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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00572

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FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Home, studio, motel ravaged by fire


By Bonner Presswood
"I went from the house to the studio and when I
opened the door the place was filled with flames,"
Karen Klosky said as she watched firefighters from
three area departments battle the blaze that began in her
garage art studio.
Klosky seemed remotely aware of what her losses
would be as she stood across the street from the fire in
a friend's driveway and remarked, "I panicked and left
my rabbit in its cage out back. I'm happy to be alive."
Klosky's home at 2001 Gulf Drive at the intersec-
tion of Gulf Drive and Avenue C and the Tropic Isle
Motel at 2103 Gulf Drive were involved in the fire.
The home suffered extensive damage from smoke
and water as firemen worked alongside the burned-out
garage to contain the fire.
Smoke poured from the roof of the two-story build-
ing on the north side of the garage at the Tropic Isle
Motel. Nine occupied units had been quickly evacu-
ated. Stunned visitors stood around the pool area
watching in fear.
Firefighters stood ready with the hook-and-ladder
truck perched over the smoldering motel roof, but ac-
cording to Anna Maria Fire District Inspector Jane
Guthrie, "If we used the hook and ladder, the water
would force the fire into other units and spread it more,
so we're going to fight it from the inside."
Just as the fire in the motel was contained,
firefighters on the back of the Klosky house, hampered
by the burning rubble of the garage, climbed onto the
roof of the overhang of the back door of the house and
pulled boards from under the eaves to pour water into
a smoldering attic. Onlookers watched smoke pour
from the eaves and held their breaths in anticipation of
an eruption of flames from the roof.
The fire was out.
The home was built in 1937 and is owned by Karen
Klosky's father, Simon Peter Klosky. Simon Klosky
said the garage had been recently renovated and con-
verted to an art studio for his daughter.
Karen Klosky said she suspected the fire was
caused by an old fan a friend had recently repaired. She
said, "I plugged it in and went into the house for a few
moments. That's when it started."
The owners of Tropic Isle Motel, Karen Burns
and her family, were able to relocate their guests
from four damaged units to other motels they own,


Sunset Beach across the street and Surfside Inn just
a short distance away.
The motel is completely out of service, accord-


Local shutterbug captures inspiring moment
Bill Murphy of Holmes Beach is the first of six weekly winners in the Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot
awards. Murphy said he saw this cold front coming toward the Island while he and his family were at the Sandbar
restaurant and he "had to take this picture." His photo will compete with other winners of the local contest spon-
sored exclusively by The Islander Bystander. The overall winner will go on to compete in the international contest
for prizes and awards including a grand prize of $10,000. Murphy will collect a certificate and redemption coupon
good for a black and white umbrella or an AM/FM sport radio from Kodak and an Islander Bystander "more than a
mullet wrapper" T-shirt for his weekly winner. Deadline for the next contest is Friday. Contest details, page 8.


No injuries
in Bradenton
Beach fire,
but damage
extensive
Afire that began in the
renovated garage, an art
studio at Karen Klosky's
residence, 2001 Gulf
Drive in Bradenton
Beach, quickly spread to
the neighboring Tropic
Isle Motel. Firefighters
saved the main structure
of Klosky's house al-
though damages were
extensive and four of the
12 units at Tropic Isle
were destroyed. Bren
Jackson, a friend of
Klosky's, fellow artist and
framer, is accepting
donations on her behalf.
Jackson said Klosky lost
nearly all of her personal
possessions and art in the
fire and could use dona-
tions of clothing and
household items. For
information call Jackson
at her business, Phoenix
Fraine in Holmes Beach,
778-5480. Pictured are
firefighters Brian Reed
and JeffLonzo fighting
the fire. For more fire
pictures, see page 2.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood


ing to Burns. The electrical service for the entire
motel is on the wall of the two-story building clos-
est to the point where the fire began in the garage.
Burns said, "My place is shut down and it's lonely
here but at least I have some piece of mind. I didn't
sleep the first night after the fire for thinking what
a nightmare it would have been if the fire had started
in the middle of the night."
Burns said she has been able to see the good come
out of it now like neighbors who helped the guests
move their belongings to other motels. "The guests
were giving me hugs and saying, 'It's OK, Karen.'"
Burns said she was at the pool visiting with guests
when someone told her to call 911. "We thought it was
a car fire and all of a sudden it (the garage) was en-
gulfed. Luckily, I knew who was in the motel and who
wasn't of the nine rented rooms."

Horseshoe contest this
Saturday, page 15








SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ....................................... ........... 6
Those Were the Days ................................. ... 7
Manatees ...................................................... 14
HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY ........................ 16
Anna Maria tides ...................................... .. 25
Real estate.................................. ........... 26
Crossword puzzle.......................................... 27


ISLANDER


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


JUNE 22,1995







ID PAGE 2 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Despite the barb, stingrays deserve respect


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Anyone who's ever suffered from the reflexive
stab of a stingray might not agree, but Dr. Carl Luer,
senior scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory, says the
stingray should be respected rather than feared for its
place in our Florida waters.
Stingrays belong to the same sub-class,
Elasmobranchii, as sharks, skates, other rays, guitar
fish and sawfish. Some elasmobranchs date back 400
million years.
Moving down the classifications list, stingrays are
of the scientific orderRaiiformes. These flattened, pec-
toral-finned shark relatives are commonly called
batoids. Their gill slits are on the underside of the body.
The diamond-shaped stingrays that are a problem
to local swimmers belong to the family Dasyatidae.
Several types swim visibly in large numbers in the
upper water column and are rarely the culprits in a
human sting.
Of the ones we fear that live and feed on the
sandy bottoms of the surf zone where we don't see
them the most common in our Island waters are the
Southern stingray and the Atlantic stingray.
With pale to dark bodies, they are dinner-plate size
with slender tails longer than the body. Emerging from
the back of the tail's midpoint is the sharp spine or
stinger. This bony spine has barbs along its edges and
is covered in a very thin sheath.
If the spine penetrates typically in the ankle, calf
or foot the sheath is sloughed off and a toxin or
venom seeps out. "The poison is not injected," stresses
Luer.
Says the scientist, "I can't overstate enough how
non-aggressive these rays are. They're an extremely
passive, docile group of animals."
The spine is the stingray's only means of defense


Be alert and
do the shuffle
Those dinner-plate-size stingrays that feed in
the surf zone of our Gulf and bay waters would be
glad to get out of your way if you announce your
presence while swimming.
To do the "stingray shuffle," advance slowly
into the water and shuffle your feet as you go, dis-
turbing the sandy bottom with each step.
Swimmers at the county beaches should watch
the lifeguard towers for the raising of the blue "dan-
gerous marine life" flag.
Swimmers in unguarded waters can keep
abreast of reports of stingrays looming through the
local news media.

against a predator or when stepped on by an unsuspect-
ing swimmer.
"Stinging is purely a reflex," says Luer.
Purely painful, say those inflicted.
The poison is a neurotoxin that can cause extreme
pain, but usually for no longer than 24 to 48 hours, Luer
says. Soaking the wound in the hottest water tolerable
helps break the toxin down. So does ammonia.
Luer reports that there can be more of a problem
from secondary infection caused by 1) spine-surface
slime, 2) bacteria in the sea water or 3) tiny pieces of
the spine often not even visible on an X-ray that be-


QUICK THINKING SAVES PROPERTY, -
LIVES IN BRADENTON BEACH A


One of the firefighters lost his footing and another helped him up as they worked through the rubble and
remains of the Klosky garage/art studio to save the Klosky house just a few feet away. Islander Photos:
Bonner Presswood


Beach Olympics to be a bash

at Beach House this Sunday


The 1995 Beach Olympics will be held from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 25, at the Beach
House Restaurant in Bradenton Beach.
The wild and wacky games are as much fun to
watch as they are to compete in and there's plenty
of beach to enjoy at the Beach House.
Nearly 30 teams have signed up to compete in the
events including a relay boat race, waiter's tray relay,


keg roll, volleyball, Frisbee toss and tug-of war. Teams
represent many area restaurants, retail stores, financial
institutions, interested groups and businesses.
Proceeds from the $75 team entry, including six
players and two alternates, will benefit United Way.
Last year's Beach Olympics generated $1,200.
For more information, call the Beach House at
799-2222.


Firefighter Brian Braun was helped into his
equipment and directed to assist other firefighters
at the height of the fire behind Tropic Isle Motel
by Anna Maria Fire Inspector Jane Guthrie.


Federal flood rules

citizens group

meets Friday in

Anna Maria
Anna Maria contractor and resident Kit Welsch
will hold an organizational meeting for an Islandwide
citizens action group to address federal rules for flood-
prone-area construction at 2 p.m. Friday, June 23, at
Anna Maria City Hall.
For more information, call Welsch at 778-5230.


come imbedded and may not work their way to the
surface for long periods of time. Continued tenderness
or discoloration may be indications of such infection.
Lifeguards on our county beaches routinely recom-
mend a visit to a doctor after being stung for a tetanus
shot if no booster has been administered for several
years and for pain killers and/or antibiotics if so pre-
scribed.
Luer agrees. Probing oneself for imbedded barbs
can cause additional irritation.

They're only babies
"Our" stingrays are live bearers whose eggs are
internally fertilized and remain in the mother, unat-
tached, until the young hatch and emerge, usually from
four to eight at a time. They are born in the spring.
The stingrays we see and fear in the summer
are these newborns. They feed during their first sum-
mer in the surf zone.
With very small teeth used for crushing and tear-
ing, the rays feed on small fish, crustaceans, mollusks,
invertebrates, coquinas, sand fleas and the like.
"Your chance of seeing one is much greater at
dawn or dusk feeding time," says Luer. The South-
ern and Atlantic stingrays will usually be seen alone or
in groups no larger than a handful.
Professionally and personally, Luer feels and en-
courages great respect for these shark relatives, these
"longtime, normal inhabitants of our waters."
Some of the local varieties that swim in the upper
waters, like the coffee-and-cream-colored cownose
rays, "are absolutely beautiful to encounter," says the
scientist.
They travel in large schools, which can be terrify-
ing. "But just stop and watch them swim past," sug-
gests Luer. "They're really beautiful and don't need to
be feared."


-- -I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 3 Ij


Former restaurant bookkeeper pleads

no contest to grand theft charges


Sentencing will be July 14 for the former book-
keeper accused of stealing nearly $300,000 from two
Island restaurants.
Andrew Hankin, 33, of Holmes Beach, pleaded no
contest to grand theft charges last week. The state
attorney's office filed grand theft charges against
Hankin last fall and had him placed under arrest.
Hankin is accused of stealing the funds from ac-
counts he managed at the Sandbar and Beach House
restaurants on the Island. The restaurants are managed
by Ed Chiles, son of Florida Gov. Lawton Chiles.
The state attorney's office said Hankin took the

Charges dropped
All charges have been dropped against a Bradenton
Beach substitute teacher accused of grabbing a 15-
year-old Sugg Middle School girl last February.
Paul Georges, 57, has said he is contemplating a
lawsuit "as a result of the false allegation." Georges
was charged with committing a lewd and lascivious act
against a child.
Georges has "been exonerated," said his attorney,
Brett McIntosh.
Assistant State Attorney Bruce M. Lee filed court


d


money over a nearly three-year-long period of time.
Hankin posted bond and was released from jail
while awaiting trial on the charges. However, Sarasota
sheriff's deputies arrested him last month on another
grand theft charge, this time for allegedly forging and
then cashing a $4,800 check to himself from a Sarasota
business where he was employed as an accountant,
Sarasota Sheriffs Department records state.
Hankin could receive a 30-year prison sentence for
the Island charges.
The sentencing delay will allow attorneys to deter-
mine the exact amount of money taken.

against teacher
documents May 15 stating that criminal charges will
not be filed against Georges.
According to reports, the girl told school officials
Georges grabbed her left breast in front of a classroom
of students. One other student witnessed the act, ac-
cording to Bradenton police reports. Georges denied
the accusation, but was arrested.
Georges is a retired federal government employee
with 25 years of service, and maintains national certi-
fication as a addiction counselor.


Traffic concerns to be addressed in

north Bradenton Beach


Speeders beware: traffic safety concerns have
prompted enhanced police patrols in the northern sec-
tion of Bradenton Beach.
Thirty-six residents near 25th Street in the city
signed a petition presented to the Bradenton Beach City
Council urging several steps be taken to ensure the
safety of children in the area.
"We are concerned for the safety of our children and
the late-night groups that mingle after dark on our streets,"
the petition states. "Signs of drug use have been seen. The
families are not happy about the situation and feel this


situation should be handled now before someone gets
hurt." Among the requests:
15 mph speed limit signs throughout the residen-
tial areas near avenues A, B and C.
A four-way stop sign at Avenue B and 25th Street.
More nighttime police patrols.
Speed bumps near the area's parks.
Police Chief Jack Maloney agreed to the added police
patrols in the evening. Public Works Supervisor Buddy
Watts agreed to the four-way stop sign and the slower
speed limit signs. Both balked at the idea of speed bumps.


island. Mary Noff f~jldn^^

says, "'^ This?~n isthe ^^^^^^
^^^B??n^-~ o(oI Iti~ f^^^^ ^^^





had*s~ inTTmy life."j^^^^^^
LIook out isIsDuffy.



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AWARD INNINGSURFSIE DINIG & COKTAIL


Anna Maria City
6/22, 10 am., Homecoming Committee
6/22, 7:30 p.m., Code Enforcement Board
6/26, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board
6/27, 7:30 p.m., Commission meeting
6/28, 7 a.m., Citizen Recognition Committee

Bradenton Beach
None scheduled

Holmes Beach
6/27, 2 p.m., Planning Commission

Of Interest
S6/23, 7:15 p.m., Needs Assessment Study
Task Forces, Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
6/24, 10:30 p.m., Holmes Beach Civic
Association, Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
6/26, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization, Sudakof Hall,
USF New College, Sarasota.


I MEETI







l] PAGE 4 M JUNE 22, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Environmentalists: Orimulsion foul for future


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Manasota 88 and Save Our Bays are the two lead-
ing opponents of the use of Orimulsion at Florida
Power & Light's Parrish plant. They have been joined
by the Manatee County Democratic Party, the Federa-
tion of Manatee County Community Associations and
the Longboat Key Commission.
They say if Manatee County residents value the air
they breathe, the water they drink and the beauty of the
surrounding Bay and Gulf waters, they will join in this
opposition.
The burning of Orimulsion will result in the emis-
sion high levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx), additional
water withdrawals from Lake Manatee, increased truck
traffic and by-product disposal problems, say detrac-
tors. In addition, they maintain that Orimulsion would
be very difficult to clean up if spilled in the Bay or Gulf
because it is an emulsion and disperses in water rather
than floating to the top and forming a slick as does oil.

Nitrogen threat
The burning of Orimulsion will increase NOx
emissions by 10,000 tons per year because the Parrish
plant will be running at 87 percent capacity rather than
30 percent.
"The NOx will affect the waters of Tampa Bay by
enriching the waters and contributing to the loss of our
marine resources," said Gloria Rains of Manasota 88.
The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program has
determined that 27 percent of the total nitrogen load-
ing to the bay is from airborne nitrogen. With the ad-
dition of airborne nitrogen deposited on the land and
washed into the bay via stormwater runoff, the figure
increases to 65 percent
"Nitrogen loading in Tampa Bay has been identi-
fied as a prime contributor to the severe depletion of its
biological community," said a Manasota 88 newsletter.
Seagrass is critical to the life of the Bay because it
provides food, oxygen and shelter to marine life. In-
creased nitrogen loading increases the growth of algae,
which decreases water clarity. This decreased water
clarity is a prime reason for the Bay's loss of 67 per-
cent of its seagrass acreage.
"TBNEP has spent several million dollars trying to
clean up the Bay," noted Rains. "This will destroy all
the work they've done."
Rains also noted that FPL says although NOx
emissions will increase 10,000 tons per year in the Bay
area, they will decrease 24,000 tons per year in other
FPL plants throughout the state, creating a system-wide
decrease of 14,000 tons per year.
"They're asking us to accept dirtier air so in some
parts of the state it can be cleaner," said Rains. "It's an
unnecessary addition to our air pollution."

Health and environmental risks
NOx can create serious respiratory and environ-
mental problems, said Clarence Troxell, a retired elec-
trical engineer and former general manager for New
Jersey Public Service & Gas Co.


In May, Florida Power & Light reached the first
step in being permitted to convert its Parrish plant
to burn Orimulsion. The state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection ruled that the company's per-
mit application is sufficient.
This means that the company has provided
enough data and information for DEP to study in
order to make a recommendation on use of the fuel.
The six-volume application is more than 4,000
pages long.
During the DEP's six-month review of the ap-
plication, various agencies such as Manatee County,
the Southwest Florida Water Management District
and the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council sub-
mitted questions on the application to the DEP. FPL
was required to supply further information and data
to respond to these questions.
Each agency will now study the application and
prepare recommendations to be presented at an ad-
ministrative hearing to be conducted by a state hear-
ing officer. This hearing is scheduled to begin Aug.
21 in Manatee County.


Orimulsion: Fueling or

fouling the future?

Part 2 in a series


He noted, "The Selective Catalytic Reduction
Committee of the NOx Control Division of the Insti-
tute of Clean Air Companies stated that NOx contrib-
utes to the formation'of acid rain and photochemical
smog (ozone)."
The SCR Committee pointed out that "ozone can
irritate the mucous membranes of the respiratory sys-
tem causing coughing and impaired lung function.
Ozone can aggravate heart disease and respiratory dis-
eases such as asthma and bronchitis."
It further stated that "acid rain has been shown to
destroy fish and other forms of fresh and coastal wa-
ter life and cause damage to buildings and materials,
forests and agricultural crops. Leaching of metals, such
as aluminum, from soils by acid rain has raised grow-
ing concerns about health effects as well."
In addition, "NOx contributes to the nitrification
of rain which may over fertilize the soil and its emis-
sions can include nitrous oxide which contributes to
global warming."
The best technology to reduce NOx emissions is
Selective Catalytic Reduction, said Troxell; however,
FPL will not consider it because of the cost.
"FPL has said SCR is environmentally and eco-
nomically unfeasible and unreasonable in Manatee
County," noted Troxell. "It's strictly the bucks that they
don't want to pay. If these emissions can kill a citrus
tree, then I don't want to breathe that air. It's as plain
and simple as that."

Cleaning up a spill
Another serious concern of environmentalists is
cleaning up an Orimulsion spill in local waters. Tankers
would deliver 80,000 barrels a day to Port Manatee.
In addition to a spill threatening Tampa Bay, the
port is located between Cockroach Bay and Terra Ceia
Bay Aquatic Preserves. Both are designated as Out-
standing Florida Waters.
"Orimulsion contains a surfactant which causes it to
disperse rapidly in estuarine waters," said Rains. "Every-
thing I know says it can't be cleaned up. FPL refutes this
but I haven't seen any information to the contrary."
Oil is traditionally cleaned up by using booms and
skimmers to contain the spill; however, they would be
of no use in containing fine particles of Orimulsion.
FPL officials say containment skirts, overlapped in
several layers, can be effective in gathering up the
Orimulsion particles. Further study results are expected
later in the summer.
"There are always leakage possibilities: at the
source of production, en route from Venezuela, while
approaching the port, as it is being loaded into the pipe-
line, within the pipeline itself and while it is being
stored," said the Manatee County Executive Demo-


Last Friday, Tom Reese, attorney for the environ-
mental groups Manasota 88 and Save Our Bays,
asked that the administrative hearing be postponed to
Nov. 13. He maintained that state and local agencies
need more time to study FPL's application because of
a state statute that requires DEP to file a written analy-
sis of the application 60 days prior to the hearing.
Manasota 88 and Save Our Bays have filed to be
a part of the hearing. The public may also speak but
rules governing public comment will be established
by the hearing officer. The hearing will be conducted
in a quasi-judicial manner and speakers may be cross
examined. Rebuttals may also be permitted.
After the completion of the hearing, which could
continue for 10 days to two weeks, the hearing officer
will make a recommendation for approval, denial or
approval with stipulations to the governor and cabi-
net The final decision rests with them.
For residents who wish to read the project ap-
plication, a copy is filed in the reference section of
the Central Library, 1301 Barcarotta Blvd.,
Bradenton.


Holmes Beach Civic
Association sponsors
Orimulsion forum
All Islanders and their guests are invited to attend
the Holmes Beach Civic Association's Orimulsion
Forum to be held Saturday, June 24, at 10:30 a.m. at
the Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach.
Wayne Ondler from Florida Power & Light and
Gloria Rains, founder and director of Manasota 88,
will present information on the pros and cons of us-
ing Orimulsion as an alternative fuel for electricity.
For more information call 778-5405.

cratic Committee in a letter to Manatee County Com-
missioners. "FPL has promised double-hulled tankers
but could give no guarantee against spills, leaks and
collisions. There are no proven methods of cleaning up
an Orimulsion spill."
Environmentalists say in the event of a spill,
Orimulsion will smother seagrass beds and marine life.
FPL officials point to tests conducted by the University
of Miami that show Orimulsion is about equal to oil in
terms of environmental damage.
Several groups also point to the fact that a spill
could have a severe impact on tourism and the
county's economy.

By-product disposal
The sulfur dioxide scrubbing system for Orimulsion
will require limestone which must be shipped into the
plant By-products of the scrubbing process are fly ash and
gypsum, which must be shipped out of the plant FPL of-
ficials estimate that the total truck traffic would be more
than 200 round trips per day.
In a letter to the Florida Department of Community
affairs, a county planner made the following points:
There will be a major transportation impact on SR
62, U.S. 301 and the community of Parrish based upon
the potential daily transport of waste from the plant
The round trip truck figures appear to be low and
represent incoming limestone deliveries only and do
not include waste removals.
The alternative to truck shipment of the waste is
to develop a 140-foot-high gypsum stack and an asso-
ciated fly ash stack on the FPL site.
FPL's proposes to use limestone as an agent in
the desulfurization process. The limestone will be pro-
cessed by an on-site crusher. A crusher of magnitude
required would generate excessive noise.
FPL officials say they have a contract with the
National Gypsum Company for the purchase of gyp-
sum to make wallboard and the fly ash will be sold to
the cement industry for making concrete.
Environmentalists note that if these markets fall
through, the company proposes to dredge and fill wet-
lands for a landfill which could leach pollutants into the
groundwater.

Water withdrawal
Manasota 88 maintains that the conversion to
Orimulsion "will result in greater withdrawals from the
Little Manatee River, an Outstanding Florida Water."
The group cites an FPL proposal to increase its aver-
age annual water withdrawals from 7.1 million gallons
per day to 16.6.
"While more water will be required to be withdrawn
from the Little Manatee River during periods of high water
flow, less water will actually be taken than the current
agreement allows," said an FPL official. "The current
Swiftmud agreement provides for minimum stream flows
that protect the river/bay ecology. These minimum flows
will be maintained after the conversion."

Foreign dependence
Environmentalists say by purchasing Orimulsion
from Venezuela, we will merely be trading our depen-
dence on fuel from the Middle East to South America.
"Venezuela has serious economic and political
problems." said Rains. "And also you're sending your
money out of the country."
They also note that Venezuela does not use
Orimulsion but relies on a combination of petroleum,
natural gas, coal and hydroelectric power.
"We cannot make a major commitment to a foreign

PLEASE SEE ORIMULSION, NEXT PAGE


Permitting process for Orimulsion





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGES 5 [


What is Orimulsion
and why shuld yu Just 6 months old, Ned
Should ou i' was popular with custom-
care? ers at Geraldson's Farm
Orimulsion is a fuel that consists of a mixture and was a pet to the
of bitumen, water and an emulsifying agent. Bitu- brothers who farm and
men is a tar-like substance found about 2,000 feet sell their produce just
underground in the Orinoco River region of Ven- across the bridge from
ezuela. The bitumen must be emulsified with wa- Anna Maria Island on
ter in order to be handled, transported and used. Manatee Avenue. Islander
The fuel is extracted, processed and distrib- .*., '- Photo: Cynthia Finn.
uted by a subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela, .
the country's nationalized energy company. It is . "
marketed in the United States by Bitor America, ..
based in Boca Raton, Fla.
The Florida Power & Light Company wants "
to purchase 80,000 barrels of Orimulsion per
day to fuel its Parrish plant. It would be the first
long-term commercial contract for the use of
Orimulsion in this country. The Parrish plant
would burn more Orimulsion than any other ed pet pig is dead
plant inthe world.Ned, pet pig, is dead and gone
FPL representatives say the use of
Orimulsion will reduce their dependency on By Bonner Presswood hide. The culprit ran over irrigation lines at the farm
foreign oil, keep the company competitive, re- Eric Geraldson of Geraldson Farms on Perico Island, in his escape.
duce electricity bills, create jobs and increase called to report that his pet pig, Ned, who was featured in The Geraldsons are offering a reward for informa-
the county's property taxes. The IslanderBystanderjust two weeks ago, was killed and tion leading to the arrest of Ned's killer. If you have in-
stolen by an intruder during the night on June 19. formation about the incident which occurred the night
Geraldson said the pig was killed in his pen, then of June 19 behind the produce store at 11700 Manatee
O rim ulsion bad for dragged over the fence and apparently loaded into ave- Ave., contact Eric Geraldson at 795-2368.


the environment?
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
source of 'dirty' fuel when domestic sources of relatively
cleaner fuel are available," said the Manatee County Ex-
ecutive Democratic Committee. "Our local utility should
not become captive to a single foreign source."
"There's no reason to bring Orimulsion here,"
stressed Rains. "It's known as the dirtiest fuel in the
world. It's a big money-maker for FPL but I think
people have proven time and time again that they still
support clean air and water. It's not going to profit us.
It's going to create serious problems for us."


Commission approves three variances


The Anna Maria City Commission unanimously ap-
proved three variances June 13, accepting recommenda-
tions from the city's Planning and Zoning Board.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Leonardo, 849 N. Shore
Drive, wish to remodel their existing home by eliminat-
ing often-flooded first-floor space and incorporating it
into second-floor square footage. The variance was
needed due to an already existing corner setback of 4
and 1/2 feet that will not be changed.
Mary B. Costanzo, 207 Palmetto Ave., sought per-
mission to split her property into two lots as originally


purchased. Costanzo wishes to bequeath the vacant lot
to a niece and the other lot with residence to a nephew.
Each lot will be 70 X 115 feet, exceeding minimum
square-foot requirements.
With letters of support from all seven neighbors,
Mr. and Mrs. Tim Eiseler requested a corner-setback
variance to make porch- and carport-improvements on
their duplex at 404 Alamanda Road.
"This plan will make it a much more attractive
piece of property," planning board Chairman Tom
Turner told the commission.


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ml PAGE 6 I JUNE 22, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

-R= I:/I


You can't do that here

any longer
More and more we see limitations put on our lives
and our lifestyles by government.
First we go through periods of government bow-
ing out, then we enter times of government dictating
rules. More rules. More regulations.
The rules have changed here.
Golf enthusiasts won't be able to chip and putt at
the "park" behind Holmes Beach city hall any more.
It seems a shot took out the window of a vehicle
parked at the fire station alongside the field and when
it came down to covering the damages, the city is left
holding the bag the price tag for the window.
Where once airplanes landed in an open field, now
it seems recreation will be limited. Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger has ordered "no more golf."
When individuals fail to take responsibility for
their actions or their property, they look for someone
else to accept the liability.
Liability seems to be the key word in the limita-
tion of our rights. It was fear of liability that caused
Manatee County to close the three piers at Cortez
Beach in Bradenton Beach. Only the pelicans occupy
what once were three great fishing spots in the Gulf
since an accident involving a swimmer and a subse-
quent lawsuit resulted in increased liability to the
county. The result: barricades and signs prohibiting
anyone from trespassing on the piers, but no signs
warning of dangers to swimmers.
When Holmes Beach City Council pondered the
question of allowing a home occupation license for a
piano teacher, they expressed a fear that another mu-
sic teacher wanting to teach drums might be denied
and file a lawsuit. Liability again.
They pondered over allowing a homeowner an
exception to an ordinance against farm animals in
Holmes Beach to keep a pet pig. In their delibera-
tions, council members considered their liability if
they denied the request in light of a previous approval
in 1992. The council denied the new request last week
and the homeowner vowed to sue.
It's a shame the guy (or gal) who busted out the
car window with a stray golf shot didn't fess up and
pay for the damages.
The liability has cost everyone the privilege to putt
around in the open field owned by the taxpayers of
Holmes Beach.




JUNE 22, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 31
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster




0 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


I 9Y O 9'. INIe


Holmes Beach gets glimpse of
Gestapo-like government
If I question Holmes Beach Mayor Bohnenberger's
motivations in opposing a resolution by me before the
Holmes Beach City Council, he has every right to ques-
tion my motivations in favoring it, with each given a
chance to answer.
Suggesting I'm a "de facto agent" for Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation is, however, a pretty far reach from
what my record shows and from what my fellow citizens
know of me. Free me from that misnomer!
That was almost amusing. The rest of Mayor
Bohnenberger's diatribe about me at the council meet-
ing on June 6, however, was not The outburst included
few remarks about the issue, but many criticisms and
innuendoes about my professional and personal life,
past and present, which judiciously were not published
in The Islander Bystander's report of the meeting.
Slander is the utterance of a falsehood damaging to a
person's character or reputation. Done in public or
maliciously, it is legally actionable. This is the area I'm
discussing and prefer not to get the city into.
The governing bodies of our three Island cities
were also recently communicated with by Mayor
Bohnenberger, this time alleging I'd cost the city
"thousands of dollars" by "home-made legal opinions."
That deserves some probing questions, investigation,
and a cross-examination. I believe that allegation is
blatantly false and welcome any investigation of it,
along with a look at the mayor's own record of legal
positions.
I am more concerned, as the discussion of that June
6 council meeting continued, that our citizens now
might fear that if they offer any suggestions or resolu-
tions that might offend the mayor, or any other official
or citizen, they might be subject to a background inves-
tigation and public critique and embarrassment.
It was even suggested that citizens who don't own
property have no right to bring a resolution before the
city. This creates a dictatorial atmosphere in an Ameri-
can city and should quickly be expunged. We have
enough trouble encouraging citizens to attend our mu-
nicipal meetings.
My grandmother used to say, "People who live in


glass houses shouldn't throw stones." She was right.
The mayor is a public official. What any public official
does in his or her private conduct is their private busi-
ness, unless that conduct crosses the line and affects the
conduct of their public responsibility or the conduct of
the city (county, state) business. Then the official is
subject to public examination and action. Sometimes
officials wisely and simply, under those circumstances,
get out of the glass house.
Humanely, I'm more in simpatico with the mayor's
frustration than he might suspect. But for all of us, the
courses to follow are what should be best for the city,
and not our personal agendas. Individual lives take
strange paths; the city goes on. Perhaps it is easier, at
a more advanced age, to accept that.
As I've said before, publicly in the city council
room, I respect all city officials for the time and efforts
they give, and have given, beyond their pay and ex-
penses, in the interest of service the community. Occa-
sionally there are bumps in the road; we should learn
to live with them.
Bob VanWagoner, Holmes Beach

Harvey Church not crumbling
The article in the June 8 issue of The Islander
Bystander written by Paul Roat has disturbed my
friends and me.
He quoted Emily Anne Smith, who stated
Harvey Memorial Church in Bradenton Beach
needed renovation.
Harvey Church does not need repair or renewal. It
is in A-1 condition.
Emily Anne owes us an apology.
Kathryn Miller, Bradenton Beach

How to have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and encourages
your letters to the Editor.
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to edit let-
ters for length. Letters must be signed, and include the city
you reside in. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Editor,
The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.


_ _











THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 2, Everybody's Talking
by June Alder


Even before the first telephone exchange opened, the future of the telephone was
foreseen by Scientific American magazine in 1877.

DR. LEFFINGWELL'S

TELEPHONE COMPANY


H.G. Reed and Ollie Stuart, who
ran the general store next to Dr. J.B.
Leffingwell's drugstore in
Braidentown, knew a good thing when
they saw it. If the doctor's 12-year-old
son and his handyman could rig up a
telephone line between the Leffingwell
house and the drugstore why, there
was no reason other Main Street mer-
chants couldn't have telephones.
The two men made Dr.
Leffingwell a proposition. If he would
start a telephone company, they would
run the switchboard out of their store
- for free.
It didn't take the doctor long to
agree. He had a barn-full of copper
wire that wasn't doing anybody any
good (Civil War surplus his father had
acquired long ago).
And he had willing hands in his
boy Jack and yard man Alec
Richardson, an experienced telegraph
lineman.
By the end of the summer of 1895
Jack Leffingwell and Richardson had
the telephone lines up. A small ten-line
switchboard was installed in Reed and
Stuart's emporium and Dr.
Leffingwell's new telephone company
was launched.
The doctor called it the "Gulf
Coast Telephone Company" a name
with a ring to it, wags said.
The Leffingwell house was as-
signed the No. 1 telephone. A.G.
Reed's home got No. 2, Ollie Stuart's
No. 3, and Leffingwell's drugstore was
No. 5. Others on the switchboard were
H.L. Wadham, No. 4; E.B. Camp, No.
6; L.R. Warren, No. 7; and Walter
Fuller, No. 8. -
To add subscribers No. 9 and 10,
Jack and Alec strung a wire about four
miles to reach Oneco. It linked
Reasoner's Nursery and the John
Helms Store to the merchants of
Braidentown.
Next, they extended the line south-
ward down to Sarasota, a hamlet of 20
dingy houses where cattle roamed in
the streets and drank from a watering
trough in the town square. Sarasota's
first telephone was installed in the real
estate office of Harry Higel. The sec-
ond went into the little post office.
By-the spring of 1897 lines had


been strung some 30 miles to Myakka
and Fruitville, and Gulf Coast Tele-
phone had a total of 16 subscribers.
All well and good. But the little
company wasn't paying its way. The 16
customers were paying a monthly rate
of $2; every cent collected went for
equipment (the instruments cost $7.50
each). Dr. Leffingwell couldn't go on
forever depending on free services from
Reed and Stuart;and his son Jack.
So Leffingwell decided to sell a 40
percent interest to Dr. L.R. Warren who
hired Ollie Stuart as manager and
moved the telephone office to his new
Opera House. There, in a back room, the
first paid operator appropriately
named Olive Hitchings plugged call-
ers in and out.
Still, growth was slow. After all,
Braidentown had a population of only
about 200; the neighboring villages of
Manatee to the east and Palmetto across
the river less than half that. The whole
of far-flung Manatee County had a
population of perhaps 4,000.
Manager Stuart realized the com-
pany needed to expand its base.
He took note of what was happen-
ing at the north end of Tampa Bay.
Tampa was booming, with a population
approaching 15,000. It was a major port
now, the terminus of Henry Plant's
South Florida Railroad. Its shipping,
citrus and cigar-making industries were
growing at a fast pace.
Besides that, Tampa had a glamor-
ous hotel attracting tourists from all
over. The town was thoroughly modern,
with a street railway, a water works,
sewers, electric lights and a Southern
Bell telephone exchange.
In Stuart's opinion, Gulf Coast
Telephone's survival depended on link-
ing up with Tampa. The problem was
where to get the capital.
It was that remarkable Leffingwell
boy at age 14 as smitten as ever with
telephone fever who came up with a
solution.

Next: Onward to Tampa

June Alder is on summer hiatus. This
column is a repeat from a series which
originally appeared on August 19,
1993.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 U PAGE 7 [IM



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* We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $30 per
year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
a Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
" scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
* ... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
[ We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
S nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
K
* real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
S you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
* only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
[ The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
* live here year-round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or rela- U
a tive, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office
S with a check in the proper amount.
* BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
0 O One Year: $30 0 6 Months: $20 3 Months: $12

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Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
CHARGE IT BY PHONE:
SS (813) 778-7978
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JID PAGE 8 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Attorney called in on Sasser case


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria City Attorney Robert Hendrickson
has been directed by the city commission to issue a
formal opinion on the Luther Sasser variance re-
quest.
Due to his medical condition, Sasser seeks per-
mission to construct ground-floor resting quarters at
his Magnolia Avenue home.
The case has generated two months of discussion
regarding an individual's right to use his property as
he wishes and/or needs versus strict guidelines is-
sued by the Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) for variances to flood-elevation
requirements.
The city's Planning and Zoning Board recom-
mended denial of the petition in April. The city com-
mission has yet to vote on the matter but may do so
at its June 27 meeting, by which time Hendrickson's
written opinion is expected to be in hand.
A written opinion by a FEMA official has said
the city planners acted "properly" in recommending
denial. A subsequent open discussion at City Hall
led by Brad Loar, FEMA's senior mitigation special-
ist, was apparently interpreted differently by parties
involved in the case.
When the item came up on the agenda at the
commission's June 13 session, Mayor Dorothy
McChesney asked her peers, "Do we open it up
again for discussion?"
McChesney said she felt Loar "was pretty clear
-it's not within regulations." The mayor also said
she "just wanted to be sure Mr. Sasser had a direc-
tion to go in."
Commissioner Mark Ratliff did want to open up
discussion again.
"I'm not entirely sure in my mind we've gotten
a definite no from FEMA," he said. "Loar may seem
to have said no. But in his position he might not want
to have said yes."
Ratliff said, "I think a lot of our variances don't
meet a strict reading of the law" and Sasser's is "a
reasonable request" he feels meets FEMA's general
standards for approving a variance.
Ratliff asked the commission "to direct the city


attorney to find some way possible for us to grant this."
"This is one of the most compelling reasons for
a variance I've seen in all my years" of following Is-
land politics, he said.
"Maybe the city attorney will say no," Ratliff
concluded. "Then we'll have to say no."
Commissioner Doug Wolfe and former commis-
sioner Max Znika mentioned previous variances the
city has granted in what they felt were similar cir-


cumstances.
Sasser said Loar spoke only of "federal guide-
lines" that left the final decision up to the city.
Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard said he thought
Loar had said no and reiterated concern about jeop-
ardizing citywide flood insurance.
"He's protecting his job," Sasser said of Loar.
"All right," said the mayor. "We will ask the
lawyer."


Picture-takers, take note of


this contest with big pay-off


Any local amateur photographer who enters the
ongoing contest sponsored by The Islander By-
stander could win as much as $10,000 in the 1995
Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards
(KINSA).
The 60-year-old amateur photo competition is
reputed to be "the largest annual amateur photo con-
test." It offers 257 cash awards, totaling $52,500.
The local photo contest, which will send eight
photos to the international judging, will run six
weeks. Weekly winners, as well as the eight finalists,
will receive local prizes from Kodak and The Is-
lander Bystander.
Photos taken since Jan. 1, 1993, are eligible to
compete in KINSA'95. Entries can be black-and-
white or color snapshots but must be taken with
Kodak film and printed on Kodak paper.
The contest runs for five more weeks and ends
with the July 27 issue. Complete contest rules are
available at The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217. Entries may be de-
livered in person or mailed to The Islander By-
stander. There is no entry form. Entrants need
only print their name, address and phone number
on the back of the snapshot.
Enter as often as you like.
Deadline for each week's contest is 5 p.m. on Fri-


day proceeding the weekly Thursday issue date. Dead-
line for the issue week of June 29 is June 23 and so on
until the final issue of July 27, deadline July 21.
Local winners will be announced weekly fol-
lowing the deadline for each week's entries.
Local judges include Karly Carlson, Gretchen
Edgren and Paul Roat.
Carlson is the former media director for the
Wisconsin legislature, a former award-winning
television news photographer and a previous winner
of the fine arts festival on the Island.
Edgren is a former senior editor for Playboy
Magazine, where she worked for 25 years. She is
the co-author of "The Playboy Book: Forty Years
- the Complete Pictorial History."
Roat is the news editor of The Islander By-
stander. He has been involved in journalism and
politics for more than 20 years and is the winner of
numerous design, writing and photography awards.
Entries judged best at the end of the contest will
be forwarded to Kodak for international judging
where your photo will win $50 if it simply attracts
the attention of one of five judges.
If The Islander Bystander's winner becomes one
of the top 57 photos, it's assured of winning at least
$250. The top seven awards include $2,000, $3,000,
$5,000 and, yes, $10,000 for Best of Show!


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Deadline June 16, 5 p.m. for first week.
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1. Kodak International Snapshot Awards (KINSA) is strictly for amateur photogra-
phers. (Anyone who derives less than 5% of their income from photography.)
2. Submit black-and-white or color shapshots taken after January 1, 1993. Photos
previously published or entered in KINSA or other competitions are ineligible.
3. Snapshots may be taken with any camera, but all entries must be on Kodak film
AND printed on Kodak paper. No retouching or alterations except cropping is
permitted.
4. Entrant's name, address and phone number must be printed clearly in ink on the
back of each print Mail or deliver to KINSA in care of the Editor, Islander Bystander,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217.
5. Entrants agree The Islander Bystander may publish their photo. Entrants must
be able to furnish the original negative or transparency. All materials become the
property of the sponsor and KINSA and will not be returned.
6. -To be eligible, entrants must be a weekly local winner and then sign a Prize
Winner's Agreement. The complete rules and agreement are available at The Islander
Bystander for review.
7. Entrants must be able to furnish a release with names and addresses of any
recognizable persons appearing in the picture.


KINSA categories: Abstract; Landscape & Sce-
nic; Special Moments; Candids; Animals; Still
Life; Humor; Grown-ups; Action and Portrait. In
addition to suggested KINSA categories, The Is-
lander Bystander judges will look for pictures
with an Anna Maria Island theme and a depiction
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Entry deadlines:
June 22 issue / deadline June 16, 5 p.m.
June 29 issue / deadline June 23, 5 p.m.
July 6 issue/ deadline June 30, 5 p.m.
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July 20 issue / deadline July 14, 5 p.m.
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 22, 1995 I PAGE 9 iJ


Emergency meetings resume on hurricanes


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Gearing up for hurricane season, the Island Emer-
gency Operations Center resumed meetings after a
three-month hiatus.
One of the first tasks was to clarify the role of busi-
nesses designated as essential service providers in the
event of a hurricane and the procedure to receive that
designation.
"Essential service providers are the businesses that
will help get the Island ready for occupation after a
disaster," explained Fire Chief Andy Price. They will
get back on the Island before the residents to get their
business up and running and prepare for the return of
residents and business owners. They have essential
services such as cable, electric, groceries and lumber."
Applications for essential service providers are
available at the three city halls; however, they must be
approved by the IEOC. Employees of these businesses
are issued tags to hang in their automobiles in order to
get through the re-entry checkpoint.
The next level of re-entry after a disaster includes
other business owners and residents. Business owners
at this level may come back on to the Island with resi-


dents and secure their businesses, said Price. They must
have a letter issued by the city where the business is
located in order to gain early re-entry.
The group approved the application of Crowder
Brothers Hardware as an essential service provider.
"I think they are an excellent source of essential ser-
vices and supplies," noted Price. "They would be able to
supply us when we come back on to get our public build-
ings in order and prepare for the return of residents."
Other businesses approved as essential service pro-
viders include Paragon Cable, Waste Management, the
Red Cross and the U. S. Postal Service.
Price said businesses that do not qualify as essen-
tial service providers but have services that may be
needed are put on a resource list. These include a lock-
smith, a seawall repair service and motels to house
emergency workers.
Price stressed that residents who have special
medical needs and/or will need help in an evacuation
should call their city hall or the fire district. The fire
district keeps a master list of these residents and a du-
plicate list is kept at the county EOC. These residents


are evacuated prior to the general population and
taken to a special shelter.
Each city was asked to provide the IEOC with a
list of its standard operating procedures for a disaster.
"We need to get some guidelines, said Price.
"My idea is to have an overall plan with tactical
checklists. We can coordinate them through the IEOC
and act as an information clearinghouse."
Price urged Anna Maria and Holmes Beach to plan
for off-site storage of city records during a hurricane. The
location should be at least 100 miles away, he said.
Two years ago, Bradenton Beach and the fire dis-
trict signed an agreement with DeSoto County to store
records in Arcadia. They plan to load city records onto
a rental truck, drive it to Arcadia and park it in a des-
ignated safe area until the storm has passed.
"We suggested that Holmes Beach and Anna
Maria get together and rent a truck," said Price. "But
whether you are doing it together or separately, you
need to acquire a vehicle and a place to go."
Price asked each city to designate its IEOC represen-
tative and alternate and provide him with their names.


Permit maybe, Paragon not now


Island grandmother stands proud
Florence Tully of Holmes Beach stands beside her
grandson, John Michael Tully of St. James, N.Y.,
who graduated May 31 from the U.S. Naval Acad-
emy in Annapolis, Md. Islander Photo: Courtesy of
Florence Tully.


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission met for a little
more than an hour June 13, quickly touching on a variety
of topics. Commissioner George McKay was absent.
The work session opened with a welcome from
Mayor Dorothy McChesney to the one dozen people in
the audience. "I'd like to get more of you here," said
the mayor, "so next time please bring a few friends."
At the request of the city's Manatee County
Sheriffs Office deputies, McChesney initiated discus-
sion about a temporary-use permit for special events in
the city.
From city files the mayor had a copy of a proposed
application written by Commissioner Doug Wolfe in
1992.
Wolfe said he'd composed the draft based on
county and five other cities' requirements, including
Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach.
Not meant to be "too restrictive," said Wolfe, the
use permit was proposed to create "a paper trail for ac-
countability" requiring notification to the deputies, the
Public Works Department and the fire district of ma-
jor activities, and perhaps regulating such items as re-
peated yard sales at one location.
Wolfe told The Islander Bystander the 1992 com-


mission dropped the matter because "it created total
and absolute revolt" by citizens who interpreted the
proposal as "oppressive."
He suggested that revisiting the issue might en-
courage greater citizen participation at city meetings.
The mayor said the city needs a temporary-use per-
mit but asked the Planning and Zoning Board to try to
reduce the number of pages in Wolfe's original proposal.
"Maybe we'll talk about it again soon," said the
mayor.
Not to be talked about again too soon is a request
from Paragon Cable to renegotiate its franchise agree-
ment with the city, rewriting certain conditions and
extending the contract for 15 years. The current con-
tract does not expire until the year 2000.
"Don't call us, we'll call you," said Wolfe of the
commission's consensus.
Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard said perhaps
Paragon's request pertained to the intent to upgrade
Island service with the installation of an underwater
fiber-optic line and the company's desire "to be sure of
money out here."
Rosemary Carlson, vice president and general
manager of Paragon, previously told The Islander By-
stander the installation would go ahead regardless of
the city's decision to renegotiate now or later.


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son of Diane Miller
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More local, Island news than any other source!
The Islander Bystander is the best news on Anna Maria Island.


r







i[ PAGE 10 M JUNE 22, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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Privateers' plan Fourth of
July parade, picnic
Make plans now to attend the annual Parade and
Picnic sponsored by the Anna Maria Island Privateers
on Tuesday, July 4.
The parade will leave Coquina Beach at 10 a.m.
and will end at the Anna Maria City Pier.
The picnic and party will be held from noon until 6
p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Food
will be served until 4 p.m. The buffet dinner includes
barbecued chicken, baked beans, potato salad and a soft
drink for $5. A cash bar will be available during the
event. There is no charge to attend the party.
Musical entertainment will be ongoing through-
out the afternoon. Entertainers include Brian Beebe,
Jay Crawford, Berni Roy, Steve Smith, Red Tide,
Barbara Johnsen, Jimbo Lease and friends, and the
Sons of the Beaches.
Tickets may be purchased in advance from any Pri-
vateer or at the door. Tickets will be available at the door
for dinner, soft drinks and drinks from the cash bar.
This fundraising event enables the Privateers, a non-
profit Island organization, to help sponsor activities.
For more information call 778-1283 or 778-5934.
Island chamber sponsors
ribbon-cutting
The Island Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a
ribbon-cutting during the official grand opening of the
Umbrella Beach Resort, 3805 Gulf Dr. N., Holmes
Beach, scheduled for Thursday, June 22, from 5 to 7 p.m.
Chamber members and Island officials are en-
couraged to attend.
Island chamber welcomes
new members
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
welcomed new members during the month of May.
The new members are Dan Goodchild of Island
Therapy, Bradenton Beach; Dr. Diane Michaels, Chi-
ropractor of Access to Health, Holmes Beach; Alan
Lavoie Financial & Insurance Consultant, Holmes
Beach; Umbrella Beach Resort, Holmes Beach;
George Kyer of Island Concierge, Bradentonand The
Longboat Observer, Longboat Key.


Ernest Counceller Jr.
Ernest Counceller Jr., 70, of Holmes Beach, Died
June 16, 1995 at home.
There was no visitation. A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m., Wednesday, June 21, at Veterans of For-
eign Wars No. 10141, 4204 67th St. W., with the
Color Guard from VFW Post 10141 and Kirby
Stewart Post 24 officiating.
Born in New Castle, Ind., Mr. Counceller came to
Manatee County from Indianapolis in 1988. He was
a machinist with General Motors. He was a member
of Veterans of Foreign Wars No. 10141, Kirby
Stewart Post No. 24, the Disabled American Veterans
and Purple Heart Association. He was a U.S. Marines
veteran of World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Carol Jean; a daugh-
ter, Brenda Gail Johnson of Fort Myers; a son, E.J., of
Fort Myers; two sisters, Donna Tope of Bradenton
and Joyce Smoot of California; two grandchildren;
and a great-grandchild.
Grace R. Johnson
Grace R. Johnson, 88, of Dover, N.J., died June


Basketball camp to be
offered at Island center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
offer an instructional Basketball Camp for children
ages 5 to 13.
The camp will run Monday through Friday, June
26 to June 30, from 9 am. to noon. The cost is $20 per
child for the week.
The camp will concentrate on the fundamentals of
basketball and skill development while providing an
atmosphere of fun.
For more information call Scott Dell at the center
at 778-1908.

Bloodmobile at Island
Branch Library
The Manatee County Bloodmobile will be at the
Island Branch Library, on Thursday, June 29, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., in the parking area.
Appointments to donate blood are not necessary.
The library is located at 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach.
For more information call 778-6341.

Offshore Grand Prix
festivities begin
Eight days of events surrounding the 11th annual
Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix Festival will begin Fri-
day, June 23, with the Caldwell Trust Invitational Golf
Tournament at Laurel Oak Country Club in Sarasota.
More than 100,000 spectators and competitors are
expected to participate in Grand Prix events that will con-
clude Sunday, July 2, with the Offshore Super Boat Grand
Prix in Gulf waters south of Longboat Key. More than $3
million has been raised for the Suncoast Foundation for
the Handicapped during the last 10 years.
Among activities preceding the race will be Off-
shore Night at the Florida Sharks basketball game at the
Manatee Civic Center Wednesday, June 28; the
festival's parade of boats at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 29,
on Main Street, Sarasota; and a display of the
powerboats and continuous entertainment from 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Friday, June 30, at St. Armands Circle on St.
Armands Key.


3 in Dover Christian Nursing Home, Dover,N.J.
Born in Dover, Mrs. Johnson was a winter resident
of Holmes Beach for several years. She was a thread
and button buyer for McGregor Sportswear for 25
years, retiring in 1976. She was a member of the First
Memorial Presbyterian Church of Dover. She was a
member of the Pearl Chapter, Order of Eastern Star of
Dover. She attended the Order of Eastern Star of
Bradenton and the Island Baptist Church of Anna
Maria Island.

George Tyler McKay
George Tyler McKay, infant, of Bradenton, died
June 16 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
He is survived by his parents, George William
McKay and Jennifer Gerhard McKay; three sisters,
Alexandra Gerhard and Jessica and Ashley McKay, all
of Bradenton; maternal grandparents, Walt and
Suzanne Gerhard of Bradenton; and paternal grandpar-
ents, George F. and Linda McKay of Anna Maria City.
Graveside services were held at Skyway Memorial
Gardens, Palmetto. Shannon Funeral Home,
Bradenton, was in charge of the arrangements.


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There are things about Holmes Beach visitors will never know,
Our pace is never too fast nor do we think it's too slow.
And somehow the folks one meets along the way,
Are never too busy to pass the time of day.
Oh, we gripe about our summer when it gets so very hot,
And then complain sometimes in winter when it's not.
But from this place don't ever try to tear us away,
'Cause we love it here that's why we stay.
Bud Atteridge


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I9OBITUARIES]






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 11 E[]

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Award-winning fire cadets
Cadets with the Anna Maria Fire Control District received a plaque and a check for $250 from Volunteer
Firemen's Insurance Services, Inc., as third place winners in the national 1994 Junior Firefighter Excellence
Award Contest. Pictured are from left, back row, Capt. Rich Losek (cadet advisor); Chris Melser, Chris
Taylor and, front row, Chad Stephens, Leigh Ann Bush, Elizabeth Losek, Chris Watson and VFIS representa-
tives Jim Adams and Chris O'Brien. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Cadets with the Anna Maria Fire Control District
were awarded third place in the national 1994 Junior
Firefighter Excellence Award Contest.
The contest was sponsored by the Volunteer
Firemen's Insurance Services, Inc., of York, Pa. Jim
Adams, the company's director of marketing for
Florida, and company representative Chris O'Brien
presented the award at last week's fire commission
meeting.
"We congratulate you as the third place winners in
our national contest," said Adams. "This plaque comes
to you in recognition of outstanding achievement as
junior firefighters and for demonstrating community
pride and enthusiasm and keeping the volunteer spirit


Planning and
By a unanimous vote, the Anna Maria City Com-
mission has appointed Melody Kramer to a three-year
term on the city's Planning and Zoning Board effective
July 1.
Kramer was instrumen-
tal in forming Save Anna
Maria Inc. (SAM), the
Islandwide civic organiza-
tion that is actively opposed
to replacement of the Mana-
tee Avenue Bridge. She is
SAM's current president, a
post she says she will retain.
Due to the new appoint- Kramer
ment, Kramer has resigned
from her seat on the Island's Citizens Action Commit-
tee, which reports to the Island Transportation Planning
Organization. Her husband, Leon, is chairman of Anna
Maria's Code Enforcement Board.
Kramer says she first submitted an application to
serve as a planner three years ago and is "extremely de-
lighted" to be named. She will replace Hondo Sunquist
on the seven-member board.
"Being on the board is a very responsible position
in terms of how Anna Maria is going to be," Kramer
says.
"I love Anna Maria. It's my home. I'm very inter-
ested in serving so I can give my viewpoints and opin-
ions on the future of our city," she says.
Kramer has a bachelor's degree in speech pathol-
ogy and a master's degree in special education. She is
active with the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island as
a professional photographer.
Native New Yorkers, the Kramers moved to Anna
Maria from Sarasota, becoming full-time residents
rather than just weekenders four years ago.


alive in our nation."
The cadets submitted the following essay as part
of the contest entry:
"We the cadets of the Anna Maria Fire District
feel that we play a very important role in today's fire
service. Cadet programs are the best place to start a
firefighting or rescue career. It develops the skills and
responsibilities needed to advance to a higher posi-
tion.
"This year we were involved in training, meet-
ings, first responder classes, community services, fire
prevention and fundraisers. Community and com-
rades are first. We are here to learn, teach and to grow.
This program is our way into the future of career de-
velopment and success. Winning would validate a
year of hard work."


Zoning Board
While in Sarasota, Kramer says she followed the
Cortez Bridge replacement issue. "I saw how the
voices on the Island weren't being heard and I started
to get interested in being involved," she says.
Kramer says being active in civic matters was "an
absolutely new thing" in her life at that point.
She and her husband's first involvement on the
Island was in resurrecting the Anna Maria Civic As-
sociation to fight development of Bean Point


Chief praises Officer
Klemkosky
Bradenton Beach Chief Jack Maloney rec-
ognized Officer Mike Klemkosky for his appre-
hension of a suspect last week.
"On May 23, Officer Klemkosky responded
across the bridge to Cortez to assist the Manatee
County Sheriff's Office in a sexual battery on an
80-year-old female victim," wrote Maloney. "On
the way over the bridge, he observed an indi-
vidual walking to the Island. He came back to the
Island, found the person and did a field inter-
view."
With the suspect's consent, Klemkosky took
him to the crime scene where he was identified
by the victim. He was placed in custody by the
sheriffs deputy.
"This is the type of violent crime that all of
society is up-in-arms about," continued
Maloney. "Officer Klemkosky's observation and
follow-up led to an immediate arrest of the sus-
pect. He helped not only the current victim but
also other potential victims."


Fire cadets receive

national award


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[II PAGE 12 m JUNE 22, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Bay program goals established for comp plans


By Paul Roat
"We need to find a place where we can all walk
together, then go our separate ways," was how Dr.
Renu Khator described the process of adding goals to
protect and preserve Sarasota Bay in the soon-to-be-
updated local comprehensive plans.
Planners from Manatee and Sarasota counties, as
well as all the municipalities, have finalized goals and
objectives formulated by the Sarasota Bay National
Estuary Program during the past six years. The goals
will be incorporated in the comprehensive plans, guide-
lines for growth and development for the counties and
cities for the next 20 years.
"This will give everyone a point at which to be-
gin," said Dr. Khator, the project manager with the
Department of Government and International Affairs
with the University of South Florida who is heading up
the comp plan process for the Sarasota Bay Program.
The goals, once incorporated in the comprehensive
plans, will become legally binding. Manatee and
Sarasota counties, as well as the larger cities including
Holmes Beach, should approve the long-range plans
next year. Smaller cities such as Anna Maria and
Bradenton Beach have until 2002 to.update their com-
prehensive plans.
The bay program goals cover a wide range of topics
including fish populations, stormwater runoff, seagrass
bed protection, wastewater utility upgrades and recre-
ational uses in the Sarasota Bay region, which stretches
from the north end of Anna Maria Island to Venice.
The goals approved by the planners include the
following.

Wastewater
Improve water transparency.
Pursue regional wastewater treatment, reclama-
tion and reuse policies with interconnection of local
systems.
Pursue interlocal agreements (as applicable) to
provide regionalized water, sewer and reuse service.
Pursue regional wastewater treatment through
expansion and/or consolidation with priority given to
areas greater than or equal to four lots per acre that
were developed prior to 1983 with septic tanks within
900 feet of bays and tributaries.

Stormwater
Reduce the quantity and improve the quality of


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stormwater runoff.
Promote pollution prevention through improved
native landscape design and maintenance by imple-
menting programs such as the Florida Yards & Neigh-
borhoods programs and through other efforts such as
the integrated pest management, xeriscaping, recycling
and composting.
Reduce the sediment and contaminant loadings in
priority watersheds. Reduce total nitrogen loadings.
Investigate alternatives for reducing the amount
of impervious surfaces with emphasis on redevelop-
ment.

Freshwater and saltwater
wetlands
Restore shoreline habitats and prevent further
losses.
Implement comprehensive wetland protection,
restoration and acquisition programs and provide op-
portunities for public involvement.

Fisheries and other living
resources
Restore and sustain fish and shellfish populations,


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especially juvenile fish, and encourage the diversity of
other living resources in Sarasota Bay.
Develop techniques to orient boating activities to
suitable areas in order to protect sensitive habitats, e.g.,
seagrass protection, turbidity reduction and manatee
habitats.
Maximize opportunities for re-establishing and
protecting seagrass habitat throughout Sarasota Bay.

Recreation
Maintain or increase, where feasible, managed
public access, particularly in high-use areas, to Sarasota
Bay and its resources.
Reduce recreational use impacts on fragile or
threatened natural resource areas within Sarasota Bay.
Develop educational programs to increase user
awareness of the natural resources of Sarasota Bay.

Governance
Support the establishment of coordinated multi-
jurisdictional efforts for managing Sarasota Bay.
Support the continuation of the existing commit-
tee structure and appropriate support staff to ensure
effective implementation of the Sarasota Bay Compre-
hensive Conservation and Management Plan.


Outstanding
cooperation
appreciated
Marion Cavanagh, left, public
affairs officerfor the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary, Div. VIII and
Flotilla 8-3, presents certificates
of appreciation to, from left, Anna
Maria Island Power Squadron
Commander Mary Ann Tyrell,
Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy
McChesney and Holmes Beach
Mayor Rich Bohnenbergerfor
their part in promoting National
Safe Boating Week festivities.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie
Pierola and Councilman Walter
Grace, Jim Cavanagh and Is-
lander feature writer Cynthia Finn
were also recognized. Islander
Photo: Bonner Presswood.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 13 JlI


Big fish, big bucks
The first place winners in the Third Annual Fishing the Islands Tournament proudly accepted their check for
$5,000 from tournament sponsor Bill Lowman. The team of Glenn Gee, Ray Ciemniecki, Danny Jordan and
Dave Porter brought in five grouper and a red snapper for a total catch of 105.4 pounds and 289.9 tourna-
ment points.


In the money
The Galati team came in second in the tournament to
take home $2,000 for a catch of grouper worth 244.8
points. Front, Chris Galati. From back left Glenn
Corder, Richard Gumpton and George Reuss. Hank
Williams' third place team was a mere three points
behind with six grouper for a prize of $1,000. Jack
Whiteside, Mike Biggins and Steve Heintz placed
fourth, fifth and sixth, respectively.
~--,' r -%


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usl
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Littlest prizewinner
Derek Smith, 6, ofBradenton, shared a three-way tie
for Best Inshore Catch in the youth division for his
21-inch snook. Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood


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Island fishing

tournament pays

off big
Capt. Mike Heistand weighed in the winning catch
at the Mar Vista docks on Longboat Key and said, "It
was an impressive catch."
The (winning) fishermen stuck around to watch
other weigh-ins at the dock, then rode back by Island
Discount Tackle, where the results were turned in.
"They were pretty anxious," Heistand said but no one
knows the winner until the points are added up.
And rightfully so. Their winning team's catch of
five grouper and an American red snapper earned the
foursome $5,000.
The tournament winner is determined by a system
of pre-established points per fish species and points per
pound.
It was a rough night of fishing offshore with high
winds and high seas but the team stuck it out. Glenn
Gee, Ray Ciemniecki, Danny Jordan and Dave Porter
were newcomers to the tournament but will surely be
back next year.
A total of 94 boats fished the tournament and at
$170 per boat, the total proceeds will exceed $15,980
not including the sale of barbecue and raffle tickets.
Even after the cash prizes and the bills are paid, that
should leave a good take for the beneficiary, the Anna
Maria Island Community Center.
The barbecue dinner and tournament party on Sun-
day was also a success with hundreds of fishers and
their families taking advantage of the prize raffles, fun
and entertainment by the Saltwater Cowboys. The food
was donated this year by Mar Vista, the Sandbar and
Beach House restaurants, all adding to the benefit for
the Center.
Complete tournament results may be reviewed at
Island Discount Tackle. Additional winners included:
Adult Best Offshore Catch: Dave Stonecypher for
a 21.9-pound wahoo;
Youth (under 16) Best Offshore Catch: Mike Bean
Jr. for an 8.5-pound grouper;
Adult Best Backwater Catch: Jim Nelson for a 33-
inch snook;
Youth (under 16) Best Backwater Catch: A three-
way tie between Bryce Johnson, age 10, for a 21-inch
snook, Derek Smith, age 6, for a 21-inch snook, and
Shawn Sapuppo, age 15, for a 5.5-pound grouper;
Largest Trout: Jeff Harnish for a 25-incher;
Largest Snook: Jim Nelson for a 33-incher;
Largest Redfish: Steve Gitt for a 30-incher;
Largest Grouper: Glenn Gee for a 22-pounder;
Largest Trout, Redfish or Snook on Fly Fishing
Tackle: Mark Bradow for a 20-inch snook.



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'Ij PAGE 14 0 JUNE 22, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Two manatees die

Saturday in

Sarasota Bay
Two of the most-sighted manatees in the Sarasota
Bay area died Saturday of as-yet-unknown causes.
SI Both manatees were about 3 1/2 years old and had
r- -no obvious injuries, according to Mote Marine Labo-
ratory officials.
Wedges, the male, was discovered near Skiers Is-
land at north Siesta Key. Anchor, the female, was dis-
covered just north of the Sarasota Yacht Club near St.
Armands Key.
Necropsies performed on both mammals were in-
conclusive, according to Virginia Haley, Mote Direc-
tor of Communications.
"There were no specific injuries on them, their
stomachs were full and they didn't die from an encoun-
ter with a boat," she said.
Blood and other samples were taken from the
manatees and tests will be performed during the next
S few weeks to attempt to determine cause of death,
Haley said.
Wedges was the most-sighted manatee in the re-
.- .. gion, Haley said, with 62 reports from residents and
-~ visitors spotting him moving through the Bay waters.
'. Haley said he was one of the few manatees who tended
to reside in Sarasota Bay throughout the warm summer
months.
Manatees generally travel through the Bay but do
Anchor passes away not stop in the region.
A young female manatee named Anchor was found dead Saturday by the Sarasota Yacht Club in Sarasota. Haley said it was very unusual for two manatees to
Cause of death is still undetermined. Pictured are volunteers preparing to transport the mammal to St. Peters- die within the same period of time in roughly the same
burg for study. Islander Photo: Paul Roat area with no specific cause of death.




Manatees: so ugly they're loved to death


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
First the bad news about manatees:
They're big and fat and about as appealing as the
lump of semi-frisky bread dough they resemble.
They're awkward and so slow that barnacles grow on
their hide. They need help from their worst enemy, too
dumb to take care of themselves.
Legend has it that old-time sailors mistook them
for mermaids. If that was the case, those old-time trips
involved something other than a square-rigger. It must
have been a long time between shore leaves in Norfolk,
because even if they were beautiful, 1,000 pounds of
gorgeous won't cut it.
Just when you think they have a face that only a
mother could love, it turns out that quite a few moth-
ers don't love those little faces enough to keep them
alive.

The up side
Now the good news about manatees:
People love them.
Natives and tourists, kids and adults, gentlefolk
and tough guys expose most people here to a mana-
tee and they get as misty and mushy as a ... well, a
manatee.
One of the locals who thinks a lot of manatees is
Jessica Koelsch, staff biologist in the Mote Marine
Laboratory marine mammal program. Mote's manatee
person. She probably knows more than anyone here
about manatees, and loves them anyway.
There are maybe 2,000 Florida manatees, half on
the east coast and half on the Gulf side. Ten percent of
them die every year, 193 in 1994, 48 in the first two
months of 1995 compared to 22 at that time last year.

Hunted down
There were many thousands of manatees when
Europeans first arrived here. Hunting them for meat, oil
and leather cut the manatee population way back. Now
most of the deaths are caused by power boats, 50 of the
193 last year.
Propellers and pollution and other things that make
human habitat ruin manatee habitat.
Manatees can't live in water below 68 degrees, so
in winter they either herd up in warm water from
springs or power plants, or head south to the Ten Thou-
sand Islands. In summer they spread along the coast as
far north as the Panhandle. A lot of them hang out here


much of the year, with concentrations in Anna Maria
Sound, Palma Sola Bay and near Sister Keys at the
northeast tip of Longboat Key. One study counted 25
to 30 in four hours at just one Manatee County site.
As long as the food is plentiful they're not picky
about what it is. Any vegetation will do, but mostly
they prefer seagrasses. That leads to trouble, for they
graze on grasses that grow in shallow water and mana-
tees escape boats mainly by sinking deep.
Mote's Koelsch says they can be quite agile in
spurts; still, every manatee has propeller scars. It would
be best if boats stayed their distance, but when a boater
spots a manatee he inevitably heads over for a closer
look. And attracts other boaters.
Only man is a threat, says Koelsch. Manatees are
so big and strong that even sharks and alligators leave
them alone. But they are so gentle and tame and trust-
ing that people can get close, although it's against the
law for swimmers to seek them out.
As if pollution and careless mankind weren't
enough, manatees have their own nature working
against them. Koelsch says a manatee is pregnant 13


Dolphin study
The "Flipper flap" has fizzled and flopped in
Sarasota Bay.
Despite threats of clanging pipes and parachut-
ing into the path of Mote Marine Laboratory scien-
tists in an effort to halt their work in studying the
area's dolphins, animal activists did little beside
take a brief boat ride until their rental boat was
taken away from them.
The activists, who had protested the capture-
and-release program at Mote as inhumane, quietly
left town in the wake of public support for Dr.
Randall Wells and his dolphin research efforts.
A circuit court judge placed an injunction
against Ben White of Friends of Animals in Port
Townsend, Wash., and others to stay more than 100
yards away from Mote researchers. White briefly
took to the water, but was beached when managers
of the rental boat business from which he had rented
a boat retrieved the vessel after police said they
could impound the vessel if White were arrested.
Joining White was Ric O'Barry from the Dol-


months with each 70-pound calf, then the calf hangs
around at least a year, probably two. So a manatee re-
produces only once every two to five years.

Marginal mamas
And now comes word out of Miami that, like hu-
mans, more manatee mothers are failing their children.
The cycle begins with baby manatees orphaned by
boat propellers, and those that survive becoming moth-
ers without benefit of maternal training. And with
fewer adult female manatees available for reproduc-
tion, more younger ones are getting pregnant and they
aren't mature enough to be good mothers. They often
abandon their young, which either die or go on to re-
peat the cycle.
What's a human to do?
Drive boats slowly in manatee waters. Don't harass
manatees or feed them or give them fresh water. Send
photos of them to Mote along with the location and date
of the sighting, so people like Koelsch can learn more
about manatees and their habits and figure out ways to
help them survive.


protest fizzles
phin Project in the Florida Keys, a former dolphin
trainer-turned-anti-dolphin-capture advocate.
O'Barry gained fame in the 1960s as dolphin
trainer for the television program "Flipper." He has
since worked toward releasing all performing dol-
phins.
The only sign of protesters was a lone banner
streaming behind an airplane proclaiming, "Mote,
leave the dolphins alone."
White had called for "everything from filming
to driving to direct-action interference. We wish to
conduct our own experiment to measure the toxins,
aging and genetics in Mr. Randy Wells and see
how he reacts to pursuit, capture and the pulling of
a blood and tooth sample."
Dr. Wells is the lead researcher at Mote con-
ducting the dolphin studies, something he and his
team have been doing for the past 25 years.
Wells has said his research is critical in deter-
mining toxin levels in dolphins in a step toward
protecting the marine mammals.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 22, 1995 m PAGE 15 BIS

Islanders meet challenge at horseshoe tournament


The late Ray Simches, former mayor of Anna
Maria, challenged the Island cities to unite in the game
of horseshoes. It was his wish for the cities to come
together in the spirit of a game for fun and goodwill.
The challenge will be met by horseshoe players
from all over Anna Maria Island this weekend when
The Islander Bystander sponsors the first tourna-
ment on Saturday, June 24, 8:30 a.m., at the Anna
Maria city hall pits.
Late registration and a game draw will take place
from 8:30 to 9 am. followed by round robin tourna-
ment play.


Fireworks will take off in Bradenton Beach in cel-
ebration of the July 4 holiday this year.
Beach House Restaurant Proprietor Ed Chiles has
requested and received permission to put on a fireworks
display to celebrate the Fourth of July on July 3.
"We will have a certified 'shooter' to ignite the
display and will carry liability insurance," Chiles said.
"The show would begin approximately 20 minutes af-
ter dark and last approximately 20 minutes."
Chiles is hoping other business owners in the city
will contribute financially to enhance the display and,
if successful, continue for years to come. "This is
something we can really publicize," he said.
Sponsors who have lent their support over
$3,700 so far to the fireworks display include the
newly formed Bradenton Beach Business Owners As-
sociation, Bridge Tender Inn, Bradenton Beach Ma-
rina, Firkins Motors, Gulf Drive Cafe, Electrical Ser-
vice & Maintenance, Beach Barn, Duncan House,
Catalina Resort, Gulfstream Beach Resort, Eatman &
Smith, Sunset Productions, Joe's Eats & Sweets and
The Islander Bystander.
Chiles said more sponsors are being sought, and he
added an incentive sponsors will have a reserved
table at the Beach House for the fireworks display plus
a complimentary bottle of champagne.


Teams may represent businesses or streets, blocks
or neighborhoods, families or friends. The entry fee for
the tournament is $20 per team with proceeds going to
a special fund for new baseball and soccer field lights
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
The Islander Bystander initiated an account at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center at First
National Bank of Manatee's Island office for "light
donations." It is hoped we will be able to dedicate
new lights to the memory of three very important
and significant political figures in the history of the
City of Anna Maria who passed away in 1994 and


Boom! will go the fireworks at the Beach House July
3. Islander Photo: Courtesy Jim Taylor-Made
Pyrotechnic Entertainment
Commemorative T-shirts will be sold and will in-
clude the names of the event sponsors.
The fireworks display will be set off from a barge
moored off the beach at the Beach House, 200 Gulf
Drive, and should be visible for miles up and down the
expanse of beach in Bradenton Beach.
Contact Chiles at the Beach House to offer support
for the event at 779-2222.


1995: Ray Simches, Mary Ross and Ernie Cagnina.
One additional honoree is still very much with us.
He's done so much for others and still does he is
Snooks Adams,a former Island police chief who dedi-
cates a great deal of time and money for the benefit of
Island youth.
It's time we honored the likes of Snooks Adams -
a great friend and a great storyteller.
Entry forms will be available at city hall Saturday
morning or in advance at The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Drive in the Island Shopping Center, Holmes
Beach. Call 778-7978 for information.


Anna Maria

invites citizens

to apply for

board positions
Applications are available at Anna Maria City
Hall for residents interested in serving on the Code
Enforcement Board or the Citizens Recognition
Committee.
City Clerk Peggy Nelson expects there will be
one or two upcoming vacancies on the seven-mem-
ber code board for three-year terms. The board
meets when necessary based on reports of viola-
tions from the Public Works Department.
The city commission has revived the recogni-
tion committee to recommend citizens deserving
honor for outstanding achievement, service to the
community or heroism.
Committee members are the city clerk; mem-
bers of the city's official boards; a representative
from the Anna Maria Island Community Center;
representatives from the business, educational and
religious communities; and one other city resident.
For more information, contact City Hall at
778-0781.


1995 Ray Simches Memorial


Island Cities Horseshoe Tournament


Anna Maria City Hall June 24 8:30 a.m.
Register in advance at The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.
Registration between 8:30 and 9 a.m. at the event at
r Anna Maria City Hall. $20 team fee. (Proceeds to Anna
Maria Island Community Center
"Little League/Soccer Field Light Fund"
SPONSORED BY


IISLANDE


Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:
Age: Phone
Signature:


@ Name:
Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:
Age: .Phone
Signature:


The following waiver must be signed before participation in any Islander Bystander sponsored
activity. Players must be 18 years of age. In consideration of your accepting my/our registration
fee, I hereby, for myself, my dependents) and minor children, and our executors and admin-
istrators, waive and release any and all rights and claims for damages I or my dependents)
or minor children have or may have against The Islander Bystander and it's representatives,
successors, assigns, employees, contractors, or volunteers (collectively The Islander By-
stander) for any and all injuries or death suffered by myself, my dependents) or minor chil-
dren at any activity sponsored or monitored by the The Islander Bystander, held upon its prop-


Date


Information: 778-7978
erty, or through the use of its equipment. If I or my minor children or dependents) should
suffer any injury, illness, or death while participating in an activity, I authorize instructors to
use their sole discretion in having me or my dependents) and minor children transported to
a medical facility and I take all responsibility for this action, including costs. Also, I understand that
no refunds are given unless the activity is canceled or a doctor's release of all claims of any na-
ture whatsoever for myself, my minor children or dependents including but not limited claims arising
due to the sole joint, contributory, concurrent or gross negligence of the Islander Bystander.


Bradenton Beach fireworks cap off

July Fourth weekend


Date


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FM PAGE 18 m JUNE 22, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Volunteer gives new meaning to educational TV


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
John Pocino is not officially a teacher and based on
his age he's not one of the kids, either. But he's created
a role for himself at the Anna Maria Elementary School
that has made some headlines and earned him recog-
nition from the Volunteer Services of Manatee County.
During this 1994-95 school year, morning an-
nouncements at Anna Maria Elementary have gone
from the old public-address system to television broad-
casts.
Pocino is the producer/director of "The Morning
Show" and oversees more than $20,000 worth of tech-
nology and 27 students.
A former longtime paramedic turned TV producer,
Pocino moved to this area three years ago with his wife
Rebecca and their sons, Michael and Bryan. They gave
up an active lifestyle in New Jersey for a quieter life on
the Gulf of Mexico. Actually, it's life on the bay in
Bradenton Beach.
A year ago, Pocino and Island photographer Jack
Elka got involved in the school film work. Today
there's a lot more to the production and a whole lot
more learning through the producing and editing than
originally envisioned, says Pocino.
Pocino's own company, Sunset Productions, is a
consortium of professionals offering top-quality video
and recording work.


'Morning Show' stars

shine at school
Tom Hanks, David Letterman, and Winona Ryder
don't have anything on the stars of the Anna Maria
Elementary School "Morning Show."
The Second Annual Academy Awards celebration
for participants of the school's daily morning an-
nouncement broadcast was held Thursday night at the
Beach House restaurant.
Student cast members, technicians and some of the
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE



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"It's a wrap," John Pocino tells his "Morning
Show" cast Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.
So what's in all this volunteer time for him?
"I don't know,". Pocino smiles. "I think it's the


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kids. I just really enjoy it."
He continues: "Every time I think about quitting -
because of its effect on my family time or my work
schedule someone will come up to me and tell me
how much they appreciate the effort, how much it's
helped their child."
Never at a loss for words, Pocino edits and re-ed-
its his original "I don't know."
"For once I'm able to have input into the educa-
tional system instead of just complaining," says
Pocino. School productions beyond "The Morning
Show" involve research, writing, editing and on-cam-
era education that tie into many aspects of what the
students are learning in class, he says.
Pocino, 41, also believes that school isn't what it
was in his day. "This isn't preparation for life like it
used to be. This is life," he says. "These kids know
what's going on in the world and they're coming in
with their own theories and ideas about why."
Pocino knows all parents and educators don't agree
with his philosophical and literal view, as in mixed
reviews for a Jay Leno/O.J. Simpson piece broadcast
over the school television system.
"If it's in society, the kids should be aware of it,"
says Pocino.
One thing's for sure, the kids are aware of John
Pocino and his impact on the '94-95 school year.


Alan Jenkins made his
appearance in full tuxedo
with "tails," much to the
delight of Principal Jim
Kronus.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 M PAGE 19 i[G


John Pocino proudly displays the plaque presented
to him by all the students including sons Michael and
Bryan, center.


'Morning Show' shines
stars of last year's show arrived by limosine to cheers
from the crowd and flashing lights of the paparazzi.
Principal Jim Kronus had high praise for school
volunteer John Pocino, who initiated the program and
oversees it with help from school librarian Warren
Phillips and a core group of volunteer parents.
The highlight of the evening was a surprise presen-
tation by the students of an engraved plaque to Pocino
- a touching tribute to the man they said taught them
about television and a whole lot more that they would
use to achieve success throughout their lives.
An obviously emotional Pocino thanked everyone
for the team effort required to do the show and closed
by saying "I love these kids ... they're No. 1 with me."
That summed up the evening for everyone.


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EARLY BIRDS $5.95* MON-SAT 11 AM 6 PM
HAPPY HOUR LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
In The Lounge Only BARBARA JOHNSEN
12 pm 7 pm Monday Saturday 6PM-10OPM
1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton CATERING &
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM* CLOSED SUNDAY BANQUETFACILITIES AVAILABLE 795-7065U





















OPEN DAILY I1:30 AM 792-5523
9915 Manatee Ave. W* Reservations Accepted MR


The winners.


Anna Maria Elementary
School Television Awards
Islander Photos:
Bonner Presswood


I ,


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $725
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls $7.2
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


EYE OPENER... 2 eggs toast,
home fries and coffee... 6nly $1.75


Island Inn Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach :


Si Fi.







Ej] PAGE 20 M JUNE 22, 1995 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Burger wars
As if life weren't tough enough with battles over
bridges, pigs and piano teaching now come the
burger wars instigated by none less than Sean Murphy,
owner of Beach Bistro.
Just as Pat Geyer, "Miss Duffy," and her crew at
Duffy's Tavern were loading up for vacation, Murphy
issued the first volley with an ad in this paper stating
his Beach Bistro and "little beach bar" would vie for
best burger on the Island.
He quotes Island notable, Janet Aubry, comment-
ing on the Bistro's new burger offering, "This is the
best cheeseburger I've ever had."
He went so far as to warn, "Look out Miss Duffy."
Well, good burgers seem natural at Duffy's Tav-
ern and the Bistro is going to have to work hard to
take this title.
After all, Duffy's was listed in USA Today in 1989
as Florida's only entry on a list of "Some More Joints
that Really Cook" and noted for its burgers. More re-
cently, in March, they were written up in the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette. As the writer notes, "The cult following
that is Duffy's patronage calls these 'the best burgers
in town.'"
What we frequent patrons of Duffy's all know is
that the atmosphere and friendly attitude of the Geyers
and all the other patrons is as good as the burgers. If
you're new, the atmosphere can be as cold as the beer.
Whatever you do, don't ask for fries, iced tea, lemon
or even for ice. It's a sure tip-off.
Murphy says at last the Bistro's own burger
will be launched on the Bistro's bar menu.
Two years ago Bistro opened for lunch during the
season (alas, no more) and listed a burger on the menu
- The World's Best Burger. Under that listing the
menu said, "Self-serve, please call 778-2501 for pick-
up at Duffy's Tavern." The only charge was for the
table rental.
Murphy says, "Because of our standards only


cy b 10519 Cortez Road/t
792-5300 I
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH
PIZZA BUFFET
$3.99 *. d

DINNER
PIZZA BUFFET o0*1

$4.49


the very best our burger will be offered only after 7
p.m. when Duffy's is closed."
With the burger comes a great grouper sandwich,
also offered only in the little Bistro bar.
And the bar offers an opportunity for a more casual
evening and some grazing among a fine list of appetiz-
ers, soup, salads and gourmet pizza. Perhaps a cocktail
- since Bistro acquired a liquor license last winter.
Can't get that at Duffy's.
Murphy takes the burger contest a step further with


a nationally acclaimed "Big Bucks Burger."
Not to be confused with the regular bar burger, this
top-grade, 8-ounce cheeseburger is lavishly garnished
with a choice of cheese, portobello mushrooms, horse-
radish potatoes with hunter's sauce ... and a bottle of
Grand Cordon Mumm's premium champagne (nor-
mally $100 plus, per bottle by itself).
Each patron imbibing in the $100 burger and its
accompaniments is photographed with the victuals
and appropriately framed and hung on the ceiling.
A lofty spot for the loftiest of burgers and cli-
entele.
The Big Bucks Burger was launched with a recep-
tion at the Beach Bistro honoring its creators, Fred
Sullivan and Chef Michael Tansil, co-owners of
Michael's Mid-City Grille in New Orleans, birthplace
of the Big Bucks Burger.
Bring a Ben Franklin and as Murphy puts it, "Get
satiated, bubbled and framed."
Your comments on burgers are welcome. The
Geyers are back from vacation and the grill is ready.
There are plenty of good burgers all over Anna
Maria Island and we'd like to hear from you about your
favorite. What makes 'em so good?


1~'


Events
"Corky" the Cougar will stop by the Manatee
County Central Library, escorted by Sergeant
Kenyan of the Manatee County Sheriff's Depart-
ment, to share time with children as part of the
library's Florida Library Youth Program. The pro-
gram, aimed at children 7 and up, will be held on
Thursday, June 22, at 2 p.m. The library is located at
1301 Barcarrota Blvd.W., Bradenton.
The American Littoral Society will hold a Palmer
Point restoration workday on Saturday, July 1, from
8:30 am. to noon. The project, led by John Sarkozy, is
to remove invasive exotic trees and plant native species.
Palmer Point is a county-owned 30-acre site at the north
end of Casey Key in the former Midnight Pass area.
Cost: None. Information: 966-7308.
The Florida Association of Medical Paraprofes-


sionals is hosting a "Care Giver Total Health & Well
Being Fair" on Saturday, June 24, at the Manatee
County Convention Center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. The fair is open to the public. Cost: free.
So you aren't stalled on the information high-
way, the Manatee County Central Library will of-
fer a Free-Net/Internet program on Friday, June 23,
at 2 p.m. The program will include an overview of
Free-Nets and the Internet, a live on-line demon-
stration connecting the Tallahassee Free-Net and
the Internet and an opportunity to have questions
answered. Information: 748-5555.
TV Newschannel 8 On Your Side will con-
duct a community forum on Tuesday, June 27, at
the United Way, 1701 14th St. W., Bradenton, at 6
p.m. in the Manateen Meeting Room. Information:
746-7117, Volunteer Services of Manatee County.


r ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
R FINE WINE SPIRITS BEER ICE


SGordons Gin
1.75 L
1499
Less 3" MIR
Buy 2 get
7" MIR


Michelob
Michelob Light
Michelob Dry 329
6 pk bottles 9


[ Smirnoff
1.75 L
S\ 1499

SSeagram's VO
( V A) 1.75 L
1799


California Wines V
Check Out
Our In-Store
Specials


Hours Mon Thurs 9-9 Fri & Sat 9-10 ~ Sun 9-8
Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-2507


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven.' Bgliz
Binffi, Pat Geyer, Owner.
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


If You've Tried The

^e WBQI


on Tuesday...


Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
38.3-2391


DY =OCK=N
778-7034
Call For Nightly
Drink Specials

June 22, 23 & 24
Willy Steele
* 0
Be Ready For A
DRY DOCK
FREE BBQ
BLOWOUT
S JULY 2
Mark Your
Calendar

Happy Hour
Daily
7 am 11 am
&4pm-8pm
& 4 pm 9 pm on
Mon & Tues
(Free Food During
Happy Hour on Friday)


I _







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 22, 1995 M PAGE 21 E3


Klearwater Systems opens in
Bradenton Beach
Klearwater Systems of Florida, Inc., owned by
John Wendell of Bradenton Beach, has introduced the
Klearwater (ZN) System to the Manatee County area.
The Klearwater (ZN) System uses a unique zinc al-
loy to control algae and bacteria in swimming pools
and spas through a simple flow-through system. When
combined with a small amount of chlorine or bromine
the system is guaranteed to slash chemical use by well
over 50 percent.
The system has no moving parts, no elements to
replace, requires no electricity and is installed in a re-
turn or suction line. Models are available to fit residen-
tial pools and spas up to 60,000 gallons and commer-
cial units to treat pools, fountains, water slides and any
circulating system up to 1.5 million gallons.
Klearwater Systems of Florida, Inc., may be con-
tacted at 778-8659 and is located at 117 Seventh St. N.
#5, Bradenton Beach.
Seery appointed sales manager
for products division
Michael Seery of Neal & Neal Realtors has been
appointed sales manager of the company's new prod-
ucts division.
The division will handle sales for Neal Communi-
ties at Hawthorn Park in northwest Bradenton and Pe-
ridia Isles at Peridia Golf and Country Club.
Seery is a 24-year veteran of real estate sales,
building and developing in both Florida and Illinois. He
recently completed the required courses for New
Homes Sales and Sales Management Strategies at
Building University in Ft. Lauderdale.
He is the incoming chairman of the Easter Seal
Society of Southwest Florida.

Prudential announces top
producers
The Prudential Florida Realty, Anna Maria Island
office, announced that sales associate Karin Stephan
was the top seller and lister for the month of May.




**0 *





PIZZA BURGERS FRIES


5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located in Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs lam-9pm Fri & Sat 1lam-1 Opm


BEACH OLYAiC$ BEIN
AT THE BEACHHOUgE


Get in on the FUN of Beach Olympics
at The Beachhousel You'ill have a blast
as teams vie for prizes with wild, wacky
games, Sunday, June 25 from 10-5.
proceeds benefit The United Way.
And while you're here, try our great
neW Early Bird Specials, all under $10,
from 3-6 daily



great food. great beach. great fun.
200 Gulf Drive North, Braderton Beach (941) 779-2222


I


By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
June 8, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 32-foot pleasure craft
one day overdue from a trip between Sarasota Bay
and the Dry Tortugas. The station began a commu-
nications check with all local marinas and bridges,
as well with other Coast Guard units between Boca
Grande to Key West, with negative results. A fixed-
wing aircraft was launched from Air Station
Clearwater and searched the area from Tampa to the
Dry Tortugas with no successful sightings of the
boat. The vessel remains unaccounted for.
June 9, Boardings. Two pleasure craft were
boarded and found to have no.safety violations.
June 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received four reports of vessels that were dis-
abled in or near Sarasota Bay. The station requested
the assistance of the Coast Guard Auxiliary to assist
the disabled boats.
June 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an 18-foot pleasure craft
aground in Sarasota Bay. The station requested the
assistance of Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel
26084231, which transported the vessel's passen-
gers ashore. The boat's captain made arrangements
from shore to free their grounded vessel.
June 10, Search and rescue /assistance. Station


Top producers announced
Island Real Estate in Holmes Beach announces that
Paul Collins was the organization's top listing agent and
Richard Freeman was the top selling agent for May.

Advocate attends Realtor
institute course
Michael Advocate, a real estate agent with Smith
Realtors at 5910 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, has suc-
cessfully completed the first two parts of the Realtor
Institute Course.
The Florida Realtor Institute course of study con-
sists of three, one-week sessions of classroom instruc-

ANCIOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


NO EXIT
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
JUNE23 & 24 10P.M.

3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085




RESTAURANT & MARINA
TUES PRIME RIB NIGHT 9.95

WED CHICKEN & RIBS 8.95

FRI STEAK & FISH GRILL 14.95

SAT LUAU, POOLSIDE 14.95

SUN 1-6PM POOLSIDE BBQ 8.95
WITH LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
SUNDAY 6 10
"BIG MAMA"
STARTING JUNE 25TH


BRIAN BEEBE
PLAYS DANCE MUSIC TUES SAT
8PM TO MIDNIGHT

BY LAND...OIl SEA...MARKiEII #33
6000 BLK OF GUIJLF OF MEXICO ) 11
595 DREAM ISLAND IIOAI)
LONGBOAT KEY
1383 5565


Cortez received three reports of vessels that were
taking on water in the rough seas that accompanied
a line of thunderstorms that passed through the area.
The station's 41-foot boat was launched to assist the
vessels, but since the squalls passed quickly through
the area and the rough seas subsided, all the vessels
were able to safely reach port unassisted.
June 10, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued a boating safety violation for not having
readily accessible both the personal flotation devices
and a throwable flotation device.
June 13, Search and rescue /assistance. Sta-
tion Cortez received a report of a man who had
fallen overboard from a boat being towed by a
commercial salvage vessel near the west side of
Egmont Key. The station's 41-foot boat was
launched in addition to a small boat from the
Coast Guard Cutter White Sumac. The commer-
cial salvor put a swimmer in the water to assist the
man overboard. The unconscious man was lo-
cated about 10 minutes later and taken to the
beach, where CPR was performed. A Coast Guard
helicopter was called to transport the man to
Bayfront Medical Center. The patient later died
from his injury. It was determined that the man
was attempting to cut the anchor line when he was
tossed into the air in the heavy seas, struck his
head and was washed overboard.


tion, with examinations, that lead to the Graduate, Re-
altor Institute designation.

Ackerman receives honors
Barbara Ackerman, co-owner of Royal Palm Realty,
Sarasota, has been recognized by four Sarasota real estate
organizations for her level of sales in 1994-95.
For the third consecutive year Ackerman has been
recognized by her peers in the Women's Council of RE-
ALTORS as a Mega-Million Dollar Producer. Active in
local real estate for 17 years, Ackerman has become one
of the area's foremost experts in premier waterfront and
golfing communities.






... -
l*


-- . . Chefs/Proprietors
,'' Andrea & Ed Spring
Gourmet Early Supper
Nightly 5:00 to 6:30
SOUPS
Black Bean ...................................... cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Gazpacho ........................................ cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Sopa de Ajo garlic soup, cheese crouton cup 1.95 bowl 2.75
Seafood Gumbo .............................. cup 2.50 bowl 3.50
SALADS
Caesar............................... ......... small 2.95 large 4.95
Watercress Walnut Salad .............small 2.95 large 4.95
Warm Mediterranean Salad ............small 2.95 large 4.95
APPETIZERS
Portobello and Artichoke Crostine......................... 5.95
Pan Et fresh spinach, cream, parmesan baked on .. 4.95
crusty Italian garlic bread, smothered in melted mozzarella
Hummus and Babaganoush with pita bread .............. 4.95
Shoa Mei dumplings filled with shrimp and pork ... 5.95
Spanakopita spinach and feta in phyllo crust .......... 3.95
Fettucini Alfredo in a tempting size .................... 3.95
ENTREES
Spring Omlette zucchini, bacon, swiss, cream cheese. 6.95
Herb Buttered Salmon rice or potato, vegetables ... 9.95
Shrimp Ajillo rice or potato, vegetables................. 8.95
Chicken Breast Kiev or marinated and grilled ........ 8.50
Veal Picatta or Schnitzel, rice and vegetables.......... 9.50
Fettucina Alfredo a supper sized portion, vegetables. 7.50
GRILLED GOURMET PIZZA
Artichoke Heart, Parmesan, Feta, Mozzarella, Fresh Spinach.... 5.95
Sundried Tomato, Pepperoni, Parmesan, Mozzarella, Provolonc.. 5.95

\1\te Sunday Brunch
4E(Us 9am 1:30pm


Spea f S
,,,ert


Espresso Cappuccino
Coffee & Teas
Also! Late Evenings


You are welcome to bring your favorite wine or beer.
9707 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Reservations Suggested 778-9399


I


__


fiPI i 1r il 'i


L'I'


I


all


I


I


I


I


I


1


I BUSINESS


. M 0







jI~ PAGE 22 M JUNE 22, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
June 9, burglary to an automobile, 407 Magnolia,
Anna Maria Island Community Center. A person un-
known removed a purse from an open vehicle.
June 10, Marchman Act, 600 block of North
Shore Drive. The subject was totally incoherent and
unable to function as a result of drinking alcohol, said
the report. He was passed out in a friends' vehicle and
could not be awakened without the help of EMS. He
was placed in protective custody.
June 10, stolen moped, 100 block of North Bay
Boulevard. The complainant reported that his moped,
parked in a carport, was removed by a person un-
known.
June 11, criminal mischief, 400 block of Magno-
lia. The complainant reported a person unknown shat-
tered the rear window of his vehicle with a BB gun or
slingshot.

Bradenton Beach
June 9, criminal mischief, 2408 Gulf Drive,Via
Roma Resort. The complainant reported persons un-
known threw the lounge chairs and tables into the pool
and broke or knocked over four concrete statues. A
guest reported seeing 10 to 12 juveniles throwing chairs
into the pool. Damages were $500.
June 10, theft, 110 Bridge Street, Sonnydaze. The
complainant reported a person unknown removed two
black wrought iron chairs with cushions valued at $75.
June 10, criminal mischief, 1325 Gulf Drive,
Catalina Resort. The complainant reported after a sub-
ject checked out he found broken bathroom tiles and
sheet rock. Damages were $100.
June 13, retail theft, 1325 Gulf Drive, Catalina
Resort. The complainant reported two persons checked
out and removed a pillowcase, two bath towels, a blan-
ket and a wash cloth valued at $51.56.
June 13, retail theft, criminal mischief, 2408 Gulf
Drive N. ,Via Roma Resort. The complainant reported
a person unknown removed six urn-style ashtrays val-
ued at $270 and punctured a tire on his vehicle. Dam-
age was $60.
June 14, grant theft, 116 Bridge St., Sports
Lounge. The complaint reported he placed his cellular
phone, valued at $600, on the bar and when he went to
retrieve it, it was gone.
June 15 trespassing, 2408 Gulf Drive,Via Roma





Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun,
a ray of sunshine? Look no further -
it's all in The Islander Bystander.
Don't miss a week!




[r iinH &6hhof


HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails,
---------------I
Lunch or
Dinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER
ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE.
Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 6/30/95
Wednesday Nights
Blind Draw Darts 8 P.M.
Food & Drink Specials
Free Giveaways.
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thurs.4 to 10
SFriday Noon to 10
Sat., Sun. Sam to 10pm
RESTAURANT Serving Breakfast 8 'til
n, Pub Hours 'Til '


A


-1


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


Resort. The officer on patrol observed five subjects in
the area of the Jacuzzi at the resort which is clearly
marked with no trespassing signs. As the officer ap-
proached, two subjects ran onto the beach but returned
a few minutes later. The officer noted that all subjects
smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage and were
belligerent and uncooperative. All were issued sum-
monses for trespassing.

Holmes Beach
June 9, burglary to an automobile, 3200 block of
Sixth Avenue. The victim reported a person unknown
entered his vehicle, removed a radio valued at $100,
broke the dash panel and pulled out the control panel
for the air conditioner, defroster and heater. Damages
were $150.
June 9, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $100,
300 block of Clark Drive.
June 9, missing person, 50 block of 67th Street.
The complainant reported his wife, who has
Alzheimer's Disease, was missing. The officer located
her in the 6500 block of Marina Drive and transported
her home.
June 9, vandalism, 5354 Gulf Drive, Dolphin Day
Care. The complaint reported person unknown broke
the plate glass in the entrance door. Damages were
$250.
June 9, petty theft, 5340 Marina Drive, Barber
Shop. The complaint parked his bicycle in front of the
barber shop, went inside, then observed a juvenile sub-
ject, who was with a group of juveniles, take his bi-
cycle. He gave chase but did not catch the subject The
officer was unable to locate the subject.
June 10, traffic, East Bay Drive and Manatee
Avenue. The officer responded to a crash in which a
single vehicle traveled north on East Bay Drive,
through the intersection at Manatee Avenue and into
the entrance to West Bay Cove. The vehicle struck
rocks and shrubbery then became stuck on top of the
rocks.
The subject and passenger fled on foot but were
apprehended by a Bradenton Beach officer and brought
back to the scene. The driver said he fled because he
had been drinking and did not have a driver's license.
He was issued a summons to appear for no valid
driver's license.
June 10, vandalism, 300 block of 73rd Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown let the air out
of the tires on two vehicles in the driveway.
June 10, found property a bicycle, 200 block


Joe's Eats & Sweets


jHo Homemade Soups, Salads
& Deli Sandwiches
Homemade Ice Cream & Yogurts
MADE ON LOCATION
SuPar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge 778-0007
Sun. 12-9:30/Mon. & Wed.-Fri. 6-10 pm/Sat. 12-10


Bridge Street Pier a Cafe
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)


oWewill remain
pier renovation


BREAKFAST
Served All Day!


* Lunch & Dinner Seafood Menu
* World Famous Hamburgers
Raw Oysters
Happy Hour 4-7
Ice Cold Frosted Mugs
Cafe Dining On Intracoastal Waterway

ALL-U-CAN EAT
FRIED GROUPER
w/50d Beer Friday 5 to 8


Open: Mon. Fri. 8AM 8PM Sat.- Sun. 7AM 10PM
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706


of 55th Street.
June 10, suspicious person, 100 block of 31st
Street. The officer was dispatched in reference to two
suspicious male subjects. He located the subjects at the
beach end of 31st Street and found they were Hispanic
and could barely speak English. They said they wanted
to go to the 7-11 store in Bradenton and the officer
drove them to the 7-11 store east of the bridge on
Manatee Avenue.
June 10, domestic battery, 100 block of 52nd
Street. The officer responded in reference to a domes-
tic disturbance between a father and daughter. The fa-
ther said his daughter was intoxicated and had become
violent and argumentative.
The officer observed the father was bleeding from
scratches and puncture wounds on the right side of his
neck and left forearm. He said the daughter caused the
injuries. She came out from beneath the carport and
began yelling. The officer placed her in custody.
June 10, suspicious, 200 block of South Harbor
Drive. A nine-year-old boy was locked out of his house
and scared by a severe thunderstorm moving through
the area. His mother reportedly went drinking with her
boyfriend and could not be located, said the report.
The boy went to a friend's house and the friend's
father called the police to report the incident. A note
was placed on the door of the boy's residence to no-
tify the mother of his whereabouts. The officer con-
tacted HRS.
June 11, found property a bicycle, 300 block
of 65th Street.
June 11, assist MSO, 52nd Street and Gulf Drive.
The officer stopped a female juvenile for operating a
bicycle after dark without headlights. A check revealed
she was a runaway. Her aunt responded to take her
home.
June 12, found property a bicycle, 6900 block
of Gulf Drive.
June 12, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
73rd Street. The officer responded in reference to a
vehicle in the middle of the road. The officer located
the owner who said he did not leave the vehicle there.
Upon inspection it was found that a person unknown
had pushed the vehicle into the road and removed a
radio valued at $200.
June 12, vandalism, 4700 Gulf Drive, Anna
Maria Elementary School. The officer responded in
reference to vandalism in which a person unknown had
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key









Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


795-8083


CORTEZ ROAD
CONSTRUCTION IS
FINALLY OVER!!
NOW IT'S TIME FOR
HAPPY HOUR
Mon.-Sat. 11-7
& All Day Sunday


Tuesday's
Restaurant Appreciation Night

Talisman Trio
Thurs June 22 8-12
Fri & Sat June 23 & 24 9-1
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
With Daily Lunch Specials
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


~,


CL.BB
cv0'%J


Kci










climbed onto the roof, thrown rocks and broken 10
windows.
June 12, vandalism, 6306 Gulf Drive, Blue Wa-
ter. The officer responded in reference to a white male
subject who had broken a statue of a fish and globes
from light fixtures. A witness had gotten up during the
night and observed the subject breaking the fish. The
subject was accompanied by a female with red hair.
June 12, suspicious persons, 5300 Gulf Drive,
Martinique. The officer was dispatched in reference to
two white male juveniles watching the apartments with
binoculars. The subjects claimed they were waiting to
meet two females who lived in the apartments. The
officer advised them the females described did not live
in the apartments. They left the area.
June 14, suspicious person, 3200 block of Gulf
Drive. The complainant advised there was a white male
subject knocking on her doors and windows. The of-
ficer found the subject sitting in his truck in front of the
residence and asked him what he was doing there.
The subject said he met two people at a local bar
and they said he could stay with them for a few days.
He said he thought this was the house where they lived
and was trying to get their attention.
The officer noted the subject was intoxicated and
did not realize he had the wrong house. The officer had
dispatch contact a friend of the subject who said he
could stay the night. The officer parked the subject's
truck and took him to his friend.
June 14, suspicious persons, 5313 Gulf Drive.
The officer responded in reference to juveniles harass-
ing customers and kicking the soda machine. He lo-


cated the juveniles and told them to leave the premises.
June 14, burglary, 3200 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported she returned from the store and dis-
covered a person unknown entered her residence and re-
moved a camera valued at $1200, jewelry valued at $310,
a stereo and CDs valued at $290 and $6 in cash.
June 14, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $20,
3705 East Bay Drive, Sunbow Bay.
June 15, found property a bicycle, 300 block
of 56th Street.
June 15, grand larceny, 3300 block of Sixth


ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 23 IG]


Oops!
Rescue workers were
called to the scene of this
accident on the Gulf Drive
curve across from the
Manatee Public Beach
where this car apparently
left the road and was stuck
in the swale alongside
Island Village. No injuries
weree reported but the
driver was observed
removing bushes and
S.. brush from the front of the
b car. Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood





Avenue. The officer responded in reference to a sto-
len bicycle valued at $400. As the officer ap-
proached the area, the victim said he pursued a sub-
ject riding his bicycle but the subject dropped the
Bicycle and ran.
The victim said a bicycle had been left at his
residence when his was stolen. The officer took it to
the police department.


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107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272


d Check
Stace'
J MON. R
J TUES. Se
St
PC
J WED. Fa
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SF
I THURS. It
SI
C
J FRI. Sc
St
PC
SAT. R
SUN. Fr
Ti
EARLY
SPECI
MON SAT 3:

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*Dinner $6.89
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regular Menu Over 100 Items
seafood Extravaganza: Fried
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imily Cookout Night: BBQ
ibs, Hot Dogs, Hamburgers,
*ench Fries and Onion Rings
alian Festival Night: Pizza,
)aghetti, Lasagna, Garlic Bread,
chicken Fettucini, Caesar Salad
cafood Extravaganza: Fried
shrimp, Baked White Fish,
eel n' Eat Shrimp, Catfish
regular Menu Over 100 Items
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urkey, etc.

BIRD Adults $5.89 + tax
ALS Children (4-11)
:30-5 PM $2.79 + tax


DOIN OUN
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Dinner Mon-Thur 3:30 8:00
dri- Sat 3:30 8:30
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4848 14th St. W. The Fountains (941) 755-3766
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~m,






1[] PAGE 24 M JUNE 22, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

The Americas' oldest city is just a sail away


By Bob Ardren
Outdoors Perspectives
Havana is sexy and getting sexier. As the oldest
city in the New World, this old beauty is getting a
facelift and a lot of callers.
Just in from a 10-day sail to Cuba and back com-
memorating last June's Sarasota-to-Havana sailing
race, I can tell you things are changing fast in Cuba
today. And the controversial organizer of last year's
race there, Bob Winters of Bradenton, is doing just fine
living in the "Queen of the Caribbean."
Cuban President-for-life Fidel Castro's lifting of
the ban on small private business has sparked an entre-
preneurial fire everywhere in Havana. Street vendors
are popping up on the comers, artists are selling their
wares from storefront galleries and anything you might
need from a guide to a meal can be negotiated in Yan-
kee dollars on any street comer.
Farmers are busy raising and selling food, and every-
body looks much better fed than when I visited last year.
I I


Keynote speaker
Wilma Bussey ofHolmes Beach held the attention
of the Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 81 Anna
Maria during the auxiliary's 33rd anniversary
party. Bussey, wife of Arthur Bussey, past captain,
Division VIII, U.S.C.G. Auxiliary, recounted
highlights of her world travels. Mary Ann Tyrrell
of Holmes Beach also spoke. Islander photo:
Courtesy of Arnold Colon

"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
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U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin





THANK




YOU

Everyone who fished
and helped us with
the 1995 Fishing The
Islands Tournament.

YOU'RE ALL WINNERS!


Skirts are very short, looks are very long, and both
Cuban men and women (at least in Havana) are still
the outrageous flirts they've long had a reputation for
being. You also can't help but notice that blacks, whites
and a dozen shades of mocha all mix and mingle freely
in a racially integrated society that puts ours to shame
at least in that respect.
It's still a police state of course, and guys-with-
guns seem to always be prowling around especially
at the marina. But with the loosening of the small busi-
ness and currency restrictions, locals don't seem nearly
as afraid of the secret police and guys-with-guns in
general. Make no mistake, Mr. Castro is still very much
in power and still very much beloved by most of the
Cuban people, though. My own experience talking with
locals and recent polls by the Miami Herald in Cuba
support that statement.

A little Cuban history and politics
The United Nations has designated Old Havana as a
World Heritage Site, and restoration of the ancient section
of the city (dating to 1519) is already getting underway.
Tourists from all over the world are flocking into the coun-
try because it's something new and relatively inexpensive
on the global marketplace of tourist spots.
Since I was obviously an English speaker, I was con-
stantly asked if I was British. American tourists in Cuba
are far outnumbered by our Brit and Canadian cousins.
Japanese and Israelis seem to leading the way in
buying or setting up businesses in the country -
Americans are still locked out by our government, but
not for much longer from the looks of it.
Riding into downtown Havana one day, our driver
(a "retired" officer from the Cuban army who spoke
excellent English with a slight Russian accent) pointed
out the old American Embassy on the waterfront
swarmed with Cuban workers.
"They're totally renovating the American Embassy
- er, Special Interest Section," he told us.
"Who works there?" I naively asked.
"Oh, Americans about 400 or 500 of them," the
driver replied.
Hmmm. As our resident historian likes to say, "Pay
little attention to what they say, just watch what they do."
Bob Winters tells me a major source of his income
is selling sailing lessons to American government em-
ployees posted to Havana. He spends the rest of his
time promoting events designed to attract boaters to
Marina Hemingway on the outskirts of Havana.
The marina appears far busier than when I visited
last year and the year before. It seems half the countries




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of Europe are represented by big sailboats, with the
largest, an 80-something footer, hailing from Perth,
Australia. That boat serves as the marina's unofficial
weather station since it can download weather satellite
pictures and maps onto fax machines.
Anyway, 50-60 boats showed up for the "U.S./
Cuba Race Week" as it was called this year, and I
didn't see anyone having a bad time. Most of the boats
were from Florida (16 from Port Richey alone), and our
local area was well represented by folks making the trip
quietly this year after experiencing all the government
nonsense last June.

Car lovers, beware of Havana
Standing along any Havana street is a wonderful
nostalgia trip for anyone loving old cars. They're still
there, just like you've heard.
On a short stroll one day I spotted a 1930-some-
thing Packard Clipper, more 1950s Chevys that I could
keep track of, an Edsel converted into a dump truck and
a mid-1940s Messerschmidt. Reports are that the Japa-
nese have been cherry picking these old American cars
for years for export to Japan.
Perhaps the strangest thing of all in Cuba these
days is the dollar economy. Everywhere you go, only
the American dollar is used in transactions.
Once in a while somebody will try to give you change
in Cuban pesos, but only a fool or a coin collector ever
takes it. The only use I've ever found for Cuban pesos was
buying postage stamps at the post office.
But what a strange situation. The only money
readily accepted is that of the country's arch enemy -
us. As the resident historian pointed out, when that
happened in Russia a few years ago, it was only months
until the government fell.
Whether Castro can survive this vote on his
economy (or lack of one) is still to be seen. But he's a
man who rather routinely seems to pull off the "impos-
sible," and you'd have to bet on him again.

A true sailing adventure
Four days down and three back on a 31-foot sail-
boat was an adventure of its own, and perhaps a better
subject for an outdoor column. But I just wanted you
to know our neighbor to the south is improving, and the
ol' gal obviously has plenty of life in her yet.
Even the giant Florida tourism industry fears Cuba
may one day regain her strength, and then who knows,
she may again become the life of the party. That could
make Florida another Georgia a place you pass
through to get where you really want to go.
But that's another story.
See you next week.



I RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS & REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
:*We are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 25 J[

Reds, trout, snapper, grouper ... could it get much better?


By Capt. Mike Heistand
What red tide? Despite some patchy red tide out-
breaks, fishing remains just about perfect around Anna
Maria Island. In the backwater, expect to reach your limit
on redfish on about any trip out Catch-and-release snook
and some big trout are also hard to miss. Offshore, grou-
per and snapper fishing remains excellent
Bob at the Rod and Reel Pier said anglers there
are catching a lot of redfish, some catch-and-release
snook, mangrove snapper and the occasional black
drum.
John Horn at the Anna Maria City Pier said fish-
ers there are catching some monster redfish that are
over the size limit, a lot of pompano and some snook
that have to be released. Snapper are being landed with
live shrimp for bait, and early rising fishers are still able
to catch some mackerel.
Lee at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 75 head of Key West grunts, porgies
and snapper. The six-hour trip averaged 120 head of
lane, vermillion and mangrove snapper as well as Key
West grunts. The nine-hour trip averaged 50 head of
mangrove snapper, red grouper, scamp and beeliners.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are catching a lot of good-sized redfish. Boat-
ers are bringing in a bunch of trout, mostly wherever
the water is moving fast In the wake of the most recent
red tide outbreak, shrimp and white bait are hard to
come by, but green backs are starting to show up.
Mike at Annie's Bait and Tackle said Efram
caught two 26 1/2-inch reds in the Bay last week. There
are also some keeper-sized snook being caught but, of
course, they aren't being kept.
Capt. Dave Pinkham has been bringing in a
bunch of bonita from offshore, and has been able to
find some grouper in Longboat Pass.
Capt. Phil Shields said the winds have kept his
trip slow offshore, but when the winds allow he's been
able to get his charters onto some excellent catches of
grouper, snapper and cobia.
Capt. Rick Gross has put his charters on some
excellent catch-and-release linesiders, some stretching
more than 44 inches in length. There are also plenty of

Anna Maria Island Tides
ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu6/22 8:42 2.3ft 1:26 1.0ft 10:37 1.4ft 3:50 0.5ft
Fri6/23 9:21 2.4ft 2:08 1.2ft 11:47 1.4ft 4:39 0.3ft
Sat 6/24 1-00 2.5ft 2:46 1.3ft 5:25 0.2ft
Sun 6/25 12:47 1.47ft 3:21 1.3ft 10:35a2.5ff 6:03 0.1ft
Mon6/26 1:30 1.4ft 3:51 1.3ft 1ll:11a2.6ft 6:39 0.1ft
Tue6/27 2:05 1.4ft 4:26 1.3ft 11:45a2.6ft 7:13 0.1ft
Wed6/28 2:30 1.4ff 5:01 1.3ft 12:20 2.7ft 7:42 0.1ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later


*







0
o





Fish

Tales

Welcome!
Got a great catch?
A great fish photo?
We'd love to hear
your fish stories, and
pictures are wel-
comel Just give us a
call at 778-7978 or
stop by our office in
the Island Shopping
Center,
Holmes Beach.


A whale of a shark
Capt. Phil Shields captured on film an underwater photo of a 30-foot whale shark while fishing offshore.
Whale sharks, although huge, are filter-feeders and generally harmless to humans.


reds being caught, he said.
Capt. Mark Bradow has been flyfishing reds and
trout like crazy during the past few days.
On my boat Magic, I've been down in the Keys


-ISLAPNDER


... and some
grouper tales
Herman Halsel of Tampa
can proudly attest to the
excellent grouper fishing
offshore. He caught this
one while fishing with
: Capt. Phil Shields.







catching a slew of dolphin, with limit catches coming
in almost every day. Back home, redfish are limiting
out on just about every trip
Good luck and good fishing.


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----7 ~







i[ PAGE 26 0 JUNE 22, 1995 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


WATERFRONT/GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY...
Immaculate well appointed 2 bedroom, 2 bath home
with boat dock in Key Royale. Beautiful Royal Palms
and gardens and room for addition and/or swimming
pool. Plenty of light and space in this home. #64352.
$215,000. Call T. Dolly Young, eves 778-5427.
LIVE THE FLORIDA UFE... Beautiful first floor unit,
ready to move into. 2 bedroom, 2 bath with tennis,
pool, elevator, covered parking and close to shopping
and beaches. Good seasonal rental. #64362.
$110,000. Call Debbie Thrasher, eves at 778-2055.
EXCELLENT LOCATION... 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath in
newly developed subdivision on a quiet cul-du-sac
with large shade trees. #63268. $104,900. Call
Sally Scrader, eves at 792-3176.


Lot... 225' to Gulf beach, approved
for building. $165,000.
Florida "cracker" house... 2bd, Iba,
garage/guest qtrs. $450,000. #DY64092.
Westbay Cove... lbd, 1ba, pool/
courtyard view. $85,900. #DY58710.
Martinique S... 3bd, 3ba, recently
decorated. Owner financing.
$196,900. #DY60737.
Restaurant Beach view/high traffic
visibility plus 2bd apartment.
$450,000. #DY52792.
Six Apt/Motel or 3 duplexes... steps
to beach. /excellent value $430,000.
#DY63227.


T. Dolly Young
REALTORF/IMS
Leading Edge Society
778-5427


GULF FRONT...
Enjoy spectacular sunsets, Gulf
breezes and relaxing moments in
this 2bd, 2ba, direct Gulf-front unit.
One car garage, storage, heated
pool, tennis, secured lobby and el-
evator. $169,000. #CH63190
Carol Heinze
REALTORF/CRS
Multi-Million $ Club
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


Karin Stephan
REALTOR* []
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Office: Mobile:
941-778-0766 941-350-5844
CORNER LOT with circle
driveway, lush landscaping,
fruit trees, pool, and canal with
boat dock. This 3 bedroom, 3
bath home is in excellent con-
dition and located in presti-
gious Key Royale. The perfect
investment! #63811. $445,000.


Labraor.Clioi a


Island real estate sales
2312 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 105 Sunset Ter-
race, an elevated Gulf front condo of 2bed/2bath with
1,180 sfla built in 1982, was sold 5/15/95, Olivera &
Hart to Grivna, for $154,000; list unknown.
3 Palm Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach, an 80x100 resi-
dential lot, was sold 5/12/95, Mischke to Treni, for
$60,000; list unknown.
3601 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 111 Sandy


i -'o


Pointe, a 3bed/3bath/2car bay front condo of 1,600 sfla,
built in 1994, was sold 5/12/95, Fla. Homebuyers Insur-
ance Inc. to Schultz, for $160,000; list $164,950.
401 74th St, Holmes Beach, an elevated attached
townhouse of 2bed/2&l/2bath/2car with 1592 sfla, built
in 1989 on a 62x85 lot, was sold 5/12/95, Kozar to Mills,
for $157,500; list $166,500.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, exclusively for The Islander Bystander. 1995

EX C E P T 1 0 N A L



ANNUAL & VACATION RENTALS
OWNERS...
Secure the highest caliber tenants
Realize the highest income from
your properties
Contact our Rental Specialist:
Brenda Reddy,
941-778-2275
N.chel i. er &Copan


TOUR OF FINE HOMES
Sunday June 25 1-4 PM
607 Key Royale Dr., Holmes Beach.. $395,000
Expansive Bay views with this remodeled 2BR/
2BA waterfront home. Caged heated pool, boat lift
& dock. Carol Williams 778-1718 eves.
623 Foxworth Lane, Holmes Beach.. $212,000
Key Royale, 3BR/2BA, canalfront home with boat
dock, pool, 70% stone lawn. Clarke Williams
778-1718 eves.
6500 Flotilla Dr. #186, Holmes Beach.. $149,900
Westbay Point & Moorings. 2BR/2BA condo with
spectacular Bay view, plus 30' boat slip. Decora-
tor perfect. Gene Rossano 778-2615 eves.
4255 Gulf Dr. #221, Holmes Beach ... $119,900
Island Village. Lovely 2BR/2BA condo with a view
of the Bay. New ceramic tile, wallpaper, decorator
perfect. Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
701 Manatee Ave. W. #11,
Holmes Beach ................................... $118,000
Westbay Cove South. 2BR/2BA bayfront ground
floor unit. Steps to pool and tennis. Furnished turn-
key. Elfi Starrett 798-9716 eves.
1103 Edgewater CIr.,
Perico Bay Club ................................ $179,000
3BR/2BA 2nd floor end unit overlooking Palma
Sola Bay. Lovely open floor plan. John Poag
778-5877 eves.
1021 63rd St. W., Bradenton............$109,900
Village Green, 4BR/2BA home on a corner lot.
Family room, screened lanai. Judy Duncan
778-1589 eves.
920 59th St., Bradenton ..................... $99,900
Spanish Park. 3BR/2BA home close to everything.
Family room, lanai, neat and clean. Frank Migliore
778-2662 eves.
6934 Arbor Oaks Cir., Bradenton ..... $148,900
3BR/2.5BA 2 story home. Open & spacious floor
plan, community pool, no yard work. Marion Ragni
778-1504 eves.

1 REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS O[


Liv~~~ ~

9- 1III~


RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY TWO LOCATIONS:
3007 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton 758-7777 24 hour number 758-7777
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 778-7777 24 hour number 778-7777
q f% / SALES RENTALS
1 w* "We Sell The Island... Worldwide"


RE/MAX
Welcomes
Debbie
Dial
Leasing
Manager


UNBELIEVABLE FOR THE PRICE, 2BR/2BA start-
ing at $64,500. 10 min. drive to beach. Must See!
DEUTSCH: Unglaublich fuer den Preis
Eigentumswohnungen Ab $64,500. 10 min. Fahrt
Zum Strand. Weibke 778-7777 or 779-1181.


Ron Travis
BROKER/OWNER


uaviu iouplanu
BROKER/OWNER


Karen Johnson
MANAGER


WHY PAY RENT when you can enjoy all the ben-
efits of home ownership plus rental income? This
duplex would be perfect for the small family. 4 bed-
rooms, 3.5 baths total. Call Yvonne 778-7777


Weibke Bentley
REALTOR


Sandy Greiner Yvonne Higgins
BROKER/REALTOR BROKER/REALTOR


JUST USTEDI Duplex in Bradenton Beach. 2 bedrooms,
1 bath on each side. double lot 100 x 100. Has had long
term tenants in both sides. Some TLC needed. $139,900.
Call Jennifer Jones, evenings at 795-2865.








Jennifer Jones Robert St. Jean Barbara Turner
REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR


CONDOS
Condominium living is increasing in popular-
ity due to its versatility. Perfect for year
round living or the investor that wishes to
gain rental income. Island Real Estate has
several condos listed for sale that just may be
perfect for you! Drive-by today!
4001 Gulf Dr..................... $91,900
6101 34th St.W., Brad ......... $94,900
2310 Gulf Dr........... from $104,900
4255 Gulf Dr................... $124,900
1171 Edgewater Cir ......... $134,500
1800 Gulf Dr................... $139,900
517 Sanderling Cir........... $140,000
5616 Gulf Dr................... $177,800
1261 Edgewater ...............$198,500
4200 Gulf Dr................... $199,000
3045 Mariners Cove ........ $330,000
For information on these or any other property
on Anna Maria Island, please call the experienced
professionals at ISLAND REAL ESTATE!


- -I-~ I II- I








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 27 flf


A MUSICAL QUIZ
BY RICH NORRIS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
I Gruesome
7 Appeal
II Mount for
Abraham
14 Cut
18 Lawrence of
Arabia portrayer
19 Resume entry
22 New Rochelle
college
23 Creedence
Clearwater
question, 19701)
25 Skier's aid
26 "There, there,"
e.g.
27 War room
fixture
28 Moss Hart's
autobiography
30 Prominent legal
celebrity
31 "Cat on-- Tin
Roof"
33 Blocked
34 Sonny and Cher
question, 1966
40 1813:-14Vice
President
41 Sought congers
42 First manned
mooncraft
43 Maj.'s superior


48 Off track
50 Minnesota
appellation
51 Mauna--
52 Exaggerated
54 1973 Vidal
novel
55 Extend, in a
way
57 Slavic hero
58 Prophet in
I and 11 Kings
60 Uneven
.61 Kind of panel
64 Press
67 Not so many
68 Holiday
hanging
69 Degrades
70 Sci-fi film of
1954
72 X--
73 Damask, for
one
74 Speaks tersely
79 "-- been real!"
80 Immerse
81 Common
answering
machine
message
83 Compact


44 Sound 84 Phone or cycle
exasperated preceder
47 False god 86 Montana call
87 "Cheers"
character


91 Young Rascals
question. 1967
94 Gave consent
96 "My Way"
songwriter
97 Jiff
98 Speed
99 Patient's need
100 Arctic habitats
106 One (ball
game)


I I Freshen, as milk
12 Hike
13 School subj.
14 They usually
work evenings
15 Peter and
Gordon's
answer to
23-Across
16 Nutty
17 Trimmed


107 Bobby Freeman 20 Takeout
question, 1958 21 Paintstlore
... choices


Ii bSource 01of
confusion
112 Michael Jordan,
e.g.
113 L.A.'s--
Boulevard
114 Hopalong
Cassidy
portrayer
115 Legal things
116 Carry on
117 Ready for
typesetting
DOWN
I Cuts
2 First-century,
Roman emperor
3 Rafter's locale
4 Flee
5 Proverbial
bringer of


2-1 Think, old-style
29 E.M.T.'s
procedure
31 Bit of
Chlorophyta
32 Sacrosanct
33 Gershwin's
answer to
107-Across
34 Entanglements
35 Make simmer
36 Winglike
37 Coded wire
transmission
38 Apportion
39 Large quantity
43 200 milligrams
45 Specklebreasts,
e.g.


misfortune 46 Onewho
6 Nash competitor hesitates
7 Cattle 48 Behave


8 Exercise units


88 Visit again 9 Behind


89 liquid fat


STUMPED?


49 The Miracles'
answer to
91 -Across


10 Slangv assent 50 Honshu peak


53 Out of gas
54 Some
ballpoints
55 Send (to)
56 Solitary ones
58 Choice word
59 George
Washington
no-no
61 Open-weave
fabric
62 Fmulale
Webster
63 Prince's answer
to 34-Across


65 Sinker of 82 Ancient
sorts strongbox
66 Luxuriate 85 Cautionedr
71 Toolshed item 87 Agree
74 "... and to -- 88 Withdrew
good night'" 90 City east of
75 Approach Utrecht
76 Actress Pills ,91 Nimbi
77 like certain 92 "They laughed
profs when ..."


78 Maximilian 'ion

80 Badges
81 Opaque bainte


93 "Could This
-'-" ((1990
song)
91 Invention of
19-15


95 Kind of bean
99 A or 0. e.g.
100 Catch
101 French 101 verb
102 Hindu royalty
103 Monogram part:
Abbr
104 -- signum
105 Spring
purchase
108 Partof SO (S.
supposedly
109 Vane dir
110 -- loss


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


is ., : ... . "
' .4.".3 .- -

4 1-,1 :

2 -. ,. -.. ..7-. .


'5,'-'-
.
- -'I ,.
',,it'~'
'


CUSTOMIZED ARTHUR RUTEN-BURG
HOME 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage. Sepa-
rate dining room, eat-in-kitchen with breakfast
nook, family room, lanai, 10 ft. ceiling, large
rooms, $147,500. Rose Schnoerr 778-7780.












WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Rare 3
bedroom 2 bath located on canal with private
dock and carport. Park like setting in quiet part
of Anna Maria Island. $149,000. Call Dick Maher
or Dave Jones 778-6791 or 778-4891.


ii,


NICK
PATSIOS,
REALTOR
"Nick at Night"


778-4642


Over 16 years of proven real estate
know-how has distinguished Nick
as an experienced professional
you can trust and count on for all
your real estate needs.


OVERLOOKS INTRA-COASTAL This 2
bedroom, 2.5 bath has security entry, eleva-
tor, pool, garage parking, Jacuzzi, boat dock
& private beach on Gulf. $142,900. Call Bill
Bowman 778-4619.


SUGAR WHITE BEACH. Located on the
north end of Holmes Beach. Exclusive residen-
tial condo complex. 2 bedroom, 2 bath end unit,
bright and cheery. Many upgrades. $179,900.
Call Bobye Chasey 778-2261.


GULF FRONT COMPLEX 2 bedroom 2 bath,
very nice unit on top floor. Vertical blinds, under
building parking, well maintained grounds and
locked pool area for extra security. Turnkey fur-
nished $174,900. Call Helen White 778-6956.


ili Igu


RARELY AVAILABLE Southern exposure,
Bay view from this 2nd floor 2 bedroom 2 bath,
elevator, spotless grounds and amenities, ten-
nis, 2 heated pools, extra storage, weight room,
rec. area, boat slips available. $121,900. Call
John Green 778-3167.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME This charmnning
2 bedroom 2 bath island home is nearly new. El-
evated open plan, over 2100 sq. ft.. Bay view,
close to the beach. Many upgrades elevator, too
$249,000. Call Janis Van Steenburgh 778-4796


SUNBOW BAY CONDOS $84,900 to $134,900
Low maintenance fees, immaculate grounds, se-
cluded, two heated pools, tennis, boat slips, wa- |j
ter views. Call John Green 778-3167.
WESTBAY COVE CONDOS $79,900 &
L 142,500. Premier island location. Lush landscape,
heated pool, one and two bedroom units. Call Bob
or Lu Rhoden 778-2692.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS 26 acres of
park like setting featuring two and three bedroom
units, tennis, pools and boat docks. From
$129,900 to $149,900. Call Dick Maher or Dave
Jones 778-6791 or 778-4891.
I - - '' ~~ -.'.- - .


~i


ISLAND 6-PLEX Great location close to
beach and shopping. 2/2 each unit. Complex
has pool and laundry on site. Plenty of park-
ing and rec area. $399,000 Call Mary Ann
Schmidt 778-4931


ii i I' ...
FULSEVC PROPERTY...MANAGEMENT


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Weekly Rentals From $450

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club from $700 mo.

2501 Gulf Drive 1/1 with
Gulf view $500 mo.


Julie
Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


-- -- ~ 7; -

- S ~ -


Ii
1-1


I |





'I Ii
i :


I


I ....
' i ', :-


- I .-.. .






1I PAGE 28 M JUNE 22, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


! L & neaL
Bi^REALTORS


What's the best news on Anna Maria Island?
The Islander Bystander gives It to you every week.


SAILBOAT WATER Perfect move in condition!
Roomy 3 bedroom, 2 bath split design that fea-
tures a spacious Florida room and a huge glassed
in porch. Two-car garage and a meticulously kept
lawn. Act nowl $249,000.


ON THE OPEN WATER With over 255' fronting on
Key Royale Pass. This artist's home captures the
best of island living with its 4 bedrooms and 3.5
baths. And a fireplace, oak & tile floors and an art
studio with sky-lights. Two boats docks, mooring
whips and davits complete with a knockout view.
L ......


LOW DOWN PAYMENT Investors dream Three
apartments in the "historic old town" of Bradenton
Beach. View of the Gulf and income of over
$2,000 month. Call for details $169,900.


BEACHIE LOW PRICE What a view! Hight
across from the Gulf. Stilted older home with 2
bedrooms and loads of charm. $129,000.

Mike
Norman *
Realty inc.
778-6696
1-800-367-1617 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Display your copy of the US. Flag from this weeks
islander Bystander, Show your pridel


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday June 25 1-4 PM
PLAYA ENCANTADA 6006 GULF DRIVE,
HOLMES BEACH, Unit 212 Gulf front complex, 2
bedroom,. 2 bath, turnkey furnished, heated pool &
spa, club-house, excellent rental. $174,900.
lB3 Call Helen White, 778,6956 mLS []
Office: 778-2261 Toll Free 1-800-422-6325
605-C Manatee Avenue Holmes Beach, FL 34217



SCome ride with me!


x RWAGNEDDEALTY ie 1939
V> F 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217 r
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
Dave Moynihan..........778-7976 Ed Oliveira ...............778-1751
Bill Alexander .............. 778-0609 Jackie Jerome ............... 792-3226




.rA
IIa


GULF FRONT NEWLY LISTED Tastefully
decorated, 2BR/2BA top floor unit in popular, well-
maintained complex with pool, covered parking
and storage room. Views and sandy walking
beach enhance this excellent rental opportunity.
Priced at $159,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


NEAT AND CLEANI Well-maintained 2BR/1.5BA
elevated one-half duplex with central Holmes Beach
location. Great vacation spot, weekend get away, or
rental. Quick walk to Bay or Gulf, shopping and
schools. Priced at $72,500. Call Ed Oliveira.

BAY VIEWS and
mouth of canal
frontage from deep
water lot in prime
Holmes Beach -
location. Quiet
residential area within
walking distance to
beach. Priced at to
$147,500. Call
SDave Moynihan
., for details.


BEACH PLAZA Affordable Island living with ex-
cellent Gulf views in this 2BR/1BA unit in small
complex, across the street from wide walking
beach. Good central location, close to shopping
and restaurants. Strong rental opportunity. Priced
at $73,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


BRIDGEPORT Gulf view from this top floor unit
with pool, covered parking, elevator and steps to
beach. Located close to shopping and restaurants.
Offered at $89,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


LAGOON VIEW from this 1BR/1BA Runaway
Bay unit with washer/dryer, extra closet space,
all new appliances and close to the pool. Across
the street from the beach, second home or great
rental with on-site rental management all for
$78,900. Call Ed Oliveira.


SitH


We'll find your place in paradise.
When buying or selling, Ed can
make your Island Dream come true
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
Wagner ealty -~ Since 1939
778-1751 2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Evenings Bradenton Beach Office
FL 34217


I


L-


I :







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 22, 1995 0 PAGE 29 ED3



ITM O ALE HELPANTD SRIE otne


MOVING freezer, boat w/new trailer, 20 hp & 5 hp, an-
tique desk, other furniture. 778-5427.
SOFA BEDS good condition $25. 778-5405.
COMMERCIAL DIGITAL SCALE 30 Ib capacity.
778-1945.
LEATHER SECTIONAL 4 pc, highback, overstuffed, coral
color w/queen pull-out and recliner $1,200. 778-3171.


HALF PRICE RUMMAGE SALE
Sat., June 24. 9 am 1 pm. St. Bernard Activity Cen-
ter. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.

YARD SALE 80th Street and Marina Drive. Fri & Sat.,
June 23 & 24. 8-2.


EYEGLASSES FOUND Saturday, June 17. 117 81st
St. Holmes Beach. 778-5427.
LOST: Locket shaped gold nugget on chain. Anna
Maria/Cortez vicinity. Reward. 778-5251.
FOUND young female tabby cat, friendly. Vicinity 85th
St., Holmes Beach. 778-3571.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. Motivated theme classes each month:
Salsa, 60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme,
etc. All classes include muscle conditioning. Classes
are: Tuesday & Thursday 7:00-8:OOPM. For info call
Geri 779-2129.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


WANTED: to rent small RV/Camper July 1 to July 5 to
go to Daytona and more later. 778-1592.
'95 CHEVY S-10 Blazer. Burgundy, auto, air, PW, PB,
power locks, fully loaded & over $2,000 in after factory
extras. Only 10K miles. Just reduced to $21,000. Call
Anytime 320-0110.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


STEPS TO THE BEACH How would you like to own a
4BR/3BA architecturally designed nearly new home.
This house should be in "House Beautiful." Too many
wonderful features to mention! Must be seen to appre-
ciate. Just $289,000. Call Fran Maxon today for your
own personal tour!

WTL TLi.A


BEST BUYI 1 bH/1B A duplex in North Holmes Beach.
Great rental potential. Just 1 short block to the beach.
Now only $122,500. Call Pat Jackson eves at 778-3301
or Ken Jackson eves at 778-6986.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALESAND RENTALS
9701 GuI DrtveP 0 Box717*Anna Marla, FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


UP TO $339.84 per week. Assembling products at
home. Call for complete details. 387-0727 ext. 123.
LABORER NEEDED for local contractor 40 hrs per
week must have own reliable transportation. Apply
778-7127 Monday Friday 8-5.


EXPERIENCED BIG SISTER, graduate of Safe Sitters
course, has openings for baby sitting in Holmes Beach
area. Call 778-0511.
ATT: "FLAMINGO CAY" homeowners Student seeking
summer lawn mowing jobs! New equipment. Excellent
references. Avg. lawn $10. Jon Dandino at 794-6479.
K-9 SERVICE dog walking. Call 778-6119 for informa-
tion and ask for Kirsten. $2 per half hour. Island only.
WANTED Student to do part-time handy work.
778-3460.



"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults at adult day center,
through Manatee Council on Aging. Transportation
available. 748-6974."



DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Holmes Beach.
Now taking reservations for our summer program ages
2-10 yrs. Also a few openings for fall registration ages
2-6 yrs. Come by and visit with us. 778-2967.


FREE FREEE *9FREE

SUMMER JOB

ADS FOR KIDS

& BUSINESS
If you're under 16 years of age and looking for
work, or if you're a business willing to hire a teen
we've got a deal for you. Your classified ad
is free.
Just write up your ad, up to 21 words, and
fax, mail or bring it to The Islander Bystander
office. Deadline each week is Monday noon.
Your ad will run for up to three weeks free
under a special "Student Work" heading in The
Islander Bystander classified ad section.
Call 778-7978 for information. FAX copy to
778-9392. Stop in or mail: 5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 34217.


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending
both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction & Design,
Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty,
Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Management and Annual &
Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilest






. .. ....-- ---- --11 11 1 m1111 . .



WIDE ISLAND CANAL!
Outstanding waterfront home is versatile as a fam-
ily home of two bedrooms with Mother-in-law Suite
or family home. The 17 x 23 Master suite includes
dressing room, large walk-in-closet & Master bath
plus a lovely corner fireplace & private patio. Two
large guest bedrooms are on opposite side of home
plus three baths. Living room, dining area & custom-
ized kitchen relate to the Florida room which has a
built-in stereo system & wet bar & opens onto won-
derful pool & Jacuzzi with stone garden & waterfall
plus built-in BBQ for great Island entertaining. Newly
replaced seawall, full service dock, new landscaped
& resurfaced circular drive. Reduced price
$390,000. Call Marie Franklin.




1957
MARIE 157 LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRAL IL REA LTVY BROKER
"We ARE the Island.'
9805 GuW Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Join our sum-
mer program. Swimming, field trips, movies, bowling,
more. Register for fall. 5, 3, or 2 day programs. $15 a
day. 778-2967.
GET PAID TO TRAVEL free! Paris, Tokyo, Maui or
anywhere you like...Absolutely free! Amazing recorded
message. 387-0727 ext. 121.
LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sunshine
Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.

HOUSEKEEPER Perfection in cleaning, delicious
home cooked meals, experienced. Excellent island ref-
erences. Please call 747-0710.

WILL CLEAN on Island. 17 year resident, references.
Barbara at 778-1608.



OPEN SUNDAY 1 to 4PM
10407 W. SPOONBILL FLAMINGO CAY


CANALFRONT HOME WITH LOTS
OF SOUTHERN CHARM
3BR/2.5BA with oak floors and 10' ceilings, formal
living and dining, breakfast nook, family room, and
fireplace. Wrap-around porch, pool with privacy
and lovely landscaping. Ideal for entertaining.
$329,000.

ANNA MARIA LOT FOR SALE
North end of island, near beaches. Price includes
state approved plans for a 3BR/3BA elevated new
home that will have some beautiful water views.
$145,000. Call Peggy or Alice 778-0426.

(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
!of Anna Maria, Inc.
-. 420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 775-1929


nIo 1uu Ii, L, M nuuou -
415 Spring Ave., Anna Maria
Remodeled 3bedroom/2bath with separate Florida room, liv-
ing room, dining room, loft. Carport & well. 78x145 lot 1232
s.f. living area under A/C; 1629 s.f. under roof. $185,000.


DOUG
DOWULING
RnEALTY
409 Pin .AV.
Ann& Marim
77T-1222


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


a S a ^J.^i l VAS a -S: ll- a PiWAaIsaA.5 l- a Sl if lS FA- l ZIs V 1 011 Z11 1 .- 11 Ja t


BELIEVE IT OR NOT ... AVAILABLE!!
Enjoy direct waterfront on beautiful Palma Sola
Bay. Pool with spa. Nice open plan, 3 bedrooms
- split plan. Located 5 minutes to beach in Fla-
mingo Cay. $219,000. #63308. Call Wedenbrock
Real Estate Co. 383-5543.

WEDEBROCK REAL ESTATE CO.
(941) 383-5543 6350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key


2:a 1 aFA C lI I N IA Z 19 '. I VA






iGj PAGE 30 E JUNE 22, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


And Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Lawn Mowing *Trimming # Edging
Lain Hauling By the cut orby the month.
i Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778 345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
, AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


fKessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900 RF-0066844

N.D.C. CARPENTRY
Door & window replacement specialist with
21 years of fine custom carpentry experience.
Free Estimates Fully Insured
941-794-8907


MUST SELL!
1988 Skyline 14' x 40' 1 bedroom
$10,000 or best offer
747-9684 or leave message



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
*SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
S* RENOVATIONS
XACT KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399

The Island Property Maintenance Co.
* Complete property maintenance on a regular basis
* Inspections weekly or more
* Immediate repairs when necessary
* Weekly & monthly rates
* Written reports sent to you each month
* Insured, Island Resident, References
If you are planning to go back to cooler weather or live
here year round & need dependable maintenance...
Call 779-2129 Jim Travis


BIG JIM "The Island Painter" is available for all your paint-
ing needs. Free estimate, reasonable prices. 778-5587.
I TOOK CARE of my family and I would appreciate the
opportunity to take car of you. 778-4881 Cecile.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody,
shampoo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm &
hall, $34.95. 11 years in the business. No hidden
prices. 794-1278.
PRO-CLEAN professional carpet & furniture cleaning.
See the difference with our powerful mobile cleaning
plant. Quick-dry system, 11 yrs experience, satisfaction
guaranteed. 779-1422.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK / GLASS BLOCK / stone / pavers / custom
homes / fireplaces / planters / decorative walls. Lic
#MC-00318. 778-5183.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.
THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of
home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experi-
ence. Insured, island resident, references available.
Jim 779-2129.

DON COLEMAN PAINTING Residential, commercial,
interior, exterior. Free estimates, 30 yrs experience.
778-2356.

LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard.
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.
HANDYMAN carpentry, painting, plywood storm shut-
ters, repairs of all kinds. Commercial or residential. 25
yrs. exp. Call Rich 778-4881.


ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views, 1BR, patio, pool, W/
D, furnished. Annual. 211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.
ANNUAL RENTAL: Immaculate one bedroom, fur-
nished home. Short distance to beach. $475/mo plus
elect. & sani. Anna Maria Realty, 778-2259.
ANNUAL, 3BR/2.5BA, north end of island. $1,000/
month. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARTINIQUE CONDO 2BR/2BA direct ocean view,
pool, tennis court. Turnkey $1,500 plus electric and
phone. Will rent yearly 813-884-0222.
VACATION RESORT 66 by owner., weeks in June &
July, poolside $500, Beach front $600. 1-800-977-0803.


HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX 2BR/1BA, all appliances,
1.5 blocks to beach, available 6/1, $600/mo, annual plus
deposit. 778-5793.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
from $400/wk. 778-1135.
GULF FRONT, one of a kind beach house, perfect,
3BR/2BA, steps to water. Fall special, Sept-Nov, $600
weekly. (941) 778-3171.
CANCELLATION SPECIAL Gulf front Executive, 3BR/
2BA, furnished, all amenities, view from every room, steps
to water. Half price $1,500/mo. Oct-Nov. 778-3171.
COMMERCIAL SPACE available for lease. Suitable for
office or retail. Inquire Smith, REALTORS 778-0777.
ARE YOU PAYING RENT because you think you can't
qualify for a mortgage? Talk with Sandy Greiner RE/
MAX Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.
ANNUAL RENTAL furnished 1 BR apt. 2 blks to beach.
$100 security, first & last, $400/mo. 813-578-0395.
A BREEZY GULFFRONT cottage with dock. Fully fur-
nished, clean & neat. Quiet area. Perfect for retiree.
$250/wk $600/mo. 794-5980.
ANNUAL EFFICIENCY 1 block from beach. Newly
remodeled. $500/mo includes utilities and phone. 778-
8626 or 813-935-2968.
BEACH RENTAL 106 31st St. Furnished seasonal
(day, week, or month) 2 bedroom duplex. Upstairs over-
looking Gulf. 2 bedroom downstairs, steps from Gulf.
Includes W/D, phone, cable and garage parking. Call
Debbie Thrasher 778-2055 at Prudential Florida Realty,
5340-1 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
SANDY POINTE CONDO 2BR/2BA with pool, W/D &
carport. $725 monthly. Duplex 2BR/1.5BA plus FLA
room & W/D hookups. $550 monthly. Triplex 2BR/1 BA.
Includes water. $475 monthly. Call Denise or Lisa,
Wagner Realty 778-2246.
HOLMES BEACH 1BR/1BA. 203 76th St. Month to
month. Available July 1. $500/mo. 778-3757.
SMUGGLER'S COVE RESORT: Week of June 24 by
private owner. $500 beautiful bayfront, cable, beach,
pool, sleeps 4. 778-1592.

ISLAND LUMBER
d HARDWARE
213 54th St. Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


I
J. R.

Painting
SPressure Cawing
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
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Holmes Beach


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MI 1DA_ S T A LE S EA F U As
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F I N E P AT E N T Y I C K L E
STETS Sco0MRSEsE p ASSEL


SEVCECntnedRNAI Cnine .;


For a cleaner car
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand wash, vacuum, buff, seal and polish,
Armorall, dress rims and tires, shampoo interior,
satin-black under-carriage, engine cleaned and
silicone protected. Our mobile service means no
one has to drive your car. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number. 320-0110.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 22, 1995 1 PAGE 31 11M


11SLAENDER LJ4;hE f-IDi


GULF FRONT residence. Excellent north Holmes Beach
location. Fully furnished 2BR/2BA. Available short term.
Call Dave Moynihan, Realtor 778-7976/778-2246.
BEACH RENTALS Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals
available on the beach. Call Debbie Thrasher 941-778-
2055 at Prudential Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
WANTED TO RENT on annual basis. 3 bedroom
house on canal with pool. Please call 916-891-0952,
leave message.
CANALFRONT HOME 3BR/2BA, 2 screened porches,
1-car garage, 1-carport. $1,300/mo includes lawn care.
Call Carla, Smith Realtors 778-0770
WATERFRONT 3BR/2BA house on comer lot, total pri-
vacy, back yard intercoastal, side yard canal, tropical
landscaped, water views from all rooms. 6 month mini-
mum at $1,500/mo. 778-4560 after 9 pm eves. Will show
house on Saturdays from 9 am to 11 am.
ANNUAL BEAUTIFUL N. END Charming country cot-
tages. Darling Ig 1BR/1BA & 2BR/1BA. Steps to beach.
Exceptional permanent residences, won't last! From
$525/mo. 778-2126.
RETAIL/OFFICE SPACE Charming Key West style.
"New" Bradenton Beach. Exceptional Gulf Dr. location/
exposure. All newly Reserve now, limited space, won't
last! 778-2126.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1 BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of Anna
Maria. Possible split Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/3 acre
w/house 100' beach front Call T. Dolly Young after hours.
779-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1 BR/1 BA
each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. 404
71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit $159,000. -
203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to Gulf -
$169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
BRADENTON MAINLAND minutes from beaches. Just
off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community. 1400 s.f.
villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1-car garage, new carpet, paint, ver-
ticals, maintenance free living, $105,000. Open house
every Sat & Sun 1 4.7142 28th Ave. Dr. W. 794-8792.
FOR SALE BY OWNER charming older home in ex-
cellent condition, 2BR/2BA, fenced yard. One lot from
beach, good rental history, great potential. 778-4372.


HIGHLAND LAKES Rutenberg home. Lakefront 2BR/
2BA, enclosed lanai, beautiful home, maintenance free
by owner. $148,500. Call 795-0973.
CLOSE TO BEACH Walk to beach from 2BR/1.5BA
one half a duplex. Move in condition. $72,500. Call Ed
Oliveria Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
RUNAWAY BAY Great view and close to pool. 1 BR/
1BA turnkey furnished only $78,900. Call Ed Oliveria -
Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
ON THE BEACH Great Holmes Beach location pool,
elevator, and walking beach. 2BR/2BA, turnkey fur-
nished. Move in now, only $169,000. Call Ed Oliveria -
Wagner Realty Off. 778-2246 Eves. 778-1751.
DIRECT GULF VIEW Great beach and pool, excel-
lent 2BR/2BA vacation home or rental. Well kept com-
plex with low maintenance fee. All for only $179,900.
Call Ed Oliveria Wagner Realty office. 778-2246
Eves. 778-1751.
ROOF TOP TERRACE Secured lobby, elevator, pool,
2BR/2BA unit and on the beach. Turnkey furnished all
for $219,000. Call Ed Oliveria Wagner Realty Off. 778-
2246 Eves. 778-1751.
TOWN HOUSE Holmes Beach. Yards from beach,
small complex, swimming pool and gardens. $115,000.
954-1110.
$114,500 3BR/2BA split design, nice neighborhood
great for children. Extra large fenced lot, fireplace, fam-
ily room, screened lanai, barrel tile roof. See it today!.
Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX Gulfstream 778-7777.
BUILD yourself a big duplex or home with Gulf and Bay
views on this cleared lot for $49,900. Yvonne Higgins
RE/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
3BR/2BA, 2-car, pool, family & dining rooms. 1,875 s.f.
$209,000. 508 70th St. By owner. 778-5770.
3 Schlafzimmer, 2 Baeder haus auf riesigem
Grundstueck zwischen Bradenton und Sarasota.
$114,500. Bitte fragen sie nach Wiebke Bentley bei RE/
MAX Gulfstream: 778-7777.
OPEN SUNDAY, June 25,2 to 4 p.m. Lovely 2BR/2BA
plus den. Completely restored doll house of a canal
front home. Visit with Sandy Greiner RE/MAX
Gulfstream Realty 778-7777. Dessert and coffee will be
served! 513 58th St. Holmes Beach.
ONE OF A KIND canal home in Anna Maria with over
3,000 s.f. of living space, garage parking for 3 plus cars,
boat house, hot tub, dock and davits and assumable
first mortgage. Call Sandy Greiner RE/MAX Gulfstream
Realty 778-7777.
TOO NEW IN YOUR JOB to qualify for a mortgage?
Owner will consider a lease purchase on this 2BR/
2BA ground floor condo in centrally located Holmes
Beach complex. Call Sandy Greiner, RE/MAX
Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.


CLASSIFIED AD FORM
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday,
Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words,
Box: $2, One or two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS.
Additional words: $2 foreach 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 perword.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by
phone. To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card num-
ber. Sorry, we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: (For 21 word minimum, use one word for each
blank space)







THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER

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More information: 778-7978


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
y ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
-* Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RCD0045125* RG005850 PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991

KAREN CLERKIN
Independent Sales Representitive
778-8624
Gift Certificates Available
AVO n Fundraisers Skin So Soft on hand

^^ Pack & Ship 1
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Small packages to entire estates
SUNSHINE SHIPPING 727-7447


VOICE

E. Burkly
778-0720


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778-2586 IL. MA Ry KAY Eve: 778-6771

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Personal Fitness
TRAINING 0R

4 One On One In Your Home
T Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
V Fitness & Nutritional Guidance
V Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
V Deep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises
Gerin Travis 7
B.S., Ph. Ed., Fitness Specialist 7 9-2129

Cleaning & W11'^IA 1 Chemicals
i Chemicals S7uwV LAND Only
Residential Personal
Chemical -UALTY POOl. CARE wc. Quality
Delivery Service

First Month Price
778-6742
134 Hammock Road, Anna Maria
Lic.# RP0059715 Insured Bonded








.U~f ~sRoN




I1m PAGE 32 M JUNE 22, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


i-LOCALINDEPENDEIrM Mi 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
HOMETOWN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
11K w We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 1995


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


Beef
der Roast


$189
I LB


SIRLOIN TIP
STEAK



PEPSI
DIET PEPSI &
MOUNTAIN DEW
890
BTL

Florida Natural
Orange Juice


WHOLE
FRYERS


PALM RIVER
BACON $429
I^'Pfi~h RiveJ 120Z


BLUE BUNNY
ICE CREAM


Green Beans
,or Corn


ELI DEPARTMENT
"SLICED TO ORDER"
WunderBar
ologna


PEACHES
CTARINES

990
LB
DELI DEPARTMENT


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


Rainbow
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390


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