<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00573

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


Holmes Beach expanding policing into Gulf


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Officer Chuck Stears of the Holmes Beach Police
Department will be deputized by the Manatee County
Sheriffs Office to expand the city's jurisdiction to the
Gulf side of the city.
The subject of personal watercraft versus swimmer
safety was brought up by Councilman Luke Courtney
at last week's meeting. Courtney asked if the council
wanted to implement any of the nine recommendations
made by a committee that studied the issue last year.
"We technically have no jurisdiction on the Gulf
side," explained Police Chief Jay Romine. "If you ex-
tend the city's jurisdiction, you're opening yourself up
to additional liability. The quickest way to solve this
problem is to deputize Officer Steams, which will give


Committee

hopes to

improve Island

bus service
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Island Transit Study Committee has recom-
mended one of five alternatives to improve Manatee
County Area Transit service to the Island.
The plan calls for a single bus route with one-hour
headway on the Island which will connect with trans-
fer points at Longboat Key, the Cortez Bridge and the
Manatee Avenue bridge. A new service would provide
two 30-minute routes one from the Manatee Avenue
transfer point to Blake Hospital and one from the
Cortez Road transfer point to Blake Hospital.
The cost is estimated at $80,000 to operate plus
$16,000 to purchase a small bus for the Island route.
According to a white paper on the proposed
changes, advantages include the following:
Service could start in the fall of 1995.
MCAT would retain control over the quality of
service to the Island.
The new route would provide two-way transit ser-
vice to areas along Cortez Road and Manatee Avenue.
Farebox revenues are expected to increase as rid-
ership doubles.
MCAT has the potential to benefit from increased
allocations from Florida Department of Transportation
and federal grants.
According to the white paper, "This project would
be deemed a success if ridership increases to 1.0 trips


him the authority to go into the Gulf and have jurisdic-
tion at no cost to the city."
Romine said Steams has been patrolling the city's
interior waterways since the start of the summer boat-
ing season and was sent to Tampa to for additional
marine enforcement training.
The city needs to designate swimming and boating
areas said resident Don Howard.
"If we were to designate a swimming area off
Holmes Beach, then we are saying it's safe to swim
in the area and we are assuming liability," noted
Courtney.
Resident Bob VanWagoner suggested buoys and
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said the county does not
want the expense or liability of placing buoys.
"According to state statute, if you set buoys for


swimming areas, you must protect that area with a life-
guard," said Stears. "Secondly, in the outside waters
the only way you're going to do anything as far as en-
forcement of reckless operation of a watercraft is have
a no-wake zone and the federal government is not go-
ing to give you that.
"Thirdly, it's easier to control a watercraft under
the no-wake zone ordinance than to try and enforce it
under a reckless operation ordinance. Who's to deter-
mine what's reckless? And the swimmers can go out as
far as they want to. Are you going to tell somebody in
his boat that's going 20 mph he has to go around them?
I don't think so."
The county has a 100-yard no-wake zone on the
Gulf side, said Bohnenberger.
Council agreed to review the issue in six months.


The sun rises over Week Two photo winner
Kim Harlow of Longboat Key is the second of six winners in the Kodak International Newspaper Snap-
shot awards. The overall winner will go on to compete in the international contest for prizes and awards,
including a grand prize of $10,000. Week Three contest deadline is Friday, and entries should be submit-
ted to The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Congratulation, Kim!


per mile. This would be a 125 percent increase for the
beach routes."
Other criteria for success include a reduction in
beach traffic and parking problems, increased usage of


mainland transit services, public acceptance of transit
as a viable and reliable alternative for accessing the
Island beaches and increased transfers between MCAT
and Sarasota County Area Transit.


For a complete map of the
Island in this issue,
see page 18








SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ........................... .............. 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS ....................... 8
Horseshoe winners .............. .............. 12
Lightning ..................................... .........- 14
Stir-it-up .................... ..... ......................... 21
Anna Maria tides ....................................... 26
Real estate ............................................ 28
Crossword puzzle ..................................35


Have a happy
and safe
Fourth of July
weekend
Fireworks, barbecues, boating,
parades and beach fun are all
ahead this weekend on Anna
Maria Island with the start of
the "official" summer season,
the Fourth of July. Look for
firework displays on July 3 and
4, a parade on Tuesday spon-
sored by the Privateers and, of
course, a ton of beachside fun.
For a complete listing of
weekend activities, see pages
8-9. Islander Photo: Courtesy
Jim Taylor


JUNE 29, 1995


B~1~4Y ~UIP


HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY ANNA MARIA ISLAND






1l PAGE 2 M JUNE 29, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


"
~T-is- i-~c~i5;u'
-~dii
--
-~ ,---
- -~
--- c---
---e
-~L----
----L- ~
- ----~ 1=31--


. -- -
- _---------- _
--- ai -- - --

-- --- _


... while another vessel sits in Bimini Bay off Anna Maria.


Derelict boats


finally to be


removed from


Island waters

Waterfront clean-up of five derelict vessels may
finally take place within a month years after the
battle to remove the boats began.
Manatee county officials have received a state
grant of $24,000 to remove the abandoned boats. Four
are off the shores of Anna Maria Island; the fifth is
sunk in a canal north of Cortez.
The boats scheduled to be removed are:
Quest, a sailboat located southeast of the
Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier in Anna Maria Sound,
sunk in June 1994. Estimated cost to remove: $3,000.
A 15-foot boat north of the Coquina Bayside Boat
Ramp in Bradenton Beach. Estimated cost to remove:
$1,500.
A houseboat in Bimini Bay south of Galati Ma-
rina in Anna Maria. Estimated cost to remove: $8,000.
A 35-foot Chris Craft cruiser south of the King-
fish Boat Ramp in Holmes Beach. Estimated cost to
remove: $1,500.
Florida Girl, a 55-foot cruiser scuttled in a boat
basin east of Smuggler's Cove in Cortez in January
1994. Estimated cost to remove: $10,000.
The efforts to get the boats off the bottom were led
by John Lilygren and Jim Kissick. The pair have been
fighting an uphill battle to have derelict boats removed
from the waters off the Island and throughout Manatee
County. It is estimated there are 18 abandoned, derelict
vessels in the area.
One of the problems Lilygren and Kissick discov-
ered in their crusade to remove the vessels is that t:e
Island cities' jurisdiction ends at the water's edge, forc-
ing the burden of boat removal onto Manatee County.
"The posture toward derelict vessel accumulations
in Manatee County had been, in my opinion, an attitude
of benign neglect for too long," Lilygren has said. He
calls the abandoned vessels "abandoned junk which
can destroy the delicate ecology and contribute to a
declining fish population."
Manatee County did not have a policy to remove
derelict vessels until last year one of the few coastal
counties in Florida not actively involved in removing
junk boats.


Bradenton Beach fire damage nearly $140,000: chief


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Preliminary estimates of damages in a recent fire
that nearly destroyed a home and damaged a motel are
$130,000 to $140,000, said Anna Maria Fire District
Chief Andy Price.
"We are still working on estimates," said Price.
"There was $10,000 to $15,000 electrical damage to
the motel alone."
Three fire agencies responded to the fire, which
caused extensive damage to the home of local artist
Karen Klosky at 2001 Gulf Drive and also damaged
portions of the Tropic Isle Motel at 2103 Gulf Drive in
Bradenton Beach.
The Anna Maria Fire District, the West Side Fire
District and the Longboat Key Fire Department re-
sponded with two engines, two ladder trucks, an air and
light truck, a command vehicle and 24 firefighters.
Response time was three minutes, said Price.
The cause of the fire, which started in Klosky's
garage art studio, is still undetermined, but a gas regu-
lator was leaking and has been sent out for testing,
Price said.
"There was so much destruction, there's very little
to go by," he noted. "The house was a total loss. Five
insurance investigators from Houston and Oklahoma
City have come to look at it."
Damage to the motel structure was limited to a
single unit, said Price, because fire rated separation
walls between the units kept it from spreading.
"It gives you an hour's worth of protection and
gives you time to get out of the building," he stressed.
"It's such an important factor in providing a level of


safety. This fire proved it"
The district's fire prevention bureau has been urg-
ing homeowners to add fire rated separation between
apartments and between the garage and living areas
under elevated homes, especially if they are remodel-


ing. Price said it's now a code requirement in new
construction.
"In the past couple of years, I know of 10 buildings
that have had substantially less fire damage because of
fire rated separation," Price said.


Chamber discusses making money


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Ways to generate more income highlighted dis-
cussion at the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce board of directors meeting June 21.
"We need your support and help," Treasurer Tom
Nelson told directors during his monthly report.
Projected income of $38,800 for the year ending
Dec. 31 will not meet anticipated expenses totaling
$47,673, Nelson said.
Board President Don Howard said the officers
will meet before the July board session to discuss
ways to improve income and reduce expenses.
Fixed monthly expenses include the executive
director's wages, fees and medical/dental insurance
costs, $2,191; rent, $669; postage, $600; electric and
telephone, $245; copier lease, $96; insurance, dues and
licenses, $42; office supplies, $100; and newsletter, $30.
Nelson said that some comparison shopping had
resulted in a reduced administrative-fee proposal from
the Chamber's payroll firm, saving $1,400 per year.
Regarding the Dodge Caravan fundraiser raffle
that was to be held June 28, Nelson reported that 100


to 150 $25 tickets still needed to be sold "to make us
break even or maybe make a dollar or two."
Approximately 500 tickets had been sold,
Nelson said, and the additional sales would be nec-
essary to meet the $15,000 cost of the van. The
Chamber has said a minimum of 700 tickets would
be sold or all ticket money would be refunded.
During her executive director's report, Darcy Lee
Marquis proposed an intensified, three-day membership
drive and introduced Gail Loefgren, executive director
of the Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce.
Loefgren said Longboat's three-day drive this past
April generated 75 "quality," full-year, new members
for a total income approaching $12,000. A similar drive
last July brought in 125 half-year members.
Most Island members are billed in November,
the rest on their anniversary date, Marquis said. Af-
ter the initial reorganizational time, annual billing
would be better, she said.
Loefgren also said that while 90 percent of
Longboat businesses are Chamber members, 60 percent
of its membership comes from off-Key. Howard said
the Chamber is "tapping off-Island for the first time."


I I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 3 li


Fill dirt dumped in Anna
<, Maria canal ordered
removed by
environmental regulators
Ted Murray with the Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection met with Matt Gentile to
discuss removal of dirt from the canal behind
Gentile's residence on Chilson Avenue in Anna
Maria. The dirt filled an area adjacent to the seawall
approximately 10 by 12 feet. It was dumped in the
canal by Gentile during installation of an above-
ground pool. Murray said, "On minor violations we
don't have to fine if the problem is rectified. We've
given Gentile 30 days to remove the dirt from the
canal and we've asked that he sod the area around
the pool to prevent further run-off "
Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Mayor to rescind board appointment


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said he will rescind the
appointment of Councilman Don Maloney to the Anna
Maria Island Community Center Board of Directors
and appoint Councilman Luke Courtney to the board
Both attended a recent board meeting, said
Courtney, and he is concerned about a possible Sun-
shine violation.
Bohnenberger read from the Florida Govern-
ment in the Sunshine manual, "When two or more
members of a public board are attending or partici-
pating in meetings or other functions unconnected
with their board, they should refrain from discussing
matters on which foreseeable action may be taken by


the board."
The mayor has steadfastly maintained it is "im-
proper to have an elected official sitting on an appro-
priating body and then sitting on the body that receives
the money."
Courtney and Maloney said they have no problem
with the city representative voting on board issues.
"My point is, who are you serving, your allegiance
to the community center or the people who elected
you?" asked Bohnenberger.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore asked Maloney to
withdraw his appointment and asked the mayor to ap-
point Courtney.
Bohnenberger said he will do so with the addition
of a qualifying statement at the next council meeting.


Anna Maria City
No meetings scheduled
Bradenton Beach
7/6, 7 p.m., Council meeting
Holmes Beach
6/30, 9 am., Code Enforcement Board
Holiday closings
All city halls and government offices will be
closed on July 4. Garbage pick-up in all cities
will remain as scheduled on July 3.


BechBstro- becuse-th s tebst

Grirl(~lled Tuna with Mango Salsa







P.S. The cheeseburger on the bar menu is still

















778-6444


July 4th

CELEBRATION
Sponsored by the Anna Maria Island Privateers

PARADE *
Leaves Coquina Beach at 10 AM
Ends at Anna Maria Island City Pier

PICNIC *
12 Noon until 6 PM Food Served 'til 4 PM
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Magnolia Ave. Anna Maria City

F ENTERTAINMENT 1
T NOON TO 6 PM V
Brian Beebe Jay Crawford
Berni Roy Steve Smith
4 Red Tide with Berni Roy at the keyboard
Barbara Johnsen Jimbo Lease & Friends
S*Sons of the Beach
TICKET INFORMATION
$5.00 ticket includes B-B-Q Chicken,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad & Soft Drinks
Food Served from Noon to 4 pm
Tickets at the door for Cash Bar and Soft Drinks
NO CHARGE FOR ADMISSION
*X Information: 778-1238 or 778-5934
^ -^ ^k)s-






E] PAGE 4 0 JUNE 29, 1995 T THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Orimulsion attracts full house


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A forum on Orimulsion, sponsored by the Holmes
Beach Civic Association, attracted a full house to the
Island Branch Library Saturday.
Wayne Ondler, environmental projects coordina-
tor for Florida Power & Light, presented arguments on
the benefits of burning the controversial fuel, its envi-
ronmental risks and how the company plans to address
them.
Gloria Rains, founder and director of Manasota-88,
outlined the concerns of environmental groups and oth-
ers about use of Orimulsion.

What is Orimulsion?
Orimulsion is a fuel that consists of a mixture of
bitumen, water and an emulsifying agent. Bitumen is
a tar-like substance found about 2,000 feet under-
ground in the Orinoco River region of Venezuela. The
bitumen must be emulsified with water in order to be
handled, transported and used.
FPL wants to purchase 80,000 barrels of
Orimulsion per day from Venezuela to fuel its Parrish
plant. It would be the first long-term commercial con-
tract for the use of Orimulsion in this country. The
Parrish plant would burn more Orimulsion than any
other plant in the world.

Wayne Ondler, FPL
Ondler told the group that the company decided on
Orimulsion as a fuel because of increased competition
in the industry, to provide an economic base in the
community, the low cost of the fuel and to provide sav-
ings to the customer. The cost of Orimulsion is $1.40
versus $2.20 for natural gas per million Btu (British
thermal units).
The Parrish plant was selected for the conversion
because it is one of the largest in the FPL system, there
is a deep water port nearby, there are existing pipelines
and no construction would be needed.
Ondler outlined the increase and decrease in emis-
sions from the burning of Orimulsion. The figures must
be taken into perspective, because the plant has been
operating 30 percent of the time, he noted. It will op-
erate 87 percent of the time with Orimulsion.
"There will be a 50 percent reduction in sulfur di-
oxide on an annual basis, a 40 percent reduction in
particulates, a 40 percent reduction in toxic air pollut-
ants, a slight increase in CO, a similar amount of CO2
and a 10,000 ton annual increase in NOx," he said.
The increase in NOx is one of the main concerns of
opponents; however, Ondler stressed, "All the analysis
we've performed to date indicates there is no environmen-
tal impact associated with that. It's well within the ambi-
ent air quality standards established by the state and the
Environmental Protection Agency. It's well below the
currently permitted operation of that plant"
The company plans to install an S02 scrubber
system and an electrostatic precipitator for particles.
By-products of this equipment include gypsum and fly
ash, which will be sold to the wallboard and cement
industries. In the event the market for the products
cools, the company has plans to construct a Class 1
landfill to store the excess.
Another concern of environmentalists is increased


Privateer
parade
Don't miss the Privateers'
annual Fourth of July
parade and picnic on
Tuesday, July4. The
parade begins at Coquina
Beach at 10 a.m and ends
at the Anna Maria City
Pier. The party lasts from
noon until 6p.m. at the
Anna Maria Island
Community Center. The
buffet dinner is $5. A cash
bar will be available
during the event For more
information call 778-1283
or 778-5934. Pictured is
Ben Murphy in last year's
parade.


Orimulsion: Fueling or

fouling the future?

Part 3 in a series

water withdrawals from the Little Manatee River.
"We have an existing agreement with the water
management district for withdrawals from the river,"
said Ondler. "We've had that agreement since the plant
began operation about 1973. We will be below what the
current permit allows us to withdraw. Our scientists
have analyzed the withdrawal, and we are not finding
environmental impacts."
Cleaning up an Orimulsion spill has also generated
concern because the bitumen particles are dispersed in
the water, unlike oil which floats to the top. Ondler said
specific equipment and techniques are being developed
to contain and clean up a spill.
"We funded a research program at the University
of Miami that involved a number of other research or-
ganization to look at the risk in toxicity and environ-
mental effects of Orimulsion compared to #6 fuel oil,"
he said. "The results indicate Orimulsion poses no
more environmental risk or is no more toxic."
The company's six-volume permit application is
being studied by various local and state agencies "to
ensure the project will not affect your health, your
welfare or the environment," concluded Ondler.

Gloria Rains, Manasota-88
Rains said Manasota-88 has been joined in its op-
position to the Orimulsion conversion by the Manatee
County Democratic Executive Committee, Federation
of Manatee County Community Associations,
Longboat Key Commission, Agency on Bay Manage-
ment, Hillsborough County Commission, Hillsborough
County Environmental Protection Commission and the
Cockroach Bay Aquatic Preserve Management Team.
The benefits are minimal, said Rains.
"Without the financial benefits that will accrue
from burning this dirty, high sulfur fuel, the company's
future economic well-being is in doubt," she noted.
"There is no regional public benefit."
The three main concerns of opponents are air pol-
lution, spills and water depletion from the Little Mana-
tee River.
Opponents target NOx as the most serious pollut-
ant. They say it will increase nitrogen loading to the
bays and the Gulf, contributing to the loss of seagrass
which provides food, oxygen and shelter for marine
life. It increases the growth of algae which decreases
water clarity.
"It will degrade all local waters," said Rains. "Lake
Manatee is loaded with nutrients that result in growth
of algae. It cannot stand any further nitrogen loading."
It will contribute to the creation of ozone and acid
rain, say opponents. Ozone irritates the respiratory sys-
tem and aggravates heart and respiratory disease. Acid
rain has been shown to destroy fresh and coastal wa-
ter life, cause damage to buildings, forests and agricul-
tural crops and leach metals into the soil. It contributes
to the nitrification of rain which over fertilizes the soil
and contributes to global warming.


"NOx levels will increase by more than five per-
cent," warned Rains. "Presently county ozone levels
are bordering on not meeting federal standards. Be-
cause increased NOx emission will result in increased
ozone levels, the county will probably be declared a
non-attainment area."
Manasota-88 has asked that FPL's 1973 permit appli-
cation for withdrawals from the Little Manatee River be
revoked. The withdrawals could be up to 50 percent of the
river's flow at certain times of the year and will have an
adverse impact on the river's fisheries and vegetation and
could change its salinity, said Rains.
"FPL should be required to comply with all current
consumptive use requirements as is everyone else in
the district," she said. "Permit agreements should not
be permitted to continue in water use caution areas."
In the event of an Orimulsion spill, Rains said, "It
stays mixed in salt water to depths of three-to-10-feet
According to spill experts, it will spread faster and deeper
than oil. The long mesh skirt and other equipment FPL
intends to use to clean up a spill will not work well because
of the many different Bay tidal currents."
Other concerns include increased truck traffic to
and from the plant and the proposed landfill to store by-
products which is located in a wetland and could affect
ground and surface water, said Rains.
"While FPL will reap big financial rewards from
burning Orimulsion, the region, particularly Manatee
County, will suffer from dirtier air and water, the threat
of spills, adverse health impacts and reduced quality of
life," she stressed.

Questions
The presentations were followed by a question and
answer period. All of the questions were directed to
Ondler. A few representative questions are as follows:
Q: Why should we do any more harm to the envi-
ronment just so you can be competitive in the market?
Ondler: I don't agree with your premise that it's an
unacceptable risk or will have the effects on the envi-
ronment that our opponent claims it has. We currently
meet all the environmental regulations and standards
that ensure protection of the environment. This conver-
sion will not change that.
Rains: I would ask people to get copies of a letter sent
to the DEP from the Hillsborough County Environmen-
tal Protection Commission saying that if Orimulsion is
permitted with the increases of NOx that are presumed to
occur, EPA regulations will be violated.
Q: With the increase of 57 percent in plant capac-
ity, you will be producing power here and selling it
everywhere else. Why should Manatee County suffer
the impact of electricity production that it does not use?
Ondler: That's not a fair comparison because the
plant is currently permitted to operate 100 percent and
there have been times it's approached that. We have
mandates for reliability, for reserve margins. When
other units in our system are down that unit is there to
supply that load."
Rains: One of the bizarre rationalizations that FPL is
giving for the increased dumping of 10,000 tons of NOx
in our county per year is that they will decrease 24,000
tons per year in other FPL plants throughout the state.
Q: Why put yourself under the control of a foreign
country?
Ondler: We have long-term contracts and assur-
ances to protect our customers. They had to put up
a performance bond. It's a national energy operation
converted in 1974. They have not missed an energy
shipment even though they've had changes in gov-
ernment and coups, because the sale of energy is 90
to 95 percent of their gross domestic product. They
know if they don't deliver, customers aren't going to
come back to them in the future and their economy
will go to heck."
Q: What will you do to clean up a spill?
Ondler: We have looked at it in great detail. Safety
plans are being developed that are required by the Oil
Pollution Act of 1990 and they will be given to the U.S.
Coast Guard for their review and approval. We will be
shipping in bigger barges, so there will be 90 more
deliveries over a year than what currently exists. The
vessels will be double hulled and safety zones may be
established around the vessels.
Rains: According to scientists in the Tampa Bay
region, there's a considerable risk of there being more
difficulty in cleaning up this fuel.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 5 i[

County developing red tide response plan


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island officials learned of a red tide response plan
being developed by the county to clean up dead fish
killed by the request scourge.
At last week's meeting of Island elected officials,
Holmes Beach Councilman Luke Courtney told county
representatives the cities need more help in cleaning the
Island's beaches.
"In case of a fish kill, we would like a coordinated
procedure to handle the problem," he said. "In the past
we could bury them but last year the Department of En-
vironmental Protection said we can't do that anymore.
Last week the city had to rent dumpsters to get rid of
the fish."
Secondly, Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach
would like to have seaweed cleaned off the beach af-
ter storms, he said.
"We feel that since these beaches are the main tour-
ist attraction for Manatee County and generate $1.8
million per year in resort tax revenues, the county


should help."
"We've been told the county can't clean private
property," added Holmes Beach Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger. "The tide deposits the dead fish from
the high tide line to the low tide line and that's public
property. It's a public health hazard."
"Before the beach was renourished, we were all
advised that was not our private property," commented
Holmes Beach resident Don Howard. "Even if it cov-
ered up our private property, we all signed easements
(for the beach renourishment) and from there to the
water's edge, we allowed it to be public property."
"A red tide response plan is being developed, "said
Jim Seuffert, the county budget director. "The idea is
to get authorization to go on private property when
there's red tide. It may require getting easements from
private property owners, or it may require the county
commission to adopt an ordinance."
All beach cleaning is governed by a permit from
the DEP, said Seuffert, and any change would require
an expanded permit.


Island officials also complained to County Admin-
istrator Ernie Padgett about the lack of an Island rep-
resentative on the county's Tourist Development Coun-
cil. The council make-up is determined by state statute,
but members are appointed by the county commission.
When there was a recent vacancy the Island lobbied
for a representative but the county commission appointed
an official from Palmetto, which has traditionally held a
seat because the civic center is located there.
The bulk of TDC funds come from the Islands,
noted Bohnenberger.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola asked
Padgett if the statute could be changed, and he said he
will check into it.
"Many of our problems come after the fact because
we are not represented," said Anna Maria Mayor Dottie
McChesney.
Padgett responded, "I personally believe in areas
where the municipalities are impacted, they should be
involved. You need to be in the loop because you have a
unique perspective on what that impact will mean to you."


'Black Saturday' looms for fishing industry


July 1 will go down in history as "Black Saturday"
for many commercial gill net fishers when a ban on
inshore netting takes effect.
The result of a voter mandate last November, the
net ban will halt most commercial net fishing within
three miles of shore in the Gulf of Mexico and one mile
from the Atlantic coastline. The prohibition took the
form of a constitutional amendment advocated by a
powerful coalition of sport fishers and developers led
by a recreational fishing magazine publisher.
Legal challenges to the net ban were being heard
at presstime Tuesday. Fishing industry representatives
claim in the court documents voters did not understand
the ramifications of the amendment proposal when they
cast their ballots last year.
There is also a legal challenge pending for three
Panhandle counties who have direct financial ties to
fishing businesses. Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla county


i:- ;:: .f- .. .. 4 :.i



__' ---



Commercial fishing will end near shore on Saturday
in Florida. Photo courtesy Carolyn Pepka.
commissions have passed resolutions claiming that,
since taxpayer money was used to purchase equipment
later leased to fish houses with a portion of the profits
from fishing going into government coffers, the fish-
ing activities there serve a governmental purpose.
The net ban amendment has a clause stating that


governmental or research using nets is allowed in the
nearshore waters.
Fishers have had mixed, but generally shocked,
attitudes in the wake of the net ban passage. Some fish-
ers have said they will continue to fish despite a pen-
alty of $100-$500 and/or 60 days in jail if convicted of
illegal fishing. Fish caught with the illegal nets will be
confiscated.
Other fishers have said they will switch to cast nets
to catch fish.
Others have threatened to block the doors to the
governor's office and state capitol.
Gov. Lawton Chiles' staff has said Florida Marine
Patrol units will be out in force during the weekend to
halt any illegal fishing. There has also been contingen-
cies planned to mobilize the National Guard if the un-
rest from the commercial fishing industry escalates and
additional enforcement authority is deemed necessary.


S778-7975
Same Shopping Center as Shell's Restaurant
All New Exercise Equipment
er Tanning Massage Sauna
1j Weekly & Dally Rates

pIr 4th OF JULY SPECIAL
Expires F ETang
7/13/95 1 FREE ning
ess Coupon
F, th Coupon


UPS PICK-UP,
FAX
SERVICE


cCROWDER BROS.

HARDWARE
YOUR HARDWARE STORE AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 5


-- STOVE TOP I KEY
SPILL :. -
S *DUPLICATED I
BAR SINGLE CUT KEY
I -r -S? II / -\ lH II
NO MORE SPILLS A 88
BETWEEN YOUR I
SSTOVE & COUNTER. "II Excluding vats and colored keys.
I R $ 5 Must Present Coupon I Must Present Coupon Expires 7/5/95
SReg.$5.99mExpires7/5/95 LIMITC1 1
a1s m.m1f m1 ll

DURSBAN *I LEATHER PALM
..O.. GLOVES
Kills Insects and
Pests in Lawns
If ~ '~ YOUR CHOICE
5 g Reg. $2.49
L1 4---- Tr Il10LB *II Limit 4
| g $ 5Must Present Coupon Must Present Coupon Expires 7/5/95
S g. $7.59 Exp res 7/5/95
SALE PRICES GOOD WHILE QUANTITIES LAST THRU JULY 5, 1995
3352 EAST BAY DR., HOLMES BEACH 778-0999


,


Ilr ,








IJm PAGE 6 N JUNE 29, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

e ar-


Cortez faces

the future
For families of commercial fishermen in Cortez
and throughout Florida, July 1 is Black Saturday.
It is the end of an era. The net ban that goes into
effect on July 1 by constitutional amendment, an ini-
tiative that was pushed through a vote last November
by sport fishermen, means the end of netfishing, the
end of life on the water, putting food on the table for
fishers' families and others and the end of a fishing way
of life for many Cortezians.
Just at a time when the tiny Village of Cortez ob-
tained recognition on the National Register of Historic
Places for more than 100 properties, the reality of the
net ban blow for at least as many families has sent the
village into turmoil.
What would be considered so idyllic, so much a part
of our heritage and so American a lifestyle to people in
other parts of the world is ending and the speculation on
what will happen runs as deep as the fear.
The buy-out and retraining program offered by the
state is minuscule in comparison to the promises. And the
offer of unemployment compensation is as insulting as the
state's whitewash on the sportfishing license fee increase
that would have been only a small percentage ofjust com-
pensation for nets, boats and other equipment.
Compensation was nearly eliminated from the bud-
get by legislators who feared the new power wielded
by voters in favor of the amendment.
And now we have nearly every form of media in
the area reporting the plight of the fishermen in Cortez
complete with scientific data indicating that habitat loss
is the real culprit behind most fishery stock declines.
Where was that balanced reporting last fall just
prior to the vote?
Where was the balanced reporting when the
sportfishing lobbies were spending big bucks promot-
ing false information about gill netters and their catch?
Where was the balanced reporting when the voters
needed to know what net fishing in Cortez meant to the
economy and the families there?
Now's a helluva time to come forward and com-
miserate with Cortez.
The Islander Bystander explained all of that data
in a multi-part series on commercial fishing last Octo-
ber. We also editorialized against the net ban, one of
the few newspapers in the state that took such a stance.
It's a shame the lifestyle and careers of the honest,
hard-working people in tiny Village of Cortez don't
qualify for historic designation.
Cortezians deserve better than what they're getting.




JUNE 29, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 32
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster




O 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


a YkllJ:-]I I eu


Puppeteer pulls too many strings
in Holmes Beach
I read with interest the diatribe in last week's Is-
lander by Mr. Bob VanWagoner.
He alluded several times to his accomplishments
here on the Island. He is very eloquent and self-pro-
claimed expert on a lot of subjects. Let's list them:
1. Organizer of Save Anna Maria. (Not an officer
or director just a manipulator from the wings.)
2. Organizer of the Holmes Beach Civic Associa-
tion. (Not an officer or director, just a manipulator from
the wings.)
3. Party to questionable election tactics in the
March 1995 election.
4. Failed in bid to organize a militia here in Holmes
Beach.
Now it seems to me that anyone who has so many
opinions would step up and run for office, vested inter-
est or not in this city.
The mayor was elected by an overwhelming ma-
jority and is trying very hard to fulfill the trust given
him by that vote.
At the June 20 work session there were 28 items on
the agenda that were pure petty politics. This city needs
to get back on track and begin facing the serious issues
such as storm water runoff, the Key Royale Bridge
problem, T-end canals, and compliance with the
American Disability Act.
All of the manipulators and puppeteers should step
up and run for office this coming March and become
the official spokesman, or go fishing full-time and stop
trying to hinder the real officials from doing their job
just to see their name in the paper.
Lee Edwards, Holmes Beach

Islander article example of
reporting integrity
I applaud The Islander Bystander for its discreet
reporting of the June 6 Holmes Beach City council
meeting. The Islander has proven again, the highest
quality of the press.
It has been a great pleasure of mine to be able to
serve on the Holmes Beach City Council for over two
years. That pleasure was replaced with embarrassment


at the infamous meeting. I have always thought our
duty was to attack issues, not citizens.
For a gentleman who gives so much time, effort and
devotion not only to Holmes Beach but the entire Island,
to have his integrity insulted was uncalled for.
No citizen deserves this.
I pledge this will not happen again if I can help it.
Billie Martini, Holmes Beach City Councilmember
Thanks from Mayor McChesney
To all the citizens of Anna Maria Island who help
daily in picking up trash from our beaches, walkways to
the beach and along our streets, I wish to say thank you.
So many times our citizens, out of the goodness of their
hearts and because they take pride in this beautiful para-
dise, clean up after others who are less thoughtful.
As the Fourth of July weekend approaches, and
more visitors will be here on holiday, it is more im-
portant than ever that we all pick up after ourselves.
That includes the debris left from fireworks, picnics
and parades.
Have a happy and safe Fourth of July
Dorothy McChesney, Mayor, City of Anna Maria
Cat no catamountain as claimed
The other day I was tidying up my litter box when
I encountered the June 15 edition of The Islander By-
stander. I nearly went into a cataleptic fit at finding
myself featured as the potential assassin of the Island's
most beloved personality The Cracker.
In the interest of fair press, I am requesting equal
space to tell the other side of the near catastrophe.
First, I categorically deny any intention of wrong-
doing. I was simply catering to my feline prerogative
of taking a catnap in the back window of The Cracker's
vehicle when I was assailed by the most cataclysmic
caterwauling ever catalogued. These cataphonic
screeches provided the catalyst which catapulted me
through the window of The Cracker's vehicle.
Now I don't wish to appear catty, but who was
really in the catbird seat, me or The Cracker? After all,
which is more catastrophic, a few scratches or dropping
me down to a remaining seven lives?
(The garage door incident is another story.)
Thank you for allowing me this catharsis.
Spook, the cat











THE WERE THE FAYS
Part 3, Everybody's Talking
by June Alder


Jack Leffingwell strikes a jaunty pose before repairing a telephone pole downed
by a storm in 1905.

RISKY BUSINESS

FOR JACK


These are days of great activity in
telephone circles. While work is being
pushed in Palmetto and Ellenton, con-
nection will be made with Judge
Cornwell's office and residence, Maj.
Adams' stores, Mr. A. P. Curry's and
Mr. L.C. Randell's residences. When
these are completed the telephone will
connect 27points on the river and vi-
cinity. When Oneco can talk with
Ellenton across 11 miles of land and
over a mile of water, it will certainly be
a circumstance worthy offireworks.
* Manatee River Journal, April 15, 1897

In early 1897 the Gulf Coast
Telephone Company started by Dr.
J.B. Leffingwell and his son Jack -
appeared to be on the verge of going
under. After two years in operation,
there were only 16 subscribers. The
population of Braidentown was just too
small to keep the company afloat.
But Jack Leffingwell was deter-
mined not to give up.
The manager of the little company
was Ollie Stuart, a family friend. It was
in Stuart's general store next to the
Leffingwell drugstore that Jack had
installed the first 10-line switchboard
when he was 12 years old.
Young Jack kept after Stuart, trying
to come up with a way to save the com-
pany.
It was Stuart's opinion that the com-
pany had to expand to Tampa to survive.
But that would take a good bit of money,
Stuart explained to Jack. And Doc
Leffingwell wasn't willing put any more
money into a losing proposition. Jack
simply didn't understand business.
That got Jack's dander up. And a
"bell rang" in his mind.
A few years before, his uncle Grant
(brother of Jack's mother, Jenny) had put
$500 into a bank account for Jack so he'd
have a nice nest egg for whatever he
wanted to do when he was grown. Jack
and Grant Barnard were fishing and hunt-
ing buddies and partners in many an ad-
venture. Jack thought sure he could talk
his uncle into letting him use that $500
for the telephone line to Tampa.
He was right. And with his uncle
and Ollie Stuart on his side, Jack talked
his dad into endorsing his scheme.
As quick as you could say Jack
Leffingwell, the brash youngster shelled


out $300 for 40 miles of copper telegraph
wire and, working side-by-side with his
lineman friend, Alec Richardson, com-
menced his ambitious project.
The first task was to string the line
across the Manatee River to Palmetto.
That was accomplished by mid-April.
Then came day after day of hard labor
under the broiling summer sun. Struggling
through vast stretches of knife-sharp saw-
grass, crossing hammock lands and pine
barrens, wading thigh-deep in dank
swamps, they cut a swath through the
largely unexplored countryside, unrolling
their coils of wire as they went and loop-
ing them between tall palm trees. And in
the humid nights by the fire they slapped
at mosquitoes, all the while keeping one
eye open for marauders both of the
human and animal variety.
At last they neared the Tampa city
limits. Their goal was in sight.
But in his naivete, Jack
Leffingwell had failed to take into
consideration the rival telephone com-
pany Southern Bell. The company
held jealously to the exclusive fran-
chise the Tampa city council had
granted it in 1894. No Gulf Coast tele-
phones were to be allowed in the city.
Nor would there be any interconnec-
tion with Bell lines.
It seemed Jack's adventure had
ended in ignominy.
Jack was 15 and heart-broken when
he was thwarted by the evil Bell company.
He was nearly 16 when he turned the set-
back into a springboard, making a shrewd
deal with Western Union to convert the
telephone line for telegraph service.
When Teddy Roosevelt's Rough
Riders took San Juan Hill in the Span-
ish-American War the U.S. fleet
sailed from Tampa Bay in June 1898 -
Jack Leffingwell's telegraph line
brought the news to Braidentown. And
the Leffingwell telegraph line was to
remain the only means of wire commu-
nication between Braidentown, Pal-
metto and Tampa until 1902.

June Alder is on summer hiatus. This
is a column that appeared in August
1993.

Next: Leffingwell
sells out


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 7 Ej



Why get
c soaked?







FAT CAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning

Dry Foam, Dries=Fastt
We never use steam!


"We give you an A+,

it looks wonderful!"
Leona & Boston Lunz
Holmes Beach

Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer

For fast, thorough, friendly
P service call me Jon Kent,
SIsland resident and owner of
Fat Cat. Call 8 am to 5 pm.
778-2882

MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE




We'd love to mail
U]

you the news!

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $30 per
year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
live here year-round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or rela-
tive, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office
with a check in the proper amount.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
O One Year: $30 0 6 Months: $20 0 3 Months: $12

U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
Q One Year: $135 0 6 Months: $85 O 3 Months: $48
MAIL TO: U
ADDRESS

CITY STATE ZIP
START DATE:


ISLANDER .IV~
THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217 :
-1 ~CHARGE IT BY PHONE:
8 (813) 778-7978
B vis .
i lI= gD1qI NI gI II] GI mmI I







JIM PAGE 8 K JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


July Fourth sparks bright memories


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Close your eyes. What's the most favorite Fourth
of July memory that comes to mind?
The Islander Bystander asked that question of six
Island officials.
Their nostalgic responses tug at the heart as Fourth
of July weekend 1995 approaches with plenty of oppor-
tunities for creating new memories.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola and her
husband have spent the past 10 Fourth of Julys at the
Shriners' annual conventions. She recalled the Fourth
they spent in Hawaii.
Adding to the festivities was the 75th-anniversary
celebration of the Jesters, a Shriners affiliate.
"I have a fabulous memory of the diamond jubi-
lee," said the mayor, "of being on Waikiki Beach on the
Pacific Ocean, seeing fireworks the way Hawaiians do
it with the luau and all the dancing and the music.
It was perfect."
Bradenton Beach Vice Mayor Dick Suhre's recol-
lection was a bit closer to home but a few years further
back.
Suhre's favorite memories are as a child in Cincin-
nati, Ohio, going on the annual day-long picnic with his
family to Mt. Airey Forest Park. They played baseball
and roasted corn and hamburgers on the grill, and the
vice mayor fondly recalls the walks along the creek
with his aunt.
"We went on this outing every year until we grew
up and found girls," said the vice mayor.
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger remem-
bers the holiday spent in a rowboat with his wife out on
a lake in the mountains of northwestern New Jersey.
The leisurely day was "romantic," said the mayor,
"until the bombs started bursting in air" on their night-
time return across the lake. The Bohnenbergers didn't
know the shore residents had a custom of simulta-
neously shooting off 'works and 'crackers at dark.
"We lay flat on the bottom of the boat,"


Bohnenberger recalled, "beneath the rockets' red glare.
It was a harrowing experience probably like the origi-
nal Fourth of July."
Holmes Beach Council Chairman Luke Courtney
likes "the fireworks celebrations right here on the Is-
land, with all the locals going to the beaches for
evening picnics and the fireworks displays."
He and his family like to walk down to the Gulf
and spread out a blanket to enjoy the lit-up sky.
"It's just the whole spirit of everyone being down
there and having our own displays" that conjures up
fond memories for Courtney.
Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy McChesney remem-
bers an Independence Day during high school at NCR
Old River Park in Dayton, Ohio.
"It was the most fantastic fireworks display I've
ever seen," says the mayor. "It was great to be young
and great to be enjoying such a beautiful evening."
Anna Maria Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard traveled
back nearly 40 years, when his son and daughter were
very young, to a Fourth of July night spent at the Uni-


Fireworks will fill the
skies over the Island July
3 and 4 compliments of
the Beachhouse and
Sandbar restaurants.
Islander Photo:
Courtesy Jim Taylor,
Taylor-Made Pyrotechnic
Entertainment








versity of Illinois football stadium in Urbana.
"They put on a display of fireworks that was the
most outstanding I've ever seen," said Shumard. "The
stadium was filled and then at one point they told ev-
eryone to light a match. The whole stadium lit up and
it's stood out in my mind ever since."
For outstanding memories 1995, the following is a
list of July Fourth events planned in our area.

Anna Maria Island
For the first time, just after dark on Monday, July
3, fireworks will go off from a barge stationed off the
Beachhouse restaurant at 200 Gulf Drive, Bradenton
Beach.
Beachhouse owner Ed Chiles and a host of other
sponsors, including The Islander Bystander, are plan-
ning a spectacular display that will be visible for miles
and is expected to become an annual affair. For more
information, or to become a sponsor with reserved seat-
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE








Island festivities for the
Fourth of July
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
ing at the Beachhouse, call 779-2222.
Tuesday, July 4, will kick off with the annual Anna
Maria Island Privateers' holiday parade leaving Co-
quina Beach on the south end of the Island at 10 am.
and proceeding north to the Anna Maria City Pier.
Following the parade, the Privateers will sponsor
their annual family picnic from noon to 6 p.m. at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Admission will be free. For $5 per
person, a buffet dinner including barbecued chicken,
baked beans, potato salad and a soft drink will be of-
fered until 4 p.m. A cash bar will be available.
Musical entertainers will include Brian Beebe,
Jay Crawford, Berni Roy, Steve Smith, Red Tide,
Barbara Johnsen, Jimbo Lease and friends and the
Sons of the Beaches. For more information, call 778-
1283 or 778-5934.
The day will conclude with a fireworks celebra-
tion for patrons at the Sandbar restaurant on the
Gulf, 100 Spring Ave., Anna Maria. For informa-
tion, call 778-0444.

Cortez
A Fireworks Cruise with bar and grill aboard the
Miss Cortez XI will depart at 6:30 p.m. July 4 from the
Cortez Fleet, 12507 Cortez Road W. The cost will be
$15 per person. For information, 794-1223.
The Seafood Shack's Showboat Fireworks Cruise
will board at 6:30 p.m. with a 7 p.m. departure from
4110 Cortez Road W. into Sarasota Bay. Connie &
Dave and the Coconuts will entertain, with a cash bar
and concession available. Tickets will be $21.50 per
person. Information, 794-5048.

Manatee
Manatee County, the city of Palmetto and the
Bradenton Kiwanis Club will put on their annual fire-
works display July 4 off the Old Green Bridge, 10th
Avenue and Sixth Street, Palmetto. The show is visible
on both sides of the Manatee River, in downtown
Bradenton and Palmetto. Information, 723-4570.

Sarasota and Siesta Key
Sarasota Jungle Gardens, 3701 Bayshore Road, has
a host of activities planned July 1-4. Included will be

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEPING -
AND YEAR-ROUND TAX SERVICE
Individuals Corporations Partnerships -
Now Accepting New Clients
Summer Hours: Tuesday Thru Friday
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
S y Ot,g~ ,nw dffa t 778-6118
Ucensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.






SSEAGRAM'S V.O. KAHLUA
CANADIAN WHISKEY COFFEE UQUEUR
10.49 *15.99


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 9 MEG

Sarasota offshore racing festivities

hit the water this weekend


Sarasota's biggest summer event takes to the
Gulf this weekend as the 11th Annual Suncoast Off-
shore Grand Prix revs a record-setting number of
powerboat engines.
Powerboat racing has been alive off Sarasota
longer than almost anywhere else in the country, and
boat race promoters promise this will be the best race
ever. And race aficionados can expect more
superboats than ever this year.
Big boats and small, fast boats and not, parades,
fireworks, bikini contests the weekend is packed
with lots of fun with just a dash of craziness.
Admission to almost everything is free, by the
way.
Weekend festivities begin Thursday at 7 p.m.
with the Festival Parade of Boats along Main Street
in Sarasota. Expect almost all of the race boats to be
in the parade, along with bands, floats, T-back clad
women and the Pretzel King.
Friday brings the World Kilo Speed Runs off the
Sarasota Bayfront from 8 am. to noon. This event
sets world record speed runs most years.
Also Friday is Powerboats in the Park at St.
Armands Circle from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. There's con-
tinuous live entertainment, a slew of boats and crews
on display, lots of food, drink, race souvenirs and the
Miss Offshore Bikini Contest.
Saturday is the prelude to the Big Day. The
Amateur Offshore Challenge is in the Gulf from
New Pass to Big Pass at noon, with prime viewing
anywhere along Lido Key. This used to be called the


Hawaiian Shows July 1 and 2; a vintage car show July
1; a children's moon walk July 2 and 3; Neon the
Clown face painting July 3 and 4; barbecue dinners
every day; and a special Uncle Sam appearance July 4.
For times and prices, 355-1112.
Fourth of July at the Meadows, 5037 Ringwood
Meadow, will include a free concert and picnic in the
park featuring The Playmates, the Vanity Fair
Cloggers, children's games and a food court from noon
to 4 p.m. Information, 377-2300.
The Sarasota Downtown Association will shoot off
fireworks at 9:15 p.m. July 4 above Sarasota Bay off

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
June 5 thru September 30


"run-what-you-brung" race, and features all those
overpowered boats you see on the water each week-
end competing for top racer-in-the-region honors.
Also at noon Saturday is the Mini-Jet Boat Race
at Sarasota's Bayfront Park, near Marina Jack's
Restaurant. If you can picture going 50 mph in your
garage, you can pretty much figure out what this
race is all about.
And what would be a prelude without a party?
The Party at the Wet Pits is from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
at the Sarasota Hyatt/Sarasota Quay boat basin.
There's food, live entertainment, race souvenirs
and, of course, a close-up look at the boats, the en-
gines, the crews and all the "guts" of powerboat
racing. There is a $5 admission to this event.
Sunday tops off the weekend with The Big
Race: at noon from New Pass to Point of Rocks is
the Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix Challenge. The
race features all classes of offshore racing boats in
a 60-12-mile race, depending on class. Offshore
boating vantage points are off south Longboat Key,
along the northwest shore of Siesta Key and at Point
of Rocks. Onshore viewing is best at Lido or Siesta
beaches.
After the race, a Victory Circle at Sarasota
Quay will feature the winners at about 6 p.m.
And, on the Fourth of July a little after sunset,
a fireworks display sponsored by the Sarasota
Downtown Association will light up the nighttime
skies at the Sarasota Bayfront. There is even syn-
chronized music broadcast on WDUV 103.3 FM.


Bayfront Park, U.S. 41 in downtown Sarasota. Infor-
mation, 951-2656.
Just around the corner, Selby Botanical Gardens
will open at 6 p.m. for those wishing to picnic on the
grounds and view the fireworks. Alcohol and personal
fireworks, including sparklers, are prohibited. Fees and
parking information, 366-5731.
The Venice Concert Band will perform at 7:30
p.m. July 4 near the tennis courts at Siesta Key Public
Beach as a prelude to the Siesta Key Chamber of
Commerce's 9:15 p.m. fifth-annual fireworks celebra-
tion off the Gulffront beach. Information, 349-3800.


Acupuncture
/ Health Care Services

July is a good month to I
increase your energy.
Get rid of old aches & pains.
Now Accepting Appointments Irma Nussbaum
Acupuncture Physician
5350 Gulf Dr Holmes Bch 778-4809


BLACK VELVET
CANADIAN WHISKEY
1.75 LTR 13.99


SAUZA AGED IN
GOLD or SILVER OAK
1.75 LTR $10.49


TANQUERAY
GIN
1.75 LTR
25.99
MIR 6.00
19.99
T ANQUERAY
675 LTR
*20.99
GILBEY'S
VODKA
1.75 LTR $11.99


McCORMICK LEEDS CAPTAIN MORGAN
VODKA VODKA SPICED & COCONUT 17.99
MIR 3.00
750 ML 5.19 1.75LTR 9.99 1.75 LR 14.99
FLEISCHMANN'S WILD TURKEY JACK DANIELS
GIN 12.99 BOURBON WHISKEY
MIR 3.00
1.75LTR 9.99 1.75 LTR 24.99 750MLt 13.99
CLAN MACGREGOR BACARDI GILBEYS
SCOTCH RUM GIN
1.75LR 15.99 750ML $8.99 1.75LTR 12.99

BUSCH BUD LITE MICHELOB CIGARETTES PK CN
ICKCE ioU 6 PK BTLS SCORESBY ANYNAME BRAND........... 1.86 15.88
$2 N 6 PK CAN DO $399 SCOTCH GPC, DORAL MONTCLAR ...1.30 11.39
12 PK CANS TLS 3.72 HAMM'S HARLEY DAVDSON & STYE...1.36 10.88
S12 PK CANS 6 PK CANS 17.59 FREE UGHER
.49 .99 1.99 WITH ANY CARTON PURCHASE


Bonnie never takes "Holidays"... even on the 4th of July,
we are ready and waiting 24 hours a day.


Z/LQ ~ SINCE 1942



AIR CONDITIONING / DUCT CLEANING
778-0773 / 383-9766
ANNA MARIA ISLAND LONGBOAT KEY


It's Hard To
Stop A Trane.i r
CACO 56298


a


?






jrD PAGE 10 l JUNE 29, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


2I7PineAveAnMaia 779-


FREE EYE EXAM
By Independent Optometrist
with purchase of complete pair of prescription eyeglasses
(Incudes Glaucoma test-contact lens exams not Included)
Limited Time Offer
'Personalized Service & Customer Satisfaction is our Business.'




PuRPLE P4kkoT

COU TO" T-O4t br
Choose from over
1,000 T-Shirts

$395 to$995

We also carry KINO'S SANDALS
778-0540
3228 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CENTRE


Case for a shell harvest ban
Anna Maria Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard, right, picks up some of the three-score fighting conchs he discov-
ered on an early morning walk at the city's Bayfront Park. The colorful orange shells are a popular item for
beachgoers to collect. They were left under a tree along with 20 or so sand dollars to die. Shumard and a
Manatee County maintenance worker returned the live shells to Tampa Bay. All the cities on the Island have
adopted resolutions prohibiting the collection of live shellfish, a measure awaiting a decision by the Florida
Marine Fisheries Commission and the governor and cabinet. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood



Holmes Beach council rejects

changes to legislative code


I By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Only one suggestion for revisions to the city's leg-
islative procedures code was accepted by the Holmes
Beach City Council last week.
Several recommendations for changes were made
by Councilman Luke Courtney.
The first, to hold a council meeting immediately
after the swearing in of newly elected city officials to
elect a chairman and vice chairman, met with ap-
proval.
A second, to give the council rather than the mayor
the power to appoint council liaisons, was rejected.
"The mayor should do it," Councilwoman Carol
Whitmore insisted. "I don't think the council should be
appointing council liaisons."
The other council members agreed.
The third, to allow public comment after a motion
is made and seconded, was also rejected.
"At a regular meeting where we're going to vote,
we will have a topic and open it up for discussion,"
said Courtney. "Discussion is from the mayor and
council members, then from the public. However once
a motion is made and seconded, the code says the pub-
lic shall not participate in debate."
That procedure is in accordance with Roberts
Rules of Order, he said. He suggested the public be
allowed to participate in debate after a motion is on the
floor.
"I agree. We've always allowed debate after a
motion is made," said Whitmore.
"If we don't go by Roberts Rules, what are we
going to go by?"asked Mayor Rich Bohnenberger.
"The work session is the time for public debate and the
meeting is for conducting business. You're turning the
meeting into a work session by continuing debate on


Bridge traffic

light to come

back on
The traffic light at the Key Royale Bridge
construction project has been turned off for
the time being following the completion of
the project. However, the light will be put to
use again when the county begins work on
water lines, said Holmes Beach Public Works
Supervisor John Fernandez.


the subject."
"Robprts Rules of Order have never indicated the
people have no right to speak, but eventually it has to
end, otherwise it goes on like pigs and piano teachers,"
noted Councilman Don Maloney.
She likes to hear as much discussion as possible,
said Councilwoman Billie Martini.
"The chair has the right not to accept the motion
and allow public discussion," said Courtney.
People may want to respond to the council's dis-
cussion of the motion, said Whitmore.
"Public input is not forbidden after a notion," noted
Maloney. "I can still ask anybody out there what they
think."
Courtney asked if the mayor can participate in the
debate of the motion.
"Once the motion is made and seconded and on the
floor, it's the property of the five people who will vote
on it," explained City Clerk Leslie Ford, "and they can
debate it."

Additional meetings
The council also rejected Courtney's bid for addi-
tional council meeting and work sessions.
"I think the work sessions are entirely too long and
we need more than one a month," stressed Courtney.
"The council has always had two meetings and two
work sessions a month. We are trying to do twice as
much in a meeting and it takes too long to get anything
approved."
The council's last two work sessions have been
three-and-a-half hours long.
"I have no problem with sitting up here and getting
the business done," said Whitmore. "I don't think a lot
of these (items) had to be included on the agenda to-
night. I think you're trying to make it seem like we
need another meeting."
"I have no problem with it (one work session and
one meeting a month)," said Maloney. "I think we
could do quite well by not talking about things over and
over again. There are certain subjects, like T-end ca-
nals, that deserve their own meetings."
Geyer agreed with Maloney and Martini agreed
with Courtney.
"By being this late, you rule out certain people who
may not stay, and you get less public input," noted resi-
dent Bob Jones.
"If you had two work sessions and one meeting a
month that would be fine," said resident Jim Meena. "It
puts pressure on me when I want to bring something up
at the end of a work session and everybody's so tired.
And some people can't stay that late."


BRADENTON
OPTICAL
Manatee West Shopping Center
-7423 Manatee Ave. W. 792-7522


TOCK REDUCTION
SALE
40% OFF
ENTIRE STOCK


ime I Sunglasses by
Bausch & Lomb
Limited Time Offer


AMI WEST
ANNA MARIA ISLAND, FLORIDA
ALEXIS SHOPPING CENTER
(2 blocks south of the Sandbar)
9801 GULF DRIVE
ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA
778-6877






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 11 I[F


Council stands firm on


in-home teaching decision


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council refused to recon-
sider another proposal to permit in-home teaching in
the city last week.
The matter was brought to council two years ago
by piano teacher Paulette Kilts who was seeking a
home occupation license. She learned the license pro-
hibits traffic to the home, making her ineligible for one.
Council was sympathetic to her plight and for two
years it considered various methods of permitting her
to teach in her home. However, council recently put
the matter to rest because it felt making an exception
for traffic to the home for one type of business would
open it up to everyone with a home occupation license.
Councilman Luke Courtney asked the council to
reconsider the matter after receiving numerous phone
calls from residents. He suggested the following sen-
tence be added to the home occupation license criteria:
"If the home occupation involves training, teach-
ing or instruction of students, vehicular and pedestrian
traffic be allowed providing that there be no more than


two students at any time, the hours of operation are
from 9 am. to 9 p.m. and adequate parking be avail-
able."
"If we open this up, we're going to regret it," said
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore. "It's not the piano
teacher, it's the vehicular traffic to the person's home.
The whole purpose of a home occupation license is to
allow people to run businesses out of their homes but
not let it look like a business and disturb the residen-
tial character of the neighborhood."
Council members Pat Geyer, Billie Martini and
Don Maloney agreed.
"It's an issue of discrimination," emphasized
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger. "If you give it to her,
you'll have to give it to everyone."
Citing vehicular traffic generated by yard sales,
resident Nick Tuit said, "I think it's a shame we can't
allow a teacher to give lessons."
"People have said if the council does not want to
approve it they would like to put it on a referendum
for next March," noted Courtney. "Citizens have the
right to question this."


5341 Gulf Dr./Holmes Beach, Fl. 33510/778-3636


Hands-on
times with
i any old
> ,handy
snake
Lulu Barber, 5, and 4-
year-old Christian
Chamberlain have a
hands-on visit with Mr.
Python at Anna Maria's
School for Constructive
Play. Island Photo:
Courtesy Maria
Richards












[.










Anna Maria code board

has 'annual' meeting


There wasn't a lot to do on the agenda at the Anna
Maria Code Enforcement Board meeting June 22 after
Leon Kramer and Dale Woodland were re-elected
chairman and vice chairman respectively.
The city commission will appoint two residents to
fill vacancies on the seven-member board which rarely
meets. The last time was May 1994.
After a quick rules adoption, Woodland urged
members to talk up the board's rightful role in the com-
munity.


He said he'd received a complaint that the board
was not doing its job by failing to survey code viola-
tions in the city.
"We are not police," said the vice chairman. "I
told the gentleman that the city has a formal complaint
procedure through the building official and that the
majority of complaints are resolved there."
The session was adjourned after 20 minutes.
Members laughed that they'd see each other next
year.


an


Gifts F





AWAOtZ


id Everything Nice


Furniture Art



5400-A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
941/779-1600


ISLAND I


J MANAGER TRACEY JEANNE
MANAGER SPECIAL
A20% OFF'
H A I R Any Salon Service
N with Tracey
DESIGNS COUPON EXPIRES 7/13/05
Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach 778-1380


50% Off All Swimwear:
^ Harbor Casuals
*Roxanne Gabar CEEB
Open M-Sat. 9:30 5:30
383-8617
Whitney Beach Plaza
6842 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


4th of July

SALE
Take An Additional
30% Off
already reduced prices in our "Sale Loft"
30% Off
Swimsuits
(except 40% Off Robby Len
"close-out" swimsuits)
25% Off
regular priced spring/summer dresses
in misses petitess
Sale today through Monday, July 3
We will be
closed Tuesday
4th of July
Open Mon.-Sot. 9-5 -RESORT WEAR
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 778-1161






RM PAGE 12 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Horseshoers dodged raindrops for winner


The team of Tim Lease and Alan "Pro-zak"
Szakacs, sponsored by Tip of the Island restaurant,
went undefeated to win the 1995 Ray Simches Island
Cities Horseshoes Tournament on Saturday.
The event began with a dedication to the late Mayor
Simches from Anna Maria City Commissioner George
McKay who spoke of Simches' desire for a tournament
to promote cooperation between the Island cities.
The games were briefly delayed twice during
morning downpours but the final match was played and
the prizes awarded just before the major rainfall of the
day began shortly after noon.
Szakacs clinched the final match with double ring-
ers to pull his team out of reach for a final score of 21
to 13.
Fourteen teams of horseshoe slingers took part in the
tournament held at Anna Maria City Hall. First place prize
of $100 and individual plaques were presented to the win-
ners by Laura Ritter, special events coordinator for the
tournament sponsor, The Islander Bystander. A traveling
plaque will bear the names of Lease and Szakacs at Anna
Maria City Hall throughout the year.
The first place prizes and trophies were donated by
the newspaper.
Marty Kimball and Bruce McKenzie were in the
running for first place all day until they ran into Lease
and Szakacs, sending them into the losers' bracket of
the double elimination tournament. They defeated the
team of Kevin Cassidy and Bob McGlynn and then
Bob Ferrara and Lance Bieker for a second shot at
Lease and Szakacs, and ultimately second place.
Kimball and McKenzie received $20 gift certifi-
cates from Crabby Bill's and Shells restaurants.
Ferrara and Bieker were third-place winners and
each received a "More than a mullet wrapper" T-shirt
from The Islander Bystander.
A $20 gift certificate from Duffy's Tavern was
awarded to McKenzie for "most ringers," and Matt
Bowers received an oil change and lube job from the
BP station in Holmes Beach for "first ringer."
Special thanks go to Lou Fiorentino, Rick Weaver,
Alan Lavoie, Rita Kane and J.W. Wynn for officiating.
Islander's Market of Anna Maria donated sodas and
Gatorade.
The event raised more than $400 for the "Light
Fund," a special account at First National Bank of Mana-
tee, established by The IslanderBystander to raise money
for the replacement of soccer and Little League field lights
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.


The winners!


A~


'I~


- ]
- -


A close call and a tense moment in thefinal rounds
required the opinion of the head official, J.W. Wynn.
(He's the one closest to the ground.) Islander
Photos: Herb Haller and Bonner Presswood


Swimwear Catal of the K
Swimwear Capital of the Keys


Our 29th Annual


e2 fori
2,-1

Women's Swimwear Sale*


Now in Progress
Sale Ends July 24
*Higher Price of 2 Prevails -7Sea
Buttonwood Plaza Longboat Key able St
3170 Gulf of Mexico Dr. t "w ^
Mon-Sat 9 to 6
Sunday 10 to 5
383-2288 Serving the Islands Since 1966


ET.' ..


-T -





Oficial Lou Fiorenno's call went in favor of Bruce.



Official Lou Fiorentino 's call went in favor ofBruce.


THE ULTIMATE PROTECTION AGAINST...
* Hurricanes & high winds Flying debris
* Theft & vandalism Extensive noise
* Sun rays & water damage Metro-Dade Approved
Enjoy security & privacy. Installed on
windows, sliding glass doors, patios, etc.
FREE ESTIMATES


--a-
9~


E SPROLLSHUTTER
ESP CORPORATION
- Serving Florida Since 1981 -
778-5773
Manufactured in Palmetto, FL


LMT -I


JUST
CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
SSorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 13 I[m

Fulfilling retirement puts 'Consequences' into print


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"Chilling, frightening, riveting," says the cover of
a new novel, "Consequences A Murder Mystery."
"It's a page turner with a shocking ending," says
the Holmes Beach author, Mary Syreen, who will make
her first-ever book-signing appearance at 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, July 1, at the Brain Gym bookstore in Holmes
Beach.
The mystery, set in the Pacific Northwest and at a
Florida condominium complex, focuses on an abused
killer who evokes sympathy until he brutally murders
a pretty high school senior.
The story opens with a woman known only as
"she" joining a group of ladies poolside at their condo
complex where they meet to review best-selling books.
"She" doesn't belong, only wandering in one day. Or
so it seems...
Sitting with author Syreen a gentle, 68-year-old
great-grandmother on her porch overlooking the
Anna Maria Sound, it's hard to see past her winning
smile to the book cover's warning: "You may never
trust anyone again, ever!"
Syreen's smile is that of a woman who has expe-
rienced a long list of fulfillments in life and decided
that retirement really just meant another chapter: writ-
ing and publishing her first novel.
"I always thought I could write a book," says
Syreen. "Not about my life, though. About made-up
lives. I tried to get into the heads of my characters and
think as they would think."

Choosing priorities
Writing the book began as a friendly poolside dare
among some women at Westbay Cove. Syreen was the
only one to keep going, who knew she had it in her,
who found the dedication necessary to write every day.
The finished product the glossy, black paper-
back with sinister red-foil eyes rests proudly on
Syreen's lap.
- ----------------


sn ELTOn FASHIONS OF
_I IL. LONGBOAT KEY

I 7.F









IELET G UP
I I

I I I
I '
I

I I




















ALL MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
I I

I













Sizes 36-44



SWIMSUITS

25% OFF
SPECIAL GROUPS OF
WOMEN'S KORET SPORTSWEAR
25% and 50% OFF
We will be closed Tuesday, July 4
SS & S Plaza, Holmes Beach 778-4505


Journalist-turned-novelist Mary Syreen says,
"Grandmother's the best thing I've ever been
called Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.
Money wasn't the motivation. The book is self-
published and Syreen says she'll be "pleasantly sur-
prised" if she makes any money from "Consequences."
"I love to write. I always have," she says. Fiction
writing is now a new lease on that love and she's 90
pages into her second novel.
Born in Oregon, Syreen lived most of her life in
northwest Washington State, spending decades on


Vlsjinb Pobiaty
CLARE H. STARRETT,
D.P.M. I I


nand
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Dally Home Visits by Appointment
S T9.


I BUYING


Whidbey Island "the gateway to Puget Sound" -
a large island compared to Anna Maria.
In her 30s, when the youngest of her three children
was two years old, Syreen embarked on a journalism
career that also enabled her to accomplish her other
heart-felt goal: "We needed the money. But I also
wanted to do all the things that mothers do. I have al-
ways loved children."
Syreen spent 25 years covering news for The
Whidbey News Times plus "doing all the other things
you sometimes have to do on a weekly newspaper."
She also worked as a news stringer for two main-
land dailies "that wanted to but really weren't cover-
ing our island," she says.
Journalism not being the most lucrative of careers,
Syreen simultaneously spent 20 years as a rural letter
carrier with the U.S. Postal Service.
"Yes," says the author, "I knew everybody. But I
never wrote about people I might have known in a way
I wasn't supposed to."
And then, after all those years of full-time activity,
what was she supposed to do in her retirement?
Hospital and senior-center volunteering hardly
took up any time for the woman used to being on the
go as a reporter and a letter-carrier, a mother and grand-
mother.
Widowed, Syreen and long-time companion
Charlie Raleigh enjoy traveling. They split their year
between Holmes Beach, Washington state and Kauai,
Hawaii.
Here on the Island, they're involved in the Turtle
Watch. And while Raleigh does his fishing thing,
Syreen has discovered a new twist on her old thing:
writing.
"It's been very interesting," says Syreen of the
publishing experience and the information and advice
she's gotten from a variety of authors.
Interesting enough to keep going?
"Oh yes," says Syreen, who already has an idea for
book number three.
Number one, "Consequences," is available at Brain
Gym for $7.95.


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


SSELLIJNG I


For Appointment or Consultation S Call Fred Vandergraff at
VANDERGRAFF'S Cortez Coins and Antiques
The "Original" Cortez Coins operated by the Vandergraff Family since 1976. (Not affiliated with anyone else.)
COLLECTIONS, ESTATES, SILVER DOLLARS, PROOF SETS,
ALL GOLD COINS, ANTIQUE JEWELRY, AND STAMP COLLECTIONS
673 Cortez Plaza East
(Walmart Shopping Ctr. across from Cortez Theatre) 7P 5- IL


!*: -;"1


PEDIATRIC MEDICINE






BIB PAGE 14 u JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


on vous of etectrcas p.ower. islanaer


Part of Nature's great balancing act


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Lightning is good for us.
That's the good news. The bad news is that light-
ning is bad for us.
Lightning does not taper on and taper off. It
doesn't even start and stop in a normal measurable
sense. One day it's just here in all its flashy noisy
wonder. Then, one day in late autumn, it isn't here
any more. Now, it's here.
So once again we can look forward to being part of
arguably a double lightning capital: Florida is the light-
ning capital of the U.S. and Tampa Bay not far north
has long been regarded as the lightning capital of
Florida, unfairly as it turns out.
Lightning statistics are kept in the form of "thun-
derstorm days," and Florida is far off the world cham-
pionship. Parts of Indonesia have 260 days of thunder-
storm occurrence a year, says Dr. Richard Orville, di-
rector of the Cooperative Institute for Applied Meteo-
rological Studies at Texas A&M.
Florida has 70 to 80 on the east coast and 80 to 90
on our west side, as recorded by Stephen Hodanish,
meteorologist and lightning specialist at the U.S.
Weather Service Center at Melbourne.
Practically forever, Tampa Bay has been con-
demned as lightning capital of the U.S., and was con-
victed by legitimate statistics. Every year, that is, ex-
cept 1993, the year of the big Midwest storms when St.
Louis won the title. But now, says Tampa TV Channel
13's weather guru Roy Leep, new instruments measure
such things better and have placed the country's most
active thunderstorm section on aline from Polk County
to Collier. The area sees 130 thunderstorms a year.

Lightning likes the
Sunshine State
We get so much lightning because we live in such
a wonderful place, says Dan Sobien, meteorologist
with the National Weather Service's station at Ruskin.
"Florida is a long thin peninsula between tropical
waters," he says, "the Gulf Stream on the east side and
the Gulf of Mexico on the west. Both create sea breezes
that move in over the land. When they meet the colli-
sion produces thunderstorms."


The breezes from the east are stronger, and every
afternoon they push the storm line westward.
Melbourne's Hodanish explains it also in tempera-
tures: the ocean temperature is steady day and night,
80-plus degrees, while land temperatures are in the 70s
at night and 90s in daytime. In the late morning sea and
land temperatures are equal, but by midafternoon the
land is a lot warmer.
The warmed air rises. That rise draws denser air from
the sea, and that moist air heads upward. The result is the
spectacular thunderheads of a Florida afternoon, some of
them soaring 50,000 feet above the earth.
The temperature is below freezing miles above the
earth, meaning moisture takes the form of ice. The ris-
ing water particles collide with ice, causing electrical
charges. As Hodanish explains it, charges are mostly
positive way up there, which induces negative charges
in the lower part of the thunderhead, which in turn in-
duces positive near the ground.
Nature won't permit such an imbalance. Lightning
is the way it is equalized. It blasts cloud-to-earth, earth-


to-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, says Sobien of Ruskin.
Lightning shows us various forms, mostly forks
and streaks, none of it what we call heat or sheet -
those are regular flashes in clouds far away.
It is powerful, typically 100 million volts, travel-
ing up to nine miles to the ground and 90 miles through
clouds. It heats the air to 60,000 degrees, which ex-
pands the air explosively to make the thunder noise.
We hear it after we see it because lightning strokes
travel at the speed of light, 186,000 miles a second,
while thunder ambles along at the speed of sound.
With such power, it's no wonder lightning kills
people. Dr. Orville says it kills 70 to 100 people a year
in the U.S. Roy Leep says eight of them died in Florida
last year, one each in Manatee and Sarasota counties.
And it's frequent, with 50 strikes per square mile
per year in the Tampa Bay region, says Orville. One
enterprising reporter, sentenced to do a lightning story,
calculated a local resident is 23 times as likely to be hit
by lightning as to get all six Lotto numbers. Go figure.
Most people killed by lightning are males in their
20s, says Hodanish. "They know they're untouchable,
so they go on with their work outdoors or with their
sport. Most are killed on the job, and the second most
deaths are recreational golfers, boaters and the like."
Few elderly fall victim to lightning, he says, be-
cause "old people are smarter, they know they're not
immortal so they head indoors during a storm."

Lightning as manure?
Despite the death and destruction, lightning has
its good side, says Sobien. It fertilizes the ground, of
all things.
"All weather is just systems getting into balance.
If there were no relief of imbalances, the tropics would
get hotter and hotter and the poles colder and colder.
"Lightning is energy in electrical form, out of bal-
ance. It releases nitrogen that gets into the rain and into
the ground, where plants need it to stay green and grow.
"We think of a lot of things as serious nuisances,
such as lightning and hurricanes, but they're integral
parts of balancing the world. Lightning is a very impor-
tant part of nature." *
So when you're attacked by a thunderstorm, count
your blessings. But do so indoors.




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 15 IE
L --IU


HAPPY 4TH OF JULY


4


Serving the
Islands Since 1987


3332 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island Center 778-4277
i- 1 i ii 11111ii t111 n-1111 .1 [t i im i i iii iiii i ifr r


I


I


A~ = A -


--u I



l In f M 1 1 "11f 1 Im k 'I L


Q Same day and next da
photo developing price
\1 We make copy negati
and can reproduce yo
Sold photos.
C Photos taken here for
passports. immiaratior


y.
es.


ves
ur


'.


weapon permits,
Realtor license -
Q We sell Jack Elka's
famous island aerial
photos and T-shirts.


ALSO FILM BATTERIES PHOTO ALBUMS
STANDARD SIZE FRAMES AND ACCESSORIES
DISCOUNTS
Senior Citizens Real Estate Companies Military Personnel
Honoring All Coupons for Printing & Processing of 4x6 Prints


ag00


j
S


9C






[B PAGE 16 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


N icki's West S9th


Nicki's West 59th Restaurant
Welcomes You To Join Us


BREAKFAST SPECIAL MON-THURS 10 AM 2 PM
EARLY BIRDS $5.95. MON-SAT* 11 AM 6 PM
HAPPY HOUR LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
In The Lounge Only BARBARA JOHNSEN
12 pm -7 pm Monday Saturday 6PM-10PM
Not Open Tuesday July 4thMonday SaM-
1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton CATERING A 795-7065
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM* CLOSED SUNDAY BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE 795-7065


Don't miss the fireworks on the beach ...
from Bradenton Beach at the Beach House on July 3 and in
VJ Anna Maria at the Sandbar on July 4!


SEAFOOD) RESTAIURAiNT
YOUR FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

1 Year Anniversary Party


SATURDAY JULY FIRST "'
FREE HORS D'OEUVRES 3-6 pm
$1.00 Oysters 11 am 7 pm
SPECIAL ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET 4-9 pm
Adults $9.95 Children (10 & under) $4.95



pE THE BIG MAMA! She's Here!
4th Wth'" Tuesday through Saturday 5 9 pm



HAPPY HOUR DAILY
7 DAYS A WEEK 3-6 PM
2 for 1 Drinks (well, draft & housewine)
I.III.I - - - - - -I i I II


SRegular A La Carte menu available 11 am 10 pm
SDockage available for those coming by boat
Marker 62 Intracoastal Waterways
5325 Marina Drive (formerly Pete Reynards) Holmes Beach
Open For Dinner I1 am-1Opm Fri & Sat 11 am-1 1pm Lounge Open 11:00-?

778-9566


Ride the bus on
Thursday
Children and adults are invited to
take a course in public-transportation
use by riding the Manatee County Area
Transit Bus No. 5 into Bradenton and
back on Thursday morning, June 29.
Under the direction of the All Is-
land Summer program heads, those at-
tending will learn how to read the bus
schedule and how and where to transfer
to another bus.
Boarding will be at 8:30 am. at the
Anna Maria City Pier. The cost will be
25 cents for children, $1 for adults. For
more information, call Barbara Amador
at 778-6110.

Women's Ephesians
seminar July 8
The Gentle Spirit's Revival, an
area-wide women's seminar on the
book of Ephesians, will be held Satur-
day, July 8, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Island
Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Drive, Anna
Maria.
Participants will learn of God's
truths for women in today's world in
song and scripture. Guest speaker is
well-known Bible teacher Robbie
Leech.
Registration is necessary and is $3.
For more information, call 792-2084.


Broadway review
comes to Roser
Chapel
Youth members of Chapel Theater
Players will present a "Broadway Tril-
ogy Plus I" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June
29, at Roser Memorial Church's chapel,
512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
The show will conclude a three-
week music workshop under the direc-
tion of professional choral conductor
Elaine Burkly of Anna Maria. Excerpts
from "Oliver," "Annie" and "Music
Man," plus one, will be featured. The
children will also stage their perfor-
mance at Freedom Village on June 30 at
7:15 p.m.
Admission will be free. For more
information, call 778-3045.


Summer dance
lessons at Island
center
The Carty Academy of Theater will
offer summer dance lessons for chil-
dren, teens and adults.
Cheryl Carty, a professional
dancer, performer and choreographer,
will be taking over Miss Lisa's classes
and offering some new ones.
The summer classes will be offered
through August as follows:
Tuesday: Jazz Teen/Adult, 7 to 8
p.m.; Tap Teen/Adult, 8 to 9 p.m.
Thursday: Kinderdance, ages 3 to
5, 10 to 11 am.; Ballet/Jazz, ages 5 to
7, 11 to noon; Jazz, ages 6 to 8, 1 to 2
p.m.; Tap, ages 6 to 8, 2 to 3 p.m.; Bal-
let, ages 8 to 12, 3 to 4 p.m.; Jazz, ages
8 to 12, 4 to 5 p.m.; Tap, ages 8 to 12,
5 to 6 p.m.
Friday: Kinderdance, ages 3 to
5, 10 to 11 a.m.; Pre-Ballet, 11 a.m. to
noon; Tap/Jazz, 12 to 1 p.m.
For more information and cost of
classes call Cheryl Carty at 795-7715 or
the center at 778-1908.


I


LAY :mLafjwir=I I (:


i


-j


Two Island
churches to unite in
worship
Throughout July and August,
members of Harvey Memorial Church
in Bradenton Beach will unite with
members of Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria, during Roser's 10 a.m. worship
services.
Dr. J. Clement Walker of Harvey
Memorial will assist in the co-church
services. Harvey Memorial choir mem-
bers are invited to join Roser's "pick-
up" choir.
Kelly cartoons on
display at Island
museum
Cartoons by the late Frank X. Kelly,
an editorial cartoonist for the Islander
newspaper, are on display at the Island
Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
Kelly, who died on April 6, was a
public relations representative for the
American Legion and an editorial colum-
nist in Washington, D.C., for 25 years be-
fore settling in Anna Maria in 1975.
Originally from Lawrence, Mass.,
Kelly was a U.S. naval combat corre-
spondent for several newspapers in
Lawrence where he was known as the
"Walter Winchell of Lawrence." His
editorial cartoons in the Islander en-
deared him to Island residents. He was
a member of the Pier Regulars who
gather frequently for coffee and conver-
sation at Anna Maria City pier.
His long-time friend and companion,
Marion Kimball, donated his many car-
toons to the museum. Ruth Elliott com-
piled the cartoons, which depict Island his-
tory and politics, into seven scrapbooks.
The Island Museum is open Tues-
day, Wednesday, Thursday and Satur-
day during the summer.
For more information call the mu-
seum at 778-0492.
Disney trip is
fundraiser for
Island Center
Janice Bergbom has organized an
overnight trip to Disney's Pleasure Is-
land in Orlando as a fundraiser for the
Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Participants will depart on a deluxe
motorcoach from the Island on Satur-
day, July 22, at 7 p.m., returning at 4
a.m. Sunday morning. The cost of the
round trip excursion is $50 per person
including admission to the park.
All proceeds of the trip, sponsored
by Uniglobe Far Away Travel, will be
directed to the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center's scholarship fund for the
center's Summer Camp Program. Schol-
arship requests have totaled more than
$10,000, according to Pierette Kelly,
director of the center.
Reservations and payment must be
made before Saturday, July 8.
Call Bergbom at Uniglobe Far
Away Travel, 778-0715, for information
and reservations.

T-end canal dock
meeting set
A meeting on the T-end canal docks
has been scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on July
20 in Holmes Beach City Hall. Copies
of the draft ordinance concerning dock
ownership, written by city attorney
Patricia Petruff, are available in city hall
during business hours.


I







THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND VISITOR INFORMATION ISLAND STREET MAP


ISLANDER


,,BI N


Island lifeguards turn tide on beach-boy image


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
In 1994 reports named television's "Bay Watch" as
the most regularly viewed program around the world.
Here on Anna Maria Island, there are no television
crews, no make-up artists, contracts and agents, and,
presently, no female members of Gulf Watch.
Our real-life drama stars 16 down-to-earth, well-
trained men who keep a 365-day watch over our Mana-
tee County-run surf and sands from the eight Gulffront
lifeguard towers at the Coquina and Manatee public
beaches.
Whether it's the division chief with 15-plus years
with the county or the one-month rookie, to a man,
these guys love what they do.
"A lifeguard for life" is a saying that holds true for
the men still in it, and for the ones who've moved on
to more lucrative, so-called professional fields.
Try to cast aside the impression of just a group of
guys "sitting the wood" and girl watching. These men
on our Island beaches are professionals, and they take
their job very seriously. Also to a man.
Until a few years ago, this lifeguard staff was part
of the Manatee County Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment. Today the guards are members of the county's
Public Safety Department, Marine Rescue Division.
The main thrust of that realignment means in-
creased responsibility, advanced certification and ad-
vanced care for the 3.2 million people a year who fre-
quent our two county beaches.
All Marine Rescue lifeguards are or are in the
process of becoming certified emergency medical
technicians. The certification includes successfully
completing a 10-month classroom course plus intern-
ships with fire departments and emergency-medical
personnel.
Ongoing EMT training is a requirement. What's
not required is this division's EMT/lifeguard ride-along
program for skills upkeep. Initiated by Marine Rescue
Capt. Joe Westerman, the program is the first in the
state and is a contender for a National
Association of Counties award.
In full dress, the lifeguards spend
whole shifts, and then some, with the
county's busiest Emergency Medical Ser-
vices teams, from ambulance response
through hospital emergency-room proce-
dures.
In addition to the updated medical
training, the Gulf guards are also scuba


certified and have passed driver-training
safety courses for using the division's
seven all-terrain vehicles (ATVs).
"We lifeguards used to be very soli-
tary," says Marine Rescue Division Chief
Jay Moyles. "We've been striving hard in
our new public-safety role to fight off that
beach-boy image. This division has


Moyles and Beach go back to the days when beach
communication was a dime taped to the inside of a
cooler. The towers had no phones and emergency re-
sponse meant running to the nearest pay phone. That
evolved to standard walkie-talkies between towers.
Today the guards are equipped with 800-megahertz
radios with a direct line to the downtown Emergency
Communications Center.
Manatee County also has the first Marine Rescue
Division in the state that is dispatched through 911,
meaning the lifeguards get notification of incidents si-
multaneously with police, fire and emergency-medical
personnel.


Division Lt. Rex
(Lonnie) Beach goes
back to the county-
beach days when
emergency communica-
tion meant a run for the
nearest pay phone.


evolved into a group of certified professionals with
advanced training and advanced capabilities."
To the public those advances spell safety with a
capital S, says the chief. They also spell lives saved.
A few years ago, first-responder/then-lifeguard
Steve Elton was credited with saving the life of a near-
drowning 8-year-old boy. These guards have also been
first on the scene for broken-neck incidents, swimmers
run over by boats, coronaries, spinal injuries and more.
Except for a suicide in the early 1980s and a heart-
attack victim a few years ago, Moyles says it's been
years since there have been any fatalities on the
stretches of beach overseen by Marine Rescue.

Dime in a cooler
Moyles is a Brooklyn, N.Y., native who spent his
adolescent and college years as an ocean guard and a
sailboat racer. In 1979, the chief took a vacation to this
area and stayed. He's been with the county Gulf-guard-
ing system ever since.
Moyles has seen some major changes. As has Di-
vision Lt. Rex (Lonnie) Beach, who's been around just
as long.


In addition to the beach watch, it's not
unusual that Marine Rescue is the first re-
sponder to a vehicle accident in the beach
vicinity. Also, all major and minor emer-
gency incidents on the beach are not neces-
sarily water related.
All of this the advanced training
and advanced communications translates
into advanced care on our Island beaches,
says Moyles.
Even updated paperwork means a
quicker arrival to the hospital for a beach or
surf victim.
The lifeguards can't administer drugs
or start an IV. But these days, by the time
the ambulance arrives, the patient has been
stabilized or packaged, the situation's
been assessed, the vitals have been taken


and transferred by radio, and all pertinent questions
have been asked, responses recorded on carbon forms
coinciding with what EMS needs.
Saving time can mean saving a life, Moyles says.

Street-sense prevention
"Prevention is a big key," the chief says of the life-
guards' new public-safety focus. Public and private
safety presentations are part of Moyles' job.
That education involves home safety as well as
beach safety. The state of Florida leads the continental
United States in drownings, Moyles says.
On the beach, says the chief, "when the numbers
are going down and getting the numbers down is a
prime focus that means we're doing our job, to get
in there before a situation escalates."
Situations can range from a potential drowning to
an on-beach medical emergency to a violation of any
of the county park ordinances, for which the guards are
also responsible.
Twenty-five-year-old Islander Pete McKelvey has
been a lifeguard out here for almost eight years. "With
time and experience," he says, "the guys develop a true


SMarine Rescue
Division Chief Jay
Moyles, left,
remembers Islander
and longtime
lifeguard Pete
a McKelvey as a
surfer kid who
couldn't resist the
excitement around
the towers.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn










street sense for possible trouble."
While the public may view the lifeguards as just
sitting the wood, McKelvey stresses that they're always
alert to all water, beach and park activity.
McKelvey was a responder to the so-called Co-
quina Beach riot on Memorial Day 1992. Added to the
rise in attendance at the south-end beaches, McKelvey
says "alcohol, hot weather and attitudes all come into
play out here."
And what of the attitude of other public-safety pro-
fessionals toward these advanced Marine Rescue Divi-
sion lifeguards?
"I've seen a slow change over a long time," says
McKelvey. "We take their work seriously; they've
come to see how seriously we take ours. They come
spend time seeing what we do; we go spend time see-
ing and doing what they do. Everyone works as a team
now."
Moyles adds a comment that he knows other pub-
lic-safety officials might not agree with. "We're really
in the public eye more than any other division. We're
dealing with a lot from giving information to medi-
cal assists and non-medicals. Lifeguards are seen by
more people a year than any other facet of public
safety."
There's that 3.2 million figure again. And a lot of
those are year-after-year repeaters who plant them-
selves on the same spot of beach, near their favorite
lifeguard's tower.
"People start to think of you almost as family,"
Moyles says.

Fraternal order of guards
A lot of these lifeguards are family men. In addi-
tion, there is a family-like camaraderie among these
Gulf-watch team members.
Rookie Billy Werner, 19, affectionately known as
Worm Boy, gets teased about his previous lifeguarding
experience: a pool, which just isn't even close to the
real thing, say his peers.
Another rookie, 22-year-old Adam Chevalier, is
also a part-time firefighter. He laughs with McKelvey
about his orientation week, remembering how in
mode, serious he misunderstood one of Lt. Beach's
orders to offer assistance on Manatee Beach and ended
up stalling out on his ATV, which he was trying to ride
onto the pier.
McKelvey recalls another incident "Just when you
think you've seen it all," he laughs, "then they called
me up to the snack bar one day. There's this guy a
flasher, you could say wearing nothing but a raft!"
Chief Moyles laughs, remembering McKelvey as

PLEASE SEE LIFEGUARDS, PAGE 20


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 17 IFM


~BI~ "





M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 18


X N


"You'll have to call us ...

or we'll never meet!"



REFRIGERATION
1EAT NDV@H

CAC044365

778-9622 Holmes Beach -

FPL
A PARTICIPATE NG
CONTRACTOFI


1!,,i


:i



:il





:.
:;%
~~:.~ 10~ ,

.i-


/:


~ ',( i

Vwl


S iN


.


S9&s Old Fashioned
TYLEJ 'S OIce Cream
and
Waffle Cones
/ Made on
Location


OPEN "Your #1 Ice Cream Parlor."
Daily Since 1984
Noon ,
to 10 p.m. 11904 Cortez Road West
794-5333 SURFING WORLD VILLAGE













on Tuesday, July 4, aboard the

MISS CORTEZ XI
12507 Cortez Road West
794-1223

$15.00 PER PERSON Ps
Departing Promptly at 6:30pm
[- BAR & GRILL ON BOARD
S GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!


Sn jL 07 8


We Know The Way
to successful Real Estate sales

TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325
MARY ANN HEL
SCHMIDT WHI
Eves. 778-4931 01 M M l MLS Eves. 77
-Brc7


E
1
II


EN
rE
1-6956


I ._ I 605-C Manatee Ave., W. Holmes Beach, FL 34217 I


AIRBOAT RIDES
Perico Harbour Marina
Manatee Avenue West
(at Leverocks & Galati Marine)


TE RSO


Joe's
Eats & The Best
Ice Cream
Sweetsand Yogurt
Sweets Homemade
by Joe on
778-0007 Premises
"Just an Old Fashioned Ice Cream Paror"
GREAT HOMEMADE
Sodas, Shakes & Sundaes
Yogurts (fat free, low fat)
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
o Belgium Waffles
Espresso, Cappuccino
219 GULF DR. S. BRADENTON BEACH
(6 blocks south of the Cortez Bridge) 8


Come see Florida's Natural beauty & wilderness.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L 7010GulfDdrive POBox 717 AnnmaMara, FL.34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell
-Is 4 WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4301'M
A-- W^^ l"l, / SATURDAYS 9AM to HO1 UN.


S' B26
Mon-Fri 7 to 3 Sat 7 to 1 Sun 7 to 11
778-9803 5340 Gulf Drive., S&S Plaza


6B4I


Age Has Its Benefits


Unforgettable Service
for over 50 years


We know the Island
We know real estate
We knLo how to help
... and you benefit from our experience.
5910 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales (813)778-0777 Rentals 778-0770 Fax 778-6944


4- When it comes to service,

everything matters.



J\ N / First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
813 798-2708


--


[Sm it


'
--c7n,
rr;c~ ctr i
: :


i.,


""~~:
2r
-~~
r=i
ci:
11J:
rj i .
;I
-i


,A


~;h
i~-~ ~~ :--N





PAGE 19 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER il


B EACH 778-4506
ARN /
in b Shells Gifts Clothing Swimsuits
8*. Inflatables Bait & Tackle Hats Much more

I LRGE SELECTION OF KITES

Look for a FIREWORKS WARM-UP
On Bradenton Beach Monday July 3
Wide selection of Panama Jack Hats, Sunglasses,
Clothing & Suntan Products. Unusual Gifts & Novelties.
200 Gulf Dr. So. Bradenton Beach (Just north of Coquina Beach)

More Island news than any other
source The Islander Bystander.


0-i cdi m akso


Established 1947


W


"Likely The Best Fishing
Spot in Florida"TM
No License Required
Live Shrimp & Shiners
Frozen Baits
Rod Rentals Tackle
1/2 Mile North of A.M. City Pier


875 North Shore Drive Anna Maria Island
Full of character and Old Florida Charm. Upper and lower
decks with magnificent views of sunsets and sunrises.
"Best kept secret on the Island."
Come join us for ISLAND COOKING ...
Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner.
DAILY SPECIALS REASONABLE PRICES
778-1885 E


t; ~H


m


SPier Walk Cafe
Splurge on the food! Not on the prices.
Breakfast & Lunch Specials
with BREAKFAST all day
MON-FRI. 5 AM to 2 PM
SAT-SUN: til NOON *
ALL NIGHT SPECIALS
FRI & SAT 11 PM to 5 AM
127 Bridge SL, Bradenton Beach 778-5542


1r First National Baink
Memb.erFDIC

"As Independent As The Island Itself"

Susan A. O'Connor
Assistant Vice President
and Branch Manager
8B4G
5324 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217, 813/778-4900


[ISLANDER


Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun,
a ray of sunshine? Look no further -
it's all in The Islander Bystander.
More local news than any other source.


F -..-----..----- -- --
Eat In or FREE I
I TakeOut $ 1 00 OFF DELIVERY
I J J ANY SIZE PIZZA!

OMA PIZZA
& ITALIAN RESTAURANT
Specializing in Veal *Chicken Fish Pasta
i Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
Open 7 Days *11AM to Midnight
201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
778-0771 or 778-0772
L -- -- .J
--- ---- I COUPON -
$1.00 DISCOUNT OFF REGULAR
ADMISSION up to (6) Persons. Must
present ad at time of purchase. Exp. 6/30/95.
I DON'T MISS OUR SPECIAL EVENT!
Jl Second Annual 4th of July Party
July 1,2, 3&4
Come enjoy the fun!
3701 Bayshore Rd
Sarasota, Florida 34234
2 Blocks West of U.S. 41
1 Mile South of Airport '
S355-5305 Open Daily 9 to 5
------------- --- x-I-------J





SALES ANNUAL RENTALS
VACATION RENTALS
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939
BS, a (813) 778-2246
Lic. Real Estate Broker
2217 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach FAX 778-4978


s ICf Fat Free, Sugar Free
SIce Cream!
Fresh Bagels
Fresh Made Deli
Take Out Sandwiches Sandwiches & Soups
For the Beach (All deli meats 94-98% fat free)
gEAT-IN OR TAKE-OUT
MON SAT 10AM -9PM
AND DELI SUNDAY 12-6PM
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386 [4


I


'IBS 11NDE






Ef THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 29, 1995 m PAGE 20


Gulffront rookie Adam
Chevalier, 22, also works as
a firefighter. Being a profes-
sional lifeguard fits in with
his career goal of helping
people. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn


Marine Rescue Division statistics


Budget $500,000 for salaries, equipment and
administration. Staff: 14 full-time positions, four
part-time, including one chief, one captain and
two lieutenants.
Total attendance: 3.2 million people.
Total bathers rescued: 102
Bathers assisted: 2,608 (non-rescue, including
entire park site)
Boats assisted: 1,498 (motorized, sail and jet
ski)
Emergency medical cases: 399 (major first aid,
aside from water rescue; includes six spinal-
related)
Minor first aid: 2,526
Preventative actions: 47,114 (involving life-
guard getting off stand, i.e. extending beyond the
swimming area or dangerous beach action).


Voted the

Suncoast's

#1

Seafood

Restaurant*




c5k"


The Freshest Seafood
at Dockside Prices!
*Tampa Tribune, Sarasota Herald-
Tribune and Bradenton Herald Reader's Choice
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Dr. 778-5997
Happy Hour Daily 4 to 7 PM
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10 Fri & Sat 4 to 11


Division chief feels this number is shy and will
be much higher under a new calculation method.
Lost and found persons: 87 (all ages)
Drownings: 0
Code Enforcement: recorded 11,845 violations
(verbal, corrective actions; if violator refuses
cooperation, police are called)
Citations issued in Coquina Park: 200 traffic,
450 parking
Numbered five arrests in Coquina during 9 am.
to 7 p.m. lifeguard shift
Public Safety Presentations: 15, attendance
2,500 (schools, beaches, malls, fire-station open
houses)
* Fiscal Year October 1993 through September
1994 Compiled for the Florida Beach Patrol
Chiefs Association


"YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET" Ja'i/ |atcel
S5016 Manatee Ave. W. (CORNER 51ST & MANATEE) 749-17851

"Intiinate Dinner for Two $39.95"
S -416 -r." &_.- I- A


Lifeguards
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

a surfing dude at the age of 10 and up. "I used to yell
at him a lot."
McKelvey loved to hang out on the beaches and
around the towers. At the age of 14, McKelvey and
Islander Richie Bell were called in to assist "Team
Cuva" former lifeguards Phil and Tony Cuva, the
latter having gone on to become a lawyer.
There was a whole family of vacationers,
McKelvey recalls, who were struggling in the Gulf.
That was his first rescue. To this day, he says, "I take
my stuff very seriously."
Seriously includes swimming laps at the G.T. Bray
pool before his 10-hour shift, and often doing gym
workouts with Chevalier for two hours after shift.
The fitness track is part of the big attraction of
lifeguarding to rookie Chevalier. Like his peers,
Chevalier also loves the interaction with people, espe-
cially the kids.
And especially since he now has his own 14-
month-old daughter.
All of the lifeguards, from the chief to the rookie,
mentioned unattentive parents on the beach as one of
their pet peeves. Lonnie Beach, also a parent, says he
never loses his compassion for the lost or struggling-
swimmer child. For the sleeping parent, well, he shrugs
his shoulders.
Nonetheless, all of the Gulf watchers love the in-
teraction with people. Chevalier does as good a job as
any at verbalizing the draw to the lifeguarding profes-
sion.
"This really fits my love in life of helping people,"
he says. "I love the environment. I love having to stay
fit."
And, says the rookie, "I like being a role model to
the community, especially being an example of respon-
sibility to the kids."
Chief Moyles smiles at hearing of his new guard's
dedication.
"I've got some of the best in the business working
in our division," he says. "And I mean that wholeheart-
edly. They're responsible. And they do it with vigor."


The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key









Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
SAdjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key






HAPPY 4TH OF JULY
The Finest Italian/Spanish/American
restaurant that does breakfast Tool
A SAMPLING OF OUR MENU...


-PS








THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI
2 for 1 Early Bird Specials 4:30-6 PM
plus Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials
Free Delivery OPEN 5 DAYS Take Out Available
S Wednesday thru Saturday 10 am 10 pm
S Sunday 8 am 10 pm Closed Monday & Tuesday
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach
BlckBen ou-Cice


PIZZA BURGERS FRIES


5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located in Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs 11lam-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm


trainn g wil our ove n fresh rea,
appetizer, soup or salad, entree,
bottle of wine and dessert.







Champagne Sunday
Brunch I0 am- 2pm
Con'mplimntary glass
ol ch.lmpalne, mimosa
or orange juice.
Traditional eggs Benedict
or with steak fillets
or crab cakes.
Omelettes, waffles.
from $3.75- $5.95


Dinner Tues. Sat. 5-10pm
... on the corner of
Manatee Avenue &e QulfDrive.
Across from Barnett bank
(813) 778-5440


I
1






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a JUNE 29, 1995 m PAGE 21 I-D


Fourth for fun
Lots and lots of people but not as many as there
were on Coney Island in the 1938 photo shown here -
will converge on Anna Maria for the Fourth of July.
This year there's twice as many fireworks as any
year before. One display is set for July 3 at the Beach
House in Bradenton Beach. The other is on the Fourth
at the Sandbar in Anna Maria. It's really great that these
businesses provide a display for Islanders.
Did you know the displays are the creative expres-
sion of Anna Maria's own Jim Taylor?
Taylor's normal, every-day line of work is build-
ing docks but given an opportunity he's ready, will-
ing and able to set off fireworks. Not the city hall kind
- the "bombs bursting in air" kind. He's a "sparkling"
kind of guy and he contributes a great deal of time to
these events for the enjoyment of all.
A lot of sponsors kicked in with the Beach House
to pay for the fireworks in Bradenton Beach this year.
The donations included $1,500 from the Beach House
and other major sponsors include Gulf Drive Cafe,
Bradenton Beach Marina and The Islander Bystander.
Other contributors are Air & Energy, Barnett Bank,
Beach Barn, Beach Bistro, Robert Blaikie & Sons,
Bradenton Beach Business Owners Association,
Bradenton Herald, Bridge St. Pier & Cafe, Catalina
Resort, Crabby Bill's, Duncan House Eatman &
Smith, Electrical Service & Maintenance, Allen & Deb
Flecke, First Union, Island Foods, Island Real Estate,
Joe's Eats & Sweets, Mike Norman Realty, National
Distributors, National Linen, Nations Bank, Pelican
Post, Southern Grocery, Sunset Productions and
Wagner Realty.
Donations and support were so great that Ed
Chiles, owner of Beach House, bought nearly twice as
many fireworks as planned.
Used to be, long ago, say 15 or more years ago,
there was a huge display sponsored by local civic or-
ganizations at Coquina Beach. Plenty of parking for


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer -
this side of Heaven." 'is
,uffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. i |
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501









FIREWORKS JULY 3
AT THE BsEACHHOUiEI


Get in on the FUN of the Fourth o July
one day early at The BeachhoUsel
you'll have a blast Monday us afterdark,
thanks in part to the Bradenton Beach
Business Owners Assn. And while you're
here, try our great new Sunday Brunch,
from 11-2 and reggae from Jam-a




great food. great beach. great fun.
9200 Gulf Drive Narth, Bradaton Beach (941) 779-2222


folks coming in cars. Plenty of room in the bay and
Gulf to watch from boats. It was a grand event that at-
tracted people from all over.
It was so popular that the old-timers in Bradenton
Beach said they stayed home to "protect the fort."
Of all the picnics and parties happening and all the
fireworks planned legal and otherwise we hope
the holiday is a safe one for all.

Leaner who?
Laura Ritter, advertising sales representative for
The Islander Bystander,front, did all the organizing,
leg-work, prize gathering, and worrying about the
weather for last weekend's horseshoe tournament.
But she'll be remembered by the players for her
attempt at rule making when she blurted out "No
points for a leaner." It got everyone's attention at
the very least, but she explained later she meant
extrapoints, "No extra points for a leaner." Ritter
was keeper of the scoreboard and she was assisted
by Rita Kane who kept a tally of ringers.
Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood
Ir -- ---------- --- -



I I
I I


I I
$2.00 off Any Purchase Over $10.
With This Ad.

Tues Sat, 11 am 8 pm & Sun, 11 am 5 pm
L 103 7th St. N. Bradenton Beach 778-5657


Bridge Tender Inn
Casual Bayfront Dining

SUMMER SPECIALS

NEW LUNCH
MENU
Early Birds
(beginning July 5)
4-6pm
Sunday Brunch
1 Oam-2pm
Happy Hour
11:30-6 daily
Closed July 4th

"Best Food ...

Best View"
Convenient Docking (Marker 49)
135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
778-4849


.



-MA, -
t.^ *, .
Al.", '
. i ... ....)t i ,. t . . .'. "'," -L ." .- "., :
~~r s" ,,.,.., p ./ I ,, ..


"^ F 6VO OJSPJEl


Homestyle Italian Cooking
All Dinner Entrees Under $7.25
Open Mon-Sat 11 am- 9pm
7467 Manatee Ave. W. (Next to Albertsons)
794-0678

Where Longboat Key History Began





SONE CRAB

RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

Summer Menu

NEW...

Create-YourOwn Platter
0 0 0
Specialty Salads

Lite and Hearty Dinners

King Crab Legs

Daily Specials
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday& Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY


Can we expect the
Island's Fourth of
July festivities to
be similar to the
Coney Island
depicted in this
1938 postcard?






EiG PAGE 22 JUNE 29, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Local resident honored by Church of the Annunciation


The Rev. Charles Folsom-Jones, a retired priest
of the Episcopal Church, who together with his wife
Nancy make their home in Anna Maria, recently cel-


ebrated the 50th anniversary of his ordination at the
Church of the Annunciation in Holmes Beach.
Father Folsom-Jones was honored at receptions


B ]I 1 :H1R I


Gladys Clark Cooksey
Gladys Clark Cooksey, 84, a former resident
of Holmes Beach, died June 21.
Mrs. Cooksey came to Manatee County
from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1970. She was a past
president of the Off Stage Ladies, a support
group for the Island Players on Anna Maria Is-
land, and a member of the Woman's Club. She
was a former member of the Regent and State
Officers Club of the Cincinnati Chapter of DAR.
She was a member of the Hamilton County Re-
publican Club. She was a member of the Epis-
copal Church of the Annunciation in Holmes
Beach.
She is survived by her husband, Lewis, of
Bradenton.
Services will be held Friday, June 30, at 11
a.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Annuncia-
tion, 4408 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, with the
Rev. Richard Bennett officiating.

Halbert E. Pierce Jr.
Halbert E. Pierce, Jr., 88, of Worcester,
Mass.,and formerly of Anna Maria Island, died
June 24 in Memorial Medical Center in
Worcester.
Born in Melrose, Mass., Mr. Pierce retired
from New England Power and Electric in 1972.
He had received his B.S. in electrical engineer-
ing from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. in
1929. He continued working as a staff engineer
for the National Electric Reliability Council for


an additional five years. He was a member of Tau
Beta Pi and National Honorary Engineering So-
ciety.
Mr. Pierce was one of the founders of the All
Island Denominations group of Anna Maria Is-
land, receiving an honorary award from AID in
1995. As president of the Florida Fellowship of
Community Churches, he championed the Adopt-
A-Family Program for Manatee County.
He was the recipient of the Man of the Year
award in 1988 from the International Council of
Community Churches.
Mr. Pierce was active in the Boy Scouts for over
25 years and served as president of the Boston Coun-
cil Boy Scouts for seven years. He was a recipient
of the Boy Scouts' Silver Beaver award. In
Needham, he was active in town programs serving
as chairman of the Needham Finance Committee,
Senior Graduation Night program, Needham Town
Report Committee and Needham Youth Council,
and was active at Carter Memorial Methodist
Church.
He is survived by a sister, Alice Weaver of
Kensington, Md.; two sons, Halbert III of Grand
Island, N.Y., and Alan of Medfield, Mass.; four
grandchildren, David, Karen, Sandra and Amy;
and two great-grandchildren, Leah and Aubrey.
His wife of 62 years, Alice, died in 1994.
A memorial service will be held in Needham.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
sent to the Alice W. & Halbert E. Pierce, Jr., Me-
morial Scholarship Fund, do Roser Memorial
Church, P.O. Box 247, Anna Maria, Fla. 34216.


Have a "bang-up" holiday on the .
Fourth of July The Islander Bystander s -- Hu
-NO" 1 t
U U S,


PLBO'S IP
10519 Cortez Road 1
792-5300 "-
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH
PIZZA BUFFET

$3.99 0
DINNER 0
PIZZA BUFFET 0

$4.49





HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails
-------------------------------1
I Lunch or
SDinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER I
ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE.
Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 6/30/95
-------------------^-------
Wednesday Nights
Blind Draw Darts 8 P.M.
Food & Drink Specials
Free Giveaways.
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thurs. 4 to 10
BRITISH PUB Fri. & Sat Noon to 10pm
SSun. 8 am to 10 pm
TAURANT Sunday Breakfast 8 'til 1 pm
Pub Hours 'Til ?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


WILLY GREAT DINNER NITES!
Wed All-U-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers $6.95
Thursday 12 oz Prime Rib.................. 9.95
Any Nite Stuffed Lobster Tails
"Key West Style" ............................ 95

KEY WEST WILLY'S
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


-Bridge Street Pier a Cafe-
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)
"Pier Pressure" R AKFAST
watch The est BREAKFAST
Burger Herel Served All Day!
Lunch & Dinner Seafood Menu
SWorld Famous Hamburgers
WAYUnder 100
Happy Hour 4-7
Ice Cold Frosted Mugs
Cafe Dining On Intracoastal Waterway

ALL-U-CAN EAT
FRIED GROUPER
w/504 Beer Friday 5 to 8

FISHING 50P
i (no license required)
S Live bait Tackle Rod Rentals
Daily 8 am 10 pm

Open: Mon. Fri. 8AM 8PM Sat.- Sun. 7AM 10PM
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


sonnydaze
110 bridge st., bradenton beach 778-3344
Enjoy our Imported Beers & Gourmet Coffees
OPEN DAILYAT4 PM
-- weeklywhappeninasr
'Thurs Folk Music June 29.
Featuring Mike Oscanyon"
Fri u 30 "Elysian Sex Drive;June"
,Sat Juy 1 "Elysian Sex Dive" &
: ^"Pushing Daisies" -
Mo -:July.3 Reggaeby'"Jamiya"
;Jue:~s -1 Phychic readings;:
Wed Bottomless beer mug nite
-. Endless domestic drafts'
'5 per person
Endless Imported drafts
S.10 per person
21 YEARS AND OVER AFTER 9 PM


held after each of the Sun-
day services on June 11, in
which he participated.
He was also honored
recently at the Church of
the Good Shepherd, .
Dunedin, a parish he for-
merly served, with the
naming of the parish build-
ings at the Folsom-Jones
Parish Life Center. Folsom-Jones
He and his wife and
children were guests at a dinner in May and at Sun-
day services on May 21 in Dunedin. At this time the
dedication of the buildings took place.
The Folsom-Jones have been residents of Anna
Maria for 10 years.
They have been visitors to the Island for more
than 40 years.


The Island Poet
Dad, why do so many men watch and a tear falls
from their eye,
As they stand there with hat in hand and watch the
flag go by?
Well, son, as a flag goes by they are feeling so
much pride,
That's why they shed those tears they cannot seem
to hide.
For they remember all those battles and how they
saw their comrades fall,
To keep this country free so there could be peace
for all.
And they think of all the hardships and how many
had to die,
So that you and I could stand here free and watch
a flag go by.
Bud Atteridge


































Homecoming committee into action
Among those already very busy making plans for the city
from left, sitting, John Home, Shirley Boyett Mayor Doro
and standing, Carolyne Norwood and Doug Copeland. Isl

ANC1ORI INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


WILLY STEELE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
JUNE 30 & JULY 1 10P.M.
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 29, 19i5 N PAGE 23 EjJ


Children's art classes at
Guild Gallery this summer
"Summer Fun Arts and Crafts Classes" for Is-
Sland children ages 8 to 12 will be held at the Artists
Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach, on Saturday from 10 a.m. to
11:30 a.m.
f. The first session will be held on Saturday, July
,.", 8. The second session will begin Saturday, Aug. 5.
Each session is four weeks long and costs $10 per
child.
STo register call 778-6694 or stop in at the gal-
lery.

,. 'Success with Collage'
.. exhibit at Unity Gallery
Unity Gallery in Sarasota will host an exhibit
featuring the second annual show of Harold Winer's
"' !"Success with Collage" class. The public is invited
to attend.
About 60 works by students ages 10 to 18 years
S- of age will be featured.
_.The exhibition will open with a reception Sun-
day, July 2, at 11:15 a.m. This show will run through
July 27.
The gallery, located at 800 Coconut Ave., is
ofAnna Maria's Oct. 21 Homecoming event are, open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday,
othy McChesney, Helen White and Elizabeth Moss; and 10 a.m. to noon on Sunday.
lander Photo: Cynthia Finn. For more information call the gallery at 955-3301.

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch i CHICAGO STYLE
Specials on the Island! THIN CRUST PIZZA
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL BABYBACKIPBS
PIES & Full cut, potato, $7 C25 &More
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week 1 383-0880 or 383-0881


Lwt"ot OpenJuly 4th 4-9 pm
Sunday-Thursday 4PM-11PM
Friday & Saturday 4PM-1AM
We deliver to all of Anna Maria & Longboat Key




German *
eaustrian =-
Restaurant .:..-

Wiener Schnitzel II ... $7.95
Beef Rouladen .... $9.95
Sauerbraten .... ....$10.95
Hungarian Qulasch ---. --.. $8.95
Bratwurst ...----.---- ..- $4.95
r-------------------
S 1/2 OFF with this ad exp. 7/10/95
S Buy one dinner at full price & take 1/2 off second
L dinner of equal or lesser value.
Dinner 5 to10 P.M.
Reservations 778-6189
101 Bridge Street
Bradenton Beach





80BO8 CRI/- POOL/D OR /S/IO 6-/OPM- /4.95
/ MUS/I/ POOI /DE/ ,LUAU 6-/OPM /4.95


EYE OPENER... 2 eggs toast,
home fries and coffee... Only $1.75

Island Inn Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach


EBw
FR/AY -SrEAK F/tSH:
SATURoAY/ wHuA/


1SU/WA4 /-SPM 880 CH/COKEN & R/BS U8FFET W/TH WVE MIS/IC. 8.95

BRIAN BEEBE & BIG MAMA

ALLYOUCANEAT CRAB IGS
SUNDAY JULY 2ND AND MONDAY THE 3RD
BRIAN BEEBE TUES- SAT 8PM TO MIDNIGHT/ SUN & MON 9PM TIL IAM
BIG MAMA SUNDAY & MONDAY 5PM TIL 9PM

TURN AT THE PIRATE SIGN, 6000 BLK, GULF OF MEXICO DR.
595 DREAM ISLAND ROAD, LONGBOAT KEY 383-5565







OM PAGE 24 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


KF


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
June 20, lost property a cellular phone, 400
block of Magnolia Avenue
June 20, illegal dumping, 200 block of Chilson
Avenue. The officer on patrol was flagged down by a
complainant who told him someone had dumped a
large amount of dirt into a canal in the rear of a resi-
dence on Chilson Avenue. The officer notified the
city's public works director, the Florida Marina Patrol
and the Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion to investigate.

Bradenton Beach
June 9, domestic battery, 107 Gulf Drive S., Key
West Willy's. The officer reported the suspect engaged
in a verbal argument with the victim and threatened
him. The suspect then tried to kick the victim and hit
him in the side. Witnesses who saw the confrontation
signed statements. The suspect was placed in custody.
June 10, disorderly intoxication, 100 block of
Bridge Street. The officer on patrol observed the sub-
ject in the Drift Inn parking lot yelling. He spoke to the
subject who agreed to go back into the bar.
Later the officer observed the subject again stand-
ing in the parking lot yelling towards the trailer park.
He approached the subject, who was swaying back and
forth, and placed him in custody.
June 10, DWLS, 2200 through 3000 block of
Gulf Drive North. The officer stopped the subject for
failure to maintain a single lane. A computer check
showed him to have six revocations of his driver's li-
cense for DUI and two suspensions for failure to pay
traffic fines. The most recent revocation was a perma-


Don't dump
Recently a resident took advantage of the dumpsters
behind the Holmes Beach Public Works Department
and unloaded a considerable amount of trash. These
dumpsters are for public works use only. Violators
will be fined and required to pay the cost of the
garbage removal.
nent one for DUI with property damage and personal
injury. The subject was placed in custody.
June 15, burglary, 2300 block of Gulf Drive North.
The complainant reported a person unknown entered two
units and removed two television sets valued at $135.
o June 17, retail theft, 101 Gulf Drive N., One Stop
Shell Shop. The complaint reported the suspect came
into the store and purchased a shirt, then began to put
various items into plastic bags and left the store with-
out paying.
Items included three ladies' scoop-necked shirts


valued at $10.95 each, one beach bag valued at $8.99,
one conch shell valued at $3.95, two bracelets valued
at $.99 each and one coral basket valued at $15.
The complainant followed the suspect, who put
one of the bags down on the side of the road behind the
store and proceeded to her vehicle. The complainant
stopped her and brought her back to the store. She ad-
mitted to the officer she took the items and was issued
a summons.
June 17, trespass warning, 100 Gulf Drive N.,
Circle K The complainant reported the subject put five
packs of cigarettes and a lighter in his pockets and left
the store. The officer located the suspect and the com-
plainant said he would not press charges if the suspect
paid. The suspect was issued a trespass warning.
June 17, criminal mischief, 1701 Gulf Drive N.,
Island Inn. The complaint reported the subject began
pulling flowers out of pots in front of the restaurant and
she and a witness confronted the subject. The subject
continued to pull flowers, then got into her vehicle and
left before the officer arrived. Damages were $50.
June 17,-disorderly intoxication, 300 block of
Bay Drive South. The officer reported an intoxicated
subject was knocking on doors looking for a place to
sleep. He was placed in custody.
June 18, criminal mischief, theft, Coquina Beach
concession stand. The complainant reported a person
unknown pried off the top of a wooden box and re-
moved $100 worth of lotion.
June 19, burglary to an automobile, Leffis Key.
The complainant reported a person unknown smashed
the side vent window and removed her purse contain-
ing a cellular phone valued at $600, $200 in cash, a
checkbook and credit and calling cards. The officer
noted the complainant parked under a sign warning
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


"Big BBQ Saturday Thru Tuesday 2 to 8 pm"

CAFE ON THE BEACH

Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)
S+$350+tax

Served Daily (Waffles too!)

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) *-Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!
DRIT-I PCKAE AMCTK


Curried Lamb with Bananas & Peaches
Served over Rice, $17.95
Sauteed Chicken with Fresh Mushrooms &
Spinach in a White Wine & Roasted
Garlic Cream Sauce over Pasta, $16.95
Sauteed Salmon Served with a Creamy
Tomato Caper Sauce, $19.95
Delightful Dining-Gourmet Take-Out
Stylish Catering-Fine Wines
Join Us at Harry's for Sunday Brunch!!
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
On Beautiful Longboat Key
Open Wednesday thru Sunday*383-0777


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
OPEN FOR
LUNCH &
DINNER
7 DAYS A WEEK
BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS
ALL YOU $6995
CAN EAT
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY

901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Just
visiting
paradise?


ISLANDER


Don't leave the
island without
visiting or calling our
office. Take time now
to subscribe to the
best news the
only paper with all
the news on the
Island. Charge your
subscription to
Mastercard or Visa
by phone or visit us
at 5408 Marina
Drive, Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
941-778-7978









Boot drive to

benefit fire

training facility
Firefighters and volunteers of the Anna Maria Fire
District will hold a boot drive on July 1 and 2 from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the intersections of Cortez Road and
Gulf Drive and Marina and Gulf Drives. The money
will be used in construction of a training facility behind
Station 2 in Cortez.




"Don't leave valuables in your vehicle."
June 19, trespass, Cortez Beach. The subjects
climbed under a barricade and went out onto the groin
clearly marked for no trespassing. They were issued
trespass warnings.
June 19, petty theft of a "For Sale" sign valued at
$40.
June 20, grand theft, 2000 block of Gulf Drive
North. The complainant reported that on June 14 she
locked her art work on her front porch and upon return-
ing on June 20, a sculpture, a drawing and an oil pas-
tel were missing.
June 22, trespass, Coquina Beach. The officer
reported the subjects were jumping off the bridge and
were issued trespass warnings.

Holmes Beach
June 17, DUI with property damage, 7400 block


778-7034

June 29, 30
&July 1 V
HOUR GLASS
Trp * *
SDRY DOCK
FREE BBQ
BLOWOUT
JULY 2 v
featuring:
HOUR GLASS

S July 3 & 4
TIM CHANDLER
0ee
Happy Hour
Daily
7-11 am
&4-8pm
and 4 9 pm on
Mon & Tues
(Free Food During
Happy Hour on Friday)





BEVERAGE
DRIVE-THRU
THINGS HAPPEN AT PLING'S'
* Keg Beer Specials
(Free 50 lb bag of ice with
each keg purchase)
* Ice Cold Beer
* Soda & Snacks
* 81b & 501b Bags of Ice

Order Your
^ Keg
For your
4th of July
BLAST!
"Best Keg Deals Around"
761-8861
"Come check our prices
& see our greyhounds"
8208 44th Ave. W.
(Cortez Rd.)


Get

Hooked
On


11th
Annual
July 4

Fireworks,
Early
Bird
Specials
And
Great
New
Lunch
And
Dinner
Menus
At The
Sandbar


100 Spring Avenue, Anna Mrad
Ca 778-0444 for Prderred Seating
Gulf Front Deck Beadh-Front Dining Room
Lunch and Dinner Entertainment Nihtly


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 25 Bl]


Holmes Beach Police May report


The Holmes Beach Police Department recorded
357 incidents in May including: 2 accidents, 22
alarms, 4 animal complaints, 1 aggravated assault,
51 assists (other agencies), 13 assists (other), 1 auto
theft, 1 bad check, 1 Baker Act, 4 batteries, 4 auto
burglaries, 2 burglaries, 6 civil complaints, 4 con-
tacts, 8 code violations, 8 code violations (animal),
9 code violations (noise), 5 damage, 3 disabled ve-
hicles, 15 disturbances, 4 domestics, 1 domestic vio-


of Marina Drive. The officer reported that Edwin S.
Marsh, 43, of Holmes Beach, pulled into a driveway
and failed to stop before striking the house. Witnesses
reported March got out of the vehicle but when he
heard emergency sirens, he got back in the vehicle and
left the scene. They described Marsh as very intoxi-
cated. They also described his vehicle and gave the
officer the tag number.
While responding to the crash scene, the officer
observed March operating his vehicle, said the re-
port. He later found Marsh seated in the driver's seat
of his vehicle in the driveway of his residence. He
described Marsh as very intoxicated and nearly
passed out. The vehicle was not running. Marsh was
placed in custody and a computer check showed his
driver's license to be suspended.
June 17, criminal mischief, 5324 Gulf Drive, First
National Bank. The officer reported a person unknown
smashed a window but it did not appear that anything
was damaged or removed inside the building.



Cfiez Andre
Have A Happy 4th Of July
W Breakfast
Luncheon
Daily Specials
Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Also, carry out for
French Bread & Pastries
Closed on July 4
Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France
Tues thru Sat Thur, Fri & Sat
8AM-230PM 6-10PM ,, ,.,,t
Sun 8AM-1:30PM Sun 5:30-9PM c.uryFka
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Chech
SStace,
MON. R
/ TUES. S(
SI
PC
J WED. F
R
Fr
/ THURS. It
SI
C
/ FRI. S,
SI
PC
J SAT. R
J SUN. Fi
T
EARLY
SPECI,
MON SAT 3

SLunch $5.19
Dinner $6.89
* Special Children Prices


regular Menu Over 100 Items
seafood Extravaganza: Fried
hrimp, Baked White Fish,
eel n' Shrimp, Catfish
family Cookout Night: BBQ
ibs, Hot Dogs, Hamburgers,
rench Fries and Onion Rings
alian Festival Night: Pizza,
spaghetti, Lasagna, Garlic Bread,
chicken Fettucini, Caesar Salad
seafood Extravaganza: Fried
shrimp, Baked White Fish,
eel n' Eat Shrimp, Catfish
regular Menu Over 100 Items
tried Chicken, Baked Ham,
urkey, etc.
BIRD Adults 5.89 + tax
ALS Children (4-11)
:30-5 PM s2.79 + tax
Lunch Mon-Sat 11:00- 3:00
JOIN OUR Dinner Mon-Thur 3:30 8:00
PLUS CLUB Fri- Sat 3:30 8:30
IOUNTR Sunday Dinner 11:00 8:00
aISCOUNTI


Banquet Facilities Available
* No charge to use room when you dine with ust
4848 14th St. W. The Fountains (941) 755-3766
(corner of 49th Ave. & US 41)


lence, 1 drugs, 6 drunks, 2 DUIs, 7 DWLSs, 5 ha-
rassment complaints, 12 house checks, 5 informa-
tion reports, 15 petty larcenies, 1 grand larceny, 3
missing persons, 2 open doors, 18 found property
reports, 7 lost property reports, 1 robbery, 18 ser-
vice calls, 1 suspicious boat, 34 suspicious inci-
dents, 26 suspicious persons, 5 suspicious vehicles,
1 theft, 8 traffic reports, 3 trespass complaints, 4
vandalism reports and 1 weapons report.


June 20, illegal dumping, 5901 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach Police Department The complainant re-
ported a person unknown filled the public works depart-
ment dumpsters with boxes and trash. The police depart-
ment located the owner through an address on the trash.
The owner will be billed for the removal of the garbage.
June 20, petty theft of two bicycles valued at $150
and $100, 200 block of 36th Street
June 21, damage, 4700 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria
Elementary School. The complainant reported a person
unknown broke eight windows.
June 22, trespass, 4200 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported juveniles swimming and throw-
ing things into the pool.
June 23, theft of three bicycles valued at $130,
$130 and $152.
June 23, found property a bicycle, 68th Street
and Holmes Boulevard.
Note: Holmes Beach Police Department reports
are incomplete due to computer problems.



POCO LOCO
MEXICAN CUISINE
S1. 0 off 0
2- All Mexican Dinners I
I for parties of 4 or less. I
L - coupon expires 7/31 _
Inside & Outside Dining 387-0161



,.(i .- ..- T,




S_ J j. '.-"' Chefs/Proprietors
Andrea & Ed Spring
Gourmet Early Supper
Nightly 5:00 to 6:30
SOUPS
Black Bean ......................................... cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Gazpacho ........................................... cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Sopa de Ajo garlic soup, cheese crouton cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Seafood Gumbo ................................. cup 2.50 bowl 3.50
SALADS
Caesar ..............................................small 2.95 large 4.95
Watercress Walnut Salad .................small 2.95 large 4.95
Warm Mediterranean Salad ..............small 2.95 large 4.95
APPETIZERS
Portobello and Artichoke Crostine............................ 5.95
Pan Etc fresh spinach, cream, parmesan baked on .. 4.95
crusty Italian garlic bread, smothered in melted mozzarella
Hummus and Babaganoush with pita bread.............. 4.95
Shoa Mei dumplings filled with shrimp and pork ... 5.95
Spanakopita spinach and feta in phyllo crust.......... 3.95
Fettucini Alfredo in a tempting size ....................... 3.95
ENTREES
Spring Omlette zucchini, bacon, swiss, cream cheese. 6.95
Herb Buttered Salmon rice or potato, vegetables ... 9.95
Shrimp Ajillo rice or potato, vegetables................. 8.95
Chicken Breast Kiev or marinated and grilled ........ 8.50
Veal Picatta or Schnitzcl, rice and vegetables............. 9.50
Fettucina Alfredo a supper sized portion, vegetables. 7.50
GRILLED GOURMET PIZZA
Artichoke Heart, Parmesan, Fcta, Mozzarella, Fresh Spinach.... 5.95
Sundried Tomato, Peppcroni, Parmesan, Mozzarella, Provolone.. 5.95

te\ Sunday Brunch
rxcluI 9am 1:30pm


Espresso Cappuccino
Coffee & Teas
Alsol Late Evenings


You are welcome to bring your favorite wine or beer.
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Reservations Suggested 778-9399

COMING 0SIONi:FAT LNCHS.


I VU
tl=fi


pesS






BIj PAGE 26 E JUNE 29, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


State gill net fishing ban is 'thisclose'


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Saturday marks the end of in shore gill net fishing
in Florida. Cortez is in agony and I, for one, refuse to
intrude with stupid questions like "What do you think
is going to happen?"
The voters of Florida spoke last November by a
three-to-one margin, approving an amendment to the
state's constitution banning inshore commercial net
fishing. The amendment becomes law Saturday.
I hope you'll forgive me a bit of mourning for the
passing of one of the oldest ways of life in Florida.
There is talk of a court challenge and perhaps even
massive civil disobedience by fishers, but I don't be-
lieve either is really going to happen or matter. The
issue was settled for better or worse by the vot-
ers.
Some people call that democracy in action.
Others call it mob rule.
The campaign to pass the amendment was a nasty
one sometimes on both sides of the issue. Argu-
ments grew personal and threats were even made. None
of that vitriolic rhetoric was good and, in the end, none
of it helped our community.
But true believers, and there were plenty of those
on both sides, honestly believed they alone held the
truth. Compromise was not mentioned. That's not very
wise, but it is unfortunately pretty human.
Personally, I felt helpless as I watched friends lit-
erally being "mugged" by politics. Make no mistake,
in the campaign against them I believed the commer-
cial fishers were being mugged and their way of life
stolen. The so-called state compensation is really no
compensation to fishing families now being told
they're no long needed or wanted here.
Everything accomplished for preservation of our


Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu6/29 2:55 1.5ft 5:43 1.3ft 12:56 2.7ft 8:14 0.1ft
Fri6/30 3:18 1.5ft 6:31 1.3ft 1:32 2.6ft 8:42 0.1ft
Sat7/1 3:46 1.6ft 7:24 1.2ft 2:14 2.5ft 9:16 0.2ft
Sun 7/2 4:17 1.7ft 8:23 1.2ft 2:58 2.4ft 9:48 0.3ft
Mon 7/3 4:52 1.8ft 9:30 1.2ft 3:49 2.1ft 10:26 0.5ft
Tue7/4 5:29 1.9ft 10:50 1.1ft 4:56 1.9ft 11:02 0.7ft
Wed7/5 6:10 2.1ft 11:38p0.9ft 6:20 1.6ft 12:15 0.9ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


GOOD CREDIT? NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT?
NOW YOU CAN
BUY A CARI ,
SBankrupt Bad Credit j
Slow Credit -
NO PROBLEM i' .
Re-establish credit through
"Me 7n r-raf Tj T3i *na "


Sb- reCILU no xI1nelU,


CHRYSLER d6 Plymouth
^^ f'A mW^Wm


Bunner Smith
CALL
Bunner Smith
748-6510
2700 1st Street
Bradenton, FL 34208


Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center 'ji'.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 ....


'The dogs barked and the
caravan moved on.'

fisheries by the net ban could have been accomplished
with simple resource management for example,
shutting down mullet harvesting during the roe season.
Look at what closed seasons have done for snook
and redfish populations.
But instead of any form of compromise, big develop-
ment money saw an opportunity. Big money convinced
voters to pass something because it sounded good.
"Save our sealife," the big-buck sportsfishermen
and developers said to the voters, and voters listened,
voted and did as they were told by the biggest-buck
campaigns.
Make no mistake, "save our sealife" was passed by
the deep-pockets crowd interested as much if not
more in real estate development as fish populations.
That's already becoming evident. Just look at the
luxury waterfront condos being announced in
Apalachicola, the boutiques replacing the marine sup-
ply stores there. Cortez may not be far behind.
So we've ripped away another part of Florida's
heritage and victimized the good citizens of Cortez
along with what few remaining real fishing villages are
left in this state.
In return, we'll get more soulless waterfront con-
dos full of scared, rootless people. More Longboat
Key, if you will.
It's tempting to want to create a Florida Marine
Museum or some such display at Cortez so the history


and heritage of the village wouldn't be totally lost for
future Florida residents.
But can we really ask Cortezians to become mu-
seum pieces? It may be better than nothing but, upon
reflection, I know I don't want to be the person doing
the asking to friends I've gained and a way of live I've
learned to love over the years.
Life changes. Not always for the better, but it changes.
And sometimes I feel as helpless as a barking dog.
"The dogs barked, and the caravan moved on."

Boat registration deadline
Don't forget Friday is the deadline for renewing
your boat registration. With the July 4 weekend com-
ing up, and all the boating that goes on, you can be sure
officials will be out on the water making sure you've
taken care of these sorts of things.
That means its also a good time to check the dates
on those flares aboard, along with the one on your fire
extinguisher to make sure that's not expired. Of course
you'll need a readily available lifejacket for everyone
aboard, and anyone aboard under six years of age bet-
ter be wearing theirs. That's a new state law.
You're required to have a whistle or horn, and if
you plan any night boating, take a look at your lights
while its daylight and they're easy to fix.
Lastly, don't forget to have your registration
aboard.
And please, be careful with your drinking afloat at
any time and for goodness sakes, watch out for the
other boats that might not be so careful.
See you next week.


Traveling team players to compete

in Bradenton little league tournament
Island Little Leaguers will have a chance to show their Johnny Cicero, Chad Alger, David Cramer and Cory
stuff at a tournament in east Bradenton over the holiday Schafer. They are coached by John Quigley and man-
weekend. They will compete on Saturday, July 1, with ager Gary Wagner. Their game is at 4 p.m.
other teams in Little League North District 16 at the Mana-
tee East Little League Complex at East 24th Street
Select players for the 11- and 12-year-old team will T e I s
be coached by Larry Armstrong along with manager
Lou Fiorentino. Their players are Taylor Bernard, D rO p S
Ricky Buckelew, Mike Patterson, Mike Armstrong,
Tim Hasse, Mark Rudicille, Jason Loomis, Greg o Al*
Grandstad, Travis Wicklund, Adam Pear and Alan
Jenkins. Their game is scheduled for 1 p.m.
Players chosen for the 9- and 10-year-old team are Date Low High Rainfa
Steve Yencho, Gabby Legrand, Aaron Lowman, Mario June 18 75 88 .0
Torres, Ryan Quigley, Brandon Roberts, Bobby Coo- ne 19 74 90 .0
per, Dusty Andricks, Billy Goldschmidt, Ben Miller, June
June 21 72 84 .7


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (941) 778-2727


Island 778-5646
Marine
Construction Inc.



II, ,, Iil ,,



SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE
Also
Seawall Caps Pylons
Patio Decks Barge Service
Holmes Beach (941) 778-5646


RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS & REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
SWe are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce



Family Owned and Millwork &
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size


* We specialize in custom cabinet making *
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center


I






THE ISLANDAND YSTADER JUNE 29, 1995 I PAGE 27 I1D


Big nurse shark caught on light line off Island


By Capt. Mike Heistand
The aftereffects of the patchy red tide are prevalent
near the Island in the form of a lack of white bait and
shrimp. Nonetheless, backwater fishing is still strong,
with redfish the best bet. Offshore action has slowed
due to the heavy seas and high winds, but the few off-
shore trips are yielding a lot of snapper, a few king
mackerel and some barracuda.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle gave me what
has to be the catch of the week maybe even the year.
Mark Fulmer boated a nine-foot nurse shark near the Sky-
way Bridge on 20-pound-test line. Wow! The fish fought
for two hours and 20 minutes before Mark was able to reel
it in. Wade anglers are doing very good on redfish catches,
Carl added, even though live bait and shrimp are hard to
come by with all the red tide we've been having.
Bill at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishing there has
been great, with good catches of mackerel, redfish,
black drum, snook and some flounder.
Lee at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 80 head of triggerfish, mangrove
snapper, Key West grunts and vermilion snapper. The
six-hour trip averaged 80 head of vermilion snapper,
and Key West grunts.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said backwater anglers
have been having a great time catching redfish. Those Bay
anglers are about the only folks having much luck, he
added, what with the offshore fishers staying close to
home with the high seas and strong winds.
Capt. Rick Gross was able to brave the wind and
weather a few times last week to land a few reds and
some catch-and-release snook.
Capt. Mark Bradow has been able to get a few
reds, too, as well as some scattered trout using live bait
or artificial lures.
Capt. Tom Chaya said reds were his best bet,
commiserating with everyone else about that hard-to-
find white bait.
Pam at Annie's Bait & Tackle said one of the
younger anglers that frequent her shop, Tyler, beat out
a lot of the older fishers with his first trip out, catching
and releasing five snook and two ladyfish.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said he's been able to get off-
shore and has done well with king mackerel in 50-100 feet
of water and, farther out in about 100 feet of water, some
good-sized red grouper. Jim Gerding caught and mounted
a 54-inch trophy barracuda. Other offshore highlights are
good catches oflane, mangrove and yellow tail snapper.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle offered his thanks to
all who participated in the Fishing the Islands tournament,
and congratulations to all the winners. Backwater angling
is about the best bet right now, he added, with all the rough
seas offshore. Look for redfish in the flats.
Good luck and good fishing.

"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers.Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin


Island community center hooks donation
Bill Lowman, left owner of Island Discount Tackle in Holmes Beach, presents to Scott Dell, sports director of
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, a check for $5,250 generated by the 1995 Fishing the Islands
Tournament sponsored by Island Discount Tackle on June 17. The money will be used to support youth sports
programs at the center. Island Photo: Courtesy of Island Discount Tackle


'Cuda, dolphin catch
The charter boat "Black Magic" brought
back a near-magical catch not too long
ago: some huge barracuda and a monster
of a dolphin. The fish were caught about
30 miles offshore. Admiring the dolphin
are, from left, Ed Salvador and Stan
Salvador. The 36-foot "Black Magic"
docks at Mariner Cove.


W;"A"--1~E-- I,


17 ALLISON, 90hp Tonatsu, Trir, $9,995

NEW BOATS
Carolina Skiff
12' to 24' Skinny Water Specials
17' Pro-Sport CC w/85 Yamaha
18' Tremblay Flats $5995
19' Sea Sport CC $5995
17' Allison CC $3995
15' Allison 40HP, trailer *$6995
18' Gulfcraft CC $3695


USED BOATS
14' Whaler-30 Mariner, trailer
$2795
14' Avalon Glass-w/9.9, trailer
$1295
21' Regal Walk-Around-150 Johnson, trailer
$7995
17' Glasstream-w/140 Merc., trailer
$3995
19' Mako CC-w/130 Yamaha, trailer.
Nice! $13,900
25' Mako Cabin-twin 140's, loaded.
Good condition! $13,995

i <{
"


1987 28' IMP UBERTY Loaded $18,995 obo


12444 Cortez Rd.Wo941-79a2-62


AMERICAN CAR WASH

Your Car Wash & Detail Center

Valet Washing w Full Detailing
Hand Wax m Engine Degreasing
Also ... Complete Self-Serve Facilities
Ask For Earl (941) 778-1617
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217


SIshin' for a Capt. Joh
I L ~ood deal? JO


---9--- GREAT VALUES ...
18 '93 Hydrasport Flats.... 90hp......................$9,995
19' '92 Chris Craft 187 ...... 5.0L OMC .......... $10,995
c /KWv23' '93 Wellcraft Nova....... Merc 7.4L........... $26,500
26 87 Sea Ray Weekender OMC 5.8L .......... $19,995
28''89 Wellcraft Monte Carlo Merc T5.7 ........ $29,900
COASTLINEBOATS

"'" F " "c""^"-








1989 20' 3.0 Mercury, Arriva, includes 18' Coastline by Action Craft. 1996 Brand
trailer and electronics! $8,995. newly 115hp Johnson, aluminum trailer. Fast,
smooth boat, only $17,900. Loaded!
1310M anateAe. .Bradnto, L3409 81


, v






I] PAGE 28 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


PRUD POnSRS OF LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL

Island baseball winners
The Jim Boast Dodgers took the top award for the Anna Maria Island Minor Little
League title, and a happy group there are indeed Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood


Everyone was a winner at T-ball, as all participants received a trophy for a job
well done this season. Helping Center Little League President Scott Dell, center,
are Anna Maria Island Pest Control Coach Jim Lewis and his wife, Susie.


By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
June 15, Search and rescue /assistance. A sailing
vessel was disabled by weather about 10 miles west of
Boca Grande and hailed the Ft Myers Coast Guard Sta-
tion to inform them of their situation. Regular communi-
cation checks began until the vessel failed to report in
while about five miles north of Boca Grande. Station
Cortez launched the 41-foot boat to locate the vessel and,
when found, was told there was no problem. Communi-
cation was maintained until the vessel reached port.
June 15, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a pleasure craft aground in Big Pass.
The station's 25-foot boat responded and stood by until
a local tow company freed the distressed vessel
June 16, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of one person in the water.
The station issued an urgent marine information broad-
cast and a private vessel removed the vessel from the
water and transported him to shore.
June 17, Search and rescue /assistance. Station


Cortez received a report of a pleasure craft with a dead
battery. A local salvage company responded and as-
sisted the distressed vessel.
June 17, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a MAYDAY from a vessel with four
people on board that struck Marker 27 in Sarasota Bay
and was taking on water. The passengers were treated
for possible back, neck, hip and chest injuries. Sarasota
Marine Police towed the vessel to port while Station
Cortez vessels, aided by Longboat Key Police, trans-
ported the victims to the Buccaneer Inn, where they
were transported to Blake Hospital by Longboat Key
paramedics. Marker 27, a steel pylon, was bent in about
a 90-degree angle, and the vessel sustained a four-inch-
wide, six-foot-long gash along one side.
June 17, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a MAYDAY from a vessel that was on
fire with two people in the water in south Tampa Bay.
The station launched its 41-foot boat to put out the fire.
The passengers suffered minor burs. The vessel burnt
to the waterline.
June 17, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an overturned catamaran off
Nokomis Beach. The station issued an urgent marine


information broadcast, and a private tow company re-
sponded and assisted the vessel.
June 19, Search and rescue/assistance. Station Cortez
received a report of a vessel disabled in Roberts Bay. The
station issued an urgent marine information broadcast, and
a private tow company responded and assisted the vessel.
June 20, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled vessel near
Venice Inlet The station issued an urgent marine infor-
mation broadcast, and a private tow company re-
sponded and assisted the vessel.
June 21, Boarding. A 14-foot pleasure craft was
boarded near Cortez Bridge and cited for having no
registration numbers on the starboard side, having no
vessel registration on board, having no sound-produc-
ing devices on board and not having enough personal
flotation devices. The vessel's voyage was terminated
due to the safety infractions.
June 21, Boarding. A 17-foot vessel was boarded near
Sisters Keys and issued a boating safety violation for hav-
ing an expired vessel registration, having no sound-pro-
ducing device, and having an inadequate number of per-
sonal flotation devices on board. The vessel's voyage was
terminated due to the safety violations.


Frank
Davis
Broker
778-6335
Rochester,
New York


Paul
Collins
Realtor
383-5635
Worcester,
Massachusetts


A


WATERFRONT COLLECTION


Tom
Nelson
Realtor
778-1382
Marshall,
Michigan



Marilyn
Trevethan
Realtor
792-8477
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin


Jean Lee
Sears
Realtor
778-5045
Massachusetts
South Shore


LOTS OF LOTS

A -


. .


* 873 North Shore Dr... Bay front elevated
home in Anna Maria. Reduced to
$299,900.
* 618 South Bay Blvd... Panoramic Bay
views from this island bungalow. $369,000.
* 3045 Mariner's Cove Dr... Premier water-
front and boating community. 2BR unit for
$299,900.
* 2310 Gulf Drive... Direct gulf fronts units,
nine to choose from. Starting at $104,900.
* 1261 Edgewater Circle... 3BR Bay front
beauty in Perico Bay Club. $198,500.


* 720 Key Royale Drive... Vacant lot in
North Point Harbour. $194,000.
* 310 Coconut Ave... Anna Maria lot in
quiet neighborhood. $139,500.
* 404 Magnolia Ave... Great family
area to build a dream home. $82,500.
* 2311 Gulf Dr... Perfect for income
duplex across street from beach.
$55,000.


Bob
Fittro
Realtor
778-0054
Wauchula,
Florida


Richard
Freeman
Realtor
Island Key
Specialist
Boulder,
Colorado


Rebecca
Samler
Realtor
758-8842
Lakeland,
Florida


DUPLEXES/CONDOS




lies I


* 5616 Gulf Dr... Direct Gulf front 2BR
condo. $177,800.
* 4255 Gulf Dr... Island Village 3BR unit
overlooking pool area. $124,900.
* 1800 Gulf Dr... LaCosta 2BR unit, direct
Gulf front complex with pool. $139,900.
* 6505 Gulf Dr... Island duplex perfect for
the investor. $189,000.
* 4200 Gulf Dr... Gulf Sands 2BR direct
Gulf front unit with pool and covered park-
ing. $199,000.


Wendy
Foldes
Broker
Salesperson
755-0826
Binghamton,
New York


Christine
Shaw
Realtor@
778-2847
Anna Maria,
Florida


LOCATION LOCATION


* 1171 Edgewater Circle... Ideal location in
Perico Bay Club, 2BR villa. $134,500.
* 4001 Gulf Dr... Three level condo across
street form beach with screened porch.
$91,900.
* 517 Sanderling Circle... Fabulous Perico Bay
Club 2BR condo with tons of amenities.
$140,000.
* 408 Magnolia Ave... Great family home in
Anna Maria with large fenced yard. $132,500.
* 306 56th St... Just listed! Completely reno-
vated, light and airy throughout. $169,900.


-q


i
~h
r-
;F "






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 29 in


OLD REPUBLIC
TITLE


Old Republic Title opens on Key
Gale Thomas, left, and Lynn O'Grady of Old Repub-
lic Title welcomed visitors at the sign-in board
during the company's open house held to celebrate
its new office located at 5360 Gulf of Mexico Dr.,
Suite 205, in the Centre Shops on Longboat Key.

Queens Harbour reports
$6 million in sales
Queens Harbour, Longboat Key's only gated com-
munity of new maintenance-free single-family homes,
secured sales totaling more than $6 million since
March 1, announced Tim McNeary, Queens Harbour
project manager.
The community is permitted for up to 102 homes
with home sites evenly distributed between open-wa-
ter lots, lakefront lots and golf course lots.
Queens Harbour is being developed by Taylor
Woodrow Communities and is located at 3556 Fair
Oaks Lane. For more information call 387-8888.


ISLANDER ||


More local
news than
any other
source!
See page 7 in this
issue for a mail
subscription or call
778-7978
and have your
MasterCard or
Visa handy.


RICHARD FREIIAM
REALTORF


Chamber opens Umbrella Beach
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce celebrated the opening of the just-renovated Umbrella Beach
Resort at 3805 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Cutting the ribbon were, from left, Chamber director Jack Elka,
developer Jim Valente, Marilyn Trevethan of Island Real Estate, Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger,
resort marketing director Cathy McCann, manager Donna Daffer, resort president Jeffrey Gravely, Chamber
volunteers director Carolyn Whitney, assistant manager Ted Daffer and Darcy Lee Marquis, chamber execu-
tive director. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Conklin joins
Longboat Connection
Kim Conklin recently joined the leasing division of
the Longboat Connection, Inc.
Conklin has specialized her real estate license in

HAPPY 4TH OF JULY
from my Family to yours!


Call the Real Estate
Professional willing to go the
"Extra Mile" for you!
When you demand excellence
in Real Estate Service
BUYING OR SELLING
REACH RICHARD FOR RESULTS!!


leasing and property management for the past five
years. A 23-year resident of the area, she has extensive
knowledge of Longboat Key and the surrounding area.
Conklin is a member of the Sarasota Board of Re-
altors and the Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce.


* ANNA MARIA DOLLHOUSE: $139,950
2BR/2BA home set on deep lot (145 x 50.) Walk to
beach and bay from this choice location.
* COMPLETELY REMODELED: $129,900.
2BR/1BA, central air, beautiful tile floors, you
won't have to do anything to except enjoy!
* GRACIOUS LIVING in this brand new 3BR/
2BA, with white tile floors and European kitchen,
huge enclosed storage downstairs. $223,000.
S309 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-7244


COMMERCIAL
OPPORTUNITY!
One of our current Island businesses
may be overlooking this great loca-
tion! Adaptable to many occupations,
this property includes five garages,
two office/retail spaces and a rental
apartment upstairs. Zoned for light
repair business, retail etc. and you
may also live on premises. 100% oc-
cupancy. Asking $275,000 & Owner
Financing.



FRNLI Sinc OE
1957
MARIE LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLY A L I r BROKER


'We ARE the Island.'
0805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Florida 34218
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


PERFECT BEACH HOUSE
Fourth house from the Gulf in Anna Maria
City. 4BR/3BA. Excellent rental property.
Great investment or family retreat. Only
$199,500. Call Agnes Tooker eves. at 778-
5287 or Kathy Granstad eves. at 778-4136.

BEAUTIFULLY WOODED LOT
Extra large residential lot close to GULF in
Anna Maria City. Truly "one of a kind" in
an area of lovely new homes. Drive by 710
Holly Rd. today! Call Kathy Granstad eves
at 778-4136 or Agnes Tooker eves. at
778-5287.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drve P 0 Box 717.Anna Maria, FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


SOUTHERN CHARM AND CANALFRONT
This 3BR/2.5BA elegant quality built home has it all Oak
floors with 10' ceilings, formal living and dining rooms,
breakfast nook, family room, fireplace plus a wrap-around
with a lovely view of canal. 70' dock and deep water
makes perfect location for yachts. $329,000.
(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria. Inc.
S420 PINS AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, PL 34216 F AX 77-1929


HISTORIC CLAY HOUSE
415 Spring Ave., Anna Maria
Remodeled 3bedroom/2bath with separate Florida room, liv-
ing room, dining room, loft. Carport & well. 78x145 lot 1232
s.f. living area under A/C; 1629 s.f. under roof. $185,000.


f .u. .- I
OOWUNO
REALTY
409 Pin A.
Anna Marli
T-1222L


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


EW ill .2 111 *.1 A -VA &-K*i [ -


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Island Really Group The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES- -
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending
both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction & Design,
8-- 1Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty, --- -
-j ~Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Management and Annual & 7- .
Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilesl ; .






IE PAGE 30 E JUNE 29, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real estate sales
522 Pine Av, Anna Maria, 4A Bayou Condo, a
ground level canal front 2bed/lbath 765 sfla condo built
in 1973, was sold 5/12/95, Cross to Kinyon, for $87,000;
list unknown.
609 North Point Dr., Holmes Beach, a 2,360 sfla
canal front home of 3bed/3bath/2car, built in 1988 on an
83x110 lot, was sold 5/15/95, Smith to Waldemar
Gregor Erich Brack, for $418,000; list unknown.
7101-03-05 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, Sun Cay Condo,
a 6-unit 3-building complex of 9bed/6bath/pool, built in
1980 on a 210x100 lot, was sold 5/15/95, Cottbus Consult
Florida Inc to KM South Inc, for $500,000; list $549,000.
8803 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria, a ground level 1,023
sfla home of 2bed/lbath/lcp, built in 1966 on an 80x125
lot, was sold 5/15/95, Blanton to Fernandez, for
$134,000; list unknown.

Exceptional Service
t Informal Approach
BARBARA TURNER
REALTOR
778-7777 or 778-4399


"GULFSTREAM REALTY
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
1-800-894-9587

THE BEcp
S ISIAPLY THETI
S ISLAND VACATION
I ISA -xnD '


USA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
R l I 3101 Gulf Drive
Realty inc. HolBeach,. L 34217









RARE OPPORTUNITY... Lot on north end of Anna
Maria with direct Gulf view and 75' of frontage.
Build your dream home here! #59178. $170,000.
Call Roni Price, eves at 778-5585.
PEBBLE SPRINGS... Good investment. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath, first floor unit overlooking pool Walk-
in closet, double vanity and sinks in master suite.
Pass thru from kitchen to din/living room. #61862.
$47,000. Call Sally Schrader, eves at 792-3176.
JUST REDUCED! 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo in el-
egant gated community. Tennis, pool and putting
green, all within a few minutes' drive to the beach.
Great rental property with beautiful view over the
mangroves and Bay. Turnkey furnished. #62759.
$76,500. Call Karin Stephan, eves at 388-1267.
LOT...225' to Gulf beach, approved for
building. $165,000.
Gulf-front Florida "cracker" house...
2BRW1BA, garage/guest qtrs. $450,000.
#DY64092.
Key Royale... 2BR/2BA, boat dock. Room
for addition and/or pool. $215,000.
#DY64352.
Martinique S... 3BR/3BA, recently deco-
rated. Owner financing. $196,900. T
#DY60737. T. Dolly Young
Restaurant-Beach View/high traffic visibil- T. Dolly Y
ity plus 2BR apartment. $450,000. REALTOR/IMS
#DY52792. 6 Apt/Motel or 3 duplexes... steps Multi-Million Sales
to beach. Excellent value $430,000. #DY63227. 778-5427
STEPS TO THE GULF...
1 bedroom, 1 bath unit with
heated pool and close to every-
thing. Excellent rental with on-site
management. #CH61035.
$79,900.

Carol Heinze
REALTOR0/CRS
Multi-Million $ Club
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


891 North Shore Dr., Anna Maria, a 2000 sfla
ground level bay front home of 3bed/2bath, built in 1956
and since updated on a 50x140 lot, was sold 5/12/95,
Seider to Schulz, for $400,000; list unknown.
1801 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 106 Runaway Bay,
a Ibed/lbath condo of 870 sfla built in 1978, was sold 5/
16/95, Lucas to Williams, for $77,900; list unknown.
2702 Avenue B, Holmes Beach, 2bed/lbath home, 816
sfla, built in 1969 on 64 x 105 lot, sold 6/17/95, Clinansmith
to Hammond, for $84,000; list unknown.
305 Poinsettia, Anna Maria, an elevated 3bed/2bath/
2car home of 1,296 sfla, built in 1980 on a52 x 112 lot, was
sold 5/17/95, Canan to Boles, for $150,000; list $159,000.
401-03 Clark Lane, Holmes Beach, an elevated du-
plex of 4bed/4bath/4cp with 2,040 sfla, built in 1985 on
an irregular-shaped lot, was sold 5/17/95, D'Arey &
Shellard to Koebel, for $170,000; list $156,000.
403 39th St., Holmes Beach, C Princess Condo, a

.L

DICK MAHER
REALTORF
778-6791
Dick has been a major
player in the Island Real Es-
tate Industry for over 10
years, and is one of Neal &
Neal's Top Producers
Call anytime for a consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325





WESTBAY
COVE
The Island's most conve-
nient location. Large 1 BR/
1BA condominium on
S beautifully landscaped
grounds with heated pool
Bob & L and tennis court and a
od & fantastic price of $79,900.
Rhoden
REALTOR Call Bob or Lu Rhoden
778-2692 Office 778-2261
or Eve. 778-2692.
MLS B Toll free 1-800-422-6325


2bed/2bath elevated unit of 648 sfla built in 1981, was
sold 5/17/95, Ball to Annis, for $77,000; list unknown.
415 Alamanda, Anna Maria, a ground level 3bed/
l&l/2bath/lcp home of 1304 sfla, built in 1958 on a
57x115 lot, was sold 5/16/95, Bush to Snow, for
$110,000; list unknown.
512 69th St., Holmes Beach, a canal front ground
level 2bed/2bath/lcar home of 1,600 sfla, built in 1968
on an 81x110 lot, was sold 5/15/95, Jobst Jaenichen to
Peter Jaenichen, for $160,000; list unknown.
514 69th St., Holmes Beach, a ground level 3bed/
2bath/2car canal front home of 1,800 sfla, built in 1968
on an 81x100 lot, was sold 5/15/95, Purvis to Jaenichen,
for $190,000; list unknown.
5200 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 404 Martinique
South, elevated condo, 2bed/2bath with 1,092 sfla built
in 1970, was sold 5/22/95, Worst to Moll, for $142,500;
list $179,900.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, exclusively for The Islander Bystander. 1995

EX C E P T IO0N A L



ANNUAL & VACATION RENTALS
OWNERS...
Secure the highest caliber tenants
Realize the highest income from
your properties
Contact our Rental Specialist:
Brenda Reddy,
941-778-2275
Nfc ael Su 3. rs ComSx


HEAVEN'S A LITTLE CLOSER ... IN A COT-
TAGE BY THE SEA! Make this your dream cottage!
Windows across the entire great room provide spec-
tacular views from this charming cottage on the shore
of Tampa Bay. A huge deck wraps around the entire
bayfront exterior. This fish-cleaning table, outdoor
shower and steps to the bay remind us of summer
days at the beach! Offered at $369,000. Call Chris
Shaw, REALTOR, after hours: 778-2847


Marilyn Trevethan
REALTOR@


May I help you sell your
property??????


I 540 67th Street
I -6F749 ia







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 31 il



ITM:OeSL OTS&BAIG OEHALHCR


SOFA BEDS good condition $25. 778-5405.
PORCH FURNITURE Lounge, chair, stand, Olympic
lamp. 778-3371.
RECIPE FOR Brown Rice Crust Pizza. Send $3 plus
S.A.S.E to Fleming, Box 1132, Holmes Beach, FL
34217-1132. It's wonderful.
KENMORE WASHER & DRYER. Excellent condition.
778-4497.
GIRLS' HUFFY 20" pink bike. $35. Call 792-8905.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


YARD SALE 207 Oak Ave., Anna Maria. Fri., June 30,
9-3. Sat., July 1, 9-1.
JULY GARAGE SALE 309 Tarpon, Anna Maria. Sat.,
July 1. 8-2. Loveseat, lamps, clothing, etc.
MOVING SALE 507 65th St. HB. Fri. June 30 Sat. &
Sun. July 1 &2. 8-3. Fumiture, tools, grill, patio furniture
and misc. Cash only.
YARD SALE 205 82nd Street. Sat., July 1.9-2 no early
birds. Refrigerator, stove, baby items, and misc. items.


LOST Himalayan cat near 35th Street and Gulf Drive.
Light tan with dark brown face and legs. Reward $100.
778-1661.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. Motivated theme classes each month:
Salsa, 60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme,
etc. All classes include muscle conditioning. Classes
are: Tuesday & Thursday 7:00-8:00PM. For info call
Geri 779-2129.


BEN & tRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


'85 CADILLAC CIMMERON 31,000 miles, perfect
$5,400. 778-3371.
1987 FORD CROWN VICTORIA: clean, one-owner,
well maintained, records, cold AC, overdrive, new
Miihelnona, a~o st. hocks. Asking $3,850. 778-4820.
'73 GALAXY 4-dr, HT, V8, PS, PB, AC. Reliable island
wheels $485.778-1003 AMI.
Buy it. Sell it. Find it. It's all right here in the pages of
The Islander Bystander.


1986 MARINER, 9.9 outboard with tank $595. Merc 7.5
with tank $495. Call 778-9538.
SNARK SAILBOAT looks like brand new. 2 sails, 1
never used. Original owners, manual and sailing guide.
Great beginner. 795-0588. $350 OBO.
35' DEEP WATER dock for rent. Electric and water
$130/mo. North Longboat, safe parking. 383-5372.
CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


LAWN CARE Need student for July, Aug. & Sept.,
Holmes Beach. 778-4773.
CROWDER BROS. HARDWARE Now accepting ap-
plications for full-time cashier and sales positions.
FULL TIME HOUSEKEEPING position. Apply at the
coconuts Beach Resort. 100 73rd St., Holmes Beach.
778-2277.


ATT: "FLAMINGO CAY" homeowners Student seeking
summer lawn mowing jobs! New equipment. Excellent
references. Avg. lawn $10. Jon Dandino at 794-6479.
K-9 SERVICE dog walking. Call 778-6119 for informa-
tion and ask for Kirsten. $2 per half hour. Island only.
WANTED Student to do part-time handy work.
778-3460.
LOCAL BOY will mow lawn between 70th Street and
50th Street, Holmes Beach. Call Jeff at 778-1158.
RESPONSIBLE STUDENT experienced in pet and
child care. Excellent references available. Call Star
Beard 778-2923.


SFREE* 1 FRlE 1 I AE
SUMMER JOB ADS FOR
KIDS-IN-BUSINESS
If you're under 16 years of age and looking for
work, or if you're a business willing to hire a teen -
we've got a deal for you. Your classified ad is free.
Just write up your ad, up to 21 words, and fax, mail
or bring it to The Islander Bystander office. Deadline
each week is Monday noon.
Your ad will run for up to three weeks free under
a special "Kids-In-Business" heading in The Islander
Bystander classified ad section.
Call 778-7978 for information. FAX.copy to 778-
9392. Stop in or mail: 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shop-
ping Center, Holmes Beach 34217.
A community service of The Islander Bystander.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults at adult day center,
through Manatee Council on Aging. Transportation
available. 748-6974."


DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Holmes Beach.
Now taking reservations for our summer program ages
2-10 yrs. Also a few openings for fall registration ages
2-6 yrs. Come by and visit with us. 778-2967.
MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Join our sum-
mer program. Swimming, field trips, movies, bowling,
more. Register for fall. 5, 3, or 2 day programs. $15 a
day. 778-2967.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
BIG JIM "The Island Painter" is available for all your paint-
ing needs. Free estimate, reasonable prices. 778-5587.
MASSAGE THERAPY pain relief, stress reduction,
neuromuscular massage therapy over 8 yrs experience.
Dan Goodchild LMT, NMT Island Therapy 779-1138.



JULIE McCLURE

i Estate And
Household
Sales

Antique And

Property
Personal

Appraisals
Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


941778-0766 LIVE THE FLORIDA LIFE STYLE in this beautifullyII
Fax: 941- 778-3035 a 20' x 5 dock and JUST LISTED OPEN HOUSE











-- plan offers 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a screened lanai


and ceramic tile throughout. Kitchen has Coan fee at $245 000. #KS64519.t
I Karin Stephan
S REALTOR O
I PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
I Ich Spreche
S Deutsch
Office: I
941-778-0766
Mobile: LIVE THE FLORIDA LIFE STYLE in this beautifully SUNDAY, JULY 2 1-4 PM
SMobie941- :4 maintained home on a wide, deep water canal with
941-350-5844a 20' x 5' dock and seawall Light and bright floor 231 South Harbor Drive
KFax: 941- 77-3035 plan offers 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a screened lanai
ARBOR OAKS... 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath energy effi- with view of the water and a barrel tile roof. Lovely 140' OF BAYFRONT... boat dock, outstanding
client home gives a bright open impression. Carpet rooms down and 1 bersoom aup with private btview over bay and canal to Sunshine Skywaye
Sand ceramic tile throughout. Kitchen hasCorpane, and balcny. Vaulted ceilings, brick frp oor Bridge. Open gourmet kitchen with breakfast bar.
counters and European cabinets, library and diningr- teg wds ad mater at t a ad White tile. Immaculate condition. #KS62765.
Room overlook lanai. Fireplace, inside utility room, $389,000.
and partially floored attic. Screened deck with spa.
aTurnkey furnished. #KS63839. $174,900.



I m m I

ON THE GRAND CANAL... Spacious split-level
home on a cul-de-sac with 263' on deep water ca-
nal with seawall and a 12,000 lb. electric davit and ARCHITECTURALLY DESIGNEDI Totally refur- I
KEY ROYALE... 3 bedroom, 3 bath on a corner a dock. Casually designed home features 2 bed- bished on 2 lots for lush, tropical seclusion. 4 bed- I
lot with circle driveway. Lush landscaping, fruit rooms down and 1 bedroom up with private bath room, 4 bath and many built-ins. 2 fireplaces, se- I
trees, pool, and canal with boat dock. Fireplace, and balcony. Vaulted ceilings, brick fireplace, floor- curity system and lights, a boat house and slip, I
large living room, storm shutters, and extra air- to-ceiling windows and master bath with Roman and interior gardens. Water views from almost ev-
conditioning for bedrooms. Excellent condition spa. Open floor plan with view of 3 canals and lush ery room. #KS60248. $289,000.
and perfect investment. #KS63811. $445,000. landscaping. Call now. #KS64508. $545,000. I
------mmmmmmmmm-mmmmm ----- ----- ----- ---- ------ mmI nmmm eI






ji3 PAGE 32 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Sand' Commercial Residential Free Estimates
San Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawi Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE o INSURED
ll7781345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
t* AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900 RF-oo0066644



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR

LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
RENOVATIONS
XACT KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399








COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Fd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"







era ls
For a cleaner car
We do it all for one low price. Everything is included
for $85 on a normal size car. Top to bottom,
ashtray to engine Hand wash, vacuum, buff, seal
and polish, Armorall, dress rims and tires, shampoo
interior, satin-black under-carriage, engine cleaned
and silicone protected. Our mobile service means no
one has to drive your car. By appointment, at your
convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.


DESIGN 2000 FOR HAIR. Offering excellence in hair
design and color expertise. We invite you to experience
the finest in personal service. North end of LBK at 6400
Gulf of Mexico Dr. 387-9807, evenings by appointment.
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk... whatever your hauling
needs. Call Eddie O. 792-1693.
WILL CLEAN on Island. 17 year resident, references.
Barbara at 778-1608.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE, joint sealing, erosion con-
trol, boat lift, dock repair. Local references. Call Cliff
779-2522.
PAYING TO MUCH for health insurance? Group rates
for individuals, self-employed, on COBRA, students.
Worldwide coverage. Free quotes and policy reviews.
Call Ken 794-8507.
HOUSECLEANING reliable and thorough. Will also
accept regular, weekly and bi-weekly clients. Good ref-
erences. 778-2862.
HOME TYPIST, will do typing for you in my home. Reli-
able, self-employed island resident. Call Geri 779-2129.
RICK'S LAWN SERVICE mowing, edging, trimming,
straight lines and square comers. Dependable service
at a fair price. Call Rick 795-0588.
CLEANING SERVICE: Fast and complete cleaning.
Island resident, 25 years experience, references, hon-
est, guaranteed satisfaction! Free estimates. 778-4587.
PAY LESS THAN $4 a month for total security and
peach of mind on your car. Call Bill O'Connor, AAA,
778-1500.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody,
shampoo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm & hall,
$34.95. 11 years in the business. No hidden prices.
794-1278.
PRO-CLEAN professional carpet & furniture cleaning.
See the difference with our powerful mobile cleaning
plant. Quick-dry system, 11 yrs experience, satisfaction
guaranteed. 779-1422.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
"sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.


ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK / GLASS BLOCK / stone / pavers / custom
homes / fireplaces / planters / decorative walls. Lic
#MC-00318. 778-5183.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.
HANDYMAN carpentry, painting, plywood storm shut-
ters, repairs of all kinds. Commercial or residential. 25
yrs. exp. Call Rich 778-4881.


THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of
home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experi-
ence. Insured, island resident, references available.
Jim 779-2129.
LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard.
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.


DON COLEMAN PAINTING Residential, commercial,
interior, exterior. Free estimates, 30 yrs experience.
778-2356.


ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907


J. R.

Painting
4Pressure Cleanvig
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
* Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


ISLANDER


More local
news than
any other
source!
It's the best news on
the island and
if you live here,
it's free! For
information on free
home delivery,
call 778-7978.
For a mail
subscription, use the
form on page 7 or call
to charge it on
MasterCard or Visa.


MIO RB ID PRfA Y A SS SINIP
O-TOO-LE RE FE R ENCE I1OINIA
W H 0 L L ST 0 P T H E R A IN TBAR
SIOIFT W 0 RDS MAP ACT 0 NE
IT 0 I MAH T IM PED ED
WHATNO M LOV E E RYN
E-EL-ED G-L 0 L SCIG H
BAAL'ASTRAY FATS AYEK A
S RETCHED B UIR ENE W
TIT O EL IIIJAH iO
S 0 L A R P U BIL CI C T Y FjWE W R1
C R-E P E AB8 A S E S TIHNE M
RATE D R 0 S-E PeH 0 R Z ES
IT S EI I ALAKI__LLAMEE T M _P
M EGA HUT CARILIA RE SEE
0E- LEIN HO0 W CA NIBA N BE SUE
A c CC E DE AN KA ESI R IE S
B AR R-L CL S E A L E RI E S
0 CA T D 0 Y0 U WAINIT N0 DANC E
MAZ E SUP RSTIAST R VIIENI CE
B0RES WAG 0E 1TFDIT EFD


LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.
Repairs & Remodeling
778-5622
#RF0049191






KOHLER.

SHOWROOM.
5348-B Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


S p rucur o Di


77m4177=4177m4,


I


JISAN ERCL SSFI






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 29, 1995 0 PAGE 33 O[3


I LA NDER-CL -ASSIFIED


MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.
MARTINIQUE CONDO 2BR/2BA direct ocean view,
pool, tennis court. Turnkey $1,500 plus electric and
phone. Will rent yearly 813-884-0222.
VACATION RESORT 66 by owner., weeks in June &
July, poolside $500, Beach front $600.1-800-977-0803.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
from $400/wk. 778-1135.
GULF FRONT Short term executive, 3BR/2BA, fur-
nished, all amenities, view from every room, steps to wa-
ter. 6 month lease available Oct 95. $1,800/mo. 778-3171.
ANNUAL EFFICIENCY 1 block from beach. Newly
remodeled. $500/mo includes utilities and phone. 778-
8626 or 813-935-2968.
BEACH RENTAL 106 31st St. Furnished seasonal
(day, week, or month) 2 bedroom duplex. Upstairs over-
looking Gulf. 2 bedroom downstairs, steps from Gulf.
Includes W/D, phone, cable and garage parking. Call
Debbie Thrasher 778-2055 at Prudential Florida Realty,
5340-1 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
HOLMES BEACH 1BR/1BA. 203 76th St. Month to
month. Available July 1. $500/mo. 778-3757.
GULF FRONT residence. Excellent north Holmes Beach
location. Fully fumished 2BR/2BA. Available short term.
Call Dave Moynihan, Realtor 778-7976/778-2246.
BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 1ulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
WATERFRONT 3BR/2BA house on comer lot, total pri-
vacy, back yard intracoastal, side yard canal, tropical
landscaped, water views from all rooms. 6 month mini-
mum at $1,500/mo. 778-4560 after 9 pm eves. Will show
house on Saturdays from 9 am to 11 am.
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA unfurnished home, caged pool on
canal with dock. Key Royale Dr. near Gloria Dei. Pet
OK. $1,250/mo. Available 7/1. 778-5405.
ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. Gulf Drive. fur-
nished 1BR apt. First & last month, $100 security, $400/
mo. 813-578-0395.
OPEN FOR THE 4th. 2BR/1 BA house from Gulf beach.
completely fumished, A/C, TV, microwave. $350/wk plus
tax. Call Bn-e-Cola 941-779-1213 anytime.
CUSTOM BUILT year old 2 or 3 bedroom home. Gor-
geous Gulf view, heated pool, fireplace, Jacuzzi.
$275,000 value weekly, monthly on annual lease. Pos-
sible lease purchase. 778-3777, 2801 Gulf Drive, HB.
ANNUAL BEAUTIFUL N. END Charming country cot-
tages. Darling Ig 1BR/1BA & 2BR/1BA. Steps to beach.
Exceptional permanent residences, won't last! From
$525/mo. 778-2126.
ARE YOU PAYING $500 or more in rent when you might
be able to own a home? It costs nothing to find out. Talk
with Sandy Greiner RE/MAX Gulfstream 778-7777.
LARGE 1 BEDROOM furnished unit. Heated pool, ten-
nis and walk to Gulf beaches and all amenities. $700/
mo. Call 794-9034.
VACATION RENTALS Eff. plus 1 and 2 bedroom apts.
Weekly summer rates. Clean, quiet, steps to beach. No
pets. Holmes Beach. 778-2071.
A BREEZY BAY FRONT cottage with dock. Fully fur-
nished clean & neat. Quiet area. Perfect for retiree.
$250/wk $600/mo. 794-5980.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of Anna
Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/3 acre
w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young after hours.
778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. *208 54 St., 1BR/1BA
each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. 404
71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit $159,000.
203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to Gulf -
$169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
BUILD yourself a big duplex or home with Gulf and Bay
views on this cleared lot for $49,900. Yvonne Higgins
RE/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.


BRADENTON MAINLAND minutes from beaches. Just
off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community. 1400 s.f.
villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1-car garage, new carpet, paint, ver-
ticals, maintenance free living, $105,000. Open house
every Sat & Sun 1 4.7142 28th Ave. Dr. W. 794-8792.
CLOSE TO BEACH Walk to beach from 2BR/1.5BA
one half a duplex. Move in condition. $72,500. Call Ed
Oliveira Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
RUNAWAY BAY Great view and close to pool. 1 BR/
1BA turnkey furnished only $78,900. Call Ed Oliveira -
Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
ON THE BEACH Great Holmes Beach location pool,
elevator, and walking beach. 2BR/2BA, turnkey fur-
nished. Move in now, only $169,000. Call Ed Oliveira -
Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
DIRECT GULF VIEW Great beach and pool, excellent
2BR/2BA vacation home or rental. Well kept complex
with low maintenance fee. All for only $179,900. Call Ed
Oliveira Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
ROOF TOP TERRACE Secured lobby, elevator, pool,
2BR/2BA unit and on the beach. Turnkey furnished all
for $219,000. Call Ed Oliveira Wagner Realty Off. 778-
2246 Eves. 778-1751.
TOWN HOUSE Holmes Beach. Yards from beach,
small complex, swimming pool and gardens. $115,000.
954-1110.
BY OWNER 2BR/1.5BA new carpeting, ceiling fans,
large new shed in Cortez. $65,500. 792-3709.
COMMERCIAL CONDOMINIUM in Homes Beach. 2-
story, one drive-in door, one walk-in door, heart of In-
dustrial District $45,000. Call Rose Schnoerr, Neal &
Neal Realtors 778-2261.
OPEN SUNDAY JULY 2, 2-4 PM. Refurbished like new
Holmes Beach canal home near open end of canal. Ready
to move in doll house with 2BR/2BA plus den, Home
Warranty for $189,900. 513 58th St. Sandy Greiner RE/
MAX Gulfstream 778-7777 or 1-800-894-9605.
AVAILABLE TO MOVE IN NOW! 2BR/2BA ground level
Holmes Beach condo. Financing options available. Call
Sandy Greiner RE/MAX Gulf stream 778-7777 or 1-
800-894-9605.
$114,500 3BR/2BA split design, nice neighborhood
great for children. Extra large fenced lot, fireplace, fam-
ily room, screened lanai, barrel tile roof. See it today!.
Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX Gulfstream 778-7777.


RAW A
1 HAVE A
HAPPY
X AND
SSAFE
4TH-I OF \
JULY!


HOW TO

S ADVERTISE
DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for
WEDNESDAY publication every week.
Minimum size, up to 21 words $5. Addi-
Stional 7 words $1.50. Boxed ad, plus $2.
: Classified ads for businesses and business
services are minimum $6.50 for up to 21
Swords. Additional 7 words $2.00. Boxed ad,
M plus $2.
SPayment is expected when you place the ;
Sad in person or by mail. The office is lo-
Scated at 5408 Marina Drive, between D. Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre, in the Island Shop-
ping Center, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.

WE NOW ACCEPT
MASTERCARD AND VISAI
Charge your classified advertising in person *
or by phone. To place an ad by phone,
'f please be prepared to FAX your copy with
your charge card number. Sorry, we can not
take ad copy over the telephone.

More information: 778-7978.


ISLANDERSR 1
*
*f
*


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
E ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
lln rn Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC045125. RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991

KAREN CLERKIN
Independent Sales Representitive
778-8624
Gift Certificates Available
AVO 1 Fundraisers Skin So Soft on hand

.f Pack &Ship
SMoving services Domestic/International
Small packages to entire estates
SUNSHINE SHIPPING 727-7447


MUST SELL!
1988 Skyline 14' x 40' 1 bedroom
$10,000 or best offer
747-9684 or leave message


778-2586 MA RV KAy Eve: 778-6771


25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 7/4/95

I Mobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
ML As Low As $1,500 Down
Experienced Thoughtful
941-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


BEACH RENTALS
Bikes Cribs Beds
Mobile Services:
Free Delivery & Pick-up
J 24-Hour Service
< )778-438 ,


Personal Fitness
TRAINING Oi

4 One On One o In Your Home
) V Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
I ]Fitness & Nutritional Guidance
V Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
V Deep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises


Geri Travis
B.S., Ph. Ed., Fitness Specialist
I--- II-


779-2129


* Cleaning & C Chemicals
Chemicals Only
Residential Personal
Chemical -UALTY rt CARE Quality
Delivery Q Service

First Month I Price
778-6742
134 Hammock Road, Anna Maria
Lic.# RP0059715 Insured Bonded


Q U ITY JJ I I










-IslandReferences


omd
-1-19






I3 PAGE 34 M JUNE 29, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTAN

F RWMB4K GULFSTREAM REALTY


IA IeaNI II IN TLitMIlaT IT
jm ?j m is IH im liilr wvTJIm4


OPEN HOUSE





........ .


6804 Gulf Drive
Sunday July 2 1 to 4 pm
Spend your next holiday in your condo at the
beach. Reduced to $179,900.
Hostess Bobye Chasey


MLS U 1


-nr I|


WELCOME 4TH OF JULY VACATIONERS:
Let me help you find the
rental property that will meet
your vacation needs. Summer
rentals now available, single
family homes both on and
S near the prettiest beaches.
Call today!


1 Sincerely,
SAlice Zoller,
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria Inc.


Rental Agent
(941) 778-0426
420 Pine Av. F Box 155
Anna Maria, FL 34216


Happy Fourth of July from The Islander Bystander




ISLAND CONDOS
Westbay Point & Moorings...
2BR/2BA Ground floor, end unit. Furnished
$134,900.
2BR/2BA Decorator furnished, second floor
unit in park-like setting. $129,900.
3BR/2BA Recently redecorated, spacious
lanai faces west. Deeded boat dock and
carport. $149,000.
Coquina Beach Club
2BR/2BA direct Gulffront. Overlooks wide
beach. Turnkey furnished. Great rental po-
tential. $185,000.
Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones
(941) 778-2261 or toll free 1-800 -422-6325

MLS [] neaLsneaL Ofc: 778-2261


419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(941) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (941) 778-2294
.I -.: '. fi


4 DEPENDENCE
DAY
SPECIAL!

This charming, updated 2 bedroom, 1 bath cottage is situ-
ated on 2 beautifully landscaped lots with loads of room for
parking and 104' frontage on perky Pine Avenue, zoned
retail or residential, this historic (Circa 1902) and pictur-
esque property would make a wonderful studio art gallery,
or retail place of business. Amenities include central air and
heat, storm awnings, roomy 1 1/2 car garage plus storage
shed, and many magnificent Grecian Um Royal Palms and
live oak tree. NOW ONLY $188,000.
979 FSarndtrLy dadfatEtiatr ofsiUonats
S#Ecrhatzn in wEim7clnf 2to#LcafL ifLtyt.
Associates Atter Hours: Barbara A. Sato... 778-3509
Nancy Guilford... 778-2158 Monica Reid... 729-3333


O Exclusive
Waterfront
Estates
Video Collection


MLS _[ I_


What's the best news on Anna Maria Island?
The Islander Bystander gives it to you every week.


NEW LISTING. Direct Gulf front condo. This 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath end unit is comfortably turnkey
furnished. A super investment or vacation home.
$168,000. Call Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.








GREAT STARTER OR RETIREMENT HOME.
2 bedroom, 2 bath with family room and
screened porch. $142,900. Call Carla Price 778-
0770 or 778-5648 eves.


DIRECT GULF FRONT CONDO with a spectacu-
lar Gulf view. Spacious two bedroom, two bath unit.
New ceramic tile in kitchen and hallway. Storm shut-
ters on all windows. Tumkey furnished. Priced at
$225,000. Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
PERICO BAY CLUB: A great view of two lakes from
this 1 st floor 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. Guard gate,
pool, tennis, minutes from the beach. $92,900.
Please call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH CONDO with
spectacular Bay view plus 30' boat slip. Decora-
tor perfect with dome ceilings in kitchen and baths,
wallpaper, ceramic tile, updated appliances in-
cluding heat & a/c unit. Priced at $149,900.
Please call Carol R. Williams 778-1718 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


WAGNEQR EALTY,,,ince19

0//,, 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
Dave Moynihan ............ 778-7976 Ed Oliveira .................. 778-1751
Bill Alexander .............. 778-0609 Jackie Jerome .............. 792-3226


EIGHT ON THE GULF

sowj Au- -


OCEAN PARK TERRACE Nicely decorated, turnkey
furnished 2BR/2BA unit. Great view of the Gulf from
master bedroom and screened porch. Pool, secured
lobby, elevator and walking beach enhance this vaca-
tion home or great rental possibility. Priced at
$169,000. Call Ed Oliveira.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Located in Anna Maria
Island's finest complex. Spectacular views, sandy walk-
ing beach, heated pool, spa, secured elevator lobby,
covered parking. Old Florida architecture, quality con-
struction. Two prime units available at $189,500 and
$235,000. Call Dave Moynihan.


ISLAND BEACH CLUB Exceptional value forthese 2BR
direct Gulf front apartments in small ten-unit complex with
quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide sandy beach
and walking distance to shops and restaurants. Starting
at $124,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.









GULF CABINS Secluded complex with lush grounds,
direct view and walking beach enhance this well-
maintained 2BR/2BA unit. An excellent buy. Great lo-
cation for second home or vacation rental priced at
$179,900. Call Ed Oliveira.



f V


OCEAN PARK TERRACE Enjoy the sunsets from you
own roof top patio when you buy this centrally located,
turn key furnished, 2BR/2BA condo with a Gulf view.
Includes pool, balconies, storage, secured building,
elevator, great location and the great new walking
beach. Priced at $229,000. Call Ed Oliveira for details.


~2rlbr~ II I--


[SMIn


Eves.778-1532.


I


iw---, ,


I


I I









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 29, 1995 M PAGE 35 BD


EPITAPH FOR AN INVENTOR
BY FRANCES HANSEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
I Check
7 Fast time
14 Baked desserts
20 Put through a
strainer
21 It's much
thanked in
March
22 Jinx
23 Start of the
epitaph
26 Seventh-inning
ritual
27 Type of whale
28 These can be
lucky
29 Overly
30 One with a
pitchfork
32 Nevada town
33 Start of a
well-known
hymn
37 Painter of
waterlilies
38 Symbol of
electric flux
39 Obtain
43 Down-home
entertainment
44 Late great Grant
45 "--oui!"
(certainly): Fr.
46 Gottfried's
sister, in opera
47 More of the
epitaph
53 Tiverton river


S 'f f


u:i
Nm~U S


54 Pumped-up
body
55 Rough, as a road
56 Simon and
Diamond
57 Stare at
59 Beaut
61 Ally of "St.
Elmo's Fire"
62 Sites for
bookcases
64 Having chairs,
maybe
66 Skullcap
69 How to draw an
egg
71 Behan's"-
Boy"
75 Violinist Mischa
76 Connaught
county seat
77 Japanese sandal
78 Coded matter
79 More of the
epitaph
84 Hospital
supplies
85 Be held in
esteem
86 Forbes profilees
87 Years ago
88 "-- bien!"
89 Pacino and Gore
90 Boxer vith a
90-9 career
record
92 Wasn't serious
94 Puppeteer Baird
95 Steven of
Aerosmith
96 Half asawbuck
97 Aware of
100 Cricket sides


101 Move
105 End of the
epitaph
110 Less fleshy
111 Regrouping
tactic
112 1992 Wimbledon
winner
113 Takes it easy
114 Computer
memory
115 Hardy novel
locale, usually
DOWN
1 Kabibble of Kay
Kyser's band
2 Architect-
van der Rohe
3 Natty
4 At all
5 Kind of key
6 Life support?
7 Multitude of
occurrences
8 Take steps
9 jongg
10 Carol starter
11 Master
12 With full force
13 Falstaff's
rascally crony
14 Ill-natured
15 Football's Grier
16 "Bridges of
Madison
County" setting
17 Neighbor of
16-Down: Abbr.
18 Big winnings
19 Boozehound
24 "Apocalypse
Postponed"
essayist


STUMPED?


25 Tub's problem
30 Teed off
31 Novelist Seton
33 "Long time

34 Adhesive
35 Paris's Musee de
'-
36 Jewish-
37 The "M" in M-1
rifle
38 Encouraged, in a
way
39 Tries again to
make rain
40 "Dallas" miss
41 -- as the hills
42 Sucker
44 Food wrapping,
informally
45 Rebel
48 Good beating
49 Actor Tom of
"Amadeus"
50 Buddy
51 European
blackbird
52 Be left
58 Bats
59 Work out
60 Lake of the
Ozarks tributary
61 Avowed
63 Triptych side
panels
65 Cousins of
musettes
66 Half of a Disney
duo
67 Inventor Sperry
68 Dean Martin
'subject
70 Truncate


72 E. C. Bentley
detective
73 Within-- of
(near)
74 Filled a hold
76 Hardly
intellectual
77 Site of King
David's royal
residence
80 Rats
81 Farm unit


82 Well up 95 Namely
83 Some fashion 96 "Forshame!"
tips 97 Owl's


90 Go-getter
91 Lough Erne
location
92 Common
card-table
project
93 Incense
94 "John Brown's
Body" poet


question?
98 Gaels of
college
football
99 Nordica
products
101 Little bit
102 Puzzle solvers'
cries


103 1994 title role
for Shirley
MacLaine
104 Facility
105 Pugilists'
org.
106 Relatives of
aves.
107 Shelley's--
Skylark"
108 Schlep
109 Fprt -, N.J.


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


... .. . .. .
:: -- , :,r- ,- -. -- :I-'.' '.','7 .i
,-. ~ 7 .. .- -.,,,- ,:. : ''-;-. : =
~lii


EXCELLENT CONDITION. 2BR/2BA, just a
short walk from DeSoto Square Mall, on a lake
with winding paths. Covered parking, all appli-
ances. Call Paul Martin 794-0049. $62,900.


GREAT WATER VIEW 2BR/2BA. Kingfisher
model with Bay views from all windows. Pool,
tennis, spa, covered parking, ceiling fans in all
rooms. Call Harold Small 792-8628. $120,000.


COQUINA BEACH CLUB 2BR/2BA directly
overlooking wide beach. Gorgeous sunsets,
Turnkey furnished. Great rental opportunity.
Call Dick Maher 778-6791 or Dave Jones 778-
4891. $185,000.


SPACIOUS ANTIQUA MODEL 2BR/2Ba.
Beautifully turnkey furnished. Reduced to
$127,000. Award winning landscaping, lighted
tennis courts, 24 hr. manned security, pools
and clubhouse. Call Rose Schnoerr for details
778-2261.




Bob & Lu
Rhoden
REALTORS@
Associates
778-2692





Bob and Lu have been active with
Island and Mainland properties for 6
years. Together they give a cus-
tomer the advantage of two agents
with one purpose, your satisfaction.


BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED & FUR-
NISHED End unit overlooking lake. Ceramic
tile & carpet, eat-in kitchen, mirrored wall in din-
ing room and 5 fans. Large screened lanai, pri-
vate courtyard, 2-car detached garage. Call Hal
Gillihan 778-2194. $129,900.


HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY

JULY 4TH


Bill Bowman
Bobye Chasey
Hal Gillihan
John Green
Dave Jones
Dick Maher
Paul Martin
Evelyn Mitchell


Nick Patsios
Bob & Lu Rhoden
Mary Ann Schmidt
Rose Schnoerr
Walt Schnoerr
Harold Small
Janis Van Steenburgh
Helen White


JUST REDUCED! Pristine and private Sun- ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME $249,000.
bow Bay. Lovely view from this 2BR/2BA top This charming 2BR/2BA Island home is
floor unit with new carpet. Amenities include nearly new. Elevated, open plan, over 2,100
two heated pools, boat slips, tennis and its just sq.ft. Bay view, close to the beach. Many
two blocks to beach. Call John Green 778-3167. upgrades. Elevator, too. Call Janis Van
$89,900. Steenburgh 778-4796.


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Weekly Rentals From $450

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club from $700 mo.
2501 Gulf Drive 1/1 with
Gulf view $500 mo.


Julie
Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


S V ~- A a


i i


_4 .l*..a


J~i~B~




Rl] PAGE 36 0 JUNE 29, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


{ Isl


d Foods


IYOUR i DEPENDENT ERKET 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
HOMETOWN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK *7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM' PHONE 778-4100
D We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JULY 4,1995


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday 4
11 A.M. to NOON


on Anna Maria Island!


fksi Wieners


12 OZ PKG


KRAFT BBQ
SAUCE

18 OZ EA
ALLVARIETIES

charcoal


hrcoal $I 9
aLB BAG

BAKER
PJ. TOES
S 490
Z LB
DELI DEPARTMENT
"BEACH PAK SPECIAL"
8 Pieces Fried Chicken
2 Breasts, 2 Thighs,
2 Legs, 2 wings
1 LB. Cole Slaw
1 LB. Baked Beans


CHICKEN


T.G. LEE
ICE CREAM
$199
1/2 G ON, ALL VARIETIES

SCOCACOLA
9 24 PKS CANS


$499


BAKERY DEPARTMENT
American
Cheese
WHITE OR YELLOW
S,- LB


COUNTRY STYLE
SEARE RIBS


LAYS
CHIPS

89A
6 OZ BAG
ASST. FLAVORS


MILLER LITE


WATERMELON


199
EA


$139
SLB