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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00580

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Anna Maria


will schedule wept. i
shellfish hearing

b e a c h The Manatee County Commission will hold a
public hearing on the proposed ban or limitation of
the harvesting of live shellfish from county waters
mt n at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 13, in the board
chambers at the Manatee County Administrative
By Cynthia Finn Center, 1112 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton.
Islander Reporter All comments will be forwarded to the Florida
The Anna Maria City Commission plans to hold a Marine Fisheries Commission which needs to ap-
public meeting on beach renourishment after part-time prove the ban. Final approval is needed from Gov.
residents return. Lawton Chiles and the Florida Cabinet.
Mayor Dorothy McChesney requested direction Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy McChesney has
after Manatee County Environmental Projects Coordi- been instrumental in requesting the law prohibiting
nator Jack A. Gorzeman said the city would need to act the taking of live mollusks and echinoderms (sand
quickly if it wished to be involved in federal, state and dollars) from the Gulf and bays. The three Island cit-
county renourishment plans scheduled for the year ies, Bradenton, Palmetto and Manatee County have
2001 for much of Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach. passed resolutions supporting the ban.
The city opted not to participate in the 1992-93
project that widened beaches for much of the rest of the
Island mainly because beachfront property owners THE QUESTION IS:
were opposed. Gorzeman suggested the city might be
able to get in on Phase II of the program.
At the Aug. 22 commission meeting, Commis-
sioner Chuck Shumard agreed the issue should be dis-
cussed but also felt a sandbar developing off the Anna
Maria beaches might result in natural build-up.
He said the beach widening to the south was last-
ing because the sand "is like clay, hard as a rock."
Like Shumard, Commissioner Mark Ratliff said he's -
seen the beaches naturally "come and go" all his life.
Ratliff said he had two questions of "the experts:"
What is the worst-case scenario and, what strings will
be attached for waterfront property owners?
Said Commissioner George McKay of recent ero-
sion near the Sandbar restaurant, "I'm seeing things out
there I've never seen in 22 years."
He said he wouldn't want the city to lose any
streets but "the public directs us" and he'd have to go
along if the beachfront property owners say no again.
He hoped the public meting would include asking the J
other two cities for their experience.
Commissioner Doug Wolfe said, "One would ask 7P |
the question: What do you give in order to get?"
Unlike the other two cities, said Wolfe, Anna
Maria's beaches are almost exclusively fronted by
private homes. He expressed concern about relin-
quishing rights and wanted to get input from affected
homeowners.
Two members of the audience commented.
Stephen Foster of Bradenton said he owns 13 lots
in Bradenton Beach and a lot near the Sandbar. He
made reference to a legal problem with his Bradenton
Beach lots stemming from the recent renourishment
project but declined to elaborate during a subsequent
phone conversation.
"I'd like to see renourishment but not lose land,"
Foster told the commission.
Gulffront owner Harry Boothe urged commission-
ers "to find out what it costs us in terms of restrictions
on our land."







Sand castle event planned for Sunday


Forget the girl watching there will be a giant
sand castle for the viewing this Sunday, Sept. 3, as the
famed Island Castlemasters "go for an extremely large
one," reports Big John Swager of Holmes Beach.
Last Labor Day weekend the Castlemasters cre-
ated a 13- or 14-foot extravaganza, one of their larg-
est ever. They'll be setting up to build this year's
castle extraordinaire at 9 a.m. in front of Cafe on the


Beach at the Manatee County Public Beach. Every-
one is welcome to watch the progress throughout the
day.
Swager will be joined by fellow masters Carole
Saulnier, J. W. Schaefer, Deb Spence and Angel
Puckett. Members of the Anna Maria Island Privateers
will also be on hand to help shovel sand for the planned
"big one."


County sets
&ft- _L Ao


At not quite high tide
Aug. 25, there was no
beach at the end of
Magnolia Avenue in
Anna Maria. Residents
will have a chance to
discuss opting into the
proposed beach
renourishment planned
for the year 2001 in
Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach at a
public meeting this
fall in Anna Maria.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


Island map, page 16







SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions .................................... ............. 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Stir-it-up............................................ ..... 19
School ..................................... .............. 21
Streetlife ................................... ............. 22
Anna Maria Island tides .......................... ... 24
Real estate ................................... ........... 26


On-site beer sales

at Bradenton

Beach Marina?
An open-air, Tiki-style concession stand serving
beer and wine is being proposed for the Bradenton
Beach Marina.
Allan Bazzy, owner of the marina, has made the
special exception request for an accessory use on the
property, located just south of the Cortez Bridge.
The request, according to Bradenton Beach Build-
ing Official Whitey Moran, is "for a concession stand
selling hot dogs, hamburgers, sandwiches, soft drinks,
beer and wine." The concession stand would be located
on one of the three docks on the property.
The issue is tentatively scheduled to be aired before
the Bradenton Beach Planning and Zoning Board Fri-
day, Sept. 8 at 7 p.m.
Planners will make a recommendation on the re-
quest to city council members, who will make the fi-
nal decision.


WHERE'S THE BEACH?


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


AUGUST 31, 1995






rij PAGE 2 K AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


City loses one


grant, applies


for two more
By Paul Roat
From the tales of "If at first you don't succeed..."
Bradenton Beach officials learned last week that
their application for a $500,000 state grant to continue
the revitalization of the Bridge Street area of the city
has been denied.
So they have applied for another grant from the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, this
one to complete the phased work proposed for the
Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier.
And they plan to apply for another grant from the
Florida Department of Community Affairs for the com-
mercial section of the city. Work to be done includes en-
hancements to parking facilities, drainage, street paving,
sidewalks, lighting, recreation facilities, water and sewer.

Block grants
Bradenton Beach came in fourth in the 1995 Commu-
nity Development Block Grant proposals. Only the first
three rankings received funding, said Bob Johnson, the
city's grant consultant for the CDBG applications.
In 1994 the city received $750,000 from the state
for renovations to Bridge Street.
Johnson said the reasons the state denied the city
this year was primarily the lack of minority employees
working for the city and a category called the "commu-
nity wide need score."
DCA provides 85 points (a significant number of
points in the ranking scale) for communities that employ
an equal percentage or greater of minorities compared to
the percentage of minorities in the county (12.82 percent).
At the time of submitting the grant applications, none of
the 18 city employees were minority.
"This category alone kept the city from receiving
funding in the last funding cycle," Johnson said.
Bradenton Beach also did not do well in ranking
with all the other communities applying for grants.
"The city had the second lowest community-wide
needs score of the communities applying," Johnson
said, "which means, by DCA standards, that you had
the second lowest general need for CDBG funding.
This unit of measure played a major role in the city not
receiving funding."
Johnson said the next funding cycle has been accel-
erated to October 1995 for 1996 funding, a move that
could benefit the city since much of the groundwork
needed to apply for the grant has already been done. "This
change in funding cycle will improve the city's chances
of obtaining funding, because there will be very few new
communities applying for CDBG funds," he said.
Johnson said the city's "ability to receive funding
in subsequent funding cycles will depend on who you
are competing against, improving equal employment
opportunities for minorities and improving the areas of
the applications that can be controlled by city actions,
i.e., applying for other grants and participating in vari-
ous related programs and activities."
City officials have said they intent to again reap-
ply for the CDBG grant in October.

Pier grant
Bradenton Beach has received $50,000 to refur-
bish the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier off the east
end of Bridge Street. Work is ongoing to replace
decking, railings, lighting and electrical service on
the pier as part of that phase.
Other phases city officials hope to have funded
from the next grant, this one for $133,000, include ca-
banas spaced along the pier's 700-foot length, an open-
air pavilion as well as a roofed tower with visitor
benches at the east end of the pier, additional parking
and handicapped accessibility.
Other elements of the pier renovations that may be
constructed, as outlined by Emily Anne Smith of the
architectural firm of Eatman & Smith, include:
A new pier entrance portico and new roof design
for the tackle shop and restaurant.
New signage via a 34-foot-high tower at the east
end of the pier.
Construction of a 34-foot-high tower featuring
clocks facing in four directions, extensive landscaping
featuring sable and royal palms at the approach to the
pier and a boardwalk.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Because federal subsidies are being phased out, the
biggest obstacle to improved Island transit service is
funding, officials told the Island Transit Study Com-
mittee last week.
The county's federal grant was cut 11 percent this
year, will be cut 49 percent next year and will be elimi-
nated completely in three to four years, said Carl
Gaites, MCAT transit section manager.
"The biggest concern is how to address the financial
situation," explained County Commissioner Joe McClash.
"It costs about $80,000 per year to put a bus on the line.
The Department of Transportation currently would be able
to help out with about half of that So we would have to
come up with about $80,000 per year for two buses."
McClash asked if the Island communities would be
interested in contributing to the funding, for example
through a county-wide, one-cent gas tax increase.
"A one-cent gas tax would bring in $800,000 that
could fund new routes and improved service," he noted.
"I think it would be the least painful and the most pro-
ductive (way to raise funds)."
"The gas tax is the only way to go," said Anna
Maria Mayor Dottie McChesney. "Visitors clog our
roads; they want to get to the beach. It's got to come
from somewhere, and I don't want it laid on the backs
of the taxpayers."
"I think our people understand the need for public
transportation and would support it," added Holmes

Sunday school starts at
Roser Church
Sunday School will begin at Roser Memorial
Community Church in Anna Maria City on Sun-
day, Sept. 10, at 9:45 a.m. followed by Children's
Church at 10:45 a.m.
Classes will be available for children three
years of age through high school age.
Transportation can be arranged by calling the
church office at 778-0414.


Beach resident Bob VanWagoner.
"Make the Island cities aware that the county is
going to be facing severe funding cuts from the federal
government," McClash said. "We need to be prepared
to fund the transit needs."
The transit committee's original recommendation
for improved service called for a single bus route with
one-hour headway on the Island which would connect
with transfer points at Longboat Key, the Cortez Bridge
and the Manatee Avenue bridge. The transfer bus
would offer 30-minute service to Blake Hospital.
This plan was nixed by DOT officials, said Gaites,
so transit officials came up with a new plan which re-
ceived a more favorable reception.
The new plan includes two buses and two routes.
The first, operating on a half-hour schedule, would
leave Blake Hospital, go out Manatee Avenue to
Longboat Key, then come back up Longboat and across
Cortez Road to Blake Hospital. The second bus, oper-
ating on a one-hour schedule, would leave Blake Hos-
pital, come out Cortez Road and up the Island to the
Anna Maria City Pier, then back to Manatee Avenue
and return to Blake Hospital.
"The board made no decision," said McClash. "I
was concerned because we didn't have a chance to
bring it back to the committee."
He and DOT officials came up with another alter-
native, said McClash. In this plan, one bus would leave
Blake Hospital and come up Cortez Road to Coquina
or Manatee Beach. There it would connect with two
buses that would go up and down the islands.
It is impossible to make the service work without
two buses, said McClash.
The Island route has the lowest ridership, added
Gaites, and "the service is woefully inadequate. We're
trying to do too much with one bus."
Gaites said a draft survey concerning service to the
Islands which will be distributed next month. Riders
will be asked to respond to questions such as how of-
ten, why and when they ride the bus. Committee mem-
bers also suggested additional questions for the survey.
A second survey is planned for January to include win-
ter residents and visitors.


SOCK IT TO THE DOT!


"This is the best
fundraiser I've ever
seen. I hope we
win!" said the
attachment to a
$500 check to Save
Anna Maria Inc. in
response to SAM
secretary Joy
Courtney's mail-out.
of 250 socks. Sock
holders are encour-
aged to fill them up
with coins for
SAM's legal fund
opposing a Manatee
Avenue mega
bridge. Paper and
checks are also
accepted. For more
information, call
Courtney at
778-5405.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


Except for money,


Island buses could roll





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 3 1i0

In the wake of red tide
comes dead redfish
Huge redfish, apparently the victims of scattered
patches of red tide, have washed ashore from the
north end of Anna Maria Island south to the
shores of Siesta Key in the past week. Strong west
winds have driven the airborne aerosol of the red
tide organisms onto the Island, causing coughing
and red eyes for beachgoers. The organisms that
M. make up red tide tend to absorb the available
oxygen in the water, killing other marine life in the
vicinity of the red tide "bloom." Red tide,
Gymnodinium breve, is a naturally occurring
dinoflagellate that "blooms" offshore and is
carried by wind and waves onto shore. The one-
celled organism is both animal and plant-like; it
possesses both chlorophyll, like a plant, and swims
freely through the water, like a fish. County crews
were out on the beaches bright and early Monday
removing dead fish, pictured at top. The clean-up
was a success with virtually all the signs of red
tide gone by Tuesday. Islander Photos:
Bonner Presswood




Anna Maria City
9/5, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board
special meeting
9/6, 7 p.m., Citizens Recognition Committee
--9/7, 7:30 p.m., First public hearing
Son the 1995-96 budget

Bradenton Beach
9/7, 7 p.m., Council meeting

Holmes Beach
None scheduled

All city halls will be closed on Sept. 4 in
celebration of Labor Day.


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IM PAGE a AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Gulf Boulevard ownership questioned


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Things aren't always what they seem. Or are they?
Gulf Boulevard is a 230-foot road that runs right
along the beach between Palm and Magnolia avenues
in Anna Maria. It has the look of a city street and its 11
or 12 parallel parking spaces afford immediate access
to a lovely stretch of Gulf beach.
Four old-Florida homes, built around 1910, face
the Gulf on the east edge of the one-block road.
Harry and Dee Boothe, 10-year owners of one of
the homes, appealed to the Anna Maria City Commis-
sion Aug. 22 for guidance and help to cut down on the
amount of traffic passing just feet from their front door.
Harry Boothe said the block is a private driveway
shared by the four homes and "everybody's just used
it over the years."
Boothe said they have never objected to the use of
the street and the beach by Anna Maria residents, but
they are concerned about an increase in the number of
out-of-county and state tags on parked cars.
Also, despite "No Trucks Allowed" signs on both
Palm and Magnolia, delivery and service trucks often
pass by or park there. The Boothes said they have got-
ten no help from Anna Maria sheriff s deputies because
it is a private road.
In addition to traffic problems, Boothe said they
are concerned about liability for those entering onto a
private beach and he also noted an increase in personal
watercraft activities and private parties on the beach.
During almost 30 minutes of discussion, a variety
of solutions were discussed to cut down or eliminate
vehicular traffic and parking but still allow pedestrian
and bike access.
No one challenged the "private" status of the street
and Boothe was directed to put a specific request in
writing to the city.


Concerns about traffic on this one-block, Gulffront street in Anna Maria have raised another question: public
or private? Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


In the days following the meeting, however, as the
city staff began checking into the status of Gulf Bou-
levard, private ownership appeared in doubt.
City Attorney Bob Hendrickson's initial evaluation
was that the street and beach access had been deeded
to the city decades ago, possibly around the time the
four homes were built.
City Clerk Peggy Nelson was going to go through
papers in the city safe for verification. "We're looking


for something on paper," she said.
At 9:45 a.m. on a recent weekday, the parking
spaces along the west side of Gulf Boulevard were all
taken. Additional cars pulled up to unload their gear
and several bicyclists and pedestrians entered the beach
across from the Boothes' home.
As the street and beach access now look and are
marked, no one would have known they were doing any-
thing to disturb private property. Apparently, they weren't


Mangrove pruning regulations relaxed statewide


By Paul Roat
Environmentalists have called it the mangrove
massacre act. Developers have said a new state law will
do more to protect mangroves than previous, more-
stringent regulations.
Regardless of who may be right, rules to protect the
environmentally valuable mangrove tree have been
relaxed by the Florida Legislature.
Homeowners are now allowed to trim mangroves
located on their property to a height of six feet as long
as the trees are no higher than 10 feet. Trees greater
than 10 feet in height may be trimmed down to six feet
only by a state-licensed mangrove trimmer a land-
scape architect.
Landscape architects are allowed to kill up to five
percent of the trees without penalties.
Permits are not required for the pruning as long as
the mangrove forest is no more than 75 feet from the
shoreline. Forests greater than 75 feet deep require a
permit from the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection.
The law allows local governments to enact more
stringent requirements regarding mangrove pruning.
On the Island, the Bradenton Beach City Council last
month opted not to enact such rules. The other Island
cities did not vote on the matter and, with an Aug. 1,
1995, deadline to implement stricter regulations, it
appears the state's more relaxed mangrove rules have
applied Island-wide.
Red, black and white mangroves are the only three
species addressed by the state regulations. Buttonwood
trees, another species of mangrove, are not included in
the restrictions.
The law ends a feud that has lasted for years be-
tween state agencies and environmentalists, who want
to preserve mangroves in as near a pristine state as
possible, and property owners who want to enjoy the
waterfront view that may have become blocked by the
trees.
On the east coast, where aquatic preserves prohib-
ited any pruning of mangroves, the sound of chainsaws
could often be heard at night. In the morning, vast
stretches of mangrove forest would be gone. State regu-
lators would fine the property owners, who would glee-
fully pay the small fine so they could have an unim-
peded view of the water.


Settlement reached

in mangrove case
The developer of the Sandy Pointe condo-
minium project has agreed to a $10,000 out-of-
court settlement to take the form of mangrove
mitigation in the wake of charges mangroves
were illegally pruned at the site in spring 1994.
Ren Glanz, developer of the condo project on
East Bay Drive in Holmes Beach, and John
Chasey, contractor on the job, will pay for man-
grove restoration and creation at the site. They
were also fined $1,000 each, will perform 100
hours of community service and will pay about
$5,000 to the Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection the amount the state agency
spent to prosecute the case.
Glanz and Chasey pleaded not guilty last fall
to charges they illegally cut down mangroves at
the Sandy Pointe Condominiums development.
They had said they did nothing wrong regarding
mangroves, that any clearing was done by a pre-
vious owner and that they had permits for what
trimming was done.
Other terms of the settlement call for fill dirt
in the area in question to be removed and salt
marshes be created.
The mangrove settlement does not end Glanz's
problems with the law. He was charged in July,
along with seven other men, with illegal gambling
in the wake of a Manatee County Sheriffs Office
and Florida Division of Alcoholic Beverages and
Tobacco five-month investigation. The group was
arrested the first of this year in the wake of "Opera-
tion Primetime," which targeted bars involved in
gambling on the Super Bowl.
Glanz has pleaded not-guilty to one count of
a RICO Act violation and two counts of book-
making. Violation of the RICO Act is a first-de-
gree felony; bookmaking is a third-degree felony.


The legislature's stated belief that mangrove prun-
ing along waterfront properties is no longer environ-
mentally necessary apparently stems from the quanti-


ties of trees in the state.
The "Mangrove Trimming and Preservation Act"
states there are "over 555,000 acres of mangroves now
existing in Florida. Of this total, over 80 percent are
under some form of government or private ownership
or control and are expressly set aside for preservation
or conservation purposes."
The law explains the role mangroves play in the
estuarine system:
"... habitat for various species of marine and estua-
rine vertebrates; invertebrates and other wildlife, in-
cluding mammals, birds and reptiles.. The mangrove
forest is a tropical ecosystem that provides nursery
support to the sports and commercial fisheries."
The law states that "scientific studies have shown
that mangroves are amenable to standard horticultural
treatments and that waterfront property owners can live
in harmony with mangroves by incorporating such
treatments into their landscape systems.
"The Legislature finds that the trimming of man-
groves by professional mangrove trimmers has a sig-
nificant potential to maintain the beneficial attributes
of mangrove resources and that professional mangrove
trimmers should be authorized to conduct mangrove
trimming, under certain circumstances, without prior
government authorization."







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 5 11j

MCAT proposes extra bus routes during bridge work


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Two interim routes could be added to the Island's
transit service to ease congestion during the Cortez
Bridge rehabilitation project if county commissioners
approve, said Carl Gaites, MCAT transit section man-
ager last week.
Route 7A would include a bus operating between
the Anna Maria City Pier and Whitney Beach on
Longboat Key. The trip would take one hour each di-
rection. The bus would connect with Route 5A at
Manatee County Public Beach every two hours for ser-
vice to the mainland.
Route 5A would leave Blake Hospital and travel
out Manatee Avenue to Manatee County Public Beach.


The bus would return to Blake Hospital via Manatee
Avenue. The round trip would be an hour. The bus
would then travel out Cortez Road to the Village of
Cortez and return to Blake Hospital via Cortez Road.
The round trip would be 50 minutes.
"We just don't know how bad the traffic is going
be," said Gaites. "We've got to plan for the worst, try
to make a time schedule and do our best to keep it."
If the two interim routes are not approved, Route
5 service on Cortez Road will be suspended. Route 5
will leave Blake Hospital, travel out Manatee Avenue
to the Island, go north on Gulf Drive to the Anna Maria
City Pier then south on Gulf Drive to Coquina Beach.
The bus will return traveling north on Gulf Drive to
Manatee Avenue and back to Blake Hospital.


The cost will be $1,540 per week to run the second
bus during the bridge project, said Gaites.
"There will be no service along Cortez Road with the
one-bus alternative," noted Mike Guy, executive director
of the Metropolitan Planning Organization. "These (in-
terim routes) will help eliminate a terribly congested situ-
ation. To help offset the maintenance of traffic is a require-
ment under the construction contract."
County Commissioner Joe McClash agreed and
said since DOT is causing the problem, Bradenton
Beach and Longboat Key officials should ask it to con-
tribute to the funding of the interim bus routes.
"The county's trying to do what's right and provide
the service," said McClash. "We don't have the money
in our budget to fund it."


CONTEST


PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS A WINNER EVERY WEEK $50 WEEKLY PRIZE


* The Islander Bystander pays $50 to the
person with the most correct game winning
predictions. Collect prize in person or by mail.
* All entries must be postmarked or hand deliv-
ered to the newspaper office by noon Saturday
the same week the contest is published.
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn
from tying entries. The decision of The Is-
lander Bystander football judge is final.


* All entries must be submitted on the pub-
lished form or a copy of the form. Be sure to
include name, address and phone number.
* The names of all of the advertisers must be
listed on the entry to be eligible to win.
* Only one entry per person, per week.
Winner Advertiser


Winner
3
4
5
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47_____
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FILL IT OUT NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach, FL 34217 941-778-7978


* Name


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ID PAGE 6 N AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

g;-9 I e


'Ifs' deferred to 'whens'
There's a lot of "ifs" pending for Anna Maria resi-
dents and all the people living on the Island, too.
Anna Maria may opt into the next beach
renourishment project, if the people in that Island city
decide the extra beach is worth the trade-off.
Ownership of natural sand accretion fronting the
beachfront homes would be lost with the establishment
of an erosion control line a line established landward
of the mean high tide line which is now the beachfront
owner's property line.
Anna Maria may be able to opt into the beach
renourishment project, if Manatee County, state and
federal authorities agree the project is warranted.
Anna Maria may be able to opt into the beach
renourishment project, if there even is another one -
something that is decidedly iffy in light of recent pro-
posed federal cutbacks.
The first "if" should be resolved soon during a
public forum on the merits of beach renourishment in
Anna Maria. We urge everyone to attend.

Red tide kudos
Speaking of beaches, ours has received its share of
attention recently in the wake of another red tide out-
break in the Gulf of Mexico.
Hundreds of large redfish, in addition to the usual
catfish, mullet, pinfish and eels, have washed ashore in the
past few days, victims of the deadly microscopic algae that
emits a throat-searing gas that plagues beachgoers.
Kudos have to go to Manatee County Parks and Rec-
reation officials for their quick reaction in cleaning up the
beaches after the outbreak. Crews were at work first thing
Monday morning to load up the dead fish and scoop up
the thick Sargasso weed that has also been washing
ashore, all driven by strong west winds for the past week.
Judging from the absence of a foul scent on Tues-
day morning we can all look forward to a pleasant La-
bor Day weekend fish and algae free.

Shellfish hearing, finally
After batting the proposal for a shellfish ban be-
tween the county and the Florida Marine Fisheries
Commission we finally have a date for a public hear-
ing on the merits of Anna Maria Mayor Dottie
McChesney's ordinance.
The ban on live mollusks and sand dollars isn't so
much a problem. No, the real problem is that once again
the county commission has ignored the fact that this is
largely a concern for the coastal area of the county.
With Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key consti-
tuting the majority of the affected area, wouldn't it be
nice if they came to us for the hearings?



AUGUST 31, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 41
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


YO OP9-Ie


Un-appetizer
Through error, a large, very unappetizing dumpster
of collected dead fish, the result of the red tide out-
break, was deposited at the door of the Beach Bistro.
A frantic hour of calls to an arrogant Waste Man-
agement Company and all manner of disinterested gov-
ernment authorities was finally met with genuine con-
cern from Manatee County Commissioner Stan
Stephens' office and then by a rapid response from
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger and Public
Works Director John Fernandez.
The dumpster and its fetid cargo was removed and
our way made clear to serving fresher and more aro-
matic fare.
It was gratifying to learn that there are public of-
ficials capable of understanding and action.
Sean Murphy, Beach Bistro, Holmes Beach

Bear loses big in Alaska
Re: David Futch's Alaska report.
The gross stupidity of camp owner Ron Hyde
(Bwana Ron, I'm sure) in shooting a bear is appalling.
Bears live in Alaska, the tourists were in cabins; the
bear had apparently made no threatening moves and
why doesn't a man who owns a camp in Alaska know
enough to bury garbage cans below ground level?
Will we ever learn to share this beautiful earth with
all living things? The outlook appears very grim to me.
Sarah Bicknell, Bradenton

Better, or worse?
In reference to the lady who picketed The Islander
Bystander because of photos taken: I feel sorry for what
happened to the little boy but is slandering and ugly
remarks going to make it better? Or worse?
The young boy needs encouragement and support
right now. He doesn't need to be made to feel bitter
about what happened.
The other publication should not black-ball any
other news organization just to gain popularity. It's not
right to use someone's misfortune for financial gain.
Caroline Counts, Holmes Beach


Elks awed at Islander's
support of youth
I want to take this opportunity to thank you and
your newspaper and especially reporter Cynthia Finn
who called me for further information for the article on
the Florida Elks Youth Camp.
It is refreshing to see a local publication that will
promote and highlight what is good for our youth to-
day. We have had some interest in the camp from Roser
Memorial Community Church in Anna Maria City
thanks to your article.
Again, thank you for this community service
Thomas Grandys, board of directors,
Florida Elks Youth Camp


Bradenton Beach great
place to live, and thank you
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the
many wonderful friends and neighbors who helped me
get through some very trying days with their generos-
ity and kindness.
Employees of the city of Bradenton Beach were
kind beyond the call of duty. Bradenton Beach is truly
a great place to live and call "my home."
God bless each and every one. I appreciate you so
very much and will forever be grateful.
Bernice D. Stahl, Bradenton Beach


Have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and encourages
your letters to the Editor.
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to edit
letters for length. Letters must be signed, and include
the city you reside in anonymous letters will not be
printed.
All letters to the Editor will remain on file in our
office and available to the public.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Editor,
The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.













THOSE WERE THE FAYS
Part 2, What's In a Name ?
by June Alder


This 1775 map produced by English civil engineer Bernard Romans shows
Egmont Key as Castor Key and Passage Key as Pollux Key (after the two bright
stars in Gemini). Anna Maria Island was labeled Long Island.


ANNA MA-REE-A OR


ANNA MA-RYE-A?


When Harry Varley founded The
Islander newspaper in 1951 he heart-
ily espoused the position of Island
pioneer Captain John R. Jones (de-
scribed here last week) that our
Island's name was Spanish in origin
and should be pronounced "Anna Ma-
ree-a." Hardly a week went by that
somewhere in his paper he'd publish
a blurb holding up to scorn those who
said it "Anna Ma-rye-er."
People took sides on the issue in
the letters column. Varley's opponents
argued that the Island wasn't known as
Anna Maria at all until after Florida
became a part of the United States. And
the U.S. was still fighting the Seminole
War and wasn't on good terms with the
Spanish, because they were supplying
guns to the Indians. So why, at that
time, would anyone name an island or
anything else after anything Spanish?
One Islander who took on Varley
was Frances Livingstone, a fascinating
character. She was, among other things,
a canny real estate agent, a three-time
county-wide tennis and golf champion;
a noted tarpon fisherman; and, as an
Anna Maria city commissioner for sev-
eral years in the '50s, a match for any
male politician.
She certainly had better credentials
than Yankee Varley when it came to
local history. Her family went 'way
back to Civil War times in the South.
And she was born in this area, the
daughter of George Riggin, a promi-
nent Braidentown citizen at the turn of
the century.
Mrs. Livingstone and Varley en-
gaged in a sort of "dueling doggerel"
competition. For example, one time
Varley wrote:

How Gounod would hate it
If in the church choir,
The soloist warbled it -
"Ave Mar-eye-er."

To which Frances shot back in two
stanzas:

The sunshine is hot
And life is much freer
For all of the tourists
On "Anna Mar-ee-ah."


But to the Crackers -
Let yell the town crier!
They'll bask in the sunshine
Of "Anna Mar-eye-yer."

This was how matters stood when
Al Robson came to live on the Island.
He was an architect and lived in a big
house on the corner of North Shore
Drive and Palm Avenue. A keen stu-
dent of Florida history, he became fas-
cinated with the controversy over the
Island's name.
One day at the post office, Robson
got to talking with a woman who was
quite amused at a notice posted by the
Island Women's Club insisting on the
Spanish pronunciation of Anna Maria.
That was nonsense, said the
woman, Mrs. J.B. Johnson. Turned out


her grandfa-
ther was
Madison
Post, the
fourth mayor
of Tampa,
elected in
1858. Mrs.
Johnson told
Robson how
government
surveyors
came to map
Tampa Bay


Mrs. Post was
named Anna and
her sister was
named Maria. Put
the names together
and you have
Anna Maria -
with the ''
rhyming with
'cry. '


around the time Florida was admitted to
the Union in 1845 and stayed in the
home of Post and his wife.
Because there were so many Palm or
Long islands scattered along the Gulf
coast (our island was called by both
names in years past) the surveyors needed
to pick another name. As a gesture of ap-
preciation to Post for his hospitality, they
offered to name the island after him.
However, Mrs. Johnson said, her grand-
father suggested naming it after his wife.
But she, in turn, wanted her sister, who
lived with the Posts, included.
You guessed it. Mrs. Post, of Scot-
tish descent, was named Anna and her
sister was named Maria. Put the names
together and you have Anna Maria -
with the "I" rhyming with "cry."
At least, that was the story handed
down to Madison Post's granddaughter.
Was it true? Robson, a keen student of
Florida history, was determined to find
out, if he could.

Next: Robson's quest
for the truth


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 7 IM



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year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
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ISA CHARGE IT BY PHONE: .
(941) 778-7978
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MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE


June Alder is on summer hiatus. This
series is a repeat from September
1993.


-----------


-------- - - - - - -






1[I PAGE 8 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




















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It takes award-winning journalists to produce
an award-winning newspaper.
The Islander Bystander earned four awards
in the Florida Press Association's
1995 Better Newspaper Contest
Community Newspapers Division A:
Circulation 12,000 and over (15,000)

Second Place, Editorial Page
"Good cartoonist, lots of letters, local editorials"

Third Place
Paul Roat, Feature Picture "Action, intensity, clarity"

Honorable Mention, In-depth News Reporting
Pat Copeland, Community in Crisis
"Reporter and paper took on the 'big one' crime, sex, drugs
and kids in an eight-part series that took the reporter to the
schools, the cop shop and beyond. A real effort to do a
serious community service."

Honorable Mention, Environmental or Conservation
Vanishing Culture: Cortez and the impending net ban
by Bob Ardren, David Futch and Paul Roat
The clash of environment and the historical livelihood of a
community is presented well. Details bring stories alive and
these stories have a lot."

Thank you for reading The Islander Bystander


Planners learn about


emergency operations


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Local emergency managers met
with the Holmes Beach Planning Com-
mission last week to give commission-
ers an overview of each agency and its
function.
The session was part of the plan-
ning commission's review of the com-
prehensive plan. Coastal hazards, hur-
ricane evacuation, emergency pre-
paredness, post-disaster aid and recov-
ery coastal construction and reconstruc-
tion issues are part of the coastal and
conservation element of the plan.
"We thought it would be helpful for
us to understand how you see the role of
the Island and each individual city in deal-
ing with emergencies," Planning Com-
mission Chairman Gabe Simches ex-
plained. "We want to have the most effi-
cient, quickest response we can."

American Red Cross
"In the first 48 hours before the
landfall of a major hurricane or other
major disaster, we work very closely
with county officials," Executive Di-
rector Alan Johnson said.
Shelter teams are determined, shel-
ters are selected, damage assessment
people put on alert and logistic teams be-
gin gathering medical supplies, food and
water for mobile and shelter feeding.
"At the same time we have made
contact with other volunteer organiza-
tions," said Johnson. "We have estab-
lished a Red Cross liaison at the county
to work with government officials and
create an open line of communication
with the Emergency Operations Center
and the county."
About 24 hours before landfall, of-
ficials determine which shelters will be
used, check food supplies and contact
vendors for back-up supplies.
"Our primary focus is emergency
sheltering and fulfilling immediate
needs," Johnson said. "Our shelters will
remain open as long as it takes for
people to be resettled. The next step is
emergency assistance for food, cloth-
ing, shelter and additional assistance
for eyeglasses, prosthetic devices, den-
tures, etc."
Damage assessment teams move
into the field and perform windshield
assessments for county personnel, and
mobile feeding units remain on the road
during the clean-up process.
"In the aftermath, the case work
management system can continue for
months," he said. "A multitude of so-
cial concerns face our citizens. We'll
manage that system in order to network
and work as advocates so that people
are resettled to resume a normal life as
quickly as possible."
The Manatee County Chapter has a
staff of five and many volunteers. In
addition to their work during disasters,
they must raise funds to pay for their
operations and recruit volunteers,
Johnson said.

Manatee County
Emergency
Management
The county's emergency opera-
tions center is housed on the fifth floor
of the county administration center, and
its activities are spelled out in the
Peacetime Emergency Plan, said Don
Reed, the county's emergency manage-
ment coordinator.


"We monitor storms through a vari-
ety of devices such as the Weather
Channel and the Hurricane Center in
Coral Gables," he said. "The informa-
tion comes in and goes out through the
EOC. When we are activated at a higher
level, we bring in decision makers from
all over the county, so they are right
there if they are needed."
An order for evacuation is a lawful
order, not a request, stressed Reed. Once
the evacuation order comes to the EOC,
the mechanisms put into place to
achieve it depend on the extent of the
evacuation.
"All of our efforts when a storm is
approaching are to evacuate and protect
the safety of those living in low-lying
areas," Reed said. "The last option of the
four we give is to go to a Red Cross
shelter. We have 240,000 residents and
40,000 shelter spaces."
The other four options are to get out
of the state, get out of the county or find
someplace safe inland such as Duette,
Parrish or Myakka City. Reed also ad-
vised residents to leave early because
the county's infrastructure cannot sup-
port the number of people that may have
to evacuate.
"After the storm, our plans are in
place to recover and restore as best as
we possibly can," said Reed. "The first
people to come back are Florida Power
and Light employees to restore power
and make sure our emergency workers
are not electrocuted. Next the emer-
gency workers come in and try and res-
cue anyone who has survived the storm
and start recovery."
The state will send rapid response
teams to respond and identify the area's
needs. They will be followed by the
small business owners who can offer
goods to aid residents in recovery. Resi-
dents are the last group to re-enter.

Island Emergency
Operations Center
"The IEOC was established in 1989
as a coordination and communications
center, because during previous storms
the county had a hard trying to get in
touch with our officials," explained
Andy Price, fire chief and IEOC coordi-
nator. "The IEOC was expanded to in-
clude the management of all the emer-
gency efforts on the Island."
All the IEOC's efforts are coordinated
with the county EOC, and it is activated
when the need arises, said Price.
The county depends on the IEOC to
gather information and disseminate it to
the EOC, added Reed.
"We would like to suggest that each
municipality have an emergency man-
agement program in place and utilize
that and work with the county," Reed
noted. "There is grant funding available
from the state for that purpose."
The IEOC is funded by the four
member agencies the fire district and
the three Island cities. When money is
needed for purchases, each pays an
equal amount. In recent years, purchases
have included phone lines to use during
activation, a videotape of the Island, an
aerial photo of the Island and sandbags.
When an evacuation is ordered,
there is no written procedure, said Price,
because local conditions must be con-
sidered and may be different each time.
The county has an overall plan of
coordination for and the sheriff's depart-
ment takes charge of the evacuation on
the mainland, Reed added.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 9 JI3

WO O I ODO I


. ,..

Ode to summer and our Island girls
As summer camp wound down at the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
campers prepared a song for presentation at a countywide campfest. Center
beach boys, from left, Sean Pittman, Jared Lee, Brian Domke and Tommy Ross
croon, "We wish they all could be ...


Board recommends


Center
The Children's Services Advisory
Board has recommended that the Mana-
tee County Commission approve two
funding requests from the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
The commission will vote on the
recommendation during budget hearings
in September for the fiscal year starting
Oct. 1.
Out of $2.974 million dollars avail-
able from the county's children's ser-
vices tax, the Community Center has,
requested $44,500 for its Family Foun-
dations project and $20,000 for a new
community outreach proposal. The ad-
visory board recommended approval of
the full amount for both requests.
These dollars are in addition to
$33,000 the Center received last fiscal
year and is hoping to receive again from
general county funding in support of its
after-school, soccer and basketball pro-
grams.
"Our programs have gotten really
good evaluations" from the county, said
Center Executive Director Pierrette
Kelly following the board's lengthy ses-
sion Aug. 16. The Center is among doz-
ens of agencies vying for the children's
services dollars.
All programs supported by the
county are subject to audited, monthly
reports and strict accounting for num-

I i., f


funding
bers of children or families helped and
exact services provided. The Center
staff has worked hard the past few
years to comply with all county paper-
work requirements.
"We are extremely grateful to
Manatee County for their encourage-
ment and constant support," said Kelly.
The Family Foundations project
received $36,000 from the county last
year for such offerings as free counsel-
ing services for children and families
by licensed therapists, including indi-
vidual and group-support programs.
Kelly says the increased funding
will enable the expansion of parenting
and family-training workshops and the
ability to work more closely with the
local Parent-Teacher Organization to
offer more support to more Island par-
ents.
The $20,000 community outreach
project will enable the Center to ex-
pand its efforts to provide after-school
programs for the children of Bradenton
Beach, preferably in Bradenton Beach,
if enough families can be enrolled.
Kelly has long had a goal of pro-
viding accessible, closer-to-home pro-
grams and care for the children in the
Island's southernmost city. She has
been working with Tingley Memorial
Library as the possible site.





... Anna Maria girls"
like Ashley Allgire, left,
and Khara Konecy.
Islander Photos:
Cynthia Finn.


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IISLANDERPI lg),'II







[Ii PAGE 10 1 AUGUST 31, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Holmes Beach planners


turn down rezone request


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A request to rezone three lots at the corner of
Manatee Avenue, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues
and adjacent to Westbay Cove, was turned down by
the Holmes Beach Planning Commission last week.
The request came from William D. White repre-
senting Michael Saunders & Company. White asked
that the lots be rezoned from R-4 to C-l so the com-
pany could build a real estate office on Lots 2, 3 and
4. A residential four-plex currently sits on Lot 1.
"The corner of Manatee Avenue and East Bay
Drive has become an economic corridor," said White.
"With the increased traffic count of 17,000 to 19,000
(daily), this corridor no longer conforms to a residen-
tial neighborhood."
White said the properties on Manatee Avenue also
have an easement of 35 feet taken off the front to al-
low for the future widening of the street.
"This area has not been developed because of the
high traffic counts, the noise, and no sewer to the prop-
erties," he noted. The only street that's cut in is Sixth
Avenue. Fourth and Fifth Avenues are not open to
Manatee Avenue, creating a tremendous problem for
ingress and egress."
Parking would be on Lot 4,45 feet from Manatee
Avenue, he said. The building would be on Lot 3 and
part of Lot 2, with more parking on Lot 2. Access
would be from Sixth Avenue, and the building and the
parking would all be buffered. The company would
have the sewer line extended to the property.
Multi-family units must be on stilts, said White,
and they will not look as pleasing as the low commer-


Anna Maria resident Bill Worth planted the
seed of a dream at the Anna Maria City Commis-
sion meeting Aug. 22.
He would like the Island's three cities and all
its organizations to find some way to bring the
Anchorage Restaurant property into public owner-
ship.
The restaurant, formerly Fast Eddie's, across
from the Anna Maria City Pier, closed down in


cial building proposed by his company. In addition, the
35-foot easement along with the required setback
makes the properties fronting on Manatee Avenue "al-
most unbuildable."
"If Blocks 8, 9 and 10 were changed to C-l, it
would make Blocks 1, 2 and 3 less residential," noted
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches.
"I think Blocks 8, 9 and 10 are less.valuable be-
cause they are right on the road," responded White.
"Who would want to live where you have 20,000 cars
going by each day? What will be built there are the
least expensive four-plexes possible. You wouldn't
build a luxury condo facing Manatee Avenue. I think
you need to look at the whole area for rezoning."
"That's the one area in the city you don't want to
increase the traffic count," stressed Planning Commis-
sioner Ron Robinson. "I don't believe the city will ever
allow those streets to have access to Manatee Avenue.
You have a real good natural buffer with the trees. I
think it would be an ideal location for four-plexes."
Planning Commissioner Bruce Golding agreed
with Robinson and said the list of uses for the C-l dis-
trict is very extensive.
They include professional offices such as doctors,
architects, accountants, and real estate offices, child
care and preschools, financial institutions, travel bu-
reaus, electrotherapists, masseurs and physical thera-
pists, said White.
"It's just a guideline of what fits there," he said.
"The good thing is you have the right to right to review
that and accept or deny it."
Commissioners agreed that the area should remain
residential.


May. The site is owned by Seay Brothers Property
and is up for sale at a reported price of $2.2 million.
"The possibilities for a public park and cultural
center are mind boggling," Worth said. "Here is an
issue we could all come together on."
He suggested that the Island's three mayors ask
the Seay brothers to put any sale plans on hold while
public ownership is explored.
Wouldn't it be nice ...


'Let's try to communicate'


about special events


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission and staff con-
tinued discussion Aug. 22 about a proposed tempo-
rary-use permit ordinance covering special events tak-
ing place in the city. Ultimately it was decided that a
special work session was needed to iron out details.
"In the interim," said Commissioner George
McKay, "we all know these events are coming up.
We're all participants in this community. Let's try to
communicate the city's desire for advance planning."
Public Works Department Administrative Assis-
tant Anne Beck mentioned two specific events the city
is aware of a Sept. 16 flea market by the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society and a Sept. 23 luau
fundraiser by the Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce at the Community Center.
Without an ordinance, said Beck, such events
typically result in last minute phone calls requesting
services the city's small staff or the sheriff s deputies
can't handle without notice.
"All we want is planning time," said Beck, en-
couraging the commission to take action.
Beck said communities that have advance-permit-
ting laws are able to require off-duty officers for park-
ing and safety purposes and to hold organizers respon-
sible for clean-up.
McKay suggested that small events be exempt
from the permitting process and the focus be kept on
major events and organizations. "Planning is the key
word," said McKay.


He said, "I think we're getting too bloody nosy"
about minor activities proposed for regulation under
the law.
Whether it's a small event or a big one, enforce-
ment will be an issue, said several commissioners.
Commissioner Mark Ratliff has proposed making
violation of the ordinance a second-degree misde-
meanor punishable by a fine of up to $500 and up to 60
days in the county jail.
He said he was in favor of an all-inclusive list of
events requiring permitting based on the desire of
sheriffs Sgt. Jim Tillner.
"I think we can stick our nose in real deep every-
where, but by choice pull it out," said Ratliff.
In other business, the commission unanimously
passed an emergency ordinance changing elevation re-
quirements for electrical, plumbing and other utility
connections in ground floor areas of elevated buildings
under construction.
Public Works Director Philip Charnock said current
restrictions using the city's base-flood elevation of 13 feet
are "prohibitive." Those connection heights will now be
based on Federal Emergency Management Agency eleva-
tions which are lower in some areas of the city.
The emergency ordinance was enacted while
awaiting a change that will be permanent under upcom-
ing city-ordinance amendments.
The commission's vote also included eliminating
a 2-foot by 4-foot limitation for windows placed in
ground level storage/garage areas. Commissioners de-
clined to remove the ban on sliding glass doors.


Public use of Anchorage proposed


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 11 EI


Roser breaks ground on expansion project
Roser Memorial Community Church celebrated the start of its $380,000 expansion project last Sunday, with
more than half of the funding raised. Final plans include a new 350-seat Fellowship Hall, a narthex and
classroom/office renovation. A new garage will be first. Taking part in the ceremony were, from left, archi-
tect Gene Aubry, Pastor Wayne D. Kirk, congregation chairman Bob Miller, children's ministry coordinator
Molly Parks and Sunday School students Sean Price and Anne Marie Whiteside. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.



Bradenton Beach deputy

city clerk departs


Bradenton Beach's deputy city clerk for the past
eight years is leaving.
Sarah Kaufmann's last day at work will be Sept 6.
She is going to work on expanding the business she and
her husband, John also a councilman in the city -
have on Bridge Street, the Magnolia Gift Shop and
Apartments. "I wanted to take longer break than a two
week vacation," she said with a laugh.
Sarah's soft southern voice and easy-going style
have helped her weather some stormy times in
Bradenton Beach in the late 1980s, times when the
city was struggling to overcome an image problem
in the wake of the departure of former Mayor Dick
Connick with the election of the city's first woman
mayor, Barbara Turner.
She has been a Bradenton Beach resident since
1985 "we moved in the week that Hurricane
Elena came to Bradenton Beach" and is no
stranger to government. Her great grandfather, John
Hamilton, was a congressman from West Virginia,
and Sarah worked in the office of Congressman Bob
Carr in Jackson, Mich.,in the early 1980s before
moving to the Island.
"I've enjoyed the day-to-day contact with the


citizens," Sarah said of the part of her job as clerk
she liked the most. "In a city like Bradenton
Beach, you pretty soon get to know everybody on
a first-name basis.
"It's a wonderful job and a great way to gain
knowledge," she added. Sarah has indeed moved
forward in her career; in June she became a cer-
tified municipal clerk, bringing Bradenton Beach
the honor of being the only city on the Island with
two fully certified clerks.
"With the skills I take with me from
Bradenton Beach, I believe I could do the job al-
most anywhere," she said.
Although Bradenton Beach has three clerks,
many of the duties are interchangeable taking
minutes of city council meetings, planning and
zoning meetings, code enforcement board meet-
ings Sarah has "specialized" in accounts pay-
able and receivable, handling the city's sanitation
billings, among other tasks.
"Everyone will miss Sarah," City Clerk Alice
Baird said. "She will definitely be hard to replace,
and we wish her well with her future endeavors."
As do we all.


Island chamber welcomes

27 new members


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The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce's
first-ever telemarketing membership drive Aug. 22-24
signed 27 new members, reports Chamber Executive
Director Darcy Lee Marquis.
Individual top-producing drive volunteers were Jo
Anne Spallino of Joe's Eats and Sweets, T. Dolly
Young of the Prudential Florida Realty and Gene
Rodgers of Five O'Clock Marine. Nita Schotsch, Mas-
sachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., was captain of
the top producing team.
Drive volunteers welcomed new members at a re-
ception at the Chamber office following the three-day
blitz. Many area businesses contributed to kick-off and
post-drive parties and to drawings for both
telemarketing volunteers and new members.
Signing up to bring Chamber memberships to
more than 300 were Rainbow Graphics, Holmes
Beach; the Rod & Reel Pier restaurant, Anna Maria;
Fluff and Buff Marine Detailing, Bradenton; Doug


Dowling Realty, Anna Maria; Cortez Watercraft
Rentals, Cortez; Cortez Auto Service and BP Gaso-
line, Bradenton.
Also, the Buccaneer Inn, Longboat Key; Minuteman
Press, Sarasota; Horizon Travel, Sarasota; All-Phase
Cleaning Service, Bradenton; Sew What, Holmes Beach;
and James G. Schotsch, engineer, Bradenton.
Also, Island Drifter, Holmes Beach; Longboat Pass
Parasail Inc., Cortez; Island Florist, Holmes Beach;
Christine Holmes, financial planner, Holmes Beach;
the Brown Pelican, Anna Maria; Penny's Petunia
Patch, Anna Maria; Victoria's (formerly Aida Apart-
ments), Anna Maria.
Also, Marilyn Trevethan, realtor, Holmes Beach;
Don Schroder, realtor/broker, RE/MAX Properties,
Sarasota; Bortell's Lounge, Anna Maria; Interamic
Corp., Bradenton; Kay's Korner, Holmes Beach; the
Beach Shop, Holmes Beach; the Sign of the Mermaid,
Anna Maria; and Island Pearls, Holmes Beach.


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1BM PAGE 12 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
FF


Francis J. Bulger
Francis J. Bulger, 88, of Holmes Beach, died Aug.
24 in Freedom Care Pavilion.
Born in New Haven, Conn., Mr. Bulger came to
Manatee County from Hamden, Conn., in 1972. He
was retired from Southern New England Telephone
Co. after 43 years of service. He was a Catholic.
He is survived by his wife, Ida; two sons, Edward
of Orange Park, and Thomas of Lexington, Ky.; a sis-
ter, Dorothy Lewis of East Haven, Conn.; a brother,
Philip, of Branford, Conn.; six grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
Margaret 'Parm' Perkins
Margaret "Parm" Perkins, 74, of Anna Maria and
Lakeland, died Aug. 23, 1995, in Lakeland.
A native of Parishville, N.Y., Mrs. Perkins moved
here in 1967 from London, England. She was an active
leader in civic and community affairs. In Lakeland she
served on the boards of directors of the American Red
Cross, the Polk Museum of Art and the Needlework
Guild. She was a homemaker and a Presbyterian.
She is survived by her husband of 57 years, Edward
F. "Ned"; a daughter, Barbara A. Sheridan, of Lakeland;
three grandchildren and one great-grandchild.


DAR sponsors U.S.
Constitution exhibit
The local chapter of Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution will observe the 208th anniversary
of the signing of the U.S. Constitution with an
exhibit at the Island Branch Library during the
month of September.
Congress has designated the week of Sept. 17 -
23 as Constitution Week and Mrs. Charles Wood of
DAR's Manatee County Chapter is organizing the
annual exhibit. The chapter will provide free book-
marks and brochures commemorating the men and
women who achieved American independence.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
June 5 thru September 30


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Michelle Carr and Joseph Krakowski


Carr, Krakowski to wed
James and Elizabeth Carr of Holmes Beach an-
nounce the engagement of their daughter, Michelle
Marie Carr, to Joseph Ernest Krakowski of Medina,
Ohio, son of James and Margaret Krakowski, also of
Medina.
Carr graduated from Manatee High School in
1990. She graduated from Florida State University in
August 1995 as an interior designer and will be seek-
ing employment in Ohio. She is a member of St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church.
The bridegroom-elect graduated from Bayshore
High School in 1991. He graduated from Florida
States University in December 1994. He is employed
by Chemical Financial Services Corp. in Ohio. He is
a member of St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church.
Car and Krakowski are both alumni of Alpha Phi
Omega at Florida State University.
An October wedding is planned at St. Bernard
Catholic Church in Holmes Beach.


The Mirandas of Holmes Beach
celebrate 50th anniversary
Frank and Vienna Miranda of Holmes Beach re- The Mirandas have two children Frank of
cently celebrated their 50th anniversary. Tampa and Edward of Sarasota and one grandchild.
They were married July 21, 1945. She is the former Mr. and Mrs. Miranda are retired.
Vienna E. Letteriello. They have lived in Manatee County for 31 years.



The Island Poet
Dreams are frivolous things that never have a home,
And are shared by the pauper and the king upon his throne.
Or the little boy who wants to be a cowboy or drive that train,
And if your dreams are kept in reason they will never be in vain.
Without dreams there would be no planes or we would have no motor cars,
For it was the dreams of our pioneers that made this land of ours.
So don't be afraid to dream 'cause they really can come true,
For they have worked wonders for others and can do the same for you.
Bud Atteridge


Sv B.YO.B.
(Bring your own bag.)
When you go shopping remember to bring your own bag.
You can do more than you think. For more ideas on
reusing and reducing, call: 1-800-9WILDLIFE
Reuse stuCP toJay
Reduce garbae tomorrow

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 13 IE


ANNOUNCEMENTS


Red Cross offers lifeguard,
nurse training and more
The American Red Cross will offer a state-licensed
Nurse Assistant Training course beginning Monday, Sept
11. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of class
time. The cost is $475 with a payment program available.
Beginning Wednesday, Sept 6, through Sept. 24,
the Red Cross will sponsor a Lifeguard Training Class.


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This is a limited offer on lines up to $50,000. The interest rate
will vary based on the Wall Street Journal's Prime Rate (Cur-
rently 9.00% APR). The maximum APR is 18%. Minimum
monthly payment of 2% of the balance or $100, which ever is
greater. Subject to credit approval.




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Anyone 15 years of age and older with good swimming
ability is encouraged to attend. The cost of the course
is $90 and includes textbooks.
The American Red Cross Health Services will also
offer the following training during the month of Sep-
tember: Standard First Aid, Sept. 6 and 7 and Sept. 25;
Community First Aid & Safety, Sept. 20, 21 and 22;
Adult CPR, Sept. 18; Infant and Child CPR, Sept. 30;
HIV/AIDS 104, Sept. 5 and 28; and Dog and Cat CPR


As Independent As The Island Itself.
rM First National Bank
Member FDIC Uw
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (813) 794-6969
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West
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& First Aid, Sept. 9.
The Red Cross is located at 2905 59th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Enrollment is limited for all classes. For detailed
information call the Red Cross at 792-8686.
Items needed for Sept. 16
flea market
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society is look-
ing for items to be sold at a giant flea market to be held
from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
All proceeds will be used to help replenish society
funds after the recent expenditure of $10,000 to refur-
bish the museum.
Donations needed include household appliances,
rugs, books, records, tapes, plants, furniture, toys, pic-
tures, knick-knacks, sports equipment and more.
For information or to arrange for pick-up, call Cathi
O'Bannon, 778-4198, or Carolyne Norwood, 778-1514.
Tickets available for
Chamber luau
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will hold its "Island Luau and Polynesian Show"
fundraiser from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23, at the
Island Community Center.
Music, dancing and a dinner buffet catered by
Ato's restaurant will precede Ato's famed entertain-
ment show. Area businesses have contributed a large
assortment of merchandise for the luau raffle.
Tickets, at $18 per person, are now available at the
Chamber office, 501 Manatee Ave., Suite D, Holmes
Beach. For more information or to make a raffle dona-
tion, contact Darcy Lee Marquis at the Chamber, 778-
1541, or Nita Schotsch, 779-2142.
WW II exhibit at museum
In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the end
of World War II, the Anna Maria Island Historical Soci-
ety is assembling an exhibit of war memorabilia at the
Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
Veterans who served in WW II are invited to share
their keepsakes. Photos, medals, uniforms, helmets and
liners, guns, knives, news clippings, ribbons and books
would be appreciated. The museum committee would
be especially interested in veterans who were stationed
on Anna Maria Island or nearby.
Information, call 778-4198 or 778-1514.


'So-AAO -V f
778-464


Personal Truth sets up


at Island library
"The shows we do always have interesting, sur- .. .
prising and sometimes challenging pieces," says artist "
Laura Keatts Avery, coordinator of a September alter-
native-art exhibit at the Island Branch Library.
Avery is one of more than 25 area and Island art-
ists who came together three years ago to form Personal
Truth, a loosely organized group exploring alternative "
themes and materials in the visual arts. This will be
their first show under that name on the Island.
While the scope of the group has evolved to in-
clude artists from Sarasota and other parts of the "
state, its origin included a desire to increase aware-
ness of the quality of non-commercial art being pro-
duced in Manatee County.
Personal Truth exhibits are designed to show-
case artists working either exclusively in experimen-
tal techniques or to provide the opportunity for art-
ists known primarily for one medium a chance to
display other works with a personal meaning.
Among those expected to participate in the li-
brary show are Islanders Barbara Neustadt, -
Marsha Rivera and Woody Candish. They will be
joined by Avery, Sandra Melcher, Jan Smith, Rifa ai '
Van Alkemade, Janet Burgess, Jean Blackburn,
Roger McMullan and Leeane Singletary. "'
However, Avery says the unexpected is a tradi- F, .
tion with Personal Truth shows and unannounced
guest artists are always involved.
"All our shows have come together in very Laura Keatts Avery, known for her "atmospheric
exciting ways," says the creator of atmospheric abstract" paintings, stands beside an alternative
abstracts. "We never know just who might show piece, "Nature Spirit." Islander Photo:
up to display." Cynthia Finn.


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El PAGE 14 A AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Water, water everywhere but still barely enough to drink


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
No matter how much rainwater is dumped on us,
it won't put another drop in your bathtub.
"It's all on the wrong side of the clay," said
Granville Kinsman, manager of the hydrologic data
section of the Southwest Florida Water Management
District, or Swiftmud.
Almost none of the summer's gigantic splashing is
going into the Floridan aquifer which supplies fresh wa-
ter to most of the residents of Southwest Florida, he said.
A layer of clay is spread far and wide beneath the
surface of the ground south of Tampa, and it is almost
completely impermeable, he said. "There is almost no
leakage through the clay, maybe an inch a year alto-
gether."
North of Tampa that clay layer is broken up or, in


much of the territory, nonexistent.
Paradoxically, during rains the water level rises in
the aquifer but it's only because people stop pump-
ing from wells for irrigation, he said.
Water we are using now has been trapped since the
Ice Age in limestone that acts just like a sponge, Kins-
man said. This is the Floridan aquifer.
It is replenished, very gradually, from the Lake
Wales Ridge in the central part of the state, where the
clay is breached and water can soak through. From
there it moves downhill toward the Gulf.
The surface-water benefit comes from rivers and
lakes, where man can shunt water off into storage.
Lake Manatee is one notable example. It traps and
stores water for Manatee County and most of Sarasota.
"It helps, up to a point," said Bruce MacLeod,
Manatee County water quality/facilities compliance


supervisor. "But you can get too much."
He and his co-workers perform sort of an aquatic
soft-shoe dance keeping the lake at optimum level by
letting more or less water out from behind a dam -
holding enough for use after a rain but not letting it
build up so its release would flood homes downstream.
Lake Manatee water also is pumped into the aqui-
fer, to be stored until needed in a dry time. This fresh-
water infusion also is being done in Charlotte County
from the Peace River. But Swiftmud's Kinsman said
such operations are limited.
Meanwhile, the rains go on. During the 12 months
ended July 31, this area got 64 1/2 inches, an even foot
above normal. And the celestial faucet is still open.
Despite that, Swiftmud notes that the freshwater sup-
ply remains constant and not abundant, that water users
must be conservative and responsible. Or end up dry.


r -~


Recycle papers for
Island youth groups
Islanders are invited to recycle their newspapers in
the new bin at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. All proceeds will
benefit more than 50 youngsters involved in All
Island Youth and All Island Middlers. Asking for
cooperation are, from left, Mike Maietta, Nick Rossi,
Jessica Foraker, Chad Dingler, Melissa Mixon and
Pastor Dan Kilts. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


GO FIGURE 1 12 3 M4 5 16 7 19 10 11 12 113 14 1 15 6 17 6 18

BY MARTIN SCHNEIDER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 1 f 1 t I1 I 2211 1


ACROSS
1 Plot
4 Cuts short
8 Mature
14 Secretaries:
Abbr.
19 Prayer
recitation
21 Soap actress
Alexander
22 Excite
23 ntsQua
e k
r
e e
damssi
25 Exercycle
button
26 Kind of pain
27 Needlefish
28 Work for a
musician
29 1994 Jim Carrey
flick
31 -- a customer
32 elYAp
t r
a o
mjx
35 Literary
monogram
36 Actress
Peeples
37 Flintlock
muskets
40 From Z
41 "1 me vient a
-" ("It occurs
to me"): Fr.
43 Emaciated


45 Wyo.
neighbor
47 Got by force
49 Universe
52 Madden
53 Shade of
green
56 Informal word
of appreciation
59 I.C.U. items
60 Feather:
Prefix
62 Jury
63 Spy name
64 Farm sound
65 Like some salad
dressing
67 Rogue
68 Call to
Carreras
70 More
circumspect
72 Terminate
74 Acid
75 Certain
cheeses
77 Puck


90 Get back to the
original wood
again
93 Stack, in a
way
94 Beastie
98 "L'Arl6sienne"
composer
99 Sound from
the cornfield
101 Hale fellow?
103 "Wheel of
Fortune"
request
104 --mo

105 Extension
108 "The--
mightier..."
110 Italian
aperitif
112 Summer in
la cite
113 Old talk-show
host McCrar'
115 Expunge
116 Less green
117 ,,

formerlyd


79 Army 121 Did theater
members? work,
infrrmall,


80 Old-fashioned
rewards
82 "Is that ?"
("You don't
say!")
83 Transfer-
84 Cramped
85 Chorus
members


122 Author
Leonard
123 Had a yen
124 Pages
125 Apply messily
126 A dollar bill
has four
cI-7nes-


cnes
)WN
critical
irks


2 Relating to
airport
equipment
3 Annually
4 ngFIo
re 0
evocr

5 Can you dig it?
6 Lit. genre
7 1940 Douglas
Fairbanks Jr.
film
8 East German
inits.
9 Dominion
10 Iroquois
League
member
11 W.W. II British
officer Orde

12 Coyote State
sch.
13 Pasta topping
14 Last word
before the first
bite
15 Twins'
birthplace
16 Wal
g t
niz
n i z
17 Set-to
18 Is after
20 Premed's
exam
24 Romps
30 "Amadeus"
co-star
33 "Let good
unto all men":
Galatians
34 mPu
s .g
iI'
38 Family
member, in
slang
39 Gulf war ally


42 --vu
44 Procedure
during
pregnancy, for
short
46 Suction pump
48 Cousin of a
canzone
50 essPlac

'subfoe
51 Some skirts
54 Paucity
55 Cain, e.g.
56 Halfofa 1991
movie
twosome
57 Humperdinck
opera role


58 cto.
V e
61 Name word
62 Eucharist
container
64 "- Mir Bist
Du Schoen"
(1938 hit)
65 Twining plant
66 Iron pumper's
unit
69 Leland
Stanford
companies:
Abbr.
71 Greekvowel
73 Popular horse
name


76 Dr. Gideon Fell's 98 Mathematician
creator Pascal


78 Madness
81 Ten, in Toledo
83 Ted Turner
event
84 asto olP u
C rP x
86 Rose essence
88 Like some vases
89 Mouths
91 -- Folly
92 Sicilian city
95 Athens-Sparta
battle site
96 Quarantined
97 Adjusts the draw


100 Swab
102 Modern rock
band with a
repetitive name
104 Benchwarmer
106 Sensitive people
pick them up
107 Logical start
109 Marine bird
111 Tiniest protest
114 Inside shot?
118 Pipe connection
119 Hideaway
120 Like Bach's
Sonata No. 3


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


S 86 Sandy's DO
sound I Di
87 Indigenous ma

STUMPED?







THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND VISITOR INFORMATION ISLAND STREET MAP


ISLANDER


IIauI r


Island teen travels to Guatemala


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Ninth-grader Elizabeth Losek took her talents,
youthful vigor and faith to Guatemala this summer to
help build an orphanage and a church.
The exuberant Bradenton Beach teenager is an
Anna Maria Fire District Cadet and a member of the
Church of the Cross in Bradenton. The trip to Guate-
mala was sponsored by People for Missions through
her church.
"People for Missions invited us to go to Guatemala
to evangelize and help build an orphanage," she ex-
plained. "Forty-one people from my church and 30
others from all over the country went on the trip. I felt
the Lord led me to go."
Planning for the trip began in January. Classes
were given at the church to prepare the travelers on the
customs and culture of the natives and on evangelizing.
Members of the group raised money to meet expenses.
"We met at the church on June 15 and took a char-
ter bus to Miami," Elizabeth said. "We flew to Guate-
mala City and took a three-hour drive to the town of
Zacapa. The mission, our main base, was there."
The first day was filled with orientation classes,
training and assignment of chores.
"The next day it rained and flooded, so we couldn't
go to the village we planned to visit," she recalled. "We
went to where the orphanage was being built and laid
a concrete slab for the water tower. After the work was
done, we went to a beautiful waterfall to swim. It had
a deep lagoon, and we jumped off the cliff and did som-
ersaults into the water."
That evening the
group held a church ser-
vice in the chapel. There
was no air conditioning at
the mission, Elizabeth
said, and the electricity
kept flashing on and off.
"The next day the group
visited an orphanage in
Antigua and played with the
orphans. Elizabeth Losek
"We went to the town
market to look around," she said. "Raw meat and fish
were just hanging out in the open. It was very smelly.
There were vegetables and cheeses and live chickens,
goats and dogs running around. People threw their
scraps to the dogs. People kept coming up to me to feel
my hair because it is so different from theirs."
Communication was not difficult, she said, with
both of Spanish and English used. Bargaining was
done with a calculator, which was passed back and
forth between buyer and seller until the price was


Fri, Sat & Sun
Sept. 1, 2, 3
Every Tuesday Happy Hour
all day & all night

Holiday Weekend Dinner Specials
All-U-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers ............... $6.95
Italian Trio Lasagna, Fettucini Alfredo, Chick Parm......$8.95
6 oz. Filet M ignon .................................... .95
M ain Lobster............................................ $9.95
Crab Stuffed Lobster Tails ....................10.95

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


M' **.: ;, "i' i"
In one of the mountain villages visited by the group, the village pastor had a little garden. In the background
is the pastor's house. Islander Photos: Courtesy Elizabeth Losek


agreed upon.
"That night we went to a restaurant for dinner," she
said. "It rained again and the lights went out, so we had
a candlelight dinner. Everything came with black beans
and rice, and there was always a bowl of salsa on the
table. The food was very bland, and we loaded it up
with salt and pepper to make it taste better."
A two-hour hike to a village in the mountains was
on the agenda for the fourth day. A medical clinic was
offered there, and villagers from miles around brought
their sick to be treated.
"We played with the children, had a puppet show
and gave them oranges, which they loved," said Eliza-
beth. "Then storms were coming, so we had to go back
to the mission."
The next three days were spent at a mountain vil-
lage about four hours away from the mission.
"We stayed in an old school with our sleeping bags
on the floor," she recalled. "There were no bathrooms
or showers. There were spigots for water but it was
brown and smelly. We brought our own."
While a construction team was building a church
for the villagers, Elizabeth's group held an outdoor
Bible school for their children.


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whole family will love."
Vine Ripe Tomatoes
Cantaloupes
Grapefruits
Oranges
Open Mon Sat 8-6

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5424 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach


"The first night we went to the church, which had
two walls up, and got a generator and lights going," she
said. "We sang songs, and did dramas for the villagers,
and they did the same for us."
Every meal consisted of bland mashed beans, rice
and tortillas, she said, but "when you're hungry, it
tastes good." Some of the group got colds because of
the constant rain.
She recalled a humorous stand-off with villagers
over her playing soccer.
"We were going to have a soccer game, and I
wanted to play," she said. "Women there don't play
sports. They laughed at me and didn't want me to play.
We had to leave before we found out if they were go-
ing to let me play."
After leaving the village, the group packed to re-
turn home. They stopped at the orphanage in Antigua
to say goodbye to the children. While in Antigua, they
also visited a Korean church.
"They made lunch for us," she said, "The food was
great they had spices!"
Shopping in Guatemala City, a visit to a tent ser-
vice and a final dinner at the Pan American Hotel com-
pleted the trip.


STO

KEY WEST
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Discounts to attractions
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- --- --


- I- ---I- I I--


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 15 lD






Ija THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 16


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to successful Real Estate sales .


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SCHMIDT
Eves. 778-4931


TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325


MLS


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WHITE
Eves. 778-6956


605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach, FL 34217


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REFRIGERATION -



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FPL
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(at Leverocks & Galati Marine)


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(at end of Bridge St. on pier)

TEMPORARY
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5-9 Wed-Fri
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with ice cold 504 Draft Beer
Wed, Fri & Sat 5 pm to 9 pm
Please callfor updates, pier fishing
and bait sales 779-1706

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`'-"--C-



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2A]

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell


s CORNER P14








Mon-Fri 7 to 3 Sat 7 to 1 Sun 7 to 11
778-9803 5340 Gulf Drive., S&S Plaza


Age Has Its Benefits B


H Unforgettable Service
for over 50 years
We know the Island
We know real estate
We know how to help
... and you benefit from our experience.
5910 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales (813)778-0777 Rentals 778-0770 Fax 778-6944


-4 When it comes to service,

everything matters.




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of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
813 798-2708


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PAGE 17 N AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER IE


Thousands of T-Shirts, Gifts,
Beach Supplies & Souvenirs n:
at LOWEST overall prices 2
on the Island [E]
FREE INFLATION, ALL FLOATS
778-1628 .
5340 D-Gulf Drive S&S Plaza. Holmes Beach


Joe's The Best
Ice Cream
Eats & and Yogurt
is made
Sweets b oe
"Just an Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor"

GREAT HOMEMADE
* Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes
* Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
* Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
* Belgium Waffles II
* Espresso, Cappuccino
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007


Home of the
Two-Fisted Burger
$3.50
Authentic Conch Chowder
and Conch Fritters


875 North Shore Drive Anna Maria Island
1/2 mile north of City Pier
"Best kept secret on the Island"
Come join us for ISLAND COOKING...
Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner
DAILY SPECIALS REASONABLE PRICES

778-1885


f


I -


'1--


J ARN 4i
Shells Gifts Clothing Swimsuits
SInflatables Bait & Tackle Hats Much More
LARGE SELECTION 10% Off
: OF KITES ANY
-t1. ~PURCHASE
Panama Jack Hats, Sun Glasses, Clothing & PUCH
Suntan Products. Unusual Gifts & Novelties. WITH THIS AD
200 GULF DR SO. BRADENTON BEACH (JUST NORTH OF COQUINA BEACH)


r First National BankkR
MemberFDIC

"As Independent As The Island Itself"

Susan A. O'Connor
Assistant Vice President
and Branch Manager

5324 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217, 813/778-4900






5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
r e t Fax: 813-778-3035




S lil rl ONi > ipA M Pu A o.
Ankapwdr o&ed ud Opward Mwr d heIO PrW" Iut" e Ede AIidt, .


Since 1984
SOld Fasiond Ie Cream and Waffle Cones
Made on Location
j Ice Cream Pies & Cakes *
Colombo Yogurt *A
Soft Serve Diabetic *
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10 PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333 8


------ ------ ---
1 Eat In or FREE I
S Take Out $00 FF DELIVERY I
| \ " ,ANY SIZE PIZZA! i

SOMA PIZZA
|I & ITALIAN RESTAURANT
I Specializing in Veal Chicken Fish Pasta
Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
Open 7 Days 11 AM to Midnight
I 88 201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
S778-0771 or 778-0772

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ADMISSION up to (6) Persons. Must
present ad at time of purchase. Exp. 11/15/95.
BIRD & LIVE REPTILE SHOWS JUNGLE ANIMALS
I JUNGLE TRAILS GIFT SHOP
KIDDIE PLAYGROUND .
SSNACK BAR
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3701 Bayshore Rd
Sarasota, Florida 34234 I
2 Blocks West of U.S. 41
S1 Mile South of Airport
355-5305 Open Daily 9 to 5 -"




WAGNER REALTY

SSALES ANNUAL RENTALS
VACATION RENTALS
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939


F -- -
Lie. Real Estate Broker
2217 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978


ROD a-REEL

Established 1947


I I


4 - -


'2


Jod 's Pier Walk Cafe
O Splurge on the food! Not on the prices.
Breakfast & Lunch Specials
with BREAKFAST all day
MON-FRI. 5 AM to 2 PM
SAT-SUN: til NOON
ALL NIGHT SPECIALS
FRI & SAT 1 PM to 5 AM
sB I 127 Bridge St. Bradenton Beach 788-5542


oywFEATURNGs


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-IM PAGE 18 M AUGUST 31, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

a 1


Bowling for dollars
Shopping tip: Bowling shoes are $1.61 at Galaxy
Lanes, the bowling alley on Cortez Road.
But that's not the only good deal around. Last Sat-
urday 191 bowlers gave a good turn for the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, raising more than $1,600 for
sports equipment $400 more than last year's chal-
lenge. Basic things like soccer balls and a P.A. system.
A highlight this year was the announcement over
the P.A. system from the management asking for the
attention of the Community Center bowlers: "Please
don't spill any more drinks, Mike's out of bar towels."
After the bowling, the Beach House restaurant in
Bradenton Beach hosted the party where raffle prizes
and impressive trophies were awarded.
Trophies went to Mark Huber, high score for men;
"Big John" Swager for best series with 582; Linda
"Sunnyside-up" Greig for women's high score; Liz
Andricks for best series with 507; and gutter king Jay
No-last-name; gutter queen was Sherrie Leversee.

Sale of sales
Labor Day spells many things for Islanders. Nearly
everyone in business labors for the weekend that sig-
nals "end of summer."
Everywhere on the Island, everything from shells
to shellack, seafood to shish-ka-bob, and chic to
shineola is on sale.
Fashion aside, a friend of mine from Sarasota, Josa
Gruelle, says the only thing that separates us from the
animals is our ability to accessorize. She once bought
a plastic-molded chest with breasts that strapped on
with strings around the neck and waist at a gag gift
store. She decided she was over-accessorized and gave
it away. Thank goodness.
On Anna Maria Island, accessorizing amounts to a
beach towel that matches your bathing suit. Sunglasses
that match your mood. A shirt that pronounces your
state of mind. We're casual chic to the max.




,.f..



/ Chefs/Proprictors
Andrea & Ed Spring

(('iaUGOURMET BRUNCH
9 am 1:30 pm
Warm Banana Bread, Butter and Jam served at all tables.
EGG SPECIALTIES & OMELETTES
Served with sauteed potatoes and fresh fruit.
EGGS BENEDICT two poached eggs on Canadian
bacon and toasted English muffin, smothered
in H ollandaise.....................................................$6.95
EGGS ANDREA two poached eggs on sauted ham and
toasted croissant with fresh herb Hollandaise........ $7.95
EGGS EDWARD two poached eggs on artichoke
bottoms covered in chopped artichoke hearts and
fresh herb Hollandaise .......................................... $7.95
SPRING OMELETTE sauteed bacon, onion, zucchini,
Swiss and cream cheeses ........................................ $6.95
SPINACH AND FETA CHEESE OMELETTE...... $5.95
SMOKED SALMON and Cream Cheese Omelette.. $6.95
WEST COAST OMELETTE saut&ed ham, peppers,
onions and cheddar ............................................. $5.95
SPECIALTIES
PAIN PERDU the original French Toast ............. $5.95
POTATO PANCAKE crisp, golden brown served
with apple sauce and sour cream ......................... $5.95
BAGEL and Cream Cheese ................................... $2.95
SMOKED SALMON, Cream Cheese and Bagel....... $5.95
CRAB CAKE SANDWICH..................................... $7.95
SHOA MEI DUMPLING....................................... $6.95
SPANAKOPITA spinach and feta in phyllo crust. $6.95
All specialites served with fresh fruit.
Islanders' Early Supper 5 ~ 6:30 pm
Always... Tantalizing Desserts
And, Late Evening Service
Espresso, Cappuccino, Coffee & Teas
You are welcome to bring your favorite wine or beer.
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria
Reservations Suggested 778-9399


Copelandfamily bowlers, from front, Pat, Anna and
Layla.
Don't miss the fun of sailing through the gift shop
and boutique sales. They're lurking for you! You're
sure to go home with some great deals on Anna Maria's
unique Island styles.


Cafe OR) Robar



SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET
SERVED 10 AM 1 PM
Mimosas & Champagne $1 each $ 95
SBloody Marys $1.50 each %$
"Live Entertainment Nightly"
Tues-Sat 8 to Midnight in our Piano Bar
THE BEST STEAKS
IN IANATEE COUNTY
Dining: Tues-Sat 4-10pm
Lounge: Tues-Sat 4pm-Mldnight Sun 1 Oam-Midnlght
LARGE GROUPS & LUNCHEON PARTIES WELCOME
RESERVATIONS REQUESTED, NOT REQUIRED
204 Pine Ave. ,
Anna Maria
778-6969


A raffle on lane 1Sfor a
new 19-inch television -
pay a buck, bowl a strike
and you're in the draw
was won by Cori
Woods at the party
following the tournament
at the Beach House
i restaurant.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood










Oysters under fire
Seafood regulators are debating in Tallahassee
over whether or not they will ban summer consumption
of raw oysters taken from the Gulf of Mexico.
At the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (I'll
bet you all want to be on this board) in Orlando, a task
force will recommend stricter requirements for oysters.
In case you weren't aware of warnings issued in
the last year, oysters have taken on a label more resem-
bling cigarettes than food. Fifteen deaths a year are
blamed on vibrio vulnificus a bacteria found in oys-
ters harvested in warm waters.
Eat 'em fried, steamed, roasted, grilled or cooked
in some way and they're just fine. Eat 'em raw and
diner beware. That seems fair.

Critique of critics
Last week in the local daily newspaper Teri
Grimes, presumably filling in for regular dining critic
Pat Benson, panned Shells shrimp but was apparently
pleased with everything else offered fier party of four
from appetizers to dessert.
PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE


Monumental Labor Day Sandcastle Contruction
begins Sunday morning, Sept. 3 Castlemasters

CAFE ON THE BEACH
Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)
-- -~'- $350 +
$ +taxt
Served Daily (Belgian Waffles too!)

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Daily
OPEN 7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Weekend Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


ISLANDER



More
Island
news than
any other
source!
See page 7 in this
issue for a mail
subscription or call
778-7978
and have your
MasterCard or
Visa handy.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 1 PAGE 19 I-3


A vacation share
The Kennedy girls of Holmes Beach have hit
upon a sure-fire way to make their summer vaca-
tion last write it down and share it.
Says Kara, age 8:
"My summer vacation was the best ever!
"First, we went to the Wilderness Lodge at the
Disney Resort. It was so cool. I liked the pool be-
cause it had a river that flowed into the pool and
it felt like a real river pushing us downstream. It
also had a slide that looked like a mountain. You
walk up and twist down the slide."


Harwich Port on Cape Cod. Our companion at dinner,
our host in fact, was Robert Levey, the Boston Globe's
restaurant reviewer.
He was at work and his work was an art.
He dines no less than three times for dinner with at
least two or three other diners to share and sample each
others courses. If the restaurant serves lunch, he returns
at least twice. Never less.
Levey's reviews are fair and the restaurateur gets
a fair chance, never knowing who his discriminating
customer was. He also was selective and said that if he
couldn't say something reasonably nice, he would say
nothing at all.
Of course, the Boston Globe has a larger budget
than The Islander Bystander. Evidently their budget for
reviews exceeds that of our local daily paper's too.
Budget is the best reason we have for avoiding re-
views 'cause if you can't do it right ...
Big generosity
Big Mama was the
recipient of many gener-
ous donations for the
MDA telethon held last
Sunday at Crabby Bill's


At last week's Anna Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce social gathering at Chez Andre in
Holmes Beach, Pat Thompson and Marilyn
Trevethan took a quick moment to pose before the
large, elaborately decorated (delicious) salmon with
ChefAndre and waiter Andre.

STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 18
It's hard to understand how she could have found
the shrimp pasta so distasteful. She admits her husband
had the dish before and it was much better.
It's hard to comprehend why this savvy diner
didn't complain and ask for a replacement for the dis-
appointing meal but more than that, a credible reviewer
would have gone back for another try, and another try.
And a credible reviewer would have sampled more
than three dinners and a kiddie meal.
The same was true for Grimes' experience at the
Buccanneer Inn on Longboat Key. More nit-picking at
details on a limited selection of entrees when she ad-
mits the overall experience was pleasurable.
Restaurants take these critiques, published in large
circulation daily papers, very seriously and so should
the newspapers.
About eight years ago a restaurateur on Longboat
Key, Ivo Scafa, was offended by critic Sally Fine's accu-
sation that he pre-cooked a medium-rare rack of lamb. He
was insulted and swore to deny Fine service if she ever
returned. Then the chance came and he served her again
and again she ordered the rack of lamb.
Fine was so pleased she waved one of the tender
little chops at a table of eight businessmen recommend-
ing "the best rack of lamb" she'd ever tasted.
Also years ago, I had a chance to dine with friends
at a lovely, small French restaurant, Cafe Elizabeth, in


Labor Day Weekend


at the Sandbar


$lOff

Pina Coladas


$20ff
Sczechuan
Snapper
Sandwiches


a:' It's the last big "Splash" of the summer,
so be sure you get in on the fun this weekend.

Live music on the beachside deck
with ILP.M. on Friday and Saturday,
Tropicats on Sunday and Monday.

So come on out for lunch, dinner and
Sa fabulous sunset on the Sandbar's beachside deck.
End the Summer with a Splash!


11:30-6 L.
September
1-4
I .. ; .


"We had a great
time," say Kara, left,
and Kaci Kennedy
about their stay at
the Disney Resort.
Islander Photo:
S Courtesy of
Charlene Kennedy.


"4 -






d lasts and lasts
Writes Kaci, age 5: "I had fun at the Wilder-
ness Lodge on vacation. The lamps in the hotel
had buffalos. The bathrooms were decorated like
Pocohantas. At dinner we ate at this restuarant
and our waiter looked like a cowboy with a cap
gun and he shooted me!
"In the morning Minnie Mouse called to wake
us up and she said, 'up and at 'em.' We ate break-
fast with the Disney characters Goofy, Chip and
Dale and Pluto.
"We got their autographs."


in Holmes Beach. As a matter of fact, local donations were
so tremendous that she will continue the raffle and auction
this week, Aug. 30 to Sept. 2, 5 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday
and Thursday and 6 to 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.

TV chef
Ray Arpke, chef and owner of Euphemia Haye
restaurant on Longboat Key, expanded his talents as a
successful restaurateur to the small screen.
Chef Ray made his first television appearance re-
cently on Manatee Educational Television in a series
entitled "Great Chefs of Florida's West Coast."
He followed that up with an appearance on WTSP-
TV 10's "Good Morning Tampa Bay" featuring his
"Chilling Trilogy," a summertime trio of chilled soups,
in June and then he appeared on WFST-TV 28, during
the evening news.
I'd say Ray is way over his 15 minutes of fame at
this point and still counting.
by Bonner Presswood






ID PAGE 20 M AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Fund set up to help

young Island couple
Rayma Stowe, owner of the Rod & Reel Pier,
wants to help offset medical expenses in excess of
$15,000 incurred from the illness of 10-month-old
Kayla Kio.
Kayla was recently diagnosed with diabetes and
spent a week at All Children's Hospital. Her father,
Philip, of Holmes Beach, is a full-time cook at the Rod
& Reel.
"This young family is desperate for help and would
be extremely grateful for any assistance," said Stowe,
who held a pig-roast fundraiser this past weekend for
the Kios.
For more information or to make a donation call
Stowe at 778-1885.


Bill Baker, left, and Mark
Baker held a pig roast
fundraiser to help offset
medical fees incurred
from the illness of l0-
month-old Kayla Kio,
Bill Baker's daughter.


433


Fun Fundraisers
The Hernando De Soto Historical Society of
Bradenton will sponsor its sixth annual De Soto Scramble
Golf Tournament on Friday, Sept. 8, beginning at 1 p.m.
at the University Park Country Club in south Manatee
County. The grand prize features a two-night, three-day
visit to the Doral Golf Resort and Spa in Miami for a four-
some with the lowest net score. The entry fee is $90 per
golfer. Guest may attend the tournament dinner and
awards ceremony for $25. Proceeds will benefit the not-
for-profit Hernando De Soto Historical Society which
produces the annual Florida Heritage Festival. Entry form/
information: 747-1998.
The Arthritis Foundation has announced that it
has kicked off its 1995-96 Victory March to benefit
those who suffer with arthritis. A volunteer may be


calling to ask you to help. To find out about the local
services provided by the foundation call 739-2729.

Clubs
The German-American Club of Manatee County
will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m., at Bayshore
Gardens Recreation Center, 6919 26th St. W.,
Bradenton. Tickets for the BYOB Winefest Dance to
be held Saturday, Sept. 9, at Bayshore Gardens Recre-
ation Center. Music will be provided by Mario
DeLeon. Reservations for eight or more: 756-5180.

Religion
Sabbath Evening Service will be held at Temple
Beth Israel on Friday, Sept. 1, at 5:30 p.m. The temple
is located at 567 Bay Isles Rd., Longboat Key.


Reggae splash at Beachhouse
over Labor Day weekend in
Bradenton Beach
The Beachhouse Restaurant will crank it up with
live musical entertainment for Labor Day weekend.
Tropical Steel, a steel drum band, will appear Sat-
urday and Sunday, Sept. 2 and 3, from 7 to 10 p.m.. The
Tropicats will be on the deck Friday night, Sept. 1
Real reggae from Jam-lya will be heard afternoons
from 2 to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Monday, Sept. 2 and
4. Cairo, another reggae band, will make a special ap-
pearance on Sunday, Sept. 3, from 2 to 6 p.m.
The Beachhouse is located just south of the inter-
section of Cortez Road and Gulf Drive in Bradenton
Beach.


* IZ zzLas


ou" s calaAs


Hours Nightly:
Lounge & Lighter Bites 5:00 1:00
Dessert Room 6:00 12:00
Restaurant 5:00 -10:30

Euphemia Haye Restaurant
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key, FL
813.383.3633
Live Entertainment Nightly


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven."'liau s
Buffy, Pat Geyer, Owner. e '
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501

ISLANDER| 0ID


Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun, a ray
of sunshine? Look no further it's all in
The Islander Bystander. Don't miss a week!






MEDIUM SHRIMP BLUE CRABS
469 "Order Now
LB for Weekend"
Seafood Kabobs Fresh OYSTERS
"Great Only 9 DOZ
for grilling" $2OZ
Silver "JFweet"
Queen Corn VIDALIA ONION
BANANAS TENNESSEE
Always "VINE RIPE"
190LB TOMATOES


WATERMELON
S$199
-, 1


Cantaloupes, Plums.
Peaches,
Nectarines ;
^"S^KH1


/-


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


WILLY STEELE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
SEPT 1&2* 10P.M.
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


RESTAURANT & PUB
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL EVERY MONDAY
Mexican Night & Happy Hour During the Game
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS FOR FOOTBALL
Serving Pub Menu
OPEN FOR BREAKFAST & LUNCH
Mon-Sat 7:30 AM to 2 PM
Sunday 8:00 AM to 1 PM
PUB HOURS: Mon-Sat 7:30 AM-10 PM
Sunday 8:00 AM-1 PM
PUB MENU AVAILABLE AFTER 2 PM
SCorner of Culf Dr. & Palmetto Ave. in Anna Maria e
.";-, 778-3909 (Take Out Orders Welcome) .




Chez Andre
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast Luncheon
Cone Dine With Us Before
We Go On Vacation
We will be closed
Sept. 4 thru Oct 9
Reopening on Oct. 10


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


Members American
Culinary Federation


Reservations Suggestedfor Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


"6BO'S p/
jy 10519 Cortez Road
792-5300 1
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH
PIZZA BUFFET

$3.99 a
DINNER
PIZZA BUFFET

$4.49 o


SIppehizers









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 21 B .


Island art league organizes for
fine art festival
Applications to participate in the 7th Annual Anna
Maria Island Festival of Fine Arts and Crafts sponsored
by the Anna Maria Art League on Saturday and Sun-
day, Dec. 2 and 3, in Holmes Beach are available. "_
Entrants will be selected from slides of recent
original work based on artistic merit and workmanship. .
To receive an application, send a request along
with a self-addressed and stamped envelope to: Anna
Maria Island Art League, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217.
Completed applications must be returned by Sat-
urday, Sept. 30.
For information call the league at 778-2099.

MCC Gallery features
photography by Wayne Eastep
An exhibit entitled "Maintaining Personal Vision
in the World of Commecial Art Photography" by inter-
nationally known commercial photographer Wayne
Eastep will open Friday, Sept. 1, at the Manatee Com-
munity College Fine Art Gallery, 5840 26th St. W.,
Bradenton.
A reception for the artist will be held from 5 to 7
p.m. on Friday, Sept. 8, in the MCC Gallery, Building
200.
Admission is free.
Eastep's work will be shown through Sept. 28.
For information call the gallery at 755-1511, ext.
4251.

Unity Gallery offers dual exhibits
Unity Gallery, 800 Coconut Ave., Sarasota, will
host an art show featuring the works of Betty Krawiec
and Matthew Lasinski from Sunday, Sept. 3, through
Sept. 27.
A reception to meet the artists will be held on Sun-
day, Sept. 3 at 11:15 a.m.
For more information call S. Campbell at 488-1933
or 955-3301.

Old brochure, new phone number
Callers to the toll-free phone number given for the
Clewiston Inn, a featured resort in last week's outdoor Joy Courtn
report were disappointed to find the number was out of
commission.
Actually, the old brochure should be put out of com-
mission. It gives an incorrect phone number. The new toll-
free number for the Clewiston Inn is 1-800-749-4466. If
that fails to produce results, you can reach them at (813)
983-8151 if you're willing to pay for the call.
Nicki's Nicki's West 59th Restaurant
SWest 59 h Welcomes You To Join Us

BREAKFAST SPECIAL MON-THURS 10 AM 2 PM
EARLY BIRDS $5.95 MON-SAT 11 AM 6 PM
HAPPY HOUR LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
In The Lounge Only BARBARA JOHNSEN
12 pm 6 pm Monday Saturday 6PM-IOPM
1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton CATERING &
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM- CLOSED SUNDAY BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE 795-7065






LABOR DAY WEEKEND
Featuring
ALL YOU CAN EAT CRAB LEGS!
Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday


Live Entertainment 7 Nights
BRIAN BEEBE Tuesday-Saturday 8 Midnight
'Special Appearance: Sunday Sept. 3 9-1
DUANE DEE Sunday Sept 3 5 9
Monday Sept 4 7 11

Turn At The Pirate Sign 6000 Blk, Gulf of Mexico Dr.
595 Dream Island Rd., Longboat Key

383-5565


dhool Daze...


U
Dry subject
SKaren Paul's third-grade class at our Island
school has begun to sift through the sands of
study to learn about the Earth's deserts.
j .. i. -- Paul's students can answer such questions
as: Why do deserts get cold at night? Because
the clouds which insulate the desert during
the day dissipate at night. The students
t `| around the desert study table, clockwise, are
Ian Frederickson, Brett Milks, Taylor Man-
ning, Marisa Butler, Colleen Cosgrove and
Jessica Beaulieu. Islander photo:
Joy Courtney




or.




B



Anna Maria Elementary
School Menu
Monday, 9/4/95
* Labor Day No School
Tuesday, 9/5/95
Lunch: Chicken Patty w/Bun or Hot Dog, Hash Browns
>* Potatoes, Banana, Ice Cream
Breakfast: Cereal or Toast, Juice
S Wednesday, 9/6/95
Lunch: Two Eggo Mini Waffles w/Syrup, Sausage Link or
Submarine Sandwich, Applesauce, Juice
Breakfast: Toast, Fruit
Thursday, 9/7/95
ey Lunch: Hamburger Gravy over Mashed Potatoes or Mini Chef
Salad, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Jello
Breakfast: English Muffin w/Jelly, Fruit
Friday, 9/8/95
SLunch: Sausage Pizza or Hamburger, Corn, Salad, Cookie
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Juice
All meals served with milk.
*************************************


I







I~ PAGE 22 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 19, open door, 700 block of Jacaranda. The
officer found the door of the residence open while per-
forming a house check. He found the washing machine
running and a key on the kitchen counter with a note
from the cleaning lady. He secured the residence and
contacted the rental agents to return the key and ad-
vised them to keep the residence secure.
Aug. 22, criminal mischief, 412 Pine Ave., Five
O'Clock Marine. The complainant reported a person
unknown hit the front windshield of the vehicle with an
unknown object causing the window to crack.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 17, grand theft, 400 block of 20th Place. The
complainant reported a 12-foot John boat valued at
$300 missing.
Aug. 20, escape, possession of burglary tools,
automobile burglary times two, criminal mischief, 300
block of Gulf Drive North. The officer responded to an
alarm call and upon arrival was approached by the
witness' girlfriend. She advised the officer that the
witness observed the suspect getting into a tool box in
the victim's truck and attempting to break into the
victim's vehicle, cracking and chipping the window.
The witness gave chase, and the officer arrived and
took the suspect into custody. The suspect was combat-
ive and uncooperative, said the report. While at the
police station, the suspect complained of chest pains
and was taken to Blake Hospital by EMS.
The suspect was released by the doctor and re-
quested to use the rest room. As the suspect ran to the
rest room, the officer gave chase. The suspect went into
the ceiling tile and attempted to escape, the report said.
The suspect came through the ceiling toward the front
desk causing $3,500 damage. The officer caught the


r Caqtle

mugtrian
Restaurant r` ..:..

Wiener Schnitzel II .............................$7.95
Beef Rouladen ................................... $9.95
Sauerbraten ......................................... $10.95
Hungarian Qulasch ........................... $8.95
Bratwurst ............................................. $4.95
r- ---------- -----
1 /2 OFF with this ad exp. 9/10/95
Buy one dinner at full price & take 1/2 off second
dinner of equal or lesser value. _
L- dinner -- --
Dinner 5 to 10 P.M.
aM Reservation 778-6189
101 Bridge Street
Bradenton Beach


This Week's Dinner Specials
Softshell Crabs Stuffed with Crawfish, Served
with a Spicy Bourbon Sauce, $18.95
Chargrilled Tournedos On Top a Roasted Garlic
Crouton with Melted Fresh Mozzarella & Sundried
Tomato Sauce, $21.95
Sauteed Duck Breast over Field Greens with
Blackberries & Champagne Vinaigrette, $17.95






383-0777
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
Open Wednesday thru Sunday On Longboat Key


suspect and placed him in custody.
Aug. 20, theft, Coquina Beach. The complainant
reported a person unknown removed two sets of car
keys, a room key, clothing, a watch, cooler and beach
towels valued at $200 from a picnic table.
Aug. 21, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. The complainant reported a person unknown
removed two purses valued at $20 and $50, two wal-
lets valued at $20 and $10, a checkbook, pain reliever
valued at $10, two packs of birth control pills valued
at $20, credit cards, $320 in cash and personal identi-
fication from the vehicle.
Aug. 21, lost property, 2300 Canasta Drive. The
complainant reported she left her cellular phone valued
at $150 on the rear bumper of her truck and drove
away.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 17, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at
$100, 200 block of South Harbor.
Aug. 19, larceny, 5353 Gulf Drive, Circle K. The
officer responded in reference to a shoplifter who put
two packs of Combos in his pocket. He asked the sub-
ject to empty his pockets and they revealed two packs
of Combos and a pack of cigarettes, all unopened.
The subject first said he bought the Combos earlier
but then said he stole them because he was hungry and
didn't have any money. The officer located the
subject's backpack outside of the building and found
two, cold, unopened bottles of beer in the backpack.
The subject said he bought the beer at another business.
The clerk told the officer the subject entered the
store twice, the first time with the backpack, but said
he did not see the subject take the beer. The officer
checked the beer cooler and found a six-pack with two
missing. The beers from the back pack had the same
bar code as the six-pack carton.
The subject was given a notice to appear on the
charge of retail theft and a trespass warning.
SAug. 20, battery, 700 block of Manatee Avenue.

Chicago Style
Thin Crust Pizza
Baby Back Ribs
& More

383-0880 or 383-0881
whit;l~ OPEN LABOR DAY
Sunday-Thursday 4 PM 11 PM
Friday & Saturday 4 PM 1 AM
We deliver to all ofAnna Maria & Longboat Key

/- kxuaut vflt

Snfiun the latC4
SIestatxrant xitlt
Formerly the 'High Seas'
Casual Dining on 9915 Manatee Ave. West
Beautiful Palma Sola Bay Bradenton (941) 792-5523
e u pe S e c
Our Specialty Ipswich Wholebelly Clams!
S 1 draft beer, S5 pitchers, s2 hi-balls
Open from 11:30 for lunch
from 5 pm for dinner
Dixieland Jazz on Wednesday & Sunday
S with "Sons of the Beach"
On Our Outside Deck from 5:00 8:00 pm
WE ACCEPT Summer Hours ad~
$ SB BS Open Wed thru Sun BaJHP


The complainant reported he and his friends were driv-
ing around the Island when the subject began follow-
ing them, threatening them and trying to get them to
stop. In the 700 block of Manatee Avenue, the subject
pulled up to them and threw a beer can, hitting the com-
plainant in the head and causing a small laceration, said
the report.
The officer spoke to the subject who gave several
different stories. He said he chased them because they
drove down the street too fast. He said he did not throw
anything at the complainant. The complainant said he
just wanted the subject to leave him alone and signed
a waiver of prosecution.
The officer advised the subject not to take matters
into his own hands but call the police when there is a
problem.
Aug. 20, suspicious, 300 block of 74th Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown drove a ve-
hicle into his mailbox. The officer replaced the mail-
box, which was not damaged.
Aug. 22, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Manatee County Public Beach. The complain-
ant reported a person unknown entered the vehicle and
removed $120 in cash and a credit card from her purse.
Aug. 22, petty larceny, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee County Public Beach. The complainant reported he
left his wallet unattended and a person unknown re-
moved two credit cards. He did not notice the cards
were missing until he returned to his motel room. The
cards were used to purchase $3,000 in jewelry and
$200 in alcohol.
Aug. 23, lewd, 4500 block on the beach. The
complainant reported a man and boy on the beach re-
moved their bathing suits and went swimming. The
officer noted the subjects were from another country
and did not know nude swimming was not permitted.
Aug. 23, lost property, 5701 Marina Drive, Island
Branch Library. The complainant reported he left his
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, 7 25
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls $
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


jI" EYE OPENER... 2 egg
Some fries and coffee... On


oast,
ly $1.75


Island Inn Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
- 1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach ---


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

OPEN FOR
LUNCH &
DINNER
7 DAYS A WEEK
BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS
SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL YOU 95
CAN EAT $
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


J"III






c.h1l e

-ol ap0
seecins icudngtadtinln
," tie iz-tt12ofte eoddne.


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 23 ji]


Kiwanians donate to
children's group
As part of its ongoing commitment to helping chil-
dren, the Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island recently
donated $200 plus food staples to the Manatee County
Children's Society.
On Monday, Sept. 4, the club will have a special
breakfast meeting at 8:30 am. at the Manatee County
Public Beach pavilion in Holmes Beach. For more in-
formation, call 792-1039.

STREETLIFE FROM PAGE 22
hand gun on a hook in the rest room of the library and
forgot it.
Aug. 23, found property a bicycle, 60th Street
and Marina Drive.
Aug. 23, battery on a law enforcement officer,
resisting with violence, 3610 East Bay Drive, Dry
Dock. The officer responded in reference to a fight,
stepped inside the back door and observed a subject
pick up a beer bottle and start to throw it across the
room. The officer grabbed the subject's shoulder, and
the subject turned and started to swing at the officer.
The subject was removed from his stool and taken
toward the back door, where he hit the officer in the
mouth with his fist, said the report. As the subject was
taken to the ground, he continued to swing, striking the
officer in the face several times. He then got away from
the officer and attempted to flee but was caught and
placed in custody.
At the jail, the officer learned the subject had war-
rants for child support, VOP (violation of parole) ag-
gravated assault and VOP resisting with violence. The
deputy at the jail served the warrants.
The officer sustained injuries to his upper and lower
lips and the left side of his head. He had a bruise under his
left eye, scratched knees and his watch and eyeglasses
were broken. His baton was taken at the scene by a per-
son unknown during the struggle with the subject.
Aug. 24, lost property, 8000 block of Marina
Isles. The complainant reported her son left a teal-col-
ored canoe valued at $500 in the mangroves behind the
residence and it was missing. It is unknown whether it
floated away or was stolen.



ninthn street





PIZZA BURGERS FRIES


5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located in Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-lOpm


I9OSTLNE4


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Aug. 17, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report from a sailing vessel of a
body floating in Sarasota Bay. The station, along
with Longboat Key police and Sarasota County
sheriff's deputies, searched the area with negative
results. The reporting source was not located despite
a number of radio conversations with them about
their location. The report was determined to have
been a hoax.
Aug. 18, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a body floating and oc-
casionally submerging about 200 yards off the north
end of Longboat Key. The station launched a boat
to investigate, and determined that the report's fo-
cus was a manatee.
Aug. 19, Boarding. A 21-footpleasure craft was
boarded in Sarasota Bay. A written warning was
given for not having readily available personal flo-
tation devices. Federal law requires PFDs be of the
proper size and number for each person on board
and they be accessible in a reasonable amount of
time if needed.
Aug. 19, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a possible plane crash in
Sarasota Bay. The station launched a boat to inves-
tigate and located a seaplane that had landed due to
low fuel.
Aug. 20, Boarding. A 16-foot vessel was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico and found not to
have the proper visual distress signals aboard. The
vessel's voyage was terminated the boat escorted to
port. The owner of the boat corrected the problem
and resumed the trip.
Aug. 20, Boarding. An 18-foot vessel was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico and found not to
have the proper visual distress signals aboard and it
was not possible to determine if a fire extinguisher
was charged or not. The vessel's voyage was termi-
nated the boat escorted to port. The owner of the
boat corrected the problems and resumed the trip.


TRE VLAcEr
IN HOLMES BEACH
For: Gourmet Pizzas, Creative Pestos,
Exotic Grains & Fresh, New,
Seafood Specials Daily.
OPEN for Lunch & Dinner; Tues-Sat 11 am-9 pm
Sunday 10 am-7 pm
For Reservations 778-5440
... on the corner of Manatee Avenue & East Bay Drive
(across from Barnett Bank, at the light.)
formerly "The Mutiny Inn"




Celebrate good ole times with good
ole friends Labor Day weekend!


Aug. 20, Boarding. A 42-foot vessel was
boarded after it appeared lost due to running outside
the Intracoastal Waterway. The vessel's navigation
lights were observed to be flickering. The operator
of the boat was later determined to be intoxicated,
failing a field sobriety test and having a blood alco-
hol level of .12. The operator was turned over to the
custody of a friend and will be prosecuted admin-
istratively by the Coast Guard. The vessel's voyage
was terminated due to the boating while intoxicated
charge and cited for improper navigation lights.
Aug. 22, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled vessel two
miles west of the Venice Inlet. The station provided
communication assistance for the vessel to contact
a friend to assist.
Aug. 22, Boarding. A 27-foot vessel was
boarded and cited for not having personal flotation
devices readily assessible and for having an in-
stalled toilet without a "Y" valve between the head
and discharge port. Vessels within three miles of
shore are required to have a valve installed between
the head and the overboard discharge, and the valve
must be in the closed position.
Aug. 22, Boarding. A 19-foot vessel was
boarded and issued a violation for not having the
required FCC license for an operational VHF-FM
marine radio.
Aug. 22, Boarding. A 24-foot vessel was issued
a violation for having a discharged fire extinguisher
and flares with expired dates.
Aug. 23, Boarding. A commercial vessel was
boarded in the Gulf of Mexico and issued violations
for not having working lights on the personal flota-
tion devices, having a "Y" valve for the marine sani-
tation device in the open position, having no emer-
gency instruction on board, having an expired CPR
qualification, having an improperly stocked first aid
kit and for not having logged instructions, drills or
safety orientations. One crewmember was detained
and turned over to the Manatee County Sheriff's
Office in response to an outstanding warrant.


POCO LOCO
MEXICAN CUISINE


S 1.00 OFF I
I Exp. 9/8/95 1
L With Purchase of entree _
Inside & Outside Dining 387-0161


Where Longboat Key History Began

4OOR |



STONE CRAB

RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

Summer Menu

NEW...

Create-YourOwn Platter

Specialty Salads

Lite and Hearty Dinners

King Crab Legs

Daily Specials
Experience Makes Us #I
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
\ r-- -. .


Please Call for Preferred Seating
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39

383-2391


A


k






li3 PAGE 24 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Danger looms from afar, but death's on our beaches


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Hurricanes, lined up like a convoy of giant 18
wheelers drafting one another across the Atlantic
Ocean, gives us pause. Already deeper into the alpha-
bet for names on this date than we've been in 60 years,
remember that it's not until Sept. 10 that we're offi-
cially midway through hurricane season.
It's no comfort to realize that from 1871 to present,
30 tropical storms and hurricanes have passed within
100 miles of the mouth of Tampa Bay during the
months of June through August. During September
through November in the past 124 years we've had 61
- 31 in October alone.
A little closer to home, red tide is killing tons of sea
creatures. Bait fish to turtles to big breeding-size red-
fish are stacking up all along beaches from Stump Pass
down south to up here on the Island.
Old timers like Jim Kissick say they've never seen
so many big redfish being killed by a red tide.

Historical gear, anyone?
The Anna Maria Historical Society is looking for old
fishing and hunting gear, along with nautical items simi-
lar to those used on the Island in the early and mid-1900s.
Stuffed fish or animals indigenous to Island waters
are needed to hang on the walls of the museum and they
can be either given outright or loaned to the society.
So look around. Poke around. There must be some
old cast nets, hooks, paddles, lures, rods and reels or
other gear dating back to earlier days on the Island

1/2 PRICE I
I 2nd Hour Rental
$50 First Hour I
-with this coupon
S expires 9/14/95
A-I ISLAND JET SKI
I b Captains Marina I
off r *ni- 5501 Marina Drive
----- 778-8559.



I RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS I
REPAIRS & REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
SWe are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce




SNOOK SEASON




OPENS FRIDAY
M ustad hooks ................ (up to 3/0) ................... pk. $.99
Eagle Claw hooks .................................. pk. $.99
Gam akatsu hooks ........................................... pk. $2.59
Big Game@ leader spools......................... $1.99
Big Game 14 lb. spools........................... $6.99
HAND PICKED Gulf shrimp ....................... doz. $3.00
CD -18 R apalas .................................................... $9.99
CD-14 Rapalas ..................................................... $8.99
Guy Harvey WHILE SUPPLIES LAST
SNOOK T-shirt ......(med., Irg.X-Lrg.)..,... $10.00
Bait W ell nets ...................................................... $3 .99
Penn & Columbia Fishing Hats IN STOCK
Big Selection of Polarized Sunglasses
Thousands of Rods and Reels IN STOCK
Jack Mackerel & other canned chum
Frank the Net@ Bait Nets IN STOCK


ILA DI ANNA RIA ISLAN CENTRE
DAILY 7 TO 7 3240 E. BAY DR., HOLMES BEACH
SAT & SUN 778-7688
6 TO 7 n-nuT


somewhere around. If you can't bear to part with the
stuff forever, Carolyne Norwood at the Society says
they'll be happy with a short-term loan if that's what
you prefer.
Photographs of fishers with their catches on the
Island are especially welcome. For more information
or pickup, just call Cathi O'Bannon at 778-4198 or
Carolyne Norwood at 778-1514.

A computerized wonder
The introduction last week of Windows '95, for those
who still can't learn DOS and are too cheap to buy a Mac,
left me pretty unimpressed. But I did witness the demon-
stration of a new computer program that honestly slacked
my jaw. It's called "The Cap'n," and it finally gives you
a good reason to take a computer to sea.
Presently used by U.S. Navy ships and much of the
world's merchant fleet, The Cap'n is surprisingly af-
fordable and there are versions for Windows, DOS and
Mac.
Here are just some of the things The Cap'n can do
for you (please forgive the navigator lingo, but this
needs to be clear):
Import charts from floppies or cd-roms now
available, display them and even print them if you want
a float plan.
Position your vessel on the displayed chart on a
minute-by-minute basis by interfacing with your GPS
or Loran and generating a legal log in the process.
Calculate your set and drift, predict tides and cur-
rents, and log in either true or compass course by auto-
matically calculating magnetic variation world wide.
Reduce and display your celestial sights, giving
you an independent, fair safe backup to your GPS for
offshore work.
And the list just goes on and on.
With a base price of $230 (can you believe that for

"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin

ENROLL NOW

SCUBA CLASSES

792-5522


I| Cortez Road at 101st St. W. |


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MARINE CONTRACTING
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Specializing in Seawalls
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.- -...------ - ---.1


something actually used by the government?), The
Cap'n can be run on something as old as a 386, al-
though a 486 is suggested. Mac computers need Sys-
tem 7 or better.
Bob Brent of High Seas Technology in Sarasota is
planning some local workshops on The Cap'n and says
anyone interested in seeing it work can contact him for
workshop times and locations. Just call Brent at 953-
3108.

Abolition of angling?
The Campaign for the Abolition of Angling
(CAA), is a group based in England trying to rally sup-
port for banning sport fishing as cruelty to animals.
"Millions of seemingly harmless anglers seek to
stick barbed hooks into the mouths of largely inedible
fish purely for the pleasure of it," the CAA brochure
reports, "fish are living creatures with sensory organs
and nervous systems similar to our own. There is suf-
ficient evidence to suggest that fish, like other verte-
brate animals, are capable of suffering to some degree
or another."
Dues to the CAA (whose address I could not find),
are $12 a year, making it cheaper than the Florida Con-
servation Association, the newsletter from which I
plucked this item.
Meanwhile, real angling abolition is on the horizon.
Nearly 150 of the 2,800 square miles in the Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary are proposed to be closed to
all fishing, including catch-and-release fishing.
As you might expect, both commercial and recre-
ational fishing industries are grumbling about it, but
marine reserves are already in use in countries such as
Grand Cayman, New Zealand, Australia and the Baha-
mas. Proposed closings are for five years.
This could well be something we'll be seeing more
of in Florida in the face of unrelenting fishing pressure
and the realization that resources are not unlimited.
See you next week.


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (941) 778-2727

605-A Manatee Ave. W. Holmes Beach
778-5883

4 ANBOUND Guided
KAYAK SHOP ture
111f11 0. ours


Complete Sea Kayak Pro Shop
SSales Tours Rentals
BIKE RENTALS
Brand New Fleet of
Single Speed Beach Cruisers
& 12 Speed Mountain Bikes
Daily Weekly Monthly Rates
SALES & REPAIRS Child Seats & Helmets Available





CAPTr MXKE'S
C HRT ERS

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Half Dbo / Fu I Day
& ET T HE HEAiTTRITA
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For iOFoarn ta7' i c-drIswyi+ioniS ,9lQ
778- lqoq


Rental Gear
Available

OPEN
7 Days A Week
M-F 10:30 7:00
Sat. 9:00 7:00
Sun. 9:00 5:00


ii






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 25 BIi

Here it comes: snook season starts Sept. 1


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Get ready for those fish you've been catching all
summer but been forced to release to come into season
- snook become legal Sept. 1. Most of the predictions
are for linesiders to be caught in epic proportions this
fall. Until then, though, redfish and grouper are still the
best bet.
By the way, don't forget Mote Marine
Laboratory's Sports Day Sept. 9, and I'll be conduct-
ing a fishing seminar Sept. 16, 1-5 p.m. to benefit the
Manatee County School Foundation. More information
will be coming on the seminar later.
We'd like to welcome a new captain on board this
week, Capt. Mike Greig. Capt. Mike reports they
landed a 120-pound tarpon while shark fishing last
week, and added they've been catching a lot of redfish
and trout on the flats.
Karen at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier regular
Don caught a 28-inch snook, Gary caught a 35-inch
linesider and J.D. Hapner caught 19-inch and 26-inch
snook too bad the season is still closed. Other fish-
ing highlights included redfish, mangrove snapper, gag
grouper and sand perch.
Ron at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching a lot of catch-and-release
snook, redfish, Spanish mackerel and skip jack.
Toni at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 100 head of Key West grunts and
porgies. The six-hour trip averaged 130 head'of Key
West grunts, porgies, grouper and lane, mangrove and
vermilion snapper. The nine-hour trip averaged 30 head
ofporgies, mangrove snapper, scamp, yellow tail snap-
per and scamp.


Three kids with some big fish
The Gutierrez brothers -from left Dick, age 12;
Alex, age 10; and Mike, age 8 caught and re-
leased more than 20 redfish while fishing with Capt.
Mike Heistand. They did keep afew reds and trout,
though. The Gutierrez family has long-time ties to
Holmes Beach, purchasing 80 acres of land here for
$40 an acre many, many years ago.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said redfish action
continues to be strong. There have been a few cobia
spotted offshore before last week's big blow came
through, and he said kingfish have decided to hang
around this year. Chris said he's hearing about lots of
anglers checking out their favorite snook holes in
preparation for the season's start Sept. 1.

Honored for service
Lee Hornack, center, of Bradenton Beach accepts a
Coast Guard Auxiliary Service Award for 25 years of
service to the organization from Master Chief
Boatswain J. D. Arndt, right, and BMCS Wade, left,
station Cortez executive petty officer. Hornack began
his avocation with the auxiliary on Lake Michigan as
the founding commander of Flotilla 09-18-10 in
1970. He is currently a member of USCG Auxiliary
Anna Maria Flotilla 81 and the Anna Maria Power
Squadron. Hornack spent 37 years in the Navy and
Navy Reserve, and retired as a chief boatswain's
mate and tug master. He and his wife, Lynn, have
lived in Bradenton Beach since 1994.


Libby at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers continue to catch lots and lots of redfish, catch-
and-release snook and some nice-sized trout. Shrimp
are looking much better, she added which means
they're getting bigger.
Capt. Phil Shields said the weather played havoc
with his charters this week as well, but he was able to
get offshore a few times and was able to bring back
some grouper and snapper. Capt. Phil added there's still
dolphin offshore, most at about the 100-foot depth.
Capt. Rick Gross said he was able to make it out
before the rains came last week and reports excellent
catches of redfish. His prediction on the snook season,
by the way, is that it should be a good one.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's been seeing huge
schools of redfish on the flats. Try drifting up on them,
he suggests, and use live shiners, gold spoons, flies or
Mirro-lures.
On my boat Magic we were only able to make
one trip due to the weather, but still caught more
than 20 redfish.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's able to bring back
limit catches of reds on every trip, some at more than
34 inches in length. He's also been doing well with
trout.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said redfish are
the best bet in the backwater, with grouper and snap-
per action continuing to be excellent offshore. Watch
for a change in the weather within the next two to
three weeks, Bill added, that should bring in more
mackerel in the Gulf and make the snook move in
the backwater.
Good luck and good fishing.

Auxiliary offers boating

skills and seamanship
A course in power boating skills and seamanship
conducted by Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors will
begin at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 5, at Flotilla 81
Training Center, 4208 129th St., Cortez, north of the
Seafood Shack Restaurant
The course includes legal requirements, boat handling
skills, navigation, weather and VHF Radio. Classes will
run for three weeks on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Tuition
for the course is free and material and textbooks are avail-
able at the center at a nominal cost
For information call Walter Grace at 778-5800, Frank
Milio at 798-9544 or Bill Sysak at 795-4195.


Anna Maria Island Tides


AMHIGH
3:23 2.4ft
4:06 2.5ft
5:05 2.5ft


AMLOW
10:08 0.5ft
11:25 0.5ft


PMHIGH
4:57 1.7ft
6:38 1.5ff


PMLOW
9:13 1.3ft
9:35 1.4ft
12:57 0.5ft


6:21 2.4ft 2:30 0.4ft
7:50 2.4ft 11:37 1.7ft 3:44 0.3ft
9:15 2.5ft 2:18 1.5ft 11:58 1.7ft 4:40 0.3ft
10:26 2.5ft 3:43 1.4ft - 5:26 0.3ft
* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


SNEPTUNET 201 Dual





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IP Johnsonr O/B. ALL OF OUR PACKAGES ENGINE ....................... 115HP Johnson O/B.
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Fish Tales

Welcome!
Got a great catch?
A great fish photo?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and
pictures are welcome!
Just give us a call at
778-7978 or stop by
our office in the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
11SLAINDERI
0 911 P-11 IP1a IL


Problem with


Insurance?


Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)



Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center *
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253


B BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS


FISHING FOR A GOOD DEAL?
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USED BOATS
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18' Sea Ray Classic. Everything new...........$3995
19' Carolina Skiff. 60 Merc..... Save Over $4000
20' 1994 Fiesta Pontoon. Loaded.................$6995
21' Chris Cuddy I/O. Loaded. Nice..............$6995
23' Stamas' OMC 1.0.................................. $8995
24'x8' Custom Flats Boat. Unbelievable.. $11,995
27' Sportcraft 340 Merc. Inbd. ................ $21,900
30' Scarab Twin 454's. Fast. Nice............ $24,995


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Fri 9/1
Sat 9/2
Sun 9/3
Mon 9/4
Tue 9/5
Wed 9/6


0


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-I
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~C _____ UU-C~CC- - -- -- ----- -- ---UY-


-1


I







IS PAGE 26 N AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island real estate sales


315 58th St., Holmes Beach, Unit B, The Palms,
an upstairs 785 sfla 2bed/lbath/lcar condo built in
1978, was sold 7/7/95, Kielian to Schmidt, for
$68,000; list (+-) $71,000.


GREAT GULF VIEW
Watch the sunset from 12x30 porch. 3BR/2BA home
in Anna Maria, cathedral ceilings, great room, ceiling
fans, wall-to-wall carpet throughout, new 3-ton A/C,
new roof, downstairs den and office, enclosed 2-car
garage. 108 Pine Avenue. By owner, $365,000.
(813) 949-0104 or (813) 229-2850.



II, -~ L


Exclusive
Waterfront
Estates
Video Collection


522 69th St., Holmes Beach, a canal front ground
level 1,351 sfla 2bed/2bath/2car home built in 1970 on
an 80x110 lot, was sold 7/6/95, Tweedie to Kendrick, for
$217,000; list unknown.


525 Loquat, Anna Maria
Beautiful 5BR/4BA canal home. Screened
porch overlooks pool area. Seawalled ca-
nal with dock and davits. Great view of
Tampa Bay. Just reduced to $475,000.
Call (941)778-5590


m _etuSyl sf lstat Z. WaWatchfor our


listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.


ILS


JUST LISTED!
Holmes Beach Contemporary
Casually elegant in design and style, this 2 bed-
room, 2 bath island retreat offers an open con-
cept floor plan filled with space and light. The
l ;i main level features dramatic 16' ceilings, custom
.. ''l..i -. casement windows, all white eat-in kitchen with
ceramic tiled floor, and attractive guest room
and bath. A solid oak staircase or paneled eleva-
tor lead to the elegant master suite, which fea-
tures a magnificent bathroom with Jacuzzi and
Oversize shower, private bayview veranda, and
separate laundry room. The lower level offers an expansive storeroom, workshop, double car ga-
rage, plus garden plot and outside shower. Located only steps to the sparkling Gulf of Mexico, this
premier property is being offered for sale with One Year Homeowner's Warranty and is reasonably
priced at only $244,500. Please call today for your private showing!
is. Aien e AfLS tater Piro .Sfional. SNpcifiz.ing in mol.J 1 eJopicaia.-3 eit .
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Nancy Guliford...778-2158 Monica Reld...729-3333


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


I Ill liii


tTI


419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(813) 778-2291 P Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


5806 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, a multi-level
4bed/3bath duplex of 2,167 sfla, built in 1969 with later
additions on an irregular lot, was sold 7/6/95,
Vandevrede to Ostrowski, for $155,000; list $169,000.
104 23rd Street N., Bradenton Beach, a ground level
4bed/4bath, 4-plex of 2,202 sfla, built in 1954 on a
58x100 lot, was sold 7/12/95, Edwards to Boudreau, for
$165,000; list unknown.
226 Willow, Anna Maria, a canal front 75x139 lot,
was sold 7/14/95, Gunderman to Iseman, for $125,000;
list $149,000.
3601 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 202A Sandy
Pointe, an elevated 2bed/2bath 1048 sfla condo built in
1986, was sold 7/12/95, Lataille to Sullivan, for $85,000;
list unknown.
5400 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 5423 5400 Gulf Dr.,
a 2bed/l&l/2bath 988 sfla condo built in 1964, was sold
7/14/95, Moore to Bruewer, for $106,500; list unknown.
SALES CONTINUES ON PAGE 23









OPEN HOUSE


Sunday September 3 1-4 PM
525 Kumquat Drive, Anna Maria
Deep water canal. 3 bedroom/2 bathroom. Over
2,200 sq. ft. of living area. Gourmet kitchen (2 ovens,
2 sinks, refrig. + extra freezer.) 6+ car, two-door
garage under house. Alaskan Rock fireplace. 20 ft.
concrete foundation pilings to bedrock; east & west
walls double thick; roof built to withstand 140 mph
winds. Call Michael Advocate, 778-0608 evenings.


Frank
Davis
Broker
778-6335
Rochester,
New York



Paul
Collins
Realtor
383-5635
Worcester,
Massachusetts


Tom
Nelson
Realtor@
778-1382
Marshall,
Michigan



Marilyn
Trevethan
Realtor
792-8477
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin


Jean Lee
Sears
Realtor
778-5045
Massachusetts
South Shore


I'
'_-"IE


Wendy
Foldes
Broker
Salesperson
952-1953
Binghamton,
Ney York


Christine
Shaw
Realtor
778-2847
Anna Maria,
Florida


WATERFRONT COLLECTION


* 529 75th... Secluded mini-estate on
Bimini Bay with exceptional views of Tampa
Bay. $449,000.
* 624 Foxworth Ln... Canalfront Key
Royale beauty with dock, immaculate yard.
$279,500.
* 618 South Bay Blvd... Anna Maria vacation
home! Windows across the entire great room
provide panoramic Bay views. $369,000.
* 504 83rd St... Spacious canalfront home
with dock, cathedral ceilings with exposed
beams and more! $189,900.


LOTS OF LOTS


* 107 Elm Ave... Gulffront lot in quiet area
of Anna Maria with miles of wide walking
beach. $350,000.
* 404 Magnolia Ave... Extra large lot in city
of Anna Maria. $82,500.
* 310 Coconut Ave... Canalfront cleared lot
in Anna Maria. $139,500.
* 705 North Shore Dr... Anna Maria lot -
build an elevated home and have great Gulf
views! $148,900.
* 720 Key Royale Dr... Canalfront lot in
prestigious Key Royale. $194,000.


DUPLEXES/CONDOS






.A -11 T.

* 2310 Gulf Dr... Shell Cove several units
to choose from, all with unobstructed views
of the Gulf. From $104,000.
* 4200 Gulf Dr... Direct Gulf front condo in
Gulf Sands with open porch for beautiful
sunset dinners. $199,000.
* 1801 Gulf Dr... Runaway Bay turnkey fur-
nished condo with on-site management,
pool, tennis and more. $104,000.
* 6505 Gulf Dr... Island duplex in great area
of Holmes Beach great investment!
$REDUCED$ $159,000.


LOCATION LOCATION


* 306 56th St... Completely renovated spa-
cious island home with fireplace, skylights
and more. $169,900.
* 7107 Holmes Blvd... Spacious island du-
plex, 2BR/2B plus den that can be used as
3rd BR. $174,900.
* 866 North Shore Dr... Anna Maria cot-
tage steps to fishing pier and beach.
$187,500.
* 408 Magnolia Ave... Great family home in
Anna Maria with screened porch and large
fenced back yard. $137,500.


PLAN.D PSTCARE


Richard
Freeman
Realtor@
Island Key
Specialist
Boulder,
Colorado


Rebecca
Sampler
Realtor
758-8842
Lakeland,
Florida


I


wr


FE. C-Lo :


60 WE


1i7


. 3


IBjC






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 a PAGE 27 jiB


SALES, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26
7/14/95, Moore to Bruewer, for $106,500; list unknown.
600 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach, 211
Westbay Cove, a bayfront 2bed/2bath, 1,200 sfla up-
stairs condo built in 1974, was sold 7/13/95, Thomp-
son to Dennis, for $134,000; list $144,900.
601 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, 110 Gulf
Watch, an elevated 2bed/2bath, 1,069 sfla condo
built in 1984 was sold 7/10/95, Roberts to Whyte,
for $93,000; list unknown.
603 North Point Dr., Holmes Beach, an elevated
canal front, 2,565 sfla 4bed/2&1/2bath/2car Key
West style home with 1,473 sf of wrap-around cov-
ered deck, built in 1986 on a 90x125 lot, was sold 7/
14/95, Paul to Skrzypek, for $280,000; list $339-
329,000.
1000 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach, #3 Beach
House Resort, a Ibed/lbath Gulf front condo of 441
sfla, built in 1973, was sold 7/19/95, Reid to Davis,
for $85,000; list unknown.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Island By-
stander. 1995.


ISLANDER


More
Island
news
than any
other
source!


FEMA flood insurance maps of
Island available
Federal Emergency Management Agency flood
insurance maps are available at the Manatee County
Central Library.
The maps identify flood zone levels for every area
of the county, including Palmetto, Bradenton, all island
communities including the Manatee portion of
Longboat Key, and all unincorporated parts of Mana-
tee County.
A user's guide and index map are available to iden-
tify an individual's property.
Other publications that provide information on
construction, repair and flood-proofing of manufac-
tured homes, waterfront properties and residential
homes are also available for check-out or use in the li-
brary.
For more information on the map program, contact
the Information Services Department at 745-5555 or
visit the library located at 1301 Barcarrota Blvd. W.,
Bradenton.


First National Bank of Manatee
votes stock dividend
The First National Bank of Manatee announced
that the board of directors approved a 5 percent stock
dividend.
The dividend is for shareholders of record as of
Sept. 1, payable Sept. 30, 1995.
The current book value of the bank's stock is
$16.15 per share.
The bank's Island location is at 5324 Gulf Dr.,
Holmes Beach.

Lf ocGboat Chamber to publish
visitor's guide
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will
begin selling advertising for its 1996 Longboat Key
Visitor's Guide/Business Directory.
The guide will include editorial matter, photogra-
phy and advertising in full color on glossy stock and a
categorical listing of all Longboat Key Chamber Mem-
bers in good standing.
For information about advertising in the guide call
the chamber at 383-2466.


r *

The Longboat Connection, Inc.
ILicensed Real Estate Broker


...be connected to
quality services,
staff and vacation
accommodations.
1.800.469.4852
or 941.387.9709

LogbatKe CamerofComec


Michele Jan Annette
Knuese Jordan Tidwell Keller
Leasing, Property Management & Sales
3720 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key, FL 34228


,-- i
I l rR*ar "all


0 C*5 !: rl

;R. : ..
:'- -' a< -'i :: :L '` a,, ." q "7 > --: ', --,- 7 .... /. .. . "... . .
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SPACIOUS ANTIGUA MODEL 2 bedrooms, PLAYA ENCANTADA Terni sld e ith all OVERLOOKS INTRACOASTAL Thi- 2
2 baths. Beautifully turnkey furnished. Reduced the amenities of Gulf side complex. Heated pool bedroom, 2.5 bath has security entry, eleva-
$127,000. Award winning landscaping, lighted & spa, clubhouse, on-site manager, covered tor, pool, garage parking, Jacuzzi, boat
tennis courts, 24 hour manned security, pools & parking, washer/dryer, storage $119,900. Call dock & private beach on Gulf. $144,900.
clubhouse. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261. Helen White 778-6956. Call Bill Bowman 778-4619.


BIMINI BAY PRICELESS VIEW 3 bed-
room, 2 bath home. 16x32 pool, 8 ft. hot tub,
40x10 dock w/lift. 210ft. sea wall, vaulted ceil-
ing, large lanai, well maintained. A LIFE STYLE
$375,000. Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones;
eves 778-6791.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS
$124,000. Parklike setting, ground floor end
unit, bright & sunny. Anna Maria's finest com-
plex. Walk to beach & shopping. Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones; eves 778-6791.





BOBYE
CHASE
EVENINGS
778-1532


Bobye is the only remaining Charter
Member of Neal & Neal's Anna Marna
office. She has earned her GRI desig-
nation and Broker status. She has been
a consistent million dollar plus producer
and active in community affairs.


EXCELLENT CONDITION 2 bedroom, 2
bath, just a short walk from DeSoto Square
Mall, on a lake with winding paths. Covered
parking, all appliances. $62,900. Call Paul
Martin 794-0049.


-...
,,7 _. ... . ]- ,


GULF FRONT CONDO 2 bedroom, 2 baths 3 Bedroom charm PERICO BAY $129,900.
with direct Gulf view. Complex has pool and is TURNKEY FURNISHED for Florida living.
on wide walking beach. Turnkey fumished with King bed in master -twins in guest, beautiful win-
new carpet & tile. $159,900. Call Mary Ann dow treatments, clean, neat, lovely views. Call
Schmidt 778-4931. Lu Rhoden 778-2692.


L:1iF'i I


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week


ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
from $700 mo.
Now Booking 1996 Seasonal
1 bedroom/1 bath ............................. $79,900 Rentals From $1300/mo.
2 bedroom/2 bath (first floor) ......... $142,500
2 bedroom/2 bath (second floor) ... $145,000 ulie
Premier Island location, heated pool, lush landscape, Call (941) 778-6665 or
Bay side. Call Lu or Bob Rhoden 778-2692 Toll Free 800-749-6665


.j._- ... .... ii- --_ .
-. ,.- ' .
. . . . . .. . _:. :~~. .. .a..J -.


Wedebroc Rea Company

cre al s since 1949

Call or visit Us loday! 33-5543
6350 Gulf of Mexico Drive longboat Key, Florida 34228
Free l as/Visitor Informati/er nl S eakini

For a subscription to The Islander Bystander, call (941)
778-7978 and have your Visa or MasterCard ready.







IIB PAGE 28 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
- ~r.. .* ~,& .1-a~.. .a ru.. 'I& .1-C,*. -I~ll ., .n ** U


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home arrant. Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND Smiles! =


JUST LISTED... magnificent bayfront with spectacular
view, Reclinata palms and lush landscaping and rock gar-
dens. 3BD, 3.5BA, hurricane shutters, 2 fireplaces, caged
pool with gas heated spa. 50' dock with elec/water and re-
mote controlled boat lift. $589,000. Call T. Dolly Young,
eves at 778-5427. #DY81795.
MARTINIQUE... just reduced. 2BD, 2BA, with newer appliance.
1 car garage, storage, pool, tennis, storm shutters, and secure
lobby with elevator. Enjoy outstanding sunsets on the Gulf of
Mexico from your glass enclosed lanai. #59042. $134,900. Call
Carol S. Heinze, eves at 792-5721.
DUPLEX... perfectly maintained duplex with 2BD, 1.5BA
and carport each side plus tropical trees, flowers and pro-
fessional landscaping. Very private fenced in backyard with
fruit trees and 1/2 block to the beach. #65582. $198,000.
Call Karin Stephan, eves at 388-1267.


DUPLEX... Beach access, 3BD/2BA,
fm rm, frpl, cprt/gar; 2BD/2BA, den.
#DY64777. $259,000.
MARTINIQUE... 3BD, 3BA, 2 car ga-
rage. Owner fin, available. #DY60737.
$196,900.
SUN PLAZA WEST... 2BD, 2BA,
turkey. Heated pool, sauna, tennis.
#DY63126. $167,500.
6 VILLA MOTEL... Valuel #DY63227.
$430,000.
ISLAND RESTAURANT... beach view/
high traffic visibility plus 2BD apart-
ment #DY52792. $450,000


T. Dolly Young
REALTORF/IMS
Leading Edge Society
778-5427


Karin Stephan
REALTOR* E
PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
Fax: 941- 778-3035


:* f | '- i,


CONCORD LANE... 3BD, 2BA, turnkey
furnished. Caged private pool and adjacent
docking available. #64666. $279,000.
PERICO BAY... 3BD, 2BA, beautiful up-
stairs unit overlooking Palma Sola Bay.
#59052. $187,100.
KEY ROYALE... 3BD, 3BA, corner lot,
lush landscaping, pool and canal w/dock.
#63811. $445,000.

MARTINIQUE...
1 white sandy beach, blue water and
breathtaking sunsets. All this and a
2BD, 2BA home with storm shutters,
heated pool, tennis, secure lobby, el-
evator, and two car garage. Call today
to have your own incredible view of the
Gull ol Mexico. #57185. $159,900.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTORO/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Soecialist


Only The Islander Bystander gives you complete news.
Weekly coverage of all three Island cities, all the happenings, stories about Island people, the elementary
school and much more. Use the mail order form on page 7 to subscribe or call (941) 778-7978 to charge
it on Visa or MasterCard. The Islander Bystander is 'the best news on Anna Maria Island."


WAGNER REALTY


&ice 1939


,No one 4 ows/4 Ania Ms a IHc t4 tter t4a. we do.
01 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
Call Toll free in the U.S. 1-800-211-2323


A RARE FLORIDA HOME Special 3BR/2BA home on ANNA MARIA ISLAND'S FINEST COMPLEX. Spec-
100x100 lot with view of Intracoastal. Built for easy enter- tacular views, wide sandy walking beach, heated pool
tainment with 30x48 covered and screened patio and pool and spa, secured elevator lobby, covered parking. Old
area. Large master bedroom includes spa room, large Florida architecture with quality construction. Three
walk-in closet and bath. Priced at $235,000. Call Ed prime units priced from $189,500 to $235,000. Call
Oliveira or Dave Moynihan for details. Dave Moyihan or Ed Oliveira.
",i. -k

Am


GULF CABINS Secluded complex with lush grounds,
direct view and walking beach enhance this well-
maintained 2BR/2BA unit an excellent buy. Great
location for second home or vacation rental priced at
$179,900. Call Ed Oliveira.


BAY VIEWS and mouth
of canal frontage from
deep water lot in prime
Holmes Beach location.
Quiet residential area
within walking distance
to beach. Offered at
$147,500. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


1'II1,


Dave Moynihan....... 778-7976


SUNSET TERRACE Tastefully decorated, 2BR/2BA
top floor unit in popular, well-maintained complex with
pool, covered parking and storage room. Views and
sandy walking beach enhance this excellent rental
opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


OCEAN PARK TERRACE Enjoy the sunsets from your
own roof top patio when you buy this centrally located,
turnkey furnished, 2BR/2BA condo with a Gulf view. In-
cludes pool, balconies, storage, secured building, el-
evator, great location and the great new walking beach.
Priced at $219,000. Call Ed Oliveira for details.


Ed Oliveira .......778-1751


Suzanne Georgia ....... 755-1576


B~ll Alexander.778-0609 Jackie Jerome......792-3226


Jackie Jerome .......... 792-3226


Bill Alexander ..........778-0609






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 PAGE 29 EJG



--ISL NDER CLA SIFIES-.,


FREE MULCH Bag it yourself. 208 Peacock Lane,
Holmes Beach.
WANTED Celebrity autographs, photos, playbills, pro-
grams, books, the Beatles, John Wayne, Marilyn Mon-
roe, Elvis, others. What do you have? 952-9251
SEARS COLDSPOT 18 cu. ft. refrigerator in good con-
dition. Harvest Gold, $100. Pick-up, one day only Wed.,
Sept. 6. Call (615) 484-4433 or 778-3134.
COFFEE TABLE $45, end table $35 and rug $25, black
marbled. 778-9342.
FREE about 35 gallons of home heating oil plus 55
gallon drum and stand. 778-3588.
40" CURTIS MATHES projection TV, factory rebuilt,
new condition, 90 day warranty. $750 firm. Remote,
cable ready on screen display. 795-5324.
PIANO UPRIGHT, for sale or will trade for pool table.
778-1966.
CRIB $59, side-by-side refrigerator $69, glass top rat-
tan coffee table $39, electric piano, frames and more.
778-8221, beeper 723-5504.
ITEMS WANTED: Donations of re-usable items for
SAM'S grand garage sale on Sept. 30, note date
change. Deliver to Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf, or call Joy
at 778-5405. Proceeds dedicated to SAM'S legal fund.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.



"WALK WITH ME..."
To select your
island property.
When buying or
selling...

I can make your
island dreams
come true.

ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR

Wagner Realty Since 1939


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


3 U


BLACK FURNITURE Excellent condition, 2 console
cabinets, 2 end cabinets, 3 sets shelves, set 4 fold-
ing wood tables/stand, dining room wood oval table
(43"x61") & leaf (16"), 6 chairs/wheels, floor lamp/3
lights, desk (20"x72")/7 drawers, leather swivel desk
chair, dishes for 4 plus serving pieces. Cream area
rugs (5'7"x8' & 2'x4'), green Christmas tree (7'), dark
green sectional couch (queen sleeper & two reclin-
ers), 5 white lamps, Aqua childs pool (4'6"x6'), Henry
Link 5-piece bedroom (2 twin headboards, triple
dresser, mirror, night table.) 778-6110.
RED BUNK BEDS, bottom double, top twin. Table and
4 chairs. 1 childs chest, stove hood, pictures, 1 chair
and misc. 778-3730.
MITSUBISHI 26" stereo television, $250. 1982 Mercury
Zephyr, 4-door, $550. 778-2862.
IN-LINE SKATES, Roller Derby BX5000. Men's size 7.
Over $230 new. Almost new wheels. Very fast. Asking
$120. 778-7978.
FUJI 21 SPEED BIKE, small frame. $100. 778-7978.


REMODELING SALE Fri 8-4 & Sat 8-1, Sept 1 & 2.
622 Hampshire Lane, Key Royale. Bunk-beds, desk,
chairs, etagere, drapes, pix, much misc.



HAVE A VACANCY??
WE HAVE TENANTS FOR
SHORT AND LONG TERM
RENTALS ON OR OFF
THE ISLAND
"DIAL DEBBIE"
778-7777 or 1-800-664-8152
'- i IMK Gulfstream
Debbie Dial '5600 MARINA DR. STE. 8
Leasing Manager HOLMES BEACH, FL.








Whether you are looking for an island property
or a Manatee County waterfront home, contact
the waterfront specialists, the exceptional people
at Michael Saunders & Company.


CASUAL ENJOYMENT is yours with this 3BR/2B
split design, ranch-style home. Features newly re-
modeled kitchen, large bedrooms, great family room.
Pool, covered patio, dock, davits. $265,000. Nancy
Keegan, 723-3929.


WATERFRONT HOME OF DISTINCTION. Fully re-
modeled and tastefully appointed. Split floor-plan,
gracious entry, formal living/dining room, new AC.
New dock and davits. $189,000. Barry and KImberly
Charles, 795-1273.


mis residence rises on ralma sola nay. sBuR.Bu,
Palladlan and stained glass windows. Open brick
porch, 4-car garage, dock and davits, elegant slop-
Ing gardens. Potential studio/guest quarters.
$750,000. Traute Wlnsor, 727-7074 or Bobble
Banan, 383-2659.


Licensed Racl l-stte Iloker
Rcsidcntial Silces / H'Reilltl DIivision:
3224 Estr By D)rive, I lolmcs IBach, FL 34217 (941) 778-6654
4400 M natcc Avcnue W, Iradcnron, FL 34209 (941) 748-6300


MOVING SALE Sat, Sept 2. 9-3. 750 N. Shore, under
cover. Housewares, linens, nic nacs, books, stereo, king
bed, antique desk, and oddities. All priced to go!
WANTED: Household appliances, furniture, sports
equipment, toys, plants, books, linens, collectibles, all
for the Anna Maria Island Historical Society Flea Mar-
ket, Saturday, Sept, 16, 8 am to noon 402 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. Delivered to the museum or call for pick-
up call 778-4198 or 778-1514.


Found and detained in Holmes Beach, small very
colorful parrot. We will care for it until owner can
identify. 778-9213.
Found kitten. 78th Street area. 778-2874.
OCEAN KAYAK MISSING vicinity of Marina Isle and
Bimini Bay. Reward offered for safe return. Please call
778-8652. Help locate the 9 ft. turquoise "Frenzy."


REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5408
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center (between D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre restaurants), Holmes Beach.


GULF FRONT DUPLEX. Looking for a direct Gulf front
investment property? Look no further this 2 bedroom, 1
bath and 1 bedroom, 1 bath duplex with new roof, new a/c
and other upgrades priced at $275,000 is the answer. Call
Marion Ragni 778-1504 for details and showing.


I I
NEW LISTING GULF FRONT HOLMES BEACH
CONDO. Love a spectacular view? You must see this 2
bedroom, 2 bath condo with a great room design, cathedral
ceiling, screened balcony with stairs leading directly to the
beach, updated a/c & heat, security system, covered park-
ing and large ground level 12x12 storage. Priced at
$174,900. Call Carol R. Williams 778-1718 after hours.


AFFORDABLE ISLAND LIVING. 2 bedroom, 2 bath
furnished villa with 1 car garage and screened lanai that
overlooks greenbelt area. Within walking distance to boat
ramp, tennis courts and shopping. All this for only $84,000.
Call Darcie Duncan 778-2290 after hours.


I LI

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Have it your way
- Island canalfront with great boating and no bridges to the Bay.
Walk to the beach too! This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has a large
yard with room for pool, and a 100 foot new seawall. Many va-
rieties of citrus and palms. Freshly painted and ready for YOU!
$188,500. Call Judy Duncan at 778-1589.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS


s 0inut






IMJ PAGE 30 M AUGUST 31, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


and Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by Ihe month.
SSerice .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
S 7781345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
\MS8i 3AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353
















State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
.* ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
8 MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
* SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimaintes 748-3558
New Construction
Remodeling 9 Service Calls
741-8900 RF-0066644



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740




RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED




SLICENSEADDITIONSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED




F IBERGLASS SHINGLES BATHS
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free E estimates 78-5230558

REMODELIC #RR053399NG
ADDITIONS
RENOVATIONS

DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399



JdX~r~ ul H IX iAIMESI


J. R

Painting
4Prwreur Cleniung
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139



SISLANDERw

The "best" news


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


A I A
ANONCMNT9oniue ERIESCntne


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Motivational theme classes; 50s,
60s, 70s, 80s, Top 40, Salsa & circuit training. Classes are
Mon. & Wed. 6:30 to 7:30 pm at The Silver Community Cen-
ter, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach. MUSCLE TON-
ING Upper & lower body toning using dynabands, dumb bells
(1 3 Ibs for women & 3 5 Ibs for men) and body's own re-
sistance. Classes are Tues. & Thur. 6:30 to 7:45 pm at The
Silver Community Center, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr., Bradenton
Beach. For info call Geri 779-2129.

THANK YOU St. Jude for prayer answered. B.C.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


83 SUBARU WAGON Runs well. $375. 778-7710
NISSAN 1993 Quest Van, excellent condition, only
30,800 miles, fully service plus new tires, brakes.
$18,000. 778-6110.
1985 JAGUAR excellent condition, new headliner, tires,
brake pads, silver. A must see car. $7,000. 778-1990.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything else
in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-1990.
YACHT DETAILING by Carleen. Maintenance pro-
grams, detailing, teak, waxing. No boat too small. Island
resident. Pager #813-252-0080.
ESCAPE on deluxe catamaran. Stable, fast, shal-
low draft. Snorkel, swim, sail. Family fun. Overnight
and day trips to Egmont Key. Passage Charters
794-5980. Group rates.
17' DAYSAILER -Great Bay boat, basic. $450. 778-7710.


LAWN MAINTENANCE Part-time. I need a hard work-
ing responsible individual. 779-2183.
RETIREES looking to travel? Become a cruise and
tour escort. Couples welcome. Call Blue Marlin
Travel, 745-5131.
KITCHEN AND WAIT PERSON wanted, Smurfs Res-
taurant 103 Gulf Dr. N. Apply in person 2-4.
OUTSIDE SALES in the travel industry. Now that the
kids are back to school earn extra $. Make your own
hours. Enjoy travel benefits. Call 745-5131.
DRUG FREE work place Great program, seeks positive,
creative, motivated, nurturing, educated individuals to
teach children ages 5 to 10 or ages 11 to 14. Aftemoons
daily, some evenings and Saturdays. Salary range $5.50
to $7.00 depending on experience. Call 778-9511.
DRUG FREE work place Great program, seeks licensed
eligible M.S.W. to work with children and families. Super-
vision available. Afternoons and some evenings. Salary
range from $10.00 to $15.00 per hour depending on expe-
rience and qualifications. Call 778-1908.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet in-
teresting people from around the world? Are you inter-
ested in learning the history of Anna Maria Island? Get
involved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Museum,
402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU! Call Dor-
othy Stevenhagen, 795-0148 if you can give a few hours
of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


Would you be interested in eliminating your long dis-
tance phone bill and also earning an excellent income
in your spare time? Sound too good to be true? Give me
a call and find out. Frank Stork, 778-8200.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled and
memory impaired adults at adult day center, through Mana-
tee Council on Aging. Transportation available. 748-6974."


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn your
old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.


NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk... whatever your hauling
needs. Call Eddie O. 792-1693.
SEAMSTRESS new in town. 25 years experience. Al-
terations, mending, hemming, repairs. Will pick-up. Call
Sandra 941-795-0676.
SPARKLE & SHINE prompt, courteous housecleaning
by Melissa. 747-6044, pager 569-8065.
"SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Residential and com-
mercial cleaning. Homes, condos, rentals. Move in/out
specialist. Estimates and appointments. Beverly 778-1945.
THE PERFECTIONIST will clean office, homes, and
rentals the way they should be cleaned. Interior paint-
ing also. Call Sharon at 778-6329.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL 2, 3 & 5 day
programs. Limited places available. 778-2967.
A-DRY CLEANERS Business, residence. Free pick-up
& delivery. 778-9189.
"MOTHER DEAR" housecleaning. Thorough, reliable and
very reasonable. Excellent references. Fall specials on
"cleaning under and inside" and on "tightening." 778-2862.
HOUSECLEANING reasonable rates, Christian lady
wants to clean house. Good references. 761-8402.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town and the
best results from classified ads and service advertising!
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed
and much more. Protect your investment. Call
Damon on mobile number 320-0110. Please leave
a message for quick reply if not available.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Remove
stains first, dry foam scrubbing, extract soap out leav-
ing carpets dirt and soap free. Free deodorizing. 11
years experience. Owner operated. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident 25
yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM -VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.




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ES TEE S K ED SK IE E _EE ENC E
LEHAsR sTE SNS T RE S


Protect your auto investment

from the scorching sun!







We clean and wax everything for one low price.
Everything is included for $85 on a normal
size car. Top to bottom, ashtray to engine! Hand
wash, buff, seal and polish, vacuum, Armorall,
dress rims and tires, shampoo interior, satin-
black under-carriage. Even the engine is
cleaned and silicone protected. Our complete
mobile service means no one has to drive your
car. We come to you. By appointment,
at your convenience, home or office.
Mobile service number: 320-0110.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 31, 1995 M PAGE 31 jIj


PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.
THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of home
repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experience. Insured,
island resident, references available. Jim 779-2129.
MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and responsible.
Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard.
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.


MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.

ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
GULF FRONT residence. Excellent north Holmes Beach
location. Fully fumished 2BR/2BA. Available short term.
Call Dave Moynihan, Realtor 778-7976/778-2246.
BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
GULFFRONT 1BR/1BA vacation condo. Screened
lanai, sundeck, private beach, nicely furnished. Avail-
able weekly/monthly Aug. 1 to Dec. 30 starting at $425.
weekly. 778-2832.
LUXURY CANAL FRONT one story home with pool. 2/
3 bedroom, 3 baths, three quarter block from beach.
$3,400/mo, weekly rates available. 1-800-223-4472.
SUMMER, ANNUAL AND SEASONAL rentals. Call the
rental specialist. Wagner Realty 778-2246.
LOVELY HOLMES BEACH 2BR/3BA home on sailboat
water with dock. Recent renovation. Annual or seasonal.
775-5047 after 3 pm.
BAYFRONT, available Sept. 1. Annually or weekly
monthly, seasonally. Large 2BR/1BA newly remodeled,
private apt with boat dock. Walk to Gulf, restaurants and
shops. Includes utilities. 794-8792.
YEARLY 2BR/2BA, condo. Dishwasher, disposal, cen-
tral heat/AC, heated pool. Bayshore active adult com-
munity. $460/mo. 795-4432. Close to everything.
ISLAND SEASONAL/ANNUAL rentals. T. Dolly Young,
The Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766.


FALL SPECIAL Gulf front condo, private beach, large
pool, 2BR/1BA. $350/wk. 778-7323.
ANNA MARIA N. END Waterfront apts. steps to beauti-
ful beach. Fully furnished. Amenities includes hot-tubs &
Kayaks, great fishing. Starting at $400 a week. 778-2202.
LABOR DAY WEEKEND rental special 3 nights, $180.
Nice cottage, cross street to public beach. 778-2832.
3BR/2BA CONDO pool, tennis court. Monthly avail-
able Oct. 1, lower rate for longer stays. 778-3036.
LOVELY ANNA MARIA Gulf front apt. 2 bedroom,
porch, cable, micro, no pets, not annual. 778-3143.
MARTINQUE WATER FRONT condo. $1,500 plus
electric and phone. Available 9/15/95 to 12/15/95. Turn-
key 813-884-0222.
ANNA MARIA Female to share nice house with male
smoker. Washer/dryer, utilities included. $400/mo.,
child plus $50. Call 778-6742.
HOLMES BEACH, unfurnished annual rental. Newly
decorated, 2BR/2BA, covered parking, steps to beach
and shopping. $625/mo plus utilities. 1st, last and se-
curity. No pets 778-0217.
ANNUAL MODERN HB duplex, 2BR/2BA, appli-
ances, covered parking, large storage, 1 block to
beach, no dogs. Available 10/1. $750/mo plus $1,000
security. 778-9689.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/1BA, upstairs, walk to beach, w/
d hook-up. 1st, last plus security. $600/mo. 778-7980.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of
Anna Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/
3 acre w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young af-
ter hours. 778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.

FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/
1BA each unit, close to shopping center $119,000.
404 71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit -
$159,000. 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to
Gulf $169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.

COMMERCIAL CONDOMINIUM in Homes Beach. 2-
story, one drive-in door, one walk-in door, heart of In-
dustrial District $45,000. Call Rose Schnoerr, Neal &
Neal Realtors 778-2261.
DEEP WATER CANAL lot 70'x100'. Easy access to
Gulf. 316 Tarpon. $160,000. Choice view and location.
Call 1-317-825-2217.
You get all the best news in The Islander Bytstander
newspaper. More Island news than any other source.


More information: 778-7978


IS ANDE C ASSFI DS
HOE MPOVMNTCotiud'RETAS


SUN
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Pack &Ship
Moving services Domestic/Intemational
Small packages to entire estates
SHINE SHIPPING 727-7447


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AP HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125- RGOO58589.PE002374 778-9244


Mobile Home Sales
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Experienced Thoughtful
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Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL



BAY VIEW annual rental, efficiency, $350.00 month
includes utilities.
WALK TO BEACH! Newly decorated 2/2 home. New
appliances & A/C. Garage & storage. $149,900.
CALL Broker Susan Normand 778-1443


6y Central Vacuum
Systems

,d Built-in Ironing Board Centers
Complete vacuum systems
as low as $475.00
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Sales 813-765-7785 service


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778-6201
Dependable, Courteous 1-800-HBF-TAXI
Service Since 1991 (423-8249)


N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907

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CLASSIFIED AD FORM

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be
placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours:
9 to 5, Monday- Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each
7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to
21 WORDS. Additional words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in per-
son or by phone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with
your charge card number. Sorry, we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: For 21 word minimum, use one word for each
blank space.


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The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet shirts, subscription orders and
classified advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392


I BAS rEA


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-JM PAGE 32 0 AUGUST 31, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


--- 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
HOM1 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
IP DWe Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5,1995


oods


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