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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( October 27, 1999 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: October 27, 1999

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00806

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: October 27, 1999

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00806

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS e HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


I A 1Ur


Candidates face off in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
An advocate of teamwork versus a style of ques-
tioning authority seems to be a prime distinction be-
tween two candidates for the Bradenton Beach City
Commission representing Ward 1.
Fran LaSpina, 70, wants to be a "communications
link between the residents and city government" who
vows to bring "more teamwork to the commission."
Incumbent Bill Arnold, 69, said "planning and
scheduling of items is my number one priority, and
now we have neither one, and I will continue to ques-


Islandwide


consolidation


again takes


nose-dive
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
As fast as Annie Oakley putting a bullet through a
target, Bradenton Beach Mayor Connie Drescher and
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard shot down any no-
tion of a Holmes Beach-proposed Island consolidation.
Holmes Beach city commissioners recently agreed to
broach the subject at the next meeting of Island elected
officials. Commissioners planned to propose a tri-city
study and a non-binding referendum on the issue.
"I worked out a series of questions that 1 would like
Chuck and Connie to respond to on a scale of one to
10," Holmes Beach Commissioner Don Maloney told
officials last week. "A response of 10 means it's a great
idea and a response of one means it should never be
brought up again."
Questions and responses include:
Maloney: Is there any sense in pursuing a study of
joining the three cities?
Drescher: One.
Shumard: One.
Maloney: Is there any sense in consolidating cer-
tain departments?
Drescher: One.
Sl-'.ir1,- 11,I.i One.
Maloney: What's your opinion of lpulting this ques-
tion on a non-binding referendum?
Drescher: One.
Shumard: Minus one.
"Why do you object to a noni-binding referen-
dum?" Maloney asked Drescher.
"I don't want to pay for it and I don't think much
of it based on the past history of citizens' opinions,"
Drescher replied. "I haven't been informed otherwise."
Bradenton Beach Commissioner John Chappie
questioned how the referendum would be worded and
who would pay for it.
"You're talking about a couple of thousand dollars
just to see if the residents want to look at the issue,"
Chappie pointed out.
"Look at the problems we've had in approving the
hanging car tags," Bradenton Beach Mayor-clect Gail
Cole noted. "It's a small thing and we can't even get
our act together on it."
Anna Maria resident Dale Woodland reiiitroduced
a letter he wrote in 1997 when former Holmes Feach
Mayor Bob VanWagoner .'e I,- 1 a study of consoli-
dation.
Woodland noted, "You won't hear a lot from most
Island oldtimers on this subject because they have been
through it before and know it just ain't gonna happen.
Show me any government agency that by getting large
has provided better service at a lower cost.
"Is it any wonder our cities disagree on many issues
when we have diverse interests and cultures?" he asked.
"Do we want to lose our individuality? I think not."


lion what is being proposed" by the city commission.
The two candidates appeared at a political forum
last week, sponsored by IThe Islander Bystander and
moderated by publisher Bonner Futch. Voters in the
city go to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 2, to elect either
Arnold or LaSpina.
Arnold is a 10-year resident of Bradenton Beach
who wais elected to the commission last year for a one-
year term. lie served on the city's board ofI adjustment
for two years. He is married, has three children and two
grandchildren. Arnold is retired from General Motors


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
"To be c...jliAnucl]'" could be the axiom for Anna
Maria's lawmakers.
Mayor Chuck Shumnard closed the Oct. 19 work
session to public comment so commissioners could
discuss, uninterrupted, amending the city's alcohol
beverage ordinance, which would eventually allow
Sign of the Mermaid and Ato's restaurants to sell beer
and wine.
The issue has been an ongoing one throughout the
years and public opinion is divided. The restaurant
owners approached the commission nearly a year ago,
Nov. 10, and most recently a month ago.
A viable solution to allow beer and wine sales so
long as 60 percent of gross sales come from food and
40 percent from alcohol sales was offered most re-
cently.
Shumrard requested a legal opinion regarding tlhe
food restriction from City Attorney Bob I lenidrickson.
: lin i. I. said that a letter from H Indrickson onl
Oct. 7 states that although the stale regulates and
controls alcoholic beverage business, tlie city is ahle
to enact ordinances regulating the hours of business
and location of place of businesses because of tlhe
Muniicipal Home Rule Powers Act and the Florida
Beverage I aw.


of Oklahoma City, where he was a heavy machinery
operator and conducted emissions tests on vehicles. He
has owned and managed a restaurant, and also worked
in the aircraft and aerospace industry as an assistant
project office manager, serving as troubleshooter be-
tween departments.
LaSpina moved to the Island 22 years ago from
Pennsylvania. where she and her husband managed a
resort. She and her husband were co-managers of the
PLEASE SEE ELECTION, NEXT PAGE


I Ie said an appropriate classification could be cre-
ated, but it is entirely dependent on tile city's author-
ity to regulate the use ol'land within the city.
As the city's ordinance stands now, it already regu-
lates the location of \which businesses can sell alcohol
by excluding a restaurant ronm serving alcohol if it's
PLEASE: SHF ALCOHOL, NEXT PAGE





',' ,- -

A. P a O'- Gm


O pinio n s ............... ......... ... .......... ...... 6
Those W ere the Days .................................... 7
A nnouncem ents ................ ..................... 10
Stl i i .p ...... .............. .. .. ............... 17
sr;ll, e ......................... .. ....... ...... 18
Sports Rap ............................... ........ 20
Sandscript ........ ................. ..
Anna Maria Island tides ..................... 23
Football Contest ................ .................. 24
Crossword puzzle ................................. 32


b a..

- 4


.,--


$ .


Pumpkins, fun meet on Pine Avenue
Five-vear-old Halie Caudill, of Bradenton, sits patiently while she gets hlirjace pumpkinii painted" at the
Flavors oflthe Island )re-milleintim celebration, a streeI party complete with nii.sic, gaines, foo/d andi fiin on
Saturday in l Anna Maria. For more on lle event, see inside. Islander Photo: SuIsa Kesselling



^r^ If .ii^ '^~iF^^*:E'y*l S?^^ ^^ ^ i


OCTOBER 27, 1999


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


~9~%si~~






IM PAGE 2 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 -THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Banner removed following city crackdown


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Cracking down on a business owner displaying an
advertising banner on her home balcony, Holmes
Beach Mayor Carol Whitmore last week ordered daily
citations issued until the banner is removed.
"She is flagrantly violating the law," Whitmore
said of property owner Tracey Glarner. "The city is not
going to put up with it."
But before any further citations were issued, the
banner was removed Friday amid allegations of harass-
ment by city officials.
The city has received numerous complaints from
residents about the banner advertising Glarner's pizza
parlor. It has been displayed from her second-story
balcony railing on Harbor Drive for more than a month.
Code Enforcement Officer Walter Wunderlich
said on Sept. 10 he explained to Glarner, owner of
Marco Polo Pizza, that the sign is a violation of city
code and he hand delivered a letter of violation to
her on Sept. 20.
On Sept. 22, Wunderlich issued Glarner a citation
for failure to remove the banner and on Sept. 29 he is-
sued a second citation for the same violation.
However, City Attorney Jim Dye advised against
the second citation, saying the first citation must go
through the appeals process in court.
The second citation was rescinded. But unhappy
commissioners ordered.a crackdown. Whitmore com-
plied after Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Stephenson
was unsuccessful in attempting to negotiate a truce on
behalf of the city with Glarner.


Election Tuesday in
Bradenton Beach
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Sandpiper Mobile Home Resort until recently, where
they still live. They have two sons, two grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
Although the two candidates agreed on most
points, there were some issues where they differed.
Asked about the need for a citywide survey to de-
termine where public property ends and private prop-
erty begins, LaSpina said such a survey was needed.
Arnold said there was no need to survey the entire city,
only those areas where problems have developed.
As to the issue of paving alleys in the city, Arnold
.said such an action was not needed, although the addi-
tion of shell to make the modest streets more passable
for vehicles was needed. LaSpina said she would need
to research the issue before reaching a decision.
Both agreed that street flooding and improved
drainage was a serious problem in Bradenton Beach.
Arnold said much of the problem was caused by con-
tinued paving of streets, raising the elevation so the
water can only flow onto private property. LaSpina said
funding to resolve the problem would require research.
Both candidates favored the return of the one-cent
sales tax boon for municipalities, with Arnold offering
the caveat that the voters must be informed as to how
the money would be spent.
Neither Arnold nor LaSpina favored Islandwide


Resident: selective enforcement
Jesse Mullen, Glarner's husband and manager of
the pizza bar, said he's trying to prove a point.
"The city is not doing its job and I'm trying to
bring attention to the issue," Mullen said.
Seven months ago Mullen said he inquired about
erecting an off-site sign to advertise the business and
Wunderlich said such signs are illegal in city or state rights
of way. Mullen said he questioned Wunderlich about signs
advertising St. Bernard Church that are in the rights of way
on Manatee Avenue and on Gulf Drive.
"Walter told us the signs for St. Bernard were ap-
proved by the city in 1986. The church was told it had
to get approval from the DOT [Florida Department of
Transportation] also, but it never did that."
Mullen said he hung the banner in protest and eight
hours later Wunderlich issued a code violation sum-
mons to Glarner. The couple contested the summons
and the case will go to court next week.

Thanksgiving package
deadline near
The deadline for applications for Thanksgiving
dinner packages is Nov. 4, with applications to be
turned in at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City.
The packages will be distributed to needy per-
sons Nov. 20 by the Center and All Island Denomi-
nations, an organization of all seven churches on the
Island. Information, call 778-1908.


"I just want to be treated equally," Mullen said.
"Why can St. Bernard do it and not me? I know I'll win
in court because he cited me wrongly."
In a letter to the mayor dated Oct. 22, Glarner said
she objected to Wunderlich's demeanor when he
served the second citation and she filed a harassment
complaint with the police department.
"I spoke to Stephenson and I expressed that I
would be very happy to take my banner down once I
received an apology letter from Walter for the way he
treated me on the second citation," Glarner said.

Church seeks sign compliance
"The difference in the two cases is that the church
is complying and Mullen and Glarner are not,"
Wunderlich says.
Wunderlich said he checked on the St. Bernard
signs and in addition to learning that the one on Mana-
tee Avenue does not have DOT approval, he discov-
ered that both signs are oversized.
"I went to the church and told them about the city
council approval and the stipulation," Wunderlich ex-
plained. "They said they would research it with the
DOT. I sent them a letter stating that the signs must be
brought into compliance or the case would go to the
code enforcement board. On Oct. 20 I received a let-
ter from the church saying they intend to comply."
Wunderlich said the DOT has approved the reposi-
tioning of the church sign on its right of way on Manatee
Avenue and church officials agreed to reduce the size of
both signs to comply with city code. The sign on Gulf
Drive does not require DOT approval, he said.


I rn R r-- '. m -"- I ......- I. I
Appearing at the Islander Bystander candidate forum in Bradenton Beach are, from left, Commissioner-Elect
Dawn Baker, incumbent Commissioner Bill Arnold, Islander publisher Bonner Futch, candidate Fran LaSpina
and Mayor-elect Gail Cole. Islander Photo: David Futch


consolidation of cities.
Both candidates said they would favor extending
the city boundaries into the Gulf and bay to enhance
police protection.
As to recycling particularly the development of
a curbside recycling program Arnold said the city
is currently starting a more enhanced program at Co-
quina Bayside on a voluntary basis, adding that he fa-


vored the current step-by-step approach the city is un-
dergoing.
LaSpina said curbside recycling "would be wonder-
ful if it weren't for the matter of money, and the citizens
don't want to pay more for anything right now."
All registered voters in the city are able to vote in
the Nov. 2 election. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7
p.m. Ballots may be cast at city hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.


Alcohol law change stalled by Anna Maria commissioners


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

within 2,500 feet of another alcohol-serving establish-
ment or a church.
In essence, an exception would be made for these
two restaurants by keeping the distance law in place
and amending the ordinance to include a classification
for the percentage of food and alcohol beverage sales.
Future establishments would have to come before the
commission seeking the same privilege.
Shumard said it boils down to what the commis-
sion will allow.
Since 1982, elected officials have changed the or-
dinance five times, the most recent in March 1996.
So where do the current elected officials stand on
the controversial subject?
The mayor is in favor of amending the alcohol
beverage ordinance, mostly because he thinks it will
curtail the amount of alcohol consumed in these restau-
rants, essentially preventing them from operating'a bar-
only establishment.


Last year during a November meeting, Commis-
sioner Max Znika said that if an exception was made
for these two restaurants then a non-transferable license
should be issued. The license would only pertain to the
current owners and should not be sold or transferred to
another owner or establishment.
Znika most recently made a motion to have the
matter turned over to the city attorney for his recom-
mendation.
Also last year, Commissioner George McKay said
he was open to both sides and would vote with what the
people want.
Recently, he has expressed concern about not rep-
resenting the silent majority and thinks the issue war-
rants a public straw vote.
Vice Mayor Robert McElheny said he stands firm
that the city shouldn't change its legislation to permit
beer and wine for these establishments.
"I don't think government should legislate rules
and laws to make businesses successful," he said.
Wolfe said changes are constantly heing made in


government. The city would be overprotective if it did
not grant the owners the right to sell drinks with meals.
"It's a good concept and gives the owners more
control if they serve the alcohol," he said.
Presently, both owners are operating as bottle
clubs, allowing patrons to bring in their own beer and
wine.
Kelly said customers are more inclined to get
drunk because they'll finish off a bottle of wine or a six
pack of beer, whereas if she served the wine, custom-
ers would probably limit their consumption.
Resident Diane Canniff told the mayor his actions
- closing the meeting to public comment were not
in order because it was the first time the public learned
of the attorney's letter.
Shumard asked for a motion before once again ta-
bling the discussion, but only after being chastised by
residents about voting during a work session.
Shumard decided the issue required more thought
and postponed it until the next regular meeting, after
presstime on Oct. ?6.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U OCTOBER 27, 1999 N PAGE 3 KE


Motel unit at Aquarius goes to code enforcement


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach city commissioners recently re-
ferred the issue of an illegal unit at the Aquarius Beach
Resort, 105 39th St., to code enforcement.
It's the next step for owner John Pace in his quest
to continue to rent an 11th unit at his resort. A previ-
ous owner added the 11th unit in 1981; however, the
city ruled at that time it was to be used for recreation,
not as a motel room.
Pace and previous owners have lived in the 1 Ith
unit and city officials have been aware of the unit's
existence and use. It wasn't until Pace and his family
moved from the property and attempted to rent the unit
that the city determined it was an illegal use.
After several unsuccessful attempts at drafting or-
dinances to resolve the issue, commissioners asked


Pace to present alternatives. Last month Pace's attor-
ney, Bill Merrill, outlined four possible solutions to
commissioners and City Attorney Patricia Petruff gave
her opinions.
Merrill: Make a determination that motel units are
not governed by density requirements.
Petruff: In 1994 the city determined that its density
limit of 10 units per acre includes all types of units re-
gardless of whether the unit is a dwelling unit or a pub-
lic lodging unit. If the city chose this option, it would
affect all hotels and motels in the city.
Merrill: Consider the unit a legal non-conforming use.
Petruff: The city took the position in 1981 that only
10 rental units are allowed. A unit that was never con-
sidered legal cannot be grandfathered or granted non-
conforming status.
Merrill: Permit Pace to rent the unit as a resort


housing unit because it is in the R-4 district governed
by the resort housing-overlay ordinance
Petruff: In order to qualify as resort housing, the
unit must have been available for rent for time periods
of less than seven consecutive days prior to June 30,
1992. This unit was not.
Merrill: Enter into a dispute resolution process as
permitted by state statute. This is a process used to
settle land use and environmental disputes created by
government action. The government entity enforcing
the action must appoint a special master to work with
all parties involved to settle the dispute.
Petruff: This is the only feasible option.
And, for this solution to be implemented, Petruff
said, the city must cite Pace for an illegal unit and the
code enforcement board must find the unit in violation.
If an acceptable solution is not reached by both
parties, the special master is required to consider the
facts and circumstances set forth in the request for re-
lief and determine whether the city's action is unrea-
sonable or unfairly burdens the property owner.


High tide on Poinsettia
Residents of Poinsettia Road in Anna Maria had to put on their waders to wander from home after a down-
pour of rain resulted in flooded roads. Islander Photo: Edna Tiemann


Anna Maria City
10/28, 7:15 p.m., Code Enforcement Board.
11/1, 7:30 p.m., Parking Committee.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
778-0781.

Bradenton Beach
11/2, City commission election.
11/4, 7 p.m., Commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.

Holmes Beach
11/3, 7 p.m., Parks and Beautification
Advisory Board.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.


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I







M] PAGE 4 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Duplex it is, says Holmes Beach commission


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach city commissioners recently voted
to uphold their building official's designation that a
residence is indeed a duplex.
Resident Joe Kennedy appealed the decision of
Building Official Bill Saunders and asked commis-
sioners to overturn it. The property in question, 226
S. Harbor Drive, is adjacent to Kennedy's home.
"As soon as I bought this property I was thrilled to
have a poor man's water access," owner Jack Elliott
said of the property. "I left town for a couple months
and this gentleman mounted an attack on me."
Elliott asked commissioners to put a stop to the
accusations. "I'm surprised he's gotten so far. I don't
know what I did to upset him," he said.
Kennedy claims Elliot has a single-family dwell-
ing and Saunders has ruled it's a non-conforming, two-
family dwelling. Kennedy maintains that Saunders'
ruling could result in a density increase.
The structure has been used as a single-family
dwelling for many years, has been listed on the prop-
erty tax roll as single family for nearly 50 years and has
one electric meter, one water meter, one mailbox and
one propane gas tank, Kennedy said.
Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger said those


points have no bearing on the issue.
"What we lack here is actual documented proof,
such as building permits or plans," Bohnenberger said.
"I feel we have to accept the opinion of our building
official."
Mayor Carol Whitmore asked if the structure
would revert to a single-family dwelling if it's not used
as a duplex.
"If a non-conforming use lapses for a period of
180 days or more, then it cannot be re-established,"
City Attorney Patricia Petruff explained. "However,
this is not a non-conforming use. It is a non-con-
forming structure on a non-conforming lot. We can
find no evidence that the structure or lot has been
changed."

What's in a name?
Kennedy said he has aerial photos from 1951 and
1958 showing a change in the structure. He says the
mother-in-law apartment was added between 1958 and
1961, again referring to his aerial photos.
"What makes a duplex?" Kennedy asked. "No one
has answered that yet. Everything I have seen says it's
a single-family home. Bill has no facts to back up his
decision. I have documents to back me up. This is an
arbitrary decision."


"What makes a duplex? A two-family residence in
a two-family residential zoning district," Saunders re-
plied. "It was used as a two-family residence before the
adoption of the comprehensive plan in 1989 and that
makes it non-conforming, but legal."
Prior to its recent sale, the building was rented for
10 years to one person whose mother occupied the sec-
ond unit on weekends and for several months at a time,
Saunders said. He also noted that there is no density
impact because every lot in the district presently is
zoned duplex.
Resident Larry Moore said there are problems in
the neighborhood with residences being used illegally
as duplexes and quadraplexes.
"This is an opportunity to eliminate those prob-
lems," Moore said.
Bohnenberger said that's a code enforcement issue
and Saunders added that problem does not affect the
property under discussion because duplex is a legal use.
After commissioners voted to uphold Saunders'
decision, Chairman Roger Lutz said, "There was a
whole lot of hearsay and very little evidence. In a situ-
ation like that I'm not going to disturb the status quo.
I don't think it was proved."
Lutz said if Kennedy feels strongly about the issue
he can pursue it by another route.


Public service honoree
Standing in the middle of 15 acres of pasture land,
Marjorie Kinnan, left, breaks ground at a ceremony
for the soon-to-be constructed Marjorie G. Kinnan
Elementary School. The school will open in fall
2000. Named in her honor, the school is on Tallevast
Road in East Manatee County. A pillar of the com-
munity for more than 40 years, Kinnan was named
Manatee County's Distinguished Citizen of the Year
for 1999. She served as a member of the school
board for 16 years. Also holding a shovel, and
pictured with the construction engineers, is her
daughter, Anne Kinnan, who teaches fifth grade at
Anna Maria Elementary School, and her daughters-
in-law, Linda and Sue Kinnan. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of Carolyne Norwood


*r
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;gE


, i,


OF YOU!
Make your
appointment now
for the holidays!
7425 Manatee Ave. W.
near Albertson's
761-8383 749-1263


City of Anna Maria
10005 Gulf Drive. P.O. Box 608 Anna Maria, FL. 34216 778-0781


g PUBLIC NOTICE A

City of Anna Maria #1 in Manatee County
RECYCLE FALL CLEAN UP RECYCLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13

8:00 AM TO 3:00 PM. ANNA MARIA CITY PIER YARD
PARKING AREA, BAY BLVD. MU!
SEPA
REMEMBER ... Every Monday is recycling pick up day FROM
in Anna Maria. Please set your blue bin at the curb. REO

For any questions about recycling, Sorry, no I
call Coriimissioner George McKay at City Hall 778-0781 or paint wil
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 5 .P


Free sand for


the bagging in

Anna Maria
By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
The City of Anna Maria has sand coming and
going.
Phil Charnock, the city's director of public
works, ordered six loads of sand costing $992 to be
delivered to a public access at the end of Pine Av-
enue on the Gulf. It was used to fill in an area eroded
by recent storms.
Charnock said the delivery man was perplexed
as to why the city would be ordering sand when it
had a huge sand pile sitting by the bay (referring to
the sand being dredged from Bimini Bay).
Charnock says he isn't able to keep the sand for
the beach because government agencies determined
it to be inferior, but he has been stockpiling some of
the sand from the project.
It's available at city hall to residents. Each resi-
dent must bag his or her own sand and is allowed 10
free sand bags. Each additional bag over 10 costs 67
cents.
The completion of the dredging project has been
postponed until early December because of weather
and a few other setbacks.
Wind coming out of the east kicks up rough wa-
ter, making it difficult for crews to perform the
dredging operation, Charnock said.
Two weeks ago the project was delayed when
the contractor cut an underground power cable with
the cutter head of the dredge. Many Anna Maria and
Holmes Beach residents were without power for two
hours.
The project began in September and took two
years to get under way. It was expected to be com-
pleted in two weeks.
For more information on the free sand bags, con-
tact City Clerk Laura Vogel at 778-0781. City Hall
is located at 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.


Holmes Beach police chief can

declare emergency state, close bars


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
As Hurricane Irene attempted to put Manatee
County at the top of her dance card last week,
Holmes Beach officials learned that the police chief
has the authority to close bars in the event of an
emergency.
Police Chief Jay Romine requested the author-
ity in July because he thought only the local sheriff's
office could declare a state of emergency and invoke
emergency measures.
Romine's request stemmed from problems en-
countered during last year's evacuation for Hurri-
cane Georges. One local establishment with about
30 patrons inside disregarded the mandatory evacu-
ation order, creating a potentially dangerous situa-
tion, Romine said.
Last month City Attorney Patricia Petruff
drafted the ordinance, but commissioners ques-
tioned provisions concerning the prohibition of al-
cohol, firearms and gasoline. They asked Petruff and
Romine to clarify the definition of public place, a
common phrase in each objection.
Petruff learned that state statute already gives


the city the authority Romine seeks. The city may,
by ordinance, designate an official who is empow-
ered to declare a state of emergency. In the absence
of an ordinance, the authority rests with the police
chief.
"If you're OK with the chief being the desig-
nated representative to declare an emergency, then
you don't need an ordinance," Petruff explained to
commissioners.
According to the statute, when a state of emer-
gency is declared, certain acts are automatically pro-
hibited. These include:
The sale, display or possession in a public
place of firearms or ammunition, except by law en-
forcement or military officials.
The sale, distribution or possession in a pub-
lic place of gasoline in portable containers or alco-
holic beverages.
Romine said he considers "public place" to be
any publicly owned property, including rights of
way.
The statute also gives the police chief the au-
thority to establish curfews and close places of pub-
lic assemblage.


Just in time for the holidays, including the event of
the century, the Game of Anna Maria Island, a board
game first issued 15 years ago, will debut as the Mil-
lennium Edition in November.
It was sponsored by the Rotary Club of Anna
Maria Island in 1984 and proved so successful that
Rotary went with it again in 1992. After the 1999 edi-
tion, it probably won't be sponsored here again, said
Rotary's Gene Moss.
It's similar to Monopoly, with local places such as
Duffy's and Publix instead of Boardwalk and B&O
Railroad. Sponsors buy their place on the board for
$200 and up to benefit Rotary's charitable projects.


They get two $15.95 games free for their sponsorship.
The game board will also include, free of charge,
the names of the three Island cities and their mayors,
along with local parks, landmarks and the Anna Maria
Elementary School.
Names of individuals are included at $5 for one
line, and $10 for two to four lines. Games bought by
Nov. 5 can have names of family members, up to four
lines' worth, printed in the "Islanders All" listing on the
board.
Persons who have questions, orders or other contri-
butions to this cause may call Moss at 778-2006 or Carol
Duncan at the 1st National Bank and Trust, 778-4900.


Island board game is revived


RINGLING BRIDGE


REPAIRS


















Starting on October 28, the rehabilitation of the
Ringling Causeway will begin. Work will include repairs
and painting of the spans, sidewalk and handrail repairs,
fender repair, pile jacket installation on various piles
supporting the bridge, installation of the scour protection
and replacement of navigation lighting and submarine
cable. Motorists should anticipate occasional land closures
and brief delays during nighttime hours.
Alternate routes are via the Cortez Bridge ( SR 648) and
Anna Maria Bridge (SR 64). Boaters should anticipate
work in the main channel.

Thank you for your patience while we complete this im-
portant bridge repair project.
Projected completion: Summer, 2000.






[] PAGE 6 M OCTOBER 27, 1999 E THE ISLANDER BYSTAMfDFR
.NR M.,


For commission, we
recommend ...
Bradenton Beach voters go to the polls Tuesday to
elect a city commissioner to represent Ward 1.
Not having to go through the ordeal of a campaign
is Mayor-elect Gail Cole, Commissioner-elect Dawn
Baker representing Ward 2, and Commissioner
Berneitta Kays from Ward 3.
They were unopposed for election to their respec-
tive offices.
We congratulate the trio's success in gaining of-
fice, although we would have liked to have had cam-
paigns for each of the seats. A campaign is a great op-
portunity for hopefuls to "stump" with the people they
wish to represent, and offers a chance to hear other
viewpoints and concerns.
By not having an election for the three seats, vot-
ers are either sending a message of confidence in their
elected officials or as we fear a message of apa-
thy in the electoral process in Bradenton Beach.
But we hear from concerned citizens regularly,
about a wide variety of issues, some single-minded, but
concerned about the city and its governmental process.
If only they'd come forward ....
On to the Ward 1 race itself.
Incumbent Bill Arnold has served on the commis-
sion for about 18 months. He is challenged by Fran
LaSpina, a 22-year resident of the city who co-man-
aged with her husband the city's largest mobile home
park, Sandpiper, for 20 years.
Arnold has offered a questioning voice in his ten-
ure on the board questioning why more attention is
not given to the northern end of the city (his ward),
questioning why greater planning and scheduling has
not been implemented, questioning many city policies
that often appear to be voted on by the board and
flounder for lack of followup.
Although sometimes strident, the questions are
generally fair ones to pose. Following the majority in
lockstep is all too common in cities the size of
Bradenton Beach, and asking those pesky "Why?"
questions can be a good exercise.
LaSpina has a wealth of business and common-sense
background to bring to the city commission. She readily
admits to not having all the answers, but pledges to bring
herself up to speed quickly to learn the ins and outs of city
government, Bradenton Beach style.
Unfortunately, though, LaSpina has been largely
absent from the process of Bradenton Beach govern-
ment, rarely attending meetings. Although those meet-
ings are often tedious, it is a necessary evil for public
servants and a practice candidates for office should
engage in.


ISLANDER W
OCTOBER 27, 1999 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 49
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner J. Futch
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Pat Copeland
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Susan K. Kesselring
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mary Fulford Green
Capt. Mike Heistand
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona Samuels
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Karen Kopp
Tracey Powers
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster
1%vt M(1, We"4el,

> W Aard Ninwrg
SNewspaper

Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents eac
1999 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@packet.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


w


:h.


SLICK Haunting issues By Egan


She's unfamiliar with the process and there's a
lot of process. The comprehensive plan is overwhelm-
ing in itself and LaSpina may not know yet what it is.
On issues, they seldom differ. Who wouldn't want
improvements to continue? But when the "free money"
falls short, who will tackle tough spending issues and
opt to raise taxes, or forfeit city services, to produce
needed revenue?
One such service and we've pressed for it for
many years is recycling. It seems no one is willing
to take the bull by the horn and bring Bradenton Beach
from the dark ages of city-owned garbage collection to
the enlightened age of curb-side recycling.


At least, they could acknowledge the city's saving
potential when one-third of most residents' "garbage"
heads to the curb to be recycled. Yes, it will cost resi-
dents to recycle, but responsible people demand it.
Since we teach students at the elementary-school
level to be globally responsible and recycle, it's time
the "old timers" joined the 1990s (before the calendar
rolls over to 2001, a new century).
Either Arnold or LaSpina will serve as effective
city commissioner for Bradenton Beach. However, for
his experience on the board, The Islander Bystander
endorses Bill Arnold for Bradenton Beach city com-
mission, Ward 1.


Employee finds a pearl in
former oyster bar
Three weeks ago I called my dad and told him I had
the greatest job I've ever had.
I worked at the Anna Maria Oyster Bar at the Anna
Maria City Pier. I started in May with no real restau-
rant experience. I learned to wait tables, cook, and
work in the bait shop. More importantly, I found a farm-
ily dysfunctional as it may have been 1,500 miles
from my closest relative.
I won't mention any names, since I can't mention
them all, but I'd like to thank everyone there for being
my friends and teaching me as much as they could in
such a short time.
Never in my life have I worked with a finer team.
Not even in six and a half years in the U.S. Army. I
can't think of one person there I didn't like to work
with.
We'll all move on to bigger and better things I
hope. I could never express my gratitude for working
with all of you in such a short letter, nor my sadness
that it's all over.
What I can do is let you know that I'm a better
person for having worked with you. And I love you all.
We'll always be a family.
Mike "Griff" Griffiths, Holmes Beach

Ghost of pier past and present
Our little island of Anna Maria will never be the
same. The beloved Anna Maria City Pier stands there


like a ghost of our past. Thanks to the greed of our
mayor and city commissioners. I have gone to some of
the meetings on the pier lease and I can understand why
John Home said enough to all your greed. We the
people will miss John Horne and all the good things he
has done for Anna Maria. We will miss the Anna Maria
Oyster Bar, a place you could proudly take your fam-
ily and friends for a wonderful meal and good friendly
service, a place to just go relax, fish, watch the dolphins
or watch the sunset.
John Horne spent thousands of dollars trying to
keep the pier repaired. How many times did you, the
mayor or commissioners, inspect the pier? At one of
your meetings you said you had not. Seems to me you
are trying to find someone to blame other than yourself.
So you are trying to put all the blame on John Horne.
Give me a break, you haven't been doing your job.
It scares me to think of some of the ideas you have
for the pier. Doug Wolfe wants a fancy restaurant and
bait shop. Max Znika talks of a McDonalds or Burger
King. Do we the people want that? The next thing you
will have is a string of strip malls if you let this hap-
pen.
My deep concern is how long it will take you to get
the repairs done on the pier, or will it just sit their like
a ghost rotting away. You city officials don't seem to
get anything done.
It's about time you start thinking what the people
want and need, not what you want.
Dorothy Keller, Anna Maria


eufu1J l / e /eII





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 7 II[


THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 2, Wartime Anna Maria: 1941-42
by June Alder


-; .-
; - j~r ~~. i~ - .1


Explosions rocked the American naval base at Pearl Harborfollowing a
surprise Japanese attack on Dec. 7, 1941.


A SNEAK ATTACK


Cleve Adams, a seaman on the U.S.
battleship Pennsylvania, groaned as he
hoisted himself out of his bunk on the
morning of Dec. 7, 1941. He had been up
late the night before. The
Pennsylvania's band had Young Br
won a dance music compe- Watson w
tition among the ships at first Man
Pearl Harbor. That had County m
called for a celebration. lose his li
Now it was Sunday, World Wa
and Cleve (short for
Cleveland) was responsible for trans-
porting Catholic crewmen to early Mass
at a local church.
The sailors were in a good mood as
they rode along "shooting the breeze"
and looking forward to a lazy day. It was
one of Honolulu's incredibly beautiful
mornings. The sky, a vivid blue, arched
like a cathedral dome above the breeze-
ruffled waters of the harbor where the
Navy ships rode serenely at anchor.
Cleve was thinking of Sunday
mornings in his hometown of Cortez,
Florida. He sure missed good, old
Cortez and the folks back there he
was one of five boys in a family that had
earned a living fishing in the waters of
Tampa Bay and the Gulf since the
1880s. But he admitted that Pearl was
good duty.
Out of the corner of his eye he
caught a glimpse of what looked like a
large flock of seabirds approaching. In a
second he realized they were aircraft -
probably those replacement B-17s he'd
heard were expected from Stateside.
But why were they coming in so
low, so dangerously close to the fleet?
Cleve didn't wonder long. Sud-
denly, the sky turned black with planes,
their racing shadows blotting out the
sun. Cleve and his men dove for cover.
For an hour bombs screamed down,
turning the harbor into a lake of fire.
The swiftly departing Japanese ma-
rauders left behind a hellish scene.
Sparks still shot up out of the blackened
carcases of ships sagging into the wa-
ters. Clouds of smoke filled the air with
ash and soot. An eerie stillness settled


rid
'as
ate
ean
*fe
ar


over the watery graveyard.
The mighty battleship Arizona had
sunk with only its superstructure show-
ing. The West Virginia, riddled with
bombs and torpedoes,
ger had settled on an even
the keel on the bottom of the
ee harbor. The Oklahoma,
z to hit by four torpedoes
in within five minutes, had
II. rolled completely over
with her bottom and pro-
peller pointing to the sky. Hardly a
vessel escaped damage.
As for the Pennsylvania in
drydock, it had received several direct
hits though it was in no danger of sink-
ing. When Cleve came aboard fires
were still smoldering in the second
deck. He found the upper deck covered
with the bodies of the dead and
wounded.
Among the dead was Cleve's
Manatee High School buddy Bridger
Watson. His mid-section had been
blown away.
Young Watson was the first Mana-
tee County man to lose his life in
World War Two. There were two other
Manateeans at Pearl that day. Both
were airmen stationed at Honolulu's
Hickam Field. Despite severe damage
at the field (nearly 126 planes were
destroyed) the Manatee airmen sur-
vived the disaster.
The final toll in human terms was
2,300 people killed, mostly sailors and
soldiers, and 1,200 wounded.
The day after Pearl Harbor Presi-
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt made his
famous "date of infamy" address to
Congress. The nation committed itself
to a war that would rage for four more
years and bring about vast changes in
the lives of Americans like the Adams
family of Cortez and their near neigh-
bors on Anna Maria Island for years to
come.

Next: A shocked nation
gets the news


m mmmm mumm m mmm-m mmumm mmmu EmE mmE. m N u m..... m umi


We'd love to mail

you the news!

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u It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
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We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
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I] PAGE 8 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria festival judged huge success


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
A contented crowd gathered in the City of Anna
Maria Saturday for a block party, the first Island event
to mark the change from 1999 to 2000.
Flavors of the Island was a successful event that
bears repeating, many attendees commented, and will
take its place in Island history.
Under the backdrop of a sunny sky, with a cool
breeze off the bay, folks from all walks of life casually
strolled Pine Avenue getting acquainted, or re-ac-
quainted, with passersby.
Some were there to partake in all the festivities,
some to shop the arts and crafts booths. Still others
came for a taste of local fare from local restaurants with
booths set up on the street.
The Pine Avenue circuit, open to foot and bicycle
traffic only, was strangely quiet. Many people brought
dogs one person brought his snake.
It wasn't calm everywhere, though. The dunk
booth across from Roser Memorial Community Church
drew the merciless, who took great aim at some of
Anna Maria's public officials who graciously took
the plunge to help raise money for local organizations.
Also at the church parking lot was a moon walk in
the shape of a large Dalmatian, where children used up
some of their stored limitless energy jumping to their
hearts content.
All along the strip, people partook in rummage
sales and visits to otherwise unfamiliar places.
Carolyne Norwood, of the Anna Maria Island Histori-
cal Museum, said quite a few people from the Island
visited the museum for the first time.
Hungry patrons kept the restaurants hopping. Gary
Wooten, manager of the Sandbar restaurant, worked
diligently flipping and grilling fish for hungry visitors.
Beer and wine sales at the Octoberfest beer garden
were flowing at a steady pace all day, but peaked near
day's end as the art and restaurant booths were closing
up shop and the reggae music of Democracy filled the
air from the stage.
It was here, across from the city pier and newly


Art abounds
More than 30 art and craft booths lined Pine Avenue in Anna Maria during the pre-millinnenm celebration
Saturday. Artist "Doctor Dot" pounds and shapes recycled aluminum into native reptiles and fish and paints
his creations in a concentric dot-dot-dot motion. Islander Photos: Susan Kesselring


built Bayview shopping plaza, that people gathered at
sunset, keeping time with the beat and where parents
danced with their children.
Many persons contributed behind the scenes to
make the event a success. Manatee County Sheriff's
Deputy Alan Johnston, stationed in Anna Maria,
watched the events unfold from the sidelines. He said
there wasn't much for him to do because people were
so laid back.
Capping off the evening was a mini-fireworks display
at 7:45 p.m. over the bay. Jim Taylor of Taylor-Made
Pyrotechnical Entertainment wired the vacant end of the
city pier with a pyro-message which said, "We love (in a
heart) Anna Maria" in red and white spurks.

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Wearing a black T-shirt with a silver-lettered
"2000," resident Ann McDonald said the celebration
was "fantastic."
Most agreed and some want to bring it back for
a repeat performance. Loretta Yearwood, owner of
Lorelles hair salon, said, "Let's do it again."
Jason Cimino, chairman of the organizing commit-
tee, said he was more than pleased with the outcome.
Anna Maria City Clerk Laura Vogel said they tal-
lied more than $6.000 from the event. The profit will
go toward fireworks for a Dec. 4 celebration with the
remainder divided between the Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School, Anna Maria Island Community Center and
Anna Maria Island Historical Society.

The Richard Suhre family recommends
Bill Arnold for Commissioner
Ward I, Bradenton Beach.

He cares
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"Paid political advertisement paid for by .
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independently of Bill Arnold."


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Halloween tra
Let's keep our little ghosts and goblins safe this
Halloween. We don't want them going bump in the
night.
The Florida Suncoast SAFE KIDS Coalition, spon-
sored by All Children's Hospital, has recommended
some safety tips to bring children home safely.
Chairman of the coalition, Inspector Robert Aus-
tin of the Cedar Hammock Fire Department, said most
parents worry about poisoned candy and many are not
aware that falls, fire injuries and auto accidents account
for the majority of injuries on Halloween, falls being
the leading cause of injury.
To limit the number of falls, SAFE KIDS discour-
ages children from cutting across yards. Lawn orna-
ments and clotheslines are invisible in the dark.
Face paint or cosmetics applied directly to the face
are safer than loose-fitting masks that can obstruct vi-
sion. If a mask is worn, be sure it fits securely. Cut the
eye holes large enough to allow full vision. Secure hats
so they do not slip over children's eyes.
If the shoe fits, wear it. Everyday shoes are much
safer than mom's heels, dad's work boots or other
poorly fitting costume shoes. Toy weapons should be
made of cardboard so they won't cause injury if the
child falls.
Make a trick-or-treater's visit to your home a safe
one. Remove breakable items or obstacles such as
tools, ladders and children's toys from your steps, lawn
and porch.
Fire injuries can be prevented by wearing flame-
resistant wigs and costumes. As an alternative to wigs,
hair spray can be used to create the same effect.
Keep jack-o-lanterns lit with candles away from
landings or doorsteps where costumes might brush
against the flame.
To be more visible to nighttime motorists, children
should wear light-colored costumes. Adding patches or


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 9 I..


ivel tips for this weekend's fun
I. I z I '- p -


strips of reflective material to costumes and trick-or-
treat bags will make children easier to see, especially
from a distance. Flashlights or battery-powered lan-
terns make it easier to see and be seen.
Remind children to stop at all corners, to cross
streets at the crosswalk, to wait for proper signals, to
look both ways before crossing and never to dart out
from between parked cars. Children should stay on the
sidewalk whenever possible. If there is no sidewalk,
walk on the left side facing traffic.
Parents should accompany children under 12 on their
trick-or-treat rounds and they should attach the child's
name, address and phone number, including area code, to
his or her clothes in case they get separated.
Children who trick-or-treat without parents should
know their phone number and carry enough change to
make a phone call. Set a time limit for older children
to return home.
Travel familiar areas along a pre-established route
and restrict visits to homes with porch or outside lights.
Instruct children never to enter a home or an apartment
building unless accompanied by a known adult.
Bring home treats before eating them. Either dis-


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Last year's Haunted House was SCARY! Islander
Photo: Bonner Futch
card fruit, or inspect carefully, looking for punctures or
holes. Fruit should be cut open before allowing a child
to eat it. Unpackaged items, such as popcorn or small
candies, and treats with opened, torn or loose wrap-
pings should be discarded.
Additional information can be obtained by calling
the safety coalition at 1-800-756-7233.
Have a safe and "spooktacular" time.


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ATTENTION:
BUSINESS & PROPERTY OWNERS
1999 MANATEE COUNTY
TAX COLLECTION NOTICE
The 1999 Manatee County Tax Roll has been delivered to the Tax Collector by the Property
Appraiser for collection beginning November 1, 1999. Taxes to be collected are Real Estate,
Special Assessments and Tangible Personal Property.
The 1999 Tax Bills will be mailed on October 30, 1999. If you have not received a tax bill by
November 15th. contact the Tax Collector at the number shown below to request that a bill be
mailed to you, All City and County taxes, assessed on the Manatee County Tax Rolls, are entitled
to discount for early payment as follows:
November ....................................... ......... 4%
Decem ber ............................................................... 3%
January ........................................ 2%
February .................................................................... 1 %
Payable without discount in March. On April 1st, unpaid taxes
become delinquent and subject to 3% interest and advertising.
Payments received after March 31st must be in the form of certified funds.

TAXES MAY BE PAID AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS,
Monday through Friday, during the office hours of 8:30 am to 5:00 pm:
1. Downtown Office, 415 10th St. W., Bradenton
2. Desoto Branch Office, 819 301 Blvd.W., Bradenton
3. Palmetto Branch Office, 1341 10th St. E., Palmetto
4. Holmes Beach Branch Office, 3340 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach
5. BY MAIL: P.O. Box 25300, Bradenton, FL 34206-5300
Taxes may no longer be paid at area banks
YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE A RECEIPT UNLESS YOU:
Send self-addressed, stamped envelope with payment or pay at one of our offices.
2000 INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS
Real Estate and Personal Property Taxes for the 2000 Tax Year may be paid in four installments if an
application is filed with the Tax Collector before May 1st. You must request an application.
If you are presently paying by the Installment Method, your account will be automatically
renewed for 2000, UNLESS you advise the Tax Collector to remove your name.
THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT APPLY TO THE 1999 TAXES.
KEN BURTON, JR. Tax Collector, Manatee County
PHONE (941) 750-9566 www.taxcollector.com 10/27/9


Haunted house comes
'alive' Oct. 29 and 30
Do you dare to be scared?
If so, come to the annual Haunted House on
Oct. 29 and 30 beginning at 7 p.m. at the
Bradenton Beach Fire Station at the corner of
Highland Avenue and Second Street North. Ad-
mission is $2. Re-admission the same night is $1.
The event is sponsored by the Anna Maria
Fire and Rescue Volunteers. For further informa-
tion, call 741-3900.





Il] PAGE 10 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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Historical society to hold
play auditions Nov. 5
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society will hold
auditions on Nov. 5 at 2 and 7 p.m. for a play to be
featured at the traditional "Anna Maria ... Remember
When Dinner." Auditions will be held at the Historical
Museum, 402 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria. Parts are
available for all ages.
This year's dinner will celebrate the 50th anniver-
sary of the incorporation of Holmes Beach. The play
will feature the development of Holmes Beach from its
settlement to the city's incorporation. The dinner will
be held Feb. 19, 2000, at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center.
If interested, but unable to attend auditions, call
Carolyne Norwood at 778-1514 or Bill Diamant at 778-
2421.

De-mystifying opera
The Friends of the Island Branch Library invite the
public to attend a program entitled "Who's Batty in
Fledermaus?" the second of their 1999-00 speaker pro-
grams.
Arden Fowler, a lecturer on opera history, will
speak at the library 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9. She cur-
rently teaches music for Manatee County Head Start
and the Education Center of Longboat Key. Fowler has
a master's degree in vocal performance and music
therapy.
The program is free and open to the public, but
space is limited. Tickets are available two weeks prior
to the program at the library's circulation desk with a
limit of two per person.
The library is located at 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. For more information, call the library
at 778-6341.

Author Porter speaking to
Writers' Guild
Cheryl Anne Porter, author of the Lawless
Women trilogy, will speak at a meeting of the Gulf
Coast Writers' Guild Monday, Nov. 1, at 10:15 a.m.
at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
Porter, who teaches writing at Hillsborough
Community College, originally wrote as a master's
thesis her first novel, "Jessie's Outlaw." St. Martin's
Press contracted with her to write the trilogy, nov-
els in western settings about three sisters who take
different paths to solve the murders of their parents.
The guild meetings are open to novelists, poets
and other writers and hopefuls, said Jerry Perry of
the organization.
Details may be obtained at 778-7732.

Clothing needed for
children in Belize
The after-school and teen programs at Anna
Maria Island Community Center are working to pro-
vide children of Belize with badly needed clothing.
The Friends Boys School in Belize was badly dam-
aged last year by Hurricane Mitch and boys attend-
ing the school are extremely needy, most of them
being orphans.
The Center is asking for donations of boys
clothes for students of the school, specifically used
light clothing in plain or solid colors in good condi-
tion. Types of clothes needed are boys long pants or
Bermuda shorts average size 28- to 30-inch waist
- long-sleeve shirts, polo, or T-shirts, underwear
and socks.
Clothes can be dropped off through November at
the Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Gifts to
the Center are tax deductible. For more information,
call 778-1908.

Community garage sale
Saturday in Cortez
A community-wide garage sale is planned in
Cortez Saturday, Oct. 30, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
firehouse, 4517 123rd St. W.
Tables are available for $5 for those wishing to sell
their "stuff."
For information, call 794-5267 or 794-6647.


Xeriscape demo
due at Tingley
Karen Fraley will conduct a tour and demon-
stration of xeriscape gardening at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 3, at Tingley Memorial Li-
brary, 111 Second St., behind Bradenton Beach
City Hall.
Naturalist Fraley will discuss salt-tolerant,
water-saving native plants and trees and lead the
tour through Tingley's "Florida Yard" demon-
stration site.
Xeriscaping is designed to work with natural
Florida conditions so fertilizers, pesticides and
watering are not needed and maintenance is mini-
mal. The goal is non-toxic storm-water runoff
safe for animal and marine life.
Inside the library will be further guides to
plant identification and characteristics. Further
information is available at 779-1208.


Boating, seamanship
classes to start
Flotilla 81 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary will con-
duct boating skills and seamanship classes for seven
sessions on consecutive Tuesdays and Thursdays start-
ing Nov. 2 from 7 until 9 p.m.
The classes will be at the Manatee Technical Insti-
tute, Room 62, 5603 34th St. W., Bradenton. Boaters
may register at 798-9544 or 795-6189.

'Everyone Has Story'
is club's topic
Author Frances J. Beard of Anna Maria will
present "Everyone Has a Story to Tell" at a meeting of
the Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 3.
The meeting will be at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria
City.
Beard will critique her novels "Nothing to Lose"
and "Kith and Kin" and a collection "It's a Great Life."
She also will sign her books at the meeting.
Club members are to bring their wrapped "Opera-
tion Christmas Child" boxes to the meeting. The pro-
gram is headed by Franklin Graham, son of evangelist
Billy Graham.
Details may be obtained at 778-7865.

Kid care classes set
for November
Teens interested in signing up for a baby-sitting
course should contact Maggie Rosario at Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
Students will receive certification from the Ameri-
can Red Cross upon completion of the course. The
class dates and time are from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, No-
vember 5, 12 and 19.
The course is free but students will need to buy a
book for the course, which is expected to cost between
$7 and $10. The center is located at 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria.
For more information, call 778-1908.

Lowly typewriter returns
to Tingley
The typewriter is back, at least at Tingley Memo-
rial Library in Bradenton Beach.
Carol Sandidge of the library said an electric type-
writer, a machine seldom seen since computers took
over its old role, has been added to the word process-
ing center for library patrons' use.
The library felt that people occasionally need "a
mere typewriter to fill out a form or jot down a note,"
said Sandidge.
The library also has a computer and printer for
those patrons who have left typewriters to the past.
Plus, the library boasts two computers with educa-
tional and reference programs in the Children's De-
partment.
The library is at 111 Second St. N., behind
Bradenton Beach City -lall. Information may be ob-
tained at 779-1208.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N OCTOBER 27, 1999 E PAGE 11 I(



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Bad old days
Holmes Beach dentist D:r John Norman 30 years ago at Dong Ha, Viet Nam, where he flew combat missions as a
Marine Corps helicopter pilot. Note the patches on the nose: "Those were some battle-worn airplanes, he said.


Nam warrior confronts

old 'chariot of the air'


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Dr. John Norman was shocked at the helicopter
photo on The Islander Bystander's front page not
that he hadn't seen more helicopters than he ever
needed, but that the old chopper was still in use.
The photo in the Aug. 18 edition was of an H-34
model helicopter moving roof trusses into place for re-
construction of the Playa Encantada condominium,
where a lightning-caused fire burned $3.5 million
worth of damage in May 1999.
Norman flew that model in Viet Nam 30 years ago,
and had assumed it was retired long ago. "They were
the workhorse of the Marine Corps," he said. Evidently
they still are a workhorse, even if in more mundane
pursuits.
The Island dentist served a 13-month tour of duty
in Viet Nam in 1968-69 of his five-year Marine Corps
hitch.
He flew 900 missions, crashed twice and was shot
down twice "and my worst wound was a bloody nose."
Others were not so lucky: Of five helicopter pilot bud-
dies who bade the United States goodbye together in
1968, Norman was the only one who lived to return.
The H-34's biggest and best mission, he said, was


medevac, flying wounded men out of combat back to
hospital for treatment. He also flew troop movement
and combat re-supply missions.
Then the new H-46 replaced the H-34 for mainly
troop carrier work. "But the pilots didn't get replaced,
we stayed there to fly the 46s," he said.
During the transition he spent a couple of months
flying Huey gunships, whose deadly dangerous low-
level flights made it the weapon most hated by the en-
emy, and the enemy's mortal target.
After his Viet Nam tour he was flight instructor at
Pensacola Naval Air Station before leaving the Corps
and going on to college, ending up graduating in den-
tistry from Emory University in Atlanta.
Norman had spent a couple of Ocala High School
summer vacations on Anna Maria Island with a friend's
family, and when he heard a dental practice was on the
market here, he didn't hesitate.
He bought Dr. Jack Colson's practice in 1976 and
has never looked back. Norman lived on the Island
until "storms scared me out of my house on the beach,
and I moved to the high ground across the bridge." He
lives now in Palma Sola Park and commutes to his
clinic and his converted 40-foot commercial fishing
boat, both in Holmes Beach.


Boats being every bit as cranky as their skippers,
it is none too early for boat owners to begin preparing
their craft and a lighting scheme for the annual parade
Dec. 4.
The big event is the 12th annual Anna Maria Island
Christmas Lighted Boat Parade, from the Key Royale
Bridge to near the north point of Anna Maria, showing
the world and a group of judges their lights.
Lighting themes should be planned early, made as
foolproof as anything about a boat can be, and put into
action long enough before then to allow crisis-recov-
ery time, said organizer Chuck Stealey.
There is even a parade hotline where boaters can
get information about boat lighting, details of entry and
other matters on the parade 778-3907.


The parade route again this year will be from
Bimini Bay at the Key Royale Bridge, up the grand
canal and back, out to the Rod & Reel Pier and back to
Bimini.
Boaters may enter at any time from now until 5
p.m. Dec. 2 for a $ 10 entry fee, with checks payable to
Stealey, 605 Crestwood Drive, Holmes Beach FL
34217. Entry forms will appear in the newspaper and
also are available at the paper's office, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Participating vessels may be
sail or power, big or small, private or commercial.
Boats must have an operational VHF radio and li-
ability insurance, and will have to abide by Coast
Guard safety and navigation rules, as well as the
parade's rules and guidelines.


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[] PAGE 12 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


You can't choose toothpaste in haste


By Don Maloney
Special to the Islander
Picking out a roll of toilet paper sorry, "bath-
room tissue" is every bit as complicated as I told you
it was last week, but it's was nothing compared to
toothpaste tube shopping.
One plus for the paste the only plus is that,
unlike bathroom tissue rolls that are packed up in col-
lections of from two to 24 rolls, toothpaste comes in
only one tube at a time. But, it comes in oh so many
different combinations. Like the first tube I reached for,
labeled "Smooth Mint with Tartar Protection." Because
neither wife Sarah nor I tartar-up our teeth by smoking
anymore, I skipped that one.
Next to it was a tube of "Regular Paste with Tar-
tar Protection." Since it had that anti-tartar thing, I de-
cided it probably wasn't really "Regular Paste."
The "mint" idea and the possibility of the sweet
breath it might ensure did interest me, however, but
only very shortly. That was because it turned out
"mint" came too many different ways for a first-time
chooser to be sure of picking the right variety or even
temperature.
There were tubes with "Cool Mint," some with
"Clean Mint," or "Fresh Mint," others with "Icy Mint"
and even one with "Thermamint."
Even if I could have decided which of the mints I'd
chance, I would have been forced to take something
else with every one of them. Those somethings in-
cluded extras like "Extra Whitener," or "Cavity Protec-
tion," or even "Gum Care." If you can't decide between
those species, there was another apparently have-them-


AIIIrl Lu


=1


all labeled "Multicare." At least, I assumed that means
it looks after all those problems in a single tube. I was
about to pick that one because I wasn't ready to risk
cavities or gum disease just for good breath and the
possibility of extra-white teeth with holes, wobbling in
rotten gums.
But then I spotted a really fascinating looking tube
I that said it contained "Fresh Mint with Baking Soda
and Peroxide with Tartar Protection" all that.
But as I reached for it, I remembered a girl back in
Teaneck High School who used peroxide to change her
black hair to yellow. Obviously, the people who use
that particular tube must eventually have to switch to
one of those others with that "Extra Whitener." I also


wondered how "Icy Mint" would get along with the
baking soda. Maybe that's where the "Thermamint"
comes in.
Anyway, just when I decided to forget the whole
thing, I spotted a tube that claimed to not only contain
just plain old toothpaste, but also grouped it with "Cav-
ity Protection and Sparkle and a Special Flavor."
That one said it was especially for kids, and THAT
did it for me. So I grabbed two tubes of that one. That's
because I remembered those old TV commercials
where it was the kids who always came home from the
dentist yelling "Look, Ma, no cavities."
The only thing that worries me now is that they
never really told us how those kids' gums turned out.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 N PAGE 13 Mi


William E. Carter Jr.
William E. Carter Jr., 64, owner and manager of
dance studios throughout the country, died Oct. 20.
He was born in Houston, Miss. He owned and
managed Fred Astaire and Arthur Murray Dance Stu-
dios in many parts of the country, and also owned
Ramada Records and Nu-Life Singles Clubs.
Surviving are his wife, Rosemary, of Holmes
Beach; three sons, William, Lacey and Chris; and four
grandsons.
His ashes will be strewn in the Gulf of Mexico by
family members.

Valerie V. Paznokas
Valerie V. Paznokas, 89, of Bradenton, died Oct.
18 in Cabot Pointe of Bradenton.
Born in Chicago, Mrs. Paznokas came to Manatee
County from Pittsburgh in 1973. She was a homemaker.
She attended St. Bernard Catholic Church, Holmes Beach,

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Improve the Q tuaity
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Caro- Greer Sie-nwwko-
B.A. Ed., M.A. Psych.
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Across from the new Publilx
778-2204 3909 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach


and was a member of its Women's Guild.
Brown & Sons Funeral Home, Bradenton, was in
charge of arrangements. Service was held at St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church. Burial will be in Fogartyville
Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the
Alzheimer's Association, Manatee/Sarasota Counties
Chapter Inc., 1230 S. Tuttle Ave., Sarasota, FL 34239.
She is survived by husband Clement J.; and a sis-
ter, Dorothy Petersen of Northfield, Ill.

Milton 'Swany' Schwanberg
Milton "Swany" Schwanberg, 96, of Holmes
Beach, died Oct. 23 in Casa Mora Rehab and Extended


Gloria Dei Lutheran Church (ELCA)
We warmly welcome you to join us.
Come Worship, Learn and Grow
Enjoy God's Presence
Saturday 5:30pm Service of Praise
(Conlemporary)
Sunday 8:00am Worship Service (Communion)
9:00 am Sunday School
10:30am Worship Service (Communion)
Rev. Danith Kilts Nursery Provided
6603 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1813


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician

Healthcare the
gentle natural way

761-0210
50 1 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 *West Bradenton
(I block eot of Albertson's Manatee Ave.)


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An Interfaith Community Church and Home of

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Sunday School

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Care facility.
Memorial service will be private. National Crema-
tion Society, Sarasota chapter, is in charge of crema-
tion arrangements. Memorial contributions may be
made to the American Cancer Society, 600 U.S. 301
Blvd. W., Suite 136, Bradenton, FL 34205.
Born in Milwaukee, Mr. Schwanberg came to
Manatee County from there in 1964. He retired as a
salesperson in the appliance industry. He was a mem-
ber of the Garden Club of Anna Maria Island.
He is survived by his wife, Betty; a son, Glen, of St.
Cloud, Minn.; a sister, Anita Guepe, of Nashville, Tenn.;
five grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.




Walk-In's Welcome Open 7 days *7:30am 8pm
Available to tend to your urgent care needs:
Fever / Infections Minor Lacerations
Simple Fractures Sprains
PINNACLE MEDICAL CENTER
315 75th Street West Bradenton
941-761-1616

voaser i06orrial Ctmmmmitg Qi1urdl
Revs. Michael An Interdenominational Christian Church
& Jan Smith Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Church Services 10AM
Sunday School 9am
Children Church 10am
(Pre-school Fourth grade)
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-0414




ISLAND
CHIROPRACTIC
CENTER
605 Manatee Ave. West
Holmes Beach
Dr. Joseph Acebal 778-0722


,CATION REN7T4LS
and RENTAL
Property Management








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we're the biggest because we're the best ...
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Norman 1-800-367-1617
3101 Gulf Drive
Realty inc. Holmes Bach, FL 34217
www.mikenormanrealty.com email: mnorman@gate.net


LAW OFFICE OF

KENDRA D.
PREssWOOD
Employment Law
and Appeals
Sexual Harassment
Sex, Age, Disability,
Pregnancy, Race, National
Origin, Marital Status
Discrimination Claims
Wage & Hour Overtime
Claims
Whistle Blower Claims
Civil and
Criminal Appeals
1322 Sixth Avenue
Bradenton, FL 34205
749-6433


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WALK-IN

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FLU SHOTS $10

PNEUMONIA SHOTS $25
Carl Voyles, M.D., and Joseph L. Mazza, M.D.
New Patients Always W welcome!

778-07811
503 Manatee Ave. W. Suite E. Holmes Beach


Do you have questions about cremation?
Our new booklet What you should know about cremation explains
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of memorial options available to commemorate a life lived.
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i[ PAGE 14 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Monkey trial' OK, says Islander


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Will an ape some day soon appear in court and talk
to the judge?
Not only will it happen, it certainly should, says
Gail Straight, animal rights activist who heads Wildlife
Inc. in Bradenton Beach.
She "totally approves" of a move under way
among lawyers in the fledgling field of animal rights
law. They are plotting strategies to bring lawsuits, per-
haps protesting the animal's confinement behind bars,
within a decade.
It is not at all far-fetched, they say, but the inevi-
table culmination of challenges they are starting to
make to the principle that animals are property without
legal rights.
"It has never happened before. An animal has
never conversed with a judge," William A. Reppy Jr.,
Duke University law professor, told New York Times
writer William Glaberson.
Some great apes have been trained to communicate
with humans, activists point out, and the large and in-
telligent creatures such as gorillas, chimpanzees and or-
angutans resemble humans genetically.
Such a challenge would affect such human "rights"
as eating meat, ownership of pets, all forms of animal
exhibition, hunting and experimentation, Glaberson
said.
But if a court determined that great apes had some
rights, what about cats, turkeys, cows, lobsters?
There is a basic legal question whether an ape
could be sworn as a witness the law generally re-
quires proof that a witness knows right from wrong,

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and there is no indication that apes understand what
humans mean by those concepts.
Wildlife Inc.'s Straight would not limit such activities
to apes, but is "totally against individuals owning any kind
of wildlife. Animals are not happy in captivity."
Many animals people want as pets, including mon-
keys, "are cute when they're little, but when they start
biting and defecating in the house, people want to get
rid of them," she said.
Given a choice of adoption or death, she strongly
favors adoption by institutions that can use animals for
education, such as zoos and children's displays -
"that's wonderful, compared with killing them."


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She firmly believes every wild animal should be
left where they belong, and apes don't belong in
Florida.
But a great ape may well belong in court, if the
lawyers have their way. They are looking for the right
plaintiff to bring the landmark case. They need one that
won't say the wrong thing in court.
Duke's Reppy quoted an orangutan in Atlanta us-
ing a voice synthesizer to say, "Go buy me a ham-
burger."
But lawyers hope that "any words uttered from an
animal to a judge would be powerful simply because
they were uttered."


Island man charged with
armed robbery,
grand theft auto
Terrence Hardy, 31, of Holmes Beach was charged
with armed robbery and grand theft auto by the Mana-
tee County Sheriff's Office last week.
According to the deputy's report, Hardy entered
the residence of his ex-roommate, Richard Davis, 201
S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, on Sept. 13. Davis said
Hardy held a knife to his throat and demanded cash,
then took $1,500, his wallet and his vehicle and fled.
The vehicle was later.recovered in the 6000 block of
Manatee Avenue.
Hardy was served with the warrants while in the
Manatee County Jail on a charge of fleeing to elude a
police officer.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 15 EI


Beach weddings vary beach by beach


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Romantic weddings on the beach at
sunset are just fine with all concerned on
Anna Maria Island, but bring your own
marryer "every couple I married
broke up," said a city official who united
several.
Bradenton Beach City Clerk Pat
Grizzle works at city hall just across
Gulf Drive from the beach. She's a jus-
tice of the peace, too, a combination that
many couples found convenient in the
past.
No more. "I gave it up when word
started to come back showing that my
couples were all splitting."
Other than that minor glitch, she is
all for beach weddings. So is the rest of
Anna Maria Island, and people here
make it as easy as possible.
On Longboat Key, on the other
hand, it's tough going.
Longboat requires written permis-
sion from the town commission for a
wedding anywhere on its 10 miles of
beach, if more than 10 people are in-
volved. That's hardly anyone if the
event has guests as well as bride and
groom and whoever is doing the mar-


Anna Maria Seilers
celebrate golden
anniversary
Audrey and Donald Seiler of Anna
Maria celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary Sept. 11 in Auburn, N.Y.
They were married Sept. 27, 1949, in
Philadelphia.
She is the former Audrey Kimball
and great-granddaughter of George E.
Bean, first homesteader on the Island
in 1893.
The Sellers have a son, Glenn, of
Liverpool, N.Y., two grandchildren
and one great-grandchild.
The Sellers moved to' Manatee
County in 1989 after both retired in
Boston.


Exhibits featuring digital painting
by Sandra Melcher and other members
of the Digital Fine Artists Association
and watercolors by Barbara Singer will
be on display at the Island Branch Li-
brary during November.
Digital painting is a process of
painting with light. Examples along


trying.
The request for permission to as-
semble on the beach must be submitted
to the town government, be considered
solemnly by the commission at a work-
shop, then be given final approval at the
commission's next regular meeting.
The commission isn't hard-nosed
about it, but it has to follow the ordi-
nance. That law "has been there for
ages," a spokesman said, and no one
seems to know how come.
On Anna Maria, official permission
may be the easiest part of the wedding.
The Island is not only wedding-friendly,
it provides a wedding package explain-
ing where to get a license, florists, cater-
ers, ministers or notary -just don't ask
for Pat Grizzle.
The wedding package is courtesy of
the Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce, whose executive director,
Mary Ann Brockman, said 20 packets
were put together recently and they're
gone, to be replaced by others soon.
"But I think most people just go to
the beach and get married," she said.
The three municipalities on the Is-
land have no problems with weddings as
long as they don't involve fireworks af-



Welcome
Nathan Woods
Cori and Bob Woods, of Anna
Maria, owners of Island Locksmith,
announce the birth of their son,
Nathan Adam Woods. Born on Fri-
day, Aug. 13, he weighed 6 pounds,
9 ounces.

... and Brandon VW ills
Joan and Tony Mills, former Island-
ers, now of Bradenton, are the proud
parents of Brandon Anthony Mills born
Oct. 11, weighing 6 pounds, 6 ounces.
His grandparents are Katherine
Shymanski of Holmes Beach and Mr.
and Mrs. C. J. Mills of Bradenton.


Thomas at Beaux Arts
Anna Maria Island artist Richard Thomas' watercolor "County Bench" will
be among artworks sold at the Beaux Arts Costume Ball and Silent Auction
Saturday, Oct. 30, at 8 p.m. in the Bradenton Auditorium, 1005 Barcarrota
Blvd., Bradenton, sponsored by the Art League of Manatee County. Details
may be obrained at 746-2862.


Four-week writing workshop starting


Author and photographer Diana
Milesko will conduct a four-week writing
workshop at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria City, starting Fridayat 10 a.m.


The workshop will stress structure,
creativity and control in writing, and
participants should being pencil and pa-
per. Cost is $16, nonmembers $20.
They may register at 778-1908.


with a history of its growth and develop-
ment will be showcased.
Singer's paintings reflect local set-
tings, as well as out-of-the-way places,
and are displayed in many galleries.
The library is located at 5701 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. For more informa-
tion call 778-6341.


ter 10 o'clock at night, as one did.
If it's a big affair involving a lot of
people, the cities want police or, in Anna
Maria City's case, sheriff's deputies, to
be notified so they can handle traffic.
Mostly they defer to the Manatee
County Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment, whose attitude is "It's a public
beach, after all, and if people want that
public a ceremony, go to it. If the event
is huge, call the cops."
Turtle nesting season, over now,
makes the situation tighter than other
times. Lights are prohibited for the
safety of sea turtle hatchlings on the
beach. Since most couples want the cer-
emony at sunset, the rule makes their
situation downright dark.


And the same rules prohibiting such
things as alcohol and tents on the beach
apply here.
To the south, Lido and Siesta Key
beaches are under Sarasota County's
control, and the county is downright
generous. Just notify Paula Wormuth of
the county's beach patrol.
What's the first thing to do? "Find a
mate," she quipped. "No, actually, we just
need to know what's coming so wedding
parties don't bump heads with a volleyball
tournament or a rock music session."
That's the prevailing attitude -
that officials want to know what's
happening so they can lend a hand.
That goes for Longboat Key, too. It
just takes longer there.


The Islander Bystander takes you ..
a A IHWaO&M.


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The Islander Bystander takes you beachcombing for bargains!


New for November






M] PAGE 16 M OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I mA


Viking
reading
fare
Marge Higgins
of Anna Maria,
Rolly and
Joyce Johnson
show the
Norsemen
some superior
reading matter
at the Viking
Ship Museum
in Rokilde,
Denmark,
while on a
European
vacation.


The Islander Bystander takes you ...


Summer bargains start here ...
Clip and save $$$$$ on these special
coupon bargains from area merchants.
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Welcome back I
Buy 1 Full Breakfast
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SThe mIslander Bystander takes you beachcombing for bargains

The Islander Bystander takes you beachcombing for bargains!


West meets
east
Nine-year-old
Nicholas Sato, son
of Holmes Beach's
Sam and Barbara
Sato, visited Tokyo
recently with his
Anna Maria Island
family to spend
some time with the
Japanese branch of
the Satos. He
brought along the
paper, he said, so
they can compare
the goings-on of
our island with that
of theirs. The Satos
discovered that it
takes more that just
"a yen to shop "for
items in the arcade
behind him it
takes thousands
and thousands of
yens.


." ... "M ~ "-
An OLD library
Travelers John and Mollie Sandberg of Bradenton Beach read The Islander
Bystander in front of the historic Library of Celsus in Ephesus, Turkey. The
Sandbergs serve on the board of the Tingley Library locally.


:j


News travels
While visiting Eagle River Park, Alaska, Ron Smitl keeps abreast of the latest
developments in 7'e Islander Bystander. As Anna Maria's postmaster, Smith's
particularly interested in reading where the post office will set up shop as it
prepares to make a move from its cramped quarters.


V
?t" .- i'


\
* e" .


.


*


I I ,t





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 M PAGE 17 WI


Stone crab a delicacy,
so is red roe
Most native Floridians consider Oct. 15 second
only to Christmas as the most important date on the
calendar.
It marks the opening of stone crab season, those fat,
stone-hard critters that provide us with perhaps the best
delicacy the sea has to offer.
But there's another tasty treat that most people
have never thought about eating because (A) they
wouldn't know what it was if they were looking at it
and (B) they wouldn't know how to prepare it if they
had some.
We're talking about red roe from mullet. They call
it red roe but it's really the prettiest golden yellow
you've ever seen.
If you think it's no good, have you ever wondered
why the Japanese pay $50 a pound for it?
It can be hard to find because fish houses prefer
selling it overseas for top dollar. Some houses do have
it though and it doesn't cost what the people in the
Orient pay for it.
You can usually find it at Star Fish next to A.P.
Bell in Cortez. Last year, I paid $5 for two, six-inch-
long roe sacs.
In a month or two the mullet will start to "roe out"
or fill with roe and that's when you can look for it. Or
you can throw a cast net and get 'em if you know how.
That's a lesson for another time.


Although called red roe, the eggs from the lowly
mullet are actually golden yellow and delicious to
eat. This is the time of year that roe mullet start to
appear. The delicacy from mullet sells for as much
as $50 a pound in the Far East.
A warning: Don't eat too much because this may
the richest thing you ever eat. One roe sac usually is
plenty. Much more than that and you'll find yourself
having to change your underwear.
My father used to simply salt and pepper them and
fry 'em in oil.
Here's a recipe from that famous Cortezian and
former Holmes Beach police chief Snooks Adams.
This is the way it was done when Snooks was a boy
and that was a helluva long time ago.
Put a bunch of salt in some water. Snooks said 100
percent saturated. You can get a little device at most
hardware stores that will measure saturation point.
Place the roe sacs in the salt water for 20 minutes,
then take 'em out and let them dry on a board. You can
also press them by putting a board on top and then
something for weight like a brick.
If it's a nice sunny day, dry the roe in the sun.
Snooks says he just puts the sacs in the refrigerator.
"All you're trying to do is dehydrate them," he
said. "And the fridge and the sun do the same thing."
After they've dried, put the sac in a toaster oven at 375
degrees for 15 to 20 minutes.


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"Then slice it, eat it and take a swig of beer," Adams
said. "Or you can crumble it up and put it in eggs or
grits."
What you don't use can be wrapped in plastic wrap
and stored. It lasts almost indefinitely because it has
been,cured by the salt. Another thing you can do is
smoke it.
Whatever you do, it's pure protein and pure plea-
sure.

Speaking of refrigerators
Jim Moran, know for his outrageous publicity
stunts in the 1940s and 1950s to promote products, died
last week at age 91.
Few people know this but Moran was the first guy
to sell ice boxes to Eskimos. He did so at the request
of a refrigerator company.
Moran once changed horses in mid-stream during
the 1944 presidential election.
To bring attention to a property for sale, Moran
once spent 10 days looking for a needle in a haystack.
Speaking of selling an Eskimo a refrigerator, I
spent three weeks in the village of Gambell, Alaska,
which is on St. Lawrence Island in the middle of the
Bering Sea.
It's so cold and inhospitable there that there is not
one tree on this 130-mile-long island. Consequently, no
wood to build a home. I was there in the warmest time
of the year and it never got above 40 degrees.
In its infinite wisdom, the federal government in
the post-World War II era barged pre-fabricated houses
to Gambell for the Eskimos.
And the first one I went into had you guessed
it a refrigerator complete with freezer.
I wonder what carpetbagger cheechako gusik (de-
rogatory Eskimo term for "white man") made a pile of
money on that scam.






IU PAGE 18 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER



Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Oct. 17, domestic disturbance, 7500 block of
Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. The subjects were hav-
ing an argument but there was no physical violence,
according to the report. The deputy issued domestic
packets.
Oct. 17, possession of alcohol, Spruce Avenue
beach. The deputy issued a notice to appear.
Oct. 17, DWLS with knowledge, 8500 block of
Gulf Drive. The deputy stopped the subject for trav-
eling 42 mph in a 25-mph zone and a check showed
the subject's driver's license was suspended. The
deputy issued two citations and placed the subject in
custody.
SOct. 17, trespass warning, 512 Spring Ave. The
complainant issued a trespass warning to the subject.
Oct. 20, trespass warning, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria Island Community Center. The com-
plainant issued trespass warnings to two juveniles.

Bradenton Beach
Oct. 11, loitering and prowling, 2400 block of
Gulf Drive. The officer on patrol observed the sub-
ject hiding between a vehicle and bushes. When the
subject saw the officer, he fled through a parking lot
onto the beach. The officer caught the subject and
placed him in custody because he was hiding in an
area where automobile burglaries have occurred and
because he fled, said the report.
Oct. 14, 1800 Gulf Drive, La Costa condo-
minium. The victim reported an unknown person
forced entry to the residence and damaged a VCR,
a television stand and a camcorder and removed a
can of coins valued at $25, a pen and a bottle of pre-
scription medication.
Oct. 15, battery on a law enforcement officer,
trespass after warning, resisting without violence
times two, 100 Gulf Drive N., Circle K. The officer
said he observed the suspect rummaging through a
vehicle in the parking lot and as he approached, the
suspect ran. The officer said when he placed the sus-
pect in custody, the suspect swore at him, pushed
him, attempted to flee and had to be forcibly hand-
cuffed.
While making the arrest, the officer said he ob-
served a second suspect screaming at patrons outside
the store. The suspect made profane statements to



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the clerk and entered the store after she had asked
him to leave, according to the report. As the officer
twice attempted to question the suspect, he swore at
the officer and walked away. He was placed in cus-
tody.
Oct. 15, criminal mischief, 2500 block of Gulf
Drive. The victim reported an unknown person
spray-painted words on a storage shed and boat.
Oct. 17, found property a wallet, Cortez
Beach.
Oct. 18, DWLS with knowledge, violation of
permanent domestic violence injunction, 2100 block
of Gulf Drive. The officer performing a traffic stop
conducted a warrant check and found the suspect had
a permanent domestic violence injunction. The of-
ficer said the petitioner of the injunction was driv-
ing the vehicle and was placed in custody.
The officer conducted a check on the driver and
found her driver's license was suspended. She ad-
mitted knowledge of the suspension and was placed
in custody, said the report.

Holmes Beach
Oct. 15, disturbance, 3000 block of Gulf Drive.
Responding to a report of a disturbance, the officer
found the intoxicated subject arguing with a group
of people. The officer transported the subject to his
residence to diffuse the situation.
Oct. 17, suspicious, 5600 block of Marina
Drive. The officer observed two juveniles throwing
rocks at signs, advised them to cease and contacted
their parents.
Oct. 17, theft, 600 Manatee Ave.,
NationsBank. The victim reported that she attempted
to use the ATM machine and the card was accepted,
but the transaction was not completed. She said her
card was not returned and she left. When she went
to the bank the next day to retrieve her card, she
learned that an unknown person had used the card to
withdraw $200 from her checking account and $150
from her savings account.
Oct. 17, suspicious, 3200 East Bay Drive,
Shells restaurant. The complainant reported two sus-
picious subjects in a vehicle behind the building. The
officer found the subjects, who said they were there
to pick up a friend. A check showed one did not have
a valid driver's license and the other had never had
a driver's license. The officer contacted their parents
to retrieve them.
Oct. 18, assistance with a vehicle lockout, 500
block of 67th Street.


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Oct. 18, animal, 100 block of 30th Street. The
complainant reported a large dog had jumped her
fence and was fighting with her dog. The officer
transported the dog to the public works kennel until
the owner could respond.
Oct. 18, noise, 62nd Street and Marina Drive,
city tennis courts. The complainant reported a sub-
ject was playing drums on the tennis courts. The
officer advised the subject to cease and seek a more
suitable location for music practice.
Oct. 19, damage, 56th Street and Holmes Bou-
levard. A stop sign was damaged by a vehicle. Dam-
ages were $100.
Oct. 19, battery, 400 block of Clark. The of-
ficer responded to a report of a disturbance and ob-
served a woman lying on the ground. Witnesses said
she was intoxicated and had fallen from a second-
story window. EMS arrived to treat her.
During the investigation the officer learned that
the woman had accompanied the suspect to the
victim's residence to retrieve the suspect's clothes.
The victim said the suspect attacked his roommate
and when he attempted to intervene, the suspect bit
him. The suspect was placed in custody. EMS ad-
vised the victim to get stitches, said the report.
Oct. 19, theft, 3600 block of East Bay Drive.
The victim reported an unknown person removed
two checks from his vehicle, forged his signature
and cashed the checks in the amounts of $2,500 and
$1,951. The case is under investigation.
Oct. 19, assistance in a residential lockout, 600
block of Key Royale Drive.
Oct. 19, animal, 100 block of 30th Street. The
complainant reported a dog jumped her fence a sec-
ond time in two days and the officer advised her to
call if the dog returns.
Oct. 20, bad check in the amount of $769.50,
Mike Norman Realty.
Oct. 20, theft of a sign, 5414 Marina Drive,
Artists Guild Gallery.
Oct. 20, dog bite, 3800 block of East Bay
Drive. The complainant reported he was standing at
the elevator and when the door opened, a dog exited
and bit him on the leg. There was a small puncture
wound, said the report. The dog's vaccination record
was confirmed.
Oct. 21, disturbance, 300 block of 61st Street.
The victim reported the suspect came home intoxi-
cated and an argument ensued. The victim said the
suspect scratched her nose and face and left. The
victim would not sign an affidavit.
If you have information that may help solve
crimes, contact Crime Stoppers at 747-COPS. You
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 19 ID


Kick off fall with fun for all


Fall Festival, the biggest and most fun of the an-
nual Anna Maria Elementary School fundraisers, is
happening Saturday, Oct. 30.
Members of the Parent-Teacher Organization and
volunteers have been busy organizing the event that
will begin with a costume parade for students and other
members of the community. Those participating in the
parade should arrive at 10 a.m. at Holmes Beach City
Hall, 5901 Marina Drive.
Costume judging will be promptly at 10:15 a.m.,
followed by a procession to the school at 10:30 a.m.
Costume winners from each class will be announced at
the school and awarded prizes.
The festivities at the school run from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Children from each classroom have been busy cre-
ating games and activities to be held on the school's
field. Some of the many activities include skeeball, an
obstacle course, pumpkin and face painting, and neck-
lace making..
The Sandbar, Sign of the Mermaid and Beach Bis-


tro restaurants, along with others, will offer food at the
event.
Music, a haunted house and dunk tank are a few
highlights of the festival.
Caramel apples, brownies, cakes and other good-
ies will be for sale in the school's cafeteria for imme-
diate consumption or to take home.
Food, game and raffle tickets can be purchased in
advance, before or after school, at the picnic tables
from 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m., or 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
through Thursday, Oct. 29, and on Friday, Oct. 29,
from 11:30 to noon.
Food and game tickets are 50 cents and are avail-
able in $5 packets. Raffle tickets are $1 and winners
need not be present. Prizes include dinner at local res-
taurants, overnight stays at area hotels, gift packages
and various gift certificates.
The school is located at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach. For more information, call Julie Krokroskia at
778-5447.


Students visit past
Martha Stewart, left, and Carolyne Norwvood, members oftlhe Anna Maria Island Historical Society, dress the part
while telling tales about the Island's early days to Anna Maria Elementary School finrth and fifth graders. Follow-
ing the presentation, students and teachers visited the museum. Islander Photo: Courtesy of Carolyne Norw'ood,


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School menu
Monday, 11/1/99
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets or Cheese Crois-
sant, Salad, Fruit, Juice
* Tuesday, 11/2/99
Breakfast: French Toast with Syrup or
Cereal, Juice
S Lunch: Ground Beef Tacos or Burrito,
Lettuce and Tomato, Fresh Fruit, Brownie
* Wednesday, 11/3/99
S Breakfast: Eggs or Cereal, Toast, Juice
S Lunch: Sloppy Joe on Bun or Junior Subma-
S rine Sandwich, Carrots with Dip, Fruit,
Dessert
Thursday, 11/4/99
S Breakfast: Pretzel with Cheese or Cereal,
, Juice .
* Lunch: Baked Chicken or Mini Chef Salad,
* Mashed Potatoes, Broccoli, Roll, Dessert
Friday, 11/5/99
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
S Lunch: Pizza or Nachos with Cheese, Salad,
Corn, Ice Cream
* All meals served with milk. *

Students seeing red
Anna Maria Elementary School will be celebrating
Red Ribbon Week through Oct. 31, to show its passion
and commitment to abstaining from drugs.
Students will be commemorating the event with a
Mighty Warriors assembly and a red ribbon will be
hung from each classroom door. Pledging their alle-
giance to a good cause, students, staff and faculty will
be wearing red attire on Friday, Oct. 29.
Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison and Holmes
Beach Police Officer Eric Kuusela will handout "To Cool
To Do Drugs" stickers to each student. Finally, Officer K,
as he is known, and other officers will receive red ribbons
for their police car antenna from students.
The community can show its support by digging
something red out of the closet, a ball cap or T-shirt,
and wearing it this week.



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Sun., Oct. 31 with
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Mr. Bones skewers
Islander Bystander
Four goals from the Islander Bystander's Tyler
Krauss were not enough to overcome the play of Blake
Tyre and Will Mills as Mr. Bones tripped up the By-
stander 6-5 in Division 1 soccer play Oct. 20.
Tyre and Mills scored two goals apiece in the
- makeup game that was rained out earlier this month
with Mr. Bones leading 2-0 on goals by Kyle Dale.
Bones goalie Kelsea Bachman saved the day for
her team when she made several saves on wide-open
shots from Bystander players.
Krauss erased the Bones lead with two quick shots
early on breakaways to make it 2-2. He could have had
a hat trick in the first five minutes of the game had it
not been for a spectacular save by Bachman.
Brandon Roberts also scored for the Bystander.
Tyre had enough of Krauss' antics, scoring on a
strong kick to the left corner of the goal and on a
breakaway in which he dribbled from mid-field past
two defenders to score and make it 4-2 in favor of
Bones.
Mills scored to make it 5-2 and it looked like Bones
had the win sewn up.
A furious Bystander comeback and a Krauss score
brought them back to 5-3. Mills put the game away
with a goal and a 6-3 Bones lead. Krauss made it 6-4
and Roberts got the newspaper team within one with a
great move and an open-goal kick.
The Bystander took four more shots in the last two
minutes but couldn't get the ball in the net and Bones
walked away with it 6-5.

Palm Tree Villas
tops LaPensee 3-2
It was deja vu all over again for LaPensee Plumb-
ing when Palm Tree Villas beat them by an identical 3-
2 score for the second week in a row in a Division 3
soccer game.
Once again Joel Mitchell was the straw that stirred
the drink for Palm Tree.


James Herrholz of LaPensee Plumbing makes a save on a corner kick by using his head. Herrholz played
goalie in the second half and made several brilliant stops to deny Division 3 leader Palm Tree Villas. How-
ever, a corner kick in the last two minutes of the game gave Palm Tree a 3-2 win over LaPensee for the second


week in a row. Islander Photo: David Futch

Mitchell scored one goal but more important was
Mitchell's defense and a final minute corner kick that
Spencer Carper smacked into goal for the victory. Palm
Tree Villas remains unbeaten and untied on the season
at 9-0 while LaPensee falls to 5-2 and is in second in
their division.
Palm Tree Coach Danny Mitchell said the game
stayed tense until the final seconds.
"This was a tough one," he said. "They played
great and we played great."
LaPensee Coach Andy Price agreed.
"We were down a man all night," Price said, "and
we still played them tough."
Mitchell started the scoring with a wicked penalty
kick that went screaming by goalie Sean Price.
Cody Pierce made it 2-0 Palm Tree shortly before
halftime when he scored on a breakaway.
The second half was a different story as LaPensee
players kept the pressure up by keeping the ball in Palm
Tree's side of the field.
Nick Smith of LaPensee started the scoring with a


nifty move to sidestep three Palm Tree players.
The Palm Tree goalie kicked the ball from inside
the box and Smith timed it just right, shooting through
the Palm Tree players waiting for the kick and firing
the ball in goal.
Nick Sato then did his part to tie the game with a
brilliant comer kick that looked like a banana as it flew
over the goalies head, hit the post and caromed in for
a 2-2 score.
Sato's teammate Smith yelled at the Palm Tree
players, "What's up with that?!?"
The goal lifted LaPensee's spirits as they put up a
strong defense.
The game could tave been a runaway if it weren't
for LaPensee's second-half goalie James Herrholz who
saved three sure goals, two of them one-on-one and one
of those he took in the gut.
But with less than a minute to play, Mitchell
burst LaPensee's bubble with a perfect corner kick
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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Mullet T-shirts ... $8 (Regular $10)
Mullet Diner-Style Mugs ... $7 (Regular $8)

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While quantities last. All prices include Florida sales tax. Mail order please add $3 per item for shipping and handling.

Iffehfo oaur new loo coming in or./Vov. 3 ./nnivei3my lmue







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 21 E[ -


SPORTS, FROM PAGE 20

to Carper for the win.

Alex Wright leads Galati
to 4-3 victory
In Division 4 action, Alex Wright of Galati Ma-
rine scored three goals to pace his team to a 4-3 win
on Oct. 18.


Wall ties Frazier TD passing
record in win over Venice
Freshman Manatee High School quarterback
Adam Wall of Anna Maria passed and ran his team to
a 24-6 win over the Venice freshman Oct. 21.
In leading the Manatee team to a 6-1 record on the
year, Wall tied Tommie Frazier's freshman Manatee
record of 11 touchdown passes.
Frazier went on to be an All-America quarterback
at the University of Nebraska and won the Heisman
Trophy as the best college football player.
Jon Jon Spearman started the scoring with a 7-yard
run and two-point conversion for an 8-0 lead on the
first drive of the game which saw Spearman run 40
yards on one play.
On Venice's next drive, defensive back DeAngelo
Carter stripped the ball from a Venice receiver and
Manatee recovered the fumble at the 50-yard line. Wall
drove the team to the two and scored on a quarterback
sneak and another two-point conversion for a 16-0 lead.
In the second half, Venice scored on a 70-yard run
to make it 16-6.
Manatee got the ball on its own 20 on the kickoff
and Wall ran the ball on a bootleg right and threw to his
favorite receiver Garris Joyner who ran another 60
yards for the score, a 24-6 win and a tie of Frazier's
record.
Now Wall is being tapped to play quarterback for
the Manatee junior varsity that has won 33 straight
games.
"We had a good season but I'm looking forward to
next year because we should be just as good or better,"
Wall said. "It puts pressure on us to win because if we
lose we'll always be remembered as the group that
stopped the streak. I don't want us to be known as the
team that did that."

Holmes Beach field complete
by Christmas
Mayor Carol Whitmore said the county expects to
finish Birdie Tebbetts Field in time for the Christmas
holidays.
When baseball and soccer players can use the field
is another matter entirely.
Whitmore and myself have been hounded by some
diehard baseball coaches and supporters who believe
the field should be strictly for hardball play and noth-
ing else.
We both agree that ain't going to happen.
"It's going to be a multi-use field for baseball, soc-
cer, art shows and whoever else wants to try and sched-
ule it," Whitmore said. "The county paid for the project


Division 1
Oct. 27
Oct. 29
Nov. 1


Anna Maria Island Community

Center soccer schedule


(Ages 12-13) All games begin at 7:30 p.m. unless designated
(makeup game) Mr. Bones vs. Island Animal Clinic 7 p.m.
Island Animal Clinic vs. Mr. Bones
Islander Bystander vs. Island Animal Clinic


Division 2 (Ages 10-11) All games begin at 7:30 p.m. unless designated
Oct. 27 (makeup game) Air & Energy vs. Florida Yacht at 8 p.m.
Oct. 28 Pool America vs. Air & Energy
Nov. 2 Beall's vs. Florida Yacht

Division 3 (Ages 8-9) All games begin at 6 p.m. unless designated
Oct. 27 (makeup game) Oden-Hardy vs. LaPensee
Oct. 29 Beach Bistro vs. Longboat Observer
Nov. 1 Oden-Hardy vs. Beach Bistro
Nov. 2 Longboat Observer vs. LaPensee

Division 4 (Ages 5-7)
Oct. 27 Harry's Continental Kitchens vs. Jessie's Island Store at 6 p.m.
Oct. 28 Island Real Estate vs. Island Pest Control at 6 p.m.
Galati Marine vs. West Coast Refrigeration at 7 p.m.
Nov. 2 Harry's Continental Kitchens vs. West Coast Refrigeration at 6 p.m.
Jessie's Island Store vs. Island Pest Control at 7 p.m.
First team listed is home team


and they're going to demand it be that way."
Fears of the field being torn up by soccer players
are unfounded. Soccer will be played only in the out-
field. The infield playing surface will be cordoned off
during soccer practice and games so it won't be
harmed.
This field is a good deal for everyone. Let's not
muck it up by saying "it's my sandbox and my toys and
you can't play."

Why boats are named
after women
I got a call from retired British Airways pilot John
Hunt on the definitive reason why boats are most of-
ten named after women.
Hunt, who lives in Surrey, England, most of the
year and stays at Bali Hai Resort in Holmes Beach
for two months, saw a story I wrote two weeks ago
about names people give their boats and why.
In all my research, however, I could not find out
the exact reason why boats are named after women.
I got a lot of good suggestions but Hunt came up
with one that's top shelf. Or at least some old Brit-
ish sailors likely came up with it.
Hunt, formerly an avid sailor, explained that in
the days of tall ships they were entirely sailing ves-
sels.
"And the reason they named ships after women
was because they're rigging cost so much."
Aye-aye, captain.

Daniels beats blustery wind,
long hitters for win
Chuck Daniels won the weekly Sunrise Golf Tour-


Hannah Mitchell with Air & Energy shows her form during a soccer game. Islander Photo: David Futch


nament by beating a howling nor'wester and some
long-driving players Oct. 20 at Buffalo Creek Golf
Course.
Daniels had a plus five on a modified Stableford
scoring system and also earned points toward player of
the year status with a skin. He had three birdies on the
day and 45 total points.
Rob Canada came in second with plus three to earn
20 points.
Closest-to-the-pin "greenies were won by John
Van Ostenbridge, Tim Lease, Tim Woltz and Neal
Curtis. Van Ostenbridge got the prize for craziest shot
of the day when he hit a line-drive tee shot on the par
3 No. 4. With the wind whipping the flag around, his
screaming shot struck the flag and dropped straight
down two feet from the hole.
Joe Rodgers had two skins on the day to add to his
total while Curtis, Daniels and Van Ostenbridge had
one each.
Jon Huffman and myself took "sandbagging"
rights for playing the worst rounds of our lives.
We blamed our bad play on staying too long at
the Flavors of the Island festival Saturday and stand-
ing too close to the Bud truck.
Also the wind was blowing too hard, we had no
short game and couldn't putt, our brothers beat us up
as children and I cut my little toe the day before.
You get the picture.
Go Bucs. Dump Dilfer.



Soccer

standings

as of Oct. 22
Divisions 1 (Ages 12-13)
Team Record Points
Islander Bystander 3-1-2 11
Mr. Bones 3-2-1 10
Island Animal Clinic 1-4-1 4

Division 2 (Ages 10-11)
Team Record Points
Air & Energy 3-0-2 11
Pool America 3-0-1 10
Beall's 2-3-1 7
Florida Yacht Conn. 0-5-0 0

Division 3 (8-9 year olds)
Team Record Points
Palm Tree Villas 9-0-0 27
LaPensee Plumbing 5-2-0 15
Longboat Observer 3-4-0 9
Beach Bistro 3-7-0 9
Oden-Hardy Const. 0-7-0 0

Points determine position in standings: 3
points for a win, 1 for a tie and 0 for a loss


;oi L. Fl CI ~ rr a st r!







0 D PAGE 22 M OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Noise squabbles near and far, musseling in Tampa


You may have been noticing the squabbles our
neighbors to the south have been going through over
noise. Sarasota residents and nightclub owners have
been shouting at each other for more than a year over
loud music.
Residents who live near downtown and out on St.
Armands Circle complain that the bass levels of bands
disrupts their sleep at night and they're arguing with
club owners to turn it down. Club owners say the mu-
sic is vital to draw in crowds and that the residents are
just old fogies who should get a life.
Sarasota officials stepped in on the side of the citi-
zens and, to date, two clubs are out of business thanks
Sto laws that restrict noise levels.
Now there's another battle brewing, this time un-
derwater.
Submarines are getting quieter and quieter these
days. Subs built in Russia, Sweden, Germany and Italy
and sold to third-world countries not necessarily
friendly with the United States are getting really,
really quiet, all the better to sneak up on folks, and the
quiet designs are getting U.S. Navy officials nervous.
The Navy is so nervous that it's dropped something
like $350 million in the past 10 years to develop spe-
cial detection systems to locate foreign submarines.
And according to a batch of environmental groups,
the detection system's low-frequency, high-decibel
sound waves are wreaking havoc with whales and other
marine mammals.
As you probably know, sound travels very, very
well under water. If you're a diver, you know you can
hear a boat motor from a really long way away.
Whales, especially humpbacks, "sing" to one another
from really phenomenal distances, apparently convers-
ing to each other from thousands of miles away.
The environmental fear is that this new U.S. sub-
detection system is so loud that it may cause deafness
in whales once it's up and running.
Naval scientists say the environmental concern is
unfounded and the Surveillance Towed Array Sensor
System don't you love those names? SURTASS? -
isn't really all that loud at all and that the eco-freaks
should just quietly go away.
What I find interesting about all this loud argu-
ing is that there doesn't seem to be any argument
that whales can hear things from great distances. In
fact, there have been some studies conducted in the
Pacific Ocean that point out that ship traffic is in-
deed disrupting the whales. Think about it: You've
got thousands of ships tooling across the water, each
ship's engine is revving away those whales must
think they're in the middle of a washing machine
instead of the placid Pacific.
And the real kicker is that the SURTASS system
emits sounds that are eerily similar to the "songs"
humpback whales sing to one another.

Pacific green mussels
Oops. A few weeks ago I mentioned that zebra
mussels are causing a problem in the Great Lakes -
particularly clogging water pipes and mentioned
that the problem is a freshwater issue that isn't impact-
ing us here. What I didn't mention was that something
called Pacific green mussels are appearing here and
starting to clog power plant cooling lines in Tampa
Bay.
It seems that ships from the Far East are bringing
the tiny mollusks to the port in Tampa via ballast tanks.
As the ships flush out the water, they flush out the
mussels, which seem to be flourishing in some parts of
Tampa Bay. As goes Tampa, so goes Sarasota?


I i

0



By Paul;,~ t ;


Just when you thought Brazilian pepper or Austra-
lian pine trees were our worst exotic species threat ...

How hot is it?
You gotta love scientists like Thomas Delworth. .
Imagine the scene. He and two colleagues are sit-
ting around having a cool adult beverage after a hard
day's work at the National Oceanic Atmospheric
Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Labora-
tory. Although you and I probably wouldn't bring it up
in idle conversation, they get to talking about global
warming.
Suddenly, somebody says something like, "1 won-
der what the heat index would be based on warmer glo-
bal temperatures?" (OK, so some scientists don't really
have lives.)
So they went into their Princeton, N.J., lab and
crunched the numbers for what the "feels-like" tem-
perature would be, factoring in humidity, based on glo-
bal warming figures. Their results are pretty scary.
Delworth and crew figure the average summer
"feel-like" temperature for most of the United States in
the next 50 years will be 100.
They also figure annual heat-related deaths will go
from the current 1.200 to several thousand.
I figure that figuring numbers like that is why sci-
entists make the big bucks. I've been reading and writ-
ing about global warming for 10 years at least, specu-
lating on the impacts heat will have on ice caps, sea
levels, mangroves, seagrass and Island waterfront
homes.
But I never thought about what the heat index
would be in conjunction with warmer weather.
As Thomas Knutson, Delworth's colleague, says
as something of an understatement, "Things are going
to be very hot and sticky and that's going to be a prob-
lem with global warming."

Florida is hot for writers, too
This is an unabashed plug for our state. Florida is
becoming a mecca for mystery writers.
The late John D. MacDonald started the trend in
the 1960s. His Travis McGee character brought the
Sunshine State into national and international promi-
nence as a place that is just as suited to crime and
crime writers as New York or Chicago.
John D. has been followed by the likes of Randy
Wayne White, James T. Hall, Carl Hiaasen, E.C.
Ayers his character lives in Manatee City, by the
way Ace Atkins, Tim Dorsey, Edna Buchanan,
Richard Hoyt, Carolina Garcia-Aguilera, Tom
Corcoran, Elmore Leonard, Charles Willeford, and
many more.
Peter King finished his last novel on Longboat
Key. Stuart Kaminsky's latest book, "Vengeance,"
takes place in Sarasota and has a pivotal scene at the
"Barrington House" in Holmes Beach a bed and
breakfast inn on the Gulf that sounds an awful lot like
the Davis's Harrington House to me.
Kaminsky, a Sarasota resident who's written 49
books, has just edited an anthology of 22 Florida-based


short stories called "Mystery in the Sunshine State."
The stories are great imagine an exotic dancer and
"her feisty Chihuahua, Fluffy, catching the killer of her
boss" as an example.
I really like part of Kiaminsky's introduction:
"Florida is ripe for the mystery: the promise of
Paradise, the reality of broken dreams. The contrast
between Paradise and consequences is, I repeat, fertile
material for the mystery writer.
"The stories in this collection are generally in
contrast to the established tradition of the noir mys-
tery set in the big city. Those stories take place
largely at night in the cynical jungle of the city, the
shadows in the darkness. In many Florida tales, it is
not only the darkness that should be feared but also
the bright sunlight. The Florida mystery can be vio-
lent. Florida's killers kill on the highways and
beaches in broad daylight.
"There is no hiding from evil in these Florida tales.
"The shark, the jellyfish, the alligator, the drug
dealer shooting wildly, the kid with a knife and no con-
science, the old man driven mad by broken dreams -
they're all out there and they're very real."
And to continue my bookish commercial message,
Kaminsky will be at Circle Books on St. Armands
Circle Nov. 6 to sign "Mystery in the Sunshine State."
He'll be joined by three contributors E.C. Ayers,
Wayne Barcomb and Peter King for the signing,
which runs from 1-3 p.m.
By the way, my friends Debbie and Eric at the
bookstore are developing a reputation of having a large
number of autographed copies of books available for
sale an alert for book-collecting Islanders. They're
at 478 John Ringling Blvd., just off the circle heading
toward Sarasota. Near the former "Buttery," if you've
been around long enough to remember it.

Sandscript factoid
From the minutes of the Bradenton Beach City
Commission, April 4, 1952:
"Mr. Hess, the city clerk, then read an article ap-
pearing in the Bradenton Herald regarding the Island
Chamber of Commerce advocating Islandwide incor-
poration. Mayor Gorsuch stated that in his opinion
Bradenton Beach was better off as it was and that with
its income it could accomplish infinitely more than it
would be possible to do if the moneys were spread over
the seven miles of territory.
"Mr. Hess stated that prior to incorporation [of
Bradenton Beach in 1951] the committee for incor-
poration had promised the people that there would
be no ad valorem taxes and that the present city of-
ficials had kept that promise by enacting as the first
thing Ordinance 1, which would require a vote of
two-thirds of the freeholders to place such taxes and
that certainly Islandwide incorporation would re-
quire more money to operate the government and
that the only way to raise such money would be by
ad valorem taxes, and due to that fact, along with the
fact that Bradenton Beach would lose its identity, he
certainly would fight such a movement."
Of course, the minutes also include a notation
from Sept. 26, 1952, that "appointed [Councilman]
Ritz to find out the dates of home football games so
as to allow council meetings to be arranged as not to
conflict."


ISLANDER

3EH 3


Inshore Sport Fishing
Charter Boat
,O eatA






Full & Half Day Trips
Custom Trips Available

Captain Steven Salgado
Owner/Operator
Lifetime experience in local waters
U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait
& Tackle Furnished
Anna Maria Island, Florida


778-9712


----~--






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 M PAGE 23 I]

Proposed rules hamper fishing, fronts hurt, too


By Capt. Mike Heistand and Capt. David Futch
Here's another rule fishermen are going to have to
live with and it comes from the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission.
The commission sent this advisory but the Gulf of
Mexico Fishery Management Council thought it up.
The council is considering a moratorium on the
issuance of Reef Fish Fishery Permits and Coastal
Migratory Pelagics Fishery Permits.
These permits are required for all Gulf charter ves-
sel/headboat operators to harvest reef fish such as gag
grouper and snapper as well as coastal pelagic fish such
as kingfish, Spanish mackerel, cobia, dolphin and blue-
fish.
Florida licensed guides and charter/headboat op-
erators are advised to contact the National Marine Fish-
eries Service at (727) 570-5326 to apply for these per-
mits before the moratorium takes effect.
The National Marine Fisheries has something up
its sleeve in an effort to save gag grouper from com-
mercial overfishing.
NMF's plan would ban fishing in two.100-square-
mile blocks of the Gulf of Mexico to protect gag
spawning grounds.
The two blocks are southwest of Apalachicola and
southwest of the Florida Middle Ground at 84 degrees
30 minutes longitude and 28 degrees latitude.
This rule strikes us as a pretty good idea because
of the intense commercial longlining that's been tak-
ing place there for the past 20 years. The constant
scouring of this area has depleted male gags and DNA
tests show intense inner breeding.
One last rule courtesy of the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission.
A public hearing is scheduled for 7 to 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 18, and will focus on regulations for
commercial stone crab traps.
The meeting will be at Kendrick Auditorium at the
Manatee County Department of Agriculture and Natu-
ral Resources, 1303 17th St. W., Palmetto.
For more information, call (850) 487-0554.
As the state and federal governments continue to
thrash us with proposed laws, it reminds us of what
philosopher and novelist Albert Camus once said, "The
surest sign of a civilization in decline is one that has too
many rules."
Apparently the Manatee County Ducks Unlimited
get together at the fair grounds Oct. 21 in Palmetto was
a huge success.
So much so that they ran out of food. They were
expecting 500 people and 600 showed up.
Still, everyone had a good time and some fancy
items were bought at auction including shotguns, fish-



NEVA-MISS


Great Fishing D eep Sea
Fun & Sun Inshore
For All Ages Fishing

FISHING CHARTERS
Docked at the Cortez Fishing Center
(941) 792-5835 Capt. Curt & Sue Morrison, Owners







Hand-LtteredBoats ndSigns
Bill & Sheri Lapointe
1103 Gulf Drive S., Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
lapointeone@mindspring.com



James G. Annis
LICENSED WATERFRONT CONTRACTOR



778-4771
P.O.BOX 1353, Anna Maria, FL 34216
MC00361


~ - .
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: rtr ^j ^ S *.


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Here's a nice Spanish mackerel David Futch caught aboard Capt. Matt Bowers' boat near Egmont Channel.
There's a bunch of them around right now and look for kingfish to show in numbers as the water temperature
starts to drop.


ing equipment and some great fishing and hunting trips
including a charter with perhaps Florida's best snook
fishing guide Capt. Scott Moore.
Now for fishing around the Island.
Offshore boats had a difficult time getting out with
the nor'westers that blew through last week and kicked
up the Gulf. Fishing remains steady if you can't get out
there.
The Rod & Reel Pier reports they're catching
mackerel, snook and drum.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said inshore fisher-
men have been getting flounder, snapper, mackerel,
redfish, trout and a lot of small grouper while offshore
people are finding grouper, snapper, cobia, flounder
and triggerfish happy to cooperate.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said boaters
are doing good on trout and redfish around the man-
groves but the snook are small. Offshore is a "no way"
because it's too rough, Carl added.
Annie's Bait & Tackle reporting for Capt. Zack
with the Dee-Jay II said he caught snook, reds, trout,
flounder and jack crevalle inside. Spanish mackerel and
triggerfish were caught off the beaches with kingfish
and cobia coming on. Nick Schram, 7, of Fort Lauder-
dale got a backwater Grand Slam on Saturday of a


OFF-SHORE SPORT FISHING
4, 6 & 9 Hour Trips plus

with Capt. Scott Greer
Aboard 34-foot ,,,
Sport Fisherman the -
STRAY DOG
794-5615 Docked at Cortez Fishing Center


In The Game of Golf,
Club Selection is Everything!
BRADENTON, FL-Conveniently located to Bradenton,
Sarasota, Longboat Key and Anna Maria Island, set in
privacy along the tranquil shores of Sarasota Bay, El
Conquistador is an established private member-owned
country club with an 18-hole championship golf course
that's considered among the area's most challenging.
Providing exceptional cuisine, beautiful clubhouse and
dynamic social programs exclusively for its limited mem-
bership, El Conquistador is the perfect club selection
for your enjoyment and Florida lifestyle.
We Invite You To Join Us
941-758-1466
www.elconcc.com

'ElConquistador'
Country Club, inc.
4350 El Conquistador Parkway
Bradenton, Florida 34210
MAlIVERIISIEMN NT


trout, redfish and snook.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
snook fishing is still slow but there are a lot of redfish,
black drum, trout and flounder brought to the dock last
week.
Capt. Tom Chaya said there's a lot of mackerel and
flounder out there right now.
Capt. Sam Kimball with the Legend said his people
caught kingfish to 12 pounds and mackerel to five,
grouper to 10 and flounder to three.
Capt. Rick Gross said there are a lot of redfish,
trout and small snook available.
Capt. Thom Smith with Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he's been catching a lot of reds and trout on
Top Dog lures and Cotce jigs.
Capt. Glenn Corder said offshore fishing was too
rough most of the week but when they did get out they
caught red and gag grouper up to 10 pounds and snap-
per to four pounds.
Capt. Kurt Morrison said the same thing with lots
of grouper under 10 pounds. With the change in the
weather and cooler waters, watch for the kings to show
up in force any day now.
On Capt. Mike's boat Magic, anglers caught eight
reds, four trout and three flounder in his only trip.



onnoa ar Tio Vslan TiSes

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Oct27 1:03 2.6 8:18 -0.3 3:51 1.6 6:56 1.4
Oct 28 1:42 2.6 9:14 -0.2 5:14 1.5 7:17 1.4
Oct 29 2:25 2.5 10:16 -0.1 - -
Oct 30 3:19 2.4 11:29 0.0 -
LQ Oct31 4:28 2.2 9:26 1.6 12:42 0.1
Nov1 5:11 1.9 8:48 1.7 12:54 0.3
Nov2 7:04 1.8 1:15 1.3 9:13 1.8 1:56 0.4
Nov3 8:34 1.8 2:27 1.0 9:34 1.9 2:42 0.5
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later






BRIAN J. WOOD

Docks Seawalls

Boat Lifts
"BUILDING THE BEST, REPAIRING THE REST"

Seawall Caps Erosion Control
Pilings Rock Revetments
Installations Supplies
Service & Repairs

FREE ESTIMATES -
S 792-5322
State Cert. CRC049564
CCN NO. 02311


_I


, .,
% -..." .






JI[ PAGE 24 N OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




Van Wezel Hall tickets
on home order
The Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall has
opened its website to theater-goers who wish to or-
der their tickets through via computers at
www.vanwezel.org.
Tickets go on sale Monday, Nov. 1, at the box
office for the Festival Tent season and online. Dur-
ing renovation of the Van Wezel, the box office is at
the south entrance to the purple construction trailer
in the theater's parking lot, 777 No. Tamiami Trail,
Sarasota.
Details may be obtained at 953-3368.


'Boyfriend' starts
Thursday
The whole cast gets into the
act on the stage of "The
Boyfriend," a jazz-age
musical comedy opening
Thursday, Oct. 21, at the
Riverfront Theatre, 102 Old
Main St., Bradenton. The
Manatee Players production
will run through Nov. 7, with
curtain times 8 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturdays and 2 p.m
Sunday. Tickets are $17,
with students half price.
Details are available
at 748-5875.


ISLANDER



October20 Wirmer
BOBDOUGLAS
Hobwseadi






$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE
* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the per- All entries must be submitted on the pub- Winner Advertiser
son with the most correct game-winning pre- lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to 3
dictions. Collect prize in person or by mail. include name, address and phone number. 4
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv- The names of all of the advertisers must be 5
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday listed on the entry to be eligible to win. 6
the same week the contest is published. Only one entry per person, per week. 7
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn Winner Advertiser 8
from tying entries. The decision of The 1 9
Islander Bystander football judge is final. 2 10


* Nam


Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978
e Address Phone


ISLANDER


Get in the game!
Advertise here!
There's a space left
for your business in
the Island's most
talked about
football contest!
Florida at Georgia
Call 778-7978
to feature your
business here!


P44- / `/'
Kite Shop

Knowledgeable Sales & Service
Kites Banners Accessories
778-7600
25 Different Stunt Kites
and over 400 Banners
including NFL, MLB, NHL
and Collegiate
Chicago a Washington
NEW LOCATION!
3228 E. Bay Drive
Anna Maria Island Center
Between Shells & Walgreens


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450
(941) 778-2307
1 (800) 306-9666
Buffalo at Baltimore
9701 Gulf Drive'P 0 Box 717
Anna Maria, FL 34216


100 Spring Ave, Anna Maria
Call 778-0444 for Preferred Sealing
SDallas at Indianapolis I


OPEN FOR LUNCH
FRITHRUSUN 11AM -3PM
4.



MEGA DEAL
Any medium pizza, any
toppings, anytime!
FREE Delivery $799 plus tax
Mon-Thurs 4-midnight
Fri-St 11-2m Sun. 11-midnight
Minnesota at Denver
778-6641
5600 Marina Dr, Holmes Beach

Football sponsors


HolmesBeachBP ISLANDER marco polo
pizza

The Island's Get in the game! l 1"K
only full- Advertise here!
olyfull.- There's a space left HALLOWEEN PARTY
se-e station. for your business in & COSTUME CONTEST
the Island's most at., Oct 30
F e tr e rotin Aa winn talked about n\
reee roasidetion Aw dining football contest! $20 All-You-Can-
with oil change. Good thru Drink DRAFT BEER
1/15/99, weekdays only. Zagat survey: St. Louis at iTelnnssee Door Prizes Surprises Food
115/99, weekdays only. "Best Food"
5333 Gulf Drive lolmes Beach Call 778-7978 778-4408
778-36 ,io V7 to feature your 3244 E. Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
San l)i'so at> Katnsais City\
NY Giants at Philadelphia | business here! TInpa ,, DCetroit
778-6444

needed. Call 778-7978 to advertise in the hottest football contest on the Island!


-4






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 25 I[1


BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love
seat $399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129;
futons (sofa by day bed at night) frame and mat-
tress $199; daybed (white with brass finials) includ-
ing two mattresses and pop-up unit $285. Can de-
liver. Call 753-7118.

MACINTOSH POWERBOOK 520. Laptop model,
ready to use $500. Ericcson cell phone with car and
home charger, manual, $35. Canon Speedlite strobe
attachment, $30. All can be seen at The Islander By-
stander office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, or
call 778-7978.

PAIR OF SPEAKERS, acoustic responsive, still in
box. Paid $400, sell for $250. 779-0909.

FURNITURE TRADITIONAL, like new. Recliner/
rocker, beige $75; oak coffee and two end tables
$120; oak dining table and four high-back chairs
$250. 778-3597.

FIGHTING CHAIR Stainless steel with swivel
$1,800 new, $750 OBO. 50-lb. swivel plow anchor,
$600 new, $275 OBO 778-7108 or 321-0479.

MISCELLANEOUS FURNITURE Couch, chairs,
lamps, small table, bookshelves. 387-7961.

TWO, THREE-WHEELED electric Amigo carts. One
Lift-all lift for cart hauling. All three $500. 778-6095.

20-FT. ALUMINUM ladder $25, boat davits $75,
1950's dining room chairs $50 set. 778-8559.


LARGE GARAGE SALE Saturday, Oct. 30. Dining
sets, sofa bed, tables, loveseat, pots, pans, and
more. 8:30am-noon. 2202 Ave. B, Bradenton Beach.

ISLAND PLANTATION RESORT, Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 29 and 30. Retired furniture, furnishings, TV's,
equipment and more. 7300 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.


501 65th Street A canalfront home with boat
lift. 3BR/2.5BA, 1.5 attached garage now under
construction. 2,000 sq. ft. remodeled home.
Close to beach. Offered at $265,000.

BDoug Dowling Realty
409 Pine Ave. Anna Maria, Fl 34216
Phone & Fax: (941)778-1222
E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/-dougdowling/


ESTATE SALE Saturday, Oct. 30, 9am-5pm. Living
room, dining room, king bedroom set, twin beds,
much more, everything must go. 600 Manatee Ave.
#12A, West Bay Cove.

GARAGE SALE Saturday, Oct. 30, 8am-2pm. An-
tiques, furniture, collectibles, wicker, mirrors, lawn
mower, clothing, etc! 424 Pine Avenue.

ROSER GUILD THRIFT Shop. Open Tuesday,
Thursday 9:30am-2pm, Saturdays 9am-noon. In
stock, children's clothing, records, wedding dress.
511 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.

YARD SALE Saturday and Sunday, 8am, Oct. 30
and 31. Beanie Babies, designer clothes, furniture,
antiques, knick knacks, Tupperware, appliances.
311A Magnolia Ave.

YARD SALE Friday, Oct. 29. Table, couches, refrig-
erators, stoves, washer/dryer, lamps, pictures, 900-
mz. phone, answering machine, file cabinets, fax,
credenza, desk, coin dryer, more. Items available
earlier than Friday 778-4523. 3104 Avenue F,
Holmes Beach.



NOW OPEN Cortez Bait and Seafood Market. Sea-
food, stone crabs, smoked salmon and mullet. Turn
south at Cortez traffic light, 119th Street W., Cortez,
FL, end of road. 798-9404.



FOUND BI-FOCAL GLASSES Oct. 18 on Bradenton
Beach. Call 778-4315.



"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water and lots of TLC! Island Residents 21 years.
Pet Care Service 5 years. 778-6000.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 795-8299.

WET SLIPS AND Hi 'N' Dry storage available at com-
petitive rates in modern, full-service marina. 778-2255.

OFFSHORE CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Glenn
Corder aboard Deep South. Half & full day. For infor-
mation call 778-1203 or Mobile 713-5900.

WANTED TO RENT a private boat dock for a 30-ft. Cabin
Cruiser year- round. Responsible owner 739-2871.

19-FOOT GRADY WHITE with 1989 130-hp
Yamaha. Great condition, many extras. $7,200 OBO
778-0321 or 778-0826.

BOAT SLIP WANTED 31-ft. sailboat, 4-ft draft, non-
liveaboard. 778-6601

GALVANIZED 14-FT TILT boat trailer, needs repair.
Good 12-in. tires $50, 778-2618.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part-time cooks and full and part-time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.

HELP WANTED, HOUSEKEEPING, non-smoker,
own transportation. Part/full-time, 778-9597.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Community Center, team
member wanted, office manager. Detail-oriented,
positive attitude, excellent communication skills, ac-
curate accounting. In addition, computer skills include
Office, Word, Excel, Print Shop. Duties include an-
swering the telephone, bookkeeping, reports, corre-
spondence, grants, volunteer coordination, program
scheduling. Competitive salary and benefits. Fax re-
sume to 778-9511 or telephone Mrs. Kelly 778-1908.


Football contestsponsorsneeded. 7787978to advertise iteh etg e Is lan


E mail: smithami@gate.net
Web site: www.smtihrealtors.com


LOTS OF POSSIBILITIES! 3BR/2BA single family
home on large lot. Duplex zoned with two entrances
already. Wood deck, outdoor shower and a deeded
boat dock, too! $174,900. Dial the Duncans! Judy
778-1589 or Darcie 779-2290 eves.
BRADENTON
MARINER'S COVE Luxury waterfront 3BR/2BA
condo at The Pointe at Mariner's Cove with cut
coral fireplace, curved wall accents, two-car ga-
rage, workshop, private lobby and elevator,
three lanais, TV security system, gourmet
kitchen, premium 20 by 50 ft. boat slip.
$425,000. Dial the Duncans! Judy 778-1589 or
Darcie 779-2290 eves.
WILD OAK BAY. View of tropical vegetation and
lake from the lanai of this well-maintained 3BR/
2BA spacious condo. This first floor unit is turnkey
furnished and just steps from the pool. $119,900.
Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
SO MUCH FOR SO LITTLE! 2BR/1BA home
close to beach has huge duplex-zoned lot and
caged heated pool. $89,900. Call Marion Ragni
761-1415 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden

1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS [ 1 L


JUST LISTED!
This well built elevated home is on two large canalfront
lots on the north end of Anna Maria. Unlimited poten-
tial here to expand or knock down for two great
canalfront lots. 228 ft. on the water. This one won't last!
Offered at $329,000.
I LISTED!




,Z,_
4 :4






CAREFREE LIVING IN NORTHWEST BRADENTON.
This charming condo is close to everything. Recently
updated with new ceramic tile, new appliances, new
A/C unit and fresh paint. Lovely corner unit in a re-
laxed complex and just steps to the pool. Don't miss
this opportunity for truly affordable living! Just listed
Sat $64,900.
Call Ken Jackson at 778-6986
Agnes Tooker 778-5287
MLS Bill and Larae Regis 779-1858



Fran Maxon
SSALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive PO Box 717 Anno Maria. FL 34216
(941) 778-2307
Toll Free 1-800-306-9666
www.franmaxonrealestate.com


BUILT LIKE A FORTRESS! Gorgeous 3BR/2BA with solar
heated/caged pool. One block to bay, two blocks to beach.
Wheelchair accessible, hydro tub, double lot (zoned duplex),
tongue-and-groove ceilings, too many extras to list. $286,000.
Robert St. Jean 794-8059 or Carolyn Patrick 331-9201.
CAROLYN PATRICK ROBERT ST-JEAN
WATERFRONT INTERNATIONAL
SPECI/AL.JIST MARKETING
331-9201 (94+1) 7 9 --8059

SURF Er TURF
1-8QQ894-9606

SWedebrock Real ie Compn
TOP EIN: TP
LISTING SALES
AC3EI-4T- -AGENT-


I^'^n'


r-Ti'mS^






M3 PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

A E C AF


TIME FOR A CHANGE? I need two experienced
agents to work at a high powered office, Great expo-
sure, good splits. Island office with a lot of traffic. Call
Michael L. Nink, Wedebrock Real Estate Company
for confidential interview 778-0700.

FULL-TIME MAINTENANCE position for Longboat
resort. Painting, carpentry, minor plumbing and elec-
tric, general repairs. Call 383-2428 for appointment.

PART-TIME HELP WANTED. Light housekeeping,
meals, driving. Call 795-1877.

SERVERS, full and part-time bartenders, bussers,
host/hostess, full and part-time cook. Buccaneer Inn
383-5565.

COMPANION LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING, light cook-
ing, Mon. Fri. 9am-1pm. References upon request,
background check required 792-1421.

FULL OR PART-TIME help needed at the Island's
health food store. Call 778-5181 for appointment.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial
Library. Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or
778-6247.







sefsySRIU9M eal stae, iL/.
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294

JUST I5TED!



wt ww





WANALFROAfT POOL HOHE
This light and spacious 3BR/2BA Bay Palms beauty
offers a deep, seawalled canal with boat dock, plus
beautiful caged heated swimming pool! Other fea-
tures include cool, white ceramic tiled floors, split
bedroom design, breakfast bar and richly textured
ceiling with fans. Only $269,000! Don't miss it!










WlLE-K1tSON HOME
JUST STEPS TO TAMPA RAy!
This inviting, spacious 3BR/2BA island residence
offers countless amenities including lovely oak floors
and molding, cozy window seats with storage under-
neath, skylights, gorgeous brick fireplace with raised
hearth and,oak mantle, vaulted ceilings in family
room, pretty oak kitchen cabinets, and spacious,
private sundeck with built-in brick barbecue. Other
features include many mature traveler's palms. Only
$229,000, including Preferred One Year
Homeowner's Warranty!
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
he a oa T le h t L i tf47
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gulllord...778-215B Monica Rild...729-3333
Susanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser... 778-1820
.QExclusive dn Pe e
'Hom Estatos MWLS IlAN
Video Colleclion


Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com


MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, mulching,
trimming, clean-up, edgings, and more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

BANKRUPTCY $200, Divorce $150 to $200. Adoption,
corporations, modifications, power of attorney, name
change. Suncoast Paralegal Services 742-4788.

HAVING A MAC ATTACK? Call for help with Mac or
PC. Training, internet, hardware selection and
installation. Call Ed, 778-2553.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.

SILCOX CERAMIC TILE. Old and new, full service.
723-2361, 24 hours.

THE HONEY DO MAN Handyman. Odd jobs, small
jobs, repairs. Heating and air conditioning. Licensed,
insured. Free estimates 778-5003 or 726-1067.

MAID FOR YOU residential cleaning for all your
needs, Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, and special
occasions. Reasonable rates, dependable service.
Licensed and bonded. Call today for a free estimate
and leave the dirty work for us! 792-7613.


\7WAGNED R EALTY
YOUR HOMETOW REALTOR ESTABUSHED 1939


Vacation Rentals
HOMES CONDOS RESORT
GOLF COURSE COMMUNITIES
800 211-2323 941 778-2246
RUNAWAY BAY RESORT
800 346-7340 941 778-0000



I'..--. .r.'.---------,..---.- ..---










ONE OF A KIND!
Gulffront lot on a quiet dead-end street! There are
no more like this! For sale by owner. 31st St. and
Ave. F. $399,000. 778-4523 or 800-977-0803.


HOME PRIDE CLEANING Service. Put pride in your
home. Honest and dependable, weekly or bi-weekly.
Call 795-1225.

HUSBAND FOR A DAY odd jobs, even jobs, no job
too small. Licensed, insured 778-2784.

STUMP GRINDING by Brad Frederick. Fenced
yard? Not a problem! Prices start at $30. Small tree
removal also available 730-0001.

RESIDENTIAL HELP house cleaning, errands,
shopping, watching pets. Longboat Key resident,
honest, reliable, references. Call 920-0046 or leave
a message.

TUTOR GRADES 4-9 reading, math, all subjects. 34
years experience, days or early evenings. 792-7377.

JAMES MELANSON PAINTING interior, exterior,
pressure cleaning. 11-year island resident, 33 years
experience. 779-1463.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING removes un-
sightly black mildew, salt and dirt from house
exteriors, windows, roofs, gutters, driveways and
decks. Call 778-0944.

LARRY'S BACK Shell delivered, spread $25 yard.
Topsoil, gravel, mulch hauling-all kinds. Office 778-
1169, home 779-1529.




I-~I

Reta Mnaemnt Ic

Simlyth Bst

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1-0023-252or77-48.


IISLANDER


LI a


M Sau 0'ndsC p
n (QAI ) 7AR/-A lio e'7: T oAA T;^-<. *. Pe-^1,- 'Rrf-%L-i


ISLAND RETREAT on Anna Maria Island. Savor the beauti-
ful sunsets from your own deck. Just steps to the beach, this
3BR home is impeccably maintained. $259,900. Sandy
Drapala 794-3354 or Kathy Marcinko, 252-1618. R40351

WATERFRONT
ENJOY NATURE'S BEAUTY in this rare condominium available on
Sarasota Bay. Secured entry and private elevator. Numerous ameni-
ties and conveniences in the area. $274,900. Carol Greenwald, 758-
6514.C40116
RELAX by the bay from this newly updated 3BR home in Terra Ceia.
1/2 +/- acre lot adjoins a pond, lake and a panoramic view of Terra
Ceia Bay. Ideal for fishing enthusiasts with a 300+ ft. community fish-
ing pier. $169,900. Joanne Jenkins, 795-3838. R38013
YOUR WIFE will love the new kitchen in this enchanting 2BR/2B unit.
Beautifully decorated. $152,900. Bob Hall, 749-5981 or
wwwfloridahouse.net. C38696


BEST BUY ON THE BEACH. Make your dream come true at
this spectacular Anna Maria Island beach house. Designed to
see the views. $599,900. Ethel Lovelace 349-3444. R13011

WEST/NORTHWEST
GREAT LOCATION. 3BR/2B condominium with cathedral
ceiling, separate kitchen. New carpet and paint throughout,
tiled family room. Lakefront setting. $116,000. Jim Sellars,
798-3577. C39889
WEST BRADENTON POOL HOME 3BR/2B plus den, tile
kitchen floor, large master suite, new carpet, well maintained
with great curb appeal. Quiet neighborhood, convenient to
shopping. $110,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200. R40765
MINUTES TO GULF BEACHES from this immaculate unit.
Great Northwest location by the bay. $79,900. Sandy Drapala
794-3354 or Kathy Marcinko, 792-9122. C40088


4uF a


"WALK WITH ME..."
I- :in paradise at





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 PAGE 27 Dlj



I I~ a -
SERVCESContnue HOM IMROVEENTContnue RENALSContnue


LIVE-IN COMPANION HOMEMAKER, light house-
keeping, good cooking, all errands, cheerful, experi-
enced, reliable, mature. In your home 383-6485.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.

CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING & MAINTENANCE Resi-
dential/commercial, full-service maintenance, land-
scaping installation, clean-ups, tree trimming, ponds,
native plants, butterfly gardens. Excellent references.
778-5294.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL Shell, dirt, mulch or stone
delivered and spread for a small fee. Yard clean-up.
Dump truck for hire. Free estimates. Call Dave
Bannigan, 794-6971.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it's
broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior discount.
Call 778-2581.


PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Huge selection of plants, shrubs and trees.
Irrigation and pest control service. Everything Under
the Sun Garden Centre. 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.

HMIRVE

VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill 795-5100.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free
estimates, no overtime charges. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.


DON & KAREN SCHRODER, REALTORS

A PLACE TO BEGIN
It is not on water but it is on
Key Royale! This charming :
home has 3BR/2BA, plus a
very spacious air-condi- "-
tioned Florida room that
makes it perfect for seasonal or year-round living. It will
adapt well to updating but you can move right in as it is.
There is plenty of room for a pool or expansion of the
house itself. Be a part of a lovely, quiet community that
is just a brisk walk to the beach. $181,000.

RMR REALTY
941-778-2200



Coil



SREALTOR.
"Wir Sprechen Deutsch"
RESIDENTIAL
CHOICE ISLAND LOT 9,700 sq.ft., $108,000.
LARGE BAYVIEW LOT. Boat slip. 90 by 132 feet. $149,500.
PINEBROOK 2BR/2BA grealroom, Florida room, golf, glassed lanai. $102,500.
WILDEWOOD 1700. 2BR/2BA. Extra nice. $110,000.
VILLAS WITH HEATED CAGED POOL. 4BR/2BA, 2,006 sq.
ft. living area each side. Extras. Can condo-ize. $440,000
RIVER OAKS 2BR/2BA, waterfront, boat dock, pool. $88,000.
BRAND NEW KEY WEST HOME 4BR/3BA with Gulf and bay
views. Upgrades and extras. Shaft for elevator. $435,000.
COMMERCIAL
STYLING SALON Eight stations. Great location. $39,000 O0O.
LOT C-2 Zoning.Walk to beach $150,000.
HISTORIC BRIDGE STREET 2,400 sq. ft., three stores, 150 ft.
to Sarasota Bay. Can add to size. Developing area. $355,000.
32 APARTMENTS Sarasola, $1,300,000.
RIENTALS
Seasonal- MARTINIQUE 23R/2BA, tennis, heated pool, elevator.
Seasonal- 5400- 2BR/2BA, updated, new furniture, heated pool.
Vacation/Seasonal GULFSANDS 2BR/2BA, heated pool.
Villas & Homes available for vacations. Ask for Lu.

5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net TDOLLYYOUNGREALESTATE.COM


JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free
estimates. Thirty-three year Island resident. Call Jim
Bickal at 778-1730.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths.
Free estimates. Lic#RC0045125, #RG0058589,
#1PE0020374. Insured. Call 720-0794.

CARL V. JOHNSON, JR. Building Contractor. New
homes, renovations, additions. Free estimates and
design service. Quality workmanship. Lic#RR0066450.
Call 795-1947.

SCREEN REPAIRS interior/exterior painting, ceiling
fans, drywall repairs, roof painting, tile work, low
prices. 778-0410 office, 504-2027 mobile.

PAINTING 35 years experience, 30 year local resi-
dent. Licensed and insured, great prices. 794-8844.

TILE, TILE, TILE. Ceramic tile supply and installation.
Quality workmanship, floors and walls. Fully insured,
call 387-7153, 750-5985.

CUSTOM TILE DESIGN installed floor tile,
countertops, and backsplashes. Fancy for the price
of plain! Call 795-4995, Terry or Greg.


BAYFRONT COTTAGE WITH DOCK. Turnkey fur-
nished, beautiful view, covered parking. No pets.
$350/week or $700/month. 794-5980.


BOB BURNEIT
LT. COL. LSA-F (RET), RFALTOR*
A proven professional
you can count on for all your
real estate needs.


Specializing In:
Longboat Key &
Anna Maria Island
properties
(941) 387-0048
email: bobburnet@aol.coin
Michal Sander & Cmpan
Licened Ral Esate roke
440 Gt ofMeic Div aLogba, FLe, 941) 33-759


WATCH THE SUNSETS!
Totally redecorated Water's
Edge 2BR/2BA and den. Up
close view of Gulf from living
room, den and balcony.
Beachfront complex with
heated pool and tennis
courts. $350,000. IB40602


Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
778-5059


ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/2BA Holmes Beach
canalfront. No smoking, no pets. $1,500 per month
plus security deposit. 203-934-8596.

ANNUAL RENTAL 1 BR/1 BA one block to beach and
bay. Close to shops, great location. $550 month,
$300 deposit. 203 2nd St. N. #2, Bradenton Beach.
(813)258-2411.

SURF SIDE STUDIO 1BA $800 per month plus
assurity/security. Available mid-Oct. or Nov. 1. Hurry,
it won't last! 792-2779.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1 BA, one-half block to beach.
Utility room, covered parking, new carpet, sky lights.
$725 month, first and security deposit 778-2043.

HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA home,
completely furnished, dock, garage, laundry, quiet
street, many extras. Monthly $1,600, weekly $550.
Call 813-286-9814.

HOLMES BEACH 2 and 3BR Gulfview homes, 100
feet to beach. Walk to shops and restaurants, great
area: $875 and $975, one-year lease, security de-
posit. 508-336-2201, 800-894-1950.

HOLMES BEACH GULF view four-room penthouse,
near shops, foodstores, restaurants. 150 feet to
beach, for one or two people. No pets. One year
lease, security deposit, $600 month 508-336-2201,
800-894-1950.

$350 PER WEEK and up. Weekly and monthly, 1 and
2BR, turnkey furnished rentals. All units are steps to
beautiful sandy beaches. Available Sept. through
April. Discount for full month. Rates higher Jan.
through April. 761-9259.

HOLMES BEACH Annual rental. 1BR/1 BA unfurnished
duplex with deck, updated kitchen, walk to beach. $625
month plus utilities. Smith Realtors 778-0770.

4BR/2BA SEASONAL, steps to beach, washer/dryer,
cable, TV, porch swing, restored wood floors $450
week, $1,100 month. Call (813)253-2052.



RENTALS
Annual / Seasonal / Monthly / Weekly


ESTUARY DRIVE AT PERICO
BAY. Motivated seller for this
tastefully furnished 3BR/2BA
condo. Tile floors, ceiling fans,
great kitchen and pantry. Wetbar,
refrigerator on balcony. Minutes to
the beach. $179,000. IB39199
KEY WEST STYLE HOME. El-
evated, canalfront 3BR/3BA
home. Across from bay. Light and
bright with view down canal from
two decks. $369,000. IB39198


,




Karin Stephan
Ich/ Spreche Deutsch
924-9000
Eves: 388-1267


VACATION

RENTAL
Direct Gulffront
1 BR/1 BA apartments
Call for rates


--


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


Residential*Commerial/IndistrialPropertyMIanagement-Moi-tgageLotnmsTieInsunm-tin Vaci iitio iiR itiLs


LOOK FOR OUR VACATION RENTALS ON THE WEB
www.arvidarealty.com or call Bob Lohse at 778-0766 for a brochure


~wwwanviar eal n


~-ii~un n





: ., PAGE 28 il OCTOBERI27,1T999 TI tEH ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
SaLawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Law Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Si' We Monitor Irrigation Systems
service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
78-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
It &Established in 1983
@@a'T[U@TIO )@ STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@[GiTRU'@0@ cRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
CONSTRUCTION JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@ @'[U@0@k (941) 778-2993
g@@ UB 0@i_ ANNA MARIA

__- Paradise Improvements
Quality home repair and maintenance
SSteven Kaluza 778-4173
Island References and Insured
Painting Drywall Tile Doors Screens Etc ...

NU GLAZE INDUSTRIES
BATHTUB REGLAZING
Countertops Appliances Ceramic Tile
Kitchen Cabinets Lifetime guarantee!
Call 926-7127 for free estimate


"The Girls"
Residential Cleaning:
Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly One Time
Mobile Detailing: Autos Boats RVs
Exterior and Interior Services Availablel 778-1924

George C.
FARA
Slate Certified Residential Contractor CR-CO57729
CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING



Quality Work Licensed-Insured Reliable Service


Bud Jackson

Painting (Interior & Exterior)
Carpentry Repairs


(941)383-8301


Longboat Key, Fl


FREE SECURITY SYSTEM
Includes : Installation Master Control Panel
Key Pad Three Door and Window Sensors
SMotion Detector Signs and Decals

941-794-8528 &
Ask about kids and seniors specials
WAC, Std. Inst. minimum monitor
agreement required. Select Security
Lic# EY0000143 Al TlliiIIkl. SI, l.U S., w Irt D ]r I


NU-Weatherside
of Florida SINCE1948
PATIO DOORS
PORCH ENCLOSURES
S' WINDOW REPLACEMENT

778-7074
CLAC286523
















Call us for plumbing, too.
SINCE
1982
?anmnmc 778-0773
FULL-SERVICE AIR CONDITIONING and PLUMBING
LIC #CACO 56298 LIC #RF0047797


I SA DERCL SS IDS


FOR RENT YEARLY 2BR/2BA townhouse, unfur-
nished, near shopping and library in Seaside Gar-
dens, Holmes Beach. $850 month plus utilities. Call
Betty Cole, 779-1213.

VACATION RENTALS 2BR apartments across form
beautiful beach $350 per week. Winter dates still
available. Almost Beach Apartments 778-2374.
BEAUTIFUL EFFICIENCY one block from fabulous
beach with great sunsets. Local phone service, ba-
sic cable and utilities are included. $600 per month
for Oct., Nov. Call 778-6411.

SURF SIDE 2BR/1BA. ANNUAL, $900 per month.
Available now. 792-2779.

ANNUALS, ANNUALS, ANNUALS. 522 Key Royale
Drive, 3BR/2BA, $1,000 per month; 305 Spring Ave.,
2BR/1BA, $900 per month; 304 Clark Drive, 3BR/
2BA, $800 per month. Call Betsy Hills Real Estate
778-2291.

HOLMES BEACHFRONT RENTAL(near Shells Res-
taurant) 2BR/1BA. Rates: Winter, $1,200 per month,
summer $850 per month. Call (813) 264-264-0639 or
(334) 988-8760.
CHARMING 1BR/1BA in Holmes Beach. Available
Nov. 1, small pet OK. $550 per month, plus utilities.
Call Lee 302-0779.

RELOCATION SPECIAL all efficiency units. One
person, $175 per week; two people from $210 per
week. Units for larger group available. Haley's Motel
778-5405.

WANTED BY MID-DECEMBER, annual 2BR in
Holmes Beach, prefer near beach with pool, W/D
hook-up or available. 704-1430.

ANNUAL 2BR/1BA, great neighborhood, Holmes
Beach. Steps to beach. Clean and new. $750 per
month, first, last and security. 778-5482.
ANNUAL 3BR/3BA Holmes Beach townhouse. Two-
car garage with storage, pool, balconies, Mexican
tiles, walk to beaches beautiful! $1,450 per month
includes water, cable, washer/dryer and security sys-
tem. First and security. 778-0167.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA, very nice
neighborhood, stroll to beach! Cathedral ceilings,
new kitchen and appliances-beautiful! Non-smokers
preferred, small pet considered $700 month, first,
last, security. 778-9798, 704-3171 or 305-296-1127
collect.

GULFVIEW STUDIO 106 31st Street, Holmes
Beach. Washer/dryer, everything, furnished, annual
$500, seasonal $1,000 per month. Lease, security
$500. 293-6131.
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA CANAL Key Royale, pool, new
dock, baths, kitchen and appliances. Lawn and pool
included. $1,800, deposit. 15,000-lb. boat lift is avail-
able. 941-545-6821.

ANNA MARIA ANNUAL furnished, 1 BR/1BA, private
parking, one block to beach, bay and community
center. Great location to new shops. $550 month.
800-350-7389, 603-889-1926.

NORTHBEACH VILLAGE LUXURY spacious, 3BR/
2.5BA townhouse with two-car garage, three balco-
nies, new carpet, heated pool, washer/dryer, $1,600
month. Suncoast Real Estate 779-0202.

ACCOMMODATIONS TO SHARE 2BR/2BA beach
house, fully-furnished, prefer non-smoking female,
call 779-1346 for more information.

TWO BEDROOM RENTALS, furnished/unfurnished,
minutes away from the Gulf. Shopping, dining and
entertaining venues. Call 794-2225.

HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA on sailboat canal, ga-
rage, three blocks to beach with cabana $1,400.
Annual, negotiable, seasonal. 312-2432.

HOLMES BEACH 2BR/1BA duplex near school.
Annual rental. Available Dec. 1. $675 per month.
First, last and security. 795-7805.
ELEVATED 2BR/1BA New carpet, eat-in kitchen with
dishwasher. Central heat/air. Block to beach, no pets. $725
per month, annual. $350 deposit and utilities. 778-2991.


BRADENTON BEACH south Gulfview furnished,
utilities included. 1 and 2BR, no pets. Day, week,
month. 1BR $55, $350, $900. 2BR $75, $500,
$1,200. 504-6009.
BEAUTIFUL EFFICIENCY one block from fabulous
beach with great sunsets. Local phone service, ba-
sic cable and utilities are included. $600 per month
for Oct., Nov. Call 778-4611.

COQUINA BEACH 2BR/1BA apartment overlooking
Koi pond and waterfall available for season. All com-
forts of home, 50 steps to Gulf. $1,500 a month plus
tax. Koi One Vacation Rentals, 753-8866, member
Anna Maria Chamber of Commerce.

SEASONAL THREE-MONTH lease. Bayview Ter-
race 2BR/1BA, beautifully furnished. 795-0436.
ANNUAL 3 OR 4BR/2.5BA with beautiful view of bay.
Full-service dock. Air conditioning, dishwasher,
washer. $1,300 month. 888-695-8749.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA furnished duplex, Anna Maria
City, updated, close to beach, dishwasher. No pets.
$675 month. Fran Maxon Real Estate 778-2307.

ANNUAL 2BR/1 BA elevated duplex, two-car garage,
W/D hook-up, open deck overlooking Spring Lake,
Holmes Beach. No pets. $750 month. Fran Maxon
Real Estate 778-2307.

HOLMES BEACH annual unfurnished 1BR/1BA.
Steps to beach. $540 month, security deposit.
778-7897.


Get It Together inc
Need Organization? I can help!
Cheaper than therapy and a lot more fun.
Home Office Condidential
Edie Force, Major Organizer, 778-7916


ISLAND LUMBER
ANP HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


Estate Sale
Friday, October 29 9-2PM
585 Yawl Lane, Country Club Shores, Longboat Key
Nicely furnished: king and twin bed sets, Ficks
Reed rattan chairs and sofa, sectional sofa,
modern art, poll and pool items, sterling, three
sets of dishes, figurines, glass tables, lawn
mower, pedestals, TV's, Cuisinart,
lamps, sewing machine, stereo,
ladies accessories, linens,
garage items and kitchenware.
Sale by Julie McClure 747-3101
Quality Sales for 25 Years
Juliel944@aol.com


W .1 A11 412toi W l


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Island Custom Tops
Complete Corian Counter Top Service
Commercial Residential
Dupont Certified
Dave Spicer 778-2010


_._._.i


I


i i -







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1999 U PAGE 29 Mf


ANNUAL 2BR/1 BA DUPLEX apartment. Huge two-car
garage, washer/dryer hookup, open deck overlooking
lake, brand new carpet. No pets. $750 month, $700
security deposit. Fran Maxon Real Estate 778-2307.
ANNUAL 2BR. First, last and security. No pets $650
month. 778-6088.
BEAUTIFUL EFFICIENCY APARTMENT one block
from fabulous beach with great sunsets! $600 per
month includes local phone service, basic cable and
utilities. Now available November. Call 778-4611.
100 STEPS TO BEACH. Seasonal but may rent an-
nual. 2BR/2BA, large family room, large backroom,
cable TV, washer/dryer available. 813-681-9111.
NEAR ANNA MARIA City fishing pier. Nice 3BR cot-
tage, fully furnished, six months at $1,100 per month.
941-779-2143.
AVAILABLE NOVEMBER and December- Anna Maria
2BR/1 BA canalfront duplex. Quiet convenient location.
$1,600 per month, $500 per week. No pets. 778-5793.
GULFFRONT PRIVATE BEACH last minute cancel-
lation. 1BR/1BA seasonal apartment. No pets.
$1,400 per month. 778-1086.
ANNUAL 1BR/1BA Gulffront, 503 Gulf Drive S. #3,
Bradenton Beach. $595 per month, no pets. Fran
Maxon Real Estate 778-2307.
FOR RENT 2BR/1BA duplex, upper unit, covered
parking, deck, laundry, ocean view, well kept home.
$690 plus utilities. 779-2337.
FISHERMAN'S DREAM! Seasonal 1BR/1BA apart-
ment at marina. $750 per month includes utilities.
Trailer boat space or dock available 778-1086.


GULFFRONT LOT, dead-end street, one of a kind!
There are no more like this. $399,000, 778-4523 or
(800-977-0803.

HEAR THE SURF and catch glimpses of blue Gulf
waters-all from this newly renovated Holmes Beach
.house. 3BR/2BA with 2BR/1 BA rental cottage. Wood
and tile throughout, brand new kitchens and appli-
ances, vaulted ceiling, French doors, decks, fire-
place. 2813 Avenue E, $279,900. 778-4523, 761-
1533, 800-977-0803.

p--- R-----------
SWhy get soaked? Dry foam dries
( fast! We never )
IO I
FAT CAT 778-2882
Carpet& or 387-0607
Upholstery Cleaning
S"Clean carpet looks better
and lasts longer."
J We are carpeting, leather and fabric
*- upholstered furniture specialists.
-- Owner/Islander Jon Kent.
a, Call today for your appointment. 3
Lmm=mmm=mmmm=mmmmm


BARK & COMPANY REALTY. Steven M. Bark, Bro-
ker. 383-1717 or 720-3200.

BAYFRONT ESTATE $715,000. Four units located
directly on bay/Intracoastal steps to Gulf beaches.
Cathedral ceilings, fireplace, wood floors, Jacuzzi
and boat docks. Great for investor or family estate!
3BR/2BA house, 2BR/2BA house and two 1BR
apartments. Call Deborah Thrasher or John Hines,
Wedebrock Real Estate Company 383-5543 or
778-3395 eves.

JUST COMPLETED NEW 3BR/2BA home one block
from beach. Tile floors, Berber carpet. 2901 Gulf
Drive. $218,900. 778-2316.

CANALFRONT HOME with panoramic view of Sky-
way lights and bay/intracoastal, 2BR/2BA and poten-
tial 1BR apartment with Spanish tile floors, cathedral
ceilings, cedar closets, oversized two-car garage with
sauna, boat dock, davits, screened enclosed lanais,
A/C, refrigerator, new dryer 1998. $284,900. Call
Deborah Thrasher, Wedebrock Real Estate Com-
pany 383-5543 or 778-3395 eves.

WATERFRONT CONDO Westbay Point & Moorings
II. 50-ft. dock, carport, second floor, end unit, 2BR/
2BA, completely refurbished. Call voice mail, 800-
558-9008, ext. 225.
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY, October 23, 1-4pm.
Westbay Point & Moorings, 6500 Flotilla #198. 2BR/
2BA, condo, carport, two boat docks. $225,000. 1-
800-558-9008, ext. 225.
BUILD YOUR DREAM home on this large Anna
Maria lot and you will overlook Tampa Bay, the City
Pier, Egmont Key, Sunshine Skyway and an interest-
ing canal. Owner asking $165,000. 792-4274.
TIME FOR A CHANGE? I need two experienced
agents to work at a high powered office, Great expo-
sure, good splits. Island office with a lot of traffic. Call
Michael L. Nink, Wedebrock Real Estate Company
for confidential interview 778-0700.
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY. Brand new, easily
rented, 3BR/2BA house. Short block from prime
Gulf beach. Close to shopping and dining. Tiled
greatroom, Berber in bedrooms, big screened
porch. $218,900. John Michaels, Pelican Real Es-
tate 779-1101.


GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
GREAT GIFTS ANYTIME!

AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT 8AM 4PM


Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos


778-2246


JPfa V GV by6/fhine D 1iifffa//t
"ProessionalExcellence'
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Seing thielsLxilssinc 1%. 778-5594 After 5 Call
Licensl;uxirnl nsurd '-778-3468

RICK BOYCE CONSTRUCTION
From the smallest repairs to major overhaul ...
I do it all and you SAVE.
778-5075 798-0078 PAGER
20-years Island experience Insured Lic.# CGC038546



Interior/Exterior Commercial & New Construction
Insured Free Estimates
7534727


PLINTU (OO (40TI%
Book Your Parties Now!
i Linda Pardy 756-2154 Debble Hewitt 739-1275


Drywall Ceiling Repair
Custom Wall Finishing Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Cell 650-7871 Eves 778-9506



Glass Sentinal
The remarkable window film that turns ordinary
glass Into a super-strength protective shield.
24-HOUR PROTECTION AGAINST
Snatch & Grab Burglaries
Violent Weather Sun & Heat
15-year glass breakage warranty.
Lifetime film & installation warranty.


Ron Klner 778-5193 or Rick Weaver 778-1610
Free Estimates Licensed & Insured


SLANDER'


Do,'t Ie&ve tke isl&hd
without t kih7 tih Sulscribt. Visit us 2t
5104 Mohriht Drive,
IslahJ SLoppih
CGeter, Holhtes Be&c.
- or call 941-778-7978
to c~a&re it Oh
Visa or MC.


------------------- ----------------------
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES- BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL : Minimum rate is $8 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for
each 7 words, Box: $2.50, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We are
sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone,
please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
-------------------------------------1
1


3
Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: LJ LJ No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:
5404 Marina Drive Fax:941778-9392
Holmes Beach FL 34217 |ISLANDER W B Phone: 941 778-7978
L----- -- - -- --- - ------------------- -1, 'rr "- .


ADCLS SIF I S
I-ENALSCntnedIR AL SAECotne


Wilson Walls iNC
STUCCO SPECIALIST


WE SPECIALIZEIN REP AIRS!
NU Residential Commercial
\.4U Restaurant 1 Mobile Home
N- Condo Assoc. \-W Vac and Intercom
\. Lightning Repair -\.. Service Upgrades

COMMNIIYELECURIC

David Paish-Owrner
U c#ER0006385


ServingtheBeadies Since 1978


PIM41 W01Im


Wisn






I~j] PAGE 30 U OCTOBER 27, 1999 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

1 I q" 1 LI l I II I
lullr
ISLAN D ER LA SSIFIEDS

REAL STAECotnudRAL SAT-otiud r QULHOSN OPRTNT


THIS GREAT FAMILY beach house is just steps from
the Island's best walking beach. Large rooms and
open floor plan make this an exceptional second
home with great rental history. Complete with caged
pool. Just listed at $295,000. Call Fran Maxon Real
Estate 778-2307.

FANTASTIC BAY VIEWS Anna Maria fourplex plus
manager's office, solar-heated pool, excellent income
and location. Waiting list of tenants, currently annual
but would make great seasonal. Walk to new shop-
ping center, Bayside Park, fishing pier. $549,000.
Call Yvonne Higgins at Wagner Realty 720-3879.


CANALFRONT 2BR/1.5BA on wide canal in Anna
Maria, great boating waters just minutes to Tampa
Bay and Gulf. Being sold by original owner who took
very good care of it. Home has never had any flood-
water in it $189,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Wagner
Realty 720-3879.
2BR/2BA VILLA with bay view on Long Boat Key.
$159,900. Please call Roger McDonough, Michael
Saunders and Company 376-2482.
ARTIST'S HOME one-minute walk to the left is a
great Gulf beach, one minute walk to the right are
spectacular sunrises. This artistic, fully-furnished
mobile home is ideal for one or two persons. Sacri-
fice at $12,000. 778-2002.


IS .I.- 1
CAL ONE O OURROFESIONAL
Bill lexndr (rokr-wne) 78-900 Lyn H s .elr BokrOwe)7-40


All real estate advertising herein is subject to the Fair
Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national
origin, or intention to make any such preference, limi-
tation or discrimination." Familial status includes chil-
dren under age of 18 living with parents or legal custo-
dians, pregnant women and people securing custody of
children under 18. This newspaper will not knowing
accept any advertising for real estate which is in viola-
tion of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hear-
ing impaired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


Why wait weeks for loan approval?
We can give you an Approval In Minutes!
Linda & Ted Davis, serving Anna Maria Island
and the State of Florida with more than 35 years
of combined experience.
Compare our Low Rates and Fees.
Call today. (941) 779-2113 or (800) 226-3351
Licensed Mortgage Brokerage Business


GREAT "NEAR GULF" PROPERTIES!
This beautiful one-year old home offers glass
enclosed living area with gulf views and split
bedroom design with private master bed-
room and two guest bedrooms. Open deck
adjoins living area plus custom kitchen with
breakfast bar creating a spacious area to en-
tertain and enjoy our casual Island lifestyle.
$695,000.

Two turnkey units features 2BR/2BA, plus den
and 2BR/2BA second floor with panoramic
Gulf view. Residential area location and in
choice Anna Maria beach. Beautifully main-
tained duplex has excellent rental history and
potential to create second floor owner's
home. $419,500 firm.


9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Flonda 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


ANN HARMON
The only Accredited
Residential Manager
on Anna Maria Island


2501 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach
www.oldfloridarealty.com
gussie@ix.netcom.com
800 778-9599
941 778-6849


SJust visitin~q


SLANDER

Do,'t h1vC tLc isl&hd ,jitLout
subscribi;y. Visit us xt 540o
Mrih Drive. Isl~hd SLoppi,
CEnter, Hol.hcs BtckI or c&ll
9V1-778-7978 to sM.rt it
oh Vis& or MsterC&rJ.


(1 TAGNEQ EALTY
YOUR HOMETOWN REALTOR ESTABLISHED 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach, Florida 34217
778-2246 *1(800) 211-2323 www.wagnerrealty.com


GULFFRONT CONDO with open Gulf
view Irom expansive windows. 2BR/2BA,
view of pool, great residence or rental.
Furnishings negotiable. $299,000. Call
Ron Archer 778-2246.


LONGBOAT KEY north end Just
reduced to $184,000 2BR, family room
and fireplace on corner lot. Boat access
close by. Mary Wickersham 383-5577.
ML#37293.


ISLAND FOUR-PLEX plus large
manager's office. Solar heatedd pool,
wonderful views of Tampa Bay and
Skyway Bridge. Excellent income and
location. $549,000. For more informa-
tion call Yvonne Higgins at Wagner
Realty 778-2246/720-3879.


BAYFRONT LOT Spectacular views of
bay Irom this rare bayfront lot centrally
located between the Manatee and
Cortez Bridges. Lot measures 65 by 100
feet, is seawalled and ready for construc-
tion. Offered at $215,000. Contact David
Moynihan 778-2246R778-7976 eves.


1999Reader. 'sPrefemrnce Aand-W innerfor#1RealEstate
Compan and#1RentalConipany inM atwee County


LLTD MORTGAGE,


giw~


~J~








Hi! I'm Marianne
Norman-Ellis.
JI For any real estate needs,
SI am ready and anxious
to serve you. Call me at
Mike Norman Realty
778-6696



OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday & Sunday 1-4 Weekly!







Key West North 1201 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach
Four new 2BR/2BA condos! Heated pool with tanning
deck, covered and lighted parking, secured and el-
evated. Also features satellite TV, two balconies, hur-
ricane shutters, elevator and two staircases, central
vacuum, marble baths. Only steps form the beach.
Call Ed Smith, GRI, Realtor
iUI) --. 795-4522
| \ All Aces Realty Inc.
I F.. 5105 Manatee Ave. W. 792-2111


ANNA MARIA


SiiiCoast
REAL ESTATE. INC.



: ,|.--. ------ ....
a:t u





BAYFRONT and CABIN CRUISER
Spectacurai views of Tampa Bay and Sunshine
Skyway Bridge. Large gracious home with 22.5
foot cabin cruiser. Caged pool, boat dock and lift,
three-car garage. Holmes Beach. $750,000.
ISLAND GIFT SHOP
Well established gift shop. 17 years at same location.
High traffic area. Books available. Below appraisal.
REDUCED. $79,000.
SUNBOW BAY TOWNHOUSE
3BR/3BA elegance! Mexican tile, den, water view and
boat dock Carport, tennis, two pools. $178,500.
SAILBOAT WATER
3BR/2BA home on deep-water canal with direct access
to Tampa Bay. Ceramic tile, caged pool, fireplace, dock.
Great Holmes Beach location. $289,000.


Julie Gilstrap
LTG, GRI
Property Manager


Patti Marifjeren
REALTOR/
Property Manager


ANNUAL RENTALS
Bradenton 2BR/2BA house $800
San Remo -IBR/1BA $625
North Beach Village 3BR/2BA $1,600
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Homes Weekly/Monthly
from $700 week / $1500 month
779-0202 1(800)7326434
ANNA MARIA

MLS a SiiuCoast
REAL ESTATE, INC.
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 27, 1999 M PAGE 31 l]
- I I


Visit us at our web site: www.islandreal.com
778-6066* 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217


Frank Davis
Broker






Bob Fittro


WATERFRONT
HOMES:

60 North Shore Dr ........ $689,000
613 Ivanhoe Lane ......... $675,000
726 Key Royale Dr........ $649,000
520 58th Street..... ...... $619,000
516 75th Street............. $539,000
407 20th Place ............. $529,000
621 Ivanhoe Lane .. NEW $525,000
540 67th Street............. $459,500
527 72nd Street ... NEW $434,800
221 Bird Key Dr.... NEW$425,000
525 68th Street .................. $339,900
506 Key Royale Dr... NEW $299,000
237 Oak Ave ........... NEW $198,500

WATERFRONT
AND ISLAND CONDOS:


"" Gulf Place Condo ......... $339,000
,_ 4706 61st Ave Dr ......... $250,000
Richa Fr' Mariners Cove ...... NEW $239,900
Richard Freeman
ealtor ISLAND HOMES:
254 Gladiolus .............. $335,000
207 Periwinkle .............. $224,900
203 76th St ................ $219,900
2409 Avenue A (lot) ...... $199,000
Alan Galletto
Realtor 455 62nd St .......... NEW $77,900
DUPLEXES/TRIPLEXES
MULTI FAMILY PROPERTIES:


Tom Nelson
Realtor


Nick Patsios
Broker/Salesperson


Rebecca Samler
Realtor


Realtor


Bob Smith
Realtor






Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor


101 25th St ................ $549,000
107 75th St ................ $499,000
2219 Gulf Dr ................ $375,000
203 76th St .................. $219,900

MAINLAND:
504 Woodstork Circle .... $139,900
938 Sandpiper Circle. NEW $125,500
6206 8th Ave Dr W....... $124,900
729 Estuary Dr..... NEW $111,000
1411 56th Street W ........ $79,500
276 Sherwood Drive........ $69,900
8518 43rd Av.Dr.W. Lot NEW $32,900

COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES
5704 Marina Drive ........ $399,900
310 Pine Ave .............. $299,900
Restaurant .................. $229,000
510 7th St E ............... $139,000

WE ALSO
HAVE
RENTALS

SEASONAL

ANNUAL

PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT


Call for details!


S/AJLt5^ 6&P,-r Of tTo




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Wiw m A ooAA.nL (lAW







EI PAGE 32 OCTOBER 27, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


THE USUAL SUSPECTS

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Discussed
thoroughly, with
"out"
7 Florentine
family name
13 Flattened at the
poles
19 Diffuse
20 Medium-sweet
Sherry
22 Introduction
23 Song from
"Holiday Inn"
25 Meteorological
menace
26 Holiday in Hue
27 Skyrocket
28 Bamako is its
capital
30 Univ. awards
31 Modest bathing
suit
34 Lustrous hue
38 Notre Dame
name
39 Feature of some
modems
40 99-Down, Down
Under
41 Oft-scripted
Baroness Orczy
novel
50 Smash letters
52 Limerick
language
53 One of the
Reiners
54 Gospel music
award


55 Moonshine
58 Cautious stock
inv.
60 Spring
bloomer
63 Op.-
64 Botanist's
workplace
66 74-Down's
opposite
68 Constriction
worker?
70 6-pointers
71 Theme of this
puzzle
75 Small shot
76 Landed a
haymaker
77 Sked guesses
78 Quits working
80 Name of 13
popes-
81 "Iceland" star
83 Cager Kukoc
85 React to a bad
joke, perhaps
86 Gore's grp.
88 InfielderJoey

90 Warehouse
supply: Abbr.
92 Shoe box
marking
93 Peaked
100 "Hot
Diggity"
singer
101 Aurora's
counterpart
102 Crack team?:
Abbr.
103 Boiled
holiday treat
108 Loaf locale


113 Get wind of
114 Mountain lake
115 Slapstick ammo
116 Suffix with
duct
117 Theseus' land
120 Counterirritant
concoction
125 First Olympic
Hall of Fame
gymnast
126 Under political
attack, maybe
127 Plan
128 Stalk
129 Cartoon cat
130 Oater groups
DOWN
I Popular book
genre
2 Wheyfaced
3 Whack
4 In great
demand
5 Journal
addendum?
6 Cut
7 Code name
8 Medicine
Nobelist
Metchnikoff
9 Afro and bob
10 "Just Another
Girl on the -"
(1993 drama)
11 Cause for
pause
12 Soul singer
Hayes
13 Stadium cheer
14 Paese
cheese
15 Fred Mertz,
notably


16 Exiter's
exclamation
17 Hint
18 Nephew of Cain
21 Where Dick
Button won gold
24 Epitaph starter
29 S.D.I. concern
32 "Phooey!"
33 Fury
34 Bud, to Lou
35 Business biggie
36 Ford Sterling
played one
37 Exiter's
exclamation
39 Chilean
president,
1964-70
41 Delicious
42 Holy war
43 Starwort, e.g.
44 Most difficult to
believe
45 Buttinsky
46 Feeling lousy
47 Chopin works
48 Exhibits,
basically
49 Answer to "Shall
we?"
50 "Put a lid on it!"
51 Kind of float
56 Revolutionary
name
57 Pawn
59 Speaker's spot
61 Putting up with
62 Dictionary abbr.
65 "Here comes
trouble!"
67 Inc. relative
69 Have-
(overreact)


72 Open-mouthed
quintet
73 "A votre- !"
74 Chabrier's "Le
Roi malgr --"
75 Palace or prison,
e.g.: Abbr.
79 "I told you so!"
82 D.S.M. recipient
84 "Singing
journalist" Phil
87 Guards,
collectively
89 Yemeni port


91 Slalom
maneuver
94 Henri or Pierre,
e.g.
95 Roadie's load
96 Shutout
97 Dress (up)
98 Shepherd's
locale
99 Stripling
103 Nursery rhyme
boy
104 Starbucks
serving


105 Stops up
106 Solicits, with
"up"

107 Map of the
Aleutians,
usually
108 Fussbudget
109 House mem.
110 What anglers
want that
campers
don't


112 Schoolclique,
maybe
113 Kind of seal
115 Readyfor
surgery
118 Whisper sweet
nothings
119 Cape--
121 Chipreceder
122 Humerus locale
123 Year abroad


111 "Mr. Belvedere" 124 Most letters in
actress Graff D.C.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


'- ". ;". .:-" -' : -. .. .
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,iF4 $~ ..::: ,, : ;1:.' r. :'.-. .( .
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PERICO BAY CLUB JanE ric. :.n,:,nie .. ,i.:,
rrna, t.r :u -;, Flhj" I.,11 ri.j I .:ri,:- i3 i a.'E r Ia.,- .er
apph nice'-. Irrei.i, *C.'. r ... c.:arp-l 1 9 0CC
Rose S,- rn,,err 7"8.2 61 .L'.:.l-10878











EUROPEAN WATERFRONT ESTATE 11 room
cu:io.m io:'mt e European dijn rrnaximize.: lh
and '.'e~'S Healed pool I -48j0.000U Rosei
S.:rnocer 778 '261 M.LSM 382 -'


COUNTRY ATMOSPHERE ,ei -.:-,rin' I -BR
Ian ii, rime lL: in Jili uld- : E
Painell,-: -8 : J u in S.- rinii, ,:iorr Jiiiin 3S J nlln
778-2261 r.LLSn383':,7


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"2'


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.. '.
". .A 1-..,;= !:',.. ;- -. '. 1 ..
,* ,,-\ ;*" "" , r"f- '. ", ,,*;*^* ,,
-'
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BAY HOLLOW Spac.,u; -BR :BA c.:ond.? vin
,Jll.,cE FICr.3, r:.,:.nm, c' erel par.,iri' and L'O'31
d.:.'. TrulI, a3 rt.;I. ril hi li'. ,i. para, i, e' 1. l 1 *'i:10
.Jan Scrrm.-11 778--'2'. t.1 MLS-1086i.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND B.,y Palms 3BR 2BA nome
wvlh Iwo.-C.r ,1arale and bo-3al d1:.ck Well mainlained.
ro.,l appro.imaiel., o':ur .ir.i Vir ws 01 .'1-, i basin
S09.000 rJLoree; RoLbens. 7;8 .261 .LS .39205


SEASONAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club -'I I l, .:-..,~n. ui1,


Perico Isles -3 i.:, ,,, l~ -.. ,:,:

Terra Ceia ..ll :.:'" :,, .:.n-1nul ,
Vizcaya L.'-jilul :I I .:.r u.I' n
ANNUAL RENTALS NOW AVAILABLE
Call Missy Laps at 778.9611
Toll Free 1-077.651.0123


L I13~~~lr.j
I ,r :, H.I,,1
r: I.. .I'1, ,i I


SANDY POINTE t.,iro
,-,:.' [l,,,- _: p,) ,:,l 3n,1 ralur,
tO L- *,,i.iCh $ 1 1<.1 n': I" ,- P ,t
M.LSn 36'd59

3,3 7

Ifv


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GREAT LOCATION ,n small .:.omnmr.i:,Il .ra i:
Holmes Beach on ,nna M[ar i ,.sl.,n.,. Fi.. ? .-
lices loali $335 :'00 'Bobve Ci'.I-', 77 *..' 1
M.ILSi 3.803


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STUNNING WATERFRONT ESTATE .:.iT.ri r II..i

rn.-m -. 4 Ri- f.B- p lu- -'BR e '" ,: .irr _,,: I.:.i :
$.1 3":I "00 N ilnc,, Fael 7' : -. i r.1L7L8 '.-82'


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