<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00579

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


THERE'S A WHOLE CROWD OF TURTLE LOVERS OUT THERE!


Hundreds of turtle lovers turned out to watch a mother turtle lay eggs and return to the Gulf in front of White Sands resort in Holmes Beach. Sea turtles venture
onto the beaches each spring and early summer to dig nests. The tiny turtles emerge about 60 days later and head for the water. For more about turtles, see
page 14. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn


Council again says 'no thanks' to farm animals


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council last week said no
to a request to change the city's ordinance banning pigs
and other farm-type animals.
The request came from Barbara Baker of Pillar
Pigs of the Community Association on behalf of
Shirley Howden-Gillett. Howden-Gillett was ordered


The Anna Maria Fire Control District must spend
$17,000 to $20,000 for additional manpower during the
Cortez Bridge rehabilitation project.
The month-long closure of the bridge and the
planned one-lane traffic necessitate the hiring of four
temporary firefighters for Station 2 on Cortez Road.
"We'll have to man Station 2 around the clock," said
Fire Chief Andy Price at last week's fire commission
meeting. "I am asking to hire temporary firefighter/EMTs
for that period for $125 per 24-hour shift."
Price expects all the temporary personnel to come
from the district's volunteer organization and surrounding
fire districts. The additional personnel will give the district
four daytime firefighters and three at night at each station.


Two state agencies are squaring off over bridge
rubble dumped at artificial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico
off Anna Maria Island.
The Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion claims Misener Marine, a contractor for the Florida
Department of Transportation, improperly dumped oily
wooden timbers, steel and other construction rubble
across the Seven-Mile Reef west of the Island without
a permit in 1993.
DOT and Misener Marine representatives claim the
DEP gave the go-ahead for the dumping, although
Misener workers removed steel rods protruding from
the concrete and relocated much of the concrete to an-
other site near the reef at a cost of $787,000 funds
paid to Misener by the DOT.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will
have the final say in the matter. EPA officials are in-


... and where's the pig?
by the city's code enforcement board to get rid of her
pet pot-bellied pig by Aug. 14 or face a fine of $25 per
day.
"Is the council interested in changing our law?"
asked Council Chairman Luke Courtney.
"I'm not interested in pursuing this case but I have


The funds to pay the temporary firefighters will
come from funds saved by delaying the hiring of four
new firefighters and a receptionist that were approved
as part of the 1995-96 budget.
The hiring is being delayed due to changes in the
state retirement system. Previously all employees were
required to join the costly state retirement system, but
new legislation allows new employees to join a less ex-
pensive retirement program. However, the legislation
does not take effect until Jan. 1.
By delaying the hiring of new employees, the dis-
trict will save about $38,000, said Price.
"We have no other choice," said Commissioner
John VanOstenbridge.


vestigating to determine if the federal Clean Water Act
was violated in the concrete dumping. Fines can
amount to $25,000 per day if the act is violated.
The debris came from the old Sunshine Skyway
Bridge. DOT paid Misener $2.6 to demolish much of
the old bridge to make way for a new span.
There is also some controversy about the source of
much of the rubble. DOT officials state some of the sus-
pect debris came from the Maximo Bridge at the north end
of the Skyway causeway, a bridge that was not approved
for artificial reef material. Misener Marine officials say
that is not true and all the rubble came from the Skyway.
They have also been critical of DOT's handling and au-
thorizations of the debris dumping siting.
Ironically, the Maximo Bridge has been renamed
the Richard "Dick" Misener bridge, after the founder
of Misener Marine.


nothing against pot-bellied pigs if the neighbors ap-
prove of it," said Councilwoman Carol Whitmore. "We
gave a special exception before."
Councilwoman Pat Geyer agreed with Whitmore
and added, "This is not a pig problem, it's a people
problem."
"A previous council made an exception, and we're
paying for it now," noted Councilwoman Billie
Whitmore.
City Attorney Patricia Petruff pointed out that the
council has no authority to grant special exceptions.
"The information from Mrs. Baker doesn't change
my mind," stressed Councilman Don Maloney. "Pigs
don't chase cars and bark, but cows don't either. The
ordinance is to keep farm animals out of our city. The
law is clear."
Courtney said Howden-Gillett signed an affidavit
on Aug. 14 that the pig is gone, and he asked her if that
is true.
"I did have somebody watch her but she couldn't
watch her all the time." said Howden Gillett. "I did
have her for a week at the house, and I will not lie
about her."
"So the pig is back at your house now?" asked
Courtney.
Howden-Gillett refused to answer.
Courtney said he will send the matter back to code
enforcement.
One neighbor said he saw the pig being loaded into
a cage in a truck on Thursday following Tuesday's
work session.


Cortez Bridge repairs


will cost fire district $17,000


Investigation ongoing in

reef debris dumping dispute


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ..................................................... 6
Those W ere the Days ............................. .... 7
Alaska ........................................................ 15
Stir-it-up...................................................... 16
Announcements ......................................... 18
Streetlife ..................................................... 19
Anna Maria Island tides ............................ 20
Real estate ............... ...............................22
Business................. .................................23
Crossword puzzle....................................... 28


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


AUGUST 24, 1995







i]] PAGE 2 M AUGUST'24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Honeymoon catch on loan to Island museum


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The honeymoon "big one" of a Holmes Beach
couple is the newest item on display at the Anna Maria
Island Historical Society museum.
Thirty-four years ago this October, Sue and Alvin
Bentley spent their honeymoon in Mexico City and
Acapulco.
"We spent most of it in bed," says Alvin with a
twinkle in his eye. "But it's not what you think. First I
was sick, then Sue was."
On a fine day in Acapulco, when both were feeling.
up to it, Sue and Alvin boarded a charter fishing boat and
headed out into the sparkling waters of the Pacific.
All told, five or six impressive sailfish were caught
and released. One a stunning, 125- or 130-pounder
- they kept. It was the "big one" they caught as a team
and the sailfish has been a life-size symbol of their
partnership ever since.
The sailfish measures 8 1/2 feet from the tip of its
tail to the tip of its beak. From Acapulco the fish was
shipped to Ft. Lauderdale to the renowned Pflueger
taxidermist.
"That's right," says Alvin, standing beside the
crated memento outside the museum. "This is an origi-
nal, Pflueger skin mount."
Not only does the Pflueger mount make the Bentley
fish unique today's stuff-and-mount process involves
plastic versus the original skin "but look what good
condition this is in 34 years later," Alvin says.
The Bentleys' keepsake has been resting alone in
a crate these past few years. Daughter Susan Bentley
recently spied The Islander Bystander's ongoing clas-


4


mo m :o1 .. ..,,magm um um-um"Imm m. m..k. ...I
The Bentleys sons Joshua, front left, and Cab, and Old Man in the Sea Alvin take a breather outside the
museum with Historical Society President Cathi O'Bannon as they prepare to uncrate the "big one" for
museum display. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


sified ad: "WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed
fish. Get rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. "
Susan called this paper and ultimately was referred
to Carolyne Norwood, former president of the Histori-


cal Society.
On a sizzling, summer morning, Alvin and his sons
carted the crated catch to the museum on Pine, where
now she rests, on loan, for all the world to see.


North beach entrance to be paved for safety


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Reversing an earlier decision, the Holmes Beach
City Council last week voted 5 0 to pave a 75-foot
portion of the north entrance to the Manatee County
Public Beach.
The city's safety committee recommended that the
unpaved strip of the triangle entrance be paved and that
cars only be permitted to exit south onto Gulf Drive
from the strip.
At the council's previous meeting, Councilwomen
Carol Whitmore and Billie Martini held out against the
project, citing their opposition to any new paving be-
cause of drainage problems.
"I ask council to reconsider the paving project as
a public safety issue," said Mayor Rich Bohnenberger.
"Based on the vote taken at the last meeting, should


there be litigation in the future we are weak on the de-
fense side."
Whitmore and Martini reiterated their opposition.
"Paving is not the safety issue, it's the traffic flow,"
said Whitmore. "If you put tar there it will flood. We're
making a big deal out of nothing."
Council members Pat Geyer and Don Maloney
were as adamant in support of the paving.
"We're talking about the ability to get onto a main
thoroughfare from a dirt road," responded Maloney.
"The paving is a big deal when it comes to doing ev-
erything you can to alert people and direct traffic in and
out of that place and when it comes to enforcement," noted
Police Chief Jay Romine. "I want to do it the right way -
paving one single lane and moving it 20 feet to the north
of where people pull out now to increase the distance that
they can see southbound traffic coming."


The area is wide enough for two lanes, said
Whitmore. She asked what the city plans to do in the
remainder of the area.
Romine suggested plantings.
Martini asked why a sign indicating right turns
only would not suffice.
"If you don't pave it, the only thing people have to
go by is the sign," replied Romine. "If they are not
paying attention and don't see the sign, there's a prob-
lem. You need to have signs and paving with stripes on
it saying one way right turn only with a directional ar-
row."
"I like all the chief's suggestions," said Council
Chairman Luke Courtney. 'The only way to designate
it as a road it to pave it."
Both Whitmore and Martini agreed to the one-lane
paving.


Anna Maria Mayor seeks action on beach


Anna Maria Mayor Dottie McChesney last week
urged Island officials to act on several issues including
testing local waters for swimmer safety, dumping of
waste by ships in the Gulf, beach cleaning and personal
watercraft and beach cleaning.
"I got a letter from Gloria Rains that the monitor-
ing of our water people swim in is not going to con-
tinue," said McChesney at a meeting of the Coalition
of Barrier Island Elected Officials. "Sarasota tests five
beaches quarterly and it only costs $1,000 a year."
She called the health department and learned that
state funding for the testing was discontinued, said
McChesney.
County Administrator Ernie Padgett said he would


check on the matter.
McChesney also told officials she wrote the Coast
Guard's Office of Marine Safety concerning ships
dumping waste in the Gulf.
"Once ships get a certain number of miles out, they
are allowed to dump everything except plastic because
of the fish," she said. "It's disgusting to think of all that
going into the water, so I've written a strong letter ask-
ing that they pursue making the Gulf of Mexico an
exclusion zone."
There is a 3,000-square-mile dead zone in the Gulf
where nothing can survive, she said.
Bradenton Beach Councilman Dick Suhre sug-
gested seeking help at the state level.


Bridge info-signs may be coming


A special task force is forming to study the fea-
sibility of installing informational signs near 75th
Street and both Manatee Avenue and Cortez Road
to inform motorists of the status of the bridges lead-
ing to and from the Island.
The signs have been pushed by Holmes Beach
Councilwoman Billie Martini for several years.
Now, members of the technical advisory committee
to a regional transportation planning organization
have gotten into the act.


Manatee County Transportation Director
Harry Mendenhall said, "The intent is to try to get
various message signs to indicate to approaching
traffic the status of the bridge."
He said the signs would be triggered by the
bridge tender and would inform motorists if the
bridge was broken. No date for the committee
meetings have been set, and no price tag for the
signs has been determined.
"I'd like to see them sometime," Martini said.


She will check for information from the Sarasota
Bay National Estuary Program, added Holmes Beach
Councilwoman Billie Martini.
The City of Bradenton now has a boat and will
begin patrolling the Palma Sola Causeway area, said
Suhre, and he fears it will drive more personal water-
craft users to the Island.
McChesney suggested designating a launching
area.
The control should come at the state level, said
Suhre.
"It is a wide-spread problem that's hard to en-
force," noted Padgett. "The county I came from in
North Florida was trying to deal with the problem. We
had one gentleman circumvent the regulations we had
in place by getting a party barge and going out to where
the state law took over."
"I would like to offer a simple solution to this," said
Bradenton Beach resident Jim Kissick. "If the state could
be induced to put a large identifying number on each craft,
it could be identified photographically. All it takes is a
camera and a long distance lens. If you've got the num-
ber, you've the got enforcement capability."
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola asked
Kissick to draft a letter to the state outlining his idea.
The county could write a similar letter, said
Padgett.
Padget announced that the county has put addi-
tional money in its budget for beach cleaning. The
cleaning will include raking seaweed after storms and
red tide cleanup.


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 N PAGE 3 B1i


Anna Maria revisits beach renourishment


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"Whether it's unpopular or not, I think I'd be re-
miss if I didn't bring it up for rational discussion."
So says Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy McChesney
of a beach-erosion/renourishment item on the the city
commission's Aug. 22 agenda.
The city of Anna Maria opted not to participate in
the $13 million federal, state and county restoration
project that widened Gulf beaches in Holmes Beach
and Bradenton Beach in 1992-93.
If Anna Maria wishes its shoreline to be included
in the next phase of the project slated for 2001, the city
needs to act quickly, according to Jack A. Gorzeman,
Manatee County Environmental Projects Coordinator.
In a letter to McChesney, Gorzeman says Anna
Maria is authorized to receive sand under the existing
General Design Memorandum (GDM). The county and
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could agree to
amend the GDM plans and specifications to incorpo-
rate the city's beaches.
Studies and evaluations, the search for sand and
funding, and the amendment process "will likely take



The way it was
Beachgoers and shell
collectors flocked to Anna
Maria Island in 1992-93
when the dredge pumped
millions of yards of sand
onto the Gulf shores of
Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach. The -
renourishment project is
scheduled to again take
place in 2001. Islander
Photo: Bonner Presswood
S .'
t^ 1


a number of years and require approval by the Assis-
tant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works," says
Gorzeman.
If Anna Maria wishes to pursue inclusion, he says,
"work should begin as soon as possible."
Gorzeman concludes, "It is important to have
strong backing from the Anna Maria City Commission
and the Manatee County Board of County Commis-
sioners."
McChesney and former Public Works Director
Frank Tyndall met with Gorzeman June 16 along the
stretch of Gulf beach near the Sandbar restaurant. The
purpose of the visit at that time was to address serious
rock problems at beach accesses.
They also noted severe erosion damage from last
winter. McChesney told The Islander Bystander that
Gorzeman indicated the Gulf beach from Gulf Boule-
vard north to Newton Lane could be "a case for
renourishment."
"It seems like in one season," says McChesney,
"several years of good build-up was lost. Suppose we
have more erosion and more storms?"
The mayor says that after that meeting she was










. ;
I t
9 .
. ~ ~ ~ ~ -


approached by Sandbar owner Ed Chiles while lunch-
ing at the restaurant. The mayor says Chiles asked that
the city explore being involved in the 2001 efforts
scheduled for the southern beaches. McChesney wrote
Gorzeman to "investigate this possibility."
"I know this is controversial," McChesney says.
"But as the mayor I feel I have a responsibility to tell
the citizens there is a possibility. If the city commission
doesn't at least pursue discussion, we'd be remiss in
not bringing this forward. I'd just like to lay it all on the
table."
McChesney says she hopes to schedule a public
meeting to furnish citizens with as much information
as possible.
In a memo to the commission prior to the Aug. 22
regular meeting, McChesney wrote: "Because of all the
reasons stated in [Gorzeman's] letter, and the time con-
straints mentioned, I feel strongly that the city commission
should weigh all the pros and cons and consider all the
ramifications of both sides of this issue in order to do what
is in the best interest of the city of Anna Maria."



Anna Maria City
8/30, 7:30, Planning and Zoning Board
8/31, Community meeting with Public Works
Supervisor Phil Charnock

Bradenton Beach
No meetings scheduled

Holmes Beach
8/24, 10 a.m., Planning Commission meeting
with emergency management personnel
8/25, 9 a.m., Code Enforcement Board

Of Interest
8/26, 10:30 a.m., Holmes Beach Civic Asso-
ciation, Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive.
8/28, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization CANCELED


Inim taufsd*wthw rl-las







boullaaise.,rac oflam, Gd~sow
vie, n aco lihe spris@ad in


I ISLANDER


I DY r~iI it


It takes award-winning journalists to produce
an award-winning newspaper.
The Islander Bystander earned four awards
in the Florida Press Association's
1995 Better Newspaper Contest
Community Newspapers Division A:
Circulation 12,000 and over (15,000)

Second Place, Editorial Page
"Good cartoonist, lots of letters, local editorials"

Third Place
Paul Roat, Feature Picture "Action, intensity, clarity"

Honorable Mention, In-depth News Reporting
Pat Copeland, Community in Crisis
"Reporter and paper took on the 'big one' crime, sex, drugs
and kids in an eight-part series that took the reporter to the
schools, the cop shop and beyond. A real effort to do a
serious community service."

Honorable Menion, Environmental or Conservation
Vanishing Culture: Cortez and the impending net ban
by Bob Ardren, David Futch and Paul Roat
"The clash of environment and the historical livelihood of a
community is presented well. Details bring stories alive and
these stories have a lot."

Thank you for reading The Islander Bystander






IB PAGE 4 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Bicycle accident produces protest


By Paul Roat
When Bonner Presswood, publisher of The Is-
lander Bystander, went to Anna Maria to photograph
a Bayflite air ambulance pick-up July 28, she was con-
fronted by the mother of the injured boy, Mary London,
screaming, "Don't you take pictures of my child not
for that newspaper."
London, an employee of another Island publica-
tion, was obviously distraught over the thought of her
son's picture appearing in a competitor's newspaper.
Photos taken of the accident scene after the he-
licopter departed with 10-year-old Jared London
have become the subject of a protest by London that
included her picketing The Islander Bystander office
with her eight-year-old daughter. They were joined
during the protest at the Island Shopping Center by
Dolphin publisher Dennis Friedel, news editor Tom
Vaught and former Dolphin employee Mike
Kinsella.
Now it appears Jared's mother wants the photo-
graphs taken at the accident scene by Presswood. As a
result of the accident, Jared London's right arm has
been amputated. Advertising clients of The Islander
Bystander said they received calls from Mary London
last week saying she needed The Islander Bystander's
photos for a lawsuit. She claimed the newspaper had
refused to give her any photos.
According to Presswood, Mary London has never
requested the photographs.
Joseph Moritz, a private investigator with Adar
Investigations, Inc., Bradenton, came to The Islander
Bystander office on Aug. 11 and requested photo-
graphs taken of the accident scene.
Moritz was purportedly retained by Sarasota attor-
ney James Dirmann, who wrote Presswood an Aug. 14
letter in which he requested the photographs. The let-
ter did not state for whom he was working, and during
a subsequent phone call Dirmann would not disclose
who his client was. He would only state he had a "com-
pelling interest" and that he represented the interests of
Jared London.
Legal counsel advised The Islander Bystander not
to release photos to attorney Dirmann unless properly
subpoenaed by the court. Dick Shelton, executive di-
rector of the Florida Press Association, confirmed this
recommendation and said a subpoena is required before
releasing photographs in this type of situation.
Dirmann was notified that The Islander Bystander
would release the photos if a court ordered them to do
so. No such legal action has occurred.
The legal situation was explained to Jared's father,
Randy London, when he visited the newspaper office.
Randy London said he hired Dirmann and that he has
legal custody of Jared. The boy was visiting the Island
from Cape May, N.J. at the time of the accident.
Presswood said she explained that the photos were
taken for the purpose of a news article, not for the pur-


Mary London picketed The Islander Bystander office with her eight-year-old daughter. They were joined
during the protest at the Island Shopping Center by Dolphin publisher Dennis Friedel, news editor Tom


Vaught, and former Dolphin employee Mike Kinsella.

pose of anyone's lawsuit. She told Jared's father that
everyone at The Islander Bystander was extremely
sorry about the accident and sympathetic to his situa-
tion but the newspaper could not release the photos
without a court order.
Randy London was told by Presswood that the
newspaper would not release the photos to either party
contemplating a lawsuit or to the sheriff's office.
According to Presswood, when Mary London
called clients of The Islander Bystander and said
Presswood refused to help Jared, many of those adver-
tisers took the time to call The Islander Bystander to
ask why.
"Our office was flooded with phone calls from
advertisers who said, 'Mary London says you refused
to give her photos that would help Jared and she says
you won't tell her why and why is Mary calling
me?'" Presswood said.
Presswood said Mary London may have an ax to
grind. She is reported to be a stockholder in Dolphin
Publishing Inc., and was employed at the Dolphin
newspaper until last Thursday. "I can only assume they
think damaging the reputation of The Islander By-
stander will improve the chances of survival for the
Dolphin."
Friedel and London jointly authored a letter ap-
pearing in several local publications thanking the com-


munity for its support for "our boy." London is re-
ported to reside with Friedel, publisher and president
of Dolphin Publishing Inc.
Presswood pointed out that everyone who called
told her that London advised them to stop advertising
with The Islander Bystander. "I specifically asked the
callers if London had pleaded with them to intervene
on her behalf. They all said no she did not request
their assistance."
Presswood said she explained the legal responsibil-
ity of the newspaper is to remain objective and that all
the callers were understanding. Presswood said some
callers thought London's actions were unethical, some
suggested she should get a court order if she wanted the
photos and some said if she wanted help or needed
money for medical expenses they would be willing to
contribute.
Holmes Beach Police Lt Nancy Rogers said, "You
can't give her those photos. You can't even give them
to the police. I've tried to request photos from the
Tampa Tribune and I know you just can't do that."
Presswood said she returned to The Islander By-
stander office with staff member Joy Courtney follow-
ing Saturday's picketing and Jared London was wait-
ing with his sister at the door of the office. Presswood
said Jared asked "Are you the lady with the pictures?"
and then immediately ran to a waiting car.


THE PHOTOGRAPHS IN QUESTION ARE PRINTED ON PAGE 10




Resident says Holmes Beach police budget too high


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The city's police budget should be reduced and its
public works budget increased, resident Frances Smith-
Williams told the Holmes Beach City Council last
week.
"I question why we're spending almost a million
dollars (on the police department) for a population of
5,000," said Smith-Williams. "Then look at the public
works budget, and I think we're being short-changed.
It looks as if they're building quite an empire in the
police department."
The police budget increased less than one percent,
said Mayor Rich Bohnenberger. It seems like more


Volunteers needed to
clean up park
Volunteers are needed to help clean up the
Anna Maria Historical Park next to the Old City
Jail on Pine Avenue on Aug. 31 from 7 to 10 a.m.


because the city's code enforcement department, with
a budget of $56,997, was added to the police depart-
ment, he said. A community police officer was also
added, but 75 percent of his salary will be paid from
grant funds.
Smith-Williams asked how many personnel are in
each department. Bohnenberger said there are 19 police
department employees 10 sworn officers including
the chief and two administrators, two clerks and seven
dispatchers. The public works department has eight
full-time employees and one-part-time employee, he
said.
"The police operating budget is $184 for every
person in the city," said Smith-Williams. "This town
needs attention, the streets need attention. I don't un-
derstand $504,000 in salaries for the police."
"I think we have one of the finest police depart-
ments I've ever seen in my life," noted Council Chair-
man Luke Courtney.
"We ought to have an outstanding one for that
amount of money," replied Smith-Williams.
The first reading of the budget was set for Sept. 13.
In other business:


Council instructed the city attorney to proceed
with drafting an ordinance to establish rental duration
in the city's residential districts. The R-1 district will
be 30 days and the R-2 and R-3 will be seven days. The
council will call a special work session when the ordi-
nance is completed.
Council agreed to waive the bid procedure for a
new survey of city property. While working on designs
for a city complex, Architect H. Patterson Fletcher dis-
covered discrepancies in the city's survey.
In a letter to council, Fletcher noted, "The property
survey for the fire station, combined with the city prop-
erty survey, indicates that the roadway from Marina
Drive is over the corner of the public works office
building and over about 50 percent of the public works
maintenance building."
Council agreed to write a letter to county officials
asking the county to resurface the city's tennis courts.
Council turned down a request from the city's
civic association to increase the number of work ses-
sions to two per month. Council members said they like
the present system of one work session per month with
special single-subject meetings called when necessary.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 0 PAGE 5 E

Raffle profits dominate Chamber meeting


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Different understandings about the distribution of
profits from the recent van raffle generated 45 minutes
of discussion at the Aug. 16 Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce board of directors meeting.
Executive Director Darcy Lee Marquis believed that
under her original contract with the Chamber, 50 percent
of the $4,100 net profit from the raffle was to be hers.
Some directors were of the opinion that the raffle was
intended to be "a bail-out" for the Chamber treasury and
was exempt from the 50-percent clause in the contract.
Marquis raised the issue at the start of the meeting,
during discussion of minutes from the July meeting, at
which she had not been present.
During that meeting, directors approved a new
compensation package for Marquis effective Aug. 1.
They raised her monthly salary from $650 to $750 per
month and redesigned the terms for other compensa-
tions, including fundraising events.
The board's re-evaluation of the original
fundraising terms in which Marquis was to get the
50-percent cut of fundraiser profits determined that
after overhead, health insurance and payroll expenses,
the Chamber was netting well under its 50 percent.
Under the new package, the executive director will
get no more than 25 percent of any fundraiser, with the
exact figure, if any, to be determined per project by the
board of directors.
Marquis said she saw no specific mention of the
raffle project in the July minutes and wondered what
the status was of the $2,000 she believed she was due
under her original contract.
First Vice President Bob Hinds was firm in his belief
that the raffle was "a separate bail-out," not a fundraising
event, and that the profits were all to go to the Chamber.
"My wish is we not pay it," said Hinds.
Second Vice President Mary Ann Brockman said
she was at first reluctant to say so, but she also had
understood that the raffle was a separate project.
Director Dolly Young felt that the "intent was to


get money in real fast" and hoped some kind of com-
promise could be found. She said that preserving the
Chamber financially meant preserving funding for an
executive director's position.
With no motion on the floor, President Don
Howard began a poll of the eight directors present. The
poll was not completed after Director Jack Elka used
the word "compromise" again and Director Larry Tyler
urged a check of old minutes.
"If we made a mistake," said Tyler, "I hope we can


t".

'.' ,,.~

1. ~
4' ,~



V 1 4.


find an equitable solution."
Treasurer Tom Nelson suggested that either the
board act on a decision at that meeting or that the ex-
ecutive committee and Marquis get together and come
back with a recommendation.
Director Sandy Haas moved, with a second by Tyler,
that the executives and Marquis meet on the issue, that the
old minutes be checked though several directors felt
there would be no reference found and that a solution
be offered at the September board meeting.


-r


Chamber's membership drive is on
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce holds its first telemarketing membership drive Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 22-24. Executive Director Darcy Lee Marquis, rear, gets set with team
captains, from left, Sue O'Connor, First National Bank of Manatee; Nita Schotsch, Massachusetts Mutual Life
Insurance Co.; and David McArthur of Home Companions of Manatee. Captains not pictured are Tony King,
Prudential Florida Realty, and Bob Hogue, First Union. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


... and charge nixed for Chamber socials


At least for now, there will be no admission charge
for members or guests at the Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce's monthly social gatherings.
A charge of $5 for members and $10 for guests had
been publicized following the July board meeting. But
no official vote had been taken on the matter.
President Don Howard had proposed the charge, in
keeping with other area chambers, as an income pro-
ducer and an alternative to raising membership fees.


"I'm not a dictator," Howard told the board at its
August meeting. He said there had been "some flak"
about the charge and he wished the board to take a vote.
He also urged his peers "to speak up at these meet-
ings" to avoid misunderstandings.
The board voted unanimously not to charge at so-
cials but to reconsider the idea at a later date.
Tom Nelson's treasurer's report for the month of
July showed a shortfall of $1,730, with expenses steady


at almost $3,500. The ending balance stood at $2,546,
with the upcoming membership drive and a Sept. 23
luau fundraiser being counted on for income needed
over the next few months.
The directors agreed unanimously to write a letter
to the Manatee County Commission supporting the
Manatee Chamber of Commerce's bid for a greater
portion of surplus resort-tax monies to spend on tour-
ism marketing.


FREE PARTS AND LABOR FOR
TEN YEARS ON A NEW TRANE
AIR CONDITIONER.
WHAT MORE COULD WE SAY?










HOW ABOUT FOR A
LIMITED TIME ONLY?
That about sums it up. So here are the details: Purchase a qualifying Trane air
conditioner or heat pump between July 1 and August 31, 1995, and receive a
ten-year parts and labor warranty. Your participating Trane dealer can tell you
which units qualify. Just imagine an extremely efficient, extremely reliable Trane
air conditioner or heat pump that won't cost you a dime in service for ten years.
Now, what more could you ask?


avu 5L OGN SINCE 1982
AIR CONDITIONING / DUCT CLEANING
778-0773 / 383-9766
ANNA MARIA ISLAND LONGBOAT KEY


*TRANE
It's Hard To
Stop A Trane.Tm
CACO 56298


UPS
PICK UP
FAX
SERVICE
COPIES
5 EACH


Score Big Savings & Service

with Crowder Bros. Hardware
Your hardware store and much, much more!
fmn A -- -


We Will Cut: Rope Window Panes Contact Paper
Poultry Netting Electrical Wire Hardware Cloth
Window Screen Copper Tubing Chain Plastic
Tubing Dry Vent Hose
We Will: Duplicate Keys Fill Propane Tanks Sharpen
Scissors, Knives & Lawnmower Blades Carry Interlux
Marine Paint
We Rent: Pressure Washers Carpet Cleaners Bicycles
We Offer: Paramount Cards Unique Gift Items
o Russell Stover Candies
And We Deliver...
Please Let Us Be Of Service To You!


Serving the Bradenton & Island Communities For Over 40 Years
3352 East Bay Dr Holmes Beach
SM B OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0999


1i ,







PM PAGE 6 E AUGUST 24, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

goe [- e :/I


Lights on, lights off,
bridge up, bridge down
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie Martini has
come up with a pretty good idea for transportation plan-
ners to mull. Let's hope that Manatee County officials
can execute the matter better than their brethren to the
south.
Martini wants lighted signs to be installed on the
mainland to notify motorists of the status of the draw
bridges to the Island. If the bridge is stuck in the upright
position, say, the signs would let people know so they
wouldn't have to drive all the way out from 75th Street,
find the bridge impassable, turn around and take an-
other route to the Island.
Good idea, right?
Well, Sarasota County officials came up with a
similar scheme several years ago to let beachgoers
know the status of the Siesta Beach parking lot. One of
the most popular beaches in Southwest Florida, it's not
uncommon for the Siesta parking lot to be full by 10
a.m. on weekends.
The solution or so Sarasotans thought was to
come up with signs on the mainland stating "Lot Full"
when it was.
The problem: they keep forgetting to turn the sign
off on Saturdays, so invariably the "Lot Full" sign
burns all day Sunday. Beachgoers have been tricked so
long by the sign that it is now totally ignored, defeat-
ing its purpose entirely.
Let's hope that the execution of Martini's lighted
sign idea is as thoughtful as its inception.

Photo controversy
The office of The Islander Bystander was abuzz
with legal matters over the past week.
We were the focus of a protest, visited by a private
investigator and barraged with phone calls from the
newspaper's advertising clients.
Why? We took photographs of the accident scene
involving Jared London an accident that resulted in
the amputation of Jared's right arm.
Jared's mother, Mary London, says she wants
those photographs and that we refused to give them to
her.
That's not true.
The photos were taken for the newspaper not for
the purpose of a lawsuit. We will be pleased to release
the photos with the proper order.
In actuality, we'll be relieved.
For such a little Island and a community of mostly
friendly people, this has been a most unfortunate acci-
dent for everyone involved. Even innocent bystanders.



AUGUST 24, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 40
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Gib Bergquist
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster




0 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


9I e Y O M


DOT's 'level of service'
seriously lacking
At 7 p.m. on Aug. 10, Florida Department of
Transportation again came to acquaint us with its inten-
tions regarding the Cortez Bridge's "rehabilitation."
Even for DOT it was quite a show featuring Bartow's
current lady public information guru and a gentleman
alluding to be a traffic control specialist.
In space provided by the Seafood Shack, some 60
people waited anxiously. The bottom line included a
work program, already started, which may cause traf-
fic blockage into mid-February. In October, the span
will totally close for one month, plus or minus. Much
of the remaining time will be unimpeded only for two-
hour morning and afternoon periods.
They ignored queries on USCG's on-record offer
to reduce Anna Maria span openings to once each hour
during Cortez's shutdown, indicating no coordinated
planning.
They freely advised on evacuations leave a day
early! They alluded to replacement of the SR64 span
as if upcoming hearings were a trivial temporary incon-
venience to DOT.
They did acknowledge "timing" at the recognized
worst part of hurricane season had been chosen by
business owners concerned with seasonal impact on
customer potential.
And it seems DOT can't afford a traffic-control
person at the 127th Street and Cortez Road intersection
to preclude blockage of the north side of Cortez. And,
re-opening 118th Street and reactivating its privately
funded traffic light is an impossibility.
Perhaps the whole charade was best defined when
the hostess, abandoning charm, angrily informed a man
concerned over potential blockage of 127th Street that
she got paid to argue with people "like you!"
The subject of a standby helicopter ambulance
was never addressed. The scope of DOT's working
knowledge seems noticeably limited. Those who
stayed seemed to learn what would be done to, rather
than for, us.
In DOT terms, "what a LOS (level of service)."
Jim Kissick, Bradenton Beach


'Pig walk' newest
tourist attraction?
It makes you wonder.
In the matter of permits for personal water craft and
pot-bellied pigs, if the pig owner brought in a couple
of dozen more, taught them to make noise and rented
them out to be paraded along city walkways, would the
Holmes Beach City Council approve?
Or perhaps a suit could be filed if the city were not
willing to close a street to all but pig-walking enthusi-
asts. How about, for the benefit of the beginners, pig-
strolling verbal directions, amplified, of course, broad-
cast along the route, (only until midnight, except on
weekends when a 2 a.m. limit would be observed).
The owner might enlist public-spirited neighbors to
raise funds for lighting the pig walk $20,000 should
about do it. Think of the publicity the Island could reap
from such an enterprise!
Why, tourists would come from everywhere just to
walk with the pigs. We'd definitely need a bigger
bridge at least until pig-walking rental facilities
were established in everyone's community.
Claire Reasoner, Holmes Beach

Community's help
touches Islander
After fire destroyed my home and studio on June
14, the community came to my rescue with places to
stay, clothes, furniture, art supplies, donations, expres-
sions of cheer and much, much more.
Words cannot express what this outpouring of sup-
port did for my spirit and well-being.
Thank you to each and every one of you from the
deepest part of my heart, which you all have touched.
And God bless you.
Karen Klosky, Bradenton


For more of
Your Opinions,
see page 8










THOSE WERE THE HAYS
Part 1, What's In a Name ?
by June Alder


THE SPANISH

CONNECTION


The question I get asked most often
by newcomers with a historical turn of
mind is: How did Anna Maria Island
get its name?
Most people assume Anna Maria is
a Spanish name bestowed upon it by an
early explorer. That's reasonable since
Ponce de Leon, Hernando DeSoto and
a host of other Spaniards of the 16th
and 17th centuries passed this way in
their search for health and wealth and
immortality.
As the lyrics of Leonard
Bernstein's haunting love song put it,
"Maria" is a "most beautiful" name -
and to me, "Anna Maria" is doubly
beautiful. It conjures up a vision of a
dreamy-eyed Spanish senorita being
serenaded by her lover on a moonlit
night on a pearly beach on a distant
shore in a faraway time. In short, a per-
fect name for an island.
The fact is, however, it was not
until 1943 that Washington, D.C, made
the name official. That doesn't mean, of
course, that the name couldn't have
been in used in times gone by.
It was one of the 1894 Island
homesteaders, Captain John R. Jones,
who finally got the name on the federal
records so the new city of Anna Maria
could have a first-class post office. And
it was Jones, an Irish sea captain and
attorney, who gave currency to the
Spanish connection in a brief history of
the Island he wrote in 1927. So far it's
the only published history, appearing in
a little 1957 booklet distributed by
Harry Varley, who founded The Is-
lander newspaper in 1951.
Entitled "Anna Maria Key His-
torical Sketch of Gulf Island Written
By One of Its First Settlers," it starts
out:
"When this Island was named and
charted is not known, outside of the fact
that it was before the state of Florida
became a portion of the United States.
On the old Spanish maps and charts, we
find it marked 'Ana-Maria Cay,' and it
is recorded that it was named in honor
of the mother of Christ (Mary) and her
mother, Ann.
"The Latin nations were accus-
June Alder is on summer hiatus. This
series is a repeat from September
1993.


tomed to give sacred names to many
places discovered and settlements es-
tablished by them. For example, Tampa
Bay is noted on these old maps as
'Espiritu Sanctu' (Holy Spirit) bay. The
name Anna in Spanish is spelled with
one 'N' and the name Maria is Spanish
for Mary. The letter 'I' in that language
has the sound of our letter 'E' and to be
correct should be so pronounced."
In support of his viewpoint Captain
Jones pointed out that traces of Spanish
fishing camps had been found on the
Island and that a well in what is now
part of Bradenton Beach was called the
"old Spanish well."
Sounds authoritative, doesn't it?
But not everyone was buying Jones'
conclusion about the origin of the
Island's monicker. It was news to a lot
of folks whose families like the
Joneses had started in the 1880s to
come to the Island from Polke and
Hillsborough counties to fish and camp
and enjoy the soothing waters.
Jones was a smart feller all right,
they reckoned, but he was full of blar-
ney. In 1927, remember, the Florida
Boom had just gone bust. He was inter-
ested in promoting his Island develop-
ments.
So most folks went right on pro-
nouncing Anna Maria just as they'd al-
ways pronounced it: "Anna Mar-eye-
er." They weren't exactly sure but some
said it was two Scottish lassies the Is-
land was named for, and that was the
way the Scots talked.
The matter became a touchy one
after World War II when Yankee
hordes descended on Florida. They
were amused at the way the ignorant
locals mispronounced the Island's name
- which annoyed those locals no end.
It all came to a head when in 1948,
the Island Women's Club posted no-
tices all over town that Anna Maria was
to be pronounced properly, with the
long "E" in the middle. And then in
1951, beginning in the first several is-
sues of the new Islander newspaper,
Editor Varley joined the ladies in their
campaign.

Next: An early case of
political correctness


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 N PAGE 7 IG



Whyget
O soaked?







FAT CAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning

Dry Foam, Dries =Fast!
We never use steam!

"It's a pleasure using your service.
You are fair, honest and reliable.
Thanks for a great job."
Whit & Kitt Hobbs, Tidy Island


Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer

For fast, thorough, friendly
service call me Jon Kent,
S..- :' Island resident and owner of
Fat Cat. Call 8 am to 5 pm.
778-2882

MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE



We'd love to mail


you the news!

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $30 per
year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on .
Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live *
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
live here year-round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or rela-
tive, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office
with a check in the proper amount or charge it to Visa or MasterCard.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
S l One Year: $30 Q 6 Months: $20 0 3 Months: $12
U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
S Q One Year: $135 Q 6 Months: $85 Q 3 Months: $48
MAIL TO:
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP____
CREDIT CARD: EXP. DATE _
MAIL START DATE: ____________



THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
SIsland Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
|- -I CHARGE IT BY PHONE:
|-- (941)778-7978
R.......ii...i..lin.i..i.....il...i.ii.......







BIM PAGE 8 M AUGUST 24, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I YOUR9] l l9


r -- CLIP THIS COUPON "


&eeamicj.
10% OFF
Any Purchase (1st Visit Only)
1 Free Lesson (2nd Visit)
Ask For Jean
Located Behind Mr. Bones Restaurant
3608 Ave. C, Holmes Beach 779-1094
Offer valid only with coupon exp. 8/23/95

6OkWN PE/IC


SI GIFT SHOP
.-JO Summer Clearance Sale
1 \ Lots of Bargains
T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
Decorative Accessories Jewelry Pewter Miniature
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 778-1645


VFW POST 8199
Bradenton Beach Fire House
ALL VETERANS...
of WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Grenada,
Panama, Lebanon, etc.
You are Invited to Join Us!
FOR INFORMATION CALL 778-4400
Meetings are 2nd Tuesday of Each Month






i' $"'s 114 ,/g
A0
!d A '0.#44


Michelle Il ompson Manager Tracey Jeanne
WELCOME ,r' %- 1 ISLAND
Michelle I n20% I
Thompson IOFF I
formerly of I Any Salon
Studio 121 and I with Michelle H A I R
Hair Motions Expires8/31/95j DESIGNS
ISLAND SHOPPING CENTER HOLMES BEACH 778-1380


DESIGN YOUR OWN

IT-'H5IRT]
WE. WILL P RINT


ON A FRUIT OF THE LOOM 'BEST" WHITE T-SHIRT
FOR AS LOW AS $14.95
DIFCCOUINT ON ( 44El QU4N7TEC


3228 E. Bay Dr. Holmes Beach 778-0540
Anna Maria Island Center


Tests needed before Orimulsion
At the last meeting of Save Anna Maria, Inc., the
membership voted to request that more testing be done
on the environmental results of burning Orimulsion be-
fore it is allowed to be imported by Florida Power and
Light.
SAM was formed to protect the health, safety and
welfare of the Island and its surrounding areas. Insuf-
ficient research has been done on the emissions of in-
creased levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and how it af-
fects air, land and water quality.
More independent studies need to be done on
the ability to adequately clean up any spills. The
problems caused by obtaining fuel from a foreign
country would be astronomical since we do not pro-
duce any of it in the United States.
A lot more thought should be given to Orimulsion
and more questions answered before rushing to en-
dorse the burning of this controversial fuel.
Bunny Garst, Anna Maria City

Islander deserves
fine writing awards
Congratulations to The Islander Bystander for
winning four awards from the judges of the Florida
Press Association.
You and your staff of fine writers do an outstand-
ing job and we are fortunate to have such in-depth
coverage of Island events and people.
Special kudos to Pat Copeland, David Futch, Bob
Ardren and Paul Roat for their commendations and to
you, Bonner, for the fine job you are doing as editor.
Dottie McChesney, Anna Maria City

Injured femurs fuel love by
family and friends
I would very much like to take this opportunity
to thank all my dear friends and family who have
helped me so much in the last six months.
Back in February I had an accident and injured my
legs. After surgery I spent the next three months
house-bound, unable to walk, work and do the sim-
plest of things. During this very difficult time for me,
I have been overwhelmed by the amount of support
my family and friends have shown.
They came to my rescue immediately without
being asked, gave me financial help, practical help,
moral support and words of kindness, showed under-
standing and love, and made me laugh.
The situation could have been disastrous for me.
Now, six months later, I am out of what I call the 'dark
period' with all the wonderful memories of people
who helped me and continue to help me some as far
away as England and one dear friend in New Jersey.
So let me say thank you. I'll never forget it. I'm
a very lucky person to know all of them.
If you ever bust one of your legs, make sure you
live on Anna Maria Island, surrounded by great people
and keep our sense of humor.
Susan Hatch, Anna Maria City


Democrat ticked off at
Republicans
What a week.
The many views of where we are:
John Hamner: "I have never seen how whatever
distinctions there are ... between the two parties make
a particle of difference in local offices."
And in the same article:
Manatee County Commissioner Pat Glass: I did
it both ways and it's a whole lot easier as a Republi-
can."
Republican Dan Miller : "I looked at Title X the
same way I looked at every other federal program this
year in the effort of balancing the federal budget. In
short, balancing the budget is the moral and economic
challenge of our time and I am committed to doing
what's necessary to reach a balanced budget in seven
years."
Columnist Molly Ivins: "True, one way to balance
the budget is by cutting spending. Another way is by
not cutting taxes for the wealthiest Americans and cor-
porations."
Republicans propose: Repeal of corporation mini-
mum tax to cost $22.1 billion over seven years; in-
crease corporate write-offs to cost $47.8 billion over
seven years; capital gain tax breaks to cost $78.6 bil-
lion over seven years total $148.5 billion.
In addition to those tax breaks, add 52% of the
$245 billion in general tax breaks which are destined
to families who earn over $100,000 a year and you
suddenly see that the Republican constituency (federal
and local wealthy persons) benefit by $257.9 billion.
Compare this to the $12 billion spread out among
the 40% of all American families who earn less that
$30,000 a year and you can readily see the redistribu-
tion of wealth in this country going from the poor to the
rich.
The rich man's feeding frenzy at the public trough
began in earnest with the Reagan tax breaks of 1981
and 1982. Remember the Laffer curve? Give tax breaks
to the rich and they will invest and hire many people
and as those hired people pay their taxes we will gain
more than we lose. Result: We added over $3 trillion
of debt with interest that is breaking this country.
I'll offer an alternative to Congressman Miller so
that he can meet this "greatest moral and economic
challenge." Raise the tax rate on the incomes over
$200,000 a year back to the levels before Reagan.
Abolish the allowance for charges against income for
depreciation, depletion of oil, gas and minerals. Charge
market price value for the use of federal lands for graz-
ing, mining of minerals on federal land, and stumpage
for the cutting of our national forests.
Republicans cry out to let the market prevail. Fine,
just do it.
Finally, back to John Hamner. John, there is a dif-
ference between the philosophies of the Democratic
and Republican parties. Governments are created to do
for people what they are unable to do for themselves.
The wealthy need no help. The poor do.
Bill Mullon, Holmes Beach


Tingley Library does books ... for sale
Librarian Carol Sandidge, left, and volunteer Ruth DuBois display a sample of the hundreds of books in fine
condition that will be available for sale at Tingley Memorial Library, 111 Second St. S., Bradenton Beach,
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 25 and 26. Birthday refreshments will be served in honor of
Beulah Hooks Hannah Tingley, whose estate provided funding for the library. Proceeds will be used to
expand Tingley's collection. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 0 PAGE 9 ji


About to board, courtesy of the Anna Maria Island Trolley, are Jim Hawkinson, rear, and his guests the
Fritsche family -from left, conductor Volkmar, orchestra chairman and wife Irmgard, and daughters Julia,
cellist, and Insa, concert master.


Handling the cookout fires for the Anna
Maria Island Rotary are Bill Herold, left,
and Bob Pearson. Islander Photos:
Cynthia Finn.


I ARN I
Shells Gifts Clothing Swimsuits
Inflatables Bait & Tackle Hats Much More
LARGE SELECTION 10% Off
OF KITES ANY
PaF,, r ; J.: H i Sun Glasses, Clothing & PURCHASE
Suntan Products. Unusual Gifts & Novelties. WITH THIS AD
200 GULF DR. SO. BRADENTON BEACH (JUST NORTH OF COQUINA BEACH)




5-; Congrtulationg
SJill &John
on the birth of
Col 0 Taylor Banyan
Born Augua t 1!
RP= BcetWishoe!Cori





CPej GUARANTEED 0
LOWEST PRICES!
E MATTRESSES 0 ADJ. BEDS SAVE $49900
BRADENTON 794-2952 SARASOTA 922-5271
Cortez Commons101an .
59th St. & Cortez Rd. W. 1901 Hansen St.


778-7975
Anna Maria Island
'. ,U Same Shopping Center as
in4 Shell's Restaurant
IJr Personal Training
y ^ Tanning Massage Sauna
Let us entertain you
Let us make you smile
Let us make you look
(DARN) GOOD!


Islanders welcome

youth orchestra


I SHTO CREATIVE FASHIONS
| IL FOR WOMEN I


"What a tremendous response we've had," says
Jim Hawkinson of the Island's welcome mat for the 22
visiting members of the South German Youth Orches-
tra Balingen.
Hawkinson, of Perico Island and the music direc-
tor of First United Methodist Church, made fast friends
with orchestra conductor Volkmar Fritsche during the
group's tour here two summers ago.
For this year's tour highlighted by an Aug. 25
recording concert at Neel Auditorium -Hawkinson
signed on as volunteer tour coordinator for the two-
week venture.
"Yes, it's been a lot of organizing," says
Hawkinson. "But the Island and Perico families serv-
ing as hosts and the local organizations and businesses
helping to provide wonderful activities have made it all
a grand pleasure."
Ten families provided accommodations and hospi-
tality. The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
helped to coordinate a special day trip courtesy of the


Anna Maria Island Trolley, ending with free ice
cream at Joe's Eats & Sweets. And the Anna Maria
Island Rotary put on a terrific cookout at Bayfront
Park.
Other businesses chipping in included Haley's
Motel, Eckerd Drugs and AAA Motor Club of
Bradenton.
While many of the young musicians were expe-
riencing America for the first time, Fritsche and his
family have chosen Anna Maria Island as their favor-
ite vacation spot in the world.
The Fritsches made friends with Barbara and
Vincent Wright of Holmes Beach during a summer
orchestra tour in Michigan six years ago. They have
vacationed on the Island after every summer tour
since.
This year will be no different. After seven con-
certs in 14 days, the youth orchestra will return home.
The Fritsches will remain to rediscover our Island
paradise.


I 'I



pI




011


n un 1

I T HIS 09. S - |
L--------------------------U






Bi~ PAGE 10 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Photos from the July 28 accident involving Jared London are
published here in the interest of resolving any controversy created
over their relevance or family need. See related story page 4.


~JL~* U


m


_____j





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 0 PAGE 11 13
I


6'


12'


I SIDEWALK UTILITY CURB BIKE TRAVEL LANE
STRIP UTTEF LANE


46'


12'


TRAVEL LANE


I
I
I
2'.
I


I I1""U 1 I


I
Bike path dreams for Island
Construction of bike lanes and sidewalks running the length of Anna Maria Island have been recommended by the Manatee County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory
Committee. Chairman Mike Tyrrell told Island Transportation Planning Organization members Monday if the construction were done the Island "would rival some of
the best bike trails in the state." Tyrrell and the committee are recommending four-foot bicycle lanes on each side of the roadway, a two-foot curb and gutter, land-
scaping and a six-foot concrete sidewalk running along the east side of highway. The bike lane and sidewalk would run from the Anna Maria City Pier south on Pine
Avenue to Gulf Drive, south on Gulf Drive to Marina Drive, then from Gulf Drive to Manatee Avenue, east along Manatee Avenue to East Bay Drive, then south to the
Longboat Pass bridge. No price for the proposal has been offered.


THE ULTIMATE PROTECTION AGAINST ...
* Hurricanes & high winds Flying debris
* Theft & vandalism Extensive noise
* Sun rays & water damage Metro-Dade Approved
Enjoy security & privacy. Installed on
win ows, sliding glass doors, patios, etc.
FREE ESTIMATES


SPECIAL 11 DAY HOLIDAY CRUISE
December 22 January 2. Visit Ft. Lauderdale, Nassau, St. Barts, LI A
St. Maarten, Guadeloupe, Grenada, Barbados and St. ]USTA
Croix. Second passenger saves 66%, 3rd &
4th in same cabin ............................. FREE REM INDER
THANKSGIVING 10 DAY PANAMA CANAL
CRUISE. Acapulco, Guatemala, Costa Rica, that Thanksgiving &
Grand Cayman & Ft. Lauderdale... $1,380.pp Christmas plane
CLASSIC 10 NIGHT CANARY ISLAND reservations are
CRUISE. Tour Genoa, Barcelona,
Casablanca, St. Cruz de Tenerifo, going fast. It's time
Funchal & Malaga. Includes air from to act now.
S Miami ..............................$1,799.pp
1 Wf '^ -- -T Ki* ra


'P
I-


E SPROLLSHUTTER
ESP CORPORATION
- Serving Florida Since 1981 -
778-5773
Manufactured in Palmetto, FL


PERSONAL ATTENTION
without the personal attention price! 1
MEMBERSHIPS
as low as


O per
2(<0 month


$26 33per
month


r------ -COUPON --m-----1
Seniors Introductory Trial Special |
3 visits for 3.00 ts
We can help you achieve your goals and too ]
work around any disabilities., get iin
L with this ad 8/9/95 to 8/31/95. ,
5345 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach Suite 100
5345 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach Suite 100


never
Late to
i shape!


SALE STARTS THURS., AUG. 24

50% OFF
All '95 Swimsuits
30% OFF
Leon Levin Print Tops
* Selection of Missy/Petite Dresses
50% OFF ALREADY
REDUCED PRICES I


in our "Sale Loft"
All purchases of sale items is final. W
This sale does not apply to purchases M k _
made before or after sale dates. f _-~
OPEN: Mon. thru Sat. 9 AM to 5 PM
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 778-1161


RESORTWEAR


You get complete news of three isdind cities in The Islander Bystander
it's everything you need to know on Anna Maria Island.
xISLANDERIMME


"You'll have to call us ...
or we'll never meet!"


REFRIGERATION -


CAC044365

778-9622
FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


mrmrmp-mu


0-


M--







E[ PAGE 12 M AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Branching out
Tuesday's surprise storm left many yards filled with
branches and debris. For some, like this homeowner on
North Shore Drive, the problem landed a little higher.


Storm whips Anna Maria
Reports of a small tornado on Alamanda Street in
Anna Maria followed a short but wild storm through
Anna Maria Island last Tuesday at approximately
7:30 p.m. The roof of the Rod & Reel Pier was
damaged during the blow. Parts of the Island lost
power from downed lines some for as long as four
hours. A rotten power pole near the elementary
school was blamed for a portion of the power
outage. Florida Power and Light crews had that
replaced by 1:30 a.m. All in all, it gave Islanders
something to talk about for a few days.


Power lines and a large Australian pine
tree blocked the corner of Rose and
Alamanda overnight but was cleared by
daybreak.

Islander Photos: Pat Copeland and
Bonner Presswood


\^PUB & RESTAUA e
New Extended Happy Hour
4 to 7 Daily All Day Sunday
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails
- Lunch or Dinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER I
ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE
Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 8/31/95
L M_ sMu!sresent at time of order. __ _J
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thurs. 4 to 10
& Fri. and Sat. Noon to 10
Sun. 8am 10pm t
RESTAURANT Sunday Breakfast 8am 'il 1pm
T.. ... Pub Hours 'til?


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 77


L




Featuring:

ALLYOU-CAN.EAT CRAB LEGS!
Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday
Thursday ~ All-You-Can-Eat Barbecue Ribs

Other Specials: lTes Prime Rib 9.95, Wed Chicken & Ribs 8.95
Sunday Poolside ENTERTAINMENT & BBQ Buffet 1-5 pm 8.95

Live Entertainment ~ 7 Nights a Week!
BRIAN BEEBE TUES-SAT SPM TO MIDNIGHT
DUANE DEE SUNDAY & MONDAY 7-11PM

TURN AT THE PIRATE SIGN, 6000 BLK, GULF OF MEXICO DR.
595 DREAM ISLAND ROAD, LONGBOAT KEY 383-5565


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
OPEN FOR
LUNCH &
DINNER
7 DAYS A WEEK
BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS
SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL YOU $195
CAN EAT 9
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Cafe CR Robar



SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET
SERVED 10 AM 1 PM
Mimosas & Champagne $1 each $ 95
Bloody Marys $1.50 each $5
"Live Entertainment Nightly"
Tues-Sat 8 to Midnight in our Piano Bar

Served Tues-Sat 4-7pm
Dining Room Open Tues-Sat 4-10pm Sunday 10am-10pm
Lounge Open Tues-Sat 4pm-Midnight Sun 10am-Midnight
LARGE GROUPS & LUNCHEON PARTIES WELCOME
RESERVATIONS REQUESTED, NOT REQUIRED
204 Pine Ave. -
Anna Maria
778-6969 _..._--


0 DEEP SEA

FISHING
4, 6, & 9 HOUR TRIPS

BAY FISHING
FISH THE CALM WATERS OF TAMPA
OR SARASOTA BAYS

EGMONT

KEY CRUISE
Tuesday, Thursday & Sunday 1 PM to 5 PM

CORTEZ FLEET
for further information and reservations call
Sn 794-1223
0 12507 Cortez Road West .


THAI O-CHA
It's easy to remember our name...
but hard to forget our food!




THAI O-CHA offers you
the finest in delicate, delicious
Thai cuisine In a comfortable
atmosphere.
Our tasty Thai food will keep you
coming back again and again.
ol ooff Any
OIFn-ER OR lncnI
with this ad exp. 8/31/95
We are open for lunch
Monday through Friday
from 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM
Dinner Monday through
Saturday from
5:00 to 9:30 PM
Closed Sunday
7604 Cortez Road West Bradenton
Tel: (813) 794-5470






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 m PAGE 13 BiG

T-end dock ordinance ready for vote Sept. 13


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Changes to the T-end dock ordinance were final-
ized last week by the Holmes Beach City Council.
The ordinance is designed to solve the question of
use of docks in T-end canals located between 72nd and
74th, 74th and 75th and 75th and 77th Streets and
fronting on Marina Drive. The use of these canals is
subject to claims by owners of lots in certain Bay Palms
subdivisions, and their deeds contain specific language
granting them the right to use a boat space.
Boat spaces should be larger than the 10 feet indi-
cated in the ordinance, said Councilman Don Maloney.
He felt 12 feet would be better.


"The city deeded those slips at 10 feet," said Public
Works Superintendent John Fernandez. "That would
probably accommodate most boats. The bigger the slips,
the less slips we'll end up with. We may lose 10 spaces."
Resident Bill Mullon said 10 feet would probably
be adequate.
Another resident noted that there has to be enough
space between the boat and the dock for the boat to rise
up and down with the tides.
Some of the existing slips are wider than 10 feet,
creating another problem, said Fernandez,
Council Chairman Luke Courtney suggested giv-
ing Fernandez the latitude to determine where the
docks should be placed. The others agreed.


City Attorney Patricia Petruff said council should
stipulate a minimum amount of liability insurance for
dock registrants to carry. Mayor Rich Bohnenberger
suggested $10,000.
"You don't require us to carry a minimum amount
of homeowners' insurance," said Mullon.
"There's still the chance we may have some liabil-
ity in this," said Courtney.
"It would provide further protection for the city,"
added Petruff.
One resident asked Petruff about trespassers on the
docks. She said once the registration is complete, own-
ers can post their docks with no trespassing signs.
The ordinance is scheduled for first reading Sept. 13.


Building officials to aid each other in times of need


Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach officials have
agreed to an interlocal agreement between their build-
ing officials to aid each other when necessary.


Building Officials Whitey Moran of Bradenton
Beach and John Fernandez of Holmes Beach
worked out the agreement which will now be sent


The city of Anna Maria will host an informal, get-
acquainted session with new Public Works Director
and Building Official Philip Charnock from 3 to 5 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 31, at City Hall.
Residents, builders and remodelers are invited to
meet Charnock, ask questions or make comments about
his areas of concern.


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH


Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)
$350 x

Served Daily (Waffles too!)


Charnock, 44, a St. Petersburg native, took over
the position July 17. His former jobs include senior
plans examiner in construction services, St. Petersburg;
building inspector, St. Pete Beach; building inspector/
plans examiner, Clearwater; and building inspector,
Pinellas County.
For more information, call City Hall at 778-0781.


Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


PRIME RIB DINNER
EVERY SATURDAY 5-10 PM
THROUGH AUGUST
Includes Caesar
SSalad freshly
prepared at your
table and soup,
NICKI'S
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
Rack of Lamb ................................$15.95
Chicken Cordon Bleu .............. $10.95
Veal Chop Diane ...................... $15.95
Stuffed Shrimp ........................... $11.95
Mussels over Pasta .................... $9.50
0 Black Grouper.......................... $14.95


LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BARBARA JOHNSON
Monday-Sat. 6 pm-10 pm
SA l Open Mon.-Sat 10 am-11 pm Closed Sunday
795-7065
|N icki West 59th 1830 59th St. W. Blake Park Bradenton
Retarnt CAEIN BNQE, FCLIIEVALB LEa__


to their cities' attorneys to finalize before formal
council approval. Anna Maria's Building Official
Phil Charnock will be added when his certification
is completed in November.
"It allows the building officials to cover for each
other in cases of emergency, illness, vacations or any-
thing of that nature," Moran told officials at last week's
meeting of the Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Of-
ficials. "There will be no money required. It's a time-
for-time exchange."
Since all cities obtain insurance from the Florida
League of Cities, the officials will be covered under the
insurance and workman's compensation of their city of
employment, said Moran.
The maximum length of service to a sister city
is two weeks and the officials must be properly li-
censed. Duties are limited to reviewing plans, issu-
ing permits and making inspections. It does not in-
clude compliance with local requirements regarding
planning and zoning, code enforcement and similar
ordinances.
The agreement would also allow the cities to aid
each other in times of emergency such as storm dam-
age assessment. It would not be in effect if an official
resigns or is terminated.

Eat In or FREE
( ..TakeOut ELROFFD Y I
..-ANY SIZE PIZZA! i

S OMA PIZZA
I & ITALIAN RESTAURANT
i Specializing in Veal Chicken Fish Pasta
"/:' I Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
Open 7 Days 11AM to Midnight
j 201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
L 778-0771 or 778-0772


Meet your new

Anna Maria building official


Complimentary fishing and hunting licenses are
Complimentary senior available for Florida residents aged 65 and over, accord-
ing to the Manatee County Tax Collector.
citizen fishing/hunting Proof of residency and age is required. A Florida
license available driver's license issued for at least six months is consid-
ered proof of age and resident.
For more information on Florida fishing and hunting
licenses call 741-4807.


ISLANDER
I .II
More local
news than
any other
source!






I-B PAGE 14 I AUGUST 24, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


V


sea A
I- ., -V_-.6 6- ,, _




f 2-


















Above, a mother
turtle returns to the

turtle hatching
became an educa

t -Islanders in
Holmes Beach.
Turtle Watch




scri bed the life
Anto the onlookers as






























S This female turtle g. t here ting confused and came ashore during the daylight
hundredsunteers had to watch their step as the tof they turtles entered the ater.
little hatchlings,



















.r to l hr e teetionu a e vtf.















,. ".Islander Photos:
AnfCynfthia Finn and the i




. -b Bonner Presswood


I
g






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 M PAGE 15 Bi3


Back to Alaska


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Editor's Note: Islander writer David Futch is taking
his second summer hiatus at a remote fishing lodge in
Alaska. If you followed his reports last year, you'll recall
fabulous salmon catches and frequent visits from a bear.
Sunrise is at 4:45 a.m. The temperature is 45 degrees
Fahrenheit At noon, it's 60 degrees, the sun is shining
with broken clouds and a northwest wind is 10 mph.
A beautiful day for Goodnews River where wind
and rain are the norm.
A run up the river with Mark Carnifax to scout two
fishing holes known as Little Crow and Slough Below
Little Crow is on the schedule today.
The "Motherlode's" V-8 is pushing thousands of
gallons per minute through a jet pump, sending this
5,000-pound-of-a-slug vessel through a maze of 90-
degree turns.
South Fork, Skeptic, Middle Fork the best holes
King Salmon have to offer. 160-degree left turn fol-
lowed by a 90-degree right turn at 45 knots into another
turn ... or another bank ... or another boat. Guides on
this river must know it like a New York taxi driver
knows his streets.
The Duckworth boat, with its Hamilton jet finds
Beaver Hut, a fishing hole next to a beaver hut the size
of an efficiency apartment.
Next day, after dinner we fish at Skeptic. Again stun-
ning weather much like a cool January day in Florida.
I catch the camp's first king salmon of the season
- 32 pounds, red and silver sides. Dan DeBonis of
Miami catches three more and we-lose two. All of them
30 pounds or bigger.
It is a fine day for revenge of camp staffers as the
guides give us the nonchalant kiss-off about our suc-
cess. Victory is far from bittersweet. It's downright
honey-glazed.
Next outing, caught seven of eight, me two of
them, 15 and 20 pounders.
On the next trip, the kings are up to 40 pounds and
we also got some four-pound rainbows. In the lower
forty-eight these would be trophy rainbows, fit for
mounting. In the Goodnews River, four pounds is av-
erage and it's not unusual to catch 10 pounders.

June 21: Summer Solstice
Sunrise 4:29 a.m., sunset 1:26 a.m. Never got dark.
Only twilight.
This is our best day yet. Just after lunch, we call it a
day and everyone goes fishing. Save Gabe Smith and L
We say, "Drop us off at the nearest mountain. We
want to climb it and go snowboarding."
The crew responds, "Yep. They're nuts."
Mike Gorton takes us up river 45 minutes to
Sugtutlig Mountain, part of the Khalun mountain
range. It's approximately 2,500 feet.
The crew drops us off with instructions to be back
at the river by 7 p.m. Looking up, it appears to be a
climb way beyond 7.
Five minutes later, we face the first of three
sloughs, or creeks, we would have to ford. We spot a
side slough with a small overhanging tree just within


The 350-plus brown bear that Alaska River Safaris'
campers affectionately called "Mr. Boo-Boo,"
crossed into camp once too often. Although Boo-Boo
was no less dangerous, a much bigger bear, over 800
pounds, still lurks outside of camp. Last summer he
entered the grounds at night on several occasions,
breaking into storage areas and garbage.


reach. Gabe goes for it, breaks a limb and goes in waist
deep. He's hanging there trying to decide whether to go
all the way or work it out. He's laughing. I'm laughing.
Gabe gathers enough strength to pull himself to the
opposite bank. He climbs into the tree and reaches for
my hand. He's got it but the limb I grab breaks and
I fall back but with my feet on a limb, Gabe holding my
left hand and my backpack slowly dropping slicker,
sweater, gloves and lunch into the creek.
I make it to the tree, Gabe jumps down and runs the
creek gathering items like Easter eggs. We are both
laughing harder.
What a start.
Two more sloughs and a climb up a 50-foot ridge
and I see what will be the cause of our tardiness.
A field of tundra extends almost a mile before dis-
appearing into alder trees at the base of Sugtutlig.
Walking on tundra is like a hike on foot-deep foam
rubber. Wet, foot-deep foam rubber.
Next are the alders. And though we avoided most,
what alders we dealt with prevented us from seeing
more than five feet.
The climb is a 7 on the 1-to-10 tough scale. Once
above alder territory is rock, easier to hike except for
the loose stuff we call scree.
We traverse a rock-filled grade of about 200 yards and
as we peer over the side, a small snow field, 75 yards wide
and 500 yards long with a 30-degree slope appears.
It's exhilarating to see what we are about to do on
the corn snow.
Gabe says, "Epic. An adventurer's undertaking of
an intense tundra walkabout It's a religious experience.
When I'm down, I think about places like this I've
snowboarded and all worries seem small."
Gabe asks if I want to try and I say, "Are you out
of your mind?" So I glaceed down on my feet and rear
end. Almost wiping out twice. Ice axe saves me.
Finished, we run down mountain, across tundra,
through alders, ford three creeks and arrive at boat at
7:15. The round trip of 8 miles including one hour of
boarding lasted four hours and 15 minutes.
Steak for dinner. Ya-hoo!

Bear makes first appearance
Mr. Bear came into camp last night and overturned
a half dozen garbage cans. After that, he came onto the
deck 5 or 10 feet from my cabin.
The next thing I know, the camp owner, Ron Hyde,
has fired one shot from his .375 caliber rifle waking up
camp.
"If I didn't hit him," Hyde says, "I sure parted his
hair."
The bear runs off and guests in Cabin 1 say they
saw it "gallop like a quarter-horse" past their tent.


Dan DeBonis and
David Futch show
off the first catch
of king salmon at
Alaska River
Safaris on the
Goodnews River
in Alaska.


















Snoimboarding
for the first
.. time on a
S mountain
S across the
-P tundra
from the
Goodnews
River was
a "chilling
thrill,"
said Futch,
:- especially
after falling
in a creek
on the way
to the
mountain.


Boo-Boo Bear is safe another day.
But now Hyde feels he has to kill it. If it's brazen
enough to come on the deck, somebody likely will be
hurt or worse.
We are pulling for the bear.
Two nights pass, no bear.
Mr. Boo-Boo returns the next night but Hyde
doesn't feel the safety of 20 crew and guests is threat-
ened. He does not take a shot.
The law is vague, but shooting a bear out of sea-
son requires that there be a "threat to safety."
Apparently the bear has read up on federal statutes.
He respects our territory as we respect his.
Then two days later, life as the bear knows it comes
to an end. He pushes the envelope and Hyde pulls the
trigger four times.
Boo-Boo is dead.
Alaska Fish and Game officials will come to retrieve
the head, claws and pelt so that no one can sell them.
One bear claw can bring up to $100.
Instead, the Fish and Game folks will sell them and
put the money in their coffers.
It apparently is a young bear, about 400 pounds.
But one this size is considered mature and dangerous.
It's a shame really. We intrude on the bear's terri-
tory and because of our food stocks, almost invite the
bear for a nightly raid.
Later, Fish and Game people on the river tell
Charlie Westcoast and Gabe Smith that the bear Hyde
killed is not the one that had been invading the camp.
They said one of their pilots spotted the original bear
(about 800 pounds worth) near our camp.
We're hoping he gets his fill of salmon and wild
berries and stays out of camp.






IM3 PAGE 16 I AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Say the secret words
Islanders seem to gravitate to other islands for va-
cations and the like. I know lots of folks from here that
head to other Islands for a getaway. Just as often as not
I hear them marvel over the idea of traveling afar when
home is like a paradise.
People from here go to Jamaica, Hawaii, Barbados
and Borneo. Strange but true?
Not so.
My own trip to Jamaica was enlightening in ways
other than beach and sun.
It was the people. Their way of life. Their enjoy-
ment of life in spite of the odds dictated by poverty.
With very little business or industry, their welfare
is almost wholly entrusted to tourism. And they dem-
onstrate their appreciation at every opportunity.
From street merchants selling carvings to women
offering to braid hair, to craft markets with rows of trin-
kets and roadside stands selling fruit and Red Stripe
beer, it's hard to imagine how they survive. There are
so many.
So many people engage in the same "enterprise."
In downtown Montego, one can barely ride a scooter
down a small alley where women sit side-by-side in
small straight chairs next to their table of wares, mostly
the same variety of homegrown fruits and vegetables,
and chat while they await a sale.
And tourists seldom ever venture there.
I found people were so kind and helpful, my hesi-
tation at being "a tourist" was totally unfounded. I
returned for a second look a year later.
Each day was an adventure. A map and a scooter
took us on a different route into the mountains and up
to villages seldom frequented by tourists. One place we
stopped was so high up a mountain and so far from any
"attraction" that the old men who chatted out front
laughed and said they'd never seen tourists there be-
fore.
The girl at the little market (a building approxi-





IN HOLMES BEACH
For: Gourmet Pizzas, Creative Pestos,
Exotic Grains & Fresh, New,
Seafood Specials Daily.
OPEN for Lunch & Dinner; Tues-Sat 11 am-9 pm
Sunday 10 am-7 pm
For Reservations 778-5440
on the corner of Manatee Avenue & East Bay Drive
(across from Barnett Bank, at the light.)
formerly "The Mutiny Inn"


U


I


}V -^ -)
Is fB


BLUES ON IA TURDAYPLUS
SUPER SUNDAY YBRUN.CH 8, PLUS

New! See "The Blynders A
Saturday from 2 'til 6 pm. And it's
Super Sunday all day at The
Beachhouse! With a great new
Sunday Brunch, from 11-2 and
reggae with "Jam-lya"
from 2-6. Tropiats" nightly. Try our
great new Early Bird specials too,
every day from 3-6, all under $10.


great food. great beach. great fun.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach (941) 779-2222
'I


Carrs visit homeland
Jim and Betty Carr visited relatives in Ireland near Donegal where they managed to confuse natives who asked
where they were from. Seems there's a Holmes Beach there too. The beachfront property was purchased by a G.I.
during World War II and area residents say the owner named Holmes hasn't returned there. Fortunately for Mr.
Holmes, property there can't be foreclosed for 99 years. In the phone directory, Jim Carr found a long list of
numbers attributed to the name Holmes -far more than you'dfind in the little Anna Maria Island book.


mately six by eight feet) pushed my dollar change at me
and when I said it was for her, she smiled and giggled
bashfully. The Red Stripes were only 50 cents "Ameri-
can," and her US. dollar tip was worth $21 Jamaican.
On another excursion, while following a road up a
mountain in search of a waterfall, we ended up on little
more than a dirt trail. We stopped for a moment to en-
joy yet another breathtaking view when we heard the
thick trees rustling. From underneath us on the steep
terrain came a large man wearing shorts and boots,
carrying a machete.
"Are you lost?" he said. "Can I help you?"
We met an artist and her husband on the road wait-
ing for a bus to Montego to sell paintings.
We met a street vendor from the road to our motel


in a little village over two hours from Montego. He was
thrilled to see us. And he gave us the best advice of our
entire vacation after we told some of the vendors we
weren't shopping.
He said to tell them we're taken care of. "That way
they think another Jamaican, a brother, has already
taken care of you and they will stop trying they'll
be satisfied that you are taken care of."
Remember this when you venture to other islands
and foreign lands. "I'm taken care of."
This little phrase carries all the magic of "please
and thank you" we learned in our youth.

PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE

-Bridge Street Pier a Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
TEMPORARY
S HOURS
S During Pier Construction
5-9 Wed & Fri
7 am to 10 pm Sat & Sun

ALL-U-CAN EAT
j FRIED GROUPER
with ice cold 504 Draft Beer
J ,I, Wed, Fri & Sat 5 pm to 9 pm

Our kitchen will be open, but our
fishing & bait are temporarily closed.
Please call for updates! 779-1706


m Wed, Thurs, Fri & Sat -
|B August 23, 24, 25, 26
Every Tuesday Happy Hour
all cday & all night
WILLY GREAT FOOD
Nightly Dinner Specials from ................$4.95
Wed All-U-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers .... $6.95
"Early Birds" 4 6 daily

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


I


"The best hamburgers and -
the coldest mugs of beer .
this side of Heaven.',w li-
f.ffv, Pat Geyer, Owner. \ A
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


B


I


In~






















_- ..-- .
', q y ;;. > -. _.. . . .

-"'a -: ..- an.;.j!., . .
...- .-.* * E l. ... :... .


___- __ .. __.
,_ ." : .- .... --7 -
e: ,, '; ,, '
o ,,, .


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N AUGUST 24, 1995 u PAGE 17 li


School Daze...

A wonderful
time of the

With some tears and a
lot of smiles, Anna
Maria Elementary
o students started a new
School year last Mon-
"- day. The earlybird
students in Michele
Gabriele's second-
grade class take a
moment off from
.A.. =checking out their new
Classroom to look
through all the books
they will use this year.

Anna Maria Elementary
School Menu


Heritage tour
Bradenton Beach resident Ida Cuthbertson shared
her news from Anna Maria Island on a break from
sightseeing on an island in Stockholm. She also
traveled to Solleftea in northern Sweden and to
Fiskebeckstil on the west coast. '

STIR-IT-UP, FROM PAGE 16

My summer vacation
So where did you go and what did you do? The
Islander Bystander would like to share vacations with
you. Short stories and pictures from your summer va-
cations are welcome. Joy Courtney
The best will be published. The rest will be relished
by the staff.
See you in the funny papers.
By Bonner Presswood


Joets f nBO'Sp0I
andoe ueat 10519 Cortez Road/A"..
Eat aYogrt 792-5300 V1
Ss made BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
Sweets byjoe LUNCH
"Just an OldFashioned Ice Cream Parlor" PIZZA BUFFET
"bc" PIZZA BUFFET
GREAT HOMEMADE
Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes a *m
Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes DINNER I .
Belgium Waffles PIZZA FF
Espresso, Cappuccino PIZZA BUF ET
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH 0*0
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 778-0007 $


Summer is the time to celebrate
with good old friends! WILD ABOUT






This Wee 's Dinner Specials
Chicken Cacciatore Braised with Mushrooms,
k r Onions, Peppers, Tomato & Italian Spices, $16.95
S-, Sauteed Lamb Loin Coated with Pistachio Nuts,
Zinfandel Sauce, Poached Pear & Asparagus, $18.95
Harry's American Bouillabaisse Crabmeat,
Crawfish, Grouper, Clams, Shrimp & Scallops, $18.95
OM/& 1%%A41 IA\


383-0777
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
Open Wednesday thru Sunday On Longboat Key


Monday, 8/28/95
Lunch: Toasted Cheese Sandwich or Pizza, Green
Peas, Red Apples, Orange Juice Bar
Tuesday, 8/29/95
Lunch: Chicken & Rice or Barbecue Ribs w/Bun,
Mixed Vegetables, Juice, Chocolate Brownie
Wednesday, 8/30/95
Lunch: Two Tacos or Burrito, Green Beans,
Cake Square
Thursday, 8/31/95
Lunch: Buffalo Wings w/ Carrot & Celery Sticks and
Low Fat Dip or Mini Chef Salad, Roll, Mixed Fruit
Friday, 9/1/95
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
Corn Salad, Cookies
All meals served with milk.
Breakfast menues not available at time of
publication.


GOURMET EARLY'SUPPERS
Nightly 5:00 to 6:30
SOUPS
Black Bean ................................ cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Gazpacho cup................................ 1.95 bowl 2.75
Sopa de Ajo garlic soup with toasted cheese
crouton ........................... cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Seafood Gumbo ..................... cup 2.50 bowl 3.50
SALADS
Caesar .................................. small 2.95 large 4.95
Watercress Walnut Salad ......... small 2.95 large 4.95
Warm Mediterranean Salad ..... small 2.95 large 4.95
APPETIZERS
Portobello and Artichoke Crostine.....................5.95
Pan Et6 .......................................................... 4.95
fresh spinach, cream, parmesan baked on crusty
Italian garlic bread, smothered in melted mozzarella
Hummus and Babaganoush with pita bread...... 4.95
Shoa Mei dumplings filled with shrimp and pork.. 5.95
Spanakopita spinach and feta in phyllo crust.. 3.95
Fettucini Alfredo in a tempting size .............3.95
ENTREES
Spring Omelette zucchini, bacon, swiss, cream cheese. 6.95
Herb Buttered Salmon rice or potato, vegetables .. 9.95
Shrimp Ajillo rice or potato, vegetables.......... 8.95
Chicken Breast Kiev or marinated and grilled 8.50
Veal Picatta or Schnitzel, rice and vegetables .... 9.50
Fettucina Alfredo a supper sized portion, vegetables........ 7.50
GRILLED GOURMET PIZZA
Artichoke Heart, Parmesan, Feta, Mozzardla, Fresh Spinach .......... 5.95
Sundried Tomatoes, Pepperoni, Parmesan, Mozzarella, Provolone.. 5.95
MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY SURF AND TURF
Whole Florida Lobster and Petite Filet ......... $15.95
SiSjte Sunday Brunch
EX I 9 am- 1:30pm

r liZinf Espresso, Cappuccino
TO n1t tS Coffee & Teas
pese Alsol Late Evenings
You are welcome to bring your favorite wine or beer.
9707 Gulf Dr. Anna Maria Reservations Suggested 778-9399


Please Call for Preferred SeaLing
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39

383-2391





IM PAGE 18 M AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I A AN NE N


New classes begin at
Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
On Sunday, Aug. 27, new Sunday School classes
will begin for ages four through adult at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Dr. in Holmes Beach.
Classes will be held weekly on Sunday from 9 to
10 a.m.
All students will meet together for music and
prayer in Fellowship Hall at the opening of that time
period. Students then separate by age levels for Bible
study and crafts. Study themes will focus on creation,
redemption, sanctification and discipleship for all ages.
For further information call Barbara Littell at 794-
2303.

Police to speak to Holmes
Beach Civic Association
The Holmes Beach Civic Association will meet on
Saturday, Aug. 26, at 10:30 a.m. at the Island Branch
Library in Holmes Beach.
Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Stephenson will
speak about the Neighborhood Watch Program and the
Holmes Beach Police Academy for residents.

Longboat art center offers
children's scholarships
The Longboat Key Art Center is now taking reser-
vations for elementary school children who wish to
apply for the Children's Scholarship Program.
The program is set up to supplement visual art edu-
cation in the public schools, where budget cuts have
forced cut-backs and elimination of art classes.
Scholarships are open to children in second
through fifth grade who have an interest in art.
Classes will be held on Saturday mornings from
October through March.
To receive an application form and schedule of
classes send a written request, including the grade level
of your child, to the Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr. S.,
Longboat Key, FL 34228.
Enrollment is limited.

Birthday book sale at
Tingley library
The Tingley Memorial Library will celebrate the
102nd birthday of Mrs. Beulah Hooks Hannah Tingley
with a book sale to be held on Friday, Aug. 25, and
Saturday, Aug. 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Birthday refreshments will be served.
Proceeds from the sale will help expand the
library's current collection.
The Tingley Memorial Library is located at 111
2nd St. N. Bradenton Beach.


yler's
Since 1984
Old Fasbioned Ice Cream and Waffe Cosna
Made on Location
SIce Cream Pics & Cakes *
Colombo Yogurt *
Soft Serve Diabetic *
A FULL SERVICE ICE CREAM PARLOR
Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10 PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333
















I-- ---- -- -


Register now for
Mote Sports Day
Mote Marine Laboratory will hold its popular
Sports Day fundraiser on a new date this year and sup-
porters are urged to choose their competition and sign
up now.
The fun will take place Sunday, Sept. 10, at the
world-famous Longboat Key Club. All proceeds will
benefit Mote's research programs.
Competitors may choose from among three sport-
ing events golf, tennis or fishing with all partici-
pants invited to a day's-end barbecue at the Longboat
Key Club.
The club's plush Islandside course will be the site
of the golf tournament at 11 a.m. with an entry dona-
tion of $100.
Tennis round-robin contests and a clinic by the
Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy will be held on the
Islandside courts at noon for $50 per person.
For those who prefer a day of fishing on Sarasota
Bay with one of the area's premier captains, fishing
tournament boats will leave Mote at 8 a.m. for $100 per
person.
For more information and registration, call Mote at
388-4441.


'Woody Allen of Folk' at the
Players of Sarasota
The Players of Sarasota will welcome comedian
Loudon Wainwright III to Sarasota on Sunday, Aug.
27, at 8:15 p.m.
Wainwright's shows are a devastating combination
of gut-busting humor and honest self-analysis delivered
with Buster Keaton-deadpan irony.
Tickets are $15 and are available at the Players'
box office, US 41 & 9th Street in Sarasota or by call-
ing 365-2494.


NEW HOURS
Tuesday thru Saturday 9 am 10 pm
Sunday 8 am Closed Monday
"- :4 1- 1-.


Silver
Queen Corn
. BANANAS
oAlways
^19LB


WATERMELON
S$499


`fweec"
VIDALIA ONION
TENNESSEE
"VINE RIPE "
TOMATOES


Cantaloupes, Plums
Peaches, ,
Nectarines : ,-_r'


Oease 8AM wuoDeA ing discount ard


Women's
right to
vote
honored
Saturday marks the
75th anniversary of -
the ratification of
the Nineteenth
Amendment
granting women
the right to vote.
Guest of honor at a
luncheon spon-
sored by the Strom
League of Women
Voters will be Susan Strom of Bradenton Beach, who
has cast a ballot in every election since the Constitu-
tional amendment was adopted. Islander.Photo:
Cynthia Finn

Young talent skis
professionally at
Cypress Gardens
Kate Arpke, daughter of Chef Ray and D'Arcy
Arpke, will no longer have time to work at her parents'
restaurant, Euphemia Haye.
Arpke, 16, has accepted a position as a professional
water skier at Cypress Gardens.
She has performed and honed her talents with the
Ski-A-Rees of Sarasota for the past five years. After
participating in an internship at Cypress Gardens, spon-
sored by Saint Stephen's Episcopal School in
Bradenton, Arpke received the offer from the ski team
at Cypress Gardens.
Arpke spent the summer filling in for ski team
members who were on vacation or tour during the sum-
mer and will continue to ski weekends and holidays
throughout the school year.

Art league publishes
class schedule
The Art League of Manatee County has set its
schedule of art classes for the month of September.
The classes offered include pottery, advanced wa-
tercolor, creating with clay and more.
Call the league at 746-2862 for a schedule.

We want your
announcements
The Islander Bystander welcomes meeting notices
and other announcements. Please send them to us two
weeks prior to the date you would like the notice pub-
lished. Send your announcements to: The Islander By-
stander, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.

S IC. Fat Free, Sugar Free
4p Ice Cream!
25o Cup of Coffee
S' With anypurchase(10-am-2pm)
SPFresh Made Deli
Take Out Sandwiches Sandwiches & Soups
For the Beach (Alldeli mets 94-98% fat ftee)
Eat-In or Take-Out
SMon Sat 10AM 9PM
AND DELI Sunday 12-6PM
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386





ninth street




PIZZA BURGERS FRIES


5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located in Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10Opm


I


N






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 0 PAGE 19 l[]


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 10, suspicious person, 700 block of North
Shore Drive. The complainant reported a white male sub-
ject was looking into a neighbor's house and knocking on
the door. The subject fled prior to the officer's arrival.
Aug. 13, eviction, 512 Spring Ave., Castaways
Resort. The officer stood by while the guest moved out.
Aug. 14, lost or stolen property, 100 block of
Pelican. The complainant reported he either lost his
ring or had it stolen.
Aug. 14, information, 412 Pine Ave., Five
O'Clock Marina. The officer on patrol observed a par-
tially sunken boat that was leaking gasoline. He con-
tacted an employee who removed the boat.

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 12, burglary, 300 block of Gulf Drive South.
The complainant reported he was in the apartment up-
stairs and heard a noise in his apartment. When he
checked, he found a person unknown had entered his
apartment by cutting the screen on the front door and
removed a camera valued at $138, a watch valued at
$30, a class ring valued at $30, a tie clip valued at $20,
a coin collection valued at $25 and miscellaneous jew-
elry. Damage was $20.
Aug. 13, criminal mischief, 1603 Gulf Drive S.,
Trade Winds Apartments. The complainant reported a
golf cart ran into the air conditioning stand, breaking
the stand and knocking the air conditioner to the
ground. There was no identification number on the golf
cart. Damage was $150 to the golf cart and $500 to the
air conditioner and stand.

Soccer season
registration ends Friday
Registration for the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center soccer season ends Friday, Aug. 25.
For those already registered, team try-outs will
be held Saturday, Aug. 26. Times for try-outs are:
10-11 a.m., 5- to 7-year-old,
11 a.m.-noon, 8- to 10-year-old,
Noon-1 p.m., 11- to 13-year-old,
1-2 p.m., 14- to 16-year-old.
Registration fees for center members are $25 for
one child, $20 for each additional child. For non-
center members, fees are $30 for one child, $25 for
each additional child. Fees are non-refundable.
Players receive a uniform of a shirt and
matching socks, but are responsible for providing
their own black shorts and shin guards.
For more information, call 778-1908.


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
V

LIFEGUARD
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
AUGUST 25 & 26 10P.M.
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


"B

ISLA
Breakfa
RODR .L 1/2 mi
Sfliam 875]
(comer ofP
Established 1947 Anna 1

PIER CAFE
(downstairs)
7 am-10 pm Daily
UPSTAIRS
DINING
(great views)
Friday 6 pm-10 pm
Sat & Sun
8 am-2:30 pm
6 pm-10 pm
When Is Your Special Day?
Our dining room is available for banquets,
private parties, birthdays, anniversaries,
showers and other special occasions.


est kept secret
n the Island"
ome join us for
AND COOKING
st, Lunch or Dinner
le north of City Pier
North Shore Drive
North Shore and Alamanda)
Maria rqlnnd ?Inridn


CALL
778-1885


Aug. 13, recovered stolen vehicle, Coquina Bayside.
The complainant reported he saw the vehicle in the same
spot for an extended period of time. The officer checked
and found the vehicle had been stolen in Sarasota.
Aug. 15, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. The complainant returned to the vehicle and
found a person unknown had taken out a window
screen and removed a purse, $350 in cash, credit cards
and prescription glasses.
Aug. 16, trespass warning, warrant arrest, 110
Bridge Street, Sonnydaze. The complainant reported a
subject with an active warrant was at the establishment.
He met the officer there and pointed out the subject.
The manager told the officer the complainant at-
tempted to start a fight with the subject and requested
a trespass warning be issued to the complainant.
Aug. 17, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered his
vehicle with a coat hanger and removed two wallets val-
ued at $10 each, driver's licenses, credit and ATM cards,
traveler's checks, $30 in cash, shorts valued at $20, a call-
ing card, a purse valued at $30, identification cards, a
checkbook and a set of keys. The male victim's wallet
containing credit and identification cards was found in the
Apollo Beach Post Office the next day.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 11, found property a bicycle, 2700 block
of Avenue C.
Aug. 11, found property a bicycle, 300 block
of 28th Street.
Aug. 11, burglary, 3018 Ave. C, Holmes Beach
Mini Storage. The complainant reported a person un-
known forced open the unit's door and removed a set
of silverware valued at $15,000. During the burglary,
the subject went through other boxes and dropped an
antique vase valued at $3,000.
Aug. 12, suspicious, 3018 Ave. C, Holmes Beach
Mini Storage. The complainant reported her unit was
found open but nothing was taken.
Aug. 12, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Manatee County Public Beach. The complain-
ant reported a person unknown broke the vent window
and removed a purse containing $160 in cash, credit
cards, a checkbook and personal papers. Recalling an
earlier burglary, the officer checked a trash can near the
vehicle and found all the complainant's property minus
the cash and a gold Master Card.
Aug. 13, animal, 400 block of Clark. The com-
plainant reported the neighbor's dogs barking. The of-
ficer noted this has been an on-going problem. The
officer reported he heard the dogs bark for about three
minutes. On a recall, the officer heard the dogs bark for
about four minutes. He informed the complainant the
county ordinance states that he must hear the dogs
barking for 10 minutes in order to prove a violation.
Aug. 13, suspicious incident, 6400 block of Ma-

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $7.25
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls .7*.
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week
EYE OPENER... 2 eggs toast, o"
024 Wl" home fries and coffee... 6nly $1'.75 .. .I


New dispatcher
Chris Hanula of Bradenton Beach began work as a
dispatcher with the Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment July 5. Hanula's fiancee, Sean Osborn, works
at Galati Marine. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland
rina Drive. The complainant reported she heard noises
in front of her residence, looked out the window and
saw a white vehicle leaving the driveway. She then
observed boxes that had been thrown into the driveway
which were starting to burn. The officer put out the fire.
Aug. 13, suspicious person, 6000 block of Gulf
Drive. The officer was dispatched in reference to a ju-
venile subject operating a personal watercraft without
a life jacket and within 300 yards of shore. The officer
gave the subject a verbal warning.
Aug. 14, warrant arrest, 5501 Marina Drive,
Captain's Marina. The officer on patrol observed a bi-
cycle beside a boat, and while checking the boat to
make sure it wasn't being burglarized, he found the
subject on the boat. The subject said the boat was his
and the officer verified that information. However, a
computer check revealed several outstanding warrants
on the subject, and he was placed in custody.
Aug. 14, burglary, 3018 Ave. C, Holmes Beach
Mini Storage. The complainant reported a person un-
known entered the unit and removed a back pack val-
ued at $50 and wall pictures valued at $10.
Aug. 17, burglary, 5318 Marina Drive, Peaches.
The complainant reported he opened the store, went to
get the receipts where he had placed them in a bank bag
and discovered the bag, containing $484, was missing.
Aug. 17, abandoned boat, 600 block of Key
Royale Drive. The complainant reported a boat adrift
behind her home banging into the seawall. The officer
contacted the marine patrol.
Aug. 17, found property a bicycle, 66th Street
and Key Royale Drive.
Aug. 17, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at
$275, 200 block of 58th Street.
Aug. 17, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at
$100, 200 block of South Harbor.


Where Longboat Key History Began






S TONE CRAB

RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

Summer Menu

NEW...

Create-Your-Own Platter
So
Specialty Salads

Lite and Hearty Dinners

King Crab Legs

Daily Specials
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
mmwmmY1mYm







EiG PAGE 20 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Use Big Sugar before it goes away


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Quick, before they shut down Big Sugar in Florida,
check out Big Sugar's Clewiston bar called the Ever-
glades Lounge. Have dinner in the Colonial Dining
Room too, for that matter. It's a beauty and the fresh
Okeechobee catfish they serve are wonderful.
As you can probably tell, there's a story behind all
this.
You see, Big Sugar is in trouble in Florida. The fed-
eral government is threatening to take away price supports
and subsidies in part to help clean up the Everglades.
For years now, every time I've driven across the
state through Clewiston, the historic Clewiston Inn has
beckoned from the side of the road. Some day, I kept
promising myself, I'm going to follow in thefootsteps
of President Herbert Hoover (for once) and check in at
the Clewiston Inn. Originally built by U.S. Sugar Corp.
in 1938 for its executives and guests, the company still
owns and operates the Inn.
It finally happened last week.
With just 48 rooms and five suites, the Inn is still
the biggest thing in Clewiston. It has the feel of old
money. Everything is first class, well broken in and
comfortable. The staff is friendly without being famil-
iar and absolutely nothing is pretentious.
Over the years I've heard two recurring stories
about the Clewiston Inn. One was about the wonderful
painted walls of the lounge (which is true) and the other
was about the wonderful breakfasts (not so true).
The Everglades Lounge alone the bar in the Inn
- is worth a trip to Clewiston. It's elegant in the nic-
est sense of the word.
In 1945, muralist J. Clinton Shepherd was commis-
sioned to create an Everglades scene wrapped com-
pletely around the inside of the lounge. The story has
it Shepherd lived at the Inn for months, traveling to the
Everglades every day to make sketches of native ani-
mals and plants for the finished mural.
The result is truly wonderful. Regardless of where
you look in the room, your eyes find flocks of black
skimmers, plunging pelicans or any one of the more
than 50 species of native Florida critters depicted on the
canvas- covered walls. To be sure, many of the crea-
tures are idealized a bit, that is, they're maybe too per-
fect. But it's still a great treat to sit there and just gaze
at one person's vision of the beauty of the Everglades
and the creatures that live there.
Interestingly, the canvas wasn't actually painted in
place, but back at the artist's studio in Palm Beach.
Only after he finished it was it brought to Clewiston
and glued to the walls.
The mural was "touched up" in 1973-74 and

AMERICAN CAR WASH

Your Car Wash & Detail Center

Valet Washing Full Detailing
Hand Wax m Engine Degreasing
Also ... Complete Self-Serve Facilities
Ask For Earl (941) 778-1617
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217



JAMES ANNIS

MARINE CONTRACTING
Lic. #MC00361

Specializing in Seawalls
I 10 Years Experience
I Fully Insured


New Construction Tie Backs
Seawall Caps Tie Pins
I Wooden Seawalls All Repairs
Erosion Control
I sALSO
I Custom Docks Boat Lifts
778-3730
Free waterfront inspection with this ad!
L ----------------..-


heavily cleaned just a few years ago. Decades of accu-
mulated smoke was sponged off and the painting is
now amazingly bright again.
The second nicest feature of the Clewiston Inn is
the Colonial Dining Room. In keeping with the tone of
the establishment, foods are local, fresh and prepared
in a first class manner.
Several tables were filled with folks from the
nearby Roland Martin fishing resort, judging from their
conversations. The menu mentions the chef will cook
your catch if that's what you'd like to eat.
Being fish eaters ourselves, we opted for the local
catfish and they haven't tasted so good since the old
days along the upper Mississippi. My lady friend, who
allowed she "didn't eat catfish," (and who can blame


By Senior Chief D.M. Bucci
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Aug. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an overturned pleasure craft
two nautical miles from Anna Maria Island. Upon in-
vestigation, the report was determined to be false.
Aug. 11, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a possible cardiac arrest
aboard a pleasure craft. The station arranged for para-
medics to meet the vessel at Cannons Marina on
Longboat Key.
Aug. 12, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of flares fired over the Gulf
of Mexico. A Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel searched
the area and checked with two vessels that were in
the area, neither of which were in distress. The
people who saw the flares later said they did not ac-
tually see the flares, just a reflection on a building
within their line of sight.


"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin



Island 778-5902
Marine





"" 1,..,..,,Ii



SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE
Also
Seawall Caps Pylons
Patio Decks Barge Service
Holmes Beach (941) 778-5902


her considering the mostly tasteless farm-raised fillets
we normally get), was amazed. She loved them.
Big plate of catfish, home-raised veggies and
homemade bread. Did I mention that I had a good time?
We paid $59 for a big double room (called the
Super Summer Special) and that included breakfast.
No, there were no grits or fresh trout such you might
find at the Boca Grande Club. The breakfast, as a
whole, was only average, although the sausage gravy
was the best I've tasted in years.
If you're interested in a little "mid-Florida" re-
treat, you can do far worse (and I have) than a stay
at the Clewiston Inn. For reservations or informa-
tion, just call 1-800-673-9528.
See you next week.


Aug. 13, Search and rescue/assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled pleasure craft
in Lemon Bay. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel
25087039 towed the vessel to port.
Aug. 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sailing vessel, "Seawind,"
overdue from Yankee Town. The station conducted a
series of phone calls, and the vessel was located near
the Albee Road Bridge in Osprey.
Aug. 14, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an overturned Hobie Cat
in the Gulf of Mexico off Bradenton Beach. The
station responded and righted the vessel.
Aug. 15, Boarding. A commercial fishing ves-
sel was boarded by crew aboard the Coast Guard
Cutter "Point Countess." Numerous safety viola-
tions were found, and the vessel's voyage was ter-

PLEASE SEE COAST LINES, NEXT PAGE


Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu8/24 12:30 1.7ft 4:34 1.2ft 11:28a2.6ft 6:15 0.5ft
Frl8/25 12:49 1.7ft 5:17 1.1ft 12:07 2.6ft 6:40 0.5ft
Sat 8/26 1:04 1.8ft 5:56 0.9ft 12:45 2.5ft 7:02 0.6ft
Sun 8/27 1:22 1.9ft 6:37 0.8ft 1:22 2.4ft 7:26 0.7ft
Mon 8/28 1:47 2.1ft 7:22 0.7ft 2:07 2.3ft 7:48 0.8ft
Tue 8/29 2:12 2.2ft 8:10 0.6ft 2:53 2.1ft 8:16 0.9ft
Wed 8/30 2:44 2.3ft 9:03 0.5ft 3:50 1.9ft 8:44 1.1ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later




I RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS


REPAIRS & REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
We are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce


Fish Tales

Welcome!


Got a great catch? A great fish photo?
The Islander Bystander would love to hear your
fish stories, and pictures are welcome! Just give
us a call at 778-7978 or stop by our office in the
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach


0*


I.., .~r.
,~,i

'kY
.


-~ ~


___ a:7',3-


I


----7


-0


IL-


COAST LINES


,. '* "" *l,'-. "
-: l., '
* ; ..: .. ... : .,
. . '; - ; f -,
"-" ri : i: : -*. 1 "


.....-. .;T-,.,c*A -, .. 1.. "


* "--I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 M PAGE 21 I30


Reds, reds and more reds


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Just when you thought redfish season couldn't get
any better, it does. We're averaging more than 20 fish
per trip, with many of the reds we're catching being
'way too big to keep. Offshore, there are lots of dolphin
to be found, as well as grouper and snapper.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier regular
Eddie caught a 35-inch snook and released it Saturday
night due to the out-of-season status of linesiders.
Other anglers are catching a lot of snapper, a bunch of
sheepshead and a couple of black drum.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there are catching snapper, flounder and redfish.
Lee at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-hour
trip averaged 100 head of Key West grunts. The six-hour
trip averaged 175 head of lane and mangrove snapper, red
grouper and Key West grunts. The nine-hour trip averaged
45 head of mangrove and yellow tail snapper, scamp, lane
snapper and black grouper.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are catching a lot of trout on the flats, and he's
hearing continued good stories about nice redfish
catches and lots of catch-and-release snook.
Capt. Phil Shields said grouper fishing offshore is
fair to excellent right now, snapper fishing is fair and those
elusive dolphin are still offshore in large numbers.
Capt. Rick Gross reports redfish are just about
everywhere in the bays right now.
Capt. Mark Bradow is finding huge schools of
reds on the flats. He suggests that once you spot the
spotties, pole into them rather than running the engine
up to them to avoid spooking the fish. He's having
good success with gold spoons, flies and Mirro-lures.
On my boat Magic we're finding redfish just about
everywhere, averaging about 20 reds per trip. We also
caught and released several snook.
Capt. Tom Chaya said when you can't catch any-
thing else you can always catch some reds. For a little
variety, Capt. Tom said he also landed some trout and
caught and released some snook.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said it looks like
the fall snook season will be a good one, what with the
excellent reports of catch-and-release snook already
coming in. Bill said the wade fishers are catching lots
of reds, artificial reef aficionados are finding lots of
mangrove snapper and even an occasional cobia.
Good luck and good fishing.

COAST LINES, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20
minated. The captain was cited $325 for 10 undersized
grouper, and the vessel was given a "captain of the
port" hold until the vessel passes a reinspection.
Aug. 16, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 12-foot Landau adrift in
Sarasota Bay after a squall had passed. The station re-
sponded and towed the vessel to a Longboat Key dock.


Big catch bonus of summer
Jacob Shuffstall, 15, of Holmes Beach, spent a large part of his summer fishing at the Rod & Reel pier in Anna
Maria. His big catches included a six-foot lemon shark, a 39 1/4-inch snook and finally this whopper, a 51-
inch, 26-pound barracuda. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Lady's day on
A the water
It was the ladies' turn to
fish on Zulu MaMa, and
what a collection of red
grouper they found.
Pictured are Vivian Allen,
SJ Dee Mingledorff, Paulette
Webb, Charlotte Fulkcs and
Mate George Reuss.







ir 1/2PRICE I
1I 2nd Hour Rental i
1IJ ~ ~$50 First Hour I
) with this coupon
JI _/ /I" expires 9/7/95
A-1 ISLAND ET SKI

S B B CaptainsMarina
-4 .5501 Marina Drive
LS*BS 7 B B B T 78-8559_

BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS BOATS -


QFISHIN' FOR R GOOD DEAL?
WE HAVE THE BOAT FOR YOU!


TjLII4


SSKIF
GULF CR
Sea."


FIES


'AFT .as
at TOHATS
outboa
USED BOATS


TA


rds


13V2' Whaler 30 Mariner............................ $2895
18' Sea Ray Classic. Everything new. ..........$3995
19' Carolina Skiff. 60 Merc. .... Save Over $4000
20' 1994 Fiesta Pontoon. Loaded...............$6995
21' Chris Cuddy I/0. Loaded. Nice........ $6995
23' Stamas' OMC 1.0.... ........................... $8995
24'x8' Custom Flats Boat. Unbelievable.. $11,995
27' Sportcraft 340 Merc. Inbd.................. $21,900
30' Scarab Twin 454's. Fast. Nice ........... $24,995


optamin John's


1444 CrtzRd W. 91-9-22


SMon-Fr AND
7:30 to05
Sat 8 to1i2 "r HARDWARE
Personal Service
Competitive Prices
Family Owned & Operated
Custom Cabinet Making
Millwork & Wood Cut to Size
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082


ISLANDER


More local
news than
any other
source!


Finest AIR CONDITIONING REPAIR
Since "We'll Never Sell You Anything You Don't Need"
1947 American Foreign

HComplete Service And Repair
0 ~A/C PARTS HOSES COMPRESSORS
Over 40 Years Experience


708-9th Street West Downtown Bradenton 747-2976
Member: Chamber Of Commerce Better Business Council FL Lic.#MV-06336


*



CO
0


*
-4





m
*
03




I
*
03

U,
O
0
-
03



In


;T


I







EI- PAGE 22 E AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Back to field operations for Senior Chief Bucci


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Senior Chief Diane Bucci is the ninth officer in
charge of the U.S. Coast Guard Station Cortez since its
opening in 1976. She is the search-and-rescue station's
first woman in command.
That gender distinction seems to pique more inter-
est from those outside the Coast Guard than those in-
side.
"In my years of service," says Bucci, "I've learned
that it's people outside who view you first as a woman
in charge. To my personnel here, and in my other com-
mands, I'm just the officer in charge."
Still, Bucci's 20 years in the Coast Guard chrono-
logically parallel an increasing role for women in the
service. She was the first enlisted woman in the Coast
Guard to command a boat and her most recent role in-
volved support and policy related to gender.
Bucci, a native of Philadelphia, Pa., didn't always
have her sights set on a career in the Coast Guard. In
fact, she says she didn't even know what the Coast
Guard was.
Rather, as a young child, Bucci wanted to follow
in the steps of one of her aunts, a naval nurse.
"Starting as a young girl," says Bucci, "that's what
I knew I wanted to be. Whenever I was around her, I
always wore her hats."
At the age of 17, Bucci had a chance to become
part of a U.S. Navy program that would have put her
through nurse's training. However, her father wouldn't
sign the papers for her at that age.
When Bucci tried again at age 18, there were no
openings in that program. The Navy recruiters asked
her if she had considered the Coast Guard. She hadn't,
not knowing what the Coast Guard was.
What there wasn't in the Coast Guard was a
nurse's program. What was offered, that Bucci decided
to go for, was a program to train her as a boatswain's
mate, a position she knew nothing about.
That was in 1975, just after the Coast Guard al-
lowed the first women officers (1973) and then the first
enlisted women (1974). Bucci was in on the bottom
rung of an active-duty role for women.
She worked her way up the ladder training in Cape
May, N.J., and Yorktown, Va., then back to Station
Cape May where she served for 3 1/2 years at what was
then one of the busiest Coast Guard stations in the
country.
From there Bucci went to Harrisburg, Pa., for two
years as a recruiter, and then returned to Yorktown as a



Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist

792-3758
Openings available for new clients Gift Certificates
Please mention that you saw this ad in The Islander Bystander.
MM0003995 MA0012461




Problem with


Insurance?

CaHl 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center -' :
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 '-.


Senior Chief Diane Bucci, new officer in charge at
Coast Guard Station Cortez.
petty officer first class where she served as the only
woman instructor at the search-and-rescue-station school.

A ship at last
In 1984, Bucci was assigned to her first ship, the
cutter Glacier, an ice-breaker, out of Longbeach, Ca-
lif. She was the senior enlisted woman, and one of only
19 women total in the crew of 200. She supervised a
deck force of 35.
Part of that 18-month stint included six months at
sea and a 60-day stay in the ice of Antarctica.
It was in 1988, having advanced to the rank of
chief petty officer, that Bucci was assigned as com-
mander of the cutter Capstan, a 65-foot harbor tug, at
Fort Belvoir, Va., on the Potomac River.
Three years later Bucci took over as commander of
her first station at Saint Inigoes, Md., where the
Potomac meets Chesapeake Bay.
While in command at Inigoes, Bucci also attended
the Chief Petty Officers Academy in Petaluma, Calif.,
where the officers were exposed to personnel from all
areas of the Coast Guard. It was there that Bucci first
met the woman's policy advisor.
The advisor's post had been created after a 1989 study
regarding women in the Coast Guard. The advisor was

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS
--------- ----
READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
June 5 thru September 30


I


No, twins Billy and George
I. O'Connor are not 5
S1" : years old but the
bowling challenge is!


SIGN UP TO BOWL FOR BENEFIT DOLLARS
Aug. 26 5:30 Sign-up at D.Coy Ducks 7:30 Bowl at Galaxy Lanes
Party to follow at Crabby Bill's $10 per bowler includes 3 games and shoes.
Advance sale raffle tickets available anyone can win! Info: 778-1500
All proceeds benefit youth sports at Anna Maria Island Community Center


responsible for working with senior management on the
recruitment and utilization of women in the service.
In 1992, Bucci's 17 years of experience with the
force she had known nothing about and her gender
earned her the assignment at Coast Guard headquar-
ters in Washington, D.C., as assistant woman's policy
advisor.
That role involved policy input, support for both
genders as related to women personnel, a lot of
travel and the implementation and expansion of pro-
grams designed not only for women, but for men and
their families.
While assistant advisor, Bucci also participated in
a more official capacity as a representative rather
than just an interested spectator on the Defense
Advisory Council on Women in Service
(DACOWITS), which brought together members of all
our armed forces.
Of the 38,000 members of the Coast Guard, almost
9 percent are women, a total number that may be lower
than other services, but a percentage that is high.
Bucci believes the Coast Guard's gender "policies
and visions are ahead" of our other forces. For ex-
ample, the Coast Guard is the only service, since 1977,
that has opened every occupation and rank to women.
Bucci remained at headquarters until June of this
year, shortly before the opening came up at Station
Cortez and the transfer she had requested to Florida
became reality. She replaces Master Chief J. D. Arndt
She says she is just as busy in her new command
as she was in her previous occupation in D.C., but it's
a different kind of busy and she's enjoying the change.
"It feels good," says the senior chief, "to be back
out in the field and involved with the operational Coast
Guard rather than support and policies."
Her current command includes 25 enlisted personnel,
four vessels and the responsibility of boater assistance and
federal and state law enforcement of the area from the
Sunshine Skyway Bridge south to Gasparilla Island.
Off duty, Bucci is enjoying her new home with her
husband, a retired Coast Guard master chief, and their
youngest daughter, a senior in high school.
Bucci may not be wearing the nurse's cap she en-
visioned years back, but she's wearing the hat she's
earned over the past 20 years of service: Senior Chief
Boatswain's Mate.
The recruiter told Bucci the Coast Guard could
teach her everything she needed to know when she
admittedly knew nothing. She's learned well and she's
in command again. Welcome to Station Cortez, Chief.

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEPING
AND YEAR-ROUND TAX SERVICE .
Individuals Corporations Partnerships '
Now Accepting New Clients W .
Summer Hours: Tuesday Thru Friday
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
St %y t y ,,=L Uti 778-6118
Licensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 M PAGE 23 BlI

9- AI 1-


Jessie May Berry
Jessie May Berry, 84, of Bradenton, died Aug. 12
in Seffner.
Born in Chicago, Mrs. Berry came to Manatee
County from Royal Oak, Mich., 17 years ago. She was
a retired Detroit school principal. She was a member of
Kirkwood Presbyterian Church. She was a member of
L. W. Blake Auxiliary, Explorers Club, Continental
Travel Club, Retirees Organizations of Administrators
and Supervisors and the Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary.
She is survived by two daughters, Judy Jorgensen of
Holmes Beach, and Nancy Shinskey of Seffner; a sister,
Esther Stubberfield of Kalamazoo, Mich.; a brother, Wil-
liam Halnon of Alexandria, Va.; five grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren.
Services were held at Mansion Memorial Park Chapel
in Sarasota. Burial was in Palms Memorial Park.

William H. Schmutz
William H. Schmutz, 76, died on Aug. 14, 1995 in
San Francisco.
Mr. Schmutz succeeded Ernie Cagnina as mayor of
the City of Anna Maria from 1988 to January 1989. He


EX C E P T I0 N AL.


ANNUAL & VACATION RENTALS
OWNERS...
Secure the highest caliber tenants
Realize the highest income from
your properties
Contact our Rental Specialist:
Brenda Reddy,
941-778-2275
N. I. Suner & o *wi


DON'T


LEAlVE


P..RAISE


WITHOUT US!

Subscribe to
The Islander
Bystander.
Over 900 Island-
lovers are already
on our out-of-town
list. It's the best news
on Anna Maria
Island Use the
subscription form on
page 7 of this issue.

ISLANDERt


Bay

Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.
Sales
Associate
Wanted
Experienced
or thinking
about getting
your license
Dynamic
Company,
Great Office.
Call Robin Kollar
778-7244
309 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria


was a member of the "Pier Regulars." He attended the
University of Pittsburgh and served as a Captain in the
U.S. Navy Pacific theater from 1942 to 1946.
He was employed as a district sales manager at
Lederle Labs of Pearl River, N.Y. for 34 years.
A memorial service will be held in Virginia on
Aug. 24.
He is survived by his wife, Valerie; four children
and three step-children.


Stewart R. Stahl
Steward R. Stahl, 74, of Bradenton Beach, died
Aug. 14 at home.
Born in Eaton Rapids, Mich., Mr. Stahl came to
Manatee County from Albion, Mich., in 1969. He was
employed at Albion College in Albion for 20 years. He
was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Bernice; a daughter,
Judy Buckler of Ephreta, Pa.; three sons, Gary of At-
lanta, Michael Kloack of Houston, and Ted Kloack of
Jackson, Mich.; a sister, Marjorie of Indiana; a brother,
Milton of Shirley, Ind.; seven grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
Burial was in Manasota Memorial Park, Oneco.


R5'~W1IX


GULFSTREAM REALTY I


ca
t Yvonn
i% 778-777
-~i . 1-800-318-.57


all

7
52


1 9bf- W.YOne'1-4i j Reltoi ,







i



525 Loquat, Anna Maria
Beautiful 5BR/4BA canal home. Screened
porch overlooks pool area. Seawalled ca-
nal with dock and davits. Great view of <
Tampa Bay. Just reduced to $475,000. <
Call (941)778-5590 4






CHARMING BAYFRONT HOME








618 South Bay Blvd., Anna Maria
Breathtaking views of sparkling Tampa Bay are seen from 4
this charming home. Large open kitchen and great room.
Huge deck wraps around the bayfront exterior. A water-
front delight that everyone will enjoy! $369,000.


Memorial contributions may be made to Southeast
Guide Dog, 4210 77th St.

William Warren
William Warren, 73, of Bradenton, died Aug. 22 at
L.W. Blake Hospital in Bradenton.
Mr. Warren was born in Lexington, Ky., and came
to this area in 1986, having visited since 1967.
A memorial service will be held Friday, Aug. 25,
at 10 a.m. at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512
Pine Ave., Anna Maria, with the Rev. Frank Hutchison
and the Rev. Wayne Kirk officiating. Arrangements are
by Brown and Sons Trust 100 Funeral Home.
Memorial donations may be made to the American
Cancer Society, P.O. Box 10459, Bradenton, Fla.
34282 or to the American Heart Association, 5927 S.
Beneva Road, Sarasota, Fla. 34238.
Mr. Warren attended Roser Memorial Community
Church. He was a member of Monument Masonic
Lodge 657 of Indianapolis and the Scottish Rite &
Murat Shrine in Indiana. He was a member of the
Manatee County and Anna Maria Island Democrat
Clubs.
He is survived by his wife Wilma, five sons; Wil-
liam E. Warren, Robert A. Warren and James R. War-
ren, all of Indianapolis, Thomas Warren of Bradenton
and Michael G. Warren of Endinburgh, Indiana; two
sisters, Margaret Warren of Virginia and Juanita
Hawkins of Bradenton; two brothers, Nelson Warren
of Cincinnati and Scott Warren of Indianapolis; 11
grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

n L eL~


DICK MAHER
REALTOR
778-2261 .
Dick has been a major
player in the Island Real Es-
tate Industry for over 10
years, and is one of Neal &
Neal's Top Producers.
Call anytime for a consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


i


F-w -ww w'V"V 'WW VWw V w w v


The Island Poet, Bud Atteridge
Things are silent round the old home like it never was before,
There are no kids racing through the house and slamming the back door.
And there are no kids fighting and yelling at each other,
And sister isn't screaming to ma that she's picked on by her brother.
For the whole house is silent and as quiet as a tomb,
As if it were an omen of some approaching doom.
But there sits mother drinking coffee and smiling like a fool,
For she's in seventh heaven 'cause the kids are back in school.


q AL


rwv' ~v


'I


I w w^ VW wY


Soyf go 5y 1

blqM Atw) ^/ T
Ao/ 7f 4Ot, 4ucii/TY
vd/r 5%^^,f
rauy XWO
You 4/ iVAl St 5f IAX4o
elr4y K4,7oo,0


NDOki



33 o5- t, jI
17; 7- 34-

3101, 4ro"l
AN,-^ AL h ^^^ AA l


N6


v


m


Ak :ik M Z -- I I -- & R


!l '






Mi3] PAGE 24 E AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Karin Stephan
Island Really Group.KrinLTteph
~REALTORG 11
FlrdRaiyPRESIDENTS CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
3mDeutsch
53 G ( 4 7 7Office:
18 I941-778-0766


Privately owned vacation homes range
from rustic beach cottages to luxury
Bayview and Gulffront accommodations.


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2-car, 3,895
sq.ft. under roof home including caged pool. Unique
origami roof line and walled solarium. $265,000.


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erly Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND Smilesl
A-.1. l.1 :1 /h'[ :M IU. =. I .]: A.1 "[ :1= .f


FLAMINGO CAY... park your boat and have a place to
sleep. 2BR/2BA, ground floor unit with screened lanai on
deep water canal with access to intracoastal. Convenient
to shopping, bus line and walk to Palma Sola Bay. #65476.
$84,900. Call Horace T. Gilley, 792-0758.
DUPLEX... well maintained 2BD, 2BA and 2 BD, 1BA,
located one lot from Gulf. Upstairs unit has gorgeous view
of Gulf. Excellent rental history, assumable. mortgage with
owner financing. #63273. $198,500. Call Debbie Thrasher,
eves at 778-3395.
JUST REDUCED... elegant Island Paradise Condos, 3BD,
2BA and 2BD, 2BA. Luxurious units with private balcony.
Windows surround kitchen, dining room and living room af-
fording a panoramic view of the Gulf of Mexico. Prime walk-
ing beach. $289,000. Call Karin Stephan, eves at 388-1267.


TERRA CEIA... 4BD, 3BA, bayfront estate
with 2 boat docks. #DY63464. $460,000.
GULF-FRONT HOME with 1/2 acre. Old
Florida charm, 2BD built in 1925 w/de-
tached gar. and guest qtrs. 50' of Gulf
frontage. #DY64092. $450,000.
W. OF GULF DR... bldg lot offering mag-
nificent views of Gulf and only 300' to the
beach. #DY64092. $165,000.
OLD FLORIDA CLASSIC... 3BD, 2.5BA,
on Ig lot. Walk to Palma Sola Bay.
#DY58420. $187,500.
ISLAND RESTAURANT... beach view/
high traffic visibility plus 2BD apartment.
#DY52792. $450,000.


T. Dolly Young
REALTORF/IMS
Leading Edge Society
778-5427


WHAT A DEALI Perfectly maintained duplex with 2BD, 1.5BA and
carport each side. Tropical trees, flowers and professional land-
scaping. Very private fenced In backyard with fruit trees and 1/2
block to the beach. Bring your drink, sit In your chair and enjoy the
sunset. #KS65582. $198,000.

JUST REDUCED...
Martinique 2BD, 2BA with newer
appliances. 1 car garage, storage,
pool, tennis, and storm shutters.
Enjoy a great view of the Gulf from
this glass-enclosed lanai w/ceiling
fans or walk on the beautiful beach.
#CH59042. $134,900.
Carol S. Heinze
REALTORe/CRS
Premier Circle
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


Only The Islander Bystander gives you complete news.
Weekly coverage of all three Island cities, all the happenings, stories about Island people, the elementary
school and much more. Use the mail order form on page 7 to subscribe or call (941) 778-7978 to charge
it on Visa or MasterCard. The Islander Bystander is "the best news on Anna Maria Island."



WAGNE12 REALTY,, Sn1939


2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-U978
L^_ Call Toll free in the U.S. 1-800-211-2323





g ,,I- U '..:


ISLAND FOURPLEX Four fully furnished 2BR apart-
ments on large 100 x 100 corner lot. Short walk to wide,
sandy walking beach. Offered at $299,500. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


LAGOON VIEW from this 1BR/1BA Runaway Bay unit
with washer/dryer, extra closet space, all new appli-
ances and close to the pool. Across the street from the
beach, second home or great rental with on-site rental
management all for $78,900. Call Ed Oliveira.


K.-.^'r' '^Al A


ANNA MARIA ISLAND'S FINEST COMPLEX. Spec-
tacular views, wide sandy walking beach, heated
pool and spa, secured elevator lobby, covered park-
ing. Old Florida architecture with quality construction.
Three prime units priced from $189,500 to $235,000.
Call Dave Moyihan or Ed Oliveira.


BRIDGEPORT Gulf view from this top floor unit with
pool, covered parking, elevator and steps to beach.
Located close to shopping and restaurants. Offered at
$89,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


NEAT AND CLEAN! Well-maintained 2BR/1.5BA el-
evated one-half duplex with central Holmes Beach lo-
cation. Great vacation spot, weekend get away, or
rental. Close to shopping, school and just a quick walk
to Bay or Gulf. Priced at $72,500. Call Ed Oliveira.


TWO GREAT ISLAND VILLAGE CONDOS Spacious
2BR/2BA, top floor units in prime Holmes Beach loca-
tion. Open floor plans, lovely views. Large screened
porches. Walk-in closets, two pools, tennis courts, ga-
rage parking and short walk to great beach. From
$109,900 to $119,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


0u4 Ptol Mt44 T4 DUifa


Dave Moynihan .......778-7976 Ed Oliveira .......... 778-1751


Suzanne Georgia....... 755-1576


Bill Alexander..........778-0609 Jackie Jerome .......... 792-3226


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


- oowu,
DOWUNG
REALTY
4091 Pine AV.
Anna Maria
771-1222
. .






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 24, 1995 K PAGE 25 IB



ITMSFO ALEIANNONCMETSCotiue lHEP ANTE Cotined


ITEMS WANTED: DONATIONS of re-usable items for
SAM'S grand garage sale on Sept. 30, note date
change. Deliver to Haley's Motel, 8102 Gulf, or call Joy
at 778-5405. Proceeds dedicated to SAM'S legal fund.

HANDMADE HAMMOCKS Hand crocheted and knot-
ted with cedar rods (all cotton), Matrimonial size, limited
supply, super deal, call soon (941) 753-4236.

REFRIGERATOR FREEZER, upright freezer, weight
bench with weights. All working condition. Call 778-
0542 after 6:00.
1985 MERCURY TOPEZ runs good, $525. 1978 Ford
van runs excellent, $700 OBO. Scuba gear, complete
set with speargun, $275. 795-1826.
FRIGIDAIRE ELITE side by side refrigerator, almond, 21
c.f. w/ice maker. King bedspread, white wicker hanging
lamp, rattan look coffee table and end tables. 778-2692.
If no answer, please leave message.
IN-LINE SKATES, Roller Derby BX5000. Men's size 7.
Over $230 new. Almost new wheels. Very fast. Asking
$120. 778-7978.
FUJI 21 SPEED BIKE, small frame. $100. 778-7978.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


SALE INSIDE Fri, Sat & Sun, August 25, 26 & 27.
210A 71st St., Holmes Beach. Baskets, floral ar-
rangements. Boys and ladies clothes, wreaths and
southwestern cacti.
HUGE YARD SALE Sat., August 26. 8 am til? 406
72nd St., Homes Beach. Lots of household goods,
furniture, etc.
YARD SALE Sat., August 26. 9-1. Iris Street dead
end, Anna Maria. King size bedding, exercise equip-
ment and more.


LOST Chair to dining room set, lost while moving the
end of July. 778-0504.


FREE MULCH Bag it yourself. 208 Peacock Lane,
Holmes Beach.
REO ITER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5408
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center (between D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre restaurants), Holmes Beach.


GULF FRONT
Two bedroom, two bath turnkey furnished unit, beau-
tiful sunsets, protected parking. For more information
please call. $175,000. Stan Williams 795-4537.
THE WATERWAY Top drawer describes this
Commodore Suite. 3BR/2BA, 2000 sq. ft. plus. Large
private dock, upgraded interior decoration and premier
furniture package. $149,900. Ken Rickett 778-3026.
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 2BR/2BA each side.
Fully rented, close to beach & Bayside Park. For more
information, call Lynn Hostetler 778-4800. $149,900.
DIRECT GULF FRONT 2BR/2BA 2nd floor
unit with Gulf view balconies, elevator, covered
parking, lighted tennis court, new carpet & new
tile. Walk to shopping & restaurants. Lynn
Hostetler 778-4800. $159,000.
COMMERCIAL BUILDING Located in center
of Holmes Beach. Over 3,000 sq. ft., two story. Can
be divided into five units if desired. Great visibil-
ity. $279,900. Stan Williams 795-4537.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Motivational theme classes;
50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, Top 40, Salsa & circuit training.
Classes are Mon. & Wed. 6:30 to 7:30 pm at The Sil-
ver Community Center, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr.,
Bradenton Beach. MUSCLE TONING Upper & lower
body toning using dynabands, dumb bells (1 3 lbs for
women & 3 5 lbs for men) and body's own resistance.
Classes are Tues. & Thur. 6:30 to 7:45 pm at The Sil-
ver Community Center, 23rd St. and Gulf Dr.,
Bradenton Beach. For info call Geri 779-2129.



BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


1985 JAGUAR excellent condition, new headliner, tires,
brake pads, silver. A must see car. $7,000. 778-1990.
'86 GMC, Safari Cargo Van, new torque, new fuel pump,
A/C, runs good. $2,295 OBO. 778-1932 leave message.
1978 DODGE Magnum. New paint, AM/FM, automatic.
Runs good. Many new parts. $1,100. 778-7048.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
YACHT DETAILING by Carleen. Maintenance pro-
grams, detailing, teak, waxing. No boat too small. Island
resident. Pager #813-252-0080.
ESCAPE on deluxe catamaran. Stable, fast, shallow
draft. Snorkel, swim, sail. Family fun. Overnight and day
trips to Egmont Key. Passage Charters 794-5980.
Group rates.
GOOD AS NEW 1992 Proline Sportsman, 19', 115
Yamaha, trailer, bimini, shower, etc. 778-5880.
VIKING INFLATABLE. Five-person, electric start 40 hp
Suzuki. Cover, forward drive, windshield, 2 pumps, 2
gas tanks, more. $1,000. 778-7765.


DRUG FREE work place Great program, seeks positive,
.creative, motivated, nurturing, educated individuals to
teach children ages 5 to 10 or ages 11 to 14. Afternoons
daily, some evenings and Saturdays. Salary range $5.50
to $7.00 depending on experience. Call 778-9511.
You get the most Island news in The Islander Bystander!


DRUG FREE work place Great program, seeks li-
censed eligible M.S.W. to work with children and
families. Supervision available. Afternoons and some
evenings. Salary range from $10.00 to $15.00 per
hour depending on experience and qualifications.
Call 778-1908.
TEACHERS AIDE 3-6 pm. Mon thru Fri. Call Dolphin
Preschool, 778-2967.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Get involved with the
Anna Maria Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. Call Dorothy Stevenhagen, 795-0148.



"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults at adult day center,
through Manatee Council on Aging. Transportation
available. 748-6974."



JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sun-
shine Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

DESIGN 2000 FOR HAIR. Offering excellence in hair
design and color expertise. We invite you to experience
the finest in personal service. North end of LBK at 6400
Gulf of Mexico Dr. 387-9807, evenings by appointment.

NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk... whatever your haul-
ing needs. Call Eddie 0. 792-1693.
SEAMSTRESS new in town. 25 years experience. Al-
terations, mending, hemming, repairs. Will pick-up. Call
Sandra 941-795-0676.
SPARKLE & SHINE prompt, courteous housecleaning
by Melissa. 747-6044, pager 569-8065.



lFmT


ISLAND GETAWAY VILLA. No condo fees to pay in
this turnkey furnished 2 bedroom, 1 bath villa with ga-
rage. Large and bright vinyl-enclosed Florida room too!
Both bedrooms have walk-in closets. Easily affordable
at only $81,500! Call Judy Duncan at 778-1589.


DIRECT GULF FRONT CONDO. This 2 bedroom, 1.5
bath end unit is comfortably turnkey furnished. A su-
per investment or vacation home. Reduced to
$157.000. Call Marion Ragni 778-1504 after hours.


PERICO BAY CLUB: A great view of two lakes from
this 1st floor bedroom, 2 bath condo. Guard gate, pool
tennis, minutes from beach. $92,900. Call Zee
Catanese 794-8991 after hours.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


[Snuk






i3 PAGE 26 M AUGUST 24, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


S Commercial Residential Free Estimates
sandy's\ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
t Lavn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
ll778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
M783 0AND SATISFACTION


Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900 RF-0066644



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
m MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558



REMODELING
ADDITIONS
RENOVATIONS
XACT KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


J. .I

Painting
*A*ssmure Ceaning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
*Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


LaPensee s
Plumbing Inc.
Repairs & Remodeling
778-5622


V ---- - -
KOHLER.
5345 GI ve Holmes Iach

5345 B Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


A 9 B A D


arrin Wash CARPENTRY
S"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


---


LANDSCAPING Lawn work, light hauling. Tree work,
no tree too big or small. Odd jobs of any kind. Call 778-
3089 anytime.
"SPARKLING CLEAN SERVICES" Residential and
commercial cleaning. Homes, condos, rentals.
Move in/out specialist. Estimates and appoint-
ments. Beverly 778-1945.
THE PERFECTIONIST will clean office, homes, and
rentals the way they should be cleaned. Interior painting
also. Call Sharon at 778-6329.
BEST CLEANING RATES and references. On island
since 1985. Also ironing and personal care. Will pick-up
and deliver. 778-2085.
"POWER CLEAN MULTI SERVICES" Residential and of-
fice. Experienced, reliable, detailed, reasonable. Serving
Manatee, Sarasota, Anna Maria, Longboat Key. For other
services or information call 756-9866, leave message.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL 2, 3 & 5 day
programs. Limited places available. 778-2967.
CLEANING weekly or bi-weekly on island or near vicin-
ity. 17 year island resident. Good references. Call Bar-
bara at 778-1608.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town and the
best results from classified ads and service advertising!
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon
on mobile number 320-0110. Please leave a mes-
sage for quick reply if not available.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
CODY'S CARPET & upholstery cleaning. Remove
stains first, dry foam scrubbing, extract soap out leaving
carpets dirt and soap free. Free deodorizing. 11 years
experience. Owner operated. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident 25
yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.

THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of home
repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experience. Insured,
island resident, references available. Jim 779-2129.

MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and responsible.
Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.


~~~~1~
(


Protection from scorching sun!







We clean and wax everything for one low price.
Everything is included for $85 on a normal size
car. Top to bottom, ashtray to engine! Hand wash,
buff, seal and polish, vacuum, Armorall, dress rims
and tires, shampoo interior, satin-black under-
carriage. Even the engine is cleaned and silicone
protected. Our mobile service means no one has to
drive your car. We come to you. By appointment,
at your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number. 320-0110.


The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet shirts, subscription orders and
classified advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 941-778-7978 FAX 778-9392




DEAL CASPARSP CHE RURAL
*U N T0 F L A T 0 M I NGH O M E
0 NEIS LLA Y E P
MI SS GETNLANDSGAMERS
B A T MANRETUU RN T AKE RS
RES 0 W F L 0 SS EN M I ES
BELA AL NTNER 0 DDB-A. LIL



BI L L E TD0AU BLETR 0 U-8L
A R NESS B R INY N 0 T N E UR
SW I N GS H IFTC L 0 G A R B
ME ESE T EE- H A.R L E E R G
E D D l E A D 0D TTlE Rl D SO S


HANDYMAN painting, most household repairs, no job
too small. Free estimates. Call Mike 778-0504.



MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.

ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
GULF FRONT residence. Excellent north Holmes
Beach location. Fully furnished 2BR/2BA. Available
short term. Call Dave Moynihan, Realtor 778-7976/778-
2246.
BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.

GULFFRONT 1BR/1BA vacation condo. Screened
lanai, sundeck, private beach, nicely furnished. Avail-
able weekly/monthly Aug. 1 to Dec. 30 starting at $425.
weekly. 778-2832.

LUXURY CANAL FRONT one story home with pool. 2/
3 bedroom, 3 baths, three quarter block from beach.
$3,400/mo, weekly rates available. 1-800-223-4472.
SUMMER, ANNUAL AND SEASONAL rentals. Call the
rental specialist. Wagner Realty 778-2246.
FEBRUARY RENTAL NEEDED; 3BR, condo? pool?
Would like to return to AMI to enjoy island beauty and
Roser Church congeniality. Will be on AMI 9/18. Mark
Foxon, 23 Ash Hill Rd, Reading, MA 01867.
LARGE 2BR/2BA CONDO, 2 blocks from beach. Avail-
able furnished or unfurnished. Dayna, 778-2134.
FURNISHED APARTMENT Close to beach. $500/mo
annual or $1,000/mo seasonal. 778-2967.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I AUGUST 24, 1995 0 PAGE 27 RIM


JISLANDJ;fER CLSSIFE4DS


2BR/2BA Holmes Beach, furnished plus W/D. 6/mo
or 1/yr lease. $650/mo plus utilities, small pet OK.
778-3527, leave message.
A BREEZY BAY FRONT cottage with dock. Fully fur-
nished clean & neat. Quiet area. Perfect for retiree.
$250/wk $600/mo. 794-5980.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1 BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
from $400/wk. 778-1135.
BRADENTON BEACH Duplex 1BR/1BA or 2BR/2BA,
water garage, garbage, cable, washer & dryer included.
104 7th Street S. Call 723-0430 leave message.
LOVELY HOLMES BEACH 2BR/3BA home on sailboat
water with dock. Recent renovation. Annual or seasonal.
778-5047 after 3 pm.
ANNUAL RENTAL unfurnished, 2BR/2BA condo at
Smugglers Landing with boat dock on canal. 1st, last
and security. $900/mo. Call Debbie Thrasher 778-2055.
Prudential Florida Realty.
ANNA MARIA annual rental: 2BR/1BA, carport, utility
room. $550/mo plus utilities. First, last and security. No
pets. 778-3119.
BAYFRONT, available Sept. 1. Annually or weekly
monthly, seasonally. Large 2BR/1BA newly remodeled,
private apt with boat dock. Walk to Gulf, restaurants and
shops. Includes utilities. 794-8792.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE -3BR/2BA large unit. Annual
rental, unfurnished, $1,200 monthly. Excalibur Realty,
795-4394.
LONGBOAT KEY waterfront, 1BR, beautiful village
neighborhood, beach, groceries, post office, restaurant,
bank one block. Very clean. 383-2819.
YEARLY 2BR/2BA, condo. Dishwasher, disposal, cen-
tral heat/AC, heated pool. Bayshore active adult com-
munity. $460/mo. 795-4432. Close to everything.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3BR condo across from the
beach. Has everything! Washer/dryer, pool, storage,
real nice! Call Edie 778-7916.
SUMMER RENTAL: 1BR/1BA direct Gulffront units,
$425/wk; 2BR & 3BR homes on or near the gulf, $600/
wk and up. Call Carla Price, Smith Realtors, 778-0770.
HOLMES BEACH 2 levels, living area 2,256 sq. ft., bed-
room 24'x28', 2 sundecks, Gulf intercoastal view. See,
evaluat,fjurnished and price negotiable. 778-5832.
ISLAND SEASONAL/ANNUAL rentals. T. Dolly Young,
The Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766.
WANTED: Quiet tenant for gr. level HB apt. 1BR/1BA
west of Gulf Dr. 1 adult preferred. Available 9/1/95. Fur-
nished or Unfurnished. First, last, security and refer-
ences. 778-2864.
FALL SPECIAL Gulffront condo, private beach, large
pool, 2BR/1BA. $350/wk. 778-7323.


GULFFRONT CONDO 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, large
pool, quiet, private beach, no pets. $700/mo plus elec-
tric. 778-7323.
ANNUAL Anna Maria N. end. Rare 1BR/1BA "old
Florida charm," steps to Gulf. Washer & dryer, won't
last! Reserve now! Only $495/mo. 778-2126.
AVAILABLE NOW and for season. 3BR/2BA house
across from beach. Enjoy sunsets and beautiful view
from covered porch. 941-778-5588 or 778-1180.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of
Anna Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/
3 acre w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young af-
ter hours. 778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.

FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/
1 BA each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. .
404 71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit -
$159,000. 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to
Gulf $169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.

COMMERCIAL CONDOMINIUM in Homes Beach. 2-
story, one drive-in door, one walk-in door, heart of In-
dustrial District $45,000. Call Rose Schnoerr, Neal &
Neal Realtors 778-2261.
WEST BRADENTON minutes from beaches. Just
off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community.
1400 s.f. villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1 -car garage, new car-
pet, paint, verticals, maintenance free living,
$102,900. Open house every Sat & Sun 1 4. 7142
28th Ave. Dr. West. 794-8792.
SAILBOAT WATER Direct access to bay. View of
Skyway Bridge. 10,000 lb. boat lift and dock. newly re-
modeled 4BR/3BA with large pool. Dream Master bed-
room with Jacuzzi. Beautifully landscaped with circle
drive. $319,000. 778-9252.
OPEN HOUSE Sun., Aug 27. 1-4 PM. Coquina Beach
Club. 1906 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach #203. Direct
Gulf front, 2BR/2BA, turnkey furnished. $185,000. Dave
Jones 778-6791.
VIEW BEAUTIFUL from this lovely Bay waterfront 2BR/
2BA condo. Call owner at 778-0799 for appointment.
OPEN SUNDAY 10AM-1PM, canal home, 2BR/2BA
plus den. Beautifully redone. Not a drive-by! 513 58th
St. Sandy Greiner, RE/MAX Gulfstream, 778-7777.
WEST BRADENTON 3BR/2BA with 2 car garage.
$87,900. Sandy Greiner, RE/MAX Gulfstream, 778-7777.


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous 1-800-HBF-TAXI
Service Since 1991 (423-8249)

N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907

778-2586 M A Ry KAY Eve: 778-6771


25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY EXP. 8-30-95

Now you can charge it!
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and Visa for
subscription orders and classified advertising. Just give us
a call. (Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to
fax copy.) CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392

Now you can charge it!
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and Visa for
subscription orders and classified advertising. Just give us
a call. (Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to
fax copy.) CALL 941-778-7978 or FAX 778-9392


,, Mobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
S* As Low As $1,500 Down
Experienced Thoughtful
941-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


Central Vacuum
69f Systems
,,rd Built-in Ironing Board Centers
Complete vacuum systems
as low as s475.00
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Sales 813-765-7785 Service


NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Call
David Parrish
792-5207


DO-IT-YOURSELF
SUPPLIES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call
798-3095


OLMES
BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
* Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


- COMMUNITY ELECTRIC


7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be
placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours:
9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each
7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to
21 WORDS. Additional words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in per-
son or by phone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with
your charge card number. Sorry, we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: For 21 word minimum, use one word for each
blank space.




3

THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER


SL re ir ati n


More information: 778-7978


JUST CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere on
Anna Maria Island.
You may also call
to stop home
delivery if necessary.
Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not available at
mobile home parks or
condos but bulk drops can
be arranged.
The bSLest news

The best news!


"Serving the Islands


for over 15 years"


iISLANDE








IiB PAGE 28 E AUGUST 24, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

FROM STOVE TO VOTES11 12 63WL7 18 9 12 113 14 11
BY CATHY MILLHAUSER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 1 9I 1121El III 21 1 1 i1E II1 I


ACROSS
1 French dessert
6 Desktop buy
10 Percussion
instrument
14 Tender
19 Race form
20 Race form
21 Bar at the dinner
table
22 Nord
department
capital
23. Feeling for
Tosca
24 Lee
25 Dressage factor
26 Crammer's
headaches
27 Start of averse
31 Mile.'s pen pal,
maybe
32 Kilmerof
"Batman
Forever"
33 Minerva's
symbol
34 Tahini, e.g.
35 Unearth, with
"up"
37 Taro dish
38 Rorschach test
image
40 Jejuna
neighbors
43 Line 2 of the
verse
49 Pulitzer
biographer
Winslow
50 Plus
^ ^ f P


51 Headlight?
52 Cold-shoulders
53 Support meeting
55 Bert Lahr's sign
57 First woman
Supreme Court
Justice, Day
O'Connor
60 Straw product
61 Floor piece
62 1-Across,
literally
64 Polaris bear
66 Anne Lindsay's
"- Robin
Gray"
68 Measure
marking its 75th
anniversary on
8/26/95
74 Iditarod sight
75 Yours, in Tours
76 Flushed
77 Some are blue
79 Use carets
82 Women's rights
advocate
Bloomer
84 Writer Deighton
86 Euripides drama
87 Swallow perch
89 Annual Epsom
race, with "the"
91 Do the hustle
94 Bother
95 Line 3 of the
verse
100 D-Day river
101 Till's bills
102 Women's rights
periodical of
1853
103 Department
104 Pigment from
cuttlefish
106 Jan. 15 honoree


107 Simpson judge
108 What Lucy
Stoner kept at
her 1855
wedding
112 End of the verse
117 Cabal successes
118 Vacillate
119 Part of SEATO
120 Ward off
121 First name in
cosmetics
122 Slangy timetable
123 --Ball
(pay-to-play
game)
124 Use a pen or
sword
125 "Paganini"
composer
126 Hardy girl
127 They demand an
expiation
128 Unexciting
bridge holdings
DOWN
I Bamboo, for one
2 Nocturnal
primate
3 Up
4 Cost of a ride
5 Checker of a sort
6 City near San
Jose
7 Advantage
8 Snickers
company
9 Troop group
10 "Taras Bulba"
author Nikolai
11 Patron saint of
Norway
12 Harris of
"Doogie
Howser"


13 Deteriorate
14 Cosmonaut
Atkov et al.
15 Obsession
16 Whiplike cell
part
17 One of the
Muppets
18 Legal matter
28 Owns
29 Rustling sound
30 Defense grp.
since '19
36 Jazz singer
Anita
37 St.-
(vacationer's
mecca)
38 Biblical prophet
on a mount
39 Mount Holyoke
founder Mary
41 Island east of
Corsica
42 Second: Abbr.
43 Left on board?
44 French actor
Delon
45 "Grease" singer
46 Row
47 Christmas
spirit?
48 Hymn
54 Cataract site
56 Film cut
58 Claudius subject
59 Late newsman
Hughes --
62 People tidbit
63 Sign away
65 Fraternity letter
67 Take a letter'.'
69 Cheer
70 Aquatic
nymphs


71 Banks of
Chicago
72 Gymnast
Comaneci
73 Dweeb
78 Advantage
79 Big-bang
physicist
Penzias
80 Kind oftprize
81 Where some
Yankees winter


83 Unattended
85 Early work of
mythology
86 Jazz pianist
Allison
88 Climbing
legume
90 Row
92 Legal
references
93 "Orphee"
painter


96 Susan B. 109 Coeurd'-
Anthony is on 110 Dobbs Ferry
one college
97 Panel expert 111 '56 ticket name
98 Out ofthe blue, 112 Tracking power
perhaps
99 Dartmouth site 113 Hookup
105 Riddle 114 Deli selections
106 Verbs and 115 "The Square
people have Egg" author
them 116 Piece of toast, in
107 "Rosmersholm" dinerese
playwright 117 Animation unit


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


U I


VILLAGE GREEN Spacious home on golf
course, family room, glass enclosed lanai, split
floor plan, all appliances, well/sprinkler.
$129,900. Call Paul Martin 794-0049.


GULF FRONT COMPLEX 2 bedroom, 2 bath
very nice unit on top floor, vertical blinds, under
building parking well maintained grounds &
locked pool area for extra security Turnkey fur-


KEY WEST STYLE TOWN HOME Private
cul-de-sac near Holmes Beach sandy walking
beach. Low maintenance fee. Wrap-around
upper balcony. Tropical foliage & lawn.
$162,500. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261.











WATERFRONT UFESTYLE Ground Floor fac-
ing Bayou & Tampa Bay. 2 bedroom, 2 bath with
private deck & covered parking A park-like seeing
with heal ed _P& I I.-nrr,, & t--'.arirg 1. 165. C C all


I :1-i


BAY VIEW Upstairs corner unit. Ceramic tile
on entry porch and lanai. Lanai is glassed in.
Dome ceiling in kitchen. new drapes and
shades. $145,000. Call Lu Rhoden 778-2692.












COQUINA BEACH CLUB 2 bedroom, 2
bath directly overlooking wide beach. Gor-
geous sunsel., turnkev furnished Great
renal Oppcrlurni, l, 1 000 Csll Di:k


AS!'


SUGAR WHITE BEACH Located north end of
Holmes Beach exclusive residential condo com-
plex. 2 bedroom, 2 bath end unit, bright and
cheery. many upgrades. $179,900. Call Bobye
Chasey. 778-2261.


VIEW OF LARGE LAKE, 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
2nd floor unit. Lush landscaping, swimming
pool lighted tennis course clubhouse. side-
l.31k ,:co n.eniernce i3 .100 Call Rose


nrshed $174.900 Call Helen While 778-6956 Dick Maher or Dave J,.ne 7"'8-.71 Marer or Da'e Jon-s 78-679 1 Schno -rr 77.:;22E1





FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Chard '- T Open Six Days a Week
Winheim 1. L I
WinheimL.--i l -:iANNUAL RENTALS

Perico Bay Club
from $700 mo.

Now BookInrg 1996 Seasonal
Chard moved to Florida from Connecticut 2 Be.dlCrm/2 BaIh Mty views $117,900 R ntals From $1 00/mo
and has been an Island resident lor 10 1 Bedroom with nice view ol green area .. $84,900 Rentals From $1 00/mo.
years He has a B S in Marketrig. from i ,. P, in i .. $8 0
Florida State University Chard specializes Bedrcrm/2 Bath lp llor ..... $89,900
in low down and no down lirsI lime home 4 Bedircosm/2 5 Bath 10wnhCuse with water view$134,900
buying Call Chard today for you piece of Boat slips tennis. 2 heated pools, 2 blocks to bea.:.h Call (941) 778-6665 or
the American Dream 778-6743 CALL JOH' GREEI evenrings T78-3167 Toll Free 800-749-6665


-------


STUMPED?


[ ma


V.-Al I


I -,m