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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 09-01-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00652

Full Text



WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


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Free-for-all erupts at political forum


The gloves came off Monday in the fight between
veteran Manatee County Commissioners Kent Chetlain
and Pat Glass.
Due to redistricting, Chetlain is seeking the same at-
large commission seat held by Glass.
The campaign appeared to turn into a cat fight at
a forum held Monday by The Islander Bystander.
Chetlain accused Glass of being a pawn of business
and development interests.
Glass accused Chetlain of misstating the facts on a
number of issues, including a county-wide recycling issue.
Even audience members entered the fray, prompting
Islander Bystander Publisher Bonner Presswood, modera-
tor of the political forum, to repeatedly call for order.
"This is more like a divorce than a political cam-


FOR CANDIDATE PROFILES,
ISSUE STATEMENTS,
SEE PAGES 4, 10.
paign," Glass said at one point within a particularly
rancorous exchange between the two as Chetlain nod-
ded in agreement.
Ironically, Chetlain and Glass have similar voting
records and philosophies. Probably the greatest distinc-
tion between the pair lies in their stand on growth and
growth management.
Chetlain said he opposed growth along State Road
70, stating he believed the roadway should be widened
before any more development was permitted along the
busy highway.


Glass said she believed in planned development,
calling the county's comprehensive plan "number one
in the state."
Chetlain accused Glass of accepting contributions
from developers, saying, "I am a candidate of the people."
Glass said "my contributions are many and varied,
and I'm not about to roll over for anyone."
On the issue of a study to determine feasibility of
an additional bridge from the mainland to the barrier
islands, both agreed that the study called a charrette
- is a good idea, but probably will not result in any
real change.
Chetlain said, "there are so many environmental
SEE FREE-FOR-ALL, PAGE 2


Drain dilemma HANDS ACROSS THE WATER

floods Gulf Drive-

Cortez Road _--- .--- .

intersection "
"Emergency" is what some are calling the intersection
of Gulf Drive and Cortez Road. And no, it's not because : ""..
of the Sunday afternoon beach exodus of traffic.
The problem is the flooding at the intersection af- -
ter a heavy rain. Florida Department of Transportation .. -. -it, .
officials have discovered the drainage system for the -
busy intersection doesn't drain.
When sand for the new beach was added to the Is-
land last year, Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim
Kissick explained, the drainage pipe for the intersection
- which previously dumped the stormwater runoff
into the Gulf of Mexico was covered over with sand. -
"The drain is useless," Kissick said.
"Worse still," he said, "as rain and surf saturate the
beach, the water from thousands of square yards of -
beach surface is backflowing into the 'funnel,' through
the pipe and up onto the roadbed."
The discovery produced a flurry of activity by
DOT officials in an effort to correct the problem. The
solution will probably be a storm drain running east
into Anna Maria Sound, Kissick said. ,.
"DOT is treating it as a crisis," Kissick said, due to ... .,. .
the intersection's use as a hurricane evacuation route
for residents living south of Cortez Road in Bradenton Their food and water stores exhausted after five days on the open sea in a rickety raft, Cuban refugees
Beach, as well as people living on Longboat Key. joyously accept a handout from the Salgado family while awaiting the U.S. Coast Guard's assistance some
DOT officials are reviewing drainage plans for the 20 miles offshore of Key West. The three men say people who protested against Castro were gunned down
area and should have price estimates soon to fix the in-the streets just a short time before they left Cuba. Photo courtesy of Roy Salgado
intersection flood problem.

Anna Maria has new building inspector almost


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The search is over, and if the Anna Maria City
Commission supports a committee's recommendation,
the city will have a a new public works director/build-
ing inspector Sept. 1.
From a short list of three candidates, a screening com-
mittee appointed by the city commission has selected the
name of Bill Zimmerman, 49, to assume the post Don
Tarantola will be vacating Sept 16. The committee voted
unanimously to recommend Zimmerman for the job, and
the only thing that now awaits is the vote of the city com-
mission Sept. 1 at 10 am. at City Hall.
Two of the needed three commission votes are
practically assured, for commission members Max
Znika and Doug Wolfe were both on the screening
committee, and both men seem very enthusiastic about
the committee's choice. Although Znika and Wolfe
both reviewed applications for the job, the two com-
missioners did not meet with the committee concur-
rently so as to avoid any possible problems with the
Sunshine law.
"His credentials are great," Znika says of
Zimmerman. "We ran him over the coals pretty good,


but we had to lay it on the line because we're hiring the
guy and this is what we want."
What the city wants is a public works director who
is fully state certified and will need no additional train-
ing for the job. Znika says the three candidates in the
running who were interviewed last week were about
equally qualified, but that Zimmerman had an edge in
living close by and being able to relocate immediately.
The screening committee is recommending
Zimmerman start at an annual salary of $28,500 and be on
probation for six months. At the end of that probation
period, he will receive an annual salary increase of $500,
with two more raises of $500 at six month intervals until
his annual pay reaches $30,000. Znika stresses this is only
a recommendation and the actual pay structure will be
determined by the city commission.
Currently, Zimmerman works as a building inspec-
tor for the City of Bradenton and is being paid $22,800.
Zimmerman says he will be able to relocate to the
Island in one day, Znika says, because Zimmerman lives
on a boat in Palmetto and plans to find a slip at Galati's.
It was expected Zimmerman would be in town
Aug. 31 to meet with city commission members and
city employees.


Harry Boothe, a building inspector the city has
used in the past as a consultant, will help ease
Zimmerman into his new position when he arrives for
his first day of work Sept. 19.

Ernie Cagnina
scrapbook, page 18








SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ...................................... ............. 6
Those Were the Days ................................. ... 7
Lightning strikes ........................................ .. 11
Island vegetable garden................................ 12
Anna Maria tides ....................................... .. 25
Beach Olympics ............................................ 27
Early classified deadline, p. 31


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


SEPTEMBER 1, 1994


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ILL


I ..






IG3 PAGE 2 N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Forum generates ideas for Center funding


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A roundtable of elected officials, civic leaders and
county personnel met Monday morning in Holmes
Beach City Hall to brainstorm alternate methods of
funding for the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger, who
hosted the event, said the community center is provid-
ing services to municipalities from Palmetto to
Sarasota and is "rapidly becoming a regional facility."
Pierrette Kelly, AMICC executive director, told the
group that the community center provides a host of
programs for youth, adults and elderly residents. She
said 44 percent of the budget comes from funding and
56 percent is raised by the staff, the board of directors
and volunteers.
"We feel our programs have expanded to the limit
within our facility," she explained. "Some of our cur-
rent reasons for asking for help for funding are to im-
prove our facilities, meet ADA (American Disabilities
Act) requirements and to improve the condition of our
gym floor."
Bohnenberger said his purpose was to find ways to
cut down the amount of money that has to be raised by
the Center. His first suggestion was to establish an
adopt-a-day, week or month program for corporations.
He said the center needs $500 per day to operate.
Russ Kitching of the Blake Foundation replied that
private businesses are at the end of their budget cycle.
Most do not want to get locked into a yearly donation
but would rather give money for a specific project or
be a sponsor for an event in order to get maximum
publicity, he said.
County Commissioner Stan Stephens asked about


job training programs funded by the Manasota Indus-
try Council (MIC) to help save costs on staff training.
Edie Anson of MIC said their programs are for the
economically disadvantaged who have no prior work
skills and individuals can be placed in non-profit situ-
ations if they are learning work skills.
Kelly noted that with the small center staff, it
would be very time-consuming to train, supervise and
administer these individuals and there are no facilities
available, as each hour of each day currently has a pro-
gram. She also said the job training program requires
up-front capital, which the community center does not
have.
Stephens stressed, "Pierrette does an excellent job
of where the dollars go. I think you'll see that from
what the county has committed to this center three
years ago and what they're doing today. It's over a 100
percent increase and it's because of the quality of the
programs."
Betty Camp from Florida Rep. Julie McClure's
office said there is money available for at-risk youth
through the juvenile justice system but it must be acted
on quickly. Kelly said she would make application.
Fred Loveland of the county's community services
department said the school board has received $40,000
for after-school programs that will be available to all
schools in the district. The proportion of distribution is
based on the free lunch program and 30 percent of
Anna Maria Elementary school students qualify.
Kelly replied, "I know our after-school program is
taken care of. Rather than take the money from an area
that really needs it, I did not apply for it. If the money
is coming to Anna Maria Elementary anyway, obvi-
ously I'll talk to Mr. Kronus (the principal) about it"


Increasing grant funding was mentioned by several
people.
Stephens pointed out, "One of the big problems
you have is the sheer volume of paperwork you have
to do with a limited staff."
Bohnenberger offered his city's grants committee
to assist and Stephens suggested contacting private
foundations, such as the Selby Foundation, for grants
for ADA compliance or a new gymnasium floor.
Bohnenberger said a community festival be
planned to benefit the community center but noted that
fundraisers are labor intensive. Stephens said various
clubs and organization could sponsor an event a month.
Holmes Beach resident and Kiwanian Lee
Edwards said there are 450 Kiwanians in 10 clubs in
the county and he suggested a Kiwanis night sponsored
by the community center to enlist their aid.
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie Martini said
a "friends" group similar to the Friends of the Island
Branch Library could help raise funds. Kelly said she
is working on that.
Stephens suggested sending the community's
center's list of volunteer needs to corporations that
have volunteer programs. Scott Dell, AMICC staff
member, said he is currently working with Champs
Kitching noted, "These are all short-term ideas.
The staff is maximized. Who's going to organize all
this stuff? If you do all these projects, you'll have to
hire additional staff to coordinate all the activities. We
need to put our efforts toward a foundation to solve the
long-range problem."
Kelly said she has been working on establishing a
foundation for the center for the past three years but the
key is finding benefactors to get it started.


Fire, smoke and water damage was
the result of an afternoon blaze in the
home of Anna Maria Fire Commis-
sioner Glenn Bliss Sunday.
No one was injured in the fire,
which was apparently started in a utility
room. Investigators believe the fire may
have been started near an electric water
heater.


Bliss was not home when the fire
caught.
The house, in the 4500 block of 86th
St. Ct., Bradenton, was valued at about
$85,000. No damage estimate was avail-
able.
Bliss was fire chief until his termi-
nation in 1991. He was elected to the
fire district commission in 1992.


Third woman charged in

Circle K grand theft


A third person has been arrested
by police, charged with grand theft.
The latest arrest stemmed from
two previous theft charges of man-
agers of Circle K stores in
Bradenton Beach. Arrested Monday
was Joan C. Whittaker, 52, of
Bradenton, an area manager for the
convenience store chain.


August 5, police arrested manag-
ers of the Circle K stores at 2518 and
100 Gulf Dr. N., charging them with
grand theft after more than $37,000
was missing from the establishments.
Police said Whittaker knew of
the late deposits made by managers
Bettye Jane Sossamon and Audrey
M. Wilkes.


Candidate debate develops


into free-for-all


Pat Glass, incumbent ...


Kent Chetlain


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
implications and Longboat Key doesn't want a
bridge that they will probably identify a bridge cor-
ridor and then point out the environmental problems
and nothing will happen."
Glass said, "I do not predict they will come back
with a favorable study. I believe we will have stasis."
It was a discussion of recycling that prompted the
most heated exchange between the pair.
"I want to capture as much of the waste stream as
possible," Glass said on county-wide recycling efforts.
"I don't believe we can have mandatory recycling.
Composting is very valuable to agriculture. We all
voted for a composting system, we just voted for dif-
ferent companies," she said of the commission decision
to proceed with Amerecycle, a private company bid-
ding to develop a composting program.
"Amerecycle is supporting my opponent," Chetlain
began, but was interrupted by Glass.
"I have received no contributions from National
Development," Glass retorted. "You keep saying that,
and it's not true."
"Yes, you have," Chetlain shot back, prompting
Presswood to call for order.
Chetlain concluded his recycling remarks by stat-
ing he wanted to end negotiations with Amerecycle be-
cause the company has not shown sufficient financial
integrity, and that other technology should be explored
to handle Manatee County's recycling needs.
In concluding remarks, Chetlain posed the ques-
tion: "Do you want a commissioner obligated to devel-
opers running Manatee County?"
Glass said, "Public service is not what I do, it's
what I am."
Both Chetlain and Glass are Republicans. The
Sept. 8 primary election will decide the race.


Fire Commissioner Bliss'

home scorched






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 PAGE 3 el


Holmes Beach planning commission


rules on three ordinances


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission met last
week to make recommendations on three ordinances
being considered by the city council.
The ordinances include: providing for a special
exception for artistic in-home teaching; establishing
definitions in the A-1 district; and providing for roof
mounted satellite dishes in commercial districts.

Artistic in-home teaching
This ordinance establishes in-home artistic teach-
ing as a special exception under the category of home
occupations and sets criteria for obtaining a license.
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches
said the term artistic license is too narrow because it
does not include other forms of instruction such as as-
tronomy or computer literacy.
Commissioner Mike Farrup asked, "Whatever hap-
pened to the concept that whatever you do in your own
home is your own business? If somebody wants to
teach they go to the city council and the council grants
them a home occupation license under the guidelines
that are set forth in the ordinance."
Simches explained that in a home occupation li-
cense there can be no traffic to the home. In-home
teaching creates such traffic, thus the attempt to legal-
ize it as a special exception use.
Deputy Clerk Teri Kirkpatrick said a special ex-
ception use requires the petitioner to come to the city
council with a site plan and follow specific criteria to
obtain the license.
She told the commission, "The council has given
the ordinance to you to see if it is compliant with the
comprehensive plan, not whether or not you want to
grant it as a special exception use. You can make a rec-
ommendation if the general consensus is that you don't
want to do this."
Simches observed, "That's an interesting limitation
on the function of the commission."
The commission voted 3-1 that the ordinance is


compliant but recommended a change from the term
artistic license to artistic/instructional license.
Commissioner Bruce Golding, who cast the dis-
senting vote, opposed the number of students permit-
ted at one time (six) and hours of instruction continu-
ing until 9 p.m.

A-1 district definitions
This ordinance is the result of a planning commission
determination that it was the intent of the city's compre-
hensive plan to limit the A-1 district, including hotels/
motels, to 10 units per acre. Simches said the ruling in-
cluded a request for the city attorney to clarify the lan-
guage in the land development code relating to the issue.
The draft ordinance which added new defini-
tions of hotel, motel and rental unit and amended defi-
nitions of dwelling, dwelling unit and multi-family
dwelling created controversy over the separation of
the definitions of hotel/motel and dwelling unit. The
council agreed to send the ordinance to the planning
commission for comment.
"This ordinance went beyond what the original
intent (of the commission's request) was," said
Simches. "I don't think the definitions are needed to
clarify the issue."
Simches said the planning commission is charged
with evaluating the comprehensive plan. Reviewing
those definitions will be part of the comprehensive plan
review process, which includes public participation.
"I think this jumps the gun," he noted. "It intrudes
on our process."
Golding said the attorney is "just clearing up defi-
nitions so we don't have any problems in court with a
legal challenge."
"I don't mind that she would offer some definitions
to us in terms of our consideration of the comp plan,"
said Simches, "but I don't want it stuck into an ordi-
nance at this time. We have not finished our delibera-
tions on definitions and I want time to consider what
she's presented to us."
The commission voted to table the discussion and


seek an extension on a ruling from council.

Roof-mounted satellite dishes in
commercial districts
This ordinance is the result of a request by
Walgreen's to install a roof-mounted satellite dish for
use in their prescription network. Several banks have
also requested the dishes.
Commissioner Gene Aubry said the language in
the ordinance is vague and dishes should be required
to withstand the same wind force as a building. He said
the dishes should be installed properly and screened.
Golding said dishes were installed in several com-
mercial locations before the ordinance was drafted and
the dishes are also proliferating in residential districts.
"I have a problem with opening the door any fur-
ther when we're not taking care of what we've already
got," he said.
Farrup said he believes satellite dishes are objec-
tionable and should be limited.
The board voted 2-2 against recommending the or-
dinance. Kirkpatrick said the dissenters, Golding and
Farrup, must submit in writing why and where the or-
dinance does not comply with the comprehensive plan



Anna Maria City
9/1, 10 a.m., Special commission meeting to
hire new public works director
9/7, 7:30,p.m., Commission work session and
first budget public hearing

Bradenton Beach
None scheduled Council meeting of Sept. 8
canceled due to lack of a quorum

Holmes Beach
9/7, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting and
first budget public hearing


ANNA

MARIA
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm, Sunday 9am-7pm
LABOR DAY WEEKEND SPECIALS 9/1 THRU 9/5
UHILE SUPPLIES LAST PLUS LOTS OF UNADVERTISED SPECIALS

CIimfy )
MISSION TORTILLA 6" Yellow Corn 12 ct................................... 3/.99
SUNNY DELITE Citrus Punch FLA 64 oz Carton.............................. S.99
BREAKSTONE Sour Cream 16oz Container Regular Only ................. '99


ROYAL ORK Hickory Chips 2.5 Ib .............................................. 1.49
SAVERS CHOICE Charcoal Briquets 20 Ib .................................... 3.39
HELLMANN'S Mayonnaise 32 oz Jar, Reg or Lite......................... 2.29
KRAFT BBQ Sauce 18 oz Bottle, Assorted Flavors ......................... .89
NORTHERN Napkins 250 count pkg................................................ .39
DIXIE Plastic Party Cups 16 oz, 20 count ..................................... ... 89

(FROZEN )
PATIO BURRITOS 50 oz Selected Flavors .................................. 2/89
BANQUET DINNERS 9-9.25 oz pkg, Assorted Varieties ............... .19
CHUN KING EGG ROLL 7.25 pkg, Assorted Varieties ................ .39


RED OR GREEN CABBAGE ...................................... Ib $.29
YELLOW CORN 2 ears .......................................................... .69
POTATOES 5 Lb ...................................................................... 2.49

(SUMMER MEAT sncLE
FRESH FAMILY-PACK SPLIT CHICKEN BREAST ....................... b .99
Smaller Packs................................................................ Ib $1.59
BONELESS RIB EYE STEAKS Pack of 5............................... b 3.99
Individual Steaks .................... .................. .... b 4.59
DELI-SLICED LEAN BOILED HAM ....................................... Ib $1.69
SORRY WE DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.






EIM PAGE 4 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

IFLORIDA PRIMARY VOTE SEPTL81


First Primary:


Thursday, Sept. 8


Florida House of

Representatives,

District 68, Republican
The winner of the Republican primary will face incum-
bent Democratic Rep. Julie McClure Nov. 8.
Mark Flanagan
Mark Flanagan is seeking the Republican nomina-
tion to the Florida House of Representatives District 68.
Flanagan, 31, is married and has three children. He
is a financial consultant. He is a graduate of Manatee
High School and has a B.A. in United States history
from the University of San Francisco. He is involved
with local boys and girls clubs and is a Little League
coach.
"As a financial consultant, I deal will people every
day," Flanagan said. "They are all from different per-
spectives and have different objectives. With that back-
ground, I believe I have unique qualities over my op-
ponent.
"I understand the importance of financial plan-
ning," he said. "I believe Tallahassee has abdicated
their responsibility over wealth," he said, pointing to
last year's Florida Health and Rehabilitative Services
computer foul-up that overpaid clients a total of $230
million.
"There is a limitless future in our part of Florida,"
Flanagan said, "but power-hungry and unethical poli-
ticians could ruin it all. Our streets could become more
crime ridden, the quality of education could be dimin-
ished, health care security for our seniors could be
threatened if we do not begin to demand that Tallahas-
see respond sincerely to our needs."

Roy Meyer
Roy Meyer is seeking the Republican nomination
to the Florida House of Representatives, District 68.
Meyer, 36, is married and has three sons. He is a
senior instrument technician employed at Tropicana.
He is a graduate of Palmetto High School and Mana-
tee Community College. He is involved in a number of
civic organizations, including serving as a YMCA
Baseball Coach, a 4-H Assistant Leader, member of the
Republican Club of Manatee County and charter mem-
ber and vice president of the Manatee County Young
Republican Club.
Meyer said he believed personality separated him
and his opponent. "At Tropicana, I have been involved
in several management classes," he said, "and I have
learned how to work with people. I see my opponent as
slightly abrasive. The Florida Legislature is a 'give and
take' effort, and you can't charge in like a bull."
He said he viewed taxes, welfare, education and
individual responsibility as important elements in his
platform for public office.
"Individual responsibility is very important to our
country," Meyer said. "As individuals, we need to be
responsible to ourselves rather than to expect a hand-
out from government."

Manatee County

Commission, At-Large
With two Republican candidates in the running for the
at-large seat and no Democratic challengers, this race
will be decided by Republican voters Sept. 8.
Kent Chetlain
Biographical information: County resident for 37
years. Wife, Joanne. Four children and four grandchil-
dren. Journalist for 40 years prior to being elected to the
county commission for the first time in 1982, where he
has served for the past 12 years. Currently writes a real
estate column for The Longboat Observer. After reap-
portionment, Chetlain was moved out of the district
where he lives, so to seek reelection he must seek the
District 6 at-large seat now held by incumbent Com-
missioner Pat Glass.


As an aid to readers of The Islander Bystander,
profiles of candidates in the Sept. 8 election are pro-
vided this week for the Florida House of Representa-
tives, Manatee County Commission, Circuit Court and

Mission statement: "For nearly 12 years on the
Manatee County Commission I have fought to preserve
our quality of life through managed growth, impact
fees and environmental protection, while at the same
time striving to keep down taxes," Chetlain says.
Chetlain says there are many important issues, but
he believes a prime importance is to end the county's
negotiations with Amerecycle. He says the county
should adopt "a recycling system that incorporates
curbside separation as soon as possible."
Chetlain also says he has opposed growth along
State Road 70 "until such time as that vital artery can
be multi-laned."
Chetlain cites a number of examples illustrating
what he believes is a positive stance for the environ-
ment. Among these is his opposition to two develop-
ments near Lake Evers, Bradenton's source of drink-
ing water, due to "the danger from pollution runoff into
the reservoir."
His vote against Florida Power and Light's request
for permission to burn higher sulfur fuels at its Parrish
generating plant is also noted by Chetlain as indicative
of his dedication to protecting the environment.

Patricia M. Glass (incumbent)
Biographical information: Manatee County resi-
dent for 34 years. Husband, Henry, just retired from
Loral American Beryllium as senior vice president.
Five children and four grandchildren. First elected to
county commission in 1978, re-elected in 1982 but re-
signed in 1984 to run for the U.S. House of Represen-
tatives against then-incumbent Andy Ireland (Glass
was unsuccessful in that bid). She was reappointed to
the county commission in 1986 by Gov. Bob Graham.
After reapportionment of county, two at-large seats
were added, and in 1990 Glass was the first person to
be elected to the four-year seat which she now holds.
Mission statement: "My career has been one of
hard work, and I've been chairman (of the commission)
five times," Glass says. "My perception of leadership
is that it's not the spotlight job people think it is, but it's
making things happen I think that's important."
Giving an example of what she believes is her abil-
ity to "make things happen," Glass says she was the
person who implemented the county's Environmental
Action Commission, which she says she would like to
see "grow and flourish."
Glass says she has devoted the last two years to
what she calls "the water issue," and the challenges of
finding enough water for a growing county is the
"single most important issue in the 21st century." Glass
notes she came up with the plan for water re-use for
agricultural concerns.
Among other achievements, Glass says she
founded the county's Human Relations Council as well
as the AIDS Council, and says she "helped the taxpay-
ers and citizens by raising large amounts of money to
help these services."

12th Circuit Court
Nancy K. Donnellan
Nancy Donnellan is seeking election to the newly
created position to the 12th Circuit Court, encompass-
ing Manatee, Sarasota.and DeSoto Counties.
Donnellan is a graduate of DePaul University in
1979. She is a member of bar associations in Florida,
Texas, Illinois, the American Bar Association, the
Academy of Trial Lawyers of American, the Florida
Association for Women Lawyers and the Sarasota
County Bar Association.
She is one of only 19 women in the United States who
is a nationally Certified Civil Trial Advocate and is the
only female attorney in the 12th Judicial District who is
certified as a civil trial lawyer by the Florida Bar.
Donnellan is married and has four children. She is
active in a number of civic organizations, including
serving as President of the Suncoast Women's Politi-
cal Caucus.
"Everything I have accomplished in the last 15


County Court.
Next week will feature candidate profiles of Mana-
tee School Board and Sarasota-Manatee Airport Au-
thority.

years, both in my legal career and in my community
activities as a volunteer, have been in preparation to be
of service to the people as a circuit judge," she said.
Ed Ford
Ed Ford is seeking a newly created seat on the 12th
Circuit Court.
A former president of the Sarasota County Bar
Association and former chair of the Lawyer Referral
Service of the same group, Ford is a graduate of Seton
Hall University, NJ, and American University Law
School in Washington, D.C.
Ford is a former captain in the Strategic Air Com-
mand of the U.S. Air Force and served three tours of
duty in Southeast Asia.
He has received the endorsement of the Southwest
Florida Chapter of the Florida Police Benevolent As-
sociation, and is an attorney with a Sarasota law firm,
Dart, Ford & Spivey. He is a director of the Sarasota
Chamber of Commerce and the United Way of
Sarasota County.
in describing the PBA endorsement, Ford said the
group "recognized that my experience as an attorney
and mediator makes me uniquely qualified to handle
tough criminal cases."
Susan Maulucci
Susan Maulucci is seeking a newly created seat on
the 12th Circuit Court.
She is a trial lawyer whose practice is limited to
marital and family law, criminal defense and juvenile
law. She is a graduate of the University of Florida and
the University of Florida College of Law. Maulucci,
37, was formerly with the Office of State Attorney in
the district including Manatee, Sarasota and DeSoto
Counties, serving as Juvenile Division Chief. She is
currently a sole practitioner.
Maulucci is a member of the Sarasota County Bar.
Association, the Florida Association for Women Law-
yers, the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Law-
yers and the Florida Bar Association. She is also in-
volved in numerous civic associations, including the
Community Foundation of Sarasota County and the
National Association of Female Executives.
She is married and has two children.
Maulucci has been a speaker on juvenile crime,
justice and criminal law and has taught law enforce-
ment training courses.
Doug Polk
Doug Polk is seeking a seat on the newly created
12th Circuit Court.
He is a member of the Florida Trial Lawyers As-
sociation, a member of the American Trial Lawyers
Association, and a member of the John M. Scheb Chap-
ter of the American Inn of Court.
Polk is a former legal guardian of elderly citizens, a
former employee of the Florida Bar, and an advisory to
Stetson Law School students on trial techniques. He is also
a Sarasota County Bar Association Law Week volunteers.
Polk has represented thousands of clients in litiga-
tion matters, and has defended police officers, cities
and counties in Southwest Florida.
Stanley R. Swartz
Stanley Swartz is seeking the newly created seat on
the 12th Judicial Court.
Swartz brings a business background to the bench,
being closely involved in the ownership and operation
of eight bakeries in Manatee and Sarasota Counties. He
is also a co-founder and former co-owner of the DeSoto
Memorial Speedway.
He is a graduate of Mercer University Law School,
and founder of the law firm of Swartz & Carter. He
went to law school late in life, and was 51 when he
became a member of the Florida Bar Association.
He was in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, and ended his
military career as a captain in the U.S. Army Reserve.
Swartz said he "expects efficiency, fairness and
accessibility from our judicial system."
For more candidates, see page 10






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A PAGE 5 I-

No one will lose service during postal renovation


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Part two of two
There's one more item to add to that list of things that
will not stay postal couriers from their appointed rounds
- remodeling. Although there will be some dust and
confusion as the Anna Maria Post Office is renovated
during the next few weeks, no one will be without mail
service, according to Postmaster Ron Smith.
While it's true that a number of postal customers
will not have a box for varying periods of time after the
six- to eight-week remodeling project gets under way
next week, postal patrons will be able to call at the ser-
vice window and ask for their mail until they get their
new boxes. Except for 30 customers, everyone will still
have the same box numbers it's just that the boxes
will be in a different location in the new post office.
Smith says while remodeling is going on he will be
at the post office beyond normal business hours Monday
through Friday nights to accommodate those customers
who have temporarily lost the use of their boxes.
"It's only fair," Smith says. "People working in
Bradenton or Sarasota won't get back here until 7 or 8
p.m. and they wouldn't be able to get their mail. The
window will close at the same time, but I'll be here.
People who want to pick up their mail can just knock
on the service door and I'll get their mail or I'll be

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sitting out in the lobby."
Smith thinks the remodeling will be completed
with relatively little pain for postal customers due to the
spirit of cooperation he says he knows Anna Maria
residents will show.
"The nice thing about (the renovation) is, I've prob-
ably got two of the best clerks in the Postal Service and
they can handle most anything," Smith says. "Secondly,
I've got the best clientele in the Postal Service. They're
good people they understand what's going on here."
Here's how the three-phase remodeling of the
Anna Maria Post Office will be done:
Phase 1 The contractors will begin by putting
up a security wall across the alcove of boxes located at
the south end of the main lobby, closing off boxes 721
through 1478.
At the same time, the south annex, near Penny's
Petunia Patch, will be closed. The area includes boxes
4001 through 4348, which will be out of service for six
to eight weeks.
When the remodeled section re-opens it will be
home to boxes ranging from 1 to 940. Therefore, boxes
721 to 940 will be out of service for about two weeks,
while boxes from 940 to 1478 will be out of service
from six to eight weeks.
Phase 2 The new service lobby will be con-
structed in the area of what is currently the north annex,


near The.Brown Pelican gift shop. During this time,
boxes 1501 through 2240 will be out of service for
about a month.
Phase 3 The workroom floor (where mail is
sorted) and the remainder of the boxes in what is now the
main lobby will be replaced during this phase. Current
boxes 1 through 718 are in this area, but since they were
re-assigned at the end of Phase 1, these postal customers
will never be without a box. When this part of the lobby
reopens it will contain box numbers above 940.

Planning commission
meeting Sept. 13
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission will
hold a public meeting on Sept. 13 at 7:30 p.m. for in-
put on the future land use element of the comprehen-
sive plan. The input is to aid the commission in its five-
year evaluation of the plan.
The future land use element details the city's
existing land uses, natural resources and projected
population. It analyzes public facilities, vacant or
undeveloped land, redevelopment and flood prone
areas and addresses the city's long term land use
programs and activities.
A copy of the comprehensive plan is available
for review at city hall.


6 .33 S


Ino an lffD i t xs







I] PAGE 6 U SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


e l-9 0


Jet-ski concerns
They've been called everything from the most indepen-
dent form of watercraft to obnoxious buzzing dirt bikes of
the seas, but whatever your name for Jet-ski-type craft, there
are some scary statistics provided by Bradenton Beach's
lIowie Herman in the "Your Opinion" section this week.
With one of the biggest beach weekends upon us this
Labor Day holiday, if you do take to the water in any type
of craft, please be careful out there.
No one wants to let go
I'm sure it's happened to you. The phenomenon is that
it seems to have happened to the whole island. No one wants
to say good-bye to Ermi. So many were touched by Ernie
C'agiina. His life was the IGA and we all passed through his
portals, and surely we touched his life as he did ours.
What was strange to us was having people offer condo-
lences to the newspaper. We all nodded in complete agree-
ment, "Yes, we're sorry about Ernie." But, as June Alder,
former editor of the old Islander offered, that's good -
people have accepted you and they consider the Islander
Bystander family."
Ernie and his family were lucky. Let there be no doubt
that he lived a full life. He was blessed with a large family
who loved him very much and a community that embraced
him as well.
It was a rougher lime for Mary Ross's family. They lost
Mary at age 55. The community lost a lovely person. And
again in the instance of Mary, people extended their condo-
lences through the newspaper.
And it was a rough week for others as well, as Roni and
Spanky lost their infant twin sons.
We're pleased and grateful that people regard us as part
of the Island family at least to share their grief and their
joys with us. We pass along to each of the families, the heart-
felt sentiments from many, many people who chose to ex-
press them through us.
On politics, other brouhahas
We hosted a political forum for candidates for the at-
large seats on the Manatee County Commission this week.
In case you missed it, it was enlightening, if not for the sub-
ject matter, the conduct of public officials.
We urged our representative, (they're both presently serv-
ing, technically incumbents) whoever may be re-elected to the
commission on Sept. 8, Pat Glass or Kent Chetlain, to provide
us with phone book recycling.
"No problem," they echoed. "We can probably take care
of that tomorrow."
No answer as of press time so if you want to be sure
your old telephone book is recycled, just bring it to our of-
fice in the Island Shopping Center at 5408 Marina Drive.
Plop 'em down beside the outdoor rack on the sidewalk
in front of the office and we'll make sure Pat and Kent take
care of them.


ISLANDERt il
SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 41
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster
,OV1t Ae.,





With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


If f9e] 'up / e-m


Personal watercraft accident
report is disturbing
Here are some disturbing statistics from the Florida
Marine Patrol Office of Waterway Management for 1993.
Of the 1,017 reportable recreational boating acci-
dents:
1.) 28 percent of the accidents involved personal wa-
tercraft (Jet Skis and Wave Runners),
2.) 30 percent of all injuries involved personal water-
craft,
3.) 8 percent of all deaths involved personal watercraft,
4.) 52 percent of all accidents involved "rented" per-
sonal watercraft, and
5.) property damage reported in 1993 was $5,297,076.
Howie Herman, Bradenton Beach
Ross family expresses thanks
We, the family of Mary Ross, wish to express our
most sincere gratitude to all the wonderful people who
kept her spirits up during her illness.
Your cards and letters, visits, flowers, phone calls,
etc., made her very aware of how much she was loved
and that made a real difference.
Receiving all your cards offering sympathy gave us
a feeling of peace that made an indescribably painful
situation a little easier to bear.
So if our thank you note misses your box, know
that you are in our hearts. We love and and thank you.
Sandi McKelvey, Chris Hansen, David Ross
and Ann Mortier
Voicing concerns of
school lunch program
Schools will be opening soon now the new taxes
(along with Lotto and the 1-cent sales) are being col-
lected for educational purposes as the schools need
supplies, paper, books, computers, etc.
Why not streamline the school lunch program? Is
it necessary to have a choice of two or three entrees,
five different juices, two and three desserts?
Two different school lunch workers told me that
the children get very confused as they are offered hot
or cold ham sandwiches, chili, or turkey salad, etc.
A perfect example of a very successful program
now in operation for over 25 years is Meals on Wheels
which offers one entree, one dessert and milk. When I


had to use their service for six months I found the va-
riety excellent. This successful program will stop waste
of food and divert the extra money for educational
school supplies.
I owned and operated a preschool and served one
hot noon meal, one dessert, one juice and milk
(checked by the board of health) and the parents were
amazed that the children did eat what I prepared and
drink their milk. One hot meal for school lunch should
be sufficient and if the parents do not agree with that,
then they can brown bag their children's lunch, the way
we senior citizens did in our school days.
Fortunately, we are still here and healthy enough
to gladly pay the extra taxes for educational purposes.
Kathy Gerard, Palmetto

Sad news inspired poet
I was moved to write this poem after seeing a news broad-
cast story about a cat burned by some teenagers. While
I'm no "Island Poet," I do hope you find it printable.
I saw on the news,
Today,
Some kids burned a cat.
How could they do that?
Do they care, do they feel?
How do they feel
About burning that cat?
Were they excited?
Chanting
Burn cat burn?
Were they quiet, watchful,
Unbelieving,
Of what they were doing?
Do they play with less
Aggression,
Today?
Do they feel guilty,
Today,
About what they did?
Can they turn off the picture,
In their head?
Are they crying?
I am crying
Today.
Lisa Rivera, Anna Maria










THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Conclusion, The Homesteaders
by June Alder


The shirtwaisted Bean women in 1902, all except Mamie Bean who perhaps took
the picture: (from left) Alice, daughter of George E. Bean's eldest son, Frank;
Lula Colman, G.E. Bean's eldest daughter; Ina Webb, a Bean sister-in-law;
Augusta, Frank Bean's wife; Mabel, wife of G. Wilhelm "Will" Bean, G.E.
Bean's third son; and at the piano G.E.B.'s youngest daughter Edith.

'PAINFULLY PEACEFUL'


The 1897 Independence Day celebra-
tion on the banks of the Manatee River
fairly burst with patriotism as the country
moved towards its first foreign adventure
- a war for Cuban independence. There
was a grand picnic, band music, speeches,
a boisterous baseball game with arch-rival
Tampa (their team won), fireworks and
-even a balloon ascension.
Perhaps to rest up from the event,
the editor of the Manatee River Journal,
Arthur Cornwell, Jr., took the steamer
out to Anna Maria Key. Afterwards,
Cornwell wrote a column I believe is the
only published eyewitness account of
the way it was here in first homesteader
George Bean's day:
"Successive generations have won-
dered, who was Anna Maria? But who
this celebrated person was seems to be
lost in impenetrable mystery. Although
history has failed to record the circum-
stances of her life, yet her monument
has made her name famous.
"Anna Maria Key is six miles long
and at places a mile wide; it is indented
by a deep bayou which teems with trout
and sheepshead. Its northern extremity
assists in enclosing Tampa Bay and
projects upon Passage Key inlet and 30
feet of water.
"On this northern point Mr. George
E. Bean has built a wharf to deep waters
to accommodate steamers, the Mistletoe
stopping always on signal; also a small
hotel where a dozen persons can enjoy
the absolute tranquillity which reigns
over these islands and almost from the
door plunge into the surf breaking onto
the beach.
"Sitting here in the cool sea breeze
we look across the quiet bay and the in-
finite blue of the Gulf which surges up
upon the shore.


"Two black lines of smoke announce
the presence of the river steamers coming
down from Tampa. A freighter comes up
from Havana and stops at the quarantine
station, where the fires are quickly started
up to fumigate the mails.
"Now the revenue cutter comes in;
after it a sailing vessel loaded with fruit
from Honduras.
"Tramp steamers, ponderous iron
vessels, a four-masted schooner, all are
going to Port Tampa to load phosphate
for ports thousands of miles away.
"These pass and we dreamily sur-
vey the glistening sands of Passage Key
and the green palm forest and white
shaft of Egmont. It is so absolutely, al-
most painfully, peaceful here.
"We came by steamer. Returning,
we ride in Mr. Hall's wagon five miles
down the hard white beach and, cross-
ing over the island, hail an obliging
fisherman who returns us to Cortez."
Thus did Editor Cornwell, in those
few simple lines, evoke the essence of
Island life at the turn of the century.
Bean also was moved to literary
expression in a poem about his Island
home. Only one of the several stanzas
has come down to us:
0 my home by the sea,
Where the wind blows free,
And the wild waves beat high,
On that glittering shore!
I gaze with delight
At the beautiful sight,
As I sit in my cabin door.
After Bean's death in 1898, his
daughter Edith set her father's poem to
music. Here is the song for you to sing
around the piano as families once did.
Next: Beginning the
Saga of Captain Jones


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A PAGE 7 E[I



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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
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W*.l, b1" C.o14 E Fr, M""At ,A E,.td k BsX i 4Hltd, .lA,

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____-____,___-___






jj PAGE 8 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

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The raft and refugees that traversed the Florida Straits from Cuba to the United States. Capt. Roy Salgado took the photo.


Island charter captain rescues Cuban refugees


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It was supposed to be a relaxing two-week vacation
fishing the Florida Straits for dolphin. A lot of fish were
caught, but for Capt. Roy Salgado the trip turned out
to be the most memorable boating excursion he's ever
been on for a much more important reason the fish-
ing party rescued three refugees fleeing Cuba.
Encountering the refugees 20 miles offshore of
Key West was not, in itself, so unusual. After all, for
quite some time the evening news had led every night
with stories of Cubans setting off for the United States
aboard rickety rafts. What was unique this time were
the accounts of violence the three related.
"They were farmers from the mountains, and Abel
raised pigs," Salgado says. "He was telling us people
were stealing his pigs, not because they were thieves
but because they were hungry. They made $20 a
month."
The tale got worse.
"Abel said that just before he left he saw five
women and children gunned down in the street (by
government forces)," Salgado says. The five were
marching in protest against Castro at the time, he says.
"One woman was pregnant, and they shot her be-
cause she was protesting."
Salgado says Abel also claimed that Cuban gun-
boats were shooting at rafts the night they departed
Havana, although he and his companions were able to
slip away undetected.
It is not hard to imagine how the refugees' craft
was overlooked in the darkness, for even in the light of
day it almost escaped notice by people who were a lot
friendlier.
In his workaday world, Salgado, 23, is recognized
for his skills in guiding anglers to the best fishing spots
aboard the charter boat Reef Reacher. Knowing how to
read a thousand natural clues, Salgado is known around
Galati's Marina (his home port) for being able to find
the most elusive fish. It's a skill he learned from his
dad, but on Aug. 21, father and son would be surprised'
at what their instincts led them to off the coast of Key
West.
"We were fishing, and my dad looked off in the
distance and saw what he thought was a flag floating,"
Salgado remembers. "He said, 'Let's go over there and
check it out.' You know, we were fishing for dolphin,


The meeting was especially poignant
for Capt. Roy Salgado, since his
mother was a Cuban refugee herself,
coming to America some 30 years ago
aboard one of the Freedom Flights.

and dolphin hang around floating things."
But this wasn't just some cast-off piece of jetsam.
As the Salgados' boat closed in on the object it became
apparent it was a raft with people on it.
"As we got closer we saw the people waving their
hands," Salgado says. "When we got up on them, they
just started crying. They told us they weren't crying
because they were cowards, but crying because they
were so happy to have found freedom."
The three men were not only overjoyed they had
finally made contact with Americans after five perilous
days at sea, but were moved that Salgado's greeting,
which was in Spanish. The meeting was especially
poignant for Salgado, since his mother was a Cuban
refugee herself, coming to America some 30 years ago
aboard one of the Freedom Flights.
For the next two hours Salgado, his mother, father
and brother talked with the refugees as they waited for
the U.S. Coast Guard to pick them up. The Salgados
passed food and water to the men, who remained on
their raft, a flimsy collection of bamboo and small tree
limbs lashed to four inner tubes.
The Cubans began to tell their story, and it's one
Salgado says only the hardest heart could ignore.
"They'd been out there five days eating lemon
peels," Salgado says. When they had put out of Ha-
vana, the men had two jugs of water and 50 rations of
bread about one-third the size of a hand, but those
stores were long gone by the time Salgado met up with
them.
Looking at the raft a vessel Salgado says most
folks wouldn't even take a few feet offshore he be-
gan to better understand the depth of despair that could
drive people to such acts in their attempts to start a new
life in the United States.
Salgado said the refugees told him they would
rather stay in Cuba, "but they don't have the means to
overthrow Castro. They need someone to come and
help them, to give them arms so they can fight."


"They're coming here because they're starving in
their country they can't eat."
Although the three men were not sure what they
would find when they got to America, they were cer-.
tain it had to be better than what they had left behind.
"They said they work all day in Cuba and make no
money, but if they work here all day they can make
money," Salgado says. "They'll come here and take
peasant jobs."
Salgado takes exception to those who do not want
to see the refugees landing on American soil, accusing
them of overburdening the welfare system. Salgado
says that's a myth, and that if anything, the refugees
ultimately benefit the country.
"The day they (the refugees) come here, they start
working and paying taxes," Salgado says. "They're
coming here to work. They're not coming here to es-
cape Cuba. They'd rather stay in Cuba, but they have
no way to help themselves."
After the Coast Guard arrived and took them
aboard the American cutter, the Cubans' raft was sunk.
"They either sink these rafts or mark them so they
know that no one has fallen off," Salgado says. Before
the craft was scuttled, Abel gave Salgado a souvenir -
one of the handmade oars that had been used on the
journey.
Salgado repaid the kindness by making a phone
call for Abel.
"The night we found them we called Abel's mother
in Miami he hasn't seen her in 17 years," Salgado
says. "She just went into hysterics she was so happy.
She couldn't even talk; her husband had to talk."
Whether Abel will be reunited with his mother is
a question Salgado can't answer, for he's uncertain
where the three refuges were sent by the U.S. govern-
ment. The question arises because, according to
Salgado's understanding of present immigration poli-
cies, refugees intercepted at sea are returned to
Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, while those who
make it to land are taken to the Krome Detention Cen-
ter in Miami.
"We believe these three went to Guantanamo,"
Salgado says. "But Abel said if he was going to be
taken back to Cuba, he would jump in the water and
drown himself. He said it would be better than going
back to Cuba. He said he'd rather die, and that there's
nothing for them in Cuba."








Code

enforcement

strengthened in

Florida
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Due to a revised state statute, Florida's munici-
palities have the option of adpoting a new code
enforcement procedure designed to strengthen and
streamline the system.
"Code enforcement is getting stronger around
the state," explained Holmes Beach Code
Enforcement Officer Mike Heistand. "The state
made provisions under Statute 161 to give local
code enforcement more leverage. The provisions
are for a citation or special master system."
With the special master system, smaller cases
such as overgrown lots and abandoned vehicles
are given a courtesy notice allowing the party a
time limit to correct the violation. If the violation
is not cleared up within that time period, the code
enforcement officer can write a citation, similar to
a parking ticket, which includes a fine.
"If the person contests the citation, the case
goes to a special master," Heistand said. "The spe-
cial master is a neutral party appointed to make a
decision in the case."
The case is heard by the special master, with
the code enforcement officer, the alleged violator
and a court reporter in attendance. Attorneys for
either or both sides may also attend. If the special
master finds the person in violation, he may pay the
fine immediately or take the case to the Manatee
County Circuit Court.
"The council has to decide if it wants to go to
that system," said Heistand, "and what the fine
structure will be. More and more cities are doing it
because it saves a lot of paperwork and gets prob-
-lems cleared up faster."

Island Branch Library
to sponsor September
displays
The Island Branch Library is sponsoring two dis-
plays in the month of September.
An exhibit of mixed-media paintings by the late
Darcie Holton Smith will be shown during the month
of September. The display is made possible by Dr. and
Mrs. George Holton of Holmes Beach in memory of
their daughter, a commercial artist and thoroughbred
horse trainer. Smith died in November 1993 shortly
before graduating from the College of Advertising
Arts in San Diego.
The Daughters of the American Revolution
(DAR) exhibit, organized by Mrs. Charles W. Wood
of the Manatee Chapter of DAR, celebrates the United
States Constitution and is an annual event at the Island
Branch Library.
The DAR is providing free bookmarks and bro-
chures to perpetuate the memory and spirit of the men
and women who achieved American independence.
A 20-minute video, "We the People: the United
States Constitution," from the Florida State Library,
will be shown in the Walker-Swift Meeting Room on
Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 1 and 3 p.m.
The Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach, is open Monday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday from 10 a.m.
to 9 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. For more information call 778-6341.
ICC to hold luau
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce is
sponsoring an Island Luau and Polynesian Show on Sat-
urday, Sept 24, at St. Bernard Catholic Church, Holmes
Beach.
Ato's restaurant will provide food and entertain-
ment. Social time begins at 6:30 p.m. and the dinner
buffet begins at 7 p.m. followed by a Polynesian show.
Advance tickets may be purchased in Anna
Maria at Ato's, Five O'Clock Marine and the Brown
Pelican; in Holmes Beach at Home True Value, Brain
Gym, Crabby Bill's, Duffy's Tavern and Neal and
Neal Realtors; in Bradenton Beach at Joe's Eats and
Sweets; and in Cortez at Cavanagh Marine.


~i III


KENT
CHETLAIN
FOR COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
AT LARGE DISTRICT 6
MANATEE COUNTY


* Voted against towering bridges

* Your accessible commissioner

* He listens and responds

V Won Extra $5 million on sale of hospital.
V Led effort to recover thousands of dollars
in lost sales tax going to Sarasota County.
V Fought to lower garbage bills.
V Won fight to have meetings on TV.
V Led effort to build more sidewalks and
bike paths.
V Supported beach renourishment.


RE-ELECT KENT CHETLAIN SEPT. 8 Republican Primary
Paid Political Ad. Paid For By Kent Chetlain Campaign Fund


We need her dedication and experience!

Police Benevolent Association

endorses Rebecca Little

for Manatee County Judge

As a former prosecutor in Manatee County, Rebecca Little represented the State
of Florida in charging and prosecuting persons committing crimes including
armed robbery, sexual battery, drug trafficking, DUI's, DUI manslaughter, and
other felony, misdemeanor and juvenile crimes. She supports our community
through her involvement with the Gulf Coast Marine Institute, Junior League,
AAUW, Faith United Methodist Church and various other community organi-
zations. She lives in Bradenton with her husband, Melton, and their son.

Vote September 8.


Campaign to Elect Rebecca Little
5720 Harbor Road
Bradenton, Florida 34209
746-8118
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Campaign Account
of Rebecca Little, Nonpartisan


BVo1te1
Forll1

Karfen


lVan Nessil


FOR MANATEE COUNTY JUDGE


The Timing Is Right,
The Issues Are Critical,
The Future of Our Children
Is In Your Hands.
KAREN VAN NESS ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
l For The Refinancing of School Board Bonds
At A Lower Interest Rate and Saved Taxpayers
$$$$$$.
D For The Implementation and Expansion of
School Resource Officer Program
1 Spearheaded Joint Meetings Between the
Manatee School Board and County Commis-
sion to Successfully Plan Joint Use of
Resources & Facilities
KAREN VAN NESS HAS AND WILL CONTINUE TO
O Fight to Provide All Students With An
Equitable Education
1 Meet With The Community to Listen To Their
Concerns and Demands
O Work To Reduce Overcrowded Classrooms
KAREN VAN NESS
O Was The Only School Board Member Who
Voted Against The Terms of Superintendent
Gene Witt's Contract Which Cost The Taxxpayers
Over A Quarter of A Million Dollars
D Voted Against The Present Proposed School
Budget Which Will Increase Your Taxes
Unnecessarily.


Republican. Pd. Pol Adv.. Paid for by the Committee to Elect Karen Van Ness


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 PAGE 9 l!



I n VOTE FOR PRESERVING

j OUR QUALITY OF LIFE
ziVT O PEEVN


i


I







iJ] PAGE 10 N SEPTEMBER I, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

A FLORIDA PRIMARY VOTE SEPTr


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County Court
Doug Henderson
Doug Henderson is seeking the vacant position of
County Judge.
Henderson, 42, is a graduate of the University of
South Florida and the South Texas College of Law. He
is a member of the Florida, Manatee County and Ameri-
can Bar Associations, the Association of Trial Lawyers
of America, the Florida Academy of Trial Lawyers and
the Florida Council on Crime and Delinquency.
He was an Assistant State Attorney for six years.
Currently, he is an attorney with Price, Price, Prouty
and Whitaker. Henderson is married and has three
sons.
Henderson is the current director of the YMCA,
the Manatee Community Blood Center, past director
of the local chapter of the American Red Cross and
member of the Manatee Historical Society.
Henderson said he "received more preference votes
for County Judge than all of the other candidates com-
bined" in a judicial poll mailed to all local attorneys.

Rebecca A. Little
Rebecca Little is seeking the vacant county judge
seat, District 3, previously held by Judge Walter
Talley.
Little holds a degree of Criminal Justice from Au-
burn University, and is a graduate of Cumberland School
of Law, Birmingham, AL. She has worked with the law
firm of Montgomery & Wilhoit, Chartered, formed
Rebecca A. Little, P.A. and subsequently joined the of-
fice of State Attorney for this circuit.
With the State Attorney's office, Little prosecuted
crimes within Manatee County dealing with misde-
meanors, felonies and juvenile crimes.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In the past year, Holmes Beach Code Enforcement
Officer Mike Heistand has written more than 200 let-
ters to residents concerning overgrown lots, trash and
debris and abandoned vehicles.
"It's something that was really
needed," said Heistand of his job estab-
lished by council last year, "and it's snow- ,
balling."
Heistand said 80 percent of the com-
plaints concern overgrown lots, but he has
also cited violators for other infractions of
the city's code such as illegal signs, unli-
censed coin-operated vending machines,
illegal living units and unlicensed rental
units.Mike Heis
"As word gets out that we have code
enforcement and it's alive and well, our complaints in-
crease," said Heistand. "Complaints can be made in
person, by phone or through the mail. Complainants
can be anonymous, but if they give their name it's pub-
lic record and we have to give them to anyone who
asks. Most people give us their names because they
want to know the results of their complaint."
Once a complaint is filed, an administrative inquiry
form is completed and an investigation begins. The
investigation can include an on-site inspection, records
research, witness interviews or all three. Finally, a
courtesy letter is sent to the violator notifying him of
the violation and giving him a specific time period to
correct the violation with the number of days varied
according to the type of violation.
Other variables include extensions granted on


She is a member of the Manatee County Bar As-
s.,.n.i-iin, the Florida Association of Women Lawyers,
the Junior League of Manatee County, and the Mana-
tee County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Mana-
tee class of 1993-94.
Little is also a former instructor of legal research
and writing at Manatee Community College.
Little is married, with one child.

Chris M. Pratt
Chris M. Pratt is a second-generation Manatee
County native seeking the position of County Judge,
District 3. Pratt, 36, is a graduate of Lenoir-Rhyne of
Hickory, NC, and received his law degree from Stetson
College of Law in St. Petersburg, FL.
He is a member of the American Inns of Court, an
attorney educational program, and serves as the group's
counsellor. He is also an attorney for the Florida Jay-
cees, and attends the First Untied Methodist Church.
Pratt is married and the father of one son.
"As a successful attorney in private practice here
in Manatee County for the past 10 years," Pratt said, "I
have handled a wide variety of cases. My clients have
been members of the community just like you.
"I recognize the importance a judge's ruling has
because I've seen the impact on the people affected by
the decision," he said. "With this knowledge and expe-
rience I will do my best to make fair and legal decisions
if elected County Judge."
Larry M. Tidmore
Larry Tidmore is seeking the position of County
Judge, District 3, being vacated by retiring Judge
Walter Talley.
Tidmore, 54, grew up in Manatee County, attend-
ing Palmetto Elementary and Junior High Schools and
Manatee County High School. A graduate of the Uni-
versity of Tulsa, he is a former Assistant State Attor-
ney representing Manatee County and is a U.S. Marine
Corps veteran. He is a member of Christ Episcopal
Church.
He is a member of the Florida and Manatee County
Bar Associations, the Association of Trial Lawyers of
America and The Order of Barristers.
Tidmore is married, and has two grown children.
He said he has the "varied legal training and expe-
rience, maturity, and the proven successful life expe-
rience and education to make an outstanding County
Judge for all citizens of Manatee County,"


some violations and second notices given for others.
The variables are all spelled out in the city's codes.
Once the notification process is complete, if the
violation has not been corrected, the case is taken to
the code enforcement board. The board hears the al-
leged violator and city employees and
I makes a ruling. The board also has the
power to levy fines of up to $250 per
day.


-


'and


"Once they come into compliance,
we send them an affidavit of compli-
ance," said Heistand. "Out of over 200
letters we've sent, we've had less than
six come before the board. About 80 per-
cent of the people don't know they are in
violation and are happy to comply im-
mediately."


Those that comply right away get a
card from the city thanking them for their coopera-
tion. A new city brochure details some of the most
frequently violated codes and the complaint proce-
dure.
Heistand said following the procedure takes a lot
of time. For example, he said it can takes two months
to get an abandoned vehicle moved. Despite this
drawback, 100 abandoned or untagged vehicles were
cleared up in the last 12 months.
Heistand stressed that the job of code enforce-
ment is not to make money or harass residents but to
gain compliance.
"We're not out to persecute people; we're out to
enforce the codes that are on the books," he said.
"Cleaning up the city helps everyone's property values
and makes the city a better place to live for all of us."


Code enforcement growing


in Holmes Beach


-.-a


--





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 PAGE 11 U


Lighting strikes Tip of the Island
Island fans of the Tampa Bay Lightning ice hockey team got a special treat last week when Head Coach
Terry Crisp and eight members of the team and support staff rolled into Anna Maria to have lunch and sign
autographs at the Tip of the Island restaurant. The faithful gave a warm welcome to all of the hard-battling
stars of the rink, but Crisp seemed to be the most valuable celebrity judging by the way kids and adults alike
crowded in to talk to the affable coach and get his autograph. Pictured above, Coach Crisp signs a hockey
stick for Joey Mousseau, 9.


Five-year-old Timmy Villars seems to have found a
friend in Crisp, who autographed a puck for him,
at left. Below, Crisp, Lightning support staff Tip of
the Island management and guests pose for a last
picture before the electrifying hockey team mem-
bers thunder out of town.
Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


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jI' PAGE 12 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island gardener shares his secrets


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Second of a series
The planting and maintenance of a garden requires
work and dedication. Many who initiate a garden ap-
proach it as another job that has to be done. However,
all the long-time gardeners I've known derive special
pleasure from gardening. The garden is their refuge
from daily stress. It is a place of learning about the
process of growth in which labor becomes ajoy rather
than a duty. The soil is their empty canvas waiting to
be filled with life.
Ernest W. Kreher of South Bay Boulevard in Anna
Maria is a retired consulting forester. He has lived all
his life in south Florida and has planted his site in Anna
Maria for 20 years. Originally he planted only his fall
garden at the site and his spring garden in Lee County,
but in recent years he has planted both on Anna Maria.
Kreher is a great believer in the power of good
compost, especially manure. He makes numerous trips
throughout the year to a horse farm in Pasco County to
fill his trailer with manure. This manure is left to sea-
son for six months, then mixed with household com-
post consisting of vegetable and fruit peelings, egg-
shells, coffee grounds and other organic matter.
"Stable manure is better because it has a lot of
straw in it," he said. "The straw makes it break down
faster and keeps the odor down. Anyone can get a gar-
bage can and go to a dairy farm and get cow manure.
It can be a little smelly but you can mix grass clippings
in with it or layer them with it. If you layer it, turn it
once a week."
He warned that gardeners should not use grass clip-
pings on which pesticides have been applied. He also
warned that grass clippings will rob the mixture of
some of its nitrogen.
Kreher noted that commercial cow manure is avail-
able in garden stores, but it has been heated to kill the
microorganisms which, he said, are very beneficial to


the soil.
He said mix or disk the compost into the soil four
to six weeks before planting the garden to give it a
chance to break down. He does this in late August to
prepare for planting Oct. 1.
"It is better to put a 50-cent plant in a $5 hole that
to put a $5 plant in a 50-cent hole," reasoned Kreher.
The next step is the addition of the three primary
plant foods nitrogen, potassium (potash) and phos-
phorus. Nitrogen is essential for leaf growth and
greener leaves. Potassium is necessary for the strength
of the plant and fighting disease. Phosphorus builds a
strong root system and promotes growth.
Until recently, Kreher used organic fertilizers to
supply these plant foods but said they have become so
difficult to find that last year he began using a small
amount of commercial fertilizer. His need for fertilizer
is minimal, he said, due to the fact that he has been
building the soil with compost for 20 years, but the
first-time gardener will need a larger amount.
If they can be located, the organic fertilizers that can
be used to supply the primary plant foods are cottonseed
meal for nitrogen, hybrotite (pulverized granite dust) for
potassium and colloidal phosphate for phosphorus.
Kreher said colloidal phosphate is held in suspen-
sion and does not settle out when water is applied.
Commercial phosphate fertilizer is treated with sulfu-
ric acid to make it water soluble and it leaches out of
the soil after two inches of rain. The acid is also very
hard on the microorganisms.
While the compost is breaking down, make a plan
for your garden, said Kreher, who has saved the plan
for every garden he has planted at this site. In the fall
garden he plants green peppers, cucumbers, lettuce,
rutabagas, carrots, mustard and collard greens, onions,
cabbage, peas, broccoli and cauliflower.
"I rotate the garden plants each spring and fall," he
said. "In the spring garden I plant green beans, toma-
toes, muskmelons, okra, lima beans, black eyed and


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zipper peas, bush beans, potatoes, corn, eggplants and
green peppers. I plant this garden around the end of
February or the beginning of March."
Kreher said he uses mostly seeds due to disease prob-
lems he has encountered with commercial plants. Large
seeds such as corn, peas, squash and beans can be sown
directly into the soil. Small seeds should be started in flats
about six weeks before transplanting in the garden
"The cheapest thing we put in our garden is the seed,"
said Kreher. "We have our old favorites but I like to try
new things each year because that's part of the fun of gar-
dening. Some new varieties do well and some don't, and
that's one of the challenges of gardening to find out
why something doesn't come up or do well."
He said his planting is governed by the old adage,
"Anything that produces above ground, plant on the
light of the moon; anything that produces below
ground, plant on the dark of the moon."
Once plants are established in the garden, they can
occasionally be side dressed with fertilizer. Kreher also
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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VOTE
CHRIS


PRATT

for
Manatee
County Judge
Group 2
- EXPERIENCE, ENERGY, AND TEMPERAMENT

[ 10 years trial experience [- Local high school graduate
[" 10 years private practice 5i 36 year Manatee County resident
representing the citizens [I Graduate Stetson University
of Manatee County College of Law
5 "Ask A Lawyer" volunteer Attorney I- Earth Day volunteer
[ Member Florida Bar [I Former Little League Umpire
5 Manatee County Bar Association Palmetto Little League
II Associate Legal Council Jaycees 5I Attends 1st United Methodist
of Florida Church of Palmetto
QUALIFIED TO HANDLE THE VARIETY AND VOLUME
OF CASES BEFORE THE MANATEE COUNTY COURT.
NON-PARTISAN
Pd. Political Adv. paid for by the Chris M. Pratt Campaign for County Judge, Betty Pratt, Treasurer


- -- -~ --c---- --~
-


111






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 8 PAGE 13 I!

,4 ...


Behind the garden site, directly on Tampa Bay, is the windbreak built by Kreher to keep the wind from drying Ernest Kreher turns the manure and compost mix-
out the soil. Part of the sprinkler system rests on cement blocks in the foreground. The remainder consists of ture that has been seasoning for six months. He will
sprinkler heads on poles in the background. A hot pepper bush loaded with tiny peppers, the remnant of a work the mixture into the garden soil four to six
previous garden, is also in the foreground. weeks before planting.


occasionally uses enzymes to assist or accelerate bac-
terial action.
Minor or trace elements can be added to aid
growth, said Kreher. In the past he has added these in
spray or powder form. Now he said he makes sure the
fertilizer he purchases contains minor elements.
He said mulch can be used to increase moisture
retention and aid in weed control. He recommended
grass clippings or newspapers be placed on the beds or
plastic if there is an irrigation system.
"I had a shredder once and chopped up newspapers
to use for mulch," recalled Kreher. Once the papers dried
out, they blew all over the neighborhood. I don't think my
neighbors were too happy! I gave up that idea."
Kreher said the worst disease problem he ever en-
countered was black cabbage rot brought in with soil
from purchased plants. He said he doesn't have prob-
lems with nematodes because "they can't live around
compost very long."


Keeping the garden well watered is especially im-
Sportant. During our winters of infrequent rain, water-
ing is often a daily necessity. Kreher uses lawn sprin-
klers, which are attached to poles to reach the wide area
that his garden covers.
Because his garden is directly on the bay, frequent
watering also helps Kreher combat the wind, which
dries out the soil, and salt spray. He has also built a
windbreak between the garden and the bay.
Insect control is one of the biggest problems for
Florida gardeners. In the north, freezing winter tem-
peratures kill many of the insects and eggs, but here we
have no freezing weather to cleanse the soil.
Insects are also so voracious and persistent that an
entire section of garden can be engulfed in a matter of
days. It is very important to attempt control as soon as
signs of insect damage become apparent.
"There are three basic types of insects," said
Kreher, "and organic methods for their control. Leaf
chewing insects, such as the cabbage worm, must be
attacked through the stomach."


Thuricide, a bacterial spore, is effective against
these pests. Follow directions on the bottle for mixing
and spray application.
Scale insects attach themselves to plant stems and
appear as tiny immovable dots, said Kreher. These must
be sprayed with an oil emulsion that suffocates them.
"Piercing and sucking insects, such as aphids, must
be killed with a contact spray. I got rid of the aphids on
my hibiscus with a spray I made using one tablespoon
of Ivory liquid in a quart of water. I'm going to try it
in my garden this year."
Occasionally Kreher must resort to a chemical
poison. For example, with corn earworms he dips a
small brush in five percent Sevin powder and taps it
into the corn silk. He said this same procedure is effec-
tive on squash and cucumber flowers to eliminate cu-
cumber beetles.
"I don't like to use chemicals," he explained. "When
you use them you are hurting yourself because you're
wearing out your land. Think of your soil as something
alive and beneficial and treat it accordingly."


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Our Environment Is Best Managed

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Pat was the first commissioner to propose
using inmate work crews on restoration
projects.


" We need
to be the
architects of
our own

destiny...

Pat Glass addressing fellow
Kiwanians on water use and reuse.


Manatee County is a complex environmental region of
barrier islands, urban areas, wetlands, farmlands, bays, rivers
and estuaries. The Environment is not a single issue. It is far
too critical to be treated as such. Objectives such as balance
between growth and quality of life require planning beyond
our children's lifetimes to protect an ecosystem as delicate as
ours.


Pat and her husband, Henry, enjoy the view from the recently completed
Leffis Key restoration project of a reclaimed waterfront dumping ground.


That's

Leadership!


Jane and Ralph Frontone give Pat the
Hope Family Services Award for her work
on behalf of families and children of
Manatee County.


votePat Glass
Republican District 6 At-Large
Republican, Paid Pol. Ad. Paid for by Pat Glass Campaign Committee






10 PAGE 14 A SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Ardovino memorial art books at Tingley Library


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
When Charles Ardovino passed away in April his
widow didn't want everyone to send flowers.
"I just didn't want flowers all over the place," ad-
mits June Ardovino.
In lieu of flowers, the family requested donations
be sent to the Tingley Memorial Library in Bradenton
Beach.
"Contributions came from all over the U.S.," says
a surprised and happy John Sandberg, library president,
who says $1,100 has come in so far and just seems to
keep arriving in the new library's mailbox.
June Ardovino wanted to buy a collection of art
books for the library which has been filling the shelves
with books since early this year when the doors opened.
Ordering from a list of 200 to 300 art books, June
Ardovino picked a composite of art styles and stylists
from Donatello to Picasso, says Mollie Sandberg,
"we've received about 20 of the books so far. We have
about eight books on back order and we'll order an-
other 10.
"These are beautiful books," says Mollie. "One of
the books alone cost $175."
Charlie Ardovino, who grew up in the Bronx, was
a fine arts designer and muralist for Sax Fifth Avenue
for 40 years. He attended the Parsons School of Design
in Manhattan, on full scholarship, and its schools in
Paris and Rome.
He was also a graduate of the Leonardo DaVinci
School of Sculpture of new York, and attended New
York University.
"Burt Bacharach and Tom Snyder have Charlie's
paintings hanging in their homes," says June.
When he retired from Sax Fifth Avenue 15 years
ago, the Ardovinos bought a condominium in the then-


U


4
Mollie Sandberg (left to right), John Sandberg and June Ardovino survey some of the collection of new art
books for the Tingle), Library in Bradenton Beach. The books were bought from the memorial donations of the
late Charlie Ardovino.


brand new Runaway Bay in Bradenton Beach.
"Charlie was always going to the libraries to do
research," says June.
The books will be specially displayed with a
plaque honoring Ardovino, says John Sandberg.
"This just makes it wonderful for the library," says
John.


"There are a lot of artists on this Island," says June,
"I think they will appreciate these lovely books."
Mollie adds that last spring another artist Cecilia
Slusser from Logansport, Ind., sent a box filled with
about 20 art books after she visited.
"Those who appreciate art can surely come to the
Tingley," says John.


CHRISTOPHER DALY
FOR
AIRPORT AUTHORITY
SEAT 3
I am a family man, college graduate,
veteran, and now a retired
businessman, willing to serve you.
I want and need your support.
Thank you.
Campaign of
CHRISTOPHER DALY
Paid Political Ad. Paid For By Christopher Daly Campaign Fund


LARRY M.


TIDMORE
FOR
COUNTY JUDGE
MATURITY, EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE
*- 37 YEARS EXPERIENCE *
VETERAN BUSINESS EDUCATION LAWYER
Former Prosecutor
Private Law Practice, Bradenton
Former Corporate Executive
U.S. Marine Corps, Veteran 1957-1963
SP* College Diplomas: Accounting, 1968;
SEducation, 1984; Juris Doctor, 1986.
-A Grew up in Manatee County
k Age 54, Married, two adult children,
Member Christ Episcopal Church


Independent lawyer with trial experience in our county and circuit
courts, as well as, experience in two other professions.
HE UNDERSTANDS ALL THE PEOPLE
OF MANATEE COUNTY
He Needs Your Vote September 8, 1994
Non-Partisan County Wide Election
Pd. Pol. Adv. Campaign Account of Larry M. Tidmore


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A PAGE 15 II]


W ^ Z 1e Z0=I /4iT


Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held at
Anna Maria City Hall for Aug. 27 were Ruth
Foehrkolb and Bill Starrett.
Runners up were Herb Ditzel and Gene Snedeker.
The games are held it 9 a.m. every Saturday, and
all are welcome.

Bridge Club resumes
play next Tuesday
The Anna Maria Island Bridge Club, which is open
to residents and visitors alike, will resume play at 12:30
p.m on Sept. 6 at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center. Players without partners may attend.
The fee is $1.50 per person.

Ryan Callen honored
with presidential award
Ryan Callen, grandson of Ed and Lee Callen of
Anna Maria, was recog-
nized by President Bill
Clinton for outstanding
scholastic achievement in
the Presidential Academic
Fitness Award Program for
1993-94. "Ryan's a little -
brain is what he is," says
proud grandmother Lee
Callen. Ryan, 10 years old
and going into the fifth
grade, was chosen class- Ryan Callen
mate of the year by his 4th
grade class. He lives in Clarks Summit, Pa., with par-
ents James and Cathleen Callen.

Snooty's Fourth Annual
Party in the Park
The Fourth Annual Party in the Park will be held
Sunday, Oct. 23, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., at Waterfront


Rossi Park, Bradenton.
The day's events include musical entertainment,
the Sarasota Ski-A-Rees, the Misty Blues Sky Diving
Team, Vintage Airplane Air Show, a free health fair,
an antique car show, more than 75 arts and crafts ex-
hibitors and food vendors. There will be games, pony
rides, a moon walk and a petting zoo for kids. The day
closes with a boat parade and a fireworks display.
Admission is free, but on-site parking is $1. Ad-
mission to the South Florida Museum for the day will
be $2 for adults and $1 for children.
Proceeds go to benefit Snooty the Manatee, the
South Florida Museum and Manatee Area Retarded
Citizens (MARC).

'Kiss me' with
lots of love
Michael Wallace


Ibasfalean was born July 15,
1994, at 8:35 p.m., at Mana-
tee Memorial Hospital. He
weighed 8 lbs. 14 oz. and
was 21 inches long. Parents
are Kim Raburn Ibasfalean,
mother, and Mark
Ibasfalean, father, of
Cortez. He has a brother
Matthew, 18 months. Ma-
ternal grandparents are
Doyal and Becky Raburn of


-. ,

Michael Ibasfalean


Michael Ibasfalean


Holmes Beach. Paternal grandparents are George and
Vilma Ibasfalean of Cortez.

Keep Manatee Beautiful
to hold cigarette butt
litter awareness event
"Don't Leave Your Butt on the Course" is the
theme of a golf tournament sponsored by Keep Mana-
tee Beautiful to be held Saturday, Oct. 8, at the
Rosedale Golf and Club Country Club, Bradenton.


Cigarette butts carelessly tossed aside accumulate
and become unsightly litter, as well as a threat to wild-
life along Manatee County's beaches and roadways
according to Susan Hancock, executive director of
Keep Manatee Beautiful. The golf tournament is de-
signed to help create awareness of the common prac-
tice of discarding "butts."
The cost for the three-club scramble is $60 per
person including lunch.
Bumper stickers "Don't leave your butt on the
course" and "Don't leave your butt on the beach," as
well as pocket ashtrays are available.
Coastal Cleanup, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 17,
is the kick-off for the cigarette butt litter awareness
campaign from 9 a.m. to noon.
For more information or to register call 795-8272.

Library to host history
fair Sept. 10
The Manatee County Central Library will host the
annual History Fair Workshops for interested students
on Saturday, Sept. 10 from 1 to 3 p.m., and Thursday,
Sept. 15 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
The History Fair, a national program similar to the
annual science fair competition, is jointly sponsored by the
Manatee County Historical Commission and the local
historical society. Students from grades four to 12 may
choose to compete in a variety of categories such as world
history, American history, and state or local history. Other
special categories are sponsored by local organizations
and include women's studies, Black America, science
history, Manatee County history, and audiovisual presen-
tations. Awards will be given at the History Fair Awards
Ceremony in November following the judging.
The workshops are designed to introduce students
to the rules of the contest, explain the 1994 theme, and
tour the library's resources for historical research. The
workshops will be held in the library auditorium. Par-
ents are invited to attend with their children.
Manatee County Central Library is located at 1301
Barcarrota Blvd, Bradenton. For more information
contact Kevin Beach or Pam Gibson at 748-5555.


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IISLANDER





[( PAGE 16 I SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Meet the new teacher
Michele Gabriele is Anna Maria Elementary's new
second-grade teacher. Gabriele replaces Marsha
Brockway who is teaching the late Ted Swank's
fourth-grade class. Anna Maria welcomes Gabriele
who is a native of New York State and a holder of a
master's degree in elementary education and a
bachelor's in social work. "I can't wait to get
started. I haven't been excited as this in a long
time," said Gabriele as she readied her new class-
room for the big day.






Joy Courtney


Meet the new guidance counselor
Jacque Follon, left, has join the staff of Anna Maria Elementary as its guidance counselor. Follon will split
her time between Anna Maria and Myakka City Elementary. She will work with students in small groups,
provide individual counsel and teach in the classroom. Follon has a master's degree from the University of
Iowa in counseling and a bachelor's degree in elementary education. Welcome, Ms. Follon.


Meet the new crossing guard
Registered nurse and Islander Lisa Crump has taken
over the duties of crossing guard at Anna Maria
Elementary. "'Zoomers,' as I call them, are the biggest
problem," said Crump. "They're in their own little
world and they zoom right through the school crossing
area. I wave at them to get their attention and get them
back to the 15 mph speed limit. If it's habitual, the
license number will be reported to the police," she
said. Crump started a program she calls "Search" at
Anna Maria Elementary. After she stops traffic for
children needing to cross, Crump says "search." Kids
look left, then right, and left again, BEFORE crossing,
even with the crossing guard present. "Search is a
habit I want them to form so they'll do it even when
they are alone," said Crump. Crump, left, assists
fourth-grade student Sarah McLaughlin, center, and
second-grade student Charlene Anderson.


PAT GEYER
Paid political advertisement. Paid for by the
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 PAGE 17 II


Meet the new
art teacher
Anna Maria Elementary
welcomes art teacher Judy
Lyon for the 1994-95
school year. Lyon, who
will split her teaching time
between Myakka City
Elementary and Anna
Maria, will teach at our
Island school on Mondays,
Tuesday and Wednes-
days. Members of Mrs.
Whitfield's first-grade
class help their new
teacher get organized.


Meet the new cafeteria manager
Anna Maria Elementary welcomes Janice Graf of
Bradenton who has taken over the ovens as the
school's cafeteria manager. Graf is a graduate of
Manatee County school system's Cafeteria Manager
Trainee program and comes to our Island school
from Moody Elementary. "I'll be watching the fats
and sugars, said Graf "It's important to keep them
low for the children's health. "


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Friday, 9/9/94
SBreakfast: Bagel & Jelly or Cereal, Pineapple
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
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All meals served with milk.



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Ei PAGE 18 N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



A look back at the life ...


-- -- ....: -.,,V '* --- ": --I^: .^ -:.- :: :-'-. : ,
Play ball! so we're hoping from a little help from our readers. Front row, left,
This team photo, taken sometime in the early '50s by the late photogra- Ernie, an unidentified player, Melvin Davis, bat boy Jack Fiske, two
pher Harold Smith, is also from from the family album. "Ernie probably more "don't knows," and Tom Larson. Back row, left to right, Charlie
organized the team," said one family member. Most agreed it was the Jones, Percy Arnold, Richard Wiggins (before becoming Rev.
Anna Maria Fire Department team but no one could name all the players Wiggins), Hugh Holmes, John Holmes and Jimmy Selman.


Always a straight dealer, Ernie said he was at a poker game the night the Island's
first fire truck was called into action. He readily admitted the poker playing fire crew
knew more about cards than being volunteer firemen. The house burned down.


Although slightly tattered,
there's no mistaking who this
young man is. Unless you see
the resemblance to Ernie's son,
John, and his grandson,
Michael Shea.


Ernie and his wife, Josephine, posed
proudly in front of their family store.
Throughout its nearly 50 years in business,
the store has been commonly referred
to by locals as "Ernie's IGA."


Thanks to the Cagnina family, Ernie's friends and


"It's not a good swing," John Cagnina says. "but it's a good picture." On or off the
field, Ernie was a hit with Island kids. All Islanders benefited from his efforts to help
the Community Center and Little League. the setting for this old Islander photo.


There were many dignitaries present in Jimr i/ 'n Go\. Lawton
Chiles kicked off his bid for re-election at the Beach House
restaurant. Ernie was singled out and honored above them all,
as Chiles referred to him as "my mentor." Ed Chiles brought
this photo to the family for a remembrance.

Islander reporter Mark Ratliff for making this tribute possible.


- ---"--I"d~






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 a PAGE 19 IJD



and times of Ernie


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
He was a shipping clerk for a box company, an
assistant manager of a school book repository, a soldier
in World War II and a volunteer fireman.
He played baseball with Al Lopez and met former
President Jimmy Carter.
But Ernie Cagnina was best known for
his 48 years as the owner of the Anna
Maria IGA store, and his years more
than 12 of them as the city's mayor.
Mayor. IGA. Ernie. These words were
synonomous on Anna Maria Island. -
Ernie died last week at the age of 84, but
memories of him and his times live on. All
around the Island, friends had an Ernie story
or two to share, and here's ours in words
and pictures. The photos were lent to us by Ernie at td
Ernie's family and friends, and the quotes are
pure Ernie, from a 1988 interview.

Ernie's first memories
of the Island
"When I was 8 years old I first came here by way
of excursion boats from Tampa. The boats used to
make a trip here almost every Sunday. When we came
here by boat we would walk to the beach you may
have seen the pictures in City Hall of people walking
to the beach with umbrellas."
That was 1918, and Ernie said the boats docked at
what is now the Anna Maria City Pier. The "we" Ernie
refers to is his parents and nine brothers and sisters, and
the beach is where the Sandbar restaurant currently
stands. Ernie said there was a bathhouse out over the
Gulf, at the end of a pier at Spring Avenue.
Ernie wore hearing aids
a war story
"It was in Luxembourg. A barrage of 88s landed in
front of me. Fortunately, I was not injured, but my hear-
ing started whistling and roaring, and since then my


hearing has deteriorated to the point where I have to
wear hearing aids."
Luxembourg was not the only time Ernie encoun-
tered the Nazis, for he was with the Army's 8th Divi-
sion at "Omaha Beach" on D-Day, among the first re-
placements after the invasion of Normandy.
Ernie served in the Army for two
years, with most of that time spent in com-
bat. Although offered a battlefield promo-
Stion to sergeant, Ernie turned it down be-
... cause he was having problems with his
stomach and left the Army as a private
first class. Suffering periodically from
bleeding ulcers, Ernie did not want to be
a leader who issued orders.
S"I told them if I can't do it, I didn't
expect my men to do it."


ie store.


How Ernie became


a store owner
"I had already made up my mind what I was going
to do when I got out of the Army I was going to get
into the concrete block business. I had already gotten
a railroad siding and everything in Tampa. With my
brother-in-law, Benny Scanio, I met a man who used
to own a store in Bradenton Beach. He was a friend of
ours, and we helped him at his store. He was ill and
wanted to sell me the store, but I said no. I didn't want
to take it out from under his feet when he was doing
real good business."
Ernie suggested that his friend should go to Johns
Hopkins Hospital, which he did. The Bradenton Beach
grocer made a full recovery and was happy to come
back to his store. Although Ernie was still looking for-
ward to selling concrete block, his friend insisted on
showing him the property where the IGA presently
stands. The rest, as they say, is history. The IGA
opened in April 1946.
Ernie's fire truck story
"We bought the first fire truck for the Island from


MacDill Air Force Base as surplus I think we paid
about $500 or $600."
The fire truck was parked in a garage at the home
of Melvin Davis, the first fire chief, and this is the set-
ting for the rest of the story.
"Seven or eight of us were there during a storm,
playing poker. Melvin Davis mentioned, 'It would be
nice if we had a damned fire now, with this wind.' First
thing you know, we got a fire call a house in Holmes
Beach was on fire. We got there and we didn't know
how in the hell to operate the fire truck, and then with
the pressure, it took three guys to hold the hose. We
finally put the fire out, but the damage was done the
house burned down all the way."
The day Ernie met Jimmy Carter
"We met at the Youth Center."
It was October 1975, when the Center was known
as the Youth Center and Jimmy Carter was such an ob-
scure presidential candidate he hadn't yet attained his
now-famous "Jimmy Who?" status. Ernie was asked by
Democratic party officials to make arrangements for
Carter to speak to the people of Anna Maria Island. It
was short notice, but Ernie did the best he could.
"Only about 20 people attended the meeting, and
most of those were kids from the fifth, sixth and sev-
enth grades that were asking questions of Carter. He
answered the questions."
The path to the (City) Hall of Fame
"I knew Al Lopez in Tampa, and we played ball on
the same team 'Los Merino.' I was 15 or 16 years
old at the time, and I was just a second-string catcher,
and Al Lopez was catching most of the games. But if
Al got hurt or couldn't continue, I took over for him."
Ernie's ball playing days ended with an arm injury.
Al Lopez went on to become the 10th most-win-
ning manager in baseball history, and secured a place
in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Ernie went on to become the most popular mayor
in the history of Anna Maria, and secured a place in the
hearts of so many of his constituents.


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[i[ PAGE 20 N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
If you missed the first guest chef at Beach Bistro,
take heart. You have a chance to make reservations in
time for the second "Guest Chef Celebratory Dinner"
on Monday evening, Sept. 5.
Chefs Paolo Corazzo and Antonello Bertoni from
Brunello's, a premiere Italian eatery on St. Pete Beach,
will take over the honors at Bistro for the night. Menu
highlights include roasted, herbed venison chop and
braised rabbit with rosemary-olive cream. Wines are pro-
vided with assistance from Southern Wine and Spirits.
Remember, it's a "one time only" event so reserve
your spot early by calling owners Sean Murphy and
J.P. Parks right away.
Ato's Restaurant is catering and entertaining at
the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce Luau on
Saturday, Sept. 24, at St. Bernard Catholic Church,
Holmes Beach. Ato and family members will provide
entertainment. Their Polynesian show is always a big
crowd pleaser at their own luaus. Tickets are available
in advance at a host of retail locations on the Island.
Sign of the Mermaid Deli opened last week to
little fanfare. Owner Andrea Spring hung an "open"
sign in the window and that was that. Patrons of the
restaurant in Anna Maria have long awaited the deli
opening (first announced in Summer 1993) at Marina
Mall, 5600 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.

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All-You-Can-Eat Outdoor BBQ Buffet.
11 to 4 SAT & MON Sept. 3rd & 5th
$S 95 includes BBQ Pork, Chicken & Ribs
Sand more! Special drink prices too.
6 1 1 1


SUNDAY $795
BRUNCH
BUFFET
10 AM 2 PM
Over 30 Breakfast and
Dinner Items
Mimosa Bloody Marys, $1 00
Screwdrivers Seabreezes
Entertainment!
SONS-OF-THE-BEACH
Sunday 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 6pm
$125 HOUSE COCKTAILS
Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10 pm
2 for 1 Well Drinks
$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet


101 S. BAY BLVD
ANNA MARIA
778-9611
Oyster Bar on
Anna Maria
Pier
778-0475
SSWM S


First baseman Mike Miser, a manager at the An-
chorage Restaurant, suffered a compound fracture
when his right leg crumbled on a play at first. The res-
taurant softball league is all for fun of course, and in
that spirit, talk has circulated about a benefit to defray
medical expenses for Miser, who is not expected back
at work for a couple of weeks. We'll keep you posted.
Speaking of the Anchorage, it might be the place
to stop for a Labor Day barbecue on Saturday and
Monday we're talking big neighborhood barbecue
with ribs cooking right out in front of the restaurant on
Bay Boulevard. They'll be serving their regular brunch
and buffet on Sunday.
Not much else happening on the Island best we can
tell for Labor Day. It's the usual, low-key, laid-back
Island way of dealing with holidays for us ... and let
the visitors and families have the beach.
Karly Carlson has a photography exhibit at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center. Karly, who
has been traveling over the summer, is working on lots
of new stuff photographed out West and in Pennsylva-
nia Amish country. Carlson says she'll have a black
and white photo exhibit at the community center soon
of kids who attended the center's summer program.
Karly is also working on establishing a photography
class focusing on unblocking higher creativity levels.
Ches's is closing Monday, Sept 5, for most of the
month. "Gone fishing," says owner Norm Chesmore.
Norm and Jane will reopen Tuesday, Sept. 27. I guess
we'll just have to do without their stromboli for a few
weeks.
Speaking of vacations, Turtles will close shortly
for renovations and Island Seafood Specialties is va-
cationing in Maine until October. Remember when

,S ICE c NEW
STACO NACHO
Take Ou, 4 wiches & TACO SALAD
For t ach BAR*
"All You Can Eat"

$495
Taco-To-Go 99'

Always Freshly Cut & Made To Order
Deli Sandwiches & Soups
Fresh Bagels Ice Cream Cakes
Everything Homemade!
Mon Sat 10AM 9PM Sunday 12 6PM
Eat In or Take -Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386


GREAT FOOD. GREAT BEACH.
GREAT SUMMER SPECIALS.


Half-Price Lunch.

$9.99 Dinner.

Buy one lunch and get the second of equal or
lesser value at half price until 4 pm! Every Day!
(With this ad, through Septamkb"30,1994.)
Monday Grouper light just $1.99
Tuesday i Prime Rib Night fre $9.99
Wednesday Shrimp light oly $9.99
Thursday nighteujay Italan Seafood $9.99
Drinkspecialdaily from 4 to 6 pn.
Guess the time of sunset to win a bottle of
Korbel champagne.
Great deck. Great playground.
Great entertainment nightly or Dixtdlaad
on Tuesday evenings.





great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach,
(813) 779-2222


Dancers from
Ato's restau-
rant will
perform at the
luau, spon-
S scored by the
-, Chamber of
Commerce.
l Islander
Photo:
Tomara
Kafka.












nearly all the Island resorts and restaurants closed in
September?
We hear Cafe Robar's long-time manager Lynda
Purcell is back in the hospital. We wish her well and
you are welcome to send cards and letters to Lynda in
care of Cafe Robar.







S ONE CRAB

REST URANT

KING CRAB DINNER $1695
WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish............. 112.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop ................. 12.95
Fri. Combo: Kingcrab & Bulldozer Lobster Tail.........113.95
Sat. Swordfish (Grilled) ..................................... 12.95
N VISA & 11:30 A T 9:DM PA
LONGBOAT KEY MASTERCARD FRIDAY & SATURDAY
383-1748 NOW ACCEPTED 11:30 AM 9:30 PM





THE

HU"T CLUB
RESTAURANT

DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY
2 FOR 1 DRINKS


**Music j
SMuSICOPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543


rgest
if fet.1
i the,

: k' N Nt
a







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 [ PAGE 21 I!G

Labor Day tip: beware of too much sun


In its early stages melanoma is a curable disease,
according to Dr. Charles Mahan, Florida health officer.
Melanoma is a form of skin cancer that begins in
the dark, protective pigment called melanin. Fair skin,
heredity and excessive exposure to the sun are the most
important risk factors for developing melanoma.
Melanin, in great quantities, is what makes the skin
appear "suntanned."
Melanoma is less common among people with
darker skin who seldom become sunburned, but no one
is immune to the damaging effects of the sun. Mela-
noma is also linked to moles and birthmarks.
Who is likely to get melanoma?
People with fair skin who burn and freckle easily,
those whose relatives have had melanoma and anyone
who spends a lot of time in the sun are more likely to
develop this skin cancer.
Here is a simple "ABCD" rule to help remember
the important signs of melanoma:

Tampa Bay Lightning strikes
Seafood Shack Showboat
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will hold
its monthly membership reception on Thursday, Sept. 22,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., on the Seafood Shack Showboat.
Tampa Bay Lightning personnel will be on hand to
help with contests and giveaways. The reception is
open only to members of the Longboat Key Chamber
of Commerce. Reservations are required.
To make reservations or for more information call
383-2466.


Cfez Atdre

Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast Luncheon
Come Dine With Us Before
We Go On Vacation
We will be closed
Sept. 5 thru Oct. 10
Will reopen Oct. 11
Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France
Tues thru Sat Thur, Fri & Sat
8AM-2:30PM 6-10PM
Sunday 8AM-1:30PM Sunday 5:30-9PM Member American
Reservations Suggested for Dinner Culinary Federation
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Asymmetry one half of the mole or birthmark
does not match the other half.
Border irregularity the edges are ragged,
notched or blurred.
Color the mole has shade of tan, brown, black
and possibly red, blue and white.
Diameter when diameter greater than six mil-
limeters and any sudden or continuing increase in size.


A monthly self-examination of your skin will help
you recognize when changes occur.
Surgery, says Mahan, is the best way to remove
early melanomas. Later stages require more extensive
treatment.
Prevention of melanoma involves reducing your
sun exposure, using a sun block, and avoiding indoor
sunlamps, tanning parlors or tanning pills.


BURNETT'S SCHENLEYVODKA McCORMICK SMIRNOFF
PREMIUM VODKA VODKA VODKA
u$11.88 -n$11.99 s *$10.69 *-15.49
BLTAK g y T CANADIAN MIST CANADIAN LTD FLEISCHMANN'S
CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY PREFERRED BLEND
R13.99 $18.49 $ *12.99 R *12.99

JIM BEAM ANCIENT AGE OLIgi f ER OLD CROW
BOURBON BOURBON BOURBON
LTR $999 1B. 86-PROOF 75 BOURBON
1.75 LTR.'15.59 13.99 L 14.99 R 12.99
SEAGRAM 7 CROWN PHILADELPHIA PAUL JONES
BLENDED WHISKEY BLENDED WHISKEY BLENDED WHISKEY
S R14.99 :1199 T $ll.99


CUTTY SARK MUIRHEAD SCOTCH OLD SMUGGLER
SCOTCH WHISKEY SCOTCH
R 24.99 $14.99 U $d15.99


I i wo SEAGPRA DN -PASSPORT


'S SEAGRAM'S CANADIAN FLEISHMANN GIN
HUNTER WHISKEY
99 1 $12.99 $12.99


- *PA IM A IVp


SCHENLEY STOYLICHNAYA BACARDI RUM
VIRGIN ISLAND RUM IMPORTED VODKA LIGHT OR DARK
1780 1 LTR
LTR 6.99 LTR Proof LTR
*11.99 99a *16.99 7' $17.69 s.s99
BAILEY'S JR I I
IRISH CREAM
$- -14.99


CLUNY
SCOTCH WHISKEY
175 $13.99


PASSPORT
SCOTCH
T1 $16.99


EARLY TIMES
BLENDED WHISKEY
T' $13.99
DRAMBUIE
IMPORTED CORDIAL

ML *21.99


Don't leave paradise without a subscription to the best news on the island.
Visit The Islander Bystander office in the Island Shopping Center before
heading north. We're next door to D.Coy Ducks. See you soon!


Bay Program experiment with artificial reef
attracts hundreds of juvenile fish
Mini-artificial reefs attached to concrete sea- leaves. The reefs are attached near the bottom of
walls in four Longboat Key canals are providing seawalls so they won't hinder boat navigation or
food and shelter for hundreds ofju- water flow, Tomasko said.
venile fish, according to a study con- Mojarras, a type of bait fish, gray
ducted by the Sarasota National Es- snapper and sheepshead have been ob-
tuary Program. -served using the reefs. Barnacles, algae
"Very few juvenile fish are j 6 and other marine life are forming on the
found around bare seawalls," said reefs providing food for baby fish. The
Dr. David Tomasko, senior scientist reefs are also designed to give the young
for the Sarasota Bay Program. "We fish hiding places from larger fish.
have found 300-400 juvenile fish Nearly 80 percent of the shoreline
hanging around the artificial reefs." has been lost to development in the last
The experimental reefs, which ."- 'P 40 years. The loss of habitat means
are about five feet long and two to fewer juvenile fish survived and the ex-
three feet wide, are made of narrow periment seems to promise success in
PVC pipe and Vexar, a plastic material used by the nurturing of the natural sea life balance.
plumbers to line water pipes. Four different types The reef experiment is a Sarasota Bay Program-
of reef designs are being used in the study. One funded Early Action Demonstration Project. The
style is designed to mimic a mangrove prop root reefs were created by Dr. Randy Edwards, a senior
fringe, while another looks like a tree without scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota.


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
LABOR DAY Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
MONDAY
Breakfastnly Full cut, potato, $6.95
Closing at Noon vegetable, salad, rolls
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


iAb EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, toast
home fries and coffee ... Only $1.75


IsfandInn

Restaurant
-j OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


*.' .




"The best hamburgers ano ,-'
the coldest mugs of beer )
this side of Heaven." ,ilit. O'
iEuffu, Pat Geyer, Owner. -
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 lam-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


BIG LABOR DAY COOKOUT!

CAFE ON THE BEACH

"( ;-^ ^ SEPT. 4 & 5
Sl6JOIN US FOR AN OUTDOOR BBQ
S* BBQ CHICKEN $6.50
i BBQ RIBS $6.95
". c All The Fixins Too!

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


J~ME.trl


MIN-BEA'CH-IBAR I,-,.,,-
:'O,,Y'tii:'36OM'iKARAokElb'v,-,,6'6''n',....,"',.'I
Widi&-t 14 MALE'REVUE:SHOW.
-;P.EIWALS FOR:AUG4$T.11-thru SEPT


nhmm n m' ammm-ct = -m mmt-


-L


Ir


.11F'l l M ] I "1II J[3 L J3 N If &| s


m


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oc NA
LTR,.


,,$$AGRAMI. GIR."':






[iD PAGE 22 E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 18, two alcohol citations, Bayfront Park.
Aug. 20, disturbance verbal altercation with
spouse, 100 block of Crescent.
Aug. 21, burglary to a vehicle, 700 block of
Holly.
Aug. 24, alcohol citation, Gulf Boulevard beach.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 18, grand theft of a surfboard valued at
$375, 200 Gulf Dr., Beach House restaurant.
Aug. 19, resisting arrest without violence, Co-
quina Beach. The officer and a lieutenant from the
Longboat Key Police Department were investigating a
suspicious vehicle with the passenger door standing
open. Around the vehicle were 10 to 15 beer bottles,
three baseball bats, a box of spilled soap powder, a
Tropicana pager, a Motorola walkie talkie and miscel-
laneous items. The officer noted in his report that it
appeared that a large fight had taken place.
A subject then walked up from the beach, fully
dressed, soaking wet and covered with sand. He yelled
at the officer, "Do you have a warrant to go in that
car?" As the officer attempted to explain, the subject
became verbally abusive and uncooperative. The of-


Bridge Tender Inn
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn

REMODELING CLOSED I
SEPT. 6 thru SEPT. 8 7-
Lunch Dinner Spirits I j,1
NIGHTLY SPECIALS from $8.95
OPEN 11:30AM 10PM DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach



SILVER QUEEN CORN
^|g5'FRESH DAILY'
BANANAS "VINE RIPE"
19Always.
S19LB. TOMATOES


WATERMELON BEST CUBAN
$99
AROUND


I5 ,faaoe wA,,/e. A(or/wro1/itS vto.m& cwa r i



OhPYh Ilud -






Ejhyii, $<,e-


Monday
Dom Night
Guess the time of sunset.
The closest guess wins a
bottle of Dom Perignon!

Wednesday
Native Night!
Show your Bradenton,
Sarasota, or Island ID when
you order and we'll knock
20% of your entree!


Every night enjoy
early bird
specials inside
from 4-6 p.m.


Tuesday
"Sandbar Sunset" Night!
That's our newest frozen
specialty drink, and
its two-for-one!

Thursday
Island Night!
Join the "South Seas" festivities
as you sway to the music
of Tropical Steel.


100 Spring Avenue I Anna Maria, Florida I 778-0444


ficer noted that he detected the strong odor of an alco-
holic beverage about the subject.
The lieutenant asked for the subject's identification
and he stated, "What for? You don't need it." The of-
ficer advised the subject to produce identification and
he became abusive and started to walk away. Accord-
ing to the report, the subject yelled an obscenity at the
lieutenant and said he was going to the beach. The sub-
ject resisted as the officer placed him in custody.
Aug. 18, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown smashed out the driver's
side window of the vehicle and removed a purse val-
ued at $30, a wallet valued at $15, a check book, credit
cards and $58 in cash.
Aug. 19, burglary to an automobile, Leffis Key.
A person unknown smashed out the driver's side win-
dow and removed a purse valued at $2, a wallet valued
at $8, an ATT calling card, a bank card, a check book
and $20 in cash.
Aug. 19, theft of a wallet valued at $15, $20 in
cash, a driver's license and identification cards, 1007
Gulf Dr. N., Summer Sands condominiums.
Aug. 20, theft of two bicycles, 100 block of 24th
Street.
Aug. 20, domestic battery, 2100 block of Avenue B.
Aug. 21, warrant arrest, 200 block of Gulf Drive
South.
Aug. 21, burglary to an automobile, Coquina


/ Ice Cream Pies & Cakes Soft Serve
-Surfing Wd Ve Colombo Yogurt Diabetic
Surfing World Village
11904 Cortez Road W. Dally Noon to 10 p.m. 794-5333

UNCLE DANS
PLACE
SON WHITNEY BEACH
383-0880/383-0881
41t < Sunday-Thursday 4 PM- 11 PM
0 Friday & Saturday 4 PM 1 AM
"OPEN MONDAY LABOR DAY 'TIL 9PM"
CHICAGO STYLE THIN CRUST
HOMEMADE PIZZA
BBQ BABY BACK RIBS
In Our Own Special Sauce
FISH & CHIPS 21 SHRIMP
HOT SANDWICHES:
MEAT BALL ITALIAN BEEF
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
ITALIAN GRINDER
Salads Garlic Bread & Cheese Bread
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
to the furthest reaches of Anna Maria Island and
Longboat Key (Delivery charge: $1.50)


Beach Attire OK
We Accommodate Large Parties
with 2 locations to serve you ...
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere

* RESB ^IA DEDF D MLD
RMDWIKCUE S DMD ERS

CRABBY HIIOURll-
3PM 6PM DAILY
504 Drafts $100 Well Drinks

PDTm 9MT OM HCI & DAMMERM


5325 MARINA DRIi
(formerly Pete Reynard's
Holmes Beach
778-9566


5872 14" ST. WEST
(U.S. 41)
Bradenton
751-3070


Beach. The victim reported that a person unknown re-
moved a purse valued at $40, a wallet valued at $20,
$80 in cash, food stamps valued at $150, a bank card
and a credit card.
Aug. 22, disorderly intoxication, 100 Gulf Dr.,
Circle K. The officer was flagged down by two white
males who reported that a woman stole their snake and
was hiding it under her shirt. The officer reported that
he detected the strong odor of an alcoholic beverage as
he approached the woman. He asked her about the
snake and she became very loud and abusive toward
the two males. She returned the snake.
As the males began to leave, the woman began
yelling at them. The officer advised her to leave and she
began walking north on Gulf Drive. The officer re-
turned to the Circle K five minutes later and found the
woman standing in the parking lot yelling and scream-
ing so loudly that employees and patrons were congre-
gating. She refused to quiet down and the officer placed
her in custody.
Aug. 22, theft, Coquina Beach. The victims ob-
served two white males walking away from their pic-
nic area with a black bag. Upon returning to their table,
they found the bag missing. The bag, valued at $15,
contained a purse valued at $10, a driver's license, two
silver dollars and prescription glasses valued at $100.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
V
T.C. & THE ALLSTARS
Fri & Sat* Sept. 2 & 3 10PM
D.N.A. (Dean from the DTs)
Tuesday Sept. 6
5th Annual GOLF Tournament Sept. 11
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


Celebrate

Florida

Cuisine

with a

Spanish

Flair '
fresh fish paella pasta *
tapas black bean soup *
stuffed veal chop duck *
tequila steak pork nueva *
homemade sangria *
cuban coffee tiramisu *

Tia Lena's Restaurant
1325 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach
Tuesday Sunday Open 4:30


The Finest Italian/Spanish/American
restaurant that does breakfast too!
A SAMPLING OF OUR MENU








THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI
2 for 1 Early Bird Specials k 4:30-6 PM
plus Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials
Hours: Open Wed-Sun 8am-2pm / 4:30-10pm
Closed Mon. & Tues. for the Summer
L S &S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach


I


TYLE'tS


Old Fashioned
Ice Cream
and
Waffle Cones
Made on
Location


o-1. Yo: I' Ar M


m


I


OF~m





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 U PAGE 23 i[


SAug. 23, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown entered a vehicle and re-
moved a purse valued at $20, $20 in cash, a GTE
beeper valued at $125, a driver's license, a social se-
curity card, a credit card, a marriage license and
children's birth certificates.
Aug. 25, warrant arrest, 2200 block of Avenue A.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 19, grand theft, 5501 Marina Dr., Captain's
Marina. The victim reported that his 21-foot boat was
docked at the marina and a person unknown untied and
removed it. The boat was valued at $12,000 and the
outboard motor was valued at $9,000. Later in the day,
the Manatee County Sheriffs Department recovered
the boat at the boat dock at Paradise Bay Trailer Park
on Cortez Road. The boat was not damaged and noth-
ing was missing. There are no suspects.
Aug. 21, fight, 5702 Marina Dr., Turtles Club and
Cafe. The officer, responding to the report of a fight,
found most of the club's patrons in the front parking
lot. A subject said a band member and patron began
arguing after the band member made crude comments
to the patron's girlfriend. The two began to fight, their
friends jumped in and a free-for-all ensued.
Aug. 21, petty larceny of a bicycle, 5800 block of
Holmes Boulevard.
Aug. 21, found property a woman's Cavaletto
Centurion, 12-speed, pink bicycle with a brown bag on
the front and black foam handlebars, 248 S. Harbor Dr.,
St. Bernard's Catholic Church.


Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Correz Bridge

Simply ... the soul of Europe in the
heart of Longboat Key.





Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
% Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


C B I HAPPY HOUR
--' .-. L .- Mon-Fri 4-7 PM

795-8083
SUNDAY:
HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY
2 C WITH NASCAR RACES
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT
KARAOKE .,.
*Wednesday
&Thursday Nights
8 to Midnight


Saltwater < '
Cowboys
Fri & Sat
September 2 & 3
9 PM -1 AM

The Best Burgers and
The Best Phillie Cheese Steaks
in Manatee County
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA *10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


Aug. 22, petty larceny of scrap copper valued at
$100, 3500 East Bay Dr., Air and Energy..
Aug. 22, found property a man's 26-inch,
black and aqua, Magna Fugitive mountain bicycle.
Aug. 23, petty larceny of a bicycle, 5800 block of
Holmes Boulevard.
Aug. 23, burglary, 3242 East Bay Dr., Wave
Zone. The complainant, who owns the business next
door, reported he came to his business and found the
window smashed out of the door of the Wave Zone.
The officer found a large piece of asphalt inside. The
subject removed shorts and shirts valued at $954.
Aug. 23, petty larceny of a ladder valued at $250,
3700 block of Fifth Avenue.
Aug. 23, found property a Florida license tag,
3300 block of East Bay Drive.
Aug. 23, petty larceny of a canvas cushion from
a lawn chair, 3800 block of Second Avenue.
Aug. 23, suspicious, 3000 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported a male and a female juvenile
with blond hair standing in the road spitting at vehicles.
Aug. 23, found property a woman's 26-inch,
green, single speed, Schwinn bicycle, corner of 2nd
Avenue and 43rd Street.
Aug. 24, petty larceny of a portable phone valued
at $250, 500 block of Bayview Drive.
Aug. 25, burglary, 5306 Holmes Blvd., Florida
Permitting. The officer on patrol observed windows on
the south side of the building open, part of the bottom
window broken out and the rear door partially open.
The report noted that a person unknown entered by
standing on a cement block under the window and went
through desk drawers, removed computer items and
exited through the rear door.


Privateers


to hold


Octoberfest


Oct. 15
The Anna Maria Island Privateers will host
their annual Octoberfest celebration on Saturday,
Oct. 15, from 5 to 11 p.m., at the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria.
The $5 ticket includes admission, dinner and
entertainment. Ann and the Bavarians will play
popular German-style music from 6 to 11 p.m.
Traditional German fare of wurst or hot dog
with sauerkraut, German potato salad and pumper-
nickel bread will be served from 6 to 9 p.m. only.
Beverages, sold separately at a cash bar, will be
served from 5 to 10:45 p.m.
Admission without dinner is free. Tickets may
be purchased in advance from any Privateer. For
more information call 794-2599 or 778-5934.

Aug. 25, vehicle accident, 6000 block of Marina
Drive. The officer in the police department heard a vehicle
skidding and a loud bang. He walked to the front of the
building and saw a bus stop sign on the ground and tire
marks in the grass. The vehicle was not found.





4 :0
HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. TO 6 p.m.
Friday Nights: Lou Huber at the Piano
Come join us September 16 to 30 for our
TWO YEAR BIRTHDAY PARTY.
We'll have lots of specials and give-aways.
DINNER SPECIAL WITH THIS AD
Buy one dinner at regular priceNOGOOD
get second at 1/2 PRICE ANYOTHERO FFR
Authentic British Atmosphere with
8 British Drafted Beers on Tap.
I I rnor n I SUMMER HOURS:


CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED
"Proof that great things come in
small packages. Kristy Nichols,
Sarasota Herald-Tribune
"Intimate ... an evening of relaxation and fine
dining.'- Longboat Observer
'Superb ... sensational ... I want to tell the
world." Pat Benson Bradenton Herald




fihe Mutinyy Inn



Intimate Dinner For Two
Including Wine
$39.95
BLACK ANGUS BEEF SELECTIONS
THE FRESHEST GULF CATCHES
Prepared 10 Ways Nightly
Exotic Grains & Wide Selection of Pastas
Summer ours
Serving Dinner 5:00 10:00 Monday thru Saturday
We wilffbe closedSeptember 4th to 11th
VRjservations Suggested
AvaiCabe for Private Parties
605Manatee Avenue at East Bay Dr.
Homes Beach
(813) 778-5440
IL.


Summer Seafood
: Extravaganza! c
Dinner for Two $48.00
Appetizers
GriedBronzedlszhrimp with iHoney MustardSauce
Novao Scotia Salnon Mousse
Creamed HLrring with Apples and Onions
Crispy arden Safat
Entrees
Salnon 'with StrawberyirVirarette Sauce
SauteedSoft Slitl Cra6 Acfredo over AngeiHa ir Pasta
Grouper Maryland withLump Crab
Slrmlp & ScaIp Djyon over Angelzair rasta
Desserts
farny's famous Key Lime nPie
Chocolate Mousse wit/i asp6erry Sauce
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[il PAGE 24 A SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Cuba calls, and charms me once again


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
The telephone rang Sunday evening and it was
Cuba calling. That "character out of American fiction,"
as he was called lately Bob Winters was on the
line.
"Hey, I just wanted to tell you that if the Americans
don't get here soon, there won't be anything left,"
Winters gushed. "The whole world, except for
America, is flocking to do business here."
The locally-vilified leader of the increasingly re-
spectable Sarasota-to-Havana Sailing Race last June
was full of good news.
He said he spent most of last week with a team of
reporters from the Tampa Tribune. "They changed their
minds about what I'm doing down here. I even loaned
them enough money to go to Guantanamo," he said.
"What are you doing down there, Bob?," I asked.
"I've got a sailing school now," he answered.
"Even had two American diplomats taking lessons a
couple of weeks ago.
"Hey, I'm not making bullets, I'm teaching people
how to sail," Winters continued. It sounded like a good
business to be in in Havana these days given all the
sailing going on down there.
Asked how he felt about being thrown out of the
Sarasota Sailing Squadron (to be honest about it, it took
place after the Squadron was bullied by the Sarasota
City Commission), Winters never faltered.
"Hey, it's their loss. St. Augustine wrote and of-
fered me an honorary membership, but this [Marina
Hemingway] is my club now."
It was the same ol' Bob Winters. Quietly upbeat,
almost impossible not to believe when you talk with
him one-on-one, and it appears still amused at all
the tempers he's riled back here.
Then, sure enough, Monday morning the Tampa
Tribune had this front page article, complete with a
handsome color picture of Winters, headlined "Skipper
anchored in Cuba." And it almost read like a love story.
"Bob Winters. Cubans wonder if he's a U.S. spy.
Americans figure he's in cahoots with Cuban President
Fidel Castro. Cuban-Americans think he's the Anti-
christ," Tribune reporter Patty Ryan wrote.
"He does more public relations penance than
Exxon. He totes marina pizza to a poor family in
Jaimanitas, promises to teach Cuban children to sail,
and finds a lightweight walker for a needy old woman.
"It wasn't like I went into a bank and embezzled
money, reasons Winters, tall and lean, with shaggy
white hair. I'm teaching people to sail," quotes Ryan
in the Trib article.
"These days, Cubans, fleeing by the thousands,
could use the lessons," she concludes.
"Things are good," Winters muses to the reporter,
who accompanied the fleet to Marina Hemingway. "I
feel a lot of pressure off being down here."
Second only to expensive fly rods, the latest
yuppie fishing toy is the flats boat. Based on the old
skiff design, these hot little fishing platforms can travel
through just inches of water up on the flats. But there's
a downside to them.
The shallow draft vessels can really tear up
seagrasses on the flats. All it takes is your average
amateur boater with his 100-horse, 17-foot flats boat


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misjudging a bit of channel, and you've got another
long stretch of ripped-out grass. Scientists tell us it
takes at least five years for a prop scar on a grass flat
to heal.
According to the best numbers I can find, about
785 acres (that's 9.6 percent) of the grass flats in Mana-
tee County are rated as "severely damaged" by prop
scars.
The flats on Sarasota Bay are already criss-crossed
with prop scars, and the fashionable new flats boats are
already making things worse. As you might guess, au-
thorities charged with protecting the Bay are taking
notice and action.
The draft Comprehensive Conservation Manage-
ment Plan (CCMP), the culmination of the Sarasota
Bay Program's study of Sarasota Bay, points out many
seagrass bed "hot spots" and calls for totally closing off
one area to boaters. That "conservation area" is located
near Sister Keys off northeast Longboat Key. Some of
the other "hot spots" include Longboat Pass, the en-
trance to Palma Sola Bay and the dog leg area in north
Sarasota Bay.
Although the CCMP is still a preliminary draft at
this point, approval by policy makers is expected to
come this fall. Expect that Sister Key closing, and prob-
ably some more too if the problem continues to get
worse.
Similar closings are already in place at various
spots in the Florida Keys and locally at Cockroach Bay,
so I predict we'll see them here too in the not-too-dis-
tant future. As is so often the case, the acts of a few
irresponsible or ignorant folks will penalize all of us.
Did you know Florida Power and Light has a
30-foot easement across the middle of Sarasota
Bay? I didn't either, but some sailboat owners have


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learned an expensive lesson because of it.
Seems FP&L announced to a group of owners with
boats on moorings off the Sarasota Sailing Squadron
they'd have to clear out for a while beginning Aug. 1.
They said the electric company would be putting a new
pipeline across the Bay on the easement and they'd
need the room to move a barge through the area.
So the boat owners rafted up their boats at the
Squadron's floating dock and hoped for the best.
And the worst happened.
A savage squall line, with rolling winds of more
than 50 miles an hour on the leading edge, came
through one early evening last week. One line came
loose and suddenly a half-dozen sailboats where
bouncing off one another. Squadron Manager Pat
Murphy said all the boats "suffered severe damage,
amounting to thousands of dollars."
Oh yes, that barge they'd all made way for still
hasn't done a single trip across the Bay. You can see
it out there off the Van Wezel, running about a month
behind schedule.
Snook season opens today! (As if any fisher
needed to be told.) But you can forget catching any,
because a local baitseller/joker told me a secret: said all
the local snook grouped up last weekend and left the
area. I guess that finally explains why snook are so rare
on my table.
Seriously, Ron said it ought to be a wonderful
snook season maybe the best in memory based
on recent catch-and-release fishing. He added the red-
fish season this summer was certainly the best in 10
years.
If ever there was proof good scientific fisheries
management works, these two species have to be it
See you next week.


SSnook Trout Redfish Flounder *

LIGHT TACKLE -
R SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
/2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308 |
SGrouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


Fish Tales
S- Welcome!
Got a great catch?
S We'd love to hear your
L T fish stories, and
pictures are welcome!
--- Just gives a call at
778-7978 or stop by
our office in the Island
Shopping Center,
IOUR PHOTO Holmes Beach.
s Beach 778-4277
island Centre






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 N PAGE 25 iB


At last, snook season opens Thursday


By Capt Mike Heistand
For those of you who have been out of touch,
snook season starts Sept. 1 and, from the catch-and-
release action in the past few weeks, the season prom-
ises to be excellent. If you aren't interested in
linesiders, look for big trout in the backwater, snapper
or grouper offshore.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip averaged 70 head of Key West grunts.
The six-hour trip averaged 65 head of lane, vermillion
and mangrove snapper, Key West grunts, sand perch,
porgies and red grouper. The nine-hour trip averaged
80 head of mangrove, lane and yellowtail snapper,
porgies and a few red grouper.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said Jack Barrett
caught a 36-inch tarpon recently. Other pier action in-
cludes large redfish in the 40- to 45-inch range, black
drum, a couple of catch-and-release snook and some
trout.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said trout action has
picked up, with fish in the 14- 24-inch range. Redfish
action is also improving, and snook action is fair. Joey
Locallo and family, all from Chicago, caught their limit
on redfish as well as a lot of trout and a few catch-and-
release snook.
Capt. Dave on the Neva-Miss said grouper action
has picked up offshore, with gag and red grouper be-
ing caught in about 100 feet of water, as well as snap-
per and barracuda. There are also big mackerel 10 to 12
miles out.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said a pier
fisher caught a 42-inch nurse shark. Anglers there have
also been catching a few reds and drum, and there was
good mackerel activity during the weekend.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper fishing
is really hot in 80 to 100 feet of water. Conditions are
good for trolling for black fin tuna and dolphin in about
80 feet of water.
Capt. Todd Romine said his charters are catching
lots of catch-and-release snook and plenty of redfish.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said mackerel are
the best bet near the piers and beaches. Offshore, man-
grove snapper is a good fish to hunt for, and redfish are
popular in the backwater. Bill said summertime fishing
is best right now, and predicts snook season will be
terrific.
Capt. Mark Bradow said trout, redfish and snook
were the best bets.
On my boat Magic we set a personal record: the
biggest trout every landed at 29 inches in length and
eight pounds in weight. Redfish action is also excellent,
with as many as 20 fish caught on some trips.
Capt Rick Gross said his clients have been catching


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limit catches of reds as well as catch-and-release snook.
Capt. Phil Shields said he has been doing well
with night shark trips in the bay, and has been catch-
ing black nose and black tip sharks in the Gulf. Also


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Fri 9/2
Sat 9/3
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Tue 9/6
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Kevin Flynn holds the jaw of a 325-pound female
bull shark he reeled into the Rod and Reel Pier
Aug. 18. The 8'1 shark hit a 5-pound black drum
,@- .E off the end of the pier. Flynn had someone in a
boat take his hook and bait and set it 300 to 400
feet out. It took about an hour for the shark to
find the bait, then it was another 80 minutes
before Flynn was able to pull the toothy beast on
shore, where it gave birth to shark pups which
swam off into the night. The shark yielded 100
pounds offillets which Flynn gave away to pier
S. H visitors. Flynn says two-thirds of all shark attacks
oin" ion humans are by bull sharks, so we imagine his
best recipe for shark steaks is called "Revenge."


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II --r I







IB PAGE 26 E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

K^JII MIr


Lee and Charlie Price
Lee and Charlie Price, infants, of Anna Maria
Island died Aug. 17 in Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Lee and Charlie were born in Manatee Memo-
rial Hospital.
The twins are survived by their parents, Roni
McCudden and Charles "Spanky" Price of Anna
Maria Island.
A private burial was held in the Rose Garden at
Roser Memorial Community Church. Memorials
may be made to the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, FL 34216.
Irene Plant
Gerbracht Smiley
Irene Plant Gerbracht Smiley of Holmes Beach


died Aug. 20.
Born in 1915, Mrs. Smiley moved to Holmes
Beach 35 years ago.
She is survived by a son, Col. John "Jack" M.
Plant of the Republic of Panama; a daughter, Irene
Vondrasek of Lakeland; and five granddaughters.
Memorial donations, which go toward the edu-
cation of Mrs. Smiley's granddaughters, may be
made to the Irene Smiley Memorial Fund, c/o Allen
and Company, 1401 South Florida Ave., Lakeland,
FL 33803.

Obituary correction
The obituary for I. E. "Ernie" Cagnina, which
appeared in last week's paper, failed to note that
Mr. Cagnina is also survived by his granddaughter,
Amy Christina Shea, of Winter Park.


The Island Poet
Well the kids left early this morning and you won-
der where I'm at.
I'm down here with a ton of bedding at the corner
laundry mat,
Oh! I am glad the kids had a ball which was very
plain to see,
But with all their coming and going they made a
wreck of me.
They came all the way from Texas to find this was
paradise,
And there wasn't very much that got past their very
eyes.
They fell in love with Holmes Beach and were glad
they could come,.
Which was no great surprise to me, 'cause doesn't
everyone?
Bud Atteridge


The pipes
are calling
Walter Martin plays the bagpipes at a memorial service held by Anna Maria
City Pier Regulars at Bayfront Park on Aug. 18. The memorial honored Joe
Beaver, who died May 5, Ed Dillon, who died July 21, Lloyd McClelland,
who died Aug. 8, and Mary Ross, who died Aug. 17. Rev. Jim Meena of Island
Baptist Church officiated as a number of Islanders shared reminiscences of
their friends and loved ones.
Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


SA Ramond lame., weshare a commitment
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(813) 755-6272 Toll Free 800 247-3011 Fax (813) 758-4542
Concerned about you and your financial well-being.





i \I i1



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Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 1 PAGE 27 IB
,. -,.-. ,. .., -.'-.. ",i- . .. -: '' -,_ l 7f "


30 Something team members Lynn Hudson, Bradenton, and Phillip Gofoith, a pilot from Kenai, Alaska, hit the kayak going in opposite directions but managed to
straighten themselves out to steer the course.


Molly Smith, 3
years old and a
resident of
Bradenton, blew
the whistle -
often and well -
while her
mother, Amy
from the Beach
House restau-
rant, helped
organize events.


Volleyball and beaches go
together like pifia coladas
and umbrellas on a hot day.
Kevin Cassidy spiked one
for the Sandbar restaurant
team.


na- &n -L
REALTORSI


ISLAND 6-PLEX
2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and
shopping. Pool and laundry facilities. $450,000.
Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 iE_ MLS EOi




I-- --- - -


Mariners Cove, a life style.
Lush, natural, tropical surroundings with mag-
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parking, pools and private deep water boat slip.
Only $205,000.
CALL DICK MAHER 778-6791
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 MIS


OVER 900 MAILED

OUT-OF-TOWN
The Islander Bystander mails a record number
of out-of-town, out-of-state subscriptions every
week. More than any Island newspaper in
10 years! Many Thanks to our loyal readers
and people who love all the best news
about Anna Maria.


6-UNIT COMPLEX
201 35th St. Gorgeous Gulf views. Strong
building in quiet neighborhood. Could be
annual rentals. $535,000.
Call 778-7373



Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
\ L 0701 Gulf Drive PO Box 717 Anna Mada, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


"- -






BEACHSIDE DELIGHT
Stunning architecturally designed, custom
built home. This 4 bedroom, 3 bath home
is of exceptional quality and design. Fire-
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few of the extras in this lovely home. Up-
scale master suite has 24k gold fixtures
and jacuzzi tub in the bath, also a 10' x 10'
walk-in closet and vaulted ceilings. Just
listed. Call for an appointment today.
Agnes Tooker 778-5287 or Kathy Tooker
Granstad 778-4136. $299,000.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
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IJ PAGE 28 0 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


GREAT BUY! Steps to the beach. Four 2BR units
in 2 well maintained buildings. For less than $70,000
per unit, you can own this "Island Gold Mine."
Call Robin Kollar 778-7244

The Islander Bystander ... it's the best
news on the Island ... and it's free!



I I


NEW LISTING NORTH POINT ESTATE: Key
West style, 4 bedroom home for the owner that is
looking for individuality. Open floor plan with excit-
ing water views from most every window. Amenities
include, his and hers master baths, skylights, wrap
around deck, security system, boat lift and dock,
maintenance free exterior. Homeowner Association
provides complete lawn care, tennis, pool and spa.
Priced at $339,000. Call Carol R. Williams, for ap-
pointment, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


REDUCED- SOUTHERN COMFORT: Enjoy the
quality and formality of yesterday with today's
convenience. Picture 10 ft. ceilings, decorative
moldings and columns, shining oak floors, fire-
place, butler's pantry, and 'ole-fashioned wrap-
around porch for catching the breeze. High hip
metal roof and 70 ft. dock. Call today for a peek
at a new interpretation of past luxuries with Judy
Duncan. Now $304,000. 778-1589 eves.
W 1M


CAR COLLECTORS DELIGHT! Room for 10
cars including (2) 2 car garage come with this
four bedroom, two bath home located 3 blocks to
beach and 1 block to Bay. Family room, spacious
screened porch. Duplex zoned. $239,000. Call
Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.


NEW LISTING VALUE A VIEW? Bayfront
condo with direct view of Skyway Bridge and Tampa
Bay. One bedroom, one bath, "great room" design
with breakfast bar, walk in closet, appliances in-
cluding washer & dryer, fans, window treatments
and ceramic tile. 2 pools, tennis, close to beach
and shopping. Priced at $129,500. Call Carol R.
Williams 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


SAREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-372 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS 1


HOLMES BEACH $108,000
Lots of possibilities here! Great location and quiet
street. Short walk to shopping center and beach. Two
bedrooms, one bath and the other side features a one
bedroom, one bath. $112,000.

Hk ^


A SPECIAL PLACE
Very large 3 bedroom 4 bath home with pecan & wal-
nut paneling. Hardwood floors beneath carpet. Extra
large lot with pool & gazebo. 35' open porch. Across
from beach.


GULF FRONT BUNGALOW
Older beach house with large lot, hardwood floors, roof
top deck and detached garage in Holmes Beach.


Mike
Norman
Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617
FAX: 778-4364


3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


PERICO BAY CLUB



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Marilyn Trevethan
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OFFERING CONDOS ...
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Labor Day Specias

On Anna Maria Island

Looking for beachfront or
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We have them.

4-day/3-night packages
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Daily, weekly and monthly specials.
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fireplace, lots of ceiling fans, 2 car garage and
plenty of storage areas! Wonderful 2 bedroom,
2 bath unit. What could be better! Includes 24
hr manned security gate. $229,000. #59041.
Ask for Karin Stephan, 778-0766, anytime.
MARTINIQUE SOUTH ... excellent view of the
Gulf, right at a wonderful walking beach. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath ceiling fans, storm shutters, glass
enclosed porch w/fans. Plus 1 car garage.
Heated pool, tennis, security. $139,900. #59042.
Call Carol Heinze today! or 792-5721 eves.
EDGEWATER COVE AT PERICO BAY ...
marvelous views of Palma Sola Bay, Long-
boat Key & Anna Maria! Many upgrades in
the fine 3 bedroom, 2 bath condo excellent
condition. Garage, pool, tennis, exercise
room, clubhouse. $196,900. #59052. Ask for
Karin Stephan, 778-0766.
IMPERIAL HOUSE ...
Bay view!
Turnkey furnished!
2BR condo!
$89,900.
Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTORe
Million Dollar Club


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


FloridaRat


I


CL




0)







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 PAGE 29 U[


Watch for our
0j listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.


Secluded Island Retreat This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is located
on the tranquil north end of Anna Maria, just steps to the finest white
beach in Florida! Completely remodeled in 1988, this tastefully deco-
rated hideaway offers a master suite with cathedral ceilings, skylights,
black slate fireplace, private lanai, and fabulous dove-gray bath with
Kohler cast iron tub, over size shower, and his & hers sinks. There is a
fully equipped, country-styled opening onto a formal dining area. The
cozy family room offers another distinctive stone fireplace with raised
hearth, vaulted ceiling and sliding doors which open onto the sunny
screened-in patio. Vinyl siding and sprinkler system make for easy ex-
terior upkeep. Truly a wonderful place to call home! Asking $275,000.


L 7 Jnde u cESatldEat PWfofeional SPiaLzing in Uiimnw UI opsoiiLif'Eyius.i
ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847
Marcella Comett...778-5919 Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Michael Advocate...778-0608


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


SYY .'.l I

__ll BC~i.UlCR/1~~!c '


* LONGBOAT KEY SPECIAL OFFERING! Spectacular
panoramic views. Direct Bayfront & canal entry. 3BR/2BA
designer home with large caged pool. Price includes 2
buildable lots. $900,000. MLS55651. Call Nick Patsios for
escorted tour. 778-2261 or 778-4642 eves.
TRUE BOATING COMMUNITY Upgraded 2nd floor
unit, 2BR/2BA, cathedral ceilings, coral fireplace,
jacuzzi, custom book shelves, 24hr. security gate.
Great view of Intracoastal. $205,000. MLS58971. Call
Dick Maher 778-2261 or 778-6791.
PERICO BAY CLUB LARGEST VILLA 2Bed+den,
lake front, beautiful end unit, tile, climatized lanai, deck
awning, vaulted ceilings, mint cond. 1269 Spoonbill
Lndgs. $159,900. MLS56690. Call Marilyn Trevethan
Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 792-8477.
DIRECT GULF FRONT CONDO 2BR/2BA with gor-
geous sunset views. Pool, covered parking, beautiful
tile. Great rental history. $185,000. MLS58348. Call
Mary Ann Schmidt Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 7784931.


*GULF FRONT COMPLEX -2BR/2BA, very nice unit on
top floor. Verticals, all appliances, under bldg. parking, well
maintained grounds, pool. $178,000. MLS58146. Call
Helen White Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-6956.
WESTBAY COVE BAYFRONT Seller will finance.
Neat & tidy, tile & white carpet. Separate equipped
laundry room off lanai. White ceramic tile on lanai,
never a rental. $149,999. MLS#54983. Rose Schnoerr
Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-7780.
WEST COVE SOUTH Lovely 2BR/2BA 2nd floor unit
with view of Intacoastal over pool. Watch morning sun-
rise over bay. Very tastefully decorated. Homeowners
warranty. $130,000. MLS54983. Call Bobye Chasey
Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-1532.
WHY YOU BUY IN FLORIDA! Light, bright, open high
ceilings. 2BR/2BA just steps to beautiful beach, quiet
streets, palm trees, hibiscus hedge. All that Florida
means! $169,900. MLS57385. Call Bob or Lu Rhoden
Off: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-2692.


60 -aateAeueWs,-Hle Bah F 41
II
"TA U IT UCES" s 0-3



WAGNER Dave Moynihan ....LI............... 778797
Licened E Olieira..................... 77 -175
RE LT IC.RelEsat BllWanrBrke ........77-51
Broker~l~ll ~ILLLLL~~


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.



k~u itlsi a I


RARE 3 BEDROOM GULFFRONT CONDO! Just
listed Ocean Park Terrace condo has it all view,
pool, walking beach, 2 balconies, built in Bar-B-
Que, secured building and an elevator. Building
has just been painted. Priced at $219,900. Call Ed
Oliveira for details.

ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ... 85 x
130'... deep water and spectacular views
... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ... 90
x 109' ... deep water and view of Bayou
... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach and zoned
for 1 to 4 units ... $129,900.


STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


SUNBOW BAY CONDOMINIUM
3805 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Furnished unit
This conveniently located complex is within walking
distance to everything shopping, Gulf beach and
more. Tennis Court, Two Pools. Excellent Investment
potential. $24.000 Reduced to $89,990.
(813) 778-0426
S HORIZON REALTY


GULF FRONT ESTATE Located directly on beautiful Gulf
Beach! Custom-built home includes a unique design of three
separate structures. Spacious plan of 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths
plus Master Suite. Lush tropical landscaping offers complete
privacy. Gulf front parcel of over 1/2 acre. Asking $950,000
& available terms. Call Marie Franklin, 778-2259.





MARIE LIC. EAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maia, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250


OPEN HOUSE 1-4 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPT. 3rd and 4th
408 South Bay Blvd., Anna Maria
Sounds of the sea are yours in this exquisite bay front home. Views
of the bay from many rooms In the 3 bedroom, 2 bath energy effi-
dent home. Many extras including a dumb waiter, and security sys-
tem. Come see this one of a kind home. $434,900. Call Agnes
Tooker 778-4136 or Kathy Tooker Granstad 778-4136.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
tL I9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717- Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307










-k - .
A'
-r ^ '. , .. *










Carpet. The thickest, tightest piletnown to man. Wall
to wall in the massive great room. And you're going to
have a cocktail party. And if it turn dull, you might want
to liven things up with the fire hose concealed in the
garage. What to do. Well, roll it up like they did in the
gracious times gone by. It's just laying there ... over
gorgeous white ceramic tile. Reason 6 of 15 why we at
Dowling Realty judge this home at 631 Foxworth to be
valued at $525,000. Call us at 778-1222 or stop by our
office at 409 Pine Ave.

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Con-
struction & Design, Existing Properly Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilesi
S I 1.l=0 11*NO; -11 l I:t


OeW gl8 s f11 eat 1tate
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(813) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294
1


GULF FRONT APARTMENTS Unique offering of
9 Gulf front apartments with outstanding views
and excellent investment opportunity. Offered at
$950,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


-T


m





[If PAGE 30 1 SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


and' Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Safldy \ Lawn Mowing *Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
77841345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
AND SATISFACTION

I I *






o KILTS PIANO STUDIO
SENROLL NOW for Private Music Instruction'
Piano or Keyboard Youth to Adult
Instruction at 6608 Marina Drive
Paulette Kilts Holmes Beach (813) 778-3788

Express Delivery Lifetime Guarantee
.. Tupperwarei
/. SALES SPECIALS
FREE HOSTESS GIFTS!
CALL 778-3057


SAnna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548

Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcom ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468

I AI I 1 U IIIl I
STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLEX ED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY

A FLORIDA COMPANY
*SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
SODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


J.IL

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates

778-2139


IS AN E 'aA S F I9ED


BASSETT SOFA BED in excellent condition and
king size bed, complete including headboard. Call
778-1447 or 778-3730.

3-CUSHION brown couch $350. Octagon shaped
end table $20. Pro-form auto Incline Treadmill $400.
Fun Island raft with oars $25. 779-2129.

GARAGE DOOR with opener, heavy wood with
glass windows. $75. 792-9366.

OAK DINETTE 48"x48" with 18" leaf and 4 chairs $175,
Voit stairstepper $50, wicker chair $20, mirrored deco-
rator table $25. 739-1660 or 792-3937, ex.174.

5 METAL DETECTORS: underwater Garrett XL-500,
Surmaster PI, plus 3 land detectors. All excellent con-
dition, sacrifice $75-$225. Call weekends 778-4065.

3 PILLOW SOFA, 3 months old, excellent condition.
Paid $400, asking $250. Double bed, like new, box
spring, frame & mattress $95. 778-6988.

COUCH & LOVESEAT set. Only 2 years old, excel-
lent condition. First $475 takes all. 778-0619 or 778-
1011.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


GARAGE SALE Sat., Sept. 3. 9 am till dusk. 874
N. Shore Dr., Anna Maria (opposite Rod & Reel
Pier). Furniture, housewares, clothing, etc.

GARAGE SALE-Sat., Sept. 3. 9am-lpm. 723 Holly
Dr., Anna Maria. Clothes, tools, misc.

YARD SALE Sat., Sept. 3. 8am-lpm. 5806 Holmes
Blvd., Holmes Beach. Furniture, washer, dryer,
clothes.


FOUND Female, peach colored, older Golden
Retriever. Brown leather collar. Vicinity of Anna
Maria School, 8/25. 778-5412.
LOST Shih-tzu, black and white male. 8/15/94.
Vicinity of St. Bernards Church. 778-5086.
LOST I've lost my dog. White Pomeranian.
Friendly, fluffy, missed terribly. Any information
please call 778-2162.


CREDIT CARD PROCESSING: Now small busi-
nesses can offer credit card processing for low rates.
Merchant bank cards. Ask for Hal. 800-882-5469.


74 VOLKSWAGEN KARMANGHIA convertible,
bright yellow, good condition, must see to appreci-
ate. $1,200 firm or trade. 778-1767.


SPORT CRAFT 16 ft with trailer, center console,
Mercury 90hp, Eagle Fish ID, new seats, excellent
condition. Call weekends, 778-4065. $4995.

SAIL BOAT 14ft, fiberglass Barnett Butterfly, 20ft
sail, excellent shape. $285. Call weekends 778-
4065.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


EXPERIENCED Retail Sales. Apply in person.
10010 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria.

LABOR needed for lawn service. Call 778-1345 af-
ter 9:00 AM.

Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you
interested in learning the history of Anna Maria Is-
land? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Dorothy Steven, 795-0148 if you
can give a few hours of community service.

Give your time where it's needed. Please volunteer.


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.

HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home re-
pairs. Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails,
etc. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.

AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. $85 for aver-
age size car. Call Damon on mobile number 356-
4649. Please leave a message for quick reply if not
available.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

K.D. FAIRS will do painting or wallpapering very
reasonably! 778-1032.

MOBILE AUTO REPAIR. A/C experienced, 29
years. Free estimate. 778-4659.
NEED A PICKUP TRUCK to move a load? Appli-
ances, brush piles, construction debris, junk. What-
ever your hauling needs. Call Eddie 0. 705-0221.

CLEANING, residential work for over 15 years, ex-
cellent references. Call Barbara, 779-2024.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home re-
pairs. Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails,
etc. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.

VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-
5183.

DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, roof coating & repairs, drywall repairs. Work
guaranteed. Low prices. 778-0410.

ISLANDER BYSTANDER advertising really works.
Call us to find out how to sell your unwanted items.


AUTO VETAILINI~
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. And our mobile service means no
one has to drive your car. By appointment,
at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 1 PAGE 31 []


JISNUWEJ4CLASSIFIEDSA
I-ENAS f RNTL 9CN INE 9


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fire-
place, jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
Intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Will-
iams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully furnished
condo, 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
BRAND NEW! 2BR/2BA, yearly, bay front complex
with pool, covered parking. $675. to $725 per month
incl. water/sewer, trash & cable. 778-4777.
BEAUTIFUL GULF VIEW, steps to beach, 2BR/
2BA, 1 car garage, pools, tennis, complete turnkey.
August thru May. 813-265-1766 or 884-0222.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.

WEEKEND SPECIAL: Fri., Sat. & Sun. $160. 1BR/
1BA Gulf front condo. Beautiful beach, beautiful
sunsets. Weekly, $300. 778-2832.

GULF FRONT, 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck,
private beach. Cable, telephone, fully equipped.
$350/week. 1-813-988-1344.
BRADENTON BEACH, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
walk to beach. Available now, $550 per month. No
pets. Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MAINLAND, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, close to shop-
ping, screened lanais. $650 per month. Call island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
BEAUTIFUL 1 BR turnkey furnished apartment. 100
yds to Gulf. $650 per month including utilities until
January. No pets. 778-5246.
EFFICIENCY $160 per week, includes utilities.
AC, cable, near beach and fishing pier. Phone 778-
2833.
1BR/1BA Apt., very clean, quiet setting. Includes
heat, A/C & water. $425/mo. Non smoker, mature
individual. 778-6511.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck, pri-
vate beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone, mi-
crowave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-813-
988-1344.
WANTED ROOMMATE to share 2BR/1 BA apt.
$295 plus 1/2 utilities. Call Don 778-7843.
YOU CAN buy it, rent it and sell anything fast in an
Islander classified ad! Call 778-7978 to find out
how. You gthe best results when you advertise with
the best newspaper.


ONE ROOM APT with bath and screened porch.
Separate entrance. Close to shopping center.
Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
ANNUAL 2BR/1BA, central H/A, no pets. $450 per
month. 778-2109 after 12:00 PM.
ANNUAL 2BR/1BA. North Holmes Beach. $600 per
month plus security, includes water & cable. 778-
6198 or 748-4842 x23.
SEASONAL, month or week. 2BR/1BA upstairs apt.
Fully furnished, walk to beach. 778-5908.
ANNUAL OR SEASONAL furnished 1BR/1BA, liv-
ing, dining, kitchen, screened porch, W/D facilities.
Holmes Beach on Gulf. 778-1392.
DUPLEX 2BR/1BA. 1/2 blk from beach. Available
Oct thru April. $1200 per month. Call 813-681-9656
leave message, will return call.
SUNBOW BAY condo apt. 2BR/2BA. Includes wa-
ter/sewer, trash, cable, pool and tennis. Annual,
monthly. 792-1554.
UNFURNISHED CONDOMINIUMS Perico Bay
Club: 3/2, Sandpiper, $925. 2/2, 504 Sanderling,
$800. 2/2, 959 Sandpaper, $850. Island In The Sun
2/2, 3100 Gulf Dr., Townhouse, pool, $600. West
Bay Point & Moorings, 2/2, bayfront, $840. Neal &
Neal Rentals, 813-778-9477 or 800-422-6325.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! On Anna Maria Island,
nothing works faster than an ISLANDER CLASSI-
FIED AD.



4-PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.

"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
KEY ROYALE, 624 Foxworth. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3Br/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dinging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $219,500. 778-7837.
WATERFRONT LOT, Holmes Beach canal, view of
skyway. 66' on excellent seawall, ready to build.
$135,000. 778-0019.
BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call Quality Builders today, 778-7127.
GORGEOUS MOUNTAIN VIEWS. Cool country liv-
ing, 2 homes for sale 1 in Hayesville, NC and 1 in
Hiawassee, GA. Call 706-896-1348.
BRADENTON PINEBROOK CONDO. 2BR/2BA,
enclosed lanai, under bldg. parking, on golf course,
many improvements. $91,900. Owner, 795-2226.


778-2586 tMARV/ KAy Eve: 778-6771

10% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 9l/94 1[YI

S PERSONAL TRAINING
Walk/Jog Step/Circuit Aerobics
Body Sculpting Stretching Exercise
By Appointment: Call 779-2129


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
S* Now AcceptingAppointments
Gift Cerrificares Available
792-3758 MM0003995
MA0012461

S PIANO & 6
KEYBOARD 4M
LESSONS -
Beginner to College Levels
Music Prep Class Ages 5 & 6
10% OFF IF REGISTERED BY AUGUST 31
778-3539


Anna Maria Laundromat

Open 24 Hours
7 Days a Week
9906 GULF DRIVE
ANNA MARIA
Laundry
facilities in the Anna Maria
appr ecate. Post Office Plaza


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX006545S
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
S VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
S ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074


KIMBALL -
SHOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Handrails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident* Local References
778-5354


Don't

forget!
We mail over 900
out-of-town subscrip-
tions every week.
If you want to keep
in touch with what's
happening on Anna
Maria Island, please
use the form on
page 7 in this issue.
ISLANDER 9 m
5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 34217
(813) 778-7978


HOLMES
1O BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

SPECIAL LABOR DAY DEADLINE:
NOON SATURDAY FOR THE SEPT. 8 ISSUE
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.

|ISLANDEI)RE iM






[[D PAGE 32 E SEPTEMBER 1, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


ISLATs JDER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
* The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
* All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
* All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 14
from the tying entries. 6 ,,.. ...15---------
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ IL II-__________ _____ :r /I i -r- l 'Jl'v V!~u


* Name


rlI L IT UUT NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
Address/City _Phone


ROD lEEL
Mini-Resort
k Best Fishing -k
ISLAND COOKING
Beer and Wine
Breakfast
Lunch-Dinner
* Reasonable Prices *
"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned -k
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier
Kansas City vs. Saints





Joe
Ungvarsky
Construction
& Remodeling
778-2993
"Experience
You
Can
Rely
On."
CRCO35Z61

SHouston vs. Indianapolis


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU* FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
Florida St vs. Virginia
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953





AMERICAN
CAR

WASH

AETILING
BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
Minnesota vs. Green Bay
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617


Repairs
*Shingles
4 Tile

S Free Estimates-,


WAND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Re-Roofs Tile
Built-Ups Single-Ply
Repairs Roofing
Shingles Systems
LICENSED-INSURED
RC0054148
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Dallas vs.Pittsburgh
COURTESY QUALITY
748-136


.-I
OUAU0 r TK*J S15 1HE 514NDARD



SConsignmenurrokorage
80ul 004n your comalnor
BOAT RENTAL
Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
C Anna Maria
778-5577
Johnson, Evinrude. OMC
Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stem Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
San Diego vs. Denver


ccg304A


HAPPY HOUR
MON FRi 4- 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KirchEN OpEN DAily 11 AM
BANIAM PlIAz BRAdENION
10104 CoRIEz Rd. W.
SNew England vs.Miami I


Play the game and
advertise here!
There's a space left
for your business in
the Island's most
talked about
football contest!
Cleveland vs. Cincinai
Call 778-7978
to feature your
business here!


v You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast,
Professional Service
from Island Ownersl
Same Day or Next Day Prlcesl
3332 E& By Dr* Holnm BeA
778-4277
Men. Fr. 8:30 t StL 30 to
Atlanta vs. Detroit


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
Seattle vs.Washington
4M


Prompt Professional
Service
*All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters n Disposals
SRemodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
Phila. vs. NY Giants


LaPensee 4
Plumbing, Inc. e'
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach




THE

CLUB
RESTAURANT
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4-6pm
.e.
Happy Hour Everyday
2 for 1 Drinks
Arizona vs. LA Rams
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


1 1-80-23


14


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