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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00681

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Coalition lobbies for Longboat membership


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island elected officials last week made another at-
tempt to entice Longboat Key into rejoining the Coa-
lition of Barrier Island Elected Officials.
Longboat Key officials quit the coalition several
years ago after they balked over a letter from Bradenton
Beach Mayor Katie Pierola on coalition stationery. In
addition, Longboat officials cited disagreements over
bridges and other issues.
In their most recent attempt at reconciliation, Is-
land officials wrote a mission statement in which they
clarified the purpose of the group and stressed that they
meet to share information but do not vote on issues.



Commission:


don't limit use


of Holmes


Beach field

By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Although Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner
last week asked to limit use of the field behind city hall,
commissioners disagreed.
The field is the site of numerous arts and crafts
festivals, Privateers' flea markets, a circus sponsored
by the Anna Maria Island Community Center and other
community events.
"The schedule is getting heavy on weekends dur-
ing some months," VanWagoner said. "I think the field
needs a rest once in awhile. I think 50-percent use
might be a ceiling."
He said local art organizations have first choice of


'I don't think we
should discriminate.
I think we should
keep an open mind
and not just limit it
to the Island. If the
mayor thinks the
schedule's getting
too full, he should
come to the
commission.'
Commissioner
Carol Whitmore


dates for festivals,
then it's open to
anyone who makes
a request.
"Are we hol-
lering before we're
hurt?" Commission
Chairman Don
Maloney asked.
"Are we going to
end up saying yes
to some and no to
some?"
Yes, Van-
Wagoner said.
Maloney
asked what proce-
dures are followed
for permitting use
of the field.


Deputy Clerk Brooke Bennett said a written appli-
cation is completed and sent to department heads and
the fire chief for approval or approval with caveats.
The mayor then gives the final OK. If he feels there are
any questions or unusual circumstances, he has the
option of bringing it to the commission for approval.
Maloney said the mayor should not deny any re-
quests without commission consent.
"I look forward to events in the field," Commis-
sioner Carol Whitmore said. "I don't think we
should discriminate. I think we should keep an open
mind and not just limit it to the Island. If the mayor
thinks the schedule's getting too full, he should
come to the commission."
Commissioner Ron Robinson suggested only al-
lowing groups that are sponsored by local, nonprofit
agencies. However, the agencies don't have to be
strictly charitable, he added.
"We should set a policy for the city," Commis-
sioner Luke Courtney said. "We currently allow both


At the meeting of Island Elected Officials,
Longboat Key Mayor Ray Metz said he would take the
request to his commission, as he has in the past. How-
ever, he noted that recent differences in opinion on is-
sues such as the Ringling Causeway Bridge and airport
flight paths over the islands hamper his efforts.
"One of the arguments against (rejoining) is that
our interests are different," he noted. "We have dif-
ferent agendas."
"We have more in common than we have in oppo-
sition," Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner said.
"It's not a matter of us agreeing on every issue. It's
to share our ideas and know what's on each others'
minds. There's so much we can do for our constitu-


nonprofit organizations and commercial groups to
sponsor activities in the field. I like Mr. Robinson's
idea."
"If you restrict it to nonprofit organizations, that
field will not be overused," VanWagoner said.
Courtney said he will draft a policy for commission
discussion at the June 24 work session.
"The city can set whatever reasonable restric-
tions and standards it chooses as long as it's treating
the applicants consistently," City Attorney Patricia
Petruff said. "There's nothing that says you have to
allow city-owned property to be used for someone
else to make money."
According to the city's calendar, the following
dates have been scheduled:
Island Bicycle Rodeo, Oct. 11.
Artist's Guild of AMI art festival, Nov. 8 and 9.
AMI Art League art festival, Dec. 6 and 7.
Arts and crafts show, Community Affairs, Jan. 3
and 4.
AMI Privateers' flea market, Jan. 10.
Arts and crafts show, Community Affairs, Feb. 14
and 15.
AMI Privateers' flea market, Feb. 21.
AMI Art League art festival, March 14 and 15.
AMI Privateers' flea market, March 21.
Arts and crafts show, M.Y. Promotions of Ft.
Myers, March 28 and 29.


ents if we work together."
"It's to the benefit of all of us to be on this com-
mittee and share ideas," Bradenton Beach Commis-
sioner Connie Drescher added. "As far as agreeing,
on the Island Transportation Planning Organization,
we have to vote what our citizens want regardless of
our personal choices on the bridge. Our cities don't
always agree but we find it very worthwhile being in
the coalition and sharing our ideas and thoughts."
"I don't argue with that but it's going to be a hard
sell," Metz said.
As a step toward understanding, Island officials
asked Metz for a presentation on the town's opposition
to the change in flight paths for the June 25 meeting.


OWW-EEE!
Six-year-old Bobby Stoker
of Bradenton gets a
comforting hand from his
dad, Bob Stoker, as Collin
Schmidt of Marine Rescue
administers first aid.
Bobby learned the hard
way that it's never to
early to learn the "sting-
ray shuffle" after being
stung near the Anna
Maria City Pier. Colum-
bia Blake Medical Center
treated more than 25
other victims during the
Memorial Day weekend.
For "lessons" in per-
forming the stingray
shuffle, see inside.
Islander Photo:
Anthony Seaton


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


MAY 28, 1997






ij~ PAGE 2 M MAY 28, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Fire commission

approves tax

rate for 1997-98
The Anna Maria Fire District Commission ap-
proved an increase in the tax rate for the 1997-98
fiscal year.
The new rates are as follows with current rates
in parentheses:
Residential $65 per unit plus .045 cents per
square foot over 1,000 square feet ($65 plus .04).
Commercial $140 for the first 1,000 square
feet plus .05 cents per square foot over 1,000
square feet ($140 plus .045).
Travel trailers $50 ($47.50).
Vacant lots $4 ($4).
The amount of the yearly increases is man-
dated by the state legislature in a five-year plan.
The district's five-year plan began in 1990 and it
has still not reached the maximum allowed by the
state.
Mary Stephens, AMFD administrative secre-
tary, said the rates must be submitted to the prop-
erty appraiser's office by June 1. The county ap-
plies the proper rate to each piece of property in
the district and supplies a print-out to the district
by July 1. The district then has 21 days to check
each piece of property and make sure the applied
tax rate is correct.



Rotten Ralph's


is expanding


eastward
Rotten Ralph came out of the north, and now
he's heading east.
Ralph Russell, founder of Rotten Ralph's restau-
rant in Anna Maria City, is opening another restau-
rant on Manatee Avenue near Interstate 75. He hopes
to be in business this week.
Operators of the new facility will be his son and
daughter-in-law, Paul and Kari Russell. They lived
on Anna Maria Island while working with the senior
Russell, but have moved to east Manatee County to
be near their new business.
"Paul has worked in the restaurant business with
me since he was a child," said his father. "He knows
the business from the ground up."
Ralph Russell had restaurants in his native
Ontario before coming here with wife Doreen nine
years ago and founding Rotten Ralph's the name,
he says, was adopted from his nickname with the
Lions Club here.
They will continue to run their Anna Maria res-
taurant, under the name Rotten Ralph's Waterfront.
The new east-county restaurant will be Rotten
Ralph's Eastside. It will seat 64 and serve beer and
wine and much the same menu as the parent restau-
rant, Russell senior said.
This is the second move beyond Anna Maria for
Rotten Ralph's owner. He operated the Hunt Club at
mid-Longboat Key for several years before selling
it. The Longboat Tavern is now at that location.


Four charged in


automobile burglaries
Thanks to an alert newspaper delivery man, four
suspects were arrested and charged with burglariz-
ing numerous vehicles in Holmes Beach and Anna
Maria on May 22.
The tale started in the early morning hours when
Holmes Beach Officer Steve Wolff was investigating
an automobile burglary on 72nd Street. The victim said
several fishing rods were taken. While checking the
area, Wolff found a car with its door ajar nearby. He
notified the owner who discovered that his cellular
phone was missing.
A short while later a newspaper delivery man ob-
served several cars with doors open in the 400 block of
63rd Street. He also observed a vehicle leaving the area
and went to the Holmes Beach Police station to report
his information.
Officers began searching the area and Officer Rob
Velardi observed the vehicle matching the suspect de-
scription. It was occupied by four males and was head-7:
ing east on Manatee Avenue near Kingfish Ramp.
Velardi, joined by Wolff, stopped the vehicle and
found the stolen items. '
The four suspects John Curtis, 29, and Millard
Miller, 19, of Sarasota, and Kevin Curtis, 17, and
James Rich, 14, of Bradenton were charged with bur-"
glary and grand theft. The adults were transported to I.
the county jail and the juveniles were transported to the
juvenile assessment center.
Stolen items included 17 fishing rods and reels, power'
tools, television sets, electronic equipment, compact disks,
spotlights, wallets and cash. Officers later found automo- Some of the "loot" recovered during a burglary
bile burglaries had also occurred on 71st Street and in spree in Holmes Beach last week. Islander Photo:
Anna Maria that may be tied to the suspects. Pat Copeland



Cortez battling for

museums, center


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Two organizations that want the old Cortez school-
house for the village's use will be seeking help in Tal-
lahassee next week.
The Cortez Village Historical Society and the
Cortez Community Center will appeal for funds from
the state's Bureau of Historical Resources, which has
$12 to $14 million a year to spend for special projects.
Deadline for applications is June 2.
Also underway now is a major effort to raise funds
toward matching the state grant with local money. This
drive is spearheaded by Dr. Mary Fulford Green, who
is treasurer of both organizations. She asked that do-
nors call her at 756-3784.
Dr. Green also will be leading the push for funds in
the capital next week. She said the state would be permit-
ted to pay half the purchase price of the old school.
It has been appraised at $360,000, she said. If the
state were to contribute $180,000, the Cortez organi-
zations feel sure they can scrape together $50,000 as a
matching amount and the rest of the village's half could
be in donated services.
Part of the grounds would accommodate the
1890 waterfront store, which has been up on mover's
blocks since it was detached from the Albion Inn
when the historic inn was demolished to make way
for the Coast Guard station.


The community raised $12,000 to move the store
building from its temporary spot on A.P. Bell Fish Co.
property, but there has been no site for it. The building
had been the east wing of the inn, and after the 1921
hurricane it housed the grocery, post office and living
quarters for the proprietors, Joe and Bessie Guthrie.
The organizations propose to develop a replica of
the old store downstairs, with the Family Life Museum
and Fishermen Hall of Fame upstairs.
Dr. Green said many articles have been collected
for the family museum, such as furniture from the
Albion, a tablecloth crocheted by Laura Mora, the first
table of Tink and Edith Fulford in 1924, handmade
baby clothing of Thomas "Blue" Fulford and more.
The rest of the old school grounds, which date back
to 1912, are earmarked for playground, ball fields, pic-
nic area, a nature walk and other developments suitable
for the Cultural Heritage Park envisioned there.
The school building would house a "mini fishing
museum" with commercial fishing gear, a small boat,
historic photos of the village's fishing heritage; a fes-
tival and public center in the auditorium; a visitors'
welcoming facility; and the Cortez Community Center.
The center recently moved from an old house near
the waterfront to the former volunteer fire station.
While this is a great improvement, Dr. Green said, the
school property would provide better and more facili-
ties for the expanding programs of the center.


Charges filed in child-choking incident


Darren Rose, 21, of Holmes Beach was arrested
and charged with aggravated child abuse and battery
after allegedly choking a child who touched his car.
Police said Rose drove into the parking lot at
4001 Gulf Drive where three children were playing.
One child held a shoe and pretended to throw it at
Rose's car. Rose got out of his car and told the boys
not to touch it.
According to police, one six-year-old boy ad-
mitted he touched the car and said Rose grabbed
him by the throat with both hands, lifting him off


the ground, choking him and yelling at him not to
touch the car. The boy appeared to be passing out
when Rose dropped him and went into his apart-
ment, police said.
The boy's father heard him crying and came to
investigate. The children told him what happened
and he went to Rose's apartment and confronted
Rose. According to the police report, the father
choked Rose, released him and called police.
Holmes Beach police questioned Rose, who
they say admitted choking the boy.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 N PAGE 3 MJ

Commission nixes cell tower moratorium


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach commissioners agreed last week
they don't need a moratorium on cellular phone tow-
ers in the city.
They felt the 60-day delay they imposed on May
6 would give them ample time to rule on the special
exception sought by GTE officials. However, they
did schedule a site visit with GTE officials on June
10 at 9 a.m.
In March, the commission approved a special
exception for GTE Mobilnet to construct a 155-foot
cellular phone tower at Smith Realtors, 5904 Marina
Drive. The tower would stand beside the new Bam-
boo Raw Bar on the south side of the Smith build-
ing.
The commission's decision against imposing a
moratorium took Mayor Bob VanWagoner by sur-
prise.
"At the last meeting the majority of the members
of the commission were in favor of it," he said. "It's
important that we decide that issue before we go
around accepting or rejecting particular sites, oth-
erwise you will lose the opportunity."
City Attorney Patricia Petruff said the commis-
sion could proceed on this ordinance and also pro-
ceed with a moratorium and review the city's ordi-
nances so the next applicant would be bound by
more stringent regulations.
Commission Chairman Don Maloney said he
originally sought a moratorium because he thought
that was the only opportunity to air his concerns but
now he feels the 60-day delay is adequate.
Maloney listed his concerns:
Is it needed in the proposed location?
What is the future need for towers?
What are the safety concerns?
What will the tower look like?
How will the tower area be landscaped?
Will GTE compensate the city for the use of air
waves?
Who will take the tower down when it is no
longer needed?
I-


What will happen to the tower when the tech-
nology changes?
With regard to the special exception, any deci-
sion must be based on the evidence commissioners
heard at the public hearing, Petruff noted. If they
want to make significant changes or hear new evi-
dence, they must reopen the public hearing.
She said the site visit is considered fact finding,
rather than gathering new evidence. However, it
must be conducted in the "sunshine," open to the
public.

Put tower at city hall,
says Courtney
Commissioner Luke Courtney said he still feels
the tower should be on city hall property, rather than
at the Smith Realtors site. He cited a July 2, 1996,
letter from Petruff in which she said that "it could be
considered to construe a valid municipal purpose."
According to the deed, the city hall property was
donated to the city for public purpose. Commercial
use of the property may cause it to revert to the heirs
of the grantors.
Courtney said the city could change its land de-
velopment code to make cellular communication an
essential service and declare it a municipal purpose
to allow the tower to be constructed on city land
without having to check with the grantors' heirs.
"My opinion was that there were some valid ar-
guments that it could be shown to be a public pur-
pose," explained Petruff. "Unfortunately, my opin-
ion doesn't count. If the heirs to the property wish
to contest that issue, they have every right to do so.
The stakes, if we lose, are very high."
Petruff said the city could ask for a declaratory
statement from circuit court to resolve the issue or
seek an opinion from the state attorney general.
"When are we going to stop asking the relatives
what we can do with our land? Courtney asked.
"Forty years from now I don't want to see another
commission trying to find a 15th cousin of an heir to
ask if we can paint the city hall pink. I think this
commission can decide what's a municipal purpose.


I am for going to the attorney general for an opin-
ion."
The city could also force the issue and try to
have the reverter clause removed, Petruff noted.
"One of the things that makes me absolutely fu-
rious is when someone gives something to someone
in a will and there's an attempt to circumvent that in-
tention," Commissioner Ron Robinson protested.
"This city accepted this land with the stipulations
that the donors made. There wasn't any question
about it. I feel an obligation to honor their wishes."
Commissioner Carol Whitmore said she favors
seeking an opinion from the attorney general.
"I stand by the way the property was given and
accepted," Commissioner Pat Geyer stressed. "I
don't think we should go to the attorney general."
Maloney agreed with Geyer.
"The site visit is a delay tactic," said Bob
Kersteen, GTE's manager of site acquisitions. "For
our facility to go on city land is a dead issue. We
have a contract with Smith Realtors and we must
honor it. We have complied with everything the city
has requested. We want some solution. We've
waited long enough."



Anna Maria City
None scheduled

Bradenton Beach
6/5, 7 p.m., commission meeting.

Holmes Beach
None scheduled

Of Interest
5/29, 9 a.m., 9 a.m., Manatee County
Commission special meeting on Riverview
Pointe acquisition, Manatee County
Administration Center,
1112 Manatee Ave.W., Bradenton.


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IM PAGE 4 E MAY 28, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


State/federal officials set to view drain pipe site


By Anthony Seaton
Islander Reporter
An Anna Maria drainage project nearly as
choked with denied permits as the ditch is with man-
groves may be about to move forward.
Representatives from five regulatory agencies
will meet with city officials Thursday, May 29, at
the proposed site of a new stormwater runoff pipe
that would stretch from the Anchorage/Fast Eddies
site on Pine Avenue to Bimini Bay in Holmes Beach.
There is some question, though, as to whether
the proposed pipe will meet the requirements of de-
creased maintenance as opposed to a ditch, while
providing improved drainage for the area.
According to Anna Maria Building Official Phil
Charnock, representatives from the Florida Depart-
ment of Marine Fisheries, the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Florida Department of Fish and Wildlife,
Southwest Florida Water Management District,
(commonly known as Swiftmud,) and the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, will be at
the site to determine whether to install a pipeline or
to landscape the ditch.
Residents have complained for years about stag-
nant water after heavy rains, and Swiftmud targeted
the area as a project to alleviate flooding as well, ac-
cording to Charnock.
For more than seven years the city has applied
for permits to do various cleanup and drainage im-


provement projects that have all been denied.
Charnock estimates it's been 30 years or more since
the ditch was properly maintained.
At a work session two weeks ago, Mayor Chuck
Shumard announced the results of a feasibility study
the city commissioned. Shumard said he didn't fol-
low the city public works department's recommen-
dation and have a study done on both a ditch, or
swalee," and the pipeline, but only a pipeline.
The mayor said he felt the pipeline was the way
to go, so he only had a study done on the costs of that
option. Based on the mayor's report, the commission
approved going ahead with the pipeline.
Charnock said that the pipeline would cost about
three times as much as cleaning out the existing
ditch and landscaping it to current standards for
swales. The pipe would have inlets at various loca-
tions to allow for runoff from roads, driveways,
roofs and yards to enter the pipe.
The water would then flow to Bimini Bayand
then into Anna Maria Sound and Tampa Bay.
Any increased nutrients that would be injected
into the various water bodies due to the increased
flow from the pipe should be "dropped off into
Bimini Bay," according to Charnock.
The cost of the pipe alone, which Charnock es-
timates will be as much as 50 inches in diameter, is
approximately $125,000.
That price does not include- removal of mature


mangroves and environmental mitigation which
could be required by any one of the agencies set to
view the sight on Thursday.
Even though the costs of the pipeline would ini-
tially be greater, Charnock said that the long-term
costs may be lower due to less maintenance.
However, according to an extensive report re-
sulting from Swiftmud's 1996 study on stormwater
runoff for the Island, "pipe ... once buried ... is typi-
cally within the zone of tidal fluctuation ... and
marine growth rapidly builds up, as does sediment
deposition, and tidal waters regularly impede the
pipe's discharge capability. Maintenance is required
at frequent intervals in order to prevent a reduction
in the system's discharge capabilities."
The report goes on to say, "The advantage of
open channels over pipes is primarily related to the
opportunity to infiltrate water into and drain water
from the soil, and to the ability to store larger quan-
tities of water at levels below the road levels.
"Open channels can also be kept at higher lev-
els than pipes, so that they are less restricted by tidal
influence, the report said, adding "maintenance is
simplified when compared to a pipe system, because
of the open access."
Charnock said that he wanted a study done on
the swale option as well, but, "for political reasons,"
the mayor prefers the pipeline to alleviate standing
water and flooding.


Young Islander looks for help for Jamaica trip


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Do you have tall grass? Bushy bushes?
Unwalked dogs? Unrun errands?
Matt Losek is just the man for you.
He is an energetic 13-year-old Anna Maria
Islander who has to earn $480 for one of life's
good purposes building a church in the Third
World.
Matt is the son of Richard and Susan Losek,
brother of Elizabeth who a couple of years ago
did a similar fine deed in Guatemala. Dad is a
firefighter with the Island department, Mom
identifies herself proudly as a homemaker. They
live in Bradenton Beach.
Young Matt hopes and prays to go to Ja-
maica with a group from the Church of the Cross
in Bradenton. In the Caribbean nation they will
build a new church, work with children in or-
phanages, help with medical treatment and gen-
erally do fine works.
But they have to get there. That's where the
$480 comes in. Once there, lodging is provided
in the form of a concrete floor where sleeping
bags fit just fine, said Ms. Losek.
To earn the round-trip ticket, Matt will do
what anyone needs done that a 13-year-old can
do mow lawns, trim shrubbery, weed gar-
dens, clean scruffy comers or garages or what-
ever, walk dogs, run errands.
He will have all of June and part of July to
work. His group will be in Jamaica from July
15-22.


"! y:" .,. .. ... ",. .





Employment wanted
Matt Losek relaxes with his pal Hunter before joining the workforce he hopes. The Bradenton Beach
youngster needs money to help build a church in the Caribbean.


He is in the seventh grade at Sugg Middle School,
plays oboe, saxophone, basketball and soccer. He's
awaiting a class that will teach him how to be a cadet


in his father's fire department.
But first, $480 and Jamaica. He's open to of-
fers at 778-7015.


Commissioners try bargaining for Riverview Pointe land


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Manatee County Commissioners attempting to
negotiate for a pristine piece of property adjacent to
DeSoto National Memorial last week ended up with a
$1,000 reduction in price but no agreement.
The nine-acre property was slated to become an
upscale development called Riverview Pointe when
residents appealed to the Manatee County Commission
to purchase the property for a public park. Sarasota
developer Tom Mannausa agreed to give the public two
weeks to raise enough money to help the county pur-
chase the property, priced at $1.8 million.
The property is home to butterfly orchids, gopher
tortoises, indigo snakes, Indian middens, a natural


spring and contains six habitats coastal stream,
sandy beach, mangrove swamp, mixed wetland hard-
woods, sand pine/xeric oak and temperate hardwoods.
A group called Friends of Riverview Pointe went
into high gear, appealing to residents, business owners
and community organizations for donations. By the
morning of the county commission meeting, Friends
had raised $102,000. Mannausa himself donated
$10,000 toward the purchase which lowered the price
to $1.79 million.
In addition county staff members, led by County
Administrator Ernie Padgett, worked to find grant
money to fund the majority of the purchase. At the
meeting Padgett said if grants are secured, the county's
cost would be about $225,000. This does not include


the donations.
Commissioners first asked Padgett to negotiate a
lower price with Mannausa. Mannausa agreed to $1.69
million, a reduction of $100,000. Commissioners re-
jected the offer.
Next they made a counter offer to reimburse
Mannausa the cost of the land and his development
costs to date plus 10 percent, with a ceiling of $1.69
million. Mannausa rejected that offer.
In a third attempt one commissioner suggested of-
fering $1,691,000, but the others rejected it.
However, all parties agreed to make another at-
tempt to agree on a price at 9 a.m. on May 29 in the
county commission chambers, county administration
building.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 28, 1997 PAGE 5 ni]3

Island police departments announce awards


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Officer Stanley House of the Bradenton Beach
Police Department and Officer Sandy Keller of the
Holmes Beach Police Department have been named
Officers of the Year.
In his nomination, Bradenton Beach Police Chief
Jack Maloney said House was selected because of "his
overall performance over the year. He achieved the
highest statistics in every category we track except two
and in those he tied for second place.
"He has also demonstrated an improvement in
dealing with the public, especially in situations that
could have been exacerbated by an emotional as op-
posed to a professional reaction on his part."


House
House


Keller


Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine praised
Keller, the city's community officer, for resolving
neighborhood complaints before they became police


matters and for her rapport with elderly, and often
lonely, members of the community.
"Sandy's job is unique in the fact that she spends
her time either riding the bicycle through business
and residential areas in an attempt to open commu-
nication lines between the police department and the
community, and enforcing the laws of the waterways
on the department's personal watercraft," Romine
said.
Romine said Keller has become a highly visible
figure in the community and people have begun to ask
for her on a regular basis.
The annual award is given by the Manatee
County 100 Club which honored the officers at a
recent banquet.


Island artist has work accepted by White House


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Myrtle Doolittle learned about collage on Anna
Maria Island, made one of a First Lady, sent it to the
White House and got an appreciative letter from the
First Lady.
Can you picture it? Doolittle can't.
But she's trying.
It started, she explained, when she took a class in
the art of collage from the Anna Maria Art League in
Holmes Beach. Collage, says the dictionary, is "a pic-
ture made by gluing fragments of various materials in
a composition," and Doolittle must have learned it ex-
ceptionally well.
She got her assignment from her teacher, who tore
pictures from a magazine and distributed them among
her students with instructions to take it from there.
Doolittle's picture happened to be of President Franklin
D. Roosevelt's wife.
Doolittle remembered how outraged her straitlaced
Republican father had been at the active part Eleanor
Roosevelt played in public life, decades before it be-
came acceptable.


"He just fumed, 'What is her husband doing, to
allow her to do all these crazy things?'"
So Doolittle researched her subject at the Island
library and found plenty for a collage.
"I found a picture of her in slacks reviewing the
troops in World War II, and I used it with humor,
clouds full of angels saying 'It's her, it's her.'
"I tied it all in with a photo of the four presidents
who attended her funeral, Kennedy, Eisenhower,
Truman, Johnson. Across the top I had pictures of
women doing things. I had three interlocking wed-
ding rings, which signified, to me anyway, how her
own ring was always attached somehow to some
other woman the mother-in-law who practically
told her when to inhale and exhale, the girlfriend the
President had all those years of Eleanor's marriage
to him, and of course herself, her own ring. And I
wired jewelry across it, signifying the wealth she
always had."
The collage hung in Manatee County Democratic
Party headquarters for several weeks, and then a friend
in North Carolina got wind of it.
He decided it was worthy of the White House that


Eleanor Roosevelt had occupied as First Lady for more
than a dozen years, and sent it there.
To Doolittle's astonishment, it was accepted as part
of the White House gallery, and she got "a nice formal
letter" from the current First Lady.
The trouble is, she has only the letter and the
memory to show for it. She didn't think to take photo-
graphs of the collage before it went north. She can only
describe it, which she finds is somewhat short of show-
ing it in living color.
She has taken the problem to Manatee Democrats,
who have promised to get something done. And maybe
they will. In spite of her not being a Democrat, nor a
Republican either: "I'm a me, I lived too long being
told what to do."
Her best hope now, she feels, is the video which a
woman made of Democratic headquarters while the
collage was there. Maybe a few frames caught her art-
work, so prints may be made from it.
Trouble is, she doesn't know who the
videophotographer was. That's one thing the Demo-
crats have said they'd find out.
She's hoping.


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UMD PAGE 6 K MAY 28, 1997 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Hurricane season
pre-planning tips
The 1997 hurricane season officially starts June
1. Forecasters predict another active Atlantic season
with 11 named storms, seven of them developing 74
mph winds to become hurricanes. Of that seven,
three are expected to be intense storms.
It's hard to imagine a more active year than the
past one with Island damages widespread from
October's brush with tropical storm Josephine. The
need for pre-season planning is even more important
in view of that experience.
First, if a hurricane is working its way toward
Southwest Florida, plan to evacuate the Island early.
But even before the storms form, take a few min-
utes to gather your family and discuss what you will
do if a storm threatens.
Talk about where you'll go if you have to leave.
Check to see if you have enough of any prescription
drugs, canned food, water, important papers and all
the other things you'll need to take with you.
Most important, if you have family or friends on
the mainland in an area that is out of the flood zone,
give them a call and make sure that you and your
family are included in their hurricane plans.
Remember that evacuation shelters do not ac-
commodate pets, so make plans now to kennel your
dogs or cats.
Probably the most important thing about family
pre-planning in the event of a storm is to openly dis-
cuss those things you'll need to do and assign tasks
to avoid last-minute scrambling. Remember, at the
last minute, extra scrambling could well cost lives.
If you don't have your evacuation sticker -
your ticket for re-admission following an evacuation
- from your respective city hall, you need to ad-
dress that immediately as well.
Now is also a good time to check your insurance
policy to see if it needs to be updated. Have you
taken photos of your home, both inside and out? Are
valuables recorded and photographed? Insurance
companies advise you to do so to speed up claims if
damage does take place. And take steps to prepare
your boat as well.
Take a few minutes to read The Islander
Bystander's special hurricane readiness section in
this issue to refresh your memory of the dos and
don't of the hurricane season. It's all there infor-
mation to prepare pets, boats, home and family for
big storms.
We're all hoping the exercise of pre-planning
will prove to be an unnecessary task.



ISLANDERS, a IN
MAY 28, 1997 VOLUME 5, NUMBER 28
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Jim Hanson
Anthony Seaton
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Kevin P. Cassidy
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Edna Tiemann
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster




Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1997 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
E-mail: islander@mead.net
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan

e -19LlaI- eom


Over-stepping authority
I am writing this letter to inform the residents of
Holmes Beach of yet another incident in which our
mayor has felt he has the authority to do whatever he
thinks he can do.
As the liaison to the Manatee County Commission,
I attended a meeting last week at which the proposed
ball field in Holmes Beach was on the agenda. The item
was approval for funds to improve the ball field follow-
ing the interlocal agreement that the Holmes Beach
Commission signed recently.
I was shocked and embarrassed when our mayor
stood up and stated, with no knowledge of his commis-
sion, that he thought he should not have signed this
agreement and he wanted to discuss this with the
county commission.
Commissioner Stan Stephens proceeded to stop the
mayor, I believe appropriately, and told him that this
was a moot point as the agreement was signed. They
appropriately halted the mayor and delayed discussion
until next week due to the comments made.
I was very embarrassed that the mayor felt he had
to approach the county commission with no authority
from his city commission. This is one of many ex-
amples of our mayor doing what he feels should be
done and not what the citizens want.
Just remember, thanks to the mayor:
No more Privateer float (on the Island for the past
20 years)
No noise-making within 100 feet of your prop-
erty line
No phone tower for our fire department or private
cell phone use
No rental restrictions (currently overnight rentals
exist in most of the city).
Citizens, please wake up.
Carol Whitmore, Holmes Beach Commissioner

Historic Cortez needs you
We want to say "thank you" for all the support you
have given our past efforts. We ask that you give us
this opportunity to inform the greater community about
the need for support for our current undertaking.
We need letters and money if we are to get ap-


proval of our proposal for funding from the State of
Florida's Bureau of Historic Resources. The applica-
tion for Special Projects is due in Tallahassee on Mon-
day, June 2. The state will have millions to be allocated.
We want a little bit of it for Cortez.
We asked for funding last year but our proposal
could not be considered because the Manatee County
Commission did not recommend the expenditure of
county funds to be used as "match." We will not ask the
county again. There are always other projects which are
more "politically correct."
We are committed to raising the required $50,000
match by our contributions and those of our friends. We
have the opportunity to draw down $180,000 from the
state. Our plan is to buy the old 1912 school house for the
site of our Cortez Cultural Heritage Park. The property
will also be used for activities of our children. The prop-
erty is on the market. This may be our last chance to get
it for Cortez. It is unfortuante that the school board did not
give it to the people of Cortez some 20 years ago.
Many readers do recognize the value of the 108-
year-old fishing village and the contribution to the
economy if we can develop Heritage Park. We believe
that many of your readers who appreciate the rich heri-
tage of this little bit of old Florida. including those who
cater to tourists, will want to help us.
We ask for letters of support to be mailed to Mr.
George Percy, director, Bureau of Historic Resources,
R.A. Gray Building 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee,
FL 32399-0250.
We ask that all who can, please make a financial
tax-deductible contribution to help us raise the addi-
tional $10,000 cash that we need. Checks should be
payable to Cortez Community Center, P.O. Box 274,
Cortez, FL 34215.
We ask that people with expertise in restoration,
project management, museums, and fundraising volun-
teer his or her services which can be counted as
"match." We need help in many areas. We say, "What-
ever you can do, we can use your help." To volunteer
services or to get more details, contact me at 756-3784.
Mary Fulford Green, Ed.D.

Your Opinion continues on page 8










THfSE WERE THE AYS


Part 17,


Conclusion, The Roaring Twenties
by June Alder


The almost-finished Gandy bridge linking St. Petersburg and Tampa gets the
once-over from an inspection team. The gents seem to be wondering why gaps
were left in the concrete paving. For interurban tracks, that's what.


MEGA BRIDGE


Sam Cobb, Anna Maria Island's
third settler, made a name for himself as
a craftsman and boat builder. The fish-
ermen of Cortez swore by him as the
builder of superior boats from skipjacks
to sea-going schooners. He built war-
ships in Tampa during World War I, and
after the war he was chosen to do the
interior work on a new Maas Brothers
Store.
But his greatest accomplishment -
few know about this was the role he
played in building what was ih 1924 re-
puted to be the longest automobile toll
bridge in the world. This was the Gandy
Bridge across Old Tampa Bay, linking
St. Petersburg and Tampa.
The man who thought up the bridge
was former Philadelphian George S.
"Dad" Gandy. People thought he was
crazy when he first began talking about
it around 1905. But this was the time of
the Panama Canal, a time for dreamers
who became doers.
Starting in 1910 he lobbied commu-
nity leaders and state legislators to get
the federal government to finance the
project. He was making headway until
World War I came along and stymied
him but only temporarily. ("If that
bridge is ever built, by myself or anyone
else, it will be by some fellow who gets
behind it like I have and never quits," he
told reporters.)
In 1922 Gandy decided to offer
stock for sale on Wall Street. It was the
right thing to do. Boom-time investors
gobbled up $2 million worth of certifi-
cates within 122 days of issue.
Gandy had already engaged Sam
Cobb in his cause. In 1920 Sam closed
up his Anna Maria boatyard and set up
a lumbering camp in the upper reaches
of the Manatee River on.the edge of
some of Florida's best yellow pine for-
estland. With his son Louis, he spied out
the prime trees, cutting through the
high, thick palmettoes surrounding the
bayheads and swamps to get to them. He


had an unerring eye, able to estimate
the exact number of railroad track ties
he could get out of a log.
It took 25 to 30 men to cut down
the trees, all by hand. A tractor-pulled
"skidmill" was hauled from place to
place to saw them up. Sam's biggest
challenge was locating 40-foot-tall
pines for the drawbridge and then fash-
ioning them into planks the proper
size-a huge task for the primitive
mill. But he did it all and rafted the tim-
bers up the Bay some 30 miles to the
bridge site where eventually as many as
1,500 men would be at work.
By the time the bridge was fin-
ished, it had used up 170,000 tons of
sand, 3,500 tons of steel and 7,000 tons
of rock. After dedication ceremonies
on Nov. 20, 1924, motorists crossed the
span joyfully, appreciating that
Gandy's 2-1/2 mile over-water road
had slashed the driving distance be-
tween St. Petersburg and Tampa in
half.
Gandy Bridge was the most long-
lasting (50 years) and important
achievement of the Florida Boom. It
literally paved the way for the mega-
development we are so familiar with
today.
About that rail line. Cobb's rail-
road ties never supported a railroad
track. The automobile took over as
king of the road, more's the pity.


Summer is upon us and I will be
taking some time off. So the next sev-
eral months' worth of columns will be
a rerun of the story of the establishment
of the Island's first municipality, incor-
porated in 1923. I scribbled the saga in
1993. Gosh, have I been doing this for
almost five years? Seems so. See you
in the fall.

Next: How Anna Maria
City was born

Bunting and flags decorated the
Gandy toll gate on dedication day
in 1924. Tolls were 55 cents for
car and driver, 10 cents for each
passenger and the same for a
horse and rider.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 0 PAGE 7 E[]


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iEG PAGE 8 N MAY 28, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Ie YOUR ]l[9


Harmony, please
This letter is in response to the letter from Hugh
Holmes Sr. printed in this space on May 14.
It is apparent to anyone on Anna Maria Island that
there is a great need for youth facilities. Mayor
Bohnenberger was presented a letter that was signed by
over 150 Islanders in June 1995 requesting the exist-
ing ball field be upgraded to a regulation size Babe
Ruth field for older boys, girls and adult teams.
Where have you been Mr. Holmes?
It took the commission more than 14 months of
planning and public meetings to get the field approved.
Manatee County was generous by offering to do the
work with twice yearly upgrading and funding as they
do for all the other communities in our county.
Why should we be different and not accept county
funding for our complex? The county commissioners
recognized and acknowledged the explosion in the
number of children on the Island, according to county
school board records.
As for your concerns about hundreds of people
coming here to play ball, as a baseball Mom I can-at-
test that no coaches in Bradenton want to drive out to
our Island. People by nature use the facilities that are
closest and convenient to their home or work.
Look out your window Mr. Holmes. The Baby
Boomers' children are having children. They're pushing
strollers, not grocery carts. They are here to stay and more
are coming. This Island is entering the 21st century with
a young generation unlike your island of 20 years ago. I
applaud our commission for having the foresight to see the
need and even greater needs in the future.
We can all live on this Island in harmony and en-
joy watching and playing America's all time favorite
- baseball.
Rose Mary Patterson, Holmes Beach


Building official enforces the law
not the 'I wants'
"If you don't like the news, fire the messenger."
We have seen two recent Anna Maria City public
works directors forced out of their positions for simply
enforcing the rules set forth by the leaders of the commu-
nity. Will we soon see a third capable building official be
railroaded out of a job because we don't like the rules


which he is bound to apply?
To add insult to injury, we have some overzealous
citizens dragging someone's personal life into the fray and
attempting to make that the issue. Everyone has skeletons
in the closet and the right to freedom of speech does not
imply that we should publicly embarrass someone if we
happen to obtain one of these skeletons. There are many
potential reasons for filing personal bankruptcy and to be
perfectly frank, I don't see any correlation between one's
ability to perform the job they have been trained for and
the fact that they have run into financial difficulties
The real issue at hand is the local building code ordi-
nances in our community and whether or not they make
sense. A great deal of time was recently spent revamping
our local building code. The code revision process in-
cluded solicitation of input from professionals in the con-
struction industry as well as observing what had been done
in other communities. We seem to be very dissatisfied
with the end result of this process, however, the loudest
complainers lack the expertise and the knowledge to be
capable of providing an objective opinion. Is it that we
actually approve of the rules and regulations as long as
there isn't one that affects what we personally want to do?
I live in the community, am a Florida registered struc-
tural engineer and I am the owner of an engineering firm
located in Sarasota. I am intimately familiar with all of the
structural codes for the coastal communities in Florida as
a good portion of my firm's work involves structures lo-
cated within the coastal zones.
There is no appreciable difference between our struc-
tural requirements and those of other communities. Our
major problem is that most of the existing residential con-
struction in our community is non-conforming to the cur-
rent requirements and that any attempt to remodel exist-
ing houses eventually runs afoul of Federal Emergency
Management Agency regulations when owners attempt to
minimize their renovation expenses.
It becomes a "Catch-22" situation. If we fight or ig-
nore FEMA, our insurance premiums will rise dramati-
cally and we run the risk of being ineligible for federal
relief funds should a catastrophic storm event inundate our
Island. Please keep in mind that these requirements are
meant to protect us from the devastating destruction that
so many other communities have felt.
I am thankful that the "good old boys" days when a
blind eye was turned to the actions of a select few have


ended. We have a conscientious building official who is
simply enforcing the rules that we have empowered him
to take care of. Building codes are always subject to in-
terpretation and in all my dealings with Phil Chamock, on
behalf of my clients, I have found him very receptive to
listening to sound reason and he has used his discretion-
ary power wisely.
If you don't like the news, don't ridicule the messen-
ger. It only makes you appear foolish to the other mem-
bers of our community.
Peter Wallis, Anna Maria City

Mayoral duties
In the editorial May 21, "Blab, blah, blah, play
ball", you write: "The duties of the mayor of Holmes
Beach are largely administrative, primarily acting to
carry out the wishes of the five voting members of the
commission. The mayor does not have a vote."
In contrast, the City Charter reads: "There shall be
a mayor who shall be the chief executive officer of the
city. He/she shall be elected at a regular election. He/
she shall be responsible to the electorate for the admin-
istration of all city affairs placed in his/her charge by
or under this charter." It is only the mayor who signs
an interlocal agreement with the County and is for-
mally responsible for its language, as example.
The charter lists eleven major powers and duties of
the mayor; it also adds the mayor's "Veto Power"
against Commission votes, which to some is more sig-
nificant than a straight vote.
The Charter gives the Commission "all legislative
powers of the city", and enumerates several duties hav-
ing to do with ordinances, taxes and other financial
matters. It also lists two major "Prohibitions", to keep
the commission from interfering with the mayor's ad-
ministrative powers.
This form of city government is known throughout
Florida as a "strong mayor" form. When you and others,
by word or action, attempt to subvert the rightful powers
given the mayor in the Charter, you are being "subversive"
to the quality and form of government of this'city and
doing a disservice to every taxpayer and resident.
I respect the balance of powers outlined here, and :i
am sworn to carry them out. I'll continue to do so...
"blah"s or not.
Mayor Bob VanWagoner, Holmes Beach


j.-.
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Yr ', .. .







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 28, 1997 0 PAGE 9 Bi

What about public rest rooms?


By Don Maloney
Special to The Islander
More than once in local newspapers I've seen full-
page ads that go something like: "They have restaurant
critics, theater critics, TV critics why not hospital crit-
ics?"
I agree with that thought. Why not?
While we're on that critical subject, why not
take a good look at the concept of public restroom
critics? Critics have always avoided writing about
public restrooms even though I'm sure that, on any
given day, more folks are seated in them than are
bedded in hospitals.
So, I've decided to flush those rooms out in the open.
In the first place, why call them restrooms? Have you
ever tried to "rest" in any of them? And, in no special or-
der of importance, I want to talk about some other things
that I see as shortcomings at many of those facilities -
shortcomings that I think ought to be wiped out.
I'll start with those I know best men's rooms.
I've always wondered if there are federal laws that
dictate the perfect ratio of sit-down to stand-up plumb-
ing. I wonder, because in many cases particularly
like at a baseball game's seventh-inning stretch or at
half-time at football and basketball games you can't
help but see the way heavy traffic during those periods
causes many men to stand-up at sit-downers. Fortu-
nately, I've never seen it happen the other way around.
And why is it at public events that there always
seems to be a long line of ladies waiting to get into their
room? Are they all kept waiting because some ladies
really rest in there?
One thing I'll never understand is how supermar-
kets and "the Marts," both K and Wal, run out of toi-
let paper in their restrooms when they have rolls and
rolls on some aisle out there.
And why do most stores hide their restrooms way
in the back? All too frequently lately, now that I own
an enlarged prostate, I don't have a lot of time to spare



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between the urge and comple-
Ik tion and don't care for lengthy
searches.
And how about stores that
say, "Sorry, but we have no
restroom." Where does your
help go, McDonald's?
The signs in those public
places worry me, too. Espe-
*^r cially those that read: "Em-
.* ployees must wash their hands
Before returning to work." For
one thing, why do restaurants
min particular hire people who
need to be reminded about
that? And why only "employ-
Sees?" Doesn't the management
have to wash? And how about
the one that tells you to call the
manager if something is miss-
ing? Call him how, by tapping the pipes?
Talk about washing hands reminds me of some prob-
lems in drying them. How it aggravates me when the pa-
per towel dispenser is mounted head-high. Reaching that
high for towels sends the dripping water down to my el-
bows or further. And how about the mechanical dispens-
ers with timers that make you wait for the next towel to
dispense and you need two or three more to do the job?
Even so, that's not nearly as bad as the wall-mounted blow
dryers that send the drips spraying off my handG and onto
my shirt. Also, I worry that you chance electrocution when
you hit the steel start button on them with wet fingers.
Fancy names on doors bug me, too. When I'm in
a hurry especially when I'm in a hurry I don't
have time to translate clever pseudonyms like "Hens"
and "Roosters," or "Buoys" and "Gulls." Aren't gulls,
for instance, both male and female? The artful little sil-
houettes on doors indicating men in slacks and women
in skirts don't work anymore, either. Not because I've


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(behind the Manatee Ave.Video Library)


seen any men in skirts lately, but women in slacks
abound and could cause problems.
I think the whole equal rights thing has gone too far
now that I've seen men's rooms equipped with diaper-
changing tables.
Travel can be a problem, too. Take airplanes, for
instance. Flying "lavatories" (airlines never call them
restrooms) are about as big as a center seat in coach
class on Valujet. When I'm aloft, I have to decide long
before I leave my seat on the specific purpose of my
lavatory visit so I'll know whether to go in straight
ahead or backwards when I get there. Once I'm in one
of those lavatories, there's no turning around.
And there's no seat belt in there where I suggest
such a safety feature would be far more welcome in
case of severe turbulence than out in seat 36D. All this
assumes, of course, that you can get to the lavatory,
past the carts that are forever in the aisle serving even
more reasons to make use of the lavatory.
Hotels, however, are great! Plenty of towels and all
too thick to dry between your toes. And lots of souve-
nirs like tiny little bottles of shampoos and lotions,
shower caps and shoe-shine sponges none of which
I ever use -just to bring home. Some classier hotels
even have coffee pots and hair dryers in their rest
rooms, but they're too big to pack unnoticed.
And why do hotel toilet paper rolls always start each
day with the first sheet folded neatly into a triangle?
All this reminds me of my rest room "good old
days." Like in high school that's where I learned to
smoke. And in the Army where I realized that while
there are no atheists in foxholes, their is no privacy in
what, for some reason, was called the latrine.
I also think about my days in Asia, where most
restrooms are furnished only with porcelain slit-
trenches. Men are much better equipped to handle those
than women sometimes.
You'll have to excuse me now. I've got to run
home; I just remembered that I left the seat up.


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l]3 PAGE 10 MAY 28, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


IANO MENS


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Social notes are welcome ...
Your news about social events, anniversaries, wed-
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wlcomrn4t The Islander Bystander. Call 778-7978 to
be included in "the best news on Anina Maria Island."


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Outside delights
Members of the Seaside Gardens Association enjoyed a pitch-in picnic on April 3. Non-strenuous relays such as
carrying a paper cup full of water in your mouth then drinking it with your hands behind your the back, suspend-
ing a tennis ball between your the knees and then dropping it into a coffee can, as well as lawn-bowling with
tennis balls challenged all who participated. Islander Photo: Courtesy of Rosemary Carter


Longboat Chamber fills
calendar with events
The Longboat Chamber of Commerce will hold
its monthly Business After Hours on Tuesday, June
3, at the Holiday Inn-Longboat Key, 4949 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
On Wednesday, June 4, the Chamber will hold a
seminar, "Secrets of the Best," at the Holiday Inn-
Longboat Key. The fourth annual Small Business
Person 'of the Year Awards Breakfast will be held
Thursday, June 5, at the Colony Beach & Tennis
Resort, 1620 Gulf of Mexico Drive, at 8 a.m.
Reservations are required for all events. For de-
tails, cost and to make reservations, call the Chamber
at 387-9519.
Island Branch Library
announces two June
exhibits
Pottery by Deborah Keller-McCartney and wa-
tercolors by Barbara Singer will be on exhibit at the
Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach in exhibits
during the month of June.
Keller-McCartney received her associate of fine
arts degree in Pennsylvania and attended pottery
workshops in New England. She continue her art
education after moving to Florida and is a frequent
exhibitor at galleries in both Manatee and Pinellas
Counties.
Singer has been a Holmes Beach resident for 18
years. After earning degrees in medical technology as
well as fine arts, she has been painting and teaching
in the arts for many years. She is a member of the
Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society, Manatee Art
League and the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island.
Singer's work has received numerous awards and she
is currently teaching watercolor at the Artists Guild.
The Branch Library is located at 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach. Call 778-6341 for more infor-
mation.

Center's summer camp
requires pre-registration
Directors of the Anna Maria Island Community
Center's "Exploring Our World," a summer camp for
children ages five to 13 years of age, remind parents
that pre-registration is required.
Camp officially begins Wednesday, June 11, and
weekly sessions continue through August 22. Stu-
dents presently participating in the Center's after-
school program will be required to re-register.
A one-time registration fee of $10 per child will
include a 1997 camp T-shirt. Weekly fees are $60 per
child or $100 for two children. Tuition includes all
costs for trips and activities.
For information, call the Center at 778-1908.


Teen girls invited-to
cooking class
Teen girls are invited to attend an Italian cooking
class to be held Wednesday, May 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the
Anna Maria Island Commuinity Center.
Dinner and dessert will be served.
Call the Center at 778-1908 for information.

Register now for Women's
Bible Study Program
Beginning Thursday, June 19, an interdenomina-
tional Women's Bible Study Program will take place
at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Holmes Beach.
The eight-week program will be held on Thursdays
at 9:30 a.m. in Fellowship Hall. The program will in-
clude the study of Psalms with Dorothy Swanberg in-
structing.
Immediate registration is required so study mate-
rials may be ordered. To register call the church office
at 778-1813.

Watercolor artist to speak
to Artists Guild
Robert Daley, a member of the American Water-
color Society, will be guest speaker at the Artists Guild's
monthly social to be held Monday, June 2, at 7 p.m. at
the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, Lowe Hall.
Daley has studied and sold his paintings all over the
U.S. He owned his own gallery in New England. He
presently spends half of the year painting on Anna Maria
Island.
The public is welcome and refreshments will be
served beginning at 6:30 p.m. The church is located
at 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
For more information, call 778-6694.

Adult volunteers needed
for Center summer camp
Adult volunteers are needed to help with kinder-
garten and first-grade level children attending the
Anna Maria Island Community Center summer camp
program.
Program hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Any assistance will be appreciated.
Those available may contact Diana Robinson at
the Center, 778-1908.

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the May 24 horseshoe games were
George McKay of Anna Maria and Ray Peckham of
Holmes Beach. Runners-up were Bill Cooney of
Bradenton Beach and Bill Starrett of Anna Maria.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday at
9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park, 10005 Gulf Drive.
There are no membership fees and everyone is welcome.


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I OITUARIES]


Robert C. Biel
Robert C. Biel, 88, of Anna Maria, died May 20 in
Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Terre Haute, Ind., Mr. Biel came to Mana-
tee County from there in 1983. He was a retired banker
and a real estate broker in Terre Haute. He was a mem-
ber of Central Presbyterian Church, Terre Haute. He
was a member of the Key Royale Golf Club and the
Island Players. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World
War II.
He is survived by his wife, Lois; a son, William of
Indianapolis; and two grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Island
Players Building Fund, P.O. Box 2059, Anna Maria,
FL 34216. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel,
was in charge of the arrangements.

Mary Tully Noldin
Mary Tully Noldin, 86, of Holmes Beach, died
May 20.
Mrs. Noldin was born in Melbourne, Australia.
She is survived by her son Charles Kingsford-
Smith of Mukilteo, Wash.; a daughter, Belinda Tully
Glionna of Toronto, Canada; and five grandchildren.
A memorial service was held at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation in Holmes Beach. Memo-
rial contributions may be made to Hospice of South-
west Florida, 6095 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238.

Florence A. Samulski
Florence A. Samulski, 86, of Bradenton, died May
24 in Senior Meadows.
There will be no visitation. Mass will be held
Wednesday, May 28, at 10 a.m., at St. Bernard Catho-'
lic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach. The
Rev. Donald Baier will officiate.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
American Heart Association, 5899 Whitfield Ave.,
Suite 200, Sarasota FL 34243. Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, Island Chapel, is in charge of arrangements.
Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs. Samulski came to
Manatee County from Buffalo in 1991. She was a re-
tired office manager of Our Lady of Victory Hospital,
Buffalo, N.Y. She was a member of St. Bernard Catho-
lic Church. She was a member of the Catholic Daugh-
ters of America/Altar Rosary Society of Nativity Par-
ish of Orchard Park, N.Y.
Mrs. Samulski is survived by a son, Alfred T.
Samulski of Bradenton; a sister, Virginia Ratajczak of
Orchard Park, N.Y.; seven grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.


Rev. George K. Skene
Rev. George K. Skene, 70, of Holmes Beach,
died May 20 in Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Yankton, S.D., Rev. Skene came to
Manatee County from Clio, Mich., in 1988. He was
a retired Free Methodist minister, serving in east
Michigan and Illinois conferences and served as
associate pastor of Free Methodist Church of
Bradenton. He was self-employed as a florist in
Michigan. He served as a lieutenant in the U.S.
Army during World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Wyla; two daughters,
Marcia Brockway of Anna Maria City and Cindy James
of Fort Worth, Texas; a son, Duane of Pike, N.Y.; two
sisters, Wilma Clark of Waterloo, Iowa, and Dorothy
Wested of Cedar Falls, Iowa; and six grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may be made to Free
Methodist Church of Bradenton, 2202 26th Ave. E.,
Bradenton, FL 34208. Bradenton Funeral Home was
in charge of the arrangements.

Jack F. 'Captain Jack'
Whiteside
Jack F. "Captain Jack" Whiteside, 80, of Anna
Maria, died May 24, at home.
Services are Wednesday, May 28, at 3 p.m. at
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. Brown & Sons Cremations was in
charge of arrangements.
Memorial contributions may be made to Roser
Community Church, P.O. Box 247, Anna Maria, FL
34216 or to the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter, P.O. Box 253, Anna Maria, FL 34216.
Born in Tampa, Mr. Whiteside came to Manatee
County in from there in 1965. He founded The Col-
onnade Restaurant in Tampa with his family in 1935
and following retirement from the restaurant in 1960,
he was a charter boat captain in Anna Maria.
He was a member of the Moose Lodge in
Bradenton Beach, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the
American Legion, a former member of the Tampa
Yacht and Country Club and a founding member of
the South Tampa Rotary Club and Gasparilla's Ye
Mystic Krewe in Tampa. He served in the U.S. Coast
Guard and in World War II.
Mr. Whiteside is survived by his wife Ruth; a
daughter, Jill Carden of Englewood, Fla.; one son, Jack
Whiteside Jr. of Anna Maria; five grandchildren, Kristy
Carden Shaffer, Mark Carden, Stacey Whiteside
Whitfield, Jack Whiteside III and Anne Marie Whiteside
and two great-grandchildren, Sara and Rip Shaffer.


Water, water
everywhere
Members of the Island Baptist
Church youth group worked
over the Memorial Day week-
end to raise money for summer
camp by accepting donations
for watermelons and a car
wash. Front from left, Angela
Hellhake, Alyssa Mohr, Pam
Taylor, Erica Lonergan, Amber
VonEnde. Back from left, Joel
Wilkinson, Colt Fletcher and
Ryan Headrick. Youth Pastor
Charlie Hahn kept busy with
the hose at the back of the car.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U MAY 28, 1997 PAGE 11 J]

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The Island Poet
Two old folks in a nursing home, decided to share their life,
So they called in a preacher to make them man and wife.
And after the ceremony was over they sneaked off to their room,
For they wanted to spend the night together as the bride and groom.
When he got in bed he gave her a hug and she hugged him back,
And they both fell sound asleep, and that was the end of that.
The second night went about like the night before,
'Cause after the huggin' was over, all he could do was snore.
The next night she didn't hug him back and it was more than he could take,
Until he sweetly heard her say, "Not tonight, honey, I have a headache."
Bud Atteridge






RIi PAGE 12 M MAY 28, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Despite the barb, stingrays deserve respect


Anyone who's ever suffered from the reflexive
stab of a stingray might not agree, but Dr. Carl Luer,
senior scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory, says the
stingray should be respected rather than feared for its
place in our Florida waters.
Stingrays belong to the same sub-class,
Elasmobranchii, as sharks, skates, other rays, guitar
fish and sawfish. Some elasmobranchs date back 400
million years.
Moving down the classifications list, stingrays are
of the scientific order Raiiformes. These flattened, pec-
toral-finned shark relatives are commonly called
batoids. Their gill slits are on the underside of the body.
The diamond-shaped stingrays that are a problem
to local swimmers belong to the family Dasyatidae.
Several types swim visibly in large numbers in the
upper water column and are rarely the culprits in a
human sting.
Of the ones we fear that live and feed on the
sandy bottoms of the surf zone where we don't see
them the most common in our Island waters are the
Southern stingray and the Atlantic stingray.
With pale to dark bodies, they are dinner-plate size
with slender tails longer than the body. Emerging from


Longboat Chamber to
hold New Member
Coffee May 28
The Longboat Key Chamber of Com-
merce will hold its monthly New Member
Coffee on Wednesday, May 28, from 8 to 9
a.m. at the Chamber office, 6854 Gulf of
Mexico Drive, in the Whitney Beach Plaza.
All members of the Chamber are invited
to attend. Breakfast will be provided.
For information and reservations, call the
Chamber at 387-9519.


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Re-Opening Thursday June 5




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the back of the tail's midpoint is the sharp spine or
stinger. This bony spine has barbs along its edges and
is covered in a very thin sheath.
If the spine penetrates typically in the ankle, calf
or foot the sheath is sloughed off and a toxin or
venom seeps out. "The poison is not injected," stresses
Luer.
Says the scientist, "I can't overstate enough how
non-aggressive these rays are. They're an extremely
passive, docile group of animals."
The spine is the stingray's only means of defense
against a predator or when stepped on by an unsuspect-
ing swimmer.
"Stinging is purely a reflex," says Luer.
Purely painful, say those inflicted.
The poison is a neurotoxi-h that can cause extreme
pain, but usually for no longer than 24 to 48 hours, Luer
says. Soaking the wound in the hottest water tolerable
helps break the toxin down. So does ammonia.
Luer reports that there can be more of a problem
from secondary infection caused by 1) spine-surface
slime, 2) bacteria in the sea water or 3) tiny pieces of
the spine often not even visible on an X-ray that be-
come imbedded and may not work their way to the
surface for long periods of time. Continued tenderness
or discoloration may be indications of such infection.
Lifeguards on our county beaches routinely recom-
mend a visit to a doctor after being stung for a tetanus
shot if no booster has been administered for several
years and for pain killers and/or antibiotics if so pre-


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scribed.
Luer agrees. Probing oneself for imbedded barbs
can cause additional irritation.

They're only babies
"Our" stingrays are live bearers whose eggs are
internally fertilized and remain in the mother, unat-
tached, until the young hatch and emerge, usually from
four to eight at a time. They are born in the spring.
The stingrays we see and fear in the summer
are these newborns. They feed during their first sum-
mer in the surf zone.
With very small teeth used for crushing and tear-
ing, the rays feed on small fish, crustaceans, mollusks,
invertebrates, coquinas, sand fleas and the like.
"Your chance of seeing one is much greater at
dawn or dusk feeding time," says Luer. The South-
ern and Atlantic stingrays will usually be seen alone or
in groups no larger than a handful.
Professionally and personally, Luer feels and en-
courages great respect for these shark relatives, these
"longtime, normal inhabitants of our waters."
Some of the local varieties that swim in the upper
waters, like the coffee-and-cream-colored cownose
rays, "are absolutely beautiful to encounter," says the
scientist.
They travel in large schools, which can be terrify-
ing. "But just stop and watch them swim past," sug-
gests Luer. "They're really beautiful and don't need to
be feared."


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Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953


Be alert, do the shuffle
Those dinner-plate size stingrays that feed in into the water and shuffle your feet as you go, dis-
the surf zone of our Gulf and bay waters would turbing the sandy bottom with each step.
be glad to get out of your way if you announce Swimmers at the county beaches should watch
your presence while swimming. the lifeguard towers for the raising of the blue
To do the "stingray shuffle," advance slowly "dangerous marine life" flag.


1I (941) 383-2391
FULL BEVERAGE SERVICE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 0 PAGE 13 IB]


Island Library to offer
summer programs for kids
The Island Branch Library summer program for chil-
dren will begin Tuesday, June 21. Registration for specific
activities may be made as of Monday, June 2, and a flyer
will be available on that date for all Manatee County Pub-
lic Library summer programs. Programs include:
Wednesday June 18/25 7 p.m. Preschool/
1st grade story time
Wednesday July 23/30 7 p.m. Preschool/
1st grade story time
Tuesday June 17 2 p.m. K i m
Brown & Friend, Southeastern Guide Dogs
Tuesday June 24 2 p.m. W a 1 1 y
Watkins & Reptile Friends, Sarasota Jungle Gardens
Wednesday July 9 7 p.m. F r a n k
Lakus & Chinese & Japanese stories told through
Origami puppets
Wednesday July 16 7 p.m. K a r e n
Hornburger & Code Talk, learning sign language
Tuesday July 22 2 p.m. L y n n
Hayden teaches the craft of creative stationery and
envelopes. Limit: 20
Tuesday July 29 2 p.m. Express
Yourself craft program by Julia Garland. Limit: 20
Registration is required for limited participation
programs and may be done at the Island Branch Library
or by calling 778-6341. The library is located t 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
FFWC awards Island club
Twelve club members of the Woman's Club of Anna
Maria Island attended the Florida Federation of Women's
Clubs, District 14, Spring Workshop held on May 16.
Representatives of the GFWC Woman's Club of
Anna Maria Island, Inc., accepted:
Certificate of Appreciation for the Hugh O'Brien
Youth Foundation.
Certificate of Appreciation for the Special Olym-
pics, Florida "Training for Life."
Certificate of Appreciation for the Hacienda Girls
Ranch.
GFWC Third Place FFWC Fundraiser Award.
Certificate of Honor FFWC/Woman's Club of
Anna Maria Island Inc.


Come and get it!
Maria Cruz of Tampa rustles up some grub for her family at the newly created beach at the Anna Maria City Pier,
completed just in time for the Memorial Day holiday. The sand for the beach came from the dredging of the Lake
LaVista inlet, which runs under the humpback bridge north of the pier. Islander Photo: Anthony Seaton


The club will resume meeting on Oct. 1.
Membership inquiries may be made to Margaret
Art, second vice president, at 778-3624.
Auxiliary to offer two
boating classes
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary will of-
fer two boating classes beginning Tuesday, June 3. The
first is Power Boating Skills and Seamanship. The sec-
ond is Sailing and Seamanship.
Both courses will begin at 7:30 p.m. at Flotilla 81
Training Center, 4208 129th St., Cortez, north of the
Seafood Shack restaurant.
Tuition is free and materials and textbooks are


available at the training center at a nominal cost.
Registration is required.
Candidates successfully completing either course
are eligible to join the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Boat
ownership is not a requisite for membership. Members
volunteer time on sea-going safety patrols, stand radio
watch and are at the forefront of providing education
and training for advanced sail boating skills.
Information, call 778-5800 or 722-6971.

National Honor Society
Manatee High School junior Marie Perinetti's name
was inadvertently omitted from last week's list of students
inducted into the National Honor Society on May 12.


Delightful Dining
Enjoy brunch,
lunch or dinner
in our tropical,
intimate dining-
room. Feast on
delicious seafood
and other
continental classics.






525 St. Judes Dr.
5600 Block GMD,


Every Thursday
All-You-Can Eat
Spaghetti
and
Meatballs
$595
2pm to Close

CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
S778-0784



Take-Out & Deli
Complete dinners,
fresh and ready to
reheat at home.
Soups,sandwiches,
salads,appetizers,
party platters,
custom gift baskets
premium wines.






Phone 383-0777
Fax 383-2029 /


Every Friday
All-You-Can Eat
Fish Fry
$695
2pm to Close

CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
4000 GULF DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH
778-0784
r-----\

Stylish Catering
Since 1979, we've
created the finest
parties and events.
Complete service
from hors d'oeuvres
to desserts, from
beachwear to
black-tie affairs.






Open Tues.-Sunday
Longboat Key j


ANNA MAI

On Anna Mar


1 1/4 lb. Live Har
^ Serve
9 oz. Florida Lob!
1 lb. Alaskan Kin(


/ LIVE'
ENTERTAINMENT
with Howie
Banfield w
Friday, Saturday
and Sunday
*'j Outside
On Our Deck


RIA OYSTER BAR

ia City Pierre


DINING OUTSIDE
ON OUR DECK
S* DOCKING BAIT
FOOD TO GO
*SNOW CONES
AT THE SNACK SHOP

BEST LOBSTER

DEALS ON

i ) HE ISLAND
d Shell Maine Lobster......$14.95
d with potato & slaw or corn
ster Tails.................... $13.95
g Crab Legs................$14.95


Mone- Fri 3 to 5



All-U-Can-Eat Fish Fry $4.95
11/4 lb. Live Maine Lobster $11.95
1 lb. Alaskan King Crablegs $11.95


Also Daily Lunch Specials from $5.95
Daily Dinner Specials starting at $9.95


DIi I:0A M 9'PM oFI "& A I PM *I


I


0






l] PAGE 14 A MAY 28, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Yeah, but have you
been to Palmetto?
Finally, last week, I got a chance to meet Woody
Harrelson. I expected to take advantage of connections
between former Islander David Reid, "Cheers" script
editor during Harrelson's hiatus with the TV show,
who came home briefly intending to touch base with
Harrelson.
Why not? I figured to wrangle my way into an in-
troduction from Reid but as things go, too much to do
in too little time for someone who stays away so long.
It wasn't that I was fixated on the encounter or
anything. The night of filming for the movie "Pal-
metto" at the Anna Maria City Pier was my last
evening to pack before the movers arrived the next
morning (and a new edition of the newspaper) from
Anna Maria to Holmes Beach and I was dead-dog sick
with a cold to-boot.
I skipped the excitement without regret. After all,
nearly everyone else who had ever worked or does
work for the newspaper was there. Staff photographer
Edna Tiemann staked out the pier for five hours and
brought back some great pictures.
Frequent contributor Carolyn Pepka got a couple
of good shots too.
Which, by the way, resulted in a phone call from
the movie's publicist, Michael Klastorin. He said
Woody liked one of the pictures, one misidentified in
our cutline as Tiemann's but actually taken by Pepka.
So I gave him our standard news photograph re-
print spiel, $15 for a 5-by-7 print, etc., and how do you
want to handle getting it, mail or pick-up.
"That's not exactly what we had in mind, or at least
it's too expensive for 250 or so prints," Klastorin said.
It seems Woody really liked the one in the newspaper
and was considering buying it for a fan photo to
send out with autographs.




Open Daily
7am to 10pm
( L_ Breakfast Lunch Dinner

WHILE BOATING BE D
OR BEACHING ,
OUR FAMOUS
3 TWO-FISTED BURGER
778-1885
875 North Shore Dr. Anna Maria Island

SIGN OF THE MERMAID
Florida Continental Cuisine















It's time again for those
that are so special in our lives.
Father's Day: June 15
Brunch only & 8 am 2:00 pm
Sunday Brunch Yearly from 9 am to 1:30 pm
Early Supper 5 to 6:30 pm / Dinner 5 pm to 10 pm
Reservations Suggested
We have the finest Beer and Wine selection
when you bring your own. (no corkage fee)
9707 GULF DR. ANNA MARIA 778-9399
No credit cards All checks cheerfully accepted
No early suppers on special occasion days and weekends


They wanted to see all the pictures we had. That
sounded pretty flattering for our photographers.
I was prepared to drop off the photos for their re-
view but the conversation with Klastorin led to the
mention of David Reid and the next thing I knew, I was
invited to the set at the downtown Bradenton Profes-
sional Building.
I waited on the street with "Palmetto" location
manager, previously only introduced by phone but rec-
ognized by photos, Gus "Corky" Holzer. Harrelson
emerged from the building to a crowd of 50 or so au-
tograph seekers about 7:30 p.m.
Holzer was replaced by Klastorin and we waited on
Manatee Avenue behind barricades as Harrelson pa-
tiently greeted and accommodated his fans.
I walked over to the church parking lot one block
over with Klastorin and we were met there by Woody,
who arrived from a very short limo ride. We were in-
troduced and went into his trailer to look over the pic-
tures.
"I really like that picture in the newspaper. Do
you?" Woody asked.
Sure, I published it, I said. He looked through all
the pictures and came back again to the one taken by
Pepka.
He bent the sides back, scrutinized it, wondering if
the slight red eye in the color snapshot would show up
in black-and-white prints.
After all was said and done, we were all pretty
convinced of what I had thought since the get-go, that
the obsured, out-of-focus fans in the foreground
wouldn't work for what Woody wanted.
He tossed the pictures aside, apologizing for put-
ting me to any trouble and we all went to the street to
pick up a "staff meal" from their caterer.
The California caterer that "Palmetto" brought to
Florida had worked miracles in the small space of a
"Chuck Wagon."
Inside, the movie crew enjoyed their dinner break,
delicious entrees, a huge spread of salads and pick-up
basketball in the community room.
Director Volker Schloendorff joined Harrelson,
Klastorin and I at the dinner table where the conversa-
tion moved from David Reid recollections to the name
of the movie, "Palmetto."



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Shrimp & Scallops Alfredo............................ $9.95
lib. New York Strip...................................... $10.95

KEYWET ILg9
Hom o te 50Oyte


"Do you think people will know Palmetto is. a city
when they hear the name?" Schloendorff asked.
It's a city and a bug, which I'm sure you're famil-
iar with since you've been here a few weeks, I said.
"There's a great but tiny Mexican restaurant there, the
Alverez, that I can highly recommend."
Harrelson said, "Maybe we should have our wrap
party there." He turned to me asking, "Is there anyplace
to have a party there?"
"Have you been to Palmetto?" I asked, my mind
rapidly calculating places in Palmetto for a party and
coming up short but for the yacht club. No, not the
yacht club I thought to myself.
Schloendorff answered no. Likewise for the rest of
the folks at dinner. No one had been to Palmetto.
"We borrowed their police cars and the mayor even
has a speaking line in the movie. They were very co-
operative," Schloendorff said.
I was saved by embarrassment by Schloendorff
who said he planned to "wrap" where they began in
Sarasota at the Gator Club.
"You really should go to Palmetto," I said, "if only
to have your picture taken at the city-limit sign."
It was nearly time to go back to work for the
Palmettans and Woody signed the cover of the news-
paper over his picture for me.
I asked Woody if he'd have his picture taken with
me as I handed the camera to Kalstorin, asking him to
be photographer.
The last time I did this was about 25 years ago at
a hotel in Springfield, Ill., I explained. I had my picture
taken with the "Six-million-dollar man," aka Lee Ma-
jors, for my kids. They were impressed."
I'll send this picture to Reid in California via E-
mail. And I'm sure he'll be duly impressed.
And just to demonstrate what a really "nice guy"
Harrelson is, I've already received a note from him
thanking me again for coming over.
Actually a super guy.
I paid the bunch of them my ultimate compliment
I invited then back to Anna Maria to meet me at
Duffy's.
Following a little description of the place,
screened-in porch, 10 or so bar stools, Woody said,
"That's the kinda place I like."




\' ealf COME
MONDAY

for $1 Off each doz.
l' Fresh Hand-Shucked
or Steamed Oysters
Raw Bar & Grill

rP -weorn Qrouper-i -
Lh_ Sanw ichwl _AAS fS^L
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with LARRY
Tues. Sat. 8 -

REID FR
Sunday 7

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Large groups an
Reservation
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Restaurant & Lounge
Dining Tue-Sun 4 10 pm
Lounge Tue-Sun 4- 11 pm
778-6969

BAR
'RICH
Midnight

OST ,
to 10

ks in Manatee County




-10 pm Tuesday-Sunday
nd luncheon parties welcome.
ns requested, not required.
nna Maria (formerly Cafe Ro-'ar)





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 N PAGE 15 h


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
May 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 25-foot power
boat 10 miles off Bean Point. A commercial salvor re-
sponded and towed the boat to safe moorings.
May 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a fuel sheen in Bimini Bay.
A Coast Guard vessel and a Florida Marine Patrol craft
responded. A work barge was stuck under a seawall
and taking on water when the boats arrived. The work
barge was freed and pumped out. Fuel leaking from the
external tank vents stopped when the barge was
pumped out.
May 11, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
May 11, Boarding. A 23-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
May 13, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an injured crew member
aboard a 500-foot tanker off Egmont Key. The crew-
man received bums to the groin and upper leg area. A
Coast Guard vessel with a paramedic aboard re-
sponded. The ship's doctor had the injured man stabi-
lized when the paramedic arrived, and he was trans-
ported to Station Cortez and taken to a hospital for
treatment.
May 13, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 13-foot power boat adrift
off Siesta Key. A commercial salvor responded and
towed the boat to safe moorings.
May 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 37-foot sailboat overdue
from Clearwater to Key West. Station Cortez called all
marinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants in an at-

- Bridge Street Pier a Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
r Casual Dining on the Water

ALL-U-CAN EAT
GROUPER $795
Every Night 4 10 pm

ALL-U-CAN EAT
FRIED SHRIMP $795
Tues & Thurs 4 10 pm

ICE COLD DRAFT BEER 750
4 9 Daily
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mon-Fri 8am-10pm Sat & Sun 7am-10pm
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


I OAT^INE ITf


I.


A

Sampling

of Our

Dinner

Menu


5610 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key
(Just North of the Corner Mart) 383-0013


tempt to locate the vessel, which was eventually found
in Key West.
May 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 19-foot power boat over-
due from Englewood. Station Cortez called all marinas,
bridges and waterfront restaurants in an attempt to lo-
cate the vessel, which was eventually found at its home
port.
May 15, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 25-foot sailboat overdue
from Stuart to St. Petersburg. Station Cortez called all
marinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants in an at-
tempt to locate the vessel, which was eventually found
in its home port.
May 15, Boarding. A 24-foot power boat was
boarded in Blackburn Bay. The vessel's operator re-
ceived a written warning for not having the rental
agreement or the registration on board and not having
a throwable flotation device.
May 15, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 24-foot power boat sink-
ing near the Blackburn Point Bridge. A Coast Guard
vessel responded, but the call was later determined to
be a false alarm.
May 18, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 24-foot sailboat overdue
from Marathon to South Pasadena. Station Cortez
called all marinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants
in an attempt to locate the vessel, which was eventually
found in Ft. Myers.
May 18, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a person in the water in
Longboat Pass. A Coast Guard boat responded, but the
call was determined to have been a false alarm.
May 18, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 18-foot power
boat in Lemon Bay. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel
25087039 responded and towed the vessel to safe
moorings.
May 18, Search and rescue /assistance. Station















Tr o pi c : a o i
rlDockage


STEEL DRUM

WEEKENDS


MARYLAND STYLE CRABCAKE
w/ lump crab meat 1095
LOBSTER THERMIDOR 1595
SHRIMP SCAMPI 12"
PASTA w/ white clam sauce 1095
CRAB AU GRATIN 1395
BROILED SALMON w/ Dill Sauce 1595
Fresh Fish, Maine Lobster, Shrimp &
Scallop dishes, Steak, & Pasta too!
WE Clam Chowder & Soups Available
Full Carry-Out Menu
California & French Wines
Domestic & Imported Beers Available


John Tesh to perform
at Van Wezel
Tickets are available for the Sarasota-area de-
but appearance of John Tesh at the Van Wezel Per-
forming Arts Hall at 8 p.m. on Sunday, June. 1.
Released on March 4 along with a PBS tele-
vision special of the same name, "Avalon" is
Tesh's first studio album in four years. Tesh's
musical style is described as an eclectic mix of
elegant piano stylings incorporating classical,
jazz and rock, electric and acoustic guitars and
full orchestration.
The Van Wezel is located at 777 N. Tamiami
Trail, Sarasota. For information call, 953-3368.


Cortez received a report of a disabled 14-foot power
boat in Lemon Bay. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel
25087039 responded and towed the vessel to safe
moorings.
May 19, Boarding. A 23-foot power boat was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico. The operator received
a written warning for not having the registration on
board.
May 19, Boarding. A 66-foot fishing vessel was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
May 19, Boarding. A 16-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator received
a written warning for not having spacing in the vessel's
hull registration numbers and not having a throwable
flotation device on board.
May 20, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 34-foot sailboat overdue
from Navarre to the Manatee River. Station Cortez
called all marinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants
in an attempt to locate the vessel, which was eventually
located safely.


I


L'V'jE
MTC
tc

to
SLIJI
S SJtLj
aFrid
atUrday 2 to,()o
SLInday 2 to 9


Bridge Tender hin
Hank McDennott
Serving Lunch Dinner Spirits plays piano
135 Bridge Street a 778-4849 Tues., Wed. and
Reservations Suggested Thurs.






Ki PAGE 16 E MAY 28, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
0 *

Anna Maria

: Elementary

School Menu
No Choices
* Monday, 6/2/97
* Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Waffles, Sausage, Warm Apples, Juice *
* Tuesday, 6/3/97
Breakfast: French Toast w/Syrup, Juice
* Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Fries, Salad, *
Dessert
*. Wednesday, 6/4/97
Breakfast: Eggs, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Sloppy Joe on Bun, Carrots w/Dip, *
Fresh Fruit, Chips
Thursday, 6/5/97
* -Breakfast: Pretzel w/Cheese, Juice
Lunch: Breaded Chicken Patty on Bun, Oven
* Fries, Salad, Jello
Friday, 6/6/97
* Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Pizza, Corn, Salad, Ice Cream
All meals served with milk.


J
Joy Courtney


Intimate Gulfview Dining
"Beautiful presentation and ... plus
wonderful flavors..." an accomplished g
Pat Benson, Bradenton Herald wine list
Serving Sunday Breakfast until 2:30
Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Tues. thru Sun
Dinner Reservations Suggested
778-2959 41Jt/
\ 103 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key





Award-winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer ._
this side of Heaven." -ins
JBuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. WWV 'A
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


DINNER UNDER $10
INCLUDING CHARGRILLED FISH
Early Birds 4 to 5:30 pm Mon. Fri.
(includes salad, entree, beverage and dessert)

^ 'B read from
i the Oven"9
i FREE 9
I with this ad
and 2 dinner purchases
,( /7 uptlo $3.50 value

.:-:..:-.:-: /795-5334
11 am 10 pm Sun. Thurs. 11 am- 11 pmFri. & Sat.
4726 Cortez Road Bradenton


Great job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ended May 19. Kneel-
ing, from left, are Aaron Way, Michael Cramer and Cory Stewart. First row, from left, are Merrily Shary,
Majka Beard, Eric Whitley, Jordon Graeff and Ben Valdivieso. Back row, from left, are Megahan Fleming,
Elise Mundy, Ginny Mazza, Kevin Greunke and Avery Ellsworth.


\\ 5702 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1776 J


Congratulations!

Bobby & Darla Tingler
on the birth of
Joseph Tingler
BEST WISHES!
from -/ s'\
all of us at ...
Holmes Beach_


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ONLY RESTAURANT
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COOKING


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BARBARA JOHNSEN
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Wednesday Saturday 7-Close
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Sunday 5-9 pm
Open Mon.-Sat 10 am-11 pm
Sunday 3 pm-9 pm
1830 59th St. W., Blake Park Bradenton


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MORE ISLAND NEWS THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE.






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Breakfast Lunch






LUNCH DINNER
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TUE. 4:30pm-10pmWED.-SAT.10am 2 pmand4:30pm-10pm
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7604 Cortez Road West,
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Tel: (941) 794-5470


ViJU!5t \


S paira iseC

ISLANDER

Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best news
- the only paper with all
the news
about the Island.
Charge your
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by phone or visit us at
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Just over the Cortez Bridge

)Tyler's
Since 1984
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' "k Ice Cream Pies & Cakes Diabetic
Colombo Yogurt Soft Serve
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10 PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333


Opening Soon ...


I


-j






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 28, 1997 0 PAGE 17 jM


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 17, theft, 100 South Bay Blvd., Anna Maria
City Pier. The victim reported a person unknown re-
moved his fishing pole.
May 18, burglary, 100 Spring Ave., Sandbar res-
taurant. The complainant reported a person unknown
opened a sliding service window and removed numer-
ous items.
May 19, animal, 200 block of Tarpon. The com-
plainant reported a pit bull entered her yard and tried
to attack her dog which was on a leash. An animal con-
trol officer issued a citation to the pit bull's owner.
May 22, burglary to an automobile, 200 block of
Elm. The victim reported a person unknown entered the
vehicle and removed a CB radio.
May 22, criminal mischief, 100 South Bay Blvd.,
Anna Maria City Pier. The complainant reported a per-
son unknown attempted to pry open a door to the bait
shop.

Bradenton Beach
May 10, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Bayside. The victim reported a person unknown re-
moved a cellular phone valued at $50 from his vehicle.
On May 14 the phone was found by a juvenile at Co-
quina Beach and returned to the owner.
May 10, property damage, 2601 Gulf Drive,
Sandpiper Mobile Home Park. According to the report
a wire hanging from a sanitation truck caused a pole to
break which damaged an air conditioning unit on a
trailer. Damages were $155.
May 13, warrant, 2600 block of Gulf Drive. The
officer stopped the vehicle on a traffic stop and found
the driver had a warrant. He was placed in custody.
May 13, theft of a bicycle valued at $50, 100
block of Highland.
May 16, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. The victim reported a person unknown punched
out the lock and removed a purse valued at $150, two
Canadian passports, identification, $200 Canadian,
$1,200 U.S. cash, two watches valued at $500 and
$165, reading glasses valued at $250, sunglasses val-
ued at $165, a gold chain valued at $2,000, a 35 mm
camera valued at $200, a wallet valued at $100, a ring
valued at $600 and a wedding band valued at $250.
The purse containing the passports, wallet, glasses
and several other items was recovered from a mail box
in Bradenton on May 20.
May 16, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. The victim reported a person unknown entered


the vehicle and removed a purse valued at $40, a wal-
let valued at $10, $330 cash, a blank check, a phone
card, a driver's license, reading glasses valued at $15,
and a 35 mm camera.
May 17, theft of a bicycle valued at $100, 200
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach City Pier.
May 17, lost property a purse containing $105
in cash, a driver's license, credit cards and a check-
book, 600 block of Gulf Drive South.
May 17, warrant, 800 block of Gulf Drive South.
The officer stopped the vehicle on a traffic stop and found
the driver had a warrant. He was placed in custody.
May 20, city ordinance violation, 1400 Gulf
Drive S., on the beach. The officer on patrol observed
the subject remove a bucket of shells from the beach.
The subject was using the bucket to fill a 30-gallon
trash can. The officer advised him of the city ordinance
prohibiting taking shells and the subject returned the
shells to the beach.
May 22, DWLS, 2600 block of Gulf Drive. The
officer stopped a vehicle with an inoperative headlight
and found the driver had three pages of suspensions on
his driver's license. He was placed in custody.

Holmes Beach
May 16, theft of a bicycle valued at $25, 300
block of 65th Street.
May 16, lost property a wallet containing
credit cards, $50 cash and a driver's license, 400 block
of Bay Palm.
May 16, theft of a bicycle valued at $20, 5325
Gulf Drive, Back Bay Steakhouse.
May 16, noise from a loud party, 4900 block of
Gulf Drive. The officer advised the resident to turn it
down.
May 17, noise from a loud party, 100 block of
49th Street. The officer advised the resident to turn it
down.
May 17, suspicious, 100 block of 66th Street. The
complainant reported juveniles making noise and the
officer found four juveniles trespassing on Resort 66
property. Two fled the scene and two were taken to the
police department and their parents responded to take
them home.
May 17, assistance, 5400 Holmes Blvd.,
laundromat. The complainant reported she put her
comforters in the washing machine and it had been
running for two hours and wouldn't stop. The officer
called the manager.
May 17, lost property a purse containing a
calling card, a driver's license and $40 cash, 5400
Holmes Blvd., laundromat.
May 17, assistance, 5410 Marina Drive. D.Coy
Ducks. The intoxicated complainant reported the sub-


A Real Italian Restaurant on Longboat Key
Lunch & Dinner Every Day Gouret Brick Oven
11:30 am 10:30 pm Piza & Calzones
BEER & WINE Starting at $6.95

Italian Specialties
Starting at $12.95
Includes Salad & Bread

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ITALIA Starting at $10.95
= r-, iAm -A A Includes Salad & Bread


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CAFE ON THE BEACH
Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
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OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment Weekends with MICHELE BISHOP
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Special
promoted to
lieutenant in
a Bradenton
Beach
-. ..- Bradenton Beach
Police Sgt. Sam
Special was pro-
Speciale moted to the rank of
lieutenant by Chief
Jack Maloney.
Special is considered "number two man" in
the department with more than a dozen years of ser-
vice. He has been a supervisor for several years, has
more patrol time than any other officer and repre-
sents the department in the chief's absence.
"He does his job well and deals well with
people and his loyalty to the department is sec-
ond to none. Sgt. Special deserves this recog-
nition for his years of service and loyalty to the
department," Maloney said.

ject took her car keys and refused to give them to her.
The officer located the keys'but told the complainant
she couldn't drive and took her to her mother's house.
May 19, vandalism, 248 South Harbor Drive, St.
Bernard Catholic Church. The complainant reported
skateboarders tore down a driveway chain used to keep
trespassers off the property and damaged wood siding
on the pole that held the chain. Damages were $50.
May 19, theft, 5318 Marina Drive, Peaches. The
complainant reported six .suspects entered the business
and exchanged words with her. After they left she
found that ajar of jelly had been dumped out on a chair
in front of the business.
May 19, lost property eight Beanie Babies in
a wicker basket, 600 block of Key Royale Drive.
May 21, vandalism, 2900 block of Avenue C. The
complainant reported an unknown person sprayed the
wheels of his truck with white paint.
May 21, theft, 3242 East Bay Drive, Wave Zone.
The complainant reported two male subjects entered
the store and then removed two shirts valued at $19.98
from a rack outside the store without paying.
May 21, found property a bicycle valued at
$80, 4800 block of Second Avenue.
May 22, burglary to an automobile, 6800 block
of Gulf Drive. The victim reported a person unknown
entered the vehicle and removed a two-way radio and
charger valued at $500.
May 22, suspicious, 200 block of Haverkos
Court. The complainant reported a male subject dressed
in black fled through a yard when she drove down the
street. He was not found.


I






PAGE 18 0 MAY 28, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Megabridge 'yes' for Sarasota again


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspective
Poor ol' Sarasota. It just couldn't get its act to-
gether and so now it's going to get the high bridge that
Anna Maria rejected.
A "world class" 65-foot clearance, fixed-span
bridge will connect downtown Sarasota with Bird
Key. From drawings and a computerized video be-
ing passed around, the new bridge looks to be quite
a monster.
Of course the folks on Longboat Key argued they
need the bridge so they won't be held up by sailboats
as they go about their important errands. And a small
group of Sarasotans argued the proposed bridge was all
out of proportion with its setting. But as usual, the
Metropolitan Planing Organization simply said "Hi ho,
hi ho and away we go." -
From the looks of it, there simply isn't the will to
fight in Sarasota that's found among Islanders here.

Show me the money
So how much is nature worth in dollars and cents?
That was the topic of an article last week in the
science section of the New York Times. The answer,
according to a team of economists and ecologists, is
quite a lot. Try several trillion dollars as a conservative
estimate.
For example, New York City is preparing to spend
$400 million on cleaning up and improving its water-
shed upstate. It wouldn't have to, and could just let the
watershed go and then highly treat the poor quality
water it would receive. That would cost $2 billion in
water treatment plants alone.
The arithmetic is pretty simple in that case.
Here on the Island it's no secret that lots with views
of our (fairly) pristine waters command a much higher.
price than those without. Likewise, we fish, crab and



7 Island Baseball

The week
that was...
By Kevin P. Cassidy

Torres leads
Jim Boast Dodge
over Tip of the Island
Jim Boast Dodge beat Tip of the Island 8-5 be-
hind a gutsy pitching performance by Mario Torres
Tuesday night, May 20, at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center.
Joey Mousseau and Torres each pitched three shut-
out innings before Torres's teammates helped him out
by scoring four runs in the-fourth, taking advantage of
uncharacteristic wildness by Mousseau, who walked
five in the inning.
Tip looked like they were in position to win the game
as they came back to tie the score, scoring three runs in the
fifth and one run in the sixth, with only one out. Tip had
runners on second and third base with Mousseau at bat and
Michael Pocino on deck. But Torres calmly struck out
both batters to get out of the inning.
Jim Boast Dodge then put the game away by scor-
ing three runs in the extra stanza and then watched as
Brian Faasse struck out the side to get the save.
m. Michael Cagnina led the way at the plate by going
two for four with a triple and two RBIs while Everett
Sowthwick scored three runs. Winning pitcher Torres
also helped himself at the plate, going two for three,
,,including a double.
Monday night's game, May 21, had Kiwanis re-
cording a 13-9 win over Haley's Motel as Kiwanis
overcame a seven-run first-inning deficit by scoring
five runs in the second inning, two in the third and six
in the fourth, to win the game.
Ryan Quigley had a huge day as he went 3-3, scored
-"Two runs and knocked in five to lead Kiwanis while Ryan
Allis chipped in two RBIs to go along with his three hits.
Haley's offensive attack was led by Dusty
Andricks, Chris Nelson and Bobby Cooper, each with
two hits on the day.
Wednesday night's contest, May 21, between
Haley's Motel and Anna Maria Fire District was a
PLEASE SEE BASEBALL, NEXT PAGE


when we're too lazy go to Cortez and buy great sea-
food. Nationally our waters provide us with seafood
worth billions every year, not including the thousands
of jobs connected with that industry.
Of course some folks ask, and I believe rightly, just
how sick are we when we have to put a dollar value on
our umbilical cord?
Like the well we really don't appreciate until it
runs dry, nature not only sustains life but also provides
us with beauty and an appreciation of something higher
than the bottom line. We could probably all use a little
dose of that.

Right next door
Up at Crystal Springs they've shut off the water
and the fun. The reason, of course, is money.
The spring's owner, millionaire Robert Thomas, is
going to get richer. It seems he's signed a contract with
Perrier, the ritzy French water company, to pipe the
water from the spring to Perrier's bottling plant five
miles away at Zephyrhills.
According to the Wall Street Journal, Thomas is
going to be paid $20,000 a day, or more than $7 mil-
lion a year, for the spring water. At least now we all
know why that stuff in the fancy bottle costs so much.
So what for decades has been the center of village
life in the burg of Crystal Springs now has a fence
around it. And a locked gate.
Perrier apparently doesn't want some kids in rural
Florida swimming in its pot of gold.

Snook season ends
If you're like me and only get hook-ups with snook
when they're out of season, this won't be a problem for
you either. But if you're normal, remember the spring
snook season ends Saturday night.
Linesiders will be closed through the months of


June, July and August. At least I'll know when Sept.
1 rolls around, because that's when I'll stop getting
snook hook-ups.
Speaking of snook, Ron Taylor with the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection wants your
snook carcasses in a biological data study he's conduct-
ing with a goal of improving management of the spe-
cies. Turner Marine in Bradenton is the local drop-off
site.
Taylor, as reported in the current edition of Florida
Sea Grant's Marine Scene newsletter, wants all size
snook carcasses, not just the whoppers. As a bonus, if
you leave your name and phone number you'll receive
updates of the status of the state's snook population.
Just remember not to filet and drop off a snook
carcass out of season.

Reef atlas
Here's a good deal: for $10, you can receive the
Atlas of Artificial Reefs in Florida, Fifth Edition. The
book provides location information on more than 350
artificial reefs off Florida's coast.
If you're interested, you can call 1-800-226-1764
and order using a credit card. To pay by mail, send a
check or money order for $10 plus $4 for shipping and
handling to: IFAS Publications, P.O. Box 110011,
Gainesville, Fla., 32611. Make the check payable to the
University of Florida.

Fish kill hotline
The Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion has established a fish-kill hotline to provide the
public with an easy way to report locations of dead fish
or abnormal marine life. The hotline is being conducted
through the Aquatic Health Group in St. Petersburg.
The fish-kill hotline number is 1-800-636-0511.
See you next week.


S.. ..,:. Tip of the Island's Joey
Mousseau leads the
league in hitting and
pitching. Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood




















Batters up at Anna Maria Island Little League
Major League Schedule
All games played at Anna Maria Island Community Center. Rain-out/make-up games
Wednesday May 28 7:15 p.m. Jim Boast Dodge vs. Tip of the Island
Friday May 30 7:15 p.m. Haley's Motel vs. Jim Boast Dodge
Saturday May 31 9 a.m. Tip of the Island vs. Anna Maria Fire District
Saturday May 31 11 a.m. Haley's Motel vs. Kiwanis
Monday June 2 7:15 p.m. Kiwanis vs. Tip of the Island
Minor League
Rain-out/make-up games All games to be played at the Center
Wednesday May 28 5 p.m. Bali-Hai vs. Islander Bystander
Friday May 30 5 p.m. Air & Energy vs. Quality Builders
Saturday May 31 1 p.m. Bridge St. Pier & Cafe vs. Islander Bystander
Saturday May 31 3 p.m. Quality Builiders vs. Air & Energy
Monday June 2 5 p.m. Bali-Hai vs. Carpet Network
Wednesday June 4 5 p.m. Bridge St. Pier & Cafe vs. Islander Bystander
Tee Ball
Game to be played at the Center Rain-out/make-up games
Thursday May 29 5 p.m. VFW vs. Big Bamboo







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 N PAGE 19 IM


Major League box

scores as of May 24


Standings
Major League
Tip of the Island
Kiwanis
AMFD
Haley's Motel
Jim Boast Dodge
At bats
Ryan Mijares, AMFD
Ryan Allis, Kiwanis
Bobby Cooper, Haley's
Bobby Gibbons, Kiwanis
Ben Miller, Kiwanis
Runs scored
Joey Mousseau, Tip
Jeremy Legrand, Tip
Allis
Tyler Krauss, Haley's
Josh Sato, AMFD
Base hits
Mousseau
Allis
Krauss
Cooper
Chad Alger, Haley's
Doubles
Cooper
Mousseau
Miller
Alger
Dusty Andricks, Haley's
Triples
Michael Cagnina, JBD
Krauss
Legrand
Hunter Green, Haley's
Ryan Mijares
Everett Southwick
Home runs
Mousseau
Cagnina
Miller
10 tied with 1
Total bases
Mousseau
Cooper
Cagnina
Allis
Miller
Runs batted In
Mousseau
Cooper
Miller
Sato
Mike Pocino
Base on balls
Casey Ryger, AMFD
Kyle Dale, Tip
Taylor Manning, Tip
Katrina Lathrop, AMFD
5 tied with 15
Batting average
Mousseau
Allis
Alger
Krauss
Sato
Legrand
Cooper
Johnny Cicero, Kiwanis
Tom Bucci, AMFD
Cagnina


On-base percentage
Mousseau
Dale
Rygier
Krauss
Evan Smith, Tip
Lathrop
David Michael, Haley's
Green
Algar
Sam Wolfe, Kiwanis
Slugging percentage
Mousseau
Cagnina
Alger
Cooper
Miller
Green
Allis
Sato
Krauss
Pocino
Games pitched
Mousseau
Allis
Yencho
Cooper
Alger
Bucci
Games started
Mousseau
Cooper
Allis
Bucci
Alger
Complete games
Mousseau
Allis
Yencho
Bucci
4 tied with 2
Innings pitched
Allis
Mousseau
Yencho
Alger
Bucci
Games won
Mousseau
Allis
Yencho
Aaron Lowman, Haley's
Peter Dowling, Tip
Mario Torres, JBD
Shut outs
Mousseau
Strikeouts
Mousseau
Yencho
Allis
Cooper
Alger
ERA
Mousseau
Manning
Dowling
Torres
Yencho
Lowman
Brian Faase, JBD
Alger
Allis


.666
.625
.532
.521
.518
.515
.500
.490
.482
.478
1.057
.641
.604
.592
.543
.527
.524
.522
.518
.489
14
14
12
12
10
10
11
8
8
8
7
6
6
3
3

61 1/3
61 2/3
45
41 2/3
36
10-1
6-3
4-3
4-3
3-1
3-1
2
119
91
89
66
62
0.68
1.96
2.29
2.53
3.06
3.11
3.84
3.88
4.37


CAPT iM.ZKES

CHARTER


* FISHING CHARTERS
FULL OR HALF DAY
* Pleasure Cruises Egmont Excursions
Backwater Offshore
All Bit, Tckle IceInclde
FISH LEANE FRE


Reservations 778-1990
Please 7 -1


Capt. Mike
Heistand


Fish smarts
Charter Capt. Mike Heistand offered fishing instruction at the Anna Maria Island Community Center in a two-
night "college" last week. The fee, $30 for two sessions or $20 for one night, included a T-shirt from
Heistand's sponsor The Islander Bystander and a free lure from Island Discount Tackle. Proceeds benefited
the Center. "The turnout was great. More came for backwater than offshore instruction, but that's because
more people have access to the backwaters, Heistand said. More than 50 participants took part in classes.
Heistand hopes to offer his services to the Center again in July. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


BASEBALL, FROM PAGE 18
game that you had to be there to believe as Haley's
pounded out 19 hits with five doubles, four triples and
two home runs to record a 31-4 victory.
Tyler Krauss went four for four during Haley's 27-run
second inning. Chad Alger went "yard" to complete a
four-for-four, four RBI day. He was supported by Blake
Tyre, who went two for three with two RBIs, Mark
Sankey with a triple and Andricks who went three for
three with two doubles and three RBIs. Josh Sato had a
two-for-two day to lead AMFD.
Kiwanis won a narrow 4-3 decision over Jim Boast


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Dodge on Thursday as Ryan Allis struck out nine bat-
ters during a complete-game three-hitter to get the win.
AFMD's Faasse was saddled with the loss.


Capt. Mike Heistand's fishing
column will return next week.



Anna Maria Island Tides

Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
May 28 7:24 1.6 10:46 1.4 4:57 2.0 -
LQ May 29 8:06 1.7 12:20 0.2 6:34 1.8 12:53 1.2
May 30 8:42 1.9 1:14 0.4 8:17 1.6 2:27 1.0
May 31 9:17 2.1 2:03 0.6 9:54 1.5 3:38 0.6
June 1 9:51 2.3 2:50 0.8 11:16 1.5 4:38 0.3
June 2 10:23 2.4 3:26 1.0 5:27 0.1
June 3 12:26 1.5 3:57 1.1 10:55a* 2.5 6:13 -0.1
June 4 1:29 1.4 4:26 1.2 11:27a* 2.6 6:51 -0.2
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later



Capt. Glenn Corder

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ANNA MARIA ISLAND .


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If3 PAGE 20 M MAY 28, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
Oops
A cutline accompanying a recent picture in The Islander Bystander was not in
keeping with the photograph. Correct outlines for the appropriate pictures are
printed here.


Art at the Key
The first Key Royale Golf Club Art Show was held in March at the Key
Royale Club. Fifteen artists from the club exhibited work in watercolors,
oils, acrylics, and prisma color. Jean Ann Tourt, left, and Betty Peters co-
chaired the event. Committee members included Helen Klos, Ruth
Hamilton, Dr. Francis Smith-Williams, Opal Schmidt and Betty Yates.
Islander Photo: Courtesy of Jean Ann Tourt


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Manatee High art show attracts a crowd
Visitors filled the Anna Maria Island Art League Friday for the opening
reception for the Third Annual Manatee High School Art Show. Forty-five
students of Robert Reiber and Kathy Linn displayed their works. Islander
Photo: Pat Copeland


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 28, 1997 0 PAGE 21 Ei,


Island property transactions
528 Key Royale Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground-
level 2,438 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car/pool canalfront home
built in 1959 on a 12,900 sf lot, purchased 7/88 for
$155,000 and remodeled, sold 2/27/97, Simches to
Melvin, for $279,900; list $279,900.
541 Key Royale Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground-
level canalfront 1,461 +sfla 3bed/3bath/2car home built
in 1962 on a 100x218 lot, purchased 12/86 for
$166,000 and remodeled, was sold 2/24/97, Forster to
Cox, for $433,000; list $495,000.
611 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 19A Imperial
House, a 789 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1968, was
sold 2/25/97, Sherman to Trapp, for $81,000; list un-
known.
114 Elm, Anna Maria, a ground-level 1,020 sfla
2bed/2bath home built in 1946 on 5,500 sf of land, was
sold 3/7/97, DeWolf to Cook, for $125,000; list un-
known.
2106 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, a 9,990 sf
Gulffront lot, was sold 3/7/97, Serrano to Chovan, for
$240,000; list $240,000.
2600 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 20 Anna Maria


Island Club, an elevated 1,453 sfla 2bed/2bath
Gulffront condo built in 1984, was sold 3/3/97,
Hammond to Chandler, for $234,000; list unknown.
3700 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, the "Mexican
Villa," an elevated 2,376 sfla 3bed/3.5bath/2car/pool
townhouse built in 1992 on 4,734 sf of land, was sold
3/4/97, Hoffmann to Fretwell, for $335,000; list
$329,000.
6500 Flotilla, Holmes Beach, 168 Westbay Point
& Moorings, a 1,250 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in
1978, was sold 3/4/97, Roberts to Woodcock & Farley,
for $130,000; list unknown.
6812 Palm Dr., Holmes Beach, an elevated 1,352
sfla 4bed/4bath/2car duplex built in 1981 on a 7,800 sf
lot, was sold 3/3/97, Black to Stafford, for $120,500;
list unknown.
205 Bay Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, a ground-level
724 sfla ibed/lbath home built in 1950 on a 6,500 sf
lot, was sold 3/10/97, Doyle to Bazzy Marine, for
$87,000; list unknown.
216 84th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 988
sfla 2bed/2bath home with deeded boat slip built in
1960 on a 90x100 lot, was sold 3/14/97, Bull to Snyder,
for $145,000; list $159,500.
3607 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 203 Sandy
Pointe 2, an elevated 1,150 sfla 2bed/2bath/2car condo


built in 1996, was sold 3/11/97, Florida Homebuyers
Insurance to Mayer, for $115,000; list $109,500.
501 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 305 Bridgeport,
an elevated 1,128 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1982,
was sold 3/13/97, Pertree to Morlock, for $113,000; list
$114,900.
5300 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 107 Martinique
North, a Gulffront 1,057 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in
1971, was sold 3/12/97, Berger to Kuchuris, for
$152,900; list $165,900.
634 Key Royale Dr., Holmes Beach, a canalfront
ground-level 1,412 sfla 3bed/2bath/lcar home built in
1967 on a 120x142x73x89 lot, was sold 3/12/97,
Fischer to Rolen, for $190,000; list $193,000.
1007 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 222 Summer
Sands, a 2bed/2.5bath 1259 sfla condo built in 1982,
was sold 3/20/97, Komor to Kaplan, for $134,000; list
$145,000.
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 132 Runaway
Bay, a lbed/lbath 691 sfla condo built in 1978, was
sold 3/19/97, McWilliams to Martino, for $79,500; list
$83,000.
3803 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 1 A Sunbow
Bay, a 1,200 sfla 2bed/2bath townhouse condo built in

PLEASE SEE REAL ESTATE, NEXT PAGE


Now you can use email to write to your Island newspaper!

Our email address is IL D
islander@mead.net
The Islander Bystander will be on the Internet with an
exciting Web site in the near future ... 'Look for us at
www.islanderbystander.com. INFORMATION: _
CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392.


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-Sw- .


CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA HOME with court- DIRECT GULF VIEWS from this elevated island
yard entrance has a split plan, unique kitchen with home just one property from the beach. Elevator,
breakfast nook, spacious Florida room with wood tons of storage, recently remodeled and has great
burning stove and large deck. $195,000. rental potential. Best price at $240,000.
O1 I I 30 54:1NM, a 3V 113.P1 0UI1 A I.3L',


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ijlI PAGE 22 0 MAY 28, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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4 Norman
Realty inc.

3101 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Office: (941) 778-6696 (800) 367-1617
gussie@ix.netcom.comrn


REAL ESTATE, FROM PAGE 21

1977, was sold 3/26/97, Rariden to Huffstutler, for
$130,000; list $135,000.
510 Magnolia, a 7,482 sf lot, was sold 3/18/97,
Chant to Murray, for $75,000; list $82,500.
5614 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, an elevated
Gulffront 1,184 sfla 3bed/2bath/2cp home built in 1979
on a 16,400 sf lot, was sold 3/18/97, Hart to Wilson, for
$439,000; list $459,000.
775 North Shore Dr., a ground-level, almost
Gulffront 1,549 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car/pool home built
in 1953 on a 10362 sf lot, was sold 3/17/97, Greene to
Skoloda, for $275,000; list $339,000.
7902 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground-level
1,115 sfla 2bed/lbath/lcar home built in 1944 on a
5,120 sf lot, was sold 3/24/97, Roberts to Monte, for
$135,000; list $145,000.
1800 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 111 La Costa,
a Gulffront 952 sfla 2bed/1&1/2bath condo built in
1979, was sold 4/24/97, Willis to Long, for
$162,000; list unknown.
1906 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 103 Coquina
Beach Club, a Gulffront 1,110 sfla 2bed/2bath condo
built in 1985, was sold 4/22/97, Nelson to Berglund &
Citera, for $172,500; list $199,000.
21 Seaside Ct., Holmes Beach, a ground-level





419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294









PRICE SLASHED!
This immaculate 3BR/3BA bayview residence has it all!
Bright, light and impeccably maintained. Only $179,000
including one year homeowners warranty! Don't miss it!









CUSTOM-BUILT ELEVATED 3BR/2BA
Key-West style home on wide canal. Only 3-years old with
nice open kitchen, breakfast bar and spacious pantry.
Open sundeck off front of house and beautiful screened
porch off back. Walk-in closets in all 3 bedrooms. Priced
at only $249,900.









SECLUDED ISLAND RETREAT
This 3BR/2BA home is located on the tranquil north end
of Anna Maria, just steps to the finest sugar-white beach
in Florida. Completely remodeled in 1988, this tastefully
decorated hideaway offers a master suite with cathedral
ceilings, skylights, black slate fireplace, private lanai and
fabulous dove-gray bath with Kohler cast iron tub, over-
sized shower and his and hers sinks. There is a fully
equipped country-style kitchen opening onto a formal
dining area. The cozy family room offers another distinc-
tive stone fireplace with raised hearth, vaulted ceiling and
sliding doors which open onto the sunny screened porch.
Vinyl siding, sprinkler system and pretty pebbled
landscaping make for easy exterior upkeep. Includes
Westec security system and One-Year Homeowner's
Warranty! Truly a wonderful place to call home! Affordably
priced at only $285,000.
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"

Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Nancy Guilford...778-2158
Monica Reid...729-3333 Suzanne Kasten ... 953-3584 Sherry Sasser... 778-1820
( Exclusive
(V'h Waterfront ri | o HI l\ ~ llL
Estates MLS 1 Ul .....
Video Collection '. "". ""....

bSfcizy in. mJLs'eu o/cafJpi/skiyL s
Visit our Web Site http://www.manatee-online.com/hills


.6AXON


NEW LISTING!!!
This lovely home has everything. 3BR/2BA, living
room, family room, fireplace, two-car garage and
screened porch with Jacuzzi. Just steps to the bay
in Anna Maria City. Call today for a personal tour
of this home. Priced to sell at just $169,000.


BAYOU LOT
Picture cloud patterns on a sunny day across this
quietly-flowing Bayou lot. Tranquil solitude would
be yours everyday of the year. Call today to see
this matchless canalfront lot on the northern end
of Anna Maria. Offered at just $137,500.


CANALFRONT JUST REDUCED!!!
Unbelievable potential here! 103 ft. on deep-
water canal. This 2BR/2BA home has been very
well maintained and is on a fantastic street of
upgraded homes. Don't miss this great oppor-
tunity. Just reduced to $219,000.
i^.^ .^ *1. P7 " ,S


MINI-RESORT
Two duplexes in great condition within walking
distance to both the Bay and Gulf. Quiet
Holmes Beach location in an up and coming
neighborhood. Buy one or both priced at just
$115,000 each.
Call Pat Jackson at 778-3301,
Ken Jackson at 778-6986
or Agnes Tooker 778-5287

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
"L 9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
FRAN MAON "RA MAXO


canalfront attached villa of 2bed/2bath/lcp, 960 sfla, and
built in 1963 on 2,500 sf of land, was sold 4/25/97,
Howard to Shaw & Vanzandt, for $86,500; list unknown.
232 85th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,098
sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1955 on 9,000 sf of
land, was sold 4/22/97, Frost to Beam, for $129,000;
list unknown.
3703 Fifth Ave., Holmes Beach, 4 Seacrest 2, a 2bed/
2bath condo built in 1985 was sold 4/25/97, Kaeding to
Clark & Durden, for $119,500; list $121,500.
4001 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 106 Beach
Townhouses, a 2bed/2&1/2bath 1,117 sfla condo built
in 1984, was sold 4/25/97, Scripo to Colleary, for
$125,000; list $126,000.
501 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 107 Bridgeport,
a 2bed/2bath 1,337 sfla condo built in 1982, was sold
4/25/97, Wiley to Wilson, for $99,500; list unknown.
5200 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 204 Martinique
South, a 2bed/2bath 1,057 sfla condo built in 1970, was
sold 4/25/97, Dickson to Terry, for $135,000; list
$149,900..
5300 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 602 Martinique
North, a 1,057 sfla 2bed/2bath Gulffront condo built in
1971, was sold 4/24/97, Cordes & Norris to Jacob, for
$210,000; list unknown.
* Compiled exclusively for The Islander Bystander by
Doug Dowling, licensed real estate broker, 778-1222.


?X e / 3 1O
3 --t- A6- NO g/-






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 28, 1997 N PAGE 23 IED


OBJEKTVERWALTUNG
VERMIETUNGEN

Professionell Zuverlassig Unkompliziert
Wir betreuen Ihre Immobilie wie unsere Eigene.


John Michals
Real Estate, Ine





I Property Management Team
"We Cover the Island"


BREEZY KEY WEST STYLE CANALFRONT
308 Tarpon, Anna Maria
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, over 2,000 sq. ft. living area
with vaulted ceilings and master bedroom suite on
the third floor. Offered at $829,509. $319,500 just
reduced.


oug Dowling Realty
778-1222







MLS
5201 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(941) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-237-2252
||^J|


FOURPLEX:
Holmes beach fourplex close to beach. All units renovated.
Owner financing. Under $80,000 per unit. Won't last long
at this price. $318,000. Elizabeth Andricks 778-4800.
WATERFRONT BARGAIN Live like royalty in this 1,386
sq. ft. 2BR/2BA canalfront end unit with private boat dock.
Priced over $17,000 less than the next cheapest unit in complex.
Won't last long. $95,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026
ATTENTION INVESTORS Four units; two buildings.
These numbers work! Income from fourth unit projected at
$450 monthly is now owners unit. $19,000 income yearly;
$5,000 yearly expenses include utilities. Great location!
Two miles to beaches. $99,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
MOTEL NEAR BEACH- Ten-unit motel in Holmes Beach,
furnished turnkey. Owners home and an additional six 2BR
units available for increased income. Profitable motel.
$800,000. For more information call Luke Courtney 778-5405.
COMMERCIAL OFFICE BUILDING Situated in cen-
ter of Holmes Beach. Uniquely designed to be subdivided
into as many as five independent offices. Five a/c units and
five meters. Shown by appointment $310,000. Stanley
Williams 778-4800.
Visit Our Web Site
http://www.manatee-on-line.com/a paradise/


-


JUTLIE McCLURE

Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America

Buy it, sell it! Find it in The Islander Bystander







REALTOR.
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
CANALFRONT- LARGE LOT Seawall, davits. 2 or 3BR,
fireplace, family room, 2-car garage, newly painted exte-
rior. Over 1,800 sq. ft. Custom-built; original owner.
PANORAMIC VIEW OF BAY AND SUNRISES enchant
one while fawn and fauna enhance this 2BR/2BA, direct
bayfront. Pool. 2-car carport and many extras. $119,995.
OWNER WANTS OFFERS.
PALMA SOLA BAY One half block away and caged pool
with this well-maintained 3BR/2BA home. 2-car garage,
family room, fireplace. Quiet cul-de-sac street. All for
$139,000. GREAT VALUE!
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
GULF FRONT 22 UNIT APARTMENT MOTEL 110' of white
sandy beach front plus "private beach". Heated pool, recent
improvements. If you are a serious buyer, compare and you
will own this "one of a kind" value. $1,995,000.
5351 GULF DRIVE 778-0807 Eves. 778-5427
or Toll Free at 1-800-956-0807
www.tdolly@bhip.infi.net


Karin Stephan k,
REALTOR
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche ,
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766 .
Home:
941-388-1267
Fax: 941- 778-3035
INTERNET-KBSTEPHAN@AOL.COM -
All my listings can be seen on the world wide
web. http://www.pruflorida.com

ARTIST'S RETREAT
Desirable floor plan with
gourmet kitchen, hardwood
Floors and caged pool.
Great views of Tampa Bay.
Just reduced to $219,000.
#DP21438. Call Don
Pampuch eves. 778-3111
CALL FOR YOUR ISLAND HOT
SHEET TO BE SENT TO YOU!
Office 941-778-0766
Home 941-778-3111 DONALD PAMPUCH
Pager 941-252-7777 RealtorP


OWNER ANXIOUS
Owner will listen to offers on this charming 2BR/2BA home
only 550 ft. to great Gulf beach! Over 1,400 sq. ft. living
area plus garage all in MINT CONDITION! Newer carpet-_
ing and appliances. Custom louvered interior shutters.Only
$185,000.


Since 1
MARIE ^'^y ^ LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive P0 Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250

Buy it, sell it! Rnd it in The Islander Bystander




WAN G IOUS SUNIS VIEW W
KEYROYALDREAM
You'll sleep easy in
this canalfront 2BR/
2BA with den. Dock
and davits. It's a
-beauty! $215,000.
Call Karen Schroder.

WANT GLORIOUS SUNRISE VIEWS? We have them
$235,000 and up. Call Sandy Greiner or Barb Turner.
NEED A GARAGE FOR A VAN? This home will park
two! 400 ft. to the Gulf. Like new. Call Sandy Greiner
or Barb Turner.
WALK TO BEACH 2BR/2BA home, enclosed lanai with
sunny 1 BR apartment. Excellent condition. 100x100 lot, nice
landscaping, turnkey furnished. $171,900. Yvonne Higgins.
FABULOUS VIEWS ARE YOURS from this 2BR/2BA
condo. Large lanai. Overlooks lake and clubhouse. Call
Don Schroder.


Opposite the Holmes Beach Library
5600 MARINA DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217
941-778-7777


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/SALES
ANNUAL
West Bradenton Home
2BR/2BA ........................................ $850mth
WEEKLY/MONTHLY SEASONAL
2BR/2BA Gulfview condo
with pool ............................................ $750wk
2BR/2BA Gulfview luxury condo
Connie Volts with pool ........................................ $900wk
2BR/2.5BA townhouse with pool ....... $600wk
2BR/2BA condo............. $800mth for summer
2BR/2BA home plus loft bedroom .. $1000mth
941-778-2055
IMPERIAL HOUSE Affordable
condo's in a Gulf to Bay location,
2BR. Turnkey-furnished with
bay view. $79,900. #CH21123.
ANNA MARIA CITY Enjoy
breathtaking Gulf views from al-
most every room in this elevated
3BR/2BA home. $325,000.
#CH18980.
BOAT DOCK ON THE BAY
with three updated units in a
Carol S. Heinze peaceful tropical setting with
REALTOR/CRS view of the bay and just steps
778-7246 to the beach. $349,000.
#CH18808.


GREAT VIEW From this contemporary elevated 3BR/2BA canalfront home in the lovely residential commu-
nity of Anna Maria. Located on deep-water canal with direct boating access to Tampa Bay and Intracoastal
Waterway. $259,900. Call Karin Stephan eves 388-1267. #22126.
BEAUTIFUL SUNSETS Spacious 3BR/2BA on deep canal. Separate one bedroom apartment, 2-car garage,
in-ground pool, outdoor wet bar with sink, fireplace, electric boat lift, recently renovated. Must see. $320,000
#19294. Call Roni Price 776-5585.
GREAT INVESTMENT 4 units, renovated with love and taste. Fireplace in two units, tile floors, Henry Linck
furniture. Private backyard. Large spa being installed. Just a few short steps to Gulf of Mexico and the bay.
$283,000. Call Karin Stephan eves. 368-1267. #22240.
^^^^^^^^^^^^- .. ...........- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^0 ^^


L ot





ID PAGE 24 A MAY 28, 1997 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



ITMSFO SLELOT NDFOND ANONCMETSCotiue


OVERSIZED RECLINER with leather-match fab-
ric in great shape. Cost $550, now $125. Also
lamps and coffee table. 778-0812.

"FOUNDERS" TRIPLE DRESSER with mirror,
light wood, twelve drawers, $100. Queen-size sofa
bed, tan color, bedding included, $125. 778-4477.

HEWLETT PACKARD LASER JET 4L black/white
printer. 1.5 years old, mint condition. Asking $275.
Call 778-4055, ask for Carl.

PORTABLE SEWING MACHINE good condition,
$45. Call 778-3058.
BUILDERS HOME FURNITURE Displayed but
never used. 4 piece bedroom sets $259; sofa and
love seat $399; queen bed set $199; full $159;
twin $129; futons (sofa by day bed at night)
frame and mat $199; daybed (white with brass fini-
als) including 2 mattresses and pop-up unit $285.
Can deliver. Call 746-4355.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


MOVING SALE Fri. & Sat., May 30 & 31, 8 12.
Furniture, clothes, garden equipment and more.
6351 Gulf Dr., N. Beach Village.
SALE Sat., May 31, 9 12. Paperbacks, picture
frames (all sizes), desk, bookshelves, chest of
drawers, four-drawer file, two-drawer file. 409 74th
Street, Holmes Beach.


NEED A PHOTO

REPRINT?
^^^^* \


Reprints are available of photographs
taken by staff photographers that have ap-
peared in The Islander Bystander.
STEP 1 Cut out or make a copy of the photo you
want with the publication date noted.
STEP 2 Send the clipping with payment to The
Islander Bystander for:
5x 7 $15 8x10 $25
Plus 7% sales tax. All reprint requests must be paid in
advance. Call 778-7978 for prices of additional prints.
STEP 3 Mail your reprint order to: Reprints, The
Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach FL 34217 or bring your order to The Islander
Bystander office.
STEP 4 Your reprints will be mailed to you or can
be picked up in about 3 weeks. Be sure to include
your address and phone number.

aISANDE nRIVNs
Reprints are intended for personal use and cannot be
re-published without the written permission of
The Islander Bystander (941) 778-7978


PELE CALL HOME! If you see Pele (a gray
male, tiger cat, neutered, approximately 11
months old) please call us! Last seen on Bay Dr.
N., BB. 778-3790.

LOST GOLD BRACELET with five birthstones.
Please call 779-1510.


"FAMILY AND FRIENDS of the elderly Stress-
Management Workshop". Call 761-8099.

"FIVE COMPONENTS of a Stress-Free Marriage
or Relationship" an educational series, not mar-
riage counseling, will begin Tuesday, Jun. 10, 7
pm. Pre-registration required. Limited seating.
Enroll early. Call 761-8099.

VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages
of information everything you need to know to
enjoy the two-county area. Retail price $14.95,
discounted 33% only at the newspaper office. You
pay only $10 plus tax at The Islander Bystander,
5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978

"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of sto-
ries and newspaper columns guaranteed to de-
light newcomers, visitors and oldtimers too, by
original Florida Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This
book makes a great gift. Available for $19.95 at
The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978


BAYFRONT
Intracoastal Waterway


REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5404 Marina Drive,, Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls)
- We come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only).
778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets
have to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide
food, water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


ISLAND TRANSPORTATION 1976 Ford Elite,
runs great, $400. Call 778-2665.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and every-
thing else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations
please. Call 778-1990.

WET SLIPS AND Hi 'N' Dry storage available at
competitive rates in modern, full-service marina.
778-2255.

15' CENTER CONSOLE boat, 1988, 50 hp Mer-
cury, trailer, bimini top. $2,100 OBO. Telephone
779-1061.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part
time servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge
St., Bradenton Beach.
HOUSEKEEPERS FULL AND PART time. Ben-
efits, year-round work. Resort 66, 6600 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach, 778-2238.
TYPIST RECEPTIONIST full time or part time, Mon.
through Fri., 8:30 5. Typing, dictation. 778-5211.


LOOKING
Jy of fuI,

Sfor & bit to t,
rfy of sU1%Ait1?







Look ho furtLer it's &II
it Tie Islahder Bysfthder.
DON'T MISS A WEEK!

TISLANDERI}Elia


MILLION-DOLLAR VIEW
3BR/2BA Large deck, double garage, totally
furnished. BY OWNER $295,900. 778-3176


Get 'em while they're fresh!
Mullet T-shirts ... $10 Hats ... $7.50
Mail order add $3 for postage and handling.
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet shirts, hats, subscription orders
and classified advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must FAX copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 Fax 778-9392







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 28, 1997 M. PAGE 25 Ij

; SA N I ,A S I .1ID


CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world?
Are you interested in learning the history of Anna
Maria Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria
Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria. WE NEED YOU! Call 778-0492.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial
Library. Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or
778-6247.



AFFORDABLE ADULT CARE 10 years experi-
ence. Certified caregiver including all home health
needs and companionship. Please call and leave
message. 792-4589.

CNA AVAILABLE for night work, Mon. Fri.,
10 pm 6 am. Excellent references, eleven years
experience. Call 778-2961.



MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trim-
ming, clean-up, shell, odd jobs'. Hard-working
and responsible. Excellent references. Call Ed-
ward 778-3222.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

"THE PERFECTIONIST" cleaning with perfec-
tion! Offices, homes and condos. Call Sharon at
778-0064.

AUTO DETAILING at your home or office at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine and undercarriage clean-
ing, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and more. Call Damon at 320-5662.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads.














DIRECT BAYVIEW! Living and dining areas,
kitchen and master suite with unobstructed bay
views across the street. Key West-style elevated
3BR/3BA spacious home with top-quality amenities.
Workshop, extra storage, dumbwaiter, central
vacuum system and much more! $399,800. Dial the
Duncans! Judy 778-1589 or Darcie 779-2290 eves.


CHECK-A-HOME Inspection Services can keep
an eye on your home or rental while you're gone.
Free estimate. Licensed builder. Call Island
Check-A-Home at 778-3089.

HOUSESITTER Christian Retired Widow avail-
able anytime. Longboat Key and Holmes
Beach area. References available upon re-
quest. 770-948-4998.

DOLPHIN PRE-SCHOOL Prepare your child for
kindergarten. Available places for ages 18
months through 6 years. Waiting list for infants
and toddlers. Telephone 778-2967.

"I DON'T WANNA clean house" you say to your-
self. Sharon wants to clean your house. Refer-
ences. Call or leave message. 778-3006.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE AND REPAIR. Call
Mark for appointment at Grooms Motors,
778-6045. 5608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All
repairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free
estimates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor
repairs and maintenance in your driveway. For
estimate or appointment call 778-0373.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread,
trash removal, tree trimming, pressure washing
and painting. Free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

SPRING CLEANING TIME! Call Rick at Dolphin
Cleaning, 778-2864 or pager 331-8114. Li-
censed, bonded, insured. "Our business is al-
ways picking up!"



DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.


LAWN CUTTING most lawns $15 $20. Call for
free estimate. 778-1560.



VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, In-
terior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Is-
land resident references. Dan or Bill 795-5100.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodel-
ing specialist. State licensed and insured. Many
Island references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, re-
pairs. Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION all types of renova-
tions/new construction services. Now offering
installation and servicing of rolling hurricane secu-
rity shutters. License # CGC 058-092. Insured.
778-5354.

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PAINTING free esti-
mates. 31 year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at
778-1730.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING power wash
roofs and homes. Also paint or stain wicker and
outdoor furniture. Pickup and delivery. Free esti-
mate. Call Big Jim at 778-5587.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco,
tile. Lic. #MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183.
Dave Elliott.


Residential Sales/Rental Division Licensed Real Estate Broker


MAGNIFICENT SUNSETS. Custom 4-5BR/4B bayfront estate
on sailboat water. Gourmet kitchen, two fireplaces, elegant
master suite. Pool, Jacuzzi, dock and davits, tennis court. Very
private. $895,000. Van Bourgois, 7781749. R19319


BOATING WATER in Anna Maria. 2BR/2B immaculate home
with great water view. Large screened pool and lanai. Low
maintenance yard, fruit trees, wood deck. Quiet cul-de-sac
neighborhood. $215,000. Van Bourgois, 778-1749. R20195


2~E Gl'dI~E,# ~' -.


BIMINI BAY POOL HOME. Sailboat water, dock, great views.
Fireplace, 3BR/3-1/2B, den, great room, beautiful kitchen.
Oversized garage. $599,000. Nancy Keegan, 723-3929 or
Julie DeSear, 794-3041. R20386
WATERFRONT COMIC
ELEGANT WHITE-BRICK RIVERFRONT ZONED C2. Lot
RESIDENCE. 5BR pool home. Oak floors, Gulf Drive location
family room, formal dining room, guest ties. $180,000.
quarters above garage. Screened brick L15843
porch overlooks pool. 1.1 +/- acres.
$950,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200. R14856
MAGNIFICENT RESIDENCE. 4 or FRISH"
5BR, completely renovated, wood
floors, crown moldings. Spacious [-OR ANI
family room overlooks pool, dock and
grounds. $618,000. Kathy Marcinko, Available pro;
792-9122. R18225 or by the mon
TWO-STORY HOME WITH WATER Island to Veni
VIEWS. Great room, fireplace. Boat slip rental and re
with electric lift. Deck with spa on (941) 951-6668
second level. $399,900. Kathy Lo
Marcinko, 792-9122. R67252 Anna Maria I


MER
, 90'
on. Exp
Anne





pertie
th fro
ice. C
resort
8 or (f
located
island


WALK TO THE GULF BEACH from this spacious 4BR/3B
furnished waterfront townhouse on Anna Maria Island. Cathe-
dral ceilings, balcony. Community dock, two heated pools and
tennis. $164,900. Jeanette Rampone, 747-3364. C21507
ICIAL MAINLAND
x 100' +/-. Prime BRAND NEW Northwest Bradenton home.
plore the possibili- 4BR/3B, coral fireplace, tile throughout.
Miller, 792-6475. Master bath with marble tub and sink,
loaded with extras. Lush landscaping.
$249,900. Van Bourois, 778-1749.
HIGH STANDARDS AND EXQUISITE
_____|__-_ TASTE is reflected throughout this
custom-built home. Located in River
RNTirAiL Wilderness on the golf course. Enjoy the
views from large screened lanai, kitchen
s by the week or family room. $459,900. Nancy
m Anna Maria Keegan, 723-3929. R16442
all one of our GO WEST. One block to the bay and
specialists, close to the beach. 2BR updated home
800) 881-2222 situated on 85' x 155' +/- lot. Plenty of
in room for your boat, RV and new pool.
Centre Shops $99,900. Anne Miller, 792-6475. R22281


324EstByDivH lmsBahFoid 41 *9178-64Vii u st n h nere-t
4 4 0 a a t e A v n e e t B a d n o n l o i a 4 0 9 9 9 4 4 8 6 0 0 h t p / % % w % i h i e s a n erg ei


. ... ,

.- --'^" *^ -


ISLAND TOWNHOUSE 3BR/2.5BA with two-car
garage and storage area. Lovely landscaped yard
with room for a pool. Washer and dryer included.
$179,900. Dial the Duncans! Judy 778-1589 or
Darcie 779-2290 eves.
CORTEZ VILLAS Evergreen model, well-main-
tained by original owner. 2-3BR/2BA end unit with
cathedral ceiling, den or third bedroom. Extra
storage space with double cabinets in kitchen.
Security system. A pleasure to show. $64,500.
Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
SAN REMO CONDOS 2BR/1BA condos in canal
complex; one unit with two boat docks. $44,900
- $63,500. Call Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK M LS I s


C^ll


h


REALTORS






S PAGE 26 M MAY 28, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
L Sandy'\ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
SWe Monitor Irrigation Systems
Service INSURED GUARANTEED LOWEST
77841345 PRICES AND SATISFACTION
t i Established in 1983

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
9 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Wal Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


@@m'NvU@T'D@N
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Specialists
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


Private & Commercial Interior & Exterior
20 Years Experience Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates Call 778-2139

OLF CLUB REPAIR
OL F Re-Grips $4
U Free pick .up and delivery
778-0413 Custom Built Clubs by Terry


Formica Wood

^Tcj B Nc T^


by REX B. SLIKER
10 Years of Local References


ISLANDER


778-7399
Insured


II STiAL


. .-


Mobile Detail Service
We come to you!

MOST CARS $95*
*Wash, buff, wax, shampoo interior, under
carriage, tires and rims all treated and
protected plus engine pressure cleaning.
$95 on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office. Your car doesn't
I K have to be driven anywhere! Let us
protect and preserve your investment.
Mention this ad for $ 10 OFF.




320-5662
(This number is a message service when we are busy.)
THE AREA'S #1 MOBILE DETAILER IS BACK!
All cars/trucks personally serviced by Damon.
"1


F DE C ASSFI D


FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1BR/1BA,
private lot and parking. Available weekly at $350
wk. 778-2832.

ELEGANT 2BR/2BA unit, steps to beach. Large
deck, tropical landscaping. Come and see. $800
mo. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244.

CHARMING HOLMES BEACH apartment. 2BR/
1 BA with bay view and washer/dryer hookup. An-
nual $675 mo. 795-7805.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND seasonal or monthly rental.
Gorgeous, totally remodeled. Canalfront with dock.
Short 1 + block walk to beach. 3BR/2BA with large,
sunny Florida room for entertaining. Five different
fruit trees in yard. Available Sept. through Dec. Call
(941) 688-9281 or (941) 683-4703.

HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS CENTER Rental
units available for commercial, retail and.storage.
Call (941) 778-2924 for information.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Bay/Gulffront, 1 & 2
BR excellent location, all new furnishings.
Totally equipped; phone, cable, new pool.
Swim, snorkel, fish at your front door. Walk to
local shops, restaurants. $69 day, $450 wk.,
$1,600 mo. (941) 778-1322.

AVAILABLE NOV. 1 MAY 1 Owner's per-
sonal 2BR/2.5BA townhouse with pool, across
from beach with view of Gulf. Covered park-
ing. No smokers or pets. $1,500 mo plus utili-
ties and security deposit. References
required. (941) 778-1221.

WANTED ANNA MARIA annual rental for
mature female artist, award-winning gardener, no
pets or children. Small cottage or apartment.
Excellent local references. (305) 856-3771.
AVAILABLE JULY 1, 1997 2BR/1 BA unfurnished,
washer/dryer, garage. $700 mo., first, last, secu-
rity, references. 2BR/1 BA furnished, wk./mo., Aug.
- Nov. $300 wk., $800 mo. Efficiency one room
with kitchen, wk./mo., May Nov. $150 wk., $375
mo. 778-5057.

ANNUAL RENTAL Large 2BR/1BA apartment.
Well maintained and landscaped. One block to
Gulf and beach. $650 mo. No pets. Call 778-0608.

MARTINIQUE DIRECT GULFFRONT 2BR/2BA,
recently remodeled. Second floor, clean and
lovely. Please call 778-5910 after May 21.

VACATION RENTALS turnkey, 1 & 2BR across
from beach. $234/$294 wk. Almost Beach Apart-
ments, (941) 778-2374.

ANNUAL 2BR/1 .5BA duplex apartment in Holmes
Beach. Unit has washer/dryer hookup, carport,
storage room. $675 mo. plus utilities. No pets. Call
Fran Maxon Real 778-1450 for information.

ANNUAL FURNISHED 2BR/2BA apartments in
Anna Maria City. Nice furnishings, dishwasher,
close to shopping and beaches. Call Fran Maxon
Real Estate 778-1450.

NORTH HOLMES BEACH Small apartment,
yearly rental, across for beach. Available Jun. 1.
$400 plus security. 778-1285.

BRADENTON BEACH DUPLEX Large 1BR/1BA
annual, new carpet, one block from beach and
convenience store. Available Jun. 1. $500 mo. Call
Mike Norman Realty, 778-6696 or Mike 779-2074.


AVAILABLE 1BR FURNISHED mobile home.
Sandpiper resort overlooking the bay. Short block
to sandy beach. $650 mo. (613) 820-9121, (941)
778-1875.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA apartment. Screened
room, garage, washer/dryer hookups, nice quiet
area. No pets. $650 mo. annual. 776-1789.
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2BR/1 BA duplex, $300
mo. including utilities. $50 deposit. Washer,
cable, dishwasher. Non-drinker. Call 745-1020
after 6:30 pm.
FULLY FURNISHED DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, close to
beach, Florida room and separate utility room with
washer and dryer. Annual, $800 mo. plus utilities.
First, last, security. 778-0182.
GULFFRONT BEACH COTTAGE 2BR/1 BA, fully
furnished, available immediately. $400 wk. Call
748-8800.
BEST GULFVIEWS beachfront, exclusive area,
unique home. 3BR/2BA, top master suite, decks,
patio, beautifully furnished. $3,000 mo., $1,200 wk.
778-0990.
TWO ISLAND APARTMENTS south of Cortez.
Walk to Beachhouse. 2BR $650 mo. or 1 BR $450
mo. No pets. Retirees welcome. 778-2864.
PAYING $1,000 OR MORE in deposits to rent?
Talk with us first. You may be able to buy a home.
Let's talk. Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner, ReMax
Gulfstream Realty, 778-7777.

GROUND FLOOR 2BR/2BA close to beach and
shops. New paint, tile floors. $650 mo. 778-4523.


GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
GREAT GIFTS ANYTIME!

AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT 8AM 4PM


Just visiting
paradise?

[SLANDER

Don't leave the island
without taking time to..
subscribe. Visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach or call
941-77b-7978.


NU-Weatherside of Florida
SOFFIT & FASCIA SINCE
WINDOW REPLACEMENT
*PORCH ENCLOSURES
S*VINYL SIDING
S778-7074
Lic. # CLAC 286523



ACDC AIMAT M|AL IClE H AG
RAIL DEL O N ALST 0 j IERR
R EED S G 0 E T 0 T O W N IRI l
A ITA-RALEIS B 0|P|EJEP
BiAN|ANAI ATM 0S DE BACLE
.CASPER C L A RKGA8 L MAI
A v LEVE E AMAS ERN
M END GAYG R Y ...P. E G STE
P R I .0 RE S T E C -RTEZ
c Aou T L E TSBS S H I E H D
N ED EA A T H R AG-6-EE
ND Y B 00AC IC RA W
FKRT AN KC|APRA CA AJ 0 L1E
A ED 0 A EL 0 T R 0 0 MAY
EAE A W S I U R FNUSLAR E M S
AGJA ITSAG| T NS 0 0 ERIFU U L L I F E
E VIEE GIREIE N S RU A,X Y


U H-H .


You moved and forgot to tell us? Act immediately to avoid interrupted service
on your mail subscription to The Islander Bystander.
Please give us a call at (941) 778-7978 or fax us your old and new address at
(941) 778-9392.
Remember, we mail bulk mail unless you paid ISLANDER,
extra for first-class mail, and the post office
will not forward your subscription.


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
XACT RENOVATIONS
o KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


I 0 Rdbfi


I-


mmool


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 28, 1997 M PAGE 27 KII3


- A *. A *-


2BR HOLMES BEACH apartment, turnkey, 1/2
block to beach. Available Jun. Dec. $800 mo.
including utilities. No smokers 778-2864.

VACATION ON BEACH 2BR/2BA, sleeps 6.
July 4th weekend still available. 1BR/1BA ,
sleeps 4, Jul. 4th and other July weeks avail-
able. Starting at $550 wk. to $2,000 mo. (800)
977-0803, 778-4523.

COZY H.B. DUPLEX 1BR/1BA, walk to beach/
dock. Smokers OK, no children. $500 mo. fur-
nished. 778-1916 (ans. mach. broken last week,
please call back.)

SUMMER RENTAL 2BR/2BA house, north end of
Anna Maria. $900 mo. 778-2665.

MINI VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either
Sun. Wed. or Mon. Thur. Two people/4nights
from $135. Kitchens. 500 ft. to beach. Free bikes.
Haley's Motel & Resort Complex, 778-5405 or
(800) 367-7824.

HIDEAWAY COVE Panoramic bay view. Nice
quiet 2BR. First floor, no pets/smoking. Fully fur-
nished. Prefer 3-6 months but will consider
weekly/monthly. Also available: 2BR winter 1998,
3-6 months. 778-7107.


WANTED DUPLEX house or condo. Serious
buyer seeking on Anna Maria Island. Call 516-
589-3943 or e-mail tweetjude@earthlink.net. Prin-
cipals only.
OPEN HOUSE 1 -4, Mon. through Sat. Spacious
4BR/4BA waterfront with boat dock on Coconut
Bayou. Current appraisal $525,000. Will consider
offers below appraisal. 130 Hammock Rd., Anna
Maria. Owner/broker. Call 778-6155.

FRANKLIN N.C. Enjoy cool summer days, beau-
tiful setting, 2BR/1BA, fireplace, two duplex
cottages, pool. Great for winter and summer. Ask-
ing $105,000. Call (813) 915-3461.

IMMACULATE! MINT CONDITION 2BR, new
kitchen, sunporch, garage, boat slip, ground level,
walk to beach, room for pool. $159,900. Hurry
while it lasts. Owner 778-3775.

ELEVATED 3BR/2BA home with hot tub. Walk to
beach. 260 S. Harbor. $219,950. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt, Coldwell Banker, 778-2261.

GLORIOUS SUNRISES over the bay. 3BR/2BA,
two-car garage, feels like a model home. Only
$235,000. Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner, Re/Max
Gulfstream, 778-7777.


NEED A PLACE TO PARK a van? This garage
can handle two of them and still have room for
a large workshop! Located 400' to Gulf, nearly
new construction, custom design. Call for ap-
pointment. Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner, Re/Max
Gulfstream, 778-7777.

ROOMY HOME west of Gulf Drive. 3BR/2.5BA
plus den, four decks and a fireplace. $800 from
the 2BR/2BA apartment will help make the
payments. Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner, Re/Max
Gulfstream, 778-7777.

HURRICANE SEASON starts June 1. Don't
stress, head for the mainland! Palma Sola pool
home with delightfully different floor plan that
you won't be able to resist. Only $149,900.
Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner, Re/Max
Gulfstream, 778-7777.

SHAWS POINT pool home. Large fenced yard,
new A/C. $149,900. Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner,
Re/Max Gulfstream, 778-7777.

DOCK AT YOUR BACK DOOR and have the
dock and seawall maintained for you for less than
$100,000? It's true! Sandy Greiner/Barb Turner,
Re/Max Gulfstream, 778-7777.

LOTS BAYVIEW DUPLEX $79,500;
Oceanview, 150 ft. to high tide, ocean access
$175,000. 778-4523, (800) 977-0803.

MOBILE HOME in Cortez Park on the bay. Clean,
modern, 2BR, unfurnished, $225 mo. Mostly sea-
sonal residents (over 55). $25,000. Call Barbara
Gentiluomo at Mike Norman Realty, 778-6696.

DUPLEX FOR SALE by owner. 3BR/2BA and
2BR/2BA, elevated, enclosed garage, new AC,
bayview. 206 Peacock Ln., Holmes Beach.
$179,900. 778-2681.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate
advertising herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act,
which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on race, color, re-
ligion, sex, handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or intention to make any such preference, limi-
tation or discrimination." Familial status includes
children under age of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and people securing
custody of children under 18. This newspaper will
not knowing accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-
free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing impaired
(TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising
must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island
Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to
Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line
rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising
in person or by phone. We are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take
classified ad copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX
your copy with your charge card number. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge
21 words.
I-----------------------------------------------




More information:
(941) 778-7978 IISLANDE I
FAX: (941) 778-9392 ------ 1


Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments CondosN
R$MK GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

JI .VTfI G byJaineeetgfenyfA
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468

R.T. (BOB) HILTON CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial. Remodel and
New Construction. Island and Mainland.
"DON'T SAY HOW, SAY HILTON"
Lic. #CGC012191 747-1098"

For Free Estimate Call 778-3089
SCi Check-A-Home Inspection Services
S J~AL/, Property Management Services
CHECK-A-1-OME Home Updating & Maintenance Services
Bob Barlow Pre-Purchase Home Inspections
Over 20 Yrs Experience Licensed & Insured Builder LUc. #RR0066504










ISLAND LUMBER

AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


LP GAS
$700
PER FILL
201b cylinder


WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING
RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING


Regnis

Mechanical


Since 1978
Licensed & Insured
State Cert.#CAC032412


We'll beat any advertised Prie! Just give us a call
ALL ESTIMATES ARE FREE!!
Call 704-3078 24 HR





WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
4W Residential Commercial
\-U* Restaurant Mobile Home
%4W Condo Assoc. Vac and Intercom
\.W^ Lightning Repair Service Upgrades

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385



Serving the Beaches Since 1978


--------------------------- 1


r- -


I --


--------------------------------___1








,,,G PAGE 28 0 MAY 28, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


JEWELRY JEST

BY CATHY MILLHAUSER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
I Where heads are
put together
6 Skater Harding
and others
12 "-- behold!"
17 Tulle's schools
19 Popeye's son
21 Founding editor
of the O.E.D.
22 How jewelers
get absolution?
24 Per
25 "Le Comte Ory"
composer
26 Cut forage
27 Super Bowl
XXIX winners,
informally
28 Midwestern
jewelry article?
33 Cut forests
36 Ends
37 Mechanical
method
38 Character
actress-Tessie
41 Oscar-winning
"Love Story"
composer
42 More than big
44 Tamperer
hamperer
48 Patron of
jewelers?
52 Exudation
54 Fills the cracks
55 "Snow White"
dwarf


I V


57 Notorious Bugs
58 Subjects of
planning
61 Actress of
"Fame" fame
62 Pippi
Longstocking
creator Lindgren
63 Green
65 Where crazy
jewels end up?
68 Powers that be
69 Section of a pas
de deux
72 Diamond great
73 "Hansel and
Gretel" role
76 Stale
77 Mustachioed
detective
79 Run
82 Bend
84 Jewelry
disaster?
'87 Surprise cries
88 "Picnic"
playwright's kin
90 -- Canals
91 Second-oldest
country in the
Western
Hemisphere
92 Adenauer, a k a
Der --
93 Position
96 Family man
97 Part of a
jeweler's
education, with
"the"?
103 Sal and others
104 Kind of diagram
105 Comeback


110 Banderillero's
target
III Jeweler's
ultimatum?
115 Late-night name
116 "The Mighty
Ducks" star
117 Bring to a boil?
118 Angora, merino,
etc.
119 "Springtime-
fresh" smokes
120 Wind-up toys?
DOWN
I Fourfront?
2 Dos cubed
3 Wing tips' tips
4 Country rocker
Joe et al.
5 Triage team
member
6 Literary inits.
7 Mine ----
8 Sparks on the
screen
9 Aches
10 Breathing
problem
11 Assail
12 Predatory
13 Rocket gasket
14 Spinning
15 Button material
16 Photography
supplies
18 -- depth
finder
20 Shoot for, with
"to"
21 Possible source
of mermaid
legends
23 Long


29 Math class, for
short
30 Writer Dinesen
31 Diamond and
others
32 Jersey girl?
33 "Chicago Hope"
setting: Abbr.
34 Biblical barterer
35 Platinum item of
jewelry?
39 Tolkien tree
I creatures
40 Plugging away
42 Wide expanse
43 Acting family of
TV and film
44 Smudge
45 Help at the
jeweler's?
46 Over
47 Imparts
49 Peachy-keen
50 O() book
51 Driving hazard
53 (German river
56 Perry Como's
Sl.oves
Mambo"
59 Gateway
Arch-ilect. to
friends
60 Floodgate
62 Song words
before gal or
shadow
63 Mariner's need
64 Fictional Italian
town
66 Others: Sp.
67 Acad
70 Hair
applications
71 Ugandan with
abandon


A lot
Turkish title
Prefix with
dactyl
Preference
(irammy-
winning Fordd
Tennyson
heroine
Swedish
soprano Birgit


Land subjugated
by 106-Down
"The last Days
of Pompeii"
heroine
Washer setting
Honors
100 agorot
Writer famous
for locked-room
mysteries


95
97

98
99

100
101

102


Roman title 103 Word in Morris
"The Ilobbit" code?
hero Baggins 106 Ahab's father
Opening 107 Showed disdain
108 Shoe-touting
Dlo maintenance bulldog
work o(n 109 Tours seasons
Rubbish 112 Figurative brink
Anatomical 113 Pro -- -
roofs 114 liar measures:
(irit Abbr.


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.






"' -. -, .- 7 . "" .' -


I ,..'- '> . .. ." . .' ..... . . . . ... "


tit,^s.-
^il^":A A


PREMIER NORTH POINT HOME
4 bedrooms, 5 baths with office, den, family room,
formal dining room, vast storage area, two-car garage.
Deep water canal, short distance to Tampa Bay.
$595,000. HOME FACTS #20462. Call Dick Maher
or Dave Jones.


IIn
4 -,


- -r".* I


WATERFRONT HOME DEEP WATER CANAL
Custom built 4 bedroom, 3 bath home on deep
water canal. Community pool tennis courts. Over
3,500 sq. ft. of living area, four plus-car garage.
$549,000. HOME FACTS #20062. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt.


TOWNHOUSE ON WATER
Westbay Point & Moorings Rarely offered 3 bed-
room, 3 bath, 2,700 sq. ft. living area. Lower floor,
Italian tile, upgraded throughout. Boat dock in front
of unit. $215,000. HOME FACTS #20332. Call
Rnove Chasev.


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE TOWNHOME
Across from Gulf beaches townhouse with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and double car garage with bonus
room. Newer Berber carpeting and fully furnished.
$159,900. HOME FACTS #21042. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt or Helen White.


ISLAND GARDEN COMMUNITY MAJESTIC BAY VIEWS from PRIVATE
Westbay Cove, the Island's lush garden condo. BALCONY
Bright open 2 bedroom, 2 baths with heated pools Irresistible 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo. Walk to
and tennis. First-floor corner unit, updated. beach and shopping. Sunrises over the bay can be
$144,900. HOME FACTS #25072. Call Bob or Lu viewed from your screened balcony. $103,900.
Rhoden. HOME FACTS #25282. Call Tony Tiberini


CEDARS EAST TOWNHOME
Designer turnkey furnished. Immaculate condition.
Ten tennis courts and nice pool. 2 bedrooms, 2.5
baths. Near the center of Longboat Key. $215,000.
HOME FACTS #20282. Call Rose Schnoerr.


SUPER LOCATION PALMA SOLA CAGEDPOOL SPACIOUS 4BR- CAGED POOL FAMILY HOME AFFORDABLE CHOICE NORTHWEST
Big, beautiful home in Palma Sola with huge caged Northwest Bradenton 4 bedroom, 2 bath spacious LOCATION
pool. Fireplace, new roof, tip-top shape. Bring your home with family room, all surrounding 35x31 caged Great northwest Bradenton 3 bedroom, 2 bath split-
boat right by the marina. Big comer lot, bay view. pool with yards of decking. Large 107x149 nicely plan home with large solar-heated pool. Walk to
$221,900. HOME FACTS #21102. Call Gary treed lot $154,900 HOME FACTS #21092. Call Stewart and King schools. A Must See! $115,900.
Larison. Rose Schnoerr. HOME FACTS #21062. Call Susan Hollywood.


BEST VALUE FOR WATERFRONT LIVING
Exquisite views of Sarasota skyline and Longboat
Key. 24-hour guard, loft, large kitchen, two lanais,
wet bar and elevator. Home warranty. $237,000.
HOME FACTS # 25252. Call Bob or Penny Hall.


HOW TO USE HOME

FACTS NUMBERS

Simply call HOME FACTS
927-3200 and enter the HOME
FACTS property code shown.
HOME FACTS will give you a

description of that property or
let you search for other proper-
ties by area and price range.


c -`"Al


"" 1 ... . . . . .


~~~---~~- --- -~


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-- -:---


-~-----






SAVE FOR HURRICANE SEASON: JUNE 1-NOV. 30,1997


l.~



I'.',
I ~' ~

JLIIJI


'Above average' storm season predicted for 1997


i,


I.. _


By Paul Roat
If predictions for an above-average hurricane sea-
son prove true it will make 1995, 1996 and 1997 the
three most active consecutive storm seasons in history.
Dr. William Gray, a professor of atmospheric science
at Colorado State University, predicts seven named storms
will spawn from 11 tropical storms this summer in the
Atlantic Ocean. Of the named storms, three are expected
to be intense with winds in excess of 110 mph.
Gray averages about a 90 percent success rate for
his prognostications on bad storms.
Global climate changes and an increased knowl-
edge of the cyclical patterns of hurricanes has spurred
the prediction that more and worse storms are brewing
for the next 30 years.
Patterns now being discovered indicate we've been
through a "mild" period during the past few decades -
a pattern that will shift for the early 21st century.
Gray bases his prediction on several factors: rain-
fall patterns in western Africa, temperature readings
over West Africa, upper-level wind direction above the



Leave, and avoid


becoming a


statistic
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Andrew or Opal and everyone has a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get away from
the flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch
the storm-driven waves crash through the broken
glass fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in
Bradenton Beach. The waves crested somewhere
inside the building and washed onto the road in a
rush of swirling water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going
out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One
more inch and it would have been inside the house -
and this was a storm that no one expected to amount to
anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on
the Island. And therein lies the biggest problem
we've got to face when not if, but when South-
west Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes call-
ing.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our


equator, the El Nino/La Nina conditions off the Pacific
coast of Peru and Caribbean Basin sea level pressure
plus wind measurements at 40,000 feet.
Wetter west-African regions produce more tropi-
cal fronts that move off the coast, cross the Atlantic and
become tropical storms. "After 20 years of drought,
close to normal rainfall means it will be pretty wet,"
Gray said. "When it's wet there, intense hurricane ac-
tivity goes way up."
Another pattern that may cause greater Atlantic
Ocean storms in 1997 has its foundation in the Pacific
Ocean. An abnormality known as El Nino that has been
occurring for the past few years appears to have sub-
sided. Barometric pressure aberrations off Peru's coast-
line cause warming of the Pacific Ocean across two-
thirds of the body of water, heating up wind currents.
The warm winds heading east keep storms from form-
ing over the Atlantic and coming west.
With the decline of El Nino comes the condition
weather forecasters call La Nina: cooler waters there
cause more storms here.


The pressure changes occur around the Christmas
season, hence the name El Nino, or "The Child." Some
scientists believe El Nino is caused by molten eruptions
on the ocean floor, resulting in massive increases in
water temperature.
Another factor Gray uses in hurricane predictions
is winds in the stratosphere near the equator. The winds
run in 18-month cycles and, if they head east during
hurricane season, shear off the tops of strong storms
and weaken them. If the winds are from the west,
though, hurricanes in the Atlantic basin almost double
in number.
Also measured are sea level pressure readings and
wind measurements during June and July of the hurri-
cane season over the Caribbean Basin.
One element that bolsters Gray's prediction this year
is the 1997 edition of "The Old Farmer's Almanac." The
book states that rainfall for Florida in May "will be above
normal, especially in the south, where Tropical Storm
Ana, in late May, could threaten the Keys before the of-
ficial start of hurricane season on June 1."


. I4..


t.. ~


., ,~


.,~


Palm trees were toppled at Coquina Beach after a hurricane blew across the Island in the 1970s. Forecasters
predict more storms will strike the United States in the next few decades.


property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is
not meant for humans in times of high winds and
waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell, Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20
billion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and 15 dead


are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Closer to our Gulffront homes, Hurricane Opal
cleared a swath of shoreline in the Panhandle in 1995.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, belongings and
priceless mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years are scat-
tered across what's left of the neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those remaining, and names
of next of kin so they can be contacted to identify the
remains.
When hurricane warnings come to this part of the
coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.


Hurricane names for the 1997 season
Ana Grace Mindy Teresa
Bill Henri Nicholas Victor
Claudette Isabel Odette Wanda
Danny Juan Peter
Erika Kate Rose Foror re on storm
Fabian Larry Sam names, see inside


. :----r---;- ----I;


i::


- IL i .: . .


:


... "; .d


;. ",'' -


SPECIAL SECTION: PREPARING FOR THE STORM


.. I9PF^





IM PAGE 2 [E 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL FI THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Emergency planners fake storm, practice preparedness


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The following story is fueled by fiction. It is derived
from an exercise of the Manatee County Emergency
Operations Center to train local elected officials and
employees.
Tropical Storm Zelda is centered 200 miles south
southwest of the Isle of Youth, Cuba, and is moving
toward the north northwest at nine miles per hour. Of-
ficials with the National Hurricane Center expect it to
turn north and eventually northeast. Maximum sus-
tained winds are 60 mph, with strengthening expected
over the next day or two. Residents of Florida are ad-
vised to monitor weather updates.
Local Emergency Operation Center officials con-
tact the Florida Emergency Management Office for the
most current storm information and project a three-day
path for the storm. They begin briefing more than 50
agencies such as the Red Cross, fire departments, cit-
ies and public works departments and move into a
minimal activation with core personnel for emergency
support functions.
Zelda has now become a hurricane with 80 mph
winds. It is 280 miles southwest of Key West and is
moving to the north at seven miles per hour. A hurri-
cane watch is in effect from Longboat Key south
through the Florida Keys to the Dry Tortugas. All resi-
dents in the eastern Gulf of Mexico are advised to
monitor the storm.
Briefings continue and emergency support person-
nel are summoned to EOC to work with state emer-
gency officials, coordinating resources and communi-
cations. Telephone lines to the Citizens' Information
Center are activated so personnel can respond to inquir-
ies from the public
The Red Cross puts its shelter staffs on standby.
Officials decide which shelters to open and issue press
releases on shelter information. Residents with special
medical needs are contacted for possible evacuation.
Local agencies and municipalities are advised to begin
disaster preparations such as fueling and securing ve-
hicles and protecting offices and equipment.

Wednesday, 5 a.m.
Hurricane Zelda is 270 miles southwest of Ft.
Myers and is moving to the north northeast at eight
mph. It is expected to turn to the northeast. Top
winds are 90 mph. A hurricane warning is in effect
from Bayport south to Everglades City. The highest
strike possibility is from north of Tampa to the Keys.
An eight- to 12-foot storm surge is expected near
and to the south of landfall.

Wednesday 11 a.m.
Hurricane Zelda is located 215 miles west southwest
of Ft. Myers and is moving to the north northeast at eight
mph. Top winds are 90 mph. Currently a Category 1 hur-
ricane, it is.expected to reach Category 2 just prior to land-
fall. A high strike zone is declared from Tampa to Ft.
Myers. Rainfall predictions are five to 10 inches, while
storm surge predictions remain the same.

Wednesday 5 p.m.
Hurricane Zelda is 150 miles west southwest of
Sarasota and top winds have increased to 100 mph, a
Category 2 storm. The storm is moving to the north
northeast at 12 mph. Rainfall predictions remain the
same, while storm surge predictions are now from eight


4 ,: t .N .: .
S. .. .

Anna Maria Sound and the Village of Cortez combined during a storm in the 1980s as shown by this picture of
the Cortez Fishing Fleet offices just south ofCortez Bridge.


to 14 feet. Winds gusts are 45 mph in Ft. Myers and 25
mph in Tampa and tropical storm force winds reach out
200 miles from the storm's center.
The EOC is tracking the storm's path and project-
ing the time of arrival for gale force winds, which will
be the cut-off point for essential services to the public
until the storm passes. Schools are closed and the is-
lands and low lying areas are evacuated. Shelters are
being prepared for emergency personnel, who will
shelter in teams.
Officials are watching the tidal anomaly, a condi-
tion under which Gulf-generated storms increase the
water level up to several feet above normal. This hap-
pened on the islands in October when Tropical Storm
Josephine moved through the Gulf.
The county's public works department is set up at
the EOC and is communicating with personnel in the
field and city officials concerning road conditions,
flooding, debris removal, evacuation traffic procedures,
road and bridge closures, equipment needs and the like.
When sustained winds on the islands reach 35
mph, the county's buses being used for evacuation and
ambulances must pull back. When sustained winds
reach 45 mph, county personnel move to shelters.
The EOC is tracking damage calls and emer-
gency aid requests and organizing teams to assess
damages after storm. Post-storm staging areas are
identified and medical, fire and public works units
are assigned to those areas.

Wednesday, 8 p.m.
Hurricane Zelda is 110 miles west southwest of
Sarasota and is moving toward the northeast at 14 mph.
Top wind speed is 100 mph. Storm surge is estimated
at 10 to 14 feet near and to the south of landfall.

Wednesday 11 p.m.
Hurricane Zelda is upgraded to a Category 3 storm


This is the way the Anna Maria City Pier looked after a hurricane in 1921. The buildings on the left and right
were later torn down.


with 115 mph winds. The center of the storm is located
65 miles southwest of St. Pete. Landfall is predicted at
Clearwater. Storm surge is estimated at 12 to 18 feet
and rain at five to 10 inches.

Thursday, I p.m.
The eye of Hurricane Zelda is making landfall 25
miles southwest of St. Pete. Winds are 125 mph, a strong
Category 3 storm. Winds are pushing into Tampa Bay and
a storm surge could reach 20 feet. Wind gusts of 135 mph
are recorded at the Ruskin weather station. Zelda is ex-
pected to be west of Tampa in a few hours and hurricane
warnings are being issued for the east coast.

The EOC begins to resume emergency services
when sustained winds slow to 35 mph. Field crews
begin assessing damages to buildings and infrastructure
and reporting in to the EOC.
The Anna Maria and Cortez Bridges are heavily
damaged and may take six months to repair. The cause-
way is breached in two locations. Shelters hold thou-
sands of residents and thousands of homes are damaged
or destroyed. The infrastructure on the islands is se-
verely damaged and may take months to restore.




Hurricane seminar

for motels, condos
A hurricane preparedness seminar for hotel,
motel and condominium owners will be offered
on May 29 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Manatee
Convention and Civic Center, One Haben Blvd.,
Palmetto.
Speakers from the University of Florida, the
Manatee County Division of Emergency Man-
agement and the hospitality industry will teach
participants:
How to prepare for a potentially devastat-
ing storm.
How to conduct effective shut down and
evacuation.
How to return to safe operation.
A customized handbook will be distributed.
The course will count towards the mandatory
continuing education hours required by the
Florida Department of Business and Profes-
sional Regulation.
The registration fee is $20 per property for all
those who contribute to the tourist tax and $40 for
others. Each property can bring more than on par-
ticipant. The fee covers the handbook, refresh-
ments and a box lunch. To register contact Brenda
Rogers at the Manatee County Cooperative Exten-
sion Office, 722-4524.







Storm surge spells

submergence

for Island
Storm surge is a "dome" of water that
sweeps ahead of the center of a hurricane. The
storm surge can inundate the Island and cause
massive, devastating destruction to property
and lives of those who have elected to weather
a hurricane in their storms. For more informa-
tion about storm surges, see inside this special
hurricane section of The Islander Bystander.


Fido, Fluffy

need not

apply for

hurricane

shelter

admission
Hurricane shelter offi-
cials prohibit pets in shel-
ters. Make plans now to
board or kennel Fido or
Fluffy on the mainland, or
find a friend that will take
care of the pets during the
storm. For more informa-
tion, see page 8.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER r 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [ ] PAGE 3 II[

Storm boat tips
Protect your boat during a hurricane by
having plenty of line to tie the vessel to the dock
you can't get it out of the water. Remove all
gear from above deck.
Don't plan to stay on the boat during the
".i blow.
Check your insurance policy to make sure
you have adequate coverage in case the worst
happens.


How hurricanes

came to be named


Andrew, Hugo and Camille are common names
to hurricane watchers, but the naming of storms is a
relatively new aspect in the science of studying
whirly weather.
An Australian weatherman, Clement Wragge, was
the first to use female names in describing tropical
storms in the late 1800s, although he also named sev-
eral after politicians whom he particularly disliked.
Meteorologists in the U.S. military picked up the prac-
tice during World War II, naming storms after their
wives and girlfriends.
In 1951, weather officials began to use names to
designate storms, using common military titles of Able,
Baker, Charlie and the like. Two years later, female
names became the norm, with the first two hurricanes
dubbed Alice and Barbara.
Complaints poured into the Weather Bureau
from women upset that they alone were being
singled out in describing wicked weather, but the
practice continued until 1978, when hurricanes in the
eastern Pacific were alternately named for men and
women. In 1979, Atlantic hurricanes followed suit
with Hurricane Bob the first "male" storm.
Six bisexual lists of hurricane names were devel-
oped by the World Meteorological Organization. The
names were short, easy-to-remember and used names
from three languages: English, French and Spanish.
The lists are repeated every six years, although the
names of killer storms are retired from use.





IEr PAGE 4 A 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [I' THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Hurricane whats, hows and what they mean to YOU


By U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Weather Service
American Red Cross
There are no other storms on earth like hurricanes.
Hurricanes are products of the tropical ocean and
atmosphere. Powered by heat from the sea, they are
steered by the easterly trade winds and the temperate
westerlies as well as by their own ferocious energy.
Around the hurricane's core, winds grow with great
velocity and generate violent seas.
Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while
spawning tornadoes and producing torrential rains and
floods.
Timely warnings have greatly diminished hurri-
cane fatalities in the United States. In spite of this early
warning system, property damage continues to mount.
There is little we can do about the hurricanes them-
selves. However, the National Hurricane Center and
the National Weather Service field offices team up with
other federal, state and local agencies, rescue and re-
lief organizations, the private sector and the media in
a huge warning and preparedness effort.

Where they start, how they grow
In the eastern Pacific Ocean, hurricanes begin
forming by mid-May. In the Atlantic Ocean, the Car-
ibbean and the Gulf, hurricane development starts in
June. For the United States, the peak hurricane threat
exists from mid-August to late October, although the
official hurricane season extends through November.
In other parts of the world, such as the western Pacific,
hurricanes can occur year-round.
Developing hurricanes gather heat and energy
through contact with warm ocean waters. The addition
of moisture by evaporation from the sea surface pow-
ers them like giant heat engines.
The process by which a disturbance forms and sub-
sequently strengthens into a hurricane depends on at
least three conditions.
Warm waters and moisture are two conditions. The
third is a wind pattern near the ocean surface that spi-
rals air inward. Bands of thunderstorms form, allowing
the air to warm further and rise higher into the atmo-
sphere. If the winds at these higher levels are relatively
light, this structure can remain intact and allow for
additional strengthening.
The center, or eye, of a hurricane is relatively calm.
The most violent activity takes place in the area imme-
diately around the eye, called the eyewall. At the top
of the eyewall about 50,000 feet most of the air
is propelled outward, increasing the air's upward mo-
tion. Some of the air, however, moves inward and sinks
into the eye, creating a cloud-free area.

What hurricanes can spawn
Storm surge is a large dome of water; often 50 to
100 miles wide, that sweeps across the coastline near
where a hurricane makes landfall. The surge of high
water, topped by waves, can be devastating.
The stronger the hurricane and the shallower the
offshore water, the higher the surge will be. Along the


Cortez Beach in Bradenton Beach was pounded during a storm in the 1970s. This picture was taken to the
south at Third Street South.


immediate coast, storm surge is the greatest threat to
life and property.
If the storm surge arrives at the same time as high
tide, the water height will be even greater. The storm
tide is the combination of the storm surge and the nor-
mal astronomical tide.
Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can de-
stroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes.
Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and
small items left outside, become missiles in hurricanes.
Winds often stay above hurricane strength well
inland. Hurricane Hugo in 1989 battered Charlotte,
N.C., with gusts of near 100 mph about 175 miles
inland from the Atlantic causing massive destruc-
tion.
Widespread torrential rains, often in excess of six
inches, can produce deadly and destructive floods.
Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 brought 45 inches of
rain to an area near Alvin, Texas. Long after Hurricane
Diane subsided in 1955, the storm brought floods to
Pennsylvania, New York and New England that con-
tributed to nearly 200 deaths. And Hurricane Agnes
fused with another storm system in 1972, producing
floods in the northeast which contributed to 122 deaths.
Hurricanes also produce tornadoes, which add to
the hurricane's destructive power. These tornadoes
most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in rain
bands well away from the center of the hurricane. How-
ever, they can also occur near the eyewall.


The Sandbar Restaurant was boarded up after Hurricane Agnes in 1972.


Our problem
All Atlantic and Gulf coastal areas are subject to
hurricanes or tropical storms. Although rarely struck by
hurricanes, parts of southwestern United States and the
Pacific Coast suffer heavy rains and floods each year
from the remnants of hurricanes spawned off Mexico.
Due to the limited number of evacuation routes,
barrier islands are especially vulnerable to hurricanes.
People on barrier islands and in coastal areas may be
asked by local officials to evacuate well in advance of
a hurricane's landfall. If you are asked to evacuate, do
so immediately.
The nation has a significant hurricane problem.
Our shorelines attract large numbers of people. From
Maine to Texas, our coastline is filled with new homes,
condominiums and cities built on sand waiting for the
next storm to threaten its residents and their dreams.
There are now more than 45 million permanent
residents along the hurricane-prone coastline, and the
population is growing. Florida, where hurricanes are
most frequent, leads the nation in new residents. In
addition to the permanent residents, the holiday, week-
end and vacation populations swell in some coastal
areas 100-fold.
A large portion of the coastal areas with high popu-
lation densities are subject to inundation from the
hurricane's storm surge that historically caused the
greatest loss of life and extreme property damage.
During the past few years, the warning system has
provided adequate time for people on barrier islands
and the immediate coastline to move inland when hur-
ricanes have threatened. However, it is becoming more
difficult to evacuate people from high-hazard areas
because roads have not kept pace with the rapid popu-
lation growth.
The problem is further compounded by the fact that
80 to 90 percent of people living in hurricane-prone
areas have never experienced the power of a major
hurricane. Many of these people have been through
weaker, storms, producing a false impression of a
hurricane's damage potential. This impression often
leads to complacency and delayed actions which could
result in the loss of many lives.
During the 1970s and 1980s, major hurricanes
striking the United States were less frequent than the
previous three decades. With the tremendous increase
in population along the high-risk areas of our shore-
lines, we may not fare as well in the future. The dan-
ger potential will be especially high when hurricane
activity inevitably returns to the frequencies experi-
enced during the 1950s.
In the final analysis, the only real defense against
hurricanes is the informed readiness of your commu-
nity, your family, and you.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E 1 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [I1 PAGE 5 E3


Trains, planes, even cows benefit fro


By Jim Hanson
Islander correspondent
The phenomenon that makes locomotive horns
sound funny when they go by is the same one that
warns us of stormy weather.
Put in terms less nostalgic, the same principle lets
police nail you for speeding.
It's the Doppler effect, by which sound waves
seem to change frequency as the source approaches and
departs. It has charmed generations of kids standing
along railroad tracks listening to the engine's whistle
change as it speeds past. Sound waves compress as they
travel ahead of the horn, stretch as they linger behind
it.
It has been applied to radar for several years, such
as a police speed gun. Like most technology, radar gets
more and more sophisticated and versatile.

Top of the line
The newest of the new is the National Weather
Service's new radar line centered at Ruskin, says Roy
Leep, the weatherman's weatherman and head of it all
at television station WTVT-13 in Tampa.
Leep installed the first full Doppler weather radar
in the area, putting it into service in 1988. He describes
the new system at Ruskin as "the most sophisticated in
the world."
Radar has been around since World War II. It sends


out radio waves which bounce off objects and back into
the radar receiver with information which operators
translate into pictures that are clear to them.
That was a giant step for finding and tracking ob-
jects in the atmosphere. It was a tremendous boon to
meteorologists, but it was limited.
Now Doppler has taken radar another step, as de-
scribed by Dan Sobien, National Weather Service me-
teorologist at Ruskin. Measuring the return signals, he
says, the complex equipment shows almost instantly
and from miles away which way a storm is mov-
ing, how fast, how much rain it is dropping in
what size droplets, whether it has hail, how
strong its winds and from what direction,
whether they are rotating as in tornado.
Although storms "are like people, no two alike,"
the new system gives weather experts a better handle
on storms with "more and much better information
than we've ever had," he says.

Bring in the cows
"We can track over river basins and
see if there is danger of a flood,"
Sobien says. "We can let a
farmer know an hour ahead
S----.-.. of a storm to get his cattle


om Doppler radar
off a flood plain."
And aviation, which has been the prin-
cipal beneficiary of radar since its inception,
benefits again from Doppler. "The Weather
BI Service does all aviation forecasting, al-
though major airlines have their own
-. weather departments too," says Sobien.
As for maritime weather, the Ruskin
station's "warning area" is 50 miles out
into the Gulf of Mexico, with a marine
forecast good for 50 miles offshore
plus a high seas forecast. Next year its
range will double to 100 miles.
Channel 13's Leep recalls just how handy Dop-
pler is by citing Hurricane Andrew, the South
Florida killer of 1992. His radar machinery is
mounted 200 feet above the ground, he said, and it
picked up Andrew when the storm was still in the
Bahamas.
When Andrew's winds destroyed Miami radar and
cut off communication with Key West's, Leep's re-
mained the only land-based radar able to hang onto the
storm as it crossed Florida and moved up the Gulf.


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PUBLIC NOTICE
EVACUATION & RE-ENTRY
RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation needs, medical problems
or need transportation off the island, you need to be registered.
BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on Anna Maria Island that
provides essential materials or services to the community you may be
given preferential return privileges after a hurricane evacuation. Submit
a request to your CITY HALL. If approved, you will receive a letter
authorizing your early return. Your request should include a list of
employees you would need to return early.
EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on or off the island, they must
have written authorization from your CITY HALL to come on the
island to work after a hurricane evacuation.
To register, or for further information call your City Hall.
Bradenton Beach City Hall .... 778-1005
Holmes Beach City Hall ......... 778-2221
Anna Maria City Hall........... 778-0781

,-- - ------- -. -- -- --

| Register special needs now

The Anna Maria Fire District is seeking written notice from Islanders who
may need special assistance in the event of a hurricane evacuation.
The information requested includes:
Date.............................. Phone ........................................
N am e.............................................................. . . .- -I- -.
I Island Address ......................................... ............... .. ................
Type of assistance needed.............................................. .................
I............ ...................... .........


(Explain what your situation is and what type of assistance you will need.)
Please mail or deliver the form to:
Anna Maria Fire District
6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
L-- ----------------------J


WE SPECIALIZE IN REPAIRS!
%\W Residential Commercial \- Service Upgrades
XU4 Restaurant %4V Mobile Home %4V Lightning Repairs
%4W Condo Assoc. %4W Vac and Intercom Safety Inspections
%\ Water Repairs %\4WWind Repairs %4W Flood Repairs

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC

David Parrish Owner
Lic # ER0006385


Serving the Beaches Since 1978





[] PAGE 6 H 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [jJ THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


our 25th Year
serving the Island communities.
There must be a reason!
During any emergency, we're there to serve you!


REFRIGERATION P


CAC044365
778-9622
5347 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


KEY INCOME TAX
& Business Services, Inc.

5500 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
For Appointment 778-5710
"Same Island Location Since 1971"






As Independent As The Island Itself
[ h First National Bank e
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (941)794-6969


When it comes to service,
everything matters.


First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
941 795-3108


Gallagher's Market
Your One-Stop Hurricane
& Storm Preparation Store
* Distilled and Drinking Water
* Conned Meats, Vegetables, Fruits and Soups
* Batteries Matches
* Medical Supplies [ S
* We'll Check and Replace
your Watch and Clock Batteries
NEXT TO VILLAGE KEY HARDWlARE
TO COMPLETE YOUR LIST





"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...
% I can make your
island dreams
come true.

ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty ~ Since 1939
778-1751 2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Bradenton Beach
Evenings FL 34217 Office


99 8 97 96


WATNERPEALT
H^^^Est. 1939B 1^


Columbia Blake
Medical Center
we're in yo 'r
neighborhood.
Heart Institute
Vascular Center
Rehabilitation Center
The Baby Place
Health Center America
Company Care/Welilness
Emergency Center
Columbia Homecare
~~COUMB1A Blake
MedicalCenter
Healthcare has never worked
like this before.
2020 59th Street W, Bradenton, FI 34209
http://www.columbia.net
:ee :OLUMBIAE(I-S0033


79 78


I


N :


i i


i





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER Eil 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL I' PAGE 7 ii3


Otey & Associates
COMPLETE
COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING
BOOKKEEPING
AND
YEAR-ROUND
TAX SERVICE
Individual/Corporation
Partnerships and Estates
Shirley Otey, Enrolled Agent
Licensed by the U. S. Government to represent
taxpayers before the IRS.


778-6118


3909 E. BAY DRIVE
(SUITE 110) HOLMES BEACH


17

I6
-0


Ll I I Kim a331 1 1111
NEXT TO GALLAGHER'S MARKET
FOR ALL YOUR STORM AND HURRICANE NEEDS
Lamp Oil Flashlights Batteries Clocks
Radios Can Openers Duct Tape n
Hibachi Sterno Gloves
Candles Gas Cans -
Propane Tanks Masking Tape
Even Life Jackets and Canoes
(t FREE DELIVERY
Longboat Key & Anna Maria Island $25.00 Min.
Located in the Whitney Beach Shopping Center
North Longboat Key
387-0052 6816 Gulf of Mexico Drive
Hours: Mon Sat. 8am 8pm Sun. 8am 5pm


77 76 .-'- 74


73 72 717- J


ALLIED PRODUCTS INC.,
"QUALITY Products to Protect Your Home"
SERVING BRADENTON SINCE 1953


HUPRICANE Rollshutters
PANELS


HURRICANE PROTECTION



FREE ESTIMATES
1217 29TH AVE. W., BRADENTON


Awnings


747-4695


FISHING CONTEST I


' Live & Frozen Bait Live Shrimp, Pinfish & Chubs
1 Fishing Charters Jet Ski Parasail Rentals
Boating Supplies Fishing License
Beer Dci Sandwiches Soda Fuel Ice
- -"_


Marina, Inc.
5501 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1977
Storm Preparedness
* Is the bilge pump operating correctly?
* Is your battery fully charged?
* Do you have sufficient dock lines to moor your
boat correctly for extremely high tides?
* Is your boat lift high enough? Check often during
tide changes.
* Remove drain plug if boat is on a trailer.


LaPensee Plumbing, Inc.
A Repairs Remodeling
S* Sewer & Drain
1 Cleaning
,^ Fixture Showroom
Sb Reasonable Rates
Reliable Service
778-5622
Lic. #RF0049191 5348 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


I ke 6 aad 5#%&te&ew qMe, 'f1".
Distributor of Pumps, Motors, Pipe Fittings
THE DO-IT YOURSELF
SPRINKLER CENTER
6804 Cortez Rd. 2050 12th St.
Bradenton Sarasota
795-2449 366-4838



Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
One of the Oldest Real Estate Companies on the Island
Founding Member of Island Co-Listing Service
778-1450 1 (800) 306-9666
Fax # 778-7035
Brokers: Nancy Stork
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson & Stephanie Bell
9 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M. TO NOON
9701 GULF DR., P.O. BOX 717 ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA 34216


311ARPET
a.ETWORK
; *"Th. Trauefing Floor Store"

Ceramic tile, vinyl, wood
and window treatments
BEST PRICES!
"Call now we'll be right over."
778-7311
Free flood and water damage evaluation.
(water tolerant carpets available)
Island owned and operated by Ed Kim


_-.... I







- y
i


63 62 6G


HOME

HARDWAREDEST

LIST OF SUPPLIES
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:
" Lanterns & Fuel 0 Hand Tools
" Flashlights Q Non-electric can
" Batteries openers
Q Candles 0 Portable Radios
" Tapes 0 Coolers
" Plastic Bags U Propane Cylinders
" Nails for Stoves & Grills
When preparing for a storm, come in and we'll
help you with all the supplies you need.
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 8 to 6 Sunday 10 to 4


ia


59 58e i






OI PAGE 8 EJ] 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


24-HR. WRECKER
SERVICE:
756-2529
(PRICE TRANSPORT)
A & M AUTO BODY:
795-2770
Insurance estimates
honored.
Work Guaranteed.
* Over 50 years
combined experience).
* Serving the Island's
for Seven Years.


A A

HOLMES BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-0791
DISPATCH
If you need further
information call
778-7875
ADMINISTRATION

Cavanagh
Marine
Repair
Complete Service
... at your dock
or in our shop!
Gas or Diesel
727-7905

PROFESSIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER
"The Island's
Only
Walk-In Clinic"
778-0711


* Affordable Family
Health Care
* Family Practice
* FREE Blood
Pressure Checks
Carl Voyles, M.D.
Joseph L. Mazza, M.D.
503 Manatee Ave. W.,
Suite E,
Holmes Beach )







* Fine Wines
* Domestic
& Imported
Beers
Cordials &
Liquors
(miniature to 1.75 liter)
Gourmet
Coffee
Cigars Ice


5508 Marina Drive
(941) 778-2507


This is not the flood coverage you need!
If you live or conduct business in a flood prone area, you need
... flood insurance coverage, not water coverage. You're all wet if
S" you think your homeowners or business insurance policies
-provide flood coverage. It must be purchased separately.
.. Your local independent agent who represents Auto-Owners
Insurance is the person to see for flood insurance. And, with Auto-
.f"- . Owners, you get "no problem" service when you need it.
Iseumncve Flood coverage will be "no problem" if you have your flood
Life Home Car Bulsness insurance coverage with Auto-Owners, so see your Auto-
-7, P, -Owners agent today.

Jim Mixon Insurance Co. Inc.
5412 Marina Dr. Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach (941)778-2253


Hurricane Safety Tips
Right now, before the hurricane season begins:
Enter the hurricane season prepared. Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable foods
and other equipment you will need to secure your home and prepare yourself for evacuation, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a two-week
supply) special dietary foods that are non-perishable blankets, pillows, sleeping bags flashlight and bat-
teries portable radio and batteries extra clothing lightweight folding chairs, cots personal items infant
necessities quiet game or favorite toys for children important papers, valid identification papers snacks.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a threatened region, pay
attention to weather broadcasts for updates.
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them with tape or storm shutters. Damage to small windows is mostly
caused by wind-driven debris; damage to larger windows may come from debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, potted plants, lawn ornaments and anything that can be easily moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture and
a number of other harmless items can become missiles in hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs, bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water. Water ser-
vice may be disturbed for days or longer after a hurricane. You should have one gallon of water per person
per day, and you should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Electricity may be off for days or longer and cooking may be difficult,
so make plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to make sure that you have a can
opener that can be operated without electricity.
Check all battery-powered equipment and stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts recommend not using
candles for light due to the threat of fire. An untended flashlight won't start a fire, but a candle or lantern might.
Stock up on clean-up materials; mops, buckets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will have
to be kept with friends or at a vet.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a possible landfall
for a hurricane, begin making preparations for the storm:
Board all windows or secure with tape or security shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hurricane
authorities predict upwards of 12 to 17 hours to evacuate the Island, so plan ahead and plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for shelter openings.
If officials order an evacuation:


LEAVE.
Leave your swimming pool filled and superchlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where you're going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have a safe, timely ride out of the area.
After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be limited and you may not be able to return to your home immedi-
ately. Roads may be blocked by trees and live power lines. Emergency crews will need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints. Make sure you have valid identification showing your proper local address.
Do not drive unless you must and don't sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open windows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structure and contents.
As soon as feasible, report broken power, water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


W~ ~ ~~h Bes Jus Go Better!r~~giJC~-j-iiJL^^^
KeR0 941-778-2261 & 1-800-422-632


MARY ANN
SCHMIDT .
Eves. 778-4931


IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER!
We're here all year,
however the four winds blow.
Nobody, but nobody, sells more
Anna Maria Island real estate than
Coldwell Banker. Nobody!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
MLS [


HELEN WHITE
Eves. 778-6956


* COMMERCIAL
* INDUSTRIAL
* RESIDENTIAL







ROLL-OFF CONTAINERS




PORTABLE [
TOILETS.


753-7591
6120 21st STREET E.
BRADENTON, FL 34203

BRADENTON
BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311 POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-1005CITY HALL

Fat Cat
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
Dry extraction
Tile, wood and
terrazo cleaned
We never use steam.
Call Jon Kent,
Island resident.
778-2882





"We specialize in being unique"



'FTD^

10115 Cortez Rd.
Bay Beach Plaza
(800) 559-6077
794-5555




BUICKO 1UBAIJU.








DON C. SMITH
Sales Representative
755-8531 CONLEY BUICK, INC.
800 Cortez Rd. West
Bradenton, Florida 34207




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER [F1 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL II PAGE 9


ROY LEEP



.lfr. Weatherfor khe walehfid


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Roy Leep's busy season is coming up, but he'll
hardly notice. Every day of the year is busy in his busi-
ness.
In case you just got in from Bosnia, Leep is the
Gulf Coast's premier weatherman, Mr. Weather, the
guru of forecast, the one most people trust beyond all
those pretenders.
He holds forth three times a day at Tampa's tele-
vision station WTVT, Channel 13, where he has been
for 40 years. And he heads the state's biggest commer-
cial service, one of the very few not caught with his
drawers adrift when the big frost ravaged the area last
winter.
Weather has been pretty much his whole life. He
recalls that as a child in Louisville, Ky., he saw some
people releasing a big balloon at the airport there, found
it was for weather observation and was hooked. From
then on, he spent weekends and holidays hanging
around and helping out at the weather station.
He ultimately interned at the Louisville Weather
Bureau, went on to college and then the Air Force,
where he taught meteorology. When he was studying
- meteorology, what else? at Florida State Univer-
sity, he got acquainted at Channel 13's fledgling capi-
tal news bureau and ended up coming to Tampa to do
weather at the station. That was 1957.
He moved right along, promoted to chief meteo-
rologist in 1959, weather service director in 1963, ex-
ecutive director in 1988.
Along the way he helped set up and became direc-


tor of WeatherVision, the first commercial weather
service in the state and still its largest. It provides fore-
casts geared to industry, media and agricultural opera-
tions.
It was "right on target" warning its clients of an
imminent heavy frost the first of this year, when the
government Weather Service missed the boat and
didn't get a warning out in time to let farmers and or-
chardists protect their crops.
Clients range from the Southeast U.S. to the Car-
ibbean and South America.
Also under Leep's tutelage, Channel 13 was first
to use Doppler radar, which permits meteorologists
such latitude as to focus on raindrops and make predic-
tions with accuracy impossible a few years ago.
"We're on our third edition of radar develop-
ment since I've been here," says Leep. "Doppler is
the newest. We designed it, put down our specifica-
tions and had the system built using a 200-foot tower
that puts the radar above obstructions and extends
the earth's horizon so we can see much clearer and
farther.-It's the most powerful privately owned Dop-
pler in the world."
There have been plenty of other, parallel develop-
ments in technology in Leep's years in the weather
trades.
"Not too long ago there weren't any weather buoys
in the Gulf, or any satellites. The Gulf was just a big
dark mysterious area as far as forecasting was con-
cerned.
"Now surveillance technology has developed so
that we know the current state of affairs almost any-


where, and that gives us the capability of more accu-
rate and longer range predictions."
Mixed in there somewhere with all that technology
is Scud. She is the little feisty/lovey Cairn terrier that
joins Leep in the weather craft. Twelve years old now,
she has to be one of the most widely known and widely
loved pooches in Florida.
One weather area Leep avoids is predicting hurri-
cane seasons. He has no better idea than anyone what
a season will bring, he claims, and people nod appre-
ciatively of his modesty.
Modesty it isn't, he insists. It's experience. His
years in the hurricane belt have made it clear that no-
body knows what any year will bring.
"Bill Gray, Dr. Bill Gray, has a good record pre-
dicting hurricanes," he says. "He's at Colorado State
University and he's researched for years. This year he
expects 11 named storms, seven of them hurricanes,
three of them intense.
"Myself, I don't know."
He looks forward to increased meteorological ac-
tion now, for summer is his busy season. "We have
hurricanes to watch out of Africa and the tropics to
keep track of, as well as the thunderstorm activity for
which our area is so famous." During the dry season
there is dramatic less weather to worry about, aside
from those few freezing winter nights. And he seems
to have them figured out.
One thing he does know for sure: "Your prediction
record can be very good when weather is good, but
when weather turns bad so does your record.
"We all like good weather."


Be prepared to leave early: Chief Price


If there are two words Anna Maria Fire Chief
Andy Price would use to advise residents on hur-
ricane safety and protection, they would be:
Leave early.
Price said Hurricane Andrew in 1992, coupled
with the freak winter storm in 1993, provided disas-
ter preparedness officials with a lot to talk about.
"Basically, from Hurricane Andrew we
learned how lucky we were," Price said. A great
deal of information was gathered and discussed
about wind speeds, wind tendencies and wind
patterns from Andrew.
Price said Andrew spared Southwest Florida


from much of its destructive force and, although the
damage was the most expensive of any hurricane at $20
billion, it could have been much worse had the storm
turned 30 miles to the north to strike Miami.
And Andrew was a Category 4 storm, Price added.
Category 5 is the most powerful of hurricanes.
For Island residents, Price said preparation before
any storm clouds appear on the horizon is critical. A
disaster plan has been prepared for the Island to allow
officials to have in writing what must be done and
when it needs to be completed as a storm approaches.
Evacuation notices will be given both through the
news media as well as by emergency personnel going up


and down streets with bullhorns, Price said.
Media should also be consulted to find out
what emergency shelters are open if an evacuation
is ordered, he said.
Evacuation notices should be heeded early.
Price said it is estimated evacuation from the Is-
land will take 12 to 17 hours, but advance notice
of a hurricane's landfall can only be expected to
come 12 hours before the event.
Don't be one of the last to leave or, if you
change your mind during the height of the storm,
don't expect to have rescue personnel help you to
safety, either.





iB PAGE 10 E ] 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL H THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER






Hurricane Agnes in
1972 undermined
sections of Gulf Drive,
such as the one pic-
tured from the 2100
Block in Bradenton. -'
Beach. --" -<. .... ; -. .. ,


Regulations, isur
The onset of hurricane season brings up ai on-
slaught of insurance fever for many barrier island resi-
dents.
Perhaps angst is a better term, as many residents
often have too little or outdated insurance for their
homes and belongings.
Remember your new computer? How about that
new kitchen or bathroom? Chances are you haven't
modified your insurance policies to reflect new pur-
chases and, in the event of a loss, only minimum
amounts may be paid for your new acquisitions.
Insurance is basically the transfer of risk. For a
small premium, you transfer the risk for a larger loss
to an insurance company. Even if your insurance is
very high say $1,000 a year you would have to
pay the premiums for 100 years before you would ap-
proach the replacement value of an average Island
home.
Insurance agents advise all property owners to re-
view their insurance policies annually to make sure the
coverage is adequate. An increase in a few dollars a
year could mean savings of tens of thousands of dol-
lars if your home is destroyed.
You don't want to pay more in premiums? Insur-
ance agents offer a cost-cutting suggestion by increas-
ing the amount of the deductible you would pay after
a loss.
Another strong suggestion insurance carriers make
is to photograph your home and belongings. Many
times both proof of purchase and value should be pro-
vided, and a photograph or video of your home, inside
and out, will take care of both those requirements.

Insurance changes
post-Andrew
Insurance providers in Florida have been rocked in
the wake of Hurricane Andrew's 1992 landfall south of
Miami. An estimated $20 billion in damage resulted
from the storm; insurance carriers paid out more than
$16.5 billion.
Many insurance companies went out of business or
left Florida after Andrew, financially unable to with-
stand the cost demanded by policyholders in the wake
of the destruction.
Many companies have limited the number of poli-
cies written in high-hazard, flood- and wind-prone ar-
eas such as barrier islands. Some customers have had
their policies canceled because the damage risk was
deemed too great from actuarial standards.
Very few insurance companies, if any, will write
new homeowner policies for houses within 1,000 feet
of the water most of Anna Maria Island.
In an effort to provide insurance to all, former


dance,


building advice to look at NOW


Florida Insurance Commissioner Tom Gallagher insti-
tuted an insurance "pool." The Florida Residential
Property and Casualty Joint Underwriters Association
allows agents to continue to write policies. The com-
panies pay out of the pool the amount of money they
have in coverage for a region of the state after a hurri-
cane or other disaster.
Although the state insurance pool has only been in
existence for five years, it currently is one of the larg-
est insurers in Florida, accepting properties other insur-
ance companies deem too dangerous.
The days of "one-stop shopping" for insurance
appear to have ended for most Florida homeowners.
Besides the state insurance pool, carriers have also
pooled coverage for wind damage and flooding.
But even with the new insurance pool, state offi-
cials have agreed that if an intense hurricane strikes a
highly populated area with a large number of homes,
insurance claims would decimate the state insurance
pool because it will take several more years to build up
enough financial reserve to handle a big hit.
If Andrew had swerved a little more to the north,
striking Miami or Fort Lauderdale instead of Home-
stead, upwards of $50 billion in damages would have
occurred, hurricane experts predict.
"We don't have enough money to cover a $50 bil-
lion storm," Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund Chief
Operating Officer Jack Nicholson has said.

Federal intervention
after storms, too
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is
also involved in hurricanes, both before and after the
fact.
FEMA has imposed strict guidelines for home con-
struction and reconstruction. The most apparent of the
FEMA rules governs home repair in high-hazard areas,
such as barrier islands. If you plan to remodel your
home at more than half of its appraised value, you will





NOTICE:
BE SURE TO GET A
VEHICLE
EVACUATION STICKER
AT YOUR LOCAL CITY
HALL.


have to meet current FEMA regulations regarding el-
evation and construction.
FEMA rules are designed to offset the massive
amounts of money the federal government would have
to pay for repairs in an area struck by a natural disas-
ter. Unfortunately, the rules also strike at social struc-
tures of neighborhoods. Many land planners criticize
FEMA for disrupting neighborhoods by forcing some
houses to loom over older homes. How can an area
retain its residential character when-some residents
have huge, elevated "skyscrapers" looking down upon
their neighbors? is the question many architects and
planners ask.
FEMA has also been attacked in the past for its
reconstruction practices. There is little or no method
the lumbering bureaucracy can use to allow residents
in high-risk areas to be relocated. During Midwest
flooding, many communities and residents agreed they
would prefer not to rebuild in a flood zone. FEMA,
though, would not release funds for relocation and only
paid out money on the condition residents rebuild their
homes smack in the way of future floods.

Home construction,
redesign can help
National Hurricane Center officials have pointed
out that many home builders do not take natural con-
ditions into account when they develop houses in high-
hazard areas.
Wind and flooding are two of the biggest problems
residents face in Florida during hurricanes. Flooding
can be alleviated by elevating the house, as is required
for new construction according to FEMA standards.
But constructing a house to withstand high winds
is often ignored by builders. Eves, gables and porticos
become wind traps during hurricanes by funneling
wind, often causing massive destruction.
The solution: hurricane shutters, reinforced doors
and internal barricades on garage doors.
Straps and clips to affix trusses firmly to beams are
sometimes omitted by builders, although the expense
of the straps and clips adds only a few dollars to the
overall cost of the house.
Geometric shapes of buildings are also an impor-
tant consideration in designing to conform to code re-
quirements. Features such as hip roofs are usually
looked upon more favorably than gabled styles because
they resist high winds more efficiently than gables.
Vertical wall areas require additional structural appli-
cations that help to resist wind force more effectively.
Everyone contemplating building a new house
should discuss wind safety with their architect or
builder before construction begins.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER ~E 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL [i] PAGE 11 liI


Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island .
* Hurricanes are categorized based on the power killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in dam- *
of the storms. Storm categories allow emergency age to eastern Caribbean islands.
* management officials to determine time and need of
* evacuation. Category'4
The Manatee County Emergency Management Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Division notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors,
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the ex- with most roofs on small homes destroyed. Com-
* ception that in a Category 5 storm you will be un- plete destruction expected of mobile homes. Storm
der a lot more water." surge 12-15 feet above normal. Major damage is ex- *
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely pected to lower floors of structures near the coast-
* difficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 line or on barrier islands due to flooding, waves and *
mph 24 miles an hour less than even a Category floating debris.
* 1 storm. Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4
There's also a good chance officials will close storm that killed 50 people and caused $500 million a
the bridges to vehicles trying to evacuate Anna A A in damages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph
* Maria Island at winds of less than hurricane force, A in Hurricane Donna.
providing yet another reason Island residents should d Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's.-
* plan to evacuate early. east coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential Sustained winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more
scale" to assign storms into five categories. From jor damage expected to exposed mobile homes and than 175 mph. More than 60,000 homes were de-
* least to most powerful, the five categories and dam- poorly constructed signs. Some damage to roofs, win- stroyed, 200,000 people left homeless, more than 2 *
age potential are as follows dows and doors of buildings expected. Considerable million people evacuated, 15 people died and dam-
damage to piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected age was estimated at $20 billion. Hurricane Andrew
* Category I anchorages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight was the third most intense hurricane this century,
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to feet above normal with accompanying flooding, and caused the greatest loss of property of any hur-
* shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm, ricane in the United States.
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly con- devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil- Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4
structed signs. Storm surge is expected to be four to lion in damage, storm, killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in
* five feet above normal. Flooding is expected on damage, mostly in the Panhandle, although some .
barrier islands. Low-lying coastal roads may be in- Category 3 damage occurred on Anna Maria Island as the storm
* undated. Expect minor pier damage and small craft Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will topple, tracked to the north.
* to be torn from exposed anchorages. Practically all poorly constructed signs will be blown
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 down. Expect structural damage to small buildings. Category 5
* storm, leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion Many mobile homes may be destroyed. Storm surge Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs *
in damage. Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Cat- nine to 12 feet above normal. Serious flooding along or signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mo-
* egory 1 storm, causing 11 deaths and $700 million barrier islands and coastal areas. Large exposed build- bile homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above
Sin damage, mostly to central Florida. ings will be damaged, and smaller structures will be de- normal, resulting in extreme damage to structures
stroyed by wave action and floating debris. less than 10 feet above sea level.
Category 2 Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the
* Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage. Florida Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A
* is considerable, with some trees blown down. Ma- Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm, total of 408 people died as a result of the hurricane.


..........................~ ~. .. .. .. . .. ... . .. . .. .


*6 56 SOS. SSSSOSSOSSSSeSSSSSSSS


Let The Sunshine in!
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with a TUBULAR SKYLIGHT
Quick Easy Affordable
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Call. for info. or an appointment
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779-2217 /44iU is Products, Inc.


/ \ Ceiling


Room


Holmes Beach, FL


EATMAN & SMITH
Architecture Planning Landscaping
AA0002740

Where creativity and rooted historic
architectural style add unprecedented value
to your remodeling or new home design.

YOU CAN AFFORD A PROFESSIONAL !

129 Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach, FL.
941-778-3113 FAX 941-778-0628




DEVON SELF STORAGE
Climate & Non-Climate Controlled

Keep yow4 life


+-ijgk cld Dry!


FOR:
* Home Owners
* Renters
* Business & Personal


WE OFFER:
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* 24 Hour Security
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* Wide Variety of Sizes


SAFELY STORE YOUR:
* RV's & Boat
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'Fo-r people wko have more stuff than space.
MANATEE AVE. WEST
MANATE AVE WE Formerly Phar Mor
Devon E E
41 (I 794-5700
S 6915 Manatee Avenue West
SM M No Deposit Required


I





i] PAGE 12 [E 1997 HURRICANE SPECIAL Mw THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
. . . . . ... .. ~--.. ....... . ...----L -


SMost Verticals made in 3
FREE VALANCE
FREE INSTALLATION


'I


HELP PROTECT YOUR HOME
FROM HURRICANE WIND
AutoBrace' is the effective.
low cost solution to protect
your home fromI te devastat-
Ing effects of hurricane dam-
., age. The largest opening in
your home is the garage area.
Through your garage door the
pressure of a hurricane can
S. concentrate and cause your
roof to blow off. Protecting
your home with AutoBrace is
easy. It's the low cost way to
f' reinforce your garage door
1 '.'against windstorm damage.
AutoBrace meets the South-
ern Building Code Congress
., .fInternational (SBCCI) codes
i, ",- for wind protection. Protect
N' your home with AutoBrace!


SThe Original Garage Door Brace
ON SALE $299 or FREE*
*when you cover six or more windows
with Hurricane Storm Panels


"t...,


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Ma ,,-.s ' i .- ;! !.' 'I'


'SAVE BIG!
elstall a 159
S,loutOe wndow*
5shadrias cmertine IN DCesI
cnaracternsic 01 curtian snades ard Dinrls 10
create a remarkable raesgri irai ia.,ncively
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FOR THE BEST PRICES QUALITY SELECTION & SERVICE


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Serving Our Customers for 10 Years
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We will beat any wnren & signed bid by 50" within 30 days of purcriase on the same merchandise.
For purchase of $300 or more Ask for details no intrest. no payments for 90 days. "" Ask for details


|194




.
, ,


-
,.,- _.. ,-
!i L ,1 _. "


9 (INCLUDES
FUTON
MATTRESS)/


v,' Ra,

.~ ~ :1 .. .
r*
i-

B _:


j TRUSTED



TECHNOLOGY


Storm debris and intruders can be
stopped when you apply 3M
Ultra ScotchshieldTM Safety and
Security film to your windows.



3M's patented 26 layer design
makes it the strongest safety film
on the market today. DON'T
MAKE THE MISTAKE
OF JUDGING A WINDOW
FILM BY ITS THICKNESS,
thicker does not mean stronger.
3M's unique design is only 4mil
thick, yet outperforms 8mil, and
ever 12mil thick window film.


ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES!
Only 3M technology can
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WARRANTY


We're impressed by this product and
we think you'll be too. Call for your
telephone estimate and/or FREE
in-home demonstration. Let us show
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offering all of the benefits of other
safety films and more.


Hurricane Glass Shield, Inc.

921-0844 or 1-800-591-SAFE (7233)

4233 Clark Road #26, Sarasota, FL 34233
3M DEALER SINCE 1981


DADE AND BROWARD COUNTY PRODUCT CONTROL APPROVED
Maximum Strength
IL !/ i* Removable & Lightweight
l / Simple Installation
Easy Storage
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CSAVE BIG! More Affordable
AVE I! Than You Think



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EXAMPLES: MINI'
23"x42"... LowPrice'11 30"x48"... Low Price'21
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MEMBER


I I


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I I -


- i .- , I .