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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Full Text



- g a e


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


MAY 30,1996


Memorial Day memorable for beachgoers


In what is becoming a holiday tradition on the Is-
land, more than 50 police officers responded to a fight
on Coquina Beach Monday afternoon that escalated
into the eventual closing of the beach.
Two men were arrested, charged with inciting a
riot. At one point, police officers sprayed the crowd
with canisters of pepper spray to break up some of the
estimated 1,000 spectators who were in the area watch-


ing the fight between Tony James, 28, and Anthony
Cummings, 26. A third man involved in the fight es-
caped into the crowd.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Jack Maloney said
he had scheduled additional police officers, including
horse patrols through the Manatee County Sheriffs
Department, for the busy Memorial Day weekend.
The Monday incident is the third such case of


Suiting up for a dive
Derek Pettigrew, of Holmes Beach, a student Argonaut in the Jason Project, gets help suiting up for a dive to the
Aquarius Underwater Habitat. Pettigrew, 14, was one of 25 students selected world-wide to participate in the
project. He spent 11 days in the Florida Keys performing scientific research on reefs. For more details, see page 8.


Romantic stingrays pose human threat


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
It's about that time again, when you can get stung
along the Gulf beaches. You can get it high and you can
get it low, depending.
Stingrays are due to begin the season of what to them
is romance and to humans can be extreme discomfort.
Stingrays are diamond-shaped fish that come into
the shallows along the beaches as the water warms, and
do their thing to propagate their race.
They hang in until their children are well along the
growing-up stage, then all of them head back into
deeper waters.
While they're here, they can be a pain. In the foot,
usually, though they can get up on the ankle, too. Wher-
ever, it's painful and can be serious enough for some
people to require a doctor's attention.
Prevention is much easier that treating a stingray-in-
flicted wound, said the Manatee County Parks and Rec-
reation Department's chief of aquatic safety, Jay Moyles.
The old Stingray Shuffle is the best way to forestall
a problem, though it may draw some funny looks.


Don't walk, shuffle, when you go through shallow
waters. Drag your feet through the sand. It warns the ray
you're coming and gives them a chance to vacate.
The rays defend themselves with a barbed spine on
their tails. When stepped on they whip the tails back
and the barb connects with foot or ankle and often
breaks off in the skin. It has a poison that causes at least
pain and sometimes stronger reactions in humans.
Scott Montgomery, Moyles' Sarasota counterpart,
advised that the best quick treatment is to soak the stung
area for 20 minutes or so in water as hot as you can stand
it, and get medical attention to make sure there's no stron-
ger reaction or to remove the barb if necessary.
Mote Marine Laboratory's Virginia Haley said a
child or anyone with chronic disorders of the stomach,
liver, kidneys or the immune system should see a doc-
tor, whether the wound seems severe or not.
When stingrays are spotted, lifeguards fly blue
flags at their stations to warn swimmers.
Chief Moyles said there have not been many skir-
mishes yet around Manatee beaches, but he expects an
influx any time now.


overzestful beachgoers in the area this year. On Easter
Sunday a traffic accident prompted two men to begin
fighting at Coquina Beach. That incident evolved into
about 40 people, some armed with baseball bats, swing-
ing at each other and the estimated 40 law enforcement
officers who responded to break up the brawl.
One week later, another fight erupted on the Palma
Sola Causeway.


Mayor unveils

new hopes for

city hall project
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Two Holmes Beach City Council members
vented their frustration last week at Mayor Bob
VanWagoner concerning his suggestions on the pro-
posed city hall complex.
Three weeks ago Van Wagoner wrote a six-page
memo recommending that council shelve Architect H.
Patterson Fletcher's plan for the complex and appoint
a city hall complex committee to come up with a new
plan. At last week's meeting, VanWagoner shelved his
own recommendation.
"As much as I like my idea, it would be time-con-
suming and involved," he noted. "I feel we should take
off from the $950,000 plan and include saving this
building (city hall). I think this building has use and
life. It could be used for some of the functions that take
up space in the last version (of the architect's plan)
such as storage and offices."
He favors an "old Florida" look for the new building,
a wing can be added in the future for additional space and
the building should face Marina Drive, he added.
"At the last meeting we directed the mayor to meet
with department heads and the architect and come up
with their minimum needs, not (come up with ideas for)
keeping this and doing this and that," councilwoman
Carol Whitmore protested. "That's going to cost more
money. We did not ask for suggestions."
Councilman Don Maloney said he was unaware
the mayor had changed his mind since the memo.
"It took me a week to decide how pleasantly I could
tell you how stupid I thought it was that we start from
scratch," Maloney said. "I'm concerned about how long
everything is taking us to do. There's always a better idea.
I just want to quit diddling around and get it done."
VanWagoner said he is looking for a plan that will
win broad public support but as he learns more, his
ideas change.
"That's the problem," Maloney. "This can go on for-
ever. Who's responsible for presenting us with some-
thing?"
"It's our decision," Council Chairman Luke
Courtney replied.
"If we can keep an established building, it can cut
PLEASE SEE CITY HALL, NEXT PAGE


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ..................................... ............ 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Argonaughts.................................. ............ 8
Crossword Puzzle ..................................... .. 13
Stir-it-up ................................... ............. 14
Anna Maria Island tides ............................. 21







i. PAGE 2 M MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Tower request must come from GTE: mayor


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Bob VanWagoner said the
city will not pursue the feasibility of putting a GTE
tower on city property without a specific request
from the company.
At a recent public hearing, GTE requested per-
mission to construct a 160-foot tower at the Holmes
Beach Marina to improve cellular telephone service
on the Island. After neighbors opposed the plan,
council rejected the request.
However, council asked company representa-
tives to provide a list of alternate locations for the
tower and said the city would research the feasibil-


ity of constructing the tower on city property. City
Attorney Steve Dye said if the tower is built on city
property, the city must get a waiver from the fami-
lies who donated the land to the city.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore said she received
many calls in support of the tower, but she heard the
mayor had directed the attorney to cease research on
constructing the tower on city property.
"The company did not make any application to do
that," VanWagoner replied. "I don't think we should be
a search party for any commercial interest. I told Mr.
Kersteen (Bob Kersteen, GTE manager of site acqui-
sition) to come to me to talk about it but I heard noth-
ing from him. I want him to go through the process."


City Attorney Steve Dye said the mayor did not
direct him to stop work on the project and that he is
sending a letter to council concerning his research on
the deeds.
Councilwoman Billie Martini agreed with
VanWagoner.
"The council asked the city attorney to look into
possibility of constructing any tower on city land,"
Council Chairman Luke Courtney said. "That's within
our realm to do that."
"I think you're hollering before you're hurt,"
Councilman Don Maloney said. "This might be the
last place they want to build a tower. Wait until they
ask us."


Award-winning watercolorist
displays at library
The watercolor works of Holmes Beach resident
Barbara Singer will be on display during June at the
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. A long time fine arts teacher and current
member/instructor at the Artists Guild ofAnna
Maria Island, Singer is also a member of the Florida
Suncoast Watercolor Society and the Manatee Art
League. She has had numerous shows and has won
many awards. For more information, call the library
at 778-6341. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.










Lights out, Turl
Anna Maria Island is a primary nesting habitat for
sea turtles. The projection of artificial light onto our
beaches threatens the survival of turtle hatchlings by
disorienting them and directing them away from the
water, often onto dangerous roadways.
All three Island cities have ordinances restricting
shoreline area outdoor lighting during the nesting and
hatching season from May 1 through Oct. 31. The Anna
Maria Island Turtle Watch volunteers remind all residen-
tial and commercial property owners that lighting that il-
luminates the beach poses a threat to an endangered spe-
cies and is not in compliance with city laws.
Among other provisions, all three city ordinances
state that lights illuminating buildings or associated
grounds for decorative or recreational purposes should
be shielded or screened so as not to project a beam of
light directly onto the beach area or should be turned
off between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. during the six-month
turtle season. Anna Maria's ordinance restricts lighting
from 9 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Further, window treatments in windows facing the
Gulf are required so that interior lights do not illumi-
nate the beach or those lights should be off between 11
p.m. and 7 a.m. Restrictions also exist for dune cross-
walks, security lighting and pole lighting.

Call for compliance assistance
Turtle Watch volunteers have been walking the
beaches at night and in the early hours before sunrise
- from the northern tip of Anna Maria Island to Co-
quina Beach on the southern end to determine prob-
lem lighting areas.
As in previous years, The Islander Bystander pub-
lishes a list of problem lighting areas as reported by the
Turtle Watch organization. As of Memorial Day week-
end, the following businesses, condominium buildings
and residential properties have been sighted as prob-
lems by volunteers.
Included are Bali Hai Resort, Coconuts Resort,
Gulf Place condominiums, Beach Bistro, Playa Encantada
condominiums, Via Roma, Gulf Shores, both Circle K
stores, Martinique North and South, Blue Water Beach
Club, Silver Sands, Gulf Stream Beach Resort, 1610 Gulf
Drive N. and the Coquina Beach Club.
Also, Tropic Isle Motel, Bungalow Beach Resort,


tie Watch begs


You can help

with lights out
The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch offers
the following tips to help keep our beaches safely
dark during the sea turtle nesting and hatching
season through Oct. 31.
Turn off all lights that shine on the beach or
are visible from the beach from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.
Install lower wattage or low-intensity am-
ber lights.
Tell your neighbors to turn out their lights
or shield the side that shines toward the water.
Keep your curtains or blinds pulled tight so
no light shines from inside out.
Walk around the outside of your residence
or business and check for lighting problems.
Go out on the beach after dark or before
dawn. If you see a light from a utility pole from
the beach, go to the pole and take down the pole
number. Report the number to Suzi Fox, 778-
5638, or Joan Snedker, 778-2735.
Anyone interested in an on-site visit from
a Turtle Watch volunteer to discuss tips on bring-
ing the property into compliance with Island city
lighting ordinances may call Fox at 778-5638.

Sea Side Motel, LaCosta condominiums, Shell Cove
condominiums, Pirate Pete's, Sunset Terrace, Casa
Marina (A-G), Econo Lodge Motel, Sandy Toes, Anna
Maria Island Club and Island Breeze.
Turtle Watch Director Suzi Fox requests that these
property owners contact her at 778-5638 so that Turtle
Watch volunteers may provide assistance in bringing
lighting into compliance.
Volunteers also report that they were assured that
spotlights atop the Beach House restaurant were off at
night. However, they were recently seen on at 4:30 am.
and were visible all the way to 25th Street North.
The volunteers would like to thank the following
who have already called for assistance and turned out
their lights: 5400 condominium residences, the
Wilsons on 49th Street and the Breakers.


McClure stops

race for

Florida House

due to illness
Julie McClure, a Republican candidate for
the Florida House for Representatives District 68
seat, has withdrawn from the race due to illness.
She was diagnosed last week as having breast
cancer.
McClure held the seat until two years ago,
when she was defeated by Mark Flanagan.
"In ending my campaign I want to endorse
Lois Gerber," McClure said. "I know that Lois
will serve the people of Manatee County well
and give them the honest, intelligent leadership
they deserve."

City Hall
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
down on some of the expenses," Councilwoman Billie
Martini said. "Even though the wall's falling down and
the ceiling leaks, it's still a good building."
City Clerk Leslie Ford called council's attention to
the 1995 presentation by Fletcher in which he said
"saving the building would provide little benefit and
offer little cost savings."
Bill Saunders, who was on the 1990 building com-
mittee, said members came up with several options but
determined that "this building is really in bad shape. It
was then and it's not improved a bit Its structure is not
really sound."
Councilman Ron Robinson said he needs more infor-
mation such as cost savings if the present building is used,
the cost of using partitions versus enclosed offices and
whether each office must be handicapped accessible.
"We're all saying the same thing how to spend
the least and get the most," Courtney pointed out. "We
need some answers to our questions. We need to have
some daytime meetings on it."
Council members were asked to submit questions
for the first meeting held on May 28 at 9 a.m.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 30, 1996 M PAGE 3 IK


Pictures, pictures everywhere?


Time to send us your very best
If you've taken even one memorable snapshot
since Jan. 1, 1994, then you may have an entry for the
upcoming photo contest in The Islander Bystander.
If your picture wins locally and moves on to the
finals of the 1996 Kodak International Newspaper
Snapshot Awards (KINSA), you could win as much as
$10,000.
Yes, $10,000 is top prize in this year's 61st ama-
teur photo competition reputed to be the largest
annual event of its kind. In all, there are 257 interna-
tional cash awards worth $52,500. Add attractive local
prizes to be awarded weekly from June 20 to July 25,
1996 and you just might want to consider entering
more than one photo.
Entries may be black-and-white prints, color prints,


or transparency (slides). They can feature just about
any subject. "Last year was our first year of participa-
tion in the contest," publisher Bonner Presswood said,
"and we were really pleased to have had an interna-
tional winner."
Sheila Fox-Tuck of Anna Maria received one of
250 international honor awards and $250 in the 1995
KINSA contest. Her photo of boats on a Caribbean
shore is hanging in an exhibit at EPCOT in Orlando
until November.
The 10 subject categories used in judging at the
international level might serve as a guide as you select
your local entries. They include Abstract, Still Life,
Landscapes & Scenic, Candids, Grown-Ups, Action,
Humor, Animals, and new this year, New Parents and
Olympic Moments.


42nd Snooks Adams' Kids Day June 8


Attention all kids 12 years of age and under.
The Anna Maria Island Privateers will sponsor
the 42nd annual Snooks Adams' Kids Day from 11

Congressional
candidate to address
Democratic Club
June 3
Sanford "Sandy" Gordon,Democratic candi-
date for the 13th Congressional District seat, will
be the guest speaker at the Anna Maria Island
Democratic Club luncheon Monday, June 3.
Gordon is a professor of economics at the
University of South Florida. He is running
against Republican incumbent Dan Miller.
The luncheon will be held at the Beach
House restaurant in Bradenton Beach and will
begin a noon at the outside deck.
All are invited. For more information, call
club president Roy McChesney at 778-3045.


a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at Bayfront Park in
Anna Maria City. The event is free to all youngsters
from Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key and Mana-
tee County.
Activities will include games with prizes start-
ing at 11 a.m., a sandcastle building contest with
judging at 1 p.m., a best-dressed little pirate contest
at noon and a treasure hunt at 12:30 p.m. Free hot
dogs, soda and pizza will be available for the chil-
dren. The Privateers will be on hand to welcome kids
aboard their well-traveled pirate ship.
Kids Day was started by former Holmes Beach
Police Chief Willis Howard "Snooks" Adams in
1954 with a kids-only cook-out on Coquina Beach.
Other Islanders and organizations got involved over
the years, until Adams turned the event over to the
Privateers in 1980.
In 1990 about 150 children attended the event.
Now about 500 youngsters and their parents -
many of whom were part of the earlier Kids Days as
children join in the fun at Bayfront Park.
For more information, call 778-1238 or 778-
5934.


Two new categories, "New Parents" seeking pic-
tures from baby's world and "Olympic Moments," fo-
cusing on personal triumph wherever it happens.
Local winners will be announced weekly for six
weeks. Kodak requires winning snapshots be accompa-
nied by the photo negative so make sure you have the
negative available when making your selections. Only
weekly winners need to submit negatives after notifica-
tion. Photos must be shot with Kodak film and printed on
Kodak paper to be eligible. Complete rules will be pub-
lished in future issues of The Islander Bystander.
Entries judged best at the end of the local contest
will be forwarded to Eastman Kodak Company in
Rochester, N.Y., for international judging.
There, your picture can win $50 simply by attract-
ing the attention of one of five judges. If your snapshot
ranks among the top 57 photos, it's assured of winning
at least $250. The top seven awards include $2,000,
$3,000, $5,000 and yes, $10,000 for Best of Show!
Almost sounds like it might be worth sifting
through stacks of snapshots. If not, get busy shooting.
The Islander Bystander's first weekly deadline for
entries will be June 14.


Anna Maria City
None scheduled

Bradenton Beach
6/3, 7 p.m., Code of Conduct review
6/5, 6:30 p.m., Charter Review Board
6/6, 7 p.m., Council meeting

Holmes Beach
5/30, 9 a.m., Planning Commission
5/30, 2 p.m., Charter Review Commission
5/30, 7:30 p.m., Council work session on
residential rental restrictions
6/4, 7 p.m., Council meeting


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I-D PAGE 0 MAY 30, 1996 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Scientists predict global warming will


create major world-wide problems


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In the future Islanders may face submerged
beaches, heat waves, contaminated drinking water and
more severe and damaging hurricanes, said scientists
at recent seminar, "Climate Change and the Financial
Sector."
They predicted rising global temperatures and sea
levels and an increase in the number and intensity of
catastrophic weather events such as hurricanes, floods
and droughts. Florida, with its many barrier islands and
hundreds of miles of coast line, is one of the most vul-
nerable states to the potential impacts of global warm-
ing.
The changes will occur within the next century due
to global warming resulting primarily from emis-
sions of carbon dioxide (CO2), they said. If the emis-
sions continue scientists predict major problems for the
world community.
The seminar was opened by Manatee County Com-
missioner Joe McClash who noted, "Sometimes we get
so busy in our daily lives that we forget about the en-
vironment, and that's the reason we're here. We really
have to look at our accomplishments but also take the
time to be active and do what's right and good for the
community. That's what makes the difference."
Gloria Rains, executive director of the environ-
mental group Manasota 88, the seminar's sponsor, ex-
plained the seminar's focus.
"For many years global warming has been a part of
the news," she said. "There has been some disagree-
ment in the scientific community about the severity of
the problem created in part by fossil fuels. However,
there's a general consensus among the majority within
the scientific community that global warming exists."
Weather-related insurance payouts have increased
from $16 billion during the 1980s to $48 billion to date
in the 1990s, she noted. Some scientists maintain that
the catastrophic weather events of the past few years
are only a taste of what's to come.

Opinions from experts
Dr. Cory Berish, U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency
"Climate change is a very different kind of envi-
ronmental problem," Dr. Cory Berish of the U.S. En-
vironmental Protection Agency explained. "I'm not
sure that in the future we can fix it. If we continue to
pump gases into the atmosphere we're committing the
earth to long-term changes. This kind of problem could
be so pervasive that it will swamp any other kind of
problem we've had in the past. We're changing the
earth's atmosphere."
The greenhouse effect, a natural process that
warms the earth, is being accelerated by the increase in
gases such as carbon dioxide, Berish said. Sunlight is
reflected by the earth and absorbed by gases in the at-
mosphere. As these gases increase, more heat is ab-
sorbed instead of escaping into space. This creates glo-
bal warming.
The biggest culprit is C02, a by-product of fossil
fuels, said Berish. The clearing of forests adds to the
problem in two ways trees which absorb C02 are
being eliminated and forest areas are cleared by burn-
ing which releases carbon into the atmosphere.
Other greenhouse gases are methane (rice cultiva-
tion, industrial processes, feed lots, land fills), nitrous
oxide (fossil fuels, fertilizers, utilities) and chlorofluo-
rocarbons (refrigeration, packing materials, propel-
lants, solvents).
The projected temperature change from global
warming is from 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Centigrade over the
next century, Berish noted. This will create the warm-
est temperatures experienced on the planet in the past
10,000 years.
Potential impacts of rising temperatures include:
A sea level rise of one foot over the next 100
years will increase erosion and flooding in coastal ar-
eas, block waterways and flood salt marshes, decreas-
ing nursery areas for juvenile fish and marine life.
Extreme weather events will result in billions of
dollars in damage.
Decreasing rainfall will result in less water for
irrigation greatly affecting the agriculture industry.
Saltwater intrusion will decrease the amount of
potable water available and increase infrastructure


costs.
Mature forests will cease to exist if rainfall de-
creases and temperatures increase.
The resulting increase in diseases and pests will
threaten humans and agriculture.
The need for power generation will increase and
further increase pollutants.
"If you look at potential damage costs and response
actions, let's do what we can right now, because we
can't afford to wait," Berish stressed.
He recommended the federal government show
leadership on the issue, promote educational and dem-
onstration programs, examine tax incentives and sub-
sidies and develop better standards.
State governments can examinetheir energy, trans-
portation and environmental policies, promote energy
efficiency in the public sector and develop more strin-
gent regulations, Berish said.
Local governments can focus on transportation and
land use planning decisions, improve building codes
and purchase recycled goods.
Utilities can develop cleaner more efficient ways
to deliver energy and voluntary conservation programs,
while industry can produce and develop better energy
efficient products and processes.
Consumers can purchase energy efficient products,
plant trees and practice xeriscape, use alternative trans-
portation, purchase recycled goods, insulate their
homes and improve maintenance of energy using
equipment.
"Climate change is going to take a passion for all
of us to work together," Berish said. "One of the keys
to this is education. We all need to educate each other
to the common sense things we can do to make the
future better."

Dr. Jeremy Leggett, Greenpeace International So-
lar Initiative
Dr. Jeremy Leggett, director of the Greenpeace
International Solar Initiative, likened the things we see
and act on such as pollution, noise, water quality,
contaminated soil and water to the tip of an iceberg.
Below the water's surface are the things we can't see
and don't tend to act on such as global warming,
climate change and the build-up of toxins in the body
- which have the greatest potential to create world-
wide catastrophe.
"The bottom line is, we don't know the conse-
quences," he noted. "The absence of certainty on the
details of these issues is such a long way away from the
absence of risk. The presence of risk is very clear and
it is huge, and the stakes are enormous."


In 1988, the United Nations convened the Inter-
governmental Panel on Climate Change which brought
together the best climate scientists in the world, he
explained. In a recent report, they predicted a tempera-
ture increase of 1 to 3.5 degrees Centigrade and a sea
level rise of 15 to 95 centimeters by the year 2100.
"These are huge increases in the average global
temperatures and they will have terrible impacts," he
noted.
He said world governments are slow to embrace
the concept of global warming because of numerous
factors including the failure of the scientific commu-
nity to spell out the worst case scenario, the low level
of concern by the general public, denial by fossil fuel
industries and failure of environmental groups to alert
the public.
In Europe, the insurance and banking industries are
taking the lead by persuading governments to promote
and encourage investment in alternative technologies
such as solar energy, which currently provides less than
one percent of the world's energy.
Leggett said the focus should be on solar energy
because it is a sustainable, low greenhouse gas energy
source, is the critical technology for the developing
world and is the only technology that gives the con-
sumer electricity at the site.

Bill Nelson, Florida Insurance Commissioner
"One of the roles of government ought to be that we
have clean water and clean air," Florida Insurance
Commissioner Bill Nelson stressed. "The Orimulsion de-
bate pointed up the need to protect and better understand
our environment and to seek long-term solutions that will
protect and preserve our precious natural resources."
Nelson said global warming is a real threat and
Florida coastal property is especially vulnerable to the
potential impacts. Hurricane Andrew is a perfect ex-
ample of one of those potential impacts, that of more
severe and damaging hurricanes.
Hurricane Andrew sent the Florida insurance in-
dustry into chaos with $16 billion in insurance losses,
Nelson said. The cost would have tripled if the storm
had hit a more populous-area.
"It would have taken down most every major insur-
ance company in the country doing business in that part
of Florida," he noted. "Andrew clearly gave a wake-up
call not only to the industry, but to the country."
Eight insurance companies "bit the dust" and others
had to be bailed out by their parent company, Nelson said.
Some wanted to cancel their policies and flee the state.
One result is that the average state-wide homeowners'
premium has increased 72 percent since Andrew.
A government insurance company was formed as
a temporary fix, Nelson said, "but if we get another
Andrew all bets are off. No insurance company could
handle a catastrophe of that magnitude."
Nelson said he is working on the formation of a
national and/or regional catastrophic reserve fund.
Florida has already established a state-level fund which
will reimburse the insurance industry for half its losses
in the event of a severe hurricane.
He also noted that 50 European and Asian insurers
have signed an accord with the United Nations pledg-
ing to consider the issues of climate change and other
environmental problems in all of their business prac-
tices, underscoring what Leggitr said. No Amefian
insurance companies signed up.
"Climate change presents us with new and unpre-
dictable categories of risk and the dimensions are stag-
gering," he pointed out. "If greenhouse gases continue
unchecked, the likelihood is that rising seas from glo-
bal warming could threaten more than $2 trillion of
insured residential and commercial properties along
our nation's coast."







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 30, 1996 0 PAGE 5 EJ


Submit a plan, city tells Island Plaza


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Roadblocks to a final certificate of occupancy for the
Island Plaza in Anna Maria still remained after lengthy
discussion at the May 20 planning and zoning board meet-
ing.
The office and warehouse complex at 314 Pine Ave.
is the former Islander newspaper building. Its renovation
by owner Angela Grasberger and property manager Paul
Horvat dates back to 1993.
Horvat thought a parking plan had been approved by
planners and the city commission under former Building
Official Don Tarantola. Current Building Official Phil
Charnock and the planning board said not so. They said
no parking plan has ever been "formally" submitted and
therefore none has ever been approved.
Bradenton attorney Catherine Mackey was retained


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council last week
agreed on a change in its proposed trailer ordinance
- parking trailers will be prohibited in the back
yards of canal-front homes.
The rationale for the change is that many canal-
front property owners consider their yards fronting
on canals their front yards and parking trailers there
would be unsightly.
Holmes Beach resident Don Schroder said that
in a survey of Key Royale residents, the majority
did not want trailers parked on canals.
"You need to consider the people who live on
the water," he said. "You as a city council have to
respect the needs of your citizens, the people that


by Grasberger and Horvat before the April planners meet-
ing. After that session, she had expected to receive "a list
of deficiencies" from Charnock detailing requirements to
be met Letters from Mackey between the April and May
meetings mentioned possible "relief through the courts."
Mackey told planners May 20 that her clients want to
comply with city requirements if city officials would just
list what those are.
"My clients have been told various things at different
stages," Mackey said.
City Attorney Jim Dye said Chapter 29 of the city
codes "spells out what's required for a parking plan." He
said the developers were told in several meetings over the
past few years that they'd have to comply with the codes
and the city "can't act as a consultant."
"Let me suggest that your client come in with a plan,"
Dye said.


voted you into office."
"Change the law to read what is actually being
done now," Bob Jorgensen added.
The ordinance is an effort to make trailer parking
uniform. All trailers must be parked in an enclosed
garage or in the side or back yard unless there is no
other alternative available due to the configuration of
the property. Trailers parked in the front yard must be
in a driveway and have a current registration and tag.
In other business, council declined to consider
requests from two citizens, without presentations
from the petitioners. One resident asked the city to
vacate the alley between Avenues E and F between
31st and 32nd Streets. The second asked if he could
purchase unimproved Fifth and Sixth Avenues be-
tween 41st and 42nd Streets.


Charnock also requested a formal plan. He said it was
not his job to design parking for the developers and sug-
gested "the best bet" was to hire a civil engineer.
Responding to charges of delay by Mackey,
Charnock said after one letter from Mackey he "assumed"
they were filing suit and "that's why you haven't heard
from me."
Planning Chairman Tom Turner repeatedly stated the
need for a formal parking plan drawn to scale on a current
survey and based on the maximum use proposed for the
site.
Several times discussion digressed into what planner
Doug Copeland called "bickering."
When Charock started to calculate a possible num-
ber of parking spots needed, Dye cautioned the board
against determining the number of spaces at the meeting.
Planner LuAnne Collins made and later withdrew a
motion for Dye and Charnock to confer, with Charnock
to come back to the board with a recommendation.
Vice Chairman Jimmy Nichols said "the burden
should be on the applicant."
Nichols made a motion that the board take no further
action until the Island Plaza developers submit "an ad-
equate parking plan that we can consider verified." It
passed unanimously.
In conversations after the meeting, Horvat said he still
believes "the city is reneging" on previous approvals but
he and Grasberger will "have to bite the bullet and try to
comply with what they want. We will submit a plan."
In the meantime, said Horvat, "We do reserve the
option for legal action."
He further stated, based on comments at the planners
meeting, that one of the current tenants, Sandy's Land-
scaping Service, has been given 30-days notice to vacate
the premises because its use of a driveway from the plaza
onto Crescent Drive doesn't meet city criteria.
"It's a shame," said Horvat "It's jeopardizing their
livelihood."


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lil PAGE 6 M MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

er -Ij/em I


Leave, and avoid
becoming a statistic
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Elena or Andrew and everyone has a story:
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch the
storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the building
and washed onto the road in a rush of swirling water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the storm and, going out
the front door, stepped in ankle-deep water. One more inch
and it would have been inside the house and this was
a storm that no one expected to amount to anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and savings lodged on a barrier island that is
unsuited for habitation in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell, Hurricane Andrew, came ashore in 1992. The $20
billion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and 15 dead
are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, belongings and price-
less mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years are scattered
across what's left of the neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place
of lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Your home.
Your precious "stuff."
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those remaining.
And names of next of kin, so they can be contacted
to identify the remains.
When hurricane warnings come to this part of the
coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.



MAY 30, 1996 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 28
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Capt. Mike Heistand
Andrew White
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


Single copies free; Quantities of five or more 250 each
o 1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


-N


SLICK


City manager not needed
As a concerned resident of Holmes Beach, I have
become intrigued by all the recent discussion around
the city manger form of government.
In a recent Islander Bystander article regarding the
Charter Review Commission's continued study of this
issue, Commissioner Betty Hill was quoted as saying,
"We want to beat it down before there's a problem."
What in the world are we talking about here? Do
Ms. Hill and the charter review members know some-
thing that the rest of us don't?
Further, is this the kind of one-sided, over-zeal-
ousness that we should expect from this board? I
think not. The majority of Holmes Beach citizens/
voters elected a mayor and city council who we be-
lieve are up to the task of trying hard to solve our
community's problems. Let's give them some time
to do their job.
Patty Green, Holmes Beach
Ex-mayor is 'falling from grace'
After witnessing ex-Mayor Pierola's performance
at our last city meeting, I cannot let her conduct go
unanswered.
I cannot believe any adult would choose to appear
and degrade a sitting mayor in front of two youths, one
his grandson, on our dais for Student Government Day.
The mainland newspaper called her comments
"awkward" and I would add embarrassing to those of
us citizens who support our mayor.
I would question Pierola's ability to remember the
questions, let alone the answers, on a list as presented
at this meeting to the mayor.
To the rest of the committee "For Continued Im-
provement and Unity in Bradenton Beach," I would say
we do not need another parking lot (seldom used) or a
park that I have yet to see anyone in, to say nothing of
using both of which together must have cost the tax-
payers of the city $200,000.
The use of the word "unity" is ludicrous in their
committee's name.
I'm sure many other citizens are saddened to see
ex-Mayor Pierola "fall from grace" for the many good
things she did for the city while in office.
Albert Williams, Bradenton Beach


By Egan


No mega bridge a bust
Since I have lived in Holmes Beach since 1971 and
visited since 1946, I feel qualified to write this letter.
Because the subjects so complex and contrary, I will
take license to simply itemize my opinions on both the
bridge and the Manatee Avenue causeway:
It has become a frightening experience to travel from
75th Street West, due to traffic, left turns and pedestrians
crossing Manatee at the boat ramp. Alcohol and limited
police and helter-skelter parking makes it highly possible
that we have an accident waiting to happen.
I don't know the dollar amount of resurfacing and
widening the causeway, however, we seem to have ac-
quired more of all bad elements. It is admitted that it is
cleaner overall. It appears we spent good money after bad.
I can be corrected on this one because at age 791 am
not an expert on the many, many groups from condo as-
sociations to governmental operations that have their fin-
gers in this pie. Some of this is based on the fact that I
believe the DOT is and should be top dog. They should
be or have been doing an excellent job. The start of the
boondoggle was in 1989 and the investment on bridge
replacement so far is between one and two million. The
irony is that we are still in never-never-land with an ag-
ing bridge crumbling and rotting away.
In none of the published media has anyone spoken to
the annual and extended cost of operating draw bridges.
Four shifts of bridge tenders at a minimum of $40,000
annually is $400,000 in 10 years which is the annual re-
pair of the cantilever mechanism, painting of metal, patch-
ing of crumbing guardrails and finally maintenance on lift
gates. In the years I have been here, I have been rear ended
twice and sent to Cortez bridge many times.
Your paper has stated, "Islanders objected to the mega
bridge due to height, ambiance and impact to the environ-
ment." I suggest viewing the Skyway for height, the mega
bridge at the northern end of the Skyway, and a thing of
beauty on the rebuilt Courtney Campbell Causeway with
guardrails, organized parking and lights for traffic control.
We have ample notice generally on hurricanes. Fif-
teen years of net throwing on the bridge and I have never
seen a manatee, and as far as ambiance well maybe
looking under a mega bridge will give the condo livers a
better view.
William Meyers, Holmes Beach


'We gotta leave sooner'


I YO e;IJ


ONIMO --,










THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Conclusion, A Spy for Uncle Sam
by June Alder


Portly Gen. W.R. Shafter (right) and grizzled, bantam-sized Gen. "Fightin' Joe"
Wheeler commanded the force assembled to invade Cuba in June 1898.


HONEYMOON IN

HAVANA


Mabel Williams' career as ia post'
office clerk/spy in the Spanish-American
War of 1898 lasted only a few weeks.
Her undercover work for the U.S. Army
almost ended her engagement to George
Wilhelm Bean of Anna Maria Island.
But everything ended happily for the
couple. They were wed in the spring of
1899 and spent their honeymoon in Ha-
vana, as Mabel tells us in concluding
her 1937 memoir.

By Mabel C. Bean
Everybody knew that my father was
very busy at the Port of Tampa Post Of-
fice and that I was his right-hand man,
as it were, so they thought nothing of
seeing me flying around on my bicycle.
No one suspected that the young girl
pedaling here and there in her trim sailor
suits had any more important mission
than helping her father.
My fianc6 (Will Bean) was in the
Naval Reserves so I wore the sailor suit
dresses in deference to him and because
they were appropriate for my work and
my bicycle riding.
Though Gen. Shafter (commander
of the expeditionary force) was very
kind to me and praised me for my work,
I did not like to go to his headquarters at
the Tampa Bay Hotel because it was
filled with soldiers and officers and no
women were there. It did seem to be a
bold thing to do in those days.
One day my fiance met me coming
out of the hotel. He was amazed to see
me and quite displeased. He asked me
what in the world I was doing there and
I replied that I was on an errand for my
father.
My father should have "better
sense," he said, than to send a young girl
where there were only military officers
and soldiers!
When Gen. Fitzhugh Lee landed at
Port Tampa after the war en route to


Cuba (to be military governor in Ha-
vana), I rode down to the dock to see
him with a number of my friends.
An officer came up to me and said,
"I want you to be the first one to greet
Gen. Lee." And he escorted me to the
train steps.
When I shook hands with Gen. Lee
he gave me a sly wink, so perhaps Gen.
Shafter had told him about my secret
service for him.
The next spring I went to Cuba as
a bride and attended the first Memorial
Day exercises held there. The wreck of
the Maine still remained in Havana har-
bor as a grim reminder of the tragic
catastrophe that had occurred at that
place.
The American women in Cuba
decorated the twisted rusty wreck that
had once been a splendid battleship
with flowers and flags and a most im-
pressive service was held in memory of
the Americans who lost their lives in
such a horrible way.
I saw the last of the Spanish sol-
diers leave Havana and witnessed and
took part in many of the activities of the
American army of occupation in Cuba.
Except for the army nurses I believe I
was the only woman, in Florida at least,
who did actual active service in the war
of 1898.

NOTE: Several suspected Spanish
agents were charged with attempting to
poison Tampa's water supply. Whether
Mabel Williams Bean's surreptitious
sleuthing figured in the arrests we'll
never know.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 30, 1996 0 PAGE 7 I'



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Next: Part 1 of a
repeat series, the
Seminole War of
1835-42






[I PAGE 8 0 MAY 30, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Student Argonaut studies reefs in Florida Keys


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In ancient myth, Jason and the Argonauts sailed the
seas in search of the Golden Fleece.
In modem times, Dr. Robert Ballard's student Ar-
gonauts sail the seas in search of knowledge through
his Jason Project Ballard founded the project in 1989
to allow students to interact with researchers on scien-
tific expeditions. The project also uses interactive tele-
communications to involve land-based students in the
expeditions.
Holmes Beach eighth grader Derek Pettigrew was
one of 25 students from around the world selected to
participate in this year's Jason Project in the Florida
Keys. Pettigrew detailed his adventures recently to
members of the Holmes Beach Civic Association.
"When Dr. Ballard found the Titanic, the Bismarck
and the Lusitania, he got letters from kids all around the
world asking how they could get to be a part of the
project," Pettigrew explained. "He figured it would be
a good idea to get kids involved in science, so he started
the Jason Project, which is named after Jason and the
Argonauts."
Every year the project focuses on a different sub-
ject, he said. Past expeditions have studied volcanoes
in Hawaii, rain forests in Belize and underwater hydro-
thermal vents in Baja California. This year's project
was a study of reefs in the Florida Keys.
After learning about the Jason Project from his
science teacher, Pettigrew applied through Mote Ma-
rine, which is one of the project's world-wide broad-
cast centers. He was one of nearly 5,000 students vy-
ing for selection as a participant.
The process involved writing two lengthy essays,
teacher recommendations and a one-hour telephone
interview with a teacher Argonaut. The 25 students
selected met in Key Largo and were assigned to partici-
pate in various aspects of the project.
"There are different components to the project," he
said. "Eight kids got to go on the Navy's nuclear sub-
marine for eight hours, which no kids had ever gotten
to do before. It was really a neat experience, because
they went down 400 feet and got rock samples. The
kids even got to drive the submarine!"
Another component was a 236-foot research ves-
sel where Dr. Ballard was headquartered and where the
broadcasts originated. A third component was Key Ja-
son in a parking lot behind the motel where satellite
trucks beamed the Jason Project broadcasts to sites
around the world.
Pettigrew and his group were sent to the Aquarius,
an underwater habitat, where scientists carry on re-
search during eight-day missions. The habitat is a tube
that measures 43 feet by nine feet and houses six
people, Pettigrew noted. In addition there are 15 people
on the surface with cameras trained on the habitat.


Derek interviews Dr. Robert Ballard who founded the Jason Project in 1989 to allow students to interact with
researchers on scientific expeditions. Ballard named his students Argonauts after the mythological Jason and
the Argonauts.


Derek swims from a boat to the mobile support base, a barge anchored nine miles off the coast. The barge
houses all the support equipmentfor those living in the Aquarius, an underwater habitat where research is
conducted.


"It's very cramped and unprivate and very eerie
because you know someone's looking at you all the
time:'he explained. "They have to do that because
they have to monitor it. With six people living un-
der water, a lot can go bad in a very short period of
time."
To get to the Aquarius, participants were taken
by boat to the mobile support base, a barge anchored
nine miles off the coast. The barge housed genera-
tors, compressors, a decompression chamber, video
cameras and gauges for monitoring, and other equip-


ment for the support those living in the Aquarius.
"We went down on one dive each," he said. "Our
bottom times were about 45 to 50 minutes We
helped Dr. Jerry Wellington with light measuring
tests. His part of the project was to see how coral
adapted to light changes and currents and how they
affected their feeding."
Students also participated in presentations and
demonstrations and interacted with students at Jason
Project sites around the world during their 11-day
mission.




A live broadcast of
scientists performing
research outside the
Aquarius is shown to
students at Mote Marine
Science Center. Local
students can participate in
the Jason Project through
interactive telecommuni-
cations at specific loca-
tions throughout the
world. Islander Photos:
Courtesy of Joan
Pettigrew


Derek works with a member of the Jason Project's
production crew. The project uses interactive tele-
communications to involve land-based students in
the expeditions.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 30, 1996 0 PAGE 9 I-M

Educate, don't regulate, boaters for marine protection


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
What boaters need to help them protect the envi-
ronment is education, not regulation.
So concludes a study after eight years of research
at the University of Florida. It's not exactly news to
many southwest Florida boaters and organizations, but
it's welcome all the same.
Gustavo Antonini, researcher with the Florida Sea
Grant Program at the university, said "There's a lot of
pressure on the aquatic environment and we need to do
something to preserve it.
"We need to empower boaters and give them re-
sponsibilities."
As an example, if boaters learn the propellers tear
up seagrass beds, he said, they'll try to avoid shallow
areas where the plants flourish.
Antonini says education of boaters will become more
and more important as numbers of boaters increase and
law enforcement agencies are unable to devote sufficient

Council changes
meeting schedule
The Holmes Beach City Council has increased
its meeting/work session schedule from two per
month to four per month. The starting time for
meetings will also change.
Beginning in June, council meetings will be
held on the first and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Work
sessions will be held on the second Tuesday at 7
p.m. and the fourth Tuesday at 9 a.m.


manpower to controlling the waterways.
A million boats crowd Florida waters every year
now, 700,000 of them registered here and another
300,000 trailered or sailed here by tourists.
Florida had the highest boating accident rate in the
U.S. in 1994, latest year for which figures have been
completed. There were 1,193 accidents in the state,
killing 74 people.
Environmental boating incidents tend to concentrate
near shore where boats dock or anchor, Antonini found.
In the southwest and central Florida area 20,000
boats from 17 counties anchor to swim, fish or relax.
More than three-quarters are power boats, which are
the guilty parties in most environmental incidents.
Part of the lure of the water is exploring new places,
he pointed out, so many sailors are unfamiliar with anchor-
ages and don't know which areas are dangerous or envi-
ronmentally sensitive. Some boaters don't have adequate
navigational charts or don't use them at all.
They are among the boaters who need education,
he said, and he joined forces with a Sarasota-based
organization to provide just such education.
Boaters' Action and Information League, state
environmental officials and Antonini have cooperated
on "A Guide to Anchorages in Southwest Florida,"
detailing nearly 50 anchorages from southern Tampa
Bay to the Everglades.
It includes a chart and photograph of every anchor-
age and advises the best way in and out. It also de-
scribes in detail sensitive seagrass pastures to be
avoided by boats whose propellers can tear great gaps
in the vital marine growth.


The booklet, at $8.95, has had 4,000 in sales, and
proceeds go to updating and reprinting the guide.
Walter Stilley of Sarasota, president of BAIL, sug-
gests that in addition to using the guide intelligently, all
boaters take a safety class. The U.S. Power Squadron and
Coast Guard Auxiliary groups offer good classes, he said.
"We believe most boaters are better environmen-
talists than most environmentalists," he said. "Most
of us who cruise or live on the water understand we
need to protect it."

The Island Poet
For years we turned to Paris if we wanted the lat-
est styles,
But some of the clothes worn in Florida will sure
bring out your smiles.
For the Levis worn in church will never fill the bill,
'Cause they look like they are rejects from a place
that's called Goodwill.
And some are cut away till there is hardly anything
there,
And if it wasn't for a few threads, I'm sure they
would be bare.
And some of the gals I see must be living in a
trance,
If they think all that blubber will fit in those tight
pants.
And it seems the men have created their own style
this fall,
For the way they wear their stomach you can't see
their belts at all.
Bud Atteridge


Why does it cost so much

to fix my TV & VCR?
Because many service shops don't repair they replace It doesn't require much training or skill and it
generates lots of money; after all it's easier to replace the entire circuit board than to locate the faulty part.
At Bob's, you won't pay $200 for an entire circuit board when a single component is bad. You might
pay $30 to $60 to locate the little bugger, but that's still better than $200.
We've got, or we can get, diagrams on just about everything ever made and we have test equipment
that can't be stumped.
If it's a TV, VCR or home stereo, and it doesn't work, we'll find the problem, we'll fix it, and we'll
guarantee it ...
We actually repair things!

BOB'S TV/VCR REPAIR


5343 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-3738


CANDSV


SAVIG ANYIE


1309 53rd Ave. W.
Bradenton
753-9908
corner of 53rd Ave. W.
and US 41


LIGHTS OUT FOR
SEA TURTLES!
May 1 thru Oct. 31 9PM to 7AM
Please turn out beachfront lights.*
Lights disorient mother turtles
and especially turtle hatchlings
as they journey to the Gulf.








Report turtles, turtle tracks, possible
nests and hatchlings to Anna Maria
778-5638
Ior778-0056. Turtle Watch

Sponsored by The Islander Bystander
*By city ordinance, Anna Maria,
Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach.
Its the lawl
L.-------.---.- -J
Use this handy reminder at the front door or in the
kitchen wherever it will be noticable that lights near
the beach must be turned out from May to October. Just
copy this light switch cover and post it. It's your chance
to contribute to helping an endangered species!


IISLANDERHlme N
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 34217 (941) 778-7978






Ij PAGE 10 m MAY 30, 1996 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

"iAUIC3111I-


EACH 778-4506
EACH
ARN V Zifstain i
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TALES
MAY 30,31 & JUNE 1 8:00 PM
Box Office Open
Open 9 AM to 2 PM daily
Visa and MasterCard Accepted
778-5755
Gulf Drive & Pine Avenue Anna Maria


The
kids are
counting
the days un-
til school's out for the
summer. Do you know where your
children will be? The following is a partial list of of-
ferings of summer activities that caught our eye.

Anna Maria Island
The Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, will hold its annual
full-time summer camp for children in grades kinder-
garten through 5 with an expanded, separate program
for children in grades 6, 7 and 8. The older group will
participate in all major field trips.
Camp will run from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday from June 10 through Aug. 23. Early
risers can be accommodated from 7 to 9 a.m. and
transportation will be available for children from
Bradenton Beach. The fee will be $50 per week per
child. Some scholarship aid is available.
Arts and crafts, cooking, sports, guest performers
and more are scheduled at the Center. Among field trips
planned are Celebration Station, Adventure Island,
Florida Wheels and the Lowry Park Zoo. For registra-
tion and information, call the Center at 778-1908.
In cooperation with the Community Center, the
Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and Chorus
will offer an Academy of Fine Music program for chil-
dren in grades 5 and up in two three-week sessions, 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 10-28,
and July 22-Aug. 9. The fee will be $150 per session. For
information, call the Center at 778-1908.
The School for Constructive Play, 304 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria, 778-2210, is open from 7 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday for ages 1 through
6 years. Fees are $85 per week for preschoolers, $75
for grades K and 1 and $15 per day.
In Holmes Beach, Dolphin Daycare and Pre-
school, 5354 Gulf Drive, 778-2967, also operates
full-time and has openings for ages 2 through 5 years.
Fees are $75 for a full week, $48 for three days or $34
for two days.


callingg all kids to


summer camps

Off the Island
Manatee County's G.T. Bray Park on 59th Street,
Bradenton, offers full-time summer camp for ages 5 to
13 and four weeks of off-site outdoor adventures for
ages 10 through 16. Information, 742-5974. The park's
C.V. Walton Racquet Center offers four-day-per-week
tennis camp for grades K-12; all skills levels welcome.
Information, 742-5973.
The Gulf Coast World of Science, the area's
only hands-on museum, 8251 15th St. E., Airport Mall,
Sarasota, 359-9975, offers one-week-session theme
programs from June 10 through July 19. Ages 3-5 and
6-7 attend from 9:30 a.m. to noon with ages 8-11
scheduled from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Registration is limited.
The South Florida Museum, 201 10th St. W.,
Bradenton, 746-4131, has scheduled several mornings-
only, one-week-session theme programs for grades K-
3. The Junior Science Museum, 747-9477, has a full-
time day camp for grades K-6 from June 10-Aug. 16.
Mote Marine Labortory, 1600 Ken Thompson
Parkway, Sarasota, 388-4441, offers mornings-only
hands-on learning programs for ages 6-9 and 10-13 in
one-week sessions from June 17-July 26. For ages 14-
18, combination day and residential camps (including
ventures out of the area) are scheduled in two-week
sessions in June, July and August. Marine Science I
covers southwest Florida marine ecology, Marine Sci-
ence II focuses on Florida Keys marine ecology and
Marine Science III is titled "Scott Carpenter's Man in
the Sea Program."
The Art League of Manatee County, 209 9th St.
W., Bradenton, 746-2862, plans a varied visual-arts
program for ages 6-12 in one-week sessions from June
10 through July 19. A one-week multidisciplinary
camp of theater, history and art will run June 17-21 for
those entering grades 6 and 7.
The Ringling School of Art and Design, 2700 N.
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, 359-7577, offers half-day,
one-, three- and six-week programs in drawing, paint-
ing and sculpting for grades K-12.
The Carty Academy of Theater Dance, 4901
Cortez Road W., Bradenton, 795-7715, offers special
weekly sessions for ages 3-5 from June 5-Aug. 23 and
three-week sessions for ages 6-10 and 11-15 from July
8-26 and Aug. 5-23. Carty Kids Too! will be open full
time for ages 6-10 from June 5-Aug. 23.


Chamber orchestra rated tops in national festival
The Manatee High School Chamber Orchestra recently received superior ratings in all categories at the
International Orchestra Festival held in Atlanta. The 22-member orchestra was also awarded second place
in its district.


Take Care of yours

in style.


We'd like to introduce our
family to your family. We
specialize in kids cuts
and have all the trendy
new looks and Matrix
styling products
for teens. Plus
we make sure
mom and dad
always leave the
salon looking and
feeling great!


Stmatrix'
HAIR*SKIN.COSMETICS
MATRIX. EXPANDING THE SALON EXPERIENCE.
Weekly: HEAD
Tues Fri 9 6
Sat 9-3 QUARTERS
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5350 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


,


1. -






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 30, 1996 E PAGE 11 I
16 YEARS IN SERVICE


Ceiling Fan & Lighting Center
& FIREPLACE ACCESSORIES
Sales Parts Service Installation
4232 Cortez Road W. Bradenton


Rummage sales Saturdays in June
The Ladies Guild of St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach, will host rummage
sales from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1, 8, 15 and 22. A light lunch will also be offered. Promising
"new" used goodies every week are, from left, Flo Mullen, JoAnn Heyne and Teddi Tomei. For more infor-
mation, call 778-4769 or 778-7935. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Longboat gallerie hosts
new exhibit
The Longboat Framing Gallerie, Inc.,will feature
the work of Marge Bennett, watercolor; Hans Ketelar,
watercolor; and Elena Lee Jones, sculptor, in the of-
fices of the Longboat Chamber of Commerce in
Whitney Beach Plaza.
The exhibit will continue through June 20.

Longboat chamber hosts
three events in a row
On Tuesday, June 4, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
the Longboat Key Chamber's will kick off Small Busi-
ness Week with its June Business After Hours to be
held at the Holiday Inn-Longboat Key, 4949 Gulf of
Mexico Dr.
On Wednesday, June 5, come to hear a panel dis-
cussion entitled "Secrets from the Best" from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. in the John Ringling East Room of the Re-
sort at Longboat Key Club.
Then on Thursday, June 6, from 8 to 9 a.m., the
Third Annual Small Business Person of the Year
Awards Breakfast will take place at the Colony Beach
& Tennis Resort.
For cost, reservations, and information, call the
chamber at 387-9519.

Island Branch Library
opens registration for
children's summer
programs
The Island Branch Library's Summer Program for
children will begin on Tuesday, June 11. Registration
for the Reading Club and special programs will be ac-
cepted after as of Monday, June 3.
The library will offer programs for pre-schoolers,
school-age children in grades 2 and up and for school
children in grades four and up.
For information and details, stop by the library at
5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, for call 778-6341.

Artist DeFrank gives guest
lecture
Anna Maria jewelry artist Autumn DeFrank was a
recent guest lecturer at the Florida Gulf Coast Art Cen-
ter in Belleair.
In a discussion and slide presentation, DeFrank
offered a contemporary perspective to coincide with a
traveling exhibition "Victorian Vision: 19th Century
Jewelry from the Nancy and Gilbert Levine Collection"
- which reflected an age of affluence and aristocracy
with pieces by some of the world's finest craftsmen.


Island 'Summer Singer'
group to form
The Anna Maria Repertory Singers is now form-
ing "Summer Singers" group.
The singers will meet every Thursday from 7 to
9 p.m. beginning Thursday, June 6, in the Coleman
Building of Roser Memorial Community Church in
Anna Maria City.
No audition is required just a desire to sing.
The group is open to all persons of all ages. Light clas-
sics and Broadway tunes will be learned in prepara-
tion for a late summer concert.
Elaine Burkly will direct the repertory group. For
more information, call Burkly at 778-0720.


Final summer registration
at MCC
Registration for new students, re-admissions,
transfers, transients and all other students who have
not registered for Summer 3B classes resumes Mon-
day, June 3, at Manatee Community College cam-
puses in Bradenton and Venice.
The registration period ends June 21. Day and
evening classes begin Thursday, June 20. The term
ends Aug. 1.
Admissions and Registration offices are open 8
a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m.
to 4:40 p.m. on Friday. MCC campuses are located at
5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, and 8000 S. Tamiami
Trail in Venice.
Proof of immunization for measles and rubella is
required for those born after 1956.
For more information, call the MCC Admissions
Office on the Bradenton Campus at 755-1511, ext.
4234. At the South Campus, call 493-3504, ext. 2163.


Poetry and pancakes at
Cafe on the Beach
Members of the Institute for Retired Executives
and Professionals will meet on Wednesday, June 5, at
8:30 a.m. at Cafe on the Beach at the Manatee County
Beach.
The group will meet at the north end of the beach
under the trees.
Participants are asked to bring their poetry to read.

Special music at Longboat
Island Chapel
Thomas Koch, a classical guitarist and an interna-
tionally acclaimed performer, will provide special
music at the Sunday, June 2, 10 a.m. service at the
Longboat Island Chapel 6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.


.d. V 4 Jewelry & Watch Repair
S All work done in our own shop
June Specials
Watch Batteries Installed $49
10% off all watch bands
NEW ARRIVAL
14 Karat "Melrose Necklace"
Shoppes of Paradise Bay
7358 Cortez Rd. W. 798-9585

/Knowledgeable
te" Sales & Service
0 Kites
Kite Banners
Accessories
778-7600


"Remember to get flying with Flash Flights"
5702 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH


tChe am.e.foq
Natural Douguf S


Flax Clothing
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3924 Manatee Ave. W.
Bradenton


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Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 778-1161


A


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1-(800)351-FANS (3267)


Unique Silver Jewelry

Worth The Drive
Off The Island


746-6387


@V( 1- - 0 M






jI[ PAGE 12 0 MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Good work
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary for the week ending May 17. The children's
names are listed left to right. Front row are Caitlin Burns, LuLu Barber, Mickey O'Bannon, Trisha McKee,
Alex Murphy, Katie O'Neill and Jared Lee. Back row are Nicole Murray, Rio Porter, Ditra Paloski, Angelina


Serve it up
The students in Deborah Thomas's second-grade class
learn what it is like to run a restaurant. The managers
and staff of the Sandbar Restaurant in Anna Maria City
lead the children through the process ofjob interviews
to working in different capacities at the restaurant.
Here the "cooks" get the orders ready for the waiters
and waitress to deliver to hungry diners.

j^,~ f.. ji..d" JB


Lee, Kelly Martin and Lauren Bucci.

Anna Maria

Elementary


School Menu
Monday, 6/3/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Corn, Salad, Ice
Cream
Tuesday, 6/4/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Bag Lunch Corn Dog, Juice,
Carrot Sticks, Cookie
All meals served with milk.


t14


,*-"'I
SLL^1:,


All aboard for St. Augustine
Ellis's Eagles, the name of choice by Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade class, get ready to board the bus for an over-
S night trip to historic St. Augustine. The children raised the funds by holding a Read-A-Thon last October.
S Their trip included the sites of the San Marcos Fort, Florida's oldest school, Catholic church and house.


School's out!
* Have a safe and happy summer!



Joy Courtney


Bo~


Housecall, a rapidly expand-
ing home healthcare company,
is proud to announce the
opening of its newest
Medicare certified agency.

NOW OPEN
at
3216 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach

The company's expansion into
the community will provide a
variety of job opportunities and
healthcare services to people
needing assistance in the home.

Call for information
778-0747


HOUSECALL

Health Services In Your Home


DR. DIANE L. MICHAELS
C r ,-, ,-ir r ti r-,-.-,r, iii


761-0210

501 Village Green Parkway P
Suite 15 *West Bradenon
(beh,nj Ih.- ,j r.jn, : 1 i ,:L t.r.. % IB

{L oser (dlemrafl TmnmmnttV (1Tprd1
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Worship 10:00
Sunday School 9:30
S Sat Seaside Worship 6:00pm
| Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414


Worship Service
10 am
Adult Study Group
9 am
Minister
Charles Jim Marsh
6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
LONGBOAT KEY
383-6491


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MASSAGE

THERAPY r '
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... largest selection of
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Anna Maria Island ...


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Norman
Realty inc.


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1-800-367-1617
3101 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Just
S visiting
paradise?

ISLANDER

Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best
news the only paper
with all the news
about the Island.
Charge your
subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


w MENEWMEMW I


~i~f~







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 30, 1996 I PAGE 13 Ij



SAT, writing scores skyrocket at Island school


The progressive teachers and staff of Anna
Maria Elementary School could very well have
found the magic formula for improving our school
system. With already scores to boast about in the
national Scholastic Aptitude Tests and the state's
Florida Writing Test, our Island school blew its
scores off the scoreboard this year.
Near the end of each school year, students in the
fourth, eighth, and tenth grades nationwide are given
a battery of SAT tests which include the subjects of
reading comprehension, math application, science, and
thinking skills. The SATs give educators an idea of
how their students' learning levels compare to other
students and school systems throughout the nation.
The Florida Writing Test was implemented by the
state four years ago and is used to see how students'
writing abilities compare within the state.
Anna Maria Elementary students have always had
excellent scores in math and reading. Though the stu-


dents' writing score was above the state's average, it
was unacceptable to our Island teachers who took steps
to do even better. Little did they know that their discov-
ery would also increase the already commendable math
and reading scores.
With only writing skills in mind, the school hired
a writing consultant Melissa Forney from Palmetto.
She worked earlier this year with our fourth-grade
teachers teaching them a skill named "Writing Note-
book." In the notebooks, children learn to organize
thoughts and create and write stories with the mechan-
ics of grammar, spelling and punctuation following
along through the process.
The process works. In 1994, Anna Maria's writing
scores on the Florida Writing Test was 22 and in 1995
they came in at 26 this year the score was 78! But
there's more.
In 1994, the school's reading SAT score was 63
followed by 59 in 1995 this year it was 81! In 1994,


the school's math score was 69 followed by 79 in 1995
- this year it was 80!
How come?
According to Jim Kronus, principal, the method of
teaching writing skills surprisingly influenced retention
and ability in the other subjects. Through the Writing
Notebooks, children learned to identify and retain the
"meat" of a math problem or a science project, for ex-
ample, and process the information in a way they learned
to recognize from writing their notebooks, he said.
"Writing needs to be placed in greater importance
than in the past," said Kronus. "We've learned that
once that is done, all other learning comes with it."
Our community needs to thank our progressive and
non-egotistical teachers at Anna Maria Elementary.
Former scores were very good to great. Our teachers
could have maintained the norm and have had a lot to
be proud of, but now, how they are teaching is better
than better it's great


CELEBRITY SWIFTIES 1 2 3 45 1 8 9 10 12 113 1 15 111 1
BY RANDOLPH ROSS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 19 I I I


ACROSS
1 Haphazard
growth
7 Country on the
Gulf of Guinea
12 Went off welfare
19 Summary
20 Popular support
group
21 Gourmet
22 "Don't tell me
what to say on
the air," said

24 Changethe
layout
25 Clear the boards
26 Gets better
27 Simple card
game
29 Complainer
30 Flew off the
handle
31 Type of belly
button
32 Singer Watley et
al.
34 Poetic
monogram
35 Quebec time off
36 Voting group
37 Voting district
38 Foot parts
41 What "nobody
doesn't like"
44 Bank holdings
46 "It's--!"
47 Retailer R. H.

48 Davis of "Jungle
Fever"


49 Of the lower
part of a pistil
52 Report card
listing
53 Brief moments
54 Sometimes it
must be
followed
55 Old Pontiac
56 Unlike the
king's English
58 Munich Mister
59 Campus
program, for
short
60 Mr. Moto reply
61 Mobs
62 Clift of "The
McLaughlin
Group"
64 Consonant
(with)
66 Bit
67 Word with
smoke or cow
69 Feeling
70 Expenditure
71 Kind of particle
72 Not work
73 --majeste
74 Make tracks
75 They feel for
you
77 One who
yearns
78 She, in Siena
79 Condition
80 Dark
81 Pub vessel
85 1961 Best Actor
for "Judgment
at Nuremberg"
87 Collar stiffener
88 Cautious
90 Apiece
91 Additionally


92 "Down by the
Salley Gardens"
poet
94 "Norma Rae"
director Martin
95 Outbuilding
97 Flubs
99 Sticky stuff
100 Obvious
pleasure
101 Port St.-,
Fla.
102 Actress Parsons
105 "Republican
Congressmen
don't like me,"
said--
108 Chills, so to
speak
109 Contacts,
modern-style
110 "Sense and
Sensibility"
director
111 Salon employee
112 Boy of old song
113 Tough ones
DOWN
1 Parts of orreries
2 How some taxes
are levied
3 Parlay a bet
4 Have--of
nerves
5 Ready for the
Information
Age
6 Trip starter
7 "I won my 1984
Tony by just a
few votes," said

8 Stalwart
9 Raggedy ones
10 Cambodia's Lon


11 What bad things
shouldn't get
12 Fritz's 1984
running mate
13 Poetically ajar
14 Baseball's
McCarver
15 1988 film
"Rent---
16 "Starring in
'Who's the
Boss?' was a
breeze," said

17 Ultimatum
18 Ball stars
20 "...-- 'clock
scholar"
23 Le Carre's"-
People"
28 Puton
32 Pop singer lan
33 "Punk rock is
cruel," said -
36 "I was no
wallflower in
'Vanity Fair,'"
said -
37 "I fear watching
my own films,"
said -
39 Undiluted
40 Limousine
42 Mystery novelist
Cross
43 Morethan
medium
45 River to the
Rhone
46 Part of
35-Across
50 Cruising
51 Nuts
52 "I'll do my
Hepburn
imitation in a
minute," said


54 Annoyed
56 Sends
57 Like a fugitive
58 "Drat!"
magnified
59 "'The Sound of
Music' would
make a good
movie," said

60 Lost
63 Japanese-
American


65 Patient's cry
68 Belgian
waterway
72 Part of a stable
family
73 Director
Wertmulleret al.
74 Words with
"stone" or "the
matter"
76 That girl
77 Finished, in a
way


82 In (stuck)
83 One who
vituperates
84 Evidence of lack
of empathy
85 Has the con
86 It's a tight fit
87 --Tome
89 A.B.A. members
93 Cast out
94 Confrontation
95 Dallas suburb


96 Steps
98 Security item
100 Paradiso in
the Alps
103 10% of DCX
104 Former Sec.
Aspin
106 Org. the
Surgeon
General
addresses
107 Grammy
category


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


rel GUARANTEED 0
A LOWEST PRICES! I

MATTRESSES N ADJ. BEDS SAVE $499o0


BRADENTON 794-2952
Cortez Commons
59th St & Cortez Rd. W.


SARASOTA 922-5271
1901 Hansen St.


F-REESA ,/EDYDEIVE'RY F


SNOOKS ADAMS'


KIDS DAY
Sponsored annually by the
Anna Maria Island Privateers

Bayfront Park Anna Maria City
Saturday June 8 11 am-2 pm




Hot Dogs! Coca-Cola! Pizza!
For kids 12 and under from Anna Maria
Island, Longboat Key and Manatee County
11 AMtthe
Games Begin Me ers! -
12 NOON prird
Best-Dressed Little o ship
Pirate Contest the


12:30 PM
Treasure Hunt
1:00 PM
Sandcastle
Judging


A


Information: 778-5934 & 778-1238


m~u


o STUMPED?


Fresh mullet for sale!

4ore than a mullet Wrapper!



-jgpto"--- -s---

IISLANDERlMNIMI

100% Cotton $10 including state sales tax
5408 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach


~94~mL~a~innzlza~2Z~






EIG PAGE 14 m MAY 30, 1996 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


From the land of
sparkling waters
Here's something that should make hard-core
Budmen and most all other beer drinkers foam: Con-
sumer Reports magazine has picked Old Milwaukee as
the best-tasting mass-market beer in the U.S.
The 17 trained beer tasters (how do you get that
job?) chose Old Milwaukee over big-name competitors
like Coors, Budweiser and Miller.
Go figure. They selected beers most of us at The
Islander Bystander haven't even tried including Old
Milwaukee.
Strohs and Miller Brewery's Red Dog came in sec-
ond and third, and the top three light beers were also
that blue-collar, moderately priced threesome Old
Mil, Strohs and Red Dog light.
The trained tastebuds selected best-tasting im-
ported beers: Molson Golden, Labatt Blue and Fosters.
"Craft ale" bests were Samuel Adams Boston Ale, Si-
erra Nevada Pale and Full Sail Amber.
The experts agreed non-alcoholic beer lovers
should love top-ranked Sharp's by Miller, Coors Cut-
ter and Kingsbury above all others.
A quick survey of our own non-scientific of
course revealed that of 17 friendly, non-professional
beer drinkers, five had tried Old Milwaukee two
made the effort just since the survey was released last
week. None of them "preferred" it. Most didn't find it
too memorable.
The best review on Old Mil we could get was for
the price. One person said he and his friends (Gators)
drank Old Milwaukee in college because it was 98


cents a six-pack.
"I was glad to see Red Dog in the top three 'cause
I really like that beer," Gib Bergquist, Florida Cracker
and Islander columnist, said. He said he buys which-
ever beer is a bargain and gets along OK with Old
Milwaukee but his son-in-law prefers "top shelf' beer.
"He never wants to drink my beer and that's just fine,"
Bergquist said.
Snooks Adams said he remembers years ago when
Schlitz came out with Old Milwaukee and Budweiser
came up with a competing product, Busch beer. He said
he tried Old Milwaukee and liked it but he stuck with
Busch all these years. "I didn't think stores here carried
it but now I'm gonna find some and try it again," he
said.
We polled more than a few bars on the Island and
couldn't find one that serves Old Milwaukee but you
can pick some up at Island Foods.
The survey obviously had an impression on beer
drinkers. Who knows? The "experts" may be right.
When was the last time you had an Old Milwaukee?

All gone
You remember pet pig Frances Bacon the pot-
bellied pet of Shirley Howden-Gillett that was ordered
out of town by the Holmes Beach City Council.
Howden-Gillett asked permission to keep the pet
despite city law that prohibits farm animals, but neigh-
bors complained of odor, fleas and unsanitary condi-
tions. Get her a home off-Island, said the council.
In case you didn't know, Frances left after much
ado and now Howden-Gillett has followed suit. She
had her duplex up for sale all along but didn't have a
buyer until recently.
Howden-Gillett told us before she moved that she
bought property in unincorporated Sarasota County
where Frances Bacon will be welcome to reside with
her.
We're glad it worked out. Howden-Gillett was a


resident of the Island for more than 20 years and those
of us who knew her appreciated her friendly ways. It
wasn't Shirley but Shirley's neighborhood that
changed. Years ago the area adjacent to her former
home was wooded known as McIntosh's woods -
and the only neighbors she had to concern herself with
were skateboarders who built a ramp nearby.
Maybe we'll invite her back for some special oc-
casion. And Frances Bacon too.

No points for leaners?
A few of the faithful have asked, so you might as
well know. The Second Annual Ray Simches Memo-
rial All-Island Horseshoe Tournament (whew!) spon-
sored by The Islander Bystander will be held June 29
at "the pits" at Anna Maria City Hall.
The late Ray Simches, former mayor of Anna
Maria, challenged the Island cities to unity in the
game of horseshoes. It was his wish for the cities to
come together in the spirit of a game for fun and
good will.
The challenge was met by horseshoe players
from all over Anna Maria Island last year and we're
hoping for enough entries this year to run double
brackets and have a play-off on Sunday. The entry
fee for the round-robin tournament is $20 per team.
Teams may represent businesses or streets, blocks
or neighborhoods, families or friends.
That's because there's a lot of money needed by
the beneficiary of the tournament, the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, for a new gym floor.
Actually, they need a gym floor. They don't need
a new one 'cause they don't have one at all right now.
It's painted concrete and it's hard on kids and adults -
a liability in the form of sport injuries.
Get busy. Get a two-person team. Warm up your
arm. Save up for the entry fee or find a sponsor.
There's a $100 first place cash award and loads of
prizes from Island merchants at stake.
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 30, 1996 M PAGE 15 Il]

Seasonal changes, from snook to tarpon


By Capt. Mike Heistand
With snook season all but over, it's time for anglers
to turn their attention to tarpon. A few silver kings have
been spotted off the Island's beaches and on the flats by
Passage Key. Other action includes trout and flounder in
the backwater, cobia and grouper offshore.
Karen at the Rod arid Reel Pier said pier fishers there
have been catching a few mackerel, some drum and red-
fish. Pier regular Don caught a 27-inch snook, and Andrea
caught her first-ever fish, a 26-inch snook. Good work!
Ken at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers there
are catching a lot of mackerel, snook and night, redfish, a
few bluefish and some sheepshead.
Georgia at the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier said
they've been catching speckled trout, flounder, sheeps-
head, snook and even a 23-pound red grouper.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 85 head of Key West grunts and por-
gies. The six-hour trips averaged 185 head of Key West
grunts, flounder, porgies, lane snapper and one nice-sized
black grouper. The nine-hour trips averaged 40 head of red
grouper, mangrove snapper, black grouper and rudderfish.
Capt Zack on the Dee Jay II said snook were the

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number one catch for him, with a bunch of 18-pounders.
He said he hasn't been able to find any reds in the past few
weeks, but flounder and trout are fine and tarpon fishing
is expected to kick in after June 1.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade fish-
ers are catching a lot of snook and a flounder. For Gulf
fishers, grouper is about 12 miles out.
Capt Rick Gross said snook season is all but over,
but it's been a good one. This week Capt Rick was able
to put his charters onto linesiders that were up to 40 inches
long.
Capt. Mark Bradow says fishing has been excellent
for his charters, with plenty of snook and a few tarpon.
On my boat Magic we've caught several trout, some
up to 25 inches, a few reds up to 27 inches and two cobia,
one a 44-inch monster.
Capt. Tom Chaya said snook, reds and trout were his
week's best bets.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said snook fishing is
remains excellent, redfish and trout angling is fair, cobia
are to be found on the artificial reefs and grouper are good
catches in about 100 feet of water.
Good luck and good fishing.


s --..., -- jT
Capt. Mike Heistand is rightfully all smiles with this
44-inch cobia, caught on 10-pound test line. Islander
Photo: Courtesy Mike Heistand


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PIB PAGE 16 0 MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 21, burglary to an automobile, 300 block of
Hardin Avenue. The complainant reported a person un-
known entered the vehicle and removed a cellular phone.
Bradenton Beach
May 17, automobile burglary in progress, 9600
block of 44th Avenue West The officer responded to a
report of an automobile burglary in progress and observed
the suspect looking into vehicles and trying door handles.
The officer approached the suspect after observing him get
into a vehicle and sit in the driver's seat. The suspect fled
but was later apprehended by the officer and turned over
to a sheriffs deputy.
May 19, information, 2502 Gulf Drive N., Econo
Lodge. According to the report, the suspect was intoxi-
cated and lost his wallet containing his identification,
credit cards and $2,000 in cash. After accusing the
housekeeper of stealing the wallet, the suspect became
angry and broke the television and a desk lamp and
knocked a hole in the wall. He was asked to pay $500
in damages and leave the premises.
Holmes Beach
May 18, assistance, 300 block of 59th Street The
officer responded to the residence of an elderly female
subject who had injured her finger by closing it in a
drawer. He filled a washcloth with ice and wrapped it
around the finger to relieve the pain. She said her nurse


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would arrive shortly.
May 19, burglary to an automobile, 5300 block of
Marina Drive. The officer on patrol observed a vehicle for
sale in the parking lot with a box with wires hanging from
it lying on the ground by the driver's door. Upon investi-
gation, he found a person unknown had removed a cas-
sette/CD player valued at $500 and speakers valued at
$100. When the items were removed, the dashboard was
broken, causing $350 in damage.
May 19, domestic, 100 block of 52nd Street The
victim reported she and the suspect were at the beach
when he became intoxicated, couldn't find his wallet and
got angry at her. She said they returned to his vehicle
where he threw a bowl of soup and a grapefruit at her,
striking her in the face and arm. He then threw a metal
wrench at her but missed. The suspect fled the area but
was located by a sheriffs deputy and placed in custody.
May 19, suspicious person, 6800 block of Palm. The
officer received a complaint of an intoxicated male sub-
ject, located the subject on a bus stop bench and gave him
a ride home.
May 19, DUI, leaving the scene of an accident with
property damage, careless driving, 5600 block of Gulf
Drive. The officer responded to a hit and run crash and a
witness gave him a vehicle description and a partial tag
number of the vehicle that left the scene. The driver, Mary
Davidson, 40, Holmes Beach, was located by a sheriffs
deputy.
Davidson did not have her driver's license and denied
any knowledge of the accident, said the report. The officer
observed damage to her vehicle and paint from the acci-


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dent. The witness arrived and identified Davidson. The
officer began to administer field performance tests bi
Davidson refused to continue. He administered a br *
test and placed Davidson in custody.
May 19, domestic, 100 block of 52nd Street.'
victim reported the suspect had been arguing with her sc
When she asked the suspect to leave, the suspect hit hez
in the abdomen with a purse and threw a wallet, hitting her
in the eye. A capias request was issued for the suspect.
May 20, found property a bicycle, 6001 Marina
Drive, behind the fire station.
May 22, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf Drive
Manatee County Public Beach. The complainant said
someone removed her purse containing $75 in cash, credit
cards and jewelry valued at $350 from her vehicle.
May 23, found property a watch, 65th Street
beach entrance.
May 23, assistance, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The
subject was mowing the grass, stepped into the storm drain
at the edge of the roadway and injured his shin and back.
The officer marked the area with traffic cones and notified
the public works department.
May 24, spouse battery, 4900 block of Gulf
Drive. The officer on patrol was flagged down by the
victim, who said he and the suspect got into an argu-
ment and she locked him out of the residence. He said
he broke the window to enter the residence and the
suspect slapped him in the eye and scratched him on the
shoulder. The suspect reported the victim pushed her
into the broken glass on the floor, and she cut her hand
and knee. Both were placed in custody.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 30, 1996 M PAGE 17 IKM


Coast Guard Auxiliary to
hold seamanship course
beginning June 4
A course in power boating skills and seamanship
conducted by Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors will
begin 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 4, at Flotilla 81 Train-
ing Center, 4208 129th St., Cortez, north of the Seafood
Shack Restaurant.
The course includes legal requirements, boat han-
dling skills, navigation, weather, and VHF radio.
Classes will run for three weeks on Tuesdays and
Thursday. Tuition for the course is free and materials
and textbooks are available at the Training Center at a
nominal cost.
For further information about Coast Guard Auxil-
iary courses, the effect of completing the course on
lowering insurance rates, and for registration, call 722-
6971 or 778-7374.



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Club honored for
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The Woman's Club ofAnna
Maria Island was honored
for 50 years of service at
the Florida Federation of
Women's Clubs' 101st
annual convention in April,
with more than 1,000
women in attendance. Past
District 14 Director Marie
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Photo: Courtesy of Marian
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Live Entertainment & Dancing
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- - - - - - 1





[I' PAGE 18 E MAY 30, 1996 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria Little League teams, 1996 season


Anna Maria Fire Department, Major League
Anna Maria Fire Department, Major League


Bali-Hai, Minor League


D. Coy Ducks, Major League


Betsy Hills, Minor League


Haley's Motel, Major League


Ciao! Restaurant, Minor League


Jim Boast Dodge, Major League


Tip of the Island, Minor League


Kiwanis, Major League





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 30, 1996 M PAGE 19 EjO

Anna Maria Little League teams, 1996 season


Bridge St. Pier & Cafe, Tee Ball League


Air & Energy, Tee Ball League


Harry's Continental Kitchens, Tee Ball League


Anna Maria Pest Control, Tee Ball League
I. .<*'* aS S SS l


Taylor Made Marine, Tee Ball League


VFW Post 8199, Tee Ball League


Grand Finale


Fun festival June 1
The Anna Maria Island Little League will finish the
season with an all-day celebration and awards ceremony
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center Saturday,
June 1. The schedule will be as follows:


9 a.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
2 p.m.


T-Ball all-star game
T-Ball awards presentation
Minor League all-star game
Minor League awards presentation
Major League all-star game


4 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.


Major League awards presentation
Moms vs. kids softball game
Minors all-stars vs. Minors coaches game
Majors all-stars vs. Majors coaches game
Coaches vs. coaches game


_ __ .I_ II_ -- IlI --






-. IF PAGE 20 0 MAY 30, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Boating safety's not just for adults anymore


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Personal watercraft usage is exploding on local
waters. Injuries are way up 38 percent of all
watersport injuries now and the Florida Legislature
just decided to require operators of most watercraft
under the age of 16 pass a safety course.
It should be required of everybody.
Charlie Grace of Flotilla 81/U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary says enrollment in local safe boating courses
is way up and he's getting about four or five calls a day
about courses.
Unlike many areas, our local flotilla starts a new
course every month in hopes of bringing the word on
safety to as many folks as possible. If you'd like to
enroll in a free safe boating course (only cost is the
books used) and maybe get yourself an insurance re-
duction for the effort, give Grace a call at 778-5800.
Speaking of insurance, rates on personal watercraft
have shot up 40 percent in the past four years, and it's
not cheap. The average premium on a new $6,000 per-
sonal watercraft is $500 a year if you can find it.
As the number of personal watercraft continues to
grow, and safety courses become more available, it's
hoped insurance and accident rates will stabilize, but
there's no guarantee.

Hardhead catfish use found
Once the bane of local fishers, hardhead catfish are
now dying at an alarming rate, and just when we've
found a good use for them.
You see it's cobia season, and whether you call
them cobia, lemonfish or ling, we all know they're
some of the best tasting critters around. That naturally
makes all of us curious as to what cobia eat.
Researchers from Mississippi recently studied the
food found in the stomachs of 403 cobia, according to
Marine Extension Agent John Stevely, and the results
are interesting. They might even help you catch a few
more of these toothsome creatures.
Writing in the current issue of "The Marine
Scene," Stevely reveals that cobia like crabs best. The
lesser blue crab (a smaller relative of the one we love
to eat) was found in almost 49 percent of the stomachs
of cobia in the study.
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Also very common were the iridescent swimming
crab (27 percent) and the lady crab (23 percent). A to-
tal of 12 different kinds of crabs were found in cobia
stomachs.
Stevely also reports that very few shrimp were
found in the cobia. Mantis shrimp (sea lice) showed up
in 20 percent of the fish however, and squid were found
in over 11 percent of the fish.
But then comes a surprise, at least to me. Some 24
percent of the fish had hardhead catfish in their stom-
achs. Eighteen percent had eaten eels.
Even more interesting, 44 percent of the cobia over
45 inches long had hardhead catfish in their stomachs.
Just seven percent of those under 37 inches had eaten
hardhead catfish lately.
So there you go. If you want to catch a big cobia,
a hardhead catfish seems to be a good bait.
But come to think of it, hardhead catfish are pretty
scarce right now too. Remember the old adage about "a
day late and a dollar short?"

Dolphin safe, but how safe?
Environmental groups are split on a new legislation
moving through Congress that would again let yellow-
fin tuna be caught through locating the fish by chasing
the dolphins that swim with them and then wrapping a
mile-long net around the whole school including
dolphins.
It's all part of an agreement with Mexico and sev-
eral other Latin American countries that presently can't
sell tuna in this country because their fishing tech-
niques aren't "dolphin safe." It's generally agreed U.S.
policy instituted in the late 1980s has brought down
dolphin deaths in the Pacific tuna fishery from more
than 100,000 a year in 1989 to under 4,000 last year.
Scientists tell us there are about 9.6 million dolphin
in the sea. I have no idea how they arrived at that num-
ber.
The proposed agreement would guarantee not to
allow more than 5,000 dolphin deaths a year. Support-
ers of the agreement argue that without it, the present
safeguards will collapse soon and tuna fleets will sim-
ply sell their catches to countries with no "dolphin
safe" rules.
Anyway, administration officials say the "dolphin

Bridge Street Pier a^ Cafe
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)


ANNIE$ OF CORTEZ





BEER SODA SNACKS
At The Bar or To Go

LIVE BAIT & TACKLE
SHRIMP SHINERS CRABS

BACKWATER FISHING CHARTERS
1/2, 3/4 & Full Day
Featuring: Cap't Zach
4334 127 St. W., Cortez 794-3580
Just east of Cortez Bridge before the Seafood Shack


safe" label could still only be used on tuna catches
which an observer would certify had resulted in no
dolphin deaths or serious injuries. Our government says
that is tighter than our present rule.
Lined up in favor of the new rule, which quietly
passed the House Resources Committee early this
month and awaits Senate action, are the National Wild-
life Federation, World Wildlife Fund, Greenpeace and
the Environmental Defense Fund. Opponents include
the Sierra Club, Defender of Wildlife, the Earth Island
Institute and Public Citizen.
The bill now goes to the Senate Commerce Com-
mittee for action, so if you want to make your views
known, that's your contact point.
See you next week.



By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
May 17, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 28-foot power boat
aground in Big Pass with an injured passenger.
Station Cortez assisted with communications
while Sarasota Fire and Rescue removed the
people from the vessel and a commercial salvage
company refloated the boat and towed it to port.
May 19, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 22-foot
power boat 40 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico off
Anna Maria Island. The reporting source towed
the vessel back to port.
May 19, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a person in the water
near Longboat Pass. A passing boater pulled the
person from the water and took him to shore.
May 19, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 19-foot power boat
overdue from Palma Sola Bay. A Coast Guard
vessel responded, located the vessel aground and
towed the boat to port.
May 20, Boarding. A 30-foot fishing vessel
was boarded in Anna Maria Sound. No violations
were found.
May 21, Boarding. A 37-foot power boat was
boarded near Cortez Bridge. The operator was is-
sued a written warning for having a marine sani-
tation device with its overboard discharge valve in
the open position while in inland waters.
May 21, Boarding. A 20-foot power boat was
boarded at Kingfish Boat Ramp. The operator was
issued a written warning for not having a Type IV
throwable life cushion readily available.


FISHING CHARTERS
FULL DAY OR HALF DAY
Pleasure Cruises Egmont Excursions
Backwater Offshore


Fast, Clean, Safe -
with Capt. Mike Heistand
Reservations 7 -1
Please 778-1990 ____


AMERICAN CAR WASH
& QUICK LUBE SERVICE
Washing, Waxing and Detailing
(Pick Up & Delivery Available)
QUICK LUBE
Lube, Oil & Filter (up to 5 Qts.)


+ Tax (Most Cars)


No Appointment Necessary
Mon. Fri. 8 -5 Sat. 8-4
24-Hour Self Service Facility
S Castrol (941) 778-1617
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Every Thursday is Ladies Day


R;Rm





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 30, 1996 E PAGE 21 li


4th annual Fishing the Islands Tournament June 15


Double the prize money, separate offshore and
inshore divisions and a format that allows a family
team to compete with professionals will be features
of the 4th annual Fishing the Islands Tournament
Saturday, June 15.
Fishing will begin at 6:30 am. that morning and


teams may weigh in their catches until midnight that night,
giving the tournament the flavor of a two-day event.
The '96 event marks the first time there will be two
divisions. Prize money will be $5,000 cash for first
place, $2,000 for second place and $1,000 for third
place in each division. The tournament is a multi-spe-


'Awesome' Adam
By Luke Courtney
Mudville's darkest day was never this bad. One v
of Haley's Motel's best players, Adam Pear, was
injured with a cracked wrist, and Haley's had to
play Anna Maria Fire District to break a tie for first
place in the second half of the Little League season.
Did Adam just sit in the dugout and cheer
his team on? No way. Wearing a special wrist
brace provided by Little League officials, Adam
stepped up and said, "Let's play ball."
He couldn't catch with his injured left wrist
(teammates rolled the ball to him); he couldn't
bat with his injured wrist, he used a small bat
with one hand; and he couldn't steal bases or
slide, but he did it all anyway.
Adam pitched six full innings, giving up only
two runs. He hit two singles with one hand,
walked once, stole a base and gave one of the
best performances of the season at the Center,
leading his team to an 8-2 victory over AMFD.
That's what baseball is all about. Never give .
up, try your hardest, don't let down the team and The one-armed baseball player
do your individual best. Adam Pear, a member of Haley's Motel little
Adam did. His outstanding display of athletic League team at Anna Maria Island Community
ability, team spirit and sportsmanship will not Center, pitched and hit a great game with only one
soon be forgotten. good arm. Pear's wrist was cracked while batting
Awesome Adam we applaud you. in a previous game. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney

Horseshoe winners


Winners in the May 25 horseshoe games were John
Johnson of Holmes Beach and Bill Starrett of Anna
Maria. Runners-up were Bill Cooney of Bradenton


Beach and Gene Snedeker of Holmes Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday
at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive.


cies competition in which each boat may weigh in up
to six fish. Points are awarded by species and weight
according to a published point system.
The backwater division will be fishing for snook,
trout, redfish and flounder which will be photographed
and released alive. The offshore division will be fish-
ing for more than a dozen different species. This is a
sportfishing tournament. All fish must be caught by
rod, reel, hook and line.
Fishing the Islands is sponsored by Island Discount
Tackle of Holmes Beach. Partial proceeds from the
event support sports programs at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center. The Center received a total of
$11,000 from the previous three tournaments, includ-
ing $5,250 donated from the 1995 tourney.
The entry fee is $175 per boat. Registration after
June 13 will be $200. All boats must be registered and
the entry fee paid by the end of the captains meeting
Friday, June 14. A maximum of five anglers per boat,
including the captain, will be allowed.
The captains meeting will run from 5:30 to 8:30
p.m. at the Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. One member of each crew must be
present.
A cash bar and food will be available during the
captains meeting. Rules will be discussed at 7:30 p.m.
All team members and their families are invited to join
in the fun as anglers compare notes, strategies and
boast over past successes.
The action that separates the boasters from the
posters begins Saturday morning with check-in from
6:30 to 8:30 am. Check-in locations include New Pass,
Longboat Pass, Bean Point and the mouth of the Mana-
tee River.
The tournament will conclude with the Fishing the
Islands cook-out and banquet at the Center from noon
to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 16. Tournament awards will be
distributed starting at 2 p.m. Live entertainment and
door prizes will be featured.
The banquet is open to anglers and non-anglers of
all ages. Admission will be $10 for adults, $5 for chil-
dren ages 6-12 years. Children under 6 are free.
For more information and registration, call Island
Discount Tackle at 778-7688 (fax 778-4999).


ISLANDER

All the news -
every week
on Anna Maria.
Pull out and save
the special
hurricane map,
evacuation plans and
safety tips this week.


ATMAIeH
Oubad


DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu5/30 10:26 2.4ft 3:31 1.0ft - 5:29 0.0ft
Fr15/31 12:31 1.4ft 3:59 1.1ft 10:58 2.6ft 6:14 -0.2ft
Sat 6/1 1:28 1.4ft 4:28 1.2ft 11:31a 2.7ft 6:57 -0.3ft
Sun 6/2 2:24 1.4ft 4:53 1.3ft 12:13 2.8ft 7:45 -0.3ft
Mon 6/3 3:19 1.4ft 5:35 1.3ft 12:56 2.8ft 8:34 -0.3ft
Tue6/4 4:17 1.4ft 6:18 1.3ft 1:44 2.7ft 9:22 -0.2ft
Wed 6/5 5:17 1.4ft 7:25 1.3ft 2:37 2.5ft 10:14 -0.1ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


243 WALKAROUND
Powered by
OUTBOARDS
Galati Perico Harbor
12310 Manatee Ave. West
795-2628


180001



$1000 c

4










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SATURI

EVERYONE

IS INVITED

TO FISH !


IH ANN
ITH ANN


DAYv J1
2 Separate Divisi
This Year:
OFFSHORE
AND
INSHORE


INSHORE



IFFSHORE

IUAL








tAte
IDS
[ENT




UNE I5TH
ons Twice The Fun...
Twice The Prizes
LE
a< ee 7Therve...
THIS TOURNAMENT
IS FUN !


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For Information Contact: IslAND DISCOUNT TACKLE
Phone 778-7688 Fax 778-4999


0 n CNNON






SE[ PAGE 22 0 MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island transactions
527 South Dr., Anna Maria, a ground level 1,060 sfla
2bed/l&l/2bath/lcarhomebuiltin 1965 on a 137x55 lot,
sold 3/29/96, Seaver to Sauer, for $149,900; list unknown.
866 North Shore Dr., Anna Maria, a ground level
896 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1951 on a
50x112 lot, was sold 4/1/96, Pence to Beach, for
$167,000; list $187,000.
108 9th Street S., Bradenton Beach, unit D,
bayview, a bayfront 2bed/2bath 1,212 sfla condo built


-I


Michael Saunders & Company
Residential Sales/Rental Division Licensed Real Estate Broker
Lt.-wated in:
Anna Maria Island Centre Shc)ps
I Open 7 Days a Week ]I]


VIEW THE DOLPHINS from this exciting 3BR/2-1/2B
home. Dock, magnificent bay views from every room.
2nd floor balcony, oversized 2-car garage. $399,900.
Janet Dickerson, 795-4357. #13768.
PICTURE BOOK HOME on Holmes Beach. Deep
water canal. Two fireplaces, fabulous kitchen, 2-car
garage, 3 large porches. $389,000. Kathleen Slayter,
792-8826 or Janet Bellingar, 727-7870. #67290.
SAILBOAT WATER. Luxurious condominium.
State-of-the-art island kitchen, master suite, loft of-
fice. Workshop with A/C, 22' lanai overlooks 41'
lighted dock. Direct access to ICW. $199,900. Barry
& Kimberly Charles, 795-1273. #67950.
QUIET AND LUXURIOUS canal-front home at the
end of a cul-de-sac. 3BR/3-1/2B, vaulted ceilings, fire-
place, extra office or den. For the discriminating buyer.
$579,500. Nancy Keegan, 723-3929. #13799.
PEACEFUL HOME on canal in a neighborhood
where homes reflect pride of ownership. Newer
dock and seawall. Ready for you to unlock the
door and move into. $289,000. Nancy Keegan,
723-3929. #13798.
BOATING ANYONE? Immaculate 3BR/2B on
Warner's Bayou, remodeled kitchen, breakfast
room, large family room, dock. $186,900.
Jeanette Rampone, 747-2244. #66768.


On Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes
Beach. Contact Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
PERICO ISLAND. 2BR/2B, screened patio, lake view,
washer/dryer. Two month minimum. Available now.
COQUINA BEACH CLUB. Lovely studio, Gulf view,
pool, washer/dryer. Weekly or monthly.
PERICO BAY CLUB. Gated community. 2BR/2B, former
model, lakeview, 2nd floor, washer/dryer. Heated pool
and tennis. $1,110.00 monthly Six month rental.


in 1984, was sold 4/2/96, Sharifi to Sassano, for
$142,000; list unknown.
120 White Ave., Holmes Beach/Anna Maria, a
ground level 1,342 sfla 4bed/2bath/lcar home built in
1951 on a 104x106 lot, was sold 4/5/96, Munday to
Grove, for $220,000; list $249,900.
214 Sycamore, Anna Maria, an elevated 2,344 sfla
4bed/3bath/2car home built in 1993 on a 67x100 lot,
was sold 4/3/96, Hardy to Tattam, for $258,000; list
$299-289-279,000. Has 24K gold fixtures.
215 Oak Ave., Anna Maria, a canalfront ground
level 1,800 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car/pool home built in





419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294








RUN AWAY
To Runaway Bay! Quiet 2BR/2BA condo overlooking
mangroves and canal, very private. Complex includes
private beach access, tennis court, largest swimming pool
on the Island, exercise room w/saunas, shuffleboard
courts, Bocce court, and fishing pier. Priced at $112,000.
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"

Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gulfford...778-2158 Monica Reid...729-3333
Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130
Exclusive
Waterfront 1
V Estates MLS I 1 L W
Video Collction ----





9f \I


1962 on a 90x125 lot, was sold 4/2/96, Ungvarsky to
Zigulich, for $257,000; list unknown.
600 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach, 138
Westbay Cove, a ground level bayfront 1,200 sfla
2bed/2bath condo built in 1974, was sold 3/14/96,
Kluge to Gregory, for $145,000; list $153,000.
607 North Point Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground level
canal front 1,970 sfla 3bed/2bath/2car home built in
1987 on an 83x110 lot, was sold 4/3/96, Hoehnel to
Bartel, for $275,000; list $320,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate bro-
ker, 778-1222, for The Islander Bystander. 1996.


DIRECT GULFVIEW
Watch the sunset from your top floor, turnkey furnished
2BR/2BA condo at an unbeatable price. Convenient loca-
tion. $119,500. Ken Rickett 778-3026.


NEW LISTING HOLMES BEACH BAYVIEW Two
bedroom, 1 bath home, Florida room, eat-in kitchen, car-
port, large lot, boat dock with 2 slips, nice BAYVIEW, lo-
cated on quiet street. Priced at $129,900. Please call
Carol Williams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


NICELY FURNISHED 1BR/1 BA corner condo with tropi-
cal view. Spacious rooms with lots of storage, pool, ten-
nis, exercise room, convenient to shopping and bridge.
Priced at $81,900, furnished turnkey. Please call Carol R.
Williams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.

PERICO BAY CLUB
LOVELY 2 BR, 2 BA WATERFRONT TOWNHOME
with loft (could be 3rd bedroom or den). Nature board-
walk though the bird sanctuary at your back door. 2
master suites, one with private balcony. All this for
$126,000! Call Judy Duncan at 778-1589.
JASMINE MODEL TOWNHOME at Perico Bay Club
boasts 2 master suites, 2 baths, plus a loft (den or 3rd
bedroom). Many upgrades in kitchen and baths. Great
waterviews from both floors. Homeowner's Warranty too!
Priced to sell at $123,000. Call Judy Duncan at 778-1589.

Nous Parlons Frangais
Wir Sprechen Deutsch
Se Habla Espanol
Parliamo Italiano
Farsi Mi Dunim
Mir Rede Schwyzerduetsch


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS .-E


ISLAND GET-A-WAY!!!









Buy mom a charming island home close to every-
thing in Holmes Beach. The new listing is in a neigh-
borhood of lovely new homes. 2BR/1BA with carport
and screened lanai. Perfect retirement home or for
the couple starting out. Listed at just $124,500.










GREAT BUILDING LOT!!!
Super building lot near the Bay in Anna Maria City.
Lovely neighborhood of executive homes. Don't miss
this great opportunity to own a piece of the Island.
Priced to sell at just $82,500.
Call Agnes Tooker at 778-5287 or
Ken Jackson at 778-6986.


j Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L 09701 Gulf Drive* P O Box 717 A a Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307
B7I t I


[snu'tn












19 Pne Ave ean a Mara ()
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, FL (941) 778-2291


OPEN HOUSE
SUN JUNE 2
1 TO 4 PM


525 Loquat Drive
Wonderful! 5BR/4BA waterfront family
pool home! Includes exquisite pine floors,
vaulted ceilings w/fans, fireplace, sky-
lights, and dazzling bayviews. Truly one
of a kind! $429,900. Call 778-2291 Now!

Looking for the perfect home or just a bite to eat?
How about a day of fun, a ray of sunshine? Look no
further it's all here in The Islander Bystander.



Wedebrock Real Estate Company








CAYMAN CAY- 2BR/2BA ground floor corner
unit with excellent rental history. 1 minute walk to
beach. M#14643. $108,900.
SMUGGLER'S LANDING 2BR/2BA condo.
Cathedral ceiling. Sailboat water, peaceful set-
ting in a friendly complex where pets and children
are welcome. M14045. $159,900.
HOLMES BEACH- Nearly now O3BV2BA home
on cul-de-sac. Open plan with cathedral ceiling and
oversize 2 car garage plus 18 x 37 bonus room for
workshop or hobbyist. M#68015. $205,000.
PALMA SOLA BA YFRONT- 3BR/2BA house.
Enjoy enchanting sunsets over the sparkling
bay from this vast waterfront property.
M#14096. $299,000.
ASK ABOUT OUR GREAT SUMMER RENTALS!
Whether selling, buying or renting we get results ... fast!
3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 941 778-0700 1-800-401-1054


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MAY 30, 1996 0 PAGE 23 J11

]I Property Management Team
. I "We Cover the Island"


6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
[3 MLS ~. 1-800-865-0800


JUST LISTED!!
Beautifully landscaped canalfront home with pool
in Holmes Beach. Large 4BR/3BA split floor
plan with tile floors. Private boat dock with lift and
great water views. $309,000.
NEW LISTING!! Great Gulf views from this 2BR/
2BA elevated home with elevator. Lots of down-
stairs storage, family room, garage. Recently remod-
eled, good rental potential. $240,000.
KEY WEST style elevated home with water and
mangrove views. Wrap around deck, indoor util-
ity, 2 car garage. $189,900.
ANNA MARIA family home on two large lots
with garage. Two bedrooms, separate dining
area. $152,000.
PERICO BAY CLUB ... the area's most prestigious
community offers several condos and villas for sale.
Enjoy amenities such as pools and spas, tennis, club-
house activities and guarded gate. Ideal location be-
tween town and the islands! From $79,900 to
$250,000. Call today for an updated list!


ThePruental FlordaRalt
a
530- GlfDiv,0ole Bac, L- 3 4217(941*778076
Lis yurproery it usan i wll e dvrtiedonth Ineretevrydy ntl i i sld htp:/ww1rufordaco


OUTSTANDING GULFVIEW!
3BR/2BA home in Anna Maria
with breakfast bar, dining area
Sand vaulted ceiling in living room.
Large deck across the back with
a fabulous view of the Gulf of
Mexico. #67898. $365,000.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTORo/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

NORTH POINT HARBOR ... 3BR/2BA home in an
area of fine homes. Pool, spa and located on deep
water canal with a dock for your boat. #68101.
$418,000. Call Karin Stephan, eves. 388-1267.
JUST REDUCED ... 3BR/2BA with old-fashioned
charm. Neat and clean with hardwood floors. Short


ANNA MARIA ... Bayfront 3BR/2BA home with clear views of
Tampa Bay. #DY13518. $329,000.
ANNA MARIA ... canalfront 4BR/3BA custom built home with
boat dock. Many extras. $249,000.
KEY ROYALE ... Bayfront 3BR/3.5BA, fireplaces, heated pool,
50' dock. #DY68061. $589,000.
SANDY POINTE ... Bayfront complex. 2BR/2BA beautifully
turnkey fumished. #13743. $98,900.
MARTINIQUE ... 3BR/3BA w/some new furnishings. Owner fin.
and carpet allowance. $196,900.
BAYFRONT ... 3BR/2BA home with views. Acre MOL with
trees. #DY13671. $209,000.
T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427

walk to Gulf, Bay and nearby Bayside Park. #12560.
$135,500. Call Carol S. Heinze, eves. 792-5721.
PALMA SOLA ... 2BR/1.5BA home with gourmet
kitchen and large bedrooms and great room. Lot
big enough for a pool and/or addition. #67936.
$137,500. Call T. Dolly Young, eves. 778-5427.


MICHAEL ADVOCATE
REALTOR/GRI
Real Estate Lecturer: NYU
Biographed in Who's
Who in American Law
Je Parle Francais
(un petit peu)
After hours:
(941) 778-0608


OUTSTANDING INVESTMENT
Island duplex. Spacious 2BR/2BA each
side. Only 1 block to sparkling Gulf and
beach. Excellent buy for pure investment or
occupy one side and rent the other. Only
$169,000. #MA67857.
Call Michael Advocate, eves. at 778-0608


ISLAND PARADISE ... luxury 2BR condo on
the beach with panoramic views. $299,000.
#KS68160.
MILLION $ NEIGHBORHOOD ... open floor plan w/
Bayviews, pool w/spa. #KS66278. $895,000.
KEY ROYALE ... 3BR/3BA w/fireplace, fruit
trees, pool & boat dock w/lift. #KS63811.
$398,000.
GULF BEACH PLACE ... 2BR/2BA turnkey,
fabulous views, steps to the beach. $165,000.
#KS68414.
ANNA MARIA ... lot with quality Key West style
home and pool under construction. 3BR/2BA.
#KS12245. $279,000.


Karin Stephan
REALTORO E
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Pager:
215-5556
Fax: 941- 778-3035


LONGBOAT KEY ... 3BR/2.5BA home w/pool on
canal w/Bay access. #KS13327. $295,000.
DUPLEX ... 2BR/2BA, 1BR/1BA. One block to the
beach. Long term tenants. #KS13934. $159,000.
DUPLEX ... 2BR/1BA, 1BR/1BA lost to the beach.
Too good to pass up. #KS13892. $110,000.
HOME ... 2BR/2BA with built-in jacuzzi. Privacy
fence and fruit trees. #KS13913. $159,000.
TRIPLEX ... 3BR/1.5BA, 2BR/1 BA and efficiency.
Covered parking and a deck on the Gulf.
#KS14087. $750,000.
TRIPLEX ... 3BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 1BR/1BA
close to the beach excellent rental history.
#KS13966. $159,900.


Po cooasp sroMtMrn0 0o.Cl-sforabrochueaddscuntcou


6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
[3 MLS 0. 1-800-865-0800
EXPERIENCE ...
can make all the difference .i.
when it comes to professional
property management.
Marguerite Sandmaier has 13
years of experience in managing
and leasing vacation rentals. If
you are interested in discussing
the benefits of professional
property management, call
Marguerite and experience the Marquerite Sandmaler
difference experience makes! REALTORO


* Week, Month
Annual
SCottages, Houses
Bungalows
Villas
Condominiums


mREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr* Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


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Caria Price







iE PAGE 24 0 MAY 30, 1996 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

LA N AE RL AS


BLAZER TOW hitch/ball (fits '86 '93) $75. Custom
full cover top line $50. Hood insect deflector $40. Fits
similar vehicles. Call 795-3802 eves.
LIFT CHAIR, velour, like new. $300. Call 755-2741.
FUJI RACING BIKE, small frame. $50. Bang &
Olufsen stereo: $600 OBO. 778-1102.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


RUMMAGE SALE Sat., June 1, 9 1. St. Bernard
Activity Center, Holmes Beach. Kitchenware, pasta
makers, meat slicers, professional hair dryer, lamps,
exercisers, bedding, etc.

HUGE YARD SALE Sat., June 1, 8 1. 777 North
Shore Drive. Furniture, collectibles, craft supplies,
housewares, books, yard tools & much more.
BLOCK YARD SALE Sat., June 1 only, 7 -12. New,
old furniture, appliances, Avon, misc. 109 77 Street.
GARAGE SALE Sat., June 1, Sandy Pointe Condos,
3601 East Bay Drive., #112. Toys, Barbie dolls and
accessories, housewares and more. 778-6382


BILL ALEXANDER
Broker Salesman
A lifelong local resident with
12 years of commercial and.
residential experience in
REAL ESTATE

SWAGNE2R1EALTY 13
778-2246
(800) 211-2323


WATERFRONT 4-PLEX IN ANNA MARIA
Unique Anna Maria property located just steps from
the prime north end beaches yet on a boating water-
way, all units rented seasonally and furnished, great
money maker, priced at $349,000.
LARGEST WATERFRONT LOT IN ANNA MARIA
Nearly 1/2 acre surrounded by mature trees, includes
50' deep water boat dock with direct access to the
Gulf of Mexico located on secluded cul-de-sac of 10
executive homes, build your dream house in the boat-
ers hideaway paradise Price $349,900.
Call Tom Nelson
for all the information on these exceptional properties

'V) Serving the Island
I %a from the same
location since 1970.


6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
[3 MLS M. 1-800-865-0800


LOST KITTEN 8 months old. Colors are cinnamon
and tan, flea collar. Vicinity of Magnolia and Tarpon.
Call 778-9592.


PROTECT YOUR FAMILY Save up to 30% on your
health insurance. Also low cost term life insurance
available. Call Arnold 794-0567.
VISITOR INFORMATION: "Insider's Guide to
Bradenton & Sarasota" is on sale at The Islander
Bystander. This guide offers more than 400 pages of
information everything you need to know to enjoy
the two-county area. Retail $14.95.You pay only $10
plus tax at The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. 778-7978
"CRACKER'S CRUMBS," is a collection of stories
and newspaper columns guaranteed to delight new-
comers, visitors and oldtimers too, by original Florida
Cracker, Gib Bergquist. This book makes a great gift.
Available for $19.95 at The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-7978
REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified
mail-in registration at The Islander Bystander office,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


ANNA MARIA CANAL FRONT HOMES
Sailboat water, 3BR/3BA. Open design
includes beautiful pool, boat dock, davits
and lots of storage. Call for an appointment
to view this almost new home.
Evenings call Steve, 778-5052

S(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria, Inc.
=-_ 420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778-1929


JULIE McCLURE

SEstate And
Household
Sales

^ Antique And
SPersonal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. (House calls)
- We come to you Cats or dogs. (Island only).
778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have
to stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food,
water, plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.


1979 MARK IV New tires, electric moon roof. Runs
good, needs radiator. PA title. Rusty. Call 778-1203,
make offer or 406 77th Street, Holmes Beach.
CONVERTIBLE 1987 RENAULT, yellow and tan,
36,000 mi., A/C, power windows and top, AM/FM
stereo cassette, excellent condition, sharp looking -
looks like BMW. $2,500. Call 778-5405.
GREAT GRAD GIFT 1984 Honda Prelude 5-speed,
power sunroof. Mileage only 70,000, top condition.
Detailed every three months. New Cooper tires.
Drives like new. $3,500 OBO. 778-7978.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
SPIRIT SONG CHARTERS pleasure cruises with
Capt. Richard Ardabell. Sunset, Egmont, snorkeling
or just relax and enjoy to view. 778-2195.


RENTALS
DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY, Furnished units available
SUMMER RATES
2BR/1BA unfurnished "short term
available". 2306 Avenue C. $625.mo
Commercial space 440 sq. ft.
garage wlun upstairs office + facili-
ties. $600 month.
"DIAL" DEBBIE DIAL
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
Debbie Dial 0 RM#X Gulfstream
Leasing Manager 5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
SHOLMES BEACH, FL.

UN71111 .


OV9



SPECIALIST
2 NEWLY LISTED VILLAS!
"ANTIGUA" 2BR/2BA & 2 car
garage many upgrades.
"GRAND CAYMAN" Largest
villa- 2BR/2BA + den, 2 car
garage, end unit.


Serving the Island
from the same
location since 1970.









MARILYN
TREVETHAN
REALTOR*
778-6066
or 792-8477


Iclnnrn DRPnlftv


GULFFRONT!
Lovely 3 bedroom, 3 bath home on two Gulf lots! 1st floor
has living area, guest bedrooms, kitchen & 2 baths. Mas-
ter bedroom suite comprises complete 2nd floor! Includes
wet bar, jacuzzi & opens onto spacious deck overlooking
beautiful beach! Two cozy fireplaces, security system plus
a "little guest house". Call Marie Franklin today!

MARIE UC REAL ESTATE
S REALTY K`
"WeARE A* I0and.'
Ms O U Dori .. PO Box a Arm~. U, noF, 34,21
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICE! THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!


41.


M- r


- 11


CANALFRONT HOME!!
This 3BR elevated home is located on sailboat wa-
ter within walking distance to the beach in the city of
Anna Maria. Split bedroom plan with great room
make this a must see. Priced right at just $199,500.
Call Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986 or Pat Jackson
eves. at 778-3301.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
i 90Gu(riv.POBox717-AnnA Ma.. FLn3416
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


A-G CASA MARINA
CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL

S$525.00per week




Casual Gulffront Living
in Bradenton Beach.
Three 1BR/1BA units now available.
$616 total for 7 nights ON THE GULF.


Doug Dowling Realty
778-1222


ill


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 30, 1996 M PAGE 25 aI


130ATS &1 iBOATING]Contnued HL- WANTE Contiue---ER-- ESrntinue


18' MANATEE CUDDY 90 hp Johnson, VHF Loran
depth finder, new bimini, bottom paint, extras.
$3,000 OBO. 792-0525.
1985 BAYLINER 19' 4 cylinder Volvo 10, trailer, most
everything works but it looks like a junker. Best of-
fer. 778-2975.
BOAT TRAILER '93 Easy Load float on, aluminum.
3,500 Ib. capacity. Up to 22' boat. Very good condi-
tion. $777. Call 778-9652.


FULL TIME OFFICE person. 5 1/2 day week. Typ-
ing, filing, heavy phone contact. Non smoker. Also
house cleaner, 2 days per week. Must have refer-
ences. Non smoker. Also carpenter repairman.
Small repairs. Non smoker. Please call 778-1913.
WANTED PART TIME varied hours for Post Office
and Card & Gift shop. 5344 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
WAIT STAFF AND PUB help needed. Apply in per-
son or call Tip of the Island, corner of Gulf Dr. at
Palmetto Ave. 778-3909.
BUCCANEER INN Wanted. dishwashers, line
cooks, lead servers/floor managers; also weekend
only work available. 595 Dream Island Rd., Longboat
Key. 383-5565.
REAL ESTATE MANAGER sales & rentals.
Wedebrock Real Estate has a position available for
an established producer. Excellent opportunity to
advance with growing company. Signing bonus,
benefits, etc. Use your skills where they are appre-
ciated. Call Michael E. Nink, Broker, 383-5543.
RELIABLE HOUSEKEEPER, non-smoker for
Harrington House Bed & Breakfast, Holmes Beach.
778-6335.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS Time for a change?
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. has openings for their
Island offices. Highest commission splits paid, sup-
port staff, orgning bonus, listings & sales referrals -
we help you make the move. Call Michael Nink, Bro-
ker 383-5543.


TEENAGER WANTED. Mature for yard work and
misc. in Anna Maria. Call 778-2896.
HOUSEKEEPER FOR BEACHFRONT motel. Part
time, some weekends. Good starting pay. Apply
Mon. Fri., 10 am- 2 pm. Sand & Sea Motel, 2412
Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach. 778-2231.
EXCELLENT SUPPLEMENTAL Income Opportu-
nity: Advertising sales representative (servicing pri-
marily marine accounts), photographer and distribu-
tor for Keels & Wheels Magazine to service Lido,
Longboat, Anna Maria and the Palma Sola area. Set
your own schedule and appointments: work only 2 or
3 partial days per week, established route. Call Marc
or Jim at 351-2411 for more information.
VOLUNTEERS! Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Call 778-4198 if
you can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three- and six-hour shifts. 778-6247.


MASSAGE THERAPY I travel to your home or office.
Neuromuscular therapy. Lic. # MA0018100. Call Lori
Manzella at (941) 748-8811.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Tue. Sat.,
10 5. Closed Sun. & Mon. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., air-
ports, cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serv-
ing the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
"THE PERFECTIONIST" Cleaning with perfec-
tion: homes, condos, rentals, etc. Call Sharon at
778-0064.


CiyLghs anyBace, Iladrems..

fidth igtI poerytoejo I nostlvig


ISLANDER

The "best" news


SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES. Licensed,
bonded, experienced. Professional cleaning.
Homes, condos, rentals. Move in/out. Excellent ref-
erences. Beverly. 778-1945.

MURALS AND PORTRAITS painted in oils by Alan
Dingman. Any photo realistically rendered. Murals
any style and size. Call 795-0344.

ISLAND AUTO/TRUCK repair. Mobile service. All re-
pairs, AC service, low rates. ASE certified, free esti-
mates, all work guaranteed. 778-6979 or 778-1560.

HAULING, SHELL DELIVERED and spread, trash
removal, tree-trimming, free estimates. Larry 794-
6348.

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE HOUSECALLS minor re-
pairs and maintenance in your driveway. For esti-
mate or appointment call 778-0373.
NEED IT CLEANED NOW? Dolphin Cleaning and
Maintenance offers prompt dependable service.
References both on and off the Island. Free esti-
mates. Call Rick at 778-2864.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LRIDR $34.95. Free
deodorizing. 794-1278.


ANNA MARIA GARDEN Center & Landscaping.
Free estimates, 32 years experience. Full service
landscaping and garden center. All work guaran-
teed. 778-6630.

ISLAND GARDEN CENTER Landscaping and na-
tive plants is our business. Same location 7 years
(Marina Drive). 778-4441

RICK'S LAWN CARE Dependable service at a fair
price. Please call 795-0588.
CLASSIFIED CONTINUE ON NEXT PAGE


8 Full Time Professionals
to Handle Your Every
Real Estate Need

CALL ONE OF US TODAY!

"We Sell the Island...
Worldwide"


Robert SL Jean Barbara Tumer



Don Schroder Karen Schroder


Best Buys on the Bay in Annna Maria
A CALL CHRIS 778-6066


867 North Shore Dr.
$359,900


Fulfill your dreams of living on the sparkling
waters of Tampa Bay. View the breathtaking
beauty of the open waters, the Sunshine Sky
way and Egmont Key ... everyday!
CALL CHRISTINE SHAW 778-6066 OR 778-2847

SServing the Island
03 from the same
Slocation since 1970.

6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 1-800-865-0800


ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB
Anna Maria's finest complex. Top floor
unit. Direct Gulf views, walking beach,
heated pool and spa, secured elevator
lobby, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, turnkey fur-
nished. $249,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


IMPERIAL HOUSE GULF TO BAY MOORINGS
2BR/1BA totally upgraded unit. New carpet, Direct Bayfront unit with great view of the
breakfast bar, walk-in shower. Low mainte- Intracoastal. 2BR/2BA with loft. Includes 2
nance fees. Priced at $99,900. Call Ed porches, covered parking and boat dock.
Oliveira. Also great value for a second unit Only one block to the beach. Offered at
just listed at $78,000. Call Suzanne Georgia. $129,900. Call Ed Oliveira for details.

RARE ISLAND LOTS .I
100 X 100 lot near beach .... $85,000 '-
100 x 100 lot duplex ..........$139,900 i
Canalfront Bayview............ $147,500
Gulfview, Holmes Beach ... $139,900
Call Dave Moynihan -
or Ed Oliverira for details


C'


618 S. Bay Blvd.
$329,000


WAGNER REALT







Il] PAGE 26 M MAY 30, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


S Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.

7781345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
7 AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPiRT"
Serving the Island communities for
8 years with Island refers,. qs.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR PAINTING
Free Estimates
25 Years Experience
S 30 Years Island Resident
Call Jim Bickal 778-1730

WILSON WALL SERVICES
Specializing in Stucco & Ceiling Repairs
Building Restoration Water Damage
SInterior/Exterior
25 Yrs Experience Island References 727-7247


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
CARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399
--------------~
LOCKSMrITH P.ITwaJw G
Gary F. Deffenbaugh iy
Licensed-Bonded-Insured AEaineZtff ewh6aguh
LOCKOUTS "Professional Excellence"
Auto-Home-Commercial
LOCKS Residential-Commercial
REKEY INSTALL MASTER Interior &Exterior
New & Used Locks & Repairs Popcorn Ceing Repair
Emergency Service Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Service Islands Since 1986 Licensed and Insured
ALOA 778-5594ASIS 778-5594 778-3468
L-------------------------


J RO

Painting
# Pm re Cleaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
S20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139



MS,


LP GAS
$700
PER FILL
201b cylinder


Isand Ci.lean21ing
&.' vac"uum:l';3 P~g
Resident Pial F


WE'VE MOVED
TO THE BACK OF THE BUILDING
RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
REPAIRS & REMODELING NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
WATER HEATERS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING


Looking for an apartment, an Island garage sale, a bite
to eat, a day of fun and fishing, a ray of sunshine?
Look no further it's all in The Islander Bystander.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

R.T. (Bob) HILTON CONSTRUCTION. Residential
and commercial. Remodel and new construction.
Island and Mainland. References. CGC012191. 747-
1098. (Don't say how, say Hilton).

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the
Island 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

CARPET, VINYL, CERAMIC tile. Sold, installed and
repaired. Excellent prices. All workmanship guaran-
teed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen 383-5381
or beeper 506-3297.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic &
vinyl tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs.
Paul Beauregard 779-2294.

KIMBALL GENERAL CONTRACTING. Residential
& commercial. New construction or remodeling. 25
years experience, insured. Lic. # CGC 058-092. Call
778-5354 or pager 506-6186.

MARBLE AND TERRAZZO restoration. Grinding,
polishing, floor leveling, stain removal, regrouting
and glazing. Call Prime Grind of West Florida, 365-
8309. Mastercard and Visa accepted.

THE I.P.M. CO. All phases of home repairs, remod-
eling, additions, new home construction. License
#RR0066842. Jim Travis 779-2129.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile.
Lic. #MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave
Elliott


Fully furnished beach cottage. 1 BR/1BA, private lot
and parking. $275 per week, includes phone and
cable. 778-2832.

HIDEAWAY PERFECT BAYVIEW between bridges.
Nice, quiet dead end street. 1st floor, 2BR, fully fur-
nished, annual, with dock. Also 2BR wk/mo and '97
season. No smoking or pets. 778-7107.

GULFFRONT GROUND FLOOR, 1 BR/1 BA condo.
Screened lanai, sundeck on private beach w/ hot
tub. $525 per wk. includes phone and cable. Avail-
able June 6. 778-2832.

ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Furnished 1BR
apartment. Private paio. Pool, w/d. 211 South Bay
Blvd. 778-2896.
ANNUAL RENTAL large 1BR/1BA. 203 2nd St.,
Bradenton Beach. 1 block to beach/fishing pier. Just
remodeled, water and garbage included. $500 mo.
(813) 874-0973.
SEASONAL RENTAL adorable cottage, 2BR/1BA,
washer/dryer, just remodeled. 1 block to beach/fish-
ing pier. 106 Church St., Bradenton Beach. $500 wk/
$1,500 mo. (813) 874-0973.
BAYFRONT WITH DEEP water boat dock. 2BR/
1BA, newly remodeled, designer turnkey furnished.
Short walk to Gulf beaches and restaurants. Avail-
able weekly, monthly or seasonal. Ask Denise about
Herons Landing. (941) 778-2246 or (800) 211-2323.


WATCH THE SUNSET or walk to dinner from this
1BR/1 BA apartment in Holmes Beach. Security and
references. June occupancy. Call 779-2171.
SUMMER SPECIAL Small deposit will hold. Anna
Maria on water, white sand beach, close to City Pier.
Good fishing, swimming, heated pool. 1 and 2BR,
everything furnished. $250 $350 weekly. $40 night
when available. Enchanted Shores, 201 Bay Blvd.
South. (941) 778-9188.
BEAUTIFUL BAYFRONT ground floor unit with dock,
2 BR, laundry room, washer/dryer. Tumkey furnished.
$900 mo. $350 wk. Spectacular view. 794-5980.
ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH. Nice 2BR/2BA apart-
ment. Close to beach and shopping. $650 mo. 1st,
last, security, no pets. 778-0217.
ANNUAL 2BR/1BA unfurnished, "short term avail-
able." 2306 Avenue C. $625. 'Dial' Debbie Dial Re/
Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
BEAUTIFUL GULFVIEW COTTAGES on quiet dead
end street. 3BR, just remodeled, Aug. $1,500 mo, $650
wk. 2BR available 5/30 to 6/15, $300 wk. 778-0990.
GULFFRONT BESTVIEW 3BR/2BA, top-floor mas-
ter suite, decks, patio, tropical gardens, 90' to Gulf.
Available 6/2/96 off season, $3,000 mo./$1,000 wk.
778-0990.
SEASONAL RENTAL. Attractive Holmes Beach
rental. Gulfview. Available through Dec. Weekly/
monthly. Reasonable. 778-4368.
TOTALLY REMODELED spacious 3BR/2BA, 1 block
to Gulf. Fenced yard w/side deck. Washer/dryer,
dishwasher, new carpet. $850 mo. includes water,
sewer & garbage. 778-0380.
COMMERCIAL SPACE 440 sq. ft. garage with
upstairs office + facilities. $600 mo. 'Dial' Debbie Dial
Re/Max Gulfalibcam 77Q-7777.
Island rentals? No one tops The Islander Bystander.


HAIR MOTIONS
778-4055
AROMATHERAPY
Massage Special
$38 Hr. Exp. 6/31/96


5340 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach


Suzanne Smith


YOUR INTERSTATE MOVER


a'

N es
Van Lines


CALL US FOR A
GUARANTEED PRICE!
Cook/Sarasota
Moving Systems


4505 30th Street West Bradenton
755-2631 or 1-800-662-4844




WASPS PT A L F E RTC G |AR01P
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AE R E VRIA L SHA- G A R S


RIOIOM DIE i Y A E


-A DEASD
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 30, 1996 1 PAGE 27 1[


11SLANDERCLSSIFE4DSEJ
IRNALSCotiue-..1RAL SATE oninud


CARPORT FOR RENT for a car or boat. Also room
in private home. 778-2709.
COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE in Holmes
Beach. Call Dennis for details. 778-4461.
COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR RENT on Anna Maria
Island. Approximately 1,340 sq. ft. Excellent location
- great visibility. Call Smith Realtors 778-0777.
MINI VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.
- Wed. or Mon. Thu. 2 people/4 nights from $135.
Kitchens. 500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Mo-
tel & Resort Complex. 778-5405 or (800) 367-7824.


WATERFRONT LONGBOAT KEY. Deep water ca-
nal, 2BR/2BA, den, eat-in kitchen, dining room, liv-
ing room, fireplace, satellite dish, large caged pool.
580 DeNarvaez Dr. $195,000. Brokers protected.
Owner/broker. Call (941) 383-5474.

ANNA MARIA GULF/BAY views. Pierside apart-
ments, 4-units furnished. Large lot with pool.
$449,000, by owner (in apt. #1). 211 South Bay Blvd.
778-2896.

RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA CONDO, Bayview, 1st
floor, $127,500 unfurnished.. New Concept Proper-
ties, Ron Wagner. 792-9314, eves. 792-5070.

WANTED SMALL home/duplex within 1 to 2 blocks
of the beach. Quiet street, Holmes Beach or Anna
Maria only. Call NY (516) 589-3943, leave message.

WESTBAY COVE 2BR/2BA condo overlooking land-
scaped pool and Tampa Bay. New kitchen, freshly
decorated, second floor end unit. $132,000. Call
(800) 484-1692-9726.

4BR/3BA HOME WITH maonificont view of tho Bay.
30 ft. dook with sailboatt davit. 778-2766.
HOME FOR. ALE $229,900.3BR/2BA, 1 1/2 years
otl. 608 Fern Street, Anna Maria. For additional in-
formation, please call 778-9515.
BOATERS DELIGHT Free slip at Spanish Main
Yacht Club, LBK with 2BR/2BA villa. $129,900.
383-7242.
PERICO BAY CLUB Largest villa. 2BR/2BA plus den
and 2 car garage. Shows like a model. Only
$169,900. Call Marilyn Trevethan, Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066.
KEY ROYALE CANALFRONT home just reduced.
3BR/2BA, well maintained. $199,999. Call Marilyn
Trevethan, Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNA MARIA HOME on two extra large lots with
2BR, garage and more. $152,000. Call Richard Free-
man, Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
FAMILY HOME IN Anna Maria with 3BR/2BA, large
fenced yard. $137,500. Call Richard Freeman, Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
You get more classified ads in The Islander Bystander.


ISLAND COTTAGE zoned for residential or retail.
$225,000. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
BRAND NEW 3BR/2BA elevated home steps to fish-
ing pier and beach. Excellent rental history.
$239,500. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
JUST LISTED 4BR/3BA canalfront home with pool.
$309,000. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
RUNAWAY BAY turnkey furnished and updated
condo. $79,500. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
PERICO ISLAND first floor condo overlooking lake,
2BR/2BA. $99,900. Call Richard Freeman or Tom
Nelson, Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ISLAND PARADISE direct Gulffront condos in pri-
vate area. $289,000. Call Richard Freeman, Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
PERICO SHORES exclusive enclave of executive
home sites three minutes from the beach. From
$74,900. Call Richard Freeman or Tom Nelson, Is-
land Real Estate, 778-6066.
FIDDLER'S GREEN vacant home site for sale in NW
Bradenton. $52,900. Call Richard Freeman, Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
EXTRA LARGE Anna Maria vacant lot. One of the
few left! $82,500. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
CANALFRONT VACANT LOT in Anna Maria.
$139,500. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
BEACH STYLE bicycle/gift shop, business and real
estate for sale. $239,500. Call Richard Freeman,
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY, excellent location on
Marina Drive. Call Richard Freeman, Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
ANNA MARIA CITY spacious 8 room custom ranch.
4BR/3BA, garage, lanai, huge lot, in-law apartment.
Beautiful location, 3rd house from beach. $225,000.
Call owner at 778-6518.
LOVELY ANNA MARIA 2BR/2BA, ground level on
Lake Vista with access to Tampa Bay. Caged solar
pool, quiet cul-de-sac, walk to beaches. 113 Pelican
Dr., Anna Maria. $229,000. (941) 778-9107.

DIRECT BAYFRONT Holmes Beach. 517 56th St.
Large, deep water dock, seawall, spectacular
bayview. 2BR, garage, fireplace, hot tub, decking,
tropical landscaping. Well cared for. $275,000 by
owner. 778-6747 or 366-7866.

GROUND LEVEL NO STEPS to climb. 3BR/2BA
ranch, 1 block to great beach, shop, P.O. Fire-
place, screened porch, fenced yard. $165,000.
Owner 778-3045.


-------------------------------------
HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D.Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday,
(Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $7.00 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box:
$2, One- or two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business or service, the minimum rate us $7.50 for up to 21
WORDS. Additional words: $2.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus
250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
I------------------ -------------------

2I


More information:
(941) 778-7978
FAX: (941) 778-9392


JISNANDKER V.001 CI


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IJI PAGE 28 0 MAY 30, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Nitrogen targeted in Tampa Bay restoration goals


By Paul Roat
The blueprint for solving the problems facing
Tampa Bay has been released by the Tampa Bay Na-
tional Estuary Program. Now all that's needed is imple-
menting the findings of five years of data collection and
analysis.
The program's report, titled "Charting the Course,"
addresses five key areas of concern: water and sedi-
ment quality, bay fisheries and wildlife, dredging and
dredge material management and spill prevention and
response.
More than just a technical analysis of problems, the
document also provides what Tampa Bay Program of-
ficials believe are workable goals to accomplish the
restoration and preservation of the bay. The findings
are of concern to Islanders because the bay program's
study area includes part of Anna Maria Island, and
there is a good chance that Islanders will be asked to
participate in the goals.
The major goal of the program is targeted at con-
trolling the amount of nitrogen reaching the bay so that
water clarity is sufficient to spark the gradual return of
up to 14,000 acres of seagrasses.
Nitrogen is the primary threat to the bay's recov-







,. I





,-' ,,-', :' '. 4 o. . . U . '
": =' ,' -- (' L .: .. : .' _. .:


llBAYFRONT CAI ED POOL $395U000
"iBR'2BA homrrne .lh i'orgh-u .. -, oI
Iniracoasial AailertAa Pad & be'j da.iis on
canal side Cul-de-sac Very priaie Large Iol
Call Helen While 778-6956


KEY ROYALE POOL & DOCK RE-
DUCED $209,000 2BR/2BA canallronl
horrie with swimming pool and boal dock Low
maintenance landscaping Full, lurrnshed
Ver, nice area Call Helen While 8." -69. .









PERICO BAY 2 CAR GARAGE $147,500
Prolessionally decorated lle marble 1loor-
2BR/2BA glass enclosed lanai Aaler .,ew
cul-de-sac. pools. tennis pulling gieern Call
Sandy Morgan 7'a-2.' 1



PAUL
MARTIN .
Broker
Salesman
794-0049


Paul and his wife Gilda moved to this .'
area 12 years ago trom Ohio Paul has
-been in real estate for the past 11 years
Sand is a graduate of the REALTOR Insi-
Stute. Paul is a member of the Neal &
:Neal, REALTORS million dollar club


ery. Scientists have acknowledged that nitrogen is the
basic "fuel" of the Tampa Bay system, producing a


steady supply of tiny one-celled plants
that are a critical element in the bay's
food chain as well as supporting other
plants such as seagrass.
The problem with nitrogen comes
from the human addition of nitrogen
through sewage, stormwater runoff
and air pollution. This human over-
dose of nitrogen has sent phytoplank-
ton into a feeding and breeding frenzy,
and with more food they have satu-
rated the water, blocking sunlight to
seagrasses and causing the bottom
plants' death.


This human
nitrogen has
toplankton in
ing and breei
and with mor
have saturate
water, block
to seagrasses
ing the botto,
death.


And as the phytoplankton die and decompose, the
chemical process of decomposition consumes oxygen,
in turn killing fish and other marine life.
Other goals of the Tampa Bay Program include:
Reducing tl- amount of toxic contaminants in
bay sediments.
Gaining better understanding of the role that air
pollution plays in the bay's health.


irn.i ll .l fl Jn pJ:D.uu L"Lr- ,I 3lUIIIi_',r,
",PRl lE Turrke. I jrrnlh ,.3 W jalk a.recil, : u[
z% reerie Id 3lra. r irom Tr, lirl Ilk:.:r urtnI >3r, prn.al
location in ihe soullthern rmosi building lg lrT he
shc.reline Corrvnrierl 10o shopping Do clIs a,.3l.
able On ba,.ou Call Rose SChnroerr 77,8-.-261









ANNA MARIA ISLAND $199,000 3BRI
2BA waleroroni home in Anna Maria Cil', orO
cul-de-sac in nice residential area Boat dock
and waterfront decck. lush water ,ie. Call
Helen While 7" h -65


-.4.r
ii



.
... -. 3, '4
______"___--," !" *'*"*. i'


SPACIOUS HOME LARGE LOT $124,900
2'560 sq tI 3BR/3BA Bradenlon 27 x 18 taiil,
roc.m rriireplace 21 x 15 ulilit room. 23 x 13 .-
rig room large BRs 2 car garage heat pumrp in
neatl c.rdlion Call Paul Marlin 7.94-0:4'3


Restoring 100 acres of low-salinity habitats in the
bay system every five years. These low-salinity tidal
areas are judged to be critical to the
overdose of survival of many fish and wildlife spe-
sentphy cies and have been lost in greater pro-
portions than other habitat types in the
ito afeed- bay.
dingfrenzy, Protecting often overlooked habitats,
e food they such as sponge and coral communities
?d the and oyster beds.
g sunlight Improving on-the-water enforcement
Ss of fishing and environmental regula-
and caus- tions.
m plants' The plan calls for greater education
efforts through expansion of the not-
for-profit organization charged with
improving the bay, Tampa BayWatch. The group is
also tasked with improving boat operator education
programs to reduce propeller scarring of seagrass beds.
The Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program has also
produced a document outlining restoration strategies for
Sarasota Bay. Many of the two group's findings are simi-
lar, although the Sarasota Bay Program has placed price
tags on many of their restoration programs.


R., ..,. .-,S BUY ,-.. Well
. -.* '',: 4 -


"- .' ..*" ,* --'. v --^'. .i.



". '. --- -''


*:- ** .- T. :il'' ; <+l1 ,,' i b




MILES OF BEACH $227,000 Large
sunny condo, 2BR/2BA corner unit, view o
Gulf, heated pool, carport, prime Holmes
Beach area. Close to restaurants & shopping
Call Helen White 778-6956.




a;;.
-"~ "kD .- ', i., v .
~ ~m *# U

.^ ^W^E" t?


GULFFRONT COMPLEX $169,000 Park
under the building with an elevator. Turnkey
furnished 2BR/2BA, lanai with gas grill. Com-
plex has 30 x 60 pool. Partial Gulf view. Call
Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-6691


1E3F
IIirW~


TERRIFIC ISLAND VALUE $92,500 Sun-
bow Bay 2BR/2BA covered parking elevator -
pool tennis close to beach, shopping. Compare
location and price. Call Lu Rhoden 778-2692.


WESTe,Ai' COVE .... ... 1.142 500
WESTBAY COVE SOUTH ..... 1139 900
SUM.IM1ER SANDS 144 91:10
LA COSTA .... .. .. $159,900
COQUINA BEACH CLUB $185 C'00 & $189 999
OCEAN PARK TERRACE .$169,000
SUNBOW BAY $92,500
GULFSANDS ...... 1182.000
5400 CONDO $83 000 & 1.227 000
WESTBA, POIilIT & M2OiRINGS $150 0: & 1 .220 000
rORTH BEACH VILLAGE L,155 5:00
WHITt IE t BEACH $97 5E.C:I '99 90i t35. 5 00.'l
friE TW_ & THREE EDECROOM UNIiTS


maintained 2BR/2BA home on 70 ft. wide canal.
Remodeled kitchen, open floor plan. Overlooks
caged pool. New kitchen. Sprinkler system. Call
Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791.


ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT $149,000
3BR/1.5BA canalfront home in Anna Maria
City. Needs TLC. Wide canal, seawall; area of
nice homes. Room to expand. Great fixer-up-
per. Call Helen White 778-6956.


CANALFRONT TOWNHOUSE $72,000
2BR/1.5BA gorgeous canalfront unit, totally re-
modeled in beautiful southwest motif. Bay view,
boat dock available. Turnkey furnished. Call
Chard Winheim 778-6743.


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

ANNUAL RENTALS
Runaway Bay $575 mo
2BR/2BA Perico Bay Club.
Starting at $725 mo
3/2 Home, Pool. on Direct
BayfIront $16C00 mo
Tidi Island $1300C mo
NOW BOOKING SUMMER
Julie Gilstrap RENTALS!
Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


AMI 'rc n. n -.. . - ^ ....


le
f
s
I -


f





THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


ISLANDER


11/7

1
,i/6


Storm surge spells
submergence

for Island
Storm surge is a "dome" of water that sweeps
ahead of the center of a hurricane. The storm surge can
inundate the Island and cause massive, devastating
destruction to property and lives of those who have
elected to weather a hurricane in their storms. For more
information about storm surges, see inside this special
hurricane section of The Islander Bystander.


f^ Yikes! It's snakes!


Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes
like Donna or Elena or Andrew and everyone
has a story: "We looked out on the flooded golf
course and saw one of the tees moving. Literally


moving, squirming, wriggling. With binoculars
you could see that the tee was covered with
snakes trying to get out from the flooded
roughs onto higher ground."


'About average' storm season

predicted for 1996


By Paul Roat
A hurricane prediction expert says storms during
the next few months will be about half as active as the
hectic 1995 hurricane season.
But during the next two to three decades there will be
some of the most destructive hurricanes ever recorded.
That's the prediction from Dr. William Gray, a
Colorado hurricane researcher who has a 90 percent
success rate for his prognostications on bad storms.
Gray says 11 named storms, seven of them hurri-
canes and two of the hurricanes classed as severe -
winds in excess of 115 mph is what the Atlantic
region can look forward to this year during summer
hurricane season.
Global climate changes and an increased knowl-
edge of the cyclical patterns of hurricanes has caused
the prediction that more and worse storms are brewing
for the next 30 years.
"I think there may be troubles in the future," Gray
said. "Can't say for sure this is coming in the next
couple years, but it is coming. Just looking objectively,
it looks a bit ominous."
Patterns now being discovered indicate we've been
through a "mild" period during the past few decades -


a pattern that will shift for the early 21st century.
Gray bases his prediction on several factors: a 20-
year drought in Africa that appears to be ending, an El
Nino system in the Pacific Ocean that is cooling water
there and stratospheric winds.
Gray believes wetter west-African regions produce
more tropical fronts that move off the coast, cross the
Atlantic and become tropical storms. "After 20 years
of drought, close to normal rainfall means it will be
pretty wet," Gray said. "When it's wet there, intense
hurricane activity goes way up."
Another pattern that may cause greater Atlantic
Ocean storms in 1996 has its foundation in the Pacific
Ocean. An abnormality known as El Nino has been occur-
ring for the past few years. Barometric pressure aberra-
tions off Peru's coastline cause warming of the Pacific
Ocean across two-thirds of the body of water, heating up
wind currents. The warm winds heading east keep storms
from forming over the Atlantic and coming west.
Gray also noted surface pressure in the Atlantic is
dropping.
With El Nino declining and the waters cooling,
greater storms are possible here.
The pressure changes occur around the Christmas


Fido, Fluffy need not
apply for hurricane
shelter admission
Hurricane shelter officials prohibit pets in shelters.
Make plans now to board or kennel Fido or Fluffy on
the mainland, or find a friend that will take care of the
pets during the storm. For more information, see inside
this special section of The Islander Bystander.

Hurricane

names for

1996
The National Hurricane Center annually
names tropical storms that become hurricanes. The
naming is done to avoid confusion in the event that
more than one hurricane is in the Atlantic Ocean
at one time.
The practice of naming intense storms has
been going on for several hundred years. Women's
names were used before the end of the 19th Cen-
tury and, in 1953, were continued by the U.S.
weather services. In 1978, men's and women's
names were used to name Pacific storms. A year
later, the same practice was used in hurricane lists
for Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic and Caribbean
storms.
The 1996 names of Atlantic hurricanes are:
Arthur Kyle
Bertha Lili
Cesar Marco
Dolly Nana
Edouard Omar
Fran Paloma
Gustav Rene
Hortense Sally
Isidore Teddy
Josephine Wilfred

season, hence the name El Nino, or "The Child." Some
scientists believe El Nino is caused by molten eruptions
on the ocean floor, resulting in massive increases in
water temperature.
The third factor Gray uses in hurricane predictions
is winds in the stratosphere. The winds run in 18-month
cycles and head east during hurricane season, shearing
off the tops of strong storms and weakening them.


I SSAV E SAVE o PULL OUT & KEEP SAVE SAVE o SAVE I


Boat tips

for storms
Protect your boat during a hurricane by hav-
ing plenty of line to tie the vessel to the dock if
you can't get it out of the water. Remove all gear
from above deck.
Don't plan to stay on the boat during the
blow.
Check your insurance policy to make sure
you have adequate coverage in case the worst
happens.


W I I.i I
AL


-- -I


HURRICANE SPECIAL SECTION


MAY 30, 1996





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER i ] SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION M 1996 [ PAGE 2


Trains, planes and
By Jim Hanson
Islander correspondent
The phenomenon that makes locomotive horns
sound funny when they go by is the same one that
warns us of stormy weather.
Put in terms less nostalgic, the same principle lets
police nail you for speeding.
It's the Doppler effect, by which sound waves
seem to change frequency as the source approaches
and departs. It has charmed generations of kids
standing along railroad tracks listening to the
engine's whistle change as it sped past. Sound waves


even cows benefit
Radar has been around since World War II. It sends
out radio waves which bounce off objects and back into
the radar receiver with information which operators
translate into pictures that are clear to them.
That was a giant step for finding and tracking ob-
jects in the atmosphere. It was a tremendous boon to
meteorologists, but it was limited.
Now Doppler has taken radar another step,
as described by Dan Sobien, National Weather
Service meteorologist at Ruskin. Measuring the
return signals, he says, the complex equipment
shows almost instantly and from miles away which
way a storm is moving, how fast, how much rain it
is dropping in what size droplets, whether it has hail,
how strong its winds and from what direction,
whether they are rotating as in tornado.
Although storms "are like people, no two
alike," the new system gives weather experts a
better handle on storms with "more and much
better information than we've ever
S had," he says.


from Doppler radar
know an hour ahead of a storm to get his cattle off a
flood plain."
And aviation, which has been the principal benefi-
ciary of radar since its inception, benefits again from
Doppler. "The Weather Service does all aviation fore-
casting, although major airlines have their own weather


compress as they travel ahead of the horn, stretch
as they linger behind it.
It has been applied to radar for several years,
such as a police speed gun. Like most technology,
it gets more and more sophisticated and versatile.

Top of the line
The newest of the new is the National
Weather Service's new radar line centered at
Ruskin, says Roy Leep, the weatherman's weath-
erman and head of it all at television station"--
WTVT-13 in Tampa.
Leep had the first full Doppler weather radar in
the area, putting it into service in 1988. He describes
the new system at Ruskin as "the most sophisticated
in the world."


Bring in the cows
"We can track over river basins and see if there is
danger of a flood," Sobien says. "We can let a farmer


departments too," says Sobien.
As for maritime weather, the Ruskin station's
"warning area" is 50 miles out into the Gulf of
Mexico, with a marine forecast good for 50 miles
offshore plus a high seas forecast. Next year its
Strange will double to 100 miles.
Channel 13's Leep recalls just how handy Dop-
Spler is by citing Hurricane Andrew, the South Florida
killer of 1992. His radar machinery is mounted 200
feet above the ground, he said, and it picked up An-
drew when the storm was still in the Bahamas.
When Andrew's winds destroyed Miami radar and
cut off communication with Key West's, Leep's re-
mained the only land-based radar able to hang onto the
storm as it crossed Florida and moved up the Gulf.


Be prepared to leave early: Chief Price


If there are two words Anna MariaFire Chief Andy
Price would use to advise residents on hurricane safety
and protection, they would be: Leave early.
For Island residents, Price said preparation before
any storm clouds appear on the horizon is critical. A
disaster plan has been prepared for the Island to allow
officials to have in writing what must be done and when


it needs to be completed as a storm approaches.
Evacuation notices will be given both through the
news media as well as by going up and down streets
with bullhorns, Price said.
Evacuation notices should be heeded early. Price
said it is estimated evacuation from the Island will take
12 to 17 hours, but advance notice of a hurricane's


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landfall can only be expected to come 12 hours
before the event.
Don't be one of the last to leave or, if you
change your mind during the height of the storm,
expect rescue personnel help you to safety, either.
Price said police and firefighters would evacuate
the Island as well if a hurricane's hit appears likely.


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k Family Practice
Free Cholesterol Test
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Free Blood Pressure Checks
503 Manatee Ave. W.,
Suite E, Holmes Beach
Behind Anna Maria Chamber of Commerce
-------


I





PAGE 3 E 1996 [K SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION [H THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


IM iMiI


1996 B


Tracking Chart


S E SV P*AVAV


I OMA PIZZA
I A& ITALIAN RESTAURANT I
I1 778-0771
or 778-0772 I
$1.00 OFF I
ANY PIZZA OR DINNER I
I j NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS
Veal Chicken Seafood Pasta
Paste up banner here
DINE IN OR ENJOY
IOUR FREE HOME DELIVERY
Open 7 Days 11AM to Midnight
. 201 N. Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach *


ISLANDER


SAiVE o SAVE. o ULL UT&. EE 9 AV 0 AV


Concerned about you and
your financial well-being

Michael H. Smith
Vice President, Investments

RAYMOND JAMES
r A SSO -LI-ES. IN M.
Memb., New Volt Stock Eclthang**ISPC

3639 Cortez Road, West, Ste. 140 Bradenton, FL 34210
(941) 755-6272 Toll Free 800 247-3011
Fax (941) 758-4542


CALL 1-800-265-8624
Physician Referral Service
or
To receive a Free Guide to Active
Medical Staff & Services Brochure,
call 798-6140
O COLUMBIA
Blake Medical Center
2020 59th Street West. Bradenton, FL 34209
OUR FAMILY CARING FOR YOUR FAMILY


y--.- Full 5 Year Guarantee -:-
on Workmanship
S- C Office Hours
- M-F 9:00am to 5:00pm

-~ 0--Holmes Beach-_ -
|- I-RU --778-7573 or 729-9739
-----Em1976 -- ------ CBC 0z8lS-R
4 ^ -fl-fl-(fl^ ^*^^'''-fl. ^ ', Xl fl'^^ T.AOAY'^''^i%'^'k%^'*%fl', *-fl


NOTICE:
BE SURE TO GET A
VEHICLE
EVACUATION STICKER
AT YOUR LOCAL CITY HALL.


PUBLIC NOTICE
EVACUATION
& RE-ENTRY
RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation
needs, medical problems or need transporta-
tion off the island, you need to be registered.
BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on
Anna Maria Island that provides essential ma-
terials or services to the community you may
be given preferential return privileges after a
hurricane evacuation. Submit a request to your
city hall. If approved, you will receive a letter
authorizing your early return. Your request
should include a list of employees you would
need to return early.
EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on
or off the island, they must have written autho-
rization from your city hall to come on the is-
land to work after a hurricane evacuation.
To register, orfor further information...
call your city hall or the Island
Emergency Operations Center
(Anna Maria Fire District).
Emergency Operations Center... 778-6621
Bradenton Beach City Hall........ 778-1005
Holmes Beach City Hall............ 778-2221
Anna Maria City Hall ........ 778-0781

. ... ... ,




This is not the flood
coverage you need!
If you live or conduct business in a flood prone area,
you need flood insurance coverage, not water coverage.
You're all wet if you think your homeowners or business
insurance policies provide flood coverage. It must be
purchased separately.
Your local independent agent who represents Auto-
Owners Insurance is the person to see for flood insurance.
And, with Auto-Owners, you get "no problem" service
when you need it.
Flood coverage will be "no problem" if you have your
flood insurance coverage with Auto-Owners, so see your
Auto-Owners agent today.
Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc. *^"
Island Shoppng Ctr., Homes Beach, FL 7782253 7tAb1 &m/ '.o -

\ HOLMES BEACH
MARINA

STAY HIGH AND DRY
IN OUR COMPETITIVELY PRICED
STORAGE FACILITY.
(WET SLIPS ALSO AVAILABLE)
SEnjoy a friendly, efficient service
7-days a week
Inspect our range of new and used boats.
(All available at realistic prices this summer!)
Talk to our expert service technicians for
accurate diagnostic and remedial repairs.
GAS BAIT ICE SHIP STORES

202 52nd St., Holmes Beach
Reception (941) 778-2255 Sales (941) 778-2121
SFax (941) 778-5172





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER EI SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION [IR 1996 M PAGE 4


our 24th Year
serving the Island communities.
There must be a reason!
During any emergency, we're there to serve you!

mWETT @/RT
REFRIGERATION ly
l~A3 @@DTD@N~CN l~

CAC044365
778-9622
5347 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach

RAELEcTpL


SERVICE IS OUR FIRST NAME
COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL
*24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
3014 AVE. C HOLMES BEACH 778-6566
Doyle Douglas President ER0005043






As Independent As The Island Itself.
First National Bank
Member FDIC /1

5324 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach (941) 794-6969










The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
-this side of Heaven.",flies
Euffy, Pat Geyer, Owner. Iw 'a
Across from Manatee Public Beach* Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


Gallagher's Market
Your One-Stop Hurricane
& Storm Preparation Store
Distilled and Drinking Water
Canned Meats, Vegetables, Fruits and Soups
Batteries Matches
Medical Supplies
Ue'll Check and Replace
your Watch and Clock Batteries
NEXT TO VILLAGE KEY HARDWARE
TO COMPLETE YOUR UST





"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...
I can make your
island dreams
come true.
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty ~ Since 1939
778-1751 2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Evenings Bradenton Beach Office
Evenings FL 34217 Office


- Charleston

Savannah a
I. -" " --''
; ,. *\ . : , r '
Baton Rouge' Gulfport ,Ph'iacola r---- -- r
Tallahassee SJ
Jacksonville
_ Tq--\New Orleans .


100 99 98 97 96 950 94 93 92 91 90 89 88


WAGNERIRAY


-. .i .



O AD ENe- rn


87 86 850 84


83 82 81 800 79


Arvid M. (Marty) Scherpf Jr.
Arvid Inc.

BOCA DEL RIO MARINE

(941) 792-9610
A FULL SERVICE YARD
2504 88th St. Ct. N.WU. Brodenton


KEY INCOME TAX
& Business Services, Inc.
Condominium Accounting
& Fiscal Management
CMA Lic #3549
5500 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
FOR APPOINTMENT 778-5710
"Same Island Location Since 1971"


When it comes to service,
everything matters.




F N

First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
941 795-3108


Family Owned and Millwork &
Operated for Over W Wood Cut
12 Years To Size



Open
S on-Fri AND WA
7:0t sat 80to 12 J HARDWARE v
We specialize in custom cabinet making *
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center





PAGE 5 111996 [ SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION I ] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Otey & Associates
COMPLETE
COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING
BOOKKEEPING
AND "-. 4
YEAR-ROUND "4'
TAX SERVICE
IndividualCorporation
Partnerships and Estates
Shirley Otey, Enrolled Agent
Licensed by the U. S. Government to represent
taxpayers before the IRS.


778-6118


3909 E. BAY DRIVE
(SUITE 110) HOLMES BEACH


73 72 -71 700 69 68 67 66 650 64 63 62 61 60059


r Just over the Cortez Bridge

Tyler's
Since 1984
Od Fashioned Ice cream and Waffle Coma
SMade on Location
A Ice Cream Pies & Cakes Diabetic
I Colombo Yogurt Soft Serve
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10 PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
One of the Oldest Real Estate Companies on the Island
Founding Member of Island Co-Usting Service
778-1450 1 (800) 306-9666
Fax # 778-7035
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson,
Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte & Stephanie Bell
9 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M. TO NOON
9701 GULF DR., P.O. BOX 717 ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA 34216


34

33

32

31

300

29

28

27

26

25
24

23

22

21

20?

19

18

17

16

150
14

13
12
11


10


58 57 56


NEXT TO GALLAGHER'S MARKET
FOR ALL YOUR STORM AND HURRICANE NEEDS
* Lamp Oil Flashlights Batteries Clocks
* Radios Can Openers Duct Tape j \
SHibachi Sterno Gloves J 1
* Candles Gas Cans
SPropane Tanks Masking Tape
* Even Life Jackets and Canoes Lulf
t M FREE DELIVERY
Longboat Key & Anna Maria Island $25.00 Min.
Located in the Whitney Beach Shopping Center
North Longboat Key
387-0052 '6816 Gulf of Mexico Drive
Hours: Mon Sat. 8am 8pm Sun. 8am 5pm


Ace Puw acid SftnM&er t use,. 9c.
Distnbutor of Pumps, Motors, Pipe Fittings
THE DO-IT YOURSELF SPRINKLER CENTER
Free Site Plan wilh System Purchase
($75 VALUE) with this ad


6804 Cortez Rd.
Bradenton
795-2449
, 1;d /ti lt


2050 12th St.
Sarasota
366-4838


MARINE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
(94 )-79 W85


SCaptains

Marina, Inc.
[jjS 5501 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
SJ 778-1977
Storm Preparedness
Is the bilge pump operating correctly?
Is your battery fully charged?
Do you have sufficient dock lines to moor your
boat correctly for extremely high tides?
Is your boat lift high enough? Check often during
tide changes.
Remove drain plug if boat is on a trailer.

La Pensee Plumbing
Repairs Remodeling
9 Sewer & Drain
Cleaning
SFixture Showroom
b ~ Reasonable Rates
ciJ^ Reliable Service
778-5622
LIC. #RF0049191 5348B Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
i'i-n *** rr--


77 76 750 74


CARPET

NETWORK
"The T'aue4ing Floor StoWre

Ceramic tile, vinyl, wood
and window treatments
BEST PRICES!
"Call now we'll be right over."

778-7311
Free flood and water damage evaluation.
(water tolerant carpets available)
Island owned and operated by Ed Kirn


NAUTICAL BUT NICE
SHIPS CHANDLER


Marine Related
Gifts Antiques Collectibles
for your home, office or store
Ships wheels
Braided rope fenders
Japanese fishing floats
Netting
Brass & copper lamps
* Binnacles & telegraphs
Boxed compass & instruments
Dock piling clusters
Signs, plaques, etc.
We Purchase, Sell and Consign
Mon.- Fri. 9 to 7 Sat.- Sun 10 to 5
12304 Cortez Road, Cortez
795-5756


O Lanterns & Fuel Q Hand Tools
Q Flashlights Q Non-electric can
0 Batteries openers
Q Candles 0 Portable Radios
O Tapes Q Coolers
0 Plastic Bags O Propane Cylinders
Q Nails for Stoves & Grills
When preparingfor a storm, come in and we'll
help you with all the supplies you need.
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 8 to 6 Sunday 10 to 4





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I- SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION [K 1996 K1 PAGE 6


778-7774
Full Service
Electrical
Licensed Insured
Residential
& Commercial
After Hours Emergency
Call 778-7774
Lic. #ER0010206

HOLMES BEACH
POUCE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-0791 POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-2221 cY HALL

Cavanagh
SMarine
Re-pair
Complete Service
... at your dock
or in our shop!
Gas or Diesel
727-7905

To stay in touch with all
the news on
Anna Maria Island,
including coverage of
major storms, you need
a subscription to
The Islander
Bystander.
Call (813) 778-7978.






RR0066842
*DECKS
KITCHENS
BATHS
REMODEL
ADDITIONS
REPAIRS
NEW HOME
CONSTRUCTION








Be sure to
get your

Resident

Evacuation

Vehicle

Sticker

at your
local
city hall


Our Skilled And Professional Craftsmen Live and Work Here.
Get The Quality And Value You deserve From The Hometown folks!
Lic# CRC052340

Hurricane Safety Tips
Right now, before the hurricane season begins:
Enter the hurricane season prepared. Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable foods
and other equipment you will need to secure your home and prepare yourself for evacuation, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a two-week
supply) special dietary foods that are non-perishable blankets, pillows, sleeping bags flashlight and bat-
teries portable radio and batteries extra clothing lightweight folding chairs, cots personal items infant
necessities quiet game or favorite toys for children important papers, valid identification papers snacks.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a threatened region,
pay attention to weather broadcasts for updates.
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them with tape or storm shutters. Damage to small windows is mostly
caused by wind-driven debris; damage to larger windows may come from debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, potted plants, lawn ornaments and anything that can be easily moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture and
a number of other harmless items can become missiles in hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs, bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water. Water ser-
vice may be disturbed for days or longer after a hurricane. You should have one gallon of water per person per
day, and you should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Electricity may be off for days or longer and cooking may be difficult,
so make plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to make sure that you have a can opener
that can be operated without electricity.
Check all battery-powered equipment and stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts recommend not using candles
for light due to the threat of fire. An untended flashlight won't start a fire, but a candle or lantern might.
Stock up on clean-up materials; mops, buckets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will have
to be kept with friends or at a vet.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a possible landfall
for a hurricane, begin making preparations for the storm:
Board all windows or secure with tape or security shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hurri-
cane authorities predict upwards of 12 to 17 hours to evacuate the Island, so plan ahead and plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for shelter openings.
If officials order an evacuation:
LEAVE.
Leave your swimming pool filled and superchlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where you're going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have a safe, timely ride out of the area.
After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be limited and you may not be able to return to your home immedi-
ately. Roads may be blocked by trees and live power lines. Emergency crews will need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints. Make sure you have valid identification showing your proper local address.
Do not drive unless you must and don't sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open windows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structure and contents.
As soon as feasible, report broken power, water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.



nea I *1 L (4)7826


MARY ANN
SCHMIDT
Eves. 778-4931


IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER!
We're here all year,
however the four winds blow.
Nobody, but nobody, sells more
Anna Maria Island Real Estate than
Neal & Neal, REALTORS. Nobody!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325
SMLS s


HELEN WHITE
Eves. 778-6956


COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL
RESIDENTIAL







ROLL-OFF CONTAINERS




PORTABLE
TOILETS


753-7591
6120 21st STREET E.
BRADENTON, FL 34203

BRADENTON
BEACH
POUCE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311 POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-1005 CITY HALL


Got a
problem?


"We can help"
Just call
Fat Cat
Carpet and
Upholstery Cleaning
Dry extraction
Tile, wood and
terrazo cleaned
We never
use steam.
Call Jon Kent,
Island resident.
778-2882

The Islander Bystander Is
the best news on the Island







24-HR. WRECKER
SERVICE:
756-2529
(PRICE TRANSPORT)
A & M AUTO BODY:
795-2770
Insurance estimates
honored.
Work Guaranteed.
Over 50 years combined
experience.


_ -~-_-- ~-- C-b--clC -~IC Ct L- I





PAGE 7 [1 1996 El SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION i THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Don't weather any of these storms on Island"


Hurricanes are designated by categories based on
the strength of the storms. Storm categories allow
emergency management officials to determine time and
need of evacuation.
The Manatee County Emergency Management
Division notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
more water."
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely dif-
ficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 mph -
24 miles an hour less than even a Category 1 storm.
There's also a good chance officials will close the
bridges to vehicles trying to evacuate Anna Maria Is-
land at winds of less than hurricane force, providing yet
another reason to evacuate early.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale" to assign storms into five categories. From least
to most powerful, the five categories and damage po-
tential are as follows.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
signs. Storm surge is expected to be four to five feet
above normal. Flooding is expected on barrier islands.
Low-lying coastal roads are expected to be inundated.
Expect minor pier damage and small craft to be torn
from exposed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in dam-
age. Hurricane Erin in 1995 was also a Category 1
storm, causing 11 deaths and $700 million in damage,
mostly to central Florida.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly con-


structed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings expected. Considerable damage to
piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected anchor-
ages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight feet
above normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage.

Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will probably
be toppled. Practically all poorly constructed signs will
be blown down. Structural damage is expected to small
buildings, and many mobile homes are expected to be
destroyed. Storm surge nine to 12 feet above normal.
Serious flooding along barrier islands and coastal ar-
eas. Large exposed buildings will be damaged, and
smaller structures will be destroyed by wave action and
floating debris.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.


Hurricane Marilyn in 1995 was a Category 3 storm,
killing eight people and causing $1.5 billion in damage
to eastern Caribbean islands.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-,
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Hurri-
cane Donna.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sus-
tained winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than
175 mph. More than 60,000 homes were destroyed,
200,000 people left homeless, more than 2 million
people evacuated, 15 people died and damage was es-
timated at $20 billion. Hurricane Andrew was the third
most intense hurricane this century, and caused the
greatest loss of property of any hurricane in the United
States.
Hurricane Opal in 1995 was also a Category 4
storm, killing 59 people and causing $3 billion in dam-
age, including the loss of 30-50 feet of beach from
Anna Maria Island.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane.


Fire Department needs to know
if you have special needs
The Anna Maria Fire District is seeking written notice from Islanders who may
need special assistance in the event of a hurricane evacuation.
The information requested includes:
Date ................... ............. ...............................................
Phone ..............................................................................................
Name.............,........................ ..... ........................--
A address ...................................................................................................
Type of assistance needed.................................................................................
....................................................................................................................
........................... ....... .... ..... .............. ............ ......................................
Explain what your situation is and what type of assistance you will need.
Please mail the form to:
Anna Maria Fire District
6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217


FINALLY ...

A window film -.

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.1 I l4l] 1 .!I
AEBULA O RPIR






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER l SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION FI] 199611 PAGE 8


Roy Leep's hurricane predictions remain state-of-the-art


At many television stations, the weathercast comes
from National Weather Service wires. In the Tampa
Bay area, it might just be the corner TV station that's
providing the scoop to the government.
The "corner" in this case is on Tampa's Kennedy
Boulevard, and the station is WTVT more popularly
known as "Channel 13." The first station with its own
weather radar three decades ago, WTVT continues to
be at the forefront of severe storm forecasting with
millions of dollars invested in the latest state-of-the-art
technology.
Not long ago, the federal government launched a
new weather satellite. There were immediate concerns
it would not achieve its proper orbit That problem was
.-:-olved and Channel 13 is on line with the most ad-
vanced eye-in-the-sky to date.
According to WTVT Weather Director Roy Leep,
Channel 13 receives satellite pictures and puts them out
to the viewing public faster than anyone. And for those
who remember Labor Day weekend 1985, when Hur-
ricane Elena taunted the Island, or watched nervously
in August 1992 as Hurricane Andrew blew ashore to
our south, the sooner someone can state where a big
storm is going (or not going), the better.

I I L~~ lSP


Hurricane reconnaissance planes, such as the WP-3
Orion, fly into the eye of big storms to gather data.


Roy Leep, the
area's weather
icon, at left,
and his dog
Scud, above,
the mascot for
WTVT Channel
13.
Photos from
WTVT,
Tampa Tribune


To explain more, The Islander Bystander inter-
viewed Leep.
Islander Bystander: What's the status with the
new satellite, GOES-8? (GOES is an acronym for Geo-
stationary Observational Environmental Satellite.)
Roy Leep: GOES-8 is in its designated orbit, and
all of the systems are functioning well. We have looked
at the signal with our equipment, and it looks very
strong.
Islander: Is this satellite just a replacement for the
other satellites which are beginning to fail, or is it an
upgrade in technology?
Leep: It's both. It's a replacement for the old se-
ries, and the first of a new series of GOES satellites
which will take better resolution pictures more fre-
quently. We get about twice the resolution of the old
satellite, and it does some other sounding techniques
that the earlier ones could not do as well.
Islander: Is it true that Channel 13 is the only non-
government entity that's going to have direct access to
the satellite?
Leep: As far as I know, we're the only television


Q
Ir*L


Regulations, insurance to meet big storms


The onset of hurricane season brings up an on-
slaught of insurance fever for many barrier island resi-
dents.
Perhaps angst is a better term, as many residents
often have too little or outdated insurance for their
homes and belongings.
Remember that new television set you just got?
How about the computer? New watch and bracelet?
Chances are you haven't modified your insurance
' policy to reflect the new purchases and, in the event of
a loss, only minimum amounts may be paid for your
new acquisitions.
Insurance is basically the transfer of risk. For a
small premium, you transfer the risk for a larger loss to
an insurance company. Even if your insurance is very
high say $1,000 a year you would have to pay the
premiums for 100 years before you would approach the
replacement value of an average Island home.
Insurance agents advise all property owners to re-
view their insurance policies annually to make sure the
coverage is adequate. An increase in a few dollars a
year could mean savings of tens of thousands of dollars
if your home is destroyed.
You don't want to pay more in premiums? Insur-
ance agents offer a cost-cutting suggestion by increas-
ing the amount of the deductible you would pay after
a loss.
Another strong suggestion insurance carriers make
is to photograph your home and belongings. For insur-
ance to be paid in many instances, both proof of pur-
chase and value should be provided, and a photograph
will take care of both those requirements.
S Insurance providers in Florida have been rocked
in the wake of Hurricane Andrew's 1992 landfall
south of Miami. An estimated $20 billion in damage
resulted from the storm; insurance carriers paid out


more than $16.5 billion.
Many insurance companies went out of business or
left Florida after Andrew, financially unable to with-
stand the cost of restoring people's homes and prop-
erty. Many companies have limited the number of poli-
cies they will write in high-hazard areas such as barrier
islands. Some customers have had their policies can-
celed because risk of coverage is deemed too great
from actuarial standards.
Very few insurance companies, if any, will write
new homeowner policies for houses within 1,000 feet
of the water most of Anna Maria Island.
In an effort to provide insurance to all, former
Florida Insurance Commissioner Tom Gallagher insti-
tuted an insurance "pool." The Florida Residential
Property and Casualty Joint Underwriters Association
allows agents to continue to write policies. The com-
panies pay out of the pool the amount of money they
have in coverage for a region of the state after a hurri-
cane or other disaster.
Although the state insurance pool has only been in
existence for four years, it currently is one of the larg-
est insurers in Florida, accepting properties other insur-
ance companies deem too dangerous.
The days of "one-stop shopping" for insurance
appear to have ended for most homeowners in Florida.
Besides the state insurance pool, carriers have also
pooled coverage for wind damage and flooding.
But even with the new insurance pool, state offi-
cials have agreed that if an intense hurricane strikes a
highly populated area with a large number of homes,
insurance claims would decimate the state insurance
pool because it will take several more years to build up
enough financial reserve to handle a big hit.
If Andrew had swerved a little more to the north,
striking Miami or Fort Lauderdale instead of Home-


stead, upwards of $50 billion in damages would have
occurred, hurricane experts predict.
"We don't have enough money to cover a $50 bil-
lion storm," Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund Chief
Operating Officer Jack Nicholson has said.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is
also involved in hurricanes, both before and after the
fact.
FEMA has imposed strict guidelines for home con-
struction and reconstruction. The most apparent of the
FEMA rules governs home repair in high-hazard areas,
such as barrier islands. If you plan to remodel your
home at more than half of its appraised value, you will
have to meet current FEMA regulations regarding el-
evation and construction.
FEMA rules are designed to offset the massive
amounts of money the federal government would have
to pay for repairs in an area struck by a natural disas-
ter. Unfortunately, the rules also strike at social struc-
tures of neighborhoods. Many land planners criticize
FEMA for disrupting neighborhoods by forcing some
houses to loom over older homes. How can an area
retain its residential character when some residents
have huge, elevated "skyscrapers" looking down upon
their neighbors? is the question many architects and
planners ask.
FEMA has also been attacked in the past for its
reconstruction practices. There is little or no method
the lumbering bureaucracy can use to allow residents
in high-risk areas to be relocated. During the recent
Midwest floods, many communities and residents
agreed they would prefer not to rebuild in a flood zone.
FEMA, though, would not release funds for relocation
and only paid out money on the condition residents
rebuild their homes smack in the way of future
flooding.


k--rW


__


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station that has a full earth station. We can pick up the
pictures directly, and we've been doing that since the
late 1970s.
Islander: What is the main advantage to viewers?
Leep: The main advantage is that since we have ac-
cess to the full satellite pictures immediately when they're
transmitted, we receive the pictures before anybody else
in the television industry. Everyone else is using a middle-
man of some type it goes through a production house
that adds value to the satellite picture, so there is a delay
before it gets to other television stations.
Our equipment processes the pictures directly, and
then we can also sectorize any view at any resolution
that we want we have total flexibility of use.
Islander: Wasn't Channel 13 ahead of the National
Weather Service in Ruskin in getting Doppler radar?
Leep: We've had full Doppler radar for seven
years, and Ruskin came on line with theirs a couple of
years ago.
We have equipment in our office which permits us to
see the new Doppler radar at Ruskin as well as those in
Melbourne and Miami. We have total access to the pic-
tures they're seeing, and that supplements our Doppler.
Islander: With all of this radar and satellite technol-
ogy, it can be assumed that the accuracy of hurricane land-
fall predictions has improved as compared with years past,
but how much has this lessened the danger to residents of
barrier islands? It's still important to heed warnings and
evacuate as soon as possible, correct?
Leep: That's true. Obviously, because you invest
in new equipment it doesn't make the danger go away.
There's still the same danger as last year and the year
before of being hit by a hurricane. Of course, we'll be
able to keep better tabs on its approach with the sophis-
ticated equipment that we have, but it certainly doesn't
lessen the danger.
Islander: As far as being able to predict landfall,
how accurate are forecasts now? Have they improved
much in recent years?
Leep: The National Hurricane Center will verify,
I'm sure, that while the accuracy has increased very,
very slowly over the last 10 or 15 years, the average
error at the end of 24 hours is still in the neighborhood
of 80 to 100 miles. That can make a great deal of dif-
ference on impacting the coastline, so the first word
you receive on the approach of hurricane shouldn't be
the last word you should keep up to date on exactly
where the main threat is going to be, because it's likely
to vary with time.