."
"Is there any way at all that Mrs. Cotter can build
this dock by putting a restriction on the width?" Mayor


Carol Whitmore asked.
Assistant Public Works Supervisor Bill Saunders
said the city code requires 10-foot setbacks from the
side property lines for docks.
"Theoretically she can't have anything," Lutz
noted.
Saunders said former Public Works Supervisor
John Fernandez allowed the rebuilding of interior
docks within the footprint of the existing dock in con-
fined areas such as Seaside Gardens.
"All she has to do is put her boat on the other side,"
Code Enforcement Officer Walter Wunderlich said. "If
she expands her dock to the width she's talking about,
it eliminates the possibility of Mr. Horigan and Mr.
Diesing having anything."


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PAGE 6 0 MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER



Opinlion


Ready, set, hurricane season
It's that six-month nail-biting time Islanders al-
ways dread. Hurricane season is upon us.
Dr. William Gray, the Colorado State University
weather guru who has an uncanny knack of pretty
much accurately predicting the number and intensity of
Atlantic hurricanes, says we should be in for an "above
average" year of storms.
Average is about nine storms, with approximately
six of them evolving into hurricanes and, of those, two
becoming severe. This year, Gray says there will be 11
named storms, with seven becoming hurricanes and
three of them to be severe.
Of particular interest to us is Gray's belief that Gulf
of Mexico storms will crank up earlier this year than in
the past few years.
That means, of course, that we should be prepar-
ing our storm survival kits now.
It's time to find a soon-to-be-new-best friend in
Lakewood Ranch or some other place way, far away
from the water. Invite your family to spend some time
with them when a hurricane comes calling.
Make sure you've got enough food and water, bat-
teries and other supplies to weather a not-so-bad storm
here on the Island.
Do you have enough insurance coverage for your
home and belongings? Have you taken pictures of your
house, inside and out, and your valuables, to facilitate
insurance claims if needed?
If you haven't done so already, pick up some plywood
at the lumberyard for your windows and glass-fronted
doors. It's a lot easier to spend a couple of afternoons ret-
rofitting the windows and doors for the quick addition of
wind barriers rather than standing in line and working all
night when a storm is barreling toward us.
Better yet, spring for security shutters that are auto-
matic and, with a push of the button, your house can be
safe from wind and the objects propelled by forceful
winds. The new super-strength glass shields are also an
option, and better protection than taping up all the glass.
We've been telling Islanders about the need to prepare
for many, many years. You've probably heard all this
storm preparation stuff before. But we've also got lots of
new neighbors moving to the Island every year, and ev-
ery year there are more and more people who have never
spent the night listening to the wind howl, surf crash and
wondering if the Island will still be the same come dawn.
Let's hope for the best, pray the good Dr. Gray is
way, way off on his predictions and the Island weath-
ers another threatening season of storms unscathed.
And we would appreciate a little rain now and again.



Te Islander


SLICK By Egan



o1111011


Bike returned thanks!
Thank you for printing my daughter's letter in the
paper regarding her stolen bike. We got a huge re-
sponse and I thought everyone should know the bike
was returned.
Julie Sawyer, Holmes Beach

Mayor responds to verbal attack
After attending the Holmes Beach City Commis-
sion meeting May 25 and being verbally attacked af-
ter walking out of the meeting, I feel that those citizens
need to understand the role of the mayor in Holmes
Beach: I act as chief executive officer/administrator of
the city. My position is not legislative and allows me
no voting powers.
I was verbally attacked because during the meet-
ing I answered a call from the Police Department on my
cell phone. Also during the meeting I reviewed photos
that directly concerned city business, and it was stated
that I "did not appear interested" in the meeting.
I have been a citizen of this Island for more than 30
years and feel I have proven my commitment to pub-
lic service since 1991. Everyone has a right to voice
opinions to elected officials, but concerns or disagree-
ments should not get any less than respectful treatment
by all parties.
Mayor Carol Whitmore, Holmes Beach

Holmes family are givers
I usually keep my mouth shut, but then I heard the
statement of that nice couple leaving the city meeting
Tuesday evening, "The Holmeses are a piece of s-,"
directed at a member of the Holmes family.
Unfortunately, I've only had the privilege of know-
ing and working with the family for 20 years. In that
time I have only known them to give to the community.
Like the rebuilding of the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, Privateers' functions, Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School, city boards.
Oh! I almost forgot the property that the city boat
ramp, tennis courts, basketball court, fire station, base-


ball field, city hall and library sit on.
A month or so ago in "Our Opinion," I read how
Mr. Holmes "sold the city out" by trading (not selling)
some of his property on 77th Street with a neighbor.
The property he has so graciously been letting the com-
munity use for 45-50 years (while paying taxes and li-
ability insurance and maintaining the property). I think
this also would be considered giving to the community.
SIn the May 24 "Our Opinion, Building Paradise," re-
garding the property swap offer: the city would get ap-
proximately 3,600 square feet of property with 20 feet of
Gulf frontage in exchange for approximately 1,600 square
feet of property with 20 feet of road frontage.
"What's in it for him?" I think the city wins here
-20 feet of beach access that we presently don't have.
Chris McNamara, Hohnlmes Beach
Gratitude from PTO
The Parent-Teacher Organization of Anna Maria
Elementary School and I would like to thank all those
who so generously contributed to the success of Staff
Appreciation Week this year.
Our Island Publix was gracious enough to provide us
with a very nice array of deli sandwiches. We're so proud
to have them in our Partners in Education program.
Thanks to Shells restaurant for the delicious shrimp
enjoyed by all. Also, Bistro put on a wonderful spread.
Susan Timmons served up delicious Caesar salad and
made sure that everyone was well fed.
Parents, what can we say? Everything was great,
from baked goods to your own special homemade
dishes right down to the bottled water. Thanks.
Eris and her kitchen staff and the custodians helped
at any given opportunity. They're truly wonderful. -
The committee was so helpful, making lots of
phone calls to parents and doing other necessary things
(like cleaning up). They made sure it all fell into place.
The efforts of everyone involved made sure some
very deserving people had a great week. Who better to
enjoy it than those who not only educate, but are care-
ful to do what's best for our children each day?
Beth Ann Scheible, Staff Appreciation Week chair


31, 2000 Vol. 8, No. 29


V Publisher and Editor
Bonner J. Futch
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Pat Copeland
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Susan K. Kesselring
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mary Fulford Green
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona S. Otto
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Karen Kopp
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster ,
. <"1995-99
^te~~ A S oriininq
^^^R * elwapaper S


ITSLANDEI ~afM
Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
. 2000 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: news@islander.org
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


May





THE ISLANDER U MAY 31, 2000 E PAGE 7


pinion.
)._:. c. PL;^aE ^^:.-:r^.. i :.. I '.s:^a ;7 7_ d-.:; *^'.. &-gia Z:k "':.. ;,: :.-.^'? :- ;- /- .:.:,.E. -.i: .(_ = -


Baseball bat accident draws
sympathy at Center
On behalf of the Anna Maria Island Community
Center Board of Directors and staff, we extend our
deepest sympathy to Johnny Mattay and his parents,
Victor and Cathy, for the injury Johnny sustained at
the Center.
In January 2000 the board enacted a policy to
stop the swinging of baseball bats, tennis rackets and
other objects in the vicinity of the tennis courts and
baseball fields. Center staff has been working dili-
gently to police this policy.
Johnny apparently stepped out of the Center's
rear door and was struck by a bat swung by another
- child. The incident was an accident. The child prac-
ticing his swing obviously did not intend to hit
Johnny, but that does not change the fact that a child
was injured on Center property.
At the May board meeting, the board voted to
heighten its efforts concerning the new policy by post-
ing signs prohibiting the swinging of bats, rackets and
other objects outside the fenced baseball field and a
blanket prohibition against "tennis baseball" at or near
the baseball fields.
Center staff will intensify their efforts to enforce
this policy. The prohibition has also been announced on
the elementary school morning show. We ask all par-
ents, coaches and children to comply with and assist in
enforcing this policy. Please do not allow your children
or players to participate in these prohibited activities.
Again, our apologies are extended to the Mattay
family. Please help us assure that another child is not
injured in a similar action.
Allen Bobo, vice chairman, AMICC Board of Di-
rectors
Thanks, paramedics
We want to express our appreciation for remark-
ably swift response to my early morning call for help


April 29 when I was seized with what appeared to be
a heart attack. It was only a matter of minutes that West
Manatee Fire and Rescue personnel were at my bedside
giving me highly professional attention, reassuring me
and my anxious wife and then rushing me to Blake
Medical Center.
We shall be forever grateful too your remarkable
medical team and the people of Anna Maria are truly
fortunate having you and your colleagues available 24
hours a clay.
Anthony and Carmen Manali, Anna Maria

Applause for commission
at Bradenton Beach
I am writing from my home in Muskegon, Mich.
My wife Ann and I get The Islander a couple of weeks
late so if this letter seems a little untimely, I apologize.
Regardless, my wife and I wish to applaud
Mayor Gail Cole and the entire Bradenton Beach
City Commission for its decision to turn down the
building permit for Bermuda Bay's proposal to build
on the beach.
My wife and I own several time-share weeks in
Bradenton Beach and have been religiously vacation-
ing on Anna Maria Island since 1988. While I applaud
the Island's moratorium against anything higher than
three stories, the fact is since 1988 there is no question
many of the open spaces that existed in 1988 are now
jam-packed with multi-resident housing.
Additionally, more and more older single-story
units are being replaced with multi-story/multi-resi-
dence units. The end result has been a diminishment of
the openness and pristine views I know residents and
visitors have loved. Moreover, there has been a dra-
matic increase in overall congestion on the Island.
Now I know people have to make a living, and I
know development can be advantageous. However, in
certain locations at certain times there comes a point
when the benefits of development are outweighed by


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the benefits of leaving things the way they are. In my
humble opinion, that point in time has come for
Bradenton Beach and Anna Maria Island.
There is intrinsic value in being able to occasion-
ally see the beach while driving down Gulf Drive (isn't
that why we love Anna Maria in the first place?); there
is value in being able to have pedestrians cross Gulf
Drive safely; there is value in being able to drive down
Gulf Drive at more than a snail's pace (and this is par-
ticularly true if and when the Island has to be evacu-
ated); there is value to having some elbow room where
one lives; and there is value in managing our resources
instead of depleting them.
Don't get me wrong, I again want everyone to
thrive on Anna Maria Island. My wife and I pay real
estate taxes in Bradenton Beach and we want to see the
community thrive. However, we are now at the point
where more development "tunnels in" Gulf Drive, in-
creases congestion, wipes out ocean views, and de-
stroys "elbow room." This is not "thriving."
Again, we applaud Bradenton Beach's decision to
nix Bermuda Bay's proposal to expand onto the beach.
Roy and Ann Portenga, Muskegon, Mich.

All the more atrocious
Can it be true what I've been hearing that
Arvida is the reason behind the city of Bradenton's
intention to ban the public from the Palma Sola Cause-
way beaches?
Can it be true that because Arvida wanted an un-
sullied approach to their new kingdom, a "royal road,"
more appealing to prospective upscale buyers than the
"spectacle" of commoners frolicking along the water's
edge, city officials therefore bowed and bestowed vir-
tual sovereignty?
If this is-so, then the city's attempted sell-out
of the area and its citizens (commoners?) is all the
more atrocious.
A.R. Braim, Anna Maria



love to mail


Wyou the news!
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fect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
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State transactions ... everything you need if your "heart is on the Island." We're
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I






PAGE 8 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER


Land exchange on hold for title research


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
They need more information before proceeding any
further on a proposed land swap at the 77th Street beach,
Holmes Beach city commissioners agreed last week.
"The Holmes family would dedicate to the city a
piece of land 20 feet wide, running from the end of 77th
Street to the Gulf," Assistant Public Works Supervisor Bill
Saunders explained. "In return, the city would vacate one-

Boat reaps $1,500 for Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center
found a new home for a 23-foot Robalo when the
Center took the high bid for the boat from Chuck
Webb -$1,500.
The Center originally donated the boat to the
City of Anna Maria, which did some maintenance
on it. When the Manatee County Sheriffs Office
expressed an interest, the city turned it over to the
sheriff and they did some work on it in hopes of
turning it into a patrol boat.
The sheriff's office decided against using the
boat and sent it back to the Center.
Webb bought it Friday, May 19, with his high
bid, when the Center offered the boat to the high-
est phone-in bidder last week. Proceeds will go to
the Center's programs for Island youth.




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half of a portion of 77th Street that extends into the
Holmes property. This would give the city a public right
of way from the travel portion of 77th Street to the Gulf."
The idea of the swap was born in conversation be-
tween Saunders and Hugh Holmes Sr. with regard to
beach access problems along the beachfront there, Com-
missioner Don Maloney said.
Mayor Carol Whitmore asked if the 77th Street beach
cabana will have to be moved because it sits in the right
of way being dedicated to the city.
Saunders said no construction is permitted in city
rights of way. However, City Attorney Jim Dye said if the
swap is approved, the city will own the land and it will no
longer be considered a right of way, so that restriction will
not apply.
Dye said he's waiting for the final survey on the prop-
erty and the city has asked the surveyor to stake out the
property so city officials can visualize it.
Attorney Stephen Thompson, representing a group of
property owners in the area, said he has been doing title
work on nearby properties.
"There are an awful lot of easements that have been
granted by the Holmes family on different deeds giving
people certain rights," Thompson said. "The commission
should be aware of that."
Dye agreed and noted, "I've heard from several inde-
pendent sources that have done title work on properties up




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and down this beach that it's a very complex title situa-
tion," Dye said.
Whitmore asked if the parking lot between 75th and
77th Street will remain. The parcel is owned by Holmes,
who allows local beach goers to park and access the beach
there.
"The sign in the parking lot says private owners and
guests of owners only," Hugh Holmes Jr. said. "We have
no plans to change that."
Resident George Luckman of 77th Street asked if area
property owners will retain rights to use the area. In 1956,
buyers in certain subdivisions were granted the right to use
the beach between 77th and 81st streets as a sales incen-
tive. The wording granting this right appears in deeds.
"If you have a vested right to use it and it's in your
deed, the city can't take that away," Chairman Roger Lutz
noted. "I see it as an opportunity to trade an easement on
some land that doesn't seem to be doing anyone a great
deal of good with some other land that gives everybody
access to the beach."
The commission's goal is to provide public access to
the beach, Whitmore said.
'Tomorrow morning, if there was a chain-link fence
across that property denying everyone access, the only
recourse the citizens who have these deeds would have is
to go to court," Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger noted.
Bohnenberger suggested tabling the issue until all the
information is available.
"It's going to be a very large project." Dye said. "My
warning is to sit tight until we get an official report and see
exactly what we're dealing with."
Commissioners said the issue will be put on the next
work session agenda if the information is complete.


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I GY YATROS, DA.D. I






THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 9


Beer, wine sales OK'd for Bridge Street restaurant


By Paul Roat
Beer and wine sales have been approved for the
Pier Walk Cafe on Bridge Street in Bradenton Beach.
Members of the Bradenton Beach Board of Ad-
justment agreed to a variance request by Geraldine
and Chris Bush, owners of the restaurant at 127
Bridge Street, by a 3-2 vote. Opposing the sales were
Chairman John Burns and Barbara Daniels.
Bradenton Beach enacted a law several years ago
that restricted all alcohol sales on Bridge Street be at
least 200 feet apart. The Pier Walk Cafe property abuts
another alcohol-selling restaurant, the Bridge Tender
Inn, and is within 200 feet of three others.
A host of stipulations were required by the board
in granting the variance. Beer and wine sales may only
take place between 11 a.m. and 9:30 p.m., and beer and
wine is to be secondary to food and served only to
seated customers. The variance was also granted only
to the Bushes and is not transferable to any future res-
taurant owners.
"Our specialty is crepes and French cuisine,'
Geraldine Bush said. "and when we opened for din-
ner, our customers want a glass of wine or a beer
with dinner."
Mike Hodges, owner of the Pier Walk Cafe
property, said when he bought the property in 1978


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there were four bars along Bridge Street and no res-
taurants. "Up until recently I could have had a bar
there, too, but I chose not to do so. The Bushes have
a clean operation there, and if they're denied serv-
ing beer and wine it is a hardship to them. We want
to promote clean businesses in Bradenton Beach."
Resident Pat Wilson endorsed the variance. "It is
impossible to have French food without wine. In fact,
I believe it is illegal not to serve wine with meals in
France," she said.
Board Chairman Burns said this is the second vari-
ance request to come before the board in the past few


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years. With the changes that have come about on
Bridge Street recently more upscale shops and res-
taurants, less bars he urged board approval to re-
quest the city commission review the zoning overlay
district that encompasses Bridge Street. He request was
endorsed by the board.
However, both Burns and Daniels said they did not
see that a hardship existed at the restaurant if beer and
wine sales were not permitted.
Other board members Dick Cloutman, David
Hendrickson and Ken Lohn voted to grant the
variance.


at their mailboxes for the postmen to collect as they
made their rounds Saturday. Anna Maria City,
which does not have home delivery, collected dona-
tions at the post office and the Bradenton Beach
personnel picked them up.
Ellen Campbell, director of Meals on Wheels
which is the main beneficiary of the annual drive,
put the total at 7,200 pounds and expressed gratitude
from the ill and elderly who wind up with those
Meals on Wheels.



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Islanders give much more food to drive


The Island has outdone itself in generosity -
donating an estimated 7,200 pounds of food to the
postal carriers' food drive, compared with 5,300
pounds last year.
Bradenton Beach Postmaster Bob Willis said he
knew the Island's truckload was more than last year's
total, but was surprised at how much more. His post
office collects the food for all three Island cities.
Residents put non-perishable food in plastic
bags provided by their letter carriers and left them






PAGE 10 0 MAY 31, 2000. I.THE. ISLANDER


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'Brainstorming session'
on education is Saturday
A second "brainstorming session" on education on
Anna Maria Island will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 3,
at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
Organizers said there are three questions relevant
to the meeting: "Do you want a middle school located
on the Island? Do you want to have a say in your
child's educational plan? Does your child need more
creativity and flexibility in his or her education?"
Anyone who answers any of the questions "yes" is
invited to talk'to others who feel the same way, said
Noranne Hutcheson.
"Since November is the cutoff for submission of
new charter school proposals or applications, we need
to get organized soon," added Marlene West.
Further information may be obtained at 778-8571
or 778-8366.

Master gardener training
recruits sought
Trainees for the designation of master gardener are
being recruited by the Manatee County Extension Ser-
vice. Volunteers must provide 100 hours of service in
their first year and 50 hours a year thereafter.
Brenda Wilson of the program said those enrolling
in the free program "will want to learn more about
plants, growing things and gardening, and have enough
free time to attend the training and complete the vol-
unteer work." She has complete information at 722-
4524.
Gulf writers organization plans
readings Monday
The Gulf Coast Writers organization will feature
readings of original works by members when it meets
at 10:15 a.m. Monday, June 5, at the Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Details
may be obtained at 792-5295.

Longboat Key chamber golf
tournament is Saturday
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce's an-
nual golf tournament will begin with a shotgun start at
8:30 a.m. Saturday, June 3, at the Longboat Key Club's
Harbourside course.
There will be game prizes, raffle, putting contest,
prizes for first- and second-place teams and a green
jacket for "the most honest golfer, the one with the
highest score."
Cost of play is $125 and includes breakfast, barbe-
cue lunch, greens fees, cart and range balls. Details and
registration are available at 387-9519.

Flotilla 81 seamanship classes
start Tuesday
Boating skills and seamanship classes will be con-
ducted by Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 81 starting
Tuesday, June 6, at the Manatee Technical Institute,
5603 34th St. W., Bradenton.
The classes will be from 7 to 9 p.m. on seven con-
secutive Tuesdays and Thursdays. There is no fee for
classes but attendees must purchase course materials.
Further information may be obtained at 798-9544 or
795-6189.


Roser scholarship applications
available at church
Applications for scholarships provided by the
Memorial Guild of Roser Memorial Community
Church are available now at the church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria City.
The aid for scholars is provided for continu-
ation of a student's formal education, said May
Cooper, who chairs the scholarship committee for
the guild. Details are available at 778-7604.



Gallery to carry pieces
of late sculptor Toffel
Stating that "the local arts community recently lost
one of its talented wood sculptors when Phil Toffel
succumbed to cancer," Island Gallery West has opted
to carry some of his remaining sculptures.
Lee Mears, secretary of the gallery, said the show-
ing will be a memorial to Toffel and is presented with
the approval of his family. "Phil's creations of birds,
dolphins and flowers have long been admired and
sought after," she said.
The gallery at 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, is
open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
Further information is available at 778-6648.

Snooty birthday card contest
opening for youngsters
A contest to pick the best cards celebrating the
birthday of Snooty the manatee is beginning, open to
Anna Maria Island and other Manatee County children
preschool through 6th grade.
The cards will be judged primarily on originality
and creativity, said Lisa Fischer, education coordina-
tor for the South Florida Museum, Bishop Planetarium
and Parker Manatee Aquarium.
Every entry must include name, home address,
phone number, age and child's grade school, mailed or
delivered to the aquarium at 201 10th St. W.,
Bradenton FL 34205, by 5 p.m. July 17.
Prizes for the top cards in each age category will
be awarded at noon during Snooty's 52nd Birthday
Bash July 22 at the aquarium. Details may be obtained
at 746-4131.

Longboat hosting emergency
response training
Longboat Key will be the scene of Sarasota County
emergency response team training from 9 a.m. until 2
p.m. Tuesday, June 6.
Gathered at Bayfront Park Recreation Center, 4052
Gulf of Mexico Drive, trainees will learn how to handle
downed power lines, phone service interruptions,
blocked roads and facilities, and search and rescue
problems.
Three teams in Sarasota will respond to the key,
one team arriving as another leaves. Agencies will use
the parking lot of nearby St. Mary Star of the Sea
Catholic Church for vehicles and equipment.
The recreation center will be closed to the public
all day to make way for the training. Details may be
obtained at 316-1988.
Information to include for
Islander story
The Islander wants your news of coming events
and current events. You know what you have, and we
know how to present it to the rest of the Island. We
need it in time to print in the edition preceding the
event. There are a few indispensable ingredients:
What the event is, in detail. Where it is, including
street addresses every time. When, including date
and time.
Who is involved, with first and last names correctly
spelled, titles, positions and any other identification. Be
sure to include a telephone contact for those seeking
more information about the event and for us to ask
questions beforehand.
Deadline for announcements is two weeks prior to
the Wednesday when the item should be published.
Mail to The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach FL 34217, or fax to 778-9392.









Commission OKs pool on recreation land


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Taking the plunge, Holmes Beach city commis-
sioners last week approved the construction of a swim-
ming pool on private land that is zoned recreational.
Last month neighbors protested plans by Pat and
Angie Kabris, 101 75th Street, to build a clubhouse for
use by family members on a portion of their property
that is zoned R-1, or private recreational. The recre-
ational portion adjoins the couple's property that is
zoned R-2, or two-family residential.
The Kabrises then changed the plan to a swimming
pool with a cabana. However, opponents were not sat-
isfied and hired an attorney to aid in their fight to save
the city's remaining recreational land between 75 and
81st streets.
Commissioners required a site plan for the pool
and reviewed it last week.
"This department reviewed the site plan very care-
fully and find that it is fully compliant with all the re-
quirements of the land development code," Assistant
Superintendent of Public Works Bill Saunders said.
"Our city attorney found no discrepancies. The plan
shows a swimming pool, cabana and storage area."
"I think this is something that everybody can live
with," Mayor Carol Whitmore noted.
Attorney Stephen Thompson, representing opponents
of the request, detailed their issues with the project.
"Many people who purchased lots in this area from
the Holmes family were assured that the waterfront
properties would never be developed and would remain
as open space," Thopmpson said.
Thompson cited deeds from two properties north-


Capri Motel renovations
approved in Bradenton Beach
It took 12 months, two building officials, two
attorneys and about seven meetings, but the final
approval has been given for reconstruction of the
old Capri Motel in Bradenton Beach.
The little motel, at 210 Gulf Drive S., was
purchased from the estate of the late Kurt
Clemons more than a year ago. New owners
Jerry Rogers and Steve Noriega hoped to re-
model the old building and convert it into more
spacious and luxurious apartments.
In the process, the pair appeared before al-
most every advisory or regulatory board in
Bradenton Beach, receiving variances to setback
and parking.
Last week's action by the Bradenton Beach
City Commission was the final phase of the ap-
proval process. Commissioners approved a setback
from the street of 19 feet instead of the prescribed
25. Commissioners also agreed to drop the number
of parking spaces from 10 to nine to allow for more
landscaping and a better traffic flow.


east of the Kabris property that state, "Parties of the
first part covenant with parties of the second part that
no building shall be erected or constructed on any lands
owned by parties of the first part lying directly between
the property conveyed herein and the Gulf of Mexico."
The property is also part of an improperly created
subdivision of 10 lots, Thompson said. The property
was divided without the city's approval and in viola-
tion of the city's land development code, he said.
Thompson said the property is designated recre-
ation/open space in the city's comprehensive plan and
should be available and open to the public.
City Attorney Jim Dye said in his opinion, pri-
vately owned property is not subject to public use with-
out the owner's permission.
"How can you tell someone who owns private
property in R-1 that he can't build a pool on his own
property?" Whitmore asked.
Attorney Charles Webb, representing the Kabrises,
countered Thompson's arguments and said commission-
ers must follow the code. Private property rights issues are
not a factor for the commission to consider, he said.
"We have done the title search on Mr: Kabris'
property and we can find no restrictions, covenants or
encumbrances regarding this property," Webb said.
The city's comprehensive plan requirements are
for rezoning requests, not building permit applications,
Webb maintained. He also pointed out that the private
recreation zoning district and what is permitted there
were upheld when the plan was approved by the state.
"As to the subdivision issue, this property was
never part of the subdivision." Webb said. "It was land
created from purchases and recombined into one lot."
Dye agreed and noted, "There has not been an il-
.legal breaking up of property. It started out as one lot
and ended up as one lot."
Webb said he reviewed the two deeds referred to
by Thompson and the pool and cabana are not in a di-
rect line from those properties. He also displayed aerial
photos to illustrate this assertion.
"We can't do a title search every time someone wants
a building permit," Lutz noted. "And we also can't get into
the middle of a very heated property rights dispute or the
city would be bankrupted pretty quickly."
Opponent Anthony Tripolino said commissioners
should consider the wording in neighbors' deeds.
"If there are public easements, they will still be
there regardless of whether the site plan is approved or
not," Dye explained. "We would have the ability to go
to court to enforce them."
Dye said the site plan application requires a report
of title that shows the property is clear of any encum-
brances. The city received that report in October when
the Kabrises contracted to purchase the lot and the re-
port was updated prior to the meeting.
The city's staff and attorney agree that the site plan
complies with the city's codes and there is no legal
reason to deny it, Lutz said.
Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger said residents
can take the issue to court if they disagree.


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Obituaries


Frieda Dangman
Frieda Dangman, 93, of Bradenton, died May 27 at
home.
Born in Manhattan, N.Y., Mrs. Dangman came to
Manatee County from Equinunk, Pa., 27 years ago. She
was a homemaker. She was a member of Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, Holmes Beach. She was a past mem-
ber of American Legion Auxiliary. She was a past
member of the Artists Guild of Sarasota.
Visitation and services were May 30. Palmetto
Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Marie Force of Cen-
ter Reach, N.Y., Dorothy Setzer of Bellmore, N.Y., and
Evelyn Cunningham of Connecticut; 11 grandchildren;
and many great-grandchildren.

Marguerite J Lehouillier
Marguerite J. Lehouillier, 86, of Bradenton, died
May 23 at home.
Born in Berlin, N.H., Mrs. Lehouillier came to
Manatee County from Littleton, N.H., 26 years ago.
She was a homemaker. She attended St. Joseph Catho-
lic Church.
Visitation and rosary prayer service was May 25.


Mass was May 26 at St. Joseph Catholic Church. Me-
morial contributions may be made to Hospice of South-
west Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL 34238 or
Meals on Wheels of Manatee County Inc., 811 23rd
Ave. E., Bradenton FL 34208. Shannon Funeral Home
was in charge of arrangements.
She is survived by daughters Monique Gutierrez of
Holmes Beach and Claire Fleming of Bradenton; sis-
ter Bertha Page of Berlin; five grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Beverly Kay Wimpy
Beverly Kay Wimpy, 43, of Dahlonega, Ga., and
formerly of Anna Maria Island, died May 19.
Born in Fort Carson, Colo., Ms. Wimpy was a
member of Dahlonega Baptist Church.
Memorial services were May 21. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to Earth Angels Inc., 4053 Hid-
den Hollow, Gainesville GA 30506. McKinney Fu-
neral Home, Dahlonega, was in charge of arrange-
ments.
She is survived by parents Hoyt Gayle and Ann
Phillips; sisters Cindy Lindsey, Houston, Tex., Jo
Phillips and Tammy Martin, both of Dahlonega; and
several nieces and nephews.


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PAGE 12 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER


Cities join residents opposing Perico project


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
The Island cities are headed into the eye of the
storm.
It should come as no surprise that the stormy sub-
ject of the proposed Perico Island development project
weathered another discussion at a recent Coalition of
Barrier Island Elected Official's meeting.
The tide is not out on the issue. The topic this time
around was a petition filed in Manatee County court
May 17. Eight citizens, residents of the Island and
Bradenton, are challenging the project, specifically
Bradenton's newly amended comprehensive plan.
Despite citizen outcry, Bradenton city officials
May 10 voted in favor of real estate developer Arvida
Corp.'s plan to build condominiums up to 10 stories tall
on the Perico shoreline opposite Holmes Beach and
Anna Maria.
Petitioners are requesting a formal administrative
hearing with the Florida Department of Community
Affairs the agency which oversees land develop-
ment and Bradenton.
Anna Maria commissioners approved the
manuever with Bradenton Beach expected to follow
suit at its Thursday, June 1, meeting. Holmes Beach
city commissioners agreed to join as well, but they are
awaiting a corrected copy of the petition before voting
officially.
The lawsuit states the petitioners stand to suffer
from adverse impacts should the project proceed. In-
creased traffic, degradation of natural resources, water
quality, stormwater runoff and hurricane evacuation are
listed as hardships.
As stated in the lawsuit, Bradenton's amendment
to its comprehensive plan is inconsistent with several
policies of Manatee County's comprehensive plan and
areas of the state's comprehensive plan, as well as the
state's Growth Management Act and Florida Admin-
istrative Code.
City officials from the three Island cities are being
asked to join the action filed by Jane Gordon, attorney
with Jonas & LaSorte of Palm Beach, who represents
the resident group.


-. -. ~
- ..-....
A


Arvida proposes developing 898 units on Perico Island,

Anna Maria Commissioner Jay Hill, also an attor-
ney, said the case might not be heard if the petitioners
don't have the backing of at least one of the cities.
It's what's referred to as "standing" in the legal
world, he said. It's possible that the defendants may file
a motion to dismiss the pleading on the basis there are
no valid petitioners named, Hill said.
The law firm that represents each of the Island cit-
ies, Dye, Deitrich, Prather, Petruff & St. Paul, was
asked to review the lawsuit. City Attorney Jim Dye said
his firm is unable to advise city officials on the matter
because it's had a long history of advising the
Bradenton's city attorney on legal and procedural as-
pects of comprehensive planning and adoption of its
recent comprehensive plan amendments.
At a May 25 Anna Maria city commission meeting,
residents applauded the commission's decision to inter-


just east of Anna Maria Island.


vene on behalf of the petitioners.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Gail Cole said he's not
against the development, but would like someone to
answer the "important questions." He wants to know
how his residents can be moved safely off the Island in
the event of a hurricane evacuation.
Also addressing the evacuation issue, Anna Maria
Mayor Gary Deffenbaugh sent a letter April 14 to
Bradenton Mayor Wayne Poston voicing his strong
opposition to the project.
Deffenbaugh states, "As you are aware, evacuation
time from the barrier island of Anna Maria can take
anywhere up to 15 hours. If Arvida's proposed 2,000-
person residential development is approved, an addi-

PLEASE SEE PERICO ISLAND, NEXT PAGE


.* .





I




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P.








FOR FREE HOME DELIVERY OF THE ISLANDER ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND* CALL 778-7978
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is r m' ..._.. -.. .




JC ,I -A I T''IH'.0O [rS '^.;/ '."" I -I"F 1 0 B'I
THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 31, 2000 N PAGE 13


Holmes Beach enters into Perico Island fight


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach city commissioners agreed concep-
tually to join an effort to challenge Bradenton's com-
prehensive plan changes regarding Arvida's pending
development on the Perico Island shoreline.
They will wait for an amended copy of the petition
to officially vote on the matter.
Last month, the Bradenton City Council approved
Arvida's proposal to build 898 units on the 353-acre
Perico parcel. The project's west phase includes six- to 10-
story condominiums and townhouses with 794 units, a
recreation center, a swimming pool and tennis courts.
The petition to intervene in the comprehensive plan
process was filed May 10 by eight residents who op-
pose the project. Opponents include Holmes Beach
residents Joan Perry, Joy Courtney and Richard
Palmer.


PERICO ISLAND, FROM PAGE 12

tional three hours will be added to that evacuation.
Needless to say, the threat of lives lost is great and not
acceptable to the City of Anna Maria."
Legal bills that may be incurred by the lawsuit made
city officials uneasy. Deffenbaugh said he would pledge
the city's support, but he wouldn't obligate city funds.
Holmes Beach Commissioner Don Maloney said
he and his colleagues would join the fray, but not if it
costs residents their tax dollars.
But Gordon cinched the deal by telling city offi-
cials they wouldn't incur legal costs if they agree to be

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According to state statute, any affected person has
the right to petition for an administrative hearing to
challenge the determination by the Florida Department
of Community Affairs that Bradenton's comprehensive
plan is in compliance.
Once a petition is filed,.other affected persons or
parties may join in the petition. Opponents have asked
the three Island cities and the Manatee County Com-
mission to join in its petition.
"I think the city should consider joining in the pe-
tition," Mayor Carol Whitmore told commissioners.
"I want to do whatever we can safely do to stop
them," Chairman Roger Lutz said.
Lutz said the copy of the petition that was faxed to
the city contains errors and he would like a corrected
copy before giving final approval. He said he also
wants assurance that the projects' opponents will pay
for the attorney and the city will have no financial ob-


named on the lawsuit.
Holmes Beach activist Joy Courtney is circulating
a flyer that asking for donations to help pay the legal
costs for the lawsuit. She asks that checks be payable
to: Palma Sola Park Association, in care of Charlotte
Bell, 608 Montezuma Drive, Bradenton, FL 34209.
Please write "Perico legal fees" in the memo line.
Courtney can be reached at 778-5405.

- -- --i



All Natural Amish-Made Ice Cream

1/2 off any ice cream

(with the purchase of another expires 6/7/00)
103 Bradenton Beach 779-2244 Open 7 Days 11 am 10 pm


La Creperie
du Pier Walk Cafe
OPEN FOR DINNER!
Try our delicious cepes
filled with whatever you lovely
Open Tues.-Sai. 4.3j.9 pm
$1 OFF Sat. 11:30 am-1:30 pm9 *Sun. 8:30 am-12:30 pm
with ad 127 Bridge St. Bradenton Beach 778-1011





Join Us For Lunch -B
On Our Bayview Deck


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Open 7 Days 1 l:30-2am
135 Bridge St. Bradenton Beach
Marker 49 by boat
Reservations Suggested


ligation.
"We have agreed that if the Island cities join us we
will take care of the attorney's fees," petitioner Ken-
neth Crayton responded. "If the city decides to go to
another attorney, it will have to bear that cost."
"I commend the citizens who took the initiative to
move this issue forward," Commissioner Rich
Bohnenberger said. "I wholeheartedly support the city
getting involved in it."
In a recent letter to commissioners, City Attorney
Patricia Petruff pointed out that her law firm has a con-
flict related to any advice to the city regarding the in-
tervention.
Petruff said one of the firm's attorneys, Alan
Prather, is a special counsel to the City of Bradenton
regarding land-use matters and advised the city on its
1989 comprehensive plan as well as the amendments
being challenged in the citizens' petition.
The petition maintains that the comprehensive plan
amendments adopted by the Bradenton City Council in
February were revised to accommodate Arvida's
project by changing land-use designations.
It further maintains that the amendments are incon-
sistent with the state, regional and county comprehen-
sive plans and the state's growth management act and
statutes. It cites density, incompatibility, safety and
environmental, as well as procedural, issues.


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o Panfish and much more.
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OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK
Casual Inside Dining Room Outdoor. Dining or Heated
and Covered Patio Dining Plenty of Parking Pier
Live Entertainment Wed. thru Sun. Beer and Wine Available
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!
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2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key






PAGE 14 U MAY 31, 2000 N THE ISLANDER


Off to higher grades: best wishes Island grads


Best wishes and a fond farewell to Anna Maria
Elementary School graduates.
From Joyce Ellis'class: Trey Andricks, Morgan
Billings, Megahan Birdsall, James Bobo, Kelsey
Brumley, Alexander Casella, Patrick Cole, Danielle
Cronin, Lauren Fletcher, Christopher Klotz, Joshua
Kruse, Sarah Lanzillo, Jessica Lovejoy, Matthew
McDonough, Bailey Porter, Andrew Royals, Emily
Salter, Grace Sawyer, Zachary Schield, Peter Stanick,
Nicholas Taylor, Lauren Titsworth, Jospeh Webb III,
Eric Whitley and Christina Zash.
From Anne Kinnan's class: Brick Barlow, Amber
Barth, Emma Curry, Steven Faasse, Heath Fiecke, Amy
Fusco, Stephanie Gift, Heather Howard, Angela Jackson,
Olivia Langston, Liam Moniz, Amanda Nelson, Katie
O'Neill, Hance Souders, Michael Southwick, Mark
Spence, Cory Stewart, Robert Vandermolen, Alexandria
Viens, Alisha Ware and Shanen Young.
From Mary Miller's class. Amber Allen, Marisa





S' cho I "
Susan Kesseiring

Anna Maria Elementary
*School menu

Monday, June 5
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, JuiceA
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Salad, Fruit, Juice
STuesday, June 6
Breakfast: French Toast with Syrup or Cereal,
0 Juice
S Lunch: Pork Chop, Scalloped Potatoes,J
Tossed Salad, Dessert
Wednesday, June 7
S Break faB erakfasto Cereal, Toast, Juice r
Lunch: Corn Dog, Chips, Carrots, Fruit/Treat,
Juice
S cAll meals served with milk.
Have a great summer vacation!
See you back Monday, Aug. 14
OOOOOOOOOOOO0OOOO


Arce, Danielle Barber, Amy Boulris, Timothy
Bouziane, Lindsey Bressi, Kristen Bucci, Avrey
Ellsworth, Christen Franklin, Nicholas Giovanelli,
Gideon Gravett, Kevin Kirn, Brad Milks, Mario
Morano, Heather Murray, Conrad Palmerton, Sean
Pittman, Alonso Price, Jordan Pritchard, Merrily Shary,
Kevin Snyder, Brooke Tanner and Maya Thompson.
An awards ceremony and luncheon will be held at


States, like people, have personalities too. There's
a state motto, song, flower, bird, fish and so forth.
Fifth graders in Joyce Ellis' class chose a state to
study and recorded their findings on poster-sized
boards which they shared with their classmates and
The Islander.
Zach Shields did his project on the grand state of
Washington, the Evergreen State. He notes the state
bird is the American Goldfinch. While Mount St.
Helen's is thankfully sleeping, some in the metropolis
of Seattle are not, or at least, not since the popular
movie, "Sleepless in Seattle," starring Meg Ryan and
Tom Hanks that was filmed there. Famous Washing-
tonians include Bill Gates, Bing Crosby and Mary
McCarthy.
Matt McDonough's colorful display of Louisiana,
the Pelican State, depicts the flavor of the state known


11:45 a.m. Monday, June 5, at the Beach House Res-
taurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach.
Third and fourth graders will have an awards cer-
emony Thursday, June 5, in the school's auditorium.
King Middle School's graduates will have their
award ceremony in the school's gymanisum at 9 a.m,
also on June 2. The school is located at 600 75th St.
N.W., Bradenton.


Personable
states
Mm- Zach Shields,
Matt
MCcDonough and
Peter Stanick,
from left, did
reports on three
states for a
project in Joyce
Ellis 'fifth-grade
class. Islander
Photo: Susan
Kesselring


for its abundance of crawfish and hospitable Mardi
Gras festival. He notes the state flower is the magno-
lia and the state bird is the brown pelican which is
pretty popular here in Florida, too. They even have
their own state dog, the Calahouda leopard dog. Fa-
mous Louisianans are Louis Armstrong, Kate Chopin
and Braxton Bragg.
Peter Stanick chose a state from the eastern sea-
board to study, the Garden State of New Jersey. Neigh-
bor to New York, Delaware and Pennsylvania, it has
adopted the purple violet as its state flower and the
brook trout for its state fish. The state bird is the east-
ern goldfinch. New Jersey's home to Atlantic City,
famous for its boardwalk and old hotels, as well as the
renowned Princeton and Rutgers universities. Famous
New Jerseyites are Albert Einstein, Bruce Springsteen
and Thomas Edison.


Treat your clients to lunch or dinner in an elegant atmosphere
meeting room available.


Dinner Specials
Monday All-U-Can Eat New Orleans Wings ...... $8.95
Tuesday Baby Back-Ribs ............................. $10.95
Wednesday 10 oz New York Strip ................ $9.95
Thursday- Snow Crab Legs .......................... $13.95
Friday All-U-Can-Eat Fish & Chips............. $8.95
Saturday & Sunday Prime Rib.................... $10.95


Call in advance
fbr jster cariy out


Early Bird
Special
3-5 pm $6.95

Let us cater your
Graduation Party


Sensational salads, creative cold sandwiches, deluxe burgers, wraps, vegetarian dishes, etc.
RECEIVE A FREE PIECE OF
S FREE BEVERAGE KEY LIME PIE WITH
WITH FULL LUNCH ORDER FULL DINNER ENTREE
SNot valid with any other offer or special Not valid with any other offer or special I
SExpires 6-7-00. Expires 6-7-00.
Wildewood Plaza 4027 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton
752-7737 Open Mon. Sun. 11 am 8:30 pm


Come join your friends at

the Island's Newest Pub
Grub Special 4-6 pm daily
Hanks 6 oz. Burger with Fries Only $2 (cheese exioa)

Sunday! Wear your Hurricane Hanks T shirt
and get your 2nd drink FREE (same as i,,st Oin M)






Check out 6i
our new PCu5 & GRU5
menu! Your hosts Hank & Jessie of Jessie's Island Store
=2 778-5788 5346 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach S&S Plaza


'arae Berri
2Restaurant =nd Bakery


ALL DINNERS
UNDER $10
We Serve Authentic
German & American Food
Try our most-popular
Bavarian Platter only $5.15

1' Thursdav-Saturdav y


oomet Fe Cooking Live Octoberfest Music!
00 Voted Best German with "Happy Bavarian Duo"
"O Restaurant 2000 Bavarian Duo
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Tues Sun 8-3PM Tues Sat 5-9PM
117 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach 778-7344



1BI"gCue 'Water Seafood

'\ Restaurant andfLounge

Recovery Hour 11 am-7 pm $1 Drafts $1.75 Wells




Wed & Thurs, May 31 & June 1 Wilson & Co.,* 7 pm -?


V.


Fri & Sat. June 2 & 3 Del Rays 9 pm ?
h Sat June 3 Roni in the Tiki Bar 1 pm 4pm


i .


Sun June 4 Roni in the Tiki Bar '
Mon. June 5 Roni 7 Midnight and Karoake with Andrew 9 pm Midnight
Tues and Wed June 6 & 7 Wilson & Co. 7 Midnight


79-370*468619hStee WCote0Vlag0(ur ouh t h tafi


West meets east in geography lesson


I


I


I


ES
v '





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 15 -


Young playwright pens award-winning
By Susan K. Kesselring see Amanda and
Islander Reporter professional sta
This could be the beginning of a career for Amanda ." .plays were per
Nelson. She may one day find herself sharing company "wonderful."
with the likes of William Shakespeare and Neil Simon. W Kinnan acc
Author! Author! families to a lu1
It's an exciting time and proud moment for the three-time Pulit
fifth grader who attends Anna Maria Elementary Albee during a
School. Amanda was one of five Manatee County The school:
students to win a "Write-A-Play" award from in its midst. Fif
Florida Studio Theatre's national Young Play- orable mention 1
wrights Festival for "The Missing Glasses," a play also recognized
she co-authored with friend, Rachel Sawmiller, who, Amanda sai
now attends Manatee School of Arts and Sciences. J*t-t other plays.
Located in Sarasota, the theater received more 3 She is cons
than 5,000 plays from students across the nation. Three ." may become a
other plays were selected as winners county-wide. m als.
The play, Amanda said, was inspired by her he said wh
teacher, Anne Kinnan. Amanda said one day Mrs. her own she ce:
Kinnan implored the class to be silent while she Amanda Nelson resume.
searched for her glasses. She and her classmates but they didn't want to get into trouble and instead If she choose
wanted to tell their teacher her glasses were right snickered while Kinnan searched high and low. one day find he
where she left them, hanging from around her neck, Fifth graders were invited to the theater recently to which she may


piece-
i Rachel's winning play performed by
ge actors. The county's other winning
formed as well. Kinnan said it was

ompanied Amanda, Rachel and their
icheon. The winners were honored by
zer Prize-winning playwright Edward
special ceremony,
has another young budding playwright
th-grader C. J. Wickersham won hon-
for his play, "The Big Tarpon," and was
Sfor his achievement.
d she likes to write and has written two

idering a writing career, but said she
veterinarian because she's fond of ani-

Len the time comes for her to go out on
rtainly will mention the honor on her

,ses writing over animals, Amanda may
herself searching for her missing pen,
later find tucked behind her ear.


Islander McDonald earns W
master's at Georgia Tech
Richard P. McDonald graduated in May from ..
Georgia Institute of Technology with a master's degree .,, ,BI
in mechanical engineering. '"- ,.".
Formerly of Holmes Beach, McDonald attended 'V
Anna Maria Elementary School, graduated from Mana- ( ,, .
tee High School and the University of Florida, and is ,
working in air quality control for the Georgia Depart- ',. i 1 .
ment of Natural Resources. ', "' *, Y
Attending the ceremony were his 95-year-old *',.' .. 1
grandmother, Laura McDonald; his father, Jim t**' ,.,j ,.J
McDonald, former administrative commander of the .- '
Manatee County sheriff's office; and his mother, Ann got,"( .
McDonald, longtime Bradenton musician. .S. V r
The new graduate said he plans to return to this ..;
area with his wife Sandra and.the baby they expect in L
early August.






0 * *0 *

Anna Madrts "e' oCompany
Specialty Coffee RoAteoP'Retail and Wholesale
Saturday June 3rd


Come in and
register for
free drawings!
Devil Ray Tickets
T-Shirts
Coffee Mugs


Register to become
Coffee
Celebrity.
Win and you get
a FREE coffee
everyday for
one year!


Gourmet Coffee
Espresso Cappuccino
Latte Frappe Cold Beverages
Teas Fine Chocolates
Luscious Desserts* Imported Bottled Water
Gift Boxes and Souvenirs
We Ship
314 Pine Ave. Anna Maria
Across the Street from the Museum
Open Tuesday through Sunday 7 am 2:30 pm
779-0341 www.amicoffee.com
Anna Maria Island Coffee Celebrity receives a regular coffee each time they enter our store,
limited to one per day for up to one year. Register for drawings from Friday,'June 2, through Friday
June 9, Thursday. Winners will be notified June 12. One entry per person, please.


It's a jungle
Anna Maria Elemen-
tary Schoolfirst
graders dressed the
part of explorers,
natives, giraffes,
zebras, gazelles,
cheetahs, vultures,
elephants, flamingos,
leopards, rhinos,
ostriches, lions,
hippos and baboons
for a play called
African Safari.
Islander Photo:
Courtesy of
Bob Barlow


ia~i ]!1 ~iIiiV 000
00
VY1-EN TPLt I PAW A at
~JJ~7~T~J~J~~ ,~00

2 for 1 Well, Draft, Bottle Beer, Top Shelf
Wednesday thru Saturday 3 6 pm


n


'.IJ


Whirl with LeMerle
The fabulous LeMerle is back!
Friday and Saturdays 7-11 pm
Sons of the Beach
Sunday 5-8 pm


CL


(


Frugal Tugdayq,,, all dinner entrees 10
Tom Barrett and the Sophisticated Jazz Band Tuesdays 6 9 pm

5325 Marina rie e 778-13





7r r'ro/to- U OnOes r8^/AT1 aIIVN~ i 3aHAT3 g
PAGE 16 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER

Streetlife


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 14, possession of alcohol times two,
Bayfront Park.
May 15, domestic disturbance, 8700 block of
Gulf Drive. The complainant reported two subjects
were arguing in the street. The deputy located the sub-
jects, who assured him there was no violence. He is-
sued domestic violence packets.
May 17, criminal mischief, 800 block of South
Bay Boulevard. The complainant reported an unknown
person hit a garbage can.
-* May 19, possession of tobacco, violation of com-
munity control, 400 block of Magnolia. The deputy
observed a juvenile subject that he knew.to be violat-
ing his community control curfew and placed the sub-
ject in custody. A search revealed two packs of ciga-
rettes and a lighter. The subject was taken to the Juve-
nile Assessment Center.
May 22, criminal mischief, 200 block of Oak.
The complainant reported an unknown person threw a
rock through a window.
May 23, criminal mischief, 400 block of Spring.
The complainant reported an unknown person
scratched the fender of his vehicle.
May 24, suspended driver's license, 300 block of
North Bay Boulevard. The subject was stopped for
speeding and a check showed his driver's license was
suspended, said the report. The deputy seized the
driver's license and issued two citations.



SRod & Reel Pier
Where The Locals Go!
Breakfast Lunch Dinner

Open 7 Days EWo& ...
7 am-10 pm S"BT ^J

Best Fishing Zi ,j' .)
on the Island! S
S1/2 Mile North of City Pier
778-1885 875 North Shore Dr Anna Maria Island


Fried Popcorn Shrimp

or Fried Oysters

$7.99

Fried Catfish

$8.99








New _SI
320 Eas Bay Drive Hle ech*7859


May 25, lost property a cellular phone, 900
block of South Bay Boulevard.

Holmes Beach
May 19, vehicle theft, 2700 block of Avenue C.
The sheriff's department found a vehicle in Bradenton
that had been stolen from a Holmes Beach resident.
The vehicle had been destroyed by fire, said the report.
The owner was informed and the fire marshal is inves-
tigating the arson.
May 19, domestic battery, 600 block of Dundee
Lane. The victim reported the suspect burned him on
the stomach with a cooking pot. The victim was treated
for second and third degree burns, said the report. The
suspect was placed in custody.
May 21, suspended driver's license. The officer
stopped the subject for driving 48 mph in a 35-mph
zone and found the subject's driver's license was sus-
pended. The officer issued two citations and gave
warnings to the passengers for not wearing seatbelts.
May 24, burglary to a vehicle, 4000 Gulf Drive,
Manatee County Public Beach. The victim reported an
unknown person removed two credit cards and a bank
card from a purse in the vehicle and charged $8,000 in
merchandise at various stores in Bradenton.
May 25, theft of a vehicle, 500 block of Key
Royale Drive. The victim reported the suspect removed
his vehicle without permission. The victim said the
suspect does not have a driver's license.
May 25, animal bite, 300 block of 65th Street.






LASAGNA Meat or Vegetarian $ 95
with Salad and Bread 5
Many other entrees available
FREE DELIVERY-" Now delivering to Perico Island!
New Hours: Tues-Sat 10:30 am-l:30 pm 5-8 pm
-5604 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


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The victim reported a dog tied in its yard bit her on the
leg when she walked by the yard. The victim was trans-
ported to the hospital for treatment and an animal con-
trol officer responded and placed the dog in quarantine.
The health department was notified.

Bradenton Beach
o May 15, burglary to a conveyance, burglary to a
dwelling, 2200 block of Avenue B. The victim reported
she observed the suspect on her lawn and asked him to
leave. She said he then entered her residence and be-
gan to take her VCR. She said she asked'him to leave
and had to force him out the door. She said he entered
her vehicle where the officer found him and placed him
in custody.
May 18, lost property a cellular phone, Co-
quina Beach.
May 19, burglary, 900 Gulf Drive N., Gulf Drive
Cafe. An unknown person cut phone lines, smashed out
the rear glass door, removed two alarms, broke the
combination lock on the safe but did not gain entry,
removed a cash register drawer and damaged a rolodex
and fled, said the report.
May 19, burglary, 700 Gulf Drive N., Green
Turtle Gift Shop. An unknown person cut phone lines,
tore off the alarm system control panel, pried open a
storage closet, threw items around the shop breaking
several and removed two alligator heads valued at $97,
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE


Rebecca' s Bistro
sI4fview dinin't,
Breakfast Tues-Sat 8-11:30AMIVI
and Sun 8AM-1PM
Lunch Tues-Sat e 11:30AM-2PM
Dinner Tues-Sun 5:30-9:30PM "
Dinner reservations sq Sgested "
778-2959 103 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach


E>1; -


R E S T A U R A N 'T

Seafood Is Our Specialtv

Live Maine Lobster, Shrimp,
Fresh Catch of the Day, Mussels...

Dinner Specials from $9.95

Breakfast Lunch Dinner 7 Days
Dinner Reservations 778-1515
III Bay Boulevard Sourh Anna Maria (Opposite City Pier)

6ra od IladAttd


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer _
this side of Heaven." i" "-"--^^
-4iTiss Puffu
Pat Geyer, Proprietress \ w
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


Summer Specrials
are now here!

Siunet Specials
Mon-Fri 4:30-6 pm

SUMMER HOURS
Mon. Fri. 4:30 pm 9:30 pm
Sat. & Sun 11:30 am 9:30 pm
Full retail seafood market for
fresh seafood to prepare at home!

M, 383-1748
www.STONECRAB.NET
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST. NORTH LONGBOAT KEY





THE ISLANDER E MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 17


STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 16


a pair of goggles valued at $24.99, two pairs of goggles
valued at $69:98 and miscellaneous gift items valued
at $340. Damages included three model boats valued
at $487 and a sea shell valued at $29.99.
May 20, obstruction, resisting without vio-
lence, 2300 block of Avenue B. The officer reported
when he stopped a vehicle the subject, who was a
passenger, got out and began questioning him. He
said he advised the subject four times not to interfere
with his investigation, but she continued to interfere
and also yelled at him. He placed her in custody and
said she resisted, yelling and screaming, and had to
be restrained. The subject was taken to the Juvenile
Assessment Center.
May 20, theft of $7 in gasoline, 2513 Gulf Drive
N., Circle K.
May 23, obstruction, Coquina Bayside. The of-
ficer was clearing the park at closing and observed a
vehicle in the middle of the access road with the sub-
ject sleeping inside. The officer said he awoke the sub-
ject, who refused to tell the officer his name. The of-
ficer observed an employment application inside the
vehicle with the subject's name on it, ran a check and
found the subject's driver's license was suspended. He
placed the subject in custody.
May 23, retail theft, 2513 Gulf Drive N., Circle
K. The complainant reported the theft of a 12-pack of
beer and the officer observed a suspect running and
throwing two cans of beer. The officer caught the sus-
pect, who said he distracted the clerk while an accom-
plice stole the beer. He was placed in custody.
May 24, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. Three victims reported an unknown person re-
moved their purses containing seven credit cards, four
ATM cards, two check books, a calling card, $425
cash, a set of keys, a pair of glasses, prescription medi-
cation, jewelry valued at $500 and identification.
May 24, domestic battery, 200 block of 22nd


3rd Anniversary!

Anniversary
1 ^ GCelebration

{; : Wed. May 3t1

D/ Don't forget to come in pU
and registertowin |
FREE Breakfast or Lunch
EVERYDAY FOR ONE FULL YEAR!*
Drawing to be held at 2pm, 5/51
GIVEAWAYS ALL DAY!
Including hats, shirts, Devil Rays tickets, etc.
Valid at any Brian's Sunnyside Up nationwide. Does not
include tax, tip, transportation. Eat-in only, no take-outs.
778-4140


*4' '~'*


Days long past
School Key, prior to 1955, was a jungle with no waterways. In 1960 it became known as Key Royale, and was
advertised as an upscale area of homes with manicured lawns, a golf course and man-made canals. To see
more pictures of days past, visit the Island Museum at 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria City, Tuesdays, Wednes-
days, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Information is available at 778-0492. Photo courtesy -
of the Anna Maria Island Historical Society.


Street. The victim reported she and the suspect argued
and he kicked her in the chest and stomach. The officer
requested a warrant.


If you have information that may help solve crimes,
contact Crime Stoppers at 747-COPS. You may be eli-
gible for a reward up to $1,000.


I IACHnES
IIC3E CREAM ,.aI, DE3LlI



any ice cream
or sandwich
purchase
Must present coupon One coupon per order I
Expires 6-30-2000 I
I I
Island Shopping Center
5318 Marina Drive,Holmes Beach 778-7386
L ................


.LTR CANADIAN MIST CLUNY SCOTCH 1.7 5
LT19 $12 3LT99 2for 2for" $1499 S1 7 99 2R
2 7 $26.98 $28.78 $129
LTD CANADIAN"' 14) $.39) TEN HIGH 2for


($1.4) F ODA R IN$5499 (SB f 12.49
ISKEY for MUIRHEAD"9 BOURBON $



PHILADELPHIA CLUNY SCOTCH $7.99 WINDSOR r175
WHIS EYI$239$28COTC LT
(IK Y $23.9.91.751OUR7ON ($ 12.49)
JIM BEAM 8 STAR MaIR 3.00 1.75 OLD CROW BOURBON


75LTR BLENDED WHISKEY OLD CROW BOURBON $7.99 LTR CANADAN LTR
$ 7.99 RON CARLOS RUM $699 $9.99
24for LITER SPECIALS$1 $25.98
$2( 9$12. 9 9 CP VODKA OR GIN $5.99 ($12.99)
($24)PHILADELPHIA CLUNY SCOTCH $7.WIDS99.7
L175 BPEDE WISEYOLD CROW BOURBON $7.99 CANADIAN T
$7.99 RON CARLOS RUM $6.99 $9.99


ABSOLUT
VODKA
$2899 1.75 LTR
70 ML$1799


BURNETT'S
GIN
$1299 s22f4.
17I TR ($12.29)4
I 7,I T ($12.29)


BACARDI
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$1979 1.7


ARISTOCRAT
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$1099 1'75
U LTR


~


OOH

LA LA!

Best steaks on
the Island.
Best seafood.
Best everything!
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French restaurant
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Serving breakfast
and lunch, Tuesday
through Sunday.
Dinner Wednesday
through Sunday.




II Frenchl
Continental'
Cuisine &
Fine Wines



Island Shopping Center
5406 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-5320


I,-






PAGE 18 0 MAY 31, 2000 E THE ISLANDER

Even those who should know this stuff sometimes don't


Pete is a retired Chicago firefighter buddy of mine.
We were talking the other day about this and that, and
after mentioning that I was going to the hurricane con-
ference in Tampa the talk turned to storms.
Since he's from the midwest, Pete is new to hurri-
canes. But since he was in the emergency business for
25 years, I figured he was pretty savvy when it came
to hurricane preparations and stuff.
Wrong.
Oh, sure, he knew about stockpiling water and
Spam and hurricane-proofing his east Sarasota house.
In fact, he said some friends came by last year
when Harvey was threatening the area to spend the
Night away from their coastal home.
"It was a good thing that they brought some food,"
Pete said. "There were about eight of us for dinner that
night, and I don't think I would have had enough for
everybody to eat if they hadn't brought some supplies."
Oops. "Hey, what would have happened if Harvey
had hit, and they would have stayed with you for four
or five days or even a week?" I asked.
Pete hadn't thought about that one, but said he had
a freezer that he planned to stock with a lot of frozen
stuff for this year.
"What happens if the power is out for a couple
weeks?" I asked.
Pete hadn't thought about that one either, but said
maybe he'd get a generator.
"Where are you going to store 20 or 30 gallons of
gasoline to power the generator?" I asked.
Pete hadn't thought about that. As a former
Firefighter, he said he really didn't like to store gaso-
line around the house, but could probably run out af-
ter the storm and get some gas if he needed it.
"How are you going to get out your driveway if all
those big trees in your yard blow over?" I asked. "Have
you got a chainsaw?"
Well, no, Pete said. "Maybe I'd better get a
chainsaw."
It was at this point that I realized that even a savvy
veteran firefighter may not be all that good in planning
for a hurricane. Pete apparently figured out the same
thing, because I spent the next half-hour or so talking
about storm protection, both pre- and post-disaster.
I'm not going to go into all of the nuances of how
to deal with a hurricane. Most Islanders know about
stockpiling water now, before the storms threaten, and
about boarding up windows and watching the news to
know when, where or if they have to leave the Island.
And even if you're new to the area, like my buddy
Pete is, we go into a lot of detail in this issue of The


Ann O Mri3ro sl/or3ioes

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
May 31 10:30 2.4 4:05 1.0 5:32 -0.1
Jun 1 12:36 1.6 4:34 1.2 11:00a* 2.6 6:22 -0.3
NM Jun2 1:41 1.6 5:02 1.3 11:34a' 2.7 7:11 -0.4
Jun 3 2:55 1.5 5:27 1.4 12:16 2.8 8:03 -0.5
Jun 4 4:06 1.5 5:59 1.4 1:02 2.8 8:56 -0.5
Jun 5 1:55 2.7 9:52 -0.4
Jun6 6:08 1.5 7:48 1.4 2:54 2.5 10:46 -0.2
Jun 7 6:47 1.5 9:23 1.4 4:03 2.3 11:40 0.0
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later- lows 1:06 later


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Islander about hurricanes and preparedness.
But preparedness is the key to surviving a storm,
and that early thinking is something that does deserve
more than a passing thought.
Have you thought through the steps you'll have to
take if a hurricane starts barreling toward Anna Maria
Island? What you have to do, where you'll go if you
have to leave, what you'll take?
Emergency managers have made it very, very clear
that there aren't enough public shelters which are out-
side of the flood plain regions in Manatee County to
hold all the people that may be suddenly homeless. If
you factor in all the evacuees from Sarasota or
Hillsborough or other neighboring counties, there re-
ally won't be enough room.
So now is a good time to make sure your friends on
the mainland who live out near Interstate. 75 are still
your friends and will be friendly enough to let you
and your family bunk with them for a while if Hurri-
cane Zoombah brushes against the Island.
Give them a call now to invite yourself to visit for
a while this summer. Talk to them about storms. Write
out a list of what they have, what they need, what you
need to bring for your storm visit.
Emergency managers call that a Hurricane Sur-
vival Kit, or a family protection plan, or some other
fancy name, but it may be one of the most important
things you can do to protect yourself, your family
and friends.
And don't just sit down and scribble it out on the
back of an envelope. Play devil's advocate, like I did
with Pete, and work out every possible worst-case sce-
nario you can.
We've been spoiled for the past 40 years with a
dearth of hurricanes in this -part of the world. That
trend won't last, and the intense hurricane activity of
the past five years is predicted to continue for an-
other 20-years with more and more hurricanes. It's

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inevitable that we will be hit by a storm eventually.
Plan for it.

Even those who should know better don't
Gov. Jeb Bush gave a little talk last week about
storms at the Tampa hurricane conference. It drew
some laughs from the audience, but I also saw some
grimaces as Bush talked about weathering Hurricane
Andrew at his Miami home in 1992.
"My wife and I were working, and we weren't pre-
pared," he said. "I went to the local Publix, and they
were out of everything. I went to Home Depot, and they
were out of everything. We didn't have a family emer-
gency plan, and we didn't know where to go or what
to take."
Bush said that has now changed, and urged every-
one to draw up a plan, stock up early on supplies, and
be prepared to leave if necessary.
That "if necessary" is important. Hurricane Floyd last
year caused the largest evacuation of the United States
ever. A lot of the people who left their homes didn't need
to they lived in high and dry homes that were well built
and could have withstood the storm. It wasn't their fault,
but emergency managers ordered them out and they went,
all 2 million of them, clogging the roads.
Emergency managers learned a lot of lessons from
Floyd, and steps are being taken this season to be more
specific as to who has to leave and where they have to go.
But it's important to remember that everyone in
Florida lives within 100 miles of either the Atlantic Ocean
or the Gulf of Mexico, and a strong hurricane can have
winds of 74 mph extending 100 miles from the eye.

Sandscript factoid
Here's a very disturbing factoid Bradenton Beach
Police Lt. John Cosby gleaned from the hurricane con-
ference.
If a hurricane strikes an area, 40 percent of the
businesses don't reopen after the storm, they just cut
their losses and leave.
Of the businesses that do reopen, 25 percent fail
within two years.
That works out to 65 percent of the businesses on
Anna Maria Island not being in business two years af-
ter a storm hits.
Think about how that will impact the Island economy,
but from a municipal and personal point of view.
Thanks for ruining my day, Cosby.


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THE ISLANDER N MAY 31, 2000 U PAGE 19

Tarpon everywhere from Egmont to Boca Grande


By Capt. David Futch
If you've never caught tarpon, the time is now to
go after them.
One of the four great gamefish with a reputation
for incredible leaping ability, the tarpon makes its
summer home along the Gulf coast.
Try using threadfin herriing, crabs, shrimp or
pinfish and look for them off the beach and in any
of the deepwater channels.
Bill Lowman at Island Discount Tackle said
snook are moving toward the passes and out to the
beach. Snook are around Bean Point and along the
beach around Long Pass.
"Take an early-morning walk down the beach with
a pair of polarized sunglasses and you're likely to see
plenty of them. They're just off the beach in the
trough," Lowman said. "Tarpon fishing is in full swing.
Lots of them along the beach and around Egmont Key.
They'll bite just about anything live from a big shrimp,
pinfish, crabs, threadfin and shiners. South of us in the
deeper water there is success fishing with jigs. But in
our shallower water we have better luck with live bait.
Offshore fishing has been about the same. Amberjack
and grouper are still in good numbers anywhere from
65 to 110 feet of water."
Capt. Thom Smith of Angler's Repair on
Cortez Road said snook, trout and redfish are biting
in Terra Ceia and Miguel Bay.
Capt. Matt Bowers on The Outcast at Captain's
Marina in Holmes Beach took some folks from Chi-
cago grouper fishing and brought home a half dozen
gag grouper after fishing for only three hours.
"You can go to just about any break in the bot-
tom whether it's a foot or two and you can catch
grouper," Bowers said. "I've been getting them in
about 65 feet of water."
Annie's Bait & Tackle reporting for Capt.
Zach Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II said he's catch-
ing tarpon along Anna Maria Island beaches and
mangrove snapper to 15 inches in the bay. There are
scattered schools of permit with some to 25 pounds


on reefs and wrecks in 25 to 40 feet of water. There
are tons of barracuda everywhere. Snook, trout and
redfish in the bay.
Capt. Sam Kimball on the Legend out of
Annie's said he's catching red and gag grouper un-
til his customers can't reel them in any more.
They're so tired they have to stop fishing. Kimball
said he's fishing in 90 feet of water.
Capt. Dan Howe of Holmes Beach said he and
Ted Geeraerts went 30 miles out in 110 feet of wa-
ter and caught red grouper to 16 pounds and had
some luck with schooling dolphin in the same area.
He said he moved into 60 feet of water and caught
lane snapper and more keeper reds to about six.
pounds.
Capt. Roy Salgado on the Grand Slam said
grouper fishing continues to be solid. He's also
catching plenty of permit on the wrecks and reefs.
Capt. Steve Salgado on the Compleat Angler
said he's jumping five or six tarpon every time out.
"It's just incredible to watch them," Salgado
said. "I never get tired of seeing them jump. And it's
so much easier to catch them here than in Boca
Grande Pass where 200 boats will jam into the same
area. You just can't get the fish out from under all
the boats."
Capt. Tom Chaya on the Dolphin Dreams out
of Captain's Marina said snook fishing is getting
better every week. There are plenty of redfish, trout
and tarpon to be had as well.
Capt. Matt Denham on the Rip Tide at Captain's
Marina said he's fishing in 80-100 feet of water and
slaying red and gag grouper to 20 pounds. He's also
catching yellowtail, lane and mangrove snapper. There
are plenty of barracuda around and bonita.
Capt. Ryan Hackney on the charterboat Neva-
Miss said he's catching grouper to 15 pounds in 70
feet of water.
"There are still some big kingfish around and we
caught one last week that weighed about 40 pounds,"
Hackney said. "The tarpon are starting to eat it up."


Hog of a grouper
Capt. Scott Greer of Stray Dog charters lifts this hefty,
48-pound gag grouper one of his customers caught in
130feet of water. Many local fishing guides said the
grouperfishing offAnna Maria Island is the best
they 've seen in years. Hire one and go catch 'em up.


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PAGE 20 ftXY3:-S:2 OUM :THE'I1LM-IDE'{


Little League AII.Star game
Wednesday night, May 31
Don't forget. The Anna Maria Island Little League
All-Star game is tonight at 7 p.m. The league's award
ceremony for all teams from T-hall through majors is
Thursday, June 1, at 6:15 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.

Haley's captures LL championship
Given up for dead before the season started,
Haley's Motel rode the arm and bat of Kyle Schweitzer
May 23 to the post-season championship of the Anna
Maria Island Little League major division by topping
West Manatee Fire District 3-2.
Haley's was expected to place no higher than third
when the regular season started with Bali Hai Resort
and WMFD tabbed as the favorites to win the title.
But a funny thing happened on the way to the
ballpark.
A scrappy Haley's squad managed by Evan Bordes
and coached by Brad Lisk and Jim Pritchard plugged
away each game to surprise the naysayers.
In the end, it was Schweitzer who capped his
team's championship season when h'e blasted a 1-1
pitch out of the park in the first inning to jump start his
team to victory.
Schweitzer also pitched a complete-game five-hit-
ter, striking out eight and giving up two earned runs.
Haley's also received some top-shelf defensive
plays from shortstop Kevin Kirn who threw out a run-
ner at the plate in the top of the first to save a run.
Catcher Michael Wallen gunned down another runner
trying to steal in the top of the fourth to stop a rally.
Rookies Shane Pelkey and C.J. Wickersham
knocked in the other two Haley's runs.


Storm wrecks Mariners
The Island Storm baseball team knows who's No. 1 after winning the mid-season Manasota Junior League
championship May 22 at G.T. Bray Park in Bradenton. The Storm beat the Sarasota Mariners 7-6 in a thrill-
ing 10-inning game. The squad is made up of Islanders who went 17-3 in the first half of the season. Islander
Photo: David Futch


Pelkey had a groundout sacrifice in the second to
bring in Matt Bobo who had singled.
Wickersham knocked in Steve Faasse with the
winning run on a double to right in the bottom of the
fourth.
Key players at the plate for WMFD were Patrick
Cole who doubled in a run in the top of the second
with a solid shot over the leftfielder's head that hit
the fence on one bounce and brought home Trey
Andricks.


Cole did it again in the top of the fourth when he
singled in Andricks who had hit a double to right.
Nick Sato had a double and Eric Stahr singled for
WMFD.
In good storybook fashion, Schweitzer made the
last out of the game and the season when he jumped
off the mound to grab a high bouncer in front of the
plate and threw off-balance to first. And the celebra-
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


LIGHTS OUT FOR

SEA TURTLES!


LIGHTS OUT FOR
SEA TURTLES!
May 1 thru Oct. 31 9PM to 7AM
Please turn out beachfront lights.*
Lights disorient mother turtles
and turtle hatchlings as they
journey to the Gulf.


F__1

SL _J

Report turtles, turtle tracks,
possible nests and
hatchlings to ... /l]aM ,i
hachigs0.. Anna Maria

Tuntie Watch
778-5638 or 569-2173 (pager)
*By city ordinance, Anna Maria,
Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach.
L J
I.J





CUT OUT AND TAPE OVER YOUR LIGHT SWITCH!
Beachfront properties and guests in beachfront rental units can have a handy
reminder at the front door or in the kitchen wherever it will be noticable that lights
near the beach must be turned out or shielded from May to October. Just tape this cut-out
light switch cover and post it. This is your chance to contribute to helping an
endangered species and just maybe the hatchlings you save will return to
your beach sometime during the next 100 years to nest!
Sponsored by
Te Islander

5404 Marina Drive a Holmes Beach 34217 (941) 778-7978


Due to a large demand for reprints of The Islander's photographs of the
March 14, 1999, Playa Encantada fire, we have prepared a package of four
8 by 10 inch color prints (shown above), available for $45 at our office.
Fire photo proceeds benefit the AMFD cadet program. Florida residents
add six percent sales tax ($2.70). Mail order add $3.20.
ThOe Islander
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 34217 (941) 778-7978







SPORTS, FROM PAGE 20

tion began.
The post-game party included three-, four- and
five-scoop splits at Dips Ice Cream in Anna Maria.
For manager Bordes, it was the culmination of a lot
of hard work.
"It's unreal to have this young of a club and win the
championship," Bordes said. "We were looking at a
.500 team when we started the season. All we tried to
do is work hard and instill sportsmanship in these kids
and Brad and Jim did a lot to accomplish that. The only
thing left to say is I love these kids. They're the best."
Both on and off the field.

Waterfront takes AAA championship
The Waterfront Restaurant of the AAA Anna
Maria Little League won the season-ending champion-
ship, beating Air & Energy 5-3 Sunday.
Tim Andricks had a pair of singles, Cole Billings
hit a long double, Shawn Culhane had a single and
scored, Max Marnie doubled and scored and Scott
Steenstra had a double and a run scored for Waterfront.
Ryan Guerin was the winning pitcher.
For Air & Energy, Dylan Mullen had a single and
hit two other long fly balls that were snagged by Matt
Shafer. Danielle Mullen singled and scored a run and
Heath Fiecke hit a double and scored. Carmine Galati
also scored for A & E.
Cody Pierce singled and doubled for Air & Energy
and Kayla Garner singled.
Air & Energy forced a second game showdown
when they beat Waterfront 16-4 May 26 on a strong
pitching performance by Jarrod McKenzie.


Island Storm takes midseason
baseball tourney
It was a long day's journey into night for The Is-


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Future hall.of.famer
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already got a good curve ball and he's working on
his slider.
land Storm who took almost four hours and 10 innings
May 22 to beat the Sarasota Mariners 7-6 for the mid-
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And it took a bizarre play to get the win.
Taylor Manning singled sharply to right centerfield
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With Manning on third and no outs, Torres broke
for second while the pitcher was walking back to the


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 31, 2000 PAGE 21
mound with the ball. Torres either stopped or slipped
half way to second and the pitcher took the bait when
he threw to the second baseman who got Torres in a
rundown.
Torres played cat-and-mouse in the rundown and
while the Mariners were concentrating on getting him
out, Manning broke for home and scored the winning
run.
It was the third, one-run win in the tournament for
the Storm who finished 17-3 at the half-way mark in
the season.
Torres gave the Storm an early lead with a two-run
single in the first inning and another single in the sec-
ond to bring in another run.
Storm centerfielder Zach Hill made a great running
grab of a shot into the gap in right in the top of the third
to keep the Mariners from scoring a sure run.
In the fourth, Storm starting pitcher Peter Dowling
got out of a jam by striking out a batter and then get-
ting another hitter to ground out to shortstop Bobby
Gibbons with the bases loaded.
The Storm made it 5-1 at the end of four when
Gibbons laid down a perfect suicide squeeze bunt to
bring in Hill, and Brandon Roberts scored on a wild
pitch. Manning clobbered a double over the left
fielder's head and Torres nearly had his third hit of
the game and another RBI but was robbed by the left
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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PAGE 22 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER


SPORTS, FROM PAGE 21


fielder who made a fine catch.
The Storm had their chances to finish off the Mari-
ners in the seventh, eighth and ninth innings but
couldn't capitalize.
Chris Nelson tried to score on Roberts' single to
right but was out at the plate on a good throw from the
right fielder.
In the eighth, the Storm had the bases loaded and
no outs and couldn't get a runner across.
In the ninth with men on second and third and two
outs, again the Storm failed to score.
Then in the 10th the Storm made it academic with
Manning and Torres' trick-me-if-you-can baserunning.
The Storm starts the summer season'session in
June.
For most of their opponents, there will be some
dark and stormy nights. Long ones,. too.

14 under par 58 takes
Horton Memorial golf tourney
Jim Miers Sr., Jim Miers Jr., Rob Parrish and
Tracey Beatty won the Sixth Annual Whitey Horton
Memorial Golf Tournament May 27 by shooting a 14
under par 58.
The tournament is sponsored by the Anna Maria
Island Privateers with the proceeds going to the Priva-
teers' scholarship fund.
Second place went to Rick Weaver, Ren Glanz,
Ernie Morris and David Remont who shot a 60. Morris
Also won the prize of the day when his raffle ticket won
a $400 print of the 13th hole at Augusta.
Third place was taken by Brad Cotner, Mike
Talerico, Hugh Lowery and Randy Wood. They had


a~
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Price's girls are champs
The Island Girls basketball team stands proud after winning the summer season title with a 7-1 record at G.T.
Bray Park on 59th Street in Bradenton. The Girls lost a squeaker 30-28 in the post-season championship
game May 9 to the Golden Girls of Bradenton. Left to right, front row, Ryane Garden, Julianna Finney, Trisha
Hasara, Susanna VanAndel, Jennifer Howard, Amber Sackett, Whitney Price, Courtney Taylor and Megan
Shimandle. In the back are Lauren Bucci and Coach/Fire Chief Andy Price.


W~t"$.r DRF &F h OAf dl^gKtefw 4
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a61.
Ron Headings won the long drive contest with a
blast of 327 yards.
Bob Lumsden won closest to the pin. In the putting





^efsf1 ffffWfeal statesj 419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294





**'' US2,B S--* ' ii:j V




HOLMES EACH DUPLEX
This bright and cheerful, high and dry duplex has been
beautifully maintained and offers lovely Berber carpet-
ing on both sides, ceramic tiled backsplash in kitchen
and baths, new refrigerator with ice maker plus new
stainless steel sink and Pfizer faucet in owner's side and
an automatic sprinkler system! Tenant's side offers a
single car garage and laundry area with washer and
dryer, ceiling fans and crown molding. Very short walk
to beach. $199,500.



_** "', ', n .,





AFFORDALE ISLAND HIDEAWAY
This charming and inviting 2BR/2BA retreat is located
near Tampa Bay and the Rod and Reel Pier! Amenities
include new windows, Pella sliding door, new heat
pump, cozy family room with Franklin-style woodburning
fireplace and a handy galley style kitchen with ceramic
tiled floors and backsplash, plus butcher block
countertops. The sunny back yard offers a spacious
patio and charming screened-in summer house with
brick floor, plus several mature, shady fruit trees and a
stately Royal Palm! Other features include ceiling fans,
skylights, washer and dryer. Only $199,000! Hurry! This
one won't last long!
Visit our web site at www.betsyhills.com


contest, Tony DiGiovanni came in first and won a
putter. Second was Fred Jomisko and Michael Glynn
was third.


)rARVIDA
Realty Services


YOUR SOURCE FOR THE
BEST OF THE ISLANDS


ENJOY THE AMBIANCE of our
lovely island from this 2BR/2BA condo
with a direct southwest Gulfview. Heated
pool, tennis, garage, security entrance and
extra storage enhance this unit in a well-
maintained Gulffront complex.
$239,000. IB43941
AFFORDABLE CONDO. Over-
look the lagoon at Woodpark and
enjoy the activities at the clubhouse
when you buy this 1BR/1.5BA unit.
Security gate, elevator, exercise room
and heated pool. $33,500. IB44707


SPANISH PARK. Fantastic 3BR/
2BA home in immaculate condition
with new tile and carpeting, large
lanai, tile roof, two-car garage. Being
close to everything makes this home a
must see! $125,000. IB42966
MELWOOD OAKS. Lovely 2BR/
2BA home in a quiet neighborhood.
Eat-in kitchen with dome ceiling, sky-
light in family room, cathedral ceil-
ings, screened lanai and fenced back-
yard. $86,000. IB45276


5350 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
(941) 778-0766 (877) 924-9001
Visit our website at www.ArvidaRealty.com


I


55


I


Denise Langlois
Tov i.isrlN(; &AITINC
AGENT UOR APRII.
751-1155
F.N-Cs. 795-8748









Real Estate


Island property sales
104 29th St., Holmes Beach, a 2,533 sfla 7bed/
6bath/lcar multi-family complex built in 1971 on a
50x100 lot, was sold 5/4/00, Kratzert to Simon, for
$230,000.
108 Third St. N., Bradenton Beach, a 1,364 sfla
4bed/2bath home built in 1952 on a 50x103 lot, was
sold 5/3/00, Pallone to Marshall, for $165,000; list
$175,000.
1401 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 3 Bermuda Bay
Club 22, a condo, was sold 5/5/00, Bermuda Bay Dev.
to Vandersloot, for $299,708.
1800 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 116 La Costa, a
Gulffront condo built in 1979, was sold 5/3/00, Kare
Liss LLC to Overway, for $250,000.
1800 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 202 La Costa, a
1,000 sfla 2bed/l&l/2bath condo built in 1979, was
sold 5/3/00, Hicks to Poulos, for $160,000.
1800 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 113 La Costa, a
Gulffront 952 sfla 2bed/1&l/2bath condo built in 1979,
was sold 5/3/00, West to Kemplin, for $237,500.
203 76th St., Holmes Beach, a 1,632 sfla two-story
duplex built in 1952 on a 90x78 lot, was sold 5/3/00,
Collins to Quarberg & Munford,-for $207,500.
213 58th St., Holmes Beach, a 1,167 sfla 2bed/
2bath home built in 1960 on a 60x91 lot, was sold 5/
4/00, Johnston to Hardesty, for $150,000.
226 Willow, a 75x139 canalfront lot, was sold 5/
3/00, Iseman to Zoller, for $145,000; list $149,000.
233 64th St., Holmes Beach, North Beach Village,
a 1,206 sfla 3bed/3bath/lcar condo built in 1988, was
sold 5/1/00, Whitley to Bilinovich, for $185,000; list
$189,000.
236 Chilson, Anna Maria, a canalfront 1,502 sfla
3bed/2bath/2cp home built in 1964 on a 75x148 lot,
was sold 5/1/00, Conoly to Badcock, for $265,000.
308 62nd St., Holmes Beach, a 1,135 sfla 2bed/
2bath/lcar home built in 1970 on a 75x100, was sold
5/2/00, Webb to Balbierer, for $170,000; list $173,500.
315 Tarpon, Anna Maria, a canalfront 1,108 sfla
2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1961 on a 75x1 10 lot,


104 CEDAR, a duplex one house from the Gulf on a dead-
end street. 3BR/1.5BA, 3BR/1.5BA now connected by
French doors to make a six bedroom home. 1,870 sfla un-
der A/C with large screened porch. Built in 1960 on a 50 by
110 ft. lot. Quality constructed and maintained. $525,000.

BDoug Dowling Realty
409 Pine Ave. Anna Maria, Fl 34216
Phone & Fax: (941)778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/-dougdowling/


Realty raves
Denise. Langlois won the honors for both
listing and sales at Arvida Realty Service's
Anna Maria Island office for April. Janet Lin-
coln was top lister and Chuck Keels top sales-
person for commercial properties during the
month.


was sold 5/3/00, Lacios to Leon Lic, for $225,000; list
$235,000.
3701 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 2B Sunbow Bay
1, a 1,320 sfia 3bed/3bath/cp condo built in 1977, was
sold 5/3/00, Splawn to Struber, for $174,500; list
$184,500.
600 Manatee Ave., Holmes Beach, 232 Westbay
Cove, a bayfront 1,187 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in
1977, was sold 5/4/00, Harris to Bell, for $210,000; list
$225,000.
611 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 14 D Imperial
House of Bradenton Beach, a 624 sfla Ibed/lbath
condo built in 1969, was sold 5/3/00, Wise to Dean, for
$63,500. 611 Gulf Dr N, Bradenton Beach, 17 D Im-
perial House of Bradenton Beach, a 754 sfla 2bed/
lbath condo built in 1969, was sold 5/5/00, Shook to
Ross, for $103,000.
613 Ivanhoe, Holmes Beach, a canalfront 2,896
sfla 3bed/2&l/2bath/2car/pool home built in 1995 on
a 90x105 lot, was sold 5/1/00, Smith to Willis, for
$625,000; list $675,000.
623 Foxworth, Holmes Beach, a canalfront 1,553
sfla 3bed/2bath/2car pool home built in 1970 on a
100x115 lot, was sold 5/5/00, Howard to Mojica, for
$344,300.
7100 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 208 Nautilus, a
Gulffront 1,801 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1973,
was sold 5/5/00, Vondran to Hill, for $370,000; list
$389,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Islander.
2000.

DON & KAREN SCHRODER, REALTORS

REDUCED $5,400! k
Just across your private .
bridge and down by the bay "
rests this fresh and bright I 71 .w. *
2BR/2BA six-year young ."
condo. Two screened '.
porches within a split-bed-
room plan. Beautiful pool ________
area. Under-building park-
ing for two cars. It's mid-Island location is close to shopping and
beach, making it perfect for personal or investment usage.
Florida contemporary furniture may also be purchased, if de-
sired. You can own a "piece of paradise" now for only $124,500.

GULESTREAM
VMK REALTY
941-778-2200


The Islander


JA I- I REALTOR.
E26 1 i',.' o' I r',i,'na/ ,,t'
TWO VILLAS w/HEATED CAGED POOL 4BR/2BA each with
2,006 sq.ft. living area $440,000. Separately @ $227,900 each.
LARGE BAYVIEW LOT 9,700 sq.ft., $108,000.
WILDEWOOD 2BR/2BA 1700 model, turnkey furnished. $110,000.
PINEBROOK DORAL MODEL 2BR/2BA, golf course. $123,000.
LAUREL OAKS New 3BR/2BA, heated pool/spa. $268,000.
WATERFRONT 3BR/2BA, two fireplaces, much more. $379,000.
RIVERRIDGE LOT Northwest Bradenton, $89,000.
BAYSHORE CONDO Age restricted, near shopping. $32,900.
COMMERCIAL
HISTORIC BRIDGE STREET 2,400 sq.ft., three stores, 150 ft.
to bay. Can add to size. Developing area.-$355,000.
STYLING SALON Eight stations, established over 35 years.
$39,000, OBO.
GULFVIEW LOT 100 by 90 ft., zoned C-2. $150,000.
RENTALS
VACATION, SUMMER AND 2001 SEASONAL
GULFFRONT CONDOS (5400, Gulfsands, Sun Plaza West, Sea Pirates)
HOMES: 3BR with 2-3 baths, heated pools, some canalfronLt.
SEE CLASSIFIED FOR BONUS FREE DAY SAIL
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
TDY41@aol.com TDOLLYYOUNGREALESTATE.COM


THE ISLANDER E MAY 31, 2000 E PAGE 23


Coffee company

launched in

Anna Maria
The Anna Maria Island Coffee Co. plans its
grand opening in Anna Maria City all day Satur-
day, June 3, launched by a Holmes Beach couple,
Robert and Lisa Termini.
The firm is at 314 Pine Ave., with wood
bartops, comfortable seating and "an atmosphere
that invokes feelings of being in 'the old coun-
try,'" said Lisa. Central to the operation is the
enamel and brass coffee roaster, where beans are
roasted and then ground for making coffee.
The product is sold by the cup at the Pine Av-
enue store, or by the whole bean, ground bean, in-
cluding special flavors. The AMI Coffee Com-
pany also sells wholesale to restaurants and other
resellers (toll-free 877-779-0341, locally 779-
0341) or at its website at www.amicoffee.com.
Along with coffee in its various forms, the re-
tail outlet on the Island offers desserts, chocolates,
teas and varied accessory items for turning beans
into a cup of coffee.
Island artist Julie Stewart created the corpo-
rate logo designed to "make us stand out from the
competition," said Lisa. She added that their mar-
keting strategy is to "treat our finished products
like that of fine wines."
Hours at the store are 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the May 27 horseshoe games were John
Bennett of Anna Maria and George Landraitis of
Holmes Beach. Runners-up were Bill Starrett of Anna
Maria and Carole Watson of England and Anna Maria.
Winners in the May 24 games were Ron Pepka of
Anna Maria and Starrett. Runners-up were Jack Coo-
per of Holmes Beach and Watson.
The weekly contests get under way every Wednes-
day and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
Park, 10005 Gulf Drive.














ONE OF A KIND!
Gulffront lot on a quiet dead-end street! There are
no more like this! For sale by owner. 31st St. and
Ave. F. $399,000. 778-4523 or 800-977-0803.


(941) 748-6300 Licensed Real Estate Broker




OWN .a.


DRAMATIC CONTEMPORARY HOME on
Anna Maria Island. Captivating Gulf view from
this custom-designed home by renowned archi-
tect Gene Leedy. Just steps to white sandy
beaches of the Gulf of Mexico. $1,150,000.
Sandy Drapala 252-1632 or Kathy Marcinko
252-1618. R44232
WATERFRONT
SPECTACULAR panoramic river view. Located
in the heart of downtown. Two units combined to
create a spacious home with two balconies over-
looking the water. Gorgeous carpeting and win-
dow treatments. $287,900. Sandy Drapala 794-
3354 or Kathy Marcinko 252-1618. 45255
THE INLETS Fantastic saltwater lot with direct
access to Manatee River and Gulf of Mexico.
$139,900. Joanne Jenkins 795-3838. 45235


THE VIEWS LOOKING towards Sarasota are
breathtaking. Elegant homes in the guarded
community on Sarasota Bay. Enjoy the secu-
rity, solitude and beauty of Tidy Island. Excel-
lent value. Priced from $164,900. Bob and
Penny Hall 749-5981. C40998

MAINLAND
GREAT OPPORTUNITY for professional office.
Located in high traffic area. New Windows, ter-
razzo floors and fireplace. Corner lot close to U.S.
41. $99,900. Sandy Drapala 794-3354 or Kathy
Marcinko 792-9122. 43270
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY. Clean and well main-
tained 2BR condominium. Updated baths and lots
of tile, indoor utility room, dome kitchen. Age re-
stricted community. $51,900. Hal Gillihan 778-
2194.42830


44Li, at ee veueWetB.r."enon" "F r "a34209 i ,


2501 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach
941 778-6849
800 778-9599 .
www.oldfloridarealty.com
anncaron@ix.netcom.com

NOW BOOKING
SUMMER
RENTALS.
Call Ann Caron
for availability -
they're going FAST!






PAGE 24 E MAY 31, 2000 0 THE ISLANDER

ACommercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
L n \Hauling S By the cut or by the month.
Service We Monitor Irrigation Systems
INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
77841345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
_Established in 1983
@a'il l]@ ~ STATE LICENSED & INSURED
I @'0@~l CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
@@ V ^[@ ~JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION In-house plan designs
@@@[o Su0@@S Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@g[ U'@V0gS V (941) 778-2993


Residential Commercial
Check our references: !
"Quality work ata reasonable price."
Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900




| Free Estimates Fully Insured Llc.#MCOO0)^0
SPECIALIZING IN BOATLIFTS, DOCKS AND SEAWALLS|


Commercial Residential
fD.R.S.
Construction Inc.
David Spicer 778-2010 504-0120 Lic.#CRC059098



Gillian Busard, Financial Advisor
(941) 365-8500
Legg Mason, Wood Walker, Inc.
Member NYSE 0 Member SIPC

Paradise Improvements 778.4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
MlUlil Replacement Doors and Windows
J -- ~Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
-'m- Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755

Keep it Cool with TIM'S Refrigeration/Air Conditioning REPAIR
Washers Dryers Water Heaters Well Pumps
Tim D. White
More than 30 YEARS Experience
941 792-1182 Cell 920-2474

Thie tlyew^elay ]Majn
T from the Anna Maria City Pier is now at the
Sarasota Farmers Market (Main St.) Saturday
7 til Noon. Fossil, Shark Teeth, and Unique Jewelry
piergear@tampabay.rr.com 778-4991


.' Old-Style Diner Mugs: $750

V The Islander
::. .*-:,L :....: ."* -----* -
.' .i "' : -[, Island Shopping Center, H.B.



Carpet Cleaning.
1 10 Reasons You'll Love My Company! I
#1 The Dog!: Oops. No more room for #2-10.
Call Lee at 778-2882 and ask for more great reasons to use
Fat Cat. We've been making customers happy for eight years. I
Over 1,600 of them! Isn't it fantastic! Call today, tell her I
you saw this ad in The Islander.

You ha ve my personal
-r' 100 percent, no-risk guarantee.
S Jon Kent, Owner/Islander




SFAT (CATI
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
778-2882 or 387-0607
5400 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach I
I- _1---- --------I


BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love seat
$399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129; futons
(sofa by day, bed at night) frame and mattress $199;
daybed (white with brass finials) including two mattresses
and pop-up unit $285. Can deliver. Call 753-7118.
ANTIQUE WOOD office chairs. Only two left, dark
wood, $100 each. 778-1102.
USED APPLIANCES: Full- and apartment- size; re-
frigerators, washer/dryers, stoves, dishwashers. All
appliances guaranteed. Beach to Bay Appliance
Service Center, 778-5757.
ADVENT HERITAGE SPEAKERS, large, great
sound. Originally $700, sell for $150. 779-0059.


ROSER GUILD THRIFT SHOP open Tues. and Thurs.
9:30am-2pm, Sat. 9am-noon. Donations only Wed. 9-
11am. Sale racks. 511 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.
LORD'S WAREHOUSE Thrift Shop. Open Mon.,
Wed., Sat. 9am-3pm. 6140 Gulf of Mexico Drive.
383-4738. Everything 50% off except fine jewelry
and some selected items.
RUMMAGE SALE: Saturday, June 3, 9am-1lpm. Fur-
niture, kitchenware, bikes, clothes and more. St.
Bernard Activity Center, 43rd St., Holmes Beach.


"CRITTER SITTER," five years in pet care, 21 years
as Island residents. Tender loving care for your pets,
with in-home visits. 778-6000.


1974 FORD, 47,000 original miles, good condition. $750.
Days, 778-6691 leave message. Nights, 778-6462.


YACHT CLEANING by Carleen. Detailing and wax-
ing. 20 years experience. Island resident, references.
941-233-7337.
OFFSHORE CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Glenn
Corder aboard Deep South. Half & full day. For infor-
mation call 778-1203 or Mobile 713-5900.
DIVING SERVICE: Underwater boat maintenance,
hull and props cleaned. Monthly contract available.
Certified diver. Call 778-8370.

HLWANTE
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.
BURNS SECURITY, SIX security officers needed for
Bradenton and-Longboat Key. 331-2500 for job infor-
mation. DFWP/EOE/M/F/H/V.
BARTENDERS AND SERVERS needed.Full and
part time. Buccaneer Inn, 383-5565.
SOUS CHEF and line cook. Full and part time. Buc-
caneer Inn. 383-5565.
WANTED: MOTIVATED SALES associate for real
estate office in high-traffic location. Commissions
negotiable. Please call Robin at 778-7244.
HOUSEKEEPING/LAUNDRY. Dependable, ener-
getic, non smoking. Part time, full time. Will train. 778-
6335.
CASHIERS NEEDED full and part time. Flexible
shifts. Apply Circle K, 2513 Gulf Dr., 778-4310, or
Circle K, 100 Gulf Dr., 778-7605.
LOVING GRANDMOTHER or experienced baby-sit-
ter needed to provide part-time care for 18 month-old
girl. Call 779-2711.
COORDINATOR for exchange student program.
Work with foreign high-school students, local fami-
lies, schools. Two to four hours per week from home.
Call 1-888-PALS-747.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, mulching,
trimming, clean-up, edgings, and more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.
LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs-hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.

PUT YOUR HOUSEWORK in our hands. "L&J Su-
preme Klean." Free estimates, all work guaranteed.
Call Laureen or John, 753-6843 or 762-4515 pager.

HUSBAND FOR A DAY. Odd jobs, even jobs, no job
to small. Licensed and insured. 778-2784.
CLEANING SERVICE: Thorough, dependable, detail
oriented cleaning, references, free estimates,
weekly, bi-weekly. Call Laurie at 795-1225 or Linda
at 794-5255.
CHAMBERLAIN PROFESSIONAL CLEANING. We
don't cut corners, we clean corners. Dependable,
affordable, honest, insured. 750-4772.
PHYSICAL THERAPY: Rehabilitation, fitness train-
ing, relaxation, stress management, massage, in
your home. 778-3523.

LAWNANDGARDE
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.
CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING & MAINTENANCE Resi-
dential/commercial, full-service maintenance, land-
scaping installation, clean-ups, tree trimming, ponds,
native plants, butterfly gardens. Excellent references.
778-5294.
FREE SNOW REMOVAL Shell, dirt, mulch or stone
delivered and spread for a small fee. Yard clean-up.
Dump truck for hire. Free estimates. Call Dave
Bannigan, 794-6971.
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it's
broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior discount.
Call 778-2581 or 713-0676.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees.
Irrigation and pest control service. Everything Under
the Sun Garden Centre. 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.
STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPING SERVICE, com-
plete installations and maintenance, specializing in
aquatic landscapes. Full delivery service for rock,
shell, mulch, etc. 727-5066.

"KURB KING," experts in cosmetic landscaping, spe-
cializing in continues concrete landscape and borders.
Free estimates, licensed and insured. 941-720-1834.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread, $25 a yard. Haul-
ing: all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free esti-
mates. Call Larry at 779-1529.









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JISWE'J4;ff41LIEZE4I I D
I9O E M RO E E T0 E T L C ni u d A


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning; wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill 795-5100.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. In-house plan designs. State licensed
and insured. Many Island references. 778-2993. Lic#
CRC 035261.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting,, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. Thirty-four year Island resident. Call Jim
Bickal at 778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free
estimates, no overtime charges. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodeling,
repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths. Free
estimates. Lic#RC0045125, #RG0058589, #PE0020374.
Insured. Call 720-0794.
CARL V. JOHNSON JR. Building Contractor. New
homes, renovations, additions and design service.
Free estimates and fair prices. Time and materials or
contract. Let me save you $$$. Lic#RR0066450. Call
795-1947.
PROTECT YOUR MOST valuable possession; your
home. Contact ESP Island Shutters Inc. for hurricane
roll shutters or glass sentinel security film. Service
and repairs and free estimates. Licensed and in-
sured. Phone 778-1610 or 778-5193.
GRIFFITHS' ISLAND PAINT/paper services: Interior/
exterior painting, pressure washing and wallpaper.
For prompt, reliable service at reasonable rates call
.,evin at 778-2996. Husband/wife team.
B&D SEAMLESS aluminum gutters, five or six inch
available. Insured, free estimates. Dean Guth, owner
and operator, 729-0619.

SCREEN REPAIRS, drywall repairs, painting, car-
pentry, new/old tile work. Ceiling fans, roof repairs,
all home repairs. Low prices. 504-2027.
RAY CORDY CUSTOM PAINTING specializing in
stain, oil, and varnish finishes. Interiors, exteriors.
Free estimates. Homeowners and contractors wel-
come. Fully licensed and insured. Impeccable refer-
ences. Mobile 724-0520, office 953-5215.


WATERFRONT COTTAGE with dock. Turnkey furnished,
beautiful view, breezy quiet area. No pets, non smoking.
Priced from $700 month, $350 week. 941-794-5980.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


ANNUAL RENTALS, SEVERAL to choose from. Big
ones, small ones and one just right for you. Mike
Norman Realty, 778-6696.

HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA duplex, $800 month.
Neat and clean, nice area. 722-2742.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA, very nice
neighborhood, stroll to beach! Cathedral ceilings,
new kitchen and appliances, beautiful! Non-smokers
preferred, small pet considered, no dogs. $695
month, first, last, security. 778-9798 or 305-296-1127
collect.

HOLMES BEACH 1 BR with screened lanai. Steps to
beach. $560 per month includes laundry. Utilities
extra. 778-3379, 11am-3pm.

CHARMING ISLAND HOME on deep-water canal.
2BR/2BA completely furnished, garage, laundry,
dock, many extras. $550 week, $1,600 month. Call
813-286-9814.

SUMMER RENTAL, available May 1 to Oct. 20,
2000. 2BR/1 BA, two blocks to Gulf. 778-0733.

ANNUAL 2BR/1 BA, new carpet, tile. 400-feet to the
beach, close to Publix. No pets. $675 plus last and
security. 778-8352.
VACATION RENTALS 2BR apartments across form
beautiful beach $350 per week. Summer dates still
available. Almost Beach Apartments 778-2374.

HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA apartment close to
beach and shopping. Annual rental. $700 month,
first, last and security deposit. Available May 1. 795-
7805.
SAN REMO CANALFRONT, 2BR/2BA house with
screened lanai, laundry and one-car garage. Unfur-
nished annual rental. $1,175 plus security. Available
now. Please call 795-7805.
ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH 2BR/1BA, new kitchen,
large deck, washer/dryer. $800 month, first, last, se-
curity plus utilities. No pets. 794-2947.
UNBELIEVABLE HIDEAWAY, panoramic waterview,
ground floor, fully furnished. One and two bedrooms,
small complex, available now. Possible annual and
or seasonal, monthly, weekly. Also next winter sea-
son. No pets, no smoking. 778-7107.
ANNUAL RENTAL, 1BR/1BA, one block to beach
and bay, close to shops, great location. $550 month,
$550 deposit. 203 Second St. N., Bradenton Beach.
Available now. 813-258-2411.

BEACH RENTALS: Private beach,-walk to every-
thing, new kitchens. Bikes, grills, chairs. $525 to $675
week, $1,500 to $1,950 month. Phone 778-4523 or
1-800-977-0803.

HOLMES BEACH, fully equipped 1BR/2BA apart-
ments. Steps from beach, cable, telephone, micro,
radio, CD. Summer special, $695 plus tax for two.
weeks. 941-778-1098. Pets welcome.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance- or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center. 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL34217.
We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES-BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $9 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $3 for each
7 words, Box: $3, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 25c per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge- 21 words.
-------------------------------------^

21
31
_________ _________ _________ __________ __________ __________ _____2___
______ ______ ______ _______ _______ _______ 2___

Run issue date(s) ____ _____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____
Amt. pd ______ Date Please indicate: Ck. No. _____ or Cash ____
For credit card payment: 7 T S. No._ _
Exp. Date _____ Name shown on card:______________


THE ISLANDER E MAY 31, 2000 0 PAGE 25,

IWONNE HIGGINS .4
WAGNER REALTY .44 w
Call me to finl( the
Best Properties of the Island f
778-2246 oir 800 211-2323


"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 7'7Q8-55/ After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 7 78-0,559' 778-3468


RICK BOYCE CONSTRUCTION
From the smallest repairs to major overhaul ...
I do it all and you SAVE.
778-5075 798-0078 PAGER
20-years Island experience Insured Lic.# CGC038546


A .I OTTAN RATO





1' ^ NU-Weatherside of Florida
li CLAC286523 SINCE 1948
I, *WINDOW REPLACEMENT
- 778-7074 Financing Available


SCOTT HOUWRRD INTERIORS
Carpet Window Treatment Furniture Re-Upholstery F Finishing Touches
Floor Sample Clearance Sale -
7443 Manatee Ave. WI. (in Albertsons Courtyard)
755-6088 Professional RA.S.I.D. FL Lic.#0001900


ISLAND LUMBER
ANP HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

778-9090 756-0074 ^
>-C5~~ U Lei M. L W~
Your bugs are .our business z -
i Island Residents Kenny and Karen Ervin -OOv
A CM E Family Owned and Operated Full Service 43 Years Experience


The Islander

Doh't l v qtte islhd
witlKout tskih7 til.< to
subscrilb. Visit us &t
5404 Mariha, Drive,
Isltd SkoLppih7
Cehtr, Holtr-s Be&.L
- or c,|ll 941-778-7978
to c,-r7q it oMC
Visa> or MC.


CLEANING"
by Claudette
Homes & Condos
One-time, weekly or bi-weekly
Fully insured
Local references
Professional &
courteous
Pager
19 331-4543


The Islander -


*.1








S IScendin-r Prces* V inlsdg


LOCATED BEHIND
ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
LP GAS RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL ISf
$800 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
PER FILL EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
21 c r WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING


^^~~ai'i^ l


5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


The Islander
I",2ET : - LS,. .Z2,L 2,27,/.7, i 2 c: 3:L't ':, .


Fax: 941 778-9392
Phone: 941 778-7978


I -






0PAGE 26V MAY 31, 2000 U THI E ISLANDER

11SLA NI ER- LA SSIFU

RNALS CntiuedRENALS-ontnue RAL SATECotiue


ANNA MARIA 3BR/2.5BA, one-half block to beach,
washer/dryer, microwave, utilities, cable, no pets, no
smokers. Winter only. $2,700 month plus security.
Three-month minimum. 863-646-9233.

LOVELY, FURNISHED BEACH house in Holmes
Beach. 1BR, lanai, tropical paradise. Short or long
term, monthly lease, Non smoking. Reasonable, 921-
0074.

ANNUAL RENTAL, Bradenton Beach. 2BR/1BA,
new carpet, covered parking, utility room, skylights.
$650 month, first, last and deposit. 778-2043.

ANNUAL RENTAL, 2BR/1.5BA duplex, appliances,
no pets. $700 per month. 778-0032.

FREE BOATING BONUS with vacation rental. 3BR/
2BA, canalfront, dream kitchen, sleeps six. Bonus: free
private daysail with captain to Egmont Key on 34-ft.
Morgan. Call Bruce at T. Dolly Young Real Estate, 941 -
778-0807, 800-956-0807, email:tdy41 @aol.com.

WATERFRONT WITH DOCK, great view, turnkey
furnished or not, annual or seasonal, lots of ameni-
ties. $900. Call Marilyn Betts, Bayshore Realty Inc.,
758-5462.

SAN REMO APARTMENT, annual or short term.
Furnished 2BR/1BA, central air, washer/dryer facili-
ties on premises. $600 month plus utilities. No pets.
Call Smith Realtors, 941-778-0770.


25~ 2s&?


7-Zin tais


Rentals and Property Management with a Personal Touch!


Sue Carlson & Teresa Gallagher
941.779.2555 800.770.6057 www.islerentals.com
THE BUSIEST LITTLE OFFICE
ON THE ISLAND!


1BR FURNISHED APARTMENT at Runaway Bay
available for six months. $650. Call Wagner Realty at
778-0000.

HOLMES BEACH PIRATES DEN, heated pool, pri-
vate. $350-$450 week. Stones throw to beach.
Weekend/month, no pets. 778-4368.

SMALL FURNISHED 1 BR/iBA duplex apartment in
Holmes Beach. Kitchen, living room, near beach.
Annual. $450 month plus utilities. Call 778-2549.

LARGE 2BR/2BA, garage, one block to beach. First,
last and deposit. No pets. $650. 778-1539.



GULFFRONT LOT, dead-end street, one of a kind!
There are no more like this. $399,000, 778-4523 or
800-977-0803.

FOR SALE BY BUILDER, new home under construc-
tion on Bradenton Beach. 1440 sq. ft., 3BR/2BA, two-
car garage, two blocks from beach on quiet dead-end
street. $210,000. Days 920-9631, evenings and
weekends 778-6131.

KEY WEST ELEVATED 2BR/2BA, two blocks from
beach, covered deck, extra storage. $170,000. 2918
Ave. C. 778-0812.


Th1 Islander
New name. Still
"the best news."


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE, 3BR/2BA. $180,000.
778-9610.

LARGE DUPLEX in Holmes Beach. 2BR/2BA and
1 BR/1 BA, possible 2BR/1 BA with deeded dock, fam-
ily room and fireplace. Asking $224,900 or best offer.
778-7098. ..

HOW TO ADVERTISE
DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wed. publication.
UP to 3 line minimum includes approximately 21
words $9.00. Additional lines $3.00 each. Box:
$3.00. Ads must be paid in advance. Stop by or mail
to 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We're
located next to Chez Andre in the Island Shopping
Center. More information: 778-7978.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate adver-
tising herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes
it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimi-
nation based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, famil-
ial status or national origin, or intention to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under age of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody
of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowing ac-
cept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of
the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing impaired (TDD)
1-800-543-8294.

*0 0 00 000 --' CLIP AND SAVE - 0 0 0 0

WAT "1 N G`IIIN t IEST ItS I CIl'IONS .
* 0

Rules in effect for Manatee County:
0
> Lawn and landscape watering is limited to one
Sday a week.
o ) Addresses ending in even numbers (or A M):
STuesday.
S>- Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N z);
Sunday.
S> Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
SIrrigation with treated waste water allowed any time.) .
>- Owners can wash their vehicles anytime as long as:
They use a hand-held hose with a shut-off nozzle. (Pull 0
'the car on the lawn to wash!)
0 Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors is 0
Sallowed for ten minutes daily.
>- Hand-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, is
* 0
e permitted any day.
S Questions or comments? Call the Southwest
SFlorida Water Management District (Swiftmud) toll-0
Free: 1-800-423-1476.0
O O OaO.. O O O O OO0 0 .OOOOOOOOO0 0


RARE ELEVATED DUPLEX Just across
the street to Gulf beaches. 2BR/2BA with
washer and dryer hookups. Parking and
storage under building. $199,900. Ed
Oliveira 778-4800, 778-1751 eves.
MLS42809







WELL LOCATED DUPLEX Enjoy living near
the beach in a single family neighborhood at
an affordable price. This unique two-story
block construction duplex offers 2BR/1 BA on
each floor with a delightful large shaded
backyard. Price of $235,000 includes new
roof and repainting as well as other interior
upgrades. Ken Rickett 778-3026.


LOWEST PRICED ISLAND HOME 3BR/
1 BA home one block to bay, two blocks to
beach. Handyman special PRICED TO
SELL! Call lister for details Ed Oliveira
778-4800, 778-1751 eves. $124,900.



-t ....r^
Litz



CLOSE TO BEACHES Contemporary
3BR/2.5BA, open floor plan with many new
features. Master bedroom and two baths
on ground floor with two bedrooms and
half baths on second floor with balcony
overlooking greatroom. $185,000. Dick
Maher/Dave Jones 778-4800. MLS36165


Bob oltr 72-18 3 DckMaer 77-691 Al li79-32
EdOlvir 78171 ae .ons 77-49 Kn iket 7-32
Dnis Rauch 79-34 Jm a.os 71-45 VncntCaanr6ci 33-86
521GufDrv, ome eah F 421
8 0 0 -23 -225 2


RENTALS
Annual / Seasonal / Monthly / Weekly

VACATION RENTAL

Call Gayle Schulz and Liz
Codola ... experienced ., ,
agents who will assist you "
withall of your Year 2000 ., .,
rental and property needs.

l REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK





THE ISLANDER N MAY 31, 2000 N PAGE 27


Hi! I'm Marianne
Norman-Ellis.
For any real estate needs,
I am ready and eager
to serve you. Call me at
Mike Norman Realty
778-6696


Frank Davis
Broker


WATERFRONT HOMES:

2306 Canasta Dr.. NEW $895,000

609 Key Royale Dr........ $829,000

542 Key Royale Dr........ $725,000

511 Loquat................... $659,000


* 618 No.Point Harbor..... $509,900
512 75th Street .................$449,000

407 20th Place .................... $439,000
Marianne Correll
Realtorr 527 72nd Street............ $479,000

217 N. Harbor Dr .. NEW $246,500


WATERFRONT

AND ISLAND CONDOS:

-Sun Plaza West Condo ... $399,000
Bob Fittro
Realtor Waters Edge Condo ....... $249,000 1


Richard Freeman
Realtor


Broker/Realtor


Tom Nelson
Realtor


ANNA MARIA


S&iCoast
REAL ESTATE, INC.






Gloria Schorpp Helen White Mary Ann Schmidt
KEY ROYALE "500"
2BR/2BA waterfront home with beautiful views.
Ceramic tile, central vac system, caged heated pool,
boat lift, direct access to Tampa Bay, oversized
double garage, excellent area. $425,000.
ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT
4BR/4BA contemporary Island home. Tropical set-
ting with lush landscaping. Three decks, cathedral
ceilings, wet bar, wood floors, custom carpeting, boat
dock. $629,000.
SMUGGLER'S LANDING
Unique waterfront condo with a Florida lifestyle.
Choice of carpet, tile, cabinets. Forty-foot deep-
water dock, heated pools, tennis, covered parking,
elevators. Waterfront condos: 2BR/2BA plus den,
$249,000; 3BR/2BA $279,000; elegant
townhouse 3BR/3BA, elevator, $325,000.







Julie Gilstrap-Royal Patti Marifjeren
ATTENTION PROPERTY OWNERS
Were you satisfied with your seasonal rental income?
We will be glad to give you a rental income projection
on your property, just call us at 1-800-732-6434.

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club 2BR/2BA condo, pool. tennis $825
Sandy Pointe Condo, 2BR/2BA, pool, waterview, $1,000
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Homes Weekly/Monthly
from $700 week / $1500 month

779-0202 (800) 732-6434
ANNA MARIA
MLS SnCo

REAL ESTATE, INC.
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


Chris Shaw
Realtor


ISLAND HOMES:

4002 6th Avenue .......... $369,000

6201 Holmes Blvd.. NEW $339,000

514 69th Street............. $298,000

2406 Avenue A............... $279,500
420 Spring..................... $219,900


VACANT LOTS:

2409 Avenue A............ $199,000

505 South Bay Blvd .......... $199,000

501 South Bay Blvd .......... $159,000

4006 6th Avenue Lot #1 ... $149,000

4006 6th Avenue Lot #2 ... $149,000

4004 6th Avenue Lot #3 ... $149,000

4004 6th Avenue Lot #4 ... $149,000

DUPLEXES/TRIPLEXES
MULTI FAMILY PROPERTIES:


4109 Gulf Drive ............ $489,000

7301 Gulf Drive ............ $249,000

MAINLAND:

2418 90th Street NW...... $3,195,000

11360 Perico Isles Circle .. $225,000

1267 Spoonbill Landings ......... $149,900

719 Estuary Drive.......... $124,900

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

812 North Bay Blvd .......... $879,900

310 Pine Ave................... $294,500

855 Cortez Rd ...................... $89,900


Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor


Nick Patsios
Broker/Realtor






PAGE 28 0 MAY 31, 2000 E THE ISLANDER


No. 0521


REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT
BY MATT GAFFNEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Fixes
5 Many a Sri
Lankan
10 Herring family
members
15 Visibly shaken
19 "By yesterday!'
20-- Kane of'AII
My Children'
21 Former Energy
Secretary
O'Leary
22 Alpine climber
23 Cooperstown
nickname
24 Capital on the
Willamette
25 Stripling
27 F.B.I.
30 Poor marks
31 Born abroad
32 Dangerous job
33 Not so new
36 Become less
tense
38 Classified ad
abbr.
41 Baseball
manager Tony La

45 N.A.S.A.
49 Sharp feller
50 Cabeza, north of
the Pyrenees
51 One way to enter
52 Causes an
unearned run,
perhaps
53 Pitch makers
57 Vietnamese
neighbor
^j Tr,


58 Vamp's
accessory
60 Blood pressure
raiser
61 Like oak leaves
62 Pie cuts,
essentially
64 Salvager's gear
66 I.R.S.
72 Kvetches
73 Really enjoy
74 Term
75 Digital clock
settings
76 Big belts
79 G.R.E. takers
80 Any of Yalta's Big
Three
84 Groks
86 Daytime talk
show name
88 Filmmaking
family name
89 Prefix with
sphere
90 E.P.A.
96 Some may mind
this
97 Prefix with fuel
98 Pewter
component
99 -- Unplugged'
(1999 album)
100 When it's low, it's
good
102 One way to go
103 Flier to J.F.K.
104 U.S.A.F.
113 When printings
begin
114 Debussy
contemporary
115 Casino tool
117Act the letch
118 Interviewer,
Perhaps


119 Kwanzaa
principle
120 It's in the eye of
the beholder
121 Reagan
sentence starter
122 Mortimer Adler's
'How to -
Book'
123 Rose and
Rozelle
124 Quits

DOWN
1 'Saturday Night
Live' alum Mohr
2 From
3 Travelers in
Matthew
4 Record holder
5 Bit of floorwork,
maybe
6 Nejd desert
dwellers
7 Leon Uris's
18'
8 Clinched
9 Protect, as a
document
10 Protect, as a
seedling
11 -- but known

12 Sea of-- (Don
River's receiver)
13 It may be kosher
14 Runners carry
them
15 Paltry
16 First shepherd
17 Zoom, e.g.
18 Something to
dial: Abbr.
26 Toyota offering
28 Doing


29 Japanese -
(popular pet)
33 Like some
judgments
34 Place for a
checkered
career?
35 Strong second?
36 It's hard to live on
37 Rancho units
38 'Dance in the
Country' painter
39 Bit of raingear
40 Usher's request
42 Series
43 Buster, old-style
44 Declare
46 'The Dancing
Couple' painter
47 Get one's fill
48 Where Regulus
is
54 Tar Heel State
campus
55 Siberian
industrial center
56 Possible result of
a sacrifice
57 Wide, to Cicero
59 In harmony
62 Add more
ornaments to
63 As a preferred
alternative
65 Publicizes, in a
way
66 Some are mental
67 Vegetarian's
demand
68 Bearded leader
69 'The Westing
Game' author
Ellen-
70 Lose a lap?
71 Gain a lap?


77 Hosp. areas
78 Nurses
80 Source of sauce
or milk
81 Penny-pinching
82 Dramatic
beginning
83 Turndowns
85 Coffeecake
topping
87 Yip or yelp


88 Approaches
stealthily
91 --Gallery of
Immortals (Greek
pantheon)
92 "Generations of
healthy, happy
pets'sloganeer
93 Colder spots,
often
94 Canute expelled
him


95 A can of soda 109 All there
may have one ..-....


101 Fix
102 Flummoxed
103 Silk-stockings
104 Basic impulse
105 Hawk
106 Kiln output
107 Pool site, maybe
108 Nut, basically


11 U ilomng
111 Bring in
112 Cargo platform
113 John McCain,
once
116 Sweden's
capital?


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 950 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


woe.~
:. -. .,. .:, . .. + -- F r't'r'/;- t,' -.:.. : ,- .. .- +.. : -,+-., ..,. +. ,--.. .. ...._-., -.-.

RM5: ftL ; at ..-1 --"-,1-. .-.-.::."l---:; -'w"


tC


'-"T. *----.


TARA PLANTATION GARDENS -BR'2EA -rnd
,r-ar,: .7':.,rlrli..l ,a n ,i.ir:,.r, C l-TIi" 3, r:l :E r .l
,r ile qi 1-,i I r,, .cr1 ,-r l.1he .''.v' Ii.r iN ',',,
ti ir, F3:'1 l'.:'uu '-..'.,l,. nr ."._'.r.. M L'-:E t4'-.01


PALMA SOLA BAY C.uir, Anrnr +rle rl.cne 4 ,;,r
, 'BR 5 B" irree ii.inp lo....l i1e..-: ,r p.:.
lhreei--:ar garage A N Br ni. :r ir, .:,r, Ir ,:.il :.ub
',i.". OrC,] Ru.e ,: rr,,ni,.err ,79.:".. 1 r.LL I 4 i 7


IRONWOOD BEAUTY Imniaculaie end-uni lurrn-
ey' lufnir,-h-.rie A iare Ilrid viIh ii, *w: n laundr,, arid
IwO lull ralrs Acr,',s from ,gof pool. clubriouse
163.500 Snela Kidd 778-2261 MLS426.30


r
jat.~.


SLEEPY LAGOON PARK Lor,,tc.a.i Ke, l-iland
r,-i re ,:r, ..'. ler 3BR -' I.',,:-, .ar ar .e *:,pen
:'p.ll pidn Lw rg, ]arn.ai ,:,.. rrl,:,,:. 1: l ,Q,,:,
i C .: '"I0 Tcri, Ti.r-rini --P.'-7 1 r .lLS944252'




16
't f ..^ '-" -*i t


-'..."^ijga;, -i- .




PRICE REDUCED! Gredi l11rd Iocal,or, F,.e
.'.epariE ,",li'e:e Cr',l,r.- tuiljir,. I...r.i.. Ter i I, .jiE
i-rie i reretun C ll l.:r p rliCularc.:. '-" ii i)o
EB.:,re,.:-.Ci-a.i, "y.-z-'bl [.L'_: 't.Sn.4:



ANNUAL UNFURNISHED RENTALS

Bradenton Beach 2 -, c'.'ier'..e'.'

Lakebridge 3 2 2m '.la lake'.e.'i. r'c.:,rn-
munily pc',I01

SEASONAL RENTALS AVAILABLE
Call Missy Laps 778-9611
Toll Free 1-877-651-0123


HAWTHORrN PARK FdnidElic -IBR ivilri .-ri and tam.
,l rco-.n'i Brir.3 i,- I,.- z -ri.:,' The ,,:,'"I ,r' eir ul riCk ,r,
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SPECIAL SECTION: PREPARING FOR STORMS


Anna Maria




--e


SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30, 2000


saner


What you
can't see ...
Extreme storm situations
on Anna Maria Island
present roadway hazards
for drivers. Heavy rain,
accompanied by
washovers from the Gulf
leave the roads flooded
for hours and, as in this
case, the hazards are
sometimes invisible.
Drivers must also be
alertforfallen limbs,
debris and power lines.
And, the vehicle takes a
beating as a result of the
saltwater intrusion often
leaving motorists
t. :stranded. Emergency
*"' -officials urge residents
not to drive until the
roads are cleared of
standing water and other
hazards. Islander Photo:
Paul Roat



'Above average' storm season predicted for 2000


By Paul Roat
Hurricane experts predict an "above average
storm season for 2000, with I I named tropical
storms forming between June 1 and Nov. 30. Seven
of those storms are expected to reach 74 mph winds,
and three of the storms are predicted to be severe.
Dr. William Gray, a storm forecaster from Colo-
rado State University, bases his predictions on a va-
riety of weather conditions from around the globe.
Although still smarting from a botched prediction of
much more activity than actually occurred in 1997,
Gray is usually very accurate in his prognostications.
Among the things Gray and his team monitor to
make storm predictions are weather patterns in Africa.
When the region there is wetter than usual, hurricane
formation in the Atlantic is generally increased.
Another key element in Gray's forecast is water


temperatures off the United Kingdom and in the
western Pacific Ocean.
Gray said the North Atlantic was warmer in the
1950s and '60s, a period of time that saw more tropi-
cal storms in the Atlantic. Starting in the 1970s, the
water temperatures dropped, as did storm activity.
In the mid-1990s, though, the water began to
warm and storms began to form.
"It's shifting again," Gray said, "and we're en-
tering a higher mode of hurricane activity, especially
with major storms."
The prediction of 11 storms is judged to be
above average for the Atlantic and Caribbean; a typi-
cal year brings 9.3 tropical storms, 5.8 hurricanes
with 2.1 intense storms.
Florida's Gulf Coast faces a 34 percent probabil-
ity of one or more landfalling major hurricanes this


year, with the average being 30 percent.
Gray also predicts the 2000 season as having
hurricane formation earlier than in the past two
years.
Other factors Gray and his group take into ac-
count in the forecast include a high-pressure ridge
located near the Azores in the North Atlantic, tem-
perature and pressure readings in West Africa, Car-
ibbean sea-level pressure readings, temperature
readings about 54,000 feet above Singapore and
wind speed globally at about 40,000 feet.
The period between 1995-99 was the busiest
four-year period for hurricane activity on record.
Gray will issue another hurricane forecast for the
season June 7. His predictions may be accessed on
the Internet at:
www.colostate.edu/Depts/PR/releases/news/


Hurricane evacuation thnimes offer scary scenario


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
A Category 5 hurricane is bearing down on South-
west Florida with 160-mph winds and coastal residents
wonder when they should evacuate their homes.
The answer: Probably several clays before the
storm ever reaches Category 5 status, according to a
report by the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Coun-
cil.
The Tampa Bay region is twice as vulnerable to
hurricane storm surge than any other region in the
United States except Mobile Bay, Ala.
And as forecasters will tell you, storm surge is what
kills and does the most damage.
"Perhaps one of the most startling results of the
Tampa Bay Region Hurricane Evacuation Study 2000
was the recalculation of the evacuation clearance
times," the report states. "The evacuation clearance
times for this multi-regional evacuation are the highest
in the country."
So how long will it take to get away from a killer
storm?
The Council's report published in April lists sev-
eral possibilities depending on the severity of the storm.
During the smallest hurricane with winds 74 to 95
mph (storm surge 4-5 feet) it would take nine to 11
hours to get the 119,000 people off the barrier islands


and low-lying areas and move them inland.
Those times are just what it would take to get them
to the east part of the county.
Moving that same number of people out of the
county and to the north would take 12 1/2 hours.
In a Category 3 hurricane (111-130 mph, storm
surge nine to 12 feet), it would take 14 to 16 1/2 hours
to get folks to the highest parts of Manatee County. To
get them out of the county and to the north would take
22 hours.
In a Category 3 storm, the number of people or-
dered from their homes could reach 400,000 from


2000 hurricane namines

for the Atlantic Ocean:

Alberto Helene Oscar
Beryl Isaac Patty
Chris Joyce Rafael
Debby Keith Sandy
Ernesto Leslie Tony
Florence Michael Valerie
Gordon Nadine William


Charlotte to Manatee counties.
If the "Big One" comes and threatens a direct hit,
it would take almost 20 hours to evacuate the Sarasota
and Manatee county barrier islands and 36 hours to
evacuate Tampa Bay.
Should a Category 5 hurricane (winds more than
155 mph, mere than 18-foot storm surge) threaten
Southwest Florida and force the evacuation of all coun-
ties from Collier to Pasco, it could take 58 to 98 hours
to get everyone out.
The time difference depends on whether they re-
verse the lanes on Interstate 75.
Betti Johnson, a regional planner with the planning
council, said the possibility of giving people 98 hours
warning is next to nothing. And 58 hours is really push-
ing it.
She added that the problem with that picture is that
a four-day advance warning of a hurricane strike never
happens.
Because .of the erratic nature of a hurricane's
course, forecasters are lucky to predict where a hurri-
cane will go in a 48-hour period and even that predic-
tion is pushing the envelope of probability, Johnson
said.
"At 50 hours out," Johnson said, "a storm usually
isn't even in the Gulf of Mexico."
So when do you leave? Real, real early.






PAGE 2 M 2000 HURRICANE SPECrAL M THE ISLANDER


Hurricane forecasting still not exact science


By Paul Roat
Magic wands, crystal balls and animal entrails have
been replaced by airplanes, satellites and computer
models in forecasting the tracks of hurricanes.
But it's still not an exact science and, although
strides have been made in the past 20 years to predict
intensity and direction of storms, there's still room for
improvement. A lot of room.
That's the word from Max Mayfield, director of the
S National Hurricane Center.
S Mayfield said the center can predict a storm's in-
tensity between 20 to 22 niph 72 hours before it makes
landfall. That mile-per-hour difference is about the
same difference between storm categories as deter-
mined by the Saffir-Simpson Scale. In other words,
three days before landfall the hurricane center may
predict a Category 2 storm will hit when, at landfall, it
has become a Category 3 hurricane.
"We've made no significant improvements in our
intensity forecasts in the past few years," Mayfield
said.
The hurricane center is accurate to between 200-
225 miles in its predictions as to where a storm will
strike land at a 72-hour prediction, accurate to 100
miles at a 24-hour prediction, and accurate to 40 miles
at a 12-hour prediction.
That means that if a hurricane's landfall is forecast
on Anna Maria Island and evacuation orders are issued
24 hours before the predicted landfall, the actual storm
track could place landfall anywhere between Boca
Grande and New Port Richey.
"It's important to remember that there is wide-
spread rain and damage away from the skinny line of
a track," Mayfield said. "Some storms are 100 miles
across and have hurricane force winds many miles
away from the eye."
Mayfield said that despite computer models and
information gathered from sea buoys and airplanes that
fly into a storm, sometimes the forecasts and the path
of a hurricane don't jibe at all.
A good example was last year's Hurricane Harvey.
It was targeted to hit just north of Tampa Bay at 10 p.m.
Sept. 20. All the computer models were in agreement
with the exception of one model, which called for the
storm to dramatically turn south and enter the Florida
Straits.
At midnight, the storm turned south, just as that
lone model predicted, and the Tampa Bay area was
spared.
Although Islanders have much to fear from storm
surge, the biggest killer in hurricanes nationwide is
inland flooding, Mayfield said.
Storm surge is basically a huge dome of seawater
that rises and inundates coastal areas. Storm surge dur-


A wvet, slow time of it
Street flooding is only one of the problems Islanders face when hurricanes approach -forecasts are still.not
an exact science and landfall and intensity still imprecise, according the National Hurricane Center officials.


Islander Photo: Paul Roat

ing a Category 5 hurricane with winds in excess of 150
mph is 15 feet. Add whatever height the waves would
be and expect the Island to be inundated with ravaging
saltwater.
Mayfield said 59 percent of the people killed in
hurricanes are inland dwellers, who drown. Those sta-
tistics are nationwide, Mayfield added. "The greatest
threat in this state is storm surge."
Mayfield said the state and nation are due for
greater hurricane activity in the next 20 years.
"People tend to confuse memory with history," he
said. "For example, in Palm Beach, there have been no
storms in the past 50 years. In the 50 years preceding
that time, though, Palm Beach had six hurricanes."
The core issue behind hurricane forecasts is to provide
emergency managers with information to determine
when, or if, evacuation of residents to safer areas is
needed. Hurricane evacuation has been under scrutiny in
Florida for the past year after Hurricane Floyd took a bee-
line on Southeast Florida, then swooped up the eastern
seaboard to make landfall in South Carolina.
"Our computer models said it would go up the
coast starting at Cape Canaveral," Mayfield said, "and
it would have gone up the coast like a weedeater. Then
the models indicated it would stay offshore. We were
pretty sure the later models were right, but we just
couldn't take the chance and evacuation orders were


issued."
Floyd's threat caused the largest evacuation in the
country's history. More than 2 million people left their
homes. At Oak Island, N.C., 240 homes were destroyed
when Floyd eventually made landfall.
"Our greatest fear is if an evacuation order is issued
people may be stuck in their cars in a traffic jam when
the storm hits," Mayfield said. "Our second worst
nightmare is if people don't leave the coastal areas
because they are afraid of being stuck in their cars, and
the storm hits them in low-lying homes."
Mayfield said one of the concerns that meteorolo-
gists have discovered in the past few years has been
changes in wind speed at differing altitudes.-
"You can have a Category 4 storm at the surface,
but at 300 or 400 feet it can be a strong Category 5
storm," Mayfield said. "There can be tremendous dam-
age to the higher floors of some of the taller buildings
in metropolitan areas. The solution is that we need to
build better and stronger buildings."
Although forecasting is far from an exact science,
Mayfield said improvements are being made. A new
hurricane hunter aircraft will take to the skies this year
with better instrumentation to gather better readings in
storms, and new satellites have been launched to pro-
vide more information about hurricanes.
"I believe we can continue to improve," he said.


One-way interstates proposed to accelerate evacuations


By Paul Roat
The pictures told the story: Interstate 10 in
Florida's Panhandle gridlocked leading from Jackson-
ville to Tallahassee as coastal residents attempted to
flee Hurricane Floyd last year. What would normally
be a three-hour trip took upwards of 19 hours.
Those pictures prompted Florida Gov. Jeb Bush to
form the Statewide Evacuation Task Force. Walter
Revell was named chair of the group and charged to
come up with ways to improve the hurricane evacua-


If the Island is
evacuated again, "
as happened in L
1998 with Hurri-
cane Georges,
Islanders may be
able to go the
"wrong" way on
parts of the
interstate system to
flee from the
storms. Islander
Photo: Bonner
Futch


tion process.
Revell is the former head of the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation. Other members of the group
included representatives from all branches of law en-
forcement, the military, Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs, chambers of commerce, emergency
managers and builders.
"There are 15,510,000 Floridians today," Revell
said. "They all need to be prepared to evacuate if a
hurricane threatens. Thirty-five of Florida's 67 coun-


ties are coastal counties, and everyone lives within 100
miles of a coast."
The group's recommendations include transform-
ing seven of the state's interstates into massive one-
way roads to accelerate the evacuation process "only
under the most dire conditions, like the threat of a Cat-
egory 4 or 5 storm," Revell said.
Also being investigated is improving the shoulders
of interstates to allow cars to travel there. "Improved
shoulders can improve evacuation times by 40 per-
cent," he said.
The state is currently modeling the roadways to
determine feasibility of one-way highways. Tests along
I-10 have proven that the road can be prepared for one-
way traffic in less than four hours, he said, and that time
should decrease as problems are solved.
One issue raised by the one-way plan is the mas-
sive manpower required from law enforcement agen-
cies to aid motorists literally driving on the wrong side
of the street. The manpower need is so great that it is
feared law enforcement personnel on non-interstate
roads would be greatly diminished.
Revell said the key to the task force plans is "com-
munication, co-operation and co-ordination."
Current Florida Department of Transportation Sec-
retary Tom Barry echoed Revell's comments.
"We can turn the interstates into one-way roads,
but only with the understanding that it will take place
under only the most dire circumstances."





THE ISLANDER M 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 PAGE 3

Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island


Hurricanes are categorized based on the power of the
storms. Storm categories allow emergency management
officials to determine time and need of evacuation.
The Manatee County Emergency Management
Division notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
more water."
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely dif-
ficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 mph -
24 mph less than even a Category 1 storm.
There's also a good chance officials will be forced
to close the bridges to vehicles trying to evacuate Anna
Maria Island when sustained winds reach 35 mph -
less than hurricane force. That's another reason Island
residents should plan to evacuate early.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale," called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, to
assign storms into five categories. Rated from least to
most powerful, the five categories and damage poten-
tial are detailed below.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to shrub-
bery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile homes. Some
damage may occur to poorly constructed signs. Storm
surge is expected to be four to five feet above normal.
Flooding is expected on barrier islands. Low-lying coastal
roads may be inundated. Expect minor pier damage and
small craft to be torn from exposed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in damage.
Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category 1 storm, caus-
ing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage, mostly to cen-
tral Florida. Also, Hurricane Allison and Hurricane Noel
of 1995 were Category 1 hurricanes at peak intensity.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-
structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and


doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to
piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
ages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight feet
above normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage. Also, hurricanes Erin and Marilyn in
1995 were both Category 2 hurricanes when Erin's
eyewall hit the Florida Panhandle coast and when
Marilyn passed through the Virgin Islands.

Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will topple.
Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
down. Expect structural damage to small buildings.
Many mobile homes may be destroyed.. Storm surge
nine to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along
barrier islands and coastal areas. Large exposed build-
ings will be damaged, and smaller structures will be
destroyed by wave action and floating debris.
Low-lying escape routes will be cut off by rising
water three to five hours before the arrival of the hur-
ricane center. Terrain continuously lower than five feet
above mean sea level may be flooded inland to a dis-
tance of eight or more miles.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.
Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm,
killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in damage
to eastern Caribbean islands. That same year spawned
Hurricane Roxanne as a Category 3 storm at landfall on
the Yucatan Peninsula.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.
Terrain lower than 10 feet above sea level may be


flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential
areas as far inland as six miles.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Donna.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sustained
winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than 175 mph.
More than 60,000 homes were destroyed, 200,000 people
left homeless, more than 2 million people evacuated, 15
people died and damage was estimated at $20 billion.
Hurricane Andrew was the third most intense hurricane
this century, and caused the greatest loss of property of any
hurricane in the United States.
Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4 storm,
killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in damage, mostly
in the Panhandle, although some damage occurred on
Anna Maria Island as the storm tracked to the north. Also
in that year, Hurricane Luis was a Category 4 hurricane
while moving over the Leeward Islands, as was Hurricane
Felix. Last year's Hurricane Georges was at one point a
Category 4 storm, killing more than 500 people and caus-
ing more than $2 billion in damage.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
There will be major damage to lower floors of all
structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and
within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation
of residential areas on low ground within 10 miles of
the shoreline may be required.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane. Hurricane Gilbert
of 1988 was a Category 5 hurricane at peak intensity.
Hurricane Mitch was a Category 5 hurricane, and
was the third-deadliest storm on record, with more than
10,000 deaths in Central America.


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PAGE 4 K 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER


Living in a post0isastr world on Anna Maria Island
living in a post-disaster world on An Maria Island


"When life gives you lemons, make lemonade."
By Paul Roat
"There is little doubt about it sooner or later,
another big hurricane will come. Atmospheric scien-
tists and emergency planners agree that it's just a mat-
ter of time before some portion of Florida is struck by
another catastrophic hurricane.
"No one knows when or where it will strike, but we
do know that eventually it will blast ashore somewhere
and cause massive destruction perhaps even greater
than that caused by Hurricane Andrew. Since there is
nothing anyone can do to alter that foreboding reality,
the question is: Are we ready for the next great hurri-
cane?"
That passage is from Jay Barnes' book, "Florida's
Hurricane History." Unfortunately, his assessment is
true, especially for residents of Anna Maria Island.
Islanders have been spared the direct hit of a hur-
ricane in recent history. Historically, five hurricanes
passed across the Island, one of the worst in October
1921. That storm turned the area north of Pine Avenue
in Anna Maria into a shallow sandbar. Today, that's the
largest land area of the city. Passage Key, just north of
the Island, once had a fishing village and freshwater
lake. After the storm, and even today, the wildlife sanc-
tuary of Passage Key is little more than a sandbar.
That storm was a moderate Category 1 hurricane,
with winds of about 100 mph. Imagine what a Category
5 storm with 150 mph winds would do.
Damage would be in the tens of millions of dollars
if a major storm made landfall on the Island. If evacu-
ation orders are not heeded, the damage through loss of
life would be horrible.
But the challenge will come through redevelop-
ment. Do Islanders want to rebuild the Island as it looks
today, or is there a better way to live on this narrow
strip of sand?
Those questions have been partially answered in
the "Islandwide Post-Disaster Redevelopment Plan for
Anna Maria Island," prepared by the Tampa Bay Re-
gional Planning Council.
The plan is the result of hundreds of hours of
elected and appointed officials, staff members and citi-
zens peering into crystal balls in an attempt to come up
with some vision of the Island in the literal wake of a
hurricane.
Taking into account existing land uses and poten-
tial redevelopment, transportation, drainage, and other
issues, officials have produced a document that will
serve as a springboard for rebuilding the Island.

After the storm
When winds have abated and water has receded,
post-disaster planning begins. There are three stages to
this process:
Immediate emergency period. Debris will be


Knotty marine problem
Although this boat owner faced a dilemma after Hurricane Josephine brushed the Island in 1996, the real
problem all Islanders will face will be the cleanup after "the big one" comes. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


cleared, search and rescue operation undertaken and an
initial assessment of damages to the Island will take
place. This process is expected to take several days.
Short-range restoration period. Minor or moder-
ately damaged structures may be repaired plus damage
assessment of all buildings. This process is expected to
take several weeks or months.
Long-range reconstruction period. This period
will allow for full restoration of services, reconstruc-
tion of all structures, and total infrastructure repair.
This process could take several years.

Crystal ball time
Although the post-disaster redevelopment plan
offers a broad brush approach to rebuilding the Island,
it also offers some "opportunities" for making things
better than today. Among the thoughts to be considered
are the following.
Consider the overall redevelopment of the Island,
rather than just one community or one neighborhood.
Consider compatibility when redevelopment oc-
curs. One ground-level house in a neighborhood of stilt
homes is an example of an incompatible neighborhood.
With widespread destruction comes an opportu-


nity to rid the Island of exotic plant species such as
Brazilian pepper and Australian pine trees and replace
the non-native species with traditional Florida plants.
Development of an Islandwide bicycle and pedes-
trian pathway should be considered.
With massive property loss comes an opportunity
to acquire sensitive lands for the public. While officials
in all three Island cities agreed not to use municipal
funds for such acquisition, state or federal funds could
be used to add more public beach or bay access.

A look ahead
Here's an interesting footnote to post-disaster plan-
ning from the Virgin Islands.
In 1995, Hurricane Marilyn struck the Caribbean
island, killing 11 people and causing $1.2 billion in
damage. Islanders repaired their homes, businesses and
resorts.
In 1998, Hurricane Georges struck the Virgin Is-
lands. This time, though, no one was killed, and dam-
age was estimated at $55 million. The difference was
stringent building codes enacted after the 1995 storm
that ensured stronger and safer new homes better able
to withstand another storm.


C'ive me shelter fi'om the storm off the Island


Oops
Unlike the boater at the top of this page whose
boat was buried under a tree this Islander's
marine problem is literally up in the air. Islander
Photo.: Banner Futch


Shelters openings are dependent on level of evacu-
ation. Some shelters open earlier than others to accom-
modate the earliest evacuees, those from mobile homes
and "level A" evacuation areas, which includes all of
Anna Maria Island.
Shelter locations are subject to change and there-
fore, residents must heed the advisories from local
emergency managers.
Manatee County shelter locations:
Abel Elementary, 710 Madonna Place,
Bradenton.
Bashaw Elementary, 3515 Morgan Johnson
Road, Bradenton.
Blackburn Elementary, 3904 17th St. E., Pal-
metto.
Braden River Elementary, 6125, River Club
Blvd., Bradenton.
Braden River Middle, 6125, River Club Blvd.,
Bradenton.
Daughtrey Elementary, 515 63rd Ave. E.,
Bradenton.-. .. .


Harlee Middle, 6423 Ninth St. E., Bradenton.
Johnson Middle, 2121 26th Ave. E., Bradenton.
Lakewood Ranch High, 5500 Lakewood Ranch
Blvd., Bradenton.
Manatee Community College, 5840 26th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Manatee High, 1000 32nd St. W., Bradenton.
Manatee Technical Institute, 5603 34th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Oneco Elementary, 2000 53rd Ave. E.,
Bradenton.
Sea Breeze Elementary, 3601 71st St. W.,
Bradenton.
Southeast High, 1200 37th Ave. E., Bradenton.
Tillman Elementary, 1415 29th St. E., Palmetto.
Wakeland Elementary, 1812 27th St. E.,
Bradenton.
Gene Witt Elemmentary, 200 Rye Road E.,
Bradenton.
A special needs shelter is located at Moody El-
ementary School, 5425 38th Ave. W., Bradenton.






THE ISLANDER M 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 PAGE 5


Regulations, insurance, building advice to consider


The onset of hurricane season brings up an onslaught
bof insurance fever for many barrier island residents.
Perhaps angst is a better term, as many residents
often have too little or outdated insurance for their
.homes and belongings.
Remember your new computer? That new addition
to your house? Chances are you haven't modified your
insurance policies to reflect new purchases and, in the
event of a loss, only minimum amounts may be paid for
your new acquisitions.
Insurance is basically the transfer of risk. For a small
premium, you transfer the risk for a larger loss to an in-
surance company. Even if your insurance cost is very high
- say $1,000 a year you would have to pay the pre-
miums for 100 years before you would approach the re-
placement value of an average Island home.
Insurance agents advise all property owners to re-
view their insurance policies annually to make sure the
coverage is adequate. A premium increase of a few
dollars a year could mean savings of tens of thousands
of dollars if your home is destroyed.
You don't want to pay more in premiums? Insur-
ance agents offer a cost-cutting suggestion by increas-
ing the amount of the deductible you would pay after
a loss.
Another strong suggestion insurance carriers make
is to photograph your home and belongings. Many
times both proof of purchase and value are required and
a photograph or video of your home, inside and out,
will take care of those requirements.

Post-Andrew insurance changes
Insurance providers in Florida have been rocked in
the wake of Hurricane Andrew's 1992 landfall south of
Miami. An estimated $20 billion in damage resulted
from the storm; insurance carriers paid out more than
$16.5 billion.
Many insurance companies went out of business or
left Florida after Andrew, financially unable to with-
stand the cost demanded by policyholders in the wake
of the destruction.
Many companies have limited the number of poli-


cies written in high-hazard, flood- and wind-prone ar-
eas such as barrier islands. Some customers have had
their policies canceled because the damage risk was
deemed too great from actuarial standards.
Very few insurance companies will write new
homeowner policies for houses within 1,000 feet of the
water most of Anna Maria Island.
In an effort to provide insurance to all, former
Florida Insurance Commissioner Tom Gallagher insti-
tuted an insurance "pool." The Florida Residential
Property and Casualty Joint Underwriters Association
allows agents to continue to write policies. The com-
panies pay out of the pool the amount of money they
have in coverage -for a region of the state after a hurri-
cane or other disaster.
Although the state insurance pool has only been in
existence for a few years, it currently is one of the larg-
est insurers in Florida, accepting properties other insur-
ance companies deem too risky.
The days of "one-stop shopping" for insurance
appear to have ended for most Florida homeowners.
Besides the state insurance pool, carriers have also
pooled coverage for wind and flood damage.
But even with the new insurance pool, state offi-
cials have agreed that if an intense hurricane strikes a
highly populated area with a large number of homes,
insurance claims would decimate the state insurance
pool because it will take several more years to build up
enough financial reserve to handle a big hit.
If Andrew had swerved a little more to the north,
striking Miami or Fort Lauderdale instead of Home-
stead, upwards of $50 billion in damages would have
occurred, hurricane experts conclude.

Federal intervention, too
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is
also involved in hurricanes, both before and after the
fact.
FEMA has imposed strict guidelines for home con-
struction and reconstruction. The most apparent of the
FEMA rules governs home repair in high-hazard areas,
such as barrier islands. If you plan to remodel your


home at more than half of its appraised value, you will
have to meet current FEMA regulations regarding el-
evation and construction.
FEMA rules are designed to offset the massive
amounts of money the federal government would have
to pay for repairs in an area struck by a natural disas-
ter. Unfortunately, the rules also strike at social struc-
tures of neighborhoods. Many land planners criticize
FEMA for disrupting neighborhoods by forcing some
houses to loom over older homes.
"How can an area retain its residential character
when some residents have huge, elevated "skyscrap-
ers" looking down upon their neighbors?" is the ques-
tion many architects and planners ask.

Home construction, redesign can help
National Hurricane Center officials have pointed
out that many home builders do not take natural con-
ditions into account when they construct houses in
high-hazard areas.
Wind and flooding are two of the biggest problems
residents face in Florida during hurricanes. Flooding
can be alleviated by elevating the house, as is required
for new construction according to FEMA standards.
But building a house to withstand high winds is
often ignored by builders. Eves, gables and porticos
become wind traps during hurricanes by funneling
wind, often causing massive destruction.
The solution: hurricane shutters, reinforced doors
and internal barricades on garage doors.
Straps and clips to affix trusses firmly to beams are
sometimes omitted by builders, although the expense
of the straps and clips adds only a few dollars to the
overall cost of the house.
Garage doors are a special problem. Due to the size
of the door and often-flimsy construction, a garage door
will buckle before any other part of a house. Once the
wind gets in, the rest of the home's integrity is compro-
mised.
Bracing the door from the inside will increase the
structural strength of the garage door and help protect
the rest of the house.


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Member SIPC 1997 A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc.






PAGE 6 0 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER


our 28th Year
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THE ISLANDER 0 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 PAGE 7 "*


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AND ASSOCIATES INC.
Accounting Bookkeeping
Year-Round Tax Service
Accounting Services Payroll & Payroll Taxes
Financial Statements Income Tax Preparation
Secretarial Services Electronic Filing
Ben Cooper, E.A.
3909 E. Bay Drive, Suite 110 Holmes Beach
(941) 778-6118
Fax (941) 778-6230 Pager 1-800-940-9271
email: bcooper@coastalweb.net


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Serving the Beaches Since 1978


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HOME
HARDWARE '(

LIST OF SUPPLIES
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:
Q Lanterns & Fuel Q Hand Tools
" Flashlights Q Non-electric can
Q Batteries openers
Q Candles Q Portable Radios
Q Tapes Q Coolers
Q Plastic Bags 0 Propane Cylinders
Q Nails for Stoves & Grills
When preparing for a storm, come in and we'll
help you with all the supplies you need.
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 8 to 6 Sunday 10 to 4






PAGE 8 M 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER

Here's a hurricane checklist to get you ready for the worst


If a hurricane strikes the coast of Southwest
Florida, expect to be away from home if there is a
home to come back to for at least three days. Maybe
a week, or longer.
There won't be power, water, telephones, ice or an
open convenience store nearby. You'll need to stock up
on what you need to survive and wait it out.
Here's a list of items experts suggest you have to
weather a storm, in no particular order.
* Fire extinguisher.
* Clean containers to store water, one gallon per
person per day.
* Food, canned or dry.
* Manual can opener.
* Hand tools: hammer, nails, ax, knife, pliers, hand-
saw, screwdrivers.
* Electric drill with screwdriver bits to install bolts
for window protection.
* Unscented bleach to purify water (eight drops per


gallon).
* Soap.
* One flashlight per person with spare batteries.
* Battery-operated radio.
* First-aid kit: bandages, gauze, scissors, petroleum
jelly, antiseptic spray, hydrogen peroxide, antacids,
aspirin, thermometer, rubbing alcohol.
* Extra prescription medicine.
* Matches, preferably wooden.
* Disposable eating utensils and plates.
* Toilet paper.
* Mosquito repellent.

Below are some things that will prove useful, but
are deemed not to be essential.
* Gallon-size plastic freezer bags to fill with water
to make ice.
* Needle and thread.
* Whistle and air horn.


Disinfectant.
Grill or Sterno stove with extra fuel.
Oven mitts.
Lantern with extra fuel.
Garbage bags.
Rope or heavy cord, 100 feet.
Tarpaulin to make temporary roof repairs.


Here are some tips to prepare your boat for storms:
* Double check the bilge pump operation.
* Make sure the battery is fully charged.
* Allow sufficient dock line for extremely high tides.
* Check that your boat lift is high enough.
* Remove the drain plug if the boat is on a trailer.

And finally, here are two items classed as "luxu-
ries."
* Chainsaw and extra fuel.
* Backup generator and extra fuel.


Storm surge spells

submergence

for Island
Storm surge is a "dome" of water that
sweeps ahead of the center of a hurricane. The
storm surge can inundate the Island and cause
massive, devastating destruction to property
and lives of those who have elected to weather
a hurricane in their storms.


Fido, Fluffy

need not

apply for

hIurricane

shelter

athnission
Hurricane shelter offi-
cials prohibit pets in shel-
ters. Make plans now to
board or kennel Fido or
Fluffy on the mainland, or
find a friend that will take
care of the pets during the
storm.


How hurricanes

came to be named
Andrew, Hugo and Camille are common names to
hurricane watchers, but the naming of storms is a rela-
tively new aspect in the science of studying whirly
weather.
An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge, was
the first to use female names in describing tropical
storms in the late 1800s, although he also named sev-
eral after politicians whom he particularly disliked.
Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up the prac-
tice during World War II, naming storms after their
wives and girlfriends.
In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
designate storms, using common military titles of Able,
Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, female
names became the norm, with the first two hurricanes
dubbed Alice and Barbara.
Complaints poured into the Weather Bureau
from women upset that they alone were being
singled out in describing wicked weather, but the
practice continued until 1978, when hurricanes in the
eastern Pacific were alternately named for men and
women. In 1979, Atlantic hurricanes followed suit
with Hurricane Bob the first "male" storm.
Six bisexual lists of hurricane names were devel-
oped by the World Meteorological Organization. The
names were Short, easy-to-remember and used names
from three languages: English, French and Spanish.
The lists are repeated every six years, although the
names of killer storms are retired from use.


SStorm boat tips
i Protect your boat during a hurricane by
~,,having plenty of line to tie the vessel to the dock
<:A',, \l geaif you can't get it out of the water. Remove all
gear from above deck.
, Don't plan to stay on the boat during the
blow. Check your insurance policy to make sure
you have adequate coverage in case the worst
happens.


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THE ISLANDER 0 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL M PAGE 9

Hlturrieanes: what they are, how they form, what they mean


By U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Weather Service
American Red Cross
There are no other storms on earth like hurricanes.
Hurricanes are products of the tropical ocean and
atmosphere. Powered by heat from the sea, they are
steered by the easterly trade winds and the temperate
westerlies as well as by their own ferocious energy.
Around the hurricane's core, winds grow with great
velocity, and generate violent seas.
Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while
spawning tornadoes and producing torrential rains and
floods.
Timely warnings have greatly diminished hurri-
cane fatalities in the United States. In spite of this early
warning system, property damage continues to mount.
There is little we can do about the hurricanes them-
selves. However, the National Hurricane Center and
the National Weather Service field offices team up with
other federal, state and local agencies, rescue and re-
lief organizations, the private sector and the media in
a huge warning and preparedness effort.

Where they start, how they grow
In the eastern Pacific Ocean, hurricanes begin
forming by mid-May. In the Atlantic Ocean, the Car-
ibbean and the Gulf, hurricane development starts in
June. For the United States, the peak hurricane threat
exists from mid-August to late October, although the
official hurricane season extends through November.
In other parts of the world, such as the western Pacific,
hurricanes can occur year-round.
Developing hurricanes gather heat and energy
through contact with warm ocean waters. The addition
of moisture by evaporation from the sea surface pow-
ers them like giant heat engines.
The process by which a disturbance forms and sub-
sequently strengthens into a hurricane depends on at
least three conditions.
Warm waters and moisture are two conditions. The
third is a wind pattern near the ocean surface that spi-
rals air inward. Bands of thunderstorms form, allowing
the air to warm further and rise higher into the atmo-
sphere. If the winds at these higher levels are relatively
light, this structure can remain intact and allow for
additional strengthening.
The center, or eye, of a hurricane is relatively calm.
The most violent activity takes place in the area imme-
diately around the eye, called the eyewall. At the top
of the eyewall about 50,000 feet most of the air
is propelled outward, increasing the air's upward mo-
tion. Some of the air, however, moves inward and sinks
into the eye, creating a cloud-free area.

What hurricanes can spaiwn
Storm surge is a large dome of water, often 50 to
100 miles wide, that sweeps across the coastline near
where a hurricane makes landfall. The surge of high
water, topped by waves, can be devastating.
The stronger the hurricane and the shallower the
offshore water, the higher the surge will be. Along the
immediatecoast, storm surge is the greatest threat to
life and property.
If the storm surge arrives at the same time as high


Here's a sign that tells it all. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


tide, the water height will be even greater. The storm
tide is the combination of the storm surge and the nor-
mal astronomical tide.
Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can de-
stroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes.
Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and
small items left outside, become missiles in hurricanes.
Winds often stay above hurricane strength well in-
land. Hurricane Hugo in 1989 battered Charlotte, N.C.,
with gusts of near 100 mph about 175 miles inland
from the Atlantic causing massive destruction.
Widespread torrential rains, often in excess of six
inches, can produce deadly and destructive floods.
Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 brought 45 inches of
rain to an area near Alvin, Texas. Long after Hurricane
Diane subsided in 1955, the storm brought floods to
Pennsylvania, New York and New England that con-
tributed to nearly 200 deaths. And Hurricane Agnes
fused with another storm system in 1972, producing
floods in the northeast which contributed to 122 deaths.
Hurricanes also produce tornadoes, which add to
the hurricane's destructive power. These tornadoes
most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in rain
bands well away from the center of the hurricane. How-
ever, they can also occur near the eyewall.

Our" problem
All Atlantic and Gulf coastal areas are subject to
hurricanes or tropical storms. Although rarely struck by
hurricanes, parts of southwestern United States and the
Pacific Coast suffer heavy rains and floods each year
from the remnants of hurricanes spawned off Mexico.
Due to the limited number of evacuation routes,
barrier islands are especially vulnerable to hurricanes.
People on barrier islands and in coastal areas may be
asked by local officials to evacuate well in advance of
a hurricane's landfall. If you are asked to evacuate, do
so immediately.
The nation has a significant hurricane problem.


Our shorelines attract large numbers of people. From
Maine to Texas, our coastline is filled with new homes,
condominiums and cities built on sand waiting for the
next storm to threaten its residents and their dreams.
There are now more than 45 million permanent resi-
dents along the hurricane-prone coastline, and the popu-
lation is growing. Florida, where hurricanes are most fre-
quent, leads the nation in new residents. In addition to the
permanent residents, the holiday, weekend and vacation
populations swell in some coastal areas 100-fold.
A large portion of the coastal areas with high popu-
lation densities are subject to inundation from the
hurricane's storm surge that historically caused the
greatest loss of life and extreme property damage.
During the past few years, the warning system has
provided adequate time for people on barrier islands and
the immediate coastline to move inland when hurricanes
have threatened. However, it is becoming more difficult
to evacuate people from high-hazard areas because roads
have not kept pace with the rapid population growth.
The problem is further compounded by the fact that
80 to 90 percent of people living in hurricane-prone ar-
eas have never experienced the power of a major hur-
ricane. Many of these people have been through weaker
storms, producing a false impression of a hurricane's
damage potential. This impression often leads to com-
placency and delayed actions which could result in the
loss of many lives.
During the 1970s and 19g0s, major hurricanes
striking the United States were less frequent than the
previous three decades. With the tremendous increase
in population along the high-risk areas of our shore-
lines, we may not fare as well in the future. The dan-
ger potential will be especially high when hurricane
activity inevitably returns to the frequencies experi-
enced during the 1950s.
In the final analysis, the only real defense against
hurricanes is the informed readiness of.your commu-
nity, your family, and you.


ANNA MARIAISAN




formerly Island Package Liquor

Convenient Location Best selection


B reeze in after the storm.

We've made it -

now celebrate!



Open 7 days: Mon Sat 10am 9 pm Sun 10-8
5508 Marina Drive 778-2507


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Mon Fri, 8:30 am 5:30 pm 383-8989 Fax 383-8534
It's not what we do, it's how we do it TM


m mmm


w mB E^





PAGE 10 0 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER

Trains, planes, even cows benefit frc


By Jim Hanson
Islander correspondent
The phenomenon that makes locomotive horns
sound funny when they go by is the same one that
warns us of stormy weather.
Put in terms less nostalgic, the same principle
lets police nail you for speeding.
It's the Doppler effect, by which sound waves
seem to change frequency as the source approaches
and departs. It has charmed generations of kids
standing along railroad tracks listening to the
engine's whistle change as it speeds past. Sound
waves compress as they travel ahead of the horn,
Stretch as they linger behind it.
It has been applied to radar for several years,
such as a police speed gun. Like most technology,
radar gets more and more sophisticated and versatile.

Top of the line
The newest of the new is the National Weather
Service's new radar line centered at Ruskin.
The first Doppler in the area was installed at
WTVT-Channel 13 in Tampa, putting it into service
in 1988. The system at Ruskin has been descripted
as "the most sophisticated in the world."
Radar has been around since World War II. It
sends out radio waves which bounce off objects and
back into the radar receiver with information which







^^ j^


operators translate into pictures that are clear to
them.
That was a giant step for finding and tracking ob-
jects in the atmosphere. It was a tremendous boon to
meteorologists, but it was limited.
Now Doppler has taken radar another step, as de-
scribed by Dan Sobien, National Weather Service
meteorologist at Ruskin. Measuring the return sig-
nals, he says, the complex equipment shows almost
instantly and from miles away which way a storm is
moving, how fast, how much rain it is dropping
in what size droplets, whether it has hail, how
strong its winds and from what direction,
whether they are rotating as in tornado.
Although storms "are like people, no two
alike," the new system gives weather experts a
better handle on storms with "more and much bet-
ter information than we've ever had," he says.

Bring in the cows
"We can track over river basins and
see if there is danger of a flood,"
SSobien says. "We can let a
farmer know an hour ahead
"-- -- of a storm to get his cattle
-- off a flood plain."


im Doppler radar
And aviation, which has been the
^ principal beneficiary of radar since its
.- inception, benefits again from Dop-
J f pler. "The Weather Service does all
aviation forecasting, although major
S airlines have their own weather de-
apartments too," says Sobien.
pAs for maritime weather, the
Ruskin station's "warning area" is
50 miles out into the Gulf of
Mexico, with a marine forecast
good for 50 miles offshore plus a
high seas forecast. Next year its
range will double to 100 miles.
Former Channel 13 meteorologist Roy Leep re-
calls just how handy Doppler is by citing Hurricane
Andrew, the South Florida killer of 1992. His radar
machinery is mounted 200 feet above the ground, he
said, and it picked up Andrew when the storm was
still in the Bahamas.
When Andrew's winds destroyed Miami radar
and cut off communication with Key West's, Leep's
remained the only land-based radar able to hang onto
the storm as it crossed Florida and moved up the
Gulf.


6915 Manatee Ave West 794-5700


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THE ISLANDER M 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 8 PAGE 11


Leave when they say and avoid becoming a statistic


By Paul Roat
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Andrew or Opal and every Islander has a
story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get away from
the flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch
the storm-driven waves crash through the broken
glass fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach. The waves crested somewhere
inside the building and washed onto the road in a
rush of swirling water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going
out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One
more inch and it would have been inside the house
- and this was a storm that no one expected to
amount to anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on
the Island. And therein lies the biggest problem
we've got to face when not if, but when South-
west Florida's own version of Hurricane Andrew
comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playingLotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is not
meant for humans in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their version of Hell,
Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20 bil-
lion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and 15 dead are
a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Closer to our Gulffront homes, Hurricane Opal


~-~'--.-
-' .:
1~.


High and (h7dry
This boat owner found out what happens when the water rises during a storm. Islander Photo: Banner Futch


cleared a swath of shoreline in the Panhandle in
1995.
And we all remember the fright Hurricane Georges
gave us two years ago when we realized for the first
time in a long time what it was like to pack up every-
thing and head to high ground, thankfully to return
home to find virtually no damage.
.Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, belongings and price-
less mementos of 10, 20 or 50 years are scattered across
what's left of the neighborhood.


But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best retort for anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of their closest kin, so they can
be contacted to identify the remains.
When hurricane evacuation orders come to this
part of the coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.


mum amluiulmuiumuiguuiuiuiuuuluuuuiuiuuiuiuluuuu

We'd love to mail


you the news!

We mail The Islander weekly for a nominal $36 per year. It's the per-
Sfct way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
SMore than 1,200 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid subscribers are already
Receiving The Islander where they live ... from Alaska to Germany and
SCalifornia to Canada.
S We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
State transactions ... everything you need if your "heart is on the Island." We're
Sthe only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
S The Islander is distributed free locally. But if you don't live here year-
Sround, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please use
This form.

BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
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IdTl e Islander
Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217

ISA CHARGE IT BY PHONE:
- (941) 778-7978
ill*i tiiU~lllllllllll~ll


PUBLIC NOTICE
EVACUATION & RE-ENTRY
RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation needs, medical problems
or need transportation off the island, you need to be registered.
BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on Anna Maria Island that
provides essential materials or services to the community you may be
given preferential return privileges after a hurricane evacuation. Submit
a request to your CITY HALL. If approved, you will receive a letter
authorizing your early return. Your request should include a list of
employees you would need to return early.
EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on or off the island, they must
have written authorization from your CITY HALL to come on the
island to work after a hurricane evacuation.
To register, or for further information call your City Hall.
Anna Maria City Hall............. 708-6130
Bradenton Beach City Hall .... 778-1005
Holmes Beach City Hall......... 708-5800


Register special needs now

I The Anna Maria/West Manatee Fire District is seeking written notice from I
Islanders who may need special assistance in the event of a hurricane
evacuation.
I The information requested includes: '"
Date.................................. Phone .........................................................
N a meI......................................................................................................
SName ...........................................................................
Island A address .......................................................................................
II
S Type of assistance needed.................................................................
..............................................................................I.
II
(Explain what your situation is and what type of assistance you will need.)
I Please mail or deliver the form to:
Anna Maria Fire District
I 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
L-.. .-----. ---.-.---.. J






PAGE 12 0 2000 HURRICANE SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER


JESSIE'S
ISLAND STORE

CONVENIENCE
DELI GAS
778-6903
5424 Marina Dr.












HOLMES BEACH

POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
708-5804
DISPATCH
If you need further
information call
708-5800
ADMINISTRATION


EVERYTHING
UNDER THE SUN
GarJeh Cqztre

PRE-STORM TIPS
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pl2%hts & gaskets
Secure i "u trees
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Right now
Before hurricane season you should:
Enter hurricane season prepared. Recheck
your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perish-
able foods and other equipment you'll need to se-
cure your home and prepare yourself for evacua-
tion from the area, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival
Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a
two-week supply); special dietary foods that are
non-perishable; blankets, pillows, and sleeping
bags; flashlight and lots of batteries; portable ra-
dio and lots of batteries; extra clothing; lightweight
folding chairs, cots; personal items; infant neces-
sities; quiet games or favorite toys for children;
important papers; and snacks.
Develop a plan for where you'll go if you
need to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland
or hurricane shelter locations should be identified
and a route to the safe shelter plotted.

If a storm threatens
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a threatened region, pay attention to local
weather broadcasts for further updates, and:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a
safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect
them with tape or storm shutters. Remember, dam-
age to small windows is mostly caused by wind-
driven debris; damage to larger windows may
come from debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings,
lawn ornaments and anything that can be moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside.
Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch fur-
niture and other harmless items become missiles in
hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disturbed for
days or longer after a hurricane. You should have
one gallon of water per person per day, and you
should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable.food. Remember
that electricity may be.off for days or longer and
cooking may be difficult, so make plans to prepare
food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to
make sure you have a non-electric can opener.
Check all battery-powered equipment and
stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recom-
mending you not use candles due to the threat of
fire. An untended flashlight won't start a fire, but
a candle or lantern might.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buck-
ets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make 'arrangements for boarding your pet.
Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals
will have to be kept with friends or at a kennel.

If landfall is predicted here
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida
as a possible landfall for a hurricane, begin mak-
ing preparations for the storm:
Board all windows, or secure with tape or se-


Hanging car tags will
soon be available for
Anna Maria Island
residents to facilitate re-
entry after an evacuation
is ordered. Call your city
hall for more information
about when the tags will
be delivered.



curity shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leav-
ing the Island will be worse than you can imagine.
Hurricane authorities predict it will take 12 to 17
hours to evacuate the Island, so plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
shelter openings.

If officials order
an evacuation:
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate it. If possible, remove the pump, other-
wise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where
you're going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.

After tile hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and live power lines, and emergency crews will
need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure
you have a re-entry tag (when they are issued by
your city government) or two forms of valid iden-
tification showing your local address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't
sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency
vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that
may have sought higher ground to avoid flood
waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


Hurricane safety tips


BRADENTON BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311 POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-1005 CITY HALL



THE CITY OF
ANNA MARIA
Call our
Communications
Number for
Evacuation Assistance
708-6130
CITY HALL


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Be Prepared!
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778-7295
414 Pine Ave. Anna Maria


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PREPARED

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