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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00683

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


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Memo war between building, police officials


By Paul Roat
A battle between the Bradenton Beach building
official and police chief, ignited by memos slung be-
tween departments, has prompted the mayor to step in
and call a cease-fire.
The flurry of writing began with a memo from Build-
ing Official Bill Sanders addressed to Commissioner
Connie Drescher regarding "police plans to commandeer
the Building-Planning Department vehicle for use during
a storm." Drescher is the liaison between the building
department and the city commission.
Sanders said his, "personal plans for family evacu-
ation from the Island are scheduled for between 24-48
hours before storm landfall. If I do not have the use of
building-planning department vehicle, it will be neces-
sary for me to leave at that time with my family."
He added that police would then be charged with
packing building department files and the computer if
the threat of a big blow loomed, as well as inspecting
on-going building sites to ensure security of possible
flying debris, handling damage assessments post-storm



Island hurricane

conference

June 18
The second Annual Island Mayors' Hurricane
Conference is set for 7 p.m., June 18, in the sanctuary
of St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive,
SHolmes Beach: All Islanders are urged to attend.
The agenda is as follows;
Introductions by Island mayors.
Evacuation Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay
Romine.
Post disaster Bradenton Beach Sgt. John
Cosby.
Law enforcement Holmes Beach Lt. Dale
Stephenson.
The role of Essential Service Functions in an ac-
tivation Anna Maria Fire Chief Andy Price.
The Manatee County Emergency Operations
Center and how it affects the Island EOC Chief
Karen Windon.
Mitigation Holmes Beach Commissioner Don
Maloney.
Questions.
Closing remarks.
The conference is free and open to all Islanders.


and determining the degree of assistance needed from
non-impacted areas.
"All departments within the city have responsibili-
ties that cannot be completed if resources are taken
away," Sanders continued. "Some of the responsibili-
ties of this building-planning department are mandated
by state and federal law and cannot be ignored. If I do
not have a building-planning department vehicle, I do
not believe I will be able to return in time to complete
these activities."
Enter Police Chief Jack Maloney.
"The building official is exactly right when he
states that the police department will commandeer his
department's vehicle (and any others we need) for use
During a storm," Maloney wrote to Commissioner Dan
Goodchild, the police liaison to the commission.
"This was never an issue before, because in the
past employees cooperated and were well aware of the
police department's potential use of other departments'
equipment in an emergency," Maloney continued.
"He can check any sites, if there is time, before he


evacuates with the other non-essential personnel,"
Maloney said. "When it is deemed safe, the police de-
partment will let him know that he can come back and
get his vehicle back in order to do his job. He will box
anything he needs before the storm and the mainte-
nance department will pack it all for shipping and safe-
keeping, something he should already be aware of.
"If Mr. Sanders would stop wasting time with
snide memos, and instead talk and cooperate, a lot more
would be accomplished," Maloney said.
Commissioner Drescher then wrote a memo to
Maloney.
"As liaison to the building department I feel it is
imperative that channels of communication be open
between department heads, especially concerning the
city's procedures for hurricane preparedness and
evacuation," she wrote. "I find your statements in an-
swer to Mr. Sanders' memo unproductive and unnec-
essarily negative and, indeed, counterproductive."
PLEASE SEE FEUD, NEXT PAGE


Almost done
Workers from Hendry Dredge are finishing up the sand-moving part of the Longboat Pass maintenance
dredging project this week. Sand from the silted inlet was placed on Longboat Key and southern Bradenton
Beach. Still to be done on Bradenton Beach shores is sand shaping and tilling. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Big day Saturday for Snooks, Island kids


One of the Island's biggest events for kids is Sat-
urday.
And, best of all, it's free to every youngster in the
Area, thanks to the Pri-
vateers, the not-so-seri-
ous outfit with a very
Serious mission mak-
Sing life better and more
enjoyable for Anna
Maria Island.
Kids' Day will be
Saturday from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at Bayfront
Park in Anna Maria
City.
The celebration was
Snooks Adams created in 1954 by the
man who then and sub-
sequently spent his days keeping Anna Maria straight
but not rigid. Snooks Adams was deputy sheriff for
years, then chief of police of Holmes Beach and finally
its best-known retiree.
He will be at Kids' Day, as he has been at all of
them.
Born in Cortez, he was raised with five brothers


and three sisters. He has spent all of his life in Cortez
or on the Island, with time out for service in he Navy.
He was a builder of seawalls until he joined the
Manatee County Sheriff's Department and for years
was the only police officer on the Island.
In 1954 he loaded up as many youngsters as his
Jeep would hold and took them on an outing at the
south end of the Island, later named Coquina Beach.
There were no paved roads to that part of the Island and
no bridge to Longboat Key, he recalls.
He cooked hot dogs and opened Coca-Colas for the
boys; no parents were allowed.
Over the next few years the annual outing moved
to Manatee Beach, girls started attending and the Lions
Club and Island residents helped.
Adams retired from being Holmes Beach's leading
law enforcement officer in 1980 and turned Kids' Day
over to the Privateers, an Island-wide organization
devoted to good times and good deeds.
What Adams started with a dozen kids has grown
in attendance to 150 in 1990 and to 500 in more recent
years. Some parents participate now, some of them part
of the early Snook Adams' Kids' Days.
Kids' Day will feature dozens of games starting at
11 a.m., best-dressed little pirate contest at noon,


sandcastle building contest from 11 to 2.
Free hot dogs, Coca-Cola and Domino's Pizzas
will be dished out all through the day. Further informa-
tion, 778-1238 or 704-2599.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Announcements ............................................. 5
Opinions ............................... ............. 6
Those W ere the Days ................................. ... 7
Island Poet ............................... ........... 9
School Daze .................................. ........ 12
Stir-it-up ................................... ......... 14
Fishing the Islands tournament ................... 15
ISLAND MAP .............................................. 18
Baseball team pictures .................................. 26
Anna Maria Island tides ............................. 28
Crossword puzzle......................................... 36


JUNE 11, 1997






Ri PAGE 2 M JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Secret' grant

sought for school

multi-media room

by chamber
The Island Chamber's drive for a multi-media room
at the elementary school has progressed to the grant stage,
but the source of a requested grant is a secret.
Don Schroder, member of the Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce board of directors, is spear-
heading the ambitious campaign. Working with school
officials, he has calculated that about $25,000 will get
the program off the ground.
An application for a grant in that amount has been
submitted, but Schroder won't say to what entity the
request has been made. "I don't feel free to reveal that
at this time," he said.
Some money has been put together already through
the Chamber at Schroder's urging, $1,000 from the Bridge
Street Festival in Bradenton Beach and other donations
from individuals. A major mailing is going out to compa-
nies, individuals and other likely sources, said Schroder.
What he envisions is using space in the old railroad
caboose on the grounds of the Anna Maria Island Elemen-
tary School, installing computers and involving all 5th-
graders in "job awareness activities." This is designed to
start them thinking in terms of eventual careers.
The projected program has five major areas, and
the cost of computer hardware and software for each
has been calculated thus:
Graphic arts, with original and scanned images,
$3,750; desktop publishing, $3,150; video editing, $5,700;
career station to teach students how to learn employable
skills, $4,500; robotics, where students will learn how to
program a robotic type machine how to do tasks, $2,800.
That's the first-year plan for five stations. Schroder
intends to end up with 20 stations in four or five years.
Schroder seems a natural for such a project. He is
broker-manager of Re/Max Gulfstream Realty which,
like many real estate operations, is highly computer-
ized. And he is a longtime member of the Scholastic
Advisory Council, where citizens, teachers, business
people and so on "look at what schools are doing and
how we can help, not in curriculum but in guidelines."
"My specific interest is where the business com-
munity can help schools," he said.
He feels strongly that the adult world should begin
training youngsters for careers earlier than middle or
high school, he said.
The Chamber has worked with the school to bring
the program along, he said, and to help write the grant
application. The school already has a small multi-me-
dia room with some computers and student video pro-
duction. The new program would greatly expand that,
with no public money involved.
Not to leave parents too far behind, Schroder
noted that adult education courses could be offered
on the same computers.


Bradenton Beach clock tower


finally finds a home


After several weeks of frantic negotiations, the
illuminated clock tower is finally under construc-
tion at the approach to the Bradenton Beach Fish-
ing Pier although at not quite the same spot as
originally envisioned.
The problem arose when city officials discov-
ered that the original location for the 34-foot-high
tower was not public land, but instead was partially
owned by Bridge Tender Inn owner Dr. Fred
Bartizal.
Negotiations with Bartizal fell through when
the city commission balked at the idea of trading
city property at Third Street South and the bay for
the small triangular piece needed for the tower.
But Emily Anne Smith, with the architectural
firm of Eatman & Smith and the designer of the
tower and other pier renovations, came up with a
new concept of putting the tower farther out on the
pier approach, slightly extending over the rock re-
vetment.
Commissioners agreed with that plan once
Smith assured them that no parking spaces would
be jeopardized with the relocation.
The pier renovations are being done through a
grant from the Florida Recreational Development
Assistance Program and matching money from the
city. Other work to improve the approach to the
pier will begin later this year through another grant,
this one through the Cominunity Development
Block Grant program.
Total cost of renovations to the pier are
$126,250.
The tower will have four illuminated clock
faces near the top, with covered seating in a gazebo
setting at the tower's base.
Most of the other renovations are completed,
with the clock tower the last major piece of work
to be done.


Register now to enter


Privateers July 4th parade


Islanders are invited to take part in an Island tradition.
Islanders' floats and cars, belonging to individuals
or as a group effort and decorated in the colors and
style of the July 4th holiday, are invited to participate.
Applications are required to be in the parade. Call Eiic
Rushnell at 794-6268 to receive an application form
and information.
The Anna Maria Island Privateers July 4th Parade
will wind its way through the Island followed by a pic-
nic at the Anna Maria Island Community Center to


mark the national Independence Day celebration.
The parade will stage at Coquina Beach at 9 am. to
leave sharply at 10 a.m. It will proceed through
Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach and Anna Maria City
to end at the Anna Maria City Pier.
The Privateers' July 4th fundraiser picnic at the
Island Center will begin immediately after the parade.
There is no admission charge and tickets toppurchase
food and beverages (soft drinks and bar) will be avail-
able at the front door.


I


Memos fly in Bradenton Beach


FEUD, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Then Mayor Leroy Arnold stepped into the ex-
change.
"According to our city charter," Arnold wrote, "the
mayor oversees all department heads as the city adminis-
trator. Liaisons are not appointed to oversee any depart-
ment head or any department. Problems in any department
must be communicated to the mayor, who will carry the
message to other departments or agencies as necessary. In
the future, if an appointed commissioner interferes with
the mayor's responsibilities and does not understand what
a liaison's duties are, he or she will be removed as liaison.
"In addition, any department head who does not
inform the mayor of problems in his or her department
will be appropriately reprimanded," Arnold concluded.
And, in another memo to the commission and de-
partment heads, Arnold said, "The policy of Bradenton
Beach has been that the police department has the pre-
rogative to use any city vehicle in the event of an emer-
gency, in the name of public safety and welfare."
Then Sanders fired off another memo, this one to
Maloney.
"After reading your memo shortly after talking to
the mayor, I first thought you had purposely misunder-
stood and misconstrued the meaning and content of
[my] memo to Commissioner Drescher," Sanders


wrote. "But it was such a shallow and transparent ploy
that I could not believe even you could be that stupid.
It was then I realized you have a reading disability of
some type causing you to misunderstand the English
language when written.
"That being the case, I will try to clarify the points
raised in your memo to Commissioner Goodchild -
for big words I will include synonyms (a word having
the same or nearly the same meaning as another word
or other words in a language) or definitions in brack-
ets to be sure you understand. If you still have a prob-
lem, just give me a call and I will explain further or
draw you a picture," Sanders continued.
The building official then describes his predica-
ment to either use a city vehicle to do pre- and post-
storm duties or evacuate the Island in his personal
vehicle with his family. He also said he has spent 20
years in government work protecting the life, health,
safety and welfare of people.
Sanders questioned why Maloney would want to
use one of the city's older vehicles when the police
department has nine newer vehicles.
He offered examples of his cooperation with the
police department and listed numerous ignored re-
quests made to the police department in the past.
Sanders then offered eight suggestions as to how


.Maloney could better run the police department. He
concluded the memo with the following:
"The long and the short of this message is: Control
your people and keep them out of other people's hair;
mind your own business; and be polite. Most people do
not have to be reminded of these things, no doubt, if
you were not disabled, you wouldn't either. Lately I
have been spending a lot of time responding to your
department meddling in mine, time I can ill afford for
that purpose. In the past, I thought it was because you
were a meddling egotistical dunce with an inflated
opinion of his worth in the world. Now I know it's all
because of your disability, so I sincerely apologize for
thinking you were a meddling egotistical dunce."
The final memo in the series is from Mayor
Arnold.
"I do not like, nor do I approve of the recent
memos that are personal remarks between department
heads. This must cease immediately!" Arnold wrote.
"As mayor and administrative head of the city, I
will set guidelines for all take-home vehicles," he con-
tinued. "The vehicles are to be used only for city busi-
ness and are to be at home on 24-hour call only. City
vehicles are not for personal use during off-duty hours.
Any special use must have my approval. Any person
misusing a city vehicle will lose that privilege."






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 P PAGE 3 []B
Islander Bystander photo contest starts with June 25 issue


If you've taken even one snapshot since Jan. 1,
1995, then you may have an entry for the upcoming
contest sponsored by The Islander Bystander.
And your picture may be worth as much as
$10,000 top prize in the 1997 Kodak International
Newspaper Snapshot Awards (KINSA).
Reputed to be the largest annual event of its kind, the
KINSA contest has 257 international cash awards worth
$52,500. Add attractive local prizes dining gift certifi-
cates, framing gift certificates from Longboat Framing
Gallery and Islander Bystander "More Than a Mullet
Wrapper" T-shirts and you just might want to consider
locating and sending in more than one eligible picture.
Entries may be black-and-white or color, negative
or transparency. They can feature just about any sub-
ject.
The 10 subject categories used in judging at the in-


international level might serve as a guide as you select
entries: Abstract, Still Life, Landscapes & Scenics,
Candids, Seniors, Action, New Parents, Humor, Ani-
mals and, returning this year, Portraits. "Portraits" in-
vites photographers to sum up a person's character or
personality in a photo.
Send your finest pictures to KINSA Contest Edi-
tor, Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, FL 34217 by 5 p.m. Friday before the date of
publication.
Local winners will be published in the newspaper
during the weeks of June 25, July 2, July 9, July 16,
July 23 and July 30.
Entries judged best at the end of the local contest
will be forwarded to Eastman Kodak Company in
Rochester, N.Y., for international judging.
There, your picture can win $50 simply by attract-


Four wheeler
Island pet Miss Molly sits ready to ride to wherever. Custody of the patient canine chauffeur is shared "jointly" by
her owners Galene Shorter and Adam Orlean, both ofAnna Maria City. Islander Photo: Edna Tiemann


FLOIDATRED: oldn SoA
Florida's Top 20

*I IA I .I .- @

















WIESPCATO: wad f xcllnc








D
becau
AWARDWINNIG SURSIDE ININ

778-6444


ing the attention of one of five judges. If your snapshot
ranks among the top 57 photos, it's assured of winning
at least $250. The top seven awards include $2,000,
$3,000, $5,000 and $10,000 for Best of Show.
The KINSA contest is strictly for amateur photog-
raphers. An Amateur Photographer is anyone who de-
rives less than five percent of his or her income from
photography.
Pictures may be either black-and-white or color,
but they must have been taken using Kodak film and
paper.
Entrant's name and address must be written
clearly, in ink, on the back of each print or, if slides are
submitted, on the transparency mount.
It's important to remember that the original negative
must also be available for use in the KINSA contest.
A complete list of rules will be available in next
week's Islander Bystander.




Anna Maria City
None scheduled

Bradenton Beach
6/16, 6 p.m., Citizens' Advisory Task Force
6/19, 1 p.m., Commission meeting

Holmes Beach
6/17, 9 a.m., Commission work session

Of Interest
6/11, 6 p.m., EMS Study Committee, Fire
Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
6/16, 2 p.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Anna Maria City Hall.
6/18, 7 p.m., Island Mayors' Hurricane Confer-
ence, St. Bernard Church Sanctuary, 248 S.
Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
6/19, 10 a.m., Community Chat with Holmes
Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner, Island Branch
Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


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Ej3 PAGE 4 K JUNE 11, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Residents along proposed pipeline debate merits


By Anthony Seaton
Islander Reporter
A proposed pipeline that would run from Pine
Avenue almost to Magnolia Avenue in Anna Maria to
Bimini Bay is being hotly debated by landowners ad-
jacent to the project.
Mayor Chuck Shumard says their complaints were
the reason for the proposed project.
There are 11 pieces of property abutting the ditch
which runs south from Pine Avenue to Bimini Bay, and
west of South Bay Boulevard.
Of those, two are commercial properties, the
former Anchorage/Fast Eddies property and Ato's res-
taurant.
Georgia Van Cleve, who lives with her husband
Carl on an adjoining property downstream of the pipe-
line, has fought this battle before. She says it's "deja
vu, all over again."
Six years ago the city proposed a dike and pump
system for the ditch that runs behind her property at
525 Magnolia to Bimini Bay.
She and her neighbors fought that to a standstill,
and the project was denied a permit by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection in 1991.
According to the permit denial for that project:
"Mangroves are dense along most of the ditch area
along both banks. Red, white and black mangroves
were observed along the entire length of the ditch.
"The project would result in ... the direct elimina-
tion of over 20 mangroves, [and] would convert the
existing tidally influenced ditch system into a freshwa-
ter system."
The mangroves are even taller and thicker now, but
a meeting at the site two weeks ago of various agencies
that have jurisdiction, apparently convinced the agen-
cies to approve the pipe project.
There will be a few mitigating contingencies, ac-
cording to Shumard. "Swiftmud says they're just wait-
ing on the final engineer's report" from the city.
The mitigating requirements will include planting
mangroves downstream of the area to be removed for
the pipeline and replacing Brazilian pepper trees with
mangroves.
Even though the city is not proposing a dike now,
the "flapper valve," which is intended to prevent tidal
water from flowing up the ditch/pipeline, would seem
to provide the same functions-- and problems as
the dike, according to the Van Cleves.
"The only thing this is going to accomplish is no
salt water by that one house where they don't like the
stink," Mrs. Van Cleve said, referring to Ray Damrow,
the chief neighborhood proponent of the plan.
Van Cleve's neighbor across the ditch agrees.
"Anything they do to clear this out, I will oppose ve-
hemently," said Bruce Anderson of 527 Magnolia.
"In fact, the trees and the privacy they afford is the
main reason I bought this property."
The trees along Anderson's property wouldn't be af-
fected, except for the pepper trees, because the U.S. Army
Corp of Engineers has determined the ditch, south of the
200 block of South Bay Boulevard, to be navigable wa-
ters, and therefore off limits to this project.
Dozens of mature mangroves upstream would be
sacrificed for the pipeline and sale, however.
That's fine with Damrow, of 523 Spring Avenue.
He says he knows why his neighbors downstream
don't feel his pain.
"Sure, they're on deep water," he says.
Damrow has been trying to get the city to do some-
thing about the problem he views in his backyard for
eleven years.


Holmes Beach mayor

to meet with

community
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner will
hold his second Community Chat on Thursday,
June 19, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Island Branch
Library, Holmes Beach.
Citizens of Holmes Beach are welcome to at-
tend the informal question-and-answer program.
The mayor will also relay the real story behind the
city's two "bridges," and Joe Duennes, superinten-
dent of public works, will also be available for
questions.
Coffee and donuts will be served.


Head start on mangrove removal
Someone apparently couldn't wait for a proposed Anna Maria drainage pipeline project to begin and started
cutting mangroves illegally. The trees may be legally removed by state agencies if approved. Mayor Chuck
Shumard says they're coming out anyway, so it doesn't matter. Islander Photo: Anthony Seaton


"I used to be able to trim the other side of those
trees," he said, pointing to trees on the ditch's bank in
his backyard.
"Now I can't because of the erosion," he said.
He says the water that comes upstream from
Bimini Bay at high tide brings with it trash and odor,
as well as erosion.
According to the 1991 DEP permit denial, it also
brings vital saltwater for important sealife habitats and
the -mangroves.
Damrow doesn't care much for that function of the
tidal flow.
He complains that when the water stands in the
ditch behind his house before evaporating or leaching
into the ground, it also provides fertile mosquito hatch-
ing conditions.
"Contrary to what people think," he says, "brack-
ish water does allow mosquito breeding."
Of the plan to tear out mangroves for the pipe, he
says, "God bless 'em, I think it's just great. It's been a
long time coming."
Apparently concerned that a report on the project
might threaten it, he said, "Don't you [The Islander
Bystander] go throwing a monkey wrench into this
thing .... You be careful what you print."
Damrow's complaints are one of the main reasons
for the project, according to Shumard.
The mayor says the pipeline "will solve every-
thing."
Downstream, on the other side of Magnolia Av-
enue, Bruce Anderson says the only thing he wants is
removal of Brazilian pepper trees from his side of the
bank, which is part of the currently proposed plan.
In fact, mangroves are slated to be planted in place
of the pepper trees for required mitigation of the many
mature mangroves that would be eliminatedupstream.
"Anything that preserves the naturalness is great
with me," he said.
"Natural, my butt," says Ray Damrow, concerned
that Anderson's opposition might cause problems for
the project.
He should move over here if he wants natural, I'll
sell him my house."
We observed an apparent jump-start on the project
Monday, June 9, when it was discovered someone has
already cut down several 10 foot-plus mangroves be-
hind Ato's restaurant.
Asked about the mangrove destruction, Shumard said,
"It doesn't matter, they're all coming out anyway."
Although the trees and waterway abutting the Van
Cleve's property south of Magnolia won't be directly
affected, they want the city to "leave well enough
alone."
"They can't do that!" Van Cleve said, when told of
the pipeline plan.
He's concerned that the proposed flapper valve,
which would prevent tidal flow waters from coming back
up the pipe from Bimini Bay in his backyard, would


worsen flooding. "It will cover my yard!" he said.
"That's completely idiotic and ridiculous," says Ray
Damrow. "They haven't studied this the way I have."
The valve would in fact be on the Bimini Bay side
of Magnolia, even though the pipeline would stop a
half block north, at the end of the navigable waters, as
determined by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.
Public Works Director Phil Charnock says there
should be no increased flooding for those residents,
unless the entire bay rises to a level that would flood
them anyway.
"It's been an engineering nightmare," he said, of
the various attempts to allay neighborhood concerns
and alleviate flooding.
Harriet Carlson, of 524 Spring, says if the city
would just maintain the existing ditch as it used to,
there would be no problem.
"There was never any problem when they kept it
cleared out."
As to the plan for a pipeline, she says, "I'm betwixt
and between." On the one hand, "I have complained about
standing water," but she says she has "mixed emotions"
about tearing out the mangroves and installing a pipe.
She doesn't think it will alleviate flooding either.
"Let's face it, we live on an island and we're going to
get flooding," she says.
Mayor Shumard agrees about the flooding on the
Island, but says he's found a solution for years of com-
plaints dating back to before he was mayor.
"We're going ahead with the pipeline .... It's a
better deal, believe me," he said.
Shumard says the pipe will result in less mainte-
nance than the current ditch system.
But a study by Swiftmud concluded: "Pipe ... once
buried ... is typically within the zone of tidal fluctua-
tion [and] marine growth rapidly builds up, as does
sediment deposition, and tidal waters regularly impede
the pipe's discharge capability."
According to the study, maintenance is required at
frequent intervals in order to prevent a reduction in the
system's discharge capabilities. The advantage of open
channels over pipes is to infiltrate water into and drain
water from the soil, and to the ability to store larger
quantities of water at levels below the road levels.
Open channels can also be kept at higher levels
than pipes and are less restricted by tidal influence.
Maintenance is simplified when compared to a pipe
system, because of the open access.
Asked how the city could save money, taking into
consideration Swiftmud's findings, Shumard indicated
the county is responsible for pipe maintenance,
whereas the city is responsible for ditches. If the pipe-
line were to become clogged, Shumard thinks Mana-
tee County, not the city, would have to clear ;
But if not, "We'll just get a firehose and flush it
out," he said.
"We're going ahead with the pipe, and the people
will love it," Shumard said.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 N PAGE 5 EIj


N B
N


Paper: Mote snook carry
bacteria; Mote: 'nope'
By Bob Ardren
Islander Correspondent
The Palm Beach Post newspaper charged Tuesday
that Mote Marine Laboratory's release of fingerling
snook in Sarasota Bay last April included fish infected
with disease. Mote officials say there was miscommu-
nication on the subject and it had the fish tested the
week of the release by a state fish health specialist who
found no disease.
According to the Post, Steve Serfling, director of
aquaculture at Mote, noticed about two fish a day dy-
ing in early February and sent samples to the state's
tropical aquaculture lab in Ruskin where, on Feb. 28,
veterinarian Roy Yanong decided they were infected
with Mycobacterium.
Yanong told the Post he called Serfling and ad-
vised him to destroy his 9,000 fingerlings. Mycobac-
terium is a disease common in more than 100 species
of fish.
At the least, the snook should not be released out
of consideration for possible human health reasons,
Yanong reportedly told Serfling.
Serfling said Tuesday that bacteria possibly in-
volved are completely different species from those
identified in the Post article causing tuberculosis and
lebrosy. He told The Islander Bystander that such spe-
cies are not carried by fish or transmitted to humans.
Serfling replied to Yanong, according to the Post,
that he wanted a second opinion. He got that from
Mote's in-house fish disease expert, biologist John
Buck, who examined the fish and declared them health.
In a letter from Mote's Executive Director Kumar
Mahadevan to the Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, Mahadevan wrote that, "it must be noted
that the potential disease involved only a few fish out
of a total population of 8,000 to 9,000 snook. After
those few sick fish were removed from Mote Aquac-
ulture in February, the facility has not had mortalities
and the remaining fish have thrived."
It is still not clear exactly what species of Myco-


bacterium were found in the sample of Mote snook.
The fish are being tested at Iowa State University and
results are due later this month.
The Post quoted Scott Willis of the Florida Marine
Research Institute in St. Petersburg as saying, "We
think it's a stretch to alarm the public and be concerned
about it. But if we had known about it [the Mycobac-
terium] we wouldn't have allowed this release to oc-
cur."
The DEP says cooking will kill the bacterium as
will human disgestive acids, but that it's possible that
open wounds could develop infections during handling
of the fish.
"The fish we stocked were completely free of any
disease and completely healthy," Serfling said.

Manners class to be held
for children
A fun class in manners for children will be held
Saturday, June 14, at A Real Bookstore, 5700 Mana-
tee Ave. W., Bradenton, beginning at 10:30 a.m.
This venture into the special world of manners and
courtesy will be conducted by Samantha Henney, a health
minister with a background in manners for children.
The class is free and open to all children in first
through third grades. Reservations are recommended
and can be made by call 795-2665.

Longboat Chamber to hold
monthly 'Nooner'
The Longboat Chamber of Comemrce will hold its
monthly "Nooner" on Wednesday, June 18, from noon
until 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Longboat Key, 4949
Gulf of Mexico Drive.
Lunch will be served.
For cost, reservations and information, call the
Chamber office at 387-9519.

Norwood named historical
society administrator
Carolyne Norwood has been named administrator
of the Anna Maria Island Historical Society, a non-


profit organization formed seven years ago.
Norwood's duties include coordinating society
events and projects, overseeing activities and volun-
teers at the historical museum and exploring grant pos-
sibilities.
The society was organized to collect, preserve, re-
search and exhibit artifacts dealing with the history of
Anna Maria Island and promote interest in historically
related projects.
Norwood announced that the society has donated
$500 to help purchase Riverview Pointe and $100 to
the Cortez Village Historical Society to help purchase
the old Cortez schoolhouse.
Art League on summer
schedule
The Anna Maria Island Art League has new hours
for the summer through Aug. 31.
The league will be open Tuesday through Friday
from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
The league is located at 5314 Holmes Blvd.,
Holmes Beach.
For more information, call 778-2099.

Booth space available for
Island Heritage Days
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island is now
accepting reservations for booth space for its 8th annual
Heritage Days Arts and Crafts Festival to be held Sat-
urday and Sunday, Nov. 8 and 9, at the Holmes Beach
City Hall Field.
To reserve a space or for more information, call
Lois Leitz at 794-8671.

Herbs and spices theme of
Island chef's seminar
Island resident Joe Evans, chef at Euphemia Haye
restaurant, will present, "Fresh Regional Foods With
Homegrown Herbs and Spices," as the theme of his
cooking seminar on Monday, June 16, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Tip of the Island restaurant in Anna Maria City.
For reservations, cost and information, call 778-4431.


. AlLB ..R.Al I: H7 \D ,O-)DRK;MS







jI PAGE 6 N JUNE 11, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

9 I y9


Pitting

department heads
is pity
"Seeing a man about a horse" has new meaning
in Bradenton Beach, where a 20-year-old four-
wheel-drive Ford Bronco is the focus of a series of
nasty memos.
At issue is what appears to be a long-standing
policy whereby police commandeer any city vehicles
they need in an emergency such as during a hur-
ricane or flooding.
Building Official Bill Sanders has one of the
city's few high-profile (higher than average ground
clearance) vehicles. When he heard that the police
may snag his Bronco during a storm, he started writ-
ing memos outlining what needed to be done during
an emergency if he didn't have access to a city ve-
hicle for his legally mandated duties.
Police Chief Jack Maloney fired back a memo of
his own. In it, he said, "If Mr. Sanders would stop
wasting time with snide memos, and instead talk and
cooperate, a lot more would be accomplished. He
might even know something about our emergency
plan and proper police procedure in emergencies."
Then city commissioners and the mayor got in-
volved. Things then got especially strange when
Sanders fired off another memo to the chief, charg-
ing the chief with a learning disability that of not
understanding the English language.
Sanders elevated the rift a step further. "In the
past," Sanders wrote, "I thought it was because you
were a meddling egotistical dunce with an inflated
opinion of his worth in the world. Now I know it's
all because of your disability, so I sincerely apolo-
gize for thinking you were a meddling egotistical
dunce."
Whoa. That's strong stuff.
Not that we expect all department heads will get
along with each other. There have been some great
differences in opinion between officials for Island
cities over the years. But what makes the Sanders-
Maloney dispute so alarming is that they've made
their accusations and grievances public by putting it
on paper.
Of course, with Florida's open records laws, the
dispute is available for all to see. It's all public
record.
One thing is clear from perusing the "he said, he
said" documents the tug of war over an old truck
is an excitable issue in Bradenton Beach.
The temperature is heating up on the south end
of the Island early and it's not officially summer yet.


ISLANDER Ra&ai1
JUNE 11, 1997 VOLUME 5, NUMBER 30
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
Anthony Seaton
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Kevin P. Cassidy
Doug Dowling
David Futch
Capt. Mike Heistand
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Jahice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster




Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1997 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@mead.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK 'The great Bradenton Beach roundup.' By Egan


I YOUR PINI


Contempt cited
I would like to commend Commissioners Ron
Robinson, Don Maloney and Pat Geyer for wanting to
honor the wishes of the donors of the city hall property
in Holmes Beach.
I would also like to state my complete contempt
and embarrassment in the disrespect and lack of pro-
fessionalism shown by Luke Courtney and Carol
Whitmore with regard statements made by them in last
week's Islander Bystander.
The land was a generous donation made long be-
fore these two commission members were elected in
office. With the greed shown by these two members, I
can't imagine anyone being as generous in the future.
I feel a public apology is in order.
I would also like to thank Mayor Bob VanWagoner
for all his dedication and hard work in preserving the
tranquillity of our Island.
Jeannie Bystrom, Holmes Beach
* Editor's note: Bystrom is the daughter of Hugh
Holmes Sr., a direct decendant of John Holmes Sr., one
of the original donors of city hall property.

Where have you been?
This letter is in response to the letter from Rose
Patterson in which she responded to the letter written
by Hugh Holmes concerning the Babe Ruth Field.
Ms. Patterson is obviously filled with a lot of emo-
tion regarding the construction of the baseball field. We
need strong people in our community to take a stand on
issues involving our city. What we don't need however,
are hot heads who fail to get their facts straight before
publicly ridiculing citizens of our community.
It seemed easy for Ms. Patterson to bash a very
gentle and caring man. In her letter she made him out
to be very uncaring towards our Island youth. She ob-
viously doesn't know Mr. Holmes, my father.
Therefore, I would like to shed a light on who he
really is. Mr. Holmes was born and raised on Anna
Maria Island and is the father of six grown children, of
which four, including myself, are Island residents. He
has 19 school-age grandchildren of which 13 live on
the Island and have been involved in Island sports.
His letter concerning the Babe Ruth field merely


points out his concerns with the Island losing the con-
trol of the field and the potential traffic and noise the
larger field would impose on the nearby residents.
These concerns do not show him to be uncaring to
our youth. They merely show that he cares for the
neighboring Island residents who have put their life
savings into their homes and to the impact that this may
have on these people.
Ms. Patterson asks ... 'Where have you been Mr.
Holmes?'
He's been here all his life. Where have you been
Ms. Patterson?
Judy Titsworth, Holmes Beach

Privateers float a loss
I stopped going to the art festival when it was de-
cided that the Anna Maria Island Privateers' float de-
stroyed the ambiance of the festival.
That's what I went for the destroyed ambiance
and their smoked mullet.
And...
The Privateers group had a boat,
It often paraded as a float.
Some effete intellectuals,
Said it made our ambiance ineffective,
So our Island lost a tradition note!
Rosemary Carter, Holmes Beach


School PTO says thanks
The Anna Maria Elementary School PTO would like
to thank the numerous merchants, friends and families
who have helped our many endeavors over the past year.
As usual, our local businesses have been most gener-
ous in donating prizes for our many fundraisers. The
Holmes Beach City Commission has helped make pos-
sible a new baseball diamond, local artist Julie Stewart
designed a fantastic new peacock to adorn our school
shirts, and friends and families gave generously of their
time and money to contribute to the many activities.
Together, this community enhances the wonderful
teachers and staff of our school to provide the best edu-
cation possible for our children.
Paula Bryant, secretary, Anna Maria Elementary
Parent/Teachers Organization


I










TtOSE WERE THE DAYS
Part 2, The Saga of Anna Maria City
by June Alder


The meetings that led to the founding of the City of Anna Maria in 1923 were
held in this bath house located approximately where the Sandbar Restaurant
now stands. The postcard photo was taken in 1926 of a meeting of the local State
of Maine Club.

FLORIDA IS GROWING WITH

WONDERFUL RAPIDITY


Letter to the Evening Herald,
March 31, 1923-
After making my winter home for
four or five months a year for the last 10
or 12 years in Florida, and very care-
fully studying every part of the state and
every phase of industry, I am convinced
that this is to be one of the richest states
in the Union.
Indicative of the tendency of outside
people to spend their winters in Florida,
I am just in receipt of a letter from Mr.
J. D. Rahner, General Passenger Agent
of the Florida East Coast Railway, stat-
ing that since January 1st his road
handled 600,000 passengers. So great
has been the travel to the state this year
that reservations out of Florida have to
be made sometimes two or three months
in advance if one wants a drawingroom
or a compartment. Similar conditions
have existed on other roads bringing
passengers to Florida.
This business is bound to increase
very rapidly. We have only seen the be-
ginning of it.
I have on my desk at the moment a
clipping from the Wall Street Journal
stating, for instance, that twelve hotels
are to be built at Miami Beach this sum-
mer. But what is going on at Miami and
Miami Beach-for they are both grow-
ing with wonderful rapidity-is merely
typical of what is going on all over
Florida, with the exception, perhaps, of
afew towns here and there which have
not yet struck their stride.
Richard H. Edmonds, Editor
Manufacturers Record, NYC

* Their faces ruddy with the last rays
of the setting sun fanning out above the
Gulf, they hurried up the beach from.
where they had hitched their horse and
wagon, a tall red-headed man carrying
a lantern in his hand and a short, plump
woman with a shawl pulled tightly
around her shoulders.
On this chilly winter night, Febru-
ary 27, 1923, they had come to Anna
Maria Beach from their place two-and-
a-half miles down the island for the sec-
ond meeting of the incorporation com-
mittee. It was being held at the bathing
pavilion not because a large crowd was
expected, but simply because it was the


only structure around with electric
lights (powered by a generator, of
course, since power lines had yet to
reach the Island).
No one was more highly respected
on the Island than Sam and Annie Cobb.
Both now in their 50's, they had arrived
in 1895 to farm 165 fertile acres at the
heart of Anna Maria Island where there
was a small natural harbor on the
Bayside. Sam was a boat-builder by
trade, and after his homestead was
"proved up" in 1903, he established a
boat yard-the Island's first business.
By 1923 his son Louis and other rela-
tives were involved in the successful
operation, but Sam was aware that oth-
erwise, the Island was not on the move
economically.
Cobb's opinion carried a great deal
of weight in the discussion that evening.
The proposal for banding together with
his neighbors up at the point made sense
to him, and he said so. That was all the
encouragement the Anna Maria contin-
gent needed.
Cobb got the honor of making the
motion officially authorizing local at-
torney and state representative Wallace
Tirvin to apply to the legislature for a
charter that would create for a munici-
pality "to be known as the Town of
Anna Maria." The new town would not
only consist of the down-on-its-luck
resort with a dock and a few cottages,
but encompass approximately two-
thirds of the Island's real estate.
"The founders" must have left the
pavilion feeling well satisfied with them-
selves. A prosperous and growing Anna
Maria was surely in the making. Sam
Cobb, for one, was already thinking of
subdividing some of his acres of empty
farmland for residential development.
But pitfalls lay ahead. Not everyone
wanted to emulate Miami Beach, grow-
ing with such wonderful rapidity.


Next Week:
Whoa, Nellie,
some folks
said.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 11, 1997 N PAGE 7 Il


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PiJ3 PAGE I I JUNE 11, 1997 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Trader Jack one of the Island's favorite characters


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
As Islanders mourned the death of Gwynne
"Trader Jack" Pearsall last week, they also took com-
fort in happy memories memories of an era when
Trader Jack's restaurant and lounge in Bradenton
Beach was one of the most popular spots on the west
coast of Florida.
It was the kind of place where millionaires sat next to
laborers in the Wheelhouse Lounge, savoring their bev-
erages and swapping stories. It was a place where couples
dined and danced the night away to the soothing sounds
of Rudy Rosa or the rockin' rhythm of the Royal Shaft.
"He drew people here and made Bradenton Beach
happen," said Scott Moore, a local backwater fishing
guide who worked at the restaurant for 14 years.
"People came from Tampa and stayed all night in the
motels so they could dine and dance at Trader Jack's."
"Trader Jack" Pearsall was one of the Island's fa-
vorite characters a tall, bearded man with a hearty
laugh who did everything with a flair. He was also a
shrewd businessman who created a unique atmosphere
where locals could feel comfortable and tourists could
talk about back home.
"Trader Jack was ahead of his time," Moore said.
"He was creative and innovative and was one of the
most successful restaurant owners in the state."
Pearsall, who in his lifetime owned 27 restaurants,
was lured here by another of the Island's famous res-
taurateurs, Pete Reynard.
"We met Jack and his wife, Pauline, at a restaurant
association meeting in Chicago," recalled Pete's
widow, Eleanor Reynard Tatatkis. "Jack had a restau-
rant in Pompano Beach and Pete told him, 'There's al-
ways room for two good restaurants on the Island. I'd
rather have you than someone else.' Jack and Pauline
came here by boat with all their children and loved it."
Pearsall purchased the Mira Mar in Bradenton
Beach in 1968 and renamed it Trader Jack's. He re-
modeled the restaurant and added personal touches
such as an agatized coral wishing well, fossils of sea
creatures, ships in bottles and other nautical decora-
tions. An old fashioned diving suit stood guard inside


the door to the lounge.
He closed-in the famous outdoor Monkey Bar to
create the Wheelhouse Lounge. One of the lounge's
conversation pieces was a large sign over the bar that
claimed, "Where everyone knows what everyone else
is doing but still reads the local newspaper to find out
if they got caught at it!"
Next he initiated a series of events that customers
and locals looked forward to each year. The Halloween
party with cash prizes generated some of the most
unique and elaborate costumes the Island has ever seen.
The St. Patrick's Day parties also drew hundreds of
customers, and the restaurant's Christmas decorations
were legendary.
However, one of his most innovative ideas was
hosting annual shows using his employees as entertain-
ers. One was a circus in October in which employees
performed circus acts. Another was a Christmas in July
party which featured an abbreviated version of a Broad-
way show such as Cabaret or Showboat.
Pearsall was the first to offer early bird specials on
the Island, Moore said. Diners could come in before the
prime dinner hour, usually between 4 and 6 p.m., and
get selected meals at reduced prices.
"His dining room policy was to offer good food at
reasonable prices," Moore said. "If he had a happy
hour, he always wanted to offer a nice buffet with it.
During season, people lined up down the street to get
in. He was good competition for the other restaurants,
because if you have good restaurants, you'll draw
people to the area."
Another of Pearsall's strengths was his employees,
Moore said. Many stayed for years showing their loy-
alty. For others it was an interim job and they moved
on to become successful as journalists, publishers, busi-
ness owners, real estate brokers, scientists and school
teachers.
"Trader Jack expected a lot from his employees but
he was very fair and took care of us with incentives
such as Christmas bonuses," Moore explained. "It was
like a big family. Employees liked each other and were
happy working there. It was good for the business be-
cause the customers could see that."


Pearsall was also active
in the community as a mem-
ber of many local organiza-
tions.
"He was always willing
to give to the community,
and he was always there for
the people of the Island,"
Moore pointed out. "For
example, every year he gave
chickens for the fire Trader Jack
department's barbecue and
hot dogs for the Privateers' picnic for kids."
Pearsall began dreaming of building his own res-
taurant showplace and in 1977 he sold Trader Jack's to
Phil Fayette, a grocery wholesaler from Vermont.
Pearsall moved north of the Bay and built the Santa
Madeira, a 175-foot ship-shaped restaurant with docks
for 50 boats, in Madeira Beach. He operated the Santa
Madeira until retiring to Venice in 1993.
Trader Jack's enjoyed a few more glory years but
began to decline as Fayette spent more and more time
battling federal tax charges. The restaurant closed in
1985 after he was convicted of income tax evasion and
sentenced to prison.
But the final blows to the once-popular restaurant
were yet to come. In September of 1985, Hurricane
Elena flooded the Island and sent waves. crashing
through the Wheelhouse Lounge and dining room, fol-
lowed by looters who stripped away some of the fa-
mous decorations.
In June of 1986 the property landed on the auction
block at the county courthouse in a foreclosure sale and
was purchased by the state of Vermont for $850,000.
A year later, on June 16, 1987, an arsonist turned
Trader Jack's into a raging inferno in the middle of the
night. Only ashes, burnt timbers and a shell of the
building remained. The fire department ordered it de-
molished immediately for safety reasons. The case was
never solved.
Several years later, the property was purchased by
George and Wendy Kokolis of Williamsburg, Virginia.
PLEASE SEE TRADER JACK, NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER- JUNE 1 1.997 B PAGE.9 EB


E9: t T f


Gertrude Koch
Gertrude Koch, 95, an Anna Maria Island resident
for 29 years, died June 8 in Columbia Blake Medical
Center, Bradenton.
She was born Sept. 2, 1901, in Plauen, Germany,
and came to the U.S. in 1926. She was married to the
late Ottfried Koch Dec. 3, 1932, in Union City, N.J.,
and for many years they lived in New Jersey and in
Beaverton, Ore. She was a seamstress and embroiderer
for many years.
She is survived by a daughter, Siegrid, two grand-
children; two great-granddaughters; sister Kathe and
other relatives in Germany.
Family and friends will gather at 3 p.m., Friday,
June 13, a her longtime residence, 302 Spring Ave.,
Anna Maria City.
Memorial donations may be made to Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, FL
34238. Direct Mortuary Suncoast Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.

Gwynne
'Trader Jack' Pearsall
Gwynne "Trader Jack" Pearsall, 81, of Venice and
formerly of Bradenton died June 2 in Venice.
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Pearsall came to
Manatee County from there and moved to Venice in
1993. He owned and operated Trader Jack's in


TRADER JACK, FROM PAGE 8
The Kokolises had hopes of rebuilding Trader Jack's
and a new restaurant, to be built across the street from
the original location, was designed by local architect
Charles Ugarte.
In the early 1990s, they asked the Bradenton Beach
City Council to sponsor a Community Development
Block Grant in the amount of $460,000 to help finance
the construction of the restaurant. The council declined.
The Gulffront property is now a concrete slab sur-
rounded by a chain link fence adjacent to the Gulf
-Drive Cafe.


Bradenton Beach and later Santa Madeira Restaurant
in Madeira Beach. He was a sergeant in the U.S.
Army during World War II. He was a member of
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8118 in Venice,
American Legion Post 159 in Venice, Free & Ac-
cepted Masons Fort Myers Lodge, and Araba Shrine
Club in Fort Myers.
He is survived by his wife, Pauline; three daugh-
ters, Kim Smith of Burlington, Iowa, Pam McDowell
of Bradenton, and Linda Cook of Sarasota; three sons,
Gwynne Jr. of Burnt Hills, N.Y., Dennis Hamel of
Manchester, N.H., and J.P. Hamel of Ellenton; and 11
grandchildren.
No services were held. Farley Funeral Home and
Crematory, Venice Chapel, was in charge of the ar-
rangements. Memorial contributions may be made to
American Liver Foundation, 1425 Pompton Ave., Ce-
dar Grove, N.J. 07009.

Charles Robert Robinson
Charles Robert Robinson, 73, of Bradenton died
June 7 in Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Born in Kentucky, Mr. Robinson came to Manatee
County from Cincinnati in 1946. He was an electrician.
He was a Protestant. He was a U. S. Army Air Corps
veteran of World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Bette; two daughters,


Becky Boston of Holmes Beach and Lynne of
Bradenton; a son, Lee of St. Petersburg; two broth-
ers, Kenneth of Las Vegas and Harold of Cincinnati;
five grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.
Visitation was held at Brown and Sons Funeral
Home in Bradenton. No service will be held.


James Wheeler
James Wheeler, 75, of Windsor Locks, Conn., and
Anna Maria died June 6 in Columbia Blake Medical
Center.
Born in Hartford, Conn., Mr. Wheeler came to
Manatee County from Windsor Locks each winter
since 1984. He was a health and beauty aids sales-
man for Gear Bros., South Windsor, Conn. He was
a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars No. 6123 and
was a volunteer fireman, both in Windsor Locks. He
served in the U.S. Navy during World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Loretta; a daughter,
Mary Ann Akil of Windsor Locks; two sons, Tom of
Windsor Locks and Richard of Feeding Hills, Mass.;
two sisters, Eleanor Mather and June Root, both of
Windsor Locks; and four grandchildren.
Services and burial were held in Windsor Locks.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, was in
charge of the arrangements.


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I want to tell you, Dad, words I never said before,
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And now that I have a family, many things are coming to light,
And I am sorry that when your restricted me, I always put up a fight,
How you wanted to know my friends, and when I would be home.
And I couldn't do like other kids, and wander.off alone.
But I see now, Dad, why you saw to it all those things were done,
And I'm glad you were my Father, and I am proud to be your son.
Bud Atteridge


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lB PAGE 10 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


School choice comes to


Manatee County


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Some day soon the age-old question, "What shall
I wear to school?" will be replaced by the question,
"Where shall I go to school?"
School choice is coming to Manatee County.
School choice, also known as controlled open enroll-
ment, gives parents the opportunity to choose the
school most appropriate for their children.
That choice may be voluntary or not.
The Manatee County School Board is developing
plans for both. The board will first offer a voluntary
choice of schools grouped within zones. If that does not
fulfill the board's requirements, it will implement a con-
trolled choice plan that includes an application process
and a lottery procedure for student assignment.
Offering school choice is actually not a choice for
the school board. Last year the state legislature man-
dated that each school district in the state must develop
a school choice plan by June 30.
According to the legislation, "The legislature rec-
ognizes that parental involvement is critical to a
child's success in education. Further, the legislature
recognizes the value of an educational system that
provides numerous and meaningful options for stu-
dents."
The legislation states that giving parents the op-
portunity to choose their children's schools will cul-
tivate creative competition, serve as an impetus for
academic improvement and foster greater accountabil-
ity within the school system.
Faced with this mandate, in January the school
board established a School Choice Committee made
up of parents representing each of the county's
schools, community members and educators. The
committee met in over 400 hours of meetings to de-
velop the core of a plan for the district.
In addition, the committee's facilitator, Mike
McCann, met with parents in a series of meeting held
throughout the district to get their input and respond
to questions and concerns. This input was taken back
to the committee to aid in its task.

Committee presents
plan to board
The committee presented its plan at the April 21
school board meeting.
Achieving equity in the district's schools is one of
the key components of the plan, committee member
Helen Birakis explained to the board.
System equity is defined as a condition in the edu-
cation system in which each school is provided with
the resources necessary to assist all learners in achiev-
ing excellence.
Human equity is defined as a condition in every
school that offers equal opportunity and appropriate
individualized support to each staff member and
learner in the educational process.
"The overwhelming consensus of the school
choice committee is that before we can proceed to
implement choice, the Equity Committee must com-
plete and present within the next six months a defini-
tion of equity, list of identified inequities, priorities to
correct inequities and recommendations of remedies,"
Birakis said.
Inequities include the physical structure of the school
buildings, the number of portables at each school, pro-
gram funding, availability of technology and so on.
"Without equal educational opportunity first,
some schools will be doomed to failure," she noted,
"They will be sitting ducks set up to be under-chosen."
Committee member Berneice Scott added, "Cor-
rect the inequities which currently exist and you will
have no reason to be concerned about choice. We have
to provide a quality education for every child in this
county and we can do it without undue cost."
Tracey Bailey, representing the Florida Department
of Education, told board members, "The state is not here
to tell you what your plan should look like. The legisla-
tion says you design the plan but you must take into con-
sideration a list of priorities developed by the legislature.
You have all the flexibility in the world."
Bailey also said the board needs to add more de-
tail to the plan and that it could take credit for exist-
ing magnet, alternative and charter schools and special


programs such as advanced placement and drop-out
prevention.
"We talking about polishing a car that has no engine,"
committee member Rev. James T. Golden pointed out.
"The four charter schools do not address the need of 99
percent of the children in this school system. The public
wants the all of the public schools to be better. Every child
in this county ought to have quality education."

Board outlines choice plan
procedure
At the next school board meeting on the plan, Su-
perintendent Gene Denisar outlined the board's next
steps:
The board will use the committee's plan as a
foundation adding the state's nine required elements
such as the application process, lottery procedures and
transportation process.
The plan will be forwarded to the state DOE for
review and suggestions.
The School Choice Committee, the board and its
staff will analyze the state's suggestions and make any
changes to the plan.
The board and staff will develop a detailed choice
implementation plan.
Assistant Superintendent Sally Shuford said the
process includes developing an overview of current
choice options available in the district, reviewing
present student re-assignment procedures, expanding
the choice options and designing a phased open enroll-
ment plan.

Revised plan presented
The school board staff's revised draft of the
committee's choice plan was slated to be approved at
last week's board meeting. However, the board voted
to table the plan until its June 16 meeting to give its
staff, the committee and the public more time to review
it.
School choice committee members pointed out that
the board's draft had watered down their emphasis on
achieving equity. Later in the evening, the board voted
to confirm its charge to the district's Equity Commit-
tee, basically the same points outlined by Birakis at the
April 21 board meeting.
Later in the week, the board's staff presented a re-
vised plan with the equity emphasis restored.
The plan addresses three aspects of choice: current
choice options, expansion of choice options and a
three-phased open enrollment procedure.
Phase I(1997-98) includes the charge to the Equity
Committee as well as a revision of the board's current
student re-assignment policy. Proposed considerations
are availability of space and transportation, accommo-
dation of siblings, racial balance, prevention of athletic
recruitment and provision for unusual conditions out-
lined in the current policy.
In Phase II (1998-99) the district will develop and
implement an Inequity Remedy Plan, develop racially
balanced regional zones for elementary and middle
schools and develop a voluntary open enrollment plan
for high schools.
In the zone concept for elementary and middle
schools, students would be assigned to a zone and pro-
vided choice within the zone and transportation. They
could transfer outside the zone but transportation
would not be provided. The voluntary high school plan
does not include transportation.
During Phase 1I (1999-2000) the district will con-
tinue to correct inequities and consider two options de-
pending on available options, equity status and desegre-
gation status. Option I is to continue with Phase I and
Option II is to develop a controlled open enrollment plan.
Copies of the plan are available at the school
board's administrative offices, 215 Manatee Avenue
W., Bradenton.
The week before the meeting, the state legislature,
which had promised state funding to help districts
implement their plans, reduced the funding to $3 mil-
lion. They reasoned that only a few districts were in a
position to implement their plans.
For the same reason, Gov. Lawton Chiles vetoed
the funding. DOE officials plan to lobby for funding in
1998, when more districts will be ready to put their
plans into action.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 PAGE 11 i3I


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Rotten Ralph has come out of the shower.
"Not the closet," says Ralph Russell, "the shower.
I've been a shower baritone all my life and now I've
turned 65 and don't give a hoot what people think, so
I sing in public."
His permanent showers have spanned two coun-
tries, his current one being in Anna Maria City. Here
he owns the restaurant he founded, Rotten Ralph's, and
lives nearby.
He sings in both places. Sang on Longboat Key,
too, for a few years, in the restaurant he owned there,
the Hunt Club.
It was there that he met Duane Dee, himself a
musician and vocalist of note. Russell had Dee as his
featured entertainer for a long time, and they became
friends and then collaborators on two records.
Those records are out now, the tapes for sale at
Rotten Ralph's and finding buyers every day.
Russell was born into a musical family in Canada.
His father, he recalls, played saxophone and clarinet
with big bands, and his brother played bass with simi-
lar biggies, but later. Their younger brother played the
vibes and sang and ended up as a stand-up comic on
cruise ships.
Ralph kept his amateur status, mostly, he says,
because "I was too busy making a living to get into
music."
He had successful restaurants in the Toronto area
until selling nine years ago and moving with wife
Doreen and three sons to Anna Maria Island, where he
had vacationed for 30 years. Started the restaurant that
he named with his Lions Club nickname, Rotten Ralph.



Chamber seminar
changes location of
business seminar
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce seminar on "Retirement Plans & Investing
for Small Business" with Christine Graham, man-
ager of First Union Bank, has changed location to
the chamber office at 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, at 9 a.m. on Thursday, June 12.
Refreshments will be served.
Members are guests are invited to attend.


Fine tuning
Deborah Keller-McCartney adjusts her hand-
thrown pottery exhibit and sale at the Island
Branch Library for the month of June in Holmes
Beach. The library is located at 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.


And took a lot of
showers, apparently, sing-
ing through them all.
He sang with his enter- ,
trainers, and Duane Dee
talked him into going on
record. Russell respected
his judgment, for Dee's
"Before the Next Teardrop 1
Falls" was in the Top 10 in a
1967 and he had two or Rotten Ralph
three others in the Top 20
along the way.
Now Dee has his own fairly elaborate recording
studio, Dee's Barn, in the solitude of Manatee County
east of Interstate 75. There he recorded at least two
records' worth of Rotten Ralph and expertly wove in
big band-type accompaniment.
Maybe Russell should have come out of the
shower earlier, for his is a most pleasing presentation.
,His baritone is rich and strong and better schooled
than one has a right to expect, given the background.
It may come off especially well because of canny
selections, great gentle oldies such as "Autumn
Leaves," "All the Way," "Strangers in the Night,"
"Pretend" and "More" er, that is, more. Many
more, all enjoyable, all giving the listener a kind of
satisfying relief that Russell is downright good, after
all, doesn't once let himself down.
The tapes are available for $10 each or both for
$18 at Rotten Ralph's Waterfront, 902 Bay Blvd. S.
in Anna Maria City, and the new Rotten Ralph's
Eastside in the Braden River Mall on Manatee Av-
enue near 1-75.

Johnson, Welder marry
Michelle Lynn Johnson and Kirk Weider, both of
Gainesville, Fla., were married May 17 at the Jungle
Gardens in Sarasota.
The bride is the daughter of Gene and Terry
Johnson of Holmes Beach. The groom is the son of
Gary and Joan Weider of Holmes Beach.
The bride is a 1994 graduate of Manatee High
School and an undergraduate anthropology student at
University of Florida. The groom is a 1992 graduate
of Manatee High School and a recent graduate of
University of Florida majoring in history.
The maid of honor was Jill Brownson of Jackson-
ville. Best man was Joseph Weider, brother of the
groom, from Gainesville.
The reception was held at the China Palace in
Bradenton. The couple honeymooned in France and
will reside in Gainesville.

MCC exhibit to feature
emerging artists
Works by visual and performing artists and a lo-
cal film maker well be featured in an "Emerging Art-
ists Out of the Darkness/Into the Light" exhibit
from Friday, June 13, through July 30 in the Fine Art
Gallery on the Manatee Community College
Bradenton Campus, 5840 26th St. W.
An opening reception for the artists will be held
Friday, June 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Fine Art.Gal-
lery. Refreshments will be served and the reception
and exhibit are free and open to the public.
Regular gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday. For more information, call
755-1511, ext. 4251.

'Beyond Therapy' opens at
Theatre Works
Christopher Durang's contemporary comedy
"Beyond Therapy" will play at Theatre Works, 1247
First St., Sarasota, from Wednesday, June 11, through
July 5, beginning at 8 p.m.
Contemporary dating patterns and adult situa-
tions are the center of Durang's play which enjoyed
an Off-Broadway run. Time Magazine summed up
the style of the show: "Screwball and scatty, with as
much owed to the Marx Brothers as to the Viennese
brethren. 'Beyond Therapy' offers the best therapy of
all guaranteed laughter."
Ticket information is available by calling 952-9170.


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KIB PAGE 12 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
~riL~~:-


Map makers challenge
The fifth-grade students in Anne Kinnan's class
accepted the challenge of designing their own
country and a map to get around. Working in teams,
the students had to include 15 elements such as
mountains and lakes in their map and complete the
process with a Compass Rose, key and scale. From
left, B.J. Keim, Shauna Steger and Trisha McKee can
now help travelers get around Sportsland, Disney
Land, and Looney Tooney Land. Islander Photo: Joy
Courtney


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Red Beard returns
Anna Maria Privateers Red Beard came ashore at
Anna Maria Elementary to speak to kindergarten
and first-grade students about privateers, pirates
and buccaneers. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


In memory of
Christian Schnoor, kneeling left, works with, clock-
wise, Cindi Harrison, school counselor; her father,
Jay; and Jim Kronus, principal ofAnna Maria
Elementary, to plant a tree in memory of her de-
ceased mother, Diana. In keeping with Diana's
favorite color, a Golden Dew Drop tree and border
plants with blue blooms were chosen. Christian's
fourth-grade classmates were present to read letters
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 PAGE 13 II


Granddads plant
for the future
Grandfathers involved in the Kiwanis Club's Adopt-
a-Grandparent program at Anna Maria Elementary
worked with their adopted grandchildren to spruce
up the area around the wishing well on campus
using native plants. Keep Manatee Beautiful donated
seeds and True Value Hardware, Holmes Beach,
donated cement borders. Islander Photo:
Joy Courtney


Songs of the Earth Island twirlers place second
"Every Day is Earth Day," sang the second-grade students in Deborah Thomas's Anna Maria Island twirlers, who are members of the Island's Manatee Mystique,
and Angelica Mannino 's classes to celebrate the 27th anniversary of Earth Day. brought home a second-place trophy from the state Drum Majorette Association
Through music and song, many ideas were shared to save our planet recy- state competition held in St. Petersburg. They are now eligible to compete in the
cling, driving less and protecting our planet's remaining rain forest and coral national contest to be held in North Carolina in July. Islander Photo: Courtesy
reefs. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney of Deborah Parmenter


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Sunday School 9 am
Confirmation Class 9 am
Seaside Service Sat. 7 pm
at Spring Ave. at the Gulf :
Transportation & Nursery Available -
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RI PAGE 14 A JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


NOT from the grapevine
Back Bay Steakhouse set off the Island grapevine
this week, with rumors reaching a feverish pitch fol-
lowing the posting of a notice on its Gulf Drive sign:
Closed for vacation until June 27.
Not so.
Back Bay is toast. Done. Gone. Gone the way of
its predecessors at the same location: Pete Reynard's,
Shucker's and Crabby Bills.
According to property owner, landlord Bill Zalla,
Back Bay Steakhouse is closed for good with more
than $48,000 in rents and taxes past due and evictions
and other legal proceedings under way.
Unfortunately, at least a few functions were scheduled
and paid for in advance. Employees who were told the
restaurant would be closed for one week are out of work.
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce re-
ported it received no cancellation notice for a planned
seminar on Thursday, June 12, which by the way has been
moved to the chamber office at 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.
Likewise for another bank function planned by
SunTrust later this month.
The restaurant has an advertisement in this week's
paper for Chef Leon's breakfast, a leased "enterprise."
Chef Leon is "locked out" of his arrangements with
Back Bay.


Welcome...
the newest additions
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physician's staff.


The 1600 Gang
Andre Renard and wife Carol Whitmore (aka Holmes Beach commissioner), right front, generously outbid
others at the Anna Maria Island Community Center March auction to the tune of $1,600 for a "Champagne
and Sunset" trolley tour. The trolley time was donated by the Anna Maria Trolley and driver Mike Kelly
graciously donated his time as well. The tour package was created by The Islander Bystander, including a
case of champagne for the Renard/Whitmore guests. The group traveled to Siesta Key with a stopover in
downtown Sarasota for "club hopping." Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Zalla said Back Bay owner Bob Gagne packed up the
food inventory and computers and vacated the property
but still operates a Back Bay in a Days Inn in Venice.
Only the Anna Maria Boat Club remains in opera-


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You can save a lot for the

City of Anna Maria

Starting Monday, July 7
RECYCLE
EVERY WEEK


Every Monday will be your recycling pickup day.
Your blue bin will be delivered the week of June 30.
It's easy to do. Put plastics, glass and cans in your blue bin.
* What to save for recycling *
Glass and Cans
Plastics all glass bottles
-plastic bottles and jars
Papers Pointers on aluminum and tin cans
* newspapers a plastic (food and beverage only)
Pointers Please ... Pointers on
on paper / empty all containers glass and cans
Please ... discard bottle tops Please ...
* put newspapers in (tops are tough to recycle) rinse first to help
brown paper bag or 'step on it' to save space: keep things clean I,
bundle and set crush big plastic bottles discard tops of
on top of bin if possible bottles and jars i J '
Every week on your recycling day, YARD WASTE:
please set your bin at the curb. Same Way, Separate Day
"Rain check:" If it's raining hard, For leaves, grass, and tree trimmings
consider saving your papers Please ...
until the next collection day. put them in separate bags or bundles & tie
set them out only on your yard waste day
Thank Tied bundles may be up to 4 feet long and
y u I 0 24 inches in diameter. Bundles and bags
yOU may weigh up to 40 Ibs. each.


Not sure if it's a "yes?"
We know you'll be a great recycler if you
follow these simple guidelines. Chances are,
though, you'll have a few questions when you
start. Just give us a call. We'll be glad to help.


Waste Management
of Manatee County
753-7591


GOOD EAR'


I


I




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JUNE 11, 1997 E PAGE 15 IE



$8,000 Cash Inshore!



$8,000 Cash Offshore!

Announcing Island Discount Tackle's FhingW theIsland bArnamen,
Sat, June 14. A benefit for Anna Maria Island Community Center.


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
FRIDAY, Fishing the Islanbs
JUNE 13: Captains' Meeting


5:00 pm- ? ...

5:00 pm- ? ...


5:00 pm 8:30 pm...




7:30 pm 8:00 pm..


5:00 pm 'til 8:30 pm at
Anna Maria Island
Community Center -
407 Magnolia, Anna Maria

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

CASH BAR and
FOOD AVAILABLE
for great food and drink

REGISTRATION
One member of each crew
MUST be present. Captains'
bags will be distributed to each
boat

CAPTAINS' MEETING
Rules discussed and all
questions will be answered


SATURDAY, Fishing the Islanbs
JUNE 14: Tournament Day


6:30 am 8:30 am...



2 pm 12 Midnight ...


CHECK-IN
with Tournament Boat at
check-in areas. After
check-in, team may begin
fishing
WEIGH STATIONS
will be open and fully staffed
to weigh your catch


SUNDAY, Fishing the Islanbs
JUNE 15: Party


12 Noon...


12:15 pm..
12:30 pm 3:00 pm ...

1:00 pm 4:00 pm ...
2:00 pm ...
4:00 pm...


DOORS OPEN
Anna Maria Island Com. Ctr.
Begins PRIZE GIVEAWAY
every 15 minutes
COOK-OUT
style banquet begins
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
TOURNAMENT AWARDS
PARTY ENDS
... until next year!


ANNA MARIA OYSTER BAR
On Anna Maria City Pier ~'~ ~o 1


DINING OUTSIDE
ON OUR DECK
DOCKING + BAIT
FOOD TO GO
SNOW CONES
AT THE SNACK SHOP

BEST SHELLFISH

DEALS ON

) THE ISLAND


* 9 oz. Florida Lobster Tail Yo 4
*1 Ib. Alaskan King Crab Legs 0Cho
11/4 Ib. Live Hard Shell Maine Lobster
Served with potato & slaw or corn


.- LIVE *
ENTERTAINMENT
with Howie
Banfield ea
Friday, Saturday
and Sunday
w7 Outside
On Our Deck


All-U-Can-Eat Fish Fry $4.95
11/4 Ib. Live Maine Lobster $11.95
1lb. Alaskan King Crab Legs $11.95
Also Daily Lunch Specials from $5.95
Daily Dinner Specials starting at $9.95


DIA Ii -e M o F, A" : 'UI P 78 4


Father's Day, Sunday, June 15




Starting at noon, we will be featuring ...
Roast Chicken..................................................... $795
includes vegetable, choice of rice or potato & salad
Braised Lamb Shanks ................................................ $8.95
with Greek pasta & salad
Homemade Lasagna ....................................... ...$7.95
with salad
Soup du Jour ............................................................ $2.50


DailbreakfasPlus
Daily breakfast, a wonderful selec
lunch and homemade soup
dinner specials. delicious dess(
Gulfview Dining N i



900 GULF DRIVE BRADENTON BEACH 778-1919
OPEN 7 AM-9:30 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK


:tion of
Is and
erts.
M






EIJ PAGE 16 M JUNE 11, 1997 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Inshore tournament winners
The winners of the Inshore Division of the Fishing
the Islands Tournament last year were, from left,
Mark Spencer, Walter Graham, Al Graham and
Jonathan Schute. Their boat won the$5,000 first
prize with five trout over 21 inches and a 39-inch
snook. This year's fifth annual tournament is from
Friday through Sunday, June 13-15, with fishing
Saturday and the other days celebrating. Islander
Photo: Courtesy Island Discount Tackle.


y9'T^ iM E N T

BT]IKUST PT A^,, sr---0000
~drp N'T Pha


1997 Fishing the Islands Tournament


I

Disclaimer
The following rules do
not claim to cover all safety
rules which should be ob-
served. The Fishing the Is-
lands Tournament urges com-
pliance with all local, state,
federal and Coast Guard or-
dinances and regulations.
All anglers and captains
in this tournament are com-
peting at their own risk. In no
way is the Tournament, its or-
ganizers or sponsors liable for
any claims and/or demands
for loss or damage to any per-
sons or property that in any
way relates to Tournament
activities.

Eligibility
All professionals and
amateur sport fishermen are
welcome to compete in the
Fishing the Islands Tourna-
ment.

Entry Fee
The non-refundable en-
try fee is $175.00 per boat.
This is a boat registration
tournament. All boats must
be registered and the entry
fee paid by the end of the Cap-
tains' Meeting.
A maximum of five an-
glers per boat, including the
Captain, will be allowed. Each
boat entered will receive a
Captains' bag. Two tickets to
the Fishing the Islands Party
on Sunday are included.

Tournament Time
The Tournament will be-
gin at 6:30 am, Saturday,
June 14,1997. Teams may be-
gin fishing after checking in
with a Tournament Boat.
Teams may weigh-in fish
until midnight that night.

Tournament Day Check-
In
On Saturday, each team
must check-in with a Tourna-
ment Boat before beginning
fishing. Tournament boats
will be located at Bean Point,
Longboat Pass, New Pass and
the mouth of the Manatee
River.


visual signing
ofthe team's assigned
Sboat number as well
as voice or radio con-
tact must be made.
All teams must
check-in between 6:30
am and 8:30 am. Any
team not able to
check-in by 8:30 am
Must contact the
Tournament Committee to be
able to compete.
The official Tournament
radio channel is 72. All Tour-
nament communication will
be broadcast on channel 72.

Weigh-n
Two official weigh-in sta-
tions will be open from 2 pm
until 12:00 midnight on Sat-
urday, June 14, 1997. The two
official weigh-in stations are:
The Rod & Reel Pier at the
north end of Anna Maria Is-
land and The Pub at Mar
Vista on the north end of
Longboat Key.
All fish must be brought
to the weigh-in station by the
boat in which they were
caught.
Teams must show official
Tournament registration
(boat) number when weighing
in fish.
Boats must be in the wa-
ter to weigh-in fish.
Boats must be at a weigh
station and acknowledged by
the weigh master by 12:00
midnight to be able to weigh-
in fish. Any boat arriving af-
ter this time will not be eli-
gible to weigh-in their catch.
Captains must sign the
official weigh-in sheet accept-
ing the weight of his team's
catch.
Weigh master should be
notified of any outstanding
catches by youths under 16
years of age.
The team's chosen fish
must be placed on the dock by
a team member.
All fish must be fresh and
caught during Tournament
hours. No mutilated fish will
be accepted.
All crew members and
the captain must be present
for any fish tobe weighed in.
All teams are responsible
for the fish they bring to the
weigh station.
Boats must leave the
dock area immediately after
the weight of their catch is
verified.
Any fish may be gutted
at weigh-in. Any attempt to
fraudulently alter the weight


of a fish shall result in auto-
matic disqualification. Deci-
sions by the weigh master and
Tournament Committee are
FINAL.

Fishing Boundaries
Teams may venture as far
as time allows.
Boats may not leave the
water or be trailered after
morning check-in.

Fishing Tackle
This is a sportfishing
tournament. All fish must be
caught by rod, reel, hook and
line.
Fish caught on long lines
or by nets are not eligible.
Electric reels are prohib-
ited. Handicapped anglers
must make prior arrange-
ments with the Tournament
Committee before using spe-
cial equipment.
Trolling devices, such as
planers, are permissible only
if attached to a rod and reel.
The use of downriggers is ac-
ceptable, but only with a line
release clip. Downriggers can-
not be used to retrieve fish.

Eligible Species
Refer to the point chart
for eligible species. A combina-
tion of points per fish and
points per pound will be used
to determine the winners of
the offshore division. A com-
bination of points per fish and
points per inch will be used to
determine the winner of the
inshore division. SIX fish may
be weighed in. The team with
the most points will be de-
clared the winner.

A SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT
SNOOK, REDFISH,
TROUT and FLOUNDER

Snook, redfish, trout and
flounder must be released
alive at the time they are
caught.
Cameras and measuring
boards will be provided each
boat fishing in the inshore di-
vision. Photos must have
the fish, the measuring
board and the team's offi-
cial registration (boat)
number.
A provided affidavit must
also be signed by all team
members for each fish.
Redfish over 27 inches
will be allowed.
More than one snook over
34 inches will be allowed.
More than one trout over
20 inches will be allowed.


RULES AND

REGULATIONS


No dead snook, redfish,
trout or flounder will be ac-
cepted for weigh-in.
Because all backwater
fish are released alive, bag
limits are not a restriction. For
example, a team may enter six
different snook as their catch.

Bait
Live bait can be caught
only by a team member.
Teams may buy live bait from
a valid saltwater products re-
tail license holder.
Any involvement in pro-
curing bait by other than team
members will result in team
disqualification. Further-
more, spotting of fish, reserv-
ing locations or other assis-
tance from a second party will
be grounds for disqualifica-
tion.

BillfshRelease
Sailfish and marlin are
eligible species but must be
released alive.
Billfish have an assigned
point value, but will not re-
ceive points per pound. No
billfish will be weighed-in.
The photographic evi-
dence must be presented to
Iburnament officials at weigh-
in.
The team must photo-
graph the fish. The photo-
graphic evidence must be pre-
sented to Tournament officials
at weigh-in. The photo or
video must be of a quality that
the fish can be identified with-
out any other source.
The fish must be on-
board or totally under control
at the boat's side by team
members. The photographic
evidence must depict the
team's official registration
(boat) number.
A provided affidavit
must also be signed by all
team members for each fish.

Protests
Protests must be submit-
ted in writing to the Tourna-
ment Committee within one-
half hour of the closing of the
weigh-in stations.
Be aware that all win-
ning team members may be
subject to a polygraph test.
Note that the Tourna-
ment Committee may inspect
any boat in the Tournament at
any time. Refusal to allow a
requested inspection will be
grounds for disqualification.

Prizes
Anglers are responsible
for any tax liability from win-
ning cash or prizes in the Fish-
ing the Islands Tournament.
All cash winners may be
subjected to a polygraph test.


ISLANDER



5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
941 778-7978


Refusal to submit to a poly-
graph will constitute auto-
matic disqualification.
All fish entered for
prizes must be of legal size.

Captains' Meeting
There will be a Captains'
Meeting on Friday, June 13,
1997 from 5:00 pm until 8:30
pm at Anna Maria Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria.
All team captains or their
representative must be
present. Each team must reg-
ister.
Rules will be discussed.
All questions will be an-
swered.
The Captains' Meeting
will be in the gym at the Anna
Maria Community Center.
The cash bar will be open
and food is available. There
are plenty of tables for your
team to sit and plan strategy
or just enjoy yourselves.
Tournament hats and
shirts will be available.
Team families are wel-
come.

Fishing the Islands
Party
The Fishing the Islands
Party will be held at thE Anna
Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria on Sunday, June
15 from 12 noon to 4:00 pm.
Two tickets to th'e Fish-
ing the Islands Party will ac-
company boat registration.
Tickets for family, team mem-
bers and friends will be avail-
able at the Captains' Meeting
or at the door the day of the
Party.
The extra ticket prices
will be: $10.00/adult, $5.00/
child (age 6-12), and under 6-
FREE.
A barbecue style layout
will begin at 12:30 pm until
3:00 pm.
Valuable merchandise
will be awarded every 15 min-
utes for the entire day.
Entertainment will be
provided from til 4:00pm.
SscoiWr

s" e





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 M PAGE 17 OI


Offshore top fishers
Last year's Fishing the Islands Tournament saw
these happy men come out on top: from left, Glenn
Gee, Ray Ciemniecki, Danny Jordan, Dave Porter
and Brian Kizluc. They won the $5,000 prize in the
Offshore Division with three black grouper, a 25-
pound cobia and two 11-pound red snapper. This
year's fifth annual tournament is Friday through
Sunday, June 13-15, with "Fish Day" Saturday.
Islander Photo: Courtesy Island Discount Tackle.


from Anna .Maria to Ellenton -and
points in between you're sure to
findhuntingfor antiques andcol-
Cectibles as much fun as the discovery.
There are so many paces to go
antiquing" that you're certain to find
just the treasure you're Cooking for.


Emiline's Antiques & Collectibles Ma
Brand New 9,900 sq. ft. bldg.
All Air-Conditioned w/Plenty of Parking
QUALITY DEALERS NEEDED
Open Mon. Sat. 10 am 5 pm
1230 Hwy. 301 Palmetto, FL
(located next to Goodwill)
Ph. 941-729-5282


I QUALITY DEALERS WANTED-
4407 Hwy. 301, Ellenton (1 mile W. of 1-75)
Mon. Sat. 10:00 5:00
(941) 729-1379


Tape over light switch!

SLIGHTS OUT FOR
SEA TURTLES!
May 1 thru Oct. 31 9PM to 7AM
Please turn out beachfront lights.*
Lights disorient mother turtles
and especially turtle hatchlings
as they journey to the Gulf.




II I
L
Report turtles, turtle tracks, possible
nests and hatchlings to Aima Maria
I778-5638
or778-0056. T rtle Watch
I I
Sponsored by The Islander Bystander
*By city ordinance, Anna Maria,
Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach.
It's the law!
L ---.----- .---J


Anna Maria Island Trolley Summer 1997


The ultimate designated driver the trolley offers a sunset and
progressive dinner package. The charter includes four hours of fun, to/
from the following locations ... Anna Maria Oyster Bar, Ato's, Rod &
Reel Pier and Rotten Ralph's in Anna Maria; Shells in Holmes Beach;
Bridge St. Pier & Cafe in Bradenton Beach; Moore's Stone Crab on
Longboat Key and Radisson Cafe Lido & Tiki Bar on Lido Key. $250,
plus driver gratuity. Bring your own refreshments and coolers!


The Anna Maria Island Trolley Schedule is sponsored by The Islander Bystander. For a copy of the schedule, stop in our office at
5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. For information on advertising in future issues including the Island
street map call 778-7978. For trolley information call Trolley Systems of America direct at 346-3115.


FEED STORE
^ ANTIQUE MALL
Over 11,000 sq. ft. Offering 55 dealers
ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES


ANNA MARIA
ISLANDRIA


RMfflBGST


I


:If





I PAGE 18 M JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


"You'll have to call us ...
or we'll never meet!"



REFRIGERATION lL

ZMEAI 9u
a^D @&%DaHm@aDolk


CAC044365



778-9622


FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


AIRBOAT RIDES
Perico Harbour Marina
Manatee Avenue West
(at Leverocks & Galati Marine)


I .- c.J II t,


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S; > UU-l Z > -:
eqn <<5 S 0 c r ,,, -I -; -, - - -i Cc


---CM--- O
qr Um


iWe Know The Way
to successful E741


MARY ANN
SCHMIDT
Eves- 78-41931


Real Estate sales


605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach,


1I I


?15% OFFI
I I
I DEEP SEA FISHING
1 4, 6 & 9 HOUR TRIPS

BEACHCOMING CRUISES:

r TO EGMONT KEY





Cortz.....


HELEN
WHITE
E.-e; 77.6' .
FL 34217 fB4


WAGNEI REALTY





SALE6 AND MENTAL( (Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Call Toll-free 1-800-211-2323
-----------------


Choice 80 ft., 1,00 f.or1,20ft

-- - -
I ~ B~l I L III~ ~7 L I(

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---lll -----i -------


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
S1 9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
1-800-306-9666
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker: Nancy Stork
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson,
Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte, Stephanie Bell
us WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4:30PM
SATURDAYS 9AM to NOON L9


-Bridge Street Pier a Cafe
I B8 (at end of Bridge St. on pier)
5 "We serve only the best!"
'ALL-U-CAN EAT GROUPER
S $795 Every Night 4 to 10pm
SALL-U-CAN EAT 4to 0 pm
FRIED SHRIMP $795
i Tuesday & Thursday
4 -9 Daily
Ice Cold Draft Beer 750 1/2 lb. Cold Peel-n-Eat Shrimp s495
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mon-Fri 8am-10pm Sat & Sun 7am-10pm
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


It's one of the most
recognized signs in Florida. But it's
hometown banking at its best. B4
All Barnett Banks are insured by the FDIC. 1995 Barnett Banks, Inc.


I


J-


I


I


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 11, 1997 0 PAGE 19 IE


'4
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7)x
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1 [I *0 1 0"Ity 14 Wil8t] E
CORTEUST OVER THE
CORTEZ BRIDGE

Since 1984 Made on Location I
Old Fashioned Ice Cream and Wafle Cones r
A Ice Cream Pies & Cakes /V
SColombo Yogurt Swim
SSoft Serve Diabetic Sportswear &
S A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
NOON 10 PM.7 DAYS A WEEK T-Shirts for Everyone!


prizes

Raffles


Saturday June


sHorseshoes


14


OYSTER BAR
HOME OF THE ORIGINAL SHRIMP BURGER


The easiest access deep-water dock from
Sarasota to Tampa at ICW Marker #49
ROD
& REEL
COMBOS
STARTING AT
$19.99

YOUR ONE-STOP SHOP FOR
LIVE & FROZEN BAIT LIVE SHRIMP, PINFISH & CHUBS
FISHING CHARTERS JET SKI PARASAIL RENTALS
BOATING SUPPLIES FISHING LICENSE BOAT SLIPS

Beer Deli Sandwiches
Soda Fuel Ice

1 I O R (SOHID RE

0 *n .- AIL


OpIN JUNE 27

'The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." f"ies
iuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. '
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


^m00 & REEL PIER J
OPEN DAILY 7AM 10PM
Come join us for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner
Come see who caught the BIGGEST FISH!
(June 14: Official Weigh Station) Best of luck to
all entries in "Fishing the Islands Tournament!

8HO & REEL
\j IB.
CoIme ejonJo' r our
beautiful sunsets!
HAPPY FATHER'S DAY
778-1885
875 Norlh Shore Dr., Anna Maria Island


/






zw
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a
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S,: SIE C Fat Free, Sugar Free

Try Our Cubans
Fresh-Cut Deli Sandwiches
& DELI 95-99% Fat Free Meats
Eat-In or Take-Out Soups, Salads, Bagels
For the Beach Mon Sat 10AM 9PM
Sunday Noon to 6PM
CLOSED WEDNESDAYS
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 9 778-7386


5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Fax: 941-778-3035




More than Sty Offices Serving Florida Statewide
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


Joe's

Eats &

Sweets l"
"Just an Old-Fashioned ce Cream Parlor"
GREAT HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM BY JOE
* Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes
* Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
* Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
* Belgium Waffles
* Espresso, Cappuccino
219 GULF DR. S., BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


L's"O






Ij PAGE 20 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
June 1, domestic disturbance, 300 block of Palm
Avenue. The subjects got into a verbal argument and
the officer issued a domestic violence packet.

Bradenton Beach
May 30, theft of bicycle, 26th Street beach access.
May 31, criminal mischief, 1701 Gulf Drive N.,
Island Inn. The victim reported a person unknown dam-
aged the window by throwing a cement block at it.
Damages were $700.
*May 31, grand theft auto, Coquina Beach. The
victim reported a female subject approached him while
he was sitting on his beach towel and asked him to go
for a walk. While they were walking, two juvenile sub-
jects took his car keys from the beach towel. The fe-
male subject said she had to leave for a minute. When
she didn't return, the victim checked and found his car
and the subjects missing.
June 1, criminal mischief, Coquina Beach conces-
sion stand. The officer on patrol observed the suspect
break three plastic chairs. By the time he reached the
suspect, he found six chairs destroyed. The officer is-
sued the suspect a summons to appear.
June 1, information, possession of alcohol under
21, 1325 Gulf Drive N., Catalina Resort. The officer
responded several times to reports of juveniles celebrat-
ing prom and causing a disturbance. According to the
report, three rooms were involved and there were 300
juveniles in the parking lot. The officer asked them to
leave.
Later, following another call to police about the
juveniles, the officer contacted the owner of the resort
who evicted the juveniles. The officer issued a sum-
mons to appear to two juveniles who were in posses-
sion of alcohol.


June 1, trespassing, 2400 block of Gulf Drive
North. The complainant reported the subject forced her
way into the residence and wouldn't leave. When the
complainant called the police, the subject pulled the
phone out of the wall, then started kicking the front
door, causing damage. The officer asked her to leave
numerous times and she refused. She was placed in
custody.
June 2, suspicious circumstances, 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach City Pier. The complainant found her
bicycle partially submerged in the bay at the city pier.
Two juveniles who were fishing retrieved the bicycle.
June 4, found property a bicycle, 103 Church
St., Pines Trailer Park.

Holmes Beach
May 30, burglary to an automobile, 700 Key
Royale Drive, Key Royale Club. The victim reported
a person unknown removed her purse containing her
driver's license, checkbook, $30 in cash, 10 to 12 credit
cards and personal items.
May 31, battery, 3400 block of Gulf Drive. The
victim reported the suspect was pounding on her door
and threatening to kill her and burn down the house.
The victim spoke to the suspect through a window and
the subject broke the window with his fist, then fled.
According to the report, the victim claimed to have a
restraining order against the subject. Later, the victim
reported the suspect slashed two tires on her vehicle.
May 31. fireworks, 100 block of 35th Street. The
officer warned several juveniles about setting off fire-
works and confiscated the fireworks.
June 1, assistance, Anna Maria Island Bridge at
Manatee Avenue. The officer assisted in jump-starting
a stalled vehicle.
June 1, marine violation, 600 block of Hampshire
Lane. The officer warned the operator of a personal
watercraft who was operating the craft in a reckless
manner.
.* June 1, disturbance, 69th Street beach. The com-


plainant reported four subjects drinking on the beach.
The officer located the subjects who had just opened a
bottle of liquor and they agree to leave the area.
June 2, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
49th Street. The victim reported a person unknown
removed a cellular phone valued at $50.
June 2, criminal mischief, 5701 Marina Drive,
Island Branch Library. The complainant reported
skateboarders destroyed light fixtures on the walkway
and spraypainted the steps.
June 2, suspicious, 248 S. Harbor Drive, St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church. The complainant reported the
subject accused the church of scamming money from
her. The subject said she received a call from the sus-
pect who said he was from the church's youth program
and was soliciting money for a charity dinner. She
wrote a check for $29.50 and the suspect picked it up
on his bicycle and gave her a receipt.
The subject said she came to the church to get her
tickets for the dinner. The complainant advised her the
church does not have a youth program or a dinner
planned. The officer advised her the church could not
return money it did not receive. He asked her to find the
receipt and bring it to the police department for inves-
tigation.
June 2, suspicious, 100 block of 31st Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed a
window screen but no entry was made.
June 3, vandalism, 3000 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported a person unknown broke the gate
in front of the building. Damages were $100.
June 3, traffic, Manatee Avenue and East Bay
Drive. A caller on a cellular phone advised the of-
ficer about a reckless driver. The officer observed
the driver stop at a red light then turn left. He stopped
the driver who said it was within the law to do so.
The officer issued a citation and ordered a driver's
license re-examination.
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE


Every Thursday
All-You-Can Eat
Spaghetti
and
Meatballs

$595
2pm to Close


Every Friday
All-You-Can Eat
Fish Fry

$695
2pm to Close


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ON THE ON THE
BEACH BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE 4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH HOLMES BEACH
778-0784 778-0784


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#1


Seafood

Restaurant*







The Freshest Seafood
at Dockside Prices!
Once Again Awarded the
Bradenton Herald Reader's Choice!
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Drive 778-5997
Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 4 to 7 PM
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10 Fri & Sat 4 to 11


Bring Dad
for
Sunday
Brunch
8 am-2 pm
Eggs Benedict,
French Toast
and ...


Crepes. Our Specialty... French Apple, Banana &
Walnut, Banana & Raspberry. Chocolate & Banana.
Ratatouille, Spinach & Cheese, Fresh Strawberry, Fresh
Peach (in season), Chicken, Ham & Cheese, Seafood.
Jumbo Crab, Mushroom & Egg, Walnut & Raisin.

A Sampling of our Dinner Menu...
MARYLAND STYLE CRABCAKE
with lump crab meat 1095
LOBSTER THERMIDOR 1595
SHRIMP SCAMPI 1295
PASTA with white clam sauce 1095
CRAB AU GRATIN 1395
BROILED SALMON with Dill Sauce 1595
Fresh Fish, Maine Lobster, Shrimp and
Scallop dishes, Steak, & Pasta too!
New England Clam Chowder & Soups Available
Full Carry-Out Menu
California & French Wlines
Domestic &S Imported Beers Available
5610 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key
(Just North of the Corner Mart) 383-0013


Hat's off to Dad!









Bring Dad in on Sunday, June 15.
Mar Vista will give him
1/2 price offhis entree!









By Land ... 760 Broadway St., Longboat Key
By Sea ... Marker 39, Intracoastal Waterway
(813) 383-2391







STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 20
June 4, theft, 8000 block of Marina Isles. The
victim reported a person unknown had access to her
credit card number and made charges by phone.
June 4, noise, 3800 block of East Bay Drive. The
complainant reported the subjects were cleaning their
carpets and the generator was making too much noise.
The subjects said they were finished for the evening.
June 5, fleeing to elude, 3700 block of Gulf
Drive. The officer on patrol observed a vehicle drive
off the left side of the road and when he turned to pur-
sue it, the driver fled at a high rate of speed. The officer
said, in attempting to elude him the driver ran several
stop signs, turned off his lights and hid in a driveway.
He was placed in custody.
June 5, bad checks, 3900 East Bay Drive, Island
Foods. The complainant reported 23 bad checks re-
ceived between April 6, 1996 and March 27, 1997.
June 5, found property a cellular phone, in front
of Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive.
June 5, suspicious, 6600 block of Marina Drive.
The officer reported a person unknown threw eggs at


CASH CASH


;2000 $2000|
CASH CASH
$1000 $1000


CASH CASH



Merchandise Merchandise


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JUNE 11, 1997 0 PAGE 21 KM

Island trolley to offer summer savings package


Trolley Systems of America, Inc., operators of
Anna Maria Island's trolley, has announced a Sun-
set & Progressive Dinner package.
A four-hour charter fee of $250 includes ex-
clusive use of the trolley from 8 p.m. to midnight,
the travel charge and cleaning fee. The trolley
carries 30 passengers and a charter is a B.Y.O.B.
event.
Participants will be picked up and dropped off
at one location of choice out of the nine restaurants


a parked police vehicle. They were washed off and
there was no damage.
June 5, DUI with injury, leaving the scene of an
accident with injury, careless driving, 5100 block of
Gulf Drive. The officer responded to a traffic crash at
5100 Gulf Drive and said the driver, Christopher
McNamara, 35, of Holmes Beach, struck the rear of a
vehicle stopped to make a left turn onto Peacock Lane.
The driver and passenger were transported to the hos-


or lounges participating. The charter includes hop-
ping to three additional restaurants or lounges par-
ticipating.
The restaurants or lounges available are: Anna
Maria Oyster Bar, Ato's, Bridge Street Pier & Cafe,
Eddie B's, Moore's Stone Crab, Radisson Cafe
Lido & Tiki Bar, Rod & Reel pier, Rotten Ralph's
and Shells Seafood.
To make reservations or for more information,
call 346-3115.


pital by EMS.
June 6, suspicious, 4000 block of Sixth Avenue. The
complainant reported water was coming from an apart-
ment above her, causing flooding. Unable to contact the
owner or find an outside cutoff, the officer called the fire
department. The owner was found and located a broken
hose on the washing machine. The officer and firefighters
assisted in turning off the water and moving furniture and
carpet out of the apartments.


I SP CIrq JI'rliMS,,,


BEST
BACKWiATER FISH
(determined by points)
BOTH
ADULT & YOUTH (under 16)


IY


FLY FISHING

AWARD
LARGEST TROUT,
REDFISH OR SNOOK
caught on FLY FISHING TACKLE
(determined by points)
(all fish must be of legal size)
TRIP FOR TWO


BEST
OFFSHORE FISH
(determined by points)
BOTH
ADULT & YOUTH (under 16)



M uh-S l o TROUT
(deerind y oits

-.$0.00
Gif Crtfi atet
ISAN DISOUN TACL


I \8lcn ", ENTRY FOR M Guy Harvey Tournament T-Shirts. (adult sizes):
I M M L XL XXL M__XL XX
S Make checks payable to: (total # shirts) at $14.00 each = $ -
I Make checks payable to:
II Fishing the Islands Tournament Embroidered Tournament Hats (adjustable).
ti A ENTMail or deliver to: (total # hats) at $ 6.00 each = $
SIsland Discount Tackle Fishing the Islands Party tickets (2 adult tkts included w/ entry fee)
3240 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach 34217 Additional Fishing the Islands Party tickets at:
Any questions, please call: $10.00/Adult $5.00/Child (age 6-12) FREE under 6
778-7688 or 77-TROUT
Adult Child_ = $
(total # add'l adult tkts.) (total # add'l child tkts.)
Capt. Name:
Phone:Entry Fee at $175.00 per boat $ 175.00
Phonep
Address:
City: STENCLOSED TOTAL $
City: ST: Zip:
S.S.# PLEASE COMPLETE:
DIVISION: __ OFFSHORE __ INSHORE Boat Name:
Length: Make:
Name: FL#: VHF Call Sign:
Address: Boat Description: Hull Type: Color of Top &Trim:
City: ST: Zip: Color of Hull:
Type: Open Fish Cuddy- Cabin Fly Bridge-
Name:
Name: Tuna Tower-- Other:
Address: Engine Make: OB 10 Inboard_ Gas_ Diesel_
City: ST:- Zip: All boats should be equipped with VHF radio.
NaeAll information should be filled in for your safety.
Name:
READ AND SIGN:
S Address: I understand that I am responsible for my boat and crew at all times. I have read and understand all
ity: ST: Zi. rules of the Fishing the Islands Toumament and hereby release its principle, and its affiliates from all
City: ST Zip: liability. As captain, I agree to abide by all the rules of this toumament.
Name: I further understand that the decision to fish is the responsibility of the Captain and all winners may
bmee subjected to a polygraph test.
Address:
I City: i,, ___ST: Zip: SIGNATURE DATE
LI2L ............................~ m --- --- -


I






B[ PAGE 22 M JUNE 11, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
May 25, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled personal water-
craft in Longboat Pass. A Coast Guard vessel re-
sponded anid towed the boat to safe moorings.
May 25, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a disabled 21-foot power boat in the
Manatee River. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 26085006
responded and towed the vessel to safe moorings.
May 25, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 24-foot power
boat near the Anna Maria Island Bridge. Coast Guard
Auxiliary vessel 23081067 responded and towed the
vessel to safe moorings.
May 25, Search and rescue /assistance. Station


I COASTLINS


Cortez received a report of a personal watercraft that
had hit a piling in Palma Sola Bay. A Florida Marine
Patrol officer with a crew member from Station
Cortez responded. There were two people injured in
the accident.
May 25, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of one red flare fired near
Big Pass. A Coast Guard vessel and a commercial
salvor responded. The commercial towing company
vessel located an overturned Hobie Cat sailboat in
the pass, but all the passengers on the boat had made
it safely to shore.
May 26, Boarding. A 14-foot power boat was
boarded in Palma Sola Bay. The operator received a
written warning for not having a throwable flotation
device on board and having improper hull registra-
tion spacing.
May 26, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 14-foot power boat adrift


1997 Fishing the Islands Tournament


^*.SS POINT

y 0A SYSTEM




1997
"Fishin the IslanMs TOURNAMENT"


INSHORE
POINTS POINTS
SPECIES PER FISH PER INCH
SNOOK 25 2


REDFISH 20 2


TROUT 25 3


FLOUNDER 25 4


SPECIES


OFFSHORE
POINTS
SPER FISH P


AMBERJACK 10 1


BARRACUDA 10
BLUEFISH 20
BONITA (little tunny) 15
COBIA 30
DOLPHIN 30
GROUPER 30
MACKEREL, KING 25
(only If federal fishery Is open)
MACKEREL, Spanish or Cero 25
MARLIN, BLUE* 175
MARLIN, WHITE* 175
PERMIT 25
POMPANO 30
RED SNAPPER 25
SNAPPER, (other, 13" min.) 20
SAILFISH 125
TUNA 30
WAHOO 45


*See BILLFISH RELEASE provisions in Rules and Regulations


i
5


O


-0
1


In addition to the more than $20,000
in cash and prizes for Tournament point
winners, we have worked all year
gathering prizes to give away at the
fishing the Islands Party on Sunday.
Every year, we give away valuable
prizes every 15 minutes for hours. Prizes
like rods, reels, outriggers, sunglasses,
bimini tops were handed out.
This year, we have even more prizes
o give away (see list on next page). sk
anyone who was there last year...


THIS PARTY If FUN!


a ao# 4044ut


Guy Harvey T-Shirts has agreed to print a
special run of Guy Harvey's New BACKWATER
GRAND SLAM design T-Shirt as our official
Fishing the Islands Tournament shirt.
This design has been printed on a 100% cotton,
ash shirt. We hope you will enjoy this new Guy
Harvey Original.


=09


in Tampa Bay. A Coast Guard vessel responded and
towed the vessel to safe moorings for the owner to re-
trieve the next day. The boat drifted off Turtle Island
during the night.
May 26, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Palma Sola Bay. The operator received a
written warning for not having the proper spacing on
the hull registration numbers.
May 26, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 17-foot power boat sink-
ing in Longboat Pass. Coast Guard and Florida Marine
Patrol boats responded, pulled three people from the
water after the boat sank, recovered the boat's equip-
ment and a commercial salvor refloated the yessel and
towed it to safe moorings.
May 27, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of two disabled personal wa-
tercraft in Longboat Pass. A Coast Guard vessel re-
sponded and towed them to safe moorings.


POINTS
ER POUND


i






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 M PAGE 23 EID


SIsland Baseball

The week
that was...
By Kevin P. Cassidy

Championship game
a grand finale
Tip of the Island won the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center's Major League championship in a dramatic
extra-innings game by a score of 6-5 over Kiwanis.
The game was a portrait of how baseball is supposed to
be played as several excellent defensive plays by players on
both teams stymied potential run-scoring opportunities.
Both teams had their "aces" on the mound Ryan
Allis for Kiwanis and Joey Mousseau for the Tip so a low
scoring game was somewhat expected. The pitchers did not
disappoint their raucous fans.
Mousseau opened the game by holding Kiwanis score-
less for the first two innings while Allis was equally effec-
tive in the first inning, striking out the first two batters he
faced before retiring Mousseau on a long fly ball.
Allis got into trouble in the second when Michael
Pocino singled and moved to third while the right-fielder had
trouble fielding the ball. A walk to Taylor Manning put run-
ners on first and third for Chad Richardson who plated
Pocino for a 1-0 lead when he hit what seemed like a harm-
less ground ball. The second-baseman bobbled the ball, re-
covered and threw home, allowing Richardson to reach sec-
ond and sending Manning to third.
Tip's Peter Dowling then hit a grounder down the first-
base line which was fielded cleanly and thrown home. Man-
ning slid safely under the tag and was quickly followed by
a hustling Richardson who kept running to slide across for
a 3-0 lead. Dowling was thrown out trying to move to sec-
ond after Richardson's gutsy dash home.
Robby Dial struck out to open the third inning before
things got tense when Andy Rauch reached first on a con-
troversial call by the umpire. Rauch had chopped the ball off
home plate and started down the first-base line but stopped


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794-1141

O'BRIEN'S
IRISH PUB & EATERY
S Entertainment:
Doug Heale-Vocal & Guitar
Every Sat.* 7:30-11:30 pm
Special One Night Only
Fri., June 13 9-Midnight
Authentic Irish
Folklore Music & Song
with Dennis O'Connor
& John McEwen
$2 cover with reservation
($3.00 at the door)
Irish-English-Domestic
Beers on Draught
11am til 11pm Mon.-Thurs.
11am til Midnight Fri & Sat
Closed Sunday
5917 Manatee Ave. W
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on the Mainland Side
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when the umpire called "foul ball."
Kiwanis manager Bob Gibbons pointed out that home
plate is fair territory so the umpire awarded Rauch first base.
Now the umpire had to deal with Tip manager Lou
Fiorentino, who cut a hasty path up the base line from the
dugout, but to no avail. The umpire's decision was upheld
and proved costly as the next batter, Allis, ripped a triple to
score Rauch, narrowing the deficit to 3-1.
Bobby Gibbons then bunted down third where
Richardson threw into right field, allowing Allis to score and
Gibbons to move to third. With Ryan Quigley at bat, Gib-
bons alertly scored on a passed ball to tie the score.
Mousseau then struck out Quigley and persuaded John
Cicero to ground out to Manning and end the inning.
After Mousseau struck out the side in Kiwanis' half of
the inning, Tip looked like they were going to retake the lead
when Richardson opened the bottom of the fourth with a
single. Dowling followed with a single to right, sending
Richardson to third and advancing himself to second on the
throw from right field.
Courtney Taylor then laid down a beautiful bunt but
Allis fielded it cleanly and flipped it to Christian Bax to nail
Richardson. After walking Kim DiPaola and striking out
Kyle Dale, Allis grooved one to Jeremy LeGrand who
ripped a line drive to left center field. Quigley instantly drew
a bead on it and made a leaping catch to end the scoring
threat and preserve the tie.
Kiwanis took the lead in the top of the fifth when Allis
singled and scored on a Gibbons single to right as the relay
throw went over Richardson's head at third. Kiwanis ex-
tended their lead when Gibbons, who moved to third on the
errant relay throw, scored on a passed ball to make the score
5-3 before Bax grounded out to end the inning.
Pocino got things going for Tip when he singled to open
their half of the inning and moved to second on a passed ball.
Manning walked and Richardson hit a grounder that forced
Manning out at second putting runners on first and third with
one out. This brought Dowling to the plate, and after
Richardson moved up on a passed ball, Dowling ripped a single
that scored Pocino and Richardson to tie the score at 5-5.
Mousseau and Allis both pitched a scoreless sixth and
then were relieved because they had reached their limit of
innings pitched. A visibly pumped Peter Dowling took the


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mound for the Tip and held Kiwanis scoreless.
Ben Miller took the mound for Kiwanis to face Pocino
who reached second on an error by the first baseman. After
Pocino advanced to third on consecutive passed balls, Man-
ning and Richardson walked to load the bases with no outs.
Dowling came up to bat and worked the count to two balls
and no strikes, prompting Coach Gibbons to make a pitch-
ing change. He called up son Bobby to try and escape the
inning.
Dowling stepped back into the box and hit a grounder
to Miller who threw home where Bax stood on the plate. He
made the catch for the force-out but the umpire signaled safe
and a celebration ensued.
Coach Gibbons again made the trip to home plate to
point out that the bases were loaded and Bax did not have
to tag the runner so the umpire reversed his call and the
game went on.
Gibbons then induced a pop-up from Evan Smith and
struck out Luther Sasser to get out of the inning.
Dowling gave up a single to Bax to open the eighth -
the second extra inning but settled down to hold Kiwanis
scoreless by getting Birch to fly out, Miller to ground out
and Dial to strike out.
Logan Bystrom grounded out and LeGrand flew out to
Allis who made a nice play in short left field to leave Tip
with only one more out and the hour getting late.
Up to the plate stepped Mousseau who was hitless on
the night, but he responded with a double to right center to
set the stage for Pocino who came through with the game-
winning single to score Mousseau and end the marathon
game 6-5.
Pocino's game-winning RBI led the way for the cham-
pions on his three-for-four night. Dowling went two for four
with three RBIs and earned the win with two innings of
scoreless pitching in relief of Mousseau. Mousseau scored
the winning run and gave up only one earned run while strik-
ing out nine batters in six innings pitched.
Leading Kiwanis was Allis who struck'out eight batters
in six innings of work and went two for four including an "
RBI triple. Gibbons went two for three with one RBI and
Quigley two for four.
It was a season-ending thriller in Anna Maria for fans
of Little League baseball.


DINNER UNDER $10
INCLUDING CHARGRILLED FISH
Early Birds 4 to 5:30 pm Mon. Fri.
(includes salad, entree, beverage and dessert)

S'Bread fromi
i t eI the Oveni"qi

SI with this ad
Sand 2 dinner purchases '
.(m upto $3.50 value"'

:****:*:*: 795-5334
11 am 10 pm Sun. Thurs. 11 am 11 pm Fri. & Sat.
4726 Cortez Road Bradenton


'..... "i LONGBOAT KEY

Nestled between the Gulf of Mexico and beautiful
Sarasota Bay:..a truly "Floribbean dining
experience awaits seafarers and landlubbers alike.


Come enjoy a delightful breakfast, lunch or
dinner amid exhilarating views of Sarasota Bay,
the Kev Club Golf Course and the Marina. Dine
indoors or out. casual attire is welcomed.
Sarasota Bay Marker 15
2600 Harbourside Drive


383-0440


Longboat Key
y^ Moiring


01E6 OT E ULC-taeByIle aka
(ltSbi hpigC ne)thog ie1eLTi\2~C





IM PAGE 24 M-JUNE 11 ,l19971 *THE.ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Bali Hai wins AAA Little League championship


Thursday night's action had Bali Hai Resort and Carpet
Network squaring off for the championship of the AAA minor
league. Bali Hai sent Brent Willard to the mound in a match-
up against Joey Mattay of Carpet Network. These players along
with many others will be stars of the majors.
Bali Hai jumped out to an early lead as they capitalized on
walks and errors by Carpet Network's defense to score their
limit of five runs. Carpet Network came back in their half of the
inning to cut the deficit to 5-1 when Danny Williams alertly
scored from third base on a passed ball.
Bali Hai kept up the scoring in the second as Mike Mijares
and Michael Wallen reached base on consecutive errors by the
shortstop and third baseman. This set the stage for Adam
Bouzianne who came through with a hard grounder that was too
hot to handle for the second baseman and scored Mijares and
Wallen to make it 7-1.
C After Steve Faasse reached base on an error and Jim
Brainard walked, Sean Pittman stepped up to the plate and
ripped a shot over the left-fielder's head that cleared the
bases as Bali Hai again reached the five-run limit to make
the score 10-1.
Carpet Network wasn't about to throw in the towel just yet
Lorenzo Rivera ripped a triple to right and kept running as Bali
Hai had trouble with the relay throw. Rivera crossed home plate
and cut the score to 10-2.





CLOSED June 9 thru 18
Re-Opens Thurs. June 19
THANK YOU for Your Patronage!
S525 St. Judes Dr. LBK 383-0777
Restaurant*Gourmet Take-Out*Catering


Thurs, Fri & Sat Nites BAMBOO


"Willy Great" Father's Day Weekend Specials!
All-You-Can-Eat Grouper .................................. $6.95
Fried Oyster Dinner ............................................ $7.95
1 lb. New York Strip ....................................... $9.95

KEY WST WLLY'
Hoefte25 yse


Trey Andricks then stepped to the plate and promptly
got hit by a wicked fast ball and was awarded first. He
quickly moved to second on a passed ball and almost scored
when Williams singled but was thrown out trying for a
double seconds before Andricks crossed the plate for the
third out.
Tim Bouziane led off the third inning by working the count
to 3-0 when Carpet Network brought Williams into pitch.
Bouziane completed the walk and quickly moved to second on
a passed ball, then broke for third on the next pitch to Willard
and scored when the catcher threw the ball into left field to ex-
tend their lead to 11-2.
Mijares personally padded the score to 12-2 when he
walked and moved to third on consecutive passed balls. He then
frustrated the pitcher into making an error allowing him to
score by dancing off the bag as if he was going to break for
home plate.
Carpet Network scored one run in the bottom of the third
when Mattay singled and advanced to second on an overthrow.
Mattay then stole third and scampered home when the throw
from the catcher got past the pitcher to bring the score to 12-3.
Williams settled down to pitch an impressive fourth inning
limiting Bali Hai to one run. Jesse Kane-Harten walked and
didn't stop at first, instead kept going and drew the throw which
went into center field, allowing him to score and extending their




Intimate Gulfview Dining
... plus an accomplished wine list
Join us for Father's Day
Breakfast or Dinner
Serving Sunday Breakfast until 1:30
Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Tues. thru Sun
Dinner Reservations Suggested
778-2959
103 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach


ROTTEN

RALPH'S
ROTTEN WATERFRONT DINING
RALPH'S FULL MENU FULL BAR
Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
k .'RoNT, 902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953
Party with
JAY CRAWFORD
Thurs, Fri & Sat
June 19-21
S.8 pm to Midnight

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT $795
FISH AND CHIPS
Mon-Thurs only starting June 16
Now open: 2nd Location
Rotten Ralph's Eastside
Daily Dinner Specials Beer & Wine
Tues-Sat 11 am to 9 pm Closed Monday
Sunday Breakfast & Lunch 9 am 2 pm
4606 Manatee Ave. E, SR 64 Braden River Plaza 746-3097



BRIDGE TENDER'S

DOCKSIDE BAR


I


Tie up to our dock and
enjoy our deck...


ON DAD'S DAY!

I



5:30 8:3


Three deep-water docks at Marker #49


lead to 13-3.
Williams then got Pittman to ground out on a nice play
by Michael Kramer, struck out Victor Guy and quickly
fielded Willards grounder in front of the plate to nip him at
first for the third out.
Andricks led off the bottom of the fourth with a beautiful
bunt single and advanced to third on passed balls. Williams then
sent him home with a grounder that the third baseman had
trouble coming up with to cut the score to 13-4. Williams who
reached on the error, moved to third on a grounder by Mattay
and scored when he got into a "pickle" between third and home
to make the score 13-5. Aaron Stark came up and ripped a long
fly ball to center that glanced off the fielder's glove to plate
Mattay and end the scoring for Carpet Network at 13-6.
Bali Hai put the game away by scoring four more runs in
the fifth inning on five walks and an RBI fielder's choice by
Faasse to extend their lead to 17-5.
Willard got the win for Bali Hai by pitching five in-
nings, giving up seven hits and no walks while striking out
10 batters. He was supported by Pittman's triple and
Faasse's RBI fielder's choice, capitalizing on 13 walks and
six errors by Carpet Network.
Carpet Network was led by Kramer, Williams, Mattay,
Miller and Andricks, who each singled while Rivera and Aaron
Stark had triples.

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key







Award-winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor

S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key



It's easy to remember our name...
but hard to forget our food!


The finest in delicate,
delicious Thai cuisine
in a comfortable
atmosphere. Our tasty
Thai food will keep you
coming back
again and again.
Dinner Mon Sat
5:00 to 9:30 PM
(Closed Sunday)
7604 Cortez Road West,
Bradenton
1 block west of 75th on Cortez Rd.
Tel: (941) 794-5470


t3Y =:Kx INN
3610 E. Bay Dr.
778-7034

OPEN 7AM DAILY

ElM-I
FRE FOO


Call or stop in
for great nightly
SPECIALS!

ISLANDER


"The best news"


fRestaurant & Lounge
Dining Tue-Sun 4 -10 pm
Lounge Tue-Sun 4 -11 pm
778-6969
PIANO BAR
with LARRY RICH
Tues. Sat. 8 Midnight
1.-:
REID FROST
Sunday 8 to 11

The Best Steaks in Manatee County




Dinner served 4-10 pm Tuesday-Sunday
Large groups and luncheon parties welcome.
Reservations requested, not required.
204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria (formerly Cafe Robar)


,,






THE ISLANDEiR' BYSTANDER l JUNE '11; 997 1 PAGE 25 W


Final Major League box scores


Second half of season
At bats
Ryan Allis, Kiwanis
Bobby Gibbons, Kiwanis
Ryan Mijares, AMFD
Bobby Cooper, Haley's
Ben Miller, Kiwanis
Runs scored
Joey Mousseau, Tip
Allis
Jeremy Legrand, Tip
Gibbons
Tyler Krauss, Haley's
Base hits
Mousseau
Allis
Krauss
Cooper
Gibbons
Doubles
Cooper
Mousseau
Miller
Chad Alger, Haley's
Dusty Andricks, Haley's
Hunter Green, Haley's
Jimmy Gallary, Kiwanis
Triples
Michael Cagnina, JBD
Allis
Krauss
Legrand
Mike Pocino, Tip
Green
Mijares
Everett Southwick, JBD


Home runs
Mousseau
Cagnina
Miller
Allis
Pocino
Josh Sato, AMFD
Cooper
Alger
Johnny Cicero, Kiwanis
Ryan Quigley, Kiwanis
Chad Richardson, Tip
David Michael, Haley's
Scott Vinsel, AMFD
Total bases
Mousseau
Allis
Cooper
Cagnina
Miller
Runs batted in
Mousseau
Cooper
Miller
Pocino
Sato
Walks
Casey Rygiel, AMFD
Taylor Manning, Tip
Kyle Dale, Tip
Robby Dial, Kiwanis
Katrina Lathrop, AMFD
Batting average
Mousseau
Allis
Krauss
Pocino
Sato
Cooper


=~3a nm L ru
HAPPY FATHER'S DAY
% I f BEAN PQtINT
If^^^ "'St4L & BEEL


Open Daily 7am to 10pm
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
778-1885
875 North Shore Dr. Anna Maria Island


World-Famous ,Setam

Skillet Breakfast

$499or $59for two
) for one 9 for two


Batting average, con't.
Cagnina .350
Alger .345
Legrand .344
Tom Bucci, AMFD .339
On-base percentage
Mousseau .648
Dale .556
Rygiel .532
Lathrop .514
Krauss .493
Allis .487
Pocino .486
Michael .485
Sam Wolfe, Kiwanis .478
Green .472
Slugging percentage
Mousseau 1.032
Cagnina .631
Cooper .569
Allis .565
Pocino .536
Alger .527
Green .523
Miller .516
Krauss .500
Sato .500
Batting Average, 11 year olds
Krauss .371
Cooper .353
Gibbons .333
Mario Torres, JBD .321
Green .309
Evan Smith, Tip .306


On-base percentage, 11 year
olds
Lathrop .594
Krauss .493
Wolfe .478
Green .472
Smith .469
Dustin Cole, JBD .460
Slugging average, 11 year olds
Cooper .569
Green .523
Krauss .500
Torres .410
Gibbons .348
Smith .347
Batting average, 10 year olds
Blake Tyre, Haley's .307
Chase Parker, AMFD .303
Manning .213
Chris Nelson, Haley's .207
On-base percentage, 10 year
olds
Dale .556
Manning .456
Parker .434
Tyre .379
Slugging average, 10 year olds
Parker .357
Tyre .307
Manning .276
Nelson .226
Games pitched
Mousseau 15
Allis 15
Stephen Yencho, AMFD 13
Cooper 13
Alger 11


0 f'9 PLIC Unexpected Guests?

SWe have lots of hot pans of
delicious Italian specialties
to go! Great for luncheons
or quick no-fix dinners.

CSalitalianDloj We deliver too!

Beer and Wine Take-out Available ~ Kids Menu Too!
Holmes Beach 778-5440
Mon-Thur 11-9 Fri 11-10. Sat 4-10




HAPPYIFATHER'S DAY
This Father's Day, be sure to
bring Dad to the
BeachHouse.
Dad's entree is 1/2
price all day on


And ... lunch 11am to 2:30pm features exotic
salads & entrees freshly prepared by Chef Leon
(formerly of Gallagher's Gourmet)




A Real Italian Restaurant on Longboat Key

Happy Father's Day! Gourmet Brick Oven
Pizza & Calzones
Eat-in or Take-out Starting at $6.95

Italian Specialties
Starting at $12.95
Includes Salad & Bread

Pasta Entrees
Starting at $10.95
Includes Salad & Bread

SITA II A Lunch & Dinner Every Day
11:30 am 10:30 pm
BEER & WINE





"... Relaxed Florida dining at its best."
Nancy Konesko, Bradenton Herald


CAFE ON THE BEACH


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT

PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Jimmy Dean Sausage)

$3 "+ tax

Served Daily

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Daily
OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment Weekends with MICHELE BISHOP
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


,ISLANDER

bHmlgs03CIa


Games started
Mousseau
Allis
Stephen Yencho, AMFD
Cooper
Alger
Games started
Mousseau
Allis
Cooper
Bucci
Torres
Alger
Complete games
Mousseau
Allis
Yencho
Billy Bob Goldsmitt, JBD
Bucci
Innings pitched
Mousseau
3
Allis
3
Yencho
Alger
Bucci
Games won
Mousseau
Allis
Yencho
Aaron Lowman, Haley's
Torres
Peter Dowling, Tip


16
16
13
13 a
11
13
10
8
8
7
7
7
6
4
3
3
73 1/
70 2/
51
44
36
11-1
6-3
5-3
5-3
4-1
4-2


Winning percentage
Mousseau
Torres
Allis
Dowling
Sato
Shut outs
Mousseau
No-hit games
Mousseau
Strikeouts
Mousseau
Yencho
Allis
Cooper
Alger
ERA
Mousseau
Dowling
Torres
Manning
Yencho
Lowman
Brian Faasse, JBD
Allis


. 5702 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1776 /


dsBREAE'AST

L NCH DINNER- b
ITALAlN SPANISH AMERICAN






DINE IN TAKE OUT0 FREE DEUVERY 778-4949
TUE. 4:30 pm -10 pm WED. SAT. 10 am 2 pm and 4:30 pm 10 pm
SUN. 8 am -2 pm and 4:30 pm -9 pm
IND,


"Not Just Bagels Anymore"


$4 99 $399r

Breakfast Lunch
(includes beverage)


llI s-o IT 0.A N t t



Finally... We're Open!






Ol~ PAGE 26 JUNE 11, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria Little League teams, 1997 season


Tip of the Island, Major League champs, 16-4


Kiwanis, Major League runner-up, 10-10


Anna Maria Fire Department, Major League, 8-12


Haley's Motel, Major League, 9-11


Jim Boast Dodge, Major League, 7-13


Bali-Hai Resort, AAA champs, 11-5-2


Carpet Network, AAA runner-up, 10-7-1


Uta I q


0


A r r



Bridge Street Pier & Cafe, AAA, 8-8-2


Islander Bystander, AAA, 4-13-1


C & M Construction, AA champs, 15-3


W-.


5"%1 rCb




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U JUNE 11, 1997 U PAGE 27 lE

Anna Maria Little League teams, 1997 season


Betsy Hills Realty, AA runner-up, 10-8


Air & Energy, AA, 8-10


Quality Builders, AA, 3-15


.-a


BeachHouse, Tee-ball


Big Bamboo, Tee ball
I t ^^B -a


4


'K 4'
I .t


asj
jw*-


Harry's Continental Kitchens, Tee ball


WF
1A


VFW Post 8199, T-ball


AMFD's Steven Yencho, Major League, took the Sportsmanship Award


PEIQIPPI


:.j


"IP"r~4

'." ~~-?-

I


-tl


Tee ball All-Star action during Saturday's Fun Day at the Center.





lB PAGE 28 3 JUNE 11, 1997 8 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Good news and good eats from the sea


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspective
There's good news for local boat operators and
fishers. The fight over posting Bay Isles canals on
Longboat Key is over, and those long feared "No Tres-
passing" signs won't be going up after all.
You'll recall the Bay Isles Association claimed to
own the canals although ownership of the water in
them was an issue they didn't want to discuss and
planned to post no trespassing signs throughout its sec-
tion of the key. But the town commission has told the
group to forget it.
The latest, and hopefully final, action comes after
the death of long-time Longboat Planning Director Dan
Gaffney. Gaffney was an ardent opponent of the post-
ing idea, and approval of the signs by the Longboat
Planning Board came only after he was no longer
around to talk sense to its members.
But then Longboat Mayor Ray Metz surprised ev-
eryone with a show of statesmanship that tipped the
balance of members on the town commission against
permitting the signs. Metz said he'd thought about the
possibility of all those new signs and decided they re-
ally weren't necessary.
Longboat Key being Longboat Key, there will
probably be a lawsuit forthcoming, but the issue is
clearly settled for now.
Go catch some fish in the Longboat rim canal.

Mullet smoking time
Alcee Taylor over at the Cortez Museum says the
, smaller mullet are getting full of fat right now and at
their prime for smoking. Hmmm, that sounds good.
With the inshore net ban, commercial and sport
fishers alike have turned to cast nets for catching mul-


Anna Maria Island Tides
Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Jun11 6:24 1.6 10:03 1.3 4:27 2.1 11:37 0.4
FQ Jun 12 7:06 1.7 11:40' 1.3 5:40 1.9
Jun 13 7:41:' '1.B 12:20 0.5 7:00 1.7 1:08 1.1
Jun 14 8:16 2.0 1:05 0.7 8:25 1.6 2:25 0.9
Jun 15 8:50 2.1 1:44 0.8 9:45 1.5 3:26 0.7
Jun 16 9:25 2.2 2:19 1.0 10:59 1.5 4:19' 0.5
Jun 17 9:54 2.4 2:53 1.1' - 5:02 0.3
Jun 18 12:02 1.5 3:22 1.2 10:26a* 2.5 5:44 0.1
SCortez High Tides 7 minutes later- lows 1:06 later


James b. Annis
LICENSED WATERFRONT CONTRACTOR



778-4771
P.O.BOX 1353, Anna Maria, FL 34216
a, MC00361


778-7990

ANNA MA 'BOAT CLUB
5323 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


let. That can be back-breaking work, especially if
you're doing it for a living, but for us amateurs the re-
wards are great. Fresh mullet, smoked, fried or even
pickled, is a tasty treat from local waters.
One other thing. Some folks say you should
promptly snap the necks of fresh-caught mullet to bleed
them out. Others say it doesn't make any difference.
The Authority, Alcee Taylor, says, "It makes a whiter
fillet for frying and when the fish isn't fat, snapping the
necks helps keep them from tasting strong."
So snap or not, it's time to get out the cast net,
catch a few mullet and smoke up a feast.

Fishing the Islands week
Speaking of catching fish, this weekend is Island Dis-
count Tackle's Fishing the Islands Tournament for fish-
ers with a competitive streak. We'll have plenty of cov-
erage elsewhere in the paper, so I won't duplicate it here.
Here's wishing all the contestants good luck and
a good time.

Fish kill hotline
I just finished reading "And the Waters Turned to
Blood," a chronicle of a single-cell critter in the waters
of the Carolinas that makes our red tide seem like a
pussy cat. Present thought is that like red tide, the critter
(Pfiesteria piscicida) is always around, but blooms are
triggered from time to time.
In the Carolinas, the evidence seems to be that pollu-
tion is triggering the blooms that produce massive fish
kills, just for starters. There's evidence it's also killed or
maimed fishers, crabbers and even casual bathers.
All of which is a long way around to saying even
the "gubment" is realizing pollution from the likes of
all of us living here is an important thingto watch. And
fish kills or abnormal fish behaviors are certainly an
indicator that something is wrong.
So jot down 1-800-636-0511. That's Florida's fish


Just visiting
paradise?

ISLANDER


Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe. Visit
us at 5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach or call
941-778-7978 to charge
it on Visa or MasterCard.















CORTEZ WATERCRAFT
RENTALS
By the Hour Day Week

Waverunners
* Largest unrestricted
ski area
* PONTOON BOATS
Next to Annies at the base of the Cortez bridge
941-792-5263



FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
CALL FOR INFORMATION
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED


kill hotline machine. Just leave your name, address and
phone number. You'll be contacted by an appropriate
researcher from the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection, they say.
After reading that book about state actions or
inaction in North Carolina, you'll certainly be even
more wary of those out-of-town experts.

Soft shell crab prospects
Still another wonderful eating prospect, the soft
shell crab, is the subject of a workshop coming up in
Palmetto on June 16. Although designed for commer-
cial fishers interested in learning more about soft shell
crab production, the workshop is open to all.
If you're interested, just give Florida Sea Grant
College in Palmetto a call at 722-4524. Marine Exten-
sion Agent John Stevely will be able to fill you in on
times and location for the initial workshop.
And after all this talk about wonderful things to eat
this week, it's time for lunch.
See you next week.

Sandlot summer baseball
at Island Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
sponsor a Sandlot Summer Baseball program from
Monday, June 30, through Aug. 8, Monday through
Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
The program is open to boys and girls ages 9
through 12. Playing age is how old the child will be on
Aug. 1, 1998.
Cost is $25 per children for the full program. Reg-
istration will be held at the Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria, from Friday, June 13, through June 20.
For more information call Elmo Torres at 778-
6767 or Scott Dell at the Center at 778-1908.


GIVE DAD A PANORAMIC
VIEW THIS FATHER'S DAY!


Fly safely in a factory-built
reproduction of the original
'35 WACO Biplane. Seats two
plus the FAA commercially
rated pilot. A fun and safe
sightseeing experience.
Bring your camera!



* Gift Certificates Available


GULF COAST

BIPLANES

359-2246
Sarasota Bradenton Airport
Dolphin Aviation Building
8191 N. Tamiami Trail (US 41)
=i a


Capt. Glenn Corder
CHARTER BOAT LA MAMA
Half and Full Day Fishing Charters
Specializing in Offshore
Grouper and Snapper Fishing
Over 20 Years Experience
(941) 778-1203
ANNA MARIA ISLAND


J,


I


I


y





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997:1 :PAGE 29 RI-


Big reds, big tarpon, big fishing tourney fun coming up


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Things have worked out well with backwater fish-
ing snook season has ended, but redfishing is pick-
ing up to take up the slack. Tarpon are thick and big
right now, with several good reports of big catches
coming in. Offshore, grouper fishing is good.
Don't forget the Fishing the Islands tournament
this weekend, sponsored by Island Discount Tackle.
Saturday is fishing day, with a obligatory captain's
meetingFriday night and awards and fun scheduled for
Sunday at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Dick at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier fishers
there have been catching nice-sized reds, quite a few
mackerel in the morning, a few catch-and-release
snook and the occasional tarpon.


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the May 31 horseshoe games were
Arlow Jullin of Bradenton and Bill Starrett of
Anna Maria. Runners-up were Bill Cooney of
Bradenton Beach and Ron Pepka of Anna Maria.
Winners in the June 6 games were Darrell
Jenneact of Bradenton and Pepka. Runners-up
were Herb Ditzel and Alan Szakaes, both of
Anna Maria.
The weekly contests get underway every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park,
10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership
fees and everyone is welcome.


Ken at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there are catching a lot of mackerel, jacks, blues and
one lucky fisher landed a 36-inch redfish. Night fish-
ing is producing a few sharks.
Katie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 100 head of Key West grunts, por-
gies and black sea bass. The six-hour trips averaged
225 head of porgies, Key West grunts and black sea
bass. The nine-hour trips averaged 40 head of dolphin,
mangrove and lane snapper and black grouper. The
lone 12-hour trip brought back 48 head of dolphin,
mangrove snapper, scamp and red and black grouper,
with one of the black grouper weighing in a 34 pounds.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said he's finding tar-
pon in the Gulf, with one coming in at 150 pounds.
Reds are the hot ticket in the backwater, with the range
in size at 16-35 inches long. Bonita and some jumbo
Spanish mackerel are just off the beaches, he added.
Capt. Dave Pinkham says grouper fishing has
been good offshore, and tarpon angling is excellent
right now.
On my boat Magic, I'll be down in the Keys for a few
days. Expect a report on the action down there soon.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said don't forget
the Fishing the Islands tourney this weekend!
Capt. Mike Greig said he's been tarpon fishing all
week and has had very good results, hooking up with
a few silver kings every day. Capt. Mike and his wife
Sally are also to be congratulated on the birth of their
first son, who weighed in at seven pounds and was 21
inches long. As they both put it, "He's a keeper!"
Good luck and good fishing.


OBJEKTVERWALTUNG
VERMIETUNGEN

Professionell* Zuverlissig Unkompliziert
Wir betreuen Ihre Immobilie wie unsere Eigene.


John Michaels
Keal Estate, ine
77-1101


Killer of a cobia
Doug Schmidt of Denver, Colo., has his handsfull
with this this 60-pound cobia caught while fishing
with Capt. Phil Shields on the ReefReacher.


"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your island
property. When buying
or selling...
I can make your island
dreams come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
WAGNEI I1EALTY
S Sales & Rentals Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North
Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Office
778-1751 Evenings


Now you can use email to write to your Island newspaper!

Our email address is
islander@mead.net
The Islander Bystander will be on the Internet with an
exciting Web site in the near future ... Look for us at
www.islanderbystander.com. INFORMATION:
CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392.

JISLANDE........ U


CONDO PRICED RIGHT!
2BR/2BA condo could be great rental or vaca-
tion home. Small complex, children OK, no
pets. Two screened lanais, one overlooks the
pool. Under-unit parking. Offered at $95,000.
Call Bill Bowman 778-2248 or eves. 794-8482.


UNIQUE TRIPLEX
Quality constructed and well-maintained resi-
dential triplex with spacious floor plans, private
garages and storage rooms on 100 x 100 lot
with Gulf views. Unit mix is 3BR/2BA, 2BR/2BA,
1 BR/1 BA with 3,225 sq. ft. of living area offered
at $325,000. Call David Moynihan at 778-7976.


ANNA MAMIA IIILANU D ,LUD
The Island's finest Gulffront complex with
spectacular views of Gulf over pool. This 2BR/
2BA has secured lobby, elevator, and under-
unit parking. Offered at $219,900. Call Bill
Bowman at 778-2248 or eves at 794-8482.


ANNA MARIA
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Unique commercial building on a comer lot in
the heart of Anna Maria. Two offices, five stor-
age garages, one recently remodeled apart-
ment. Live or work at the beach. Call Mark
Reemelin 778-2246 or eves. 778-4126.


AiiaMai sln 7824 1 Ba ent on 9-26Plmto7224
LongboatIKey 383-5R-7e l I tA1 i inaway Bay 8-000ll RiI t. lIDivii 7 4 6


PRICE SLASHED!
"Perico Bay Club villa decorator furnished,
2BR/2BA, 2 car garage and more!
$144,000 to $129,900!!
Hurry and call Marilyn Trevethan today!
" -~ -."778-6066
Visit us at our web site: http://www.islandreal.com
[E MLS 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
` '-- -i


ml


PRICE REDUCED! Now only $249,900 for a LOVELY CANALFRONT home with circular
2BR/2BA canalfront Anna Maria home com- drive and lush landscaping with large and bright
pletely renovated recently! Extensive decking Florida room, 2BR/2BA, garage and more. Now
across the back of the house opens to the bed- only $219,900.
rooms and offers a serene setting.
^ M :^ ..01 IL R iI -J.ITak ll^ .I WE







BI PAGE 30 M JUNE 11, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
ii i


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
CANALFRONT Seawall, davits. 2 or 3BR, fireplace, family
room, two-car garage, newly painted exterior. Over 1,800 sq. ft.
Custom-built; original owner. $259,000.
PANORAMIC VIEW OF BAY AND SUNRISES enchant one
while fawn and fauna enhance this 2BR/2BA, direct bayfront.
Pool. Two-car carport and many extras. $119,995. OWNER
WANTS OFFERS.
PALMA SOLA BAY One half block away and caged pool with this
well-maintained 3BR/2BA home. Two-car garage, family room, fire-
place. Quiet cul-de-sac street. All for $139,000. GREAT VALUE!
NEW LISTING GULFSIDE 1BR/1BA, garage, fence and land-
scaping. one of a kind. $110.000.
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
GULFFRONT 22-UNIT APARTMENT MOTEL 110' of white, sandy
beachfront plus "private beach." Heated pool, recent improvements.
If you are a serious buyer, compare and you will own this "one-of-
a-kind" value. $1,995,000.
5351 GULF DRIVE 778-0807 Eves. 778-5427
or Toll Free at 1-800-956-0807
www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net

Buy it, sell it! All in The Islander Bystander


-r ~- w W 1 W


Oetff 9MGf&leaWsta &AW
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


IMMACULATE ISLAND RESIDENCE
This beautifully maintained, custom-built 2 bedroom, 2
bath contemporary offers a light and expansive floor
plan filled with space and light! Features include a fabu-
lous master suite with Jacuzzi and bay view, paneled
elevator and 16' vaulted ceilings with fans. Also in-
cludes an intercom system and double-car garage with
workshop and store room. Reduced to $209,000
Including one-year homeowner's warranty!


DELIGHTFUL NORTH POINT HARBOR
This light and spacious 4BR/2.5BA tri-level home offers
an electric boat lift and dock on deep-water seawalled
canal plus dazzling panoramic view of sparkling Bimini
Bay! Amenities include airy, vaulted ceilings with fans,
bayside hot tub, wood-burning fireplace and many in-
teresting room angles, octagon windows, greenhouse
window and more! A truly unique and inviting contem-
porary home designed for informal island living. Priced
at $489,000, $400,000, including use of community
swimming pool and tennis court. Owner says "sell!"


WATERFRONT POOL HOME
This gracious 3BR/2.5BA canalfront beauty offers pan-
oramic views over Bimini Bay plus a 30 ft. heated,
caged pool and two boat docks! Oversize lot offers
privacy plus! Amenities include a tiled entry foyer,
lovely wet bar with glass-front cabinets, large circular
hot tub and many tropical flowering trees and shrubs.
Asking $370,000 including preferred one-year
homeowner's warranty! Drop anchor here!
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
T F. 7" t L -t:
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Nancy Gullford...778-2158
Monica Reid...729-3333 Suzanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser... 778-1820
j Exclusive
Waterfront R
Estates MLS I TV I nr
Video Collection M

Visit our Web Site http/www.manatee-Pion /hills
cta ft i ng iUz E7imess -JohiftrLyl s
Visit our Web Site http l/www.manatee-online.com/hiils


Palma Sola Pool/
Spa Home.
Delightful floor plan,
fenced yard.
$149,900. Call
Barb Turner or
Sandy Greiner.

Duplex West Of Gulf Drive. 3/2.5 and 2/2. 100 x 100 lot.
$279,900. Sandy Greiner/ Barb Turner.
Nature Lovers Delight! Sunny 3BR end unit overlooks
sunsets, wildlife, wetlands at Perico Bay. 5 minutes to
beaches or shopping. $159,900. Yvonne Higgins.
Breathtaking Views Surround You in this 3BR/3.5BA
bayfrontt home. Panoramic bay and golf course views. 3
bedroom suites. Vast greatroom. Pool. Dock. Park 4+.
:$974,500. Call Don Schroder.
Great Bird Watching Here! 2BR/2BA end unit in a
beautiful waterside community close to beach. Club-
house, pool, tennis and more. $83,900 furnished. Call
Karen Schroder.


Opposite the Holmes Beach Library
5600 MARINA DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217
941-778-7777


5201 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(941) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-237-2252










WATERFRONT BARGAIN
Live like royalty in this 1,386 sq. ft. 2BR/2BA canalfront
end unit with private boat dock. Priced over $17,000 less
than the next cheapest unit in complex. It won't last long!
$95,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
MOTEL NEAR BEACH Ten-unit motel in Holmes Beach,
furnished turnkey. Owner's home and additional six 2BR units
available for increased income. Profitable motel. $800,000. For
more information, call Luke Courtney 778-5405
ATTENTION INVESTORS Four units; two buildings.
These numbers work! Income on fourth unit projected at
$450 monthly; is now owners unit. $19,000 income yearly;
$5,000 yearly expenses includes utilities. Great location!
Two miles to beaches. $99,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
FOURPLEX Holmes Beach fourplex close to beach. All
units renovated. OWNER FINANCING! Under $80,000
per unit. Won't last long at this price of $318,000. Eliza-
beth Andricks 778-4800.
COMMERCIAL OFFICE BUILDING Building is situated
in center of Holmes Beach. Uniquely designed to be subdi-
vided into as many as five independent offices. Five A/C
units and five meters, Shown by appointment. $310,000.
Stanley Williams 778-4800.

Visit Our Web Site
http://www.manatee-on-line.com/a paradise/

Buy it, sell it! All in The Islander Bystander



lI Cmm I


NOW YOU CAN CHARGE IT!
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and Visa for
subscription orders, T-shirts and classified advertising.
(Classified charge customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392

jISLANDERIinI ME


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SUMMER SANDS Rarely available 2BR/2BA
bayfront unit. Elevator, pool, covered parking.
$156,000. Call Carla Price 778-5748 eves.


LONGBOAT KEY CANALFRONT HOME Enjoy
Island lifestyle in this 3BR/2BA home designed
with your comfort in mind. Cathedral ceiling, fire-
place, spacious kitchen, extensive screened
porch overlooking deep-water canal. Reduced
$10,000, now $299,000. Call Zee Catanese 794-
8991 eves.


DIRECT GULFFRONT CONDO Fabulous fifth-
floor views of Gulf and across Island to bay. New
carpet, updated kitchen, baths and lanai. Corian
counters and ceramic-tile floors. 2BR/2BA, two
garages, interior storage and deeded cabana
room. $230,000. Dial the Duncans! Judy 778-
1589 or Darcie 779-2290 eves.


SREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK M S


1






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 11, 1997 M PAGE 31 IG.,


Longboater heads
Sarasota visitors' bureau
Larry Starr, owner of
Longboat Accommoda-
tions, has been elected
president of the Sarasota
Convention and Visitors
Bureau for 1997-98.
The CVB has super-
vised the expenditure of
approximately $5.5 million
in tourist tax funds for ad-
Starr vertising and promoting
Sarasota County during the
last eight-plus years.

Realty raves
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. has announced that
Rebecca Smith and Elfi Starrett were the top listers and
sales agents for the Holmes Beach office for the month
of May.
Prudential Florida Realty, Holmes Beach, has an-
nounced that Karin Stephan was its top lister and Carol
Heinze its top seller for the month of May.


Housecall adds staff
Housecall Home Healthcare, 3216 East Bay Drive,
Holmes Beach, announces the addition of Brenda Rose,
R.N., and Martha Braddy, to its staff.


Stem to Stern meets
boat detail insurance
requirements
Stem to Stem Boat Care, a bonded and insured boat
detailing business, does compounding, waxing and teak
preservation and provides yacht watch services.
The company will take care of boats moored at the
owner's house or at marinas.
Contact Stem to Ster at 778-8436.

New real estate office
opens in Holmes Beach
T. Dolly Young & Associates, a real estate firm,
has opened at 5351 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Young, a 24-year resident of Manatee County and
23-year Realtor, said the company will move to new
quarters soon to be constructed at 5352 Gulf Drive.
The firm provides full real estate services within


ANNA MARIA BAYFRONT HOMEWITH BEACH
812 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria
3BR/2BA,
terrazzo floors.

with stone
fireplace and
cathedral
ceiling.
New roof.


Lot has 75' of
sandy beachfront x
168' with views of
the Sunshine
Skyway and
Egmont Key.
$399,000.
941-778-1239


FLAMINGO CAY
CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA home with beautiful wood, cathe-
dral ceiling in formal living room. Solar heated, caged lap
pool. Boat davits and seawall with no bridges to Palma Sola
Bay and the Intracoastal Waterway. Street lights, deed-re-
stricted community. Great room concept! Beautiful!
$213,000. #HG20477. Call Horace or June Gilley 792-0758.

LONGBOAT KEY 3BR/2BA Key West-style bayou-
sound condo. Huge pool great for laps. Great wa-
ter views. Just steps to the beach. $350,000 #19871.
Call Karin Stephan eves. 388-1267.
JUST LISTED Enjoy the glimmering Gulf and beach
view from this end unit with southern exposure.
Turnkey-furnished, 3BR/3BA plus two-car garage.
Also includes heated pool, clubhouse, secured
lobby, elevator, tennis and great beach walking.
$194,900. #22563, Call Carol Heinze 778-7246,
MAGNIFICENT GULF OF MEXICO Enjoy breath-
taking views from almost every room in this elevated
3BR/2BA house. $325,000. #18980. Call Carol
Heinze 778-7246.


Roni M. Price
broker/salesman
778-5585


Recently Renovated Spacious
3BR/2BA on deep canal. Separate
1 BR apartment. Pool, wet bar, and
fireplace. Boat lift with separate
dock. #RP19294. Must see!
$320,000.
ONE OF A KIND Custom-designed
dream home on a lushly land-
scaped lot. Oak flooring, cabinetry,
staircase. Seller will entertain offers
: $280,000-340,000. #RP20483
ISLAND HANDYMAN Location is
right close to the beach and the
library. Priced right at $117,000
Great "fixer upper." #RP18681.


the county and surrounding areas.
Young is joined by sales associates Richard Estock
and Madelynne Fried.


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/RENTALS
778-2055
ANNUAL
2BR/2BA West Bradenton home $850mth
WEEKLY/MONTHLYISEASONAL
2BR/2BA Gulf view condo-w/pool $750wk
2BR2BA Gulf view luxury condo w/pool $900wk
2BR/2.5BA Townhouse w/pool $600wk
2BR/2BA Condo $800mth for summer
2BR/2BA Home plus loft bedroom $1000mth
3BR/2BA Executive pool home $2500mth
3BR/2BA Home steps to the beach $900wk
2BR/1.5BA Duplex $650wk
2BR/1BA Bradenton Beach apt. w/Jacuzzi $500wk


Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
778-7246


IMPERIAL HOUSE: 2BR/
2BA poolside. updated. Well
kept Gulf to Bay community.
$94,900. #CH20338
MARTINIQUE CONDO with
southern Gulffront view
2BR/2BA turnkey furnished.
$139,900. #CH19316.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX:
Price reduced to $150,900 on
this 2BR/1 BA and 1 BR/1BA
with den and open floor plan.
Neat and clean. #CH19134


BAYFRONT BOATING WATER -
GLORIOUS VIEWS AND SUNSETS
Home located on Sarasota Bay. 3BR/2.5BA, open-plan,
over 2,500 sq. ft. living area. Home built to surpass build-
ing code. A comparable $400,000 value priced today at
$330,000. Call Karen and Bob Lohse at 795-5336 ext. 216
for open house schedule. #KL22366.


ht....llst...u.propertymw, anyaus ld t/ r f l,


REDUCED OWNER ANXIOUS
Attractive 2BR/2BA home only 550 ft. to choice Gulf
beach! Over 1,400 sf living area plus garage in mint con-
dition and ready for furnishings. Custom interior window
shutters, appliances only 3.5 years old and structure
beautifully maintained. Ideal summer home and seasonal
rental. Reduced price: $174,000.



l^ K\ Since 14
1957
MARIE kLIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


JULIE McCLURE

B CoEstate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


The Cats Meow is at
415 Spring Avenue in Anna Maria.
A 3BR/2BA For $219,000.


oug Dowling Realty
778-1222


snut^h!


0


0 0







SlED PAGE 32 K JUNE 11, 1997 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



IEMFOR*S A--LEGARAGESALBA


FURNITURE FOR SALE dining set, kitchen set, bed-
room set (no bed), coffee table, twin beds. See at
3805 E. Bay Dr. #312 or call 778-5438.

SERTA KING-SIZE mattress and box spring, excel-
lent condition. $150. 401 29th Street, Holmes Beach
or phone 778-1064.

11-PIECE SECTIONAL sofa set includes four uphol-
stered tables. $400. Call 778-0086.

BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but
never used. Four-piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and
love seat $399; queen bed set $199; full $159; twin
$129; futons (sofa by day bed at night) frame and
mat $199; daybed (white with brass finials) including
2 mattresses and pop-up unit $285. Can deliver. Call
746-4355.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.



RUMMAGE SALE Sat., June 14, 9 1. Roller
blades, bikes, furniture, king spreads, clothes for
everyone, specials. St. Bernard Activity Center, 43rd
Street, Holmes Beach.

GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., June 13 & 14, 9 -5. An-
tiques, nautical, furniture, ladders, lawn tools, chain
saw, luggage, camping/golf, dishes, books, TV. 609
Ivanhoe, Key Royale.

MOVING SALE Sat., June 14, 9-12. Ceramic kiln, golf
clubs, glassware, lights, Dremel scroll saw, miscella-
neous collectibles. 214 Lakeview Dr., Anna Maria.

MOVING SALE Sat.., June 14, 8 ? Furniture,
dishes, clothes, plants and more. Tradewinds Apart-
ments, 1603 Gulf Dr. N. #19.


LOST CAR KEYS last week of Apr. Has Veteran's
war tag, push-button entry and four keys. Please call
778-7350 after 6 pm if found.

BIKE STOLEN! 20" chrome NSX Dyno. Taken on
June 7 from public beach. Reward! 778-1165, no
questions asked.


LOST CANE BY HANDICAPPED veteran at Home
Depot, Cortez Rd., Sunday, June 8. Lost by Fred
Laurie, 8402 Marina Dr. 778-7250.



NEW FISH MARKET 119th Street and Cortez Rd.
(turn south two blocks). Call for daily specials. 798-
9404. Cortez Bait & Seafood.

PAST-LIFE REGRESSION, rebirthing, weddings, com-
mitment ceremonies, funerals, pet funerals, memorial
services, house blessings. Call Glo, 351-9364.

VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages of
information everything you need to know to enjoy
the two-county area. Retail price $14.95, discounted
33% only at the newspaper office. You pay only $10
plus tax at The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978

"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of stories
and newspaper columns guaranteed to delight new-
comers, visitors and oldtimers too, by original Florida
Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This book makes a great gift.
Available for $19.95 at The Islander Bystander, 5404
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978

REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls) -We
come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-1012.

"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


HYUNDAI EXCEL 88 white, air, stick shift, stereo,
four-door. Very good condition. $875. 383-0582.

1986 PLYMOUTH CARAVELLE SE blue, fully
loaded, only 40,000 miles. Looks like new. $3,990.
778-7227.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Tarpon beach fishing is "hot." Half &
full day. Reservations please. Call 778-1990.

WET SLIPS AND Hi 'N' Dry storage available at
competitive rates in modern, full-service marina. 778-
2255.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.

RECEPTIONIST/DOCTOR'S ASSISTANT for
chiropractic office on the Island. Will train. Two days
in Anna Maria and two in Sarasota. 955-8686.

INTERNET CONSULTANT demonstrating the hot-
test, new TV Internet terminal box on the market. Will
train. 798-9099.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three- and six-hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.


MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

"THE PERFECTIONIST" cleaning with perfec-
tion! Offices, homes and condos. Call Sharon at
778-0064.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.


We offer the
largest variety of
Seasonal and
Annual rentals
from St. Armands
to the tip of Anna
Maria Island.
For Rentals
Call Julie Gilstrap


AFFORDABLE ISLAND LIVING
2BR/1BA, heated pool ............ $79,900
BEAUTIFUL BAYFRONT Stunning
decor, 2BR/2BA, furnished ... $139,900
SUNSETS AND DOLPHINS Gulffront,
huge beach, 2BR/2BA.............. $519,750


Call
Becky Smith
or
Elfi Starrett
778-0700


778-6665


Director of Rentals


SEASONAL RENTALS
Weekly from $500
Monthly from $1,000
ANNUAL RENTALS
* Bradenton Condo
3BR/2BA $800 mo
* Wildewood Springs
2BR/2BA $750 mo
* Townhouse on Cay
2BR/2BA furnished $950 mo
* Coquina Beach Club
efficiency furnished $800 mo


I SALES-- ALESSAL RENTALS- RTALS


ISLAND GEM! Newly built Key West- UNBELIEVABLE, BUT TRUE
style elevated home. Steps from the $299,000 for a canalfront pool
beach and fishing pier. $224,900. home!






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER n JUNE 11, 1997 G PAGE 33 lE
r 1' I'


AUTO DETAILING at your home or office at your con-
venience. Complete detailing includes wash, wax,
shampoo, engine and undercarriage cleaning, leather
& vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and more. Pro-
tect your investment. Call Damon at 320-5662.

CHECK-A-HOME Inspection Services can keep an
eye on your home or rental while you're gone. Free
estimate. Licensed builder. Call Island Check-A-
Home at 778-3089.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE AND REPAIR. Call Mark
for appointment at Grooms Motors, 778-6045. 5608
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree trimming, pressure washing and paint-
ing. Free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

DEBBIE'S CLEANING SERVICE now accepting new
clients. Homes, condos, offices, rentals, also win-
dows. Fourteen years experience, references, free
estimates. (941) 739-8314.

"I DON'T WANNA clean house" you say to yourself.
Sharon wants to clean your house. References. Call
or leave message. 778-3006.

"SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" licensed, bonded.
Residential, commercial, condos, rentals, house clos-
ings, move in/out, windows. Estimates. Beverly, 778-
1945.

ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.

IRONING DONE sheets to shirts. Fast service, Island
pickup and delivery. Smoke-free environment. Ref-
erences available. Phone 778-4192.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.



LAWN CUTTING most lawns $15 $20. Call for free
estimate. 778-1560.



VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION all types of renovations/
new construction services. Now offering installation
and servicing of rolling hurricane security shutters.
License # CGC 058-092. Insured. 778-5354.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 31 year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

THE COMPLETE HANDYMAN I repair, I install, I
paint. Prompt service, excellent Island references.
Call Bob at 778-8655.

JOE DeGREGORIO Painting and Staining. Interior/
exterior, reasonable rates. Power washing. Free
estimates. Insured. (941) 792-4882, ask for Joe.

CARPET VINYL CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed
and repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship
guaranteed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen, 383-
5381, beeper 506-3297.


ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile.
Lic. #MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave
Elliott.



FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1BR/1BA, pri-
vate lot and parking. Available weekly at $350 wk.
778-2832.

DIRECT GULFFRONT Cute and cozy 2BR/1BA,
$500 wk. 1 BR/1BA, $350 wk. 1110 Gulf Drive. Gulf-
Bay Realty 778-7244.

CHARMING HOLMES BEACH apartment. 2BR/1BA
with bay view and washer/dryer hookup. Annual
$675 mo. 795-7805.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND seasonal or monthly rental.
Gorgeous, totally remodeled canalfront with dock.
Short 1 + block walk to beach. 3BR/2BA with large,
sunny Florida room for entertaining. Five different
fruit trees in yard. Available Sept. through Dec. Call
(941) 688-9281 or (941) 683-4703.

HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS CENTER Rental units
available for commercial, retail and storage. Call
(941) 778-2924 for information.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Bay/Gulffront, 1 & 2 BR ex-
cellent location, all new furnishings. Totally
equipped; phone, cable, new pool. Swim, snorkel,
fish at your front door. Walk to local shops, restau-
rants. $69 day, $450 wk., $1,600 mo. (941) 778-
1322.

ANNUAL RENTAL Large 2BR/1 BA apartment. Well
maintained and landscaped. One block to Gulf and
beach. $650 mo. No pets. Call 778-0608.

Classified advertising continues on the next page.


JUST LISTED! This 2BR/2BA elevated home is
located on a deep-water canal on the north end
of Anna Maria. 27 ft. dock with water and elec-
tric and large, open deck. Don't miss this great
buy priced to sell at just $199,000.





';- IB r. '- ^ "^
3, 1
A, l t;ii iii : 1 ,


212 FT. ON DEEP-WATER CANAL! This spe-
cial hideaway within walking distance to Gulf is
just waiting for. you! Architecturally-designed
home with cathedral ceiling and wraparound
porch. Sliding glass doors overlooking the spar-
kling canal. This mini estate can be yours for just
$259,000.


BEAN POINT BEACH HOUSE! This 2BR/2BA
beach house comes fully furnished and is just wait-
ing for you. Close to the Rod & Reel Pier and Gulf.
Low maintenance landscaping. Great location!
Great house! Great price! Offered at just $169,900.

Call Pat Jackson at 778-3301,
Ken Jackson at 778-6986
or Agnes Tooker 778-5287


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
S9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
F AN MAON RAN .AXO


WALK TO THE GULF BEACH from this spacious 4BR/3B BIMINI BAY POOL HOME. Sailboat water, dock, great views.
furnished waterfront townhouse on Anna Maria Island. Cathe- Fireplace, 3BR/3-1/2B, den, great room, beautiful kitchen.
dral ceilings, balcony, Community dock, two heated pools and Oversized garage. $599,000. Nancy Keegan, 723-3929 or
tennis. $164,900.- Jeanette Rampone, 747-3364. C21507 Julie DeSear, 794-3041. R20386


BOATING WATER in Anna Maria. 2BR/2B immaculate home
with great water view. Large screened pool and lanai. Low
maintenance yard, fruit trees, wood deck, Quiet cul-de-sac
neighborhood. $215,000. Van Bourgois, 778-1749. R20195
WATERFRONT
ELEGANT BAYFRONT CONTEMPO- WATERFRONT I
RARY POOL HOME. 4-6BR/3-1/2B. Gran- Large lot with Rip
ite counter tops, marble floors, gourmet sets with full water
kitchen, spectacular master bedroom. Boat $200,000. Kathlee
dock, lifts, pool with waterfall. $895,000. Janet Bellingar, 7
Don Lewis, 746-3200. R18884
MAGNIFICENT 2-STORY GEORGIAN or
river home. Elegantly appointed, masonry
fireplace, crown moldings, French doors,
5BR/4B. $1,195,000. Kathy Marcinko, 792- Available pro;
9122. R21398 or by the mon
MANATEE RIVERFRONT. Unparalleled Island to Veni
water views from every room. 4BR/3-1/2B. rental and ri
Spacious traditional residence with fine ap- (941) 951-6668
pointments. $499,000. Bany and Kimberly o
Charles, 795-1273. R22176 Anna Maria I


LOT
LOT oi
arian r
view.
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47-454



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SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT ESTATE. 4BR/4B, gourmet
kitchen, fireplace. Elegant and spacious. Water views from all
rooms. Dock and davits on sailboat water. $895,000. Van
Bourgois, 778-1749. R19319
MAINLAND
n Palma Sola Bay. GO WEST. One block to the bay and
rights. Watch sun- close to the beach. 2BR updated home
Fabulous location, situated on 85' x 155' +/- lot. Plenty of
lyter, 792-8826 or room for your boat, RV and new pool.
43 L21782 $99,900. Anne Miller, 792-6475. R22281
LAST AFFORDABLE NEW HOME on
Riverview Blvd. 4BR/3B, formal dining
and living room, coral fireplace, tile
throughout. Master bath with marble
s by the week tub. Luxurious landscaping. $249,900.
m Anna Maria Van Bourgois, 778-1749. R19079
all one of our
specialists. BEHIND PERIDIA. Older 3BR/1B home
800) 881-2222 on 13 +/- acres. Can become your dream
home or develop, zoned Al. $298,000.
in Nancy Keegan, 723-3929. R/L68499


island Centre Shops


3224 astB vDivH l e Bec ,Foia327*9 17865 iiou icnt I,-,ti:
44 0 aate vnu es, rde tnFlrda320 &9 1-4 ,6 00 htt:%%%% .i i k* m r m


Residential Sales/Rental Division Licensed Real Estate Broker






J~ PAGE 34 M JUNE 11, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
'S \ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Law We Monitor Irrigation Systems
service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
778-1345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
Established in 1983

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
S "A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
9 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Specialists
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


Private & Commercial Interior & Exterior
20 Years Experience Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates Call 778-2139


OLF CLUB REPAIR
Re-Grips $4
Free pick up and delivery
77800413 Custom Built Clubs by Terry

Designed Refaced
Formica Wood


-CAJBN1$TS

by REX B. SLER 778-7399
10 Years of Local References Insured


REMODELING


XACT

ARPENTRY

SERVICES


* ADDITIONS
* RENOVATIONS
* KITCHENS BATHS
* DECKS & MORE
CALL KIT WELSCH
778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


WE DELIVER ...
CONVENIENCE
QUALITY
PRICE
EXPERIENCE
CaIl nnwl GUARANTEE


778-7311
We'll be right over.
Island owned and
operated by Ed Kim


ATWORK
**- n.a.f eroor slow, (


CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
@@GflTlU@TO@N
K]@u'13y)@''0@K


FULLY FURNISHED DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, close to
beach, Florida room and separate utility room with
washer and dryer. Annual, $800 mo. plus utilities.
First, last, security. 778-0182.
GULFFRONT BEACH COTTAGE 2BR/1BA, fully
furnished, available immediately. $400 wk. Call 748-
8800.
EFFICIENCY ANNUAL OR 6 month rental. North
end of Anna Maria on canal, large deck. 794-8877.
3BR BEAUTIFULLY TURNKEY furnished. Close to
beach. Available monthly July through Dec. $800 mo.
plus utilities. Jan. $1,500. 778-4473, leave message.
ANNUAL OR SEASONAL 2BR/1BA furnished
condo, Anna Maria Island, three month minimum.
(941) 795-0436.
1BR BAYSIDE "Old Florida" cottage. Unfurnished,
yearly lease. $450 mo., first, last, security. Water and
garbage included. 795-1243.
VACATION SUMMER OR FALL Gulffront complex,
heated pool, Jacuzzi, tennis, beach. 794-8877.

HIDEAWAY COVE panoramic bayview, nice, quiet,
2BR, first floor, no pets/smoking, fully furnished. Pre-
fer 3 6 months but consider weekly/monthly. Also
available 2BR, 1998 winter, 3- 6 months. 778-7107.

FOR RENT UNFURNISHED 2BR/2BA Gulfview and
garage, $850. 1BR/1 BA Gulfview, $550 (one person
limit). Call T. Dolly Young & Associates, Realtor, 778-
0807 or (800) 956-0807.
SPEND A "Weekend at Bernie's" Pirate's Den in
Holmes Beach. Furnished 1 & 2BR apartments
stone's throw to beach. Available now at off-season
rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Six month leases avail-
able. 778-4368.
ANNUAL RENTAL GULFVIEW 2BR,1BA, very
roomy, updated appliances, new carpet, private pa-
tio, quiet street. $750 mo. plus electric, 106 31st
Street. Must see. 778-6050.
AVAILABLE NOV. 1 MAY 1 Owner's personal 2BR/
2.5BA townhouse with pool, across from beach with
view of Gulf. Covered parking. No smokers or pets.
$1,500 mo plus utilities and security deposit. Refer-
ences required. (941) 778-1221.
HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL 1BR/1BA, close to
beach. Available July 1. $500 mo. 778-6791.

ANNUAL BAYFRONT 2BR/1BA furnished duplex.
Large dock with sweeping views of Sarasota Bay.
Utilities included. Call Wagner Realty at 778-2246.

ANNUAL 1BR DUPLEX With new carpet. $500 mo.
Call Wagner Realty at 778-2246.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA DUPLEX washer/dryer hookup,
storage and covered parking. Two short blocks to
beach. $650 mo. Call Mark at Wagner Realty 778-
4126 or 778-2246.
ANNUAL RENTAL Large 1BR/1BA just remodeled.
Balcony, Gulfview. New carpet, paint, appliances.
Adorable. 203 2nd Street N., Bradenton Beach. $525
mo., $250 deposit. (813) 258-2411.
WANTED ROOMMATE to share quiet 2BR/2BA
duplex near beach. Basic cable, washer/dryer. Must
have references and steady job. $115 wk. in ad-
vance. 778-4192, leave message.
MARTINIQUE DIRECT GULFFRONT seasonal
rental available Nov. through Jan. 2BR/2BA, recently
remodeled, second floor, clean and lovely. Please
call (410) 581-5849.
2BR/2BA APARTMENT carport, washer/dryer hookup,
tennis, boat launch. Near shopping, library, no pets.
$700 mo., last, security. 778-1259 or 778-0405.
SPACIOUS KEY WEST-STYLE 1BR/1BA mobile
home, adult waterfront park, furnished. $525 mo.
Annual rental. Call 792-3794.
ANNUAL EFFICIENCY nice location, two blocks to
beach. $450 mo. Call Wagner Realty at 778-2246.


GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
GREAT GIFTS ANYTIME!

AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT *8AM -4PM
ISLANDER
U- -J.L ~I~ -I pULIK


NU-Weatherside of Florida
SOFFIT & FASCIA SINCE
1948
WINDOW REPLACEMENT
*PORCH ENCLOSURES
VINYL SIDING
778-7074
Lic. # CLAC 286523

E $ 1 A11


JISLAND5 CLASSIFIEDS
IRNALS oninedI-ENALSCnine-


HOLMES BEACH 2BR huge enclosed garage, wrap-
around decks, quiet location on small lake. No pets.
$850 mo. 778-1868.
UNFURNISHED IMMACULATE fully renovated.
New kitchen, carpets, tile, paint, landscaping. Ground
level. Walk/bike to beach. 2BR/2BA, bright Florida
room, garage, boat slip. Immediate occupancy. $995
mo. 778-3775.

HOLMES BEACH ANNUALS one half block to
beach, walk to everything, new paint, 2BR/2BA, deck.
$675. Also 1BR/1BA. $575. (800) 977-0803 or 778-
4523.

BEST GULFVIEWS beach front, exclusive area,
unique home. 3BR/2BA, top master's suite, decks,
patio, beautifully furnished. $3,000 mo., $1,200 wk.
778-0990.

VACATION ON THE BEACH 2BR/2BA, sleeps 6.
Also 1BR/1BA, sleeps 4. Starting at $550 wk. to
$2,000 mo. No extra charge for sunsets! 778-4523 or
(800) 977-0803.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA DUPLEX apartments in Anna
Maria City. Units have dishwasher, open courtyard.
Close to shopping and Gulf beach. $650 mo. No pets.
Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-1450 or (800)306-
9666.
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA CANALFRONT home in Holmes
Beach. This large home includes a two-car garage,
utility room with washer/dryer, screened porch and
more. No pets. $1,200 mo. plus utilities. Fran Maxon
Real Estate, 778-1450 or (800)306-9666.
VACATION RENTALS turnkey, 1 & 2BR across from
beach. $234/$294 wk. Almost Beach Apartments,
(941) 778-2374.


SUUU taL3 'IUS IV %^ Including
yBuffalo & Ostrich
Whitney Beach Plaza 6810 Gulf of Mexico Drive 383-0858


420
BOATWORKS
Small Boat
Detailing



Dockside Service
Rates by the Foot
CALL NOW
778-7109


Mobile Detail Service
We come to you!

MOST CARS $95*
*Wash, buff, wax, shampoo interior, under
carriage, tires and rims all treated and
protected plus engine pressure cleaning.
$95 on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office. Your car doesn't
have to be driven anywhere! Let us
protect and preserve your investment.
Mention this ad for $10 OFF.




320-5662
(This number is a message service when we ore busy.)
THE AREA'S #1 MOBILE DETAILER IS BACK!
All cars/trucks personally serviced by Damon.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 11, 1997 0 PAGE 35 BIll


JISLANDER CLASSIFIEDSr
I R~ENTL Cninufed I REAL ESATE4oninud


ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT Lovely furnished 2BR
apartment on beach. Sundeck, porch. Weekly, vaca-
tions, no pets. (941) 778-3143.
MINI VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.
- Wed. or Mon. Thur. Two people/four nights from
$135. Kitchens. 500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's
Motel & Resort Complex, 778-5405 or (800) 367-
7824.


OPEN HOUSE 1 4, Mon. through Sat. Spacious
4BR/4BA waterfront with boat dock on Coconut
Bayou. Current appraisal $525,000. Will consider
offers below appraisal. 130 Hammock Rd., Anna
Maria. Owner/broker. Call 778-6155.

NEW! NEW! NEW!
EVERYTHING NEW Kitchen new, A/C new, carpets
new, ceramic tile new, bathroom floors new, inside
wall finish new, outside paint new, landscaping new.
Best of all, price new. Reduced $10,000 to $154,900.
2BR/2BA, Florida room, garage, boat slip. "Best Is-
land buy." Owner, 778-3775.

ELEVATED 3BR/2BA home with hot tub. Walk to
beach. 260 S. Harbor. $219,950. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt, Coldwell Banker, 778-2261.

PERICO BAY CLUB condo, first floor, 3BR/2BA,
gated community, great view of Palma Sola Bay.
Pool, tennis, clubhouse, garage, bright end unit. In-
cludes boat with access to bay. $179,000. Call (941)
761-8063.

LOW MAINTENANCE TOWNHOUSE type living
without the fees. Roomy, elevated, 2BR/2.5BA
home, two-car garage, hardwood floors, large screen
deck, walk to beach. 309B 66th Street. $179,900.
(813) 685-1474, owner.


REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE Prime Holmes Beach
home, 2BR/2BA with water view. Must sell.
$145,000. 795-7805.
SPACIOUS KEY WEST-STYLE 1BR/1BA mobile
home, adult waterfront park. $41,000 plus own your
lot. Furnished. Call 792-3794, by owner.
FRANKLIN NC. Enjoy cool summer days, beautiful
setting, 2BR/1BA, fireplace, two duplex cottages,
pool. Great for winter and summer. Asking
$105,000. Call (813) 915-3461.
FOR SALE BY OWNER Great location, 317 Spring
Ave. 3BR/2BA large two-car garage. Call 778-
1023.
WATERFRONT LOT 3BR/3BA, three-car garage,
approximately one acre, access to bay, wraparound
deck, ideal location. $225,000. 792-7082.

LOTS FOR SALE One bayview, one Gulfview. (800)
977-0803 or 778-4523.

DEEP-WATER CANAL LOT in Anna Maria for sale.
75 x 115. $158,000. Call 778-7127.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate
advertising herein is subject to the Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination." Familial sta-
tus includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children under 18. This
newspaper will not knowing accept any advertis-
ing for real estate which is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for
the hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


Get your owh cPy of tLe "'best hews oh Ahh Mhri& IsslJd.' It's free!


For free home or business delivery on Anna Maria Island call 778-7978.
(Sorry, we can not dp!i"er to individual condos or mobile homes.)
Ct' of-town subscription form on page 7.

F- - - ------------------------ ----------------------------------- ----
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising
must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island
Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to
Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line
rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising
in person or by phone. We are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take
classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX
your copy with your charge card number. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge
21 words.
----------------------------------------I
2 1
21
I___ ____ _____ 3
31
More information:
(941) 778-7978 IISLAMj ERI sa i
FAX: (941) 778-9392
L -------------------------------------J


Yvonne Higgins REALTOi
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
RW/MB GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

yPaI.V7 IJVG 6yW&ineD0gyenbauffg
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468

R.T. (BOB) HILTON CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial. Remodel and
New Construction. Island and Mainland.
"DON'T SAY HOW, SAY HIL TON"
Lic. #CGC012191 747-1098

For Free Estimate Call 778-3089
Check-A-Home Inspection Services
JA, i Property Management Services
CHIECK-A-HIOME Home Updotfng & Maintenance Services
Bob Barlow Pre-Purchose Home Inspections
Over 20 Yrs Experience Licensed & Insured Builder Uc. #RR066504

ISLAND LUMBER
Ap HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING


Regis

Mechanical


Since 1978
Licensed & Insured
State Cert.#CAC032412


We'll beat any advertised Price! Just give us a call
ALL ESTIMATES ARE FREE!!
Call 704-3078 24 HR


Lr umJ PRESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL I
$700 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
PER FILL EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES *
201b cylinder
WATER HEATERS*- SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING .

PeccO
V ~ O


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
%4 Residential Commercial
%\4 Restaurant Mobile Home
-\.4 Condo Assoc. -\ Vac and Intercom
\.4 Lightning Repair Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385


Serving the Beaches Since 1978


HT
CP 1MR1


_ eRX
.Alt








KIjE PAGE 36 M JUNE 11, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ET TOO

BY RICHARD SILVESTRI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Take for a spin?
7 Lincoln's
Secretary of
State
13 Pop follower
16 Curly conker
19 For him and her
20 Information like
15-Down
21 Aerialist's get up
23 Shoot-out?
25 Ran against
26 Journal
conclusion
27 Everglades
deposit
28 Bolts down
29 Without words
30 Mr. Hyde, for
one
32 Cousin of a
bandore
33 Drained
34 Stood by
36 Some of the best
Impressionist
art?
40 DH stat
43 Scots tongue
44 Riding for a fall
46 Construction
piece
47 Go over
48 Jerk
50 Canute's foe
52 Mining waste
53 Year St. Eugene
became Pope


54 Second-rate
missile?
57 Harangue
58 Teacher's deg.
61 Exmoor
exclamation
62 Surrey, e.g.
63 "Stand By Me"
director
64 Scholarly
66 Formal
accessories
67 Pelts
68 Dieter's
temptation
69 Lose one's
balance?
70 With the intent
71 Monogram of
Macavity's
creator
72 Swedish imports
73 When to go
shopping?
75 "When You
Love" (1912
tune)
76 Olympus Mons's
locale
77 "Phooey!"
78 Spot maker
83 Sounds of
disapproval
84 Personal quirks
85 "Phooey!"
87 Naturalness
88 Comic Philips
89 Trip fare?
93 Cretaceous
95 Middle of a TV
trio
97 Touched the
tarmac


98 1944 Preminger
movie
99 Positions of
authority
102 Obote's deposer
103 Post
104 1959 Kingston
Trio hit
107 Photography
aids
108 Tennis player's
bad end?
111 Cheese dish
112 C4H8, e.g.
113 Tickled pink
114 Affirmative on
board
115 Connections
116 Heavy
117 It's good for
what ails you
DOWN
I Rustic
2 Responsibility
3 Catch of the day,
perhaps
4 Digital
communica-
tion?: Abbr.
5 Crow's home
6 Spreads out
7 Galley mark
8 Vocalized
pauses
9 Get smart
10 Use a joystick
11 This person's
revolting
12 Fancy fellows?
13 Gobs
14 Do the walls
over


15 Officer Dibble's
nemesis, in
cartoons
16 Setting of a sci-fi
slave story?
17 Pitcher
Hershiser
18 Where debris
gets caught
22 Peg away
24 Down
31 Bit of gossip
32 Senate
Agriculture
Committee head
34 Basketball
Hall-of-Famer
Unseld
35 Cycloid section
36 Pacer's burden
37 Four-minute
men
38 Die down
39 Old bay, maybe
41 Fishermen, at
times
42 Opposite
45 Simple
organism
47 Money
substitute
49 Two cents worth
51 Promotes
52 Slipped in sleet
53 Not coastal
55 People on line
56 Big piece
57 Sunfish
58 Put on a pedestal
59 Good form
60 "Backdraft" by
the Bolshoi?
65 Shankarand
others


66 Spread out
67 Exact
moment
69 Directly
70 Cremona
collectible
74 Fortuneteller's
tool
76 Short time?
79 Honey


80 Sled dog
81 Set, as a price
82 Marshal at
Waterloo
84 Receptive
86 Checkout device
89 "1, Claudius" star
90 Hot dish
91 Thunderhead's
mother, in film


92 Sounded
swinish
94 Giant
get-together
96 Pluckable
98 Pastoral setting
99 Other, in the
barrio
100 Row
101 Mach 1 fliers


102 Uzbekistan's
-Sea
103 British gun
105 Headed for
overtime
106 Capp of the
comics
109 Pilot's heading
110 1971 McCartney
album


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


. .. .... .. .. .. : .- ,.: .
.. . . ...



--;_ '-,s-: . r-~ 71

7-7
'Z-T
EI-'- .. .



11111i --- :


WATERFRONT ESTATE ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
European-designed waterfront estate nestled on the open Bimini Bay bayou on Anna Maria Is-
land. Use ot marble and intricate tile A separate exercise suite a guest suite and super large
rooms Special attention to quality, chmalizalion, use of lighl and view. Healed pool Security sys-
tem and complete privacy $1.645 000. HOME FACTS s21172 Call Rose Schnoerr


....... ---._-
WATERFRONT HOME DEEP WATER CANAL
Custom built 4BRi3BA rome on deep-w ,er ca-
nal Community pool.tennis courts Over 3.500)
sq It. ol Iving area, four plus car garage
$5-49.000i HOME FACTS #20062 Call Mary
Ann Scrmidat











ISLAND TRIPLEX CLOSE TO BEACH
Large l o r.:..:.m I r pooi. qgod renril pcnrtial JcnTri
H.:.lm-es Be.ah ,cn -1 us line One unit panirlivJ lur-
rni TW) .BR 1 A.o riui iciric: v --i. crime
W,.rk Frilced o sell quiLk $159.9c00 HOME FACTS
2 1192 Call Helen Wriie or Mary Ann Schmidl


SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT HOME
Dramatic, updated 2BRi3BA home on Intracoastal
waterway. Fabulous views of Sarasota Bay Boat
r, -k with two boat lits Large garage and much
storage $385.900 HOME FACTS Q21112. Call
Dick Marer or Dave Jones


MAJESTIC BAYVIEW from PRIVATE
High qualirv 2BR 2BA condc Sunri
seen rom screened 'alccny Wdlk
Two-car enclosure under unit wi
si103.90 HOl..IE FACTS s25282
TiDcerin


BALCONY
es over tba
to Deacnes
in storage
Call Tony,


SUPER LOCATION IN PALMA SOLA
CAGED POOL
er,- tIeauliul h, -me in r, Palm a fa l TiC.-l,.p
s3rape B.rng ,o:ur tbat Huqge C qae po:..l :.:omer
IC. rje.21 900i HOME FACTS a2 11012 Call
Gar\ Larnion


i 4.


HOW TO USE HOME

FACTS NUMBERS
Simply call HOME FACTS
927-3200 and ENTER THE
FIVE-DIGIT properly code shown
HOME F C TS ,-. ill g..e ,.:.u a je.scripii.-l n
.-.1 ti,al pr,,per. ,' or lel ,o'u easrcrh 1.,.r
,-rier pr:,perie- ;are a nr,, price
FROM.1 SOUR COrMPUTER "cces. us
an ,..h ere in trhe ,,i rld at
.,'A ', cold.ell .i.an r ,-,:,rr,


~-i~
; 1
.,-..-..
. .


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