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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00689

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE
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JULY 23, 1997


Island consolidation has history of defeat


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner again
suggested a study on Island consolidation at his third
neighborhood chat last week.
"I'm concerned that no one is looking at it seri-
ously." he said. "I think it has to be looked at, and
someday we'll get a study on it. People have told me
they're interested in looking at it. Coordinating three
city commissions and 15 different commissioners
keeps us from being as efficient as we could be."
In 55 years, the question has faced Islanders at least
six times and has been defeated at the polls at least
three times.
In minutes of the Town of Bradenton Beach dated


April 4, 1952, Charles H. Hess, the city clerk, told of
an article in which the Island Chamber of Commerce
advocated Island-wide incorporation.
NMIayor E.R. Gorsuch said Bradenton Beach was
better off as it was and could accomplish more with its
income than it would be possible to do "if the money
were spread over seven miles of territory."
Hess stated that the committee for city incorporation
had promised the people that there would be no ad valo-
rem taxes. Present city officials had kept that promise by
enacting Ordinance #1 "which would require a vote of two
thirds of the freeholders to enact such taxes." He further
noted that an incorporated government would require
more money to operate and the only way to raise the
money would be by ad valorem taxes.


Jumping for joy nets KINSA award for week five
Vicky Young was in Freeport, Bahamas, when she heard about an opportunity to swim with dolphins in the
harbor. When the handlers said to get ready for the big dolphin jump, the Hohnes Beach resident pointed her
camera and "it was just the perfect time to take the picture. Young is the fifth winner in this years's Islander
Bystander and Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards. Shie will take home her choice of a "mullet-
wrapper" T-shirt or hat from the newspaper as well as certificates good for framing from Longboat Framing
Gallerie, dining at the Sandbar restaurant and merchandise from Kodak. Her photo will be submitted with five
other weekly local winners to KINSA where $52,500 will be awarded in international judging. Friday is the
deadline for the final week of the contest. Please see page 4 for more information about the contest.


Bradenton Beach loses a leader


Dick Suhre lost his battle with cancer Sunday.
Surrounded by the family he loved, he passed away at
the home he loved in
Bradenton Beach, the city
he adored. Hie was 65.
Suhre was appointed
to the council in May 1994
to fill a vacancy from the
Ward I area of northern
Bradenton Beach. He was
re-elected subsequently un-
til illness forced him to re-
Suhre sign from the council in late
September 1996.
"The love and concern that I have for this city will
not change, and I'm proud to have had the opportunity
to be a part of the city council for the past 27 months,"
Suhre wrote. "I thank you all for your help and support
during that time."
Although Bradenton Beach was going through
some tumultuous times during Suhre's tenure, he
served the people with a calm, level-headed approach
to governance. He often cut to the heart of the matters


at hand with a razor-sharp locus.
Although Suhre is remembered for his time on the
council, his dedication to the city started shortly after
he and his wife, Eileen, moved to their bayfront home
off 25th Street in 1987. He and then-citizen, now-com-
missioner John Chappie burned gallons of midnight oil
in what became a successful effort to get a state grant
to improve the Bridge Street area of the city.
Suhre will also be remembered fondly for his fi-
nancial acumen with Tingley Memorial Library, assist-
ing library chair John Sandberg to transfer the library's
endowment from low-interest to high-interest savings
accounts, reaping almost $40,000 a year in interest for
the library.
Suhre was honored by Islanders last May when a
pavilion at the end of the Bradenton Beach City Pier
was named in his honor. The Bradenton Beach Civic
Association unveiled a bronze plaque thanking Suhre
for his dedication to the community. Sadly, Suhre's
illness forced him to miss the ceremony.
A celebration of life for Dick Suhre will be held
Thursday, July 24, at 7 p.m. at Palma Sola Community
Church, 8604 Ninth Ave. NW, Bradenton.


"Due to that fact, along with the fact that
Bradenton Beach would lose its identity, he certainly
would fight such a movement," Hess said.

A concerted effort in 1955
The Jan. 13, 1955, issue of The Islander noted that
the nine-man Committee for Island Incorporation held
its first meeting. The committee hired an attorney to
develop a charter and the proposed charter was printed
in The Islande r in March.
Meetings on the proposed incorporation were held
in the three cities and reported on in The Islander.
About 30 citizens attended the meeting at the Anna
PLEASE SEE CONSOLIDATION, NEXT PAGE



Property tax

drops, services

increase in

Bradenton Beach
By Paul Roat
Using spreadsheets instead of magicians' wands,
officials in Bradenton Beach have conjured up en-
hanced services to the public while making the prop-
erty tax rate slightly disappear next year.
Bradenton Beach City Commissioners have
adopted a tentative millage of 2.5508 for fiscal year
1997-98. The current millage is 2.5954. A mill is $1 for
every S 1,000 of assessed value of a piece of property
less homestead exemptions if applicable.
The final budget is scheduled for public hearings and
eventual ratification in September. The process of increas-
ing the millage after it is tentatively set is a long, expen-
sive process that generally precludes any tax hikes.
Commissioners have agreed to add an additional full-
time police officer in the city, bringing the police force to
nine people. They also agreed to hire a code enforcement
officer to aid in the building and planning department.
Also in the budget for next year is an increase in com-
mission and mayor salaries for those officials taking of-
fice after the November elections. Commission salaries
will go from $250 to $400 per month: the mayor's
monthly stipend will increase from $500 to $800.
Another big element of next year's Bradenton
Beach budget will be replacement of pilings at the
city's fishing pier. Between 30 and 35 pilings need to
replaced at the pier, and the commission budgeted
$1,000 per piling for the work.
Not all the news on the budget front is lower,
though. Building fees are tentatively scheduled to in-
crease by about 75 percent as a means to have the
building and planning department become independent
from the city's general fund.
Building fee increases will be discussed later this
summer during public hearings.
"We needed to continue the progress of the city,"
Vice Mayor Charlie Grace, chair of the budget commit-
tee, said, "and I was totally against raising taxes in the city.
We lowered them a little bit, and this budget will do that."


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ......................................................... 6
Those W ere the Days .................................... 7
S tir-it-u p ....................................................... 15
Streetlife ....................................................... 16
Anna Maria Island tides ............................... 21
Real estate .................................................... 23
Crossword puzzle.......................................... 28






[] PAGE 2-A M JULY 23, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Work starts next

week for fix-ups in

Bradenton Beach
Work should begin in about a week on the next phase
of improvements to Bradenton Beach.
Commissioners last week approved a contract with
Megaforce Construction, a Clearwater-based company,
to do $388,065 worth of improvements to the city.
Work will include a boardwalk-sidewalk along the
',approach to the city's fishing pier, landscaping along
Gulf Drive betWeen Third Street South and Second
Street North, improvements to the city's parking lot off
.First Street North and landscaping along that street.
Megaforce's bid was about $40,000 less than an-
ticipated, providing the city with more money for fur-
ther enhancements such as larger trees and perhaps
more intense shrubbery than originally designed.
The work is being done through funds provided the
'city after receiving a $500,000 Community Develop-
.: ment Block Grant, the second such award the city has
-- i received. Work already done in Bradenton Beach from
grant funds included the landscaping, lighting, benches
Truck meets palm tree on causeway and other work to Bridge Street two years ago.
No charges will be filed in a single-vehicle accident that occurred on the Palma Sola Causeway Sunday Megaforce has performed work in the area to
evening, July 19, according to Bradenton Police. James Rohaley, 37, of Panlmetto. apparently slffered a widen Manatee Avenue in Bradenton and improve the
seizure and lost control of his Ford Ranger pickup truck and hit a pahn tree, severing the tree and causing his toll booths at the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
truck to flip over. Witnesses reported Rohaley was driving erratically and sped on the shoulder to the point of Work is expected to begin Aug. 1, with a comple-
impact. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood tion date of early November.



Island consolidation has 40-year history of defeat


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Maria Community Hall where "the name (City of)
Anna Maria won many times over (City of) Anna
Maria Island, while (City of) Anna Maria Key received
no votes." However, the name Anna Maria Key was
favored by Wyatt Blassingame for its romantic appeal.
"P.D. Wright was, as usual, again it and gave as his
reason that he did not want Anna Maria's assets to go
into the community pot," said the article.
The editor wryly noted, "Was he afraid somebody
would steal the city park, pier and community hall and
move them to Bradenton Beach?
"The meeting ended in time for the people to see
'I Love Lucy' on TV," concluded the article.
In the Homes Beach meeting, the name Anna
Maria Island won by a small majority. Anna Maria was
second and Anna Maria Key and Bradenton Beach
each received one or two votes.
The largest audience was in Bradenton Beach
where "Jack Jones, mayor and chairman of the incor-
poration committee, came from his sick bed to tell the
people that the members of the committee had done an
honest and sincere task in bringing to the people the
proposed charter."
However, the opposition was building and Robert
Martini, councilman and leader of the opposition, said,
"He doubted if Anna Maria City would give $150,000
of property to us summerss"
The article noted, "Many opponents of the incorpo-
ration have been smoked out in these meetings. Some few
may have serious convictions. Others have only selfish,
small-minded, petty arguments that have no more honest
weight than thistledown in a high wind."
In April the name City of Anna Maria Island was
selected. A bill to incorporate the city was introduced
into the state legislature and passed. Opponents intro-
duced a petition to exclude Bradenton Beach from the
incorporation because of "majority opposition."
In May the Bradenton Beach City Council voted to
eliminate the city from the upcoming election. How-
ever, it was noted that the city could not overthrow the
authority of the state legislature which passed a bill
ordering the election.
A panel discussion was held by the Civic Club in
May and the opponents refused to join the panel but
instead heckled from the audience. A memo to The Is-
lander referred to them as "the three mutineers." A
People's Committee to oppose incorporation also
formed in Bradenton Beach.
The following appeared on the front page of The
Islander on June 9: "Bradenton Beach voted against
incorporation and defeated the will of the majority of
the Island. The opponents of unification did a magnifi-
cent job. If ever they would devote this same time,
money and energy for some good civic purpose, what


a wonderful Island this would be. They will not."
Incorporation was favored by 60 percent of the
voters. Anna Maria and Holmes Beach voters strongly
supported it, but Bradenton Beach voters defeated it by
a majority of 84, said The Islander.

The 1959 urge to merge
In August 1959 The Islander noted, "A friendly
debate on the subject of incorporation of the three Is-
land communities took place at last week's meeting of
the Island Kiwanis Club."
Anna Maria Mayor Max Woodland "pointed out
the obvious savings in operating budgets through the
elimination of duplicate services, the greater voice and
weight in county and state affairs that one Island com-
munity would have, the fact that the combined Island
would be the largest assessment unit in the county and
the greater general efficiency of government and com-
munity services possible."
Richard M. Rose, chairman of the Bradenton
Beach Board of Zoning Appeals, said his city had 90
percent of its streets paved, owned its own sanitation
system and did not charge taxes. He compared these
facts and other reforms to a "nest egg which we don't
like to share." He said Bradenton Beach would be an
"unwilling participant in a shotgun wedding."
In October a meeting on incorporation sponsored
by the Island Citizens' League attracted 150 people to
the public beach pavilion. No one in attendance spoke
in opposition, but no Bradenton Beach officials at-
tended the meeting.
An editorial in The Islander on Nov. 5 said, "Why?
Because one city on the Island, governed in the tradi-
tional American way, for and by the people, is the only
logical conclusion possible.
"Is it not better for all Islanders, singly and collec-
tively, to all have the assets and resources for the Island
at work for the benefit of all than to divide the resources
into three portions?
"Can an island less than seven square miles in area
really afford the luxury of sectionalism?"
The proposal was soundly defeated at the polls.
The vote was 88 for and 103 against in Anna Maria, 72
for and 423 against in Bradenton Beach and 201 for and
130 against in Holmes Beach.
According to the Island's "most astute political
observers," incorporation was a dead issue.

Short-lived tries
In May 1963, The Islander noted that a bill autho-
rizing a referendum election on the question of merg-
ing the cities of Anna Maria and Holmes Beach was
being prepared by city attorneys. Originally Bradenton
Beach was to be included, but the city wanted no part
of the merger.
If the bill was passed by the legislature it would go


to a vote in the two cities. If the vote was affirmative
a new City of Anna Maria Island would be formed.
Two weeks later, the three members of the Manatee
County Legislative Delegation agreed not to introduce the
legislation. They said it reached them too late and they had
received many letters opposing the merger.
Another brief try was made in 1973, but the citi-
zens of Bradenton Beach nixed it before it could go to
an Islandwide vote. The city voted 230 against and 112
for consolidation.

Last effort made in 1988
Developer Howard Adams revived the consolida-
tion.question in 1988 with a letter to the Island Cham-
ber of Commerce. He said many "civic-minded Island-
ers" feel the three Island cities should merge. He sug-
gested the Chamber take the leadership and organize a
merger study committee. He also suggested a feasibil-
ity study be done.
In May 1989 the Consolidation Consideration Com-
mittee was formed. Members included Adams, Dahlia
Barreda, Eric Bergan, John Burns, Ed Chiles, Westwood
Fletcher Jr., Betty Hill, Hugh Holmes Sr., Bob
MacDonald, David Moynihan, John Pettigrew, Hamilton
"Chip" Rice, Mollie Sandberg and Mary Tebbetts.
The committee asked that sealed proposals for a
feasibility study be delivered by December 1989. The
study was to include:
The governmental structure and function of each
city.
The general and/or specific revenue streams
available to each city.
Appraised property values, millage rates and bud-
gets of each city.
All city ordinances/codes/resolutions with special
emphasis on land use, personnel and law enforcement
matters.
Other governmental functions and costs as nec-
essary to determine costs and benefits to each city as
well as to a consolidated government.
If the study found that consolidation of two or three
cities was feasible and desirable, the consultant was to
recommend one or more forms of government, project
operating costs and millage rates and recommend a
time phase And method of transition.
If the study found full consolidation of two or three
cities was not feasible, the consultants were to identify
specific city services that could be consolidated and
how that could be accomplished.
By December of 1990, the group had signed a con-
tract with The Mercer Group, a municipal consulting
firm in Atlanta. A contingency of the contract was the
group's ability to raise $14,960 for the study. The funds
had to be raised by the end of January 1991. The group
was unable to raise the funds by the deadline, the study
was shelved and the issue died, once again.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 3-A IE


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
If the mayor gets his wish, the citizens of
Holmes Beach will be paying half a mill more in
property taxes to the city.
Mayor Bob VanWagoner has proposed raising
the millage from 1.75 to 2.25 for the 1997-98 fiscal
year. The millage has been 1.75 for the past four
years.
"The city deserves a pay-as-you-go budget and
we need to keep the momentum in the programs we
have started and are about to start," VanWagoner
said. "The city must face the increasing costs of
doing business. What we're asking is not out of
line."
The mayor said the city needs an operating bud-
get of $2,251,425, an increase of $263,200 over the
current budget. The proposed millage increase will
bring in an additional $275,000. If the village re-
mains at 1.75, the city will generate only $47,000 in
additional revenue.
The alternative is to take the funds out of the re-
serves, he said. If the millage remains at 1.75, the re-
serves will drop from $1,348,137 to $1,089,452. If
the millage is increased to 2.25, the reserves will
remain the same.
"Look at your tax bill and see the breakdown,"
VanWagoner pointed out. "You're paying about $20
per $1,000 and the city gets less than 10 percent of
that. The majority goes to the county and the school
board. Compare the services that you get from those
other agencies with the services you get from the
city."
Part of the increase will be used for salary ad-
justments for four department heads who will be ad-
vanced in pay grades $2,466 increase to the po-
lice chief; $1,795 increase to the public works direc-
tor; a $1,860 increase to the city clerk; and a $3,418
increase to the treasurer.
VanWagoner said the city does not adequately


reward the additional responsibilities of the depart-
ment heads. He also noted that three of the four had
to forgo a year's longevity advance either at hiring
or through past budget trimming.
The deputy clerk will be taking on additional re-
sponsibilities because the city clerk is taking a short-
term disability leave, the mayor said. He proposed
advancing the deputy clerk two years of longevity
resulting in a salary increase of $1,514.
The proposed operating expenditures for general
government are $409,185. up from $388,533. This
includes an additional $3.000 for commission and
mayor education and office expenses, $16,000 for
new computer hardware and software and a $25,000
increase in donations.
Proposed donations are: Anna Maria Island
Community Center. $22,000; Mote Marine, $1.000,
Friends of the Library, $1,000; Anna Maria Island
Historical Society, $1.000; Solutions To Avoid Red
Tide, $5,000: Sarasota Bay National Estuary Pro-
gram, $1,000; Keep Manatee Beautiful, $1.000; and
Island Players Building Fund. $1,000.
The proposed operating expenditures for the po-
lice department are $1,056,837, up from $945,882
last year. This includes $52,000 for two vehicles,
$15,000 for video cameras, $4,000 for radios and
$10,500 for computer equipment and software.
The proposed operating expenses for the public
works department are $755,403., tip from $623,758.
This includes $50,000 for two utility vehicles,
$35,000 for a dump truck. $5,500 for a lawn tractor
and $5,500 for computer equipment.
Infrastructure funding from the one-cent school
tax includes $1,400,000 for a city hall complex.
$75,000 for support work on the Key Royale Bridge,
$40,000 for dredging Key Royale Pass and $100,000
for a stormwater drainage program.
Tentative date for the first public hearing on the
budget is Sept. 2, 7 p.m., city hall. A second public
hearing is required but has not yet been set.


Mayor proposes village

increase from 1.75 to 2.25


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Friday night

accident injures

Islander, kills

two others
An Anna Maria woman is in stable but serious
condition in the wake of a Friday night accident on the
Palma Sola Causeway that killed two people.
Bernice Kipp, 64, 200 block Cypress Avenue, was
westbound at about 11 p.m. Friday when a eastbound
car driven by William Mattox, 38, apparently crossed
the center line. The two vehicles collided head-on, ac-
cording to police.
Mattox and passenger Krista Smith, 27, were killed
in the accident.
A third car may have been involved in the accident,
according to police, who speculate that the other car
forced Mattox to swerve into the opposing lane.




Anna Maria City
7/23, Noon, presentation by Solutions To
Avoid Red Tide for Island residents
7/24, 7:30 p.m., Code Enforcement Board
quarterly meeting Canceled
7/28, 7:30 p.m.. Planning and Zoning Board

Bradenton Beach
None scheduled

Holmes Beach
7/24, 10 a.m., Planning Commission
7/24, 2 p.m.. Canal Commission

Of Interest
7/28, 9:30 a.m., Sarasota-Manatee
Metropolitan Planning Organization,
Sudakoff Hall, USF campus, Sarasota.


It's Hard To Stop A T7)am'e.
FPL PARTICIPATING INDEPENDENT
CONTRACTOR
CACO 56298






Il PAGE 4-A 0 JULY'23, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria woman attacked by raccoon


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
An Anna Maria woman started a series of rabies
shots after she and her dog were attacked by a raccoon
Thursday night while walking on Coconut Drive.
Linda Hadala, of North Shore Drive, said she took
her Jack Russell terrier out for a walk about 10 p.m.
While walking on Coconut Drive she heard something
behind them, turned and saw a raccoon cross the street.
As the dog sniffed the raccoon's path, the raccoon sud-
denly came back and attacked, she said.
"I was screaming and yelling and trying to pick up
my dog by the leash," Hadala recalled. "The raccoon
wouldn't let go of the dog. I tried to get the dog away
and it attacked me and I fell down. Then it went after
the dog again."
Hadala said the raccoon still wouldn't let go of her
dog, so she began to drag it by its leash to her yard,
about 20 to 25 feet away. A neighbor, Amy Romeo,
heard Hadala screaming and came to the rescue.
Romeo yelled and stomped her feet at the raccoon un-
til it finally released the dog and ran.
"Amy called 911," Hadala said. "My dog was ly-
ing in the yard and I thought it was dead. It all hap-
pened so fast."
Hadala said police, paramedics and animal control
Center wants to hear from
middle schoolers, parents
The Anna Maria Island Community Center held its
first Friday night coed teen "skate night" on July
11, attracting 42 kids ages 11 to 15 for a few hours
of skating, basketball, music and pizza. Center staff
says the event was a success and more Friday night
activities will be planned. "We'd love to hear from
the middle school-age group about what types of
events they'd enjoy," reports Patches Radford,
Center education director. "We'd also love to get
some adult volunteers to help with our teen pro-
grams. Volunteers should call the Center, 778-
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arrived. The animal control officer offered to try and
trap the raccoon if she could identify it, but that would
have been impossible, Hadala said.
The dog revived and Hadala took it to the veteri-
narian. A wound in the dog's side required five stitches
and the raccoon also left tooth marks.
"I went to the emergency room and they sewed up my
leg where it appeared to be ripped by a claw," Hadala said.
"I decided to go ahead with the rnbies shots, because I
wasn't sure if the wound was made by the raccoon's claws
or teeth. The rabies virus is carried in the saliva."
Hadala received her first two rabies shots and
must return every seven days for five weeks to com-
plete the series.
"It's terrible when you can get attacked just walk-
ing down the street," she said. "There seem to be more
raccoons on the Island than in the past. I think they
should all be trapped and removed."
Vaughn Garbarek, manager of Manatee County
Animal Control, said Hadala may have unknowingly
contributed to the problem. Hadala admitted she has
fed neighborhood raccoons dog food and some have
come onto her porch to be fed.
"Our biggest problem is people who feed the raccoons
and other wildlife such as squirrels." he explained. "The
animals get dependent on the food source and become


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territorial about it. They also become semi-domesticated.
The same thing happens when people feed their pets out-
doors and leave some of the food. It sets up a scenario to
encourage raccoons to come eat there."
Garbarek also had some advice on avoiding or
fending off an attack.
"Always have the animal you're walking on a leash
because you can control it better," he said. "A person's
natural instinct is to protect his or her pet. Carry a walk-
ing stick. It gives you some means of defense to keep the
raccoon away from your pet and your body. Another natu-
ral instinct is to break up the fight, but that's like playing
with dynamite and you're always the loser."
Raccoons, despite their appealing appearance, are
vicious fighters, Garbarek said. They have large canine
teeth that can do a lot of damage in a short period of time.
"Raccoons are territorial animals and if a dog wan-
ders into its territory, it will most likely attack," he
noted. "During mating season, a male will protect his
territory. Females are extremely protective and will
attack if their young are nearby. They are fierce."
He told of one woman who startled a raccoon by
taking a flash picture. The raccoon mauled her. In an-
other instance, a group was hunting raccoons with
dogs. One dog followed a raccoon into a stream and the
raccoon held it underwater until it drowned.
"We get a lot of calls on the Island," Garbarek said.
"It's an ideal place for raccoons to overpopulate, be-
cause they have sufficient habitat and food. They have
a very diverse diet and don't need that handout. If
people didn't feed them and make them semi-depen-
dent, they would act like they should standoffish.
Please just let wildlife be wildlife."
Anna Maria Public Works Director Phil Charnock
said the city keeps several traps for residents to use.
The traps are loaned for a deposit of $50 each. The
deposit is refunded when the trap is returned.
"Right now we're out of traps because people take
them and never return them," he said Friday. "We've
ordered two traps from animal control for Mrs. Hadala.
They'll be here this afternoon."








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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 5-A ID


Solution for chickens: attorney to


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Commission directed its attor-
ney to write a definition of house pet in an attempt to
clarify its animal ordinance.
The problem revolves around two chickens being
kept by a resident. The city received an anonymous
complaint about the chickens but Mayor Bob
VanWagoner refused to accept it.
A second complainant then stepped forward and
filed a complaint. After a site visit, the mayor ruled that
the chickens are pets and do not constitute a nuisance.
He said the chickens could remain at the home on 72nd
Street.
Commissioners and residents have questioned the
mayor's interpretation of the ordinance, which prohib-
its "the raising of cows, chickens, pigs, horses or any
other item or fowl for private or commercial use" but
does not prohibit the keeping of house pets, provided
they don't become a public nuisance.
They have also questioned the process used by the


mayor and why the case did not go before the code
enforcement board.
VanWagoner said he is willing to send the case to
the code enforcement board if he gets a complaint that
the chickens are a nuisance.
"We made some lady move off the Island because
she had a pet pig," Commissioner Carol Whitmore re-
called. "I was raised on a farm. Chickens are farm ani-
mals."
"I read the same clause as you," VanWagoner re-
plied. "I remember some of the things the pig did and
the chickens aren't doing what the pig did. Chickens
can be considered a house pet."
Commissioner Ron Robinson said the code is not
clear to him and it appears as if a chicken, cow or pig
can be considered a house pet.
City Attorney Patricia Petruff said commissioners
must determine the intent of the code as well as what
they consider a house pet.
"In the past the city has been somewhat conserva-
tive in its interpretation as to what constitutes a house


define house pet
pet," she explained. "The pig was allegedly a Vietnam-
ese pot-bellied pig and the owner claimed it was a
house pet. It was brought to the code enforcement
board on the basis that it was a pig, not on the basis that
it was a nuisance."
Petruff said if the code enforcement officer has a
question about an interpretation of the code, it is the
building official's job to interpret the code. The com-
mission can accept the recommendation or overrule it.
It can also ask the planning commission to study the
code and make a recommendation on changing it.
"If you think it will be a continuing problem, then
it may be appropriate to change it," she noted.
Commissioner Luke Courtney said the code is
clear to him and "house pets are dogs, cats, birds and
fish, not farm animals. Pigs, cows, horses and chickens
are prohibited."
"Some people have snakes, rabbits and hamsters,"
Whitmore said.
Petruff said she will visit pet stores to see what's
acceptable as a house pet before writing the definition.


F _. __n
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Rebecca's Bistro honors
Christmas in July
Friday, July 25, will mark a celebration of Christmas
in July at Rebecca's Bistro in Bradenton Beach. The
entire restaurant will be filled with holiday music
and traditional Christmas dinner specials will be
served. An extraordinary display of miniature pieces
of Dickens' Village will grace the dining room. The
display includes a 13-year collection of more than
100 original pieces, complete with fallen show.
Dickens' Village will be on display through the end
of the month. Islander Photo: Courtesy of
Rebecca's Bistro


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VIM PAGE 6-A E JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Is it chickens or process?
Holmes Beach's city attorney has offered to visit pet
stores on her own time in order to define house pets for
the city's codes.
Will she find pigs, chickens or other farm animals
there? It seems doubtful.
She may, however, come across mice, snakes and
other critters for sale. Exotic pets, wolves, boas, ostriches,
hedge hogs, and flying squirrels, are for sale in the "Crit-
ter Comer" section of the Tampa Tribune daily.
Don't you know good folks with something other
than the ordinary house pet? Lizards, snakes, spiders, fer-
rets or rabbits for instance. It seems the city would be bet-
ter served to define nuisance.
Although Mayor Bob VanWagoner said he would
only process a complaint about the newest controversy,
the 72nd Street chickens, if he received a written com-
plaint that they were a nuisance, he was all in favor of
anonymous complaints when the focus was loud music at
the Anchor Inn.
City Attorney Patricia Petruff reminded the commis-
sion and mayor that in a past situation, a pig was brought
to the code enforcement board on the basis that it was a
pig, not on the basis that it was a nuisance. The pig was
ousted and now the mayor defends his actions by saying
the chickens aren't doing what the pig did. We can only
wonder what that means.
Petruff said if the 'code enforcement officer has a
question about the codes, it's the building official's job to
make an interpretation for him. The city commission can
accept his recommendation or overrule it or ask the plan-
ning commission for a recommendation.
The intervention of the mayor into the normal func-
tioning of city employees is an underlying cause to what
we find has escalated to a "chicken war."
Had the complaints remained in appropriate channels,
we might not have this fodder to fuel the press.
We'll keep you posted on Petruff's discoveries at the
pet store and reserve our plaudits.

How does Mary's garden grow?
If you've been by Anna Maria's city hall, you know
it's not doing too well. What began as a beautification
project of the late Mary Ross, then a city commissioner,
fell prey to Mayor Chuck Shumard's preference for a
manicured green lawn recently.
Although a letter writer indicates some prefer the
lawn approach, it's simply not practical or desirable any
longer in Florida. Water managers have long extolled
manintenance-free native plants.
Golf-course-perfect lawns are destined to be a thing
of the past in Florida in view of watering limits.
It was an arbitrary decision by the mayor to desecrate
the seven-year volunteer project. Who will step forward
to mend it?




JULY 23, 1997 VOLUME 5,'NUMBER 36
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Kevin P. Cassidy
Doug Dowling
David Futch
Capt. Mike Heistand
Edna Tiemann
Michelle Timpanaro
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster

1995 a n \
1997 4


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1997 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@mead.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


.:: :::


CO. -). .


SLICK


By Egan


Islander raked over facts in
garden story
"Who is Kidding Who" should have been the head-
line for the story "Grass replaces natives!" in the July
2 Islander.
The article left out quite a few facts. It also made the
Island people sound like a bunch of nit-picking, dim-wit-
ted people with nothing to do with their lives but gripe.
Only less than 10 percent of the plants were re-
moved at Anna Maria City Hall. Most of the plants
weren't native of Anna Maria or even Florida for that
matter. Mr. Miller received a two-week notice about
the "native removal."
Did he save any?
The article didn't mention the "native" garden at-
tracted snakes and rats, not birds and butterflies. To the
untrained eye, the "native" plants looked like weeds, the
lot looked unkempt and city hall couldn't even been seen.
Lately, all we get in our Island paper is blaming,
complaining and then who knows if all the facts are
correct, or slanted. Instead of informing, it is inflaming
public opinion. We would be better served to have
more responsible reporting. Until then, we should al.
remember you can't believe everything you read!
C.J. Hall, Anna Maria
Editor's note: As reported, Mike Miller and other
volunteers removed some plants which were consid-
ered valued and those recently purchased from Selby
Botanical Gardens for the butterfly garden.

Mayor's garden decision shears
common sense
It is apparent that the current mayor of Anna Maria
City has seen fit to ignore the city commission, the city's
constituents, all ecological, aesthetic and financial consid-
erations, seven years of volunteer work and the City ad-
ministration of seven years ago to replace a xeriscaped
section of garden with a northern-style lawn.
Said manicured lawn requires constant watering in
an area with a chronic and worsening water shortage
and fertilizer and chemical treatments that no one on
the city staff is qualified to administer.
The mayor should publicly apologize to all con-
cerned citizens and resign his office forthwith. Under


no circumstances should he make any decisions con-
cerning swales or pipelines.
In addition. I would like to congratulate Anna
Maria resident Doug Copeland upon attaining the des-
ignation of Manatee County Master Gardener.
Lou Fiorentino, Anna Maria Island

Mayor turns back on
environment by removing garden
The destruction of one of the finest examples of
native Florida landscaping in front of Anna Maria City
Hall is indefensible.
Mayor Chuck Shumard could have no valid reason
for destroying the garden. If the growth was too high,
it could have been pruned. If the growth was too thick,
it could have been thinned.
I've brought many a visitor to Anna Maria City
Hall to show them the city's showcase example of how
beautiful and environmentally-friendly a xeriscaped
garden could be.
During our tours of the lovely garden, I would tell
my visitors how it was also a memorial to an exemplary
city commissioner, Mary Ross, and how it was at-
tended by volunteers led by Mike Miller for years!
If I had been treated like Mr. Miller, I doubt I'd be
interested in replanting what it took years to develop.
I mourn that the garden may not be replaced. Whether
it is or not, I suggest the other four voting city commis-
sioners bestow the city's highest honor, by resolution
or whatever means available, to officially recognize
Mike Miller for his years of volunteerism, and find a
way to permanently memorialize the service to the city
and devotion to the garden displayed by Ross.
In the past, the mayor's excellent work with the
turtle program has shown an awareness of what is best
for the Island, therefore, I felt he would recognize the
importance of the plantings at city hall.
I hesitated to write this letter because I am not a
resident of Anna Maria. I wrote because I want the citi-
zens of Anna Maria to know that others outside of their
city admired its accomplishment and even envied them.
In addition, a xeriscaped garden or lawn benefits every-
one who lives in Florida. I am so sorry this happened.
Barbara' Lacina, Holnws HBeach


Ie YO9OUR 9lIWIN-


IyEa










THOE TER THE BAYS
____________ Part 8, The Saga Of Anna Maria City


by June Alder


~~*~*i ~*


Spring Avenue bristled with pine trees in this c. 1920 photo looking toward the
city pier. The house still stands, much remodeled, at 504 Spring.

SNAPPER IS IN

A VERY BAD FIX


Letter of October 3, 1923, to H. W.
Pillsbury of Derry, New Hampshire
As you have no doubt been advised,
the County has just about completed a
nine-foot, hard-surfaced
road from Cortez Beach to
the Town limits, and as the
old rut road along Snapper /
Street (Gulf Drive)
through the Town to where
it intersects with Pine \
Street is in a very bad fix, F
the Town has decided to
pave a 16-foot road from
Pine Street south to the town line with
shell. The Town Charter provides that
where streets are improved or paved the
cost may be assessed to the abutting
property holders; but the commission
has decided that the Town pay one-third
and the abutters each one-third.
In view of the fact that the Town has
no funds, and will not have any until
next year when taxes come in, the Com-
mission has arranged to borrow the
Town's part, and we are asking the
property holders to pay their part when
the work is completed. A number have
already agreed to do this. Mr. (C. M.)
Roser has by far more than any one else
to pay and he has not only agreed to pay
all when finished but offers to advance
to the Town two-thirds of his assess-
ment if the Town needs it to complete
the work.
Now we are asking you if you will
pay the amount assessed against your
property for this improvement when
completed rather than wait until the
paving certificates mature. We are hav-
ing an engineer prepare an estimate of
this work and as soon as this is in our
hands we will be able to give you the
amount of your assessment.
Hoping to hear from you soon with
your endorsement and promised assis-
tance we are, Cordially yours...
W. M. Davis, C. W. Bonham
andJ. G. Whitehead,
Commissioners, Town
of Anna Maria, Fla.

Since June when he was vice
mayor pro tem (elected mayor on Au-
gust 7) Mitch Davis had been trying
his darndest to borrow $1,000 to get his
town on its feet. But he had been turned
down by two banks. Bradentown finan-
ciers clearly were skeptical that the new


Island municipality with less than 30
voters ever would amount to anything.
By the end of September Anna
Maria had a considerable number of
unpaid bills stacked up.
Mitch had to dig into his
,own pocket for $10 to
1,, pay for patching up Pine
and Snapper for the Pen-
insular Telephone Com-
. pany picnic that summer.
.. A town seal (a coconut
palm in a circle cost
$14.60) and stationery
displaying it cost $8.20. The Bradenton
Hardware Store was holding an IOU
from the town for $89.90 for a mowing
machine. And the United Abstract
Company was owed $25 for a list of
taxable property so that 1924 assess-
ments could be made.
Then there was the matter of attor-
ney Wallace Terwin's fee. He had been
in on the first meetings leading to the
founding of the town back in February,
had drawn up the city charter and
steered it through the state legislature.
As yet he hadn't been paid a penny.
Besides taking care of the bills,
Mayor Mitch was determined to get
Snapper Street shelled before the end of
the year.
So he went to see C. M. Roser,
former owner of the Anna Maria Beach
Resort and still the town's major land
owner, and got in touch with the New
Hampshire man to whom Roser had
recently sold a chunk of Gulfside prop-
erty between Oak and White avenues.
The result was an arrangement de-
scribed in the October letter to
Pillsbury that unloosened the bank's
purse strings.
On Nov. 6, a note endorsed by
Roser and Pillsbury was drawn up for
a $600 loan at 8 percent interest to the
First National Bank of Bradentown. So
the town was able to enter the new year
with its finances and its main street in
good shape.
With land values soaring unbeliev-
ably all over the state, 1924 was certain
to be a great year for Anna Maria.

Next Week:
Anna Maria takes
a giant step


------~-


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 N PAGE 7-A Ri



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only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
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[]in PAGE 8-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Just pool it to cool that traffic congestion rage


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Stating that "our demand for concrete and black-
top exceeds our ability to provide it," a Bradenton
Beach man is urging fellow Islanders to "pool it."
His organization will even help people buy a pool
van to get where they're going and leave their cars
home. George Mendez is in charge of the vehicle
pooling program for the Sarasota-Manatee Metropoli-
tan Planning Organization. He and others at the MPO
are increasingly worried, he said, about "our auto-de-
pendent state."
"It took 300 years to reach a population of seven
million people, then only 20 years to double it. Last
year 43 million vacationers came to Florida, and 47


percent of them drove. In 20 years there'll be 80 mnil-
lion and if half of them drive we'll have total gridlock."
People must consider alternative transportation, he
said, such as bicycles, walking, buses and pooling
of riders into one vehicle with common points of de-
parture and destinations.
To that end MPO has set up a computer program
to match people with rides. Such pooling saves ve-
hicles, roads and money, he said.
"Split the driving with one other and you halve the
cost. Get three or four together and save a lot."
This can be arranged by calling him at 359-5772.
MPO will even help interested groups acquire
commuter vans. Mendez said he is working with a
Chrysler Corp. program that is being introduced around


the state for such transport.
The way it works, he said, is the program will ar-
range to lease a van to a group whose members split the
cost, except for the driver who pays zero for his trouble.
It has a commuter van with bench seats for 15 passen-
gers and a professional van carrying six or eight in
more conventional seating at higher cost.
Costs depend on the distance traveled, but Mendez
said at 2,000 miles per month each of 15 passengers in
a commuter van would pay $68 per month. The com-
pany maintains the van, and provides a new one every
couple of years.
Some Florida barrier island hotels and resorts are
using the van pool program to help employees get back
and forth to work, he said.


A special moment
Kevin Callahan, age 5, receives his yearbook and
diploma from Maria Richards, School for Construc-
tive Play teacher. Islander Photo: Courtesy of Maria
Richards


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Grads of School for Constructive Play
The School for Constructive Play in Anna Maria City held its eighth graduation picnic for its upwardly mobile
students with 170 parents, grandparents, students and siblings joining the celebration. Entertainment was
provided by the graduates. Reciting "These are Grampa.'s Spectacles" are, left to right, Adam Wolfe, Ryan
Wolfe, Stephen Thomas, Kenney Burns, Noelani Carver Mills and Chelsea Dudevoire. Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy of Jim Bertrand


Not everything works as well as
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 23, 1997 M PAGE 9-A IQ


Kids do count at Cortez Community Center


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Everything has nearly doubled in the "Kids Do
Count In Cortez" summer program, but the project is
still looking for more kids and more work.
Of the 112 registered, some 40 youngsters from
around the Cortez peninsula show up on a given day.
Both numbers are about double those of last year.
Even the quarters have doubled, with the young-
sters using the old fire station after the cramped facili-
ties of the old Fulford family residence where the pro-
gram has been housed until this year.
It is a major undertaking of the Cortez Community
Center, whose treasurer, Dr. Mary Fulford Green, also
is director of both the summer youth program and the
after-school counterpart the rest of the year.
But there's room for more, says director Green.
"We have staff to handle 60 children easily, and room
for them."
The program is financed by the Manatee County
"children's services tax," which raises about $3.5 mil-
lion a year. That amount is divided among many
projects, says Green, so the Community Center aug-
ments its program with various fundraising efforts.
Right now its youngsters are selling cookbooks
compiled by the Cortez Historical Society. That group
donated 200 books, and any youngster who sells three
for S8 each winds up with his or her own pool cue.
The center needs another pool table, too. so it can
have one for the big kids and cut the current one down


for the shorter players.
Also on hand at the center are a ping pong table,
computers, TV, library and other indoor items. Not
there are basketball, football, soccer and other sports
facilities, for the center's property isn't big enough for
them. Instead, they use grounds of the Church of
Christ, four blocks away.
That is one reason Green and others at the center
want to buy the old schoolhouse on its 4.5 acres at the
eastern end of Cortez. They would incorporate the
children's programs with a proposed visitors'- center,
historical museum, marine museum, a nature walk and


other features, Green said.
The center organization has applied for a state
grant to help finance the purchase, and continues rais-
ing matching funds.
Meanwhile, youngsters are being well served at the
current address from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. weekdays with
a diversity of programs.
The latest is the director's own creation. From one
donor she got 200 pounds of plaster, from another some
molds. She has spent several evenings making plaster
figures which she takes to the center so the kids can
paint them.


BeVanie Baby
Giveaway
he world's greatest stocking stuffers
are now featured at the Sand Dollar
ft Shop. In the spirit of Christmas, we
are giving away one free Beanie Baby
with any purchase of $40 or more.
More than 40 "Baby" styles
to choose from. (While supplies last)
All Christmas paper goods now 25% OFF!





5302 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
Island Shoppingenter 778-2024


Tape over light switch!


I LIGHTS OUT FOR
SEA TURTLES!
May 1 thru Oct. 31 9PM to 7AM
Please turn out beachfront lights.*
Lights disorient mother turtles
and especially turtle hatchlings
as they journey to the Gulf.

I I I





Report turtles, turtle tracks, possible
nests and hatchlings o
778-5638 Anna Maria
or 778-0056. Tirtle Watch
Sponsored by The Islander Bystander
*By city ordinance, Anna Maria,
Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach.
It's the law!
L--- ----------I


TINfW WARNrR'S

TV TIAL. WAVr

IS NrRr'!


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And get all this:
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*FREE HookUps for 3 TVs 0

CALL

748-1829
'Now


.' TIME WARNED
> m ,,l 11 N I I I N
/fA Wf /Af^ a /*


Some restrictions may apply. Limited
time offer available in cabled areas
only. Offer expires 8 /15/1997
CuLstom installation additional


Turtle Watch beach tours offered on Island
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch will be down, with close to 150 nests on the beach to
offering educational beach walks for anyone inter- date.
ested in learning about the sea turtle program. The first nests on the Island are now hatch-
Walks will be held at 10 a.m. Sunday begin- ing, and more will be coming in the next few
ning July 27, starting at the Manatee Public Beach weeks, Turtle Watch volunteers said.
in Holmes Beach. Donations are welcome. For more information, call Sabine Buehler at
The nesting season is beginning to slow 778-4929.


./ ..*7
/ --






[I PAGE 10-A U JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
..p .-- V. EL .,4


217 Pinef ve- 0fMfiaH 779-278


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bI ,' OrfFcC!r W Christmas "
20% OFF Ornaments
Plus savings on many gift ideas!
Get your shopping done early!
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 778-1645












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t Photography/Art Prints

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1 ^ O O FF No valid with iny o oiler f'!-s obr liscouis
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5,


i


*1-ieJ


Count them two grandmas in tow
Patsy "Beads" Hopkins of Carpinteria, Califj, right, recently checked in to the Sunset Beach Resort in
Bradenton Beach for her annual visit with Island offspring. True Island native Mary-Elizabeth Finn (born in
Holmes Beach). age 3, invited Bradenton grandma Eloise Finn to a pool party. "Next year, Mary-Elizabeth
told her grannies, "you guys have to swim without swim wings!" Islander Photo: Courtesy of Cynthia Finn


Island Repertory Singers to
The Anna Maria Island Repertory Singers will
begin the season with a "Musical Head Start" pro-
gram.
The sessions are designed for anyone who wants
to explore singing with the group or learn and rein-
force skills. Some of the techniques to be explored are
phrasing, proper breathing, dynamics, correct vocal
technique and sight reading.
All ages and voices are invited to join the head
start program, sing over the holiday season and to par-
ticipate in the group's spring concert.


get 'head start' on season
"Musical Head Start" will begin Tuesday, July 29,
in the Coleman Building of Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church on Pine Avenue in Anna Maria City from
9 to 11 a.m. and continue through September.
There will be a small registration honorarium.
The popular Island singing group, directed by Elaine
Burkly, a professional conductor, vocal teacher and solo-
ist, is preparing for its third season. Residents and visitors
are welcome and participation in the group can be worked
around vacations and travel commitments.
For more information, call Burkly at 778-0720.


Bistro Boys branch out
The blues.fision.band )Das Funkhouse belts out a tune at the Cornerstone bar on Main Street in Sarasota.
Half the band's makeup includes Beach Bistro waiter David Klingler on lead guitar (third from left) and
Bistro souits chef Rex Harrison on saxophone. Other members are Michael Boyette on bass and drtmumnner
Erick Ward. Das Funkhouse plays all original material and here do their rendition of a Klingler tune called
"The Yeti of Love. Islander Photo: David Futch


Spaghetti dinner to be
served at church
Church of the Annunciation will conduct its first
Spaghetti Dinner on Saturday, July 26, from 5 to 8
p.m. on the church grounds, 4408 Gulf Drive, I-Holmcs
Beach.
The menu will include spaghetti, garlic bread,
salad and drinks. Dessert will be available for pur-
chase.
Diners may eat their meal in the church's air con-
ditioned banquet room or order ahead by calling 778-
1638 and lake oul.


Tickets pay be pre-purchased at the church and will
be available at the door. The cost is $4 for adults and
$2 for children under six years of age.


Bradenton Beach Civic
Association meeting
canceled
The Bradenton Beach Civic Association has can-
celed a scheduled meeting for Thursday. July 24.
lior information regarding rescheduling, call Lee
I lornack at 778-11 68.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 11-A IlM


FOT iIf,!T; I Iqi-


Samuel A. Cooper
Samuel A. Cooper, 86, of Bradenton, died July 14
at home.
Born in Jersey City, N.J., Mr. Cooper came to
Manatee County from Atlantic Highlands, N.J., in
1990. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War
II. He was a retired foreman for R.E.A. Express Air
Division at Newark, N.J. He was a member of Saints
Peter and Paul The Apostles Catholic Church. He was
a member of Loyal Order of Moose Lodge No. 2188,
Bradenton Beach; American Legion Kirby Stewart
Post 24, Bradenton; and life member of Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 2179, Midletown, N.J.
He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter, Mary
Anne Hughes of Cortez; a son, Michael of Bradenton;
three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.
Visitation was held at Brown and Sons Funeral
Home in Bradenton. Mass was said at Saints Peter and
Paul The Apostles Catholic Church in Bradenton with
the Rev. Dennis Cooney officiating.

Rebecca 'Becky' Early
Rebecca "Becky" Early, 53, of Bradenton, died
July 20 at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.
She was born in Mountain City, Tenn., and moved
to Manatee County in 1991.
Memorial services will be held Thursday, July 24,
at 7 p.m. at Brown and Sons Funeral Home. 604 43rd
St. W.. Bradenton. Pastor Nicholas Manassa of First
Assemply of God Church will conduct the service.
She is survived by her husband, Don: two sons,
Gregory Triplett and Matthew: two daughters, Lisa
Werner and Laura Briggs: a brother. Homer Cox of
Statesville, N.C.; and six grandchildren.
Mrs. Early was a member of First Assembly of
God Church Bradenton.
She was familiar to patrons of Ato's Restaurant,
Anna Maria.

Stanley M. Miska
Stanley M. Miska, 70, of Bradenton, died July 19
in Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Port Carbon. Pa., Mr. Miska came to
Manatee County from Weston, Conn., nine years
ago. He was a retired design engineer. He was a
member of the Episcopal Church of the Annuncia-
tion in Holmes Beach. He served in the U.S. Navy
during World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Shirley; a daughter,
Linda of Sarasota; a son, Stanley Jr. of Sarasota: four
sisters, Catherine Wozny of Louisville, Ky., Eliza-
beth Boraski of Port Chester, N.Y., Josephine
Lawson of Shelton, Conn., and Mary of Stanford
Conn.; and two grandchildren.
A memorial service was held at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation with the Rev. Richard
Bennett officiating. Memorial contributions may be
made to Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, Fla. 34238, or the charity of one's
choice. Toale Brothers Funeral Home, South Chapel,
was in charge of the arrangements.

Cecilia Marie Polach
Cecilia Marie Polach, 96, of Anna Maria, died July
19 in Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Mrs. Polach came to the area six years ago from
Carleton, Mich. She was born in Kelcany, Czechoslo-
vakia. She was a homemaker and member of the
American-Czech Society of Gulfport, Fla.
She is survived by a daughter, Patricia Cleland of
Anna Maria, and a son, Louis Jr. of Los Angeles, Calif.
Memorials may be sent to Hospice of Bradenton,
3355 26th St. W., Bradenton, Fla. 34205.



The Island Poet
He's a clumsy bird as you pass him by,
And you say to yourself he will never fly.
An ugly bird when he's standing still,
With his beady eye and his flabby bill.
Yet when he takes to the air he's a thing of grace,
As he soars arid he glides all over the place.
And when he hits the water with his crazy dive,
Seems only a miracle that he stays alive.
So he waddles along like a tired old man,
But all Florida loves that old pelican.
Bud A lieridIe


Services will be held at a later date in Carleton.
Burial was in Michigan Memorial Park, Flat Rock,
Mich.

Joanne Bundy Pratt
Joanne Bundy Pratt, 69, of Sarasota and for-
merly of Longboat Key, died July 20 in Sarasota
Memorial Hospital.
Mrs. Pratt came to the area in. 1940 from Quaker
City, Ohio. She retired as manager of checking ser-
vices from Coast Federal Savings & Loan and worked
for several years as the secretary for the Longboat
Key Chamber of Commerce. She was Episcopalian.
Mrs. Pratt was active in the Longboat Youth
Group, was a Girl Scout leader and a volunteer librar-
ian at Anna Maria Elementary School. She was a
graduate of Sarasota High and attended Richmond
Professional Institute at William & Mary College,
Richmond, Va., and Ringling Art School in Sarasota.
She is survived by her husband, Stewart Jr. of
Sarasota; two daughters. Katharine of St. Petersburg,
Fla., and Molly Santangelo of Sarasota: two sons.
Christopher of Bradenton, and Eric of Sarasota: her
father, Rudy Bundy of Sarasota: five grandchildren:
and one great-grandchild.
Memorials may be sent to Children's Haven &
Adult Center, Inc., 4405 Desoto Rd., Sarasota. Fla.
34235. A celebration of life will be held at the fam-
ily residence on Saturday, July 26. at 7:30 p.m.


Richard P. 'Dick' Suhre
Richard P. "Dick" Suhre. 65. of Bradenton Beach
died July 20 at home.
Mr. Suhre was a Bradenton Beach councilman
who resigned his council position Sept. 20 due to ill-
ness. He was appointed to take over the Ward 1 va-
cated commission seat in April 1994 and ran unop-
posed for the seat in the election held later that year.
In May, Mr. Sure was honored with the naming of
a pavilion for him located at the end of the Bradenton
Beach city pier. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio. he came to
Manatee County about 10 \ears ago from New Jersey.
He had a career in technical support.
He is survived by his wife, Eileen: one daughter,
Jan Bocchino of Parrish: three sons. Steve of Colo-
rado Springs. Colo., Paul of Lake Bluff, Ill.. and Mark
of Wheeling, Ill.: a family friend, Kathy Downing of
Dade City; and three grandchildren.
The family will have a Celebration of Life service
at 7 p.m., Thursday. July 24. at 7 p.m. at Palma Sola
Community Church, 8604 Ninth Ave. N.W.. Bradenton.
Memorial contributions may be made in lieu of
flowers to Bradenton Beach Beautification Committee,
107 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach, Fla. 34217:
Tingley Memorial Library. 111 Second St. N..
Bradenton Beach: or Palma Sola Community Church,
8604 Ninth Ave. W., Bradenton. Fla. 34209.


FMwF2Tj4/j~;!2U


Island dentist to marry
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Flagg of Naples an-
nounce the engagement of their daughter,
Michclle Lynn, to Gy Yatros, son of Dr. and Mrs.
John Yatros of Batesville, Ind., and Holmes
Beach.
Miss Flagg is a 1986 graduate of Naples
High School. She is employed by Gy Yatros,
D.M.D., as an office manager.
The bridegroom-elect is a 1983 graduate of
Barbourville High School and a 1989 graduate of
University of Kentucky -- College of D)entistry.
He practices dentistry in I lolmncs Beach.
The couple will marry oil Sept. 27 aboard
the Showboat in Cortez.


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[] PAGE 12-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Ironman and woman steeled to compete


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
It should be enough to have one Ironman in the
family. But two Ironmen? Or an Ironman and a half?
Want to start over?
Brad Illing, who operates the Florida Sports Out-
let at Captain's Marina in Holmes Beach, is an Ironman
and will prove it again July 26.
His wife Elizabeth is a nurse, and half Ironman.
The Ironman competitions are self-imposed torture
tests in strength, stamina, self-discipline and persever-
ance. The one this month, in which both will compete,
is at Santa Rosa, Calif.
The full event requires Illing and other self-chal-
lengers to swim 2.4 miles in the Russian River, bicycle
112 miles through redwoods and the rolling hills of the
Napa Valley, then run 26.2 miles.
Consecutively. All in the same day. The triathlon
events cut off at the end of 17 hours.
Illing expects the winner in Santa Rosa will finish
in about nine hours. He believes he can do it all in
about 11. He finished in 12 hours in his first Ironman,


two years ago in Canada.
Elizabeth, meanwhile,
will be competing in the
half version of the triathlon,,
swimming and biking and
running just half of each
Ironman leg.
Just completing either -
one is considered an
achievement. Doing so in
competitive time is truly a llling
triumph.
It takes work, Illing says, but "not as much as
you'd think, although we do spend a lot of time on the
road, training."
He has cut back on the work hours at his kayak
shop, starting with seven days, then slowing down to
six, and this summer open five days "to see how it
goes.
He has run the shop for three years, moved from
Manatee Avenue to the marina in Holmes Beach last
November and changed the name from Ocean Bound


to Florida Sports Outlet.
The Illings have lived in California, Seattle and
Atlanta, where he grew up. When they started looking
for a permanent place, they came to Florida, where she
grew up, and settled here. They live in northwest
Bradenton with their 2-year-old daughter, who "will be
with Grandma" while they're triathloning.
There are several Ironman competitions world-
wide, he says, in Hawaii, Japan, Australia, Germany
and other countries. He plans to enter one at Claremont,
near Orlando, in October.
He hasn't even a hint of his time limit he's been
competing for 10 years in such events of all distances
and times from one hour on up, and he's only 35.
There's no thought of slacking off.
As a matter of fact, there's one in California next
year that will be really tough swimming, mountain
biking, mountain climbing, kayaking and running, with
a 32-hour cutoff.
It will be called the "Eco-Challenge, the Longest
Day."
He's looking forward to it, can you believe it?


Anna Maria, Westside fire
commissioners meet
Commissioners from the Anna Maria and
Westside Fire Districts held their first joint meeting
last week.
The districts merged training, fire prevention.
administration and operations in April. Anna
Maria's Fire Chief Andy Price will be in charge of
administration and Jay Pinkley, Westside's acting
chief, will be in charge of operations.
The commissioners agreed it's time for the pair
to begin those jobs and directed Price and Pinkley
to draft job descriptions to be approved by both
boards. Commissioners will also hire a training/
safety officer to be shared between the two districts.

Longboat Chamber to
hold coffee
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will
hold its monthly New Member Coffee on Wednesday.


July 30, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Chamber office, 6854
Gulf of Mexico Drive, Whitney Beach Plaza.
Breakfast will be served. All Longboat Key
Chamber members are invited to attend.
For information, call 387-9519.

Island Gallery West
presents special exhibit
Island Gallery West. an artist cooperative, will
present a special exhibit, "A Florida Summer: Sunl,
Sand, Surf," from now through Aug. 3 1, featuring
the works of local and regional artists.
Mediums on exhibit include watercolor, acryl-
ics, porcelain, raku, basketry, photography. Indian
beadwork, quilting, stained glass, mosaic, fabric
art and stone, wood and clay sculpture.
The gallery is located at 5348 Gulf Dri\ve
Holmes Beach. Its summer hours are Tuesday
through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Call 778-6648 for information.


Temps

& Drops

on A.M.


Date Low
July 13 78
July 14 78
July 15 78
July 16 77
July 17 79
July 18 76
July 19 78
Average Gulf water


High Rainfall
94 .0
92 .0
94 .0
94 .0
95 .0
95 .1
95 .0
temperature 88


IISLANDER


K/INS/OAis






Doaaoone (o


1997 Official Rules: o w-
1) The Kodak International Newspaper Sonapshot Awards (KINSA) contest is strictly lor arilalcut photoaphlers Amainur
Pholnographers are 'hose who derive less than 5% of then income hrom photography
2)'
2 ,,i, .i ..I .. .. i1, i hD C ': | ,, rhi, ,, ,ua ill bi ina,, I ,,, i .. .. .... .1 ,, 11 ,b i 1 ..i .
10. 1997 eligible enlies must have been received om hne sponsoring newspaper anii poslmaiked no ialef Ihan Auriusi
22,1997
3) Black-and-while and color photographs lake afler January 1,1995, are eligible This allows for a two year eligibility Pholns
previously published or entered in any KINSA or other competitions are nol eligible
4) Enlranls are permilled to submit pictures to only one newspaper participating in the KINSA contest
5) Snapshots nay be taken with any make of camera, but all entries must be taken on !KODAK Film AND, If printed, an
KODAK Paper. No retouching or other alteration (except cropping) is permitted el negatives or pnnls, no composite pictures
of multiple printing can be submilled
6) Entranl's name and address must be wrillen clearly, in ink, on the back of each print or transparency mount Mail engines
to the KINSA Contest Edilor, care ofl tis newspaper
7) Entrants by their entry agree that the Newspaper may publish theif pictures ter local promotion of the contest. Enitrants must
be able to furnish the original negative or transparency, 11 requested, by the Contest rdlor All photos sibrnited become
the property ol tie sponsors and none will be returned. he sponsors assume no responsibility lor negatives. transparencies,
or prints
To be eligible for the International Judging of the KINSA contest, each entrant must first satisfy the requiremels 01 trie local
Sponsoring Newspaper e.g. be a local winner, and must then sign a Pnze Winner's Agreement in the lorm provided by
Kodak. This Agreement attests the photo was taken by the entrant and assigns to Eastman Kodak Company the original
negative/transparency o0 their picture It grants Eastman Kodak Company and others, with Kodak's consent, tie exclusive
ingh io copy and use the picture, in whole or part. for any purpose (including advertising, display, and publication) for at
least five (5) years; and to use the entrant's name and likeness in connection with any use of tire picture, or with any
prrnolion of this or any othlier contest 11 entry is on ADVANTIX Film cassette, the cassettlle will be returned to the entrant
at lie conclusion ofu the international Contest Hnwover, all fights o' exclusive usage ofn he prize-winning image wil remain
will Kodak
I nrant must know itn names and addresses of any recognizable persons appearing in the picture In order to be a finalist
and to be eligible for international ijdging, entrant must provide the written consent of suctiperson(s) to permit use of
the picture by Kodak and others, with Kodak's consent, tlo any purpose including advertising, display, and publication By
signing the PIlle Winner's Agreement enltant also agrees that rhe picture. or another closely similar plcluce of the same
subject or situation has nol, and will not be entered in any other contest and will not be oilored for publication elsewhere.
I failure to sign and return the Agreement within 20 days ol its receipl may result in foilefuire of the local prize and selection
oea new winner
8) Cash prizes totlairg $52,500 US will be awarded in Internaltional Judging as follows
Grand Priec S10.,000 U S
2 First Pizes $5.,00 US each
2 Second Prizes $3,000 US each
2 Third Pries $2,000 U S each
50 Honor Awards $250 U.S each
200 Special Merit Awards $50 US each


Honor Awards may include the Cinrgoiis ol
Abstractl Sli LLitO
Landscape & Scenic Huminor
*Poliall* Seoiors
Candids Action . .
Animals New Paentls
) I ,,,,I.... ...ilh,,, ,,,,,,,.. '.. I,,,,, ..... .... Ii, ,i,,,,, .. iI ... I i, I,
Ihe same household
S ...... . ... ...... Any cash ri won by a no will awarded Into a pai nl
1 ) This contest is void where pohibitedt and subjc t to all appicable laws and regulations


Please attach to photo and mail or deliver to The Islander
Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217.
"Attention, KINSA Editor." I
NAME
ADDRESS I
CITY
STATE -ZIP_
PHONE NO.
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:_
I have read the competition rules and affirm that this entry Is
In compliance with them.

-- SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT
L-- -- --


Sponsored by

IISLANER
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217
Just two chances left to win ...
Final contest date: Issue 7/30.
Deadlines: Friday, 7/25.
Local prizes: Weekly winners receive a merchandise
certificate from Kodak, a choice between an Islander
Bystander "mullet-wrapper" T-shirt or hat, a framing
certificate from Longboat Framing Gallerie.
and a dining certificate from
The Sandbar restaurant.
0 Eastman Kodak Company, 1997


I nentoaNesprSasoAw d


EBS






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 13-A Ilr[


Guild gets kids creative
with crafts
Members of the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island
volunteered to teach children the art of painting sand
dollars at the Anna Maria Island Community Center
with colorful results. Fifteen children participated in
creating medallions, magnets and Christmas orna-
ments. Guild members from left are Jo Huges,
Donna Bednarz, Nadine King and Lois Lietz. The
sand dollars were donated by Raders Reef of Holmes
Beach. Islander Photo: Courtesy of the Artists Guild
of Anna Maria


I DEIDPATMNT I


ID





[ PAGE 14-A JULY 23, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
':'], '


Island sculptor donates
artwork to
Island Branch Library
Local artist Woody Candish donated his sculpture
entitled "Read a Book" to the Island Branch Library
in Holmes Beach. The welded steel sculpture,
designed and crafted by Candish, spells out the
words "Read a Book. The artist, whose sculptures
grace several Island locations, has worked on many
artistic projects with the Island Branch Library and
is currently planning a showing of his work at the
library for summer 1998. Call Candish at 778-9230
for information about his work. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of the Island Branch Library


Crumbs -
Wit and wisdom by native -,r
Floridian Gib Bergquist
An affair of the heart
The Cracker and his wife, Madeleine, take
separate vacations. Neither believes that ab-
senee makes the heart grow fonder, but this ar-
rangement is forced upon us by the fact that we
have a dog, Spud, who rebels at being left at the
kennel. His "protest movements" are in evi-
dence on the carpet for some time afterwards.
This year was no different. While his wife
and family were living high on the hog with
Grandma in Puerto Rico, the Cracker stayed
home to dog sit and tend his xeriscapic sand-
spur patch. He also was psychologically prepar-
ing himself for an affair of the heart a triple
coronary bypass.
This gameplay was prompted by three-
strikes-and-you're-out saves and the quick re-
sponse of our wonderful Anna Maria Island
Fire District and Emergency Medical Services
over the past couple of years.
As a former Marine and FBI Agent, the
Cracker tried to approach this surgery cool,
calm and collected, "like one who wraps the
drapery of his couch about him and lies down
to pleasant dreams." All went well with the
operation, but the dreams were not that pleas-
ant. Let me tell you about them.
He has this project pending at home to in-
crease the insulation in his attic. All through the
second day of recovery, the Cracker imagined
he was home and vividly saw these gremlin-like
creatures carrying armfuls of insulation mate-
rial right through the walls into the attic in a
steady parade which continued 1'or houLrs. 1


also experienced some bizarre light patterns
moving to the cha-cha-cha rhythm along the top
border of the hospital room wall. Another
strange delusion manifested itself by changing
his doctors, nurses, bloodletters and
needlestickers into grotesque "pinheads" with
missing facial features.
At this point, the Cracker had ample reason
to doubt his sanity, especially when he heard a
Chinese military band playing an inspiring ren-
dition of "Amazing Grace" on TV during the
formal ceremony of the return of Hong Kong to
Chinese rule. As incongruous as it seemed, he
was later assured that this actually occurred.
During a visit from his wife, the Cracker re-
marked, shaking his head form side to side:
"What a wild place this is!" This was incompre-
hensible to her since the only thing she could
observe was the quiet simplicity of the Progres-
sive Care Unit's normal routine. She couldn't
see behind her head, where the wall clock was
playing peek-a-boo with the Cracker by fading in
and out of the wall.
Coming home from the hospital, after six
days of rest and "recreation," the Cracker
thought he had left his weird and unbelievable
adventures behind him. He was wrong. He
walked into the yellow bathroom, only to find
that his wife had redecorated it in the orange and
blue colors of his beloved Florida Gators. Origi-
nally, he was elated at the artistry of the transfor-
mation and his wife's thoughtfulness, but later
had second thoughts about the tackiness of it all.
He was relieved the following morning when he
discovered the bathroom was unchanged from its
familiar pastel yellow decor.
The Cracker wishes to thank his wonderful
doctors, nurses and well-wishers who shared this
"vacation" adventure in la-la land with him. He
is recovering nicely, with only some temporary
loss of visual acuity. This may affect his future
as a Little League coach, but he feels qualified
to join the ranks of the umpires, who are always
accused of being blind anyway!


N6TEE WEST SHOPPING CENTER 4 i4 4

Christmas in July Special Sales Just For You!
Convenient MANATEE AVE.WEST MANATEE AVE. WEST fIT 75TH STREET, BRODENTON
Shonnina _____


i Albertson's


% DII E'S
GEMAG AGNATION
STOP by to see what) ^
Santa can put in ']
your stocking.
7441 Manatee Ave. W.
Bradenton 795-8875


-WALL TO WALL

STOREWIDE 13% to 50% OFF I


7435Mana eeAv. W'st
B COLORS: (nex tONo B ACKrton at-1^ __ 75t &RO an atee)__ ^- ---^


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ESTABLISHED 1983


Breakfast & Lunch
Now Serving Cappuccino & Espresso
Beer & Wine Take-Out
Mon :il t l to '3 m "- 8 lo I
Mt ll co Woil ',hopp|p|Ci n C for (n'x\ Io All rl),,'on,0
741d ) M. iilloo Avc W. Blr niid.on '7W, T/8'/
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SUMMER SAVINGS COUPON


10% OFF
I One Purchase $20 or more
I *One offer per customer no photos copies, excludes
sales tax, layaways, gift certificates & other discounts.
Expires Aug 31, 1997


I Iff ....
IASHIONS Monday-Saturday
Manatee Shopping Center 9 am-5 pm
I Manatee West Shopping Center Store Only


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c Christmas in July Sale
S SELECTED SUMMER DRESSES
AND SPORTSWEAR 30 to 50% OFF /
ALL JEWELRY 25% OFF
( Sale ends August 10, 1997
(941)794-5599 A



"It's

Christmas
in July!"3
'* come to our

Sidewalk 6ale


25 to 50% O1FF.
All Summer Merchandiese

-r Contemporary
Clo hing
for the Classic
Woman
7471 Manatee Ave. West
Bradenton 792-6695,


MA



s.,xl "


next to
Albertsons" --


I I I I I


---,,





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 N PAGE 15-A [iM


Be careful what
you wish for
Road construction began last week along Marina
Drive in front of the Island Shopping Center on culverts
and storm-water drains.
All the merchants who expressed an opinion so far
agree there might have been a better time to schedule
the work, but they weren't consulted.
Suddenly, the best anyone could have hoped for by
way of a summer season, evaporated when traffic was
re-routed. It's quiet except for spurts of business at
lunch hereabouts. It's also slowed down at Jessie's and
the liquor store and just about everywhere in the cen-
ter of the Holmes Beach business district.
Except of course, there's always a little sunshine in
every cloud. Rosemary Fleck, owner of Essence of
Time, and Betty Files at Under the Sun antiques and
collectibles report booming business. Both shops are at
5306 Holmes Boulevard.
"I sold $500 worth of merchandise right off the
walls in one day," Fleck said. She's thrilled with the
boost from drivers circumventing the marked detour.
It seems lots of folks know that cutting down
Holmes Boulevard from 56th Street to Gulf Drive, and
vice versa, will get you to point B faster.
In the process, some drivers have taken time to
discover new perusals. Good for Fleck and Files.
The road work is not so good for some others.
Numerous fender-benders not to mention near
misses are occurring at 56th Street at Holmes Bou-
levard. The presence of the Holmes Beach Police
"ghost car" seemed to have deterred the rush of some

Longboat Is1anb Chapel
6200 GULF OF MEXICO DRIVE
383-6491 Ministers
Dr. Bill Grossman
-d-:. Rev. Cleda Anderson
_,_ Sunday
~ '"-----. -_ 8:00 am .... Informal Worship
S 9:00 am ... Adult Study
-""1 y i 10:00 am .. Worship Service
in Sanctuary
interfaith nursery
sharing community newcomers welcome


ser (- rmarial m a nmmnunitu fl4urcl
Pastor Wavne An Inter denominational Christiiii Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Morning Worship 10 am
Adult Sunday School 9 am
Children's Summer Sunday School 10 am
Seaside Service Sat. 7 pm
at Magnolia Ave. at the Gulf
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414

WAGNEI REALTY
221 2217 gul drive norl.ih, braidcnilon b dch, II l217


NINC': I


MICHAEL ADVOCATE
REALTOR"WGRI
cveral Notchs Abov!d
Know 'ledge ]':x1 'ricinc S rol',ioiiili.ni
Real Estate Lecturer: NYU
Biographed in Who's
Who in American Law
I"'I'I mifrkcel analysis or your home c
Office (941) 778-2246
Home (941) 778-0608
Pager (941) 215-4202


MASSAGE

THERAPY
Dan Goodchild .
NEUROMUSCULAR
Stress Reduction Pain Relief &
L.M.T. #MA0008593 Clinic #MM0005692
cALLF O777.- 1*138
APPOINTMENT 779-1138


2501 Gulf Drive N.
Suite 103
Bradenton Beach


S..


at 5Sae wrl -Sn. d h- - -.h

Ode to the beach Froggy musicians playing guitar and bass adorned the 66th Street beach in Holmes Beach last
week. The attention-getting sculpture, approximately 10 feet wide and four feet tall, was created by Jim Shipley, a
partner in Flash Flights in Holmes Beach. Shipley has just begun work on another large sand sculpture in the store
ait 5348 GullfDrive. Stop by for a peek at his work "in progress. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


drivers one day last week but a frenzy to beat cars to
the other side of the road continues.
Meanwhile, at Gulf Drive and Holmes Boulevard,
we see long lines of cars waiting to get into the flow on
Gulf Drive. With traffic on Gulf Drive uninhibited by
a stop light at Marina Drive, pedestrians attenipting to
use the crosswalk fear their lives.
Another long line of congestion was created, from
Holmes Boulevard to Eckerd, when a north-bound

Thai Masseag
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me Relaxes body & renews spirit
e Promotes balanced energy flow
Coming Soon to Hair Motions!
Patricia Emslie, LMT Dell D.L. Dell'Armo, LMT
779-2021 383-5678
Lic# MA0023639 Lic# MA0021487


(GARL('LI
Miracle Herb?
Probably not, but for some it beats
taking antibiotics. For more information:


GOOD EARTH

NATURAL FOODS
6717 Manatee Ave. W. 795-0478
725 Cortez Rd. W. 756-4666
5153 14th Street W.753-8902 _


school bus waited for cars blocking its turn onto
Holmes Boulevard to pull onto Gulf Drive. Stalemate.
Think maybe the school bus should use the desig-
nated detour? Then, so should the Manatee County
Area Transit buses. They've been observed short-cut-
ting on Holmes Boulevard as well.
And to think, there's five more weeks of this in- _,
tense land-mine, kamikaze driving to endure.
Heaven help us and our businesses.
WVhen you sy ...
"I just want cremation!"
... we know exactly what yot mean!

Prearranged $
Simple $ / 6 5any
CremI. tionI ( ot (, Crematon Society,

GEORGE WYLLY (941) 371-8605
Family Services Counselor Res: (941) 355-6429

I 1


j-JIw


-A-1-


Stephen G. Gloria J. Scott L.
Pelhami M.D. ischr, M.D. Kosleld, M.D.


Island Family Physicians

PROVIDING COMPLETE FAMILY CARE
ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
3909 East Bay Drive #100, 778-1007


Banker's Life & Casualty Company

Invites you to a FREE
Informational Seminar and Luncheon.

Topics in'lude.-
LI Home Health LU ACLF's
L Long-Teri (iCarc L Estate Planning

To I)be lihed at:.


Eae-houge7


Bradenton Beach
Tuesday, July 29
and Thursday, August 14
10:30 a.m.


Reservations required: Please RSVP Carole Marshall at 955-484(


S JU5t
visiting
paradise?


ISLANDER

Don't; leave the island
without ,l i I linic ,to
subLscril)e o 1 lie bch t, 1 lCws
- the only paper with all
the news
about the Island.
Chlarec your
sublscripion to
M;t5 erciCar orVicd
by phone or visit us alt
5404 Marina Drive. Island
Shopping Ceiter,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


fess". 4' i .-.-^

^IMnM^


i'~T~E~6~~


I, '


/4






_Ij[ PAGE 16-A U JULY 23, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
July 12, criminal mischief, 100 block of Beach
Avenue. The complainant reported several boarded up
windows were pulled loose.

Bradenton Beach
July 11, bench warrant, 100 Gulf Drive N., Circle
K. Based on past experience with the suspect, the of-
ficer ran a warrant check and found he had an outstand-
ing warrant. He was placed in custody.
July 12, harassing phone calls, 2500 block of
Avenue B.
July 12, multiple charges, Coquina Beach. Three
subjects, claiming to be gang members, became abu-
sive to the officer and were advised to leave. The of-
ficer did a check and found the vehicle's tag was sto-
len. After stopping the subjects, he found a 12-pack of
beer in the vehicle.
One subject attempted to run and was placed in
custody. He was charged with attached tag not as-
signed, operating an unregistered vehicle, resisting
without violence and no valid driver's license.
The other subjects began hollering in Spanish
and were searched, said the report. The officer found
a knife with an eight-inch blade on one subject. He
was placed in custody and charged with obstruction,
carrying a concealed weapon and possession of al-
cohol.
The third subject was released.
July 12, no valid driver's license, Coquina Beach.


ISTREETL


Come Dine With Us!
Breakfast
Daily Special Luncheon
Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported Frenc ti wines
We Also have
French Bread, Croissants Pate
& Pastries To Go


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-9:30PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Su:n SAM-1:30PM


Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinneri
778-5320









Free Delivery 5pm close

PIZZA Medium Large Sicilian
Cheese ........................ $6.75 ......... $8.50 ..... ... $9.50
1 Item ......................... $7.75 ....... $10.00 ..... ..$11.00
2 Item s ........................ $8.75 ....... $11.50 .......$12.50
3 Item s ........................... $9.75 ....... $12.50 ..... ..$ 13.00
4 Item s ...................... $10.75 ....... $13.50 .......$14.50
All Item s ................... $11.75 ....... $15.00 ..... ..$16.00
Pizza by the Slice Plain...$1.25
Extra Toppings...25 each
***
Stuffed M eat Pizza ........................................... $16.95
Stuffed Vegie Pizza .......................................... $16.95
White Pizza (Ricotta & Mozzarella) .................. $9.95
Grandma Pizza
Fresh Tomato, Olive Oil & Garlic........... $9.95
Stromboli: Sausage, Pepperoni, Mushroom, Qheese
Large ........... $8.50 Small ......... $4.25
Calzone: Ricotta, Mozzarella
Large ........ $8.50 Small ......... $4.25

We also offer...
Delicious variety of Sandwiches
and Dinners to go!
Full Deli & Produce Market
Monday-Saturday i 10:30 am to 8 pm
5604 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-0333 or 779-2268


The officer on patrol observed the subject operating a
vehicle with several small children climbing over the
seats and did a traffic stop. A check showed the driver
had no license and also had two warrants. He was
placed in custody.
July 15, retail theft, 2513 Gulf Drive, Circle K.
The complainant reported a subject removed two 12-
packs of beer valued at $21.98 and fled. He was not
found.

Holmes Beach
July 11, domestic battery, 3000 block of Av-
enue C. The complainant reported having a domes-
tic dispute with the subject over money. The officer
said she had been drinking heavily, became violent
while he was there and threatened the subject. She
was placed in custody. As she was being handcuffed,
she reached out and slapped the subject,, the officer
said in the report.
July 12, disabled vehicle, 3900 East Bay Drive,
Island Foods. The officer observed the subject pushing
his disabled vehicle into the parking lot. The officer
helped him push it into a parking space and advised the
store's management.
July 12, disturbance, 400 block of 63rd Street.
The complainant reported loud yelling coming from the
residence. Two subjects were having a disagreement
and didn't realize they were too loud.
July 12, suspicious, 3900 East Bay Drive. Island
Foods. The complainant arrived for work and observed
two subjects at the front of the store. She thought they
attempted to open the door and left to get an officer.
The subjects were gone when the officer arrived.
Jufy 12, noise from loud music. 3500 block of




Chez Andlre


f ON T H E





Nestled between the Gulf of Mexico and beautiful
Sarasota Bay...a truly "Floribbean" dining
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. ... :.

Come enjoy a delightful breakfast, lunch or
dinner amid exhilarating views of Sarasota Bay,
the Key Club Golf Course and the Marina. Dine
indoors or out, casual attire is welcomed.
Sarasota Bay Marker 15
2600 Harbourside DIrive


383-0440


Longboat Key
Moorings


New Ownership!
Come say "HI" to Brian!
Great food and...
service with a smile.
Open 7 am 2 pm weekdays
7 am 1 pm Sat. & Sun.
closed Wednesdays


Watch for new daily $5
lunch specials all under
Take-out available *778-4140
(formerly Linda ') 534&-A1 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Sixth Avenue.
July 12, found property a bicycle, 5800 block
of Gulf Drive.
July 12, assist EMS, 52nd Street beach. EMS
advised the patient, who was stung by a stingray, to
treat the wound with hot water. The officer transported
the patient to the public beach to get hot water.
July 12, assist Bradenton Beach Police Depart-
ment. The officer responded to a report of a suicide
threat and found a couple having a domestic dispute.
The male subject threatened to make the female sub-
ject walk back to Winter Haven, said the report. The
female subject said she would kill herself before she
would walk home. She assured the officer that she had
no intention of killing herself. The couple settled the
dispute.
July 12, assist Bradenton Beach Police Depart-
ment, 1100 block of Gulf Drive. The complainant re-
ported juveniles breaking windows in a vacant house.
They told the officer they thought it was OK because
the house was being torn down. The officer issued tres-
pass warnings.
July 12, assistance, 56th Street and Gulf Drive.
The subject had been drinking and was trying to ride
his bicycle while balancing several packages, said the
report. He lost his balance and fell, hitting his face. He
refused treatment and a fire department volunteer gave
him a ride home.
July 12, noise form loud subjects swimming,
3100 block of Gulf Drive.
July 13, suspicious, 5300 Gulf Drive, Martinique.
The complainant reported juveniles were throwing
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE



STIAI O-C01A
It's easy yto remember our name..
but hard to forget our food!





The fiet in t ite.
,,_ '. us Thai cuisine
in comfortable
atmos-phere. Our tasty
Thai food will keep you
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again and again.
Dinner Mon- Sat
5:00 to 9:30 PM
(Closed Sunday)
7604 Cortez Road West,
Bradenton
1 block west of 75th on Cortez Rd.
Tel: (941) 794-5470
300 OUFDR -457


OPEN TOTHE PUBLIC- take Bay Isles hirkway
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Take first right and SCeOlid lel't IL11 11 10 NNIMII'MIL






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 N PAGE 17-A [iM


STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 16


stones from a third or fourth story window and shat-
tered a window.
July 14, theft, 3018 Avenue C, mini-storage. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed $200
and a box of vitamins valued at $20 from the office.
July 14, traffic, 800 block of Manatee Avenue.
The officer stopped a vehicle with excessive exhaust
fumes and a check showed the driver didn't have a li-
cense, registration or proof of insurance. The officer
issued four citations and advised the driver to have the
vehicle repaired.
July 14, assist fire department, 699 Manatee Av-
enue, Barnett Bank. The officer on patrol observed
smoke coming from the flower bed and found the cy-
press mulch on fire. He alerted the fire department and
stomped out the fire. The fire department doused the
flower bed with water.
July 14, assistance, 7500 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported her neighbors were gone for
several days and the caretaker was not properly caring
for their dog. She said she would provide food and
water if the officer would respond and feed the dog. He
did.
July 14, assistance, Kingfish Ramp. A sightseeing
boat had engine trouble and stopped at Kingfish Ramp,
according to the police report. The officer gave a pas-
senger a ride to her car so she could return for the other
passengers.
July 15, assist Florida Highway Patrol, Anna
Maria Bridge: A chair fell off a vehicle and was block-
ing the bridge. The officer removed it.
July 16, noise from a loud party, 2700 block of
Gulf Drive.
July 16, warrant, 56th Street and Holmes Boule-
vard. The subject was at fault in a minor traffic acci-
dent and a check showed he had an outstanding war-
rant from the Manatee County Sheriff's Office. He was


Just over the Cortez Bridge

STyleyr's
S ) .1 9 Since 1984
Old Fashioned Ice Cream and watfle Cones
IN Made on Locatio
Ice Cream Pics & Cakes Diabetic
Colombo Yogurt Soft Servec
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10 PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333


N1 BO 'Sp
( 10519 Cortez Road /
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

LUNCH PIZZA
BUFFET

$4.19
DINNER PIZZA 0 0
BUFFET

$4.69 0.0


placed in custody and issued a citation for failure to
observe a traffic sign.
July 16, assistance, 699 Manatee Avenue, Barnett
Bank. The officer assisted the subject in jump-starting
his car.
July 16, suspicious, 7100 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported a person unknown took mail
from her mailbox and threw it on the ground.
July 16, harassment, 400 block of Clark Drive.
The complainant reported juveniles were harassing him
and making threats against his children.
July 16, disturbance, 3000 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported the landlord arrives at all
hours of the day and night claiming he is there to fix or
check something. The officer advised him to give
proper notice.
July 17, theft of a plant valued at $80. 5608 Gulf
Drive, Sun Plaza West.
July 17, damage. 2900 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported a spider-web crack in his wind-
shield. Damages were $100.
July 17. warrant arrest, 7100 block of Palm Drive.
July 17. code violation, 200 block of 84th Street.
The complainant reported a skateboard ramp in the
road and the officer advised the subject to remove it.
July 17, assault, 3015 Gulf Drive. Citgo. The vic-
tim reported while he was filling the cooler, a subject
entered the cooler and began accusing him of trading
beer for personal favors. The complainant said he told
the subject he didn't know what he was talking about.
The subject began to curse and walked out of the store.
On his way out, he produced a knife and pointed it at
the complainant, said the report.
July 18, suspicious. 2700 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported subjects armed with guns
had crashed a party. Upon the officer's arrival, nu-
merous subjects departed quickly. The complainant
said they were the ones who were armed but he
didn't know them.


0'it--MLMT-.
Every Day
All-You-Can Eat
Pancakes
and
Sausage
Includes
$.-~ Jimmy Dean
$ Sausage
Mon Fri 7am to 12
Sat & Sun 7am to 1pm
(RAIN OR SHINE)
CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
778-0784


Every Thursday
All-You-Can Eat
Spaghetti

Meatballs
$595

2pm to Close
Live Music hy Micele
CAFE ''
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
778-0784


Islander charged
with arson
Bradenton Beach police arrested Timothy
Moran, 38, 202 24th St., Friday and charged him
with arson in a July 15 fire at his residence.
When an officer responded to the residence last
week, he found Moran exiting an apartment that was
on fire. The officer said Moran smelled strongly of
an alcoholic beverage and his feet were burned.
Moran said he was distraught because his girl-
friend was going to leave him and he began drink-
ing and looking for pills to take, police said. Un-
able to find any, he said he carried some of his
girlfriend's clothing into the bedroom and set it on
fire. When the house filled with smoke, he fled.
Moran was placed in custody under the Baker
Act and transported to the hospital. While at the hos-
pital, he became violent and had to be restrained by
hospital security, the officer reported. Upon his re-
lease from the hospital, Moran was placed in custody.


Nautical extravaganza to
feature Island businesses
One of Southwest Florida's premier boat sales and
show, Nautical Extravaganza '97, will feature exhibits
by Island boat businesses and related services.
Cannons Marine, Five O'Clock Marine, The
Boatworks, Captain John's Marina, Cavanagh Marine
Engine Repair, Island Discount Tackle, Holmes Beach
Marina, the Anna Maria Island Power Squadron and the
Buccaneer Inn will be among the exhibitors. The show
will be held Friday, July 25, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.: Sat-
urday. July 26, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.: and Sunday. July 27,
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Manatee Convention Cen-
ter in Palmetto.


Every Friday
All-You-Can Eat
Fish Fry
$695

2pm to Close

CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
778-0784


"Beachside" ]
Char-Grilled


Every Saturday &
Sunday 2pm-Close
(RAIN OR SHINE)
Savory St. Louis $795
Ribs Plus tax
1/2 Tender $i95
Chicken plus tax
Dinners include Potato Salad,
Baked Beans & Texas Toast.
Live M.lusic by Michele
CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
778-0784


Lobster

Lover's

Week


" V DINNER i, ',
.DISCOUNT .;'.
Simply purchase a
Showboat ticket at i '' -.
regular price, keep your
ticket and present in the -.' w
Seafood Shack main '
dining room (upper i i'.,'
level) for $7 discount on .. T i
dinner entree. Dinners
start at $9.95 plus tax.

RESTAURANT
794-1235


.:4110 127th St. W. Cortez Cortez Rd. ..
on the Mainland Side
of the Cortez Bridge ..


1 1/4 lb Steamed Maine Lobster 1595
1/2 Lobster Stuffed with Jumbo Crab 1 495
Lobster Scampi over Pasta 1695
Lobster Thermidor 1695
Chilled Lobster Salad 1395
All dinners served with choice of Soup or Salad,
Pasta or Potato and Vegetable, Corn Fritters or Hot Rolls

Beer & Wine Take Out Available
383-0013
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Specializing in Fresh Seafood, Pasta & Steaks
5610 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key
(Just North of Gary's Comner Mart)


- Bridge Street Pier ad Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
CASUAL DINING ON THE WATER




GROUPER $795
Every Night* 4 10

FRIED SHRIMP $795
Tues & Thurs* 4 10pm I

CRAB LEGS $1595
Every Sunday 4 10 pn

ICE COLD DRAFT BEER
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mon-Fri 8am-10pm Sat & Sun 7am-10pm
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706





I[] PAGE 18-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Realty Raves
Wedebrock Real Estate Company announced the
opening of its fourth location at 1290 Palm Ave.,
Sarasota. The Sarasota office will house the firm's
commercial division headed by James Foster.
Rob Walker, former manager of Neal & Neal, El
Conquistador branch office, has joined the Wedebrock
team.
A Paradise Inc., Realtor, of Holmes Beach has
announced that the real estate sales team of Dick Maher
and Dave Jones have joined its sales staff. The two
sales agents bring 30 years of combined sales experi-
ence to the firm at 5201 Gulf Drive.
,_ Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate an-


Sea Dog Grill & Tavern
11:30-11 Closed Mondays
Thursday: Ribs & Fries $399
Friday: Fish & Chips $399
Saturday: All-You-Can-Eat
Pasta Marinara
W'b & Garlic Bread
$350
Dog-gone
Great Food
& Beer!
7834 Cortez Road Coral Way Plaza 761-0517


nounced that Bobbye Chasey was its top sales producer
and Chard Winheim its top listing agent for the month
of June at its Anna Maria Island office. Rose Schnoerr
was top producer and Lynn English top lister for the
month of May at Coldwell.
Island Real Estate in Holmes Beach announced
Nick Patsios was its top sales agent and Richard Free-
man its top listing agent for May. For the month of
June, Nick Patsios was top sales agent again and Bob
Fittro was top listing agent.
The Prudential Florida Realty announced its top
lister and seller for the Holmes Beach office in June
was Karin Stephan.
The team of Rebecca Smith and Elfi Starrett were
the top listers and sellers for Wedebrock Real Estate's
Holmes Beach office in June.
Coldwell Banker recently raised $10.800 for Habi-


DINNER FOR TWO ~ $49.95
includes choice 1 f appetirs, entrees a11nd
desserts with a selected bottle of
red or whliite Italian wine.





AWARD-WINNING ITALIAN CONTINENTAL CUISINE
Reservations 383-8898 Ivo Scata, Proprietor
Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive. Longboat Key


Theme-Night Dinners


'> with Chef Mo'
a Dine around the world at Isabelle's
7! ,> Every Friday and Saturday, 5 to 9:30 pm

T his week stop, in


Mexico and Italy
for appetizers, salads,
entrees and desserts.
Casual candlelight dining!
priced from $8.95 to $12.95
i Still serving our delicious
breakfast and lunch 7 days,.

ISAt =LLL'S GATQRY INC.
6836 Gulf of Mexico Drive Whitney Beach Plaza 383-0689


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I SLANDER

"The best news"


I


tat for Humanity through a golf tournament held at the
Walden Lake Golf and Country Club in Plant City.
Over the past three years, Coldwell Banker has raised
more than $150,000 for the organization and has built
four Habitat homes in West Central Florida.


SEAHORSE OYSTER BAR
MONDAY: $1 OFF DOZEN OYSTERS
FREE POOL: 6 to close
TUESDAY: PEEL & EAT SHRIMP $9.95 / lb.
Drink Special: $2 for the first Daquiri,.
$1 for the second Daquiri
WEDNESDAY: WINGS 250 each, Minimum 1dz.
THURSDAY: $1.50 Domestic Longnecks ,
ALL DAY ALL NIGHT Join our
FRIDAY & SATURDAY: softTP
FREE JUKE BOX 8:30 TO CLOSE LeagU *
THIS WEEK ~ ALL WEEK BASS ALE $2"


Great Food, Great Beach. Great Fun!
Enjoy our value-priced daily specials and our fresh, native
seafood for lunch or dinner daily. Relax in our cool dining room,
or sit out on our Gulffront deck to live
music and a fabulous sunset every
evening. Enjoy the steel drum sounds
of Trinidudes Wednesday nights,
Cairo's rockin' reggae on Sunday
afternoons and R.P.M.'s rock and
roll favorites every other
evening during July.
Call ahead for preferred seating.
It's great music, .-4.
a great view ... B
and great fun! se
howureww~


RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
Dining: Tues Sun 4 10 pm
Lounge: Tues Sun 4 11 pm
778-6969


PIANO BAR
with L'ARRY RICH J
Tues. Sat. 8 Midnight 1
REID FROST r f
undoy 8 to 11 '
CIGAR SMOK1NS VVI OMN I


HAPPY HOUR
All Day -11 am-6 pm
-, Well Drinks
House Wines
L -^\ Domestic Beers


$150


Kitchen will close lor remodeling July 28-31
Kitchen re-opens Aug. I1 r luly 25
lIook forour newm IllNCI I MINLI dicbnt!
204 Pine Ave. RESERVATIONS ,RQUISTI) NOT RIQUIRFD Anna Maria


Island Chamber's card
exchange tonight
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce July Business Card Exchange will be held
at the Chamber office, 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, on Wednesday, July 23, from 5 to 7 p.m.
All members, guests and prospective mem-
bers are invited to attend.
Call the Chamber at 778-1541 for more infor-
mation.


I


GININGJUL 28


it






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 19-A [i3


Island Sports

'The week
tlhatt wIas ...
B~R K''. in 1 C.,,d\



My kinda town,
Chicago is
My wife Jennifer and myself, along with fellow
Islanders Matt Bowers and Chrissy Bruegen, made
our trip to Chicago in one piece as did our lug-
gage. After settling in, we made the trek to historic
Wrigley Field, home of the lovable Chicago Cubs.
Wrigley field is the third oldest ballpark in the
major leagues, after Detroit's Tiger Stadium and
Boston's Fenway Park, both built in 1912. The
ballpark was originally known as Weeghman Park.
Built in 1914 at a cost of $250,000 on the grounds
of a former seminary at the corner of Clark and
Addison streets, Wrigley's vine-covered brick walls
make a statement in these days of domes and syn-
thetic grass.
It was the original home of the Chicago Whales,



cQ Ice Cream!

S We have Cubans and...
< p"Fresh-Cut Deli Sandwiches
& DELI 95-99%Y Fat-Free Meats
Eat-In or Take-Out Soups, Salads, Bagels
For the Beach 1 Mon-Sat 10AM-9PM
Sunday Noon to 6PM
CLOSED WEDNESDAYS
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386


Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best
news the only paper
with all the news
about the island.
Charge your subscription
to MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


1:1Y OCK INN
3610 E. Bay Dr.
778-7034

oPEN 7AM DAILY


the city's entry in the short-lived Federal League,
and was named after team owner Charles
Weeghman.
After the Federal League folded in 1916,
Weeghman bought the Cubs from the Taft family of
Cincinnati and moved the team to Chicago.
No stadium in baseball captures the spirit of the
game more than Wrigley. I've been to Boston's
Fenway Park and though it too has a lot of charac-
ter, it pales in comparison to Wrigley Field.
Some of that character can be attributed to the
spirit Chicago fans bring to the stadium. This, de-
spite the fact that the Cubs are perrenial losers. They
haven't won a pennant since 1984 when they won
the National League's Eastern Division title only to
lose to the San Diego Padres in seven games after
leading three games to one.
You have to go back to 1907 to find a Cub's
team that won a World Series. Still, Cub fans flock
to the stadium to support their "home team."
This support is personified by the "bleacher
bums" who pack the outfield seats to support their
team and drink a few beers. If an opponent hits a
home run, the "bleacher bums" throw the ball back
onto the field. Even if the ball is hit out of the park
and onto Waveland Avenue, the ball will come sail-





Intimate Gulffview Dining
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Come Celebrate Christmas in July!
See ouA muthentic Dickens Village


103 Gulf Dlriv c 7
Bratdcnton Beach 778-2959


Tiucs-Sun, 8 a.m.
Closed Mondays


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Dine Between 5 and 6 p.m.
for -1 495 per person
from our Special "Early Bird" Menu





S O5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.
525 SL Judes Di.i Longboat Key
SOpen Tuesday Sunday
383-0777


ing back over the fence, perhaps with the hope of
somehow nullifying the homerun.
It is this spirit that makes the Cubs so lovable
and successful at the ticket gates. Almost every
game is met with a throng of fans fighting for tick-
ets to bleacher seats.
We made it to the bleachers for Friday's game
but ended up getting wet when a nasty thunderstorm
came through. We made the trip back the next day
but couldn't get bleacher tickets for the double-
header against the Colorado Rockies. We did, how-
ever, get great seats.
Bleachers not withstanding, it was still a great
time as the Cubs swept the double-header by scores
of 7-0 and an exciting come-from-behind 6-5 victory
in the second game. The only blight on the day was
that Matt "Butterfingers" Bowers could not hold
onto a foul ball hit by Bradenton's own Cubbie,
Brian McRae.
We'll be going to more games this week as the
Braves are coming to town. I'll catch a White Sox
game on Thursday night when my older sister and
her three kids come to town, so expect a report on
those events in next weeks edition.
So long for now from Chicago, that toddlin'
town.


Karaoke Sun & Mon
REID FROST Thursday ,
DAN CRAWFORD .
' 7 Wed, Fri & Sat Nite '


cL


JAY CRAWFORD
Coming July 31, Aug 1 & 2 DAN CRAWFORD


I LB. New York Strip...................... ................. $10.95
Roast Sirloin \,. ppl' -'cii i, Sauce ..................... $7.95
Potato Crusted Grouper & Shrimp Au Gratin ........ $8.95
"All-You-Can-Eat" Fried Groupet Fingets ........... $7.9


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven, "+i iss t'
nufffo, Pat Geyer, Owner.
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


R00' RESTAURANT -*
S CAFE BAKERY
117 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
PHONE: 778-7344 FAX: 778-6967
"I have the best goulash and it's served
within red cabbage. Come and taste it!"
BREAKFAST LUNCH
8-11:30 am 11:30 am 2:30 pm
Cco. ,i-.irii- r,t:.ry Choose from
coffee until 9 am 25 Entrees
with purchase of o 70
breakfast $1.50-4.50 $3.95 to $7.90
CLOSED TUESDAYS







I- PAGE 20-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


More fish, crabs and even pictures


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Local fishers are in for a treat. The Sarasota Bay Na-
tional Estuary Program, in cooperation with the City of
Sarasota, plans five new artificial Bay reefs to supplement
the four existing reefs in the Sarasota County portion of
the Bay.
Best news of all is that the largest new reef, measur-
ing 3,700 feet square, will be almost smack up against the
Sarasota-Manatee county line. The proposed location is
just west of the Intracoastal Waterway, near Marker 15.
In fact, the Walker Reef as it's proposed to be
named is in 10- to 12-foot-deep water with a firm sand/
shell bottom. A variety of different reef materials will be
used within the reef area, so it is hoped that a divergent
group of fish will be attracted to the area.
The different materials used on the reef, and what they
attract, will be monitored so you might say that the Walker
reef will be an experimental one.
By the way, as serious fishers have probably already
guessed, the name "Walker" is in honor of Capt. Jonnie
Walker. Almost as well known among charter captains
here as in his home town of Sarasota, Jonnie is considered
by many to be the dean of local inshore guiding.
The remaining four new reefs will be placed farther
south. most of them off downtown Sarasota.

And here too
Manatee County has received $25,000 from the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection for ar-
tificial reef construction in 1998. As I understand it. that
money will be used to expand the nearshore reef located
three miles west of Longboat Pass. Phase I construction
of that reef got underway last May with earlier state fund-
ing when 500 tons of concrete pilings were split between
two areas about 50 feet apart.
Funny thing about that particular reef is that although
it's been shown on charts for years, it was never actually
there. Now it's finally underway.
The GPS numbers for the eastern most point of that
site are 2726.20 and 82044.82.

Soft shells, yum
Last call for anyone interested in some training on
raising soft shell blue crabs! Sponsored by the Marine
Extension Service, the class is set for July 30 in Palmetto.
It's an all-day event beginning at 9 a.m. and lasting
until 4 p.m. Years ago I attended one of these classes in
Ft. Myers as an observer and although I certainly don't sell
soft shells for a living, it was a great educational experi-
ence and I gained much respect for both those wonderful-
tasting crabs and the people who raise them.



Anna Maria Island Tides

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Jul 23 3:43 1.8 8:12 1.1 2:49 2.5 9:29 0.4
Jul 24 4:20 1.9 9:21 1.1 3:48 2.2 10:03 0.6
Jul 25 4:59 2.1 10:44 1.0 4"57 1.9 10:40 0.9
LQ Jul26 5:46 2.2 11:17p* 1.1 6:31 1.6 12:12 0.9
Jul 27 6:38 2.3 11:59p* 1.3 8:32 1.5 1:46 0.7
Jul28 7:32 2.4 10:42 1.5 3:09 0.5
Jul29 8:32 2.5 12:58 1.4 4:17 0.4
Jul 30 12:02 1.5 1:57 1.4 9:31a* 2.6 5:09 0.3
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


For more information, call Marine Extension Agent
John Stevely at 722-4524.

Sharks are locals too
From time to time we're seeing new and ever tougher
regulations on shark fishing. The cause is simple, since
there are simply fewer sharks around and the critters play
an important role in the marine environment.
As evidence, think about this number. In the Mote
Shark Census this year, a total of 404 sharks of nine dif-
ferent species were caught and released. Of those 404, all
but 88 had been tagged in the past.
So its pretty clear that sharks, believe it or not, are
locals too.

Butcher goes south
Lots of us locally are fans of Clyde Butcher's photog-
raphy of the Everglades.
Likewise, there's a large print of his, bought at an
auction a couple of years ago, on my living room wall.
So it was interesting to learn that while Butcher has


based his career on photographing the Everglades, as of
last week he's begun to photograph the Keys too. But the
elements of his Keys work will be the same as those pho-
tographs shot in the Everglades, Butcher says. That's the
clouds and sky, mangroves and the beauty of the area.
No alligators or pretty birds in Butchers shots. For one
thing, they don't sit still long enough for his style of pho-
tography, which uses a big view camera similar to those
used at the time of the Civil War. If you're not familiar
with his photographs, think of Ansel Adams only
shooting in the Everglades.
Should you like to ever see some of Butcher's work
up close, stop by his gallery the next time you drive to
Miami. It's located at 52388 Tamiami Trail in Ochopee.
You know that place, it has the country's smallest post
office and is located out there near the old Monroe Station.
By the way, Butcher just donated $30,000 from sales
of his limited-edition Everglades prints to the South
Florida Water Management District to help improve fish
habitat in the Everglades. That's the kind of guy he is.
See you next week.


I,


. .*
World record
Anthony Manali, far right, holds up what appears to be an International Game Fish Association world record
mutton snapper. Actually, the fish may take two world records, one for largest fish in the all-tackle category-
and also taking top honors for biggest fish caught on 30-pound-rtest line. Manali caught the fish while fishing
with Rich Buptin, left, Chris Galati, middle, and Bob Lopez, not pictured. The mutton snapper weighed in at
28 pounds, 7 ounces. Previous records for all-tackle was 28 pounds. 5 ounces set in 1993 and 16 pounds, 8
ounces for 30-pound-test line set in 1992.


Licensed Coast Guard Captain
George Glaser


778-2761 0


CORTEZ WATERCRAFT
RENTALS
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* Two- & Three-Personi
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* Call for additional
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Next to Annies at the base of the Cortez bridge
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Get a different view of

the beach this weekend!
Fly safely in a
factory-built reproduction
of the original
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Seats two plus the FAA
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A fun and safe "
sightseeing experience.
Bring your camera!

SAVE $51
with this ad
L _EXPIRES 7/31/97 J
Gift Certificates Available

GULF COAST BIPLANE* 359-2246
Sarasota Bradenton Airport Dolphin Aviation Building
8191 N. Tamiami Trail (US 41) -=




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JULY 23, 1997 M PAGE 21-A IM3


Tarpon catches continue to excel


By Capt. Mike Heistand
With bait being about as thick as most of us can
ever remember, fishing is excellent right now. There
are still lots of tarpon off the beaches and in the passes,
while backwater angling for redfish is starting to peak.
Offshore, bottom fishing seems to have slowed a little,
but dolphin and blackfin tuna catches are good.
Dick at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier fishers
there have been catching a lot of Spanish mackerel,
mangrove snapper and night fishing for snook and big
redfish.
Kelly at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there are catching a lot of speckled trout, a few man-
grove snapper and some mackerel' Saturday night a
fisher caught a 57-inch barracuda off the pier.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 100 head of Key West grunts and
sand perch. The six-hour trips averaged 250 head of
black sea bass, Key West grunts and sand perch. The
nine-hour trips averaged 35 head of red and black grou-
per, black sea bass and a few mangrove snapper. And
one lucky angler last week landed a lemon shark while
offshore.
Annie's Bait & Tackle in Cortez reports that Capt.
Zack on the Dee Jay II is catching trout up to 23
inches, reds to 30 inches and catch-and-release snook
up to 30 inches. He's also putting charters onto blue-
fish and tarpon, but the silver kings seem to be slack-
ing off from earlier success. Starting to pick up is man-
grove snapper and Spanish mackerel, Capt. Zack said.
Capt. Dave Pinkham on the Legend said he's
catching kingfish, black grouper and mangrove snap-
per in the Gulf.
Capt. Glenn Corder on the Zula Mama said grou-
per and snapper action is excellent in about 95 feet of
water. Shark fishing is hot in the bays right now, with
black tips and nurse sharks being boated.
At the Cortez Fishing Center, inshore fishing reports
are very good and feature tarpon, redfish and trout as well
as catch-and-release snook. The Cortez Kat with Capt.
Joe Bernhard is getting plenty of action on the four- and
six-hour trips, bringing back Key West grunts, grouper
and triggerfish. Capt. Roy Salgado on the Grand Slam
said grouper and dolphin in about 90 feet of water is his
best bet of the week, as well as tarpon in the passes and
sharks in the bay around Marker 70.
Lee at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said fishers

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$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
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U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin



James G. Annis
LICENSED WATERFRONT CONTRACTOR



778-4771
P.O.BOX 1353, Anna Maria, FL 34216
MC00361


are catching gag grouper in about 90 feet of water off-
shore. Trout and redfish action is hot on the seagrass
beds, and there are a few snook and cobia being caught
off the beaches.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's still catching 100-
pound tarpon as well as some 30-inch redfish and big
trout.
Capt. Thom Smith at Angler's Repair said he's
finding lots of reds and trout as well as catch-and-re-
lease snook in the Terra Ceia Bay area.
On my boat Magic we've been bringing back lots
of reds, trout, flounder and a few small shark in the
bays. Offshore, triggerfish and mangrove snapper are
popular, as are some legal-sized grouper.
Capt. Tom Chaya said reds and trout are at the top
of his fish list for the week, with most of those caught
being in the slot limit. Bait is everywhere, he added.
Rick at Island Discount Tackle said there are lots


Capt. Glenn Corder
CHARTER BOAT LA MAMA
Half and Full Day Fishing Charters
Specializing in Offshore
Grouper and Snapper Fishing
Over 20 Years Experience
(941) 778- 1203
ANNA MARIA ISLAND

/ore tha _amulletWrapper!


Taking a bite
out of fishing
Matt Waitz and Frank
Leahy, both of Snead
w Island, were fishing in
the Egmont Channel
when they hooked up
with a huge tarpon. They
fought the fish close to
the boat when their big
fish suddenly got much
smaller about half-
size, in frct, due to a
shark taking a bite out of












and lots of tarpon in the passes and off the beach right
now, with fish being caught almost every morning the
weather permits. Backwater fishing for redfish seems to
be the best bet for inshore angler, while offshore fishers
are doing very good with grouper, snapper and amberjack.
Good luck and good fishing.

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the July 19 horseshoe games
were Bob Baker of Bradenton and Herb Ditzel
of Anna Maria. Runners-up were George
McKay and Bill Starrett, both of Anna Maria.
The weekly contests get underway every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
Park, 10005 Gulf Drive. There are no mem-
bership fees and everyone is welcome.




15 FREE TIME
MINUTES JET SKI
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3 At the Cortez Fishing Center on
798-3 f th'South Side of Cortez Bridgej


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FULL DAY OR IIALF DAY
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Backwater Offshore


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ALL SIZES


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MulletT-shirts ... $10 Hats ... $7.50
5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-7978





IE PAGE 22-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real estate sales
4255 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 215 Island Village,
a 3bed/2bath 1,460 sfla condo built in 1981, was sold 6/
10/97, Zeller to Jones, for $117,500; list $123,900.
526 69th St., Holmes Beach, a groundlevel
canalfront 1.209 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1968
on a 9,200 sf lot, was sold 6/9/97, Bikus to Stork, for
$170,000; list $175,000.
6400 Flotilla Dr., Holmes Beach, 32 Westbay Point
& Moorings, a canalfront 1,450 sfla 2bed/2bath condo
built in 1977, was sold 6/9/97, Stork to Fleet, for
$165,000; list unknown.








GREAT GULF VIEW!
Panoramic view of the Gulf from upstairs unit in this du-
plex, only 150' to choice beach! Includes 2BR/2BA with
additional 3BR/2BA on first floor. Priced the same as a
single-family home in this location. Two for the price of one
at $419,500!



ARIE L' IC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY ".
We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria,Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


-516t BAYou
*Ai ta-0 HO. q D/c y WiTh PooN jDdt >qj6 R.3'A3 4.



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aif 4 / /oo &
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http://www.manatee online.com/norman/


7000 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 107 Tiffany Place, a
2bed/2bath 1259 sfla condo built in 1978, was sold 6/10/
97, Lowther to Bundy, for $175,000; list $185,000.
106 49th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,585
sfla 2bed/2bath/2car home built in 1969 on a
1OOxlOOlot, was sold 6/19/97, Landon to Creed, for
$290,000; list $299,000.
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 256 Runaway
Bay, a lbed/I bath 691 sfla condo built in 1978, was sold
6/19/97, Simpson to Martin, for $77,500; list $79,000.
233 Chilson, Anna Maria, a 8,318 sf canalfront
lot, was sold 6/18/97, Mayor to Ellsworth, for
$140,000: list unknown.
2501 Avenue B, Bradenton Beach, an elevated
1,728 sfla 3bed/2bath/2cp bay-view home built in 1990
on a 50x100 lot, was sold 6/18/97, Valerio to Childs, for
$205,000: list $225,000.
406 Magnolia, Anna Maria, a 1,146 sfla home built
in 1920 on a 52x 145 lot, was sold 6/17/97, Rozeman to
Daniel, for $95.000: list unknown.


6200 Flotilla, Holmes Beach, 275 Westbay Point &
Moorings, a 3bed/2bath 1,535 sfla canalfront corner
condo built in 1979, was sold 6/16/97, Jay to Peterson,
for $195,000; list unknown.
6200 Flotilla, Holmes Beach, 314 Westbay Point &
Moorings, a 1,271 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1977,
was sold 6/20/97, King to Laupper, for $132,500; list
unknown.
214 Lakeview Dr., Anna Maria, a ground-level
canalfront 3bed/3bath/2car/pool 1,663 sfla home built in
1959 on a 148x100 lot, was sold 6/26/97, Barnhill to
Auerbach-Powers, for $295,000; list $300,000.
309 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, an elevated newly-
built home on 6,565 sf of land with bay view was sold
6/25/97, Shank to Trivers, for $319,900; list unknown.
507 71st St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,223 sfla
3bed/2bath home built in 1963 on a 95x100 lot, was sold
6/24/97, Murphy to Benedict, for $150,500; list $159,900.
* Compiled exclusively for The Islander Bystander by
Doug Dowling, licensed real estate broker, 778-1222.


JULIE McCLURE

Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


CUTE ISLAND GETAWAY
Unbelievable potential. Situated on two large lots,
steps to the bay in Anna Maria City, this home is
well-maintained in need of some minor updating.
Just listed at the unbelievable price of $155,000.


"TUCKED AWAY"
This lovely cedar chalet is in a secluded neighbor-
hood within walking distance to the Gulf. 3BR/
2BA with large master suite on third floor. Don't
miss this opportunity to live on the north end of
Anna Maria Island. Priced to sell at just $229,900.


BEST BUY
This 2BR/2BA elevated home is located on a
deep-water canal on the north end of Anna Maria.
27-foot dock with water, electric and large, open
deck. Don't miss this buy priced at $199,000.
Call Pat Jackson at 778-3301
or Ken Jackson at 778-6986
or Agnes Tooker 778-5287

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drnvo P 0 Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


BREEZY KEY WEST STYLE CANALFRONT
308 Tarpon, Anna Maria
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, over 2,000 sq. ft. living area
with vaulted ceilings and master bedroom suite on
the third floor. Offered at $319,500.
Just reduced to $299,000.


oug Dowling Realty
,778-1222


KEY ROYALE 3BR/3BA home located one lot off
Key Royale Pass. Charming setting, formal dining
room, two walk-in closets, oversized double garage,
sprinkler system, updated A/C and heat, and boat
dock. $280,000. Call Carol Williams 778-1718 eves.


BAY PALMS 3BR/3BA canalfront home with dock, lots
of tile, new kitchen with breakfast bar, over 950 sq. ft.
of decking, outdoor shower. All this and so much more
amid lushly tropical gardens. $295,000. Dial the
Duncans! Judy 778-1589 or Darcie 779-2290 eves.


a-


KEY ROYALE Ready to move in! Immaculate 2BR/
2BA home with family room and large caged pool.
Beautifully landscaped. Great view. $210,000. Call
Carol Williams 778-1718 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS 03 igr


Irmvi1^





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 23-A IiG


"WALK WITH ME..."


,k( -
I-^L.
4 .* *' *


To select your island
property. When buying
or selling...
I can make your island
dreams come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
WAGNElR I2EALTY
Sales & Rentals Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North
Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Office
778-1751 Eveninas


MORE ISLAND NEWS THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE.

ISLANDER ii


Vs i--












Write your novel here! Gulffront 2BR/2BA cottage near the
tip of Anna Maria Island. All of the comforts of home, ready
to move in. If you want a panoramic Gulf view and a huge
beach this is your dream home. $519,750.


SEASONAL
Weekly from $500 week
Monthly from $1,000 mo
ANNUAL
* Bradenton Condo 3BR/2BA $800 mo
* Townhouse on Cay
2BR/2BA furnished $950 mo
- Ouquiina Beach Club
efficiency furnished $800 mo
* Island Home 3BR/2BA $850 mo
* Mango Park 4BR/3BA pool $2,000 mo


.... rp "Personalized, Not Franchised"
*rty Manager ,


WeebrocT Real1 Company.
matchling pE i / h JK perties since 1949
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales: 941-778-0700 Rentals: 778-6665
Toll Free: 1-800-749-6665


Property Management Team
"We Cover the Island"


GREAT BIRDWATCHING HERE! 2BRO2BA end unit in a
ISLAND COTTAGE With
small apartment. Secluded
and shady back yard. Easy
walk to beach. Includes
memories of yesteryear.
$119,900. Yvonne Higgins

GREAT BIRDWATCHING HERE! 2BR/2BA end unit in a
beautiful waterside community close to beach. Clubhouse,
pool, tennis. $83,900 turnkey furnished. Call Karen Schroder.
SPECTACULAR SUNSETS! Luxurious bayfront 2BR/2BA
condo. Cathedral ceiling, glass-enclosed lanai, private eleva-
tor, two-car garage. Pool. $245,000. Call Don Schroder.
HONEY STOP THE CAR! Don't just drive by this island
bayfront home. 2200 sq. ft. of remodeled charm.
$349,900. Call Sandy Greiner / Barb Turner.
SPACIOUS DOESN'T MEAN EXPENSIVE! Northwest
Bradenton pool home 3BR/2BA and caged area for lots
of quality time. A bargain at $110,000. Call Sandy
Greiner / Barb Turner.

Opposite the Holmes Beach Library
5600 MARINA DRIVE
\0'/ HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217
941-778-7777


There are 166 houses, 42 condos and 47
lots listed for sale on Anna Maria island.*
Your piece of paradise is there somewhere.
We'd jump at a chance to help you find it.
"Manatee County MLS, 6/24/97,


IMPERIAL HOUSE Affordable
condo, turnkey-furnished with
bay view, heated pool and
clubhouse. $79,900. #CH20338.
GULFVIEW GALORE! Elevated
house in Anna Maria with 3BR/
2BA. $325,000. #CH18980.
INCOME PRODUCING bayfront
with boat dock. Three 1BR
apartments completely reno-
vated. $335,000. #18808.


'INBIHMUUn -are end unit, Augusta model, overlooking golt
course. 2-3BR/2BA, beautiful clubhouse with loads of activities (golf,
tennis, woodworking shop, ceramics, aerobics, exercise room, and
much more). Fabulous view Priced at $119,000. Call Karen and Bob
Lohse for details 795-5336, ext. 216 or 794-5588. #KL22745.


Karin Stephan
REALTOR
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Home:
941-388-1267
Fax: 941- 778-3035


JUST REDUCED!
Four units renovated with love and taste. Fireplace in two
units, tile floors, Henry Linck furniture, private backyard,
large spa being installed. Enjoy long walks on the beach and
wonderful views of the Gulf of Mexico. $279,000. #KS22249.


I


d


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/RENTALS 778-2055


ANNUAL
2BR/2BA West Bradenton home
WEEKLY/MONTHLY/SEASONAL
2BR/2BA Condo / beautiful bay view
2BR2BA Gulf view condo w/pool
2BR2BA Gulf view luxury condo w/pool
2BR/2.5BA Townhouse w/pool
2BR/2BA Condo $800mt
3BR/2BA Executive pool home
3BR/2BA Home steps to the beach
2BR/1.5BA Duplex
2BR/1 BA Bradenton Beach apt. w/Jacuzzi


Roni M. Price
broker/salesman
778-5585


$850mth


$850wk
$750wk
$900wk
$600wk
h for summer
$2500mth
$900wk
$650wk
$500wk


BEACH GETAWAY Attached
3BR/2BA elevated villa close to
the beach and priced right at
$117,000. Come and take a look
today! #RP18681.
YOUR PERFECT DREAM
HOME Custom-designed home
on a lushly-landscaped lot with
many amenities including Gulf
views from the master suite and
deck. Seller will entertain offers
between $280,000 $340,000.
#RP20483.


JUST LISTED 2BR/2BA canalfront home. Well maintained with
a flowing floor plan. Also includes eat-in kitchen, formal dining
room and a boat dock. All this for only $199,900. Call Carol
Heinze for your look today. 778-7246. #23404.
PLAYTIME IN THE SUN Spacious 2BR/2BA home with family/
play room large enough for your pool table and pinball machine.
Swim laps in your solar-heated caged pool. Lower your boat
from your davits into the deep-water canal and cruise the
Intracoastal Waterway with no bridges to the bay. $209,500. Call
June Gilley 792-0758 anytime. #20477.
EXECUTIVE HOME Recently completed 4BR/2BA, 2,600 sq. ft.
Light, bright and huge kitchen. Spacious family room with fire-
place, high ceilings, security-fenced lap pool, many extras. Pri-
vate lot. Seller will entertain offers between $280,000 -
$340,000. Call Karen or Bob Lohse for details 778-0766 ext. 216
or 794-5588. #20330.

INTERNET-KBSTEPHAN@AOL.COM -
All my listings can be seen on the world wide
web. http://www.pruflorida.com


Lit ou poprt.. thusan i i ...aderisd .n heInereteer- a uti: I i 5* htp//w .pruforid co


John Michaels

Real Estate, Imc

178-1101


Wir sprechen auch Ihre Sprache!


Juli
Prope


rL&- ^ -.- - --
HOLMES BEACH WATERFRONT Large fenced lot,
3BR/2BA, fireplace. two-car garage. Wheelchair ac-
cessible. Custom built for present owner. Over 1,800
sf for $229,900.
RARELY AVAILABLE AT GULFFRONT SUN PLAZA
WEST 2BR/2BA heated pool, elevator, secured lobby,
tennis, covered parking. Priced for sale this season.
Furniture negotiable. $175,000.
GULFFRONT 22-UNIT APARTMENT MOTEL 110' of
white, sandy beachfront plus "private beach." Heated
pool, recent improvements. If you are a serious buyer,
compare and you will own this "one-of-a-kind" value.
$1,995,000.
C-2 VACANT COMMERCIAL LOT 100'x 90' on Gulf
Drive. Steps to beach. $150,000. Can add adjacent
duplex 2BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA at $210,000.
COMMERCIAL ZONED DUPLEX Steps To Beach.
2BR/2BA completely renovated, garage, new kitchen
and 2BR/1 BA rented. Large covered patios. $210,000.
Adjacent lot C-2 at $150,000.

5351 GULF DRIVE 778-0807 Eves. 778-5427
or Toll Free at 1-800-956-0807
www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net


530- GlfDive
Hom- -BahFL341
Pri1TI(tial FloirsdatU11~ Rely 91)7806


Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
778-7246


ML S
5201 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(941) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-237-2252











ATTENTION INVESTORS
Four units; two buildings. These numbers work! Income
on fourth unit projected at $450 monthly; is now owners
unit. $19,000 income yearly; $5,000 yearly expenses in-
cludes utilities.. Great location! Two miles to beaches.
$99,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800
FOURPLEX Holmes Beach fourplex close to beach.
Owner financing! All units rented annually. $31,500
gross annual (could be more). $335,000. For more infor-
mation call Elizabeth Andricks 778-4800
COQUINA BEACH CLUB studio unit offered at a
great price. Turnkey-furnished, heated pool, beautiful
beach. $76,900. Call Elizabeth Andricks 778-4800.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Direct Gulffront con-
dominium. Heated pool, spa, sauna. This unit turnkey
furnished. New carpeting and furniture. Very good in-
come producer as well. Lynn Hoestetler 778-4800
REDUCED BARGAIN Live like royalty in this 1,386
sq. ft. 2BR/2BA canalfront end unit with private boat
dock. Priced over $17,000 less than the next cheapest unit
in complex. $92,500. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
Visit Our Web Site
http://www.manatee-on-line.com/a paradise/


[sniith


artsliG





EI PAGE 24-A F JULY 23, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A-t -' U 4 -9:/ ..


TWO COMPLETE TWIN bed sets with matching
bedspreads. New white-wicker headboards. $100
each. 778-1165.

ANTIQUES NAUTICAL antiques and artifacts just
arrived from Europe. Nautical But Nice, Mon. Sat.,
10 5, 12304 Cortez Rd. W., Cortez. 795-5756.

AVON PRODUCTS Skin-So-Soft lines, skin-care
products, Anew cosmetics. Catalog. Allow 3 weeks
delivery or express. Call Alison, 383-6201.

KENMORE SEARS BEST 18 cubic ft. frostless
freezer. $450 OBO. Call 778-9222 before 7 pm.

BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but never
used. 4 piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and love seat
$399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin $129;
futons (sofa by day bed at night) frame and mat
$199; daybed (white with brass finials) including 2
mattresses and pop-up unit $285. Can deliver. Call
753-7118.

MATTRESSES FOR SALE Used king, queen,
double and twin. $10 to $30. Call 778-5405.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


YARD SALE Sat., July 26, 9-1. Area rugs, ceiling
fans, bunk bed, furniture, household items. 405 Clark
Lane, Holmes Beach.

ROSER GUILD THRIFT SHOP open Saturday, 9-
12. Clothes, linens, shoes, potpourri, children's
clothes. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.


FOUND ABUSED TABBY 7 weeks old, vet treated
but needs a home. Call 778-3100.


NEW FISH MARKET 119th Street and Cortez Rd.
(turn south two blocks). Call for daily specials. 798-
9404. Cortez Bait & Seafood.

CAN'T AFFORD THAT dream vacation? Call your
local CAT rep and learn how you can travel and get
paid for itTM! (800) 223-4472.

YOGA ON THE ISLAND with Harmony Feldman.
Summer intensive begins July 21. Daytime and
evening classes. Call 778-3892 to enroll.

CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER Strength training
and cardio, Young or old, fat or thin. Let's have fun.
Norman 778-9244.

LOOKING FOR ACCOMMODATIONS or will share.
48-year-old single male professional will work in ex-
change for rent. Norman 778-9244.

REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls) -
We come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-
1012.

"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


Now you can e-mail your Island newspaper!

Our e-mail address is islander@mead.net ISLANDER
The Islander Bystander will be on the Internet with an
exciting Web site in the near future ...
Look for us at www.islanderbystander.com.-
INFORMATION: CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392 i _


IISLANDER


U I


IBYSUME


I call us 1 st


Visit us at our web site: http://www.islandreal.com
778-6066 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217


MS
MIS


DRIVE BY our "talking house" at 619 Emerald THIS HOUSE IS "talking" also. Drive by and tune
Lane! 3BR/2BA canalfront in Key Royale with in to 507 69th Street. Lovely canalfront home with
garage and many extras! $238,000. large and bright Florida room overlooking the wa-
ter. Garage and circular drive. $219,900.


A'"


,M E }..' i., ,
OWNER FINANCING! Direct bayfront, elevated
home in Anna Maria. Steps to fishing pier. Large
windows across the glass-enclosed lanai let the
open-water views right in! $329,000. .


1987 SUBARU JUSTY hatchback. $400. Call 779-
2417.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.

WET SLIPS AND Hi'N' Dry storage available at com-
petitive rates in modern, full-service marina. 778-
2255.

21' SCORPION CHRIS CRAFT 175 hp mariner, ra-
dio, depth finder, loran, fully equipped. Call 778-
5934.

1988 CHRIS CRAFT SCORPION 21', I/O, S/S prop,
cuddy, 1990 aluminum Slideon trailer, excellent con-
dition. $8,000 package. (941) 753-6462.

WANTED TO BUY Deeded boat slip on Anna Maria
Island. Call (800) 927-3979 between 8 and 5, Mon-
day Friday.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.

EDDIE B'S RESTAURANT is now accepting applica-
tions for all positions. Apply in person 3-5 pm daily.
204 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.







4S-- .11


STUNNING CANALFRONT
This special hideaway features 212 ft. on deep-
water canal!! Architecturally designed home
with cathedral ceilings and large wrap-around
porch. Drive by 228 Periwinkle and call for an
appointment! offered at just $259,000.
Call Pat Jackson at 778-3301
or Ken Jackson at 778-6986
or Agnes Tooker 778-5287


.....


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
r.^

ATTENTION INVESTORS! Island duplex in
great location and rented continuously! Each side
has carports, picnic areas and more! $159,900.


SJust visiting
aradise?

ISLANDER

Don't Icavc the islancld without
taking time to subscribe. Visit
us Jt 5404 Marina Drive,
eIsland Shopping Center, Holmes
Beach or call 941-T/778-7978 to
charge it on Visa or Mastv.crCard.


r AGAED JEALTY
2217 Gull r^ m ^fiveorhBradentonBeahFL341


L bit K T38-i 7.1 .a i' 78 00IR tl i ii 78-2


W ei 1 ^i DIM IN I EI".0 M..


DIRECT BAYFRONT UNIQUE TRIPLEX Quality constructed and
Newly listed 2BR cottage on a 50x130 lot with well-maintained residential triplex with spa-
fantastic views and boat dock. Zoned R-3. cious floor plans, private garages and storage
Needs TLC. Offered at $149,900. Call David rooms on 100 x 100 lot with Gulf views. Unit
Moynihan 778-2246 or eves 778-7976. mix is 3BR/2BA, 2BR/2BA, 1BR/1BA with
3,225 sq. ft. of living area offered at $325,000.
Call David Moynihan at 778-7976.


LARGE ISLAND HOME perfect for a growing
family! Multi-level 3BR/3BA, large kitchen, court-
yard entrance. $199,900.,


LOTS
DEVELOPMENT SITE Prime, wooded
Holmes Beach location north of Manatee Ave.
with partial view of gulf and short walk to
beach. Site is 100x200 and zoned for four
units. Offered at $130,000.
NEWLY LISTED COMMERCIAL LOTS
100x150 zoned C-3. Offered at $199,500.
GULF VIEW LOT Quiet Holmes Beach loca-
tion with terrific views of gulf. State permits
and plans in place for 3BR/2BA residence.
Offered at $118,900. For information on any of
these prime lots, call David Moynihan 778-
2246 or eves at 778-7976.


BAYFRONT DUPLEX with fabulous view,
spacious floor plans and a short walk to the
beach. Turnkey furnished. 2,736 sq. ft. total
living area, Large deep-water dock. Offered at
$369,000, Call Dave Moynihan 778-7976.


NOINQJ7- -o" --1=
MAGNIFICENT BAY VIEWS from the elevated
deck are just the beginning of this wonderful home
in Anna Maria built and decorated with discrimi-
nating taste. Extras such as a dumbwaiter make it
unique. $344,900.


Isl
REAI


a


II)






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 25-A 1B.


COUNTER PERSON NEEDED for bagel shop. Must
be honest and reliable. Flexible hours between 6:30
am and 2:30 pm, Mon. through Sat. Call Cindy at
778-7105 or 779-1212.

NATIONAL COMPANY needs part time/full time
Internet Consultants. Work from home. Fun job. Dif-
ferent positions available. (888) 785-7859.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER with Pagemaker and
Photoshop advertising experience. HTML savvy for
web site and page design. Good typing skills. Self
starter. Experience is a must. Send resumes by mail
or fax to The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach 34217. FAX 778-9392.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.



BABYSIT AND DOG SIT on Island. Straight A stu-
dent, experienced. Call me at 778-9610.

YARD WORK Very responsible. Will cut grass, weed-
eat or anything for reasonable prices. Call me at-779-
1087. Andy.

BABYSITTER Responsible babysitter will work any
hours for reasonable prices. Call me at 779-1087.
Parthena.

12 YEAR OLD BOY needs something to do. Will work
odd jobs for reasonable prices. Call 778-6812.


PERICO BAY CLUB
2BR/2BA from $92,500
WESTBAY COVE
2BR/2BA ... $138,900
SMUGGLER'S LANDING
40 ft. Dock, 2BR/2BA with
two-car garage from $119,900

Tom Frost, Broker Salesman REALTOR
(041) 778-2261 (800) 422-6325 Eves. 792-5383
605-C Manatee Avenue vvw., rtNulio-Dcoh FL 34217


419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294











OPEN HOUSE
Thursday July 24 11 am 2 pm
268 South Harbor Dr. Holmes Beach
This beautifully maintained, custom-built 2 bedroom, 2
bath contemporary offers a light and expansive floor
plan filled with space and light! Features include a fabu-
lous master suite with Jacuzzi and bay view, paneled.
elevator and 16' vaulted ceilings with fans. Also in-
cludes an intercom system and double-car garage with
workshop and store room. Reduced to $209,000 In-
cluding One Year Homeowner's Warranty!

"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"


Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato ...778-3509
Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Susanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820
SExclusive
SWatorron MS
Estates WA ^,
Video Collection


THEA WHITEHEAD CNA/HHA Certified Nursing
Assistant, Home Health Aide. Cook appealing,
healthy meals. Read to you. 795-4003 or digital pager
331-5406.

CNA/CMT WILL CARE for loved one. Meals, light
housework. Twenty years experience, references.
Will work weekends. TLC. Call 778-1793.



MAN WITI-1 SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serving
the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

"THE PERFECTIONIST'" cleaning with perfection!
Offices, homes and condos. Call Sharon at 778-0064.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE AND REPAIR. Call Mark
for appointment at Grooms Motors, 778-6045. 5608
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

CHECK-A-HOME Inspection Services can keep an
eye on your home or rental while you're gone. Free
estimate. Licensed builder. Call Island Check-A-
Home at 778-3089.


ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-2469 or 778-1560.

DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL We are tak-
ing registration for the Fall. You are welcome to come
by and visit our school. 5354 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
Phone 778-2967.

DOLPHIN CLEANING AND Maintenance Licensed,
bonded, insured. Homes, offices, condos, seasonals,
weekly or one time. "Our business is always picking
up." Call Rick at 778-2864.

"I DON'T WANNA clean house" you say to yourself.
Sharon wants to clean your house. References. Call
or leave message. 778-3006.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree trimming, pressure washing and paint-
ing. Free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

MOBILE POLISHING SERVICE Will meticulously
detail your car, boat or aircraft with an acrylic-Teflon
polish. 778-5215.

HOUSECLEANING SERVICES by an experienced
person with many Island references. Call for an ap-
pointment. 778-4192.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TREASURE. 2BR/2B, ideal getaway SAILBOAT WATER. Large, captivating 3BR/4B quality home
or investment home. Nestled on quiet street and short walk near open end of Anna Maria island's widest deep-water ca-
to the Gulf. $130,000. Barry and Kimberly Charles, 795-1273. nal. Two fireplaces, caged pool, Jacuzzi, built in grill and
C22689 waterfall. $385,000. 778-6654. R19637


IMMACULATE HOME on boating water. 2BR/2B, private SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT ESTATE. 4BR/4B, gourmet
screened pool and lanai. Low maintenance yard. Located on kitchen, fireplace. Elegant and spacious. Water views from all
a quiet cul-de-sac. $215,000. 778-6654. R20195 rooms. Dock and davits on sailboat water. $895,000. 778-
6654. R19319


WATERFRONT
ELEGANT WATERFRONT RESI-
DENCE. 4,612 +/- sq. ft., 5BR, oak floors,
family room, formal dining room.
Screened brick porch, open pool.
$950,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200. R14856
MAGNIFICENT RESIDENCE. 4 or 5BR,
wood floors, crown moldings. Built in
1905. French doors, fireplace. Family
room overlooks pool, dock and grounds.
$599,900. Kathy Marcinko, 792-9122.
R18225
NORTHWEST BRADENTON'S NEW-
EST COMMUNITY. Large lagoon with
access to Palma Sola Bay from 2
homesites. Priced from $150,000 to
$199,000. Sandy Drapala, 794-3354.


MAINLAND
LARGEST UNIT in Shorewalk. 1,200 +/-
sq. ft. 2BR/2B, split plan, breakfast nook,
enclosed lanai. Lakeview and across
from clubhouse. $72,900. Van Bourgois,
761-0273. C20688
CUSTOM-BUILT MASTERPIECE ON
GOLF COURSE. Contemporary 4BR/3-
1/2B, split-bedroom design. Cathedral
ceilings, eat-in kitchen with Ray Routh
cabinetry, 4-car garage. $459,900. Nancy
Keegan, 723-3929. R16442
CUTE HOME NEEDS A FAMILY. 3BR,
fruLlit trees, fenced yard. Room for expan-
sion. Convenient westside location.
$57,900. Anne Miller, 792-6475. R16532


ISLA-ANDERlNDERB
Fresh mullet T-shirts $10 Mullet hats $7.50
Mail order add $3 for postage and handling.
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet wear, subscription orders and
classified advertising. Just Give Us A Call.
(Classified "charge customers must FAX copy,.)
Call 941-778-7978 Fax 778-9392


KIDS SEEKING

SUMMER JOBS
can advertise for work
, A DS, and get up to
S FO21 words FREE.
(No charge 3 week maximum per kid)
FOR Ads must be placed
S in person at
The Islander Bystander,
KI S I Island Shopping Center
(UNDER 16) 5404 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach


Residential Real Estate. Inc
An Independently owned and operaled Member
of Coldwell Banker Real Eslale Corporaion


WATERFRONT LOT
WATERFRONT LOT on Palma Sola Bay.
Large lot with Riparian rights. Watch sun-
sets with full water view. Fabulous location.
$200,000. Kathleen Slayter, 792-8826 or
Janet Bellingar, 747-4543. L21782




Available properties by the week
or by the month from Anna Maria
Island to Venice. Call one of our
rental/resort specialists.
(941) 951-6668 or (800) 881-2222
L ocatei inl
Anna. Maria lIsland Centre Shops


324EatBy rv, om s ec, lria321 4178664Vsi urst*o tleStrntt


S f Reidel Sal/Rtivindier seto

^^^^^^^007 Residential Sales/Rental Division 0 Licensed Real Estate Br~oker ^ ^^^^


kRWmW a






IG PAGE 26-A 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
w Hauling By the cut or by the month.
SLawe We Monitor Irrigation Systems
S i INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
77841345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
I LEstablished in 1983

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY

e f I Serving the Island communities for
D9 years with Island references.
UJI J DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Contractors
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


Private & Commercial Interior & Exterior
20 Years Experience Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates Call 778-2139


FreshREX B. SLKER 778-7399Saltwater
10 YeA Gourmetes Groces Insured
Whitney Beach Plaza 6810 Gulf of Mexico Drive NG* 383-0858

Kitchen & Bath Cabinets Refacing New
Entertainment Centers Formica Wood
C SU C>



REX B. SLIKER 778-7399
10 Years Local References Insured


REMODELING


9 XACT


* ADDITIONS
* RENOVATIONS
* KITCHENS BATHS
* DECKS & MORE


U ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


* CARPET
CERAMIC TILE
VINYL
WINDOW TREATMENTS

Call now! .- ARPET
778-7311 j,-NETWORK
We'll be right over. Island owned and operated by Ed Kirn
Check our web site: www.carpetnetwork.com


Mobile Detail Service
We come to you!

MOST CARS $95*
*Wash, buff, wax, shampoo interior, under
carriage, tires and rims all treated and
protected plus engine pressure cleaning.
$95 on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office. Your car doesn't
have to be driven anywhere! Let us
protect and preserve your investment.
Mention this ad for $10 OFF.




320-5662
(This number is a message service when we are busy.)
THE AREA'S #1 MOBILE DETAILER IS BACK!
All cars/trucks personally serviced by Damon.


P & K's RESIDENTIAL CLEANING Service. Experi-
enced, reasonable, free estimates. Pat Cantwell
(941) 792-0478 or Kitty Frost (941) 792-5383.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


"GENTLE GARDNER" will weed, plant, manicure
and water your garden with gentle perfection. Call
Barbara at 778-6110.
GRASS CUTTING 60 years experience. Commer-
cial, residential. By the cut or by the month. Retired,
want to keep active. Lowest prices. Call 779-2203.
LAWN CUTTER Expert service, free estimates. In-
sured, affordable. Call Jeff at 778-1560.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident, references. Dan or Bill 795-5100.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION Remodeling
contractors. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 31 year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.
JOE DeGREGORIO Painting and Staining. Interior/
exterior, reasonable rates. Power washing. Free
estimates. Insured. (941) 792-4882, ask for Joe.

CARPET VINYL CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed
and repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship
guaranteed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen, 383-
5381, beeper 506-3297.

THE COMPLETE HANDYMAN I repair, I install, I
paint. Prompt service, excellent Island references.
Call Bob at 778-8655.
SCREEN REPAIR, painting, roof coating/repairs,
drywall, carpentry, ceramic tile work. Ceiling fans
installed, security lights. Quality work, low prices.
778-0410.
ISLAND .UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile.
Lic. #MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave
Elliott.



FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1BR/1BA, pri-
vate lot and parking. Available weekly at $350 wk.
778-2832.

HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS CENTER Rental units
available for commercial, retail and storage. Call
(941) 778-2924 for information.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND seasonal or monthly rental.
Gorgeous, totally remodeled canalfront with dock.
Short 1 + block walk to beach. 3BR/2BA with large,
sunny Florida room for entertaining. Five different
fruit trees in yard. Available Sept. through Dec. Call
(941) 688-9281 or (941) 683-4703.

AVAILABLE NOV. 1 MAY 1 Owner's personal
2BR/2.5BA townhouse with pool, across from beach
with view of Gulf. Covered parking. No smokers or
pets. $1,500 mo plus utilities and security deposit.
References required. (941) 778-1221.


ANNUAL RENTAL Large 2BR/1BA apartment. Well
maintained and landscaped. One block to Gulf and
beach. $650 mo. No pets. Call 778-0608.

ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. Close to beach
and shopping. 2BR/1BA apartment, washer/dryer
hookup, new appliances, residential neighborhood.
$675 mo. 795-7805.

ANNUAL RENTAL Large 1BR/1BA just remodeled.
Balcony, Gulfview. New carpet, paint, appliances.
Adorable. 203 2nd Street N., Bradenton Beach. $500
mo., $250 deposit. (813) 258-2411.

ANNUAL RENTAL Carriage house available Aug. 1,
1997. A stone's throw from beach and bay. Classic
Anna Maria Island cottage, 1BR/1BA, screened
porch, deck, fully furnished, central heat and air,
washer dryer, basic cable TV included in $600 mo.
plus electric. First, last, security. Call (941) 778-3205.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND paradise. 3BR/2.5BA, canal/
pool home. $3,400 mo./$900 wk. (800) 223-4472.
Call 9 7. Available 1997/98 season.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Bay/Gulffront, 1 & 2 BR excel-
lent location, all new furnishings. Totally equipped;
phone, cable, new pool. Swim, snorkel, fish at your
front door. Walk to local shops, restaurants. $69 day,
$450 wk., $1,600 mo. (941) 778-1322.

OVERLOOKING BAY 1BR/1BA unfurnished duplex
with dock. No pets. Quiet neighborhood. Utilities not
included. $550 mo., $300 deposit. 778-9639.




Re-Grips $4
Free pick up and delivery
1778-0413 Custom Built Clubs by Terry

ISLAND LUMBER
ANO HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


GIFT CERTIFICATES AREE
GREAT GIFTS ANYTIME!

AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach

778-1617
MON -FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT 8AM 4PM


Just visiting
Paradise?

ISLANDER

Pon't leavc these island
without tikiin time to
subscribe. Visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shoppinje Center.
Holmies Beach or call
941-778-7978.


Interior and Exterior Painting
Specializing in Faux and Custom Finishes
Furniture Restoration and Refinishing

L tistirc expressions 778-7592

Licensed / Insured / References Richard Hourdequin
Member of Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce


JS ANDERCLAS IFIE





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 27-A IQ1


ANNA MARIA ISLAND and Manatee beaches. Book-
ing rentals for 1997/98 summer and season now.
Weekly and monthly rentals available for summer
and fall. Four month minimum for winter season. Call
Noreen Roberts (941) 778-9611 or Donna Mosley
(941) 795-6142. Coldwell Banker Residential Real
Estate, Inc. An independently owned and operated
member of Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corporation.

GULFVIEW ANNUAL OR SEASONAL furnished,
new central A/C, washer/dryer, patio, nice yard,
ground floor. Quiet dead-end street, newly refur-
bished. Feb. 1 annual $700 plus electric. Water,
cable and lawn care furnished. Seasonal $1,600
mo., 6 mo. minimum. 106 31st St., Holmes Beach.
778-6050.
NORTH SHORE DR. Just steps to beach. Light, bright
and neat as a pin. 3BR/1.5BA, 2 fireplaces, screened
patio, much more. Available Jan. Apr., 1998. $2,300
mo. John Michaels Real Estate, 778-1101. -

HIDEAWAY COVE Panoramic bayview. Nice, quiet
2BR, first-floor. No pets/smoking. Full furnished. Wk./
mo. Also available 1997/98 winter. 778-7107.

GULFFRONT BEACH COTTAGE 2BR/1BA, sleeps
6, fully furnished on Holmes Beach. $425 wk. or
$1,350 mo. Call 748-1600.
ANNA MARIA GULF/BEACHFRONT Charming 2BR
apartment, cable, microwave, porch, sundeck. No
pets. Perfect vacation spot. Weekly. 778-3143.
PRIVATE HOLMES BEACH duplex steps to beach.
Annual, unfurnished, 1BR/1BA. $550 mo., last, secu-
rity. Includes utilities. By appt. only. 778-5099.
HOLMES BEACH Pirate's Den 1 and 2BR apart-
ments, summer.rates Also hooking for fall and win-
ter season. Six month lease available. 778-4368.
ANNUAL RENTALS 2BR/2BA elevated duplex with
large garage, central Holmes Beach; 3BR/2BA home
in Bradenton Beach, excellent location; short-term
unfurnished condo, 2BR/2BA. Call Old Florida Realty
Co. 778-3377.
BEST GULFVIEWS beachfront, exclusive area,
unique home. 3BR/2BA, top master's suite, beauti-
fully furnished. $3,000 mo., $1,200 wk., nightly also.
778-0990.
BAYVIEW HOUSE UNFURNISHED a5Rni.SBA,
quiet area, deck, big yard. Available Aug. 1. No pets.
$750 mo. 794-5980.
BEACH APARTMENT Nice 2BR/2BA, central air.
Two blocks to beach, shopping. $630 mo., last, se-
curity. Includes water, garbage. No pets. 778-1259 or
778-0405.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA close to beaches. Central heat/
AC, new paint/carpet, washer/dryer hookup, covered
parking. No pets. $625 mo. 778-1539.
SMALL COMMERCIAL SPACE for rent in desirable
location. Call Smith Realtors, 778-0777.


BRADENTON BEACH ANNUAL Charming, clean,
2BR duplex with deck. Lush grounds, new dock, pri-
vate parking. $600 mo. includes water. 778-4625.
COMMERCIAL FOR RENT approximately 600 sq. ft.,
A/C. Ride by 5306 Holmes Blvd. Available after July
1. $450 mo. 778-2694, leave message.
MINI VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun. -
Wed. or Mon. Thur. Two people/four nights from $135.
Kitchens. 500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel &
Resort Complex, 778-5405 or (800) 367-7824.


SPACIOUS WATERFRONT 4BR/4BA with dock, two
years new. 5,920 sq. ft. under roof, 3,420 sq. ft. liv-
ing area. Appraised at $525,000. Make an offer. 130
Hammock Rd., Anna Maria. Ted E Davis, Licensed
Real Estate Broker (owner/broker) 778-6155.
ELEVATED 3BR/2BA home with hot tub. Walk to
beach. 260 S. Harbor. $219,950. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt, Coldwell Banker, 778-2261.
DEEP-WATER CANAL LOT in Anna Maria for sale.
75 x 115. $158,000. Call 778-7127.
NORTH END 767 Jacaranda. 2BR/2BA, sunken fam-
ily room, ceramic tile, newly updated, one block to
beach. $169,000. 778-9685, owner.
MOBILE HOME for sale. Furnished, central air, near
beach. Cortez Florida. Call (941) 739-6193.
CANALFRONT HOME 228 Oak Ave., Anna Maria.
4BR/2BA includes master suite, 50' dock, many ex-
tras. Divorce forces quick sale. $279,900. All reason-
able offers considered. Realtors welcome. 778-2191
or leave message at 778-0578.
2BR/2BA BAYFRONT CONDO Shared boat dock,
covered parking. Small, private complex. Large stor-
age loft, cathedral ceilings, low maintenance fee.
$129,900. (941) 778-3861.
PALMA SOLA BLVD. Bayfront Mediterranean on two
lots. 5BR/5.5BA plus 6,500 living, 9,300 total sq. ft.
Six-car garage, triple pool, 3 stories with glass eleva-
tor. 24K fixtures, lots of marble, 3-zone AC/heat, etc.
Magnificent. $790,000 OBO. Terms. By owner. Mr. &
Mrs. Kerper, (941) 795-4432.

FLAMINGO CAY CONDO by owner on canal with
dock. 10407 Waterbird Way. Single-story 2BR/2BA,
lanai. pool, tennis, covered parking, shed. Excellent
condition. $93,500, furnishings negotiable. 792-0588.

DON'T BUY A CONDO until you talk to Yvonne. My
experience, extensive research and hundreds of pho-
tographs can help you zero in on the one that fits your
budget and lifestyle. Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max
Gulfstream 778-7777.
OPEN HOUSE Sunday, July 27, 1-4. By owner. 408
79th Street, Holmes Beach 2BR/2BA (possibly 3BR/
3BA) living room, dining room, kitchen with all appli-
ances, enclosed lanai, garage, AC/heat, in-ground
sprinkler, new roof. $169,500. (941) 778-5978.


r-HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD


1
|


I
j
I
|


1


DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be
placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $7.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional
words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in person or
by phone. We are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad copy over
the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card
number. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.


- -- -- - - - - - - - ____1






More information: 9T3 9 2
(941)778-7978 I NAVISA A
FAX: (941) 778-9392 -


I


A D AD


BIKS -THEEWHELES WELCAR
Sale: Bi kes ] Pats, Eq Ip',1 ent & Specia,377tll Orders;
We o~ a.V 1.0 6 2-91


Regis

Mechanical


Since 1978
Licensed & Insured
State Cert.#CAC032412


We'll beat any advertised Price! Just give us a call
ALL ESTIMATES ARE FREE!!
Call 704-3078 24 HR


Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
WRAM4 GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

-Pa VTI G b* y /1/ie/J/fHeIffiwbia/,i,
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving thie Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468

R.T. (BOB) HILTON CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial. Remodel'and
New Construction. Island and Mainland.
"DON'T SA Y HOW, SAY HILTON"
Lic. #CGC012191 747-1098

m z-t,1ewi, Seat Whether you buy or sell.
JinditfatLi Ztu.Ction O-. Remodel or build new.
Working together to personalize your options.
CGC058-092 Phone 778-5354 Insured


4ore than a mullet a
e Wrapper


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
\-4 Residential Commercial
'-^^ Restaurant -\ Mobile Home
\.4B Condo Assoc. Vac and Intercom
%\ Lightning Repair Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978







Ik] PAGE 28-A N JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ROCK TOUR DOUBLE BILLS

BY RICH NORRIS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Favorite Degas
subject
8 Behave
11 Ball
15 It often has its
arms out front
18 Gorged oneself
19 Classified
21 "Windsor
Forest" poet
22 Dinner offerings
24 Services, in a
way
25 "Mr. Basketball"
Holman et al.
26 Gray remover,
maybe
27 "Suzanne"
songwriter
28 Orbital point
29 "The Simpsons"
tavern
31 Show of
affection
33 Backgammon
piece
34 Oater
affirmative
36 Engine conduits
37 Hits errantly, in
golf
38 Impassioned
41 State to be in
42 Word with ready
or shy
44 Reef
45 Hair-raising
site?


47 Undercover
operation
52 #2 at the 1994
U.S. Open
54 Swing voter:
Abbr.
55 Lodge
56 CD--
57 Ice cream parlor
order
59 "La vita nuova"
poet
60 Captures, in a
way
63 Rachmaninoff's
"--tableaux"
64 Indian stringed
instruments
65 Makeup
66 Like some
muscles
67 Poop
68 Impetuous
69 Listen: Sp.
70 British noble,
briefly
72 "--in my
memory lock'd":
Ophelia
73 Certain berth
76 Kind of pie
79 Community
spirit
81 Majors in acting
82 Ruling groups
83 Farm resident
84 Part of a split
personality
86 Orchestral
works
88 Considerable
irritant
91 Word in many
business names
92 "Star Trek" role


93 Soup kitchen
offering
97 Taradiddles
100 Puffball relative
101 Release upon
102 Hotfooted it
104 Clock sound
106 Make money
107 Health care
group
110 Sews up
111 Reserved
112 Totals
113 Christie
contemporary
114 Musical syllables
115 Never, in
Nuremberg
116 Least irrigated
DOWN
1 Butler's
expletive
2 Col. Hannibal
Smith's group
3 Cool
4 Relative of an
agate
5 Plumbing piece
6 Chancel
entrance display
7 Collar inserts
8 Collar
9 Animator's unit
10 Parcels
11 "-- Is Love"
(1962 hit)
12 They provide
prayer support
13 Brings in
14 1997 U.S. Open
champ
15 Long-term
pollution
concern


16 Data
transmission
path
17 Actress
Armstrong and
others
20 Tend the hearth
21 Toaster treat
23 Couple or so
28 Word before and
after "to"
30 Parasol
32 Quite a while
35 Fund-raising
grp.
37 Seemed funny
38 Sit-up
benefactors
39 Squeal
40 Travels of
Shane, e.g.
41 Locale
42 Mention
43 Breeze through
46 Items in sync?
47 Imaginary
48 Chaplin and
others
49 Mil. transports
50 "Are you
nervous?"
response, A la
Don Knotts
51 Diamond execs
53 Gist
58 Hairsplitters
59 Pronouncements
61 Charge with
62 Bribe money, in
slang
63 Chacon of the
1962 Mets
64 Still-life subject
65 Hasty
66 Pocket item


67 Holiday
purchases
68 Diamond target
71 Company that
made
Photophones
72 Ford sobriquet
74 Sniggler's quest
75 Fam. reunion
attendee
77 Castle features


78 "Paper Moon"
actor or actress
80 Breakfast
orders, briefly
83 J.F.K. posting
85 Emulated Mme.
Defarge
86 Kind of meeting
87 Prize
88 Aquarium
acquisitions


89 Track and field
events
90 Secure
93 Topps rival
94 Gaucho gear
95 Mil. address
96 Longtime Guy
Lombardo
record label
98 City on the
Oregon Trail


99 Dumbarton
denizens
103 New Look
designer
105 Measure of
speed
107 Presidential
monogram
108 Star Wars,
initially
109 "-
dreaming?"


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 75c per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


... .- ...'.
, .. . .. . . . . . ... .
Ba ^L ."- ,' .. .-", ,"


PERFECT FAMILY BEACH HOUSE Great fam-
ily beach house. 4BR/3BA, one house from the
white sand. Fantastic rental history. HOME
FACTS #21122. $369,000. Call Bob or Lu
Rhoden.


SOUTH LONGBOAT KEY ON GULF OF
MEXICO Preferred southwestern exposure from
this seventh-floor condo with two balconies.
Gulf-to-bay view plus full view of gorgeous
beach and pools. 2BR/2BA. HOME FACTS
#25242. $259,000. Call Rose Schnoerr.


I RARE WATERFRONT LIVING If you are look-
ing for privacy, here it is. 130 families on 80 acres
of bayfront and nature preserve. Panoramic views
down Sarasota Bay. Cathedral ceilings, two-way
fireplace, wel bar. tile $294.500 HOME FACTS
A125182 Call Bob or Penny Hall


WESTBAY COVE ISLAND LIFESTYLES
Sunny corner unit overlooks greenbelt and pool.
Close to beach, shopping, restaurants. 2BR/
2BA, glassed lanai. Heated pool and tennis. First
floor. HOME FACTS #25372. $138,900. Call
Helen White or Mary Ann Schmidt.


ISLAND FOURPLEX Four nice 2BR/1.5BA
townhouses steps to beach. Gulf and Bay views
from 30x30 sundeck, private courtyards, units
can be sold separately. HOME FACTS #20752.
$340,000. Call Chard Winheim.


i


PERICO BAY TWO-CAR GARAGE 2BR/2BA
patio home. Beautifully decorated, tile floors.
Glassed lanai. Quiet street, water view.
$144,500. HOME FACTS #20402. Call Bobye
Chasey.


AFFORDABLE CHOICE NORTHWEST LOCA-
TION Great NW Bradenton 3BR/2BA split-plan
home with large yard and caged solar-heated
pool. Two-car garage, new A/C. lots of charm. A
must seel HOME FACTS 121C162 .1 15 900
Call Susan Hollvwoc.


BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA BAYFRONT Bayberry
villa. Epoxy-pebble lanai, humidistat, open
kitchen, courtyard and upgraded cupboards.
$122,900. HOME FACTS #25262. Call Gary
Larison.











BEST VIEW IN CORAL SHORES 3BR/2BA,
two-car garage on canal with a water view by a
dam site. Park-like setting. Dock your boat right
in front and enjoy the fantastic water view.
HOM.1E FACTS u20872 1.159 000 Call Harold
Small


Pick up a Buyer's Guide
to see all of our properties.
605-C Manatee Ave. Holmes Beach


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[j PAGE 2-B 0 JULY 23, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Studies continue on


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The ban against inshore gill net fishing is two years
old, and still nobody knows whether it helped fisher-
ies as it was touted to do. Or whether it helped any fish-
ery as much as it hurt commercial fishermen.
There has been an 80 percent reduction in the har-
vest of mullet since the ban began, but mullet generally
are not fished by recreational anglers. And those were
the people who pushed so hard to get the nets banned.
The prohibition against using gill net gear within
three miles of shore was approved statewide in the
general election in November 1994. It went into effect
July 1, 1995.
Since then well...
Broad data on fishing are being collected in an
extensive study by the Florida Marine Research Insti-
tute to be completed about the end of August. The
study is designed to look at the recreational side of the
net ban as well as the commercial, said Dr. Robert
Muller, senior research scientist for the institute at St.
Petersburg; the laboratory is part of the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection.

About the mullet
Until then, scientists there know most about mul--
let. A study of that commercial fish has just been com-
pleted, with results released this week by Dr. Muller's
group.
Nothing unexpected came up, Muller noted, but
still the figures are startling.
From 1990 to 1994 the average annual commercial
mullet harvest on Florida's west coast was 18 million
pounds. Since then, landings have averaged 4.5 million
pounds a year.
"Mullet was probably the most directed target of
gill netting," he said. "No gear out there is nearly as
efficient as the gill net. Remove the most effective gear,
and you can expect a great change."
Reduce the catch and more mullet remain in the
Gulf, in other words.
This is showing up in spawning, he said. "There


Mullet, top, and trout are some of hefis s
studied to determine numbers and sizes in
are more spawners, we know, and that is
of management."
And the spawners are bigger now, li
and maturing beyond previous expectati
spawners are better spawners, Muller said
"If this continues, the difference will
and the recovery of the fishery will accele
"But don't think the fishery gets all those
Of the 13 or 14 million not caught in a ye
come food for other fish, for one thing.
"Mullet is the preferred food for dolpi
incident with the greater supply of that foi
crease of calving among porpoises we
now."
Another fishery scientist. Dr. David Tc
lives any improvement in any fishery he
due to many factors, the net ban perhaps ai
He noted that between 1988 and 1995 S
got much cleaner, with Manatee County an
Sarasota cleaning up their waste disposal
"The water quality improved so much t
has gained 714 acres of new seagrass. The f
has been studied, and if we extrapolate the
juvenile fish per square meter, we get 38 r
"So there are more small fish that eith
or become food for bigger ones."
Tomasko, now with the Southwest F
ter Management District, was for several


of state's fisheries
marine scientist for the Sarasota Bay National Estu-
ary Program.

Many other factors
That program's director, Mark Alderson, agrees
with Tomasko's assessment of the significance of other
factors as well as the net ban, in any improvement in
I fisheries here.
"We have many things at work here water qual-
ity is better, seagrasses are coming back as a result,
habitat restoration is proceeding, artificial reefs are
being helping, improved regulations have been enacted, bag
the area. limits are being enforced, there is much more catch-
and-release fishing, and of course the net ban,"
the purpose Alderson said.
He noted that a few years ago a Mote Marine Labo-
ving longer ratory study concluded that it took an average recre-
ons. Bigger national angler three to four hours of fishing to catch a
1. "keeper" and as much as 12 hours for a sea trout, and
accumulate that a small- percentage of fishermen caught a large
rate. percentage of fish. Alderson would like to see that
se fish back. study repeated. He feels that trout fishing "is definitely
ar, a lot be- better."
"I'm catching some out there myself now, but I
hin, and co- don't know whether there are more fish or I'm getting
od is the in- better as I get older."
are finding Scott Willis of the Marine Research Institute added
still other factors to the list of contributors to any im-
omasko, be- provements in the fishery.
ereabouts is He cited an unusually warm winter and an easing
among them. of the red tide fish kill that was so severe for nearly the
arasota Bay whole preceding year and a half.
d the city of "We need long-term information," Willis said.
act. "Some fish take longer to mature than others, and we
that the Bay have to know the effects on maturation. The red drum
ishery there is inshore for four years before it's mature enough to
number of go offshore, for instance. Snook take three or four
million fish. years, but then the snook is more a stay-at-home fish
er grow big and doesn't move far."
David Miller of Cannon's Marina on Longboat
lorida Wa- Key says he doesn't know., either, but "there's more
l1 years the bait around now, and the net ban is bound to help."


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A tarpon by any other
By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Anyone who's had a tarpon nearly jerk a rod out
his or her hand understands why anglers call him the
silver king.
People have described the feeling of hooking a
tarpon to that of reaching out and grabbing hold of
a passing freight train.
Then comes the violent, beautiful jumps up to 10
feet in the air that look like controlled chaos.
But just where did this magnificent creature
Scme from?
The tarpon (megalops atlantica), also called
tarpum, sabalo real, cuffum, silverfish or silver king,
is a prehistoric animal dating back almost 10 million
years. Tarpon belong to a primitive family
(Elopidae) of bony fishes and is related to herring.
Tarpon occur on both sides of the Atlantic. On
the western side it has been taken as far north as
Nova Scotia, although it does not regularly occur
north of Cape Hatteras.
Southward, its territory extends to Brazil. The
all-tackle world record is 283 pounds and was
caught in 1956 in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. Gus
Bell of Key West holds the Florida record of 243
pounds with a fish caught in 1975 on 20-pound-test
line. In 1982, Billy Pate Jr. caught a 188-pound tar-


Tnrnrnn time -


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 E PAGE 3-B j[]

name would be a silver king
S- pon in Homossasa Springs for the world record fly
fishing record.
Silver king also are found along the west coast
of Africa from Senegal to the Congo.
Perhaps the best tarpon season ever recorded by an
angler, man or woman, came in 1972 when Elsie Bracken
of Boca Grande landed and released 236 tarpon.r
Tarpon in excess of eight feet and 350 pounds
have been caught in commercial nets but not for
Many years. However, most of those in Florida wa-
ters average about 80 to 100 pounds. During roe sea-
son, large females in the 125 to 150 pound range are
not uncommon.
Yet for all their size, the tarpon's rate of growth
is slow. It does not reach sexual maturity until it's
about six years old and has obtained four feet in
length. Fish exceeding 100 pounds are probably 13-
16 years old.
The tarpon is one of the most prolific of all
fishes; a single female may contain more than 12
million eggs. Spawning takes place from May to
September.
Tarpon, like snook, can be found in both fresh
and saltwater. They have an air bladder and when
rolling on the surface, gulp air. This enables them to
survive in waters with low oxygen content.
The silver king has no food value so there's no need
to kill one. And never gaff one and lift him out of the water
for his organs will drop and he will surely die.
If you want to find out a tarpon's weight, here's
a formula. Measure the length and girth, square the
girth and multiply that number by the length. Then
divide by 800. Such figuring will allow you to get an
estimate within a pound or two of true weight.


I1U or is it monster time?
Six-foot-one-inch Jimmyn Eubanks, right, is some-
what dwarfed by his 168-pound, 6-foot 10-inch
tarpon caught off Egmont Key. Eubanks fought the
silver king for almost 2 1/2 hours before bringing
it to the boat. He caught the monster while fishing
with Capt. Roy Salgado.


Tarpon visit local waters in late
spring and early summer.


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LI PAGE 4-B U JULY 23, 1997 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Best fishing in years expected to continue


Whatever you want from
reds to tarpon available
in local waters
By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Fishing is called fishing because if you were
catching fish all the time it would be called catching.
But this continues to make a case for changing
fishing to catching.
Anna Maria fishing guides say the best fishing
in years shows no sign of letting up as the dog days
of summer bear down.
Tarpon near the shipping channels and in the
bays, snook along the beaches, schooling redfish ev-
erywhere, grouper, snapper and permit on the wrecks
and reefs are providing a piscatorial potpourri for
anglers to target.
Capt. Glenn Corder on the Zula Mama admits
that this year remains all good.
"We're fishing for anything and everything,"
Corder said. "You can almost guarantee any kind of
fish this time of year except maybe kingfish and
we even caught a 30-pound king recently. I think he
was a local or he was lost."
According to the long-time guide, there are
nurse sharks around Marker 70, the Sunshine Sky-
way Bridge and anywhere along the edge of chan-
nels. There are "wads and wads and wads of tarpon
and they look like they're going to be around for the
rest of the summer."
Grouper fishing is still producing and mangrove
snapper are biting along the edges of channels, es-
pecially at night.
Corder said one guide told him he caught 90 on
a recent night outing.
Capt. Mike Grieg of Capt. Mike's Charters said
tarpon fishing is phenomenal and reminds him of
fishing for silver kings "on the hill off the phosphate
dock in Boca Grande." Tarpon are tearing up pass
crabs as they flow out of Tampa Bay and it's not
unusual to jump five or 10 each time out.
Grieg said he's fishing "beat-the-heat-trips"
from 5 p.m. to dark most days, mostly for black tip
and lemon sharks. Both species are good eating, with
black tips having a flesh similar to swordfish.
"The shark fishing can be good, but I sure like


One of the last of legal snook
at season's end
Brad Smith of Holmes Beach is all grins at the
35-inch snook he caught just before the
season ended May 31.
tarpon fishing this time of year," he said. "It's a lot
cooler because you're cruising the beaches instead
of sitting in one spot looking for reds. I've also been
catching permit and mangrove snapper around the
reefs and wrecks."
Capt. Tom Chaya has found tarpon off the
beaches cooperative. Soon they'll move into Tampa
Bay in good numbers and he expects to catch them
up to the first cold fronts in mid-October.
Permit on artificial reefs eight or nine miles out
are biting.
Beach fishing for snook has been real good


along the beaches near Boca Grande but a bit slow
along Anna Maria's sugar sand when compared to
past years.
Chaya has a theory.
"I think it's because of the beach
renourishment," he said. "Snook fishing.along the
beach hasn't been the same since."
On the inside, Chaya can be found going after
redfish in spots most folks would consider unlikely.
But then you'd have to charter Chaya to find out
these productive spots.
If you're new to the area, hiring a guide can be
money well spent. It can save a lot of time trying to
find out where fish hang out and if you pay attention,
you can learn how professionals do their thing.
"The reds really haven't schooled up yet and
trout fishing will be gangbusters soon," Chaya said.
"Each day changes dramatically. One day the reds
are good, the next day it's snook. I guess they're just
chasing bait."
Capt. Jeff Hilliard has been running the Miss
Cortez located on the east side of the Cortez Bridge.
On one 16-hour trip he brought back 50 head of
grouper to 30 pounds as well as snapper and some
big barracuda.
While fishing the charter boat Let's Go recently,
his customers landed lemon sharks to five feet. On
occasion, Hilliard says if customers are agreeable,
he'll lead you to fish then pull up on Egmont Key for
a shore lunch featuring your catch.
Capt. Mike Heistand on board Magic has been
landing tarpon to 100 pounds and large trout in the
bays. Shark fishing is a forte of Heistand's and he
said now's the time to go after them.
Capt. Zack Zacharias on the Dee Jay II is an-
other guide who has been leading his charters to a
variety of fish. Snook are bunching up in numbers
around the Longboat Pass bridge and near the beach
while tarpon fishing is good in the bays and along
the beach.
Capt. Dave Pinkham on the Legend said he's
catching kingfish, black grouper and mangrove
snapper in the Gulf.
Regardless of what you target this time of year,
you can be assured that something will bite the bait.
Remember: if you're too busy to go fishing ,
you're just too busy.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 23, 1997 E PAGE 5-B Ir]-



If dining is your pleasure, grab a boat


By Bonner Presswood
"Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina."
No. That's not the way it goes.
"Nothing could be finer than cruising' on an
oceanliher."
That's definitely not the lyrics I'm looking for.
"Nothing could be finer than a waterfront diner -
and a sunset."
Yep. There's plenty of delicious locations on the
waterfront to dine. All have something unique to offer and
a specialty or two.
If you're partial to grouper sandwiches, as I am, you
know the highlights of a good waterway tour.
Nearly every choice spot can be reached by car. Only
one location I know of on this coast requires a boat to get
there the old inn on Cabbage Key near Boca Grande.
Everyone says it's top notch for dining and a stayover.
It's likely the origin of the practice of scribbling your name
on a dollar bill and posting it on the wall to mark your visit
to a tavern. At Cabbage Key, they take the dollars that fall
off the walls and donate them to children's charities -
about $15,000 a year!
If you want to leave your mark locally, your dollar
mark that is, then head down to Mar Vista Pub & Restau-
rant on Longboat Key. It's at Intracoastal Marker 39.
Dollars, old and new, are tacked on the walls and support
beams and even on the ceiling, as the new clientele is con-
stantly contributing to the decor.
Here, among a few others, you'll find that grouper
sandwich that stands big and tall on my list of great grou-
per sandwiches. Order it chargrilled with a slice of cheese
melted over it and it's perfection. Docking is plentiful and
convenient here too, and more than a few anglers have
hooked into a snook or two around the city docks just
south of the Mar Vista.
The same tasty treat can be said of the grouper sand-
wich at the Anna Maria Oyster Bar on the historic Anna
Maria City Pier. It is BIG. And the price is right. Live
music by Howie Banfield adds local color to the deck on
weekends coincidentally around sunset.
Newest on the dock-and-dine tour is Manatee Land-
ings at Regatta Pointe Marina in Palmetto. It's the big
restaurant on the end of the pier hard to miss. As pic-
turesque a location as anyone could ask for to be sure, with
hundreds of sailboats lining the docks. It just opened over
the Fourth of July and inside sources tell me the crab cakes
are "killer." Just up the Manatee River, this destination is


a pleasant, easy evening cruise from Anna Maria.
Add another newcomer to your chart of restaurants to
go to by boat. Name Our Restaurant. No doubt you know
by now that the former Pete Reynard's Yacht Club Res-
taurant, then Shuckers, Crabby Bill's and Backbay
Steakhouse, is being operated under "no name" until
owner Bill Zalla chooses from contest entries to name the
eatery. You can enter the fracas with a purchase and pos-
sibly claim the prize, a trip to the Grand Caymans.
Rotten Ralph has always been a top choice for boat-
ers with consistent quality and super deck location over-
looking Bimini Bay near marker number 63. Now Ralph
has ventured to a land-locked location in east Bradenton
with the same menu and casual style as the original loca-
tion. Nice for "e.i'.renier," but if you're scouting an origi-
nal fish-and-chip dinner for your pontoon party, better
head over to Bimini Bay.
For super sandwiches on the run, cold drinks, ice and
bait, you might enjoy a stop over at an old Florida-style
welcome station Annie's Bait & Tackle, alongside the
north side of the Cortez Bridge. A couple of charter boats
hail out of there and something always seems to be hap-
pening at Annie's docks.
For good fishing and a good meal, nothing beats the
Rod & Reel Pier. While the ghost of Frank Cavendish,
long-time owner who is long-since gone, lingers in the
minds of the older gents that frequent the pier, a younger
generation works on creating new fishing feats at this his-
toric location. Any sort of breakfast fare at the Rod & Reel
is top notch. You can't beat the view from the counter,


looking through screened windows, past countless fishers,
across the bay to the Skyway Bridge. And the cheesebur-
ger there is a "two-fisted" deluxe version of Jimmy
Buffett's victuals in paradise.
At Bridge Tender Inn the possibilities are endless.
Enjoy lunch, dinner or a beverage inside or on the outdoor
deck while listening to live entertainment most nights.
Popular fare is seafood, especially grouper dishes, but a
recent taste test reveals a delicious shrimpcargot a take
on escargot. This version has shrimp sitting atop artichoke
hearts and spinach, topped by parmesan cheese and two
orders would make a nice dinner. Head into the south side
of the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier to two small docks,"
best served by shallow-draft vessels.
The Seafood Shack and its partner, the paddle wheel
cruiser of Anna Maria Sound, are perennial favorites for
seafood. The paddle wheel boat gives landlubbers a wa-
tery tour on its dinner cruises. Dockage is extensive and
may accommodate craft of almost all sizes. The marina
accommodates large or small crafts and is one of the few
remaining live-aboard locations in the area. They're lo-
cated just across from Bradenton Beach to the north of the
Cortez Bridge.
The newly renovated Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier
boasts a popular dining spot too. All-you-can-eat fare has
become a trademark for the summer there, with grouper,
shrimp and crab legs featured on different nights through-
out the week. You'll dine real fine if you go to Marker 49.
Buccaneer Inn is one of the Longboat Key's mainstay
restaurants, serving great aged prime rib and fresh seafood
with a pirate motif. The outside deck is a great place for"
lunch, or you can have dinner inside while listening to live
music most nights. It's one of the few places left where
you can go dancing! Dockage can handle anything from
a canoe to a cabin cruiser. By land, watch for the pirate
sign on Gulf of Mexico Drive in the 6000 block. By wa-
ter, turn in at Marker 33.
Cafe on the Bay located in Arvidaville on
Longboat Key offers a fine dining experience. It is
owned by the same group that operates the award-winning
Cafe L'Europe on St. Armands. but here you'll find break-
fast as well as lunch and dinner and a marina view that far
surpasses that of tourists running around in circles. Dock-
age is extensive for all size boats. Look for them by boat
at Marker 15 in Harborside Marina.
See you on the water or in the waterside restau-
rants!







" PAGE 6-B U JULY 23, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Fishers fraught with adversity, but continue


By Paul Roat
Fishing in the waters off Anna Maria Island did not
always include graphite rods, $30,000 flats boats and
bright-colored plastic artificial lures.
In fact, historical accounts of the region's fisheries
make today's catches pale in comparison.
Fishing in this part of the state has always been a way
of life. Tocobaga, Calusa and Timucuan Indians plied the
bays and passes thousands of years ago, bringing in
catches of mullet, pompano and redfish to feed their ex-
tended families.
Oysters, clams and scallops were scooped from the
"shallow waters. The shells were heaped in huge piles,
sometimes reaching heights of more than 100 feet.
Cuban fishers set up camps throughout the region in
the 1600s, shipping salted mullet to fish houses in Havana.
The practice continued until the late 1800s.
One of the larger fish camps in the state was at
Hunter's Point in Cortez. In 1879, a surveyor with the U.S.
Fish Commission reported that 28 fishers were at Hunter's
Point. "There were no permanent dwellings at Hunter's
Point," Ben Green writes in his book "Finest Kind," only
a large fish house for storing fish and two rooms built onto
the fish house where the men slept.
The area became home to a group of families from
Carteret County in North Carolina. As Green writes:
"The immigrants had found what they were looking
for: Sarasota Bay, sheltered from the Gulf by Anna Maria
Island and Longboat Key, provided miles and miles of
fishing grounds that were teeming with mullet, redfish,
-'trout, bluefish, snook, sheepshead and flounder. Just be-
yond Anna Maria with easy access through Longboat Pass
lay the Gulf of Mexico, which had huge schools of mul-
let running along its beaches during roe season and, in the
spring, a wealth of mackerel and kingfish.
"It was all there within easy reach of young men and
women with strong backs and a determination to work
hard. The beautiful pristine environment must have looked
like heaven, or something close to it, since at dusk the
mosquitoes surely reminded them that it wasn't. But the
fish were there in abundance, and, other than a few fish-
ermen from Fogartyville up the Manatee River and a few
other small villages scattered further south towards Punta


Longboat Key was the site of a commercial
shark plant from 1932-40. Edgar and "Sharky"
Holbrook estimate they brought in 6,000 sharks
during those eight years, including the famous great
white shark on Christmas Day, 1937.
The following description is from Doris M.
Green's book, "Fog's Comin' In."
It was cold and windy so Edgar decided not to go
to the distant lines set six miles out in the Gulf but
check only the submerged trotline a quarter-mile off
Whitney Beach. The one-inch rope trotlines were
anchored to the bottom at each end with a 50-pound
weight and a 25-pound weight in the middle. Each line
was about 1,000 feet long and had separate lines at-
tached for the 50 or so baited hooks. Each line had a
two- to four-foot chain leader that held the four-inch
Norwegian shark hooks, baited with any fish avail-
able. Floating barrels were attached to the end of each
line so they could be located.
Edgar began pulling on the line through an open-
ing in the stem of his 26-foot wooden boat. It was hard
pulling and he knew he had something big. He was 27
years old, weighted over 200 pounds and was very
strong, but this shark was different from any that he
had pulled in before. He looped the slack ends around
the comer ends of the stem timber and suddenly the
largest shark he had every seen surfaced, still alive and
fighting to break away from the hook.
It began to weaken after about an hour, so
Edgar turned the boat toward shore, towing the
shark about 20 feet behind. He came through the


Gorda and Charlotte Harbor, it was theirs for the taking."
The taking of fish wasn't easy. Hours were long and
the work often backbreaking. Mosquitoes often covered
the screens of the houses so thickly that little light could
penetrate. Drinking water came from rain, and was often
so thick with mosquito larvae that the water had a consis-
tency of sludge. A hurricane in October 1921 completely


The great white shark.
Longboat Pass and into Savarese Bayou, now
Land's End. People gathered around to see the
huge shark, still barely alive.
Logs were rolled to the waterline, a hand
winch attached to the rope and the shark was
cranked to the edge of the beach and left until the
next day. Gordon Whitney came to take the only
pictures made of the huge shark. Edgar told every-
one that he'd caught it miles out in he Gulf as he
didn't want to hurt Whitney's tourist business, but
they never set lines close in to shore again.
The only measurement taken was by using
Edgar's 16-foot poling oar and laying it on the
shark's back, beginning at the nose, and the fish
extended about three or four feet beyond that.
When the hide was removed, it was over eight
feet wide. The liver, the principal portion used,
filled three wash tubs and yielded a 55-gallon
drum of oil for vitamin A. They sold shark hides,
fins and jaws. The jaws from the huge shark were
sold for $5.


destroyed the village waterfront. Red tide decimated
the fish in Sarasota Bay in 1946 with an algae bloom
that lasted for more than a year.
But the fishing continued and, despite the dev-
astating effect of the 1995 ban on inshore gill net
fishing in Florida. the village of Cortez and the
fishers there continue.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 23, 1997 0 PAGE 7-B IB.



Redfish an easy gamefish catch


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Redfish are one of the easiest of all gamefish to
catch locally. The spot-tailed brawlers will feed on vir-
tually anything pinfish, pilchards, chub, shrimp,
sardines, grunt and squid.
And even though they have notoriously bad eye-
sight, reds will take artificial lures, too. Some of the
best artificial include floating or sinking Mirrolures,
Cotee jigs, Love lures, Johnson sprite spoons espe-
cially gold colored ones and white bucktail jigs.
The right place to dangle your line depends on the
calendar. Like our visitors, reds like to move around
throughout the year.
In summer, look for them around mangrove is-
lands, oyster bars, seagrass beds and sand pockets
along the shore. The best bait during the warm
months is shiners and large, hand-picked shrimp.
Artificial lures work, too, and I've found that redfish
take a fake bait more readily in the summer than any


Florida saltwater

fishing laws
African pompano: 24-inch minimum size
limit; two-fish per person or vessel (whichever
is less).
Amberjack: 28-inch minimum fork length,
three-fish daily possession limit.
Black drum: 14- to 24-inch slot limit; five-
fish daily possession limit; cannot possess more
than one of more than 24 inches.
Black mullet: No minimum length; 50-fish
limit.
Bluefish: 12-inch minimum fork length; 10-
fish limit.
Cobia: 33-inch minimum fork length; two-
fish limit.
Dolphin: 10-fish daily possession limit.
Flounder; 12-inch minimum length; 10-fish
bag limit.


Redfish are a popular fish to catch in the summer.
other time in the year.
In the winter, reds school along the beaches. The
tend to cluster around structures like docks, bridges,
sunken boats or docks. You'll also find redfish school-
ing on the tips of any of the islands just before the cold
fronts push through in winter.
Another tip to finding reds in winter is to look for
schools of mullet. Your quarry will be intermingled
among the mullet, and casting into the school should
produce some excellent hook-ups.


Grouper (gag, black, red, yellowfin,
yellowmouth, scamp): 20-inch minimum length; five-
fish limit; no harvest of Nassau grouper allowed.
Jewfish: Closed. Illegal to possess.
Kingfish: 20-inch minimum (fork length); two-fish
daily bag limit. Bag limit in Gulf-Atlantic fishery reduced
to one when federal waters closed to all harvest.
Permit: 10- to 20-inch slot limit; 10-fish bag limit;
may possess one fish of more than 20 inches.
Pompano: 10- to 20-inch slot limit; 10-fish bag
limit; may possess one fish of more than 20 inches.
Redfish: 18- to 27-inch slot; one-fish daily pos-
session. (No closed season.)
Sea bass: eight-inch minimum; no bag limit.
Shark: Recreational limit of two per vessel per day;
the harvest of sawsharks, sawfish, basking sharks, whale
sharks and spotted eagle rays is prohibited.
Sheepshead: 12-inch minimum size limit; 15-fish
bag limit.
Snapper: 15-inch minimum on red snapper: 16-
inch minimum on mutton snapper; 12-inch minimum


Although redfish don't see too well, they do have
an excellent sense of smell. Once you've located and
caught your first fish of the day, chum the water with
wounded shiners or shrimp. The splashing of minnows
and the scent of bait will keep the spotties within reach
of your rod. Chum becomes even more important when
you realize that reds hang out in muddy water and are
hard to see.
Redfish, Scianenops ocellatus, are also called red
drum or channel bass. They are classed as an inshore
species until they reach about 30 inches in length -
which puts them at about four years old when they
migrate to join the nearshore fishes. They are usually-
a copper-bronze in color, although they will be lighter
in color in clear water.Redfish have one or more spots
at the base of the tail.
Redfish must be between 18 to 27 inches in size to
be legal, and each fisher may keep one fish per day.
Good luck and good fishing.


on dog, silk, queen, mahogany, blackfin and yel-
lowtail; 12- to 30-inch slot on Cubera (may pos-
sess two more than 30 inches); 10-inch minimum
on gray or mangrove snapper; eight-inch mini-
mum on vermillion and lane snapper. Bag limit 10
daily (no limit on lane or vermillion). Limit may
not include more than 5 mangrove daily or 5 red
snapper daily.
Snook: 24-inch minimum length; closed
Dec. 15 Jan. 31 and June, July, Aug.; may pos-
sess one fish of more than 34 inches; two-fish
total limit. Snook stamp required.
Spanish mackerel: 12-inch minimum length;
10-fish limit.
Speckled trout: 15- to 20-inch slot limit; five
fish limit; may possess one of more than 20
inches. Season closed in Nov. and Dec.
Tarpon: No size limit; two-fish limit; re-
quires $50 tarpon tag to possess or kill.
Tripletail: 15-inch minimum size limit; two-
fish possession limit.


We Need Your Help!

/Vame Oca 2estaant./

Og Have Any Suggestions?
HA11 Join Us in the Famous Revolving Compass Room


4-1 L1A0
.7t. Kterl


Banquet Rooms
Available for
25-200 People


Early Bird Menu 3pm-6pm
Prime Rib Sandwich .......... $5.95
Half Rack Ribs................... $7.95
Chicken Gaspar.............. $6.95
Grouper Gaspar .... ......... $7.95
Liver & Onions................. $5.95
Beef Stroganoff ............... $5.95
8 oz Prime Rib Dinner ....... $8.95
Salisbury Steak .............. $5.49
Grilled Shrimp................ $7.99


Nameless Specialties
Veal Oscar ................. $16.95
Veal Melannaise........... $13.95
Chicken Gardenia ........$12.95
Eggplant Parmesan...... $12.95
Del Monico.................. $13.99
Prime Rib......... $10.99-$14.99
Linguine w/fresh clams $12.95
Grouper Gaspar ........... $15.95
Raw Oysters 1/2 oz ........ $2.95
Oysters Rockefeller........ $5.95


P For Your Listening & Dancing Pleasure.
Brian Beebe
Every Tuesday thru Saturday, 6-10pm
Chuck Douglas
Sunday & Monday, 6-10pm
Dining: Daily 3-10 pm Lounge: Daily 3-Midnight
Visit Our Marina By Boat Marker #62 5325 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach


Jazz & Contemporary Music
Mon. Thurs. 5:30 to 9:30 pm
Fri. & Sat. 6:30 to 9:30 pm

t6 ( :. ,. .: \"


Located on the end of the pier at Rogatta Pointe Marina in Palmetto
995 Riverside Drive Palmetto 723-.--.,)
Ride our courtesy shuttle from the Regatta Pointe Marina parking lot.


I


I


-- ~ -4 -







PAGE 8-B M JULY 23, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Send Your Entry Today!


1997 OFFICIAL RULES


1) The Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards
(KINSA) contest is strictly for amateur photographers.
Amateur Photographers are those who derive less than 5% of
their income from photography.
2) International winners will be selected by an independent panel
" of judges based on some or all of the following criteria-
human interest, general appeal, uniqueness, composition and
quality. Kodak reserves the right to reject entries that are
considered harmful or offensive. Decisions of the judges will
be final. International Judging will take place October 9,10
1997; eligible entries must have been received from the
sponsoring newspaper and postmarked no later than August
22,1997.
3) Black-and-white and color photographs taken after January 1,
1995, are eligible. This allows for a two-year eligibility. Photos
previously published or entered in any KINSA or other
competitions are not eligible.
4) Entrants are permitted to submit pictures to only one
newspaper participating in the KINSA contest.
5) Snapshots may be taken with any make of camera, but all
entries must be taken on KODAK Film AND, if printed, on
KODAK Paper. No retouching or other alteration (except
cropping) is permitted of negatives or prints; no composite
pictures or multiple printing can be submitted.
6) Entrant's name and address must be written clearly, in ink, on
the back of each print or transparency mount. Mail entries to
the KINSA Contest Editor, care of this newspaper.
7) Entrants by their entry agree that the Newspaper may publish
their pictures for local promotion of the contest. Entrants
must be able to furnish the original negative or transparency,
if requested, by the Contest Editor. All photos submitted
become the property of the sponsors and none will be
returned. The sponsors assume no responsibility for
negatives, transparencies, or prints.
To be eligible for the International Judging of the KINSA
contest, each entrant must first satisfy the requirements of
the local Sponsoring Newspaper, e.g. be a local winner, and
must then sign a Prize Winner's Agreement in the form
provided by Kodak. This Agreement attests the photo was
taken by the entrant and assigns to Eastman Kodak Company
the original negative/transparency of their picture. It grants
Eastman Kodak Company and others, with Kodak's consent,
the exclusive right to copy and use the picture, in whole or
part, for any purpose (including advertising, display, and
publication) for at least five (5) years; and to use the
entrant's name and likeness in connection with any use of the
picture, or with any promotion of this or any other contest. If
entry is on ADVANTIX Film cassette, the cassette will be
returned to the entrant at the conclusion of the International
Contest. However, all rights of exclusive usage of the prize-
winning image will remain with Kodak.


Entrant must know the names and addresses of any
recognizable persons appearing in the picture. In order to be a
finalist and to be eligible for international judging, entrant
must provide the written consent of such persons) to permit
use of the picture by Kodak and others, with Kodak's consent,
for any purpose including advertising, display, and
publication. By signing the Prize Winner's Agreement, entrant
also agrees that the picture, or another closely similar picture
of the same subject or situation has not, and will not be
entered in any other contest and will not be offered for
publication elsewhere. Failure to sign and return the
Agreement within 20 days of its receipt may result in
forfeiture of the local prize and selection of a new winner.
8) Cash prizes totaling $52,500 U.S. will be awarded in
International Judging as follows:


Grand Prize
2 First Prizes
2 Second Prizes
2 Third Prizes
50 Honor Awards
200 Special Merit Awards


$10,000 U.S.
$5,000 U.S. each
$3,000 U.S. each
$2.000 U.S. each
$250 U.S. each
$50 U.S. each


Honor Awards may include the Categories-of:
Abstract Still Life


* Landscape & Scenic
* Portrait
* Candids
*Animals


* Humor
* Seniors
* Action
* New Parents


9) Employees and their immediate family members of
participating newspapers, of Eastman Kodak Company, and of
its subsidiaries are not eligible to enter the contest. For the
purpose of this contest, immediate family is anyone residing
in the same household.
10) Any taxes on prizes are the sole responsibility of the winners.
Any cash prize won by a minor will be awarded to a parent or
guardian. Prize rights are not transferable.
11) This contest is void where prohibited and subject to all
applicable laws and regulations.
Sponsored by

ISLANDER *
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217
Eastman Kodak Company, 1997


Contest dates: One Issue Remaining: 7/30. Deadlines: 7/25. Local prizes: Weekly winners receive a merchandise certificate from
Kodak, a choice between an Islander Bystander "mullet-wrapper" T-shirt or hat, a framing certificate from Longboat Framing Gallerie
.1 and a dining certificate from The Sandbar restaurant.


Please attach to photo and mail or deliver to The Islander
Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217.
"Attention, KINSA Editor."
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE ZIP
PHONE NO.
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
I have read the competition rules and affirm that this entry is
in compliance with them.

SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT

Please attach to photo and mail or deliver to The Islander
Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217.
"Attention, KINSA Editor."
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE ZIP
PHONE NO.
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
I have read the competition rules and affirm that this entry is
in compliance with them.

I SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT
r----------------I
Please attach to photo and mail or deliver to The Islander
Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217.
"Attention, KINSA Editor."
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE ZIP
PHONE NO.
DATE PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
LOCATION PHOTO WAS TAKEN:
I have read the competition rules and affirm that this entry is
in compliance with them.

SIGNATURE OF ENTRANT


Past winners selected from IslanderBystanderentries:


1995 Honor Award Winner: Sheila Fox Tuck


1996 Honor Award Winner: Ines Norman


KnonAw