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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00804

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


I IM


Too many


hands in


Island sand
By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
It may appear to be pretty, fine, white beach sand.
just like what you find at the north end of Anna Maria
Island. But it's going to the landfill anyway.
Anna Maria residents are questioning city officials
as to why sand pumped from Bimini Bay for a routine
dredging project can't be put on the beach.
Public Works Director Phil Charnock can't give
them an easy answer, but the short one is that tests per-
formed indicated it's not compatible with existing
beach sand.
And now that the sand is being dredged and is by
the mayor's account "beautiful." residents and officials
are confused.
What went wrong that 11,000 cubic yards of per-
fectly good sand is being transported to the county
landfill for garbage cover? And at city expense.
All this, and Manatee County is presently scouring
areas for compatible sand for a 2001 beach
renourishment project.
Mayor Chuck Shumard said he recently met with
Manatee County environmental manager Jack
Gorzeman, who showed him samples of sand taken for
the renourishment project.
Shumard said the sand being hauled to the dump is
equivalent to or a better match than the samples showed
to him by Gorzeman.
Holmes Beach Public Works Director Joe Duennes
has worked with Charnock for two years on the
$224,657 project. Because the pass to Bimini Bay splits
PLEASE SEE SAND, NEXT PAGE


Hot shot
happens in
Bradenton
Beach
Autumn lightning is
captured over the
hay from Gulf Drive
at 10th Street North
by the camera
expertise of Myron
Davis, owner of the
Beach House Resort
in Bradenton Beach.
He is a retired
professional photog-
rapher from Fort
Meade in Polk
County and has a
horticulture business
and wildlife refuge
in the Lake Wales
area. Davis shoots
pictures for fun now,
with lightning
instead of weddings
a favorite subject.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Whittling down two five-member fire commis-
sions to one was the most recent task for Anmna
Maria/West Side fire commissioners on the path to
total merger of the districts.
Once legislation to merge the district is passed.
possibly next spring, the board \\ill include Annar
Maria Chairman Larry T\ ler and CComiissionrer
Chuck Stearns and West Side Chairman Rob Elliott
and Commissioners Jack Emert and Je.csie Da\ is.
T\ ler and Elliott will serve t\\ o-\ear terms arnd
face re-election in 2002. The other,-, \\ il serve foi:r-
\ ar terms and face re-election in 2 i4i. The election
for each seat on the board l \ ill be ai -!Le v, within ;
nex\ district.
"The bill itself is the unirfor : -ati\s ..
passed a couplee of '.e.ar- ;.ii o. -::I C" A.\:


County gives nod to
B} D:.'.iJ F..

N eanater Count ,' :u ; :-c:' e :..-.. '

ates Inc. The '. oe a .. : '

tmes C e mon. The B c r .... .. :e o.

BraLldenton Beach ;or a: :,_., ..: "-. .. :-.
P S. Beacn v il aso ,e :', ,. .. :: :-.
the 'ommission approved he i ::..'.. .... .
time ne\t month. The prer eri ,'e n::- : ," ".' ( I .. .


Price explained. "It dissolves both districts and cre-
ates the Wc'st Manatee Fire and Rescue District.'
'The only things that are different are the
makeup of the board and the tax rate," Price said.
"'lhe tax rate is the proposed five-year cap, but it
don't mean xwe will go to that in that period of
time.-"
'Price', budget projections show a five percent
ii.;: .',:e each ear through 2006. with the exception
o: ':,e 200(0-01 budget. when the district plans to
h:!c 10 additional firefighters.
'rice ,sid the bill ill be presented to the Leg-
is 't!re in Febrary or March and take effect w. hen
it app d h h\ the Hoiuse and Senate and signed
b '!;e go\ ern -r.
\ puNbc during on the merger legislation will
... d Thi ..iaa. Oc '. 2 a:t 6:30 p.m. at Fire Sta-
: ( .:: Dr:'.. H Ine- Beauch.


Cafe on the Beach
^ :I.-


Cops, kids bike

rodeo Saturday
The annual Bicycle Rodeo for youngsters 6 to 14
years of age will be sponsored by the Holmes Beach
Police Department Saturday, Oct. 16.
It will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Anna Maria
Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive in Holmes Beach.
Anna Maria Island youths may bring their bicycles to
the school grounds and go through a prescribed safety/
agility course.
More than 100 kids are expected to participate in
the "opportunity to meet with law enforcement face to
face in a positive atmosphere." said Holmes Beach
Officer Eric Kuusela. school DARE officer in charge
of coordinating the e ent.
The "cops and kids" aff;,ir alo i '.,ill feature the
Anna Miria Fire District and its personnel.

Nautical Section in this
week's Islander


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...


:L rzze 5


7
-4r


.. .......28
22


Members culled in anticipation

of fire district merger


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


OCTOBER 13, 1999


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,,


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JI13 PAGE 2 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


House hit by fire second time this year


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Was it an unfortunate accident or coincidence?
Anna Maria/West Side Deputy Fire Marshal Kurt
Lathrop pondered the second fire in a year in the same
Anna Maria City residence.
Lathrop said the fire on Oct. 5 destroyed the bed-
room and burned through the attic and roof of the house
at 311 North Bay Blvd. causing $30,000 in damage.
The tenant Kathryn Kaluza was out of town.
"Right now, it's still under investigation," Lathrop
said. "I'm looking at all the pieces of the puzzle. [Ar-
son dog] Penny pointed out some areas where we took
samples. They've been sent to the sheriff's lab for
analysis."
About 11:30 p.m. neighbor Charles Lindstrom
smelled smoke, went outside and saw the fire.
Lindstrom called 911, then opened the unlocked front
door to make sure no one was inside.
According to an Anna Maria deputy sheriff's re-
port, Lindstrom said, "Flames were coming out of the
roof and the whole house was on fire."
Lathrop praised Lindstrom for his alertness and
firefighters Capt. Randy Roth, Jeff Lonzo and Victor
Accurso Sr. for their quick response.
"The firefighters did an excellent job stopping the
fire," he noted. "It makes my job so much easier when
the evidence is preserved."


Lathrop said he's not prepared to name the cause
of the fire yet. He's working with Fire Inspector Tom
Soleau and the state fire marshal's office.
"I still have to interview some people because I've
heard reports that some of the neighbors were without
power that night," he explained. "I'm trying to find out
when that occurred and how many homes were affected."
Last October eight fires were set in the house,


This North Bay Boule-
vard home had $30,000
in damages from an
Oct. fire of unknown
origin. Last year in
October the home was
the victim of arson eight
S. times. Islander Photo:
Pat Copeland











which was vacant at the time. Lathrop said those fires
were the work of an arsonist targeting owner Ted Cole.
Cole had just completed renovating the house again.
At the time, because of the way the fires were care-
fully planned, the arson was not considered a random
act of vandalism, Lathrop said. Despite rewards of
$1,000 offered by the state fire marshal's office and
$1,500 from Cole, the perpetrator was never identified.


Bohnenberger urges commission to dump car-tags


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Presenting a list of objections to the proposed car-tag
evacuation re-entry system, Holmes Beach Commissioner
Rich Bohnenberger opposes the city's participation in the
program.
Car tags will be used to identify the vehicles of Island
residents returning after an evacuation. They replace
bumper sticker identification and are similar to tags used
to identify handicapped drivers.
During evacuation re-entry, residents in cars with tags
will form a separate line and will be waved through by
police at checkpoints. Residents in cars without tags, in-
cluding those with bumper stickers, must wait in line to
show two forms of identification showing an Island ad-
dress before being allowed to return.
Bohnenberger submitted the following objections:
The tag system will not limit re-entry to one car per
household because anyone with two forms of ID will be
permitted entry.
Tags may not be in the vehicle when needed.

Stomp the flu bug
Manatee County Health Department personnel
will administer flu vaccines at the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria, from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 15 and 16. The cost is $7. There is
no cost for the vaccines with a Medicare card.


The cost of the tags is more expensive than bumper
stickers.
Tags can be easily lost or stolen.
The administration of the tags is cumbersome.
"This concept will slow down re-entry because more
people will not have the required tag hanger when
needed," Bohnenberger said. "Some will not pay the pro-
posed fee. The bumper sticker has served us well. Let's
keep it simple and dump this hanging tag proposal once
and for all."
Vice Chairman Don Maloney gave the following re-
sponses to Bohnenberger's objections:
It's true that the tag system will not limit re-entry to
one car per household.
Tags are the responsibility of the vehicle owner.
There is no current method. Stickers are no longer
recognized by county-wide emergency officials.
Maloney said the stickers have been eliminated be-
cause county officials recognized they were rampant
throughout the county, as Islanders sold or traded vehicles.
In addition, there was no limit to the number of stickers
dispensed to a household.
Bradenton Beach Commissioner Gale Cole has of-
fered to set up a spread sheet for recording and tracking
the issuance of tags.
"The most important thing to realize about the
hanger system is that if anyone thinks it costs too
much, he doesn't have to get one," Maloney noted.
"The bumper sticker has not served us well. It really
hasn't served us at all."


Mayor Carol Whitmore sided with Bohnenberger.
"The staff says it will be an administrative night-
mare," Whitmore said.
Commissioner Sandy Haas-Martens reiterated the
offer from Cole to develop a spread sheet and noted, "I'll
volunteer to help issue them."
"I believe that we have a responsibility to the citizens
of this Island," Maloney added. "If it takes a little extra
work, then that's fine."
Whitmore aked what would happen if one city de-
cides not to do it and Maloney said its residents will have
to show two IDs and wait in line.
Bohnenberger asked how the tags will expedite re-
entry.
"Showing two IDs will slow the return process,"
Maloney replied. "There will be two lanes for returning
vehicles one for IDs and one for tags. The ones with
tags will be waved through. They'll get back much
quicker."
Whitmore said people will likely wait until the last
minute to get tags when a hurricane is bearing down on
the Island.
"Suspend the program during the emergency and
don't give them out," Haas-Martens said.
"The police departments of all the communities want
this and have been wanting it for years," resident Bob
Jones pointed out. "It's not going to satisfy everybody, but
I think we need to support them."
Maloney said he will present the objections at the next
Island Emergency Operations Center meeting Oct. 13.


Sand from Bimini Bay dredging causes citizen strife


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

the Anna Maria-Holmes Beach city line, it's consid-
ered a shared responsibility.
Galati Marine Inc.'s "dog leg" channel is included
in the project at a cost to the marina of approximately
$23.000.
Both men have thick files pertaining to the project.
The paper trail shows the involvement of numerous
government agencies.
"It was our intent to keep the sand on the beach
from the start." Duennes said.
Plans to dredge the pass have been underxway since
the beginning of 1997 and while there have been man,
snags along the way. Charnock said. the "bureaucratic
nightmare" began when he requested the dredged sand
be deposited on the ba\ side beach.
A letter from Tampa Department or En.vironmen-
tal Protection Rose Po\ nter directed Char-nok to pur-
sue an alternative site because dumping -and on the
proposed site would harm tornado "v.orn,.
Charnock and Duennes tried to re-ro,'.ce rhe ,and to
the Gulf beach \ i;i :iT ei.l.nr,," -::1:,e' ::- -; -


tem. but the Gulf beach is not included in Tampa
DEP's jurisdiction.
The dividing line for Tampa DEP is the Rod &
Reel Pier. The area heading north around to the Gulf is
Tallahassee's jurisdiction.
Results of a soil exploration and analysis for the
Key Royale channel performed by Ardeman & Asso-
ciates in May 1998 were forwarded to Tallahassee DEP
the summer of 1999.
Comments from a coastal engineering consultant
dated Aug. 4 and directed to Gorzeman's attention
stated an accurate depiction of the proposed sand place-
ment was not provided in the permit and the color of
the sand was not compatible with existing sand.
The consultant said because it was a small fill place-
ment. v-er in sand would iikeli hae been more noticeable.
Gorzeman recommended the city' perform further
ana! identified ~ pe. color and other component. of the sand.
he a id. But a <-pecific 1. re of colorization test kn: .1, n
, Li -... C ,r M c-:-n.-'rT


Charnock said there were other demands made of
the cities at that point, but they faced losing a 5150,000
grant from the West Coast Inland Navigation District
because the project took so long to get underway.
Charnock said the color of the sand was never an
issue on the bayfront. It was harming the thriving tor-
nado worms, or benthicc community."
Gorzeman wrote Charnock a letter after attending
a meeting on the subject and said studies conducted on
the subject determined the worms recover, and while
Tallahassee DEP acknowledges the study, Tampa DEP
does not. Charnock said.
Duennes likened the experience to a game of ping
pong.
Charnock said it ".,as too late in the game to re ver.
direction and re-test the sand. so he and Duennes. made
arrangements for the sand to be hauled from the beach.
It mav not be to late to keep .'.hat's left of the sand.
Charnock ,aid. With commission approval, the cities
ma,. be able to modify the permit ..without negatively
affectin i its contract" ith the dredger.
'- a cre 'in: shame." Duennes said. of the sugar-






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 3 I[


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Despite pleas from the property owner, Holmes
Beach city commissioners recently held fast on a $5,000
fine and attorney's fees for a charge of excessive remod-
eling.
"Recent events involving Hurricane Floyd point up
the necessity of vigorous enforcement of building codes
in coastal areas and I think the city would be sending the
wrong message if it agreed to a lesser fine," attorney Gre-
gory Hootman told commissioners.
Commissioners allege that the renovations to the
home of Pauline Pasco, 201 73rd St., exceed the Federal
Emergency Management Agency's 50 percent rule. Ac-
cording to the rule, renovations or improvements to a
nonconforming, ground-level structure cannot exceed 50
percent of the structure's value.
The case has been ongoing since May 1998 when
commissioners appointed Hootman to pursue the issue in
circuit court. Negotiations with Pasco's attorney, Donald
Yetter, led to a reduction from the original $10,000 fine.
Pasco sought a further reduction to $2,500.

Commission OKs
5 ordinances
Holmes Beach city commissioners have passed
five ordinances on first reading.
The ordinances would:
Define essential services and essential service
delivery systems.
Provide an additional homestead exemption for
senior citizens who meet the requirements and make
application to the city.
Amend the city's definition of substantial im-
provement.
Provide for a charter change to be submitted to
voters at the March election. If approved by voters, city
elections will be held in November rather than March.
Permit overnight camping by participants in tem-
porary special events held on the city field.


"In this instance there was a difference between a
contract that was used to obtain the building permit and a
contract that was found later," City Attorney Patricia
Petruff explained. "It's the contractor's position that both
parties entered into the misrepresentation knowingly."
Petruff said Pasco and the contractor apparently had
a disagreement resulting in lawsuits between them. When
Pasco reported the contractor to the Florida Department of
Business and Professional Regulations, a second contract
came to light.
The second contract was for $20,000 more than the
contract used to obtain the building permit, Petruff said.
The DBPR notified city building official Joe Duennes.
Duennes conferred with FEMA officials who advised him
to enforce the 50 percent regulation.
"I spent a lot of time trying to determine whether or
not there could, or would, be any modification or variance
for improvements that deal with handicapped accessibil-
ity," Petruff said. "We haven't been able to find anything."
Pasco, who is confined to a wheelchair, said the ad-
dition was upstairs.
"The penalty has to be strong enough to have the ef-
fect you want and people don't think it's just the cost of
doing business, Petruff noted. "The case is ready for trial
if no settlement can be reached."
"I knew nothing of two contracts," Pasco maintained.
"I only had one contract in my possession. It's the
contractor's fault. He committed this wrongdoing and I'm
paying for his mistake. I can't afford to pay $5,000."
Pasco said the contractor duped her by pretending to
ruin the first page of the contract due to an error with his
computer and asked her to sign a second one.
Mayor Carol Whitmore said the penalty should re-
main at $5,000 and asked about the possibility of placing
a lien on the house.
Vice Chairman Don Maloney said that's not an option
with a home improvement issue.
Commissioners agreed to seek a $2,500 down pay-
ment and set up a payment plan, as requested by Pasco, for
the remainder. Petruff said attorney's fees would be
$2,500 to $3,000 in addition to the fine.


Commission seeks fine for


excessive remodeling


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Candidate forum Oct. 21
in Bradenton Beach
Candidates for the Ward 1 commission seat in
Bradenton Beach will discuss goals if elected and field
questions from voters Thursday, Oct. 21 in a forum
sponsored by The Islander Bystander.
Incumbent Bill Arnold is being challenged by Fran
LaSpina. Also scheduled to give brief remarks to the
audience will be Mayor-elect Gail Cole, Commissioner
Berneitta Kays and Commissioner-elect Dawn Baker.
The trio were not challenged in their bids for office.
Arnold and LaSpina will be given three minutes for
opening remarks and two minutes for closing comments.
Questions from the floor will be read by moderator
Bonner Futch, publisher of The Islander Bystander.
The forum will be held at the Bradenton Beach
City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N. Doors will open at 6:30
p.m. for a "meet and greet the candidates," and the fo-
rum will begin at 7 p.m.



Anna Maria City
10/19, 7:30 p.m., rescheduled commission
work session.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive,
778-0781.
Bradenton Beach
10/21, 1 p.m., Commission meeting.
10/21, 6:30 p.m., Candidates' Forum sponsored
by The Islander Bystander.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.
Holmes Beach
None scheduled.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.
Of Interest
S10/18, 3 p.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Holmes Beach City Hall.
10/20, 2 p.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
10/21, 7 p.m., Anna Maria/West Side Fire
Commissions, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


Voted

"Best New

Restaurant"






Bistro



at Island's End

At the end of Gulf
Drive at Pine Avenue
Anna Maria 779-2444


LIC #CACO 56298
LIC #RF0047797


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1lID PAGE 4 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Anna Maria commissioners fixate on fixing pier


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria city officials may have a nearsighted
vision of the city's historic pier.
They're not concerned with hammering out details
of another lease or future negotiations with prospective
tenants.
At the moment, commissioners are focused on
making much-needed repairs to the structure before
formally accepting bids for the operation of the restau-
rant later.
The restaurant now sits vacant after nine months of
lease negotiations came to a screeching halt with John
Home, former operator of the oyster bar restaurant -
two days before the 12-year lease expired.



Anna Maria mayor's plea

hearing set Oct. 27
By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
Some six months after he was charged with wrong-
fully keeping public documents under lock and key,
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard is scheduled for a
plea hearing Oct. 27 in Manatee County court.
Shumard said he would plead no contest to the
non-criminal charge of violating Florida's public
records law. If found guilty, he may be ordered to pay
a fine of up to $500.
Complaints were filed in April by The Islander
Bystander and Jim Conoly, a resident of Anna Maria,
when Shumard denied requests to view city clerk re-
sumes and applications following the resignation of the
former city clerk.
Following its investigation, the state attorney's
office lowered criminal charges to non-criminal and
subsequently dropped Conoly's complaint. Conoly's
charge was dropped after he told prosecutors he was
satisfied that he received the requested records in a
reasonable amount of time.
Shumard said he will submit all bills for his legal
defense to the city for payment.


Commissioners first plan to proceed with an engi-
neer study to determine the pier's condition, reversing
a decision to rule out a $9,634 bid submitted by Infra-
structure Engineers Inc. The commission said the
company's expertise was overkill for its relatively
small pier.
The city is also checking into the services of
Graphic Underwater Engineering & Diving Inc., a lo-
cal entity that surveyed the Bradenton Beach City Pier.
Without obtaining an evaluation of the pier, com-
missioners have differing ideas of what should be ac-
complished. Mayor Chuck Shumard said he would like
to see a new pier, saying residents deserve something
they can be proud of.
Commissioner Max Znika said the city should treat
the pier as a turnkey operation, allowing someone the
opportunity to fix it up and take over its operation.
Vice Mayor Robert McElheny recommends repair-
ing only what is necessary and what the city can afford.
A previous preliminary cost estimate submitted by
engineer Joe Mittauer of Mittauer & Associates was
$800,000 for the replacement of pilings, decking and
substructure.
With what funds the city has on hand, it may be
limited to piecemeal repairs, though financing has been
a consideration.
The city set aside $100,000 from a matching fund
grant from the Florida Recreation Development Assis-
tance Program, which it received in August. For its
1999-00 fiscal year, the city budgeted $100,000 for its
share.
But the city faces a loss of $5,000 per month rent
while the pier sits vacant.
Commissioner Doug Wolfe said the pier shouldn't
be in the substandard condition it's presently in.
The former tenants were obligated to maintain the
pier under the lease that expired Sept. 30. Wolfe said
the city should sue them to collect money it's spent
making repairs in the past and for future costs the city
will incur.
A letter dated Oct. 1, addressed to the mayor from
former lease holder Phil Seay, requests the city return
his lease deposit. The $2,400 initial deposit has grown


with interest to $6,484.88.
There is no mention of the deposit in the former
lease. The city has forwarded the letter to the city at-
torney for recommendation.
McElheny said the security deposit should be re-
tained by the city for repairs the city was forced to do.
Residents complained that as of Friday, no signs
were in place at the city pier telling of the restaurant's
closure. A sign put up by Ralph Russell, owner of Rot-
ten Ralph's restaurant, directing hungry patrons to his
restaurant was ordered removed by Shumard.
Shumard said signs have been ordered.
McElheny said he appreciates the good-faith pro-
posals from Russell, who has offered to accept the
city's most recent draft of a new pier lease.
McElheny said other immediate items the city
needs to address is opening the bait shop and cleaning
and repairing the dumpsite area.
Russell also offered his services to keep the bait
shop open regular hours, which he says will help re-
duce vandalism.
However, to open the bait shop, the city would
have to deal with a faulty lift station, repair the electric
service and replace bait tanks removed by John Horne,
the former tenant. Commissioners say the bait tanks
belong to the city.
Public Works Director Phil Charnock said he inter-
vened to prevent Home from removing attached items
such as the hood vents.
Znika said the city should re-think some lease pro-
visions and alter the rent. Instead of a flat rate of $5,000
per month or 6 percent of sales, the city should ask for
12 to 15 percent of sales, thus creating less hardship on
a restaurant operator during slow months, he said.
Commissioner George McKay said the commis-
sion is being accused of running the tenant off by price
"gouging."
He said the city should do some research on what
income a restaurant on the pier would generate and then
establish the rent.
Znika said when accepting bids, the city shouldn't
rule out large, commercial restaurant chains such as
McDonalds or Burger King.


NEW f/tSR


ARRIVALS ARE IN!










0 :

















s p o k- t
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR SEPTEMBER SALE GIFT CERTIFICATE WINNER
JANET FITTRO OF HOLMES BEACH

SOT A
ANAMRAILAD LRD
9801"LF RM MNAMM& CMD
77-67


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 5 JIM

Holmes Beach considers new cable franchise


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Watch out for the Road Runner. Beep. beep, Mr.
Modem.
Holmes Beach residents will soon be able to hook up
to the high-speed Internet service Road Runner offered by
a cable provider if commissioners proceed with a new
franchise agreement for Time Warner of Manatee.
Time Warner attorney Gregory J. Porges answered
questions on various aspects of the renewal agreement
at a recent meeting.
Commissioner Don Maloney said he learned about
a law firm in Houston, Texas, that has experts in the
field. A lawyer at the firm was asked to review an early
draft of the Holmes Beach agreement and offer com-
ments, which were sent to Porges for reply.
Maloney said those changes were incorporated into
the current agreement except for one questioning the


15-year length of the agreement and the other on the
percentage of the franchise fee.
"I don't think the length of time deserves any con-
sideration because if any system comes up during that
15 years that's better than the current one, users will
respond to that," Maloney said.
He noted that the percentage of the franchise fee
is not a concern to Time Warner because it is a pass-
through fee to customers.
"I'm concerned about giving carte blanche to
Time Warner to put anything they want in the city,"
Chairman Roger Lutz said to Porges. "The agreement
gives Time Warner the right to provide cable service
and 'any such additional services the grantee from
time to time may choose to provide.' It seems to me
the grant of franchise gives Time Warner the right to
do anything it wants."
Porges said the term "additional service" is de-

Road gang
scoops
seaweed
Manatee County
Sheriffs Department
coordinated seaweed
removal by jail
prisoners at the at
4 ~ King Fish Boat Ramp.
Deputy Robert Becker
said the crew will
Possibly spend two
S days removing sea-
S .weed, the result of
-. -'.- unusually high tides
: and hurricane-related
S ... storms. The sheriff's
"department is assisting
S' the Manatee County
,,." I Parks and Recreation
: Department, he said.
." Islander Photo: Susan
Kesselring


fined in the agreement. "It's limited to what we can
provide over the system," he noted. "Now we're going
to have Internet services and with the changes in tech-
nology, I can't predict what else, other than the fact that
we can't become telecommunications over the system.
The term 'cable system' is also well defined."
Maloney asked how often the 5 percent franchise
fees will be paid and Porges said semi-annually. City
Treasurer Rick Ashley said he would prefer that they
be paid monthly, or at least quarterly. However, Porges
said that would be too difficult because the process
involves complex calculations.
Ashley said the fees are about $42,000 annually.
"I have a whole lot of problems with this ordinance
because the citizens and the city are not driving the
process," resident Joan Perry said. "We are giving
away the use of our rights of way. I would like to know
how the community feels about it."
Porges said vendor prepared franchises are typical
in the industry. The city had the opportunity to conduct
a needs survey in 1997 when the company made the
original proposal for a renewal, but it did not, he added.
"You're talking about the great value of the rights
of way." Lutz said to Perry. "If we don't enter into an
agreement and have Time Warner provide cable, how
are we going to get it and who else will want to buy that
space in our rights of way?"
City Attorney Patricia Petruff questioned several
aspects of the agreement and Porges said he would
work with her to clarify them.
Perry asked why the city is in a hurry to finalize the
agreement.
"Residents, old and young, have called and yelled
at us for holding up the agreement," Mayor Carol
Whitmore replied. "They want to know why they can't
get the cable company's Internet service, which they
can't get until we approve the agreement."
"I'm one of the people who called Carol," resident
Edie LeCroy said. "I can't get certain services because
you haven't approved the agreement. This is a service
that is being offered to us that we shouldn't refuse.
Time Warner's done a good job for the Island and it's
just offering us a little bit more."


Gerald Chip Shea
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Investments


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[ PAGE 6 U OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BvCTAKI'"


Not so sportsmanlike
Please, please read Erin Beal's compassionate letter shar-
ing this page. It's not a plea for help, but we hope you'll find it
in your heart to join us in doing just that.
Beal's the mother of two young children, one pre-school
age and the other an infant. And she's a victim of a senseless
free-for-all night of destruction, apparently committed by high
school hockey players and/or fans.
It all started Sept. 26 when her car broke down in the
3600 block of East Bay Drive in Holmes Beach.
Later police found the car vandalized, apparently by
wielders of hockey sticks. Along with numerous demolished
mailboxes throughout the city, every window, mirror and
glass item on Beal's vehicle was destroyed and the driver's
side sustained severe damage. A partial hockey stick was
found at the scene, a likely remnant from a heated hockey
game between Manatee and Bayshore high schools the pre-
vious night where tempers were running high.
The incident is under investigation and Holmes Beach
police assure they are working with school resource offic-
ers to find the vandals.
Meanwhile, Beal says she still has no vehicle. She has
rent assistance from family and is presently unemployed
with income from an inheritance.
Our community is so supportive of its people, with
fundraisers and compassion overflowing from all sides. We've
recently raised $60,000-plus for school playground equipment.
And $8,000 for holiday fireworks. And the Anna Maria Island
Community Center's annual challenge fund brought more than
$80,000 last year to its endowment and the auction proceeds
topped $100,000.
Surely there are Islanders who can lend Beal a car -
and a hand.
If so, call Pierrette Kelly at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. She's poised and ready to help.
If you have information on the crime, please call
Holmes Beach police at 708-5800.

Red tide redux, or not
As this is being written, there is a threat of red tide off
Anna Maria Island. Let's hope the micro-organism's bloom
remains just that a threat.
It wasn't too many years ago that we went through an
almost unprecedented 14 months or so of red tide outbreaks
off the Island. The beach was mostly deserted, the shorefront
restaurants were quiet, city work crews worked overtime
keeping dead fish in abeyance from seawalls and off
beaches, and things generally were pretty lousy out here.
It stunk.
The economic impact to the Island was a disaster for
business and our quality of life suffered. In fact, about the
only good thing that came of the experience was a realiza-
tion by scientists and researchers who study red tide that
damage caused by the micro-organism was greater than
environmental and medical.
It hurts business, too.
Let's hope we don't have to shop with our cartoon char-
acter Slick this year. And keep hoping the east winds keep
a'blowin'.

ISLANDERS Rg1.
OCTOBER 13, 1999 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 47
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner J. Futch
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Pat Copeland
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Susan K. Kesselring
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mary Fulford Green
Capt. Mike Heistand
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Shona Samuels
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Tracey Powers
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


.ttW^i,


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1999 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@packet.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


I Y OU ON


Open letter to
'hockey team'
It hurts me greatly to realize that when you read the
police report in the Oct. 6 Islander Bystander about
your "un-sportsmanlike" conduct, you will perhaps be
gloating or bragging about how cool you think you
were that night.
I hope you'll begin to be concerned about the finger-
prints, witnesses and other evidence. You should be. If old
enough, you'll spend some time in jail. If too young for
jail, your parents will probably have considerable finan-
cial expenditures for your night out. The next ring of the
doorbell may not be a friend or the Avon Lady.
What you don't know, I'm sorry to believe, and
what probably wouldn't have made a difference to you
"sportsmen," is how I'm suffering. I'm the owner of the
car oop's, goal you destroyed.
As a young, single mother (not on public assistance)
with two small children, acquiring the money to purchase
that vehicle, license and insurance was nothing short of a
miracle. Subsequent problems since the purchase drained
my meager resources another $250.
Your "trophy," my car, had just broken again and
I was really down as I walked home with my babies.
Life isn't easy, I can tell you from experience. That not-
so-pretty vehicle was for me a shining star and an end
to long treks for diapers. milk. formula and groceries.
It meant no more imposition on friends and neighbors
for trips too long to walk with my babies.
Things were looking brighter for me and my family.
My daughter had just entered Palma Sola Pre-school and
loved her classes, showing an enthusiasm only found in
small children experiencing a new adventure in life.
With no way to get her there, she missed a week of
her beloved school until other parents came to the res-
cue. So there are angels in this world as well as you
"sportsmen."
I know you'll say. "So what? She's just a little kid,
she'll get over it."
That's true, but it's still very difficult to look her
in the eye and try and explain we didn't have a car any-
more because of some local "sportsmen." She wanted
to know why you would hurt our car and I didn't have
an answer that would make sense.


The towing and two-day storage was only a mea-
sly $225. The glass replacement and body damage will
cost a few thousand dollars. It might as well be a $1
million because the money for that kind of repair is
impossible for me to obtain.
Well, it's back to long treks for diapers, milk, etc.;
rain or shine, hot or cold.
Yes, life is tough, but just right at this moment the
tears and depression I'm feeling just makes this new
lesson a little to hard for me to assimilate.
I truly hope somehow you'll understand that your
night of fun caused someone a lot of misery and prob-
lems and that you won't repeat your actions.
It probably won't make sense to you, but it's nec-
essary for me to say, I forgive you. I might still curse
you when I'm trudging down the street in the rain over
the next year, but I do forgive.
Erin Beal, Holmes Beach

Ex-mayor likes short terms
You keep distorting my record as mayor from March
1996 to March 1998 (as you did similarly during that pe-
riod), to create a straw man you can easily malign, this
time for your campaign against four-year terms for
Holmes Beach elected officials.
No need. I would be on your side on this issue, as a
matter of fact, if I still lived there. But not for the same
reasons. The whole structure of the city's government and
"expense" pay for officials are pointed toward short terms.
That may need change some day; but not yet. Right now,
someone's looking for a "life" term.
When asked to run in early 1996 and at my election,
I promised only to "give the city two gooxi years" of my
life. I did that, at some cost to myself, and am happy to
have done so. Together with a fine staff and despite an
often-split commission, we accomplished much. The city
was in especially fine financial shape by the time I left.
Someday when I'm free of other tasks, I'll write the
up-front and behind-the-scenes story of my term, and what
led me to it. You can be sure your "coverage" of city hall
news (with specific examples) will be included.
Bob VanWagoner, Siesta Key

For more of Your Opinion,
see page 8


iR~


%. > 1 s


' I "/ 1 /











THOSE WERE THE DAYS
Part 20, A Soldier's Story
by June Alder


This damaged picture of 19-year-old Arthur St. Clair Jones was taken in Tampa
around the time he joined the Army to fight in the Spanish-American War of
1898. His two brothers and his father, Col. John R. Jones, also served in that
war. The photograph was found recently after a diligent search by his grand-
nephew, Arthur Duperon Jones Jr. of Lakeland, who made available to this
column the documents "A Soldier's Story" is based on.


".A GLORIOUS EXIT


Private First Class Arthur St. Clair
Jones met his death in the Battle of the
Argonne Forest 28 days before his 39th
birthday and 22 days before the Armi-
stice of Nov. 11, 1918. A piece of shrap-
nel pierced his brain. Three months
later his grieving parents, John and
Sophia Jones of Anna Maria Key,
Florida, received from his commanding
officer, Captain F.A. McCann, a copy of
this citation:

Arthur S. Jones joined Company E.
Sixth Engineers at Washington, D.C.,
about September 1917. He came to
France with the regiment in December
and during the long and hard winter he
worked from daylight until dark in the
mud, snow and rain, preparing himself
for the part he was later to play in the
game of war. The work was hard and
uninteresting. The hours were long and
when the time for dismissal came, gen-
erally long after nightfall, there was no
place to go but to a pallet of straw in
some cold, dark barn.
Through all of this, which it seems
to me was more of a test than what came
later, Arthur Jones and his companions
went with a willingness and cheerful-
ness that could not be excelled.
In the early spring the regiment was
sent to the British front where it took
part in the operations before Amiens,
which barred the enemy from the coast.
Upon leaving the British line, the
Sixth Engineers went to the vicinity of
Chateau-Thierry where it worked day
and night in the preparation of the de-
fenses of the Marne. When the German
attack was launched, on the night of July
14, he was wounded and sent to the rear.
His work, however, and that of his com-


rades, had made it impossible for the
enemy's attack to succeed.
Jones rejoined his company in time
to do his full share in the work of the
regiment in the taking of the St. Mihiel
salient. From this fight he went directly
to the task of preparing for the launch-
ing of the Argonne-Meuse drive. He
was one of those who assisted in cut-
ting wires and making the way clear for
the advance against Montfaucon in the
early morning of Sept. From then until
the day, e fell, there was nothing but
continuous battle and toil.
On the 20th day of October 1918,
after having made a successful attack
on the little tangle of trees and brush
called Claire Chenes, he was struck and
instantly killed by a fragment of shell
while resisting an unsuccessful enemy
counter-attack.
He was buried where he fell, north
of the ruins of the village of Cunel and
about 20 miles northwest of Verdun.
It was his lot to make the supreme
sacrifice, but it was not made in vain.
It was the indomitable spirit of Jones
and his fellows which made the win-
ning of the war possible.
I have related the history of the
regiment because it is the history of
Jones. He was at his post of duty al-
ways and he did that which he was
called upon to do with a willing spirit
and a stout heart.
He died for his country, in the mo-
ment of victory and with his face to-
ward the beaten foe. No man can ask a
more glorious exit.
Next: New series,
'Wartime Anna Maria:
1941-42.'


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 U PAGE 7 E



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Ml PAGE 8 K OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

a e^S ^ ^I ^


Set record straight
In the Sept. 29 Islander Bystander Barb Wilson
misrepresented my position on beach access parking in
Anna Maria city.
I previously stated and still feel a good temporary
action would be to replace all existing "no-parking"
signs at Beach Avenue and Gladiolus Street in par-
ticular with resident-only parking until the parking
committee recommends a city-wide policy for beach-
access parking.
I am a member of the parking committee and will
promote my ideas on a comprehensive solution as fol-
lows: Anna Maria has always been an open commu-
nity, it's part of our character and we're proud of it.
This is not a "Live like me city," but rather a "Live and
let live city."
The closer one lives to the beach, the more people
you will encounter. If that isn't suitable to your
lifestyle, then choose a community that's private or
more restrictive. When people live on a beach-access
street, they can't expect people to quit using the pub-
lic right of way in front of their house to park, nor can
they expect people not to walk past their house to get
to and from the beach.
Everyone has a right to live in a safe and secure
environment. If we indeed have problems with blocked
driveways, litter, noise, etc., then we need to be more
diligent in enforcing the laws that prohibit those actions
without restricting the rights of law abiding citizens.
Dale Woodland, Anna Maria

Try as I may ...
I can't resist responding to what I've just read in the
Sept. 29 "Our Opinion" column, where you quote what
you believe to be my reactions to the sculptures that some-
how got into the ditch in front of city hall.
You wrote: "Pooh," says Commissioner Maloney and
some of his Key Royale cronies.
That bothered me because I haven't used the word
"pooh" since I told Sister Mary Ursula back in the third
grade at St. John's, Teaneck, N.J., that "pooh" was the
reason I wanted to leave the room.
And while I' ve heard the sculpture opinions of many



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of my "old cronies," most of whom have never crossed the
Key Royale bridge, I don't recall the word "pooh" ever
being mentioned. Old cronies, as I'm sure you're aware,
normally find far more descriptive words at their disposal,
especially when expressing opinions about sculptures. In


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fact, I've never even read the story I've heard was writ-
ten about some Winnie or other, which I understand uses
the very word in the title.
And another thing: I loved reading where you seemed
more than somewhat pleased that with all that aluminum,
stating, "We've reached beyond the natural beauty of our
palm trees, sunsets and beaches."
I thought our cell tower took care of that months ago,
but you never gave it any credit.
I've invited a friend who works at Time magazine to
come down and take a look at our sculptures. If, after
checking them out, that magazine then praises our city -
as you report it praised Chicago when Picasso donated a
sculpture there likewise, for our "vigor and vision,"
and/or those sculptures as "one of the most magnificent
windfalls in its history," then I'll change my mind and my
weekly news-magazine subscription.
But, enough. Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.
Unfortunately, so are the sculptures. But please, don't
misunderstand. I'm quite glad your paper decided to get
into this sculpture fray. The City of Holmes Beach needed
a good issue for your pages in order to catch up with all
the attention Anna Maria has been getting, so keep at it.
One last word mine, that is. I know it won't be
yours. While I never said "pooh" up to now about those
sculptures, I did object and will continue to do so -
that the decision to accept the sculptures in the name of the
City of Holmes Beach were made without discussion by
the city's beautification committee, as well as to the de-
cision to finance care of them with $1,500 of taxpayers'
funds without discussion with them.
If you are really interested in citizens' opinions, ask
readers if there might have been some other way $1,500
could have provided a greater good for a greater number
- such as to our elementary school or the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
On second thought, why didn't I use that word be-
fore? So, here goes now: Pooh on the sculptures.
Commissioner Don Maloney, Holmes Beach

* The Islander Bystander is donating funds to help offset
the city's cost for refurbishing and installing the Linda
Howard sculptures and we invite others to do the same.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 9 BIB


Cortez launches logo contest


A contest to develop a logo illustrating the Cortez
Waterfront Florida program's goals and projects has
been launched by the program and the Florida Institute
of Saltwater Heritage.
The proposition for a contest was offered at a meet-
ing of Cortez Waterfront by Blue Fulford, lifelong
Cortezian who is co-chairman of the program and
president of FISH.
Winner of the contest will get a special free meal
- the first dinner at the first fish fry in the to-be-reno-
vated kitchen at the old fire house, which the program
will rejuvenate as the Cortez Community Center with
a $10,000 state grant.
The meal will be a Cortez special, mullet cooked
by Fulford himself, a widely hailed master in the prepa-
ration of mullet in the smoker, the oven, the frying pan.
The contest is open to local artists and non-artists,
who may send their entries to FISH at P.O. Box 606,
Cortez FL 34215. Deadline is Oct. 31.
The 20-member steering committee approved two
grant applications at the meeting:


For renovation of the Miller dock at the foot of
123rd Street West, a project tied loosely to the old
school building that is being purchased by Manatee
County with a state grant. No amounts were specified
in the grant applications, but this one's top is $50,000,
said program manager Janet Hoffman.
For designing standards for waterfront construc-
tion in the historic village. Maximum for this type of
grant would be $25,000.
Both of those grants would come through the
Coastal Management Program of the Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs.
The committee decided to invite Dan Pennington and
Julia McGee of the Waterfronts Florida state office to help
outline the program, its benefits and how to use it. They
are to be at a meeting in late October or early November.
Their presentation will be an adjunct to the train-
ing being passed along to members by a carload of their
fellow committee persons, who got a two-day briefing
in Panama City from delegates of current beneficiary
communities under Waterfronts Florida.


Gulf fishing heritage exhibit here


"The Fishing Heritage of Gulf Coastal Florida,"
traveling exhibit from the Florida Museum of Natural
History, has arrived for an indefinite stay at the Anna
Maria Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria City.
The society explained that the display features
"people of the estuary who lived in the rich Gulf
Coast area for more than 6,000 years. The Calusa
were the most powerful. By the 16th century the
Calusa controlled the southern half of Florida.
"They were fishermen and engineered canals to
connect coastal towns to inland waterways and com-
munities. Some of their ancient fishing traditions con-
tinue today along the Gulf Coast.
"The Calusa depended on the estuary for most of
their food and found ways to use bones, teeth and
shells of sea creatures. Dugout canoes were made
from pine trees. Tools were made from shells and
fishing nets were made from cord fashioned from


plants and trees. The Calusa society died out by the
mid-1700s from disease, warfare and slavery.
"Spanish fishermen and Indians from surrounding
areas arrived. Now, the future of coastal fishing is un-
certain due to overfishing by commercial fishermen,
pollution and the destruction of fish habitat."
Another new exhibit at the museum traces the life
of Mario Sanchez, wood carver and painter of old Key
West. His works "celebrate life as he remembered it
from the '20s to the '40s in Key West and Ybor City,"
the historical society said.
"His carvings/paintings are colorful, humorous
interpretations of actual historical events. Behind ev-
ery carving is a story which helps preserve the history
and flavor of his community."
The admission-free public museum is open from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Saturday.
Details are available at 778-0492.


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resident without the right estate plan, taxes and probate laws could significantly erode the value of
your estate. That's why you should attend this free informative seminar.
October 20 December 2, 1999
9:30 a.m. at Olive Garden, 4420 14th Street West, Bradenton


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Vice President Associate Vice President -
Investments Investments


"Six Steps to an Effective Plan for You & Your Family" addresses:
* How Florida probate laws affect your will
* The advantage of being a Florida resident
* How to establish Florida residency
* How to protect your income or estate from Northern state taxes
* Is your out-of-state will valid in Florida?
* Do you need a Florida will or living trust?
You'll get fresh insights into these topics from both a knowledgeable professional financial
consultant and a Florida attorney.


Seating at "Six Steps to an Effective Estate Plan for You & Your Family" is
limited. Call 747-6666 today to reserve your place. Refreshments will be served.


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Holmes Beach

commissioner

questions ITPO

agreement
A transportation agreement was detoured
by Holmes Beach city commissioners follow-
ing objections from Commissioner Rich
Bohnenberger.
Commissioners recently declined to ap-
prove the revised interlocal agreement and
rules of procedure for the Island Transporta-
tion Planning Organization.
Bohnenberger said he objects to the fact
that ITPO members are seated in April rather
than January. He maintained that the late seat-
ing creates a disadvantage for the Island rep-
resentative to the Sarasota/Manatee Metropoli-
tan Planning Organization.
"We fought for years to have a seat on the
MPO and we struggled in the early years to
have equal recognition from members of that
board," Bohnenberger noted. "It's quite diffi-
cult to do that if you don't play on the same
level."
Bohnenberger said because the MPO
chairman and vice chairman are selected in
January, the Island representative will never
have an opportunity to serve in those positions.
Bohnenberger's second objection is to the
provision limiting ITPO representatives to
mayors or vice mayors. He said any elected
Island city official should be considered for
appointment.
"It limits the ability of the three cities to
put the best person forward to do the job,"
Bohnenberger said.
Commissioners asked Bohnenberger to
present his objections at the next ITPO meet-
ing Oct. 18.


t* -;, 1., m







(IE PAGE 10 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

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Register to learn kid care
Teens interested in signing up for a baby-sitting
course should contact Maggie Rosario at Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
Students will receive certification from the Ameri-
can Red Cross upon completion of the course. The
class date and time will be determined as soon as 10 or
more potential baby-sitters register.
The center is located at 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. For more information, call 778-1908.

Center offers fitness
classes
Aerobic classes are held at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria,
10:30 a.m. Monday and 9 a.m. Wednesday and Friday.
The cost is $3 for members and $4 for non-members.
For more information, call the Center at 778-1908.

Local artists show
in fall exhibition
Two Anna Maria Island artists will be featured in
exhibitions of "visual responses by artists to the spec-
trum of emotions attached to the challenges and en-
lightenments of illness." The shows continue through
Nov. 1.
One is titled "cancer, Courage, CURE," and it is in
tandem with "In Memoriam," an invitational display of
works by artists who survived or who died of cancer.
It is produced by the Art League of Manatee
County and features works by the late Virginia Powel
and Dr. Carl Voyles.
Ms. Powel was a resident of Holmes Beach who
survived cancer, but died following unrelated surgery
last summer. She then was planning a printmaking
exhibit at the league, and that show will go on at an
invitational exhibit in December.
Dr. Voyles is a longtime resident of Anna Maria
City, active in the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island.
He is a physician on the Island.
Hours at the admission-free gallery are 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday-Friday except Thursday, when it is also
open from 7 to 9 p.m.
Information is available at 746-2862.

Longboat Chamber
sets two events
Two events are scheduled Wednesday, Oct. 20, for
the Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce.
At noon the monthly "nooner" will be at the Buc-
caneer Inn, 595 Dream Island Road, for networking
and business discussions.
At 5:30 p.m. an Internet seminar will be conducted
at the Chamber office, 6854 Gulf of Mexico Drive, in
the Whitney Beach Plaza.
Reservations may be made and further information
obtained at 387-9519.

Historical Society will hear
Tampa Bay harbor pilot
Capt. Joseph Shary of Anna Maria, Tampa Bay
harbor pilot, will tell of his adventures on the high seas
at a meeting of the Anna Maria Island Historical Soci-
ety Monday, Oct. 18.
The society will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Anna
Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive.
Capt. Shary was in the U.S. Merchant Marine for
12 years before becoming a harbor pilot here 13 years
ago. He and his wife Sandy and children, Patrick, 12,
student at King Middle School, and Mary, 10, fifth-
grader at the Island Elementary School, have lived on
the Island for seven years.
The society said his workday starts with a trip in
his power boat to Egmont Key. where he joins an in-
coming ship to take to the Tampa docks. Next he pilots
an outbound vessel beyond Egmont before takinE his
own boat home to the Island. Information may be ob-
tained at 778-0492.

Judge will address civic
association
Judge Matt McMillan will address the Holmes
Beach Civic Association's meeting at 10 a.m. Satur-
day. Oct. 16. at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Ma-
rina Drive. Holmes Beach.


Hazardous waste
collection Oct. 16
County residents may bring household haz-
ardous waste materials to the Manatee County
Public Works complex, 4410 66th St. W.,
Bradenton, on Oct. 16 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Businesses that generate small quantities of
hazardous waste may bring their waste on the
same date and times. However, small businesses
will be charged a fee for the service. The fee
must be paid on site to the collector.
Radioactive and bio-hazardous materials
will not be accepted.
For information, call 792-8811 extension
5423.

Three barrier island
chambers meeting
The Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key and Siesta
Key Chambers of Commerce have scheduled their an-
nual Tri-Chamber Business After Hours for 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 14.
The event will be at Mote Marine Laboratory's
aquarium, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway on City Is-
land, off the southern end of the New Pass Bridge.
It will be hosted by Mote and Harry's Continental
Kitchens, including complimentary hors d'oeuvres and
a cash bar. The networking get-together will feature
displays of chamber members' products and services.
Reservations may be made and details obtained at
387-9519.

'Shining Star' candidates
sought on Longboat
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce is ac-
cepting nominations for its "Shining Star" award, pre-
sented to an employee in the hospitality industry for
exceptional customer service.
Candidates may be nominated by management,
another employee or by a visitor or resident of the area,
said the chamber. The Tourist Development Commit-
tee, chaired by Lorriace Boccio, will determine the
winner and present the award at the Chamber's annual
meeting next January.
Details are available at 387-9519.

Local Girl Scout official
at meet
Susan Atherton of Anna Maria City has gone back
to her home territory for the Girl Scout national coun-
cil and 48th annual convention.
The convention will be from Thursday through
Sunday, Oct. 14 17 at Kansas City, Mo., not far from
where Atherton grew up in Council Bluffs, Iowa. She
is one of 2,000 delegates.
As treasurer and member of the board of directors
of'Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida, she is one of 14
local representatives to the convention. The Gulfcoast
organization serves more than 8,500 girls in Manatee,
Sarasota, Charlotte, DeSoto, Lee, Collier and Hendry
counties.
Atherton has lived on Anna Maria Island for six
years. She is a portfolio manager at Peninsula Asset
Management, Bradenton.

Chef Arpke schedules
'Luncheon Lessons'
Chef Raymond Arpke of Euphemia Haye restau-
rant on Longboat Key is setting aside every Wednes-
day in October and Tuesdays in November for his
"Lesson Luncheon" series that started Oct. 6.
He said the lessons will include preparation of reci-
pes. luncheon and wine pairing with each course. The
gourmet classes will be from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
at his restaurant. 5540 Gulf of Mexico Drive. They are
by reservation only (383-3633) at S50 per person. The
schedule:
Wednesday Oct. 13. You Can't Tuna Fish But
You Can Tuna Piano: Oct. 20, What the Heck is
"'Dirty" Risotto Anyway? Oct. 27, Si Grazzia ('at's
Italian), but it's already sold out; Tuesday, Nov. 2,
Mid-Eastern Mania; Nov. 9. Culinary Classics; Nov.
16. Duck, Duck, Goose: Nov. 23, It's Holiday Time.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1999 M PAGE 11 JI


Rotary offers Island Millennium Monopoly
There's a new game in town and playing it, from left to right, are Pat Dixon, Ned Perkins, Carol Duncan and
Gene Moss. Actually it's the old game of Monopoly with a new face. The Anna Maria Island Rotary Club is
about to release its Millennium collector's version of Monopoly and instead of Park Place and Boardwalk the
game board has familiar Island addresses such as Duffy's Tavern and Anna Maria Island Elementary School.
This is the third in a series of Island Monopoly games offered by Rotary, the first in 1984 and the second in
1992. They will be available beginning Nov. 15for $15.95 at First National Bank and Trust. If you order it


ahead, they'll put your name on the inside of the board.
branch at 778-4900. Islander Photo: David Futch


Democrats will hear
rabbi Monday
Rabbi Ben Aiello will discuss "Celebrating Di-
versity" at a meeting of the Anna Maria Island
Democratic Club at noon Monday, Oct.18, at the
Beach House Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N. in
Bradenton Beach.
No reservations are necessary for the "dutch
treat" lunch, said Norton Niss, official of the club.
Further information may be obtained at 778-9118.


Art League introduces
Beaux Arts Ball
A costume ball inviting guests to wear clothing
from their favorite decade in history is scheduled when
the Art League of Manatee County inaugurates a Beaux
Arts Ball for the area on Oct. 30.
A committee including Joe Vona of Anna Maria
has been working for months organizing the ball. said
Pat Richmond of the league. The affair is to raise funds
for the league.
"The Beaux Arts Ball is a long-standing tradition
among artists and their patrons around the world as a way
to support the arts," Richmond said. "This is the first tinice
we have had such a ball in Manatee County."
Reservations are being taken now at 746-2862.
Tables of eight persons are S200. tables of 10 S250.
Individual tickets are available to league members
only. The ball will be at the Bradenton Municipal
Auditorium. 1005 Barcarrota Blvd.

Commission approves site
plan for repair business
Holmes Beach city commissioners approved a site
plan for Island Starter and Alternator owned by Will-
iam Carlbart at 3001 Gulf Drive.
Carlbart said he will be repairing parts brought into
the business by customers or picked up by him and will
not be installing or repairing the parts in vehicles there.

Firefighters attend
National Fire Academy
Four Anna Maria/West Side fire district personnel
recently attended the National Fire Academy in
Emmitsburg. Md.. during the academy's Florida State
Weekend.
Personnel included Battalion Chiefs Rich Losek
and Dennis Dotson. Captain Barry Brooks and
firefighter Brian Braun. Classes included arson inves-
tigation. engine company tactics and public education.


For more information, call First National's Island


Island couple showing art
in Sarasota
Marilyn and Robert Davis of Holmes Beach are
exhibiting their art at Unity Church of Sarasota, 800
Coconut Ave., until Nov. 4.
The public exhibit will be open from 10 a.m. until
2 p.m. Tuesday through Fridays, and before and after
worship services on Sundays. A reception will honor
the artists at the church at 11 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 10.
Davis retired 10 years ago as a professor at Michigan
State University, and since has concentrated his energy on
art and the arts. Ms. Davis is a watercolor painter who
recently has worked primarily with dyes on silk.

First chili dinner set
Saturday at church
The Fellowship of the Episcopal Church of the
Annunciation will serve its first public chili dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16, on the church
grounds, 4408 Gulf Drive. Holmes Beach.
With chili will come bread. salad and drinks, with
dessert available, at S4 for adults, S2 for children un-
der 6. Diners may eat in the banquet room or order
ahead and take out. 778-1638.
8 courses added on key
The Longboat Key Center for the Arts has loaded
itself with the heaviest class schedule in its 47-year
history with the addition of eight new courses for the
1999-2000 schedule.
The new classes are in drawing, jewelry, experi-
mental mixed media, watercolor. pastel, quilting,
stained glass and stone and wood sculpture. Informa-
tion and registration are available at 383-2345.


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Red tide moves closer
Red tide appears to be lurking offshore of Anna
Maria Island. but as of Tuesday there were only
reports of itching eyes and scratchy throats no
dead fish on the beach.
Mote Marine Laboratory researchers have de-
tected what the, call "high levels" of red tide from
Tampa Ba\ to Fort MyIers. Most of the problems are
to the south.
Red tide is caused by blooms of a tiny marine
organism called a dinoflagellate. The microscopic
organisms produce powerful toxins that can cause
fish kills. contaminate shellfish and can cause se-
vere respiratory irritation to humans.
Characteristic of a serious red tide outbreak is
burning eyes and a dry cough.


I






PI PAGE 12 M OCTOBER 13, 1999 2 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

I9 f: F =_ fI q


Hubert J.
Dowling Jr.
Hubert J. Dowling Jr., 64, of Bradenton, died
Oct. 8 at home.
Services will be a later date. Covell Crema-
tion and Funeral Center is in charge of arrange-
ments. Memorial contributions may be made to
Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd.,
Sarasota, FL 34238.
Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Dowling came to
Manatee County from Tucson, Ariz., in 1987. He
was employed at the Silver Surf Motel,
Bradenton Beach. He was Catholic. He served in
the U.S. Army.
He is survived by his companion, Annette
Lamb, of Bradenton; a sister, Phyliss Meinhardt,
of Nashville, Tenn.; a brother, Donald, of Nash-
ville; and his father, Hubert J. Sr., of Nashville.

Shirley M.
Higbee
Shirley M. Higbee, 66, of Holmes Beach,
died Oct. 7 at home.
Born in North Kingston, R.I., Mrs. Higbee
came to Manatee County from Brunswick,
Maine, in 1994. She was a homemaker. She was
a Methodist.
Visitation and service was held Oct. 9 at


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Brown & Sons Funeral Home, Bradenton, fol-
lowed by burial in Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. Brown and Sons Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions
may be made to the American Cancer Society,
600 U.S. 301 Blvd. W., Suite 136, Bradenton, FL
34205.
She is survived by her husband, Andrew S.
Sr.; a daughter, Maryann Hopkins, of Bradenton;
two sons, Andrew S. Jr., of Chesapeake, Va., and
Michael J., of Palm Harbor; her mother, Agnes
Evans of Wakefield, R.I.; and seven grandchil-
dren.
Alfred
Walins
Alfred Walins, 79, of Bradenton, died Oct. 13
in the Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Bay
Pines.
There will be no service. C.E. Prevatt Funeral
Home, St. Petersburg, is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Born in Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Walins came
to Manatee County from Bridgewater, Conn., in
1980. He was a carpenter. He served in the U.S.
Army during World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Bertha; a daugh-
ter, Diane Moment of Yarmouth, Maine; a son,
Alfred Jr., of Bradenton; a sister, Bernice Meyer
of Anna Maria; and a grandchild.


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Welcome baby Jos6
Joe Lightner holds his first grandson. He and wife
Eris, both employees at Anna Maria Elementary
School and residents of Anna Maria, are the proud
grandparents of Josd Angel Rodriguez Jr., born Sept.
22. The Lightnersflew to Dixon, Ill., to meet the
stork and be with their daughter Jamie Lynn and
son-in-law Josd for the occasion. Little Jose was
quite the catch, weighing in at pounds, 10 ounces
and measuring 20 1/2 inches long.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 13 IKM


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Oct. 1, animal bite, 300 block of Palm Avenue.
The victim reported she was walking her dog and a pit
bull charged her dog and bit its neck and hind legs. The
victim said during the struggle to get the pit bull off her
dog, it bit her on the arm and hand. The Manatee
County Health Department is conducting a rabies in-
vestigation.
Oct. 2, possession of tobacco by a minor subject,
300 block of Pine Avenue. The subject was issued a
notice to appear.
Oct. 5, vandalism, 10002 Gulf Drive, Bortell's
Lounge. The complainant reported an unknown person
threw a concrete block through the front window, but
did not gain entry. Damages were $700.

Bradenton Beach
Oct. 3, giving a false name, no valid driver's license,
failure to register a motor vehicle, Coquina Beach. The
officer observed the subject illegally park his vehicle and
asked for his name and date of birth. The officer said the
subject gave him a false name, but he learned his true
name from passengers in the vehicle.
A check showed his driver's license was not valid,
the vehicle did not have a tag assigned to it and the
decal belonged to another vehicle. The subject was
placed in custody.

Holmes Beach
Oct. 2, traffic, 56th Street and Holmes Boulevard.
The officer said he observed the subject in a vehicle
-without a tag and when he attempted to catch up to the
vehicle, the subject attempted to elude him by turning
off his headlights and turning down a side street.
The officer stopped the subject and a check showed
the attached tag was not assigned to the vehicle and the

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Prosecutors add

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Prosecutors have added charges and dropped
one charge in the case of a Bradenton man accused
of sexual assault and burglary in Holmes Beach.
James T. Straitwell, 29, of Bradenton, was
arrested on Sept. 14 after an intense investigation
by Holmes Beach police.
Straitwell is accused of twice entering un-
locked vacation condominiums on the beach, tak-
ing the mothers' purses and sexually battering fe-
male children, ages 14 and 9. The first incident
occurred in the 7100 block of Gulf Drive on July
9 and the second occurred in the 5600 block of
Gulf Drive on Aug. 8. In both cases, Straitwell is
alleged to have threatened the victims' families.
Current charges include sexual battery by some-
one over 19 to a child under 12, sexual battery with
threats, burglary with battery times two, handling a
child in a lewd and lascivious manner times two and
petty theft times two. Prosecutors have dropped a
charge of conspiracy to commit murder.


subject had no vehicle registration. The officer issued
two summonses and two citations.
Oct. 2, disturbance, 5700 block of Carissa. The
victim reported the suspect entered her apartment un-
announced, made accusations and threats and left. The
officer advised the victim to call police if the suspect
returned.
Oct. 2, vandalism, 3300 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported an unknown person smashed out
the window in a door.
Oct. 3, noise from a loud party, 8100 block of
Marina Drive.


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Oct. 3, gas drive-off of $27.22, 3015 Gulf Drive,
Citgo.
Oct. 3, damage, 202 52nd St., Holmes Beach
Marina. The complainant reported an unknown person
entered a locked, fenced area and put 70 gallons of
water in the fuel tank of a fork lift. Damages were $200
to $300.
Oct. 4, theft, 3900 East Bay Drive, Publix park-
ing lot. The victim reported he found three credit cards
missing from his vehicle after he parked at Publix on
Sept. 1 or 2. The victim said he received statements
from the credit card companies showing charges of
$579, $155.32 and $83.70 that he did not make.
Oct. 4, theft, 3200 block of Sixth Avenue. The
victim reported an unknown person removed four
plants valued at $50. The victim later reported she saw
the plants at a nearby residence.
The officer spoke to the subjects at the residence
and they said they were the victims of a practical joke.
They said an unknown person placed the plants, a city
bicycle rack and the sign from Paradise Bagels in front
of their door so they couldn't exit the residence. All the
items were returned to the rightful owners.
Oct. 4, DWLS, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The of-
ficer observed the vehicle with an improper tag and
stopped the subject. A check showed the subject's driver's
license was suspended. The officer issued a summons.
Oct. 5, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf Drive,
Manatee County Public Beach. The victim reported he
returned to his vehicle and found a purse valued at $50,
passports, airline tickets, four driver's licenses, $1,300 in
cash, 200 pounds in foreign traveler's checks, 40 pounds
sterling and a credit card were missing.
Oct. 7, suspicious, 200 block of Haverkos Lane. The
complainant reported he heard a vehicle door slam outside
the residence. He said he observed a subject coming from
the neighbors' residence and when he asked the subject if
he could help, the subject jumped into a waiting vehicle.
He said there were two other subjects in the vehicle and
they drove off rapidly in reverse.

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P(IM PAGE 14 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER





Sch@oO

Susan Kesselring


Volunteers needed for
upcoming Oct. 30 festival
Tracey Glarner needs help selling raffle tickets for
this year's Fall Festival to be held at Anna Maria El-
ementary School Saturday, Oct. 30.
Anyone interested in selling tickets at their place
of business should call Glarner at 779-9025.
The festival kicks off with a parade of Halloween
costumed students marching from Holmes Beach City
Hall to the school for a costume-judging contest fol-
lowed by food, music and games on the school
grounds.
Parent volunteers are also needed to staff a haunted
house. Call Julie Krokroskia at 778-5447, or Gina
Duvall at 778-4499.


S ^--- dSchool tech center
gets off ground
President of the World of Work
program Don Schroder does the
ribbon-cuttintg honors (it a
Milk / ceremony for the opening of the
:, KKr-onius CommunritV Teclhnolov
.. Center at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School. To his left are
; + h. P-Principal Tinm Kolbe and school
-.board Iember Harry Ki/an.
To his right are Manatee Countv
Superintendent of Schools Gene
.Denisar, guidance counselor
Cindi Harrison, Larrrv Tler,;
Lynn McDonough, Christine
Callihan and Sally Reed. The
tech center is named for.fornler
principal Jim Kronus.


Community christens


Kronus Tech Center


No football follies here
Coach Gene Burr at Anna Maria Elementary School
recently conducted the first level of the Punt, Pass and
Kick Contest for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders.
Winners are fourth-graders Ashley Bowling, scor-
ing a total of 129 yards, and C.J. Wickersham, who
scored 172 yards.
Fifth-grade winners are Avery Ellsworth, scoring
169 yards and Sean Pittman with a score of 187 yards.
They will advance to a sectional competition to be
held at G.T. Bray Park, Bradenton, at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 17.

Fish wins
Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School's j -
broadcasting station "
sponsors a logo
contest each year.
Students in third
through fifth grades
submit creative
artwork and it's
tough for judges to
choose among them.
This year, fifth-
grader Bailey Porter
won the contest with
her submission of a
royal blue and lime 4
green fish, its belly
bearing the name
"Channel 6 News.





ISLAND
S CCHIROPRACTIC
CENTER
605 Manatee Ave. West
Holmes Beach
Dr. Joseph Acebal 778-0722


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
On a warm, fall evening nearing sunset, ordained
minister Dr. J. Clement Walker led a congregation in
prayer at Anna Maria Elementary School.
Walker reflected on man's progression through time
when he said, "It used to be a man had 40 acres and a
mule, but the mule has been superseded by the mouse."
A computer mouse in reality, and indirectly the rea-
son why 150 people gathered for a dedication and ribbon
cutting for the Kronus Community Technology Center
Sept. 23.
Though the center is still in its formative stage, its
inception was the brainchild of local real estate agent Don
Schroder and former Anna Maria Elementary School
Principal Jim Kronus. They sought to establish a program
that would enable students to learn valuable computer
skills to help them compete as adults in a broad range of
work places.
World of Work, or WOW as the program is titled,
further benefits adults in the community by providing
computer education coordinated and taught by Manatee
Technical Institute.
KTC board members include President Don
Schroder; Larry Tyler Jr., treasurer; Cindi Harrison, sec-
retary; Christine Callihan, Lynne McDonough, Tim
Kolbe, and Jim Kronus, director emeritus.
Many in the community have contributed to WOW's
realization, including contributions from the three Island
cities and Longboat Key, businesses and individuals, as
well as support from the school board.
Schroder said he would like to acknowledge Janet
Aubry, former director of WOW, who has since moved
from the area, for being instrumental in gathering the ini-

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tial funds needed to jump start the program.
The tech center is housed in a portable building next
to the red caboose behind the school's outdoor gymna-
sium.
In opening remarks, Schroder said the school board
donated the portable building and paid for the installation
of the computer hardware and software.
He said the school board will also incur the cost of
maintaining the computers in the future and additional
computers will be installed as money becomes available.
The tech center is a tribute to Jim Kronus, who was
the principal at the school for 23 years before retiring in
1998. Kronus, who lives part time in Vermont, was not
able to attend the ribbon cutting due to a family emer-
gency.
Speaking at the ceremony, Principal Tim Kolbe said
Kronus asked him to continue the vision of technology for
the school's children and other adults in the community
because it is a project near and dear to his heart.
School Superintendent Dr. Gene Denisar said chil-
dren were at the center of Kronus' leadership during his
tenure and acknowledged Kronus for his many accom-
plishments, including being named 1998 "Islander of the
Year" by The Islander Bystander.
Fittingly, "Wow" was the overwhelming comment as
guests entered the computer center. Neon-green iMac's
and PC-format computers lined the perimeter of the room,
tastefully decorated with Gulf-blue mini-blinds and a wall
adorned by an oil-painting of Kronus that was commis-
sioned by In6s Norman.
Anyone wishing to help can call 778-2200.


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician

Healthcare the
gentle natural way

S761-0210
501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 *West Bradenton
(I block east ofAlbertson's Manatee Ave.)


Gloria Dei Lutheran Church (ELCA)
We warmly welcome you to join us.
SCome Worship, Learn and Grow
Enjoy God's Presence
Saturday 5:30pm Service oa Praise
(Contemporary)
Sunday 8:00am Worship Service (Communion)
9:00 am Sunday School
S10:330am Worship Service (Communion)
Rev. Danith Kilts Nur;ery Provided
6603 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1813

nser fij mnrial Community churchh
RPF;, Michael An Interdenominational Christian Church
SJan Smith Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Church Services 10AM
Sunday School 9am
Children Church 10am
(Pre-school Fourth grade)
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine A'.e. Anna Maria 778-414


Stephen G. Gloria J.
Pelham. M.D. Fischer. M.D.


Island Family Physicians
Providing complete family care Accepting new patients
Now accepting Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida,
Health Options and CCN Health Ne work.
3909 East Bay Drive #100, 778-1007


Scott L.
Kofeld. M.D-

















Harry's, Air America
tie 1-1
Miles Hostetler scored on a wicked kick that was
just beyond goalie Brooke Fitzgerald's outstretched
hands to pace Harry's Continental Kitchens in Division
4 soccer Oct. 7.
However, heads-up play on the part of Paige
Carper kept the Air America team in the game as
Carper scooted the ball past the Harry's goalie in the
second half to give her team a 1-1 tie.
Both teams moved the ball at will with Hostetler all
over the field for Harry's.
On the Air America side, Sage Geeraerts and
Hannah Mitchell had outstanding games on defense,
keeping Hostetler at bay on several occasions.
For Harry's, Coach Scott Kosfeld singled out
Rachel Nelson for her tough, defensive play.
Mackenzie Kosfeld and Blake Wilson split duties
in goal for Harry's and saved a number of shots from
the hard-charging Air America team.
Air America Coach Tracey Mitchell said it was the
best game her team has played.
"Certainly the best game defensively," she said.
"We've had better results, but we haven't played much
better than this."

Bystander ekes out win over
Island Animal Clinic
In other soccer action last week, The Islander By-
stander slipped by Island Animal Clinic 5-4 in Division
1 on the strength of five goals by Tyler Krauss.
For Island Animal Clinic, Skyler Purcell's three
goals earned her the hat trick and Logan Bystrom
added a goal.
Pool America stayed undefeated in Division 2 with


I I, / Ii


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 15 ] -
. -.;.,'-- -- - -


Penalty kick
Miles Hostetler takes one in the gut for the team as he blocks a penalty kick from Sage Geeaerts. Hannah
Mitchell, on right, waits for the rebound. Hostetler scored a goal for Harry's Continental Kitchens and Paige
Carper nailed a goal for Air America as the teams tied in a hard-fought defensive battle. Islander Photo:


David Futch


a 5-0 win over Bealls. Daniel Miller was a force, scor-
ing three goals and Zak Geeraerts scored twice.

LaPensee, Palm Tree Villas
remain undefeated
In Division 3 soccer action, two teams remain un-
defeated with perfect 4-0 records.
LaPensee Plumbing maintained its dominance by
outlasting Longboat Observer 5-2 on three goals by
Nick Smith and a goal each by Ian Douglas and Nick
Sato. Drew Chesanek and Brad Bryant scored for the
Observer.
Palm Tree Villas also continued its winning ways
with a balanced attack and a 7-1 drubbing of Beach
Bistro.
For Palm Tree, Joel Mitchell and Max Marnie had



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two goals each while Cody Pierce, Mikey Schweitzer
and Tanner Pelkey scored one apiece. Alex Phillips
scored for Bistro.
Another Division 1 game between The Islander
Bystander and Mr. Bones was halted due to rain after
seven minutes in the first half.
Bones was leading 2-0 at the time with both goals
coming from the foot of Kyle Dale. The game will be
resumed Oct. 20.

IFC adult team plays rival
Sarasota club
The Island Football Club adults play one of their
fiercest rivals Sunday, Oct. 17, in Sarasota.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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.\ -"R







-" I] PAGE 16 M OCTOBER 13, 1999 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SPORTS, FROM PAGE 15

IFC is scheduled to go against Sarasota Football
Club United 1 at SFC's Fruitville complex on Honore
Avenue.
SFC has some fine soccer players, many of whom
come from Slovakia, and are known for their tough
play as well as their acting skills.
It seems many SFC players know how to fall down
writhing in pain when an IFC player gets near them. This
allows them to draw a penalty kick and often gets an IFC
player a yellow card for allegedly being too aggressive.
If you're interested in seeing some good action
and how soccer is played in Eastern Europe, get out
for this one.
To get there, take SR 64 to 1-75 and head south
until you get to the Fruitville Road exit and go west. Go
about two miles until you get to Honore Avenue and
turn right (north). Go to the next light and go left -
you'll see the field.
There generally are some large and loud crowds for
this game. The two teams don't care for each other very
much.
SFC has a nice clubhouse where you can mingle
and purchase sodas, beer and food.

Volleyball at the Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center at 407
Magnolia in Anna Maria starts its fall youth and adult
volleyball pickup games on Tuesdays beginning Oct.
19 from 6 to 9 p.m.
Youth teams (under age 16) will play from 6 to
7:30 p.m. and the adults play from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
The cost is $2 per person for both children and
adults.
The Center also needs experienced volunteers and
coaches to help run the program. For more information,
call athletic director Seth Groseclose at 778-1908.

Curtis shoots 77, ties Morash in
Sunday golf tourney
Neal Curtis carded a 77 at Palma Sola Golf Club
and tied Rick Morash at the Sunday Sunrise Golf
Tournament.






Northern Italian and Continental Cuisine
Escoffier Award-winning
CHEF GIORGIO OLDANO
has headed culinary teams at fine
restaurant in London, Paris, Rome and the
United States, and now on Anna Maria Island.
"Giorgio Oldano's culinary work is absolutely
exquisite, the very best." Bon Appetit Magazine

Dinner Six Nights
Monday Saturday 5 10 pm
779-0220
5702 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Anna Maria Island
Reservations Suggested


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission is having a math problem.
On Thursday, Oct. 7, the commission adopted a
new size limit on cast nets used to catch mullet.
At the commission meeting in St. Petersburg,
Executive Director Allen Egbert offered up the new
limits and commissioners decided 10-0 to allow cast
nets to have a radius of 12 feet, 6 inches, or a total
size of 500 square feet the maximum permitted
by the 1994 constitutional amendment that banned
gill nets.
Problem is, 12 feet, 6 inches only comes out to
490.87 feet if you use the equation that states the
area of a circle is pi (3.14159) times the radius
squared.
Riviera Beach commercial netter Richard Van
Muster, who argued for a net with a 17-foot radius,
told the commission their arithmetic was wrong and
fishermen are "either going to get their 500 feet or
we're going to court."
Van Muster and a number of other netters be-
lieved it was just another slap in the face at commer-
cial fishermen.
Cortez commercial fisherman James Lee agreed
with Van Muster. The state said the nets could be
500 square feet and Lee said he won't take an inch
less.
Cortez cast net maker Thomas "Blue" Fulford said
if the state or anybody starts messing with the law,


Because of a difference in handicaps and the use of
a modified Stableford System of scoring, the two ended
up at plus 7.
Curtis also had four skins, Morash had two, Tim
Woltz had one and I slipped in there with one.
Three closest-to-the-pin greenies were awarded to


there's going to be trouble in the form of lawsuits.
"The people who are against the commercial
fishermen will do anything they can to screw them,"
Fulford said. "In terms of net size, we don't need any
more than 500 square feet or any less."
Despite the threat of lawsuits, Fulford admits it
will be difficult to fight the state and its battery of at-
torneys.
"We've got to go to court but the fishing indus-
try is broke. We don't have the money to fight them
anymore," he said. "The state has a battery of law-
yers up there we pay for. We hire the army to fight
us."
The Florida Marine Patrol is in charge of enforc-
ing the size of cast nets.
FMP spokesman Terry Noll said FMP has been
telling its officers 12 feet, 7 inches is the maximum
size for the radius of a cast net from the horn to the
lead line.
However, some of the netters say that's wrong
and the measurement should be the length of the
leadline and the net should be measured as a cone.
"That can make the size of the net considerably
larger than 500 square feet," Noll said. "Absolutely
(the issue of size) is confusing. We're waiting to see
what the new commission is going to do or what a
judge will decide. We're patient. We're not going
anywhere."
Look for lawsuits some time in December when
the new size rule comes into play.
Let's hope the judge knows his geometry.


Curtis, Morash and myself.
Next week's tournament tentatively is scheduled
for Buffalo Creek with Butch Van Ostenbridge in
charge. To play, call Van Ostenbridge at 792-1310.
Jon Huffman won't be there this week he's off
to a bluegrass festival in White Springs.

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key





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New net rules another blow

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Soccer standings

as of Oct. 8
Division 1 (Ages 12-13)
Team Record Points
Mr. Bones 2-1-1 7
Islander Bystander 1-0-2 6
Island Animal Clinic 0-2-1 1

Division 2 (Ages 10-11)
Team Record Points
Air America 2-0-1 10
Air & Energy 1-0-2 5
Bealls 1-2-1 4
Florida Yacht Conn. 0-3-0 0

Division 3 (Ages 8-9)
Team Record Points
LaPensee Plumbing 4-0-0 12
Palm Tree Villas 4-0-0 12
Beach Bistro 2-4-0 6
Longboat Observer 1-3-0 3
Oden Hardy Const. 0-4-0 0
Points determine position in standings: 3
points for a win, 1 for a tie and 0 for a loss


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 17 II


Anna Maria Island Community

Center soccer schedule
Division 1 (Ages 12-13) All games begin at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 15 Islander Bystander vs. Mr. Bones
Oct. 18 Island Animal Clinic vs. Mr. Bones

Division 2 (Ages 10-11) All games begin at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 14 Florida Yacht Connection vs. Bealls
Oct. 19 Florida Yacht Connection vs. Air & Energy

Division 3 (Ages 8-9) All games begin at 6 p.m.
Oct. 14 Beach Bistro vs. Palm Tree Villas
Oct. 15 Oden Hardy vs. Longboat Observer
Oct. 18 Palm Tree Villas vs. Longboat Observer
Oct. 19 Beach Bistro vs. Oden Hardy Construction

Division 4 (Ages 5-7)
Oct. 13 Harry's Continental Kitchens vs. Island Pest Control 6 p.m.
Oct. 14 Harry's Continental Kitchens vs. West Coast Refrigeration 6 p.m.
Air America vs. Galati Marine 7 p.m.
Oct. 19 Air America vs. Jessie's Island Store 6 p.m.
Island Real Estate vs. Harry's Continental Kitchens 7 p.m.
First team listed is home team






3,. '"a n Lunch Tues-Sat 11:30AM-2PM
SReotaurant i )aker Dinner Tues-Sun 5:30-9:30PM
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Irlfl PAGE 18 U OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Red tide, social impacts of Tupperware?


Although spared for the past few years, it appears
we are again in the midst of a red tide outbreak. There
is some good news, though so far the bloom appears
to be centered to our south, with no problems reported
on the Island as yet.
Red tide is caused by blooms of a tiny marine or-
ganism called a dinoflagellate. The microscopic organ-
isms produce powerful toxins that cause extensive fish
kills, contaminate shellfish and can cause severe respi-
ratory irritation to humans.
The blooms typically begin in the Gulf of Mexico 40-
80 miles offshore and move slowly toward shore. As the
bloom approaches the shore, dead fish begin to wash
ashore. There is also the characteristic burning sensation
of the eyes and nose and a dry, choking cough.
Bivalve shellfish, particularly oysters, clams and
coquinas, accumulate so much toxin they become toxic
to humans.
Red Tide blooms have been documented in the
Gulf since the mid-1800s. A particularly bad bloom
occurred in 1947, and we had a 14-month bloom off
and on in 1995-96.
I was at a red tide conference a few years ago,
sponsored by the group Solutions To Avoid Red Tide.

Horseshoe winners
Winner in the Oct. 6 horseshoe games was Bill
Starrett of Anna Maria. Runner-up was Jack Cooper
of Holmes Beach.
Winners in the Oct. 9 games were George McKay
of Anna Maria and Chris McNamara of Holmes
Beach. Runners-up were Ron Pepka of Anna Maria
and Starrett. The weekly contests get under way every
Wednesday and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City
Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive.


There was talk about research into stopping the blooms,
and talk about how the Japanese are making progress
controlling the outbreaks by dumping clay on the
blooms to drop the tiny critters to the bottom of the
water where they won't hurt anything.
There was also some talk, some of it not very nice,
about how the media do a disservice to the public by over-
playing red tide outbreaks. See, there can be one area of
a beach that has a slew of coughing, wheezing.people, and
just up the sand there can be no problems at all. The same
is true with dead fish tides and currents can cover one
stretch of sand with bodies, but a few hundred yards away
the shore can be pristine.
So don't cancel your day at the beach because you
see on TV or read in a paper that red tide is offshore.
It may well be offshore, but not necessarily where
you're planning your sun, sand and surf. And if you
find your eyes watering and your nose running if you're
at, say, Coquina Beach, chances are excellent that there
won't be a problem at all at Manatee County Public
Beach, or up at Bean Point.
Sometimes, you just need to shop for your spot in
the sun.

Tupperware
Remember the guy who wrote the book about the


t, -'-


These guys are constructing habitat in sea


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Two Bradenton men are helping build reefs that
have a strong, positive effect on marine life hereabouts.
They are Larry Beggs and Harry Rolfe, president
and production manager, respectively, of Reef Innova-
tions, the production arm of Reef Ball Development
Group in Bradenton.
* They make concrete balls in sizes ranging from
tiny for fish tanks to big for ocean reels, and help place
them. One of the more rewarding parts of their business
is involvement of youngsters in reef building.
They sort of drifted into their vocation while pur-
suing their avocation. which was and is diving. Both
are instructors, and when their dise club decided to
make a reef it fell to Beggs to look into it. He found a
life for himself and his old partner Rolt'e.
They ha\e a hot product in Reef Balls, finishing a
400-ball project for the North Carolina Department of
Natural Resources just in time to head for another big
one off St. Augustine. They have built reefs and taught
reef building in six states and seven countries in their
two years in the business.
"Reefs can be made with about anything." said
Beggs. "Old ships and barges, concrete from demoli-
tion of buildings and bridges and streets and sidewalks.
railroad cars. buses, anything but wood."


"But Reef Balls are a lot better," Rolfe interjected
almost belligerently. "Rubble spreads out in the cur-
rents, so you can end up with a reef several acres big
and a foot high. Reef Balls are placed precisely and
they're stacked. They stay where they're put."
Concrete is the same stuff as the lime rock where
corals grow, they explained, and balls in the Gulf have
sponges and soft corals a year after placement and hard
corals in four years.
"Little fish and other marine life come to eat the
growth, big fish eat the little ones, and life circulates,"
said Beggs.
Creating a Reef Ball is simple, they said. Innova-
tion makes them in five sizes, mini to max. The big
3.500-pounders are four feet in diameter scheduled for
offshore reefs. They are somewhat bell-shaped. with
holes around and through them for fish traffic.
To create them. a strong bladder is inflated in-
side a heavy fiberglass mold. Tether balls fit into
holes in the form. Concrete flows in. cures in a day
.or so. the mold is knocked away in three pieces.
tether balls kicked away. bladder deflated and
presto! a Reef Ball.
A bladder can be reinflated to suspend the ball just
under the surface of the sea. for towing by a personal
watercraft. Or a load of balls can be moved out by
barge and placed precisely on the sea floor by crane.


They can be piled or stacked in any configuration, usu-
ally eight to a dozen in clusters 100 feet apart, leaving
sand for some marine species to forage.
That's the big-ticket heavy operation, designed for
profit. Reef Ball Development researches and develops
new designs and new uses for its product. There is also
the Reef Ball Foundation, an education and marine
science nonprofit funded by Reef Ball and grants.
That's where a lot of the fun comes in, for young-
sters in high school classes and 4-11 and other clubs that
get involved. They develop projects ;and Beggs and
Rolfe make them a reality.
"The kids come in and pour concrete and make
their oswn reefs." said Beggs. "'They get to chase around
in hard hats. spray water around. pound thii',- v., ith
hammers. They have a blast."
As for the Reef Ball chiefs. It'-,i really, atis in.'.
said BeLLs. "We build something ..here nothing is
nosw.
"It's like basketball." Rolfe added. "Sorrebody
threw us the ball and we're not letting it g,-o.

LaIrrv Beg,.s and Harry Rolfe of Reef Innovations, a
production arm of Reef Ball Development Group in
Bradenton, make concrete balls in .sizes ranging
from tiny for fish tanks to hig (below) for ocean
reefs, and help place them.


/ 7,,


Hey kids! You're invited to a


Bicyde Rodeo


/ Saturday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m.

at the Anna Maria

Elementary School

zRECo' m --^=Z S Cf- f :

\\ J , DARES:. : -- C : -s c -^ cj < s a


This advertisement sponsored as a community ser. ice bi The Islander Bystander


history of bookshelves? He was also the author of an
"exhaustive history of the pencil." too. Well, just when
you thought those two topics couldn't be topped, a
woman named Alison Clarke has written a book on the
history and social ramifications of Tupperware.
In "Tupperware: The Promise of Plastic in 1950s
America," Clarke apparently goes into some detail of
how Tupperware parties got women out of the house
and, through the social interaction of the get-togethers,
provided broadened horizons for women other than the
context of wife and mother.
As another columnist often says, I'm really not
making this up.
Tupperware is being celebrated at the Smithsonian
Institution on its 50th anniversary this year, by the way.
For those of you who are interested in trivia,
Tupperware was invented by Earl Tupper. The par-
ties were the brainchild of Brownie Wise. Last year,
sales topped $1.1 billion, and there are 950,000 "in-
dependent salespeople" hawking the plastic goods,
selling to 105 million attendees of Tupperware par-
ties.

Sandscript factoid
I got a copy of the first set of minutes for the first
meeting of the Bradenton Beach City Council, dated Dec.
28, 1951, the other day. I'll be doing a column or two
about the antics of the council eventually, but the body's
first official act as a city is too good to let pass any longer:
"Mr. Ritz made a motion to enact the NO. 1 Ordi-
nance relative to no ad valorem taxes for Bradenton
Beach, seconded by Mr. Armstrong. The vote of the
Council was unanimous and the ordinance so ordered."
I haven't yet found the minutes of the meeting
where that ordinance was rescinded, but when I do I'll
let you know.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 M PAGE 19 [i


Red, snook fishing hot, huge mackerel offshore


By Capt. Mike Heistand and Capt. David Futch
Capt. Rick Gross and Capt. Mike Heistand caught
50 snook between them over the weekend and as many
redfish. Gross also went offshore for some of those big
Spanish mackerel and came home with a box full of
four and five pounders.
If you're having trouble catching fish, hire a local
guide who can show you where to go and how to do it.
Mackerel is probably the easiest fish for people to
catch. They're not near as wily as snook or as strong
as redfish.
Rig your line with a swivel then take some piano
wire leader, one about four feet long and the other a
little more than two, and attach each separately to your
swivel. Then put a white feather jig on one and a yel-
low feather jig on the other and troll them between 75
and 100 feet behind the boat just offshore of the beach.
You need to look for pods of bait and where the
mackerel will be slicing through and eating. You'll
know the mackerel are there because the bait will go
into a frenzied "shower." Then troll around the pod in
a big circle. No need to cut right through. That just
breaks up the bait and the mackerel go elsewhere.
If you're fishing without benefit of a boat, the Rod
& Reel Pier in Anna Maria is always a good bet. They
reported last week that anglers caught snook, redfish,
black drum, mackerel and also had a run of pompano.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade
fishermen near the Manatee Avenue Bridge are catch-
ing snook and reds in the mangroves using live shrimp.
Trout are scattered.
Annie's Bait & Tackle reporting for Capt. Zack
with the Dee-Jay II said his folks caught snook to 30
inches, reds to 33, mangrove snapper to 14 and some
flounder, trout, mackerel.
Dave Johnson at Snead Island Crab House said
sharks are being caught in Tampa Bay, black drum in
the Manatee River, snook in Terra Ceia Bay and reds
in Miguel Bay.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said you can catch
what you want right now with fishing rated excellent
both inshore and offshore. Bigger snook are starting to


4%nnoa Ma0nrio sl7an3 iTes
Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Oct 13 1:46 2.3 8:42 0.2 4:02 1.7 7:56 1.3
Oct 14 2:21 2.3 9.31 0.2 5:02 1.6 8:23 1.4
Oct15 2:58 2.2 10:25 0.3 6:20 1.6 9:10 1.5
Oct16 3:48 2.1 11:34 0.4 7:50 1.6 10:19 1.5
FO Oct 17 4:57 2.0 9:01 1 6 12:48 0.4
Oct 18 6:25 2.0 12:10 1.5 9:41 1.7 1:55 0.4
Oct 19 7:54 1.9 1:49 1.4 10"13 1.7 2:51 0.4
Oct 20 9:08 2.0 2:56 1.2 10:34 1.8 3:38 0.5
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


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Plant City man
brings home the bacon
Yep, they're out there all right. Orlando Casiano of
Plant City caught this 15-pound snook while fishing
with Capt. Tom Chaya last week. Islander Photo:
Courtesy Capt. Chaya

show up in the bays and of course reds are plentiful
with some trout and mangrove snapper. Offshore there
are mackerel, grouper, snapper, cobia and some kings
though the weather and water will have to get a little
colder for kings to show in numbers.
Capt. Rick Gross said he caught a lot of small


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snook, often 20 to 30 per trip, and a lot of mackerel to
30 inches.
Capt. Glenn Corder said he limits out on red
grouper each time out and that within 20 miles of shore.
Some of them go to 15 pounds. There are a lot of snap-
per on wrecks.
Capt. Tom Chaya said mackerel, redfish, trout
and snapper were all caught on his boat this week. And
see the picture with this column for the 15-pound snook
a Plant City man landed.
Capt. Thom Smith of Angler's Repair on Cortez
Road said he caught mostly reds and some snook last
week. There are plenty of flounder in Terra Ceia Bay,
Smith said.
Capt. Kurt Morrison said fishing is awfully good
right now with lots of snapper, grouper, rudderfish,
triggerfish and large mackerel.
Capt. Mike on his boat Magic said he averaged 20
redfish per trip, trout to 20 inches and he's starting to
catch more flounder.


2


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BlB PAGE 20 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

'Dancing' offers flights of fantasy in overcoming poverty


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
"Dancing at Lughnasa" portrays a family in abject
poverty in 1936 Ireland and offers up the stark realities of
life punctuated with brief moments of fantasy.
And thank God for fantasy, for this family has little
else to fall back on in terms of the joys of life. Only the
familial glue keeps the group from falling to pieces.
As is its trademark, Island Players make us feel their
pain and sorrow, laughter and joy.
"Lughnasa" (pronounced LOO-nah-sah) is a sad tale
of people who have nothing, not even dreams. It also may
be a reminder to some audience members of where their
ancestors came from and what those ancestors had to en-
dure.
The play made me wonder what James Joyce would
have thought. The wretched Dublin of "Ulysses" is not far


removed from County Donegal and this play.
"Lughnasa" is a two-act, Tony award-winning play
written by Brian Friel. It is set in the home of the Mundy
family, outside the village of Ballybeg, County Donegal.
The festival of Lughnasa was a ceremony and dance
held to celebrate the pagan god of the harvest.
The sisters Kate, Maggie, Agnes, Rose and Chrissie,
along with the play's 7-year-old narrator Michael, have
nothing but each other, not even electricity.
They do have a cast-iron stove that burs "turf" to
heat their meager meals of "three eggs for seven, no make
that eight with Uncle Jack, and caraway bread and sweet-
ened tea."
The starkness of the one-room set reminded me of
some of the hovels I lived in during my college days.
In spite of it all, the family cohesion makes the best
of a bad situation. They still rejoice in what little they have,


throwing a three, scrambled-egg picnic on their little
square of a yard.
The one thing they've just acquired to bring them into
the 20th century is a battery-powered radio, a "Marconi."
At times and it's not often some bit of music
comes through the ancient set. The sounds coming from
the mysterious box send the women into flights of fancy,
but only for a moment.
Uncle Jack, a priest, arrives about the same time as the
Marconi, yellow with jaundice he contracted while living
in Uganda, Africa. Besides telling stories, Uncle Jack's
only other purpose, as one of the sister's says, is to "shuffle
from room to room."
Uncle Jack, played with grace by Richard Garcia, is
not well. Indeed, he's a little pixilated and prone to forget-
PLEASE SEE DANCING, NEXT PAGE


ISLANDER



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* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
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the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The
Islander Bystander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
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I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 21 iD


DANCING, FROM PAGE 20


ting things while telling his wild stories of Africa and the
tribes he lived with.
Kate (Joy Dickinson) is a bit of a shrew with some
spinster thrown in. Agnes (Sara Trembly) and Rose (Jen-
nifer Vassel) are in worlds of their own making.
Chrissie (Jennifer Martin) hopes beyond hope that
Gerry Evans, the father of her son Michael (David B.
Haynes), will make her an honest woman someday,
though she seems resigned to believe he won't.
All of these actors push for realism and they obvi-
ously spent considerable time mastering their Irish
brogues with the help of dialect coach Mark Woodland.
But it is Carolyn Zaput as Maggie who steals the
show with her witticism and riddles and blunt statements
to her sisters and nephew Michael.
Zaput infuses the play with what little charm can be
squeezed from this impoverished narrative, and she pulls
her lines off with zest.
Andrew White plays the part of Michael's father
Gerry Evans with a wonderful enthusiasm that makes you
like and dislike this gigolo at the same time.
On more than one occasion, this free-spirited par-
amour tells Chrissie a tall tale and finishes with "Would
I lie to you?" It reminds us of the phrase, 'Trust me."
As always with Island Players productions, the set
design affords the audience the intimacy of being there.
Set designer Pat Bergen's details are right on the mark,
down to the "turf" used in the cast-iron stove.
This taxing play was directed by Kelly Woodland.
In her director's notes in the playbill, Woodland


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writes, "Every 7-year-old child knows there's a moment
when it is possible to fly. At the top of the arc of a play-
ground swing, one becomes weightless for a split second
and all laws of reality are suspended.
"In 'Dancing at Lughnasa' the narrator recalls the
events of the summer of 1936 from the prospective of a
7-year-old suspended in that weightless moment. Though
aware of the harsh realities that befell his mother and
aunts, Michael Evans recalls the sense of 'otherness' he
felt, underscoring their lives with the return of his father
and Uncle Jack.
"He remembers his aunts caught up in its current,
'Dancing' ... as if ritual, this wordless ceremony, was now























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They're "Dancing at Lughnasa" during
the annual celebration of the pagan god of
the harvest. Island Players kicked off its
51st season Friday, Oct. 8, with its rendi-
tion of "Dancing at Lughnasa" at the
playhouse on the corner of Gulf Drive and
SPine Avenue in Anna Maria. "Dancing" is
a portrait of life in a small Irish village in
the summer of 1936. From left to right are
Joy Dickinson (Kate), Sara Trembly
\ (Agnes), Carolyn Zaput (Maggie), Jennifer
Vassel (Rose) and Jenny Martin (Chrissie).
"Dancing" runs through Sunday, Oct. 17,
with curtain time at 8 p.m. except for two
Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12
each or $50 for the five-play season. For
information, call the box office at 778-
5755. Islander Photo: David Futch

the way to speak, to whisper private and sacred things, to
be in touch with some otherness ... as if language no
longer existed because words were no longer necessary....
"'Dancing at Lughnasa' is about, despite everything,
finding a way to be in touch with this otherness."
The play runs through Sunday, Oct. 17, with curtain
times at 8 p.m. except for a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. Tick-
ets are $12 or $50 for the five-play season. The box office
is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and an hour before each
performance, quiet Mondays.
Island Players theater is located at the comer of Gulf
Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. For more infor-
mation, call the box office at 778-5755.


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LISTING 8 SALES
.-AGEfsJ-T ^-AGENJT-


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
Nous parlons francais
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1-C-,741.3772 OPENSEVENHDA1SAAWEEy S M ( [1 t
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jIJB PAGE 22 OCTOBER 13, 1999 o THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

i ,' l -" i' # I~.r


BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love
seat $399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129;
futons (sofa by day bed at night) frame and mat-
tress $199; daybed (white with brass finials) includ-
ing two mattresses and pop-up unit $285. Can de-
liver. Call 753-7118.

MACINTOSH POWERBOOK 520. Laptop model,
ready to use $500. Ericcson cell phone with car and
home charger, manual, $35. Canon Speedlite strobe
attachment, $30. All can be seen at The Islander By-
stander office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, or
call 778-7978.

PAIR OF SPEAKERS, acoustic responsive, still in
box. Paid $400, sell for $250. 779-0909.

BLUE PUSH-BUTTON RECLINER, like new; sofa
double bed with headboard/mattresses, $200. 778-
5427 or 778-0807.

ZENTIH COLOR TV, 13-inch, white cabinet. Fourteen
months old, used only six months. 792-4406, after 4 pm.

SMOKED MULLET Free delivery 778-0403.

ANITQUE EASTLAKE CHAIR $150, antique
mahogany coffee table $45; white wicker chair $20;
45 wades $20. 778-4451.


ANNA MARIA

ISLAND


REAL ESTATE, INC.





'


r..r__ -- .



BAYFRONT
Spectacular views of Tampa Bay and Sunshine
Skyway Bridge. Large gracious home, caged pool,
boat dock and lift, three-car garage. $750,000.

SUNBOW BAY TOWNHOUSE
3BR/3BA Elegance! Mexican tile, den, water view
and boat dock Carport, tennis, two pools. $178,500.
ISLAND GIFT SHOP
Well-established Island gift shop. 17 years at the same
location. Appraisal and books available.
ANNA MARIA NEAR BEACH
4BR/2.5BA family home. Caged pool, deep-water
canal, large lot. Split plan, fireplace, den. $257,500.








Julie Gilstrap Patti Marifjeren
LTG, GRI REALTOR/
Property Manager Property Manager
ANNUAL RENTALS
Bradenton 2BR/2BA house S800
San Remo -1BR/IBA S550
North Beach Village 3BR/2BA 51,600
206 82nd IBRIlBA duplex S650
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Homes Weekly/Monthly
from 5700 week / S1500 month
779-0202 1(800)7326434

M m Sm^fiCo
REAL ESTATE. INC.
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


ROSER GUILD THRIFT Shop. Open Tuesday,
Thursday 9:30am-2pm, Saturdays 9am-noon. In
stock, children's clothing, records, wedding dress.
511 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.

BIG GARAGE SALE SATURDAY October 16, 8am-
1pm. 7002 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

ESTATE SALE ANTIQUES. Saturday Oct. 23.
Phone for flyer with details. 778-8470.

GARAGE SALE Saturday October 16, 8am-2pm.
many treasures. 7902 Palm Drive, Holmes Beach.

GARAGE SALE Saturday and Sunday October 16, 17.
lots of new basketballs, toys, teddy bears, tea sets, new
sterling and vintage jewelry, collectibles, clothing and
cut glass. 209 Peacock Lane, Holmes Beach.



NOW OPEN Cortez Bait and Seafood Market. Large se-
lection of seafood, smoked fish. Stone crabs Oct. 15! 119th
St. W., Cortez, Fl., turn south at traffic light. 798-9404.



"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water and lots of TLC! Island Residents 21 years.
Pet Care Service 5 years. 778-6000.


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FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander, 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 795-8299.

WET SLIPS AND Hi 'N' Dry storage available at com-
petitive rates in modem, full-service marina. 778-2255.

OFFSHORE CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Glenn
Corder aboard Deep South. Half & full day. For
information call 778-1203 or Mobile 713-5900.

BOAT SLIP for rent. Seaside Gardens, accessible to
boat ramp. Call 778-5719..


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part-time cooks and full and part-time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.

HELP WANTED, HOUSEKEEPING, non smoker,
own transportation. Part/full-time, 778-9597.

HOUSEKEEPING FULL/PART-TIME. Good benefits,
pleasant working conditions. Resort 66, 6600 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach and Via Roma Beach Resort,
2408 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach.


W AGNE )ESALTY
S YOUR tiFOl REALIOR .JL ESTABLISHED 1939


Vacation Rentals
HOMES CONDOS RESORT
GOLF COURSE COMMUNITIES
800 211-2323 941 778-2246
RUNAWAY BAY RESORT
800 346-7340 941 778-0000
__,i r" '


IISLANDER


IiAN


Hi! I'm Marianne
Norman-Ellis.
-"s' F For any real estate needs,
I am ready and anxious
to serve you. Call me at
Mike Norman Realty
778-6696


SAFlL oAr CTAA(iL
ArU/RiF-Ly > cItRV A6y FI/RA/6/& #f2

A4 '.IV /ffI /y o" 4 i 9a




NORMAN
800 367-1617
REATY, INC. 941778-6696
3101 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach
www.mikenormanrealty.com
I I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1999 M PAGE 23 EK3



H E W C Ar So 4n L I


FULL-TIME ADMINISTRATIVE assistant/secretary.
Able to manage many tasks at once. Must be orga-
nized, computer skills helpful, benefits. Call 383-2182.

PART-TIME HELP WANTED. Light housekeeping,
meals, driving. Call 795-1877.

TWO SIDES OF NATURE Anna Maria Island's
Largest Little Beach Shoppes has immediate full and
part-time retail sales positions available. Great pay
and great fun! flexible hours- weekdays and some
weekends. Apply in person at our new and expanded
Bayview Plaza location. Two Sides of Nature, 100 S.
Bay Blvd, Unit A-1.

SEEKING PERSON TO board my friendly, well-
trained springer spaniel on their home. Dates: No-
vember 13 23 and again on November 29 Decem-
ber 6. Please call Cindy at 752-7162.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.



SMAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, mulching,
trimming, clean-up, edgings, and more. Hard-work-
ing and responsible. Excellent references. Edward
778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

BANKRUPTCY $200, Divorce $150 to $200. Adoption,
corporations, modifications, power of attorney, name
change. Suncoast Paralegal Services 742-4788.

HAVING A MAC ATTACK? Call for help with Mac or
PC. Training, internet, hardware selection and instal-
lation. Call Ed, 778-2553.

LICENSED COMPUTER SPECIALIST. Available
evening, weekend. For any computer needs hard-
ware, software, network, commercial, private. Call
778-8473.









419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294












5HIP ON 5HORE
This cozy 3BR/2BA bayfront hideaway offers a
preferred split bedroom design, complimented by
ceramic tiled floor and beachy tongue-in-groove
ceilings. Offers a seawall with stairs plus beach
beyond. Wonderful island retreat, offering pan-
oramic vistas of Tampa Bay, Sunshine Skyway
and the historic city pier! Only $360,000.

"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
"Ea 3T -ff* L Z 4
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gulford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Susanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820

(SiWatern MWeS [a bt s2 s -
Video conecton " -
i7AL 7Jizfndf eal'5sia~ttr t7Pofesiionrai

Visit our Web site at www.betsyhills.com

.% --,, >, -- >/


LARRY'S BACK Shell delivered, spread $25 yard.
Topsoil, gravel, mulch hauling-all kinds. Office 778-
1169, home 779-1529.

SILCOX CERAMIC TILE. Old and new, full service.
723-2361, 24 hours.

THE HONEY DO MAN Handyman. Odd jobs, small
jobs, repairs. Licensed, insured. Free estimates 778-
5003 or 726-1067.

HOME PRIDE CLEANING Service. Put pride in your
home. Honest and dependable, weekly or bi-weekly.
Call 795-1225.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING removes unsightly
black mildew, salt and dirt from house exteriors, windows,
roofs, gutters, driveways and decks. Call 778-0944.

TOPS WITH MOPS specialized cleaning to suit your
needs. Home or office, daily, weekly or occasionally.
Call for free estimate 778-2234.

DOMESTIC AFFAIRS. Reliable, thorough house-
cleaning. Neurotic attention to detail we'll do any
cleaning job. Insured, references 798-3139.

PAINTING 35 years experience, 30 year local resi-
dent. Licensed and insured, great prices. 794-8844.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!



JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.

CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING & MAINTENANCE Residen-
tial/commercial, full-service maintenance, landscaping in-
stallation, dean-ups, tree trimming, ponds, native plants,
butterfly gardens. Excellent references:.778-5294.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL Shell, dirt, mulch or stone
delivered and spread for a small fee. Yard clean-up.
Dump truck for hire. Free estimates. Call Dave
Bannigan, 794-6971.


.ta.... .....---r ..-r. l
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ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it's
broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior discount.
Call 778-2581.



PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
lation. Come in and choose from our huge selection
of plants, shrubs and trees. Everything Under the
Sun Garden Centre. 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. 778-4441.



VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
ences. Dan or Bill 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. Thirty-three year Island resident. Call Jim
Bickal at 778-1730.

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free
estimates, no overtime charges. (FL#RF0038118)
778-3924 or 778-4461.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodel-
ing, repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths.
Free estimates. Lic#RC0045125, #RG0058589,
#PE0020374. Insured. Call 720-0794.

CARL V. JOHNSON, JR. Building Contractor. New
homes, renovations, additions. Free estimates and de-
sign service. Quality workmanship. Uc#RR0066450.
Call 795-1947.


The only Accredited Residential Manager on Anna Maria Isla Com

I have experience.
I have tenants.
I need more rentals! 2501 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach
www.oldfloridarealty.com
Call today to discuss my gussie@ix.netcom.com
1 800 778-9599
Ann Harmon marketing plan for your property. 1941 7784849





(941) 748-6300 Licensed Real Estate Broker


L... a'..


"Im


GULFFRONT BEACH HOUSE. Elegant Mediterranean cus-
tom-designed residence featuring imported tile, arched door-
ways and a balcony overlooking beach. $1,350,000. Don
Lewis 746-3200. R37566

WATERFRONT
TIDY ISLAND TREASURE. Former model townhome with
unparalled bay view and Sarasota skyline from almost every
room. excellent value. $249,000. Bob and Penny Hall 749-
8220 or www.floridahouse.net. C37370
CYPRESS CREEK BEAUTY overlooking twelve acre stocked
lake. Enjoy serenity from your screened gazebo, heated pool
and dock. $525,000. Larry & Louise Miller, 794-0131. R35539
ELEGANT two-story brick residence located on the Manatee
River. Spacious 5BR, light rooms, wood floors, crown molding,
outdoor kitchen, private beach. $1200,000. Sandy Drapala 794-
3354 or Kathy Marcinko 792-9122. R39126


PANORAMIC VIEW of Tampa Bay from this hexagon shaped
Anna Maria Island residence. This fantastic custom-built
home features a wrap-around porch, beach, fireplace and
wood floors. $469,000. Jeanette Rampone 747-3364 or
e-mail: Jraml207@aol.com. R38938
MAINLAND
TERRIFIC FAMILY HOME on large lot in Northwest Bradenton, one
block from Riverview Blvd. 38R/2B, spt design, fruit trees and many
extras. $109,900. Toni King 794-5534 or Janet Orr 747-4543. R40448
LOCATION, LOCATION. One of Bradenon's finest neighborhoods.
Just off Desoto Memorial Highway, wak to park and great schools.
Bright home with lots of windows, ceramic tile, plastered walls.
$134,900. Sandy Drapala 794-3354 R40409
OVER 4,00 sq.ft in this central located home. 48R/38, plenty of
storage. Extra large master suite with spaous wak-in coset nurs-
ery or office off master suite. $273,500. Julie DeSear 794-3041.
R36314


'DO


1 V ournitc on the Inn rn c -i71






E PAGE 24 K OCTOBER 13, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy' Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
a Hauling By the cut or by the month.
iwr \ We Monitor Irrigation Systems
1 seice INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778.1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
Established in 1983
2 'j.. STATE LICENSED & INSURED
@@ [ 3U'T@N CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
ONSTRU ON JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
CONSTRUCTION Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@iMi lDBUV@k_[@ (941) 778-2993
@@gaTUV@TD@Vn ANNA MARIA

Paradise Improvements
Quality home repair and maintenance
Steven Kaluza 7784173
Island References and Insured
Painting Drywall Tile Doors Screens Etc ...

NU GLAZE INDUSTRIES
BATHTUB REGLAZING
Countertops Appliances Ceramic Tile
Kitchen Cabinets Lifetime guarantee!
Cal 926-7127 for free estimate


"The Girls"
Residential Cleaning:
Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly One Time
Mobile Detailing: Autos Boats RVs
Exterior and Interior Services Availablel 778-1984

Quality Work Licensed-Insured Reliable Service


Bud Jackson

Painting (Interior & Exterior)
Carpentry Repairs


(941)383-8301


Longboat Key, Fl


FREE SECURITY SYSTEM
Includes : Installation Master Control Panel
Key Pad Three Door and Window Sensors
Motion Detector Signs and Decals
941-794-8528
Ask about kids and seniors specials
WAC. Std. Inst. minimum
monitor agreement required. Select Security
Lic#EY0000143 A .nn S ,r> D



Glass Sentinal
The remarkable window film that turns ordinary
glass into a super-strength protective shield.

24-HOUR PROTECTION AGAINST
Snatch & Grab Burglaries
Violent Weather Sun & Heat
15-year glass breakage warranty.
Lifetime film & installation warranty.


Ron Kilner 778-5193 or Rick Weaver 778-1610
Free Estimates Licensed & Insured
















Call us for plumbing, too.
S.-' SINCE

1 11 YLL E 778-0773
FULL-SERVICE AIR CONDITIONING and PLUMBiNG
LIC #CACO 56298 LIC #RF0047797


SCREEN REPAIRS interior/exterior painting, ceiling
fans, drywall repairs, roof painting, tile work, low
prices. 778-0410 office, 504-2027 mobile.


BAYFRONT COTTAGE WITH DOCK. Turnkey fur-
nished, beautiful view, covered parking. No pets.
$350/week or $700/month. 794-5980.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/2BA Holmes Beach
canalfront. No smoking, no pets. $1,500 per month
plus security deposit. 203-934-8596.

ANNUAL RENTAL 1 BR/1BA one block to beach and
bay. Close to shops, great location. $550 month,
$300 deposit. 203 2nd St. N. #2, Bradenton Beach.
(813)258-2411.

SURF SIDE STUDIO 1BA $800 per month plus
assurity/security. Available mid-Oct. or Nov. 1. Hurry,
it won't last! 792-2779.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, one-half block to beach.
Utility room, covered parking, new carpet, sky lights.
$725 month, first and security deposit 778-2043.

SURF SIDE STUDIO 1BA $800 per month plus
assurity/security. Available mid-October or first of
November 792-2779. Hurry, won't last.

HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA home,
.completely furnished, dock, garage, laundry, quiet
street, many extras. Monthly $1,600, weekly $550.
Call 813-286-9814.

HOLMES BEACH 2 and 3BR Gulfview homes, 100
feet to beach. Walk to shops and restaurants, great
area. $875 and $975, one-year lease, security de-
posit. 508-336-2201, 800-894-1950.

ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT, fully-loaded, 2BR
apartment. Sun deck, porch, top location. No pets.
Vacation rental, weekly, monthly. 778-3143.

2BR/1BA ANNUAL UNFURNISHED bright and spacious!
New kitchen, appliances, tile and more. Quiet, secure
neighborhood, close to beach! Small pet considered, non-
smokers preferred. $725 month, first, last, security. 778-
9798, 704-3171 or (305-296-1127 collect.)

$175 PER WEEK and up. Weekly and monthly, 1 and
2BR, turnkey furnished rentals. All units are steps to
beautiful sandy beaches. Available Sept. through
April. Discount for full month. Rates higher Jan.
through April. 761-9259.

BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED 2BR/2BA, garage, walk to
beach, for rent except Feb. and March. 703-450-
2883.

ANNUAL 2BR/1.5BA duplex, screened lanai, nicely
maintained property, quiet Holmes Beach location,
no pets. $650 month. Fran Maxon Real Estate 778-
2307.

FOR RENT YEARLY 2BR/2BA townhouse, unfur-
nished, near shopping and library in Seaside Gar-
dens, Holmes Beach. $850 month plus utilities. Call
Betty Cole, 779-1213.

AVAILABLE DECEMBER 2BR'1 BA spacious house.
Large bedrooms, living room. and modern kitchen,
screened porch, washer/dryer and garage. Just steps
from Gulf on north end of Holmes Beach. Sorry no
pets, S2.500 month. 813-985-6765.

ELEVATED 2BR/1BA New carpet. eat-in kitchen
with dishwasher. Central heatair. Blcck to beach. no
pets. S725 per month, annual. S350 deposit and utili-
ties. 778-2991.

150 STEPS TO BEACH. Seasonal 2BR/2BA.
ground level, newly furnished, cable TV. washer/
dryer. Available Nov. May. Security deposit re-
quired. 813-961-6992.

HOLMES BEACH Annual rental. 1 BR'1 BA unfurnished
duc'ex v. .th Cec dated a 'tci e .an k to beach. 5625
mont, ;LS t- ii;t;es. S-;'h Pea!tors 778-0770.


ANNUAL 2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX, utility room, washer/
dryer hookup, dishwasher, carport, storage room.
$800 month. Fran Maxon Real Estate 778-2307.

ANNUAL FURNISHED 2BR/2BA duplex, Anna
Maria, updated, dishwasher, courtyard, close to
beach. $675 month, no pets. Fran Maxon Real Es-
tate 778-2307.

4BR/2BA SEASONAL, steps to beach, washer/dryer,
cable, TV, porch swing, restored wood floors $450
week, $1,100 month. Call (813)253-2052.

VACATION RENTALS 2BR apartments across form
beautiful beach $350 per week. Winter dates still
available. Almost Beach Apartments 778-2374.

AVAILABLE NOV. 1. Annual 2BR/1BA, great neigh-
borhood, Holmes Beach, clean and updated. $750
month. First, last, security. No pets 778-5482.

BEAUTIFUL EFFICIENCY one block from fabulous
beach with great sunsets. Local phone service, ba-
sic cable and utilities are included. $600 per month
for Oct., Nov. Call 778-6411.

ANNUAL HOUSE available Nov. 1, 2BR/2BA,
washer/dryer hookup, deck, screened porch, view of
bay, steps to beach, $800 month, security, deposit,
plus all utilities. 778-7199.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED, 406 2nd St. North,
Bradenton Beach. 1BR/1BA on the bay, no pets.
$600 per month, first/last/security. Call 778-2619 or
795-1243.


ISLAND LUMBER
AND HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

Island Custom Tops
Complete Corian Counter Top Service
S Commercial Residential
Dupont Certified
K Dave Spicer 778-2010

Get It Together Inc
Need Organization? I Can Help!
Cheaper than therapy and a lot more fun.
Home Office Confidential
Edie Force, Major Organizer, 778-7916

G-6 C.
WFARA.
ae Cermifted Resdential Conract CR-C057729
CONSTRUCTION A REMODEUNG



NU-Weatherside
of Florida INE 1948
PATIO DOORS
PORCH ENCLOSURES
WINDOW REPLACEMENT

778-7074


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 25 [1


EJ4WE'J4; DECLASSIFIED


SURF SIDE 2BR/1BA. ANNUAL, $900 per month.
Available now. 792-2779.

COQUINA BEACH available for season. 2BR/1BA
apartment overlooking koi pond and waterfall. All com-
forts of home, fifty steps to Gulf. $1,500 per month, plus
tax. Koi One Vacation Rentals, (941) 753-8866, mem-
ber Anna Maria Chamber of Commerce.

LARGE OFFICE three rooms on Pine Ave. $700 per
month, 778-5796.

EFFICEINCY APARTMENT on Pine Ave. $500 per
month, 778-5796.

ANNUALS, ANNUALS, ANNUALS. 522 Key Royale
Drive, 3BR/2BA, $1,000 per month; 305 Spring Ave., 2BR/
1 BA, $900 per month; 304 Clark Drive, 3BR/2BA, $800 per
month. Call Betsy Hills Real Estate 778-2291.

BED AND BREAKFAST $25 dollars and up. 921 41st
St. Ct. West, Bradenton. 941-714-0219. $5.00 extra
person, kids seven and under free.

ANNUAL 2BR/1.5BA Bradenton Beach. Elevated
Duplex, rec room, W/D hook-up, nice area. $700 per
month, security. Available November 1st. 778-4837.

SEASONAL SIX MONTH lease. Two-car garage,
3BR/2BA, home in Northwest Bradenton. Minutes to
beaches and shopping. November thru April, $1,800
per month. Also available, Perico Bay, 2BR/2BA
condo, now thru Jan, flexible lease and price. Real-
tor 941-756-1090.

HOLMES BEACHFRONT RENTAL(near Shells Res-
taurant) 2BR/1BA. Rates: Winter, $1,200 per month,
summer $850 per month. Call (813) 264-264-0639 or
(334) 988-8760.
CHARMING 1BR/1BA in Holmes Beach. Available
Nov. 1st, small pet OK. $550 per month, plus utilities.
Call Lee 302-0779.

ANNUAL ATTRACTIVE 2BR/1BA. new paint and
carpet, 400 ft. to beach. $700 per month, security
deposit. 778-7933.

RELOCATION SPECIAL all efficiency units. One person,
$175 per week; two people from $210 per week. Units for
larger group available. Haley's Motel 778-5405.


GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
GREAT GIFTS ANYTIME!

AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT 8AM 4PM


paradise?

16SL ADER

Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe. Visit us at 5404
Marina Drive.
island Shopping Center.
Holmes Beach
or ca!l 941-778-7976
to charge it on Visa or MC.


WANTED BY MID-DECEMBER, annual 2BR in
Holmes Beach, prefer near beach with pool, W/D
hook-up or available. 704-1430.

SEASONAL 1BR furnished apartment Holmes
Beach. Upstairs, washer/dryer, cable, microwave, all
linens/kitchenware. No pets. $1,700 per month (
beach one block.) 407-846-8741.

COZY COTTAGE 82nd St., Holmes Beach. 2BR,
ceiling fans, window blinds, nice neighborhood. An-
nual $829 per month, plus utilities. 778-6544.

CANALFRONT BAYVIEW 2BR/2BA, fireplace, work-
room, garage, lush tropical screened pool and lanai,
boat dock, walk to shops and beach. 778-6177.

AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 1st. 2BR/1BA, great
neighborhood, Holmes Beach. Close to beach and .
shopping. $750 per month. First. last and security. No
pets. 778-5482.

ANNUAL 3BR/3BA Holmes Beach townhouse. Two-
car garage with storage, pool, balconies, Mexican
tiles, walk to beaches beautiful! $1,650 per month
includes water, cable, washer/dryer and security sys-
tem. First and security. 778-0167.



GULFFRONT LOT, dead-end street, one of a kind!
There are no more like this. $399,000, 778-4523 or
800-9177-0803..

BARK & COMPANY REALTY. Steven M. Bark, Bro-
ker. 383-1717 or 720-3200.

BAYFRONT ESTATE $715,000. Four units located di-
rectly on bay/Intracoastal steps to Gulf beaches. Cathe-
dral ceilings, fireplace, wood floors, Jacuzzi and boat
docks. Great for investor or family estate! 3BR/2BA
house, 2BR/2BA house and two 1BR apartments. Call
Deborah Thrasher or John Hines, Wedebrock Real
Estate Company 383-5543 or 778-3395 eves.

JUST COMPLETED NEW 3BR/2BA home one block
from beach. Tile floors, Berber carpet. 2901 Gulf
Drive. $218,900. 778-2316..




SWhy get soaked? es in hours
,Not days.
I .

F AT 778-2882
Carpet& 5 or 387-0607
Upholstery Cleaning
"Clean carpet looks better
Sand lasts longer."
We are carpeting, leather and fabric
S! upholstered furniture specialists.
SC- Owner/lslander Jon Kent.
Call today for your appointment. T I
-------L-----------
g .7


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
and paid in advance -or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center. 5404 Manna Drive. Holmes Beach. FL 34217.
We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5. Monday Friday. (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL : Minimum rate is S8 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: S2.50
for each 7 words, Box: $2.50. One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 25c per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We
are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by
phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
----------------------------------------------------1
__ ___ ___ ___21

Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
For credit card payment: J No.
Exp. Date Name shown on card:
5404 Marina Drive SLf Fax: 941 778-9392
Holmes Beach FL 34217 ISLANDE Phone: 941 778-7978
L -------------------------- ------------------------------------ _


Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos


WLAGNl


778-2246


P.JI 7L/VG6y lfalie /Deffeiwbaiugi,
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Serving the Islands since 1969. 778-5594 After 5 Call
Licensed and Insured 778-3468

R.T. (BOB) HILTON CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial. Remodel and
New Construction. Island and Mainland.
"DON'T SA Y HOW, SA Y HILTON"
Lic. #CGC012191 747-1098

Need PC assistance? Help getting on the
Internet? "@Ease With PCs" can help. Instruction,
problem resolution, upgrades. Most work done on
your premises. Y2K TEST & FIX. -
Sorry, no Macs. Call Keith Allen 792-8718.

RICK BOYCE CONSTRUCTION
From the smallest repairs to major overhaul ...
I do it all and you SAVE.
778-5075 798-0078 PAGER
20-years Island experience Insured Lic.# CGC038546


EULL eLL .ILLLLULlL-L [U ILLiL[LU
Interior/Exterior Commercial & New Construction
Insured Free Estimates
753-4727


U


Wilson Walls NC
STUCCO SPECIALIST


Drywall Ceiling Repair
Custom Wall Finishing Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Cell 650-7871 Eves 778-9506



flntiques and Collectibles
PINK & WHITE EINTIIEPIUSES
(Now Selling Wholesale)
GRAND OPENING SALE
Saturday, October 30 9am 3pmr
2150 Whitfield Park Drive, Bldg. F/Unit JO
Bradenton, FL 941 504-5496


LOCATED BEHIND
S ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
LP GAS I RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
$800 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
P er FLL EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
20b cynderHEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
S WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING


WE SPECIALIZE IN IRS-
-\W Residential N-4W racial
%4 Retaurant Ho
-\- Condo A,,o:. "W v l hd n!t.rcom
\4 Lightning Repair tS I p~rade

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978


II







| -[I PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I S D E RA L A S S FE


CANALFRONT HOME with panoramic view of Sky-
way lights and bay/intracoastal, 2BR/2BA and poten-
tial 1 BR apartment with Spanish tile floors, cathedral
ceilings, cedar closets, oversized two-car garage with
sauna, boat dock, davits, screened enclosed lanais,
A/C, refrigerator, new dryer 1998. $284,900. Call
Deborah Thrasher, Wedebrock Real Estate Com-
pany 383-5543 or 778-3395 eves.

HEAR THE SURF and catch glimpses of blue Gulf
waters-all from this newly renovated Holmes Beach
house. 3BR/F8A with 2BR/1BA rental cottage. Wood
and tile thr..ighout, brand new kitchens and appli-
ances, vauld ceiling, French doors, decks, fire-
place. 281 Avenue E, $279,900. 778-4523, 761-
1533, 800- 7-0803.


COMMER
own 140 f
Super gross
Real Estal


L PROPERTY fabulous opportunity to
is on main Island drive, zoned C-3.
:ome. Reach Richard Freeman, Island
8-6066 or 800-865-0800.


WATERFRONT CONDO Westbay Point & Moorings
II. 50-ft. dock, carport, second floor, end unit, 2BR/
2BA, completely refurbished. Call voice mail, 800-
558-9008, ext. 225.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY October 17, 1-4pm.
Westbay Point and Moorings, 6500 Fotilla #198.
2BR/2BA, condo, carport, two boat docks. $225,000.
1-800-558-9008, ext.225.

CLOSE TO BEACHES. CONTEMPORARY 3BR/
2.5BA, open plan with many new features. Master
bedroom and two baths on ground floor with 2BR and
half-bath on second floor with balcony overlooking
greatroom. $185,000. Dick Maher/Dave Jones 778-
4800. MLS 36165

BUILD YOUR DREAM home on this large Anna
Maria lot and you will overlook Tampa Bay, the City
Pier, Egmont Key, Sunshine Skyway and an interest-
ing canal. Owner asking $165,000. 792-4274.


LONGBOAT KEY NORTH END. just reduced to
$184,000. 2BR, family room and fireplace, on comer lot.
Boat access close by. Mary Wickersham 383-5577.

FOR SALE BY OWNER. Lovely 2BR/2BA condo at
Perico Bay Club. completely furnished, only
$108,000. Call Arnold 727-864-1650, toll free 888-
296-6351.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate ad-
vertising herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which
makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention
to make any such preference, limitation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status includes children under age of 18
living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of children under 18. This
newspaper will not knowing accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777, for the hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-
543-8294.


DIRECT GULFFRONT 1 BR/1 BA each floor duplex
to be sold with adjoining property which is 3BR/
2BA home. Total of eighty by one hundred feet
direct Gulffront. Zoned C2. Presently rented sea-
sonally. 3BR home is 1,392 sq.ft., duplex is 1,160
sq.ft. Turnkey furnished. Appointment needed, call
Lynn Hostetler 778-4800. $850,000. MLS#40129


BillA Se : ( BroerOwer i78-90 Lnn Ho B roe-we)7 4402
E Olvia ..........7 8-7 1K n : a......... 7 83 2
De ns Ra sh,.....77 -3 0 ik a e ..... ....7 8- 91 Jm L os ........3 30 6
BobWote ...........72 -18 3 av Jo es...........77848 1 avi B um n .... ..m91-11


PANORAMIC VIEW!
Investment property. Great seasonal rental!
Direct bayfront steps to beach. 3BR/2BA
house, 2BR/2BA house, two 1BR apartments.
REDUCED PRICED! $715,000.


LARGE FAMILY DUPLEX
Builder's personal home. Two blocks to Gulf.
3BR/2.5BA each side. Family room, large
kitchen, oversized garage. Low maintenance.
Asking $339,000.


CANALFRONT VIEW!
Gorgeous view of canal and bay. 3BR/3.5BA,
boat docks with davits, steps to beach. Over-
sized garage, fireplace. Asking $284,000.







VIEW OF BAY!
Affordable old-Florida charm. 2BR elevated
cottage. Steps to beach with boat access and
dock. Asking $155,000.


WTAGNER REALTY
YOUR HOMETOWN REALTOR ESTABLISHED 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach, Florida 34217
778-2246 1(800)211-2323 www.wagnerrealty.com


THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER!
2BR/1BA. Rare find on Anna Maria Is-
land. Eat-in kitchen, one-car garage, on
a nice lot. This one won't last long.
S134.500. Call Harold Small 778-2246.


ISLAND HOME REMODELED. 4BR/
2BA, walk to beach. 1,700 sq.ft., owner
will consider lease back. $214,900. Call
Sandy Greiner 794-2246.


BAYFRONT LOT Spec.acla' vie7/s of
bay from thrs rare baronrit !or cenra,!y
located beviee- the Manatee a
Cortez B 'jes. It -eas-'es 65, c. C00
fee. sse ,a n red'e rcr-ofr, T,_-
tion. Offered at S215.000. Con'tac David
Moynihan 778-2246;778-7976 eves.


ISLAND FOUR-PLEX p!us large
manager's office. So!ar heated poo;.
',r- derf'j /ieiis of Tarrna Bay anrd
;"',r'/y i Bc' ce. E/rce e:'4 ir, '-.e,- a.,d
G-,atir.n. 5549.000. For morre infoirra-
tion cail Yvonne Higgirs at Wagner
Realty 778-2246/720-3879.


1999 Reader's Preference Award winner for #1 Real Estate
Company and #1 Rental Company in Manatee County


S ISLANDER
I Imi'moin


'*B .~;~ '.p;


Brf~rih


P c
-4 r:;


Af W






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 27 [II


I


ONE OF A KIND!
Gulffront lot on a quiet dead-end street! There are
no more like this! For sale by owner. 31st St. and
Ave. F. $399,000. 778-4523 or 800-977-0803.


ANNUAL RENTAL -ANNA MARIA
2BR/1BA duplex, ceramic tile floors.
$650 month plus utilities


7 2 "Wir Sprechen Deutsch"
RESIDENTIAL
RIVEROAKS 2BR/2BA, waterfront, boat dock, pool. $88,000.
BRAND NEW KEY WEST HOME 4BR/3BA with Gulf and bay
views. Upgrades and extras. Shaft for elevator. $435,000.
PINEBROOK 2BR/2BA greatroom, Florida room, golf, glassed lanai. $102,500.
VILLAS WITH HEATED CAGED POOL. 4BR/2BA, 2,006 sq.
ft. living area each side. Extras. Can condo-ize. $440,000
LARGE BAYVIEW LOT. Boat slip. 90 by 132 feet. $149,500.
WILDEWOOD 2300. 3BR/2.5BA. Extra nice. $125,000.
CHOICE ISLAND LOT 9,700 sq.ft., $108,000.
COMMERCIAL
HISTORIC BRIDGE STREET 2,400 sq. ft., three stores, 150 ft.
to Sarasota Bay. Can add to size. Developing area. $355,000.
32 APARTMENTS Sarasota, $1.300.000.
LOT C-2 Zoning.Walk to beach $150,000.
STYLING SALON Eight stations. Great location. $39,000 OBO.
RENTALS
Seasonal-MARTINIQUE 2BR/2BA, tennis, heated pool, elevator.
Sepaonal-5400-2BR/2BA, updated, new furniture, heated pool.
Vacation/Seasonal GULFSANDS 2BR/2BA, heated pool.
Annual-RIVER OAKS 2BR/2BA. elevator, clubhouse, tennis. heated pool.
Villas & Homes available for vacations. Ask for Lu.
5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net TDOLLYYOUNGREALESTATE.COM


Residential Commercial/Industrial Propert) Management Mortgage Loans Title Insurance Vacation Rentals


LOOK FOR OUR VACATION RENTALS ON THE WEB
www.arvidarealty.com or call Bob Lohse at 778-0766 fo a brochure


I 4



Carol S. Heinze
REALTORY/CRS
778-5059


WATCH THE SUNSETS!
Totally redecorated Water's
Edge 2BR/2BA and den. Up
close view of Gulf from living
room, den and balcony.
Beachfront complex with
heated pool and tennis courts.
$350,000. IB40602


ESTUARY DRIVE AT PERICO
BAY. Motivated seller for this
tastefully furnished 3BR/2BA
condo. Tile floors, ceiling fans,
great kitchen and pantry. Wetbar,
refrigerator on balcony. Minutes to
the beach. $179,000. IB39199
KEY WEST STYLE HOME. El-
evated, canalfront 3BR/3BA
home. Across from bay. Light and
bright with view down canal from
two decks. $369,000. IB39198


Karin Stephan
Ich Spreche Deutsch
924-9000
Eves: 388-1267


www.arvidarealty.com


SALES RENTALS

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Visit us at our web site (((i(a ))
http://www.islandreal.com 6-jTi e.


HAVE IT YOUR WAY! Recently renovated,
this two-level 3BR/3BA home with two kitchens
offers many options. Upstairs has a 1BR/1BA,
downstairs a 2BR/2BA. Close to the beach!
Perfect for seasonal/annual rental. $219.900.


BOATERS PARADISE! 3BR/2BA home OPEN WATER CANAL HOME! Stunning
located on double-wide deep canal with 3BR/2.5BA home at end of great canal over-
dock, lift and davits. Can house two boats, looking Bimini Bay. Open floor plan, caged
Home has brand new windows, Berber car- pool and lanai area, boat dock with davits and
pet, paint and stucco. $339,900. lift. Ideal boaters home! $459,500.


ISLAND FOURPLEX on large corner lot in
Holmes Beach just steps to beach! Two
separate buildings house two 2BR/1BA
units each for a total of four rental units.
Great visibility on Gulf Drive! $499,000.


EVERYONE WANTS a condo on the beach -
there are not too many left for sale! Anna Maria
Island Club Gulffront condo recently redone. 2BR/
2BA with pool. elevator, balcony area perfect for
sunset watching. Cowvred parking. $296.000.


PEEK AT THE BAY! Spacious home with
four-car garage. RV pad with hookup, low
maintenance yard with herb and citrus gar-
den. Screened porch is a perfect place to
relax! $335.000.








S--____N"--" .
SEASIDE GARDENS e-::c I3 3/iBA
.- :. ,. : .r r 95. Ce r


-. -7


NEW LISTING! Canalfront 3BR/2BA is-
land home close to bay and beach.
$198.500.


FOUR BEDROOM -a : a. f:-,res a ..de
-.e r.c --a. a ....:r~c r. .,C -. ..


v.:r-?3ar: zrCe gmr!r t: o-


GREAT ISLAND HOME! 2BR/2BA with
caged pool and deeded boat slip. Seller will
help build dock'
$224.900.


LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!

-,r=rJ -. :'. r. T '.' c- r.d Br '-- *r :cS' r4 4 8d


l I REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


ISLAND GEM! Beautif:iuy upcare,. 23R
2BA home wi;h open floor :on. -
caged pool area with !:sh Ia-cap-:ng. v
decks and steps to beach 5$224.900


Q, i'I
1 r,


DON & KAREN SCHRODER, REALTORS

GREAT LOCATION! .f
The view from the front is
Key Royale golf course and -
the view from the back is
overlooking one of the -r-" -- .
wider canals. This 3BR/2BA ,
home offers spacious rooms and an air-conditioned, glass en-
closed Florida room that stretches the full length of the home. A
flexible floor plan makes the third bedroom ideally situated to func-
tion as a den or office. No doubt it's one of the better locations on
the Key and it is packed with potential for the buyer with a creative
eye. Dock, boatlift. $299,000.

^ GA GULFSTREAM
941 -REALTY
941-778-2200


I


6101 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 941-778-6066 1-800-865-4








JiMlJ PAGE 28 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


NO HOLDS BARD

BY FRED PISCOP / EDITED BY WILL SHORT


ACROSS
1 Morse code bits
5 Reveals
10 Legislation
14 Toughie
19 Israel's first U.N.
representative
20 Lodge
21 No quick trip
around the block
22 Kristen of
"Ryan's Hope"
23 Increased pay
rate, Bard-style?
25 Angry reaction
26 Your place or
mine
27 Like some
guesses
28 20th-century
combat,
Bard-style?
31 Move, in a way
32 The Mustangs of
the N.C.A.A.
34 Ride, so to speak
35 Stew ingredient
36 "Uh-uh!"
38 Springtimes
40 Legit
43 Empathic
remark,
Bard-style?
47 Inched
49 Charles who was
dubbed "the
Victorious"
50 Abbr. on a
discount label


51 Auto purveyor,
Bard-style?
57 Pulver's rank, in
film: Abbr.
58 Pack away
59 Synchronous
60 Heiress, perhaps
61 Sales people
63 Kicked off
65 It may fill a lib.
shelf
66 "Kramer vs.
Kramer"
director Robert
67 Hunks
69 Bamboozles
71 Card combo
73 Travel agt.'s
suggestion
75 Moderator's
milieu
76 Time to act
79 Person with a
day
80 Rating giver
82 Eshkolonce led
it: Abbr.
84 Zoological
mouths
85 Hierarchy,
Bard-style?
87 First word?
88 Knock the socks
off
89 Marner's creator
90 Takes advantage
of, Bard-style?
94 Harness ring
97 Scuffle memento
99 Rocker Nugent
100 Black and tan
ingredient
101 Like
Chippendale
furniture


104 Hunter's quarry
106 Book of the
Apocrypha
110 Easy schedule,
Bard-style?
114 Perfectly
matching
116 Capt.'s inferior
117 Two-liter bottle
contents
118 Miserly,
Bard-style
120 1973 Rolling
Stones hit
121 "Be that-
may...
122 Customers:
Abbr.
123 N.Y.P.D.
employee
124 Spring purchase
125 France's Coty
126 Titter
127 Informal shirts
DOWN
1 Ward off -
2 Stand for
3 Overplay
4 Carnival treat
5 Tuckered out
6 Stuntmen's woes
7 Folding challenge
8 Military E-l or
E-2, e.g.
9 Convertible,
perhaps
10 Of a heart part
11 Public
announcers
12 Edison
contemporary
13 Manipulates, as
data


14 Loading site
15 Minnesota's St.
College
16 Six-winged
being
17 Access
18 Try again
24 Singer Merchant
29 Animals with
calves
30 Opposite of bid
33 --tree
37 Qualified for the
job
39 Age
41 Warmed up the
crowd
42 Like some glass
43 "Your turn"
44 Durable wood
45 Like many
Harlemites
46 Soviet co-op
47 Kind of block
48 Contemptible
newspaper
52 Density symbol,
in mechanics
53 Attached, in a
way
54 Forsakes
55 Prefix with
system
56 Half a cartoon
duo
59 Summon up
62 Fore-and-aft sail
64 Balzac's Pere

66 Puts in a blue
funk
68 Pie chart
section, perhaps


70 Playwright
Pirandello
71 Medicinal amt.
72 -- devie
74 Antiquity, once
75 Having no
master
77 Slangy suffix
78 [bo-o-o-ring!]
80 Vietnam's -
Dinh Diem


81 Combat
zone
83 Stone name
86 Dynamite
component, for
short
91 "Sprechen--
Deutsch?"
92 Dab
93 Skelton
catchphrase


94 Indian drums
95 "Seinfeld"
role
96 Goren gaffe
97 "No -!"
98 Sharpened
102 Prize for Page
or Cage
103 Embraced
105 All-American
name


107 Held up
108 Busy
109 Sidewalk
Santas, e.g.
111 Pound, in
Piccadilly
112 Versatile
vehicles
113 "Now!"
115 In (actually)
119 Break the--


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 950 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.




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40






ilr] PAGE 2 K OCTOBER 13, 1999 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Boat names come in all shades


- clever to dumb


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
People have an odd sense of humor when it
comes to naming children and boats.
In both cases some are great and some just
plain silly. This story will stick to boat names to
protect the guilty from progeny lawsuits.
When referring to boat names, there's the
cute, the profound, the self-important and -
drum roll, please the idiotic.
From top to bottom, stem to stern, the best
boats have names with a certain flair that makes
you think, "She's a beauty."
My favorite all-time name is a guide boat that
ran out of Boca Grande for 55 years. Her name
was "Sitarah" (Si-tar-uh) an Indian word for
"beautiful star."
Sitarah has local flavor as well. She was built
near Palma Sola Bay by Bradenton boat builder
Lee Hickock in 1940. She was named by Palm
Beach socialite Mrs. Algier, heiress to the Packard
automobile fortunes.
When the wood version of the boat was re-


tired, the owner brought Sitarah back to Palma
Sola where she promptly sank. A fiberglass ver-
sion still plies Boca Grande Pass. Hickock built a
number of boats for Boca Grande guides, one of
which is still working, the round-sterned Chico.
Sitarah is a wonderful name. But names origi-
nating in another language can sometimes put
people off.
Aren't there just a few too many boats named
Carpe Diem? That's Latin for "seize the day."
Sounds a little bit too uppity, too blue bloodish.
On the other hand, here's a good one from the
Creole language. It's the word Lagniappe (Lan-
yap) which means "a little something extra."

Think maritime
The use of sea terms is common in the name
game and can work for you or against you.
For example, Frayed Knot is pretty good.
Whimsea is not too bad. Certainly whimsey is
what it is when anyone buys a boat. How about
Searene or Boatdacious?
But LunaSea? I don't think so.
Alliteration is often employed when hanging
a moniker on a boat. There's Miss Milly or Les
Stress or Which-a-Way.
Now take for instance Dolphin Doll. It's a solid
name for a solid work boat owned by Harvey
Hamilton of Bokeelia.
Her 454-cubic-inch engine would push her
about 60 mph. Hamilton needed it, for he was one
of three men who were federally licensed to cap-
ture dolphins for seaquariums around the world.
The government doesn't let him do it anymore.

Historic ships
Then there's the doomed and ill-fated:
Lusitania and Titanic come to mind right away
Perhaps the most infamous boat in American
literature was the Pcqiuoi from Herman Melville'e
masterpiece "Mobv Dick."


Local charterboat captain Jason Henzell calls
his boat Pequod.
Pequod was the name of a now extinct cel-
ebrated tribe of Massachusetts Indians.
As Melville writes in chapter 16, "She was a
ship of the old school, rather small if anything;
with an old-fashioned claw-footed look about her.
Long seasoned and weather-stained in the ty-
phoons and calms of all four oceans, her old hull's
complexion was darkened like a French
grenadier's, who has alike fought in Egypt and
Siberia. Her venerable bows looked bearded. Her
masts cut somewhere off the coast of Japan,
where her original ones were lost overboard in a
gale her masts stood stiffly up like the spines
of the three old kings of Cologne. Her ancient
decks were worn and wrinkled, like the pilgrim-
worshipped flag-stone in Canterbury Cathedral
where Beckett bled."
Melville paints quite a picture.
In Greek mythology, Jason and his Argonauts
set out to find the golden fleece of a flying ram.
About 50 of the greatest Greek heroes took


The Bells of A.P. Bell fish
house in Cortez have a
long history of naming
longline and shrimp boats
after women almost all
belles. Here are the Lisa
M. Belle and the Deanna
Belle. Islander Photo:
David Futch


part including Castor and Pollux, Hercules,
Orpheus, Peleus and Telamon.
The Argonauts took their name from their
ship, the Argo, which had been named for its


builder Argos, a famous craftsman. The Goddess
Athena helped in the ship's construction.
I saw Circe docked at Galati Marine in Anna
Maria. She was an enchantress who changed
Odysseus's men into swine by a magic drink.
Odysseus in Greek legend was king of Ithaca
and one of the Greek leaders in the Trojan War
and hero of the Odyssey.

Animal names and potpourri
Animal names are options to consider.
Kitt! Mittens, was a favorite name during the
1930s. A lot of people from Havana to Chicago
loved that little boat. It made them rich.
Mv -randfather Dan Futch would nail two-
inch by 1v!-inch Dpanks on ner sides so there rose


above the gunwales about a half foot. This addi-
tion created more- free board, allowing him to
smuggle more cases of rum across the Florida
Straits during Prohibition, rum that went on to the
Windy City for dispersal.
The Kitty Mittens sister boat was the Sweeney. A
lot of people during the Depression loved her, too.
Remember the Balamina? Harry Belafonte
sang about her. When she was loaded with rum
they'd paint her black at the dock to hide the
Balamina during her night-time runs. When her
cargo was secreted away, they'd paint the
Balamina white.
Other animal names I like include Sundog and
Moondog. They're not really animals, rather atmo-
spheric conditions. A ring around the sun is a
sundog and a ring around the moon ... well, let's
see if those people who named their boat Carpe
Diem can figure that out.
Doodlebug is another one I like. It's just cute.
Lil' Tiger was a beautiful wood open boat built
for beach casting for tarpon around Anna Maria
Island in the 1950s. Capt. Bobby Buswell, one of
the best beach fishermen alive, still hunts for sil-.
ver kings from Englewood south to Fort Myers
Beach in Lil' Tiger.

Stars, boats and other stuff
I once saw a red-hulled sailboat called Betel-
geuse and that made sense because Betelgeuse is
the red star.
In the 1920s, several island villages in Char-
lotte Harbor were cut off from the mainland and
depended on the library boat Papyrus to bring
them books. Papyrus is a type of writing paper
used by the ancient Egyptians.
A friend has an impressive dinghy called Yat.
Here's one that sucks. Wet Dream. What sort of
moron names a boat that?
Another stern seen recently Herbehind.
World-famous wood boat builder George
Luzier of Sarasota thought of his sailboat as his
best friend and named it Buddy. He named the
little tender he towed behind Buddy Row.
Reel always comes in handy in boat naming.
Reel Addicted, Reel Screamer, Reel Deal, Reel
Slammer, Reel Hooker, Reel Love, Reel Pleasure.
There's a sailboat around named Aground.
Towing companies are having fits every time the


As most owners
will attest, Ship
Happens when
you own a boat
- as this owner
displays on
his stern.
Islander Photo:
David Futch


captain calls on his VHF radio. "This is vessel
Aground. This is vessel Aground."
Islander singer/entertainer Jay Crawford
keeps all his money in a Swiss Bank. Dave Russel!
of Rotten Ralph's Restaurant calls his vessel Reel
E Rotten. Island dentist Gy Yatros's boat is called
Offshore Drilling. Island attorney Dick Shapiro
named his Ship Happens. An excellent name for a
sailboat is Windependence. How about naming one
The Other Women. Or Til Debt Do Us Part.

History of boats
The World Book Encyclopedia 1999 tells us
that boats date back 6,000 years. The earliest pic-
tures of boats sno'. them in a comparatively re-
cent staze in their history for man ventured or
cer). r, \ h. e, v~






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 3 []


water thousands of years before this.
The earliest ship for she was a great deal
bigger than a boat about which we have real
knowledge is the funeral ship of the Pharaoh
Cheops, the builder of the great pyramid at Giza,
the first of three pyramids built by his dynasty at
Giza in 2600 B.C.
His 113-foot-long funeral ship was carefully
and lovingly made in prefabricated sections to be
buried in a great pit hewn from the solid lime-
stone of the Giza plateau, and when assembled
was covered over by 41 slabs of rock, each weigh-
ing around 18 tons.
Cheops' ship is referred to as "she" through-
out the article on ships and boats. So why is it
when people refer to a boat or ship they call it
"she" or "her"?
The most logical explanation came from Is-
land Branch head librarian Sarah Bicknell who
found that the Latin word "navis" means ship or
vessel and is of feminine gender.
When the Spaniards of old named a ship it
was after the name of a city but was always pre-
ceded by Neuestra Senora de which means My
Lady of.'The most famous of Spain's lady ships
was Mel Fisher's treasure-laden boat the Neuestra
Senora de Atocha found sunk near the Marquesas.
Speaking of boats and ships, what's the differ-
ence?
The common explanation is "a ship is a vessel
that can carry its own boats."

Why are boats named
after women?
Capt. Keith Barnett said men promise to name
boats after their wives or girlfriends so they can
convince her to let them have one.
One ingenious sailor told his wife, "Honey, if
you let me buy a boat I'll name it after you." So he
named it After You.
Someone else said naming boats after women
came about because during the days of tall, sail-
ing ships men were at sea for years at a time and
it was the one way to keep their loved ones close
and remembered.


I don't like either one of those explanations.
Anybody out there have a better one? Call me
at 778-7978.
Is it really bad luck to change the name of a boat?
No, as long as you re-christen the boat.
Christening is an interesting custom
orginating with the Vikings. You've heard how
tough the Vikings were? Wait 'til you read this.
Capt. Barnett is credited for this one.
The original christening ceremony was called
"blooding the boat."
A volunteer was needed to "blood the boat"
before putting her overboard so that all future
passengers would be safe during voyages.
Some brave and crazy Viking would lie down
across wood rails and when the boat was backed
into the water: Squish. Blood all over the boat
hull. Yikes. Tough guys with some tough love.
As the centuries went on, the number of vol-
unteers dropped dramatically and the new way to


christen was to break a bottle of red wine on the
bow stem.
It wasn't until the middle of the 19th century
that champagne became the christening wine of
choice.
There are two other superstitions surrounding
boats.
Number One is never take bananas on a boat
you're getting ready to fish out of. Just plain bad
luck. Ask any professional guide and he'll tell you
that.
The other is never pick up change you've
dropped in a boat. It just isn't done, Capt. Barnett
said.
"You're not supposed to take money out of a
boat. Just put it in," he said. "A boat I once had I'll
bet had $15 in change in the bilge."
Must have been called Pocket Change.


Perhaps this boat is rawjedaffj~r ts owners particular sense of direction? Islander Photo: David Futch


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[IQ PAGE 6 N OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Mathews builds homes for millions of fish


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Heyward Mathews built his first artificial reef
of old tires and polyethylene line, anchoring it
with metal pipes.
That was in 1963 and his early experiment in
man-made fish habitats didn't win him any
friends with Panama City net fishermen.
Good thing they didn't find out who he was.
Commercial fishermen lost three or four nets
on Mathews' contraption aimed at attracting sea
life to barren ocean bottom.
Mathews is still unknown to most fishermen,
but hundreds of thousands of anglers can thank
him for creating some of their favorite fishing
spots along Florida's Atlantic and Gulf coasts.
In Manatee County alone Mathews has super-
vised construction of seven reefs including the
popular One-Mile Reef and the north and south
Three-Mile Reefs off Anna Maria Island.
Between Dunedin and Naples, he has had a
hand in more than four dozen reefs since sinking
the first one off Clearwater in 1974. Since then he
has helped almost every coastal county in Florida
start reef projects.
A marine biology and oceanography profes-
sor at St. Petersburg Junior College-Clearwater
campus for 33 years, Mathews has had a hand in
150 artificial reefs in Florida waters. That's five
times more than any person in the country.
On a hot June day, Mathews makes for a reef
15 miles west of the sea buoy at New Pass. He and
fellow scientist Dan Sheehy are going to dive 60
feet to find some armored personnel carrier and
M-60 tanks (LORAN 14128.4 and 44496.9 while
GPS is 27 degrees 12.633 and 82 degrees 48.211).
The second stop was GPS coordinates 27 degrees
12.653 and 82 degrees 48.169. "This is the good
part of the job."
"There are grouper on all these reefs particularly
on these tanks. Grouper like something over their


head with a field of view to either side," Mathews
said. "Snapper are quite the opposite. They want
something surrounding them with an overhead
view. On the first of five tanks at this spot, we saw
three jewfish, one over 150 pounds, one gag grouper
about 33 inches. There were a bunch of mangrove
snapper living in the cockpit," he said.

Mathews passionate about healthy fishery
Mathews has a machine-gun approach to con-
versation, stringing together idea after idea in
rapid fashion until the brain is saturated.
Sheehy is chief scientist with Aquabio Inc. of
Boston, a consulting firm specializing in fisheries,
artificial reefs and constructing reefs. He has
worked with Mathews for 25 years.
No one, he said, has more experience.
"He's passionate about the environment and
fisheries resources and he's quite an asset for the
state of Florida," Sheehy said. "There's probably
no one around the country with a greater wealth
of practical experience in finding sites for reefs
and placing material.
"Florida has the biggest artificial reef pro-
gram, the longest experience. The first reef project
Heyward helped set up in Pinellas County was
one of the pioneer programs in the state.
"He was the one that got the artificial reef pro-
gram going. And every time it was jeapordized by
lack of interest or something he would mobilize
fishermen and divers to tell their representatives
that they thought this program was valuable and
they didn't want it to disappear."
When it came to artificial reefs, Mathews was
a bulldog.
"He's not a political animal," Sheehy said. He's
a scientist by training and he usually answers ques-
tions without flavoring it. He'll tell it like it is.
Heyward is an institutional data base in terms of
how to do things.
"He can tell what the ocean bottom's like by


sticking his hand in it. In engineering terms we
have a device called a penetrometer that gives
you bearing capacity of the ground. I told
Heyward before he passes on we're going to cast
his arm and call it the Mathews Penetrometer."

Mathews doesn't sugarcoat his thoughts
Nothing fancy about Mathews. What you see
is what you get.
His boat isn't a modern research vessel. Its
austere appearance is not unlike the owner.
He still has the same crew cut he's always had.
He has hands and fingers of a diver, complete
with cuts and scrapes and grease and oil and
BandAids blamed on engine and equipment
maintenance.
He pulls his 29-foot vessel around with a die-
sel-powered 4X4 truck. A bumper sticker on the
rear windshield reads "Remember the Golden
Rule But Carry a Gun." It's right next to his Na-
tional Rife Association sticker.
He's an avid deer hunter who was born in
Orlando and grew up near Cordele, Ga., later
earning a bachelor's degree in zoology at the Uni-
versity of Georgia.
"I got the idea for artificial reefs early from
Eugene Odom, an ecologist at UGA," Mathews
said. "Odom was the one who got me interested
in marine biology.
At Florida State University, Mathews earned
a masters degree studying under Winston Menzel
(spelling), a fourth-generation commercial fisher-
man whose family harvested oysters in Chesa-
peake Bay and whose research centered on oys-
ters and shellfish.
"He was one of these old-time scientists who
had a motto I really loved. He would say 'Go
ahead and do it, then ask if it's OK. It's easier to
ask forgiveness than it is to ask permission.' That
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1999 0 PAGE 7 [E


REEFS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6


was his way of dealing
S with bureaucracy. At a
S".' u, university, nine times out
of 10 if you ask them they
say no. Do it first. Then
check in with them."

Not your run-of-
the-mill teacher
Mathews is not a
Mathews
Mathewtypical professor. He'll
take on just about anyone or government agency
if it means saving what little Florida has left in the
way of sensitive wetlands. He does not shy away
from controversy.
He helped lead the drive to save Honeymoon
Island north of Clearwater Beach when develop-
ers wanted to dredge and fill and put 60,000
people on its deserted shores.
Still, he remains a realist about Florida's future.
"I don't see any improvement in the environ-
ment any time soon. Population growth is a great
problem," Mathews said. "At least we've stopped
dredging and filling in Pinellas County."
He doesn't mind telling folks how he feels
about the Constitutional amendment banning
commercial netting in Florida. It was a travesty
inflicted on unwitting voters and commercial net
fishermen, he says.
"Netters didn't hurt Florida's fishery. Loss of
habitat and sheer population growth damaged
the fishery. The people at Florida Sportsman
magazine and a lot of others are to blame for per-
petrating this hoax," Mathews said.
"They lied about what was taking place. The
television commercial with a manatee wrapped in
a net was a hoax.
"The backers of the amendment used it re-
peatedly to convince people that commercial
netters were the bad guys. What they didn't tell
people was the manatee in the net was sick and
was trapped by scientists who were going to give
it some antibiotics."
Mathews called the now-defunct Marine Fish-


r o
"- .








series Commission a joke. They were political ap-
pointees, not scientists, he said.
"They shut down the jewfish fishery, a fishery
I think was and is healthy. The Fisheries Commis-
sion shut it down on the basis of one letter from
a commercial fisherman in the Keys.
"The fishermen said he had seen a decline in
jewfish caught and that's what they based their


An angelfish
glides past a
concrete post
that serves as
his home
offshore of
Anna Maria
Island. Islander
Photo:
Courtesy of
John Stevely,
-in Fo. Florida Sea
Grant Program









decision on. No research about whether they were
endangered. Nothing. A friend of mine dove the
phosphate dock in Boca Grande recently and
counted 60 jewfish along one area of the dock."

The reason behind artificial reefs
Mathews' first experiment in reefs was based
on the primary production of algae, something
that had not been done. It was food production at
the bottom of the food chain.
His results were comparable to the amount of
algae produced on natural turtle grass beds in Boca
Ciega Bay before developers dredged it, he said.
But no one was making money in artificial
reefs. On graduation, Mathews found himself tak-
ing the worst job of his life. He was to tag sardines
for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
"Something you could teach a monkey to do.
After a year of government research I realized this
isn't what I thought it was going to be."
That's when he applied to every junior college
in Florida, at least those by the water.


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Bmj PAGE 8 K OCTOBER 13, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A triggerfish looks for dinner near a rock at Three-Mile North Reef off Anna Maria
Island. Biologist and oceanograpk HiHeyward Mathews of Clearwater is respon-
sible for Manatee County's artificial reefs as well as 150 others around the state.
Islander Photo: Courtesy of John Stevely, Florida Sea Grant Program

,.'.,



:\. .- ...





7 l




: ',~ t4-"
.. .. .-.


REEFS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7


St. Pete had an opening for a biology teacher
Sand a year later he was offering marine biology.
Years later he thought about going to one of
Florida's large universities but there were serious
obstacles.
The University of Florida only had a small lab
at Cedar Key. Mathews described it as "a joke."
The Miami area "I just couldn't tolerate" and
FSU was 40 miles from the coast. Plus at Turkey
Point reef work would have been difficult because
underwater visibility was just about zero.
Then there were the constraints of academia.
At the state's major universities, the pressure to
publish is great. "It is publish or perish" in terms
of tenure.
At the junior college level, the primary focus
was on teaching.
Clearwater won out. First, because Mathews
. was happy at St. Petersburg Junior College, a
school known for its academic excellence.
And second, because the waters off Pinellas
were ideal for what he wanted to accomplish.
Any further north the water's too shallow. At
Crystal River you go out 10 miles and you're only
in 10 feet of water. Waters south of Naples stay
murky most of the time.

Another reason Clearwater won out
"I think a number of advantages have come out
of artificial reefs," Mathews said. When I started the
SPinellas reef project it was at a time when there were
gasoline shortages and people were waiting in lines
to fill their cars let alone their boats.
"I deliberately went due west of the sea buoy
at Tarpon Springs, Dunedin, Johns Pass, Pass-a-
Grille, Blind Pass figuring that first of all the guys
with the small boats can get to these reefs easily.
"The guys with the big boats didn't really
need our help. They had the fish finders, the
books filled with good (LORAN) numbers.
"The need I saw was for the mom-and-pop
fishermen, the guy.that has a 17-foot tri-hull and
hand-held compass from K-Mart and he wants to
take his kids out on Saturday and catch anything.
"Running an odd bearing like 219 degrees is
difficult with a hand-held compass, but anybody
can run due west 270 degrees. So I deliberately
built all the reefs due west from each of the sea
buoys.
"I made all-the near-shore reefs in less than 33
feet of water so divers wouldn't have to worry
about getting the bends. We put buoys on either
end and one in the middle so they're easy to find
and you don't need GPS or LORAN as long as
you head due west.
"We also put out a map of where these reefs
were located. The first one we built off Clearwater
three miles and we went to count the number of


boats visiting.
"Just after it opened we counted more than
100 boats in one day. In Pinellas we built six reefs
three miles offshore and then we put one in
Tampa Bay off Egmont Key figuring some guys
would never go offshore then we built two 10
miles out in 50 feet of water figuring bigger boats
would want to go a little deeper. Then another 20
miles out in 75 feet of water.
"Funny thing was when I first started, the
charter boat guys wouldn't give me the time of
day. Within a year or two the charter boats would
go to these reefs if they had been offshore and
hadn't caught anything at their secret numbers."

Where to find reef numbers
Every county with an artificial reef has the
LORAN and GPS coordinates for them. In Mana-
tee, call Manatee County Environmental Depart-
ment at 742-5980.
Bait and tackle stores usually have them, too.
The state has the complete lists of numbers for
all artificial reefs in Florida. Send a check or
money order for $10 payable to the University of
Florida and the publication number which is SG-
1. The address is Florida Sea Grant, P.O. 110400,
Gainesville, FL 32611-0400.

The seed money
The first reef off Clearwater was built with
money from the Department of Natural Re-
sources, now Department of Environmental Pro-
tection.
The Florida Parks Service had what they call
the 15 percent fund. It was money from boat reg-
istrations earmarked for boat ramps and Mathews
got $48,200, but not before some arm twisting.
"We got together with the city of Clearwater
and went to Tallahassee and ask if we could get
the money for reefs and were told it was meant for
boat ramps," Mathews said. "And we said, 'Why
not a reef?' We had to go the Cabinet and I knew
the attorney general at the time and had helped
him get some environmental things shut down
and I was an expert witness for him. So I called in
a favor."
Mathews had the money to build the reef but
no way of hauling material offshore.
"Then I find out it's going to cost 530,000 or
S40,000 to lease a barge every time we wanted to
take something out there. So I contacted a local
company that could build me a barge for 518,000
and we could buy two big outboards to put on it.
"We were using tires back then for the reef.
We had to go back to the Cabinet to get approval
to buy the barge because the grant didn't allow for
capital outlay, only services. We got that ap-
proved. We convinced them by saying when
we're done with it we can give the barge to the
ranger at Caladesi State Park to get his fuel truck


back and forth.
"I hired a crew of my former students to put
down the tires. Technically I was a dollar-a-year
consultant for the city of Clearwater because I was
the supervisor of the project. I never got my dol-
lar but we did do this for two or three years."
In 1974 when state money ran out, Mathews
went to County Administrator Merritt Stierheim,
an avid fisherman.
"He just loved fishing so I convinced him
there would be a lot more fish if we could put
these reefs out there."
Mathews found a diesel-powered barge and
Stierheim said if he could get the cities to pitch in
for the barge the county would maintain the barge
and put a crew on it.
He put together a slide show and went to every
city in Pinellas to pitch the project. He got the
money. Then he convinced the county to allow him
to put the project under mosquito abatement, show-
ing them that by taking tires out of the county land-
fill it was removing a breeding ground for mosqui-
toes and allowed the county to justify the yearly ex-
pense for running the barge and project.
"We convinced the county that it was habitat
created as opposed to tons of material dumped in
the landfill," Mathews said.
Pinellas has spent about $3 million since 1974.
When other Florida counties learned of
Mathews' success in Pinellas, his phone was ringing
off the hook. He was in demand and glad to oblige.
Mathews went to Florida Sea Grant and got
them to fund the Florida Sea Grant Artificial Reef
Resource Team.
When a county requested, the team would
speak at a public meeting. When the county was
ready to start, Mathews would dive the spot.
"I would dive the spot to make sure the bot-
tom was suitable," Mathews said. "Mainly I
would stick my hand in the sand and if I could
stick it past my wrist, I knew it wouldn't work."
The procedure for finding the right place con-
tinued until the early 1980s.
Mathews would do this in his spare time, on
weekends when he wasn't teaching. They would
pay his salary, mileage and fuel.
"It's not something where I made any money.
I had my college salary, so it was no big deal.
"I did them from Fernandina Beach in just
about every inlet down to the Florida Keys then
up the other side beginning with five in Naples,
Fort Myers, Boca Grande, Sarasota, Manatee,
Pinellas, on up to Crystal River and then all the
way out to Pensacola."
There he helped place an oil rig in 180 feet of
water perhaps the most successful artificial reef.
And though the work is never done, Mathews
is proud and still vigilant about his reefs.
They're his children, but they belong to us and
the fish.


_ -t .I