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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE FEBRUARY 15, 1996


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ANNA MARIA


ELECTION:

Mayor Shumard:

McElheny, Burkly,

Wolfe on council
Anna Maria voters Tuesday elected a new mayor,
two new commissioners, re-elected one commissioner
by a one-vote margin, approved beach renourishment
but oppose a high, fixed-span bridge to the Island.
Chuck Shumard will assume the office of mayor,
replacing one-year incumbent Dottie McChesney.
Political newcomers Robert McElheny and Elaine
Burkly won commission seats. Also elected for another
term is Doug Wolfe, beating fellow incumbent
commissioner Max Znika by one vote.
The beach referendum question won by a substantial
margin. Anna Maria voters also opted to go for repair
rather than replacement of the Manatee Avenue Bridge.
Tallies of the 819 voters (57 percent) casting ballots:
Mayor:
Shumard, 436 votes, 53.7 percent, winner
McChesney, 376 votes, 46.3 percent
Commission:
McElheny, 459 votes, 21.4 percent, winner
Elaine Burkly, 437 votes, 20.4 percent, winner
Doug Wolfe, 424 votes, 19.8 percent, winner
Max Znika, 423 votes, 19.7 percent
Tom Turner, 401 votes, 18.7 percent
Bridge referendum:
Yes, 514 votes, 64.2 percent
No, 287 votes, 35.8 percent
Shore referendum:
Yes, 480 votes, 60.2 percent
No, 317 votes, 39.8 percent


By Paul Roat
Citing "continued rumors, insinuations and lack of
support being directed at me personally," Whitey
Moran briefly resigned his position as Bradenton Beach
Building Official last Thursday.
Moran rescinded his resignation Friday pending
council's request for a public meeting to discuss his
reasons for wanting to leave. The matter is expected to
come up during Thursday's city council meeting, be-
ginning at 1 p.m.
Although not mentioned directly in his brief letter
of resignation or the even briefer letter in which he re-
scinded, much of Moran's problems would appear to
involve Mayor Leroy Arnold.
Arnold proposed a merger of planning and public
works departments as one of his first goals after being
elected last December. Moran researched the proposal and
developed a plan to merge the city's planning, building,
public works, maintenance, parks and recreation, sanita-
tion and code enforcement departments that would result
in more than $11,000 per year savings to the city.
Moran's plan included a proposed $42,000 annual
salary for the head of that department, making that per-
son the highest-paid employee in the city. There was no
suggestion as to who would take the position of the di-
rector of the combined departments.
Buddy Watts, current public works director, said he
approves the merger, which would mean he would take
a demotion in both pay and position and return to his
previous post as a working foreman.
At a meeting in January Arnold reversed his sup-
port for the merger plan, stating he could not endorse
having any Bradenton Beach employee make that
much money. However, he later voted with the rest of
the council in unanimous approval of continued re-
search on the merger.


14th Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival this weekend
Children of all ages can enjoy the attractions, seafood, music and art on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 17 and
18, at the 14th Annual Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival on the bayfront in the village of Cortez. A frequent
visitor at past festivals, Cody Giltner, was caught in the crabby photo frame between bites of hot "mullet" dog
and fritters and pelican feedings. For more, see stories inside. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Bradenton Beach

$500,000 grant

appears likely
The check isn't quite in the mail yet, but officials
in Bradenton Beach are confident it will be soon.
Community Redevelopment Agency Chairman
Clem Dryden said last week Bradenton Beach was
ranked fifth in funding for last year's Community Re-
development Block Grant request for $500,000.
Six projects will be funded this year, Dryden said,
meaning the city's chances of getting the money "is
excellent."
Work to be done with the state money includes
improvements to the city parking lot between Bridge
Street and First Street North, drainage improvements,
paving, sidewalks and lighting in the "historic old-
town" area of the city, from the Cortez Bridge to Fourth
Street South.
The city received a grant from the Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs several years ago. Grant
funds were used on improvements to Bridge Street.


The plan was scrapped last week, with Arnold,
Councilman Gail Cole and Councilman John
Kaufmann voting against it.
Residents made a strong showing of support for
Moran at last Thursday's council meeting.
"The money that it could cost the city to not have
a building official is pretty devastating," Jo Ann
Goodchild said. "I hope this internal destruction stops."
"What is happening to this city?" Emily Smith
asked the council. "There have been orchestrated phone
calls to get people to make complaints because there are
a handful of people who want to run this city and they
are using you, Mr. Mayor, as their sounding voice."
"You shouldn't assume other people are dangling
me around," Arnold said. "I've bent over backward to
try to help people."
"I think it is a shame," former Bradenton Beach
Mayor Barbara Turner told Arnold, "that people we
hired Alice Baird, the city clerk wonders every
day if she's going to continue to be employed. Buddy
Watts he is wondering every day if he's going to
continue to be employed.
"You're a man of honor, Leroy I hope. You're
a man who can think for himself I hope. Do what is
right for this city that we all love," she said.
"This is like a conspiracy," Arnold said.
"I saw a regime under Mayor Katie Pierola that
was smooth," resident Lee Hornack said. "We were
making progress. Now I see a regime of total chaos. Let
the blame lay where it falls, but I'd like to see this city
staffed with quality people. Put this city back on the
track it was on four months ago."
"The question is, did Whitey Moran do a good job
for the city?" Dan Goodchild asked the council to a
round of applause and shouts of "yes" from the audi-
ence. "If he did, then why should we let him leave?"


Building official briefly quits


in Bradenton Beach


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions .......................................... ...... 6
Those Were the Days .............................. 7
Announcements .............................................. 8
Stir-it-up ........................................... ..... 18
Streetlife .................................... ............ 25
Anna Maria Island tides ............................... 26
Crossword puzzle ....................... ............ 36


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


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[a PAGE 2 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Council establishes capital improvements policy


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council attended to busi-
ness in record time last week, passing two resolutions
and hearing other matters in less than an hour.
Resolutions included establishing a capital im-
provements policy and executing a mutual aid agree-
ment with DeSoto County.
The capital improvements resolution established a
five-year policy. Council will identify funding for the
projects and has the ability to amend priorities or fund-
ing. Each January the mayor will submit his/her recom-
mendation for the fifth year.


The mutual aid agreement came out of a sugges-
tion by the Island Emergency Operations Center,
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger explained. In the event of
a hurricane, the city's records will be loaded into a
rental truck and transported to DeSoto County until
the storm has passed. The City of Bradenton Beach
and the fire district have similar agreements with
DeSoto County.
Only essential records will be transported and
will take about an hour and a half to load,
Bohnenberger said. The city employees will take the
computers and other office equipment with them
when they evacuate so a city office can be set up off-


Island if city hall is damaged or destroyed.
The Department of Transportation has completed
the preliminary drawings for the Key Royale Bridge
replacement project, Bohnenberger noted. However,
only the planning, design and engineering phase has
been funded. The construction of a new bridge is not
included in the DOT's five-year plan.
City Clerk Leslie Ford asked council to consider
what to do about boats illegally docked in the city's T-
end canals. All existing docks in the canals between
72nd and 77th Streets along Marina Drive have been
registered and there are 20 boats squatting in slips that
have been registered to other owners, she said.


SAM chips away at
anti-bridge legal bill
Save Anna Maria Inc. activists, from left, president
Joy Courtney, vice president Barbara Lacina and
secretary Joan Perry were among dozens of volun-
teers who helped raise $1,625 by selling used items,
food stuffs and raffle tickets Feb. 10 at the Priva-
teers' Thieves Market. SAM's "no mega bridge"
legal bill still remains at more than $85,000 and
volunteers will be selling tickets for the March 9
Megaa" raffle drawing at various locations on the
Island. To make a donation or for more information,
call 778-5405. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


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Less noise, more sidewalks top goals


of citizens in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
Improving and expanding sidewalks and reducing
noise from loud cars and "boom boxes" in Bradenton
Beach were the top wishes of citizens at last week's
"goal-setting" workshop.
About 10 residents representing a cross-section of
organizations in the city and on the Island suggested
goals for Bradenton Beach to city council members.
"This is a very important meeting," Councilman
John Kaufmann said. He instigated the sessions, the
first of which was held last year.
Anna Maria Island Community Center Executive
Director Pierrette Kelly began the meeting with kudos
to the city and the Tingley Memorial Library for ex-
panding the Center's after-school programs in
Bradenton Beach.
A perennial problem has been the transportation of
youths between the city and the Center in Anna Maria.
Last year an after-school program began at the library.
The goal of 15 students participating in the program has
been met, and Kelly is already looking for a new loca-
tion so more young people can participate.
Kelly also hopes the city will continue its financial
support to the Center.
Emily Anne Smith, representing the Bradenton Beach
Business Owner's Association, said the number one goal
on that group's agenda is the production of a four-color

Holmes Beach
election change
Because the Holmes Beach election March
12 is also a presidential preference primary,
there are changes in normal procedure, City
Clerk Leslie Ford said last week.
Absentee ballots will not be available in city
hall. They must be obtained from the supervisor
of elections. Call 749-7181 for information.
Voters must also vote at their county polling
location, either Gloria Dei Lutheran Church or St.
Bernard Catholic Church. The location is indicated
on your voters' identification card, Ford said.


brochure for Bradenton Beach. The brochure will provide
visitors with "facts, history, demographics and a map of
Bradenton Beach," she said, adding that the handout could
be produced by this spring.
Smith urged the council to continue to go after grants
to beautify city neighborhoods and to finish the master
plan for the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier. Beautification
should include adding benches and trash receptacles at all
the street ends at the bay and beach and the addition of
"mileage markers" for beach walkers.
Smith hopes to have a trolley service focus on
Bradenton Beach to bring people from the beach to
Bridge Street and elsewhere in the city.
"Vertical growth" to the second story of stores and
businesses should be encouraged to provide offices for
doctors, dentists, banks or other professionals, she said.
"We need to use the land in the city more efficiently
and effectively."
The question of changing the city council's meet-
ing schedule has been raised. Smith urged the city to
continue its afternoon meeting for minor business and
leave the more pressing issues for night meetings.
The current $25 charge for up to three yard sales
a year has also been debated. Smith said she favored
some regulation of yard sales to avoid "mini-
junkyards" from sprouting up.
Smith also urged a budget category each year for
sidewalk expansion and improvement, development of
a master plan to redesign city buildings, creation of a
bandshell and construction of a beach pavilion.
Tom Hoey of Bridgeport condominium said traf-
fic and "boom box" noise particularly at night is
a serious problem. He asked for increased police en-
forcement of the city's noise ordinance.
Resident Gene Gardinier said he favored afternoon
meetings, a time and efficiency study of city employees
and better cleaning and repair of streets and sidewalks.
He also said the city council should consider reduc-
ing the speed limit to 25 mph and begin to plan now for
the federally mandated stormwater improvements
scheduled to start in June.
Jim Chapman of the Imperial House condominium
said the council should improve lighting, sidewalks and


drainage. He had no problem with the meeting schedule.
Barkley Omans of Harvey Memorial Church urged
caution with management of grant money.
As to garage sale fees, Omans likened the city's
charging for them to "trying to kill a flea with an ax.
You are inconveniencing many people to solve a
relatively small problem." He suggested zoning or
limiting sales to once a month.
Dick Griffin of the Moose Lodge wanted the city to
improve sidewalks and pave the area of Bridge Street west
of Gulf Drive near the lodge. Griffin favored city council
workshops during the day and meetings in the evening.
John Sandberg of the Tingley Memorial Library
said stormwater runoff management was a pressing
problem and urged continued cooperation with Mana-
tee County on the issue.
Cooperation is needed with Longboat Key to re-
move dead fish caused by Red Tide outbreaks, he said.
Sandberg said the library board will hold a "values,
goals and mission" workshop shortly to provide a mis-
sion statement for the library. "We've been over-
whelmed with our own success," he said.
Community Redevelopment Agency Chairman
Clem Dryden called upon the city council to "sharpen
up and work together with the citizens. We need to
stick our necks out if we want to be what we want to
be," he said.
Former Councilman Herb Dolan urged the council
to lobby the Florida Department of Transportation to
revise the drawbridge signal system on the Cortez
Bridge.
Former Councilman Jim Kissick pushed for in-
creased police enforcement on speeders.
Eileen Suhre wanted to stop illegal venders on the
beach hawking timeshare units.
Henry Drescher wanted to curb loud vehicles and
speeding on the city's side streets.
"You can't please everybody," Mayor Leroy
Arnold said, "but we want to do what is best for our
own community. A former mayor said to remember to
do what you think is best for the community. We need
all of us together. We need to keep an open mind and
work together to make a better community."






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N FEBRUARY 15, 1996 I PAGE 3 IiG


State commission recommends two live shell limit


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Striking a compromise, the Florida Marine Fisher-
ies Commission last week recommended limit of two-
live shells per person, per day for Manatee County.
The MFC made its recommendation after listen-
ing to shell enthusiasts and collectors who advocated
no limits on harvesting live shells and others who
wanted to prohibit the harvesting of all live shells.
MFC members cited the lack of scientific studies on
shellfish reproduction and depletion. The recom-
mended rule will be forwarded to the governor and
cabinet for a final decision.
For the past three years, Anna Maria Mayor Dottie
McChesney has fought for a ban on harvesting live
shells in county waters; however, a limited ban is bet-
ter than no ban, she says.
"At least it will prohibit people from taking large
amounts of shells," she said last week. "I won't rest


until the rule is signed. It's the final hurdle."
McChesney's concern led her to lobby local mu-
nicipalities and the county to pass resolutions support-
ing a ban. All did so in 1994. She also received assur-
ances from local law enforcement agencies that they
would enforce a ban. Public hearings were held by the
MFC, ending in the final hearing last week.
The MFC rule, titled the Manatee County Shells
Rule, defines live shellfish as any living mollusk or
echinoderm excluding oysters, hard clams, bay scallops
and coquinas.
Mollusks include gastropods such as tulips,
whelks, conchs, olives and augers and bivalves such
as clams, scallops, cockles, oysters and mussels.
Echinoderms include starfish, sand dollars, sea ur-
chins and sea biscuits.
ThS rule provides an exception in which the De-
partment of Environmental Protection may issue per-
mits to individuals to harvest or possess more than two


The Islander sees snow
Gil Pierola, Jr., left, of Bradenton Beach, and Deborah Phillips of Bradenton, enjoy their copy of The Islander
Bystander in Steamboat Springs, Colo., at an elevation of 9,800 feet. Maybe the classified section can answer
their question, "Where's the beach?" Islander Photo: Courtesy of Gil Pierola


][I 'St I F Io
Co aVn- Olad
















Mis n Plce -Tamp

Best Watrfill* Dinin


live shellfish of any species.
Each violation of the rule is punishable by a pen-
alty not to exceed $500. Each live shellfish over those
permitted to be taken constitutes a separate violation.



Anna Maria City
2/16, 5 p.m., Commission meeting second
reading of ordinances
2/20, 7 p.m., Swearing in of mayor and com-
missioners followed by commission meeting
at 7:30

Bradenton Beach
2/15, 1 p.m., Council meeting. Agenda: discus-
sion regarding waiving occupational license
fee, school board request for funds for METV,
American Disabilities Act requirements, first
reading on changing meeting times, first
reading on changing occupational license fee
charges, red tide proclamation, approval of bills
and council reports.

Holmes Beach
2/15, 9 a.m., Planning commission
2/20, 9 a.m., Code enforcement
board Anchor Inn
2/20, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
2/22, 9 a.m., Planning commission

Of Interest
2/17, 10:30 am., Holmes Beach Civic Associa-
tion, Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
2/19, 10 a.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization CANCELED
2/21, 10 a.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach City Hall.

Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach city offices
will be closed Feb. 19 in honor of
Presidents' Day.


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account, your money will earn a higher rate of return. That's what you'll receive
with First Choice Savings offered by First National Bank of Manatee.
Minimum Deposit $10,000. Interest rate calculated at 1% below the prior
month's average 90-day Treasury Bill rates. Effective: Feb. 6, 1996. Fees may reduce
earnings. Please contact a Customer Service Representative for complete details.

4.02% 4.10%
Interest Rate Annual Percentage Yield

















Linda Braithwaite, Branch Manager
"We look forward to continuing to serve all your
banking needs, no matter how big or small.
And, we're open Saturdays."

S As Independent As The Island Itself

First National Bank
M Mmber FDIC
Drive-thru open Saturday 8 am to Noon
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (941)778-4900
Bradenton: 5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton 794-6969








IB PAGE 4 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


New Coast Guard Auxiliary


Commander John Hughes settles in


By Leonnie Mosier
Islander Correspondent
When election season started on Anna Maria Is-
land, Holmes Beach resident John Hughes won a post
- but not to any city council.
Hughes replaced two-year Commander John Gillie
as Flotilla 81 Commander, the Coast Guard Auxiliary
serving the Island.
A lifetime of experience and leadership have
brought Hughes to his newest post, yet he still envi-
sions a changing world.
As commander, Hughes plans to change things -
including the current teaching format for the classes run
by the auxiliary. He says he'll make the classes more
interesting to entice new students and, subsequently,
members.
With the lease expiring on the flotilla's headquar-
ters in 1998, Hughes also plans to find property for the
flotilla, a matter of great concern for many auxiliary
members. The flotilla headquarters is necessary for
boating safety classes, meetings, and provides space for
rescue and pollution-awareness sessions. The plan is to
go door to door asking for a land donation. Hughes says
the property doesn't have to be waterfront or even on
Anna Maria.
According to Shirley Northrop, officer of public
affairs for the Manatee chapter, Ato's Restaurant has
begun the building-fund drive by donating a portion of
their proceeds received from the Coast Guard Auxiliary
Valentine luau to the land fund.

Auxiliary purpose
"The Coast Guard Auxiliary enhances boating
safety by conducting classes for the public," Northrop
says, "by patrolling the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW),
andby providing Courtesy Marine Examinations."
The auxiliary is not a branch of military service,
but is considered "quasi-military" in that it is under the
jurisdiction of the U.S. government and the Coast
Guard while they and their boats are on the water.

Functions and benefits
There are three classes available for non-members:
boating skills and seamanship, sailing and seamanship
and advanced coastal navigation. Successful comple-
tion of one of the first two classes is needed for mem-
bership eligibility. Other advanced classes are available
for members.
Membership is on a volunteer basis, but members
must be 17 years of age or older. For more information
on class availability, call Shirley Northrop at 722-6971.
The CGA performs many functions, one of the
most important being the patrol of the ICW. On these
patrols, CGA members offer free assistance for boat-
ers in need.
They inspect aids to navigation (navigation sym-
bols) for repair or removal. Waters are also scrutinized
for any sign of pollution or submerged crafts. A mem-
ber of the CGA constantly monitors a marine radio so
assistance may be provided in the event of on-the-wa-
ter emergencies.
The CGA also courtesy marine examinations, free
boat examinations to ensure availability of required
emergency items such as life jackets in addition to in-
specting the seaworthiness of craft. A CGA sticker is
then provided upon successfully completing the exami-
nation.

Commander style
Hughes, the new commander of Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Flotilla 81, arrived promptly at the agreed-upon
time for his interview, 0900 hours. His method of con-
veyance was a black Peugeot bicycle, the hybrid type
that protects its riders from harm with wide, sand-plow-
ing tires and a strong frame.
He is seen cycling frequently, hunched over his
handlebars, using the slow-pedal revolutions of the
retired and unhurried. He never appears to have a des-
tination, his pedaling possibly more a battle against
aging than a method of conveyance. John Hughes is in
no hurry, he has already done and seen so much.
His attire was beachy: well-worn baggy shorts,
short-sleeved shirt and sandals. His tanned face was
leathery and well lined, blue eyes watered slightly from


Coast Guard Auxiliary Commander John Hughes

the breeze. Despite his countenance, his strength shone
through.
Commander Hughes is a retiree on Anna Maria
Island and lives here with his wife, Jo, and his Welsh
corgi, Freddie.
Hughes readily agreed to an interview but as for the
appointment time, he responded with the accent of an
English seaman, "I'm sorry I'm not available this
evening, I have to take the missus out for the evening
meal to keep her quiet."
Early morning was out as well, "Y' see, I'm up at
eight, but my dog Freddie, she likes to sleep later and
I hate to wake her, would 9 be sufficient?"

Liverpool beginnings: always
looking ahead
John Clifford Hughes was born in Liverpool, En-
gland, in 1916. He was one of four children, two girls
and two boys. His younger brother Ivor would die
tragically at the age of 19 on D-day, June 6, 1944. His
memories of wanderlust date back as far as age three,
when he used to gaze out the large bay window of his
home and wonder about the world beyond the treetops.
He always yearned to be a sailor, and at the age of
16 signed on with a British merchant marine training
ship christened the "Durham." The training in those
days involved a very strict and difficult four years, but
despite the rigid instruction and harsh conditions,
Hughes loved it. He was finally in his element.

War years
After his initial training at sea, Hughes was sent
ashore to study for his second mate's license. In 1937,
after obtaining this valuable ticket, he joined a New
Zealand freight ship until the outbreak of World War
II in 1939. Hughes was home in Liverpool visiting his
family when the war was announced.
He said no one was surprised. Unlike his brother,
John Hughes was not accepted into the military his
experience was needed more by the merchant marine
companies than the British navy.
Hughes knocked on the door of the biggest ship-
ping company in the world, hoping for employment as
third mate of a small ship. The Cunard line assigned
him to the "Acquitania," the largest ship at sea. He
boarded the "Acquitania" in Southampton, England,
where he stayed until the Japanese attacked Pearl Har-
bor on Dec. 7, 1941.
In 1942 he found a berth on the "Queen Mary"
transporting what he described as "ill-equipped Austra-
lian soldiers" to New Guinea.
The Japanese-held island just north of Australia
had been captured in 1942 in an attempt to cut off U.S.
supply lanes to Australia. Despite the lack of supplies


and limited military training, these soldiers were some
of the strongest and toughest men Hughes had ever
met.
Hughes said upon arrival in New Guinea the troops
went ashore in lifeboats with scotch- and gin-bottle
"canteens" full of water dangling from their waists.
The "Queen Mary" and the "Acquitania" were
both transporting troops. The "Queen Mary's" capac-
ity was for 5,000 men, and she sailed to New York to
be refitted to hold 12,000 more. Upon arrival in New
York City, Hughes was overwhelmed by the enthusi-
asm, the freshness, the impetus, and the power pro-
duced by this great country. He realized then that Hitler
did not have a chance.
Hughes made several more voyages across the
Atlantic before he joined a Liberty ship as chief of-
ficer. Hughes claims he really learned how to become
a sailor on this ship. Crew was minimal and the duties
overwhelming.
There were 18 Liberty transport ships at sea in
1943- nine British and nine American- and they
were all built quickly to try to compensate for the many
ships lost at sea during the war.
Chief Officer Hughes' ship was responsible for
transporting supplies to American troops in Italy who
were under the command of General Patton.
While in Italy, John met several American soldiers
while delivering supplies. During one of his deliveries
he had paused to smoke his pipe in which he had
crushed one "V is for Victory cigarette for a lack of
pipe tobacco. A soldier inquired why Hughes used
cigarettes in his pipe instead of tobacco, and he ex-
plained that they were very low on goods, specifically
pipe tobacco.
After several more deliveries John returned to his
ship to find large cans of pipe tobacco, toothbrushes,
toothpaste and additional supplies for the whole crew.
The next day Hughes tracked down the soldier to
thank him and gave him a bottle of Scotch. "The En-
glish lads never drank scotch anyway, only the
American's did. We only drank beer," he explained.
Hughes returned to Liverpool his Liberty ship
was to be outfitted in preparation for a mass invasion
of Japan.
While waiting in Liverpool, Hughes studied in
preparation for his master's papers and sat for his exam
in May 1945.
It was a grueling five days of questioning given by
a "tough old boy," a former sailing ship captain with a
very stern manner. In the late afternoon of the fifth day
of the exam, an aide came and whispered into the ear
of the examiner, who then excused himself and left the
room for 20 minutes.
Hughes waited in agony, not knowing the purpose
of the interruption.
"John Hughes, this is your lucky day," the exam-
iner said upon his return. "First, you passed your
master's papers, and second, the war is over. Congratu-
lations."

Famous names, faces
and 'baggage'
In 1947, Hughes briefly traveled to the Caribbean
as second officer of the "Mauritania." In the later part
of the year, he returned to New York and applied to and
was accepted for the position of assistant to port cap-
tain.
Through hard work and attrition he was latter pro-
moted to stevedore. It was his job to look after the
safety and well being of the Cunard ships docking in
New York, and to meet and escort famous people.
His face lit up as he recalled the people he met
during his years in New York. These included Nikita
Krushchev subordinates of Krushchev later sent him
a case of vodka and a large tin of caviar for his assis-
tance.
Other famous passengers included Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor and
Lord Louis Mountbatton "one of the nutty Royals."
Hughes told a tale with a great deal of guffawing
about a gentleman of great stature in the British gov-
ernment who John prefers not to name. This gentleman

PLEASE SEE HUGHES, NEXT PAGE





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 a PAGE 5 B~3


Timing is everything in this

meeting change


All regular Bradenton Beach City Council meet-
ings will be evening meetings or they will be once
an ordinance is drafted.
Ironically, the first reading of that ordinance will
be at the Feb. 15 afternoon meeting. Public comment
will be on March 7 in the evening.
The time change for the second meeting of the
month was introduced last year after Councilman John
Kaufmann announced that, due to job constraints, he
would be unable to attend any afternoon meetings ex-
cept for daytime budget discussions this summer.
Mayor Leroy Arnold brought the issue to a head
last December. Professional people have a hard time
attending the council meetings during the day, he said.
He advocated holding all meetings in the evening.
Arnold said the council had only met once a month
until five years ago. Then a second meeting, held the
third Thursday at 1 p.m., was added to attend to
"housekeeping" duties such as approval of bills and
council reports.
Arnold said the workshop-like afternoon session
had evolved into more pressing issues being discussed
and voted upon in the past few years.

HUGHES, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4
drank a great deal at a ship's party, and became "utterly
paralytic" as the evening wore on.
Hughes was assigned make sure the man reached
home safely, so he hoisted him on his shoulder for the
trip down the gangplank. The docks were full of work-
ing sailors who recognized Hughes' "baggage," and
they lined up to salute the unconscious fellow. Need-
less to say, the gentleman was unaware of the entire
proceeding but did arrive home without mishap.

... and finally, Anna Maria
and the CGA
In the mid 1960s, airline prices dropped and the
shipping company lost a great deal of business. In
1975, Hughes was transferred to San Juan, Puerto Rico


"I believe it was well-intended," Arnold said of
the afternoon sessions, "but it put a barrier up for
people who work."
"I'm bothered that there is a councilman who can't
be here in the afternoons," Councilman Gail Cole said
of Kaufmann. "The meetings should be scheduled at a
time when he can be present."
"Too many things have come up in the afternoon
meetings where things are slipped by and passed
through," a Bradenton Beach resident called "Stormy"
told the council. "I'm a working man, and I can't be
here in the afternoon. Evening meetings are what the
people want. Afternoon meetings are for people like
you who don't have anything better to do."
City Clerk Alice Baird warned that scheduling all the
regular monthly council meetings in the evenings would
probably double the cost of overtime for her department's
budget She also said the change could conflict with the
other advisory board meetings held at city hall.
Council members unanimously voted in favor of
the change. First reading is Feb. 15 at 1 p.m. The pub-
lic hearing on the matter, second reading and final vote
are scheduled for March 8 at 7 p.m.

where he served until his retirement in 1980.
He then moved to Lake Placid where he had pur-
chased property which turned out to be a "heap of
junk." But John and his wife Jo grew to enjoy Lake
Placid, and they loved Florida.
They made several excursions to Anna Maria for
swimming and shopping, and moved here nine years
ago, where he joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary.

Busy man, important tasks
Hughes still had a great deal to do that day and
many more days. He was planning on attending yet an-
other Coast Guard Auxiliary meeting. Something has
to be done.
Mounting his black Peugeot bicycle he pedaled
down South Bayshore Drive toward home with his sails
full, and the wind at his back.


STOP

proponents seek

constitutional

amendment
Proponents of Stop Turning Out Prisoners,
who championed state legislation in 1995 mandat-
ing that prisoners serve 85 percent of their time, are
taking their campaign one step further. They are
seeking a constitutional amendment to insure that
the legislation is never changed.
STOP members are currently working to ob-
tain the necessary number of signatures to have the
amendment placed on the November ballot. They
need 429,428 signatures, which must be certified
by the Supervisor of Elections and in the Secretary
of State's office by Aug. 6.
They are hoping to have the signatures by July
4 and are seeking volunteers to gather signatures.
Call Nancy Bennett at 778-7562 to volunteer. Cop-
ies of the petitions are available at the Island's
police departments. Petitions must be signed by
individual registered voters in ink.


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Ij PAGE 6 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Citizens against Arnold?
Criticism of Mayor Leroy Arnold is headed toward
a crescendo in Bradenton Beach.
One department head quit as a result of what he
called "continued rumors, insinuations and lack of sup-
port directed at me personally." Although the mayor was
not specifically mentioned as a reason for Building Of-
ficial Whitey Moran's resignation, Arnold's name was
omitted from Moran's apologies to council in his brief
letter of resignation.
Moran later rescinded his resignation and a discus-
sion of his problems is expected to take place during
Thursday's council meeting at 1 p.m.
Meanwhile, Arnold took it on himself to place a
want ad for Moran's position in a local paper some-
what conspiciously absent of equal employment oppor-
tunity provisions.
Hearsay abounds in the city as to who will be the next
to leave or be fired but Arnold says he "just wanted to
clarify what I could do" regarding city employees.
"God, Leroy, if you want to instill confidence in
people, that is really the way to do it!" resident Dan
Goodchild said to Arnold at last week's meeting.
Goodchild, who ran against Arnold for mayor last
December, is not the only resident critical of the mayor.
Former Bradenton Beach Mayor Barbara Tumer whose
husband, Walt Grace, also made a bid for mayor against
Arnold said she was fearful of other terminations.
"We're frustrated," she said. "You have to earn the
respect of the people in the position you have now."
The past two council meetings have concluded with
resident after resident coming forward to question the
mayor's leadership.
"You say you don't know there is unrest?" resident
John Sandberg asked Arnold at one point. "You say you
don't know there is bad morale?"
Sandberg suggested the council members make
written evaluations of city department heads to deter-
mine job performance. Sandberg said, "If you don't do
a review, there will be tremendous unrest in this city."
Board of Adjustment Chairman John Burns was
more blunt in his assessment
"It was good to see this city go from having only
negative things printed in the paper to having positive
things in the paper," Burns said. "Now we're going back
to the way it was 10 years ago."
If you've been here long enough to remember Dick
Connick's totalitarian rule over the affairs of city gov-
ernment during a 13-year tenure as mayor, from 1973-
86, you'll know how sad and fearful we are that we may
be revisiting that era.
If you haven't been here long enough to remember
Connick's reign well, try to sympathize anyway.
Believe us when we say loud music is nothing to com-
plain about in comparison to an autocratic government.



FEBRUARY 15, 1996 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 13
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Jennifer Heisdorf
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster





O 1996 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan

-e- eiuz


Red tide war is unrealistic
Perhaps I'm becoming a bit of a cynic, but does it not
make about as much sense to mount a war on hurricanes
as it does to declare "war on red tide," to wit:
both cause tourism problems;
both can create breathing problems due to atmo-
spheric changes;
both have effects on our social structure (? red tide);
both negatively impact our beaches (erosion/dead
fish);
both cause economic loss and both are the result of
natural forces over which mankind is not soon likely to
have significant control.
I send this letter largely tongue-in-cheek, but seri-
ously, shouldn't we direct our efforts toward goals more
realistically attainable?
James Zucker, Bradenton Beach
Open letter to council chairman
Editor's Note: This letter was addressed to Luke
Courtney, chairman of the Holmes Beach City Council.
It is an oxymoron to say that we want to preserve the
quality of the Island "the way it is" and then add a $1.2
million City Hall complex with education money. If the
city of Holmes Beach cannot hold a Florida Department
of Transportation meeting because and I quote you -
"we don't have the facility to sit all those people," you
should consider renting a real big tent for this one-time
event (a lot cheaper than $1.2M). You're getting a
politician's head, Luke.
I noticed the politician in you succeeded in changing
the speed limit to 25 mph in the "dangerous intersection"
area surrounding your motel. Was this motel not built
when you bought it? Why don't you and your guests back
your cars into the parking spaces so you can have a bet-
ter view pulling out? That way you can foot the bill to put
a sign that reads "Back in Only" instead of wasting tax-
payers' money on 25-mph signs and the city-employee
time installing them. Lest we not mention the waste of city
council agenda time trying to self-serve your needs. Get
a grip!
Capt. Elmo Torres Jr., Holmes Beach

Guild gives merchants A+
On behalf of all of the ladies of St. Bernard's


Guild, we would like to thank each and every Island
merchant who donated to the success of the guild's
Annual Valentine Dessert Card Party. We couldn't
have done it without their support.
Theresa Wieclaw and JoAnn Heyne,
St. Bernard's Guild
Against Orimulstion
I'm scared! Scared of what looms in our future
should Florida Power be allowed to bring Orimulsion
into Tampa Bay and burn this dirty fuel at the Parrish
power plant.
Rare is the day when we do not read articles in our
local newspapers indicating the necessity of improving
our air quality or too much nitrogen in Tampa Bay or
conserve water use because of limited supply and the
risk of salt water intrusion in to aquifer.
Now we learn our community is at risk of being sub-
jected to a situation which would have a negative effect
on all of the above. If the use of Orimulsion is approved,
there will be significant increases of nitrogen oxide emis-
sions into the air we breathe. If an Orimulsion spill should
occur in Tampa Bay, there is no proven way to clean it up
and correct the damage. The passing of a resolution to ban
the taking of live shellfish would be a moot issue. Our
shores would be littered with dead sea life similar to the
recent occurrence at Matunuck Beach in Rhode Island.
Please don't let the local politicians and the deep
pocket power company subject our community to the
potential of "a disaster waiting to happen."
Dorothy Perricone, Anna Maria
Business sponsors and
volunteers made festival
Thank you to all of the business sponsors and citizen
volunteers who made possible the recent Fourth Annual
Bradenton Beach Festival on Historic Bridge Street.
Thank you to The Islander Bystander for the news
space and publicity.
A drippy Saturday and a freezing Sunday did not
deter some 70 artists and craftspersons. The music and
good food were enjoyed by all. Here's to sunshine next
year as we have already begun the plans for our fifth fes-
tival. A special thank you to Sandy Greiner, volunteer Fes-
tival Committee chairwoman. See you all next year.
Emily Anne Smith, Festival Committee member











THOSE WERE THE DAY
by June Alder


Captain John
R. Jones's
fruit trees
came through
the Freeze of
1895 just fine.


THE BIG FREEZE


We interrupt the saga of Will Bean
and the Anna Maria Beach Resort of 80
years ago to bring you a weather report
dating back to the years the pioneer fami-
lies were just settling down on Anna Maria
Key. You think this winter weather is bad?
It's nothing compared to the Big Freeze of
1895 101 years ago.

There were no bad weather warn-
ings whatsoever in 1895, the days before
we had telephones or radios or scientific
weather forecasting instruments. Old-
timers who "felt it in their bones" when
"unsettled weather" was on the way,
were taken by surprise by the sudden
cold snap in '95.
December '94 had been chilly and a
near-freezing night occurred during
Christmas Week. The four families on
Anna Maria Key the Beans, the Cobbs,
the Joneses and the Casanases awoke to
find icy water in their cisterns and frost
glistening on the ground. They were lucky.
The temperature got down to a chilling 19
degrees in Tampa.
The weather warmed up nicely after
that. A January full of sunny days brought
campers and boaters to the Key from the
mainland to picnic and walk on the beach.
Citrus trees put out new growth and the
homesteaders began to think of starting
seeds for their garden patches.
Thursday, Feb. 7, was perfect for
swimming and sunning and tending to
the garden a balmy 77 degrees in the
morning.
But that evening the islanders were
shivering under their bed clothes. And in
the dark early morning hours of Feb. 8,
they were out in their newly planted citrus
groves with blankets and smudge pots, try-
ing desperately to save what they could.
The cold snap was again severe in Tampa


The freezing weather of 1895 was
rough on Florida's citrus industry but
gave Tampa Bay a boost.


where thermometer dropped some 50
degrees to the low 20s.
Worse was to come. Next day, the
temperature plummeted from a high of
36 degrees to a record low of 14 above
zero, the Tampa Tribune reported.
There were snowball fights in the city
that day, the paper said. Water pipes
burst and "icicles hung from almost
every roof."
A week of mild temperatures fol-
lowed. Then once again a two-day cold
wave hit Florida. Temperatures ranged
from 12 to 16 degrees in the northern part
of the state, so low that trees split open.
Florida's citrus crop was devastated.
The freeze drove many grove own-
ers out of the state. Others went south and
the pickers went along with them. But
along Tampa Bay, where the freeze
wasn't so severe, most of the groves re-
covered within a year. The killer freeze
actually did a good turn for this area.
"Hardly a day passes that Tampa is
not visited by some country merchant
who since the freeze finds his business
unprofitable," the Tampa Tribune re-
ported on Aug. 8, 1895. "Since the great
disaster of last winter, there has been a
steady and unbroken movement of popu-
lation to Tampa from the entire state."
To Captain John R. Jones, an
amateur horticulturist, the experience
of 1894-95 was proof positive that
citrus and vegetables would flourish
on Anna Maria Key. He was confi-
dent its economic future would be as
sunny as its weather.
He was right. For a long time agri-
cultural and fishing provided a living
for the communities on Anna Maria
Island. Now when cold weather de-
scends upon us we worry about the ef-
fect on our tourist industry.
Sure, the weather we've had lately
is snappier than we'd like. But when
we step out our doors that white stuff
we see isn't snow but sand. Our pipes
don't freeze. We pull on walking shoes
instead of galoshes. There's no danger
of slipping on ice. And unless we've
left our headlights on after a rain our
cars will start without the northern win-
ter ritual of "warming up the motor."

Next: More about
Will Bean's resort


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 E PAGE 7 l[
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Ill PAGE 8 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



CORTEZ: STATE OF CHANGE








Aerial view of
the village of '. .
Cortez, with the -
Cortez Bridge ,
at the bottom.
Islander Photo:
Paul Roat, with
special thanks
to Jim Kissick.


Business in Cortez is a changing'


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Cortez business is regaining vigor after languish-
ing for months and nearly dying from malnutrition
when the bridge closed for repairs and auto traffic dis-
appeared.
Biggest switch in the historic fishing village is the
uprooting of the Miss Cortez Deep Sea Fishing Fleet
from its headquarters of more than two decades, and re-
settlement across Cortez Road.
Jamie Berry, who with her father Capt. Jim owns
the boating operation, said two factors dictated their
move an increase in rent and the uncertainty caused
by the pending sale of the Cortez Trailer Park, their
landlord.
When the park went on the market last fall and they
were advised their rent was going up, they started think-
ing about moving. Ultimately they developed the new lo-
cation, which they had been negotiating to buy from the
Cipriani family. They hadn't intended to put it to that use
when they started negotiations, Capt Jim said.
The move puts them on the north side of the main-
land end of the Cortez Bridge, between the Seafood
Shack restaurant and the bridge. Miss Cortez had spent
25 years at the south side of the bridge approach.
The operation runs a somewhat complex schedule
of deep-sea fishing "head boats" seven days a week and
sightseeing cruises three afternoons a week and by
charter. The main boats are two 65-footers, though the
Berrys also handle an offshore deep-sea charter boat
with room for six people and a smaller vessel for back-
water and bay fishing. The larger boats also are avail-
able for private charters.
Annie's Also involved in the Miss Cortez new
property is Annie's Bait and Tackle Shop, a landmark
in the old village. Included in the property the Berrys
bought was the site of the bait shop, and they promptly
turned it over to Bruce and Kim Shearer.
"We cleaned it up and put in more seating and low-
ered the tackle prices," said Ms. Shearer. They plan to
offer wine and draft beer in the future, in addition to the
bottled beer now available. Live and frozen bait, tackle,
snacks and other fisher items will continue.
Shearer owns Coastal Hauling, transporting recy-
clable waste, and Ms. Shearer was office manager of
Diesel Marine in Bradenton. They are longtime Cortez
residents.
Seahorse Another local establishment changing
hands is the Seahorse Raw Bar and Grill, just east of
the bridge on Cortez Road. Franky and Machell Koons


are the new owners.
The Seahorse formerly was Imperial Pizza and
then Dockside Lucy. Ms. Koons said that during the
cleanup phase they hauled out 5,800 pounds of trash.
The restaurant sticks mainly with seafood, oysters
"shucked before your very eyes" a mainstay, with some
beef dishes plus beer and wine. Entertainment is con-
fined to weekends.
Outgrown Canvas A 800-square-foot addition
boasting 14-foot ceilings is completed and newly oc-
cupied at Gulf Coast Canvas, said owners Andy and
Joyce Poelsma.
How it came about is a retailer's fond fantasy -
a sideline outgrew its parent business. The Poelsmas
have run Gulf Coast Canvas, manufacturing boat tops
and covers, for 10 years at 123rd Street and Cortez
Road. Bit by bit they added some boat hardware to their
stock, then antiques, instruments, ship wheels and other
nautical gifts and gear, calling that side of the business
Nautical But Nice.


Ultimately it started crowding the main business so
the owners built the sideline its own quarters.
Not just like that, though. "The county was really
nice and helpful," said Ms. Poelsma. "But the federal
approval took forever, and it was quite limiting too."
Permission was needed from the Federal Emergency
Management Administration, the dreaded "FEMA,"
because Cortez is a flood area.
Not only do stringent construction criteria have to
be met, but the costs of building an addition may not
exceed 50 percent of the value of the original structure.
"We couldn't add on all we wanted," Ms. Poelsma
said, "and we have to wait two more years to build
anything more here."
Another feature of Gulf Coast and Nautical is
"Chain Saw Charlie," Charles Keller, wayfaring carver
who wields a chain saw to convert coconut palm trunks
into Tiki heads, masks and other tropical mementos. He
is hard at work in front of the store and will remain
there through next weekend's Seafood Festival.


Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival Saturday and Sunday
Cortez Tiki artists Tom Sellers, left, and Charles Keller -joined by 01' Salty "the Seafarer," Merlin and more
- will display their Facemakers artwork as one of many attractions Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 17 and 18, at
the 14th annual Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival on the shores of Sarasota Bay in Cortez Village. Islander
Photo: Cynthia Finn.








Cortez

Commercial

Fishing Festival

coming up this

weekend
The Cortez Chapter of the Organized Fisher-
men of Florida will host its 14th Annual Cortez
Commercial Fishing Festival on Saturday, Feb. 17,
and Sunday, Feb. 18.
The festival will be held along the southern
shoreline where Cortez village meets Sarasota
Bay. The area encompasses a three-block region
from 123rd St. W. to 124th St. W. at the intersec-
tion of46th Ave. W.
The theme for this year's festival is "Casting
Into the Future."
Saturday's hours are from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday's entertainment will feature the
Cortez Grand Ole Opry, the Jack Tambourine
Band and the Anna Maria String Band. Sunday
will bring the Slick Nickel Band and the Cortez
Grand Ole Opry. Nautical arts & crafts will be on
display throughout the village along with numer-
ous environmental and marine exhibits. There will
be boat rides on the Cortez Fleet and a large vari-
ety of delicious Florida seafood will be available.
Admittance is $2 for adults, and children un-
der 12 are free. Parking is available in the village
of Cortez or at Coquina Beach gulfside. There will
not be a shuttle boat this year. Instead, Manatee
County Area Transit buses will offer a shuttle ser-
vice from Coquina Beach to the festival for $1
each way.
For more information, contact John Stevely at
722-4524 or Karen Bell at 794-1249.


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
A tentative agreement on the sale of the Cortez
Trailer Park has stirred a sort of tentative optimism that
the trailer residents will wind up owning their neigh-
borhood.
The newly organized homeowners association has
made its third offer for the mobile home complex at
Cortez Road and 125th Street, and it apparently is
pleasing to owner Harry (Butch) Howey Jr.
If. And there are several ifs hanging fire,but all
sides are semi-confident they can be resolved.
The homeowners association was organized to es-
tablish the entity which Florida law requires for self-
ownership of a mobile home facility, as intensely regu-
lated an industry as there is in the state, attorneys agree.
The homeowners association made two earlier pro-
posals that didn't interest Howey, then offered
$2,075,000 which he has found more agreeable, ac-
cording to both Howey and Dick Berry, association
president.
But the association has some matters to iron out
before going ahead:
To satisfy financiers, more than half of the 79
owner-residents must agree to buy a share in the as-
sociation. They will be in effect stockholders in the
entity that will own the park, assuming all goes ac-
cording to plan. Prices vary according to value of the
lot they occupy, but $21,800 is close to the going
rate, said Capt. Jim Berry, member of the board of
directors and no relation to president Dick. The as-
sociation will own the lots, the residents will own the
mobile homes. Bankers met with the association last
Friday to outline financial requirements and to lend
a hand in any transaction, Dick Berry said.
The "marina property," the waterfront just


south of the mainland end of the Cortez Bridge, must
be leased for a given amount for five years to "a
qualified party." It includes two piers with several
docks, a bait shop building on the water and another
building that has been used for storage and boat
maintenance. Capt. Jim has just moved his Miss
Cortez fleet from the site to land he bought north of
Cortez Road. Peter Brady currently rents that part of
the park.
In addition to the 79 owner-residences, the park
has a house, three cottages and seven to 10 RV sites
that it rents out. President Berry said the income and
handling of these units will have to be considered in the
value of the park.
"It looks quite positive, all sides seem fairly
happy," said the association president. "It seems each
of us will have a role in the future of our park."
Owner Howey, noting that by state law the associa-
tion has 45 days to sell its shares and arrange financ-
ing and that "a lot of aspects will have to be settled,"
said he has strong hopes "it will work out for everyone
concerned."
Capt. Jim Berry, who has lived in the park for
many years, finds a chuckle in the coincidence of his
long life here:
"I first saw this place in 1954, when I waited in
line for six or seven miles to get to the old wooden
bridge to the Island. When I finally got to the head
of the line, I took one look at that rickety old bridge
and decided I didn't need to go to Anna Maria, and
I turned around and left. Exactly where I turned
around is where I settled down and set up business
when I came back in 1970.
"The trailer park had been here more than 30 years
at that time, and it's still as good a place to be as it was
then."


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 PAGE 9 i]

CORTEZ: STATE OF CHANGE


Cortez Trailer Park sale

to residents pending


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[II PAGE 10 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


S CORTEZ: STATE OF CHANGE


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The Cortez Community Center hopes to acquire the home of the late Robert Sailors. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Center sought for Cortez kids


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
After months of assuming its heart's desire was
gone for good, hope thrives afresh that the Cortez Com-
munity Center may get its own permanent home.
Led by Mary Fulford Green, a delegation of orga-
nization leaders has formally asked the Manatee County
Commission to help the Center buy the historic ex-
schoolhouse in Cortez.
The building was feared out of reach since last au-
tumn when its owner, artist Robert Sailors, died and left
it to his alma mater, Cranbrook Arts and Crafts College
in Michigan. He wanted the school to establish a branch
here or at least benefit from its sale. The school has opted
not to branch out, at least in this direction.
Ms. Green has had an eye on the property as an ideal
Community Center since she helped get the Center or-
ganized last June through the Cortez Village Historical
Society. She kept her eye on it even though it seemed for
months to be out of reach.
"We haven't asked the price, but it has been ap-
praised at over $300,000," she said. The Center organi-
zation is busy raising funds, including a booth at the fire
hall during the Seafood Festival to be manned or
youngstered by Center children.
What the Center would get for the money is 4 1/2
acres of land with a large building in good repair at 4415
119th St. W. Its original element was built in 1912 with
walls 18 inches thick, expanded with an auditorium in
1935, abandoned as a school in the 1960s, and sold at
auction for $80,000 in 1974. During the hurricane that
devastated Cortez in 1921 the schoolhouse became a
shelter for most of the village, its strong construction
more than a match for wind and water.
Ms. Green envisions its use as an after-school study
center and lending library, perhaps a visitors' center


from which instructional walks can begin through the his-
torical village. There is room for football, soccer and other
sports, she pointed out, "and I'd like to have a garden with
a plaque or fountain as a memorial to the 80 war veterans
of Cortez."
But the organization needs help for such a project, and
Ms. Green asked the county for it at the commission meet-
ing last week.
The county already is lending a hand through the
Children's Service Tax, $36,000 of which it designated as
the Center's share starting last October. That let the Cen-
ter pay two part-time staffers, Hazel Doyle and Ryan
Green.
Doyle is on the staff of Palma Sola Elementary
School in west Bradenton, working mainly with handi-
capped children. She heard of the opening here through
her goddaughter, Katie Goldsmith, who lives in Cortez.
"I went around the streets, talked with kids, and got
them in here with a full schedule that's much more inter-
esting than hanging out in the streets," she said. "There
were a few with trouble at first, now they're turned around.
Their grades are going up and their deportment is better.
"They need lots of love and approval. I called every
parent and found many were two-job families, so that
between parents working and children doing homework,
there was little family time. Now they do homework here
and there is much more quality time with their families."
Up to 25 youngsters use the Center daily. They have
been busy the past few weeks making craft items for sale
through the Seafood Festival booth. They get a percent-
age of the sale price, Doyle said. "It's good for kids to
learn what it's like to earn money instead of having it just
given to them."
The Center is housed temporarily in Ms. Green's
parents' home, which is just fine, Doyle said, but it's re-
ally a better home than a Center.


"Get your homework done, get your points to-
ward a pizza party and you're ready for school the
next day so you can relax and have fun."
It works wonders, says Ryan Green. He is athletic
director and general incentive creator at the Cortez
Community Center. At least until next August, when
he hopes to enter the Manatee County Police Acad-
emy.
His incentive program goes like this:
You come to the Center because it's more inter-
esting than hanging out after school. You do your
homework first, with loving boosts from Green and
the Center's director, Hazel Doyle. Finish it, go on to
sports or crafts or another activity strictly for fun at
the Center.
But on the way out of the homework room, pick
up your points. You get four for doing the homework.
Get an A on a school paper, 10 points. Also 10 for
each A on a report card, and some get 70 points for
straight A's. For basketball or volleyball or other ac-
tivities at the Center, two points a day.
When they pile up you spend them on a ham-
burger, or the Center throws a pizza party.


It's simple and easy and "it really works," says
Ryan, who devised the incentive program with Doyle,
patterning it partly after a program at Palma Sola El-
ementary School, where Doyle works.
They're especially proud of the child with a behav-
ior problem who, after many weeks at the Center, got
her first 100 percent for behavior in school. Ten solid
points in the Center's program.
Green does all the sports coaching from basketball,
where he's "searching for a little Michael Jordan," to
volleyball to football drills. There isn't room for soc-
cer or tag football, he says, "and these kids just lust for
football."
Green was born in Cortez, left with his mother
Carol when he was eight, and spent much of his life at
Tallahassee where Mom is a county commissioner.
Now 21, he came back here the first of the year to at-
tend Manatee Community College, living with grand-
parents Clyde and Mary Fulford Green.
He is apprehensive that he may have to drop the work
here when he starts the academy in August But until then
he's at full throttle, anticipating a summer program when
kids will be at the Center most of every day.


... and Center kids get points)






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 PAGE 11 [li


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The Star Fish House will stay in business.
That's the promise of Allen Garner, who has
fought off foreclosure threats and has "some things in
the works" for a longer-range solution to the financial
problem.
The supply problem is something else again, he
said.
NationsBank had a five-year note for $95,714.37
with a balloon payment that came due last week, and
decided not to renew the loan, Garner said. With the
business losing money, he couldn't make the payment,
he said.
The bank served notice it was going to foreclose on
the Star Fish Co. property on the Cortez waterfront. But
the bank "decided it didn't really want a large property
in a business that has such supply and marketing prob-
lems."
Now the bank is working with Garner to seek a
workable solution, he said.
As he explained it, he bought the company from his
mother after his father's death, and she agreed to fi-
nance the deal. Later he bought some equipment from
neighbor A.P. Bell Fish Co. and Bell took a second
mortgage. Then the bank came into it and now holds
the first mortgage, with Bell still there with a second
and his mother with a third mortgage, which he said is
most of the debt.
Star is a retail operation that has been hard hit by
two Cortez factors (1) construction work to widen
Cortez Road, a long project that strangled traffic for
months, followed by repairs to the Cortez bridge that
shut traffic off for months until recently, and (2) the ban
on net fishing in traditional near-shore waters.


"People just got out of the habit of driving here
for their seafood" when the road and bridge work
made travel so difficult, Garner said. "Access is up
now, but the net ban has cut off much of the supply.
"Where we used to depend on net fishermen, now
we rely on cast nets and the like. Where we might buy
200 pounds from a netter, now we get more like two
pounds from cast netters. It affects prices."
Added to those woes are increasingly complex
and stringent regulations, high insurance rates and
foreign competition, making a fish house a very hard
business.
Bell, he noted, is working in some specialty ar-
eas, for instance offshore grouper. But even there, he
said, overhead is growing. Bait is scarce, mainly be-
cause mullet is a premium fish now where it used to
be the mainstay bait for more desirable fish. Alterna-
tive baits are being used, even cat food.
Another fish house, Sigma, is pretty well closed
for operations, he said. He recalled that owner Tony
Huang originally came here as a buyer of scrap metal
and mullet roe for his family's businesses in Taiwan,
and the roe business blossomed for him.
Huang bought the Gulf to Bay Fish Co., changed
the name to Sigma and was going great guns until he
tried to put in a big freezer. He was unable to get
permits for it, so he bought a plant in St. Petersburg
and moved much of his business there. With the net
ban virtually shutting down commercial fishing, the
Cortez Sigma plant "sits idle now."
Garner works full time during the day for the
state Cooperative Extension Service at Palmetto, runs
Star on his time off and weekends and also operates
a landscape consulting business. He says he only
vaguely remembers a 40-hour work week.


I : aBITE I


Jean Helen Dries
Jean Helen Dries of Anna Maria died Feb. 6. at
Transitional Hospital in Tampa.
Mrs. Dries came to the area in 1948 from Michi-
gan. She was a retired sales person for Hendricks Real
Estate in Holmes Beach. She belonged to St. Bernard
Catholic Church in Holmes Beach where she was a
member of the Ladies Guild.
She is survived by a daughter, Judy Pilny of Pal-
metto and Jeffersonville, N.Y.; and a son, David Dries
of Anna Maria.
A memorial service was held at St. Bernard Catho-
lic Church. Memorial donations may be made to St.


Bernard Catholic Youth Organization, 248 S. Harbor
Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217.

Rogelio Gonzalez
Rogelio Gonzalez, 92, of Holmes Beach, died
Feb. 1, in Holmes Beach.
Born in Nava, Spain, Mr. Gonzalez came to
Manatee County from Tampa 12 years ago. He was
a carpenter.
He is survived by his wife, Dorinda Villadonga;
a son, Roy of Apollo Beach; a sister, Corona
Pandiella of Tampa; three grandchildren; and a great-
grandchild.


Hardy family
adds one
Chandler Hardy, age 2,
left, and his brother,
Hunter, age 4, make
things cozy for their new
baby brother, Denver
Riley Hardy, born to Dan
and Kay Kay Hardy of
Anna Maria City. Denver
entered the world on Jan.
11 at a healthy 8 lbsJll
ozs. with a stretch of 20
inches. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of the proud
parents.


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And still find all their gestures could be a total loss.
'Cause all those fine gifts may miss their marks by a mile,
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jB PAGE 12 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Islanders promote retired greyhound adoption


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"They're just big pussycats," says Michael Advo-
cate. "Gentle giants."
He rests a hand on Victor's slender tan back.
"They're very tame and hardly growl."
Victor lays a paw on Advocate's knee and looks up
into his owner's eyes, best friend to man. He rests his
head on Advocate's lap.
Victor is one of the lucky ones. Advocate says he's
the lucky one. To watch them together is to experience
"the affinity" Advocate says he felt when he found
Victor in Massachusetts nearly three years ago.
They've been together ever since.
Victor was one of 300 retired racing greyhounds
"just left behind" in New Hampshire when the race-
track owners headed to Florida for the winter.
Advocate's Holmes Beach residence is Victor's
personal sanctuary. Victor will be 6 years old in June.
Most of Victor's retired race-track peers will never see
6. A lot of them never turn 2.
Advocate's smile disappears. Nationwide, he ex-
plains, 50,000 to 75,000 greyhounds a year are "put
down" by the race-track industry "when they've fin-
ished their usefulness."
"Usefulness" means winning, he says. "They're
given six chances to win a race. If they can't place first,
second or third, they're history."
He talks about swamp drownings and lethal injec-
tions, incinerators and mass-burial graves, never taking
his hand from Victor's head.
"The majority are not mistreated during training,"
he says "depending on your definition of mistreat-
ment because they want them to win. But they live
in little cages with muzzles on. The real shame is, the
mistreatment comes when they can't or no longer win."
Greyhounds are runners and racers by instinct,
Advocate explains. They are the only dog mentioned
by breed in the Bible, their history dating back to 4,000
B.C. when they were bred in Turkey and Egypt.
Later, he says, in Europe, it was a felony to mistreat
a greyhound. "They were trained to outrun their prey
and bring it back."
And today, all across our country, they are trained to
outrun each other for our betting pleasure and to deepen
their owners' pockets. And when they can't "history."
In 1988 Cynthia Branigan of New Hope, Pa., said
"enough" to those thousands and thousands of grey-
hounds whose fate each year is euthanasia, abandon-
ment or being sold to research laboratories.
Brannigan formed a not-for-profit organization
called Make Peace With Animals Inc. to create an al-
ternative to that plight and put even a small dent in
those murder tallies.
Sarasota resident Allison Curtis joined Branigan to
start the Florida branch of Make Peace With Animals
in 1992. The group is responsible for saving about 130
retired racers each year through an adoption and fos-
ter-care program, the Racing Dog Rescue Project.

Rotary sponsors Island rescue
Recently thanks to Advocate, another Holmes


JoAnne and John Driscoll say adopting Penny Lane was "destiny."


Beach resident named Wendy Billings, and the Anna
Maria Island Rotary Club the Make Peace With
Animals adoption program has reached the Island.
Rotary member Advocate and the Island club put
a tent up at last December's Art League festival in
Holmes Beach with adoption literature and some Island
greyhounds on hand to display their gentle nature. The
tent will be back at the League's spring festival March
9 and 10.
From the December promotion, three greyhounds
were adopted, with five more applications pending.
Winter residents JoAnne and John Driscoll of
Holmes Beach are the new parents of Penny Lane -
renamed from her racer's name, Lane an almost 5-
year-old who "was very loving right from the begin-
ning," according to Mrs. Driscoll.
Mrs. Driscoll says finding Penny Lane through
their visit to the arts festival was "destiny."
The Driscolls had recently lost two dogs, a 16-
year-old Irish setter and a 13-year-old golden lab. They
felt they would want another dog, but hadn't taken ac-
tion. A granddaughter in upstate New York had
adopted a retired greyhound, so the Rotary display
caught their attention.
"I knew this was it," says Mrs. Driscoll.
After completing Make Peace's thorough adoption
process, the Driscolls met their Penny Lane.
"She is just the most loving, most gentle dog," says
Mrs. Driscoll. "She came right to us and gave us the
greyhound hug, between your legs. When I'm out
walking with her, everyone loves her. She's so
friendly."
Billings has owned her 6-year-old Butch for more
than a year. Right now she's also providing temporary
foster care for Chester, "so named because he limps


Michael Advocate says Victor is definitely top dog. Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.
Michael Advocate says Victor is definitely top dog. Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.


Other ways to help
If you are unable to adopt a retired racing
greyhound, Make Peace With Animals Inc. can
also use help in other areas.
Tax deductible donations can be mailed to
P.O. Box 18153, Sarasota, FL 34276.
Volunteers are needed to answer the 379-
FAST phone line; calls can be forwarded to your
home. Volunteers are also needed to pick-up and
deliver dogs to vets and kennels, to help organize
Make Peace activities and visits to merchant lo-
cations, special events and nursing homes, to do
other follow-up phoning and to help with special
mailings.
Foster parents people who will take a
needy greyhound into a home to love and care for
until a permanent home is found are always
needed. For more foster information, call Connie
Murk at 955-7239.


like the TV character," she says with a smile.
Billings and Advocate have been active volunteers
with the local chapter of Make Peace With Animals for
several years.
Advocate describes the chapter's annual fall picnic
in Sarasota where owners and about 150 retired "gentle
giants" gather for fellowship.
"There's not one bark, not one growl. Just the occa-
sional yelp from being stepped on by a child. These dogs
all get along so well with each other and with the people.
"They're just ideal pets. They sleep 15 to 18 hours
a day, they don't require a lot of space, they don't have
to be run a lot and they don't require any special food.
They've done their running they just want to love
and be loved."
Greyhounds placed through the rescue project are
usually between 2 and 5 years old. These adults stand
between 26 and 29 inches at the shoulder and weigh
between 50 and 80 pounds, with males being a little
larger.
Billings says the adoption program is thorough not
only in researching potential "parents," but in follow-
ing through with 365-day-a-year support for owners.
And if the adoption doesn't work out, Make Peace
takes the dog back and finds another home.
Advocate adds that the goal is to find mutually
happy and safe environments for these "precious pets."
The program discourages adoption into homes with
children younger than age 7.
"We're just trying to get the word out," says Ad-
vocate, sharing one of those greyhound hugs with Vic-
tor.
"These greyhounds make the best pets in the world.
Just ask any greyhound owner. They'll all tell you the
same thing."
For more information on the greyhound adoption
program, to make a donation or to volunteer, call Make
Peace With Animals in Sarasota, 941-379-FAST
(3278).






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 PAGE 13 ii


Chamber music recital
Sunday at Gloria Dei
Seven artists from the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Orchestra will present a fundraiser recital titled
"Music Around the World" at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb.
18, at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Yelena Gershfeld will serve as master
of ceremonies. All proceeds will benefit the Commu-
nity Orchestra & Chorus.
Featured artists will include Alfred Gershfeld, vio-
lin, and Lyudmila Afanasieva, piano. They will be
joined by violinists Bud Bernard and Carleton Brower,
Paul Diesing on viola, cellist Eleanor Diesing and Lita
Tyler, flute.
Tickets will be $15 per person at the door. The
audience is invited to attend a post-recital reception
with refreshments at the Gloria Dei fellowship hall. For
more information, call 778-6517.

Chamber board meets
Feb. 21
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will hold its monthly board of directors meeting at 5:15
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21, at the Chamber office, 501
Manatee Ave., Holmes Beach. The meeting is open to
members and the public.
For more information, call the Chamber at 778-
1541.

Melody-Booth dance
Feb. 23
The seven-piece Melody-Booth Orchestra fea-
turing Lisa Rojas, Art Siefert and the Melotones will
play Big Band and contemporary favorites at an open
dance from 8 to 11 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23, at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria.
Tickets for the B.Y.O.B. affair, at $10 per person,
are now available at the Center or at Home True Value
Hardware, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach, and
will be available at the door. For more information, call
the Center at 778-1908.


EMPLOYEE
LEASING


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PROSTAFF
HUMAN RESOURCES. INC.
Preparation and
Administration
of Payroll
including related
tax issues
Workers'
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Administration
Management
Employee
Benefit
Programs
Locally owned
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6220 Manatee Ave.
West, Suite 203
Bradenton
FL DBPR License #EL85

BISLANDBER
a sAs a


Islanders help Islanders with taxes
Grace Cooper and Edward Brown of Holmes Beach are part of the local Volunteer Income Tax Assis-
tance team that offers free help on basic tax returns from noon to 3 p.m. Wednesday and from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria, and from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday
at Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Volunteers from the American Association
of Retired Persons also offer free help at the library from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday and from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Thursday at Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach. AARP membership
is not required. Both organizations will be available through the week ending Friday, April 12. Islander
Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Roser resumes Seaside
Worship Services
Roser Memorial Community Church will resume
Seaside Worship Services beginning Saturday evening,
Feb. 17, at 6 p.m.
The seaside services will continue each Saturday
until further notice.
Pastor Wayne Kirk leads the service held at the
beach at the west end of Magnolia Avenue in Anna
Maria City.


ISLANDERw

The best news!


Tax Planning seminar at
Island community seminar
Christine Holmes of American Express Financial
Advisors will offer a free seminar, "Tax Planning: Keep-
ing More of What You Earn," at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 1 p.m.
Discussion includes development involving tax
laws, how to determine your tax liability, tax-saving
strategies that correspond with individual financial
goals and how to resolve common tax dilemmas.
The free seminar is open to the public. Holmes will
offer a one-hour free consultation to seminar partici-
pants interested in learning more about tax planning.
Reservations are not required, but you may call 755-
7000 to reserve materials for your use.


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- -


I






I_ PAGE 14 A FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


John Holmes to speak on
'Growing up on Anna Maria'
John Holmes Jr., born in the City of Anna Maria
in 1925, will speak on "Growing Up On Anna Maria
Island" at the Monday, Feb. 19, meeting of the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society.
The pubic is invited to attend the meeting to be
held at Anna Maria City Hall at 7:30 p.m.
The city of Holmes Beach is named after John's
father, Jack Holmes.
"He wasn't the founder of Holmes Beach," says
Holmes. "It was named after him because he owned
more mortgaged land than anyone. He was one of the
first 'snowbirds' on Anna Maria Island." The town of
Holmes Beach was incorporated in 1950 when approxi-
mately 30 people lived there.
Holmes was born in a house across from the
present Islanders Market (formerly IGA). He .and his
brother, Hugh Holmes Sr., live in Holmes Beach.

Island Branch Library
sponsors Florida
discussion series
Island Branch Library will sponsor a reading and
discussion series entitled "Making Florida Home" on
Thursday, March 7 through April 11, from 4 to 5 p.m.
at the library.
The program is limited to 20 participants who must
pre-register by phone or in person at the Island Branch,
5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. Registrants must
commit to attend the full six-week series.
The free program is funded by the Florida Humani-
ties Council in Tampa and provides all materials and
discussion leader. The title selected for the program is
"Florida Stories" by Dr. Kevin McCarthy. The book
will be distributed at the time of registration and does
not have to be read prior to the first meeting.
Leading the group will be Jane Anderson Jones,
professor of English and Humanities at the Venice
Campus of Manatee Community College.
To register or for more information, call the library
at 778-6341.

Publisher to speak to
Holmes Beach Civic
Association
Dot Ridings, publisher and president of the
Bradenton Herald, will speak to the Holmes Beach
Civic Association, at its meeting Saturday, Feb. 17, at
the Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach.
Ridings' topic of discussion will be "What You
Can Give Back to Your Community."
All members and their guests are invited to attend.


Elephant sale a huge success
Buyers and browsers "were lined up for the opening and we're very pleased with the proceeds for the Episco-
pal Church Women," said co-chairwomen Betty Lindsay and Barbara Hoffman of the Church of the
Annunciation's annual white elephant sale Feb. 10. Among the many that helped put on the sale were, from
left, Lindsay, Jackie Kane, Hoffman and Dorothy O'Hara. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Roser Men's Club to meet
The Roser Church Men's Club will meet on Tues-
day, Feb. 20, at noon in Fellowship Hall of the church.
John Hamner will speak. Hamner is a native of
Alabama and former editor of the Bradenton Herald
and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune's Manatee AM. He
now writes a once-a-week column for Manatee AM.
All members and friends are invited to attend.

Island Garden Club to meet
The Island Garden Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Feb. 15, in Lowe Hall at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation in Holmes Beach
Peggy Dessaint, Manatee County horticulturist,
will speak.
The public is invited to attend.

Bingo at Silver Center
Bingo will be played at the Annie Silver Commu-
nity Center, 23rd St. N. and Avenue C in Bradenton
Beach, on Thursday, Feb. 15, beginning at 7 p.m.
Cards cost 50 cents each.
Refreshments available for purchase include cake,
soda and coffee.


Attend Historical Society's
'Remember When?' dinner
March 16 at Beach House
Tickets are on sale now for the Anna Maria Island
Historical Society's "Remember When?" dinner to be
held on Saturday, March 16, at the Beach House Res-
taurant, 200 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach.
The evening will be reminiscent of the nostalgic
Old Timers Reunions and will be a time of sharing of
experiences by residents who have lived on the Island
for more than 40 years.
A cash bar will begin at 5 p.m. followed by a din-
ner with a choice of five different entrees at 6 p.m., and
there will be door prizes.
Reservations are required and seating is limited.
Tickets cost $20 per person and may be purchased at
the Anna Maria Island Historical Society Museum,
402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria; the Island Florist, Island
Foods, Island Market, Sandbar Restaurant and the
Beach House Restaurant.
For additional information or to make reservations,
call the Anna Maria Island Historical Society at 778-
0492.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 E PAGE 15 U]]

Third annual Island Tour of Homes set for March 16


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The interiors of six exquisite Island homes will be
open for public viewing Saturday, March 16, for the
Anna Maria Island Community Center's third annual
Tour of Homes benefit.
The Islander Bystander and First National Bank of
Manatee in Holmes Beach are co-sponsoring the tour
which has raised $25,000 for the Community Center
over the last two years, attracting thousands of profes-
sionals and house-beautiful gazers from throughout the
Tampa Bay area.
Three residences in Holmes Beach, including one
in the Key Royale subdivision with panoramic views
of Tampa Bay and Anna Maria Sound, and three homes
in Anna Maria, including a recently renovated
Gulffront residence on North Shore Drive, will wel-
come guests from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tour-takers are invited to view the homes in the
order they prefer. Refreshments will be offered at the
midway point at "Bentley's Court" in Anna Maria, the
home of long time Community Center and Tour-of-
Homes supporters Dale and Marcia Powers. Treasures
by Island artists will be displayed for sale at The
Islander's Market on Gulf Drive in Anna Maria.
For the second year, Sue O'Connor of Anna Maria
and Herta Bowes of Holmes Beach will serve as tour-
committee co-chairwomen.
O'Connor is a current member of the Center's
board of directors, following in the footsteps of hus-
band George who served as board chairman for several
years. Bowes' husband Gerry is the current board
chairman. Both couples have contributed countless
hours to the Center's administration and to its many
annual fundraisers.


Inspired by the success of other house tours in the
Sarasota-Manatee area, Center "angel" supporters Zita
and Jim Gavin of Anna Maria donated the seed money
for the first Tour of Homes in 1994.
With assistance from Anne and Al Abgott of
Holmes Beach, the Gavins began a tradition that has
turned into a successful, well-attended fundraiser that
is looked forward to by interior designers, architects,
tourists and Islanders alike.
All proceeds from ticket sales $10 per person in
advance or $12 on the day of the tour benefit the
Community Center's more than 40 year-round pro-
grams and services for all ages.
For more information or to sign on as a Tour-of-
Homes volunteer in a variety of pre-event or tour-day
capacities, call the Center at 778-1908.

Homes 'to die for'
The first residence on the tour belongs to Caryl and
Alan Bouziane, 5911 Flotilla Drive, Holmes Beach. Situ-
ated on the end of a deepwater canal, this 1982 home was
completely "engulfed" by a 1994 rebuilding by the owner/
engineer in a Northeast Coast architectural design. Rough
cedar siding, divided-light windows and extensive interior
custom millwork are the background to a spectacular view
of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Home number two, "Samsarra," meaning reborn,
belongs to Zoe and Jerry Von Averkamp, 607
Crestwood Drive (Key Royale), Holmes Beach.
Sweeping waterfront views on three sides frame artist
Zoe's 1994 redesigning of this early 1960s ranch which
is now open and well-lit and home to a unique collec-
tion of pre-Columbian pottery, oriental antiques and
other pieces from around the world.
Janet H. and Robert K. Fittro, 210 76th Street,


Holmes Beach, have transformed a 1950s concrete and
block bungalow into a stunning example of Classic
Revival, an ageless blend of three period styles Co-
lonial, Queen Anne and Victorian (1750-1930) -
which reflect charm, warmth and human scale. The
interior and exterior, complete with white picket fence,
are reminiscent of a quaint British cottage.
Moving north into Anna Maria, the home of
Bonnie and Harold Carnahan, 301 North Shore Drive,
is nestled one block from the Gulf. Designed and built
by their son, Tim, with lots of family assistance, the
residence is complete with many items Tim retrieved
from other homes in Ohio. The French doors were dis-
plays and the kitchen window is half of a sliding door
turned sideways. This family affair comes complete
with Harold's decades-old sailboat-craft display and
his handcrafted dollhouse.
Noted Island architect Gene Aubry designed the
home of friends Verna and William Snow, 702 Fern
Street, Anna Maria, as a cross between a Florida
Cracker beachhouse and a Texas ranch home with big
porches. An eclectic decor includes charming antiques,
paintings, pottery and folk art. On the best of days, with
sun and fresh air streaming in through all the open
doors and sliders, this home has the feel of a treehouse.
The final home on the tour is a 1993 total interior
and exterior renovation of a 1979 Gulffront residence
now owned by Mrs. Julie Caron, 805 North Shore
Drive, Anna Maria. Transformed from eight small
rooms to the current four, the house takes full advan-
tage of spectacular views of dunes, beach and sparkling
Gulf. Hardwood floors plus green marble in the bath-
rooms, a custom-built kitchen and a living/dining area
centered around the fireplace create elegance detailed
with memorabilia from family and many travels.


Iron Mountain-Kingsford
luncheon at Crabby Bill's
There will be an Iron Mountain-Kingsford area
luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at noon at Crabby
Bill's Seafood Restaurant, 5325 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach.
Entree choices are seafood, beef or chicken.
Reservations must be made by Tuesday, Feb. 20,
by calling Georgina Johnson at 778-3832.


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Batteries Sold and Replaced


Medicare workshop at
Island Branch Library
The Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach will
be the site of a Medicare workshop on Tuesday, Feb.
20, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The topic of discussion will be Medicare changes
for 1996, covered Medicare entitlements, and informa-
tion about what is not covered by Medicare.
The public is invited to attend.


AAUW to hold book sale
The Bradenton Branch of the American Association
of University Women will hold its annual book sale at De
Sota Square Mall in Bradenton from 9 am. to 9 p.m. on
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Feb. 15, 16 and 17.
Both hard back and paperback books will be available
in a wide range of categories from mysteries and religion
to fitness and cookbooks. Many are priced at 50 cents.
Proceeds from the sale go to the AAUW Education
Foundation which awards scholarships to women.


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IjQ PAGE 16 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Line-dance
workshop 'fun
day' Sunday
Popular instructor
Bunny Burton, top right,
and a gang of her
regular dancers invite
all levels of line-dance
enthusiasts to attend a
workshop "fun day"
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 18, at the -
Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. The cost will be
$5 per person with all
proceeds to benefit the
Center. Dancers should
bring their own lunch.
Beverages will be
available. For more
information, call the
Center at 778-1908.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.










New Options Center offers
free workshops
The New Options Center at Manatee Vo-Tec, 5603
34th St. W., Bradenton, will offer a variety of informa-
tional workshops for single parents and divorced, sepa-
rated or widowed homemaker at no charge through
February.
February's slate of workshops include Stress Man-
agement; Coping With Crisis; Feeling Defeated and
Demoralized: Worry Fear; Determining Priorities


JOSEPH V. BURKE, CPA, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
214 54TH ST., HOLMES BEACH
778-1550

Tax & Tax Planning
Small Business Accounting
Monthly & Annual Financial Stmts.
On Anna Maria Island since 1984


pRrser fnlemorial Imnmm itmtg (Ipurr4
Pastor Wayne An Interdenominational Christian Church
D. Kirk Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
1st Worship 8:45
2nd Worship 10:45
Sunday School 9:45
Sat Seaside Worship 6:00pm
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414


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FAMILY DENTISTRY
Now Accepting
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Suite 205
Holmes Beach
778-2204
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
8:00 to 5:00


- Setting Goals; and Rebuilding Self-Esteem.
For dates and details, contact the center at 751-
7922.
Horseshoe winners
Winners in the Feb. 10 horseshoe games were
Dave Trask of Bradenton Beach and Bob Troery of
Bradenton. Runners-up were Herb Puryear and Walt
Swift, both from Anna Maria.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday
at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive.


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Shuffleboard winners
The winners in the Anna Maria Shuffleboard
Club's games held on Tuesday, Feb. 6, were Roland
Nelson and Carol Mosher.

Islanders elected to serve
on AIDS council
George Sinclair of Bradenton Beach and Carol
Whitmore of Holmes Beach were recently elected to
the AIDS Council Manatee Board.
Sinclair will serve as vice president and Whitmore
as chairman of the board.
Also serving are Ellie Perkins, president; Gary
Hickerson, treasurer, and Daniel Lunger, secretary. The
members of the new board will serve from 1996 to
1998.
For information about the AIDS Council of Mana-
tee call 753-2705.

Poetry Night at Artists
Guild Gallery
Coffee and poetry among the art will be offered at the
Artists Guild Galley, 5414 Marina Dr., Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach, on Thursday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m.
Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and resident poets. An open mike
will be available for aspiring artists who should regis-
ter before 7 p.m. at the poetry night or by calling Zoe
Von Averkamp at 778-7216.

Longboat art center offers
lecture and exhibit
The Longboat Key Art Center will host an open-
ing/award reception for the fifth annual "Town of
Longboat Exhibit" on Friday, Feb. 16, from 5 to 7 p.m.
The reception is open to the public. The exhibit
will run thorough March 17.
On Thursday, Feb. 22, at 7:30 p.m. Jean Renoux,
an internationally known lecturer, European tour direc-
tor and interior designer, will give a walking tour with
a slide demonstration and lecture entitled "The Louvre
Museum."
Reservations are required. The fee is $3.
Herbie Rose will present a demonstration in "Wa-
tercolor" on Saturday, Feb. 17, at 2 p.m. The fee is $3.
To make reservations or for more information, call
the center at 383-2345 or stop by at 6860 Longboat Dr.
S., Longboat.


Worship Service
9&11am
Church School
9 am Ages 3-16
Adult Study Group
10 am
Minister
Charles Jim Marsh
6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-6491


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visiting
paradise?

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 U PAGE 17 E[]
--I mllpm -*W 77--


Four new firefighters join district
Pictured from left are Tim Hyden, Donna Braun, Brent Kruse and Ken Treffinger, new firefighters with the
Anna Maria Fire District Control Commission. They began work Jan. 1. Hyden has been a district volunteer
for three years and Braun for five years. Braun's husband, Brian, is also a firefighter with the district. Kruse
was with the Westside Fire Districtfor three years, and Treffinger was with the county's EMSfor nearly five


years. Islander Photos: Pat Copeland.


Longboat Chapel hosts
concert
The Longboat Island Chapel will present the sec-
ond in its Music Artist Series with a program of cham-
ber music by maestro Paul Wolfe with Yoko Keta,
percussion, and Jonathan Spivey, piano, on Sunday,
Feb. 18, at 4 p.m.
The program is free and open to the public. A free-
will offering will be taken.
The chapel is located at 6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr.,
Longboat Key.
For additional information, call 383-6491.

Choral Festival at
Methodist Church
The American Guild of Organists will present sev-
eral area churches in a choral gathering of 250 plus
voices in concert under the direction of conductor,
composer and arranger Alice Parker on Monday, Feb.
19, at 8 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 104
Pineapple Ave. S., Sarasota.
The concert is free and open to the public.
Call First United Methodist Church in Bradenton
at 747-4406 for more information.

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Free 'Inside Jazz' program
Big band veterans Don and Terri Lamond will be fea-
tured in a free "Inside Jazz" program on Saturday, Feb. 17,
from 10 am. to noon at the Burns Court Cinema in
Sarasota, sponsored by the Jazz Club of Sarasota.
Call the Jazz Club for more information at 366-
1552.

Sarasota Music Archive to
present string quartet
On Sunday, Feb. 18, at 3 p.m. the Sarasota Music
Archive will present the Montillado String Quartet of
the Harid Conservatory. The concert will be held at the
Sarasota Music Archive, 265 Orange Ave., Sarasota.
The program will include quartets by Haydn and
Ravel, and Schubert's "Death and the Maiden."
Admission is free for archive members and a $5
donation is requested from non-members.

Van Wezel bursts into song
The Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota













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Willey honored for
35 years of service
From left, Anna Maria Fire Chief Andy Price
presents Jeff Willey with a chiefs watch adorned
with five gold bugles, the chiefs insignia, at a
luncheon recently honoring Willey for his 35 years of
service. Through the years, Willey has been chief of
the Anna Maria volunteers, a district volunteer and a
fire commission member. Islander Photo: Dennis
Dotson.


will host a week of musical highlights beginning with
a performance with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra on
Friday, Feb. 16, at 2 p.m.
That same evening the Van Wezel will host a con-
cert by young violinist Joshua Bell on Friday, Feb. 16,
at 8 p.m., followed by the Grammy and Emmy Award-
winning "first couple of American popular music"
Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, who will perform
at 8 p.m. on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, Feb. 18,
19 and 20.
On Thursday, Feb. 22, at 8 p.m. the Iceland Sym-
phony Orchestra will perform during its first U. S. tour.
Call the Van Wezel box office at 953-3368 for
ticket information.


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I







[] PAGE 18 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Italian fiasco
The dining room was attractive and tastefully re-
done since the former tenant, Dumplings, left the
downtown Sarasota location. The service was defi-
nitely not pretty. Some of the food was very good.
Some was definitely not good.
This unfortunate dining experience was our fault,
of course. We asked for it. We excursioned to Sarasota
to try a new restaurant and it was obvious we should
have given them more time to work out the kinks.
But we went on a good recommendation, in good
faith, to Mediterraneo.
Our table of seven included the executive sous chef
of Cafe L'Europe, my son, two professional waiters,
one from L'Europe and one from Beach Bistro and
three other tasteful friends. No dining neophytes among
us.
We first sensed trouble outside the door, where
patrons blocked the entryway while carrying on their
conversation, oblivious to our maneuvers to pass.
We waited at the bar for our table to be ready and
the crackling warm fire of the open brick oven was
enticing. It didn't take more than a few moments for us
to realize we were the lone WASPs among the
Mediterraneo clientele.
The ceiling was painted to resemble blue sky and
clouds but it yielded only the thunder of a crowded
dining room. With an obvious lack of acoustics, we
vied to be heard over the clatter of silverware and table-
hopping conversations.
Then came dinner. Two women in our group or-
dered a pizza to share and it came early. And it was
the wrong pizza. And after it disappeared and the bread
arrived, we asked for a wine list.
Dinner came quickly after that and we strained to
find the maitre d' to order wine. The waiter brought the
bottle of wine (still no pizza) and plunked it on the table
- unopened.

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We intruded on a busy busboy for wine glasses
while we searched somewhat in vain for someone to
open the wine. This was becoming a struggle.
Meanwhile, dinner was happening. My pasta with
"fresh" spinach and meat sauce was so pedestrian
(tough noodles with sauce like Ragu and hamburger).
I sent it back. Likewise for an extra side order of the
night's pasta special, intended to be shared among us.
As we attempted to explain our dilemma, our
waiter made a great effort of appearing exasperated and
running his hand through his hair adding to our
waning appetite but apparently demonstrating his need
for brain stimulation.
"This pasta's hard," said our resident chef to
which the waiter replied, "It's al dente."
"Not," was the retort. We insisted we knew the
difference between hard, dry noodles and al dente. A
replacement never arrived but a late guest to our table
had arrived shortly before the pasta. While we
struggled to find someone to open wine and plates for
the shared pizza, he hadn't been offered a menu.
He ordered another pizza to share. The crust on the
pizza was tasty on the ends but under the cheese and
sauce it was soggy. Very soggy.
The latecomer also ordered a pasta with cream
sauce and wild mushrooms which we all found tasty in
the first round. The latecomer's pasta was in a deep
puddle of water. Not tasty.

0 o0 ISIANI)

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Seafood Market
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Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-7pm
Catering Available
5604 Marina Drive/Holmes Beach


In fairness, the breaded veal chop with fresh basil
and tomato was delicious. It was butterflied, crispy and
it filled a platter-sized plate.
All in all, to say we were eager to exit would be an
understatement. No dessert was offered and we were all
the more pleased for that.
The check for seven people was $149 and we of-
fered exact change and no gratuity to our waiter. A first
among us. We tipped our "other" waiter on the way out
the door, a former Cafe L'Europe waiter who had
"helped us out."
Alas, we swore never to return.

Now comes deja vu
Some while back, I stumbled into another two-
week-new Italian restaurant with the same sort of re-
sult.
Our first hint of disaster was the waitress, who
slowly and methodically wiped table crumbs over to
one side and brushed them onto the floor while we
stood by waiting for our seats.
On this occasion, we started with a request for a
wine list and the reply was, "I'm too young to serve
wine."
"Fine," we said, "but perhaps if you give us a wine
list someone else could serve it."
"OK," she said, trundling off we presumed -
for a list. She returned with a three-item list scribbled
on her order pad and apologized for her pronunciation
of Chablis. The other two items she pointed at for us
to read ourselves zin and cab.
It went downhill from there to a point where we
were forced to ask a couple more questions this time
about menu items. Cheese or meat ravioli? What's in
the stuffed shells?
Every question sent our too young, too nervous,
eager waitress running off to seek answers until finally,
she said, "Really, I don't know much about this food.
I only know McDonalds."
Now really, I ask, would you have stayed?
We were gluttons for punishment. And we were
hungry and the bread was a come on. It was delicious.
Our dinners arrived. Mushy baked ziti. Overbaked
PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE
I


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 PAGE 19 ID


STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 18


eggplant parmesan, cold-centered ravioli and some-
thing else of questionable name and origin.
We all tasted our dinners. We all tasted each oth-
ers dinners. We collectively agreed none of it could
be consumed.
We spoke to the owner, who was courteous and
understanding, paid for the wine and left. And we left
a generous tip for the confused young waitress who had
obviously had no training.
But before we left, a couple and a six- to seven-
year-old boy seated behind us prepared to leave. On the
way out'we overheard the boy's comment: "We should
have eaten at McDonalds."
What a mouthful. The irony of his comment was
just the interjection of humor we needed to get past the
experience at hand.
And it's not necessarily that I agree with his choice
of McDonalds, but with the concept of something tried
and true. A known commodity.
The old familiar, favorite places offer refuge from
the restaurant wars, almost-guaranteed satisfaction and
warm, friendly gratification. But how do we get to that
point beyond newness and into the comfort of famil-
iarity?
Normally I try out a new spot by trying lunch and
appetizers first. If the grouper sandwich or the cheese-
burger is good that's a good sign to me.
From now on, I'll stick to my old plan. I'll get to
know a server who knows the menu well and work my
way up the dining evolutionary scale. But never in the
first two weeks.
Here's to getting to know you new restaurants
and those obviously yet to come.
I have a hard time understanding why everyone
who comes to Florida either wants to own a restaurant
or publish a newspaper. Life is hard enough as it is.

Much ado
This election season in the City of Anna Maria has
stirred up a frenzy of old-time campaigning. Signs on
cars and campers appeared all over town promoting
one candidate or another.
.--...--There were glitter signs, ribbons and streamers,


balloons and flags and candidates and supporters deco-
rated everything possible even bicycles.
And why not? Elections on Anna Maria Island had
gotten boring until a few years ago. It wasn't uncom-
mon for a city election to go by without seeing so much
as a sign or and advertisement. Spending reports were
non-existent because candidates didn't spend anything.
Along with the good comes anonymous calls re-
porting alleged wrongdoing and even one caller who
said, "There's a campaign car parked at the post office
all day and even the post office personnel are grous-
ing."
Now, at least in the City of Anna Maria, election
time is a "happening." There are coffees and barbecues
and any number of excuses for a get-together. Support-
ers are lining the main streets, waving banners at
passers by.
I noticed while driving up to Anna Maria the past
few days that it is actually sort of nice to have a greeter


at the city limits. Perhaps grant money can be found to
support a continuation of this policy some neighbor-
hood funding source surely exists in the federal govern-
ment.
It would be like a super friendly combination
neighborhood watch, Guardian Angel program.
I remember the greeters at the door of the church
when I was a kid. I sometimes wondered why the same
older couple was always at the door to say hello and
shake my hand until I missed them one week.
Then I knew they were there just to make me
feel welcome.
Imagine the friendly city or Island image we
could project with daily greeters at the bridges or the
city limits.
Let's hope the candidates and their supporters have
half as much fun in Holmes Beach leading up to their
election on March 12 as they appeared to have in Anna
Maria.


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f~ PAGE 20 N FEBRUARY 15, 1996 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

From paint-by-numbers to 'Son of Raw Fish,'

Don Maloney's done it all


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Whether he's offering insight at a council meeting
or recalling his days as a businessman in Japan, the
Irish twinkle never leaves the eyes of Holmes Beach
Councilman Don Maloney.
That twinkle was especially bright recently when the
American translations of two of his books were added to
the Island Branch Library's collection. The books, "Ja-
pan, It's Not All Raw Fish" and "Son of Raw Fish," are
collections of columns Maloney wrote on the humorous
challenges experienced by Americans living in Japan.
The columns, written during Maloney's six years
as a marketing executive for the Harris Corporation,
were a weekly feature in Tokyo's Japan Times news-
paper. Titled, "Never the Twain," they made him the
"only white face in Japan that everyone knew," he said.
Fifty years ago Maloney began his career in journal-
ism as founder and editor of the Pointer View, the weekly
newspaper of the United States Military Academy at West
Point. He also edited several other magazines.
"When I found out the girl selling advertising made
a hell of lot more than I did, I decided to switch to sales


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and marketing," he recalled.
One of his initial successes in the marketing field
involved the first paint-by-numbers kits.
"A sign painter, who was also an artist, got a brain-
storm on how to paint his signs more quickly by using
a numbering system," Maloney explained. "His wife
asked him to number one of his paintings in the same
way so she could paint it."
The painter brought his idea to Maloney who was
employed with a company that sold office equipment and
stationery. Maloney tried out a painting, gave some to his
friends, who were equally enthusiastic, and agreed to
market the product. The rest, as we know, is history.
In the 1950s, Maloney joined the Harris Corpora-
tion, a communications equipment giant, and became
responsible for the company's business interests out-
side the United States.
"I kept telling them we needed to get involved with
Japan," he said. "No one wanted to go, so after getting
tired of listening to me, they sent me!"
His mission was to negotiate and manage licensing
agreements for Harris with companies like Mitsubishi
Heavy Industries. In 1970 Maloney moved his family


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to Japan and became chief operating officer for a mar-
keting venture between Harris and the Marubeni Cor-
poration in Tokyo.
"When I got to Japan, I couldn't understand the
television or the newspapers," he said. "It was a whole
new and very different life. No one in the corporation
had ever been there before."
The family was shocked by how expensive it was
to live in Japan where "the kids' tuition was more ex-
pensive than Notre Dame," Maloney noted.
"Shortly after the United Nations declared Tokyo
the world's most expensive city, the Japanese govern-
ment did a study that was published in an English lan-
guage daily," he recalled. "It showed that there were 28
cities in the world more expensive than Tokyo. Of
course, they forgot to include such amenities as food,
clothing, housing and medical care."
This was just the opening Maloney needed to unleash
his Irish humor on the unsuspecting Japanese. He wrote
a letter to the editor of Tokyo's "Japan Times," thanking
the government for its insight on the cost of living.
PLEASE SEE MALONEY, NEXT PAGE




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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I FEBRUARY 15, 1996 U PAGE 21 IJ


Holmes Beach Councilman Don Maloney shows three
of his books about the humorous challenges of living in
Japan. Two of the books, "Japan, It's Not All Raw
Fish" and "Son of Raw Fish, are available at the
Island Branch Library. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.
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MALONEY, FROM PAGE 20
"A week later, the letter was on the front page of
the newspaper," he said. "No one had ever said any-
thing quite like that before. The government sent a rep-
resentative to find out what I thought was wrong with
the survey. A newspaper representative called and said
they had a flood of requests for the issue featuring the
letter and asked me to write a weekly column."
The column became one of the most popular in Japan,
because it was the first time anyone attempted to explain
the frustrations that foreigners face living in Japan and
trying to understand its vastly different culture. With his
tongue-in-cheek humor, Maloney used the column to pro-
mote understanding between the two cultures.
In addition to the collections of columns, Maloney
has authored five books including a primer on under-
standing American idioms for Tokyo University busi-
ness students and numerous business articles for the
Wall Street Journal.
Maloney shared a couple anecdotes from his books.
"In Japan, a telephone is a property," he began.
"The cost of a telephone in 1969 was $1,500, but the
buyer got a certificate with coupons and would even-
tually get his money back.
"We rented a house and the landlord brought his
phone for us to use. The only problem was that every-
one who called spoke Japanese and thought they were

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calling the landlord. We couldn't answer them.
"I went to the phone company to request an un-
listed number. A few days later, I called my wife and
learned the number had been changed, as I requested.
I called the phone company to get the number but they
refused to give it to me because it was unlisted!"
Another anecdote involves the Japanese aversion
to saying the word "no." The Japanese would rather
risk death than utter the word, Maloney noted, which
gave him fits until he learned to accept it.
He told of going to a stationery store to buy some pads
of blue lined paper. After 45 minutes of conversation with
the clerk in which she grilled Maloney about the number
of pads, the size of the pads, the color of the paper, the
number of lines in the paper, and so on, it dawned on him
that the store did not carry the pads.
The clerk was not about to tell him she didn't have
the pads, because that would be negative. Instead she
had to make him say it, then she could affirm the fact.
But let me note that these versions of Maloney's
anecdotes pale in comparison to the real thing filled
with his wit and humorous insight. My advice is to go
to the library, check out the books and settle into an
afternoon of chuckles and guffaws.
And don't miss Maloney's presentation at the Friends
of the Island Library's Focus on Florida Series at 3 p.m.
on March 12 in the Walker Swift Meeting Room.

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fl PAGE 22 o FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

There's fish in them there canals


By Andrew White
Special to the Islander
The cold weather that has befallen Anna Maria Is-
land has been hard on both tourists and locals. It has
been especially hard on fishing 40-degree tempera-
tures and high winds aren't exactly what anyone
around here would call good angling conditions.
Cold weather does do one positive thing for fish-
ing. The lower temperatures force large schools of
snook, redfish, spotted trout, sheepshead, jack crevalle
and a host of other sport fish into Anna Maria Island's
vast maze of canals to seek warmer water.
These fish can be spotted along seawalls in the
early morning hours attacking schools of small mullet
and other bait with great ferocity.


The optimum way of catching these warm-water-
seeking fish is in a small skiff like a Jon boat. If you're
lacking a boat, you can gain access to many of the ca-
nals or small bridges.
Look for deep holes or channels that run through the
canals. A tell-tale sign of this form of bottom is any large
boats moored at the docks; the bigger boats draw a lot of
water and need a few extra feet to maneuver in. The boats
also provide the structure that fish congregate around.
Live shrimp are the bait of choice for those anglers
in the know, but many large fish have also been taken
on top-water lures. These work best at night or on calm
days. Good examples are Heddon Zara Spook,
Mirrolure 52m and Bagely's floating finger mullet.
Soft baits work well, too, with Love's Lures and DOA


shrimp being the most productive.
Tackle for canal fishing needs to be on the heavy
side. Since there are obstructions like docks and pilings
for the fish to use to break the line, monofilament in the
12- 15-pound test range is best Tie on an additional 18
inches of 20-pound mono leader to further reduce
break-offs. And be sure to test the drag on the reel
you're using you might need it when that big red-
fish takes the bait.
The fish move in and out of the canals with the
tides. I've had my best fishing on the top of the low
tide, but experiment with the spots you're trying out.
Remember to consult with any tackle shop for fish-
ing regulations on size and bag limits.
Good luck!


Dance ends with a kiss
The Kiwanis Club ofAnna Maria Island's Feb. 8
"Sweetheart Dance" was a sellout, earning a sweet
$2,500 donation to the Center. Center executive director
Pierrette Kelly thanks Kiwanian and keyboardist Bob
Lopiccolo.Islander Photo: Tony Werth

HOMEMADE AOpen
SOUPS ^ Daily
11:30 AM
DESSERTS 0 to 10 PM

Fine German and Polish Cuisine
RESTAURANT
EVERY TUESDAY IS SCHNITZEL DAY!
Complete Meal! $9.90
Anna Maria Island Centre (next to Walgreens)
Holmes Beach 778-1320


COME &
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ROD REEL WITH YOUR
,~ 'iER VALENTINE AT ...
Established 1947 THE TOP OF THE PIER
While enjoying our panoramic views,
let us create a memory foryou!
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Roasted Duckling
Deboned and served with a cognac orange sauce ... $12.95
Chicken Wellington
Chicken breast stuffed with fresh spinach & fresh mozzarella cheese,
wrapped in a puff pastry served with a peanut sauce....... $9.95
Salmon Provencal
Sauteed salmon filet finished with fresh tomatoes, garlic, capers,
basil & a splash of white wine ................................. .... $8.95
Surf & Turf something out of the ordinary.
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All entrees include choice of two
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Complimentary
champagne with an
above entree
purchase
778-1885
1/2 Mile North of City Pier
875 North Shore Dr.
Anna Maria Island


.r
Taking a break while setting up for the dance were Kiwanians, from left, Bob Barrett, Bob King, Bob
Lopiccolo, Norm Thompson, Barbara Amador, Jack Salty, Bob Schuetz and dance chairman Russ Olson.


OPEN DART AND POOL GAMES
ANYONE CAN PLAY
Darts on Mondays 8-?
Pool on Thursdays 8-?
ComeTest Your Skill!
10002 Gulf Dr. Anna Maria 778-9884


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CASUAL BAYFRONT DINING
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LUNCH ON THEPATIO
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Steel Pan Dan
Sunday 2-6 pm
Happy
Valentine's Day
SLunch Dinner Spirits
1 35 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
778-4849


I






























Praiseworthy performance
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending Feb. 12. '
children's names are listed left to right. Kneeling are Jessica Cramer, Cory Schafer, and Kyle Dale. Se
row are Mark Whitley, Katie Dittmeier, Sara Troutt, John Paul Goldschmitt, Serena Spring, and Chris
Sicard. Back row are Kimberli Nance, Robbie Ball, Raven Greco, Cindy Connelly and Lisa Aldrich.


Gardeners on air
The students in Anne Russell's
fifth-grade class prepare an "on
the air" segment of their new
program "How Does Your
Garden Grow." Principal Jim
Kronus, center, waits for his cue
to cut the ribbon opening the
vegetable garden. The students
earned a grant from the Florida
Farmers Bureau to study veg-
etables and will share what they
learn with fellow county students
through television.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N FEBRUARY 15, 1996 N PAGE 23 Irm


Anna Maria

Elementary

School Menu
I I Monday, 2/19/96
No School President's Day
Tuesday, 2/20/96
Breakfast: Cheese Toast, Juice
Lunch: Ham Patty on Bun or Cheese Crois-
S sant, Potato Rounds, Juice, Pudding
Wednesday, 2/21/96
Breakfast: Mini-Waffles w/Syrup, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Sausage Links and Macaroni &
SCheese or Chicken Wings, Green Beans, Hot
,y Roll, Fruit Crisp
Thursday, 2/22/96
Breakfast: Warm Pretzel, Fruit Cup
Lunch: Barbecued Chicken w/Noodles or
McRib Sandwich, Mixed Vegetables, Hot
Roll, Citrus Cup
-- Friday, 2/23/96
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
The Whole Kernel Corn, Salad, Peach Cup
'cond All meals served with milk.
tina
oooooooeooooooo oe o


Joy Courtney


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TUESDAY & THURSDAY
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT C /if
Dungeness Snow Crabs J
Blue Crabs ,
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Come By Boat, Marker 62
5325 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach 778-95,


CORTEZ FLEET
has moved across the street
Come Visit Our New Location
DEEP SEA FISHING
4, 6, & 9 HOUR TRIPS
BEACHCOMER & SHELLING
CRUISES TO HISTORIC
^ EGMONT KEY
NARRATED RIVER CRUISES
THROUGH MARCH

PARASAILING
New Location Between Cortez Rd. &
Seafood Shack on 127th St. West
794-1223


- --


p~T~ ------ -1 I I







E3 PAGE 24 A FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Wit and wisdom by native
Floridian Gib Bergquist

Just ducky!
"It would be duck soup for you to write a column
about your favorite feathered friends," suggests the
Cracker's wife. "You could call it 'Quacker's
Crumbs.'"
"Great!" sez the Cracker who is always solicitous
to her every whim, wish, desire, demand or command.
As an inveterate bird watcher, he does greatly ad-
mire ducks and never ceases to be amazed at how
graceful they are in flight and on the water, and how
awkward they appear on land as they waddle about His
favorite is the gorgeous mandarin duck from Asia with
the crested, showy plumaged native wood duck run-


Crumbs


ning a close second.
The ugly duckling did not turn into a swan but into
a Muscovy duck which has proliferated to the point of
being pesky in the catch basins and ponds of Bradenton
neighborhoods.
Recently a local high school teacher was driving
through such a neighborhood while chatting with her
husband on her car phone. Suddenly and without prior
quacking, this Muscovy flew right into her car through
an open window.
"Honey you won't believe what just happened. A
duck just flew in my window. What do I do?" was her
frantic inquiry.
He told her to pull over and open the doors to let
the bird out as the duck soloed about her head looking
for its own way out, leaving a wake of flying feathers
and blood drops from a slight wound.
She did pull over and pleadingly asked two young
lawn workers to help her discharge her unwelcome
passenger. They did so while shaking their heads in
disbelief.
There was this recent story off the AP wire about
"The Duck Man" in Mount Dora, Fla. who has been
befriending ducks for years by feeding them and nurs-


Hutchison returns for AID award
Rev. Frank W. Hutchison, former 17-yearpastor of Roser Memorial Community
Church in Anna Maria, returned to Roser Feb. 4 to be named All Island Denomi-
nations' (AID) 1995 choice for the annual Bonnell Humanitarian Award. He is
pictured with AID president Virginia Heatley. Enjoying the post-ceremony


reception at Fellowship Hall pictured above, from left, Ward and Bernice Cole
and'Jeanette Cashman. Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.


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ing the sick and injured ones back to health.
As the story goes, he offered one of his terminal
patients to a hungry, homeless couple for a duck din-
ner. This act of charity "cooked his goose" as it appears
he had run "a-fowl" of the bird sanctuary laws. He was
ordered to "cease all activities involving ducks."
The Cracker also looks on ducks as a great food
source. Take for instance roasted Long Island duckling,
barbecues mallard a la Pettigrew, and canard a
l'orange, any of which will set off a gastronomic
frenzy.
There is also Peking pressed duck with feet and
head still attached which looks like it has been run over
by a steamroller more than once. The Cracker admits
he hasn't tried that dish.
Popeye's hamburger-chomping sidekick, Wimpy,
is famous for his two-liner, "You are invited to my
house for a duck dinner. YOU bring the duck."
Also back in the Depression '30s there was a
vaudevillian and wannabe actor by the name of Joe
Penner who won temporary fame by walking around
with a duck tucked under his arm while asking in his
whacky voice, "Wanna buy a duck?"
Not in Mount Dora, you don't.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 a PAGE 25 JI


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Feb. 1, theft, 100 block of North Shore. The com-
plainant reported the suspect took her lawn mower to
have it fixed and later said she gave it to him. The sus-
pect said he no longer has the lawn mower.
Feb. 3, larceny of a bicycle, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Feb. 4, theft, 600 block of Jacaranda. The com-
plainant reported a person unknown removed an item
from his dock.
Feb. 5, vandalism, 200 block of Gladiolus. The
complainant reported the. suspect threw an orange
through her window. The deputy located the suspect
who agreed to pay for the window.

Bradenton Beach
Feb. 2, burglary, possession of burglary tools,
2502 Gulf Drive N., Econo Lodge. The victim reported
suspects staying at the motel broke into the game room,
kicked open a coin box on the pool table and removed
the change and removed the change machine. The of-
ficer found the change machine on the beach.
The cleaning woman reported she found a crowbar
behind the dresser in one of the rooms. The officer ob-
tained descriptions of the suspects and vehicle and located
both at Coquina Beach. The suspects confessed, were
identified by the victim and placed in custody.
Feb. 7, criminal mischief, 2100 block of Avenue A.
The complainant reported a person unknown threw an
object through her passenger window, causing it to
break.

Holmes Beach
Feb. 2, noise, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn. An
anonymous complainant reported loud noise at the
business. The officer asked the doorman to have the
band turn the volume down.
Feb. 2, burglary, 600 block of Key Royale Drive.
The complainant reported the front window of the resi-
dence was broken and the front door was unlocked. The
officer investigated and found the residence was
stripped of most of its furnishings.


The fire district may have to build a new room
soon to house the trophies brought home by its
firematics team.
The Anna Maria Fire Control District's
Firematics Team has been awarded 18 trophies
since November. A November competition in Avon
Park resulted in five trophies, another in St. Lucie
County in January resulted in eight and the first
national competition in February resulted in five.
At the 1st National Firefighters Competition
in Casselberry, Fla., recently, the team competed


Feb. 2, suspicious, Marina Drive and 73rd Street.
The complainant reported several subjects in white
shirts and ties were fishing from the seawall and felt
they appeared out of place.
Feb. 3, alarm, 3232 East Bay Drive, Subway. The
officer responded to a report of a hold up alarm and the
clerk said he slipped, grabbed the counter and acciden-
tally set off the alarm.
Feb. 3, noise, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn. An
anonymous complainant reported loud noise at the
business. The officer asked the doorman to have the
band turn the volume down.
Feb. 4, Baker Act, 2800 block of Avenue E. The
complainant reported the subject said she was going to
kill herself and took some pills. The subject said she
took the pills because she had a headache and wanted
to sleep. The officer questioned the subject who said
she did not know what some of the pills were.
The subject refused treatment from EMS person-
nel but the officer noted she was becoming very relaxed
and dazed. He felt she was unable to make a rational
decision about herself, placed her in custody under the
Baker Act and transported her to the hospital. Accord-
ing to the report, she told the officer she cleans houses
and found the pills at different houses.
Feb. 4, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $200,


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ISLANDER 41


The "best" news IN..uES


with 20 teams to take second place in five events
and win $1,000 in prize money. They donated 10
percent of their winnings to the Shands Burn
Center and challenged other teams to do the
same.
In the January competition the team snagged
three first place, two second place and two third
place trophies in addition to the Sportsmanship
Award. The November competition resulted in
two first place, one second place, one third place
and second place overall.


2900 block of Avenue B.
Feb. 5, domestic, 200 block of 54th Street. The
complainant reported the subject pinned her to the bed,
yelled at her and poured ice water on her head while
calling her names. The officer issued a capias request
for the subject.
Feb. 5, petty larceny of two hubcaps valued at
$200.
Feb. 6, fraud, 100 block of Sunset Lane. The
complainant reported he paid the subject $1,100 to
paint his house, and the subject purchased a gallon of
paint and didn't return. The officer contacted the mo-
tel where the subject was staying and was told the sub-
ject left without paying his bill.
Feb. 7, domestic, 200 block of 71st Street. The
complainant reported the subject battered her. The of-
ficer issued a capias for the subject.
Feb. 8, noise, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn. An
anonymous complainant reported loud noise at the
business. The officer asked the doorman to have the
band turn the volume down
Feb. 8, noise, 3007 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn. Two
complainants reported loud noise at the business. The
officer reported he went into both residences and could
hear the music in one residence. He asked the doorman
to have the band turn the volume down.
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ia PAGE 26 N FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Snook fishery freeze deaths unfounded


By Jim Hanson
Outdoor Perspectives
Editor's Note: Bob Ardren is roaming the outdoors
somewhere. In his absence, Jim Hanson will take over
the Outdoor Perspectives column.
A quick plunge in temperatures can be hard on a
fishery, but for a really efficient fish killer there's noth-
ing like red tide.
That's the word from Dr. Randy Edwards, senior
scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory, who follows the
ups and downs of fish hereabouts.
He has good news and bad news: The freeze last
week didn't kill as many fish as was at first feared, but
the red tide is unseasonably here and unreasonably
persistent.
There is some fish kill in Sarasota Bay, all right,
but it's hard to know whether it's from the freeze or red
tide. Edwards says that right after the freeze some dead
snook showed up in Phillippi Creek in Sarasota and
some amberjack in the Manatee River.
But it was nothing like the chill at the first of the
year when he saw hundreds of large amberjack dead
in the river, he said. Certainly nothing at all com-
pared with the snook kill of the 1989-90 cold wave


that killed an estimated one-fourth of the snook fish-
ery. That devastation was all too evident to sport
fishermen the next year.
The 26 degrees a week ago Monday was plenty
low to be deadly, said Edwards, but the "sequence of
chill" apparently let fish adapt and survive. Fish can die
in 55-degree water in a freezing snap, but if the water
cools gradually fish can adapt to live in water as cold
as 50 degrees.
"The red tide is more important than the cold as a
threat to fish this year," he said.
"Large numbers of fish are gone in the bay and
in the Gulf of Mexico because of the red tide. We
measure bay water regularly and there have been and
still are significant counts of the bloom. It's more
difficult to keep track of in the Gulf, there's just too
much Gulf to monitor precisely."
Red tide is an algae bloom that is always present
in local waters but doesn't affect fish or humans unless
it reaches high concentrations. Then it can kill fish and
the gas it emits into the air irritates people's eyes and
nasal passages.
The comparatively low fish mortality was a special
relief because the freeze coincided with an unusually


low tide, and normally the combination would be le-
thal. Not this time.
The cold came at full moon and with a strong
northeast wind to create the lowest tides of the year.

Coast Guard hoaxes
Coast Guard officials had a busy week last week
responding to a slew of false calls from Sarasota.
Seems someone put in five calls from a VHF-FM
radio reporting dead bodies, sinking boats and other
problems. All the calls proved to be false.
By setting up a tracking system at Station Cortez,
guardsmen were able to pinpoint the location and,
since all VHF-FM radios have their own "finger
print" signature, the caller's radio was proven to be
the reporting source.
Guess he just wanted to watch the helicopters and
boats run around searching for nothing.
Prosecution is expected.
Guardsmen have enough to do rescuing legiti-
mate boaters in distress on the water to have to put up
with this type of hoax.
See you next week.


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Feb. 1, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sailing vessel taking on
water north of the Ringling Bridge. A Coast Guard
boat responded and conducted a search with the
Sarasota fire department, police and a commercial sal-
vor. No vessel was found and the report was later de-
termined to have been a hoax.
Feb. 1, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of two bodies floating on the
north side of the Ringling Bridge. A Coast Guard boat
responded and conducted a search in conjunction with
Sarasota police. No bodies were found and the report
was later determined to have been a hoax.
Feb. 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of two bodies floating on the
north side of the Ringling Bridge. A Coast Guard boat
responded and conducted a search in conjunction with
Longboat Key police and the Florida Marine Patrol. No
bodies were found and the report was later determined
to have been a hoax.
Feb. 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled pleasure craft
in Palma Sola Bay. A Coast Guard boat responded

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* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


and located the vessel. A good Samaritan towed the
vessel to port.
Feb. 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sailing vessel taking on
water in Big Pass. A pleasure boater in the area re-
ported there were no vessels in the pass. The caller later
reported the vessel was located near Centennial Park.
A search near the park by Sarasota police provided no
sightings of a vessel. The call was later determined to
have been a hoax.
Feb. 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sailing vessel taking on
water between the Hyatt Hotel and the Sarasota Sail-
ing Squadron. A Coast Guard boat responded. As soon


as the caller said he could see the Coast Guard boat he
stopped broadcasting. No vessel was found and the call
was also determined to have been a hoax.
Feb. 5, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from a man who sounded
similar to the other false alarms received earlier.
Station Cortez, with the help of the FCC, was able
to track the call to the suspect in his home not far
from Centennial Park in Sarasota. Every VHF-FM
radio has its own unique "finger print," and the
suspect's radio matched the other false calls. The
Coast Guard is still investigating the case and it will
later be turned over to the U.S. Attorney's office for
prosecution.


OFF ISLA


The Fiesta Cat Fanciers affiliated with American
Cat Fanciers Association will host a cat show on Sat-
urday and Sunday, Feb. 17 and 18, at the Manatee
County Civic Center, 1 Haben Blvd., Palmetto, from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $3 adults/$2.50 seniors/$1.50
children under 12 years of age/free children under six


Transform your ordinary concrete with our
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es Walkways Pool Decks
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years of age. Information: Patty Cole 794-3808.
The American Littoral Society will sponsor a
Carefree Learner Sarasota Bay bio cruise on Tuesday,
Feb. 20, from noon to 2 p.m. to observe marine and
bird life. Cost: $10 members/$15 non-members. In-
formation/reservations: 922-0493.


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Gas, Diesel, Ice, Beer & Cold Drinks
12507 Cortez Rd. W. Cortez, FL 34215
941-795-7796


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M PAGE 27 Rj

Sheepies still in full swing for local anglers


Sheepshead fishing remains the best bet for any-
one going angling. Look for the tasty striped fish
around any pier, dock or bridge. There have also
been good catches reported near the Sunshine Sky-
way Bridge. Offshore, amberjack and grouper are
still a strong favorite.
Karen at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier anglers
are catching some keeper redfish as well as some
that are too big to keep. Other reports include sheep-
shead and a few snook. By the way, Kevin has laid
in a good supply of nice-sized shiners are bait, she
said.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said pier
fishers there are catching a lot of bonnet head shards,
sheepshead and snook using ballyhoo as bait.
Kim at Annie's Bait and Tackle said regulars
there are still catching a lot of sheepshead. Trout
fishing remains fair, but there are good reports of
redfish, blue fish and mangrove snapper.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the six-
hour trips averaged 100 head of vermilion snapper
and porgies. The nine-hour trips averaged 50 head of
mangrove snapper, black grouper and lane snapper.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said sheepies are
his best bet, with charter customer Ernie Cassic from
New York landing a nine-pounder.
Jim at the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier said
customers there are bringing in a lot of sheepshead
in the afternoons and some nice-sized snook at night.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper fish-
ing is good in about the 60-foot water depth. Closer
to shore, sheepshead are thick at the artificial reefs
about one to three miles out, as well as at the ledges
five miles from the beach.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are catching snook around the mangroves at
the seagrass flats, as well as trout and some sheeps-
head near the oyster bars in the bays.
Capt. Phil Shields said reports red and black
grouper, snapper and amberjack have been caught

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off his boat.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said gag grouper are being
caught in about 45 to 65 feet of water, some up to 28
inches long. There are some small tuna being
brought in a little farther from shore.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's finding sheepies,
reds and blue fish from the beaches as a best bet.
Capt. Mark Bradow reports lots and lots of
small trout, a few snook in the canals and lots of
sheepshead from around the docks off Longboat
Key.
Capt. Mike Heistand aboard Magic reports lots
of sheepshead, trout and a few redfish being caught
in the bays. Offshore, grouper fishing remains stable
with lots of amberjack coming in, some up to 50
pounds in size.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's been catching some
good-sized redfish and lots of sheepshead.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said sheepshead
fishing is in full swing with good reports of plenty
of fish being caught around the Skyway Bridge. Off-
shore, look for grouper.
Capt. Mike Greig said sheepies and reds with
a few snook mixed in are his best reports.
Good luck and good fishing.


Russ Frangella, a winter resident of Anna Maria
from Shorewood, Ill., proudly displays a seven-
pound, 17-inch long sheepshead he caught while
fishing off the Anna Maria Island Bridge.


Free Redbud trees from Arbor Day Foundation


Ten free American Redbud trees will be given
to each person who joins the National Arbor Day
foundation during the month of February.
The free trees are part of the nonprofit
foundation's Trees for America campaign.
Redbuds have clusters of rosy pink flowers in
spring and dark green summer leaves turning yellow
in the fall.
The trees will be shipped post paid at the right


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I[3 PAGE 28 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Clay starts Little
League
Island major-league coach
Lou Fiorentino shows how
it's done without actu-
ally doing it himself- to
get the Community Center
Little League field ready for
action. As February
practice moves toward the
March 4 season opener,
Coach Lou says Kiwanis
andAMFD "look like the
teams to beat." Islander
Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Division I (11-13 years old)
Team Record
Island Real Estate (champs) 7-1
Action Performance 5-3
Westbay Athletic Club 0-8

Division 11 (8-10 years old)
Team Record
First National Bank (Champs) 10-0
Beachhouse 8-2
Anna Maria Oyster Bar 5-5
Island Animal Clinic Bulls 3-7
Dips Ice Cream 3-7
Dowling Park 1-9


Division III (5-7 years
Team
Crowder Brothers Hardware (Champs)
Air & Energy
Island Animal Clinic Panthers
A-Paradise Realty
Cafe on the Beach


old)
Record
7-1
6-2
5-3
1-7
1-7


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Basketball MVP
Division I, Mike Patterson
Division II, Tyler Krauss and Josh Sato
Division III, Steven Winkelspecht

Basketball All-stars
Division III: Brian Debellevue, Steven Winkelspecht,
Matthew McDonough, Michael Wallen, Steven Faasse,
Stephan Faillange, Brent Willard, Michael Crammer, Sam
Lott, Michael Mijares, Greg Lowman, Joey Mattay, An-
drew Prudente and Sean Pittman.
Division II: Tyler Krauss, Josh Sato, Brian Faasse,
Aaron Lowman, Brandon Roberts, Caitlin Cosgrove,
Bobby Lee Gibbons, Ryan Mijares, Peter Dowling,
Ben Miller, Daniel VanAndle, Alex Miller, Bobby
Cooper, Chris Nelson, Chase Parker, Mario Torres,
Billy Malfese and Kim Dipaola.
Division I: Preston Copeland, Travis Rice, Colt
Fletcher, Paul Sutphin, Ricky Buckelew, Robbie Dou-
glas, Joey Mousseau, Mike Patterson, Mike
Armstrong, Taylor Bernard, Sky Beard, Alan Jenkins,
Jason Loomis, Mark Huber and Logan Bowes.


I II
Th3Pudnia Ford Raly
530- ul rieHlmsBechFL321 (4 ) 7 -0 6


PINE BAY FOREST...2BR/2BA with loft. Garden win-
dow in kitchen, $92,000.
WESTBAY COVE...bayfront complex, heated pool, ten-
nis, walk to beach. 1BR/1BA, $85,900. 2BR/2BA,,
$133,900.
SUNBOW BAY...2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, elevator and
walk to beach $95,900.
MARTINIQUE...Top floor 2BR/2BA with Gulf & Bay
views, $189,900. Also 3BR/3BA 3rd floor $196,900.
ISLAND MOTEL/APARTMENT...22 units, 110' gulffront.
#DY68061. $1,850,000.

T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427


DUPLEX
5613 Guava Street. Spacious 2BR/2BA each
side. One block to sparkling Gulf & beach. Great
investment for income property or owner/occu-
pier 1/2 and rent other. #MA67657. $169,000.

GREAT VIEW ... 2BR/2BA lakefront home with tile and
Berber carpet. Extra large storage shed/workshop area,
well and two pumps for yard. #68827. $84,900. Call Carol
S. Heinze, 792-5721.
PALMA SOLA ... immaculate contemporary 2BR/
2BA home. Vaulted ceilings, Berber carpet, tile
floors. Lushly landscaped and privacy fenced. Sprin-


Karin Stephan
REALTOR a
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office: ,"
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
Fax: 941- 778-3035 -
MILLION $ NEIGHBORHOOD...Open floor plan with
bayviews, pool with spa.. #KS66278. $895,000.
WEST WIN DS...2BR/2BA, gulfview complex with heated
pool. #KS67250. $179,900.
PERICO BAY...2BR/2BA unit overlooking Palma Sola
Bay. Many upgrades. #KS66624. $186,000.
KEY ROYALE...3BR/3BA with fireplace, fruit trees, pool
and boat dock/davits. #KS63811. $445,000.
SYCAMORE AVE...4BR/3BA elegant home. Close to the
Gulf. #KS67913. $279,000.
CONCORD LANE...totally renovated 3BR/2BA with
caged pool. Turnkey furnished. $269,000.
GULF BEACH PLACE ... fabulous views, 2BR/2BA,
turnkey furnished, steps to beach. $179,900.
LOT ... 50x100 Island Bayview lot available. Build your
own. $80,000.
ISLAND PARADISE ... luxury condos w/panoramic Gulf
views. $289,000. Maint. fees $274/mo.

JUST REDUCED
West of Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
2BR, 1BA, zoned duplex.
100x100 corner lot. Steps to the
beach. Room to add on or go up.
$F1eeeegr, reduced to $149,900.
Make an offer! #CH67226.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

kler system, fruit trees, large lanai and beautiful in
ground pool. #KS11761. $144,000. Call Karin
Stephan, eves. 388-1267.
VILLAGE GREEN ... 2BR/2BA home in popular subdivi-
sion. Eat-in kitchen, 2 car garage. Freshly painted.
#68711. $95,000. Call Carol S. Heinze, 778-7248


Community center season

basketball standings


ISLANDER


-TND


The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard
and Visa for mullet shirts, subscription
orders and classified advertising.
Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392


". "' -


* ii ij jjiPr l orlplotles pons. os.olM e. Mrlne'l aI roIr.ICjaIll usfo.- rci ureaInd.dIji ..-.isu.ItIuoI.Iii.-


I-


Realty raves
January's top producers for The Prudential Florida
Realty, Anna Maria Island Office, were Karen Stephan,
top lister, and T. Dolly Young, top seller.
Wedebrock Real Estate, Longboat Key, announces
that the team of Mary Wickersham and Cindy English
were the office's top sales agents and Mike Migone
was its top listing agent for the month of January.
Jean Lee Sears as top sales agent, and Thomas Nelson
as top listing agent, were the highest producers for Island
Real Estate in Holmes Beach for the month of January.
Neal & Neal Realtors has announced that Dick Maher
and Dave Jones were the Island office's top sellers for the
month of January and Nick Patsios was its top lister.

Prudential Realty creates
own web net
The Prudential Florida Realty has developed and
designed its own web site on the Internet.
The Internet site currently features an inventory of
the company's residential real estate listings, helpful
articles that focus on buying a new home and basic
information that would be of interest to any person re-
locating to Florida plus more.
The address for the new site is http://
www.pruflorida.com.

Island podiatrist attends
symposium
Dr. Clare Starrett, an Anna Maria Island podiatric
physician, recently attended the Florida Podiatric Medi-
cal Association's 12th Annual Florida Symposium on
Podiatric Science and Management in Orlando.
The symposium focused on foot trauma management
and postgraduate medical education courses on the latest
techniques and procedures for the treatment of foot disor-
ders.
Dr. Starrett's practice is located at 104 Crescent
Drive in Anna Maria City.





AM* N0* NR 4 -*












Thank you Anna Maria Island!
We've come a long way in 1995 with the
completion of our new office and increased sales
volume.
We plan to continue to grow in 1996 and need
one or two experienced sales people to help handle
our increased volume.
Please call 778-2246 or send resume in strict
confidence to David C. Eckel, Broker/Owner,
2217 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach FL 34217.

1 ~WAGNER REALTY snce 1939
No* on< nuo Ann HfMa M isCs b ta nMA wte d A





4. Ore th an a mullet PWrapper!
ZVBM.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M PAGE 29 I-~



nServing the I land


ei from the same


location since 1970.



0 *l1 ..MLS

6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066 1-800-865-0800


I ,


:J5<. ~ .f'-


Tom
Nelson
Realtor
778-1382
Marshall,
Michigan


Marilyn
Trevethan
Realtor
792-8477
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin


Jean Lee
Sears
Realtor
778-5045
Massachusetts
South Shore


Bob
Fittro
Realtor
778-0054
Wauchula,
Florida


4' %
.i4'-


Richard
Freeman
Realtor
Island Key
Specialist
Boulder,
Colorado

Martha
Williams
Realtor
747-0453
Lakeland,
Florida


Wendy
Foldes
Broker
Salesperson
952-1953
Binghamton,
Ney York


Christine
Shaw
Realtor
778-2847
Anna Maria,
Florida


: ^ *"W r J 1


DIRECT BAYFRONT home in Anna KEY ROYALE ON THE BAYOU DIRECT GULF FRONT condomini-
Maria, 2BR/2B plus den, great room fabulous southern water views, sea- ums in Shell Cove. Several to choose
with vaulted ceilings and more. wall, boat dock, large lot, 2 car ga- from, all with unobstructed views of
$375,000. rage. Original owner says time to the gulf and miles of wide walking
sell. $349,500. beach. From $104,900.
-I ..M,. .7 T71,


CHARMING BAYFRONT HOME
with panoramic water views, wrap
around deck, large custom kitchen
and more. $349,000.


SMUGGLERS LANDING Builders
last unit in upscale waterfront commu-
nity. Dock for 40' boat, choose carpet,
tile and fixtures. 3BR/3B. $315,000.


A I .i -Fi. i .. - ... .1- = I -- i
ISLAND DUPLEX 2/2 and 1/1 with ce- WATERS EDGE condominium in Gulf CANALFRONT HOME Spacious ANNA MARIA LOT Canalfront, 70 x MT. VERNON turnkey fumished 2BR/
ramic tile, carport, large comer lot. front complex, 2BR/2B, excellent 4or5BR/3Bwithindoorpoolandexpan- 130, fabulous location in residential 2B second floor condo with carport.
Close to beach and bayl Excellent rental history. $169,000. sive lanai overlooking private mangrove area with upscale homes. $139,500. Community offers pool, tennis, club-
rental history. $170,000. preserve. 70' dock. $334,000. house. $72,500.
.... .... 1 .- i lM I E . .. '1,


M I 1---": I I I _.
BACK ON THE MARKET! Buyers ISLAND LOT Cleared and ready to DIRECT GULF FRONT Condo- TIP OF THE ISLAND Is where you'll
loss is your gainI Island cottage 2BR build your single family home or du- minium on Gulf Sands. Open porch find this charming beach style cottage
home on 2 large lots zoned residen- plex! 50 x 100, 1 block to beach. overlooking the gulf and open walk- with large yard. Steps to beach and
tial or retail. $225,000. $59,900. way overlooking pool area. Covered fishing pier. $REDUCED$ $179,500.
parking, 2BR/2B. $199,000.
Ladir I WI I


PERICO BAY CLUB Spacious 2BR/
2B villa with 2 car garage, sundeck
and lanai. Fabulous location between
town and the islands! $134,900.


SPACIOUS Canalfront home with ATTACHED ISLAND VILLA Newly
boat dock. Cathedral ceilings with built, close to beach. 3BR/2B each
exposed beams in family room, huge side, tile floors, lots of storage and
master bedroom and more. $179,900. parking! $149,900 each side.




-----:- 4..- 1


ISLAND HOME on 2 extra large lots PERICO BAY CLUB Turnkey fur-
in Anna Maria. Across street from nished 2BR/2B St. Barts model over-
community center perfect for a fam- looking sparkling pond with 2 car ga-
ily with kids! $152,000. rage. $137,000.


GRAND CAYMAN unit in Perico Bay
Club, 2BR/2B with den, 2 car garage,
bricked courtyard entry and many up-
grades. $175,000.


PERIDIA golf course community
close to new 301 and 175 features this
3BR/2.5B home on the 16th tee.
Sparkles! $234,900.


CANALFRONT LOT in Holmes Beach.
Comer lot, 30' canalfront, walking dis-
tance to everything $79,900.


READY TO BUILD? We have sev- FAMILY HOME with huge backyard
eral prime island lots available call and enclosed porch across street
for an updated list to drive by today! from community center. $137,500.


- i 'nq .. i


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE
Townhouse with 2 car garage, large
storage area or craft room, 3BR/2B,
homeowners warranty. $156,500.


PERICO BAY CLUB St Barts model
villa with garage, 2BR/2B, many up-
grades and decoratorfurnishings. Tile
floors, cathedral ceilings. $149,900.


PERICO BAY CLUB Beautiful sun- WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
sets are yours from this 2nd floor unit Ground floor end unit with carport.
with lanai. Bright, open floor plan, 2BR/2B, enclosed lanai best buy in
2BR/2B, vaulted ceilings. $94,900. fabulous community $124,000.







PRIVATE end villa in Perico Bay Club ISLAND MOTEL quaintness of a bed
with 2 car garage, 2BR/2B, screened and breakfast and income of a high oc-
porch, eat-in kitchen and morel cupancy motel. New pool, completely
$134,900. renovated. Call for further details.


Frank
Davis
Broker
778-6335
Rochester,
New York


Paul
Collins
Realtor
383-5635
Worcester,
Massachusetts


C~T~i*.. ~~ -~ - .. : *I


t


__jI


-- -- i


i







E] PAGE 30 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island property transactions
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 253 Runaway
Bay, a 2bed/2bath 2nd floor condo of 1,080 sfla built
in 1978, was sold 12/29/95, Burkhardt to Westendorf,
for $86,000; list unknown.
3601 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 204 Sandy Pointe
A, an elevated 2bed/2bath/cp 1,050 sfla condo built in
1987, was sold 12/22/95, Glanz to Lawes, for
$111,000; list unknown.


3805 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 3 Sunbow Bay 2, an
elevated 2bed/2bath 1,247 sfla condo built in 1979, was
sold 12/29/95, Keller to Otto, for $92,000; list unknown.
516 74th St, Holmes Beach, a ground-level canal
front 3,200 sfla 3bed/3&1/2bath/2car home with pool
built in 1968 on an irregular shaped lot, was sold 12/
28/95, Waldron to Griffin, for $312,500; list $325,000.
529 75th St, Holmes Beach, a ground-level canal
front 2,129 sfla 4bed/3bath/lcar home built in 1969 on
a irregular sized lot, was sold 12/29/95, McKelvey to
Woodruff Int'l Ltd, for $430,000; list $449,000.
6006 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 120 Playa


WedebrockRea tate Company JUST LISTED!
creatinfle' S yes since 1949 WE LISTTO SELL








SANDY POINTE 2BR/2BA, nearly new, fantastic
view of the Bayou. $104,900. Call Muffin Shearon.
Muffin Shearon








SMUGGLERS LANDING 2BR/2BA, elegant, cus-
tom built, one of a kind unit. Unbelievable master
Becky Smith suite. $190,000. Call Becky Smith, 778-0599.

Stop by to see us, we'll give you a 12x18 flag
to put in your yard to celebrate President's Day.
3001 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 941 778-0700 800 401-1054


Whether you are looking for an island property
or a Manatee County waterfront home, contact
the waterfront specialists, the exceptional people
at Michael Saunders & Company.


GULF-FRONT CONDOMINIUM on Anna
Maria Island. Special 2BR/2B unit. 2 pools,
shuffleboard. For owner occupancy or as
investment property. $229,900. Sandy
Marchinetti, 758-7438.
SUPER LOCATION. Close to the beach, beautifully upgraded.
2BR/2B and 3BR/2B duplex, large porches and utility rooms.
Excellent income potential. $189,900. Janet Bellingar, 727-7870
or Kathleen Slayter, 792-8826.
KALEIDOSCOPE SUNSETS. Panoramic view, 2BR/2B condo-
minium, formal living room, mirrored-wall dining room, appli-
ance-filled kitchen, den or 3rd bedroom, turkey furnished, pool.
Excellent income potential. $199,900. Barry or Kimberly
Charles, 795-1273.
GREAT BEACH RETREAT. Gorgeous bay views. Just 1/2
block to beach and bay. Architect designed for duplex or single
family. Turnkey fumished. $185,000. Don Lewis, 746-3200 or
Phyllis Garfinkel, 351-5473.
PICTURE BOOK HOME on Holmes Beach. Deep water canal.
View the Sunshine Skyway from master suite deck. Two fireplaces,
fabulous kitchen, 2-car garage, 3 large porches. $389,000.
Kathleen Slayter, 792-8826 or Janet Bellingar, 727-7870.
SPECTACULAR ELEVATED GULF-FRONT RESIDENCE with
panoramic view. 3BR/3B, fireplace in great room, 55' +/- wrap-
around porch. On a professionally landscaped lot. $795,000.
Nancy Keegan, 723,3929.
FURNISHED SEASONAL OR ANNUAL RENTALS on Anna
Maria, Bradenton Beach, Holmes Beach. Contact Barbara
Milian, 778-2275.
COQUINA BEACH CLUB. Lovely studio, Gulf-side, washer/
dryer in unit. Covered parking, community pool. $595.00 per
week. Available 3/3 3/30. Barbara Milian, 778-2275.
SEASIDE BEACH HOUSE. Spacious 1 BR/1 B. On direct Gulf-
front. $800.00 per week. Barbara Milian, 778-2275.


Residential Sales/Rental Division: Licensed Real Estate Broker
3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (941) 778-6654
4400 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)748-6300
6016 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)792-2727


Encantada, a condo of unknown size and amenities but
certainly grand, was sold 12/21/95, Halsey et al to
Dieterman, for $255,000; list unknown.
8304 Marina Dr., Holmes beach, a ground level
2,062 sfla 3bed/2bath/lcar home with pool and deeded
boat slip, was sold 12/29/95, Hamidi to Kendell, for
$175,000; list unknown.
5 Sunset Cove, Holmes Beach, a 70x120 Gulf front
lot, was sold 1/5/96, Sayler to Kirk, for $400,000; list
unknown.
* Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate broker,
778-1222, exclusivelyfor The IslanderBystander. 1996





419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, FL (941) 778-2291

OPEN HOUSE
SUN* FEB. 18
1 TO 4 PM

525 Loquat Drive
Wonderful! 5BR/4BA waterfront family pool home!
Includes exquisite pine floors, vaulted ceilings w/
fans, fireplace, skylights, and dazzling bayviews.
Truly one of a kind! $465,000. Call 778-2291 Now!


FOR SALE BY OWNER
11 *JPM"KLMI W-Tna 91~B~B


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SOLAtS $ BfAe


Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best
news the only paper
with all the news
about the Island.
Charge your
subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978


ANNA MARIA
IMMACULATE 4 1/2 year old home. Open &
Bright! 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths. Tile & Berber
throughout. Large backyard! $315,000.
LCall 778-0352



f~ ~ r^. , 1. .,


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday February 18, 1996
1 -4 pm
609 Dundee Ln, Holmes Beach......$269,900
Key Royale. 2BR/2BA canalfront home, vaulted
ceilings. Judy Duncan 778-1589.
264 Gladiolus, Anna Maria.............. $165,500
2BR/1.5BA elevated home. Short walk to beach.
Frank Migliore 778-2662.
102 68th St. #105, Holmes Beach...... $162,500
Seaside beach house. 2BR/1.5BA, Gulffront, fur-
nished. Elfi Starrett 798-9716.
211 North Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach...269,900
Custom built 3BR/2.5BA tri-level home on wide
canal. Zee Catanese 794-8991.
4255 Gulf Drive #221, Holmes Beach......$119,900
Island Village. 2BR/2BA condo, view of the Bay.
Bill Donnelly 778-6392.
6702 32nd Avenue W., Bradenton...$145,000
2 story, 4BR/2.5BA home, new carpet, pool. Carol
Williams 778-1718.
911 38th St. West, Bradenton...........$68,500
2BR/1BA home with family room, workshop and
screened porch. Carla Price 778-5648.
5805 19th St. W., Bradenton..............$70,500
2R/1BA home. Cathedral ceilings, newa/c & hot
water heater. Marion Ragni 778-1504.
1351 Perico Pointe Circle, PBC, Bradenton...$217,000
3BR/2BA Bayfront unit. Hardwood floors, crown
moldings. Dick Rowse 778-2003.
1219 Edgewater Circle, PBC, Bradenton ... $187,500
3BR/2BA condo. Panoramic view of Palma Sola
Bay & Intracoastal. Bill Allen 778-1620.

Nous Parlons Frangais
Wir Sprechen Deutsch
Se Habla Espanol
Parliamo Italiano
Farsi Mi Dunim
Mir Rede Schwyzerduetsch


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS 0


,-g


[snu't


7:








Property Management Team
'We Cover the Island"

Af\-tn
1 10, w IW--NE


*Week, Month
Annual
Cottages, Houses
Bungalows
Villas
Condominiums


Caria Price


SREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr* Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call 941-778-0770 Toll Free 800 741-3772
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK



- SAND PEBBLE REALTY INC.


UNIT 45 e NORTH BEACH VILLAGE $169,900
6250 HOLMES BLVD., HOLMES BEACH
This beautiful townhouse has 2 large bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, a large 2 car garage with
good storage. Open airy floor plan is very taste-
fully decorated. Almost new unit has parklike
setting. Short walk to pool or beach.
Call John & Karen Zirzow
778-9171/Office 753-1620



PICK A DUPLEX, ANY DUPLEX!!!


BEST BUY!
1BR/1BA duplex in North Holmes Beach.
Cute as a button, just one block to the beach.
Priced right at $122,500.


JUST LISTED!!!
This duplex located between two streets of-
fers plenty of privacy for both units. Desir-
able north end location. 1BR/1BA each
side. Just listed at $134.500.


NORTH END DUPLEX!!!
This duplex has 2BR/1 BA each side and is
just steps to Anna Maria's north end
beaches. This incredible investment oppor-
tunity is now offered at $165,000.

Call Pat Jackson eves. at 778-3301 or
Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L 9701 Gulf Ddve P Box 717* Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
FRSANMX N RA MAXON


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 1 PAGE 31 [E


Exclusive
SWaterfront
Estates
Video Collection


REALTOR
MLS


et^ 9tt' 5ReaCl &ste, Q Watch for our
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida R listings on
(813) 778-2291 P Box 2150 D== Clasivision,
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294 -.-., channel 19.


LUXURIOUS
WATERFRONT POOL HOME
Deep canal with direct Bay and Gulf
access. This beautiful 3 bedroom, 3
S bath canalfront home offers the very
,- finest amenities throughout. Fea-
tures include Pella window and slid-
ing glass doors, Kohler bathroom fit-
tings, peach ceramic tiled floors in
kitchen and foyer, wood burning fireplace, electric boat lift, sauna and free
form solar heated swimming pool! Live the Island dream for only $375,000!
ET grJndLy EnJi anard PofIonaa SbciaiizinQ n 7inrxLax wt roi'aaCtfxstLyt
Barbara A. Sato..... 778-3509 Nancy Guilford .......... 778-2158 Monica Reid ........729-3333
.Susanne Kasten.......... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser..................778-1820


RENTALS
DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY
furnished units available
"Now through Season"
"DIAL DEBBIE"
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152

Debbie Dial CRfK Gulfstream
Leasing Manager 5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
HOLMES BEACH, FL.


BILL ALEXANDER
Broker Salesman
A lifelong local resident with
12 years of commercial and
residential experience in
M REAL ESTATE
WAGNER REALTY 19
778-2246
(800) 211-2323


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


-- -






IBm PAGE 32 I FEBRUARY 15, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


G.E. REFRIGERATOR almond $150. Thule cartop bike
rack $100. 4x8 trailer $50. Video camcorder $200. Call
778-5206, leave message.

RATTAN LOVESEAT with rattan side table (like new)
$50. Coffee table solid wood $25. 778-2085.

AUBUSSON CARPET 8.5' x 10.5' blue, off white with
accent colors. Excellent condition. $450. 778-5427.

GOLD SLEEPER SOFA queen size $35. 778-5066.
2601 Gulf Dr. Lot 534.

ELECTRIC RECLINER full up and down motion, tan
color. 6 months old. Asking $300. Call 778-2961.

2 WHITE BROCADE love seats and 2 matching chairs.
$250. Call 778-6063.

SKYWAY MEMORIAL GARDENS four plots located in
Last Supper Gardens. Excellent location normally selling
for $500 ea., now all four $1,200. Phone 778-2755.

EXOTICA JUST IN TIME for Valentines Day, many
styles, sexy lingerie, dresses and accessories. Exotica
is where romance begins. At 10110 Cortez Rd. West.
Exotica is like no other boutique in Bradenton. Exotica,
795-8405, 11 am to 9 pm and Sundays 12 to 5. Exotica
brings lingerie to life. Come get your free rose.

VCR, TV, STEREO and computer repair. Under $49.95
in most cases. Free in shop estimates, 30 years expe-
rience. VCR Clinic, 10018 Cortez Rd. 795-5324.

FUJI RACING BIKE, small frame. $100. Bang &
Olufsen stereo, Beocenter 7000 includes tuner, turn-
table & cassette player $600. 778-1102.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


GARAGE SALE. Sat., Feb. 17, 9 ? No early birds!
Collectibles, baseball cards, antiques, clothes, toys,
misc. 410 Magnolia, Anna Maria.

SUPER GARAGE SALE, multi family. Sat., Feb 17, 8-1.
6300 Flotilla Drive, Holmes Beach. Shell Point club house.
GARAGE SALE Sat., Feb 17, 8 3. Sweatshirts, t-
shirts, misprints, misc., Sandbar, Beach House, Mar
Vista and Anchorage shirts. Portion of proceeds to
Benefit Anna Maria Island Community Center. 114
Palmetto Ave., Anna Maria City.

NEIGHBORS SALE Sat., Feb. 17, 9 3. Furniture,
clothing, toys, books, household items. 780 Jacaranda

ANNUAL STREET SALE Sat., Feb. 24, 9 2. Arts &
crafts, odds & ends, homemade pies, lunch & snacks,
coffee & donuts. Pines Trailer Park, Bradenton Beach.

FLEA MARKET at Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary. Sat.,
Mar. 23. Reserve table space now. Call 388-4444.


BINGO EVERY THURSDAY at 7 pm. 3 cards $1.50.
Annie Silver Community Center, corer of 23rd and
Ave. C, Bradenton Beach.

FEELING OVERWHELMED? A well trained, caring,
peer counselor at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center will listen and help you find solutions. Confiden-
tial. No charge. Call 778-1908 for an appointment.


RESIDENTS AGAINST THE high bridge have a second
chance to donate items of reusable rummage for Save
Anna Maria, Inc.'s second rummage sale to be held on
March 9 within the Privateers' Thieves' Market. Drop off
usable items at Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf Dr. or call Joy
Courtney at 778-5405 for pick up. Thanks a million to
the many who donated items for SAM's sale on Feb. 10.
Watch the Islander Bystander for the financial results.
All proceeds donated to SAM's legal fund.

SELF EMPLOYED or small business owner! Low cost
health coverage sponsored by American Small Busi-
ness Association. Call Arnold 746-1566 or 794-0567.

REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5408
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center (between D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre restaurants), Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.

"CRITTER SITTER" Going away and your pets have to
stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food, water,
plus lots of TLC! Call 778-6000.

WANTED GOOD HOME for an, adorable, lovable,
friendly, soft white 7mo. male part Bischon poodle. 778-
3527. Leave message.


USED POLICE CARS 2- 1989 and 1 1988 Crown
Victorias. Sealed bid to Bradenton Beach City Clerk by
12 noon, Feb. 23, 1996.

FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything else
in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-
1990.

16' FIBERGLASS SAILBOAT for sale with small out-
board engine. Good condition. $700. 778-8357.
BOAT SLIP FOR RENT in Holmes Beach. 778-7039.


BREAKFAST COOK needed 5 or 6 days. Also needed,
kitchen help or line cook 3 to 11 pm. Apply in person
only 3 to 6 pm, Tue. Sat. Rebecca's Bistro, 103 Gulf
Dr., Bradenton Beach.

BABYSITTING EXPERIENCED adult will baby sit in my
home evenings and weekends. 778-6509.

LADY TO HELP with light office work. Must be good
with children. Hours flexible, Island location. Fax re-
sume to 778-6894.

RECEPTIONIST FOR BUSY Island real estate office.
Experience required with superior phone skills. All in-
quiries confidential. Call 778-2246.

COUNTER PERSON for bagel shop. Mothers hours.
Full time. Call Cindy 779-1212.

CLERK PART TIME. Island Canvas Gear, 5348 Gulf
Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-3121.


RETIRED. NEED EXTRA INCOME. Clerk for gift shop on
the beach. Nights and weekends, P.T. Must be willing to
do light cleaning. Call 778-8607 and ask for Robin.

DEALERS REQUIRED. Earn thousands per week.
Home based business. Help others and yourself. Pro-
mote waterless cookware, china, etc. Galaxy 779-1109,
746-1566.

Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you in-
terested in learning the history of Anna Maria Island?
Get involved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 if you can give a few
hours of community service.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.



JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605

MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222..

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports. Flat rates. Sunshine Cab. Serving the Is-
lands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

INCOME TAX SERVICE Call Laurie Miller at 778-2844.

DOLPHIN CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE depend-
able cleaning services for homes, offices, condos and
rentals. Call Rick 778-2864.

KT'S HIGH PRESSURE water cleaning. Decks, alumi-
num siding, side walks, docks, driveways. Mobile
homes double wide $55, single wide $45. Kevin
Walters (941) 794-5381. Insured.

"THE PERFECTIONIST Cleaning with perfection:
homes, condos, rentals, etc. Call Sharon at 778-0064.

INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 778-5617.

'SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Licensed, bonded.
Experience professional cleaning. Residential & com-
mercial. Homes, condos, rentals and businesses. Ex-
cellent references. Call for estimate or appointment.
Beverly 778-1945.

CARPET, VINYL, TILE. Sold, installed and repaired.
Free estimates, excellent prices. All workmanship guar-
anteed. Fully licensed/insured. Steve Allen 383-5381.

EXPERT CLEANING, personalized service. Island resi-
dent, excellent references. Leigh 778-1960.

ISLAND AUTO/TRUCK repair. Complete mobile ser-
vice, foreign and domestic. All repairs guaranteed. ASE
certified, 17 years experience. Affordable rates, free
estimates. Call 778-6979 or beeper 749-2150.


= A *ZIIAu b ~i, ~ 0: FlP W 4111 NW ,Ifrill I M TIN ia1 0 S IA t 121 FlSb 0c~o m


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICE! THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!


ANNA MARIA
Charming three bedroom home on two lots and one of
Anna Maria's nicest streets. Ideal plan for mother-in-
law suite or family home. Room for pool & use of boat
dock on Anna Maria Basin. Call Marie Franklin. Re-
duced to $182,500!


1957 .4
REALTY
W.ARE AMaMed.
"Of(O UIOt" PO Bo- X An Madrl. Roridm 3421
1-aoo45-9673 (941)778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


NEW LISTING!
KEY ROYALE BEAUTY
Well maintained 2BR/2BA home on wide canal complete with
large caged pool. Remodeled kitchen, dome lighting and new
appliances. Open floor plan provides view of pool and canal.
Offered at 219,000. Call Pat Jackson eves. 778-3301 or Ken
Jackson eves. 778-6986

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701Qu l oM ..P 0 Bo 717.Am. MA, FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


MARCH VACATION RENTAL
703 Fern, City of Anna Maria, north end of island. An out-
standing remodeling job has created this most delightful 3
bedroom, 2 bath, carport, single family home. Fully equipped
to include skylight in kitchen, washer/dryer, bikes, VCR, and
beautiful fenced-in back yard. Steps to beach. $1800.

Doug
Dowling wu
REALTY
Realty An..Mrl
778-1222


916i7. -J .0 P* TT in SbI 5 .0 S I T'T TTT 5 .0 - **.I N*I Te


I OF-11: I -


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--






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 0 PAGE 33 1-G


S C -F I


LOWEST CLEANING RATES on Island. 10 years ex-
perience. Great references. Ironing and alterations a
specialty. Pick up and delivery. 778-2085.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town and
the best results from


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free de-
odorizing. 794-1278.
PRO CLEAN professional carpet & fumiture cleaning. See
the difference with our powerful mobile cleaning plant.
Quick-dry system. Satisfaction guaranteed. 779-1422


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
References. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.


CARL V. JOHNSON, JR. Building contractor, new
homes, alterations, additions. Free estimates, design
service, quality, fair prices. Reg.# RR0066450. (941)
795-1947.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, roof coating and re-
pairs, carpentry, dry wall repairs, painting. TV and
phone jacks installed. Island Home Repairs. 778-0410.
CUSTOM HOME MAINTENANCE, inside and out,
cleaning, painting, lawn care, etc. Responsible couple
at your service. 779-2151.
WALTERS SERVICES Remodeling, carpentry, repairs
of all kinds. Seamless guttering. 40 years of quality
work. Call Tom. 794-5381.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.

THE I.P.M. CO. All phases of home repairs, remodel-
ing, additions, new home construction. License
#RR0066842. Jim Travis 779-2129.

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, pavers, stucco, tile. Lic.
#MC00318. Insured. Phone 778-5183. Dave Elliott


Get your oth opy f tl. "l 4st huvs oh AhhI Mrn IslI.J.l. It's free!











~~6--- U




For free home or business delivery on Anna Maria Island call 778-7978.
(Sorry, we can not deliver to individual condos or mobile homes.) Out-of-town subscription form on page 7.


AVAILABLE First 3 weeks of March only! Fully fur-
nished beach cottage. 1BR/1BA, private lot and park-
ing. $450 per week or all 3 weeks $1,000 includes
phone and cable. 778-2832.

MARCH VACANCY.Duplex 1BR/1BA, close to shop-
ping and restaurants, 1 block to nice Gulf beach in
South Holmes Beach. $375 per week includes utilities,
cable and phone. 778-2832.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB. Apr., May 1996. Mar.,
Apr., May 1997. Available $900 wk. (813) 949-3713.

SIX MONTH RENTAL. Unfurnished, 3BR/2BA and
spacious great room design. Choice neighborhood
near beach. Only $850 mo. plus utilities. Call Anna
Maria Realty, Inc. 778-2259.

AVAILABLE FEBRUARY/MARCH furnished apart-
ment, monthly rental. 1 BR/1BA, private yard, 2 blocks
to the beach. Cable TV, microwave. $1,200 mo., $350
wk. Must call 749-1695.
DUPLEX WATERFRONT Intracoastal, Bradenton Beach.
2 or 3 bedroom, dock, davits, walk to beach, carport,
modern. $850 or $750 mo. 1 year lease. (813) 539-5586.

CHARMING BEACH CLASSIC 2BR/1BA, Gulfview, all
new kitchen, w/d, hardwood floors and double garage.
Perfect winter get away. $650 wk or $1,800 mo. Gulf
Bay Realty 778-7244

SEASONAL RENTAL, H.B. 2BR fumished house, kitchen
fully equipped, cable, washer/dryer, hot tub, large lanai w/
wet bar. Steps to beach with beautiful tropical yard in quiet
neighborhood. Avail. now (941) 778-0311.



1lare than a mullet wrapper
K __h.


PERICO BAY CLUB
SPECIALIST




Selling & Listing
all of Perico Bay
Call Me Today!
778-6066


IPA A




MARILYN
TREVETHAN
REALTOR
Home: 792-8477


l I Sera'ing Ihe Island
from Ihe some
location since 1970.

6101 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-6066
[3 MLS 8i 1-800-865-0800


"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...

I can make your
island dreams
come true.

ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty Since 1939


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


U U


*i S A L N


IISLANDER


The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet shirts, subscription orders and
classified advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392


VIEW OF INTRACOASTAL


Entirely remodeled 3BR/2BA single family home
with 2 car garage and extra work area. 2,100 sq.
ft. under roof, on 100 X 100 lot. New kitchen, car-
pet, imported Italian tile, formal dining room and
beautiful waterviews. $235,000
Shown by Appointment Only 778-3148
2217Ave. B., Bradenton Beach


1 TO 4 SUNDAY, FEB 17
259 GLADIOLUS, ANNA MARIA
Lovely canal home with two spacious bedrooms, two baths
and open living area and kitchen all overlooking natural ca-
nail You're invited to preview this one owner home



REALTY
"We ARE the Wlnd.'
9005 QuI Drfi PO Box 835 AnnL Mlri, Rorid 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


i






OI PAGE 34 M FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


jCommercial Residential Free Estimates
andy's Lawn Mowing *Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
L AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years- with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


MULCH STONE SHELL SOD

6Cstom Trucking
Free Estimates 778-1497
HAULING BOAT DELIVERY

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SERVICE
SCoastal Design Specialists
Custom Luxury Homes
Additions & Alterations
Call Tony Peduzzi 778-1529 35 years experience



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
M i MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
SADECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399
-- --------- - --
.LOCKSMITH PJIWVTI7VG
S GaryF.Deffenbaugh 6laeie
tictned-Bonded-lmaured effexaUhA
I LOCKOUTS
LOCKOUTS "Professional Excellence"
IAuto-Home-Commercial
LOCKS e Residential-Commercial
REKENSLLMASTER Interior & Exterior
SREKEYINSTALL MASTER Popcorn Ceiling Repair
New & Used Locks & Repairs
Emergency Service Serving the Islands Since 1969
Service islands Since 1986 Licensed and Insured
LOA 778-5594 ASIS 778-5594 778-3468
L - - - - J


I I


J. R.

Painting
#Pirwres Cl(eaing
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


Ind Cle. aning




-I I 'iltySer ic
EIi~li~n
1E1ellete 1c
Licesed& Bnde
VACUUM SALE
& REAIR
Motpoua


ANNUAL UNFURNISHED, 2BR/2BA, lovely & spacious
with deck and garage. Steps to beach. $700 mo. Gulf
Bay Realty 778-7244.

BEAUTIFUL PANORAMIC GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA
house. Panoramic view, available Apr. due to cancella-
tion. Full month or weekly. (813) 920-5595.
SMALL SHOP in best Anna Maria location available in
March. Call T. H. Cole (941) 779-1213.
ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH, 2BR/2BA apartment close
to beach and shopping. 1st, last, and security. $650 mo.
778-0217. Available Mar. 1, no pets.
GULFVIEW COTTAGES on small dead end St. along
Gulf. 3BR, $1,800 mo./$700 wk. 2BR $1,600 mo./
$650 wk. 2BR $1,400 mo./$600 wk. Available 96/97.
778-0990.
SEASONAL RENTALS nightly, weekly, monthly ac-
commodations. Fully furnished. Walk to beach, post
office, restaurants. Magnolia apartments. 778-2627.
Visit our gift shop.
STEPS TO BEACH 2BR/1 BA, washer/dryer, partially
furnished/optional. $525 mo. 1st, last, security. No
pets. 778-1345.

ANNUAL RENTAL, Anna Maria. 2BR/2A canalfront
home. Garage, boat dock, no smoking or pets. $850
mo. + utilities. Green Real Eastate 778-0455.

SECLUDED SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA furnished condo.
Pool, covered parking, Bayview. Available Apr. $900
mo. 6-9 mo. lease. Jan., Feb., Mar. '97, 3 mo. $5,500.
723-6802.
ANNUAL RENTAL 1BR/1BA + den. $575 mo. Wagner
Realty. 778-2246.
ANNUAL RENTAL 2BR/2BA unfurnished duplex. $600
mo. up & $700 mo. down + utilities. Will consider pets.
Call Carla Price, Smith Realtors. 778-0770.
TWO FURNISHED VACATION rentals ideal for single
or couple. Avail. now. Gulfview studio $350 wk. Key
Royale apt. $1,600 mo. 778-6126 778-6127.
ANNUAL SMUGGLERS LANDING spacious 2/2- $925
mo. Elegant 2/2 $1,100 mo. Picturesque with deep
water dockage, pools, tennis. Bayshore Realty. Judy
Durant, 755-3791 eves. 792-7465.
AVAILABLE NOW AND for 96 97 season. 3BR/2BA,
unique Florida beach style house. Across from beach,
no annual. (941) 778-1180.
BEAUTIFUL GROUND LEVEL house overlooking bay.
2BR/2BA, available Mar. or Par. $1,800 per mo. 778-9639.
BEACHFRONT 96 97 WINTER season. 3BR/2BA,
dishwasher, microwave, washer, dryer, cable, TV, VCR,
phone, fireplace, utilities included. Covered patio, car-
port. Discount 3 mo. Shown Feb. weekends. 101 78th
St. (813) 778-3532, (941) 686-5448.
GULFFRONT BEST VIEW, 3BR/2BA, fireplace in top
floor master suite. Patio, tropical garden. March 18th/
24th, $1,050. April 10th on $3,300 mo./ $1,200 wk.
778-0990.
ROOMMATE WANTED 2BR/2BA duplex, Holmes
Beach. $100 per wk., $50 security includes utilities.
Available Mar. 1, 1996. 778-5080.
ROOMMATE WANTED FEMALE, non smoker prefer-
ably. 2BR/2BA, kitchen privileges. 778-7954.
SEASONAL/YEARLY 1BR/1BA, 2 story, garage,
washer/dryer, no pets. Steps to beach. $1,200 / $650
mo. includes utilities. (813) 985-6765.
SEASONAL 96/97. 2BR/1BA home, screened porch,
cable, w/d, garage. Close to beach. (813) 689-0925.
2BR/1BA ANNUAL ON Bradenton Beach at 9th Street
N. $600 mo. Call after 3 pm. (804) 220-3544.
2BR/2BA FULLY FURNISHED duplex close to beach
and shopping. Available now, Mar., and Apr., also May
through Oct. 778-0510.


LATE CANCELLATIONS NOW available for Mar. 96.
Westbay Cove condo, 2BR/2BA, tennis, heated pool,
Bayfront. Also 3BR/2BA pool home in Holmes Beach.
Call Old Florida Realty 778-3377, eves. 778-3730.
WHY RENT? 2BR/2BA condo, turnkey furnished.
Beautiful beach, tennis, heated pool. Neal & Neal Re-
altors. Helen White 778-2261 eves. 778-6956.


OPEN 1 3 SATURDAY. 110 Gull. Canalfront, 2BR/
2BA, elevated, boat dock. Shows well in and out. T.
Dolly Young, Prudential Florida Realty. 778-0766 or
778-5427.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Feb. 18, 1 5. Sunny condo,
5400 Gulf Dr. #29. Gorgeous beach. Neal & Neal, Re-
altors. Helen White 778-2261, eves. 778-6956.

WANTED PRINCIPLE desires small, Gulffront or
Gulfview, Bayfront or Bayview home. Call NY (516)
589-3943. Leave message.

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR PAINTING


Precision Tree Trimming
*Topping Trimming Removal
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
Insured & Licensed
Free Estimates *795-2877

ISLAND LUMBER
ANl HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

S BODYWOR FITINESSI
Step Aerobics Tone
SMon. Tues & Thurs 6:30-7:30pm
At the Bradenton Beach Fire Station 2nd St. N.
Outdoor Walk & Tone Twice a Month
CALL FOR SCHEDULE f LOCATION GERI TRAVIS 779-2129
V Fitness Consulting also available


For Your Island Home Paint Needs

ISLAND
PAINT WORKS

* Interior/Exterior 9 Years Experience
SPrivately Owned New Construction
Residential/Local Business Repaints

BILL ROMBERGER 778-7821



Gentiluomo Enterprises
STATE LICENSED CONTRACTOR CRC017380

New Home Construction
And Remodeling

77 FRSMATE S
II778m35ESTIMATES


Lanscpe t. 14Shll t.
CalIlndGr n etr CllIln ardeA Cete
778444 1 78m44


I LA NDER ASSIFI E
RENTLS ontiuedRENALSCntned-~


Free Estimates
25 Years Experience
30 Years Island Resident
Call Jim Bickal 778-1730


P






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 M PAGE 35 iE


JISLA a CL ASSIFIEDS


KEY ROYALE 3BR/2BA, split design, lanai, large dock,
double garage, circle driveway. 615 Emerald Lane. Info
call 778-0017.
ANNA MARIA BUILDING LOT w/view across from
beach. Will work with Realtors, owner has plans.
$119,900. 778-5842.
LOT FOR SALE deep water canal. 515 75th Street,
Holmes Beach. $153,900. 778-7127.
BAYOU WATERFRONT CONDO. Newly remodeled,
2BR/1BA, dock space. Must sell or rent. $850 mo. plus
utilities. 779-2206.
FOR SALE 2BR/2BA home. Call 778-5814 for appointment.
HOLMES BEACH, deep canal, dock, davits, heated
caged pool. 3BR/2BA, big lanai, family room, fireplace,
wheelchair accessible, sprinklers. 778-9378.

PERICO BAY CLUB, by owner. Unique 2BR/2BA villa
with garage, ceramic tile floors and extended living
area. Must be seen! $110,000. 794-0959.

WALK TO BEACH 2BR/2BA, 2 lanai, pool, covered
parking, beautifully furnished spacious condo. Excel-
lent rental. $110,000. Yvonne Higgins, Re/Max
Gulfstream. 778-7777.
SPORTSMAN HARBOR 2 years new home, 2BR/2BA,
den, 2 blocks to Gulf. All furnishings included. Only
$199,900. 779-1109.
PERICO SHORES Executive home sites including
waterfront lots, deed restricted community, ready for
immediate building. Custom builder available. From
$74,900. David 779-1109.
PLAYA ENCANTADA 2BR/2BA furished condo. Beau-
tiful beach, tennis, heated pool. Neal & Neal Realtors,
Helen white 778-2261, eves. 778-6956.
LARGE & SUNNY! 2BR/2BA, condo, comer unit,
Gulfview. Gorgeous beach, heated pool, $227,000. Neal
& Neal Realtors. Helen White 778-2261, eves. 778-6956.
BAYFRONT 3BR/2BA home. Panoramic view, caged
pool, boat davits, large lot. $395,000. Neal & Neal Re-
altors. Helen White 778-2261, eves. 778-6956.



sCAIM LIADD CAINISMAL I
PAICIA ISE R I AIT A ATAL
0 ATE BAL S 0 RCA A BE E i
L|E V|EYLHE DE L 0 H AT
AREEL O L NI SID 0 E EF ETON
EATE SL NG ORDD MINI

ST RIM ASK AGGREGATE
STRJAII IGIH T S HIO 0 T E R
BONAPA IRT REASLIM ES
A PIE UNIT O DEMI NA D PAPTII V E
R EIG A ITIAM E I MIS TA X IS
BRIE R S I 0 IP E P PEERA
A V0W S D 0 W NTE A R T H
APOWERHO SE I E RAL COA
LABAN IB S E N F A U LTLE SS
FIL 0Y D PETES ELSE ANAT
AMESS RAKE DET S SITIY E


DUPLEX 3BR/2BA and 1BR/1BA. Newly remodeled
inside and out. $134,000. 2103 Ave. B., Bradenton
Beach. 778-1353.
BEAUTIFUL BAYVIEW HOME 2 years old. Large
screened porch. 2/3BR 2BA. Drive by 2202 Ave. A,
Bradenton Beach. $229,900. 778-2960.
CONDO FOR SALE Bayview Terrace, Bradenton
Beach. Ground floor, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, pool.
Will rent to own. Seller financing, small down pay-
ment. $61,500. 778-1546.
PERICO BAY CLUB. 2/2 villa with garage, decorator
furnished. Storm, security and insulator shutters.
Glassed lanai, sundeck. $136,000 by owner. 795-8371.

CUSTOM HOME CREATED in 1991 by two people
very much in love. Beautifully landscaped lot with irri-
gation. Large private entry foyer plus 6-car garage.
Solid oak staircase surrounded by open floor plan.
Solid oak and Corian kitchen with every option. Oak
floors in kitchen and dining rooms. Oak crown moldings
and baseboards, chair rails and solid wood doors ga-
lore. Brass fixtures, solid oak and onyx bathrooms. Re-
cessed and decorative lighting. Two antique oak and
marble fireplaces. Walking decks with turned and
painted rails and pickets. Two floored, roofed and
screened porches. Honeymoon suite with beamed and
vaulted ceilings. His and her closets. Two person
shower (of course). Spiral staircase to the stars and
large sun deck with great views. Security alarm and
central vacuum. Steps to beach. We really put our
hearts into this love nest. Looking for couple who feels
the same. Was listed at $389,900, now unlisted. Moti-
vated sellers still in love. 209 68th Street. 778-0178.


9 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising herein is subject to the Fair
Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national
origin, or intention to make any such preference, limi-
tation or discrimination." Familial status includes chil-
dren under age of 18 living with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women and people securing custody
of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowing
accept any advertising for real estate which is in vio-
lation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available
on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777,
for the hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


ISLANDER


*I31?tdh~Jlia^thM P
JDW~~r~BJv~h;JMLq


Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun,
a ray of sunshine? Look no further -
it's all in The Islander Bystander.
Don't miss a week!


~1


r-----------------------------------
I HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
I
AED DLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER Cl ifi d d ti i t i


-- *-*wIL w fvl-li bsjt- l ,Rl I iB l. YkI VdtI I 1 r lT\L, 'w'IdIOOIIIIOU lUVOI LIII I II IUOL I JICI IIU III UC7l 1UII Il1U CplU
in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We
are located next to D.Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $6 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.00 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or
two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.00) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business or service, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS.
Additional words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. To place
an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry, we can not take clas-
sified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.
I ----------- --------------------------


I~ 1
2

3

More information:
(941) 778-7978 ISLANDEl VISA


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COLOAOL.COM

N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907

778-2586 & MARY KAY Eve: 778-6771


Close Out Sale 15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

HOLMES BEACH MINI STORAGE
Vacancies Climate Controlled Storage
Facilities in variety of sizes
10' x 20' Garages Now Available
3018 AVE C Holmes Beach *778-5549

"/ 778-5455
Si'* / -Painting & Decorating
Custom Painting Pressure Cleaning
S* Wallpaper Hanging General Repairs
P Interior/Exterior Design
References 15 Years Experience

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
792-3758
Gift Certificates
Surcharge for home visits
MM0003995 MA0012461
r PRESENT COUPONS l
HEARING AIDS

,ATTERIES Sales. Service* Testing
BA E BATTERY CLUB
Buy 1 Get 1 pk. FREE
Hearing Care Services, Inc.
Elsworth Hearing Service
501 Village Green Pkwy. In Village Green Plaza
I Bradenton 792-0082 |

Residential
Commercial
Design
e, i ,Selection
N .le' Installation

FREE ESTIMATES
Call 761-8240 for appt.
Visit our showroom at 4815 Manatee Ave. W.
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE ISLAND REFERENCES






The Islands ,# 6

Property

Maintenance CO.
Jim Travis 779-2129


JUST CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere on
Anna Maria Island.
You may also call
to stop home
delivery if necessary.
Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not available at
mobile home parks or
condos but bulk drops can
be arranged.

The best SLANDER

The best news!


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
* Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


--


I
_________j


FAX: (941) 778-9392







I-M PAGE 36 1 FEBRUARY 15, 1996 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


WING NUTS 12 1 1 7 111 12 I
BY NORMA STEINBERG / EDITED BY WILL SHORT 16 1 1 117 18 1920


ACROSS
I Ball
4 Handouts
7 "Like, stupid!"
10 Reprimand
viciously, in
slang
16 Make suitable
for family
viewing, e.g.
18 Close-fitting
clerical garment
20 Chest
21 70's White
House name
22 Less
compromising
23 Kickback
24 Crazy bird?
26 Tied article of
apparel
28 "Happy
Birthday" writer
29 Doesn't forgive
and forget
30 Concluded
32 "- -ce pas?"
33 Computer
interface jack
34 Forecast info,
for short
38 Attendance
notation
40 Silver or blue
follower
41 Belly
42 "Butterfield 8"
author


46 Geronimo and
kin
50 Hudson Bay
settlers
53 Brash
54 Secure by tying
down
55 Recorderabbr.
56 Mister abroad
57 Play period
58 Barbara, to
friends
59 Dressing
ingredient
61 Kama--
62 "Bummer!"
63 Bird's
privileges?
66 Kind of test
69 Nubs
71 Election results
72 Numbskull
73 Outdo
75 The Andrews
Sisters, e.g.
77 Part of an
Egyptian
headdress
78 Colonial suitor
79 Subjects of New
Age study
80 1989 Winona
Ryder movie
82 Comic John
83 Marquises, e.g.
84 Jackie's second
85 "The --Tale"
(Chaucer
segment)
87 Pines
89 Carwith
Teletouch
transmission
90 Polish's partner


94 Schlep
97 Duplicity
100 The sea
personified
102 Kind of game
103 Spanish bear
104 Cultural
bird-geoning?
108 Like some
reasoning
110 Helped
112 Perthshire
pattern
113 Vocalize
114 Was excited
115 Fairy folk
116 Reps
117 Convened
118 Personal-
119 ile surrounded
DOWN
1 "Food, Glorious
Food" musical
2 New-sprung
3 Since,
colloquially,
with "as"
4 Grp.
5 Trace
6 Something one
can't do
7 Step lively
8 A, as in Aries
9 Dueling bird?
10 Sort
11 "What
(cry of surprise)
12 Dating a young
bird?
13 "It's-- to the
finish"
14 Clotho, Lachesis
and Atropos
15 Push


16 "Superb!"
17 Artist's range of
options
19 Speaker of
baseball
21 Police
operation
25 --friendly
27 Arrests
31 Reno
transaction
35 Measuring
(out)
36 Shopper's
burden
37 Relative of
reggae
39 Multipart
composition
40 Short
43 Prefix, of sorts
44 Vacation homes,
for short
45 Old-style
exclamations
46 Group that did
"I Do, I Do, I Do,
I Do, I Do"
47 Knell
48 Long-finned
tuna
49 What a
suspicious bird
will do?
51 Ruler in
Exodus
52 Cause of worry
55 War statistics
57 Old bandleader
Morgan
59 No. 2
60 Understand
61 Part of a
process


64 Expressed
anger, in a way
65 Villain's earful
67 March time
68 Ready to eat
70 Ballet -
73 It runs in the
woods
74 Vietnamese city
75 Treacherous
birds?


76 Hike
78 TV's Bundy and
others
80 Symbols of
speed
81 Prior to
82 Madame- .
French dancer
of old
86 Start of Caesar's
boast


88 Flips over, so to
speak
90 More than fast
91 Special team
member, in
football
92 Conquerees of
1533
93 YM competitor
94 Actress Shire
95 Due (to)
96 French relation


98 "- my
Maypo!"
99 High school
math
101 Song of David
105 First name in
jazz
106 Impecuniosity
107 Puts on
109 Certain soldier
111 Trajan's way


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 75o per minute for the call.


''*

.'- . -'.
.- - '., .- ."- .".:. - ., -


. .-; .. .. .'' -...-. ,-. -.


SIX BEDROOM WATERFRONT $698,000
Boater's dream home on Bimini Bay. Many up-
grades, indoor pool, boat dock and lift for large
boats. Located on Key Royale on quiet cul-de-
sac. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-2261,
eves 778-6791 or 778-4891.











PERICO BAY CLUB CONDO $192,000
3BRi,.A Edgewaler Manry upgrades Fabul:'us
iaew over Bay 2 porches, garage walh e.ria stor-
age Pool. tennis. pulling green. clutbhouSe Call
Rose Schnoerr 778-226E1





Nick

Patsios
REALTORO
778-4642 '




A native of Chicago. IL, Nick enjoys all i
of the good things Florida offers plus i
the special joy of six grandchildren
close by. Nick has the marketing and i
sales background to get you the top ^
dollar for your home and to find you the
perfect home if you are buying.
M


i,. .,E8 : -.
l. ow ,na r .,g. B ,.,






DIRECT BAY VIEW $195,000 This 2BR/
2BA has it all. Corner unit, garage for 2 cars,
turnkey furnished, secured entry. Has Bay &
Gulf views, pool & boat dock. Please call Bill
Bowman 778-2261, eves 778-4619.




... .. ,*






CANALFRONT TOWNHOUSE $72,000
21R, 1 5BA gorgeius c:aralirrii uniil[ lciall, re-
modeled in beaululull ou[ulhi ~e- iiMtlil ba,view,,
boa' l dock a.adlajl Turrine,, lurnijthed Chard
Wrnheim 778-2`6.1 ees 7 28.i6743



i .'.


,. ,


TOWNHOUSE ON THE WATER $220,000
Rarely available 3BR/3BA, 2 story enclosed
lanai. Westbay Point & Moorings. Dock outside
your door. Spacious, elegant interior. Bobye
Chasey 778-2261.


WALK TO BEACH $124,900 island Village
co.rndo; BR,2A .ilh large screened porch
jNe Iile. carpel appliances &i lu-l paired
Cormmunil, Fpool. e. Innti cur C3jll .Mar, Ar
SchiTdl 7787-."61 e.es 778-4921


1BR/1BA Furnished, REDUCED ...... $78,000
1BR/1BA View ol Gulf, carport ............. $83,000
1BR/1BA Furnished................................. .. $84,000
2BR/2BA Beautiful view of Gulf ............... $227,000
2BR/2BA Direct gulfview......................... $250,000


-v.i -
f ..~-- . ^ --.. ., -. : . ... -,.. .,-


EXQUISITE WATERFRONT $579,500
Unique luxury home on extra wide canal. Large
lot, 3BR/3BA, dock, 12.5 davits. Vaulted ceiling,
fireplace and much, much more. A must see.
Please call Nick Patsios 778-2261, Nick at Nite
778-4642.


GULFFRONT COMPLEX $169,900 Turn
'e;, furrnlhred 2eR.BA .,er, rice urit orn lop
floor Verlical blndi under building parking,
m.ell maintained grounds & locked poo1 area tor
e xra securii/' Call Helen While 78-2c6l e.,es
778-6956


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

ANNUAL RENTALS
2BR/1 5BA Duplex, Pet OK 1750 morr
21BR/2BA Perico Bay Club oPl $8ED me : r
3,2 Home Bradenlcrn F'oolI $12Cro rro
'' 3/2 Home. Pool on Diect BayfronI h Il'ro rr
*' /2 Pool & Bay $22-3 rr m
3/1 Home Pet C'K BCOJ rro
LBKi 32 Gulitrcrit $1l rr1 o 3 mo
SiNOW BOOKING SUMMER
Julie RENTALS!
Call (941) 778-6665 or
S Toll Free 800-749-6665


, .: '~ :.-I .- .'.'.' .'.' ., .:.
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