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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00664

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE JANUARY 15, 1997










Four vie for two seats in Anna Maria


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Three veteran Anna Maria City politicos and one
newcomer are set to run Feb. 11 for two commission seats.
The job pays $400 a month.
Current Commissioner George McKay and Vice
Mayor Doug Wolfe are seeking to retain their seats.
Longtime commissioner and former Mayor Max
Znika and Anna Maria Island native Dale Woodland
will attempt to unseat them.
Commissioner McKay, 51, said he's running again
because he enjoys working with people.
McKay, who owns L&M Construction, said his
primary goal is to rid city government of bureaucracy.
"Even though we are a small town, government
always seems to grow and grow," McKay said. "People
ask me why I run. I enjoy it and I like being a spokes-


Privateers


told to move


boat-float

By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Island Privateers are under fire
again from the Holmes Beach Mayor Bob
VanWagoner for parking their boat-float on a vacant
lot at the corer of Clark Drive and Clark Lane.
The mayor sent the Privateers a letter last week
asserting that the float is stored illegally on the vacant
lot.
Parking trailers on vacant property is prohibited
according to the city's new trailer ordinance, said
Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Officer Bill
Kepping.
"In the past week we've received several com-
plaints about the float and about the Privateers' smoker
that is also stored there now," Kepping explained. "The
callers have also complained about an open fire on the
lot and children playing on the float. I have to respond
to the complaints. That's part of my job."
Privateer President John Swager said the group's
board of directors has not had a meeting to discuss the
new charge but he maintains the float does not violate
the ordinance.
"It's not a trailer, so it doesn't fall under the code,"
Swager said. "We're not alarmed by the mayor's let-
ter. We have been looking at other locations for the
float but there's not a lot of places on the Island to store
something like that. We also have a new tow vehicle
and a second smoker."
Regarding complaints about the children on the
float, Swager said they are trespassing and should be
cited by the police. He said members have also found
beer bottles littering the float that did not belong to
them.
VanWagoner said in addition to the complaints
received by Kepping, he has received complaints from
residents who have been ordered by the city to move
items from vacant lots.
"They feel a privilege is being given to this group
that we deny other residents," VanWagoner said. "We
have to apply the codes as equitably as we can. It would
be a mess if people started storing things on vacant lots.
These lots are not for the storage of floats or any large
out-of-place structure."
Swager said members have had no formal com-
plaints from area residents but if any complaints are
received, they will work with residents to correct any
problems.
The mayor said it is the third time he has attempted
to resolve the problem with the group. He said he has
offered to find a location at city hall for the float with
arrangements for electricity. Such a move would re-
quire council approval.


McKay


Wolfe


person for the people. I haven't had too many people
throw knives at me. I enjoy it 99 percent of the time."
McKay said his drive to get beach renourishment
for the city was an important accomplishment.
"When it will happen is another question," he said.


"I'm serious about wanting to allow them to use
city property," VanWagoner stressed. "It is a symbol
of the city and people could see it when they pass by.
I admire the work the Privateers do and love their pa-
rades. They are a part of Island lore. I hope we can
work something out."
Former mayor and council member Pat Geyer,
herself an honorary Privateer, said one of the problems
with moving the float to city hall is that the Privateers
spend many hours working on the float and like to have
a beer or two. She said VanWagoner told her he could
stipulate to that but she added, "the city's never made
that exception before."
"Moving the float to city hall may be fine and
dandy but we don't agree with all the stipulations that
go with it," Swager pointed out. "We're willing to bend
a little but they need to bend too. It's a two-way street."
VanWagoner said if he cannot reach a compromise
with the Privateers, he will ask Kepping to cite them for
a code violation.


Woodland


zniKa


"Some people would say we're protecting the people who
live on the beach. I think beach renourishment is an insur-
ance policy to protect the beach for all of us. We all en-
PLEASE SEE CANDIDATES, PAGE 4


Spike time
Craig Benson of
Centerville, Ohio, goes
for the kill as he
attempts to spike one past
Ray Lewis. Richard
Shapiro waits for his shot.
Lewis and partner Ralph
McElhiney and Shapiro
are from Bradenton. The
four were playing at
Manatee County Public
Beach. Islander Photo:
David Futch


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ........................................... ...... 6
Those Were the Days .................................. 7
Circus .................................................... 10
Cracker's Crumbs ....................................... 14
ISLAND MAP ............................................. 18
Stir-it-up ..................................... ........... 20
School Daze......................................... ......... 23
Streetlife ............................................. .... 24
Anna Maria Island tides ............................. 26
Fishing .................................... .................... 27
Crossword puzzle.................................... 36






mj PAGE 2 M JANUARY 15, 1997 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Residents make noise about noise ordinance


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach residents made their wishes clear at
last week's council meeting no new noise ordinance.
"Many of us don't want or need any more govern-
ment intrusion," resident Clark Leips said. "It appears
our leaders are against entertainment, music and danc-
ing. If we continue on this pattern of restriction, we
should be called Boring Beach no fun allowed."
The council was slated to pass on second reading an
amended noise ordinance that eliminated the decibel read-
ings required in the city's present ordinance and substi-
tuted a standard in which a violation would occur if the
sound was "plainly audible at a distance of 50 feet from
the building, structure or vehicle in which it is located."
A week before the meeting City Attorney Patricia
Petruff alerted council to a recent case interpreting Lee
County's noise ordinance in which the court ruled that
the 'plainly audible' standard was unconstitutional. She
advised them to not to pass the ordinance.

Council seeks a compromise
"Any government that has a plainly audible standard
is subject to challenge," Petruff told council. "That's not
to say that you couldn't define the term plainly audible in
a way that would withstand judicial scrutiny, but because
this case exists, I think it will open a can of worms for you.
You'll be subject to possible challenge and then you'll be
fighting an uphill battle."
Councilman Ron Robinson said he favors the
amendment and the judge's decision in the Lee County
case was only one person's opinion.
Petruff told Robinson the decision was made by a
panel of three judges. She also noted the city falls un-
der the jurisdiction of the appeals court that made the
decision and any challenge to the city's ordinance
could end up before that court.
Councilwoman Billie Martini asked if the decibel
levels in the present ordinance can be lowered.


"The council can establish levels to be measured
by certain decibel readings, but it can't just pull them
out of the air, Petruff replied. "I wouldn't know what
to recommend. You would have to have some back-
ground information which would support lower levels,
for example, the expertise of a noise consultant."
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore, who adamantly
opposes the ordinance, noted, 'The reason this started was
(neighbor's complaints about loud music at) the Anchor
Inn and now it pertains to the entire city. I think it's un-
constitutional and selective enforcement. This is not
Longboat Key and I don't care if I can hear my neighbor
talking. I think 50 feet is very unreasonable."
Councilman Don Maloney said he favors keeping
the present ordinance.
Council Chairman Luke Courtney said the city
needs a better definition of excessive noise.
"Every time you define a term, you're limiting
your capability to enforce," Petruff warned.
Mayor Bob VanWagoner said he is opposed to
noise which disturbs neighborhoods, not music.
"If the police officer goes to an establishment and
tells them to turn the music down and the officer goes
away and we get another call about the same establish-
ment, then that's disorderliness," VanWagoner said.
"We will do anything we have to do to control the se-
curity of the city."
"This resurfaced because I went to the mayor about
two months ago," Police Chief Jay Romine said. "I
wanted a noise ordinance that was as enforceable as
possible on a practical basis. I wanted something that
was in black and white that we could enforce."

Residents rumble
Nine residents spoke in opposition to the ordinance
and one spoke in favor of it.
"I'm concerned about imposing an ordinance on a
whole town when only one area may be a problem,"
Gabe Simches noted. "I'm not sure we have the exten-


sive problem that this change seems to imply."
Simches said he is also concerned that the amendment
will be in effect 24 hours a day as opposed to the present
ordinance that is in effect from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
"At one point this evening, the city attorney stated
that the language in the current ordinance is sufficient
to deal with the problems in the city," said Steve
Lardas, owner of D. Coy Ducks. "The mayor also said
he used the language in the current ordinance to deal
with the problem. The ordinance had been on the books
for 20 years and you're wasting all this time and money
to rewrite it. Leave it alone."
"I strenuously object to this proposed ordi-
nance," Karen Collins said. "It is arbitrary and capri-
cious and seems to be aimed at one particular busi-
ness. The way it's written it will encourage spite
fights between neighbors."
Scott Ricci said the city shouldn't risk a court chal-
lenge but instead purchase more decibel meters and
train the officers to use them and adopt a citation pro-
cedure for violators.
"I'm in favor of the ordinance," Rose Spinoza said.
"I feel there are some really flagrant, habitual offend-
ers in the neighborhoods. The police department needs
more definitive ordinance which will help them enforce
the law in a fair way."
"If there ever seemed a time appropriate to say I'm
sorry I brought it up, I think this is it," Romine said as
the audience applauded. "But I still want something I
can enforce. I don't think anyone here endorses obnox-
ious or annoying music, but the vast majority of the
people in this room feel that 50 feet is too restrictive. I
don't think we need to re-create the wheel to fix this."
With Whitmore the lone opposing vote, council
instructed Petruff to rewrite the ordinance to include a
definition of plainly audible, return the 10 p.m. to 7
a.m. restriction on excessive noise to the ordinance and
work with Romine to establish an acceptable distance,
as opposed to 50 feet.


Walkover bridge in Anna Maria City open


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
The long-awaited walkover bridge next to the
humpback bridge in Anna Maria City is open to pedes-
trians.
On the drawing board for more than five years, the
bridge cost approximately $180,000, said Mary Ellen
Maurer, Florida Department of Transportation project
administrator for Manatee County, said.
DOT officials originally budgeted $171,000.
Maurer said the $9,000 cost overrun resulted when
DOT decided to make the sidewalk six inches thick
rather than the original four inches.
The decision to go thicker occurred because DOT
felt the high number of automobiles using the Anna
Maria City Pier parking lot would eventually crack or
destroy a four-inch sidewalk, Maurer said.
Handrails for the walkover bridge were installed
Jan. 8-9 and the city checked off the items required for
completion on Jan. 9-10, said Anne Beck, city public
works assistant.
She said the humpback bridge was closed to vehicles
Jan. 2-3 while contractor M.L. Boyer shored up portions
of the bridge that had been undermined by erosion.
"It was something we had been getting criticized
for in (DOT) reports," Beck said. "This should prolong
the life of the bridge."
Boyer injected a heavy, concrete-and-sand mixture
in the west approach or part nearest Bean Point, she
said. Road crews also filled in underneath the slopes on
both sides of the bridge.


. -6. *I. . R
H*BHHI^ l-


~"" ~1m4


e i8~s


Jay Turner of Traffic Control Products in Tampa drills holes for handrails at the recently completed walkover
bridge in Anna Maria City. Islander Photo: David Futch


The humpback project cost the city approximately
$1,750 plus $1,150 for the estimated 15 yards of ma-
terial used to fill in the voids, she said.


The city also paid $5,340 for a new, 100-foot guard-
rail on the Lake LaVista side of the bridge. DOT paid for
a new guardrail on the Tampa Bay side of the bridge.


Night may turn

to day once a

month in

Bradenton

Beach


Last March, elected officials in Bradenton Beach
changed the time of the second commission meeting of
the month from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Now, a majority of the commission has agreed to
change the meeting back to an afternoon time.
Commissioner Dan Goodchild led the charge for
the change. He said overtime costs to department heads
and other employees totaled nearly $300 for the
evening meeting and, since the second meeting of the
month dealt mostly with housekeeping matters, by
changing the meeting time to the afternoon the city


could save that added expense.
Goodchild's suggestion was unanimously en-
dorsed by the commission with Mayor Leroy Arnold
absent. Arnold was a leading proponent of the change
to night meetings last year. He said then that meetings
at night tended to increase citizen participation.
Last year, several residents complained that com-
missioners were passing sweeping changes to city laws
in usually low-attendance afternoon meetings.
Further discussion on the time change for commis-
sion meetings is expected in February.


"i Wl I
.WOW i






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 U PAGE 3 iE


Fire commission wants ambulance service


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
New legislation giving the Anna Maria Fire Dis-
trict the power to collect taxes to provide emergency
service to the district has been sent to the local legis-
lative delegation for support.
The fire commission approved the move in a spe-
cial meeting last week. The legislative change was re-
quested by the district's EMS (Emergency Medical
Service) Study Committee.
The committee is studying four options for im-
proved EMS service the present EMS-based service,
a combination EMS and fire district service, a fire dis-
trict-based service and privatization. Once the study is
complete, the committee plans to recommend one of
the options to the AMFD commission.


Committee members learned recently that if they
decide to recommend a change to fire district-based
service and the change is approved by the people, the
district's legislation must be changed. However, if they
wait until a recommendation is made, the legislation
may take a year-and-a-half to be implemented. They
found they can go ahead with the legislation now with-
out acting upon it unless it's needed.
Fire Chief Andy Price explained the district's legis-
lative enabling act establishes powers and duties, taxing
methods, abilities and limits. If the change to the district's
service is approved, the enabling act must be changed to
allow the district to collect taxes to fund the service.
The change to the enabling act reads, "The district
shall have the right, power and authority to levy ad
valorem taxes on an all taxable property in the district

Author signing
Holmes Beach author and
editor Gretchen Edgren
signed her latest book,
"The Playboy Book, at
J Books-a-million in
Bradenton Saturday. The
book chronicles 514
Playmates from Playboy
Magazine from the first
centerfold -featuring
ip j I Marilyn Monroe in
raPr?~,m'~ay December 1953 to Miss
December of 1996.
Current whereabouts and
whatever-happened-tos
are also included in the
book. Edgren worked for
Playboy for 25 years,
retiring in 1992 as Senior
Editor. She still holds the
title of Contributing Editor
and writes features for the
magazine. Islander Photo:
Paul Roat


to establish and maintain emergency medical and res-
cue response services."
"This does not mean the committee will approve a
recommendation to combine the fire district and EMS,"
stressed Larry Tyler, fire commissioner and study com-
mittee chairman. "It just makes the funds available if
we do. If we don't, the act just lays idle."
Tyler said his committee will study the costs and lev-
els of service of the four options, then make a recommen-
dation. The committee's findings and recommendation
will be presented to the fire commission, the Island cities
and the people. Tyler said the committee hopes to put its
recommendation to a referendum of the people.



Anna Maria City
1/16, 7:30 p.m., Code Enforcement Board

Bradenton Beach
1/16, 7 p.m., Commission meeting
1/22, 7 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board

Holmes Beach
1/21, 9 a.m., Council special work session
on A-1 district
1/21, 7 p.m., Council meeting on
Joe Kennedy appeal

Of Interest
1/18, 10:30 a.m., Holmes Beach Civic Asso-
ciation, Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
1/20, 10 a.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Anna Maria City Hall.
1/20, 3:30 p.m., Anna Maria Fire
Conunnission Pension Board, Station 1, 6001
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
1/23, 7 p.m., Bradenton Beach Civic Associa-
tion, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
1/23, 7:30 p.m., EMS Study Committee,
Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


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[] PAGE 4 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Holmes Beach mayor releases 'State of City'


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner beat
President Bill Clinton to the punch by issuing his "State
of the City" report last week.
In the introduction VanWagoner said the citizens
"deserve a reasonable and balanced assessment of the
conditions, problems, programs and directions of the
city from the viewpoint of the present administration."
During his first nine months in office,
VanWagoner claims he has "developed a more proper
checks and balances relationship with the city council,
molded operations of the major departments into a
team effort, initiated several new management prac-
tices and began, completed and re-assessed programs."
VanWagoner listed 11 issues and gave their stages
of progress.
SNew city hall complex "The architect's plans,
which were being approved without tight executive
review several months ago, have been re-assessed and
re-aligned" including a new location and enhanced rec-


rational and park facilities.
City-wide rental rules The proposed ordinance
has "faltered" under city council review and the admin-
istration had asked for a totally new beginning.
Cellular towers He cites success in defeating a
bid by GTE to build a cellular tower at city hall and said
his desire is to provide reasonable service without destroy-
ing the Island's beauty "violently or unnecessarily."
Noise "The increase of intrusive noise from
nightclubs was brought under control" and "the present
city statutes are sufficient for prosecution. If the offend-
ing locations do not correct the noise at the first visit and
keep the noise subdued, the operation will be shut down."
Bridges On the Anna Maria Bridge, "The is-
sue is not dead but a settlement is more likely than
continued litigation." On the Key Royale Bridge, "If
litigation becomes necessary in this case, it will be
shown that MPO (Sarasota-Manatee Metropolitan
Planning Organization) was once committed to assign-
ing federal funds to the project. Now some of its lead-
ership and staff are trying to renege with weak logic."


Other issues include the planning commission's
review of the comprehensive plan, the charter review
committee's recommendations, the revamping of pe-
destrian cross walks, beautification, an amended trailer
ordinance, and the ill-fated fence ordinance.
VanWagoner noted that administrative action he
implemented includes restoring the initiative for ap-
pointing liaisons to the council, instituting weekly staff
meetings, reviewing police logs daily, ordering code
enforcement to crack down on illegal real estate and
garage sale signs and increasing the mowing of vacant
lots to four times a year.
Upcoming issues highlighted by the mayor in-
clude: working with the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center to establish a youth corps, training the city
staff on hurricane preparedness, dredging Key Royale
Pass and the city's canals, continuing the stormwater
runoff program, sponsoring a public forum on beach
renourishment, continuing public information pro-
grams to increase public involvement and promoting
the civic association's recommended bike route.


Spaghetti dinner
at Roser
Ed Callen dips the spaghetti while John Williamson
ladles on the sauce at the Roser Church Women's
Guild benefit Friday in the Fellowship Hall of the
Roser Memorial Community Church.
Islander Photo: David Futch


CANDIDATES
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
joy it. We've lost a lot of valuable property already."
In making decisions that affect citizens, McKay
said he tries to express himself from his heart and brain.
"The combination of the two offers a good balance as
a servant," McKay said. "I don't consider myself above
anyone in the community. I do what I do for the people."
He said keeping the city the way it is with little or
no increase in density is a must. People don't want high
rises. And anything higher than three stories would be
detrimental, he said.
No increase in the budget and cooperating with the
other two island cities is a priority, McKay said.
"I may not agree in philosophy with some people but
I can work with anyone," he said. "We're not going to get
into fist fights. I think it's a plus to be able to disagree
without being disagreeable, to act as mature adults."
Anna Maria Vice Mayor Wolfe, 62, is in his sixth
term since first running in 1988.
Wolfe has been elected to fill the office of several
commissioners who left early, the first being Brendan
Greene and the most recent Mark Ratliff.
"I've run six times to serve seven years. I don't
know why I end up with one-year terms," Wolfe said.
"I'm always getting re-elected. I think people have
confidence in my abilities."
Wolfe said drainage is the city's No. 1 problem and
is the biggest cost factor to the city and residents.
"We don't have to have a storm," he said. "A low-
pressure system sits at the mouth of Tampa Bay for
three days and we're under water."
Then there are always the little problems whether
it deals with infrastructure or the personal concerns of
the people.
"My primary concern is honesty in government,"
Wolfe said. "As long as I represent the people of Anna
Maria, they're going to get a fair and honest shake."
Wolfe, an artist and whittler who uses only a knife


and has created pieces 20 feet by 20 feet, said the cur-
rent commission has only the city and people in mind.
"The commission at this time has the interest of the
citizens at heart," he said. "No one has an axe to grind."
Woodland, 48, said he thinks he can be an effective
servant of the community and points to his work on the
city's code enforcement board and the Lake LaVista
Committee.
Woodland currently is vice chairman of the code en-
forcement board, a group he has served on since 1989.
As a member of the Lake LaVista Committee, Wood-
land said he is charged with providing the city with a long-
term, cost effective means of maintaining the LaVista
Channel. The city now has two dredge permits.
"I love this city government. I think the most im-
portant thing I can do is help maintain our small town
atmosphere," Woodland said. "Though I've never run
for office, I think I've worked well with all commis-
sioners past and present."
Woodland said his agenda as a commissioner
would highlight fiscal responsibility, looking at im-
proving the city's recycling efforts and improve infra-
structure such as drainage and roads.
Woodland, who owns and runs a swimming pool
maintenance and repair company with his son, said it
is a priority to increase recycling even if it means go-
ing to curbside service. The city currently has large bins
on Pine Avenue for newspapers, glass, plastic and alu-
minum cans.
"People don't realize how much they throw away
that goes into the dump," he said. "When I look back
over the past four years I would say I'm putting out 25
percent of what I used to put out before I started recy-
cling. I recycle 20 pounds of newspapers each week."
A recreational path for bikers and walkers is an-
other initiative Woodland said he would like to pursue.
"The thing I enjoy about politics in Anna Maria is I
don't consider commissioners as politicians but as neigh-
bors and residents," he said. "None of the commissioners
seem to have power. It's a commission that's responsive
to the people. The people have the power."


Znika, 70 and retired, has been a force in city politics
for years and said his business background has been an
asset to the city in the past and can be in the future.
"The mayor (Chuck Shumard) needs more help.
He's trying to do ajob and at least one commissioner,
George McKay, isn't there for him," Znika said. "I
have a business background and someone like me who
has the time can help the mayor.
"We have a $1 million budget this year and the city
clerk is busy, public works is busy, busy. In my seven
years on the commission I saved the city $100,000 on
equipment purchases and I think I can do the same again."
He said he would fight any attempt to raise taxes.
Znika said he can help the city save money on pro-
posed purchases of two new pickup trucks, another
small truck to replace the Toyota that's almost 20 years
old.
The city could also use a new backhoe for its trac-
tor and a new mower, he said.
"We're going to have to spend big bucks in the next
couple of years and I'd like to see these purchases spread
out over a three-year period," Znika said. "There's going
to be less and less grant money from the federal govern-
ment and we're going to have to be frugal.
"All I'm concerned about is the city. I'm here for
the long haul. You have to care. Some people come
here and in three or four years they make $25,000 on
a house and leave."
This will be Znika's fifth attempt at running for a
commission seat.
Znika moved to Anna Maria from Indiana in 1982,
where he owned and managed Dairy Rich Foods, an
$8- million-a-year manufacturing and distribution com-
pany.
He managed the Manatee County Public Beach for
three years. He is married and has five children.
Znika is a member of the Elks, Masons, Rotary, the
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce, past presi-
dent of the Anna Maria Island Civic Association, the
Island Hurricane Volunteer Program, Adopt-a-Family
and the Island Needy Program.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 5 fj


Ten take qualifying packets in Holmes Beach


Although 10 city residents have picked up qualify-
ing packets for the March 11 election in Holmes Beach,
only two have qualified Luke Courtney and Don
Maloney, both incumbent council members.
The remaining packets were taken by: incumbent
Councilwoman Billie Martini; Lee Edwards:; former
mayor and councilwoman Pat Geyer; Mike Heistand, the
city's former code enforcement officer; Joe Kennedy; Sue


Normand, current chairman of the planning commission;
Walt Stewart; and Mercedes Thornburg.
Candidates have until noon Jan. 21 to qualify. The
qualifying fee is $72.02 or 1.5 percent of the $4,801
each council member receives yearly for expenses.
Candidates must be residents of the city for two
consecutive years and sign a residency certificate. The
signatures of 15 registered voters are needed on elec-


tion petitions.
Candidate qualifying information may be ob-
tained at city hall, 5901 Marina Drive. All candi-
dates must comply with the Florida Public Disclo-
sure Law at the time of filing.
New residents have until Feb. 10 to register in order
to vote on March 11. All precincts in the city will vote at
Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Drive.


Contractor OK'd for fishing pier renovations


By Paul Roat
TBS Construction has received the contract to
make improvements to the Bradenton Beach Fishing
Pier by the city commission.
The Sarasota company was the lowest of four bids
for the work, which will cost $126,250. The improve-
ments are paid from a $100,000 state grant for pier res-
toration under the Florida Recreational Development
Assistance Program. The city will contribute $33,000
in matching funds for the work.
Probably the most visual highlight of the renova-
tion effort is a 34-foot-high, four-sided clock tower at
Bridge Street and Bay Drive. The tower will have a
gazebo at its base to provide a gathering spot for resi-
dents and visitors, according to Emily Anne Smith,
with the architectural firm of Eatman & Smith. The
faces of the four clocks will be illuminated.
Extensive landscaping will guide pier patrons
along the parking area to the entrance of the pier, which


will have wide verandahs and porch swings for seating.
Moving further along the 660-foot-long pier, fish-
ers and walkers will have three covered cabanas under
which to pause as they look at the vistas of Sarasota
Bay and Cortez.
At the far end of the pier, a huge covered pavilion
will provide a bit of relief from the sun. Smith said she
anticipated the pavilion, with its picnic tables and
benches, will become a popular spot for gatherings,
card playing and even weddings.
Parts of Smith's original design were scaled down,
eliminated or may be done through other grants due to
estimates coming in higher than anticipated.
Building Official Bill Sanders said TBS Construc-
tion and Bob Dale Construction were asked to rework
their estimates. The two companies were the lowest
bidders. All estimates were much higher than the
$133,000 in available funds.
Deleted from the project was a boardwalk along


Bridge Street to the pier, a flag tower at the east end of
the pier and construction of a rear roof area just east of
the restaurant.
Sanders and Smith said they hoped the boardwalk
work could be done with funds from a $500,000 state
grant for work throughout the historic old-town area of
the city.
The flag tower will be replaced with a smaller sign.
The roof addition was deleted.
Bidders for the work were:
TBS Construction, with an original bid of
$212,536, revised to $126,248,
Bob Dale Construction, with an original bid of
$216,216, revised to $137,778,
Pat Cook Construction, $249,412,
Walrus Construction, $253,500.
TBS Construction, headed up by Ted Sparling,
recently completed renovation work on the Sports Bar
on Bridge Street.


Mayor seeks comment on

one-way road


Anna Maria Mayor Chuck
Shumard is seeking comments from
residents concerning a suggestion
that traffic on Magnolia Avenue be
changed to one-way from Gulf Drive
to South Bay Boulevard.
In a memo to the city commis-
sion, sheriff's office and public
works department, Shumard noted,
"This is a primary concern of all
those who use the Anna Maria Island
Community Center facilities. It is
still only an idea and still only in the


discussion phase. We on the Anna
Maria City Commission would like
to hear your pros and cons."
Shumard is especially inter-
ested in comments from affected
property owners on Magnolia Av-
enue, South Bay Boulevard, Tarpon
Street, Crescent Drive and North
Shore Drive. Residents are asked to
write a note and drop it off at city
hall, call 778-0781 or make their
views known at a commission
meeting.


ELECT



MAX ZNIKA

For

Commissioner

Anna Maria

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The Island churches of St. Bernard
Catholic, Gloria Dei Lutheran, Episco-
pal Church of the Annunciation, Roser
Memorial Community, Harvey Memo-
rial Community of Bradenton Beach
and the First Church of Christ Scientist
will participate in an ecumenical service
including presentation of the 1996 Hu-
manitarian Award on Sunday, Jan. 19, at
2 p.m. at St. Bernard Catholic Church in


Holmes Beach.
Prayers, songs, psalms and readings
will be shared by all the Island pastors.
The Rev. Patrick Farrell of St. Bernard
Catholic Church will deliver the homily.
Light refreshments will be served af-
ter the service in the activity center.
The pastors of the Island churches
invite their members to attend and par-
ticipate in the event.


28 Homeowners Will Get $490.00 Cash

After the Holiday Season


By Chuck Kaiser
Which is when we all need it most.
Now in Bradenton, Ocean-Aire
Conditioning, Inc. has created a program
that will allow 28 homeowners to get
$490.00 cash right now after the Holiday
season. Plus get a new Coleman heating
and air conditioning system without
taking one penny out of their pockets.
My question when talking to Mr.
Long was ...
Why would he make this offer?
His answer made sense. He said, "At
this time of year I'm faced with a devastat-
ing problem and I know this can solve my
problem. You see, after the Holiday
season, people have spent so much that
they will do whatever they can to put off
spending money on anything else.
Now I know many homeowners
are faced with their own problems ...
They have all these things that they
bought during the holidays, but many
of them don't know where the money
will come from. Well, this plan will
take care of their problem and mine.
I believe that by giving homeowners
this opportunity, these 28 Coleman
systems will keep all of my employees
busy. I realize we don't have the profit in
these jobs we normally do, but it's worth it
just to keep all of our people working
instead of having to send them home."
After discussing the advantage to
the homeowners I believe Mr. Long
will wish he had enough employees to
put in more than 28 heating and air
conditioning systems, and I am sure
many homeowners will too.


Here Is How The Homeowners Benefit
They can finance a new Coleman
heating and air conditioning system
without taking one cent out of their
pocket for 90 days. Then Mr. Long will
give them a check for $490.00. Note...
offer is subject to credit approval. Either
way the homeowner can save $490.00.
Here Is Another Part Of This Concept
That Impressed Me
The homeowners that are replacing
an old system will get a guaranteed
energy savings of 25% during the first
year or Mr. Long will pay them the
difference. Plus, he will take care of any
repairs on the new system FREE for the
next 5 years. And get this Mr. Long
said "Many of our customers have found
that the money they save on their energy
and repair bills is more than their
monthly payment."
Remember, this offer is no payment
for 90 days, $490 cash back on cash
savings, plus a 25% savings on utility
bills. And an added bonuses of an FPL
rebate of up to $859.00 to those who
meet FPL guidelines.
The Only Way The Homeowners Can
Lose Is If Their Call Comes Too Late
Because, according to Mr. Long,
once the 28 Coleman Systems are sold,
this program will have to end.
Homeowners can request more
information (or schedule a free survey)
by calling Ocean-Aire Conditioning,
Inc. at (941) 746-4191. Here is my
advice if you are interested in taking
advantage of this opportunity ... Do
Not Delay Calling!!!






BI3 PAGE 6 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 I THE ISLANDER BYSTA

e *- e


VanNewcomer now
Vanlnterloper
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner has pro-
duced a "State of the City" address that makes for in-
teresting reading.
Of 11 items under the category of "Issues Faced,
Completed or Progressing," we count six that have
been stymied in some form or another. Six of the
mayor's references include words such as "re-as-
sessed," "faltered" or "proved controversial enough."
One of the most "successful" of the issues cited by
VanWagoner was the noise ordinance, something he
lauds, saying, "the increase of intrusive noise from
nightclubs was brought under control."
Of course, that was after the code enforcement board
determined no action could be taken and prior to the city
attorney's warning that parts of VanWagoner's recom-
mended ordinance violated the U.S. Constitution.
Issues that have been accomplished, according to
the mayor, include a number of things outside his pur-
view: re-writing the city comprehensive plan by the
planning commission and review of the city charter by
the charter review commission.
A puzzling item in the category, "Upcoming issues
- Great & Small." includes VanWagoner's statement
on beach renourishment:
"We'll need to do at least one public forum on
beach renourishment before committing any support to
further programs. Federal/state financing is getting
scarce, and the citizens should be making the decisions.
It is a conflicting field, and needs careful moderation."
Could the mayor be balking at the next scheduled
beach renourishment project? Islanders fought for al-
most a decade to get beaches renourished in 1993 along
the shores of Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach.
Now, does VanWagoner want Holmes Beach to
pull out of the program? What does "careful modera-
tion" mean? What does he imply with "committing
support" to the program?
The next phase of the ongoing renourishment
project is planned for the year 2000 and the whole
project has not cost the city a dime.
In his first year in office, VanWagoner has developed
a reputation of meddling in every department. He continu-
ally inhibits the department heads in their duties.
His adversaries say he demands the final say on
everything and he gets involved in everything. He
epitomizes the loathed micro-manager.
We don't want to appear petty so we offer some
examples ... including his attendance at code enforce-
ment hearings and planning commission meetings
where he injects his opinions on cases.
For instance, council requested that the planning








June Alder
IISLANDER[O1M
JANUARY 15, 1997 VOLUME 5, NUMBER 9
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Frank Cunningham
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Kevin Cassidy
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
1997 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK


No encore.


commission review a proposed rental ordinance for
possible changes and compliance with the comprehen-
sive plan. VanWagoner attended the planning commis-
sion meeting and told the commissioners they were
going beyond their duties by making recommendations
for rental ordinance changes. He told them they should
only discuss compliance.
For instance, just this week VanWagoner sent a
letter to the Privateers that precedes any code enforce-
ment action, warnings of procedures regarding the lo-
cation of their boat-float on a vacant lot. He clearly
states "it is stored illegally." We ask: Who determined
the legal status of the boat-float?
For instance, we've heard that when people com-
plain to a department or request information,
VanWagoner frequently undermines department action
with contradictory advice.
For instance, Joe Kennedy went to city hall this week
to request public records and discovered the clerk was
ordered by VanWagoner not to assist him. Kennedy says
VanWagoner told him he couldn't request records because
he is represented by an attorney and that his attorney
would have to deal directly with the city attorney.
We accompanied Kennedy back to city hall to in-
voke access to the public records and VanWagoner
denied all that Kennedy claimed he had said. The


Take a step back
Mayor Bob VanWagoner has issued a "newslet-
ter" to inform the citizens of Holmes Beach. Coun-
cil had no input on this communication to the citi-
zens, which I feel is wrong.
Regarding rental restrictions: The mayor has stated
time and again that he will not support the rental re-
strictions discussed by council. He feels the entire city
should have a 30-day minimum for rentals.
Cellular towers: The mayor has not supported this
because of the cosmetic appearance and his thinking
that cell phones promote crime and assist drug smug-
glers. What about public safety?
Noise: The mayor stated in his newsletter that the
present laws are sufficient. He is supported on this issue
by a group of residents living next to the Anchor Inn, the
root of his issue. The city is treading on constitutional


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mayor stated three times that he would determine a
reasonable fee above the 15-cent-per-page copy fee to
meet Kennedy's request although state law clearly
prohibits the charging of any fee for viewing any pub-
lic, open public records in the state.
In terming him "VanNewcomer," residents cite a
lack of historical perspective, particularly in regard to
the Privateers and the Anchor Inn.
Prior to his election, VanWagoner rambled on and
on at meetings in all three cities on myriad subjects,
even commanding commissioners to recognize their
"global responsibilities." Now he states a preference to
limit input at city meetings.
He also wrote numerous lengthy letters to the edi-
tor on many subjects before he became mayor. Like so
many other newly elected officials before him, the lines
of communication ceased when the first pile of "to-do"
hit the proverbial fan.
While the old saying goes, "power corrupts,"
VanWagoner has seized absolute power a virtual
dictatorship with evidence of his inhibiting actions
on council, boards, committees and in city departments.
The city's accomplishments in the past year under
VanWagoner's "absolute rule" really haven't been so
many not nearly so many to merit a five-page report
from the mayor copied at taxpayer expense.


rights by punishing everyone to resolve one issue.
Key Royale Bridge: The mayor does not want to dis-
cuss alternative means to fund replacement of this bridge.
He thinks the state is going to pay for a private road.
Our mayor seems to do what he thinks should be
done and not what is in the best interest of this city. As
a four- to five-year resident of Anna Maria Island, he
doesn't have a clue what this Island is all about.
Mr. Mayor: I know you feel you are doing right but
please take a step back and talk to everyone on the
council and residents before we read your plans in the
newspaper or a newsletter that is filled with half-truths.
Carol Whitmore, Holmes Beach Council Member


For more of
Your Opinions, see page 8


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THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 19, A Soldier's Story
by June Alder


American fighting men inch forward through the smoke of battle amid the war-
misshapen trees of a once-idyllic French wood.


DEATH ON HILL 298


In a muddy foxhole in the Argonne
Forest, Privates Clair Jones of Anna
Maria and his friend Will Austin
waited in the dark and cold for morn-
ing to come. They were among the half
million Americans about to fight the
last great battle of the Great War.
Their specific mission was to rush for-
ward behind the infantry to erect a
gun emplacement on Hill 298. The
command to "go over the top" came
at 7:15. Austin's diary goes on:

Oct. 20, 1918. Facing our fox-
holes was a long hill or "hog's back"
covered with a fringe of woods on the
summit. When we reached this point
we were surprised by a "hell" of ma-
chine gun bullets which caused us to
quickly seek cover.
Our captain learned that the big bar-
rage by the American artillery, which
was to have cleared the way for the in-
fantry, had fallen short and the infantry
had been almost annihilated. So now it
was "up to us."
We went forward, driving the Ger-
mans out of the Bois de Pultiere. By
making a dash across an open field we
next gained the edge of Clair Chenes
woods. This woods was bristling with
machine guns, and we had a hot time.
Clair and I wondered what made the
bullets snap so some sounded like the
crack of a whip while others seemed to
moan. We discovered to our discomfort
that the bullets that snapped were pass-
ing a few inches from our faces while
those that passed at a distance of five
yards or more made the moaning sound.
Clair Chenes was a wood about one-
third of a mile wide and a mile long. Af-
ter we had taken about half of it a report
came to the captain that a number of
Germans were approaching on all edges
of the woods, perhaps 300 of them. We
would be surrounded. The officers held
a consultation and decided it was best to
occupy the hill, an excellent position
commanding the woods and surround-
ing countryside.
We withdrew in good order and the


Germans, seeing our design, sent up a
flare signaling for a barrage. The reply
was immediate. The 77s and one
pounders dropped thick around us.
As we were about to make a bayo-
net charge to clear away the few gun-
ners that were between us and the hill
a shell came in. It hit the ground about
30 feet to our right, and the concussion
nearly knocked us all down.
While we lay waiting for the gas to
clear so we could go on, I turned to
look at Clair (there was just one man
between us). His face was blank. I saw
that a piece of shrapnel had struck him
in the temple. It had apparently gone
straight to his brain.
I watched him die. He drew only a
few breaths, each one a little shorter
than the other, and then he was gone.
His only movement after he fell was to
draw his feet up a little as though to
make room for those to pass who were
coming behind him.
Will Austin and his comrades in
the Sixth Engineers did not need to
make a bayonet charge to gain Hill
298. For the Germans yielded it with-
out a fight. But six more days of severe
fighting and loss of life were required
before Hills 297 and 299 were taken.
Austin survived the battle and the
war which ended 22 days after Clair's
death. Some month's later Austin made
a trip to Anna Maria Key to present the
diary he had kept so meticulously to his
dead friend's mother. Among a few
observations he added was this:
When Clair and I went over the top
on Sunday morning, Oct. 20, our aim
had been to plant the machine gun on
Hill 299 and return possibly by 3
o'clock. Our company was gone for
seven days. We succeeded in gaining
enemy territory and holding it, but the
gun emplacement was never put in
place. What Clair and I set out to do
was not required after all.

Next: A glorious exit


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 7 Ei3


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E]3 PAGE 8 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I 9-YOUR lINe


Holmes Beach mayor
speaks up
I have no intention whatsoever of changing my
conduct of office because of the "heat" you have cho-
sen to apply to me after the city quieted down some of
the disorderliness in one of your favorite haunts. But
enough is enough.
Your initial anger in your editorial columns
(which freedom of speech I support because I was
bred in journalism) has spilled, however, for weeks
into your alleged "news" columns, to the degree you
are stomping on accepted journalistic ethics, on your
own staff people and on our innocent city employ-
ees. And leading the citizens of the whole city down
a false trail.
By painting an inaccurate picture of what's going
on in government in this city, you are committing an
extreme disservice to the Island you should be pledged
to serve well and fairly.
If you want to call me "vermin," go ahead. But do
not apply it in the plural to the "City Hall." Have some
respect for the dignity of this city and of the officers,
employees and volunteers who help make it work as
well as it does each day!
You have deliberately distorted my positions on
noise, on cellular phones, on the Island Transporta-
tion Planning Organization, on the serious matter of
replacing the Key Royale bridge, and a line-up of
faked "issues." You turn council arguing into my
flaps and ignore any positive steps this office has
taken on its own. You have never asked me for a
comment. This has not been mere carelessness but
planned maliciousness and journalists know the thin
legal line you are toying with here.
I dislike having to communicate in this way. But I
appear the one in the responsible position to do so. You
tamper with letters people write you for publication, so
this is our resort. For the city's good, we need a more
fair and open forum.
Bob VanWagoner, mayor, Holmes Beach

Xeriscape a must for
Florida's future
To expand on your Jan. 1 editorial cartoon, I don't
know who is in the tall grass, but I do know xeriscape
is a must for our future. We who live in Florida must
decide: do we want to drink the water or put it on our
lawns.
Tingley Memorial Library is a demonstration site
on xeriscaping for the Sarasota Bay National Estuary


Program. We invite everyone to visit and learn about
trees and shrubs that are salt tolerant and need little or
no watering.
There is a great deal of difference between an un-
kempt lawn and a well-planned xeriscape landscape.
John Sandberg, Bradenton Beach

Cracker tale added to Futch's
fish name story
I enjoyed very much David Futch's scholarly dis-
course on fish names in your Jan. 8 edition.
Just so it will be recorded as part of lost Florida
Cracker lore, please let it be known that we local
Crackers had our own name for snook during the 1920s
and '30s when this Cracker was growing up.
While I never had to spell it and don't know how,
if you pronounce the words "roe" and "value" as one
word, you have spoken the term exactly. This name is
undoubtedly derived from one or both of the Spanish
words for snook, robalo and ravillia, mentioned in
Futch's article.
When cornered, a snook would rip our cotton nets
to shreds and the art of catching them on a hook and
line was not generally known. We were experts, how-
ever, in gigging snook in the shallow waters along the
beach where they once gathered in large schools.
At the time, we Crackers also referred to freshwa-
ter bass as trout and some still do.
All fish don't really smell the same until after three
days.
Gib Bergquist, Holmes Beach

Property rights at risk
in Holmes Beach
When the Florida legislature passed the Compre-
hensive Growth Management and Planning Act in
1985, unknowing property owners took a royal bath.
Many will never know just how drenched they are un-
til they try to sell or build on their property.
Enter Joe Kennedy of Holmes Beach and his cur-
rent battle with city hall. It's unthinkable that city gov-
ernment is dictating how and whether Kennedy has a
right to sell his own property. If there was a contin-
gency in Kennedy's original purchase contract allow-
ing sales of the property as suitable building lots, then
this provision should be honored.
It is discouraging to see city government using so
much of the taxpayers' dollars in pursuit of outlaws and
criminals such as Kennedy. Why not concentrate on
some of the real problems at hand and in doing so re-


store some sensibility to city government?
Cathy Cuthbertson, Bradenton Beach

Use money to catch drug
smugglers, not fishermen
Your article about the Florida Marine Patrol using
high tech gear to catch a few fisherman trying to make
a living at Christmas time sent shudders through me.
I have a bumper sticker in my garage that says,
"Get Hooked on Fishing Not Drugs," and then I read
about extremely expensive equipment being used to
apprehend fishermen trying to earn a little money for
their Christmas shopping.
Makes you think about Big Brother, doesn't it?
Drugs are coming into Florida in ever increasing
amounts and we are spending scarce tax dollars catch-
ing fishermen when we should be catching drug smug-
glers!
I wonder just how much it costs to put a helicop-
ter with an infrared scope and a two-million-candle-
power spotlight in the air. Is this the best and most ef-
fective use we have for these resources?
Let's solve the biggest problems first before we
even think of the little ones.
Herman Borstelmann, Holmes Beach

Bridge tax bad idea
In response to your editorial of Dec. 5 entitled
"Follow the Process ...," I wish to take issue with your
advocacy of forming a Key Royale taxing district to
pay for the necessary replacement of our bridge.
For the past 20-odd years, the City of Holmes
Beach has been gladly taking the taxes of the residents
on Key Royale. In fact, I am quite certain that the city
has been taking more tax money from Key Royale than
it has been returning in services.
The bridge and all the roads on Key Royale belong
to and have been maintained, up to now, by the city.
The taxes we pay to the city are based on that assump-
tion.
Now that a problem arises with the bridge, you
want us to be double-taxed by paying our regular taxes
plus the taxes due to a new special district.
Give us back all the tax money the city should have
been escrowing for repair and replacement of the
bridge over the years and maybe it might be worth con-
sideration.
In the meantime, maybe we can figure out a spe-
cial taxing district for newspapers.
Dr. Arthur Danziger, Holmes Beach


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 a PAGE 9 fIf

Dock demolition decision upheld in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
The Bradenton Beach Board of Adjustment up-
held a decision by the city commission and the
building official to demolish a pair of docks in the
city off Seventh and Eighth Streets South.
What makes the docks somewhat unique in the
city is the question of their ownership. Residents say
they are for the use of the homeowners on the two
streets and are private. City officials say the docks
abut the bay end of the streets and are therefore pub-
lic, city-owned structures.
Building Official Bill Sanders decided the docks
were unsafe last summer and recommended demo-
lition. City commissioners agreed with Sanders and
ordered the docks torn down.
Residents objected and appealed the matter.
Sanders rejected the appeal for a number of pro-
cedural reasons.
Residents appealed Sanders' denial of the appeal
and were granted a hearing before the adjustment
board, which upheld Sanders' decision in short,
the docks will be demolished unless the demolition
is challenged in court.
The whole dock issue began last June, when
residents on the two streets requested city assistance
to repair the docks. They said at the time the docks
had been undergoing a joint city-resident repair pro-
cess for upwards of 40 years, with the city paying for
the materials to bolster the structures and the resi-
dents providing the labor. The same relationship was
again requested.
Commission members balked at the request,


fearful that someone would be injured on the shaky
docks. The commission also said at the time they
weren't comfortable with using public funds to re-
pair structures that were used mostly by residents on
the two streets. There were also legal liability ques-
tions raised if someone was hurt on the piers.
Commissioners instructed staff to post "No
Trespassing" signs on the docks.
In an effort to reach a solution to the problem, a
special citizen task force was formed to look at the
docks and present a repair solution to the city com-
mission.
During often-contentious sessions, the group
agreed that the city should repair the docks.
Task force recommendations included: the city
pay for repair or new construction of the docks plus
any liability insurance coverage; the city pay for all
materials and insurance, with homeowners picking
up the tab for labor; or the city paying for all mate-
rials and labor for that portion of the docks the city
owns with the city paying for all insurance.
Commissioners balked at the suggestions and
voted to have the docks demolished.
During the appeal hearing before the adjustment
board last week, Building Official Sanders said the
residents, represented by Rosie Hinnebusch, had
failed to follow a number or procedural require-
ments. They included:
No separate appeal petitions were filed for
docks at Seventh and Eighth Streets South.
Separate fees for each dock's appeal were not
paid.


No proof of ownership was filed by the resi-
dents for the docks.
The appeal did not correctly address the issue
of the docks being unsafe.
Adjustment board members seemed to agree that
the ownership question was the pivotal issue that
needed to be resolved and was not by the resi-
dents.
"I believe it is incumbent upon the city to prove
ownership if it plans to demolish the docks, and the
city has not done that," Hinnebusch said.
"The prime issue is no one has shown clear title
or interest to docks that are attached to city prop-
erty," Adjustment Board Chairman John Burns said.
"It looks as if the building official made a correct
decision unsafe docks do come under his pur-
view."
Hinnebusch also objected to the meeting taking
place at all. A legal ad for the meeting stated the
meeting on the docks would take place in December.
That December dock session was postponed.
Hinnebusch said there wasn't a new legal ad in the
paper notifying the public of the new meeting date
and time.
Burns said he was satisfied the notification re-
quirements were met since the building department
sent letters to all residents on Seventh and Eighth
Streets South telling them of last week's meeting.
Other adjustment board members concurred with
Burs.
Adjustment board members voted unanimously
to uphold Sanders' decision to demolish the docks.


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Ei PAGE 10 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER





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Islander reporter Futch


headlines Media Circus


A media circus is coming to town. No, it's not the
O.J. Simpson trial.
The American Cancer Society's first Media Cir-
cus, featuring local media talents from television,
newspaper and radio, will be held Friday,
Jan. 17, at the Sarasota Sailor Circus.
It's your chance to watch as some of
our area's finest flaunt their talents in the
arena while raising money to fight can-
cer.
David Futch of The Islander By-
stander and Jason Metnick of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society will walk the high
wire in the show's finale performance.
Other performers will be riding a bicycle -
built for six, balancing on giant globes Futch
and, typical of journalists, there will be
plenty of clowning around.
Students from the Sailor Circus, which comprises
Sarasota County middle and high school youngsters,
will be on the flying trapeze, performing acrobatics as
well as other death-defying acts that the cowardly me-


dia folks refuse to do.
Sailor Circus, also called "The Greatest Little
Show on Earth," started in 1947. Much of the equip-
ment and costumes came from Ringling Bros. Circus
and the acts have the same look and feel of
"The Greatest Show on Earth."
Performances are held in a 1,900-seat
Big Top located at 2075 Bahia Vista St. on
the south side of Sarasota High School and
across from Michael's on East.
Some of the media participants are
Scott Dennis with Channel 40, Lynn
Matthews and Jane Baldwin of the
Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Harold Briscoe
::- of SNN and Pete Jarrett of Oldies 106 ra-
dio.
Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for
children for the 7:30 p.m. show. They are available at
The Islander Bystander office, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach; Davidson Drugs stores in Sarasota and
from the American Cancer Society. For more informa-
tion call 778-7978 or 365-2858.


Artists receive awards
Winners in the Third Annual Jim Pay Member's Exhibit at the Anna Maria Island Art League were an-
nounced Friday. From left: Zoe VonAverkamp, judge; Gail Cutting, Third Place for "Portrait ofP.B.;" Julie
Claudel-Stewart, Best of Show for "Trapped in Illusion" (pictured in the background); Layla Copeland,
Second Place for "Untitled, 1, 2, 3, 4." Not pictured are Susan Curry, First Place for "Inside the Frame-
work" and Jean Barth, Honorable Mention for "Geraniums." The show will be on view at the AMI Art
League, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, through Jan. 31. Hours are 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday through
Saturday. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 15, 1.997 PAGE 11 IE


A citizen advisory commission in Bradenton Beach
has had its duties and responsibilities refined and officially
designated by the Bradenton Beach City Commission.
The Citizens Advisory Task Force is a group re-
sponsible for a wide range of duties, most relating to
grants within the city.
CATF Chairman John Sandberg, at the suggestion
of Commissioner John Chappie, researched the min-
utes of past commission meetings and provided an
outline of responsibilities for the group. His research
was approved by the commission last week.
The CATF will:


Personal checks were stolen from two mailboxes
in Holmes Beach and the names were altered before the
suspect attempted to cash the checks at a Wal-Mart
store. The suspect was apprehended by store security.
According to the police report, one victim on 67th
Street reported four checks which had been placed in
her mailbox along with bills she was paying were re-
turned to her by Bradenton police. Wal-Mart security
apprehended a suspect attempting to cash a check
which appeared to be altered and found the Holmes
Beach victim's checks in his possession. Those checks


Holmes Beach Police Officer Sandy Keller sub-
mitted a written report to city council last week on
her activities as personal watercraft patrol officer.
Keller has been patrolling the city's waterways
since the city received its personal watercraft
through a grant program on Aug. 16, 1996.
Keller said she has given verbal warnings for per-
sonal watercraft operators following boats too closely,
speeding in no-wake zones, speeding in canals and


Be involved with all grants the city obtains.
Represent the commission in negotiating con-
tracts involving grants.
Act as overall grant coordinator. The chair has
powers to act when the CATF is not in session.
Review all quotes for services and materials for
the projects.
Review all invoices submitted for purchase of
services and material for the projects as well as the
contractor's requests for payment.
Review all progress reports.
Receive clerical support by the clerk's office.


also appeared to be altered.
The check the suspect attempted to cash was from
a second victim on Key Royale Drive and made pay-
able to a co-suspect. Wal-Mart security contacted the
Bradenton Police Department, which contacted the
co-suspect, who claimed the check was his but he
didn't wish to prosecute. The suspect was released.
The Bradenton Police Department returned the
altered checks to both victims. The first victim said
there were two more missing checks unaccounted for
from her mailbox.


improperly using safety equipment.
She also reported checking both boats and per-
sonal watercraft operators for proper safety equip-
ment and the appropriate number of life jackets, us-
ing life jackets and having the proper registration.
Keller noted that verbal warnings were given for
most infractions because most operators took the op-
portunity to correct the problem.
The patrol will resume when the weather warms.


Citizen task force duties outlined

in Bradenton Beach


Mehmetali Azerli
Mehmetali Azerli, 86, of Holmes Beach, died Dec.
3 in Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Azerbaycan, Mr. Azerli came to this
area from Chicago, Ill., in 1983. He was a retired
carpenter. He was a member of the Moslem Associa-
tion of Chicago.
He is survived by his wife, Maria of Holmes
Beach; a son, Ben Azerli of Coconut Grove; a brother,
Saleh Madow of Azerbaycan; and two sisters, Bayaz
and Bagad, both of Azerbaycan.


Marion D. Collins
Marion D. Collins, 99, of Bradenton and a resident
of Holmes Beach for 23 years until 1983, died Jan. 8,
at The Shores in Bradenton.
Born in Rockland, Mass., Mrs. Collins came to
Holmes Beach from Syracuse, N.Y., in 1960. She was
a homemaker and a member of Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church in Anna Maria City.
She is survived by a niece, Elizabeth Erb of New
Canaan, Conn.

Thomas Sheperd
Thomas Sheperd, 62, of Holmes Beach, died Jan.
13 at Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Highland Park, Mich., Mr. Sheperd
came to this area in 1974 from Davisburg, Mich. He
was a journeyman and a member of Pipeliner Local
Union 798.


He is survived by his father, Frank of Memphis,
Tenn.; his mother and step-father, Ruby and Wesley
Dawson of Richmond, Va.; three daughters, Debra
Detkowski, Denise Hunter and Diane Knack, all of
Clarkston, Mich.; a son, Dan of Riverview, Fla.; and
nine grandchildren.
There will be no visitation. A gathering will be
held Friday, Jan. 17, from 6-7 p.m., at Stowers
Riverview Chapel, 10510 Riverview Drive, in
Riverview, Fla. Direct Mortuary Service, Sarasota, is
in charge of arrangements.

Clinton D. Wheeler
Clinton D. Wheeler, 89, died on Jan. 8.
Mr. Wheeler retired to Holmes Beach in 1969 and
resided there until 1992 when he moved to Freedom
Village Retirement Community in Bradenton. He was
an officer in the Bank of Huntington, N.Y., for 15
years and employed at Sammis and Downer Co. Ford
dealership for 10 years.
He become co-owner of this dealership in 1955
until his retirement in 1970. He was a member of
Roser Memorial Community Church, the Key Royale
Golf Club, past secretary of the New York District
Ford Dealers Association and past president of the
Huntington, N.Y., Lions Club.
He is survived by one son, Alan Wheeler of Santa
Fe, N. M., and a daughter, Nancy Paxton of
Steilacoom, Wash.; and five granddaughters.
Service will be held at The Landings, Freedom
Village, on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 2 p.m.


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Ui PAGE 12 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Beautification committee plans planting party


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Marge Soeffker and Holmes Beach Commissioner
Billie Martini foresee Manatee County Public Beach as
a landscaped jewel welcoming visitors to the Island.
Jim Gloth said a proposed spiffing up of the beach
parking lot and surroundings is a plus for Islanders and
their children as well.
"It's good for the future and good for the kids,"
Gloth said. "We as Islanders would like it and it's good
for the economy because the tourists like it."
What these three members of the Island Beautifi-
cation Committee need is help from the public, not just
financial but help in coming up with a proposed land-
scape design and then following through with planting.
The IBC met Jan. 8, with Manatee County Parks and
Recreation Parks Maintenance Manager James Cole.
At the meeting held in the beach pavilion, Cole
said he would make an inventory of what the county
has available at its nursery that could be planted at the
beach.
He added the group should try to find salt-tolerant
plants requiring little or no watering or maintenance.
The next job would be to pick a highly visible spot
at the public beach where people would notice the first
stage of the planting process.
"The entrance to the beach is a great spot and then
you could ask people to adopt part of the public beach
park," Cole said. "They could plant and take care of it.
There's the key."
Gloth, owner of Island Foods, said he would like
to see a planting party involving Islanders and employ-


ees at his store.
Cole indicated the IBC might tie in the planting
with the Keep Manatee Beautiful project in March.
Doing so would draw a lot of attention to the group's
effort, he said.
Soeffker said wedelia might be a good choice to
plant between the 175 posts in the parking lot.
Martini suggested either beach daisies or ice plants,
a California species that Longboat Key uses for erosion
control purposes.
None of the three require watering. Wedelia pro-
duces small, yellow daisy-like flowers with tight
ground cover, while beach daisies also produce a yel-
low flower but are more leggy.


Planting wildflowers might also be an option,
Groth said. The state already sows wildflower seeds
along highways but they're mostly inland and away
from salt air.
Cole said he may be able to find four palm trees for
the group.
Soeffker said the committee is looking for a land-
scaper or landscape architect with a computer program
that can create a landscape design for the public beach.
Call Soeffker at 778-3530 or Martini at 778-2549
for information or to volunteer.
"A computer-generated program or landscape
architect's drawing would provide continuity,"
Soeffker said. "We could really use a landscape plan."


Giles Allevato wed


Tina Louise Dominick Allevato and Terry Dean
Giles, both of Kansas City, Mo., were married Nov. 25,
at Bayfront Park in Anna Maria City. D. Kelly Cohen
officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Stephen Dominick of
Anna Maria and Brenda Tunt of Pleasonton, Calif. The
bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Giles of
Claycomo, Mo.
Matron of honor was Genevra Dominick, step-
mother of the bride, of Anna Maria.
Brandi Allevato, daughter of the bride and bride-
groom, of Kansas City, was the flower girl. Ring bearer
was Cassie Allevato, daughter of the bride and bride-
groom.
Best man was Stephen Dominick, father of the
bride, of Anna Maria. Participants were Jon Hall, step-
brother of the bride of North Port, who provided the


music and sang. Wendy Hall, stepsister of the bride, of
Gainesville, made flower girl and ring bearer dresses.
Steve Dominick, brother of the bride, of Anna Maria,
was the photographer.
A reception followed the ceremony at the couples
home. The couple honeymooned at the Umbrella Beach
Resort in Holmes Beach. They live in Kansas City, Mo.

Ball field costs
estimated at $36,180
The City of Holmes Beach received a letter from
Danny Hopkins, the county's parks and recreation
director, detailing costs to modify the existing base-
ball field behind city hall to meet regulations.
The costs include $20,750 for a new back-
stop, $9,250 for field fencing, $2,400 for clay for
the infield, $3,000 for irrigation and $780 for in-
field and outfield grass for a total of $36,180.
Hopkins will present the figures to the Manatee
County Commission for funding consideration.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 15, 1997 N PAGE 13 EG3


Prestons produce 30 million flowers a year


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Tucked away in Cortez along Palma Sola Bay lies
one of the best-kept secrets in Manatee County.
Just over the Cortez Bridge are fields containing mil-
lions of flowers covering the full spectrum of colors.
For more than a century, four generations of
Prestons have produced flowers and fruit at their Mana-
tee Fruit Co. farms in Cortez, Palmetto, Naples and
Immokalee.
Since the 1960s, the Prestons have grown flowers
on their 40-acre Cortez farm land that most people
would have been tempted to sell for development.
The tradition of a Preston growing and working
hands-on in the field will continue, said Manatee Fruit
President Whiting Preston, 36, of Holmes Beach.
"Our mission is that we are in the business of grow-
ing cut flowers and this is a temperate area and good
place to grow," he said. "My father is 67 and works
every day. He's still very much involved. He loves the
flower business. My grandfather lived to be 94 and
worked until a week before he died."
It may be a family affair, but David Thorn is the
man entrusted with overseeing the Cortez operation
that goes by its original name, the Pom Field.
Manatee Fruit grew pompons there but gave it up
several years ago because of stiff competition from
Central and South American growers.
"I meet a lot of people who are surprised that an
agricultural operation is this close to the beach," Thorn
said. "Yeah, it's a valuable piece of property but it's
valuable to us because we're close to the water where
the temperature isn't as cold.
"I think the Prestons would rather see the (Cortez)
land used for what it's always been used for and that's
farming. I can't say that Walter (Preston) is anti-devel-
opment, but he has been here a long time and seen the
effects of development."
Whiting Preston said his family has seen the draw-
backs to unbridled development along Manatee County
waters.
"There have been some blunders," Whiting said. "I
think development will come. I just don't know when
it will come. Yeah, we've been"called crazy for not
selling this land. But our mission is to grow flowers.
We like to think we've been good people in the
county."
Thorn's roots are in farming. He grew up in a small
Wisconsin town and his parents were raised on a dairy
farm.
"But I didn't want to dairy farm because it was


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seven days a week," said Thorn, who has a degree in
horticulture from the University of Wisconsin. "Now
here I am cutting flowers seven days a week."
From September to July, approximately 20 variet-
ies of flowers are grown at the Pom Field and shipped
to retailers throughout the country. The field produces
25 to 30 million flowers a year, each of them hand
planted and hand cut.
Because the farm is next to Palma Sola Bay, Mana-
tee Fruit takes precautions to prevent pollution prob-
lems caused by fertlizers and pesticides, Thorn said.
The farm uses the latest in integrated pest manage-
ment which means identifying a problem before hav-
ing to spray chemicals, he said.
"We use ecologically friendly pesticides," Thorn
said. "We cover plants with plastic and that keeps fer-
tilizer on plants rather than us blanketing the entire
farm."
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of 1911, the groves were budded back into grapefruit
and oranges.
These, along with vegetables, were grown and
packed under the Manatee label. Vegetables were dis-
continued in 1946 as flowers became an increased area
of production.
Gladiolus production began in 1936 and the com-
pany now has 1,200 acres devoted to "glads," much of
it located at their farm at 75th Street and Cortez Road
and the rest in Naples.
The gladiolus harvest begins in November in
Bradenton and moves south to fields in Naples for the
deep winter months then back to Bradenton for the
strongest production period.
Manatee Fruit has 200 acres of orange and grape-
fruit groves in Palmetto.
"There aren't a lot of Florida companies that have
been in business over 100 years. I think there's only
three in Manatee County," Whiting Preston said. "It's
still amazing that we're plugging away."


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RB PAGE 14 a JANUARY 15, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Crumbs
Wit and wisdom bk native
Floridian Gib Bergquist


Hoppin' John
It's an old southern custom to start the new year off
with a heaping plate of Hoppin' John, a humble but
delicious dish of black-eyed peas, rice and hawg jowls.
This ritual assures one of vip, vim and vitality for the
coming year and a heaping plate of good fortune, mon-
etarily and otherwise.
The Cracker doesn't consider himself to be super-
stitious but tries hard to observe and preserve estab-
lished traditions and sees no need to tempt fate. Since
his immediate family is culturally diverse, some adjust-
ments must be made along the way.
For example, for most Cracker families, Christmas
is a two-day celebration and then we get on with the
fast-approaching celebration of the New Year. In his
Cracker/Puerto Rican family, the Christmas tree usu-
ally stays up through Epiphany or Three Kings Day
when more gifts are passed around.
When you think about it, back when the three kings
were traveling to Bethlehem with gifts for the Christ
Child, they couldn't have arrived on Christmas Day but
sometime later, say Jan. 6. You must consider that the


magi were following a star and could therefore only
travel at night which hampered travel plans somewhat.
Some of the Cracker's Puerto Rican friends carry
the Christmas celebrations even further by throwing a
farewell party for the departing monarchs on Jan. 13,
logically assuming that the kings stayed awhile to visit
and rest their camels. (As a matter of interest, in Puerto
Rico the three kings all ride horses.)
Well, anyway, if you still hear "Silent Night" or
"Grandma Got Runover by a Reindeer" wafting over your
canal, it's probably a violation of the Holmes Beach sound
ordinance, but the Cracker is still celebrating Christmas.
For some unknown reason, the Christmas tree only
made it through Christmas Day before raining its leaf-
lets on the carpet by the bucketful even though the tree
trunk was in a container of water.
These little needles certainly earn their name when
they get worked into the carpet, painfully limiting any
carefree, barefoot traipsing about the house.
Let's get back to the Hoppin' John. If you weren't
raised that way, a hawg jowl with alll those hawg
teeth still in place doesn't make a very gastronomi-
cally appealing presentation to the squeamish. Ham
hocks make an acceptable substitute.
Leave it to the Cracker's culinary adept wife,
Madeleine, to bridge the cultural gap with her Puerto
Rican version of Hoppin' John by substituting
black-eyed peas for the black beans in her famous black
beans and rice dish. This new creation, prepared with
ham chunks, squash cubes, cilantro, chopped onions
and much garlic is a guaranteed palate titillater.
You guessed it. She calls it "Hoppin' Juan."
Happy New Year!


1


T


SM atiTuINGLE


I


NEl' ON THE LIBR-RY SHELF


'Exclusive'
by Sandra Brown
Another cliff-hanging bestseller from Sandra
Brown. In this one TV journalist Barrie Travis gets a
call from the First Lady, Vanessa Merritt, for an infor-


mal coffee and chat (off the record, of course). A ran-
dom odd remark sets the determined Vanessa off on a
trail of subterfuge and crime that somehow relates to
the death of the President's son. An amazing, believ-
able tale that keeps your interest high.
Reviewed by Bette Kissick

'Buzz Cut' by James W. Hall
This high powered thriller is set in the Florida
Keys, a Miami cruise ship and the Caribbean. Hall's


laconic character, Thorn, returns along with his lifelong
friend, Sugarman. A madman is on the loose with a
knife in one hand and 400,000 volts of electricity in the
other. He's targeting passengers and crew alike on the
floating palace and gambling casino. On board are the
shipping magnate owner, his TV star wife and a host
of other famous celebrities. Dark family dramas and
long forgotten secrets emerge while Buzz Cut keeps
you on the edge of your seat.
Reviewed by Susan Mendonca


Anyway, Happy New Year


By Don Maloney
Special to The Islander
Surely, I don't have to remind you that this is the
time of any year when all of us usually make it a spe-
cial point of wishing family, friends, in-laws, neigh-
bors, co-workers anybody we're likely to just smile
at in passing during other times of wishing them all
a Happy New Year.
Sometimes, we even add "prosperous" to our wish.
Or, if any of them don't look especially good,
"healthy."
At least I assume you wish all of that to all of them.
I know I do. I also assume that you make it a point to
skip wishing anything "Happy," "Prosperous" or
"Healthy" to another bunch of people who seem to
have consciously tried in one way or other to
insure that none of us will ever be able to ever again
have a completely Happy New Year.
I got thinking, while sitting around our plastic
Christmas tree the other day, that the really true spirit
of the season calls for wishing good things to those for
whom you usually wish only bad things the rest of the
year. And so, that's exactly what I'm going to do.
Like I want to wish the healthiest of Happy New
Years to those who always seem to be in front of me
at the supermarket 10-items-or-less express lanes when
they have a lot more than 10 items. They've only
stayed healthy up to now because the law prohibits me
from throwing my can of generic pork and beans at
them.
And good wishes, too, to the cashiers in those ex-
press lanes that let them get away with it. They could
solve the problem instantly by short changing those
people. After all, if they can't count to 10, they prob-
ably can't count their change either.
And good wishes, too, to those who are ahead of
me in those check-out lanes and have either an item that
doesn't ring up at the right price or those who want to
pay with a traveler's check from a European. bank.
Generic beans to them, too.


NEWYEAR


And prosperous coming months to some inventors
I've skipped in the past. Like I had some back problems
recently and took the pills for it four times a day as in-
structed. My back got worse instead of better, and I
finally realized one day that the whole problem was
caused by the muscle strain of trying to open the child-
proof pill bottle. I quit the pills my back is fine. A
good 1997 back to that child-proof inventor. Too bad
his parents weren't child-proof.
And I know Wife Sarah wants to wish a special
something to restaurants that provide hot out-of-the-
dishwasher plates at their salad bars. She never cared
for body temperature lettuce.
Please those of you drivers out there who never
flick on your directional signal before you turn: Don't
think I've forgotten you. I'm only surprised that we
haven't already met at one intersection or another.
To all of you who pull into the handicapped park-
ing spaces at the mall and then run into sport shops to
buy tennis rackets, I wish you everything you'll need
to legally park in those spaces in 1997. I'm not leav-
ing out those who think the dividing lines painted in


parking lots are supposed to be under the center of their
cars, either. I wish them double spaces of happiness.
To those of you other Island-bound drivers to
whom I have lost during 1996 in our races from 75th
Street to the merge at the Palma Sola Causeway, I wish
a whole car length of prosperity.
And a special 1997 collection of winds to all of the
high-masted sailors who cause the bridge to be opened
when I'm in a hurry to get home for reasons caused by
the large amounts of iced tea I downed on the mainland
New Year traffic makes me wonder who earns my
fondest wishes for 1997 those who move 25 miles
an hour in the 50-mile-an-hour zone, those who move
50 miles an hour in the 25-mile-an-hour zone, or those
who move 15 miles an hour in any zone. So, to all of
you, God speed.
Probably I shouldn't leave out those Longboat Key
folks who think all the jet airplanes should fly over
Anna Maria instead of their island. If our buildings
were as high as theirs, we would probably wish the
reverse for them. I don't think it's the planes that bother
them as much as the fact that drivers who don't yield
to pedestrians in crosswalks down there are fined only
$69.50 the last time I looked, while in Holmes Beach
we think $8.50 more of our pedestrians by fining those
drivers $78.50.
Plus, I hear Longboat is still upset over the law that
won't allow them to have molded concrete dolphins
hold up their mailboxes anymore. So, Happy New Year
to all of them except to the ones with over 12-inch-
high grass on their lawns. After all, we have to draw a
line somewhere.
Last, and maybe least, kindest wishes to all of us
who must decide in 1997 how tall our grass should be,
how big our city hall should be, how loud our noise
should be, how long a rental should be, how high a big
bridge should be and who should pay for the small
bridge, plus where boats, trailers and RVs should park.
Most important: While all that is being decided,
Peace on Earth especially at City Hall.


Center basketball
standings, week
ending Jan. 13
Division I (11-13 years old)
Team Record
Dips Ice Cream 5-0
Joe's Eats & Sweets 4-2
A-Paradise Realty 3-4
Bridge Street Pier & Cafe 2-4
Westbay Athletic Club 1-5

Division 11 (8-10 years old)
Team Record
Econo Lodge 7-0
Hair Motions 6-2
Christie's Plumbing 5-2
Island Real Estate 5-2
Debellevue Dragons 4-3
Air & Energy 2-5
Beach House 0-8
Dowling Park 0-7

Division III (5-7 years old)
Team Record
Jessie's Island Store 5-0
First National Bank 3-2
Cafe on the Beach 3-3
Anna Maria Oyster Bar 2-3
Island Animal Clinic 0-5






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 15, 1997 U PAGE 15 I[


,t's a courmiets Yeast at


Jaste ourrl


L', itiney Beach


zet


noods


wines


WhIitbnc Bcacli
n[.,:, l .u l,, \ .


17, 4 p.m. I l


Cominmemorti've 'lbtl1te'r tB ch
'Winfe 'Thstinbllet


Gallaglit r "'. "I /ih Gt(,urin I 's" Gruc' rt'
,.,I,!/ Lo.,ng boat Pa'cA gc


$5 0,..IIO0


Include ,t CO Iup' lln iedeernilhle i'.-i .i 5 L '1-I lun ',m .-,i
.iii', v'.I I e pulcill : e ': I1 ri i,_. i l lll 1 [.11 'Ie.


I I I I
LSIII .LnC
:Myers IrIinaI


jAppleton 1 ;:.
1Jamaican Rum
Gold 6 5-Year
.i. r-,.. 18" ,. i, 23"
h v ,t ,- 5 i 4 ,.- 5 "
,,,, :. 113" ,,,, 18"
Ron Bocoy Puerto
Rican Rum
Sale Price 13"
Less Rebate -5"
Finl Cost 8 99
I 7 Lui
Bentleys Vodka
or Gin


Caffe Lolita
Sale Pice 16"
Less Rebate -8"
Final Cos 899
1.75 Ltr.
Seagrams VO or
Canadian Club
Blend' 75 Lr.
Sale Price 17"-
VO Only
Less Rebate -3"
final Cost 1499
Gordons Vodka
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Check your
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1.75 Ltr.


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:,,, ,,.. -26-
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Captain Morgan
Spiced, Silver or Coconut
Seagrams 7-Crown
Canadian
Sale Price 11 i






Dewars or
J. Walker Red

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jI PAGE 16 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island youth repair homes in Georgia
By Pat Copeland E- .- *
Islander Reporter ; "''
Everyone told them the experience would change
their lives, said five teens who spent a week of their :
summer vacation repairing homes in Savannah, Ga.
"Yeah, right," they said when they left Anna Maria. ", r
They returned a week later true believers in those
words. They emphatically agreed that the experience
fostered a respect for others, increased their apprecia-
tion for what they have, bolstered their self-confidence
and strengthened their spiritual beliefs.
The teens, all members of All Island Youth, were
Dusty Allen, 15; Meredith Kahl, 14; Jennifer Vogel, 16;
Dolores Pruden, 17; and Amy Berra, 15. They were chap- r
eroned by Stacey Bellows, Christian education coordina-
tor at Roser Memorial Community Church, and Tim wp
Horton, youth leader at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church.
The work camps are sponsored by Group, an inter-
national organization that publishes Sunday school
materials and Christian magazines, Bellows explained.
There are 22 locations in the United States and others
in Mexico and Canada. .


Heading for Savannah
From left: Dolores Pruden, Amy Berra, Jennifer Vogel, Dusty Allen, Stacey Bellows, Meredith Kahl and Tim
Horton are off to Savannah, Ga., to repair homes for low income residents there.


I '- <.,
The pause that refreshes
Three members of Jennifer's work crew take a break
from painting. Jennifer is in the center.


"They have sponsored the work camps since 1977,
she said. "In the camps, volunteers perform all types of
home repair for low income residents. Eighty percent
of the residents are 50 percent below the poverty level.'
Bellows said the AIY group, which welcomes
teens from 14 to 17 years old, is 2 1/2 years old and
leaders felt it was time for the teens to undertake a
major project. The teens picked a location from the
the Group brochure and applied for participation.
They raised money for the trip by holding car washes


and collecting donations. One innovative campaign in-
volved pink yard flamingos planted in parishioners' yards.
They packed their bags and left the Island in the
Roser Church van July 27, headed for Savannah. A
send-off service with friends and relatives fired their
enthusiasm. The first night's stop was Jacksonville and
the second was Savannah.
"We stayed at A.E. Beach High School and slept
PLEASE SEE HOMES, NEXT PAGE


Come See Islander Bystander Reporter

David Futch Walk the High Wire Tickets

at The Islander Bystander


Come out and watch
David Futch and our
area's media personalities
perform under the big top
while raising money for
the fight against cancer.


1 gaL WfflJT MI ifl BOB 1m1



HIM eIB Bfflinp GBtaI2


Tickets are $5 for
children and $10
for adults.
Purchase or Call
The Islander
Bystander,
778-7978.
AMERICAN
CANCER
I SOCIETY"
Providing answers.
Saving lives. -






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 M PAGE 17 IE


Just like home
The volunteers were housed in a high school, 20 to a room. The boys quickly
settled in and demonstrated one of the things that makes moms tear out their hair.


Up on the roof
A work crew gives a fortunate resident a new roof and a paint job.

C, W.- I ;ON .IV--5.-A- -A--N


HOMES, FROM PAGE 16
in classrooms on the floor with about 20 other girls,"
Meredith said.
More than 400 volunteers representing 40 youth
groups camped at the school. The first morning six-
person crews were assembled to work on 58 sites. Each
of the Islanders was put on a different crew. Work in-
cluded installing skirting on trailers, roofing and scrap-
ing and painting.
"Each person on the crew had ajob," Jennifer said.
"The jobs were devotions, work director, organizer,
break maker, quartermaster and progress reporter."
The teens said all the residents welcomed them
with open arms, providing snacks and drinks and some-
times lunches. They said they grew very close to the
residents and tears flowed when they parted.
"In the week we were there, crews completed
seven major roofing jobs, 25 carpentry jobs, four dry
wall jobs and 20 painting jobs," Tim noted.
Mid-week, the volunteers were given a half-day off
to go sightseeing and shopping. The other days they
worked seven or more hours per day.
At the end of their work week, the Islanders took


ITALIA


Pasta
Entrees
Starting at $10.95
(Includes Salad & Bread
Spaghetti and Meatballs Stuffed Shells
Spaghetti aglio e olio Ravioli Bolognese
Penne con Broccoli Fettucini Alfredo
Fettucini Carbonara Tortellini nCarbonara
Tortellini Bolognese


a week-long camping trip through northern Florida.
How did the experience change their lives?
"I learned how to make friends faster -I made 100
friends the first day!" exclaimed Amy. "I also learned
how to communicate my feelings better. I'm not afraid
of my feelings or ashamed to share them now."
"No one cared what you looked like," Dolores
said. "Everyone was equal. It's hard to explain how
awesome it was."
"We became stronger spiritually," Meredith said.
"We learned how much we can do for others."
"I made a lot of good friends," Dusty said. "It was
incredible that I met that many people and felt so close
to them in such a short time."
"There are no words to describe it," Stacey
stressed. "I had some expectations this would be worth-
while and meaningful and those expectations were
filled by the first night. It was a spiritual high that will
carry me for a long time."
"I think they could offer a money-back guarantee
that they would change your life and they would never
have to pay a dime," Tim exclaimed.
All agreed they'll be the first on the van for next
year's trip.


A Real Italian Restaurant
on Longboat Key
Lunch & Dinner Every Day
11:30 am 10:30 pm
BEER & WINE

Gourmet Brick Oven Pizza
& Calzones Starting at $6.95

Italian Specialties
Starting at $12.95 Includes Salad & Bread
Linguine with Clam Sauce
Shrimp Fra Diavolo
Polio Parmigiana
Polio Arrabbiata
Veal Marsala
Veal Pizzaiolo
Veal Cutlet Parmigiana
Petti de Polio Puttanesca
Sausage, Peppers and Mushrooms


A job well done
Three work crews are all smiles upon completing
their task.


draft beer and wine
with dinner. Kids-they eat

as each

778.4811

EARIN BIRD MENU
BEFOR 7 M $9.99



GROUPEDS SCALLOPS served s
P Dkened ... ..........''. .......... $7 *99


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pOR HOP grilled t our liking ea e d veggies ta.....................
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FRiED C CKEN TENDRS all white meat ................... $9.99
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BABY BACRIS LINGUINEveggies over rice ...... $7.99
GRiLLED CICWEN OVER LiNG E grilled
GRILLED CICKEN STTIRFR with saute alad, Fresh ye and
leBac kBay ,-sfamousunlimited Shipwreck S ies, Rice or.Stean sed
Pumpernie e available upoi ebt.es ra coffee, tea and soft ari
All entrees-.nd includeBfree rCls a of drn s.
Vegetables. Other dressings a b roh'sdraftbeer
Burgundy, White Zinfandel, ro drafber Sangi c


for your listening Pleasure


I heCiemni hmips53a70Iufiofmei ctI LB3ii : IMiim iini


Wed. & Thur. "Berni Roy & Friends" 5 9 pm
Fri. & Sat. "Berni Roy" 4 8 pm
Fri & Sat & Sun "Kathleen Sweet on piano 5:30 8:30 pm


Eli J IF-0-IR4,11,


41





liB PAGE 18 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I I1 I


"You'll have to call us ...

or we'll never meet!"




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With this ad Not valid with an other
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I-d


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2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Call Toll-free 1-800-211-2323


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REAL ESTATE
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l 9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
1-800-306-9666
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker: Nancy Stork
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson,
Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte, Stephanie Bell
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 19 IE


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.irj PAGE 20 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Go, go gourmet
There is a gourmet feast in the making on the north
end of Longboat Key at Gallagher's Market in Whitney
Beach Plaza. They are hosting the second of a series of
"Tastes" since remodeling, redesigning, reoutfitting
and restocking the store to suit gourmet tastebuds.
Mark and Carol Gallagher invite you to experience
their "new atmosphere" and sample foods from around
Sthe world.
They will be serving among many other items
a selection of ostrich meat. "Don't knock it 'til you
try it," as they say. And they say it's delicious.
Don't miss this taste opportunity on Friday, Jan.
17, from 4 to 8 p.m. It's free and it's delicious.
Also participating .in the free open house is
Longboat Package just across the shopping center
parking lot from the market. Owner Ray LaFlamme
and his staff will serve a vast selection of imported and
California wines.
Another wine tasting this one with pat6 is
offered on Sunday, Jan. 19, from 4 to 7 p.m., at Island
Package Liquors, 5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The new owner of the liquor store since November,
Jim Wickwire, and previous owners Bob and Cheryl
Stone invite everyone to stop in for introductions and
a free sampling of wine and pate.
Island Package Liquors moved to its new location on
Marina Drive after more than 10 years at the building that
now houses Smith Realtors, formerly Webb's Island Phar-
macy for those here long enough to remember.

Jump how high?
The Sarasota Ski-A-Rees a 39-year-old re-
gional, state and nationally competitive water-ski club
feature more than 75 performers from ages 3 years
through adults offer daring shows of barefooting,
ramp jumping and striking human ski pyramids.
Oops. Did we say ramp jumping? New Ski-A-Rees
President Damon Presswood says the jump ramp is in
such poor condition that they removed it from the water.
Although they have plenty of able-bodied skiers to



reakfast.u74949b

LIVE DINNER MUSIC Featuring DOUG HEALE Fri & Sat
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SEAFOOD & POULTRY SELECTIONS
HOMEMADE SOUPS & DESSERTS
THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI


r- PIZZA SPECIAL -
Large 2 Topping Pizza $9.95 1
Second Cheese Pizza $5.00
Carry Out and Delivery Only j
Open 7 Nights 4:30pm 10:00pm
Open 6 Days Tues Sat 9am 2pm / Sun 8am 2pm
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach
1 14 I I -


build the ramp, the club urgently needs help to replace
the materials needed with the season's shows set to
begin in just two weeks.
The wish list includes lumber, 2 x 4s and such, nails
and plywood and probably a little paint would help. Please
call Presswood at 371-8006 to make a donation.
The club's shows are free and all the skiers donate
endless hours for practice and provide their own cos-
tumes, gas and boats.

We stand corrected
Yes, Turtles is closed. Done. Finis. Finito. The Ital-
ians, brothers Larry and Franco Moschini, are rushing
in to remodel and open their restaurant at Turtle's now
former location by Feb. 1.
But Island musician Chuck Caudill was quick to
point out that Laura Ritter and Herb Haller were not the
first to bring live music to the club. It was actually
owner Karen Leopold who hired Caudill's band, China
Moon, to play there in 1987.
And Kelly Zimmer at the Dry Dock was quick to
point out that even if Publix acquires the property
where they're located, they will still have a liquor li-
cense and they will move their business.
Apparently lots of readers, at least those who fre-
quent the Dry Dock, thought otherwise after reading
last week's cover story.
Sorry to alarm you.
I don't know about you but I feel slightly more
confident just knowing that the Dry Dock doesn't have
immediate plans to discontinue live music rock 'n'
roll including hard stuff like Winter's Ghost and


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RALPH'SS FULL MENU FULL BAR

Party with

JAY CRAWFORD
Fri & Sat Jan 17 & 18 8 to 12 ,
No Cover Charge

Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953


Hog wild
Lamar Muggridge, left,
helped owners Machell and
Franky Koons present a roast
S pig to customers at the Sea
Horse Raw Bar and Grill in










new wave feminist Twinkle.

And the answer is ...
"Come quickly, I am tasting stars!" is attributed to
Dom P6rignon (1638-1715) on the occasion of his dis-
covery of champagne.
I have long remembered a line to go with that quote
that I heard in the "Carpetbaggers," an exchange be-
tween Elizabeth Ashley and George Peppard. As I re-
call, they had just retired to the honeymoon suite when
he asked her if she wanted a glass of champagne. She
replies, "The only stars I want to see are on the ceiling."
Or something to that effect.


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." ,"ie
"uffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. e
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 lam-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


PIANO BAR
with LARRY RICH
Tues.-Sat. 8-Midnight

The Best Steaks in ,
Manatee County




Dinner served 4-10 pm Tuesday-Sunday
Large groups and luncheon parties welcome.
Reservations requested, not required.
204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria (formerly Cafe Robar)


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 21 111

'Moon Over the Brewery' offers glimpse of growing pains


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
The Island Players performance of "Moon Over the
Brewery" is a study in growing pains including some
diabolical help from an imaginary friend.
Lauren Albrecht as Amanda Waslyk does an out-
standing job in the role of a young girl coming to grips
with her single mother's dating.
As the play's main character, she has an enormous
amount of material to memorize. Her sense of timing
is something typically associated with more mature
actors and she pulls it off with ease.
James Thaggard as her imaginary friend Randolph
is there to throw a wrench into the works whenever
possible and does a fine job as the foil.
He is hell-bent on helping Amanda drive away any
of her mother's potential suitors, including mailman
Warren Zimmerman played by David B. Haynes.
.Pamela Hopkins plays Amanda's mother Miriam,
who has a penchant for painting the full moon in all her
pictures.
At least five paintings of the town with a moon
high in the sky adorn the walls of their small house.
Miriam is so enamored with lunar likenesses she even
wears a crescent moon necklace.
According to Director Kelly Wynn Woodland, "The
moon, in literature and mythology, traditionally represents
an ethereal, feminine and somewhat surreal image.
"This image juxtaposed against the very real, con-
crete impression of a brewery from a Pennsylvania beer
town results in a painting by Miriam Waslyk and is the
perfect metaphor for the conflict faced by her daugh-
ter Amanda's struggle to deal with growing up, both on
her part and her mothers, and is one we've all faced at
one time or another with or without the help (or hin-
drance) of a suave, debonair and possibly diabolical
imaginary friend."
Miriam tries to convince Amanda that her new
beau Warren will be part of her life whether Amanda
likes it or not.
Amanda asks, "Why do we need Warren anyway?"
Miriam replies, "We don't. I need Warren Ijust
don't want to be alone anymore."
I


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S OPEN
Mon.-Sat 10 am-11 pm
Sunday 3-9 pm


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Wednesday 6 pm-10 pm
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Delicious Sandwiches
Gourmet Dinners To Go
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(I


"Moon Over the Brewery" features, from left, James Thaggard as Randolph, David B. Haynes as Warren
Zimmerman, Pamela Hopkins as Miriam Waslyk and Lauren Albrecht as Amanda Waslyk. Islander Photo:
David Futch


Earlier in the play, Randolph in his most obnoxious
attitude tells Amanda a sure-fire way to get rid of War-
ren. "I recommend ground glass in the ice cream."
And later Randolph says, "When it comes to men,
your mother is not even a gourmet. She's more fast
food."
The back-and-forth repartee between Amanda and
Warren is fueled by Randolph on one side and Mirianr
on the other.
Miriam attempts to get Amanda to "go to the
dance, you'll enjoy it."


Amanda, in her best little chaste way, refuses, say-
ing, "They act like such kids. Besides, Peter has a
pimple."
Miriam responds by saying, "You keep waiting for
perfection and you're going to sit home a lot."
Amanda tries to drive Warren off by trying to make
a fool of him in front of Miriam. Warren recognizes the
ruse and will have none of it.
In the end, Amanda acquiesces to her mother's
wishes for a life with Warren and rids herself of
Randolph.


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4- J PAGE 22 M JANUARY 15, 1997 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


H-APPENIN


Jazz Club of Sarasota to
offer scholarships
For the seventh year, the Jazz Club of Sarasota has
announced plans to award approximately $5,000 in
cash and college scholarships to assist talented young
musicians who have the state of Florida as their prin-
cipal residence and wish to pursue careers in the field
of jazz.
High school students residing in Manatee or
Sarasota Counties are eligible to apply. School enroll-
ment is not mandatory in every case as long as the ap-
plicant is studying privately or performing in a musi-
cal group.
SThe criteria for selection will be merit and a dem-
onstrated ability/interest in jazz. A five-minute video-
taped performance must be submitted including two
pieces, at least one of which must be in a jazz style.
Two 12-bar choruses of jazz improvisation on blues are
also required. Additionally, the applicant should give
a brief verbal accounting of past musical involvement
and state how the monetary award would be used.

A completed application form and a letter of ref-
erence must accompany the video. Application forms
may be obtained from the Jazz Club office, high school


guidance offices, or from college music departments.
Awards will be given in June at the end of the second
semester. The deadline for application submission is
April 1.
Further information and an application form may
be obtained by calling the Jazz Club at 366-1552.

Applications sought for
leadership awards
This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Ameri-
can Association of University Women Leadership
Awards and members are asking the community to
nominate women who should be recognized for their
contributions.
The AAUW hopes to receive nominations which
will reflect its commitment to the principle of diversity..
Nominations are invited from both individuals and or-
ganizations as well as corporations. There is a separate
category for a Corporate Award.
To receive a nomination application, write Mrs.
Jackie Chapman, 2519 51st St., Bradenton, FL 34209
or call 792-4238.
Deadline for receipt of nominations is Wednesday,
Jan. 15.
Nominees will be honored at a reception at the
Bradenton Academy where judges will have the oppor-
tunity to meet them. Awards will be presented at the
10th Annual Awards Luncheon to be held in March.


Anonymous HIV testing
available
The Aids Council of Manatee began offering free
anonymous HIV testing in October, at 300 Riverside
Dr. E., Suite 3000, Bradenton.
The testing is offered every second and fourth
Monday of each month between 3 and 7:30 p.m.
Appointments are preferred. Walk-ins are wel-
come.
For on appointment call Daniel Junger at 750-
9521.




Off Island
SThe Manatee County Central Library, 1301
Barcarrota Blvd. W., Bradenton, will feature "Scams,"
a consumer-awareness program presented by Jake
Parrish of the Manatee County Sheriff's Department on
Thursday, Jan. 16, in the library's meeting room. The
program begins at 1 p.m. Information: 748-5555.
The Manatee County Audubon Society will meet
on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 7:30 p.m. at Emmanual United
Methodist Church, 5115 44th Ave. W., Bradenton.
Rich Paul will present a slide show on the present sta-
tus of the Tampa Bay sanctuaries. Information: 792-
9235.


1


Waterfront and very stylish with attentive service,
superb award-winning cuisine, table-side prepa-
ration. Sarasota's finest wine selection and the
most memorable Sunday Brunch in Sarasota.
LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY
CALL 383-5558 FOR RESERVATIONS


^k^WV


An informal, casual beachfront restaurant with a
menu that includes All American favorites like
Chicken Pot Pie, Veal Meatloaf, old-fashioned Bris-
ket. Or choose from an eclectic array of Italian
Pastas. Oriental Stirfries and meal-sized Salads.
"DINNER NIGHTLY,NO RESERVATIONS.



The Colony


PaliO
What is more delightful than lunching
outdoors at poolside? Salads.Gourmet
Sandwiches. Seafood Specialties.
LIBATIONS SERVED THROUGHOUT THE DAY.


(LOIU NCE


Smooth Jazz featuring Debble Keaton and
Eclectic on Friday and Saturday evenings and.
as always, the nightly piano styling of Jose
Martinez, plus an endless selection of rare and
favorite ports, cognacs, late harvest wines and
single malt Scotches and a distinctive collec-
tion of cigars.

CThe Colo,
BEACH & TENNIS RESORT
1620 GULF OF MEXICO DRIVE
LONGBOAT KEY, FLORIDA 941-383-5558
OPEN TO THE PUBUC DAILY
FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER


LIVE ENTFETAINMIEN
"That Jazz Band" 1 Year Anniversary Party
Monday, January 20... 7:30-10:30
"SwingTime" 5pc swing/ance ......... 7:30 pm Tuesdays
"Big Mama" ............................ 7:30 pm Wed-Saturday
"The Marvlns" .................... 7:30 pm Sunday


Homemade Country-Fried Steak........................... $5.95
All-U-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers ........:................... $7.95
Combination Lasagne & Chicken Parmesan .........$7.95
Blackened Shrimp Alfredo ...................................... $8.95
Steak & Ribs .................................. .............. $9.95

'I 'IE'dY W E S W L L "
Hoeo h 5 Ise


mommoor


-.I




























Schools of tomorrow
As part of the celebration of American Education Week
the students ofAnna Maria Elementary School were
challenged to draw the "school of tomorrow," under
the direction of art teacher Tracy Roesel. Top ideas
came from students Coty Kochanowski and Victor Guy,
kneeling, and, from left, Devon Mertz, Kristin Bucci
and Andromeda Hewson.


A feel for the Old West
Poco the donkey receives a hug from a thrilled
student at Anna Maria Elementary during the
kindergarten and 1st grade's celebration of "West-
ern Days" at our Island school. The students
learned about the Old West, through dancing,
panning for "gold," and watching demonstrations
of "days-gone-by'farm equipment. Poco and his
horse friend, Aztec, not pictured, brought the real
live Old West to the campus and were provided by
the Roesel Ranch in east Manatee County.


SLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 I PAGE 23 []


SAnna Maria

0 Elementary

I School Menu
Monday, 1/20/96
No School
Tuesday, 1/21/96
*
No School
Wednesday, 1/22/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
S Lunch: Corn Dog or Hamburger on Bun,
Tator Tots, Salad, Fruit
0
Thursday, 1/23/96
Breakfast: French Toast, Juice
S Lunch: Hamburger Gravy w/Mashed
Potatoes or Pork Chop w/ Green Beans,
Roll, Cookie
*
| Friday, 1/24/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
S Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos &
Cheese, Corn, Salad, Juice Bar
All meals served with milk.
*0
y C e
0
OO0000 000090000000005O000000



Joy Courtney


Puppet power
Members of the Acme Puppet Company held a day-
long puppet workshop for the students in Toni
Lashway's 4th and 5th-grade class at Anna Maria
Elementary. After making puppets and practicing the
skills of puppetry, the students perform a show
entitled "Be Sharp, Look & Listen" for students in
2nd and 3rd grade. The program, sponsored by
Saturn of Manatee, taught the children about auto
and bicycle safety.


IU.ju


Anna Maria Island


See it like a


native

More than
a mullet
wrapper! Don't forget to

save the special
pull-out street
map of
the Island.
See pages
18-19.


IISLANDEI


RMBY


-






[] PAGE 24 1 JANUARY 15, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Jan. 4, domestic disturbance, 300 block of Spring.
The complainant and the subject got into a verbal ar-
gument and the subject left the residence. There was no
physical violence, said the report.

Bradenton Beach
Jan. 2, criminal mischief, 400 block of Gulf Drive
North. The complainant reported a person unknown
scratched the hood, fenders, doors and trunk of his
vehicle. Damages were $1,000.
Jan. 2, domestic battery, 100 block of Seventh
Street North. According to the report, the victim re-
ported the subject was drinking, lost control, hit him
twice in the face and threw items at him. The subject
was placed in custody.
SJan. 3, grand theft, 2700 block of Gulf Drive
North. The victim reported a person unknown removed
his vehicle from the garage. The vehicle was later lo-
cated on 29th Street. According to the report, there
were five items in the vehicle that did not belong to the
victim. A tow truck was called because the ignition was
missing from the vehicle.
Jan. 3, criminal mischief, Coquina Beach. The
complainant reported a person unknown broke the
hatch on a lifeguard stand.
Jan. 7, burglary to an automobile, Cortez Beach.
The victim reported a person unknown entered the ve-
hicle and removed $115 in cash, a credit card and two
35 mm cameras.
Jan. 7, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
The victim reported a person unknown entered the ve-
hicle and removed $20 in cash, an ATM card, three
calling cards, identification, a purse, credit cards, a 35
mm camera and flash valued at $500 and a disposable
camera.








Cfif 4Andrea!& extraordinary d&iste& include
BEACH NUT Today's fresh catch crusted with macadamia nuts and
crowned with mango butter, served with saffron rice and fresh
vegetables ... $15.95
CATCH RANGOON Today's catch marinated in lime, sauteed and
finished with sauce of mango, papaya and banana ... $14.95
STUFFED SHRIMP ~ Blue crab stuffed jumbos with two sauces
accompanied by homemade lattice chips and fresh vegetables ... $16.95
GOLD COAST PAELLA Fresh seafood baked with chicken and chorizo
in saffron rice. Garnished with roasted peppers, peas, asparagus and
plantains ... Marketprice
CHATEAUBRIAND Tenderloin blackened or grilled to order
served with roasted pepper bernaise and vegetable brochettes ..
$17.95 for one, $35. 00 for two.



778Len (562


Jan. 7, theft of a bicycle valued at $80, 2201 Gulf
Drive N., Sunset Beach Motel.
Jan. 8, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
The victim reported a person unknown entered the ve-
hicle and removed a credit card, $76 in cash and $200
in traveler's checks from his wallet.
Jan. 8, retail theft, 2513 Gulf Drive, Circle K. The
complainant reported a male subject with long blond
hair and wearing a blue shirt and dark pants ran out of
the store with an 18-pack of beer. The subject was not
found.
Jan. 8, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
The complainant reported a person unknown punched
out the driver's door lock and removed two purses val-
ued at $65 containing two wallets valued at $20, $640
in cash, credit cards, a car rental agreement, an apart-
ment key, two driver's licenses, a checkbook, two
ATM cards and three bottles of prescription drugs.
Damages were $200.
Jan. 9, criminal mischief, 100 block of 23rd
Street. The complainant reported a person unknown
dented the door of the vehicle. Damages were $400.
Jan. 9, theft, criminal mischief, 501 Gulf Drive
N., Bridgeport. The complainant reported she offered
her friend a ride after the friend had an argument with
the suspect. She said the suspect followed them until
she confronted him, then he left the area. The com-
plainant took the friend to her residence for the night
and in the morning found her battery missing and oil
drained from her vehicle.
Jan. 10, theft, 116 Bridge St., Sports Lounge. The
victim reported she allowed two subjects to get into her
vehicle but refused to give them a ride. After they ex-
ited the vehicle she said her jewelry box and car keys
were missing.

Holmes Beach
Jan. 3, vandalism, 5323 Marina Drive, Back Bay
Steakhouse. The complainant reported a person un-
known scratched his vehicle while it was in the park-
ing lot.
Jan. 3, noise, 3300 block of Sixth Avenue. The
complainant reported loud music coming from an
apartment across the street. She said she asked the resi-
dents to turn it down and they did but turned it up when


The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key










Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


Youths confronted by
man with assault rifle
Walter Schmidt, 39, of Holmes Beach was
placed in custody Jan. 4 and charged by Holmes
Beach police with openly carrying a firearm after
confronting two skateboarding youths.
The officer on patrol observed Schmidt with
an assault rifle slung over his shoulder standing at
52nd Street at Second Avenue taking to the
youths. The officer stopped, removed the weapon
and placed Schmidt in custody. The officer also
confiscated a loaded clip containing 29 rounds of
ammunition from Schmidt.
The youths said they were skateboarding in
front of Schmidt's property when Schmidt came
across the street carrying the weapon and asked
them if they knew anything about recent thefts
from his yard. According to the report, Schmidt
said he was carrying the weapon in an attempt to
intimidate the youths and get information about
the thefts. The youths said Schmidt did not point
the gun at them or threaten them with it.


she left. The officer monitored the residence and did
not hear loud music.
Jan. 4, theft, 5600 block of Gulf Drive. The com-
plainant reported her purse valued at $50 containing
$200 in cash, a $125 gift certificate, a necklace valued
at $600, credit cards and a checkbook was missing af-
ter she took delivery of two appliances.
Jan. 4, noise, 5702 Marina Drive, Turtles Bar and
Grill. The complainant reported loud music coming
from the business and the officer requested that the
amplifiers be turned down.
Jan. 4, disturbance, 3100 block of Gulf Drive.
The officer responded to a complaint of a disturbance
and found two intoxicated subjects arguing. He advised
one to leave for the night.
Jan. 4, disturbance, 200 block of 58th Street. The
complainant said he called the police because he and
the subject were arguing and he wanted to leave to cool
down. He said the subject took his paycheck and ATM
card to prevent him from leaving. The officer advised
the subject to allow the complainant to leave and take
his ATM card.
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 M PAGE 25 II -


STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 24


Jan. 4, vandalism, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported a person unknown smashed the
windshield of his company truck parked at the beach.
Jan. 5, noise, 5702 Marina Drive, Turtles Bar and
Grill. The complainant reported loud music coming
from the business. The officer advised the doorman to
turn it down.
Jan. 5, disturbance, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn.
According to police, a complainant reported an intoxi-
cated subject became upset after losing a bet and went
outside and began kicking his vehicle. His brother, also
intoxicated, tried to stop him. The officer issued tres-
pass warnings to both.
Jan. 6, noise, 200 block of 69th Street. The com-
plainant reported loud music coming from the residence.
The officer spoke to the subject who was playing his car
radio too loud and advised him to turn it down.
Jan. 6, assistance, 3900 East Bay Drive, Island
Foods. The officer gave the stranded complainant a ride
home.
Jan. 6, domestic, 3400 block of Gulf Drive. The
officer responded to a domestic argument and the victim
directed his attention to the suspect who was running from
the residence. The officer said he brought the suspect, who
appeared to be intoxicated, back to the scene.
The complainant said the suspect threw a remote
control device at her, pushed her against the shower
wall three times, tore down the shower curtain, spit on
her head, head butted her, tore a bath towel from her
head and attempted to get her to leave the residence
against her will.
The suspect was placed in custody but refused to
be handcuffed until threatened with pepper spray by the
officer. He also threatened the officer, screamed pro-
fanity and hit his head against the glass in the patrol
vehicle, according to the report.
Jan. 6, domestic, 300 block of 60th Street. The
officer responded to a report of domestic violence and
found two subjects who had hit each other in the face
during an argument. Both were placed in custody.
Jan. 7, vandalism, 3015 Gulf Drive, Citgo. The
complainant reported a person unknown spray painted
graffiti on the side of the building.

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All games will be played at the Anna Maria Island Community Center


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Friday
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Jan. 16 8 p.m.
Jan. 17 8 p.m.
Jan. 18 6:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

2, 8 10 year olds
Jan. 16 6 p.m.
7 p.m.
Jan. 17 7 p.m.
Jan. 18 2:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.

3, 5 7 year olds
Jan. 17 6 p.m.
Jan. 18 12:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.


Jan. 7, noise, 5410 Marina Drive, D. Coy Ducks.
The complainant reported noise at the rear of the busi-
ness. The officer found a radio playing in the kitchen
but noted it was not loud.
Jan. 7, suspicious, 7200 block of Palm Drive. The
complainant reported that she was taking care of a resi-
dence and found the door unlocked and the television
on. The officer checked the residence and found no
sign of forced entry and noted that nothing appeared to
be disturbed. He turned off the television and locked
the door. The complainant said the resident told him
there is a ghost in the residence and things turn them-
selves on. The officer noted no such entity.
Jan. 8, suspicious, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee
County Public Beach. The complainant reported he
parked at the beach and walked to the store and, upon
returning, he found a person unknown had tried to en-
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Joe's Eats & Sweets vs. Dips Ice Cream
Westbay Athletic Club vs. Bridge St. Pier & Cafe
Joe's Eats & Sweets vs. A-Paradise Realty
Dips Ice Cream vs. Westbay Athletic Club


Econo Lodge vs. Christie's Plumbing
Island Real Estate vs. Debellevue Dragons
Air & Energy vs. Dowling Park
Beach House vs. Dowling Park
Econo Lodge vs. Debellevue Dragons
Island Real Estate vs. Hair Motions
Air & Energy vs. Christie's Plumbing


1st National Bank vs. Cafe on the Beach
Jessie's Island Store vs. Anna Maria Oyster Bar
Island Animal Clinic vs. 1st National Bank


ter the vehicle triggering the alarm.
Jan. 9, theft of $5 in gasoline, 3015 Gulf Drive,
Citgo.
Jan. 9, suspicious, 5333 Gulf Drive, BP Station.
The complainant reported two subjects came into the
business and, while the complainant was talking to one
subject, the other went into the bathroom and wrote
graffiti on the walls.
Jan. 9, suspicious, 100 block of 50th Street. The
complainant returned home, found an unknown vehicle
in her driveway and called the police before realizing
it was her cleaning woman's car.
Jan. 9, noise, 5702 Marina Drive, Turtles Bar and
Grill. An anonymous complainant reported loud music
coming from the business. On inquiry, the officer
found a band testing equipment for a performance the
next day.


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- Mi PAGE 26 K JANUARY 15, 1997 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Longboat signs illegal, but still up


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Let's be honest. It isn't often we cheer for
Longboat Key town government and feel good when it
wins. But this is one of those times.
The town stopped a move by residents of Bay Isles
last week that was downright scary. Under the guise of
"protecting mangroves" along the canal mangroves
that some people in this same community have been
accused of mangling over the years to enhance their
water views they want to keep the general boating
public out of "their" canal.
It all comes down to control, and that's what this
group craves, in spades.
A hearing before Longboat's zoning adjustment
board resulted in a decision that "No Trespassing"
signs placed along the southeastern rim canal by the
Bay Isles Master Association are illegal and in viola-
tion of the town's sign ordinance. Does that mean the
signs will come down? Well, no. At least, not yet.
The folks from Bay Isles who according to one
source spent in the neighborhood of $10,000 for their
dog and pony show of two lawyers, charts, and all the
trimmings at last week's meeting have 30 days to
appeal. The difference is that now they'll have to ap-
peal to the circuit court.
Following their defeat at the hands of the local
board, the Bay Isles group was tight-lipped about fu-

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Jan. 4 horseshoe games were
George Landraitis of Anna Maria and Gene
Snedeker of Holmes Beach. Runners-up were
John Bennett of Anna Maria and David Trask of
Holmes Beach.
Winners in the Jan. 11 games were J.C. Phillips
of Bradenton Beach and Bill Starrett of Anna
Maria. Runners-up were Adin Shank of Anna
Maria and Gene Snedeker of Holmes Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every Sat-
urday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park,
10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership fees.




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ture plans. But the signs are still up at least until the
end of the 30-day appeal period. Then, if an appeal isn't
filed, they come down, according to town officials.
But wait, there's a new wrinkle in the case.
Longboat Key Town Attorney David Persson says he
expects the issue of "No Trespassing" signs to come up
at this week's town commission meeting and perhaps
some changes will be made to allow them.
"Allow them on the water?" I asked.
"Well, I don't know about that," he replied.

More sand dollars?
Bradenton Beach Vice Mayor Charlie Grace says
there may be more state dollars coming for local beach
renourishment. At least that's what will happen if the
Legislature pays attention to priorities set by the
Manasota League of Cities.
The new priority was settled at the League's Janu-
ary meeting where the City of Sarasota raised the beach
renourishment issue and it was adopted by the group.
With an estimated $15 billion spent every year by
tourists who come here to use our beaches, the $8 mil-
lion the state appropriated for beach restoration last
year seems pretty paltry. Just last week the Senate
Natural Resources Committee was asked to increase
the appropriation for next year to $35 million by the
Florida Shore and Beach Preservation Association.
That group says more than one third of Florida's
beaches "are critically ill," and need help.
After hearing of the condition of Florida's nearly
800 miles of beaches, Senate Committee Chairman
Jack Latvala, a Palm Beach Republican, said the Leg-
islature can be expected to increase its appropriation
this year. He is on the record as saying that up to $25
million could be expected.
Locally, beaches in both Pinellas and Sarasota coun-
ties are in dire need, and if you don't believe that, just take
a look at Sarasota's Lido Beach. The dredging of New
Pass and Longboat Pass, scheduled for April, will supply
only a fraction of the sand needed there.
Sarasota recently increased its tourist tax by an-
other penny, with 75 percent of the money earmarked
for beach restoration. Since local communities are try-
ing to do their part, it appears that now is the time for





Moon Date AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
FQ Jan 15 4:41 1.2 10:01 0.4 5:19 1.8 -
Jan 16 6:29 1.0 12:17 0.3 6:06 1.9 10:37a*0.6
Jan 17 8:49 0.9 1:36 0.1 6:56 2.0 11:15a'0.8
Jan 18 -- 2:41 -0.1 7:48 2.0 -
Jan19 3:37 -0.3 8:38 2.1 -
Jan 20 9:24p* 2.1 4:23 -0.4 12:34 1.1 2:16 1.0
Jan 21 10:06p* 2.1 5:02 -0.4 12:59 1.2 3:10 1.1
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


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the legislature to really join the effort.
After all, tourism is the reason most of us came to
eventually live here, and it's what drives our local
economies, provides jobs and generates an estimated
third of our state sales tax revenues.

Prop guards rise again
Last week we mentioned the record number of
manatees killed in Florida in 1996, and that news has
prompted Florida Sen. Charlie Crist, R-St. Petersburg,
to bring up the idea of required propeller guards on
boats in Florida. That's one way to help protect some
manatees. If you've ever seen a manatee "in the wild,"
you've likely seen the kinds of propeller scars nearly
all wear on their backs from encounters with boats.
Under Crist's proposal, which he says will be of-
fered to the Legislature this spring, all boats built af-
ter March 1998 would be required to carry guards
around their props. In addition to manatees, prop
guards would protect humans, of course.
Not surprisingly, the Marine Manufacturers Asso-
ciation has already announced that it's against the idea
and it will be interesting to see if the old Florida Con-
servation Association takes a stand. That group, by the
way, now calls itself the Coastal Conservation Associa-
tion of Florida.
Let your legislator know your feelings on the issue.

Sheepshead limit increased
Beginning Jan. 1, the daily bag limit for sheeps-
head was increased from 10 to 15 fish per person. The
new rule, which also allows commercial spearfishing
of sheepshead, was approved by the Governor and
Cabinet on Dec. 10.

Monday at Mote
Mote's Monday night speaker series includes Dr.
Anne Meylan of the Florida Marine Institute on Jan.
20. She will be speaking on "Ecology and Migrations
of the Green Turtle," beginning at 7 p.m.
SAdmission is free for Mote members and $5 for
non-members.
See you next week.


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ISLANDERKIMAINS

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Just give us a call. 941-778-7978 Fax 778-9392


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U O H^ You moved and forgot to tell us? Act immediately to avoid interrupted service
on your mail subscription to The Islander Bystander.
Please give us a call at (941) 778-7978 or fax us
your old and new address at (941) 778-9392. ISLANDER
Remember, we mail bulk mail unless you paid
S extra for first class mail, and the post office
will not forward your subscription.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 27 1 1-

Blackfin tuna, grouper, amberjack best bet offshore


By Capt. Mike Heistand
A cold front squelched offshore fishing last week-
end. Prior to that anglers were nailing a variety of fish
including blackfin tuna and large amberjack.
Capt. Glenn Corder on the Zulu Mama said
blackfin tuna are about 30 miles out and there are
plenty of them. Now if the wind will die down, anglers
should be able to get all they want. Grouper fishing is
also excellent, according to Corder.
Capt. Tom Chaya reports catching a few cobia,
sheepshead, redfish and mackerel before the wind
started.
On my boat Magic, we've been catching sheeps-
head to six pounds, some mangrove snapper, and
plenty of small trout. Offshore fishing for grouper re-
mains hot with fish to 12 pounds just 10 to 12 miles out.
Capt. Roy Salgado on the Grand Slam caught
amberjack to 50 pounds and got one monster that
weighed 110 pounds. Salgado also got a true black
grouper that weighed 38 pounds. He also led Mr. and
Mrs. Webeck of Alaska to 12 blackfin tuna.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he has been doing well
catching trout on the flats by fishing the potholes and
using live shrimp.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's been catching nice
snook on warm days. Redfish are difficult to find but
he expects them to show up in numbers after a few cold
fronts pass through.
Capt. Phil Shields said anglers on the Reef


Eight-week safe
boating class to begin
The Anna Maria Island Power Squadron
will begin its 39th eight-week safe boating
course on Tuesday, Jan. 21, at Manatee Tech-
nical School (formerly Manatee Vo-Tech),
5603 34th St., Bradenton.
The course consists of boat handling and
seamanship, boat type and terms, registration
and equipment regulations, state and local boat-
ing regulations, weather, marlinespike, charts
and navigation. A small fee is charged for ma-
terials used in the course.
For more information or to make arrange-
ments to attend, call Charles and Nancy Best at
792-4435.


Reacher caught some tuna, snapper and good catches
of black grouper. They also brought back some nice-
sized lane snapper.
Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet Sue said the four-
hour trip got 200 Key West grunts, porgies and trigger-
fish. The six-hour trip had about the same number but
also caught some black grouper. On the nine-hour trip,
fishermen got 150 head of rudderfish, grouper, man-
grove and lane snapper.
Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle Carl said the
wade fishermen are catching a lot of sheepshead, trout
and flounder. Boaters are catching the same.
Bradenton Beach Pier John said people are
catching grouper, flounder and trout.
Anna Maria City Pier Michelle said sheeps-
head, bonita and redfish are hitting.
Annie's of Cortez Bait & Tackle Bruce said
that their customers caught sheepshead and trout on
live shrimp. Capt. Zack Zacharias on the Dee-Jay II
said he has been catching trout, sheepshead, a lot of
mackerel, bluefish, triggerfish and the occasional grou-
per.
Rod & Reel Pier Joseph said the cold weather
has made for slow fishing. He did say anglers are catch-
ing sheepshead and drum.
Galati Yacht Basin Chris said grouper fishing
in shallow water has been productive.
Island Discount Tackle Bill said cobia off
Longboat Key were hitting while flounder were caught
on the one- and three-mile reefs. Sheepshead have been
biting around bridges and piers. Grouper is still the best
bet offshore, with many folks limiting out.
Skyway Fishing Pier One fisherman caught a
monster eight-pound sheepshead while others pulled in
a number of the black-and-white-striped convict fish.
Grouper, flounder, triggerfish, mangrove snapper and
bluefish were caught off the pier.

Former Bollettieri coach
Former Nick Bollettieri tennis coach Scott
Whiteman is scheduled to hold a free tennis clinic and
evaluation Jan. 16-17 at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center.
The clinic will be held from 4-6 p.m. It is a new
after-school tennis program open to everyone.
Beginning Jan. 20, Whiteman will offer private
lessons for children and evening lessons Monday
through Saturday for adults.





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Neva-Miss this fish
Alfonso Delgado of Guadalajara, Mexico, shows one
of the three gag grouper (25, 27 and 28 inches) he
caught in 55feet of water. Delgado was fishing with
Capt. Mark Chapman aboard the Neva-Miss out of
Cortez Fishing Center. Chapman said they caught
the grouper on pinfish and while dragging planers
with gold bomber lures. Islander Photo: Courtesy
Mark Chapman

offers free tennis clinic
"I'd like eventually to get a competitive league
going," Whiteman said. "You'd be surprised how
much fun a league can be."
Whiteman is head of the Scott Whiteman Tennis
Academy in Boston, where he teaches.
He said he hopes to make the community center his
fall and winter base.
For more information, call Whiteman at 1-800-
950-3105.






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S i[ PAGE 28 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I ANNOUMENTS9I


Art league encourages
artists to pick up art
Now that the success of the Junior Art Show at the
Anna Maria Island Art League's Festival of Fine Arts
and Crafts lingers on the palettes of the show's young
participants, art work from the show needs to be col-
lected immediately at the league.
In addition, class schedules for photography, wa-
tercolor, prismacolor pencils (adult and children), and
beading are available.
The league is located at 5312 Holmes Blvd.,
Holmes Beach, and is open Tuesday through Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 778-2099 for additional in-
formation.

Poetry Night at Guild
Coffee and poetry among the art will be offered at
the Artists Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Drive, Island
Shopping Center, Holmes Beach, on Thursday, Jan. 16,
at 7 p.m.
Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and resident poets. An open mike
will be available for aspiring poets who register before
7 p.m.
Call Zoe VonAverkamp at 778-7216 for additional
information.

'Painting on Silk'
demonstration on key
On Saturday, Jan. 18, Belgian artist Snoopy Gates
will demonstrate "Painting On Silk."
This unique European art form (not to be confused
with silk-screening or printing) requires special dyes
and techniques. Several of Gates's works are currently
on display at the Ringling Mansion in the American
Society of Interior Design exhibit.
In addition, the Northern Trust Bank of Florida
All-Media Exhibit, will open at the center on Thursday,
Jan. 16, and will run through Feb. 15. The exhibit is
free.
$3,000 in prizes will be awarded.
For cost of the demonstration and additional infor-
mation, call the center at 383-2345.

Maya murals examined at
.- Education Center
Dolores Plunkett will detail the discovery of the


'Stress' included in blues exhibit
"My painting is autobiographical," says artist Gale Fulton-Ross, "but that doesn't mean I am personally
unhappy. It is just my preference to paint 'the blues' as it might be a jazz singer's preference to sing them."
Twenty-one oil and mixed-media "blues" painting by Fulton-Ross are included in the Sarasota Visual Art
Center's "Painting the Blues" exhibit now open through Feb. 3. Gallery hours at the center are 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. on weekdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends. The center is located at 707 N. Tamiami Trail. Informa-
tion: 365-2032. Islander Photo: Courtesy of the Sarasota Visual Art Center


remarkable Mayan murals of Bonampak in a slide lec-
ture to be presented on Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 3 p.m. at
the Education Center, 5370 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key.
The Maya murals portray totally unexpected as-
pects of ancient Maya life, according to Plunkett.
Plunkett is a pre-Columbian art historian, archaeologist
and author.
For tuition information and to pre-register, call the
center at 383-8811 or visit the center between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Arts council to host
ultimate block party
The Sarasota County Arts Council will present
Arts Day on Sunday, Jan. 19, from noon to 6 p.m.
throughout six blocks of downtown Sarasota.
The day will include two art tents exhibiting art by
over 60 artists; 15 stages for performing dance, music
and theater; a children's activity area; street studios;
information displays by 35 local arts groups; and food.
Everyone is welcome to this rain or shine event.


Island Democratic Club to
install officers
The Anna Maria Island Democratic Club will in-
stall officers for 1997 at its noon luncheon meeting at
the Beach House Restaurant in Bradenton Beach on
Monday, Jan. 20.
The guest speaker will be Rev. James Golden of
Bradenton's Ward Temple A.M.E. Church.
Reservations are not required for the $7.50 lun-
cheon meeting.

Pipin' hot pancakes
at St. Bernard
St. Bernard Catholic Church in Holmes Beach will
hold a Pancake Breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 19, from 8
to 11:30 a.m.
The menu will include pancakes, sausage, orange
juice and coffee. A homemade bake sale will also be
held.
The donation for.breakfast is $2.50 for adults and
$1 for children.


GOOD EART RALFOODS

colloidal Toxicity
ARE YOU CONFUSED ABOUT ...

Trace Minerals?
FREE BOOKLET! By Dr. Erwin DiCyan Ph. D.
6717 Manatee Ave. W. 5153 14th Street W.
795-0478 753-8902




Longboat Key Plastic Surgery "
Celebrates a Year of Success!

The community is invited
to join the celebration at an

-OPEN HOUSE-
Wednesday, January 22 4:30 6:00 pm
Longboat Key Plastic Surgery
5350 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Suite 202
At the Centre Shops on Longboat Key
ENJOY COMPLIMENTARY HORS D'OEUVRES,
* TOURS AND MORE
i. e


Home Services ... that are Just Like Family


Just Like Family offers a fresh
new non-medical approach to in-home
assistance for you or your loved ones.
Our personalized services are available
with a 2 hour minimum up to 24
hours a day and are tailored to
your individual needs on a
JT JU t at affordable rates.


Hi Family
At-hom Coai <& CompniOp SCnvi,"


Professionally trained aides who are
bonded and insured come to your home
and can assist with:
Home Management
Housekeeping
Meal Preparation
Shopping
Transportation
Companion Services
... we'll be there for you

(941) 7391626 #0590


LorGBc A
Islar c pel New Patients Welcome
An Interfaith Comm i Church

S3909 East Bay Drive
f f Holmes Beach
778-2204


Worship Service
9 & 11am
Church School
9 am Ages 3-16
Adult Study Group
10am
Minister
Charles Jim Marsh
6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-6491


w mer Ifemorial Cnmmunitu Tlpir=4
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913

Come Celebrate Christ
First Worship 9 am
Second Worship 11 am
Sunday School 10 am
Children's Church 11am
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-0414





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 15, 1997 M PAGE 29 []


Ringling School of Art
offers classes
The spring session of Continuing and Professional
Education classes at Ringling School of Art and Design
begins Feb. 1 with registration currently ongoing.
Ringling offers studio art classes for adults and
children, whether beginner or advanced. High school
students may register for any of the adult courses.
Some of the courses and workshops in the spring ses-
sion are: cartooning, textile painting, interior design, cal-
ligraphy, book illustration and Polaroid image transfer.
Courses meet weekdays, evenings or on Saturdays
in five-, eight- and 10-week sessions at 2700 N.
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. For tuition information and
class meeting times, call 359-7577.
Community center
announces classes
The Anna Maria Island Community Center in
Anna Maria City will offer the following classes begin-
ning in January:
Bridge Lessons Friday, Jan. 17, 10 to 11 a.m.,
eight-week session.
Chair Aerobics Wednesday, Jan. 22, 9 to 10
a.m., ongoing.
Line Dancing Friday, Jan. 17, 10:30 a.m. to noon.
Photography Thursday, Jan. 23, 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., four-week session.
Yoga Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1 to 2:30 p.m. and
Thursday, Jan. 23, 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Contact the Center at 778-1908 for fees and regis-
tration or to inquire about the Center's additional on-
going classes and programs.

Mote Marine lecture to
discuss green turtle
Dr. Anne Meylan, a research scientist for the
Florida Marine Research Institute at the Department of
Environmental Protection, will be the guest speaker for
"Monday Night at Mote." She will discuss "Ecology
and Migrations of the Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas)."
The presentation will begin at 7 p.m. on Monday,
Jan. 20, in the Mote Marine Laboratory's Martin-Selby
Science Education Center, 1600 Ken Thompson Park-
way, Sarasota.
The presentation is free for Mote members and a
guest and there is a $5 fee for non-member adults and
children ages 4-18.
Call 388-4441 for more information.




The Therapeutic Art
of European Massage
Nadia Tryciecky-Esterbrook, LMT
(941) 795-0887
BY APPOINTMENT LIC. #MA0017550 .i


Mature Driver?
We've Reduced
The Cost
Of Auto
Insurance
Our statistics show that mature
drivers have fewer and less
costly accidents than others.
So, It's only fair to charge you
less for your personal auto
insurance.
4 uto-Owners Insurance
Life Home Car Business

Jim Mixon Insurance Co. Inc.
5412 Marina Dr. Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach* (941)778-2253


Elderhostel topic of civic
association meeting
The Holmes Beach Civic Association will meet on
Saturday, Jan. 18, at 10:30 a.m. at the Island Branch
Library in Holmes Beach.
Ricki Cunninghis will discuss Elderhostel, a local,
domestic and international residential learning experience
for people 55 and over. Nominations for officers and
board of directors will take place. The election is in Feb-
ruary. Members and guests are invited.
For information, call Shirley Romberger at 778-9315.
Mature driving class at
Island Branch Library
The American Association of Retired Persons will
sponsor a Mature Driving Class on Thursday and Fri-
day, Jan. 16 and 17, at the Island Branch Library in
Holmes Beach and on Saturday, Jan. 18, at the Eye
Associates, 6002 Pointe West Blvd., Bradenton. All
classes will take place from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
The course is open to people age 50 and older.
Those who complete the course may be eligible for an
insurance discount; participants are encouraged to con-
tact their insurance company.
Pre-registration is required by calling Les Knoll at
729-7742. Course fee is $8 per person.

Hibiscus subject meeting
The Anna Maria Garden Club will meet on
Wednesday, Jan. 15, at 1 p.m. in Fellowship Hall at
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria City.
Members and guests are invited and refreshments
will be served.
Sally Beesley and Ankie Watt from the Golby-
Reasoner Chapter of the American Hibiscus Society
will discuss "Arrangements with Hibiscus Blooms."

Mote scientist to speak
Dr. Richard Pierce, research director at Mote Ma-
rine Laboratory, will speak at the Monday, Jan. 20,
meeting of the Anna Maria Island Historical Society.
Dr. Pierce's subject will be red tide. The meeting
is at Anna Maria City Hall at 7:30 p.m.


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
Chiropractic Physician


761-0210

501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 -West Bradenton
(behind the Manatee Ave. Video Library)


Captain Miller takes
pen in hand again
Capt. Bill Miller, author of "Tampa Triangle: The
Dead Zone," signed copies of his book Saturday at
the Anna Maria Historical Museum. Pictured with
Miller is Peggy Nelson, Anna Maria's city clerk.
Islander Photo: Paul Roat
Community Center looking
for instructors
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will be
offering many new programs beginning this month.
Some of the classes are bridge, gymnastics, Tai
Chi, fishing, language, CPR, cooking, gardening, mu-
sic appreciation, career planning and more.
If there is a subject you think is interesting and are
qualified to teach, contact the Center at 778-1908.

CALL ME TO FIND
the "Place in the Sun"
that is affordable for you.
FREE Pre-Qualification
755-0009 pager: 502-3018
Island Resident
Brad Smith
ii Loan Officer
FHA VA CONVENTIONAL
0*n *BOND FARMERS HOME
4800 26th Street West Bradenton, FL 34207


STEPHEN HAERING, M.D.


> Pediatric, Adolescent,

-i Adult & Geriatric

General Practice



HOUSE CALLS


Why wait at the doctor's office?

Dr. Haering will wait on you!



761-0999

Medicare Reimbursable
Emphasizing Prevention & Nutrition





ID PAGE 30 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


DUPLEX OR HOME
$159,900. Easy walk
to beach, quiet location,
private yard, gazebo,
tropical landscape.
Real neat and clean.
Yvonne Higgins.
FANTASTIC VALUE! Key Royale 2BR/2BA canalfront
home with large Florida room. Large lot offers room for pool
and house expansion. Just $174,900. Call Don Schroder.
A GEM ON THE WATERFRONT! 2BR/2BA on canal with
dock & davit. Priced affordably at $125,000. Call Sandy
Greiner or Barb Turner.
CAN YOU IMAGINE a 2BR/2BA furnished condo in a com-
munity with pool, tennis, clubhouse and exercise room for
just $83,900? It's true! Call Karen Schroder.
RETIRE JUST OFF THE ISLAND to a 55+ park on
Sarasota Bay water. 2BR/1.5BA with lanai, laundry and
carport. Reduced to $69,500 turnkey furnished. Call Barb
Tumer or Sandy Greiner.
Opposite the Holmes Beach Library
5600 MARINA DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217
941-778-7777

All the best news is in The Islander Bystander


ANNA MARIA BAYFRONT HOME WITH BEACH
812 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA
3BR/2B,
terazzo floors.
Living room w/
stone fireplace
and cathedral
Ceiling. One car
garage, fenced
area for pets.

Lot has 75' of
sandy beachfront
x 168' with views
of the Sunshine
Skyway and
Egmont Key.
$399,000.
941-778-1239 ; -


Visit us at our web site: http://islandrealestate.com !
[B MLS 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066


PERICO BAY CLUB
SPECIALIST
Marilyn has the
KEYS to V
Home Ownership at


Marilyn Trevethan
REALTOR


Call Anytime Evenings 792-8477 Office 941-778-6066
Toll Free 1-800-865-0800


Now you can email your Island newspaper!

Our email address is islander@mead.com
The Islander Bystander will be on the Internet with an
exciting Web site in the near future ...
Look for us at www.islanderbystander.com.
INFORMATION: CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392

IISLANDER I H] lMiA


I AE A LE -SAES ALE


Sandy Pointe
M#17902. 2BR/2BA,
Top floor, view of
wetlands and bay.
S$99,900.


Perico Truly,
Beautiful!
M18677 2BR/2BA
plus den. Bright end
unit, cathedral
ceilings, 2-car
garage. $159,900.

SEASONAL RENTALS
* 1BR/1BA, apartment $1400 mo
* Key Royale, 3BR $3300 mo
* 2BR/2BA, Sarasota $2000 mo
* 2BR/1BA, Beachview $1600 mo
ANNUAL RENTALS
Smugglers Landing
* 2BR/2BA with boat dock $850 mo
* 3BR/2BA, Brd. House $900 mo


Julie Gilstrap


Property Manager


Wedebroct'l Company
matching pe plFa erties since 1949

3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales: 941-778-0700 Rentals: 778-6665
Toll Free: 1-800-749-6665


GULF BEACH PLACE


ai -- .. -~~-. . . . - -. -, ,
GULFVIEW TOWNHOUSES
ONLY 2 UNITS LEFT!
TWO CHOICE CONDOS available at LOW PRICES!
Gulf Beach Place includes 2BR/2BA, 2nd floor unit
only 100 ft. to beach and priced at a LOW PRICE of
$114,900 firm. Gulfview Townhouses include 2BR/
2.5BA townhouse located 400 ft. to beach and LOW
PRICE of $109,900 firm. Both are TURNKEY UNITS
and include POOL. Excellent rentals! Call Marie
Franklin!


\Since
^ys 1957
MARIE LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKULN REALTY BROKE
'We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gull Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!!!
2BR/2BA Island get-a-way on the north end
of Anna Maria. Walk to Bean Point and the
Rod & Reel Pier. Lush tropical landscaping
surrounds this lovely home. Easy to see!
Offered at just $172,500.


R SI a s- -- a a


JUST LISTED!


(F~' ~


NEWlhleatstt^ Z o
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


NORTH POINT HARBOUR BEAUTY
This impeccable 2/3 BR, 2BA waterfront home offers
the finest appointments throughout. Airy vaulted ceilings
with fans and clerestory windows lend a feeling of space
and light. Amenities include ceramic tiled floors in
kitchen, baths and foyer, wood burning brick fireplace,
spacious eat-in kitchen with top of the line appliances,
gorgeous window and wall treatments, spacious den
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH" with built-in bookcases, sunny waterside deck, boat
"Et ,r E .7" -t -t, L dock, sprinkler system, plus community pool and ten-
l nis court..Truly a pleasure to show. Priced to sell at only
Exclusive $365,000 including Preferred One Year Homeowner's
Estates t LS .E $YEAR
astaten' MLWS NY 7 Warranty! This one absolutely will not last!
Video Collection .
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 NancyGuior...778-215 MonicaReid 729-3333 SuzanneKasten...921-4130 Sher Sasser...778-1820
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333 Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser ...778-1820


:F


l


FRAN MAXON FRAN MAXON


I . : .; : 1


m





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 M PAGE 31 I i


BILL ALEXANDER
Broker* General Manager
Invites you to contact our rental
and sales professionals for any
of your real estate needs.

WAGNERZ REALTY 1939
778-2246
Offices Located in:
Anna Maria Island Palmetto
Longboat Key Bradenton


BY OWNER DEEP CANAL








Light, bright, airy waterfront home in beautiful Key
Royale. Ready to move into at 606 Gladstone Lane,
Holmes Beach. 3BR/2BA, 2,194 sq. ft. newer air condi-
tioning, large kitchen with canal view. 319 sq. ft. screen
or window enclosed porch overlooks canal, newer boat
dock and lift with electricity and water. 536 sq. ft. 2-car
garage. Newer double-pane windows, carpeting and
ceramic tile throughout. Inside laundry room. $269,000.
PLEASE CALL GLENN BLACK, 778-4880 FOR APPT.


BILL BOWMAN
Broker Salesperson
., No catchy phrases, no fancy
slogans. Just 25 years of Real
Estate experience with the last
10 years on Anna Maria Island.

WAGNER REALTY '"1
778-2246



I Property Management Team
"We Cover the Island"
I 1 111h


FISKL '94Agiu C k&6K O-(TT V'- of-
NPfAJ wloR /AM XCt-0/,V,- 4KC
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'F )1 C1or kffir Qo,,Rs g4Ako
LbMPclAPjd,-r -r, TIVAL -NJ -6STr.


-F0LSoAi Co&poO


Karin Stephan
REALTOR"
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
S:. ., i. 1 Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
S941-778-0766
Home:
941-388-1267
Fax; 941- 778-3035
INTERNET-KBSTEPHAN@AOL.COM -
All my listings can be seen on the world wide web.
http://www.pruflorida.com


I
NEW LISTING City of Anna Maria 3-story Key West style
home. 3BR/2BA, very secure quiet neighborhood, 300 steps to
Anna Maria's finest snow white sandy beaches, sunsets in
paradise. Turnkey furnished, excellent rental history. Great
investment. Custom built, many nice features, 3 balconies.
Priced right at $239,500 for a fast sale. Owner very motivated
and wants an offer today! #KS19345.
ANNA MARIA Brand new Key West style home in the City of Anna
Maria. Gulfview from the bedroom. Steps to the beach. 3BR/2BA
with pool. Call for your private tour today. #KS16988. $295,000.
DIRECT GULFFRONT 4 units beautifully furnished on a lot 100
x 100. Room for pool, extra office, laundry facilities, storage and
outdoor shower. Long term rental agreement with German travel
agency. Rent guarantee. Walking distance to shopping, restau-
rants. Excellent income. *MVP seller will entertain offers between
$650,000 $750,000. #KS17201.
ANNA MARIA/HOLMES BEACH west of Gulf Drive. 2BR/1.5BA,
parquet floors, paneled walls, crown molding, shuffleboard court,'
banana and grapefruit trees, fireplace, garage plus room for a
second garage. $279,000. #KS18867.
TRIPLEX 3BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 1BR,1BA close to beach. Excel-
lent rental history. $159,900. #KS13966.
BEST BUY in San Remo Shores. Owner invested $100,000 in reno-
vations. Must see! 3BR/2BA, vaulted ceiling in living room, fireplace,
white carpet and white tiles. Newer doors, breathtaking kitchen.
$239,900. #KS67542. Call Karin Stephan today on this great buy.
DIRECT GULFFRONT *MVP seller will entertain offers between
$630,000 $720,000. House with 2 apartments and 1 efficiency
on 2 lots. Great rental income. #KS14087.

DOLPHIN WATCH APARTMENT
Bayfront with boat dock.
Completely updated within
walking distance to Gulf
beaches and shopping.
$349,000. #CH18808.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


MICHAEL ADVOCATE
REALTOR/GRI
Real Estate Lecturer: NYU
Biographed in Who's
Who in American Law
Je Parle Francais
(un petit peu)
After hours:
(941) 778-0608


JUST LISTED!
Spacious 3BR/2BA on deep canal. Separate one
bedroom apartment, 2-car garage, in-ground pool,
outdoor wet bar with sink, fireplace, electric boat lift.
Recently renovated. #MA19294. Must see! Offered
at $340,000. Call now ask for Michael Advocate.
CHARMING BAYFRONT HOME Lovely 3BR/2BA home
with clear views of the Skyway, city pier and pristine nature.
$329,000. #DY13518.
TIFFANY 2BPJ2BA, Gulfview, elevator. $185,000. #TDY15658.
DEEDED BOAT DOCK*MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$130,000 $160,000. 2BR/2BA, lushly landscaped backyard,
enclosed lanai, garage, potential for duplex. #TDY18162.
GULFFRONT MOTEL 22 units, heated pool, private beach,
desirable location. $1,895,000. #TDY16859.
PALMA SOLA *MVP Seller will entertain offers between $130,000
-$160,000. 1/2 block to Bay. 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage, caged pool,
large lot. Citrus; quiet street. #TDY17901.
SANDY POINTE Beautifully furnished 2BR/2BA unit in
bayfront complex. $93,900. #TDY18420.
NEW LISTING *MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$190,000 $230,000. Bayfront elevated home with protected
inlet. #TDY18532.
T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427
ISLAND DUPLEX with bayview. Each side has 2 bed-
rooms in this elevated duplex with tile floors down and
wood floors up. Great rental history. Schedule your
appointment today to see this for only $139,000. #19352
Call Debbie Thrasher, eves. 778-3395.
DELIGHTFUL MARTINIQUE New listing offering this 2
bedroom, 2 bath unit with a southern view of the white
sand beach and Gulf of Mexico. Turnkey furnished, all you
need is your toothbrush, even includes 1-car garage.
#19316. To see this today call Carol Heinze, 778-7246.
FLAMINGO CAY Canalfront 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage,
family room, end of cul-de-sac, dock, fruit trees, screened
lanai overlooking wide canal. All this and the seller will
entertain offers between $170,000 $210,000. #19053.
See ittoday with Horace GiHey, anytime 792-0758.


Proudorporae sponsors.ofMotearineLabora Clurab e anicop.


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REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


s 0nult


'/-Wo ,9O76,e







- I1D PAGE 32 W JANUARY 15, 1997 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



ITEMFOSAL___________ConinudBOTS__BOAINGContnue


BLACK LEATHER KING HEADBOARD, 2 twin box
springs that attach and swing apart. $75 OBO. Call
778-8406.
GAS WATER HEATER for sale. Rheem 62 gallons.
$80 and you move it please. Call 778-7978.
PRIDE ELECTRIC SCOOTER 12V batteries,
on-board charger, 100% warranty, transaxle, free
wheeling, portable. $1,000 OBO. Folding alumi-
num ramp $200. Call 778-7422.
TV 27" COLOR excellent condition $125. Phone
778-3639.
COSCO CRIB WITH MATTRESS, crib sheet $35.
Stroller, excellent condition $5. Cosco toddler car
seat $25. Graco carriage, folds up $30. 778-7963.
WHIRLPOOL WASHER AND DRYER in good con-
dition, almond color $195. 778-4917.
THE CARD LADY is back! Same lady has home-
made cards for sale at Spicer Cottages, 112 Oak St,
Anna Maria. Ask for Dorothy Bronson.
THREE DRESSERS/2 BAHAMA COUCHES with
cushions on rollers. Excellent condition. Call 778-4572.
CHANDELIER, WEATHER INDICATOR, pretty
shower curtain and liner, unusual sofa table, framed
pictures, small kitchen chairs, etc. 778-6003.


ESTATE SALE Fri. & Sat., Jan. 17 & 18, 8 4. Con-
tents of large 3BR home. Art-deco furniture and
much more! 531 72nd Street, Holmes Beach.
YARD SALE Sat., Jan. 18, 8 5. Tools, bikes,
CD's, movies, collectibles, odds and ends, exer-
cise equipment, fishing equipment, etc. 206E Pea-
cock Lane, Holmes Beach.


YOGA ON THE ISLAND with Harmony Feldman.
Beginning and intermediate level, morning and
evening classes. Call 778-3892 to enroll.




ReietalS lsRetlDviin9LiesdRelEtteBoe


.-~


STEPS TO THE BEACH. Spacious 3BR/2B, open
and bright, turnkey furnished unit, washer/dryer.
Covered parking, 2 pools. Excellent rental history.
$124,900. Barry and Kimberly Charles, 795-1273 or
Sandy Marchinetti, 758-7438. C19243
PRIVACY AND ELEGANCE on a large tree-bor-
dered secluded lot. Fronting the Manatee River with
a panoramic view extending to the Gulf. 2-story
home filled with innumerable special touches.
$1,900,000. Jim Brown, 747-1200. R19008
EXTRAORDINARY WATERFRONT. Historic loca-
tion at the mouth of Manatee River. Breathtaking
views of Skyway Bridge, Tampa Bay. 2.4 +/- acre
estate, over 200' of beach. 5BR/5-1/2B, crown mold-
ing, travertine flooring, stone fireplace. Open floor
plan. $2,999,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200. R12291
BEAUTIFUL TOWNHOUSE. 3BR, eat-in kitchen,
combination living/dining rooms. 1BR/1B on first
floor. Master and second suite upstairs. Elevator,
40' slip on sailboat water. Workshop. $269,900.
Kathy Marcinko, 792-9122. C11680
BEAUTIFUL VIEWS of the bay. Dock on sailboat
water. 3BR/3B, great room, elevated living area
with game room below. 2-car garage. Built with
concrete pilings and break away walls. $289,500.
Nancy Keegan, 723-3929. R18579
ZONED C2. Lot, 90' x 100' +/-. Prime Gulf Drive
location. Explore the possibilities. $180,000. Anne
Miller, 792-6475. L15843

aIII"IIilIN .N I' I I 1.I11ill l I ,1A

Exceptional vacation properties available
for 1997 season, weekly or monthly.
Call 951-6668 or 1-800-881-2222.


L 40 M naeeAvnu W s Badnon,9 L 409*(91)4-60A


GEORGE WASHINGTON SLEPT at Roser Chapel!
Or did he? Find out during the hilarious comedy
"George Washington Slept Here." Chapel Players of
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria City. Tickets on sale Wed., Jan. 22,
10 2. Show opens Fri., Jan. 31. Donation $7 for
adults, $4 for children. Information 778-5405.
ARNOLD RUMPH TH. M. Creation Therapy instruc-
tion, temperament analysis profile administrator and
Christian counselor to individuals, couples and fami-
lies. 794-0567 for appointment.
THANKS AND PRAISE to Saint Jude for prayers
answered. Thy name be exalted forever. P.B.
OEX OPTION TRADERS wish you earned more
$ ? Intraday Technical Analysis could help. This is not
a sales ad. Phone 778-5788.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls) -We
come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-1012.


WHITE '84 CADILLAC ELDORADO full power, moon
roof, runs good. $1,750 OBO. Call 778-6569.
1992 GMC VAN DURA 14 ft. cube van, excellent
condition, 93,000 miles. $12,500. '89 Mustang LX,
runs great. $1,995. 794-5891.


BOAT SLIP FOR Rent in Holmes Beach. Call 778-7039.


BREEZY KEY WEST STYLE CANALFRONT
308 Tarpon, Anna Maria
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, over 2,000 sq. ft. living area
with vaulted ceilings and master bedroom suite on
the 3rd floor. Offered at $329,500. $319,500 just
reduced.


Doug Dowling Realty
778-1222







MLS B
5201 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(941) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-237-2252







__ . __---- .


THIS ONE HAS IT ALL!
Direct Gulffront view from across street. 100 ft. to
beaches has Bayview as well. Boat dock, tennis, spa
and pool. Turnkey furnished. Great rental history.
$140,000. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
PRIME GOLF VILLA Class A membership at Tara Golf &
Country Club included with this turnkey furnished 2BR/2BA
ground floor unit. Direct fairway views & private garage com-
plete this quality package. $124,900. Ken Rickett 778-4800.
LONGBOAT KEY HOME 4BR/2.5BA home in one of
Longboat Key's desired communities. Gated community,
security alarm, inground heated caged pool with great deck-
ing. Perfect home for entertaining. New carpeting, tile roof
and vertical blinds. $309,000. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
WATERWAY PENTHOUSE This 3BR/3BA top floor
unit in the Waterway Condos offers exclusive views of
Palma Sola Bay. The upgraded complex has heated pool,
tennis court, workout room, billiard room and boat docks.
Great location! Asking $159,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
COMMERCIAL OFFICE BUILDING Building is situ-
ated in the center of Holmes Beach. Uniquely designed to
be subdivided into as many as five independent offices. Five
air conditioning units and five meters. Shown by appoint-
ment. $310,000. Stan Williams 778-4800.
Visit Our Web Site
http://www.manatee-on-line.com/a paradise/


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
1990 20' LOWE PONTOON boat with 60 hp Johnson
outboard, seat covers. Excellent condition. $6,800.
Call 778-4676.
AVON REDCREST DINGHY floor boards, pump,
oars, motor mount with 3 1/2hp Mariner outboard.
Good condition. $650. 778-2321.
1985 SKI NAUTIQUE like new. 17.5 feet, 351
Windsor. New upholstery $10,500. 371-8006.
WANTED FIBERGLASS sailing dinghy, 6' 9'
length. Call 778-2832.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.
TIP OF THE ISLAND is now accepting applications
for breakfast/lunch cook. Call 778-3909.
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you
can give a few hours of community service.


ONLY 35 FEETTO BEACH
On North Shore, great sunsets from
caged pool. 2BR/2BA, den, Florida room,
art studio. Sunny and bright. $339,000.


Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
R5WMB GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752


serving theIslarid
from ,ee me .,
In cathom sniei 197Q0.

Visit us at our web site: http://www.islandreal.com
[] MLS 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066


NEW LISTING OF THE WEEK
North Beach Village largest townhouse with
many extras. Custom kitchen, ceramic tile,
porch and 2 decks. 3BR/2.5BA and one year
Homeowner's Warranty! $174,000.
BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED HOME in park-like
setting with new designer kitchen, 3BR/2BA split
plan, new carpeting throughout, oversized 2-car
garage and more! $199,500.
DIRECT GULFFRONT charming island beach
house with many upgrades! Wide, sandy beach and
open water views. 2BR/2BA, garage, turnkey
furnished. $549,000.
SMUGGLER'S LANDING features this immaculate
and stunning unit in like new condition! Upgraded
kitchen with breakfast area, 2 huge storage rooms,
2BR/2BA and cathedral ceilings! $148,000.
ELEVATED newly built home in Anna Maria, steps
to beach and fishing pier. Excellent rental history.
3BR/2BA with split plan design and tons of covered
parking and large open porches. $229,500.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JANUARY 15, 1997 U PAGE 33 IE


LA I E R C ASSEI


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION / OPERATIONS
COORDINATOR for Anna Maria Island Community
Center. Highly motivated, positive attitude, must be
detail oriented with strong communication and
computer skills, accurate accounting and book-
keeping skills, effective time management a must,
great organizational skills. Good work ethics and
values required. Degree in Business Administra-
tion, Management, Accounting, Communication a
plus. Duties include: office management, com-
puter, Lotus, Word Perfect, analytical with problem
solving skills, coordinating volunteers, phones,
scheduling, bookkeeping and accounting manage-
ment reports, program reports, and correspon-
dence and grant proposals occasionally. Work with
fund raising program and volunteers. Resume to
PO Box 253, Anna Maria, FL 34216. Full time
position: hours 9:00 5, M F (may vary occasion-
ally). Salary range $6 $7.50 hr. depending on
qualifications and experience. Benefits available.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605
MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
'THE PERFECTIONIST"- cleaning with perfection!
Offices, homes and condos. Call Sharon at 778-0064.
IRONING DONE sheets to shirts. Fast service. Island
pick-up and delivery. Smoke free environment.
References available. Phone 778-2085.
"I DON'T WANNA clean house" you say to yourself.
Sharon wants to clean your house. References. Call
or leave message. 778-3006.
:.-MOTHER/DAUGHTER CLEANING honest, reliable,
,.- references,Let us clean it up! $12 per hour, 2 hour
minimum. Please beep Linda 21,5-5956.
CLEANING CHRISTIAN GRANDMOTHER with
residential experience. Honest and dependable. Call
for free estimate. 778-5941.


SANDBAR




Sandbar Restaurant is now
hiring positive, energetic
individuals, wanting to work
in a fun atmosphehere.
WAIT STAFF
BUS HELP
HOST/HOSTESS
KITCHEN
Apply in person at
100 Spring Ave.
Mon. thru Fri., 3pm to 5pm.
We are looking forward
to meeting with you
on a one to one basis.




SOLMES


BUSINESS
CENTER


C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree trimming, pressure washing and paint-
ing. Free estimates. Larry 778-0119.
MAN AND VAN FOR HIRE for light hauling or
moving needs. Reasonable rates, courteous service.
794-5891.
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor
repairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.
DOCTORS FRANK & LISA LANZISERA, Chiroprac-
tors. Treatment for neck and low back pain, head-
aches, sciatica, ruptured discs, fibromyalgia. 15
years experience. Free consultation. 794-3344.
EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL COUPLE
cleaning homes, condos and rental properties. Im-
peccable local references. Island resident over
4 years. Call 778-3989.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


NEED A PHOTO REPRINT?
Reprints are available of photographs
taken by staff photographers that have appeared
in The Islander Bystander.
STEP 1 Cut out or make a copy of the photo you want
with the publication date noted.
STEP 2 O Send the clipping with payment to The Islander
Bystander for:
5x7 $15 8x10 $25
Plus 7% tax. All reprint requests must be paid in advance.
Call 778-7978 for prices of additional prints.
STEP 3 Mail your reprint order to: Reprints, The Islander
Bystander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217
or bring your order to The Islander Bystander office.
STEP 4 c Your reprints will be mailed to you or can be
picked up in about 3 weeks. Be sure to include your
address and phone number.
Reprints are intended for personal use and cannot be
re-published without the written permission of
The Islander Bystander (941) 778-7978

|ISLANDER a I 1i


ISLANDER
aL4AEl


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.


ANNA MARIA GARDEN Center & Landscaping. Free
estimates, 32 years experience. Full service land-
scaping and garden center. Next to Island Foods. All
work guaranteed. 778-6630.


INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR Painting free estimates.
31 year Island resident. Call Jim Bickal at 778-1730.

WEST BAY PLAZA & BANK


2217G lfDivA orh* Badntn eah, FL321
77;226- 1* 00-11-32
PT **~I UI *I A
Broke, CR, GR, LT S :11



:0.I


RUNAWAY BAY CONDO 1BR/1BA
ground floor unit. Fantastic rental history
for investors. Fully turnkey furnished and
already rented through March. Offered at
$83,000. Bob Wolter 794-2246 or eves.
727-1883.


GULFVIEW LOTS
* Wooded 100 x 100 single family or
duplex, $82,500
* Residential lot, convenient to shopping
and restaurants. Outstanding Gulfview!
$112,900. Call David Moynihan 778-7976


COQUINA MOORINGS Exceptional top
floor unit with spectacular views of bay
and Gulf. Upgraded appliances, 2 balco-
nies and spacious floor plan. Pool, deep
water dockage and across from wide
sandy beach. Offered at $199,900. Call
Ed Oliveira at 778-1751.


iAY-RHUNT UUPLtA Witn TaDUIOUS
view, spacious floor plans and a short
walk to the beach. Turnkey furnished.
2,736 sq. ft. total living area. Large deep
water dock. Offered at $369,000. Call
Dave Moynihan 778-7976.


WONDERFUL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY!
Multi-business offices and storefronts.
Excellent rental history. High visibility
and high traffic. Corner of East Bay
Drive and Manatee Avenue in Holmes
Beach. West Bay Plaza offered at
$595,000. Bank property offered
at $695,000. Total package offered at
$1,290,000.

CALL MARY ANN SCHMIDT
778-2261 OR 1-800-732-6434
SColdwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Inc.
605 Manatee Ave. W Holmes Beach


DJUUT UUNL.AN
Broker, CRS, GRI, LTG


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday January 19, 1997
1 -4 pm
6250 Holmes Blvd. #66, Holmes Beach $164,900
North Beach Village. 3BR/2BA townhouse, turnkey
furnished. Near pool, walk to beach. Carla Price
778-5648 eves.
213 58th Street, Holmes Beach ............ $135,000
2BR/2BA refurbished home, turnkey furnished. Fire-
place, large deck, close to beach. Pat Thompson
778-6439 eves.
613 Dundee Lane, Holmes Beach........... $249,900
Key Royale. 3BR/2BA home on a deep water canal
with dock and davits. New A/C system. Frank Migliore
778-2662 eves.
505 Key Royale Drive, Holmes Beach .... $269,00
2BR/2BA home on a deep water bayou. Pool, fire-
place, great view. Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
403 74th Street, Holmes Beach ..............$179,900
3BR/2.5BA townhouse with 2-car garage and storage
area. Lovely landscaped fenced yard. Darcie Duncan
779-2290 eves.
502 70th Street, Holmes Beach............... $164,900
2BR/2BA pool home with many upgrades. Choice cor-
ner lot. Bill Donnelly 778-6392 eves.
6746 2nd Ave. Circle W., Bradenton....... $149,900
4BR/3BA pool home in a great west side location.
Many special features in this home. Zee Catanese
794-8991 eves.
6306 98th Street E., Bradenton ............... $159,900
Braden Woods. 3BR/2BA with heated pool on one
acre lot. Fireplace. Carol Williams 778-1718 eves.


3 mREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


ANN AMAR'IA ISLAND I BRADENTOi NPALMETTO
^^^^ 778-2246 794-2246 722-2246^^^^^^


r., ..


GSI[Cal 78077 r -80-413727






R IB] PAGE 34 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


N Commercial -Residential Free Estimates
W a dh \ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
7781345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
I I .. AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
/ r "A DOOR EXPERT"
R Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247

]@'i 'm ('o@l STATE LICENSED & INSURED
o ,B're~ 'a l@lI CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
CONSTRUCTION. JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION Remodeling Specialists
CONSTRUCTION Building Anna Maria since 1975
@@ T[aU@@ (941) 778-2993
@@ TUO@T ANNA MARIA

G.R. SULLIVAN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Specialists in Hurricane Resistant
New Construction Remodeling Rennovation

25 Years Experience ECLNC Licensed & Insured
References 794-3260 XC NE Lic RR 0047996

Designed Refaced
Formica Wood


C^S C
CP B NI T~f


by REX B. SLIKER
10 Years of Local References


778-7399


REMODELING


* ADDITIONS
* RENOVATIONS
* KITCHENS BATHS
" r '-r" Fo M O R RAtD"e


- ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


J. R.

Painting
tPresi re CZeaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


XACT


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.
PROFESSIONAL PAINTER 12 years experience.
Interior/exterior, excellent Island references, no
mess. Call Don at 778-3456.
WE FIX WE PAINT WE CLEAN apartments,
houses, etc. Call Bob and Jean at 778-8655. Excel-
lent local Island references.
PAINTING AND PAPERING by Betty. 20 years pro-
fessional experience. Island references. Insured.
Please phone 794-5987. Thanks for your interest.
WE FIX WE PAINT WE CLEAN apartments,
houses, etc. Call Bob and Jean at 778-8655. Excel-
lent local Island references.
CARPET VINYL CERAMIC TILE sold, installed,
repaired. Great prices. All workmanship guaranteed.
Fully licensed and insured. Steve Allen 383-5381 or
beeper 506-3297.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile. Lic.
#MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave Elliott.


FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1BR/1BA,
private lot and parking. Available Mar. & Apr. at
$1,300 mo. 778-2832.
BAYFRONT QUAINT POOLSIDE 1BR/1 BA apart-
ment in ideal Anna Maria location near City Pier.
Available from Apr. '97 and winter '98. $1,000 mo.
778-4107 or 778-4657.
QUAINT GULFVIEW HOME directly across from
beach. 2 units available Mid Jan: Apr. 2BR/1BA
$1,500 mo., 1BR/1BA $1,100 mo. 778-8200.
ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT fully equipped, 2BR/
2BA, charming interior, sun deck. No pets. Wk./
mo./season. 778-3143.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA detached elevated
duplex apartment in Holmes Beach. No pets. $750 mo.
plus utilities. Washer and dryer included. 778-2993.
WANTED 1 OR 2 STALL GARAGE to rent in
Holmes Beach on a yearly basis if possible. Call
778-5974.
WANTED VACATION HOME RENTAL near or
Gulffront, middle two weeks of March. 2 or 3BR for
three retirees. Call (508) 336-2201.
DUPLEX BRADENTON BEACH waterfront, dock,
davits. 3BR/2BA, laundry room, modern, walk to
beach, view Intracoastal. $850 mo. 1st, last. Annual.
(813) 539-5586 or(813) 784-3679.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED in Bradenton Beach.
1BR/1BA across from Gulf. Large deck. $575 mo.
plus electric. Covered parking. 778-0019.
BEACH HOUSE Anna Maria Island. Gulffront,
great view, 3BR/2BA, garage, furnished. Available
for Jan., Feb., Apr., May, Jun. Week or month. Call
(813) 949-0104.
SEASONAL 2BR/1BA apartment. Nice and clean.
Walk to beach. Deposit. (941) 778-5057.
ANNUAL RENTAL 1BR/1BA, wood floors, newly
painted, one block to beach and bay. 203 2nd Street
N., Bradenton Beach. Available now. $500 mo.
(813) 874-0973.
2BR/2BA MARTINIQUE OR SANDY POINTE sea-
sonal. Call T. Dolly Young Realtor, Prudential Florida
Realty, 778-5427.
CHARMING HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA home with
water view. Annual lease at $1,185 mo. 778-0217.


ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH APARTMENT just re-
decorated. 2BR/2BA elevated with washer/dryer
hook-up. Great location near beach and shopping.
778-0217.
FURNISHED ACROSS FROM BEACH 3BR/2BA for
January. North Beach Village, $2,200 mo. Excalibur
Realty, 792-5566.
SEASONAL LARGE 1 BR/1BA, clean, freshly painted.
One block to beach, shopping. Tile/wood floors, private
deck. $350 wk., $1,200 mo. Call 778-5143.
CANCELLATION DUE TO HEALTH 2BR/2BA 6orido
in small 4-unit complex. Private, quiet with pool, laun-
dry. Deluxe remodeled unit, garage. Available Jan.,
Feb., Mar., Apr. 1997. Won't last long. One block to
public beach, Manatee Ave., Island Foods, Duffy's
Tavern. Call 778-4560 for information. Weekly,
monthly or seasonal only.
ANNUAL CUTE 2BR/1BA lower duplex for quiet,
professional non-smokers. $650 mo. 1st, last, plus
$650 security includes water, trash, cable. 792-3226.
SEASONAL CANCELLATION SPECIAL! Cute 2BR/
1 BA lower duplex, one block to beach. Available now
for season. $1,350 mo. 792-3226.
BEAUTIFUL GULFVIEW small 2BR on dead end
street along Gulf. Quaint, quiet, cozy. Washer/dryer.
Mid Jan. Apr. $1,000 mo., $550 wk. 778-0990.
BEAUTIFUL GULFFRONT BESTVIEW 3BR/2BA,
exclusive north end. Fireplace in top floor master
suite. Deck, patio, tropical garden. $3,000 Jan.,
$1,000 wk. 778-0990
ANNUAL 1BR/1BA DUPLEX apartment in Holmes
Beach. Unit has central heat/air, electric range, gar-
bage disposal. $525 mo. plus utilities. First and se-
curity required. No pets. Call Fran Maxon Real Estate.
at 778-1450 for further information.
BAYFRONT IN ANNA MARIA Heated pool/spa, pri-
vate courtyard and spectacular view df Skyway
Bridge from 2BR/1BA penthouse. One of a kind loca-
tion near City Pier. Available from Feb. '97 and win-
ter '98. $1,800 mo. 778-4107 or 778-4657. ;
2BR/1 BA YEARLY Walk to beanhl Downstairs util-
ity room. Central heat/air. $650..1st,-lastsecurity.
778-7980.
SEASONAL RENTAL 2BR, washer/dryer, carport,
porch, 2 blocks to beach. $1,500. Available Feb; 1.
Fenced yard. Pets considered. 778-8221, beeper
723-5504. Discount for 2 months. -"
2BR/2BA ANNA MARIA (Martinique) on beach. Pool,
tennis, garage.. Feb. 15-Apr. $2,500 mo. 778-6786.
AVAILABLE FOR RENT Feb. and Mar. 1BR apart-
ment, heated pool, steps from beach. Also renting for
1997/98 season. Telephone 371-0500.
THE CARRIAGE HOUSE Anna Maria Island annual
rental. A stone's throw from Gulf and bay. 1BR/1 BA,
screened porch and deck. Sparkling clean and
private. Fully furnished with washer/dryer, central
heat and air. $600 mo. 778-3205.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA duplex close to Rod &
Reel Pier. $550 mo plus security. 778-6088.
ROOM FOR RENT on Holmes Beach including pri-
vate bathroom and sharing rest of house. House has
a pool and is two blocks from Gulf. $400 mo. plus any
long distance calls. Utilities are included. Male or fe-
male. Please call after 7 pm. 778-4078.
ADORABLE ANNA MARIA COTTAGE cancellation
available for April $1,200. Central heat/air, clean,
nicely furnished, no pets, steps to beach. Phone
(813) 935-2339.
11 F 1
11I[l # 1


JISLANDER DECLASSIFIED
I HMEIMROEMNT onined I ENALSCotiue


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 15, 1997 0 PAGE 35 KI


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE seasonal or annual.
Lovely 3BR/2.5BA, garage, furnished. No pets. Call
778-9171.
HOLMES BEACH bird lovers seasonal, turnkey fur-
nished, ground floor, 1BR apartment 100 yards to
Gulf. Currently available. 778-5617.
ANNUAL WATERFRONT VILLA in Holmes Beach.
2BR/2BA. $700 mo. Call Steve 778-4370.
ANNUAL RENTAL Brand new 2BR/1BA duplex
across from beach. Covered parking, washer/dryer.
Deposit plus $700 mo., water included. 778-5098.
ANNUAL RENTAL 1BR/1 BA newly painted and new
carpet. Minutes to beach. 778-9240.
LOVELY 2BR/1 BA in Anna Maria. Gulffront apart-
ment fully furnished, sundeck, porch, washer/
dryer, microwave, convenient location. Weekly or
monthly, no pets. 778-3143.


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE condo for sale by owner.
Priced at $143,000. 3BR/2BA. Call for appointment.
778-2629.
OWNER SELLING ELEVATED HOME in Anna
Maria City. 2BR/2BA, 2 living rooms, garage,
workshop, storage, warranty. $197,000. Call 778-
4543 to view. Spacious.
REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE OWNER deep canal,
large lot, unique design, 3BR/2BA. 517 71st Street,
drive by. $199,900. Appointment, call 778-7999.
ANNA MARIA UNOBSTRUCTED Gulf/bay views.
Custom 3BR/3BA, 3 years old. $459,900. Appoint-
ment only. 207 South Bay Blvd. (941) 778-5948.
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY Jan. 19, 1 4. 2202
Avenue A, Bradenton Beach. One of a kind cus-
tom built 3BR/2BA. Fabulous bay view. Only 3
years old. Many extras. $229,900. Call 778-2960.
SUNNY SHORE SUPER STAR owner financing!
Mobile home, 2BR/2BA, new kitchen, new roof
over with insulation. Towne & Shore, Madelynne,
778-2940 or 779-2044.
SALE OR TRADC Lovoly 3BR/3BA Island home.
Enclosed downstairs; $140,000. Want condo with
Sboat slip, duplex or handyman. 778-5125.
COZY, CONVENIENT, CARPORT Desoto Villa.
1 BR/1 BA across from clubhouse, pool, tennis. Great
location. Possible owner financing. Towne & Shore,
Madilynne, 778-2940 or 779-2044.
PROPERTY FOR SALE Oriental North Carolina.
1/2 acre waterview, deeded boat slip, septic system
installed. $40,000. (941) 778-0315.
WANTED ISLAND DUPLEX OR home $115,000 or
under. Call me before listing with a Realtor and we
both save! (813) 960-5996 or 779-2237. Ask for
Karen. No Realtors please.
BY OWNER ONE YEAR OLD 3BR/2BA, fireplace,
pool, 2-car garage, near beach. For appointment call
794-5891. $129,900.
HOLMES BEACH 4-PLEX across from beach. All
2BR/2BA at $650 mo. New everything, room for
pool. Cash back to qualified buyers. 778-0217.


-----------------

HOW TO PLACID
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEE
must be placed in person and paid in
Shopping Center. 5404 Marina Drive, H


Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Fr
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INI
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for eaci
rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND
in person or by phone. We are sorry, bu
classified ad copy over the telephone. To
your copy with your charge card number
USETHIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENT
21 words.
I-------------------------


More information:
(941) 778-7978 ISLANDE
FAX: (941) 778-9392
L -- -


I' I


OPEN HOUSE Sun., Jan. 19, 1 4. 524 Spring Ave.
Come enjoy the beautiful views of Tampa Bay as we
escort you through this charming 3BR/3BA elevated
home for only $199,500! Betsy Hills Real Estate,
778-2291.
GULFFRONT CONDO TURNKEY furnished! 2BR/
2BA, pool, lots of extras. $199,000. 778-7980.
Towne & Shore Realty.
ISLAND VILLAGE CONDO for sale by owner. Pan-
oramic view of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
Spacious, upscale 2BR/2BA. Over 1,500 sq. ft., 30'
porch, 2 pools, tennis. Attractive, convenient com-
plex. Walk to beach, shopping and church. Priced
thousands below appraised value for quick sale at
$110,000. Open house Sun., Jan. 19, 1 4. 4255
Gulf Drive #221, Holmes Beach. 778-5180.
NEW HOUSE 2BR/2BA, tile and carpeted. Spa-
cious. Come see! 3301 6th Avenue. 779-1336.


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COL@AOL.COM

Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
RWMBKGULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

C J's Plumbing Inc. 722-2702
24-Hour Emergency Service & Repairs
* Water Heaters *Drain Cleaning *Disposals *Remodeling
JOHN DAVIS Beeper 569-9052
Licensed & Insured CFC056844

Kern Construction, Inc.
Remodeling Additions Carpentry
S ^ 1 Repairs Custom-Built Kitchens
MICHAEL S. KERN JERRY KERN
748-8020 778-1115
License #RR0066904 & Insured

JP~ JaVTIE'G kEninelJwaf,,h
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468


----------------------

E A CLASSIFIED AD
K for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising
advance or mailed to our office in the Island
iolmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to
riday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
DIVIDUAL" Minimum rate is $7.50 for up to 21
h 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line

VISA! You can charge your classified advertising
t due to the high volume of calls we can not take
place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX.
r. FAX (941) 778-9392.
4CE: One word per blank space for minimum charge





:l - - -- -
- - - _ _ _ _ _


LOTS FOR SALE Direct bayview $79,500.
Oceanview with beach access and ownership
$175,000. 778-4523 or (800) 977-0803.
OPEN HOUSE Sun., Jan. 19, 1 4. Charming
ground-level home on Lake LaVista with access to
Tampa Bay. 2BR/2BA, pool, cul-de-sac. Walk or
bike to beaches. Price reduced to $215,000.
113 Pelican, Anna Maria. 778-9107.
WANTED HOLMES BEACH canal home. 3BR/
2BA, 2-car garage. Pool or room for pool. $250,000
range. Cash. No agents. 387-9122.
NORTH ANNA MARIA CANALFRONT residence,
newly renovated, 3BR/2BA in secluded tropical set-
ting. Steps to beaches. Drive by 102 Gull. $229,000.
748-6550 or 748-6110.
PERICO BAY CLUB gated community, private, water-
side lane, bayside villa. End unit 2BR/2BA, garage,
clubhouse, tennis, pools. $112,900. Phone 792-5218.
OPEN SUNDAY Jan. 19, 1 4. 515 Loquat Dr.,
Anna Maria. 3BR/2BA canalfront home with 2-car
garage, screened porch, Mexican tile and vaulted
ceilings. $299,000. Nicholas Patsios, Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH BY OWNER Short walk to Gulf,
ground level 2BR/1BA with 1 BR/1 BA guest quarters
on lushly landscaped duplex lot. Large lanai with
spa. $219,000. Principles only. 778-5617.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising
herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin,
or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant wpmen and people securing
custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowing ac-
cept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain
of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hear-
ing impaired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


RICH'S WINDOW CLEANING

15-YEARS EXPERIENCE
-- REASONABLE RATES

S727-8734
PROMPT AND COURTEOUS SERVICE


, COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095

7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


CUTE HOUSE FOR SALE 2BR/1BA, Mexican tile,
carport, porch, fenced yard. Two blocks to beach,
1/2 block to bay. $104,000. 778-8221.


r-


I


I


Buy it! Sell it! Find it! Rent it!
Islander Bystander classified produce results.


Co WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING
LP GAS |RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
< $70--------
|| 00 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
PER FILL EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
20blind WATER HEATERS *SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING







ESIjj PAGE 36 M JANUARY 15, 1997 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE


AC
I Bla
6 Air
eng
13 Re'
anc
err
20 Sto
21 Ge
the
22 Ve
the
23 Bu
fer
cor
24 It o
75-
sol
26 Poc
27 Ref
28 Zo
29 Lik
30 "1,
Nig
31 Qu
34 Ro
35 Ff.
36 Ch
39 Pai
dec
41 Mo
42 Eso
44 Co
gr
cei
45 Co
Bla
46 Dr
on


BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS
ROSS 48 Follow, as
ah advice
"plane 49 Social activities
gines 50 Noted Dixieland
mind again clarinetist
d again of an 52 Unequaled
or 54 The sun, the
pped lying moon and the
t hot under stars
collar 55 Implant
ry hot under 56 Notorious
Collar London prison
ck Rogers's 58 Like some
nale stocks, for short
mpanion 61 Initials on a
Dpens with a rocket
bar bassoon 62 Rum cocktail
o 65 Circles and such
or surfer 66 Fiesta, e.g.
f. set 67 Mystery writer
diac symbol Josephine
e Abner 68 Italian province
001 Arabian or its capital
ghts" hero 70 Disney deer
ills 71 Caesar's well
man way 72 Sitcom
religieuse originally titled
arged "These Friends
rade of Mine"
corations 73 Bouquets
mumental 77 Scotland yards?
ophagus 80 Corps unit
mpletes a 81 Basins
aveside 82 Neural
remony transmitters
untry singer 83 "Happy Days"
ack role
oopy-eared 85 Papal capes
e 86 Engine stats
87 It gives players a
cushion
f v p 89 Bird calls
92 Meteorological
datum


/ EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


93 Tennis player
Ramirez
94 del Fuego
96 Bailey's
bailiwick
97 "Walking on
Thin Ice" singer
98 Those playing
the role of Boris
Godunov
100 Athos, to
Porthos
101 Writer Rogers
St. Johns
103 Like a
samaritan's
help
107 Tangle
108 Implement
109 Staffing
110 Goddess of
peace
111 Crook
112 Understanding
113 Cause for an
insurance claim
DOWN
1 Derisive laugh
2 Jim Palmer,
notably
3 Preventing an
attack, in a way
4 Cadets' inits.
5 Drink for
Beowulf
6 Camera setting
7 Not the
prayerful sort
8 "You-- worry

9 Clash
10 Major record
co.


STUMPED?


11 Sounds of
reproof
12 Display item
13 Ransackers
14 Indy 500 family
15 Some
Protestants:
Abbr.
16 Sale item abbr.
17 Pilot's
nightmare
18 Firing up
19 Overlooks
25 Gene Autry pic
31 His feast day is
April 11
32 The unmarried
woman in "An
Unmarried
Woman"
33 Submitted
37 Ditties
38 Arabic letter
40 Makes amends
41 Writer Wiesel
43 Hard to describe
45 Holiday
decorations
46 State
oratorically
47 Intrinsically
48 Fighting
49 Show senility
51 Idle
52 Capital of Guam
53 One of the
Canaries
57 The place
58 1960 Sinatra
movie
59 Roberts of
"Charlie's
Angels"


60 Salad green 75 Noted workshop
62 Fr. girls chief
63 Bothers 76 Ship, in poetry
64 Actually 77 English writers
69 Behind the Derek and
times Christopher
71 It gets into a 78 Advocate
pickle 79 "The Electric
72 Seabirds Kool-Aid Acid
74 Small African Test" author
antelope 80 1974 Chicago hit


83 Furniture
protector
84 Roulette player's
opponent
85 Unrest
87 Steed's
-movement
88 Position oneself
to hear better
90 Pageant element
91 Low tracts


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get ans
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minul


95 Chip feature
98 Engage in
logrolling
99 Cartoonist
Drake
101 Dry
102 Defy
104 Mauna-
105 Bank figure:
Abbr.
106 "- moment"
0
swers to any
te for the call. 0


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


-----1
IA --- -w


SPECTACULAR HOME $439,000 Al open
end of Island's widest canal. Totally updated
1996. Master bedroom overlooks heated pool
and spa. Dock with 10,000 Ib boat lift. Call Bob
or Lu Rhoden 778-2692.


NORTH POINT HARBOR WATERFRONT
HOME $549,900 Custom built 4BR/3BA
home on deep-water canal. Community pool/
tennis courts. Over 3,500 sq. ft of living area.
Four-car garage with plenty of storage area. Call
Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931.


KEY ROYALE WATERFRONT $199,500
Well-maintained and decorated canalfront
home. Private dock only minutes from Tampa
Bay. Large screened lanai, low maintenance
landscaping. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones
778-6791.


PRIVATEER CONDO LONGBOAT KEY
CLUB $215,000 Breathtaking Gulf view.
Beautiful unit with elegant lobby. Elevators,
exercise room. Pool, near beach. Tennis court
on grand walking beach. Call Rose Schnoerr
778-2261


SIX-UNIT MOTELIAPARTMENT $3:
Only a half block to beach. A vacation oas
Florida living. Large, heated pool. New
conditioner. Cook-out grill. Barbecue grill,
Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791


PINE LAKES $115,000 No backyard neigh-
bors. 3BR/2BA home with family room and
screened porch. normal living room, dining room
and eating area in kitchen. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt 778-4931.


29,900 HERON'S VIEW OF SARASOTA BAY FLAMINGO CAY CANALFRONT HOME
is of old $219,000 Situated on a private Island. This $199,500 3BR/2BA Boater's Dream w/ direct
wall air- 2BR/2BA townhouse with cathedral ceiling over- .Intracoastal waterway, garage on cul-de-sac.
laundry. looks Sarasota skyline. Community pool, tennis, 1,0001b lift, water & electric. Call Rose
clubhouse. Best priced waterfront property. Call Schnoerr 778-2261
Bob & Penny Hall 506-2239.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
$155,500 Waterfront condo Premier boating
community off Tampa Bay. 2BR/2BA downstairs
turnkey furnished. Heated pool, Jacuzzi, tennis.
Call Bobye Chasey 778-1532.


PALMA SOLA'S BEST BUY $169,000
Like new 3BR/2BA completely redone from top
to bottom. Above-ground fenced-in pool with a
large deck. Call Harold Small 792-8628.


GULFFRONT CONDO OVERLOOKS A BETTER WAY OF LIFE $56,500 Your
COQUINA BEACH $124,500 Open decks, search is over. Easy living, 2BR/2BA, large
under cover parking, close to shopping. 2BR/ lanai, very nicely updated. All ages and pets
2BA Call Evelyn Mitchell. 778-1952. OK. Close to beaches. Call Donna Mosley
795-6142.


I _.