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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00590

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FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE NOVEMBER 23, 1995


DOT: Cortez Bridge reopens Wednesday


By Paul Roat
Cortez Bridge will reopen to vehicular traffic at 6
p.m. Wednesday, Florida Department of Transporta-
tion officials have told The Islander Bystander.
The bridge linking Bradenton Beach to Cortez has
been closed for rehabilitation since Oct. 2. The origi-
nal 30-day closure period was extended by DOT offi-
cials to Dec. 7 when more extensive structural prob-
lems than anticipated were discovered plus the finding
of a toxic lead-based paint on parts of the bridge.
Wednesday's reopening date is 23 days later than
called for in the original contract. DOT Project Man-
ager Don Maxwell said a modification of the contract,
requested by contractor PCL Civil Constructors and


Island to join

Longboat Key in

'war' on red tide
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Longboat Key officials came to last week's meet-
ing of Island elected officials in Bradenton Beach to
announce they have declared an all-out war on red tide
and they invited Islanders to join them.
"I received the authority from my commission to
head up a 'Let's Get Rid of the Red Tide' organization,
and I intend to do that," said Longboat Key Mayor Jim
Patterson. "It's going to be a very vigorous effort. My
initial plan is to work with government and chambers
of commerce from Naples to Tarpon Springs."
Longboat Key will host a day-long session of all
officials to share ideas, plan a strategy and discuss
funding methods, he said. Mote Marine Laboratory will
be invited to make a presentation.
"Part of my personal vendetta to lick red tide is
related to the fact that Mote Marine has been studying
this problem for about 15 years and has done very little
of substance," he explained. "They've spent $75,000 a
year monitoring the red tide where it starts, where
it goes, how big it is and when it arrives on shore. It is
not necessary to know where it is or what it is or to kill
it. All we really want to do is keep it off our beaches."
Mote Marine has requested $25,000 to $30,000
seed money to plan the project, he said. Longboat
Commissioner Ray Metz added that Mote officials es-
timate the project would cost about $300,000 per year
for five years.
"Pierce (Mote Marine chemist Rich Pierce) said
they've been monitoring red tide, but they haven't re-
ally done any research on if it can be controlled or how
to control it," Metz said.
"If we can put a man on the moon, we can find a
cure for red tide," Patterson noted.
Island officials agreed to join the study group.

Personal watercraft
Anna Maria Mayor Dottie McChesney said
Holmes Beach Councilman Don Maloney is working


Notable noticed

on Island
Tele-evangelist Jim Bakker has found a new
home on Anna Maria Island.
Bakker, who ran into trouble a few years ago
with misappropriating funds from his financially
successful television ministry and spent time in jail
because of it, has been spotted around the Island.
Bakker is reportedly staying in Anna Maria.
He has been seen at local restaurants, the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society where he
bought a T-shirt and at the Island Library, where
he took out a library card and said he was staying
on the Island to "write his prison memoirs."


The contractor will receive a
$100,000 bonus for finishing
ahead of schedule.
approved by the DOT last month, set Dec. 7 as the new
date for reopening.
Maxwell confirmed that the incentive-disincentive
clause of $10,000 per day for up to 10 days remained
in the revised contract.
That clause means PCL Civil Constructors will
receive an additional $100,000 for finishing the repair
work on the bridge ahead of the revised schedule.
"I can't understand it," Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie
Pierola said of the "bonus" for the contractor.


"I don't think he deserves it," said Ida Cuthbertson,
chairperson of the Cortez Bridge Watch Committee, a
three-member group formed to monitor the work on the
bridge.
Maxwell said that one-lane closures may continue
on the bridge for one to three weeks while the contrac-
tor finishes some of the work on the bridge. That work
includes installation of a generator and final painting.
Maxwell said the contract has been modified sev-
eral times to allow for more extensive steel work, ex-
tra painting and lead-paint removal. He said he did not
know how much the contractor will be paid for the
contract modifications beyond the previous price tag of
$2.051 million.


Happy Thanksgiving
This 1911 Thanksgiving greeting card is from the collection of Islander Bystander reporter Pat Copeland.


on a resolution seeking certification of personal water-
craft operators.
"This is a major concern for all of us," she said. "If
we get a reasonable resolution and we all pass it, it will
send a message to. Tallahassee. We want something
done on a statewide level."
Bradenton Beach Councilman Walt Grace said the
Coast Guard Auxiliary is seeking licensing of all boat
operators.
The Longboat Town Commission is working on an
ordinance to govern the operation of all watercraft,
Patterson said. It will include manatee protection, no
wake zones, operating watercraft near swimming areas
and watercraft noise. He offered to send copies of the
ordinance to the other cities.
"We're taking the first crack at what will be a posi-
tive step forward," he said. "In addition, all responsible
boaters would love to have a licensing operation. The
Manasota League of Cities ought to be pushing for that
through the state."

Beach maintenance
The commission is also working on a long-range
program of beach maintenance, Patterson reported.
"We're not talking about beach restoration but
beach maintenance," he said. "The commission has
come to the conclusion that maintaining the beaches is
like maintaining the roads or sewers. It's part of the
infrastructure, and we are prepared to do whatever's
necessary to develop a maintenance program."
A consultant told the commission it would cost $4
million in 1996 to repair hot spots in the renourished
beach, Patterson said. Hot spots are areas where erosion
threatens to compromise the integrity of the
renourished areas.
"In the long-term plan we're talking about needing
$12 million in 1997-98," Patterson said. "We've taken
our TDC (Tourist Development Council) money,


$150,000 from each county, and we've got a $300,000
trust fund, and we're going to continue that."
State legislators may be more receptive to funding
for renourishment after Hurricane Opal critically
eroded 120 miles of beaches in the Panhandle,
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola said.
Island officials said the appearance of Patterson
and Metz at the meeting was a pleasant surprise. Last
year, Longboat Key dropped out of the Coalition of
Barrier Island Elected Officials. Patterson and Metz
hinted that the town may consider returning to the
group.



We're starting

our fourth year!
The Islander Bystander
celebrates three years of
serving Anna Maria Island
with this issue







SKIMMING THE NEWS...
O pinions ......................................................... 6
Those Were the Days ............................. .... 7
ISLAND MAP ........................................ 20
Stir-it-up ....................................................... 22
Streetlife ................................. ............... 27
Anna Maria Island tides ........................... .... 30


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


I
1:-.






[E PAGE 2 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Fire taxes would jump if calculated by property


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
If the fire district were to change its taxing method
from assessment to ad valorem, property owners' taxes
could skyrocket, said Fire Chief Andy Price at last
week's fire commission meeting.
At the request of several residents, Price compared
the two taxing methods. The residents felt it was unfair
that homes valued at $100,000 and up are charged the
same rate as homes of much lesser value.
"Ad valorem is based on property value, and as-
sessment is based on use of the building," explained
Price. "Residences have high value but low use. With
assessment, the burden is shared according to use and
is being spread more evenly. With ad valorem, that
burden would be shifted to the property owner."
Price said he compared the two taxing methods
using-1.25 mils, which is what the district would have
to charge to get the same amount it gets through assess-
ment now. He gave the following examples:
A vacant lot on Kumquat in Anna Maria with an
assessed value of $100,406 would be charged $4 with
assessment and $125.50 with ad valorem.
A vacant lot on 84th Street in Holmes Beach with
an assessed value of $42,750 would be charged $4 with
assessment and $53.43 with ad valorem.
A single family home on North Bay Boulevard in
Anna Maria with an assessed value of $100,477 would


be charged $80.75 with assessment and $125.59 with
ad valorem without a homestead exemption and $94.34
with a homestead exemption.
A single family home on North Bay Boulevard in
Anna Maria with an assessed value of $158,409 would
be charged $97 with assessment and $198.01 with ad
valorem without a homestead exemption and $166.76
with a homestead exemption.
A condominium in Holmes Beach with an as-
sessed value of $100,590 would pay $72.50 with as-
sessment and $125.73 with ad valorem without a
homestead exemption and $98.48 with a homestead
exemption.
Mobile homes are an exception. A mobile home
in Cortez with an assessed value of $14,000 would be
charged $65 with assessment and $18 with ad valorem
without a homestead exemption and nothing with a
homestead exemption.
In the past he favored a change to the ad valorem
method, said Commissioner John VanOstenbridge,
because the district would not have to raise the taxes
every year. It would get increases through the increase
in assessed value of the property.
"It frightens me what happens to people with an
empty lot," he noted. "We should have public hearings
so people can see what would happen and realize what
a good deal we have."
"Everything we get comes directly from our fire


assessments," added Price. "We have no other funding
sources like the cities and do not get automatic in-
creases like they get with ad valorem. For us to have
enough money to cover the general increase in the cost
of doing business we have to increase our assess-
ments."
The assessment method is cumbersome, he said.
There are 11,000 parcels in the district that personnel
must check against the tax roll from the county to make
sure the category and rate are correct.
"We have found $150,000 in changes over the
years," said Price. "That means we don't have to in-
crease the rate as much."
Price said the district's practice of holding off on
increases for a year or two, then having a large increase
should be changed. He suggested developing a system
of small planned increases each year.
In other business:
VanOstenbridge suggested the chief and a member
of the commission do a salary study so the district does
not fall too far behind other districts as it did in the past
"Otherwise, we're training these people to go else-
where," he said.
The continued closure of the Cortez Bridge will
cost the district additional money, said
VanOstenbridge. He suggested using a portion of the
$66,000 budget carry-over to pay the temporary per-
sonnel who are manning Station 2.


Big new building going up
in Bradenton Beach
Construction continues on the Bradenton Beach
Marina boat storage shed. The building, visible from
the Cortez Bridge, is 80 feet wide, 34 feet high and
200 feet long. The shed is the most visible of the
estimated $2 million renovation work. Islander
Photo: Paul Roat


Gulf Boulevard petitioners vow to be back


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria City Commissioner George McKay
was "shocked" by public comment Nov. 14 about the
elimination of parking on the city's popular one-block
Gulf Boulevard and reference to the new split-rail fence
as "obscene" and "an insult."
Mayor Dorothy McChesney said she knew the
commission's previous unanimous decision on the
matter "would be controversial," but she wished people
"would give this plan a chance."
"Obviously if you get 400 or 500 signatures," said
Commissioner Doug Wolfe of the grass-roots petition
effort that has sprung up, "we'll have to revisit the is-
sue."
"We'll get it," residents Jack Jolley and Sinclair
"Bubba" Stewart assured the commission.
Stewart is a trustee of Roser Memorial Community
Church which has a Saturday seaside service at Gulf
Boulevard. He cited inconvenience to worshippers and
said he understood that someone had complained about
the Roser van being parked at the beach for 45 minutes
during a recent service.
"We have some very costly music equipment out
there for those services," said Stewart. "There was the
threat of rain and we couldn't take the chance by hav-
ing the van parked two blocks away."
"A lot of people are very upset about this," said
resident Ellen Trudelle. She added that her schedule
prohibits her from attending many city meetings, "but


,.'. "


here's an issue I just can't ignore."
Jolley said he returned to the city after the summer,
visited the Gulf Boulevard beach he's been going to for
30 years and cried out, "What have they done to my Is-
land?"
Thomas C. Brown said the street's been available
for parking for 40 or 50 years. "Why 'no' all of a sud-
den?" He labeled the fence "obscene."
Dorothy Kerr called the fence "an insult."
Trudelle suggested several times that dune resto-
ration and parking can co-exist on Gulf Boulevard. She
was out in front of the Anna Maria Post Office the fol-
lowing day to collect more signatures on the petition to
return parking to the city-owned street.
"Something has been taken away from us," she
said. "We will be back before the city commission
again soon."




Ellen Trudelle of Anna Maria is part of a
grass-roots effort to restore parking to
the city's popular Gulf Boulevard beach
access. Hundreds of signatures have been
collected. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.















By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Most of us know something about the first Thanks-
giving on American soil. A year after their arrival in
Massachusetts, and despite the fact that only half of
them had survived, the Pilgrim settlers celebrated their
first harvest in October 1621 with a three-day festival
joined by their new native American friends.
Where did Thanksgiving go from there?
Actually, there was no Thanksgiving for the Pil-
grims in Plymouth in 1622. That second year's harvest
was so poor that there was nothing left for a feast.
The winter of 1622-23 was brutal. Spring finally
came but after planting time there was no rain. By late
July the drought was serious and William Bradford,
governor of the colony, ordered a day of fasting and
prayer.
The Pilgrims prayed in unison for nine hours.
Clouds began to gather. The next morning rain soaked
the parched
fie Ids
Bradford de-
clared a spe-
cial Thanks-
giving Day
July 30,
1623.
For
the next 150-
plus years,
harvest festi-
d vals were
held locally
at varying
t i m e s
throughout the growing American settlements.
In 1784 a special Thanksgiving was held to cel-
ebrate the end of the American Revolution. In 1789,
when the 13 colonies had become the 13 states, Presi-
dent George Washington proclaimed Thursday, Nov.


26, a day of
Thanksgiv-
ing.
At the
end of the
War of 1812
President A
James Madi-
son also de-
clared a na-
ti on al
Thanksgiving
Day, but for
decades
longer, days
of thanksgiving were celebrated by different states and
localities on different dates.
After 30 years of trying to convince the country
that there should be one national day of celebrating
thankfulness, Sarah Josepha Hale author, editor and
composer of the song "Mary Had a Little Lamb" -
was granted a visit with President Abraham Lincoln.
Lincoln liked the proud New Englander's idea and
in 1863 he proclaimed the last Thursday in November
to be Thanksgiving Day. Americans have celebrated
the holiday every November since then.
In 1939 to accommodate retailers who wanted
to extend the Christmas shopping season President
Franklin Roosevelt changed the date of Thanksgiving.
For two years the holiday fell earlier in the month. As
a result, some states used the old date, some the new.
In 1941 Congress stepped in and set Thanksgiving Day
as the fourth Thursday in November.
In another 50 years, who knows? Maybe retailers
will convince Congress that Halloween really should
be the legal Fall Festival Day, Nov. 1 can become the
busiest shopping day of the year and no one will notice
who leaves their Christmas lights up all year.
All ye in favour, gather at ye meeting house.
Happy holidays!


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E PAGE 3 IR



Anna Maria City
11/27, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board
11/28, 7:30 p.m., Commission meeting


Bradenton Beach
None scheduled
4r


Holmes Beach
11/28, 9 am., Planning Commission review of
comprehensive plan evaluation

Of Interest
11/27, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization, Sudakoff Hall,
USF campus, Sarasota.
11/28 through 12/15, 9 am., Certification
hearing on Orimulsion, Manatee Civic Center,
One Haben Boulevard, Palmetto. On 11/30 from
3 to 5:30 p.m. and 7 to 9:30 p.m. and
12/1 from 9 to 11 a.m. public input will be taken.

All city offices will be closed Nov. 23 and 24
for Thanksgiving.


Itm tSS ae .. wethwoSl -cls



















bouillabai~~sse ako ab
Gods on vewan*ccoplihe


Famous presidents gave us


national Thanksgiving






I~ PAGE 4 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 5 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Mayoral candidates face off for Dec. 5


Bradenton Beach election


By Paul Roat
Paid parking at the public beaches and continued city
police and garbage pickup may be in store for Bradenton
Beach residents.
All three candidates for mayor of the city Leroy
Arnold, Dan Goodchild and Walt Grace concurred on
those topics and more at last week's candidates forum,
sponsored by The Islander Bystander.
About 50 people attended the forum and posed ques-
tions to the trio. The forum was moderated by Islander
Bystander Publisher Bonner Presswood.
City elections will be Tuesday, Dec. 5. In addition to
the mayoral slate, there will be a question on the ballot
asking if voters favor rehabilitation or replacement of the
Anna Maria Island Bridge at Manatee Avenue in Holmes
Beach.
Three ward seats have already been filled since only
one candidate qualified to run for each of the posts. Tak-
ing office for the ward positions will be Dick Suhre, Ward
1; Gail Cole, Ward 2; and Connie Drescher, Ward 3.
Profiles of the council-elect members will be included
in next week's Islander Bystander.

The candidates
Arnold served on the council from 1986 to 1988,
when he unsuccessfully ran against Katie Pierola for
mayor. He is a retired school teacher and has also worked
for a number of large hotel chains. Arnold moved to
Bradenton Beach full-time 15 years ago.
Goodchild is a former member of the city's planning
and zoning board. He is a former vice president of a na-
tion wide manufacturing company, and runs a massage
therapy business in the city. Goodchild moved to the city
seven years ago.
Grace was elected to the city council one year ago
after serving on the city's planning and zoning board. He
is a former airline pilot and is active in the Coast Guard
Auxiliary. Grace is a graduate of the basic institute for
elected municipal officials and the advanced institute of
elected municipal officials.

Arnold statement
Arnold said the city has gone through a year of tur-
moil in the wake of the council decision to rezone several
lots to allow the expansion of a marina in Bradenton
Beach. "The love of money is the root of all evil," Arnold
said, "and money played too big a part in those decisions,
and residents played too small a part."
He said if elected he would "restore freedom of
speech so you can express yourself freely without fear of
legal harassment"
Arnold said the city should "join with other Gulf
Coast cities to declare war on and eliminate Red Tide."
The city should also continue to obtain grant funds for
beach renourishment and the completion of the city fish-
ing pier, promote a new bridge south of Anna Maria Is-
land, beautify Bridge Street with "more shade trees and
less beer and wine," and "support commercial develop-
ment when it will benefit the residents of the city."

Goodchild statement
Goodchild said his candidacy for mayor is his first
venture in politics. "Politics is new to me," he said, "but
I'm not afraid to say yes, and not afraid to say no." He said
he believed his personality "allows me to get along with
a stone. I'm an excellent listener and I will listen to your
problems and do what I can to solve them."


Bradenton Beach mayor candidates, from left, Dan Goodchild, Walt Grace and Leroy Arnold are questioned
by Islander Bystander Publisher Bonner Presswood. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


He said if elected he would push for the recommen-
dations by a task force to improve Gulf Drive with bike
paths, sidewalks, crosswalks and road improvements. He
wants to continue to apply for grants to further improve
the city, and favors "accomplishing better relationships
between the three Island cities."
Goodchild said he favors rehabilitation rather than
replacement of the Anna Maria Island Bridge at Manatee
Avenue, and said he "believes in giving business owners
a voice in how their tax dollars are spent I want Bradenton
Beach to be known as a city that is friendly toward busi-
ness, promoting new and more commerce for a balanced
and healthy community."

Grace statement
Grace said his record of service in the city means "he
has been working for the community." He pointed to his
membership on the Tingley Memorial Library, the
Manasota League of Cities, the Island Transit Study Com-
mittee, board of directors of the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center as examples of his commitment to the city.
He said if elected mayor he would hold the line on
taxes, continue to give priority to citizen's welfare on
zoning matters, improve drainage and cure below-stan-
dard streets, aggressively seek funding for future grants
and search for creative solutions to noise and drinking
problems in the city. He said he is opposed to the high,
fixed-span bridge in Holmes Beach.
"Our phone is ringing all the time with people calling
with problems," Grace said. "I expect that any problems
you have you will call us."

The questions
All three candidates said they favored continued city-
operated police and sanitation services despite higher costs
rather than having an outside agency take over those du-
ties.
The candidates also agreed on paid parking at Co-
quina and Cortez beaches.
'"he county commission would be the ones to do it,"
Arnold said of the paid beach parking. "I'm against park-
ing meters, but if there were gates and attendants to col-
lect the money, that would be okay."
"The money generated could be used to keep the
beaches up," Goodchild said. "The attendants would serve
as a deterrent to car break-ins. I believe we will eventu-
ally have to do it"
"I would like to keep the charge to a minimum,"
Grace said. "They are county beaches, but if we pushed
for it, then the county would probably do it Of course, the


county would like to keep all the money, so we'd have to
fight them to get our share."
What about the vehicle break-ins at Coquina Beach,
Leffis Key and Cortez Beach that have plagued the city
for the past year?
Arnold said he favored recruiting citizen volunteers
to aid police in patrolling the city. He said retired police
officers could "be the eyes and ears on our streets at night"
Goodchild said he believed there needed to be more
police coverage on the beaches, and suggested bicycle
patrols. "Some kind of presence is needed there," he said,
"and we need to educate our visitors in several different
languages about the need to lock their cars."
The expansion of the Bradenton Beach Marina last
year involved all three of the candidates. Arnold was one
of the 19 citizens taken to court for what marina owner
Allan Bazzy said was a conspiracy against him to block
the marina's expansion. Goodchild, as a planning and
zoning board member, voted in favor of the estimated $2
million expansion project. Grace, although elected to the
council after the critical votes, voted against the court-
ordered rezoning for the marina. In hindsight, would they
have done things differently?
Arnold said, "If any of you had that building in your
back yard, you'd be raising the daylights. The city sacri-
ficed one neighborhood for a building."
Goodchild said that "the whole neighborhood was an
eyesore, but when the marina is finished I believe it will
look terrific. When I walked into that meeting, I was pre-
pared to vote against the expansion, but after listening to
the presentation, leaned more toward being in favor of it"
Grace said, "I believe the marina will look good when
it's finished, but I believe the people and neighbors should
come first and that is why I opposed it"
And what would they do differently than Katie
Pierola as mayor?
Arnold said, "The mayor is the leader, and you can't
lead anyone where they don't want to go. I would like to
motivate people to contribute to the city. The leader of the
city is charged with making everyone realize that people
are important to the city's government"
Goodchild said he "wouldn't change a thing. I like to
compare Bradenton Beach to a caterpillar. The town is
now in its chrysalis state, and I can see a beautiful butter-
fly coming out"
Grace said, "Katie's a hard act to follow" as mayor.
"I would like to see us pushing more for the improvements
along Gulf Drive. I'd like to have us get away from hav-
ing a swimming pool on every street corer after it rains
and get our beach taken care of through more grants."


Election season opens in Anna Maria


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Qualifying packets for the city of Anna Maria's Feb.
13 election are now available at City Hall and the rumor
mill is in full operation, especially regarding the mayoral
race.
Mayor Dorothy McChesney says she will "definitely"
run again for the spot she has held since last February.
Incumbent commissioners Doug Wolfe (five years in
office) and Max Znika (seven years prior to recent return)
have also told The Islander Bystander they will run again.
Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard, completing his first
commission term, is currently "weighing the options" and
will make his final decision soon.


Commissioner George McKay squashed rumors that
he would try to unseat McChesney.
"No, not this year," said McKay, an eight-year com-
missioner who lost a mayor's race to the late Mayor Ray
Simches in 1994. McChesney beat out Znika last Febru-
ary for the remainder of Simches' mayoral term.
The mayor's seat and three out of the four city com-
mission slots will be up for grabs in February. Only
McKay's seat is not open.
The mayor's position and two commission seats will
be for two-year terms. The third vote-getter in the commis-
sion race will get the remaining one year of the seat Znika
now holds. He was recently appointed to serve the remain-
der of the term following Commissioner Mark Ratliffs


resignation.
The mayor's salary is $8,000 per year. Commission-
ers earn $4,000 per year. Interested candidates must have
been city residents for at least the past six months.
Qualifying packets can be picked up from City Clerk
Peg Nelson at City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive. Obtaining a
packet does not obligate anyone to run. The qualifying
period will run from noon Tuesday, Dec. 12, through noon
Tuesday, Dec. 26. For qualifying requirements, contact
Nelson at 778-0781.
Residents wishing to register to vote must do so by
Monday, Jan. 15, to qualify for the Feb. 13 ballotting. The
ballot will also include a beach-renourishment referendum
and a Manatee Avenue bridge question.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 PAGE 5 ]

Beach 'primer' proposed for Anna Maria
By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach resident and retired civil engineer
John Adams thinks Anna Maria voters need to be edu- -
cated by mail about beach renourishment or the city's "
Feb. 13 referendum will turn up negative.
"People's concerns result from a misunderstanding A, L
and 30 audience members on Nov. 14. .
"Doing nothing is the most costly option," he said ,
near the end of a 15-minute address. "Renourishment 4
is the least costly option." Most of the audience ap- ....
plauded his remarks. .
Adams has submitted a proposal to the commission
for preparation of a "beach-protection primer" at a cost
Of $2,500. Reproduction and mailing to Anna Maria -
citizens would be additional.
He is the creator of a countywide beach-education
publication that was distributed for $29,500 prior to the
establishment of the 50-year Anna Maria Island Project
that is now in effect for the Gulfside beaches of Holmes
Beach and Bradenton Beach.
Anna Maria voters will decide on their February
ballots whether or not to try to get in on the next 45


Retired engineer John Adams, left, donated this pictorial essay on Anna Maria's beach status to City Hall as
part of his proposal to educate city voters. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


years of that project which is funded by federal, state
and county monies.
City commissioners were deadlocked 2-to-2 on the
matter last month but agreed unanimously to turn the
issue over to voters.
"Few remember that an education program saved
the day for Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach
renourishment," Adams wrote in his proposal.
In person he stated several times, "Unless you edu-
cate, you'll lose the vote."
After comments in favor of renourishment from
Sandbar restaurant owner Ed Chiles and resident Bob
Vanhousen, Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard said, "Now
it's my turn to talk on the other side."
Shumard is also the director of the Anna Maria


Island Turtle Watch and remains opposed to
renourishment efforts.
"I feel we've got as much sand right now as we've
ever had," he said. "The people will decide."
Mayor Dorothy McChesney, a proponent of the city's
trying to get in on the federal project, told the commission
that some of the cost of the mailer "might be picked up by
the county's Tourist Development Council."
When she pressed commissioners on the question
of the mailer, only Shumard spoke.
"I think the education should come in the newspa-
pers," said the vice mayor.
Commissioners George McKay, Doug Wolfe and
Max Znika declined to comment. No action was taken
for or against Adams' proposal.


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Dolphin announces
demise
The Dolphin publication of Anna Maria Island
ceased publication effective last Wednesday.
Publisher Dennis Friedel said flagging cash
resources and a lack of investor capital, coupled
with a high amount of past-due accounts, forced
the publication's demise.
"It's a shame that this newspaper has to close
because of a few deadbeats who refused to honor
their commitments to us," Friedel said in his last
issue, "but that's the way it looks." Friedel said
he is owed "more than $22,000 [in] outstanding
receivables."
The Dolphin began publishing March 31,
1994.


I


I -


- I


ilT


!






1I PAGE 6 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


-


Good things and bad
Let's see if we can get this Cortez Bridge sce-
nario straight:
In summer 1994, officials from the Florida De-
partment of Transportation announced plans to reno-
vate the Cortez Bridge in lieu of their dumped plan to
replace the span with a mega bridge.
This is a good thing.
The DOT says it would like to get input from the
residents and business owners on the Island, in Cortez
and along Cortez Road for when and how the bridge
repairs could cause the least disruption. Suggested are
partial lane closures for a long time and the accom-
panying gridlock or a total closure for a short, time
gridlock, but limited. The people confer and decide
a total closure for a little while is better than a long
period of lane closures. DOT agrees.
This is a good thing.
DOT says, How about a total closure in the off
season, say just after Easter? No! scream residents and
business owners, that's still our season! So the DOT
again agrees with the locals and declares the bridge will
be closed in October, the "most-off' of off seasons.
This is a good thing.
DOT says, although the bridge closure could
stretch as long as 30 days, the bridge will probably be
closed for a much briefer period of time, more like 20
days. To make the contractor work faster, the DOT
offers a generous $10,000 per day incentive for every
day he whittles from the schedule. There's a disincen-
tive too a pricey $10,000 per day for every day the
contractor runs over schedule.
This is a good thing.
Oct. 1 dawns. The bridge is still open. It's Sunday.
Oops.
Oct. 2 dawns. The bridge is closed. Here we go.
Work begins. It stops a few weeks later. So-called
"unforeseen problems" are found, like toxic lead-based
paint and more structural repairs than anticipated. We
can't meet the schedule! There's all these regulations
we've got to follow! the contractor says, despite a clause
in the contract that says lead-based paint should be antici-
pated.
Oops.
DOT changes the contract to allow for a total clo-
sure of the bridge until Dec. 7, a total of 67 days rather
than the original 30. A revolt erupts as businesses re-
alize that critical shopping days surrounding Thanks-
giving will be lost.
This is a bad thing.
Work on the bridge continues and, surprise! The
contractor discovers he CAN reopen the bridge in time


ISLANDERi a t
NOVEMBER 23, 1995 VOLUME FOUR, NUMBER 1
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Janice Dingman
V Production Graphics
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Rob Ross
Mary Stockmaster


0 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


TRUST M6E... "TtE.
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OPEM Y, ~N ETDB .
E-MER\NCr, OR. V'LL.
t-\AVE- HOOT DOeS FOR.
TA iNiVKSCrTI NEGI r
'D^MER .


SLICK


By Egan


for Thanksgiving.
This is a good thing.
DOT's contract modification allows the incen-
tive-disincentive clause to continue to Dec. 7. Since
Thanksgiving is some 14 days ahead of Dec. 7, the
contractor's bonus remains intact: $100,000.
$100,000.


For finishing the job 23 days later than scheduled
- and in the wake of at least one Cortez business clos-
ing due to lack of traffic and business.
This is a bad thing. A very, very bad thing.
Why is DOT giving a $100,000 bonus to a contrac-
tor who has completed work more than three weeks late?
Why are we, the people, putting up with it?


Gulf fence shuts out seniors
I was appalled at seeing the split rail ranch fence
on Gulf Boulevard in Anna Maria City.
Three years ago at the request of disabled seniors,
then Anna Maria Commissioner Manuel Huerta put up
handicap parking signs on that street It was easy for the
handicapped to take a few steps from their car to sit and
watch the sunset.
Also, Roser Church has beautiful services on Sat-
urday evenings on the beach at this location. The
church's older parishioners could park and only had a
few steps to go to sit down.
Now they must walk a block and carry their chairs.
Commissioner Max Znika has assured me he will
do something about this fiasco.
I also intend to seek legal advice on the fence. I
may take it down myself and suffer the consequences.
John Bacich, Anna Maria City
Orimulsion a breath of bad air
I would like to urge all concerned citizens to attend
the public hearings regarding the proposed burning of
Orimulsion by Florida Power and Light.
There have been strong objections voiced against the
use of this fuel, all of which have been ignored by the
majority of Manatee County Commissioners who have
voted in favor of allowing FPL to burn Orimulsion.
The Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion has ruled that if FPL wins the right to burn the fuel,
the electric company will not be required to install se-
lective catalytic reduction technology to control the
increase in nitrogen oxide emissions.
Many people to whom I have spoken agree that the
quality of life would be greatly depreciated if
Orimulsion is burned at the Parrish plant, but they act


as though nothing can be done at this point that ap-
proval of the permit is indeed a "done deal." Well it is
not not yet- and not unless we allow it to happen.
There will be public hearings from Tuesday, Nov. 28,
to Dec. 15 at the Manatee Civic Center after which the
hearing officer will present his findings to the governor
and his cabinet, who will then make the final decision.
It is incumbent on us all to make ourselves heard at
these hearings and to write to the governor and his cabi-
net expressing our deep concerns about the use of
Orimulsion. Sarasota residents would do well to join with
their Manatee County neighbors since their water and air
will be affected as much as will Manatee County's.
Let us make ourselves heard we have an oppor-
tunity to prove that democracy can work and that
grassroots activism has meaning. Watch the newspa-
pers for the times when public comment will be permit-
ted attend and speak out!
Freda Perrotta, Longboat Key

Habitat fundraiser a success
Because of the patronage by the Island community,
the parking lot rummage sale held on Saturday, Nov.
18, at Neal and Neal Realtors to benefit Habitat for
Humanity raised approximately $1,300.
This money, combined with two other projects, is
sufficient to buy materials to frame one new house for
a neighbor in Manatee County.
The work of Habitat for Humanity is not a charity. It
is an opportunity to extend a helping hand to a deserving
family to achieve the great feeling that comes with home
ownership a feeling that most of us take for granted but
is denied to so many. Thank you Anna Maria Island for
your participation and for caring.
Neal and Neal Realtors, Holmes Beach


50.zE... AWIO T~.E
Soo, 000 Ot-4Nus
CACK F=OR HOT
BE-MGr Ot1 T4-MME \%
IN -rE. A t AtL-



(

0


I 9Y9OUR OPNIONI











THOSE WERE THE BAYS

Part 10, Turn-of-the-Century Anna Maria
by June Alder








/





4




Anna Maria homesteaders of the 1890s got their mail and supplies at this over-
water store on Perico Island.

MAIL CALL


In the 1890s the handful of settlers on
what we now call Anna Maria Island had
to row across the sound to Perico Island to
get their supplies and mail. The store and
post office was in the Johnstone home,
perched on the end of long dock located
where the east end of the Manatee Bridge
sits today. Mail arrived about twice a week
by schooner or by steamboat.
It was all pretty casual. People
didn't get a lot of mail, and no one was
fussy about correct post office addresses
back then. A letter addressed to so-and-
so in the "Manatee section" would likely
reach the recipient sooner or later.
But then in 1898 came the Spanish-
American War when 30,000 soldiers
poured into the Tampa Bay area. Suddenly
the post offices of Tampa Bay were forced
to "modernize." One result is that the
Perico Island post office was shifted south
to Brown's General Store in Cortez.
This was fine for the fisherfolk of
Cortez but not so nifty for the Anna
Marians, most of whom lived in the
northern half of the island. For now they
had to row a long haul to pick up their
mail. They decided it was high time for
the island to get its own post office.
Second homesteader John R. Jones,
an attorney with political moxie, took
the lead. Our island was known by sev-
eral names Palm Key and Long Key
as well as Anna Maria Key.
Jones's first step was to petition the
government to strike the name "Palm
Key" (by now the most prevalent name)
from the maps and charts and have the
island officially labeled "Anna Maria
Key." He argued this "on the ground
that there was more than one island on


Anna Maria Island was shown as
"Long Island" and Longboat Key was
marked "Palm Island" on this 1839
U.S. Army map.


the Florida coast called Palm Key and
it caused confusion in our mail. Even
with the Perico office, people would
address mail to Palm Key and our let-
ters often went astray."
Next, Jones filed a petition for a
separate post office on the island. Gov-
ernment officials agreed, but said the
name "Anna Maria" wouldn't do.
Well, Jones wasn't buying this. He
was convinced the name had been be-
stowed upon our Island by the Spanish
conquistadors in the 16th century and that
it stood for the Virgin Mary and her
mother Anna. (Actually, the evidence is
strong that the name dates only from
1848 when surveyors put together the
names of the wife and sister of Tampa's
postmaster to form "Anna Maria.")
Anyway, Jones prevailed. He ex-
plained with pride in 1924: "...We were
at first turned down on this because of
the ruling of the department that a
single name only could be given a new
post office, unless what was asked for
was historical or tending to perpetuate
history. We proceeded then to show
that the name asked for covered both
these points, and having satisfied the
department as to our position, Anna
Maria was made the official name for
our post office."
Jones acknowledged getting help
from his friend, George Wilhelm
"Will" Bean, son of "first home-
steader" George Emerson Bean. Young
Bean married the daughter of the post-
master of Port Tampa and was rapidly
rising in postal circles. He had an inter-
est in the post office matter, of course,
because of the large tract his family
controlled on the north point Still in his
20s, he already was thinking of devel-
oping it and the name Anna Maria
was appealing.
On Feb. 8, 1904, the island offi-
cially got its post office in Sam Cobb's
house (located in what today is down-
town Holmes Beach). Within 10 years
Bean moved the post office to his new
Anna Maria Beach Resort (nucleus of
today's City of Anna Maria).
By the way, does anyone know
why or when Anna Maria Key became
Anna Maria Island?

Next: Good neighbor
Fort Dade


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E PAGE 7 i[



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year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
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IO PAGE 8 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Deputy reports 'problems' at


Community Center


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Manatee County Sheriffs Office Deputy Jules
Dengler cited two "problems" with the Island Commu-
nity Center during his monthly report to the Anna
Maria City Commission Nov. 14.
Dengler called the parking situation during the
Artists Guild's Heritage Festival the previous weekend
"a disaster." He said Sgt. Jim Tillner had spoken with
Center administrators after the event to inform them of
deputies' and residents' complaints.
"We will not overlook any more illegal parking"
during special events, Dengler told the commission.
A private, outside security guard hired by the Cen-
ter "sat inside all day" and "didn't have any power any-
way," said the deputy.
Actually, much to the Center's regret, the guard
never showed up at all, Center Program Director Scott
Dell told The Islander Bystander.
Some parking-monitor volunteers promised by the
Artists Guild also did not materialize, said Dell.
In recent years the Center has hired off-duty
sheriffs deputies for major events. But the same con-
tract-liability concerns that forced the Island Chamber
of Commerce to move its luau from the Center in Sep-
tember now plague other organizations that plan large
events at the Center.
Commissioner Max Znika, Center liaison, said he
would look into the matter.
Znika also promised to look into Dengler's; "sec-
ond problem" the use of the Center by teenagers.
Dengler said the deputies get complaint calls about
teens playing football in city streets.


"The teens say they're not allowed to play football
at the Community Center," said Dengler. "That's what
we have a community center for."
James Dougherty addressed commissioners as "the
spokesman" for five other teens with him.
He said Dell with Center Director Pierrette
Kelly present told him "we are too big to play foot-
ball because we'll hurt the little kids."
"It seems that the only time you can use the Cen-
ter now is if you're a youth or an elder," Dougherty
complained.
Dell was surprised by Dengler and Dougherty's
remarks. Rather, said Dell, Center administrators have
worked hard to incorporate many teen programs into
the schedule and those programs are well attended.
Dell said state regulations do limit the presence of
unsupervised teens inside during the weekday elemen-
tary-age after-school program from 3 to 6 p.m.
As for use of the playing fields, "the teens can use
them as long as there's no scheduled program going on
out there," said Dell.
The conversation with Dougherty about being "too
big" had to do with playing baseball and softball, ac-
cording to Dell. In an effort to keep neighbors happy,
teens and adults are asked not to use the Little League
field because their higher-powered hits reach beyond
the Center's property.
After Dell contacted Dougherty about joining in
some of the Center's teen programs, Dell said it turns
out that Dougherty is 19 years old.
"I asked him why he didn't come down for our
three hours of adult basketball in the gym Wednesday
nights," said Dell. "He said he didn't know about it."


Award for Katie
Outgoing Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola was
surprised by Island officials with an orchid and an
award for outstanding leadership and dedication to
the Island at a recent meeting of the Coalition of
Barrier Island Elected Officials. Islander Photo: Pat
Copeland


IBYSmaI iii







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 9 iE


Cortez historic designation:


sav

By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Talk about history!
Some "historic" places make you wonder either
where the history is or how to scrape it off you, it's laid
on so thick.
With Cortez, there's enough right before your eyes
to hone interest to a sharp edge, and enough behind it
to satisfy the most insatiable buff.
Many of the 500 people of Cortez are living with
their own roots, having grown up with three or four
generations of family as a living history with tales of
"the good old days."
Unlike such historic towns as Williamsburg and
Virginia City, which had to be resurrected after death,
Cortez is a living, breathing, sometimes fighting village
trying valiantly to preserve itself.
It seems all Cortezians know each other, not sur-
prising since the whole place is populated by relations
ranging from sibling to shirt-tail. Several of them have
been pressing for years to get their town on the Na-
tional Historic Register, and finally made it.

From 'Captain Billy'
Leading the historic movement has been Mary
Fulford-Green, highly qualified by determination and
by ancestry. Her grandfather, "Captain Billy," came
from North Carolina in 1889, and founded Cortez and
a bunch of Fulfords.
He and a few other pioneering fishermen settled on
Hunter's Point, as the area that is now the village of
Cortez was then known, but they weren't the first here
by any means.
First the Indians, of course. And in the 1700s the
Spanish fished here for the Cuban market. In 1834
Capt William Bunce had a fish operation at the mouth
of the Manatee River. A few years later Cuban fisher-
men set up shoreside fishing headquarters called
ranchos, but no trace remains of any such outposts
around Hunter's Point. There is a record of 28 fisher-
men working at Hunter's Point in 1879, many of them
from the Bahamas.
Ten years later five North Carolina fishermen ar-
rived, via Cedar Key and Perico Island Charlie
Jones, Jim Guthrie and William, Nathan and Sanders
Fulford and bought land in what became Cortez.
Early settlers built near the waterfront, their homes
patterned afterthe ones they had left in Carolina. Al-
most simultaneously came fish docks, camps for sleep-
ing and for net storage, and a store.

Then came Cortez
When villagers applied for a post office in 1896,
Hunter's Point became Cortez. That year energetic
Cortezians hauled lumber by ox cart from a mill in
Palma Sola and built a school. Its larger brick succes-


ring a community

r- -^am^^71r.


Fulford Fish House in Cortez, now a part of the historic designation of the village. Islander Photos: Paul Roat


sor, built in 1912, was the residence of artist Robert
Sailors until he died last summer, and now there are
high hopes it may be turned into a community center
building.
More Carolinians came around the turn of the cen-
tury, and Midwesterners. The Mora family came from
the Canary Islands. By 1910 Cortez had a population
of 110. As children grew up, the original large holdings
were divided for their homes.
The waterfront store was expanded about then to
create the Albion Inn, which lasted until 1991 when it
was torn down.
The village's life always has been fish. Immigrants
found square miles of fish in tremendous variety -
mullet, redfish, trout, blues, snook, sheepshead, floun-
der, mackerel and kingfish. Fishermen sold their har-
vest at fish houses some of their brethren established.
That was for the men. For the women, the Kitchen
Flats ran shallow from the waterfront far into the Bay.
Its name evidently derived from its richness in marine
life, like a well-stocked kitchen.

Hard labor
Women waded the flats and scooped scallops into
wooden washtubs they towed along, then went back to
Cortez to pry open the shells and scoop out the scallop
meat for the market. Full-grown men still cringe when
reminded of helping Mom with the scallops.
Another memory: The shore was extended into the
Bay by residents dumping trash along the waterline;
every storm washed debris back up on the bank and
kids had to pick it up and put it back where the
grownups wanted it "We kids hated it," Mary Green
recalls.
Life was hard here for everyone. Water was scarce,
collected in cisterns, three of which are still around
today. Mosquitoes were terrible. A hurricane in 1921
wiped out the waterfront and many inshore dwellings.


A nasty little war erupted in the 1920s over types
of nets being used, and Joe Fulford's house was dyna-
mited; it is still standing. A decade later another linger-
ing dispute raged over unionizing of fishermen.
The Depression of the 1930s hit as hard here as
anywhere, but Cortez people still boast that theirs was
the only place in the country that accepted no federal
assistance at all. Worse yet, during that entire decade
the mullet disappeared from the seas here.
One of the worst times was in 1947, when a 13-
month bloom of red tide practically destroyed fishing
for awhile. Another bloom hit in 1953 and killed fish
by the thousands.

What next?
With the state-wide ban on gill nets, imposed by
the voters last November and placed into effect July 1,
fishing as Cortez has always known it is finished. With
it goes a way of living.
But Cortez won't go. It has survived and prospered
after crises and calamities, and most expect this new shock
to be another curve, not the end of the village's road.
Wherever that road takes it, Cortez won't be
changing physically. Its assignment to the National
Register of Historic Places helps, putting it much
nearer to federal and state money for preservation. As
a county-designated Historic Neighborhood, it is pro-
tected from condo-ization by the Manatee County
Comprehensive Plan and by the county's Preservation
Board, which must approve any changes.
And as Mary Fulford-Green says, feisty Cortezians
have put up such tremendous battles against develop-
ers that "nobody in the county planning department
wants to run afoul of this village."
Cortez is still, as one writer described it, place where
"ordinary people wishing for ordinary things have worked
and prayed together in perhaps ordinary ways to create a
way of life which now seems extraordinary."



Cortezians hope to
acquire the former
school, later the home of
the late Robert Sailors,
and turn it into a commu-
nity building. The school
was built in 1912.


Royal palms line many of the streets.






IEB PAGE 10 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Howard completes term as

Island Chamber president


Dessert Fashion Show

and Sale

STuesday Nov. 28 1 PM
St. Bernard's Parish Hall
$5 per person
Reservations Florence Tully 778-7749
Sponsored by: The Ladies Ancient Order of Hibemias






ART GALLERY
Exhibiting extensive collections by the
most talented Florida artists ...
Pointing, Sculpture. Glass & Pottery
Mon-Sat 10:30 to 5 Sunday 12 to 5
and by Appt. Closed Wed.
509 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-4655


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Don Howard chaired his last board of directors
meeting as president of the Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce Nov. 15. There will be no meeting
or Chamber social in the month of December. Bob
Hinds will be installed as the new president at a recep-
tion Jan. 10 at the Sandbar restaurant.
Howard owner of Island Plantation Resort in
Holmes. Beach and a former city councilman will
remain on the Chamber board.
He expressed two hopes for the future of the
Chamber that it can look at working with and par-
ticipating with its "neighbor" chambers in Manatee
County and on Longboat Key and that directors and
members "get more involved with the government
process instead of being Monday morning quarter-
backs."
"We need to be more involved in the planning
processes," said Howard.
Earlier in the meeting, Howard described a recent
meeting at the Seafood Shack restaurant between
Cortez business people and representatives from the
Florida Department of Transportation regarding the
extended closing of the Cortez Bridge.
He reminded directors that FDOT had given the
Island cities the opportunity to choose from several
repair options for scheduling. "It was this Island's
choice to start the work Oct. 1," he said.


Howard


He said he had "stood
alone" for starting work the
day after Labor Day but
people were afraid of its be-
ing right in the middle of
hurricane season.
"Sometimes we are
our own worst enemy," said
Howard of the current pre-
dicament and its effect on
area businesses. "I think
Thanksgiving's going to be
a wash."
Hinds repeated the


sentiment that's been surfacing regarding repair delays
that should have been foreseen by either FDOT or the
contractor.
"I still think they just did all this to aggravate us
and get a major four-lane highway out to us on Mana-
tee Avenue," he said.
Except for approving secretary's minutes and the
treasurer's report, no action was taken by the bare quo-
rum of board members present There was discussion
about the status of road work throughout Manatee
County and the pros and cons of a buffet-style instal-
lation reception next month versus the traditional,
harder-to-mingle sit-down dinner.
Tickets for the reception will be $15 in advance or
$18 at the door. For information, call 778-1541.


WORLD'S A
SAFER PLACE ...
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Free water testing doesn't wash with

Holmes Beach councilwoman


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie Mar-
tini received a letter offering free water testing, she
thought it came from the county's utility department,
but she soon learned differently.
"The envelope looked like the ones from the
county," she said. "I sent in the postage-free return
envelope and someone called to set a date to come out
and test my water. I thought the county was checking
the quality of water coming to the Island. Some wa-
ter companies do spot checks like that."
A man came and tested her water and told her it
was unfit for human consumption due to the high
level of chlorine, said Martini. Then he offered to sell
her an outside water filtering system at a cost of $18
per month. She politely declined and called the
county's Water Division Manager, Jim Zimmerman.
The company offering the testing is Manatee
Water Consultants, said Zimmerman. It has been the
subject of numerous calls to his department.
"The envelope contains the words 'important
water information' in the left corer," he said. "Inside
is an 'important bulletin' offering free water testing.
The reply envelope is similar to the county's."
A company representative tests the water and then
tries to sell the customer a water filtering system, ac-


cording to Zimmerman. Filtering systems can range
from several hundred to a couple thousand dollars.
Special floor models are offered at reduced rates.
"What a lot of people are buying is a carbon filter,"
he noted. "You can buy a national brand carbon filter
for $12 in a discount store."
The county started getting complaints about the
company in August and ran a special notice in its bills
in September, he said.
The notice cautions, "Before you buy an expensive
home water treatment device that you may not need,
call the Manatee County Water Department of Public
Services for free information about your water. We'll
also send you a free reprint from Consumer Reports
regarding the selling of home water treatment devices.
"Call us before you buy," he advised customers.
"We can test your water and provide information about
what's in your water. We try to get the information to
the customers, so they can make informed choices.
People need to shop around."
Zimmerman said consumers who have com-
plaints should first call the company and if not sat-
isfied, call the Better Business Council. If they feel
they've been defrauded, they should call the Mana-
tee County Sheriff's Office, because there is a state
statute making it illegal to make false claims about
tap water contamination.


With a little help for our friends
Woody Candish, David Reeves and Deana Reemelin of the Anna Maria Island Community Center spent their
Saturday distributing Thanksgiving food supplies donated by All Island Denominations to Island families in need.
For information on receiving Christmas help, call the Center at 778-1908. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


~s~Z








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E PAGE 11 IiI
-i J16 YEARS IN SERVICE


Ceiling Fan & Lighting Center
& FIREPLACE ACCESSORIES
Sales Parts Service Installation
4232 Cortez Road W. Bradenton


Hi-12 holds installation luncheon
The Anna Maria Island Hi-12 Club held its annual installation of officers Nov. 16. Taking part in the cer-
emonies were, from left, Al Velasco, past president; Harold Redfield, director; Chet Cianfaglione, outgoing
president; Bill Bingler, past president; Free Stittswerth, first vice president and past president; Al
Butterfield, chaplain and past president; Will Ashburn, incoming president; and Jay Barbour, secretary/


treasurer. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Orchestra fundraiser
recital Dec. 3
The Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and
Chorus will host a six-performer recital to raise money for
their organization at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 3, at Gloria
Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The performers will include Community Orchestra
music conductor Alfred Gershfeld on violin and Lyudmila
Afanasieva on piano. They will be joined by local orches-
tra members Carleton Brower, violin; Eleanor Diesing,
cello; Paul Diesing, flute; and tenor Tim Smith.
The program will include a variety of music from
Baroque to modern times. A donation of $15 per per-
son will be collected on the evening of the concert. The
doors will open at 7 p.m.
For more information, contact Willem Bartelsman
at 778-6517.

Longboat chamber
welcomes new members
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will
hold a new member orientation and power networking
seminar on Tuesday, Nov. 28, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the
Holiday Inn Lido Beach, 233 Ben Franklin Drive.
Admission is free and attendees are requested to
bring "lots of business cards." The power networking
seminar focuses on teaching how to make money
through the chamber.
Complimentary hors d'oeuvres will be served. For
information or reservations call 387-9519.

Trash, treasures, crafts
vendors wanted for
thieves' markets
Spaces are available to folks who want to partici-
pate the Anna Maria Island Privateers' Thieves' Mar-
kets to be held on Jan. 13, Feb. 10 and March 9.
Spaces are available for $15 per market.
All three markets will be held at Holmes Beach
City Hall Field, 5901 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
To reserve your space or for more information call
Billy or Janice Dingman at 778-5777.

Women's Key Royale Club
to meet Monday
The Women's Association of the Key Royale
Club will meet on Monday, Nov. 27, at 1:30 p.m. in
the clubhouse.
The meeting will feature the annual "Show and
Sell," where items contributed by members will be
auctioned.
Guests of members are invited to attend.


'Holiday Craft House' on
Key
The Longboat Key Art Center will hold its annual
Holiday Craft House sale of hand-crafted gift items
on Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 25 and 26, from 12:30
to 4:30 p.m.
The sale will be located in the craft gallery, the
garden patio and entry lobby of the art center located
at 6860 Longboat Dr. S., Longboat Key. Works in
pottery, wood carving, holiday decorations and cards,
hand weaving and more will be featured.
For detailed information, call the center at 383-
2345.

Children's holiday
shopping at Secret Shop
Children up to the age of 11 are invited to shop
for holiday gifts at the Anna Maria Island Art
League's Secret Shop.
The Secret Shop will be open on Saturday, Nov.
25, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the league located on
5312 Holmes Blvd. in Holmes Beach.
Handmade gift items for all members of the fam-
ily will be priced from 25 cents to $2.50. Children
will shop alone no adults allowed and will be
assisted by league volunteers.

Hot cake breakfast
at St. Bernard
St. Bernard Catholic Church in Holmes Beach
will host a pancake breakfast on Sunday, Nov. 26,
from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Homemade pancakes, sausage, orange juice and
coffee will be served. A homemade bake sale will
also be offered.
The cost is $2.50 for adults and $1 for children.

Oops
Rose Fleck of Anna Maria was featured in a pho-
tograph last week at Heritage Festival with her dried-
flower arrangements. Her name was listed incorrectly.

Low Vision Group meets
Nov. 28
The Anna Maria Island Low Vision Group, a sup-
port group for those who are legally blind, will hold a
welcome-back meeting at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28,
at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
The 1995-96 theme is "Putting Ourselves on the
Anna Maria Map." The public is invited. For more in-
formation, contact Doris Hunter at 778-3391.


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ID PAGE 12 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

I r =-I iTa


James L. 'Bud' Capo
James L. "Bud" Capo, 65, of Bradenton, died
Nov. 16 in Columbia Blake Medical Center.
Born in Cortez, Mr. Capo was a lifelong resi-
dent of Manatee County. He was a Protestant. He
was a U.S. Army veteran serving in the Korean
War.
He is survived by his wife, Frances; a daugh-
ter, Linda French of Newtazwell, Tenn.; a son,
Mike "Bubba" Albritton of Bradenton; two sisters,
Mildred Davis of Okeechobee and Edith Phillips of
Bradenton; and four grandchildren.
Service will be private. Burial took place
Bradenton. Memorial contributions may be made to
American Kidney Fund, 6110 Executive Blvd.,
Suite 1010, Rockville, Md. 20852.

Margaret 'Maggi' Clark
Margaret "Maggi" Clark, 82, of Holmes
Beach, died Nov. 19, 1995 in Columbia Blake
Medical Center.
Memorial services will be held in Concord and
Cape Cod, Mass., at a later date. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to Mayo Foundation, Center
of Development, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester,


Minn. 55908. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Born in West Medford, Mass., Mrs. Clark
came to Manatee County from Chelmsford, Mass.,
in 1982. She was a schoolteacher with Lexington
Public School System and retired in 1980. She was
an Episcopalian.
She is survived by twin daughters, Virginia C.
Von Dran, of Broken Arrow, Okla., and Carol
Clark, of Depoe Bay, Ore.; two grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren.
Gwendolyn Ligmal
Gwendolyn Ligmal, 84, of Bradenton, died
Nov. 12, in Freedom Care Pavilion.
Born in Detroit, Mrs. Ligmal came to Mana-
tee County in 1972 from Livonia, Mich. She was
an assembly worker at Ford Motor Co. She was a
member of the Order of the Eastern Star, Detroit.
She was a Presbyterian.
She is survived by four daughters, Beverly
Wilson of Livonia, Judy Adams of Anna Maria,
Cheryl Marcum of Ypsilanti, Mich., and Cindy
Boyer of Tallahassee; a son, Arthur Ligmal of
Bradenton; 11 grandchildren; and five great-grand-
children.


A I S


Pagington, Angell wed
Heather Avia Angell and Richard Scott
Pagington, both of Bradenton, were married Sept. 30
at Woodland Baptist Church. The Rev. Frank
Hutchison officiated. The bride was escorted by her
brother, Thomas Angell Jr.
The bride is the daughter of the late T.K. Angell
and Darlene Angell, formerly of Anna Maria. He is the
son of Gwen Pagington of Bradenton and Richard
Pagington of Pennsylvania.
Matron of honor was Carol Angell, sister of the
bride, of Bradenton. Bridesmaid was Katelyn Angell,
niece of the bride, of Bradenton.
Flower girls were Darci Wiedenhoft and Heather
Woodbridge, nieces of the bridegroom, of Bradenton.
Ring bearer was Danny Wiedenhoft, nephew of the
bridegroom, of Bradenton.
Best man was Justin Poor Jr., stepfather of the
bridegroom, of Bradenton. Groomsman was Justin
Angell, nephew of the bride, of Bradenton.
A reception at Gold Tree Estates followed the cer-
emony. The couple honeymooned in Fort Myers
Beach; Gatlinburg, Tenn.; and Talledaga, Ala. They
live in Bradenton.


The Island Poet
When Thanksgiving comes around don't treat it as
another day,
Stop and thank the Lord for the good things He sent
your way.
The fact that you are alive and live in this great
land,
Could never have happened if it weren't for His
hand.
And the Pilgrims who were the first to celebrate
this way,
Gave Him thanks they had survived the hardship
of the day.
So on Thanksgiving when you sit down to enjoy
your lovely meal,
Let the good Lord know just how thankful you feel.
Bud Atteridge


Welcome
Jim and Rondi Guerin of
Anna Maria City would like
to introduce their son,
Zachary "Zack" Ryan
Guerin, to Anna Maria
Island Zack was born Sept.
12 at Columbia Blake
Hospital weighing in at a
healthy 7 lbs12 ozs. Zack's
maternal grandparents are
Steve and Joy Goldberg of
St. Petersburg. His paternal
grandparents are Tom and
JoAnn Guerin of Royal
Oaks, Mich. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of Jim and Rondi
Guerin


PROMISES KEPT
* BUDGET:
Lowered
Millage Rate
* PUBLIC WORKS:
Money for Capital Im-
provements
* GRANTS:
Seeking funds
* BRIDGE:
Steered Referendum
Proposal
Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for by the
Campaign to Elect Walt Grace


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Mayor
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Walt "Charlie" Grace
PROVEN LEADERSHIP


AS MAYOR I
PROMISE
* BUDGET:
Keep Taxes Down
* PUBLIC WORKS:
Improve Drainage
& Streets
* GRANTS:
Aggressively Seek
Funding
* BRIDGE:
NO high-rise
BRIDGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 13 I-

Little Miss Universe says thank you


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Bystander
An August "Stir It Up" column in The Islander
Bystander about Jamaica and being "taken care of'
inspired a Bradenton Beach resident to contact us.
Elham "Ellie" Feanny wished to share two extraor-
dinary times in her life one from her childhood in
Jamaica, the other from this past summer, when she
almost lost her life and being "taken care of" gained
new meaning.
"Everyone I know reads The Islander," says
Feanny. "It seemed the right place for me to try to thank
the people of Bradenton Beach and Cortez for their
excellent outpouring of friendship and compassion."
Feanny moved here last Christmas, knowing no
one, but she was moved by "the warmth of the people
on the Island."
In June, that warmth temporarily turned chilling.
During a late-night dispute with her boyfriend,
Feanny sustained a blow to her right temple from a
metal oxygen tank.
By the time friends James and Lonny Childs
rushed her to Blake Hospital the next day, Feanny was
near death from a cerebral hemorrhage. Her family in
Miami was notified she was dying and a priest was
called in to administer last rites.
Feanny underwent nine-hours of emergency sur-
gery. Even when her condition stabilized days later,
physicians thought she would never regain sight or
hearing on her right side. Now, several months later,
both have been restored.
Recovery has not been rapid or easy, but Feanny
says her lifelong faith has deepened. And she feels she
has been blessed by the local people who got her
through these past few months.
"I thought I had left paradise when we moved from
Jamaica years ago," says Feanny with a tear and a
smile.
"But all the kindnesses make me know I have
found it again here. I couldn't have found a better place
to move to."

The summer of '64
Feanny spent the first 15 years of her life in
Babican, Jamaica, a member of a prominent family that


included four doctors and involvement in several busi-
nesses including the raising and training of race horses.
Of Arabic and Irish descent, Feanny says she was
raised in a strict Arabic and Catholic tradition that later
included the "arrangement" of her first marriage.
The summer she was 8, propriety gave way to the
glamorous chance of a lifetime. A family photographer
brought news that the Miss Universe pageant was de-
buting a Little Miss Universe contest. Wouldn't Elham
- with her Arabic beauty and her five years of classi-
cal ballet training like to compete?
The first step was the Little Miss Jamaica contest.
Feanny's grandmother was exuberant, overseeing ev-
ery detail of a lavish Jamaican costume and a short
gown of lace and rhinestones.
Feanny was crowned Little Miss Jamaica and also
won for the best costume and as the most photogenic.
On to Miami, for a two-week adventure leading up
to the first-time pageant for young girls more than
300 of them from all over the world.
Feanny's eyes light up.
"I had spent my whole life in Jamaica," she says.
"I was so excited and so thrilled. I befriended everyone


Elham means inspiration in Arabic. She was an
inspiration taking the throne in 1964. Islander
Photo: Courtesy of Elham Feanny.












and entertained everyone. I even introduced girls from
around the world to reggae that's what I was danc-
ing when it wasn't ballet."
Feanny gets goosebumps still. Not only was she
voted Miss Amity by those hundreds of peers she cap-
tivated, but her beauty, poise and dance talent carried
her to the title of the very first Little Miss Universe.
Back on Jamaica, the young beauty was treated to
celebrity status for months afterwards.
"Everyone went crazy over the honor to our is-
land," she says. "It was a lot of fun and a tremendous
blessing."
And now, having just turned 40, Feanny says that
childhood glory has been exceeded by the glory of just
being alive.
"It's hard to describe what it was like to hold my
children in the hospital after the surgery," she says
quietly. Or to describe the gratitude she has for her new
friends here who have played such a part in her recov-
ery.
"Sometimes I sit on the beach and watch the sun-
set and think that I could have died. I just say thank
you, thank you."


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II[ PAGE 14 A NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Sign on for Christmas Parade By land and by sea
The Anna Maria Island Privateers invite individuals, organizations and Don't be confused there are two, two, two Christmas parades both on Dec.
businesses to show their community spirit and join in the annual Christmas 9. The Anna Maria Island Privateers host the "land parade" and The Islander
Parade and gifts from Santa on Saturday morning, Dec. 9. There's no fee to be in Bystander is sponsoring the "sea parade." Pictured from left, Ken Guscott and
the parade. For information, call 778-1238, 778-5934 or 794-2599. Islander Bruce Seewald started early on the elaborate carousel of reindeers on Seewald's


Photo: Cynthia Finn.


boat for the Dec. 9 lighted boat parade.


Concert to feature MCC
Symphonic Orchestra and
Arts Trio
The Manatee Community College Symphonic Or-
chestra will present works by Mozart and Haydn and the
Metropolitan Arts Trio will perform a concerto by
Beethoven in a concert beginning at 8 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Nov. 29, in Neel Auditorium, 5840 26h St W.,
Bradenton.
The 38-member orchestra will be directed by Profes-
sor Michael Stone and will play Mozart's Overture to
"Don Giovanni" and Haydn's Symphony No. 94 "Sur-
prise."
The Metropolitan Arts Trio will perform the "Triple
Concerto" for piano, violin and cello by Beethoven.


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General admission is $3. Student tickets are $1.
For more information, call the Neel Auditorium
Box Office at 755-1511, ext. 4240.

'The Barber of Seville' on
screen at Music Archive
The Sarasota Music Archive will present Cecilia
Bartoli and Gino Quilico in Rossini's "The Barber of
Seville" on the archive's big screen with English sub-
titles on Thursday, Nov. 30, at 11 a.m.
Participants are encouraged to bring lunch and
complimentary coffee will be served during the inter-
mission lunch break.
The program is free to members and $5 for non-
members.



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I HISLAINDERI
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Coconuts hosts chamber
social Wednesday, Nov. 29
Coconuts Beach Resort and Island Plantation Re-
sort will host the Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce's final monthly social of the year from 5 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 29, at First of America Bank,
603 Manatee Ave., Holmes Beach.
All are welcome. For information, call 778-1541.

Smith joins Raymond James
Michael Smith recently joined Raymond James &
Associates, Inc., a member New York Stock Exchange/
SIPC, as a vice president of investments in its 3639 Cortez
Rd. W. office. He resides in Holmes Beach with his wife,
Karen, and their sons, Michael and Kristopher.






MANGROVE TRIMMING
Under recent legislation, the State of Florida will
allow selective trimming of mangroves under the
supervision of a Registered Landscape Architect.
Eatman & Smith, a leader in coastal architecture and
landscape design is now accepting reservations for
mangrove trimming. Please call our office at (941)
778-3113 for information or visit our office at 129
Bridge Street in downtown Bradenton Beach.
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 N PAGE 15 jD3


Islander heads county Cultural Alliance


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"It's been something like a painting," says Anna
Maria artist Joan Abrahamson Voyles of her role as head
of the Manatee County Cultural Alliance (MCCA).
Read that as the transition from a conceptual inspi-
ration to a sketch, from the first dip of the brush into
paint to myriad colors and forms on canvas. And then,
at some point, a finished work of art is framed and on
display, generating public involvement and even the
passing of the almighty dollar.
"Right now funding is our weakest component,"
says Voyles. "It's been a long haul but we're starting
to be acknowledged."
"No," Voyles has had to tell government and busi-
ness leaders, "we're not that building down by the
river."
"It's been a tremendous learning process," Voyles
says about the task of communicating with county gov-
ernment and community planners, business developers
and supporters.
"We never got into the loops in terms of funding
so we are learning to talk a different language. We are
learning to integrate arts with government and the busi-
ness community."
That kind of dialogue that results in community
backing and public and private funding is a far cry
from the solitary artist creating because it's pleasurable
and good for the soul.
Voyles talks about looking at art as a business and
creating pride in the role culture plays in the overall
quality of life. She talks about linking artists of all
types, from individuals to large local organizations.
"Our arts organizations haven't had an advocacy,"
says Voyles. "Artists are so busy doing their thing.
They haven't had someone who looks at them from a
business point of view."

Crossing the bridge
Voyles' involvement began a few years ago. As a
member of the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island, she
went across the bridge for general information from a
loose group of advocates leftover from the discontin-
ued Manatee Council of the Arts.
What has evolved is a rejuvenation of the 501-C-
3, not-for-profit federal status; a 16-member board of
directors; an office and part-time secretary in the Lake-
wood Business Park; a successful annual festival; and


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a stated purpose.
MCCA's mission "is to provide ac-
cess to, promote, develop and support art
and culture throughout Manatee County."
It includes working with public and pri-
vate agencies, supporting community ac-
tivities and serving as an advocate.
MCCA's Phantom of the Arts festival
along Old Main Street in downtown '.
Bradenton has gained strong business
backing. The third annual festival in Voyles
March 1996 will combine with the well-
established "Riverfest," a major event in the Hernando
DeSoto Historical Society's Florida Heritage Festival.
The Phantom festival's objectives mirror those of
the Cultural Alliance: to emphasize that the arts are part
of redevelopment and economic growth; to develop
and celebrate "Pride in Manatee;" and to call attention
to the high quality of performing and visual arts talent
in Manatee County.
A year ago, funded by a grant to MCCA from the
Knight Foundation, a team from the National Alliance
of Local Art Agencies conducted a survey of commu-
nity leaders and representatives from business, govern-
ment, education, social services and the arts and hu-
manities.
The survey "validated" the need for an advocacy
organization like the Cultural Alliance, says Voyles.
The following were pinpointed:
Strong arts community: Not only is there a large
number of cultural organizations within the county,
there is an above average number of individual artists.
Solid facilities base: The performing arts, visual
arts and humanities all benefit from a multitude of cul-
tural facilities of various sizes. These allow not only for
the presentation of programs, they also provide work
space for artists and accessible public gathering places.
Highly fractured visual arts community: The art
leagues, guilds, art centers and galleries that serve the
thousands of visual artists in the county do not commu-
nicate with one another or work together. In some
cases, they have historically been antagonistic toward
one another and very territorial.
Money available: Leaders from the business and
local government arenas indicated that funds could be
made available for worthwhile programs that address
community needs. There is potential for a contributor
base of individual donors.


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Cultural inferiority complex: Despite
Manatee County's plethora of cultural as-
sets, residents, community leaders, artists
and cultural organizations regularly term it
a cultural wasteland. "The good culture is
down in Sarasota," is too often the attitude.
Cultural groups working in isolation:
Cultural groups repeatedly indicated an in-
terest in and need for coordination and com-
munication. However, there has been little
action to encourage coordination or com-
munication.

Down to basics
The practical means for MCCA to achieve its mis-
sion involves two "M" words money and man-
power.
The county has indicated a willingness to provide
matching funds if the alliance can raise $5,000. State
funding is also based on what MCCA can raise on its
own.
"And we're very much looking for people on all
levels to get involved," says Voyles.
An immediate goal is to create a countywide data-
base of cultural organizations, services and individuals
for networking and referral.
"We know there's a huge talent base," says Voyles.
"Imagine having the resources to immediately identify
who is an art therapist, who could take art into a deten-
tion center."
Islanders gathered at a recent arts forum were ex-
cited about the database concept. And the concept of
how the Island's arts community could benefit from
on-Island and off-Island linking.
In a recent letter to the Manatee County Commis-
sion regarding the just published "Visitors Guide to
Manatee County," Voyles points out the omission of
more than a dozen cultural and historic sites and
groups, including several on the Island.
She says those omissions "demonstrate both the
opportunity and the need for cooperative planning be-
tween the Tourist Development Council and MCCA."
Her letter concludes: "MCCA represents diverse
cultural components of this county which feel
underserved and unacknowledged. We ask to be in-
cluded in your funding so we can help you, the com-
missioners of Manatee County, do an even better job
of serving this unique county."






JIM PAGE 16 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island Players offer

'Greetings' Dec. 1-10


Tom Dudzick's "Greetings," an inspiring seasonal
play loaded with good cheer, will be the holiday offer-
ing by the Island Players with performances scheduled
from Friday, Dec. 1, through Sunday, Dec. 10.
The play centers on a holiday gathering that ex-
plodes with complications. Andy Gorski has a sweet
Catholic mother, a grouchy Catholic father and a men-
tally challenged younger brother. When Andy reluc-
tantly brings home his Jewish atheist fiancee to meet
the family on Christmas Eve, his worst fears about a
family blow-up become reality. For the audience, the
fun is only beginning.
Director Phyllis Elfenbein describes the play as
"imbued with the mystery and magic of Christmas and
Hanukkah while reflecting the endearing, hilarious and


touching closeness of family life."
Cast members include Sandi Simpson as Andy,
Diane Kearney as Randi, Jo Kendall as Emily, Gabe
Simches as Phil and David B. Haynes as Mickey.
Set design is by John Flannery, lighting design by
Steve Henderson. Don Bailey is costume designer and
Anne Fasulo is stage manager.
Curtain time will be at 8 p.m. except for the two
Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. There will be no perfor-
mance Monday, Dec. 4.
Tickets will be $10 per person. The Island Players
Theater box office, 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria, is
open from 9 am. to 2 p.m. and one hour before each
performance. For more information, call the theater at
778-5755.


Auditions for the Island Players production of Ed-
ward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" will
be held at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 3, at the Island Play-
ers Theater, 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. The play

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will run from Jan. 19 through Feb. 3.
Director Geoffrey Todd will be casting for four
roles including middle-aged Martha and George, and
Honey and Jack, ages 26 to 30 years.
For more information, call 792-3986.




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Holiday Gifts, Scents and Sounds!
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presently insured by the Florida JUA pool,
you may be eligible for preferred rates and
better coverage through our licensed Florida
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First Saturdays for on-site
demonstrations
The cooperative artists of Island Gallery West, 5348
E. Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, offer free technique
demonstrations the first Saturday of each month.
Debbie Angel browses while husband Craig eyes the
work ofsculptor Charlie Haight. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


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Available through
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
All proceeds benefit Island Players


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^IHHINCEIT^TLUDES ^^







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 17 lI


Islander writes history through stamps


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Jeanne Maschek of Holmes Beach is known by
many Islanders for her enthusiastic involvement in
the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island and All Is-
land Denominations.
She applied that same enthusiasm to a year-long
project that resulted in a book that has been accepted as
part of the Florida Collection of the State Library.
Maschek's 32-page "The Story of Florida on
Stamps" is a unique concept. It includes hundreds of
stamps and accompanying facts that chart the history
of our state and its resources from the earliest days
through the present.
The easy-reading material and stamp illustrations
include tidbits of information about scores of people
and events one would never suspect had anything to do
with Florida.
Did you know that essayist and poet Ralph Waldo
Emerson lived in Florida in 1827 to regain his health?
There's a portrait of him on a 3-cent issue from the
Famous Americans series of 1940.
Did you know Frederic Remington of western
fame also painted pictures of Florida's cracker cow-
boys in the 1890s? There are four stamps honoring
Remington and some interesting facts about the origin
and history of Florida's cattle industry.


Stamp sleuth Jeanne
Maschek found a cre-
ative way to present state
history. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


Maschek, a retired Illinois schoolteacher, found the
early history section the most fascinating to work on.
"All the things I didn't know and learned," she says.
And now she's hooked, constantly on the lookout for
new and old Florida connections she wasn't aware of.
Maschek headed up a junior high school stamp
club 20 years ago and she has her own inches-thick
collection of canceled stamps. The history book has


renewed her interest.
"This really involved some sleuthing," she says,
spreading her detective's tools on her dining table.
Aided by history books, almanacs, the U.S.
Postal Service Guide of every stamp ever issued, and
the staff at the Island Branch Library, Maschek has
created one of those one-of-a-kind gems our creative
Islanders are known for.


Fire chief for a day is hot stuff!
Michael Rogers, 4, of Holmes Beach was the lucky winner in a drawing courtesy of
Janet Aubry to shadow Anna Maria Fire District Chief Andy Price for one day.
Michael didn't want to get inside that big red engine, but Price said, "That's OK,
Chief. We'll do lunch instead." Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


CANDYLAND
BY CATHY MILLHAUSER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
1 Not so fast
8 Deck
supervisors
14 Making even
21 Bythesea
22 Bulletin board
fastener
23 Puff's land, in
song
24 Actress Barbara
shows affection
for E.M.T.'s?
27 Biblical
birthright seller
28 Detecting device
29 Dynamite sound
30 Proceeds
31 Barker and Bell
34 Preschool
group?
35 C.E.O.'s degree
38 Colorado
tributary
40 That: Sp.
41 Naughty but
nice women fail
to reimburse
Doris?
48 Brief freedom?
49 Table scraps
50 "There was--
woman who..."
51 "Une baignade"
artist
55 Capri suffix
56 "Just kidding!"
57 Did nothing
59 Cheese choice
62 Rent
63 Dumas heroes
exploit losers?
70 Marathoner's
ordeal
71 Strenuous
72 Buttercup
relatives


73 Imbue
75 Role for Liz in
'63
76 Get better in
barrels
78 Monthly check
sender: Abbr.
79 Kind of
fingerprint
80 Rossner title
character acts
derisively?
86 "Cheers"
network
89 Furthermore
90 Tarzan creator's
monogram
91 Marvin Lee--,
a k a Meat Loaf
92 Spring perennial
96 "Omnibus" host
Cooke
99 Open auto of old
101 Strip at a swim
meet
102 Fumblerdefaces
parts of
diamonds?
108 "C6mo--
usted?"
109 Part of 36-Down
110 Abbr. on some
hulls
111 N.T. book before
James
112 Juno, forone
113 Note elevators
116 "White
Christmas"
record label
119 Prompter
beginning
120 1970Jackson 5
hit
121 Dustin persona
wheels young
Dr. Westheimer?
127 Provider of
home runs?
130 Shell, to old
poets


131 Son of Odin
132 "What did I tell
you!"
133 Third king of
Judah
134 Actress Demich
of 60's filmdom
136 67030'
138 Varnish
ingredients
141 Holm and
Hunter
145 Ing6nue's elderly
beau bespeckles
Della's mug?
151 Ezra Pound
contemporary
152 More strapped
153 Singer Lynn
154 Books stored
horizontally
155 "Gunsmoke"
star
156 Sawyer of ABC
News
DOWN
I Pine (for)
2 Two-year-olds'
chorus
3 Operatic basso
Enzo -
4 Undertake
5 Ordinal
adjective
6 Menlo Park
monogram
7 TV Tarzan's kin
8 Warm welcomes
9 buco (veal
dish)
10 His act was
antitrust
11 Pkg. carrier
12 Zilch
13 Impudent
nobody
14 "Ease on Down
the Road"
musical


15 Bandleader
Edmundo
16 In the dark
17 Place for
hangers-on?
18 TV's Kristen or
Graff
19 Dweebs
20 Art base
22 Wine grape
25 Deborah,
Graham and
Jean
26 Stick-in-the-
mud
32 In concurrence
33 A loser to Harry
in '48
36 "I'm not
supplying," on
invitations
37 Madam Polly
39 Article on Mont
Blanc
41 Tropical
tree-hangers
42 Hip
43 40's singing
brother Ray or
Bob
44 Aleutian island
45 LuPoneof
"Evita"
46 Sticks on
47 Best
52 Beefcut
53 Miss Brooks
portrayer
54 "The
Gondoliers" girl
57 Tackled moguls
58 Oxygen-
dependent
organism
60 "1 Thief"
(1935 film)
61 Big name in
burlesque
64 Kind of sch.
65 Normandy
battle site


66 Surround with
trees
67 Souffle sine qua
non
68 Majesty start
69 Discount chain
74 Chatter
75 Arrange
systematically
77 Gives weapons,
old-style
81 Growl
82 "Verrry
interesting"
Johnson
83 Mind set?
84 Singer Vikki
85 Enterprise
helmsman


86 Theaters near 106 Peach-


you
87 Cheek
makeup
88 Roma is one
93 Two-seated
carriage
94 Behind on bills
95 Seder period
97 Plunge in
98 Flight
destination in a
1933 title
100 Routine
103 Bare: Prefix
104 Dosome
salaaming
105 Diamond of
Queens


107 Heels, e.g.
114 Guiding light
115 Teriyaki
ingredient
117 Blubber
118 Rust
119 Steak order
122 Goodies
123 Enrapture,
slangily
124 Insurance claim
particulars
125 Create
smocking
126 Fund---
127 Service program
128 Pizza part


129 Star of Orion's
left foot
135 Simba's "Lion
King" love
137 Novelist O'Brien
139 Football's
Armstrong
140 Ego
142 Dumas novel
143 "Phooey!"
144 Young oyster
146 ---eyed
147 Ending akin to
-ist
148 Cub house
149 -- Locks
(Great lakes
passage)
150 Necessitate an
"Oops!"


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.






Ui PAGE 18 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island shopping centers
launch holiday season
The second annual Island Shopping Center Holi-
day Open House will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Fri-
day, Dec. 1.
A "choir of angels" from the Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School will perform at 5:30 p.m. Carollers from
Manatee High School Chorus will stroll through the
shops throughout the event.
The Islander Bystander will host the Manatee High
School Chamber Orchestra at their storefront at 6:30
p.m. Last year's performance by the 20-plus orchestra
members on the sidewalk at the newspaper office was
a highlight of the open house.
Neighboring galleries and shops at S&S Plaza
across Gulf Drive will join the open house this year.
Santa will visit with youngsters at the Artists Guild
Gallery in Island Shopping Center.
Crabby Bill's restaurant across Marina Drive
said they'll join the festivities. They're holding their
grand re-opening party complete with entertainment
and specials all evening. The Privateers are set to
"dock" their landcruising pirate ship at the restaurant
and welcome guests aboard.
Merchants will celebrate the spirit of the season
with refreshments and specials throughout the open
house. Everyone is welcome to attend.
Island Shopping Center is the oldest shopping cen-
ter on Anna Maria Island, located in what has been
called the "heart of Holmes Beach" at the intersection
of Gulf and Marina Drives.



Events
"The Alien Who Stole Christmas," a children's
star show, will open at the Bishop Planetarium on Sat-
urday, Nov. 25. Show times are scheduled at 10:30 am.
on Saturday in December. The Planetarium is located
at 201 10th St. W., Bradenton.
The Meals on Wheels Plus door will be open this
Thanksgiving Day and will be serving a holiday din-
ner for those who would like to join them in fellowship.
Dinner will be served on Thursday, Nov. 23, from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 3100
26th St. W., Bradenton.


Music and Santa will echo through the Island Shopping Center Friday, Dec. 1 during the annual Holiday
Open House. Among the groups returning this year is the Manatee High School Chamber Orchestra, pictured
at last year's popular event.


The public is invited to attend the grand opening
celebration of the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary's new
Birds of Prey Center Phase 1, and dedication of the
Drue Tiffany Memorial Garden on Sunday, Nov. 26, at 1
p.m. Refreshments will be served. The sanctuary is located
1708 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota.
Manatee Memorial Hospital will sponsor a Cancer
Support Group meeting (for all types of cancer) held on
the second Thursday of each month from 11:30 am. to 1
p.m. The group will meet in the Second Annex Solarium.
Refreshments will be served. Information: 745-7225.

Fun Fundraisers
The drug prevention program SMART Moves at
the three local Boys & Girls Clubs of Manatee County
will hold its annual Christmas tree sale beginning Fri-
day, Nov. 24, through Dec. 9. Trees will be sold at three
locations: Westgate Shopping Center, Manatee Town
Center on State Road 70, and the Big "L" Restaurant,


Route 301 E., Ellenton. All of the trees are stored in
refrigerated trucks and guaranteed fresh.
The Arthritis Foundation 1996 Entertainment
Books are now available. Each book contains hundreds
of "two for one" discounts for fine dining, family din-
ing, fast food, sports activities, special attractions and
much more. Cost: $30. Order: 739-2729.
Folksinger Nanci Griffith at Van
Wezel
Grammy Award-winning folk singer/songwriter
Nanci Griffith will perform on Thursday, Nov. 38, at
8 p.m. at Sarasota's Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall,
777 N. Tamiami Trail.
This is the first Florida performance by Griffith
who earned a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary
Folk Performance for her 1993 album, "Other Voices,
Other Rooms."
Call 953-3368 for ticket information.


The
Beach
Shop
778-5442


CAFE
ON THE
BEACH
778-0784


MANATEE PUBLIC BEACH PAVILION MANATEE AVE. (AT THE GULF)
PRE-CHRISTMAS PARTY & SALE
Nov 30 to Dec 1 Only! 11 am to 8 pm
30% Off All Apparel
Drawings for Gifts & Meals Free Dessert with Lunch s Dinner
Music on the Patio by David Bixby & Bob Capen
Save big, enjoy the party, eat well! 4000 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach


778-9566


3-YEAR-OLD

MULLET FOR

SALE!



















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with a "fresh" Mullet T-Shirt -
40% OFF 'til CHRISTMAS!

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MasterCard and Visa Accepted. Add $3 postage and handling for mall order.
5408 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
Call 941-778-7978


Holmes Beach
Seafood Restaurant & Entertainment Emporium

TYPHOON SPORTS BAR
PREVIEW OPENING!
SUNDAY NOV. 26 11 AM
All NFL Games Via FIVE 32" TVs plus 2 Satellites


5325 Marina Drive in beautiful downtown Holmes Beach
Come by Boatl Marker 62 Boat Slips Available


I --cl b I






THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND VISITOR INFORMATION ISLAND STREET MAP



ISLANDER


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E PAGE 19 eB



I


Beyond the beach on Anna Maria


By Paul Roat
Tired of the beach, but don't want to leave the
Island?
There are a host of activities for visitors and
residents on the Island. The following are just a
few samples of things you can do other than bake
on the beach or frolic in the waves.
Although fishing or eating are highly recom-
mended on any of the Island's three fishing piers,
a stroll and chat with anglers is also a good way
to find out what's biting and how to catch 'em.
The Anna Maria City Pier (100 Bay Blvd. S.,
Anna Maria) juts out into Tampa Bay and pro-
vides a great panorama of the Sunshine Skyway
Bridge to the northeast. Pelicans wheel and dive
for fish or perch on the roof and electric wires
leading to the pier restaurant and offer great
photo opportunities, by the way.
Chances are good you'll see some dolphin
frolicking in the water near the Rod and Reel Pier
(875 N. Shore Drive, Anna Maria). This pier is
near and dear to Island pier fishers who remem-
ber the late great Frank Cavendish, he of the
(near-perennial) bare feet and shark-hunting
prowess.
The Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier (200
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach) offers some of the
best backwater fishing around. Hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars have been spent renovating the
pier, with new decking, railings, lights and fish-
cleaning stations added. More work on the pier is
expected next year if a state grant is approved.
While you're in Bradenton Beach, be sure to
stroll through the Coquina BayWalk at Leffis
Key, across Gulf Drive from Coquina Beach. The
BayWalk offers a terrific view of Anna Maria
Sound and the village of Cortez from atop its 40-
foot dune. There are also interpretive trails and
what some have called a "romantic" vista point at
the park's northeast tip.
Another public park with a natural twist is the
Anna Maria Historical Park in the City of Anna
Maria. The park, part of the Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program, was completed last year
and is a good example of how low-maintenance,
drought-tolerant landscaping can be created to
provide a beautiful garden or yard.
Readers may want to visit one or both of the
Island's libraries. Tingley Memorial Library (111
Second St. N., Bradenton Beach) is the result of
the benevolence of Beulah Hooks Hannah
Tingley, who bequeathed a huge sum in her will
for the library's creation several years ago. The
library offers computers and a large selection of
contemporary and classic novels.
The Island Branch Library (5701 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach), offers a full-service
county library on the Island, plus a number of
special presentations, features, lectures and other
offerings. Check the current edition of The Is-
lander Bystander for what's happening at the Is-
land Library.
Both libraries, by the way, offer readers a
chance to catch up on past happenings on the Is-
land by browsing through the bound copies of all
editions of The Islander Bystander.
Speaking of times past on Anna Maria Island,
history buffs should plan to stop at the Anna Maria
Island Historical Society (402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria) to see what times were like in days when the
Island was sparsely populated. Photographs, books
and helpful volunteers will offer leads to events and
characters of the Island's founding.
Be sure to take a picture of the first Island jail
just next door it has to be one of the most pho-
tographed facets of Island life short of one of
the spectacular, Technicolor sunsets.


The old
city jail in
Anna
maria was
built in the
1920s, but
only used
as a lock-
up once or
twice.


S^^ Wel,, \
^^Y -^Lj
^^ fP ~


W 0 Holmes Beach
Seafood Restaurant &Entertainment Emporium
SEVEN THEMES UNDER ONE ROOF

"GRAND REOPENING"

CELEBRATION
Friday 0 December 1









UVE ENTERTAINMENT FROM 3 PM TO CLOSE
3 to 7 Berni Roy in the Tuna Piano Bar


9to 1 -


7 to 9 Boon on Guitar in the Restaurant
8 to Midnight Fritzi in the Tuna Piano Bar
Dr. Chuck Stevens of MIX 96 in the R@ck" L@bster R@@m


ALL NEW SPORTS BAR OPENING
WITH FIVE 32" TVS & 2 SATELLITES


0.


WATERCOLOR DEMONSTRATIONS
by Barbara Singer and Faye Rosechild-Nierman
in the Waterfront Gallery & Crabby Cafe


*Mon -Thurs 11 AM to 10 PM Fri & Sat 11 AM to 11
5325 Marina Drive in beautiful downtown Holmes Beach
Come by Boatl Marker 62 Boat Slips Available


PM Sun 11 AM to 10 PM
778-9566






Ijf3 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 20


"You'll have to call us ...
or we'll never meet!"



REFRIGERATION -

S@)CAC0443 Iv@
CAC044365 C.


778-9622


FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


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"*** 't ', : ."' - -
,,(',: *, :" /


A Whale OfA
Present Gift
Certificates!


o et Deep Sea Fishing sting
4 -6 -9 HOUR TRIPS Sters
Beachcombing Cruises
TO HISTORIC EGMONT KEY
Offshore Fishing Charters
Backwater & Bay
Fishing Charters
*f Parasailing
r Jet Ski Rentals



VBSSES3


Don't miss the special unuge -r DiU Lt L tlt a,- L- .aiL
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
Insert this week in t< ^ .~a.'w^~oJ ai o,
The Islander
Bystander... cISLAND FISHING 50i
DISCOUN TACE (no license required)
Bill Lowman 's Live ait Tackle Rod Rental
T'l'xi/^l ^ Cold Deer & Soda
FtlAt Great deals on every- Pally am-lOpm
I! I n f g E thing you need for <-
Islandfishing!' ____BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


We Know The Way


MARY AN
SCHMID
Eves. 778-4


to successful Real Estate sales
TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325
IN
PT Ev
931 ALS .Eve


5


HELEN
WHITE
s. 778-6956


1 :141 1 605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach, FL 34217 |I


3-year-old mullet for sale!
Celebrate our 3-year anniversary with a "fresh"
Mullet T-Shirt 40% OFF 'til Christmas!

lore tha a mullet wrapper!



INSANDER S

Sale Price $6 including state ale tax
Mail order: add $3 postage and handling
5408 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
941 778-7978


841


Bridge Street Pier a~d Cafe
88 (at end of Bridge St. on pier)
Open Thanksgiving
for Breakfast 7am-Noon

Breakfast Anytime
Happy Hour 4-7
Mon-Thurs Open 8 AM
7 AM to 10 PM Sat & Sun
ICE-COLD BEER!

ALL-U-CAN EAT $95
FRIED GROUPER
Wed & Fri 5 to 9pm
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


-J


Ni


&,IJ
/


.1




-1








:-1


WAGNER REALTY



B7
SALES AND RENTAL& (Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Call Toll-free 1-800-211-2323


KAYr qKORNER DINER

NOW OPEN

S7 to 11
BREAKFAST
__ ONLY
Mon-Fri 7 to 3 Sat 7 to 1 Sun 7 to 11
778-9803 5340 Gulf Drive., S&S Plaza


..
...

I:


-i


;



~.
\1


.






PAGE 21 1 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER IE


bBAREFOOT
T READER
BEACH SHOP
ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND 6
Thousands of T-Shirts, Gifts, ,
Beach Supplies & Souvenirs 0 J
at LOWEST overall prices
on the Island [ B-
FREE INFLATION, ALL FLOATS
778-1628
5340 D-Gulf Drive S&S Plaza. Holmes Beach


I'


L
-C, Z ^.:." :...". _- -".-


110B OWN PEIc


Lots of Cards & Gifts
New Arrivals Daily
T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
Decorative Accessories Jewelry Pewter Miniature
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 778-1645

S 'S ICk Fat Free, Sugar Free
dB W. IIce Cream!
SFresh-Made Deli
SSandwiches & Soups
Take-Out Sandwiches Fresh Bagels
Mon Sat 10AM 9PM
Sunday Noon to 6 PM
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386




5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Th uent- Fax: 813-778-3035



AN.b. a l-rbM..W -.p. Muu.dM -d ~ W
E

I1


I~ I A
-U


Tyler's
Since 1984 Made on Location S
Old Fashioned Ice Cream and Waffle Cones
S* Ice Cream Pies & Cakes *
Colombo Yogurt *
Soft Serve Diabetic Swin
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR & T-Sh
NOON 10 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK


794 -533 1 104 Cortez R oad Wes t 79123


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
SEAFOOD, BEEF, CHICKEN, RIBS BUFFET
PLUS YOUR CHOICE OF ENTREE TO ORDER:
Steak, Peel & Eat Shrimp or Beer-Battered

$200 FABULOUS SUNDAY
BRUNCH BUFFET
OIFF 1 or ALLYOU-CAN-EAT BUFFET
Coupon not valid w/other offers or Thanksgiving Day Exp. 12/2/95
6701 Manatee Ave. W.
Bradenton 795-5637


STONE CRABS $1595
Enjoy afull pound of
fresh stone crab claws
served with 2 side dishes




RODI -L R fL
.A,* srPJiLT
Established 1947
1/2 mile north of City Pier
875 North Shore Drive
Anna Maria Island, Florida
778-1885 Ei


Joe's Holiday r
Eats & Egg Nog

Sweets Pumpkin
Ice Creamr
GREAT HOMEMADE Ice
ICE CREAM BYJOE
* Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes
* Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
* Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
* Espresso, Cappuccino
* Belgium Waffles Ice Cream Cakes
* Mon-6-9:30pm Tues Closed
* Wed-Fri 6-10pm Sat 11:30am-10pm
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


c81


n Sportswear I l- l
irts for Everyone! W ll


THA 1 0-CHA
It's easy to remember our name ...
but hard to forget our food!




The finest in delicate, delicious Thai cuisine in a
comfortable atmosphere. Our tasty Thai food will
keep you coming back again and again.
100% off Any
OinnrR OR LUltCn)
including Beer, Wine & Sake
with this ad exp. 12/6/95
Open for lunch Monday Friday 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM
Dinner Monday Saturday 5:00 to 9:30 PM
(Closed Sunday)
1 Mock west of 75th on Cortez Rd.
Tel: (941) 794-5470


i I
I-i


S .i/







E3 PAGE 22 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Something to be thankful for
We all have something to be thankful for. Some
more than others. Some weeks more than others. But
this year we have plenty to add to our list at grace on
Thanksgiving.
This issue is another hallmark in the short history
of The Islander Bystander. We begin our fourth year
this week a year that has been accented by awards
from our peers, accomplishments and perseverance,
and, most of all, great teamwork that made it all pos-
sible.
Everyone at The Islander Bystander. has a dedica-
tion to Anna Maria Island. It goes without saying some-
times but it is that love that gives us the spirit of com-
munity you see translated in the stories, photographs
and pages of the newspaper week after week.
We're thankful when our effort is acknowledged
through the respect and regard of those people we work
to serve.
A beginning
I first stumbled on Anna Maria in September 1972.
It was shortly after Hurricane Agnes had brushed the
Island leaving behind substantial damage.
The new swimming pool at the Martinique was
crumbled and opened onto the beach.
Slabs of concrete were missing from the groin at
the Manatee County Public Beach. The stairway lead-
ing to the top floor patio of the pavilion at the public
beach was gone and the patio was to be no more.
My mother had moved here just six months prior
to that storm and she died that same year. My first visit
to Florida was to take care of some of her affairs and I

ST. BERNARD CATHOLIC CHURCH
Pancake Breakfast
W SUNDAY, NOV 26
8:30 AM TO 12:30 PM
Homemade Pancakes, Sausage,
OJ & Coffee. Adults $2.50. Children
$1.00. Also-there will be a Home-
made Bake Sale. Come and enjoy.
'Activity Center, 43rd St., Holmes Beach


found little then to be thankful for. But that quickly
changed.
A snapshot she had sent me, labeled "my beach" on
the back, gave me a destination. I found the spot where
she had met new friends just north of the public beach,
a path through the sea oats and a parking spot under a
sea grape tree.
A few more short visits to "my beach" convinced
me to leave a corporate world in Illinois so far behind
that I barely returned for a visit in the past 21 years.
An Illinois friend moved here shortly after me,
shortly after his first vacation to Anna Maria, and he
was soon married and appointed chef of Cafe L'Europe
on St. Armands Circle for 18 years.
He was a mentor to my son, now executive sous
chef at the same restaurant. Chef Augie Mrozowski
now has a successful restaurant of his own in Sarasota.
We merged our families on holidays and made the
best of the beach and a turkey feast on Thanksgiving.
We all spent the day on the beach traipsing back to
the house to roll the bird over occasionally. No one
person really slaved over the meal.
Once we were toasted from the sun, we headed in
to mash the potatoes, and finish the stuffing and gravy
while "samurai chef' carved the perfect turkey. I'll
never understand how he (or my son who has of course
taken over the job) gets the meat off the carcass so ef-
ficiently and so quickly. Whoosh and what would
take me at least 45 minutes of toil is done.
It's a tradition now. My kids and a few of our
friends serve up the minimum but the best of tra-
ditional dishes along with one extravagance Augie's
wife Alaine's recipe of pumpkin bread is always fin-
ished in time for an early sampling. We enjoy the beach
and no one rushes, overcooks or overdoes anything but
the parades and football on TV.
How sweet it is.
And how especially nice it is not to be stuffed into
a house on the prairie with the heater running, sucking
all moisture from the air and fluctuating the tempera-
ture from over-baked to popsicle toes.


Call for our selection 24-Hr. Notice
778-9399
From the bakers at J. ftA e/- le nwe,





SGS)NE EgAfl

ESTABLISHED 1983
Breakfast & Lunch
featuring ... fresh baked croissants and breads
Tue Sat 8 to 3 Sun 8 to 1
Now serving romantic dinners ...
in an authentic French country atmosphere
Friday & Saturday 5:30 to 8:30
Reservations accepted
Serving your favorite beer & wine Carry out available
Manatee Wert Shopping Center (next to Albertoona)
7449 Manatee Ave W. Bradenton 792-3782


More turkeys and news
We'll be very thankful to look forward to many
more issues of The Islander Bystander, and many more
Florida-style Thanksgivings.
This week's anniversary issue is our biggest ever
- if you count the 12-page insert from Island Discount
Tackle. You can look forward to monthly insertions of
Bill Lowman's bargains and fishing advice in The Is-
lander Bystander over the next six months. "Fishing
the Islands" focuses on one of the biggest sports if
not the biggest in Florida and we're pleased to join
forces for distribution to our readers.
Next week we publish our third annual edition of
the "Holiday Wish Book," a special section that high-
lights the needs of local community service organiza-
tions. We ask you the readers to fulfill their wishes for
the holidays. It's our way of giving back to the com-
munity and it is supported by many fine business spon-
sors.
You're bound to find something you can contrib-
ute to the community in our listings. And with your
contribution comes the true spirit of the holidays the
joy of giving.
After the Wish Book, we'll embark on issues in-
cluding the Holiday Gift Guide. In this special section,
advertisers will beckon you to unique and ideal gifts for
all the special people on your holiday list.
This is followed by a Christmas and New Year is-
sue and the launch of a great visitor season on Anna
Maria Island.
No more turkeys. Just more issues of what we're
proud to call "the best news on Anna Maria Island.

An invitation
Please mark a special evening on your calendar.
Open house at the Island Shopping Center and The Is-
lander Bystander on Friday, Dec. 1, will officially
launch the holiday season.

PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE









Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


Patio Reunion!

SCALAWAGS Presents...
2nd Annual Patio Oyster Bar Reunion!
WEDNESDAY NOV 22 ALL DAY
Bring your old Patio pictures & memories.
Wear a Patio or Scalawags
shirt for a free draft beer.
Music: 2 pm 2 am
Jay Crawford "
Donny & Lori Bostic
Rich Kendall & Friends

1120 Whitfield Avenue E., Sarasota 756-7397


This Week's Dinner Specials
Tender Grilled Pork Loin Miso
with Sauteed Eggplant, $17.95
000****0*
Fresh Pompano Stuffed with Blue Crab
with Champagne Caviar Sauce, $23.95
Curried Lamb with Bananas & Peaches
served with Steamed White Rice, $17.95

383-0777
Delightful Dining*Gourmet Take-Out
Stylish Catering Since 1979
525 St. Judes Dr. (behind Circle K) Longboat Key


F~r ~


SL U
spco


RESTAURANT & PUB 0


BREAKFAST & LUNCH D
Restaurant Hours S
Mon Sat 7:30 am 2 pm
Sunday 8 am 1 pm 4s5
Pub hours
Mon Sat 7:30 am 10 pm
Sunday 8 am 10 pm
COLD BEER GREAT FOOD


V corner of Gulf Dr. & Palmetto Ave. in Anna Maria V
778-3909
(Take Out Orders Welcome Closed Thanksgiving)
vS^ c-- *r*:*** *. w -rMr l w.'-- *, .- ..-"- a


FIRST ANNUAL; TRADITIONAL
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Serving 1 to 9pm -Make reservations now!
ALSO OFFERING OUR REGULAR DINNER MENU.
Lunch 10:30 1:30 Sunday Brunch 9:30 1:30
Early Supper (7 days) 5 6:30 Dinner (7 days) 5 10 pm
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria 778-9399


r~R~


I Iff






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 23 Ki3


STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 22
You're sure to catch the spirit of a choral perfor-
mance by Anna Maria Elementary School students and
strolling carolers from Manatee High School at the old-
est shopping center on the Island. And we invite you to
enjoy an inspiring encore performance of the Manatee
High School Chamber Orchestra at The Islander By-
stander office at 6:30 p.m.
It's open house in the entire neighborhood of
shops, galleries and restaurants surrounding the inter-
section of Gulf and Marina Drive in Holmes Beach.
Crabby Bill's will be celebrating its "grand re-
opening" and nearly all the shops at Island Shopping
Center and S & S Plaza will be participating from 5 to


.t Some of the folks enjoying
the festivities at the Beach
Bistro's benefit for All
Children's Hospital in St.
Petersburg were, from left,
S Manatee County Commis-
Ssioner Joe McClash,
S Supervisor of Elections
3 5,,,I ii'2 IBob Sweat, Holmes Beach
Councilwoman Pat Geyer
and County Commission
.- Chairman Stan Stephens.
A total of $42,000 was
raised to benefit the
hospital. Islander Photo:
Paul Roat





8 p.m.
It's another way for us to say thanks to you.

Especially thankful
A delayed reopening of the bridge on Manatee
Avenue was blamed for a short incident of gridlock on
Monday afternoon just before rush hour. (Ever been to
Chicago or New York City for a real rush hour?) The
delay was attributed to electrical problems and the
bridge tender can't risk allowing traffic across the
bridge until he has a clear indication the bridge is
locked.
Remember, patience is a virtue.
But also remember the Cortez Bridge was closed


for repair.
The Manatee County Emergency Operations Cen-
ter immediately notified Island fire and rescue squads
to route any emergencies to Sarasota Memorial Hospi-
tal via Longboat Key and thankfully that was not nec-
essary in this instance.
But since work began on the Cortez Bridge, a bridge
tender has reported for work there every day -just in case
the contractor needs the bridge raised or lowered.
We were all advised before the contractor started
the project that the bridge could be opened to traffic in
the event of an emergency.
Thankfully, the emergency didn't occur because
the bridge wasn't in any state of readiness during this
incident.
Unfortunately, the Florida Department of Trans-
portation leaves us little to be thankful for.

Last but not least
All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg was the
beneficiary of some caring patrons and the hard work
and organization of Island restaurateur Sean Murphy
last week.
Murphy covered his parking lot at Beach Bistro with
a huge tent and transformed the surroundings with plants
and twinkling lights for an elegant benefit dinner. The
Sandbar, Beach House, Mar Vista and Pier restaurants all
pitched in to help with food stations as did the Mike
Carter Construction Company "grill team."
Two hundred guests contributed $125 each to at-
tend and then purchased auction items to bring the to-
tal donation to All Children's to $42,000.
We know all too well of more than a few recipients
of care from All Children's Hospital Island young-
sters who have benefited tremendously and we're
thankful for the generosity of all those who made the
Bistro event a success.


Now Accepting Reservations for
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Thursday Nov. 23 11 AM to 8 PM
Thanksgiving Day Menu
Roast Turkey with stuffing ..........................$8.95
Roasted Duck ........................................... $12.95
Baked Ham ................................................. $8.95
Prime Rib ................................................... $12.95
Surf & Turf ( New York Strip & Shrimp)..... $15.95
Broiled Snapper........................................ $10.95
Stuffed Grouper ....................................... 13.95
Stuffed Shrimp .......................................... $12.95
All entrees' Include choice of soup & salad
and apple cobbler for dessert.
BiF LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
M-G BARBARA JOHNSEN
S. .mMonday-Wednesday 6-10 pm
|L B.IR The DUANE DEE SHOW
Thursday Saturday 7 pm to close
-* l 1 Open Mon.-Sat
l 10 lam-11 pm 795-7065
C Closed Sunday
S a West 59th 1830 59th St. W., Blake Park, Bradenton


IN.


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH


a


Join us
Thanksgiving Day
TURK EY
DINNER
I WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS
$795 plus tax
SERVED FROM 1 PM
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


I
d


I


THANKSGIVING DAY i .lg;,
SPECIALS
Served 11:30 am -10 pm Thursday November 23
HONEY PINEAPPLE HAM ..................................$...... $8.95
with sweet potato & vegetable
OVEN ROASTED TURKEY .......................................... $7.95
with mashed potatoes or dressing & vegetable
PRIME RIB .................................................................... $10.95
with baked potato & vegetable
GROUPER PROVENCALE ......................................... $12.95
with wild rice & vegetable
All specials served with salad & rolls
Lounge menu available at 4 pm.
BOOK HOLIDAY PARTIES NOW!
204 Pine Ave. RESERVATIONS REQUESTED NOT REQUIRED Anna Maria


_ I- I II I







II~3 PAGE 24 m NOVEMBER 23, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Anna Maria

S Elementary

School Menu
Monday, 11/27/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fresh Fruit
S Lunch: Corn Dog or Chicken Nuggets, Potato *
Rounds, Mixed Vegetables, Frozen Juice Bar
Tuesday, 11/28/95
* Breakfast: 1/2 Slice Pizza, Strawberry Fruit Cup
Lunch: French Toast s/Syrup and Sausage Link or
SMeatball Sub, Warm Harvest Fruit, Fresh Fruit \
Wednesday, 11/29/95
Breakfast: Waffle, Applesauce
* Lunch: Beefaroni or Chicken Wings, Garlic Bread, *
Mixed Salad, Fruit Juice
Thursday, 11/30/95 *
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs, Pineapple
SLunch: Pork Shapes or Mini-Chef Salad, Mashed
Potatoes, Peaches, Fresh Baked Hot Roll
Friday, 12/1/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Pears
Lunch: Fiestada or Nachos & Cheese, Corn, Salad,
Bar Cookie
All meals served with milk. The
******************** ** These s
Anna
is to rea
Augusti
Ellis's
sponsor
a goal o
S Joy Courtney reading
S.d


Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it, we'll make it!
Cappuccino & Espresso
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Mon-6-9:30pm Tues Closed
Wed-Fri 6-10pm Sat 11:30am-10pm
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of the Cortez Bridge


THANKSGIVING
ON THE GULF








THANKSGIVING DAY FARE
All dinners include house salad or slaw salad, green
bean casserole, cornbread stuffing, cranberry relish
and mashed potatoes or sweet potato casserole.
Butter-Basted Turkey ... $9.95
Honey Glazed Ham ... $9.95
Prime Rib Au Jus
King 12 oz ... $13.95 Queen 10 oz ... $11.95
Salmon in Puff Pastry with
Lobster Creme Sauce ... $14.95
Shrimp and Scallops Provencale ... $13.95
Seasonal Fresh Catch of the Day ... $16.95
Apple or Pumpkin Pie for Dessert
$1.50 or Ala mode $1.95
Thank You for choosing the Sandbar to celebrate your holiday!
qAN.DBA,




SPECIAL THANKSGIVING HOURS NOON TO 8 PM
Call for preferred seating 778-0444
Thanksgiving Day Entertainment on the Deck 2 to 6 PM
100 Spring Avenue Anna Maria Island


big read Tennis anyone?
students in Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade class at Gabriel Ferrer, tennis director for Manatee County
Waria Elementary School are reading all there Parks and Recreation, demonstrates a powerful
ad to earn money for afield trip to historic St. serve to the students ofAnna Maria Elementary
ine scheduled for later this year. Entitled School. Ferrer along with Marcelo Galdardo,
Eagles Read-A-Thon, each student solicited fitness director for the tennis program at G. T. Bray,
rs to donate ten cents for every page read with and Jeff Jaudon, Racquet Center coordinator at G.
of 1,250 pages per student. Soon they'll be T. Bray, not pictured, came to Anna Maria to help
Their itinerary, physical education Coach Gene Burr begin his
tennis unit.


Deli S&iidwiches
Lunch Entrees Omelets
Carry-out or Eat-In
Lunch Wed thru Fri. 10:30-1:30
Sunday Brunch 9:30-1:30
Early Supper (7 days) 5-6:30 Dinner (7 days) 5-10 pm
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria 778-9399


GREfT FOOD. GREIT BEACH.

GRffT THflHSGIVIfG DI0f0R .






Come on out for a great
Thanksgiving Dinner
at the Beachhouse!
Enjoy a superb ham or turkey dinner with
all the fixin's. Full Thanksgiving dinner is
just $9.95 for adults; children $5.95.
Call ahead for preferred seating.
Special hours: Noon to 8PM
Great deck.
Great playground.



HhoUpe
great food. great beach: great fun.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach (941) 779-2222


Anna Maria Island Centre (next to Walgreens)
Holmes Beach 778-1320
























A show with body
Costumed to illustrate all the different parts of the body and to explain how they
work together, the children in Lynn McDonough's kindergarten and first-grade
split class at our Island school put on a pulsating show for parents and guests
entitled "The Magic Bus Field Trip of the Human Body. "


ITak iig inr. .Serv*. ied Noo M


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 25 Ii]

















Election highlights
As part of their study of government, the students in Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade
class elected officers. From left to right are Morgan Woodland, president;
Stephen Yencho, vice president; Brittany Parker, secretary, along with Josh
Armstrong, not pictured; Ben Miller, treasurer; Laura Wustemann, historian;
and Kim Schenk and Carly Douglas, alternates. Woodland ran on a platform of
working with Adopt-a-Family, Adopt-a-Beach and Adopt-a-Whale, and no more
spelling sentence assignments.


Praiseworthy performance.
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria
Elementary School for the week ended Nov. 10. The
children's names are listed left to right. Front row
are Teddy Talarino, Hannah Brickse, Amy Fusco
and Ben Moore. Middle row are Chuck Carter,
Brandon Roberts, Alana Greundl, Marisa Butler,
Amanda Sebastiano, Andrew Prudente and Katrina
Metcalf. Back row are Ben Bryant, Morgan Wood-
land and Katie Howard.







Vienna


-Re!taurant

r 6 8:30 pm SERVING THANKSGIVING DINNER 5 to 10 pm
ROST Wiener Schnitzel II ......................... $7.95
9-1 Beef Rouladen ................................... $9.95
Sauerbraten ................................... $10.95
Hungarian Qulasch ......................... $8.95
1/2 O FF with this ad exp. 11/30/95
SBuy one dinner at full price & take 1/2 off second
'L dinner of equal or lesser value.
Dinner 5 to 10 P.M.
S Reservation 778-6189 !c
101 Bridge Street
AILY SPECIALS Bradenton Beach


Beautiful Waterfront Dining
OVERLOOKING TROPICAL SLEEPY LAGOON
FPaTIWJ.. VG..
Slow-roasted Prime Rib,
Buccaneer Famous Baby Back Ribs,
Fresh Seafood, Hand-carved Steaks, Rotiserrie
Duck, Loin Lamb Chops, Pasta and More!






Ii PAGE 26 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Golden dreams, Olympic reality


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
The road to the 1996 Olympics is taking a detour
through Sarasota Bay as Don Smith, a member of the
U.S. Olympic sailboarding team, prepares for the Sum-
mer '96 Games.
Up at dawn, a full day of hard exercise and prac-
tice, then asleep with the birds that's how Sarasota's
Olympic contender lives. A U.S. sailor has never won
an Olympic medal in sailboarding. But with a lot of
hard work and a little help, Smith plans to change that
at the 1996 Games in Georgia and bring a medal home
for the United States.
As you can imagine, getting to the Olympics is a
lot more complicated than just throwing a sailboard
into the back of a van and driving to Savannah, venue
for the sailboarding events. The road is much longer
than that.
Ponder this: if there were ever a case of an event
tailor-made for a contender, this must be it. Smith has
won seven national titles on the very Mistral sailboard
recently named for use in the 1996 Olympic Games.
"I have five years' experience on that very board
right now," Smith explains. "The racing technique is
very different from the board used previously now
you pump and the races have become a triathlon."
A sailor most of his life, Smith holds a 300-ton
professional captain's license. The Connecticut native
was introduced to sailboards by his brother eight years
ago in Puerto Rico. Shortly after that, Smith moved to
Sarasota and began serious competition, winning his
first national title in 1989.
Supporting himself by doing boat deliveries to
Europe and later with his own residential framing com-
pany, Smith tried to put a campaign together for the
1992 Olympics. "I had the tactics down, but the board
they used was totally different," he explains. Called the
Lechner board, it was much heavier than the Mistral
that Smith sails.
But that's all changed now and changed for the
better, from Smith's point of view.
Suddenly "his" board is "the" board.
Having done most of his racing in the heavyweight
class (173 pounds), Smith decided to restructure for the
1996 Olympics, for which there are no weight classes
and the optimum weight is 150 pounds. He presently
carries 147 pounds on his six-foot frame, living on a
special dietary program that includes no red meat but
lots of vegetables, turkey, fish and fruit.
Smith's training day begins with stretching exer-
cises, then a routine that includes 500 or more sit-ups
to strengthen his back muscles, followed by push-ups
and more stretches. Then he hits the water till sundown,
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practicing by sailing on a race course to
fine-tune his skills.
If this sounds a little extreme, it's not.
Smith's European competitors commonly
travel with their own trainers, coaches
and even their personal psychologists.
"Sports psychologists" they're called, an
invention of the old East Germany now
widely used by athletes throughout Eu-
rope.
European sailors are also usually sup-
ported by their governments, "commonly
at the $30,000 level, plus expenses,"
Smith relates. "In this country, you do it
on your own, with the help of any spon-
sor good enough to step up."
Support from the U.S. Olympic
Committee is also very minimal. "Up to
now they've sent me a cap with a
sponsor's name on it with orders to wear
it at all competitions," Smith says. "Our
coach is basically an administrator."
So far just one local company has
stepped up to help fund Smith's Olympic
campaign: H2Optix, a sunglass company.
"They've been wonderful, but it's not fair
to expect them to carry the whole load,"
Smith says. "The Heart Center has al-
lowed me to use its rehabilitation center
for working out, too, and some of the
other smaller sponsors, such as Dynamic
Health, have been very helpful.
"It hurts to miss races against interna-
tional competition," Smith says, "because
something serious always happens at Don Smith,
these events. Miss a race and you're vul-
nerable I've always felt that."
But plane tickets and basic living costs at race sites
are sometimes beyond the sailor's reach. "Obviously,
fundraising is a distraction, and my only real goal right
now to stay focused, so there's some conflict," he
notes.
"But I'm going to bring back the gold medal with
or without local help," Smith promises. "You always
have to have hope I call it the hope factor."
Smith is preparing to leave for a grinding month of
sailing competition on the European Olympic Circuit.

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"It's come down to staying focused through the quali-
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necessary to qualify for a spot in the Games."
Anyone else interested in helping this young
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 27 E-


I'STEETL


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Nov. 7, lost property, 9908 Gulf Drive, Anna
Maria Post Office. The complainant left her pocket-
book at the post office boxes, and when she returned
it was not there.
Nov. 7, theft, 400 block of Magnolia. The com-
plainant reported a person unknown removed the
wheel covers from her vehicle.
Nov. 11, burglary, 100 block of Park Avenue.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered
the carport, opened a locked storage room and removed
a case of beer.
Nov. 13, theft, 700 block of North Shore Drive.
The complainant reported a person unknown removed
two chairs and a picnic table from an open porch on the
beach side of the residence.
Nov. 15, grand theft, 700 block of North Shore
Drive. The complainant reported a person unknown
removed her mink coat.
Nov. 15, open door, 200 block of Spring. The
complainant reported his neighbor's door was open.
The officer checked the residence and found nothing
disturbed.
Nov. 15, found property, 200 block of Fir. While
cleaning her mother's home, the complainant found a
Smith and Wesson .32 caliber revolver with three bul-
lets. She asked to have the bullets destroyed.

Bradenton Beach
Nov. 9, hit and run accident, 66th Street and
Cortez Road. While on his way from town to work on
the Island, the officer came upon a hit and run accident.
He notified EMS and the Florida Highway Patrol and
sent out information on the suspect. After FHP arrived
he left for work. Further west on Cortez Road, at the
7300 block, he saw the suspect's vehicle traveling
toward the crash site. He stopped the suspect and held
him for FHP.
Nov. 10, loitering and prowling, Coquina Beach.
The officer on patrol was flagged down by a couple who
said they were sitting in their vehicle and observed a man
wearing dark clothing peering in their vehicle. As they
started the vehicle, the suspect ran toward the beach.
The officer knew of the suspect and his vehicle due
to past incidents. He found the suspect's vehicle and
then the suspect, who was in the water. When the of-
ficer asked the suspect what he was doing, he said he




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was fishing. The officer noted the absence of any fish-
ing equipment, and the suspect said he was crabbing.
The officer noted the absence of any crabbing equip-
ment and placed the suspect in custody.

Holmes Beach
Nov. 10, burglary, 600 block of Ivanhoe. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed two
motion lights from the residence.
Nov. 10, suspicious, 400 block of 62nd Street.
The complainant reported a person unknown struck her
window with a golf ball.
Nov. 10, battery on a law enforcement officer,
3610 East Bay Drive, Dry Dock. An employee advised
the officer a female subject who had been asked to
leave the business was standing in front of the bar hit-
ting people as they entered and exited.
Upon the officer's arrival the subject was being
held down in the parking lot by the bouncer. The of-
ficer attempted to talk to her, and she tried to re-enter
the bar. He advised her several times she could not do
so. She attempted to enter the bar again and was placed
in custody. While the officer was putting her in the
patrol vehicle, she began kicking him and trying to get
out. She was shackled.
Nov. 12, assist Manatee County Sheriffs Depart-
ment, 600 Manatee Avenue. The officer responded to
Manatee Avenue and East Bay Drive to intercept a
subject in reference to vandalism and aggravated as-
sault with a motor vehicle.
The officer stopped the subject's vehicle and sepa-
rated the occupants. According to the report, the sub-
ject made a spontaneous statement that he saw some-
one chasing his friends and swerved his vehicle toward


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him to scare him but did not intend to hit him. The sub-
ject was placed in custody.
Nov. 12, lost property, 5353 Gulf Drive, Circle K.
The complainant reported he was in the Circle K and
set his wallet down on a display while talking. He said
he forgot it was there and left the store. He returned to
the store three hours later and the clerk said a tourist
found the wallet by the dumpster and turned it in. The
wallet was missing $662 in cash.
Nov. 12, larceny of two bicycles valued at $100
and $50, 200 block of 56th Street.
Nov. 12, burglary, 500 block of 67th Street. The
complainant reported she returned from the beach and
discovered $170 missing from her purse.
Nov. 12, suspicious, 5324 Gulf Drive, First Na-
tional Bank. The complainant reported a person un-
known damaged a sign in front of the bank's entrance
stating "No skateboarding."
Nov. 13, suspicious, 3244 East Bay Drive, Marco
Polo's. The complainant reported a person unknown
attempted to twist the lock off the door. No entry was
gained.
Nov. 14, suspicious person, 300 block of 66th
Street. The officer responded in reference to a subject
yelling at his neighbors. The subject said he was yell-
ing because they were staring at him. The officer ad-
vised him to quiet down.
Nov. 16, larceny, 3610 East Bay Drive, Sandy
Pointe. The complainant reported a person unknown
removed private property signs.
Nov. 16, suspicious person, 5324 Gulf Drive, First
National Bank. The complainant reported juveniles skate-
boarding in the parking lot. The officer told the juveniles
they could not skateboard on bank property.





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Holmes Beach code
enforcement officer
Bill Kepping, Holmes Beach's new
code enforcement officer, has settled
into his office in city hall and is
familiarizing himself with the city's
codes and pending cases. Kepping
was formerly with the city's mainte-
nance department. He and his wife,
Maggie, and children, Ashleigh, 17,
and Jeremy, 19, have lived in Holmes
Beach for 10 years. Islander Photo:
Pat Copeland






ED PAGE 28 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Community Center soccer teams, 1995 season


Galati Marine. Division I. Season Champs


LaPensee Plumbing, Division I


Mr. Bones, Division I


rlannd Real Erttate Division I


Island Animal Clinic, Division II, Season Champs


Uncle Dan's Place, Division II


Joe's Eats and Sweets, Division II


Lowting rarSc, Divison If





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 29 B3

Community Center soccer teams, 1995 season


Beach Barn, Division III


B & M Heating & Cooling, Division III


Holmes Beach Mini-storage, Division III


Longboat Observer, Division III


School for Constructive Play, Division III






EGj PAGE 30 N NOVEMBER 23, 1995 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


All I want for the holidays is a dredge


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Coming cutbacks on federal spending may signal
the revival of an old idea a regional dredging author-
ity. That's right, dredges we'd own and share with our
neighbors to the north and south.
Dredges used to keep our passes and channels open.
The federal government recently laid down new
rules on which passes it will maintain in the future and
how that would be determined. Frankly, outside of
Tampa Bay and perhaps Boca Grande, there isn't a pass
on the southwest coast of Florida that qualifies under
the strict new rules.
Under the new regulation there has to be "signifi-
cant commercial activity" through the inlets to qualify
for federal dredging.
It appears most of our local passes have one more
dredge coming (the project is in the, as they say, "pipe-
line ") but everything is up in the air after that. In the
face of federal cutbacks, the chances of any inlets near
us receiving any dredge activity in the future probably
range from slim to no-way.
Perhaps coming to the rescue is the West Coast
Inland Navigation District. The WCIND is supported
by taxpayers from Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte and
Lee counties. The organization is charged with keep-
ing the Intracoastal Waterway and channels to the Gulf
navigable to boaters.
"Recreational boating is a major commercial enter-
prise ... but the feds don't see it that way," says Chuck
Listowski, the district's executive director. "The district
wants to see the definition of what is commercial ex-
panded."
In the meantime, and just in case the feds won't be
moved on the issue, WCIND is taking a look at alter-
natives. For example, down in Sarasota County the
district is spending $10,000 to take a look at Big Pass
as a low-maintenance alternative to New Pass.


Everyone knows that Big Pass is far wider than
New Pass and has a history of always being open even
though it has never been dredged. But the truth is Big
Pass is little more stable than New Pass. It just doesn't
tend to close.
The Coast Guard reports it has adjusted navigation
aids in the Big Pass channel 40 times in the past two years.
So that brings us back to the idea of a regional dredg-
ing authority. As first proposed many years ago, the au-
thority would maintain passes and renourish beaches
in the process from Manatee to Lee counties.
Costs could be spread out over the counties.
WCIND would be the logical body to run the operation,
as it has both the expertise and taxing power.
In the past that idea has never flown because the fed-
eral government would always eventually show up to fund
local dredging. But that's probably coming to an end.
One can't help but wonder how many other federal
programs that are presently being slashed from the fed-
eral budget will also come home to haunt us locally.

Congressional update
One set of programs that won't come back to haunt
us are the proposed riders in the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency budget. Among other things, the riders
congress initially put into place prevent EPA from en-
forcing major portions of the Clean Water Act.
The riders have now been removed, thanks to a
vote by 63 maverick Republicans joining with a major-
ity of Democrats. Proposed were things such as halting
protection of wetlands, no federal control of polluted
stormwater or raw sewage discharges from combined
sewer and stormwater systems and lowered standards
for drinking water.
Florida Republicans joining with the Democrats
to defeat this weakening of our environmental stan-
dards included Porter Goss and Bill Young. One
Republican who didn't support the environmental


quality standards was our own Dan Miller.
He probably drinks bottled water.

Big Sugar update
Strange bedfellows fighting Big Sugar in Florida
were pointed out last week in this space, and now
there are more. Imagine a room full of folks repre-
senting the Florida Keys Chamber of Commerce,
Florida Wildlife Federation, the Miccosukee Tribe
and 1000 Friends of Florida.
That's who's signed on most recently in the fight
against Big Sugar.
Virginia Barley, widow of perhaps the Everglades'
most visible and outspoken champion, George Barley,
is serving as spokesperson for the group. She says the
guiding principle behind their work is, "In Florida, the
environment means business."
And one last thing. Remember those television ads
that claim Big Sugar has committed to spending "$30
million dollars" to help clean up the Everglades? Well, the
latest estimate for damage done by the sugar industry is
$400 million and may go to $700 million.
So much for these sugar folks paying their own way.

Butterflies pass through
After my lament a couple of weeks ago about the
demise of monarch butterflies this year, what should
begin appearing in my front-yard milkweed patch but
butterflies. A few monarchs even.
Hey, these were some pretty beat-up-looking mon-
archs, but they were alive and feeding. But there
weren't many of 'em.
In the last couple of days a variety of very small
sulfurs (round, yellow wings) have been putting in
an appearance too. Maybe our weather has finally
stabilized enough to give these critters a chance
again. Let's hope so.
See you next week.


Community Center soccer all stars


Division I B
White Team S
Jon Cannon R
Paul Feeney J<
Misty Kinney G
Mark Lathrop v
Travis Rice C
Mark Rudacille N
Jim Sebastiano K
Michael Smith B
Crystal Stephens T
Miles Sullivan
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Thu11/23 11:20p 2.7ft 6:10 0.6ft 1:57 1.4ft 4:18 1.3ft
Fri11/24 6:58 0.6ft 2:58 1.4ft 5:02 1.3ft
Sat11/25 12:08 2.6ft 7:47 0.5ft 3:51 1.4ft 6:01 1.3ft
Sun 11/26 12:57 2.4ft 8:40 0.3ft 4:44 1.4ft 7:15 1.3ft
Mon11/27 1:58 2.2ft 9:33 0.1ft 5:26 1.5ft 9:00 1.3ft
Tue 11/28 3:05 1.9ft 10:26 0.1ft 6:08 1.6ft 11:02 1.1ft
Wedll/29 4:39 1.6ft 11:15 0.4ft 6:46 1.8ft -
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 106 later


9lue Team
ky Beard
.obbie Douglas
essica Foraker
ireg LaPensee
lark Manali
hris Moss
like Patterson
aelan Richards
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ravis Wicklund


Division II
White Team
Katrina Akers
Peter Birch
Max Brickse
Carly Douglas
Brad Hagerman
B.J. Keim
Aaron Lowman
Jim Mazza
Joe Mousseau
Mario Torres
Daniel Van Andel
Kim Wojculewski


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 23, 1995 M PAGE 31 EI


~. --~t~
:~~L~I~LTilSI)IFI. FI::
~
~ .ri
i
p.iYc".'.- ~/*~~71~.~


Ed Worncamp and his party caught these redfish and more while fishing with
Capt. Mike Heistand this week. Although they kept a few, they released more than
30 reds.


Bill Worth ofAnna Maria is all smiles and rightfully so, with this 33-inch
snook he caught one Sunday morning off the Rod and Reel Pier. He followed up
his good luck thefollwing week with a 35 1/2-inch linesider. Good going!


Black grouper moving close to Island


By Capt Mike Heistand
Offshore is where the action is this week, with
black grouper moving into the relatively shallow wa-
ters off the Island. Look for them in about 50 feet of
water, and expect to catch them in the 10 pound range.
Backwater anglers are reporting snook starting to move
out, but trout and flounder are still biting.
Shawn at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching black drum, redfish, snook, sheep-
shead and a bonnet head shark.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said pier angers


Women win
horseshoe match
Winners in the Nov. 18 horseshoe games
were Nancy Carson and Doris Wilson, both of
Holmes Beach. Runners-up were Ed Frager of
Cortez and John Johnson of Holmes Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall,
10005 Gulf Drive.


are catching a few reds, some keeper grouper, a few
flounder and sheepshead.
Fishers on the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier are
reporting catching lots of redfish while fishing in the
evening. The reds are biting on live shrimp. Daytime
fishers are doing well with sheepshead and flounder.
Toni at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 50 head of Key West grunts. The
six-hour trip averaged 50 head of mangrove snapper,
porgies, lane snapper and Key West grunts. The nine-
hour trip averaged 35 head of mangrove snapper, am-
berjack, cobia, a black fin tuna and red and black grou-
per.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said he's finding the
snook and reds to have left the flats for deeper water.
The best fishing action, he says, is redfish, trout, floun-
der and sheepshead the first of the season. In the
Gulf, he's finding cobia, mackerel and trigger fish, al-
though the mackerel are hard to find. Look for floun-
der fishing to improve, too.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said the wade
fishers are bringing in a lot of snook from the flats, and
some nice-sized trout caught in Palma Sola Bay. Bait
is getting hard to get, Carl said, but there are still lots


of live shrimp.
Capt. Phil Shields said grouper fishing offshore is
still excellent, with black grouper tipping the scales at
more than 10 pounds being caught in about 50 feet of
water. There are also a few kingfish starting to show.
Capt. Rick Gross is still getting a few keeper
snook, but the linesiders are harder to find every day as
the weather cools.
Capt. Mark Bradow said trout fishing has im-
proved for him in the past week, but white bait is get-
ting harder to find.
On my boat Magic we've been fishing offshore
most of the week and have found that black grouper
have moved into shallow water 40 to 50 feet deep.
We've been able to land a few, as well as some trigger
fish, permit and mangrove snapper.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's been catching a few
reds, trout and snook.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said offshore is
where the action is right now, with excellent catches of
grouper and snapper being reported. For those willing
to try backwater fishing, there are still a few snook
being caught by the piers, and a few cobia, too.
Good luck and good fishing.


V A-

CAPT ZKE1


Don't miss the
special Insert
this week in
The Islander
Bystander ...
Bill
Lowman's
FW-hC fhe/

Look for bargains
on everything you
need for great
Island fishing!


s~a
r -. .'Ci
i Oe v
^-o UT


Fish Tales

Welcome!


Got a great catch? A great fish photo?
The Islander Bystander would love to hear your
fish stories and pictures are always welcome
Just give us a call at 778-7978 or stop by our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


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-- -







[IM PAGE 32 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Officer in Charge, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Special Note: The U.S. Coast Guard continued to
provide service to the public as usual despite the "shut
down" of the federal government.
Nov. 9, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received orders from Coast Guard Group St.
Petersburg to take over a tow of a sailing vessel from
Coast Guard Cutter Point Jackson. The sailboat had a
disabled steering system, no communication gear and
was 54 miles offshore. A Coast Guard helicopter lo-
cated the vessel after an EPIRB distress signal was
received in Miami. Station Cortez launched a boat,
located the disabled vessel, took over the tow and
moored the vessel at a local marina.
Nov. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. A Coast


Guard Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 84, while on pa-
trol in New Pass, discovered a disabled 21-foot plea-
sure craft. The auxiliary vessel towed the disabled boat
to a safe mooring.
Nov. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. A Coast
Guard Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 84, while on pa-
trol in Little Sarasota Bay, discovered a disabled 14-
foot pleasure craft. The auxiliary vessel towed the dis-
abled boat to a safe mooring.
Nov. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. A Coast
Guard Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 87, while on pa-
trol in the Intracoastal Waterway near Venice, discov-
ered a 32-foot vessel in need of assistance. The auxil-
iary vessel towed the disabled boat to a safe mooring.
Nov. 12, Boarding. Station Cortez boarded a 29-
foot pleasure craft near Jewfish Key. The owner was
issued a written warning for a fixed firefighting system
without a gauge to determine bottle pressure and with-
out a current inspection tag to verify bottle pressure.


Nov. 12, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from a boater of a submerged
rowboat in Anna Maria Sound. A Coast Guard Auxil-
iary vessel from Flotilla 81 located the sunken boat and
towed it to a nearby boat ramp.
Nov. 12, Boarding. Station Cortez boarded a 20-
foot pleasure craft near Cortez Bridge. The owner was
issued a written warning for having a fire extinguisher
with an inoperable pressure check button.
Nov. 12, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an overturned eight-foot
skiff in Little Sarasota Bay. A Coast Guard Auxiliary
vessel from Flotilla 84 towed it to nearby moorings.
Nov. 13, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from a passing boater of an 18-
foot pleasure craft adrift with no one aboard. A Coast
Guard Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 84 responded, and
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


ISLANDER



$50 Winner,
Mike Clar
9$of





$50 FOOTB


Nov. 16 Contest
rke, Bradenton
9 correct





%LL


CONTEST


PICK 10 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
person with the most correct game winning
predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Is-
lander Bystander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
* The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser
1
2

FILL IT OUT NOW!


Winner
3
4


Advertiser


5
6
7
8
9
10
10 __________________________


Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach, FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Address


* Phone


As Independent As
The Island Itself
rI
First National-
Bank
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
(941) 778-4900
[ Pariots vs Bills


ROD rRfEL

"Best kept secret
on the Island"
Home of the Two-Fisted
Burger ... 3.50
at the corner of North Shore
& Alamanda, Anna Maria
1/2 mile north of city pier
778-1885
S Dolphinsvs Colts


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
Cribbage Tournament
Noon Every Sunday
Jets vs Seahawks
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Seafood & Spirits
Wings
Raw Bar
Fun Food
Football Specials
Broncos vs Oilers
7423-D Manatee Ave. W.
(next to Albertsons)
798-3876


LONGBOT
TAVERN

& RESTAURANT
ON LONGBOAT KEY
Finest Foo, Wine,

SEntertainment
Dancing
Happy Hour
at The Centre Shops
383-3898
SBengals vs Jaguars


DESIGN YOUR OWN
IT-SHI:RT
WE WILL PRINT

ON FUIT OFHE LOOM BEST'T-SHIRT
foR AS LOW AS
$14.95
DISCOMDIT 09 LAb QcouraifTf
778-0540
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach
Rams vs 49ers


We do
immigration
and passport
photos right
here
Bean vs Giants


778-7975
Anna Maria Island
Same Shopping Center as
Shell's Restaurant
Personal Training
Tanning Massage Sauna
Weely & Dally Rates
All New Equipment
SState of heart
Cardiovascular Equipment
* Full lime of free weights
featuring Hoist Equipment
Panthers vs Saints


Casual Waterfront Dining
steaks, fresh seafood
rotisserie duck & chicken
Entertainment &
Dancing Nightly
383-5565
6000 Block of Gulf of Mexico Dr.
595 Dream Island Rd.
Longboat Key
Falcons vs Cardinals


SName






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 33 BI]


COAST LINES, FROM PAGE 32
Station Cortez was able to contact the owner through
a check of the boat's registration. The vessel had be-
come disabled, and the owner was on his way back to
tow it to port when it broke its moorings.
Nov. 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a request for towing assistance from a
grounded 32-foot pleasure craft in Tampa Bay. Station
Cortez relayed the information to a commercial towing
company and monitored the situation until the vessel
reached port.
Nov. 15, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from police of a person jump-
ing off the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier. Station
Cortez launched a boat to investigate but found no one.
The Cortez Bridge bridge tender reported the swimmer
reached shore safely.
Nov. 16, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from a passing boater of a
vessel anchored one mile offshore with people aboard
waving their arms as if in need of assistance. Station
Cortez launched a boat and located the vessel, which
was being towed to port by another vessel. Station


Cortez monitored the situation until the disabled ves- foot pleasure craft offshore of the Manatee County
sel reached port. Public Beach. The owner was issued a written warning
Nov. 16, Boarding. Station Cortez boarded a 24- for not having the vessel registration on board.



WAGNIER REALTY

NOon ek"W4 A4,, Mr* 144a Is b etter ta we d4.
6ALES5 AND RENTALS Since 1939
0 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
778-2246 Call Toll-free 1-800-211-2323

Wagner Realty wishes to thank all their friends and clients for
their patience during our recent renovations.

(Iwm/m all 4j u ... o^l (app19 f ?han/qiving


I E pat, e *


Whether you are looking for an island property
or a Manatee County waterfront home, contact
the waterfront specialists, the exceptional people
at Michael Saunders & Company.

rrT~sibi~


END OF ANNA MARIA on busy corner
with two houses. Possible commercial
zoning. Potential income property.
$179,000. Ruth Cherko 747-2411. R2082.


PICTURE BOOK HOME on Holmes Beach.
Deep water canal, view of Sunshine Sky-
way from master suite deck. Two fireplaces,
fabulous kitchen, 2-car garage, 3 large
porches. $389,000. Kathleen Slayter 792-
8826 or Janet Bellinger 727-7870. R2081


OUTSTANDING GULF PLAZA condo-
minium, beautifully furnished. Stunning
view of Gulf from your first floor screened
lanai. Excellent income potential.
$310,000. Nancy Keegan 723-3929.


Residential Sales/Rental Division: Licensed Real Estate Broker
3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (941) 778-6654
4400 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)748-6300
6016 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)792-2727


0I44 PUdel& H4ae 4T D^*ae


Dave Moynihan
778-7976


1 T 1
Ed Oliveira
778-1751


Bill Alexander
778-0609


Suzanne Georgia Jackie Jerome
755-1576 792-3226


Going to a
new home
Mel Beall, a member of the Pelican
Man's Bird Sanctuary hospital, holds a
wood stork, an endangered species,
prior to its departure for the Brookfield
Zoo in Illinois. The wood stork and a
little blue heron which have suffered
permanent injuries will allow adults
and children in Illinois to view these
birds for the first time. The Pelican
Man's Bird Sanctuary is pleased to be
able to save the birds and to place them
in a permanentfacility where they can
be observed and appreciated by the
public. Islander Photo: Courtesy of the
Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary.


I





PM PAGE 34 E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Craig Claiborne's The New York
Times Cookbook' by Craig
Claiborne with Pierre Franey
A chapter titled "De Gustibus," which literally
means "about tastes," begins this very large cookbook.
Claiborne's comments and reminiscences about food
and cooking are worth reading whether you like to
peruse recipes or not Although they are comparatively
simple, many have a slight variation of a common
theme that makes them special.
Reviewed by Mollie Sandberg

'McNally's Trial' by
Lawrence Sanders
That up-scale Palm Beach detective, Archy









HaIppy Thanksgiving
JUST LISTED
WEST OF GULF DRIVE ... corner lot 2BR/1BA
home two blocks to the beach. Use the hot and
cold water outside shower to rinse off after your
stroll on the beach. #67226. $160,000. Call Carol
S. Heinze, eves at 792-5721.
RARELY AVAILABLE ... superb 3BR/2BA home on
the widest canal on Anna Maria. Boat dock accommo-
dates 70' yacht w/additional boat slip. Jacuzzi tub, en-
closed pool and many extras. #111595. $329,000. Call
T. Dolly Young, eves at 778-5427.
SIESTA KEY ... totally updated 2BR/2BA with new
carpet and tile. Mirrored foyer wall, combination
kitchen and family room. 50' dock out your back
door with no bridges to bay. Community pool, spa,
tennis and clubhouse. $235,000. Call Karin
Stephan, eves at 388-1267.
T. DOLLY YOUNG
Presents ...
BAYFRONT ... 3BR/3.5BA w/magnificent views.
Two fireplaces, electric storm shutters, gas heated
pool/spa, 50' dock w/water, electric and controlled
boat lift. DY67411. $589,000.
MARTINIQUE ... 2BR/2BA top floor w/breathtaking
Gulf and Bay views. Exquisitely furnished.
#DY66863. $189,900.
DUPLEX ... west of Gulf Drive. 3BR/3BA family room,
fireplace; 2BR/2BA den. #DY64777. $259,000.
ISLAND RESTAURANT ... beach view, high traffic vis-
ibility plus 2BR apartment. #DY52792. $450,000.
T. Dolly Young, REALTOR*/IMS
Leading Edge Society 778-5427
BAYVIEW TERRACE ...
itGreat bayfront complex. 1BR/
1BA unit nicely decorated and
furnished. Neat and clean. Walk
to beach. Make an offer and
spend your winter in the sun.
#66942. $57,500.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR /CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

Karin Stephan
REALTORG I
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
Fax: 941- 778-3035
WEST WINDS ... exclusive residential Gulf view
complex. Bright and cheery 2R/2BA first floor end
unit. Security doors, heated pool and walk to
beach. #67250. $179,900.


McNally, is on the loose again. Whether succumbing to
predatory females, telling you what he had for lunch or
catching the crooks, McNally always conducts himself
with style and flair. Author Sanders has a lot of fun
poking the pompous balloons of the rich and the un-
scrupulous. An eminently readable series.
Reviewed by Carol Sandidge

'The Burglar Who Traded Ted
Williams' by Lawrence Block
The latest in a series, it is the story of a "gentle-
man" burglar, Bernie Rhodenbarr, who solves a mur-
der. I found the conversational patter excessive, but the
intrigue of the crime was maintained in tight, logical
style. Faithful followers of Block's Matthew Scudder
series will find this series wholly different.
Reviewed by Philip Connolly

'Private Altars' by
Katherine Mosby
Southern writer Mosby's first novel tells of an
iconoclastic young woman trying unsuccessfully to fit
into a small 1920 town. While the prose is lyrical, the

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story is too often lost in the lovely words. But the char-
acters are unforgettable and Ms. Mosby's humanity
shows through in this portrait of life's consequences.
Reviewed by Carol Sandidge

'Daughters of England' by
Philippa Carr
The author, who also writes as Victoria Holt, has
set this story in late 1860s England when women
were just being allowed on the stage as actresses.
Against a background of Catholic-Protestant unrest,
this historical romance abounds in details of the politi-
cal, religious and moral dilemmas of the time.
Reviewed by Bette Kissick

'In Search of Stones' by
M. Scott Peck, M.D.
I felt that the author was representative of neither
psychiatrists nor ministers-both of which he is. Airing
his private affairs in public seemed a disservice to his
wife. I did not find much to like about this book.
Reviewed by Elizabeth Tomkins


rim [l^^Thi^
n L^*n L
A L TO-R S O M


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE on northern Anna
Maria Island 3BR/2BA townhouse in the city
of Holmes Beach. Community pool. Steps to
wide walking beach. Reduced to $159,900.
ROSE
SCHNOERR
778-2261
Top of the Team
No. 1 Neal & Neal
Company Agent MS
Through October 1995
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


411~1 -L






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U NOVEMBER 23, 1995 N PAGE 35 lKi]


TINGLEY, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34

'The Nightingale's Song'
by Robert Timberg
A provocative, riveting book about how the Viet-
nam war affected five publicly prominent Annapolis
graduates. James Webb, Oliver North, Robert
McFarlane, John McCain and John Poindexter, three
Marines and two Naval officers, are portrayed as sym-
bols of the war and the subsequent political upheaval
from which only Webb emerged unscathed.
Reviewed by Philip Connolly

'Beach Music' by Pat Conroy
This long awaited novel by the author of "Prince of
Tides" lives up to all expectations. To describe the plot
would require a complicated and lengthy review and it is
not so much the plot as the author's writing style that
makes this an excellent read. Be aware though that as you
become caught up in the beautiful way Conroy has with
words, you will find the book leading you from the bright
and shining beginning into the stormy and dispiriting story
of men and women growing though the Viet Nam era.
Reviewed by Mollie Sandberg

'Renewing America'
by Newt Gingrich
This book lays out the Republican plan for


OPEN HOUSE Westbay Point & Moorings
6400 Flotilla Dr., #25, Holmes Beach. $129,000. Show-
place, upgraded, turnkey furnished unit in garden set-
ting. Overlooks pool. Needs nothing. Just move in, re-
lax and entertain. Dick Maher or Dave Jones 778-2261
or eves 778-6791 or 778-4891.
mmom


SUNSET TERRACE CONDO Direct Gulffront,
spacious 1BR/1 BA. $129,000.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Gorgeous Gulffront
condo. 2BR/2BA, 1200 sq. ft. $225,000.
405 73rd St. Elevated new 3BR/2BA home, over
3500 sq. ft. $223,000
6103 HOLMES BLVD. 4BR top of the line Duplex.
Built like two separate homes. __ $249,000
2403 AVE B. Investors dream, completely remod-
eled. 2BR/1BA home. $129,000.
423 SPRING AVE. Anna Maria City. 2BR/2BA
home. $188,500.

3appMy 74hannk&,in 60om
our family to yours!


JULIE McCLURE

Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals

Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


America now that they are in the majority in the House
of Representatives. It provided insight into the think-
ing of Speaker of the House Gingrich.
Anyone who follows politics will find it of inter-
est. Easy and fast reading.
Reviewed by John Sandberg

'True Crime' by Andrew Klavan
The reporter in this novel is not a particularly likable
person. He's unkempt and unfaithful but also unshakable
in his convictions. Steve Everett stumbles on a great story
when a co-worker is hospitalized and Everett's boss reas-
signs the story to him. There have been any number of
recently printed books written in a similar vein...the ac-
cused, convicted and incarcerated is scheduled to die...but
is truly innocent. It falls to our sometime hero to discover
"who-dun-it" and the ending makes the reader feel good.
Reviewed by Norma M. Oldfield

'Modern Women' by Ruth Harris
Lincky Desmond, Elly McGrath and Jane Gresch are
three women of the 1950s who tried to overcome the tra-
ditional roles for women of their day. Their roles changed
as history was made but always with the determination to
break out of the mold. Each was involved in publishing
in some way and eventually their lives became inter-
twined. A fascinating novel that I found easy to relate to.
Reviewed by Mollie Sandberg


RENTALS
DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY
furnished units available
"Now through Season"
S "DIAL DEBBIE"
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152

7ib IMe 1Gulfstream
Debbie Dial REM Gulfstream
Leasing Manager 5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
HOLMES BEACH, FL.


BEACH-SIDE FIXER UPPER


ANNA MARIA HISTORIC HOME
Location, value, spaciousness! These are only
three features of this outstanding 3BR/2BA home.
Only six houses to Gulf beach on dead-end
street. Original property shown on page 34 of
Anna Maria Island History book, "Days Past".
Central A/C, family room, sun porch, big modern
kitchen, separate dining room, 1746 sq. ft.
Needs some handyman work and decorating.
Great price of only $159,900 includes new roofl


reen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA


778-0455
9906 Gulf Drive
Next to the Anna Maria
Post Office


'Prisoners of the Japanese'
by Gavan Daws
It is so easy for us to forget. And because of
this, those who wish to revise history can have a pow-
erful influence on our thinking. This book provides
well documented evidence of the horrors and brutal
treatment of allied prisoners in the Pacific. The book
provides the realism to reawaken our awareness.
Reviewed by John Sandberg
'Stormy Weather' by Carl Hiaasen
It is hard to beat Miami-based Hiaasen for a fast-
paced action story. His latest is based on the nefarious
antics of opportunists trying to take advantage of unfor-
tunate homeowners after a massive hurricane strikes
southern Florida. The author parlays the human foibles of
his characters with a malicious zest A funny story with a
definite sense of outrage directed at the human scum that
always seem to surface after a disaster.
Reviewed by Philip Connolly

'Walking After Midnight'
by Karen Robards
Murder, mayhem, drug dealers, bad cops all be-
come an unwanted part of Summer McAfee's life when
a supposed corpse comes to life in a funeral home that
she is cleaning. Summer and Steve, the former
"corpse," make a mad dash while fearing for their lives.
An intriguing story of cruelty, depraivation, adventure
and love (with some explicit scenes).
Reviewed by Bette Kissick


International Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
CLOSE TO BEACH Spacious 3/2 with screened
lanai, covered parking, "great room" plan, $194,500
YOUR FLORIDA HIDEAWAY or great investment!
Close to everything West Bradenton condo, 2BD/2BA,
central H/A, W/D, low fees, positive cash flow! Currently
used as investment (zero vacancy rate), also great win-
ter home or year-round living. This will go fast at
$42,500! Eves. 778-5028.
941-778-1443 1-800.711.7072

BILL ALEXANDER
Broker Salesman
A lifelong local resident with
12 years of commercial and
residential experience in
REAL ESTATE


WAGNE R EMATY Y
778-2246
(800) 211-2323


KEY ROYALE. Impeccable 2BR/2BA canal front home
with vaulted ceilings, dream kitchen for the discriminat-
ing gourmet. Large lot seawalled with dock and new
boat lift. $274,900. Call Judy Duncan 778-1589 eves.
SEASONAL RENTALS
$1,000 $3,000 mo.
Call for reservations
Carla Price 778-0770
ANNUAL RENTALS
$400 mo 1BR/1BA
$750 mo 2BR/2BA
$1,200mo 3BR/2BA
Call Carla Price 778-0770
"We speak your language"
German French Italian

r REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. *Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS L


[snu,~






I PAGE 36 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

1~ :/ l- 1


DACOR BC Dive Vest. Ladies, barely used. $200. 778-
2068.

RATTAN 6 PIECE living room set. Sofa, love seat, club
chair, 3 glass top tables. Good condition. $375 for all.
778-9694.

GE COMPACT CLOTHES washer and dryer (120 v).
Both 21" x 21", good condition. Ideal for apartments.
$175 pair. 778-9694.
METAL BIFOLD DOORS, 4 sets. Two 2 door 60" w
$60. One 2 door 48"w $45. One door 36"w $25. Good
condition. 778-9694.
TWO TWIN BED mattress sets with frames. Very good
condition. $150. AMF. recumbent exercise bike, digi-
tal display. Excellent condition. $150. 778-9694.
SUNN MODEL-4 P.A. system. $250. SUNN bass amp
with 18" EV speaker. $250. Computer desk custom
made. $200. 778-1060.
DOUBLE OVEN RANGE, self clean, 30" white. Perfect
condition. $75. 778-0076.
QUEEN SLEEPER SOFA, occasional chair, table with
leaf and four chairs. Excellent condition and reasonably
priced. Florida colors. 778-2635.


WANTED WORKING reel to reel tape recorder, 7 in.
size. Also Big Band era records. 778-5073.


CANOPY KING SIZE water bed, mirrored ceiling, chis-
eled glass cabinets. Under bed drawers and cabinets.
New $2,000. Asking $500 obo. 778-0990.
CARPORT SALE. Sat. Nov 25 and Sun. Nov 26, 9 to
5. 93 North Shore Drive, Anna Maria City. Household
items, furniture, electronics, computer with printer and
modems.
XMAS SALE. Fri Sun, Nov 24 Nov 26, 8:30 to 2:30.
2507 Ave. A, Bradenton Beach. All new gifts, souvenirs,
dolls, music boxes, angels, santas, lamps, wood, fish,
birds, porcelain flowers, nite lites and more.
SALE. SAT., NOV 25, 8 to 12. 328 Tarpon, Anna Maria.
Bunk beds, trunks, exercise equipment, antique furni-
ture and lots more.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


BODYWORX FITNESS PROGRAM. Offering low im-
pact aerobics, step aerobics, muscle toning with
weights, relaxation & stretching exercises. Silver Com-
munity Center, 23rd & Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach. For
info call Geri Travis. 779-2129.

SELF EMPLOYED? 100% low cost health coverage
sponsored by the American Small Business Associa-
tion. Call Arnold. 794-0567.
CRUISE WESTERN CARIBBEAN on the new Sun Prin-
cess, Jan 27. Group rates. Escorted by Dick and Mar-
garet. For information, Call 778-3624.


1985 JAGUAR excellent condition, new headliner, tires,
brake pads, silver. A must see car. $7,000. 778-1990.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-
1990.
ISLAND DRIFTER. 30 ft. pontoon boat with enclosed
rest room. Available for private and personalized char-
ters with Capt. Al Bentley. 778-4597.


PEDDLING FOR
WATERFRONT PROPERTY
Then call the Real Estate
Professional willing to go the
"Extra Mile" for you!
When you demand excellence
In Real Estate Service
BUYING OR SELLING
L REACH RICHARD FOR RESULTS!!
RICHARD FREEMAN
REALTOR' Wishing you and your family a Happy Thanksgivingl







OPEN HOUSE SUN., NOV 26 1 -4 Call


PI
618 S. I
"MOW M1':.



Anna Maria Bayfront Home
Owner Finance. Price reduced from
$299,000 to $???,??? ,* Charming be
Make an offer! of the Sun!
: 510 South Bay Boulevard changing na
seen from th
Yvonne Higgins REATOR Price re
778-7777 or 1-800-318-5752
R5M n1 GULFSTREAM REALTY

fAAblAM AAfAiMA


IcIn~rAr1 DervrrfI "


NORTH END DUPLEX!
This duplex located on the north end of Anna Maria
offers 2BR/1BA each side and is just steps to the
Beach. This rare property is a great investment oppor-
tunity at just $172,000. Call Ken Jackson eves at 778-
6986 or Pat Jackson eves at 778-3301.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
Il701 Gulf Dve* P O Box 717-Anni MaMU ,. FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY GROUP
OFFICEI THREE ISLAND real estate offices working together to provide personal and
professional services. Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience shows
we are long established ISLAND offices!





lol
"'Hv-


Remembering all our friends this Thanksgiving Day...
"Happy Thanksgiving and many warm memories."

p4A MAIM
1057
MRE LIC. REA ESTATE
L" W. AREthe l wd."
0I06 OMf Dre. PO B 83135 Aun Mr.Fa, FldM 34218
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


DOWUNG
REALTY
409 Piln Av.
Anna Marl2
negr


I A \ 1 *0 : l b rTi AM I A


ISLANDER


More local
news than
any other
source!
See page 7 in this
issue for a mail
subscription or call
778-7978
and have your
MasterCard or
Visa handy.


Open House 525 Loquat, Anna Maria
Sunday, Nov. 26 1 to 4 pm
Beautiful 5BR/4BA canal home. Screened porch
overlooks pool area. Seawalled canal with dock
and davits. Great view of Tampa Bay. $465,000.
Call (941)778-5590


9 OPEN HOUSE!!
\ o Sunday Nov. 25, I to 4








506 59th Street, Holmes Beach
Lovely modern home with boat dock in family neigh-
borhood. 3BR/2BA shows like a new home. Vaulted
ceilings and large screen porch. Offered at
$199,000. Call Ken Jackson eves at 778-6986 or
Pat Jackson eves at 778-3301.
Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drve P Box 717 *Anna Mard. FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


lb-ll Ait Mej~j~jlf L -1NiW sl 1Il


I


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 PAGE 37 IJ



B T&OI CnndEISEI O I


KAWASAKI JET SKI with trailer, many extras. Has
never been used in salt water. Asking $1,500. Call 778-
4743 eves.


RECEPTIONIST FULL TIME for busy Island Real Es-
tate Office. 5 days a week. 778-0777.
SALESPERSON EXPERIENCED for women's bou-
tique gift shop. Apply in person. The Beach Shop at
Manatee Public Beach, 4000 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
NOW HIRING FOR SEASON. Sales positions avail-
able. Buck Creek Groves, 5424 Marina Dr. 778-3534.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATION for permanent full
time cashier position. Apply at Crowder Bros. Hard-
ware, Holmes Beach.
TIRED OF NOT WORKING? Want to make $'s and
meet great people and have fun. Call me at 779-2079.
Ginny Dutton, Excel Telecommunications Rep. Inde-
pendent representative.


COMPANION AND HEALTH care. Experienced, de-
pendable, live-in. Can drive, cook, housekeeping. Help
is just a phone call away. (414) 248-2488.
GERI CARES. CNA, HHA quality in home care. Rea-
sonable, references. 794-0481.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything else
in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.




North Beach Village
6305 Gulf Drive
3BR/2BA. 2 big sundecks in a tropical setting.


Turnkey furnished, all new carpet, 1/2 block to
beach. Own your piece of Paradise! $158,900.
Excalibur Realty
(941) 795-4394






Oe Rr&9a&atd tae 9
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294




Jiom Betsyffffl*
andComprany










NEW LISTING
This light and spacious 3BR/2BA Key West style home
offers soaring cathedral ceilings, paladin windows and
private elevated master suite. Amenities include a con-
venient great room floor plan with handy breakfast bar,
brass chandeliers, ceiling fans and wooden deck with
hot tub. also includes 2 nearby deeded deep water
boat slips! Priced at $250,000.
"WIR SPRECHEN DEUTSCH"
"E T S-t? L 4"
Associates Ater Hours Barbara A. Sato...778-3509
Nancy Gullford...778-2158 Monica Reld...729-3333
Suzanne Kasten ... 921-4130 Sherry Sasser ... 7781820
Exdusidv
Waterfront d

ES&ctin In LimLS tr"JbR
Video Collection
7/;a 5' -t"yz u -r,-J' ta Loq.(ts


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sun-
shine Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
'SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Residential & com-
mercial cleaning. Homes, condos, rentals and busi-
nesses. Excellent references. Licensed, bonded. Call
for estimate or appointment. Beverly 778-1945.

DOLPHIN CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE. All types
of residential cleaning. Free estimates. References on
and off the island. Call Rick. 778-2864. "Holiday
cleaning now."

RENTAL SERVICE. Beds and baby needs for rent.
Mobile service. Free delivery and pick-up 7 days a
week. Beach rentals. 778-6438.

"THE PERFECTIONIST Cleaning with perfection:
homes, condos, rentals, etc. Call Sharon at 778-0064.

I DO CLEANING by the hour, 4 hour minimum. Homes,
condos, rentals. Call Marie 794-6135.
CLEANING SERVICES, residential, condos and rent-
als. Reliable. Ana 778-5814.


reen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA


778-0455
9906 Gulf Drive
Next to the Anna Maria
Post Office


WE ARE VERY PROUD TO
INTRODUCE...


4fiPPT
qfflwiv11(


MARK REEMELIN
An enthusiastic real
estate sales professional,
dedicated to top quality
service, who has joined the
Green Real Estate Team.
Mark and his wife Deana
make their home in Anna
Maria. He has background as
a real estate appraiser.
Mark would like to meet you
and solve your real estate
problems.
Drop by to say "Hello."


COMPUTER CREATIONS: Hardware and software
consulting, training, troubleshooting, backups, audits,
data entry, custom printing and other computer ser-
vices available. Call 778-9271 anytime.
DEUTSCHER HANDWERKER Sanitar Installateur,
erledigt Arbeiter aller art im Haus und am Haus. 779-1263.
INTERESTED IN SAVING up to 50% on your phone
bill? No gimmicks, no minimums. Call me at 779-2079.
Ginny Dutton, Excel Telecommunications Rep. Inde-
pendent representative.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Dry foam
shampoo & steam cleaned. LR/DR $34.95. Free de-
odorizing. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
HOME Improvement continues on the next page.


Happy Thanlvgivingl
Call Lisa for Rentals ...
Weekly Monthly
Annual


Lisa G. Varano


3001 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 941-778-0700
6350 Gulf of Mexico Drive Longboat Key 941-383-5543






I~I PAGE 38 0 NOVEMBER 23, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


a Commercial Residential Free Estimates
W a ndyS\ Lawn Mowing Trimmlng Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service *13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
Ui "0AND SATISFACTION


m I


OTemporary Health Care
Companion & Private Duty Nursing
HOME HOSPITAL NURSING HOME
Licensed 794-1086 Bonded


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


REMODELING


* ADDITIONS
* RENOVATIONS
* KITCHENS BATHS
* nFDCK &R MORF


ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


9 XACT


Deffenbaugh
LOCKS & SECURITY
LOCKED OUT?
HOME AUTO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
ALL TYPES OF LOCKS
Installed Rekoyed Repaied
Bonded Licensed Insured
Serving Anna Maria, Longboal
Key, Cortez, West Bradenton
-EMERGENCY SERVICE-
RADIO DISPATCHED
SPECIALTY KEYS
LUGGAGE REPAIRS
By Appointment 778-5594


S I



Painting
1Preure Cvieanig
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


Painting by Elaine
Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR
S& EXTERIOR
* RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
We repair popcom ceilings.
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468


"SEW WHAT"
... of Anna Maria Island


Tailoring & Alterations
for Men & Women
PICK-UP
AND DELIVERY
Bette Buckley
524 70th St., Holmes Beach
(941) 779-2281


IWSLANDERZCLASSIFIEDS
HOE IMROEMET otiue-ENAL ONINE


Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
S "A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


ONE


MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident 25
yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober,
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 778-5617.

THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of
home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs exp. Insured,
island resident, references available. Jim 779-2129.

CARL V. JOHNSON, JR. Building contractor, new homes,
alterations, additions. Free estimates, design service, qual-
ity, fair prices. Reg.# RR0066450. (941) 795-1947.
ISLAND HOME IMPROVEMENTS. Fall specials on
clean-up & hauling. No job to large or small. Tile, tex-
ture, paint, etc. Free estimates. Real Estate and build-
ers welcome. Island resident. Call Sam. 778-2191.


ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

DECEMBER ONLY! Fully furnished beach cottage.
1 BR/1BA, private lot and parking. $325 weekly includes
phone and cable. 778-2832.

BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
GULF FRONT 1BR/1BA vacation condo. Screened
lanai, sun deck, private beach, nicely furnished. Avail-
able Mar. & Apr. $1,700 mo. 778-2832.

SUMMER, ANNUAL AND SEASONAL rentals. Call the
rental specialist, Wagner Realty 778-2246.
EFFICIENCIES from $140/wk for one person, from
$175/wk for two. Excellent off-season vacation and tem-
porary re-location rates until 12/15/95. Haley's Motel,
8102 Gulf, Holmes Beach. 778-5405.

ANNUAL RENTALS 2 & 3BR rentals. Unfurnished $625
& $850 mo plus utilities. No pets. Call Anna Maria Re-
alty, Inc. 778-2259.

SEASONAL RENTALS 1 BR/1 BA direct Gulf front units.
2 & 3BR homes on or near the Gulf. $1,000 $2500
mo. Call Carla Price, Smith Realtors. 778-0770.
SEASONAL West Bay Cove, Sun Plaza, Martinique and
River Oaks. Please call T. Dolly Young, Prudential
Florida Realty, 778-0766.

VACATION IN FLORIDA! 3 houses from Gulf beach.
2BR/2BA, Florida room. Completely furnished duplex
apt., ground level, central H/A, open Jan., March & April
1996. Call Betty Cole (941) 779-1213 or write PO. Box
246, Anna Maria, FL 34216.

SUNBOW BAY Yearly unfurnished. 2BR/2BA apart-
ment w/lovely views. Pool, tennis, elevator, covered
parking. Non-smokers. $775 mo. Call Dave Moynihan,
Realtor. 778-2246 or 778-7976.

BEACH FRONT 3BR/2BA downstairs duplex, covered
patio, carport. Fully equipped kitchen, laundry, C/H/A.
Utilities included, maximum 6 people. $2,500 mo. + tax.
(941) 686-5448.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 2BR completely remodeled, new
appliances, 1st floor. Attached efficiency apartment. Walk
to beach. Days (813) 931-8888 eves (813) 960-2882.


Mulchifl, hell fl FRE ESTMATES



Cet.ofReisraio
778-444178441784411


ANNA MARIA CANALFRONT. Bay, beach, 2BR/1BA
completely furnished, utilities included. Four mo. $1,300
mo. Available Dec. 1 778-5793.
ANNA MARIA 3BR/2BA canalfront home, ground level,
dock, garage. All service included less electricity. Yearly
lease $1,500. 778-5793.
PANORAMIC GULFFRONT 3BR/2BA home, Anna
Maria. Beautiful! Available Nov 25 Dec 23. Off season
rates. wk/mo. (813) 920-5595.
SEASONAL FOR 1996. 2BR/1BA home, screened
porch, cable TV, washer/dryer, garage. Close to beach.
(813) 689-0925.
3BR/2BA CONDO 1/2 Block from beach. Cafe, pool,
tennis, washer/dryer. Available Dec. and/or Jan. 778-
3036.
GULF VIEW STUDIO APT, Holmes Beach. Fully fur-
nished, annual or seasonal. No pets. Available Nov 1.
Also 2BR/1BA (941) 293-6131.
ANNUAL RENTAL. Bradenton Beach studio apartment.
Walk to beach. $425. mo. includes utilities and cable.
1st, last, security. Call (813) 935-2968.
HOLMES BEACH. Renovated modem, spacious house
for rent seasonal. 3BR/2BA furnished plus two
screened lanais. Private pool with total privacy fence,
fireplace, tile floors etc. Must see. Call 792-1554 eves.
SEASONAL. BE THE FIRST one to rent this newly
renovated 2BR/2BA house directly on beach. Great
amenities. (941) 778-2940 or 778-2357.
ANNA MARIA Gulf/Bay views. 1 BR, patio, pool, w/d, fur-
nished. Seasonal or annual. 211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896


We clean ana wax everyming ror one low price.
Everything is included for $85 on a normal size
car. Top to bottom, ashtray to engine! Hand wash,
buff, seal and polish, vacuum, Armorall, dress rims
and tires, shampoo interior, satin-black under-
carriage. Even the engine is cleaned and silicone
protected. Our complete mobile service means no
one has to drive your car. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
Mobile service number: 320-0110.


I A T .6P






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 23, 1995 E PAGE 39 lI


11SLANDER CLASSJ.FEEZI
RENALSCotiue RAL ST E


SEASONAL ANNA MARIA Bayfront. Great view, ground
level home, turnkey, 2BR/2BA, dishwasher, disposal,
washer, dryer, garage. $2,000 mo (941) 778-2825
BRADENTON BEACH across street from public beach.
Furnished 2BR/1BA. Available til Feb.1. Seasonal
$1,250. mo. plus electric. 778-5458 or 798-9099.
ANNA MARIA, at fishing pier next to Alto's restaurant on
water. Large apartments furnished, private courtyard,
heated pool and spa. Seasonal or annual $600 $900.
CHARMING STUDIO apartment with Gulfview. Fur-
nished. Available monthly. Steps to Gulf. 778-5657 or
792-5303.

2BR/2BA DUPLEX unfurnished. On lake, near beach.
Small pet. Annual $625 or seasonal turnkey Dec. thru
Apr $1,200. 1st, last, security. 778-1592
SPOTLESS 1BR/1BA apartment west of Gulf Drive.
Quiet complex with laundry facility. Furnished or unfur-
nished. References required. 778-2864 or 778-4854.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE. 3BR/2BA 2car, annual
unfurnished. $950 mo. 795-4394 Excalibur Realty.
BARGAIN RATES
SELECT DATES for Dec and Jan. Casa Sierra,
heated pool, 2BR/2BA. 36th and Gulf Dr. 778-0032
SEASONAL NORTH BEACH Village condo. Gorgeous
3BR/3BA, 1,500 sq. ft townhouse. Pool, large deck and
designer decor. $2,400 mo. Gulf Bay Realty 778-7244
TURNKEY FURNISHED 1 bedroom furnished condo,
bayfront pool. Gulf and bayviews, near shopping and
restaurants, laundry. Available now. 778-6724.

CHARMING BEACH CLASSIC 2BR/1BA, Gulfview, all
new kitchen, w/d, hardwood floors and double garage.
Perfect winter get away. $650 wk or $1,800 mo. Gulf
Bay Realty 778-7244
FRENCH NORMANDY fairy tale home. 4BR/3BA,
Gulfview, prestigious neighborhood. Available for Dec.,
1995. Call 778-2206 or 794-8202
SIMPLY CHARMING. North end beach cottage, newly
renovated, designer furnished. 3BR/2.5BA ground
level. Steps from prime beach. Drive by 806 Jacaranda.
(941) 746-6269
"MARTINIQUE 1BR/1BA Gulffront view. Nicely fur-
nished. Available Feb., Mar. Apr. $2,400 mo. Michael
Saunders & Co. Holmes Beach. 778-2275
PERICO BAY CLUB and Perico Island. Beautiful 2BR/
2BA furnished condominiums, near beach. Seasonal.
$2,100 $2,200 mo. Michael Saunders & Co. Holmes
Beach. 778-2275
SANDY POINT CONDOMINIUM Furnished 2BR/2BA,
pool. 3 month minimum. Available Jan, Feb and Mar.
Michael Saunders & Co. Holmes Beach. 778-2275
DUE TO OVERWHELMING response from advertising,
we need properties to rent, annual and seasonal. Call
the rental specialist. Wagner Realty, 778-2246.
ANNUAL HOLMES BEACH duplex, 2BR/1.5BA, deck,
garage, on lake near beach. $700. Bradenton Beach,
2BR/2BA, carport, Gulf view, 1 block to beach. $650.
Both units new carpet, flooring, paint and verticals.
Seasonal Holmes Beach duplex, Dec, Jan. 2BR/1 BA,
clean. $1,400. 779-1070 or (941) 625-2889.
WANTED. ANNUAL LEASE 2 or 3 bedrooms, canal
dockage preferred. 778-5934

SEASONAL 2BR/1BA Bayview. $1,450 mo. 2BR/
1.5BA $950 mo. Both 3 minute walk to beach and turn-
key. (800) 977-0803 or 778-4523


GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of
Anna Maria. Possible split: Home + lot; vacant lot: and
2/3 acre w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young
after hours. 778-5427.
GREAT GULFVIEW Watch the sunset from 12x30
porch. 3BR/2BA home in Anna Maria, cathedral ceil-
ings, great room, ceiling fans, wall-to-wall carpet
throughout, new 3 ton A/C, new roof, downstairs den
and office, enclosed 2-car garage. 108 Pine Avenue.
By owner, 813-949-0104 or 813-229-2850.
ONE OF A KIND on Anna Maria Island. Large lovely
home with extraordinary landscape. Gardenias, birds of
paradise, ginger, citrus, oleanders, succulents... need we
say more? Oh yeah, Bay view. $148,000. 749-1695.
REDUCED REDUCED REDUCED! Runaway Bay,
2BR/2BA furnished, 2nd floor unit now only $99,999.
Call Marilyn Trevethan, Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ISLAND DUPLEX 3BR/2BA split, each side. 2 blocks
to beach. Renovated 94-95. Carpet, tile, A/C and newer
appliances. 778-5057.
REMODELED LARGE 3BR/2BA split plan. New fam-
ily room w/fireplace. 306 56th St, Holmes Beach. Not
a drive by. $159,900. By appointment. 778-6700.
PENTHOUSE 3BR/3BA, 2080' sailboat water, ten-
nis, heated pool, Jacuzzi, clubhouse, covered park-
ing, security door. New carpet, tile, paint, fans.
$139,900. 794-8961.
FREE RENT UNTIL purchase. Nicest duplex, 3BR/
2BA 2BR/1BA, in Holmes Beach. Private deeded
beach. $259,000. Call for openings, rates, brochure.
(813) 254-4949.
2BR/2BA VILLA. SPANISH Main Yacht Club, Longboat
Key. Free boat slip, swimming pool, beach access and
more. Asking $133,500. 383-7242.
WATER FRONT DUPLEX for rent or sale. Dock, dav-
its, 2 or 3BR, modem, walk to beach. Information (813)
539-5586.
? CONDO SHOPPING ? My knowledge, research, and
years of experience can save you time, energy, money,
and last minute surprises. To find the Condo that fits
your lifestyle, call Yvonne Higgins, RE/MAX
Gulfstream. 1 800 318-5727 or 778-7777.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/
1BA each unit, close to shopping center $119,000.
404 71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit -
$159,000. .203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to
Gulf $169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.

OPEN HOUSE
Westbay Point & Moorings 6400 Flotilla Drive #25
$129,000. Showplace, upgraded, turnkey, furnished
unit in garden setting. Overlooks pool, needs nothing.
Just move in and relax and entertain. Call Dick Maher
or Dave Jones 778-2261 eves. 778-6791 or 778-4891.

GULFFRONT PROPERTY for sale. 110' x 200'. Ask-
ing appraisal price. 778-5814.
CANAL LOT, deep water, choice Anna Maria location.
75' x 100'. $150,000. 778-2338.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising
herein is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimi-
nation." Familial status includes children under age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing
custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowing accept
any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, for the hearing im-
paired (TDD) 1-800-543-8294.


----------------------------------------------7

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAYfor WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person and
paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL
34217. We are located next to D.Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $6 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2.00 for each words, Box: $2, One-
or two-line headlines, extra-line rate ($2.00) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional
words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone. FAX (941) 778-9392.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: One word per blank space for minimum charge 21 words.



2__ __ _
I1
3 _3
More information: IISLANDE I *R
(941) 778-7978 1._I
L -


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous BRUCE COLLINS
Service Since 1991 BRUCE99COLOAOL.COM

N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907

Island Office Opening Special
Weekly, Seasonal & Annual Rentals Needed
Discounted Rates!
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. Call Lisa Varano
Since 1949 778-0700


ISLAND LUMBER
AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5* SATURDAY 8 to 12

Cherie A Deen LrT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist

792-3758
Gift Certificates
MM0003995 MA0012461 Surchargefor home visits


BODYWORX FITNESS PROGRAM !
K, Low impact aerobics & step
Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 pm
Muscle Toning (with weights)
Tue. & Thu. 6:30-7:45 pm
Silver Community Center 23rd & Gulf Dr.,Bradenton Beach
V BODY WORX also provides Fitness
Consulting for individuals at reasonable Prices
FOR INFORMATION CALL GERI TRAVIS 779-2129


Residential
Commercial
Design
Selection
Installation

FREE ESTIMATES
Call 761-8240 for appt.
Visit our showroom at 4815 Manatee Ave. W.
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE ISLAND REFERENCES


6y Central Vacuum
Systems

Built-In Ironing Board Centers
AS LOW AS $99.95
Call for Free Estimates
Sales 941-756-7785 Service


NURSES
Home Health Aides
Therapists
Social Workers
All Health Care
Workers

If You Don't Know
Us, You Should
HOUSECALL, (formerly
known as Rescare),
leading home health care
into the 21st Century.
Employment Information
CALL (941) 755-9199
1-800-877-1060
HOME HEALTH CARE
Eul9 Oppotnity Efmployer


OOLMES
BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach







If PAGE 40 m NOVEMBER 23, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


LONGBOAT KEY DIRECT GULFFRONT CANALFRONT HOME $238,000. Large
BEACH HOME $585,000. 100 rI. wide, 2 2BR/2BA Key Royale home designed for en-
stories, room for expansion Call Rose Schnoerr pertaining Open floor plan. big family room. 2
lor desalas 778-2261, eves 778-7780 car garage & maintenance free yard Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones 778-2261 eves
778-6791 or 778-4891


ANNA MARIA ISLAND $159,900. Spa-
cious 3BR/2BA home in Anna Maria Short
walk to beach, shopping and community cen-
ter Possible 41h bedroom or study Call Mary
Ann Schmidt 778-2261 eves 778-4931


VILLAGE GREEN $129,900. Spacious
home on golf course, family room glass en-
closed lanai, split floor plan, all appliances
well/sprinkler 3BR/2BA and 2 car garage
Call Paul Martin 778-2261 eves 794.00)4


DIRECT BAYVIEW $189,900. Tris custom
orne-ofla-kind condo has it all 2BR/2eA pool
]3cuzzi. ele.'ator, secured entry. boal dock
and plenly of storage. Call Bill Bor.man
778.2261 e.es 778-4619


GULFFRONT COMPLEX $174,900. 2BRI
2BA very nice unit of lop floor Vertical blinds.
under building parking. well maintained
grounds and locked pool area for extra secu-
rity Turnkey furnished Call Helen While 778-
2261 eves 778-6956


BAYVIEW $145,000. Upstairs corner unit
Ceramic tile on entry porch and lanai lanai
is glassed in Dome ceiling in kitchen hJeA
drapes and shades Call Bob or Lu Rhoden
778-2261. eves 778-26-92


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
$134,900. 2 BR/2BA ground floor unit. turnkey
lurnished With marn upgrades tie.v Rkichen tile
and domed ceiling Heated pools. lenni, and
toal docks Call Dick M3her or Dave Jones
778-2261. eves 778-6791 or 778-4891


Harold

Small
REALTOR"
Asscoate
792-8628


Harold came to Florida from Indiana
'" v.here he was in the LP Gas business.
SHe was a commercial fisherman out of
Cortez er 10 years before entering the
real estate business He specializes in
waterfront property. Call Harold for
your piece of paradise. 792-8628


2BR/2BA In rear section of Perico Bay Club.
Fabulous views of Palma Sola Bay, tidal pond
and wildlife preserve.................... ... $125,500
2BR/2BA Spacious Antigua model. Turnkey
furnished Reduced......................... $127,000
2BR/2BA Lots of privacy. Villa with a garage,
courtyard & deck. .............................. $132,000
2BR/2BA Direct Bayfront unit with garage.
.$..................................... ..... ..1...... $ 15 7 ,900
Beautiful landscaping, pools, tennis courts,
security guards, clubhouse, putting green
and shuffleboard.
Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261
Evenings: 778-7780.


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
from $700 mo.

Now Booking 1996 Seasonal
Rentals from $1,300/mo.

Julie
Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


* ~ \


Holiday Open House


Sand Book Sale

Exclusive book signing by Author Gib Bergquist

. L. L Dec. 1 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

SC.G'.' at The Islander Bystander

Music at 6:30 p.m. by the Manatee High

SSchool Chamber Orchestra

,__ All monies from the sale of Gib Bergquist's book,
\ JCracker's Crumbs, go to the Anna Maria Island
T Community Center Endowment Fund. $19.95 plus tax.



ISLANnDER10@l

THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
5408 Marina Drive Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach 778-7978


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