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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE SEPTEMBER 14, 1995


Booze basher busted after crime spree


A crime spree that included the firebombing of a
Holmes Beach bar and the vandalization of a liquor
store culminated in the arrest of an Anna Maria man
Tuesday afternoon.
Steven Spadoni, 32, of Crescent Drive, Anna
Maria, was arrested on charges of burglary and arson
of the first degree to an occupied dwelling by Holmes
Beach police.
Lt. Dale Stephenson said Spadoni said he was
"cleansing the Island of alcohol" Friday when he at-
tempted to bum the Anchor Inn, 3007 Gulf Drive N.,
and Saturday night in the vandalism of Island Package
Liquors, 5904 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
Stephenson said Spadoni also committed similar



Anna Maria

budget gets

first-reading OK
By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
By 4-to-1 votes Sept. 7, the Anna Maria City Com-
mission passed on first reading a 14-percent increase
in the property-tax rate and a $940,000 budget for the
fiscal year starting Oct. 1.
The ad valorem tax hike from 1.41 to 1.61 mills
or $1.61 for every $1,000 of assessed property value -
is the first increase in the city's millage rate in seven years.
Only one member of the public voiced opposition
to any portion of the budget. Commissioner George
McKay voted against both the increased tax rate and
the overall budget
The additional $41,574 in revenues that will be
generated by upping the village nearly mirrors the
$41,089 in increased expenditures proposed over last
year's budget.
Total expenses for the 1995-96 fiscal year are pro-
jected at $939,867, up 4.6 percent. Public safety costs
of $297,888 for Manatee County Sheriff's Department
services represent the biggest expense. That figure is
down $2,111 from the previous year.
Elected officials and staff salaries and related ex-
penses comprise the next biggest chunk of spending,
coming in at $199,116, up 9.4 percent. Staff-salary in-
creases average about 9 percent, but that figure in-
cludes the hiring of a new and better qualified public
PLEASE SEE BUDGET, PAGE 2


See related article, page 2

crimes in Sarasota, including the burning of his par-
ents' house Sunday.
Spadoni was being held in the Manatee County jail
at Port Manatee.
The events that led to the arrest rocked the usually
tranquil Island.
About 8:30 p.m. Friday, a fire was spotted on the
roof of the Anchor Inn.
Quick thinking and a phone call that brought quick
response from the Anna Maria Fire District and
Holmes Beach Police spared the bar and an adjoining


business, Mr. Bones BBQ restaurant, from disaster.
Anchor owner Bob Tingler said there were 45 to 50
patrons in the bar, the band was in the process of mov-
ing their equipment to the stage, and employees were
preparing for a busy Friday night when flames were
spotted on the roof by two patrons.
"They were just leaving and on their way from the
bar to their car they saw the fire and came back in to
get me," Tingler said.
Tingler quickly alerted personnel to call 911 and
the bar was immediately evacuated. Tingler said every-
one stood in the parking lot watching flames roll into
PLEASE SEE SPREE, PAGE 3


Soccer season kicks off at Center
More than 200 children ages 5 to 16 opened up the soccer season last weekend at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center with a kick-off banquet and jamboree. B/M Heating & Cooling players, from left, Mickey
O'Bannon, Megan Fleming and Shane and Tanner Lisk got the post-competition sillies. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn


Concession stand OK recommended for marina


By Paul Roat
Planners have unanimously endorsed an open-air,
Tiki-hut-style concession stand serving beer and wine
at the Bradenton Beach Marina.
The Bradenton Beach Planning and Zoning Board
recommended to the city council that a special excep-
tion for the business be granted, but hours of operation
be limited from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
One person spoke in favor of the concession stand
and one opposed it during the public hearing on the
matter last Friday. The city council will make the final
decision on the request Wednesday, Sept. 27, at a spe-
cial meeting beginning at 7 p.m.
The request by marina owner Allan Bazzy, accord-
ing to Bradenton Beach Building Official Whitey
Moran, is "for a concession stand selling hot dogs,
hamburgers, sandwiches, soft drinks, beer and wine."
The concession stand would be located on one of the
three docks at the marina, located just south of the
Cortez Bridge.
"It is not a restaurant and it is not a bar," Bazzy said
of the 500-square-foot, 24-seat building. "It will be a
concession stand." Bazzy said the building will follow
the "old Florida theme" of the rest of the marina, with


peaked, metal roofs and windows along the roofline.
"It will be real stylish," Bazzy said.
He said health department officials are requiring
the building be screened in.
"I'm very supportive of a full-service marina
there," said resident Lea Ann Bessonette of the pro-
posal. "I look forward to it being there and drawing
more boaters to Bradenton Beach."
"Due to the close proximity of the residential
neighborhood and the church to the marina, we are to-
tally against the sale of any alcoholic beverages at the
marina," residents Frank and Nancy Banyas wrote to
the board. "The combination of drinking and boating
is as bad as drinking and driving, and we certainly do
not condone another Bridge Street atmosphere on
Church Avenue."
According to Bradenton Beach Planner Bill
Brisson, Bazzy already has approval for a marine con-
venience store selling "ice, bait, tackle, beverages,
beer, snacks and food to go."
Brisson said the existing site plan for the marina
expansion project "identified the existing concession
stand but made no mention of the sale and consump-
tion of food or alcoholic beverages on site. It is my


opinion that the proposed sale of food and alcoholic
beverages ... represents a change in the use of the con-
cession stand."
That change, Brisson said, prompted the special
exception request.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ......................................................... 6
Those Were the Days ........................ 7
Announcements ............................................ 8
Island Poet .................................................... 10
School Daze.................................................. 15
Stir-it-up......................................................... 16
Streetlife ........................................................ 18
Announcements ......................... 19
Anna Maria Island tides ............................. 20
Crossword puzzle....................................... 23





[I PAGE 2 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anchor Inn versus neighbors: the beat goes on


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Friday's firebombing of the Anchor Inn in Holmes
Beach cast a pall over the neighborhood and sparked
efforts to end the conflict between neighbors and the
business.
Neighbors, angered about loud music coming from
the bar, sought help from the police, the mayor and the
city's civic association. Three meetings concerning the
complaints were held in the past few months.
Negotiations are at a stalemate. Neighbors say the
problem continues. The police say the decibel levels
are within the limitations of the city's noise ordinance.
The mayor says the city cannot take the issue to the
code enforcement board without documentation. The
business owner says he is weary of the entire issue and
plans no action.
"The city can only follow the law," said Mayor
Rich Bohnenberger. "There is no evidence to act on."
"I'm fed up with it," said bar owner Bobby
Tingler. "I'm just trying to run my business and stay
within the law."
The Holmes Beach Civic Association entered the
picture this summer in hopes of mediating the problem.
They presided over two meetings that generated several
suggestions.

Police advise neighbors
At the July meeting, Police Chief Jay Romine said
his officers had taken decibel readings on many occa-
sions but all were within limits. He told neighbors of
the Anchor at the meeting that if they call in a noise
complaint they must give their name and address so
officers know where to set up the decibel meter for
further readings.
Neighbors complained that noise was not the only
problem and said they witnessed other illegal activities
taking place outside the bar. The chief said neighbors
must report these incidents before police can take ac-
tion, and a record of the activities must created. He said
these complaints can be anonymous.


Polynesian fare

at Chamber

fundraiser Sept. 23
Momentum is building for the Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce Island Luau and Polynesian
Show fundraiser Saturday evening, Sept. 23, at the
Community Center, reports Executive Director Darcy
Marquis.
The admission fee of $18 per person will include
live music, authentic Polynesian entertainment and a
dinner buffet, all provided by Ato's restaurant of Anna
Maria. The menu will include Hawaiian pork, beef
teriyaki, Hawaiian chicken, fried rice, spinach a la Ato,
pineapple upside down cake and banana nut cake.
Tickets are available at the Chamber, Home True
Value Hardware, Island Real Estate and Five O'Clock
Marine. For more information, call the Chamber at
778-1541.

Expect some dancing excitement at the luau and
Polynesian show at the community center.


Neighbors suggested Tingler sound insulate the prob-
lem portion of the bar, and he said he would get estimates
for the work. Neighbors also appointed a neighborhood
liaison to check with Tingler once a week.

City code cited
The August meeting focused on other aspects of
the city's noise ordinance the definitions of noise
and excessive and unnecessary noise. Civic association
members pointed to the following portions of the city
code:
"General prohibition No person shall make,
continue to cause or to be made or continued any un-
usually loud, unnecessary or excessive noise which
unreasonably annoys, disturbs, injures or endangers the
comfort and repose of others within the limits of the
city," and
"Statement of policy- It is declared the policy of
the city to prevent, prohibit and provide for the regu-
lation and abatement of excessive noise and unneces-
sary noise which may injure the physical and emotional
health or welfare of any of its residents or degrade the
quality of life."

Court requires a standard
Lt. Dale Stephenson replied, "The city legislature
set forth standards, and he is operating under the legal
limits. If we would cite under what you just read, it
would go to the court, and the court would say, 'What
legal limit have you set forth?' You have to have a stan-
dard."
"These people are saying it's degrading their qual-
ity of life, and if this can't be a forum for them to be
heard, what is their alternative?" asked Shirley
Romberger, civic association president.
Go to the city council and ask to have the decibel
level changed, advised Stephenson.
"The council has been asked in the past to lower
the decibel level," said Bohnenberger, "but too many
everyday noises would be affected."
Neighbors noted that Tingler had not yet insulated the


bar, saying he could not afford to have the work done.
"The bottom line is no one can force Mr. Tingler
to insulate his property, unless the city is willing to
enforce the ordinance," said Romberger.
If the issue is to be pursued through the code enforce-
ment board, incidents must be documented, said
Bohnenberger, and at present there is no documentation.

Exchange of letters
Following the meeting, an anonymous letter was
mailed to residents of the surrounding area urging that
they report excessive noise and other incidents to po-
lice. Regarding noise complaints, the letter advised
residents to allow the police to enter their homes to hear
the noise and feel if the walls are vibrating.
Last week, the mayor suggested using the county's
Citizen's Dispute Resolution Program to bring the
neighbors and Tingler to the mediation table.
"I have passed this information on to Susan
Normand (neighborhood liaison), and she will contact
you directly about that possibility," replied Romberger
in a letter to the mayor. "Our board of directors, how-
ever, questions why the city would choose to try to
solve this problem outside of its jurisdiction. Such ac-
tion implies that we may have reason to be concerned
about the viability of code enforcement in the City of
Holmes Beach."
"If they view a possible solution as a sign of lack
of viability for code enforcement, I'll withdraw my
suggestion," replied the mayor Saturday. "The city and
the police can only enforce the codes and statutes. We
have investigated every complaint and have not found
Tingler in violation. There is no evidence to act on."
Bohnengberger said he has no reason to call an-
other meeting, as requested by the civic association.
Tingler said he talked to Romine, and "the decibel
levels are lower. The chief believes the problem is be-
ing solved. At this point, I'm not going to insulate or
do anything more. I'll just deal with the problems as
they come along. I'm going by the law, and I run a
clean place."


FPL updates customers on Orimulsion


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In a recent newsletter, the Florida Power & Light
Company updated its customers on the Manatee
Orimulsion conversion project.
FPL wants to convert its Parrish plant to burn
Orimulsion, a controversial new fuel that is a mixture
of bitumen, water and an emulsifying agent. Various
state and local agencies have been reviewing FPL's
4,000-page application to use the fuel.
Environmentalists oppose its use and are concerned
about increased air pollution, spills in Gulf and bay wa-
ters and water depletion from the Little Manatee River.
The water depletion issue is the focus of the newsletter.
The major factor under consideration is a 22-year-
old permit agreement from the Southwest Florida
Water Management District which allows FPL to with-


draw water from the river. When the present Parrish
plant was built, Swiftmud issued the permit based on
the premise that the plant would operate continuously.
However, the plant has operated at a third of its capac-
ity due to the high cost of fuel oil, thus using only a third
of its water allocation. If the conversion to Orimulsion is
allowed, the plant will be operating two to three times
more, resulting in increased water withdrawals.
FPL is exploring alternative sources of water in-
cluding reuse water (treated domestic wastewater) and
water from existing goundwater wells, said the news-
letter. However, the availability and cost of alternative
sources will be major considerations.
Biologists are also exploring the impact of increased
water withdrawals on the salinity of the river and the re-
sulting impact on the river's ecology and estuary.
The project received approval in August from the


conversion project
Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council and the Mana-
tee County Commission. Both approvals are subject to
numerous conditions, restrictions and safeguards.
The state's Department of Community Affairs and
Department of Transportation are expected to issue
their reports on the project shortly. Swiftmud's report
is expected in September, and reports from the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection will follow.
All agencies issuing reports will present their find-
ings and conclusions at a hearing before a state hear-
ing officer beginning Nov. 28. FPL representatives will
also present their findings. The hearing is expected to
continue for several weeks.
After the data is presented and discussed, the hear-
ing officer will issue a recommendation, including con-
ditions of certification, on the project. The recommen-
dation then goes to the Governor and Cabinet.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 N PAGE 3 iE


SPREE, FROM PAGE 1


RED TIDE, DEAD FISH SLAM ISLAND


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Extremely high levels of
red tide have caused
thousands of dead fish to
wash ashore on the
Island's beaches and
along the shore of the
bays. Scientists at Mote
Marine Laboratory have
said the microorganisms
that make up red tide
have entered the bays
and are in greater
concentrations than they
have seen all summer.
The organisms that make
up red tide tend to
absorb the available
oxygen in the water,
killing other marine life
in the vicinity of red tide
"blooms. "Red tide
organisms also emit a
gas, called an aerosol,
that can cause respira-
tory problems. County
workers have been
cleaning up the dead fish
from the beaches, but
little work has been done
for bayshore beaches
such as the one pictured,
near Bridge Street in
Bradenton Beach. Red
tide, Gymnodinium
breve, is a naturally
occurring dinoflagellate
that "blooms" offshore
and is carried by wind
and waves onto shore.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood


the sky from the roof on the south side of the building.
Anna Maria Fire District Chief Andy Price said they
were "real lucky. They were fortunate the gas didn't go in
the vent on the roof. If it had run in the vent, the inside of
the bar would have been on fire very quickly. Fortunately
there were no leaks around the vent and it was extremely
fortunate it didn't land on the flat gravel roof."
The one-gallon gas container filled with ignited gaso-
line landed on the pitched roof of an addition to the bar.
The main part of the building has a flat gravel roof and
Price said "they might not have seen it in time and the fire
would have had a better chance to get started. The section
that burned was newer and pitched asphalt"
Chief Price said the flammable substance used in
the container smelled like gasoline.

Vandalization, too
Gary Sawyer, an employee at island Liquor Store,
was shocked to find the store had been broken into and
vandalized when he arrived for work Sunday morning
at 8:20 a.m.
The store was "trashed," according to reports from
people who helped with the clean-up.
"It looked like someone took a baseball bat to the
place," was one comment. The front door was shattered
and glass from the door was strewn all the way to the back
of the store. Approximately a dozen bottles of liquor were
broken and liquor was poured all over the cash register.


Anna Maria City
None scheduled
Bradenton Beach
9/21, 1 p.m., Council meeting
Holmes Beach
9/19, 10 a.m., Planning Commission
9/21, 7:30 p.m., Second public hearing on the
budget followed by council work session
Of Interest
9/18, 10 a.m., Island Transportation
Planning Organization, Holmes Beach City Hall.
9/20, Coalition of Barrier Island Elected
Officials, Anna Maria City Hall.






Il PAGE 4 N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Police programs featured at civic meeting


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Members of the Holmes Beach Civic Association
recently learned of three programs being sponsored by
the city's police department.
LL Dale Stephenson told association members
about the Citizens' Police Academy, Combat Auto
Theft and Neighborhood Watch and urged all residents
to participate.

Citizens' Police Academy
The Citizens' Police Academy will be taught by
members of the police department and cover topics
such as the criminal justice standards and training, the
911 system, communications, crime prevention, inter-
nal affairs issues, arrest procedures, investigations, re-
ports, search and seizure, use of force and liability, the
role of the detective and traffic and DUI investigations,
Stephenson said.
"On the last night, we'll have a panel of law en-
forcement professionals so you can get an overall look
at each department's tasks compared to your city po-
lice department."
The academy will be held one night a week for
seven weeks at the Anna Maria Elementary School.
Sessions will last about one-and-one-half hours.
"The academy will help answer questions and mis-


By Paul Roat
The cost of doing business in Bradenton Beach
just went up.
Bradenton Beach City Council members have
approved a revision to the occupational license fees.
It is the first time the fees have been raised since
September 1977, and is expected to generate about
$17,000 for the city for the 1995-96 fiscal year.
Occupational licenses in the city generated
$9,495.25 for fiscal year 1993-94, the last year all
the figures were tabulated. Based on other Island
cities, occupational licenses are very low, said Build-
ing Official Whitey Moran.
By the far the largest category of "businesses"
in the city, single rental units, account for 225 li-
censes. Fee for rental units under the previous fee


Business Nf
Advertising
Appraisers
Automotive
Large engine repair
Fueling
Boat marina
Slip rental only
Fueling
Sales
Eating & drinking establishments
Less than 10 seats
11-25 seats
26-50 seats
51-100 seats
100+ seats
(Note: add $1 per seat over 100 seats)
Plus beer & wine
Plus liquor
Plus entertainment
Electronic games
(Inc. pool tables, cigarettes)
Contractors (state licensed)
Garage sales
Merchant, retail
Inventory to $5,000
Inventory to $15,000
Inventory more than $15,000
Real estate broker
Each additional salesperson
Rentals


conceptions that most people have about law enforce-
ment," Stephenson said. "One purpose is to provide
you with information that will help you protect your
home. Criminals want the easy dollar and the more
obstacles you give them the quicker they'll go down the
road."
Applications to the academy are available at the
police department Preference will be given to city resi-
dents, but all Islanders may apply.

Neighborhood Watch
The purpose of the Neighborhood Watch is for
neighbors to be the eyes and ears for the police depart-
ment, said Stephenson. Neighbors report suspicious or
unusual activities or persons for police to investigate.
"It helps people feel more secure in their own
neighborhoods," he said.
Several neighborhoods in the city have qualified as
Neighborhood Watch groups. Any neighborhood
group of 13 or more households is invited to request the
six hours of instruction from the police department.
"You set up the time and place and I'll come," he
said. "You have to decide at that meeting who will be
block captains and who will be the liaison with the
police department. The block captain is the cheerleader
of the neighborhood, and when new people come into
the neighborhood, he asks them to participate in the


schedule was $7 per year. The new license fees are
$25 for the first unit, $10 for each additional unit.
"Some of the billings for people with one rental
unit didn't cover the office labor to collect them,"
Moran said.
The fee structure comes from advise from an
Occupational License Equity Study Committee, a
five-member group that met throughout the summer
to hammer out the new rates.
A public hearing on the new fee structure last
week produced no comment either for or against the
new, higher fees. The new fees will go into effect
Oct. 1.
Some of the occupational license fee categories,
listing both previous and current charges, include the
following:


ew fee
$25
$50


Previous fee
$25
$30


$350
$75 additional

$100
$75 additional
$150

$25
$50
$75
$100
$100

ADD $50
ADD $100
ADD $100

$50/machine
$75
$25

$50
$100
$150
$50
$25
$25 first unit, $10 additional


$35
$35

$35
$0
$50

$25
$35
$50
$75
$75

$25-$75
$25-$75
$35-$150

$5-$50
$0
$5

$25-$35
$50-$75
$75
$25
NA
$7 per unit


program."
Once the group completes training, neighborhood
Watch signs are issued.
"The signs are just the beginning," Stephenson
said. "You have to keep people motivated, and one of
the ways to do that is to have block parties every two
or three months. Everybody can bring a covered dish
and meet the neighbors. That way everybody feels
more confident in the neighborhood."
Stephenson said he is available to teach the pro-
gram to any neighborhood group in any Island city.

Combat Auto Theft
"This program is widely used in the state,"
Stephenson noted. "If you don't drive your car between
the hours of 1 and 5 a.m., you should be in this pro-
gram. You sign a form saying any police officer can
stop your car between those hours to make sure you or
your designee is driving it."
Teenagers and kids stealing cars and joy riding is
becoming a major problem, he told the group. It hap-
pens on the Island and involves kids as young as 10 or
11 years old.
"It's costing you thousands of dollars a year as tax-
payers, on your insurance premiums and for property
loss," Stephenson pointed out. "This program is offered
at no cost to you and will help us deter crime."
CAT applications are available at the police depart-
ment. All Islanders are welcome to sign up.

Questions
Gini Smith said drivers are not adhering to the
speed limit in the school zone when children are arriv-
ing and leaving school.
"There's no safe place for the kids to cross the
street," she added. "We need to start thinking about
signage and fines. I'd like to see the police ticket driv-
ers for a few weeks."
Stephenson said the police department has been
running radar at the school and issuing citations. He
said the first two weeks after school starts are the worst
until drivers get used to going slow again. He said he
would bring the concern about crossing the street to the
police chief.
Do drivers have to stop for pedestrians in cross-
walks? asked Frances Smith-Williams.
"There's no state law that says you have to yield,
but you have to use due care when you approach the
crosswalk, a stop sign or a stop line," Stephenson re-
plied. "You can stop, but you have to consider how
many cars you have behind you. There is a state stat-
ute that says you're not allowed to impede the flow of
traffic."
If residents want the speed limit in the city lowered
to 25 mph, would that have to go to a vote? asked Joy
Courtney.
"That would be best," he said. "I don't think you
really want the 25 mph speed limit throughout the city,
but it's good on the side streets."
Another member said the city needs bike paths,
because the sidewalks are not wide enough for bicy-
clists.
Stephenson said the sidewalks were originally con-
structed as bike paths using grant funds. Bicyclists are
also permitted to ride in the street, but police would
prefer they remain on the sidewalk.
An Island-wide grant for bike paths has been ap-
proved for the year 2000, said resident Bob
VanWagoner, and "the trick is to get that money ad-
vanced somehow."
VanWagoner asked the civic association to appoint
a task force to study the problem at the school and
make recommendations.
Courtney asked if the Citizens' Police Academy is
cerebral or physical.
"It's more cerebral," Stephenson replied. "There
will be some hands-on training such as how to take fin-
gerprints but no physical training."
Some people have objected to the intrusiveness of
the application, said Shirley Romberger.
"The wording sounds intrusive but it's not,"
Stephenson said. "We just want to make sure you don't
have a criminal background and check your driver's
license. That's all."
In other business, the civic association established
three new committees landscaping and beautifica-
tion, traffic and transportation and education and
schools.


License fee increase approved

in Bradenton Beach


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 N PAGE 5 [F[


Trash takes its toll on marine life


With the annual coastal clean-up pending Sept. 16,
the dangers of dumping trash in or near the water has
taken a poignant turn in the past few weeks.
A 36-year-old female bottlenose dolphin was
found dead last month, strangled on a piece of
monofilament fishing line. The dolphin, dubbed
"Hannah" by researchers at Mote Marine Laboratory,
has been observed in Sarasota Bay since 1976.
Scientists discovered that she had consumed a
sheepshead which had a hook and 12 inches of line
extended from its mouth. When the dolphin swallowed
the fish, the line wrapped in a slip knot around the
dolphin's goosebeak, cutting off air to the mammal's
lungs. As the dolphin swallowed, the knot tightened
and she was asphyxiated.
The goosebeak moves air from a dolphin's blow-
hole to its lungs.
"This is a tragic way to lose an old friend," said
marine mammal expert Dr. Randall Wells. "It serves as
a horrible and graphic illustration of the importance of
removing the hook and line before returning a fish to
the water."
Wells said Hannah is the third Sarasota Bay dol-
phin to have died because of complications caused by
monofilament fishing line in the past two years.
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
officials report another casualty in the debris problem:
a female loggerhead turtle was found dead off Key
Largo in the Florida Keys after she became entangled
in a derelict lobster trap rope.
The turtle had been tagged by Mote researchers
after she laid her nest on Casey Key in June. Of the 88
eggs she had laid on the beach, 55 have since hatched.
The annual coastal clean-up is set for Saturday, Sept.
16, from 9 a.m. to noon. Anyone interested in volunteer-
ing in the clean-up, call Susan Hancock at 795-8272.


Keep Manatee Beautiful Executive Director Susan Hancock says Island participation in the annual cleanup is
traditionally great. Let's do it again! Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Volunteer for Coastal Cleanup


Volunteer Gulffront and bayside beach walkers, small
boats and personal watercraft are still needed to participate
in the Island effort during the eighth annual Florida
Coastal Cleanup Saturday, Sept. 16, from 8 a.m. to noon.
Individuals, families and organizations are invited
to sign up. Island coordinators are Sheila Hurst, Anna
Maria, 778-4520; Billie Martini, Holmes Beach, 778-


2549; and Connie Drescher, 778-2655. To volunteer
off-Island, call Keep Manatee Beautiful at 795-8272.
Last-minute volunteers are encouraged to show up
at the following sites at 8 a.m.: Bean Point in Anna
Maria; the Gulf beaches at 67th Street or 31st Street in
Holmes Beach; or the Gulfside concession stand at Co-
quina Beach in Bradenton Beach.


Disabled veterans entitled to reduced-cost parking permits


Any veteran who has a 50 percent or greater ser-
vice connected disability may be entitled to receive a
Disabled Parking Permit at the reduced cost of only
$1.50 for a four-year permit, according to Ken Burton,
Jr., Manatee County Tax Collector. The cost for a regu-
lar permit is $15.
To be eligible the veteran must provide written


Free Educational Seminar

Some of the topics to be discussed:
* Take more pre-tax dollars out of your business
* Recent tax law changes
* How to retain key employees with pre-tax dollars
* Good record-keeping practices
* Self-employed deductions
* Buy-sell Agreements
* Securing your retirement

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Holmes Beach FL 34218 779-1310
Securlee offered through Washington Square Securite Inc. 20 Washington Avenue S.,
Minnmea..p MN 55401, 612-372-5507. Member NASD SIPC.


proof of his or her disability. The veteran must also
provide proof that he is a resident, such as a Florida
Driver's License or Voter ID card.
Proof of disability can include a letter from the
Veteran's Administration, letter from any branch of the
US Armed Services, or a copy of the front and back of
a valid identification card issued by the Florida Depart-





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ment of Administration. All forms of proof must state
that the veteran is at least 50 percent disabled.
The parking permits can be purchased at any office
of the Manatee County Tax Collector.
The Island office is located at 3340 East Bay Dr.,
Holmes Beach. For more information call the tax
collector's office at 778-9363.


PUBLIC NOTICE
FIRE ASSESSMENT APPEALS HEARING
ANNA MARIA FIRE DISTRICT
A public hearing will be held on Monday, 9/25/95 at
7 p.m. at 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida.
The purpose of the hearing will be to hear appeals from
any property owner in the district with respect to the
method of calculation for fire assessments only. This is
not a hearing to appeal the tax assessment rates. Those
rates were set earlier in the year after advertised public
hearings and meetings.
Interested parties are encouraged to attend either in
person or by agent and submit their appeal in writing
prior to the date of the public hearing. Information
needed is parcel identification number, address, square
footage, number of units and type of use. Most of this in-
formation is contained in your TRIM notice. If you have
any questions or need assistance in any manner you may
contact the administrative offices at 778-6621 during
normal business hours.
John Van Ostenbridge, Secretary/Treasurer


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Ji PAGE 6 N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

9 rip-]


This is not a war zone
A fire bombing in Holmes Beach. It's too shock-
ing to be true but it is. The ignited gas can that set
the roof of a Holmes Beach bar, the Anchor Inn, aflame
was no accident. There is no doubt it constitutes seri-
ous felony violations.
The bar was filled with more than 45 customers,
band members and employees, not to mention staff and
patrons at Mr. Bones next door in the same building.
Sadly, the fire at the bar is the latest of the prob-
lems the bar has faced. Residents, who have so boister-
ously fought with the Anchor Inn over what they claim
is excessively loud music, have barraged us with
anonymous letters and police complaints. We're left
to wonder how it could come to this.
The complaints have come largely from a growing
neighborhood behind the Anchor where new homes
have popped up in recent years and changes in owner-
ship have brought about improvements.
The neighbors have called police frequently to com-
plain about the lounge music, but police who have re-
sponded have not found sounds in excess of the legal limit
These neighbors have been relentless in calls to
police, writing letters to other neighbors and city hall.
They've pursued every possible avenue for relief, in-
cluding enlisting support from the Holmes Beach Civic
Association (HBCA).
We wonder why these adamant seekers of "peace
and quiet" bought homes near the bar in a neighbor-
hood with a gas station, storage facility, lawn mower
shop, hair salon, printer, mini-storage, restaurant and
a bar all within the same block.
There doesn't seem to be an easy solution here.
The Anchor owners have quite obviously found a profit
for their business in live music a business that
thrived as a rock and roll club 20 years ago under dif-
ferent ownership.
But the HBCA can do something more for the city
if they take the lessons learned from the Anchor back
to their council.
Rather than working to represent the interests of a
few residents in the vicinity of the Anchor, the associa-
tion can lobby for better ordinances to protect neigh-
borhoods from commercial intrusion.
It can work for buffer zones that include fencing and
landscaping, more street lighting and stricter codes where
noise insulation is a consideration. Wall insulation, win-
dow openings and entry modifications at a bar or restau-
rant could be regulated to lessen noise with city codes.
While there's nothing any of us can do to prevent
a random act of violence, there's plenty we can do if
we work together with the common goal of a better
community for everyone.

|ISLANDERR l 011
SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 43
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster




0 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


LOOKS LU KE THE,
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SLICK


By Egan


Public purchase of Anchorage
not a good idea
Re: Proposed purchase of the Anchorage Restau-
rant for public use for a public park and cultural cen-
ter.
Are the citizens of Anna Maria ready to take a
piece of property worth $2.2 million off the tax rolls,
assume the cost of maintenance on a high-maintenance
building, and hire a staff to operate the facility? I think
not!
When will some people learn that once created, a
bureaucracy never dies. This is just another attempt by
the artsy group to further burden the taxpayer. The pre-
vious attempt was the proposed purchase of the prop-
erty on Bean Point.
The majority of the people in Anna Maria City are
content to let the sleeping dog lie. We enjoy the natu-
ral beauty of our city, the security of a good police
force, and our temporary neighbors from the north and
Europe.
As one of the content majority, I would suggest
that efforts be made to construct walking/bicycle paths
adjacent to the humpback bridges on Crescent Street
and Bay Boulevard before someone is killed and the
city loses its assets in litigation.
Bud Aubry, Anna Maria City

Keep Gulf Boulevard public
In my opinion, it looks as though the folks living
on Gulf Boulevard between Magnolia and Palm are
wanting their own private beach view.
I have been going there since 1980, 15 years. There
has never been a sign at Magnolia or Palm stating they
dead-ended into a private drive. There are well-marked,
public road signs, [were] parking signs and I presume
the road is maintained by public taxes. Or do these
folks maintain that road themselves?
Remember, tourism keeps Florida alive. In-state or
out-of-state cars? The signs do not dictate such.
In 15 years, I have never seen anyone go toward
their private property.
Mary L Griffith-Jones, Bradenton taxpayer,
Manatee County and state of Florida
(Editor's note: Accompanying this letter was a


recent newspaper advertisement titled "What did we
find when we came to Bradenton? We found a truly
special quality of life." The letter writer added a P.S.
- What we find are folks who don't want us to park
across from their house to go to the beach. Are we not
taxpayers, too?)
Thanks to St. Bernard Church
As co-leader of All Island Youth, I thank you for
last week's article and photo showcasing all the great
things that the All Island Youth ministry has been do-
ing.
Also, as the one responsible for providing The Is-
lander Bystander with the information regarding the
group, I would like to take this opportunity to apolo-
gize to Fr. Donald Baier and St. Bernard Catholic
Church for neglecting to mention their support of this
ministry.
This has been a cooperative effort among three of
the Island's churches St. Bernard, Gloria Dei and
Roser as well as support from the Longboat Island
Chapel. There can be no doubt that St. Bernard, its
parishioners and its clergy have been very supportive
and active in all phases of this venture, and we are very
grateful for their care and concern toward the
community's young people.
St. Bernard and Fr. Baier have faithfully been there
for All Island Youth since its inception in March 1994
and they should not be forgotten for their enthusiastic
participation in this wonderful ministry.
Thanks go out to the entire community for their
support, to the businesses which participated in our
back-to-school scavenger hunt and to the many volun-.
teers from the four churches and the community at
large.
Stacey A. Bellows, Youth Director,
Longboat Island Chapel


We welcome your letters
The Islander Bystander welcomes letters to the
editor. The letters should be brief, to the point, and
addressed to:
Editor, The Islander Bystander
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.


I^e -YU ;eINIO










THfSE WERE THE BAYi
Part 4, What's In a Name?
by June Alder


Compare this 1946 shot of Anna Maria Island with the 1993 aerial photo that
was on the front page of last's week's Islander Bystander. Then: A wooded
island with a handful of houses along the Gulf and a natural beach on both sides
of the north point. Now: Shoulder-to-shoulder houses and a man-made beach.
That's progress?


OTHER PLACES,

OTHER NAMES


Having said about all that can be
said about the "Anna Ma-ree-a versus
Anna Ma-rye-a" controversy with-
out settling it one way or the other I
turn now to names of other places here-
abouts.
* Holmes Beach, formed 27 years
after Anna Maria City, was literally
"the city that Jack built."
Jack Holmes came to the Island
from New Jersey during the Depression
and bought land in the vast emptiness
south of Anna Maria City. As soon as
World War II was over he began to fill
the acreage up with concrete-block
houses, selling them at reasonable
prices to war-weary Northerners (200
were built between 1948 and 1950).
When 62 residents voted to incorporate
on March 13, 1950, the winning name
was Holmes Beach. Runner-up was
"Coquina Beach," which in the 1960s
became the name of Anna Maria
Island's second public beach.
* Bradenton Beach, originally
known as Cortez Beach, was given its
present name by a newspaper reporter.
Frances Warttig was Anna Maria
mayor and postmaster in the '50s and
'60s. In the '40s she wrote for the
Bradenton newspaper. In her stories
everything south of Anna Maria City
was headed "Bradenton Beach." This
pleased the Bradenton Chamber of
Commerce though many Island resi-
dents didn't relish being tagged as a
Bradenton adjunct. Nevertheless, when
84 property owners who lived south of
27th Street voted in 1951 to form a
municipality, they stuck with
Bradenton Beach.
In an interview she gave to Varley
towards the end of her life, Mrs.
Warttig confessed she was sorry about
what she'd done. Cortez Beach would
have been a nicer name, she decided
when she was older but wiser.
* Cortez was a thriving fishing vil-
lage long before Anna Maria Island
was populated. Fishermen from North
Carolina started coming in the 1880s to
what was then called Hunter's Point
June Alder is on summer hiatus. This
series is a repeat from October 1993.


where Indians and Spaniards had
camped in past centuries. The hamlet
was named Cortez in 1896 by U.S.
postal officials (perhaps In the offhand
way it's said Anna Maria Island was
named). Ben Green, in his book about
his hometown, "Finest Kind," specu-
lates that officials may have had
Hernando DeSoto in mind. But there
were already several DeSoto post of-
fices in the state, so maybe someone in
Washington who wasn't much of a stu-
dent of American history thought
Cortez would do as well.
* Longboat Key, the well-to-do,
fashionably slim key to the south of our
Island, got its name from the gap that
comes between us. That narrow slit,
which has shifted about considerably
over the years, has been called
Longboat Pass for centuries. It probably
was called that because the Indians used
to paddle their long dugouts through it
on their fishing trips. Also, there's a
high probability that DeSoto and his
chief scout Juan Anasco used the pass
in 1539, having first put in on the shore
of either Anna Maria Island or
Longboat Key. (Read the book Narra-
tives of DeSoto available at DeSoto
Memorial Park and decide for yourself.)
Possible evidence for Longboat
Key's claim to DeSoto fame was found
on the Key's north end back in 1941. A
crew building a road were digging into
a swampy area when their shovels hit
something solid. Gradually there
emerged a 30-foot ribbed portion of a
ship's keel. It had iron bolts and its de-
sign suggested that it was the skeleton
of a Spanish galleon.
Longboat resort owner Gordon
Whitney had some of the relics ana-
lyzed by experts at the American Mu-
seum of Natural History in New York
City. Their opinion was that the ship
was between 200 and 400 years old. So
it could have been the wreck of one of
DeSoto's vessels. It also could have
been a pirate ship or simply the wreck
of an unlucky trading vessel.

Next week, an all new
'Those Were the Days'


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E PAGE 7 13



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year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
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We bring you all the news-about three city governments, commu-
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you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
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[iM PAGE 8 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Youth basketball trip


to Europe falls short


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Tommy Tyrell's 12-day trip to Europe to play
basketball turned into air ball last week.
Tyrell, 15, of Anna Maria, was selected as one of
14 boys in the Bradenton-Sarasota area to play for the
East-West Basketball Ambassadors in the August
tour.
More than $60,000 was needed by the East-West
Youth Foundation, a not-for-profit youth basketball
venture initiated by the United States Basketball
League Sharks, to cover the trip for a boys and girls
team, airfare, meals, transportation, tournament fees
and coaching.
The money didn't come through and the trip was
canceled two weeks prior to the departure date.
The foundation was established in 1980 and
moved to Sarasota last year from Cleveland, Ohio.
This was the first attempt to field a basketball program
after 15 years of success with soccer and baseball tours
involving thousands of youngsters.
Recent Sarasota news reports focused on the dis-
appointment and suspicions of a few parents who ap-
parently felt victimized by the cancellation of the tour.
Tyrell's stepfather Todd Fleck expressed surprise
at negative press reports about the trip.
Fleck said, "We knew we had to raise a lot of
money $60,000 -from the start. There wasn't very
much time to do that. We weren't really surprised that
it didn't come off."
Fleck said "Tommy's attitude was great if it
worked out, OK if it didn't."
"We just took it from the standpoint that Tommy
was selected. His part was to be the athlete not the
money raiser," Fleck said.
Tom Furth, founder and president of the youth
foundation, said he was dismayed by "one-sided re-


porting" of the canceled tour in the Sarasota daily
newspaper and the suggestion that the foundation was
involved in some kind of scam.
"I'm disappointed that they can try to undo 15
years of a very successful youth leadership program
without telling the truth from our side," said Furth.
That success has included recognition nationally
and stories on ABC and CBS television news shows,
said Furth.
Furth said his foundation was approached by the
Sharks regarding a basketball program last spring. Par-
ents of an interested Sarasota youth player said they
would coordinate the project, he said.
"We thought it was very short notice," said Furth,
"but we agreed to help by offering assistance with our
international contacts."
Furth says he has a paper trail that shows "it was
very clear from the start" that the foundation would not
be involved in selecting players and coaches and would
not be responsible for fundraising.
Despite reports that $15,000 was raised, Furth says
the figure was $9,000. He says the foundation spent
$18,000 on the project, including payments to the
Sharks, a coach and for the purchase of uniforms.
He also said he "was more than happy" to refund
$1,700 to people who made requests when the tour was
canceled.
Regarding suggestions that the foundation had
moved out of its offices for underhanded reasons, Furth
said the move had long been planned.
The foundation is otherwise alive and well, says
the founder, and his commitment to youth remains.
Furth added that six baseball and four soccer tours
planned over the summer to five different continents
involving 600 kids went off as planned.


Mayor presents capital


improvements plan


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council plans to call a
special work session on comprehensive capital im-
provement plans recently presented by Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger.
"Our infrastructure has been virtually ignored for
the past 45 years," said Bohnenberger. "This city has
not lived up to the capital improvement element of its
own comprehensive plan."
A capital improvement is a major project or pur-
chase with a long life expectancy, costing more than
$5,000, he said. According to state law, the city must
demonstrate its ability to obtain the needed revenues
to implement each capital improvement or purchase.

Infrastructure capital
improvements
The mayor submitted the following schedule for
infrastructure capital improvements:
Year 1: Finalize plans with the architect on city
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
including current and future needs. Project funded.
Year 2: Let contracts and complete construction
on the above project. Project funded.
Year 3: Dredging of pass and silted canal ends.
Project unfunded. Seeking partial grant and shared
funding from the City of Anna Maria.
Year 4: Sidewalks and bike paths. Grant ex-
pected.
Year 5: Key Royale Bridge replacement or ma-
jor overhaul. Unfunded. Possible funding from Florida
Department of Transportation.
Year 6: Encourage county to extend reuse water
line to Holmes Beach.
Bohnenberger recommends establishing a perma-
nent Infrastructure Trust Fund using the revenues from
the city's portion of the one-cent school tax after the
Key Royale Bridge and city building projects are com-
pleted. The city will receive $2 million over five years,
and the funds must be used for infrastructure.
"Regular contributions to this fund would allow it


to grow, permitting future infrastructure needs to be
paid from the interest earned," noted Bohnenberger.
"Dollars currently designated in our annual operating
budgets for such purposes would be freed up for other
uses."
The fund would eliminate large tax increases when
an unforeseen need arises, he said. The funds would be
dedicated and could not be used for any other purpose.

Stormwater management
The Southwest Florida Water Management District
has identified seven areas of the city that flood under
normal rain conditions, Bohnenberger noted. He sug-
gested making the. improvements over the next five
years under the following plan:
Year 1: 74th Street and central Holmes Beach
watersheds
Year 2: Haverkos Court watershed.
Year 3: Manatee County Beach watershed.
Year 4: Island Baptist Church watershed.
Year 5: Upgrade remaining stormwater drainage
systems and stormwater operational equipment.
The cost of improvements to these areas is $1 mil-
lion in today's dollars, Bohnenberger said. In addition,
the city must fund the on-going operational mainte-
nance expenses.
Funding options include: spending city reserves,
increasing the millage rate, imposing a special assess-
ment, borrowing the funds, implementing a stormwater
utility fee and spending the infrastructure tax revenue.
Of these, he recommends the stormwater utility fee.
The utility fee "is based on the property's relative
contribution to the need of the system," Bohnenberger
said.
Advantages of the plan include:
1. The fee is on all improved property and does not
increase with assessments. All residential property pays
the same regardless of value.
2. Revenue is dedicated and cannot be used for any
other purpose.
3. Fees are usually low $1.50 to $2 per month.
4. The fee can be easily terminated or reduced.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 9 1]


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Because profits from last year's fund raiser were
severely slashed due to competition from phone solici-
tors, Anna Maria Fire District Chief Andy Price, de-
cided to notify residents early this year.
"The profits from our Halloween dance were cut
from $4,000 to $1,500 last year because of solicitors for
the Sarasota/Manatee Firefighters and Paramedics
Union," said Price. "The solicitors were selling tickets
to their country and western show, and district residents
thought they were buying tickets for our dance."
In addition, the district's residents were told the
profits generated by the solicitation Would benefit the
Anna Maria District.
"Not true," stressed Price. "We do no soliciting by
phone. The dance is our only fund raiser."
Residents should receive informational letters
about the Halloween dance and tickets in the mail soon,
said Price. The dance will be held on Oct 21.
"The union has already started their solicitation this
year." Price noted. "I've had a lot of calls from resi-
dents who have received calls in the past few weeks."

Avoiding sales calls
According to a recent enclosure in GTE phone
bills, consumers can register their wish to avoid sales
solicitation calls to their residential and mobile phones


Music professional Elaine Burkly will begin a
Music Theater Workshop for children in grades 6
through 12 at the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter beginning Sept. 25.
Sessions will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mon-
days, concluding with a stage show Dec. 15. Registra-
tion will be held at the Center from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Fri-
day, Sept 22. The fee will be $40 for Center members,
$45 for non-members.


and paging devices, but business phones cannot be in-
cluded on the list.
According to the brochure, Telemarketers may
still call:
In response to an express request of the person
called
In connection with an existing debt or contract,
payment or performance which has not been com-
pleted at the time of the call
To any person with whom the telephone solici-
tor has a prior or existing business relationship
On behalf of newspapers
For the purpose of soliciting charitable contri-
butions.
To register, write the state Division of Consumer
Services, Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services, P.O. Box 6700, Tallahassee, FL
32314-6700. Include your name, address and residen-
tial or mobile phone or paging device number and a
check for $10 per number (initial fee) or $5 (annual
renewal fee) payable to the Division of Consumer
Services.
"Solicitors are required to identify themselves by
true first and last name and the business on whose
behalf they are soliciting," said the brochure. "If it
becomes necessary to file a complaint with the divi-
sion, this information will be required."
The division's phone number is 1-800-435-7352.


The workshop will focus on putting together a
show while learning stage direction, voice projection,
singing, acting, movement and more. Students will
assume such roles as producer, stage manager and
lighting director.
"No prior knowledge of acting or singing is re-
quired," says Burkly. "Just a great deal of energy, en-
thusiasm and a willingness to learn."
For more information, call Burkly at 778-0720.





Long and
short of it
Amberlyn Bell of
Oldsmar, Fla., is a
mere six years old but
her thick, blonde locks
are over three feet
long. She visited her
father, Art Bell of
Holmes Beach, recently
and was proud to show
off her Rapunzel-like
hair. Look out dad: The
guys are going to be
after this princess in
the tower some day.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood


Be wary of phone solicitors

says fire chief


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Burkly leads workshop for teens


Social notes are welcome ...
Your news about social events, anniversaries,
weddings, births and "interesting Islanders" is
always welcome at The Islander Bystander. Call
us at 778-7978 to find out how you can be in-
cluded in "the best news on Anna Maria Island."


#i
iing.-aSLEEP KING


I


I


I


I





EiG PAGE 10 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Scott R. Hatfield
Scott R. Hatfield, 41, of Bradenton Beach,
died Sept. 7 at home.
Born in Middleton, Ohio, Mr. Hatfield came
to Manatee County from there in 1970. He was
a real estate broker with Dolores M. Baker Real
Estate. He was a member of the Island Co-List- -
ing Service and Manatee County Board of Real-
tors.
He is survived by his wife, Mary McHugh;
two sisters, Jessica Baker of Holmes Beach, and
Nancy Jean Nichols of Franklin, Ohio; a brother,
Steven of Holmes Beach; and his parents,
Dolores and Cecil of Holmes Beach.
A gathering of friends was held at Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home in Holmes Beach. The fu-
neral was held at the funeral home on Monday S
with the Rev. Jim Marsh officiating. Memorial
contributions may be made to Pelican Man's '
Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thompson Parkway,
Sarasota, Fla. 34236-1000.

Boys of summer work
The Island Poet up a smile
Well, the good old summer is slipping away, Pictured above, the schoolyear may have started, but
But that good old summer was over 90 each day. there's always a good reason to smile say Island
And it looked like to reach fall, we couldn't last, fellows, from left, Bobby Cooper, Sergio Recanati
For each day seemed hotter than the past. and Brian Faase, who participated in the Island
So we thought we'd get away and take a vacation, .Community Center's summer camp.
Till we found we were cooler than most of the na-
tion.
And I guess it's not so hard to put up with the heat, At left, Community Center regulars Preston
When you know that our winters never can be Copeland, left, and Jason Loomis use a poker hand
beat. to practice the art of concentration they will take
Bud Atteridge into the classroom. Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.


You're

invited

toa






Rodeo
y Sat., Oct. 14
9am to 1pm
At the Anna Maria
Elementary School
Presented by the Manatee County Sheriff's Office
and Anna Maria Island Deputies with the Anna Maria
Kiwanis Club. Co-ordinated by Deputy Julius Dengler
Sponsored by
The Islander Bystander, Island Foods, Islanders' Market,
Pittsburgh Pirates, Air & Energy, Sandbar Restaurant,
Galati Marine, Subway-Holmes Beach, Beaver Products,
59th Street Bicycles and Joe's Eats & Sweets
Only Rodeo Riders will be eligible for PRIZES!


Beachwalkers of all ages, small boats and personal
watercraft are needed on Anna Maria Island for the
eighth annual Florida Coastal Cleanup
Saturday Sept. 16 8 a.m. to noon
Contact Island coordinators: Sheila Hurst 778-4520
Billie Martini 778-2549 or Connie Drescher, 778-2655.
To volunteer off-Island, call Keep Manatee Beautiful at 795-8272
Last-minute volunteers are encouraged to
show up at the following sites at 8 a.m.
Bean Point in Anna Maria; the Gulf beaches at 67th Street or
31st Street in Holmes Beach; the Gulfside concession stand
at Coquina Beach in Bradenton Beach.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 U PAGE 11 ED


: NEW ON THE LIBRARYTSHELF

'Dave Barry's Guide to Guys' by Dave Barry
The funniest so far of Barry's books. Though he
admits to being a 'guy' himself, Barry fills his yearly
quota of guy bashing in this 186-page delight. Yes,
members of the female population will laugh uproari-
ously, but in my personal experience, so will their sig-
nificant 'guys.'
Reviewed by Mary Gourley

'Original Sin' by P.D. James
This prolific writer of murder mysteries places this
book's murders in a small but prestigious publishing
house on the Thames. It is an absorbing whodunit
solved, as usual, by Inspector Adam Dalgliesh and his
crew.
Reviewed by Mollie Sandberg

'Beauty From The Ashes' by Eugenia Price
In this final volume of the trilogy, the Georgia
based characters are all family oriented. As in the two
previous books, they share the slings and arrows of life
on St. Simons Island. As the heroine moves north to
Marietta, so the South moves closer to Civil War. De-
spite formal, slow-moving 'speechifying,' this lovely
story endears author Price to many past, present and
future readers.
Reviewed by Norma M. Oldfield

'Apocalypse Watch' by Robert Ludlum
This latest Ludlum novel involves Special Officer
Drew Latham in a search for his brother's killers and
the truth behind the information he was carrying out of
a neo-Nazi compound. By taking his brother's identity,
Latham hopes to flush out the killers and reveal the
brain trust behind this frightening movement. Before it
is over he enlists the help of the Deuxieme Bureau in
France, the German government, the American Em-
bassy and Karin deVries, a sharp female counselor
operative with her own reasons for seeking the truth.

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Together they must thwart a poisoning of their
country's major water sources, infiltrate the impen-
etrable fortress of the neo-Nazi leader and through him
uncover the multinational network of zealots. Their
base is the sonnenkind and their descendants who have
been trained since the defeat of the Third Reich to take
control of the world. Typical heavy reading for Ludlum
fans. Well written as usual.
Reviewed by Mollie Sandberg

'True Betrayals' by Nora Roberts
A manipulative woman, a family, horses, love, ro-
mance, murder and intrigue all in this fast paced
novel. One of Nora Roberts' best. Don't pick it up if
you need to get something else done.
Reviewed by Bette Kissick

'The Last Coyote' by Michael Connelly
Irrepressible Los Angeles Police Department de-
tective Harry Bosch decides to look into his mother's
murder. Unfortunately, it happened 35 years ago. His
search for long-ago witnesses takes him to Las Vegas
and Florida, where he enjoys a romantic dinner at the
Sandbar on Anna Maria Island. A moral tale of corrup-
tion, opportunism, love and shame.
Reviewed by Carol Sandidge

'Suitable For Framing' by Edna Buchanan
Britt Montero, the series' intrepid reporter-heroine,
is again deeply involved in tracking and cracking car
jacking murder and mayhem in Miami. A fast paced
story with a new on-the-scene gal reporter who engen-
ders suspicion with the 'news breaks' falling her way.
Buchanan has written a winner once more.
Reviewed by Bette Kissick

'California Angel' by Nancy Taylor Rosenberg
A fascinating story of a woman whose desire to help
children in need becomes a tale of the mind seeming to
transcend the body and of the reluctance of people to be-
lieve in the impossible. Toy Johnson, the heroine, is a lov-
able, caring person who is confused herself about what is
happening. Even if you don't believe in angels, I think you
will after you read this book.
Reviewed by Bette Kissick

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ISLANDER

Don't leave the island without
taking time to subscribe to
the best news the only
paper with all the news
about the Island.
Charge your subscription to
MasterCard or Visa
by phone or visit us at 5408
Marina Drive, Island ShoppIng
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941-778-7978


Katt Hefner joins big band in
Jazz Club concert
Sarasota singer Katt
Hefner joins the 18-piece
West Coast Big Band for a
Jazz Club of Sarasota con-
cert to be held Sunday, Sept.
17, at the Sarasota Opera o
House beginning at 8 p.m. .m
Admission is by Jazz [z
Club membership cards or
$10 for guests.
The Sarasota Opera KattHefner
House is located at 61 N.KaHeJr
Pineapple Ave., Sarasota.
For information call the Jazz Club at 366-1552.


Big band concert Sept. 17 at the
Sarasota Opera House
The Jazz Club of Sarasota will host a concert by the
18-piece West Coast Big Band at 8 p.m. Sunday, Sept.
17, at the Sarasota Opera House, 61 N. Pineapple Ave.,
Sarasota. Admission will be free for Jazz Club mem-
bers and $10 for guests.
Music educator, arranger and trombonist Jack
Lapato formed the band a year ago with other area
professionals, including members of the Florida
West Coast Symphony Orchestra and the Sarasota
Concert Band.
"We're a dynamic band with a contemporary feel-
ing," says Lapato. Playing in various styles, the band
uses its own arrangements and those of Tommy
Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Stan Kenton, Woody Herman
and others.
With more than 2,100 members, the Jazz Club of
Sarasota is one of the largest and most active in the
country. It is a member of the Professional Alliance of
Performing Arts and a founding member of the Ameri-
can Federation of Jazz Societies and the Sarasota
County Arts Council.
For more information, call 366-1552.


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KI PAGE 12 N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


An aerial map of the property near the DeSoto Monunent shows six highly diverse habitats.


AMERICORPS


focusing lives, fostering community service


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
AmeriCorps gave her life focus and an opportunity
to make a difference in her community, said Cheryl
Williams, a recent graduate of the national service pro-
gram originated by President Bill Clinton.
"Before joining, I did not know how to become
involved or identify my interests," said Williams, a
Holmes Beach resident. "I was attending Manatee
Community College, and I felt like I was spinning my
wheels. The AmeriCorps gave me a chance for hands
on experience, the ability to identify areas of need in
my community and become involved and the incentive
to finish school."
Williams said she got into the program by the back
door when she answered an advertisement for an
AmeriCorps position for exotic plant removal and re-
search on beach renourishment at De Soto National
Memorial. Williams was the park's first AmeriCorps
volunteer.
AmeriCorps volunteers come to the national parks
through the International Student Conservation Asso-
ciation, said Barbara Goodman, park superintendent.
The SCA was originally formed to provide experience
for students and assist the national park system.
Through AmeriCorps, its volunteers focus on environ-
mental needs.
One of Williams' most interesting projects in-
volved property adjacent to the park. The 11.3 acres are
owned by the Catholic Diocese of Venice, and feature
six natural Florida habitats.
The church purchased the land in 1958 because of
its historical ties to early Spanish explorers. It now
wants to sell a majority of the property because of high
taxes, but wants to retain a portion containing a 60-
foot- high white steel cross honoring early Catholic
missionaries.
Park officials want the land to remain in its natu-
ral state, but legislation prevents a direct purchase by
the park service. The land may be purchased by the
state, county or other agency and administered by the
park, or the park service may receive funds, such as
donations or grants, to purchase the land.
"We were made aware that the church wanted to
sell the land and began to see what we could do to pro-
tect it," Williams said. "The main objective is to keep
it from being developed."


... and just

what is

AmeriCorps,

anyway?
The AmeriCorps is a program that en-
courages national community service by
young people and rewards the service with
education credit to fund higher education.
In the tradition of President Franklin D.
Roosevelt's Civilian Conservation Corps,
created during the Depression, and President
John F. Kennedy's Peace Corps, created in
the 1960s, AmeriCorps is a call to service. Its
creation was announced in President Bill
Clinton's inaugural address and signed into
law in 1994.
The first goal of the program is meeting
the nation's unmet education, public safety,
human and environmental needs. Other goals
include strengthening communities, encour-
aging responsibility and expanding opportu-
nity.
The AmeriCorps network includes 300
programs across the nation. VISTA, a 30-
year-old program of service in low-income
communities and urban areas, has been incor-
porated into AmeriCorps. The National Ci-
vilian Community Corps has also been incor-
porated into AmeriCorps and focuses on the
PLEASE SEE CORPS, NEXT PAGE



Her curiosity about the property led her on a
learning quest. She discovered seagrass beds in the
cove, which is a manatee habitat, and endangered
species such as gopher tortoises, indigo snakes and
butterfly orchids.
"The park and the church property filter rain wa-
ter before it empties into the cove," she pointed out.
"And it contains six habitats a coastal stream, a


beach, a mangrove swamp, mixed wetland hardwoods,
sand pine/xeric oak and temperate hardwoods."
Williams also learned the property contains prehis-
toric Indian sites and a natural spring. She began writ-
ing a grant for funds from Save Our Rivers/Preserva-
tion 2000 to purchase the property. Park officials hope
to receive a response in September.
Another of Williams' projects was to aid in orga-
nizing the first Indian Cultural Arts Festival sponsored
by the park and the De Soto Historical Society. The
festival hosted eight participants including carvers,
dancers, storytellers, patchworkers and leaders.
Williams worked with a landscape architect on a
landscaping plan using native plants for the park's en-
trance. The project, to be completed in mid August,
includes pathways and a butterfly garden.
"I went to native growers, who were very helpful
in showing me a variety of plants to use," she said. "I
did a lot of reading, talked with landscapers and iden-
tified native plants in the park that can be used."
She also worked on the traveling trunk educational
project. Trunks highlighting American Indians in
Florida at the time of De Soto and a Spanish explorer
of De Soto's time are being developed for use in the
Manatee County School system.
Exotic plant removal was an on-going project for
Williams.
"I learned the importance of removing the exotics
and how they affect the native vegetation," she said.
Now that her service is complete, Williams plans
to return to college full-time. In addition to receiving
a salary during her service, she received education
credits that will pay her tuition.
"Through my work at the park I became really in-
terested in native plants, habitat restoration and eco-
systems management," she said. "I'm leaning toward
horticulture and botany with a focus on habitat resto-
ration, but I haven't narrowed it down yet."
Williams said she encourages other young people
to join the program, and she encourages voters to sup-
port it by writing their Congressional representatives.
The program has come under fire from Congressional
budget-cutters who cite the cost of the program.
"It's a great program," Wiliams emphasized. "It's
an opportunity for hands-on experience that means
much more than sitting in a classroom. It's rewarding
to work and have an impact on your community."






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 13 Bi3


CORPS, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12
nation's environmental needs.
To receive an AmeriCorps education award, the
volunteer must complete a required term of full or part-
time service based on the needs of a specific program.
The amount of the award can vary from $4,725 to
$2,362.50.
Education awards may be used to repay qualified
existing or future student loans, to pay college tuition
(including certain vocational programs) or to pay ex-
penses incurred while attending an approved school-to-
work program.
For more information, contact Corporation for
National Service,-1100 Vermont Ave. N.W., Washing-
ton, D.C. 20525.


New look for
entrance to De
Soto Memorial
Cheryl Williams helped
plan new landscaping for
the entrance to De Soto
National Memorial. The
design uses native plants
and will include paths and
a butterfly garden. It will
be completed in mid-
August. Islander Photo:
Pat Copeland


ISLANDER I



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* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
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predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Is-
lander Bystander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
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include name, address and phone number.
* The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
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Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach, FL 34217 941-778-7978


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JIM PAGE 14 A SEPTEMBER 14, 1995K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island involvements hook music professional


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Talented people can sometimes pinpoint their be-
ginnings.
Elaine Burkly laughs as she remembers the start of
her 30 years in the music profession.
She was 5 years old in Naugatuck, Conn. As a
member of the Martones, Burkly was one of a large
group of children involved in tap-dance recitals in what
she remembers as a huge hall in the city of Waterbury.
The rhythm and precision of those tapping feet
were broadcast over the radio.
At the age of 8, then in Woonsocket, R.I., Burkly
began taking piano lessons and taking part in any and
every school stage production she could.
"Our elementary school put on wild extravaganzas I l
for that era," Burkly recalls. "Very simply, I got
hooked!"
So hooked that by the age of 12 she was organiz-
ing and directing her friends in summertime variety
shows.
"I liked being in charge and directing," says .
Burkly. "And I must have been good at it, because the
kids never questioned me."
Decades later, being "good at it" means a source of
new talent, energy and direction for the Anna Maria
Island music scene.
Burkly and her husband, Alfred, have only been
living in Anna Maria since last October. Already Elaine
Burkly's presence has made an impact.
She was choral director of the Anna Maria Island
Community Chorus' final performance of the '94-'95
season. She directed the Chapel Players' three-week,
summer youth theater workshop that culminated in a
two-performance staging of Broadway hits.
Burkly is also working on the city of Anna Maria's
Fall Homecoming festival slated for October. Plus
she's already busy as coordinator and director of the
Artists Guild/Community Center November variety-
show fundraiser, "Rock-a-Round the Fifties."
At home, Burkly resumes one of the favorite as-
pects of her multifaceted career she gives voice les-
sons to children and adults.
Those lessons, for those who so choose, also involve
staging direction and technique and choreography. cal background kept on beckoning.
"I love giving voice lessons," Burkly says. "The Burkly formed a semi-professional singing group,
voice is that one great natural instrument that's with us the Veritones, a group of well-trained women like her-
wherever we go. Sometimes confidence is the only self, and once again Burkly was directing, arranging
thing holding natural talent back." and performing.
Burkly's own choral confidence developed well The Veritones who are still going strong today,
beyond those childhood summer shows. with the addition of males began a tra-
In high school, still studying the With a firm goal of instill- edition throughout greater Massachusetts
piano, Burkly went on the radio again, ing confidence in a typi- and Rhode Island.
giving a solo performance that shocked of They performed for visiting digni-
her family. cally insecure grotaup ofes and at all kinds of formal events,
Expecting a piano solo, what seventh-and eighth-grad- and staged mini-Broadway shows and
Burkly's family heard was a vocal solo. ers, Burkly put every one other similar productions as fundraisers
They decided it was time for Elaine's of 250 students up on for major organizations. Burkly fondly
formal vocal training to begin. stage in an innovative remembers the thrill of opening for
Attending a private girls school music-theater program Arthur Fedler.
during those high school years, Burkly music-theaterprogram. concurrently Burkly began teaching
became fully enmeshed in all the artis- grades seven through 12 in the Lincoln,
tic endeavors available. R.I., school system, including directing the bands and
In addition to performing in every musical stage choruses and instituting the school's first marching band
production, she served as the student director. Burkly and drill teams.
was also known as the class artist, in charge of deco- When the family moved to Falmouth, Mass.,
rations and displays for every conceivable function. Burkly headed up seventh-and eighth-grade music at
By the time she left high school, Burkly knew that Lawrence Junior High School.
her life would be dedicated to teaching music and With a firm goal of instilling confidence in that
working with young people. typically insecure age group, Burkly put every one of
250 students up on stage in an innovative music-theater
Studying with the stars program. Every eight weeks, as the music session ro-
Burkly's four years at Boston University where tated, Burkly and "her kids" staged a condensed Broad-
she majored in music education with minors in piano way show.
and voice included extras to her curriculum that are "It was a marvelous, marvelous program," says the
thrilling to this day. director, educator and mother who developed a real
An excellent artist-in-residence program at BU knack for inspiring children, including her own.
meant Burkly got to work with plenty of pros, like Burkly laughs, recalling her stint as a Girl Scout
Arthur Miller and Louis Armstrong. leader. "We were the only troop that never went
Burkly served as campus hostess for Armstrong and camping."
describes the excitement of being called up on stage to Instead, excursions and instruction were in the
sing "Summertime" with him and his orchestra. realm of the arts and music. The scouts never com-
All in addition to keeping up with regular studies plained.
were highlights like appearing at Carnegie Hall, under Neither did the Falmouth school district which
the baton of Leopold Stokowski, in the world premiere made Burkly the music director for seven schools,
of Carl Orff's "Carmina Burina." grades kindergarten through 12.
After obtaining her degree, Burkly married and That meant administrative duties as well as the
started to have children she has four. But her musi- continuing pleasure of teaching, including the initiation


Elaine Burkly is enthusi-
astic about the stage and
music opportunities on
Anna Maria Island.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.






























of a high-school, audition-chosen show choir known
for its gala performances throughout the area.
As if all that weren't full time, Burkly also taught
voice to all ages at the Cape Cod Conservatory and
received her master's degree in fine arts administration.
And then she was the fine arts administrator for the
school system, with all arts and music programs and 19
teachers in her care.
That care included Burkly's particular ability for
developing a rapport with children and adolescents and
all aspects of their lives.

Anna Maria bound
When Burkly retired from public education in
1989, she left with the knowledge that she had made an
impression in programming and instruction, in the
caliber of performances in her one part of the world,
and in being an adult whose accessibility touched the
lives of children in ways that not all teachers do.
Her success that "being good at" organizing and
directing and formal teaching is now an Anna Maria
asset.
The Burklys intended to be here full time a few
years ago but family matters delayed their final move.
At that point, Burkly had already begun her involve-
ment, having auditioned for Dorothy McChesney and
her Chapel Players production of "You Can't Take It
With You." Burkly was unable to stay for the role she
was offered.
Burkly ran into McChesney again last winter and was
asked to run the youth summer workshop. She agreed.
"I love Anna Maria," says Burkly. "And the more
I get involved, the more I love it."
One of Burkly's ideas is to start an adult singing
group to perform lighter classics and show tunes, be-
lieving there is a lot of talent around but "not everyone
wants to sing the masters."
She also wants to continue working with children and
says she is very impressed by what was accomplished in
three short weeks with the Chapel Players group.
Considering all that Elaine Burkly has accom-
plished over several decades, and what she's already
inspired in less than a year on Anna Maria, the Island
music and stage scene has a lot to look forward to.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 15 Irm


Pow er of .. -... ..... ... .
the pen
Melissa Forney, '
standing, author of
children's books
and a writing
consultant, begins.
a seminar about
modern writing
skills for Island
teachers. Clock-V
wise from left are .
teachers DeAnnA
Davis and Marcia "
Brockway, Forney,
Toni Lashway,
Maureen Loveland
and Karen Paul.





Featuring
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You get complete news of three island cities in The Islander Bystander
plus community events, school news and stories about Island people
it's everything you need to know on Anna Maria Island.


Party
Principles
Stephanie Tennell,
left, and Kayla
Boak create works
of color as they
concentrate on a
worksheet about,
parties. The stu-
dents in Melanie
Moran's kindergar-
ten class will begin
a week studying the
letter "p" and
everything possible
that goes into
planning a perfect
party.


: Anna Maria Elementary
School Menu
Monday, 9/18/95
* Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Lunch: Hamburger on Bun or Barbecue Chicken Sand- *
which, Lettuce & Tomato, French Fries, Orange Juice Bar
* Tuesday, 9/19/95
Breakfast: French Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese or Pizza, Green Beans, *
Strawberries & Banana, Roll
* Wednesday, 9/20/95
* Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Juice
* Lunch: Baked Chicken or Mini Chef Salad, Steamed
* Carrots, Fresh Fruit, Roll
* Thursday, 9/21/95
Breakfast: Bagel, Fruit
Lunch: Pork Chop Shape or Cheese Croissant, Rice,
Peas, Applesauce, Cookie
* Friday, 9/22/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Ham & Nachos & Cheese, Corn, *
Salad, Jello
* All meals served with milk.
* S


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Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
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On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


$1095






IE PAGE 16 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 W THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

lA I


Focus on football
The return of the football contest to the pages of
The Islander Bystander should have been my tipoff.
News that a group of friends were caravaning off
to Orlando to see the Seminoles should have been a
clue.
I smirked mildly when I saw a commercial with a
bunch of country gals singing about watching the
movie on "their channel" while the men watch Mon-
day night football. They were dancing, shouting and
singing a mimic of that football opener, "Are you
ready for some football?"
It was cute as commercials go, but sexist. They
presume that only men watch football and only women
watch movies. That's an absurd premise.
Next revelation? I was shopping for a new, bigger,
better, brighter more clever television last weekend. I
priced models at two stores in Bradenton before head-
ing over to the outlet mall in Ellenton.







0












COUPON o f
EXPIRES lb I

10519CortezRoad '
UT 792-5300 H
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

PIZZA JS
BUFFET HPM

$3.49

I Per person all day with purchase of soft drink. I
I "Thank you to all our local patrons" I
ihM mMME COUPON EmmMa eMi


Southwest Tournedos of Beef Topped with a
Spicy Picante Butter served with Crispy Tortilla &
Sauteed Mixed Vegetables, $21.95
Softshell Crabs with Fresh Basil & Roasted Garlic
Cream Sauce, Pasta & Mixed Vegetables, $18.95
Broiled Salmon with Orange Tarragon Glaze
served with Steamed Asparagus & Potato, $18.95



S r- S


383-0777
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
Open Wednesday thru Sunday On Longboat Key


The parking lot at Gulf Coast Shops was packed
with cars and the Sony outlet store was packed with
people. As the salesman evoked the virtures and dis-
tinctions of several models, another interested shopper
listened in. It seemed easier for him to give the spiel
once for us both.
As soon as the salesman took a breath, the male
shopper said, "I'll take that one."
That's when it hit me.
He needed that TV. He had to get home to watch
football. It was the first weekend of games and he
wasn't wasting any time.
I look forward to watching "a little" football. So,
I replaced my 15-year-old Quasar with a new television
with PIP (picture-in-picture) and I can now watch two
games at once! Or a movie and a "little" game.
I spent an hour or so hooking up a maze of cables:
F-to-F cable to the box, F-to-F cable to the VCR, RCA-
to-RCA cable from the VCR to the TV, stereo sound
cables, splitter boxes and so on.
I felt like a total electronic whiz after I coded the
cable box and the VCR to work with the universal re-
mote and finally achieved a picture in the little picture-
in-picture window that was on a different TV channel.
Whew! Let the games begin.






IN HOLMES BEACH'
Try Our Early Dinner Specials 4-6 pm
Including: Chicken Piccata, Grouper Florentine,
Shrimp Scampi or Pasta Primavera;
All s8.95 with soup or salad, etc.
Open Tues Sun 4pm 10pm
For Reservations 778-5440
... on the corner of Manatee Avenue & East Bay Drive
(across from Barnett Bank, at the light.)
formerly "The Mutiny Inn"


Just listed?
Island real estate sales-
man Dick Maher just
couldn't break his daily
habit on vacation as he
S e scoured the countryside
9 in Ireland for the perfect
place for his many buyers
he showed off his Anna
Maria listings in The
Islander Bystander.






Bob Woods, of Island Locksmith, poked his head
in The Islander Bystander office to inform me a week
ago Sunday afternoon that the Bucs had won. "That's
news," he said. "You ought put that in the paper."
To which I said, "Yes, I guess it is," cause we
don't see the Bucs win too often. But we sure got a lot
of die-hard Buc fans around here.
Take Loretta Lease of Holmes Beach for instance.
Last year and the year before, she entered The Islander
Bystander football contest every week. She won one
week last year when she picked all the games right -
including a tie game for who else? Yep, she picked
the Bucs to tie. You gotta figure Loretta just couldn't
give up on the Bucs.
She beat out several other players with that pick.
They too had them all right except for that Bucs
game. Way to go, Loretta.

Switch to wine
J.P. Parks started a new position last week with
Tampa's Premier Beverage Company. He is their new
"key accounts manager" and according to J.P. that
doesn't mean he only calls on restaurants on Longboat
PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-JP, NEXT PAGE


"The best hamburgers and -
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven. "fis
,Iuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. '
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501

Where Longboat Key History Began








STONE CRAB

RESTAURANT

Vacation Special

Sept. 19-20-21

Fresh Florida Lobster
While They Last!
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
>n' xauarmm n rul ^e






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 N PAGE 17 [!


Education vacation
Eight-year-old Kimberly Kuizon proudly showed off
her local newspaper in front of the Capitol while on
vacation with Mom and Dad, Carla and Alex Kuizon
of Holmes Beach. They toured historic sites in
Washington, D.C., and Williamsburg, Va.

STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 16
Key. He'll be calling on larger accounts who may ben-
efit from his expertise in wines.
Premier is a premier supplier of wines for the
Tampa Bay market and J.P. will put to use many years
(he's too modest to say how many) worth of restaurant
experience going back as far as I can remember to
the former High Seas, most recently with Beach Bis-
tro and the Sandbar.
Sounds like J.P. landed in a good spot. And all we
have to ask is, "When's the tasting?"


Keeper of the castle
When the masters were gone,
Amanda LaBelle, age 7, of
Kissimmee, kept short watch over
the Island Castlemasters' Labor
Day weekend fortress at the
Manatee County Public Beach in
front of Cafe on the Beach. Unfor-
tunately, the castle was destroyed
by vandals overnight. Islander
Photo: Cynthia Finn.














Castle created
for charity
The Mystical Castle Team,
sponsored by Garden
Pizza and Deli and Gulf
Drive Cafe, was part of
Island Labor Day
j fundraising for the Muscu-
lar Dystrophy Association.
Creators Angel Puckett,
Vita Osterbury, George
Sadler, Marcie Johnson
and Jon Caropepe in-
.-J spared more than $100 in
donations. Islander Photo:
-. Courtesy of
Marcie Johnson.


ALLIGATOR
SPORTS BAR
& GRILL
761-0611
NOW OPEN FOR
LUNCH
11:30 2:00
Daily Lunch Specials
Dinner Menu pin 10pm
Late Nite Menu Avail.
Tuesday & Wednesday
Restaurant
Appreciation Night
750 Drafts (Domestic)
$1.75 Drafts (Imports)


Food Specials
Satellite & Big
Screen TVs
College and Pro
Football
$1.00 Drafts (Domestic)
Monday Night
Football
750 Drafts (Domestic)


Sun -Thurs 12am 2am $1.00 Drafts (Domestic)
Pebble Springs Plaza 5917 Manatee Ave. W.


Fri. & Sat.
Sept. 15 & 16

ROCKIN' ROMY
Tues., Wed. & Thurs
Every Tuesday Happy Hour all day & all night

Willy Great Dinner Specials
All-U-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers ............... 6.95
Chicken Marsala/Cordon Bleu/Parmesan ... S6.95
6 oz. Filet Mignon .................................. 8.95
M aine Lobster........................................ $9.95
Check out our Early Bird Menu 4 to 6 Daily!
KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


,THE',



RESTAURANT & PUB
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL EVERY MONDAY
Mexican Night & Happy Hour During the Game
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS FOR FOOTBALL
Serving Pub Menu
OPEN FOR BREAKFAST & LUNCH
Mon-Sat 7:30 AM to 2 PM
Sunday 8:00 AM to 1 PM
PUB HOURS: Mon-Sat 7:30 AM-10 PM
PUB MENU AVAILABLE AFTER 2 PM
Corner of Gulf Dr. & Palmetto Ave. in Anna Maria
778-3909 (Take Out Orders Welcome)


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES& Full cut, potato, 7
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls $7.2
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


I EYE OPENER... 2 eggs, I
home fries and coffee...


Island Inn Restaurant
EN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031



__-- .,
M -' 1701 Gulf Dr.N.B




/ Chefs/Proprietors
-\ Andrea & Ed Spring


Starting In November


Every Wednesday, Thursday & Friday

SUNDAY ONLY

lowvneft 0/ %wzA
9 am 1:30 pm
Warm Banana Bread, Butter and Jam served at all tables.


5 ~ 6:30 pm
Always ... Tantalizing Desserts
And, Late Evening Service
Espresso, Cappuccino, Coffee & Teas
You are welcome to bring your favorite wine or beer.
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria
Reservations Suggested 778-9399


to a st, ,.
Mon.t;2 Fi. -Af I~


'S-.-


E~E~:





IE PAGE 18 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Sept. 1, theft, 200 block of Archer Way. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed a
survey stake from the property.
Sept. 6, automobile theft, 700 block of Jacaranda.
The complainant reported she returned home from
work and discovered her vehicle missing.

Bradenton Beach
Sept 1, grand theft, 100 block of Sixth St. N. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed coins
valued at $1,500.
Sept. 1, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. The complainant reported a person unknown
entered the vehicle and removed a large bag, two wal-
lets, two driver's licenses, the vehicle registration,
credit and gas cards, ATM cards, keys, a birth certifi-
cate, $400 in cash, a gold chain, a cellular phone, a
pager, a CD, cassette tapes, a video camera for a total
value of $980.
Sept. 4, theft, criminal mischief, 107 Gulf Drive
S., Key West Willy's. The complainant reported a per-
son unknown removed a tool box containing tools val-
ued at $250 from the back of the vehicle and smashed
the windshield. Damage was $100.
Sept. 4, DUI with property damage, 100 Seventh
St. S. Witnesses reported the subject, Peter James
Hamel, 46, of Bradenton Beach, had driven into their
yard and through their fence, almost striking their
house. Hamel backed up over the fence again, got out
of the car, slammed the door and walked to his resi-
dence.
The officer went to the residence and found Hamel,
who made a spontaneous statement that he knew he hit
the fence and wanted to pay for it, said the report. The
officer noted Hamel's speech was slurred, and he
smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage.
The officer inspected Hamel's vehicle and noted
damage to the front and fresh skid marks from the road
to the parking lot. Hamel's vehicle was the only one in
the lot. The officer administered field sobriety tests to
Hamel and placed him in custody.

THA 0,-CHA
It's easy to rememberour name...
buthardtoforgetourfood'


THAI 0-CHA offers you
the finest in delicate, delicious
Thai cuisine in a comfortable
atmosphere.
Our tasty Thai food will keep you
coming back again and again.
10b Off tiny
OIDnnR OR LunCrn
with this ad exp. 9/30/95
We are open for lunch
Mondaythrough Friday
from 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM
Dinner Monday through
Saturday from
5:00 to 9:30 PM
Closed Sunday
7604 Cortez Road West Bradenton
Tel: (813) 794-5470


i


Wiener Schnitzel II .$7.95
Beef Rouladen ........... .... $9.95
Sauerbraten .................$10.95
Hungarian Qulasch ..----. $8.95
Bratwurst ........--..........--- $4.95
r -- --" -- .--- -- --
r 1/2 OFF with this ad exp. 9/25/95
| Buy one dinner at full price L take 1/2 off second
dinner of equal or lesser value.
Dinner 5 to 10P.M.
M Reservation 778-6189 i li
i 101 Bridge Street
Bradenton Beach


Sept. 4, trespass warning, Coquina Beach. The
lifeguard reported the subject began yelling at him
when he told individuals to get off the groin. He ad-
vised the subject to leave the beach, but he did not. The
officer issued a trespass warning to the subject.
Sept. 4, criminal mischief, 1801 Gulf Drive N.,
Runaway Bay. The manager reported juveniles were
kicking and breaking the fence on the north side of the
property. Damage was $400.
Sept. 6, battery, 2400 block of Avenue C. The
complainant reported she responded to a knock at her
door and was splashed in the face with a liquid by a
person unknown. She rinsed her face and flushed her
eyes. The liquid was determined to be varnish.
Sept. 6, possession of marijuana less than 20
grams, possession of drug paraphernalia without drug,
116 Bridge St., Sports Lounge. The officer on patrol
observed Greg J. Morris, 38, of Bradenton Beach, be-
hind the Sports Lounge. When he approached Morris,
he smelled the strong odor of marijuana.
Morris tried to hide a cigarette pack behind his
back. When the officer asked about the cigarette pack,
Morris dropped it on the ground behind him. The of-
ficer picked it up and found two small bags of mari-
juana and two rolling papers inside. Morris was placed
in custody.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 1, code violation, suspicious incident, 200
block of 64th Street The officer responded in reference
to a barking dog. The officer monitored the barking and
advised the owner he was in violation of the city code
and must correct the problem. The owner said he would
do so.
Later the complainant arrived home and found a
note from animal control about a dog barking and a
note in her mailbox which read, "No pig! No dog!
Barking all day. Paybacks are hell."
Sept. 1, assistance, 300 block of Clark Drive. The
complainant reported two German tourists came to her
door looking for a friend, but they couldn't speak En-
glish. An officer was able to locate their friend and
transported the tourists to his residence.
Sept. 2, lost property, Palmetto Avenue to 52nd
Street. The complainant reported while he was walk-
ing the beach he lost $800 to $1,000 in assorted bills.
The officer searched the beach but could not find any
bills.
Sept. 2, found property a pair of eyeglasses,
5400 Marina Drive in front of the laundromat.
Sept. 2, grand larceny, 5400 block of Gulf Drive.


The complainant reported when she awoke she found
her jewelry bag open on the kitchen table and four $100
bills missing.
Sept. 2, vandalism, 7300 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered
his boat, pulled wiring from the ignition switch and
attempted to hot wire the boat. While investigating, the
officer found the fan belt shredded.
Sept. 2, disturbance, 400 block of 63rd Street.
The complainant reported loose dogs attack her dogs
when she walks them. The officer told her to call when
an incident takes place.
Sept. 3, suspicious, 5313 Gulf Drive, Eckerd
Drug Store. The officer observed several beer bottles
scattered on the floor inside the front doors of the
closed business. He checked the building and found no
signs of criminal activity. The keyholder and manager
responded, and the manager said she dropped the beer
the night before and was going to clean it up when she
arrived for work.
Sept. 3, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Manatee County Public Beach. The complain-
ant reported a person unknown entered the vehicle and
removed a wallet valued at $10, $10 in cash and credit
and identification cards.
Sept. 3 burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Manatee County Public Beach. The complain-
ants reported they returned to their vehicle and found
the driver's door window missing. A person unknown
had attempted to remove the stereo. Also missing were
two wallets valued at $20, an apron, a checkbook, iden-
tification and credit cards and $52 in cash.
Sept. 3, suspicious person, 5353 Gulf Drive,
Circle K. The clerk reported he observed juveniles se-
lect candy items and put them in their back pockets.
The officer approached the juveniles, asked them to
produce all items in their possession and conducted a
pat-down search. Nothing was found. The juveniles
purchased the items they had in their hands and left the
store. The clerk found an open wrapper of an item he
observed one of the juveniles holding.
Sept. 3, assistance, 3200 East Bay Drive, Anna
Maria Island Center. The officer was advised by a
Bradenton Beach officer that a vehicle stolen on the
causeway was traveling to the Island. The officers lo-
cated the vehicle in the shopping center parking lot and
staked it out, but no one approached. A Manatee
County sheriffs deputy arrived with the victim to
claim the vehicle.
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE


- Bridge Tender Inn-
CASUAL BAYFRONT DINING
Historical Site Of The 1917 Ba Inn
"THE PLACE FOR LUNCH I,..
Early Birds
4-6 daily
Sunday Brunch
1 Oam-2pm --
Happy Hour .- -
11:30-6 daily

"Best Food... Best View"
Convenient Docking (Marker 49)
135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
778-4849



ROTTEN

R OTN RALPH'S
\.RAfLPH'S WATERFRONT DINING
^ FULL MENU FULL BAR
Open for Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

BRITISH-STYLE

Served 7 days a week
All- You-Can-Eat Monday thru Thursday Only
-0----- _________


Joe's e Best
Ice Cream
Eats & and Yogurt
is made
Sweets ,joe
Just an Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor"
GREAT HOMEMADE
* Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes
* Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
* Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
* Belgium Waffles
* Espresso, Cappuccino
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


r1 C ,1 PUB & RESTAURANT .e
b '- SERVING i
Sunday Breakfast 8 am til 1 pm
Lunch Friday, Saturday & Sunday -
New Extended Happy Hour
4 to 7 Daily All Day Sunday 1
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails
r Lunch or Dinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER |
ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE .
K" Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 9/21/95
L - Musresent at time of order. __
Authentic British
Atmosphere with Mon.-Thurn. 4 to 10
Cocktails & 8 Fri. andSal Noon to 10
ockals & Sun. Sam I p" 0
British Drafted Sunday Breakfast Sam'til 1 pm
Beers on Tap Pub Hours 'til?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


Fun & Games with
JAY CRAWFORD
Sept 15, 16 & 17
Fri & Sat 7-lpm >
Sunday *6-10 pm ,--
778-3953
901 S. Bay Blvd. Anna Maria Yacht Basin


--~i~iu.


L


!


WANZEIfa


1





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E PAGE 19 II3

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Historical Society meets
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society will hold
its first meeting of the season at 7:30 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 18, at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive.
SThe Rev. Al Butterfield, former 11-year pastor of
Roser Memorial Community Church, will speak on
"Florida on My Mind," including memories of his 1931
arrival on the Island.
Members and the general public are invited. For
information, call 778-0492.

Cookbook entry
deadline nears
Those who want their favorite and most tasty reci-
pes included in the Anna Maria Island Community
Center's "A Taste of Paradise II" cookbook are encour-
aged to submit their entries by Wednesday, Sept. 20.
The cookbook will be the second version of what
has been a very successful fundraiser for the Center the
last four years. This version will include some differ-
ent categories. Individuals, including children, and
businesses are invited to submit their own creations or
their best-loved dishes.
To obtain an entry form or volunteer to serve on
the cookbook committee, call Shirley at 778-0340 or
778-1908.
Small business seminar
at Island library
A free educational seminar will be held at the Is-
land Branch Library in the Walker-Swift Meeting
Room on Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
The seminar will be conducted by Alan Lavoie,
financial and insurance consultant, and Paul Pavich,
accountant and CPA.
Some of the topics to be discussed are: take more
pre-tax dollars out of your business, recent tax law
changes, self-employed deductions, good record keep-
ing practices, how to retain key employees, securing
your retirement, etc.
The seminar is free and open to the public.

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Ladies Days: One lady 50% off with purchase
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Kids Days: One child (under 15) FREE with
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Mens Days: All men 20% off any trip
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CORTEZ FLEET
for further information and reservations call
L 794-1223
0 12507 Cortez Road West


Homecoming committee
meets Sept. 22
Plans for the city of Anna Maria's Oct. 21 Fall
Homecoming will be formalized at a committee meet-
ing at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 22, at Anna Maria City
Hall. All committee chairman are urged to attend.
Daylong festivities are being planned. Anyone inter-
ested in being involved may call Dorothy McChesney at
778-3045 or Carolyne Norwood at 778-1514.

Meditation lecture offered
Gaining inner peace through Raja Yoga meditation
will be the subject of a free lecture from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Brain Gym bookstore, 5340
Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Guided meditation with the background music of
the Shakuhachi flute by Bradenton Beach resident
Laura Kiley will be offered.
Reservations are not required. For more informa-
tion, call 778-5990.
Chamber meeting Sept. 20
The board of directors of the Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce will hold its monthly meeting
at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20, at the Chamber of-
fice, 501-D Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach.
All members and the general public are invited. For
more information, call 778-1541.

STREETLIFE, FROM PAGE 18
Sept. 5, assistance, 5901 Marina Drive, police
department. The complainant reported he drove over an
alligator on SR 64 near 1-75, put it in the trunk of his
vehicle and brought it to the police department. The
officer notified the fish and game department, and they
responded and picked up the dead six-foot reptile.
Sept. code violation, 300 block of Avenue C. The
complainant reported a person unknown dumped nu-
merous items of furniture in the road. The public works
department disposed of it.
Sept 5, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf Drive,
Manatee County Public Beach. The complainant reported
a person unknown entered the vehicle and removed two
credit cards from a wallet on the front seat.
Sept. 5, burglary, 75th Street and Marina Drive.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered




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Poetry night Sept. 21 at
Artists Guild in
Holmes Beach
Coffee and poetry amidst the art will be offered at
7p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, at the Artists Guild Gallery,
5414 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes
Beach.
Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and resident poets. There will be
an open mike for aspiring poets.
For registration and information, call Zoe Von
Averkamp at 778-7216.

Historical society 'fabulous
flea market' Saturday in
Anna Maria
Bargains galore will be found at the Anna Maria
Island Historical Society's "Fabulous Flea Market"
from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 16, at the society's
museum parking lot, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
In the event of rain, the sale will be rescheduled to
Sept. 23.
Donations will be accepted from 10 a.m. to noon
Friday, Sept. 15. Needed are household goods, furni-
ture, sports equipment, games and more.
For more information, call 778-0492.


his pontoon boat and removed nylon line valued at $80
and a gas tank valued at $20.
Sept. 6, suspicious, 5353 Gulf Drive, Circle K.
The clerk reported the subject had been in the store and
shoplifted something. The officer stopped the vehicle
described by the clerk and returned the driver and pas-
senger to the store. The passenger fit the description of
the subject but said he had not stolen anything.
The clerk and a customer said they saw the subject
put something in his pocket. The officer checked the
subject and the vehicle and found nothing from the
store. The officer said he had no proof to arrest the
subject. The clerk asked him to issue a trespass warn-
ing to the subject.
Sept. 7, vandalism, 50 block of 75th Street. The
complainant reported the theft of her mailbox. The of-
ficer found it smashed in the street nearby.

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iE] PAGE 20 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'The Word' according to Pilkey


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Orrin Pilkey is a professor of geology at Duke
University and a revered figure by some of us who love
beaches. Pilkey probably knows more about beaches
than any person alive, and he has strong feelings about
a new Florida law that could result in lots of new sea-
walls here.
As Anna Maria Island ponders additional beach
renourishment, Pilkey's thoughts on beaches and ero-
sion are really quite pertinent.
Pilkey and fellow Duke researcher Katharine Dixon
co-authored an article appearing in Sunday's Miami Her-
ald explaining the fallacy of building seawalls the
short-term gain followed by long-term loss.
"In order to understand Florida's beach erosion
problems, it's first necessary to understand what his-
tory, and our own research at Duke, has shown to be
true," the team wrote.
"There is no erosion problem until someone con-


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Sept. 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 12-foot pleasure
craft about 900 yards off Longboat Key. A Coast Guard
vessel towed the disabled vessel to shore.
Sept. 3, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 18-foot pleasure
craft a half-mile south of Egmont Key. A Coast Guard
vessel responded and stood by until a commercial sal-
vage boat arrived to provide a tow to port.
Sept. 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an overdue 18-foot pleasure
craft en route to Boca Grande. A Coast Guard Auxil-
iary vessel located the vessel.
Sept. 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station


Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu9/14 3:00 2.3ft 9:58 0.5ft 5:02 1.7ft 9;00 1.3ft
Fril9/15 3:45 2.3ff 10:58 0.6ff 6:20 1.6ff 9:32 1.4ff
Sat9/16 4:41 2.2ff 10:35p1.4ft 8:00 1.5ft 12:15 0.6ff
Sun 9/17 5:53 2.2ft 9:22 1.6ft 1:36 0.6ft
Mon9/18 7:17 2.1ft 12:17 1.5ft 10:12 1.6ft 2:46 0.6ft
Tue 9/19 8:36 2.2ft 1:52 1.4ft 10:44 1.7ft 3:43 0.6ft
Wed 9/20 9:38 2.2ft 2:59 1.3ft 11:08 1.7ft 4:25 0.6ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


structs a building in the path of a retreating shoreline.
The beach itself is never endangered by 'erosion.' As
the sea level rises, the beach simply moves itself fur-
ther inland.
"There is no need for a seawall unless someone
builds too close to a retreating beach. And only a small
number of a coastal community's property owners -
those located right at the beachfront create the de-
mand for this shoreline armoring."
Not every community calls for seawalls, of course.
Some, like Anna Maria and Longboat, opted for
renourishment. "But many recognize that pumping in
sand to shore up beaches is a costly proposition often
quickly undone by storms," the Duke team writes.
"There are too many miles of developed Florida
shoreline to use replenishment everywhere. Not the
least of the problems is a shortage of suitable sand.
Hence, the alternative calls for seawalls rock edi-
fices that are supposed to protect buildings behind them
from the encroaching surf."


Cortez received a report of a disabled 16-foot pleasure
craft in Stump Pass. The vessel was also overloaded.
Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 17087046 removed three
people from the boat and towed the vessel to Tom
Adams Boat Ramp. An overloaded vessel, either by
weight or number of people, is not only unsafe but also
a violation of state and federal law.
Sept. 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 16-foot pleasure
craft in Lemon Bay. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel
17087046 located the vessel and towed it to port.
Sept. 5, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 18-foot pleasure
craft in Palma Sola Bay. Station Cortez provided com-
munications assistance in the form of calling a com-
mercial salvage company to tow the vessel to port.


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Pilkey then goes on to explain that as surely as
night follows day, a seawall will eventually narrow a
beach until the only alternative becomes a bigger sea-
wall. It may take anywhere from 10 to 40 years, but


eventually a bigger seawall
will be needed.
"Surely it is a rare politi-
cian who can withstand the
complaints of beachfront
property owners and devel-
opers seeking seawalls and
instead think three to four
decades ahead to the beach
destruction the walls will
cause," Pilkey says.
"As governor of Florida,
[now U.S.] Sen. Bob Graham


'There is no
erosion prob-
lem until some-
one constructs
a building in
the path of a
retreating
shoreline.'


may have been such an exception when he said: 'This
generation doesn't have the right to destroy the next
generation's beaches.' The states of North and South
Carolina, along with Maine, have outlawed shoreline
armoring," according to Pilkey, "but now Florida has
lifted most controls." He thinks we could go the way of
New Jersey, where many of the beaches are lost
He suggests we ask our legislature to put things
back the way they were before the wealthy Jupiter Is-
land property owners bought themselves (and all the
rest of us) a bad, new law.

Your help is needed
"Think globally, act locally," is the theme of this
year's Florida Coastal Cleanup scheduled for 9 a.m. to
noon next Saturday. It's something worth doing.
All of our beaches could use some real cleaning
right now, but the local focus project this year is the
new Quick Point Preserve. That's the new preserve just
north of the New Pass Bridge on the southeastern tip
of Longboat Key. Frankly, it will not only help get this
new area open, you'll also have an opportunity to be
one of the first to see and prowl around it.
If you're interested, just give a call to Jaime
Doubek, the new public affairs person at the Sarasota
Bay Program at 361-6133.
On the other hand, if you'd rather volunteer for
something more in your own neighborhood, you can do
that too by calling Susan Hancock at Keep Manatee
Beautiful at 795-8272.
Hundreds of volunteers have collected tons of
marine debris over the years, and we all benefit from
the effort. Give a call, spend a couple of hours meet-
ing people as nifty as yourself doing their bit to help us
all.
You'll be glad you did. See you there.

FLORIDA SALTWATER FISHING IAWS:
AMBERJACK: 28-inch minimum fork length; 3 fish daily posses-
sion limit.
BLACK DRUM: 14- to 24- inch slot limit; 5 fish daily possession
limit; cannot possess more than one of more than 24 inches.
BLACK MULLET: no minimum length; 50 fish limit.
BLUEFISH: 10-inch minimum fork length.
COBIA: 33-inch minimum fork length; 2 fish limit.
DOLPHIN: 10 fish daily possession limit.
FLOUNDER; 11-inch minimum length.
GROUPER: (black, gag, red, yellowfin, yellowmouth,scamp): 20-
inch min. length; 5 fish limit; no harvest of Nassau grouper allowed.
JEWFISH: closed. Illegal to possess.
KINGFISH: 12-inch minimum fork length in state waters; 20-inch
minimum federal waters: 2 fish limit in state and federal waters.
MANGROVE SNAPPER: 10-inch minimum; 5 fish limit.
PERMIT: No bag limit for fish of less than 20 inches; 2 fish bag
and possession limit for fish of more than 20 Inches.
POMPANO: 10-Inch minimum length.
REDFISH: 18-to 27 Inch slot; closed in March, April, May. 1 fish
limit.
SEABASS: 8-inch minimum; no bag limit.
SHARK: daily bag limit of one; maximum possession limit of
two. The harvest sawsharks, sawfish, basking sharks, whale sharks
and spotted eagle rays is prohibited.
SNAPPER: 20-inch minimum on red snapper; 12-inch minimum
on cubera, dog, silk, queen, mahogany, blackfin and yellowtail; 10-
inch minimum on gray or mangrove snapper; 8-inch minimum on
vermilion snapper, lane snapper,. Bag limit 10 daily (no limit on lane
or vermilion). Limit may not include more than 5 mangrove daily or
2 red snapper daily.
SNOOK: 24-inch minimum length; closed Jan., Feb., June, July,
Aug.; 2 fish limit; cannot possess more than one fish or more than
34 inches.
SPANISH MACKEREL: 12-inch minimum length; 10 fish limit.
SPECKLED TROUT: 14- to 24- inch minimum length; 10 fish
limit.; cannot possess more than one of more than 24 Inches.
TARPON: no size limit; 2 fish limit; requires $50 tarpon tag to
possess or kill.
For questions on rules in state water, call the Florida Marine
Fisheries Commission at (904) 487-0554. Other rulings may apply
for federal waters (those waters that are more than 9 nautical miles
offshore). Check with the National Marine Fisheries Service in St.
Petersburg (813) 893-3145 Florida Marine Patrol Information line
(813) 893-2221 for complete current regulations.


Capt. Heistand, other guides featured at
Sports Fair Saturday at Manatee civic center
Holmes Beach charter Capt Mike Heistand will and Capt. Mitch Cockeri at the event, scheduled
be one of the featured speakers at a series of instruc- from 1-5 p.m.
tional seminars at the Sports Fan Fair Saturday, The fishing seminars will feature fishing tech-
Sept. 16, at the Manatee County Civic Center in niques. The event will benefit the Manatee County
Palmetto. Schools Foundation.
Heistand will be joined by Capt. James Woods For information, call 741-7242.


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (941) 778-2727


COAST LI






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 21 IBU

Just when you thought it couldn't get better, it does


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Redfish and snook dominated the week's catches,
with some charter captains reporting more than 50 reds
caught on a single trip out. Offshore, look for grouper
and amberjack, and we can expect mackerel to start
moving in any time now once the water temperatures
cool just a bit.
Bill at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishing has been
pretty fair, with good catches of snook, redfish and a
few flounder being the most-caught fish.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching reds, snapper, a couple of
snook and lots of mackerel. Red tide hasn't been much
of a problem at the pier, he added.
Lee at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 65 head of Key West grunts. The
six-hour trip averaged 100 head of Key West grunts,
grouper, porgies, lane snapper and scamp. The nine-
hour trip averaged 37 head of yellow tail snapper,
scamp, red grouper, mangrove snapper and black grou-
per.
Capt. Phil Shields said the red tide seems to be
south of us, but he's been bringing red and black grou-
per back to the docks while fishing offshore as well as
mangrove snapper and cobia.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said he caught a 31-
inch snook off the Key Royale flats using a white jig
a few nights ago. Offshore, Chris says the grouper are


very active in about 80 feet of water.
Lee at Perico Island Bait & Tackle redfish and
snook are thick on the flats, while offshore anglers are
reporting good catches of grouper, snapper and amber-
jack.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's been catching lots and
lots of redfish, with catches of 50 or more not being
uncommon on some trips.
Capt. Mark Bradow reports huge schools of red-
fish on the flats that are responding very well to his fly
rod magic.
On my boat Magic I've been focusing on redfish,
with most of the reds being caught on lower tides. We
also caught a few keeper snook and some 24-inch trout
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's caught some very nice
snook this week, as well as limit catches of reds. Capt.
Tom says there are lots of trout out there, but they're
on the small side.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said that although
snook angling is good right now, redfish action is ex-
cellent. Mangrove snapper catches are getting better
and better, and expect mackerel to start showing up
once the water gets a little cooler. Offshore, grouper
and amberjack catches remain excellent.
Capt. Mike Greig said he's catching lots of red-
fish and trout off the flats in the backwater, with good
catches of mangrove snapper thrown in.
Good luck and good fishing.


Labor Day equals
love and leisure
Six-year-old C.J. Klingbeil and his dad, Don, cashed
in the schoolwork and the carpentry for some father-
son casting bright and early Labor Day at Coquina
bayside. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


The opportunity for women to step up to the plate
is here! Professional women's baseball has taken a
major step forward with the recent formation of the
Women's Baseball Association, Inc., a professional
Florida league consisting of eight teams.
"Women now will have a professional environ-
ment in which to play baseball," said Tom Teskey,
president of WBA. "These women are really talented
players who are motivated by athletic competition
rather than financial considerations."
Opportunities for talented players from both
Sarasota and Manatee Counties to try out for the "Stin-
grays" team are open. Try-outs are going on now ev-
ery Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 5 to
8 p.m. at Wellfied Park in Venice.
Head Coach Mike Lowen and Assistant Coach
Gordon Struble both have extensive experience, Lowen
having signed with Kansas City Royals and presently

ISLANDER


C1t/ More local
news than
any other
S ,~. source!


playing baseball for Venice Chiefs, while Struble, in
earlier years was drafted by the Phillies, has coached
St. Petersburg Rangers for seven years and has played
in men's senior baseball league for nine years.
The league consists of the Polk County Peppers,
Lake County Tornados, St. Pete Pepsi-XL, Orlando Or-
ange, Tampa Panthers, Ocala Falcons, Ft. Myers The
Wave, and, of course, the Stingrays.
To open the season's schedule, the Stingrays will
play home games on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 7 p.m.
against Polk County Peppers, and on Sunday, Sept. 17,
at 1 p.m., against Lake County Tornados. Stingrays'
home field is Bayshore High School's new stadium at
5323 34th St. W., Bradenton. The team will play 28
games, 14 of them at home and playoffs in December.
All games are scheduled to be played on Saturdays
and Sundays. For information call Sandy LaDuke at
747-0898 or Tammy Fieber at 795-7661.



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Temps

& Drops

on A.M.I.

Date Low High Rainfall
Sept. 3 78 93 .0
Sept. 4 78 92 .2
Sept. 5 76 91 .0
Sept. 6 74 83 .2
Sept. 7 73 80 .8
Sept. 8 73 88 trace
Sept. 9 74 88 .3
Average Gulf water temperature 860


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iE PAGE 22 I SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real estate sales
119 81st SL, Holmes Beach, a ground level 840 sfla
2bed/2bath duplex built in 1946 on a 101x80x50x95 lot,
was sold 7/19/95, Barber to Dragstren, for $103,000; list
unknown.
507 65th St., Holmes Beach, a ground level canal
front 1,279 sfla 2bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1968 on
a 90x100 lot, was sold 7/17/95, Gates to Schuette, for
$175,000; list $179,900.

HAVE A VACANCY??
WE HAVE TENANTS FOR
SHORT AND LONG TERM
RENTALS ON OR OFF
THE ISLAND
"DIAL DEBBIE"
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
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Debbie Dial 5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
Leasing Manager HOLMES BEACH, FL.


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6101 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground level
2,538 sf office building with 4 baths, built in 1975 on a
105x108x97x94 lot, was sold 7/21/95, Dowd to Davis,
for $225,000; listed at appraised value of $225,000.
685 Key Royale Dr., Holmes Beach, a ground level
bayfront 2,350 sfla 3bed/2&1/2bath/2car/pool home
builtin 1979 on a 150x125 lot, was sold 7/17/95, Possehl
to Squier, for $542,500; list $585,000.
8 Palm Harbor, Holmes Beach, a 45x75x180x153 lot,
sold 7/18/95, Gulash to Young, for $65,000; list $84,500.
115 & 117 Bridge St, Bradenton Beach, (along with
112 3rd St S), a ground level commercial building of


International Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
WALK TO BEACH, shops, restaurants. Large 3/2
with screened, lanai, storage & covered parking.
$194,500.
EXCELLENT VALUE! Newly decorated 2/2, home
furnished. Lots of storage, attached garage, all new
appliances plus washer & dryer. $149,900.
(Unfumislhed $139,900)
941-778-1443 1-800-711-7072
vU U


Ask
Marilyn!
Buying or Selling,
Marilyn Knows
Condos Best!


Marilyn Trevathan
Realtor


TWO NEW LISTINGS!!
.TODAY'S
BEST
____ VALUE!

$79,900. 2/2 Lakefront

Runaway Bay
2/2 Furnished
$104,000

Call Today!


3,186 sf built in 1955 and two vacant lots, each of three
lots measuring 50x100, was sold 7/27/95, Heerema &
Waldo to Schymanek, for $265,000; list unknown.
117 Beach, Anna Maria, an elevated 1,188 sfla 2bed/
2bath/2cp home built in 1977 on a 75x100 lot, was sold
7/24/95, Hendricks to Fasel, for $200,000; list $249-
239,000.
201 35th St., Holmes Beach, a two story 4,565 sfla
direct gulf view 6-plex of 8bed/6&l/2bath, built in 1969
on a 100x100 lot, was sold 7/28/95, Alder to Victorian
Inns Inc, for $418,000; list $499,000.
411-15 62nd St., Holmes Beach, a ground level
1,870 sfla 4bed/4bath 4-plex built in 1965 on a 55x97
lot, was sold 7/25/95, Nickel to Chiavatti, for $143,500;
list unknown.

ANNUAL RENTALS
301 Highland Ave....................1/1........ $400.00
204 Bay Dr. S.......................... 2/1........ $475.00
303 Gulf Dr. N. ........................1/1........ $500.00
117 3rd St. S. ...................... 2/1........ $500.00
203 2nd St. N .................. 1/1 ........$350.00
3604 Gulf Dr ........................... 2/1 ........ $575.00
3705 E. Bay Dr ....................... 2/2........ $700.00
504 68th St. ............................. 2/2. ..... $850
108 72nd St................... 3/2 1/2.......... $1,500

Mike
Norman
Realty inc.
778-6696
1-800-367-1617 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


JULIE McCLURE

S' Estate And
Household
Sales
Antique And
Personal

Appraisals
Consultations
My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


Gulf

Bay

Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.
Sales
Associate
Wanted
Experienced
or thinking
about getting
your license
Dynamic
Company,
Great Office.
Call Robin Kollar
778-7244
309 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria


S WAGNEI REALTY ince 1939

I 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
___ li Call Toll free in the U.S. 1-800-211-2323
ISLAND CONDOS
Anna Maria Island Club.................................. Unit #29 ........... $189,500
Anna Maria Island Club.................................. Unit #44............$229,900
Anna Maria Island Club.................................. Unit #12........... $235,000
Gulf Cabins .................................................. Unit #204 ........... $179,900
Ocean Park Terrace..................................... Unit #103............$169,000
Ocean Park Terrace..................................... Unit #202............$219,000
Island Beach Club ............................................... Unit #1 .............. $124,500
Island Beach Club ............................................ Unit #4 ........... $129,900
Island Village................................................ Unit #222 ............ $1 19,500
B ridgeport ........................................................ ................ $89 ,900
Longboat Pass ................................................. Unit #7 ............. $84,500
Runaway Bay ............................................... Unit #279 ............. $78,900
Beach Plaza ................................................. Unit #202 ............. $73,500
CANALFRONT HOME
2107 Avenue A.............................................. 3BR/2BA ........... $235,000
ISLAND APARTMENTS
2400 Avenue C .............................................. Fourplex ........... $299,500
2305-07 Gulf Drive .......................................... 5 Units........... $359,000
LOTS
230 So. Harbor.............................Canalfront/Bayviews........... $147,500
4507 & 4510 125th St. ................................... Bayfront ........... $549,000
044 poftle wma4 the 4iena
Dave Moynihan.... 778-7976 Ed Oliveira..... 778-1751 Suzanne Georgia .... 755-1576
Bill Alexander ...... 778-0609 Jackie Jerome 792-3226


F 71 _ ,I 7 --- '


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1







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 23 I~


WISECRACKS4 E110 1112 113 E 1.415 11f61171r

BY DAVID J. KAHN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 2 E1


ACROSS
I Card game with
four jokers
8 Lovebird's
phone question
14 Spinning
20 70's tennis star
from Spain
21 All the same
22 Short-skirted
garment
23 White or gray
mineral
24 1 onghorns
25 Ivanhoe's love
26 -- Alamos
27 Part of a shuffle
and three steps
28 Monopoly
landings: Abbr.
29 Subsidy
30 Dallas player,
for short
31 Spring--
33 What Lola did in
"Damn
Yankees"?
38 Rehearse
stand-up
comedy?
41 Dry up
42 Feeling
unworthy
43 Swell on el
oceano
44 Pulled a lever,
maybe
45 Small number
48 Milk cow


50 Janis Joplin, to
her fans
52 Believer of
spirits in plants
54 Ad-
55 Old infantry
soldier
59 Friction
60 Took notice
62 Precious
63 "Chances
64 October
alternative
65 Model
66 Big hand?
68 "Missing" locale
70 Command
ending
71 Annoy
72 Kind of copy
74 Ready to spring
75 House
transactions
78 Pencil partner
79 Sensible
80 Hugo novel
"--s'amuse"
82 Exhibitor's place
84 Old car make
85 Comedy writer
Pat--
87 Capek play
89 Protective sheet
for artwork
91 Kind of stream
92 How to use
excess cotton or
silk?
97 Attracted to the
wrong men?
99 "Do I -
Waltz?"
100 4-point Scrabble
tiles


101 Marching
cadence word
102 Neighbor of Ger.
103 With 16-Down,
old TV show
105 Together: Prefix
106 Math figures
108 Bolivar and
Legree
111 Resembling a
birthstone
113 Texas wildcat
114 Peevish
115 Colosseum
officials
116 Actor Jacobi et
al.
117 Picked up on
118 Finisher of a sort
DOWN
I Word with white
or dog
2 Botanical space
3 Queasy feeling
4 Mandela's polit.
party
5 Work period in a
glue factory?
6 Ninth Hebrew
letter
7 Not landbound
8 "No -!"
(Spanish boxer's
cry)
9 Communica-
tions corp.
10 Auto option
11 Subsidiary of
9-Down
12 Bring together
13 S.A.T. company
14 Pungent
15 Angst-filled
movie?
16 See 103-Across


17 One way to
reduce taxes
18 Like-Saigon,
today
19 Raise, in a way
29 Know-how
32 Oklahoma town
33 Beauties
341 Franklin et al.
35 Iligh- tech
communication
36 Put- on
(limit)
37 Boxer's quest
39 More than that
40 Sentry's cry
44 Full of oneself
45 "Step on it!"
46 Menu item
47 Electricians
49 Hosp. area
51 Narrative poetry
53 Frank's third
56 1980 Pulitzer
novelist
57 Longtime
"What's My
Line" name
58 Must
60 Either of two
A.L. teams
61 Minesweeping
device
62 Spell
65 Devalued
currency
67 Legal add-on
68 Local
politicians?
69 Camouflaged
71 Green, in
heraldry
73 Car-emissions
agcy.


74 European in the
news
76 Vocally
77 Tricky Sandy
Koufax pitch?
79 Core
81 Latin hymn
word
82 Like the
Mesozoic Era


83 Mr. Diamond 92 Sports award
85 Introduction 93 Descriptive of
86 Friars Club some fables
member, often 94 Uncomplicated


88 Lira: Italy ::
karbovane :

90 Classified ad
inits.
91 This may be
spared


95 Homemaker,
sometimes
96 Least feral
98 Removes


104 Abbe de I'-
(sign language
pioneer)
107 Seine sight
108 Family member
109 Society page
word
110 Car size abbr.


103 50's Davis Cup 112 Flower on a
player French shield


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


'


.-''


KEY WEST STYLE TOWNHOME Private
cul-de-sac near Holmes Beach sandy walking
beach Low maintenance fee Wrap around up-
per balcony Tropical foliage and lawn Call
Rose Schnoerr 778-2261 $162,500












VILLAGE GREEN Spacious home on golft
course, family room. glass enclosed lanai.
split floor plan, all appliances, well/sprin-
kler 3/BR/2BA/2 car garage. Paul Marlin
794-0049 $129,900


JOHN

GREEN "


778-2261


Information about Island Real Es-
tate is John's specialty. Call him
anytime for a quick market analysis
or sales question. His informal style
p and personable manner have made
. him a Million Dollar Producer.


SUGAR WHITE BEACH Located north
end of Holmes Beach exclusive residential
condo complex. 2BR/2BA end unit. bright
and cheery Many upgrades Call Bobye
Chasey 778-2261 $179,900


= ESSlS I


ISLAND 4-PLEX Four nice 2BR/1 SBA
townhouses 1/2 block to Gulf Private
courtyards 30X30 common sundeck on
roof Close to everything Call Chard
Winheim 778-6743 $340.000


L" i-_-- _
vaOwl
liRiCTB lw I~rBIr


PLAYA ENCANTADA Beautiul beach 2BR/
2BA urnkev furnished Healed pool & spa club-
house on-sae manager covered parking. W/D.
and storage Gullside $174.900/Tennis side
$119900 Helen White 778-69E,


ANNA MARIA ISLAND Bayside Sunbow
Bay 2BR/2BA lurnkey tumshlrd and ready to
move into Newer appliances and AC Pool. ren-
nis. boat dock Steps to walkiln beach on Gull
Rose Schnonrr 778-2261 $.34 500


6200 Floilla Dr #311 ..$124,000
6400 Flolilla Dr #25 .. .. .. 129,900
6500 Flotilla Dr 2 3 .. ... ....... ........ 134,900
6500 Flotilla Dr. 9225 .... .. ... ......... 149,000
6400 Flotilla Dr i 32 .. .... 165,000
, HEATED POOL. TEritll3 ANjD BOAT DOC.S 2 and 3BR/2B1 unris
Some furnished Call Dic Maher or Dave Joines 778.6791 or 778 4891


[1


i-i
Ii
Ii
ii I


ANNA MARIA ISLAND Spacious 3BR/
2BA home in Anna Maria Short walk to
beach shopping and community center
Possible 41h bedroom or study Call Mary
Ann Schmidt 778-4931 $159 900


DIRECT BAYVIEW This cuElom one-of a-kind
condo has it all 2BR/2BA pool lacuzzi ele.'a-
lor. secured eniry boal dock and pienrty ol stor-
age Bill Bowman 778-4619. $189.900


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week


( ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
from $700 mo.

Now Booking 1996 Seasonal
Rentals From $1300/mo.


Julie


Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


- -- -1 .".. JO


'--I


L


i.., ..~


~1


127 _


-7 ---]i.
_' '3i!w







[ED PAGE 24 E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 W THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

SIlad Rl r BILL ALEXANDER
Island Really Group Broker Salesman
A lifelong local resident with
12 years of commercial and
i residential experience in
I ~ ~: ',% REAL ESTATE


2BR/2BA home with lots of living space on
sailboat water in Anna Maria city. This home
offers an expansive Florida room with peace-
ful bayviews. Just $279,900. Call Agnes _
Tooker eves. at 778-5287 or Ken Jackson .
eves. at 778-6986.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701GulfDdve-*POBox717-AnnaMaria,FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


MAGNIFICENT GULF ESTATE
100 ft of private beach! Unique home design includes 3 guest
bedrooms, Master suite and 4.5 baths. French doors surround
the spacious living area and open onto a 42 ft. deck. new
metal roof and beautifully maintained. Lush tropical foliage.
Offered at $950,000 & owner financing. Call Marie Franklin.


Since '4
MAE 1 LIC REAL ESTATE
FRAL REALTY ",',
-We ARE the Island.
9805 Gull thrive *PO Box 835 Artl Mai.. a r loid. 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250









SEASONAL RENTAL
Direct gulffront, beautifully decorated 2BR/2BA
home and spacious apartment in back. This nicely
landscaped home also has a private pool. Avail-
able this fall and winter. Call Alice Zoller for infor-
mation, 778-0426 or 778-2464.

0. (941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778-1929


ANNUAL RENTAL
HOUSE CANAL
503 59th St. HB, 2 BR/2
BA ,1 car garage, dock,
screen room.

$800 month


Doug DOUG
Dowling OoW.. a
Rt 409 Pine AV.
Realty Ann Mr.
778-1222 77-222

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND SmilesI


I I


WAGNE2 R EALTY 6
778-2246
(800) 211-2323


"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...

I I can make your
island dreams
come true.

S ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty ~ Since 1939
778-1751 B2217GulfBDrive 778-2246
Evenings FL 34217 Office










SUN PLAZA WEST ... Rarely available. Gulfview
from this turnkey furnished condo. 2BD/2BA with
many upgrades and on-site management. Heated
pool, sauna and tennis. #63126. $167,500. Call T.
Dolly Young, eves. at 778-5427.
JUST LISTED...4-PLEX. A rare find with exceptional
view of Skyway and Tampa Bay. Swimming pool,
heated spa, gazebo, party deck and privacy fence.
Above average construction. #65927. $525,000.
Call Donald Pampuch, eves. at 778-3111.
JUST REDUCED...Smuggler's Landing. Large
end unit, 2BR/2BA, 2 lanais overlooking canal. 40'
dock. Reduced to $129,000. Offers invited.
#64016. Call Carol S. Heinze, eves. 792-5721.


MARTINIQUE...3BD/3BA, 2 car ga-
rage. Owner financing available.
#DY60737. $196,900.
WESTBAY COVE...1BD/1BA, turnkey,
heated pool and tennis. Walk to beach.
#DY58710. $85,900.
TERRA CEIA...4BD/3BA, bayfront
estate with 2 boat docks.
#DY63464. $460,000.
DUPLEX...west of Gulf Dr. 3BD/3BA,
family room, fireplace, cpt/gar; 2BD/
2BA, den. #DY64777. $259,000.
ISLAND RESTAURANT... beach view/
high traffic visibility, plus 2BD apart-
ment. #DY52792. $450,000.


T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Leading Edge Society
778-5427


MARTINIQUE...
t' 2BD/2BA, southern gulffront,
,bright and cheerful end unit.
f Turnkey furnished. Elevator, se-
cured lobby, tennis, swimming
pool. #CH65119. $145,000.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTOR*/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

Karin Stephan f
REALTORG F]
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche .
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
Fax: 941- 778-3035 .

Pru. oprt pnosoi oeMrn aoaoy


525 Loquat, Anna Maria
Beautiful 5BR/4BA canal home. Screened
porch overlooks pool area. Seawalled ca-
nal with dock and davits. Great view of
Tampa Bay. Just reduced to $465,000.
Call (941)778-5590

More Island news than any other source The Islander Bystander







BEAUTIFUL & BRAND NEW TOO!
IE"- ----- a I


Gorgeous 3BR/2BA home with elevated deck.
Great room design with all white kitchen, ceramic
tile floors & carpet. 1800 s.f. of living area and
900 s.f. of storage. $223,000.
Drive By Anytime,
405 73rd Street, Holmes Beach
309 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-7244




TOUR OF HOMES
September 17, 1995
1 -4pm
102 68th St., #201, Holmes Beach ..$157,000
DIRECT GULFFRONT CONDO This 2BR/
1.5BA end unit is comfortable turnkey fur-
nished. A super investment or vacation home.
Carla Price 778-5648 eves.
5616 Gulf Dr., #206, Holmes Beach $174,900
GULF SHORES CONDO 2BR/2BA with a great
room design, cathedral ceiling, screened balcony
with stairs leading directly to beach. Carol R. Wil-
liams 778-1718 eves.
264 Gladiolus, Anna Maria ............$165,500
Elevated Island home in the city of Anna
Maria. 2BR/1.5BA, wood floors. Close to
Bayfront Park. Peeks of Tampa Bay, Charm-
ing. Bill Allen 778-1620 eves.
4255 Gulf Dr., #221, Holmes Beach $119,900
ISLAND VILLAGE Lovely decorator perfect
condo. 2BR/2BA, spacious open floor plan with a
view of Tampa Bay. Elfi Starrett 798-9716 eves.
423 62nd St., Holmes Beach ...........$81,500
ISLAND GETAWAY VILLA. Turnkey furnished
2BR/1 BA villa with garage. Large and bright. Judy
Duncan 778-1589 eves.
875 Audubon, Bradenton ............... $89,900
PERICO BAY CLUB. A great view of two lakes
from this 1st floor 2BR/2BA condo. Gated com-
munity, pool, tennis, minutes from the beach. Zee
Catanese 794-8991 eves.
6702 32nd Ave. West, Bradenton ... $158,000
EXTRA NICE FAMILY HOME WEST
BRADENTON. 4BR/2.5BA home with office or play-
room, eat-in kitchen, family room, caged heated
pool and Jacuzzi. Clarke Williams 778-1718 eves.
6934 Arbor Oaks Circle, Bradenton $148,900
3BR/2.5BA 2-story home. Open and spacious
floor plan, community pool, no yard work. Marion
Ragni 778-1504 eves.
920 59th Street, Bradenton .............$99,900
Spanish Park. 3BR/2BA home close to every-
thing. Family room, lanai, neat and clean. Frank
Migliore 778-2662 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MIS Q


[Snuk







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 PAGE 25 J3


ITEMS WANTED: Donations of re-usable items for SAM'S TWO RATTAN BAR STOOLS. Beige cushions, seat &
grand garage sale on Sept. 30, note date change. Deliver back. Paid $300 will sacrifice $75 for both or best offer.
to Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf, or call Joy at 778-5405. Pro- 779-2068.
ceeds dedicated to SAM'S legal fund.
40" CURTIS MATHES projection TV, factory rebuilt, new
SEARS COLDSPOT 18 cu. ft. refrigerator in good condi- condition, 90 day warranty. $750 firm. Remote, cable
tion. Harvest Gold, $100. Pick-up, one day only Sat., Oct ready on screen display. 795-5324.
21. Call (615) 484-4433 or 778-3134.
BAR STOOLS (5) rattan with padded seats. Excellent
SOFA BEIGE/BLUE floral. Excellent condition $95. Beige condition, $25 each. 727-1085.
recliner $50. 778-6406.


DELTA DRILL PRESS, $90. 4" belt and disk sander, $75.
2 vice, sturdy worktable, $50. Or $200 together. 778-
2862.
BABY ITEMS Crib $35, stroller $25, tub ring $4, table
chair $15, play pen $10, misc. toys and clothes. 778-
1832, leave message.
SLEEPER SOFA Immaculate, queen-sized, tan tweed.
$300. 778-7473.


The Longboat Connection, Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
...be connected to
quality services,
staff and vacation
accommodations.
1.800.469.4852
Michele Jan Annette or 941.387.9709


Leasing, Property Management & Sales
3720 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key, FL 34228


195 Sm Bs


HISLANDERI
i viol FA11 0ofC


PEDDUNG FOR
WATERFRONT PROPERTY
Then call the Real Estate
Professional willing to go the
"Extra Mile" for you!
When you demand excellence
in Real Estate Service
BUYING OR SELLING


R


REACH RICHARD FOR RESULTS!!


of AnMraI.


DIRECT GULFFRONT
2BR/2BA, 2nd floor unit with gulfview balconies,
elevator, covered parking, lighted tennis court, so-
lar heated pool. Walk to shopping and restaurants.
$159,000. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
COMMERCIAL BUILDING Can be divided into
5 units if desired. Building located in center of
Holmes Beach. Over 3,000 sq. ft. two story. Great
visibility. $279,900. Stan Williams 795-4537.
TWO TO CHOOSE FROM New construction. Two
homes, side by side. 3BR/2BA homes just one block
from one of Anna Maria's finest beaches. Features
include vaulted ceilings, overhead fans, whirlpool tub,
large porch, southern exposure and convenient loca-
tion. Priced from $174,900. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
DIRECT GULFVIEWS from this recently remod-
eled 2BR/2BA beachfront, elevated home. Must see
to appreciate. Property is fenced. $240,000. Lynn
Hostetler 778-4800.
THE WATERWAY Top drawer describes this Com-
modore Suite over 3,000 sq. ft. 3BR/3BA with large pri-
vate dock, outstanding views, upgraded interior decora-
tion & premier furniture package. All this in a first class
complex for $149,900. Ken Rickett 778-3026.


GREAT GULF VIEW
Watch the sunset from 12x30 porch. 3BR/2BA home
in Anna Maria, cathedral ceilings, great room, ceiling
fans, wall-to-wall carpet throughout, new 3-ton A/C,
new roof, downstairs den and office, enclosed 2-car
garage. 108 Pine Avenue. By owner, $365,000.
(813) 949-0104 or (813) 229-2850.


I'
r


WedebrockRea e Company

cr0a14 1 t- 1394

Call or Visit Us today! 383-5543
6350 Gulf of Mexico Drive Longboat Key, florida 34228.
Free Maps/Visital in iatt in/flu Speakin..


as



Whether you are looking for an island property
or a Manatee County waterfront home, contact
the waterfront specialists, the exceptional people
at Michael Saunders & Company.


-.


Pr


KALEIDOSCOPE SUNSETS and turquoise blue
waters of the Gulf create the panoramic view
from this 2BR/2B condominium. Formal living
room, mirrored wall dining room, appliance-filled
kitchen, den or 3rd bedroom, turnkey furnished,
pool. Good potential income property. $199,900.
Barry & Kimberly Charles, 795-1273.


GULF-FRONT CONDOMINIUM on Anna Maria Is-
land. Listen to the surf, see beautiful sunsets from
this special 2BR/2B unit. 2 pools and shuffleboard.
For owner occupancy or Investment potential.
$229,900. Anne Miller, 792-6475.


CASUAL ENJOYMENT are yours withthis 3BR/2B
split design, ranch-style home. Features newly re-
modeled kitchen, large bedrooms, great family
room. Pool, covered patio, dock, davits. $265,000.
Nancy Keegan, 723-3929.
I1 .1 .


Residential Sales/Rental Division: Licensed Real Estate Broker
3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (941) 778-6654
4400 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)748-6300
6016 Manatee Avenue W., Bradenton, FL 34209 (941)792-2727


Eamm


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JI[ PAGE 26 u SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
and Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
SService .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
77f.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
.f 74;5AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353









Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900-oo 0066644



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558



REMODELING

ADDITIONS
XACT RENOVATIONS
KITCHENS BATHS
DECKSS & MORE
CARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399

Deffenbaugh Painting by Elaine
LOCKS & SECURITY
LOCKED OUT? Deffenbaugh
HOME AUTO "Professional Excellence"
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INTERIOR
ALL TYPES OF LOCKS & EXTERIOR
installed Rekeyed Repaired .' RESIDENTIAL
Bonded ULicensed Insured &
Serving Anna Mada, Longboat COMMERCIAL
Key, Cortez, West Bradenton
-EMERGENCY SERVICE- We repair popcorn ceilings.
RADIO DISPATCHED Serving the Islands Since 1969.
SPECIALTYKEYS Licensed and Insured
LUGGAGE REPAIRS
By Appointment 778-5594 778-5594 778-3468


' I



Painting
4PWrere meaning g
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
* Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


ISLANDER


The "best" news


1OLNES
BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
* Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


LA N A U


YARD SALE Sat., Sept. 16. 8am-2pm. 316 Magnolia,
Anna Maria. Schwinn Exercise Bicycle, drafting desk,
stool, dishware, clothing, etc.
GARAGE SALE Sat., Sept. 16. 9-5. 210 54th St. (across
from Island Lumber.) Furniture, fine art etchings, antique
toys, small appliances, shop crane, recliners and more!
LARGE GARAGE SALE Sat., Sept. 16. 8-2. 2 Palm
Harbor Dr., H.B. near St. Bernard. Air conditioner, micro-
wave, kitchen items, bikes & toys.


LOST ON NORTH END white and yellow Cockatiel. An-
swers to Uchello, very friendly, hand held bird, family pet,
only chirps. Please call 778-1642.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Motivational theme classes;
50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, Top 40, Salsa & circuit training.
Classes are Mon. & Wed. 6:30 to 7:30 pm at The Silver
Community Center, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr., Bradenton
Beach. MUSCLE TONING Upper & lower body toning
using dynabands, dumb bells (1 3 Ibs for women & 3 -
5 lbs for men) and body's own resistance. Classes are
Tues. & Thur. 6:30 to 7:45 pm at The Silver Community
Center, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach. For info
call Geri 779-2129.
FEMALE WALKING BUDDY Serious walking compan-
ion needed for daily beach treks of 5-10 miles. Call Gail
778-7795. Walking schedule is flexible.
PLAY AT CHESS CLUB. Thursday 11:30 AM to 3 PM,
Anna Maria Community Center. More info call 794-2444
or 778-1664.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls (Is-
land only). Cats included. 778-1012.


1975 MG MIDGET rebuilt and modified engine, custom
leather interior, extra clean. 727-1085.
1982 MERCURY ZEPHYR w/air, $550. 1979 Buick LTD,
$500. 1980 BMW 633 CSI, $2,500.
1985 JAGUAR excellent condition, new headliner, tires,
brake pads, silver. A must see car. $7,000. 778-1990.


ESCAPE on deluxe catamaran. Stable, fast, shallow draft.
Snorkel, swim, sail. Family fun. Overnight and day trips to
Egmont Key. Passage Charters 794-5980. Group rates.
17' DAYSAILER Great Bay boat, basic. $300.778-7710.
"ISLAND DRIFTER" 30 ft. pontoon boat with enclosed rest
room. Available for private and personalized charters with
Capt. Al Bentley 778-4597.
12 FOOT JON BOAT with 6 horse Evinrude motor. Mo-
tor runs good. $450 or best offer. 778-6135, leave mes-
sage.


KITCHEN & COUNTER HELP wanted. Part-time days &
weekend. Key Royale Golf Course. 700 Key Royal Dr.
THE CITY OF HOLMES BEACH Building Department is
accepting resumes for the position of One & Two Family
Dwelling Inspector. Resumes may be sent to the Building
Department, 5901 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, FL, 34217
and will be accepted until October 10, 1995. Individual
must possess State of Florida One & Two Family Dwell-
ing Inspector License or the ability to obtain a Standard
Certificate within one year of employment. Starting salary
$21,673. The City of Holmes Beach Is a Drug Free Work-
place. Pre-employment drug testing required. The City of
Holmes Beach is an Equal Opportunity Employer and
does not discriminate based upon age, race, sex, religion,
national origin, citizenship, disability, martial status or
veteran's status of any individual.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults at adult day center, through
Manatee Council on Aging. Transportation available. 748-
6974."


DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL 2, 3 & 5 day pro-
grams. Limited places available. 778-2967.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn your
old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
"SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Residential and com-
mercial cleaning. Homes, condos, rentals. Move inrout spe-
cialist. Estimates and appointments. Beverly 778-1945.
LANDSCAPING Lawn work, light hauling. Tree work, no
tree too big or small. Odd jobs of any kind. Call 778-3089
anytime.
SEAMSTRESS 25 years, alterations, mending, hem-
ming, repairs, will pick up. Thank you to my new custom-
ers. Call Sandra 941-795-0676.
CLEANING SPECIAL Get your rentals in shape now
50% off September only. Call Maid For You 779-2193.
A-DRY CLEANERS Business, residence. Free pick-up
& delivery. 778-9189.
"TUTOR" Need a tutor for "English Grammar?" Satur-
days and evenings are available on Anna Maria island.
Call Sharon at 778-6329.
ECONOMY CLEANING SERVICE Lowest rates and
best references on island since 1985. Also ironing pick-
up and delivery. 778-2085 24 hr. service.
RESIDENTIAL CLEANING/LANDSCAPING. island resi-
dent will work with you weekly or bi-weekly. References.
Call Rebecca at 779-1022.
THE PERFECTIONIST Will clean offices, rentals, and
homes the way they should be cleaned. Interior painting
also. Call Sharon at 778-6329.
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk... whatever your hauling
needs. Call Eddie 0. 792-1693.
MATH TUTOR Grades 5-9, reasonable rate. Call 778-
2415.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Remove stains
first, dry foam scrubbing, extract soap out leaving carpets
dirt and soap free. Free deodorizing. 11 years experience.
Owner operated. 794-1278-


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling spe-
cialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island refer-
ences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional installa-
tion and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident 25
yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.



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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 M PAGE 27 rm


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic. #RX-
0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40. Crowder
Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999. Bradenton
748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober prompt,
finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl tile, fine fin-
ish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul Beauregard
387-8066.
THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of home
repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experience. Insured,
island resident, references available. Jim 779-2129.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE, joint sealing, erosion control,
commercial diving, boatlift dock/davit repair, UV dock
sealing. Licensed/insured. Local references. Call Cliff
779-2522.
MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and responsible.
Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard.
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.


ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available from
$300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr. Holmes
Beach, FL 34217.


GULFFRONT -1 BR/1 BA vacation condo. Screened lanai,
sundeck, private beach, nicely furnished. Available
weekly/monthly Aug. 1 to Dec. 30 starting at $425.
weekly. 778-2832.


SUMMER, ANNUAL AND SEASONAL rentals. Call the
rental specialist. Wagner Realty 778-2246.
BAYFRONT, available Sept. 1. Annually or weekly
monthly, seasonally. Large 2BR/1 BA newly remodeled,
-pnrivate apt with boat dock. Walk to Gulf, restaurants and
shops. -In1udes utilities. 794-8792.
FALL SPECIAL Gulffront condo, private beach, large
pool, 2BR/1BA. $350/wk. 778-7323.
LOVELY ANNA MARIA Gulffront apt. 2 bedroom, porch,
cable, micro, no pets, not annual. 778-3143.
MARTINQUE WATER FRONT condo. $1,500 plus elec-
tric and phone. Available 9/15/95 to 12/15/95. Turnkey
813-884-0222.
SUMMER RENTALS: 1BR/1BA direct Gulffront units,
$425/wk; 2BR & 3BR homes on or near the gulf, $600/wk
and up. Call Carla Price, Smith Realtors, 778-0770.
QUIET TENANT wanted for first floor apartment west of
Gulf Dr. near beach. Available furnished or unfurnished.
One adult preferred. First, last, security and references.
778-2864 leave message.
LOOKING FOR RESIDENCE to share on Island by Sept.
30. Working woman and long-time resident with refer-
ences. Some furniture. 778-0366.
ANNUAL Directly across from Gulf beach. 2BR/1 BA apt.
Stove, refrig, water and garbage pick-up included. Small pet
OK. Bradenton Beach. $500/mo. 778-9154, leave msg.
ANNA MARIA 2BR/2BA duplex apt., furnished. $1,100/
mo includes utilities. Available Oct. to April. 218 Palmetto
Ave. Call Tampa 813-949-6891.
Read get the most classifed listings on the Island right here.


2BR/1BA HOME across from beach, furnished com-
pletely, water, cable, garbage pick-up included. $600/mo.
available Sept., Oct. & Nov. No pets. Security. Call col-
lect 219-772-3904 evenings after 7:00.
ISLAND SEASONAL/ANNUAL rentals. T. Dolly Young,
The Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766.
ANNA MARIA Female to share nice house with male
smoker. Washer/dryer, utilities included. $450/mo., child
plus $50. Call 778-6742.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1 BA unfurnished. $700/mo plus elec-
tric, large pool, private beach. No pets. 778-7323.
ANNUAL MODERN HB duplex, 2BR/2BA, appliances,
covered parking, large storage, 1 block to beach, no
dogs. Available 10/1. $750/mo plus $1,000 security. 778-
9689.
1 BR APARTMENT across the street from beach. $550/
mo plus electric. Pirate Pete's 2219 Gulf Dr., Bradenton
Beach. 778-5035.
ANNUAL RENTAL. Large 2BR/1BA apartment. Well
maintained and landscaped. 1 block to Gulf. Washer/
dryer hookup. $600/mo. No pets. 778-0241.
EFFICIENCIES from $140/wkfor one person, from $175/
wk for two. Excellent off-season vacation and temporary
re-location rates until 12/15/95. Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf,
Holmes Beach. 778-5405.
ANNUAL Beautiful 1BR/1BA beach rentals. Excellent
locations, steps to Gulf, w/view, W/D. First, last & secu-
rity. Won't last, includes utilities. Reserve now! 778-2126.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional Information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261. '
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of
Anna Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/
3 acre w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young after
hours. 778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1 BR/1 BA
each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. 404
71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit $159,000.*
203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to Gulf -
$169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
DEEP WATER CANAL lot 70'x100'. Easy access to Gulf.
316 Tarpon. $160,000. Choice view and location. Call 1 -
317-825-2217.
OLDER 2BR possibly more in prime section of Anna
Maria. Double lot, boat dock near beach. Asking
$185,000. Write P.O. Box 604, Anna Maria, FL 34216.
DUPLEX 1BR/1BA & 2BR/1BA. Excellent rental in-
come. 104 7th St. S. Bradenton Beach. Shown by ap-
pointment only. 723-0430

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
213 76th St. (Corner of Palm Dr.) 2BR/2BA home in.
cludes many updates. 1 car garage, deeded boat slip,
$139,900. For sale by owner, 778-6185.
3BR/2BA Completely remodeled and directly across from
the beautiful beach. Spacious, light, bright and immacu-
late inside and out. Just $159,900. 778-1165.
BEACH COTTAGE: 2BR/1 BA, just remodeled. Gulf and
Bay views. Reduced $99,500. 778-1932 or 751-7197.
Realtors welcome!
HOLMES BEACH, canalfront, 3BR/2BA, family rm w/fire-
place, lanai, caged pool w/solar, dock & davits. 529 69th
ST. $235,000. 778-9378.
BRADEN RIVER LAKES upgraded and exquisite Centex
home with thousands of dollars in owner upgrades. On
largest corner lot with caged pool. $169,900. Contact
Sandy Greiner RE/MAX Gulfstream 778-7777.


DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in
advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are
located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, (Saturday 10 to 2 usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or
two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words:
$2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One- or two-line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. To place
an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry, we can not take clas-
sified ad copy over the telephone.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: For 21 word minimum, use one word for each blank space.


2

3
______ ______ ______ _______ _______ _______ ___3


More information:
(941) 778-7978


ISLANDER


- IW^SAI


JS ANDE C ASSFIDS

I H*MEIMROEEN I ENAS oniue-


gISIANDER A a
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and Visa for
mullet shirts, subscription orders and classified advertising.
Just give us a call. (Classified "charge" must fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392


Protect your auto investment

from the scorching sun!







We clean and wax everything for one low price.
Everything is included for $85 on a normal
size car. Top to bottom, ashtray to engine! Hand
wash, buff, seal and polish, vacuum, Armorall,
dress rims and tires, shampoo interior, satin-
black under-carriage. Even the engine is
cleaned and silicone protected. Our complete
mobile service means no one has to drive your
car. We come to you. By appointment,
at your convenience, home or office.
Mobile service number:. 320-0110.


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous 1-800-HBF-TAXI
Service Since 1991 (423-8249)


N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907

778-2586 M A R KAY Eve: 778-6771


25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY EXP. 9/20/95


ISLAND LUMBER
80d HARDWARE
213 54th St. Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION

ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Si* Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125s RGO058SM- PE002374 778-9244


Mobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
Ss As Low As $1,500 Down
Experienced Thoughtful
941-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


S 7 CLEANERS & Linen Service
at the Centre Shops on Longboat Key
Full Service Dry Cleaning & Laundry
Tailoring, Alterations & Shoe Repair
Pick Up & Delivery
5390 Gulf of Mexico Dr., 383-1222

Residential
Commercial
Design
'' Selection
,il cigf Installation


FREE ESTIMATES
Call 761-8240 for appointment
Visit our showroom at 4815 Manatee Ave. W.
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE ISLAND REFERENCES


r-


I ,


vo'IYSTLN




i [I] PAGE 28 E SEPTEMBER 14, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


13900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1995


'oods


on Anna Maria Island!


MANGOS


PEPSI PRICE SAVER DELTA
DIET PEPSI & UTTERTR PAPEI
MOUNTAIN DEW TOWEl
89 39
BTL 1 LB QUARTERS
DELI DEPARTMENT .--..DELI DEPARTMENT BAKERY DEPARTMI
HARD OR GENOA .volone CHER
SALAMI P Cheese
Cheese
929 $ 69
H $YOU OSPADEA
THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS0...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


90