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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00627

Full Text



FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Common Island speed limits proposed


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
An Island-wide speed limit would benefit tourists
and residents, said Island elected officials last week.
The subject first came up in a Holmes Beach Coun-
cil meeting several weeks ago when Councilman'Don
Maloney suggested an Island-wide speed limit to reduce
confusion. Speed limits of 25 and 30 mph were suggested.
In a memo to council, Police Chief Jay Romine


noted that although a 25 mph speed limit works for the
City of Anna Maria, it would not work in Holmes
Beach. He said four times the number of vehicles pass
through the city on a daily basis than through Anna
Maria. Holmes Beach is the hub of activity for the Is-
land and it is the main thoroughfare for the majority of
people coming onto or leaving the Island.
"There are so many speed limit changes that it is
confusing to people," Holmes Beach Councilman Don


Wild in Lakeland
JeffJohnson of Lakeland captured the final week's top prize in the Kodak International Snapshot Awards
sponsored by The Islander Bystander. Johnson made special note of "wild" in his title "Wild alligator in
Lakeland" on his KINSA contest entry. He'll collect a prize from Kodak, a "mullet" T-shirt and award
certificate from the newspaper and a $50 gift certificate from the Sandbar restaurant. The six weekly winners
featured in The Islander's locally sponsored contest since June 20 now go on to international judging with
the the top winners collecting $52,500 in October from Kodak. Watch for next week's KINSA wrap-up
featuring our judge's picks for runners-up.


Island hurricane evacuation:


biggest player is you


By Paul Roat
There's three things you need to remember if a hur-
ricane threatens Anna Maria Island:
Leave early.
Leave early.
Leave early.
That was the advice from Manatee County Emer-
gency Management Division Chief Karen Windon Mon-
day during the Island Mayors' Hurricane Conference.
About 100 people heard hurricane tips, advice and warn-
ings of "the season" that anyone living in a coastal com-
munity has come to dread.
Windon was one of a half-dozen speakers in the
short, informative session extolling what to do and
what not to do if a storm threatens the area. Although
much of her advice involved basic common sense, the
audience's head-nodding seemed to indicate that her
suggestions were well taken.
All of the Island is flood-prone, Windon explained,
which means that a mandatory evacuation will be issued
if a hurricane track indicates landfall in the area. She
advised Islanders to make plans now as to where they
will go to weather the weather, and evacuation shelters
are not necessarily the best option.
"The idea of spending three or four days in a room
with 500 people with limited facilities is not my idea of
a good time," she said. With shelters able to accommo-


date 26,000 people, and with 143,000 people living in
flood zones in Manatee County, shelter space obviously
is not the best destination for all.
"Hey, you live on a beautiful island," Windon said.
"Don't you know people on the mainland who would
love to come and visit you for a weekend? Invite 'em out
now, buy them dinner, show them a good time. Then,
when the storm comes, they already will owe you. How
can they turn you down?"
She advised making a hurricane plan now, includ-
ing stocking up on food, water, batteries, medicines and
other supplies you'll need for several days away from
home. Construction material to secure your home should
also be purchased and fitted now to avoid last-minute
rushes.
Windon also advised taking an inventory of your
home and possessions to facilitate insurance settlements
if disaster strikes.
Dan Sobien, a meteorologist with the National
Weather Service in Ruskin, said 1996 should be "aver-
age" as far as the number of Atlantic hurricanes. Com-
puter analysis indicates there will be 9.3 named storms
this year, 5.7 of them becoming hurricanes and 2.1 of
them being intense. "Obviously, the odds aren't that
great," Sobien said, "but the ferocity is great with the
PLEASE SEE HURRICANE, NEXT PAGE


Maloney told officials at the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials. "But I doubt if Anna Maria would go
up or Holmes Beach would go down."
A uniform speed limit would be advantageous to
tourists who "don't understand there are three cities,"
Bradenton Beach Vice Mayor Connie Drescher said.
"They see it as one road on the Island."
The group agreed to discuss the issue further at a
future meeting.


Holmes Beach

to enhance,

add crosswalks
Holmes Beach plans to enhance its existing
crosswalks and add several new ones, announced
Councilman Don Maloney recently.
Maloney and Police Chief Jay Romine identi-
fied the following areas for new crosswalks:
82nd Street at Gulf and Palm Drives.
Between 71st and 72nd Streets at Marina
Drive.
66th Street and Gulf Drive.
Across 66th Street to Marina Drive.
Between 45th and 46th Streets at Gulf Drive.
Gulf Drive at Manatee Public Beach.
28th Street and Gulf Drive.
Existing crosswalks at 66th Street and Marina
Drive, across from the post office on Gulf Drive at
Holmes Boulevard, Marina Drive at the Island
Shopping Center and the elementary school will be
repainted.
"They will be painted according to the state
statute and marked with approved federal highway
signs," Romine said. "If a pedestrian steps into the
crosswalk, the driver must stop. The pedestrian has
the right of way."
This will be backed up with a $69.50 fine for
violators, Mayor Bob VanWagoner stressed.
Anna Maria has no plans for increasing the
number of crosswalks in the city, Public Works
Supervisor Phil Charnock said. Currently there are
crosswalks at the intersection of Pine Avenue and
Bay Boulevard, Pine Avenue at the intersection
with Gulf Drive, and Gulf Drive at the post office
plaza, Islanders' Market and the Island Baptist
Church.
"Drivers need to exercise more common cour-
tesy and stop for pedestrians," Charnock said.
"If they're in the crosswalk, the cars have to
stop," said Sgt. Jim Tillner of the Manatee County
Sheriffs Office.
The lone crosswalk in Bradenton Beach is at the
roundabout at the intersection of Gulf Drive and
Bridge Street. There are no plans for others, because
there are no other problem areas, Police Chief Jack
Maloney said.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions .................................................. 6
Those Were the Days .................................. 7
Obituaries......................................... ............ 12
Stir-it-up ............................................ ........... 10
Crossword puzzle ..................................... 15
Stir-it-up ............................................ ..... 16
Cracker's Crumbs .................................... 18
Streetlife ......................................... ..... 19
Anna Maria tides ...................................... 20
Real estate ......................................... ..... 22
Business........................................... ..... 23


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


JULY 25, 1996







[I PAGE 2 0 JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Holmes Beach council protests trailer buy


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The protests came quickly when Holmes Beach
Mayor Bob VanWagoner asked to purchase a personal
watercraft trailer last week.
At a previous meeting, the council agreed to ap-
ply for a personal watercraft from Yamaha Corp. at
no charge to the city. Yamaha has offered personal
watercraft to law enforcement agencies and commu-
nities to help curb reckless users. However, the
council also asked for a written policy from the po-
lice chief on its use.
"Before I can vote on a purchase, I'd like to see a
memo from the chief on why, when and how this is
going to be used," Councilman Ron Robinson replied


when VanWagoner asked for a motion to spend $365
on the trailer.
VanWagoner said the craft will be used in conjunc-
tion with the police boat to patrol the city's waterways
as needed.
"We want a more formal presentation," Council-
woman Carol Whitmore said.
"You're putting the trailer before the boat," Coun-
cilwoman Billie Martini protested. "Wait until we get
the boat to buy the trailer."
Martini added, "The next thing he'll want is a he-
licopter."
The craft could arrive within 60 days, which would
put the city "in a rather embarrassing situation,"
VanWagoner said. "I'll instruct the chief to put a hold


on the application. I can't let him be hung out there in
case you decide you don't want it."
"At the last meeting we had a consensus to apply
for the craft," Councilman Luke Courtney explained.
"We were under the impression we were to get more
information on its usage. No information was given
except the request for a trailer tonight"
"What the hell do you think he's going to do with
the craft?" Councilman Don Maloney said with exas-
peration. "It's up to the chief to run the department sat-
isfactorily. Why are we trying to micro manage it all of
a sudden?"
Council voted to proceed with the application for
the craft and purchase the trailer after the application
is approved.


Anna Maria gets

two bridges on

state repair

replacement list
ByPaul Roat -..
Two bridges in Anna Maria have made it to a '"-""
Florida Department of Transportation list for repair.
That's the good news. r
The bad news is that funding for project on the '
special "off-system bridge program" is "very, very \
scarce," according to a DOT spokesman.
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard made his ..
pitch for state funding to repair the humpback .. .
bridges at North Bay Blvd. and Crescent Avenue .-
Monday during the Sarasota-Manatee Metropolitan
Planning Organization. The two bridges are "in dire. .-
need of repair," Shumard said, with annual bridge V -, .
surveys indicating the bridges need to be fixed al- .
most immediately.
Shumard requested, and the regional transportation Leaving a mark on the Island
planners unanimously agreed, to place the bridges on Margaret Falbo and family of Smithers, W. Va, left us these memories of their June/July vacation on the Island Pat
a list of projects categorized as being off the state road- Falbo waspart of the "builders three," with brothers Tony and Greg, in the creation of this face from a five-foot
way system but still important for transportation or mound of sand They swore he bore no family resemblance. Islander Photos: Courtesy of Margaret Falbo.
evacuation needs.
But Norm Feder, with DOTs Ft. Myers office, Mayor Arold doing better
said off-system bridge priorities are hard to fund with
all the other needs for state roads and bridges in the Bradenton Beach Mayor Leroy Arnold is in im- Arnold, 66, complained of lower back pain
area. proving condition after being hospitalized July 13 last week. He and his wife, Millie, drove to the
"Getting on the list does not mean the projects will for an enlarged artery. hospital, where doctors discovered an artery car-
be funded," Feder said. He was taken off a ventilation machine Monday trying blood from the heart to Arnold's legs was
One other bridge is ahead of the two Anna Maria and moved out of intensive care at Columbia-Blake twice normal size.
projects the Key Royale Bridge in Holmes Beach, Medical Center. Arnold is expected to be released Surgeons performed emergency surgery that
in need of replacement for several years. from the hospital by the weekend. evening.


Early departure only assurance of safety in hurricanes


CONTINUED FROMPAGE 1

storms we'll have."
Sobien said the greatest threat Islanders face in a hur-
ricane is the storm surge, a dome of water that advances
ahead of the hurricane and, coupled with high waves,
could easily inundate Anna Maria Island in a strong storm.
Looking back in history, Sobien said a hurricane in
October 1921 produced a storm surge 10 1/2 feet high
in Tampa. Another severe storm in September 1848
produced a 15-foot storm surge at Fort Brook in
Hillsborough County.
"Down here, a 15-foot storm surge would be cata-
strophic," Sobien predicted.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Jack Maloney said
Islanders are well served by the Island Emergency
Operations Center when it comes to planning, coordi-
nation and streamlining of action during emergencies.
"With the IEOC at the fire station in Holmes
Beach, all of the decision makers are in one place, get-
ting the same information and reaching a decision that
can be implemented together," Maloney said.
One of the important aspects of the IEOC is help-
ing people with special needs, he said, those with
physical handicaps that would hamper them if the need
to evacuate the Island became a necessity. A list of
special-needs residents is kept on file, updated annu-
ally, and assistance to get them safely off the Island
during an emergency is provided.
Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine stressed that
early evacuation is critical. "If a voluntary evacuation is


ordered, get your stuff together and leave," he advised,
adding that if a mandatory evacuation is issued it is a sec-
ond degree misdemeanor not to heed the order.
Once the storm passes, don't expect to be able to
immediately return to your homes, Romine said. There
are six levels of re-entry, and four steps must be com-
pleted before residents can return to the Island.
First, Romine said, comes search and rescue for
those who did not heed the evacuation order and re-
mained on the Island. Second comes damage assess-
ment teams to determine the extent of damage. Third
are clean-up teams to make the Island safe for residents
as they secure downed power lines and clear streets of
debris. Next to come to the Island are essential provid-
ers to open food stores, lumber yards and provide other
services that will be needed for residents. Finally, once
everything is safe, "priority-class parties" with identi-
fication proving they are residents will be permitted to
assess damage to their properties. The final stage of re-
entry provides complete accessibility to all.
"Remember this," Romine told the audience. "If
you think it's time to go, it is. If people tell you it's time
to go, it definitely is. If there's no one around to tell you
to leave, it's too late. The only way to evacuate the Is-
land efficiently is to evacuate early."
U.S. Coast Guard Chief Glen Wade said Station
Cortez has a responsibility to notify boaters of any
approaching hurricane as well as controlling the bridge
openings to facilitate evacuation.
"Our current directive is to lock the bridge down
when winds reach 39 mph," Wade said, "so boaters


need to secure their boats ahead of time.
He was involved in the clean-up efforts south of
Miami after Hurricane Andrew in 1993 and learned
first hand the damage a hurricane can do. "We saw a
170-foot vessel three miles inland, pushed there by the
storm surge," he said.
Anna Maria Island Power Squadron Lt. Com. Bob
Jorgenson echoed Wade's comments about securing
boats well in advance of a hurricane. "It's not just for
the boat's safety, but for the safety of the neighbors,
too," he said, explaining that boats can become missiles
during strong wind and high waves.
If you have a boat that can be trailered, take it well
inland, Jorgenson said. If you don't want to take your
boat off the Island, put it in your garage. If you are
going to keep it in the water, add extra lines and allow
for a storm surge "make it look like a spider web"
was how he described the tie-off network of lines for
boat hurricane protection.
And make sure you have adequate boat insurance,
Jorgenson added.
Holmes Beach Councilman Don Maloney, who
coordinated the Mayors' Hurricane Conference, said
Monday's seminar was not the end of the hurricane
planning process. Meetings will be set up in the com-
ing weeks with service, civic and business groups on
the Island to continue to disseminate information about
evacuation procedures with a goal of creating a net-
work of information throughout the Island.
As Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner said,
"the biggest player in any evacuation is you."






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JULY 25, 1996 a PAGE 3 Ii


Holmes Beach fence ordinance veto stands


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Three Holmes Beach council members unsuccess-
fully tried to overturn the mayor's veto of an ordinance
allowing six-foot fences on properties that border on
more than one street.
Four votes are required to overturn a veto. Coun-
cil members Carol Whitmore, Don Maloney and Luke
Courtney voted to over turn the veto; however, Coun-
cil members Billie Martini and Ron Robinson dis-
agreed.
In his veto, the mayor cited the planning
commission's conclusions against the ordinance and
said the council did not give careful review of the
points raised (see related article). He said he was also
concerned about the request being triggered by one
property owner and believed that more than the 16
properties cited by the public works supervisor could
be affected.


The Holmes Beach Planning Commission issued
the following conclusions concerning the proposed
fence ordinance:
Amending the land development code at the re-
quest of an individual is unacceptable policy.
The ordinance would affect not just one owner
but dozens of properties throughout the city.
Commissioners did not identify one legitimate
health and safety reason for constructing six-foot

City may limit garage
The Holmes Beach City Council will consider add-
ing the definition of garage sale to proposed changes
in its sign ordinance.
The definition is an attempt to curb residents who
hold weekly garage sales, which council considers con-
ducting a business.
In the proposed definition a garage sale is "the


"I am concerned, too, that the impact even if
only on 16 properties spells a change in the visual
openness of the city's residential (and even commer-
cial) neighborhoods, and leads us to suburban trends
toward walled or 'gated' neighborhoods," he wrote.
"This is completely contrary to the appearance the
city has developed over decades and is trying to pre-
serve in its comprehensive plan and in the ordinance in
question."
He suggested the property owner seek a variance
from the board of adjustment.
"I did not realize the planning commission sets
policy," Maloney pointed out. "The fact that any indi-
vidual cannot request a change in the land development
code is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. Most things
come from individuals."
Maloney also cited a letter from the city attorney
in which she said the city could be liable if the ordi-
nance is not adopted because certain property owners


fences.
Commissioners felt six-foot fences may be haz-
ardous, especially during floods or hurricanes.
Changing the definition of a front, side or rear
yard could have the unintended consequence of affect-
ing setbacks.
A proliferation of six-foot fences would create
negative visual impact and adversely affect the residen-
tial/family character of Holmes Beach.

sales to three per year
exchange of consideration for various items of previ-
ously owned personal property by a resident or group
of residents during the hours of 7 am. and 6 p.m. for
no more than three consecutive days held in a residen-
tial zoning district no more than three times per calen-
dar year will be considered conducting a business."
Discussion is set for July 23 at 9 am.


would be denied the right to build six-foot fences, a
right enjoyed by most other property owners.
On the mayor's concern about visual openness,
Maloney said he looks forward to removal of the 35
documented, illegal six-foot fences in the city.
"I'm so upset about this," Whitmore said. "I feel
this is another example that the mayor represents a cho-
sen few and that he's not open minded. This doesn't
affect the whole city. It's only 16 properties."
Martini said the fence would be dangerous because
it would obstruct drivers' visibility.
"You are being unfair," Whitmore replied. "That's
a subjective opinion, not an objective reason."
"The city building department would not allow
them to construct a six-foot fence that would obstruct
visibility," said Courtney.
The council proceeded with the ordinance because
it was told the request does not meet the criteria for a
variance, he added.



Anna Maria City
None scheduled

Bradenton Beach
7/24, 9 a.m., Appeals Board Hearing
(An incorrect time was listed last week)
7/25, 7 p.m., Special meeting on role of council
in emergency events
7/29, 7 p.m., Board of Adjustment, tentative
7/30, 7 p.m., Dock Study Committee
8/1, 7 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board public
hearing on land development code changes

Holmes Beach
7/25, 9 am., Planning Commission
8/1, 9 am., Planning Commission

Of Interest
7/24, 8:30 am., Special meeting regarding
adoption of state retirement plan, Anna Maria
Fire District, Station 1, 6001 Marina Dr.


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... and planning commission

conclusions on fence ordinance


m






I' PAGE 4 a JULY 25, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Hatching season begins lights out!


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"The big news," reports Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch coordinator John De Fazio, "is that our first two
nests have hatched."
The Gulffront nests one at the end of Park Av-
enue and one off North Shore Drive near Bean Point,
both in Anna Maria yielded the Island's first 1996
tiny sea turtle hatchlings during the night of July 18.
De Fazio and Turtle Watch Director Suzi Fox got
a call about the hatching on Park just after sunset and
arrived in time to view the last of the inch-long babies
scamper to the sea.
There were no lights in that shore area that might
disorient the hatchlings confusing them into a
rush in the wrong direction so all went well, says
De Fazio.
Sand indentations at the nest near Bean Point in-
dicated some possible hatching activity the same
night. By the time De Fazio returned to the nest early
on the 19th, all that remained were the small tracks
in the sand leading to the Gulf. There were no signs
of any problems.
Three days later a check of the nest remains indi-
cated 120 hatched eggs in the first nest with 10 un-
hatched eggs and 125 hatched, 13 unhatched, in the
second nest, for a 90 percent hatch rate.
The two nests were also the first ones recorded this
season. They were laid May 11 and 12 for incubation
periods of 68 and 67 days. That is slightly longer than
average due to cooler temperatures from summer rains
several weeks ago.
With the total number of nest climbing near 175,
De Fazio says this is already the second best nesting
season the local Turtle Watch has recorded. Last year's
nests numbered 214.
He and Fox are extremely enthusiastic about how
the season is going, especially considering its shaky
administrative start.
In late February, the Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection refused to renew the marine turtle
permit in the name of former Turtle Watch Director
Chuck Shumard, mayor of Anna Maria City.
Among other problems, the DEP said Shumard's
practice of relocating nests to hatcheries protected
turtle "condominiums" was no longer in compliance
with current DEP guidelines.
Fox, a four-year Turtle Watch volunteer, and De
Fazio, an eight-year volunteer, stepped forward as the
new principal permit holders for the Island group. They
are backed by a corps of about 60 other volunteers and
say they remain on good terms with Shumard.
So far this year only a few nests that were endan-
gered by the Gulf have been moved. They were relo-
cated further back on the beach where they were laid.
De Fazio says he knows of only one nest that was de-
stroyed by raccoons.
Gone with the hatcheries are the giant release
events of previous years, when sometimes hundreds of
people would gather as volunteers carried the
hatchlings in coolers down to the shore.

Are your lights in compliance?
Some assisted release will be necessary, says Fox,




These restraining
cages will soon
appear on mid-
Island nests whose 7 .
hatchlings are in
danger of being
disoriented by i .
artificial light.
Turtle Watchers
ask: "Please do not f'
disturb." .


Volunteer John De Fazio searches the sea oats of Bayfront Park for a possible nest. This one turned out to be


a false crawl. Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.
from 70th Street in Holmes Beach south to Bridge
Street in Bradenton Beach, where artificial lighting
remains a problem.
She says everyone that has been contacted person-
ally regarding the "lights out" policy has complied, but
around 75 percent of the lights in that section still do
not meet local ordinances written to protect the turtles.
She and De Fazio specifically thanked the Via
Roma resort for its effort of putting its outside lights on
timers.
Generally, outside lighting should be off between
the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. or should be shielded
or screened in such a way as to not project a beam of
light directly onto the beach area. Window treatment to
darken windows facing the Gulf is required so that in-
terior lights do not illuminate the beach.
Anyone who would like assistance in bringing their
lights into compliance with city laws is asked to con-
tact Fox at 778-5638 or De Fazio at 778-0056.
In order to protect nests in heavily lighted areas,
Dan Wells of Cortez has constructed restraining
cages. They will soon start to appear over nests
where Turtle Watch volunteers think there may be a
danger to hatchlings. Fox says there are currently
about 40 nests that will require alternating use of the
cages.
The cages will restrain the small hatchlings from
heading toward the lights and away from the water.
Doors on top will enable permitted volunteers to reach
inside to retrieve the hatchlings.
Fox says they can put the hatchlings in a bucket


and take them to a dark spot on the beach or they can
use a hand-held black shield to escort the turtles down
to the water.
Beach users are encouraged to stay away from all
caged and staked nests.
Every case of disorientation will be documented to
the DEP so the agency is aware that lighting is a prob-
lem and where the problem areas are located.
Volunteers will be closely watching the caged
nests checking them twice each night at 11 p.m. and
4 a.m. to ensure that assistance is on hand when
needed.
"Yes, it's very time consuming," says Fox, com-
pared to monitoring nests held in one or two hatchery
sites as was done in the past "But John and I knew that
when we took this on."
Nest success evaluations determining numbers
of eggs and/or hatchlings will also be done differ-
ently this year.
"We'll be evaluating about every 10th nest for an
average," says Fox. "That's all that's required of us.
We won't have the hard-core numbers like they got
with the hatcheries."
Each nest generally holds about 110 eggs. When
nests were relocated to hatcheries an exact egg count
was taken.
Nests may be evaluated either 70 days after the
eggs were deposited or 72 hours after the first emer-
gence of a hatchling, whichever occurs first In the case
of cooler temperatures, which delay hatching like this
year, the nest remains untouched for 80 days.
If the nest hasn't hatched at the 70- or 80-day mark,
says Fox, a small hole is dug in the nest "If we see any
activity, we stop immediately and wait for the nest to
take its natural course."
-Hatched nests can be evaluated after 72 hours by
counting the number of broken shells remaining.
"We're all doing well adjusting to the new ways
this season," says De Fazio. "Everyone sees that things
are going OK."
He says he's enjoying his increased involvement,
remembering that volunteering with Turtle Watch was
the second thing he did when he moved to the Island
years ago after he got his library card.
"It's not the cash," he jokes. "I love seeing nature
at work."
Fox says volunteers are still coming forward and
"we're already organizing for next year."
She laughs at her own enthusiasm over the newly
built cages and then points again to the increasing num-
ber of nests this year and last.
"I'm hoping it means that the turtles are making a
comeback," she says. "We must be seeing some return
on the 15 years of effort by so many people out here.
In the end, that's what this is all about."









Cortezians debate

enterprise zone

concept for village
By Paul Roat
The notes on the wall pretty much sum it all up.
Under the hand-lettered sign that states "What We
Want" is a score or so of carefully lettered descriptions
of what residents of the village of Cortez hope for.
Self determination. Environment for existing busi-
nesses. Right to fish. Access to water. Money to restore
buildings. Meeting hall. Profitable fish houses.
The notes under the "What We Don't Want" are
fewer but perhaps more telling.
More regulations and review. Government-man-
dated costs. Multi-family housing. Tourist shops. Busi-
ness chains. Large stores and businesses. Heavy auto-
mobile traffic. Government interference.
Those problems, and the associated solutions, are
being weighed in the village these days as residents
wrestle with the question of establishing an "enterprise
zone" somewhere within the area as a crutch after the
disastrous passage of a constitutional amendment ban-
ning inshore gillnet fishing a ban that has put thou-
sands of commercial fishers out of work statewide.
Enterprise zones allow low-income government-
subsidized loans to businesses within the zone's bound-
aries. Coupled with the national historic designation for
the village, community leaders hope to maintain some
semblance of a fisher lifestyle in the area.
But the clock is ticking for Cortezians. Application
for the enterprise zone must be made by the Manatee
County Commission by Aug. 15. A group of 60 or so
residents of the village met last week to discuss the
merits of zone, what the area's boundaries should be
and the resulting benefits the zone would incur for
them.
There were more questions than answers. For in-
stance, Karen Bell of Star Fish Co. asked if every fisher
in the village could not take advantage of the zone's
low-interest loans. "Each fisherman is his own busi-
ness," she said. "Couldn't everyone get some breaks if
we had an enterprise zone here?"
Meeting moderator Allen Garner, who had just
received the Florida statutes which could permit Cortez
to participate in the enterprise zone concept that day,
said he didn't know.
Thanks in part to efforts by Florida Sen. John
McKay who ironically was an advocate of the net
ban the Florida Legislature hammered through an
exception that would allow Cortez to establish the low-
interest loan area. Enterprise zones were previously
designated for larger areas or cities, not relatively small
areas like Cortez. Enterprise zones have been estab-
lished for Palmetto, Bradenton and Jacksonville,
among other areas of Florida.
Another question involved the membership of the
board that would oversee the zone. The board is to
consist of between eight and 13 members, with repre-
sentation from chamber of commerce, business, law
enforcement, not-for-profit organizations and code
enforcement representatives as well as residents. The
board would be appointed by the county commission,
an appointment that some villagers questioned, appar-
ently fearful that people with less-than-good-intentions
would be charged with determining the village's eco-
nomic fate.
Much of last week's meeting was devoted to the
boundaries of the enterprise zone. Wyman Coarsey,
postmaster in Cortez before his retirement, was a strong
advocate of a very limited area encompassing the zone.
He pointed out that if the entire peninsula of Cortez
were to be included, condominium owners along Anna
Maria Sound would outnumber the residents of Cortez
proper and could push through things not in the best
interest of the fishers.
Coarsey's comments drew nods and mutterings of
agreement among the villagers.


Island elected officials
to hold night meeting
At the request of elected officials who work
in the daytime, the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials will hold one night meeting per
quarter. The next meeting will be held at 7 p.m.
August 21 in Anna Maria City Hall.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JULY 25, 1996 U PAGE 5 1iB


Cortez trailer park sale up in air


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Everything about the Cortez Trailer Park sale is
up in the air any sale, official clearance of its oil
spill cleanup, lawsuits, any glimmer of the future.
The "For Sale" sign that decorated the front of
the facility is down. The sale that all concerned
thought they had is off and the park's owner is "not
considering selling at this time. I can't."
Harry (Butch) Howey had it sold and the park's
homeowners' association had it bought and the bank
had it financed, all but the closing.
Then someone struck oil. More precisely, die-
sel fuel.
As Howey recounted it, the buyer hired
Ardaman & Associates Environmental Services of
Sarasota to make required pre-sale soil tests. On
March 12 fuel showed up in the sandy soil where a
worker had been hand-drilling for samples a few
days earlier.
Ardaman called in an emergency response team
which worked for 12 days, Howey said, and "I had
to hire another one to finish it up."
Federal, state and county governments got in-
volved and "it all went down the tubes," said
Howey.
The homeowners association had to pull back,
for, as President Dick Berry put it, "a bank isn't
anxious to make aloan on property with this kind of
a situation pending."


He had a bank's commitment to back the
association's $2,075,000 offer for the park, he said.
The near-60-year-old park, at Cortez Road and
125th Street, has 79 mobile homes, a house, three
cottages and some RV sites.
Howey said he had to abandon any hope for a
sale, indeed, any thought of making plans for the
park, until the oil spill matter is finalized.
An Ardaman spokesman said early on that his
company refused to accept responsibility for the
spill, blaming an old fuel tank there, and the firm
since has declined comment.
So Howey has financed the efforts required by
the various governments. "Everyone ran for cover,"
he said. "I was stuck."
He hired an environmental specialist. He has
filed the required "contamination assessment re-
port" with the state, which is supposed to finish its
review within 60 says "but everybody is behind."
Even after that hurdle, "it's ongoing. There
have to be three monitoring wells at the spill and
every test has to be done by a state-certified labo-
ratory. It's all expensive."
He said he hopes he doesn't have to sue anybody:
"You know how that works, how expensive it is."
He wouldn't be surprised if resolution of the
whole matter takes a couple of years, he said.
Meanwhile, "I'll just run the trailer park, see
what comes down the road. The buck stops with the
property owner. It's the hand I've been dealt."


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[IM PAGE 6 0 JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


9I


Wrestling with the future
Cortezians are wrestling with whether they should
take advantage of a newly created state law to allow low-
interest government loans for businesses in their village.
Called an "enterprise zone," the area, if approved,
is designed to boost business. If there is an area in the
state that needs help in the wake of the near-shore gill
net ban, it has to be Cortez.
The ban had disastrous results for the majority of
the workforce in Cortez fishermen.
There are still lots of questions that need to be an-
swered before the village embraces the enterprise zone
concept. What will the boundaries of the zone be? Who
will serve on the governing board for the area? Are
low-interest loans only applicable to currently operat-
ing businesses, or can residents former fishermen
now use the funds for home and other repairs?
Will the establishment of the zone meet the needs
of Cortez residents who are trying to find a new way
of life now that their fishing livelihood has been leg-
islated away from them?
Even with all the questions, the zone appears to be
a start toward a new way of life for some Cortezians.
Grasping for options and new direction, the villag-
ers should enter the zone with optimism and the
hope that responsible parties will avail themselves of
all the opportunities.
Let the games begin ...
Not the Olympics. Local political hopefuls entered
the starting blocks last week for fall elections.
Some current office holders got a bye, lacking op-
ponents, while other key races have only Republican
nominees to face off in primaries in September.
We will choose a state representative on the full
ballot in November but our choice in the primary no
longer includes Julie McClure. She opted out of a race
for the Florida House of Representatives in District 68,
which includes the Island, when she was diagnosed
with breast cancer.
Julie looks and sounds as if she's dealing with can-
cer in a positive way and she's keeping up her business
in estate sales but she'll be missed on the ballot.
And as far as elections go, we'll follow up the presi-
dential showdown on Anna Maria Island with the Decem-
ber Bradenton Beach council election followed by Anna
Maria in February, Holmes Beach in March.
It would seem to be never-ending like the hype
associated with the Olympics. The games (and elec-
tions) come and go but with constant repitition, they
stay on your mind like that song at Disneyworld ...
"It's a small, small world."
Putting aside all things political, we wish a speedy
recovery from surgery to Bradenton Beach Mayor
Leroy Arnold.


JULY 25, 1996 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 36
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Andrew White
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free; Quantities of five or more 250 each
0 1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


Beach litter boost for
Island exercisers
Recent reports indicate that a treadmill is the most
effective home exercise machine. Of course, we don't
need that on Anna Maria Island. Here, we can go out
and stride along our wonderfully scenic beaches.
During these walks it is a good idea to stop once in
a while and stretch your back and thigh muscles. Bend
from the waist and touch your toes or the ground. Hey,
while you're down there, why not pick up a bit of trash?
If you plan to pick up trash, you'll find it conve-
nient to have a plastic bag available. These bags
squeeze easily into your pocket or waistband and can
be dropped or emptied into trash barrels. On an aver-
age day of trash collecting, you would be able to get in
about 50 touch-toes equivalents a nice supplement
to your walk.
Remember, bending down for small bits of trash is
just as beneficial as reaching for larger pieces. So get
everything.
Also, a real health-conscious bag lady (or gentle-
man) will not hold a rigid line of march. A bit of trash
off to the side (even up little sand hills) is not consid-
ered an inconvenience, but rather a healthy bonus.
The absence of trash will do wonders for the ap-
pearance of the beach and make it a more enjoyable
place for everybody to visit. It will help the environ-
ment to remove plastics and bits of balloon that are a
deadly menace to hungry sea creatures.
Certainly, we should continue to encourage people
to pick up their own trash, but until everyone does ...
Denis Patrick O'Connor, Holmes Beach
Spirit of Olympics creates
parent trap
"How could you help the enemy, Mommy? Don't
you know that's wrong?"
These were the words that greeted me when I
called my sons from the British Olympic Preparation
Camp the place I had the incredible good fortune to
be at last week.
I struggled in vain to explain what an honor it was
to be selected to the sports massage team for the Brits,
and about the spirit of goodwill and peace that is the


SLICK


essence of the Olympic Games. Unfortunately, a seven-
year-old boy is far more swayed by the opinions and
teasing of his friends than he is by a sermon delivered
from his mother 300 miles away.
I spent the rest of the week in search of a way to
bring it home to him.
"Son," I said upon my arrival back to paradise, "imag-
ine you were selected to a team of all-stars in tee-ball to
represent the state of Florida against the state of Califor-
nia. You begin practicing everyday at 5 am. so you would
be ready for this wonderful opportunity, and you were
very excited. When you got to California though, people
had decided not to treat you right in order to give their kids
an edge. They gave you yucky food, lumpy beds, no air
conditioning and, even though the home kids had a beau-
tiful practice field and massage therapists to warm up their
muscles, none of that was made available to your team.
"None of you played well, you lost your game, and
came home disappointed. A couple of years later,
Florida and California have a big disagreement that
gets so bad some people are talking about going to
California and hurting people while others are trying to
get everyone to talk about their problems without hav-
ing a war. Which side do you think you might support
after your experience with Californians?"
"I'd probably want to hurt them," he said.
"But," I said, "suppose the people out there had
treated you wonderfully and you had made many
friends with the California kids and they had said to
you, 'Sure, we'd like to win, but we'd want to beat you
at your very best and, more important than even win-
ning, is just being here and getting to know one another
as people.' If you left California feeling wonderful,
what might you think about war then?"
He smiled shyly, squirmed in his chair a little and
finally looked deep into my eyes.
"I'd probably want to talk about it peacefully,
Mommy. I understand. Do you think you could tell
everyone else that story so they'll understand too?"
And so as the opening of the Olympic Games
comes upon us, I offer you this story in fulfillment of
my promise to my son, lest we forget what the games
are all about
A. Shuria, Holmes Beach


By Egan


SCOTTY, BEAM US
13AC,K TO COZ-TE Z. *.
TO A TtMEl r.EORz-E.
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-~--~---










THnSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 8, Anna Maria Island and the Seminole War, 1835-1842 _
by June Alder


U.S. troops hunted Indians with bloodhounds in the Seminole war.


SLAVE CATCHING


In early spring of 1837 Gen. Tho-
mas Jesup, new American army com-
mander, succeeded in persuading most
of the Seminole chiefs except
Osceola and old Sam Jones to end
their year-long fight against deportation


from Florida.
Soon, in groups large
and small, their people
were drifting in to Fort
Brooke where ships were
waiting to take them
West. The main induce-
ment was that they would
be able to take their Ne-
gro allies with them.
It appeared that the
war would soon be over.
But then Jesup
double-crossed the Semi-
noles. Giving in to pres-
sure from slave holders,
he decreed that the Indi-
ans would have to return
all runaway slaves to
their rightful owners.
Professional slave-
catchers were delighted.
But Northern anti-slavery
factions and the Indians
were outraged. The
Seminole chiefs claimed
that the blacks living


The discontent
Seminole chit
to claim the w
children of ra
fishermen as
descendants.
demanded tha
people go witi
Arkansas ten
now Gen. Tho
Jesup was so
get the Semin
Florida and o
hair that he w
to do almost a
His decision t
soldiers into t.
villages to seize
women and cl
caused another
up North.


among them were freed slaves or had
been legally purchased or in many
cases ought not to be interfered with
since they had been with the Seminoles
for generations.
Slave catching was riothing new.
(The story is told that Osceola's beauti-
ful wife Morning Dew was stolen away
from him as a slave, and that's why he
went on the warpath.) But Jesup's policy
attracted hordes of scoundrels who fig-
ured that any black or mixed breed with
the Seminoles could be grabbed.
It got so bad that Jesup barred all
outsiders from the detention camp at the
gates of Fort Brooke, where heat and
disease were making conditions unbear-
able.
To make things worse, the discon-
tented Seminole chiefs began to claim
the wives and children of rancho fisher-
men as tribal descendants. They de-
manded that these people go with them
to Arkansas territory. They might not
leave Florida after all if Jesup didn't
back them up, the chiefs threatened.
By now Jesup was so eager to get
the Seminoles out of Florida and out of


his hair that he was ready to do almost
anything. His decision to send soldiers
into the fishing villages to seize the
women and children caused another up-
roar up North.
William Bunce, whose Mullet Key
fishery was the largest rancho on the
Gulf coast, put up a fight.
He was a justice of the
nted
peace and knowledgeable
efs began about the law. He argued
vives and that former Spaniards
7ncho and their wives were
tribal American citizens under
They the terms of the 1821
at these treaty by which the U.S.
h them to got Florida from Spain
rir. By and therefore were en-
titled to every right and
omas .
privilege of citizenship.
eager to He had Judge Augustus
oles out of Steele, the top official in
ut of his Hillsborough County, on
'as ready his side.
anything. But Jesup was ada-
o send mant. The rancho fisher-
he fishing men, he claimed, had
ze the "enticed the women from
hiren their Indian
rildren protectors...no matter by
er uproar what name you call them
whether husbands, mas-
ters or employers."
Bunce must turn over to the military
"all the Indians and their children
whom the chiefs may demand" whether
of full or mixed blood.
Then Jesup made a terrible mis-
take. He threatened Osceola.
"I intend to send exploring parties
into every part of the country," he or-
dered an aide to tell Osceola, "and take
all Negroes who belong to the white
people, and he must not allow the Indi-
ans or Indian Negroes to mix with
them.
"I am sending to Cuba for blood-
hounds to trail them, and I intend to
hang every one of them who does not
come in."
He carried out his threat for a short
time. But the use of bloodhounds to
track down fleeing Negroes and Indians
was brought to a halt by a horrified
American public. Jesup was derided as
a monster in newspapers from New
York to Paris.
.Through all this turmoil Osceola
was biding his time. He would take ad-
vantage of Gen. Jesup's mistakes -
when the time was ripe.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 7 I0



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fif PAGE 8 M JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Election face-off for September, November


You could call it the election that almost never
was.
Although voters will have a full ballot upon which
to cast their votes this fall, seven constitutional offic-
ers, six circuit court judges, a Florida senator, two
members of the Florida House of Representatives, a
mosquito control board member and two members of
the local fire control district will not face opposition in
their re-election bids.
Taking office without the need of a campaign will
be:
Clerk of Circuit Court R.B. "Chips" Shore.
Property Appraiser Charles Hackney.
Public Defender Elliott Metcalfe.
Sheriff Charlie Wells.
State Attorney Earl Moreland.
Supervisor of Elections Bob Sweat.
Tax Collector Ken Burton Jr.
Circuit Court Judge Durand Adams.
Circuit Court Judge Stephen Dakan.
Circuit Court Judge Peter Dubensky.
Circuit Court Judge Thomas Gallen.
Circuit Court Judge Bob McDonald.
Circuit Court Judge Andrew Owens.
Senator James Hargrett.
Rep. Rudy Bradley.
Rep. Mark Ogles.
Mosquito Control Board Commissioner Michael
Daugherty.
Anna Maria Island Fire District Commissioner
John VanOstenbridge.
Anna Maria Island Fire District Commissioner
Larry Tyler.

Stop in the _
name of art --
Artists Guild members
Karen Klosky, left,
Snoopy Gates, Debbie ,. a
Keller-McCartney and,
seated, Lois Leitz invite
Islanders to stop by the
Artists Guild Gallery to i
enjoy its new "Summer
Scenes and Island
Dreams" exhibit. The
gallery is located at 5414
Marina Dr., Island
Shopping Center, Holmes
Beach. The exhibit runs
through Aug. 31.


But there will be an election Sept. 3 for Island
Republicans, at least, as well as some non-partisan
races such as circuit court and airport authority. The
general election is Nov. 5. Candidates appearing on the
Sept. 3 ballot are:

County Commission, District 3
(including the Island)
Stan Stephens, incumbent, Bradenton.
Roy Hendricks, Bradenton.
Jan von Hahmann, Cortez.

County Commission, District 7, At-large
Joe McClash, incumbent, Bradenton.
Michael Stern, Bradenton.

County Commission, District 1
John Gause, incumbent, Bradenton.
Bill Edmonson, Palmetto.
Amy Stein, Parrish.
The winner of the Republican primary will face Ron
Cox, a Democratic challenger from Palmetto.

County Commission, District 5
Maxine Hooper, incumbent, Bradenton.
Jonathan Bruce, Bradenton.

Florida House of Representatives, District 68
(including the Island)
Mark Flanagan, incumbent, Bradenton.
Lois Gerber, Bradenton.
The winner of the Republican primary willface Demo-
cratic challenger Bob Nolan, Bradenton, Nov. 5.


School Board, District 2
Eloise Lisch, incumbent, Bradenton.
Harry Kinnan, Bradenton.
The winner of the Republican primary willface write-
in candidate Thure Wegener in November.

School Board, District 4
Barbara Turner, incumbent, Bradenton Beach.
Frank Brunner, Bradenton.

Circuit Court, 12th Judicial Circuit, Group 17
(non-partisan)
Peter Baranowicz, Sarasota.
Deborah Ford-Kaus, Sarasota.
Stanley Swartz, Bradenton.

Airport Authority,
Seat 2 (non-partisan)
Tim Rocklein, Sarasota.
Dick Schultze, Bradenton.

Airport Authority,
Seat 4 (non-partisan)
Greg Young, incumbent, Palmetto.
Christina Donnolo, Bradenton.
Bob Hall, Bradenton.
Russ Olson, Holmes Beach.

Some non-partisan elections will be held Nov. 5,
as well as elections with Republican and Democratic
challengers. Non-partisan offices appearing on
Islander's Nov. 5 ballot include:

Anna Maria Fire Control District, Seat 5
Glenn Bliss, incumbent, Bradenton.
Joseph Galati, Anna Maria.

Soil & Water
Conservation District, Group 1
Betty Glassburn, Duette.
Thomasina Guerin, Ellenton.

Soil & Water
Conservation District, Group 3
Anne Beck, Holmes Beach.
Lynn Harrison, Arcadia.

Soil & Water
Conservation District, Group 5
Rebecca Haddix, Holmes Beach.
John O'Connor, Duette.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 M PAGE 9 IE

Anna Maria sets tentative 1996-97 village rate


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Pushed by Manatee County Property Appraiser
Charles Hackney to meet an earlier-than-usual dead-
line, the Anna Maria City Commission has set a tenta-
tive property tax rate for the 1996-97 fiscal year.
Commissioners agreed July 16 on a proposed mill-
age rate of 1.70, up from the current rate of 1.61. A mill
is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of assessed property
value, with the proposed increase translating to an ad-
ditional nine cents per $1,000 value.
The tentative rate can be lowered between now and
final budget adoption in the end of September but it
cannot be raised.
Hackney let county municipalities know in late
May that his office had computed taxable values a


month early in order to receive proposed village rates
by July 17 instead of early August.
Anna Maria's citywide taxable value has risen to
$222 million versus an assessed value of $208 million
a year ago. A millage rate of 1.70 will generate
$377,720 in ad valorem revenues, which traditionally
account for about one-third of the city's budget. Fiscal
year 1995-96 ad valorem income is $334,672 in the
overall budget of $940,000.
Commissioners said they believed they were being
asked to put the cart before the horse in meeting
Hackney's deadline. Formal budget discussions item-
izing proposed expenditures and anticipated incomes
have not yet begun.
Workshops will be scheduled over the next several
weeks to settle on a proposed budget before the first


public hearing on Wednesday, Sept. 4. The final hear-
ing will be Tuesday, Sept. 24.
The only expense figure commissioners had before
them was a proposal from the Manatee County
Sheriffs Office for police services during the next
year. The figure for maintaining a six-man force has
risen to $324,631 versus the current contract of
$297,888.
Mayor Chuck Shumard, acting as police liaison,
said lie intends to try to get that figure down. He had
also asked for a cost on a seven-man force. That pro-
posal came in at $361,500.
Without any other figures to work with, the com-
mission agreed to increase to the 1.70 mills rather than
undercut themselves before the real number crunching
begins.


Anna Maria code board holds 'annual' session


Code complaints that are not resolved by notifica-
tion from Anna Maria Building Official Phil Charnock,
who also serves as code enforcement officer, make
their way to a hearing before the city's code enforce-
ment board, a quasi-judicial body.
That board met for the first time in a year July 18
but not to hear a case. Members met to elect offic-
ers and to adopt rules and regulations.
Four members out of seven a quorum -
showed up. Some had never met. Present were Chair-
man Leon Kramer, Vice Chairman Dale Woodland and
new members Alfred Burkly, husband of City Com-
missioner Elaine Burkly, and Joe Vona.
As the first order of business, members agreed
unanimously that the chairman would call all mem-
bers prior to the next meeting. Kramer and Wood-
land retained their officers roles and the rules -
which have not changed for at least three years -
were adopted.
Under new business, Burkly engaged the board in
general discussion about the effectiveness of the city's
code enforcement and wondered if the board should
have more of a voice.
"We don't see anything coming before us and I
don't think it's because everything is OK," Burkly said.


J


-.
* '


Woodland suggested that if Burkly feels that code
enforcement is not effective, or if he believes there is
a need for additional code enforcement staff, he should
go before the city commission as a private citizen.
In May the commission did discuss the possibility
of hiring a part-time code enforcement officer. The
matter may come up again during budget discussions
next month.
Burkly mentioned traffic safety and parking viola-
tions and also said perhaps the city's code enforcement


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SCynthia Finn.



officer shouldn't live in the city of Anna Maria.
"Well, fellas," he said during discussion, "whether
you realize it or not, we've gotten some conversation
going."
He concluded by suggesting that the board meet
every few months "to shoot the breeze for a frank
exchange of views."
The others agreed. Members also thought it would
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I] PAGE 10 0 JULY 25, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

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By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Painting, packing and repair work is under way in
anticipation of the Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce Aug. 24-31 move to a new location.
Faced with a rent increase at the present Manatee
Avenue office in Holmes Beach, the Chamber has en-
tered into a 16-month lease at 5337 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach, formerly the White Otter.
Anyone wishing to help with the move is asked
to call the Chamber at 778-1541.
Chamber directors have also held talks with
Manatee County commissioners regarding the long-
term possibility of constructing a permanent facility
on the south end of the pavilion at the Manatee
County Public Beach in Holmes Beach.
County Facilities Director Sam Love said his
department is in the "preliminary" stage of investigat-
ing state and city permitting requirements for build-
ing on the beach.
"We will report our basic finding on that aspect to
the county commission," said Love. "Discussion has not
reached the point of a specific plan or funding."
In other business at the July 18 board of directors
meeting, First Vice President Don Howard, Second
Vice President T. Dolly Young and director Frank
Davis were appointed as a nominating committee to
make a recommendation on filling eight directors
slots that will be open at year's end.
The positions are open to all Chamber members.
Application forms will appear in future Chamber
newsletters.
Director Jack Elka told the board that advertising
sales for the next Vacation Guide are in full gear. He
has signed a contract to produce the guide with a run
of 25,000 copies. The Chamber will make a minimum


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
With the blessing of her board of directors,
Pierrette Kelly, executive director of the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, will fly to Prague, Czecho-
slovakia,to teach fundraising.
The offer came through Catherine Johnson, a
former assistant director of the center. Johnson left the
center in 1993 and spent two years in the Peace Corps
in Latvia. Following her Peace Corps duty, Johnson
joined the Open Society Institute.
"The OSI was founded by George Sorors, an
American philanthropist," Kelly explained. "Its goal
is to help fund projects in Eastern Europe that support
human rights. They also work with charity organiza-
tions on issues such as poverty and children's health
problems and disabilities."
Charities in Eastern European countries find it
difficult to provide services, because many people
have lost faith in them, she said. In some cases, sup-
plies and money sent to them were stolen by govern-
ment employees or police, giving the charity
orgainzations a bad name.
In the past, representatives of American charities
have attempted to teach these organizations how to
raise money, she said. However, the effort proved to
be frustrating because they don't have the same re-
sources available to them as the Americans or any
way to identify themselves as legitimate.
"I will participate in a what is called a debate
camp, where participants debate issues to be decided
by the group," Kelly said. "We will work on finding


Chamber social
Wednesday evening
Econo Lodge Surfside, 2502 Gulf Drive,
Bradenton Beach, will host the monthly social
and business card exchange for the Anna Maria
Island Chamber of Commerce from 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 24. Members and guests are
welcome. For more information, call the Cham-
ber at 778-1541.

of $7,500 based on $50,000 worth of advertising, with
increases for every additional $5,000 worth of sales.
Elka, who is also Chamber liaison for the sale of
Island advertising pages on the Internet, agreed to ar-
range for a computer display at the September social at
Harrington House.
Executive Director Mary Ann Brockman said she
is working on advertising sales for a reprint of the
Chamber's map, which will also have a run of 25,000
copies.
She reported that election season is producing re-
quests from political candidates for opportunities to ad-
dress Chamber members, including one request to help
sponsor an event.
The board agreed that the Chamber could not back
any one candidate in any race, but discussed cooperat-
ing with The Islander Bystander in sponsorship of its
candidates forum. Directors Sandy Haas and Don
Schroder volunteered to look into the matter.
Shroder and Davis reported that they have been
attending Holmes Beach City Council meetings on
rental restrictions. Shroder said he is trying to attend all
council meetings and encouraged all directors to keep
abreast of activities by elected officials.


new ways to support charity organizations."
The camp will include 250 to 500 participants from
Kurdistan, Kazakhstan, Estonia, Latvia, Czechoslova-
kia, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Romania and other Baltic
states.
"I hope to help them discover their own resource,
identify their clients and develop a mission statement
and how it relates to the community they serve," she
noted. "We are so blessed, because we have excellent
support from our businesses.
"In Russia, for example, the businesses get only a
10 percent tax credit for giving to charities. The gov-
ernment taxes them 70 percent, and they want to hide
their profits. When they do get involved with charities,
they look for ways to take advantage of them to get a
tax break."
Other obstacles to charity funding include few
donations, tight finances, the absence of a check writ-
ing system, lack of grant funding and lack of volunteers
and personnel. Also, churches which were banned for
many years are just beginning to rebuild their congre-
gations and get organized.
"There is no such thing as a new problem," she
said. "We've all experienced the same problems. They
are just individuals struggling for a way to fund
projects needed by their people and communities. I
don't want to be an American who knows it all. I want
to go as a person who has a similar organization that
has grown to serve a large percentage of the commu-
nity."
Kelly will leave Aug. 1 for the two-week trip. All
expenses are being paid by OSI.


Community center director

to aid European charities


The Island Poet
That old hurricane season is here once more,
And you better be alert, you folks near the shore.
So get out your charts and watch where they go,
For you may save your life if you are in the know.
'Cause if you are warned to leave, don't wait till tomorrow,
For you may be stuck on the Island much to your sorrow.
And when those big waves roll in, don't look for me.
'Cause far, far away I am going to be.
Bud Atteridge






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 11 jij


Island cities to develop


mission statement


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
To vote or not to vote? A privilege and a right to
vote is sometimes taken for granted.
In the instance of Island elected officials, it is just
one of the questions discussed while considering a mis-
sion statement last week at the regular meeting of the
Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials.
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner claimed
past votes have offended some officials.
VanWagoner proposed a mission statement to
other elected officials at last weeks meeting that would
eliminate voting at coalition meetings.
"Basically it emphasizes the group is for the ex-
change of information a consensus of our concerns,"
he explained. "We're not taking political votes, be-
cause we have no stature as an official body and the
people who attend are very different from one meeting
to the next."
The statement reads in part, "Because of the nature


of membership and organization and irregular at-
tendance no formal votes or positions can be taken
or are sought."
Anna Maria Mayor Chuck Shumard suggested get-
ting a consensus on an issue during the group meetings,
then taking the issue back to each city for a vote.
The group can also pass resolutions, said Holmes
Beach Councilman Don Maloney.
"A resolution could be advertised and not be
voted on until the next meeting so everybody has time
to consider it," Maloney said.
What if one city attempts to throw the vote by
having more elected officials there than the other cit-
ies? VanWagoner asked.
"If a resolution is put on the table, we could take
it back to our cities for discussion," VanWagoner sug-
gested. "At the following meeting we report what our
officials think about it"
Officials agreed to take the mission statement to
their councils for discussion.


By Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner
The Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Offi-
cials is an informal group formed primarily to share
information and concerns on subjects which may
affect the various local government jurisdictions
represented on Anna Maria Island and Longboat
Key, and which are of interest to their populations.
Attendance also would be welcome from any other
barrier island.
The group meets periodically, usually monthly
on a rotating host basis, and, by its nature, is at-
tended by a changing body of elected officials. All
elected officials from the member jurisdictions are
welcome. Attendance is voluntary and there are no
by-laws. The chairmanship of each meeting is hon-
orary and is usually the chief executive attending
from the host city.
The meetings are noticed and and public com-
ments are invited after discussion by those elected
officials present.
Also, because of the nature of membership and
organization and irregular attendance no for-
mal votes or positions can be taken or are sought.


Officials of each jurisdiction can be requested to
take issues back to their respective councils or
commissions for formal action, which can be
jointly announced or corresponded if those bodies
wish.
The acting chairperson can ask for a consen-
sus of those officials attending any given meeting
on matters they would like to bring up at future
meetings, the place and date of meetings and other
non-controversial subjects. There can also be a
consensus to seek information on a particular sub-
ject for discussion at a later meeting. Within
these guidelines, the sharing of information and
concerns has proved beneficial and educating
among the Island officials. The regular face-to-
face meetings also provide a good introduction for
later communication among the parties when spe-
cific day-to-day issues arise which need swift and
knowledgeable coordination. Whether this infor-
mal group later evolves into a more formal coali-
tion or breeds separate interlocal agreements on
specific subject areas is a matter for the separate
jurisdictions to determine. Today it is informal.


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Holmes Beach men take honors

in Mote shark tourney


Two Holmes Beach men took honors in the 1996
Gulf Coast Shark Census Tournament, sponsored by
Mote Marine Laboratory's National Center for Shark
Research.
Mick Gast and Rich Gupton received special
awards for their efforts during the catch-tag-release
tournament. Gast had the most sharks tagged at 58,
while Gupton received kudos for the largest shark
caught, an 11-foot nurse shark.
The tournament saw 114 anglers catch 887
sharks, the second-highest number in the event's
eight-year history. About 70 percent of the fishers
caught at least one shark, with an average of 13
sharks caught per angler. The average size of the


sharks caught was less than four feet and the great-
est number of sharks were in blacknose and
blacktip species.
Tournament prizes were awarded using a lot-
tery system, with anglers earning points in the lot-
tery by determining the total length of the caught-
recorded-released shark. Top prize of $1,500 was
won by Steve Bartley of Sarasota. Second prize of
$750 went to Jack Dillon of Sarasota, and third
place was won by Johnny Keller, a Pinellas County
15-year-old who received $450.
Nick Summers of Bradenton also received the
Harwell Award for the largest number of sharks
caught and released by a single angler, 139.


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It's work as usual after a slight geologic
problem was uncovered, causing a delay while
new construction plans received state approval.
Bradenton Beach Building Official Bill
Sanders said original plans for the project called


for pilings to be driven 40 feet into the sand to
support the small condo. However, limestone
was reached about 25 feet down, halting the
pile driving effort.
Revised plans with a less-than-40-foot pil-
ing depth have now been approved by state
coastal regulators and work is proceeding,
Sanders said.


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Proposed mission statement

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Condo project hits 'rock bottom'


I








PI PAGE 12 M JULY 25, 1996 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Vesta E. Corwin
Vesta E. Corwin, 86, of Anna Maria, died July 19
in Columbia Medical Center.
Born in Toledo, Ohio, Mrs. Corwin came to Mana-
tee County from Parma, Ohio, in 1969. She was retired
from retail sales. She was a Protestant.
She is survived by a son, Jack of Parma; a sister,
Esta Eicher of Stryker, Ohio; and two grandchildren.
No visitation was held. A memorial service will be
held at a later date in Williams Center, Ohio. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, Holmes Beach,
was in charge of the arrangements.

Sara Elizabeth Graham
Sara Elizabeth Graham, 86, of Anna Maria, died
July 8 at home.
Born in Bell Buckle, Tenn., Mrs. Graham came to
Manatee County from there in 1980. She was a retired
school teacher. She was a Methodist. She was a mem-
ber of Sigma Kappa Sorority.
She is survived by her husband, James; two daugh-
ters, Elizabeth Hedges of Springfield, Mo., and Louise
Ehrich of Southport, Conn.; and four grandchildren.
No visitation was held. A graveside service was
held at Hazel Cemetery, Bell Buckle. Griffith-Cline
Funeral Home, Island Chapel, was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

Oren L. Jeffries Jr.
Oren L. Jeffries Jr., 78, of Holmes Beach, died July
18 in Tennessee.
Born in Worthington, Ohio, Mr. Jeffries came to
Manatee County from there in 1978. He joined the U.S.
Army Air Corps in 1941 and retired as a lieutenant
colonel in the Air Force Reserve in 1977. He led 30
World War II combat missions. He was the former
owner of Columbus Electrical Works Co. in Columbus,
Ohio.
He is survived by his wife, Edna of Holmes Beach;
a son, Michael of Bradenton; a daughter, JoAnn Kirby
of Dublin, Ohio; five grandchildren; and three great-
grandchildren.

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To all my dear friends;
Thank you so much for all
you've done for me in the
time I've had the pleasure to
know you. The last three years
have been some of the happiest
days in my life. You've all meant
so much to me and I can only
thank you when I see you
again.
Until then, Love always,
Nancy Newman
A special thanks to Pat & Jim
Comkowyczfor taking such good
care and love for my children.
And many special thanks to
Larry Willis for all you've done
for my children and myself. I
could never thank you enough. I
love you Jessie, Josh, Tony &
Raven. "We will be together


1\ again someday."
Memorial service,
at 6pm, St. Bernar


Wed, July 24,
d Church.


Visitation was held in Worthington. Service was
held in Worthington with Rev. Theron Smith officiat-
ing. Burial was in Union Cemetery, Worthington.

Nancy Norma Newman
Nancy Norma
Newman, 43, of Anna
Maria City died July 19.
Ms. Newman came to -
Anna Maria from Dalton, "
Ga., four years ago. She was
a homemaker.
She is survived by a
daughter, Raven Greco of [
Anna Maria City; three
sons, Joshua Greco of Can-
ton, Ga., Jesse Greco of Newman
Bradenton, and Vincent "Tony" Sisto of Anna Maria;
a brother, Robert Newman of Deleon Springs, Fla.; and


one grandchild.
A memorial service will be held Wednesday, July
24, at 6 p.m., at St. Bernard Catholic Church, Holmes
Beach. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel, is
in charge of arrangements.

Helen K. Sark
Helen K. Sark, 79, of Southfield, Mich., died July
6 in Lourdes Convalescent Home, Waterford, Mich.
Born in Bayonne, N.J., Mrs. Sack was an elemen-
tary school teacher in Detroit area parochial schools for
35 years.
She is survived by a son, James of Westland,
Mich., and two daughters, Patricia Bommarito of
Southfield, Mich., and Mary Sark of Anna Maria.
Memorial contributions may be made to Anna
Maria Elementary School in Holmes Beach, St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church in Holmes Beach or the elemen-
tary school of your choice.


ISrA I


Elizardes celebrate 50th
wedding anniversary
Irma and Joseph Elizarde of Anna Maria cel-
ebrated their 50th wedding anniversary June 29 at the
Holiday Inn Riverfront.
The were married June 29, 1946. She is the
former Irma Garcia.
The Elizardes have two children Joseph
Elizarde of Miami and Valerie Rosas of Anna Maria
- and three grandchildren.
Mr. Elizarde is retired from the City of Miami
Fire Department. Mrs. Elizarde is a homemaker.
They have lived in the area for 16 years.

Islander sends messages
to military families
Holmes Beach resident Jane Early is a volunteer
message handler for a free, world-wide message ser-
vice for military personnel, family and friends.


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Messages are sent on computer via the Internet
and come in two sizes 250 words and 50 words.
They can be sent once a day. For those who don't
have access to the Internet, Early provides the link.
Families and friends can contact Early to send
non-emergency messages to any U.S. active duty
family member or loved one located at any perma-
nent U.S. military installation in the world. Military
personnel can also send messages home to family
members and friends located in any city in the U.S.
or any permanent U.S. military installation in the
world.
To send a message or for information on be-
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The program is sponsored by the North Ameri-
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I E I D N T A O I
MORE ISLAND NEWS THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE.


IISLANDER


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visiting
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SLANDER


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f Drive
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 25, 1996 N PAGE 13 jII

Communities must encouage pedestrians and bicyclists


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Americans must focus on redesigning their com-
munities to encourage walking and bicycling and to
discourage driving, said Dan Burden of the Florida
Department of Transportation last week.
Burden, DOTs pedestrian and bicycle coordinator
for 16 years, conducted a day-long seminar for plan-
ners, designers, architects, elected officials and resi-
dents at the Manatee Civic Center. He encouraged the
development of walkable communities, bicycle lanes,
trails and parks as a way to enhance the quality of life
and cut down on the use of automobiles for transpor-
tation.
"A car gets in the way of other forms of transpor-
tation," said Burden. "We are in the habit of going ev-
erywhere in our automobiles. In Florida we drive more
miles per person on the average than just about any-
where else in the nation. DOT could never build
enough lanes to meet the demand, and so we have to
look for alternatives."
A survey of means of travel between 1980 and
1990 shows driving increased from 64.4 to 73.2 per-
cent, car pooling decreased from 19.1 to 13.4 percent,
riding a bus or trolley decreased from 4.1 to 3 percent,
bicycling decreased from .5 to .4 percent and walking
decreased from 5.6 to 3.9 percent.

Walking and bicycling
Burden said communities can encourage walking
by making streets and surrounding areas attractive and
interesting. He recommended that a sidewalk be a mini-
mum of five feet wide with a strip of plants and/or trees
between it and the street.
"We need to build beautiful, quality streets and
sidewalks that make people welcome, make people feel
better," he said. "It does not cost a lot more to do that."
The three top qualifiers for moving into a neigh-
borhood are low speed traffic, open space/greenways
and sidewalks, he said.
"Our streets have been built with the premise that
no one rides bicycles, but they can be used as the base

1,- 10 J7771.1 n-h~ ~ l N~


of a system of good bikeways in our cities and towns,"
he exDlained.
Bicyclists like to use streets because they take rid-
ers where they want to go. Adding bike lanes to streets
increases the comfort of drivers as well as bicyclists,
slows traffic and is less costly than developing bike
paths.
He recommended that a bicycling task force inven-
tory existing conditions such as demographics and
crash data and conduct user surveys, then set goals,
objectives and strategies.

Multi-use trails and greenways
Another way to enhance a community is by devel-
oping multi-use trails and greenways, he said. Multi-
use trails can be used by pedestrians, bicyclists and
roller bladers. Greenways are corridors of protected
open space that link natural parks, cultural and historic
sites and populated areas.
"We have robbed ourselves of places of quality,
places to reinvent ourselves and meet people," Burden
noted. "People are stressed out and exhausted and
there's nowhere to go to recharge. Trails and
greenways provide this uplift."
Their impact on a community includes increasing
property values, energizing neighborhoods, generating
interest and encouraging people to walk and bicycle.


Wherever possible trails should make use of and pro-
tect the natural land features.
Trails should be 10 feet wide. Eight feet is accept-
able for low volume, limited use and short sections.
Twelve feet is desirable in areas where there is a high
level of use and a mix of uses. Popular urban trails can
be as wide as 15 to 22 feet.
He recommended separating pedestrians from bi-
cyclists and roller bladers with a line or median, main-
taining a two-foot, stable shoulder and a two-foot clear-
ing along the sides of the trail and keeping trees and
plants as close to the trail as possible to increase the
calming effect.

A different way of thinking
Burden said one important factor in developing
these alternate methods of transportation is that offi-
cials and planners must work closely with the public
using creative and fresh ideas to attract public interest.
"There's a very bright future for transit in Florida,
but it requires a different way of thinking than we've
had in the past," he stressed. "We need a different way
for people to move around.
"We've got progressive leaders, well-trained
knowledgeable people and great citizens, but we need
vision. Funding is not the issue, property rights is not
the issue. The issue is our quality of life."


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JIm PAGE 14 A JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANE

Islanders named

to leadership

program
Five Island residents have been selected to partici-
pate in the 1996-97 Leadership Manatee class designed
to expose current and future community leaders to all
aspects of Manatee County, enhance leadership skills
and encourage increased community involvement.
The 14th annual program will include a class of 37
people from a variety of county businesses, agencies
and organizations. Islanders chosen include Joan
Voyles, Suzi Atherton and George O'Connor from
Anna Maria, Jim Brown of Holmes Beach and Barbara
Turner of Bradenton Beach.
From September through February, participants
will study elements of the county under the topics of
social/economic structure, health care, human needs,
education, land use and transportation, agriculture, arts
and communication, law enforcement, business and in-
dustry and local government.
The program is sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of
Bradenton, the Manatee Chamber of Commerce, Co-
lumbia Blake Medical Center and the Staff Leasing
Group, with support from Quinlan and Smith PA,
Manatee Palms and New Wave Communications.
Voyles is president of the Manatee County Cultural
Alliance and Dunhill of Bradenton, an executive search
firm. She said her involvement with MCCA has given
her an opportunity to understand more about the com-
munity and its diverse group of people.
"I'm interested in continuing to grow and expand
my knowledge and understanding," said Voyles. "This
in-depth course on our community represents another
chance to increase my knowledge."
O'Connor is vice president and sales manager for
Air and Energy Inc. of Holmes Beach. A former chair-
man of the board of the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, he is a board member of the Manatee County
Chamber of Commerce and is president of the Pitts-
burgh Pirates Booster Club. He'was in Pittsburgh for
the weekend with his son, Michael, for a second oppor-
tunity to throw out an opening game ball.

Sunday
Breakfast Only
7am -1pm
Mon Sat
7am 3pm
JAMAICAN STYLE FOOD BEER & WINE
BREAKFAST 7- 11am LUNCH 11am 3pm
Dave & Trisha Proprietors
5340 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 779-1320


Brown is a senior retail executive for Barnett Bank
of Manatee County. He has been with Barnett since
1989 and was transferred to Manatee last year. He is on
the board of the Manatee Community Blood Center.
Brown said even though he has been in Florida
since the late '60s, Manatee County is a new arena.
"I'm very much looking forward to meeting more of


Line dancing
with smaller
steps
Line dance instructor
Tanya Slack recently
shared some of her
favorite moves with
summer campers at the
Anna Maria Island
Community Center.
Getting the knack, from
left, were 6-year-olds
Kayla Garner, Tierney
Green, Maddie Bennett
and Ian Beck and Heath
Fiecke, 7. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


the day-to-day players in the county and learning more
about how the county functions," he said.
Turner is currently running for her second four-
year term on the Manatee County School Board. She
is a former 23-year teacher, a former mayor of
Bradenton Beach and a real estate agent with Re/Max
Gulfstream Realty.
She said she feels "very honored" to be selected for
the leadership program and is looking forward to shar-
ing with others involved in the community.
Atherton is a senior tax manager for Christopher,
Smith, Gentile, Leonard and Bristow PA. She was un-
available for comment.

Arts Council issues call for
Artists-in-School
The Sarasota County Arts Council has openings for
its roster of Artists-in-Schools. Freelance artists in all
media are eligible to instruct.
Artists work in classrooms with students and teach-
ers in residencies which average six weekly sessions.
Artists are responsible for planning a sequential pro-
gram that offers students participatory experiences and
exposure to the art form.
For information, call Ann Wykell at 365-5118.


Joe's Our
Pep.ermint
Eats & 'T" waist'
Ice Cream -'
Sweets is cool
36 GOURMET Christas!
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAMS BY JOE
Yogurts (18 fat free, 26 low fat)
10 Sugar Free Flavors
Sundaes Sodas Shakes
Regular or Sugar Free
Espresso, Cappuccino
Belgium Waffles Ice Cream Cakes
Open Daily 2-10pm Closed Tuesdays
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


Just over the Cortez Bridge

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Since 1984
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Made on Location
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 15 iE


Career seminar for teens
at Community Center
The School-to-Work Suncoast Consortium and the
Anna Maria Island Community Center will host a free
business orientation program for boys and girls ages 12
to 14 years from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday, July 29,
through Friday, Aug. 2, at the Center.
The seminar will include hands-on and role-play-
ing activities dealing with career exploration; job ap-
plication techniques; interviewing, business and com-
puter skills; and the opportunity to shadow a local busi-
ness industry.


Registration will be open to the first 10 adolescents
to apply. For more information, call Deana at the Cen-
ter, 778-1908.


Longboat chamber talks faces
Dr. Enrique Fernandez, founder of Bradenton Plas-
tic Surgery and Longboat Key Plastic Surgery, will
hold an informative session entitled Contemporary
Cosmetic Surgery on Tuesday, July 30, from 9 to 11
a.m. at the Longboat Key Hilton
Complimentary coffee and donuts will be offered
and the session is free of charge.


The seminar is the second in a series of seminars
offered by the Senior Outreach Committee of the
Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce.


Horseshoe winners
Winners in the July 20 horseshoe games were
George McKay and Bill Starrett, both of Anna Maria.
Runners-up were Bill Cooney of Bradenton Beach and
John Johnson of Holmes Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday
at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall Park, 10005 Gulf
Drive. There are no membership fees.


NOTHING GAINED 12 13 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 112 13 14 115 1
BY DEAN NILES / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 18 I 120 1


ACROSS
1 Summer
weather stat.
4 Western treaty
grp.
7 Book of 150
songs
13 Hibernated, with
"up"
18 Like some
canvases
20 Orville Wright
or Pete Rose,
e.g.
21 Join
22 Victim of
calumny
23 Film about an
R-rated oracle?
25 Last cameo
appearances?
27 Centaur killed
by Hercules
28 Longtime Mex.
ruling party
29 Like Gen.
Schwarzkopf
3G Brought along
32 Sub powerer
35 Flowering shrub
39 Get (from)
43 Kind of
statesman
44 Long-running
"Popeye"
spinoff?
49 Intro
50 "The Burghers
of Calais"
sculptor
51 Licks


ISK IN
Mumm


55 Enemyof the 125 Shampoo
Sioux instruction
58 New York's-- 126 Very
Island 197nnPc:whn
1217 Ones who


61 Tropical climber
63 Rap's Dr. -
64 Flowery Greek
couple?
68 Watch
70 Shows flexibility
71 Jazz grp.
72 Flunky
73 Spotted
74 Traditional song
for a medfly?
80 Tributary of the
Tennessee
81 Soul singer
Bryson
83 Shredded
84 Neighbor of Aus.
85 Newspaper
department
87 Hazing target,
once
89 More mysterious
92 1996 thriller
that's a must?
99 Area code 208
102 Periodic
weather
disruption
103 Christian
Science
practitioner
104 Lifetime domain
107 Bubbly drinks
110 Suffix with bass
111 H.E.W. offshoot
112 Observation
116 Debtors'
fasteners'?
120 Slick baseball
great?
124 Expresses anger
toward


speak
128 "Damn
Yankees" part
129 General
command
130 Potassium
hydroxide
131 Like some
jobs
DOWN
1 Hip New York
City area
2 Surroundings
3 "- a man who
wasn't there"
4 Song lead-in for
"di" or "da"
5 Sharp
6 Take care of
7 Detachable
container
8 Blowout
9 Rich person's
suffix
10 Subdivision
subdivisions
11 Third all-time
record
home-run hitter
12 Muzzle
13 Paul Newman
title role
14 See46-Down
15 Clear
16 Unending,
old-style
17 Atheist
18 Plant
groupings
19 Skier's peak


24 Fighting Tigers
of the
Southeastern
Conf.
26 "Perfesser"
Casey
31 "Bingo -
Yale" (Porter
song)
33 Accelerate
34 Exploded
36 16 tablespoons
37 Abbr. on a sale
item
38 Ornaments
40 Religious
believer: Abbr.
41 "--you so!"
42 --for
(alluring)
45 "Put on it!"
46 With 14-Down,
"Walking on
Thin Ice" singer
47 Makeup artist
48 Traveler's house
52 Curtain detail
53 Sort of sorting
54 Merchant
55 Like a sculpture
56 Old Roman
politico
57 Curmudgeons
59 Actress Russo
60 Clunky shoe
62 Say so
65 Check one
66 Surmounting
67 Billionth: Prefix
69 Concert ending
72 Listless
74 "Archers ofSt.
George" artist
75 Bigger than big
76 Shell rival


77 Warbling
78 Dickens forger
79 From the
Continent
82 Center starter
86 Successor to
Schmidt
88 Time without
end
90 Capt.'s heading
91 River inlet


93 1985 movie "Izzy 99 Ethereal fluids
and -" 100 Showy flower
94 Small change 101 Without
95 Daughter of 105 Play about
Cadmus Capote
96 Puffed out, as 106 Part of v.v.
apparel 108 No-good
97 Tights 109 Like floodwater
98 Some German 113 Kindofcourt
Surrealist 114 Zoning measure
paintings 115 Mother of Zeus


117 Hoopster
Thurmond
118 Standardized
test, for short
119 Leaderof
A.D.54
121 She-bear, in
Sonora
122 Cub house
123 One that's
seeded


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Door Prizes Food & Drink Specials


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three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


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d'at Willy World Starring
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Come partY with'e Natfic at...

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


" A Real Bagel Shop with Island Attitude."
New Hours: Mon Sat 7am to 4pm
19 Varieties Fresh Baked Bagels
Made to order
Deli Sandwiches & Salads

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
-J 779-1212
East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach (Next to Shells)


Casual Gulfview Dining -
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service, with a selection of fine wines and favourite
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Reservations Suggested (941) 778-2959
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.-.:' Great Casual Seafood
,,, 778-5997 .-,s
3200 Ease Bay Prive. Holmes Beach


- YlU lqbW l


Fr






f'1 PAGE 16 M JULY 25, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Taking the high road
My daughter, Kendra, recently made a visit to the
Grand Canyon and was appropriately amazed by the
immensity of it all. She and her friends went on one of
the short walking tours, amounting to just a few hours
of hiking down into the canyon and according to her
that didn't take them in very far relatively speaking.
They observed other tours where sightseers and
their guides rode donkeys and presumably camp over-
night.
Her friend related a story from a park ranger about
the donkeys. Where they get them and how they train
them, in particular, left Kendra quite certain she'd be
skipping the donkey tour.
According to the park ranger, the tour operators
search all over the country for just the right donkeys for
the canyon.
"They can't be too smart and you got to find ones
that aren't too dumb either."
They only select donkeys that appear to have a
medium level of intelligence and for good reason.
According to Kendra's passed-on tale, if they're
too smart, they won't even consider going down the
narrow trails. If they're too dumb, they're likely to
underestimate the footing and fall off into the canyon.
Medium-smart donkeys do the best job in the
Grand Canyon after a lot of training. The tour guides
train new recruits with pack loads of trash similar in
weight to a human rider. They train with trash for two
years, trekking up and down the canyon with regular


tours, before they're allowed to move up to carrying
real folks -'if they make it th irfi'taiNiifg, that is.
The whole routine sounded like the type of train-
ing program we should devise for local politicians -
before they run for office. Just a little proving ground
with the burden of loads of taxes, new ordinances and
bad bills tugging at their coat tails.

Round tuit
Tedra T. Williams, a local business writer for a
daily paper we commonly refer to only as the "mullet
wrapper," ran a news brief recently on the newest busi-
ness to operate at the former landmark restaurant loca-
tion of Pete Reynard's Yacht Club Restaurant.
Yes, businesses have come and gone at that loca-
tion since it was operated by Pete and his wife Eleanor.
But Pete Reynard was not the first in the succession of
operators as Williams stated incorrectly.
The marina and restaurant was built by Jack Holmes
in the hope that a true yacht club would be attractive to
Islanders and being an enterprising developer, Holmes
probably hoped it would attract prospects.
In 1947 Holmes hired and cleared off some 30
acres of jungle in the middle of the Island extending
northward from where the restaurant is today, then just
a private marina. Producers of a film needed a small
airstrip for various sequences featuring Esther Will-
iams. Holmes after whom the city was named in
1950 was glad to oblige.
Here's a little bit of history on the Yacht Club,
gleaned from June Alder's column, "Those were the
days," which first appeared in this newspaper in 1994.
New Manager for Yacht Club Pete Reynard,
from Clearwater, has bought the concession for the
Yacht Club bar and restaurant from Mike Vertich. Mr.
Reynard has been managing a popular restaurant in
Clearwater for about four years. Before that he had


ISLANDER
|EDml51DI


considerable experience in the restaurant business in
New York. Islanders welcome~ MrReiynaid aid liis
wife Eleanor.
The Islander, Oct. 28, 1954
This item tucked in at the foot of a column of Gar-
den Club news on the front page of Harry Varley's
newspaper of 40 years ago should have been in the
headlines in retrospect. But who could have imag-
ined that this Greek immigrant with the French name
would so quickly turn the failed private yacht club into
a fabulously successful restaurant that put tiny Anna
Maria Island on the tourist map.
Pete Reynard's success story began in the early
1920s. He was 16 years old when he signed on as a
seaman aboard a freighter captained by his uncle. His
first voyage took him across the Atlantic to New York.
It happened that the ship docked on the Jersey side of
the Hudson River near the famed Palisades Amuse-
ment Park. The sights and sounds of the summertime
gaiety were irresistible to the lad watching from the
deck of the ship. And when the ship steamed out of
New York harbor, Pete wasn't aboard.
Because his uncle didn't report him to U.S. immi-
gration authorities he was able to get working papers.
He started out as a bus boy in a New York restaurant,
working his way up the ladder to waiter captain and
head waiter. Meanwhile, he had proudly become an
American citizen.
Pete also had a taste for show business. He took ball-
room dancing lessons and worked up a dance act, touring
the country with various partners in the 1930s and '40s.
But while he was on a USO tour entertaining World War
II troops, a severe attack of pleurisy ended this career.
After he recovered, Pete and his wife Eleanor de-
cided to take off for warmer climes. They settled first
in Clearwater where Pete soon made a name for him-
self as a restaurant manager, using radio and television
to good advantage.
PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE


Florida Continental Cuisine
Seafood w Steaks ? Creative Salads
? Kitchen Made Desserts
FABULOUS SUNDAY BRUNCH
Every Sunday 9 am 1:30 pm
Dinner: 5 10 Tues. Sat.
Early Supper 5 6:30 Tues.- Sat.
Closed Sunday Eves & Monday
RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
9707 Gulf Dr. Anna Maria 778-9399



All You Can Eat!

Sunday- Crab legs $2195

Wed Shrimp $1895

Thur Surf & Turf $2195
(Prime Rib & Shrimp)

Thursday-Prime Rib Dinner 1195
8 oz. cut




LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Big Mama* Thurs-Sat 7-11pm Sun 6-10pm
That Jazz Band "Jam"
Monday 7-10 Pi



Closed Tuesdays


WATERFRONT RESTAURANT
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LOOK FOR THE PIRATE SIGN
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 M PAGE 17 IIQ


STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 16

One day Pete and Eleanor came by boat to Holmes
Beach and tied up at the city yacht basin. Pete got to
talking with the operator of the snack bar there and
ended up buying him out. He refurbished and enlarged
the place and reopened it in 1954 as "Pete Reynard's
Yacht Club Restaurant"
I remember my first trip to the Island with my fam-
ily in 1958. We went to Reynard's everybody did.
Who could forget the genial host with the pencil-thin
mustache who greeted us at the door. And his blonde wife
behind the cash register. The food was delicious, the nau-
tical setting memorable especially the lounge where
beautiful mermaids seemingly swam in a tank among
swaying seaweed fronds (on film, of course).
Pete Reynard's fame continued to spread and pa-
trons came by the busload. Then came a setback. A
midnight fire on March 17, 1965, gutted the restaurant
But Pete's came back better and bigger than ever,
with many innovations.
Many eating spots had salad bars by then. But Pete
gave his version a unique twist. It revolved. Slow
enough so that you could stand in one spot and load up
your plate with delicious viands from compartments
kept perpetually filled by an unseen hand behind a cur-
tain. Then there was a revolving dining room you
didn't realize was moving until you noticed a change
in the scenery outside the picture windows.
Pete was at the pinnacle of success by 1975 when
he and Eleanor went off on one of their annual trips to
Greece. But it was to be his last. He died in Athens of
a heart attack and was buried in his homeland. Four
hundred people attended the memorial service back on
Anna Maria Island.
Eleanor would not let Pete's dream die. She ran the
restaurant and (with the help of her second husband,
Tony Tatakis) continued its high standards for several
years. In the late '80s Eleanor reluctantly sold out, but
the new owners never recaptured the old magic, and at
a bankruptcy auction sale on the county courthouse
steps just a few weeks ago, [1994] Eleanor Tatakis re-
gained ownership.
She has vowed to restore Reynard's to the elegant
landmark dining and gathering place it once was.
We're rooting for you, Eleanor.


So much for history
A year or so before they went bankrupt, the restau-
rant was renamed Shucker's Dockside Grill with a bar
named Papa R's Pub. The landmark restaurant in Holmes
Beach had changed from Pete Reynard's to Shuckers,
back to Pete Reynard's again and then to Crabby Bill's in
August 1994 all in the course of three short years.
Next entered a series of Crabby Bill's owners and
operators. First it was a corporate franchise with some
of the corporate investors and a few others (rumored to
be professional wrestlers) mixed in. Part-time Island
resident Bill Zalla is the current property owner and
claims to be a shareholder in Crabby's.
Rumors circulated that Crabby would go public
and shareholders like Zalla were hanging on in antici-
pation until September 1995 when Landmark Res-
taurant Holdings purchased all 12 of Crabby Bill's
Florida locations, including the one in Holmes Beach.
Momentarily, it was a company Crabby. In less
than a moon cycle, the local Crabby was franchised by
Landmark and new management arrived.
Talk about the revolving dining room and salad bar
focused on a revolving front door.
In less than two years the door made three slow
turns as Islanders, patrons and employees struggled to
make sense of the changes.
The revolving salad bar had become a retail display
case for Crabby merchandise. The banquet room was
converted to a short-lived rock club. The mermaid
room was transformed into a sports bar. The front bar
was changed, rebuilt and rearranged. And so on.
The final curtain for Crabby's was Memorial Day.

Metamorphosis
The transition from Pete's the landmark to Back
Bay Boat House began a month ago as we watched red
paint appear in big splotches on the building. The
stonework on the front of the building and planters
alongside the vestibule began turning red and Island-
ers began to groan. They even called the newspaper to
complain.
"What are they doing?" "How can they paint it
red?" "Is it going to be a Red Barn Flea Market?" "Is
Stockyard Steakhouse moving out here?"
Obviously owner Bob Gagne wanted to make an

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impression and to stand out along the commercial
convergence of Holmes Beach. He also added a tin-
roof facia.
He made a lot of changes inside too. The front bar
is gone converted to dining area with tidy rows of
vinyl booths. Gagne wants to attract a more family-type
business and lots of it with over 700 seats to fill.
The revolving Compass Room still has a compass
on the ceiling but the room definitely wasn't orbiting
during my recent visit. List the revolving salad bar
among the forfeitures along with the sports bar and
rock club.
Gagne's new menu features steaks with a mixture
of enough seafood specialties to keep local visitors and
clientele happy. Oddly, there's no chowder or soup on
the menu but they have both.
Talk around town varies this way and that. The
only consistent comment is that Back Bay Boat House
is pricey.
Pricey? Compared to what? If the prices are higher
than Crabby's, they should be. The consensus was that
Crabby's had somewhat less than great food for cheap.
And we won't bother to compare the Boat House with
the award-winning Beach Bistro that's a whole differ-
ent league of cuisine, with upward pricing to match.
Back Bay Boat House boasts "World-class food at
hometown prices," on the menu. Without knowing
what hometown prices mean, I'll tell you that the en-
trees range from $7.99 to $16.99 for dinner. Lighter
fare for lighter prices, all under $10, is offered from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.
The reputation of Pete Reynard's Yacht Club Res-
taurant was something known throughout Pinellas,
Hillsborough and Sarasota counties and Islanders
were rightfully proud of the recognition the Reynard's
garnered for Anna Maria.
Face it It's the end of an era for fans of the Pete's
of old. The building is red and we'll have to leave it to
Bob Gagne to build a business we can all take pride in.
Gagne has the background to make it all work.
He's the owner of a Checkers restaurant in
Hillsborough County and a former partner in two
Brewmaster's restaurants, at Indian Rocks Beach and
Plant City.
I hope Islanders give Gagne and Back Bay Boat
House a chance.
;co-u rso-.-----_-. IIi-,- 8 -----m I
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jD3 PAGE 18 M JULY 25, 1996 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Crumbs
Wit and wisdom by native
Floridian Gib Bergquist

'Her mother and I do'
On Saturday, June 29, 1996, in a beautiful candle-
light ceremony in the historical old church at the Mana-
tee Village Historical Park, the Cracker's daughter,
Laura Anne, became the wife of Jason Motta.
As an emotional touch, the bride's bouquet was
artfully fashioned from white roses and interspersed
with wild Florida orchids grown by the Cracker.
(Thanks, Lisa.)
The wedding was one whole year in the planning
by the Cracker's wife, Madeleine, and the bridal
couple. Every little detail was addressed well in ad-
vance of the wedding and reception. The three are now
all over-qualified as wedding consultants.
The Cracker got to be the gopher. You know, go for
this, go for that. His first big job was to go to the post of-
fice to buy the stamps for mailing the wedding invitations.
"Forty-eight dollars worth of LOVE, please," sez
the Cracker.
"Nice offer, but my husband might object," replied
the sassy postal lady, laughing as she counted out 150
32-cent LOVE stamps.
The blushing Cracker rushed home to help stick the
stamps on the invitations. When he returned to the post
office, he was in for another surprise. The invitations
were slightly overweight, requiring an additional 23-
cent Mary Cassatt stamp on each one.
Back home the Cracker sped for more stamp lick-
ing and a quick return to the post office to beat the
mailing deadline by minutes.
Unknown to the Cracker at the time, and for your
edification, the post office has issued a special 55-cent

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LOVE stamp just for overweight invitations. Live and
learn the hard way.
Being a by-product of the Great Depression, the
Cracker has a well-established reputation for this fru-
gality some even call him cheap.
He did hire a caterer for the reception for the spe-
cial Caribbean dishes, but relied on culinary-savvy
friends to provide other dishes. What a delight!
A professional dee-jay volunteered himself and his
extravagant equipment for the dance music. (Outstand-
ing, Danny.)
In order to save some scratch from the reception
bar bill, the Cracker pre-mixed the screwdrivers in
advance, using an American vodka while reserving the
expensive Swedish brand for the purists.
The bartender he hired did not have the best com-
mand of the English language and had no conception
of what "pre-mix" meant. After it was too late, the
Cracker learned that the bartender, with a big smile,
was topping off every screwdriver he served with a
healthy splash of the prime vodka. Needless-to-say, the
reinforced screwdrivers were the big hit of the evening.
For the non-imbibers and the children, a fountain
was set up filled with bubbling fruit punch. When the
fountain ran a little low, a well-meaning but unin-





NEW ON THE LIBRARY SHELF


"Blue Lonesome" by Bill Pronzini
A novel about becoming who you really want to be
that masquerades as a mystery. The attractive non-hero,
Jim Messenger, leaves his San Francisco accounting job
on a quixotic quest to discover the past of a suicidal
woman he once met. In the Nevada desert he finds much
more than he seeks danger, a troubled family, ancient
cover-ups and self-knowledge. A haunting book that both
entertains and challenges.
Reviewed by Carol Sandidge

"Infernal Affairs" by Jane Heller
When Barbara Chessner is confronted by a husband
who not only wants a divorce but is very vocal about her
shortcomings, she unwittingly makes a pact with the devil
to improve herself. What happens next is a novel full of
bizarre happenings as she seeks to annul the contract.
While this smacks of the occult, the book is written
I


formed guest poured a container of pre-mix provided
by the bartender into the fountain thinking it was or-
ange juice. Thank goodness the Cracker saw what hap-
pened and the fountain was emptied and refilled before
any kids got to it.
One bit of serendipity emerged from these minor
glitches which has now become a family recipe. Cracker
blended some tasty parsley-garlic olives as a side dish and
also made a Caesar salad using a special baked garlic
dressing and homemade croutons. One of the ladies in the
kitchen thought the olives were to go into the salad and,
in doing so, created a hit. (Recipe on request)
The rehearsal dinner at a famous Island restaurant
hosted by the parents of the groom was absolute per-
fection. Some things should be left to the profession-
als. (Thanks, Ed and Apdrea.)
During the wedding rehearsal, the Cracker flubbed
his one-liner. When asked by the minister, "Who gives
this woman to be wed?" he replied, "My mother and I
do," which caused a snicker or two.
All the next day, he practiced his one-liner under
his wife's wary eye and, by golly, during the actual
wedding came through with a hearty and well-meant,
"Her mother and I do."
Live happily ever after, Laura Anne and Jason!


in a lighthearted way which makes for easy reading.
by Mollie Sandberg
"A Southern Exposure" by Alice Adams
A fairy tale for adults as Mr. & Mrs. Baird decide
to move South during the Depression to save money
and avoid the stresses of Connecticut. They are be-
fuddled by the Southern morals and manners in the
small town of Pinehill where they end up. Their gradual
enlightenment occurs alongside their growing accep-
tance of their neighbors foibles. A funny, interesting,
if somewhat immoral, story of Dixie characters and
characteristics.
Reviewed by Carol Sandidge

"Borderliners" by Peter Hoeg
Although not science fiction, this book deals with a
cruel distortion of time in an educational experiment at an
elite Danish school. The three main characters, Peter,
August and Katarina, are orphans cast together as the
unwilling victims of a brutal system. Using wits and re-
sources, two escape while one falls into madness. A com-
pelling, suspenseful and painful novel that touches ideas
from the author's previous thriller, Smilla's Sense ofSnow.
Reviewed by Lorraine Woodard


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01 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a JULY 25, 1996 M PAGE 19 3i


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
July 13, domestic battery, 500 block of South Bay
Boulevard. The victim and subject got into an argument
over diving gear and the subject hit the victim in the
chest and forehead. A capias was issued for the subject,
who fled the residence.
July 13, grand theft, 875 North Shore Drive, Rod
and Reel Pier. The complainant reported a person un-
known broke the fence and attempted to remove a boat
tied to the pier. Damages were $50.
July 15, burglary, 800 block of North Shore
Drive. The complainant reported a person unknown
removed construction materials.

Bradenton Beach
July 14, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Bayside Park. The officer on patrol observed a pickup
truck had been burglarized. Later the owner reported a
VHF radio valued at $200 and a GPS navigational sys-
tem valued at $700 were missing. Damages were $200.
July 14, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Bayside Park. The complainant reported a person un-
known broke the vehicle's window and removed a can-
vas bag valued at $170, reels valued at $2,700, a rod
valued at $390, a GPS navigational system valued at
$670, a color monitor valued at $800, a VHF radio
valued at $200 and miscellaneous items valued at $200.
Damages were $350.
July 17, domestic battery, 1600 block of Gulf
Drive North. The officer, responding to an anony-
mous complaint, found the victim sitting on the
ground beside her vehicle. Her shirt was torn and she
had a large black and blue lump between her eyes,
said the report.
The subject said she fell out of the vehicle and
hit her head. The victim first refuted the account,
then agreed. The officer noted the injuries could not
have been caused by a fall on the blacktop, and
asked the victim why she changed her story. She said






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she didn't want the subject to get in trouble. The
subject was placed in custody. .,. ..... ,
July 17, theft, Coquina Beach. The victim re-
ported he placed a camcorder valued at $900, a case
valued at $25, a battery charger valued at $75 and film
valued at $60 on a picnic table. When he returned from
a walk, the items were gone.
July 18, burglary to an automobile, 200 Bridge
St., Bradenton Beach City Pier. The complainant re-
ported a person unknown entered the vehicle and re-
moved a purse containing a wallet valued at $30, a
checkbook, identification, a driver's license, medica-
tion, a watch and $37 in cash.

Holmes Beach
July 12, battery, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported he was walking along Gulf Drive
when four males in a white Toyota drove by and yelled
at him. The vehicle turned around and, as it passed the
complainant again, he felt something hit him hard on
the left side of the face, knocking off his glasses. The
officer found his glasses on the ground.
July 12, found property four patio chairs, 52nd
Street beach.
July 12, aggravated domestic assault, 3600 block
of Gulf Drive. The complainant reported she was bat-
tered by the subject and threatened with a knife. The
subject fled but was found in a local bar and placed in
custody.
July 12, suspicious, 7300 Gulf Drive, Island Plan-
tation. The complainant reported juveniles were hold-
ing a party in one of the rooms. According to the report,
the juveniles who rented the room said it was for his
parents' anniversary party.
The officer found five juveniles in the room, which
he reported was a mess. He told them to clean up the
room and leave. The complainant locked the room. The
officer called the parents of the juvenile who rented the
room and advised them of their son's claim and the
party.
July 13, drunk, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn. The
complainant reported a subject lying on the ground in
the parking lot. The officer woke the subject and called

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a taxi to take him home.
July 13, lost property, 700 Manatee Ave., King-
fish Ramp. The complainant reported she left her purse
containing $2,000 in jewelry, a bank book, a check
book, a phone card and identification in the parking lot.
Later a female subject called the complainant, said she
saw her leave her purse and returned it with the con-
tents intact.
July 14, 700 Manatee Ave., Kingfish Ramp. The
complainant reported a person unknown broke the left
side vent window of his pickup truck. Nothing was
missing.
July 14, 700 Manatee Avenue, Kingfish Ramp.
The complainant reported a person unknown smashed
the window of his pickup truck. Nothing was missing.
July 14, service, 600 block of Key Royale Drive.
The complaint reported a dead blue heron in her yard.
The officer disposed of it.
July 15, found property a necklace, 6500 block
of Gulf Drive.
July 15, lost property $3,900 in traveler's
checks, 4000 Gulf Drive, Manatee County Public
Beach.
July 15, lost property a driver's license, 4000
Gulf Drive, Manatee County Public Beach.
July 15, lost property a wallet, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Manatee County Public Beach.
July 18, assistance, 6600 Gulf Drive, Resort
66. The complainant reported four subjects swim-
ming in the pool. When asked to leave, the subjects
threw a large ashtray into the pool and turned over
garbage cans. The officer found four subjects in a
swimming pool in the 100 block of 68th Street. They
said they did not live there and the officer advised
them to leave. He was unable to determine if they
were the same subjects reported swimming at Resort
66.
July 18, damage, 7000 Gulf Drive, Tiffany Place.
The complainant reported a person unknown broke a
bulb and globe from an outside light post. Damages
were $75.
July 18, theft of a bicycle, 5701 Marina Drive,
Island Branch Library.




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fiM PAGE 20 0 JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Clams and mullet, bait and switch snook


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Clams and mullet, historically two of this area's most
important seafood products, are back on menus again. At
least that's true on the high-end menus that count those
in the Holy City of Tallahassee and at area resorts such as
Cedar Key.
The elevation of mullet to socially acceptable eating
status comes as the price of that fish has at least doubled
in the past year due to the inshore waters gillnet ban. Now
mullet are taken with castnets, the added work means
higher prices, and maybe price does have a lot to do with
how much some people like things.
As a matter of fact, during a recent weekend stay in
Tallahassee, I picked up a new tour guide to Florida that
recommended we try eating mullet as a way to "eat what
the natives eat" Boy, there goes the price up some more.
Fortunately, the supply of mullet seems to be increas-
ing, so that helps those of us with a castnet of our own.
Clams, on the other hand, played out around here sev-
eral decades ago. Clamming at one time was an industry
so huge that barges looking like present-day dredging
machinery worked the local coast for clams and eventu-
ally worked out the critters.
Then came a soaring human population and its ac-
companying pollution, so it appeared the clam industry
was dead forever. But now it appears that's not so.
A couple of months ago I mentioned the new clam-
ming project starting up in Bull Bay south of Sarasota. It
seems an even bigger one is now underway in the Cedar
Key area.
Promoted by the State of Florida as, among other
things, employment for fishers thrust out of work by the
net ban, the new clammers get five-acre leases of bay bot-
tom and some technical help not entirely unlike
farmer's old "40 acres and a mule" philosophy.
Well, the first clam crops are now coming out of the




DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Ju125 7:35 2.4 12:08 1.3 10:31 1.5 3:09 0.5
Jul26 8:32 2.6 12:53 1.4 11:56 1.5 4:15 0.3
Jul27 9:30 2.7 1:52 1.4 5:12 0.1
Ju28 12:56 1.6 3:02 1 .5 10:25a 2.8 5:59 0.0
Jul29 1:28 1.6 4:11 1.4 11:17a* 2.9 6:44 0.0
Jul30 1:53 1.6 5:10 1.3 12:10 2.9 7:22 0.0
Jul31 2:18 1.7 6:07 1.2 1:02 2.8 7:58 0.2
SCortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later



OVER



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Cedar Key beds and are hot new items in the area's many
restaurants and up in Tallahassee, too. I couldn't find them
raw, but steamed they're delicious. The little clams pro-
duce meat about the size of a fifty-cent piece and are very
sweet and meaty.
A check with Karen Bell over at Star Fish Co. in
Cortez reveals nobody locally has taken up clam raising,
but if you'd like to try some of the new product, she'll be
glad to order them for us.
Up at Cedar Key, on the other hand, there are leased
clam beds both in the bay itself and off in some of the
backwater areas. So far, according to the Cedar Key
weekly newspaper, clam farming hasn't had much of an
economic impact except as a locally produced and very
edible seafood popular with both tourists and locals, but
there's still a lot of hope for the long term as production
goes up.
So there's no telling if we're on the verge of a resur-
gence of Florida's clam industry, but early signs are posi-
tive and it could be another money-maker for local com-
mercial fishers as Sarasota Bay continues to be cleaned up.
Clams and mullet now there's a mouth-watering
combination.

Possible record snook
For folks who keep track of such things, you should
know a possible world record snook was caught recently
in the Indian River. And the fisher used an unusual "bait
and switch" technique you might find interesting.
Capt. Bram Broder of Stuart, a professional light
tackle guide, landed a 31-pound snook on eight-pound test
line, besting the old eight-pound record of 24 pounds, 12
ounces. How he did it is almost more interesting than the
fish.
Broder says he was fishing at first light July 4 using
live bait to tease big snook out of the deep water onto some
grass shallows. Upon seeing a big wake terrifying his live
the guide quickly cast a deep-running DOA Bait Buster
lure just past the big fish and began a retrieve.
There was a quick strike and Broder had his fish. It
was 42 inches long and had a 28-inch girth. After mea-
surements and a quick picture by his wife, Broder returned
the fish to the water.
Broder says he's been using the "bait and switch"
technique this summer without a lot of success, but it cer-
tainly worked this time.


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8 AM to 6 PM


Weekend boat show
If you'd like a chance to look over an array of new and
used boats next weekend, all in one spot, check out the
"Nautical Extravaganza" scheduled for Friday through
Sunday at the Manatee Civic Center in Palmetto.
There's free admission and parking so the price is
right to browse around and dream of what you'd buy just
as soon as that lottery ticket pays off. In addition to boats,
there'll be fishing tackle, gifts and boating safety informa-
tion available.
Hours Friday are 10-7, Saturday 9-8, Sunday 10-5.
See you next week.



By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
July 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report from Coast Guard Group St. Petersburg
of a 40-foot sailboat overdue from Marathon to Hanlins
Landing, Fla. Station Cortez conducted a communications
check with all local marinas, bridges and waterfront res-
taurants in search of the missing vessel with no results.
July 13, Boarding. A 30-foot power boat was boarded
in Venice Inlet The operator received a notice of viola-
tion for not having the vessel's registration, oil pollution
placard or garbage placard on board.
July 13, Boarding. A 33-foot power boat was boarded
near the Ringling Bridge. The operator received a notice
of violation for not having the vessel's home port on the
stern and not having a garbage placard on board.
July 13, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 34-foot power boat overdue from
Apollo Beach to Anna Maria. Station St. Petersburg
launched a boat to search the area from Apollo Beach to
the Sunshine Skyway Bridge and located the vessel at a
restaurant
July 13, Boarding. A 33-foot power boat was boarded
at the Sarasota Quay. The operator received a written
warning for not having the vessel's registration on board.
July 13, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded at the Sarasota Quay. The operator received a
notice of violation for being intoxicated, not having reg-
istration numbers displayed on the vessel, not having ves-
PLEASE SEE COAST LINES, NEXT PAGE


m F]UN & SUN
PARASAIL
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS:
795-1653
easy and fun -
anyone can flyl -.. -

Located adj. to the Cortez Deep Sea Fishing Fleet
at the base of the Cortez Bridge














AMERICAN CAR WASH
& QUICK LUBE SERVICE
Washing, Waxing and Detailing
(Pick Up & Delivery Available)





No Appointment Necessary
Mon. Fri. 8 5 Sat. 8-4
24-Hour Self Service Facility

H Castrol (941) 778-1617 S
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Every Thursday is Ladies Day


Bridge Street Pier d Cafe
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)


1






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 M PAGE 21 MI]

Too hot to fish? Go out at night and catch shark


By Capt. Mike Heistand
As summer weather progresses and summer waters
warm, fishing starts to level off. There are still redfish
and catch-and-release snook around, and mackerel are
being caught by pier fishers at the passes, but, hey, it's
getting just too hot to go out during the noontime hours
with little breeze and no clouds to break the sun glare.
What to do? Nighttime angling is the answer, and there
are good reports of shark being caught after the sun
goes down and the temperature cools off a little.
Jack at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier fishers
there have been catching a lot of catch-and-release
snook, redfish, black drum, mangrove snapper, mack-
erel and the occasional sheepshead.
Gary at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there are catching mackerel, a few snook, reds and
they've been targeting a five-foot-long barracuda that's
been hanging around the pier with no success as yet.
Jim at the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier said
reds have been plentiful at night, as have been
linesiders.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 75 head of Key West grunts, por-
gies, snapper and sea bass. The six-hour trips averaged
S85 head of Key West grunts, sand perch and a few


COAST LINES, FROM PAGE 20

sel registration, not having navigational lights on after
sunset and having an improperly charged fire extinguisher.
The passenger on the boat ran away from officers while
being escorted to the rest room but was later apprehended.
The passenger was arrested by Sarasota police and
charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct.
July 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 14-foot power boat aground in
Lemon Bay. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 18087165 re-
sponded, floated the vessel and towed it to safe moorings.
July 14, Boarding. A 16-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a notice of viola-
tion for not having the vessel's registration on board, not
having a throwable personal flotation device, not having
a sound-producing device and not adhering to proper rules
of the road the vessel cut off a Coast Guard vessel when
that boat had the right-of-way and nearly caused a colli-
sion between three boats.
July 14, Boarding. A 21-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a notice of viola-
tion for not having the vessel's registration on board, hav-
ing a child under the age of six without a life jacket, not
having a flame arrestor on the engine and having a full gas
can with no cap on board. The boat's voyage was termi-
nated due to the safety violations.
July 14, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 16-foot power boat overdue from
Englewood to Boca Grande. A commercial towing com-


grouper. The nine-hour trips averaged 70 head of grou-
per, snapper and Key West grunts.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are catching some scattered reds and a few nice-
sized flounder. Shrimp and white bait are plentiful for
bait, though.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's finding plenty of red-
fish and a few catch-and-release snook while out on his
charters.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's been targeting tar-
pon all week and has landed and released four.
On my boat Magic we've been catching redfish
and trout during the daylight hours, blacknose and
blacktip sharks at night.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's also getting reds and
trout, and notes white bait is getting bigger as these
summer days continue.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said wade fishers
are catching redfish by the Anna Maria Island Bridge
on low tides. Offshore, amberjack fishing has shut
down, but snapper angling is excellent. Bill said there
are plenty of dolphin the fish, not the mammal -
about 30 miles out in the Gulf. His suggestion is to troll
for them with bally-hoo as bait.
Good luck and good fishing.


pany located the vessel and towed it to safe moorings
while Station Cortez assisted with communications.
July 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a disabled 16-foot power boat near
Sand Point Cove. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 26084231
responded and towed the vessel to safe moorings.
July 14, Boarding. A 23-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a written warning
for not having the vessel's registration on board and hav-
ing improper spacing on the vessel's registration numbers.
July 14, Boarding. A 16-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a written warning
for not having a sound-producing device on board.
July 14, Boarding. An 18-foot power boat was
boarded near the Ringling Bridge. The operator received
a notice of violation for not having a sound-producing de-
vice, improperly displaying registration numbers and not
having enough life jackets for the passengers aboard the
boat. The vessel's voyage was terminated due to the safety
violations.
July 14, Boarding. A 17-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator was given a notice of vio-
lation for not having the vessel's registration on board,
having improperly displayed registration numbers and
having expired flares.
July 14, Boarding. A 20-foot commercial tow boat
was boarded in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a
notice of violation for not having his captain's license on
board, not having throwable personal flotation devices and
not having a fire extinguisher.


F' KITE SHOP
lp VomainuhadWt.ndI


CHRISTMAS IN JULY SALE
78-0238 "Copter Kites"
As seen on
ON GULF DR. (1 block N. of Cortez Light)


Ling limit
Jim French caught his limit on cobia sometimes
called ling which featured these 39 and 41 inchers
while fishing with Capt. Tom Chaya.
July 14, Boarding. A 21-foot power boat was boarded
in Sarasota Bay. The operator received a notice of viola-
tion for not having the vessel's registration on board, in-
operable engine room blower, intoxicated and negligent
operation of a boat.
July 15, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report from a fishing vessel of finding an Elec-
tronic Positioning Indicating Radio Beacon 20-23 miles
southwest of Bean Point. Debris was found in the area as
well. The EPIRB was not activated and appeared new.
Station Cortez searched the area with negative results.
July 16, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 42-foot sailboat overdue from Belize
City to Miami. Station Cortez conducted communications
checks with all marinas, bridges and waterfront restaurants
in the area with negative results.
July 16, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a 20-foot power boat capsized with
five people in the water near the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
A Coast Guard boat, helicopter and the Florida Marine
Patrol responded and removed four people from the wa-
ter while a Good Samaritan removed the fifth person.
FMP and the Coast Guard searched the area for the fam-
ily pet but were unable to locate it. None of the people
were injured.
*- --- -------- 1
I s25 OFF
.s 2nd Hr. Rental I
I 1st Hr. Reg. Price I
V 4 w/ this coupon exp. 8/1/96

A-1 ISLAND JET SKI
I Accepted Captains Marina
-5501 Marina Drive
IAccepting competitors discounts 77 8-
L honored tour discretion77 55
hoord-----m-----i--------iq




WSth this ad
|1 BOATERS KEY RING Exp. 8 196
a, *Illuminated Floating t iiper lrt
united to first








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o NE SYOR I 95-7796 I
SuSHING STORE 12507 CORTEZ RD

I Gas Diesel Ice Beer Cold Drinks I
Oll -lSTiOP l i I llllI


ANNIE$ OF CORTEZ




FISHING
CHARTERS
1/2, 3/4 & Full Day Trips
With Capt. Zach
Zacharias
CHnRSTMA IN JULY SPECIAiL
i 10% OFF FROZEN BAIT & TACKLE I
S: w/ this ad exp. 7/31/96
COLD BEER & SODA AT THE BAR OR TO GO
4334 127 St. W., Cortez 794-3580
Just east of Cortez Bridge before the Seafood Shack


CORTEZ WATERCRAFT
RENTALS
By the Hour Day Week
* JET SKIS
SAllNew...
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* PONTOON BOATS
for cruising & fishing
Located at the base of the Cortez bridge
941-792-5263

a --
FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
CALL for RESERVATIONS
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED


--


i


F


----






Ui' PAGE 22 0 JULY 25, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Se II ng the Island
from the same
I location since 1970.

6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
[B MLS L. 1-800-865-0800



SPECIALIST f
REDUCED *REDUCED *REDUCED
3 Waterfront Villas
"ST BARTS" 2BR/2BA & 2-car '
garage. Save S3,000.00 CALL
"GRAND CA YMAN" Largest MARILYN
villa 2BR/2BA + den, 2-car TREVETHAN
garage. Save S10,000. REALTOR*
"STBARTS" 2BR/2BA & 1-car 778-6066
garage. Save $4,000.00 or 792-8477






ets T eStlsta tA

419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294


OPEN HOUSE-
SUNDAY JULY 28 *1 4
2202 Avenue A, Bradenton Beach
Beautiful and inviting 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 bath quality built
showplace, only a short walk to Gulf or bay. A decorator's
dream complete with dazzling bay views over Anna Maria
Sound Includes Homeowner's Warranty for $248,000.


I -N


BLUE RIBBON HOME
This impeccable, tastefully appointed 2BR/2BA home reflects
pride of ownership throughout. Amenities include beautifully
tiled bathrooms and entry foyer, lofty vaulted ceilings with fans
and Paladin Windows, spacious loft area, perfect for an office
or television area, gourmet kitchen with almond cabinetry and
beautifully manicured grounds. Located on Anna Maria's se-
cluded north end only steps to the beach, this desirable island
retreat is being offered for a reasonable $215,000, including
One Year Homeowner's Warrantyl
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"


Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Guilford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser ... 778-1820
Exclusive
Waterfront
Estates MLS V.... I
Video Collection o -- -
,SrL ytindy JWea fstaL aProf oconal
S/it ail'lCng aIn 9imdclx 'o/2taaLLif.sLyt'cs


"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...

S-I can make your
island dreams
come true.

ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty Since 1939


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


LI in
5 -


AInnaMariasndC tS


^^^ET~OpeB~nll 7~ T Days 5 a Week^


IT'S AN EASY STROLL TO THE GULF from this
exceptional, spacious, 3-story townhouse. Two
heated pools, tennis, docking privileges. Situated
on a lovely lagoon leading to the bay. $134,900.
Dick Ring, 748-7937. #13626.
STUNNING CUSTOMIZED Smugglers Landing
condominium. Immaculate. Perfect for the dis-
cerning boater. 40' dock, easy access to Tampa
Bay, boating, islands and beaches. 2-car covered
parking, pool and tennis. $190,000. John &
Jolene Zisman, 383-5252. #13691.
WATERFRONT CONDOMINIUM with fabulous
ICW view. Deeded carport, large boat slip. Pool
and tennis. Desirable 2BR/2B 1st floor corner
unit. West Bay Point & Moorings. $178,500. Bob
Burnett, 387-0048. #15844.
PRIME, CONVENIENT LOCATION. Duplex your
income. 2BR/2B and 2BR/1B. Gulf-side. Short
walk to beach. Zoned C2. $205,000. Adjacent lot
also available. Anne Miller, 792-6475. #15425.
ZONED C2. Lot, 90' x 100' +/-. Prime Gulf Drive
location. Explore the possibilities. $180,000.
Anne Miller, 792-6475. #15843.
I I I' I '

On Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach. Contact Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
PERICO BAY CLUB. Gated community. Beautifully
furnished 2BR/2B. Lake view, 2nd floor. Washer/
dryer. Heated pool, tennis. $1,100.00 per month.
HOLMES BEACH. Newly renovated 2BR/2B,
turnkey furnished. Spectacular Gulf view. Avail-
able for summer or winter. $600 per week /
$1,600 per month.
Exceptional properties, exceptional service.
Call us for your property management needs.

S 11iF i "IVU II n1~lry~pU1 HN11 11


DICK MAHER
REALTOR
778-2261
Dick has been a major player --
in the Island real estate "
industry for more than 10
years and is one of Neal &
Neal's Top Producers.
Call anytime for a consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325



RENTALS


--





Debbie Dial
Leasing Manager


* 2/1 2306 Ave C ... $595
* 2/1 w/ boat dock on canal ... $650
* 2/1 blk from beach ... $650
* Commercial Condo 400 sq. ft.
w/office & facilities... $600
"'DIAL" DEBBIE DIAL
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
O R/MAIK Gulfstream
5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
SHOLMES BEACH, FL.


FOUR UNITS
Four units, two buildings, concrete block, quality con-
struction. Each unit has one bedroom, one bath, turnkey
furnished. Only two blocks to beach, one block to Bay.
Good rental history. 100 x 100 ft. lot. Back lawn totally
fenced. $249,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
CONVENIENT LOCATION 3BR/2BA newly con-
structed home just one block from one of Anna Maria's fin-
est beaches. Features include vaulted ceiling, overhead fans,
southern exposure. $189,900. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
DIRECT BAYFRONT Hard to top this 2BR/2BA
waterview home anywhere on the Island. 100 x 100 ft. lot
right on the Intracoastal Waterway. Newly remodeled, new
appliances, elevator, garage, carport, boat docks and more.
Priced to sell at $399,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
TIDY ISLAND TOWNHOUSE Exceptional 2 or
3BR/2BA Bayfront unit. If quality is important, then this
is the property for you. Gated community and outstand-
ing views are accentuated by exquisite finishing touches.
Must see! $290,000. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
SANDY POINTE CONDOS Views of the Bay from
the balcony of this spacious and furnished condo unit.
2BR/2BA, cathedral ceilings, quiet and private area of the
Island, overlooking pool area. Close to shopping and
beaches. $109,000. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.


ED'S SPECIAL R
OF THE WEEK: TA


IMPERIAL HOUSE
2BR/1BA totally upgraded unit. New carpet, break-
Sfast bar, walk-in shower. Low maintenance fees.
Ed Oliveira Priced at $99,900. Call Ed Oliveira 778-1751.
Da.7 -7O : ..". e...".'


II A
RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY

THE # RESIDENTIAL RESALE OFFICE IN MANATEE COUNTY!




Debbie Dial Yvonne Higgins Sandy Greiner Jennier Jones Don Schroder Karen Schroder Barbara Turner
CALL ONE OF OUR ISLAND PROFESSIONALS TODAY!






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 23 IM


Wedebrock purchases Island
Neal Mannausa rental office
Wedebrock announced the purchase of Neal
Mannausa Inc.'s single family and condominium rental
accounts managed at 605 D Manatee Avenue West,
Holmes Beach. The rental accounts for both offices
will be combined and located at the current location
until Aug. 1. when the accounts will be managed from
the Wedebrock Real Estate office in Holmes Beach.

Real estate raves
Neal & Neal Realtors in Holmes Beach has an-
nounced that Janis Van Steenburgh was the office's top
producer and Rose Schnoerr was the top lister for the
month of June.





kV-olll 6me oT; '6 -lii L























OPEN HOUSES
Sunday JULY 28, 1996
S-4 pm
1351 Perico Pointe Cir., PBC, Bradenton.. $210,000
3BR/2BA Bayfront unit. Hardwood floors, crown mold-
ings. Carla Price 778-5648 eves.
5623 15th Avenue W., Bradenton .............$69,900
Meadowcroft 2BR/2BA condo with a lake view in
move-in condition. Clarke Williams 778-1718 eves.
6934 Arbor Oaks Circle, Bradenton....... $142,900
Arbor Oaks. 2 story, 3BR/2.5BA home open & spa-
cious, community pool, no yard work Elfi Starrett 798-
9716 eves.
264 Gladiolus, Anna Maria ................... $159,500
2BR/1.5BA elevated home. Short walkto beach. Frank
Migliore 778-2662 eves.
3811 Plumrose, Bradenton ................. $154,900
San Remo 3BR/2BA home on deep sail boat water.
Family room, dock. Mi Mi Summers 798-3247 eves.
518 74th Street, Holmes Beach.............. $229,900
2BR/2BA home on deep water canal. Split bedroom,
eat-in kitchen, open & bright Florida room, covered
patio, large lot. Marion Ragni 778-1504.
203 Lakeview Drive, Anna Maria............ $189,500
3BR/3BA 2-story home on a large corner lot. Boat
docking privileges. Susan Hatch 778-7616 eves.
503 Bayview Drive, Holmes Beach........ $129,900
2BR/1BA home on large lot with BAYVIEW. Eat-in
kitchen, Florida room, deeded boat dock. Carol Will-
iams 778-1718 eves.
879 Waterside Lane, Bradenton.......... $123,000
Perico Bay Club 2BR/2BA plus loft townhome. Many
upgrades. Great water views from both floors. Judy
Duncan 778-1589 eves.
4255 Gulf Drive #221, Holmes Beach .... $121,900
Island Village. 2BR/2BA condo, view of the Bay. Zee
Catanese 794-8991 eves.
512 68th Street, Holmes Beach.............. $219,900
Canalfront home. 2BR/2BA, family room, dock, deep
water canal. Bill Allen 778-1620 eves.

Nous Parlons Frangais
Wir Sprechen Deutsch
Se Habla Espanol
Parliamo Italiano
Farsi Mi Dunim
Mir Rede Schwyzerduetsch


Donna Mosleyand Beverly Nelms have joined
Neal & Neal Realtors at its Island office located at 605
C Manatee Ave. in Holmes Beach.
The Prudential Florida Realty announced that T.
Dolly Young was the Island office's top lister and
Bruce Skorupa was its top seller for the month of June.
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. announced that Mike
Migone was its top producer and lister for the month
of June at the firm's Longboat Key office, Rebecca
Smith was top lister and Muffin Shearon top sales
agent at the Holmes Beach office.
Wendy Kay Foldes was the top sales agent and
Marilyn Trevethan was the top lister at Island Real Estate
in Homes Beach in June.


Island transactions
6305 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, a North Beach Vil-
lage elevated attached townhouse of 1,206 sfla with
2bed/2bath/2car built in 1988 on a 39x87 lot, was sold
6/4/96, Fitzgerald to Nelson, for $156,500; list un-
known.
770 North Shore Dr., Anna Maria, a ground level
1,512 sfla 4bed/2bath duplex built in 1969 on a 50x100
lot, was sold 6/4/96, Saddlemire to Zubero, for
$150,000; list $172,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real es-
tate broker, 778-1222, exclusivelyfor The Islander
Bystander. 1996.


TeP dnaFlia el
5340-1GulfDriv,- m


IMPERIAL HOUSE *MVP LISTING
Gulf to Bay complex with
heated pool & fishing dock.
*Seller will entertain offers be-
tween $72,000 $89,000.
CH#60974.
SCarol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
J778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

GULFVIEW Elevator, extra storage, parking beneath.
Tiffany condo, rarely offered, 2BR/2BA. Offered at
$185,000. #15658.
ANNA MARIA ... canalfront 4BR/3BA custom built home
with boat dock. Many extras. $249,000.
MVP LISTING. Bay access 3BR/3BA across from
Sarasota Bay with view of Bay, Islands. Must see interior
to appreciate. Seller will entertain offers between
$140,000 $170,000. #TDY15251.
BAYFRONT SERENITY. Nature's best. 3BR/3BA. Coun-
try kitchen, open floor plan. DY13571. $209,000.
GULFFRONT CONDO. Spectacular sunsets and sandy
beaches. Light & comfy. DY13378. $168,000.
T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427

SILK OAK CONDO Nice income from this 2BR/
2BA condo. Close to everything; hospital, shop-
ping, dining and mall. $450,000. #14086. Call Karin
Stephan eves. 383-1267.
NICE HOME Spacious 1BR/1BA home on large
fenced lot. Great workshop and plenty of storage.
Park your motor home, boat/trailer or truck. 1 car
garage and 1 car carport. Call Horace T. Gilley eves.
792-0758. #11959. Seller will entertain offers be-
tween $60,000 $73,000.
CONDO 2BR/2BA ground floor unit in good condition.
Located in a bayfront complex with gorgeous views,
heated pool, and putting green. Great location and
priced to sell. Call Debbie Thrasher eves. 778-3395 or
Connie Volts eves. 778-0399. #68740. $116,500.


Karin Stephan
REALTOR" N
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Pager#
215-5556
Fax: 941- 778-3035


KEY ROYALE DRIVE
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with
fireplace, large living room, storm shutters,
lush landscaping, fruit trees, pool and ca-
nal with boat dock #KS63811. $395,000.


CANALFRONT HOME
Beautifully maintained 3BR/2.5BA home in
Longboat Key. Fruit trees, pool. Carpet and
terrazzo floors, tile roof and screened court-
yard. #KS13327. $295,000.


48 CONDOS
IN TERRA CEIA BAY
GOLF & TENNIS CLUB
2BR/2BA & 3BR/2BA
starting at $112,500 -
$155,000 on 8th floor. Out-
standing view over Bay to
Skyway Bridge. Fantastic
boating & fishing water.
Make reservations now.


ANNA MARIA
Key West style cus-
tom-built house under
construction. 3 large
bedrooms, cathedral
ceilings, screened
porch, 2 car attached
garage and a pool. Buy
now and select your
finishing touches.
#KS12245. $279,000.

Call
Karin Stephan


m > > 1 ] t J[lrl Io> [ 1 [ --1^l I 1,
-Proud -corporate sposrso-ot ain aorlt s for Sbrohure-nd*dscoun copon


," MICHAEL ADVOCATE
REALTOR*/GRI
Real Estate Lecturer: NYU
Biographed in Who's
Who in American Law
Je Parle Francais
(un petit peu)
After hours:
S (941) 778-0608

JUST LISTED
IMMACULATE
SNewer elevated
3BR/2BA home
near Anna Maria's
pristine white
beach and glisten-
ing turquoise Gulf
Sof Bean Point.
Vaulted ceilings
and open floor plan. Kitchen with new appliances. Wood
shuttered window treatments in living room. 3-4 car ga-
rage under house with 3 doors. A must see. MVP listing.
Seller will entertain offers between $210,000- $250,000.
Call Michael Advocate eves. 778-0608.
JUST LISTED








STRIKING townhouse at Sunbow Bay Condominium.
4BR/3BA. Spanish tile floors and Berber carpeting cre-
ate a sensational look coupled with a step-down,
vaulted ceiling living room overlooking its lush back
yard and private boat dock, make this large unit a won-
derful purchase. Numerous closets and a large stor-
age/laundry room on ground level cannot be beat. MVP
listing. Seller will entertain offers between $140,000 -
$170,000. Call Michael Advocate eves. 778-0608.


.'..: ~
.-,' .v
i .',WI. sf
.4p~ .
~-.,,-..


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS Q


DUPLEX ... 2BR/2BA, 1BR/1BA, one block to beach. Long term tenants.
#KS13934. $159,000.
DUPLEX ... 2BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, close to the beach. Too good to pass up.
#KS13892. Seller will entertain offers between $88,000 $110,000
HOME ... 2BR/2BA w/built-in jacuzzi. Privacy fence & fruit trees. #KS13913.
$159,000.
TRIPLEX... Direct Gulffront on two lots. 3BR/1.5BA, 2BR/1BA, efficiency. Deck on
the Gulf. #KS14087. $750,000.
TRIPLEX... 3BR/1 BA, 2BR/1BA, 1BR/1 BA close to the beach excellent rental his-
tory. #KS13966. $159,900.


s nt


la &
,,,.


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;$`i"""






EB PAGE 24 E JULY 25, 1996 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

A A A A __________________________________________________ B


WHITE WICKER 42" round table with heavy glass
top. 4 chairs with cushions. Excellent condition. $300
OBO. W/W step tables $25. Call 778-1981.
5 PIECE RATTAN dining set, like new. Wash~-. ak,
48" round glass top. Cushions pastel colors. Paid
$500, sell for $295. 794-5376.
SIDE BY SIDE Refrigerator/freezer with ice maker.
Almond color, good condition. $200. Call 778-3629.
FURNITURE SALE 4-chair dining room set, couch,
coffee table, chair. Call 778-7692.
DINING ROOM SET Extended table with two leaves,
4 chairs, and lovely large lighted china cabinet. $450
OBO. Call 778-0799.


3-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., July 26 & 27,
8 ? Furniture, household items, baby cribs and
much more. 210 85th Street, Holmes Beach.
MOVING SALE Sat. & Sun., July 27 & 28, 9- ? Lots
of kitchen stuff, clothes, books. 211 67th Street,
Holmes Beach. My junk, your treasure.
YARD SALE Sat., July 27, 8 12. Wing back chair,
goose down bachelor chair, floor lamps, misc. No
junk. 603 Baronet Lane.
YARD SALE Sat., July 27, 8 5. White wood bed-
room set, collectibles, furniture, household items.
216A North Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach.
YARD SALE Sat., July 27, 9 3. Great stuff. 121 50th
Street, Holmes Beach.


GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., July 26 & 27, 9 2. Tele-
scope, karaoke, bikes, TV, dishes, country items, etc.
Flamingo Cay, 9915 Sandpiper Rd. East.


LOST FEMALE CAT in Holmes Beach area on Fri.,
July 19. Long haired tiger striped, white chin, green
eyes. Call 778-0934.


YOGA INTENSIVE WITH Harmony Feldman. July
18, 22, 25 & 29 at the Brain Gym, 7 9 pm. Call 778-
5990 to register.
VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages of
information everything you need to know to enjoy
the two-county area. Retail price $14.95, discounted
33% only at the newspaper office. You pay only $10
plus tax at The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978
"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of stories
and newspaper columns guaranteed to delight new-
comers, visitors and oldtimers too, by original Florida
Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This book makes a great gift.
Available for $19.95 at The Islander Bystander, 5404
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978
REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5404
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center (between D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre restaurants), Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls)- We
come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only). 778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLCI Call 778-6000.


1978 CHEVY CAPRICE Estate Wagon. V8, 350.
Runs great. $700 OBO. Call Bill at 778-5455.
JEEP 1985 CJ-7 driven daily on Island. Runs great.
Moving in 3 weeks. Must sell fast. $2,000 cash. Call
778-5766.
1986 CHRYSLER LABARON convertible. New front/
rear brakes. As is $1,795 or reasonable offer. Please
call 778-6735.
1985 VW SCIROCCO Strong engine. Needs some axle
work and muffler. $899 OBO. Call Frank at 778-8200.
1987 VW FOX 4 door, good condition. Good A/C, new
exhaust, new radiator. $2,500 OBO. Call 778-6836.
1984 Honda Prelude 5 speed, power sunroof. Mile-
age only 70,000, top condition. Detailed every three
months. New Cooper tires. Drives like new. $3,500
OBO. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
NEED TO RENT a boat dock for 12' 6" beam, 38'
motor yacht. Call 779-1049.


TOM

NELSON


6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, FL
(800) 865-0800


ISLAND UVINGI
Elevated attached villa overlooks Spring Lake,
2 bedrooms, large kitchen, garage with lots of
storage and workroom downstairs, large deck,
all conveniently located in Holmes Beach makes
this the best buy on the Island at $84,900.



kTO a l
Talk
to .b


Toni!


Realtor*


778-6066
778-1382 after hours


WATERFRONT 4-PLEX IN ANNA MARIA
Unique Anna Maria property located just
steps from the prime north end beaches yet
on a boating waterway, all units rented sea-
sonally and furnished, great money maker,
priced at $349,000.

CANALFRONT HOME
IN ANNA MARIA.
This beautifully landscaped home with
courtyard entrance greets the new home
buyer and also affords gorgeous water
views looking down the canal, split bed-
room plan, unique kitchen with breakfast
nook and spacious Florida room. Priced
at $219,000.


STEPS
TO THE
BEACH
Island
Duplex
$118,900

L.B.K.


$119,000

CALL ME!


ISLANDER


The best news


r % SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICE! THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!
- L -
T115-





GULFFRONTTI __
Lovely 3BD/3BA home on two Gulf lots! 1st floor has liv-
ing area, guest bedrooms, kitchen & 2 baths. Master bed- GU VIEWS BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME
room suite comprises complete 2nd floor! Includes wet 2BR2BA nearly new elevated home is close to the Gulf in 103 Pelican, nna Maria
bar, jacuzzi & opens onto spacious deck overlooking Holmes Beach. This home features 2 master suites with
bar, jacuzzi & opens onto spacious deck overlooking 75 x 100 canalfront lot, cleared, ready to
beautiful beach Two cozy fireplaces, security system plus extra large baths and nice views of the Gulf. Many upgrades 75 x 100 canalfront lot, cleared, ready to
a "little guest house". Call Mare Franklin today including Pella windows and tile floors. Must be seen to be build. $150,000. Shown by appointment only.
appreciated! Reduced to $159,000.
SCall Pat Jackson eves. at 778-3301
k IA M^W, or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986. Doug DOU
1957 Fran Maxon Dowling I oowuC L
FRUI REALTY o, UCENSED REAL ESTATES BROKER Realty 709 Pio'Av.
E1.I REALTY SALES AND RENTALS Anna Maria
'W .ARE Al ld *9701 rO DPO BI,17Mnna Maa.M34216 778-1222 n 222
u05 Gul D rt, PO Box 835 Ana MaAm, Fbrkf 34218 FAX# 778-7035
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250 (941) 778-1450 or 778-2307
A' -LA21 [11;1A 1 Awok5" -3W' II;:.A Lp1 2 =".bvA .0r111


~- --------`----~I~'~~---o~--~~---~~~I-~-


PAUL
COLLINS M
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, FL 778-6066
(800) 865-0800 569-4602 after hours






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 25 IiI


1986 CATALINA 22" roller furled rigging with Marina
8hp outboard. Kept on lift. Must go. $4,350 OBO.
Call 779-2229.
WOMEN'S SAILING Come join the fun! Racing
Thursday. Sunfish and prams. Beginners to ex-
perts. Classes September 9 13. Call 387-8610.


HOMEWORKERS URGENTLY NEEDED! Earn
weekly paychecks from the comfort of your own
home. Free details. Send long, self-addressed,
stamped envelope to: S.P.E.L., Dept. BB, 10955
Bristol Bay Dr., Unit 122, Perico Island, FL. 34209.
CIRCLE K HELP WANTED all shifts, part or full time.
Apply in person. Holmes Beach or Bradenton Beach.
Excellent benefits, advancement opportunities.

Calling ALL VOLUNTEERSI Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you
interested in learning the history of Anna Maria Is-
land? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you
can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


NEED A BABYSITTER? Call Laura. 15 years old,
responsible. Bradenton Christian School honor stu-
dent. 3 years experience. 778-1972.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER will watch your kids
for $2.75 hour. If needed, call Jackie Vadas at 792-
9199 or 792-7427. Loves kids.


Fresh mullet T-shirts ... $10
Mail order add $3. The Islander Bystander
accepts MasterCard and Visa for mullet shirts,
subscription orders and classified advertising.
Just give us a call.
Call 941-778-7978


Serving the Island"
'f rom the same
.location since 1970.

Visit us at our web site: http://www.lslandreal.com
[] MLS i. 1-800-865-0800
6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066









JUST LISTED!
Canalfront home in Anna Maria with gorgeous wa-
ter views. Split 2BR/2BA design with unique kitchen
and breakfast nook. Spacious Florida room with
wood burning stove and large deck. $219,000.
SEASIDE GARDENS Elevated apartment with
excellent rental history steps to boat ramp, tennis
court, library and more! $79,900.
ISLAND DUPLEX on large comer lot with car-
port in tropical setting. 1BR/1BA and 2BR/2BA
with excellent rental history. $169,500.
SUMMER RENTAL! Act now! Prime beachfront
properties are going FAST! Call today to arrange
the vacation you have always dreamed of ... from
$600/week.
ANNUAL RENTALS! We have a few 1 and 2
bedroom annual rentals available ... call quickly be-
fore they're gone!


BABYSITTER EXPERIENCED with children of all
ages. Available days, nights, weekends. First Aid
certified. Call Sarah at 778-6799 or 506-5904.
FREE ADS FOR KIDS (under 16) seeking Sum-
mer Jobs. Up t6 21 words free. Must be placed in
person at The Islander Bystander, 5404 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

'THE PERFECTIONIST Cleaning with perfection:
homes, condos, rentals, etc. Call Sharon at 778-0064.


SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES. Licensed,
bonded, experienced. Professional cleaning.
Homes, condos, rentals. Move in/out. Excellent ref-
erences. Beverly. 778-1945.


AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.
ISLAND AUTO TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.


NEED IT CLEANED NOW? Dolphin Cleaning and
Maintenance offers prompt dependable service.
References both on and off the Island. Free esti-
mates. Call Rick at 778-2864.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE, joint sealing, weep
holes, erosion control, commercial diving. All work
guaranteed. Call Cliff at 727-7673. (Matthew 6:30).
REASONABLE RESPONSIBLE POOL care. It's our
business. Will handle all your pressure cleaning needs.
Please call Woodland's Quality Pool Care at 778-6742.
BABYSITTING EXPERIENCED MOM available
days, evenings and weekends. My home. Reliable
and responsible. Reasonable rates. Call 778-6090.
RELIABLE PROFESSIONAL COUPLE will sit your
house while you're away. Reasonable fees great
references. Call 778-3629.
PROFESSIONAL PEST CONTROL service. Fully
guaranteed. 28 years experience. Call Bill O'Connor
at 778-1500.
TRANSPORTATION TO & FROM Tampa Airport.
Call 778-7934.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.



JULIE McCLURE

Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
Personal
SProperty
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


Fran Maxon

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307

LOTS OF LOTS!!!


TWO LOTS CLOSE TO THE BEACH in Anna Maria
City. Super location at North Shore Dr. and Pine Ave.
Currently zoned for residential, office, or retail. Many
possibilities here with lots facing two streets! OWNER
MAY FINANCE! Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-5287 or
Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986 .............. $150,000
413 PINE AVE., ANNA MARIA.............. $69,000
Zones ROR. Lots of possibilities here. OWNER MAY FI-
NANCE. Great buy in Anna Maria City! Call Agnes Tooker
eves. at 778-5287 or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
510 MAGNOLIA AVE., ANNA MARIA.... $82,500
Great building lot near the Bay in the City of Anna Maria.
Lovely neighborhood of executive homes. Don't miss this
opportunity to own a piece of the Island! Priced to sell
at just $82,500. Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-5287 or
Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
111 TERN DR., ANNA MAJF4 ....... $134,500
One of the last~caI l 1I'Rft fAnna Maria. This cul-
de-sac lot offet, .oTlip a very private set-
ting. Call Agnes -l8t78-5287 or Ken Jack-
son eves. at 778- 96.


112 TERN DR., ANNA MARIA ......... $139,900
If you want peace and quiet, this lot is for you! Wonderful
canalfront lot at the end of a very quiet street. This lot offers
great views down several canals. Call Agnes Tooker eves.
at 778-5287 or Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
CLOSE TO THE BEACH! ............ Just $89,000
Buildable lot close to the beach in Anna Maria. 52 x 110.
Don't miss this one!
MULTI-UNIT PROPERTY
Zoned for 9 units. 200 x 200 lot north of Manatee Avenue
in Holmes Beach. Many possibilities including apartment
complex or condominiums. Very close to Gulf beaches.
Owner is motivated and has listed below market value at
$259,000. Call Pat Jackson eves. at 778-3301 or Ken
Jackson eves. at 778-6986.
PRIME CANALFRONT ACREAGE
They can't make anymore! This is the last piece of unde-
veloped waterfront property in Anna Maria City. Unlimited
potential with 15 proposed lots available. Call Fran Maxon
today for a complete brochure on this unbelievable invest-
ment opportunity! Asking $2,110,000.


SALES ASSOCIATES AVAILABLE IN THE EVENINGS.
PAT JACKSON AT 778-3301 AGNES TOOKER AT 778-5287 KEN JACKSON AT 778-6986


I


IISLANDER


-I


r-


-i


I


E'nukh







10B PAGE 26 M JULY 25, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing *Trimming *Edging
lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 1 .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
'778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
71 34 l- -/ AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

SWILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
Interior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


C J's Plumbing Inc. 778-3614
24-Hour Emergency Service & Repairs
SWater Heaters *Drain Cleaning *Disposals *Remodeling
JOHN DAVIS Beeper 569-9052
Licensed & Insured CFC056844

MULCH STONE SHELL

tistoma Trucking
Free Estimates 778-1497


HAULING SOD INSTALLATION


TOMMY'S APPLIANCE
SALES & SERVICE
Reconditioned Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators & More
100% Warranty
S 8106 CORTEZ ROAD 795-4188

CVOIC LESSONS
VOICE COACHING
E. Burkley AUDITION PREP
778-0720 ALL LEVELS


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
SADECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


LOCKSMITH
I Gary F. Deffenbaugh
Licensed-Bonded-Insured
LOCKOUTS
Auto-Home- Commercial
LOCKS
REKEY INSTALL MASTER
New & Used Locks & Repairs
Emergency Service
Service Islands Since 1986
ALOA 778-5594 ASIS



M

J. R

Painting
* SPmriess Cleaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


P. IIWTIw G
by
ElabnlDefIenbauffvA
"Professional Excellence"
, Residential-Commercial
Interior & Exterior
Popcorn Ceiling Repair
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 *778-3468



For
Doors Trim Wicker
Louvre Doors
Furniture
PICK UP & DELIVERY

Ogden Painting
755-2166

TISLANDERw


The "best" news
O 000OO000eOOO00


II


MMII


ISLAND GARDEN CENTER Landscaping and na-
tive plants is our business. Same location 7 years
(Marina Drive). 778-4441
ANNA MARIA GARDEN Center & Landscaping.
Free estimates, 32 years experience. Full service
landscaping and garden center. Next to Island
Foods. All work guaranteed. 778-6630.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
JIM TRAVIS CONSTRUCTION Remodeling, room
additions, decks, baths, kitchens, repairs. License
#RR0066842. 779-2129, Jim.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the
Island 20 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vi-
nyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.
KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION CO. Residential & com-
mercial. New construction or remodeling. 25 years
experience, insured. Lic. # CGC 058-092. Call 778-
5354 or pager 506-6186.

SCREENS REPLACED/REPAIRED, roof coating
and repairs, interior/exterior painting, drywall repairs,
ceiling fans, carpentry & ceramic tile. Low prices. Call
778-0410.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
R.T. (Bob) HILTON CONSTRUCTION. Residential
and commercial. Remodel and new construction.
Island and Mainland. References. CGC012191. 747-
1098. (Don't say how, say Hilton).
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
CARPET, VINYL, CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed and
repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship guaran-
teed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen 383-5381 or
beeper 506-3297.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile. Lic.
#MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave Elliott.


Fully furnished beach cottage. 1 BR/1BA, private lot
and parking. $275 per week, includes phone and
cable. 778-2832.
VACATION RENTAL. Bayfront with deep water boat
dock. 2BR/1BA, newly remodeled, designer turnkey
furnished. Short walk to Gulf beaches and restaurants.
Available weekly or monthly. Ask Denise about Her-
ons Landing. (941) 778-2246 or (800) 211-2323.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA apartment,
Florida room, w/d hook-up, garage, peek of the Gulf.
No dogs. $650 mo. 1st, last, security. Call Gulf-Bay
Realty at 778-7244.
SEASONAL RENTALS: Anna Maria Island Club
$750 wk; North Beach Village $650 & up; Charming
old Florida beach house, sleeps 6 +, $650 wk. Call
Gulf-Bay Realty at 778-7244.
HIDEAWAY COVE PERFECT bayview between
bridges. Beach 1 block. Nice, quiet dead end street. 1st
floor, 2BR, fully fumished, annual, with dock. Also 2BR
wk/mo and '97 season. No smoking or pets. 778-7107.


WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING
RESIDENTIAL I COMMERCIAL
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING


jHC 1 1 [




ME AIT AS Ti0 B E BIEI R E C A
A LIE LAIIC R A RI E E V A DIE
S C 0 N E I UIST DE V I L N I N E R
T H E G RIE N HIO R N ETiS E TT E E
L E DNAF PUT THE WASPS
BLOIN D S 0IF-0 R 0i EE
RAZIE LADY BU GILA DY U G
ABO IL BIESS ALLEN E IRE
MESNL o I0 AC MTi P YR 0 S MlA NGE
LAE-S 0 TH 0 LI I 0TuEN DI ER
M 0 S U" ET 0 C 0 ASAT ER
RAB I D MAUI D RS T A L ULRI ES
lG 0 T lsSA DA T iQ UlES SELATLIE
DA Y O FT H 0EL CL U STB SE T R E
A T TI C B EE E U X0S ETI
CR 0 CU u L0 R ID 0 FI T I F L .LIE
M ISS E I SIV0 V E TR EE LB.L L E
SH ERD TT EEN C E N S T E E D


A A A fg I '


AND A.I


ANNUAL DUPLEX Holmes Beach. 2BR/1BA, cable,
hot water. Steps to beach. No pets. $650 mo. 778-
7665. 1st and security.
STEPS TO BEACH unfurnished, 2BR/1BA. $625
mo. Call 778-1345.
NEED A TEMPORARY PLACE? Lovely furnished
Island duplex available August 1 for three months
only. $475 mo. Call 778-4872.
HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL. Immaculate 1 &
2BR apartments within easy walking distance to
beach. Available weekly or monthly. Special summer
rates. 778-4368.
1 BR/1 BA SPACIOUS APARTMENT Annual, turn-
key furnished, steps to beach. Cable TV, washer/
dryer. Anna Maria City. $500 mo. plus utilities. 1st,
last, security and references required. Available
August 5. 778-4543. No Sunday calls please!
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA apartment in Holmes
Beach. Washer/dryer hook-up. $650 mo. + utilities.
208-A Peacock Lane. Call to see. 778-4084, 778-
6541 or pager 569-1591. Available now.
THIS IS THE CONDO you've been looking for. 2BR/
1BA, beautiful Gulf view. Turnkey furnished includ-
ing washer, dryer, dishwasher, etc. or unfurnished.
Don't miss this one! Call today. 749-0216.
CANALFRONT HOME 2BR, den or 3BR, washer/
dryer, 2 decks, furnished or unfurnished. 779-1049.
Available immediately. Annual or seasonal. $1,200
mo. (513) 891-9703.
HOLMES BEACH 1 BR turnkey furnished vacation
rental. 100 yards to the Gulf. Weekly/monthly.
778-5617.
ANNUAL 2BR/1BA with porch, carport, washer,
dryer. Adults only. Holmes Beach, great location.
$625 mo. furnished. Call 778-9625.




Fans Phones Rooms Services Clocks
Call 779-1104 or page me at 252-2446
*S25 rate does not apply to after hours or emergency service work


LP GAS
$700
PER FILL
201b cylinder






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 25, 1996 0 PAGE 27 I-


ISWLA 4;H CLASpSIFIEDS
IRNALSCotiue RAL SATE on ineI


HOLMES BEACH 2BR turnkey furnished vacation
rental. 100 yards to Gulf. Large lanai with spa.
Weekly/monthly. 778-5617.
BEAUTIFUL GULFVIEW 3BR on quiet dead end
along Gulf. Entirely remodeled. Furnished, unfur-
nished. Now $950 mo., winter $2,000 mo., or annual
$1,250 mo. 778-0990
BEAUTIFUL GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA bestview. 50'
to water. Private beach. Top floor master suite,
decks, patio, tropical gardens, unique. $3,000 mo.,
$1,000 wk. 778-0990.
UNFURNISHED ANNA MARIA annual. 2BR/2BA
elevated house with huge garage. Bay view. $975
mo. Available September 1. Call 778-7702.
YEARLY RENTAL UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA,
washer/dryer hook-up, central air. Clean, quiet neigh-
borhood. No pets. 778-7112.
SMALL APARTMENT for rent annually. One block
from the bay. $450 mo. + utilities. No pets. 778-8436.
2BR/2BA ANNUAL DUPLEX apartment in Holmes
Beach. Unit includes utility room with washer/dryer,
dishwasher. No pets. $650 mo. plus utilities. Call
Fran Maxon Real Estate at 778-1450 for further in-
formation.
LARGE 2BR APARTMENT with beautiful bay view.
Available August 1. Summer rates. Call today. (941)
778-9188.
VACATION & SEASONAL Resort 66. July 27 to Aug.
3. Oceanfront 1BR efficiency. $650. Ocean cottage,
ground floor, 2BR/2BA, $700 wk., $2,500 mo. 2BR/
2BA ground floor duplex, 3 minutes to beach. Sea-
son $1,300 mo. (800) 977-0803.
THE BEST 2BR/1BA on the Island for the money!
Annual. Unfurnished. Recently renovated, near
beach. Beautiful! $650, 1st, last and security. No
pets, non smokers preferred. 778-1144.
ROOMMATE MALE OR FEMALE New remodeled
3BR house. $450 mo. includes utilities, cable. Lo-
cated in central Holmes Beach 100 yards to Gulf
beach. 778-8213, leave message.
COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE in Holmes
Beach. Call Dennis for details. 778-4461.
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE above the Bridge
Tender Inn. Will remodel to suit. $14 sq. ft. Mike
Norman Realty 778-6696.
MINI VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.
- Wed. or Mon. Thu. 2 people/4 nights from $135.
Kitchens. 500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Mo-
tel & Resort Complex. 778-5405 or (800) 367-7824.


ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Pierside apart-
ments, 4-units furnished. Large lot with pool.
$449,000, by owner (in apt. #1). 211 South Bay Blvd.
778-2896.


2BR/1BA 9306 GULF DRIVE, Anna Maria. $115,000
OBO. 500' from beach. West side of Gulf Drive. (812)
275-3980.
TRAILER 30 X 8 W/SCREENED lanai, carport, new
carpet. Pines Trailer Park, Bradenton Beach. For
information call 746-1058 or 747-7290.
WESTBAY COVE 2BR/2BA condo overlooking land-
scaped pool and Tampa Bay. New kitchen, freshly
decorated, second floor end unit. $133,500. Call
(800) 484-1692-9726.
STOP, LOOK, MAKE AN OFFER! Great Island condo.
2BR/2BA, pool, walk to beach, more. $105,000.
Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max Gulfstream, 778-7777.
DON'T BUY A CONDO till you talk to Yvonne. My
experience plus a 120 page color catalog of Island
condos can help you zero in on the one that fits your
budget and your lifestyle. Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max
Gulfstream, 778-7777.
REAL ESTATE WANTED. Condo or house that
needs T.L.C., near water. Fixer-upper OK. Good deal
only. Call collect, (802) 899-3186.
LOTS FOR SALE. Direct bayview $80,000.
Oceanview with deeded beach access, 150 ft. to high
tide $175,000. Call 778-4523 or (800) 977-0803.


2IEQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising herein is subject to the Fair
Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or intention to make any such prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women and people secur-
ing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will
not knowing accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-
free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing impaired
(TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COLOAOL.COM

HOLMES BEACH MINI STORAGE
S* Vacancies Climate Controlled Storage
Facilities in variety of sizes
Now Shipping UPS
3018 AVE C Holmes Beach 778-5549

/ ,ro. 778-5455
Painting & Decorating
S Custom Painting Pressure Cleaning
Wallpaper Hanging General Repairs
Interior/Exterior Design
References 15 Years Experience

Yvonne Higgins REALTOR
Call me for the
BEST BUYS ON THE ISLAND
Homes Investments Condos
R6jM GULFSTREAM REALTY
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752

PROPERTY SERVICES ASSOCIATES
Complete Property Make-Ready Services
FOR SALE LEASE OR RENTAL PROPERTY
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Bill Presley Insured Bonded (941) 753-1300


Wedebrock Real Estate Company
SALES & RENTALS
778-6665 800-749-6665

HAIR MOTIONS
ALMA --- -~

AROMATHERAPY ,
Massage Special
$38 Hr. Ucence#
$8 H. MA*0021105
5340 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach Suzanne Smith L.M.T.

For Your Island Home Paint Needs
ISLAND
PAINT WORKS
Interior/Exterior
Commercial & Residential
Licensed / Insured
SExcellent References


BILL ROMBERGER


778-7821 I


- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - ---
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance-or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D.Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday,
(Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $7.00 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box:
$2, One- or two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business or service, the minimum rate us $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional wofds: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus
250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
I--------------------------------------I
I___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ____ 2
2
I I
___ ___ _____ 31
More information: I
(941)778-7978 |iSSLANDER
FAX: (941) 778-9392
L --------------------------------------


* Driveway Staining Roof Coatings
(We can make your tile or pebble roof look new again.)
* Exterior Painting & Pressure Cleaning

looNed Let the
l' Professionals
iO Bring Some
0 I SPARKLE
Homes Cleaned To Your Home!
LCNEF REE


ISLANDER


Fresh mullet T-shirts ... $10
Mail order add $3. The Islander Bystander accepts
MasterCard and Visa for mullet shirts, subscription
orders and classified advertising.
Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392


~x~eaue3n






Ii~ PAGE 28 M JULY 25, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Celebrate Chritm in l)y, 7)y with A a Maria land and area merchantI Look inpide for morc "Holiday" ipedal.

I --- -" -==- --camassm I ON I=SIS


MONfTEE WEST SHOPPING CENTER MONTEE VE. WEST lT 75TH STREET, BRODEHTON


Christmas in JalyA owSSUMMER SAVINGS COUPON

SChristmas in July Sale 10% OFF
SI Il SELECTED SUMMER DRESSES e u $
al Sale UNUE THNG so][ AND SPORTSWEAR One Purchase- $20 or more
UNIQUE CLOTHING 30 to 50% OF
J TEt Fr YVWE FOR KIDS... JUL ( 559 Eisg1
JusALL JEWELRY /5% OFF I *One offer per customer no photos copies, excludes
CHRISTMAS Sale ends July 31, 1996 1 sales tax, layaways, gift certificates & other discounts.
TEE AVWEST IN JULY (941)794-5599 Expires Aug 311996
=i (- == t


SIDEWALK
SALE

20% to 40%

OFF







745 Maate ve0


ASPIRIN


:, FEE- a T *i"


WIDTHS SOFT SPOTS
S-N-M-W REALLY COMFORTABLE SHOES
SExactly what the doctor ordered. The most comfortable shoes eyed
Syour feet hurt. take two of these for fast pin relief.
1W i ^sland Footwear
1 J'V.1 t w.1 ,r


q794-8383

CG- APIHICS AND FRAMING


Quality Custom Originals Limited
Framing Editions Prints

r20 i / ,2 5 9 r
OFF 1 OFF I
CUSTOM,.- I FRAMED
-FRAMING ART
coupon exp. coupon exp.
L8/96 "The Race" by Robert Kennedy L8/1J

"A Corner of France Nestled in N.W. Bradenion"




S' ESTABLISHED 1983

Enjoy Breakfhst & Lunch
Featuring ... fresh baked croissants and breads
plus a wide variety of omelettes
Tue Sat 8 to 3 gSun 8 to 1


e- i
Serving your favorite beer & wine Carry out available
Manatee West Shopping Center (next to Albertsons)
7449 Maneate Avr W. Bradenton 792-3782


1
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| FAOw Monday Saturday
9 am to 5 pm
Manatee West Shopping Center Store Only
--- -rBmBBB--rn-aBrn__---B---- J



"lIt's
Christmas
in July!"'
S come to our

e Sidewalk Mae


25 to 50% OFF

All Summer Merchandise

Contemporary
& 72ZeClothing
for the Classic
Woman

7471 Manatee Ave. West
Bradenton 792-6695 ..*.;jAlr..


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ISLAND
* PREMIER NORTH POINT DR., H.B............... $595,000
4BR/5BA with olffce, den, lamily room. formal dining room.
vast storage. 2-car-plus garage, built for elevator Dock w/
electric and water on deep canal. Call Dick Maher or Dave
Jones 778-6791.
* DIRECT BAYFRONT...............................$595,000
Panoramic view of Tampa Bay. Immaculate 3BR/2.5BA split
plan. Spanish motif, tropical courtyard, elegant open plan, liv-
ing area with fireplace, heated pool, large dock and much more.
Call Nick Patsios 778-2261 or 778-4642.
* DEEP-WATER CANAL ............................ $589,900
Custom 4BR/3BA with vaulted ceilings, lighted plant shelves.
Spacious master suite with Jacuzzi tub. Over 2,400 sq. ft. ga-
rage area. Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931.
* UNUSUAL KEY ROYALE HOME ......... $349,000
2BR/2BA plus den. 1 BR/1 BA private guest quarters. Tile floors,
pool, screened porch, dock, 2-car garage, low maintenance
landscaping. Call Helen White 778-2268 or 778-6956.
* KEY ROYALE .........................................229,000
Well-maintained and decorated canalfront home on prestigious
Key Royale. Private dock and only minutes away from Tampa
Bay. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791.
* ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT ............... $149,000
3BR/1.5BA canalfront h_ gj ilj Maria City. Needs TLC.
Wide canal, seaw Qe ll homes Rooms to expand.
Great fixer-upper. C P f White 778-6956.
* TOWNHOUSE ON THE WATER .............$215,000
Rarely available 3BR/3BA, 2-story with enclosed lanai. Westbay
Point & Moorings boat dock outside your door. Spacious, el-
egant interior. Call Bobye Chasey 778-1532.
* COQUINA BEACH CLUB ........................ $185,000
2BR/2BA directly overlooking wide beach. Gorgeous sunsets.
Turnkey furnished. Great rental opportunity. Call Dick Maher or
Dave Jones 778-6791.
* GULF FRONT COMPLEX .......................$169,000
Park under the building wilh an elevator 2BR/2BA lanai with
gas grill Complex has 30 x 60 pool Partial Gull view Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791


E KEY WEST STYLE TOWNHOME.......... $1 55,500
Pivate cul-de-sac. steps to Ihe northern Island beaches 3BR/
2BA. 2-car garage. recreation area Low mainlernance tee
Wrap-around upper balcony Tropical foliage & lawn Call Rose
Schnoerr 778-2261.
* VIEW OF BAY FROM ALL WINDOWS! ...........$139,900
Downstairs comer unit, 2BR/2BA, tile entry, kitchen & baths,
Berber carpet. Entry is glassed and living room extended.
Seven ceiling fans, domed kitchen ceiling. Call Lu Rhoden 778-
2692. REDUCED.
* TERRIFIC ISLAND VALUE REDUCED .... $89,500
Sunbow Bay 2BR/2BA, covered parking, elevator, pool, tennis.
Close to beach, shopping. Call Lu Rhoden 778-2692.
* FACING TAMPA BAY.............................$395,000
Ideal for strip center and resort related business. Near all ma-
jor beach and restaurant facilities. Lot also includes existing
small building and boat dock. Call Walt Schnoerr 778-7780.

OFF ISLAND
COZY WATERFRONT ............................. $159,900
2BR/2BA with fireplace, 2-car garage, caged pool, like new in-
side and out. Located in beautiful Coral Shores East. Call
Harold Small 792-8628.
PALMA SOLA HOME REDUCED.................... $132,000
3BR/2BA, family room, Florida room, solar hot water heater with
electric auxiliary. 2-car garage, lot 116 x 125. 2,000 sq. ft. air-con-
ditioned area. Cul-de-sac street. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-7780.
BOATERS TAKE NOTE REDUCED ..............$59,900
2BR/1.5BA townhouse with available boat dock. Overlooks large
pool and courtyard. Excellent location great rental or vacation
home. Call Chard Winheim 778-6743.
CLOSE TO BEACHES ............................... $56,500
2BR condo, newly decorated. Berber carpet and lots of tile. Large
screened lanai with work shop/utility room. Very private. Pool. All
ages and pets OK. Owner/Agent Donna Mosley 795-1218.
INVESTMENT $$$ MAKER.................... $54,900
Close to beaches 2BR/2BA pool. billiard club house, all ages.
pets OK Approximale seasonal income $1.200 rrmonth / $850
ori-season Owner is moiivated Call Donna Mosley 795-1218


* MONEY-MAKER DUPLEX ........................ $49,900
Front is 1 or 2BR. rear is studio Two rental garages make Inis
one very positive in cash flow investors take note Chard
Winheim 778-6743
* AUTO PARTS BUSINESS.......................$485,000
Well established and very profitable business. Two excellent
locations might be bought separately. P & L available. Call
Harold Small 792-8628.
* COMMERCIAL BUILDING NEAR 1-75.............. $285,000
8,776 sq. ft. commercial building on cul-de-sac off State Road
64 East near 1-75 interchange. Clean, modem and fully air con-
ditioned. Zoned C-G. Call Walter Schnoerr 778-2261.
1 2.9 ACRES OR 3 LOTS ....................... Good Buy!
2 miles east of 1-75 on busy State Road 64. Could be light com-
mercial, offices or multi-family. Cleared and has old fence. Call
Harold Small 792-8628.
* PERICO BAY CLUB ...............................$219,000 '
Luxurious 3BR/2BA, first floor in Edgewater Pointe. $20,000
worth of additional upgrades. Fabulous bay view. Designer fur-
nishings. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261.
8 PERICO BAY CLUB VILLA ..................... $155,900
Large Grand Cayman model. Den can be third bedroom.
Screened porch & deck with private water view. 2-car garage.
Entry courtyard. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791.
N PERICO BAY LAKEFRONT .................... $137,000
2-car garage, tiled foyer amd kitchen, 5 fans, microwave, hu-
midifier, designer wall coverings, glass Florida room, pool, ten-
nis, security guard. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261.
* PERICO BAY CLUB CONDO ..................$125,500
2BR/2BA. Immaculate turkey furnished "KINGFISHER" unit
with a breathless view. Pool, tennis, clubhouse, with 24-hour
guarded gate. See & call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261.
* PERICO BAY CLUB ................................ $119,900
Lovely lakeside villa featuring tennis, nature trails and only two
miles to Gulf beaches. Gated community. Call Dick Maher or
Dave Jones 778-4891
* PERICO BAY 2BR/2BA CONDO ...........$115, 000
Including tennis courts, pool and spa. lush landscaping
Guarded security gate. private garage Foreign owner with len-
ant in place Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261


..,~t .-- 2
i-: jA7-- i. r ..,S,


oConvenient Shopping
next to Albertsons"


Hours:
Mon Fri
10-5:30
Sat
10-3


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