<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00645

Full Text








TISLANDERER



Anna Maria's 'Fast Eddie' charged with theft


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Missing in action since 1992, Edwin B. "Fast
Eddie" Porter was arrested in Michigan and charged
with 10 felony theft counts stemming from his failure
to pay the state of Florida $430,582 in sales taxes.
Porter, 54, the former owner of Fast Eddie's Place
restaurant in Anna Maria City, was arrested Oct. 30 at
his home in East Port, Mich., by Michigan state police.
Lori Doganiero, assistant prosecutor with Florida
Department of Revenue's Office of Statewide Prosecu-
tion, said Porter was charged with six counts of second-
degree felony theft and four counts of third-degree
felony theft.
He faces up to 4 1/2 years in prison and the state
hopes to recoup the sales tax money plus interest, pen-
alties and investigative costs, Doganiero said.
The state is seeking $991,278.62, she said.
"There's no chance he can pay it back, but discov-


Savings due


to recycling


staggering
By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Llewellyn Johnson of Anna Maria City recycles his
old newspapers, plastic bottles and glass at the city's
four recycling containers on Pine Avenue.
Johnson is in the minority.
"I do it all the time. I don't mind it. But I hear my
neighbors say it's too far to go to haul it to Pine," he
said. "I think if we had curbside pickup for recycling
then a lot more people would do it. Look at Holmes
Beach. Every Wednesday almost every house has one
of those blue recycling bins in front of it."
Johnson is in accord with nationwide trends when
it comes to recycling.
Each month with maximum recycling participa-
tion, an average 100-unit apartment or condominium
has the following positive impact on our environment:
Save 21.93 30-foot trees
Save 8,389 kilowatts of electricity
Save 26.86 cubic yards of landfill space
Reduce 77.4 pounds of air pollution
In terms of recycling paper, 4,100 kilowatts of
electricity is saved for each ton recycled while 60
pounds of air pollution is reduced.
Steel cans can be recycled to reduce mining wastes
by about 70 percent. It takes four times as much energy
to make steel from virgin ore.
Annually, enough energy is saved by recycling
steel to supply Los Angeles with almost a decade worth
of electricity.
A ton of glass produced from raw materials creates
384 pounds of mining waste. Using 50 percent recycled
glass cuts it by 75 percent.
Recycling glass reduces air pollution by up to 20
percent and saves 25-30 percent of the energy used to
make glass from virgin materials.
At the current pace, Americans will be generating 222
million tons of waste by the year 2000. Currently about
130 million tons of waste ends up in landfills each year.
In 1992, a whopping 26 percent of landfill owners
said their landfills would be full in less than three years.
Environmental Protection Agency regulations pro-
vide minimum standards for the nation's public and
private landfills. It involves the use of composite lin-
ers and having an elaborate monitoring system.
The cost of the enacting new regulations result in a
dramatic increase in the cost of new landfills. The regu-
lations also require local governments to come up with
enough money to close and cap old landfill sites and per-
form care and maintenance for 30 years after closure.
With these sort of doomsday numbers, recycling
becomes imperative.
For more on recycling, please see page four.


ery will tell. Our objective is to recoup L
some of the money."
Porter allegedly failed to pay the sales I
taxes from six Florida restaurants he owned
under the Fast Eddie's name that capitalized
on the motto, "Warm Beer and Lousy
Food." .
His 500-seat Anna Maria City restau-
rant was the flagship of the company and
closed Dec. 21, 1992, following a foreclo-
sure by its major lien holder, First Union
Bank of Florida.
When employees arrived on Dec. I
20, 1992, they were told the restaurant L-
would close. Many felt that Porter had Porter
betrayed them.
Almost 150 employees were out of ajob days before
Christmas and later some said they lost health insurance
benefits and defaulted on home mortgages because they


couldn't find work.
Ruth Crossley believes it cost her hus-
band Arnie his larynx and later his life to
cancer. In a July 15, 1993, article in The Is-
lander Bystander, Crossley said Porter
& failed to pay premiums on his employees'
health insurance and that her husband re-
ceived a notice from Porter's insurance car-
Srier that benefits had ceased on July 1, 1992.
Because of his insurance problems,
Arnie Crossley was unable to get the
medical attention he needed when his
family doctor recommended he see a
1 I throat specialist. Ultimately he had his
larynx and a large neck tumor removed -
but only through the generosity of a
Bradenton physician.
PLEASE SEE FAST EDDIE, NEXT PAGE


DARK SAND MAY DIMINISH LONGBOAT'S ALLURE


-- ---d' Al- 7- z


Longboat Key beach renourishment begins
Longboat Key's beach renourishment project began Monday as workers with Weeks Marine began moving sand
onto the beach near the Bayport Condominium at mid-key. The $5.5 million project consists of moving 827,777
cubic yards of sand from offshore sites onto a three-mile-long stretch of Longboat near the Manatee-Sarasota
county line. The project also will feature five fabric "sand sausages" and a 2,000-foot-long sand "sill" that will be
placed offshore in an attempt to keep sand on the beach. The renourishment project is expected to be completed by
February. By the way, the dark color should fade as the sun bleaches the sand. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Holmes Beach crosswalk crackdown


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Drivers be aware!
New crosswalks will be springing up in Holmes
Beach. Current ones will be refurbished and police will
be watching them.
"We want people to be aware that we will do ev-
erything we can to make people realize we're a heavy
pedestrian area," Police Chief Jay Romine stressed.
"We're going to enforce the laws as they relate to
crosswalks."
If a pedestrian steps into the crosswalk he has the
right of way and the driver must stop or face a fine of
$78.
"We encourage pedestrians to use common sense,"
Romine noted. "Don't just assume the driver will stop
and step in front of a car. However, if we see a pedes-
trian in the crosswalk and a car doesn't stop, we'll take
appropriate action."
New crosswalks are slated for Marina Drive at 66th
Street and 56th Street and at Gulf Drive and 85th Street.
Crosswalks to be refurbished are between the Is-
land Shopping Center and the bank in the 5400 block
of Marina Drive; in front of the Anna Maria Elemen-


tary School; and in front of the Holmes Beach Post
Office at Holmes Boulevard and Gulf Drive.
New crosswalks have been completed at the inter-
sections of 45th Street 67th Street on Gulf Drive.

Islander Bystander
celebrates fifth year!
See page 14 for Island newspaper history


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ........................................ ........ 6
Those Were the Days .................... ........ 7
ISLAND MAP ............................... ......... 20
Stir-it-up ................... ........................ 24
School Daze ........................................... 27
Streetlife ......................... ......... ........... 28
Anna Maria Island tides ............................... 31
Crossword puzzle.......................................... 40


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE NOVEMBER 21, 1996


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND





lj PAGE 2 N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Officials questioned on storm insurance rules

By David Futch
Islander Reporter -I


Tina Schambers has an Anna Maria Island home
she recently renovated.
Now she's concerned that if she does any more
work on the house, federal and city regulations may
require her to raise her ground-level home 13 feet or
more above sea level.
Schambers and approximately 150 Islanders found
a crowded house when they
met last week at the Anna
Maria Island Elementary
School Auditorium to ques-
tion federal, state and city
officials about federal flood
zone regulations.
The crux of the meet-
r ing centered around what's
commonly called the "50
percent rule."
Loar The federal rule,
which went into effect upon
adoption of flood ordinances in the 1970s, states that
if a homeowner has had to rebuild after a devastating
storm, or a series of storms over a five-year period, then
the cost of rebuilding cannot exceed 50 percent of the
fair market value of the home. Land value is not con-
sidered in the 50 percent rule.
Any renovations not related to storm damage also
are included in the formula.
Brad Loar, senior mitigation specialist with FEMA's
regulatory office in Atlanta, said if renovations include
anything you're attaching to the house such as carpet or
paint, it is included in the 50 percent rule.
If rebuilding costs, or renovations, exceed 50 per-
cent, then the homeowner has to elevate the house to
city and federal FEMA regulations, which means hav-


A crowd of more than 150 Islanders packed the Anna Maria Elementary School auditorium last week to learn
more about Federal Emergency Management Agency rules governing rebuilding or remodeling of property on
barrier islands. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


ing to raise the house to a height required by varying
"velocity zones" on the Island, commonly 13 feet
above sea level.
If a homeowner does not raise the house, he or she
wouldn't be allowed a permit to rebuild nor would
they qualify for the federal flood insurance program or
low-interest loans to rebuild.
"Anything that's attached to the structure such as
cabinets, drywall, paint, guttering, roofing and the
foundation is included in the formula," Loar said.


"Things like stoves, refrigerators and televisions are
not included."
Schambers asked Anna Maria City Public Works
Director Phil Charnock her question about the rule.
"Let's say you start with a house that needs sub-
stantial work and put a roof and a new HVAC (heating,
vent, air conditioning) and you're at 50 percent," she
said, "do I have to elevate my house just to replace, say,
a warped door?"
Charnock replied, "If you exceed 50 percent, then
yes. But you do have the option of bringing to us a new,
private appraisal if you have improved your home.
Also, the city adds 15 percent to the value of whatever
the property tax appraisal shows your house is worth."
Others in the audience said they felt the 50-percent
rule would stop routine home maintenance, leaving
blighted neighborhoods.
Loar said that was not the intent of the rule and
hoped that this was not the case.
Part of the reason for the 50 percent rule deals with
tracking development in the flood plain, Loar said.
Virtually all of Florida's barrier islands are in a flood
zone because any structure within 5,000 feet of the
coastal construction setback line is considered to be in
a flood zone, he said.
Still others voiced concern that real estate agents were
not being "up front" in telling buyers about the implica-
tions of the 50-percent rule. One speaker said when she
viewed the home she eventually bought, she planned
renovations she would make but the real estate agent did
not disclose that the home had already been improved to
the maximum extent of the 50 percent rule.
Don Schroeder replied that he manages a Holmes
Beach real estate office and all his agents tell each pro-
spective buyer about the rule. The audience booed in
protest shouting that wasn't the case with real estate
agents they dealt with.
Mark Alonso of Anna Maria City posed another
question to Charnock, who has been criticized for fol-
lowing the letter of the law when handing out building
permits and fines.
Alonso said he has had trouble with raccoons get-
ting into his garbage and hired someone to build a box
to hold his garbage cans.
"The contractor came back and said I needed an
architect's drawing in order to get a building permit for
a $50job," Alonso said. "Where's the common sense?
I can't spend $800 on a $50 job."
Charnock said the problem stems from a city ordi-
nance that follows FEMA rules stating that new struc-
tures must be able to withstand 110 mph winds.
After a number of others complained about having
to get a $30 permit to put new grout in their bathroom
or lay tile, Charley Canniff had the last word di-
rected at Charock.
"I'll bet 90 percent of the people in this room
would leave here happy if (renovations) under $500
didn't need a permit," Canniff said to applause.
Loar and his state counterpart agreed that the $500
exception would meet their criteria. The three building
officials agreed to take the suggestion back to their
respective councils and the meeting ended.


By Paul Roat
A Bradenton Beach wildlife rescue service will
continue to aid ailing birds and beasts.
Acting City Attorney Jim Dye advised mem-
bers of the city's Board of Adjustment last week
that Wildlife Inc.'s state permit to provide assis-
tance to injured critters superseded any city zoning
codes, based on court rulings in similar matters.
Wildlife Inc. operators Ed and Gail Straight
have had a state permit to aid injured wildlife for
nine years.
Board of Adjustment members unanimously
concurred with Dye's recommendation and dropped
the matter, much to the glee of more than 60 sup-
porters of the not-for-profit service operating in the
2200 block of Avenue B.
Wildlife Inc. had been the focus of city atten-
tion since March after neighbors complained of in-
creased visitor traffic to the site, referring to the
operation as a "zoo-keeping activity."
There is also an odor problem and a possible
health hazard at the site, neighbors Richard and
Mary Bolam said last March.
The Bolams requested the city "put an end to


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Crossley said. "He's hurt my husband and a lot of our
friends. How he can just disappear without having to
answer for what he's done is unbelievable. I want jus-
tice."
Porter's financial problems started in early 1992 when
he filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of
the federal bankruptcy code. This action was over a law-
suit against Fast Eddie's parent company, West Florida
Seafood Inc., for non-payment of $192,461 in worker's
compensation insurance premiums.
In addition to the charges Porter now faces,
Doganiero said it was her understanding the Internal Rev-
enue Service has assessed some liens against Porter.
After Porter posted a $10,000 bond Thursday
evening, Nov. 14, he was released from a Hillsborough
County jail and returned to Michigan, she said.
"I don't feel there's a chance he'll flee," Doganiero


the zoo keeping activities, restore the residential
character of our neighborhood and restore our con-
fidence in public health and safety" in a letter to the
city council at that time.
At the time, former Building Official Whitey
Moran said the wildlife rescue service did not meet
the city's land development codes which "prohib-
its the keeping of animals or fowl of any kind, other
than household pets in any district of the city."
But a letter sent to Dye from Florida Game and
Freshwater Fish Commission General Counsel
James Antista said the city's ordinance was "over-
broad, vague and should be struck down as an en-
croachment of [Fish Commission] authority over
wildlife. It is not a zoning ordinance; it is a com-
plete prohibition of the possession of wildlife. Un-
der this ordinance, the possession of tropical birds
and fish is prohibited. The term 'customary house-
hold pets' is so vague as to place unlimited author-
ity in code enforcement officers to determine what
kind of wildlife is allowed," Antista wrote.
Building Official Bill Sanders said he would
bring the matter to city council members to deter-
mine if further city action would be undertaken.


said. "He voluntarily returned to Florida and posted bond.
He has some sort of building or boat building business in
East Port and he has a wife and two children."
Porter will be arraigned in Manatee County Circuit
Court in four weeks and Doganiero said she expects him
to enter a written plea of not guilty.
She said she does not expect him to show up for the
hearing.
"We don't expect to charge him with anything
else," she said. "If we don't come to a plea agreement,
a trial could start in March or April."
After filing for Chapter 11 in early 1992, Porter
gradually closed his other restaurant locations with the
goal to keep his Anna Maria restaurant afloat.
His financial problems then hit Anna Maria when
he was unable to make payroll for several weeks, leav-
ing many of his employees unpaid and suffering from
the shock of closing just before Christmas.


Wildlife Inc. may continue to aid

ailing critters: state, city


'Fast Eddie' turns himself in to authorities





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E PAGE 3 IJ


Red tide research reveals greater

impact here than ever suspected


By Paul Roat
"If there is one place in the country that will do
something about red tide, it will be on the west coast
of Florida."
That was the assessment of Dr. Patricia Tester, one
of a panel of experts in attendance at a conference on
red tide held in Sarasota last week.
The panel of scientists and researchers held discus-
sions here as part of three fact-finding sessions held
throughout the country in an effort to prevent, control
or mitigate the effects of red tide.
Red tide is caused by blooms of a tiny marine or-
ganism called a dinoflagellate. The microscopic plants
produce powerful toxins that can cause extensive fish
kills, contaminate shellfish and can produce severe res-
piratory irritation in humans.
The blooms typically begin in the Gulf of Mexico
40-80 miles offshore and move slowly southeast to-
ward shore. As the bloom approaches the shore, dead
fish begin to wash ashore. There is also the character-
istic burning sensation of the eyes and nose and a dry,
choking cough.
Bivalve shellfish, particularly oysters, clams and
coquinas, accumulate so much toxin they become toxic
to humans.
A particularly bad red tide outbreak racked South-


IEOC suspends
meetings until February
Members of the Island Emergency Opera-
tions Center agreed to suspend meetings until
February of 1997.
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner told
members he has named Police Chief Jay Romine
as the city's emergency coordinator. He said the
city is planning an employee training program.
Andy Price, fire chief and IEOC director,
suggested the Island cities plan an emergency
drill for the spring.


west Florida for more than a year during 1995 and into
1996. Another outbreak of red tide is occurring off the
coast of Mississippi now.
The 50 or so scientists who gathered at Sarasota's
Mote Marine Laboratory last week agreed that much
more research is needed to fully understand red tide and
its impact on the Gulf coastal environment. Theories
abounded about cause of the outbreaks, from vast
groundwater upwellings to increased nutrients caused
by runoff from the land.
Conclusions reached by the panelists included a
general consensus that red tide has a far greater impact
in Florida particularly Southwest Florida than
had ever been realized before. Other parts of the coun-
try and world have red tide outbreaks that adversely
impact fisheries and shellfish harvests, the panel
agreed, but nowhere else has the impact to tourism
been as widespread.
Visitor and convention estimates place the cost of
the 1995-96 red tide outbreak at more than $3 million
in lost revenue to motels, restaurants and other busi-
nesses in Sarasota County alone.
"We tend to forget the trickle-down effects of red
tide," Dr. Rita Homer of the University of Washington
said, "the times the phone does not ring for reservations
at resorts."
"The red tide problem here is out of control," Dr.
Don Anderson of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
said. "Here, people on the beach move away, tourists
check out of hotels it's a whole different level of
concern here."
In an effort to control the effects of red tide, a group
of citizens and businesses have formed a group called
Solutions To Avoid Red Tide. START is headed by re-
tired general and Longboat Key Commissioner Jim
Patterson. The group has retained Mote Marine Labora-
tory researchers to monitor red tide in the Gulf of Mexico.
Patterson said the organization has also retained the ser-
vices Anderson to look into global information on the
micro-organism and see what other countries, especially
Japan, are doing to combat their own "scourges."


Anna Maria City
11/25, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board,
CANCELED
11/26, 7:30 p.m., Commission meeting

Bradenton Beach
11/21,7 p.m., council meeting. Agenda: land
development code text amendments public
hearing and second reading, charter revision
public hearing and second reading, Florida
Department of Transportation maintenance
agreement discussion, Manatee County potable
water franchise agreement discussion, improve-
ments to sanitation building discussion, Commu-
nity Development Block Grant contract discus-
sion, AIDS Manatee presentation.
11/25, 6:15 p.m., Citizens' Advisory
Task Force

Holmes Beach
11/22, 9 a.m., Code Enforcement Board
11/26, 9 a.m., Council work session

Of Interest
11/25, 9:30 a.m., Sarasota-Manatee Metro-
politan Planning Organization, Sudakoff Hall,
USF campus Sarasota.

11/29, 7 p.m., Bradenton Beach Civic Asso-
ciation, Bradenton Beach City Hall.

Thanksgiving holiday schedules:
All city offices, the Anna Maria Fire Control
District Office, the Island Branch Library and
the Anna Maria Island Community Center will
be closed on Nov. 28 and 29. The Island
Branch Library will also close at 6 p.m. on
Nov. 27, rather than 8 p.m.
Garbage collection normally scheduled for
Nov. 28 will be on Nov. 30 in Anna Maria,
Holmes Beach and on Longboat Key. Garbage
collection in Bradenton Beach will be as usual
on Nov. 28.


FOIAGLFCAST:-









I~ID
D P I
AA.I IG6 0DNN 784


PRESENTING A NEW

AIR CONDITIONER WITH

AN EXTREMELY HIGH

SEER RATING.

WHATEVER THE HECK

THAT MEANS.














In plain English, the Trane XL 1400 is one of the world's most energy-efficient air
conditioners: up to 15.45 SEER (which by the way, stands for seasonal energy ef-
ficiency ratio.) To make it as durable as it is efficient, we build the XL 1400 with
tried-and-true technology like our legendary ClimatuffrM compressor, then back
it with a 10-year manufacturer's limited warranty. All of which means, in short,
that our XL 1400 is one heck of a cooling machine.
It's Hard To Stop A Trane.m


ww /SINCE 1982
CACO 56298



S AIR CONDITIONING / DUCT CLEANING
778-0773 / 383-9766
ANNA MARIA ISLAND LONGBOAT KEY
77-77__8396






Ejj PAGE 4 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Recycling convenient, environmentally


correct and inexpensive too


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Waste haulers agree that only a small percentage
of Anna Maria residents put their recyclables in the
city-owned Pine Avenue dumpsters. Figures indicate
participation in the city's program dropped almost 75
percent from the previous year.
In terms of recycling, the savings in natural re-
sources alone outweigh other considerations such as
profitability, say county recycling officials and
Islanders.
But officials and residents in two Island cities -
Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach have begun to
question whether they're doing enough.
Florida counties are under a mandate from the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection to
recycle 30 percent of their solid waste every year.
Bob Schoenleber, Manatee County recycling pro-
gram manager, said the county is meeting the required
threshold at the county's 1,300-acre landfill, where 300
acres is permitted for solid waste.
Half of the 30 percent solid waste can be yard
waste that is mulched and either sold or utilized by the
county. Less valuable yard waste is sold as boiler fuel
at a Polk County electric plant.
In January, the county started curbside pickup for
recycled materials Schoenleber called "the big five" -
newspaper, glass, aluminum cans, steel cans and some
types of plastic.
Two companies, Waste Management of Manatee
County and Browning Ferris Industries, pick up re-
cycled goods from residences. Half of their companies'
customers put their recycle bins out every week,
Schoenleber said, while at least 75 percent put them out
once a month.
Schoenleber attributes the good response to conve-
nience.
"For recycling to be successful, it has to be conve-
nient," he said. "It's important to us to recycle because
it will extend the life of the county landfill."
Ben Alex, solid waste technician at the Manatee
County landfill, said if the county continues to main-
tain a 30 percent recycling rate every year, the life ex-
pectancy of the landfill is 24 years.
"Regarding another facility, our tipping fee in-
cludes money that's set aside for closing this facility
and purchasing land for a new one," Alex said,
"whether it's a regional facility or one here. We don't
know what a county commission in 2010 is going to
do."
People should make it a civic duty to recycle -
and for a number of reasons, Schoenleber said.
The obvious ones are conserving resources and
protecting the environment, he said.
Instead of cutting down a virgin forest to make
newsprint, you can recycle. Plastic is made from petro-
leum, so by recycling plastic you save oil.
Recycling is also big business.
Recovered materials from recycling was a $10 bil-


Llewellyn Johnson of Anna Maria City makes his contribution to recycling at the city's collection bins on Pine
Avenue. Johnson gives regularly but says his neighbors think it's too far to go just to recycle. Islander Photo:


David Futch

lion enterprise nationally in 1995, according to
Schoenleber.
"This is an industry that provides work for people,"
he said. "Recycling is as much an economic develop-
ment issue as it is an environmental issue."

Bottom line
Anna Maria City Commissioner George McKay
said the importance of recycling can't be emphasized
enough.
"I don't much mind the status quo, but I'm not
against improving," McKay said. "I'm not sure there's
sentiment on the commission to go to curbside pickup.
I tried a couple of years ago to do something different.
Unless there's a rash of people saying they want
curbside, the commission isn't going to do anything
differently."
On the other hand, the bottom line is money. The
question remains whether homeowners are willing to
pay for curbside pickup, McKay said. He thought it
would add at least $1 a month to trash bills.
Bub McKinney, Waste Management assistant
manager, said each Anna Maria City household
would pay approximately $1 to $1.25 per month for


For residents of Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach:


* Do you recycle?


* Do you recycle at collection bins at Pine Avenue?

* Do you recycle at collection bins at Coquina Beach?

* Do you recycle at collection bins at Holmes Beach City Hall?

* Are you for or against curbside recycling service?

* Are you for or against curbside recycling if fees increase?


Name (not required)


l Yes

SYes

a Yes

E Yes


1 No

SNo

SNo

a No


O For Against

J For 1 Against


City


Comments:


curbside service.
McKinney agrees that only a small percentage of
Anna Maria residents put their recyclables in the
city-owned Pine Avenue dumpsters. Even then,
McKay said, recycling seems like it's done just by
year-round residents.
Former Anna Maria Mayor Max Znika led the
drive to install the four large recycling dumpsters on
Pine Avenue.
He thinks the dumpsters are the only way to go
because he sees problems with curbside recycling. "If
you have curbside you have to have three or four bins
in your home or in the garage that are filled with ants,"
Znika said.
"As time goes on, there will be more demand for
recycled items instead of it being a mediocre business.
Right now in the midwest, cardboard is big business.
In California they're recycling silk and wool.
"As the marketplace gets ready for an increase
in recycling, we'll have companies that want the ma-
terial we're collecting and the city will be in a posi-
tion of making money. Down the road we'll make
big money on recycling. Cities with curbside service
are locked into contracts and can't go back. In a year
or two, you'll see curbside pickup is a mistake."
In the 1994-95 fiscal year, from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30,
the city spent $3,813 on recycling and received
$2,293.48 in return for a net loss of $1,524.52, accord-
ing to Anna Maria City's clerk Peg Nelson.
In the 1995-96 fiscal year, the city broke even
when it spent $985.27 to recycle from the city bins on
Pine Avenue and received $985.27 in return, city fig-
ures show.
While the city broke even during the second year
of its recycling operation, the figures indicate partici-
pation in the city's program dropped almost 75 percent.
Buddy Watts, Bradenton Beach public works di-
rector, knows about the cost of instituting curbside re-
cycling.
Watts said two years ago he came up with an esti-
mate that placed start-up of such a venture at $200,000,
a figure that included a new truck, a garage and two
people to man the operation.
Bradenton Beach is the only city on the Island that
has its own garbage collection service, garbage trucks
and crew, all paid with taxes paid by city residents.
Anna Maria City and Holmes Beach contract the busi-
ness of picking up trash to Waste Management.
Bradenton Beach rents recycling dumpsters for
PLEASE SEE RECYCLE, NEXT PAGE


Please limit replies to one per household. Deliver, mail or fax to: The Islander Bystander,
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.
Phone (941) 778-7978. FAX 778-9392.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 U PAGE 5 EI]


RECYCLE, FROM PAGE 4


$85 a month per dumpster. Bradenton Beach also
pays $20 a ton for old newspapers to be hauled off,
Watts said.
The three Bradenton Beach dumpsters are located
on the bayside at the north Coquina Beach boat ramp.
"The only money we get is from aluminum cans
but it still doesn't pay the cost of dumpster rent. I'm
sure eventually we're going to have to do (curbside
recycling) and we'll probably farm it out," Watts said.
"There's a definite need to do it. It's a shame we can't
do it ourselves at a reasonable cost."

Feasibility
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner said cit-
ies should encourage recycling.
"From a personal standpoint, curbside recycling
works and works well. It's a feel-good thing,"
VanWagoner said. "I've had no one knocking on my
door saying something is wrong. Curbside recycling
has been almost complaint free."
Holmes Beach has large dumpsters at city hall for
condominium owners who currently don't have
curbside service.
The city pays $100 each time the roll-off
dumpster for plastic is picked up by Waste Manage-
ment. There is no charge for the glass and newspa-
per roll-off bins, which were provided to the city
through a pilot project started by Waste Manage-
ment.
Each month, Waste Management picks up an av-
erage of 40 tons of recyclable materials from Holmes
Beach, McKinney said. Some months it may be 25 or
30 tons while in winter months the volume may be as
high as 70 or 80 tons.
The current fee for Holmes Beach residents is 96
cents a month for curbside service. Waste Management
currently serves 3,000 residential properties in Holmes
Beach, 9,000 on Longboat Key and 45,000 throughout


the county.
"Curbside recycling has been a great success in
Holmes Beach and countywide. I think convenience
is the key," Waste Management's McKinney said.
"We're taking items out of the waste stream instead
of putting them in the landfill. In time, recycling
pays for itself. It saves the landfill and brings rates
down. It may not show up now but may in four or
five or even 20 years."
There were no figures available for the amount of
recycled material Waste Management picked up prior
to starting curbside service.
From Jan. 1 to Oct. 31, Holmes Beach residents
recycled 179.11 tons of newspaper and 123.01 tons of
glass, plastic and aluminum and tin cans, according to
Waste Management.
During the same period, Anna Maria City residents
contributed 56.57 tons of newspapers and 22.73 tons of
glass, plastic and aluminum and tin cans, Waste Man-
agement figures show.
Countywide statistics indicate Waste Management
picked up 4,132.86 tons of newspaper and 2,106.18
tons of glass, plastic and aluminum and tin cans.
Manatee County expects to get another 20 years
out of its landfill, much of it due to its aggressive re-
cycling program, McKinney said.
The dumping fee at the Manatee landfill is $23 a
ton for garbage while the Sarasota rate is $63.77 a ton
because of the cost of building a new landfill.
In Sarasota County, each single-family home pays
$48.05 a year for recycling which translates into $4 a
month for curbside service.
City of Sarasota residents pay $2.13 per household
each month for an aggressive recycling program that
picks up everything from stoves to cardboard to junk
mail, said Duane Mountain, manager of solid waste for
the city.
He added that the city's program is mandatory.
"We force people to recycle," Mountain said. "If
we see things in their garbage that can be recycled, we


don't dump their garbage."
In October, the city of Sarasota recycled 1,000 tons
of special waste such as refrigerators, carpet and con-
struction waste and another 591 tons of newspapers,
glass, plastic and cans, he said.
Contamination, or mixing of glass with newspa-
pers or other unlike materials, has not been much of a
problem in Manatee County because, as McKinney
said, "If people want to recycle, they want to do it
right."
Such has been the case on Longboat Key, a town
earnest in making recycling a top priority.
Public Works Director Len Smally said the town
started recycling almost eight years ago. The program
has evolved to include all homeowners, condomini-
ums, apartments and commercial buildings.
"We think recycling is going well. We've got a
good group of conscientious citizens who are con-
cerned about the environment and are good recyclers,"
Smally said. "It's very inexpensive and convenient."
Starting Jan. 1, single-family homes will pay 76
cents a month for curbside recycling pickup, he said.
In another ambitious move, the town installed a
roll-off container at Town Hall that takes odds and ends
not allowed curbside cardboard, plastic grocery
bags, lids and aluminum foil.
Rose Quinn-Bare, Browning Ferris district vice
president in Palmetto, said her company services
18,000 homes countywide. The cost is 98 cents a
month for their curbside recycling service.
"That's a bargain," she said. "It's not just that. It's
an environmental issue. We can't throw what we use
every day on a piece of land. In 20 years, everything
will be recycled. That's where we're headed."
Recycling is a matter of education, Quinn-Bare
said.
"The big thing in recycling is to bring in a clean
product," she said. "People are conscientious about
recycling. People who want to recycle learn how to
do it."


} '






Exhibiting
most taler

509 Pine Ave.

















5
Sa funshjop Hc


Let the Anna Maria Island Trolley take you on
an enchanted evening tour of Island Art Galleries


(i.


'V


Wed Nov 27 5 to 8 pm


17,


/'I


FREE TROLLEY SERVICE BETWEEN GALLERIES
Holmes Beach Island Shopping Center: Artist Guild Gallery,
Essence of Time, Art League, Phoenix Frame, S&S Plaza: Island Gallery West
Anna Maria: M Rees Marlatt, Heron's Watch & Autumn's Whims


ART GALLERY


I extensive collections by the
rted Florida artists... Painting,
Sculpture, Glass & Pottery.
Anna Maria 778-4655


NOW OPEN...
A fun shop featuring
-Cssentialities
of nature
iP LocaFtrtiscns
306 Holmes Boulevard
)lmes Beach 778-9396


r Featuring
works by
'dnsrs 75 local artists

Z buildd THEGALLERY
of Anna Maria island _
Watercolor demonstration by Faye Rosechild-Nierman
5414 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-6694


Anna !Maria Island
( I .. Art League, Inc.

Classes Monthly Exhibits
"The Front-Room Gallery"
5312 Holmes Blvd. Holmes Beach
941-778-2099

^ Artists Demonstrations

A Meet Local Artists

Holiday Refreshments

A Door Prizes
Trolley Sponsored by
Betsy Hills Realty & The Sandbar Restaurant


'VL


7~*ZT
'V


5348 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
(941) 778-6648


STUDIO GALLERY
PlOFESIOINsAL Aa TIsTg CREATED
PAINTINt-<3 rFo- LaANINl TI.__ AND FIVL
IJOLLANIP AII-I.CA LINI -5LIP5.
A-TI-T MEMBE I OF TIJf AsMA
779-1507 ALEXIS PLXAZ


Holibay Gallery Nigbt Tour

^^ ^~


4







/












'i




i


-.==M6hwmiM


m .,W__ _


r
a
3'


I






jU PAGE 6 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


goae *- 9 I


Recycling, anyone?
Everyone? No one?
We like to think that Islanders are an environmen-
tally savvy bunch.
We care about the birds and beasts and critters of
the bays and Gulf.
We watch out for turtles and turn off the lights
during sea turtle nesting season.
We even recycle our trash. But do we do enough
to recycle plastics, cans and newspapers? Do we take
our trash to the recycling bins religiously, or do we
sometimes fudge and toss a newspaper in with the
regular garbage?
Or, more to the point, would we find ourselves
more environmentally sensitive if it were just a little
easier for us to help Mother Nature out?
Holmes Beach currently has curbside recycling.
Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach do not.
We're running an unofficial reader poll on page 4
of this week's newspaper to see what you think about
curbside recycling. It will hit you a little harder in your
pocketbooks, but are Islanders willing to pay more to
protect the environment?
We'll let you know soon.

... and now we're older
If dogs live 7 years compared to one year of a hu-
man life, how long do we expect mullet to live in like
comparison?
With fresh mullet as a symbol of the life of The
Islander Bystander, hopefully the answer is: A very
long time.
The live mullet we splashed on our copier to cre-
ate a lasting T-shirt design four years ago didn't have
such good luck. He became lunch shortly after his ar-
tistic endeavor.
But it's still considered by us to be a good symbol
for our newspaper. Mullet is the staple offering in this
area of the Gulf of Mexico the most basic of food
resources in Manatee County.
We'd like to be the staple in your news diet, now
and in the future. More than a mullet wrapper.
With this anniversary issue, we ask again for your
help with a community service project we first under-
took in our second year the Wish Book.
And we need your help. We need to know the
needs of Island community service organizations so
that we may publish them. We need advertisers to sup-
port the cost of this special edition.
Most of all, we need you to add just one item from
the Wish Book to your holiday shopping list. Begin
your holiday season with the true spirit of giving.
And, as always, thanks for reading us.


ISLANDER, im I0
NOVEMBER 21, 1996 VOLUME 5, NUMBER 1
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Frank Cunningham
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Kevin Cassidy
Andrew White
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
Joan Marie Giannini
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more 25 cents each.
1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK, by Egan.


Recycled from 1971: "Now after an oil spill I can get steam cleaned"


'Dunked' driver touts aid
given by Islanders
My wife and I were the unfortunate occupants of
the automobile that ended up in the Holmes Beach
yacht basin on Saturday, Nov. 9.
We would like to take this opportunity to publicly
thank the many people who not only came to our res-
cue but also provided comfort and concern during and
after this trying ordeal. Without their help, the conse-
quences to our health and well-being would have been
much worse.
In addition to Bob Cooper, who was quickly on the
scene and helped extricate us from the car, we would be
remiss in not mentioning and thanking some of the oth-
ers.
We would particularly like to mention Dave
Teachout, who was immediately on the scene and helped
Bob Cooper open the back door to get us out of the car.
Melinda Davis, of Island Realty, was following behind us,
stopped and helped to lift us from the water. Judy from the
bank came to our aid. A man from Back Bay Steakhouse
rushed over with a brick to break a window, if needed.
There were many more, some who have chosen to remain
anonymous, who secured blankets, etc., to keep us warm
and give us aid and comfort.
Sandy Austin and Sandy Freeman came to the hos-
pital and made two trips to our apartment to pick up dry
clothes and make sure we arrived home safely. Officer
Henry Frappier took time to secure our apartment keys
from the automobile and deliver them to the hospital.
When you read about and see on television so
many acts of man's inhumanity to man, you tend to
become discouraged about the moral fiber displayed in
our society today. Our experience this past weekend
brings home the fact that there are still many unselfish
and caring individuals which restores faith in our
neighbors inherent goodness.
John Danko, Longboat Key

Cat killers break hearts
We felt we had to write and express our horror af-
ter reading the Islander's article and Ms. Lawton's let-
ter about the disappearance and death of her beloved
pet, Mr. Jones.


We, as animal lovers, find it very hard to believe that
there are two such adults on Anna Maria Island who spend
their time capturing and disposing of cats when they have
no way of knowing if the cats are pets or strays.
We find it even more disturbing that these people
have pets of their own. Don't they understand that a pet
is a member of a family? It's as if they have killed a child!
Who are these people? Maybe they should live
somewhere else. Our hearts go out to Ms. Lawton.
Karen Knight and family, Anna Maria City
Susan Hatch and family, Anna Maria City

Off Stage Ladies set stage
for happy member
Feeling lonesome while my husband was away, I
was very interested in an announcement in the Islander
about a luncheon meeting of the Off Stage Ladies to be
held at the Bradenton Yacht Club on Nov. 13.
After placing several phone calls and leaving a
message, I would like to thank the ladies who re-
sponded to my inquiry.
I feared my age (41) would not blend in with them or
that perhaps I wouldn't fit in, but they spent time on the
phone and made me feel welcomed. I was very pleased
and impressed with the list of activities as well as their up-
coming guest from the Sarasota Opera Company.
Bravo! Off Stage Ladies of the Island Players. I
look forward to meeting all of you and joining your
lively group.
Mrs. E. Hall, Bradenton Beach

Contractor creates dream home
After hearing horror stories about building a home,
my husband and I were not really looking forward to
the process. But we contracted with Frank Gentiluomo
and what was to follow was a very pleasant experience.
Our home was completed by the expected finish
date without any unexpected costs. Mr. Gentiluomo
was at our property regularly making sure everything
was being done exactly the way we wanted it. His sug-
ge. tions and building experience helped us to build the
hon e of our dreams.
We just want to say thanks for everything, Frank!
Sally Greig, Holmes Beach


YORJ O INO











THOSE WERE THE HAYS
Part 11, A Soldier's Story
by June Alder


In June 1918 thousands of Yanks were on the move to the front in France.


RAIDING THE

CHOW WAGON


From the train they could see the
silhouettes of the Eiffel Tower and Sa-
cred Heart Church on the heights of
Montmartre, but Clair Jones of Anna
Maria and his friend Will
Austin would not be able to We had
take in the sights of Paris and break
that month of June 1918. milk and
They were heading toward lade. Alt
the front. the fello
Arriving late that night days' ra
at a country station, they and one mea
their buddies slept for three those in
hours in the boxcars, then the wag
next morning loaded up their seem to,
equipment onto trucks and had don
left on a 22-mile journey. It deed.
was slow going. The muddy
road was crowded with military ve-
hicles, French and British troops and
civilian refugees fleeing the war zone.
Dead horses littered the roadsides.
Six hours later they left the trucks
and marched off through rugged coun-
tryside to a wood about three miles from
the River Mame where a French artil-
lery unit was camped. A few hours
sleep, then off again with no break-
fast. The company kitchen hadn't
caught up with them, and the French
were short on rations.
After that the company had to move
under cover of darkness so enemy ob-
servers would not see them. They rested
the next day in another wood, but all
they had to eat was some broken pieces
of hard tack.
Now the outfit had gone 48 hours
without a meal.
In the dark before dawn on the third
day since leaving Amiens, Company E
of the Sixth Engineers finally reached
their destination bone-tired and fam-
ished. The company kitchen was no-
where to be seen just a small emer-
gency ration wagon, which their captain
had commandeered for the officers.
Captain Kenneth Jones their su-
perior officer since the days at Washing-
ton barracks had never been liked by
the men. But now a fierce anger boiled
up in them.
Will Austin tells what happened in
his diary:
"The captain had much to learn. He
was not a West Pointer and unlike our
other officers he didn't share and share
alike with his men. He was overheard to
ask an aide 'to fix up one or two sand-
wiches' for him and his aides. The en-


che
id,
Im
og
ws
tion
:. A
ch
on
knt
eth


listed men, you see, could fast.
"All seemed quiet till by-and-by fig-
ures were seen darting about in the direc-
tion of the emergency chow wagon and
vanishing among the bushes
eese and long grass. The company
canned was supposed to be 'at rest.'
7arma- "This went on until
ether 2nd Lt. McCann was heard
ate two to answer a question from
ns in Capt. Jones quite gleefully,
And 'Yes sir, I think they have
large of eaten everything but the
didn't soap and candles.'
ow who "It was a magnificent
-he feed. I cornered some for
Clair and me. We had cheese
and bread, canned milk and
marmalade. Altogether the fellows ate
two days' rations in one meal. And those
in charge of the wagon didn't seem to
know who had done the deed."
Capt. Jones went into a rage.
"The entire company was arrested
and told that we were to be put under
two weeks' restriction to camp. We
were drawn up in four platoons. After
reading us a lecture and putting us un-
der arrest, Capt. Jones told the first ser-
geant to dismiss us by platoons.
"The fourth platoon was the first to
be dismissed and it was made up of a
tough crowd. They scattered through
the woods and some of them began to
count '1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10.' Then
someone shouted, 'Who are you count-
ing out?' And someone else would re-
ply, 'Capt. Jones!' Then all yelled in
concert, 'You're out, you bastard!'
"Capt. Jones ordered the first ser-
geant, 'Assemble the company!'
(McCann was sitting with his face hid-
den through all this.) Another lecture
was given 'for insulting your company
commander.' And he upped the restric-
tion to three weeks."
That wasn't the end of the story.
Two months later, when the regi-
ment got a new commanding officer,
one of the first things he did was order
an investigation of the "chow wagon"
incident. As a result Capt. Kenneth
Jones was relieved of his command. He
was replaced by 1 st Lt. McCann, much
to the satisfaction of the 250 men of
Company E, Sixth Engineers.
Next: The bloody
Second Battle of
the Marne


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 7 Il


Carpet V Upholstery Cleaning

Dry Foam, Dries Fastk

We never use steam!

We have happy customers
and happy holidays! Reserve
your time now for clean

carpets and furnishings ...
before or after the holidays!

Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer

"; 7 LEATHER & UPHOLSTERED
S 1 FURNITURE SPECIALISTS.
. For fast, thorough, service call
me Jon Kent, 12-year Island
.* resident and owner of Fat Cat.
778-2882

MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE



We'd love to mail


you the news!

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $32 per
year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 1,200 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
live here year-round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or rela-
tive, please mail or drop off this form at our office with a check in the
S proper amount or charge it to Visa or MasterCard.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
O One Year: $32 L 6 Months: $24 O 3 Months: $15
U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CAN DIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
Q One Year: $140 Q 6 Mor $87.50 U 3 Months: $49
MAIL TO:_
ADDRESS
CITY __. ATE ZIP_
CREDIT CARD: EXP. DATE
MAIL START DATE: _


ISLANDER "
THE BEST NEWS C NA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5404 h 1 Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
--- CHARGE IT BY PHONE:
-VIS (941) 778-7978
U U Himaim i liii iiilli lBilg


CAT





Ij PAGE 8 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


No reply to council queries on ethics


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Both the Florida ethics commission and the attor-
ney general were unable to reply to Holmes Beach City
Council on questions created by the proposed ordi-
nance on residential rental restrictions.
Two inqueries, both written by Council Chairman
Luke Courtner, asked whether two council members
may vote on a rental restriction ordinance because they
both own rental property in residential districts affected
by the ordinance. The question to the attorney general
concerned whether three council votes could override
a veto of the same rental restriction ordinance by the
mayor if the other two council members were forced
to abstain from voting.

Ethics Commission
correspondence
In his letter to the Florida Commission on Ethics,
Courtney wrote, "The council member (Billie Martini)
owning a duplex could be perceived to have a conflict
of interest because rental duration could affect her in-
come. The other council member (Courtney) could be
perceived to have a conflict of interest because he could
vote for the residential rental restrictions to enhance his
income from his motel, or he could vote against the


All Island Denominations will be operating
"Island Christmas" for needy Island families from
Monday, Dec. 2, though Wednesday, Dec. 18, at
314 Pine Street, Anna Maria City.
Families or persons who qualify to receive
help may call 778-3908 or pick up applications at
the Pine Street address before December 6.
Residents who wish to volunteer or make


restrictions to enhance his income from his short-term
rentals."
He asked if the two should abstain from voting on
the ordinance but his letter did not identify the coun-
cil members.
In the reply, Staff Attorney Peter D. Ostreich
noted, "Because you have not represented in your let-
ter that you are inquiring on behalf of the two members
of the city council, that is, that you are authorized by
them to make this inquiry on their behalf, I am unable
to provide you with a specific response."
Ostreich said he could only give general guidance
if the council members write directly or authorize
Courtney to do so on their behalf. He asked that the
affected council members provide him with a copy of
the ordinance and respond to the following questions
in writing:
Will the proposed ordinance amendment affect
the motel in the same manner as all the other rental
units in Holmes Beach?
How will the proposed ordinance impact the two
council members?
How many rental properties and rental property
owners within Holmes Beach will be affected by the
amendment?
Will all the districts have the same rental restric-


monetary donations may contact the Pine Street
locations between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday
through Saturday.
Donations received this year and not fully
expended on Christmas 1996 will be used during
the coming year for Islanders in need.
For more information, call Virginia Heatley
at 778-7095 or Jeanette Cashman at 778-4105.


tions?
In which zoning districts are the two council
members' properties located?
According to state statute, "A voting conflict arises
when the official is called upon to vote on any measure
which would inure to the officer's special private gain
or loss; which he or she knows would inure to the spe-
cial private gain or loss of any principal by whom the
officer is retained or to the parent organization or sub-
sidiary of a corporate principal by which the officer is
retained; or which the officer knows would inure to the
special private gain or loss of a relative or business
associate of the public officer..."

Attorney general
correspondence
The question for the attorney general arose during
council's discussions of the rental restriction ordinance
when Mayor Bob VanWagoner announced he would
likely veto the ordinance.
According to the city charter, four votes are needed
to override a veto. In the event Martini and Courtney
abstained from voting due to a conflict of interest, only
three members remain able to vote. This prompted the
question: If the mayor vetoes the ordinance, could the
two who abstained from voting override the veto?
Assistant Attorney General Joslyn Wilson noted,
"The attorney general is statutorily authorized to ren-
der opinions to public officials regarding their own
official duties under state law.
"When questions are received involving the inter-
pretation of only local codes, ordinances or charters
rather than the provisions of state law, such requests
will be referred to the attorney for the local govern-
ment."
Although not able to specifically answer the ques-
tion, Wilson enclosed an opinion from the attorney
general in a similar case which stated, "there is no ex-
ception to the prohibition against voting in the state
statute even though the abstention has the effect of pre-
venting the local legislative body from taking action on
the matter."


Thank you Anna Maria Island
SI. -


We're celebrating four great years and


looking forward to many happy returns!


IISLANDER


November 21, 1996, Volume Five, Issue No. One
Banner Presswood, Paul Root, June Alder, Bob Ardren, Pat Copeland, Joy Courtney, Frank Cunningham
Jack Egan, David Futch, Jim Hanson, Michelle Timpanaro, Bud Atteridge, Gib Bergquist, Doug Dowling,
Capt. Mike Heistand, Kevin Cassidy, Katharine Wight, Andrew White, Jan Barnes, Laura Ritter,
Joan Giannini, Janice Dingman, Michelle Ruiz del Vizo, Rob Ross and Mary Stockmaster


Pick up applications now
for December's 'Island Christmas'


BYSA NDER





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 N PAGE 9 M3

Later Life provides a second chance for daring
By David Futch
Islander Reporter -


Having never taken a chance in life, Austin is
doomed to never having lived.
While Austin plays it safe in the Island Players
presentation of Later Life by A.R. Gurney, middle-aged
guests and friends pop on and off an apartment terrace
from a cocktail party in Boston and spill forth vignettes
of their lives.
The characters explain how they're moving on in
life: Learning the macarena, buying a new Pentium
processor, seeking a new lover, looking for change and
a second chance.
The lessons to be learned: Seize the day. Life is
short, have fun. Get it while you can. Just do it.
Or as the playbill so poignantly states in a quote
from Henry James, "Live all you can; it's a mistake not
to. It doesn't much matter what you do in particular, so
long as you have your life ... Live!"
Ruth (Linda Davis) and Austin (Jim Schotsch)
haven't seen each other since they met on the Isle of
Capri many years before.
Now middle-age, marriages, children and divorce
seem to be the only common thread they share.
Ruth has taken chances and suffered as a result, but
some of those chances have allowed her to taste the
good life.
Austin exists in an insular Boston world, following
in the footsteps of generations of his family who sel-
dom venture beyond the lights of Provincetown on
Cape Cod.
Later Life is chock full of metaphors for life and
living. The existentialist theme that pervades the play
hits the audience right between the eyes with regard to
living life.
Not often do we get a chance to do something dif-
ferent. If we take that leap of faith, it allows us to dis-
cover our faults and strengths, witness failures and
successes, rejection and new-found love. Later Life
drives those points home.
Director Geoffrey Todd sums up Later Life by
quoting one of the characters who says, "We all have
a second chance in life if only we have the courage




8th ANNUAL


to grasp it."
Davis as Ruth and Schotsch as Austin bare their
characters' souls for the audience to dissect.
But it is the versatility of Peter Barcia and Jo
Kendall that provide an incredible kaleidoscope of
characters.
Barcia and Kendall each portray five individuals,
each as different as the other.
For example, Barcia plays aging computer nerd
Duane, sentimental Jim, plain old Roy, bolo-tie wear-
ing, Southern-drawl-talking Ted who recently moved
to Boston from Atlanta and Austin's pompous and
drunk life-long pal Walt.
Kendall handles her mosaic of characters by giv-
ing us party-giver and Austin friend Sally, plain-Jane
Marion, lesbian-affair seeking Nancy, Ted's Georgia
partner Esther and the very Boston-mannered Judith.
Here are some early-in-the-play examples of where
the cast took the opening-night capacity audience.
As Jim, Barcia explains that "cigarette smoking is
a ... gesture of freedom in an absurd universe. I am an
existential smoker. I smoke, therefore I am."
Later in a conversation with Roy, Austin says,
"Boston. I was born here, have lived here and can't


-rt

oln the


_ Avenue


Saturday, November 23

10 am to 5 pm


Over 85 Unique Displays Of.
Watercolor Sculpture Photography
Pottery Jewelry Holiday Craft House

Music by: Richard Tazewell
Food by: China Blossom & Zachary's Cafe
A Cultural Event on Longboat Key sponsored by:


0 LONGBOAT KEY
ART CENTER INC.



FINE SHOPPING AND DINING
At Tower Plaza Shopping Center
in the 2500 block of Gulf of Mexico Drive.
Bay Isles Parkway Traffic Light on Longboat Key


r/
S/,





4


4
4^


Linda Davis as Ruth
takes time for tea and
chit-chat with Jim
Schotsch as Austin in
Later Life. Islander
Photo: David Futch


imagine being anywhere else."
To which Roy replies, 'A man's gotta do some-
thing. A man can't just sit around and grow old."
When Austin asks, "How can you fight history?"
Ruth replies, "I suppose by making it."
Later, Esther from Atlanta is talking about the in-
teresting people she and Ted have met since they
moved to Boston. Esther tells Austin and Ruth about "a
Latino who told us he wanted to become a woman.
Well, Boston does have the best doctors, but I mean,
OUCH!"
The set by Art Ballman and lighting design by Jo-
seph Oshry, including a starlit backdrop for the patio,
provide an accurate depiction of upscale Boston ambi-
ence.
Later Life is filled with themes that should hit
home with anyone who sees it.
As an old friend used to say, "I'd rather be a glad
I did something than a wish I had done something."
Tickets are $10 and the box office is open one hour
before the performance during the run of the play. The
theater is located at the corer of Gulf Drive and Pine
Avenue in Anna Maria City. Phone 778-5755 for infor-
mation.


COME IN TODAY
10 DAILY DRAWINGS
SURPRISE GIFTS


W Pees Btou9due

Gifts & Christmas Shoppe
Anna Maria Island Shopping Centre
between Crowder Bros. Hardware & Walgreens
3328 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
Fun Fashions! Unique Gifts!
Year-Round Christmas Shoppe ...
a fascinating store!

Register to Win
$100, $50 & $25 Gift Certificates
Drawing Sunday, Nov. 24 at 4 pm
Light Refreshments Served
Open 9 am 'til 8 pm except Sunday 10 5
Dori Reynolds, manager -., .


'V


I


%~/- /





E[ PAGE 10 E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


t. ,' Jewelry & Watch Repair
N All work done in our own shop
NOVEMBER SPECIAL
10% OFF ALL WATCHES
AND WATCH BANDS
Watch Batteries "We have the largest
$4.95 Installed selection of Speid
bands in Manatee County."
Shoppes of Paradise Bay
7358 Cortez Rd. W. 798-9585




Contemporary & Classic

Clothes & Ensembles
Perfectfor Special Occasions

S 1931 Manatee Ave. W.
(at 20th Street W.)
Sunrise Plaza 750-8178


Bob's air & Co.

Get Ready for the
SHolidays with a Brand
New Perm & Style
Mon-Sat 9-?
& by App't 778-3724
9701 Gulf Drive Anna Maria


Women's Guild sews up solution
Members of the Women's Guild of Roser Memorial Community Church in Anna Maria City meet twice a
month throughout the year to sew and crochet items for migrant workers. The guild will deliver their dona-
tion to the migrant program during a tea at Trinity United Methodist Church in Bradenton on Friday, Nov.
22, at 2 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Previously, guild members have made 31 quilts, 19 crocheted
afghans, 45 layette sets and 22 dresses and look forward to increasing their donation this year. Donations of
fabric and especially flannel are appreciated. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


Island community center
offers flu shots
The Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City, will offer flu shots
from 8 a.m. to noon on Friday, Nov. 22, at the cen-
ter.
Shots will be free to those with Medicare Part B
cards in hand. The fee for all others will be $7 per
person.
For more information, call the center at 778-1908.

Tickets on sale for
St. Bernard's holiday gala
St. Bernard's Parish Christmas Dinner and Dance
will be held on Saturday, Dec. 14, at 6 p.m. in the
Welsmiller Activity Center of St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach.
Music will be provided by Bob LoPiccolo.
Tickets are $10 per person and advance reserva-
tions are required.
For tickets, call: Nina Compton at 778-3397;
Suzanne McUsic at 778-0514; Jayne Kane at 778-
7846; or the church office at 778-4769.

Art League wants young
artists for festival
The Anna Maria Island Art League will sponsor
the 6th annual Junior Arts and Crafts Show during its
Festival of Fine Arts to be held December 7 and 8.
The Junior Arts and Crafts Show is open to all
young residents of Anna Maria Island who are in pre-
school through 12th grade.
Applications and information are available at the
league, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, between the
hours of 9 am. and 2 p.m., Tuesday through Friday.
Entries are due at the league's facilities on Satur-
day, Nov. 30, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. After the
festival, all entries will be displayed at the Art League
gallery through the month of December. Entries are
to be picked up on Wednesday, Jan. 1, between the
ours of 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. or 5 and 7 p.m.
For additional information, call the league at 778-
2099.

Whitney Beach Art Expo
this Saturday
Longboat Framing Gallerie at Whitney Beach
Plaza on Longboat Key will present "Art-on-the-Pa-
tio" on Saturday, Nov. 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The event will feature local artists at work outside
the Gallerie on the sidewalk patio.
Inside the Gallerie, a "Pre-Holiday Art Expo" will
be held from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The theme of the
expo is "Affordable Art Gifts."
Call 383-9814 for more information.


Anna Maria Garden Club
to hold plant sale
The Anna Maria Garden Club will hold its annual
plant sale on Saturday, Nov. 23, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Roser Memorial Community Church in Anna Maria
City.
Plants, decorations and books will be sold.

Pancake breakfast Sunday
at St. Bernard Church
St. Bernard Catholic Church will host a pancake
breakfast on Sunday, Nov. 24, from 8 to 11:30 a.m.
The menu includes homemade pancakes, sausage,
orange juice and coffee.
Adult tickets are $2.50 and children's are $1.
A homemade bake sale will also be available.

Island Art League sponsors
events to support the arts
The Anna Maria Art League will host a "Holiday
Gallery Night Tour" to be held Wednesday, Nov. 27, from
5 to 8 p.m. at its Holmes Beach location at 5312 Holmes
Blvd.
In conjunction with the tour, the league will hold an
"Art on Sale" beginning Wednesday, Nov. 27, through
Saturday, Dec. 7, at which Anna Maria Art League artists
will have their work on display for purchase.
Also, vendors are still needed and are welcomed to
participate in the league's Annual Craft and Bake Sale
to be held on Saturday, Nov. 30, beginning at 10 a.m.
Booth spaces are $15 and can be reserved by calling the
league at 778-2099.

Poetry Night to be held
at Artists Guild
Coffee and poetry among the art will be offered at the
Artists Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Drive, Island Shop-
ping Center, Holmes Beach, on Thursday, Nov. 21, at 7
p.m.Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and resident poets. An open mike
will be available for aspiring poets.
The public is invited to attend.
MCC theater presents
fairy tale by Neil Simon
A small Russian village cursed with universal stu-
pidity is the site of "Fools," a Neil Simon fairy tale to
be performed on the Manatee Community College Stu-
dio 84 stage at 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton.
Evening performances will begin at 8 p.m. and are
scheduled for Nov. 23, 26, 27, 29 and 30. A matinee
will begin at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 24.
Contact the box office at 755-1511, ext. 4240 for
ticket information.


NEED SOME WHEELS?
Call Enterprise for immediate
free pick-up and special rates.
(Cash rentals welcome!)

ML _ m ___ __ -


rent-a-carl


Pick Enterprise. We'll Pick You Up.
817 First Street East Bradenton, FL 34208
(941) 746-4311


I


I


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E PAGE 11 IE


Woman's Club reports
results of state meeting
Maggi Wilkinson, president, and Dolores Harrell,
first vice president, of the Woman's Club of Anna
Maria Island recently attended the fall board meeting
of the GFWC Florida Federation of Women's Clubs in
Orlando.
The Islanders joined approximately 1,000 mem-
bers from throughout the state of Florida to learn how
to do the very best in club endeavors.
The board encourages all Woman's Clubs to renew
its support in the work of the March of Dimes organi-
zation, and to emphasize the importance of women
maintaining their mental health amidst the stresses of
today's world.
Attendees enjoyed a tour of "Disney's Accent on
the Environment." The three-hour tour explored how
Disney World maintains the delicate balance between
technology and ecology and challenged attendees to
look for ways they and their community can better live
in harmony with the environment.
To inquire about membership in the Woman's
Club of Anna Maria Island, contact Maggi Wilkinson,
president, at 778-1670.

Island library collecting
cookbooks for sale
The Friends of the Island Library are now accept-
ing donations of cookbooks to be sold at its annual
Cookbook Sale to be held in January.
The exact day of the sale has not been established.
Donations may be brought to the Island Branch
Library, located at 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
For more information, call the library at 778-6341.


It's Holly Berry Bazaar time
Jeanne Akers, left, and Carolyn Powers, both of the
Episcipal Church of the Annunciation in Holmes
Beach display just a few of the times that will be
available at the Holly Berry Bazaar to be held at the
church on Saturday, Nov. 23, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Christmas decorations, toys, boutique items, silver
and plants will be featured. Coffee and doughnuts will
be served in the morning and hot dogs and soft drinks
will be served beginning at noon. The community is
invited to attend. Islander Photo: Courtesy of the
Holly Berry Bazaar Committee


A Non-Musicians Music Store
for
THE MUSICALLY HOPELESS
c 4524 14TH ST WEST
BRADENTON FL. 34207
-*S]l:1A I ] ;! =14 Z ',I I'-S l Vll
(941) 751-0887 FAX (941)739-6102


S"Miracles" of the Sea
Everything Under "Creation"
6011 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton 794-6196
"CASH & CARRY" SPECIAL 1 Q9
A Colorful, Fresh Flower, 1 $1
THANKSGIVING CENTERPIECE


f 9-]J fA1 T I I


Elizabeth Barnes
Elizabeth Barnes, 88, of Bradenton Beach, died
Nov. 17.
Born March 13, 1908, in Augusta, Ohio, Mrs. Barnes
came to Manatee County 22 years ago from Erie, Michi-
gan. She was a retired supervisor for Ohio Bell Telephone
Co. She was a member of Desoto Life Member Club Tele-
phone Pioneers of America, Ohio Bell Telephone Com-
pany Pioneers, Kingsbury Chapter, in Toledo, Ohio, and
Order of Retired Fire Fighters & Policemen and their
Widows. She was a member of the Harvey Memorial
Community Church of Bradenton Beach.
She is survived by a daughter, Gloria (Bert) M.
Milks of Bradenton Beach; five grandchildren; 15
great-grandchildren and six great-great grandchildren.
There will be no local visitation. Services will be
announced at a later date.
Memorial donations may be made to Harvey Me-
morial Community Church of Bradenton Beach,
Church Avenue, Bradenton Beach, Fla. 34217.

Robert K. Curry
Robert K. Curry, 67, of Bradenton died Nov. 15, at
home.
Curry was born in Alton, Illinois, and came to Mana-
tee County in 1968. He was a retired carpenter and musi-
cian. He was a member of Roser Memorial Community
Church in Anna Maria and Moose Lodge #2188 of Anna
Maria and the Palmetto Elks Lodge #2449 in Palmetto.
A memorial service was held Monday, Nov. 18, at
Roser Memorial. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Mana-
tee Avenue Chapel was in charge of arrangements.
He is survived by his wife Evelyn of Bradenton,
son David Curry of Bethalto, Illinois, and stepson Gene
Lynn of Bradenton; sister Marlene Buttry of East
Alton, Illinois; brother Jerry Curry of East Alton;
mother Mildred Curry of Wood River, Illinois, and four
grandchildren.

Brennan Robert Walden
Infant Brennan Robert Walden of Bradenton died
Nov. 16.
He is survived by his parents Carrie Ann Albro and
Robert Walden of Bradenton; maternal grandparents
Eugene and Sheila Monica of Memphis, N.Y.; paternal
grandparents Jim and Kathy Walden of Bradenton; ma-
ternal great-grandparents Gordon and Agnes Albro of
San Antonio; and paternal grandparents Robert and
Kathleen Hancock of Roswell, Georgia.
Services will be held Wednesday, Nov. 20, at


Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, 6000
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
William F. Lewis
William F. Lewis, 92, formerly of Holmes Beach,
died Nov. 13, in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Born in Norway, Maine, Mr. Lewis came to
Holmes Beach in 1969 and returned to Virginia four
years ago. He was a retired chemist for Monsanto Co.,
Nitro, W. Va.
Memorial contributions may be made to Fletchers
Chapel United Methodist Church Needy Fund, 8330
Fletchers Chapel Road, King George, Va. 22485.
Mullins and Thompson Funeral Service,
Fredicksburg, Va., is in charge of arrangements.
He is survived by a daughter, P. Anne Deeter of
Tacoma, Washington; a son, William J., of King
George, Virginia; seven grandchildren, nine great-
grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren.
Peter A. Lopez
Peter A. Lopez, 81, of Anna Maria, died Nov. 11 at
home. Born in Tampa, Mr. Lopez came to Manatee
County from there in 1956. He was a self-employed ra-
dio and television repairman in Tampa. He served in the
U.S. Army during World War II. He was a Catholic.
He is survived by his wife, Leonor.
There will be no visitation or service. Memorials
may be made to Hospice of Southwest Florida, 6055
Rand Blvd., Sarasota, Fla. 34238. Roberts Brothers
Universal Memorial Center, Sarasota, was in charge
of the arrangements.


The Island Poet
I can't find the words in Webster's Dictio-
nary no matter how I seek,
Nor can I put the words upon this paper what
I think of the dirty sneaks,
Who would beat their child, break its bones
until it was half dead,
Then take it to the hospital and say that it fell
out of bed.
Or leave it out by the dumpster in hope that
it was dying,
Just because the little tyke wouldn't stop its
crying.
For the rest of us would do anything to keep
our kids OK,
And we would be there to protect them until
our dying day.
Bud Atteridge


SMammoth Pecan Halves New Crop
$6.50 Ib. in Holiday Bags
on SALE at BOX OFFICE
Call 778-6956
for information or delivery
ISLAND PLAYERS
Gulf Drive and Pine Ave. Anna Maria

Pre-Holiday Art Expo


116 YEARS IN SERVICE



Ceiling Fan & Lighting Center
& FIREPLACE ACCESSORIES
Sales Parts Service Installation
4232 Cortez Road W. Bradenton
755-8095
I -(800)351-FANS (3267)


Visit Our Famous Year-Round
CHRISTMAS SHOP
and from our Florist Shop
Fresh & Silk Arrangements


,fWe're NUTS about


~1
1


We Have Unique
Shells, Gifts
and Jewelry


,.[ITl^ ^ ^ ^^r-,Pints S;cu l lptureMm ,t:JM m l ,,






IR3 PAGE 12 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Civic association develops Island bikeway


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Civic Association plans to seek
approval from the three Island cites to designate a
bikeway route from Bean Point to the Longboat Pass
Bridge.
The route was developed by members David
Romberger and Rod Jordan and presented to the asso-
ciation recently. It takes advantage of current streets
and sidewalks, as opposed to the county's plan to add
bike lanes along the Island's main arteries.
The proposal received the conceptual endorsement
by the Island Transportation Planning Organization
Monday. Members of the group agreed to bring the
matter up before their respective governments for fur-
ther discussion.
"We are suggesting a bike path that is safe and
usable, away from congested areas and not necessarily
requiring the spending of public funds," Romberger
explained. "It is possible to have a safe and enjoyable
through route from Bean Point to Longboat Pass with-
out traveling along any of the major roadways."
Romberger said the following criteria were used
for developing the route:
Emphasize safety and convenience, not speed.
Avoid bicycle traffic on sidewalks and congested
traffic areas.
Make it feasible for all ages.
Romberger and Jordan suggested improving the
road surface in areas of caution, widening sidewalks
used as part of the route, designating bike crossings on
major streets, correcting the dangers and hazards noted
in the report, installing street markings and bikeway
route signs and a printing a bikeway map, if the route
is to be developed. They also suggested that several
large weatherproof versions of the map be placed in
strategic areas of the Island.
According to Sarita Krysman, county planner and
coordinator of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory
Board, the county's plan is to:
Provide a four-foot designated bicycle lane on
each side of the main thoroughfare throughout Island.
Provide a six-foot sidewalk on the Bay side of the


main traffic routes throughout the Island.
Provide an eight-foot multipurpose path on the
Gulf side of the Island from Fifth Street South in
Bradenton Beach to Longboat Pass Bridge, under the
bridge, then north on the Bayside to 13th Street South.
Provide an alternate bicycle route under the
Cortez Bridge.
Provide and eight-foot multipurpose path within
the City of Anna Maria's right of way, facing the Gulf
of Mexico, from Magnolia Avenue to Beach Avenue.
"Yours is the beginning of a good plan," Krysman
said. "We will use it as an example for other commu-
nities in the county. It's an immediate solution, while
ours is a long-range plan. Our map coincides exactly
with your map."
Krysman said the bike lane concept was developed
because there's no room on the Island for a separate
bike path, and bike lanes are considered safer.
"My personal view is that the county plan is
wrong," Romberger stressed. "I don't think it's proper
to spend the money and force all of the vehicular traf-
fic into the same corridor as bicycle traffic."
"I see room for both plans one as a family route
and one for the serious bicyclist," member Joy
Courtney said.
Krysman encouraged the association to pursue the
plan and publish the bikeway map.
Courtney asked if the BPAB could endorse the
plan, and Krysman said it would be on their next
agenda.

The proposed bikeway route
Beginning at the intersection of Gladiolus and North
Shore Drive in Anna Maria, proceed south on North Shore
Drive to Pine Avenue and across Pine Avenue to the in-
tersection of North Shore Drive and Palm Avenue. An
alternate route is south on Gladiolus to Crescent Drive,
south on Crescent Drive to Pine Avenue, across Pine
Avenue to Palm Avenue and west on Palm Avenue to the
intersection with North Shore Drive.


With a Jump Rate CD, if our rates go up you
can choose to increase your rate either once
or twice, depending on the term.

It's That Simple.

ONE YEAR ONE JUMP
TWO YEARS TWO JUMPS


ONE YEAR

5.40%
APY*


TWO YEAR

5.60%
APY*


rI

First National

Bank qMW
Member FDIC
"As Independent As The Island Itself'
5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton 794-6969
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-4900
502 48th St. Ct. East Bradenton 746-1000

*Annual Percentage Yield assumes monthly addback interest. APY good through
November 30, 1996. Minimum Deposit $1,000. Penalty for early withdrawal.


Travel south on North Shore Drive to Willow Av-
enue, west on Willow Avenue to Gulf Drive and across
Gulf Drive to the sidewalk on the west side. Bear
southwest on Gulf Drive at Haley's Motel, then cross
to the sidewalk on the east side of Gulf Drive and travel
south on the sidewalk to 75th Street.
Travel to the south side of 75th Street, then east on
75th Street to Holmes Boulevard, south on Holmes
Boulevard to Gulf Drive, across Gulf Drive and south
on Holmes Boulevard to the dead end at the south side
of 52nd Street. From 52nd Street travel east to Second
Avenue, south on Second Avenue to 43rd Street and
east on 43rd Street to the sidewalk on the west side of
Gulf Drive.
Travel south along Gulf Drive on the sidewalk
into the Manatee County Public Beach parking area,
through the parking area to the sand street and through
the picnic area to 39th Street, east on 39th Street to the
sidewalk on the west side of Gulf Drive and south on
the sidewalk to Fourth Avenue.
Travel south on Fourth Avenue to 35th Street, east
on 35th Street to the sidewalk on the west side of Gulf
Drive, south on the sidewalk to Avenue E, south on
Avenue E to 28th Street, east on 28th Street to the stop
sign, across Gulf Drive and east on 28th Street to Av-
enue B and south on Avenue B to the dead end at the
trailer park. Proceed east through the park and exit on
26th Street.
Travel east on 26th Street to Avenue B, south on
Avenue B to 22nd Street, west on 22nd Street to Av-
enue C, south on Avenue C to the sidewalk along the
east side of Gulf Drive and south on the sidewalk to
north of the Cortez Bridge. Travel on the sidewalk
under the bridge, through the Bradenton Beach Marina
onto Church Street.
Travel south on Church Street to Bridge Street and
cross Bridge Street to Bay Drive South. Travel south
on Bay Drive South to Fifth Street South and west on
PLEASE SEE BIKEWAY, NEXT PAGE


SLIGHT UP DARK ROOMS WITH
NATURAL DAYLIGHT!!
Enjoy optimum light, without radiant heat, even on cloudy days.
ROF Easily Lights 400 sq. ft. More Light Than
S Any Other Tubular Skylight
S* Energy Efficient
Burglar Proof
Professional "No Mess" Installation
ATTIC Within Hours
Maintenance Free
Completely Sealed and Waterproof
No Structural Changes
UV-Protected
CE ITN. Half The Price Of Conventional Skylights

(i 779-2217 MUSIL PRODUCTS




c EXCITEMENT


23 & 24


N Must Register,
No Purchase Necessary -
Need Not Be Present To Win -
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS


NEW RELEASES 2 NIGHTS $2.99
) STANDARD VIDEOS (PAST RELEASES)
4 MOVIES 4 DAYS $4.00
rirKr rA In Ti/ri rT I ID \r


SKt-AL IKILt I IEUU-K
(10 PER BOOK AT DISCOUNT) STL
7370 Cortez Road 761-8606 GIVE
at 75th Street & Cortez Rd. Next to Winn Dixie
10 am to 10 pm Sun. thru Thurs. 10 am to 11 pm Fri. & Sat.


JDI0
~CWAY5


DOOR

pRzE GRAND OPENING
3 DAYS FRI, SAT & SUN NOV 22,


ll


,- s
Lc






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 13 EIl


Bradenton Beach charter hearing Thursday


By Paul Roat
Revisions to the Bradenton Beach charter appear
destined to appear on the Dec. 3 ballot for voter ap-
proval or rejection.
Council members met with the Charter Review
Committee in a workshop session last week to iron out
any last-minute problems with the document, the guid-
ing vehicle that permits the city to function as a munici-
pality.
Although there was extensive discussion of several
sections of the charter, specifically areas dealing with
term limits of elected officials and the election of the
mayor, few modifications were made to the document.
A public hearing on the charter and a final coun-
cil decision on whether to place it on the ballot is ex-
pected Thursday, Nov. 21, during the regular council
meeting at city hall. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m.
Much of last week's workshop discussion revolved
around term limits and mayoral election.
Currently there is no limitation on the number of
years a council member may serve. The new charter
proposes limiting council members to three two-year
terms. The council members were split on the issue,
with some favoring no limitation while others said six
years was too long.
The matter also was a pivotal one for the charter


BIKEWAY, FROM PAGE 12
Fifth Street South to the sidewalk on the east side of
Gulf Drive. Travel south on the sidewalk to 13th Street
South.
The report notes that this is the end of the bikeway,
at present. It suggests that the county pave the gravel
access road along the east side of Gulf Drive through
the boat ramp area and connect the gravel access road
to 13th Street South. It also suggests the county im-
prove the sand street from the Manatee County Public
Beach parking lot to 39th Street.
The report lists several areas of caution:
The sidewalk from Willow Street to Haley's
Motel is designated extreme caution because of its nar-
row width.


review committee, which also argued passionately
during its seven-month review of the charter on
whether or for what term limitations should be placed
on elected service.
In the end, no change was made to the proposed
charter and the six-year period of service remained in
the document.
The other bone of contention among council mem-
bers was the election of mayor. Currently, the city char-
ter calls for a simple majority of votes to elect officials
in Bradenton Beach. The new charter calls for a simple
majority of votes to elect a council member, but re-
quires the mayor to receive 50 percent plus one of the
voters to take office.
Charter committee members argued that since the
mayor represents all the citizens, while council mem-
bers represent citizens in their respective wards, a ma-
jority .of the voters should endorse the mayor for him
to take office.
In the end, the committee's arguments took prece-
dence and the charter language remained unchanged.
One area of the charter that was changed was the
section calling for citizen initiative/citizen recall of
ordinances. Charter language was changed to allow 10
percent of the electors who cast ballots in the previous
election, or at least 50 electors, to sign a petition insti-


The section from 54th Street south to the south
side of 52nd Street is designated extreme caution, and
there are dangerous grates in this area.
There are dangerous sand street ends between
35th Street and Avenue E.
Bicycling is difficult from Avenue C to the
Cortez Bridge because of the high volume of traffic,
narrow bike route, numerous side streets, soft sand ar-
eas and dangerous grates.
The sidewalk through the Bradenton Beach Ma-
rina area is dangerous because of heavy marina equip-
ment being used in the area.
The section between Fifth Street South and 13th
Street South is dangerous because of the high volume
of traffic and soft sand areas.


gating any initiative or recall of a law.
Prior language called for only 10 percent of the
voters.
Highlights of the proposed city charter include the
following.
A commission rather than a council would gov-
ern the city. The change is in name only: duties would
remain the same, but "commissioner" is a gender-neu-
tral title that avoids the unwieldy use of "councilman"
and "councilwoman" in addressing elected officials.
Regular charter review would take place as
needed but at least every five years. The current char-
ter does not have any regular charter review provisions.
Elected official compensation pay raises for
elected officials would go into effect one full fiscal
year after the group votes itself a raise. There are no
waiting periods for salary increases in the current char-
ter.
Election dates would change from a special elec-
tion in December to council and mayoral candidates
running during the general elections in November in an
effort to save money. City elections currently cost
about $2,050; under the proposal that cost would be
greatly reduced. Elected officials would still take office
in early December under the charter proposal.
A decision to change the use or disposition of the
city's four parks would require a "super majority" of
four affirmative votes of elected officials plus approval
by the voters in a referendum under the proposed char-
ter.
Copies of the proposed charter are available at city
hall at no charge.


Holmes Beach has
mulch for residents
The City of Holmes Beach is offering
free mulch to its residents. The mulch pile is
located behind the public works department,
and residents should bring their own con-
tainers.


Get Up To 63 Channels


Plus HBO


JUST SAY NO
... to appliances for your wife
this holiday season. That's no
way to treat the woman you
love. Plus it could get YOU in
a lot of trouble. Instead, give
her fine jewelry YEEEESS!"

Yes You Can
Afford It!
Lay-a-way with 10% down

14K JEWELERS
6535 MANATEE AVE. W.
795-5812

Just
visiting
paradise?

ISLANDER


Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best
news the only paper
with all the news
about the Island.
Charge your
subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


* No equipment to buy
* No monthly program charge for addtl TVs
* 30 day, money-back guarantee


* On-Time Installation Guarantee
* Free Service Calls
* Includes all local off-air broadcast channels


Call and order our
Standard Cable & HBO Package
and get Cinemax and The Disney Channel
at no extra charge!


CALL 748-1829 NOW!

>TIME WARNER
C O M M U N I C A TI O NS
f, No-j'tcafe-a4 acunymr.e/
Cinemax lis free through 1997 only if all components of this HBO package special offer are maintained throughout next year. Prces are subject
to change. Some services not available in all areas and additional equipment may be required. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with
other Time Warner promotional offers and is available to new customers only Offer will end on December 15, 1996.


II





IM PAGE 14 A NOVEMBER 21, 1996 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Fifty years of Island news


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Island's first newspaper was not a
newspaper at least according to the newspaper.
The Bradenton Beachcomber printed its first issue
on Christmas 1947, announcing in a front-page story
called "The World, The Flesh and The Devil" that
"Bradenton Beach needs a newspaper like a long-dis-
tance swimmer needs a toilet. What is put in, must
come out.
"Newspapers are unnecessary here ... except when
other perforated kinds of paper fail. Practically every
inhabitant of Bradenton Beach is a news-hawk, a star-
reporter or a gossip columnist.
"Everybody on the Island is informed of every-
thing that happens about 35 seconds after the event....
There is no reason why a newspaper should exist on
this island, where every man is a leg-man and every
woman a crusader.
"So we have decided to publish a newspaper with-
out news. The Bradenton Beachcomber will contain
only items of human interest.... In general, we will
confine ourselves to generalizations about people and
things about the world, the flesh and the devil."
Here are a few of the ads written by publisher
Gerald Kersh.

Thurdh of t4e knnunriaivn
SSR/ Holly Berry
BAZAAR
Saturday, November 23
9 am to 1:30 pm
Christmas Gifts and Decorations, Jewelry,
PLANTS, Baked Goods, Cutlery, Toys &
S Handcrafts, Christmas Boutique & Raffle,
Donuts & Coffee in AM, Hot Dogs & Dessert in PM
4408 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH




GUARANTEED
LOWEST PRICES!
MATTRESSES 0 ADJ. BEDS SAVE $49900


BRADENTON 794-2952
Cortez Commons
59th St. & Cortez Rd. W.


SARASOTA 922-5271
1901 Hansen St.


I = ... FR SAiMEDY -DELIVERY=-


T THE BRADENTON 4-



BEACHCOMBER
VOL 1, NO. 1. XMAS 1947 INDEPENDENT PUBLISHED & EDITED BY GERALD KERSH 5 CENTS A COPY
The World, The Flesh and The Devil
Bradenton Beach needs a newspaper like a long-distance
swimmer needs a Toilet. WARNING TO
What is put in must come out The inhabitants of this place READERS AND
do not keep secrets and if by some crazy chance some eccentric
person decides to retain a confidence he or she (generally she) is ADVERTISERS
diagnosed as needing some kind of verbal purgative; so that in a
little while all the secreted dirt comes out in a gush of whispers, We do not have to take anything
e we don't like. If we disapprove of
and there is nodding and winking, leering and nudging, up and omehing we'll see it further before
down the Island. we let it be advertised in this paper.
Newspapers are unnecessary here . except when other Ayone who imagine that he ca- in-
fluence us by paying for columo-
perforated kinds of papers fail Practically every inhabitant of inches is formally invited to go and
Bradenton Beach is a news-hawk, a star reporter, a gossip-column- take a flying leap at a galloping
ist. ostrich. We accept advertising only
from people we know ..or fancy
The ni news isscarcely worth reporting. we might like to know. -Editor
A child is horn in lawful wedlock ... a man and a woman
decide to get publicly married . the Fire Department adver-
The Island'dfirst publication, the Bradenton Beachcomber, was published by Gerald Kersh.


"A.P. Bell Fish Co. Never send to know for
whom the bell tolls. Buy his fish. They are good for the
brains." Another for "Island Pharmacy" says, "There
are no insects on Anna Maria. If, however, you get bit-
ten, go to the Island Pharmacy. Their aspirin tablets,
incidentally are delicious."
Kersh wrote this about Lowell Timmons who
owned Bishop's Inn at Sister's Lake, Mich.: "We have
drunk & gambled with Timmons and believe him when

HomeTown Service
Ou9O TisWoldRaes


5.30a


APY 4 Month
Certificate


(G CENTURY BANK
A Federal Savings Bank FDICINSUREDIL5



A rates subject to change. Annual Percentage Yield effective as of 11/4/96
A Penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. Minimum deposit required of $500.


IISLAT*NDER
0 r00 9B6


he says that his food & drinks are as good as can be got
at the price."
The Gulf Park Hotel in Bradenton Beach had this.
"Dick and Betty Dodge, who run the place, are a good
natured couple, legally married and always ready (in
the presence of witnesses) to cash you a very small
traveler's cheque if your profile does not tally with any
PLEASE SEE NEWSPAPERS, NEXT PAGE




*Appointed Princess Cruise Specialist
Princess Cruises I

Crown Princess
I "Best of Alaska" I
14-day cruise/tour includes 6-night interior
Alaska land tour. Priced from $2368 per person
FREEBROHUR


[ Ship "N' Shore Cruises
\:48 383-1847 I
I' ea~a .i 6


SaL BBigger Is Better!!!


SESINCE 1979 ST R
20"x30" save 3.00 POSTER

$16.95 ewitxp.11/ PRINTS
From your 35mm negative, slide or print % FUJI TruColor
Palma Sola Square, Manatee Ave. at 59th St., Bradenton 792-1009


CABINETS
0 .__ _._

,;p" z '- ,#"- -
.... r. . .


' -i =-=lh ; ,


CABINETS ~


Ifilt Cdifnlrlr SirV 1,nN969


Eighly-Sv ln Hundleil Colirte RuIl, Brailiin
(2.5 miles east of Conez Bridge) 941-/92-8656


Stute...


~.. ~Vue.


.t r,ll r "i' r,. tn,. J ,,:r j:ij l hi jdr[. ,, l

y, TE, j r i t -11 h T, 3j ri,,,r

'f, : ,iur t ir, ? :..u Tl h ..m
j lj u .r Ih l. ,-n i : l our h. hi ,i.



*.>lp I j ,, -,' r .:'m .: l .: n-i


SEALY
SPRIN


I


SERTA
BASSETT
SIMMONS


Metal Day Beds Mattresses
complete w/mattress acting $59
$199 #2626 White from
$1 #2720 Black Twin: Each Piece


* Marietta Super Store
SRoswell Super Store
* Gwlnnett Place Mall
Super Store
*Snellville


mii


SMidtown
SStone Mountain Festival
* Warehouse Clearing Ctr.
*Tampa
*Jacksonville


Open Monday-Friday 10-8, Saturday 10-7, Sunday 12-6
We accept Checks, Lay-a-Ways, Visa, American Express, Discover, MasterCard


F f
*


AS -WN M


youction..o.


F(IC'14^94


k^c


F 4





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 U PAGE 15 E[


NEWSPAPERS, FROM PAGE 14


of the police handouts."
According to the late Jean Blassingame, who
shared her copy of the Beachcomber with us, Kersh
insisted on writing the ads himself. She said, "I agreed
to buy an ad for the tavern I owned on Bridge Street
and asked him to come back the next day for the copy.
'Oh no,' he said. 'I write the ads."'
Of Blassingame's establishment, Kersh said, "Sun-
set Lounge: This is by no means a bad pub. We never
saw the sun set in it but its well worth visiting. Mr.
Jones is a friendly, fair-dealing sort of geezer, and the
lady of the house is of remarkable beauty. It is possible
to find peace and quiet there."
Finally, there's this little note from the editor.
"Drink Scotch Whiskey. If it's good enough for me it's
good enough for you."
Kersh packed up his entourage and left his resi-
dence at the Gulf Park Hotel shortly after his first and
only edition of The Beachcomber never to be heard
from on Anna Maria again, according to Blassingame.
She said he was disgruntled by what he considered a
general lack of hospitality from pub owners toward
his dog.
Indeed, he wrote an article "Floridian Bites Dog,"
which ended with, "Until the Floridian antidog law is
altered there must be some other, more tolerant part of
the world for us. We intend to look for it, with our
dog."
The first continuously published newspaper on
Anna Maria Island, Anna Maria Key News, was started


C


Jis 1 A ournetls BJeast...


Jaste Iourmet Joods

& cJine UUines
Friday, Siovemrer 22
4 p".. to 8 p.m.
ia




/ A Gourmet's Grocey
---- -----. _
and at

Longboat Package Video

ome sample

gourmet f/6 rom 1, .
around tie world Y.i-

* .7'ncl c i o,',,,n')et Dei S a d c l (ic ese.
* ( .S t'icN L ,i iinal 'll ... fnin, I Ill i, .
t 1 /. i /- Trime 1,m,,f ,,.
0 e fea ,oA .,,,,i.iI.,, ,.,, (',,fn,,,, l ,,,l n / ,,,i.,,Im .


l sii,,, a. i,,,,I l ... ,S'liCi


hmlvnnx,',., ...


Gs.,, ,.,.s ( J ,.T ,,Ii/. "Pa ,in, '.,-c,,,v, *. h .. .,ii ,I .% ',,,i ,,,/

* ( an,,ic 'it.s c i'ei(afe.t s

.* ,(' imet offees,
13iscotti cC- .rslries

'.., f hI:,l *i',,(I' v ( 'R I;

Whitney Beach Plaza
6800 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key 383-085


in 1949 by Ellen Brackin (later Ellen Marshall) and
Harriet Williams (later Harriet Blair of Sarasota).
When she came to the Island in 1947, Marshall was
a war widow and stayed at the Anglers Lodge on the
bay. She became friends with Harriet and together they
published the weekly newspaper. The Key News was
an immediate success.
"We were young and had a lot of energy," says
Marshall. "We soon became secretaries for all the or-
ganizations on the Island. Then we got the idea to pro-
duce a newspaper. I didn't know much about it but I
was gifted with intestinal fortitude."
On the front page of the Sept. 7, 1950, issue,
Marshall writes how an unnamed hurricane flooded the
island, causing considerable damage. But she empha-
sized that natives rose to the occasion.


r Ellen Marshall was
S"j, I surprised and delighted
to see the mural painted
4 on the north wall of the
SIsland Shopping Center
in Holmes Beach depict-
ing a man reading the
S Anna Maria Key News,








Marshall took to task the Bradenton daily for re-
porting that "helpless residents were scared and grim
and that rescuers from the mainland found barefoot
women wandering around aimlessly."
In her put down, she wrote, "We must remember
to wear white tie and tails during the next hurricane."
The major controversy on the Island in the early
months of 1950 was whether Anna Maria Island should
have several municipalities or be one community, the
Key News reported.
The City of Anna Maria had incorporated in 1923
.with Capt. W. "Mitch" Davis as mayor. But by 1950,
in the wake of the post-World War II boom, sentiment
had grown for the incorporation of the southern portion
PLEASE SEE NEWSPAPERS, NEXT PAGE


HEADBOARDS 40% OFF
B Suggested Retail

When You Purchase Bedding
Top of the Line SealyPosturepedic at Low Everyday Prices.
FREE Bed Frame! FREE Delivery & Setup! FREE Removal of Old Bedding!

-SA, BD IN G


COMFORT SERIES
CORAL SET
TWIN ...........$329
QUEEN .........$475
KING ..........$675

BALLET SET
TWIN ...........$380
QUEEN .........$575
KING ..........$795


SOUTH STORE
1 mi. South of Bee Ridge
4586 S. Tamiami Tr.
923-3299


-EDGEGUARD"


Deli.ai la* a-.,
tirdmerl sleeping e nd
finrm ernling edge.


Choose From:
Wicker By Henry Link,
The Lexington Collections
Including Weekend Retreat,
Island Traditions, De Cristofaro,


POSTUREPEDIC"
AFFIRM SET
TWIN .........$440
QUEEN ......$650
KING .........$850

VIRTUOSO SET
PILLOW TOP
TWIN .........$549
QUEEN ......$900
KING .........$1150


Posturepedic Support U-Z.
Only From Sealy
Posturepedic'
Mon. thru Sat. 9-6 Sun. Noon-5


NORTH STORE
1 mi. North of Airport
7782 N. Tamiami Tr.
355-5619


PAMRRO SHOP
F U R N I T U RE


I


I





I~ PAGE 16 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


NEWSPAPERS, FROM PAGE 15
of the Island.
In strongly worded editorials, Brackin backed the
cause of one-Island, one-city, "whether it's Bradenton
Beach, Anna Maria or Gasparilla Gulch."
It was a losing battle.
On March 13, 1950, 61 of 75 mid-island residents
voted to incorporate and voted 49-12 for the new city
to be named Holmes Beach with Halsey Tichenor Jr.,
the first mayor.
On Dec. 21, 1950, Bradenton Beach became a city
by a vote of 84 to 56. Bernard Wagaman was named
mayor.
The Anna Maria Key News ceased publishing on
March 1, 1951.
Then on Nov. 15, 1951, the first edition of the
longest-published Island newspaper, The Islander,
rolled off the presses. It was
eight pages with no sub-
scribers and no advertisers.
Circulation was 500.
There was no bridge
between Anna Maria Island
and Longboat and
wouldn't be for another six
years. The only way to drive
to the mainland was via a
rickety wooden bridge from
Varley Bradenton Beach to Cortez.
The way of life on
the Island was summed up in a line under The
Islander's name plate which proclaimed, "Where Life
Is Peaceful... and Fishing Is Good."
Harry Varley was the founder, editor and pub-
lisher. Varley was no newcomer to the publishing busi-
ness. Having been with a New York City advertising
agency for years, he went on to become president of
Schick Razor Company before coming to Anna Maria.
Varley originally came from England and was
known for his outspoken manner, weaving editorial
comment with news stories.
In his 1971 Islander obituary, future editors Don
Moore and Steve Kimball wrote, "To say he was well-
liked would be only half true. To say he was disliked



tiw Manat tHomre
"Companions" Inc.
V Companions V Homemakers
V Alzheimer's/Dementia Caregivers
V Sitters V Live-ins
(941) 795-5006
Now available our new assisted home at
116 75th Street W., Bradenton FL 34209


*Awryd4O


-Ts AWO v
778-6696


KENDRA D.

PRESSWOOD
Attorney at Law



Employment
Discrimination

Civil Rights

Civil & Criminal
Appeals



Call toll free
(888) 888-9178
Located in
Tampa, Florida


The Islander
THE VOICE OF THE ISLANDS . ANNA MARIA ISLAND, LONGBOAT KEY,
LIDO SHORES, ST. ARMANDS KEY; COON KEY, BIRD KEY AND LIDO KEY
No. 902 ANNA MARIA ISLAND, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1969 TEN CENTS


TIDAL WAVE HITS BEACHES
A giant wave swept I've seen in the 20 years feet deep flooded the front
across sections of Anna I've lived down here," ground floor apartments.
Maria Island, Longboat O'Connell said. It washed back as far as
and Lido Keys Saturday Coquina Beach, the mile the swimmingpool sever-
morning, causing damage long county beach at the al hundred feet from the
estimated in the millions, south end of Anna Maria beach. '
Termed a small "tidal Island, was completely Colony Beach Resort,
wave" by Sheriff Ross flooded when the wavehit. just to the south, was the
Boyer of Sarasota County, Sections of logs used to hardest hit of all the mo-
mark the parking areas tels on Longboat. Ten
More Pictures On at thebeach werescatter- units were flooded, the
Pages 10 & II ed around like pieces of large plate glass windows
straw. Bigoildrums, used in the dining room that
the giant breakers struck at the beach for trash overlooks the Gulf were
within minutes along a 40 cans, were all over the knocked out bypalmtrees
mile stretch of coast line area. hurled through them by the
from St. Petersburg Homes along Gulfside force of the waves.
Beach to Siesta Key. Road near Longboat Key's A visitor who was inthe
The wall of water, five north end were severely diningroom when the wave
feet or more inheight, hit damaged in the storm. In hit, said, "The front win-
the beaches without warn- spjite of the erosion con- dows crashed in like a
ingshortlybefore I11a.m., trol jetties along that bunch of dishes splatter-
floodingmanyhomes, mo- stretch of beach, large ing on concrete."
tels and other businesses areas of thebeach were By 1p.m., several dozen
alongthe Gulf front and the eaten away by the waves, workman had shoveled the ROCKY PATH--Gulf Drive, just south of Trader Jack's Brigantine in Bradenton
main roads. Miraculous- and homes were flooded (Continued on Page 11) Beach, was covered with sand and rubble following the huge wave that swept
Iv. onvly a few minor in- as the waves washed nast across sections of Anna Maria Island on Saturday.
A copy of The Islander from Feb. 20, 1969. Steve Kimball was editor, Don Moore assistant editor. Moore
later took over as the owner of the publication.


would be no closer to the
truth.
"In the newspaper
profession it is axiomatic
That an editor if he is do-
ing a good job never will
win any popularity contest.
S.. It also is said that the true
gauge of an editor's worth is
S ".i not necessarily the number
Kimball of friends he has made, but
the number and caliber of
the enemies he has made.
"Harry Varley scored well on both sides of the led-
ger."
Varley's tenure at The Islander lasted eight years
when in 1959 the paper was handed over to Judd
Arnett. For five months, Arnett and his wife ran the
Islander. Arnett left to become a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press.
Steve Kimball took over following Arnett's depar-


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
.:7 r r -:: ,r i: Fr ,:,: 3rI



76 I1-0210


501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 *West Bradenton


ithtmj ihe+ I.)nri,;r- A l, ,,:, Ltr r bhr 1

We Protect Your Boat On **
Land As Well As Water.
Sailing cruising or fishing is usually corilneda
to weekends tor most of lrie boal owners
In faci. mosI ol Ihe time your Doal isn [
even in the waler Ii's in storage
somewhere' Auio-.Oners
Insurance covers your boal
in the waler ard oul. anr,
everywhere in between -
all year Iorig'
Jim Mixon
Insurance
Co. Inc.
,94 I77S-223 \ t4-


Auuto-Owners Insurance
Life Home Car Business
7/iVo'A68ne,'b&-


5412 Marina Dr.
Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach


ture. Kimball later would
S become a mayor of Anna
Maria City.
As the Island grew,
Kimball switched the focus
of the Islander to providing
hard news coverage of local
events, keeping opinions on
Ii the editorial page. He is
| E credited with changing the
Moore printing process from letter
press to offset printing.
Like Varley, Kimball voiced his opinions on sub-
jects of importance to the community, but unlike the
paper's founder he limited his comments to the edito-
rial page. It was an editorial page that spoke with au-
thority but did not try to drown out other points of view.
In the early 1960s, Don Moore joined the staff. In
1970, Moore became the third editor and publisher af-
PLEASE SEE NEWSPAPERS, NEXT PAGE





New Patients Welcome
* *
3909 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach

778-2204


' nnll i


Islanb Pobiatr

CLARE H. STARRETT,
D.P.M.

LTri kAir hrMKIC -I


I rUIA KIM MICVIILIN
and
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment


Home Services ... that are Just Like Family


Just Like Family offers a fresh
new non-medical approach to in-home
assistance for you or your loved ones.
Our personalized services are available
with a 2 hour minimum up to 24
hours a day and are tailored to
your individual needs on a
UT short or long term basis
Jus0t at affordable rates.



A,-horin C keP < Copnon nr, i .l


Professionally trained aides who are
bonded and insured come to your home
and can assist with:
Home Management
Housekeeping
Meal Preparation
Shopping
Transportation
Companion Services
... we'll be there for you

(941) 739,1626 c
I'f Ic[nJJnsssn


Worship Service
10 am
Nursery During Service

Adult Study Group
9 am

6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
LONGBOAT KEY
383-6491


JUST b*

CALL
778-7978
for FREE home
delivery of The Islander
Bystander anywhere on
Anna Maria Island.
You may also call
to stop home
delivery if necessary.
Sorry, home (unit) delivery
is not available at mobile
home parks or condos.


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 17 I-G


NEWSPAPERS, FROM PAGE 16
ter he and his wife Roxanne bought the paper.
A University of Florida School of Journalism
graduate, Moore had innovative ideas and a "tell it like
it is" style that would win the paper numerous awards
over the years.
Under Moore's guidance The Islander expanded
into the printing business on Jan. 3, 1974. The plant not
only produced The Islander but a handful of other small
papers around Florida.
The Islander won a number of Florida Press Asso-
ciation awards with Moore
at the helm. By 1974, the
paper garnered two national
awards, something no other
Florida weekly has accom-
plished.
Moore's younger
brother Colin joined the pa-
per in 1977 and became edi-
tor when Don Moore sold
Alder his publishing business in-
cluding The Islander, the
Bayshore Banner and the printing operation in May
1980 to The New York Times.
Ed Warren was installed as publisher and in 1981,
on the paper's 30th anniversary, he said, "After 30
years of progress we're looking forward to a bright
future and another 30 years of progress with our read-
ers."
In 1984, The Islander again became a family-
owned paper. Richard Ingham, owner of the
Zephyrhills News, bought the paper and appointed his
son Sky as publisher. Ingham eventually changed the
paper's name to The Anna Maria Islander Press.
June Alder, a veteran reporter with the paper, suc-
ceeded Colin Moore as editor but left the position in
May 1985 to return to her first love reporting the
always fascinating news on the Island.
Shirley Foor, a former Bradenton Herald manag-
ing editor, replaced Alder, with Dennis Ecklund suc-
ceeding Foor as editor.
The Islander Press printed its final edition in on
July 25, 1990.
Pat Copeland, then editor of The Islander Press,
said staffers were dismayed over the paper's demise.
"The saddest part is the loss of an island institu-
tion," Copeland said. "This is the 40th anniversary year
of The Islander."
Islander advertising manager Jim Wallis said em-


tRoer emorial Tmmuxnit (gItpirdi
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913

Come Celebrate Christ
First Worship 9 am
Second Worship 11 am
Sunday School 10 am
Children's Church 11lam
Transportation & Nursery Available
S 512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414


The last issue of the Anna Maria Islander Press, which stopped distribution July 25, 1990.

.- i ii


f ma




Staff members of the Islander Press on the publication's last day got together for a final photo opportunity.


ployees had heard rumblings about possible changes
but that they were hoping the paper would be sold and
not closed.
Sky Ingham, president of Asterisk Printing, an-






"Will power in a bottle"
Look and Feel Great!




Call 778-0354




<> COLUMBIA"

Homecare


Bringing Quality

Healthcare Home

There are times, after you pass the acute stage of an illness or injury,
when recuperation at home can be just what the doctor orders.
Columbia Homecare with its skilled professionals (utilizing
modern techniques, service and equipment) makes this possible.
With Homecare's help, you can enjoy the comfort of your own
home with the knowledge that you are in capable hands. For more
information and our free brochure call

COLUMBIA HOMECARE
West Office 798-2121 East Office 751-6334


COLUMBIA BLAKE MEDICAL CENTER
2020 59th Street West, Bradenton, FL 34209
1-800-COLUMBIA


Columbia Home Page: http//www.columbia-hca.com


nounced the closing to employees.
Wallis said the paper was closing because of stiff
PLEASE SEE NEWSPAPERS, NEXT PAGE




Johnson & Niewodowski, M.D.'S, P.A.
LeNlovne F. lohnson. M.D. &
Mlichael A. Niie\\ do\os.ki, MN.D.
welcome e
Nanette K. Wendel, M.D.
to their Practice of Surgery

Dr. Wendel's practice
includes General,
Vascular and
Pediatric Surgery.
She also has special : .
training in Advanced -
Laparoscopic
Surgery .


Ich Spreche Deutsch
Now Taking Appointments

Please call us for information on the
New Outpatient ABBI Breast Biopsy

2010 59th Street West
Suite 5800, Bradenton
Medical Arts Building

792-2033

Medicare Assignment Accepted
Most Insurance andM managed Care
.- PlaniYAc .d
_.,... ;, .-,..- ...~..V"


E u... .-k I I
O- rqUhIC '
THE ANNA MARIA m
ISLANDER a AL 4 L L A


25 CENTS


July 25, 1990 / ANNA MARIA ISLAND, FLORIDA / VOL. 40, NO. 33


Islander Press staff bids farewell


Due to financial considerations, Asterisk Printing an-
nounced Friday it will cease publication of the Anna Maria
Islander Press, the Island's oldest, most respected
newspaper. Said Publisher Sky Ingham, "I'd like to thank
our loyal subscribers and advertisers that stuck by us and
hope we were able to meet their needs. It takes community
support to keep a weekly newspaper going, and I thank the
many people that gave us that support."
Islander Press staff members, stunned by the decision, ex-
pressed their determination to put their best efforts into the
final issue. Each shared his/her thoughts on the loss of the


- I I '


~------ ~l~"-~--""-~""~a~~""I""~


r


fis Ie id





IJ] PAGE 18 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
NEWSPAPERS, FROM PAGE 17


competition.
In 1954, Bob and Gret'n Daughaday started a
"shopper" based in Holmes Beach and a local woman
(grandmother of former Islander reporter Mark Ratliff)
named it The Beachcomber in a write-in contest.
It was sold in 1976 to the Bradenton Shopping Guide
and Bette Kissick managed the popular shopper from
1976 to 1990. They began printing on its trademark yel-
low newsprint in 1977 but never published Island news.
The Beachcomber was acquired along with a group
of shoppers in 1988 by Westminister Publishing, which
in turn eventually sold to TS Publications Inc., an af-
filiate of the Toronto Sun Publishing Company.
Don Moore returned to Anna Maria in January
1989 to launch a new weekly paper, The Island Sun, in
direct competition with The Islander Press.
Competition for advertising dollars from the Sun
and Beachcomber were blamed for the demise of The
Islander Press.
Within just a short time, Moore's staff was stunned
by the acquisition of the eight-month-old Island Sun by
TS Publications. Editor and publisher Don Moore
made the agreement to sell his second Island publica-
tion in 1990 following a heart attack.
TS published The Island Sun combined with a
madeover Beachcomber including entertainment news
for two years. They renamed it TGIF (Thank Goodness
It's Friday) Beachcomber and inserted it weekly as a
second section in the Sun.
In November 1992, TS Publications announced
plans to transform their weekly newspapers, The Island
Sun, TGIF Beachcomber, Longboat Times and two
shoppers, Sarasota and Venice, into one regional paper,
The Weekly.
With a predicted absence of Island news in The
Weekly, advertising agency owner Bonner Presswood
decided to launch a newspaper that would serve the
needs of the Island community.


Cartoonist Jack Egan, circa 1981, has been produc-
ing Slick the oily bird since 1971 for a variety of
Island newspapers, including The Islander By-
stander.
Presswood already operated a storefront for her
agency, MacBonner, in the Island Shopping Center.
Staff members pooled their resources and began sell-
ing advertisements. Joy Courtney, a former Island Sun
writer, signed on as the paper's first editor and the
newspaper, The Islander Bystander, hit the streets with
its first edition the same week that TS Publications
converted its publications to The Weekly.
"We were 12 pages the first two weeks, then 16
pages for two weeks, 20, 24 and so on, until we hit 40
pages during the first season. It happened so fast that
we were all swept into perpetual motion weekly
perpetual motion," says Presswood.
The Islander Bystander staff now boasts many con-
tributors from an assortment of former Island papers
including cartoonist Jack Egan, June Alder, Pat
Copeland, Paul Roat and Courtney, who stepped down


from editor to school reporter when her motel business
demanded more time.
Presswood was an advertising sales representative
for The Islander in 1978. She went on to help launch
Clubhouse magazine in Bradenton and Sarasota -
now Sarasota magazine and provided consulting to
other start-up publications.
"We started with one focus: that the paper would
cover news in three Island cities. We also have a strong
commitment to include people. It's all about people. I
really believe that's why we grew so quickly,"
Presswood says.
"I've followed Don Moore's news philosophy: If it
doesn't happen on Anna Maria, or isn't about Island
people, it doesn't get printed. I knew people respected the
former Islander newspaper and we worked hard from the
beginning to revive that spirit in The Islander Bystander."
The Islander Bystander competed for awards in the
Florida Press Association's annual contest for the first
time in 1994 and 1995. Classed in the top division of
community newspapers statewide with a circulation of
15,000 or more, the newspaper earned seven Florida
Press Association awards for writing and photography.
The Islander Bystander has withstood two com-
petitive challenges, the first from The Island Free Press,
which published from January to October 1993. The
other entry into the Island market was a short-lived
publication that folded in October 1995, The Dolphin.
Anna Maria Island's only current weekly maintains
a circulation of 15,500, serving readers on Anna Maria
Island, Longboat Key, Cortez and west Bradenton.
"I'd like another 50 years," Presswood says of her
future goals. "We may only be starting our fifth year,
but I'd like to be here for another 50.
"I relate owning the newspaper to professional
baseball players. I admired them for having a career
where they played a game from their youth. What could
be more fun, I thought. Now, I can't imagine anything
better than living and working on Anna Maria Island,
publishing The Islander Bystander."


- THE

BUTCHER SHOP



j %de 4 7c^ 7wt~ef &





Beef Kabobs ................................ $2.99Ah
Chicken Kabobs ........ .........................$2.99 b
Lean Chuck Roast...............................$2..49Ab
Lean Ground Chuck .............. ............ 1. 9Ab
Butterfly Pork Chops...........................$3.99Ab
Lean Boneless Whole Hams ..................$3.99Ab


Beer & Wine
Carry Out


Amish Smoked Sliced Bacon .........$2.39/b
Boar's Head
Oven Gold Roast Turkey Breast .......$3.99/Ab
Boar's Head Deluxe Ham ...............$4.59A1b
Old Fashioned Wieners ................$3.19/lb
-79- r,': ," 2 ": :


~!ii,'


Medium Shrimp.............$5.99Ab


15 to 17 oz. Lobster Tails $18.69/ea
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 27



HOR:MN *A.8TS


REST
Dining *
Lou





THANKSGIVING DAY

Specials


LURANT & LOUNGE
Tues Sun -11:30 am 10pm
unge open Tues Sun
1l:30am to Midnight
778-6969


Served 11:30 am 10 pm Thursday November 28
HONEY PINEAPPLE HAM ..................................$...... $8.95
with sweet potato & vegetable
OVEN-ROASTED TURKEY .......................................... $7.95
with mashed potatoes or dressing & vegetable
PRIM E RIB .................................................................... $12.95
with baked potato & vegetable
All specials served with salad & rolls
Lounge menu available at 4 pm.
BOOK HOLIDAY PARTIES NOW!
204 Pine Ave. RESERVATIONS REQUESTED NOT REQUIRED Anna Maria


7..2


~pa` ~za,
1 : i


:1 : ~

~I
z





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 19 Ei

Key board says 'yes' to new Cultural Center


By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
The Longboat Key Art Center Board of Governors
voted last week to proceed with a new $4 million Cul-
tural Center.
Now it's up to the 950 members of the Art Center
to decide if they want to move the Art Center from the
village on the north end of Longboat Key to Durante
Park in the 5300 block of Gulf of Mexico Drive.
The members will meet with the board of gover-
nors and the cultural committee this week to discuss
details of the move. They have until Dec. 9 to cast their
ballots. About a third of the Longboat Key Art Center
members are from Anna Maria Island and Bradenton.
Several hundred ballots have been cast and remain
sealed until the election referee committee counts the
votes on Dec. 9. Insiders would not speculate on any
voting trend.
The concept of a Cultural Center on Longboat Key
was unveiled in 1995, when the late Les Weller left a
$500,000 conditional bequest to the Art Center to re-
locate and form a cultural center. If members vote
against relocating, the bequest will lapse and be used
for other charitable purposes in Sarasota.
Citing the need for a new facility to replace the
deteriorating 45-year-old buildings, Art Center Presi-


Cultural board
includes Islanders
The Manatee County Cultural Alliance re-
cently elected officers and board members for
the 1996/97 season. The slate includes many
Islanders.
Island resident Susan O'Connor was elected
treasurer. Island board members are Joan
Abrahamson Voyles, Julia Garland, Susan
Diffatte of Cortez, and Barbara Turner.
The alliance is located at 323 10th Ave. W.,
Suite 303, Palmetto. Call 721-0509 for informa-
tion.


dent Ed Sherman said, "I'm hopeful the members will
see the need to move to a new facility."
Opposition has mounted in recent weeks from
neighbors on Gulf Bay Road and St. Jude Drive who
fear the eight building complex will exacerbate their
drainage problems and change the residential charac-
ter of their neighborhood.
The Public Interest Committee has stated opposi-
tion to a Cultural Center because it would be built on
environmentally sensitive land that should be reserved
for open space. They argue such green space can only


Art on the Avenue
The Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Drive
S., will present its 8th Annual "Art on the Avenue"
art show from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Nov.
23, at the Avenue of the Flowers Shopping Center, at
the mid-key traffic light on Longboat Key. Sandy Tull
ofBarnett Bank, with June Lefkovitz, Joan Sapstein
and Gini McArdle, chairperson of the event, pose
with a banner announcing the juried art show
featuring more than 85 displays offine art and
crafts, live music and refreshments. Call 383-2345
for more information.















be used for passive activities.
Board members protested The Longboat
Observer's questionnaire asking citizens for their opin-
ion prior to the membership vote, claiming it would
skew the membership vote. Former Art Center Presi-
dent Pat Metz said she questioned the wisdom of the
poll and the reliability of the 300 votes received. She
claims one person voted 80 times in the straw poll.
Cultural Center planners envision the Art Center
joining with the Adult Education Center and other civic
groups at Durante Park in a campus-like setting.


TDAI! 6-crA
It's easy to remember our name...
but hard to forget ourfood!


The finest in delicate,
FREE BB.Q. delicious Thai cuisine in a
comfortable atmosphere.
Sun Nov 24 Our tasty Thai food will
w/ Frankie Gunn keep you coming back
and the Persuaders again and again.
They Jam every Wed. nite Open for lunch




7604 Cortez Road West, Bradenton
1 block west of 75th on Cortez Rd.
778-7034 Tel: (941) 794-5470

Xfast*Lunch* 49 ner








PIZZA SPE CIAL I
Large 2 Topping Pizza $9.95 I





Second Cheese Pizza $5.00 I
S- Carry Out and Deliv-ery Only -
LARGE SELECTION OF PASTA DISHES





BEAKFASOOD POULTRY SELECTIONS
HOMEMADE SOUPS & DESSERTS





LUNCH: Wed th PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND





DINNER: Tues thru Sun *4:30-10pm
S&S PLA O andulf Drivey Holms Beach
BREAKFAST: Sun o 8arn IpM
LUNCH: Wed thru Sun 11am-in2pri
DINNER: Tues thru Sun e 4:30-10pm
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


GREAT FOOD, GREAT DECK "

Great Food. Great Beach,

Great Thanksgiving Dinner,


Come on out for a great Thanksgiving dinner
Sat the Beachhouse! Enjoy a superb ham or turkey
dinner from our special menu with all the fixin's. Full
Thanksgiving dinner is just $10.95 for adults; children
$5.95. A limited special menu is also available. Call ahead
for preferred seating. Special hours: noon to 9 pm.
Great Deck. Great Fun
Great Thanksgiving!
--- ^ BEadHhoug


\


Anna Maria Island Trolley Schedule 1996-97


Take
the
scenic
route!
Tuesday-
Saturday
9:30 am
to 6 pm
Adult: $2
Up to 3
children under
age 6 free
with adult.
Info:
346-3115


STOP LOCATION 1st Run Return 2nd Run Return 3rd Run Return
Rotten Ralph's Restaurant, Anna Maria 9:30 AM 11:55 AM 12:30 PM 2:55 PM 3:30 PM 5:55 PM
Anna Maria Oyster Bar / Ato's Restaurant 9:31 AM 11:54 AM 12:31 PM 2:54 PM 3:31 PM 5:54 PM
Rod & Reel Motel and Pier 9:33 AM 11:52 AM 12:33 PM 2:52 PM 3:33 PM 5:52 PM
Scotty's Deli 9:35 AM 11:50 AM 12:35 PM 2:50 PM 3:35 PM 5:50 PM
Blue Water Beach Club, Holmes Beach 9:42 AM 11:43 AM 12:42 PM 2:43 PM 3:42 PM 5:43 PM
Harrington House Bed & Breakfast Inn 9:43 AM 11:42 AM 12:43 PM 2:42 PM 3:43 PM 5:42 PM
Island Real Estate 9:44 AM 11:41 AM 12:44 PM 2:41 PM 3:44 PM 5:41 PM
The Islander Bystander 9:45 AM 11:40 AM 12:45 PM 2:40 PM 3:45 PM 5:40 PM
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce 9:46 AM 11:39 AM 12:46 PM 2:39 PM 3:46 PM 5:39 PM
First National Bank of Manatee 9:47 AM 11:38 AM 12:47 PM 2:38 PM 3:47 PM 5:38 PM
Westcoast Surf Shop 9:49 AM 11:36 AM 12:49 PM 2:36 PM 3:49 PM 5:36 PM
Shells Restaurant / Paradise Bagels 9:52 AM 11:33 AM 12:52 PM 2:33 PM 3:52 PM 5:33 PM
Econo Lodge, Bradenton Beach 9:55 AM 11:30 AM 12:55 PM 2:30 PM 3:55 PM 5:30 PM
Gulf Stream / Smuggler's Cove 9:58 AM 11:27 AM 12:58 PM 2:27 PM 3:58 PM 5:27 PM
Silver Su; Motel 9:58 AM 11:27 AM 12:58 PM 2:27 PM 3:58 PM 5:27 PM
Bridge Street Pier & Cafe 10:00 AM 11:25 AM 1:00 PM 2:25 PM 4:00 PM 5:25 PM
Moore's Stone Crab Restaurant, Longboat Key 10:06 AM 11:19AM 1:06 PM 2:19 PM 4:06 PM 5:19 PM
Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce 10:08 AM 11:17 AM 1:08 PM 2:17 PM 4:08 PM 5:17 PM
Silver Sands Motel Apts. 10:12 AM 11:13AM 1:12 PM 2:13 PM 4:12 PM 5:13 PM
Little Gull Condominum 10:14 AM 11:11 AM 1:14 PM 2:11 PM 4:14 PM 5:11 PM
Albritton Fruit Company 10:16AM 11:04 AM 1:16PM 2:04 PM 4:16 PM 5:04 PM
Avenue Of The Flowers 10:22 AM 10:58 AM 1:22 PM 1:58 PM 4:22 PM 4:58 PM
*Radisson Resort & Cafe Lido, Lido Key 10:35 AM 10:45 AM 1:35 PM 1:45 PM 4:35 PM 4:45 PM


*Connect to Siesta Key. The Anna Maria Island Trolley Schedule is sponsored by The Islander Bystander. For information on
advertising in future issues including the Island street map call 778-7978. For trolley information call 346-3115.


= I


IF


-C~ ---- I I


~CI)


II r


il





JIl PAGE 20 m NOVEMBER 21, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
r~ I


"You'll have to call us ...
or we'll never meet!"



REFRIGERATION 1P
gA @EAIN@ & W
MaiZ^Tr ^^CW


CAC044365



778-9622


FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


rB4


- CM 'o y "


r-J
c d-j
W o -,S2 I-

00 m


oi
'o ocr





-" r GIL OPz O z
6, L) Il




_0I-
r r- 0.




.< < z cf.






S: a: :
,: .r --
00..







S5- C IU r
w J GUM
CL u
-i LL


liqll n Ei5;E
< < < <~


0011 zICoIcQQQ gz C


1 __cm 1 C-- 2------ LO


i3L 3h etJst t
nea. LD N


We Know The Way
to successful Real Estate sales
TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325
MARY ANN HELEN
SCHMIDT WHITE
E.e. 7i-4931 M LS Es. 78-656
605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach, FL 34217 -B4


ki"


It's one of the most
recognized signs in Florida. But it's
hometown banking at its best. [-
All Barnett Banks are insured by the FDIC. 1995 Barnett Banks, Inc.


WAGNER REALTY




B7]
SALES AND RENTALS Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Call Toll-free 1-800-211-2323

Bridge Street Pier ad Cafe
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)

;. -... ~-i -- .- :2 &-- Z-- ,}
SFISHING 504 oreqire
Live Bait* Tackle Rod Rentals Beer & Soda
Bait Shop Open All Night: Fri., Sat. and Sun.
Monday thru Thursday 8am 10pm
S "-':- '.. \ - : ^ --,- r,&2 o'
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
L _,. 9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Mana, FL 34216
1-800-306-9666
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker: Nancy Stork
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson,
Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte, Stephanie Bell
rdR" e.mltyGupC WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4:30PM
SATURDAYS 9AM to NOON L


AIRBOAT RIDES


-Bridge Street Pier a Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
Casual Dining on the Water
ALL-U-CAN EAT GROUPER
S$795 Every Night. 4 to 10pm
SALL-U-CAN EAT 4to 10pm
FRIED SHRIMP $795
-9 DailyThursday Only
4 -9 Daily '------- - ----
Ice Cold Draft Beer 750 1/2 lb. Cold Peel-n-Eat Shrimp s495
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mon-Fri 8am-10pm Sat & Sun 7am-10pm B8]
LIVE BAIT [BRADENTONBEACH
8 AM PM 779-1706


H









a-
z
tu


CORTEZ FLEET
A WHALE OF A PRESENT
Gift Certificates

Gift Certificates
25% OFF
With this ad Exp. 11/30/96
Not valid with any other
offers or discounts.

DEEP SEA FISHING
S4, 6 & 9 HOUR TRIPS
BEACHCOMBING CRUISES
TO HISTORIC EGMONT KEY
New Location Between Cortez Rd. &
Seafood Shack on 127th St. West
794-1223 IC8
TOHITOI EMOT E


I


- I --


- --





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 21 Ij


Co y c o


w
w
0
a


p.


-1 -
oDW
UIo o C
U- 0
n~


"CC CM CO C C" "C m m C) 04


, i i
n C-, t t F z o
"zarr S SJ^FS S h ^ ^ 111
,3 OIOIC)) I aiu


cc Fc
wU]
__c -rc
* -aj...cc fno~cc<
__<.C iO
i i I 0 0 0.i i

P^ CLCL~a.-Q-a-aLaLo


in V)- C4)"C c. C C. CV)tn.:r"C-
C.) < C9 O0 C9 CO 0<(09 )CO) (0
: : ; : : :~ : i
~UJ01
Ia. (/> L) -,c
'C5 = C, J >-
0.CL3 .5 IEjI
>ccom c^ (0 5
yA z Lu w1]: -0o- 0-. <
(D oDW(o(D0w(000co(0(0(0w(


C11 < < co CQi
1<

to
=,: < 3:
S 0 g
01 P-
F.- r6 I


I- -I C- m c) m '"C '

C3 0 CC1
't0 U(0:0 OOUO
in O3 I= 0-0 w wI-
s c < cc 0 CS U) D( cc
a 000C0 cccm -
L.) 00 C.) 0 UL3 C. 3 C. C.) C.) CJ > C.)


.-TC') CM CO) i Sc )
(00 11cc0
( : :; 0:o

01:, 1 _
00 5 0 o
< C3

ocL 2 LLU 0~L


i-CO 'T CO T

-j 0 CO C C
0 -i
(00 :
O ca
_^ Q U U- _j
'S-i- =) =:)=3=
CD 0000oo
o~~c~I


C- *- cO z C- (-
O( : 0 c c a 3 C
cc cc0- >: : : .Q
uj= =n > ( n >
nCCC> rr
cc 't HE = =


03T CO



1C


QU
Co N0 cc


EVERY BEACH NEED
______ _- __ FOR THE BEACH BOUND
T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
Decorative Accessories Jewelry Pewter Miniatures
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 Sun 12 to 5 778-1645


SB-4 S ICQ Fat Free, Sugar Free
L-k' ^fi Ice Cream!

^ We now have Cubans
S & DELI Fresh-Cut Deli Sandwiches
Eat-In or Take-Out 95-99% Fat Free Meats
For the Beach Soups, Salads, Bagels
Mon Sat lOAM 9PM
Sunday Noon to 4PM
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386


IRoll0


\ ITyler's
S |l Since 1984 Made on Location 5
Old Fashioned Ice Cream and Waffle Cones
Ice Cream Pies & Cakes *
SColombo Yogurt k
S*Soft Serve Diabetic Sw
S A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR T-S
NOON- 10 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK


Id


&
ie!


JUST OVER THE
CORTEZ BRIDGE


CORTEZ FISIHNG

CENTER ^
I Caztle
. Watch for Parasailing at our dock
^ (erman 2u trian BOATS FOR RENT & SALE


FISHING ~ SNORKELING SIGHTSEEING l
CHARTERS

MANGROVE
'SANPPER
CONTEST
SNov. 16- 30

ENTER OUR BI-MONTHLY FISHING TOURNAMENT
STOP IN FOR DETAILS


1 yUR
ONE-STOP
FISHING
8 STORE


795-7796
12507 CORTEZ RD
(SOUTH SIDE OF CORTEZ BRIDGE)
NEW HOURS: 6AM -6PM DAILY
E =


GAS
DIESEL
ICE BEER
COLD DRINKS
RENTAL SLIPS


nim, Sportswear
hirts for Everyon


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer 5-
this side of Heaven." liss
nuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. \W v.
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


S Full of character and Old "
Florida Charm. Upper and lower
decks with magnificent views of
the sunsets and sunrises.
"Best kept secret on the Island"
Come join us for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner.

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

FRESH STONE -T
CRABS s1595 -

875 North Shore Drive -
Anna Maria Island, Florida -1 5
1/2 mile north of City Pier 778-1885


S/<








ZZ
zz
zw


CO
cc
-.1
0:
^r -,U v


With a Fine Selection of Qerman Wines and Beer
Wiener Schnitzel II .............................$7.95
Pork Roast .............................................. $9.95
Sauerbraten ......................................... $10.95
Hungarian Qulasch ...........................$8.95
Bratw urst ............................................... $4.95
r --------------- 1
S 1/2 O FF with this ad exp. 11/27/96
Buy one dinner at full price & take 1/2 off second
L dinner ofequal or lesser value. _
Dinner 5 to 10 P.M. _
S Reservation 778-6189 n
101 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach


Joe's

Eats & Pumpkin
Pie Ice Cream
Sweets Pies ...8.95
36 GOURMET
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAMS BY JOE
SYogurts (18 fat free, 26 low fat)
* 10 Sugar Free Flavors
SSundaes Sodas Shakes
Regular or Sugar Free
Espresso, Cappuccino
Belgium Waffles Ice Cream Cakes
Open Daily 2-10pm Closed Tuesdays
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


I


--


I


I1





E]3 PAGE 22 E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Gillian Welch to perform
at Sarasota Players
Folk singer-songwriter Gillian Welch will perform
at the Players of Sarasota on Sunday, Nov. 24, at 8 p.m.
Welch will open her debut album with a song she
wrote, "Orphan Girl," which first appeared last year in
singer Emmylou Harris's "Wrecking Ball" collection.
Reserved seats are available at the Player's box
office, 9th Street and U.S. 41, Sarasota, or by calling
365-2494.


I mHusi


Florida symphony to host
two musical events
With the nation's elections over, the Florida Wind
Quintet of the Florida West Coast Symphony, Inc., will
offer an "all-American" program entitled "Red, White,
and Blues" on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m. in
Holley Hall of the Beatrice Freidman Symphony Cen-
ter, Sarasota.
On Thursday morning, Nov. 21, at 10 a.m. the
Friends of the Festival will present a Florida West
Coast Symphony Coffee Concert of chamber music at
the same location.
For ticket information, call the symphony's ticket
hotline at 953-3434.


ki TIllES NTfc A E


j. Shop now for
CHRISTMAS!
Sat, Nov. 23
20% OFF Storewide
Lots of new merchandise -
Come In and Browse.
20 DEALERS
Antique & Collectible Mall
749-1360


11 NO


_, 0
* 5
Z
0 >
ri
s n


ANYTHING
GOES, INC

Collectable
Dolls & Bears


FEATURING:
Muffy Bears, Steiff, Gund
Barbie Dolls, Alexander Dolls, Effanbee

SALE IN PROGRESS

20-50% Off
(Selected Items)
9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza Anna Maria
Hours: Mon. Sat. 10 5 778-4456
After Hours by Appointment FAX: 778-1906


The Old Feed Store -=
ANTIQUE MALL
ver 11,000 sq. ft. Offering 75 dealers
ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES
BUY SELL
4407 Hwy. 301, Ellenton, FL 34222
(1 mile W. of 1-75)
SMon. Sat. 10:00 5:00
(941) 729-1379 1-800-757-6719-


S arenjms Doll Houses,
Miniatures
and
-Accessories
OPEN: MON SAT 10 to 5
N.W. PROMENADE 795-1490
6745 MANATEE AVE. W.
BRADENTON =

Fine Jewelry Etate
Custom Designs ewe
Repairs
Remounts WE BUY
Gold SELL AND
Silver CONSIGN
Gemstones *
JewelrnjDesigns By r 778-0898
( ll 1 r '" _Anna Maria Island Centre
Sa.fl __- (next to Shells Restaurant)


from Anna .Maria to Elfenton -
andpoints in between you're
sure tofindhunting for antiques
and coClectibles as much fun as the
discovery. There are so many
pCaces to go antiquing" that you're
certain tofindjust the treasure
you're Cooking for.

Bryant's Recycled Treasures
CONSIGNMENT SHOP
We Buy & Sell
Quality Furniture,
,'' Collectibles, Art, Etc.
10103 Cortez Rd. W.
794-5536

AMERICAN HOMES FURNITURE CO.
Quality New & Used Furniture
Unique Accents,
Collectibles & Antiques.
Selling your
Furniture?
Call us first for
FREE APPRAISAL
794-1719
OCEAN PLAZA 8112 Cortez Rd. W.


Wicker N Things


Colors to compliment any decor
NOVEMBER JEWELRY SALE SAVE BIG $$$
Antiques Estate Jewelry
SDecorator silk arrangements & trees
One of a kind original items
Tues Fri 10 to 5 Sat 10 to 3 792-4818
Pebble Springs Plaza
5917 Manatee Ave., Unit 301 Bradenton, Florida 34209


24 QUALITY DEALERS OFFERING
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

ANNIVERSARY SALE
FRI & SAT NOV. 29th & 30th
0% OFF any item over
0 F $10 Dollars
Open 7 Days
Mon Sat 9:30 5* Sun 10- 4
1421 12th AVE. WEST (941) 749-1421
BRADENTON,FL


S9TH STREET ANTIQUES
S Multi-Dealer Antique Mall
Antiques Collectibles Furniture
F- Dolls Books Jewelry
Open 7 days a week 10 5
We buy & sell
S 2209 9th Street W. 747-9234
__--_ 112 mile south ofMcKechnie Field


~is~ber "~; cal~rext3ure& ~~i~r~T~n~


Swing orchestra plays
at Van Wezel
Sarasota's own Larry Elgart, renowned around the
world as "The Ambassador of Swing," will bring his
"Hooked on Swing Orchestra" to the Van Wezel Perform-
ing Arts Hall in Sarasota at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 27.
Elgart's "Hooked on Swing" album is the biggest
selling big band record in history, having sold five
million copies worldwide.
Elgart began performing at age 17. In 1952, he and his
brother, Les, formed their own orchestra and recorded
their first Columbia album, "Sophisticated Swing."
Ticket information is available by calling 953-
3368.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E PAGE 23 II]


Christmas boat

parade Dec. 7

needs more

festive vessels
Ahoy! Calling all boat owners. The Anna Maria
Christmas Lighted Boat Parade scheduled for Saturday,
Dec. 7, needs more vessels.
"We have prizes and patrols, but now we need
more boats," said parade co-chairman Chuck Stealey.
"The business community has gotten behind the boat
parade 100 percent. We have dinners and gift certifi-
cates from the a dozen restaurants and businesses .
"We have many prizes for participants in addition
to a captains' awards ceremony at the Back Bay
Steakhouse on Sunday night, Dec. 8. But, we need
more private boats as participants."
Stealey admits that people aren't thinking of
Christmas yet, but the days available to plan boat deco-
rations are passing quickly. The Boat Parade Hotline,
778-1136, contains information about decorating boats
and the parade route.
Local units from U.S. Coast Guard Station Cortez,
the Florida Marine Patrol, and the police departments
of Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach will guide the
parade.
Stealey adds, "If you want to compete for prizes,
entertain the community and be part of a great tradition,
you can pick up entry forms at The Islander Bystander
or call 778-1136 for an application.


- W ,. l l ... M PMW <,o...
Nuts about you, too
Helen White sold more than 200 bags of pecans, all benefitting the Island Players, at the Heritage Festival in
Anna Maria. "Far better than last year," White said of sales at her booth. The nuts are offered at the Island
Players box office, Pine Avenue at Gulf Drive in Anna Maria, and at The Islander Bystander office, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Islander Photo: David Futch


W ITALIA


Pasta
Entrees
Starting at $10.95
Includes Salad& Bread
Spaghetti and Meatballs Stuffed Shells
Spaghetti aglio e olio Ravioli Bolognese
Penne con Broccoli Fettucini Alfredo
Fettucini Carbonara Tortellini Carbonara
Tortellini Bolognese


A Real Italian Restaurant
on Longboat Key
Lunch & Dinner Every Day
11:30 am 10:30 pm
BEER & WINE

Gourmet Brick Oven Pizza
& Calzones Starting at $6.95

Italian Specialties
Starting at $12.95 Includes Salad & Bread
Linguine with Clam Sauce
Shrimp Fra Diavolo
Polio Parmigiana
Polio Arrabbiata
Veal Marsala
Veal Pizzaiolo
Veal Cutlet Parmigiana
Petti de Polio Puttanesca
Sausage, Peppers and Mushrooms


iCIemjopL30 uiei, oD, nigbatKeii..,3010


* *inin :~ Clip this menu & SAVE IT! I" ** l

Welcome to Tony'
,~OAY'07 PLAC I


Place

a I
I C ^sual Italian 778-5440

I Come join us for Casual Italian dining
i Appetizers Salads
I Antipasto ................................... s4.95 House Salad ............................... 2.25
I Spidini ....................................... 4.25 Chef Salad ................................. 4.25
SSoup of the Day................1.75/'2.25 Grilled Chicken Salad ................ 4.25
Garlic Bread .............................. 1.25 Tuna Salad Plate ....................... .25
Cheese Bread ............................. 1.95 Caesar Salad .............................. 2.75
Braciola ............................. 2.25 w/Chicken or Tuna.............. *4.75
Side Orders Small Pizza w/Salad ................... 4.95
Meatballs .................... ......... 11.75 (limit 3 items,.25 per extra)
Sausage (hot or mild) ................. 1.75 a k O u A va i
Braciola ..................................... 2.25 1
Sandwiches 6" 10"
Meatball Parmesan ......................................... 4.25 .................6.75
Italian Sausage & Peppers (Hot or Mild)..................4.25 ................. 6.75
SHot Italian Sub ............................................... 4.25 ...................6.75 5
Chicken Breast Parmesan ......................................... 4.25 ................. .75
Cheeseburger (half-pound on 6" roll) ....................... 4.25
Veal Parmesan .......................................................... 4.50 ................. 6.75
Steak & Cheese w/mushrooms, peppers & onions .... '4.50 ................. .75
Eggplant Parmesan.................................................... 4.25 ................. .75
Sausage Parmesan, hot or mild ................................. 4.25 .................'6.75
Grilled Chicken w/mushrooms & cheese .................4.50.................'6.75
Pepper & Egg ............................................................ 4.25 ................. 6.25
Roast Beef with Cheese ............................................. '4.50 .........6.......6.75
Ham with Cheese ......................................................25 ................... .25
Genoa Salami with Cheese .......................................4.25 ................'6.75
Capicolla with Cheese .............................................. 4.50 .................'6.75
Prosciutto with Cheese ............................................. 4.50 ................. '6.75
Turkey with Cheese .................................................. '4.25 ................. .25
Tuna Salad .......................................................4.25 .............'....6.25
Choice of Cheeses: American, Swiss, Provolone
All sandwiches served with potato chips, pepperoncinis and olives
Cup of Soup of the Day and 1/2 sandwich (your choice) ................... 4.95
IDinners
House Specialty "STEPH'S ITALIAN FEAST"...................................... 10.95
Baked Ziti .......... ............. '8.95 Spaghetti w/Meatballs or Sausage...............7.95
Lasagne................................. '8.95 Chicken Breast Parmesan w/Spaghetti......... '8.95
Manicotti .............................. '8.95 Eggplant Parmesan w/Spaghetti ............... '9.95
Cavatelli ............................... 7.95 Spidini Aglio Olio w/Garlic-Basil Linguini '10.95
Stuffed Shells ........................ '8.95 Shrimp Alfredo w/Fettuccine ................... '10.95
Ravioli .................................. '7.95 Shrimp Parmesan w/Tomato-Basil Linguini. 10.95
Fettuccine Alfredo ................ '7.95 Shrimp Aglio Olio w/Garlic-Basil Linguini.. '10.95
Tortellini Alfredo .................. '8.95 Tuna Steak w/our own cream sauce / lemon-
Veal Parm esan w/Spaghetti.......... '10.95 pepper linguini ............................................ 10.95
I All dinners served with house salad and hot bread or garlic bread
1 605 Manatee Ave., Holmes Beach (Corner of Gulf Drive & Manatee Ave.)
*mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


I





li] PAGE 24 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Heads up
Thanksgiving is just around the corer. As soon as
I'm reminded of the "great turkey" holiday, I can't help
but recall a long-ago sitcom, "WKRP in Cincinnati."
In one of the weekly TV shows, the radio station's
management came up with a Thanksgiving promotion
to top all promotions.
They decided to give Cincinnati residents turkeys.
And they handed them out from 1,000 feet above the
city. They thought they'd deliver the live turkeys like
drops of rain from an airplane.
The problem for the generous station folks was that
turkeys don't really fly. They dropped like buckets of
concrete and WKRP was in deep do-do. Oops.
There are plenty of other ways to celebrate Thanks-
giving, quite thankfully, and personally I prefer to get
my turkey from a butcher.
There are a couple of new options for turkey buy-
ing this year.
a A new spe-
X cialty meat market
opened at 7026
I Cortez Road, aptly
named the Butcher
Shop. Fresh, plump
turkeys are on their
way to the new
shop, as well as
another holiday fa-
% ) vorite, spiral-cut
hams. No frozen
birds, said owner
Wayne Heath.
On Longboat, the
newly remodeled,


rejuvenated Gallagher's Market offers gourmet fare
to go along with their fresh birds.
Gallagher's invites everyone to experience its new
atmosphere and taste gourmet foods from around the
world at a "The Tasting Event," Friday, Nov. 22, from 4
to 8 p.m. They'll be sampling ostrich, smoked salmon,
gourmet cheese, gourmet coffee, pastries and much more.
Gallagher's neighbor at the Whitney Beach Plaza,
Longboat Package & Video, will be serving hundreds
of fine wines from California and around the world
during the event. Their wine tasting will include "the


best of Napa, Sonoma and Carmel" as well as estate
vineyards from Italy, Spain, France, Australia and Ger-
many. The plaza is located at the north end of Longboat
Key, 6800 Gulf of Mexico Drive.
This sounds like an excellent opportunity to "stuff"
a grocery cart in preparation for Thanksgiving.
I wonder if they'll have those delicious red velvet
sweet potatoes I used to crave from Morton's Market
in Sarasota. It's worth checking out, I'm sure.
PLEASE SEE STIR PAGE 24


Artists Guild busts seams at annual variety show
"Broadway Tonight" was a raging success ifjudged by the turnout at the seventh annual event last week. 550
chairs weren't enough to hold the eager audience at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Directed by Dottie
McChesney and Art Ballman, the show included vocal numbers from popular Broadway shows accompanied by the
18-piece orchestra, the Sophisticates. Performers included Linda Grieg, Jack Elka, Pat Kenny, John Sharp, Pat
Higginbotham, Bob LaPiccolo, Roser's Youth Chorus and Mr. Wizard. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


"Serving Thanksgiving Dinner from 1 pm."

CAFE ON THE BEACH
Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Jimmy Dean Sausage)
Aa$3 O+tax
Served Daily
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment Weekends with MICHELE BISHOP
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Now Accepting Reservations for
T THANKSGIVING DINNER
Thursday Nov. 28 Noon 9PM
Thanksgiving Day Menu
Roast Turkey with stuffing ............... $9.95 New York Strip ............................... $15.95
Roasted Duck ................................ $13.95 Broiled Snapper ............................ $12.95
Baked Ham........................................ $8.95 Stuffed Grouper.................................. $14.95
Prim e Rib ................................... ....... $12.95 Stuffed Shrim p .................................... $14.95
All entrees' include choice of soup & salad and apple cobbler for dessert.


Nicki'st
Ifl~ll ^estS59th


795-7065
Mon.-Sat 10 am-11 pm Closed Sunday
1830 59th St. W., Blake Park, Bradenton


ICAEN&BAUIB


ANNA MARIA OYSTER BAR

On Anna Maria City Pier

SWe're much more than just Oysters
'E BEST DEAL

DAILY 11:30 am to 9 pm BEST DEAL
Fri. & Sat. ti 10 pm ON THE ISLAND!
778-0475 1 lb. of Fresh $14.95
Stone Crabs
Served with Potato & Slaw

'4 OTHER SPECIALS INCLUDE:
Blue Crab Cakes (Two)
S Served with Potato & Slaw $9.95
o\ -0l e ootat0 All-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry $4.95
S(b \Ae. .- \,N t Orfo (Monday Friday 3 5pm)
Wel Bu Yo se Drf Beerf
01 % ^ \ If You Spot A Dolphin While Dining
\ We'll Buy You A Draft Beer


LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BARBARA JOHINSEN
Monday-Wednesday 6-10 pm
SPLASH
Thursday Saturday 6-11 pm


12 rh pm S
. .
M M
THE GLASS


I


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 N PAGE 25 I~


STIR CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22


You're invited to Cortez
To mark their first year in business, Machell &
Franky Koons, owners of the Seahorse Raw Bar and
Grill, 12012 Cortez Rd., invite everyone to participate
in their three-day "Happy Birthday to Us" celebration.
Bobby G. "Sings the Blues" on Thursday night,
Nov. 21. Friday, Nov. 22, Reid Frost performs at 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Nov. 23, the Koons are expecting to play
horseshoes all day followed by a luau-style pig roast
starting at 4 p.m. They'll have "singin' and playing' with
Sue Griffith" from 4 to 7 p.m. followed by a tropical
costume contest. Reid Frost will supply music begin-
ning at 8 p.m.
The Koons have done a fantastic job of turning
around a formerly blighted location in the village of
Cortez and we hear their grouper sandwich is pretty
dar good too.


Commemorate the holiday
Pierrette Kelly has an idea. She wants to make
the Anna Maria Island Community Center's holiday
tree a remembering tree and she's inviting you to
share the occasion with her.
This year, the Center will celebrate the spirit of
the holiday season and honor those we are privileged
to have known with a dedication to the late Brendan
Greene, Center board member, volunteer, and long-
time umpire for Anna Maria Little League with a
holiday tree-lighting ceremony on Saturday, Dec. 7,
from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria.
Performances by the Manatee High School
Chamber Singers, the King Middle School Eighth
Grade Orchestra and the All Island Youth Chorus
will highlight the event.
Unique paper doves crafted by the children in
the Center's TLC program will be available to in-


No complaints, no problem
An unidentified Holmes Beach swine was caught surveying a puddle near 56th Street and Holmes Boulevard
- coincidently near the area where another pet pig stirred controversy in Holmes Beach. The previous pig
owner was forced to remove her pet and eventually sold her home. Islander Photo: David Futch


scribe and place on the
Center's tree for a do-
nation to the Center.
Kelly, executive
director of the Cen-
ter, said she hopes
that turning the
holiday tree into a /
"remembering
tree" will help
express love
for those we



commu- NOR
nity in
renourished a
hope for .*04
the future.


Mark your calendar now
The Anna Maria Island Community Center an-
nual dinner auction has always been a "Hallmark"
event on my calendar. Plans for the 1997 event are
on "fast forward," according to auction committee
chairwoman Trudy Moon.
Last year's event was a tremendous success due
largely to Moon's efforts and innovative ideas. She
is credited with moving the event from the gym at
the Center to the large hall at St. Bernard.
Moon also is credited with "dressing" up the
event with an annual theme, An Affair to Remember.
The date for this year's major Center fundraiser
is April 12. The event nearly sold out last year and
this year, the committee has decided to limit ticket
sales to advance sales only with a price not yet
determined. No tickets will be sold at the door,
Moon said.
The committee has decided on a sit-down dinner
rather than a buffet as in the past, Moon announced
to Center board members last week. We can't wait
to hear who will do the catering this year. Yum.
Shop. Bid. Yum. Shop. Bid.


Bring A Bunch, Groups Welcome."

CAFE ON THE BEACH
Join us Thanksgiving Day


DINNER
e -r$79'5 plus

5 vtaxd with all the trimmings
Served Daily From I pm
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Daily
OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Weekend Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!

The Friendliest -BEER
Tavern on \J) LONGBOAT .I I WINE
Longboat Key! ----- --9 SPIRITS
TAVERN


Al/l Traditional Thanksgiving

yro Turkey

GCl Dinner*

at $1095
*Full dinner includes cup of soup and pumpkin pie
Also Featuring:
Grilled Ham Steak w/Pineapple ................................. $9.95
Poached Salmon w/Hollandaise Sauce .................... 12.95
Prime Rib of Beef w/Yorkshire Pudding ................. 3.95

Open Lunch Daily 11 4 Dinner Daily 4 -10
Sunday! Reservations suggested =
At The Centre Shops 9 5350 Gulf of Mexico Drive 383-3898


. ....-- .g -F-- ... .


Si M~I~Wh~d raftlbeer and wine




l with dinner.




SThursday Nov. 28 Serving 11 am to 10 pm ,
*


Oven Roast Turkey $10.95 )
(Cranberry Sauce, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Fresh Vegetable) ;


I/
.\


Kids under 12


S$.95


Unlimited salad, bread & butter. Free refills on draft beer, wine
and sodas with dinner. Regular menu also available.
Make your reservation now!
Walk-Ins Welcome (

Live Entertainment )
With Berni Roy 4 to 8 pm ./


(

('


52.aiab. An ai sadaFomryPf enr1
,Hs:Su..Thrs lamtolI ;Fr. &Sa. 1lmt 1p
Ball~uct :11ciillis Avilabl For pl0 00Poi6 f-cYuChstaP l R cltonEry


r'~.~
.-i
: ...


:!:'d! ).i::,:''!C: .I
ii'





SiD PAGE 26 E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

200-year-old Bible uncovered; any others older?


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Betty Shell's link with the past fits snugly in a pew-
ter box six inches long and contains some of the great-
est stories-ever told.
For more than 200 years a leather-bound Bible
brought to the New World from the Old has been in
Shell's family.
The Holmes Beach woman is not sure why anyone
including a newspaper would be interested.
It doesn't matter. Shell, 84, and her granddaughter
Star Galletta covet their Good Book, handling it with
"kid gloves" while showing off their pride and joy.
Inside, the book shows it was printed in 1790 by
"The Assigns of Alexander Kincaid, His Majesty's
Printer."
Shell said she isn't positive about the origin of the
book, which is in good shape and legible, though the
print is quite small.
"I assume someone gave it to my grandmother. I
believe it came from grandfather's side of the family,"
Shell said. "It's a link with the past and my family."
Star Galletta is trying to determine what that link
may be by studying her family tree. Galletta is credited
with saving the book.
"I think the book is wonderful. How many families
can say they have a family Bible this old?" Galletta
said. "I'm a pack rat and save everything."
Apparently it was true about previous generations
of her family.
Shell also has another family Bible considered the
Youngster of the two.
The "newer" Bible is dated 1884 and is the size of
a Webster's unabridged dictionary. It contains beauti-
ful illuminations and block prints, pictures of Roman
coins and a chronological table of the world's great
events. The first entry states "Creation" occurred in

ST. BERNARD'S
Pancake Breakfast


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24
8:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Homemade Pancakes, Sausage,
OJ & Coffee. Adults $2.50. Children
$1.00. Also-there will be a Home-
made Bake Sale. Come and enjoy.
Activity Center, 43rd St. Holmes Beach


Star Galletta turns to the first page of her grandmother's 206-year-old Bible that has been in her family since
the beginning ofAmerica. Islander Photo: David Futch


4004 B.C.
"What have these Bibles seen? Where have they
been?" Galletta said. "I think that's the amazing part.
They're irreplaceable."


Editor's Note: Anyone else out there holding an an-
cient book, manuscript, document or art they want to
share? Call us at the newspaper: 778-7978.


SAND DOUAR
Rooftop Restaurant
Join ,is /,,Ia t,'ia'tiohdi
Thanksgiving Daty Dinner Buffet
and enjog the best CGlf views in Sarasota!
Your Thanksgiving Dinner includes...
Complimentary Champagne. Mimosas or
Fresh squeezed orange juice
Seafood Salad Bar
Peel and eat shrimp steamed mussels & clams
l'-'. led crabs casino oysters rockefeller
freshly prepared salads pumpkin bisque soup
GL Giving Board & Entrees
Ch0f-car.'ed roast beef au jus and ham with rum
irasin sauce Traditional Tom Turkey Florida grouper
ih\th t:oi:o-uIr basil sauce seafood Newberg over rice
and Oriental beef stir Fry
Traditional Accompaniments
Whipped potatoes & gravy new potatoes
country sweet yams garden vegetable medley
sweet corn with red peppers cranberry sauce
fresh baked breads, muffins and pastries
Tantalizing Desserts
Homestyle pies, cakes & mousses
1100 a.m. 300 p.m. & 530 p m 8 3 p m.
$21.95
Children 5 to 10 years i.i '?.
Prices do not include sales ta, '_:r .jr-aulry
Reservations are strongly recomrrimended.
Please call 388-5555 ext. 3332


Luo Beach


Includes:
Roast Tom Turkey, Dressing,
Cranberry Sauce, Mashed Potatoes,
Yams, Green Beans, and Pumpkin Pie
Other Menu Items Available...
Prime Rib, Stone Crabs, Salmon
Noon 'til 8 p.m.
Call Now for the Best Times



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Big Mama. Thurs-Sat 7-11pm Sun 6-10pm
S"That Jazz Band"
Monday 7-10 V i


A


Stop

Gift Wrapping

Grouper!


Get your shopping done early
Holiday Gift Certificates
are now available!





Happy Hour: Mon Fri 4to 7 pm
Hours: Sun-Thur 4 to 10 pm Fri & Sat 4 to 11 pm
3200 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach 778-5997





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 U PAGE 27 IE


Bales
of kids
Students in Maureen
Loveland's and Melanie
Moran's kindergarten
classes at Anna Maria
Elementary visited
Hunsader Farms to enjoy
a old-fashioned hay ride
and a day learning about
fall harvests. One little
girl, right, stoops over to
investigate this thing they
call "hay." Islander
Photo: Courtesy of
Deborah Parmenter


Praiseworthy
performance
These are the "Students of
the Week" at Anna Maria
Elementary School for the
week ended Nov. 12. The
children's names are listed
left to right. First row are
Chris Martin, Jeremy
Barrett, Ted Gajda and
Emily Yates. Second row:
Brad Milks, Ethan Struber,
Sarah Claussen, Nick
Taylor, Charlie Woodson
and Danielle Barber. Back
row: Hunter Green, Taylor
Manning and Shawn
LaPensee.


Anna Maria

Elementary

School Menu


S
Monday, 11/25/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
SLunch: Hamburger on Bun or McRibs, Potato
Sticks, Salad, Pudding
Tuesday, 11/26/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
SLunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
Corn, Salad, Ice Cream
Wednesday, 11/27/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Early Release
Thanksgiving Holiday
Bag Lunch: Corn Dog, Chips, Juice,
Fruit, Cookie
S Classes will resume Monday, Dec. 2.
All meals served with milk.


Joy Courtney
Joy Courtney


ISLANDER
S4110 127th St. W. Cortez Cortez Rd. .
on the Mainland Side
the Cortez The best news.



Celebrate Our

Jf I Year Anniversary
NOV 21, 22 & 23


50N Draft Bud Noon 8 pm
h Bobby G Plays the Blues 8 pm


[ Reid Frost 8 pm
t PIG ROAST LUAU
Sue Griffin 4 7:30 pm S
S Reid Frost 8 pm
HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY!


ST


117 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach
778-7344
CAFE & RESTAURANT
for Breakfast Lunch
& Coffee Klatsch





TUES SUN 7 am-4:30 pm
CLOSED MONDAYS


N
I S


EAT-IN OR 0 OFF I
TAKE-OUT $1 O F
TKO Any Size Pizza I
I FREE DELIVERY!
I I
SOMA PIZZA
I & ITALIAN RESTAURANT I
Specializing in Veal Chicken Fish Pasta
Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
Open 7 Days *11AM to Midnight
S 201 N. Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach
UL --- 778-0771 or 778-0772 -

NOW OPEN
Friday & Saturday
Evenings 5-9pm
Fish Fry Friday
Evenings only
ALL-U-CAN-EAT $7.95

JAMAICAN STYLE FOOD BEER & WINE
SUNDAY Breakfast only 7 am-1 pm
MON SAT Breakfast 7-11 am Lunch 11 am-3 pm
5340 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 779-1320

SIGN OF THE MERMAID














FLORIDA CONTINENTAL CUISINE
Seafood Steaks Creative Salads i*- Kitchen Made Desserts
Fabulous Sunday Brunch: Sunday 9 am 1:30 pm
Lunch: 11 am 1:30 pm Wed. Fri.
Dinner: 5 10 Mon. Sat.
Early Supper: 5 6:30 Mon. Sat.
Closed Sunday Eves. Reservations Suggested
DON'T LET THE HOLIDAYS SLIP BY
Thanksgiving Day: 11 am 3 pm & 4 pm 9 pm
Traditional or Select from Regular Menu
CHRISTMAS PARTIES
Christmas Eve Dinner:4 pm 10 pm (Closed Christmas Day)
New Year's Eve Dinner: 4 pm Last Reservation 11 pm
Gift Certificates Available
Accommodations for Special Functions up to 75 People
9707 GULF DR. ANNA MARIA 778-9399


S
S
S
0.
S
0
0
0
0
S
S


0
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
0
S
S
S
0
C
0
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
0O


HORSESHOE;
DOOR PRIZE!
LIMBO CONTE
GIVEAWAYS


Ih Se a s

Raw Bar SBl


Serving Regular Menu pILI's
Extraordinary Chef SpecWs

TRADITIONAL TURKEY DINNER
Oven Roasted Turkey Dinner with Sage
Dressing, Giblet Gravy, Mashed
Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Fresh Green
Beans, Fresh Cranberry Sauce,
Pumpkin Pie, & House Salad ... $1595

Sunset Specials
Tues. Sun. $12.95

T T (E$f rS
Gourmet Gulfview Dining
1325 Gulf Dr, North Bradenton Beach
778-Leno (5362)


Grass Skirts and
Hawaiian Shirts
COSTUME CONTESTS


Wear Your





SID] PAGE 28 N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports.

Bradenton Beach
Nov. 4, trespass to a structure, 2401 Gulf Drive
N., One Particular Harbor. The complainant reported
she cleaned the unit on Oct. 16 and on Nov. 4, she
found that a person unknown had been in the unit. She
found beer bottle caps on the couch, open sodas in the
refrigerator and the bed sheets rumpled. She said she
spoke to the owner who said the unit was not being
rented at the time.
Nov. 6, theft, 200 Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach
City Pier. The victim reported he left a camera valued
at $200 on a table at the pier cafe and when he returned,
the camera was gone.
Nov. 8, recovered stolen vehicle, 200 Bridge
Street, Bradenton Beach City Pier. Police were alerted
by the sheriff s department about a stolen vehicle in the
parking lot. The officer located the vehicle, and a wit-
ness reported a white male subject left the vehicle two
hours earlier and walked north on Church Street carry-
ing a bag of clothes. The officer found the subject had
been employed at the pier but left stating he was return-
ing north.
Nov. 8, theft, criminal mischief, 2400 block of
Avenue C. The complainant reported the following
items missing from the residence: a necklace valued
at $36, a jacket valued at $200, a nutcracker valued
at $29, a platter and bowl valued at $15, sandals
valued at $18, a figurine valued at $37, a shirt val-
ued at $22, a book valued at $20, two packages of
garbage bags valued at $6, groceries valued at $50,
a cooler valued at $15, a vase valued at $10, a salt
shaker valued at $8, spices valued at $20, cleaning
products valued at $40, paint supplies valued at $15,
cat medication valued at $30, a bait bucket valued at
$10 and $20 in change.
The complainant also reported a lamp was broken
and her clothes and shoes were cut up.
Nov. 9, capias for failure to appear on two
charges, 200 block of First Street North. The officer


rBO's p;.
10519 Cortez Road /
792-5300 1
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH PIZZA
BUFFET

$4.19

DINNER PIZZA 0
BUFFET

$4.69


responded to a report of a domestic disturbance, ran a
check on the subject and found two warrants out of
Volusia County. The subject was placed in custody.
Nov. 10, theft of a bicycle valued at $45, 100
block of Highland Street.
Nov. 11, warrant, 100 block of 29th Street North.
The officer observed a subject known to him, ran a
check and found outstanding warrants for failure to pay
child support and DWLS. The subject was placed in
custody.

Holmes Beach
Nov. 7, burglary, 200 block of 52nd Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed fish-
ing gear valued at $300 from his boat.
Nov. 8, vandalism, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee
County Public Beach. The complainant reported he and
a witness saw a pickup truck with four to five male ju-
veniles in it drinking beer. The juveniles drove onto the
beach, set fire to some newspapers and left. The juve-
niles were not found.
On Nov. 10, the witness advised the police that
some of the juveniles possibly involved in the incident
were at the beach. The officer spoke to the juveniles,
who denied involvement. The complainant and witness
said they did not see the juveniles start the fire. The
officer warned the juveniles about being at the beach
after hours.
Nov. 9, damage, 5400 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported a person unknown threw two
deck chairs into the pool, breaking them, and three
other deck chairs were broken.
Nov. 11, domestic battery, 100 block of Seaside
Court. The officer found the subjects arguing. One said
the other stabbed him in the chest with a toothbrush and
the other said he grabbed her shirt collar and threw her
to the floor. Both were placed in custody.
Nov. 12, suspicious, 2900 block of Avenue E.
The complainant reported a person unknown dumped
a refrigerator, a water heater and miscellaneous trash
in a dumpster at a construction site.
Nov. 12, assistance, 500 block of 68th Street. The
complainant reported an elderly subject wandered
away from the residence. The officer located the sub-
ject in the 5400 block of Marina Drive and returned
him to the residence.


ZINGER'S
' 0':'i ',,'

4:00 8:00 PM
EVERY WEDNESDAY







A& 1ASANAaA aa


A Big Success
"This was one of our most successful yard sales
ever," said Edwin Callen, left, chairman of the
mission committee at Roser Church, working the sale
with Beb Meylan. Thanks to the many Islanders and
visitors, the mission committee collected more than
$1, 000 for disaster relief and other worthy causes.
Islander Photo: Michelle Timpanaro


Override power locks
Following a recent accident in which a car
went into the yacht basin at the Back Bay
Steakhouse, the fire district received many calls
concerning power door and window locks on cars.
"You can manually override the locks,"
Fire Chief Andy Price said. "But you have to
wait until the pressure inside and outside the
vehicle is equalized. You cannot open the
vehicle's door against the water pressure, and
you will cause more problems if you try to
break the window. After opening the door, keep
your composure, take a couple of deep breaths
and swim for the surface."


f U HAPPY HOUR 4 to 8 pm
Tuesday
FREE POOL & DARTS
Wednesday, Nov. 20
REGGAE no cover
SFri & Sat Nov. 22 & 23
NO EXIT BAND
Thursday, Nov 28
MIKE OSCANYAN no cover
Fri & Sat Nov. 29 & 30 STRYKER
Now Serving Cappuccino & Espresso
5702 Marina Dr Holmes Beach 778-5075



POCO LOC
.THE BEST OF
SMEXICO'S CUISINE

"I think Poco Loco is onto something
with it's delicious, light, digestible fare."
N. Konesko (Bradenton Herald)
LUNCH & DINNER DAILY Closed Tuesday
219 Gulf Dr. 778-5626 Next to Joe's Eats & Sweets




S ROTTEN

ROTTEN RALPHS
RALPH'S WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Try Our New
Pasta Dishes
Starting at ... $6.95
FISH AND CHIPS SPECIAL
BRITISH-STYLE
Fish (One Piece), French Fries & Cole Slaw ... $5.95
British Style Fish & Chips (Regular) ... $6.95
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT (Mon Thur Only) ... $7.95
Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 29 PI


Island king
Brett Pettigrew, Holmes Beach, and Leah Knowles, Bradenton, right, were
crowned 1996 Manatee High School Homecoming King and Queen by Hernando
DeSoto (Rick Harris) and 1996 DeSoto Queen (and Islander) Tracy Moynihan,
second from left, last week. Islander Photo: Courtesy Joan Pettigrew


The Islander meets ninth world wonder
Islander Donna Huffman reads her copy of The Islander Bystander in front of the
Tunkhannock Creek Viaduct, commonly known as Nicholson Bridge in
Nicholson, Pa. Nicholson Bridge, built between 1912 to 1915, is the largest stone
railroad bridge in the world. Acclaimed as the ninth man-made wonder of the
world, the bridge is 2,375feet long, stands at a height of 240 feet above stream
level/300 feet above bedrock, and is held up by 12 spans, two of which are buried
100 feet into the earth. Islander Photo: Courtesy of Donna Huffman


Pirate's Play
Christina Zash and Shanen Young, above, play Privateers at the Fall Festival in the
tree at Anna Maria Elementary School. At right, many including the Privateers -
volunteered their time to be a part of the parade and festivities at the annual Fall
Festival, the Anna Maria Elementary School Parent/Teacher Organization's major
fundraiser of the year. Islander Photos: Michelle Timpanaro


THANKSGIVING ALL DAY
S. ALL-U-CAN-EAT FEAST
J Turkey Dinner $795
w/ all the trimmings only
Bring the family for a Special Thanksgiving!

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 25 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


Patio Reunion!

SCALAWAGS Presents...
The 3nd Annual Patio Oyster Bar Reunion!
WEDNESDAY NOV 27 ALL DAY
Bring your old Patio pictures & memories.
Wear a Patio or Scalawags
shirt for a free draft beer.
Music: 6 pm 2 am < ,-.
Donny & Lori Bostic _,
Rich Kendall
Dan Crawford & Friends
1120 Whitfield Avenue E., Sarasota 756-7397

9o0Len: S/oon cawat S 2i jo J czNc9 Ihrojia


Serving in the HayeLoft

* Appetizers
* DINNER SPECIALS
* Outrageous Desserts
* Top-Shelf Spirits
* International Coffees/Tea
* Music du Jour








I


zA~cr mu/K aura~rn
aL~v2121&


o7r az iEmaxafLE and
me.mortafL dining
exPe.rienc2.


~j-EjIauanit


5540 Gulf of Mexico Drive
Longboat Key, Florida
Reservations/Information 941.383.3633
Lie/ tet iletNihl


The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key









Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


Your
Turkey
Is
Waiting
At
Harry's


Gourmet Take-Out. Restaurant- Catering


525 St. Judes Drive
(5600 Block-Gulf of Mexico Drive)
Longboat Key
383-0777 Fax 383-2029





JE PAGE 30 N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

'Sophisticated' panhandle; Longboat tries again


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Affectionately known as the "Redneck Riviera,"
Florida's panhandle has been called many things but
"sophisticated" is generally not one of them. Now,
though, The New York Times has done just that.
Four times a year the Times publishes a Sunday
magazine called "The Sophisticated Traveler." Each
issue contains a half dozen or so destinations that New
York travel editors think are hot, up-and-coming spots.
The most recent issue includes articles on cruising
Lake Nasser in Egypt, touring Bologna in Italy,
Melbourne in Australia, Baden-Baden in Germany and
the Florida panhandle.
S "Where beer flows like wine," is how they de-
scribe the area.
"This is Florida: not the familiar face of it the
Caribbean stew of Miami, metro Disney World, the
armed-response retirement camps of Sarasota but
north Florida, where the South runs into the Gulf."
Here's betting Sarasotans love seeing their commu-
nity described as "armed-response retirement camps."
The article celebrates small seaside communities
like Apalachicola, Sopchoppy, St. Marks and Panacea.
Mostly very small towns offering some vestiges of real
Florida charm, not Disney-type reproductions.
"The little towns here with weird names are strug-
gling to catch up with the rest of the 20th century, so
far without success. Until they do, it's a good place to
get lost," Times writer Kevin Canty concludes.
As I mentioned last week in this column, many of
us feel the same way about Cortez. Here's hoping it
never catches up with the 20th century.

Migrators passing through
This is the time of the year we can all see various
migrating birds either passing through or arriving for


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Sight Seeing
Anna Maria, FL 34216 U.S. Coast Guard
(941) 778-2727 Licensed Captains


Alum-A-Vator Boat Lifts




MARINE CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Mobile Phone: 742-0396
TIMBER DOCKS BARGE SERVICE
PILINGS BOAT HOUSES DAVITS
SRIP-RAP REPAIRS-SEAWALLS/DOCKS
SEAWALLS WOOD BULKHEADS
VERTICAL BOAT LIFTS FREE ESTIMATES
CORTEZ, FLORIDA -STATE RX0050998, MANATEE CO. #01125
SINCE 1985-
y^^^^^^^^^^W^^^^^J^^^'^rA~


the winter. Just last week I spotted some American
Goldfinches (I think) in winter plumage.
If you see anything unusual or even particularly
nice, let me hear about it at 955-4960. This is no
bird-watching column, but there's certainly room for
them here.

Longboat tries again
Three miles of Longboat Key beaches are get-
ting renourished in a $5.5 million program starting
this week. Longboat Public Works Director Len
Smalley says funding comes from $4 million the
community had left over from the 1993
renourishment project, three years of Tourist Devel-
opment Tax funds plus $651,000 from the State of
Florida.
This time Longboat is trying to keep the pumped
up sand in place using groins and a sand "sill" about
450 feet offshore. It's going to be interesting to see
if this works and if it eliminates the so-called "hot
spots."
Coastal geologists say that there would be no
real erosion problems along Longboat Key beaches
if they'd had the sense to build back behind the sec-
ond dune line instead of right on the beach. But
that's hindsight now, and Longboat if this
renourishment works no better than the last one -
will be spending millions for re-nourishment into
eternity.
Or at least until "The Big One" comes through.

Signs still rim canal
Those phony "No Trespassing" signs along the
Longboat rim canal are still in place despite the
Longboat town manager's demand for removal within
10 days a month ago.
Now, I'm told, the Bay Isles Association is appeal-

Se ISLAND CRUISES
Sight Seeing
Snorkeling
Water Taxi
Special
$15 per person 1 1/2 Hour Cruise
max 6 people


Licensed Coast Guard Captain


778-2761


JUST ARRIVED
OVER 300

7016 CORTE .uNEW,4BR ITEMSLi2



941-719&6565 I~l FAX 13-525-8727

ilkfllSpace & 1il YFi


U


ing to the town Board of Zoning Adjustment, appar-
ently claiming that signs on the water aren't covered by
the town's sign ordinance.
Just for fun last week, I checked with the Sarasota
County tax office and discovered that apparently the
association has never paid taxes on the rim canal it
claims to own. A local fisher/attorney tells me he's
asked to see the group's deed, but they've never got-
ten back to him.

My bay bottom, no, it's mine
Islanders may be amused at the mess the City of
Sarasota finds itself in over its spiffy downtown ma-
rina, Marina Jack. Seems the marina operator wants
to expand his operations. The city thought it was a
fine idea.
So the operator's lawyer did a little research to
make sure all loose ends were tied up, and "holy
cow!" They discovered the city has no lease or dedi-
cation for the submerged lands it's been renting to
the marina for 40 years.
For 40 years this operator has been paying rent
to a landlord the city that didn't own the farm,
so to speak.
Now the city is scrambling to get the submerged
lands under the 110 or so slips dedicated to it, but there
may be a hitch. These days the state likes to lease that
kind of land and collect rent. A portion of the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection's annual bud-
get comes from just such leases.
The marina operator says he's not going to pay the
state fees, that he's already paying the city $155,000 a
year and has a contract far beyond the year 2000. And
city officials are squirming and hoping and... well, stay
tuned as those "sophisticates" in Sarasota try to find a
way out of this one.
See you next week.


,4ce PWmO 4nd Spit$E& qaa Dislribuior of Pumps. Moicrs, Pipe Fihings
THE DO-IT YOURSELF SPRINKLER CENTER
Free Site Plan with System Purchase
($75 VALUE) with this ad
6804 Corlez Rd. 2050 12th SI.
Bradenton Sarasota
795-2449 366-4838









FISHING CHARTERS
FULL DAY OR HALF DAY
Pleasure Cruises Egmont Excursions
Backwater Offshore


Fast, Clean, bate -
with Capt. Mike Heistand
Reservations 778-1990
Please -19


O Rlr OfiT (LUJ


OFFERING MEMBERSHIPS Starting at ... $995

Your choice of several boats
NEW:
Center Consoles,
_. r Dual Consoles,
.. . . Pontoon Boats
and others coming soon ...


JOIN TODAY! 778-7990
5323 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
IB 6E9KE 3 WE8RZEWI: ZUjE


Fish

Tales

Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and
pictures are welcome
at The Islander
Bystander. Just give us
a call at 778-7978 or
stop by our office in the
Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach.
ISLANDER
bVIMSd


"BUILDING THE BEST
REPAIRING THE REST"
Seawalls Boat Lifts Custom Docks
SErosion Control, Rip Rap, Davits, Decks

FREE ESTIMATES
FREE DOCK & SEA WALL INSPECTIONS
792-5322
Senior Citizen Discount
State Cert. CRC049564 CCN NO. 02311


I '


.1


i






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 31 I]


High winds mean low catches


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Winds up to 40 mph kept fishing guides in port last
week, though some braved the gusts and had some
luck.
Now that the winds have subsided, fishing and
catching should do a 180-degree turn.
Anna Maria City Pier Gary said anglers are
catching a lot of sheepshead using shrimp and oyster
crabs in the morning and in the afternoon they're catch-
ing mangrove snapper.
Rod & Reel Pier Jack said Joseph Tannell
caught a 39 1/4 inch, 21-pound snook. Also, he said
they're catching a lot of black drum, sheepshead and
keeper redfish.
Galati Yacht Basin Chris said the Dorato King-
fish Tournament saw two people catch a 30- and 40-
pound kingfish off Clearwater Beach. Also, sheepshead
are biting around the bayous, bridges and docks.
Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet Sue said their four-
hour trip averaged 45 head of Key West grunts and
porgies. Their six-hour trip averaged 50 head of grunts
while the nine-hour trip averaged 30 grunts, porgies
and four black grouper.
Angler's Repair Capt. Thom Smith was able to
put one charter on several snook to 27 inches and red-
fish to 24 inches in Terra Ceia Bay.
On my boat Magic we managed one trip last week
with several small redfish and only two keepers. We
also caught several mangrove snapper and sheepshead.
Capt. Phil Shields and Capt. Keith Barnett on the
Reef Reacher braved the offshore winds and came


Michael Steach is all smiles after catching this 47-inci
Bonner Presswood

up with an unusual catch not far off the beach. While
fishing for kings about 12 miles out, Shields and
Barnett found some black fin tuna chasing bait and
were able to get one of their anglers a 30-pound


;,'- .. . i ." '



h, 35-pound cobia in the Gulf Islander Photo:

prize. On another trip, Shields said his customers
insisted on going out despite howling winds. They
stayed within a mile of the beach and caught floun-
der and grouper.


MON FRI
8AM 5PM
SAT
8AM 4PM


AMERICAN CAR WASH
& QUICK LUBE SERVICE NO
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217 NEEDED
778-1617 Z


Holmes Beach


Marina


-- STAMAS
''C I -YACHT
jv ELYcs WUT~w"


uAm Elw4
Outboards


Reception: (941) 77


ZEOT' ~OUTBOjRDS

Despite the efforts of city hall and certain
individuals Homes Beach Marina is pleased to
complete their first year of business. A big thank you
to ALL our customers who have participated in our suc-
cess. Come and join us for a complimentary glass of
wine and view our fabulous range of 1997 sports
boats, cuddy cabins and cruisers from Maxum. Key West
fishing and deck boats from 15' to 23' and see the first
of our exciting new Stamas boats. An elite line of fish-
ing craft, built for people who know boats, ranging from
25' to 36'. High and dry storage available too.

We're Open 7 Days A Week.
Ample Parking Available!!!

202 52ND STREET, HOLMES BEACH

8-2255 Sales: (941) 778-2121 Fa


DAY AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Nov 21 9:54 1.5 3:11 0.3 9:00 2.2 2:19 0.9
Nov 22 11:05 1.5 4:00 0.0 9:32 2.3 2:54 1.1
Nov 23 10:01p* 2.3 4:42 -0.2 12:08 1.5 3:26 1.2
Nov 24 10:29p' 2.4 5:21 -0.3 12:57 1.5 3:54 1.3
Nov 25 11:03p* 2.4 5:56 -0.4 1:50 1.4 4:19 1.3
Nov26 11:36p* 2.4 6:34 -0.3 2:29 1.4 4:48 1.3
Nov 27 7:10 -0.3 3:01 1.4 5:23" 1.3
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later-- lows 1:06 later


*~ ^

*A/ (


MAXUM"
aom/IaW zawevf


a''
E ii >


STERN DRIVES & INBOARDS


ix: (941) 778-5172


- I I I-I I II I I I I


L -I I


;:I
r.
~~;
i.
ii.
"'' r-: ~.
:.
:ii*' r
;f.





IE PAGE 32 N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Nov. 8, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 44-foot sailboat
aground in Anna Maria Sound. A commercial sal-
vage company boat responded to the call and re-
floated the vessel.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 48-foot fishing vessel was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator re-
ceived a notice of violation for not having the
vessel's name on life rings and Emergency Position
Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), the painter for
the life raft was not attached to the vessel, reflective
tape and personal marker lights on life jackets
needed to be replaced and the EPIRB was in the
"Off" position.


COAST L


Nov. 9, Boarding. A 48-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel was found to be
in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel's operator re-
ceived a written warning for having damaged life jack-
ets on board.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 27-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator received
a written warning for not having the required fire ex-
tinguisher on board.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator received
a written warning for not having the vessel's registra-
tion on board.
Nov. 9, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for not having the vessel's
registration on board and improperly displaying the


ISLANDER



$50
$ November
Carl Va
Anna





$50 FOOT.B)


Winner
S14 Contest
n Cleave
Maria


\LL


CONTEST


PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
person with the most correct game winning
predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Islander
Bystander football judge is final.


Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander
* Name


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
*The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1 __________ __________
2

FILL IT OUT NOW!
* 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center
Address


Winner


Advertiser


3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978
Phone
Phone______________


I .


As Independent As
The Island Itself.
FI
first National-

5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
(941) 778-4900
San Diego at K. C.


Kite Shop


Knowledgeable Sales & Service
SKites Banners
Accessories
778-7600
Check out our Fall
& Christmas Selection
Over 200 Banners &
Mini Flags Including
Collegiate & NFL Flags
SDallas at N.Y. Giants
5348 C Gulf Drive
S&S Plaza Holmes Beach


Serving the Island
from the same
location since 1970

778-6066

1-800-865-0800
visit us at our web site
http://www.islandreal.com
I S.F. at Washington
6101 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450
(941) 778-2307
1 (800) 306-9666
Denver at Minnesota
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717
Anna Maria, FL 34216


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
000* @0@000
Cribbage Tournament
11:30AM Every Sunday
lPhiladelphia at Arizona
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 9 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


" A Real Bagel Shop
with Island Attitude."
19 Varieties Fresh
Baked Fat Free
Bagels Daily
10 Homemade Blends of
Cream Cheese
Specialty Coffee & Tea
Breakfast & Lunch Daily
OPEN:
Mon Sat 7am to 2 pm
779-1212
East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
(next to Shells)
Detroit at Chicago







Florist
"We specialize in being unique"


10115 Cortez Rd.
Bay Beach Plaza
794-5555
(800) 559-6077
Oakland at Seattle


CP DELI
FREE
DELIVERY ON
THE ISLAND
779-2268
Pizzas Sandwiches
Subs Salads
Calzones Strombolis
Jacksonville at Baltimore
5704 MARINA DRIVE
HOURS
Mon.-Thu. 11 to 8
Fri. &Sat. 11 to 10







a
RESTAURANT & PUB
FOOTBALL SUNDAYS
MEXICAN MENU
V
MONDAY NIGHT
FOOTBALL
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
N. Orleans at Tampa Bay
Corner of Gulf Dr. & Palmetto
Anna Maria
2i 778-3909
0-..


hull registration numbers.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 26-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 9, Boarding. A 31-foot fishing vessel was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for having the wrong color
life rings, not having reflective tape on the life rings
and displaying the wrong size documentation numbers.
Nov. 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 21-foot power boat
aground in Sarasota Bay. A commercial salvage com-
pany responded and refloated the vessel.
Nov. 10, Boarding. A 24-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 10, Boarding. A 30-foot sailboat was boarded

PLEASE SEE COAST LINES, NEXT PAGE


dkI~L8~9i~B~L







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 33 1J


Islanders improve soccer standings to 8-1-1


By Kevin P. Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The Island Football Club improved their record to
8-1-1 on the season with a 5-2 win over F. C. United
of St. Petersburg Sunday at G.T. Bray park. Their vic-
tory was truly a "team effort" as they had a difficult
time naming one person as "man-of-the-match." In-
stead, they split the Foster's oil can among the "men-
of-the-match" which happened to be the whole team.
F.C. United came out at the opening whistle and
looked like the better side as they were controlling the
ball and the mid-field. The Island defense managed to
keep them from scoring thanks to stellar play from the
back line of Brett McIntosh, Ian Fairweather, Danny
Mitchell and Matteaus "Franz Becken" Bowers.
The Islander's got on the scoreboard first when
Eddie McKeithan received the ball on the left wing and
held onto the ball while Neil Fellowes made a diago-
nal run through the defense. McKeithan made a nice
pass that Fellowes ran onto and split the defense then
beat the goalie for a 1-0 lead.
The lead was short lived however as F.C. United
came right ba6k at the Islander's defense with a cross


to a wide open teammate on the far post that he finished
to tie the score at 1-1. Minutes later, F.C. United was
handed a gift by the referee when an Island player went
up and over a United player to head the ball out of the
box. The referee called a foul and awarded a penalty
kick which they finished for a 2-1 lead.
That penalty kick gave United the lead but it also
woke the Islanders up as they really stepped up the
defensive and offensive pressure. The Islanders stole
the ball in their defensive end and started a counter at-
tack. Neil Fellowes took the ball down the right side of
the penalty box and delivered a cross into the goal
mouth that bounced around before Tim "Bubba"
Bugna "faced" the ball into the goal to knot the score
at 2-2. The score remained 2-2 as the whistle blew to
signal the end of the first half.
The IFC came out to play the second half the way
they ended the first half: aggressive! Their aggressive-
ness paid off early as Andy Smith stole the ball and sent
a shot on goal from 30 yards out that "knuckled" it's
way past the goalie for a 3-2 lead.
The Islanders were really starting to move the ball
around which created a lot of scoring chances. One


such chance was realized when Kenny Bowers con-
trolled a clearing ball by United and found Smith mov-
ing up the middle of the field. He sent a short pass past
the defense to Bugna who hit a high shot from 35 yards
over the goalie's head and into the goal for a 4-2 lead.
The next scoring chance was a total team effort.
First the ball was stolen deep in the Islanders defen-
sive end. There, the ball was passed out to Kevin
Cassidy who spotted Ken Bowers in the mid-field.
Bowers saw his brother Matt making a run down the
left wing and delivered the ball to space which he
quickly filled. Matt took the ball to the corner and
served it across the goal mouth where Tim Lease
finished it off with a scintillating header into the
corner of the goal for an insurmountable 5-2 lead.
The 5-2 lead held up as the Islanders rested some of
the regulars for the remainder of the game.
The IFC is back in action next Sunday at 1p.m. in
south St. Pete against the SS Jammers, already beaten
by the Islanders 3-0 in a hard fought game in October.
Islanders would appreciate fan support for this last
away game. For information or directions to the field,
please contact Kevin Cassidy at 778-1635.


COAST LINES, FROM PAGE 32

in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found to be in
compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 10, Boarding. A 25-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for not having any flares on
board.
Nov. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 26-foot sailboat overdue
from Tampa Bay to Miami. Station Cortez conducted
communication checks with all waterfront restaurants,
bridges and marinas with negative results.
Nov. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 20-foot power boat adrift
with a diver in the water near the Sunshine Skyway
Bridge. A Coast Guard vessel, Manatee Marine vessel
and an Eckerd College boat responded. The Coast


Guard boat retrieved the diver from the water and re-
turned him to his adrift boat.
Nov. 11, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel's operator re-
ceived a written warning for not having the vessel's
registration on board.
Nov. 11, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel was found to be
in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 11, Boarding. A 27-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a writ-
ten warning for not having the vessel's registration on
board and not having enough life jackets for the pas-
sengers.
Nov. 11, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Tampa Bay. The vessel was found to be in
compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Nov. 12, Search and rescue /assistance. Station


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Nov. 16 horseshoe games
were George Landraitis and Bill Starrett, both of
Anna Maria. Runners-up were Bill Cooney and
Vaughn Davis, both of Bradenton Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall
Park, 10005 Gulf Drive. There are no mem-
bership fees.


Cortez received a report of a 47-foot sailboat aground
in Sarasota Bay. A commercial salvage company boat
responded and refloated the vessel.
Nov. 13, Boarding. A 26-foot fishing boat was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.


RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY

THE # RESIDENTIAL RESALE OFFICE IN MANATEE COUNTY!




Debbie Dial Yvonne higgins Sandy Greiner Jennifer Jones Don Schroder Karen Schroder BarEbraTai rner
CALL ONE OF OUR ISLAND PROFESSIONALS TODAY!













Cal oneoa l us stoa
F ~vr ,00 poprtisto ho yu hres asapl


Just Listed! Large elevated duplex in central
Holmes Beach location. 2BR/2BA each side with
no common wall. Shell drive and covered park-
ing. $204,900.
Island Cottage with income apartment and
extra vacant lot zoned duplex, must be sold as a
package. Bay views, quiet street and landscaped
with coconut palms. $199,900.
Sun Cay ... 6 unit apartment complex with pool
and plenty of parking. All units furnished and
have excellent rental history. $539,000.

Canalfront 3BR/2BA home with spacious floor
plan, large kitchen that is a real gourmet pleaser


and jumbo walk-in closets! Roof top sun deck and
indoor utility/hobby room. $313,000.
Open Sunday 11/17 1 to 4:00! 2804 Avenue
C ... elevated 3BR/2BA home with large decks
and lots of parking. Steps to beach. $169,900.
Neat as a Pin! Newly built 3BR/2BA elevated
home with large open decks and lots of parking.
Steps to fishing pier and beach. $229,500.
Gulf Views from this elevated home with eleva-
tor. Recently remodeled, garage and steps to
beach. $240,000.
Just Listed! 2BR/2BA home with deeded boat
slip and large lot with room for a pool. Excellent
rental history! $164,900.
Visit us on the world wide internet-
http://www.islandreal.com


RUNAWAY BAY
1BR/1BA and 2BR/2BA units available
from $82,500. Amenities include swim-
ming pool and tennis courts. Vacation
home or rental (on-site rental manager).
Across from beach. Call Jerry Martinek
or Bob Wolter at 778-2246.


GULFVIEW LOT
Wooded 100 x 100 lot north of Manatee
Ave. with short walk to beach. Zoned
single or duplex. Offered at $82,500. Call
Dave Moynihan for details eves. 778-7976.


II
..: B .., !. .^ ,



SUMMER SANDS
Enjoy a direct Gulfview and beautiful
sunsets from this 2BR/2.5BA condo.
Amenities include pool and Jacuzzi. Unit
just refurbished and is in "as new" condi-
tion. Too many extras to list. Offered at
$154,900. Call Bill Bowman at 794-8482.


IMPERIAL HOUSE
2BR/1 BA totally upgraded unit. New car-
pet, breakfast bar, walk-in shower, low
maintenance fees. Priced at $99,900.
Call Ed Oliveira at 778-1751.


SWgt
ARIONIN


OCEAN PARK TERRACE
Newly listed 2BR/2BA direct Gulffront
residence, Mexican tile floors, private 17
x 29 roof-top terrace. Secured elevator,
large pool area and wide sandy walking
beach! Offered at $279,900. Contact
Dave Moynihan 778-7976.


ISLAND RESIDENCE
Spacious 5BR/2.5BA Island residence
on a double lot with lush tropical land-
scaping and a short walk to prime
beach. $179,000. Call Dave Moynihan
778-7976.


Serving t n : .,


778-2246 94-2246 72-2246383-5577






I!J] PAGE 34 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island property sales
746 Jacaranda, Anna Maria, an elevated 2,102 sfla
2bed/2bath/3car home built in 1985 on a 50x100 lot,
was sold 10/11/96, Armstrong to Sinnott, for $195,000;
list $215,000.
2105 Avenue C, Bradenton Beach, a ground-level
1,196 sfla 2bed/lbath home built in 1930 on a 50x100
lot, was sold 10/17/96, Murphy to Nill, for $147,000;
list unknown.

SEASONAL RENTALS
1BR/1BA, apartment $1400 mo
Key Royale, 3BR $3300 mo
2BR/2BA, Sarasota $2000 mo ,

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
2BR/2BA villa $950 mo
Julie Gilstrap
Property Manager


WedlebroclRea Company
matching p.1e a ferties since 1949

3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
941-778-6665 800-749-6665





P1etff 9M fi&et10eate, A14
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 PO Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294
[,J9 r = I


BIMINI BAYFRONT SPECTACULAR
Gracious 3 or 4BR/2BA Island residence is located di-
rectly on the open end of the canal, including a 35 x 12
ft. waterside caged swimming pool, boat dock, two
double car garages with workshop area, slate entry
foyer, ceramic tiled floors, private den with built-in book-
cases and wood burning fireplace, formal dining room,
and so much more! Only $450,000 including Preferred
One Year Homeowner's Warranty!


ENCHANTING BAYFRONT
Beautifully remodeled 3BR/2.5BA bayfront showplace
offers dazzling view and lots of privacy, including a pre-
ferred split bedroom design, all white gourmet kitchen with
ceramic tiled floor and loads of counter and cupboard
space, oversized interior laundry room and 307.15 ft. of
spectacular newly seawalled waterfront on a 3/4 acre lot!
One Year Homeowner's Warranty! $495,000.


LUXURIOUS BIMINI BAYFRONT HOME
This light, spacious, beautifully appointed 3BR/3BA
home overlooks the sparkling waters of Bimini Bay!
Includes floor to ceiling sliding doors along the lovely
bayside Florida room, wood burning brick fireplace,
Interesting room angles with built in bookcases, glass
blocks, ceiling fans, security system, boat dock with
Sdavits and sprinkler system. $525,000.

"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"

"Bita T t- t' -O L
Associates After Hours. Barbara A Sato .778-3509
Nancy Gullforc 778-2158 Monica Reid .729-3333
Suzanne Kasten .921-4130 Sherry Sasser. 778-1820
SExclusive
SWaterfront ONE YEA
V Estates MLS -. -RAN-
Video Collection

E7& 13,afi i in eRzafit E atE fuiofeisionafil
ISPddi&S[12Eliamzff.,tfz


2911 Avenue E, Holmes Beach, an elevated 1,566
sfla 3bed/2bath/2car duplex built in 1980 on a 50x100
lot, was sold 10/14/96, Glanz to EMR Investments, for
$149,500; list $159,000.
5300 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 209 Martinique
North, a 2bed/2bath 1,200 sfla condo built in 1972, was
sold 10/14/96, Wirtschafter to Morse, for $145,000; list
unknown.
600 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach, 134
Westbay Cove, a bayfront 1,200 sfla 2bed/2bath condo
built in 1977, was sold 10/17/96, Patak to Kilbank, for
$154,000; list unknown.

Anna Maria Canalfront Home By Owner


224 OAK AVE: 3 bedroom, 3 bath, elevated home. Open
and airy, great room/living room with wood burning fire-
place and oak floors. Master suite has his and her walk-in
closets and whirlpool tub with separate shower. Screened
deck overlooks the boat ramp and dock with electric and
water hook-up. No bridges. Ample parking and storage
under 2,100 sq. ft. of air conditioned living space.
Asking $349,000 Please call 778-0217.


611 Gulf Dr N, Bradenton Beach, 11B Imperial
House, a 2bed/2bath 789 sfla condo built in 1969, was
sold 10/18/96, Reynolds to O'Hara, for $81,500; list
unknown.
208 54th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,236
sfla 2bed/2bath duplex built in 1954 on a 7,950 sf lot,
was sold 10/24/96, Wickwire to Reiber, for $112,500;
list $118,900.
237 Willow Ave., Anna Maria, an elevated,
canalfront 3bed/2bath/2cp home built in 1,990 on a
PLEASE SEE REAL ESTATE, NEXT PAGE


BILL ALEXANDER
S Broker General Manager
Invites you to contact our rental
and sales professionals for any
of your real estate needs.

WAGNER REALTY "
778-2246
".r | Offices Located in:
SAnna Maria Island Palmetto
Longboat Key Bradenton


LOTS OF LOTS
We are the Island lot specialists! Here is just a
sampling of super lots currently available.
Call today for a complete list!

510 MAGNOLIA AVE.
51.5 x 145 .............................. $82,500
305 NORTH SHORE DR. (comer of Palm and N. Shore)
52 x 110 ................................. $89,000
117 WILLOW AVE.
52 x 110 .................................$119,000
112 TERN DR.
Cul-de-Sac Canalfront............$139,900
MULTI-UNIT PROPERTY
Zoned for 9 Units....................$259,000
PRIME CANALFRONT ACREAGE
15 Proposed Lots ................$2,110,000


SFran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
1 9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307
o---- -


PERICO BAY CLUB
Beautiful bay and inland waterway
views from this large ground floor
3BR/2BA condo. Many expensive
upgrades include sliding glass
doors around screened lanai.
$210,000. Dick Rowse 778-2003.
Ask about other Perico Bay listings.


Dick Rowse


n NREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


0AY Aovv' T Eo T r -AB- ~ T-wo

fp/w 4 eAPl SreO tmr Fo
gf-fiafliFafi 1MRItu~ari F4O?


iitAt fRIoAJT Co4Oo




*ig oo -WIP141

o/k,,r 7AE A e A-








RloACIr, Pc. 5
3101 Gr0<$ Pft. 4l)CLA~tS 8^A'
i J


OPEN HOUSES
Sunday November 24, 1996
1 -4 pm

218 Chilson, Anna Maria.......................... $300,000
Canalfront 2BR/2BA pool home on a double lot. Prop-
erty can be divided. Frank Migliore 778-2662 eves.
613 Dundee Lane, Holmes Beach........... $259,900
Key Royale. Sparkling 3BR/2BA home on a deep water
canal with dock and davits. Dick Rowse 778-2003 eves.
5808 Gulf Drive #109, Holmes Beach ..... $279,000
Direct Gulffront condo with sweeping views of the Is-
land. 2BR/2BA, secured lobby, elevator. Carol Will-
iams 778-1718 eves.
6250 Holmes Blvd. #66, Holmes Beach $164,900
North Beach Village. 3BR/2BA townhouse, turnkey
furnished. Near pool, walk to beach. Carla Price
778-5648 eves.
6934 Arbor Oaks Circle, Bradenton........ $142,900
2 story custom built home. 3BR/2.5BA, open and
spacious floor plan, community pool, no yard main-
tenance. Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
1206 58th Street W., Bradenton ................ $64,500
Meadowcroft. 2BR/2BA condo with cathedral ceilings
and extended porch overlooking greenbelt area. Zee
Catanese 794-8991 eves.
3705 9th Avenue W., Bradenton ............... $72,900
2BR/1 BA pool home. Updated kitchen and bathroom,
entertainment deck. Judy Duncan 778-1589 eves.
6306 98th Street E., Bradenton ............. $159,900
Braden Woods. 3BR/2BA home on an acre lot. Free
form solar heated pool, fireplace in family room,
updated appliances. Clarke Williams 778-1718 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800741-3772 OPENSEVENDAYS A WEEK MLS 0Ij r
5"3 --


s0Tth


[smitn






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 35 10


REAL ESTATE, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34

75x148 lot, was sold 10/22/96, Loudermilk to
Sappenfield, for $238,000; list $246,500.
3703 5th Ave., Holmes Beach, 1 Seacrest II, a
2bed/2bath 1,100 sfla condo built in 1985, was sold 10/
23/96, Singerle to Kaeding, for $100,000; list un-
known.
503 Bayview Dr., Bradenton Beach, a ground-level
bayview 864 sfla 2bed/lbath/2cp home built in 1960 on
a 9,000 sfla lot, was sold 10/22/96, Brown to Ander-
son, for $130,000; list unknown.
511 59th St., Holmes Beach, an elevated canalfront
1,692 sfla+ 3bed/2.5bath+/2car home with pool built in
1983 on a 12,075 sf lot, was sold 10/22/96, Mansfield
to Armstrong, for $260,000; list unknown.
6005 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 217 Playa
Encantada, a 2bed/2bath 1108 sfla condo built in 1980,


RENTALS
DAILY WEEKLY
MONTHLY

"'DIAL" DEBBIE DIAL
,-, 778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
Rr 4MIK Gulfstream
Debbie Dial RM Gulfstream
Debbie Dial5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
Leasing Manager 9 HOLMES BEACH, FL.



BILL BOWMAN
Broker Salesperson
I* No catchy phrases, no fancy
slogans. Just 25 years of Real
Estate experience with the last
/10 years on Anna Maria Island.

,A-J WAGNER REALTY
778-2246




I.Lcated in:
Anna aria slad enreShp


WATERFRONT CONDOMINIUM with fabulous ICW
view. Deeded carport, large boat slip. Pool, tennis. De-
sirable 2BR/2B 1st floor corner unit. Westbay Pointe &
Moorings. $174,000. Bob Burnett, 387-0048. C15381
EXTRAORDINARY WATERFRONT. Historic location
at mouth of Manatee River. Breathtaking views of Sky-
way Bridge, Tampa Bay. 2.4 +/- acre estate, over 200'
of beach. 5BR/5-1/2B, crown molding, travertine floor-
ing, stone fireplace. Open floor plan. $2,999,000. Don
Lewis, 746-3200. R12991
SPECTACULAR ELEVATED GULF-FRONT RESI-
DENCE with panoramic views. 3BR/3B, fireplace in
great room, 55' wraparound deck. Professionally land-
scaped. $795,000. Nancy Keegan, 723-3929. R68328
PRIME, CONVENIENT LOCATION. Duplex plus lot
2BR/2B and 2BR/1B. Gulfside, short walk to beach.
Zoned C2. $390,000. Anne Miller, 792-6475. D15844
LUXURY CONDOMINIUM. Elegant 3BR/2B on the
ICW. Overlooks boat basin. Private lobby/elevator.
Over 2,000 sq. ft., fireplace, 3 porches, 2-car garage
and workshop. Tennis, pool, boat slip. Immediate pos-
session $335,000. Bob Burnett, 387-0048. C16424
EASY STROLL TO THE GULF. Spacious 3-story
townhouse. 2 heated pools, tennis, docking privileges.
Situated on a lovely lagoon leading to the bay.
$139,900. Dick Ring, 748-7937. C13626

4.1 I 1R I l 1
On Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach. Contact Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
ANNA MARIA. Seasonal, elegant and charming
single family home. 2BR/2B, den, second level, bay
view. $3,500 per month.
Exceptional properties, exceptional service.
Call us for your property management needs.


was sold 10/21/96, Palmitier to Wahls, for 124,500; list
unknown.
626 Key Royale, Holmes Beach, a ground-level
1,197 sfla 2bed/2bath/Icar home built in 1966 on a
9,600 sf lot, was sold 10/21/96, Roak to Althoff, for
$175,000; list unknown.
1003 73rd St., Holmes Beach, 202A Coconuts, an
upstairs 645 sfla lbed/1bath Gulffront condo built in
1972, was sold 10/30/96 Sipe to Vandenbranden, for
$115,000; list unknown.
1906 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 204 Coquina
Beach Club, a Gulffront, elevated 1,200 sfla 2bed/
2bath condo built in 1985, was sold 10/29/96,
Giacalone to O'Neill, for $180,000; list $189,000.
4307 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 207 Cayman Cay
Villas, an upstairs 1,000 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in
1974, was sold 11/1/96, Stoner to Reynolds, for
$90,000; list unknown.
525 56th St., Holmes Beach, a bayfront two-story
2,083 sfla 3bed/3bath/2car home built in 1954 on a
10,965 sf lot, was sold 11/1/96, Chalfant to Geeraerts,
for $384,900, list unknown.
9502 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria, a ground-level 1,508
sfla 4bed/2bath duplex built in 1972 on a 75x110 lot,


I REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


CHARMING BAYFRONT HOME Lovely 3BR/2BA home with
clear views of the Skyway, city pier and pristine nature.
$329,000. #DY13518.
TIFFANY 2BR/2BA, Gulfview, elevator. $185,000. #TDY15658.
DEEDED BOAT DOCK *MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$130,000 $160,000. 2BR/2BA, lushly landscaped backyard, en-
closed lanai, garage, potential for duplex. #TDY16062.
GULFFRONT MOTEL 22 units, heated pool, private beach, desir-
able location. $1,895,000. #TDY16859.
PALMA SOLA*MVP Seller will entertain offers between $130,000
-$160,000. 1/2 block to Bay. 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage, caged pool,
large lot. Citrus, quiet street. #TDY17901.
T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427


was sold 11/1/96, Brewer to Sanjuan, for $190,000; list
$210,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Islander By-
stander.


IMPERIAL HOUSE
"Gulf to Bay community with club-
house. Heated pool, fishing dock
S and 150' deeded Gulffront ac-
cess. Ground level unit well
maintained. $87,500. #17564

SCarol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


IMPERIAL HOUSE 2BR/1BA bayview. Heated pool, dock, walk to beach, low maintenance fees. Carefree living
in this Gulf to Bay community. $79,900. #CH68847. Call Carol S. Heinze eves. 778-7246.
BEAUTIFUL SUNSETS *MVP listing. Seller will entertain offers between $300,000 $370,000. View of Gulf, 3BR/
2BA, large deck with vaulted ceilings. #CH67898. Call Carol S. Heinze eves. 778-7246.
MVP LISTING Seller will entertain offers between $130,000 $160,000. Deeded boat dock, possible duplex. Close
to Gulf and Bay. Lanai, private backyard. #TDY18162. Call T. Dolly Young eves. 778-5427.


Karin Stephan
REALTOR
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Home:
941-388-1267
Fax: 941- 778-3035


TRIPLEX *MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$650,000 $720,000. 3BR/1.5BA, 2BR/1BA and efficiency.
Covered parking. Direct Gulffront on 2 lots. #KS 14087.
TRIPLEX 3BR/1 BA, 2BR/1BA, 1 BR/1 BA close to the beach.
Excellent rental history. #KS13966. $159,900.
GULFFRONT FOURPLEX *MVP Seller will entertain offers
between $650,000 $790,000. Direct Gulffront. 4 units
beautifully furnished, excellent income, contract with large
German travel agency. Walking distance to stores and res-
taurants. Laundry room, outdoor shower, guest bath and
shower downstairs. Walk around the Island from this super
complex. #KS17201.


3BR/3BA HOME with solar heated pool.
Ceramic entrance and traffic area, ceramic
kitchen, fireplace and cathedral ceilings. Many
ceiling fans and upgrades done on this
beautiful home. #17777. $175,000. Call Karin
Stephan eves. 388-1267.


DUPLEX 2-story charming, well-main-
tained, 2BR/1BA each. One short
block to sparkling Gulf in Holmes
Beach. Beautiful landscaped lot with
large shade trees. Room to enlarge or
build pool. Quiet neighborhood. Priced
to sell at $169,000. #17780. Call Karin
Stephan eves. 388-1267 or Michael
Advocate eves. 778-0608.


ANNA MARIA p T LR
Brand new Key
West style home in
the City of Anna .
Maria. Gulfview from
the bedroom. Steps to the beach. 3BR/2BA with
pool. Call for your private tour today. #KS16988.
$295,000. Call Karin Stephan eves. 388-1267.


I NTERNET-KBSTEPHAN@AOL.COM All my listings can be seen on the world wide web. W.PRUFLORIDA.COM.

IrouII.IJ.Ir.I.I poi srs.I.I.teIaklJiilaliJIrJ.ICIll us!I forabrochure anddiscounIIIt.JouJon.


BY OWNER DEEP CANAL








Light, bright, airy waterfront home in beautiful Key
Royale. Ready to move into at 606 Gladstone Lane,
Holmes Beach. 3BR/2BA, 2,194 sq. ft. newer air condi-
tioning, large kitchen with canal view. 319 sq. ft. screen
or window enclosed porch overlooks canal, newer boat
dock and lift with electricity and water. 536 sq. ft. 2-car
garage. Newer double-pane windows, carpeting and
ceramic tile throughout. Inside laundry room. $269,000.
PLEASE CALL GLENN BLACK, 778-4880 FOR APPT.


The Prudential Florida RealtyT~~T'~i~ii~ C! I ii t~ IlYI~~






Iir S PAGE 36 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



ITEMSFORSALGARAGSALBAT


PAIR SWIVEL WING-BACK rockers, excellent con-
dition. $50 each or $75 pair. 778-6445, if no answer,
leave number.

ELECTRIC GUITAR Epiphone Les Paul brand
new. Guitar, stand, instruction book included. $250
firm. Call 778-0511 anytime. Must see!

WESTINGHOUSE WASHER and electric dryer, 5
years old. $150 pair. Whirlpool gas dryer with 100 lb.
tank. $150. Call 778-4228.
WILLS, LIVING WILLS Give your loved ones a gift
certificate for a will for Christmas $75. Horn Parale-
gal Services 798-9649.
SINGLE BED in good condition. Very comfortable
with white headboard $55. Call 778-9125.
$179 BLUE BLAZER size 42, portly. Like new $60.
Call 778-2617.
LIFESTYLE CARDIO FIT exerciser. Total body mo-
tion. Like new $110. 778-3767.
RATTAN 2 END TABLES, queen size sofa/
sleeper, glass top dining table with 4 chairs. Also
white newly upholstered Castro love seat. 778-6284.
TWO BLUE AND WHITE tulip-pattern couches $100
each. Call 778-7455, leave message to see.

PECAN SALE MAMMOTH HALVES, new crop.
Holiday bags. $6.50 lb. Island Players Box Office
778-6956 for information or delivery. Also available
at The Islander Bystander 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.

FUJI RACING BIKE, small frame. $50. Bang &
Olufsen stereo: Beocenter 7000 includes tuner, turn-
table & cassette player $600. 778-1102.


CARPORT SALE Fri. & Sat., Nov. 22 & 23, 9 2.
Golf clubs, bicycles, games, linens, clothing, purses,
housewares, typewriter, books and tools. 4602 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach.
GARAGE SALE Sat., Nov. 23, 9 ? 603 Concord
Lane, Holmes Beach. Off Key Royale/66th Street.
PLANTS DECORATIONS BOOK SALE. Sat.,
Nov. 23, 9 1. Roser Church Fellowship Hall, 512
Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Anna Maria Garden Club.
CRAFT AND BAKE SALE Sat., Nov. 30. Vendors
wanted. Booth spaces are $15. Contact the Anna
Maria Art League at 778-2099.
2 FAMILY MOVING SALE Sat., Nov. 23, 9 ?
2309 2311 Avenue B, Bradenton Beach.
GARAGE SALE Sat., Nov. 23, 7 2. Custom cock-
pit enclosure, brass collectibles, complete set of
dishes, Bennington stoneware, brass items. 616
Baronet Lane, Key Royale.
YARD SALE Sat. & Sun., Nov. 23 & 24. Kids bunk
bed, queen water bed, scuba equipment, stackable
dryer and lots more! 308 60th Street, Holmes Beach.
GARAGE SALE 3 FAMILY Sat., Nov. 23, 8 am.
Christmas items, gifts, weight bench, china, glass-
ware, fabric, linens, bath/kitchen, jewelry, guitar,
electronics. 308 Iris, Anna Maria.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


BIG YARD SALE. Fri., Sat. & Sun., Nov. 22, 23 &
24, 9 4:30. Couches, beds, dressers, miscella-
neous furniture and many other items. 1107 Gulf
Drive. 778-8200.
YARD SALE Fri. & Sat., Nov. 22 & 23, 8 ? Miscel-
laneous. 8010 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


LOST CAT. Nana misses her kitty kitty. Orange and
brown stripe with white paws. Vicinity of 77th Street,
Holmes Beach. 778-2323.
FOUND GLASSES on the beach near Coquina in
Bradenton Beach. Glasses can be claimed at The
Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach. 778-7978


VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages
of information everything you need to know to en-
joy the two-county area. Retail price $14.95, dis-
counted 33% only at the newspaper office. You pay
only $10 plus tax at The Islander Bystander, 5404
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978
"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of stories
and newspaper columns guaranteed to delight new-
comers, visitors and oldtimers too, by original
Florida Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This book makes a
great gift. Available for $19.95 at The Islander By-
stander, 5404 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978
REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5404 Marina Drive,, Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls) -We
come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


1988 SAAB 900S automatic, air, all power, sun roof,
very clean. $4,250 OBO. 778-7819.
CHRYSLER LEBARON CONVERTIBLE 1982. Low
mileage motor and top in good condition. Real buy at
$1,990. 113 51st Street, Holmes Beach. 778-7334.
1992 LINCOLN TOWNCAR Signature Series. Ex-
cellent condition, 56,000 miles. Asking $15,500
OBO. Call 778-5057.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
25' CATALINA SAILBOAT, swing keel, well main-
tained. 9.9, VHF, 2 new batteries, recent bottom
paint, extras. Ready. $6,800. Call 778-9315.

A STEAL! 25' CHRIS CRAFT CRUISER. Inboard
225, sleeper, head, galley, dinette, radios, compass,
fish-finder. Fully equipped, clean, runs great. Sac-
rifice at $9,500. See at Holmes Beach Marina. (941)
646-8853, owner.


BOAT DOCK FOR RENT deep water, easy access
water and electric at dock. Holmes Beach. 778-5963.

WANTED FIBERGLASS sailing dinghy, 6' 9'
length. Call 778-2832.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.
AVON EARN MONEY for Christmas. Full or part time.
For information or to buy Avon call 252-4687 pager.
CIRCLE K ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for full and
part time cashiers. Excellent benefits, great opportu-
nities for advancement. Retail experienced preferred.
Apply in person.
TIP OF THE ISLAND is now accepting applications
for breakfast cook/waitress. Call 778-3909.
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you
can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED forTingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.


RN NURSE COMPANION available to give you
assistance in your home. Also will run errands. Over
20 years experience. References. 383-2497.

QUALIFIED HOME HEALTH CARE all phases. 20
years experience, excellent references. Nights avail-
able. Call 778-2085.

ADULT CARE in your home. 25 years experience,
good references. 756-0102 afternoons or eves.
CARING COMPANION AVAILABLE for your needs.
Prepare meals, doctors appointments and errands.
Available days, have car. 778-7637.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
GENERAL CLEANING & REPAIRS Apartments,
condos, homes, rentals. Weekly, monthly, hourly or
one time. Dependable Island residents. Trustworthy,
references. 779-2057.
HOUSE CLEANING apartments, condos, houses.
Call Ana at 778-0141.

IRONING DONE sheets to shirts. Fast service. Island
pick-up and delivery. Smoke free environment. Ref-
erences available. Phone 778-2085.


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICE! THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!


CEDAR BEACH HOUSE!!!
Close to bay & beach on the north end of Anna Maria. Lush
tropical landscaping surrounds this lovely home. Just steps
to the Rod & Reel pier. Just listed at $177,500.
Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-5287
or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 GullDlve P 0 Box 717.Anna Mana, FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


ON TWO BEAUTIFUL LOTS!
Charming two bedroom home offers potential to
create a lovely family home with two lots which
front two streets! Lovely Anna Maria neighbor-
hood and open view of Anna Maria Basin.
Close to Bay beach. Asking $175,000.


A '(^^sS 1957
.R.. REALTY ".0.
*We ARE the I land
9805 Gulf Drive PO BoR 835 Anna Maia, Florda 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


101 PELICAN
Modern 2 bedroom with loft (a 3rd bedroom), 2 bath,
caged pool, 2-car garage, fireplace, canalfront home
in the city of Anna Maria. 2,016 sfla/3,286 sq. ft.
under roof. $295,000. 103 Pelican canal lot next
door is also available for $150,000 ... for the person
requiring estate proportions.

Doug Dowling Realty
778-1222


N A I I Ai = :; I I : U^W7 T A M m A- I : j


IAi 3Z I In A Ab :T:T L A i A :I[ 1 III i NAIL


1 1
^^^^^^^^^^W)F


---TS~i -- NINE






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 1 PAGE 37 IE]

S, L AN I E D S9


HIS PARENTS COMING in for the holidays? Don't
stress. Have your home cleaned now. Call Rick at
Dolphin Cleaning and Maintenance. 778-2864.
"I DON'T WANNA clean house", you say to yourself!
Sharon wants to clean your house. References. Call
or leave message. 778-3006.
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Treat yourself to a
therapeutic massage. Very relaxing, stress and pain
relieving. Nationally certified massage therapist.
Very reasonable. Jeff, 795-8243.
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree trimming, pressure washing and paint-
ing. Free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

FREEDOM CARE Save on health insurance. En-
dorsed by the American Small Business Association.
Choose your own plan. Call Arnold at 794-0567.

DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Full and part
time places available now for 18 months through 5
years. Also, limited after school care. 778-2967.

HOUSE CALLS HAIR & NAILS, tips and wraps,
pedicures. Insured, licensed and well experienced.
For appointment call 756-5669, leave message,
name and phone.

DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Important
notice to parents. Hot meals served daily, naps now
optional. Come by and check us out. 778-2967.

DOCTORS FRANK & LISA LANZISERA, chiroprac-
tors. Treatment for neck and low back pain, head-
aches, Sciatica, ruptured discs, Fibromyalgia. 15
years experience. Free consultation. 794-3344,
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.
HOME IMPRlOVElMENT i7 d


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.












JUDY DUNCAN
Broker, CRS, GRI, LTG


Don't leave the Island
without a subscription
to "the best news on
Anna Maria Island"-
The Islander By- BUSINESS
stander. You'll be able BUSI
to keep up on all the CENTER
news from three Island
city governments, news
about the bridges, C3 ZONING
Island people, fishing, RENTAL
and real estate.
Call (941) 778-7978 SPACES
and charge it to AVAILABLE
MasterCard or Visa.
P.S. Visit our office and Mini Storage
subscribe in person -Retail or Service
5404 Marina Dr., Retail or Service
5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. We're CALL NOW
right next to Chez 778-2924
Andre in the Island 5347 Gulf Drive
Shopping Center. Holmes Beach


JIM TRAVIS CONSTRUCTION Remodeling, room
additions, decks, baths, kitchens, repairs. License
#RR0066842. 779-2129, Jim.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION CO. Residential &
commercial. New construction or remodeling. In-
sured. Lic. # CGC 058-092. Call 778-5354 or pager
506-6186.

R.T. (Bob) HILTON CONSTRUCTION. Residential
and commercial. Remodel and new construction.
Island and Mainland. References. CGC012191.
747-1098..(Don't say how, say Hilton).

RELIABLE HANDYMAN Small jobs and odd jobs
are my specialty. Licensed and insured. Call Tom
the Handyman at (941) 761-8182.
HOME MAINTENANCE REPAIRS over 35 years
experience in all phases for residential, condos and
mobile homes. Small jobs preferred. Bill 778-2409.
HANDYMAN LIGHT HAULING. Fix screens,
doors, painting, cleaning garages, trimming, etc.
Free estimates. Reasonable, honest, dependable.
Jeff, 795-8243.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE joint sealing, weep
holes, back-fill, commercial diving, erosion control,
dock repair. Local references, work guaranteed.
Call Cliff at 778-7367.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile. Lic.
#MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave Elliott.


FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1 BR/1BA, pri-
vate lot and parking. Available weekly from Nov. 26
to Dec. 29 at $300 wk., includes phone and cable.
Also available Mar. & Apr. at $1,300 mo. 778-2832.

ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Furnished 1BR
apartment. Private patio, pool, washer/dryer. Off
season $700 mo., season $1,100 mo. 211 South
Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
ENCHANTING ENGLISH TUDOR home 4BR/3BA,
Gulfview on 3 lots of beautiful landscaping. Fireplace,
turret observatory, large screened porch. Everything
you could possibly want in a vacation. Available Nov.
and Dec. Call 778-2206 or 794-8202.


ECl7807 oI I ,r 8 0:sI74 7E


DARCIE DUNCAN
REALTOR. GRI


ANNUAL RENTAL Spacious, unfurnished 2BR/2BA
plus Florida room offering 1,400 sq. ft. living area.
Panoramic Gulf view! $950 mo. plus utilities. Anna
Maria Realty, 778-2259.

HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL RENTALS 2BR/1BA
$625. 2BR/2BA $650. Nice, quiet locations. No
pets. 778-0217.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL Cute 2BR/1BA
lower duplex. Available Mar. $1,600 mo.; Dec.
$350 wk. 778-6198.
SEASONAL WATERFRONT 1BR/1BA overlooking
Gulf, across from beach. Large deck, covered parking.
$1,500 mo; less for 3 months or more. 778-0019.
WANT TO TRADE HOMES for 1 or 2 months. Mine
in Dana Point, CA for your Gulffront. 778-2092 un-
til Dec. 1 or (714) 493-3537 after Dec. 15.
CHARMING 2BR GULFFRONT apartment. Walk to
shops, ground level, lovely furnished interior. Sea-
sonal, no pets. (941) 778-3143.
BEAUTIFUL GULFVIEW 2BR on dead end street
along Gulf. Quaint, quiet, cozy. Washer/dryer. Jan. -
Apr. $1,100 mo. plus electricity. $400 wk. 778-0990.
BEACH HOUSE 3BR/3BA, carport, wrap-around
porch, dishwasher, washer, dryer, steps to beautiful
beach. Available Dec. 1 through Dec. 30, week or
month. Call 778-4468.

HIDEAWAY COVE SEASONAL perfect bayview
between bridges. One block to beach. Nice quiet
dead end street. First floor, 2BR, fully furnished with
dock. Available Dec. through Apr. No smoking or
pets. (941) 778-7107.

HOLMES BEACH nicely furnished 1 BR/1BA, stones
throw to beach. Available for 1996 1997 season.
Clean and quiet. $1,500 mo. 778-4368.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL rentals. Immaculate
1 & 2BR apartments, turnkey furnished. Stones
throw to beach. Weekly or monthly. 778-4368.
QUAINT GULFVIEW HOME directly across form
beach. 2 units available Dec. Apr. 2BR/1BA $1,500
mo., 1BR/1BA $1,100 mo. 778-8200.
UNFURNISHED ANNUAL charming North Longboat
home on canal with dock. Easy walk to beach.
Vaulted ceiling in great room, open kitchen, lanai,
nice landscaping with citrus trees. 3BR/2BA. $1,500
mo. Michele Lynn Knuese, Broker/Realtor, the
Longboat Connection (941) 387-9709.


.,


OPEN HOUSE
Sat November 23 1 to 4
5400 Gulf Drive #28, Holmes Beach.
Fumished 1BR/1BA unit with extended living room.
Completely updated in '95. Overlooks pool with a Gulf
view. $89,900. Call Frank Migliore 778-2662 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK AMLS |. i


I


[Snuo ;


I






ME PAGE 38 E NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Commercial Residential Free Estimates
lfn rS Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
fAND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
S Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Specialists
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


Grooms Motors0and Autmotive

COPLTEAUT RPAR
^OIL CHANGES TOWING mv--03599
AI ADR I -HOLMESBE1A CIl HI B
* *


G.R. SULLIVAN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Specialists in Hurricane Resistant
New Construction Remodeling Rennovation

25 Years Experience EC Licensed & Insured
References 794-3260 ELic RR 0047996

Designed Refaced
Formica Wood



SCA]N^1S


778-7399


REMODELING

ADDITIONS

XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


SPHILLIP FRAZIER
CONSTRUCTION

* CERAMIC TILE MARBLE FLOOR & COUNTER TOPS
FORMICA LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORING
CEILING & WALL TEXTURING FINE FINISH WOOD
WORKING CABINETS SHELVING BOOKCASES
* INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING PLUS MUCH MORE
OCC. LIC. # 0713 BEEPER 941-215-1544
16 YRS. EXPERIENCE OFFICE 941-778-0273


J.R.

Painting
PrTesnre Cleaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
* Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


Just
visiting
paradise?

ISLANDER


Don't leave the Island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best news
on Anna Maria Island.
Charge your subscription
to MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


@@N]TRU@TD@N
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
@@NuTu@TI]@N
M~Dagi' eu'


SEASONAL RENTALS AVAILABLE. Call Wagner
Realty at 778-2246 or (800) 211-2323.

HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL 3BR/2BA, steps to
beach. $1,750 mo. includes utilities, washer/dryer.
Available Dec. and Mar. 106 77th Street. 778-3267.

SEASONAL RENTAL Anna Maria Island. Gorgeous,
totally remodeled, canalfront with dock. Short 1 block
plus walk to beach. 3BR/2BA with large, sunny
Florida room for entertaining. Call (941) 688-9281 or
(941) 683-4703.

FOR RENT DEC. THROUGH APR. Newly remod-
eled 4BR/3BA pool home. $2,650 on canal, includes
everything. Just move in. 526 75th Street, Holmes
Beach. 778-9252.
FOR RENT DEC. THROUGH APR. Beach house,
3BR/2BA, 2-car garage, fireplace. Best view in Anna
Maria. Turnkey furnished. 778-9252. $2,850 per mo.
CUTE COTTAGE WITH DOCK on ICW. Fully fur-
nished, quiet, breezy, fantastic sunsets. Available
now. $800 mo. or $250 wk. 794-5980.
SEASONAL AVAILABLE for winter season. Effi-
ciency and 1BR apartments starting at $1,200 mo. 3
mo. minimum. No pets. Holmes Beach. 778-2071.
WESTBAY COVE 2BR/2BA seasonal fully furnished.
Heated pool, washer, dryer, tennis court. $2,100 mo.
778-1640.
COZY QUIET CLEAN 2BR/1BA annual in Anna
Maria. Ground floor, carport, utility with washer/dryer
hook-up. No smoking or pets. $700 mo. plus. (860)
355-3009 or 778-3119.
RENTALS
ANNUAL: DUPLEX, Holmes Beach. 2BR/2BA, ga-
rage, on lake, near beach. Recently refurbished,
deck. $700 mo. Seasonal: Beautiful 2BR/1BA near
beach. Dec. Jan. $1,200. Annual: Bradenton
Beach duplex. 2BR/2BA, carport, recently refur-
bished. View of Gulf. $700 mo. Call 779-1070 or
(941) 625-2889.

HAVE FABULOUS CONDO IN Smokey Mountains
Gatlinburg, TN. Would like to swap for house or
condo in Feb. Can use my condo anytime for skiing,
fireplace, view. 778-3532 or (513) 941-7377.
WANTED VACATION RENTAL 2 weeks in March. 2
or 3 beds on or near Gulf for 2 responsible adults with
2 well behaved children and no pets. Non smokers.
Call (508) 336-2201.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share furnished 2BR/2BA
duplex. Close to Gulf beaches. $125 wk. no utilities.
Call 778-2085.
DUPLEX 2BR/2BA lanai, carports, elevated on lake.
Turnkey. 3 month minimum $1,625., available 1/1/97 or
unfurnished now at $625, last and security. 778-1592.
SUNBOW BAY CONDO 2BR/2BA for rent and
house for rent, 3BR/2BA, pool, fenced, 2 lanais, just
remodeled. Both for Dec., Jan. 792-1554.

ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA detached elevated du-
plex apartment in Holmes Beach. No pets. $750 mo.
plus utilities. Washer and dryer included. 778-2993.

SEASONAL 2BR/1BA & EFFICIENCY apartment.
Nice and clean. Walk to beach. Small pet OK with
deposit. (941) 778-5057.
BRADENTON BEACH GULFFRONT 2BR/2BA
condo. Available immediately. $1,500 mo., 3 mo.
minimum. Call (941) 795-1022.
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED 2BR/2BA condo
available through January. $600 wk. Call 778-0510
or 778-2324.
DECEMBER ONLY 1BR/1BA duplex apartment, 1
block to grocery, drug store, restaurant, shopping. 2
blocks to beach. Clean and comfortable, only $350
wk. 778-2832.
BEAUTIFUL PANORAMIC GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA
elevated home. Carpeted, huge deck. All rooms
overlook Gulf. Available Dec. 8 31 and month of
March. (813) 920-5595.

VACATION/SEASON Ocean ground floor renovated
cottage, turnkey. 2BR/2BA, sleeps 6. $700 wk. -
$2,500 mo. 778-4523 or 1 (800) 977-0803.

ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH for rent. Kitchen/laun-
dry privileges, pool, walk to beach. Holmes Beach
778-5963.
ANNUAL RENTAL PROPERTY NEEDED! We
have a waiting list! Wagner Realty 778-2246 or
(800) 211-2323.


oD WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING
LP GAS RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
$700
$700 REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
PER FILL EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
Snde WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
-1
r'-Icd.. *
b o Ua : A ,
A: A : 0 . -: .


* * ** CLIP AND SAVE 5 ,- 0 oo*o
* 0
WATERING RESTRICTIONS
* Rules in effect for Manatee County: a
* > Lawn and landscape watering limited to two days a week.
a *
> Addresses ending in even numbers (or A- M):Tues& Sat.
S>- Addresses ending in odd numbers (or N Z): Wed & Sun. 0
>- Irrigation not allowed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Irriga-
a tion with treated waste water allowed any time.) *
S >- Car owners can wash their vehicles anytime as long as
* they use a hand-held hose with a shut-off nozzle. *
S>- Rinsing boats and flushing of boat motors allowed for
Sten minutes daily.
* > Hand-watering of plants, NOT LAWNS, permitted any *
Sday.
* Questions or comments? Call the Southwest Florida Water *
* Management District (Swiftmud) toll-free: (800) 423-1476.
* *


S AN A D_

RENALS CntiuedRENALSont -ue


EFFICIENCIES FROM $140 WK for one person
from $175 wk. for two. Excellent off season vaca-
tion and temporary relocation rates until Dec. 15,
1996. Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
778-5405.


ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Pierside apart-
ments, 4-units furnished. Large lot with pool.
$449,000, by owner (in apt. #1). 211 South Bay
Blvd. 778-2896.

NORTH BEACH VILLAGE condo for sale by
owner. Priced for quick sale. $143,000. 3BR/2BA.
Call for appointment. 778-2629.


MANGROVE TRIMMING
Mangroves & other native trees can be legally trimmed under the
direction of a registered landscape architect. For details call Tom
at Eatman & Smith, a leader in in environmentally sensitive design.
Ph# 778-3113 FL LA REG. # 001539


by REX B. SLIKER
10 Years of Local References


Personal Service
Competitive Prices
Family Owned & Operated
Custom Cabinet Making
Millwork & Wood Cut to Size
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082


*^k11'iirI EI; 'I YAI I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 21, 1996 0 PAGE 39 KI


JISLANDER A SS


HOUSE FOR SALE Deeded boat slip, owner financ-
ing. 218 84th Street, Holmes Beach. 779-1074.
FOR SALE BY OWNER 3BR/2BA condo on Palma
Sola Bay. Deep water canal, dock & davits, sea-
wall, 2 pools, clubhouse, tennis. $159,900. (941)
792-7122 for appointment.
IRONWOOD CONDO 5th floor, on golf course.
1BR/1.5BA, partly furnished. $55,000. By owner,
794-3687.
PERICO BAY CLUB Waterside Lane. Single story
end unit, 2BR/2BA, Bayside. Excellent condition,
professionally decorated, many upgrades.
$114,900. 792-5218 for appointment.
LAST WATERFRONT LOT IN Cortez Village. On
Seafood Shack canal to Intracoastal Waterway. Lot
size 75 ft. x 100 ft. with water on two sides, seawall,
fenced. Zoned RDD-6/CH for single family or du-
plex. Only $117,500. Call Jim at 794-2479.
COMMERCIAL/RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE for rent
in Holmes Beach. Call Dennis for details. 778-4461.
MOBILE HOME 12 X 52 2BR, Florida room. Sand
Piper, Bradenton Beach. 2 minutes to beach. All
furnishings. 778-9306.
PROPERTY FOR SALE Oriental, NC. 1/2 acre
waterview, deeded boat slip, septic installed. $40,000
or trade for 1955 57 T-Bird. (941) 778-0315.
PLAYA ENCANTADA GULFSIDE 2BR/2BA
condo, porch, elevator, heated pool, Jacuzzi,
sauna, clubhouse, tennis. $167,500. 778-4616.
DO YOU OWN A DUPLEX? Thinking of selling? I
have buyers. Please call Susan Hatch 778-7616
eves. Smith Realtors 778-0777.
3BR/2.5BA KEY WEST STYLE executive home
with Gulf view and large great room. Master suite
with loft. Many amenities. $395,000. 108 72nd
Street, Holmes Beach. For information or to view
call (941) 778-2277 (Coconuts Apartments).
BY OWNER 116' wide, 190' deep lot with your
own private beach. 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage, fire-
place, boat slip. Tax assessed value $365,000.
Appraised value $465,000. Sale price $459,900.
Best beachfront available for the price. 778-9252.
810 So. Bay Blvd.
SAN REMO SHORES For sale by owner. Sailboat
depth water, 1,800 sq. ft. air conditioned, new roof,
AC, windows, interior doors and dock. Priced be-
low market. Asking $155,900. 4107 Royal Palm
Drive. 792-5701.
2BR/2BA VILLAGE GREEN. Must sell. Please call
778-2709.
MOBILE HOME IN Sandpiper Mobile Home Re-
sort, 2601 Gulf Drive #415. Completely furnished,
covered patio, electric heat, air conditioning, life-
time roof, corner lot, beach access. 778-4886.

Be a good Islander and invest
in your future. Recycle!

SLANDER
1 I T AIL


ISLAND VILLAGE Spacious upscale beach condo.
2BR/2BA, large porch, decorator perfect. Panoramic
view of bay and Skyway Bridge. Priced for quick sale
at $114,000. 778-5180.
DO YOU OWN PROPERTY on the water in Anna
Maria/Holmes Beach that needs a little TLC? Think-
ing of selling? I have buyers. Please call Susan
Hatch 778-7616 eves. Smith Realtors 778-0777.
LOCAL FAMILY WISHES TO BUY Island motes/
guest resort up to about 16 units. Please call 778-
9315. No Realtors, brokers or agents.
OPEN HOUSE 1 4 DAILY. Waterfront showplace,
1 year new. Spacious 5,900 sq. ft. under roof, 4BR/
4BA, cathedral ceiling, 7 person spa, boat dock. Will
consider offers below appraisal. Appraised at
$485,000. 130 Hammock Road, Anna Maria. Broker/
owner 778-6155.
LOTS GULF JUST 150' away. $175,000. Bayview
lot direct, duplex. $79,500. Call 778-4523 or 1 (800)
977-0803.
SPOTLESS RETIREMENT OPPORTUNITY for only
$73,500. Turnkey furnished unit just off the Island in
a 55+ community with possible boat dockage. Call
Sandy Greiner or Barb Turner, Re/Max Gulfstream
778-7777.
LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION For sale by
owner. 4 apartment complex, 200' from Gulf. Beach
side of Gulf Dr. Quiet area, close to public beach,
food store, Anna Maria Island center, Manatee Ave.
High ground, flowing well, lush grounds. Owner op-
erated for 27 years. $350,000. 111 113 36st. St.
778-2071.
UNBELIEVABLE CONDO with a garage. 2BR near
the center of Holmes Beach. Priced at only $71,900.
Great rental potential. Call Sandy Greiner or Barb
Turner, Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
WE HAVE HOMES FOR SALE on open water and
on canals, priced from $125,000. Call Sandy Greiner/
Barb Turner, Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
BY OWNER 110' X 100' canal lot with view of Sky-
way holds a nice 4BR/3BA home with tile throughout.
Large living room, cathedral ceilings, large master
bedroom and bath with Jacuzzi tub, large swimming
pool, boat dock and lift. Circular driveway. 526 75th
Street, Holmes Beach. $287,900. 778-9252.

12 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising herein is subject to the
Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to adver-
tise "any preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, fa-
milial status or national origin, or intention to
make any such preference, limitation or discrimi-
nation." Familial status includes children under
age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians,
pregnant women and people securing custody of
children under 18. This newspaper will not know-
ing accept any advertising for real estate which
is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing im-
paired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


-----------------------------------------1
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must
be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5,
Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL: Minimum rate is $7.50 for up to 21 WORDS.
Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250
per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! You can charge your classified advertising in per-
son or by phone. We are sorry, but due to the high volume of calls we can not take classified ad
copy over the telephone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your
charge card number. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.

--------------------------------------------------------I
2

_____ ____ 31
More information: IIlAnDEI _
(941) 778-7978 S AE
PAY-. l[IAJI I 77Q non01)


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COL@AOL.COM

Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
R16M GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

CJ's Plumbing Inc. 722-2702
24-Hour Emergency Service & Repairs
SWater Heaters 'Drain Cleaning -Disposals *Remodeling
JOHN DAVIS Beeper 569-9052
Licensed & Insured CFC056844

Kern Construction, Inc.
Remodeling Additions Carpentry
Si m Repairs Custom-Built Kitchens
MICHAEL S. KERN JERRY KERN
748-8020 778-1115
License #RR0066904 & Insured

P. IfJ. VTJVG 6yEf'neDejen&rffh
"Professional Excellence"
Residential-Commercial Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured 778-5594 778-3468


TREAT YOURSELF
To A Mini Vacation
Aromatherapy Massage
755-8711
LicenlceS MA*0021105
Suzanne Smith L.M.T.


For Your Island Home Paint Needs

ISLAND
PAINT WORKS
Interior/Exterior
SCommercial & Residential
SLicensed / Insured
Excellent References


BILL ROMBERGER


Residential
Commercial


BACARR


778-7821


Sales
Service


AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING
Proudly serving the Island since 1969
778-0800
Member of the Manatee Chamber of Commerce
and Better Business Bureau


State Certificate
CACO56745


1917 14th Street West
Bradenton


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095

7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
<____________ -----------


I


: /-(\. k&+ I / b* &dJoz
---- --- --- --- --- --------------


r
I






Ij PAGE 40 N NOVEMBER 21, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


THANKSGIVING SHOPPING LIST

BY NANCY NICHOLSON JOLINE / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Perfume
6 Tie
12 Individually, in a
way
20 Truman
biographer Miller
21 Sub feature
22 Ups and downs
23 TURKEY
25 SWEET
POTATOES
26 Town near
Oakland
27 Closeout
28 Home in the
woods
29 Words of
acquiescence
30 Rose fancier
33 Kind of chair
38 SQUASH
45 Some Dadaist
works
49 "Voila!"
50 Conduct
51 Composer
Khachaturian
52 Funny ones
54 "That lie!"


66 The Way
68 Lobster part
69 Pen noise
70 Big name in
sportswear
75 Kind of jet
S76 STUFFING
79 Stings
83 One who looks
at books
85 "Flash Gordon"
originator -
Raymond
86 Rival of Athens
87 Separated
88 Equips with
better materiel
90 Sound-stage cry
92 Theater drop
93 Scope
94 Soul
95 What wine
shouldn't be
97 Earth tones
98 GRAVY
102 Stage direction
103 Hoof sound
104 Kind of ground
109 Bali Ha'i, in
"South Pacific"


55 Gathering places 113 Iranian money
56 Henry 116 "My Left Foot"
57 Regulars Oscar-winner
59 Suffix with Rock Fricker
61 Skill tested with 117 CHESTNUTS
Zener cards 121 APPLE PIE
62 Resounds 123 Band attraction
63 BRUSSELS 124 San-
SPROUTS 125 Harden
126 Dinnerender
127 Atlas features
128 Father-and-
I y daughter
Hollywood duo


DOWN
1 Perth -, N.J.
2 Opposite of eau
3 Dumas's--
Mousquetaires
4 King and others
5 More rubicund
6 Civil War inits.
7 They may be
caught at the
shore
8 Itallian sports
car, informally
9 Bordered by a
ridge
10 Protozoan
11 Pointer
12 "Sweet Swan of
-!": Jonson
13 Valenciennes, e.g.
14 Eastern V.I.P.'s
15 Business combine
16 Uris hero
Ben Canaan
17 Tin Tin
18 Hot spot, in lunch
counter lingo
19 Tee predecessor
24 Attended
31 "Where's
Daddy?"
playwright
S32 Elicits
34 Sisal oryucca
35 "West Side
Story" song
36 Send
37 Rigs
39 X, to Xenophon
40 "One Flew Over
the Cuckoo's
Nest" author


41 Goddess with a
lyre
42 Some pens
43 Screenwriter,
often
44 Bandleader
Baxter
45 Curaqao
neighbor
46 Up
47 Young fowl
48 Rocket section
53 Hamlet's"-
and arrows"
55 Greek brandies
58 Mideast capital
60 March need
62 Sea anemones,
eg.
64 Dawning
65 Salute
67 Beggar's quest
71 Do a legislator's
job
72 Missionary
Junipero--
73 Kind of sleeve
74 Red-coated
cheeses
76 Airstrip
77 Style of
furnishing
78 Part of a
metropolitan
region
79 Satisfy
80 Actor Redgrave
81 About
82 Gettysburg
general
84 Hosiery purchase
88 "A Yank in the
"(1941
movie)


89 Knightwear
91 W.B.A. result
95 Office machines
96 "-- dabba doo!"
99 Baltimore's -
Park
100 Saxon's foe
101 Deflected


105 Marie 112 Direction in 118
Antoinette, e.g. Durango
106 Bringon 114 Autoracer 119
107 Beautify Luyendyk
108 Spare locales 115 Reason 120
110 It's a put-on for a 121
III Kipling's"- brushoffr 122
we forget!" 117 Gametes


Cambodia's
Nol
Seventh-century
date
N.T. book
Bon--
Nasdaq listings:
Abbr.


D STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. YouI can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" Call 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


tI_,.. _, .- I ,
















SAILBOAT WATER NO BRIDGES TO
GULF $439,000 Spectacular home at open
end of Island's widest canal. Totally updated
1996. Master bedroom overlooks heated pool
and spa. Dock with 10,000 lb. boat lift. Call
Bob & Lu Rhoden.


LONGBOAT KEY CEDAR'S EAST
$215,000 Gorgeous turnkey furnished
townhome. 2BR/2.5BA. Garage with extra stor-
age. Ten HarTru tennis courts. Complex with
great rental program. Call Rose Schnoerr.


PALMA SOLA PARK'S BEST BUY
$169,000 3BR/2BA in a completely remodeled
house. Everything new inside and out. New out-
door above-ground pool and large deck. Call
Harold Small.


S:- ,Di
-;"'5 L


PREMIER NORTH POINT HOME
$595,000 4BR/5BA with office, den, family
room, formal dining room, vast storage, 2-car
plus garage, built for elevator. Dock with elec-
tric and water on deep canal. Call Dick Maher
or Dave Jones.


TURNKEY FURNISHED CONDO
$99,500 2BR/1.5BA overlooking heated pool.
Close to gorgeous beach, shopping, excellent
seasonal or annual rental. Gulffront complex.
Call Helen White.











PINEBROOK GOLFERS DELIGHT $136,500
Turnkey furnished. Used only 10 months in three
years. Professionally decorated with the finest
quality decor and furnishings. Glass enclosed
lanai. Fifth-floor lake view. Call Rose Schnoerr.


DEEP WATER CANAL $549,900 Custom
4BR/3BA with vaulted ceilings, lighted plant
shelves. Spacious master suite with Jacuzzi
tub. Over 2,400 sq. ft. garage area. Call Mary
Ann Schmidt.


PANORAMIC WATER VIEW $139,900
Watch sailboats go by. Fabulous sun/moon rise,
heated pool, tennis court, large beautifully land-
scaped greenbelt. Call Bobye Chasey.


CANALFRONT $59,900 2BR/1.5BA
townhouses with available boat dock in great
canalfront community overlooks pool and court-
yard. REDUCED for quick sale. Call Chard
Winheim.


ESPLANADE ON THE BAY $695,000
Mainland beauty house on Sarasota Bay. 4BR/
2 plus 1/2 bath. Fireplace, newly glass-enclosed
30x12 porch. Only 3 years old. Owner financing.
Call Rose Schnoerr.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
$139,900 Anna Maria Island's finest commu-
nity featuring boating, tennis and heated pools.
Located near shops, beach & library. 2BR/2BA
Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones.











INVESTMENT $$$ MAKER $54,900
Close to beaches, 2BR/2BA, pool, billiard, club-
house, all ages, pets OK. Approximate seasonal
income $1,200 mo. and $850 off season. Owner 5
is motivated. Call Donna Mosley.


!F t
'- ":" ".1.

lil! I !,,, ,,, . 1 1


W-.1

."_t .,..,ll.l', '.. ' ." -


&:.


.-j


I


I'