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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00636

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE SEPTEMBER 19, 1996


-- ,,r - ------


Vandalism may force 11 p.m. pier closure


By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
Citing increased vandalism at the Anna Maria City
Pier, Public Works Director Phil Charnock said he may
ask the city commission to close the pier after 11 p.m.
"Vandals have stolen an American flag and bro-
ken in restroom doors after the restaurant is closed.
When the restaurant closes, I would like to see the



Restaurant


relocation


OK'd at marina
By Paul Roat
A restaurant's relocation has been approved by the
Bradenton Beach City Council within the Bradenton
Beach Marina complex.
The council decision permits an 82-seat restaurant
within the former dockmaster's office at the marina just
south of the Cortez Bridge on Anna Maria Sound. The
former Tiki-hut-style restaurant, once home to Shrimp
Louie's Restaurant, will become the new dockmaster's
offices.
The restaurant relocation plan was forced after sev-
eral thousand dollars in fines from Florida Department
of Environmental Protection officials, who cited the
marina for having a restaurant located on a dock over
the water, a location that is apparently no longer al-
lowed in the state.
In their unanimous approval of the plan, council
members provided marina owner Allan Bazzy with a
number of conditions:
Pedestrian passage along the shore under the
bridge must continue to be maintained, clearly marked
and left unobstructed.
The city garage, located on Church Street adja-
cent to the marina, will receive a face-lift at Bazzy's
expense with city council approval.
Any repair of the pavement due to undue wear of
Church Street will be shared by Bazzy and the city.
A Church Street traffic count will take place
within six months. If traffic exceeds the level of service
for the street, seating within the restaurant will be re-
duced to meet the street's carrying capacity. The traf-
fic count will be conducted at Bazzy's expense.
The quasi-judicial public hearing required a more
formal approach to the proceedings that many other
matters of city business. Council members were
charged by city attorney Alan Prather with weighing
citizen comments against land development code re-
quirements. Those LDC findings call for the special
exception to take place as long as it met 10 criteria.
Pivotal to those findings was one that dealt with traf-
fic increases with the new restaurant.
"Traffic coming on the site will be exactly the
same," Bazzy said. "The traffic you've seen in the past
six months is the traffic that will be there now, and
there has been no problem whatsoever. The impact on
the road is immeasurable. It just does not increase traf-
fic on that street."
"From 8 am. to 6 p.m. all you can hear is machinery,"
resident George Hawley said. "You can't take a nap in the
afternoon. I counted 93 cars in one day during the winter.
Now, with 82 seats, the cars will double."
"The marina is again in violation by currently op-
erating a 70-seat restaurant when there are only permits
for 24 seats," resident Larry Hinds wrote in a letter read
to the council. "Now you are asked to reward this be-
havior by approving another out-of-scale enterprise
located on marina property. Where is the control sys-
tem of the Bradenton Beach government?"
"I've heard nothing but good things about the res-
taurant," resident Eileen Suhre said. "I can't see a big
issue in this. I urge the city council to allow Allan
Bazzy to change the location of the restaurant."
"As a member of Harvey Memorial Church, I'm


pier closed," Charnock said.
Charter fishing captain Mike Heistand said, "I hate
to see anybody lose their fishing spot, but this may be
necessary." Heistand said he experienced similar prob-
lems at the the Rod and Reel Pier where vandals broke
in and damaged propane tanks.
"The cost of 24-hour security is just too great,"
Heistand said.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Architect H. Patterson Fletcher presented his new
design for the interior and exterior of the city hall com-
plex to the Holmes Beach City Council last week.
Council had asked him to submit a plan with the
building site near the Island Branch Library. The build-


proud to be on the same street as the marina," Bernitta
Kays said. "I'm in favor of the marina's new addition."
She also presented a petition signed by 21 residents
who also favored the change in restaurant location at
the marina.
"When I went to the restaurant, it was full to capac-
ity and I had no problem finding a place to park," resi-
dent Dan Goodchild said. "I recommend you accept the
change."
"For me, the question is one of credibility," resi-
dent Tom Hoey said. "The city council needs to look
at the original application for a Tiki-hut that is now a
full-fledged restaurant with who knows what kind of
traffic."
"Bazzy always gets his way, and he will get his
way tonight," Cortez resident Joe Kane said.
"Church Street used to be a very quiet street," resident
John Merrigan said, "and now, Boom! there's a full-
fledged marina there. You need to look at this before you
allow the restaurant to go in there. It will probably double
the people traveling on Church Street. I feel very sorry for
the people who live on Church Street."
The council vote was 4-0 to approve the restaurant
relocation plans with Councilman Dick Suhre absent due
to illness. Councilman Gail Cole at one point argued to
have a full council present, but was told by Mrs. Suhre that
it would be more than a month before Suhre would be well
enough to participate in the proceedings.


Charnock plans to submit a proposal to the com-
mission for 29 new lights on the pier. They would re-
place three light poles destroyed in a July 6 storm.
Charnock estimates the cost to be $2,900, which is
covered by insurance.
Monthly electrical charges are expected to increase
from $18 to $80 and will be paid by the Anna City Pier
Restaurant, which leases the pier from the city.


ing is now shown straddling 58th Street and facing
Marina Drive, with parking in the front and rear. A
three-car police garage is in the rear.

The new interior design
The entrance, reception area and council chamber
are in the center of the building. The public works de-
partment is in the rear to the left of the council cham-
bers. It contains offices for the director, assistant direc-
tor, clerk and building inspector and a break room.
There is a rear entrance for public works employees.
The city administration is on the same side to the
front, with offices for the mayor, city clerk, treasurer
and two deputy clerks. Central records and storage and
conference and work rooms are in the center.
On the right side of the council chambers is the po-
lice department with offices for the chief, assistant chief,
PLEASE SEE COMPLEX, NEXT PAGE


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. . ;......-- ,. I.. ,* .


Little rascals play soc e.-
These three "darlin'" players took a break from routine soccer play at the Anna Maria Community Center
soccer league try-outs for Division III last week. It will be serious fun on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 20 and
21, at the annual Jamboree, featuring a spaghetti dinner catered by Beach Bistro Friday night and soccer
games on two fields all morning Saturday. The public is invited, of course. Dinner is $5 for adults and $4 for
children. For more information, turn to page 21, this issue. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Hall plan again back at council


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinio ns ........................... ....................... 6
Those W ere the Days ............................... ... 7
Island Poet ........................... ........... 11
C oastlines .................................................... 14
Stir-it-up ............................. ............ 16
Streetlife .............................. ............ 18
Anna Maria Island tides ............................... 20
Crossword puzzle .......................................... 28


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND






1K3 PAGE 2 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

1998? 2000? When do you want sidewalks?


It's all a matter of perspective. On one hand, Holmes
Beach and Anna Maria are to receive $459,000 to enhance
sidewalks and bike paths in their respective cities.
On the other hand, the funds and the work won't
take place until fiscal year 1999-2000.
In an attempt to speed up the projects and get bikers
and walkers off the roads and onto a more safe path, offi-
cials on the Island are contemplating advancing the funds
themselves, with the Florida Department of Transporta-
tion to reimburse the money to the cities once the funds
become available at the turn of the century.
However, members of the Island Transportation
Planning Organization learned Monday that due to the
DOT design department being swamped with other
work, the quickest the speed-up program could take

City hall complex plan

presented to Holmes

Beach council
COUNCIL, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
clerk, code enforcement officer and detective. There is a
dispatch area, records storage, conference and work
rooms, bathrooms with showers and lockers, a property
and evidence room and a room for breathalyzer testing, as
well as a rear entrance from the garage.
The city administration is 5,070 square feet, the po-
lice department is 3,825 square feet and the public works
department is 1,150 square feet, for a total of 10,045. The
police garage adds another 1,560 square feet.
On the remainder of the property, the basketball
courts have been moved to a site between the public
works garage and the current city hall. There is a Little
League practice field behind the fire station, a Babe
Ruth field in the same location as the current field and
a soccer field with portable goals in the field behind the
current city hall.

Council design
input, project costs
Councilwoman Billie Martini said she would be
going over the plans with a fine-tooth comb.
"I don't think that's our responsibility," Council-
woman Carol Whitmore noted. "We gave the mayor
direction. He trimmed down the space. Why do we care
where the bathrooms are as long as they're in compli-
ance and we have enough of them. We pay the depart-
ment heads to make those decisions."
Councilman Ron Robinson said council has a respon-
sibility to be involved in the design and council was sup-
posed to have a meeting before the interior was drawn.
Council Chairman Luke Courtney said it's the
council's responsibility to go over the plans, but it needed
a design plan on which to base those discussions.
"This is the architect's concept of how this can be
operational in this space," Mayor Bob VanWagoner
said. "I think he's done a good job on the total square
footage. We can still move this stuff around. We
haven't nailed down anything yet. We're still talking
about concepts."
"If we had not gone over it, this city would have paid
$1.2 million for the first drawing," Martini replied. "Be-
cause we did look it over, we're getting it for a little
cheaper."
Wrong, Whitmore said.
"We're getting more for the same amount of
money," VanWagoner said. "What's important here is
that by moving the city hall, it opens up a lot of creative
ideas for the rest of the space. We're getting much
more than just a city hall. "
The cost of the building project is estimated at
$1,226,762 and includes $169,251 for site work, parking
lots, landscaping and irrigation; $880,364 for building
construction; and $177,147 for construction expenses.
Other costs include $39,065 for public works,
maintenance garage and vehicle storage; $4,500 for
ball field restrooms, $10,314 to demolish the police
department for a total of $53,879.
The total project cost is $1,280,641.
Courtney said a small portion of the property at the
north end of the building is on land designated recreation/
open space rather than public/semi-public. However the
area where the present city hall and police department now
stand is public/semi-public land, which will become rec-
reation/open space under the new plan.
The next step is to direct Fletcher to draft the plans,
Courtney said.


place is in fiscal year 1998-99.
No decision was made to go forward with the ad-
vanced funding scheme.
Thanks in part to former Anna Maria Mayor Ray
Simches and former Holmes Beach Public Works Su-
perintendent John Fernandez, the grants were placed in
the works two years ago. The money comes from spe-
cial highway enhancement funds under a category ear-
marked for programs for things like sidewalks, bike
paths and the like transportation that is not the typi-
cal moving-cars-around method.
Anna Maria is to receive $264,000 to improve
about five miles of sidewalks; Holmes Beach is down
for $195,000 to improve about three miles of side-
walks. Exact location of the sidewalks, plus material


David Twiddy is the new Florida Department of
Transportation District 1 secretary for this area, re-
placing David May.
Twiddy will begin his new job Sept. 20. For-
merly, he was DOT District 7 director of planning,
programs and public transportation in the district,
which includes Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco,
Hernando and Citrus counties.
"During his tenure with the private sector and
the department, David has proven himself as a
leader and an effective manager," DOT Secretary
Ben Watts said. "I'm confident that David will do
a great job in leading District 1 to meet its future


and other details, will be worked out later.
DOT Senior Traffic Analyst Dawn Wolfe said
transportation engineers could begin designing the
sidewalks in accordance with federal guidelines in fis-
cal year 1997-98. If the cities wanted to advance the
program and advance the funds to do the work -
the construction could begin in the 1998-99 fiscal year.
Funds would then be reimbursed to the cities in fiscal
year 1999-2000.
Bradenton Beach did not participate in the funding
request, partly because of efforts by the city and Mana-
tee County to secure other funding for improvements
to Gulf Drive from Manatee Avenue south to the
Longboat Pass Bridge. No funding has been identified
to do that work as yet.


transportation challenges."
Twiddy began his tenure with DOT in 1989
as District 7 Project Development and Environ-
ment Engineer in Tampa. In November 1992, he
was named director of planning, programs and
public transportation.
A University of Central Florida graduate with a
degree in civil engineering, Twiddy also has a
master's degree in civil engineering from University
of Florida. He is a registered professional engineer.
District 1 includes Anna Maria Island as part of
its 12-county Southwest Florida jurisdiction, en-
compassing 1.8 million residents.


Cabinet
dedicated at
Tingley Library
Librarian Carol Sandidge,
left, and Library Board
Chairman John Sandberg
welcomed cabinet maker
Doug Copeland, center, to
a dedication for the
display case made by
Copeland for the library.
The case houses a display
of boats hand-made by
Bradenton Beach Council-
man Dick Suhre.


Happy
Birthday
Beulah!
From left, Gale
Carter dishes out a
piece of cake to Bette
Kissick to celebrate
the birthday of
Tingley Memorial
Library patron
Beulah Hooks
Hannah Tingley. In
her 1986 will, Tingley
left the City of
Bradenton Beach
$580,000 to build and
Operate the library.
There are currently
3,700 books in the
library's collection,
with room to grow to
more than 15,000.
The library recently
received a $2,000
grant from the
Sarasota Bay Na-
tional Estuary Pro-
gram to develop an
educational program
for its native land-
scape.


New DOT District 1 secretary named





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 U PAGE 3 JIM

Longboat Key homeowners seek to privatize waterway


By Bob Ardren
Islander Correspondent
Boaters have moved freely about the nation's wa-
ters for centuries, but that may be changing. Some
Longboat Key residents believe they've found a way to
stop public boat traffic in a hope to privatize a water-
way in general use for 25 years.
Five "No Trespassing" signs have been installed
along what is known as the perimeter canal on the
southeast coastline of Longboat Key, claiming the ca-
nals as private property.
Bay Isles Association, representing 1,050 resi-
dents on eastern Longboat Key, has launched a cam-
paign to exclude the general public from the perim-
eter canal between the Bay Isles development and
Sarasota Bay. If successful, their case could result in
the closing of canals throughout Florida and the rest
of the nation, according to attorneys familiar with
the situation.
"We been working at this for four years," Bay Isles
Association president Julian Dorf said. "Everybody
thinks the water belongs to everybody, but that's not
true."
Attorney David Levin, representing the
homeowners' group, has very carefully laid his ground-
work. Levin recently obtained permission first from
the U.S. Coast Guard, then the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers and finally, the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection to post a series of "informa-
tional" signs along the canal. The signs read, "Private
Waterway, No Trespassing, Bay Isles Inc."
Levin emphasizes that these are "not regulatory
signs, but informational. They are not enforceable as a
result of the DEP approval."
In fact, a letter from DEP specifically says, "Per-
mit number 96-111 does not authorize the invasion of
private rights, nor grant any exclusive privileges..."
Levin said that "the signs are a warning to casual inter-
lopers."
In 1994, Levin attempted to obtain DEP permis-
sion to erect the "No Trespassing" markers, but was
rebuffed because "protection of property (public/pri-
vate) is not considered a valid statement of purpose,"
according to a Nov. 29, 1994, letter from DEP officials


to the Town of Longboat Key.
Thus far, DEP has not explained why it has appar-
ently reversed itself.
At nearly the same time as the 1994 letter, how-
ever, Levin did establish with the DEP Division of
State Lands that the perimeter canal adjacent to Bay
Isles was never deeded over to the state of Florida af-
ter being created by Arvida Corp. It lies landward of an
old bulkhead line; only the property seaward was
deeded to the state. "The perimeter canal...does not fall
within this reconveyance," the department wrote Levin
on June 27, 1994.
Armed with that ammunition, the association has
now laid claim to privatizing the busy canal. Its case is
based on a U.S. Supreme Court decision issued in 1979
in "Kaiser Aetna v. United States."
In that case, according to Longboat Town Attorney
David Persson, "owners who dredged non-navigable
property and then connected it to navigable waters are
not required to open it to the public."
Persson said, "It is my opinion, therefore, that the
Bay Isles Master Association has the power to assert
that the canals are private, and may erect signage which
complied with the Town's Sign Code."
But the case is far from over.
For example, Persson's letter goes on to explain
that while "No Trespassing" signs are exempt from
many parts of the town's sign ordinance, they are not
totally exempt. For example, they must be placed in a
"street yard." "A canal has no street yard," Persson
writes.
Capt. Alan Richard of the Florida Marine Patrol's
main office in Tallahassee said, "The Florida Marine
Patrol will not be out there writing tickets.
"They brought in records showing they own the
canal," Richard said. "Now whether that will hold up
in court, that's a question for a judge. The department
[DEP] has not endorsed their claim one way or another.
That's for a court to decide."
Likewise, Longboat Key Police Chief Tom Coons
said, "The town manager hasn't asked me to do any-
thing [about the Bay Isles situation], so I have no plans
to do anything."
Persson agrees that if the rights to control access to


the canal are upheld in court, it would affect not only
additional canals on Longboat but hundreds, perhaps
thousands, of waterways throughout Florida and the
nation.
Association president Dorf has his own ideas about
enforcement. He claims homeowners could bring civil
action against trespassers or swear out warrants against
them.
"It's just like your front yard," he says. "It's ille-
gal to trespass."



Anna Maria City
9/23, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board
9/24, 7:30 p.m., Second budget public hearing
followed by commission meeting

Bradenton Beach
9/19, 7 p.m., council meeting. Agenda: Ap-
proval of last lot at Katie Pierola Sunset Park,
Emergency Operation Center report, "Green
Dream Team" report on citywide beautification,
amendment of beach ordinance to include
parking at Coquina Beach, discussion of law
enforcement at Cortez Beach, tree trimming bid
award, code of conduct committee report,
pending council issues discussion, consent
agenda and council reports.

Holmes Beach
9/19, 2 p.m., Charter Review Commission
9/24. 9 a.m., Council work session

Of Interest
9/21, 10:30 a.m., Holmes Beach Civic Asso-
ciation, Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
9/23, 9:30 p.m., Sarasota/Bradenton Metro-
politan Planning Agency, Sudakoff hall, USF
Campus, Sarasota.
9/26, 7:30 p.m., EMS Study Committee, Fire
Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


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I






UM PAGE 4A SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Mayor shut down on trailer ordinance change


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council last week re-
fused to consider a change to the city's recently
passed trailer ordinance as requested by Mayor Bob
VanWagoner.
The ordinance requires that all trailers be parked on
the side or rear of the property, except on canal-front
lots. On canal-front lots, trailers are banned from rear
yards, which many owners consider their front yards.
There is also an exception for property owners without
side yards.
In a letter to council, the mayor said the ordinance
is creating problems of "equity and justification" and
he outlined two areas of concern.
"There are a number of recreational vehicles (al-
most all purchased at considerable prices before the
advent of this ordinance) being parked in front drive-
ways, where the configuration of the property might
physically permit parking in a side yard but the land-


Commission


passes 5-year


capital plan
By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
As required by state law regulating municipal com-
prehensive plans, the Anna Maria City Commission ap-
proved a resolution on Sept. 10 establishing what capital
improvements it will make over the next five years.
Subject to the vicissitudes of life, commissioners
estimated capital expenditures until 2001 to be:
Vehicles and Office Equipment- $130,000
Storm Drainage $170,500
Road improvements $45,000
Sidewalks $157,000
Bike Paths $182,500
Maintenance Buildings and modifications -
$74,500
Bridges $302,000.
During a discussion of six ongoing drainage
projects, Commissioner George McKay asked Public
Works Director Phil Charnock if competitive bids were
required and if contractors other than Sun Construction
and Spectrum Underground were used in the past.
Sun Construction is owned by Harlan Sunquist Sr.
and Spectrum Underground is owned by Harlan
Sunquist Jr. Both companies operate under Sunquist
Sr.'s contractor's licenses.
Charock said no bidding was necessary since each
project was under $125,000. Charnock said he has used
two other contractors in the past and prefers to use con-
tractors who live in the community.
Commissioner Bob McElheny said he is continu-
ing his discussions with block grant consultant Betty
Jordan to seek up to $500,000 in state funds for com-
mercial, neighborhood and infrastructure improve-
ments. McElheny said Jordan works on a "if come"
basis and has engineers who will design plans on a
contingency basis.
Commissioner Elaine Burkly announced that
Coastal Clean-up Day is Sept. 21 from 9 a.m. until
noon. Burkly said city hall is the gathering place in
Anna Maria and more volunteers are needed.
Rose Street resident Kate Eiseler asked the com-
mission not to pave Rose Street. "This is the only un-
paved street left and paving will destroy its historical
significance. I like it the way it is," she said.
But Mayor Chuck Shumard said, "We've had pav-
ing discussions for five years and this is the last
unsurfaced street. It's a done deal," Shumard said. The
city completed a drainage project and began grading
the roadbed last week in preparation for paving.

Low vision group meets
Visionaries, the Island's low vision group,
will meet on Tuesday, Sept. 24, at 1:30 p.m. at
the Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach.
Members will observe National Vision Reha-
bilitation Month. Guest speakers will discuss re-
sources and activities for coping with vision loss.
Information, call Doris Hunter at 778-3391.


scaping (trees, well-kept lawns, other growth) or other
factors would make such adjustments costly and disfig-
ure the very neighborhood environment we are trying
to encourage."
His other concern was for property owners who do
not have room in the side yard for boat trailers, which
must be parked partially on the yard.
"No way," Councilman Don Maloney said. "They
have to decide if they like the trees or their trailers."
"You're going to be digging up lawns and tearing
down trees," protested the mayor. "These people have
already purchased these things. We're creating an un-
usual hardship on them. Is this what you want the city
to enforce?"
"I don't think we preserve the city by putting these
RVs and trailers in driveways," Maloney retorted.
"We can't satisfy everyone," Councilman Ron
Robinson said. "We spent a lot of time on this ordi-
nance and we reached a compromise. We got the mo-
tor homes and trailers out of the front yards."


"Recreational vehicles weren't allowed before the
ordinance, so they bought them illegally," Council-
woman Carol Whitmore said.
Self-propelled motor homes were always permit-
ted but could not be parked on the city right of way,
City Clerk Leslie Ford noted.
"I tore out my whole garden to comply (with the
ordinance)," Councilwoman Billie Martini protested. "I
spent several hundred dollars for the flowers."
"They have a choice," resident Jane Early pointed
out. "If they don't want to dig up their side yards, they
can pay for storage and have to commute to get their
RVs to use, which I did."
"This was illegal until this council decided to
change the law," Planning Commissioner Sue
Normand said. "Therefore those of us who were
complying and had our vehicles elsewhere are now
allowed to bring them here, as long as we park them
in our side yards. We've given people an additional
privilege, and I don't see expanding that privilege."


Police donate bikes
Det. Sgt. Nancy Rogers, left, and Anna Maria Island Community Center Maintenance Supervisor Sam
Lacovelli load 28 bikes donated by the Holmes Beach Police Department to the Center. The department has
donated unclaimed bikes to the Center for the past two years. Lacovelli said he hopes to have a bike clinic for
youths at the Center to fix up the bikes. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.


New equipment will aid

victims of cardiac arrest


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Fire Commissioners have voted to
purchase two semi-automatic external defibrillators
(AEDs) for firefighters to use in aiding victims of car-
diac arrest.
When a victim goes into cardiac arrest, the heart
goes into ventricular fibrillation and begins quivering
like a bowl of jelly. The AED delivers an electric shock
to the heart muscle to correct the imbalance in the
rhythm.
The AED is simple to use. The district's
firefighters have been training to use the equipment.
Once connected to the patient, it analyzes the heart's
rhythm and tells the operator whether a shock should
be administered.
The district is joining with six other local dis-
tricts to purchase the equipment at a discount. Fire
Chief Andy Price estimated the cost of two AEDs at
$20,350 before the discount. The district also plans
to apply for an available $2,500 private grant toward
the purchase.
Treasurer John VanOstenbridge said the 1995-96
budget has an overage of $50,000, some which can be
used for the purchase.
The district's volunteers have agreed to purchase
a third unit for the volunteer station in Bradenton
Beach, Price told commissioners
Carrying the equipment requires the district to have
a medical director, and Dr. Joseph Solar, director of
emergency services at Blake Medical Center, has


agreed to take the position for payment of $1 per year,
Price said.
Sudden cardiac arrest causes more than 300,000
deaths each year in the United States because external
defibrillators arrive on the scene to late. If defibrillators
were more widely available to first responders, 20,000
to 100,000 lives could be saved, the American Heart
Association has estimated.




Planner wanted in

Bradenton Beach
Are you a frustrated planner wannabe?
Always wanted to have a say in city govern-
ment, especially on land use decisions? Here's
your chance.
Marvin Zerkel has resigned his position
on the Bradenton Beach Planning & Zoning
Board, and the advisory panel to the
Bradenton Beach City Council has a vacancy.
Term of the position in until March 1998. The
city council will decide the new member.
Applicants need to be residents or prop-
erty owners in the city. Deadline for written
applications is Oct. 3. Mail or drop off the
letter to Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107
Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach, 34217.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 5 II


Residents absent from comp plan hearing


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
What if they held a meeting and no one came?
That's what happened at the Holmes Beach Plan-
ning Commission's public hearing on comprehensive
plan amendments last week.
In addition to planners, the city attorney and two
council members, two residents showed up and one left
after 30 minutes.
"I'm surprised at the lack of public participation,"
Planner Gabe Simches said. "Here are four or five
people making decisions about the future of the city for
council consideration. I hope there's more involvement
when the council reviews the amendments."
City Attorney Patricia Petruff questioned a policy
in the Future Land Use Element concerning the me-
dium density residential area from Manatee Avenue
south to the city limits. The policy encourages mixed-
use residential development in a combination of 50
percent commercial residential and 50 percent non-
commercial residential to enhance opportunities for
redevelopment/revitalization.
"What is a commercial residential and non-com-
mercial residential use?" Petruff asked.
Commercial residential is when there is a business
downstairs and residence upstairs, Planning Chair-
woman Sue Normand replied. A non-commercial resi-
dence is strictly residential.
"Can you just have commercial facilities without
an apartment upstairs?" Petruff asked. "I think what
we're aiming for is 50 percent commercial and 50 per-
cent non-commercial uses."
Normand said planners were concerned about non-
conforming properties with businesses and residents in
the same building while maintaining the residential
character of the district.
"The intent was in order to have commercial in this
district it had to be in combination with residential,"
Gerald Smelt of the Tampa Bay Regional Planing
Council explained. "According to state statute, percent-
ages are required in a mixed use district."




DEMOCRATIC CLUB
Democratic Compassionate Conservative
Republican Radical Conservative
VOTE DEMOCRATIC
VOTE EARLY! VOTE OFTEN!
Pd. Pol. Adv. Anna Maria Island Democratic Club


"This policy's giving me problems," Petruff said. "If
you have a quadraplex and are renting all four units, are
we saying you can't do that if it's in a mixed use area? In
order to make the 50/50 mix, you could only rent two."
Smelt said he would reword the policy.
Resident and motel owner Don Howard questioned
a policy in the Future Land Use Element that provides
for rebuilding at existing densities following a disaster.
"If motels are wiped out, do they have to build at
10 units per acre? he asked.
Petruff said the policy should read "existing legally
non-conforming densities."
Planner Gabe Simches questioned a policy in the
Future Land Use Element dealing with historical struc-
tures. The policy names the Anna Maria Island Histori-
cal Society as the agency to identify such structures.
"We are designating an agency over which we
have no power or authority to undertake this responsi-
bility," Petruff noted. "What if they don't want to do
it, or we don't like the way they do it?"


Effective immediately, Doyle Douglas, D.B.A.
Service Electric, no longer operates the busi-
ness at 3014 Avenue C, Holmes Beach. He
no longer has use of electrical license num-
ber ER0005043. He cannot apply for an elec-
trical permit or do any wiring or repairs using
my license. The reason for this action is
breach of contract and indebtedness.
Brendan J. Greene


Planners reworded the policy to make the city the
responsible party.
Mayor Bob VanWagoner asked that the Future
Land Use Map be changed to address the problem of
the proposed city hall encroaching on land designated
recreational/ open space. Petruff said it would also re-
quire changes to other elements of the plan.
Planners voted to make the changes.
Planner Bruce Golding suggested adding a level of
service standard of one per 25,000 residents for a
swimming pool in the Recreational and Open Space
Element. The others agreed.
Petruff warned planners about the numerous re-
quirements and deadlines placed on the city by various
elements of the plan. She said they should be listed
separately to see how many require manpower and the
expenditure of funds.
The amendments will be forwarded to the city
council, which must hold four workshops to discuss the
amendments between Sept. 23 and Oct. 18.


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Longboat man wins Florida

Shore and Beach award
By Frank Cunningham --helped plan a $6 million
Islander Reporter beach restoration project
Longboat Key condominium manager Jim scheduled for the end of 1996.
Quinn will receive the 1996 Florida Shore and Other Longboat recipi-
Beach distinguished citizen award on Oct. 24 at ents in recent years were
the South Sea Plantation on Captiva Island. '* former Mayor Jim Brown,
The annual award goes to a private citizen Ruth Shapiro and Gordon
who has made a significant contribution to the *-- Haglund, who all worked
cause of beach preservation in Florida. on beach studies.
Quinn, who has worked on Longboat's beach In addition to managing
restoration studies and projects for the past 10 Quinn the 600-unit Seaplace,
years, said, "I'm really honored with this award." Quinn is chairman of the
In 1993, Quinn participated in the planning of the Coalition of Condominium Managers and a mem-
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i[] PAGE 6 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


Sorry about that, Church Street
What a difference two years make.
The mention of Bradenton Beach Marina or its
owner Allan Bazzy in 1994 would have prompted an
outpouring of the strongest sentiments by residents in
the city due to controversial and costly plans to reno-
vate the marina.
Hundreds of people packed city hall then to voice
their thoughts on the project to expand the marina onto
six residential lots and construct an enclosed boat stor-
age facility.
After court-ordered approval, amended plans
called for a "snack bar" on the dock to service boaters
with beer and sandwiches. As it was proposed then,
Bazzy said it wouldn't increase traffic in the neighbor-
hood but it blossomed into a full-service restaurant,
leased by Bazzy to operators who named it Shrimp
Louie's. Popularity was preceded by increased seating
- and of course increased, unmonitored traffic.
Last week, only a handful of people showed up to
speak on Bazzy's proposal to relocate the restaurant
from what had been determined by Florida Department
of Environmental Protection to be an illegal spot on the
dock to the enclosed marina office on the site.
The relocation proposal includes adding parking
and more than doubling the indoor seating of the res-
taurant, from 24 to 56 seats. With outside seating, the
restaurant capacity pumps up to a possible 82 patrons.
Council members wisely added a stipulation to the
amendment to the marina's plan calling for a traffic
study to be conducted within the next six months to
determine if there is an increase of traffic on Church
Street. If the traffic exceeds accepted levels of service,
seating will be diminished at the restaurant.
But increased from what? From the original
amended use for a 24-seat snack bar or more recently
when service on an adjoining deck increased the total
seating to 76?
What irks us is repeated claims by Bazzy that there
will be no more cars passing on the street with an 82-
seat restaurant at the marina than there has been since
the first of the year.
Al fresco dining is a wonderful thing, but it's not
so grand when it's too hot, too cold, too windy or rain-
ing. Council members perhaps didn't consider that
more than doubling the interior seating of the restau-
rant will double the number of people who will want
to go there ALL the time not just on those perfect-
for-outside dining days.
Two years ago, Bazzy filed lawsuits against 19
Bradenton Beach residents and city government to get
the marina expansion approved. The courts ruled the
council had to grant Bazzy the expansion. The suit
against the residents, claiming they "conspired" against


I|SLANDERI i 1110
SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 44
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Frank Cunningham
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
Jim Hanson
Michelle Timpanaro
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Andrew White
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Bames
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Daria Tingler
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free. Quantities of five or more 25 cents each.
o 1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


him by meeting and planning a course of action to halt
the expansion, was later settled but not without un-
told legal fees accrued by all involved.
The lawsuit against the residents is what is called
a "SLAPP" suit, an acronym for Strategic Lawsuit
Against Public Participation. Legal experts say it is a
means to "chill" public comment under the threat or
fear of legal action.
If the lack of public comment last week was any
indication, Bazzy's relocation proposal had a definite
chilling effect on the citizens in Bradenton Beach
Ironically, one of those who was sued by Bazzy was
current Bradenton Beach Mayor Leroy Arnold, who re-
mained mum about the whole restaurant issue except


for his affirmative vote. This was the man referred to by
one of his supporters as "our revenge for Bazzy."
We urge council members to take a close look at
the traffic study when it is completed, checking to
make sure the dates and hours of the study are realis-
tic representations of the restaurant's patronage.
And, as one resident put it last week, we too feel
sorry for those people living on Church Street. But we
already felt that way when we heard of the first plans
for the marina expansion in the neighborhood.
We're also left to feel sorry for the people who
lease the restaurant from Bazzy, as they are mere
pawns in his continued dealings for expansion, expan-
sion, expansion.


Cortez Bridge rehabilitation
rebuttal
Since ancestry seems important, my grandchildren
are seventh generation Floridians.
I have just read a letter in the Sept. 5 Islander
Bystander addressing certain aspects of the Florida
Department of Transportation Cortez Bridge Re-
placement Project offering personal commentary on
a 53rd Avenue extension bridge. As something of an
authority on both, holding some 2,000 documents on
the subject, having led the civilian engineering task
force to inspect the existing span, and having done
extensive land, sea and air surveys, please allow me
to offer that the author is considerably confused.
The route offered as the 53rd Avenue concept goes
nowhere near the "kitchen" and certainly not the avi-
ary islands. That route was DOT's smokescreen
"southern alignment." It was to depart Cortez Road
around 115th Street, curve through heavy mangroves
and landfall on Coquina Beach's bayside just north of
Leffis Key. It was totally political to accomplish ex-
actly what the writer reflects indignation!
By contract, the 53rd Avenue extension never
comes near Cortez, would cross the "long bar" to just
north of Longboat Bridge the only location in all
Sarasota Bay where sand exists almost all the way
across, and the only location where eco-impact would


be absolutely minimal.
At the time, the writer objected quite vocally be-
cause the 53rd Avenue concept would reduce the chok-
ing traffic through Bradenton Beach by some 18,000
vehicles per day and, presumably, would deny that
quantity passing her business location. Yet, 2,700 ap-
proving petition signatures were obtained in two days
at the Cortez Seafood Festival.
Further, DOT did not rehabilitate the bridge. Even
the absolute minimum specifications for the pier sec-
tion were unfulfilled. They merely upgraded a bascule
dangerously rusted out from some eight years of main-
tenance neglect anticipating replacement (task force
conclusion).
Now, the Anna Maria span is getting the same
treatment. The Howard Frankland Bridge in Tampa is
an example of rehabilitation. Affirming documentation
and charts are available.
Jim Kissick, Bradenton Beach


e *lf -J^/ 9/fJ II


For more of
Your Opinions,
see page 8


I











THOSE WERE THfE AYS
Part 2, A Soldier's Story
by June Alder


Clair Jones's Canadian sweetheart Edith (right) with friends at Anna Maria
Key's Lookout Point pavilion used by the John R. Jones family during World
War I and later. Located about where Manatee Beach is today, it had a palm-
thatched roof but blustery weather frequently tore it away.

THE NEW RECRUIT


Arthur St. Clair Jones of Anna
Maria Key enlisted in the Army on May
28, 1917, the month after the United
States declared war on Germany. It was
a shock to his family. He was 37 and
they thought he had done his duty to his
country in the Spanish-American War
two decades before.
Clair arrived at Fort Screven, Ga.,
the first week in June, expecting he
would soon be on his way to France. He
may have seemed an "old man to most
of the other recruits, but judging from
his first letters home, like them, he wor-
ried about the same things his pay
and his family, especially his "kid sis-
ter" Kathleen.
Also evident in his letters was his
yearning for "the girl he left behind."
And the nagging fear that he might
never see her again.
This letter was written to his mother
Sophia at the start of his third week at
the camp:
June 17, 1917: This will be only a
note, as I missed writing on Sunday. We
expected to go away that day. I thought
I would wait till the orders came out so
I could let you know where we were
going. But plans changed at the last
minute and no engineers were in-
cluded in the roster.
We are so busy now, it is impossible
to write more than scrawls like this one.
I received your two letters and one from
Father, also several from Kathleen.
Thanks for them all. Tell K that I will
write to her when I can get time.
Now, Mother, I will do what I can
to help the kid out as soon as I re-
ceive some wages. My last pay day I
received two dollars, and that is every
cent I have had since I got here. Next
pay day will be about the 10th of July.
But every pay day I will try and send
her something. I owe Francis [his


younger brother] five dollars for my
film he is keeping for me.
So dear little Chiquita [Clair's
hunting dog] has been good and made
friends. Isn't she a clean little devil? No
wonder I like her so. Thank you all for
taking such good care of her. Tell
Kathleen I would like to receive the
picture of Chiquita and her [or rather
her and Chiquita] very much.
The weather here is very warm,
and the drilling is accordingly fierce.
There is very little news. But so far I've
gotten along very well.
So Dr. Cameron and his spouse are
to become Red Cross people. Elmore
always was cross enough, God knows.
Just think of the chill that would run up
my spine if I should be wounded and
see him ghoulishly gathering up his
instruments while she approached with
the ether. My act of contrition would
indeed be a devout one.
I am sending my cuff buttons to
you. If I should be unfortunate, you can
give them to John [his elder brother].
But be sure I am dead, as it would fill
me with dire rage to come home and find
that you had distributed them before I
was really dead. However, I trust I will
come back and wear them myself.
How is the okra coming along? And
once more I ask, did you eat the gophers
[turtles]? Well, I could write lots more
but can't now. However, I hope you can
read this and I will do better next time.
Give my best to everyone. I hope you are
all well. And don't worry.
At the bottom of the letter,
scribbled across the lefthand corner,
was this poignant addition: "P.S. My
little Edikins still loves bad Clair."

Next: Singing the
Fort Screven blues


Overseas-bound
World War I
soldiers often
had group
pictures like this
taken to send to
the homefolks.
This is a Tampa
group, though
not Clair Jones'
company.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 7 I



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Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
* scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live *
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1P PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


e l9lj:']II[


Community must shed light
on turtle threat
As a beach walker for the Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch looking for newly-laid turtle nests, it was exciting
to find my first "crawl." Since then and with the turtle
season having come to an end, the Turtle Watch identified
approximately 200 nests on nine miles of beach.
Now it is time to watch for a hatching. This is
much more difficult because baby turtles hatch at any
hour of the evening or night. The incubation period is
anywhere from 50 to 70 days, but I have hopes that
before they all hatch in October, I'll catch at least one
nest erupting from the sand.
With the number of hatchings to take place, it is
more important than ever that beach properties obey
the law and turn off their outside lights at night.
Recently at 9 p.m. a turtle nest was hatching at Katie
Pierola Park in Bradenton Beach. Several coordinators of
the Turtle Watch were on hand to monitor the situation
because there was a big problem with lights along the
beach. The baby turtles are drawn irresistibly to these
bright man-made lights instead of moon light which
guides them to the water. These deadly lights draw the
hatchlings away from the sea and safety.
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch wants to
thank Shell Cove for turning out their lights that night
and to Brenda Roshaven and Lynn Budzinski for get-
ting the job done. And to Jerry Martinek of Wagner
Realty who was on the scene and quickly turned off
their outside lights and to the many nameless people
who tried to help.
Regretfully, everyone was unsuccessful in trying to
turndown some very bright lights at the Sea Side Mo-
tel. Lights on the beach during turtle season is against
the law and the next time they refuse to cooperate, the
police will be called.
Through the care and concern of more than 40
people, about 100 baby turtles made it to the water that
night. It was exciting and one cannot help to be im-
pressed by how caring most people are and hurt by how
callous a few people can be.
I hope that everyone will experience the excitement
of a hatching. If you have any information about turtles,


turtle nests or turtle hatchings, call Suzi Fox, director of
the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch at 778-5638.
Amy True, Turtle Watch volunteer
Real thanks
I want to thank The Islander Bystander for print-
ing a fine article about the tree planting project at Bean
Point and also for acknowledging the contributions of
Scott Ricci, Mel Rector, J.C. Cochrane and the City of
Anna Maria in making this project a success.
In addition, I want to thank Mr. and Mrs. John Dicks
for providing water for irrigation at the walkover.
However, the real thanks belong to Bud Bailey and
Glen Towery of the Anna Maria Public Works Depart-
ment. These two hard-working men are the ones who
actually made a concept become reality. Their day-in,
day-out contributions to our city go unrecognized and
this is an excellent opportunity to acknowledge them
and thank them for the fine job they do.
Doug Copeland, Anna Maria

Island already has 'slogan'
I read the suggestion in a recent Islander, with little
interest and less enthusiasm, that Anna Maria Island
should develop an "image."
Superimposing an image on Anna Maria Island
would come under the heading of "gliding the lily,"
"carrying coals to Newcastle," or perhaps "gilding the
coals in Newcastle."
Long before "Virginia is for Lovers" and "I Love
New York" became slogans for those localities, my
father-in-law, Wyatt Blassingame, penned "Anna
Maria, I Love You." This "slogan" is documented. It
appeared in the Ford Times in February 1957. It has
been almost 40 years since it has been published in the
Islander. You may wish to republish it again.
In the article, in defending his statement, "Anna
Maria, I Love You," my father-in-law referred to a
short story he had written in the 1940s which began:
"If you unscrew a screwball anywhere in the
United States, blindfold him, turn him around twice
and turn him loose, he'll wind up in Anna Maria."
He then expanded his thesis with illustrations of
the independent spirits who reside here. There were


less than 1,000 people living on the Island then so per-
haps it was easier to recognize the screwballs.
Anna Maria has many more residents now which
is proof that in the interim there has been a lot of blind-
folding and turning. Check out the people down the
street I am sure you will find the free spirits.
During our years of exile my wife, Peggy, stated sev-
eral times a week, "Anna Maria, I Love You." With the
sure knowledge that she was not referring to me or any
other person (except for our eight-year-old granddaugh-
ter named Anna Maria), I have come to agree with her.
Someone may suggest that Anna Maria Island have
a song, but it already has one. I'll bet copies are avail-
able at the historical society.
We are back now and, "Anna Maria, We Love You."
Bill Diamant, Anna Maria City

Church sends mixed signals
I previously enjoyed walking and driving by one
Holmes Beach church whose building and grounds are an
especially uplifting tribute to God; now it saddens me.
A church sign, "No Playing or Trespassing on Church
Lawn," now conveys a dismal message to children, resi-
dents and visitors. This sign and another one, "Welcome
to Vacation Bible School," send different signals.
Church members and officials, please thoughtfully
consider replacing it with a new sign reading some-
thing like, "This is God's park and building. Enjoy
playing, picnicking and worshipping here seven days
a week, but please don't leave any litter."
The church may even consider building picnic
tables and a sports court.
It should bring joy to those passing by and utilizing
the open space and to church members to see people en-
joy His beautiful sanctuary. This overshadows any diffi-
culty the church may have. A grounds committee could
monitor litter and a competent attorney will give assurance
that church insurance protects against all liability.
The meaningful new message conveying "Come Ye
Little Children and All" would certainly justify the trouble
of this splendid, inexpensive, community outreach pro-
gram.
William Skipper, Holmes Beach


vl 4-









For free home delivery* of The Islander Bystander on Anna Maria, Perico Island and Flamingo Cay call 778-7978.
Sorry, we can not deliver to individual units at mobile home parks or condominiums.


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 9 irm


Kiwanis Club changes meetings,

but continues to serve


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island has changed
its meeting place, helped plan the district's annual pro-
gram and is geared up to help eliminate goiters in adults
and mental and physical deformities in children.
Richard Ross said the service club will meet hence-
forth at Back Bay Steakhouse every Monday at 6 p.m.


for a dinner session.
Ross, secretary-treasurer of the Island club, and
four other officials are back from a district planning
meeting at Marco Island. Also attending from the Is-
land were Bob Barrett, president of the local club; Russ
Olson, president-elect; Jeff Asbury, past district lieu-
tenant governor; and Bob LoPiccolo, in charge of the
grandparenting program.
A major topic was the Kiwanis International drive
to eliminate iodine deficiency in other countries as has
been done in the U.S. Ross explained that before World
War II goiter was a widespread problem in the U.S.
until its cause was identified.
A goiter, he noted, is a large loose growth on a
person's neck. Swiss scientists found that the disfigure-
ment is caused by a lack of iodine in the diet, and con-
vinced the U.S. to arrange to put iodine in table salt.
This did away with goiters in the U.S. but they still
are widespread in many Third World countries, Ross
said. A person needs only a teaspoonful of iodine in a
lifetime, he said, and Kiwanis is spearheading efforts
to have national legislatures in those countries to re-
quire suitable treatment of salt.
Iodine deficiency also causes cretinism and some
physical deformities in children, Ross said.
The local club has raised $200 toward the effort and
considers double that amount its share. It will soon begin
taking orders for the fruit that many people send from
Florida as Christmas treats. The fruit is from the
Gracewood Orchards of Lakewood, a Kiwanis packing
house.
Other programs by the Island Kiwanis include its
annual Easter sunrise service, with the offering given to
the seven churches on Anna Maria, and the Valentine
Dance for the benefit of the Island Community Center; the
club gives $2,300 each year to the Center, Ross said.
Also large on the club list of good works is the
Adopt a Grandparent program in which Kiwanians
work with the Anna Maria Elementary School to make
sure youngsters have at least a surrogate grandparent
to help them along.


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'Bridge Club'

opens at Island

Players Oct. 4
Over an uneasy, sometimes grim period span-
ning parts of both the Depression and World War II,
eight sisters meet every two weeks to play bridge,
gossip and entertain themselves. They are a varied
group with diverse interests and talents. Theirs is a
close knit family probably too close for comfort.
Potential conflict are concealed or ignored, though
eventually they find there way to the fore.
As Director Phyllis Elfenbein says, "In these
days when we are bombarded by talk of family
values, the Donovan sisters present an intimate
view of what most of us already know of real
value of family and the sometimes dark side
which can shadow its togetherness. With mostly
love and laughter, our talented case invites you to
join the Octette Bridge Club."
Alice Doeden takes the part of Martha, the
oldest; Mary is played by Marge McKeever; Joy
Courtney is Connie; Ellie Cavis is Nora; the part
of Alice is played by Laura Morales; Miriam
Ring is Ann; Janice Kraft is Lil; Jo Kendall plays
Betsy; and John Durkin is Foster.
The set was designed by John Flannery and
constructed by Jack Abene. Gabe Simches is
stage manager and the costume designer is Don
Bailey.
The play will run Oct. 4-13. Curtain times are
8 p.m. except for two Sunday matinees which
start at 2 p.m. There are no performances on
Monday. Tickets are $10 each or $45 for the five-
play season.
The theater is located at Gulf Drive and Pine
Avenue in Anna Maria and the box office is open
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning Monday, Sept.
23, and also an hour before performance during
the run of the play.
For ticket information, call the box office at
778-5755.


A special flag
Enid Stewart, left, of Bradenton Beach receives
a U.S. Flag that has flown over our nation's
capitol from Connie Drescher, vice mayor of
Bradenton Beach. Stewart became a U. S. citizen
on July 19. To celebrate, Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Hornack of Bradenton Beach, not pictured, feted
Stewart at their home with a reception including
20friends and relatives. Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy of Lee Hornack .


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[]( PAGE 10 E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


sooks BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS
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I ,HI'pltj "reWa ',n -
Something to celebrate
Carol Pulizzi, center, retired from Island Foods last week to a fanfare from staff members including a big
cake, a platter of food, lots of flowers and presents. Pulizzi said, "I started working here on Jan. 10, 1980 at
5 p.m." Asked what will you do, Pulizzi quickly replied, "Nothing!" but she has plans to move to Dixie
County in North Florida. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Art League to open
front-room gallery
The Anna Maria Art League in Holmes Beach is
opening a small sales gallery in the front room of the
league building.
All member artists who wish to display and sell
their art may do so for 20 percent Of the sale price.
Stop by the League at 5312 Holmes Blvd.,
Holmes Beach during business hours or call 778-2099
for additional information.

Island youth chorus to
gear up with new director
Roser Memorial Community Church has an-
nounced that Elaine Burkly will be the new director of
the Community Youth Chorus.
Rehearsals will begin on Wednesday, Sept. 25, at
3 p.m. and meet every Wednesday thereafter. Trans-
portation is available to the church from Anna Maria
Elementary School at 2:45 p.m. by church van. On
elementary school early dismissal days, students will
be picked up at noon.
This year's chorus is open to students in second
through fifth grades. Singers will learn vocal tech-
niques and a variety of choral selections both secular
and sacred. Programs will include special concerts,
singing engagements and a final formal concert recital
in the spring.
There is a $25 per semester donation requested
which includes all music and a chorus T-shirt.

R.E.A.P. to meet at public
beach Sept. 25
The Institute for Retired Executives and Profession-
als will met on Wednesday, Sept. 25, at 8:30 a.m. at Cafe
on the Beach at the Manatee County Public Beach for a
morning of Pancakes, Poetry and Paddling.
After breakfast, the group will locate at the north
end of the beach under the trees for poetry reading.


Chamber card exchange
slated for Sept. 25
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce has
set Wednesday, Sept. 25, between 5 and 7 p.m. for its
social meeting and card exchange at the Harrington
House Bed and Breakfast, 5626 Gulf Drive. Chamber
Executive Director Mary Ann Brockman said anyone
wishing to be a member should call or visit the cham-
ber office at 5337 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, or come
to the social for membership information.

Writing courses begin
Oct. 1 at Center
Helen Nettleton's "Writing to Publish" fall classes
will begin Oct. 1 at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Classes, including fiction and non-fiction writ-
ing, include instruction on how to write feature ar-
ticles, profiles and interviews as well as short stories
and biographies.
Classes run from Oct. 1 through Nov. 19. Fee for
the eight-week course is $45. For information or to
register, call 727-8054.

Free business seminar at
Back Bay Boathouse
Alan Lavoie, financial and insurance consultant, and
Paul Pavich, accountant, will conduct a free business edu-
cational seminar to be held at the Back Bay Boathouse
Restaurant, 5325 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, on Wednes-
day, Sept. 25, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
The seminar is open to the public.
Topics of be discussed are: how to take more pre-
tax dollars out of your business, audit-proof your busi-
ness, how to retain key employees with pre-tax dollars,
focus on cash in your monthly accounting reports, sim-
plified monthly accounting reports, executive bonus,
buy-sell agreements and securing your retirement.
Contact Alan Lavoie at 779-1310 for information.

Discover the Bible course
at Roser Church
Registration is open now at Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church in Anna Maria City for a "Kerygma: Discover
the Bible" course to begin Thursday, Sept. 26, at 7 p.m.
The course will run for 30 weeks. Materials are $25.
To register and for more information, call Stacey
Bellows or Molly Parks at the church at 778-0414.

'Phantom' at Manatee
Players' 48th season
"Phantom," the time honored story of unrequited
love, has opened at the Manatee Players to begin the
company's 48th season. The show will run through
Sept. 22 at the Riverfront Theatre in Bradenton.
Call the Players' box office at 748-0111 for show
time and ticket information.








Key Chamber

launches into

next millennium
By Frank Cunningham
Islander Reporter
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce has
embarked on an ambitious five-year strategic plan
which will carry its members into the next millen-
nium. "Longboat Key 2001: Be there!" is the slogan
affixed to its new starfish logo.
Chamber board member Jo Ann Wolverton said
the chamber is a powerful voice that leads its mem-
bers toward economic success while uniting govern-
ment, business and residential interests. Over the next
five years, the chamber will focus on increasing busi-
ness opportunities of its members with emphasis on
educational programs, timely information and promo-
tion of Longboat as a premier resort destination.
Wolverton said the chamber now boasts 500
members and its goal is 885 members by 2001.
The strategic plan also calls for the creation of
three new councils of the restaurant, hotel/condo-
minium and retail industry, designed to "promote and
sustain the key's economic climate to benefit island
and nearby businesses via coordinating hospitality
industry sales and marketing strategies."
According to Chamber President Andrew Vac,
his executive committee will develop a new value
added product each year. The chamber now offers
discounted long distance telephone rates, internet web


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 E PAGE 11 I-

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MCC to offer cornucopia of courses


Manatee Community College Open Campus in
Bradenton will offer the following upcoming courses:
Italian I, Sept. 23 to Oct. 24, 4 to 6 p.m.
Conversational Spanish I, Sept. 23 to Dec. 2,
4 to 6 p.m.
Conversational Spanish II, Sept. 23 to Dec. 2,
6:15 to 8:15 p.m.
Video & Film Producing, Sept. 24 to Oct. 22,
5 to 6 p.m.
Conversational Spanish III, Sept. 24 to Dec.
3, 7:15 to 9:15 p.m.
Basic Film & TV Production, Sept. 24 to Oct.
22, 1 to 4 p.m.
History of Television, Sept. 24 to Oct. 22, 7


Robert V. Byron
Robert V. Byron, 98, of Bradenton and formerly of
Holmes Beach, died Sept. 9 in Columbia Blake Medi-
cal Center.
Born in Belmont, N.H., Mr. Byron came to Mana-
tee County from Concord, N.H., in 1965. He retired as
owner and operator of Bridge & Byron Printers Inc.,
Concord. He was a Protestant. He was a ham radio
operator in Concord and was a member of Concord
Camera Club. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World
War I.
He moved to Holmes Beach in 1965 and was one of
the founders of the Anna Maria City "Pier Regulars."
He is survived by a daughter, Nancy Stewartson of
Tilton, N.H., and Holmes Beach; two sisters, Ruth and
Mardelle, both of Hartford, Conn.; four grandchildren;
and five great-grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice


to 8 p.m.
Basic Broadcasting Production, Sept. 24 to
Oct. 22, 9 a.m. to noon.
Moroccan Nights, Sept. 26, 6 to 9 p.m.
Beginning German II, Sept. 26 to Dec. 5,
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Conversational Spanish II, Sept. 26 to Dec.
5, 6 to 8 p.m.
Creative Writing I: Manuscript, Sept. 28 to
Nov. 16, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Creative Writing: Manuscript Critique, Sept.
28 to Nov. 16, 1 to 3 p.m.
For cost and class schedules, call MCC's
Open Campus at 755-1511, ext. 4203.


of Southwest Florida, 6055 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, Fla.
34238. Brown and Sons Funeral Home was in charge
of the arrangements.
Ethel Janet Peters
Ethel Janet Peters, 86, of State College, Pa., and
formerly of Holmes Beach, died Sept. 12 in State
College.
There will be no visitation. The family will have
a private service. Interment will be in Halfmoon
Township, Pa. James L. Schwartz Home for Funerals,
Mifflinburg, Pa., was in charge of arrangements.
Born in Halfmoon Township, Mrs. Peters was a
homemaker and assisted her husband in the operation
of their Halfmoon Township Family Farm. She was
a member of Society of Friends, Halfmoon Garden
Club and Halfmoon Grange 290.
She is survived by a son, Emil G., of Port
Matilda; two sisters, Betty Hall of Port Matilda and
Miriam Winkelbleck of Woodward; three grandchil-
dren; and two great-grandchildren.


Ocette Bridge Club

Oct. 4-13 8 PM
Matinees Oct. 6 & 13 2 PM
Box Office Opens Sept. 23
Open 9 AM 2 PM daily, Except Sunday
Visa and Mastercard Accepted
778-5755
Gulf Drive & Pine Avenue Anna Maria
Social notes are welcome ... Your news about events and
happenings is always welcome at The Islander Bystander.
Call 778-7978 to be included in "the best news
on Anna Maria Island."



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The Island Poet
Well, today we have an all-day rain,
And you go around the house as if you were in pain.
For you wish that rain would just go away,
'Cause there was so much you wanted to do today.
And you tell of all the jobs you wanted to do,
But that really wasn't what was bugging you.
'Cause like that guy called Little Jack Homer,
There were your golf clubs sitting in the corner.
Bud Atteridge


F~Y COM~Y
~p9A-~4~?9






[] PAGE 12 M SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Take a byte out of OPAC at Island Library


By Joy Courtney
Islander Reporter
You can look as hard as you want, but you will not
be able to find it. This volume is checked out per-
manently.
The card catalog, with its gleaming mahogany
mouths of information, double-daring you to drop one
of its long drawers, is no more at the Island Branch
Library in Holmes Beach.
Our public library system has entered the computer
age via OPAC. No, not Ornery Persons At Computers,
but the On-line Public Access Catalog, a computerized
card catalog system now used throughout the entire
Manatee County Public Library System.
OPAC is a nickname library users will hear often. It's
the moniker for both the hardware (the computer equip-
ment) standing guard over the carpet footprint of its
predecessor (the card file) and the name of the software
(the operating program within the hardware) for this
particular electronic card catalog system.
OPAC is there to answer the very same question
library users asked of their former buddy: "Where's the
book?"
But OPAC works faster and in a much more com-
prehensive manner.

Dos and Don'ts for beginners
To begin to learn OPAC, non-computer users only
need to understand that it will not blow up if an incor-
rect entry is made. It can only be damaged by slamming
keys on the keyboard or christening the computer cas-
ing with a cup of coffee. These are the only don'tt"
of the system.
"Do" understand that OPAC does not care how fast
or how slow a user types and, in some areas, doesn't
even care how well the user can spell. All OPAC asks
is that a user read what's on the screen, pay attention
to the yellow command line found at the bottom of the
screen, and return the screen to one of two first-step
menus when done. (More on that later.)
A user's first introduction to OPAC will be one of
two menus entitled Brief Search or Full Search, titles
appearing at the top of the screen. (Menus list choices
and identify which features are available to dive into.)
Warning: These menus will not be on the screen IF
a "Miss Manners" reject has left the remnants of his or
her search behind. It's bad manners to leave the com-
puter without returning to the initial search mode -
just as it would be to leave the card file open.
First-time users, have faith. By looking at the com-
mand line and inserting SO (Start Over), then hitting
the return key, the promised menus will appear. And,
as a "Miss Manners" alumnus, please SO when you are
done as well.

Choices are easy
OPAC starts with a choice between a Brief Search
or a Full Search. A quick way, especially for the inex-
perienced, to differentiate is to know Brief Search is
composed of six menu choices while the Full Search
has 11. Within each of the searches is a menu choice
to switch between brief and full, reinforcing the fact
that a user cannot get lost in OPAC-land. The differ-
ence between the two is not apparent at first.
Brief Search is for a specific search- that is, the
user who knows the exact title, including spelling of
the book or author.
In searching for "Gone with the Wind," if the user
wants to see every title in the entire Manatee County
Library System that has the word "gone" in it, includ-
ing video tapes and cassettes, he'll find that by typing
in "gone."
The subject choice in Brief Search is "unforgiv-
ing," meaning a user can't type in a subject in a man-
ner approved by creative thinkers. Brief Search wants
a diet of subjects as listed in the "Library of Congress
Subject Headings" (LCSH) book. Rest assured that
help is nearby. The subject list is located on the table
to the left of the computers.
If a user wants to locate information on auto repair,
he or she will find "nothing in the system" if a search
is done using the words "auto repair." Brief Search,
under the subject menu choice, will only dine on the
entry "automobile maintenance and repair," as found
in the LCSH.

Making it easy er easier
For users who are creative thinkers or in need of


OPAC, my OPAC
Susan Luzier of Holmes Beach, a self-proclaimed "complete computer illiterate, "found a new friend at the
Island Branch Library. Luzier uses Manatee County Public Library's new On-line Public Access Catalog to
find a specific book, instead of using the card catalog of yesteryear. Luzier's book was checked out, but OPAC
listed the return date and allowed her to automatically place it on reserve. "OPAC's very nice and easy to


use, said Luzier. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


forgiveness from the spelling gods, Full Search is the
place to go.
Full Search, in all menu choices, forgives mis-
spelled words in titles, authors and subjects and accepts
incomplete clues such as "Ernest." (For the hopeless
searcher of I-can't-think-of-the-last-name Hemingway
or "War and Piece.")
Free-style subject seekers hit the jackpot with Full
Search lucky #7. This is the menu selection where us-
ers can type searches in their own words and creative
ideas. (This saves playing around with menu choices
offering "keyword" until after you've earned a bronze
in the OPAC Olympics. Trust me.)
To illustrate the difference in the thrill of the hunt
between Brief Search and Full Search, search for "dog
training." In Brief Search, under the subject choice,
OPAC will tell a user nothing is found. You could
check the LCSH for the official verbiage, as in auto
repair already discussed, or ...
Go to Full Search, choose subject choice, and type
dog training. An alphabetized list of sub-headings (i.e.,
everything you wanted to know about dogs but were
afraid to ask) will spew forth. Advance the screen by
using the return key and soon the sub-heading of "dog
training" will appear, which offers a list of 29 appli-
cable selections to choose from.
Full Search is also the menu to use if a user wants
to find the auxiliary information mentioned earlier such
as the best seller lists, dictionary and community news.

Don't go into shock
Five or more items found through any search can
cause you to go into OPAC shock. On a recent search,
I netted 289 selections!
A hunt that yields over four items will not appear
on the screen all at once. OPAC appears with a num-
ber in the upper right-hand corner of the screen indicat-
ing how many items were found within the entire
public library system. Each are numbered and may be
viewed screen by screen in groups of four using the
return key to move down the list. Pack a lunch.

Throw out the life preserver
OPAC does have a rescue feature for lengthy finds -
called Sort. (See the commands at the bottom of the
screen. Remember the yellow command bar?) It can sort
a list into alphabetical order by author or by title a big


help when a user is looking at 289 possible selections.
In addition to book searches, OPAC offers or will
soon offer community announcements, best seller lists,
a dictionary and other categories of auxiliary informa-
tion previously unavailable at a centralized location -
all at your fingertips.
OPAC does fall short in its inability to sort selec-
tions by library. There is no way to ask OPAC to nar-
row its search to selections available within the four
walls of "your" library.
An example is Spanish tutorials. There are 30 se-
lections available within the entire library system but
only four are part of the Island Branch Library collec-
tion. A user must look at every selection produced by
the search to determine which library has it. That's the
bad news.
The good news is, no matter which library's col-
lection a book belongs to, a user can instantly: deter-
mine its availability which library it's at if it's
checked out and the date it's scheduled to be returned
- reserve it and place a hold on an available copy
at any library in the system. It's all done through OPAC
- right then and there.
OPAC also offers a housekeeping feature for li-
brary patrons. Through a menu choice in Full Search,
a user can insert the last six digits of his or her bar code
(found on the back of new library cards) and check the
status of his or her account. Instant relief for TRA,
Tome Return Anxiety.
Initially, a user should make time to just play with
OPAC by going into each search to see what each
menu choice does. The OPAC computers occupying
the former card catalog area have a 15-minute use limit.
The Island Branch has a computer in the back of the
library for those who want to enjoy a vacation in
OPAC-land, and there are two OPACs available to
children in the juvenile section.
Library patrons of all ages can get results through
OPAC. All that's needed is the patience to read the
screen, a passion for yellow (the command bar) and a
little rehearsal of the OPAC anthem Start Over, Start
Over.
Plus, with OPAC there's an additional safety net
- the more-than-happy-to-help librarians.
Inspired? Go for it.
Kaboom!
Just kidding.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 E PAGE 13 Ii~


'Mister' the beginning of aging


By Don Maloney
Special to the Islander
One of the grandsons asked me the other day when
it was that I first started feeling old.
I remember the day, I assured them, like it was
yesterday even though it was quite a collection of
yesterdays ago. I remember where it happened, but not
the exact date. It was at one of the doors on the 42nd
Street side of Grand Central Terminal in New York
City.
As I entered the terminal, I noticed a girl coming
through the door right behind me. She was in her twen-
ties, I guess, and she was loaded down with packages.
I held the door for her.
"Thank you, mister." she said as she brushed by.
Then, it struck me. I froze there, door in my hand.
"Mister," yet. From a maybe-25-year-old girl, yet.
Anyway, being called "mister" by a 25-year-old
girl was the first sign of aging that I remember.
Like I said, I don't remember exactly when that
was, but I was probably only about 35 years old when
she "mister-ed" me. It really ruined the rest of that day.
And months to come.
As I made my customer calls in the city that day,
I began to notice that I was older than most of the po-
licemen. How could that be, I wondered. Next thing
I know, I worried I'd be older than airline pilots.
How could I trust my life to those kids? Or to a
younger doctor?
Oh, there were other signs of aging, too. Like our
kids' weddings, where I faced the inevitable possibil-
ity of someday being called "Grandpa" a title that
makes "mister" seem young again.
Then there was that morning sometime back
where I woke up, sat on the edge of the bed trying
to get everything working, and noticed the collection
on my night table. There were my glasses, my upper
bridge, and both hearing aids all in the same dish.
Good lord, I thought, everything in my body is wear-
ing out.
The latest reminder of passing time came just re-
cently when Wife Sarah and I made one of our regular
visits to our daughter's house, complete with her five
boys. Since we all live on Anna Maria now, I get to see
them quite often. So, as long as we're all right here, I
decided to get virtually involved with the grandsons -
even to the point of playing some games with them.
When I told them of my plans, they agreed to the
involvement and led me to a little TV set where they
had one of those electronic games going. You know


"You'll have to call us ...

or we'll never meet!"




REFRIGERATION



CAC044365



778-9622 PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


- complete with joy stick, cartridges the works.
It was all hooked up and ready to go. I was more
than somewhat nervous; I just learned recently how
to pump my own gas.
The game of that moment was called "Kung Fu,"
I believe. The object was with the help of the joy
stick to rescue Silvia, who was up on the fourth
or fifth floor. To do that, I had to Kung Fu all sorts
of enemies before they Kung Fu-ed me. The kids
would do the same, and the highest scorer would J
be the winner.
Now I should tell.you ahead of time that I
still have an unreasonable amount of trouble
with our VCR. Some VCR challenges I've
mastered. Such as, it now tells the actual time
instead of just blinking "12:00" all the time.
But as often as not, I don't get what I
thought I was taping the night before. For in-
stance, instead of a "Murder She Wrote" re-
run last Sunday, I taped a one-hour pitch on
a 14K gold bracelet that sold for years at
Saks Fifth Av-
enue for
$3,590 and
was now go-
ing to the first
500 callers
for only $29.95!
I tell you that because I want you to know that the
grandchildren beat me at Kung Fu 256,000 to 725.
While their Silvia is off to the King's party downstairs,
my Silvia is still up on the fifth floor.
Anyway, I decided to drag them from the electron-
ics out to the environment where I'd show them games
I used to play when I was a kid games where noth-
ing needed to be plugged in.
First, I chose "Kick the Can." Now for those of you
who are still of the age to call me "mister" and don't
understand that game, I'll tell you as I told them -
- how it works.
You get an empty soup can (sodas and beer only
came in bottles back then) and set it on a mark in the
middle of the street. You argue about who will be "it"
first, and with that decided the action begins.


KENDRA D.

PRESSWOOD
Attorney at Law



Employment
Discrimination

Civil Rights

Civil & Criminal
Appeals


Call toll free
(888) 888-9178
Located in
Tampa, Florida


Worship Service
10 am
Nursery During Service

Adult Study Group
9 am

6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
LONGBOAT KEY
383-6491


S- The players line up
across the street about 10
/ feet behind where the can
is waiting. One kid is
I :/ I picked to run up and kick
the can as hard as he can.
While all the other kids go
hide someplace, the "it" kid
has to go get the can, return
to its original spot on the
street, and start the search for
the other kids.
When he spots one, he has
S/^ to beat him back to the can
and tag it. If the kid he spot-
Sted gets back to the can first,
I 79. he kicks it, and the game
starts all over.
How did the grandsons
; J like the game?
They didn't.
/ i. First off, they objected be-
S cause, they said, empty cans
should be recycled and not kicked
around. And besides, as one of the
kids pointed out, most of his favorite
soups come in envelopes.
Second, there's no place to hide in "flat Florida."
That ruled out ordinary "Hide and Seek," too.
Then I decided I'd buy marbles and teach them that
game.
No good. Did you ever try to shoot marbles in
Florida sand?
I tried some other games. Two-a-cat was out. (I'm
not even going to try to explain that game to the Little
League generation.) In the first place, the kids only had
real baseballs, not tennis balls. In the second place, they
had no broomstick because their Mom's got an electric
broom with no stick.
So, I decided to give it up and just buy them candy
bars and ice cream cones and take them to the dollar
movie like grandfathers are supposed to do.
God knows I tried. So, I'm left to wonder, will my
Silvia remain stuck up there on the fifth floor?


,oser 4eirnrit l t a Ormmmnritg (Ttth rcr
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913

3 Come Celebrate Christ
Sunday School 9am
Worship 10am
Children's Church 10am
S at Seaside Worship 6pm
P Transportation & Nursery Available
-512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414


DR. DIANE L. MICHAEL
Chiropractic Physician '



761-0210

501 Village Green Parkway
Suite 15 West Bradenton
(behind the Manatee Ave. Video Library)


is proud to sponsor a team in Anna Maria Island Community Center's

Soccer League, Division III, 5-7 Year Olds

Good luck to all the teams, players and coaches. May the "best news" win.


i I---- ss~---~~~= --a~--31--------s. L- I LE~ I I





ffl PAGE 14 A SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Sept. 5, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of two capsized vessels in
Tampa Bay. A Coast Guard boat responded and found
two derelict vessels aground.
Sept. 5, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a body floating in Tampa
Bay near the Sunshine Skyway South Fishing Pier. A
Coast Guard boat and helicopter searched the area with
negative results.
Sept. 7, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 16-foot power
boat in Sarasota Bay. a Coast Guard vessel responded
and towed the vessel to safe moorings.
Sept. 7, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sick person aboard a 19-
foot power boat. A Sarasota Fire and Rescue Marine
Unit responded, but the ill person refused treatment
upon the boat's arrival.
Sept. 7, Boarding. A 15-foot power boat was
boarded in New Pass. A written warning was issued for
not having a sound-producing device on the vessel and
having improperly sized lettering for the vessel's reg-
istration numbers.
Sept. 7, Boarding. A 15-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. No violations were
found.
Sept. 7, Boarding. A 17-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a notice of violation for having no naviga-
tional lights and having an extra letter on the vessel's
registration number. The vessel's voyage was termi-
nated for the safety violations.
Sept. 7, Boarding. A 23-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for having a faulty fire ex-
tinguisher.
Sept. 7 Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for not having a sound-pro-
ducing device and having a faulty fire extinguisher.
Sept. 7, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 15-foot power
boat near Jewfish Key. A Coast Guard vessel re-
sponded and towed the vessel to safe moorings.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 35-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for having improperly sized
registration numbers and not having a garbage placard.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 19-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for having no sound produc-
ing device on board and having a letter in the place of
a number on the vessel's registration numbers.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 15-foot power boat was
boarded in the Manatee River. No violations were
found.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 22-foot power boat was
boarded in the Manatee River. No violations were
found.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 26-foot power boat was
boarded in the Manatee River. The vessel's operator
received a written warning for improper spacing on the
vessel's registration numbers and not having a garbage
placard on board.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 21-foot power boat was
boarded in the Manatee River. the operator received a
written warning for not having the original registration
on board and not having a throwable flotation device.
Sept. 8, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded in Anna Maria Sound. The operator received
a written warning for having a stern navigational light
in the wrong location and having an improperly
charged fire extinguisher. The light problem was im-
mediately corrected.
Sept. 8, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a Emergency Position In-
dicating Radio Beacon activated in the Braden River.
A Coast Guard vehicle responded and searched the area
with negative results.
Sept. 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a person in the water near
Longboat Bridge. A Coast Guard vessel responded and
located the person aboard a Good Samaritan's vessel.
Sept. 10, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. The vessel's operator re-
ceived a written warning for not having a sound-pro-
ducing device on board.


During Pierrette
Kelly's trip to
.Prague, she had
the opportunity to
spend a day in the
city with some of
the students and
... teachers who
attended the
Debate Camp.
"I'm very proud to
Shave had the
opportunity to
meet these won-
;Vderfully open and
friendly people.
Touching their
1 lives has changed
mine forever."
Islander Photo:
Courtesy of
Pierrette Kelly





Making more of memories


By Michelle Timpanaro
Islander Reporter
Unforgettable experiences occur throughout our
lives. After time, we tuck them away in a place near our
heart as they become a part of our past. We feel blessed
to have been a participant in such an important event.
Not so for Anna Maria Island Community Center
Executive Director Pierrette Kelly. She plans to make
the most of a recent memorable experience.
Kelly visited Prague, the capital of the Czech Re-
public, where she attended the Open Society Second
Annual International Debate Camp. The program, co-
ordinated and funded by the Soros Foundation, was
designed to promote the ideals of open society in East-
ern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
An open society is a form of social organization based
on the recognition that no one has a monopoly on the truth,
that different people have different views and interests,
and that there is a need for institutions to protect the rights
of all people to allow them to live together in peace. As
becomes apparent from this definition, debate is an inte-
gral component of an open society.
Kelly's contribution to this event was one of great
importance. As an educator, she spoke to students and
teachers who gathered from 21 Eastern European coun-
tries. Kelly said that although her message was a simple
one, she feels it is often taken for granted.
"Many people living in this region have never had
the opportunity to learn how to solve problems in a
civil manner or build consensus and share decision-
making. The purpose of my involvement was to change
this way of thinking," said Kelly.
"The greatest barrier for these people was over-
coming depression. They have been oppressed and
controlled by communist and authoritarian regimes for
so many years now that they expect to be told how to
think and feel," said Kelly. The first part of Kelly's
program focused on empowering the individual.
"I remember one young girl's story of how things
were when she was growing up, just a few short years ago.
She lived in a society where governing bodies, as well as
religious beliefs, changed frequently. Entire families were


murdered because they would not convert."
Kelly reminds us that this is not a story from the
history books. It is not a faded memory like the World
War II stories of Jewish persecution by the German
Nazis. It happened within the last 15 years.
"There are communities throughout Eastern Eu-
rope that do not yet have electricity or running water.
It is no wonder they are in a state of informational iso-
lation," said Kelly.
Communication and technology go hand in hand.
Many authoritarian regimes in Eastern Europe maintain
power by keeping people isolated from the progress which
would enable them to think or create for themselves.
In order for governing bodies to remain all-powerful
institutions, people are forced to depend on their govern-
ment to survive. They were denied the technology which
could enable them to be a self-sufficient society.
The second half of Kelly's program focused on exam-
ining and evaluating each nation's strengths and commu-
nity resources to support and promote internal develop-
ment.
"The greater the change in external forces that af-
fect stability, such as government policies, economic
and social conditions, the greater the need for internal
strength and flexibility to ensure that stability," ex-
plained Kelly.
"I wanted to teach these individuals how to be
proactive, rather than reactive. It is one thing to be
aware of a problem, but being proactive means accept-
ing the responsibility to make changes."
In addition to a lesson on maintaining assertive
character ethics, Kelly included themes on developing
leadership skills, opening lines of communication and
positive approaches to conflict/resolution.
"This experience opened my eyes and made me re-
alize how lucky I am," said Kelly. "It is my hope to assist
the individuals I met and their struggling nations by get-
ting our community involved whether it means setting up
some sort of international correspondence program or
asking local businesses and churches to sponsor them. I
would like to find some way to make this experience more
than just another treasured memory."

Chapel Players
workshop
A few of the Seven
Dwarfetts watch to see if
beauty can awaken her
prince with a kiss in the
final performance of the
I" Chapel Players' Kids
Music and Drama Work-
shop Program in the
chapel of Roser Memorial
Community Church.
Student Christina Ostrye
wrote the script, which
was directed by Pat Ross
and Larry Westfall and
involved a cast of 17
Island children. Islander
Photo: Joy Courtney





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 15 E1
*1


Community center receives
surprise donation
Standing from left, Anna Maria Island Community
Center Board members Allen Bobo, Linda Loken,
Jerry Bowes, Andy Price, Yvonne Shook, Gib
Bergquist and Sue O'Connor were surprised by a
donation of $1,000 for the gym floor project from
Abraham Chevrolet of Tampa. Sitting in front, Anna
Maria Commissioner and manager of the auto
dealership Bob Mcllheny, presented the check to
AMICC Executive Director Pierrette Kelly at a
recent board meeting. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.


ISLANDER



$50
Sept. 1
Jesse L
Holm





$50 FOOTB


Winner
12 Contest
ampariello
res Beach
-..M mm


\LL


CONTEST


PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
person with the most correct game winning
predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Islander
Bystander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
*The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1
2

FILL IT OUT NOW!


Winner
3
4
5
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Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5404 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Address


* Phone


The Island Itself.

First Nationalm

5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
(941) 778-4900
Chicago vs Detroit


Kite Shop


Knowledgeable Sales & Service
Kites Banners
Accessories
778-7600

We Now Carry
NFL BANNERS
Seattle vs Tampa Bay
5348 C Gulf Drive
S&S Plaza Holmes Beach


Serving the Island
from the same
location since 1970
778-6066

1-800-865-0800
visit us at our web site
http://www.islandreal.com
Arizona vs New Orleans
6101 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


Fran Maxon
REAL ESTATE
SALES AND RENTALS
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450
(941) 778-2307
1 (800) 306-9666
SanFrancisco vs Carolinal
9701 Gulf Drive P Box 717
Anna Maria, FL 34216


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
Cribbage Tournament
11:30AM Every Sunday
SGreen Bay vs Minnesota
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 9 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


" A Real Bagel Shop with
Island Attitude."
$199
includes choice
of bagel, plain
cream cheese &
a regular coffee
September Hours:
Mon Sat 7am to 12 noon
779-1212
East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
(next to Shells)
San Diego vs Oakland


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Florist
"We specialize in being unique"
Flowers by wire
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Bay Beach Plaza
794-5555
(800) 559-6077
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MONDAY NIGHT
FOOTBALL
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11 am to 11 pm Mondays
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ON THE ISLAND
Pizzas Sandwiches
Subs Salads
* Calzones Strombolis
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I


'





jL PAGE 16 E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Closed, closed, open
If you get to the door and the sign says "Closed,"
"On Vacation" or "Remodeling" just take a deep
breath and move on. It's that other season, when Island
businesses close the doors, take their own deep breath,
do some remodeling and prepare for another great sea-
son of business. The tourist season.
We heard a rescue call on the fire department scan-
Sner today (press day) for a victim in the 3700 block of
Gulf Drive. The dispatcher said it was heat related and
we weren't surprised. We guess the victim got to
Duffy's and they were closed (always on Tuesday) and
he just couldn't make it back home.
Duffy's isn't on vacation but plenty others are.
Still, you can find options for any type of dining or
carousing on Anna Maria just around the corer. The
"Open" signs far outnumber the "Closed" ones. And
others are returning every day painted, spiffed up
and rejuvenated.
The Sandbar in Anna Maria is redoing the kitchen
and reopening this week. The Buccaneer Inn on
Longboat Key is due to reopen Sept. 20 and Euphemia
Haye, also on Longboat, will begin service again on
Sept. 25. Mr. Bones, Holmes Beach, is due back on
Sept. 27. Chez Andre in Holmes Beach and Ivo's Con-
tinental Cuisine on Longboat Key will return in Octo-
ber. Rebecca's Bistro in Bradenton Beach set reopen-
ing for Sept. 25, "If there are no construction prob-
lems." Ches's Pasta Plus and Bortell's will return from
annual vacations on October 1.
Meanwhile, everyone else is open!





HAPPY HOUR
Seahorse Cocktails $1


Raw Bar & Grill


HULA ~ LUAU DANCE (`
--.. Sat Sept 28 8pm -
^" Dance Contests ,
Door Prizes Food & Drink Specials .'
THE TALISMAN BAND Wed Sun y


Lottery winners
take home green
Chris and Michael Vinhage wintered on Anna
Maria in the past from Frankfurt, Germany, and even-
tually bought a home on Key Royale.
Their real estate agent, Karin Stephan, introduced
them to an attorney who submitted their name into the
U.S. Department of Immigration's "green card" lottery
last February.
Just last week they were notified they are winners.
Michael said, "It's like winning a million dollars to us.
No, it's more like winning two million!"
Vinhage said without winning the lottery he would
be required to open a business with $1 million capital
and employ a minimum 10 U.S. citizens to earn the
green card.
Vinhage and his wife operate a business in Frankfurt


Lottery winners
Chris and Michael
Vinhage, left, and
Karin Stephan.












where they deal in computer network systems, customized
programming and repairs. They hope to move perma-
nently and re-start their business here very soon.

To be expected
We've been teasing Darla Tingler, Islander pro-
duction and graphic artist, since she married "Anchor
Inn Bobby" 2 1/2 years ago. Every time Darla so much
as sneezes, we all chime in and ask if she's pregnant.
The announcement came unexpectedly this week
without a whimper of morning sickness, that the couple
is expecting their first baby in May.
The newspaper expects to take part in all the ex-
citement as the big event draws near. Employees at
the Anchor said they expect sales of Miller Lite to
drop drastically.
First with a suggested name was Herb Haller of
Holmes Beach: "Anchor Inn-fant."



ROTTEN

RALPH'S
ROTTEN RALP/S
RALPH'SS/ WATERFRONT DINING
S, FULL MENU FULL BAR
Yes, We're Open the
Entire Month of September!!!
FISH AND CHIPS SPECIAL
BRITISH-STYLE
Fish (One Piece), French Fries & Cole Slaw ... $5.95
British Style Fish & Chips (Regular) ... $6.95
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT (Mon Thur Only) ... $7.95

.pb's BERNI ROY
gotte . on Keyboard
Slcol Tues. Sat. 4 to 8 pm
eIv' AND ALL HER FRIENDS TOO!
Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week
902 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953


The Best Steaks in Manatee County






PIANO BAR
with LARRY RICH
$ Tuesday-Saturday 8-Midnight
Dinner served 4-10 pm Tuesday-Sunday
Large groups and luncheon parties welcome.
Reservations requested, not required.
204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria (formerly Cafe Robar)


0 11 I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 N PAGE 17 Ij
- g..........


To sort or not to sort
Fifth-grade students, left to right, Ginny Mazza,
Kiley Murphy and Zeinah Waliagha give their Anna
Maria Elementary teacher a hand by sorting
worksheets produced by classmates during the first
two weeks of school. They quickly determined floor
space was a sorter's 'best friend."


A n~Ie

A'.,

LJ U' 1'


/~~-


Don't bug me
Insects and flowers communicate through taste,
smell and light. Using this knowledge learned in
science class, these Anna Maria Elementary
students built their own "Bug Barns." From left
to right are Ashley Allgire, who used sugar to
lure insects into her no-exit bug hotel; Wyndham
Riter, Philip Montgomery and Dustin Cole, used
a variety of light sources to attractflies to fly
paper.


Anna Maria
Elementary School
. Menu
Monday, 9/23/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Turkey Breast Sandwich or Hot Dog on
Bun, Coleslaw, Fruit, Sherbert
Tuesday, 9/24/96
S Breakfast: Warm Pretzel w/Cheese, Juice
Lunch: Sloppy Joe or Meatball Sub, Green
Beans, Relish Cup, Fruit Cup
Wednesday, 9/25/96
Breakfast: French Toast, Juice
SLunch: Macaroni & Cheese w/Canadian Bacon
or Breaded Pork Patty, Salad, Roll, Cookie
Thursday, 9/26/96
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: BBQ Chicken Noodles w/Seasoned
S Noodles and Green Peas or Chef Salad,
Roll, Jello
Friday, 9/27/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
Corn, Salad, Pudding
All meals served with milk.



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"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
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Vuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. 8
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 lam-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501






II] PAGE 18 E SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 THE ISLANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports available

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 5, criminal mischief, 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach City Pier. The complainant reported
a person unknown cut nine screens in the patio area
causing $180 in damages.
Sept. 10, criminal mischief, 1800 Gulf Drive N.,
LaCosta garage. The complainant reported a person
unknown broke the passenger-side window of the ve-
hicle, causing $100 in damages.
Sept. 10, theft, 200 Gulf Drive N., Beach House
restaurant patio. The complainant reported a person
unknown removed a speaker valued at $150.
Sept. 11, burglary, 100 block of Fourth Street
South. The complainant reported a person unknown
entered the residence through a bedroom window and
removed $130 from a cabinet. Possibly the same sub-
ject removed six orchid plants valued at $24 from the
yard, kicked stones into the fish pond and damaged the
water pump.
Sept. 12, burglary, 100 block of Fourth Street
South. The complainant reported a person unknown
entered the residence, put a container of food in the
oven and turned it on. The food was burned and the
residence was filled with heavy smoke. Possibly the
same subject deleted files from the complainant's per-
sonal computer and removed two plants valued at $10
from the outside of the residence.


Joe's Eats & Sweets

"Jus The Best Homemade Ice Cream and aror
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it, we'll make it!
Cappuccino & Espresso
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Open Daily 2-10pm Closed Tues.
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of the Cortez Bridge


~Ljju~unIWra(dU4~Yi[


Don't Let The
Holidays Slip By!

THANKSGIVING DAY
Traditional or Select from Regular Menu
11 am 3 pm & 4 pm 9 pm

CHRISTMAS PARTIES
Christmas Eve Dinner
4 pm 10 pm (Closed Christmas Day)
New Year's Eve Dinner
4 pm Last Reservation 11 pm


BYSTANDER
Sept. 12, retail theft, 2513 Gulf Drive N., Circle
K. The complainant reported the subject came into the
store, asked for a cup of water, grabbed a four-pack of
cigarettes, ran out of the store, got into a vehicle with
two other males and fled. The subject was not found.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 6, lost property a wallet, 100 block of
White Avenue on the beach.
Sept. 6, bad check, 3304 East Bay Drive, Island
Bazaar.
Sept. 7, traffic, 3300 block of East Bay Drive, park-
ing lot. The officer responded in reference to a vehicle
crash involving a pedestrian but found no evidence of a
crash. He was approached by a female who said she drove
around the corner of the parking lot and observed a white
male subject lying in the driveway tangled up in his bi-
cycle. She said she thought he had been struck by a vehicle
and called 911. She then learned he was intoxicated, fell
off his bicycle and fell asleep.
Sept. 11, code violation, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee County Public Beach. The complainant reported an
employee of Umbrella Beach Resort was soliciting
people in the parking lot to purchase time shares. The
same employee, as well as other employees of Um-
brella Beach Resort, have been warned in the past
about being in violation of a city ordinance, said the
report. A trespass warning was issued to the employee.
Sept. 11, found property a bicycle, 600 block
of Key Royale Drive.
Sept. 12, assist EMS, 3200 block of Gulf Drive.
The officer responded to a report of an unconscious
child at the bus stop. The officer found the 14-year-old
subject conscious and lying in the grass. The subject
said he was climbing the tree and fell. He was assessed
by EMS, and his mother was called to the scene.

Enjoy the Sunrise with Breakfast
Starting at 7am featuring \1 1
Specialty Omlettes -.( l-


Wit and wisdom by native
Floridian Gib Bergquist


The Cracker is
all wet, again
The Cracker reached the beach for his daily walk
just as the morning was clearing the "sleepies" from the
corners of her eyes.
As he looked up and down the beach in the dim
light, he saw no one.
"Great," mused the Cracker, quite pleased with
himself since the early bird on the beach gets first crack
at the best seashells and any flotsam and jetsam tossed
up by the tide during the night.
He had walked only a short distance when he spied
a corner of a soggy wallet protruding from the wet sand
a short distance below the high tide mark.
The Cracker theorized that the wallet had been
brought in by the tide along with the seashells since it
was full of sand and completely waterlogged.
His hunch was reinforced by a charge card from a
cruise ship company occupying the top slot in the credit
card case in the wallet.
"There might be a story here," thought the Cracker
as he let his imagination slip into second gear. "Could
the wallet have somehow fallen off a cruise ship and
washed ashore?" he asked himself. "A story of ro-
PLEASE SEE CRACKER, NEXT PAGE


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i-I


i





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 i PAGE 19 9j


CRACKER, FROM PAGE 18
mance and mystery, perhaps."
The wallet was taken to the Islander Bystander office
and completely taken apart. Contained within were the
driver's licenses of both a gentleman and his wife from
Bridgman, Mich., along with credit cards and some cash.
A telephone call was placed to the owner's home and
a message left on the family's answering machine to call
the Islander Bystander for the return of the lost property.
The Cracker then took the wallet home and care-
fully washed the saltwater and sand from the wallet and
its contents and set them aside to dry.
To digress a moment, Bridgman is a small city of
about 14,000 souls on Lake Michigan in the extreme
southwest corer of lower Michigan near the Indiana line.
It so happened that the Cracker vacationed once in the
general area during his FBI days in the early Fifties. At that
time, Bridgman's population was about 1,500 citizens.
During the visit he stayed at a tourist camp on Lake
Michigan that had once been a military training camp for
the German-American Bund, a powerful group of uni-
formed Nazi-Hitlerite supporters that existed in this coun-
try prior to and leading up to World War II.
During his visit, the hated Nazi swastika symbol
was still in evidence, having been carved on some of
the trees on the lake front. The Cracker wonders
whether they might still be there today.
Well anyway, a few days later a happy and relieved
wife of the wallet's owner returned the call soon after
arriving back home in Bridgman.
The Cracker and his cruise ship theory were all
wet. The family had been vacationing right here on the
Island and the wallet was found in close proximity to
where it was lost.
She explained that the reason her husband's wal-
let also contained her driver's license was that on a
previous vacation she had lost her own wallet, causing
considerable concern and inconvenience and this was
to preclude a repeat. (So much for that idea.)
Since the Cracker was holding the ace, he asked the
caller point-blank how her husband's wallet had been
lost on the beach during the night.
"You don't really want to know," was her sassy
retort as she tried to repress a giggle.
"A story of romance and mystery, for sure."


3 --


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1/2 Rack Baby Back Ribs ... $6.95
Don't be fooled b, a Tourist Trap
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107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


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Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hansen
Mr. and Mrs. Terrell Collins Horn announced the
marriage of their daughter Stacey Lee to Christo-
pher James Hansen on July 27 at the American Club
in Kohler, Wis. The groom was a life-long resident of
Anna Maria Island and the son of the late Mary
Ross, a former Anna Maria City Commissioner and
an employee of First Union Bank in Holmes Beach,
and step-son of David Ross. The couple are residing
in New Jersey.

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Friday, Sept. 20-Sunday, Sept. 22
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Lunch Served: Sat-Sun
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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
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Big Mama Thurs-Sat 7-11pm Sun 6-10pm
That Jazz Band "Jam"
Monday 7-10 f


Rogers, Cucci
announce engagement
Margaret Rogers announces the engagement of her
daughter, Margaret Ann of Holmes Beach, to Anthony
Joseph Cucci of Holmes Beach, son of Gennaro and
Olga Cucci of Bradenton. She is the daughter of the late
John Rogers, M.D.
The couple will wed Nov. 16 at Saints Peter and
Paul The Apostles Catholic Church.
Rogers is a 1988 graduate of Manatee High School
and received a bachelor of science degree in elementary
education from the University of South Florida in 1992.
The bridegroom-elect is a 1987 graduate of Manatee
High School and attended the University of South Florida
from 1990-92. He is the owner of Andiamo restaurant.
Happy birthday
Robert Nisbet of Holmes Beach recently cel-
ebrated his 95th birthday on Aug. 24. Nisbet has lived
on Anna Maria Island for
more than 29 years. He and
his wife Martha have been
married for 70 years. The
birthday boy's family in-
cludes his wife, six daugh-
ters, 20 grandchildren and
26 great-grandchildren.
Happy birthday, Rob-
ert Nisbet. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of the Nisbet Nisbet
family
Geurin, McCartney wed
Theresa Ann McCartney and Bryan Dean Geurin,
both of Bradenton Beach, were married July 4 at North
River Family Worship Center. Cyndi Morrison officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Jane Boland of Chi-
cago, Ill., and the late Robert McCartney.
The groom is the son of Trudy Williams of Holmes
Beach and the late Gene Geurin.
The couple honeymooned in New Orleans, La.
They live in Bradenton Beach.

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Breakfast Only
7am 1pm
Mon Sat
7am 3pm
JAMAICAN STYLE FOOD BEER & WINE
BREAKFAST 7 11am LUNCH 11am 3pm
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16 oz. Prime Rib ..................................... $15.99
6 oz. Filet Mignon................................... $12.99
10 oz. Filet Mignon................................. $16.99
16 oz. N.Y. Strip...................................... $16.99
16 oz. T-Bone .......................................... $16.99
(all steaks include all-u-can-eat salad, rye & pumpernickel bread)

Happy Hour Daily 3 to 7 pm
2-for-1 Well Drinks $1 Drafts
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Tuesday Sunday 6 10 pm
(941) 778-4811
5325 Marina Dr. Anna Maria Island Formerly Pete Reynard's
Hrs: Sun.- Thurs. 11am to 10pm; Fri. & Sat 11am to 11pm
Banqu e Facii te Availa *Up To 200 People


--F





li- PAGE 20 m SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Bad, bad people, say Longboaters


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
It began with the rim canal off the Bay Isles Asso-
ciation at southwest Longboat Key. Now it's the pub-
lic docks and boat ramp near Moore's and the Mar
Vista restaurants at the north end of the key.
The (further) privatization of Longboat Key.
That's right, members of the Longbeach Village
Association on Longboat Key say they will ask for
government help to keep non-Longboaters off the pub-
lic docks. No word yet from Longboat officials, who
seem to have their hands full trying to figure out how
to deal with last week's posting of the rim canal by the
Bay Isles Association.
Longboaters complain that non-residents are
crowding their dock facilities in the village, producing
litter and association president Bob Burnett in his
excitement even threw out the red herring that maybe
boats are flushing their toilets directly into the bay.


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Sept. 14 horseshoe games were
Bill Cooney of Bradenton Beach and Bill Starrett
of Anna Maria. Runners-up were J.C. Phillips of
Bradenton Beach and Billy Tucker of Bradenton.
The weekly contests get underway every Sat-
urday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park,
10005 Gulf Drive. There are no membership fees.



Anna Maria Island

Community Center
soccer schedule
Division 1
11 to 13 year olds. All games begin at 7:30 p.m.
Mon., Sept. 23, H.B. Mini Storage vs. Mr. Bones
Tues., Sept. 24, Galati Marine vs. Island Real Estate

Division II
8 to 10 year olds. All games begin at 6p.m.
Mon., Sept. 23, Air & Energy vs. Harry's Cont. Kitchen
Tues., Sept. 24, Dowling Park vs. Island Animal Clinic

Division III
5 to 7 year olds
First game begins at 6p.m.
Second game begins at 7p.m.
Tues., Sept. 24, Bridge St. Pier & Cafe vs. Islander
Sept. 24, Hosier Auto Service vs. Longboat Observer




DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Sep 19 3:55 2.4 11:21 0.4 7:01 1.5 9:41 1.4
Sep 20 4:57 2.3 10:53p* 1.5 9:16 1.6 12:49 0.4
Sep 21 6:20 2.3 10:19 1.7 2:16 0.4
Sep 22 7:56 2.3 1:12 1.5 10:52 1.7 3:23 0.4
Sep 23 9:22 2.3 2:53 1.4 11:20 1.8 4:18 0.4
Sep 24 10:32 2.3 3:59 1.1 11:42 1.9 5:04 0.5
Sep 25 11:34 2.3 4:53 0.9 5:42 0.6
SCortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


That last item is not only violation of federal law, of
course, but also a physical impossibility on most boats
these days.
But hey, let's don't let the facts interfere with our
selfishness.
Don't you wish you lived on Longboat Key?

Cause of the year
It's the new "cause of the year" merging the
Marine Fisheries Commission with the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Volunteers are trying to gather the 500,000 signa-
tures of registered voters needed statewide to put the
issue on the 1998 ballot. The petition drive by a coali-
tion of groups called the Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Committee is being led by the Florida Wildlife
Federation.
Basically, proponents of the merger are the same
groups that led the net ban amendment movement, and
so it's no surprise the commercial fishing industry has
reservations about the whole thing. As I've heard it,
commercials object to the lack of "checks and bal-
ances" if the merger takes place.
As it stands now, if the Marine Fisheries Commis-
sion makes a decision, it must be ratified by the Gov-
ernor and Cabinet. If the Florida Game and Fresh Wa-
ter Fish Commission decides something, it's decided.
The public has no further appeal.
The arguments go on and on, of course. Folks in
favor of the merger say it takes politics out of the pro-
cess. Commercials counter that since they really no
longer have representation on state-wide regulatory
groups, all rulings would be in favor of the "sporties."
That's the same old "us and them" talk you hear
whenever sport and commercial fishers argue about
their resource. Commercials want "their" share and
sport fishers say "the resource belongs to all of us,"
excluding the commercials, of course.
Regardless of how you feel and you'll probably be
bombarded with arguments over the coming months -
nobody I've talked with has anything bad to say about the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Looks to me as though the merger is inevitable.

Mullet on flies
Islanders taken with fly fishing should know the
latest fad in the sport taking mullet on flies. Hey, I
can't make up stuff as good as this.
Not only can mullet be coaxed to take a fly, the bait
is called a "Yeasty Beasty."
It all started in Fort Lauderdale, where a fly-fish-
ing guide and instructor named Steve Kantner noticed
he could chum up mullet in his backyard canal using


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bread crumbs. Nothing so new there, but then Steve
had an idea.
Using basically the same tackle as needed for
northern brook trout small fly, light leader, double
taper line (meaning it's thin at both ends and fat in the
middle) and a dead drift Kantner started hooking
mullet after chumming them into range. And get this,
the flies are made of carpet fibers.
He uses white fibers if the mullet are eating white
bread, brown if he's chumming with whole wheat and
green if they're eating their usual food, algae.
Kantner says he uses seven- or eight-weight gear
just so it won't be overpowered by the occasional jack
or ladyfish that strays by, but that mullet still give quite
a tussle on a fly rod.
So I'm just passing this along. It's probably good
casting practice if you're a fly redder, but I still prefer a
cast net when it comes time to find mullet Failing that, the
local fish market is a pretty good alternative, too.

Boating safety money
The Boat/U.S. Foundation for Boating Safety is
offering grants up to $5,000 for local boating safety
projects anywhere in the country. Applications from
non-profit, volunteer organizations will be accepted
until Nov. 1.
Groups wishing to receive a "Grassroots Grant"
application packet can call Tom Huestis at (703) 823-
9550, ext. 3016.
Anybody have any local ideas?

Computer offerings
Boat/U.S. now has its own home page on the
World Wide Web and offers a couple of interesting
features. You can check marine weather or even a
world-wide schedule of boat shows.
Just go to http://www/boatus.com for the informa-
tion. The weather page provides tropical storm fore-
casts, storm tracking data and the latest marine obser-
vations from the National Weather Service's automated
buoys and weather stations.
For a world-wide schedule of boat shows, go to a
special section called "Boat Show Central," and you'll
find not only the schedule, but also the ability to buy
show tickets and even possibly win free tickets to se-
lected events.
See you next week.

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(at end of Bridge St. on pier)


I Obr


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941-792-5263



FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
CALL for RESERVATIONS
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED


GINON
MARINA


I


IL





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 21 li


Reds in school now; snapper starting to peak


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Tarpon may have left the area for the winter, but
that doesn't mean the fishing is dead around the Island.
Backwater anglers are reporting huge schools of red-
fish. Snook action is fair, with better linesider reports
expected once the first cold front cools things off a bit.
Offshore, dolphin, tuna, wahoo and grouper fishing
remains good, while the artificial reefs are seeing their
fair share of action with mangrove snapper. And for
those of you who prefer to fish the passes, angle your
angling toward mackerel.
Bill at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier fishers
there have been having good luck with snook, with
Jack Barrett catching a linesider tipping the scales at
better than 16 pounds. Other action includes redfish,
mangrove snapper and a lot of mackerel.
Gary at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there are catching jacks, blue runners and mackerel.
Saturday, two snook were landed, one better than 23
inches long, plus a 53-inch barracuda and a couple of


dolphin.
Melissa at Annie's of Cortez Bait & Tackle said
snook are plentiful out there, and seem to have a fond-
ness for artificial lures. Reds are still the number one
catch, though, and trout action in the bays is so-so.
Offshore fishing features mackerel, with mangrove
snapper also excellent. The snapper should peak out in
the next month or so, by the way.
Sue at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 100 head of Key West grunts. The
six-hour trips averaged 150 head of porgies, lane snap-
per and Key West grunts. The nine-hour trips averaged
35 head of small grouper, lane snapper and Key West
grunts.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are doing well with snook and reds in the shal-
lows by mangrove islands.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's caught several permit
this week, plus a five-foot-long black tip shark and
several reds. Snook fishing, he added, remains slow but


should pick up when that first real cold front blows
through.
Capt. Mark Bradow said tarpon are gone for the
year, but there are still plenty of redfish, snook and
trout to keep his charters happy.
On my boat Magic we've caught several reds, plus
legal-sized cobia and lots of Spanish mackerel.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's been working those
huge schools of redfish, with some of the whoppers
going to 34 inches in length.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said plenty of
snook are being caught and entered in the store's tour-
nament so far this month. There are lots of mackerel off
the artificial reefs, he added, and he's heard reports of
a few cobia being caught, plus dolphin, tuna and wa-
hoo offshore.
Sunshine Skyway Fishing Pier action includes lots
of Spanish mackerel, a few flounder, mangrove snapper
and some small sharks being caught mostly at night.
Good luck and good fishing.


Soccer kicks off season with spaghetti dinner


The public is invited to the Anna Maria Island
Community Center's 1996 Soccer Jamboree this week-
end, Sept. 20 and 21, starting with a catered dinner
Friday night.
The traditional spahgetti dinner is catered this year
by Beach Bistro, Holmes Beach. Owner Sean Murphy
and a team of volunteers are donating their time for this
event including a prize raffle.
The cost of the meal is $5 for adults and $4 for
children. Take-out is available. Dinner includes spa-
ghetti, salad, bread and drinks. Parents are asked to
bring dessert to share.
Sponsorsfor the event and prizes include Bali Hai
Resort, Beach Barn, Island Animal Clinic, LaPensee
Plumbing, Island Pest Control, Dowling Park and Bob
Dale Construction.
Players will receive uniforms at the banquet. Black
shorts are required for games and can be purchased for
$10 at the Center, if needed.
The Jamboree schedule begins at 9 a.m. on Satur-


day with games running continuously on two fields
until noon.


Big Field
9 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
Noon


Air & Energy
Taylor-Made Marine
Harry's Continental Kitchens
Island Pest Control
Holmes Beach Mini-Storage
Galati Marine
Island Real Estate


Small Field
9 a.m. Bridge Street Pier & Cafe vs
9:30 a.m. Longboat Observer vs
10 a.m. Joe's Eats & Sweets vs
10:30 a.m. Longboat Observer vs
11 a.m. The Islander Bystander vs
11:30 a.m. Hosier Auto Service vs
For additional information, call the center at 778-1908.


Teams from Division I, II and III will match up on
the fields as follows:

Dowling Park
School for Constructive Play
Island Animal Clinic
Ben Webb Landscaping
Mr. Bones
LaPensee Plumbing
Mr. Bones


The Islander Bystander
Hosier Auot Service
Beach Bistro
Bridge Street Pier and Cafe
Beach Bistro
Joe's Eats & Sweets


S- Homes Beach Marina

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MAXUMA
IM^ALyiJi^s- ^W


L II I la


L-







] OM PAGE 22 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...

I can make your
island dreams
come true.

ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty Since 1939


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


I I
MORE ISLAND NEWS THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE.

ISLANDERS, iO

I JUST LISTED!


WATERFRONT PARADISE 3BR/3BA, elevated,
canalfront estate. Steps away from Bay & Gulf.
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Call Ron for any Island Property 778-5957


Onm K,

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3014 Manatee Avenue West
Bradenton, Florida 34205-4241
Business (941) 748-5551
Fax (941) 749-5554


Ron Pepka Realtor


DIRECT GOLF COURSE VILLAGE GREEN
Super nice 2BR/2BA with possible third bedroom,
screened-in porch with spa on 6th tee. Includes all
window treatments, hot water recovery system, deep
well & sprinklers, 3 ceiling fans, large walk-in closet
and much more. Asking $114,900.
Please call Nick Patsios
for more information, 778-6066
or Nick at Nite, 778-4642.

MORE ISLAND NEWS THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE.

|ISLANnDRR RiaeIiRaI


,s et^ l le als,^
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


TRADITION IN THE TROPICS
Capturing the charm and romance of a bygone era, this
custom built, quality constructed 3 bedroom home blends
traditional southern charm with Key West style architecture
to form a truly distinctive, inviting and gracious Florida fam-
ily residence. Some of the countless amenities include
pretty pickled oak floors, custom wainscoting and crown
molding, beautiful marble fireplace, custom window and
wall coverings including the finest plantation shutters, for-
mal English-style dining room, wonderful octagonal En-
glish garden room with brick paved floor, and exceptional
eat-in kitchen with many glass front cabinets, center is-
land, 2 sinks, breakfast bar and pantry. Other features in-
clude an enormous 30' x 30' entertainment room with built-
in wet bar, triple car garage, lush and tropical landscaping
including oak trees, specimen palms and bamboo, all wa-
tered by an automatic sprinkler system. Superbly located
on a quiet cul-de-sac in a fine West Bradenton neighbor-
hood offering glimpses of sparkling Palma Sola Bay and
situated in one of the county's finest school districts, this
first rate Florida retreat will captivate your senses and cap-
ture your heart! Only $369,900.
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
"a tAI" T3 L L t"
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820
F( Exclusive
=Waerfron|
SEstates MLS I 1rII.
Video Collection ,,. --
I7aflc ziincidC cwlmEilSalc a.oflcsiionah
,Spbc.aZailna in ^imnS~ i ^loblcaL 'ifniuyti


JULIE McCLURE

i,', .l Estate And
Household
Sales

SAntique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


WEEKLY RENTALS AVAILABLE
STARTING AT $450 PER WEEK


Key Royale Home
Martinique (Gulffr
Westbay Pt. Moor
Perico Bay Club


Perico Bay Club
Perico Bay
Seaside Gardens
Holmes Beach


SEASONAL
3/2 w/pool $3600 mo
front) 2/2 $2900 mo
rings 2/2 $2300 2700 mo
2 & 3BR villa $2000 2400 mo
AND MANY MORE ...


ANNUAL
2BR/2BA villa
2BR/2BA townhouse
2BR/2BA
3BR/2BA


$950 mo
$900 mo
$700 mo
$850 mo


Wedebrocl a Comipany
nalching p.p te*r iets since 1949

CALL A PROFESSIONAL
WEDEBROCK AGENT TODAY!
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
941-778-6665 800-749-6665


DICK MAHER
REALTOR@
778-2261
Dick has been a major player
in the Island real estate
industry for more than 10 .
years and is one of Neal &
Neal's Top Producers.
Call anytime for a consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED 2BR/2BA canalfront
home with lovely tropical landscaping. Open views
through to family room and out to water. Nice circle
drive and 2-car garage make this a special place.
$219,900. Judy Duncan 778-1589.


ISLAND VILLAGE Stunning updated condo ce-
ramic tile, wallpaper soft pastel colors. 2BR/2BA
unit with a view of Tampa Bay & Skyway Bridge.
Short walk to beach. All this and a Homeowner's
Warranty. $121,900. Call Zee Catanese 778-0777,
794-8991 eves.
TWO LARGE WATERFRONT LOTS in the city of
Anna Maria very close to the beach. Caged pool on
one lot. Lot with pool $159,000, lot without pool
$150,000. No bridge obstructions for boaters. Can be
sold together or separately. For more details call
Frank Migliore at 778-2662.
COMMERCIAL LOT Corner lot, good Cortez Road
frontage suitable for strip mall, convenience stores,
offices, etc. $129,000. Call Marion Ragni 778-0777,
778-1504 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MI ER 1ir


s 0iu






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 23 KI


Island chamber seeks
volunteers
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
needs volunteers to answer phones, greet and assist
visitors and to help at social events.
Some knowledge of the Island is helpful, but training
will be provided. Working schedules are flexible and as
little as working one-half day a week will be appreciated.
Call the Island chamber at 778-1541 for details.

WHAT?
A 3BR/3BA
on the water
with fantastic
.. views, huge
rooms, an
open floor plan
Hi: "" with an
800 sq. ft.
-great room
S,.and it's all new!

HOW
S MUCH?

L WHERE?

CALL MEI


PAUL
COLLINS
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, FL 778-6066
(800) 865-0800 569-4602 after hours


I


Longboat chamber
sponsors medical seminar
Dr. Enrique Fernandez, founder of Bradenton Plas-
tic Surgery and Longboat Key Plastic Surgery, will
hold an informative seminar entitled "Your Skin and
the Sun" on Tuesday, Sept. 24, at the Longboat Key
Hilton from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
The seminar is free and open to the public. A con-
tinental breakfast will be served. A door prize will be
awarded at the conclusion of the seminar.
For information, call the Chamber at 387-9519.


W Yf,,qoa/d /oo/xaoo l,/r, o0-<- Hot-.
co", rIou As AR,4LA, s/, o ,Kteo I


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Ino n I. l-778. c


3101 GoU: P HtlOc4 5 t e^Ac)


Realty raves
Island Real Estate in Holmes Beach has announced
that Martha Williams was the top sales agent and
Nicholas Patsios was the top listing agent for the firm
for the month of August.
Karin Stephan was the top lister and T. Dolly
Young was the top seller for The Prudential Florida
Realty in Holmes Beach for the month of August.


RENTALS
DAILY WEEKLY
MONTHLY
'"DIAL" DEBBIE DIAL
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
Debbie Dial k1 R6MIK4 Gulfstream
ei a 5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
Leasing Manager 4. HOLMES BEACH, FL.


Property Management Team
"We Cover the Island"



*Waek. Month
Annual
Cottages. Houses
Bungalows
V las
Condominiums
Pat Thompson Carla Price

c REALTORSO
5910 Marina Dr* Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


The-Pr uden ta F ri mR ealty
530- ul DieHoms eah F-327 94)77-06


Ana ara Isad enreShos.
V isi u tetnte Intre tp/%-%,,. ihtlan escvi


THE POINTE AT MARINERS COVE
LUXURY CONDOMINIUM WITH 50' BOAT SLIP
Elegant 3BR/2B on the ICW. Overlooks boat basin.
Private lobby/elevator. Over 2,000 sq. ft., gorgeous de-
cor, fireplace, 3 porches, 2-car garage and workshop.
Tennis, pool. $335,000. Bob Burnett, 387-0048. #16424
WATERFRONT CONDOMINIUM with fabulous ICW
view. Deeded carport, large boat slip. Pool, tennis. De-
sirable 2BR/2B 1st floor corner unit. West Bay Pointe &
Moorings. $174,000. Bob Burnett, 387-0048. #15381
SAILBOAT WATER. Luxurious condominium. State-of-
the-art kitchen, master suite, loft office. Workshop with
A/C. Lanai overlooks lighted dock. Direct access to ICW.
$199,900. Bany and Kimberly Charles, 795-1273. #67950
STUNNING, CUSTOMIZED Smugglers Landing condo-
minium. Immaculate. Perfect for the discerning boater.
40' dock, easy access to Tampa Bay, boating, islands
and beaches. 2-car covered parking, pool and tennis.
$190,000. John and Jolene Zisman, 383-5252. #13961
PRIME, CONVENIENT LOCATION. Duplex your in-
come. 2BR/2B and 2BR/1B. Gulf-side. Short walk to
beach. Zoned C2. $205,000. Adjacent lot also avail-
able. Anne Miller, 792-6475. #15844
EASY STROLL TO THE GULF. Spacious 3-story
townhouse. 2 heated pools, tennis, docking privileges.
Situated on a lovely lagoon leading to the bay..
$139,900. Dick Ring, 748-7937. #13626

I lI t 1 li M Iu
On Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach. Contact Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
PERICO BAY CLUB. Gated community. Beautifully furnished
second floor unit. 2BR/2B. Former model with lakeview.
Washer/dryer. Heated pool and tennis. $1,100/month.
HOLMES BEACH. Newly renovated 2BR/2B, turkey furished
unit. Spectacular Gulf view. Available for summer and winter
rentals. $600 weekly/$1,600 monthly.
Exceptional properties, exceptional service.
Call us for your property management needs.

U11111WIF Mi. IST Mi tIMM57.171 (T UN


GULFVIEW Elevator, extra storage,
parking beneath. Tiffany condo, rarely
offered. 2BR/2BA. Offered at
$185,000. #TDY15658.
DEEDED BOAT DOCK 2BR/2BA with
lushly landscaped backyard, enclosed
lanai, garage. Well maintained, on dead
end street. $139,900. #TDY16062.
GULFFRONT MOTEL 22 units, swim-
ming pool, private beach. North
Holmes Beach location. $1,895,000.
#TDY16859.
GULF & BAYVIEW CONDOS
$98,900 $196,900.


T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society
778-5427


__________________________________


Karin Stephan
REALTOR8 *
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Pager#
215-5556
Fax: 941- 778-3035


MILLION $ NEIGHBORHOOD ... open floor plan on
Sarasota Bay, pool with spa. Beautiful & spacious.
$895,000. #KS66278.
KEY ROYALE ... 3BR/3BA with fireplace, fruit trees, pool
& boat dock with lift. $398,000. #KS63811.
ANNA MARIA ... Brand new Key West style home in the
city of Anna Maria. Breathtaking view from master suite.
Steps to the beach! 3BR/2BA with pool. Call for your pri-
vate tour today! $295,000. #KS12245.
LONGBOAT KEY ... 3BR/2.5BA home with pool on ca-
nal with Bay access. $295,000. #KS13327.
HOME ... 2BR/2BA with built-in Jacuzzi. Privacy fence
and fruit trees. $159,000. #KS13913.
TRIPLEX ... *MVP Seller will entertain offers between
$650,000 $790,000, 3BR/1.5BA, 2BR/1 BA and efficiency.
Covered parking, direct Gulffront on 2 lots. #KS14087.
TRIPLEX ... 3BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 1BR/1BA close to the
beach excellent rental history. $159,900. #KS13966.


BAYVIEW
Lowest priced Imperial house
S condo with view of the bay.
Seller motivated for a quick
sale. Asking $79,900.
S#CH66847.

Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


48 CONDOS
IN TERRA CEIA BAY
GOLF & TENNIS CLUB
2BR/2BA & 3BR/2BA -
$112,500 $155,000.
8 story building. Out-
standing view over Bay to
Skyway Bridge. Fantastic
boating & fishing water.
Make reservations now.


NEW LISTING *MVP Seller will entertain offers be-
tween $650,000 $790,000. Direct Gulffront. 4 units
beautifully furnished, excellent income, contract with
large German travel agency. Walking distance to
stores and restaurants. Laundry room, outdoor shower,
guest bath and shower downstairs. Walk around the
Island from this super complex. #KS00000.


NICE HOME 1BR/1BA home on large fenced lot with 1-car garage & carport. Great workshop
and plenty of storage. Park your motor home, boat, trailer or truck. No deed restrictions! #11959.
*MVP Seller will entertain offers between $60,000 $73,000. Call Horace Gilley, anytime 792-0758.
WOW WHAT A VIEW! Magnificent view of Gulf, 3BR/2BA, vaulted ceiling, deck and garage. #67898.
*MVP Seller will entertain offers between $300,000 $370,000. Call Carol Heinze, eves. 792-5721.
PRIME CORNER LOT! Woodlawn Lakes. Beautiful oaks & palms. Convenient to golf course & shop-
ping. Near 1-75 in a growing family neighborhood. #16629. Call Roni McCuddin-Price, eves. 778-5585.
] *lyre I M [ M 1 S a I - A U i * i S U [ l -


S, .. !


4 I





I] PAGE 24 : SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 G THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

r r J ; J^" T^B^3B^[ BF1 l Fly^


OAK HEADBOARD & FRAME, king size $150. Oak
full size crib $45. Jenn-Aire stove, white $250. Ethan
Allan recliner chair, peach $150. 212 Oak Ave.
Phone 779-1801.

WATER BED QUEEN SIZE Simmons Dream Cloud.
Used 2 years, excellent condition. $250. 778-9655.

AUBUSSON AND SILK Oriental rugs, bedroom fur-
niture, ironing board, miscellaneous household
items. 778-5427.

AMANA 22 CU FT. black refrigerator, excellent con-
dition. $300 OBO. Uniden portable marine radio,
never used, still in box. $350 new, will accept $200.
Call 778-0321.

FUJI RACING BIKE, small frame. $50. Bang &
Olufsen stereo: Beocenter 7000 includes tuner, turn-
table & cassette player $600. 778-1102.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


FLEA MARKET Sat., Sept. 28, 8 noon. Island Histori-
cal Museum parking lot, 402 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.

AUCTION EVERY TUES. & FRI., 7 pm. Dolls, col-
lectibles, jewelry, electronics, toys, lamps, carpets.
New merchandise truckload of bargains. Fish dinner
by Tom Hannah. West Bradenton Flea Market and
Auction, 9516 Cortez Road West. We buy, sell, con-
sign. Information 792-5347. AU2013. AB1264.

GARAGE SALE Sun. Sept. 22, 8- 2. Miscellaneous.
100 52nd Street, Holmes Beach.
LIQUIDATING CONTENTS of house. Sat., Sept.
21,8 3. Furniture, color TV, miscellaneous items.
218A Coconut.

BACK PORCH SALE Sat., Sept. 21, 9 4. Too much
to list. 121 48th St., Holmes Beach.


OPEN DAILY Indoor air-conditioned flea market. New,
used, antique, collectibles, much much more. Dealer
spaces for rent. When not there, we collect the money
for you. Mt. Vemon Plaza, 9516 Cortez Road West. In-
formation 792-5347. We buy, sell, consign.


IS ANYBODY MISSING a gerbil. Well if you are, con-
tact The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978


VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages of
information everything you need to know to enjoy
the two-county area. Retail price $14.95, discounted
33% only at the newspaper office. You pay only $10
plus tax at The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978

"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of stories
and newspaper columns guaranteed to delight new-
comers, visitors and oldtimers too, by original Florida
Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This book makes a great gift.
Available for $19.95 at The Islander Bystander, 5404
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978
REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5404 Marina Drive,, Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls) We
come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-1012.


COLLECTOR ITEM great investment. 93
Mercedes Benz 600 Sel, V12 engine. Amenities in-
clude gray leather. Interested buyers only. Price ne-
gotiable. Inquiries 753-3972.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.

SPIRIT SONG CHARTERS pleasure cruises with
Capt. Richard Ardabell. Sunset, Egmont, snorkeling
or just relax and enjoy to view. 778-2195.

SAILBOAT 25' IRWIN with 9.9 Suzuki. Good condi-
tion. $5,000. Please call 778-7710.

21' 1987 BAYLINER with cuddy cabin. 350hp V-8 I/
O engine. Very good condition and less than 40
hours use. $7,000 OBO. 778-0118.

WANTED FIBERGLASS sailing dinghy, 6' 9'
length. Call 778-2832.


BRIDGE STREET PIER & Cafe is now accepting
applications for part time cooks and full and part time
servers. Please apply in person. 200 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach.

NOW HIRING Meat cutters, deli clerk and cashier.
Full and part time available. Gallagher's Market,
Longboat Key.
AVON EARN MONEY for Christmas. Full or part time.
For information or to buy Avon call 252-4687 pager.

MAINTENANCE PERSON Holmes Beach condo-
minium. Carpentry, plumbing, general exterior duties.
Call 758-9624.

HOMEWORKERS URGENTLY NEEDED! Earn
weekly paychecks from the comfort of your own
home. Free details. Send long, self-addressed,
stamped envelope to: S.P.E.L., Dept. AA, 10955
Bristol Bay Dr. #122, Perico Island FL 34209.

MANAGE MY MOTEL while I'm gone for one month
to six week periods. Call 778-0212,


Serving the Island from the
same location since 1970.

6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-6066- 1-800-865-0800



NOW ON THE WORLD-WIDE INTERNET!!


Visit us at our web site http://www.islandreal.com

tsch For FULL COLOR PHOTOS of Island properties for SALE or RENT
petsc on the most extensive LOCAL real estate site!



SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICEI THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!


CEDAR BEACH HOUSE!!!
Close to bay & beach on the north end of Anna Maria. Lush
tropical landscaping surrounds this lovely home. Just steps to
the Rod & Reel pier. Just listed at $177,500.
Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-5287
or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 GW Drive POB717*AmrMla,.FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 cr 778-2307


101 PELICAN
Modern 2 bedroom with loft (a 3rd bedroom), 2 bath,
caged pool, 2-car garage, fireplace, canalfront home
in the city of Anna Maria. 2,016 sfla/3,286 sq. ft.
under roof. $295,000. 103 Pelican canal lot next
door is also available for $150,000 ... for the person
requiring estate proportions.

Doug Dowling Realty
778-1222


' il a 0 Z I a .0 a 0ba .0 -431a .0 a I


NEWLY LISTED FOR 1996-97 SEASON
Make your reservations today
on one of the following available
seasonal rentals!
GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA elevated, beautifully
decorated home ......................... $3,600 mo.
CHARMING 2BR/2BA recently refurbished,
lovely deck ................................. $1,900 mo.
CLOSE TO GULF 2BR/2BA refurbished,
spacious porch ........................... $1,900 mo.
GULFFRONT CONDO 2BR/2BA plus den
and pool ..................................... $2,600 mo.



S REALTY
"We ARE e I&sl nd
Saos GU Dr0Ive PO Bo 35 A r Ma Fiokd 34218
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


-----


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.,.. .~kp~


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c- --





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 E PAGE 25 ir3



HPANTEDContuSERed0E


EXPANDING DISTRIBUTION BUSINESS in Central
South America. Looking for serious individual. Bilin-
gual college degree preferred. Part time hours, full
time income potential. Call 792-7342.

COUNTER & KITCHEN help. Part time days and
weekends. Apply 700 Key Royale Dr., Holmes
Beach Golf Course.

BAGEL SHOP NEEDS energetic, pleasant "morning
person" to work Monday Saturday, 6 am to 10 am.
Good pay. Call Cindy at 778-7105 or 779-1212.

NEED LOVING, PATIENT person for part time
babysitting in my home. Call 778-5215.

Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you
interested in learning the history of Anna Maria Is-
land? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you
can give a few hours of community service.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 779-1208 or 778-6247.


QUALIFIED HOME HEALTH CARE all phases. 20
years experience, excellent references. Nights avail-
able. Call 778-2085.



JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

"THE PERFECTIONIST" Cleaning with perfection.
Offices, homes and condos. Ironing too! Call Sharon
at 778-0064.

GENERAL CLEANING & REPAIRS Apartments,
condos, homes, rentals. Weekly, monthly, hourly or
one time. Dependable Island residents. Trustworthy,
references. 779-2057.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.


ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash re-
moval, tree trimming, free estimates. Larry 778-0119.

EXPERIENCED CNA AVAILABLE for a variety of du-
ties. Cleaning, doctor appointments, shopping, private
care, errands. Call Robert for appointment. 778-5136.

REASONABLE RESPONSIBLE POOL care. It's our
business. Will handle all your pressure cleaning needs.
Please call Woodland's Quality Pool Care at 778-6742.

DOLPHIN DAY CARE & PRESCHOOL where learn-
ing is fun and educational. Places available for 2
years thru 5 years. Come by and check us out.
Phone 778-2967.

ISLAND CERTIFIED CNA 25 years experience will
care for your loved ones and more. References. Call
Paula at 779-1405.

WANTED HOUSES TO CLEAN! Weekly, biweekly.
Honest, dependable, reliable. Local resident. Call
778-1135 between 5 8 pm or leave message.

IRONING DONE sheets to shirts. Fast service. Is-
land pick-up and delivery. Smoke free environment.
References available. Phone 778-2085.

HOMES, CONDOS, RENTALS, COMMERCIAL
cleaning. Experienced professional couple with im-
peccable local references. Island resident over 4
years. Call 778-3989.

"TUTOR" ENGLISH GRAMMAR evenings and
Saturday mornings are available on Anna Maria Is-
land. Call Sharon at 778-0064.

ATTENTION BOAT/CAR owners! You tell us where
and we'll bring back a showroom shine. 778-5215.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.

CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.


ANNA MARIA GARDEN Center & Landscaping.
Free estimates, 32 years experience. Full service
landscaping and garden center. Next to Island
Foods. All work guaranteed. 778-6630.


VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentialCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

JIM TRAVIS CONSTRUCTION Remodeling, room
additions, decks, baths, kitchens, repairs. License
#RR0066842. 779-2129, Jim.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

SEAWALLS LIFTS DOCKS
License #MC00105. Fully insured. Doug Hugenberg
Marine Construction, Inc. Free estimates. Quality
work. Call Doug at 792-5685.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

CARPET, VINYL, CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed and
repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship guaran-
teed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen 383-5381
or beeper 506-3297.

R.T. (Bob) HILTON CONSTRUCTION. Residential
and commercial. Remodel and new construction.
Island and Mainland. References. CGC012191.
747-1098. (Don't say how, say Hilton).

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco,
tile. Lic. #MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183.
Dave Elliott.

I DON'T START OUT working for friends. It just ends
up that way. Complete remodeling, insured, refer-
ences. Pete Mulder Construction. 77e-1825.


Fully furnished beach cottage. 1 BR/1BA, private lot
and parking. $275 per week, includes phone and
cable. 778-2832.

STEPS TO BEACH unfurnished, 2BR/1BA, washer/
dryer. $625 mo. Call 778-1345.

ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Furnished 1BR
apartment. Private patio, pool, washer/dryer. 211
South Bay Blvd. 778-2896.


Get your oWh copy of tl< "'Ist hCUS oh Ahh, M&ri Islhd.," It's free!










For free home or business delivery on Anna Maria Island call 778-7978.
(Sorry, we can not deliver to individual condos or mobile homes.)
Out-of-town subscription form on page 7.



CityLightsadyBache, Isandreams



RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY
THE # RESIDENTIAL RESALE OFFICE IN MANATEE COUNTY!




Debbie Dial YvonneHiggins SandyGreiner Don Schroder Karen Schroder Barbara Turner
CALL ONE OF OUR ISLAND PROFESSIONALS TODAY!


SALE N ETLSSNE13
2 7 uDvN t Ba n Ba. 321
&fw 778-2246 1-800-211-2Ic 3 23


NEWLY REMODELED BAYFRONT DUPLEX
With fabulous view, spacious floor plans and
a short walk to the beach. Decor turkey fur-
nished. 2,736 sq. ft. total living area. Large
deep water dock. Offered at $389,000. Call
Dave Moynihan.


ISLAND DUPLEX
Best priced duplex on the Island. In a quiet
neighborhood & less than one block from
great beach. East side seasonal rental.
West side unfurnished annual rental. Call
Ed Oliveira. $129,900.


GULFVIEW LOT
Wooded 100 x 100 lot north of Manatee Ave.
with short walk to the beach, zoned single or
duplex. Offered at $85,000. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.



,, ,l ,- ,



DIRECT BAYFRONT
Unit with great view of the Intracoastal.
2BR/2BA with loft. Includes two porches,
covered parking and boat dock. Only one
block to the beach. Offered at $129,900.
Call Ed Oliveira for details.


^^BiiiTwf *'1 Tlaj:^ v^^ i 'i-a ^^^i ^ Bi'T,i:i
BILL ALEANDERIANDY INDAH
DAI-MYIHNDVI CE LNA YL
ED OLIVEIRA i censed Real Estate MARK REE
JERRY MART INEK Broker SUE NORMAND I





B~D PAGE 26 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy S Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE* INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
10 ;_ AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

M WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


STATE LICENSED & INSURED
CRC 035261 EXPERIENCED
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling Specialists
Building Anna Maria since 1975
(941) 778-2993
ANNA MARIA


Designed or Refaced ^
Formica or Wood




10 Years of Local References 778-7399
REX B. SLIKER


REMODELING

ADDITIONS

XACT *RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


LOCKSMITHl P.IVTWVG
Gary F. Deffenbaugh by
Licensed-Bonded-Insured Elaie0 Iffrenbaigrh
LOCKOUTS "Professional Excellence"
Auto-Home-Commercial
CKS Residential-Commercial
LOCKSv Interior & Exterior
REKEYINSTALL MASTER te r e r
SREKEY INSTALL MASTER Popcorn Ceiling Repair
New & Used Locks & Repairs
Emergency Service Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Service Islands Since 1986 Licensed and Insured
ALOA 778-5594ASIS 778-5594 778-3468
L- -------------- ----I


J. R.

Painting
4 Presre Cleauning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
* Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


[:]-]






lr'(:] [;I: :
,p .n a e. -, ]
OultySrvc


@@G9@WuoDGfl
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
c@ o tu N


GULFVIEW SENSATIONAL French country premier
home. 4BR/3BA, turret, quiet, best neighborhood.
September- December. $1,950 mo. 107 Beach Ave.
Call 778-2206 or 794-8202.

SEASONAL RENTALS Sun Plaza, Martinique, Sandy
Point, River Oaks. Call T. Dolly Young, Realtor- 778-
0766 or 778-5427. The Prudential Florida Realty.

VACATION RENTAL Adorable cottage near beach,
bay and fishing pier. Washer, dryer, 2BR/1 BA. Avail-
able weekly, monthly, Sept. Dec. 1996 and begin-
ning Apr. 1997. Call (813) 874-0973.

SUN DECK OVERLOOKING GULF and steps to
shops, fine dining, beach, fishing pier. Private,
shaded, fenced yard. Pets OK. Large 1BR/1.5BA
plus 2 sleeping areas. Week/month/year starting at
$350 wk. or $795 mo. 751-3151.

ANNUAL 3BR/2BA central heat/air, washer/dryer hook-
up, fenced yard, near beach. Pets, kids OK. Low utili-
ties. $750 mo. References, deposits. 778-7431.

BEAUTIFUL BAYFRONT 1BR/1BA unfurnished
apartment. Deck, boat dock, 1 block to beach. Also
two apartments poolside, off Island. Private, quiet.
749-0216.

FURNISHED 1 & 2BR apartments. Stones throw to
Gulf beach. Desirable Holmes Beach location.
Weekly or monthly. 778-4368.

RESERVE A LITTLE BIT of paradise for this winter.
Spacious 2BR/1 BA home. Modern kitchen, washer/
dryer, large screened porch, patio, gas grill, garage.
No pets. Also 1BR/1BA upstairs apartment steps
from beach. (813) 985-6765.

BRADENTON BEACH 2BR/2BA elevated duplex
with garage. 2 blocks to beach. Adults only, no pets.
1st, last, security $650 mo. (813) 681-6750.

TURNKEY FURNISHED 1BR condo. Bayfront,
pool, steps to beach. Available now. $550 mo. Call
778-8412.
ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH 1 block to beach.
Beautiful 2BR/2BA duplex with storage and cov-
ered parking. All appliances, washer, dryer. $775
mo. plus $1,000 security. No pets. 209E 71st
Street. 778-9689.

WEEKLY, MONTHLY, ANNUAL rentals from $550
wk. Call Island Real Estate at 778-6066.

WANTED TO RENT/LEASE with possible option
buy. My master and I (2 yr. old Springer Spaniel) are
both quiet and clean. Need furnished accommoda-
tions at or near beach for 5 months beginning Dec.
1. Nice but not luxurious. Prefer Holmes Beach.
References available. Call collect (518) 624-5381
eves. or leave message.

HIDEAWAY COVE Perfect Bayview between
bridges. 1 block to beach. Nice, quiet, dead end
street. 1st floor, 2BR, fully fumished with dock. 3 mo.
minimum. Annual for the right person/couple. Refer-
ences required. Also 2BR seasonal available. No
smoking or pets. (941) 778-7107.

BEACH APARTMENT Nice 2BR/2BA duplex apart-
ment in Holmes Beach. Steps to beach and shop-
ping. $615 mo. plus last and security includes water.
No pets. 778-1259 or 778-0405.

ANNUAL FURNISHED STUDIO, across from beach.
$480 mo. includes electricity. Apply at Pirate Pete's,
2219 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach.

SEASONAL GULFFRONT, BAYFRONT
CANALFRONT and no front vacation rentals still avail-
able. Betsy Hills Real Estate, P.A. (941) 778-2291.

ANNUAL RENTALS Privacy plus on this 2BR/2BA
canalfront home on double lot in Anna Maria City.
$1,100 mo. Elevated 2BR/2BA home in Anna Maria
City. Close to Community Center, shops and
beaches. $1,200 mo. Betsy Hills Real Estate, P.A.
(941) 778-2291.

2BR/1BA UNIT & 2BR/2BA UNIT available for
annual rentals. Call Wagner Realty at (941)
778-2246.

CASA SIERRA Relax for a great price! Our 2BR/
2BA condos have privacy plus a huge-pool, beau-
tiful gardens. Starting at $350 a week. Call (941)
778-0032.


I RE NTAL^S T^S C continue R T S C continue I


BEAUTIFUL GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA best view, 50'
to water. Top floor master suite, decks, tropical pa-
tio, unique. $3,000 mo., $1,000 wk., $350 weekend.
778-0990.

BEAUTIFUL GULFVIEW 2BR penthouse on dead
end street along Gulf. Quaint, quiet, cozy. Washer/
dryer. Dec. May $1,100 mo. plus utilities, $400 wk.
778-0990.

LARGE STUDIO in Holmes Beach. $425 mo. until
January. 778-0212.

BAYVIEW OF SUNSHINE SKYWAY with sandy
beach and pool. Extra large 2 bedroom, steps to City
Pier and restaurant. Best location in Anna Maria.
Nov., Dec. $450 wk., $1,200 mo. Discount for Sept.
17 Sept. 26 and Oct. 4 Oct. 27. Daily if available,
$45 $80 per night. 778-9188.

FLORIDA KEYS excellent neighborhood. Very
clean 2BR/2BA, mobile home on wide swimming,
boating canal. Screened patio, washer/dryer. 25
miles from Key West. (813) 968-9284.

ANNUAL ONE ROOM STUDIO steps to the beach.
$510 mo. includes all utilities plus phone and
cable. Deposit of $510 plus 1st mo. required. (813)
935-2968.

VACATION/SEASON Ocean ground floor cottage.
2BR/2BA, sleeps 6. $1,475 to $2,475 depending on
months. 778-4523 or 1 (800) 977-0803.

ROOMMATE NEEDED TO share 2 bedroom, fully
furnished home conveniently located in quiet area.
References and interview required. 779-1215, Sally.
EFFICIENCIES FROM $140 WK for one person
from $175 wk. for two. Excellent off season vaca-
tion and temporary relocation rates until Dec. 15,
1996. Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
778-5405.


OPEN HOUSE Saturday, Sept. 21, 12 3. One
day special priced at $219,000. 605 Emerald Lane,
Key Royale.

ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Pierside apartments,
4-units furnished. Large lot with pool. $449,000, by
owner (in apt. #1). 211 South Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
TRAILER 30 X 8 W/SCREENED lanai, carport, new
carpet. Pines Trailer Park, Bradenton Beach. For
information call 746-1058 or 747-7290.

NORTH BEACH VILLAGE condo for sale by owner.
Priced for quick sale. $143,000. 3BR/2BA. Call for
appointment. 778-2629.

FOR SALE BY OWNER on the Island. 2BR/2BA
home, vinyl siding, garage with paved driveway, new
roof, new central heat/air, French doors, fireplace, 2
decks, enclosed sun porch. $165,000. 778-6804.

$167,000 ISLAND BARGAIN. Home plus guest
quarters. Updated. Large corner lot with trees. Call
778-7980. Towne & Shore Realty.


ISLAND LUMBER
AN, HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12





T H E FI -I- R I N DlS
P RT I SS RETE NAS 0 LE
UNE D SUPA S S E T RES




AMIL SLONICOBERMUDAA
LII C I NCH C E
sI U A 1 AS E Ul
JADAM TTALICA C | TPE
A1 IDSM T IAL I SABPIRE

LA ;Y S 0NTHE IBA-C K T 0 0 0 E
UN IE REAMS SU I TE NIA
SAGS IPAYNE PETSI RST


Island In-Home Consultations
Fre Estimates
IDecor ,v,8
I- ySusan Complete ulterior Desig
Sr Powers 778-5181


G.R. SULLIVAN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Specialists in Hurricane Resistant
New Construction Remodeling Rennovation

25 Years Experience I.. Licensed & In
References 794-3260 Lic RR 00l


sured
17996





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 0 PAGE 27 l ,.


WESTBAY COVE 2BR/2BA condo overlooking land-
scaped pool and Tampa Bay. New kitchen, freshly
decorated, second floor end unit. $133,500. Call
(800) 484-1692-9726.
PERICO BAY CLUB villa, 2BR/2BA. Reduced to
$125,000. Call Marilyn Trevethan, Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066.
DON'T BUY A CONDO till you talk to Yvonne. My
experience and a look through my 120 page color
catalog can help you zero in on the one that fits
your lifestyle. Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max Gulfstream.
778-7777.
WALK TO SANDY Bean Point or fishing pier. 3BR/
2BA, huge garage, lovely lanai, luxury bath, metal
roof, more. $199,900. Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max
Gulfstream 778-7777.
WEST BAY POINT & MOORINGS 2BR/2BA ground
floor end unit. Sunny, renovated. Agents protected.
(416) 922-0119.
ANNA MARIA north end beach house. Panoramic
view of open waters. Priced below appraisal. Excel-
lent rental history. $359,900. Call Christine Shaw,
Island Real Estate, 778-6066 or 778-2847.
COMMERCIAL/RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE for rent
in Holmes Beach. Call Dennis for details. 778-4461.


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR SALE Prime Is-
land commercial rental property. Great rental history,
150 + frontage. Gross annual income over 45k. For
details call Richard Freeman, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR SALE Tired of
paying rent. Then own your own business with pos-
sible living quarters. Large 52 x 145 lot plus fabulous
building steps to beach. Call Richard Freeman, Is-
land Real Estate, 778-6066.
LOTS OCEAN 150 ft. away with beach front ac-
cess. $175,000. Bayview direct, 50 x 100. $79,500.
Call 778-4523 or 1 (800) 977-0803.

19 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising herein is subject to the Fair
Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or
intention to make any such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status includes children under age of
18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of children under 18. This
newspaper will not knowing accept any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this news-
paper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-
9777, for the hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


Enjoy a light-hearted look into Florida's

past and support the Anna Maria

Island Community Center!


Monies from the sale of Gib
Bergquist s 6ook Cracker s Crumbs,
goes completely to the Center's
endoUwment fund.
$19.95
plus tax.
On safe at
The Islander Bystander.


IISLANDERM A1m
THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
5404 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach 778-7978

r---------------------------------------
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADUNE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday- Friday, (Saturday
10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $7.00 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box:
$2, One- or two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business or service, the minimum rate us $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus
25o per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge -21 words.
I---------------------------------------
I

3
More information:
A(941) 778-7978 IISLA39NDE VISA i
FAX: (941) 778-9392
L -------------------------- -- J.


SN DE A A D
REAL SATE ontnu- RAL SATECotiue


LPS Qualified
Call 778-5354
Pager 506-6186


PHILLIP FRAZIER
CONSTRUCTION
* CERAMIC TILE MARBLE FLOOR & COUNTER TOPS
FORMICA LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORING
CEILING & WALL TEXTURING FINE FINISH WOOD
WORKING CABINETS SHELVING BOOKCASES
* INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING PLUS MUCH MORE
OCC. LIC. # 0713 BEEPER 941-215-1544
16 YRS. EXPERIENCE OFFICE 941-778-0273


BAY IRRIGATION
Sprinkler Systems Lawn & Garden
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
(no service charge)
INSTALLATION REPAIR
& DRIP IRRIGATION

355-0668


* Hemodeling Kitchens Baths
* Room Additions Decks
* New Home Construction
* Repairs
* License #RR0066842 Insured
S iTL,&I InM=


CALL US TODAY
FOR AN APPOINTMENT!
AMERICAN
CAR WASH
5804 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-1617
MON FRI 8AM 5PM
SAT 8AM -4PM

ISLANDER


"The best news
on Anna Maria."


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Mini Storage
* Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COLOAOL.COM

HOLMES BEACH MINI STORAGE
Vacancies Climate Controlled Storage
Facilities in variety of sizes
Now Shipping UPS
3018 AVE C Holmes Beach 778-5549

Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me to find the
BEST PROPERTIES ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
R6M1iK GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

HA IR MOTIONS
778-4055 755-8711
AROMATHERAPY
Massage Special
$38Hr. Licence#
3$ H 8H MA*0021105
5340 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach Suzanne Smith L.M.T.

Kimball
Construction
Company


STATE LIC. & INSURED
CGC 058-092






IjO PAGE 28 N SEPTEMBER 19, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SO BIG

BY ALEX K. JUSTIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Teleflora rival
4 It's
semi-attached
7 That being the
case
12 Eastern music
16 Willingly
18 Dummy
19 Remote
20 Groupies follow
them
22 OPENLY
25 Express
disapproval of
26 Kind of
grandparent
27 First name in
rock
28 Saute
29 Informs
positively
30 Start of the Sons
ofthe
Covenant's
name
31 Rice dish with
meat
32 Insult,
modern-style
33 They come
before yodhs
34 Panama Canal,
in slang
37 Ewer's adjunct
40 Exert one's
influence
42 "Some meat
and canna eat":
Burns


43 "You Are My
Destiny" singer
44 Prefix with
dollar
45 "Looking for
-" (Gershwin
hit)
46 Actress Carter
47 BARELY
52 Exemplary
53 Suffers
humiliation
54 Heckelphones
55 Japanese naval
base north of
Nagasaki
56 St. -- fire
57 Falsify, in a way
58 Words on a
Wonderland
cake
59 More lenient
61 Northerly region
of myth
63 Where Empress
Zauditu ruled
66 Mailboxes
67 SILENT FILM
CAPTION
69 They're worth
bonuses, in
cards
70 Unwanted look
71 Subject of
Ishmael's
narration
72 -- the kill
73 Certain therapy
74 Smooth talkers,
perhaps
78 Ellerbee's"-
It Goes"
79 Go over the lines
81 "... my dainty
!I shall miss
thee": Prospero


82 Ahead: Abbr.
83 --time
(eventually)
84 Aries articles
85 "Bad air," literally
89 Housekeeping
91 Oscar winner of
1961
93 Press agents?
94 a dozen
95 STEERS CLEAR
OF
97 Worrying sort
98 Whitebait
99 Baseball's
Ashby
100 Point of
(British
lighthouse site)
101 "Alice" diner
102 Body of art?
103 Detail of
pointillism
104 Urgent message
DOWN
1 coin (decide
by chance)
2 Actress Yothers
et al.
3 They can be bad
4 Conclusions
5 Extra: Abbr.
6 Tight wrapper?
7 Braided breads:
Var.
8 Not a democrat
9 Canceled
10 Columbia
Pictures
co-founder
Harry
11 Lizard, old-style
12 Vulgarians
13 Another name
for God


14 FLIP OUT
15 Banned
plant-growth
retardant
17 Revealing
comments
18 Vitus Bering and
others
21 Farm home
23 Sen. Hatch
24 Movie based on
an Isaac
Bashevis Singer
story
28 Kind of back or
bank
30 At the base of
31 Attribute to
33 "Presumed
Innocent"
author
34 Netanyahu and
others
35 Godwin's "The
Adventures of
-Williams"
36 Aloha
37 Unsophisticate
38 "The Cherry
Orchard" girl
39 DEFIES
DANGER
40 Cigars
41 Latest thing
44 Screwup
46 Certain
designated
section
48 Apices
49 Finish, finally
50 Have-
(revel)
51 Copland ballet
52 Suffix in camera
names
55 Indian master


58 Actor Hawke of
"Alive"
59 Trimmer
60 Stand
61 Faulkner's "
Thirteen"
62 Daughter of
Cronus
63 One of the
Barrymores
64 Poet Coolbrith et
al.


65 Apropos of
67 Pointed
68 Breaks, in a way
70 Lash, the
cowboy
74 Freeloaders
75 Acclaim
76 Auto maker
Maserati
77 Tuscany
province


78 Wing it
80 Canine cover
82 Fraught
85 No longer
speaking to
86 Calhoun and
others
87 Speaker's
need
88 Remains to be
seen?


89 Driver's aid
90 What's wrapped
up in the whole
ball of wax?
91 Prom night
rental
92 Fini
93 Storehouse
95 Astron. clock
setting
96 Pile


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


Want to keep in touch? Subscribe to the "best news!" (all 941 778-7978 and charge it to Visa or MasterCard.


'.' _a' .' ., I

C'
*':' . ,._ .' i '- *' .....; ** -' --- l**.?? i1 -: '* .... '. ', '


fe .. . ...^ ~ .. : :


*'-" .. -- ..- .- . .-
,. _. .:- .' ;,. .: .
i:- ,I -.t . 7 .. . '


ELEGANT WATERFRONT RESIDENCE
$780,000 4BR/2.5BA, huge recreation area &
6 car garages. 3 year old home with many ex-
tras. Lowest price home on fine home street.
Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261.


KEY ROYALE REDUCED $215,000
Well maintained and decorated canalfront home
on prestigious Key Royale. Private dock and
only minutes away from Tampa Bay. Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791.


' i i'-

. . . -- A-,..,.,,





... : .. . ..... . -. . ^ ...^ .. : .-:


ANNA MARIA ISLAND $199,000 3BR/2BA
waterfront home in Anna Maria City, on cul-de-
sac in nice residential area. Boat dock and wa-
terfront deck, lush water view. Call Helen White
'778-6956.


LUXURY GULFVIEW TOWNHOME
$229,000 A tennis player's delight. 10 Har-Tru
tennis courts. 2BR, turnkey furnished. New tile.
Beautiful and ready for occupancy. Call Rose
Schnoerr 778-2261.


u TI
aH^ "'c


I ----
KEY ROYALE $215,000 Well maintained
and decorated canalfront home on prestigious
Key Royale. Private dock and only minutes away
from Tampa Bay. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones
778-6791.


A_,




OVERLOOKS INTRA-COASTAL $144,900
This 2BR/2.5BA has security entry, elevator,
pool, garage parking, Jacuzzi, boat dock & pri-
vate beach on Gulf. Call Bill Bowman 778-4619.


PREMIER NORTH POINT HOME
$595,000 4BR/5BA with office, den, family
room, formal dining room, vast storage, 2-car
garage, built for elevator. Dock w/electric &
water on deep canal. Call Dick Maher or Dave
Jones 778-2261 or 778-6791.
M ---


RIVERFRONT $222,000 100 feet of the
Manatee River at your back door set back for
privacy. This 3BR/2BA is a country hide-a-way
convenient to schools & shopping. Call Lu
Rhoden 778-2692.


SPACIOUS HOME LARGE LOT $114,500
2,560 sq. ft. 3BR/3BA 27X18 family room with
fireplace, 21X15 utility room, 23X13 living room,
large bedrooms, 2 car garage. In neat condition.
Call Paul Martin 794-0049.


COZY WATERFRONT $159,900 2BR/2BA
with fireplace. 2 car garage, caged pool, like
new inside and out. Located in beautiful Coral
Shores East. Call Harold Small 792-8628.


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