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 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00641

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FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Aid center opens for Josephine victims


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Islanders victimized by damage attributed to Tropi-
cal Storm Josephine are encouraged to apply for fed-
eral aid at a recovery center in Holmes Beach.
The center will be at the Anna Maria Fire District
Station 1 at 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, and
will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 24 and 25.
Those wishing to apply by phone can call toll free
1-800-462-9029 or 1-800-462-7585 TDD for hearing
and speech impaired.
According to Manatee County emergency manage-
ment planner Mike Makar, the purpose of the center is
to determine if you qualify for a variety of aids.
"We're encouraging anyone who thinks they might


Residents


irate over


building


permit fines
By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
When Dan Hardy installed a spa in the backyard of
his new home at 122 Beach St. in Anna Maria, he
didn't think he needed a building permit. But Public
Works Director Phil Charnock thought otherwise and
levied a $200 fine.
And when Hardy built a fence around his yard, he
paid another $200 for not having a permit.
"The spa is like a bath tub. I tried to get a permit
but the clerk was on vacation," Hardy said.
But Charnock said, "These both require permits
and under our ordinance I have authority to levy a $200
fine. We live on a barrier island and the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency has strict requirements,
which I'm only enforcing. In a storm, a fence post, a
roof shingle or dock slat can become a dangerous mis-
sile so they have to be built right and with a permit."
Asked if a builder has any recourse to appeal
Charnock's fine, Charnock said, "They can go to the
Planning and Zoning Board."
In neighboring municipalities like Holmes Beach
or Longboat Key, a code enforcement officer notifies
the builder and owner in person or by registered mail.
The builder is given a reasonable amount of time to
take corrective action or to request a hearing before the
Code Enforcement Board.
And Charnock said, "These people know they have
to have permits and I'm just enforcing the law. FEMA
rates us each year on how we enforce the codes and stricter
enforcement results in lower flood insurance rates for the
entire community." Charnock added that most of his en-
forcement actions result from citizen complaints.


qualify to come in no matter how small the damage to their
property," Makar said. "There will be grants, loans, food
stamps. All sorts of things depending on need."
Damage to Manatee County and Island homes and
businesses is estimated at $4 million.
One of the aid options includes individual and fam-
ily grants up to $13,000 for families in serious need to
cover damages not covered under their insurance policy.
Another option is temporary housing which in-
cludes mortgage and rental assistance for families
evicted or foreclosed on because of the financial hard-
ship due to the storm. There's rental assistance for
those whose home was made unlivable as a result of the
storm.
In addition, unemployment assistance and counsel-


ing are available from the Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency.
"They will look at your income and assets, whether
you have insurance, how much the damage was,"
Makar said. "It's a qualifying process. If you have in-
surance or are well-insured and have lots of assets, you
probably won't qualify."
City and county governments are not eligible for
assistance because they have not been declared for
public assistance, Makar said. However, that could
change in coming days or weeks, Makar said.
At the request of Gov. Lawton Chiles, President
Clinton declared 16 Florida counties a disaster area.
Assistance is available to citizens but not to local gov-
ernments.


'GREAT PUMPKIN' CONTEST INAUGURATES HALLOWEEN
Christopher Mowry, left,
and Cole Billings thrust and
parry while Morgan
Billings protects the giant
pumpkin. A guess-the-
weight contest sponsored by
the Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce,
Gulf-Bay Realty and First
National Bank of Manatee
includes divisionsfor
-. children and adults. The 12-
year-old-and-under winner
will receive a radio for the
closest guess. The adult
winner receives a $50
savings bond. Islander Earl
Mowry donated the pump-
kin, which was "officially"
weighed Oct. 14. The
pumpkin will be at the Anna
Maria Elementary School
until Oct. 24. After that it
will be returned to the
Chamber office at 5337.
GulfDrive where "guesses"
are welcome. The winner
will be announced Nov. 1.
Islander Photo:
David Futch




Forum for House candidates Oct. 24


A forum featuring candidates for the Florida House
of Representatives District 68 seat will be held Thurs-
day, Oct. 24, at Back Bay Steahouse, 5325 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
The forum, sponsored by The Islander Bystander,
will include incumbent Rep. Mark Flanagan, R-
Bradenton, and Democratic candidate Bob Nolan. The


Three take three seats without

opposition in Bradenton Beach
By Paul Roat in as many
Some new weeks. He
but familiar was appointed
faces will join to the council
the Bradenton earlier in Oc-
Beach City tober to re-
Council in De- .. -. place Dick
cember. Suhre, who
J o h n resigned from
Chappie, Dan office for
Goodchild and Chappie Goodchild Grace health rea-
Charlie Grace sons.
were the lone qualifying candidates for three seats on the Chappie, 44, represents Ward 4 in the southern part
council and will take office without the need of mounting PLEASE SEE ELECTION, NEXT PAGE
a campaign. For Goodchild, it is the second "campaign"


House district includes all of Anna Maria Island as well
as northwest Bradenton.
The forum will begin with a "greet the candidates"
period beginning at 6:30 p.m. At 7, candidates will be
given five minutes to discuss their background and the
issues. Written questions from the floor will be pre-
sented by Islander Bystander Publisher Bonner
Presswood, with a one-minute time of response by
Flanagan and Nolan. Candidates will then be allowed
two minutes for closing remarks.
Everyone is invited. For information, call 778-7978.
I I


SKIMMING THE NEWS...
Opinions ..................... .................. 6
Those W ere the Days .................................... 7
Stir-it-up ................... ............. ......... 18
School Daze ........................... ............ ... 19
Streetlife ...................... ........ ........ ...... 21
Anna Maria Island tides .......................... ... 25
Real estate ............................. ........... 26


OCTOBER 24, 1996


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND






II PAGE 2 E OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria Island next on Sea Grant survey


By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
Now that the state has completed its pilot survey of
all canals and waterways from the Cortez Bridge south
to Siesta Key, it will conclude with a survey north of
the Cortez Bridge including Anna Maria Island's wa-
terways within one year.
Speaking before an Oct. 17 Longboat Key Town
Commission meeting, Florida Sea Grant researcher
Gustavo Antonini said, "A pilot study carried out in
Sarasota Bay provides an example of how boat traffic
can be managed in ways that reduce stress on natural


habitats and waterfront communities."
The study was prompted by the 169 percent increase
in Florida's population in coastal areas since 1960 and a
176 percent increase in recreational boats. The boat in-
crease has resulted in the need for thousands of miles of
dredged canals and access channels. Over time, these have
silted over and caused navigational problems.
Antonini said, "Criteria for improving water depth
have been based on historic dredged depth or arbitrary
depth which has not produced satisfactory results."
For the past several months, Antonini traversed
83 miles of waterway and measured the depth and


width of every canal and the length and draft of each
boat and dock.
Antonini surveyed 5,000 boats, 900 signs and 51
boat-source areas. Based on the canal depth and boat
draft, the computerized study, with colored graphs,
concludes that boats have 73-87 percent unrestricted
access to canals and few canals require dredging.
Longboat Mayor Bob Drohlic said, "The report
will be useful to us in our deliberations to spend $1.4
million to dredge several silted canals in our town. But
I regret I did not know they were surveying every boat
or I would have my boat cleaned before they came."


Crash, boom went
the school bus
Manatee County school bus driver Wayne D. Witham
checks on the driver of a station wagon he rear-
ended at the intersection of Manatee Avenue and
East Bay Drive. Witham was charged with failure to
use due care at the Oct. 7 accident. Witham's school
bus struck the car which then was pushed into a third
vehicle. Witham told Holmes Beach Police he was
turned around talking to students at the time of the
accident when he should have been looking ahead.
Anna Maria resident John Yencho, the driver of the
station wagon, suffered minor injuries, according to
county emergency personnel. None of the children on
the bus were hurt. Islander Photo: David Futch


Wondering what's hot in Halloween wear?


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Superman, Batman and the Grim Reaper are the
old standards for Halloween costumes. And just about
anything Disney is doing in the way of a cartoon fea-
ture fosters a big hit with children.
But nipping at their heels this year are such blood-
and-guts favorites as Jaw Breaker and Butt Mommy.
Mark Wolfe, owner of Party City of Bradenton in
the Cortez Plaza, said the current top seller is from
Disney's "Hunchback of Notre Dame."
"Esmerelda (the hunchback's femme fatale) is the
hottest thing going," Wolfe said. "But the trend this
year seems to be blood-and-guts. We've got a mask
called Jaw Breaker that looks like someone had their
face ripped off. We've got another one called Butt
Mommy that is just hysterical."
While children tend toward the supernatural, most
adults prefer to transform themselves into their favor-
ite alter-ego state such as harem dancers, he said.
"Women go for sexy costumes and the men get
whatever their wives or girlfriends tell them to get,"
Wolfe said. "Kind of like what happens in everyday
life."
Most of Party City's offerings sell for $9.99 to
$39.99. But a promotional costume used at the
company's 200 stores nationwide fetches $600.
Wolfe said they will sell the 9-foot-tall costume but
primarily it is used for display and shock value. He
rents it for $100.



Election
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
of the city. He is owner of a landscape company and
has been active on city beautification boards and is on
the city's planning and zoning board.
Goodchild, 48, represents Ward 1 in the north end
of the city. He was an unsuccessful candidate for mayor
last year. Goodchild too was a member of the city's
planning and zoning board and is owner of a massage
therapy business in Bradenton Beach.
Grace, 70, representing Ward 2, also ran unsuc-
cessfully for mayor last year against Leroy Arnold. He


A history of masks from
Encyclopedia Americana
MASK Generally a covering or a partial
covering worn over the face. Masks usually con-
ceal the identity of the wearer, modifying or
transforming this person into a different indi-
vidual, creature, or spirit personification. Most
cultures, whether historical or contemporaneous,
have used masks on special occasions as part of
their festive performances or ceremonies. Depic-
tions of masks have been found in Paleolithic
cave paintings in southern France, dating from as
early as 30,000 years ago. Today, in Europe and
the Americas, Halloween and Carnival are im-
portant times when masking performances are
presented for the enjoyment of the community.


"We did rent it to one guy last year and he won
$500 in a costume contest at some bar," he said.
"That's a pretty good tradeoff."
Witch Hazel's Closet is an adults-only store in
northwest Bradenton.
According to owner Dru Love, the store in her
home caters to folks who want an authentic costume.
Love said she makes all her own costumes and they
are fitted in a personalized way.
Witch Hazel's fits by appointment only and rents
rather than sells. Love can be reached at 792-4087 and



resigned a seat on the council to run for higher office,
a seat he had for two years. He is a retired airline pilot
and is active in the Coast Guard Auxiliary.
Current council members Gail Cole and John
Kaufmann did not seek re-election due to business
reasons.
Chappie and Grace will serve two-year terms.
Goodchild will serve the remainder of Suhre's term
of one year. The three will take office Dec. 9.
Although there will not be a candidate face-off
Dec. 3, Bradenton Beach voters will still go to the
polls to determine if revisions to the city's charter
should be approved.


is open from noon to 6 p.m.
"We do a lot of couple's things such as Anthony
and Cleopatra, King Neptune and mermaid-saloon girls
and gamblers and flappers are always big," Love said.
"I found it's more fun dealing with adults because they
act like children when they get here."
Love charges $25 to $45 for a 24-hour rental. She
doesn't carry many masks.
"We have original designs that are new," she said.
"I pick up things at vintage stores to add on and make
them real."



More phones

coming to

city ... more

money, too
Consumers may have more pay phones to
use and Bradenton Beach may receive more rev-
enue from those phones under a proposal agreed
upon in principle by the city council.
Council members unanimously agreed to a
proposal by Meyer Publishing Co. to add several
pay telephones throughout the city. Still to be
worked out is a contract between the city and
George Meyer, president of the Tampa telephone
systems and service company.
Revenue to the city would be $180 per year
per phone under Meyer's proposal. The exact
number of phones would have to be determined
after further review, but four locations were dis-
cussed: the police and sanitation departments,
city hall and one location on Bridge Street, pro-
ducing $720 per year. The city currently receives
$49 annually from GTE for one phone at the po-
lice department.
Meyer said he would work with the city's
beautification committee to ensure the phones
would be in keeping with the city's "historic old-
town" look.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E OCTOBER 24, 1996 U PAGE 3 j]


Officials to improve disaster procedures


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In the wake of Tropical Storm Josephine, Island
elected officials last week critiqued storm preparedness
efforts and offered suggestions for improvement.
Officials at the Coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials cited lack of communication and coordination
as the two biggest problems during the storm. A sec-
ond problem is the cities' lack of participation in the
Island Emergency Operations Center, they said.
"Some of our problem is the nature of the IEOC,"
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner said. "It's not
an official body and we have no power. We let Andy
(Fire Chief Andy Price) run it, but he has no power
either. Decisions are made by consensus."
VanWagoner said he believes there is a lagging
interest in attendance at the meetings. "What happens
at the meetings should be reported back to the city
halls. I think it's too loose and we ought to tighten it
up," said VanWagoner.
Holmes Beach Councilman Don Maloney said
elected officials should be represented at IEOC meet-
ings, but city officials such as public works directors


By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
In the wake of Tropical Storm Josephine on Oct. 7,
Mayor Chuck Shumard had this to say about disaster
relief funds for the city, "I don't think we have a disas-
ter. I hate to be crying wolf."
Public Works Director Phil Charock said he
would prepare damage estimates to obtain disaster
funds but the declaration of state and federal aid which
followed covered only individuals not governments.
In other business, there was a consensus of the
commission to provide bike racks and benches for the
Bean Point Walkway Beautification Project. Subject-to
space and safety considerations, the commission will
decide later how many parking spaces to allot to the


and police department representatives should be as-
signed to attend.
Maloney also advocated establishing a "commu-
nity coalition" of all clubs and service organizations on
the Island. Each would designate a representative to
attend IEOC meetings and they would be available to
help during emergency situations.
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard said city offi-
cials there were not informed about the closing of the
bridge at Manatee Avenue and concerned citizens were
calling city hall. He also cited the lack of communica-
tion between officials in the three cities.
"We need to find some way we can communicate
with each other, whether it's by cellular phone or what-
ever," Shumard said.
"I think all the police departments seemed to know
what was going on, but we got left out of the loop,"
Anna Maria Commissioner Robert McElheny said.
"I felt there was some disorganization and we had
residents who were very anxious," Holmes Beach Coun-
cilwoman Carol Whitmore said. "There was a lack of co-
ordination. The mayors should have been informed."
VanWagoner said the broadcast media reported the


Bean Point project.
The commission also:
Approved a home occupational license for
Michael Ellsworth carpet cleaning service at 607 North
Bay Blvd. Ellsworth said no sign would be posted and
no customers would visit his home.
Deferred a decision on granting a variance to in-
crease existing residential square footage on non-con-
forming commercial property at 110 Spring Ave.
Owner Fred Nally had requested 4 1/2-foot setbacks on
each side of his property. Commissioners wanted more
time to study the proposal.
The commission closed its meeting by observing
a moment of silence for former commissioner and com-
munity leader Brendan J. Greene, who died Oct. 4.


bridges were closed to everyone even though residents
were allowed onto the Island, which created a problem.
He said the county should have an information hotline
for the media during disasters.
"We didn't think we were going to have a prob-
lem," Bradenton Beach Vice Mayor Connie Drescher
said. "It would be helpful if we had better communica-
tion when something surprises us. We all should be in
contact by phone so we know what each city and the
EOC is doing."
Holmes Beach Councilman Ron Robinson said the
cities should develop a manual so when a disaster
strikes, "we're all on the same page."
Drescher said the stickers which residents put on
their cars in order to be able to return to the Island are
ineffective because people sell their cars. She sug-
gested tags that hang from rear view mirrors.
Bradenton Beach Councilman Dan Goodchild said
the tags are costly, and Maloney said residents should
pay for them. Officials agreed they will take the sug-
gestions to the next IEOC meeting in.November.


Anna Maria City
10/28, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board

Bradenton Beach
10/28, 6:15 p.m., Citizens' Advisory
Task Force

Holmes Beach
10/24, 1 p.m., Board of Adjustment
10/30, 9 a.m., Planning Commission. Agenda:
residential rental and outdoor
dining ordinances

Of Interest
10/28, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization, Sudakoff Hall, USF Campus,
Sarasota.


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EH PAGE 4 N OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Spring ahead, fall behind' Sunday


Clocks must "fall behind" Sunday. Federal law
demands it.
The Uniform Time Act, enacted by the U.S. Con-
gress in 1966, established a system of uniform (within
each time zone) daylight saving time throughout the
U.S. and its possessions.
Under legislation enacted in 1986, daylight saving
time begins at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of April and
ends at 2 a.m. on the last Sunday of October.
Clocks are set ahead one hour in the spring and set
back to standard time in the fall. Hence the saying,
"spring ahead, fall behind."
Daylight Saving is the system of setting clocks an
hour ahead so that both sunrise and sunset occur at a
later hour, producing an additional period of daylight
in the evening.
The idea of daylight saving was mentioned in a
whimsical essay in 1784 by Benjamin Franklin titled
"Turkey vs. Eagle, McCauley is my Beagle."
DST was first advocated seriously by a British
builder, William Willet in a pamphlet, "Waste of Day-
light," (1907).
During World War I, DST was utilized in the United
States in order to conserve fuel needed to produce electric
power. Some localities reverted to standard time after the
war, but others retained daylight saving.
During World War II, the U.S. Congress passed a
law putting the entire country on war time, which set
clocks one hour ahead of standard time.
War time also was followed in Great Britain where,
in an act of one-upmanship, clocks were put ahead still
another hour during the summer.
Farmers, who usually work schedules determined
by sun time, registered strong opposition to daylight


saving in peacetime.
Perhaps because of their accents or overalls, they
were ignored.
Richard Scott Holmes, a DST aficionado, has his
own ideas on the pluses and minuses of savings time.
"It happens every spring: crocuses, baseball (with
any luck), and the switch to Daylight Savings Time,"
Holmes said "Coming off DST is not hard. In the Fall,
we set our clocks back one hour. We all get an extra
hour to sleep, and those who forget find themselves at
church, or the airport, or wherever an hour early. Em-
barrassing, but not catastrophic.
"But in the Spring we set the clocks forward, and
the trouble begins. We lose an hour of sleep. Forgetful
people miss mass, planes, breakfast, and the big game


on TV. Some are thrown into disarray for up to a full
week. Annual losses due to DST confusion have been
estimated by me at over a million dollars. I myself have
missed a flight to Washington and a showing of The
Seven Samurai because of DST."
There is no need for such tragic waste, Holmes
said. Americans must urge lawmakers to reform Day-
light Savings Time as follows.
Setting clocks back is easy; setting them forward
is difficult. Therefore, let us keep the fall ritual as it
is, he said.
However, one Sunday each Spring, let us set our
clocks not one hour forward, but twenty-three hours
backward.
"Think of all the advantages. We will not lose an
hour of sleep; we will gain almost a day of rest. It
will be Saturday all over again," Holmes said. "You
will never again miss church service, or an airplane,
or the Redskins game."
Naturally, if this were the whole plan, our calen-
dars would fall behind one day in each year.
However, the second part of the revised DST plan
deals with this. Every four years, instead of adding a
day, let us subtract three days. Furthermore, let these
be Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, which accord-
ing to recent polls are the least popular days.
If done in February, which seems reasonable con-
sidering what a miserable month it is, this would have
the beneficial side effect of shortening the excruciating
presidential primary season by an effective four days.
"The advantages of this plan are clear. Let us waste
no time," Holmes said. "With a determined effort we can
have Reformed Daylight Savings Time by Spring of next
year. Write your congressional representative today!"


Charter changes proposed in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
Commission rather than council.
Run-off rather than simple majority for mayoral
elections.
Election of officials in November rather than in
December.
Those changes and more are proposed for what
could be the last December election in Bradenton
Beach if voters approve a charter revision for govern-
ing the city.
A city charter is the enabling law that allows a city
to be a city. The document sets forth how officials are
elected, general guidelines for duties of officers, city
boundaries and other elements of municipal govern-
ment.
"The City of Bradenton Beach shall have all gov-
ernmental, corporate and proprietary powers to enable
it to conduct municipal government, perform munici-
pal functions and render municipal services, and may
exercise any power for municipal purposes except as
otherwise provided by law. A grant of power is not a
mandate requiring the exercise of that power," is how
the charter description reads.
A committee comprising Harry Brown, John
Burns, Walt Grace, Lee Hornack and Ken Lohn -
with Councilman Gail Cole serving as council liaison
- has spent the last six months researching and re-
viewing the city's charter. It's been more than 20 years
since the Bradenton Beach charter was substantially
reviewed.
"This is the one document that sets forth how
we, the citizens of the city, want to be governed,"
Burns told the city council last week. "The charter
shares common ground with the constitution of the
United States: it is of the people as we, the citizens,
chose to create it; it is by the people as we, the citi-
zens, wrote it; and it is for the people as this docu-
ment serves us all."
Burns said one of the biggest points of conten-
tion among committee members was the matter of
citizen initiative and citizen referendum relating to
council actions.
The proposed charter "sets forth how we consent
to be governed, and more importantly, how we the citi-
zens are entitled to address issues by initiative .and ref-
e endum," Burns said. "In other words, to address and
resolve issues that have either been unaddressed or in-
appropriately addressed by our elected officials. The
entire committee has very strong feelings concerning
how this issue is handled in the charter.


"It is our sincere desire that this issue and the
implementing procedure not be left open for interpre-
tation," Burns said.

Highlights of proposed charter
Key elements of the revisions of the city charter
include the following.
Commission rather than council. Charter commit-
tee member Charlie Grace said "commission" was a
gender-neutral term that would avoid the unwieldy use
of "councilman" and "councilwoman" in addressing
elected officials.
Regular charter review. The proposed charter
revision calls for review of the city charter every five
years. The current charter does not have any regular
charter review provisions.
Elected official compensation. Any increase in
pay for council members will take effect one full fis-
cal year after the council votes for a pay hike. There are
no waiting periods for salary increases in the current
charter.
Mayor election requires 50 percent plus one
vote. Council and mayoral candidates are elected by
a simple majority the person who gets the most
votes wins. That procedure would remain the same
for council seats under the proposed charter lan-
guage. For the mayor under the new charter, though,
the winner must receive 50 percent plus one vote or
a runoff election would be held between the top two
vote-getters.
"We determined the current system works for the
city's four wards," Burns said, "but the committee de-
cided the position of mayor is too important it is the
most important position in the city and we deter-
mined that the person who holds that office should
have received the majority of the votes in the city elec-
tion."
Term limits. The proposed charter calls for a
three-year term limit on elected officials in Bradenton
Beach. No such limitation currently exists.
Election date change. In an effort to save money,
elections will be held for city officials during the gen-
eral election in November rather than during a special
city-only election in December. City elections currently
cost about $2,050; under the proposal that cost would
be greatly reduced, Burs said. Elected officials would
still take office in early December under the charter
proposal.
City property disposition. "To lease, acquire, dis-
pose of or change the use of city property" under the


proposed charter will require a "super majority" of four
affirmative votes of elected officials plus a referendum
of the city voters.
Citizen initiatives. Citizens may propose ordi-
nances as long as 10 percent of the voters in the last city
election have signed a petition endorsing the new law.
The council or commission then has 90 days to
enact the new ordinance; failure to do so will call for
a special election where the matter is on the ballot or
the question will be on the regular election as long as
it takes place within 210 days of the petition being pre-
sented to the city.
Citizen referendums. The same process to remove
ordinances from the books is to be followed as the pro-
cedure to create a law. Once the petition is presented
to the city the law in question is suspended.
Both citizen initiatives and citizen referendums do
not apply to the city budget, emergency ordinances or
salaries of city officers, contractors or employees that
are adopted by ordinance.

Timetable
Council members agreed that a workshop or
workshops to discuss the charter should be held in
the next few weeks.
The timetable leading up to the charter appearing
on the Dec. 3 ballot calls for a public hearing on the
proposals on Nov. 21.
Free copies of the proposed charter are available at
city hall.


Community Center

board honors

Lee Edwards
The Board of Directors of the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center honored member Lee
Edwards last week for his dedication and outstand-
ing service to the community center and the com-
munity.
His efforts include working on the fundraising
committee, the circus, getting new lights for the
field, the Pirates' games, the gym floor, the gym
and the library door, said Executive Director
Pierrette Kelly. In addition, he contributed $400
for the rental of a floor prep machine for the instal-
lation of the new gym floor.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 5 IE


Spending referendum petition sparks debate


By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
When Longboat Key resident Rainer Josenhanss
heard the Longboat Key Town Commission had voted
to spend $2.3 million to build a new police station and
upgrade other municipal offices, he was upset. So up-
set, he circulated a petition to limit the commissioners'
spending to $800,000 without a referendum.
Josenhanss, a retired Volkswagon of North
America executive, says the town is at 95 percent


build-out and the voters should decide if capital expen-
ditures of this magnitude are warranted.
The petition states, "We the people ask for a sec-
ond opinion on particular capital improvements via
referendum in the manner provided by law."
Any expenditure over $800,000 would have to be
approved by the voters at a special referendum.
Josenhanss now has half of the required 600 signatures
and he expects the referendum to be on the ballot in
March 1996.


Jamie Raschella of Anna Maria, age 11, watched and worried from the shore as the crew from 5 O'clock
Marine attempted to extract its boat from the waves on the shoreline at Anna Maria's Bayfront Park.
Raschella, her mother and a friend were boating on Saturday when they were stranded just offshore from the
park. They swam ashore and sought help from the marina on Sunday morning. While Raschella's boat re-
mained afloat and anchored offshore, the 5 O'clock Marine boat sent to assist them was swamped by waves.
Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


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MIIU AGENCRASE.










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The petition has sparked a lively philosophical
debate about representative government.
"This petition is not about dollars," Josenhanss
said. "It's letting the commissioners know we are
watching them."
But Mayor Bob Drohlich said, "We are elected
representatives. We have an election every March
when some of our commissioners face re-election. If
the voters don't like what we are doing, they can vote
us out." Town Commissioners Jim Patterson, Bob
Farber and Drohlich face re-election in March, 1996.
Michael Gibbons, chairman of the Department of
Government and International Affairs at the University
of South Florida said a referendum would make
municipal government more cumbersome and could
immobilize it, especially in times of emergencies.
"Voters elect their representatives to make decisions
for them and if voters don't like the decisions, they can
turn them out at election time."
Betty Blair, spokeswoman for the Longboat Key
Public Interest Committee, a fiscally conservative
group which boasts more than 1,000 members, said,
"PIC's board of directors has not endorsed the
Josenhanss' petition but certain members are circulat-
ing the petition."
The concept of a spending referendum is the first
to be circulated in Florida and Josenhanss hopes his
concept will be adopted in other municipalities.

Law firms merge
The law office of Dye & Scott, P.A. and
Alan Hardy Prather, Chartered, have joined to
form the new firm of Dye, Scott, Prather &
Petruff, P.A.
The firm will practice in the areas of adminis-
trative, local government, land use and environmen-
tal law, real property, banking and commercial law,
homeowner and condominium association law,
wills, trust and estates, civic litigation and employ-
ment law, including wage and hour disputes.
The firm is located at 1111 3rd Ave. W.,
Suite 300, Bradenton.


THEFISTATONABNK -O RATE-UPCD






IBj PAGE 6 E OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


You need to know this
Emergency management personnel at the county
level encouraged city personnel to return from a storm
criteria meeting with a message for you. They want you
to understand storm surge.
Nothing better than a first-hand example, aka
Tropical Storm Josephine, we thought.
New people come and old-timers depart, they rea-
soned, and just not enough people understand what can
happen when forecasters predict a storm surge.
Remember Gump? Remember the scene where
Forrest Gump marches through rain and deep water up
to his neck and actor Tom Hanks' voice reads aloud
Forrest's letter to his girlfriend explaining that rain in
Viet Nam comes from the sky in buckets. It rains side-
ways there too, he says, as we watch the wind hurl rain
horizontally at Forrest. It even rains upside down, he
says, as we watch the rain fall so hard around his shoul-
ders that it splashes back up in his face.
We think that image from a movie that nearly
everyone relates to these days symbolizes what you
need to know about a storm surge.
In a storm surge situation, the water comes from ev-
erywhere. The tide rises much higher than normal high
tides. Water from the Gulf and bay fills the storm drain
system and backs saltwater up into streets. Rain falls, satu-
rates all the yards and fills every crevice until the streets
and low-lying areas are nearly knee deep with water. The
waves crash on the beach with a powerful force more
destructive than the accompanying winds.
It leaves people stranded in flooded homes while
the power dangerously remains on and the TV
forecasts warnings. All the while, escape and evacua-
tion routes are obscured or obliterated.
But, we said, we can't tell people often enough or
strongly enough what the consequences of a storm
surge mean on Anna Maria Island. Unfortunately,
Mother Nature provides an unforgettable lesson.
Plainly speaking, it's not just a tidal wave or swol-
len canals or flooded streets and homes or waves crash-
ing over beachfront homes. It's all of the above.
Now, Islanders have an opportunity to appeal for
a variety of assistance temporary housing, rental as-
sistance, unemployment assistance and counseling.
This is the first such instance of on-site recovery
assistance in the collective memories of Islander news
hounds and assorted old-timers.
Will it help to have answers about assistance hand-
ily available for two days? Well, yes, if you can qualify
for the assistance which basically comes down to
whether you have insurance, enough insurance, or
enough ability (money) to pay for the damages with-
out the government's assistance.
The "storm victim counseling" offered by FEMA
should start off with a questionnaire the first ques-
tion being "Why do you live here?"


IISLANDERt 11011sk
OCTOBER 24, 1996 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 49
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Frank Cunningham
Jack Egan
David Futch
Jim Hanson
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Kevin Cassidy
Andrew White
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
Joan Marie Giannini
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Michelle Ruiz del Vizo
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more 25 cents each.
1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK 'Bring your own ladder' By Egan

e p T


Hurricane section is
whirlwind of information
Your special articles relating to the 1996 Hurricane
Season are extremely well written and documented.
For many years, I have studied hurricane tracking
and warning materials your presentation is the best
I have seen:
Every Islander should review and keep this special
section in a readily accessible location.
Walt Ande, Holmes Beach
Community looses good friend
I didn't know it at the time, but on Thursday, Oct.
3, I had a rare privilege. I was given the opportunity to
share one last bear hug with Brendan Greene.
In retrospect, it is fitting that our paths crossed
outside the Anna Maria post office a morning greet-
ing spot in the city he loved so well.
He said he wasn't feel well. Yet he said it with a
smile, not as a complaint.
Although many of you have known Brendan for
many years, my friendship with him was only 5 1/2
years old. We met when he was still a member of the
board of directors of the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center and I was first an employee.
Over these last few years, we have shared a bond that
was very much like a father and daughter, good times and
bad. That last hug was like every one before it a mu-
tual respect and understanding that needed few words.
There is a true gentleman, a man of integrity and
compassion, gone from us today. But definitely gone
to the even more loving arms Brendan always served.
To his family, thank you for sharing him with us.
His example is always with us. Godspeed, Brendan.
Cynthia Finn, Holmes Beach
Story out of chaos
I would personally like to thank The Islander By-
stander for giving me an opportunity to share my ex-
citement with our Island friends.
Gary Dingier and I have had numerous people remark
to us about the article Islander Correspondent Jim Hanson
wrote, "Island missionaries labor in Guatemala."
I must say that I am pleased with his ability to piece
together enough fo: a.rti. I hadij~ :returned ro.


a 16-hour driving trip to make our appointment know-
ing that the timing of the story on behalf of Gary and I
was critical to our departure time.
Your correspondent was able to come up with some-
thing which I consider a miracle since as I was very tired
and my communication skills were at best distorted. Upon
our return we are hopeful that there might be a follow-up
article as the members of Roser Memorial Church seem
to be interested in their own Gary's experience. I have
never been on one of these trips when we didn't have an
interesting story or two to share.
I expect to take Sept. 26 issue including our story
with us on the trip and have someone photograph the
Islander with one of the natives or whatever we
might come up with.
Again, my thanks and appreciation to the staff of
the Islander for allowing me to share what is dear to
me. Hopefully we'll be able to follow up.
Larry Maschino, Bradenton Beach Post Office let-
ter carrier

Buff up buffer zones in outside
dining ordinance
The Holmes Beach City County has done a com-
mendable job in the placement of several restrictions in the
draft ordinance for the allowance of outside dining, how-
ever, I feel a very important factor has been overlooked.
Although outside dining in Holmes Beach would
be enjoyed by many, we must, however, be certain that
this would not affect the peace and tranquillity of the
adjoining residents. We must remember that these resi-
dents purchased their homes when the ordinances pro-
hibited the outside use of these establishments.
There are several restaurants (i.e., Back Bay
Steakhouse) that are occupying a building that has been
around a very long time. Throughout the many changes
of ownership and partial remodels and additions it has
never been made to be brought into compliance with cur-
rent codes and ordinances (i.e., screening and buffering).
We must at this time make all existing restaurants
who will benefit from this changed ordinance bring
their properties into compliance by submitting a current
site plan for review with the city officials.
li, I- T'tnoi rt!. Holj Q / ; ,P i:










THOSE WERE THE DAYS
Part 7, A Soldier's Story
by June Alder


Chateaux, cathedrals and wine shops held a fascination for American soldiers.


TRAVELS WITH CLAIR


Like many other Americans arriv-
ing in France, Clair Jones of Anna
Maria, Florida, and his friend Will Aus-
tin of New York state were astonished
not only at how beautiful the country
was but how very old.
In the early spring of 1918 "Black
Jack" Pershing was massing his troops
southeast of Paris holding out for a
separate American army instead of al-
lowing his men to link up with Allied
forces. So the Yanks had some opportu-
nities to sight see.
Clair was especially eager to ex-
plore the countryside. His mother's fam-
ily was French (their last name was
"Baby," pronounced "Bobby"). They
had moved to Canada in the mid-1800s
where Sophia married Irishman John R.
Jones who later took her and their chil-
dren to Tampa and eventually to Anna
Maria Key.
"There are many things that would
interest you," he wrote his mother.
"There are lots of little villages gener-
ally consisting of one or two churches
surrounded by wine shops. Your artistic
eye would be charmed by the old build-
ings and roadside shrines. But after you
have been billeted in one of the old
buildings and waded by the shrine knee
deep in mud, it rather palls."
Clair had read much about Saint Joan
of Arc, the peasant girl whose simple faith
had saved France from its enemies in the
15th century. Her birthplace of Domremy-
La-Pucelle on the River Meuse was not far
away from camp.
Clair and Will hopped a train for a
visit. They looked at artifacts from the


Maid's time displayed in a museum
and saw the font in which she was bap-
tized. They gazed up at her statue and
paused at the spot where she heard
some of her voices. Finally, they
prayed in the basilica built in her
memory and in the memory of all
French soldiers fallen in war.
One Sunday in March "Holy Fa-
ther" Clair took his "congregation" on
a 15-mile expedition through four vil-
lages.
In each town they enjoyed liba-
tions at the inns. At the first they
lunched on eggs and sausages that had
been aging in the rafters and "drank
lots of beer." By the time they reached
the fourth village they were feeling
very mellow.
Clair wrote to his sister Kathleen
back in Anna Maria:
"The last village was on top of a
steep hill. The street leading up to it
had terraces and it was a fierce climb to
get to the top. We found an inn up
there, too. So we had some more beer.
"One of the boys wanted to try out
his French, so when the old innkeeper
showed us a picture of his daughter, he
tried to say, 'very good.' But it came
out 'ne pas bon,.' which means no good,
and that made the old man grumble.
"By that time it was quite late so
we had some more sausages and eggs.
Also more beer. We then burst into
song and sang so loudly that all the
simple villagers crowded into the inn to
see what had broken loose. After quite
a gladsome songfest we came back
home, arriving just in time to keep
from being picked up by the Military
Police. It was a happy occasion."
It was the last "happy occasion"
they'd have for a while.
The Sixth Engineers got orders to
leave for Picardy to the north of Paris
where a massive German offensive had
taken the British and French forces by
surprise. Their commanders begged
Pershing for reinforcements.
By the time 500 engineers and two
American infantry divisions reached
the war-scarred Somme Valley the
Germans were on the fringes of the
lovely cathedral city of Amiens and
within 40 miles of Paris.

Next: Will the
line hold?


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 7 |M
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A French market woman tends her
cauliflower stand.






IK PAGE 8 E OCTOBER 24, 1996 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Holmes Beach long-range plan amendments


ready for Nov. 7 public hearing


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The plan that will chart the city's course for the
next seven years will be presented to Holmes Beach
residents for comment at 7 p.m. on Nov. 7.
In two weeks of work sessions, council reviewed
the planning commission's revisions to its comprehen-
sive plan amendments and made further changes. Ar-
eas of major discussion included establishing a mixed-
use district south of Manatee Avenue, designating capi-
tal improvements, constructing a new city hall and cre-
ating a parks and recreation board.
The plan was prepared by Gerald Smelt of the
Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council, following the
direction of the city's planning commission.

Future Land Use Element
Policy 1.2.9 : After several lengthy discussions,
council eliminated this and related policies to make the
area bordered by Manatee Avenue on the north, the
Bradenton Beach city limits on the south, East Bay
Drive on the east and the Gulf of Mexico on the west
a mixed-use district.
Smelt explained that the policy was added to the
plan as an opportunity to aid in redevelopment of the
area. The mix of uses would be 50 percent residential
and 50 percent commercial. Commercial uses would be
low intensity such as hairdressers, barber shops, drug
stores and the like. It would also allow for businesses
with residences on the second floor.
"You're taking a residential district and turning it
into commercial," Council Chairman Luke Courtney
protested.
"We're talking about land use, not zoning," replied
Smelt. "We're not amending your zoning."
City Attorney Patricia Petruff explained that the
district's land use designation in the comp plan is resi-
dential. A property owner can never get a change in
zoning unless that designation is changed.
"This would establish a method to have a combi-


nation of types of uses in the district," Petruff pointed
out. "The next step would be to amend the land devel-
opment code to establish the standards and criteria. If
anyone came before you for a zoning change, you
would be able to objectively determine if that change
is appropriate."
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore asked why that
area was chosen.
Planner Sue Normand said it was to recognize the
mixed uses already established in the district such as
Duffy's Tavern and the West Coast Surf Shop without
making the district completely commercial. However,
she felt the mixed-use area should stop at the intersec-
tion of East Bay Drive and Gulf Drive.
Courtney said Duffy's and the surf shop are legal
non-conformities and are grandfathered, but Whitmore
noted they can never change or expand that use.
Council members Billie Martini and Ron Robinson
said they saw no reason for the change.
"There's a lot of people in residential districts who
would like to convert their properties to commercial,"
Robinson said. "That's one of the most congested ar-
eas in the city. If we do anything to intensify it, we'll
make the situation worse."
"Your traffic concern is well taken; however, be-
fore anyone is allowed to have a change of use, the land
development code requires that they demonstrate that
the impact of that development does not exceed the
level of service," Petruff replied. "Assuming you're
correct, unless they want to increase the capacity of the
road by putting in a turn lane, it would be self-acting
moratorium."
Petruff said the flip side is that if the city restricts
property owners so much that they cannot get a reason-
able benefit from the use of their property, the city
could have legal problems.
"For example, the four lots on the corer of Gulf
Drive and Manatee Avenue are zoned residential but are
unsuitable for residential because of the traffic volume,"
she said. "This was an attempt to help deal with that."


Rita Clark, whose family owns three of the four
lots there, has approached the planning commission on
several occasions to have the two lots on Manatee
Avenue rezoned. She was told it is impossible without
a change in the land use designation.
Whitmore asked that the surf shop be included in
any change because the owner sought relief in the past
and was told he could not expand or make any changes
to the property.
Courtney said he would like to help Clark but did
not want to include the Duffy's or surf shop properties.
"Gerald and I would have to do some tap dancing
with DCA (Florida Department of Community Affairs,
which must approve the comp plan) to explain why two
lots in the middle of a residential area should have a
commercial land use designation," Petruff replied.
Smelt said a mixed-use designation is preferable to
a commercial one. He also noted if the only the two lots
are changed, it will put more traffic onto Manatee Av-
enue but if the whole block is changed, the lots can be
accessed from the side or rear.
Council agreed to visit the site and discuss the is-
sue at a second session.
At council's second session, Jim Brady, owner of
the West Coast Surf Shop, asked council to include his
property if a change to mixed-use is made.
"Non-conforming is a restriction of use," Brady
said. "I'm only 30 percent built-out, and I can't do any-
thing to my property. The highest and best use of the
property in that area is mixed-use or commercial and
it would be greatly appreciated by everyone con-
cerned."
Martini said changing only certain properties is
spot zoning.
"It's not spot zoning because the land use is still the
same," Smelt replied. "It's only recognizing the
uniqueness of those six lots."
Maloney said if someone in that area wants to
PLEASE SEE PLAN, NEXT PAGE






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 9 fi


PLAN, FROM PAGE 8
change a property's use, he wants to see a specific plan
before approving it.
Courtney said there is currently a procedure for
expanding a non-conformity in the city's codes.
Policy 1.3.3: This policy stated that mixed use in
the multi-family residential/ seasonal tourist land use
category (the A-1 zoning district along the Gulf be-
tween 74th Street and the Martinique) shall be encour-
aged and when the development is on a parcel of two
acres or more, the mixture shall be 60 percent commer-
cial and 40 percent residential.
Smelt said the district was designated as mixed-use
in the 1989 comp plan but because of new state re-
quirements, percentages must be added to any mixed-
use district. He said the percentages can be any num-
bers of the council's choosing.
Petruff said in the 1989 plan the term mixed-use
was to address the mixture of seasonal tourist and resi-
dential uses on different properties in the district. The
DCA now defines it as a mixture of uses on the same
property.
Council agreed to remove the term mixed-use and
the percentages from the policy.

Transportation Element
Policy 1.3.6: The major discussion in this element
was about this policy which states that the planning
commission, in conjunction with the public works de-
partment and the business community, will prepare and
implement a streetscape plan for the city's main roads.
Smelt said a streetscape plan includes landscaping,
benches, street lights and other amenities and there is
no financial obligation on the city's part.
Robinson said the council should appoint a com-
mittee to prepare the plan; however, Martini objected
because the committee would have to operate in the
Sunshine: giving notice of meetings and minutes.
Courtney said a planning commissioner could be
chairman of a streetscape committee that would gather
information for commissioners.
"If you give it to the planning commission, you're
taking it out of my hands (as the council's liaison for
beautification)," she said. "As the liaison, this is what
I'm supposed to do."
Normand noted that the planning commission


makes recommendations to council, which makes the
final decisions.
Council agreed to leave the policy as is.

Housing Element
Goal 1: Robinson questioned how the city is to
provide affordable housing for all of its residents.
Smelt said the requirement will be met because the
city's codes permit duplexes and triplexes.
Policy 1.2.3: Council questioned the need to iden-
tify very low and low income housing sites in this ele-
ment.
"The governor and the DCA did not feel that the
original housing element was sufficient," Smelt ex-
plained. "So they're looking at this very carefully.
Recognizing the character of this community, you
don't have any but you still have to address it. It's
easier to write the policy with that language than jus-
tify why it's not there."
Smelt said if people with very low and low in-
comes can't find housing in the city, the county can
help them find it elsewhere.
Policy 1.3.2: Councilman Don Maloney asked why
the city must permit group and foster care homes.
Smelt said the city must have a policy to permit
them, but they are not allowed in a Coastal High Haz-
ard Area, which includes the entire city.

Infrastructure Element
Policy 1.2.5: In this policy to encourage the county
to bring treated wastewater to the Island for landscap-
ing and irrigation, the council added that the water must
be safe and tested.
Policy 2.1.3: This policy stated that in low lying
areas the city should consider construction of drainage
retention areas in the public right of way. Robinson felt
this would create hazards in the rights of way. Coun-
cil changed "consider" to "consideration be given to."
Policy 2.2: This policy stated that the city must
adopt a comprehensive master stormwater drainage
plan by July, 1997. The council changed the adoption
date to within one year after receiving the plan from the
Southwest Florida Water Management District.

Coastal, Conservation Element
Policy 1.4.1: This policy said the city shall con-


tinue enforcement of the tree ordinance which requires
all development or redevelopment to preserve 25 per-
cent of the native vegetation on site.
Martini said it should be 100 percent.
"If you want to build a house where the trees are,
you can move them to another location or give them to
the city," she said.
"If I bought that property for $150,000, I can do
what I want," retorted Whitmore. "That's property
rights."
"Who is going to pay to relocate the trees and what
about lots that are covered with trees and vegetation?"
asked Maloney. "If the property owner doesn't want
any of them, the city will be clearing their lots for free."
Robinson said it is costly to move mature trees. He
also asked why the policy states that it is not applicable
to wetland areas.
"A developer could take out all of them in a wet-
land area," he noted.
Smelt said the 25 percent does not apply to wetland
areas and they are also covered by state and federal
laws.
Policy 1.4.4: Robinson asked that carrotwood be
added to this list of exotic species that the city encour-
ages developers to remove.
Smelt said carrotwood is not listed as an exotic by
the state.
Policy 1.7.2: This policy stated that along water-
ways that have no seawalls, native marine vegetation
shall be used for shoreline stabilization.
Maloney asked if this applied to private property,
and Smelt said it did.
"What if they have vegetation and want to build a
seawall? Maloney asked.
According to the policy as it is they can't, Smelt
said.
Council changed the policy to state, "All existing
waterways must be seawalled or planted with native
vegetation to insure shoreline stabilization."
Objective 2.1: This objective states that the city,
to the extent practical, shall limit public expenditures
that subsidize development permitted in the Coastal
High Hazard Area.
Smelt said it's a state requirement but "it's totally

PLEASE SEE PLAN, NEXT PAGE


GOOD EAR'


Alzheirners


ARE YOU CONFUSED ABOUT ...

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Over 92% of people who have purchased annuities have made a
costly mistake. Most annuity owners will find 70% or more of their
accumulated earnings go to the IRS, not their families, because of
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This is why Elder Care Financial Services is having a free eye-open-
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1. How to prevent 70% or more of your annuity's value from
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increase in the benefits from your annuity.
3. What to do when the interest rate on your annuity drops.
4. How to use annuities to obtain long-term care protection.
5. How to protect yourself now against a possible decrease in
estate tax exemption.
6. Leave a "DYNASTY" to your heirs up to 10 times greater than
your current estate using existing Annuities, CD's, MUNIS, Etc.
7. Protect yourself if your new president should reduce the estate
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9am 11am
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MI PAGE 10 M OCTOBER 24, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


II


ART GALLERY
Exhibiting extensive collections by the
most talented Florida artists ...
Painting, Sculpture, Glass & Pottery
Mon-Sat 10:30 to 5 Sunday 12 to 5
and by Appt.. Closed Wednesdays
509 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-4655

Fine Jewelry LOONEY
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'Children's Night' now at
Island Baptist Church
The Island Baptist Church in Anna Maria City will
offer "Children's Night" each Wednesday beginning
this week for children grades one through five.
A church-wide supper by reservation will begin at
5:30 p.m. with Children's Choir at 5:45 p.m. and
King's Kids Mission Bible fun at 6:30 p.m.
There is no charge for the programs but a $2 do-
nation will be accepted for the meal.
For more details call Pastor Chuck Hahn, director
of youth, at 778-0719.

Historic railroad station
returns to Parrish
Dedication ceremonies of the historic railroad station
in Parrish will be begin with Halloween fun on Friday,
Oct. 25, and continue through Monday evening, Oct. 28.
An "Eerie Train Ride" will run nightly from 6 to 9
p.m. The Halloween program continues on Saturday, Oct.
26, and Sunday, Oct. 27, with three train runs starting at
11 a.m. re-enacting the Great Train Robbery.
Arts and crafts, food and entertainment will round
out the festivities.
The historic station was moved from Bradley
Junction to Parrish and will house the Florida Gulf
Coast Railroad Museum and train tour ticket office.
The Florida Gulf Coast Museum and the railroad
station is located behind the post office on U.S. 301,
Parrish. Call the railroad information line for more
information at 722-4272.

Island sculptor lauded
Island sculptor Debbie Keller-McCartney of Anna
Maria City was given the Best Sculpture award at the
annual Autumn Members' Art Show at the Sarasota
Visual Art Center in Sarasota.
Keller-McCartney was awarded a $100 gift certifi-
cate from Art & Frame in Sarasota.


PLAN, FROM PAGE 9
impractical in your case. That being the case, you couldn't
fix a pothole. We're saying that if a developer wants to
build 10 condos, he has to pay for the (installation of)
sewer and water and drainage. The city can't stop him, but
it will not subsidize that infrastructure."
Robinson said it should include all development,
but Smelt said that would prevent the city from build-
ing a city complex or a master drainage system.
Policy 3.2.1: This policy stated that the city shall
adopt a temporary post disaster moratorium following
a disaster. Robinson said "shall" should be changed to
"consider."
Smelt said the policy was designed to guard
against unlicensed contractors and give the city time
to develop procedures to verify their legitimacy.
Robinson said if the policy was in place the city
would have had to abide by it last week when the
mayor declared a disaster following the storm.
Council agreed to Robinson's suggested change.

Infrastructure
Policy 1.2.5: The council added a provision that
the city will pass a resolution encouraging the state to
authorize the establishment of a county water and
sewer board and that the city will seek membership on
the board.

Capital Improvements Element
Smelt said the proposed city hall complex must be
included in this element or the city can't build it, but
it can be added any time before formal council adop-
tion of the comp plan in April, 1997.
He said the city must provide a legal survey and
respond to 15 questions he submitted before he can
add the complex to the plan. He must have the infor-
mation by this week in order to add the complex to the
plan before the public hearing.
Courtney said he would consult with the mayor
and city clerk to see if they can provide the informa-
tion this week.
Smelt also told council that once a plan for a spe-
cific capital improvement of $5,000 or more is adopted
by council, it must be added to the comp plan and in-


Have Islander will travel
Islanders Taylor and Kathy Manning and Josh
Wimberly took their copy of The Islander Bystander
to Chicago and did a quick read before visiting the
Field Museum of Natural History. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of Mike Wilson

Anything Goes
in bear show
Anything Goes, Inc., of Anna Maria City will par-
ticipate in the Doll and Bear Show and Sale to be held
Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Bradenton Auditorium, 100
10th St. W., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is $2.50 and the public is invited to attend.


clude specifics, costs and funding methods.
Policy 1.3.1: This policy states that the city shall
not expend public funds to expand the capacity of a
public facility or service, over which it has control,
which results in an increase of intensity or density.
Courtney asked if this applies to the proposed city
hall complex.
"This is here because of the DCA," Smelt ex-
plained. "Their concern was expending funds in a
coastal high hazard area for anything that will increase
the density or intensity of uses. A new city hall is a
public benefit. It's not going to involve any more
people coming here. It's a community use."

Recreation, Open Space Element
Policy 1.4.2: Martini objected to this policy which
established a city parks and recreation board for the
same reason she objected to a streetscape committee.
"You have to have some way to insure you're
meeting your state requirements," Smelt said. "You can
get rid of it but you have to revise another policy to
implement the objective."
Courtney noted that the city has a hard time find-
ing volunteers for its current boards and another board
would create additional work for the city staff.
Smelt said the council could designate the planning
commission as the parks and recreation board.
Martini said she would take the responsibility as a
council liaison and accomplish the duties the same way
she does with her beautification group, several volun-
teers that report to her. She, in turn, reports to council.
Planners Normand, Gabe Simches and Frances
Smith-Williams said the task is too large for one coun-
cil person aided by a small group of volunteers.
"I don't think you should do it like you do beauti-
fication, because the impression we get is that its hap-
hazard," Whitmore told Martini. "It (a parks and rec-
reation board) should be more formalized. There
should be a committee that has meetings and comes up
with a plan."
"It needs to be an organized effort," Normand
added.
Council assigned the board's function to Martini as
council liaison, but agreed it might reconsider that de-
cision at the public hearing.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 11 II[


Island chamber to hold
Dust off your ol' grass skirt and join the Anna
Maria Island Chamber of Commerce at its Island Luau
and Polynesian Show to be held Saturday, Oct. 26,
from 6 to 10 p.m. at St. Bernard Catholic Church.
The evening will include music, dancing, dinner
and entertainment at a cost of $20 per person. The cost
for children age six and under is $12.
Ato's Restaurant of Anna Maria City will provide
a meal of teriyaki beef, Hawaiian pork and chicken,
fried rice, coconut spinach, salads and desserts. Beer,
wine and soft drinks will be available at a cash bar.
Advance ticket purchase is recommended. Tick-
ets may be purchased at the following Holmes Beach
locations: the Island Chamber, 5337 Manatee Ave.,
W.; Island Real Estate, 6101 Marina Dr.; or Home
True Value Hardware, Holmes Beach Shopping
Center.

Women's association to
meet Monday
The Women's Association of the Key Royale Club
will met on Monday, Oct. 28.
Tea will be served at 1:30 p.m. and the meeting
will convene at 2 p.m.
The program will feature George Fleenar, director
of the Bishop Planetarium, who will speak about plan-
ets and stars.

Booth space available for
annual Heritage Days
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island is now
accepting reservations for booth space for its 7th An-
nual Heritage Days Arts and Crafts Fair to be held Sat-
urday and Sunday, Nov. 9 and 10, at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
To reserve a space or for more information, call
Lois Lietz at 794-8671.

Bradenton Beach Festival
seeks 1997 logo for
February festivities
The Bradenton Beach Festival committee is look-
ing for a design for its 1997 festival logo.
The fifth annual festival will be held Feb. 8 and 9
in the Historic Old Town area of Bradenton Beach.
The winning design will be used on festival souve-
nirs and in promotional advertising for the event. The
designer will receive credit for the design and receive
an award to be presented during festival weekend.
The design can be no larger than one square foot,
must be one color line art and be camera ready artwork.
Entries should be mailed to P.O. Box 333, Bradenton
Beach, FL 34217 or delivered to 129 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach, no later than Monday, Nov. 18.
Anyone requiring additional information should
contact the Festival Committee at 778-2864, ext. 2.

Party with Snooty in the
park Sunday
The sixth annual "Party in the Park" will be held
Sunday, Oct. 27, at Bradenton's Rossi Waterfront Park.
The day begins with a pancake breakfast served
from 7 to 10 a.m. including pancakes, sausage, and
juice or coffee for $2.50.
The festivities begin at 10 a.m. There are plenty
of activities for the whole family including musical
performances, more than 75 arts and craft exhibitors,
miniature golf, pony rides, a petting zoo and much
more.
In addition to the "Salute to Freedom" flag proces-
sion, there will be a boat parade, a DeSoto Speedway
car display and antique car show, a five-person sky
diving team, a bird and reptile exhibit from Sarasota
Jungle Gardens, a free health fair and a variety of food
vendors.
Admission is free and on-site parking is $2.
The South Florida Museum will be open all day to
visit Snooty the Manatee and view all the planetarium/
laser shows. Museum admission is $4 for adults and $2
for children.
The day will conclude with a fireworks display
over the Manatee River at 9 p.m.
This event will benefit Snooty the Manatee, the
South Florida Museum and Manatee Players/
Riverfront Theatre. For more information call Dave
LaBell at 745-7020 or Jane Evers at 747-3727.


Polynesian fundraiser


Baptist youth to go
camping
The Island Baptist Church youth will be camping
and horseback riding at Myakka City's Circle E
Ranch on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26.
To make reservations, contact Pastor Church
Hahn, director of youth, at 778-0719.


Parliamentary procedure
workshop at
A Real Bookstore
A Real Bookstore will offer a workshop, "Mak-
ing Meetings Work," on Tuesday, Oct. 29, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Jane Pratt, professional registered parliamentar-
ian, will present information for officers and members
of organizations, based on Robert's Rules of Order,
Ninth edition.
The workshop is limited to 15 participants and a
light lunch will be available. Cost is $10. The store is
located at 5700 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton, across
from Denny's.
For information and reservations for the work-
shop, call A Real Bookstore at 795-2665.
Housecall of Holmes
Beach to hold open house
Housecall Home Heathcare invites the public to
its open house to be held on Friday, Oct. 25, from 4
to 7 p.m.
Food, music and good company will be featured.
Housecall Home Healthcare provides both pri-
vate and Medicare services in the home and has op-
erated in the area for eight years. The facility is lo-
cated at 3216 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.
If more information is needed, call Housecall
Home Healthcare at 778-0747.

Workshops sponsored by
Longboat Island Chapel
Katherine Penfield will conduct a seven-session
workshop on "What We Do and Why We Do It," on
Thursday, Oct. 24 and 31, Nov. 7, 14 and 21, and Dec.
5 and 12, at 10:30 a.m. at the Longboat Island Chapel.
Dr. Robert Ball will conduct a three-session work-
shop on "Self-esteem: An Essential Ingredient In Whole-
ness," on Tuesdays, Oct. 29, Nov. 5 and 12, at 10:30 a.m.
The chapel is located at 6200 Gulf of Mexico
Drive, Longboat Key. Call 383-6491 for registration
information.

Vial of Life available at
Longboat Chamber
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce is dis-
tributing the Vial of Life for the home and automobile.
The Vial of Life program is designed to provide
emergency service personnel with time-saving medi-
cal information. The Vial of Life kit includes a medi-
cal information form, a plastic vial and sticker indi-
cating Vial of Life user to be place on the outside of
the refrigerator for home use or on the glove compart-
ment door for use in the automobile. Emergency ser-
vice personnel will see the sticker and know where to
look for your Vial of Life.
There is no charge for the Vial of Life. If you
would like a Vial of Life, stop by the chamber office
at 6854 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key, in the
Whitney Beach Plaza.


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T -Artle 1-2'n TOfi Wtstats indicate anotharNbR

Turtle season stats indicate another good year


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Suzi Fox figures she has put in a doubly rewarding
sea turtle hatching season:
10,939 baby turtles safely off Anna Maria Island
beaches into the Gulf of Mexico, and
What she regards as proof positive that she and
the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
took the right course in changing the whole approach
this year.
Fox is the turtle conservation permit holder for the
Island, and it was up to her to put the new DEP program
into effect against vociferous protests by last year's
group, Turtle Watch.
Until this year, those in the program moved many
sea turtle nest to shelters for hatching. They felt the
eggs needed protection from predator birds, animals
and people. The hatching season just ended saw DEP's
prohibition against moving nests in effect except in
most extraordinary circumstances.
Fox said that of the 196 nests on the Island, only
14 were moved from surf and fatally soggy sand to
more healthful places no more that 25 feet away.
As for predators, the turtle benefactors found only
one nest disturbed, and that by a young raccoon. It had
gotten 70 eggs of the 136 in the nest. The protectors
caught the coon in a cage provided by the county Ani-
mal Control Division.
"When you give them back the cage they destroy
the coon," she said, "but we didn't want to be part of
that so we relocated the coon ourselves, away from
turtles."
Other would-be predators, two young boys seen
digging for a nest marked with stakes to warn people
away, weren't up to the job they didn't lay a glove
on the nest. Just as well, for the state penalty is 60 days
in the slammer, $500 fine plus $100 per egg, while the
federal penalties run from $25,000 to $50,000 fines.
The "major major" problem remains lights, Fox
PLEASE SEE TURTLE STATS, NEXT PAGE


A turtle hatchery in
Ft. Lauderdale. Use
of the hatcheries has
been disallowed by
Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection officials.


Turtle hatcheries around, but not here


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Turns out you can still bring tiny sea turtles to life
in a hatchery. If you're in Fort Lauderdale, that is.
Not if you're on Anna Maria Island.
Ed Callen of Anna Maria, one of the originators
of the Island's Turtle Watch program, was outraged
to learn that hatcheries are not only permitted but
required in some Florida Atlantic Coast areas.
Why, then, he asked furiously, was Anna
Maria's turtle hatchery program shut down by the
state this year and nests simply staked or caged for
protection?
Turtle Watch volunteers used to move eggs into
well-guarded hatchery areas. They kept an eye on
developments and saw to it that fresh-hatched babies
made their way across the beach into the Gulf. That


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ended this yuar by state edict.
The state claims handling the eggs damages
their embryonic turtles, Callen said, although "there
was no proof and that is still speculation, still just
a theory.
"If handling the eggs is harmful here I can't
imagine it's not harmful there. Or if it's not harm-
ful there, why is it so harmful here?" Callen asks.
Well, says the state official responsible for pro-
tecting endangered species, it's a matter of numbers
and several other things.
"We looked at all beaches that get sea turtle
nests," said David Arnold, chief of the Protected
Species Management Bureau of the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection. "Some of them
PLEASE SEE HATCHERIES, NEXT PAGE


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PUBLIC NOTICE

City of Anna Maria #1 in Manatee County
RECCE FALL CLEAN UP ECYCLE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2ND.


8:00 AM TO 3:00 PM. GULF DRIVE NEXT TO
THE ANNA MARIA POST OFFICE PLAZA

Plus ... our RECYCLE YARD at Pine Ave.
is open 7 days a week.

For any questions about recycling,
call Commissioner George McKay at City Hall 778-0781


YARD WASTE
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iTJ$;IANER BYSTANDER, ,OCTOBER 24, 1 996i 'PAGE-43 'Ij

Tropical Storm Josephine spares turtle nests


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
While other Gulf islands were losing hundreds of
sea turtle eggs to Tropical Storm Josephine, Anna
Maria Islanders were saving them.
When the storm started sending heavy seas over
the beach, a deadly threat to turtle nests, there were
only two nests left unhatched on the Island's north-
ern beach. One was, and is, far enough back from the
water to be deemed safe; it should hatch any time
now.
But the other ... Suzi Fox, the state turtle conser-


Turtle stats
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12
said. Hatchlings scramble right from the egg toward the
brightest light, which often is inland away from life-
giving water.
But Island residents were superbly helpful, she
said. Some lights just couldn't be turned off, so people
relieved the problems as best they could when a nearby
nest was hatching.
"One group must have been 10 people cooper-
ating wonderfully held up a huge black cloth to
shield a nest from condo lights we couldn't get turned
off," Fox said. "And Eddie Gulash gave us his cell
phone so we could get word quickly of hatches, and
that probably saved a lot of turtle lives."
There were "disorientations" involving nine nests,
she said, an estimated 500 hatchlings, but her people
moved so swiftly to get the turtles into the Gulf that
they found only 10 dead.
"We didn't find a problem we couldn't solve," she
said. "We filled dangerous trenches, took down escarp-
ments, moved boats."
And except where mortal peril was obvious, she
said her group closely followed the advice of DEP bi-
ologist Allen Foley:
"Trust the mother turtle, she had a turtle reason for
nesting wherever she did. She knows what she's do-
ing."




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vation permit holder, tells about it:
"A volunteer (turtle monitor), Bud Edgren, found
the nest almost awash at the end of Willow Avenue and
called me. When I got there, he was lying on the sand
on top of the nest to keep the waves from washing it
out.
"There was water everywhere, we couldn't move
the nest there. So we called the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection and they said to go into it.
We dug in and found seven dead hatchlings, four live
ones and about 30 eggs.
"Bud took the babies home and kept them alive


Hatcheries
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12
are over-turtled."
In the Fort Lauderdale area, he noted, there are
2,500 sea turtle nests per nesting season. "If we tried
to use cages over the nests for their protection, we'd
have wall-to-wall cages. So they are gathered into
hatcheries, and the hatchlings are released into the
ocean from there."
Anna Maria's beaches, by contrast, have smaller


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until they were ready for release. I took the eggs to my
house in sand and they started hatching. Some pretty
soon and some a lot later.
"Everything we took out of that nest lived. It's a
wonderful feeling."
One more nest remains at Bradenton Beach, due to
hatch momentarily.
South of the Island, about a dozen unhatched nests
were destroyed between Longboat Key and Venice,
said Jerris Foote, biologist at Mote Marine Laboratory.
Sea turtles lay from 100 to 150 eggs per nest, to
hatch about 50 days later.

'ki,,"^ i. -. Bob Hite, news anchor-
man at WFLA-TV8 in
Tampa timed a visit
last year in September
with the hatching of
n e several nests at the
Anna Maria hatchery.
SHis story was in
to response to a letter
from 0-year-old Nikki
Berry, niece offormer
hade o Turtle Watch head
Chuck Shumard,
pleading to maintain
the hatchery. Islander
Photo: Bonner
Presswood

numbers of nests and lend themselves to "alternatives
to hatcheries, that is, protecting them where the moth-
ers bury the eggs."
There's a bad lighting problem in Fort Lauderdale
too, he said, that DEP hasn't been able to resolve and
that would lead hatchlings upland instead of into the
sea.
"Every place has its own problems. In the Pan-
handle, raccoons and coyotes are a real menace, dig-
ging up nests for food."
Even libido brings a threat to turtles around South-
east Florida. "There are people who dig up the nests
regardless of what we do- some cultures believe turtle
eggs are an aphrodisiac."


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jM PAGE 14 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Newlyweds Robby and Teri Bennett roll a lucky seven at the 32nd Annual Halloween Dance sponsored by the
Anna Maria Fire & Rescue Volunteers at St. Bernard Church on Saturday.


"Give me a ... cup of cheer," cheered Al Robinson. If
only he would have shaved, he may have won first
place in the costume contest last Saturday at the
Halloween party.

A haunting we will go:

haunted house this

weekend
The Bradenton Beach Fire Station is having an
open house an open haunted house.that is.
Admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children.
Parking is available at Bradenton Beach City Hall,
Tingley Memorial Library and in the city lot behind
Key West Willy's restaurant.
The Haunted House opens at 7 p.m. Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday night, Oct. 24, 25 and 26, and ends
each night when the spooks scare off all the ghosts and
goblins.
This annual event is sponsored by the Anna Maria
Fire and Rescue Volunteers. The Bradenton Beach sta-
tion/haunted house is located at 105 Highland Ave. in
Bradenton Beach. For more information call Station 1
at 778-6621.


State pulls license of Tampa pilot


involved with tanker collision


The man blamed for the worst oil spill in
Tampa Bay history is out of work.
For the first time in its 20-year history, the
state Board of Pilot Commissioners revoked a
license when they took Thomas Baggett's ticket
away that allowed him to guide ships through
Tampa Bay.
In February, Baggett was guiding a cruise
line ship with 1,672 passengers and crew
aboard veered out of the channel and went
aground. He was accused of turning the ship too
late. Baggett said the ship failed to respond to
commands.
Although the ship sustained little damage and


was refloated hours later, the pilot board felt his
history of accidents made him too much of a haz-
ard to the environment and public.
Baggett, Florida's most disciplined pilot
with at least 14 sanctions from federal and
state agencies, was one of four men found at
fault in the collision of three vessels Aug. 10,
1993.
The ensuing fire and oil spill left Anna
Maria Island and Pinellas beaches awash in
thick, gooey oil. Thousands of birds also were
affected.
State law requires local pilots be on board
ships when entering or leaving port.


WHAT THEIR NAMES MEAN

BY RANDOLPH ROSS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Fix firmly
6 Galileo's
birthplace
10 Part of a
communications
company's
800-number
13 Moolah
17 Focal point of
the Reformation
18 Uncomplimen-
tary comments
19 Libertine
21 Mideast title
22 "Gimme--"
23 FLORIDA
26 KANSAS
28 items in Gray's
country
churchyard
29 blanco
(polar bear)
30 Check
31 Clerical error?
32 Pilot's heading
33 Follow
35 Member of the
wedding
40 MASSACHU-
SETTS
48 Anna of "Nana"
50 Going in the
right direction
51 Enveloping glow
52 Patently amazed
56 Tipped off
57 Homer's find


58 Datum foran
economic
indicator
59 Many Muslim
men
60 OHIO
63 NEVADA
71 Joiedevivre
73 Half-cocked
74 Spy in'94
headlines
78 They're found
on reservations
nowadays
81 Hamlet's mother
82 Neighbor of
Sonoma
83 Bags more game
than
85 Southeast
Kansas town
86 ILLINOIS
91 Shine
92 Dismissive
visage
93 "- My Party"
96 H
99 Frankfurt's river
103 Business letter
abbr.
104 Home to billions
105 MISSOURI
111 MINNESOTA
112 Coverstories?
113 M-G-M founder
114 Ocean flier
115 Hirschfeld's girl
116 The absolute
minimum
117 -- buco
118 Banking
convenience


119 Sentence
120 Chicago's--
Tower
DOWN
1 Rises up
2 Where to do as
others do
3 Some execs
4 Assessment:
Abbr.
5 "Here..."
6 Expand, as the
chest
7 Beach Boys'
"- Around"
8 Peacock Throne
occupants
9 Plus
10 1954 showtune
"--in
Bloomsbury"
11 Vegetarian
staple
12 Campus in
Medford, Mass.
13 Apteryx
14 Cry from the
flock
15 Fat
16 Mommy's
triplets
17 Rubbernecks
20 K-12,
scholastically
speaking
24 Literary
monogram
25 Confess
27 Greek peak
33 Papa's real
name
34 Funnyman
Philips
36 Blow


37 Cargo
38 Hosiery shade
39 Stationer's order
40 Medieval rival of
6-Across
41 -- toot
42 1995 N.C.A.A.
basketball
champs
43 Carols
44 First capital of
unified Italy
45 Lied
46 Real ending in
London
47 Sparks on the
screen
48 Bar order
49 Convey
52 GQ, e.g.
53 Yevtushenko's
"Babi --
54 Samuel's
mentor
55 Takes away, in
law
61 Root of
diplomacy
62 Incurred
64 Trouble
65 Hub: Abbr.
66 More bohemian
67 Descamisados'
leader
68 Epistle apostle
69 Audrey
Hepburn's real
first name
70 Processed food
additive
72 The absolute
minimum


74 Do this if you
want to get a
hand
75 "Capital" fellow
76 Of enormous
import
77 Kemo-
78 Cote quote
79 Strauss's
"Ariadne-
Naxos"


80 Orch.
section
84 Spanish ayes
87 Kate Nelligan
title role
88 .035 ounce
89 Kevin's co-star
in "Tin Cup"
90 Holy City
populace
93 Front line


94 Marketing ploys
95 Fresh
97 Vocal quality
98 Network
employees'
union
99 "-- Golden
Slippers"
100 Condensation
101 Largest living
antelope


102 Cosine orsecant
104 "West Side
Story" role
105 Fight enders
106 Court cry
107 Tax filer's form
108 Oxygen -
109 Seat ofWashoe
County
110 Burn treatment
111 Sign of caution


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 15 hIB


Education centers opens
for registration
The Longboat Key Education Center, a non-profit
school for adult enrichment, is accepting registration
now for nearly 100 classes. The first term begins Mon-
day, Nov. 4, and runs for six consecutive weeks, Mon-
day through Thursday, until Dec. 19.
Perennial class favorites include oil and acrylic
painting, bridge, basic yoga, drawing, Tai Chi, and cre-
ative writing.
Call the center at 383-8811 for a class schedule or
stop by at 5370 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key.

'God's Favorite' opens at
Manatee Players
Neil Simon's "God's Favorite" will open at the
Manatee Players Riverfront Theatre on Thursday, Oct.
24, through Nov. 10.
What did poor Job suffer from in the Biblical story
of his afflictions at the hand of his testing God?
America's top humorous writer for the stage ransacked
the medical books to find a clutch of modem diseases
that the Biblical chronicler hadn't known about that
will be recited during the play for laughs.
Former Island resident Roy McChesney rounds out
the cast as Morris, an ever faithful though impatient
servant.
For ticket and performance information, call the
Players' box office at 748-5875, Monday through Fri-
day, and Saturdays during production from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance.


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Located in
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Mary Todd Lincoln takes
center stage at MCC
this weekend
The "real" Mary Todd Lincoln will take center
stage in Manatee Community College's Neel Audito-
rium in the world premier of "Lincoln's Lady," an
original play by Dr. Thomas Gambill.
The show will run Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25
and 26, at 8 p.m. and on Sunday, Oct. 27, at 2 p.m.
Calling Mary Todd Lincoln "one of history's most
misunderstood women," Gambill offers a new and con-
troversial interpretation which gives the President's
wife an opportunity she was denied in life.
Call the box office at 755-1511, ext. 4240, for
ticket information.

Pelican Man seeks
volunteers
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Th-
ompson Parkway, Sarasota, needs volunteers for its gift
shop, hospital, coin bank program, information booth
and as tour guides.
The sanctuary has also opening a thrift shop, lo-
cated at 7849 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, which is in
need of volunteer support.
Those interested in volunteering, can apply at the
sanctuary or contact Jennifer Burke at 388-4444.



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V Sitters V Live-ins
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Chiropractic Physician


761-0210


501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 West Bradenton
(behind the Manatee Ave. Video Library)


Island Pobiatry


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D.P.M.


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and
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104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
* t t


Florida String Quartet
opens 29th season
The Florida String Quartet, with Paul Wolfe and
Anita Brooker, violins; Yuri Vasilaki, viola; and Chris-
topher Pegis, cello, will present five concerts in Holley
Hall of the Beatrice Friedman Symphony Center begin-
ning Sunday, Oct. 27, at 4 p.m.
The opening concert will feature a program of clas-
sic favorites by Mozart and Brahms plus a work by the
American composer, Walter Piston.
The symphony is located at 709 N. Tamiami Trail,
Sarasota. Tickets and information are available through
the Symphony Ticket Hotline at 953-4252.

The Persuasions perform
in Sarasota
The a cappella sensations, "The Persuasions," will
perform at the Players of Sarasota on Saturday, Oct. 26,
at 8 p.m.
The Persuasions began by working the street cor-
ners of the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brook-
lyn. Frank Zappa took the boys out of the neighborhood
by signing them to his early label, Straight Records.
Since that time the group has been touring and per-
forming their repertoire of the classic sound of doo-
wop, gospel, blues and ballads for over 30 years.
Tickets are available at The Players' box office, 9th
and U.S. 41, or by calling 365-2494.


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New Patients Welcome
**. **...
3909 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach

778-2204


If~.. '-


Rser 3Imortial ottmmumttt i t=l=rchu
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913

Come Celebrate Christ
Sunday School 9am
Worship 10am
SChildren's Church 10am
SSat Seaside Worship 6pm
I: s Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414

HomeTown Service
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Worship Service
10 am
Nursery During Service

Adult Study Group
9 am
6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
LONGBOAT KEY
383-6491


is proud to sponsor a team in Anna Maria Island Community Center's

Soccer League, Division III, 5-7 Year Olds
Good luck to all the teams, players and coaches. May the "best news" win.


I -sl 1 1~111 i' I I LII I





I!D PAGE 16 N OCTOBER 24, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Arlene 'Nina'
Andrea Tucker
Arlene "Nina" Andrea Tucker, 43, of Anna
Maria, died Oct. 17 at Columbia Blake Medical
Center.
Born in Suffern, N.Y., Mrs. Tucker came to
Manatee County from Wallkill, N.Y., in 1970. She
was owner of Island Typing Services. She was a
member of Island Baptist church. She was a mem-

Sarasota friends bring
The Sarasota Friends of Florida Folk will bring
singer/songwriter/guitarist/ Walter Craft for one perfor-
mance to be held Monday, Oct. 28, at the Sarasota
Sailing Squadron located on City Island.


I] I O IT 4 S


ber of the Island Chamber of Commerce.
She is survived by her husband, Steven; a son,
Robert of Bradenton; two sisters, Betty Dykstra of
Bradenton and Dorothy Little of Ramsey, N.Y.;
two brothers, Walter Goetschius of New York and
Douglas Goetschius of St. Petersburg; and a
grandchild.
A memorial service was held at the Island
Baptist Church in Anna Maria City with the Rev.
James Metts officiating. Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, Island Chapel, was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

guitarist to City Island
Admission is by a suggested $3 donation.
To find the squadron facility, follow the signs to
Mote Marine, pass Mote and go to the end of the road.
The Sailing Squadron is on the left.


ISLANDER



$50 Winner
October 17 Contest
Rita Finlon
Longboat Village


$50


FOOTBALL


CONTEST


PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
person with the most correct game winning
predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Islander
Bystanderfootball judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
*The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1
2


FILL IT OUT NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Address


* Phone


I,



As Independent As
The Island Itself.
rg
First National--

5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
(941) 778-4900
SSa Francisco at Houston
L -- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---


Kite Shop


Knowledgeable Sales & Service
Kites Banners
Accessories
778-7600
Check out our Fall
& Christmas Selection
Over 200 Banners &
Mini Flags Including
Collegiate & NFL Flags
SCarolina at Philadelphia
5348 C Gulf Drive
S&S Plaza Holmes Beach


Serving the Island
from the same
location since 1970

778-6066

1-800-865-0800
visit us at our web site
http://www.islandreal.com
St Louis at Baltimore
6101 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450
(941) 778-2307
1 (800) 306-9666
San Diego at Seattle
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717
Anna Maria, FL 34216


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Cribbage Tournament
11:30AM Every Sunday
SPittsburgh at Atlanta
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 9 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


"A Real Bagel Shop with
Island Attitude."
Happy A
Halloween
Try our Holiday
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with Coffee 52.50
OPEN:
Mon Sat 7am to 2 pm
779-1212
East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
(next to Shells)
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(800) 559-6077
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The Island Poet
It's October and our winter residents are coming
back once more,
And we love to see their smiling face as they stand
there at the door.
Though we can't understand why they leave us and
don't stay through the summer,
'Cause when you have to keep two houses it must
be a bummer.
Perhaps we could be prejudiced, we folks who are
here to stay,
And never will we know why they haven't settled
here beside the bay.
Of course they have their reasons why they want
to roam,
But we like to make them feel each winter that they
really have come home.
Bud Atteridge


Winner


Advertiser


* Name


4
5
6
7
8
9
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~UB~BI~IU~L















I take it back
Yikes! The backlash from Bradenton Beach is still
hurting me.
Last week in "Stir" I said we hadn't seen a good
night spot in Bradenton Beach since a former mayor
ordered the city (bars and alcohol service) shut down
at midnight in the '70s.
I was obviously caught in a '70s time warp and my
recollection of the Wreck, a restaurant with a "Silver
Dollar Bar" and live bands every week rock and roll
bands distorted the present.
Yes, there are night spots in Bradenton Beach. Just
not the same ones for the most part. Except for the Drift
In and the Moose Lodge, Bradenton Beach nightlife
has changed.
The Wreck was sold and the silver dollars were
stripped off the bar and through a lengthy metamorpho-
sis, it eventually turned into Key West Willy's with
food, live music and Karoake.
There used to be a really fun place called the Purple
Porpoise. It had a sunken, round bar in the center with
purple booths lining the walls. Bands, when they
played there, were set up on a platform at bar height in
the center of the bar. I remember one particular sax
player with a talent for playing two saxophones at the
same time. I also recall it was the first place where I'd
ever seen a condom machine in the ladies restroom.
The Porpoise was obviously ahead of its time.
The Porpoise is now transformed into the Sports
Lounge with lots of pool tables and a square bar.
Back then, the Bridge Tender Inn didn't exist. The
building was mostly in disrepair with apartments up-
stairs. But down the street, on the site of the parking lot
for Berliner Backstube (formerly the hardware store),
was the Beach Lounge.
Everyone was welcome at the Beach Lounge. Bik-
ers,surfers,Jardcores, floozies and everything in be-
tween. Gregg Allman stumbled in one night and al-


Nancy Luca
though he really didn't appear in any condition to per-
form, he picked up a guitar, climbed on a bar stool
behind a microphone with whatever band was playing
that night and sang and played as well as anyone had
ever heard.
Halfway through "Stormy Monday," my knees
began melting, it was so good.
So long Beach Lounge. City fathers and other
stuffed shirts didn't like the place and after the build-
ing and property sold it was eventually torn down.
The Vienna Castle renovated the former dive shop
into first-class dining facilities and Beach House settled
into the old digs of the family-style Harbor House and
Patio Bar. Surely you recall Sundays, sweaty parties,
raw oysters and loud music at the Patio with the likes


ANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 E PAGE 17 lED
of Donny Bostic and Jay Crawford performing.
That's a lot of change.

Remembering Ronnie
"The Stranger Band" lead guitarist Ronnie Garvin
died of apparent suicide this month. He'll be honored
for his musical contribution to southwest Florida, par-
ticularly on Anna Maria at Turtles Bar & Grill, with a
benefit party on Sunday, Oct. 27, beginning at 2 p.m.
Bands and musicians donating their talent to the
event include No Exit, Fatcat, Lifeguard, Point of
View, XK Band, Razing Cane, Patti and DeBoyz,
Elysian Sex Drive, The Crave, Rocky Ruckman, Mike
Oscanyan, The Traveling Freak Show and many more
in no particular order of appearance and also sub-
ject to change.
A $5 donation, earmarked for Garvin's children,
will be requested at the door.
Arrangements are in the works for food, lots of
barbecue, under a tent in the parking lot.
There's no telling how they can cram this many top
musicians and bands into the afternoon and evening but
it's for a good cause and your attendance will be appre-
ciated.

Party weekend
Take the kids to the Bradenton Beach volunteer
fire station on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24,
25 and 26, for Halloween fun. Take yourself! It opens
at 7 o'clock each night and closes "when the mummy
wraps it up."
The annual haunted house put on by Island fire and
rescue volunteers promises spooky fun for all ages.
Seems like the big kids would have enough fun at
Turtles Sunday benefit but there's more top-ranked
music on the marquee this weekend, according to
owner Gina Gentiluomo.
Nancy Luca, of the Nancy Luca Band, singer,
songwriter and "ripping" lead guitarist, is to appear in
an exclusive area show on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25
and 26.
According to Gentiluomo, Luca contacted her and
offered to play while here on vacation from Santa
Monica.
PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE


C_+_;rZXIII~"C~k;li-11


~-TC,;~,~ql~aC,~3C~Z~P,;C~






IE PAGE 18 M OCTOBER 24, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Stir-it-up
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17
Luca's spin doctor says she has just recorded 12
songs with multi-platinum producer Richard Podolor.
The release says, "These are songs about sweaty
sex and love that doesn't last. Luca's guitar work is
filled with steaming riffs and good energetic solos. Her
lyrics hit the universal chords and the notes travel the
adrenaline route straight to the heart and soul. But these
are just words and it's not about words. It's about mu-
sic; rock 'n' roll."
It really says that. I couldn't begin to make that
stuff up. So, if they actually managed to spark a little
intrigue with those absurdities, maybe us fans of rock
'n' roll should all go.

SAR essay contest set for
area high school students
High school students in their junior or senior year
are invited to enter the National Society of the Sons of
the American Revolution Knight Essay Contest.
The contest is sponsored in the area by the Saramana
Chapter of the Florida Society and is open to students at-
tending public, parochial, private or accredited home
schools in Manatee and Sarasota Counties.
The contest is for an original essay written in English
and must not exceed 500 words excluding title page and
bibliography. The topic for the essay shall deal with an
event, person, philosophy or ideal associated with the
American Revolution, the Declaration of Independence or
the Framing of the United States Constitution. Essays will
be judged for historical accuracy, clarity of thought, orga-
nization, grammar and spelling and creativity.
A $2,000 first prize will be awarded to the national
contest winner. In addition, the winning essay will be
submitted to the SAR Magazine for publication. The
Florida Society will award prizes totaling $1,800 in
U.S. Saving Bond to three winners. Locally, the
Saramana Chapter will present the writer of the win-
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By Cynthia Finn
Special to The Islander Bystander
You don't have to still be in those adolescent years
to remember what it feels like to think you're alone, no
one understands and there's nowhere to go.
Lucky for Island teens who need a friend, there are
two places in our community whose doors are open to
provide safe and immediate help for youngsters 17
years old and younger.
The Anna Maria Island Community Center, 778-
1908, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City, and
Domino's Pizza, 778-6641, 5600 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach, are both registered Safe Place locations.
Trained volunteers at both spots are available to offer
support to runaway, homeless and in-crisis youth.
Project Safe Place is a nationwide runaway and
outreach program that has proved to be effective at
reaching troubled teens in the early stages of crisis,
giving them a much better chance of finding lasting
solutions to their problems. Cities around the country
that have adopted this program have found that youths
are more likely to ask for help when a Safe Place site
is available. The end result often means healthier
choices, awareness and positive actions for the teen's
whole family.
The program also offers an opportunity for com-
munity volunteers who care about the plight of troubled
children to put their concern into action.
Individuals and businesses interested in getting
more information may call area Safe Place coordinator
Wendy Batey at 741-3575.

ning essay with a $100 U.S. Savings Bond and the sec-
ond and third place winners will each receive $50"
bonds. All contestants will receive a certificate ac-
knowledging their participation.
The contest entry deadline is Jan.15 and entries
must be received on or before that date. Local winners

2AID ANNUAL lOV & irH- PrFR
IlILLOWVW COstXr CONTrsT
S Saturday, October 26 i
Scariest Funniest Sexiest
Most Original Best Dressed Couple
Grand Prize Cruise for Two
JOiN tS FoR
PULL, WooN

1/2 mile north of City Pier
ROD -RE-EL 875 North Shore Drive
-AbA 6 Anna Maria Island, Florida
Established 1947 778-1885


STEEL DRUM

.SUNDAY


Sway to the steel-drum rhythms
of "Tropical Steel" on deck this
Sunday from I 'til 5 pm. Listen to
the sounds of RPM nightly.
Guess the time of sunset* for a
bottle of champagne. And enjoy
superb Early Bird Specials, all
under $10, daily.


V,




1-


Community Center Assistant Director Deana Reemelin
is one of several Anna Maria Island Community Center
members and volunteers who are specially trained to
offer immediate assistance to teens in need. Islander
Photo: Courtesy of Cynthia Finn

will be announced at the annual George Washington
Luncheon on Feb. 21.
For additionanat4ormation and the contest rules,
send a self-addressed, stamped envelop to Chairman,
Knight Essay Contest, 4437 Atwood Cay Circle,
Sarasota, FL 34233.


The Best Steaks in Manatee County





PIANO BAR
with LARRY RICH
0Tuesday-Saturday 8-Midnight
Dinner served 4-10 pm Tuesday-Sunday
Large groups and luncheon parties welcome.
Reservations requested, not required. Now booking holiday parties!
204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria (formerly Cafe Robar)


FRESH CATCHES


Attention teens: someone cares


Every Day Lunch & Dinner
P.S. We'll even cook your catch...
Just reel them in!







Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
383-2391





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 19 EI


Anna Maria

Elementary

[ "School Menu
Monday, 10/28/96
No School Records Day
Tuesday, 10/28/96
Breakfast: Cereal Toast, Juice
Lunch: Hamburger on Bun or Corn Dog,
a a French Fries, Salad, Fruit
th h Wednesday, 10/30/96
Breakfast: French Toast, Juice
Lunch: Macaroni w/Cheese and Ham Slice or
SMcRib Sandwich, Carrot Sticks, Roll, Cookies
Thursday, 10/31/96
Breakfast: Soft Pretzel w/Cheese, Juice
Lunch: Chicken & Noodles w/Broccoli or
Mini Chef Salad, Corn Bread, Juice,
v ': IChocolate Cake
Friday, 11/1/96 *
: Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
F* Lunch: Pizza or Nachos & Cheese, Corn,
Dance of Russian tradition Salad, Sherbet
The fifth-grade students in Anne Russell's class closed their study of All meals served with milk.
Russia with a morning of Russian dance, enjoying the traditional
hospitable meal of bread and tea, and discussion of items, such as
Matryoshka dolls, from the country. The students began their study by
reading about 1700's Russian artist Marc Chagall.


Russian head gear
At left, Jim Kronus, principal, brought to Anne Russell's fifth-grade Joy Courtney
class an assortment of hats made of lamb's wool, rabbit and other furs
that his wife purchased during a trip to Russia. Kronus explained the
bitter cold of Russian winters made hats like this a must to survive.


Iii~y


Autumn SunsetSpecial&-$12.95
. FRESH CATCH- Char-grilled in adobo marinade or lightly dusted
Sin Cuban bread crumbs and sauteed with lemon butter accompa-
C'-ied by saffron rice and fresh vegetables.
VEAL NIC LE- Sauteed veal scaloppini with mushrooms and as-
paragus in white wine cream sauce accompanied by house pota-
toes and fresh vegetables.
PAN SEARED BLACKENED SHRIMP- with a tropical fruit salsa ac-
companied by saffron rice and fresh vegetables.
STUFFED CHICKEN BREAST- with Chorizo and Monterey Jack
cheese in a green peppercorn cognac sauce accompanied by
saffron rice and fresh vegetables.
PASTA- Homemade fettucini alfredo with blackened chicken
breast accompanied by fresh vegetables.
Specials include choice of soup or house salad and hot Cuban garlic bread




AAHA4:30A6:30Am


SIGN OF THE MERMAID
--- --- ^---


FLORIDA CONTINENTAL CUISINE
a Seafood ?e Steaks *. Creative Salads
?& Kitchen Made Desserts
Fabulous Sunday Brunch: Sunday 9 am 1:30 pm
Dinner: 5 10 Tues. Sat.
Early Supper: 5 6:30 Tues. Sat.
Closed Sunday Eves. & Mondays
Reservations Suggested
DON'T LET THE HOLIDAYS SLIP BY
Thanksgiving Day:
11 am 3 pm & 4 pm- 9 pm
Traditional or Select from Regular Menu
CHRISTMAS PARTIES
Christmas Eve Dinner: 4 pm 10 pm
(Closed Christmas Day)
New Year's Eve Dinner:
4 pm Last Reservation 11 pm
Accommodations for Special Functions up to 75 People
9707 GULF DR. ANNA MARIA 778-9399


RI


I II






i] PAGE 20 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Spirit of John D. returns to area


By Bob Ardren
Islander Correspondent
With his iconoclastic views and low regard for much
of what was socially correct, John D. MacDonald was a
Southwest Florida legend for many years. Having written
some 70 novels plus another 19 Travis McGee adventures,
totaling in all nearly 80 million copies sold, MacDonald
was also known around the world.
Shortly after MacDonald's death in late 1986, the first
John D. MacDonald Conference was put together by some
of his fans and scholarly students of his work. The sixth
such conference, scheduled Nov. 15-17, will be held in
Sarasota with events ranging from a gathering at his home
on Siesta Key to scholarly discourses on his work.
To be headquartered at New College and the Hyatt
Hotel, the conference is expected to attract 100 to 125
people all of them passionately interested in
MacDonald's work. Cal Branche of New Port Richey,
conference chairman, said he's been spreading word of the
gathering over a series of home pages on the Internet.
Many of Florida's best-known writers, including
Randy Wayne White, James Hall, Stuart Kaminsky and
Paul Levine, will join a panel discussing "The Staying
Power of JDM's Writing." Another panel, moderated
by retired University of South Florida professor Ed
Hirschberg and including Bob Plunkett, Tim Kantor
and Charlie Huisking, among others, will contribute to


EAT-IN OR 00
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I Any Size Pizza
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I & ITALIAN RESTAURANT
SSpecializing in Veal Chicken Fish Pasta
I Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
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I 1 201 N. Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach
_L 778-0771 or 778-0772



Chez Andre


Come Dine With Us!
Breakfast
Daily Special Luncheon
Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
We Also have
French Bread, Croissants Pate'
& Pastries To Go


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


ROTTEN RALPH'S

Halloween Weekend
ROTTEN
RALPH'S Party with

CAJAY


S Thurs., Fri & Sat "-"
,4 Oct 31, Nov. 1 & 2
from 8 to 12

S COSTUME PARTY!
Thursday ~ October 31
Prizes & Fun
GRAND PRIZE: Full day deep
sea fishing charter for 6 people aboard the
REEF REACHER (valued at $575.)
2ND PRIZE: Sunset sailing charter for 4
people aboard SPICE SAILING CHARTERS
3RD PRIZE: ROTTON RALPH'S
gift certificate
Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953


Dorothy and John D. MacDonald at a New College
clambake in 1982. Islander Photo: Paul Roat
a "JDM Retrospective."
Hirschberg is also editor of the JDM Bibliophile,
the oldest continuously published magazine in the U.S.
devoted to a single crime-fiction author. It began pub-
lication in the mid-1960s.
Curator Jeffrey Barr of the JDM Collection at the
University of Florida will deliver an illustrated lecture, and
Lewis D. Moore of the Dept. of English at the University
of the District of Columbia will present a paper on "John
D. MacDonald's Fiction and the Idea of Identity."


NOW OPEN
Friday & Saturday
Evenings 5-9pm
Fish Fry Friday
Evenings only
ALL-U-CAN-EAT $7.95

JAMAICAN STYLE FOOD BEER & WINE
SUNDAY Breakfast only 7 am-1 pm
MON SAT Breakfast 7-11 am Lunch 11 am-3 pm
5340 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 779-1320



What's happening at ...

prxiun tip ^HatcI
Nearly Nar & (Grill
Casual Dining on Beautiful Palma Sola Bay
9915 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton FL
Fresh New England Seafood "Home of the Whole Bellies"
Fall Hours: Open Daily 3 pm to Close
Complete Patio & Dinner Menu
MONDAY NITE Football with
Complimentary Hot Dogs & Kraut (cooked in beer)
TUESDAY NITE Karaoke
WEDNESDAY NITE Ladies Nite with DJ Andy
THURSDAY NITE Open Blind Draw Dart Tournament
$4 entry fee $100 prize
FRIDAY & SATURDAY NITES Live music 9 -12
SUNDAY Funky Catz 3 8
Happy Hour 3 -7 Every Day
792-5523


All-You-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers.............. $6.95
Steak & Shrimp ........................ .......... $8.95
Stone Crab Claws .................................... $12.95
Don't be fool[Ed 61 a Tourist Trap
Come partY with the Natives at ...

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


Other scheduled events include columnist and author
Bob Morris talking on "JDM and Florida" and Thomas
Lane of East Tennessee State University presenting a pa-
per on "Faulkner and MacDonald: Ending Well."
Other scheduled papers include Ellen Smith of
Stetson University on "Dana, Britt, Gretel and Gail:
McGee's Women and a Warm Climate for Sleuthing."
Stan Soocher, a New York editor, will offer "An Ex-
amination of the Legal Profession in John D.
MacDonald's Works."
There will be plenty of time for fun, too. In addi-
tion to the barbecue at MacDonald's old home on Si-
esta, hosted by present owner Diana Kahlenberg and its
architect Tim Siebert, planned events include a cock-
tail party sponsored by Sarasota magazine at Cook
Hall on the New College campus. Then there are all
those late-night opportunities to sample some of
McGee's favorite, Plymouth gin.
Conference registration is $95 and should be sent
to JDM Bibliophile, Department of English, University
of South Florida, 4202 Fowler Ave. CPR107, Tampa,
Fla. 33620. For more details, contact Branche at (813)
842-4349 or check the JDM homepage on the Internet
at http://innet.com/ cbranche/index.html.


BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
FRESH STONE
CRABS1S5
I


RooD arEL

Established 1947


1/2 mile north of City Pier
875 North Shore Drive
Anna Maria Island, Florida
778-1885


October Hours: Tues Sat 4:30-10pm
Sun 8am-2pm / 4:30-10pm Closed Monday
S&S Plaza 5348 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
WI i_ 6 I I


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." f ise
tuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. \ e '
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501

- Bridge Street Pier a Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)

o Casual Dining on the Water
SALL-U-CAN EAT
GROUPER $795
Every Night 4 10 pm
i Dinner Specials
Include Snow Crab Legs
ALL-U-CAN EAT
FRIED SHRIMP $795
D\ Tues & Thurs 4 10 pm

ICE COLD DRAFT BEER 75
1/2 lb. Cold Peel-n-Eat Shrimp $495
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mon-Fri 8am-10pm Sat & Sun 7am-10pm
LIVE BAIT BRADENTON BEACH
8 AM 10 PM 779-1706




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER OCTOBER 24, 1996 ~ PAGE 21 .I.
THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 21 1-


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports available
Bradenton Beach
Oct. 10, trespass warning, 2502 Gulf Drive N.,
Econo Lodge. The complainant reported a guest was
unable to pay for his room and was asked to leave. He
was issued a trespass warning.
Oct. 11, burglary to an occupied dwelling, 1000 Gulf
Drive N., Beach House Resort. The victims reported a
person unknown entered their room while they were
sleeping and removed two wallets, $190 in cash, $20 in
traveler's checks, credit cards, driver's licenses, a check-
book, a purse valued at $30, a camera and lens valued at
$100 and a gold chain valued at $150. Later the victims
found the wallets on the beach with the currency missing.
Oct. 12, grand theft auto, recovered stolen vehicle,
100 block of Gulf Drive North. The complainants reported
the owner gave them permission to stay at her residence
and use her vehicle. When they returned home, they found
the vehicle missing and another in its place. The officer
ran a check on the vehicle left at the residence and found
it to be stolen. The vehicle was returned to the owner.
Oct. 12, burglary to an automobile, 1501 Gulf
Drive, Smuggler's Cove. The victim reported a person
unknown entered the vehicle by cutting the convertible
top and removed a cassette player valued at $150 and
a portable cassette player valued at $150. The steering
column was damaged in an attempt to steal the vehicle.
Damages were $1,100.
Oct. 12, burglary to an automobile, Cortez Beach.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered
the vehicle and removed an ATM card, credit cards, a
checkbook, driver's licenses, $140 in traveler's checks,
$1,080 in cash, clothing, keys and a camera with a
zoom lens valued at $250.
Oct. 14, burglary, 200 block of Church Street.


The complainant reported a person unknown removed
$250 from her purse on the kitchen table.
Holmes Beach
Oct. 11, burglary, 500 block of 68th Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown broke a win-
dow and slept in the garage leaving shirts, a towel and
a pillowcase. Damages were $200.
Oct. 12, DWLS, 3600 block of East Bay Drive.
The officer stopped the subject for unlawful speed and
found his driver's license was suspended. The officer
issued a citation for speeding and a summons for
DWLS to the subject and gave him a ride home.
Oct. 12, Baker Act. The subject was depressed
and took an overdose of pills, stated she wanted to die
and refused treatment, said the report. She was placed
in custody and transported to the hospital.
Oct. 13, suspicious person, 4400 block of Second
Avenue. The complainant reported an intoxicated sub-
ject causing problems. The officer found the subject
asleep on the corner and gave him a ride home.
Oct. 13, found property, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee County Public Beach. While gathering cans from a
trash can, the complainant found a purse containing
three driver's licenses, credit cards and a set of keys.
The purse was placed in the property room.
Oct. 14, burglary to a boat, 5300 Marina Drive,
Back Bay Steakhouse. The complainant reported a
person unknown removed an electrical extension cord.
Oct. 15, assistance, 500 block of 72nd Street. The
complainant reported there was water pouring out of
the neighbor's house. The officer observed a steady
stream of water coming from a pump in the garage,
broke a window and turned off the pump. The water
continued to pour out due to a broken pipe and the of-
ficer threaded the pipe ends to slow the water to a
trickle and secured the garage.
Oct. 15, code violation, Kingfish Ramp. The sub-
ject set up a seafood market at the ramp and the officer
informed him it was not permitted in the city. The sub-
ject left the area.


Oct. 15, found property an unopened, five-
gallon can of motor oil.
Oct. 16, drunk, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee County
Public Beach. The officer responded in reference to an
intoxicated subject and found the subject with two
young children. The subject had no driver's license and
the officer transported him to his residence and took
custody of the car key.
Oct. 17, burglary to an automobile, 2905 Avenue
E. The complainant reported a person unknown entered
the vehicle and removed a laptop computer and moni-
tor valued at $1,800 and a camera valued at $150.
Oct. 17, burglary to an automobile, 2905 Avenue
E. The complainant reported a person unknown entered
the vehicle and removed a duffel bag containing work
clothes and shoes valued at $650.
Oct. 16, theft of a bicycle, 100 block of 29th Street.
Oct. 17, theft, 100 block of 73rd Street. The com-
plainant reported a person unknown removed a boat
cover valued at $300 and a flashlight valued at $60
from a boat at the rear of the property.


-,", X4


Delightful Dining Lunch &Dinner
Gourmet Take-Out Stylish Catering



525 St. Judes Dr. 5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key 383-0777


GHOSTS & GOBLIN5

NEED TO EAT TOO!











The Freshest Seafood
at Dockside Prices!





Happy Hour: Mon Fri 4 to 7pm
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10pm Fri & Sat 4 to 11pm
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Drive 778-5997


INTRODUCING: *N

DayAnd lNight

At The Beachouse!
You know there's great music every evening from 6 10 pm. Now
Syou can come out to Late Nite Weekends at the Beachhouse and
dance to the sounds of Nu-Soul, one of Tampa's hottest bands, every
Friday and Saturday night from 10:00 pm to 2:00 am. Enjoy free valet
parking and a terrific after-hours menu. And don't forget James Peterson
Thursday, October 24, from 6 10 pm, or Rajin' Cajun Tuesday evenings
and Rockin Reggae Sunday afternoons through October.
That's entertainment. dav and b S.


night, at the Beachhouse!
I


r.EZBAEANT


1l


ANNA MARIA OYSTER BAR

On Anna Maria City Pier

SWe're much more than just Oysters

\LOBSTER BLOW OUT!
Live Hard Shell 11/4 lb. Maine Lobsters
41195 Served with potato
$I & slaw or corn
BEST DEAL ON THE ISLAND!
1 Ib. of Fresh Stone Crabs
.lA\ Served with Potato & Slaw $14.95
SO 1 iity OTHER SPECIALS INCLUDE:
aval \Blue Crab Cakes (Two)
C0 Served with Potato & Slaw $9.95
SAll-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry $4.95
778-0475 (Monday Friday 3 5pm)
OPEN DAILY Live Dolphin Shows Daily
11:30 am to 9 pm If You Spot A Dolphin While Dining
Fri. & Sat. til 10 pm We'll Buy You A Draft Beer W


I


~s I


^
s






I] PAGE 22 I OCTOBER 24, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Uninspired effort leads to Island Football Club's first loss


By Kevin P. Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
The Island Football Club lost its first match of the
season 2-0 to SFC United Sunday in Sarasota.
"We came out flat and were not ready to play," said
Islander coach Danny Connelly. The Islanders had a few
scoring chances in the first half but didn't consistently put
up much of an offensive attack as SFC United looked like
the better side. SFC scored in the 15th minute to take a 1-
0 lead that took them to half-time.
The Islanders looked like they were going to get
back into the game in the second half as they came out
and started playing some ball. They applied constant
offensive pressure but were either off the mark or sim-
ply turned away by the opposition's defense.
With the Islanders pushing forward in an effort to
knot the score, they became prone to counter attacks by
United. United had several break-away opportunities
but the Island kept them at bay until the 30th minute of
the second half. SFC United got a direct free kick when
one of their offensive players got taken down from
behind. Doug Rhodes of Sarasota sent a curling ball
over the defensive wall that goalie Lance Bieker could
do nothing but watch go into the net.
As the game ended, captain Ken Bowers put the
loss into perspective by saying, "Maybe we needed to
lose a game to wake up. We can't just show up and
expect the other team to roll over."
Man-of-the-match was Matt Bowers who played
stellar defense all game. Fan-of-the-match was co-






"Thi lns Week'sl Se eia il
Sdraft beer and wine
with diner.





This Week's Special


Bring the Kids-they eat
as $ 9 5
low
as each

Captain's Early Bird Menu
Priced at under $10.00 a bountiful selection of light entrees for
sailors who want to eat before sundown. (Served 11 am to 7 pm) All
entrees include Back Bay's famous, unlimited Shipwreck Salad,
Fresh Rye and Pumpernickel Breads and your choice of Baked
Potato, Boathouse Fries, Linguini, Rice or Steamed Vegetables.
Dockside Special (fresh catch of the day) ..............$9.99
Grilled Shrimp Over Rice ....................................... $7.99
Fried Shrimp ............................ ................... $6.99
Grouper Sandwich ............................................. $7.99
Deep-Fried Sea Scallops .............................. $9.99
Creamy Seafood Pasta ...................................... $8.99
Dockside Seafood Stir-Fry..................................... $8.99
Filet Mignon Pasta ............................................. $9.99
Filet Mignon Stir-Fry......................................... $9.99
The M iniloin ............................. ....................... $9.99
8 oz. Prim e Rib .......................... ........................ $9.99
Baby Back Ribs (Half-Slab) ................................... $9.99
Grilled Chicken Breast Over Linguini .....................$7.99
Grilled Chicken Breast Stir-Fry ...............................$7.99
LIVE Entertainment
Berni Roy & all her friends.
Wed Sat 5 to 9pm
Bill Zoller
Fri, Sat & Sun 5:30 to 8:30pm
Rob "The Islander" Fri & Sat 8 to 11pm
- - COUPON - -
/ coBroldpil $099* 1
Top Sirloin Dinner 0 70Z

L Exp. Nov. 15, 1996 Good 11am to 7pm __
Includes all-you-can eat shipwreck salad, bread and
unlimited refills on draft beer, wine and soda
Finest selection of steaks on the island!
(941) 778-4811
5325 Marina Dr. Anna Maria Island Formerly Pete Reynard's
Hrs: Sun. -Thurs. 11am to 10pm; Fri. & Sat. 11am to 11pm
-eismlabe-oUT2


sponsor Fran Maxon Real Estate employee Stephanie
Bell who has not missed a game this season. The IFC
will try and get back on the winning track next Sunday


OWP"S PL-A
1.


TONY'S ORIGINAL


TONY'S ORIGINAL
GROUPER SPECIALS
Sandwich $495
Dinner *1095
Served over Black Cracked Pepper Linguini
a


CSllal talIalian Variety of Specials Nightly
Beer and Wine Take-out Available Kids Menu Too!
Holmes Beach 778-5440 =-
Mon-Thur 11-9 Fri 11-10 Sat 4-10 Closed Sunday


1G6 MAMA ,--,P,


Enjoy Our Great
View Without The
^ Premium Price!
fa

MUSIC
,c DINNER
Every
Tues, Wed &Thur
5:30- 8:30



Sugg d
STEEL PAN DAN
Saturday 1-5 &

4 r Sunday 2 to 6



Tropical Frozen Drinks $3.25

PATIO BAR HAPPY
Open 1 pm Mon Thur HOUR
biD Midnight Fri & Sat 11:30 to 6

SULunch Dinner. Spirits
S135 Bridge Street
S778-4849


in St. Petersburg at 1 p.m. against the Southside Foot-
ball Club. For information or field directions, call
Kevin Cassidy at 778-1635.


Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it, we'll make it!
Cappuccino & Espresso
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Open Daily 2-10pm Closed Tues.
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of the Cortez Bridge

H M O F .E .H -i BURGE
FRS HANDSHCEDOYTRS,


117 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
778-7344
CAFE & RESTAURANT
for Breakfast Lunch
& Coffee Klatsch
All Pastries & Original,
Healthy Breads
Baked Daily
on the Premises
THE BEST COFFEE IN FLORIDA
Original German -
Eduscho Coffee
The Best Apple Strudel
& Black Forest Torte
Breakfast: 8 11:30am
Lunch: Noon 2:30pmr
Tuesday-Sunday


TDAI O-CDA
It's easy to remember our name...
but hard to forget our food!


The finest in delicate,
delicious Thai cuisine in a
comfortable atmosphere.
Our tasty Thai food will
keep you coming back
again and again.


Open'
Mon
11:30 AN


ir lunch
- Friday
2:30 PM


Dinner Mond, Saturday
5:00 to 50 PoFM
(Closed Su iday)
7604 Cortez Road West, Bradenton
1 block west of 75th on Cortez Rd.
Tel: (941) 794-5470

I SLANDER


The best news.


Center soccer schedule
Division 1, 11 to 13 year olds
All games begin at 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Oct. 23 Holmes Beach Mini Storage vs. Galati Marine
Thurs. Oct. 24 LaPensee Plumbing vs. Mr. Bones
Tues. Oct. 29 Island Real Estate vs. Holmes Beach Mini Storage

Division II, 8 to 10 year olds
All games begin a 6 p.m.
Wed. Oct. 23 School for Const. Play vs. Harry's Continental Kitchens
Thurs. Oct. 24 Air & Energy vs. Ben Webb Landscaping
Mon. Oct. 28 Island Pest Control vs. Air & Energy
Tues. Oct. 29 Ben Webb Landscaping vs. Dowling Park

Division III, 5 to 7 year olds
First game begins at 6 p.m.
Second game begins at 7p.m.
Thurs. Oct. 24 Beach Bistro vs. Bridge St. Pier & Cafe
Hosier Auto Service vs. Longboat Observer
Tues. Oct. 29 Longboat Observer vs. Bridge St. Pier & Cafe
Islander Bystander vs. Joe's Eats & Sweets


F






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 23 KI

Williams 'saves' School for Constructive Play from loss


By Kevin P. Cassidy
Islander Correspondent
Taylor-Made Marine and The School for Construc-
tive Play battled to a 0-0 tie Saturday morning at the Anna
Maria Community Center as Danny Williams made sev-
eral spectacular saves to keep his team in the game.
The School for Constructive Play started the game
off in an offensive mode as they pressured Taylor-
Made's defense. They had what turned out to be their
best offensive chance in the 12th minute but were
turned away on a nice save by Suzanne VanAndle.
The complexion of the game turned after that scoring
chance as Taylor-Made stepped up the offensive pressure.
Shawn Koerber got loose on a break-away down the left
wing and "ripped" a shot that beat Williams but couldn't
find the back of the net. His shot bounced harmlessly off
the goal post. Koerber again figured in the action as he
found himself ten yards out and seemingly unchallenged
but Skyler Purcell came out of nowhere to block
Koerber's shot. The half ended in a 0-0 tie as Williams
made another great save of a Taylor-Made shot.
Taylor-Made came out full of fervor in the open-
ing minutes of the second half. They missed out on two
good scoring chances in which they had an advantage
in numbers only to be called offsides and give the ball
back to their opponents.
In the 15th minute of the second half, Joey Mattay
came down the right wing and unleashed a good shot
that Danny Williams saved. One minute later, Shawn
Koerber "hammered" a shot from point blank range
that Williams miraculously kept out of the goal.
Seconds later, Jordan Bowers sliced through the
defense in what looked like a good scoring chance only
to be met by goalie Suzanne VanAndle who came out
and smothered the ball. Taylor-Made had trouble clear-






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ing the ball out of their defensive end and almost paid
for it. Jordan Bowers got the ball and made a nice pass
to a cutting Mike Richards who hit a nice shot, but just
wide of the goal.
Taylor-Made again stepped up the offensive pres-
sure as they sensed that time was slipping by. Scot
Vensel woke the crowd up with a blistering shot from
the top of the box that Williams somehow held on to.
Seconds later, Courtney Taylor came in on a break-
away down the left wing and hit a shot towards the far
post. Williams dove for it, came up short but with one


Soccer standings,
Week Five


Division I (11-13 years old)
Team Record
Galati Marine 5-0
Holmes Beach Mini Storage 3-3
Island Real Estate 3-2
Mr. Bones 1-3
LaPensee Plumbing 0-4


Points
15
9
9
3
0


Points
21
15
12
10
10
7
5
5


Division II (8-10 y
Team
Ben Webb Landscaping
Island Pest Control
Dowling Park
Air & Energy
Taylor Made Marine
School For Constructive Play
Harry's Continental Kitchen
Island Animal Clinic


ears old)
Record
7-0
4-1-3
4-4
3-5-1
3-2-1
2-4-1
1-3-2
1-6-2


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Italian Restaurant
on the West Coast"


NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH
MON FRI IAM TO 2 PM
DINNER: MON SAT 5 TO 8:30 PM
CLOSED SUNDAYS
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(next to Albertsons) 794-0678


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CAFE ON THE BEACH

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Live Entertainment Weekends with MICHELE BISHOP
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Serving
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ISLANDER


"The best news
on Anna Maria
Island."


last ditch lunge, was able to tip it wide of the goal.
The game ended in a hard fought 0-0 tie as Will-
iams turned Taylor-Made away for the last time as the
final whistle sounded.
In other action on Saturday, Island Pest Control
beat Ben Webb Landscape 3-0 in what seems like an
easy win on the surface.
The two teams battled through a scoreless first half in
which both teams missed out on scoring opportunities.
The complexion of the game stayed the same for
much of the second half until Tyler Krauss and Taylor
Manning got their team going. Krauss scored two sec-
ond half goals and Manning added one to complete the
scoring and give Island Pest Control a hard fought vic-
tory over Ben Webb Landscaping.

Basketball registration
ongoing at Center
Anna Maria Island Youth Basketball registration is
open until Nov. 2 for boys and girls ages 5-16. Fees are
$30 for Center members, $35 for non-members.
Mandatory tryouts will be at the Center Nov. 2,
with Division III (ages 5-7) at 4 p.m.; Division II (ages
8-10) at 2 p.m.; and Division I (ages 11-13) at noon.
Information, call 778-1908.

Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Oct. 19 horseshoe games were J.C.
Phillips of Holmes Beach and Bill Starrett of Anna
Maria. Runners-up were Herb Ditzel and Ron Pepka,
both of Anna Maria.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday
at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park, 10005 Gulf
Drive. There are no membership fees.

ISLANDERRMfIAaa
Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun, a ray
of sunshine? Look no further it's all in
The Islander Bystander. Don't miss a week!


T Tues: FREE POOL & DARTS
Thur: POOL TOURNAMENT
Tues & Thur Happy Hour til 10pm
Wed: Reggae w/ DEMOCRACY
(No Cover Charge)
Fri & Sat: Nancy Luca Band 10pm
HAPPY HOUR (National Recording Artist)
4-8 PM
Benefit for Ronnie Garvin Sun, Oct 27 2pm
Live Music, BBQ & Drink Specials
Now Serving Cappuccino & Espresso
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Lunch & Dinner Every Day
11:30 am 11:00 pm
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Gourmet Brick Oven Pizza
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Italian Specialties
Starting at $12.95 Includes Salad & Bread
Linguine with Clam Sauce
Shrimp Fra Diavolo
Polio Parmigiana
Polio Arrabbiata
Veal Marsala
Veal Pizzaiolo
Veal Cutlet Parmigiana
Petti de Polio Puttanesca
Sausage, Peppers and Mushrooms


LocatedllnlheCentrelShopslll 537t lflIfMe icoD. IBo o t






I PAGE 24 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Proof of progress on Sarasota Bay


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
There's major good news to report on the condition
of Sarasota Bay. Seagrasses, one of the most important
indicators of water quality and a basis of the bay's food
chain, are on the increase.
This comes after decades of decay of the bay's
seagrass beds.
In the area of the bay from the northern tip of Anna
Maria Island southward to the Sarasota County line,
there was an increase of 352 acres, or 38 percent, of
seagrass beds in the period between 1988 and 1995. In
addition, another 381 acres of seagrasses became more
lush. That is, they went from being classified "patchy"
to "continuous."
Farther south, from Siesta Drive north to the Mana-
tee County line, there was an increase of 191 acres, or


10 percent, of seagrass beds. In addition, another 132
acres a 39 percent increase of seagrass beds have
become more lush in that same area, according to a
study done by Dr. David Tomasko.
Tomasko, you may recall, is the former senior sci-
entist for the Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program
and is now with the Surface Water Improvement and
Management Department of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District. One of his duties is as-
sessing the status and trends of seagrass coverage.
Using aerial photographs taken in 1988 as a
baseline, Swiftmud had a new set of photos shot last
year for this study.
Being a good scientist, Tomasko can't say exactly
what's caused the improvements yet, but his report
does relate "that most likely, [it is attributable] to man-
agement activities associated with reduction in nutri-


Hoop It Up winners whoop it up
"The Islanders" basketball players show off their first-place trophies after winning a three-on-three tourna-
ment in the over 30 division of the Hoop-It-Up contest in Orlando. Pictured from left are John Ricciardo, Tom
Cramer, Norm Davis and Jon Lott.


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Sept. 28, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Venice Inlet. The vessel was found to be in
compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Sept. 28, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 24-foot power boat taking on water
in Big Pass. A Coast Guard vessel responded, pumped out
the vessel and escorted it to a boat ramp.
Sept. 28, Boarding. A 19-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Sept. 28, Boarding. A 14-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel was found
to be in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Sept. 29, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a disabled 25-foot power boat in New
.-, Pass. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 25084055 responded
and towed the vessel to safe moorings.
Oct. 1, Boarding. A 22-foot fishing vessel was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for not having the vessel's
life jackets properly marked with reflective tape and
not having an injury placard posted.
Oct. 3, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 24-foot power
boat off Egmont Key. Station Cortez monitored the
vessel's condition while a commercial salvage com-
pany vessel provided assistance to safe moorings.
Oct. 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 30-foot power boat over-
due from Pine Island to Rattlesnake Point. Station
Cortez conducted communication checks with all ma-
rinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants and located the
vessel on VHF-FM radio. The vessel's operator was
disoriented and lost, and a Good Samaritan escorted the
overdue boat to safe moorings.


Oct. 5, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a capsized Hobie Cat in
Palma Sola Bay. A Coast Guard vessel responded,
righted the vessel and towed it to safe moorings.
Oct. 5, Boarding. A 17-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel was found to be
in compliance with all applicable federal laws.
Oct. 6, Boarding. A 48-foot fishing boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator received
a written warning for not having the proper markings
on life-saving equipment and not having a copy of the
navigational rules on board.
Oct. 8, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 25-foot power
boat near Indian Mound Park. Coast Guard Auxiliary
vessel 17087246 responded and towed the vessel to
safe moorings.
Oct. 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 38-foot power boat tak-
ing on water near the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. Two
Coast Guard vessels and a commercial towing com-
pany boat responded, pumped out the vessel and towed
it to safe moorings.
Oct. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of an 18-foot power boat out of control
in Little Sarasota Bay. Coast Guard, Sarasota Fire and
Rescue and Sarasota Sheriffs Department vessels re-
sponded. While Coast Guard and sheriffs deputies se-
cured the area, fire personnel retrieved one person from the
water. A Good Samaritan hooked the runaway boat's
throttle and stopped the vessel. The boat operator received
back injuries after being thrown into the water.
Oct. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an injured personal water-
craft operator in Palma Sola Bay. A Coast Guard ves-
sel responded and towed the watercraft to safe moor-
ings. The boat's operator did not receive any injuries.


ent loads."
In somewhat plainer language, that would be the
huge reductions in nitrogen put into the bay by Mana-
tee County and the City of Sarasota through use of new
wastewater treatment plants.
Everyone deserves a nice pat on the back for this
accomplishment. The City of Sarasota's new wastewa-
ter plant cleaned up its end of the bay, and Manatee
County's regional wastewater treatment plant is prob-
ably responsible for the 352-acre increase in seagrasses
in the part of the bay located here.

Scallops appearing
It would great to report that cleaner water and
healthier grass flats are responsible for the scallop
sightings on the north end of Anna Maria Island re-
cently, but that's not the case. John Stevely at Florida
Sea Grant says the scallops we're seeing washed up on
the beach appear to be the calico species.
Calico scallops can be identified by the bright
flecks of color on their shell, hence the name.
Although an important fishery in the Cape
Canaveral area and also sometimes in the Panhandle,
calico scallops are a deep-water species living offshore
- not the bay scallops that would benefit from expand-
ing grass flats. Following Tropical Storm Josephine a
couple of weeks ago, thousands of these usually-rare-
locally scallops were found washed into a tidal pool by
north-end residents.
Stevely says he doesn't remember calicoes ever
showing up locally in the kinds of numbers he's heard
about recently. He adds that calicoes tend to be in boom
or bust cycles, and we may be having a boom cycle in
the shallow waters just offshore.

Paid to be on the water?
Dr. Gustavo Antonini, a geography professor from
the University of Florida, is looking for some help. And
he's willing to pay for it.
Antonini is doing a waterfront boat/dock survey in
southern Sarasota County for the West Coast Inland
Navigational District. I don't know the details, but he's
looking for a field technician to work full time from
Nov. 15 until March 31 of next year.
Candidates must be experienced boat handlers in
good physical shape, experienced in aerial photo inter-
pretation and must have some computer skills. They
also should be able to identify boat types, makes, mod-
els and determine the boat's draft.
Salary is negotiable and if you're interested, re-
spond by Nov. 1 to Antonini, P.O. Box 115530, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 32611.

Bay Isles again
Well, I was wrong. The "No Trespassing" signs in
the Bay Isles rim canal of Longboat Key are still in
place. Good sense didn't prevail after all.
Now the Town of Longboat Key has sent a letter
to the Bay Isles Association asking that the signs be
removed because "they do not meet the required place-
ment standards of the town sign code." The association
has been given until Oct. 25 to remove them.
The letter concludes that if the signs aren't re-
moved by the association, "the violation will be for-
warded to the Code Enforcement Board for final dis-
position," whatever the heck that means.
In its usual spirit of cooperation and openness, as-
sociation president Julian Dorf hasn't returned phone
calls from The Islander Bystander. Likewise, the Bay
Isles lawyer hasn't replied to inquiries from Sarasota
attorney John Patterson on the matter. Patterson repre-
sents Sarasota guide Capt. Jonnie Walker, who fishes
the rim canal on a regular basis and plans to con-
tinue doing so.

Manatee deaths solved
It's official. It was red tide that killed 10 percent of
the Gulf Coast population of manatees last spring. Dr.
Scott Wright, chief manatee scientist for the State of
Florida, says 158 manatees "just suffocated" because
the critters can't detect the brevetoxin produced by the
red tide algae.
Most, but not all, of the deaths came in the area
between Naples and Fort Myers, according to the report
in "The Marine Scene," a publication of the Florida Sea
Grant Program.
See you next week.


ICOAST I LIN




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 25 l-

Reds, snook plentiful, kingfish soon


By Capt. Mike Heistand
As water temperatures fall, kingfish will make their
fall run. But the action remains with snook and redfish.
Last week Gary Grant caught a 36-inch snook off the
Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier using a live mullet as
bait.
Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet Lee said their four-
hour trip averaged 50 head of Key West grunts, trigger-
fish, porgies and vermillion snapper while their 9-hour
trip has been getting 25 head of grouper, snapper and
grunts.
Anna Maria City Pier Mackerel seemed to be the
big thing this week, according to Gary. Some to 24
inches were caught. There were catches of bonnethead
sharks and snook 24 to 36 inches and sheepshead to
three pounds.
Rod & Reel Pier Folks are catching plenty of
mackerel and black drum. Schools of snook and redfish
are hitting late at night.
Annies of Cortez Bait & Tackle Bruce said Capt.
Zack with Dee-Jay II has caught a lot of snook and red-
fish on his charters. In addition, he has seen some mack-
erel. Fishing near Longboat Pass has been good and some
anglers are catching a few snook in the canals.
Galati Yacht Basin Chris said with the weather
straightening up you should look for cobia on artificial
reefs. Sheepshead are picking up inshore and the king-
fish should be here in two weeks.
Capt. Rick Gross reports snook fishing is still good
with plenty of small fish and a few keepers.
Capt. Tom Chaya said bait is still plentiful and




DAY AM HIGH AM LOW PM HIGH PM LOW
Oct24 11:46 1.9 5:00 0.4 11:15 2.2 4:53 0.9
Oct25 11:39p* 2.3 5:43 0.2 12:43 1.8 5:22 1.1
Oct26 6:25 0.0 1:36 1.8 5:47 1.2
Oct 27 12:04 2.4 7:04 -0.1 2:22 1.7 6:09 1.3
Oct28 6:43 -0.1 2:12 1.6 5:35 1.3
Oct29 12:04 2.4 7:22 -0.1 3:01 1.6 5:59 1.4
Oct 30 12:38 2.4 8:07 0.0 3:48 1.5 6:34 1.4
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


snook and redfish are biting.
On my boat, Magic, redfish have been the best bet
with up to 30 fish per trip. We also caught a few nice
flounder.
Capt. Mark Bradow has been doing well on snook
this past week with several keepers boated along with
some keeper redfish.
Skyway Fishing Pier Mangrove snapper have
moved in. Also legal-sized grouper, mackerel, jacks


Kirk Davis, right, of
Holmes Beach has help
from Rob Anderson of
Bradenton with a 20-
pound cobia Davis
recently caught off Anna
Maria.











and flounder were caught on the pier.
Island Discount Tackle Bill said snooking is good
right now. Wade fishermen are still catching their share
of linesiders and there are lots of redfish being caught
on the charter boats. No reports of kingfish yet, but any
day now.
Anglers Repair Capt. Thom Smith reports red-
fish, snook up 27 inches and trout to 21 inches in
Terra Ceia Bay.
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PI PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real estate sales
214 Periwinkle, Anna Maria, a ground-level
canalfront 1,430 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1963
on a 9,375 sf lot, was sold 8/30/06. Gagner to Tucker, for
$190,000; list unknown.
405 Bay Palms, Holmes Beach, a ground-level,
1,124 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1968 on an
80x100 lot, was sold 8/30/96, Hydecker to Durfee, for
$130,000; list $130,000.
420 Magnolia, Anna Maria, a ground level 868 sfla
2bed/lbath/lcar home built in 1961 on a 104x145 lot,
was sold 8/27/96, Wright to Stewart, for $135,000; list
$152,000.
102 68th St., Holmes Beach, 105 Seaside Beach
House, an elevated gulffront 1257 sfla 2bed/1.5bath
FRA MAXN FAN AXO


GREAT BUILDING LOT!
Super building lot near the Bay in Anna
Maria City. Lovely neighborhood of execu-
tive homes. Don't miss this great opportu-
nity to own a piece of the Island. Priced to
sell at just $82,500.
Call Agnes Tooker at 778-5287
S or Ken Jackson at 778-6986.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L 9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


i- I S .


GORGEOUS VIEW OF ICW. 2BR/2B 1st floor corner unit.
Many quality upgrades including electric storm shutters.
Deeded carport and 54' boat slip. Tennis, heated pool and
spa. $174,000. Bob Burnett, 387-0048. #15381
SPECTACULAR ELEVATED GULF-FRONT RESIDENCE
with panoramic view. 3BR/3B, fireplace in great room, 55'
wraparound deck. Professionally landscaped. $795,000.
Nancy Keegan, 723-3929. #68328
LUXURY CONDOMINIUM. Elegant 3BR/2B on the ICW.
Overlooks boat basin. Private lobby/elevator. Over
2,000 square feet, fireplace, 3 porches, 2-car garage
and workshop. Tennis, pool, boat slip. $335,000. Bob
Burnett, 387-0048. #16424
EXQUISITE 2BR/2B town house with den. End unit,
many upgrades. Tennis, biking. $129,900. Traute
Winsor, 727-7024. #13284
SAILBOAT WATER Luxurious condo. State-of-the-art island
kitchen, master suite, loft office. Workshop with A/C. Lanai
overlooks lighted dock. Direct access to ICW. $199,900. Barry
and Kimberly Charles, 795-1273. #67950
TWO-PARCELS. Multi-use duplex, zoned C-2 commercial,
and lot 90' by 100' +/-, west side of Gulf Drive and only steps
to the beach. Duplex perfect for owner occupancy, 2 families,
seasonal rentals or investment. Lot on Gulf Drive could sup-
port retail, restaurant or professional. Can be sold separately.
$385,000. Anne Miller, 792-6475. #15843, 15844


On Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach. Contact Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
ANNUAL. Duplex 2BR/2B, washer/dryer hookups,
storage shed. Walk to the beach. $700 per month.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE DUPLEX. 1BR/2B,
ground floor. Walk to the beach. Available March,
April 1997. Seasonal. $1,300 per month.
Exceptional properties, exceptional service.
Call us for your property management needs.


condo built in 1977, was sold 9/3/96, Moffett to Lange,
for $147,000; list $162-155,000.
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 175 Runaway
Bay, a ground floor 1,080 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in
1978 was sold 9/3/96, Murrell to Guppy, for $110,000;
list $117,900.
1906 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 203 Coquina
Beach Club, an elevated Gulffront 1,090 sfla 2bed/2bath
condo built in 1985 was sold 9/3/96, Hazel to Zajac, for
$176,000; list $185,000.
222 Chilson, Anna Maria, an elevated canalfront
1,248 sfla 3bed/lbath/2cp home built in 1981 on a
75x148 lot, was sold 9/5/96, Pizzo to Frisco, for
$190,000; list $209,000.
310 Tarpon, Anna Maria, an elevated canalfront

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Anna Maria Island Club, most preferred on the Island. Two
bedroom, two bath, top floor end unit, turnkey furnished.
Heated pool, spa, sauna & elevator. $244,000. Lynn
Hostetler 778-4800.
WATERWAY PENTHOUSE This 3BR/3BA top floor
unit offers expansive views of Palma Sola Bay. The up-
graded complex has heated pool, tennis court, workout
room, billiard room and boat docks. Great location. Asking
$159,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
ONLY STEPS TO THE BEACH 3BR/2BA, turnkey fur-
nished home with view of Gulf and only steps to the beach.
Inground heated pool, garage, nice sized bedrooms and liv-
ing room. $164,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
SOUTH BRADENTON BARGAIN Neat as a pin 3BR/
2BA comer home located across the street from expensive
Bayfront properties. Fruit trees, new refrigerator, stove,
washer & dryer are just some-of the features. Boat slip avail-
able. $95,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
GREAT VALUE Views of the Bayfront from the balcony
of this spacious & furnished condo unit. 2BR/2BA, cathe-
dral ceilings, quiet and private area of Island overlooking
pool area & close to shopping & beaches. $94,900. Lynn
Hostetler 778-4800.


1,930 sfla 3bed/3bath/3car/pool homes built in 1993 on
a 75x115 lot, was sold 9/5/96, O'Bannon to Huggins, for
$335,000; list $385-379,000.
112 Hammock, Anna Maria, a ground-level
canalfront 1,673 sfla 2bed/2bath/2cp home built in 1968
on a 9520 sf lot, was sold 9/10/96, Lane to Diamant, for
$235,000; list unknown.
2312 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, an elevated
Gulffront 966 sfla lbed/lbath condo built in 1982, was
sold 9/10/96, Clendenon to Botts, for $121,000; list
$126,000.
312 64th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,934
sfla 4bed/3bath/lcp duplex built in 1969 on a 13,728 sf
lot, was sold 9/12/96, Rozamus to Weir, for $160,000;
list unknown.
5806 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 204S Waters Edge,
an elevated 1,051 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1975,


Help-U-Sell Realty Counselors [3
National Real Estate Service MLS

Buyers buy for less
Sellers save
thousands
We'll sell your home
for3 1/2%

WALK TO FABULOUS GULF BEACH
1.5 story, 4BR/3BA with updated guest apart-
ment. Completely remodeled. Like new.
2,400 sq. ft. of living area, vaulted modem
open design. 460 ft. to beach. $269,900.
Call Matt Stella CRS 795-0615


NOW BOOKINGSEASONAL
RENTALSFOR 199


ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
2BR/2BA villa $950 mo
Key Royale Home
2BR/2BA with den $1500 mo
Holmes Beach Duplex
2BR/2BA $575 mo Julie Gilstr
Property Man


Wedebroclea)I Company
matching p l-e h p erties since 1949

3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
941-778-6665 800-749-6665


-


ap
ager


NORTH ANNA MARIA 3BR/3BA, elevated,
canalfront estate. Steps away from Bay & Gulf.
Hardwood floors, 4-car garage, caged pool. Pri-
vate dock with power & H20. Priced at $319,900.
Call Ron for any Island Property, 778-5957.





Scotland Yard Realty, Inc.
3014 Manatee Avenue West
Bradenton, Florida 34205-4241
Business (941) 748-5551 -
After hours (941) 778-5957 Ron Pepka Realtor


r,~


OPEN HOUSES
Sunday October 27, 1996
1-4 pm

218 Chilson, Anna Maria.......................... $300,000
Canalfront 2BR/2BA pool home on a double lot. Prop-
erty can be divided. Frank Migliore 778-2662 eves.
518 74th Street, Holmes Beach............... $229,900
2BR/2BA home on deep water canal. Split bedroom, eat-
in kitchen, open & bright. Marion Ragni 778-1504.
512 68th Street, Holmes Beach ............... $219,900
Canalfront home. 2BR/2BA, family room, dock, deep
water canal. Bill Allen 778-1620 eves.
213 58th St., Holmes Beach..................... $135,000
2BR/2BA refurbished home. Fireplace, large deck.
Walk to beach, shopping and restaurants. Pat Thomp-
son 778-6439 eves.
501 Gulf Dr. N. #305, Bradenton Beach ..... $114,900
Bridgeport. Bayfront condo, 2BR/2BA furnished.
Steps to beach, covered parking, elevator. Zee
Catanese 794-8991.
879 Waterside Lane, Bradenton.............. $119,800
Perico Bay Club 2BR/2BA plus loft townhome. Many
upgrades. Great water views from both floors. Judy
Duncan 778-1589 eves.
3705 9th Ave. W., Bradenton..................... $72,900
2BR/1BA pool home. Updated kitchen and bathroom,
entertainment deck. Darcie Duncan 779-2290 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS | 1 J
B~tAUoB"w*


I


s 0n nt







was sold 9/11/96, Melvin to Shea, for $155,000; list
unknown.
615 North Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, a 50x100 resi-
dential lot, was sold 9/10/96, Paris to Young, for
$60,000; list unknown.
625 Dundee, Holmes Beach, a ground-level
canalfront 1,856 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car home built in 1968
on a 10,350 sf lot, was sold 9/9/96, Knier to Taylor, for
$235,000; list $249,000.
7100 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 201 Nautilus, a second-
story 1,100 sfla 2bed/2bath condo built in 1975, was sold
9/13/96, Spencer to Badgley, for $125,000; list unknown.
9306 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria, a ground level 669
sfla lbed/lbath home built in 1925 on a 5,202 sf lot,
was sold 9/13/96, Blackburn to Disalvo, for $110,000;
list unknown.
102 74th St., Holmes Beach, a ground-level
Gulffront 1,700 sfla 2bed/2bath home built in 1948 on


Just
visiting OLMES
paradise2

ISLANDER BUSINESS
E CENTER
Don't leave the island
without taking time to C3 ZONING
subscribe to the bhst RENTAL
news the only paper SPACES
with all the news
about the Island. AVAILABLE
Charge your
subscription to Mini Storage
MasterCard or Visa Retail or Service
by phone or visit us at CALL NOW
5404 Marina Drive, 778-2924
Island Shopping Center, 5347 Gu
Holmes Beach. 5347ve
941-778-7978 Holmes Beach


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 27 Ki_
a 19,683 sf lot with 113 feet fronting the Gulf, was sold
9/16/96, Bartizal to Kabris, for $495,000; list $495,000. REN TA LS
102 Gull, Anna Maria, a ground-level canalfront
1,701 sfla 3bed/2bath home built in 1969 on a pie- DAILY *WEEKLY
shaped lot, was sold 9/20/96, Suhs to Smith, for MONTHLY
$155,000; list $179-175-165,000. DIAL" DEBBIE DIAL
2909 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground-level 1,512 778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
sfla 3bed/2bath duplex built in 1971 on a 50x100 lot,
was sold 9/20/96, Glanz to Ockerman, for $105,000; list Debbie Dial T R1 VIh1L Gulfstream
$110,000. Leasing Manager 56HO MERINA DR.EH F.
3805 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 301 Sunbow Bay
2, an elevated 993 sfla Ibed/lbath condo built in 1979,
was sold 9/20/96, Burd to Lorimer, for $79,000; list BILL L
$81,900. BILL ALEXANDER
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate Broker General Manager
broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Islander By- Invites you to contact our rental
stander. 1996, all rights reserved. and sales professionals for any
of your real estate needs.
A I. X


BILL BOWMAN
Broker Salesperson
.. .,,.. No catchy phrases, no fancy
slogans. Just 25 years of Real
A- Estate experience with the last
10 years on Anna Maria Island.

WAGNER RMEALTY
778-2246


Dream to touch the Stars...
3 Live to touch your Dreams

Sue Normand
Realtor
S1 For all your real estate needs
lo Let me help you reach foryour star
SUE NORMAND
Evenings Wagner Realty
(941) 778-3128 (941) 778-2246 or 1 (800) 211-2323


SWAGNER IEALTY 1'
Sj 778-2246
,' Offices Located in:
Anna Maria Island Palmetto
Longboat Key* Bradenton


Anna Maria Canalfront Home By Owner


224 OAK AVE: 3 bedroom, 3 bath, elevated home. Open
and airy, great room/living room with wood burning fire-
place and oak floors. Master suite has his and her walk-in
closets and whirlpool tub with separate shower. Screened
deck overlooks the boat ramp and dock with electric and
water hook-up. No bridges. Ample parking and storage
under 2,100 sq. ft. of air conditioned living space.
Asking $349,000 Please call 778-0217.


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"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"

SExclusive
Estates M S I
Video Collection ... ... i


WATERFRONT SHOWPLACE









This exquisite, newly listed 3 bedroom, 3 bath
canalfront residence offers the finest appoint-
ments and quality construction throughout some
of the numerous amenities include a 70' boat
dock, davits, 30' swimming pool on separate,
lushly landscaped lot, spnnkler, security and in-
tercom systems, vaulted ceilings with fans, sky-
lights, and gorgeous window and wall coverings,
Kohler fixtures and fittings, and so very much
more! Truly a must see! Priced at $650,000 with
a Preferred Homeowner's Warranty!


ssc iates fter rs arara Sat...77 ancy f nao- 8 iciaiin ind...729-3 S a 9- 0 Shery Sser .. 778-
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333 Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820


NEW LISTING 3BR/2BA home with built-in grill, private
backyard with pool, wet bar in family room, formal dining,
many extras. $175,000. #17701. Call Carol S. Heinze
eves. 778-7246.
MEXICAN VILLA 3BR/3.5BA townhouse with two fire-
places, master bath with Jacuzzi, heated pool sur-
rounded by lush landscaping, steps to beach. $349,000.
#14412. Karin Stephan eves. 388-1267.
CHARMING HOME IN ANNA MARIA 2BR/2BA, recently
remodeled. Screened porch with spa, private back yard,
close to North Point beach. Very clean. $170,000.
#67468. Call Roni Price eves. 778-5585.

SKarin Stephan
REALTOR
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
I Home:
941-388-1267
Fax: 941- 778-3035


IMPERIAL HOUSE
Ground level, turnkey fur-
nished, 2BR with Bayview. Af-
fordable condo in excellent
area with low maintenance
Sfees. $75,000. #CH17250.


Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist
TRIPLEX ... *MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$650,000 $720,000. 3BR/1.5BA, 2BR/1BA and efficiency.
Covered parking, direct Gulffront on 2 lots. #KS14087
TRIPLEX ... 3BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 1BR/1 BA close to the
beach excellent rental history. $159,900. #KS13966
GULFFRONT TRIPLEX *MVP Seller will entertain of-
fers between $650,000 $790,000. Direct Gulffront. 4
units beautifully furnished, excellent income, contract
with large German travel agency. Walking distance to
stores and restaurants. Laundry room, outdoor shower,
guest bath and shower downstairs. Walk around the
Island from this super complex. #KS17201


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419 Pine Avenue Anna Maria. Florida
i 19,-11 778-291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX 1941) 778-229-1
sf."


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m







13 PAGE 28 OCTOBER 24, 1996 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


1997 ENTERTAINMENT BOOK Hundreds of 2-for-
1 and 50% discounts on dining, travel, shopping,
movies, events and more! $30. Portion of proceeds
to Island Rotary Club. Michael Advocate, 778-0766.
WHITE WICKER SET 5 piece. Love seat, rocker, 2
chairs and table with glass top. Like new with cush-
ions. $175 OBO. 778-5522.

SMALL WOOD DROP LEAF dining room table with
2 chairs $75. Call 778-3022 after 6 pm.
LIKE NEW NEUTRAL COLORS. Sofa and love
seat $300. Queen sofa bed $300. Swivel chair, bar-
rel-back $40. Double mattress, springs, frame $175.
Single mattress, springs, frame $125. Large paint-
ing, beach scene $75. Patio set $50. Antique ladder-
back chair $35. Lazy Boy recliner $250. 794-2947.
OAK DINING TABLE with 2 leaves, 6 chairs. Very
good condition. $200. 778-7765.
ORIENTAL SCREEN 4 PANEL x 6 ft. Black with
Mother of Pearl figurines $175. Oriental jewelry box
$75. Oriental foyer table with glass top $125. 778-7371.
ASSORTED SIZES OF Rolladen storm shutters.
Marble vanity double sink. 1989 Kawasaki jet ski.
Call for prices and sizes. 778-3960.
MANY ITEMS FOR SALE moving. Bedroom furni-
ture, large corner unit couch, miscellaneous pictures,
antiques and collectibles, cedar chest. 778-3899 Joey.
LEATHER PILLOW TOP SOFA, love seat, less than
year old. Bought at Burdines. $750 pair. Fossil stone
with glass tops cocktail and 2 end tables $275 for
all 3. All glass dining room table with 4 upholstered
chairs $350. Call 779-2223 days or 795-0189 eves.
ALL ITEMS LIKE NEW Dinette table, chairs and
breakfront. VCR, microwave, double box spring and
mattress, stuffed animals, 2 rattan swivel barstools,
cashmere sweater, beautiful clothes med. size. Also
1920's kitchen items. 794-8177.
FUJI RACING BIKE, small frame. $50. Bang &
Olufsen stereo: Beocenter 7000 includes tuner, turn-
table & cassette player $600. 778-1102.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


BRADENTON VILLAGE GREEN AREA. Huge
yard sale Sat., Oct. 26, 8 3. Christmas decora-
tions, tools, yard equipment, craft supplies, crystal,
dishes, computer items, books and much more.
7202 9th Avenue West.
GARAGE SALE Sat. only, Oct. 26, 8 12. Washing
machine, television, dining/bedroom furniture,
kitchenware, clothes, rifles, miscellaneous, etc. North
Beach Village, 6250 Holmes Blvd. #25, Holmes Beach.
LAWN SALE Sat., Oct. 26, 9 ? Plenty of furniture,
basketball hoop and stand, cameras, odds and ends.
210 67th Street, Holmes Beach.
MOVING SALE Sat., Oct. 26, 8:30 3. Fine furni-
ture and elegant glassware. 243 South Harbor
Drive, Holmes Beach.
WEST BRADENTON Flea Market and Auction. Open
7 days a week. 9516 Cortez Rd. West, Mt. Vernon
Plaza. Collectibles, dolls, select furniture, mattresses,
birds, jewelry, etc. Auction every Friday at 7 pm. We
buy and sell daily. AU2018 AB1264. Ray Simmons,
Auctioneer 761-0906.
WE BUY FURNITURE, antiques, collectibles, misc.
items. Any or all. 761-0906 or 792-5347. Auction.
consignments wanted. Auction every Friday at 7 pm.
9516 Cortez Rd. West. AU2018 AB1264. Ray
Simmons, Auctioneer. Come shop.
L O S T A ND:F N I C --l

FOUND KITTEN multi-colored. Call 778-5777 for
information.
LOST BLACK KITTEN female. Reward. 778-2923.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls)
- We come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only).
778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


'90 BUICK LESABRE custom, excellent condition, blue,
automatic, maintenance records. $5,000. 778-6511.


RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY
THE # RESIDENTIAL RESALE OFFICE IN MANATEE COUNTY!




Debbie Dial Yvonne Higgins Sandy Greiner Jennifer Jones Don Schroder Karen Schroder Barbara Turner
CALL ONE OF OUR ISLAND PROFESSIONALS TODAY!


A g 8 3 G LSRA MRA


IISLANDERI
^BSS^ESSHA


1991 DODGE SHADOW CONVERTIBLE good con-
dition. $4,000. Call evenings at 778-4027.
CHEAP TRANSPORTATION 1984 Mercury Topaz,
4 cylinder, new tires, runs good. $500. 778-5643.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
SPIRIT SONG CHARTERS pleasure cruises with
Capt. Richard Ardabell. Sunset, Egmont, snorkeling
or just relax and enjoy to view. 778-2195.

WANTED FIBERGLASS sailing dinghy, 6' 9'
length. Call 778-2832.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.
AVON EARN MONEY for Christmas. Full or part time.
For information or to buy Avon call 252-4687 pager.
DELI PERSON NEEDED. Apply in person. Jessie's
Island Store, 5424 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND Community Center, a drug
free workplace, seeks responsible, enthusiastic indi-
viduals to teach and energize our after-school chil-
dren ages 5 19 and/or to work some evenings and
Saturday with our adolescent groups. $5.75 $6.75
per hour. Call Liva, 778-1908.
AN OHIO OIL COMPANY needs mature person now
in the Holmes Beach area. Regardless of experience,
write C.W. Read, P.O. Box 696, Dayton, OH 45401.
EXPANDING DISTRIBUTION BUSINESS in Central
South America. Looking for serious individual. Bilin-
gual college degree preferred. Part time hours, full
time income potential. Call 331-1297.
CHILD CARED NEEDED for 6 month old baby girl.
Mon. Fri. or Tues. Sat., 9:30 7. Call 383-0551.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED full or part time. Must be
fast, efficient, dependable, able to work weekends.
Good pay. References required. 778-3053.


SSUSAN
AND


Smith, REALTORS welcomes Susan Hatch. Originally from
London, England with a background in banking, Susan has been
an Island resident for the past 12 years. Member of Manatee
4- County Board of REALTORS ... gardening enthusiast and pro-
fessionally a REALTOR. Susan is off to a great start with being
named Associate of the Month for September.
Susan, along with the entire Smith team, wants to serve you better than anyone on the
Island. If what you need has anything to do with selling, buying or managing real estate, call
Susan at 778-7616 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-0777
Rentals 778-0770
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK


Ilahndirl Realt


CEDAR BEACH HOUSE!!!
Close to bay & beach on the north end of Anna Maria.
Lush tropical landscaping surrounds this lovely home.
Just steps to the Rod & Reel pier. Just listed at $177,500.
Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-5287
or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gull DOrvo P Box 717 .An Mana MaaFL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICE! THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
PRICE REDUCED BY $10,000
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2 car,
3,895 sq. ft. under roof home including
caged pool. Next to bun not on a canal.
Owner anxious. $265,0-0. Now $255,000.

Doug Dowling Realty
778-1222


N A I : I i I AN; A11-s A 3l = f I L'Ati -


S A 3 A I :1 1 1 T : H e -i A I M i I A z 11 :7 F I i M :f l ILA' S


NEW RENTAL LISTINGS FOR 1996 97
PANORAMIC GULF VIEW!
3BR/2BA Gulffront, beautifully decorated,
elevated home ................................. $3,200/mo.
2BR/1.5BA Gulffront. Loveley single-level
home with fireplace ..........................$2,600/mo.

VERY CLOSE TO GULF!
2BR/1 BA Refurbished, turnkey unit and very
charming decor ................................ $1,800/mo.
2BR/2BA Refurbished, single home with
lovely screened porch ...................... $1,900/mo.



.=.. REALTY
We ARE the Island."
9o05 Gull Orv. o Box 835 AMna, Maria. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


I


-el





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I OCTOBER 24, 1996 M PAGE 29 IMI

L I F I E D

HEPWATDCotnud7 mSRICSCotned 7 ARPTCENN otne


SITUATION WANTED Chauffeur and related du-
ties. Young, retired law enforcement officer seek-
ing part time employment. Responsible, versatile,
personable, knowledgeable and flexible. Call Jack
at 794-8388.

POSITION WANTED Managing/operating small
rental complex on the Island. Experienced, excellent
local references. Call Frank at 778-0513.
CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you
can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or778-6247.


ISLAND 25 YEARS EXPERIENCED CNA will care
for you or your loved ones and much more. Child
care also. Call Paula at 779-1405.
COMPANION FOR ELDERLY Bradenton or the Is-
land. Caring and friendly with references. Low rates.
Call Melinda at 739-2340.
CAREGIVER/COMPANION dependable, reliable
and loving care person available days to help you
with your needs. Have car. Please call 778-7637.



JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
WILL DO BRAINLESS TASKS at my home such as stuff-
ing envelopes, apply labels, etc. Call me at 779-1217.


JUDY DUNCAN
Broker, CRS, GRI, LTG


SE,'EEl 778077:7lor1i804 :s B


"THE PERFECTIONIST" Cleaning with perfec-
tion. Offices, homes and condos. Ironing too! Call
Sharon at 778-0064.

"SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Licensed,
bonded. Get ready for season or just pamper your-
self. Excellent references. Estimate or appointment.
Beverly 778-1945.

GENERAL CLEANING & REPAIRS Apartments,
condos, homes, rentals. Weekly, monthly, hourly or
one time. Dependable Island residents. Trustworthy,
references. 779-2057.
HOUSEKEEPER COMPANION available by the
hour or by the day for cleaning, laundry, errands,
light cooking, etc. References. 729-4595, Kathy.
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Treat yourself to a
therapeutic massage. Very relaxing, stress and pain
relieving. Nationally certified massage therapist.
Very reasonable. Jeff, 795-8243.
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree trimming, free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.
TYPING WORD PROCESSING RESUMES and
more! Could you use an extra two hands? Call
Joanne at 778-4053, leave message.

DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL openings for
18 months through 5 years. Come by and check us
out. 778-2967.

NEVER WAX YOUR VEHICLE again! We'll come
to your garage, marina, work or hanger. Bring
back the showroom shine you thought was gone.
Call now! 778-5215.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.


DARCIE DUNCAN
REALTOR*, GRI


S. I.


RUNAWAY BAY
1BR/1BA and 2BR/2BA units available
from $82,500. Amenities include swim-
ming pool and tennis courts. Vacation
home or rental (on-site rental man-
ager). Across from beach. Call Jerry
Martinek or Bob Wolter.


BAYFRONT DUPLEX
With fabulous view, spacious floor
plans and a short walk to the beach.
Turnkey furnished. 2,736 sq. ft. total liv-
ing area. Large deep-water dock. Of-
fered at $389,000. Call Dave Moynihan
eves. 778-7976.

Il\11RAC Eimi


K--_,----------- 1F1W*&- ---A-m
GULFVIEW LOT ISLAND DUPLEX
Wooded 100 x 100 lot north of Manatee Best priced duplex on the Island. In a quiet
Ave. with short walk to beach. Zoned neighborhood and less than one block from
single or duplex. Offered at $82,500. great beach. East side seasonal rental.
Call Dave Moynihan for details eves. West side unfurnished annual rental.
778-7976. $129,900. Call Ed Oliveira eves. 778-1751.


JERY. RTNE IL BWANSAD LNDH


CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.
PROCLEAN CARPET & FURNITURE cleaning.
High power truck mount extraction. 1 hour quick dry
service. Emergency water extraction. 12 years expe-
rience. 778-5206.


ANNA MARIA GARDEN Center & Landscaping.
Free estimates, 32 years experience. Full service
landscaping and garden center. Next to Island
Foods. All work guaranteed. 778-6630.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

JIM TRAVIS CONSTRUCTION Remodeling, room
additions, decks, baths, kitchens, repairs. License
#RR0066842. 779-2129, Jim.

KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION CO. Residential &
commercial. New construction or remodeling. In-
sured. Lic. # CGC 058-092. Call 778-5354 or
pager 506-6186.


ANNA MARIA BAYFRONT LOT -
Spectacular Views Build your dream
home. See us for details on this new
Island listing- just reduced in price.
Call Horizon Realty of Anna Maria, Inc.
(941) 778-5052


(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY

of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778-1929


-I I -. I.. EWE


iAm -W 1


DIRECT GULF FRONT
Luxury home in Anna Maria with endless open
water views! Large lot, walled for privacy, ex-
tensive decking, 4BR/3B, over 2000 sq ft and
4-car garage.
CANALFRONT
3BR/2B home in Key Royale under complete
renovation like brand new! $299,000.
CHARMING
Beachfront home with panoramic views of
Tampa Bay, Sunshine Skyway and Egmont
Key. Wrap-around deck, lush tropical land-
scaping and new seawall. $299,000.
BAYFRONT
Beach house, steps to fishing pier, offers mag-
nificent open-water views and private beach
area. Large open lanai area, 2-car garage and
meticulous landscaping. $359,900.
REDUCED!
Canalfront home in Anna Maria with spacious
Florida room with wood burning stove, large
deck and lot with courtyard entrance.
$209,000.
BAYOU
Open-water views from this fabulous home
with low maintenance shell yard, newer sea-
wall, boat slip with large dock and many fruit
and palm trees. 3BR/3B. $429,000.
CONTEMPORARY
Canalfront home with large open decking that
wraps around the back and opens to the living
and master bedrooms. 2BR/2B, light and
bright throughout, fabulous landscaping and
more! $259,000.

OCEAN PARK TERRACE
2BR/2B condo with roof-top deck perfect for
entertaining, barbecues or quiet sunbathing.
Security system, elevator and covered parking.
$169,000.
BRIDGEPORT
Condo features this turnkey furnished unit on
the bay and Intracoastal waterway. 2BR/2B,
breakfast bar and extra storage space. Excellent
rental history. $119,900.


IEr


N*"~

x-ig


Serving the Island
from the some
location since 1970.


6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-6066 1-800-865-0800


GULF TO BAY MOORINGS
Waterfront complex offers spectacular views of
the bay and Intracoastal waterway from this
2BR/2B end, comer unit with new carpet and
tile floors, covered parking and boat dock.
$118,500.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE
Extra large townhouse in shaded tree top location
steps to the beach and pool/garden area. Top
floor has two master suites, open floor plan and
screened lanai. $171,900.


ISLAND COTTAGE
With extra income apartment and vacant lot
sold as a package deal! Large 100 x 100
fenced yard with coconut palms. $199,900.
ATTACHED
Island residence newly built. Elevated, light and
bright home with covered parking for 4 cars,
3BR/2B, steps to beach or bay. $149,900
each side.
ELEVATED
Key West style Anna Maria pool home. 3BR/
2B, fireplace, tile floors, open floor plan with
cathedral ceilings and skylights and many ex-
tras! $279,900.
ATTENTION INVESTORS!
Excellent rental property just steps to fishing
pier and beach. Newly built 3BR/2B home
with 2+ car garage and open lanai. $229,500.
REMODELED
Home extra close to the beach with great gulf
views. Elevated with elevator, 2BR/2.5B, lots
of downstairs storage space and garage.
$240,000.


BACK ON THE MARKET!
Buyers loss is your gain with this fabulous 3BR/
2B home on large lot. A steal for only
$119,000!
Call Island Real Estate for all
your Real Estate needs!
We're selling to the world
on the Internet.


Visit us *on the 6 6'Id.widei te t t/ w l ac


MU MS
I .19


17 1 " - m m w


I






j~ PAGE 30 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


d Commercial Residential Free Estimates
S Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
wlaw Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778 1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

s WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
@@N9@TR1U@TO@N
snBgavi0G
(aR'lS'iF~slMTn a


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Specialists
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


m Island In-Home Consultations
D r Free Estimates
Decor ,
by Ssn Complete Interior Design
@ by Susan
Powers 778-5181

G.R. SULLIVAN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Specialists in Hurricane Resistant
New Construction Remodeling Rennovation

25 Years Experience t Licensed & Insured
References 794-3260 CELLENCE Lic RR 0047996

Designed Refaced
Formica Wood


cA-sNIoS$


by REX B. SLIKER
10 Years of Local References


778-7399


REMODELING
ADDITIONS

XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


LOCKSMrITH PArITIWG
Gary F. Deffenbaugh b6y
Licensed-Bonded-Insured AYknElliAfenb lba.,q
LOCKOUTS
LOCKOUTS "Professional Excellence"
Auto-Home-Commercial
LOCKS Residential-Commercial
REKEY INSTALL MASTER Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
New & Used Locks & Repairs
Emergency Service Serving the Islands Since 1969.
S Service Islands Since 1986 Licensed and Insured
ALOA 778-5594ASIS 778-5594 778-3468
L -- --- ----I


JISWAWDZ.ER DECLASSIFIED
I-OM MPOVMNTCotnud. ENAL onine


INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
FIREMAN ED HANDYMAN no job too small! Car-
pentry work, remodeling, yard clean-up. Island resi-
dent. Many references. Call 778-7691.
MARBLE TERRAZZO TILE floors wet ground,
sealed polished wood floors cleaned and polished.
Since 1968. Barton Weeks. 779-1120.
ELLIOTT'S PRECISION TILE SERVICE Ceramic
floors, counters, baths. License 1165. Local resident,
references. (941) 778-1319.
TOM THE HANDYMAN Small jobs and odd jobs are
my specialty. Licensed and insured. Thomas Leddy
(941) 761-8182.
HOME MAINTENANCE REPAIRS over 35 years
experience in all phases for residential, condos and
mobile homes. Small jobs preferred. Bill 778-2409.
HANDYMAN LIGHT HAULING. Fix screens,
doors, painting, cleaning garages, trimming, etc.
Free estimates. Reasonable, honest, dependable.
Jeff, 795-8243.
SEAWALLS LIFTS DOCKS
License #MC00105. Fully insured. Doug Hugenberg
Marine Construction, Inc. Free estimates. Quality
work. Call Doug at 792-5685.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE joint sealing, weep
holes, back-fill, commercial diving, erosion control,
dock repair. Local references, work guaranteed. Call
Cliff at 778-7367.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
CARPET, VINYL, CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed and
repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship guaran-
teed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen 383-5381 or
beeper 506-3297.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile. Lic.
#MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave Elliott.


FULLY FURNISHED beach cottage. 1BR/1BA, pri-
vate lot and parking. $275 per week, includes phone
and cable. 778-2832.
ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Furnished 1BR
apartment. Private patio, pool, washer/dryer. 211
South Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
ENCHANTING ENGLISH TUDOR home 4BR/3BA,
Gulfview on 3 lots of beautiful landscaping. Fireplace,
turret observatory, large screened porch. Everything
you could possibly want in a vacation. Available Nov.
and Dec. Call 778-2206 or 794-8202.
SEASONAL Sandy Point, Martinique. Call T. Dolly
Young, Realtor 778-0766 or 778-5427. The Pru-
dential Florida Realty.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONALS Immaculate 1 & 2
bedroom apartments, turnkey furnished. Stones
throw to Gulf Beach. Summer rates, weekly or
monthly. 778-4368 or 727-8303.
ANNUAL RENTAL Unfurnished 2BR/2BA with won-
derful Gulf view! Attractive and spacious $1,000 mo.
plus utilities.. Anna Maria Realty, 778-2259.
YEARLY RENTAL FURNISHED 1 bedroom. Suit-
able for older or single person. 203 Peacock, Holmes
Beach. $450 mo. Utilities not included. 778-1546.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND Ocean front efficiency.
Beach, pool. Now through Dec. 19, $395 wk. Winter
'97, $1,995 mo. (401) 232-3262.
SEASONAL 1BR apartment and 2BR house, steps
to beach. Washer/dryer, turnkey furnished, no pets.
3 mo. minimum. $1,200/$2,200. 116 White Ave.,
Holmes Beach. (813) 985-6765.
GULFFRONT COTTAGE 2BR/2BA newly reno-
vated, turnkey furnished. Too many amenities to list.
Available now. Week/month/season. For details call
(941) 778-2357.
HIDEAWAY COVE Perfect Bayview between
bridges. 1 block to beach. Nice, quiet, dead end
street. 1st floor, 2BR, fully furnished with dock. 3 mo.
minimum. Annual for the right person/couple. Refer-
ences required. Seasonal 2BR also available. No
smoking or pets. (941) 778-7107.


PET OK. PRIVATE, shaded, fenced yard, Gulfside.
Steps to shelling, shops, fine food, fishing pier. 1 BR
plus sleeper. Wk./mo./yr. 792-8482.
BALCONY OVERLOOKING THE GULF. Shelling,
shopping, fine dining, fishing pier. Pets permitted. Pri-
vate shaded fenced yard. Large 1BR plus. 751-3151.
CUTE COTTAGE WITH DOCK on ICW. Fully fur-
nished, quiet, breezy, fantastic sunsets. Available
Oct. 1. $800 mo. or $250 wk. 794-5980.
BEAUTIFUL BAYFRONT 1BR/1BA upstairs apart-
ment. Private boat dock/deck. One block to beach.
CAll 749-0216.
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA CONDO on Bay near Co-
quina Beach. Amenities include boat dock on deep
water canal. Annual $850 mo. Unfurnished. 778-
3383 for details.
SEASONAL 2BR/1BA & EFFICIENCY apartment.
Nice and clean. Walk to beach. Sorry, no pets. (941)
778-5057.
CASA SIERRA Relax for a great price! Our 2BR/2BA
condos have privacy plus a huge pool, beautiful gar-
dens. Starting at $350 a week. Call (941) 778-0032.
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA HOME on quiet street. Unfur-
nished, hardwood floors. Available for 1 year at rea-
sonable rate. Call Old Florida Realty at 778-3377.

ANNUAL RENTALS IN HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA
home with above ground pool, no pets $1,500 mo.
3BR/2BA canalfront home, no pets $1,000 mo. 2BR/
2BA canalfront home, no pets $900 mo. Smith,
REALTORS, 5910 Marina Drive. 778-0770.


Kern Construction, Inc.
BUILDING AND REMODELING
!Es 748-8020
0 Michael S. Kern 198 49th St. W.
Island References Bradenton, FL 34209

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SERVICE
Coastal Design Specialists
Custom Luxury Homes
Additions & Alterations
Call Tony Peduzzi 778-1529 35 years experience


MANGROVE TRIMMING
Mangroves & other native trees can be leagallytrimmed under the
direction of a registered landscape architect. For details call Tom
at Eatman & Smith, a leaderin in environmentally sensitive design.
Ph# 778-3113 FL LA REG. # 001539



9 thm 8M^ct J R.
*sO


ISLANDER

"More than a mullet wrapper"
100% cotton hats:
$750
Visit us at 5404 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


Painting
4Ptresiure Cleaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


T I BIAl |A LT |R MIMIEIR FA SITITE R
E N EIS CIONR EIS C Al L EI AN H LA I E
AIC HI EIR A F R IEN DX E DI
SL L0 IDIE L IR 0 S AGA
DULL I NE E M lNAN BIS S
DDMONS EXTPRI FIT GILEE
EIT M E S E L A A R7T NE S S
ESIHIARP P LATA NER O 0 11III!N
EIXASTEIR N!AAILIS TX Y|VE ET 0M


IAN E A T E S A I E IRE I E
LS EPP IEBS SOI O L S
SUBP 0 ENA N EDBA I LLE


MAPE A MR ERI IE!XER 0
XII E LA I NLE S E E RI A
SSIE MEDS L ENESSDn ESINT


II Pp II

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095

7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
J.___ __ ^ -__






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 24, 1996 0 PAGE 31 I-I


EISLANEI4CLASSIF~IEDS
IRNALS-oninuda R AL SAECotne


RETIRED COUPLE WANTS to rent in Perico Bay
Club from Nov. 1 through Feb. 28. Contact 792-7442.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 1BR/1BA duplex apart-
ment in Holmes Beach. No pets. $450 mo. plus utili-
ties. Call Fran Maxon Real Estate for further informa-
tion at 778-1450.
ANNUAL RENTAL UNFURNISHED Holmes Beach
house. 2BR/2BA, newly carpeted. Dial Debbie Dial,
ReMax Gulfstream (941) 778-7777.
ANNUAL RENTAL
CUSTOM 2BR/2BA home with 3-car garage, fire-
place and Jacuzzi in Anna Maria City. $1,200 mo.
Call Betsy Hills Real Estate, P.A. (941) 778-2291.
GULFVIEW 2BR/1 BA on quiet street, fully furnished,
seasonal. $1,600 mo. No pets, no smokers. Nov.
through May. 778-6050.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/1BA, 1/2 duplex, recently
refurbished. French doors lead to well landscaped,
fenced back yard. Small pets OK. $695 mo. 778-
0608 for appointment.
ANNUAL RENTAL
Privacy plus on this 2BR/2BA canalfront home on
double lot in Anna Maria City. $1,100 mo. Call Betsy
Hills Real Estate, P.A. (941) 778-2291.
HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL RENTALS 2BR/1BA
$625. 2BR/2BA $650. Nice, quiet locations. No
pets. 778-0217.
SEASONAL RENTALS
GULFFRONT, BAYFRONT, CANALFRONT and no
front vacation rentals still available. Call Betsy Hills
Real Estate, P.A. (941) 778-2291.
SEASONALS: 2 GREAT LOCATIONS; both are
2BR/2BA. Gulffront $800 wk., $3,000 mo. Across
street $650 wk., $2,000 mo. Turnkey, no smoking,
reserve nowl-779-2193.
STATELY 4BR/3BA home available for Jan. 1997.
Just a few steps from the Gulf beachfront. 107 Beach
Ave., Anna Maria Island. $3,600 mo. or $2,400/two
weeks. Telephone (319) 583-1839.
3BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE at North Beach Village.
$1,100 mo. includes lawn care and community pool.
1st, last, security. Jan Jordan, Broker-Realtor, the
Longboat Connection, Inc. 387-9709.
SEASONAL RENTALS: BAYFRONT 2BR/2.5BA
home. Spectacular views from this beautiful home.
Available Jan., Feb. and to Mar. 15, 1997. $2,000
mo.; 2BR/1BA Holmes Beach near shopping and
beaches. Available Jan. and Feb. $1,400 mo.;
Gulffront 3BR/2.5BA home. This spectacular new
home available Nov. through May, 1997. $3,000 mo.;
2BR/2BA west of Gulf Dr., very near beach. Available
Jan., Feb. and Mar. 1997. $1,700 mo. Call Steve
Kring at Horizon Realty of Anna Maria, Inc. for details
on these homes. (941) 778-0426 office or at home
(941) 778-5052.
WANTED TO RENT annually or longer. Nice, re-
sponsible couple; non-smokers, no pets or children.
Want large, unfurnished 2 or 3BR/2BA. Can do pro-
fessional fix-up/repair work. 778-9370.
WANTED SMALL OFFICE SPACE. Will consider shar-
ing or room in residence. No walk-in traffic. 778-7050.


ATTENTION PROPERTY OWNERS! Annual rentals
needed. Wagner Realty has a waiting list of 25 +/- rent-
ers looking for annual rentals. We would like the oppor-
tunity to place them in your property. Call Mark Reemlin,
Monique Stevens or Linda Oyola at 778-2246.
EFFICIENCIES FROM $140 WK for one person from
$175 wk. for two. Excellent off season vacation and
temporary relocation rates until Dec. 15, 1996. Haley's
Motel, 8102 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-5405.


ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Pierside apart-
ments, 4-units furnished. Large lot with pool.
$449,000, by owner (in apt. #1). 211 South Bay Blvd.
778-2896.
TRAILER 30 X 8 W/SCREENED lanai, carport, new
carpet. Pines Trailer Park, Bradenton Beach. For
information call 746-1058 or 747-7290.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE condo for sale by owner.
Priced for quick sale. $143,000. 3BR/2BA. Call for
appointment. 778-2629.
WEST BAY POINT & MOORINGS 2BR/2BA ground
floor end unit. Sunny, renovated. Agents protected.
(416) 922-0119.
PERICO BAY CLUB CONDO gated community.
2BR/2BA, 2nd floor. Large open layout, gorgeous
lake view from screened lanai and living room.
$94,000. Call 761-8063.

TRIPLEX BRADENTON BEACH -great investment.
Close to beach and Bay. Fully leased. Call Jack
McCormick broker, Kevin Levins Realty, 383-5577.
COMMERCIAL/RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE for rent
in Holmes Beach. Call Dennis for details. 778-4461.
SAN REMO SHORES For Sale by Owner. Sailboat
depth water, 1,800 sq. ft. air conditioned, new roof,
A/C, windows, interior doors and dock. Priced below
market. 4107 Royal Palm Drive. 792-5701.
PORTEBELLO OWNER SELL/RENT $5,000
down, $1,100 mo. Financing on spacious 2BR/2BA/
den. Excellent Gulfview, mint condition. Turnkey.
366-8362 owner.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE $159,000. Spacious 3BR/
2BA townhouse with treetop views! Steps to beach
and pool. Motivated seller! Jan Jordan, Broker-Real-
tor. The Longboat Connection, Inc. 387-9709.
LOTS GULF JUST 150' away. $175,000.
Bayview lot direct, duplex. $79,500. Call 778-4523
or 1 (800) 977-0803.


Be a good Islander and invest
in your future. Recycle!


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COL@AOL.COM

HOLMES BEACH MINI STORAGE
Vacancies Climate Controlled Storage
SFacilities in variety of sizes
SNow Shipping UPS
3018 AVE C Holmes Beach 778-5549

Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
R6WKGULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

C J's Plumbing Inc. 722-2702
24-Hour Emergency Service & Repairs
* Water Heaters .Drain Cleaning -Disposals -Remodeling
JOHN DAVIS Beeper 569-9052
Licensed & Insured CFC056844


PHILLIP FRAZIER
CONSTRUCTION

CERAMIC TILE MARBLE FLOOR & COUNTER TOPS
FORMICA *LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORING
CEILING & WALL TEXTURING FINE FINISH WOOD
WORKING CABINETS SHELVING BOOKCASES
* INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING PLUS MUCH MORE
OCC. LIC. # 0713 BEEPER 941-215-1544
16 YRS. EXPERIENCE OFFICE 941-778-0273


For Your Island Home Paint Needs
ISLAND
PAINT WORKS
Interior/Exterior
SCommercial & Residential
Licensed / Insured
Excellent References


BILL ROMBERGER


778-7821


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday- Friday, (Saturday
10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $7.00 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box:
$2, One- or two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business or service, the minimum rate us $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus
250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISA! Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
I-------------------------------------I

I 1_
I I

More information:
(941) 778-79789 SLAMI ERI V
FAX: (941)778-9392
L --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I_ _


* Driveway Staining Roof Coatings
(We can make your tile or pebble roof look new again.)
* Exterior Painting & Pressure Cleaning

/ ROOfd Let the
CI"O \Professionals
S10T Bring Some
Om 0II SPARKLE
HomesCeand To Your Home!
LIESDFE
&ISUE 75 -4 3 ETMAE





I-I PAGE 32 E OCTOBER 24, 1996 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


-- -
-... .---
. -' -



- -*
-


S---'--- The


-




- -


Great Food! Great Beach!
Great Fun!
779-2222
Directly on the Gulf
200 Gulf Drive North
Bradenton Beach


Featured in USA Today!
"A terrific place to eat"
Open 7 an 7 da\s
Bring a hunch for lunch & sunset dinner too!
S Please see our ad else% here in this i.sue)
4000 Gulf Driee llolme' Beach 778-0784
-----------------

Great casual waterfront atmosphere.
Lunch 11 5 daily
Dinner 5 10 Mon. thru Thurs.
and 5 10:30 Fri. & Sal.
By land: 760 BroadwaN Longboat KeN
B\ sea: Marker 39 383-2391


freshest seafood at dockside prices!
Happ) hour Mon. Fri. 4 to 7 pm
Hours: Sun. Thurs. 4 to 10 rpm
Fri. & Sat. 4 to 11 pm
3200 East Ba\ Drive Holmes Beach
778-5997


An American classic.
778-0444
Gulffront deck and indoor dining
100 Spring Avenue City of Anna Maria


121.b- ~i' I hi r:L;' j B iIg t


7'.." 4:" t P : !si ;"PcW ?


E t RESOR'[
~j~11 KEL0[

'-I-.
,,.1.-ff. '
; "_- .


Get your FREE $50 lnmch or dinner
certificate good at any of these 5 fine
restaurants ... the best on the island ...
compliments of the folks at Florida's
Newest RCI Gold Crown Resort ...

UMBRELLA BEACH
ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND!
Call Amy Burke 778-2365 10 am to 3 pm

FOR DETAILS RIGHT
OVER THE PHONE!
ICertain re-trirctons apple, I
Guaranteed Best Food On The Island.
and guaranteed you'll be impressed
with the most outstanding vacation
home on Florida's West Coast.



irYawing E\ERY D\A for a free 5 day
/ 4 night actionn so be sure to register
to win!
Ofler repirev 11/31/96
This promolion nma, not he u-ed in
conjunction ith an) other promotion.


THIS ADVERTISING MATERIAL IS BEING USED FOR THE PURPOSE OF SOLICITING TIMESHARE PERIODS.


AI


SIX-BEDROOM WATERFRONT $589,000
Boaler z dream hci.iTie ronr Birrmni Ba, Marn/
up,_rades 'ndj.-.r pool :'31 C:: 1c 3ano ill ior
large O'rcdli LO:Caled On Key RO:,l- ,'n Iqur'J
Cul-de-S3 C31ll DiCk r.13ar r :.r Da.e lonerr
778-6791


C-







ISLAND MOTEL/APARTMENT $329,900
Li urni .uil aC nai l :I.i-oc :. Iie l,.ea.:r, H ald
: i.l ,: ,ireCu,- grill- arid i31:." lc3 le C C 11
L,:F r.la3r, r : [Da.e J.I r,z. 7-T.- 1


WATERFRONT HOME ON KEY ROYALE
$229,900 Bnng IrThe-. a:.i and doc t.i-rindl Ire
rih uE T .:. beIdr.-: m rr -airz j.ilt h grea[l r.,rn
Epac:rouS i'rii.enied Ilanai :.erl,:,: C,2 ,anal
D:.uIcg- Q rage 3 anC u ld iIy rn-,:m '.,iri .are-a t1:.
hn:be:. Call Hein Wrl Vri- t9


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
$130,000 D. :..-.:lar i C: .-r ir ur ii o'.: rl, :.41 ri,
0,:.:,1 an I ,.]r.en r, ,--ll ., rit. i n.:r, ,, .1 -:l .:;i. .
lanair, uij ,ra d I n-l- 1 p: ..r:ri C all E c.,e
,.- r 3 77- 1 e .?2


ISLAND CONDO SUMMER SANDS
$183,000 Full .ie,.' ,: Ie Intlr ..Cr '3 .'. aer-
.*.'.' ', W 1.l m nia i rlrain ie.: u r L ,i r e le . l, ,r
B 3,'jliul Qar.r rI Ernd3 uirn l; Iic ,,.:.1 ai3 d.
ri i3aurarl r'all .:? rrc rr 77.., .1


SUNBOW BAY TOWNHOUSE $165,000
Imma.:ulaie 4,*ir.3 larIea be,3r.,:,iTi ,4airi
He3led pI. :.'l lenr .. alertr.,ni a 3',, u Cai..e.
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WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS ELEGANT WATERFRONT RESIDENCE
$137,500 2ER -- nn' a r .l.al Illri d 5 lir.- $695,000 ara 3.:.I: t.a L r.,1rni J R'2 sB,-. :::o
51 ,-,prr C, l u. uriru hrEial.d p:,,', l. irn,-. C.urt"l l3ara3 ' ri: ''i .iar. a rJ .,',. C ai C'e re:. ile
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RIVERFRONT $222,000 100 i-er l .:i Itri. MINUTES FROM BEACH $57,500 r,.:, BOATER'S TAKE NOTE REDUCED -
S r.1 ,nalcT i ,T i. r ,:u1ji o :.3.k ,,.r -- .a. t.. 1, ea 3m -i l ..:. n:- -on .3-e and $59,900 LeR 1 '.8- :..'.rT:,u -4 ..irn a'llajtI
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Lu Rr in 7. -78 9 ..a,: alor, r ill L'.I:r a E .l..:.-e: :i T r .' 14. ri:. ,n all C :har.3 d ,'.1r i i.7J .
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POINTE WEST VILLA $66,900 2BR/2BA
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