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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992) ( May 26, 1999 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 26, 1999

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00784

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546

Material Information

Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Creation Date: May 26, 1999

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00784

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


IYSfA.EIR


Island Players theatergoers ticketed


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
As fast as they could write them, two Manatee
County sheriff's deputies wrote parking tickets to
theatergoers enjoying the final play of the 1999 season
at Island Players Theater.
Any laughter people got out of the comedy
"Sylvia" quickly turned to frowns when they returned
to their cars parked along the east and south sides of
Anna Maria City Hall.


Bimini Bay


inlet may be


dredged this


summer
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
After two years of preliminary work, bids are in for
dredging Bimini Bay, a joint project of the cities of
Anna Maria and Holmes Beach.
Anna Maria Public Works Superintendent Phil
Charnock said when he returns from vacation next
week, he schedule a meeting to study the bids with
Holmes Beach Public Works Superintendent Joe
Duennes; Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch Director
Suzi Fox; Manatee County Environmental Projects
Coordinator Jack Gorzeman; and engineer Bob Gause
of Zollar, Najar and Shroyer.
"We'll look at all the proposals and their methods
of getting the sand to the beach and select the most
responsible bidder," Charnock explained. "We also
have to develop a turtle protection plan."
Bids are as follows:
Henry Corporation, $232,119.80.
Duncan Seawall, $310,521.60.
Subaqueous Services, Inc., $349,069.
Ludlum Construction, $242,210.
Aztec Development, $238,355.90.
Energy Resources, $199,767.
According to Charnock, there are several methods
of getting the spoil to the 65th Street beach site where
it will be used to renourish the beach. These include
pumping it onto a parcel of land, either private prop-
erty or at Bay Front Park, and trucking it to the beach
or piping it to the beach.
"We hope to begin the project in late July,"
Charnock said.
Planning for the dredging project started in Janu-
ary 1997 and shortly after, the cities applied for a grant
to help with costs.
The cities received a $150,000 grant from the West
Coast Inland Navigational District for the dredging and
each city added $50,000 for a total of $250,000. In
addition, the cities split the cost of environmental test-
ing, engineering and permitting.
Charnock and Duennes secured a permit for the
work from the Tampa office of the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection.
Originally the dredge spoil, estimated at 11,000


Islander closed

Memorial Day
The Islander Bystander offices will be
closed Monday, May 31 in observance of Me-
morial Day.
Classified advertising deadline for the June
2 edition is 2 p.m. Saturday, May 29.


Twelve car owners were ticketed in 11 minutes,
seven of them for illegal parking, despite the fact there
were no signs saying "No Parking."
Five other people were ticketed for blocking a
driveway marked for apparent exclusive use by
sheriff's deputies despite the fact the vehicles were
pulled off the drive onto grass and none of the cars
were blocking the driveway.
Mary Ann Schmidt said she and her husband ar-
rived for the play at 7:45 p.m. and parked near the en-


trance to the city public works department on the south
side of city hall. There are no "No Parking" signs
posted at that spot.
"I found it hard to believe," Schmidt said. "It was
night. There were no city employees there who might
have needed a parking space and people arriving for the
play did. What the police did was ridiculous."
Helen White, a volunteer at Island Players, said
PLEASE SEE TICKET, NEXT PAGE


A, New look
1 k ,,t for old
S'landmark by
I Island artist
Holmes Beach's
Kip Ackerman has
,transformed the
New Pass Grill and
Bait Shop facade
into a vision of the
structure as it may
j; have looked more
-. than a century ago.
I The Tromp l'oeil
i 1 facade of the
structure was done
(.' .I over the course of
S, several months.
The shop is at City
Island just south of
New Pass and
Longboat Key.
S. ; Ackerman said the
V project "was one of
...the most rewarding
of my career."
Islander's can
check out nore of
Ackerman's work
at the Rod & Reel
7.. Pier in Anna
Maria. Islander
,. Photo: Paul Roat



Beautification board plans fundraisers


The Holmes Beach Parks and Beautification Advi-
sory Board is planning events to raise funds to con-
struct a pavilion in the area where the old city hall and
police station now stand.
The project currently has $7,000 in pledges for the
pavilion. The board must raise the remainder of the


cubic yards, was to be placed at Bay Front Park in
Anna Maria. The cities had to prove the sand was beach
compatible, and hired Ardaman and Associates Inc. of
Sarasota in May 1998 to do the testing.
In December 1998 the cities put the project out for
bid and received a surprise. Three bids came back -
$269,069, $293,388 and $320,314. All exceeded the
project cost and were rejected.
Charnock and Duennes then developed the current
plan which calls for the spoil to be trucked or pumped
to the Gulf beach in Holmes Beach. According to
Charnock, the 65th Street beach access is the most
promising candidate.
The cities then had to modify the DEP permit
showing the sand going to the Gulf and send it to the
DEP's Division of Beaches and Coastal Systems for
approval. In addition, the Army Corps of Engineers
permit was modified to show the new site and engi-
neers certified that the plan is technically feasible.


funds, or approximately $33,000.
The pavilion will have bathrooms on either side,
movable walls and a metal roof to match city hall. It can
hold 40 folding chairs or four picnic tables. The walls will
be constructed of movable acoustical panels.
Board members said they plan to ask city commis-
sioners for $3,000 from the city's beautification budget to
purchase three welcome signs for the city's entrances. The
signs will be constructed of sand-blasted, redwood.


Special hurricane

section, this issue





SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions .................... .... .............. 6
Those W ere the Days ................................... 7
Announcements ....................................... 10
ISLA ND M A P ......................... .................. 16
Streetlife ...... ......... .................... ...... 18
Anna Maria Island tides .......................... ... 22
C rossw ord puzzle......................................... 32


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


MAY 26, 1999







1] PAGE 2 M MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Turn off lights for

turtles, or face

fines, publicity
By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The first sea turtles of the season have come and
gone, leaving 13 nests full of eggs from one end of
the Island to the other.
Suzi Fox, who holds the state sea turtle conser-
vation permit for Anna Maria Island, said the nests
range from the northern tip the Island in Anna Maria
City to Coquina Beach on the southern end. There
also are several in Holmes Beach and Bradenton
Beach.
There are still problems with lights at some busi-
nesses, she said, and she gave those offenders until
June 1 to shape up. After that, Fox said she'll release
names and offenses for publication.
"They're getting in touch with us, saying they're
starting to do stuff to correct the problem," she said.
"But that's not enough it needs to be done right
now."
Mother turtles coming ashore sometimes are dis-
oriented by inshore lights, she noted, and their ba-
bies are in peril when they hatch. The hatchlings are
programmed to get into the sea quickly, attracted to
the glittering reflection of stars and moon on the
water.
But artificial lights tend to lure them inland, and
hundreds die every year under automobile tires, in
fresh-water swimming pools and in brush where they
get hung up and dehydrate.
The solution is to shield lights from visibility on
the beach, Fox said, or turn them out as most resi-
dents are doing already.
She and fellow Turtle Watch volunteers have
agreed to monitor the dredge project at Bimini Pass,
where the city of Anna Maria plans to be working for
two weeks or so. The spoil from dredging may be
trucked to the Gulf beach, which requires precise
planning to avoid endangering turtle nests.
Date of the project has not been determined, said
Fox, "but we're ready when the city is they've
been very good about getting us prepared."
The nesting is somewhat behind last year's, she
said, but that's good.
The eggs, an average 100 per nest, incubate
about 55 days in the warm sand, which puts "the
bulk of the hatch starting after the Fourth of July,"
when beaches are exceptionally crowded.


Mayor for a Day
Holmes Beach resident Bea VanWelde enjoyed being mayor of her city for a day last week. VanWelde
was escorted to city hall in style by Patrol Officer Chuck Stearns. Mayor Carol Whitmore then gave
VanWelde a tour of the city in the electric car and the pair did a bit of city business along the way.
VanWelde purchased the honorary day at the 1998 Anna Maria Island Community Center Affaire to
Remember auction. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.



Grassy Point acquisition


ongoing, but delayed


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
With time running out, Holmes Beach has asked
for an extension of the agreement under which the state
will buy Grassy Point for the city.
The Florida Communities Trust in a conceptual
agreement with the city agreed to provide $847,167 to
turn the tract into a public nature preserve similar to
Leffis Key. It is 37 acres of pristine mangrove wetlands
on Anna Maria Sound across East Bay Drive from
Publix.
The agreement will expire July 27 unless it is ex-
tended by the Trust's governing board at its meeting
June 11 and the deadline for applying for an exten-
sion was Monday, May 24,


The city was reminded of this deadline by Anne
Peery, executive director of the Trust, and City Trea-
surer Richard H. Ashley quickly wrote her on the 17th
requesting the extension. He is handling Grassy Point
for the city.
Otherwise there is little movement on the project.
Appraisals are due in early June, Peery said, and they
will have to go through a review process. Then the state
will be able to make an offer to the owners.
Owners of the original site are Nora Hames, R.L.
Davis, and Martha and Lawrence Wald. The city
later added two small adjacent properties to its ap-
plication, which were approved for inclusion. They
are owned by Josephine Frisco and the firm
Zewadski & Smith.


Tickets issues to evening
theatergoers in Anna Maria
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


ticketing playgoers is bad public relations on the part
of the city and sheriffs department.
"It's mean spirited and it stinks," White said.
"These deputies are overly militant."
Elaine Stroili also saw "Sylvia." The next thing she
saw was a ticket on her windshield.
"If I had seen a sign that said 'no parking' I
wouldn't have parked there. I live in Bradenton and
heard about the play 'Sylvia' and how good the produc-
tions were at Island Players so I came out for the first
time and I'll never be back.
"The city needs to use the money they ripped off
people who paid these no parking tickets to buy and put
up 'no parking' signs," she said.
A busy evening at the Sandbar, Bistro at Island's
End restaurant and Bortell's bar as well as an overflow
crowd at Island Players was blamed for lack of park-
ing, leading to the ticketing incident.
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard said signs at
either end of the shell drive on the east side of city hall
say "Police Only. Do Not Enter."
That means "No Parking," Shumard said. Ditto
from Sgt. Jim Tillner, supervising officer for Anna
Maria's sheriff's department patrol, who also said "Po-
lice Only" means no vehicles allowed.
Schmidt said "Police Only" does not mean no
parking. "No Parking" means no parking. She and her
husband thought "Police Only" meant that only police
could use the shell drive to pass through from Pine to
Spring Avenue.
When Anna Maria City Commissioner Max Znika


Where's the no parking sign? Islander Photo: David Futch


was asked if he thought "Police Only" meant "No Park-
ing," Znika replied "I don't know. It's a good question.
Anything has to be posted."
Shumard said one of the two deputies called him
at home to come to city hall prior to writing the tick-
ets.
"I've never seen people park back there before,"
Shumard said. "If people park back there at any time
they can be ticketed."
White said almost every time there is a perfor-
mance at Island Players people park in the same spots


where some of the people were ticketed.
Shumard said one of the cars ticketed was block-
ing the east side back door (one of two entries) to the
deputy's office and deputies could not get in the office.
When asked why deputies couldn't enter through
the main entrance to their office on the north side of the
building, Shumard said, "They don't normally bring
prisoners in the front. These officers could be out catch-
ing speeders if they didn't have to issue parking tick-
ets. You wait. We're going to put up 'No Parking'






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 3 Iln


Teens issued 11 smoking tickets


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
It breaks many hearts and even infuriates some
people to see a teenager light up. Smokers and non-
smokers alike know that tobacco is a health risk and an
addictive substance.
Kim Painter, regional coordinator for the American
Lung Association of Gulfcoast Florida, said statistics
show 80 to 90 percent of adult smokers started smok-
ing before age 21.
Laws making it illegal to smoke in many public
places, multi-million dollar lawsuits being waged
against manufactures of tobacco products and anti-to-
bacco educational campaigns have contributed to mak-
ing smoking socially unacceptable.
Despite this, many teenagers start smoking daily.
According to Painter's statistical data, each day 3,000
teenagers will smoke their first cigarette, which is
equivalent to more than 1 million teens per year. Of
those, one-third will eventually die of a smoking-re-
lated disease, she said.
According to a fact sheet on cigarette smoking issued
by the American Lung Association, cigarette advertise-
ments tend to emphasize youthful vigor, sexual attraction
and independence themes, which appeal to teenagers and
young adults struggling with these issues.
In an attempt to stop or curb teen smoking, a state
law was enacted in October 1997 that makes it illegal
for minors to smoke or possess tobacco.
Since the law came into effect, there have been 11
tickets issued Island-wide to smoking minors to date. Ten
were issued in Anna Maria and one was issued in Holmes
Beach. Bradenton Beach police have not issued a ticket to
smoking minors since the law was implemented.
Some Florida counties have a smoking court, such
as in Broward, where a pilot program is under way.
According to Director of Court Terry Turner, Manatee
County doesn't have a smoking court, but a tobacco
court is being considered here.
Anyone wishing to contest a ticket can do so in
infractions court, Turner said.
He said Director of Family Services Carl Youngs
plans to send several people to visit the smoking court


in Broward County to see how things are managed. If
the idea of a smoking court begins to take shape in
Manatee County, then it will most likely be a part of
teen court, according to Turner.
According to the law, minors who are ticketed face a
fine of $25 or 16 hours of community service and attend
a tobacco education program, if locally available.
A minor's driver license will be suspended for 30
days if he or she doesn't pay the fine on time or are issued
three tickets within 12 weeks, according to Turner.
In Manatee County, a minor is not given a choice
between a fine and community service. There is no
community service available because, according to
Turner, "there's no one to monitor the public service
work."
Minors who are caught smoking or possessing to-
bacco products are charged with a non-criminal viola-
tion. Community service is only being offered to those
charged with a misdemeanor.
Manatee County is also without a tobacco educa-
tion program. Turner said he was recently contacted by
someone from the Manatee County Health Department
who is working on starting a program.
Money is available for these programs, but it hasn't
trickled down yet or is just beginning to. Florida re-
ceived an $11 billion settlement in its case against the
tobacco companies. According to Painter, the dollars
are funneled to local health departments.
A litany of things needed to be done with the
money, and much has been accomplished, but Painter
says the process must be seen through to the end.
Ticketing minors for smoking or possession is only
one part of the process, Painter said. Smoking courts
and tobacco education courses complete the process.
But the good news is that there has been a reduc-
tion in the number of teens who start smoking, accord-
ing to Painter. She said it is nearly 20 percent. This is
due to Florida's Tobacco Pilot Program, which was
created with funds from the settlement. The late Gov.
Lawton Chiles turned a portion of the money over to
teenagers to create their own campaign against tobacco,
which they titled "The Truth Campaign."
"It has been very successful," Painter said, as teens
fight the smoking war on their own battlefield.


Anna Maria City
6/3, Commission six-month budget review,
tentative, call for time.
Anna Maria City Hall, 1005 Gulf Drive,
778-0781.
Bradenton Beach
5/27, 10 a.m., Commission work session
5/27, 1 p.m., Commission meeting
5/27, 4 to 6 p.m., Public reception for building
official
6/1, 1 p.m., Commission work session on capital
improvements
6/3, 7 p.m., Commission meeting
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
778-1005.
Holmes Beach
5/28, 9 a.m., Code Enforcement Board,
CANCELED
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
708-5800.

Of Interest
*6/1, 7 p.m., Island officials meeting on Island
wide post-disaster redevelopment plan, followed
by meeting on National Scenic Byways Program,
Holmes Beach City Hall.
S6/3, 8:30 a.m., Celebrate 2000 meeting,
Holmes Beach City Hall.

Memorial Day Closings
City offices in Anna Maria, Bradenton
Beach, Holmes Beach and Longboat Key.
Administrative office of the Anna Maria/
West Side Fire District.
Island Branch Library and
Tingley Memorial Library.
There will be no Waste Management gar-
bage collection on May 31. There will be an
alternate collection on May 29.
The Islander Bystander will be closed
Monday, May 31 in observance of Memorial
Day. The classified advertising deadline for the
June 2 issue is Saturday, May 29 at 2 p.m.


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1"M PAGE 4 K MAY 26, 1999 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Planners nix special nonconformity ordinance


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Invoking the dreaded D word for density,
Holmes Beach planning commissioners recently
voted not to recommend an ordinance creating a spe-
cial nonconformity status.
Planners said the ordinance would open the door
to density increases and does not conform to the
city's comprehensive plan.
"The planning commission understands the pre-
dicament of Holmes Beach property owners whose
properties may not meet current requirements nor be
grandfathered in," planners said in a memo to city
commissioners. "However, we cannot recommend
passing any law which would usurp the comprehen-
sive plan and land development code."
The ordinance would create a special non-con-
formity status for buildings or structures that do not
comply with the city's requirements but are not con-
sidered nonconformities.
The ordinance was the result of a problem con-
cerning the number of allowable rental units at the
Aquarius Beach Resort, 105 39th Street, which was
brought before the city commission last year.
The motel's owner, John Pace, said he has been
renting 10 units since he and his wife purchased the
property in 1991. Pace said that when he and his
wife moved from the property and their unit became
available to rent, the situation came to the city's at-
tention.
According to city research, prior to 1981 the
owner was renting nine units and was living in one,
or kept it for a manager. The 11th unit was added in
1981 and was approved by the city commission with
a stipulation that no more than 10 units be occupied.
The 1981 commission minutes state the 11th unit
was to be used as a model to promote the sale of
timeshare units. It was to be turned into a recreation
room after the original 10 units were sold.
Pace said his family, as well as all the previous
owners, have lived in the 11th unit and city officials
were well aware of the unit..
"Our attorney and the city attorney came up with


this ordinance as the most reasonable solution to the
problem," Pace said. "There's no reason I should be
penalized for being honest. Everything we have is in
that property."

Criteria
According to the ordinance, the property owner
must make application for the speci'?' 'itus and
meet specific criteria. The applicant muT show that:
He was not the owner at the time the noncom-
pliance was created and he had no knowledge of it,
or it was created without his knowledge or consent.
He has not attempted to avoid compliance.
Bringing the property into compliance will cre-
ate an undue hardship on him.
When granting the special status, the commis-
sion can impose conditions and stipulations. If the
property owner fails to comply with these, the sta-
tus can be revoked.
"My concern is the density issue," Chairman Sue
Normand said. "We're opening the dooi for anyone
who has a density issue to come forward and come
in under this ordinance. This property should have
been grandfathered."
Planner Bruce Golding said all nonconforming
properties were grandfathered when the 1989 com-
prehensive plan was passed.
"If it was legal in 1981, why isn't it legal now?"
Planner Joe Kennedy asked.
"It wasn't a legal rental unit," Pace replied.
"Herman Borstelman, the previous owner, had it in
1981. He got permission to make it model and he
was going to timeshare it. He never did anything he
said, nor did the city follow up to see that he did."
Normand noted if it was grandfathered, it would
be as 10 rental units plus a manager's quarters. How-
ever, Pace changed the status of the manager's quar-
ters from a home to a rental unit.
"The purpose of this ordinance is to permit the
latitude to allow a change [of use]," Normand noted.
"To me it sounds like a special exception use."
"I find this ordinance to be a lot of legal mumbo
jumbo," Golding said. "It's important for us to stick


to the rules and regulations that we have. They have
to be subordinate to the comp plan. The comp plan
rules everything."

Ordinance problems
Golding said the ordinance is not in compliance
with the following policies and objectives of the
comprehensive plan:
Future Land Use Element, policy 1.3.4 De-
velopment of commercial seasonal tourist facilities
within the multi-family residential seasonal tourist
land use category shall not be used as a means to
usurp the density limitations of 10 units/gross acre.
Future Land Use Element, policy 1.4.4 -
Nothing contained in this objective shall be consid-
ered to grant any legally recognized nonconforming
use privileges beyond those set forth in this compre-
hensive plan.
Coastal and Conservation Element, objective
2.2 As an ongoing objective, the city shall not
increase densities or intensities of use within the
designated coastal high hazard area.
Coastal and Conservation Element, policy
2.4.3 The building official shall ensure that the
code of ordinances reflects the coastal construction
standards embodied in the Coastal Zone Protection
Act and shall strictly enforce their implementation
through the building inspection process.
Land Development Code, III A 3 No build-
ing, structure or part thereof shall be constructed,
altered or used so as to result in a density of 5.8
dwelling units per acre in an R-1 zone and 10 dwell-
ing units per care in an R-2, R-3, A-l or PUD.
"It would appear an answer to the problem
would be to grant Mr. Pace a license to rent his cur-
rent residential unit as any homeowner might rent
his/her residence," planners noted in their memo.
"With regard to other situations where there might
be a nonlegal nonconformity, it would seem more
appropriate to seek other methods of assisting the
property owners on a case by case basis with special
use permits, variances or other creative legal op-
tions."


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 26, 1999 N PAGE 5 i[]

Remembering Adams brothers on Memorial Day


The late Gov. Lawton Chiles offered the following
praise when he was a U.S. senator.
Chiles' "Tribute to the Adams Family" was entered
in the Congressional Record on Oct. 4, 1988, during the
proceedings and debates of the 100th Congress, second
session.
"Mr. President, I would like to pay tribute today to
the Adams family of Cortez, Fla. The reason I am call-
ing attention to this one native Florida family is be-
cause all six of the brothers William H., Leon H.,
Willis H., Cleveland T., Henry C. and Clyde D. -
served overseas in the U.S. Armed Forces at the same.
time during World War II.
"William Hugh Adams, the eldest son of the fam-
ily and who is now deceased, enlisted in the Navy in
January 1942 and served for almost four years as a
boatswain's mate in the Atlantic, Europe and Africa
areas.
"Leon Harrison Adams, the second son, also now
deceased, enlisted in the Navy in June of 1942 and
served as motor machinist's mate in the Atlantic, Af-
rica and Europe areas.
"Willis Howard Adams, whom I know as
'Snooks,' was the third son. He, too, chose the U.S.
Navy. He enlisted in December 1941, before his two
older brothers, and served aboard ships in the Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans. A total of seven battle stars were
awarded to the various ships on which Snooks served.
After the war, Snooks returned to Cortez to work in his
family's fishing business. In 1954 Snooks started work-
ing for the Manatee County sheriff's office. Several
years later he was appointed chief of police of Holmes
Beach, Fla. Snooks remained as Holmes Beach chief of


Snooks Adams during his Navy days.
police until he retired in 1978. When it came to carry-
ing out his law enforcement duties, I am sure Snooks
had occasion to call upon some of that military train-
ing he received while serving in the Navy.
"The fourth son, Cleveland Thomas Adams, was


the first of the Adams brothers to join the Navy. He
enlisted in August 1940. Cleveland was at Pearl Har-
bor during the Japanese bombings of the Islands.
Cleveland remained in the Navy for more than 20
years and retired in 1960 as a gunner's mate first
class. During the time he spent in the Navy, Cleve-
land was awarded the United Nations Service Medal,
Korean Service Medal with two stars, the Purple
Heart for wounds he received in action while serv-
ing aboard the U.S. Mobile on Dec. 4, 1943, the
Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic Pacific Area Medal,
American Areas Medal and the National Defense
Service Medal.
"Henry Clayton Adams chose a different path from
his four older brothers and enlisted in the U.S. Army
in July 1942. Henry was sent to France, Algeria, Mo-
rocco and Sicily.
"The sixth brother, Clyde Dillard Adams, joined
the Army Air Force in 1942 and flew 15 combat mis-
sions over France as an air crew member. I understand
on his 15th mission his plane was shot down. He was
captured and served for nine months in a prisoner of
war camp in Germany. In 1950, during the Korean
conflict, Clyde re-enlisted in the Air Force and was sent
to Korea where he put 15 more combat missions under
his belt.
"I am told six brothers serving in the U.S. armed
forces during World War II is not quite a family record.
But it seems to me the willingness of all six brothers of
this one Florida family to voluntarily answer the call to
arms when their country needed them to fight to defend
our basic freedoms certainly exemplifies the true patri-
otic spirit on which our Nation was founded."


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He has served on a fire department advisory
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The four-year term, which began in November
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In June the Anna Maria Fire Commission will
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Mulyck, an Anna Maria resident, is a retired


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JI] PAGE 6 N MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

e -9- e;d~


After the storm
Islanders had a rude wake-up call Sept. 25, 1998,
when Hurricane Georges came calling dangerously close.
Emergency managers ordered a total evacuation of
Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key, and other barrier is-
lands in Southwest Florida. Here, the order was followed
nearly to the letter, with an estimated 90-plus percent of
Anna Maria residents packing their bags, stuffing their
trunks with canned goods, and leaving the Island to stay
with mainland friends or at shelters.
Good for us.
Good for us for having the foresight to realize that our
lives are more valuable than our possessions. We made the
correct decision to evacuate.
And good for us that Hurricane Georges was a false
alarm. We were inconvenienced for a day or so, but were
able to come home to an intact, although damp, Island.
Let's talk about what would have happened if things
had turned out differently and the Island was "less than
intact" in Georges wake.
First, it would have been days, if not weeks, before
you would be allowed back on the Island. Figuring you
were going to stay with friends on the mainland, and want-
ing to be a good host, you probably brought some food
with you. Your friends have some food, too.
Have you got enough to eat and drink for all of you
for a week or more? Three meals and at least a gallon of
water per person per day? For what could be weeks?
Let's say the power is off for a few days at your main-
land refuge. No power means no refrigerator. Or lights. Or
cable TV. Or air conditioning. Maybe no phone.
Think about the last time you spent three for four days
without air conditioning in August.
Eventually, you're able to get back to the Island to
find the house is in pretty good shape, except for a bunch
of broken windows and a flooded carpet. You still don't
have any power, though, nor water, sewer, phone, or any
of the other utilities we take for granted. Emergency man-
agers strongly discourage you from staying on the Island
and tell you it may be a month or more before all services
are back in operation.
Wheie do you go then? What do you do?
Or what if you're not as lucky as some, and you find
your house is.pretty much in shambles? Your insurance
claim is filed quickly, and you can expect a quick response
and check, but it's still months and months before you can
get your house fixed. If the damage is extreme, federal
laws may require you to tear down what's left and start
over in compliance with new regulations.
Again, where do you go? What to do?
We tend to focus on hurricane preparation and all the
problems with getting ready for a storm. Think for a while
about what you'll do after "the big one" passes because
that takes planning, too.


ISLANDER! S' I
MAY 26, 1999 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 28
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Futch
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Pat Copeland
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Susan K. Kesselring
V Contributors
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Cynthia Finn
Mary Fulford Green
Capt. Mike Heistand
Charmaine Engelsman-Robins
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Rebecca Barnett
Kim Durocher
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Tracey Powers
V Production Graphics
Carrie Price
Elaine Stroili
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster

r L 14995-99 %
W Aardw inning


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1999 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@packet.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan

ILZ- *- e~


Prayer thanks
I would like to take this way of thanking the City
of Holmes Beach for providing the setting for our
World Day of Prayer gathering, the island pastors for
participating and planning the program and The Is-
lander Bystander for its publicity.
We were gratified by the turnout, which provided
us an opportunity to give thanks for our freedom, for
our country and to ask for continued guidance in a
world of strife.
Robert A. Meylan, president,
All Island Denominations
Great fun, great day
Little League Funday was a great success and a
good time was had by all.
It couldn't have happened without the support
and generosity of so many people. We'd like to
thank so many, including the Sandbar, Budweiser,
Marco Polo's Pizza and Ice Cream, the Bistro's,
AMI Science Camp, Rod & Reel Pier, Key West
Willy's, Dips Ice Cream, Tammy Fitzgerald, Anne
Marie Schurina and the Schafers.
Many thanks to the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center for allowing us to hold Funday on the
grounds and the field.
To all the kids, parents and members of the commu-
nity who attended Funday, we thank you for your support
and look forward to seeing you all there next year.
Lori Guerin, secretary, on behalf of the
Anna Maria Little League Board of Directors

Quit it, smokers
I can't believe it. Millions of dollars are being spent
for anti-smoking ads targeted at teen-agers. This is a
national campaign to make our youth aware of the dan-
gers of smoking.
When attending Little League games at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center I am shocked to see
the adults who attend the game smoking. Smoking isn't
allowed at major league games, only in the designated
areas outside the stadium.
Come on, let's set a good example for our youth,
or are you going to let your kids smoke too?
Marilyn Kowak, Anna Maria


Come back, John Brown
In response to the letter of George Whelpley, Anna
Maria (Islander Bystander, May 5):
I live in Holmes Beach and have done so for a sig-
nificant number of years.
I am sarcastically in favor of your notion of a resi-
dency requirement of five years [for commission can-
didates] and a poll tax.
Perhaps if we all prayed hard enough we could
resurrect John Brown. We would have one heck of a
story to sell to the AP or UPI.
Is there something wrong with me, or is the gen-
eral populace of this country going mad?
Thank God for the rational yet humorous thoughts of
Mr. Whelpley. There, but for the grace of God, go I.
Thomas W. Wright, Holmes Beach

Support appreciated
My family and myself want to thank friends and
neighbors and our clients of J.R. Painting since the
untimely death of Joe. I don't know how I would
have gotten through such a hard time without their
support.
I hope to be able to continue with the business
we had on Anna Maria Island for eight years. If I
didn't live on this Island with these wonderful
people, I wouldn't be able to make it. The people
here are grand.
Irene Roidt, Anna Maria

Thank you, Alice
Picture this: The mayor resigns, along with two
council members and the city clerk. The office records
go with the mayor.
This is what then-deputy clerk Alice Baird faced
when she came to work many years ago. She had to
start from scratch.
Times were tumultuous then in Bradenton Beach,
to say the least. She, more than anyone else, kept the
city together.
I've said this before, that the city clerks are the
executive directors of our cities.
God bless you, Alice, and Godspeed for your
new life.
Former Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 7 KM


THOSE WERE THE IAYS
SPart 13, Conclusion, The Bean/Hall Story
by June Alder



















The five Hall daughters (from left) Miriam, Luella, Edith and Bertha with
brother Clarence in 1907.


A NEW LIFE BEGINS


The rosy glow of sunset was just be-
ginning to wash over the September sky
when Mary Bean Hall and her husband
Wilbur alighted from the steamer
Mistletoe at her father's Anna Maria Is-
land dock.
It was at his urgent sickbed request.
that they had come to take charge of his
homestead. No sooner had they arrived
when Mamie, walking up the beach to
the house, suddenly doubled over in
pain. Wilbur had to carry her in his arms
the rest of the way.
It was apparent that Mamie was
close to giving birth to her second child.
Their nearest neighbors lived more
than a mile away. Wilbur could not risk
taking Mamie down in the wagon in the
darkness along the bumpy track through
the jungle. And Wilbur feared to leave
Mamie and their 11-month-old daughter
alone while he went for help.
There was a tent hospital on Egmont
Key filled with sick soldiers from the
summer war in Cuba. But it was out of
the question to subject Mamie to the
rough channel crossing.
Wilbur was mightily worried. This
child was arriving two months prema-
turely. It would have little chance of
surviving in this wilderness, Wilbur
thought. And as young and healthy as
Mamie was, what if she Wilbur
couldn't bear to think of it.
But Mamie remained calm. She
knew her father had a big medical
manual on his book shelf she had
often paged through it. It had instruc-
tions, with pictures, on how to deliver a
. .-_


baby.
She had faith in the Lord and in
her husband.
So the couple grasped hands and
Wilbur prayed a fervent prayer to
which Mamie said amen, after which
he went to get the manual. And after
hours of pain and more prayer, Wilbur
- praise the Lord safely delivered
Mamie's tiny five-pound girl Bertha.
(She was the second settler's child born
on the Island. Anna Maria Cobb was
the first.)
Bertha survived the night. And the
next day, and the next. A week passed.
Wilbur rejoiced at how well Mamie
and the baby were doing.
Then the Mistletoe stopped to de-
liver a message from Edith and Lula.
Their father had passed away on Sept.
3, 1898, two days after his granddaugh-
ter entered the world in the Island cabin
he'd loved so dearly.
It had been George Bean's request,
lying paralyzed on his hospital bed in
Tampa, that Mamie and Wilbur remain
on the homestead. Now they were torn
between their duty to him and their
duty to God and the Salvation Army.
After much prayer, the couple decided
to ask for a leave of absence from the
Army in order to "prove up" Bean's
claim to 124 acres.
This was accomplished a year
later, on Sept. 7, 1899.
By that time the Halls had a third
daughter, Miriam, delivered by Mana-
tee pioneer Dr. J.B. Leffingwell at Fort
Dade. Another girl, Luella, and a boy,
Clarence, arrived in rapid order. One
more son died in infancy and was bur-
ied on the Island.
The years rolled by until 1907
when the Halls moved to Tampa to get
proper schooling for their youngsters.
Eventually they were able to return to
Salvation Army duty.
Wilbur was "promoted to glory" in
1944 at the age of 81. Mamie died in
1971 at '94, having lived out her final
decade on the Island.
Miriam, the last surviving Hall
child who'd been a Salvation Army
officer before she married a Navy man
- died on Feb. 19, 1999, 15 days be-
fore her 99th birthday.

Next: A Soldier's
Story, Part 1


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ja PAGE 8 0 MAY 26, 1999 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Commission to lighten up on outdoor dining


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Although none of the city's restaurants have applied
for outdoor dining privileges, Holmes Beach city commis-
sioners last week agreed to ease up its requirements.
The 1997 outdoor dining ordinance, including a 1998
amendment to allow the serving of alcoholic beverages
outdoors, was returned to commissioners because it was
passed without proper notice. Commissioners then began
to question the ordinance's provisions.
According to the present ordinance, restaurants
must adhere to the following criteria to allow outdoor
dining:
The present allowable capacity of the restaurant
shall not be increased.
Within one hour of the restaurant's closing, all
tables must be brought indoors unless they are an-
chored.
Physical barriers that block public access are pro-
hibited.
Outdoor entertainment, loudspeakers and an-
nouncement systems are prohibited.
Outdoor areas adjacent to residential zoning must
be buffered.
The amended version allowing alcohol to be served
includes these additional criteria:
Alcohol cannot be served between the hours of 10
p.m. and noon.
More than 51 percent of the restaurant's gross
sales must be from food or non-alcoholic beverages.
A minimum of $5 worth of food or non-alcoholic
beverages must be purchased at each outdoor dining table.
Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger asked why out-
door diners must purchase $5 in food in order to drink
an alcoholic beverage.
"The public asked us not to allow them to sit out-
side and drink beer all afternoon," Mayor Carol
Whitmore replied.
Commissioner Don Maloney said the requirement
was a major consideration in getting the ordinance passed.
"What if I want to sit outside and have a drink
while I'm waiting for a table inside?" Bohnenberger
asked. "Do I have to order $5 worth of food? What if
I want to have an after-dinner drink outside?"
Bohnenberger then questioned the restriction on
increasing the restaurant's capacity.
"If the restaurant has parking available, why not let
owners increase their capacity?' Bohnenberger asked.


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Whitmore said she concurred on the parking.
Chairman Roger Lutz agreed and added, "My
theory is called the Manhattan Theory. If you want to
open a restaurant with no parking spaces and think you
can make a go of it, you're welcome to do it. If your
customers park illegally, they get ticketed or towed. I
don't think the city has any business counting parking
places or telling anyone what percentage of food or
drink their customers have to order."
Bohnenberger also questioned the requirement to
bring tables in at night.
"This is silly because there are plenty of businesses

^---FX


that are not restaurants that have outdoor furniture, the
city has benches and bike racks and I have outdoor fur-
niture," Bohnenberger noted. "No one else has to bring
their furniture in at night.
"I don't understand why we're putting this extra
onus on restaurants because they serve food on a patio.
If we pick arbitrary rules without some basis, I'm un-
comfortable with that. There are so many flaws in this
ordinance."
Lutz instructed Whitmore to draft an outdoor din-
ing ordinance that addresses commissioners' concerns
for discussion at a June work session.


Officers learn to save lives with defibrillators
Holmes Beach Patrol Officers Eric Kuusela and Vern McGowan learn how to use automatic external
defibrillators to help save lives of victims of cardiac arrest. In February, the city received an $11,000 dona-
tion forfour defibrillators for police cars. The donation was "a gift from a Key Royale resident in memory of
his spouse, according to Police Chief Jay Romine, who said the donor wished to remain anonymous. Ron
Gales, a Holmes Beach reserve officer, North River firefighter and an AED and CPR instructor, provided
training. He explained that when a person goes into cardiac arrest, the heart goes into ventricular fibrillation
and begins quivering like a bowl of jelly. The defibrillator analyzes the patients heart rhythms and tells the
operator whether a shock should be administered. It also delivers the electric shock to the heart muscle, which
corrects the imbalance in the rhythm. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 9 19


Commission to negotiate new cable agreement


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach residents should tune in to impend-
ing franchise negotiations with Time Warner Commu-
nications, Commission Chairman Roger Lutz said last
week.
With myriad new services and regulations not cov-
ered by the city's franchise agreement drafted 20 years
ago, Holmes Beach and Time Warner officials are
working on a new agreement.
Gregory Porges, attorney for Time Warner, ex-
plained that in February 1997 the company sent then-
Mayor Bob VanWagoner a notice that the franchise
agreement would expire in February 2000. The com-
pany requested that the city begin renewal proceedings,
but the mayor never followed up on the letter.
"That notice is mandated by the communications
act of 1992," Porges explained. "It states that 36
months prior to the expiration of a franchise, either the
city or the franchisee can give notice of intent to seek
renewal. If the franchisee gives notice, the city has six
months to make a study, give criticism, do a needs as-
sessment relative to cable television in the community.
That six-month period expired in August 1997."


Anna Maria jeweler/artist Autumn DeFrank
has added seven solid awards to her growing
list of honors, four at Melbourne and three at
Lakeland.
At the Melbourne Art Festival, she won Pa-
trons Awards for two abstract pieces of glass and
colored stone, one large gold pendant she's still
finishing, and one abstract pendant with opals.
The awards are sponsored by the founders
of the Melbourne Museum of Art and the juried
art show where DeFrank exhibited. She noted
that the artworks were "new designs based on
works I did for the Smithsonian Institution


Porges said Time Warner has developed a com-
parison schedule of the current and proposed agree-
ments for city commissioners to study.
"I was hoping the city could make some money
from franchise fees, but by federal law the maximum
they can charge is five percent," Mayor Carol
Whitmore noted.
"Under the cable act, the franchise fee is limited to
five percent of the gross revenue," Porges added. "At
the present time, you are collecting four percent. The
franchise fee is not something the cable company pays
out of its own pocket. It is passed through to the cus-
tomer. It is collected by the cable company and remit-
ted to the city."
Whitmore asked what if another cable company
would want to provide service to city residents.
"This is not a non-exclusive franchise," Porges
replied. "If another cable provider wanted to come in,
they could do it. We have every interest in delivering
the best service we can to make it less interesting for
another company."
Commissioner Don Maloney asked if the city
would share in the receipts of the company's coming
Internet service named Road Runner.


some years ago, recycled and improved."
At Lakeland, she won three Collectors Club
awards from the Mayfaire by the Lake show pre-
sented by the Lakeland Museum of Art. Those
pieces were an abstract, a gold ring and a large
fish, she said.
Her next show will be a four-day juried event
June 17-20 on the boardwalk at Virginia Beach,
Va.
DeFrank and her husband Richard operate
Autumn's Whims and Fine Things gallery at 217
Pine Ave. in Anna Maria City, where, she said,
she is well into her seventh year on the Island.


"It will be billed as a cable service and it will be
subject to the franchise fee," Porges replied.
Resident Joan Perry asked commissioners not to
rush into an agreement.
"The city has more homework to do," Perry noted.
"This should be the beginning of long series of meet-
ings. I don't like to see a vendor-proposed ordinance,
but it's good to put on the table and start from."
Lutz asked Perry to state her two biggest concerns.
She said they are how commissioners define cable
services and that commissioners understand the com-
plex technology involved in providing those services.
"The present uses are a small part of the system's
capacity and the future uses are immense," resident
Jerry Perry said. "Will the city receive the maximum
amount of the revenues from these future uses?"
Porges said while the uses are myriad, "they are
defined and only certain uses can be made within the
cable system. Anything that occurs within that tier will
be subject to franchise fees."
Commissioner Rich Bohnenberger suggested that
commissioners study the information provided by
Time Warner and schedule a work session to discuss
it.



Temps
:^-^' A'^---
& Drops

on A.M.I.


Date Low High Rainfall
May 16 68 88 0
May 17 70 90 0
May 18 71 87 0
May 19 73 90 0
May 20 72 91 0
May 21 73 92 0
May 22 74 91 0
Average Gulf water temperature 82




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TIe r.usic a Jl fuh is e1|Jless
Sitl food a~td dritk, you'll see.
Tll ll your ftriqds to coe a slore
for & lifeti ire,, -,hrory!
n To joih tkis Gr&teful Gktlcrity
5 tLere is o'te tlih7 you tust Jo,
ple2as buy a skirt 2ad a cup,
&Jd we'll tirowv tkL best party for you!
STk,, fhcs you'll see ,re friendly
Notkih7 left to do but s.ile
tkL ohly place wluer tkis could LAppet
is HERE ON GILLIGAN'S ISLE! -/


q ANOTHER BIG
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SEE YOU TUESDAY. ^q H




"Super Tuesday"



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--

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Largest Selection of Highest-Quality Vitamins
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-e


Merllla's new WhileBay II i
cabinetry is the ideal : I.
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sions, all while maintaining its bright appearance.The traditional
raised panel, full overlay doors feature sharper profiles for a
more upscale look. And because they're available in squared
and arched models, you have more design options to truly make
your kitchen your own. All at the same value you've come to
expect from Merillat.


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ji PAGE 10 0 MAY 26, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I ^ANNOUNCEMENTSI


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MATRIX i
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778-2586 5376 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Cortezians installed
by yacht club
Bernard and Doris White of Cortez were installed
as commodore and secretary, respectively, of the Sun
Coast Yacht Club at its "change of watch" banquet in
Venice.
Others installed were Forrest Crawford of Siesta
Key, vice commodore; Leonard Dietch of Longboat
Key, rear commodore, race; Newell Masengale of
Bradenton, rear commodore, cruise; and Jack Miller of
Siesta Key, treasurer.
The club is made up of cruising sailboat owners.
Information may be obtained at 798-3887.
'Storybook Playhouses'
open at Selby
The summer-long "Storybook Playhouses at the
Gardens," with five playhouses for youngsters, will
open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 29, at Selby
Gardens, 811 S. Palm Ave., Sarasota.
The playhouses representing five children's stories
were built by local builders and painted by student art-
ists from five high schools. One house will be perma-
nent at Selby, one will be given away at a drawing Sept.
4, the remaining three will be given to the Boys and
Girls Clubs of Sarasota County Inc., beneficiary of the
summer program.
Leadership Manatee
deadline Friday
The deadline is Friday, May 28, for applications to
participate in the 1999-2000 edition of Leadership
Manatee, sponsored by the Manatee Chamber of Com-
merce for the 17th year.
The program is to expose leaders to "all aspects of
Manatee County and the important issues facing our
community" through lectures, discussions and field
trips. Applications and information may be obtained at
748-4842 ext. 131.

Honor for Islander
Maria C. Perinetti, daughter of Robert and Cynthia
Perinetti of Anna Maria City, has been inducted into
the Mercyhurst College honors program based on tests,
grades and class rank. She is a freshman in political
science and plans to be an attorney. She is a 1998
Manatee High School graduate. Mercyhurst is a Catho-
lic liberal arts college with an enrollment of 2,835 in
Erie, Pa.




Realty raves
Barbara and Don Penney were tops in both listing
properties and selling them out of the Holmes Beach
office of Wedebrock Real Estate Co. during April, the
company announced.
Other top listers were John Hines, Longboat Key;
Jennifer Mayforth and Paul Glock, Cortez Road office.
Other top sellers were Lynda Melnick, Longboat Key;
Rob and Randy Walker, Avenue of the Flowers; Rob-
ert St. Jean, Cortez Road. Jim Foster was top lister and
seller for the commercial division.
David Moynihan listed more properties and sold
more for Wagner Realty at its Anna Maria Island of-
fice during April, the firm announced. Other top list-
ers were Nancy Allen of the Manatee Avenue office,
Paul Martin of Cortez and Mary Wickersham and
Cindy English of Longboat Key. Other Wagner agents
who topped the selling honors were Sarah Jackson,
Manatee Avenue; Bob Wolter, Cortez; and
Wickersham and English, Longboat.
At Island Real Estate, 6101 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, Wendy Kay Foldes was top sales agent and
Alan Galletto and Frank Davis were top listers for
April.
Tom and Kitty Frost emerged as top listing agents
in April for the Anna Maria Island office of Coldwell
Banker Residential Real Estate Inc. Top lister for the
Longboat Key office was Judy Kepecz.
Leading salespersons for the month in open trans-
actions, or listings sold and buyer-controlled sales,
were Rose Schnoerr of Anna Maria and Cheryl
Loeffler of Longboat. Tops in closed transactions were
Laura McGeary for Anna Maria and Barbara
Ackerman for Longboa:.


-. K


4


Excellent
Starloe Galletta, formerly of Holmes Beach, was one
of three statewide winners of the Excellence in
Service award from the Florida Office of Collegiate
Volunteerism. The Manatee Community College
graduating sophomore gets $1,000, as well as letters
from President Bill Clinton, Governor Jeb Bush and
Bradenton Mayor Bill Evers.


Graduate
Patrick W. Ryskamp has graduated cum laudefrom
Stetson University College of Law. The son of Bill
and Sara Ryskamp of Holmes Beach and Brussels,
Belgium, he will join the Sarasota law firm Williams,
Parker, Harrison, Deitz and Getzen in September.


New lawyer
Jason Michael DePaola of Holmes Beach has
earned a juris doctor degree from the Florida State
University College of Law. He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph DePaola. He is with the firm of Harllee,
Porges. Hamlin, Knowles, Bald & Prouty P.A. of
Bradenton.


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A RN "everything for the beach"
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Inflatables Kites Hats Much more


10% OFF ANY PURCHASE
with this ad
Wide selection of Panama Jack Hats, Sunglasses,
Clothing & Suntan Products. Unusual Gifts & Novelties.
200 Gulf Dr. So. Bradenton Beach (Just north of Coquina Beach)


Huge Selection of Banners,
Windsocks, and Wind Chimes for
all seasons... Wind Toys too!
Knowledgeable kite sales and ser-
vice including parts and repairs
1400 sq. ft. of "FUN STUFF"
5364 GULF DRIVE S&S PLAZA HOLMES BEACH


L


AM6






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MAY 26, 1999 E PAGE 11 IL


A wonderful deal for anywhere


... especially on Longboat Key


By Jim Hanson
Islander Reporter
For Sale: Home on Longboat Key, property Gulf
to bay, beach, yacht moorage, 2 br/2 ba, $15,000.
No lie. It's true. All that for 15 thou. And neighbors
who care, whose unanimous description of their place
on the key is "friendly."
They live in the two mobile home parks at mid-
key, Twin Shores and the larger Gulfshore of Longboat
Key. They are among the happiest people on the island,
and make no apologies for living in a mobile home
park on an island where a million-dollar home isn't all
that much.
Indeed, many of them could live anywhere they
wish, and they choose their mobile homes among
people they like. Many own highly livable property
elsewhere, and some own condos on Longboat. They
just don't want to live in them.
The location could hardly be more pleasing. The
beach and the sea are just across Gulf of Mexico Drive
from the parks, and each has a private section of beach.
Sarasota Bay is at the other end of the properties, and
each has a boat basin with some sheltered moorage.
They were grandfathered-in when Longboat be-
came a town in 1955. No mobile home has been per-
mitted on the island since, other than in the park. None
ever will be, on this upscale and carefully maintained
island enclave.
Still, most residents say they've never encountered
any uppishness on the part of their fellow islanders who
live in more elegant quarters.
Gulfshore is the elder, celebrating its 50th birthday
last year. It has 178 units, with a 37-slip boat moorage.
Twin Shores next door is just a tad younger, with 88
homes and room for 24 boats.
Tom Jerkins and two other men built Gulfshore in
1948 when there was nothing but a shell road along the
beach and, their records indicate, 17 residences on the
rest of the key. Three years later Twin Shores was com-
pleted.
The parks' development has been virtually paral-
lel over the years, as has their occupancy: 100 percent.
Originally the residents towed trailers in and spent
winters in them, leaving in the spring along with the
trailers. That evolved into permanent mobile homes on




COI)RTEZ

CC)ON1NECTI ONS

By Mary Fulford Green


What a wonderful time
My feeling is, I can't believe the Cortez Natives
Picnic was so wonderful."
To the delight of everyone, the location at the his-
toric Fulford Fish.Co.'s dock was perfect. Natives
came from far and wide.
There was food, food, food, but all I choose to re-
member is the fried mullet, cooked to perfection by our
own Kenny Kight and his wife Atlas. The fish was
donated by Bell Fish Co.
There is nothing, at least no seafood, as good as
mullet cooked the way we do in Cortez. Someday,
yes, someday our fishermen will again be permitted
to use gill nets to harvest this delectable fish for all
to eat.
It's not fair that so many Floridians are being de-
nied this fresh fish for food. Recently, Alcee Taylor
was sharing the route he traveled as he "peddled"
fish to many little markets up and down the length
and breadth of Florida. I just wish we could invite all
of them to Cortez for the "world's largest fish fry"
and let them enjoy such a feast just one more
time.
The highlight of the picnic was the impromptu
performance by our beloved "Goose" Culbreath and his
nephew Richard, of the Cortez Grand 01' Opry. Added
attractions included dancers, who gave us quite a show.
We always knew we had such talent and it makes
me hope that when we get the schoolhouse we can host


small plots of ground rented from the park's owners.
Now the residents own the land, too, through coopera-
tives.
Gulfshore led the way there, its residents buying
the park through their cooperative three years ago.
Twin Shores followed somewhat more than a year ago.
Now most residents own shares equal to the value of
the land they occupy, from $35,000 to $49,000, and
have a 99-year lease. Like most of Longboat Key, the
land is worth more than the structures on it.
Some lots are still rented, bringing from $300 to
$380 a month to the cooperatives. That $15,000 mobile
home's owner will pay $320 a month rent, or buy the
land. Its current owner, Joanne Cochrane, is selling be-
cause she lives in her other unit in Twin Shores.
Like everyone else who lives there, she lives there
because of people.
"Everyone pitches in," said Monica Durand, Twin
Shores resident manager.
"It's the feeling of friendliness here, the feeling of
family," said Pat Howatt, Gulfshore president of the
Gulfshore cooperative. "It's easy living. Purely pleasant."
For Earle Ewert, it's quite clear. A retired hardware
distributor from Illinois, he has owned in Twin Shores
since 1969 and moved there permanently in 1985. He
plans to stay in his six-room triple-wide as long as he
lives.
"It's where I'm at," he said. "Sure, maybe some
Longboat people look down on us, that's up to them.
In this life, it's whatever you care for."
The two parks have no problems with each other.
Residents make trips together, party together, celebrate
holidays together. And they share the outlook.
"It's a feeling of community," said Louise Nelson,
who retired last year after 12 years as Gulfshore's man-
ager. "We look after each other if you're not up and
around by 10 o'clock, a neighbor wants to know why.
Not nosy, just being sure you're okay.
"It's the next best thing to heaven until you get
there."
As Durand of Twin Shores put it, "We're like an
extended family. The people are just exceptional."
They'd better be, for they live quite close to each
other. It's cozy, but if your neighbor is also your bud,
that's just dandy.


an old-fashioned square dance where all can shake a leg
to the Culbreath family music, which has been heard in
Cortez for more than 75 years.
Some special guests were Mayor and Mrs. Bill
Evers. I'm sorry that Cortez can't be annexed by
Bradenton. That way, maybe we'd get some DDA
funds to develop our downtown. Bill is a native son and
we always get great support from him and Jane.
Cortezians are preparing for the first group to ar-
rive from the Teachers Project, a program of the
Florida Humanities Council. The first visit will be June
22 and additional groups will be visiting in the fall. The
theme is "Florida as Home."
We'll be telling all, as to what it was like back
then. Alcee will open up his home the Taylor
Boatworks Museum. Lunch will be at the dock restau-
rant of Star Fish Company where Blue Fulford and his
grandmother, Sallie Adams Fulford (actually my im-
personation of her), will share memories of family and
Cortez as home long ago. Also included, a visit to
Linda Molto's home and studio.
Some day the 1912 schoolhouse will be the site of
many such visits as we share our heritage with visitors
and residents alike.
Persons interested in helping with the Fishing
Museum and donations of artifacts, including home-
made wooden poling oars, collections of mending
needles, ice hooks, etc., are needed. We are most anx-
ious for our Florida Institue of Saltwater Heritage to get
started.
In the meantime, we offer for sale our three books
and a video, "Tales of Cortez." The Historical Society
does not have a store, so we rely on the U.S. postmas-
ter to deliver purchases. Call me at 756-3784 for more
details or to place your order.
The next social event in Cortez will be the June
celebration of the 88th birthday of our most gracious
Cortezian, Ruth Mora Culbreath our oldest native.
Happy birthday Ruthie.We love you.


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Open Memorial Day 10-3PM





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Island Shopping Center
5418 Marina Drve, Holmes Beach 778-2169
Open Mon Sat 10am to 6pm Sun 1Oam to 5pm







IIf] PAGE 12 0 MAY 26, 1999 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Fire commissioners to develop new tax method


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria/West Side fire commissioners last
week wrestled with developing a new tax structure for
the merging districts.
Commissioners of the two districts, which plan to
merge next year if the move is approved by state leg-
islators, must develop a tax structure for the new dis-
trict. In addition, they must develop a new five-year


plan of tax increases, which must also be approved by
state legislators.
"I've been working on a single tax rate that will
allow for adding personnel and for growth in the de-
partment," Fire Chief Andy Price explained. "I've done
a very simple calculation based on the current rates and
tried to project five years ahead, which is actually seven
years from now."
Price said his tentative plan calls for adding one


Officers and board members elected
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society elected the following officers and directors for 1999-2000: Jim
Kissick, director; Pat Copeland, recording secretary; Sinclair Stewart, director; George McKay, treasurer;
Marguerite Thompson, president; Carolyne Norwood, director; Max Willeson, vice president; Paula Tripp,
corresponding secretary; Martha Stewart, assistant treasurer; and John Deam, director.


Financial Planning & Investment Services

Michael D. Brusso
Financial Advisor
Morgan Stanley Dean Witter
1401 Manatee Avenue West, Suite 1110
Bradenton, FL 34205
MORGAN STANLEY DEAN WITTER
(800) 488-8420 (941) 714-7917
Morgan Stanley Dean Witier is a service mark of Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co. and services
are offered through Dean Witter Reynolds Inc., member SPIC. Dean Witer Reynolds Inc.



ALL ISLAND

PROMISE KEEPERS
For men of all ages
Thurs., May 27, 7PM
Island Baptist Church

Praise music
by Charlie Hahn

Dr. Billy Daws
will speak on
"Why Men Don't Talk"



The family of M. Craig Stephens
wishes to share their gratitude and
sincere thanks to:
Ken and Margaret Kelley
Dennis and Tina Schavey
Dave and Sandy Austin
Brain Schultz and family
Marina Bay and Guy Lococo
Along with all of their friends and the
community that have been so support-
ing of our needs during Craig's illness
and now through our time of loss.
Chris and Craig


Improved the/ Qacdty
of Your Life'
Carol Greer Stemwako-
M.A. Counseling Psychology
National Certification #00740 ,
Perico Island, Bradenton
(941) 794-1492


firefighter per station per shift in the first year of the
five-year plan. This will give each station three full-
time firefighters per shift.
"Then I added a general increase of about five per-
cent per year for the normal increase in the cost of do-
ing business," Price said.
For the first year of operation, 2000-2001, Price
said the merging districts will need about $3.3 million
if 10 firefighters are added. The 1998-99 combined
budget is $2,473,970 and the proposed 1999-00 com-
bined budget is $2,597,668.
"This is a work in progress," Anna Maria Fire
Commission Chairman Larry Tyler told the board. "It
is not cast in stone but we have to start somewhere."
Commissioners plan to have the budget and five-
year plan, as well as any other required paperwork,
ready to present to residents at public hearings in the
fall. The material will be presented to the local legis-
lative delegation in December and the delegation will
hold its public hearing on the issue in January 2000.
If the merger is approved by state legislators in
March 2000, the boards will begin meeting as the West
Manatee Fire District in May 2000 and set the tax rate
for the 2000-01 fiscal year. Election of commissioners
for the new district will be held during the general elec-
tion in November 2000.
Commissioners also instructed Price to proceed
with the selection of a new deputy fire chief to replace
Jay Pinkley, who is returning to firefighting. Price said
he is seeking a replacement "with the ability to move
the department into the future" and will announce his
selection within the next week.
Price announced that firefighter Ron Fincher has
accepted a position with the Sarasota County Fire-Res-
cue and that Pinkley will replace Fincher. He said Fire'
Inspector Mark Fultz has accepted a position with
Longboat Key Fire-Rescue.
PLEASE SEE TAX, NEXT PAGE




Walk-In's Welcome Open 7 days .7:30am 8pm
Available to tend to your urgent care needs:
Fever / Infections Minor Lacerations
Simple Fractures Sprains
PINNACLE MEDICAL CENTER
315 75th Street West Bradenton
941-761-1616


LongBooat isLaoo chapeL
An Interfaith Community Church
Rev. Cleda Anderson. Minister
9 am: Adult Bible Study
Conference Room Upstairs
Thurs., May 23
10 am: Service in the Sanctuary
with Rev. Cleda Anderson i N
GUEST SPEAKER
5/30 Rev. Chas. Jim Marsh
383-6491
6200 Gulf of Mexico Drive



FRESH MULLET SALE


4ore than a mullet wrapper!






ISLANDER EI

FRESH MULLET T-SHIRTS
AND TANK TOPS -$10

Mail order add $3 for postage and handling.
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
941-778-7978 Fax 778-9392


Stephen G. Gloria J. Scott L.
Pelham, M.D. Fischer, M.D. Kosfeld, M.D.
--------------~ .; --------
Island Family Physicians
Providing complete family care Accepting new patients
Now accepting Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida,
Health Options and CCN Health Network.
3909 East Bay Drive #100, 778-1007


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 13 I]


TAX, FROM PAGE 12

He asked the board to consider hiring a civilian
inspector with civilian pay to replace Fultz.
"This will enable us to get a person who is not a
firefighter, so he won't be participating in firefighting
activities and can concentrate on inspections," Price
noted.
Battalion Chief Brett Pollock announced that the
West Side district received a hazard mitigation grant of
$38,411 from the state to replace and reinforce shutters
and bay doors at Station 4, 407 67th Street W.,
Bradenton. Pollock said the original estimate for the
work was $47,541, but the state removed the proposed
upgrades on electric for the station's generator.
Price said the money for the generator upgrade was
set aside in the current budget and West Side commis-
sioners voted to approve the work.
Commissioners separately approved their 1999-
2000 tax rates. Until the districts can officially merge
and establish a five-year plan for tax increases, they are
bound by the requirements of the Uniform Fire District
Act. The act limits any increase to the average annual
growth rate in personal income over the previous five
years, currently five percent.
Anna Maria increases are as follows with the 1998-
99 rates in parentheses:
Residential, condominium and mobile homes -
$68.25 ($65) base rate plus $.02525 (.05) per 1,000
square feet.
Duplex $136.50 ($130) base rate plus $.02525
(.05) per 1,000 square feet.
Travel trailers and mixed residential $55
($52.50).
Commercial $157.50 base rate ($150) plus
$.02525 (.05) per 1,000 square feet.
Vacant lot $4 ($4).
West Side increases are as follows with the 1998-
99 rates in parentheses:
Residential $78.75 ($75) base rate plus $.05
per square foot up to 1,500 square feet.
Condominium and duplex- $105 ($100).

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church (ELCA)
We warmly welcome you to join us.
Come Worship, Learn and Grow
Enjoy God's Presence


Rev. Danith Kilts
6603 Ma


SSaturday 5:30pm Service of Praise
(Contemporary)
-Sunday 8:00am Worship Service (Communion)
9:00 am Sunday School
10:30am Worship Service (Communion)
SNursery Provided


ina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1813


GeySatrri^TX*Ii .
^^BFAMILY DENTSTRY I^^


I9:] lfARlS


Georgia B. Atwood
Georgia B. Atwood, Holmes Beach, died May
22.
A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Thursday
at Church of the Annunciation, Holmes Beach.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, is in
charge. Memorial donations may be made to Blake
Medical Center, 2020 59th St. W., Bradenton, FL
34209.
She was born in Tampico, Mexico, and came to
Manatee County 23 years ago from Basking Ridge,
N.J. She was a homemaker and an avid photogra-
pher. She was a member of Audubon Society,
Bradenton Yacht Club and Bradenton Country
Club. She attended Church of the Annunciation.
She is survived by her son, Jack, of West Long
Branch, N.J.; a sister, Patricia Gere of Bradenton;
and four grandchildren.

Bernice B. Cole
Bernice B. Cole, 87, of Anna Maria, died May
22 in Casa Mora Rehabilitation & Extended Care,
Bradenton.
Visitation will be 6-8 p.m. Thursday, May 27,
at Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel,
6000 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Service will be
11 a.m. Saturday, May 29, at the funeral home with
the Revs. Frank McGrath and Wayne Kirk officiat-
ing. Burial will in Raymond Hill Cemetery, Carmel,
N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to Hos-
pice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd.,
Sarasota, FL 34238.
Born in Mooresville, N.C., Mrs. Cole came to


Mobile homes, travel trailers and mixed residen-
tial $78.75 ($75).
Commercial $204.75 ($195) base rate plus
$.089 ($.085) per square foot up to 1,500 square feet.
Vacant lot $4 ($4).

,Rover ffmoiarita QTmmmnitg iTpr
Revs. Michael An Interdenominational Christian Church
& Jan Smith Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Church Services 10AM
Sunday School 9am
Children Church 10am
(Pre-school 4th grade)
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician

Healthcare the
gentle natural way

761-0210
501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 West Bradenton
f I block east ofAlbertson's Manatee Ave.)


Manatee County from New York City, N.Y., in
1987. She was a secretary for Pfizer Chemical Co.
She was a Presbyterian and a member of Roser
Memorial Community Church, Anna Maria. She
served in the Woman's Army Corps during World
War II and is listed on the Woman's Service Me-
morial in Washington, D. C.
She is survived by a niece, Mary McGrath, of
Anna Maria Island; and three nephews, John and
Jim Adams of Anna Maria Island, and Rick Adams
of Atlanta.

Edward Thomas
Wright Sr.
Edward Thomas Wright Sr., 93, of Holmes
Beach, died May 20 in Blake Medical Center.
Born in Augusta, Ga., Mr. Wright came to
Manatee County from Lakeland in 1975. He was
owner and operator of the Dr. Pepper and 7-Up
bottling plants in Lakeland and Orlando. He was a
Baptist.
Burial was held in Oak Hill Burial Park, Lake-
land. Toale Brothers Funeral Home, Bradenton
Chapel, is in charge of arrangements. Memorial
contributions may be made to the American Can-
cer Society, 1750 17th St., Sarasota, FL 34234, or
to Alzheimer's Disease Research, 15825 Shady
Grove Road, Suite 14D, Rockville, MD 20850.
He is survived by two daughters, Susann C., of
Holmes Beach and Kathleen E. Butler of Lakeland;
two sons, Edward T. Jr., of Millerville, Md., and
Lawrence P., of Savannah, Ga.; eight grandchil-
dren; and a great-grandchild.


Fire tax rate hearings are set for June 20. The hear-
ing for the West Side Fire District will be at 6 p.m. at
Station 4, 407 67th Street W., Bradenton. The hearing
for the Anna Maria Fire District will be at 7 p.m. at
Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive. Holmes Beach.




ISLAND
A' CHIROPRACTIC
CENTER
605 Manatee Ave. West
Holmes Beach
Dr. Joseph Acebal 778-0722


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II







liM PAGE 14 0 MAY 26, 1999 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Scho el
Susan Kesselring


Anna Maria

Elementary

School menu
Monday, 5/31/99
No School Memorial Day
Tuesday, 6/1/99
Breakfast: French Toast with Syrup, Juice
* Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Vegetable, Fruit,
Dessert
0 Wednesday, 6/2/99
Breakfast: Eggs, Toast, Juice
Lunch: McRib Sandwich, Vegetable, Juice,
Dessert
Thursday, 6/3/99
S Breakfast: Pretzel with Cheese, Juice
Lunch: Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Salad,
Roll, Dessert
Friday, 6/4/99
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Lunch: Pizza, Corn, Salad, Ice Cream
All meals served with milk.
**000*0000000000000000***0*000


*0
:0
0
0
:0
0
*0

*0
0
0
0
0

*0
*


The countdown continues:
June 9 is the last day of
school at
Anna Maria Elementary


By Susan K. Kesselring
Islander Reporter
"A heart is not measured by how much you love,
but how much you are loved by others."
That was said by the great and powerful Oz to the
Tin Man in the movie classic "Wizard of Oz." It's also
the sentiment shared by 22 surrogate grandparents who
give of themselves so children at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School won't miss out on an opportunity for a life-
enriching relationship.
The purpose of the Adopt a Grandparent program
is to pair third- and fifth-graders with grandparent fig-
ures. It may be that students and grandparents have
family living out of the area or may not have a grand-
parent or grandchild in their family.
Guidance Counselor Cindi Harrison is the
program's coordinator. She is excited about many of
the school's programs, but said she has a special niche
carved in her heart for the grandparent program.
Harrison is in awe of the grandparents' modesty.
They don't realize the value they have to the program,
she said. When she tells them, they shrug it off.
They meet once a month at the school for lunch


and an activity beginning in October until the end of the
school year. Grandparents and grandchildren look for-
ward to each visit, Harrison said.
Bob LoPiccolo is the founder of the program and
head grandparent. He started the program more than 10
years ago and at 78 works as a professional musician.
LoPiccolo said there are 11 members of the Island
Kiwanis Club and 11 members of All Island Denomi-
nations who participate in the program.
Recently, all got together for a picnic at Bayfront
Park in Anna Maria for one big sendoff. The afternoon
was spent grilling hot dogs and hamburgers, eating ice
cream and playing wiffle-ball.
Amelia Macione, 82, said she's been involved with
the grandparent program for seven years. She has no
trouble recalling the names of each of her grandchil-
dren through the years and names them off in succes-
sion. She speaks fondly of her latest grandson, Clay
Barlow, who she said is shy, but very loving.
Macione said the best part of theprogram is the
hugs she gets from the kids.
PLEASE SEE GRANDPARENTS, NEXT PAGE


One big
happy
family
Participants of
Anna Maria
Elementary
School's Adopt-
a-Grandparent
program shared
a picnic at Anna
Maria Bayfront
Park. Islander
Photo: Susan
Kesselring


Guardian grandparents


share their love


FOR FREE HOME DELIVERY OF THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND* CALL 778-7978
SSorry, we cannot deliver single copies to condominium or trailer park units.


----- ----- -------------


. .a --







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 15 i[


The cast of the school's production of "Sneetches." Islander Photo: Susan Kesselring


'Sneetches' gets four stars


Ann Kinnan's fifth-grade class production of
"Sneetches" was a huge success, judging by the hearty
applause and impulsive laughter emerging from par-
ents, grandparents, staff and others who attended May
19.
Kinnan has been putting on different plays for 19
years. This year's play, based on a story by Dr. Seuss,
is about strange birds that live by the beach. Music
accompanied the poem-based script.
Kinnan said children were involved with all as-
pects of the production including designing the pro-
gram, scenery and props, and costume design.
Principal Tim Kolbe was amazed the boys weren't
inhibited wearing tights yellow tie-died ones at that.
Nina Brumley starred as the play's narrator in her
part, The Cat in the Hat, and Shawn Koerber won the
delight of the audience in his role as Sylvester
McMonkey McBean.
The play's themes are about prejudice, differences
and acceptance. Some Sneetches who live on the
beaches have stars upon their bellies and some have
"none upon thars." The star-less Sneetches couldn't
attend the "frankfurter roasts" and "marshmallow
toasts" and were teased by the star-bellied Sneetches.
McBean, the "Fix-it-Up Chappie," comes to their
rescue, and for $3 apiece, those without stars could have


Kaci Kennedy, a third grader at Anna Maria El-
ementary School, met Gladys Ademna in the Adopt-a-
Grandparent program at the beginning of the 1998-
99 school year. Islander Photo: Susan Kesselring


GRANDPARENTS, FROM PAGE 14
Jack P'terson agrees. His granddaughter is Jenna
Maroney who is in the fifth grade. He said she is good
with the younger kids and likens her to everyone's big
sister.


them placed on their bellies by McBean's magic machine.
Then the first star-bellied Sneetches become dis-
tressed that all the Sneetches look the same. McBean,
again to the rescue, charges them $10 apiece to enter
his "Star-off-Machine."
The merry-go-round continues until the Sneetches
have spent all their money to put their stars "off again"
and "on again." McBean rides off into the sunset say-
ing "They never will learn. No. You can't teach a
Sneetch!"
At the conclusion, it occurs to the Sneetches that
"Sneetches are Sneetches. And no kind of Sneetch is
the best on the beaches."
And so the moral of the story is it's not what you
look like on the outside, but what's on the inside that
counts.

Cast of characters:
Star-bellied Sneetches: Ashley Armstrong, Jimmy
DiPaola, Chad Ensley, Kate Gazzo, Victor Guy, Sam
Lott, Elise Mundy, Jack Pollock, Esteban Reyes,
Lorenzo Rivera, Anthony Rosas and Tiffani Wade.
Plain-bellied Sneetches: Alex Bollettieri, Sarah
Claussen, Meredith Durkin, Kevin Greunke, Ashley La
Rose, Angelina Lee, Daniel Schafer, Jackie Stump,
Phelps Tracy, Kyle Reynolds and Ashly Zakazeski.



Peterson misses his nine grandchildren who live up
north and Jenna helps fill that void, he said.
When asked who her grandchild was, Mary Ann
VanWinkle, who hasn't any grandchildren of her own,
proudly says, "Kala Garner, the one who hit the first
home run in the wiffle-ball game."
"It's a great program for the kids and adults,"
VanWinkle said.
What do the children think of their grandparents?
Lillie Marnie speaks fondly of hers. "He's [Russ
Nelson] nice and we exchange presents," she said.
Not all grandparents and grandchildren say
goodbye at the end of the year. Some of them keep in
touch with each other through visits, by phone or let-
ters.
Frank Davis is no longer in the program, but he
stays in touch with Katie Ott whom he met four years
ago. She is now 15 and lives in Alabama, he said.
They keep in touch by phone and whenever she
comes back to the area, such as at Christmas time, they
get together. He said she's a "pretty neat girl."
Davis said he has several grandchildren and prob-
ably none of them keep in touch as closely as Katie
does. "She's a special person," he said.
Students are just as committed to this program as
the grandparents. This year the date of the picnic co-
incided with another school field trip. Students were
given the choice of coming to the picnic or going to the
Ringling Museum of Art. All but one chose to attend
the picnic.
And then came the moment for goodbyes. Grand-
parents and grandchildren embrace, sharing in the un-
spoken wisdom that they will forever be richer for the
time they spent together.


Math superstars
Teams of students from each Manatee County
elementary school competed in the Mathematics
Superstar Competition in early May. Anna Maria
Elementary School fifth-grade students Elise Mundy
and Andrew Prudente won grand prize. They each
received a $100 savings bond and were honored at a
breakfast at the Bradenton Country Club. In addi-
tion, a trophy bearing their names and the school's
name will be displayed for one year.

Camp money is out there
Summer camp scholarships are available to Island
youths who are in the fourth through eighth grades.
The Lou Fiorentino Memorial Scholarship Com-
mittee will award 15 $200 scholarships to students to
attend summer residential camps of their choosing.
Applications are available at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria;
Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach; King Middle School, 600 75th Street
NW, Bradenton; and Sugg Middle School, 3801 59th
Street West., Bradenton.
Applications must be turned in to the Center by
Friday, May 28. For more information, call the Center
at 778-1901.


Congratulations to Anna Maria Elementary
School's class of 1999! "May the road always rise
up to meet you." Graduation and a luncheon for
fifth graders will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday, June 8, at the Beach House Restaurant,
200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach.

Mrs. Sackett's class:
Charlene Anderson, Adam Arling, Ilyse
Auerbach, Derek Burger, Michael Cramer,
Monique Ellsworth, Evan Hunt, Michael Spicer,
Kellie Spring and Melissa Wolfe.

Mrs. Kinnan's class:
Ashley Armstrong, Alexandra Bollettieri, Nina
Brumley, Sarah Claussen, James DiPaola, Meredith
Durkin, Chadwick Ensley, Kate Gazzo, Victor Guy,
Shawn Koerber, Ashley La Rose, Angelina Lee,
Sam Lott, Elise Mundy, Jack Pollock, Esteban
Reyes, Kyle Reynolds, Lorenzo Rivera, Anthony
Rosa., Daniel Shafer, Jacklyn Stump, Phelps Tracy,
Tiffani Wade and Ashly Zakazeski.

Mrs. Ellis's class:
Thomas "Bud" Anderson, Amanda Bailey,
Allamanda Beard,, Oceanna Beard, David
Branning, Logan Bystrom, Ryane Carden, Kyle
Dale, Anna Maria Diamant, Heather Foy, Ashley
Lane, Greg Lowman, Samantha Maietta, Lillie
Marnie, Jenna Maroney, Joey Mattay, Michael
Mijares, Daniel Miller, Andrew Prudente, Amber
Sackett, Erik Stahr, Blake Tyre, Michael Wallen,
Zachary Westerman, Joshua Wimberly and
Chealsea Wolf.





I] PAGE 16 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 26, 1999 M PAGE 17 UI


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l[ PAGE 18 N MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 13, theft, 875 North Shore Drive, Rod &
Reel Pier. The complainant reported an unknown per-
son removed cash from a cash register in the bait shop.
May 15, theft of checks from a checkbook, 300
block of Iris.
May 15, altered temporary tag, DWLS, 7800
block of Palm Driive, Holmes Beach. The deputy ob-
served the subject driving a vehicle with an unreadable
tag and pulled him over. The deputy noted the tag had
been altered. The subject had no proof of insurance, a
check showed his driver's license was suspended and
he had a warrant for violation of parole. The subject
was placed in custody and the deputy issued three ci-
tations.
May 16, possession of alcohol, Bean Point.
May 17, domestic battery, resisting without vio-
lence, 512 Spring, Castaways Apartments. The suspect
hit the victim during an argument and then left the
scene, said the report. The deputy later located the sus-
pect and placed him in custody. The deputy said the
suspect resisted while being placed in handcuffs. A
check showed the suspect had two warrants.
May 19, criminal mischief, 400 block of North
Bay Boulevard. A Manatee County employee observed
graffiti on a picnic table.

Bradenton Beach
May 15, battery, 135 Bridge St., Bridge Tender
Inn. The victim reported the suspect unzipped her
sweater without her permission. A witness corrobo-
rated the victim's story. The officer spoke to the sus-
pect, who said he did not touch the victim. The officer
noted the suspect was extremely intoxicated. The of-
ficer requested a warrant for the suspect.
May 15, battery on a law.enforcement officer,
resisting with violence, obstruction, 2513 Gulf Drive,
Circle K. The officer on patrol ran a check on a suspect
that he knew from a previous encounter and found a
warrant. The officer said when he attempted to place
the suspect in custody, the suspect pushed him and fled.
The officer pursued the suspect to the 2400


block of Gulf Drive where the suspect ran into the
Gulf. The officer removed the suspect from the wa-
ter and placed him in custody. When transported to
the police department for paperwork, the suspect
became very violent and had to be pepper sprayed
twice, said the report.
May 16, information on sheriff's office pursuit,
11900 block of Cortez Road. The officer encountered
a hit-and-run accident on Cortez Road and stopped to
aid the victims. They said the suspect rear ended their
vehicle and fled east. The officer notified dispatch of
the incident and tried to catch the suspect. When the
officer heard on the radio that sheriff's deputies were
in pursuit of the suspect and he was no longer needed,
he returned to Bradenton Beach.
May 16, possession of marijuana with intent to
sell, possession of paraphernalia, possession of mari-
juana, 1301 Gulf Drive N., Silver Surf. A witness re-
ported Ann M. Martin-Edmond, 39, of Anna Maria,
was in a motel room with Joseph Allen McDuffie, 39,
of Bartow, and they were rolling a marijuana cigarette.
The officers said they knocked on the door and
McDuffie allowed them to enter. Officers said
McDuffie consented to a search of himself, the room
and his vehicle.
Officers said they found a bag of marijuana, a pack
of rolling papers, a duffel bag containing 48 grams of
marijuana, a scale, a quantity of unknown pills, a tool
box containing $1,000 in cash, a pipe with residue,
bottles containing 70 partial marijuana cigarettes and
several marijuana plant stems. Both McDuffie and
Martin-Edmond were placed in custody.

Holmes Beach
May 14, found property a knife, 4700 Gulf
Drive, Anna Maria Elementary School.
May 14, suspicious, 3304 East Bay Drive, Island
Bazaar. The complainant reported the subject was
looking at two pairs of earrings. She said she did not
see the subject put them back, nor did she pay for them
with other items. The officer checked the subject's
purse but did not find the earrings. The complainant
issued a trespass warning.
May 15, suspicious, 5400 block of Holmes Bou-
levard. The victim reported he was using the pay phone


outside the coin laundry and he was bombarded with
raw eggs that broke all around him.
May 15, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
77th Street. The victim reported an unknown person
smashed the car window and removed a purse contain-
ing a clutch purse, a driver's license, a checkbook and
a bank access card.
May 15, suspicious two gas drive offs of $10
and $12, 3015 Gulf Drive, Citgo.
May 16, battery, 2900 block of Avenue E. The
victim reported she and the suspect got into a verbal
argument and he grabbed her arms and shoved her
against a wall. A witness corroborated the victim's
story. The suspect was placed in custody.
May 16, found property a cellular phone, a hat
and a pair of sunglasses, 6900 block of Holmes Bou-
levard.
May 16, suspicious gas drive off of $13, 3015
Gulf Drive, Citgo.
May 17, code violation, 2700 block of Avenue B.
Solicitors selling meat door to door were told to cease
or be cited, said the report.
May 17, lost property a surfboard, 66th Street
beach.
May 18, lost property a cellular phone valued
at $100, 300 block of Clark.
May 18, burglary, 8000 block of Marina Drive.
The victim reported an unknown person entered her
boat and broke the glove box door and removed an air
horn.
May 18, theft of a bicycle, 51st Street and Gulf
Drive.
May 19, theft, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee County
Public Beach. The complainant reported the suspect
took a pair of her shorts and left with a companion. She
gave a description of the suspect and his first name.
Marine Rescue observed the suspect and companion in
the 6400 block of the beach. The officer located the
suspect and noted he was wearing the shorts. The of-
ficer said the suspect admitted taking the shorts and
was placed in custody.
May 20, found property a boat, 6900 block of
Holmes Boulevard.

PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE



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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 E PAGE'19 1M]-


Unlikely heros, usual
suspects lead WMFD
over Bali Hai
There were the usual suspects in West Manatee
Fire District's Anna Maria Little League playoff vic-
tory over Bali Hai on Monday, May 17.
Then there were some unlikely heroes who came
through against previously undefeated Bali Hai pitcher
Taylor Manning (10-0).
In another tense game,.WMFD topped Bali Hai 9-
7 in wild action, including several stellar plays and a
number of sloppy errors.
Had Bali Hai won the Monday playoff game, they
would have won the major league title by virtue of their
season record but it was not to be. WMFD's win forced
the two teams to play again Friday, May 21, for the cham-
pionship.
The usual heroes for WMFD on Monday were
Chase Parker, who led the offensive attack with a run
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


Packed house
The stands ofBennie Scanio Memorial Stadium at the Anna Maria Island Community Center were packed
(well, nearly) for an Anna Maria Island Little League major's playoff game between Bali Hai and WMFD last
week. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 18


May 20, grand theft auto, 4000 Gulf Drive,
Manatee County Public Beach. The officer on patrol
observed a van with the suspect walking around it. He
ran a check and found the van was stolen. He parked
behind the van and questioned the suspect.
The suspect said he did not steal the van and that
it was broken and he had called a tow company, said
the report. The officer said the suspect gave several



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false names but the officer found the suspect's identi-
fication papers in the van. The officer contacted the
Manatee County sheriff's office to confirm the auto
theft and placed the suspect in custody.
May 20, theft, 3902 Gulf Drive, West Coast Surf
Shop. The complainant reported she observed the sus-
pect take two T-shirts into the dressing room and exit
with one. She said when she confronted him, he handed
her one T-shirt and a wad of money. She said she saw
the missing T-shirt under his outer shirt.



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The suspect then left the store saying he would get
more money and the complainant said she followed
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said he attempted to give her his wristwatch if she
would not prosecute. The officer asked the suspect to
remove the T-shirt, which still had the price tag on it,
and placed him in custody.
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contact Crime Stoppers at 747-COPS. You may be eli-
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_Fm PAGE 20 0 MAY 26, 1999 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
SPORTS, FROM PAGE 19 1


.. "-'i
., ":. ':., ., i .h ;


scored in the first, a two-run single in the second, a long
fly ball to left that was dropped and allowed another
runner to score in the top of the sixth inning and a run
scored in the sixth.
Parker also started a double play in the first.
WMFD teammate Brett Milks came in to relieve
starting pitcher Anthony Rosas in the bottom of the
second and got his team out of a bases-loaded problem.
Milks pitched himself out of two more bases-
loaded jams to get the win and hand Bali Hai only its
second loss of the 1999 season.
But it was younger brother Brad Milks who made
two fine catches in right field in the bottom of the third
and had a key hit in the top of the fourth to keep a rally
,.going and allow his team to go up 7-1.
Brad Milks also scored the eighth and winning run
in the top of the sixth after taking one for the team when
Manning hit him with a pitch.
Manning looked in control in the top of the first
despite WMFD manufacturing a run. Michael Spicer
tried to bunt his way on with Manning throwing the
speedy Spicer out by a halfstep.
He walked Parker on four pitches. Brett Milks
reached on an error and Parker who went to third
scored on Rosas' ground out to first base. Manning
struck out the next batter.
After Bali Hai's Sean Pittman flied out to Parker
behind third, Rosas walked Courtney Taylor.
Joey Mattay hit a grounder up the middle on the
next pitch and Parker picked it up, stepped on second
and fired to first to complete a double play.
Manning got a little wild in the second, walking
Trey Andricks and Greg Lowman after he had run the
count on them to 0-2 and 1-2. When Michael Cramer
reached on an error, Andricks scored and Lowman
went to third and Cramer to second.
Manning struck out the next two batters. Then on
a 2-1 pitch, Parker sent a shot into right center scoring
Lowman and Cramer. Score 4-0. Brett Milks bounced
out to Manning.
Manning started off the bottom half of the inning
by blasting a towering fly to left and hitting the fence
in the air for a double. Walks to Adam Bouziane and
Kyle Dale loaded the bases .


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Home run swing
Taylor Manning of Bali Hai sends a blast to deep left-center for one of his seven home runs of the year, tying
the Anna Maria Little League season record. This home run hit near a cabbage palm behind the second fence
at the Little League field in Anna Maria and was estimated to have traveled 300feet. The ball was not found.


Islander Photo: David Futch
Logan Bystrom hit a high hopper to third sacker
Greg Lowman, who made a fine throw home to nip
Manning racing to the plate.
Rosas walked Andrew Prudente to score Bouziane
and make it 4-1.
WMFD coach Andy Price had seen enough and
brought in Brett Milks to pitch. He struck out Tim
Bouziane and when Pittman bunted, Milks tossed the
ball to Cramer to force Dale at home.
A determined Manning then got Rosas to pop out
to Taylor at second and struck out the next two batters.
In the bottom of the third, Brad Milks made two
catches to buoy his team. Taylor had already reached
on a single to left center when Joey Mattay came to the


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plate and lifted a fly to right and Brad Milks made the
catch. Manning popped out to short for the second out.
Adam Bouziane came to the plate and hit the ball
on the nose and Brad Milks made another catch of a
hard-hit liner.
In the top of the fourth, Brad Milks singled off Man-
ning up the middle after Lowman reached on an error.
When the ball got past the centerfielder, Lowman went to
third and Milks to second. On the next pitch, an error al-
lowed Lowman to score and Spicer to reach first.
Brad's brother Brett singled between short and third
to score Cramer and Spicer and make it 7-1 WMFD.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 21 Igi


SPORTS, FROM PAGE 20

Bali Hai scored one run in the bottom of the fourth
on an infield single by Dale, Bystrom's bunt single and
walks to Dominic Termini and Chad Richardson.
Manning bore down again in the fifth when he struck
out two and got an out on a grounder.back to the mound.
Things started to fall apart for WMFD in the bot-
tom of the fifth. Some bad decisions led to six straight
errors and three Bali Hai runs to bring them within two.
Brett Milks turned it up a notch, striking out three
of the next four batters as Bali Hai left the bases full for
the second time.
In the top of the sixth, Manning struck out the first
batter then hit Brad Milks. He walked Spicer and both
runners moved up on a wild pitch.
Parker hit a fly to left that was dropped, scoring Milks.
Spicer made a big turn at third and Parker, think-
ing Spicer was headed home to score, went to third. At
the same time, Spicer turned around and went back to
third. He had to stop to make sure both of them weren't
on the base at the same time and Lowman tagged
Spicer, while Parker ran back to second.
Brett Milks came up and when the ball got by the
catcher, Parker went to third and scored as the throw
sailed into left.
The bottom of the sixth had the crowd of 150 on
its feet.
Milks gave up a single to leadoff batter Mattay and
Manning singled to deep short for his third hit of the
night. Adam Bouziane hit a hard shot back to pitcher
Milks, who could only react and knock the ball down
with his glove. Bases loaded.
Another error allowed Mattay to score and
Bystrom brought in Manning to make it 9-7 with no
outs and the bases loaded.

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Brett Milks struck out the next two batters then
played a key role in his team's win.
With Pittman at the plate, Bouziane headed for
home when the ball got by Cramer. But Cramer recov-
ered, diving for the ball and flipping it to Milks who
tagged a sliding Bouziane for the final out.

Bali Hai takes title with
16-9 win over WMFD
Bali Hai took revenge on West Manatee Fire Dis-
trict Friday, May 21, beating them 16-9 in the Anna
Maria Little League championship game.
Parlaying 11 walks and some timely singles, Bali
Hai topped WMFD to end the year with an 18-2 record
and the major league title.
WMFD struck first when Anthony Rosas hit a two-
run single, knocking in Chase Parker, who had singled,
and Brett Milks, who reached on an error.
Bali Hai started off slow but batted around in the
bottom of the second inning to score five runs on five
walks and singles by Logan Bystrom and Kyle Dale
and a double off the bat of Adam Bouziane.
WMFD came storming back with five runs in the
top of the third on singles by Parker, Milks and Ian
Fredrickson, a hit batsman, a couple of walks and an
error to make it 7-5 WMFD.
But Bali Hai came roaring back in the third and
fourth innings, tallying three runs in the third on three
walks and Joey Mattay's triple.
In the fourth, Bali Hai sent 11 batters to the plate
and scored seven runs to put the game out of reach.
Dominic Termini started the barrage with a triple.
Tim Bouziane knocked him in with a single and he
came home after three straight walks. Adam Bouziane
knocked in three more with a double, Bystrom picked
up an RBI single and Dale finished the scoring with

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another single.
The major league All-Star game is Wednesday,
May 26, at 5 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center Bennie Scanio Stadium at 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria.
The awards ceremony for all Anna Maria Little
Leagues teams will be Thursday, June 3, from 6-8 p.m.
at the Center.
For those interested, all Little League coaches are
invited to play a coaches game at 6 p.m. Thursday. May
27, at the Center.

Island Animal Clinic clinches
AAA title
Island Animal Clinic finished out its AAA Little
League season with a 13-2 win over Air & Energy,"
taking the first and second half crowns to earn the
title outright.
Because Island Animal Clinic had 8-2 and 9-1
records for the first and second halves of the season, a
championship game was not necessary.
Helping Island Animal bounce Air & Energy in the
final tilt, were Patrick Cole, Connor Bystrom, Chris
Klotz, Kelly Officer and Timmy Andricks.
Cole and Bystrom combined to pitch the win, while
Cole, Klotz and Officer each had a double, Bystrom had
a triple and Andricks socked a three-run homer.
Coach Bill Bystrom credited his players for their
great attitudes and willingness to learn. Those qualities
led to the team's stellar 17-3 record on the full season.
The AAA league is the first opportunity players in
Anna Maria Little League have to pitch to batters and
Coach Bystrom made the most of it.
Bystrom said that during the course of the year, 10
of 12 players got to pitch. He also gave each player a
chance to play each position in the infield and outfield.

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IK PAGE 22 E MAY 26, 1999 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Water worries, from flooding to trash


Let's talk about water, something near and dear to
all our hearts since Islanders are quite literally sur-
rounded by the stuff. Sometimes, we're inundated with
water.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is
charged with handling major flood problems, caused
by storms, rising rivers, or other natural disasters.
FEMA has had a policy of paying money to folks to
allow them to rebuild soggy houses, despite the fact
that often those soggy houses are in flood plains where
they will just get soggy again in a few years.
Even though residents may plead for money so
They can relocate someplace drier, the feds have only
given the money for rebuilding in the same place. One
family in Oklahoma received $150,000 from the feds
for five floods over-the course of 10 years, despite the
fact the house was only worth $75,000. Our tax dollars
at work, eh?
Nationwide, 32,000 insured home properties in
300 cities have been flooded at least twice in the past
18 years. Total pay-out was $6.4 billion, which works
out to 1 percent of the nation's insured properties get-
ting.20 percent of the money.
Here's another number that should wake you up -
in the past 25 years, the federal government has spent
$140 billion preparing for floods and cleaning up after
them.
There's a change afoot, though. The feds are now
looking to increase their efforts to encourage buyouts
of flooded property and then restrict the use of the land
to more natural purposes than homes or businesses,
such as to recreate natural, historic wetlands. FEMA
officials have pledged to spend $325 million on the
project, and hope to save $1 billion in the next 10 years.
Finally, something that makes sense.
"It's time to quit wasting money and rebuilding in
high-risk areas," FEMA Director James Witt said in an
article in "National Wildlife" magazine.
That means that Islanders inundated by the "big
one" may get money from the feds and then be ex-
pected to move some place a little more suited to hu-
man habitation than our narrow strip of sandy beach.

Dead zone
Speaking of flooding, water-borne chemicals flow-
ing from the Mississippi River appear to be the culprits
behind the creation of a vast "dead zone" in the upper
Gulf of Mexico near Louisiana. The fertilizers speed up
the growth of algae, which in turn suck up all the oxy-
gen in the water and create a huge area where nothing
can live.
The bad floods in 1993 doubled the size of the dead

r


bnno doarki

Moon Date AM HIGH AM
May 26 10:34 2.1 3:43
May 27 10:55 2.2 4:10
May 28 12:30 1.5 4:35
May 29 1:16 1.5 4:50
FM May 30 1:58 1.4 5:08
May 31 2:44 1.4 5:27
Jun 1 3:29 1.4 5:52
Jun 2 4:14 1.4 6:24
Cortez High Tides 7 minu


, -. '.,, ,.
LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
0.8 11:35 1.5 5:02 0.4
0.9 5:41 0.2
1.0 11:16a* 2.3 6:15 0.1
1.1 11:36a" 2.4 6:48 0.0
1.2 12:05 2.5 7:23 -0.1
1.2 12:33 2.5 7:59 -0.1
1.3 1:06 2.5 8:36 -0.1
1.3 1:44 2.5 9:19 -0.1
tes later lows 1:06 later


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zone to 7,000 square miles, and it's still about that big
today. To help you out, that makes the dead area about
the same size as New Jersey.
Another problem facing the area is a loss of wet-
lands in southern coastal Louisiana at the rate of 30
square miles a year. The loss is attributed to
channelization of the river and erosion of its banks as
the flood water rushes into the Gulf.
The dead zone is a phenomenon that worsens in the
summer, but exists year-round.
The real problem is that scientists know what
causes the dead region in the Gulf the nutrient-rich
waters of the Mississippi but to solve the problem
means stopping or slowing human activity in about 40
percent of the U.S., which is the drainage basin of the
big river. "Dealing with the problem will require that
we look at the millions of individual farm fields arrayed
all the way up the Mississippi basin," one scientist
commented.
No quick fix here, I guess.

Tracking trash
Here's a nasty thought: a cargo container holding
4,756,940 LEGO toy pieces enroute to Connecticut
from the Netherlands, toppled off a ship, broke open,
and the pieces are floating around the north Atlantic as
you read this article.
Everybody seems to be concerned with beer cans
and other marine debris, like fishing line or nets, but
there is a significant amount of trash that comes from
cargo ships. It's estimated that 1,000 cargo containers
wash overboard every year, and since the containers are
really, really big, that means there is a lot of junk out
there, floating around, adding to water pollution.


Some.of the trash is benign, like the LEGO pieces
or plastic rubber ducks, but some of the stuff is more
dangerous, like canisters of toxic chemicals.
Here's another problem that doesn't answer-to a
quick fix.

Notable quotables
Quotations are the stock in trade in journalism.
Without those wonderful words whispered or some-
times shouted into our ears, reporters can't put to-
gether an article. And no, we don't make quotes up.
Here are a few quotes from prominent people dur-
ing the years that you may find amusing.
"Computers in the future may weigh no more
than 1.5 tons." Popular Mechanics magazine, 1949.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five
computers." Chairman of IBM, 1943.
"There is no reason anyone would want a com-
puter in their home." Founder of Digital Equipment
Corp., 1977.
"This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to
be seriously considered as a means of communication.
The device is inherently of no value to us." Western
Union internal memo, 1876.
"We don't like their sound, and guitar music is on
the way out." Decca Recording Co., rejecting the
Beatles, 1962.
"Heavier-than-air flying machines are impos-
sible." President of the Royal Society, 1895.
"Everything that can be invented has been in-
vented." U.S. Office of Patents commissioner, 1899.
"640K ought to be enough for anybody." Bill
Gates, 1981.

Sandscript factoid
Plants, animals and other alien species cost the
United States $123 billion a year to eradicate, ac-
cording to a Cornell University study. The biggest
problem comes from non-native weeds and trees at
$35.5 billion, followed by rats at $19 billion. Oh,
and don't forget mongooses, imported to Hawaii and
Puerto Rico to eat the rats they've gotten so nu-
merous it costs $50 million a year to get rid of the
pests that were originally imported to get rid of the
pesky rats.



SV Museum visitor
SCarolyne Norwood, administrator of
the Anna Maria Island Historical
Museum, explains special items to
visitor John Paulson of Arcadia,
Mich., an architect who serves on the
commission for the historical museum
in his hometown. The Island facility is
at 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria City.
Islander photo: Courtesy of
Ruth Burkhead.





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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 26, 1999 M PAGE 23 Bi]

Snook season's end yields to excellent trout


By Capt. Mike Heistand and Capt. David Futch
Snook season is coming to a close this month, and
reports are scattered on linesider action. It looks like if you
can find 'em, they're fair-sized and hungry, but the trick
is finding them. Trout fishing is excellent in the bays,
though, as is grouper action offshore. Anglers around the
piers report good catches of mackerel, too. Oh, and tarpon
action is getting better and better every day.
Fishers at the Rod and Reel Pier report good
catches of mackerel, pompano, redfish, a few snapper
and snook last week.
Anglers at the Anna Maria City Pier are reeling
in an occasional pompano, redfish, and some snook at
night, but the linesider action is starting to slow.
Annie's Bait & Tackle said that Capt. Zack on the
Dee Jay I said he's putting his charters onto lots of reds
to 34 inches, small snook, and trout to 25 inches in the
bays. Off the beaches, he's still getting into Spanish mack-
erel, a few cobia, mangrove snapper and permit to 18
pounds. One client, Chris Walker of Bradenton, nailed an
18-pound permit and released it last Friday, and Capt.
Zack says tarpon are starting to show up in good numbers.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair said his best
bets are snook, redfish and trout both silver, gray
and a few speckled.
Capt. Curt Morrison on the Neva-Miss said gag
and red grouper are coming to the hook, plus man-
grove, lane and yellowtail snapper to four pounds. He
also caught a pair of 95-pound tarpon last week.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade

Boating classes
set by flotilla
Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 81 has sched-
uled boating and seamanship classes in seven ses-
sions Tuesdays and Thursdays starting June 1.
The classes will be 7 to 9 p.m. at room 62 of
Manatee Technical Institute, 5603 34th St. W.,
Bradenton. Classes are free but a fee will be charged
for materials. Registration may be made and infor-
mation obtained at 795-6189 or 798-9544.


fishers are doing well with snook and redfish near the
mangrove islands on the seagrass flats, but shrimp are
getting hard to get. Offshore action includes lots of
permit, with blue crabs the best bait.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's getting permit to 20
pounds, plus cobia, mackerel, snapper and a few legal-
sized grouper.
Capt. Mark Bradow said tarpon are getting more
numerous by the day, landing two last week.
On Capt. Mike's boat Magic we're still getting lots
and lots of trout up to 26 inches long, redfish to 32
inches, snook to 31 inches, flounder to 18 inches and
a few mangrove snapper.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's putting clients onto
trout, permit and a few tarpon.
Capt. Glenn Corder on the Deep South said he's
bringing back limit catches of grouper most days, plus
mangrove and lane snapper and a few black fin tuna.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said snook is season
coming to a close, but they are still around and taking bait.
Trout fishing is excellent right now, though, and offshore
fishing is also excellent. Snapper are another good bet, and
pelagic fish such as dolphin, wahoo and black fin tuna
should start to pick up soon.
Dave Johnson at the Snead Island Crab House
said redfish are in Terra Ceia Bay and silver trout in the
Manatee River, plus black drum in the cut and shark
fishing is starting to come on strong.
Good luck and good fishing.

'International'
horseshoe winners
Winners in the May 19 horseshoe games were Ron
Pepka of Anna Maria and Pete Watson of England.
Runners-up were Carole Watson of England and Bill
Starrett of Anna Maria.
Winners in the May 22 games were Pepka and
Chris McNamara of Holmes Beach. Runners-up were
George McKay of Anna Maria and Starrett.
The weekly contests get under way every Wednes-
day and Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
Park, 10005 Gulf Drive.


t,-- .r
King of a kingfish
Capt. Glenn Corder caught this 29 1/2-inch-long
kingfish on a freelined sardine in about 40 feet of
water.


Fish
Tales
Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and pictures
are welcome at
The Islander Bystander.
Just give us a call at
778-7978 or stop by our
office in the
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
ISLANDER


Inshore Sport Fishing
Charter Boat
o^'eat 4





Full & Half Day Trips
Custom Trips Available

Captain Steven Salgado
Owner/Operator
Lifetime experience in local waters
U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait & Tackle
Furnished
Docked at
Cortez Fishing Center
778-9712


CAPT SKEW
CHARM^^TERS^

GBl/--^o^rFsi~nJ A kcI^B

Loa iL^df ||HilB3 G^


*i


FISHING CHARTERS
4- FULL OR HALF DAY
SPleasure Cruises Egmont Excursions
Backwater Offshore
A t e I
FISH LEANE FRE


Reservations 795-8299
Please 9 -


Capt. Mike
Heistand


OFFSHORE FISHING CHARTERS ABOARD

ZULU MAMA
31-FOOT BERTRAM


47,000


AND COUNTING ...

7TH ANNUAL



v4' -\
.raw









In addition to huge payouts to the fishermen in cash prizes and
merchandise, Island Discount Tackle's Fishing the Islands
Tournament has been able to donate $47,000 so far to the Anna
aria Island Community Center's youth sports programs! Let's
keep us the good work and add to that total this year!

COME

JOIN THE FUN!
FOR MORE INFORMATION: ISLAND DISCOUNT TACKLE
PHONE 778-7688 FAX 778-4999
I 'T -J =







D]i PAGE 24 N MAY 26, 1999 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Residential Commercial/Industrial Property Management Mortgage Loans Title Insurance Vacation Rentals


BRADENTON BEACH DUPLEX
2BR/1BA in each side. Duplex in-
cludes a 50x100 lot that is also
zoned for a duplex. $299,000. Call
Carol Heinze, Realtor 751-1155 or
Karin Stephan, Realtor 924-9000.
IB36091
CANAL FRONT LOT with direct ac-
cess to Gulf & bay with no bridges.
Near library and shopping. Reduced
to $150,000. Call Carol Heinze, Re-
altor 751-1155. IB33995


U


BEST BUY ON THE ISLAND! End unit 2BR/2BA turkey fumished
condo with spectacular views of the bay is yours for only $137,900.
Includes updated carpet, washer and dryer. Just steps to the beach.
Call Donald Pampuch, Realtor 751-1155. IB34309
TUCKED AWAY In quiet area of Anna Maria. Beautifully
maintained 3BR/2BA home. Screened & covered patio area
by pool is great for entertaining. Large screened upstairs
porch overlooks pool and has view of the bayou. Call Pat
Thompson, Realtor 751-1155. IB37311 $339,900
FLAMINGO CAY 2BR/2BA condo overlooking the bayou and
bird sanctuary with private boat dock that will accommodate
a boat-lift. Includes two car attached garage and a commu-
nity heated pool. Children and pets are welcome! Call Carol
Heinze, Realtor 751-1155. IB36389 $139,900


778-6696
S1-800-367-1617
3101 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217


ANNA MARIA



REAL ESTATE, INC.
REAL ESTATE, INC.


Mary Ann Schmidt Helen White
Eves. 778-4931 Eves. 778-6956
DIRECT GULFFRONT
2BR/1.5BA Seaside Beach House condo. Furnished, end-
unit, heated pool, beautiful beach and view. $225,000.
CLOSE TO BEACH
2BR/1.5BA home in central Holmes Beach. Excellent
rental or vacation home. A great buy! $148,500.
SAILBOAT WATER
3BR/2BA family home. Large sunny family room.
Ceramic tile and terrazzo. Private dock, playhouse. $229,000.
PERICO PATIO-POOL HOME
2BR/2BA Perico Island patio home. In-ground pool,
two-car garage, ceramic tile, mirror, fireplace. $159,900.
SABAL PALMS CONDO
2BR/1.5BA furnished condo. Westside, convenient to
everything. Pool and clubhouse. Close to golf. $59,900.
WATERWAY
3BR/3BA luxurious penthouse condo. Private boat dock,
water view, elevator, tennis, heated pool. $259,000.


Julie Gilstrap
LTG, GRI
Property Manager


Patti Marifjeren
REALTOR/
Property Manager


ANNUAL RENTALS
Sandy Pbinte 2BR/2BA condo $9o00
3012 Gulf- 1BR/1BA $500
5102 5th Ave-2BR/1BA house, direct Gulffront $2,650
308 63rd 2BR/2BA duplex $800
SEASONAL RENTALS
Condominiums and Houses s Weekly/Monthly
from $700 week/ $1500 month
779-0202 1(800)7326434
ANNA MARIA

MIS [ Si&iCoast
REAL ESTATE, INC.
Island Shopping Center 5402 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 www.suncoastinc.com


SEASONAL & VACATION RENTALS 941-778-0766
Visit our exciting new comprehensive web site at www.arsidarealtyservices.com


E mail: smithami@gate.net
Web site: www.gate.net/~smithami


HIBISCUS HIDEAWAY Live in a tropical paradise in
this cozy new subdivision. Eight units to be built within
1 1/2 blocks to the beach. Villa style 3BR/2BA, three
breezy porches, two-car garage, light open floor plan.
Pre-construction choice of colors and extra options.
Starting at $220,000. Dial the Duncans! Judy 778-1589
or Darcie 779-2290.


CANALFRONT. Looking for a 2BR/2BA canalfront home
on the Island for under $150,000? We have it! Open floor
plan, split bedrooms with water views from almost every
room. Do not miss this one. Dock and davits, too!
$147,250. Call Susan Hatch 778-7616 eves.


ELEVATED VILLA. Bright and airy 3BR/2BA half
duplex with great room, vaulted ceilings, Berber carpet
and Mexican tile. Parking for 4-5 cars under building.
Central to everything. $159,900. Dial the Duncans!
Judy 778-1589 or Darcie 779-2290 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
Nous parlons francais
Mit uns koennen Sie deutsch reden

1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS E2 1S


ISLANDER


GULFSIDE DUPLEX! 100 feet to best Island
beach! Two units, completely furnished offers
2BR/2BA second level and 2BR/2BA and den on
first floor. Popular seasonal and summer rentals!
Own your summer place with advantage of
. rental income from two units. $419,500.


Since
1957
MARIE h LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


NOTICE )

EARLY CLASSIFIED v

AD DEADLINE

The deadline for ads that will appear in June 2 issue
of THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER must be placed
before noon on Saturday, May 29 at 2 p.m.


MARIANNE LISA SALLY
... largest selection of
gulf front rentals on
Anna Maria Island ...


Mike
Norman
Realty inc.


CANALFRONT LOT
Walk to the beach from your new home built on this
large lot in Anna Maria City! 75 X 140 feet with seawall,
no bridges with direct bay access. Build your dream
Home here! Just listed at $149,000.
Call Pat Jackson at 778-3301
Ken Jackson at 778-6986
Agnes Tooker 778-5287
or Dave Sork 726-1704

Fran Maxon
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gull Drve P O Box 717 *Anna Maria, FL 34216
(941) 778-2307
Toll Free 800 306-9666
Fax # 778-7035


[smth


tBY VIlMD


cmmn


I m


I I I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 25 IB


Clearly the quality choice
CAROLYN PATRICK ROBERT ST. JEAN
WATERFRONT SPECIALIST INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
778-0700 office 794-0007 office
941-331-9201 home 941-794-8059 home
The S riand Turf Team!
../Ja Francais

Wedebro kRe l ae
C I c[E g es ince 1111
1998 Top Listing Agent & Top Sales Agent

ISLAND RRlan ia
Buy it, sell it! Find it in The Islander Bystander

"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your island
property. When buying
or selling...
I can make your island
dreams come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
I WWAGNER REALTY
Sales & Rentals Since 1939
S2217 Gulf Drive North
Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
I" 778-2246 Office
S778-1751 Evenings






ets/f f J6Y/ lReac state, (. e
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294





44/4 ,44 1%44


This darling 2BR/2BA waterfront home features tran-
quil water views over natural Lake La Vista. There is
a boat dock and electric boat lift, plus a fully fenced
back yard with fruit trees and specimen palms. Easy
walk to great Gulf beach! Don't miss this rare value,
price to sell at only $219,000!


can4fro4 Podo Hfoe ...
D no4 AAc Heu!
This newly refurbished 3BR/3BA waterfront pool home
offers a spacious split bedroom design and bright
southerly exposure in the beautiful Bay Palms section
of Holmes Beach. Some of the countless amenities
include a light and spacious eat-in kitchen with gor-
geous washed oak cabinets, cozy bar area with glass
block front, custom etched glass front doors and
shower enclosure, ceramic tiled floors and 34x17' fi-
berglass in-ground swimming pool. Enjoy the views of
sparkling Bimini Bay and the convenience of a private
boat dock and davits. Includes lush tropical landscap-
ing and fully fenced back yard. Priced at $389,000.

"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
"- *, T ~I" g -t L t7"
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Susanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820
( Exclusive
Waterfront MLS r[B
Estates um LJ W*BnB
Video Collection ro"
V 7iue JriElnd ly sa1 caftnte PI.obEiieonal.
V Sit eaianz in irt ne te l oww tsyhiiiseal.s' at e.cl o
Visit our Web site http://www.betsyhillsrealestate.com


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Visit us at our web site: www.islandreal.com
778-6066- 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217


(-U.F QRp INLgX


Frank Davis
Broker






Chris Shaw
Realtor

.V -



Tom Nelson
Realtor




^. *. 4. 2
Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor






Alan Galletto
Realtor






Bob Fittro
Realtor






Wendy Foldes
Broker/Salesperson






Nick Patsios
Broker/Salesperson






Rebecca Samler
Realtor



.40


Richard Freeman
Realtor






Bob Smith
Realtor


3APTS. -NE B6fdI 2di,500O


GrULF FROT, TfWo ftoMES 3/ EaftH 75,000


TUPL(-X- CoAAtRaCtAL 3ooo SAfr. ^ /69T, oo


P;C q1H -778-GOG
MIkf. ,Y' 8oo-31.1- I11


RiALTY loc.
33o01
    www.mikenormanrealty.com
    4 --.## A --o -,I


    MiiraB-fi^^ '____________


    WATERFRONT
    HOMES:
    60 North Shore Dr ........ $689,000
    520 58th Street..... ....... $619,000
    520 Bayview P ............. $499,000
    407 20th Place ............. $529,000
    525 68th Street .................. $339,900
    703 South Bay Blvd............. $319,900
    226 South Harbor .............. $189,000

    KEY ROYALE
    WATERFRONT HOMES:
    631 Foxworth La.... ...... $795,000
    726 Key Royale Dr.............. $695,000
    613 Ivanhoe La............. $675,000
    624 Foxworth Lane ............ $339,000
    621 Foxworth Lane............ $319,900
    WATERFRONT
    AND ISLAND CONDOS:
    6700 Gulf Dr ............... $339,000
    Mariners Cove .... $229,900-$297,500
    4255 Gulf Dr .............. $134,900
    ISLAND HOMES:
    208 75th St .................. $299,000
    502 Magnolia .............. $249,000
    114 Park .................... $239,000
    203 76th St ................ $219,900
    2408 Avenue A............. $199,000
    205 South Bay (vacant lot)... $209,000
    6805 Holmes Blvd......... $199,900
    231 South Harbor ......... $189,000
    8314 Marina Dr ............ $179,900
    705 North Shore (vacant lot) .. $152,500
    DUPLEXES/TRIPLEXES
    MULTI FAMILY PROPERTIES:
    201 35th St .................. $640,000
    2302 Gulf Dr ................ $569,000
    101 25th St ............... $549,000
    2219 Gulf Dr ................ $375,000
    203 76th St .................. .$219,900
    312 64th St ................ $219,000
    5806 Holmes Blvd......... $199,900

    PERICO BAY CLUB
    1276 Spoonbill Landings .. $149,000
    923 Sandpiper Circle..... $133,500

    MAINLAND:
    449 North Shore (Sarasota)... $299,900
    1769 Vamo Drive........... $299,000
    419 51st St NW ............ $269,900
    6937 42nd Ct E (Sarasota) ... $98,000

    COMMERCIAL
    PROPERTIES
    304 Pine Ave ................ $224,000
    310 Pine Ave ................ $299,900
    5704 Marina Drive ........ $479,000


    WE ALSO

    HAVE RENTALS

    SEASONAL
    *ANNUAL
    and
    PROPERTY
    MANAGEMENT


    Call for details!


    KEY RoYALE 2 n CNL






    I- PAGE 26 E MAY 26, 1999 R THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

    A' A -]t "_ 3 ql[/l;/~2 JIio z1 -,i] *


    BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
    used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love seat
    $399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129; futons
    (sofa by day bed at night) frame and mattress $199;
    daybed (white with brass finials) including two mattresses
    and pop-up unit $285. Can deliver. Call 753-7118.
    MACINTOSH POWERBOOK 520. Laptop model,
    ready to use. 778-7978.

    DINING ROOM TABLE with 3 by 5-foot rectangular,
    beveled glass top. Wrought iron base is a wine rack.
    Really nice! Need to sell, make offer. 778-6234.

    ANTIQUE REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire, works great!
    24 by 52-in., 22-inches deep. $95, 778-6234.

    MACINTOSH PERFORM 6200 CD. 64 MB RAM, 1
    GIG hard drive, 15-in. color monitor. OS 8.5, new
    Zoom 56K modem. Loaded with software!
    Pagemaker 6.0, Photoshop 3.0, Pagemill 3.0, Illus-
    trator 5.5, Quark Xpress 3.32, MS Word 5.0, plus
    more. $850. Optional Iomega zip drive, $100 and
    Apple Laserwriter 300, $175 are available. All in mint
    condition. 748-6222.

    OVERHEAD WOOD GARAGE door, 9-ft. wide.
    Sears electric opener with remote, tracks, available
    soon. Only $100. Call 778-4029.
    CD PLAYER GREAT SOUND and window pocket
    cover for a Mazda Miata. For further information call
    778-8224.
    1990 YAMAHA 50HP, 65 hours, $1,000 or best offer.
    778-2584.
    FULL SIZE POOL TABLE for sale. Please call and
    leave message. 778-9456.
    KENMORE PORTABLE DISHWASHER pristine
    $350. Heavy-duty washer, no frills $100. 748-1392.
    MUST SELL! Two vertical blinds 105 by 80 inches and
    two vertical blinds 36 by 76 inches plus all hardware.
    Like new $1,000 plus, yours for $300. 778-7589.


    TEAK FRAMED MIRROR 42 by 30 inches, $50. Two
    teak twin headboards $35 each, 19-inch Sony color
    TV with remote, $100. Please call 778-5088.


    LORD'S WAREHOUSE THRIFT Shop. Open Monday,
    Wednesday and Saturday, 9am to 3pm. Tremendous
    discounts! 6140 Gulf of Mexico Drive. 383-4738.
    GARAGE SALE SATURDAY, May 29, 8am. 216
    81st St.
    YARD SALE SATURDAY and Sunday, May 29 and
    30. Furniture, household items, etc. 3008 Ave. E,
    Holmes Beach.
    YARD SALE SATURDAY and Sunday, May 29 and
    30, 9am. Furniture, silver items, clothes, Beanie Ba-
    bies. New $1 items. No early birds. 401 72nd St.
    BACKYARD SALE. Saturday and Sunday, May 29
    and 30, 9am 2pm. Air compressor $80, tools and
    cart $5-$25, grab bags 250, bikes $2, workbench
    $30, porta potty $30, security lights $15, window air
    $10. 515 Magnolia or 779-1701.


    CHILDREN'S SUMMER PROGRAMS Want to im-
    prove your child's reading? Also, programs for chil-
    dren with learning problems. Free evaluation. Call
    795-0303.
    PREMIERCOM LONG DISTANCE phone service.
    7.5 flat rate, Florida 7.1, 800 numbers same rates.
    888-785-7859.

    6% CD, FDIC INSURED. Five years minimum invest-
    ment $5,000. Call Ryan Young at Edward Jones
    investments 746-3348. 5008 Manatee Avenue.

    INTERNET AUCTION SERVICE. Reach buyers
    around the world through intemet auction. Sell rare
    hard to sell items. Call, fax 779-9098, information.

    SUMMER TUTOR: Continue your child's education
    throughout the summer. Certified teacher willing to
    tutor on Island at affordable rates. 761-3461.


    F2 BULLET WINDSURFER board lost in Gulf of
    Mexico. Ludwig Kalinowsky 778-2815.
    FOUND PRESCRIPTION GLASSES at 2nd Ave.
    and 54th St., Holmes Beach on May 24, 1999. Call
    778-4709.


    BRADENTON CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL honor
    student seeks house-sitting opportunities. July -
    August 15, 1999. Call Laura at 778-1972.


    CRITTER SITTER. Going away and your pets have
    to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
    water and lots of TLC! 778-6000.


    1992 BUICK CENTURY wagon. White and wood-
    grain. Low mileage, 74,000. A/C, cruise control, all
    power. One owner, excellent car. $5,400. 778-4029.
    SEVEN-FOOT CAMPER top for Jeep Comanche.
    Like new $75. 778-7589.


    YACHT CLEANING by Carleen. Detailing, wax,
    maintenance programs. 15-years experience. Island
    resident. References available. 750-7337.
    CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
    aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
    Call 795-8299.

    WET SLIPS AND Hi 'N' Dry storage available at com-
    petitive rates in modem, full-service marina. 778-2255.

    BOAT STORAGE. $5.00 per foot, per month. Fuel,
    bait, ice, and more available. Island Marine, 412 Pine
    Avenue, Anna Maria. 778-1260.

    ISLAND MARINE BOAT Rentals, motor repairs,
    bottom painting, etc. Full service facility. 412 Pine
    Avenue, Anna Maria. 778-1260.


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    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 N PAGE 27 Il


    A 9


    OFFSHORE CHARTER FISHING with Captain
    Glenn Corder aboard Deep South. Half and full day.
    For information call 778-1203 or Mobile 713-5900.

    WANT TO GO to Cuba? Experienced blue-water sailor
    needed for race. Goodwill mission. Leaving May 28,
    must have passport. Ask for David, 778-7978.

    1987 BAYLINER, 20.7-FT, Capri 5.0 OMC I/O, low
    hours, cuddy, new bimini, $1,800. (727) 845-5689.

    BOAT SLIP FOR rent, Anna Maria Island. By month
    or year $75 per month. Phone Orlando, 407-851-
    5858 or write PO Box 560922, Orlando, FL, 32856.

    1979 BOAT AND TRAILER 21ft. Enterprise, open fish-
    erman and trailer, set for large motor. Asking $1,500 or
    best offer. 778-2462, 507 59th St., Holmes Beach.

    I
    BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
    applications for part-time cooks and full and part-time
    servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
    Bradenton Beach.

    SUMMER WORK FOR college students and 1999
    high school graduates. $10.25 per hour/base. Flex-
    ible part-time and full-time. No experience necessary.
    Entry level sales/service. Will train. Scholarships
    available, conditions apply. 927-8868.

    HOUSEKEEPING FULLPART-TIME. Good benefits,
    pleasant working conditions. Resort 66, 6600 Gulf
    Drive, Holmes Beach and Via Roma Beach Resort,
    2408 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach.

    NURSERY CARE GIVER and organizer. Part-time,
    paid position, Sundays 8:45 11:15 am. Roser MC
    Church 778-0414.

    ANNA MARIA RESORT Housekeeping, flexible hours,
    top wages, pleasant working conditions, generous
    amenities. Begin at once. Please call 778-4784.


    The ultimate condo, this unit has everything.
    Extra large paver drive, central vacuum,
    beautiful tile floors, extra large deck and
    screened porch, storm shutters, plantation
    shutters, beautifully turn-key furnished and
    more. $199,000. Call Robin Kollar.


    SERVERS, BARTENDER, dishwashers. Buccaneer
    Inn 383-5565.

    EXPERIENCED LAWN CARE worker wanted. Part-
    time knowledge of all equipment edger, weed-eater,
    blower, mowers. Dependable, must have car or truck
    and phone. Great pay for right person. 778-5294.

    LONGBOAT CHEVRON weekend/evening help
    needed. Located on north end of Longboat Key 383-
    2110 or 383-2980 Robby.

    NOW HIRING ALL positions. Rod and Reel Pier.
    Apply in person. 875 North Shore Drive.

    CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
    meet interesting people from around the world? Are
    you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
    Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
    torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
    NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

    VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
    Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.



    PARTNER WANTED in established local hair salon.
    Little or no capital investment required. Must be
    responsible, professional and highly motivated to suc-
    ceed. Stylists, if you dream of becoming a salon owner,
    this is your opportunity knocking. Call Loretta at Lor-EII
    Beauty Salon 778-7767. All replies confidential.



    STATE CERTIFIED CNA/home health aide/compan-
    ion available for a variety of duties. Monday through
    Friday, mornings, afternoons or evenings or eight-
    hour shifts. For appointment, call Robert 747-7958.



    MAN WITH SHOVEL Plantings, natives, mulching, trim-
    ming, clean-up, edgings, and more. Hard-working and
    responsible. Excellent references. Edward 778-3222.

    HANDYMAN ODD JOBS, repairs. Reasonable
    rates. 778-2584.


    THE VIEWS LOOKING SOUTH towards Sarasota are breathtak-
    ing. Elegant homes in guarded community on Sarasota Bay. Enjoy
    the security, solitude and beauty of Tidy Island. Excellent value.
    Priced from $179,000. Bob and Penny Hall 749-5981. C34359
    ',4 V!4 k-:


    LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appoint-
    ments, airports, cruise ports. Flat rates: Sunshine
    Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476.

    BANKRUPTCY $200, Divorce $150 to $200. Adoption,
    corporations, modifications, power of attorney, name
    change. Suncoast Paralegal Services 742-4788.

    POOL REMODELING, remarciting, cage additions,
    poly removal, new deck surfaces, concrete work. Is-
    land resident. State licensed and insured. 951-4007.


    HOUSE CLEANING wife and husband team special-
    izing in vacation turnarounds and residential. Area
    residents since 1966. Hardworking, dependable, in-
    sured. 761-1863.

    CHAMBERLAIN PROFESSIONAL CLEANING.
    Insured, affordable, dependable, honest. Island resi-
    dent, free estimate. 750-4772, leave message.

    THE HONEY DO MAN Handyman. Odd Jobs, small
    jobs, repairs. Licensed, insured. Free estimates
    778-5003 or 726-1067.

    HAVING A MAC ATTACK? Call for help with Mac or
    PC. Training, internet, hardware selection and instal-
    lation. Call Ed, 778-2553.

    THE GIRLS Professional Mobile Detailing! We will
    clean, polish and protect your auto, boat, RV at your
    location. Exterior/interior. 778-1924.

    WEB STATION business and personal Internet web
    site design and maintenance. Phone: 779-2276, fax:
    778-3038, e-mail: rafcorp@pcsonline.com or http://
    www.rafcorp.com/webstation.

    COMPUTER HELP/Web design. Kelly Z can teach
    you about computers. Design, code and post busi-
    ness or personal web sites. 727-5066.

    PAINTER SEMI-RETIRED painter seeks exterior
    paint jobs. 35 years local experience, satisfaction
    guaranteed. Top quality work at very affordable
    prices. 761-1863.


    COCONUT BAYOU on Anna Maria Island. Tropical hideaway with
    4BR/4B basks in Florida sunshine. Stunning drama in this waterfront
    residence with 30 ft. of glass overlooking bayou. $559,900. Sandy
    Drapala 794-3354 or Kathy Marcinko 792-9122. R37933


    BEACH HOUSE on Anna Maria. Breathtaking views of CASTNETTER APARTMENTS directly across from Public Beach.
    Tampa Bay and Egmont Key, sea birds, porpoises and gor- Overlooks the Gulf of Mexico. Consists of four buildings, NW building
    geous sunrises. Open floor plan, 3BR/2.5B, two-car garage. offers owner's unit, rental unit and office and two-car garage. All other
    $595,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200. R34157 buildings offer two units. $1,500,000. Don Lewis 746-3200. CM31317
    WATERFRONT LOTS/ACREAGE MAINLAND
    EXCEPTIONAL SAILBOAT WATER. Two THROUGH THE WOODS to private 20 CORDOVA LAKES PHASE I. Concrete
    lifts, 51-foot dock for three boats. Light and +/- acres of pasture and palmettos away block, split plan home located on cul-
    bright, immaculate 3BR home with a great from the crowds. Solar powered well. de-sac. 2BR/2B, new appliances, perfect
    view. $319,900. Sandy Drapala 794-3354 or $81,000. Sandy Harmon 722-1347. condition. Fenced yard. $94,000. Janet Orr
    Kathy Marcinko 792-9122. R37734 L37853 747-4543. R37817
    SPARKLING WATER VIEW and lush tropi- i EXQUISITE HOME with marvelous land-
    cal foliage. Over 4,000 +/- sq. ft. of classical I escaping leading up the walkway to the tile
    elegance. Wood floors, fireplace and pool. foyer entry. Versatile floor plan, neutral
    $649,000. Sandy Drapala 794-3354 or Kathy l decor, white kitchen cabinets. $135,000.
    Marcinko 252-1618. R37457 Van Bourgois 761-0273. R37888
    1.75 +/- ACRES ON WARNERS BAYOU Available properties by the
    fully irrigated with dock. Terrific home opens week or by the month from AZALEA PARK HOME on beautiful park-
    wide for entertaining inside and out on the Anna Maria Island to Venice. like cul-de-sac. Just under 1/2 acre private
    large enclosed lanai with pool.4BR3.5B, for- Call one of our rental and lot. 4BR/3B, open design, like-new, reno-
    vations in 1996. Large heated pool.
    mal dining, living room and great room resort specialists. $249,900. Sandy Drapala 794-3354 or
    Zoned cooling and heated, two fireplaces. (941) 951-6668 or (800) 881-2222 Kathy Marcinko 792-9122. R36157
    $750,000. Pat Willingham 722-4412. R34191

    evOkSoiglz4!I1Ae[*Jhrd tonFlorida34203941752-01 vi
    440 Maate Aenu W stBaetn lrd 329*917860


    Residential Sales/Rental Division Licensed Real Estate Broker
    Residential Sales/Rental Division Licensed Real Estate Broker


    ANNA MARIA BAYFRONT LOT at 834 S. Bay Blvd.
    includes a front wall with gate and asphalt driveway,
    a seawall in very good repair, some sandy beach to
    walk, and 19,600 (100x196) square feet of land to
    build a better house than the one that burned down
    in the 1960s. Asking $400,000.
    SDoug Dowling Realty
    409 Pine Ave. Anna Maria, FI 34216
    Phone & Fax: (941)778-1222
    E-Mail: dougdowling@earthlink.net
    http://home.earthlink.net/-dougdowling/


    r


    t






    i[ PAGE 28 W MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


    Commercial Residential Free Estimates
    Sandys Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
    awn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
    I I i We Monitor Irrigation Systems
    S Service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
    778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
    Established in 1983
    @@ @[V(RoU@@N STATE LICENSED & INSURED
    @@N T['(U@T03 CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
    CONST RUCOTON JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
    CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Contractors
    CONSTRUCTION Building Anna Maria since 1975
    @@IGf@B iiO@V0Ki (941) 778-2993
    @@N -RUTBrOi@ ANNA MARIA

    Paradise Improvements
    Quality home repair and maintenance
    Steven Kaluza 778-4173
    Island References and Insured
    Painting. Drywall Tile Doors Screens Etc ...


    AIN (iHN f PlINTINO(
    Residential Commercial
    Check our references:
    "Quality work at a reasonable price.
    Licensed/Insured Serving Anna Maria Island Since 1986 761-8900

    WILSON WALL SERVICES
    Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
    Building Restoration Water Damage
    SInterior/Exterior
    25 Yrs Experience Island Resident 650-7871


    1AAt Horne Child Care solutions, Inc.
    "A child-care referral service providing
    professional, quality child care at your
    home, hotel or special evenT."
    778-0443

    Get It Together Inc
    Get organized: Home or Office
    Affordable Confidential
    Call me ... you need me ...
    Edie Force, Major Organizer, 778-7916


    STEVE ALLEN FLOORING
    SQuality Workmanship 15 Years Experience
    Unbeatable Pricing on Carpeting & Vinyl
    Ceramic Tile From $3.25 sq. ft. Installed
    Mobile Showroom, Free Estimates
    Fully Licensed and Insured i
    Call 383-5381
    or 506-3297





    CARL V. JOHNSON, JR.
    BUILDING CONTRACTOR

    Free Estimates Design Service
    Quality Fair.Prices

    (9411 795-1947 RRoos645


    ISLANDER


    Swn usaltprobllema?

    Mobile Detail Service
    comes to you!

    Most Cars: $95*
    *Wash, buff, wax, shampoo interior. Under
    carriage, tires and rims all treated and
    protected. Plus, engine pressure cleaning.
    $95 for small to mid-size cars. By
    appointment, at your home or office. Your
    car doesn't have to be driven anywhere! Let
    us protect and preserve your investment.



    KJO
    371-8006
    THE AREA'S #1 MOBILE DETAILER
    All cars/trucks personally serviced by Damon.


    IS ANDER C ASSFID
    SEVIESCotnud l* RNALCotneI


    DAYCARE PROVIDER will baby-sit your child seven
    days a week, 24 hours a day. meals included. Love
    children. Please call 778-9693.

    TOPS WITH MOPS specialized cleaning to suit your
    needs. Home or office, daily, weekly or occasionally.
    Call for free estimate 778-2234.


    JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE Lawns,
    native plants, mulching, trimming, hauling, cleanup.
    Island resident 25 years. Call 778-6508.
    CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING & MAINTENANCE Residen-
    tial/commercial, full-service maintenance, landscaping in-
    stallation, clean-ups, tree trimming, ponds, native plants,
    butterfly gardens. Excellent references. 778-5294.
    FREE SNOW REMOVAL Shell, dirt, mulch or stone
    delivered and spread for a small fee. Yard clean-up.
    Dump truck for hire. Free estimates. Call Dave
    Bannigan, 778-6972.
    ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair. If it's
    broken, we can fix it. Free estimates. Senior dis-
    count. Call 778-2581.


    PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN and instal-
    lation. Come in and choose from our huge selection
    of plants, shrubs and trees. Everything Under the
    Sun Garden Centre. 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes
    Beach. 778-4441.


    CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
    shampoo and steam cleaned. Living room/dining
    room $34.95. Free deodorizing. 794-1278.


    VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/
    exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island refer-
    ences. Dan or Bill 795-5100.
    JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
    contractors. State licensed and insured. Many Island
    references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
    INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
    prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops. ceramic & vi-
    nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
    Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
    INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
    mates. Thirty-three year Island resident. Call Jim
    Bickal at 778-1730.
    CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Island and off-Island ser-
    vice since 1975. Repairs and new construction. Free
    estimates, no overtime charges. (FL#RF0038118)
    778-3924 or 778-4461.
    ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
    craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
    Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
    ROOFING REPAIRS and replacements. Remodeling,
    repairs, additions, screen rooms, kitchens, baths. Free
    estimates. Lic#RC0045125, #RG0058589, #PE0020374.
    Insured. Call 720-0794.
    TILE, TILE, TILE. Ceramic tile supply and installa-
    tion. Quality workmanship. Floors and walls. Fully
    insured. Call 387-7153 or 750-5985.
    SCREEN REPAIRS, interior/exterior. Painting, tile
    work, ceiling fans. Concrete repair, all types of home
    repairs, drywall repairs, free estimates. 778-0410.
    PAINTER SEMI-RETIRED painter seeks exterior
    paint jobs. 35 years local experience, satisfaction
    guaranteed. Top quality work at very affordable
    prices. 761-1863.
    MR. BILL'S Handyman Service. Thirty years experi-
    ence, self-employed in the construction trades. I am
    handy to have around, 778-1110.
    THE WINDOW EXCHANGE Replace old windows
    with new single hung, awning, double insulated, your
    choice. Call 778-2462. Licensed, bonded and in-
    sured. Member of Island Chamber of Commerce.


    GULFFRONT STUDIO ANNUAL $725 per month,
    one only. 792-2779. Now rented.


    HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS CENTER Rental units
    available for commercial, retail and storage. Call 778-
    2924 for information.
    BAYFRONT COTTAGE WITH DOCK. Turnkey,
    beautiful view, covered parking. Available now. $350/
    week or $700/month. 794-5980.
    PETS WELCOME. 2BR/2BA, lovely furnished home
    on canal, with dock and fenced yard, in Coral Shores.
    Available March 1, by the week or month. Realtor/
    Owner 387-0533.
    FURNISHED 2BR/1BA near beach. Six month or
    annual lease. $650 per month. Lovely lanai and yard.
    No smokers please. 921-0074.

    HOLMES BEACH 3BR/3BA townhouse, pool,
    garage. Extra nice, convenient. Walk to beach, shop-
    ping, dining. May through September $600 week,
    $2,000 month. October through April $750 week,
    $2,600 month. Call 778-0167.

    FOR RENT ANNUALLY 2BR/2BA townhouse, unfur-
    nished. Near shopping and library in Seaside Gar-
    dens, Holmes Beach. $850 per month plus utilities.
    Call Betty Cole 779-1213.
    HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT HOME 2BR/2BA
    completely furnished. Dock on deep-water canal,
    garage, laundry, quiet street. Many extras. Monthly
    $1,600, weekly $550. 813-286-9814.
    HIDEAWAY COVE PANORAMIC BAYVIEW, nice,
    quiet, ground floor. One and two bedroom, fully-
    furnished, steps to beach, restaurants and more. Avail-
    able now through December. Also winter season and
    consider annual. No pets or smoking. 778-7107.

    AIMcmber FFMTA
    Karin M. Holloran, LMT, CNMT
    NEW OFFICE OPENING!
    MANATEE 4815 Manatee Ave. West
    MEDICAL 941-748-047
    MASSAGE Bring in thisadfor a FREEgft


    Tired of wading around?
    Cast a look in our direction -.J
    reel in_-voea drcInm job today!








    The Sandbar, Beach House and Mar Vista
    Restaurants are now accepting applications.
    All positions available, flexible schedule.
    Casual atmosphere. Comprehensive training.
    Competitive wages. Excellent benefits,
    including 401K, Health & Dental Plan, Credit
    Union, Health Spa Membership.
    AM and PM shifts available.



    200 Gulf Drive North,
    Bradenton Beach


    100 Spring Ave. 760 Broadway St.
    Anna Maria Longboat Key
    Apply in person. Monday-Friday. 3pm-5pm.



    H HAISSE G USED S E
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    AND ABOE EOUS l|ANT


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    SENDS ETTE SGT SANER


    ISe






    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MAY 26, 1999 0 PAGE 29 1i


    h2J~Ii~DZ *:ffUi TNE:* ,jI]
    JS ANDER LASSFIED


    SEASONAL RENTAL AVAILABLE monthly, weekly,
    May 1 through October 15, 1999. No smoking, no
    pets. 2BR/1BA, one and a half blocks to Gulf. Call
    778-0733.

    PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Our management fee
    is a flat fee, not a percentage. We provide the level
    of service you wish you had for far less than you are
    paying. We offer 30 years of local experience, a va-
    riety of management programs to fit your needs, an
    aggressive campaign, and a 100% satisfaction guar-
    antee. 761-1863, toll free: 1-800-716-0510.

    HOLMES BEACH OFFICE or retail space. Approxi-
    mately 1,300 sq. ft. Excellent parking with exposure
    on main thoroughfare. Call Smith Realtors 778-0777.
    SPECTACULAR GULFVIEW, new 3BR/3BA house
    or 1BR/1BA ground apartment located one house
    from beach, all extras. 106 72nd Holmes Beach,
    great seasonal rates. 778-1365.
    ANNA MARIA ISLAND paradise. 3BR/2.5BA, canal
    home, heated pool. Close to beach. $3,000 per
    month, $875 per week. 800-223-4472.
    ANNUAL 1BR in Holmes Beach. $500 month plus
    security deposit. Nice! Available now! 778-6541, 778-
    4084, or pager 569-1591.
    ANNUAL DUPLEX one block from beach. Large
    2BR/2BA, elevated, covered parking. $850 mo.
    ROOM FOR RENT in quiet Holmes Beach neighbor-
    hood. Laundry facilities, kitchen privileges. Month to
    Month rental. Call 778-0024.
    FOR RENT ANNUAL furnished 1BR/1BA close to
    shopping and beach. $560 per month plus electric.
    Available May 21. Great landlord 725-1304.

    ANNUAL RENTAL vacant, private 2BR/1BA upstairs
    duplex apartment with screened porch, one short block
    to Gulf. Clean, new air conditioning and paint. 203 72nd
    street. $695 per month plus utilities. No pets! Call Carol
    Saulnier at Green Real Estate 778-0455.

    NEWLrT-r=IMIRHED 2BR apartment in Old Florida
    beach cottage. WialkLto-ea",a. c hy $800 per
    month, annual. Call Russell at 378-4530.

    BRADENTON BEACH SMALL 2BR duplex in Old Bridge
    Village. Dock privileges, deck, lush grounds. $650 per
    month annual includes water. No pets. 778-4625.
    ANNUAL 1BR FURNISHED duplex at 5625 Gulf Dr.
    $650 per month plus $300 security includes water
    and garbage fees. No pets. 778-5114.
    ISLAND 1 BR/1 BA duplex style apartment in Holmes
    Beach, close to beach. Non-smoking, no pets. $575
    per month. Tenant pays all utilities except water.
    ISLAND 2BR/2BA duplex style in Holmes Beach,
    close to beach. Non-smoking, no pets. $775 per
    month. Tenant pays all utilities except water. For
    appointment call 778-8224.
    VACATION RENTALS 2BR apartments across form
    beautiful beach $350 per week. Summer dates still
    available. Almost Beach Apartments 778-2374.


    STEPS TO BEACH 2BR/1BA, unfurnished duplex in
    prime residential area. Washer/dryer, large yard.
    Small pet okay. Annual $750 per month plus $200
    utilities. Gulf-Bay Realty, 778-6602.

    Annual duplex, one block from beach. Large 2BR/
    2BA. Elevated, covered parking. $850 mo. Gulf-Bay
    Realty 778-6602.

    ROOM WITH PRIVILEGES 200 feet from beach 50
    feet from bay. Washer/dryer, cable, updated. $400
    plus half utilities or $125 per week. Deposit and ref-
    erences required. 778-2991..
    ANNUAL 1BR DUPLEX. Non-smoking, no pets. Near
    Anna Maria Community Center, 316 B. Hardin. Water
    and garbage included. $475 per month. 778-9378.
    SURF SIDE 2BR/1BA. Annual, $900 per month.
    Available now. 792-2779.

    2BR/2BA ANNUAL UNFURNISHED. Bright and spa-
    cious, new kitchen, appliances, tile, washer/dryer, etc.
    quiet, secure neighborhood, close to beach. $850 per
    month, first. last and security. Small pet considered,
    non-smokers preferred. 704-3171 or 779-2056.

    BAYFRONT GROUND LEVEL house 2BR/2BA,
    annual unfurnished, with dock privileges. No pets.
    109 13th St. South, Bradenton Beach. $1,100 per
    month. 322-2101.
    HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA with washer and dryer.
    Walk to beach and shopping. Call 795-2915.
    ANNUALS, ANNUALS, ANNUALS. 521 South Dr.,
    2BR/2BA, canalfront $1,500 per month. 304 Clark
    Dr., downstairs, 3BR/1BA, $800 per month. 770
    North Shore Dr., front 2BR/1BA, $700 per month.
    Call Betsy Hills Real Estate 778-2291.
    ANNUAL RENTAL: SPACIOUS, elevated 3BR/2BA
    home with open design and lovely screened deck. Double
    carport and storage. Short walk to beach and residential
    neighborhood. $1150 per month plus utilities. No pets
    please. Anna Maria Realty, Inc., 778-2259.
    ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA on canal with dock.
    - 778-7039.
    LARGE DUPLEX 200oo sq. ft. with garage in Sunny
    Shores. Quiet, close to everything, beaches. Avail-
    able June 1, $625 per month. 795-4432.
    HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 2BR/1.5BA elevated
    duplex. Screened porch, washer/dryer, dishwasher,
    undercover parking, storage. Nice place, nice loca-
    tion. $750 plus utilities. 778-2167.
    HOLMES BEACH ONE block to beach. Quiet, newly
    done, large 2BR/1BA. Annual unfurnished, no pets.
    $750 plus utilities. 778-6348.
    ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH great location, 2BR/
    1BA, $650 per month. 778-2658.
    1 BR/1 BA $540 per month. Steps to beach. First. last,
    security. 778-2658.
    HOLMES BEACH close to beach. 1BR/1BA, water,
    trash included. $550 per month. Ready now! 778-4010.

    ----- - - - -- -- 7


    HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
    DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person
    and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
    We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
    CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL : Minimum rate is $8 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50
    for each 7 words, Box: $2.50, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
    WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. We
    are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by
    phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your credit card information. FAX (941) 778-9392.
    USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
    -------------------------------------



    Run issue date(s)
    Amt. pd Date Please indicate: Ck. No. or Cash
    For credit card payment: U Lj UJ D No.
    Exp. Date Name shown on card:_
    5404 Marina Drive Fax: 941 778-9392
    Holmes Beach FL 34217 glSLANDEIMlaIlia Phone: 941 778-7978
    L----------------------------------------------I


    Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
    Call me to find the
    BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
    Homes Investments Condos


    IJ1G.NElQAl r,


    761-3100


    PJIJVTff IVG OEl/aineDigfen if/taug
    "Professional Excellence"
    Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
    Serving the Islands since 1969. 7785594 After 5 Call
    Licensed and Insured 778-3468

    R.T. (BOB) HILTON CONSTRUCTION
    Residential and Commercial. Remodel and
    New Construction. Island and Mainland.
    "DON'T SA Y HOW, SA Y HILTON"
    Lic. #CGC012191 747-1098

    Need PC assistance? Help getting on the
    Internet? "@Ease With PCs" can help. Instruction,
    problem resolution, upgrades. Most work done on
    your premises. Y2K TEST & FIX.
    Sorry, no Macs. Call Keith Allen 792-8718.


    Complete Corlan Counter Top Service
    Commercial Residential
    Dupont Certified
    Dave Spicer 778-2010

    RICK BOYCE CONSTRUCTION
    From the smallest repairs to major overhaul ...
    I do it all and you SAVE.
    778-5075 798-0078 PAGER
    20-years Island experience Insured Lic.# CGC038546

    Island Starter and alternator Service
    .ji .- Auto *Marine
    y Diesel, Foreign and Domestic
    5608 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach 778-0818 Behind the Auto Service Center

    Quality Work Licensed-Insured Reliable Service


    Bud Jackson

    Painting (Interior & Exterior)
    Carpentry Repairs


    (941)383-8301


    ISLANDER


    * sssnEl ~i


    Longboat Key, Fl


    IBYS *


    LOCATED BEHIND
    ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
    LP GAS RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
    $000 I ------"
    $800 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
    S2 ynderFILL EMERGENCY SERVICE* FREE ESTIMATES
    WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING








    WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
    N-U Residential Commercial
    %4W Restaurant Mobile Home
    \- Condo Assoc. % Vac and Intercom
    \4W Lightning Repair \ Service Upgrades

    COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

    David Parrish Owner
    Lic # ER0006385



    Serving the Beaches Since 1978







    LI PAGE 30 0 MAY 26, 1999 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


    RETLSCn9 :4,RAL ; -E7qnihte:


    CUTE ANNUAL 2BR/1BA lower duplex. 8108 Gulf
    Dr. $650 per month plus security. Includes cable,
    washer/dryer, water, trash, gas. 792-3226.
    SPECTACULAR OCEAN VIEW right on the beach.
    2BR/2BA for rent, newly renovated. Daily, weekly,
    monthly, seasonal. Reasonable rate. 778-4555.
    HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA, garage, new carpet and
    more. No pets or smoking. Nice and quiet. $750 per
    month. 776-1789.
    BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA with lanai overlooking water.
    Quiet complex with heated pool and tennis courts.
    Available now. 778-0510.
    SPACIOUS CLEAN AND brightly furnished 2BR/2BA
    close to beach and shopping. Cable, washer/dryer.
    Available now through October. 778-0510.

    BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA ideal neighborhood, steps to
    beach. White tile floors, immaculate. 1,200 sq. ft., all
    new kitchen and large pool. $1,200 month. No pets,
    please. Gulf-Bay Realty, 778-7244.


    PERICO ISLAND mint condition, one year old. 3BR/
    2.5BA, 1,726 sq. ft. Many extras $174,500. Call Mr.
    Bruno 800-631-2221, 792-8289.

    GULF FRONT LOT, dead-end street, one of a kind!
    There are no more like this. $399,000, 778-4523 or
    800-977-0803.

    SECLUDED, CHARMING BAYFRONT, updated Old
    Florida-style home surrounded by huge oaks on one
    plus acre. Located in NW Bradenton on Palma Sola
    Bay. 3BR/2BA, Mexican tile, private master suite.
    Dock, channel to bay and Intracoastal. Hemingway
    would love it, Price of $499,000 includes platted
    buildable lot. Call Helen Barry or Yvonne Higgins at
    Wagner Realty 761-3100.



    Hi! I'm Marianne
    Norman-Ellis.
    For any real estate needs,
    SI am ready and anxious
    to serve you. Call me at
    Mike Norman Realty
    778-6696


    ANNA MARIA CITY Custom canalfront home. 4,200
    sq. ft., 3BR/2.5BA, 2.5-car garage, pool, raised lot,
    dock, boat lift. Bright, open, great room layout. Tour:
    www.annamaria.net/1, $569,000. Broker participa-
    tion accepted. Call 778-4636 for appointment.

    BEAUTIFUL VIEW OF the bay from this brand new
    home. 1,764 sq. ft., 3BR/2BA elevated custom built
    home with decks. Offered at $229,000. Please call
    778-6724.

    GULFFRONT BEACH HOUSE 2BR/2BA ground
    floor on a 50 by 150-ft. lot to be completed in June.
    Nice, quiet, dead-end street. $525,000, 800-977-
    0803, 778-4523.

    BARK & COMPANY REALTY buyer's broker. Buyers
    represented. Steven M Bark, Broker. 383-1717 or
    720-3200.

    2BR/2BA CONDOMINIUM on Gulf. LaCosta, 1800 Gulf
    Drive North. $198,500. 404-656-7597. No Brokers.
    FOUR-PLEX 1BR's, plus 2BR/1 BA cottage. 203 2nd
    St. N., 103 Church St., Bradenton Beach. Positive
    cash flow. $299,000. 813-258-2411.

    KEY ROYALE CANALFRONT stucco 3BR/2BA,
    dock, sundeck, screened lanai, open and airy floor
    plan, totally refurbished, immaculate turnkey. This
    house will go very fast. FSBO $249,900. Open House
    Sunday, May 23, 1-3pm. 609 Ambassador Lane,
    Holmes Beach. 778-3099.

    BY OWNER, VERY NICE Holmes Beach duplex on
    double lot. Plenty of room for additions, pool, etc.
    One hundred yards to beautiful beach. Rental
    income! $199,000. Frank 761-9259.

    BRADENTON BEACH COTTAGE with Gulf view.
    Thirty steps beach. Reduced to $148,000. 778-7098.


    D.J.H. MORTGAGE

    Specializing in -...
    Mortgages for
    Anna Maria Island!
    Island Resident

    Call Dennis J. Hendrickson 778-5304


    DELIGHTFUL MOBILE HOME 3BR/1BA. Looks and
    feels like a small home. Decorated and remodeled by
    perfectionists. Land owned, Floridiana park fee only
    $65 per month. Includes water, sewer, trash. Near
    Cortez Plaza in Bradenton. $44,000. Yvonne Higgins
    at Wagner Realty 761-3100.
    KEY ROYALE BY owner 3BR/2BA with large yard.
    Room for additions, pool, etc. Nice quiet street.
    $20,000 under anything else on Key at $189,000.
    Hurry! Will sell quick. 761-9259.
    SEASIDE GARDENS 2BR/2BA villa close to beach
    and bay. Nice sunroom and single attached carport.
    Priced to sell! Call Norma Niles at'Georgia Anthony
    Real Estate 752-4147 or 725-1834.
    HOLMES BEACH TIMESHARE unit for sale. On the
    Gulf, fully furnished, 1 BR. Week #27, July 3-July 10,
    buy now and use this year. No brokerage fee. $3,000
    or best offer. 639-8388.
    HOW TO ADVERTISE
    DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wed. publication. UP to 3
    line minimum includes approximately 21 words $8.00.
    Additional lines $2.50 each. Box: $2.50. Ads must be paid in
    advance. Stop by or mail to 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach,
    FL 34217. We're located next to Chez Andre in the Island
    Shopping Center. More information: 778-7978.
    EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate adver-
    tising herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which
    makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or
    discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handi-
    cap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make
    any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial
    status includes children under age of 18 living with parents
    or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing
    custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not
    knowing accept any advertising for real estate which is in
    violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that
    all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on
    an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination
    call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing im-
    paired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.






    HOLMES BEACH BOATER'S DREAM
    S521 1 hll.Si (Valrlri nln) 41BR 2BA 5299,000.

    Call Judy McClosky, GRI 792-8387,
    Evenings 794-6360 [ |q


    'Buy it, sell it! Find it in The Islander Bystander
    *- -- -- --A


    MAS


    LAKEFRONT HOME 3BR/2BA home in
    Village Green. New A/C, water heater,
    washer/dryer. Large patio with caged pool,
    fruit trees, l.184,900. Dick Maher/David
    Jones 77a480Q. MLS 37861


    ANNA ISLAND HOME Spacious
    3BR/3BA ip~i.ttor plan, hardwood floors,
    fireplace, swined balcony, more than 4,000
    sq. ft. under one roof. Boat ramp and dock large
    enough to accommodate sailboat. No bridges
    to Tampa Bay. All this for $375,000. Elizabeth
    Andricks 778-4800. MLS 32547
    (941) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-237-2252


    Visit Our Web Site
    http://www.paradiserealty.com


    -- I



    ISLAND GEM
    Contemporary 3BR/2.5BA large home,
    completely updated. Master bedroom and
    bath upstairs with balcony overlooking
    great room with skylights and vaulted ceil-
    ing. $185,000. Dick Maher/Dave Jones
    778-4800. MLS 36165







    BAYWATCH Beautiful 2BR/2BA bayfront
    complex. Spacious, open floor plan, turkey
    fumished. Intracoastal view with private boat
    and fishing dock. A rare opportunity to own a
    good investment property. $179,900. Elizabeth
    Andricks 778-4800. MLS#34463.

    5201 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217


    GULFFRONT SHOWCASE


    102 31st Street, Holihles Beachl
    $795,000
    Call Jane Tinsworthl
    at 795-3000


    Directly on Gulf Beach, this newer
    3BR has plantation shutters. Ander-
    son windows, solid oak spiral stair-
    case, two-car garage. Wood deck
    overlooks white sandy beach. Enjoy
    beautiful sunsets over the Gulf.
    Quality and beauty throughout.

    R.S. Olson Better
    Real EsLtate, Inc. I InH9 S1 o


    Why wait weeks for loan approval?
    We can give you an Approval in Minutes!
    Linda & Ted Davis, serving Anna Maria Island
    and the State of Florida with more than 35 years
    of combined experience.
    Compare our Low Rates and Fees.
    Call today. (941) 779-2113 or (800) 226-3351
    Licensed Mortgage Brokerage Business


    A iradise Rental Management, Inc.
    COMPARE:
    *i Hours of Telephone Coverage
    Amount of Advertising and Promotions
    International Contacts
    Occupancy Rate
    Total Rental Income Per Property
    1-800-237-2252 or 778-4800
    5201 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


    Just



    V ililOg


    paradise?

    You can keep up
    on real estate
    activity with
    a subscription to
    "the best news on
    Anna Maria Island"
    You'll get news
    about three Island
    city governments,
    Island people
    and more.
    Call (941) 778-7978
    and charge it to
    MasterCard or Visa
    or visit our office
    and subscribe
    in person -
    5404 Marina Dr.,
    Holmes Beach.


    LMTG:C


    ~b~J~


    0.1







    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 26, 1999 M PAGE 31 Ii[


    RENTALS
    Annual / Seasonal / Monthly / Weekly


    L. VACATION RENTAL
    Bayfront condo,
    2BR/2BA units.
    Call for rates.




    Sil REALTORS
    5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
    Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
    OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK










    o. REALTOR.
    "Wir Sprechen Deutsch"
    RESIDENTIAL
    DUPLEX 2BR/1.5BA each side. Family room and porch one side. Total
    2,300+ living area. 309 65th, Holmes Beach. $229,500.
    VILLAS WITH HEATED CAGED POOL. 4BR/2BA, 2,006 sq.
    ft. living area each side. Extras. Can condo'ize. $440,000
    WHITE AVE/BEACH ACCESS. 3BR/2BA. lot 100xl30.
    Immaculate, attractive, lush landscape. $375,000.
    CANALFRONT LOT Anna Maria 75 ft. front. $175.000.CHOICE
    ISLAND LOT 9,700 sq.ft., $108,000.
    BRAND NEW KEY WEST HOME 4BR/3BA with Gulf and bay
    views. Upgrades and extras. Shaft for elevator. $425,000.
    CALL US ABOUT BRAND NEW HOMES HERE NOW
    AND COMING SOON. From $150,000 and up.
    COMMERCIAL
    STYLING SALON Eight stations. Great location. $39,000 OBO.
    LOT C-2 Zoning.Walk to beach $150,000.
    HISTORIC BRIDGE STREET 2,400 sq. ft., three stores, 150 ft.
    to Sarasota Bay. Can add to size. Developing area. $355,000.
    VACATION RENTALS. Homes/Villas & Condos.
    ANNUAL: Waterway Condo $900/month.

    5508C MARINA DRIVE 778-0807 800-956-0807
    www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net. TDOLLYYOUNGREALESTATE.COM


    IF YOU WANT TO BUY OR SELL
    WATERFRONT PROPERTY ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
    CALL DON & KAREN SCHRODER.
    Our sales record speaks for itself. Six-month sales include:
    102 Tern Dr ............ Canalfront........ Selling and Buying Agents
    501 68th St. ............ Canalfront ....................... Selling Agents
    533 70th St. ............ Canalfront ....................... Selling Agents
    259 Gladiolus ......... Canalfront.... Selling and Buying Agents
    2118 Ave. E.............. Gulffront ........................ Selling Agents
    609 Baronet Ln....... Canalfront....................... Selling Agents
    610 Hampshire Ln.. Canalfront....................... Buying Agents
    502 Bay Dr. S........... Bayfront ........................ Selling Agents
    616 Baronet Ln........ Bayfront ....................... Under Contract
    TO SELL YOUR PROPERTY NOW, CALL US!
    DON & KAREN SCHRODER
    RE/MAX Gulfstream Realty
    941-778-2200






    Wedebrociae e Company



    THREE GULFFRONT

    ISLAND RESORTS FOR SALE

    Island Resort Hotel outstanding oppor-
    tunity. Year-round occupancy 92%, $506k-
    plus NOI asking $5,250,000.

    A gracious renovated classic 1930's island-
    style resort, $350k gross, asking $1,795,000.

    Casey Key t -
    eleven units- "
    $1,445,000. "



    CallJames E. Foster CCIM
    Realtor Commercial Division
    Sales 941-383-5543
    Eves 941-377-9793 Toll-Free 1-800-335-5543


    HOME MORTGAGE LOANS

    Little or no down payment
    No income verification
    i Loans up to $3,000,000.00
    Condos and investment properties
    Call Derrick S. Rushnell
    asmaaS LB359-3659
    * .m .. Licensed Mortgage Brokerage Business


    .1 ,


    BAYFRONT ELEGANCE Magnificent residence with spectacular bay views. 3BR/2.5BA,
    great room, eat-in kitchen, separate dining and living rooms, large master bedroom and
    bath overlooking bay, ten-foot ceilings, oak floors throughout and a six-car garage. Heated
    pool and deep-water dockage. $695,000. Call Dave Moynihan at 778-2246/778-7976 eves.


    RUNAWAY BAY Fully-furnished, bright
    sunny condominium unit at Runaway Bay
    with lagoon view. Clubhouse, tennis and
    pool. Walk to beach. Great vacation or
    rental home. On-site property manage-
    ment. Call Ed Oliveira 778-2246/778-1751
    eves. $129,900. #27160


    BAYFRONT LOT Spectacular views of bay from
    this rare bayfront lot centrally located between
    the Manatee and Cortez Bridges. Lot measures
    65-by-100 feet, is seawalled and ready for con-
    struction. Offered at $215,000. Contact David
    Moynihan 778-2246/778-7976 eves.


    PLAYA ENCANTADA 2BR/2BA unit
    located tennis court side of first-class
    Gulffront complex with pool/spa, tennis and
    on-site manager. Offered at $154,500. Call
    Dave Moynihan 778-2246/778-7976 eves.


    HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE WITH
    INCOME Newly listed 3BR/2.5BA residence with
    garage and attached 2BR/1BA apartment for ad-
    ditional income. Large 88x117 lot with short walk
    to beach and shopping. Offered at $172,500. Call
    Dave Moynihan 778-2246/778-7976 eves.


    S J i 'r,: 1. 1:, i l a. I.. i n: ', i I ,r I, I r r.. rl r i, i rrc
    I-', : n salc. L,.ri hiad be-n i f 'ldc rir it .l ., r,. : t ,Lunr Iorrw
    2' *.-., '1hi. r.d,,rp d F,%.n :MN tii,:,.. H l r, p[idj .irrrndjd
    E cl ,',_t lidI .: 1-,,. I .., I. J '. ,i rl rh, .l i icc .-. j n ri
    .- ,t" ,-, li,..: p -J ,. ,i ii Dri .. ...r-'.u ll tiir [.;r L. .ri tnd :,.u I
    hi 'Ll' r.. C ill I... l it. ,.


    IN11-ESMENT OI'IORTUNITn

    .K ,r *:.n ,ijl f [ .Ii \. r. .,, ion, il-.. beahc l
    '.o ,:,1t li i ,i ,3";% 01),) Bc,, ,, _mainir [,'[ ll'i S f,.Ir

    CEDARS EAST CONDO LONGBOAT K.E.
    Prn.o. REDUCED' 2BR 2:B -r.. nh. ,u- ,n r,.,,,I

    r ... le ] rc.,a ir O ., .
    in i r'l i]"I .m)fl. C ill R..,btii Sr IL w ". O. ,
    ..*.rO-.'i cc:


    SPACIOUS EL.EG \NC(F
    R ,r P /P IPt .A 'X N ,b V i.,,,, ,,-J 1 .,,, _.-

    ..ii, bi ib i.r.,,nn l .l :nl n. ,.r. [l.:h.l,.. .i .,,, ,.' ii:
    Bil: N doNand : D.icp,,rr h;.l hcf,,,in ..,.krO b-1- L.
    in [, lf t l,-u, otho.. _` 1 ,.ii' B.I.%1 Siinmi i'[.
    N .imrr ri c. -> ",'' i'lls "-, i Il.,
    BRLND NEW' MODEL NOW' OPEN!
    -'.' U| .,-:, MF i !). .1 f :. ,It, I [-.m n ,
    I, h -r PE P It' 1_ S -'% 1T. E ', inc .. ., ,
    .. ,o u r .B.,..,. r, -, '.r i. I, ...... ,-, ,,.,
    i -l. c F i r- c p- iL, : t r. i : r. ,, 1n1 ,, 1 r., .r
    E d i ,, ,.r *", '' *' S ....


    WEEKLY-MONTHLY-SEASONAL-,ANUIAL


    Fi-lh 2BR/2BA homern 1 li, '.ll t 1,-. Ip
    t',iiii, of ie [hr lust on L.l,-':k .. rl-,. li ,..h
    . i; prr i[e h .a:l: .prd arJ d.:p.'... r .lr.a iri l
    (- .ill .lcrn e KI'U C, jr -,i n-w'i t',, iii,,r
    i l'.r i ir' ,rw


    I O ip n a n d # 1 R e t a C m p nyin M a n ateIC o u n t I


    2501 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach, Fl 34217

    PROUDLY INTRODUCES ...
    Ann Harmon
    Licensed by the
    State of Florida as an:
    Accredited Residential Manager
    Ann has managed rental properties on Anna Maria Island
    during the past two decades and is considered to be one of the
    best property managers in the area.
    Her methods of property marketing include but are not limited to:
    * The internet
    * Direct mail
    * Local advertising media and signs
    * Regional advertising
    * Service organizations
    Services to landlords include the following:
    * Full-time leasing and management
    * Accurate and timely accounting
    * Payment of monthly expenses
    * Property inspections and evaluation reports
    * Renovation development and project supervision
    * Assistance in equipping, upgrading and maintaining properties
    Ann is committed to full service management. If you want your
    seasonal or annual property managed by a respected, experienced
    and reliable Property Manager, please contact he at Old Florida
    Realty Company.
    CALL FOR SPECIAL SIGN UP INCENTIVE
    941 778-6849 800-778=9599 fax: 941 778-1907
    www.oldfloridarealty.com


    i'.
    i.


    I1


    '., /









    OM PAGE 32 0 MAY 26, 1999 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

    No. 0530

    APOSTROPHES IN THE HEADLINES 1 2 3 415 16 7 i 9 10 112 13 14 11 16
    BY CATHY MILLHAUSER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 17 1- t 212E


    ACROSS
    1 Halfofa 1955
    merger: Abbr.
    4 Florida
    footballer
    9 "Zip--Doo-
    Dah"
    13 Mallow family
    plant
    17 Strive
    18 Horror film
    director George
    19 Like relaxed-fit
    jeans
    21 Conch shell
    effect
    S22 VIOLENCE ON
    THE ICE GETS
    OUT OF HAND!
    26 Some Iroquois
    27 Burdens
    28 Releases
    29 Great bargain
    30 Shoe
    strengthener
    31 Does something
    appealing?
    32 Ending with
    Smurf or Rock
    35 Dormmate
    38 Word on the
    Great Seal
    42 CONCERT
    ENDS WITH
    DISH ON FAN'S
    HEAD!
    48 Partially
    49 "The Sound of
    Music" song
    50 Hibernia
    51 Doin

    -1~,L'


    52 Half-and-half 105 Dancing man in
    half "Dancing Lady"
    54 Dudley 109 Zealous
    Do-Right's 111 Don't mind
    beloved 113 ONE PART OF
    55 -Tan (cigar EMPLOYEE
    brand) RETURNS TO
    56 Paesano's land JOB!
    57 Clueless 116 As old as --
    59 Ref. room 117 Postembryonic
    offering 118 With class
    61 Chapeau's perch 119 A.A.A.
    63 INSURGENT'S recommenda-
    PARKA IS tion
    GUNFIRE 120 Bank take-back
    CASUALTY! 121 Campaigner's
    71 Michigan stand
    college 122 Kind of mail
    72 Blue shade 123 Teakettle sound
    73 Section of DOWN
    Queens I One of the Three
    74 Five-iron, once Musketeers
    78 Year in the life 2 Attack locale
    of Constantine 3 French school
    81 Figures on 4 "Tauromaquia"
    Pharaohs' artist
    headdresses 5 Rockers'
    83 Afoam equipment
    84 Basket material 6 Part of A.T.&T.:
    85 Symbol on a Abbr.
    phone button 7 Electioneer
    86 Works with 8 Shade of blue
    measures 9 Alot, maybe
    88 Back-to-sch. 10 First of two
    times related lists
    89 OPERATING 11 German resort
    PHYSICIAN 12 Overflowing
    HASTROUBLE 13 Lunchbox treat
    WITH STATIC
    CLING! 14 Brown and
    Williamson
    93 Squid squirts brand
    94 Back-baring top 15 Large number
    95 Autocrat 16 Pounds' sounds
    96 Church center 18 Colorful
    97 Juanita's "those" partridge
    100 Not upright 20 Union member

    STUMPED? Answer
    three


    23 1990's car
    24 Prefix with
    version
    25 "The Nanny"
    network
    30 "-- off to see
    the Wizard"
    31 Ancient Semite
    33 Pro--
    34 Window over a
    door
    36 Chit writer
    37 Medley
    38 --cosa
    (something
    else): Sp.
    39 Kind of time
    40 Lucie's father
    41 Readytogo in
    42 Somewhat,
    slangily
    43 "Er... um..."
    44 Poet/dramatist
    Larry et al.
    45 Country towers
    46 One who makes
    a bundle
    47 Checks to make
    sure
    48 Fraud
    53 Heavy sweaters
    56 Oft-misused
    contraction
    58 Something
    underfoot?
    60 Criticize,
    slangily
    62 Catholic
    Reformation
    writer
    64 Feeling
    65 Animal with
    striped legs
    66 1997 boxer of
    the ear?
    67 Extinguish


    79 Four-striper: 96 Biomed.
    Abbr. research agency
    80 Rock's M6tley 98 Lord's workers


    82 Gnats, rats, etc.
    85 Drooled
    87 Married mujer:
    Abbr.
    90 Zhivago
    portrayer
    91 Ragu alternative
    92 Lush, in a way


    99 Alan of
    "Havana"
    101 Throw, as a
    grenade
    102 Certain girders
    103 Sunnites and
    Shiites, e.g.
    104 Wee ones
    105 At a distance


    106 Pro or con
    107 Kisser
    108 Shots, for short
    109 Morales of"La
    Bamba"
    110 Hand-held holers
    11l Vierpreceder
    112 "- showyou!"
    114 Posting at SFO
    orLAX
    115 Old Spanish
    queen


    ers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
    clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 95o per minute for the call.


    Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.




    - '


    PERICO ISLAND TREASURE There ii roomrr
    galore in Inis 3BR 3BA oIwnvrhime Lour ma.nr
    nance and many real arriniiies' $125I' 000
    Tony Titerini 778 221 LS': 7835






    -_pIia.a. "


    PERICO BAY CLUB LIpda te, 28R'2BA wlrr, Ile ant
    tlaie Waler,,,iew from I nna C,'nl, I.e mrinules lo Gull
    beaches Live iniropical splerinr': lO 109.000 ranch '
    Fasel and Douq Newcomer 7.8-22.61 MLSLt37808


    ACROSS FROM PALMA SOLA GOLF
    COURSE 2BR 2 SB Spar.nih sile l:wnr.,me in
    Heatrier Run rmall pr. .a3le c'1mpie S l05.00i C
    trjoreen Roberts 778-2261 .1 LSnl35.46.


    I, i...-.',,' h ir,


    rN

    eull 1 i r,,;n


    FORTY THREE WEST cu.ndc: .,n Iaik' .'BR
    'BA wo.'h Ill a1. giaraqge anrd 28I lanaii
    Superior locale lui'_ '-i1 ameniiie'': .m 9600
    Shella Kid 7"8-J 21 1.1LS3783-8

    LOTS & ACERAGE

    Ellnlion Chard Winhenm
    $24.900 Gre.,a jl ol r.tl, rc,. -,lip in Ellenion
    Crii ri3 Wrinhiem
    S25.900 Willo,.. ~h.:.ri- I01 In PFrr,Er T.:.n,,

    $89.900 Cone: R:,ad ,~'.,:Timrieriol .i-iri, Sunren
    S275.000 Terra Cei3 11 ', + a:.res ilJceen
    Rubens
    S399.500 BaV Hart.:.r Anna Mararlc Ric
    Scrhncerr


    ANNUAL RENTALS
    Perico Bay -j 1 n.i 1 ..: : ..rl.:..:. : .' ,uj'


    T i d y I s l a n d :. ,,..l ,-; i . r e iC ,:r.
    .tir "I.:'raje .'. i ,-: c,,:. : 1 ,ri
    SEASONAL CONDO & HOMES
    STILL AVAILABLE
    Call Missy Laps at 778-9611
    Toll Free 1.877.651.0123


    L"'i


    EAGLE CREEK upild .r -2 R 2BA unir ,..r.
    k, P nalm %Are Lal. 'g-ll ur_: Turnl, ,
    lurn.ii-r.d rnewv ceran.mi i: Iil. a3rn. arpe -l ,- 991.)
    Susan H.-ll,.o.":o:d 778 2261 r.lLS0'3-.?










    SANDY POINTE Da,ltrnil compi-'l 2Bi 2BA
    0'. erl,-oKi,_ p."o,:I and'i nature pree-.er. 5 ,r r e.alk
    10 beach I1.110 000 1 ,B' tle Ch)a i 77 --e-'61
    MLSQ36759


    CORDOVA LAKES Lilri tr dril, 3BR -'BA
    ,-.pen n au]1S .:elr... er,:l.;,ed lara, Prr:e
    reduce ,] r,:, o 1,:,- 90,.) C,.:,u ra .e',:,,ner -8 .
    ;'j l /.lL'.,# :) ,2 ..


    Sj I . -, *.,,. I.. .


    CIr., ....1r .,l


    ar, L v,.,O r.h











    ~i c.








    ,1.1. 3 J 1 i,


    3'




    tl,: t1n .h -






    irF
    T,'.. T, 2 ,,





    ,i ,',,.















    T ,- ,,T
    Mc -.- l j. j








    i





    . *..I 'i*J


    - L 41-,


    68 Corinthian, for
    one
    69 Gossamer
    70 Those opposed
    74 -- operandi
    (ways of
    working)
    75 "... unto us -
    is given"
    76 Like some jokes
    77 "-- a Rebel"
    (1962 Crystals
    hit)







    SPECIAL SECTION: PREPARING FOR STORMS





    l" JIl i


    SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30,1999


    Dunked
    Tropical Storm
    Josephine swamped
    Anna Maria Island the
    night of Oct. 8, 1996.
    Although the storm
    packed winds of only
    50 mph when in blew
    through, the storm
    surge and high tides
    were enough to cover
    much of the Island,
    including this car in
    Holmes Beach. Al-
    though streets and
    some houses were
    flooded, the brunt of
    the blow hit the
    beaches, pulling sand
    offshore along the
    length of the Island.
    Islander Photo:
    David Futch


    ./

    By Paul Roat
    A n Atlantic hurricane forecaster is predict-
    ing an "very active" storm season for
    1999, with 14 named tropical storms
    forming between June I and November
    30. Four of the storms are predicted to be severe.
    Dr. William Gray, a storm forecaster from Colo-
    rado State University, bases his predictions on a va-
    riety of weather conditions from around the globe.
    Although still smarting from a botched prediction of
    much more activity than actually occurred last year.
    Gray is usually very accurate in his prognostications.
    Among the things Gray and his team monitor to
    make storm predictions are weather patterns in Af-
    rica. When the region there is wetter than usual,
    hurricane formation in the Atlantic is generally in-
    creased.
    The prediction of 14 storms is judged to be
    above average for the Atlantic and Caribbean; a typi-
    cal year brings 9.3 tropical storms, 5.8 hurricanes
    with 2.1 intense storms.
    Other factors Gray and his group take into ac-


    count in the forecast include water te
    the north, east and tropical regions o
    Ocean, a high-pressure ridge located nc
    in the North Atlantic. temperature and
    ings in West Africa, Caribbean sea-I
    readings, temperature readings about
    above Singapore and wind speed glo
    40,000 feet.


    -^ -^ *#i-.p*,i| -y.i-


    mperatures in The period between 1995-98 was the busiest
    f the Atlantic four-year period for hurricane activity on record.
    ear the Azores The four-year span generated 53 named storms and
    pressure read- 33 hurricanes. 15 of which were intense. Based on
    evel pressure that record, Gray maintains his theory that the Atlan-
    it 54,000 feet tic is entering an era of increased hurricane activity
    bally at about which will include particularly intense, major hurri-
    canes.


    How hurricanes came to be named


    Andrew, Hugo and Camille are common
    names to hurricane watchers, but the naming of
    storms is a relatively new aspect in the science of
    studying whirly weather.
    An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge,
    was the first to use female names in describing
    tropical storms in the late 1800s, although he also
    PLEASE SEE NAMES, NEXT PAGE


    1999 Attlantic hurricane names


    Arlene
    Bret
    Cindy
    Dennis
    Emily
    Floyd
    Gert


    Harvey
    Irene
    Jose
    Katrina
    Lenny
    Maria
    Nate


    Ophelia
    Philippe
    Rita
    Stan
    Tammy
    Vince
    Wilma


    The Anna Maria Fire District is seeking written notice from Islanders who
    may need special assistance in the event of a hurricane evacuation.
    The information requested includes:
    Date.................... .......... Phone .................. ..................
    N am e...................................................
    Island A address .....................................................................
    SType of assistance needed ............... .............. .... .. ..........




    (Explain what your situation is and what type of assistance you 'need.)
    Please r.-;! or dei's." the form to:
    Anna Maria - District
    g8 6001 .-''- Drive, Holmes ': : FL .17
    i SS ', ^ = -3 E 3 -E3 a = r 5S


    RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation needs, medical problems
    or need transportation off the island, you need to be registered.
    BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on Anna Maria Island that
    provides essential materials or services to the community you may be
    given preferential return privileges after a hurricane evacuation. Submit
    a request to your CITY HALL. If approved, you will receive a letter
    authorizing your early return. Your request should include a list of
    employees you would need to return early.
    EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on or off the island, they must
    have written authorization from your C']TY HALL to come on the
    island to work after a hurricane evacuation.
    To :'i.r, or for further information ..'.7 your City Hall.
    Anna Maria ( '.H :;...; .... 778-0781
    Bradenton .. City .7..,.. 778-1005
    Holmes -: ... City Hiall ........ 708-f,:':







    K[] 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL E] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


    Living in a post-disaster world on Anna Maria


    "W hen l'te gves you lemons, make
    lemionade."

    By Paul Roat
    "There is little doubt about it sooner or later,
    another big hurricane will come. Atmospheric scien-
    tists and emergency planners agree that it's just a
    matter of time before some portion of Florida is
    struck by another catastrophic hurricane. No one
    knows when or where it will strike, but we do know
    that eventually it will blast ashore' somewhere and
    cause massive destruction perhaps even greater
    than that caused by Andrew. Since there is nothing
    anyone can do to alter that foreboding reality, the
    question is: Are we ready for the next great hurri-
    cane?"
    That quote is by Jay Barnes in his book, "Florida's
    Hurricane History." Unfortunately, his assessment is
    true, especially for residents of Anna Maria Island.
    Islanders have been spared the direct hit of a hur-
    ricane in recent history. However, from 1886 to 1995,
    71 storms came close enough to the Island to have an
    impact. Historically, that works out to one hurricane
    every 2.5 years.
    Five hurricanes passed across the Island, one of the
    worst in October 1921. That storm turned the area north
    of Pine Avenue in Anna Maria into a shallow sandbar.
    Today, that's the largest land area of the city. Passage
    Key, just north of the Island, once had a fishing village
    and freshwater lake. After the storm, and even today,
    Passage Key is little more than a sandbar.
    Damage will be in the tens of millions of dollars if
    a major storm strikes the Island. If evacuation orders
    are not heeded, the human damage through loss of life
    will be horrible.
    SBut the challenge will come through redevelop-
    ment. Do Islanders want to rebuild the Island as it looks
    today, or is there a better way to live on this narrow
    strip of sand?
    Those questions have been partially answered in
    the "Islandwide post-disaster redevelopment plan for
    Anna Maria Island," prepared by the Tampa Bay Re-
    gional Planning Council and completed earlier this
    month.
    The plan is the result of hundreds of hours of
    elected and appointed officials, staff members and citi-
    zens peering into crystal balls in an attempt to come up


    -U
    r--- -- .


    1'

    1id


    -r


    Kc W
    4.-


    This house in Bradenton Beach was lucky during Georges it was elevated, and flood damage was minimal.


    with some vision of the Island in the literal wake of a
    hurricane.
    Taking into account existing land uses and poten-
    tial redevelopment, transportation, drainage, and other
    issues, officials have produced a document that will
    serve as a springboard for rebuilding the Island.

    After tie storm
    When the winds have abated and the water has re-
    ceded, post-disaster planning begins. There are three
    stages to this process:
    Immediate emergency period will clear debris,
    conduct search and rescue operations and undergo an
    initial assessment of damages to the Island. This pro-
    cess is expected to take several days.
    Short-range restoration period will provide for
    minor or moderately damaged structures, plus damage
    assessment of all buildings. This process is expected to
    take several weeks or months.
    Long-range reconstruction period will allow for
    full restoration of services, reconstruction of all struc-
    tures, and total infrastructure repair. This process could
    take several years.


    If the Island is evacuated again, as happened last September with Hurricane Georges, don't expect to get
    back home any time soon. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


    Names
    CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
    named several after politicians whom he particularly
    disliked. Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up
    the practice during World War II, naming storms after
    their wives and girlfriends.
    In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
    designate storms, using common military letters of
    Able, Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, fe-
    male names became the norm, with the first two hur-
    ricanes dubbed Alice and Barbara.
    Complaints poured into the Weather Bureau from
    women upset that they alone were being singled out in


    describing wicked weather, but the practice continued
    until 1978, when hurricanes in the eastern Pacific were
    alternately named for men and women. In 1979, Atlan-
    tic hurricanes followed suit with Hurricane Bob the
    first "male" storm.
    Six bisexual lists of hurricane names were devel-
    oped by the World Meteorological Organization. The
    names were short, easy to remember and used names
    from three languages: English, French and Spanish. To
    receive a name, a tropical low-pressure center must
    develop at least into a full-fledged tropical storm with
    wind speeds between 39 and 73 mph.
    The lists are repeated every six years, although the
    names of killer storms are retired from use.


    Land use, redevelopment
    A central concern officials in the three Island cit-
    ies have in post-development planning is ensuring that
    there will still be three Island municipalities in the fu-
    ture. With massive destruction on the Island, the tax
    base which provides money to run city services will be
    gutted or stricken. Put simply: no taxes, no cities.
    Compounding the problem are federal rules that
    call for homes in what is referred to as "high-hazard
    zones" like the Island that suffer damage more
    than 50 percent of appraised value to be rebuilt to meet
    current building codes. Among those codes are eleva-
    Stion requirements of 13 to 17 feet above sea level.
    In other words, if more than half your house is dam-
    aged, you'll probably have to tear it down and put it on
    stilts. Demolition and construction could take up to a year
    or more. Federal Emergency Management Agency funds
    for low-interest loans probably will be offered, and insur-
    ance checks will be expedited, but the rebuilding of the
    Island will be a long, slow, expensive process.
    The post-disaster redevelopment plan encourages
    minor repairs to homes be completed as easily as pos-
    sible. But the plan also encourages reconstruction to be
    stronger to make it tougher for damage to occur in the
    next storm.

    Crystal ball time
    Although the post-disaster redevelopment plan
    offers a broad brush approach to rebuilding the Island,
    it also offers some "opportunities" for making things
    better thari today. Among the thoughts to be considered
    are the following.
    Consider the overall redevelopment of the Island,
    rather than just one community or one neighborhood.
    Consider compatibility when redevelopment oc-
    curs. One ground-level house in a neighborhood of stilt
    homes is an example of an incompatible neighborhood.
    With widespread destruction comes an opportu-
    nity to rid the Island of exotic plant species such as
    Brazilian pepper and Australian pine and replant the
    non-native trees with traditional Florida plants.
    Consider developing an Islandwide bicycle and
    pedestrian pathway.
    With massive property loss comes an opportunity
    to acquire sensitive lands for the public. While officials
    in all three Island cities agreed not to use municipal
    funds for such acquisition, other state or federal funds
    could be used to add more public beach or bay access.

    A look ahead
    Here's an interesting footnote to post-disaster plan-
    ning from the Virgin Islands.
    In 1995, Hurricane Marilyn struck the Caribbean
    island, killing 11 people and causing $1.2 billion in
    damage. Islanders repaired their homes, businesses and
    resorts.
    In 1998, Hurricane Georges struck the Virgin Is-
    lands. This time, though, no one was killed, and dam-
    age was estimated at $55 million. The difference was
    stringent building codes and ensured stronger and safer
    new homes that were better able to withstand a bad
    storm.
    There's a lesson to be learned here.


    L\ .*






    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER [E 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL I[]

    Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island


    Hurricanes are categorized based on the power of
    the storms. Storm categories allow emergency manage-
    -ment officials to determine time and need of evacua-
    tion.
    The Manatee County Emergency Management
    Division notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill
    you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
    tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
    more water."
    There's also a good chance officials will close the
    bridges to vehicles trying to evacuate Anna Maria Is-
    land at winds of less than hurricane force, providing yet
    another reason Island residents should plan to evacu-
    ate early.
    Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
    scale," called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, to
    assign storms into five categories. Rated from least to
    most powerful, the five categories and damage poten-
    tial are detailed below.

    Category 1
    Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
    shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
    homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
    signs. Storm surge is expected to be four to five feet
    above normal. Flooding is expected on barrier islands.
    Low-lying coastal roads may be inundated. Expect
    minor pier damage and small craft to be torn from ex-
    posed anchorages.
    Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
    leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in dam-
    age. Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category 1
    storm, causing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage,
    mostly to central Florida. Also, Hurricane Allison and
    Hurricane Noel of 1995 were Category 1 hurricanes at
    peak intensity.

    Category 2
    Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
    considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
    age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-
    structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
    doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to


    piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
    ages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight feet
    above normal with accompanying flooding.
    Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
    devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
    lion in damage. Also, Hurricanes Erin and Marilyn in
    1995 were both Category 2 hurricanes when Erin's
    eyewall hit the Florida Panhandle coast and when
    Marilyn passed through the Virgin Islands.

    Category 3
    Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will topple.
    Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
    down. Expect structural damage to small buildings.
    Many mobile homes may be destroyed. Storm surge
    nine to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along
    barrier islands and coastal areas. Large exposed build-
    ings will be damaged, and smaller structures will be
    destroyed by wave action and floating debris.
    Low-lying escape routes will be cut by rising wa-
    ter three to five hours before the arrival of the hurricane
    center. Terrain continuously lower than 5 feet above
    mean sea level may be flooded inland to a distance of
    eight or more miles.
    Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
    that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.
    Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm,
    killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in damage
    to eastern Caribbean islands. That same year spawned
    Hurricane Roxanne as a Category 3 storm at landfall on
    the Yucatan Peninsula.

    Category 4
    Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
    Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
    most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
    struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
    15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
    lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
    rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.
    Terrain lower than 10 feet above sea level may be
    flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential
    areas as far inland as six miles.


    Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
    that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
    ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Hurri-
    cane Donna.
    Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
    coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sus-
    tained winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than
    175 mph. More than 60,000 homes were destroyed,
    200,000 people left homeless, more than 2 million
    people evacuated, 15 people died and damage was es-
    timated at $20 billion. Hurricane Andrew was the third
    most intense hurricane this century, and caused the
    greatest loss of property of any hurricane in the United
    States.
    Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4
    storm, killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in dam-
    age, mostly in the Panhandle, although some damage
    occurred on Anna Maria Island as the storm tracked to
    the north. Also in that year, Hurricane Luis was a Cat-
    egory 4 hurricane while moving over the Leeward Is-
    lands, as was Hurricane Felix. Last year's Hurricane
    Georges was at one point a Category 4 storm, killing
    more than 500 people and causing more than $2 billion
    in damage.

    Category 5
    Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
    signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
    homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
    resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
    feet above sea level.
    There will be major damage to lower floors of all
    structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and
    within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation
    of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of
    the shoreline may be required.
    A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
    Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
    people died as a result of the hurricane. Hurricane Gilbert
    of 1988 was a Category 5 hurricane at peak intensity.
    Hurricane Mitch was a Category 5 hurricane, and
    was the third-deadliest storm on record, with more than
    10,000 deaths in Central America.


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    IIJ 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL [i] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
    1 I I


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    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E[ 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL IB


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    ~. ] 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL IK] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



    The flood that no one saw


    By Arthur B. Green
    Special to The Islander
    Residents of the barrier islands of Anna Maria and
    Longboat Key are no strangers to high water and
    flooded streets whether from hurricanes, near-miss
    hurricanes, "almost" hurricanes or tropical storms. But
    floods that pass in the night are something new.
    This one came by stealth and left the same way, but
    not before leaving graphic evidence of its brief visit in
    the shape of missing property, barren shrubbery, wilt-
    - .ing flowers and puzzled residents.
    This is the way one of those puzzled residents re-
    members that storm:
    The pre-millennium year 1999 began normally after
    the holiday season, but by the evening of Jan. 2 there were
    signs of an approaching thunderstorm with continuous
    lightning, heavy rain and rising wind. By the time most
    residents had retired, however, things seemed to have
    settled down. There was nothing to indicate that anything
    out of the ordinary was about to happen.
    Next morning the bayou was calm. Nothing out of
    the ordinary, just a regular high tide. Everything ap-
    peared normal except for a strange quietness every-
    where. But clumps of seaweed scattered all over the
    grass and flower beds indicated something out of the
    ordinary had happened.
    Closer inspection revealed that seaweed was not
    the only unusual accumulation. Debris of every kind
    had been caught in shrubbery or any place where it
    could come to rest. It began to look as if a major flood
    had taken place but there was no indication of it in the
    bayou, which was calm and at normal level. Neverthe-
    less, evidence of water in doorways and patios was
    everywhere confirming that indeed there had been
    flooding.
    Could the tide have risen so far during the night


    Checklist to get you
    If a hurricane strikes the coast of Southwest
    Florida, expect to be away from home if there is
    a home to come back to for at least three days.
    Maybe a week, or longer.
    There won't be power, water, telephones, ice or
    a nearby convenience store. You'll need to stock up
    on what you need to survive and wait it out.
    Here's a list of items experts suggest you have
    to weather a storm, and approximate prices.
    Fire extinguisher, $10.
    Clean containers to storm water, one gallon per per-
    son per day, $5.
    Food, canned or dry, $8 per person per day.
    Manual can opener, $2.
    Hand tools: hammer, nails, ax, knife, pliers, hand-
    saw, screwdrivers, $45.
    Electric drill with screwdriver bits to install bolts for
    window protection, $35.
    Unscented bleach to purify water (eight drops per
    gallon), $1.
    Soap, $2.
    One flashlight per person with spare batteries, $5.
    Battery operated radio, $15.


    Thanks to a little detective work the boat returned home safe and sound.


    and returned to normal by morning? It turned out that
    was exactly what happened.
    An inspection to determine what if anything was
    missing, damaged or just out of place was indicated.
    There is a dock on the property on which a small
    boat called a Landau had been parked. The name
    should not be confused with the horse-drawn open car-
    riages known as landaus that used to transport royalty
    and other VIPs to state functions. It is rather the trade
    name for a modest 10-foot aluminum boat. Although
    a line had been attached to the boat, it had not been
    secured to the dock.
    There was no sign of the Landau. Apparently it had
    realized freedom was at hand when the water came
    over the dock and floated peacefully away on a little


    ready for the worst
    First aid kit: bandages, gauze, scissors, petroleum
    jelly, antiseptic spray, hydrogen peroxide, antacids,
    aspirin, thermometer, rubbing alcohol, $15.
    Extra prescription medicine.
    Matches, preferably wooden, $1.
    Disposable eating utensils and plates, $2.
    Toilet paper, $1.
    Mosquito repellent, $4.
    Below are some things that will prove useful, but
    are deemed to not be essential.
    Gallon-size plastic freezer bags to fill with water to
    make ice, $2.
    Needle and thread, $2.
    Whistle and air horn, $4.
    Disinfectant, $2.
    Grill or Sterno stove with extra fuel, $30.
    Oven mitts, $2.
    Snake-bite kit, $10.
    Lantern with extra fuel, $10.
    Garbage bags, $2.
    Rope or heavy cord, 100 feet, $12.
    Tarpaulin to make temporary roof repairs, $10.
    Go shopping today.


    trip on its own. It was a shocking discovery.
    This was no ordinary boat. It had been willed to my
    wife by a close friend. It had a little outboard motor
    which had just been put in good working order and was
    ideal for cruising the bayou and canals in search of
    suitable places from which to sketch.
    A call to the insurance agent was cold comfort. A
    review of the policies revealed that the deductible
    clause exceeded the value of the missing boat.
    How does one go about finding a lost Landau? Was
    it still afloat? A check with the last one to see the boat
    indicated that the drain plug was in place, so the like-
    lihood of its being afloat was pretty good. It looked like
    a search of all the canals, inlets and backwaters of Anna
    Maria Island was indicated. A difficult task when there
    was no boat available.
    Could the police help? A visit to the local station
    in Anna Maria found a locked door and a number to
    call. A call to the number requested the caller to leave
    a message. Much to the disappointment and sorrow of
    the owner, it looked like the boat would have to be a
    write-off.
    A few days later I happened to see an officer in the
    parking lot at Rotten Ralph's restaurant. I described the
    problem of the lost boat to him and he said he would
    drop around and get the details and check the owner-
    ship and registration.
    Good as his word, a couple of hours later he came
    to the house and picked up the registration along with
    a description of the missing Landau.
    Two hours later a pickup truck identified as be-
    longing to the Manatee County sheriff pulled into the
    driveway and my officer friend was at the door. I didn't
    need to ask why. With a small boat that looked for all
    the world like the lost Landau projecting out the back,
    the reason for the call was obvious.
    And so thanks to the detective work of the local
    constabulary, the story of the lost Landau in the flood
    that nobody saw had a happy ending.
    (Editor's Note: The writer is a Canadian who win-
    ters on Anna Maria Island and summers in
    Mississauga, Ontario.)


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    THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER F] 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL i] -


    Hurricanes: what they are, how they form, what they mean


    By U.S. Department of Commerce
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    National Weather Service
    American Red Cross
    'There are no other storms on earth like hurricanes.
    Hurricanes are products of the tropical ocean and
    atmosphere. Poivered by heat from the sea, they are
    steered by the easterly trade winds and the temperate
    westerlies as well as by their own ferocious energy.
    Around the hurricane's core, winds grow with great
    velocity and generate violent seas.
    Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while
    spawning tornadoes and producing torrential rains and
    floods.
    Timely warnings have greatly diminished hurri-
    cane fatalities in the United States. In spite of this early
    warning system, property damage continues to mount.
    There is little we can do about the hurricanes them-
    selves. However, the National Hurricane Center and
    the National Weather Service field offices team up with
    other federal, state and local agencies, rescue and re-
    lief organizations, the private sector and the media in
    a huge warning and preparedness effort.

    Where they start, how they grow
    In the eastern .Pacific Ocean, hurricanes begin
    forming by mid-May. In the Atlantic Ocean, the Car-
    ibbean and the Gulf, hurricane development starts in
    June. For the United States, the peak hurricane threat
    exists from mid-August to late October, although the
    official hurricane season extends through November.
    In other parts of the world, such as the western Pacific,
    hurricanes can occur year-round.
    Developing hurricanes gather heat and energy
    through contact with.warm ocean waters. The addition
    of moisture by evaporation from the sea surface pow-
    ers them like giant heat engines.
    The process by which a disturbance forms and sub-
    sequently strengthens into a hurricane depends on at
    least three conditions.
    Warm waters and moisture are two conditions. The
    third is a wind pattern near the ocean surface that spi-
    rals air inward. Bands of thunderstorms form, allowing
    the air to warm further and rise higher into the atmo-
    sphere. If the winds at these higher levels are relatively
    light, this structure can remain intact and allow for
    additional strengthening.
    The center, or eye, of a hurricane is relatively calm.
    The most violent activity takes place in the area imme-
    diately around the eye, called the eyewall. At the top
    of the eyewall about 50,000 feet most of the air
    is propelled outward, increasing the air's upward mo-
    tion. Some of the air, however, moves inward and sinks
    into the eye, creating a cloud-free area.

    What hurricanes can spawn
    Storm surge is a large dome of water, often 50 to
    100 miles wide, that sweeps across the coastline near
    where a hurricane makes landfall. The surge of high
    water, topped by waves, can be devastating.
    The stronger the hurricane and the shallower the
    offshore water, the higher the surge will be. Along the
    immediate coast, storm surge is the greatest threat to
    life and property.
    If the storm surge arrives at the same time as high


    Here's a sign that tells it all. Islander Photo: Bonner Futch


    tide, the water height will be even greater. The storm
    tide is the combination of the storm surge and the nor-
    mal astronomical tide.
    Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can de-
    stroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes.
    Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and
    small items left outside, become missiles in hurricanes.
    Winds often stay above hurricane strength well in-
    land. Hurricane Hugo in 1989 battered Charlotte, N.C.,
    with gusts of near 100 mph about 175 miles inland
    from the Atlantic causing massive destruction.
    Widespread torrential rains, often in excess of six
    inches, can produce deadly and destructive floods.
    Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 brought 45 inches of
    rain to an area near Alvin, Texas. Long after Hurricane
    Diane subsided in 1955, the storm brought floods to
    Pennsylvania, New York and New England that con-
    tributed to nearly 200 deaths. And Hurricane Agnes
    fused with another storm system in 1972, producing
    floods in the northeast which contributed to 122 deaths.
    Hurricanes also produce tornadoes, which add to
    the hurricane's destructive power. These tornadoes
    most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in rain
    bands well away from the center of the hurricane. How-
    ever, they can also occur near the eyewall.

    Our problem
    All Atlantic and Gulf coastal areas are subject to
    hurricanes or tropical storms. Although rarely struck by
    hurricanes, parts of southwestern United States and the
    Pacific Coast suffer heavy rains and floods each year
    from the remnants of hurricanes spawned off Mexico.
    Due to the limited number of evacuation routes,
    barrier islands are especially vulnerable to hurricanes.
    People on barrier islands and in coastal areas may be
    asked by local officials to evacuate well in advance of
    a hurricane's landfall. If you are asked to evacuate, do
    so immediately.
    The nation has a significant hurricane problem.
    Our shorelines attract large numbers of people. From
    Maine to Texas, our coastline is filled with new homes,
    condominiums and cities built on sand waiting for the
    next storm to threaten its residents and their dreams.
    There are now more than 45 million permanent resi-


    dents along the hurricane-prone coastline, and the popu-
    lation is growing. Florida, where hurricanes are most fre-
    quent, leads the nation in new residents. In addition to the
    permanent residents, the holiday, weekend and vacation
    populations swell in some coastal areas 100-fold.
    A large portion of the coastal areas with high popu-
    lation densities are subject to inundation from the
    hurricane's storm surge that historically caused the
    greatest loss of life and extreme property damage.
    During the past few years, the warning system has
    provided adequate time for people on barrier islands and-
    the immediate coastline to move inland when hurricanes
    have threatened. However, it is becoming more difficult
    to evacuate people from high-hazard areas because roads
    have not kept pace with the rapid population growth.
    The problem is further compounded by the fact that
    80 to 90 percent of people living in hurricane-prone ar-
    eas have never experienced the power of a major hur-
    ricane. Many of these people have been through weaker
    storms, producing a false impression of a hurricane's
    damage potential. This impression often leads to com-
    placency and delayed actions which could result in the
    loss of many lives.
    During the 1970s and 1980s, major hurricanes strik-
    ing the United States were less frequent than the previous
    three decades. With the tremendous increase in population
    along the high-risk areas of our shorelines, we may not
    fare as well in the future. The danger potential will be,
    especially high when hurricane activity inevitably returns
    to the frequencies experienced during the 1950s.
    In the final analysis, the only real defense against
    hurricanes is the informed readiness of your commu-
    nity, your family, and you.


    Be sure to get your
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    Vehicle Sticker
    at your local city hall.


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    I[] 1999 HURRICANE SPECIAL [] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


    JESSIE'S
    ISLAND STORE

    CONVENIENCE
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    HOLMES BEACH
    POLICE DEPT.
    Call our
    Communications Number
    "for Evacuation Assistance
    708-5804
    DISPATCH
    If you need further
    information call
    708-5804
    ADMINISTRATION


    24 Hour
    Water Removal

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    EVERYTHING
    UNDER THE SUN
    Gar dc C
    PRE-STORM TIPS
    Rotiove potted
    pilets & baskts
    SGcur hCetw treS
    reServe rxih w ter
    POST-STORM TIPS
    Flusl bLJds
    RetulIc Fortilizv
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    Right now, before
    hurricane season begins:
    Enter the hurricane season prepared. Recheck
    your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable
    foods and other equipment you will need to secure
    your home and prepare yourself for evacuation from
    the area, if necessary.
    Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit.
    The kit should include: medicines (at least a two-
    week supply); special dietary foods that are non-per-
    ishable; blankets, pillows, sleeping bags; flashlight
    and batteries; portable radio and batteries; extra cloth-
    ing; lightweight folding chairs, cots, personal items;
    infant.necessities; quiet games or favorite toys for
    children; important papers; and snacks.
    Develop a plan for where you will go if you
    need to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland or
    hurricane shelter locations should be identified and a
    route to the safe shelter plotted.

    If hurricane advisories list
    Southwest Florida as a
    tlueatened region,
    pay attention to local weather
    broadcasts for further updates
    Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
    check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
    Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
    Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe
    mooring.
    Be prepared to board windows or protect them
    with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to
    small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven de-
    bris; damage to larger windows may come from de-
    bris as well as wind pressure.
    Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings,
    lawn ornaments and anything else that can be easily
    moved. Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken
    inside. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch
    furniture and a number of other harmless items be-
    come missiles in hurricane winds.
    Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
    bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
    Remember, water service may be disturbed for days
    or longer after a hurricane. You should have one gal-
    lon of water per person per day, and you should have
    at least a three-day supply.
    Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
    that electricity may be off for days or longer and
    cooking may be difficult, so make plans to prepare
    food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to
    make sure you have a can opener that can be operated
    without electricity.
    Check all battery-powered equipment and stock
    up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recommending
    you not use candles due to the threat of fire. An
    untended flashlight won't start a fire, but a candle or
    lantern might.
    Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buckets,
    towels, cleansers and the like.
    Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Re-
    member, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will
    have to be kept with friends or at a vet.

    If hurricane advisories list Southwest
    Florida as a possible landfill for a
    hurricane, begin making preparations
    Board all windows, or secure with tape or se-


    curity shutters.
    Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leav-
    ing the Island will be worse than you can imagine.
    Hurricane authorities predict upwards of 12 to 17
    hours to evacuate the Island, so plan to leave early.
    Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
    shelter openings.

    If officials order an evacuation:
    Leave.
    Leave your swimming pool filled and super chlo-
    .rinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover it.
    Turn off electricity and water to your house.
    Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
    main valve.
    Let your friends and relatives know where
    you're going.
    Check with neighbors to make sure they have
    a safe, timely ride out of the area.

    After the hurricane passes:
    Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
    limited and you may not be able to return to your
    home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
    and live power lines, and emergency crews will need
    time to make the area safe.
    Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you
    have valid identification showing your proper local
    address.
    Do not drive unless you must, and don't
    sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency
    vehicles.
    Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
    Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may
    have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
    Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
    dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
    house.
    Be cautious with fire until you have checked the
    area thoroughly for gas fumes.
    Assess and photograph damage to structures
    and contents.
    As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
    water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.

    WMum


    A "river" runs through Bradenton Beach during
    Hurricane Georges. Islander Photo: Paul Roar


    ANNA MARIA
    S i ISLAND





    REAL ESTATE, INC.

    IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER

    We're here all year, however the four winds blow.

    Sales Rentals Property Management

    779-0202 Island Shopping Center e 5402 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
    L ir -


    Hurricane safety tips


    BRADENTON
    BEACH
    POLICE DEPT.
    Call our
    Communications Number
    for Evacuation Assistance
    778-6311 POLICE
    If you need further
    information call
    778-1005 CITY HALL


    THE CITY OF
    ANNA MARIA
    Call our
    Communications
    Number for
    Evacuation Assistance

    778-0781
    CITY HALL



    chrissy's
    Marina Deli

    BE PREPARED!
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    FOOD SUPPLIES
    778-7295
    414 Pine Ave. Anna Maria


    PROFESSIONAL
    MEDICAL T
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    "The Island's Only
    Walk-In Clinic"
    Monday-Friday
    8:30am 4:30pm
    SImmediate Medical Care
    SEKGs
    Lab
    SPhysicals
    Carl Voyles, MD
    Joseph L. Mazza, MD

    778-0711
    503 Manatee Ave. W.
    Suite E, Holmes Beach



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