<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00571

Full Text


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


";: ': : I;
: ''*- .-" ..r :" .... '* " -
7I I II
I :. ...' i :.
,- i ,' I ,
' .i -' *,* ,'~ .' I I ,


Fireworks erupt at Holmes Beach


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council approved three
resolutions concerning bridges last week.
The resolutions were penned by Holmes Beach
resident Bob VanWagoner, Bradenton Beach Mayor
Katie Pierola and Holmes Beach Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger.
Bohnenberger expressed his opposition to
VanWagoner's resolution which requests that the U.S.
Department of Transportation initiate a major invest-
ment study of all area bridges.


In a letter to council prior to the meeting,
Bohnenberger noted:
The council would be abdicating its home rule
authority by supporting the resolution.
A federal study could result in additional support for
the Florida Department of Transportation to four-lane
Gulf Drive and build twin spans at existing locations.
Alternative transportation will never make a sig-
nificant difference in Island traffic problems.
All council members except Pat Geyer said they
still favored the resolution.
"I would like to point out that Mr. VanWagoner's


council meeting
career has been that of a spokesperson for various large
governmental entities," Bohnenberger said. "His job
was selling big government agency policies to the pub-
lic and I don't believe his role has changed much.
"I think Mr. VanWagoner, either inadvertently or
by design, is really a de facto agent for the DOT's de-
sire to impose its will on the Island. I really think this
resolution is ill-advised. You'll have to answer to the
people for the decision you make."
"I have no problem with my record on the Island,"
PLEASE SEE COUNCIL, PAGE 2


PEEKING AHEAD FOR FATHER'S DAY


-., -
.*: r ^ -^ .' *-' **- ^ '.- '^ '*:" ', ..


I"
i A


'1.


4. ;];.

'Eh1111.4
Joey Hutchinson found a good hiding spot from which to look ahead to Father's Day next Sunday while
visiting Sarasota Jungle Gardens with dad Joe. Islander Photo: Courtesy Joe Hutchinson.


Fatherhood gives life new meaning


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
"Every day I know I'm lucky," says Walter
Chamberlain of Holmes Beach.
Chamberlain is talking about being a dad to his
almost 5-year-old son Christian.
Islanders might recognize blond-haired Walter
from his full-time cooking job at Rotten Ralph's or
his part-time job at the Island Foods Deli. He's been
at those jobs for 10 and five years respectively. He's
been on the Island for 20 years.
You've probably seen him bicycling the Island
with even-more-blond-haired Christian in tow.
Walter is 27 and he's been raising his son on his
own for more than 3 years. Being a single father
might not make him unique, but his devotion to the
role does make him special.
Walter admits raising Christian alone was hard at
first, but the adjustment time is in the past. They are
fully in tune with each other and the father-to-son bond
is "more pleasurable" than Walter ever imagined.
Christian is a student at the School for Construc-
tive Play four days a week. Walter also gets child-
care help from his father, John Chamberlain of
Holmes Beach, and his mother, Georgia Brown of
Bradenton.
When Walter's not working, he and Christian
are always outside, says Walter. The simplest activi-
ties biking, swimming, enjoying the Island's
parks take on special meaning when it's a guy and
his child.
Taking care of Christian is "the most important


Every day is
Father's Day for
Walter Cham-
berlain with his
son Christian.
Islander Photo:
Courtesy of
Maria Richards.


thing in my life," says Walter. "He comes first."
Walter gets a little teary-eyed remembering
Christian's birth. "When he opened his eyes, I was
the first one he saw. I'll never forget it," says Walter.
Other unforgettable moments include the first
time Christian called Walter "Daddy."
That's a big one, "off the top of my head," says
Walter. "But there are so many joyful memories."
And many more to come.
"Kids really make you feel lucky," says this grate-
ful dad. "He's made me look at life a lot differently."
Walter will work until 4 p.m. on Father's Day.
He hopes Christian makes him something. Beyond
that their celebration will be just spending the
evening together.
To Walter and all you dads out there a
very Happy Father's Day from The Islander By-
stander.


Porker



prohibited



in city

By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In a unanimous vote, the Holmes Beach City
Council agreed last week that Shirley Howden-Gillett
must find a new home for her pet pig, Frances Bacon.
Howden-Gillett made the request for permission to
keep the pig at the last council work session. However,
several neighbors complained about the odor, the un-
sanitary conditions and the fleas created by the pig.
The city's land development code prohibits the keep-
ing of farm-type animals, but another council made a spe-
cial exception for a pet pig several years ago.
"I don't think I can support the request," said Coun-
cilwoman Carol Whitmore. "When we granted the special
exception last time, we had the person come to the meet-
ing before she had the pig. She got permission from all her
neighbors and they had no problem with it"
Councilwoman Pat Geyer said she sympathized
with Howden-Gillett, but the concerns of the neighbors
take precedence.
She is "shying away from granting special excep-
tions," said Councilwoman Billie Martini.
He feels the same as he did at the work session, said
Councilman Don Maloney. The code prohibits farm-type
animals and if council does not agree with the code,
"change it instead of constantly making exceptions."
"She's like a puppy," said Howden-Gillette. "She
follows me all over the place. I love my animals bet-
ter than people. My house is up for sale. I'm trying to
get out of here. I want to go back to the country. I have
no bad feelings."
After the council vote, Council Chairman Luke
Courtney said the matter would be handled by code
enforcement.
"I want it to go to code enforcement," declared
Howden-Gillett, "because I have a lawyer and I will
sue you for discrimination."
The violation will be written up by the city's code
enforcement officer and Howden-Gillet will be sent a
notice of hearing. She must receive the notice 10 days
before the hearing. The case will be heard by the code
enforcement board.


SKIMMING THE NEWS...
Opinions ......................... ............ ..
Those Were the Days ........................
Anna Maria tides ................................
Real estate ........................................
Crossword puzzle...............................


.......... 6
.......... 7
......... 25
......... 27
.........32


JUNE 15, 1995


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND







Hfl PAGE 2 0 JUNE 15, 1995 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


FEMA official pays visit to City Hall


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Federal Emergency Management Agency -
also known as the four-letter word FEMA took on
a human scope at Anna Maria City Hall June 9.
Brad Loar, FEMA's senior mitigation specialist
and chief of its Loss Reduction Section, Natural Haz-
ards Branch, led a two-hour informational session.
Thirty-five Islanders including elected officials,
city staff members, appointed board members and in-
terested residents attended the meeting which had
been requested by Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy
McChesney.
The three Island cities are among 18,500 commu-
nities nationwide that participate in the National Flood
Insurance Program which Loar says is totally
supported by insurance premiums and not subsidized
by taxpayer dollars.
FEMA oversees the program and issues regula-
tions for flood-plain management and flood-hazard
identification.
Back in the 1930s, said Loar, federal flood pro-
grams aimed at structural management of the water, as
in dams and levees. Over the years, non-structural
measures such as building codes, financial regula-
tions and flood insurance were designed to keep
people out of water's harm.
In 1968 the National Flood Insurance Act was
passed to provide previously unavailable flood-insur-
ance protection to property owners in flood-prone ar-
eas. To qualify for the insurance a community must
apply as a whole and continually comply with regula-
tions that are required to be included in local codes.
Loar said federal flood-mitigation regulations and
guidelines, with application and responsibility at the
local level, are designed to reduce the effects of flood-
ing, to protect citizens from the devastation of flood-
ing and to alleviate the prohibitive costs of insuring
structures built below the flood level.

Guessing games?
Discussion of the so-called 50-Percent Rule led to
a series of questions from Anna Maria contractor and
resident Kit Welsch.
In simplest form, the rule says that older buildings
must be elevated if damaged by any cause for which
repair costs are 50 percent or more of the building's
value. If proposed improvements to older buildings are
50 percent or more of the building value, elevation can
also be required.
Communities' varying methods of time-frame cal-
culation have turned the process into "an incredible
game," said Welsch.
Loar agreed there are "loopholes" and said that a
FEMA compliance official in Washington, D.C.,
would love to hear from citizens.
"We understand this system is broke," said Loar.
"We want to stop playing guessing games between the
federal government and local communities."
Welsch later asked why the federal government can't
let property owners do as they wish at ground-floor level
if they are willing to assume the risk and asked what is the
danger of building in lower elevations?
"We're regulating for the health, welfare and safety
of the community whether you believe it or not,"
said Loar.
Lists of items permitted and not permitted below
base flood elevation generated many questions. In the
city of Anna Maria the lists pertain to any new con-
struction after June 1971.
"For years," said Loar, "we avoided being this spe-

Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

countered VanWagoner. "It speaks for itself. It's an
innocent resolution and came about through research
on this particular bridge."
All the area's bridge projects have been individual
projects, said VanWagoner, and have not been studied
comprehensively.
"I thought it was time that all these projects had
one major investment study," he said."
She has no problem with the resolution, said Coun-
cilwoman Carol Whitmore, because she has always
supported a replacement bridge.
"We're lust asking for a study, we don't have to


Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy McChesney gives
thanks to Brad Loar of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.

cific. We wanted the communities to do it. We didn't
want to be that prescriptive. But you asked us to be."
In response to questions about FEMA's definition
of "habitable use" and the inclusion of not-permit-
ted uses such as washer/dryers and bathrooms Loar
suggested the way to change the regulations is by get-
ting congressional representatives involved.
Acting Anna Maria Public Works Director Frank
Tyndall and Island realtor Dolly Young questioned the
reasoning behind not allowing finished entrance foyers
on elevated homes considering the large retirement
element in the community and the intent of a foyer as
an access area not a habitable area.
Loar responded that "it has to do with the percep-
tion of habitability" and that flood-resistant-material


Anna Maria contractor Kit Welsch was polite but
persistent as he directed a long list of questions and
comments to Brad Loar of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency during a June 9 visit.
Welsch told The Islander Bystander he intends to
form an Islandwide citizens action group to attempt
to drive through changes in federal policies regard-
ing flood-prone areas.
An organizational meeting will be held at 2 p.m.
Friday, June 23, at Anna Maria City Hall. Welsch
urges those interested to call him at 778-5230.
Loar was courteous in telling Islanders that the
remedy for some of their building- and rebuilding-
regulation concerns was out of his hands.
Loar suggested citizens seek involvement from
congressional representatives. He also provided the
names of higher-up FEMA and National Flood Insur-
ance Program officials who "would be happy to have


accept what they come up with," said Councilwoman
Billie Martini.
Councilman Don Maloney said he favors a study
that takes the entire area into consideration.
'I'm getting pretty tired of this bridge issue,"
pointed out resident Dr. Arthur Danziger. "The whole
thing is a subterfuge to try and block the bridge.
There's been enough talk and enough action. If they're
going to build a bridge let them, and let's get on with
our lives here."
He does not feel citizens should be writing resolu-
tions, said resident Lee Edwards.
"I think it behooves us to have a comprehensive
study so we can be informed on what best serves both
counties," resident Diane Michaels noted.
The resolution was approved with Geyer dissenting.


options are listed in FEMA literature.
Regarding what's not permitted in a garage, Rob-
ert Loomis asked, "Wouldn't it be simpler to just say
nothing's insured?"
"The agency has not taken that position. I don't
know why," said Loar.
Of non-permitted items below base flood eleva-
tion, Bunny Garst wanted to know, "Does that mean
they're illegal or just not covered?"
"Illegal and not covered," said Loar.

Community penalties
Among many other questions was one from Anna
Maria Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard. "Have you ever
declared a community uninsurable?"
Loar described a two-phase process for communi-
ties that don't apply FEMA regulations locally. First,
FEMA would work with the community, sometimes
even for a few years, trying to achieve compliance.
If not successful, then a community goes on pro-
bation for one year during which FEMA puts a sur-
charge on every policy. The intent, said Loar, "is to get
you upset and come over here and tell them to do it
right." After a year, the community is re-evaluated.
Loar said FEMA does not "microscope" for iso-
lated incidents but rather responds to "patterns of prob-
lems." He said the city of Clayton, Ga., was declared
inelligible for federal flood insurance earlier this year.
McChesney asked why no living area, not even an
office, is permitted at ground level.
"I guess," said Loar, "so you (the local community)
wouldn't have to keep determining what is habitable."
He defined ground-floor quarters of any kind as "a
hazard."
A 16-year FEMA employee who has worked pri-
marily in North Carolina, Kentucky and Florida, Loar
works out of the agency's seven-state Region IV At-
lanta office. His Florida responsibilities include the
West Coast, Tampa Bay and the Panhandle.
FEMA was created as an executive agency, merg-
ing several agencies, in 1979 under former President
Jimmy Carter. A new Mitigation Division has been
created by President Bill Clinton and is headed, says
Loar, by the agency's "first true emergency-manage-
ment professional."
FEMA has 2,500 staff members, half of whom
work in Washington, D.C.


your input"
Welsch, owner of Exact Carpentry Services, spe-
cializes in residential remodeling, and has constant
dealings with the so-called 50-Percent Rule that limits
improvement to non-elevated structures and defines
new elevation for substantially damaged structures.
"This is just one issue that is important to me
and many others on the Island," says Welsch. "It will
become particularly important should a storm create
tremendous damage."
Welsch would also like to see regulations changed
to charge flood-insurance premiums based on the risk
of individual properties rather than by zone, enabling
property owners the right to use their property based on
what financial risk they want to assume.
"There are many issues that should be addressed
and it seems we'd have more power as a group,"
says Welsch.


Bohnenberger also objected to Pierola's resolution,
which he maintained "asks for things to be removed from
the county's comprehensive plan that are not there."
Whitmore agreed and said she also has a problem
with other wording in the resolution.
The resolution was approved with Whitmore and
Geyer dissenting.
Bohnenberger's resolution sought the removal of
inconsistencies regarding the number of traffic lanes
for bridges and their approaches in the comprehensive
plans of the county the Island cities and the Metropoli-
tan Planning Organization. It was unanimously ap-
proved.
Bohnenberger was directed to support the three
resolutions at the Island Transportation Planning Orga-
nization level.


Contractor to form citizens group






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 m PAGE 3 II

Jet-ski rental denied off Bridge Street


By Paul Roat
By unanimous vote, Bradenton Beach City Coun-
cil members denied a special exception request for the
rental of personal watercraft Jet-skis from a dock
at the foot of Bridge Street.
"I'll see you in court!" was Daryl Konecy's reac-
tion to the vote. Konecy and his wife, Geri, requested
the expansion in use for their parasail business, Fun and
Sun Sports, Inc.
Council members followed the lead of the city
planning commission, which also rejected the motor
scooter rental request. Rationale for the rejection was
health, safety, welfare and morals and a belief the use
would "result in substantial economic, noise, glare or
odor impacts on adjoining properties and properties
generally in the district."
Konecy gave a lengthy presentation to the council
in an attempt to dissuade the noise issue, including a
video of one of the personal watercraft zooming back
and forth in Anna Maria Sound in the area the rental


Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch Program volun-
teers are urging Islanders to turn out their outside lights
to aid sea turtle nesting on the beaches this year.
Female turtles come ashore in the evenings be-
tween May and October to dig nests in the sand and lay
eggs. After about 60 days, the tiny turtles burrow out
from the sand and head for the water.
Beachfront property owners who leave outside
lights on distract or attract the turtles. Both the
females and the little turtles use the glow off the wa-
ter to given them a direction to head when they seek the
warm waters of the Gulf. Lights other than the Gulf's
illumination will attract turtles, and every year hun-
dreds of turtles are squished under the tires of cars as
baby turtles head for street lights near busy highways.
All three Island cities have ordinances prohibiting
outside lights during the turtle nesting and hatching
season from May to October.
A number of streetlights also shine on the beach,
Shumard said. FPL representatives told The Islander By-


craft would operate. He claimed there would be no
appreciable noise associated with the business.
The watercraft would have mufflers, Konecy said,
and the engines would have governors to keep the top
speed to less than 35 mph.
Safety to boat drivers and others on the water
would be addressed through the use of life jackets and
instruction targeted at proper use of the craft, Konecy
said. He would only rent to people 18 years of age or
older and the use area would be within sight of the dock
and would be monitored by Konecy or his representa-
tives, he said.
"The ride area is my policing.problem and some-
thing I will have to deal with," Konecy said.
Residents of the area opposed the rental business.
"When I moved here from Siesta Key, this was a
quiet community," Jim Tee said, "but it's become a
circus. I will hear the noise from in front of my house.
When you get on a Jet-ski, it's like fantasy time -
you'll do whatever you can get away with on it.


stander they would look into the beach illumination issue.
Shumard said the following addresses had left out-
side lights on last week:
Street lights at the beach and 30-39th Streets
Street light at the beach and 43rd Street
Street light at the beach and 45th Street
Street light at the beach and 47-49th Streets
House light between 29-30th Streets
Security light at 31st Street
Condo light at 202 35th St
Condo light at Island Paradise
Condo light at 37th Street, Sailfish Apartments
Outside house lights, 37th Street and beach
Manatee Public Beach lighting
Outside lights, Aquarius Apartments, 39th Street
Outside lights, Alamanda Apartments, 39th Street
Security lights, West Coast Surf Shop, 39th Street
Outside lights, 102 47th St.
Security lights, 101 47th St.
Outside lights, 102 49th St.


"I suggest he put them in his back yard, not mine,"
Tee added.
"The water is not the problem," Bay Drive South
waterfront resident Mollie Sandberg said. "We are ac-
customed to hearing those 'gnats' out on the water, but
what concerns me is when you approved the Bridge
Tender Inn to expand there, you allowed them less
parking to get more business on Bridge Street. Then
you approved the parasail business there, and now you
may allow an increase in a special exception at the res-
taurant for another business, and there is not enough
parking to allow more business."
Capt. Jeff Hilliard, one of the captains who oper-
ate the parasail boat, told council members "you can-
not live in Oz forever. This request gives you a rare
opportunity to control water safety. These boats will be
in a certain area under your control."
The council members voiced concern about low-
ered property values along the water with a personal
watercraft business adjacent to them, noise concerns
and a belief that the location was not suited for the
rental business in rejecting the special exception.



Anna Maria City
6/22, 10 am., Homecoming committee
6/22, 7:30 p.m., Code Enforcement Board

Bradenton Beach
6/15, 1 p.m., Council meeting
6/16, 1 p.m., Occupational License
Review Committee

Holmes Beach
6/20, 7:30 p.m., Council work session

Of Interest
S6/19, 10 am., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
6/21, 10 am., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Holmes Beach City Hall.


LAPENSEE PLUMBING AND

THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

CONGRATULATE THE

ANNA MARIA ELEMENTARY

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1995


Mrs. Ellis's Class
Kyle Bachman
Marika Barrett
Randy Blancet
James Blanchard
Allison Chewning
Akela Collins
Preston Copeland
Patricia Domke
Melisso Eddington
Kirsten Foasee
Sarah Fazioli
Vaugh James
Alan Jenkins
Misty Kinney
Kate Lindahl
Andy McCarrick
Nicole Miller
Travis Rice
Chose Riter
Crystalyn Roach
Lauren Shuford
Michael Stamm


Sarah Thomas
Lisa Troutt
Adam Wall
Justin Weng
Tyler White

Mrs. Russell's Clas
Tami Aldrich
Ryan Allis
Alicia Anton
Sky Beard
Star Beard
Rachelle Brockway
Jennifer Burgner
Wayne Charles
Jack Cole
Chad Dingier
Ashley Eannarino
Amber Johnson
Sarah Judeh
Megan Kyzer
Michael Little
Jason Loomis
Sarah Loveland


LaPensee

Plumbing, Inc.


Michael Maietta
Michael Martin
Cara Perinetti
Shawna Rigney
Jennifer Sayko
James Sebastiano
Julie Smith
Mark Rasmussen
Sergio Recanati
Ben Sato
Erica Webb


Miss Small's lass
Eric Bobo
Maggie Collins
Jonathan Cannon
Jenna DeNoyelles
Hannah Jansen
Matthew Losek
Katie Holmes
Kristopher Smith
Amanda Parsels
Laura Potter



ISLANDER


Turn out the light!


island. Janet*AATA





Lookn^~i ou Missf Duffy. ^^^^^



ID,
AWARDWINNING DININ &COCKTAIL





iC7r 778-6


BYS35SEI






i[ PAGE 4 0 JUNE 15, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

What is Orimulsion and why should you care?


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Orimulsion is a fuel that consists of a mixture of
bitumen, water and an emulsifying agent. Bitumen is
a tar-like substance found about 2,000 feet under-
ground in the Orinoco River region of Venezuela. The
bitumen must be emulsified with water in order to be
handled, transported and used.
The fuel is extracted, processed and distributed by
a subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela, the country's
nationalized energy company. It is marketed in the
United States by Bitor America, based in Boca Raton,
Fla.
The Florida Power & Light Company wants to
purchase 80,000 barrels of Orimulsion per day to fuel
its Parrish plant. It would be the first long-term com-
mercial contract for the use of Orimulsion in this coun-
try. The Parrish plant would burn more Orimulsion
than any other plant in the world.
FPL representatives say the use of Orimulsion will
reduce their dependency on foreign oil, keep the com-
pany competitive, reduce electricity bills, create jobs
and increase the county's property taxes.
Environmentalists and other opponents say the use
of Orimulsion will more than double emissions of ni-
trogen oxide which contributes to acid rain, smog, ni-
trogen loading in the Bay and Gulf and health prob-
lems, and it would be a nightmare to clean up if spilled
in the Bay since it disperses in water.
This week we will present FPL's arguments on the
benefits of using Orimulsion. Next week opponents of
the fuel will detail their concerns.

FPL says Orimulsion is the fuel
for our future
One reason FPL wants to convert its Parrish plant
to use Orimulsion instead of oil is because competition
is coming to the electric utility industry, said Jerry
Kirk, FPL projects manager, at a recent meeting of Is-
land officials.
"It will not be very long until individual residents
will have a choice of who you buy your electricity
from," Kirk explained. "You'll have the option of call-
ing any number of utilities in the southeast. If we can-
not reduce our costs and become more competitive,
there's a very high likelihood that FPL will simply not
be in business."
In addition to reducing fuel costs $6.2 billion over
20 years, the use of Orimulsion will reduce the utility's
dependency on oil, he said. Last year FPL burned 40
million barrels and was the largest consumer of oil in
the United States for the production of electricity. With


The figures for oil are with the plant running at
30percent capacity. Thefigures for Orimulsion
are with the plant running at 87percent capac-
ity. Allfigures were supplied by FPL.

Sulfur dioxide
Oil 23,908 tons per year
Orimulsion 13,635 tons per year
Particles (ash and other particles resulting from
the combustion process)
Oil 3,152 tons per year
Orimulsion 1,749 tons per year
Nitrogen oxide
Oil -7,565 tons per year
Orimulsion 17,491 tons per year
The rate of nitrogen oxide emitted per hour
in burning Orimulsion would remain the same
as in burning oil, but there would be a 10,000
ton per year increase because the plant would be
running at a higher capacity.

Heavy metals
A 40 percent reduction in current levels of


Orimulsion: Fueling or
fouling the future?

Part 1 in a series

the use of Orimulsion, consumption will be reduced to
13 million barrels per year.

Economic benefits
Orimulsion will decrease the cost of electricity to
the consumer, because it is comparable in price to coal,
he said. Fuel bills will be reduced about $42 per year
per customer.
"All the saving will flow directly to the customer,"
said Kirk. "FPL stockholders do not get one penny out
of this."
Other economic benefits include the creation of
350 construction jobs, 40 jobs within the plant and 50
jobs in the transportation of products used in the pro-
cess and by-products created by the process of burning
Orimulsion.
Port revenues will increase by $1.5 million per year
and property taxes by $700,000 per year, Kirk said.

Emissions
Kirk said FPL is concerned about protecting the
environment and will install an electrostatic precipita-
tor to remove dust and particles from the flue gas and
a sulfur dioxide scrubbing system to remove sulfur.
(See the box on this pagefor a comparison of emis-
sions created by burning oil and Orimulsion.)
One of the greatest concerns of environmentalists
is the 10,000 ton per year increase in nitrogen oxide
(NOx) created by Orimulsion.
"In the state of Florida we are permitted to emit
22,732 tons per year," noted Kirk. "We currently emit
7,565 tons per year burning oil at a 33 percent capac-
ity factor. Once we convert, we will increase those
emissions to 17,491 tons per year.
The high cost of oil currently keeps the capacity
factor of the plant down, but if the plant were running
at or near capacity using oil, NOx emissions would
increase significantly, he said.
FPL has also maintained that while NOx emis-
sions will increase by 10,000 tons per year locally, they
will decrease by 24,000 tons per year in other FPL
plants throughout the state, creating a system-wide
decrease of 14,000 tons.
"We are installing new low NOx burners on the
plant to keep the emissions as low as possible," Kirk
added.


regulated heavy metals, a 60 per cent reduction
in current levels of non-regulated heavy metals
and a reduction of 155 tons per year in the to-
tal volume of heavy metals would result from
burning Orimulsion.

Volatile organic compounds
A 7 percent annual decrease in volatile or-
ganic compounds would result from burning
Orimulsion.

Carbon monoxide
A 50 percent decrease in carbon monoxide
emissions per hour would result from burning
Orimulsion. However, there would be an in-
crease of 3,000 tons per year, because the plant
would be operating at a higher capacity.

Carbon dioxide
There would be no significant difference.
Some carbon dioxide would be created by the
sulfur dioxide scrubbing system.


Cleaning up a spill
If spilled, the bitumen particles inOrimulsion are
dispersed in the water, unlike oil which floats to the top
and forms a slick. Containment skirts have been devel-
oped to deal with spills.
"We've been doing a lot of work with marine con-
tractors," Kirk said. "They have been developing new
equipment and looking at how we would clean up a
spill. They conducted tests and, in 30 minutes after a
spill, they had cleaned up and recovered 70 percent of
the Orimulsion."
"It separates in water but if you agitate it, it causes
the particles to come in contact with each other and
stick together," said Wayne Ondler, FPL's environ-
mental affairs manager. "It will float back to the sur-
face and form a thick, tarry mass. A skimmer has been
developed to skim this material off the water."
Kirk said according to results from tests conducted
by the University of Miami, Orimulsion is about equal
to oil in terms of total environmental damage.
"In the mangrove area, they saw no damage with
the Orimulsion at all," he said. "There were actually
new seedlings growing in the mangroves that had
Orimulsion on them. They did not see that with oil."
Orimulsion is less toxic than oil, said Kirk, and
takes about five times as long to reach sensitive habi-
tat-areas.
Researchers in Miami developed microcosms of
habitats, said Ondler.
"They introduced oil and Orimulsion to observe
how that might affect the rate of growth of seagrasses,"
said Ondler. "There was no growth occurring in the oil
test and new growth occurring in the Orimulsion test."
Ondler said fish and filter feeders such as oysters
were also studied and there was little difference be-
tween the effect of oil and Orimulsion.
"There's no way to design a risk-free project," he
stressed. "We're trying to look at the potential environ-
mental impacts and what we can do to mitigate them.
That deals with the development of systems to contain
and remove the material."
The company has developed a three-dimensional
model of Tampa Bay and its habitats, said Ondler, which
can be used to track the path of a spill. Lines of defense
could be set up at the projected destination of the spill.
If an Orimulsion spill reaches the shore, it would
be cleaned up much like oil, said Ondler, and it does
not adhere to water fowl as much as oil.

Why the Parrish plant?
Manatee County's Parrish plant was selected for
the Orimulsion conversion project primarily because
there is a nearby deep water port, said Kirk.
Other reasons include an existing fuel delivery
system from Port Manatee to the plant, cost effective-
ness due to the size of the plant and sufficient available
land at the plant site.
"The customers get the most fuel savings if we
burn the cheapest fuel in the largest plant we have,"
noted Kirk.

Impact minimization
All Orimulsion will be delivered in double-hulled
vessels, said Kirk. Oil is delivered in single-hulled
vessels.
"There's a six-foot air gap between the hulls," he
noted. "There's a lot of structural steel supports be-
tween the two hulls. It would be almost impossible,
traveling at the speeds ships travel coming into the port,
to rupture that inner hull if it ran aground."
The company will be reclaiming water from its
sanitary system and capturing stormwater and recy-
cling it to the cooling pond, Kirk said. Landscaped
buffers will be added. Fly ash and gypsum, the by-
products produced in burning Orimulsion, will be sold
to other companies.
"We have the National Gypsum Company under
contract and they will be purchasing all the gypsum and
using it to make wallboard," explained Kirk. "The ash
will be used in the cement industry for making con-
crete."
As a back-up plan, a Class 1 landfill is being de-
signed for the disposal of the gypsum and ash if it is
not purchased by other companies.
FPL hopes to begin conversion of the plant in Janu-
ary 1996, complete it by December 1997 and begin
burning Orimulsion by January 1998.


Comparison of emissions from

burning oil

vs. burning Orimulsion







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JUNE 15, 1995 U PAGE 5 B1i

Mayor appoints Maloney to community center board


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger surprised and
shocked some council members when he appointed
Councilman Don Maloney to represent the city on
the Anna Maria Island Community Center Board of
Directors last week.
The question of whether to make an appointment
has been debated by the mayor and council for several
months. Council members said they have no problem
with an appointment; however, the mayor has stated he
believes it is improper to have an elected official sitting
on the Center board and the council, which appropri-
ates money annually to the Center.
According to the Center's bylaws, the city repre-
sentative must be appointed by the mayor and has full
voting powers on the board.
At the council's May meeting, Maloney noted that
both Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach have appointed


representatives to the Center's board. After hearing the
mayor's objection, he suggested that the Center change its
bylaws to eliminate voting by city representatives.
At last week's work session, Maloney said he met
with Center representatives who said "they would change
the bylaws so the vote by city representatives is optional.
I'm asking the mayor to reconsider the appointment based
on that possibility, because I believe it's very important
that we are represented on that board."
"What's the big deal?" asked Councilwoman Carol
Whitmore. "We're the only city that won't appoint
somebody. Luke Courtney was on the board before he
came on the council. (Councilman Courtney is an at-
large board member.) He votes now. I think we should
appoint Luke and forget the bylaws change."
Councilwoman Billie Martini agreed with
Whitmore.
"Just because they say they'll change the bylaws
doesn't mean they will," cautioned Lee Edwards, resi-


dent and Center board member. "The board will have
to vote on it. If the mayor feels that being part of the
council and being on the board is in conflict, you
should respect his wishes."
"I can settle this right now," said Bohnenberger. "I
appoint Don Maloney as the Holmes Beach represen-
tative with the stipulation he does not vote on any is-
sue, and if the subject of funding by the city comes up,
he has to leave the room"
"It's a Sunshine violation. You can't," said
Whitmore.
Martini asked that the matter be placed on the June
20 work session.
"We will discuss it at our next work session,"
Courtney said, "because we are going to be discussing
our legislative code and the mayor's ability to make ap-
pointments."
"The authority to make appointments is in the char-
ter," noted Bohnenberger.







EG PAGE 6 1 JUNE 15, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

9 -3d eI


How do you get

across the street?
Here we are, a quiet, beachside resort community.
Why can't we cross the road without taking our life in
our hands due to cars zipping down Gulf Drive?
John Green has provided a letter this week in The
Islander Bystander that makes perfect sense to us:
crosswalks.
As Mr. Green points out, there are an awful lot of
Bayside condos and resorts with people who want to go
to the beach side of the Island. To get there from here
requires a traverse of Gulf Drive and, with a lot of im-
patient people driving on the state highway, there are
some long, long waits to cross the road.
Crosswalks with clearly defined road markings would
at least provide an indicator to motorists that pedestrians
use that part of the highway from time to time.
Speaking of pedestrians, whatever happened to the
sidewalk plans for the Island as outlined by the 789
Task Force report last year? If there is one place that
desperately needs a sidewalk it would be along East
Bay Drive from Manatee Avenue south to Gulf Drive.
It doesn't appear the road project currently in
progress on Manatee Avenue includes sidewalks from
the bridge to the Manatee Public Beach.
Perhaps Mr. Green does have it right: to get across
the street you need to call a cab.

Red tide redux
Red tide has again floated up on shores, complete
with the gagging toxins and the stench of dead fish.
We predict the winds will shift later this week and
drive the irritating microorganism away from the
beaches, and we hope clean-up crews will rake and re-
move the dead fish before the weekend.
We also have a suggestion to anyone planning to
visit the beach it's ok to go ahead and give it a try.
The red tide outbreak is sporadic. Bradenton Beach
beaches may be toxin-free, yet Holmes Beach could be
covered with dead fish carcasses, or vice versa. Just
pick a spot that's free of the odor and enjoy the beach.

Congrats to us
The Florida Press Association awarded The Is-
lander Bystander with four awards: a second place for
our editorial page, a third place for Paul Roat's photo
of a windsurfer, an honorable mention for Pat
Copeland's "Community in Crisis" series and an hon-
orable mention for our series on Cortez and the impact
a net ban would have on the village.


JUNE 15, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 30
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Jay Davis
Laura Ritter
Darla Tingler
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


o 1995 Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


'Deer in flip flops' afraid
to cross street
Help! I need somebody to help me quick! I can't
get across the road and I don't know what to do!
I'm scared. Those cars sure are big and there com-
ing awfully fast. They don't see me let alone want to
let me cross the road.
I just read in The Islander that the intersection of East
Bay Drive and Manatee Avenue is the most dangerous for
cars and the police want ideas on how to make it safer. I
thought about it for quite a while and talked to a lot of
people and came up with a sure-fire idea.
Make the cars slow down!
Put in crosswalks for pedestrians with a button to push
so we can cross the road to the bank or the grocery store
without risking our lives. There's 100 or so units in West
Bay Cove and another 100in Sunbow Bay. Those people
would probably like to have a well-marked crosswalk.
How about one at the Sandpiper Mobile Resort, there's
another 100 units. I've seen groups of people from Island
Village trying to cross the road to the beach and they look
like frightened deer in flip flops.
Why do we have those funny rectangular yellow
signs every so often with the little man on them, and
what do they mean? My son Hunter says that little man
on the sign must have gotten hit at this spot because
he's got no hands or feet and his head has been sepa-
rated from his body.
Maybe the signs mean "slow down from 40 to 30
mph." Nobody's looking or caring. I tried stopping for
a pedestrian coming out of the post office and using the
ill-marked crosswalk there and the people behind me
blew their horns and waved their fingers at me. Well,
excuse me, I was trying to help the old geezer and fol-
low the law.
Al Gore says we need to stop auto pollution and the
doctors say get more exercise. Walking could be the
cure.
Let's put red or yellow crosswalks all over the Is-
land with flashing yellow lights and signs that say, "all
traffic must stop for pedestrians; violation $75" and
enforce it.
Inconvenient? Maybe, but we can teach ourselves
to slow down and give the right-of-way to pedestrians.


We drive north on Gulf Drive and approach the Anna
Maria City limit and what do we do? Every car slows
to 25 mph and waves at the patrol car parked at the
church. Maybe Holmes Beach should adopt the 25 mph
speed limit, especially with a new bridge which will
bring more cars.
This is not a political matter.
It is a matter of broken bones.
Overheard at Barnett Bank:
First man: "How can I get across the road to the
Mutiny Inn?"
Second man: "Call a cab."
See you along the side of the road.
John Green, Holmes Beach
Islander puts paper on line
for Island safety
The officers, members and supporters of Save
Anna Maria, Inc.,want to thank you Bonner as editor
and publisher and The Islander Bystander for the effec-
tive idea, design, sale and support of "Save Our Bridge/
Save Our Island" stock certificates in the existing
Manatee Avenue bridge.
Your fundraiser, dedicated to SAM's legal fund, is
a success with only a hundred or so certificates left to
sell out of 496 issued !
The payoff for all of SAM's past and future
fundraisers is finally at hand. Because DEP has issued
an "intent to issue" notice to FDOT for the mega-
bridge, SAM will now get its yet-to-be-scheduled ad-
ministrative hearing paid for with the legal fund
money. This action will also allow SAM to pursue the
rehabilitation of the existing low bridge with the addi-
tion of safety lanes.
SAM has raised $24,000 with $6,000 more to go to
reach its end-of-summer 1995 legal fund goal of $30,000.
Fundraisers will continue through the summer.
The Islander's effort to protect the environment,
evacuation safety, traffic safety and the unique charac-
ter of Anna Maria Island is respected and more than
appreciated.
Melody Kramer, president, Save Anna Maria, Inc.
Kay Hoey, vice-president
Izzy Amaro, treasurer
Joy Courtney, secretary


Holmes Beach road kill


e 9


[ISLANDER


Iw BYS











THOSE WERE THE A YS
Part 1, Everybody's Talking
by June Alder


A turn-of-the century view of Main Street in the center of Braidentown.

THE DOCTOR


HAS AN IDEA


What was the new doctor's son
up to now? the gossips on Curry's
Point wondered. Everybody had been
glad when the Ellenton physician and
his pretty wife Jenny moved in on First
Avenue. Lord knew, the town needed a
doctor.
But that gangly boy of theirs! If
there was any mischief among the
neighborhood youngsters, you could be
sure he was the ring leader.
When he wasn't fishing or poling
his skiff in Ware's Creek, he was off
with his Uncle Grant to Anna Maria,
poking among the Indian mounds, ex-
ploring for "treasure" in old ship-
wrecks. He brought home every sort of
critter-an ailing otter one day, a baby
raccoon or nest of snake eggs the
next-not to mention the straggly cats
he picked up; one of them surely was
kin to a panther.
Oh, he was smart, and could be a
gentleman he played angelically on
the violin at afternoon socials. But he
was a strange one, spoiled rotten. His
pa let him get away with murder.
Last week a barge had come down
river heavy with a load of what looked
like telegraph wire. The new yard man
and the boy who'd taken quite a
shine to the burly black fellow filled
the barn up with the spools. Yesterday
the two of them had been up and down
the street with a measuring stick. Now
they'd lugged one of the spools of wire
out and were up in the trees on ladders,
hammering away while the neighbor
kids gawked.
What in the world was going on?
As the Curry's Point folks learned
soon enough, what the pair was doing
was putting up Manatee County's first
telephone line.
In 1895 there were only a few scat-
tered home-made or mail-order phones
in all of Central Florida. Tampa was
the only town with a phone exchange,
connected up just last year. No one had
even thought of telephones in Manatee
County. Until now.
When Dr. J.B. Leffingwell settled
on the Point (lured there by "Rich Bill"
Curry's gift of a homesite) he'd left be-
hind in his father's barn in Ellenton a
good deal of farming and construction


equipment including a box-car of
field telegraph wire from Civil War
days. The now-elderly father, General
Hiram Wheeler Leffingwell (a well-to-
do developer in St. Louis and founder of
Kirkwood, Missouri), and his young
doctor-son had moved to Ellenton to-
gether in 1881. The general brought the
wire along with him, intending to use it
for vineyards. But he found that grapes
didn't take to Florida's climate.
Well, it came to the doctor one day
that he now had a use for some of that
wire. His office and drugstore were
about a half mile away at the corner of
Turner and Main Street. It was too far to
"whoop or holler" to the drug store, so
when he learned that Alec Richardson,
his new yard man, had been a telegraph
lineman for the now out-of-business
Arcadia, Gulf Coast and Lakeland Rail-
road ("Old Slow and Wobbly"), he de-
cided to go ahead with his plan.
Young Jack was thrilled, course. He
read up on Alexander Graham Bell's in-
vention, pestered Richardson for infor-
mation and in the end persuaded his in-
dulgent dad to let him work on the line.
Man and boy working together as a
team, the wire was looped through the
live oak trees and strung along.palm
trees to Main Street, using the necks of
beer bottles for insulators. And within a
week messages were zipping back and
forth between the two "coffee grinder"
style instruments bought from a bootleg
(non-Bell) manufacturer.
The private "talking line" was a
sensation, and before long the score or
so neighbors on the Point were begging
Leffingwell to set up an exchange to
accommodate them.
"Think you and Alec can do it?" the
doctor asked his son.
Confident now that he was a tele-
phone expert, Jack puffed out his chest
and replied, "Yessir, you bet we can!"
So it was that Jack Leffingwell got
the "contract" to establish the company
that would become what we now know
as GTE. He had yet to celebrate his 13th
birthday.

Next: Hello, Central -
Hello


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 E PAGE 7 1



Why get
c soaked?







FAT CAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning

Dry Foam, Dries =Fast
We never use steam!


""...Our furniture and carpet

look terrific!"
Nancy & Dick Birdsall
Holmes Beach


Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer

For fast, thorough, friendly
service call me Jon Kent,
SIsland resident and owner of
S Fat Cat. Call 8 am to 5 pm.
778-2882

MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Umi u. iimiui m muJ m mi m m mm mn mI IuI IU 1 nm ii lnmmmunm

SWe'd love to mail




you the news!
S We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $30 per
Year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 900 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live u
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
S We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
Real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't
live here year-round, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend or rela-
tive, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office
With a check in the proper amount or charge it to Visa or MasterCard.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
SE One Year: $30 l 6 Months: $20 l 3 Months: $12
U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
O One Year: $135 O 6 Months: $85 E 3 Months: $48
MAIL TO:
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP_
CREDIT CARD: EXP. DATE _
U1 U
MAIL START DATE: ___


ISLANDER EIDA
THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
[]l CHARGE IT BY PHONE: _
... .. (941) 778-7978 [


June Alder is on vacation. This column is a repeat of a
column which originally appeared Aug. 12, 1993.






EI- PAGE 8 m JUNE 15, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Uneven planks get warning signs at pier for a while


Signage in lieu of plywood will be the first tactic
used to alert patrons of the restaurant at the Bradenton
Beach Fishing Pier that the flooring is not level.
City council members agreed last week that post-
ing signs warning of gaps between the planks of the
pier would be a compromise between covering the
floor with plywood a move that, although safer,
would reduce the rustic ambience of the pier.
Building Official Whitey Moran has said that, al-
though the deck is structurally sound, the gaps between
the planks some more than one inch wide present
a hazard to customers and could place the city in legal
problems if someone slipped or tripped.
There is also a three-quarter-inch elevation differ-
ence between the inner and outer dining rooms, pre-
senting an accessibility problem for handicapped res-


taurant patrons, Moran said.
Moran offered three suggestions to get the city out
of the potential liability crack at the pier: demolish the
building, remove and replace the planks and then re-
erect the building; place additional decking perpen-
dicular to the existing deck; or install plywood with a
non-skid surface over the floor of the pier restaurant.
Cost of the building demolition and total deck re-
placement is about $16,000; additional perpendicular
decking was deemLd a health hazard due to the prob-
ability of food becoming lodged in the tiny cracks; ply-
wood with a non-skid covering would be about $325.
Pier manager Georgia McKee has said customers
like to look at the water through the cracks as well as
slip bits of food to the fish. If the decking were covered,
her business would fall off, claimed McKee.


Vice Mayor Dick Suhre suggested the signage so-
lution, a solution City Attorney Alan Prather reluc-
tantly agreed to.
"If someone has a duty to protect people from a
potential hazard, you must act reasonably to address it,"
Prather said. "Warning people of the potential hazard
is one method, however, the warning must be reason-
able. If you have an existing potentially hazardous situ-
ation, a warning alone may not be sufficient.
"If you have an unsafe situation and do not want to
address it because people like to drop food to the fish
and watch them swarm, it will be a difficult issue to
argue in court," Prather warned.
Council members agreed to the quick-fix of a sign
until a representative from the city's insurance carrier
can review the pier decking next week.


Winning mateys
at annual
Kids' Day
A good time was had by
all hundreds of them -
at the Anna Maria Island
Privateers' 41st annual
Snooks Adams Kids' Day
at Bayfront Park Priva-
teer Eric Rushnell gangs
up with overall pirate-
look-alike winners, from
left, John Short, third;
Stephen Caton, second;
and Andrew Fortenberry,
first place. Islander
Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Swimwear Capital of the Keys


bUY0l


Trhis W-

Resist all those ads from the
big guys 'til you see what
we've got planned ^ .;f ,:
for you next week ...

Our 29th Annual 2for 1

Swimwear Sale
Begins Saturday, June 24!


Buttonwood Plaza Longboat Key
3170 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Mon-Sat 9 to 6
Sunday 10 to 5
383-2288


WEAR


Serving the Islands Since 1966


Anna Maria plans fall
homecoming event
Anna Maria Mayor Dorothy McChesney has re-
ceived unanimous backing from the city commission to
hold "a down-home, welcome-home homecoming" in
the city on Saturday, Oct. 21.
All Anna Maria organizations, businesses and resi-
dents are invited to participate in the day-long festival.
Inside and outside activities are being scheduled
around City Hall and the Island Players Theater, at the
Anna Maria Island Historical Society Museum and
Roser Church.
A sunset Pine Avenue promenade and an evening
street dance are also in the planning stages.
Organizational meetings are underway. To be in-
volved, call Cathi O'Bannon, 778-4198, or Carolyne
Norwood, 778-1514.

License fee review
4 begins in Bradenton
Beach
Occupational license fee review in Bradenton
Beach will begin this week when a citizen advisory
board meets Friday.
The five-member committee will review the fee
Structure the city charges businesses in Bradenton
Beach. The organizational meeting will begin at 1 p.m.
E.. in city hall.
Members of the committee are: Ed Chiles, The
Beachhouse Restaurant; Charlie Dubbs, Seaside Motel;
Joe Garbus, Garbus Construction; Emily Anne Smith,
Eatman & Smith Architects; and Peggy Smith, P.J.'s.



Enter KINSA to win.
1. Kodak International Snapshot Awards (KINSA) is strictly for amateur photogra-
phers. (Anyone who derives less than 5% of their income from photography.)
2. Submit black-and-white or color shapshots taken after January 1, 1993. Photos
previously published or entered in KINSA or other competitions are ineligible.
3. Snapshots may be taken with any camera, but all entries must be on Kodak film
AND printed on Kodak paper. No retouching or alterations except cropping is
permitted.
4. Entrant's name, address and phone number must be printed clearly in ink of the
back of each print. Mail or deliver to KINSA in care of the Editor, Islander Bystander,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217.
5. Entrants agree The Islander Bystander may publish their photo. Entrants must
be able to furnish the original negative or transparency. All materials become the
property of the sponsor and KINSA and will not be returned.
6. To be eligible, entrants must be a weekly local winner and then sign a Prize
Winner's Agreement. The complete rules and agreement are available at The Islander
Bystander for review.
7. Entrants must be able to furnish a release with names and addresses of any
recognizable persons appearing in the picture.
Entry deadlines:
June 22 issue /deadline June 16, 5 p.m.
June 29 issue / deadline June 23, 5 p.m.
July 6 issue / deadline June 30, 5 p.m.
July 13 issue / deadline July 7, 5 p.m.
July 20 issue / deadline July 14, 5 p.m.
July 127 issue / deadline July 21,5 p.m.
KINSA categories: Abstract; Landscape & Scenic; Special Moments; Candids; Animals; Still Life;
Humor, Grown-ups; Action and Portrait. In addition to suggested KINSA categories, The Islander
Bystander judges will look for pictures with an Anna Maria Island theme and a depiction of the
Island's July 4 holiday.

faM sSffTi SS I! S


~U~YLT~ ~~'C-'- -I 1 '


- I a I- I -------.I-.YC------~C-


m


I


h ~ '~r[Sn
k
1 r.if-l

Ca ,.'-
V


e:


G~v






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 M PAGE 9 il]

Agency comments on Sasser variance request


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Planning and Zoning Board acted
"properly" in recommending denial of Luther Sasser's
ground-floor variance request, says a letter to the city
from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
The City Commission tabled action on the variance
pending guidance from FEMA regarding Sasser's desire
to construct daytime resting quarters at his Magnolia
Avenue home. The item was scheduled for renewed dis-
cussion at the commission's June 13 work session.
In their denial recommendation, planners main-
tained that Sasser's medical condition does not meet
federal and city criteria for "hardship" and that grant-
ing the variance could jeopardize the city's participa-
tion in the National Flood Insurance Program.
At the commission's direction, Planning Board
Chairman Tom Turner wrote to FEMA requesting
guidance.
Responding for FEMA, Mitigation Programs
Branch Chief John C. Heard Jr. said, in part: "Our re-
view of the request indicates that the Planning and
Zoning Board properly considered our previous guid-
ance and all appropriate issues in denying the request.
The board properly noted that requests for relief from
the elevation requirements must pertain to situations
concerning the land and not the physical or financial
condition of the applicant. The board further noted that
Mr. Sasser could have full use of his elevated home
with the installation of a chairlift or elevator."
In forwarding Heard's letter to Sasser, Mayor Dor-
othy McChesney said, "I am afraid it is not too encour-
aging."
The Sasser case was the impetus for the mayor's
request to FEMA's Senior Mitigation Specialist Brad
Loar to visit the city. Sasser attended Loar's informa-
tional session at City Hall June 9.
Quiet for most of the meeting, Sasser did express
his frustration, creating some moments of discomfort
in the chambers.
Sasser told Loar that "it sounds like you're threat-
ening" the city and "you run around in circles." Sasser
also called FEMA's letter about his case "typical gov-


As Independent As The Island Itself


rm*
First National-


5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (941)778-4900
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton 794-6969


ernment crap again."
Contractor and Anna Maria resident Kit Welsch
told Sasser, "I believe the correct response is for us to
put pressure on our government officials."
Loar said that the city has the option of getting out
of the federal program. Citizens can contact their leg-
islators and higher-up FEMA officials for law and
guidelines review, he said.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Volunteers are being recruited to join task forces
formed to address the community's six most press-
ing social service needs as identified in the recent
Needs Assessment Study sponsored by the Anna
Maria Island Community Center.
Planning for the study began last year when a
group a community leaders and interested citizens
met to develop a survey to identify residents' most
pressing social service needs. In March, residents in
six age groups were surveyed.
Results of the survey were published in a series
of four articles in the Islander Bystander beginning
May 11. Based on the survey results, the following
six needs were identified as the most pressing and
task forces are being formed to address the needs:
Transportation
Medical care/public health
Counseling alcohol, drug and medication
abuse and prevention; suicide prevention; and
spouse, child and sexual abuse
Recreation
Community education AIDS, disaster and
vocational training
Public safety and crime prevention
Last week, volunteers met at the Center to sign
up for task forces and receive direction from the
Pierrette Kelly, the Center's executive director.


CROWDER BROS.

HARDWARE


Factory Rep

9 mpa hp will be
/ UUUL here!


*'Ii -.


s1


I


"You're talking about things that are much higher
level than my pay grade," said Loar.
City Commissioner Mark Ratliff later asked Loar
the final question of the afternoon. If an individual
signs a formal document stating that he chooses not to
participate in the program, asked Ratliff, "then does the
city have latitude in granting such a variance?"
Answered Loar, "Absolutely not."


"Our next mission is to evaluate existing ser-
vices and resources related to those identified
needs," said Kelly. "We really want to deal with
the issues and how we can resolve them."
Bill Mullon asked what Kelly expects as the
end result.
Kelly gave an example using the public health
task force. She said members should start by listing
all the providers in the community, their general
charge, whether or not they have a sliding fee and
what it is and their accessibility. Members should
then list the facts about public health care and any
other related services and compile all the information.
"When we're done, we'll probably take all the
information from all the task forces, print it into a
booklet and have it accessible at the chamber of com-
merce, the school, the community center, city halls
- so people who have these human service concerns
can find out who the providers are and can access
them much more easily," explained Kelly.
With the task force results in hand, commu-
nity leaders and volunteers can then work to up-
grade the quality of services available in the com-
munity, said Kelly.
All those wishing to volunteer for one of the
six task forces should attend the next meeting at
7:15 p.m. on June 23 at the Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Task forces will select chair-
persons and set goals.


PS PICK-UP COPIES
YOUR HARDWARE STORE MUCH, MH MORE!
YOUR HARDWARE STORE AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!


We will be hosting another
exciting WEBER GRILL
demonstration

Saturday, June 17

10 AM-3PM

Select models will have special
prices Saturday only!
Present this ad for a 10% discount
off all WEBER accessories.
Discount good only during day of demo.


Task forces seek volunteers to

address community needs


3352 FAST BAY DR.. HOLMES BEACH 778-0999


PUBLC OTCE.
0 M OI ER l


--


L






I[ PAGE 10 M JUNE 15, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLAND I.


J MANAGER TRACEY JEANNE
MANAGER SPECIAL
'20% OFF'
H A IR Any Salon Service
DESIG S with Tracey
|__DESIGNS COUPON EXPIRES 6/22/95
Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach 778-1380


Summer Solstice Sale


SWednesday June 2st
Wednesday June 21st
fflM P1. -


O Every
Worth The Dr


Yam -7pm
thing Under The Sun
ive Off The Island!

746-6387


3924 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton




PuePtlE 4eeov


Choose from over
1,000 T-Shirts

$395 to$995

We also carry KINO'S SANDALS
778-0540
3228 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CENTRE


C HEAD

QUARTERS
13 5350 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-2586


Marine ecologists
take to the field
AW' o" Islander Dave Ferguson's 90 eighth-
grade King Middle School science
'. students got their feet wet in a hands-on
field study at Leffis Key recently. From
left, Ferguson, Doug Johnson and Brad
Moore identify hermit and blue crabs and
a trigger fish.



,i ...


... and you can, too
Rick Meyers, environmentalist with
"R. ,' Manatee County schools, will lead a nature
tour of Leffis Key, opposite Coquina Beach
in Bradenton Beach, at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday,
June 20. This All Island Summer event is
open to all ages.
SAnyone wishing transportation from
the Anna Maria Elementary School may
call Barbara Amador at 778-6110.






Mote continues effort to save Sandy


Mote Marine Laboratory continues to care for the
approximately 200-pound female stranded sea turtle that
was brought to the lab on Wednesday, May 31. Sandy,
as she has been nicknamed, has an obstruction in her in-
testinal tract, which may be a result of garbage.
When Sandy was found lethargic and distressed
on Siesta Key, Mote staff rescued the animal and re-
turned her to the lab for rehabilitation, not knowing
what might be causing her problems.
Since then, X-rays have shown that there is an
unknown foreign body lodged in her intestines. Sandy
is being tube fed a mixture of electrolytes and vitamins
in order to keep her system from weakening. Sandy's
caretakers had hoped that she would be able to pass the
obstruction naturally. Unfortunately, additional X-rays
taken recently showed that the obstruction has not


moved and alternate methods of freeing the obstruction
are being considered.
"Sandy's plight really illustrates the serious prob-
lems that garbage can cause," states Jerris Foote, senior
biologist and program manger of Mote's Sea Turtle
Program. "Everyone can easily help by making sure
that when they're boating or spending the day at the
beach that they keep their garbage out of the water."
Foote hopes to free Sandy of her obstruction and
bring her to the point where she can be released back
into Gulf of Mexico. Since sea turtle nesting season
began May 1, Foote would like to get Sandy "back
home" as soon as possible so she can continue with her
normal nesting behavior.
"With these animals being so highly endangered,
we need every baby turtle we can get!" states Foote.


Avoid lines by mailing your boat

registration in now


The Manatee County Tax Collector's Office has
mailed nearly 19,000 boat registration renewal notices
to boat owners in Manatee County. The 1995 registra-
tions expire on June 30. The tax office is encouraging
residents to mail their renewal notices.
If boaters must visit an office to renew a registra-
tion, the tax office is the busiest on Mondays and Fri-
days and closer to the end of the month.
Boaters who want to purchase a saltwater or fresh-
water fishing license are reminded that they can be
purchased at Island locations: Annie's Bait & Tackle,
Cortez (saltwater only); Cortez Bait and Tackle,
Cortez (salt and freshwater); Island Discount Tackle,
Workout Center
welcomes
Chamber ,
The Workout Center of
Holmes Beach was host to
members of the Anna
Maria Island Chamber of
Commerce at its May
reception. Enjoying the
affair, from left, were
Chamber Treasurer Tom
Nelson with his wife, Anna
Maria City Clerk Peggy
Nelson, owner Lois
Norman and Bradenton
attorney Theresa Skahill.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


Holmes Beach (saltwater only); Perico Harbor Bait &
Tackle, Bradenton (saltwater only); and all Manatee
County Wal-Mart and K-Mart stores.
All tax collector offices are now also selling the
new Manatee and the new Sea Turtle decals. A contri-
bution to either state fund of at least $5 entitles you to
a decal.
For more information on boat registrations call
741-4806, or for information on fishing and hunting li-
censes call 741-4807.
The Island tax offices located at 3340 East Bay
Dr., Anna Maria Centre, Holmes Beach or call 778-
9363.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 11 I i


A 9^MJW1^3!^


Cool combination in Sarasota
"Kanega Speaks," a spoken-word-performance evening featuring a cool combination of eight artists and
background music, will be held at Kanega, 1528 Main St., Sarasota, at 8p.m. Wednesday, June 21. Featured
artist, Naked Poet Wayne Genther, displays a big black grouper, the mascot of one of his favorite perfor-
mance pieces, "Here, Eat This Fish." For information, call 957-0813 or 755-1632.


Historic-sites tour planned
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society will of-
fer a tour of historic Island sites for children and adults
from 9-11 a.m. Friday, June 16. Children under 9 years
of age should be accompanied by an adult.
For reservations, call the society at 778-0492.

Friday swimming offered
All Island Summer 1995 will offer transportation
to swimming lessons for children ages 6-12 years at the
Manatee YMCA in Bradenton Friday mornings start-
ing June 16.
Lessons, at $2 per week, and additional free-swim
time will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. through Fri-
day, Aug. 18. Vans will leave the Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School at 10 am., returning at 2 p.m.
For information and to reserve space call Barbara
Amador, 778-6110.

July 4 parade applications
due by June 25
The Anna Maria Island Privateers are requesting
that all units wishing to be included in their annual July
4th parade through the Island submit an application by
June 25.
For registration materials and additional informa-
tion, contact Rick Maddox, 794-2599; John Swager,
778-1238; or Norm McKelvey, 778-5934.

Practice horseshoes in
Anna Maria
In preparation for the 1995 Ray Simches Memorial
Island Cities Horseshoe Tournament on June 24, the
City of Anna Maria has horseshoe equipment available
for practice sessions, Monday through Friday from
8:30 am. to 4:30 p.m.
Equipment must be checked out from city hall and
utilized at the city pits next to city hall and returned no
later than 4:30 p.m.

Free business seminar at
Island Branch Library
A free business educational seminar will be held at
the Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach on
Wednesday, June 21, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Some of the topics to be discussed are: recent tax
law changes, self-employed deductions, taking more
pre-tax dollars out of your business, securing retire-
ment and more.
Alan Lavoie, financial and insurance consultant
and Paul Pavich, accountant, will hold the seminar.
The seminar is open to the public.


School board offers adult
education programs
The School Board of Manatee County's Adult
Basic Education (ABE) is offering classes, free of
charge, in pre-GED and English for Speakers of
Other Languages (ESOL) at several locations in
Manatee County.
Classes are open entry and open exit and are
continuous throughout the summer. All classes
begin Monday and Tuesday, June 12 or 13. Reg-
istration is on site prior to the first class.
The Bradenton locations and programs are:
Goodwill Industries, 5512 Manatee Ave. W,,
Pre-GED, Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m.
Safe Haven Resource Center, 1108 61st Ave.
Terrace E., ESOL, Monday and Wednesday, 6:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
For more information call the ABE office at
751-7973.

Coast Guard accepting
applications to class of
2000 at academy
The United States Coast Guard Academy is
now accepting and processing applications for ap-
pointment to U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Class
of 2000.
Appointments are tendered solely on the ba-
sis of an annual nationwide competition with no
congressional nominations or geographical quo-
tas. Applications must be submitted to the Direc-
tor of Admissions prior to Dec. 15, 1995. Candi-
dates must arrange to participate in either the SAT
I or ACT prior to or including the Dec. 1995 test
administrations.
Appointments are based on the candidate's
high school record, performance on either the
SAT I or ACT, and leadership potential as dem-
onstrated by participation in high school activi-
ties, community service and part-time employ-
ment. Most successful candidates rank in the top
quarter of their high school class and have dem-
onstrated proficiency in both mathematical and
applied science.
Candidates must be unmarried at the time of
appointment, have no legal obligations and must
have reached the age of 17 but not 22 by July 1,
1996. Candidates must be assured of high school
graduation by June 30, 1996.
To obtain an application or further informa-
tion write: Director of Admissions, U.S. Coast
Guard Academy, 15 Mohegan Ave., New Lon-
don, CT 06320 or call (800) 883-8724.


I I


Ladies & Mens Sportswear

"Don't forget Dad
on his special day!"
ALL REGULAR PRICED ITEMS
25% OFF

4 DAYS ONLY
,Wed-Sat June 14-17
ALL MENS SHORTS:
Higgins, Weekender, Woolrich & Sportif
ALL MENS HIGGINS SLACKS:
Slider, 2nd Belt Loops, Long and Regular Rise
*ALL MENS SPORT SHIRTS:
Knit, Banded-Bottom, Sport,
Hawaiian & Tropical Prints
SALL MENS SWIMSUITS:
Hobie & Weekender
Plus Gift Certificate and Free Gif Wrap
= S & S Plaza, Holmes Beach 778-4505 =


Father's Day
A Special

3 months $690tax
or
20 Pack Met-RxTM Box
FITNESS CENTER $4900 re. $590

5345 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach Suite 100 778-5446


Bob's Hair & Co.
Get Dad Looking Good
SGift Certificates Available
Happy Father's Day
from
Robin, Nellie, Loretta, Ellen,
[ Monica & Bob.
778-3724 778-1660
9701 Gulf Drive Anna Maria


r 778-7975
Same Shopping Center as Shell's Restaurant
S Ut AHl New Exercise Equipment
er Tanning Massage Sauna
Weeky & Daily Rates
FATHER'S DAY SPECIAL
Expie s% OFF 3 Mo./or over
6/2395oupon Membership
GIFT CERTIFICATES ALSO AVAILABLE


ISLANDER [ 101er



Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun,
a ray of sunshine? Look no further -
it's all in The Islander Bystander.
Don't miss a week!






Iim PAGE 12 M JUNE 15, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Miyo Miyashiro
Miyo Miyashiro, 69, of Key Royale, died June 6 in
Integrated Health Services of Bradenton.
Born in Hawaii, Miss Miyashiro came to Manatee
County from Arlington, Va., two years ago. She was a
30-year resident of Washington D.C. She was a super-
visor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
She is survived by a brother, George, of Honolulu.
Burial was in Masion Memorial Park.


Charles D. Mora
Charles D. Mora, 78, of Cortez, died June 9 in
HCA Piano Medical Center & Hospital, Piano,
Texas.
Born in Cortez, Mr. Mora came to Manatee
County from Lodi, N.J., where he lived for 35 years
before retiring in 1973. He was a member of Hope
Presbyterian Church. He was an elder in the Ortho-
dox Presbyterian and the Presbyterian Church of
America for more than 40 years.
He was a volunteer firefighter for Cortez Fire
Department in the 1970s.
He also was a commercial fisherman in this area.
He is survived by his longtime companion,
Beatrice Culbreath; two daughters, Beverly
Hanson of Piano and Ellen Ann Olivetti of India-
napolis; two sons, Edward J., of Bradenton and
Robert T., of Washington Township, N.J.; three
sisters, Ruth Culbreath of Cortez, Polly
Staigerwald of Oneco and Bessie Kromrey of
Ellenton; one brother, Vernon of Cortez; 10
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.


fi





STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631

Free Educational Seminar

Some of the topics to be discussed:
STake more pre-tax dollars out of your business
Recent tax law changes
How to retain key employees with pre-tax dollars
Good record-keeping practices
Self-employed deductions
Buy-Sell Agreements
Securing your retirement




SPEAKERS:






Paul R. Pavich Alan Lavoie
Accountant Registered Representative*
6400 Manatee Ave. W. Suite J Washington Square Securities Inc.
Bradenton FI 34209 792-1697 PO Box 1974
Holmes Beach, FL34218 779-1310
Securities offered through Washington Square Securities In Branch Office 9700
Koger Blvd. Sute 313 SL Petersburg, FL 33704. 813-670-9900. Member NASD SIPC.


I] OBIlfA l


DI.P.M.

PODIATRIC MFDICINF


and
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Dally Home Visits by Appointment
j*0




Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center *'
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 ...


Service will be 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 14, at
Hope Presbyterian Church 4455 30th St. E.,
Bradenton, with the Rev. Randall Greenwald offici-
ating. Burial will be in Bradenton. Memorials may
be made to Deacon's Fund of Hope Presbyterian
Church.
Peter Allen Pampanin
Peter Allen Pampanin, 32, of Bradenton Beach,
died June 5 in Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Born in Bristol, Pa., he came to Manatee County
from Morrisville, Pa., in 1991. He was a bartender
and a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose,
Bradenton Beach.
He is survived by a sister, Janet L. Kemery of
Cortez; a brother, Michael T., of Bradenton Beach;
and his mother, Mary Meyers of Ashland, Pa.
No visitation or service was held. Kicliter Fu-
neral Home was in charge of the arrangements.
Richard Otis
Powell
Richard Otis
Powell, 34, of Goose
Creek, S.C., and formerly
of Anna Maria Island, died
May 25 in Highlands, N.C.
Born in Hampton,
S.C., Mr. Powell was a
construction supervisor
Powell with the E.P. Kellar Con-
struction Co. He was a
Baptist.
He is survived by his wife, Lori; a daughter, Jes-
sica of Goose Creek; two sons, Richard and
Cameron, both of Goose Creek; two brothers, Garon

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEPING ,
AND YEAR-ROUND TAX SERVICE < 4
Individuals Corporations Partnerships
Now Accepting New Clients .
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
,;iiy lEy, nwwEoZu Ent 778-6118
Ucensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.



j IIslanb Pobiatr


Jr. of Summerville, S.C., and James Hunter Jr. of
Moncks Corner, S.C.; a sister, Jami of North
Charleston, S.C.; his mother, Carolyn Crapse
Sheider of Hanahan, S.C.; his father and stepmother,
Mr. and Mrs. Garon Powell of Moncks Corner; and
his grandmother, Edna Crapse of Hampton.
Memorials may be made to the Richard O.
Powell Memorial Fund, First Union Bank, 5327 Gulf
Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217 Burial was in Hamp-
ton, S.C.


Avis W. VonDissen
Avis W. VonDissen, 81, of Holmes Beach, died
June 11 at home.
Born in Heyworth, Ill., Mrs. VonDissen came
to Manatee County from Heyworth in the mid-
1970s. She was co-owner with her husband Robert
of Wholesale Company of Children and Teens Ap-
parel, with stores throughout the Midwest. She was
a member of the National Association of Women's
and Children's Apparel Salesmen and a Lutheran.
She is survived by three sisters, Reva Phillips
and Helen Gregory both of Decatur, Ill., and Ruth
Stepnich-Sumner of Washington; several nieces
and nephews; and a grand-niece and nephews.
A memorial services will take place at a later
date. Burial took place in Heyworth Cemetery,
Heyworth.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of South-
west Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Bradenton, Fla.
34209, or the American Cancer Society, Parkwood
Professional Center, P.O. Box 10459, Bradenton,
Fla. 34282-0459.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home was in charge of
the arrangements.



PRESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS & REMODEUNG FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
SWe are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce






Social notes welcome! News about social events,
clubs, anniversaries and special gatherings are
always welcome at The Islander Bystander. Call
778-7978 and ask how you can submit items to
"the most award-winning newspaper" on the Island.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS
0
READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
June 5 thru September 30


JULIE McCLURE


Household
Sales
Antique And
Personal
Property
Appraisals
Consultations

My 20 years of appraising and 25 years of sales
means I can offer you a qualified service to help
in the disposition of your fine antiques, art, and
household furnishings. I will be happy to send
you a resume and references.
(941) 746-2100
Member of Appraisers Association of America


i






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 13 jB


Treasure penned

by father

resurfaces in

time for Dad's

Day
Going through some papers recently, Jeanne
Blassingame of Anna Maria came across a 50-
year-old treasure written by her deceased husband
Wyatt for his then 5-year-old daughter April.
Wyatt Blassingame was a noted author of 65
books for young people, several historical novels
and a long list of articles on a variety of subjects.
April Lane lives in North Carolina where she
will be on the lookout for publication of this re-
surfaced childhood memory.

From father to daughter
Early in the morning
When the grass was wet with dew
I took April out canoeing
To see the zoo's new gnu.
Said April, "I've a question
To ask of you, new gnu.
How do you make your living?
Please tell me, rare strange beast,
Exactly what you do.
The new gnu knew April
And said, "I'll answer you.
I entertain the children
Who visit in the zoo.
"You see in this, your country,
There aren't many gnus.
And that's the only reason
A new gnu's news.
"Africa's my homeland
And there a gnu's not new.
No one would think of having
An old gnu in the zoo."


Corsi and Haynes marry
Henry and Joyce Corsi of Holmes Beach announce
the marriage of their daughter, Patricia, to Sean
Haynes, son of Kenny and Sherry Haynes of
Bradenton.
They were married on April 29, at the Holiday Inn
Riverfront in Bradenton. The Rev. Cleta Anderson
performed the ceremony. The reception followed at the
Riverfront Inn.
Susan Corsi, sister of the bride, was maid of honor.
Best man was Kenny Haynes, father of the groom.
Patricia is a hairdresser with Fantastic Sam's in
Bradenton.
Sean is employed by the City of Bradenton.


Williamson and
Mathews to wed
Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Williamson, Jr., of Lexing-
ton, Ky., announce the engagement of their daughter,
Gwenda Rollins Williamson,to Marc Alan Mathews, son
of Catherine (Kay) M. Mathews of Holmes Beach and
formerly of Hamilton, Ohio, and the late H. T. Mathews.
Miss Williamson is a graduate of Tates Creek High


School and Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky.,
and the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She
is a member of Phi Mu Sorority and is employed by
Transylvania University.
Mr. Mathews is a graduate of Taft High School in
Hamilton, Ohio, and Transylvania University. He is a
member of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity and is employed
by Ross, Sinclaire and Associates of Lexington.
The wedding will be held in July at the Christ
Church Cathedral in Lexington.
Fernandez, Schultheis wed
Linda Elizabeth Fernandez of Holmes Beach and
Eric John Schultheis of Brandon were married April 22
at Southside Baptist Church of Brandon.
The bride is the daughter of John and Diane
Fernandez of Holmes Beach. The groom is the son of
Louise Schultheis of Brandon and Richard Schultheis
of Leesburg.
Matron of honor was Ginger Morgan. Maid of
honor was Susie Blomquist and bridesmaids were
Laurie Rideout and Sandra Flynn.
Best man was Paul Southall and groomsmen were
Richard Schultheis, Mike Schultheis and John
Fernandez, Jr.
A reception at Walden Lake Country Club, Plant
City, followed the ceremony.
The couple honeymooned in Cancun, Mexico.
They live in Tampa.
The Island Poet
Dear Dad, I am sending you a gift though I know
it's not so great,
But with it I send all my love before it gets too late.
And to thank you for your helping hand that guided
me on my way,
For without it I would be in a sorry state today.
For the hours you spent with my homework when
I was a little tyke,
And how you helped with my paper route when I
couldn't ride my bike.
And to say I am proud to be your son as you go
along your way,
For my respect and love for you grows greater ev-
ery day.
Bud Atteridge


THE ULTIMATE PROTECTION AGAINST ...
* Hurricanes & high winds Flying debris .
* Theft & vandalism Extensive noise
* Sun rays & water damage Metro-Dade Approved
Enjoy security & privacy. Installed on
windows, sliding glass doors, patios, etc.
FREE ESTIMATES

SROLLSHUTTER
ESP CORPORATION
Serving Florida Since 1981 -
778-5773 _ _:
Manufactured in Palmetto, FL-


We mail over 900
out-of-town subscriptions
every week. If you want
to keep in touch, use
the form on page 7,
this issue. And, you
can charge it on
Visa or MasterCard.

(941) 778-7978


I W ARN "ai s f Lafe '
*Shells Gifts Clothing Swimsuits
Inflatables Bait & Tackle Hats Much more

Si-LARGE SELECTION OF KITES

10% OFF ANY PURCHASE
with this ad
Wide selection of Panama Jack Hats, Sunglasses,
Clothing & Suntan Products. Unusual Gifts & Novelties.
200 Gul Dr. So. Bradenton Beach (Just north of Coquina Beach)


. . . . . . . .

Eli.ART795I42


LUKSUSOWA
POLISH POTATO VODKA
1.75 LTR 750 ML
$19.99 $12.59


SEAGRAM V.O. CANADIAN CLUB CANADIAN LTD
1.75 LTR 18.99 1.75 LTR 19.99 1.75 LTRm 12.99
SMIRNOFF 80 McCORMICK .ORDONMS 6.99
S1.75 3.00 mir 1.00
1.75LTR $15.99 1.75 LTR 10.49 .TR net 099

BEEFEATER McCORMICK GORDON'S
1.75 LTR 25.99 1.75 LTR $1059 175m 1.99 n py

BACARDI LIMON CAPTAIN MORGAN MYER'S
1.75 LTR $17.99 10.59
$9 BUY3 SAVE BUY ONE SAVE 750 ML 2.00 mir
750M. MIRS 0.00 MIR 3.00 8.59 et

CHIVAS REGAL CROWN ROYAL GLEN LIVET 12YR
750ML $20.99 750 MLt 1 6.49 750 ML $24.49
Free 6 Mo Golf M Sunscrilion
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK CANADIAN HUNTER MR. BOSTON
A11.99 750 ML 6.49 VODKA
750ML 20.49 200 nr 1.00 $.9.99
750ML .SPEA LTR 9.99 netay 5.49 1.75 LTR 9.

7 5 0 M C IC E O U S A N Y N AM E BRA N D ........... 1.86 15.88
BUSCH BUD LITE PK CTN
6 PK CANS RED DOG MICHELOB HAMM'S N ..8 1.8
299 6 PK CANS PKMICHELOB HAMMS GPC, DORAL MONTCLAR...1.30 11.39
$2.99 6 PK CANS 6 PK BTLS 6 PK CANS
S$3 2 3.99 1.99 HARLEY DAVIDSON & SRIT.36 10.88
12 PK CANS & BTLS 99 FREE UGHTER
549 12 WITH ANY CARTON PURCHASECANS
.9 $6.99 wTH ANY CARTON PURCHASE
$5.49il 1 l 4.99 1 !-1 -l-li - 03lLIC0393LM


Patricia and Sean Haynes


"Happy
Father's
Day!"
L4? I S SINCE 1982

oi3D E"l7 W "'9E


- MJL O







JIM PAGE 14 0 JUNE 15, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Extraordinary day for dads
My dad lives in Virginia Beach where he still
struggles to regain mobility from a massive stroke al-
most two years ago. Were he fit and able, he'd be play-
ing golf, and any sort of golfing gift would be an ex-
cellent choice for him for Father's Day.
I ventured to the Longboat Key Club one year and
got him a very nice embroidered polo shirt with the
club's name on it. It was one of his favorites, second
only to the one from St. Andrews in Scotland.
Dads can be tough to buy for. And with Island
dads, the dress tie is a definite "no" unless, of
course, dad works in a bank.
Island restaurants vie for your attention on dad's
day and certainly there's no more appreciated gift by
any man than a good meal. Make that threee meals in
one day. Treat dad to breakfast, lunch and dinner and
you'll be a shoe-in for a little extra allowance. A quick
perusal of Islander Bystander advertisers will enlighten
you to some special deals on Father's Day meals.
A pair of in-line skates or an all-terrain bike is a
real good deal for active dads. Prolong his health and
get him into a new sport that's fun. He might get
hooked.
And speaking of hooked, fishing gear is always a
good idea or even better, a day's charter with an area
guide for some top sports fishing. It'll set you back
about $200 to $500, but hey, isn't dad worth it? Be-
sides, someone will have to go with him.
On the lighter price side, a serious Fr':bee costs
around $10 and it'll be worth every buck when the
wind is up on the beach. We found an inf_' 1ble two-
man kayak for under $90 that's easily transported any-
where on Anna Maria Island to water.
Don't count out tools. Dads love 'em. Spoil him with
some high-end tools like a cordless drill or reciprocal saw.
A new dad might appreciate a jogging stroller. Good for
exercise, good for baby, time out for mom.


Here's the ultimate for surfer dude dads, a Wave
Fax. It's a twice-weekly surf forecast faxed to you with
the outlook for Florida, the Caribbean and Central
America (isn't everyone going to Costa Rica?). Even
more decadent the Surf Alert, in which SurfLine
forecasters personally leave a message on dad's pager,
voice mail or answering g machine. The prices range
from $5 to $15 for these services. Information is avail-
able toll free at 800-940-SURF.
And now, the ultimate gift suggestion for dad, the
best we could come up with anywhere. A universal re-
mote. One of these will give him ultimate power over
TV, VCR and cable. Top-of-the-line models even come
with satellite system control. These devices start around
$12 and come in all shapes (football) and colors (fus-
tier). But for $150 we heard the Mitsubishi MX2551
will even bring dad a cold one. Well, it should.

What's in a name
A few weeks ago we mentioned some of the new
Mahi Mahi specials at Shells restaurant and we
stumbled over Manager Beth Guertin's name. She is not
Beth Shields or Beth Si,,lls but she is a great sport.
Sorry.
She's also responsible for some great peanuts, pasta
and seafood.
If you've been discouraged by the lines at the door,
don't be. Here's a hint for a quick seat and fast service:
as long as you don't have minors in your party, there's
nearly always a few seats open at the bar. You'll fight
your way through the crowd at the door but Cheryl and
Keefer run a tight ship at the bar and service is great.
You can eat your dinner right there or wait for a table
in the dining room.

Beat the drum
Congrats to Sue Barreda and Caryn Hipp, who have
simultaneously taken on the task of publishing "Drum
Beats," the newsletter put out by the former Apache
Snrings Wellness Center, and have opened new busi-
nesses, respectively, Whale's Song and Storyteller.
Going as far back as the High Seas (the restaurant
now known as Down the Hatch), Barreda has been an
Islander and an eccentric.


She does hair. As a matter of fact, even though her
shop has been located in Bradenton on Manatee Av-
enue for some time, Islanders still drive in town for
cuts and "dos."
Barreda has now ventured into her very own shop,
Whale's Song. It's named for an imaginary ship that
sails the seas, listening for the songs of the humpback
whales. The salon is captained by Sue, a gentle care-
giver for hair and the mind. There is a harmony of spirit
and nature here. A gentle mood.
Barreda's been in the hair business for 13 years. In
her spare time she works quietly and feverishly on a
book inspired by Native American roots.
Hipp has stocked her shop, Storyteller, with books
on Native Americans and general well-being, music,
candles, ceramics, note cards, jewelry and art prints
reflecting her life's interests.
One corer of the store houses a vast array of beads
and beading materials where a variety of classes will
be offered.
A grand opening reception at Storyteller and
Whale's Song will feature guest artists, a Native
American flautist, "Many Paths," and refreshments. All
are welcome.
The shops are located at 400 59th St., a door or two
north of Manatee Avenue in a cute, quaint house. Call
795-5331 for information.

Speaking of
While we've brushed on the subject of Down the
Hatch, the restaurant perched on Manatee Avenue
overlooking Palma Sola Bay, we haven't mentioned it
is the proud host for Island Favorites, the Sons of the
Beach.
Sons of the Beach play Dixieland and how.
They've roosted in the past at D.Coy Ducks, then Pete
Reynard's/Crabby Bills, then up at the Anchorage.
They've ..nade a bold move "off-island" (barely,
since Hatch is located just before you reach mainland/
town on the causeway) and folks love it.
It's a great casual waterfront atmosphere where
beach attire is welcome, there's happy hour all day and

PLEASE SEE STIR-IT-UP, NEXT PAGE


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH


Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)

$350+ax
Seved Daily [Waffles too!)


Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!
I I'


You get complete news of three island cities in The Islander Bystander -
it's all you need to know on Anna Maria Island.


FATHER'S DAYj B IN
AT THE BSAC HHOUS

Get in on the FUN of Father's Day
at The Beachhousel Dad's entree is
half price. And we'll have special
moments he'll remember forever...
along with our great volleyball,
wide white beach, children's
playground... and when
you lease expect it Magic!



great food. great beach. great fun.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach (941) 779-2222
H1 ^--^i^^^^^^^^^^


=nyrocK =
778-7034
***
June 16 & 17
The Feel

Mon & Tues
June 19 & 20
Saltwater
Cowboys

Friday
& Saturday
New Items
42 oz Fosters
&
Big Gulp
Coors Light
Bottles

HAPPY HOUR
DAILY
4 pm 8 pm
(Free Food during
Happy Hour on Friday)


ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS

FINE WINE SPIRITS BEER ICE
Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-2507


OPEN DAILY 11:30 AM ^-( L 4
9915 Manatee Ave. W. Reservations Accepted


I


-- I` ---







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 15 jI


XrfRR^ f


Cmm~s ^


Wit and wisdom by native
Floridian Gib Bergqulst


SPOOKED
"State Highway Patrol, Corporal Miller speaking."
"Hello, this is the Cracker out on the Island."
"Who?"
"Oh. This is Gib Bergquist in Holmes Beach. I
need a little information."
"Shoot"
"Does Florida law require that personal injury ac-
cidents in an automobile be reported?"
"Certainly does. Who was injured?"
"Me."
"Anyone else?"
"No."
"Where did the accident occur?"
"In my driveway."
"Did the injury involve another vehicle?"
"No."
"Was the vehicle moving at the time of the injury?"
"No."
"Was the motor running?"
"No, but the ignition was on and the shift lever was
in 'Park."'
"This is very strange, sir. You're telling me that
you were injured in your own vehicle parked in your
own driveway with the ignition on and with the car in
'Park.' Is that right?"
"You got it. You see I had been out all morning
collecting material for the Anna Maria Community
Center Auction and had returned home for a quick
sandwich between appointments. I was home for about
15 minutes and then crawled back behind the wheel for
a quick trip to Bradenton Beach. I remembered that my
high-school-age son had left a particularly offensive
'gangsta' rap tape on the tape player that I wanted to


change for my favorite Anne Murray tape. I turned on
the ignition and hit the 'Eject' button. Get the picture?"
"Yeah, go on. I'm getting' all this down."
"Well, ili: car radio comes on full blast at an ear-
splilliing level and all hell breaks loose!"
"Wh:litta you iiic;an?"
"I ellt this Ilying objcct hit the back of my head,
catapult over my shoulder and race down my right arm
- which was still extended to the tape player button.
"It then bounded over to my left arm which was
extended to the window sill on the driver's side. After
about three trips up my bare arm, this black furry thing
managed to make it out the window which was par-
tially open at the top. I looked at my left arm to find it
was drenched in my own blood from a six-inch rip and
other multiple scratches.
"It looked like someone had been playing tic-tac-
toe on my arm and was running out of space.
"As I raced back into the direction of the house,
dripping blood like a stuck pig, I spied the neighbor's
cat, Spooky, eyeing me with a shocked and quizzical
expression on her face from her refuge beneath a
nearby hedge."
"That's quite a story, sir, but I think you better for-
get it. Who wants a personal injury on record involv-
ing his own automobile? Your insurance company


Stir-it-up
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
dining ranges from full seafood dinners to burgers
and snacks.
Sons play on the patio deck on Sundays from
5 to 8 p.m.

Other happenings
Crown & Thistle British Restaurant and Pub in
Bradenton Beach is now featuring blind draw darts
on Wednesday nights at 8 p.m. They offer food and
drink specials as well as some "giveaways."
Word comes from Chef Ray and D'Arcy
Arpke, owners of Euphemia Haye restaurant on
Longboat Key, of new musical entertainment in


SAM-wiches for

SAM-sational Dads
Take your SAM-sational dad out to lunch on
Father's Day weekend, June 17 and 18, without tak-
ing him away from his easy chair.
Members of Save Anna Maria, Inc., will deliver
a frc.hli piled-high Cuban or low-fat turkey SAM-
wiches to your door from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on either
Saturday, June 17, or Sunday, June 18.
The donation is $7 for one; $12 for two; $16 for
three or $20 for four hoagies. Orders must be pre-paid.
Make out checks to Save Anna Maria, Inc.
To order or for Information call Joy Courtney at
Haley's Motel at 778-5405.


might eat you alive on your next rate adjustment."
"I see what you mean. Thanks, officer. Have a
nice day."
"Same to you sir. And always remember to check
the back seat before buckling up."
"Dont worry from here on I will."
And the Cracker does.


their lounge, the Haye Loft.
The Haye Loft Trio includes Skip Cook on piano,
Mike Moran on drums and Nobby King on bass. Their
repertoire of musical favorites ranges from Cole Por-
ter to Duke Ellington to Rodgers & Hart.
D'Arcy says, "It's more than music, it's fun."
But where's the sax? Many years ago (pre-
Euphemia Haye) D'Arcy touted a trip to New York
by showing off an autograph from a sax player -
Woody Allen. I especially enjoyed the night we
lucked into a band at the now-defunct Purple Por-
poise on Bridge Street with a sax player who was
so hot he played two saxophones at once.
The trio performs on Friday and Saturday
nights.
by Bonner Presswood


Pasta Seafood Poultry
Stromboli Pizza -"HI RB -1.
Soups Salads
Homemade Desserts
SIMPLY THE BEST!
Wednesday thru Saturday 10 am 10 pm
Sunday 8 am 10 pm Closed Monday & Tuesday
: : I ."


icki's Nicki's West 59th Restaurant
Nick West 59th Welcomes You To Join Us

BREAKFAST SPECIAL MON-THURS 10 AM 2 PM
EARLY BIRDS $5.95. MON-SAT 11 AM 6 PM


HAPPY HOUR
In The Lounge Only
12 pm 7 pm
* 1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM. CLOSED SUNDAY


LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BARBARA JOHNSEN
Monday Saturday 6PM-10PM


CATERING &
BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE


795-7065


The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key









^^I


383-8898


Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
Ivo Scafa, Proprietor


*


Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


t-uiE 0 1 0 moaIt WA-- *


rib K2 0 -.J I ma -1 5= 92 J4- Im 3=9 W U0-Am.I


- ---:- ~ .y-.-~-


DRIFT-IN PACKAGE
The Leader in Discount Liquor for 39 Years
SPECIALS Good From JUNE 14 thrU JUNE 20 *


r-







ID PAGE 16 N JUNE 15, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Grandpa writes: for the love of Libby


By Bob Leonard
Special to The Islander Bystander
Libby Kline of Anna Maria is a bright, cheerful and
enthusiastic kindergarten girl who recently celebrated
her sixth birthday. Were it not for the "chemo"-induced
baldness, one would never suspect that she suffers from
a life-threatening illness.
Shortly after the start of school last fall, Libby was
diagnosed with T-Cell Lymphoma, a rare and particu-
larly stubborn form of leukemia. Prospects for long-
term survival have improved in recent years but she is
still in a life-or-death struggle. Even at her young age,
Libby somehow seems to realize this.
Libby has been in remission for the past six
months, but she is on a continuing regimen of intensive
chemotherapy involving high doses of nine very toxic
drugs. She has an almost daily ritual of needles and
nasty tasting medicines that would overwhelm many
adults.
Libby visits a St. Petersburg oncology clinic every
week for shots, bone-marrow punctures, blood work
and other often-painful procedures. At least once a
month she is admitted to All Children's Hospital for
tests and IV therapy.
Her little body is devastated by the many side ef-
fects of the "chemo" drugs. On several occasions she
has required transfusions of blood and platelets to re-
store her depleted counts.
Amazingly, Libby takes all this trauma in stride
with hardly a whimper and rarely a complaint brav-
ery knows no age or gender boundaries.
When praised for her courage, Libby declares,
"The only thing I'm afraid of is lightning."
The All Children's staff maintains they have never
had a patient Libby's age who is as compliant and co-
operative.
Prior to a recent spinal injection Libby began to sob
and shake. The doctor told the nurses to hold her still.
Through her tears Libby said, "Wait till I calm down
and I'll be still." They did and she was.
Libby's parents, Lori and Larry Kline, try to play
down the illness and make her life as enjoyable and
normal as possible. She may be seen swinging at


,


7 1




Six-year-old Libby Kline touches the hearts of
family, Islanders and persons in the medical field.
Islander Photo: Courtesy of Bob Leonard.

Bayfront Park, flying a kite on the beach, playing with
friends or selecting books and videos at the library.


Tremendous support
Libby's attendance at Anna Maria Elementary
School has been sporadic, but teacher Mrs. Moran and
her students have been tremendously supportive.
Imagine entering a classroom greeted by cheers
and applause. The driver and riders on bus 142 have
been especially kind and considerate as well.
A highlight of Libby's week are sessions with
gifted and caring homebound teacher "Miss Martha"
Karnas. Her one-on-one instruction enables Libby to
keep up with her classmates and has given Libby a love
for learning. Each session begins and ends with a hug.
The congregation of Roser Memorial Church has
rallied around Libby and her mom with an outpouring
of prayers, cards, gifts and loving concern. Libby is on
countless prayer lists here and around the country.
Libby faces at least two more years of continuous
maintenance therapy. Following that will be periodic
tests and exams to determine that she remains cancer-
free. In the event of a relapse, the only option would be
a costly bone-marrow transplant.
Mother Lori tries to stay positive and upbeat. When
she began crying uncontrollably during one hospital-
ization, Libby looked up from her bed and said, "Don't
cry now, Momma. Wait until I'm dead."
"Don't you even think about dying," Lori scolded.
"You have to grow up and have babies so I can be a
grandma like Grandma Milly."
Libby smiled an angelic smile as only she can and
fell promptly asleep.
Grandma Milly is Libby's primary caregiver while
her parents work. The bond of love between these two
is beautiful to behold but impossible to describe. Milly
thought she had retired from nursing long ago, but her
skills have never been more needed or appreciated.
Libby accompanied Grampa to the post office a
short time ago. He received a letter from a longtime
friend in Indiana.
"Jack wants to know how you're doing," Grampa
told Libby.
"I'm doing good!" Libby exclaimed.
From her lips to God's ear, may it ever be so.


t 1995


S6Ray Simches


Memorial


0 Island Cities


Horseshoe Tournament


Anna Maria City Hall June 24 8:30 a.m.
Registration fee is $20 per team (two players) Deadline for registration is June 19
D Name:


Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:
Age: Phone
Signature:


@ Name:
Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:


Age:
Signature:


The following waiver must be signed before participation in any Islander Bystander sponsored
activity. Players must be 18 years of age. In consideration of your accepting my/our registration
fee, I hereby, for myself, my dependents) and minor children, and our executors and admin-
istrators, waive and release any and all rights and claims for damages I or my dependents)
or minor children have or may have against The Islander Bystanderand it's representatives,
successors, assigns, employees, contractors, or volunteers (collectively The Islander By-
stander) for any and all injuries or death suffered by myself, my dependents) or minor chil-
dren at any activity sponsored or monitored by the The Islander Bystander, held upon its prop-


Phone


Date


erty, or through the use of it's equipment. If I or my minor children or dependents) should
suffer any injury, illness, or death while participating in an activity, I authorize instructors to
use their sole discretion in having me or my dependents) and minor children transported to
a medical facility and I take all responsibility for this action, including costs. Also, I understand that
no refunds are given unless the activity is canceled or a doctor's release of all claims of any na-
ture whatsoever for myself, my minor children or dependents including but not limited claims arising
due to the sole joint, contributory, concurrent or gross negligence of the Islander Bystander.


Date


~~__ __


Mail or deliver your registration with the "
$20 fee to The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Information: 778-7978


A


^






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 17 El


Summertime exhibit at
guild gallery
An old-fashion look at Island summers through the
eyes of Island artists is on display at the Artists Guild
Gallery through Wednesday, July 5.
The gallery is located at 5414 Marina Dr., Island
Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.
Summer gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 am. to 2 p.m.

Applications available for
December festival
Applications are available for artists and
craftspersons wishing to enter the 7th Annual Anna
Maria Island Festival of Fine Arts and Crafts, spon-
sored by the Anna Maria Island Art League.
The festival will be held on Dec. 2 and 3 in Holmes
Beach.
Entrants will be selected from slides of recent
original work based on artistic merit and workmanship.
To receive an application, send request along with
a self-addressed and stamped envelope to: Anna Maria


Island Art League, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach,
FL 34217. Completed applications must be returned by
Sept. 30.
For information call (941) 778-2099.

Coffee and poetry at Island
gallery
Coffee and poetry among the arts will be offered
at the Artists Guild Gallery, Thursday at 7 p.m.
Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and resident poets. An "open
mike" will be available for aspiring poets. Poets needs
to register before 7 p.m. the evening of the event.
To register or for information call 778-7216.

'Art On The Avenue'
accepting applications
The Longboat Key Art Center is now accepting res-
ervations for space for the 7th annual "Art On The Av-
enue" taking place on Nov. 18 at the Avenue of the Flow-
ers shipping center on Longboat from 10 am. to 5 p.m.
This major fine art show will be juried.
Interested artists are to call (941) 383-2345 or write
to Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr. S.,
Longboat Key, FL 34228 for an application form.



Events
The Sarasota Model Railroad Club is sponsoring
a Father's Day Spectacular at the Bradenton Municipal
Auditorium, 100 10th St.W., Bradenton, on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, June 16, 17 and 18, from 3 to 9
p.m. on Friday, 10 am. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Over 120 dealer tables with
thousands of railroad items for the novice and collec-
tor. Cost: Adults $4, Teen $1, under 12 free, and all
scouts in uniform are free. Information: 355-8948.
Lecturer and author Lindsey Williams will speak
on the latest research and how to protect yourself and
loved ones from EBOLA, TB, HIV, Microbial Muta-
tions, flesh eaters and cancer during a seminar to be
held Wednesday, June 14, at 7:30 p.m. at the Holiday


Inn Riverfront, Bradenton. Cost: free.

Clubs
SMidsummer will be celebrated by the Swedish
Club of Sarasota on Saturday, June 17, at Phillippi
Estate Park at the junction of U.S. 41 and Constitution
Boulevard, Sarasota. The celebration starts at 4 p.m.
and is open to the public. Everyone is asked to bring a
dish to pass around and to bring some greens and flow-
ers for the Maypole. Cost: free. Information: 921-4434
(day) or 378-2651 (evening).

Fundraisers
The Arthritis Foundation is offering its 1995 Ar-
thritis Foundation Golf Card for Father's Day. The card
enables golfers the chance to receive free or reduced
greens fees on almost 300 courses in Florida. The cards
are valid until Oct. 31. Cost $15 each or buy three and
get one free. Information: 739-2729.

Religion
Sabbath Evening Service at Temple Beth Israel
will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, June 16. Summer
services will be conducted by lay leaders. The temple
is located at 567 Bay Isles Rd., Longboat Key.

Volunteers
Volunteers Services of Manatee County, Inc.,
needs volunteers to supervise Operation Painteen; clas-
sify historical documents; shelve books; teach knitting,
sewing, and exercise; welcome vacationers at the infor-
mation center; and more. Call 746-7117.
Directory of Human
Resources now available
Advance sale orders for the new Directory of Hu-
man Resources are being solicited by Community Con-
nections of Manatee County, Inc.
The 1995 edition of the directory includes all the
new human resources in the community.
The advance sale price is $10 (plus $.70 tax) and
can be ordered by calling Rose Wiley at 747-4435 or
mail in orders to Community Connections of Manatee
County, Inc., P.O. Box 1331, Bradenton, FL 34206.
Add $1.75 to cover shipping costs.


Father's Day, Sunday, June 18



will befeaturing from Noon to 9:30 p.m.

Roast Stuffed Leg of Lamb ................. ................ 8.95
includes vegetable, roasted new potatoes & salad

Roast Chicken Athenian.......................................... 7.95
includes vegetable, choice of rice or potato & salad

Roast Loin of Pork ................................................... 7.95
includes cornbread dressing, vegetable & salad

Soup Du Jour ........................................................ 25




^cfy^/^^w


Daily breakfast,
lunch and
dinner specials.


Plus
a wonderful selection of
homemade soups and
delicious desserts.


900 GULF DRIVE BRADENTON BEACH 778-1919
OPEN 7 AM-9:30 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK


SEALFI 01) RESTAURANT
YOUR FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


FATHER'S DAY BUFFET
Vj~ ^ Sunday June 18 11 am 3 pm
60I IALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Adults $11.95
S , $5.95 (Children Under 10)
; ,* t Includes: Carved Roast Beef
Ham Oysters Rockefeller
SAssorted Seafood
t. Plus More!
Regular A La Carte menu Available 11 am 10 pm
Call for Reservations
* *
Dad Day Drink Specials
$ 1.00 Absolut Bloody Marys
I .V Mimosas & Draft Beer


BIG MAMA IS HERE!
Tuesday through Saturday 5 9 pm

dlcove a crob9 n 9a.

Dockage Available For Those Coming By Boat
Marker 62 Intercoastal Waterways
5325 Marina Drive (formerly Pete Reynards) Holmes Beach
Open For Dinner 11 am-1 Opm Fri & Sat 11 am-1 1pm Lounge Open 11:00-?
778-9566


_ __I


(25: e







1DF PAGE 18 0 JUNE 15, 1995 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Coast Guard guidelines for kids and life jackets


J.D. Arndt, officer in charge at the U.S. Coast
Guard Station Cortez, issues the following guidelines
for purchase and use of children's personal flotation
devices (PFDs):
Children's PFDs are sized according to weight
ranges under 30 pounds, 30-50 pounds and 50-90
pounds and should be selected appropriately.
Many manufacturers specify a chest size (mea-
sured underneath the arms). Be sure the PFD you are
considering purchasing accommodates your child's


measurement.
Children who are afraid of the water or cannot
swim should opt for a Type II Child or Infant PFD.
A brightly colored PFD will enhance your child's
desire to wear it.
A snug fit determined at the store is im-
portant. Lift the shoulders of the PFD to make sure
it does not slip over the chin or ears. There should
never be more than 3 inches between shoulders and
PFD.


Crotch straps should be used at all times for added
security. Avoid a too-tight, uncomfortable fit.
Assist your child in testing the fit in the water. Let
child indicate where device needs adjustment.
A child may fight the PFD's tendency to float him
slightly back of vertical. Choose the float style that
works well for your child.
Working together, parents and guardians can defi-
nitely achieve optimum child safety. Please have your
child wear a PFD!


New grouper project underway at Mote Marine Laboratory


Scientists at Mote Marine Laboratory have joined
forces with researchers at North Carolina State Univer-
sity (NCSU) on a cooperative Grouper Project, funded
by the National Marina Fisheries Service.
The project is expected to provide a detailed under-
standing of the reproductive biology of gag grouper
and black sea bass. Field work for the project will be
conducted at Mote and is already underway.
Grouper is a heavily fished species by both com-
mercial and recreational fishermen. It is critical for
effective fishery management and for grouper aquac-
ulture to understand the reproductive cycle of these
animals. For instance, the study could yield informa-
tion on which females are the best spawners and at
what size, which in turn could be used to fine-tune
catch size regulations.
"We are fortunate to have the opportunity to estab-
lish a long-term collaborative relationship with
NCSU," said Carole Neidig, senior biologist for Mote's
Aquaculture/Stock Enhancement program. Leading the
team for NCSU will be Dr. Craig Sullivan, well known
in the area of finfish reproductive biology.
"This joint effort will place Mote in the forefront
in this important area of fisheries biology," added
Neidig.
Mote's Aquaculture Program is also involved in a
significant, three-year snook stock enhancement re-
search program in partnership with the Florida Depart-


for
O SAMsational
Dads!

On S 4 Fresh & Piled High
NO1 Cuban or Low-Fat Turkey

Delivered To Your Dad's Door

7.00 ea / 2 for $12.00 / 3 for *16.00 / 4 for $20.00
proceeds to Save Anna Maria No Mega Bridge Legal Fund
Call Joy at Haley's 778-5405


Red grouper


Nassau Grouper


ment of Environmental Protection.
Snook is one of the most sought after sport fish in
Florida and has suffered serious declines in population
through the 1970s and 1980s. The snook program is


PIZZA BURGERS FRIES


5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located in Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs 11lam-9pm Fri & Sat lam-lOpm


I "Intimate Dinner for Two $39.95"
atS n i fh ,ith n. n f-ch Kr-nd


CiraIIy I:l lour oveUn resii1 a Ultad,
appetizer, soup or salad, entr6e,
bottle of wine and dessert.


*V ."




Champagne Sunday
Brunch 10 am- 2pm
i Coinplimnutary glass
4 of cltamnipagne, mimosa
or orange juice.
Traditional eggs Benedict
or with steak fillets
or crab cakes.
Omelettes, waffles.
from $3.75- $5.95


Dinner Tues. Sat. 5-1 Opm
... on the corner of
Manatee Avenue & ulf iDrive.
Across from Barnett bank
(813) 778-5440


building on 10 years of research by Mote and scientists
hope to ultimately move toward hatchery production of
juvenile snook.


Governor

searches for JNC

candidates
Governor Lawton Chiles has called for quali-
fled Floridians to apply for openings on the state's
Judicial Nominating Commissions.
The governor has until July 1 to appoint one
new member to each of the state's JNCs, including
the Supreme Court, the five Appellate Districts and
the 20 Judicial Circuits JNCs.
JNC appointees serve a four-year term and
cannot be appointed to judicial office while serv-
ing on the commission and two years afterward.
Judges are not allowed to be JNC members.
Those interested in serving on a state JNC
should call (904) 488-3494 to ask for a question-
naire for gubernatorial appointment form.
Questionnaires should be received by June 15,
1995. Qualified minority and female applicants are
encouraged to submit their questionnaires.

I -


I E a I Ior Take-lotI


]






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 15, 1995 N PAGE 19 I[E

Carson closes chapter at King Middle School


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Of the changes affecting Manatee County schools
under new Superintendent of Schools Dr. S. Gene
Denisar, one will hit close to home June 22 the last
official day for Nancy Carson as principal of Martha B.
King Middle School.
Carson, a resident of Holmes Beach, has been
King's top administrator since the school opened in
1978 with 500 students and half a building. She's
seen the school grow through two building phases -
up to today's campus and its 11 portable classrooms
- and enrollment rise to 1,300 sixth, seventh and
eighth graders.
After 17 years as principal Carson will retire, in
large part motivated by Denisar's early-retirement-in-
centive program that he says will eventually save the
district millions of dollars.
Carson looks forward to some traveling, but she's
not closing the door on Manatee County education. "I
expect to be involved again in some way, shape or
form," she says emphatically. "I'm wide open."
Carson's education career spans 40 years, 38 of
them in Manatee County.
A North Carolina native who knew in ninth grade
that she would become a teacher, Carson taught high
school physical education for two years after college
and was the first woman basketball coach in the South
Carolina county where she worked.
In 1957 Carson came to Manatee County as PE
teacher at Walker Junior High School, later the south
campus of Manatee High School. She then served as
Walker's dean of students.
When the district initiated its middle-school con-
cept, Carson was dean to ninth and 10th grade girls
on the high school's south campus and then served
in the same role for grades 11 and 12 on the north
campus.
In 1974 Carson was named assistant principal
for the upper two grades and acted as director of ac-
tivities for both campuses, overseeing all extracur-
ricular programs.
---* t


POCO LOCO
I MEXICAN CUISINE
Fre
to A na M ria


Inside & Outside Dining


387-0161


Learning center
named for principal
Principal Nancy Carson of King Middle School,
.: ho will retire this year, was honored at the school's
awards assembly by having the school's learning
center named for her. An engraved plaque was
placed above the door to the center declaring it the
Carson Learning Center. Carson is an Island
resident. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland

She remained at those posts until King opened in
1978, when she became the first woman in Manatee
County to be named as a principal of a secondary
school.
In her 17-year stint, Carson says discipline is the
one area where her job changed the most. Overdue li-


brary books once constituted a major offense.
"I've seen more violence and less parent involve-
ment" due to family-structure changes and working
mothers, says the educator.

Turning kids around
When asked how the children are different to-
day, Carson responds that today's students "are more
lethargic about learning, but at the same time there's
another whole group eager to learn and motivated by
new technologies."
She believes that innovative learning/teaching
styles that blend classroom instruction with relevance
to real life and today's technologies "will turn kids
around" and remotivate those who exhibit apathy.
To her replacement Carson would say, "They have
the best school, the best student body and faculty and
the best and most involved parents" of any middle
school in the county.
Carson says her greatest joy during 40 years in
education is to see former students come back to the
education field as adults.
The hardest part of her job, Carson says, "probably
is knowing that there are so many things that education
needs for which the funding isn't being made avail-
able." She has deep concern that "the state legislature
is putting education second."
That concern and "truly loving" the kids, faculty
and parents she knows she will miss are the reasons
Carson vows to "stay involved."
Of the financial incentive for early retirement,
Carson mentions 140 district educators who will re-
tire this year, taking with them a combined 2,500
years of experience.
"I know all businesses are doing it," Carson says
of the retirement incentives. "But what's always kept
education apart was professionalism. We're getting
to the point that we're going to run our schools like
businesses."
With the sigh of a woman who has devoted four
decades to our children's future, Carson concludes,
"You just can't buy experience."

Eat In or a
TakeOut FOOI
u $1000OFF DELIVERY I
ANY SIZE PIZZA! I
O 'oA PIZZA
& ITALIAN RESTAURANT
SSpecializing in Veal *Chicken Fish Pasta
Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
SOpen 7 Days 11 AM to Midnight
( \. 201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
778-0771 or 778-0772
L.. .......... rn.


Florida Trend'
Golden Spoon Award
DiRoNA Award



FABULOUS
Dining






AND THE HAYE LOFT

Hours Nightly:
Lounge & Lighter Bites
5:00 1:00
Dessert Room
6:00 -12:00
Restaurant
5:00 10:30

Euphemia Haye
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key, FL
813.383.3633
Live Entertainment


Casual Dining
Appetizers, Pizzas
Soups, Salads
and more.


Hours Nightly:
Lounge & Lighter Bites
5:00 1:00
Dessert Room
6:00 12:00
Restaurant
5:00 -10:30

The Haye Loft
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key, FL
813.383.3633

Live Entertainment


Where Longboat Key History Began

1OOR S




|SONE CRAB
RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

Summer Menu

NEW...

Create-Your-Own Platter

Specialty Salads

Lite and Hearty Dinners

King Crab Legs

Daily Specials
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
....


Makes Living Easy!

4Y Delightful Dining
Brunch, Lunch & Dinner

Sushi at Harry's
Join Us Thursday Night!

Gourmet Take-Out & Catering

NBA Playoffs
Don't Miss the Tip Offl
Dinner Specials at Harry's Deli, 6/15 thru 6/21
p, Steak Arcadia, $9.95
P* { Chicken Blackberry, $9.95
Blackened Swordfish, $9.95

383-0777
Open Wednesday thru Sunday
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
On Beautiful Longboat Key


I I EMIT" 'P"q-w mrg-imK-mDogD-







- PAGE 20 0 JUNE 15, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
June 7, traffic crash, Anna Maria Post Office. A
vehicle stopped to let out a passenger and was hit by a
vehicle backing out of a parking space.

Bradenton Beach
June 2, warrant arrest, 2601 Gulf Drive North,
Sandpiper Mobile Home Park. The officer was called
to the trailer park by the manager who indicated which
trailer the subject was in. The subject had a warrant out
of Orange County for violation of probation on grand
theft.
As the officer approached the trailer, the subject
rolled up the window and refused to come out. The
owner was contacted and gave the officer the key and
permission to enter. He opened the door and placed the
subject in custody.
June 3, Marchman Act, Cortez Bridge. The of-
ficer found the subject lying down on the walkway of
the bridge. The officer noted he could smell the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage and the subject had to be
held up to keep from falling.
When the officer asked the subject where he lived,
he replied, "on the south end of Vietnam." When asked
again, he said he had lived on the bridge for seven
years. He was placed in custody for his own protection.
June 6, aggravated domestic battery, 1603 Gulf
Drive North, Trade Winds. Upon arrival, the officer
observed the victim bleeding severely from the mouth.
He observed a deep gash on the inside of the victim's
lower lip and her front tooth pushed to the rear of her
mouth.
The victim stated that she and her boyfriend had
just broken up and as he was leaving the residence, he
ripped the phone out of the wall and punched her in the
mouth. The suspect was not located.
The next day, the suspect came into the police de-
partment and was placed in custody.



Cfiez Aure


W Breakfast
W Luncheon
W Daily Specials
W Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Also, carry out for
French Bread & Pastries


Happy Father's Day
Sunday June 18


Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France Z __
Tues thru Sat Thur, Fri & Sat
8AM-230PM 6-10PM M mbrAmercan
Sun 8AM-1:30PM Sun 5:30-9PM Ckla Ftdiralin
Reservations Suggested for Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320





HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails

Lunch or I
SDinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER I
K ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE.
Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 6/30/95
Wednesday Nights
Blind Draw Darts 8 P.M.
Food & Drink Specials
K Free Giveaways.
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thus. 4 to 10
Friday Noon to 10
& Sat, Sun. 8am to 10pm
RESTAURANT Serving Breakfast 8 'til
T 1 ^- n Pub Hours 'Til ?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


Holmes Beach
June 2, information, 27(X) block of Avenue C.
The complainant called the officer to complain about
"the system." He said he was fed up with forms to fill
out, fees to pay, etc. He asked the officer to revoke his
probation and take him to jail. The officer told him he
could not do that and suggested that the complainant
call if necessary after he sobered up. The officer cau-
tioned him not to do anything he would be sorry for
later.
June 3, found property prescription sunglasses,
Neptune Lane.
June 3, theft of a boat, 202 52nd Street, Holmes
Beach Marina. A boater observed a boat sinking north
of the Island and contacted the Coast Guard. The Coast
Guard contacted the sheriff s department and a towing
company to tow the boat to the Bradenton Beach Ma-
rina.
The officer observed the instrument panel of the
boat had been ripped out and the vessel hot-wired. A
mast on the flying bridge had been snapped off. The
owner was contacted. The 33-and-a-half-foot cabin
cruiser was valued at $100,000, and damage was esti-
mated at $5,000.
June 4, found property a 14-foot canoe with
paddles and an anchor, 46th Street beach.
June 4, found property -a wallet, 5353 Gulf
Drive, Circle K.
June 5, found property -a bike, 5353 Gulf Drive,
Circle K.
June 5, suspicious, 75th Street beach. The officer
responded in reference to lost property and found two
male subjects sleeping on the beach. He advised them
they could not do so.
June 5, suspicious, 4700 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria
Elementary School. The school crossing guard reported
that two vehicles passed through the school zone and
the drivers yelled obscenities at her.
June 5, burglary, 5400 Holmes Boulevard. The
complaint returned to the residence and found the slid-
ing glass door pried open and cassette tapes disturbed.
June 6, Marchman Act, 300 block of 55th Street.


sonnydaze
110 bridge st., bradenton beach 778-3344
Enjoy our Imported Beers & Gourmet Coffees
OPEN DAILYAT4PM
weekly happenings
Fri & Sat Folk Music June 61 & i17
featuring Mike Oscanyon
Mon- Live Reggae June 19 "Tugboat"
Tues Psychic readings every Tuesday
Wed Open Jam hosted by.
S"Judge Roy Bean"-,:, ';:.i
Thurs Acoustic Guitar June 22
featuring Rich Kendall::::
21 YEARS AND OVER AFTER 9 PM



Voted the 4.

Suneoast's

#1

Seafood

Restaurant*






The Freshest Seafood
at Dockside Prices!
*Tampa Tribune and
Sarasota Ilerald-Tribiune Reader's Choice
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Dr. 778-5997
Happy HIour Daily 4 to 7 PM
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10 Fri & Sat 4 to 11


New dispatcher in
Holmes Beach
I)ebbie ,';,,lth, began
dispatching for the
Holmes Beach Police
i H: Department last week
Santillo moved to the
SIsland a month ago
From New York state.
She said she loves
Island life and is
happy to have found a
"great" job. Islander
Photo: Pat Copeland

The complainant reported an intoxicated female subject
sitting on his lawn. The subject told the officer she
lived in Ellenton, had no one to pick her up and take her
home and had no money. The officer noted that she was
unable to stand and vomited several times. She was
placed in custody for her own protection.
June 7, found property a bicycle, 5400 block
of Marina Drive.
June 7, suspicious, 7400 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported that a person unknown tam-
pered with his sailboat moored at a dock across from
his residence.
June 7, disturbance, 5300 Gulf Drive, BP station.
A juvenile came into the police department and said he
was assaulted by an elderly white male subject who
grabbed him by the arm. The officer spoke to an em-
ployee at the station who said the carload of juveniles
were verbally abusing the subject.
June 7, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $150,
4700 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria Elementary School.
June 7, burglary, 3018 Avenue C, Holmes Beach
Mini Storage. The officer responded in reference to a
burglary to a storage unit. A wedding dress valued at
$1,100 and boxes of cassette carriers valued at $768
were removed.


~ SUNDAY, JUNE 18, 1995

t rthe ajjl ...








I-.-t

TI k
G G N

h~~~~E I ?tll~ll M~mlrd lRM IT
Sunst SpcialHour
'reda hr una



4:34) to :34) PN







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 21 RE


By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
May 28, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
near Venice and issued an enforcement action report
for feeding dolphins.
June 1, Boarding. Three pleasure craft were
boarded and found to have no safety violations.
June 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 25-foot pleasure
craft adrift in a squall near Bean Point. The station
launched the 25-foot boat to assist, but upon arrival at
the disabled vessel it was no longer in need of assis-
tance.
June 2, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of an Emergency Position In-
dicating Radio Beacon transmitting on 121.5 MHz six
miles off Casey Key. The station launched the 41-foot
boat to investigate, and the USCG Point Countess, also
in the area, aided in the search. No vessel was found to
be in distress.
June 3, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 36-foot pleasure
craft adrift two miles west of Anna Maria Island. The
vessel requested a specific commercial salvor to assist.
The station contacted the salvor, who provided a tow
to port.
June 3, Search and rescue /assistance, Station
Cortez received a report of a downed ultralight aircraft
in Sarasota Bay. The station launched the 25-foot boat
to investigate as well as requesting the assistance of
Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 2684231. No downed
aircraft was found and no vessels or persons were in
distress.
June 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a capsized 18-foot sailboat
one mile west of Manasota Key. The station requested
the assistance of a Sarasota County Marine Unit lo-
cated in the area, which assisted in re-righting the ves-


Fishing the Islands this weekend
The third annual Fishing the Islands Tournament will take place this Saturday, June 17. First place in the all-
species benefit event will be $5,000. Contact Island Discount Tackle, 778-7688, for registration. From left,
John Cannon and Frank Amadio accept the 1994first-place award from sponsor Bill Lowman.


sel. No one was injured in the mishap.
June 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 38-foot sailboat aground
and taking on water in New Pass. The station's 25-foot
boat investigated and removed the people on board, per
their request, and transported them to a nearby port.
The vessel's crew contacted a commercial salvor to
assist the vessel to deep water.
June 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 22-foot pleasure craft dis-


abled near Marker 59 in the Gulf Intracoastal Water-
way. The station requested the assistance of Coast
Guard Auxiliary vessel 2684231, which provided a tow
to the nearest port.
June 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 21-foot pleasure
craft near Marker 11 in New Pass. A boater provided
the disabled vessel a tow to the nearest port.
June 6, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded and
found to have no safety violations.


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
OPEN FOR
LUNCH &
DINNER
7 DAYS A WEEK
BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS

CAN NOT695!
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
STARTING MAY 15
901 S. Bay Blvd, Ann Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953

ThSLANDERw


The best news!


Established 1947


1/2 Mile North of City Pier

"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "TM
No Fishing
License Required
Live Shrimp & Shiners
Frozen Baits
Rod Rentals Tackle


875 North Shore Drive
na Maria Island, Florida
Full of character and Old
ida Charm. Upper and lower
ks with magnificent views of
the sunsets and sunrises.
est kept secret on the Island.'
Come join us for
ISLAND COOKING
breakfast, Lunch or Dinner.
UtA POI-7







MM,
I Y \^ l^^^lA'

SFC 5


DAILY SPECIALS REASONABLE PRICES
778-1885






S '-: Florida Coninental
-, *.'-' Cuisine

Tempting Appetizers
Creative Salads
Award- Winning Entrees
Superb Desserts
With our new "bringjour awn spirits"
policy, you may enjoy your own fantastic
selection of wine to compliment your dinner
any evening and there's no corkage fee.
Early Supper
This much requested menu offers lighter,
creative fare for a lighter price.
Nightly 5 to 6:30 pm.
SundayBrunch 9 am to 1:30 pm
You are welcome to bring your favorite Wine or Beer
9707 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria Reservations Suggested 778-9399


WILLY GREAT PRIME RIB
for Father's Day




SAll-You-Can-Eat Grouper Fingers $6.95
Home of the 250 Oyster
107 Gulf Dr. Bradenton Beach 778-7272

-Bridge Street Pier a Cafe -
(at end of Bridge St. on pier)

"BestGroup BREAKFAST
Sandwich
on the Islandi" Served All Day!
Happy Hour 4-7
Lunch & Dinner Seafood Menu
World Famous Hamburgers
4 Raw Oysters
ALL-U-CAN EAT
FRIED GROUPER
w/504 Beer Friday 5 to 8

$2.00 OFF DAD'S MEAL
for all dads on Father's Day!
(with this ad)


FISHING 50P
SPECTATING FREE!
LIVE 1BAIT& TACKLE EVERYDAY

Open: Mon. Fri. 8AM 8PM Sat.- Sun. 7AM 10PM
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706






ja PAGE 22 0 JUNE 15, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Top grade earners

in fourth grade

announced
The students in fourth-grade at Anna Maria El-
ementary School who earned all A's for the school year
are: Joshua Armstrong, Jeff Comkowycz, Abby
Dahlquist, Genevieve Douglas, Michelle Modisett,
Ditra Paloski, Lorraine Stanick and Lindsey Talarino.
The students who maintained a 3.5 average are:
Joshua Armstrong, Rachel Bell, Peter Birch, Jacquelyn
Carter, Tyler Chennault, Jeff Comkowycz, Abby
Dahlquist, Kimberly DiPaola, Genevieve Douglas, Jer-
emy LeGrand, Jim Mazza, Ryan Mijares, Michelle
Modisett, Ditra Paloski, Mark Rudacille, Kimberly
Schenk, Lorraine Stanick, Lindsey Talarino, Maggie
VanWormer and McKenzie Wilkins.






Joy Courtney


Hard workers
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending June 2. Kneeling
are Coty Kochanowski and Vincent Marone. First row, left to right, are Hayzen Dunsworth, Ashley Zakazeski
Denesse Gonzalez, Andrew Carbone and Cindy Connelly. Back row, left to right, are Shawn LaPensee,
Rachelle Brockway, Alan Jenkins, Taylor Manning and Joshua Fleming.


Just a special kind of zoo Class of 2007
Karen Paul's third-grade class added three-dimensional projects to accompany Anna Maria Elementary School graduated 72 kindergarten students to first
their reports on insects. The class displayed their projects during the class's grade. Representing the graduating class of 2007 are Merrily Shary, sitting, with
"Insect Zoo." Some of the students who participated in the insectival event are Becka Dewick, left, Emma Curry, Hannah Brickse, Alex Casella and "I-can't-
Michael Caudill (Ichneumon Fly); Devon Mertz (Monarch Butterfly); Ben Rigney wait-to-get-to school" wannabe Kelsey Taylor, who will be a member of the class
(Ant); Ashley Chiles (Housefly); Billie Malfese (Hornet) and Mario Torres of 2008.
(Silverfish).


I M ?, I W 0wL 4M16 C
Battleship book banks big impression
Little reader-to-be Zachary Westerman came across with big facts and a big
project from the book "Battleship Bismarck" during his class's Parade of
Books. Students in Lynn McDonough's kindergarten-and first-grade split class
were assigned to read a book and make a three-dimensional project based on
what they learned. "Zach came to me and asked me to read this book about the
Bismarck to him," said his father, David. "He was really interested in the
Bismarck." Interested? That proved to be an understatement. Zach's audience
listened in awe as he rattled off a multitude of facts and details about the Bis-
marck and its sinking in World War II.


Super pizza provider
Anna Maria Elementary School Principal Jim Kronus, left, and Charlene Mundy,
co-chair of the Math Superstar Program, right, present Tim Bell, manager of
Dominos' Pizza, Holmes Beach, with a plaque thanking Domino's for its annual
contribution to the program. This year Domino's provided 42 pizzas for the
students who completed the voluntary advanced math program. Eckerd Drug and
Island Foods also support the math program with donations of soft drinks and
cookies.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 23 OIM


A well-deserved 'thank you' Next stop middle school
Luke Courtney, left, chairman of the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce Soon to be on their way to middle school, the fifth-grade students at Anna Maria
Education Committee, and Anna Maria Elementary School teacher Marcia Elementary School said "so long" to their school and fellow students with a
Brockway look over $800 worth of gifts donated by Island businesses to thank program entitled "Lights ofBroadway," a medley of Broadway hits.
our Island school teachers for all their hard work As part of Teachers Apprecia-
tion Day, 25 teachers enjoyed a hamburger grilled to perfection by Jim Kronus,
principal not pictured, and drew his or her lucky number for their
gift from our Island merchants.


Never too young
for health-care class
Manatee Memorial Hospital operating-room nurse
Charlie Kennedy paid a recent visit to the Schoolfor
Constructive Play to teach daughter Kaci and her
preschool peers about germ prevention and proper
surgical dress. Islander Photo:
Courtesy of Maria Richards.


IISLANDER


IBYS


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


JOHN PRESTIA
THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY
JUNE 15, 16 & 17* 10P.M.

3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


Joe's Eats & Sweets


SHomemade Soups, Salads
& Deli Sandwiches
Homemade Ice Cream & Yogurts
MADE ON LOCATION
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge 778-0007
Sun. 12-9:30/Mon. & Wed.-Fri. 6-10pm/Sat. 12-10


SIsland Inn Restaurant
.r OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach a

pmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmql
COUPON
EXPIRES I
6/221/95 N p 3 0
10519 Cortez Road I
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 1200 Noon 8 PM

PIZZA *
BUFFET

$3.49
I Per person all day with purchase of soft drink.
S "Thank you to all our local patrons"
hllmmll COUPON Ilmmmml


G%%1B 64


795-8083


CORTEZ ROAD
CONSTRUCTION IS
FINALLY OVER!!
NOW IT'S TIME FOR
HAPPY HOUR
Mon.-Sat. 11-7
& All Day Sunday


Tuesday's
Restaurant Appreciation Night

Talisman Trio
Thurs June 15 *8-12
Fri & Sat June 16& 17 9-1
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
With Daily Lunch Specials
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $725
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls *
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


EYE OPENER... 2 eggs, toast,
home fries and coffee... nly $1.75


00on V" S
June
"The best hamburgers and
the coldestmugs of beer
this side of Heaven.'"fli
auffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. O 1'a
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout *778-2501


Mon.h Fi


SUN -)I FAT]W ]]OI[HLEWS DAY 111 a 10] 1-6







[l PAGE 24 M JUNE 15, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Local beaches fare fair during blow,

but watch out for offshore sailor's dust


Editor's Note: While Bob Ardren is cruising the Carib-
bean, JimHanson will take over Outdoor Perspectives.
By Jim Hanson
Outdoor Perspectives
How come, one is bound to wonder: that ill wind
called Allison brought suffering to beaches at both ends
of Anna Maria Island but left the midsection pretty much
alone. One island down, it beat heck out of Longboat
Key's middle beaches and pretty much ignored north and
south. On Lido, it was more democratic it whaled away
all over the key, but especially that superlative beach at the
north end. Siesta Key got away virtually undamaged.
Anna Maria Vice Mayor Chuck Shumard, the com-
missioner most involved with the Public Works De-
partment, lamented the narrowing of the beach around
North Shore Road.
Not to mention a disaster for turtles. Eight nests
lost, he figures, as Allison drove waters seething far
over the beaches and into the dunes. The nests just
vanished with the beach.
A bright spot: Turtle Watchers on the Island saved
at least one nest that was threatened.
Shumard said the sea cut deeply into the dunes at
North Shore from Seagrape Lane down. Bean Point did
fine, Palm-to-Magnolia lost some sand and at the Bali
Hai the pounding waters tore away the sand and left the
shells and rocks and other unlovely stuff.
John Fernandez, Holmes Beach public works di-
rector, found "no damage to speak of" along his city's
beaches, beyond "normal erosion as with any storm."
Some turtle nests may be distressed, he said, but it's so
early in the nesting season "it's probably not bad."
His bright spot: No Australian pines blew down
to clog streets, as usually happens "with a breeze of
any size."
Bradenton Beach's newly renourished beach made
it through without real problems, said Jack Gorzeman
of the Manatee County Environmental Action Com-
mission. He oversaw the just-completed dune construc-


Family Owned and Millwork
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size





7:30 to5 AND
Saturday A
8 012 HARDWARE
We specialize in custom cabinet making:
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located Just West of the Island Shopping Center


tion, which held up just fine.
The south end of Cortez Beach, the lower limit of
the renourishment, lost sand back to the foot of
Gorzeman's dune and water rolled in over the beach
onto Gulf Drive and was trapped there until nature took
its course and got rid of it.
Speaking of which, Shumard summed up his city's
beach prospects cheerily: "Mother Nature will prob-
ably put it back next week."

Meanwhile, back at the passes
The channels from bay to Gulf, surprisingly, fared
better than the beaches. Allison left the three passes in
our-area pretty much as they were before the storm,
which isn't all that great when you get right down to it.
Longboat Pass between Anna Maria Island and
Longboat wasn't noticeably affected, said Dr. Cliff
Truitt, a senior scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory. No
change in the results of the U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers survey, made in February: not much dredging
needed, the channel is not moving around.
Different proposition at New Pass, at the south end of
Longboat Key, where the channel months ago moved
south right along north Lido and stayed there. The Coast
Guard, you recall, by a "mariner's notice" advised boat-
ers the service would no longer move navigation aids to
mark channel changes. New Pass is considered a hazard
to navigation and boaters are on their own.
Big Pass, between Lido and Siesta Keys, is undam-
aged because of "downdrift offset shorelines," which
Truitt was kind enough to explain. This is a condition
under which the earthy south border of the pass sticks out
into the Gulf farther than the north side. Since Allison's
winds and waves were from the southwest, the protrud-
ing ebb shoals protected the pass from major erosion.

New rules for sea trout
Protection of the spotted sea trout, a prized
gamefish, seems to be in our future. The Marine Fish-



AIRBOAT RIDES
J \ Perico Harbour Marina
Manatee Avenue West
(at Leverocks & Galati Marine)


Come see Florida's Natural beauty & wilderness.


Let's talk about ...
HUMIDITY CONTROLS
Are you going away and closing your home for
even a short while? A dehumidistat will help pre-
vent mildew formation. Installed onto your present
A/C unit, it works in conjunction with the thermo-
stat to run your unit only when the two humidity
forming conditions are met.
For only $70.56 you can buy "peace of
mind." Let us install one for you. Our price
includes: part, labor, and tax.
You'll have to call us or we'll never meet.
Celebrating our 23nd Year

WE@44T @@AT
REFRIGERATION &


CAC044365


778-9622 Holmes Beach
5347 Gulf Drive #4


WE SERVICE
ALL MAKES & MODELS


FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


series Commission at its meeting last week in Sebring
said the trout is "a stressed fishery" and needs some
relief to give it a chance to rebuild.
Public hearings will precede any such recommen-
dation by the commission to the governor and Cabinet,
which have the final authority to impose rules.
As proposed now, the rule would prohibit sea trout
harvest in January and February from the Pinellas-Pasco
county line to Alabama and in November and December
in other state waters (that's us, folks); set a daily bag limit
of five in our waters; set 15-inch minimum and 20-inch
maximum-size limits; allow commercial harvest and sale
in June, July and August, with 50-fish daily limit and,
no surprise here, gill-netting prohibited.

And now, a sawdust tide
As if red tide isn't enough there's another algae
bloom to worry about. It's oscillatoria, which fish-
ermen call "sailor's dust." It's a blue-green algae
which usually blooms far out in the Gulf from March
to October, but the hurricane apparently blew ashore
a batch half a mile long and a quarter of a mile wide.
It's been sighted at St. Petersburg Beach, and the
state Department of Environmental Protection is
monitoring the Intracoastal Waterway and the Gulf
for more signs. It's said to look like sawdust and in
concentrated masses can be gooey. Harmless to
swimmers, it's just nasty.

Fish the Islands Saturday
Reminder the third annual Fishing the Islands tour-
nament is Saturday, June 17, starting with a captains'
kickoff event from 5 to 8 p.m. the day before at Anna
Maria Community Center.
The tournament itself begins when anglers check
in between 6:30 and 8:30 a.m. Saturday and continues
until midnight. Prizes galore, promises the sponsor,
Island Discount Tackle.
See you next week.



Kid's Bring Dad
& Fish for Free*
SATURDAY OR SUNDAY JUNE 17 & 18

DEEP SEA
FISHING
4, 6, & 9 HOUR TRIPS

BAY FISHING
FISH THE CALM WATERS OF TAMPA OR
SARASOTA BAYS

CORTEZ FLEET
*1 child free w/purchase of an adult ticket
for further information and reservations call
794-1223
12507 Cortez Road West



Island 778-5646
S Marine
Construction Inc.



11 "', i1 "
-- ........... :: .....
|illli i---*

SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE
Also
SSeawall Caps c Pylons
Patio Decks o Barge Service
Holmes Beach (813) 778-5646


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER JUNE 15, 1995 0 PAGE 25 rm


Redfish action


continues;


expect blues

soon
Redfish season continues to be one of the best
times of year for avid anglers. The big reds are hungry
and plentiful right now, with good reports of the tasty
fish coming from just about any backwater location. To
round out the color pattern of fishing, several sightings
of blue fish have been made in the past few days.
Anglers at the Rod and Reel Pier have been
catching a ton of snook naturally, since the season
ended June 1 they are starting to bite now, when you
can't keep them as well as a lot of redfish, grouper
and a few flounder.
Fishers at the Anna Maria City Pier have been
catching some nice-sized mackerel, some catch-and-
release snook and a bunch of redfish using live shrimp
for bait.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trips averaged 80 head of Key West grunts and
porgies. The six-hour trips averaged 250 head of grou-
per, mangrove snapper and porgies. The nine-hour
trips averaged 60 head of mangrove snapper, grouper
and Key West grunts.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper are thick
in the Gulf in about 100 feet of water, some in the 20-
to 25-inch range. Red tide has hurt tarpon fishing,
Chris said, but redfish are very productive.
Capt. Phil Shields said he's been bringing in some
nice-sized dolphin from out in the Gulf, as well as
sighting a whale shark. He's also hearing reports of
sailfish being caught about 40 miles offshore.
Good luck and good fishing.


"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin


GOOD CREDIT? NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT?
I as- - -- -*--


NOW YOU CAN
BUY A CARI
Bankrupt Bad Credit
SSlow Credit
NO PROBLEM
Re-establish credit through
"E Z" Credit Hot Line"


CHRYSLER 4, Plymouth
-SS ^^Bdf~


r 1-

f
Bunner Smith
CALL
Bunner Smith
748-6510
2700 1st Street
Bradenton, FL 34208


Tampa police officer and avid fisher Debbie Cochran caught this gag grouper while fishing with Capt. Phil
Shields. Pictured with the smiling Debbie is some of the ReefReacher crew.


Free boating-safety events


planned by C.G. auxiliary


Cavanagh Marine Repair and the U. S. Coast
Guard, Flotilla 8-3 Div. VIII, will hold two upcoming
events free of charge for all ages.
From 10-11 a.m. Saturday, June 17, there will be
a tour of the Coast Guard's Cortez station and its 41-
foot boat Boating safety, how to help boats in trouble
and how to save people will also be taught.


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (941) 778-2727


AMERICAN CAR WASH

Your Car Wash & Detail Center

Valet Washing w Full Detailing
Hand Wax m Engine Degreasing
Also ... Complete Self-Serve Facilities
Ask For Earl (941) 778-1617
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217


ILLV1NEER


- m* ^ -


A Water 'n' Kids/Boats 'n' Kids program will be
held from 10-11 a.m. Thursday, June 22, at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center. Demonstrations will
include tying up a boat in any weather, use of marine
radios and life jackets and how to handle trouble.
For more information call Marion Cavanagh at
727-7905.


Fishing' for a Capt Johni
Jood deal?S


17' ALLISON
w/90HP Tohatsu, galvanized trailer.
Special $9995.

NEW BOATS
Carolina Skiff
12' to 24' Skinny Water Specials
17' Pro-Sport CC w/85 Yamaha
18' Tremblay Flats $5995
19' Sea Sport CC $5995
17' Allison CC $3995
15' Allison 40HP, trailer *$6995
1l' (- iifcrrift C C a 4Z'7Pca


USED BOATS
14' Whaler-30 Mariner, trailer
$2795
14' Avalon Glass-w/9.9, trailer
$1295
21' Regal Walk-Around-150 Johnson, trailer
$7995
17' Glasstream-w/140 Mere., trailer
$3995
19' Mako CC-w/130 Yamaha, trailer.
Nice! $13,900
25' Mako Cabin-twin 140's, loaded.
Good condition! $13,995
mi '' *1,
*we%?. f^SSS;


S-w VL-


I


Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu6/15 4:17 1.4ff 6:11 1.3ft 1:34 2.8ft 9:11 -0.2ft
Fr 6/16 4:56 1.5ft 7:25 1.4ft 2:28 2.6ft 9:55 0.0ft
Sat6/17 5:28 1.6ft 8:46 1.3ft 3:27 2.3ft 10:40 0.2ft
Sun 6/18 6:05 1.7ft 10:20 1.3ft 4:33 2.0ft 11:22 0.5ff
Mon 6/19 6:41 1.8ft - 5:52 1.7ft 12:02 1.2ft
Tue6/20 7:24 2.0ff 12:02 0.7ft 7:29 1.5ft 1:32 1.0ft
Wed 6/21 8:03 2.1ft 12:44 0.9ft 9:07 1.4ft 2:50 0.7ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1.06 later


BOAS OATS o BOATS9BATS9BATBOS


_---~Us Ru--Y~-----.-L~U-- -F--


^vss'12444.Cortez Rd: o 941-792-26


I







EiM PAGE 26 JUNE 15, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


WE ARE THE


MAJOR LEAGUE CHAMPIONS!


With a 16-3 winning record, D.Coy Ducks tookfirst place in the Major League of the 1995 Anna Maria
Island Little League. The champs are, kneeling, from left, Preston Copeland, Kris Smith, Josh Armstrong,
Peter Dowling and Gabby LeGrand; standing, Matt St. Clair, Justin Dries, Scott MacGregor, David Evans,
Michael Patterson, Michael Armstrong and JeffAmbut; and rear, Assistant Coach Larry Armstrong, Head
Coach Lou Fiorentino and Little League President Scott Dell.


Special Major League honors went to, from left,
Michael Patterson, Batting Champion with a .523
average; Taylor Bernard, the Joe Maggio MVP
Award for exceptional play and impact on his team
and/or the league; and Michael Armstrong, the Bill
Ogden Sportsmanship Award for excellence on and
off the field Bernard and Armstrong's names have
been engraved for life on plaques displayed by
League President Scott DelL


American Legion Award
Paul Esformes of Anna Maria and Katie Jenkins of
Holmes Beach were presented with the prestigious
American Legion Award as the outstanding eighth
graders at King Middle School for the 1994-95
school year. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Presidential scholars
Standing from left are Anna Maria Copeland, Pam Taylor, Paul Esformes and Katherine Wight. Kneeling
from left are Katie Jenkins, Dixie Ferguson and Julie St. Germaine Critelli, presented with the President's
Award for Educational Excellence at the King Middle School awards assembly. They received medals en-
graved with their names and certificates and letters of congratulations from President Bill Clinton for being in
the top five percent of the eighth grade. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Thomas takes third in state contest


Anna Maria Elementary School fifth-grader Sa-
rah Thomas, the Manatee County winner, earned
third place in the elementary division of the state
speech contest in Orlando recently. She is the daugh-
ter of Susan and Richard Thomas of Anna Maria.
The text of Sarah's speech, "Breakfast with Dad,"
follows:
Eccentric, neurotic, organic can these words
have anything in common? Yes they can, when they're
describing my dad eating breakfast.
In the morning, most of us like to eat normal ce-
reals like Trix, Lucky Charms or even Golden
Grahams. And even if our parents are a little bit
picky, we'll go ahead and eat plain Cheerios with 1-
percent, low-fat milk.
But not my dad.
In a big bowl, he pours organically produced


multi-grain-flakes cereal.
On top of the flakes comes
brown-powdered, organic
oat bran which "has not
been altered in any way by
the additions of chemical
substances." On top of the
flakes and bran he pours ij, I. .
his non-dairy beverage
called soy milk.
Doesn't that sound re- Sarah Thomas
ally appetizing to you?
And every morning it's the same as usual. I get
to wake up to the sound of"eeeeeeerrrrr." And guess
what that sound is? It's my dad, "Mr. Juicer." He's
juicing his organically grown carrots and apples into
an orangish-brownish concoction. Doesn't that


sound charming?
And do most of you get to wake up to that great
smell of freshly brewing coffee in the morning? Not at
my house with my dad!
In the morning he drinks yum green tea. I
asked him if he really likes green tea and why he drinks
it. He said yes, he likes it, and he drinks it because it
prevents plaque.
Although his standard breakfast may be organic
fruits and cereals, when he does stray into the world
of cholesterol, it's not for bacon or sausage. It's for
free-range organic eggs. And these eggs are laid by
stress-free, happy chickens that get to roam free.
And these chickens have said no to drugs!
All these wonderful eating habits are leading up to
my father's ultimate goal.
His ultimate goal is to die healthy!


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 15, 1995 M PAGE 27 I]f


Island real


estate sales
103 Highlands Ave., Bradenton Beach, a ground
level 591 sfla 2bed/1&l/2bath/lcar home, built in
1947 on a 50x53 lot, was sold 5/4/95, Taylor to Haul,
for $74,500; list $89-79,900.
206 & 208 Palm Ave., Anna Maria, 2 elevated
homes newly built on 52x110 lots, were sold 5/4/95,
Glanz to Barlow, for $149,500 & $149,600; list un-
known.
2111 Avenue B, Bradenton Beach, a ground level
736 sfla home of 2bed/l&l/2bath, built in 1962 on a
50x100 lot, was sold 5/2/95, Skerratt to Gadden, for
$57,000; list unknown.
2600 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach, 36 Anna Maria
Island Club, a Gulf front 2bed/2bath 1200 sfla condo
built in 1984, was sold 5/4/95, Garner to Pence, for
$225,000; list unknown.
3601 E Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 209 D2 Sandy


I E X C E P T I 0


N A LI


ANNUAL & VACATION RENTALS
OWNERS...
Secure the highest caliber tenants
Realize the highest income from
your properties
Contact our Rental Specialists:
Debbie Dial or Brenda Reddy,
941-778-2275








ISLAND CONDOS
Westbay Point & Moorings...
* 2BR/2BA Ground floor, end unit. Furnished
$134,900.
* 2BR/2BA Decorator furnished, second floor
unit in park-like setting. $129,900.
* 3BR/2BA Recently redecorated, spacious
lanai faces west. Deeded boat dock and car-
port. $149,000.
Coquina Beach Club
* 2BR/2BA direct Gulffront. Overlooks wide
beach. Turnkey furnished. Great rental poten-
tial. $185,000.
Call Dick Maher or Dave Jones
(941) 778-2261 or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325

MLS _. ne.aL neat


Marilyn Trevethan
REALTORO


Call Today!!!
Ofc: 778-6066
Evenings: 792-8477

May I help you sell your
property??????


540 67th Street
List to contract in 60 days!


Pointe, a 2bed/2bath/2cp 1048 sfla condo built in
1994, was sold 5/4/95, Florida Homebuyers Insurance
Inc to Craig, for $92,500; list unknown.
3805 E Bay Dr., Holmes Beach, 11 Sunbow Bay
2, a bay front 2bed/2bath 1150 sfla condo built in
1978, was sold 5/2/95, Versage to Chaudhry, for
$120,000; list unknown.
405 Clark Lane, Holmes Beach, a ground level
1371 sfla 3bed/2bath/lcar home built in 1967 on a
90x110 lot, was sold 1/13/95, McCabe to Kirk, for
$132,000; list $134,900.
5300 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 310 Martinique
North, a 2bed/2bath Gulf front condo of 1092 sfla
built in 1971, was sold 5/1/95, Graves to Fox, for
$170,000; list unknown.
5400 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, 13-5400 Gulf Dr.
Condos, a ground floor 850 sfla 2bed/l&l/2bath condo
built in 1964, was sold 3/8/95, Mervenne & Koreja to

I VACATIONERS: |


Let me help you find the rental
property that will meet your
needs. Summer rentals now
available, single family homes
both near and on beach.
Please call today!
Sincerely,
Alice Zoller, Rental Agent


HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria Inc.


(941) 778-0426
420 Pine Av. Box 155
Anna Maria, FL 34216


Weingart, for $108,000; list $124-116,900.
6300 Flotilla Dr., Holmes Beach, 110 Shell Point, a
2bed/2bath 1200 sfla condo built in 1973, was sold 5/4/
95, Elton to Lowry, for $103,000; list $109,000.
6300 Flotilla Dr., Holmes Beach, 70 Shell Point, a
2bed/2bath 1200 sfla condo built in 1973, was sold 5/2/
95, Smith to Brock, for $93,000; list unknown.
790 North Shore Dr., Anna Maria, a 2 story 1787
sfla home of 3bed/2bath/lcp, built in 1930 & 1987 on
a 75x100 lot, was sold 5/2/95, Benz to Blackburn, for
$250,000; list $289,000.
1007 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach, 213 Summer
Sands, an elevated condo of 2bed/2&l/2bath, built in
1982 with 1,259 sfla, was sold 5/15/95, CKF Rentals
to Danza, for $138,000; list $146,900.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, 778-1222, exclusively for The Islander
Bystander. 1995






(941) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (941) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Betsy hills is pleased to
announce that Monica Reid has
joined her Anna Maria office as
a residential sales associate.
Involved in the local real estate
industry for the past 14 years,
SMonica has worked in the Anna
Maria Island market for over 10
years. She specializes in
residential sales on Anna Maria
Island and the Mainland. Please give her a call
anytime at the office 778-2291 or eves. 729-3333.
RL itndCyIj ctaiEiats -ofcri~ionao.
Spiclalzln.q in EJim tnE, r pEJwiccua-lirL[
Associates Alter Hours: Barbara A. Sato... 778-3509
Nancy Gulford... 778-2158 Monica Reid... 729-3333


E) xclusive
Waterfront
Eotatie
Video Collection


MLS R


If You Need
A Latitude
Adjustment
SCall Jennifer
Office: 778-7777

Eve: 795-2865



GULFSTREAM REALTY
Call Jennifer Jones,
REALTORD
eves 795-2865.
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217


GREAT INCOME PROPERTY: 6-plex, 3 buildings
(#1-2 efficiencies, #2-1 BR/1BA, #3- 3BR/1BA, 1BR/
1BA and 1 studio) on 2 building lots. All apartments
recently refurbished. Currently fully rented to annual
tenants. Just steps away from the Gulf. OWNER FI-
NANCING! POSITIVE CASH FLOW AFTER EX-
PENSES! Low maintenance for absentee ownership.
2707 & 2705 gulf drive, Holmes Beach, $350,000.
Call Michael Advocate 778-0608 eves.

au,


NEW LISTING KEY ROYALE BAYOU Stunning
refurbished two bedroom, two bath home with ex-
pansive water views near Intracoastal waterway.
Over 2300 square feet of open living area with 18 x
28 family room, breakfast nook that could be den or
office. Caged, heated pool, dock with boat lift, up-
dated top of the line appliances, custom window
treatments. Priced at $395,000. Please call Carol R.
Williams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.
NEIGHBORHOOD BAR/RESTAURANT in the City
of Cortez, 2 COP license, also licensed for package
store & take out food. Great potential. Real Estate in-
cluded. $149,000. Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
WHAT A RARE FIND! A two bedroom, two bath
condo in pristine condition. Tile floors, Berber carpet.
This has it all tennis, swimming, elevator, covered
parking, walk to new beach. Just move in and enjoy
the good life! $84.900. Call Marion Ragni for your
personal tour 778-1504 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-400-7413772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


L Ir


~.) i~Bn~


[sml is


r


I


m I.? w" bCfE






UIM1 PAGE 28 M JUNE 15, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Exceptional Service
Informal Approach
S. BARBARA TURNER
REALTOR@
778-7777 or 778-4399

Hlikatoa^ RV1rMI(X
T'bGULFSTREAM REALTY
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
1-800-894-9587


WAGNEQ EATYince 19

S 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
// Dave Moynihan............ 778-7976 Ed Oliveira .................. 778-1751
Bill Alexander .............. 778-0609 Jackie Jerome ............... 792-3226


TWO GREAT ISLAND VILLAGE CONDOS Spa- NEAT AND CLEAN Well-maintained 2BR/1.5BA
cious 2BR/2BA, top floor units in prime Holmes elevated one-half duplex with central Holmes Beach
Beach location. Open floor plans, lovely views, location. Great vacation spot, weekend get away, or
Large screened porches. Walk-in closets, two pools, rental. Quick walk to Bay or Gulf, shopping and
tennis courts, garage parking and steps to beach. schools. Priced at $72,500. Call Ed Oliveira.
From $109,900 to $119,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


. L .. ..


LAGOON VIEW from this 1BR/1BA Runaway
Bay unit with washer/dryer, extra closet space,
all new appliances and close to the pool. Across
the street from the beach, second home or great
rental with on-site rental management all for
$78,900. Call Ed Oliveira.

BAY VIEWS and
mouth of canal
frontage from deep
water lot in prime
Holmes Beach
location. Quiet
residential area within
walking distance to
beach. Priced at
$147,500. Call
Dave Moynihan
.' for details.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for these 2BR
direct Gulf front apartments in small ten-unit
complex with quiet Holmes Beach location.
Pool, wide sandy beach and walking distance to
shops and restaurants. Starting at $124,500.
Call Dave Moynihan for details.


APARTMENT MOTEL Five-unit Island apartment
motel, fully renovated and tastefully decorated. Lo-
cated across the street from beach. Complex in-
cudes 2 pools, courtyards, Jacuzzi and laundry. Of-
fered at $359,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


DICK MAHER
REALTOR*
778-6791
Dick has been a major
player in the Island Real Es-
tate Industry for over 10
years, and is one of Neal &
Neal's Top Producers
Call anytime for a consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325



SMPLY THE BES ,
f ISLAND VACATION
I DIFNTAI C I


USA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
Realty-inc 3101 Gun Dritv
Realty-inc. Holmes Beach, FL 34217










THE COCONUTS... Excellent rental with on-site
management. This 1 bedroom, 1 bath unit sleeps
six and is steps to the Gulf of Mexico and a
heated pool. #61035. $79,900. Call Carol Heinze,
evenings at 792-5721.
IMPERIAL HOUSE... This well kept Gulf to Bay
community offers a heated pool, clubhouse, pri-
vate fishing dock and 150' of deeded Gulf ac-
cess. Two bedrooms, 1 bath, turnkey furnished
and low maintenance fees. #60974. $89,900. Call
Carol Heinze, evenings at 792-5721.
KEY ROYALE... New listing. 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage. Immaculate, light, well appointed
home. Upgrade appliances. Attractive courtyard
and gardens. room for additions and pool.
WON'T LAST LONG AT $215,000. #64352. Call
T. Dolly Young, evenings at 778-5427.
LOT 50X107 West of Gulf Drive. 225'
to Gulf beach. Priced to sell fast at -
$165,000. #DY64092.
CONDOS-TURNKEY
Westbay Cove... 1bd, Iba, pool/
courtyard view, $85,900. #DY58710.
Martinique S... 3bd, 3ba, newly
decorated. Owner financing.
$196,900. #DY60737. -. r. '
Sun Plaza... 2bd, 2ba, with upgrades. T. Dolly Youn
Gulf view. $167,500. #DY63126. T. y
Restaurant-Gulf Dr/Beach view plus REALTOR/IMS
apartment. Furnished/equipment. Multi-Million Sales
$450,000. #DY52792. 778-5427
EXCELLENT INVESTMENT POTENTIAL...
Bayfront with boat dock! Neat
and clean, completely remod-
eled triplex. Three 1 bedroom
units within walking distance of
Gulf beaches and shopping.
#CH59444. $329,000.

Carol Heinze
REALTOR0/CRS
Multi-Million $ Club
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist
Karin Stephan
REALTOR" "
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Office: Mobile:
941-778-0766 941-350-5844
236 South Harbor Drive,
Anna Maria
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY,
JUNE 18,1-4PM
140 FEET OF BAYFRONTI Rare
bayfront home with million dollar
view. Fine investment. 2br, 2ba,
great for entertaining. $389,000.
.rudcrprt.spnor...ot arn






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 15, 1995 U PAGE 29 Fm3



ITMSFR AE 1 ES EVIE


SOFA BEDS good condition $25. 778-5405.
PACE SAVER electric cart. Battery charger and cart,
cover included. $600 OBO. Call 778-2961.
COPPER SIDE BY SIDE $150. White refrigerator $50.
Both run good! 778-5909 or 778-5840.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


HALF PRICE RUMMAGE SALE
Sat., June 17. 9 am 1 pm. St. Bernard Activity Cen-
ter. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.

GARAGE SALE Sat., June 17. 8-2. 539 67th St.,
Holmes Beach. Furniture, golf clubs and misc.

RENOVATION SALE Sat., June 17. 8-1. 210 76th St.,
Holmes Beach. Clothes, household items, furniture.
GARAGE SALE Sat., June 17. 8-2. 7402 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. Misc. household, odd & ends, book-
case, chest, sofa, etc.


LOST LONG HAIR white cat with blue eyes. Vicinity of
Walgreens. Cat is deaf. Reward offered. 778-2181.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. Motivated theme classes each month:
Salsa, 60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme,
etc. All classes include muscle conditioning. Classes
are: Tuesday & Thursday 7:00-8:00PM. For info call
Geri 779-2129.

WANTED WW II, Korea, Vietnam and other veterans
of Foreign War to join Island VFW Post. Call NOW! Bob
DeVane 778-4400.
Invest now! $10 will help save the Island and the bridge.
Pick up your stock certificate at The Islander Bystander.


'95 CHEVY S-10 Blazer. Burgundy, auto, air, PW, PB,
power locks, fully loaded & over $2,000 in after factory
extras. Only 10K miles. Just reduced to $21,000. Call
Anytime 320-0110.
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE to good island home. Looks good,
runs great, needs work on top. $1,500 firm. Call be-
tween 10 am and 2 pm, 792-1063.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything else
in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


GREAT OPPORTUNITY!
This property is unique in that it offers
a full apartment, five rental garages
and two retail/office locations. The
rental history is excellent and always
100% occupied. Well-maintained struc-
ture is designed so you may expand
the upstairs apartment. Versatile in that
the garages and offices are adaptable
to various small businesses. Asking
$275,000 and excellent owner financ-
ing. Call Marie Franklin.


SJ 1057
MARIE U IC. REAL ESTATE
FRAKL REALTY BROKER
'We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 836 Anna Maria. Florid 34218
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.

SPRING SALE NEW 1995 BOATS 20' Fiesta pon-
toon boat, 60 hp, loaded, fish or cruise, call for low
price. 17' Allison center console, "dealer cost" $3,995.
19' Gulfcraft center console "unbelievable" $3,295. 15'
Allison "salt water flats boat" w/40 hp galv. trailer,
loaded $6,995. 17' Pro-sports center console w/85
Yamaha Galv. trailer, loaded $10,995. 18' Tremblay
"pro-flats" lowest price ever $4,995. 19' Carolina Skiff
"hull only" special $2,595. 21' Carolina Skiff "hull only"
Special $3595. Capt. John's 792-2620.


SALES full or part time. Product for pools, hot tubs and
spas. Florida Corporation. Call 778-8650 for appointment.
LINE COOK IMMEDIATELY Rotten Ralph's 902 S. Bay
Blvd., Anna Maria. 778-3953.
PERSON TO RETYPE typewritten manuscript. Must
know Word Perfect. Use my computer. Compensation
plus good bonus. 778-6974.
MOTIVATED CLEANING PERSON 4hrs Saturday. 10
-2. Good pay. Must be reliable. 778-3143.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for beachfront motel. Part
time 15 to 20 hours per week. Some weekends. Ap-
ply at Sand & Sea Motel 2412 Gulf Drive., Bradenton
Beach. Mon Fri 10-2. Start immediately 778-2231.
UP TO $339.84 per week. Assembling products at
home. Call for complete details. 387-727 ext. 123.


EXPERIENCED BIG SISTER, graduate of Safe Sitters
course, has openings for baby sitting in Holmes Beach
area. Call 778-0511.
"FLAMINGO CAY" homeowners: Student seeking sum-
mer lawn mowing jobs! New equipment. Excellent ref-
erences. Avg. lawn $10. Jon Dandino at 794-6479.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults at adult day center,
through Manatee Council on Aging. Transportation
available. 748-6974."


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending
both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction & Design,
Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty,
Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Management and Annual &
Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Experience AND SmllesI


JUST LISTED!
This newly listed canal-front home is in one of
Anna Maria's finest neighborhoods. 2BR/2BA
with lots of living area. This home offers an ex-
pansive Florida room with peaceful Bay views.
Call today to see this fantastic Island Home!
What a buy at $279,900. Agnes Tooker eves at
778-5287 or Kathy Granstad eves at 778-4136.
LOVELY MODERN HOME
This 3BR/2BA home has it alll Vaulted ceil-
ings, large screened porch and boat dock.
Convenient Island area of newer homes.
Won't last long at $199,000. Call Ken Jack-
son eves at 778-6986 or Pat Jackson eves.
at 778-3301.

Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gul Drive PO Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Holmes Beach.
Now taking reservations for our summer program ages
2-10 yrs. Also a few openings for fall registration ages
2-6 yrs. Come by and visit with us. 778-2967.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

HANDYMAN carpentry, painting, plywood storm shut-
ters, repairs of all kinds. Commercial or residential. 25
yrs. exp. Call Rich 778-4881.
HURRICANE window tint cars, homes, boats. Hurri-
cane screen service, greenhouses etc. Pro music and
modeling, private parties by "Bash Buck and the
Babes." 795-6268.
MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
MOTHER OF 1 will sit for your child all day Friday-Sun-
day in my island home. References available. Pay ne-
gotiable. Contact Betty Jo 779-2038.

MASSAGE THERAPY pain relief, stress reduction,
neuromuscular massage therapy over 8 yrs experience.
Dan Goodchild LMT, NMT Island Therapy 779-1138.

1; BB1 1114 I4--.,
FREE FREE9* FREE

SUMMER JOB

ADS FOR KIDS

& BUSINESS
If you're under 16 years of age and looking for
work, or if you're a business willing to hire a teen
we've got a deal for you. Your classified ad
is free.
Just write up your ad, up to 21 words, and
fax, mail or bring it to The Islander Bystander
office. Deadline each week is Monday noon.
Your ad will run for up to three weeks free
under a special "Student Work" heading in The
Islander Bystander classified ad section.
Call 778-7978 for information. FAX copy to
778-9392. Stop in or mail: 5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 34217.


ANNA MARIA


LOT FOR


SALE

North end of island, near beaches. Price includes
state approved plans for a 3 bedroom/3 bath el-
evated new home that will have some beautiful wa-
ter views. $145,000. Call Peggy or Alice, 778-0426.

(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria, Inc.
420 PINEAVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778-1929


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2-car, 3,895
sq.ft. under roof home including caged pool. Unique
origami roof line and walled solarium. $265,000.


DOUG
DOWULING
REALTY
409 Pin.Av.
Anna Marll
778-1222


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


PIWi Z160 .IV Atdt I A I SZII: =SAI ti @IIC F W r.l-TNF I il &I 21-1. = -70 &II" P alN. IlFAM i tll STW


N RA Z I DIJ ZSj WA W '~ji & .aL, SA C Z11 IV-1. SW S-61CN S1:1AA






lKI PAGE 30 M JUNE 15, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


So6 Commercial Residential Free Estimates
I Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
I Lawin Hauling By the cutorbythe month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778-1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
___ AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
SRemodeling Service Calls
741-8900 RF-0066844

ALL ISLAND NEWS ... PURE AND SIMPLE!
Announcements of upcoming Island events are welcome
at The Islander... call us, fax us or write TWO WEEKS
IN ADVANCE. Call 778-7978, fax 778-9392 or write
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217.


IiIi 'IITI
State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


J.IL

Painting
*PJesur Cle Maning
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


Don't
forget to
enter the
horseshoe
contest!
Deadline:
June 16.
Form:
pagel6

ISLANDER
6 0Is 111a


SEVIESCtndENTLCniu


CLEANING SERVICE: Fast and complete cleaning.
Island resident, 25 years experience, references, hon-
est, guaranteed satisfaction! Free estimates. 778-4587.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Join our sum-
mer program. Swimming, field trips, movies, bowling,
more. Register for fall. 5, 3, or 2 day programs. $15 a
day. 778-2967.
GET PAID TO TRAVEL free! Paris, Tokyo, Maui or
anywhere you like...Absolutely free! Amazing recorded
message. 387-0727 ext. 121.
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk... whatever your hauling
needs. Call Eddie O. 792-1693.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody,
shampoo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm &
hall, $34.95. 11 years in the business. No hidden
prices. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK / GLASS BLOCK / stone / pavers / custom
homes / fireplaces / planters / decorative walls. Lic
#MC-00318. 778-5183.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.

THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of
home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experi-
ence. Insured, island resident, references available.
Jim 779-2129.

PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.

DON COLEMAN PAINTING Residential, commer-
cial, interior, exterior. Free estimates, 30 yrs experi-
ence. 778-2356.

LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard,
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.


GULF-FRONT beach house! Firecracker special on N.
Shore Drive in Anna Maria. 3BR/2BA in perfect condi-
tion. July 1 July 8, 1995. $900. 778-3171.
1,000 S.F. of Retail/Commercial space. 5508 Marina
Drive. Ask for Dennis, 778-3924.
ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views, 1BR, patio, pool, W/
D, furnished. Annual. 211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.

MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.
FURNISHED one and two bedroom rentals available
until December. $550 and $750/mo. Anna Maria Re-
alty, 778-2259.
ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.


PERICO BAY CLUB unfurnished 2BR/2BA, pristine
bayfront, carport, appliances. $850/mo plus $850 se-
curity. No pets. Prudential Florida Realty T. Dolly
Young 778-0766.
ANNUAL, 3BR/2.5BA, north end of island. $1,000/
month. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARTINIQUE CONDO 2BR/2BA direct ocean view,
pool, tennis court. Turnkey $1,500 plus electric and
phone. Will rent yearly 813-884-0222.
VACATION RESORT 66 by owner., weeks in June &
July, poolside $500, Beach front $600. 1-800-977-0803.
ANNUAL: 1BR/1BA unfurnished condo. Very nice.
Large garage with W/D. $550/mo. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-
7244 309 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
ANNUAL: 3BR/2BA unfurnished townhouse. Large 2-
car garage and storage. Comm. pool. North Beach Vil-
lage. $1,100/mo. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244 309 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria.
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA unfurnished home, caged pool on
canal with dock. Key Royale Dr. near Gloria Dei. Pet
OK. $1,400/mo. Available 7/1. 778-5405.
SEASONAL Gulf front bargain! Cute & cozy Florida
beach house. 2BR/2BA $400/wk. 1BR/1BA $300/wk.
Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244 309 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
SUMMER & FALL RENTALS direct Gulf-front, 2
week minimum. 3BR/2BA, pool, Jacuzzi, sauna,
tennis. 794-8877.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX 2BR/1BA, all appliances,
1.5 blocks to beach, available 6/1, $600/mo, annual plus
deposit. 778-5793.
CANALFRONT HOMi 3BR/2BA, 2 screened porches,
1 car garage, 1 carport. $1,300/mo includes lawn care.
Call Carla 778-0770.


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
* Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.


0OLIES
BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER


RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


STEAMS SEAR DAMO N MPAG 0
MAUU U L CIERIAIT IIVI E M A IR E D
OR GANS M A IGIA R ET IHRE E 0 D

| SoY N0CE T MEi T0RIST HU T DI I |GS
T ET N 0 V A S C 0 TIA RETT 0
WIN E 0 U I IN T I L BR IN IR
OBWIl U HR E E T E IR A R11 A O
PL I IO E E 0 S I tV E NEE C OS
TALERVEzT 0 A ZIE RSKY
SY L N I IC RE IM REL UT BC D
G E NT L 0 RIAIN P IT V 0 TIL.E
SPARSE B 0 VAMER S E EN LA

DY EN AC E U E0 F TR K ED
BR E 0 EINNLEDNIN L 0 N
I0 L GAP I PU U K ING N IIB
P 0 ITI 0 RANGE P E K 0 E EC 0
E9L E VENZ IN G N RG A Y F IS K Y
D0 YIE N A C C E N TUA T E F K E D
E IIR IN IS ~R E E 0 Y 1 L IE ID qmI IA I t I


The Island Property Maintenance Co.
* Complete property maintenance on a regular basis
* Inspections weekly or more
* Immediate repairs when necessary
* Weekly & monthly rates
* Written reports sent to you each month
* Insured, Island Resident, References
If you are planning to go back to cooler weather or live
here year round & need dependable maintenance...
Call 779-2129 Jim Travis


REMODELING
ADDITIONS
RENOVATIONS
XACT KITCHENS* BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly- utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.


-L I_






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 15, 1995 1 PAGE 31 E3


A SL A A DECLASSIFIED


CHARMING BAY FRONT vacation cottage. Beautifully
furnished and landscaped, private patio, steps to Gulf
beaches, fishing pier and historic village. $75/night.
$400/week. 779-1131.
HOLMES BEACH Gulf view from your balcony. 2BR apt.
turnkey fumished. Available now thru Dec. at off season
rates. 778-4638.
HOLMES BEACH nice 1BR/1 BA seasonal or annual.
Short walk to beach. 778-4368.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
from $400/wk. 778-1135.
VACATION RESORT 66 by owner, weeks in June &
July. Poolside $500, beach front $600. 1-800-977-0803.
GULF FRONT, one of a kind beach house, perfect, 3BR/
2BA, steps to water. Fall special, Sept-Nov, $600
weekly. (941) 778-3171.
GULF FRONT- Executive, 3BR/2BA, fumished, all ameni-
ties, view from every room, steps to water. 3 mo. lease
Sept-Oct-Nov, total $4,200 plus utilities. 778-3171.
COMMERCIAL SPACE available for lease. Suitable for
office or retail. Inquire Smith, REALTORS 778-0777.
ARE YOU PAYING RENT because you think you can't
qualify for a mortgage? Talk with Sandy Greiner RE/
MAX Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX very nice, 2/1, annual rental.
First, last, security. $625 mo plus utilities. 778-0217.
ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT Lovely furnished 2BR apt
w/porch, sundeck, microwave, A/C, cable. Weekly va-
cation. No pets. 778-3143.
ANNUAL & SEASONAL Beautiful north end charming
dream rentals. Several 1/1 & cozy 2/1. Excellent loca-
tion. Steps to gulf. Won't last. From $525. 778-2126.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
PRIVATE PARTY is looking to buy an island lot, rental
or income property with 10% down seller financing. Fax
info. to 414-332-4898.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of Anna
Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/3 acre
w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young after hours.
778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
INVEST! Several Island 2-plexes & 4-plexes available.
Get all the facts from Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX
Gulfstream, 778-7777.
DEEP WATER CANAL. Walk to beach from newly re-
modeled 4BR/2BA home, 222 Oak Ave., Anna Maria, by
owner. $219,500. 778-2681.


FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/1 BA
each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. 404
71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit $159,000.
* 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to Gulf -
$174,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
BRADENTON MAINLAND minutes from beaches.
Just off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community.
1400 s.f. villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1-car garage, new carpet,
paint, verticals, maintenance free living, $105,000.
Open house every Sat & Sun 1 4. 794-8792.
CROWDED in your present home? Take a look at this
4BR/2.5BA canal home with over 3,000 sq. ft. living
space and parking for 3 or more cars. Sandy Greiner
RE/MAX Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.

MOTEL MINDED? Going business with 6 income pro-
ducing units, heated pool & gorgeous courtyard. One
half block to beach in residential area. Priced to sell
$375,000. For additional information, call Connie L.
Carberry, Realtor. RE/MAX ACTION GROUP, INC.
800-735-4190 or 941-522-4122.

EAST MANATEE by owner. 12+/- acre Manatee Lake
frontage, 50' above sea level +/-, two fish ponds, cleared,
very private with a beautiful southern view and a 3BR The
Holiday House built by Jim Walter Home's furnished.
$110,000 on Bethany Road 1/8 mile +/- south from State
Road 64 on left side. Phone 322-1263 B. Plichter.

GORGEOUS GULF VIEW year old award winning cus-
tom built home. Heated pool, 2-car garage. Can be
used as 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 bath, Jacuzzi tub, fireplace,
completely furnished. Long term lease or will work with
qualified buyer on lease purchase. Owner financing.
941-778-3777 or 941-965-2158.

ITS HARD TO FIND a canal front home under
$200,000 and this one is a peach! Nicely remodeled
with nothing left to do except move in. 2BR/2BA plus
den, garage, 2 decks, boat dock and great view out
open end of canal. Only $189,900 including home war-
ranty and furniture. Call Sandy Greiner RE/MAX
Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.
WESTBAY POINT AND MOORINGS ground floor
condo with owner financing. Call Sandy Greiner RE/
MAX Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.
LOOKING TO OWN a piece of paradise under
$100,000? Call Sandy Greiner RE/MAX Gulfstream
Realty 778-7777.
QUADRAPLEX FOR SALE 1 1 bedroom, 2 2 bed-
rooms, 1 2 bedroom / 2 bath. 778-5814.
GULF FRONT LOT for sale. 200' deep, 110' on Gulf.
778-5814.
LARGE 3/2 HOME on extra large lot. Family room with
fireplace, screened lanai, barrel tile roof, split bedroom
design, much more. Located in good south county
neighborhood. $114,500. Yvonne Higgins Re/Max
Gulfstream 778-7777.


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
SEROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RCOM45125 *RGOOSaa* PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins- Since 1991

KAREN CLERKIN
Independent Sales Representltive
778-8624
Gift Certificates Available
AVO n Fundraisers Skin So Soft on hand

SPack &GShip
ns We pick-up We deliver
delicate heirlooms to large fumiture
SUNSHINE SHIPPING 727-7447

VO LESSONS
VO I CE* COACHING
/) AUDITION
E. Burkly PREP
778-0720 SOLFEGIO


Mobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
MLS As Low As $1,500 Down
Experienced Thoughtful
941-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


BEACH RENTALS
SBikes Cribs Beds
Mobile Services:
Free Delivery & Pick-up
24-Hour Service
778-6438


Personal Fitness

TRAINING ERI
S 4. One On One In Your Home
V Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
: V Fitness & Nutritional Guidance
V Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
V Deep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises
Geri Travis7792
B.S., Ph. Ed., Fitness Specialist 779-2129





QUAIT CpoE,

792-5767.

CalDo o AFeeWite stmt


Raiy-eaonis ea CllNo
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


CLASSIFIED AD FORM
DEADUNE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person and
paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL
34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional
words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. To
place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry, we can
not take classified ad copy over the telephone.
USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: (For 21 word minimum, use one word for each blank space)



2

3

THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER

Run issues)
Amt. pd Date Ck. No. Cash


iISLANDE fRation: 77
More information: 778-7978


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"







10 PAGE 32 a JUNE 15, 1995 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Y CAPTAIN, MY CAPTAIN 2 13 14 16 7 HO8 9 110RTZ11112 13114 1 0158 i1
BY CORAL AMENDE / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 20 1 1 12111 111 1 1 22


ACROSS
1 "Little" person
7 Qualifies
15 Calyx division
20 To land
21 Brownish-
yellow to the
extreme
22 Astronaut
Schirra
23 "I may be--
but.."
24 Captain Kirk
26 Excommuni-
cates
27 Binders
28 Say it's so
29 Whole
32 Peter of rock's
Kiss
34 Clever remark
36 Ancient X
37 San--, Italy
38 Cookout fare
39 Other
43 Captain America
48 --flow
turbine
49 Suffix with
magnet or
meteor
50 Grew aware of
51 Once more or no
more
52 Lick
53 Common side
dishes


55 Waiting period,
seemingly
56 Captain Bligh
58 Moon
phenomenon
59 Novelist-
Easton Ellis
60 Scratches (out)
61 "Old
MacDonald"
syllables
62 Kind of name
64 Happy as a lark
65 Less happy
69 Nanny's charge
70 Green scene
72 Hires a crew,
perhaps
74 Linen hue
75 Captain Hook
79 Health care
lobby, for short
80 Aunt Jemima or
Uncle Ben's, e.g.
81 Subject of "The
Last Command"
82 Put up
83 Brio
85 Not dawdle
86 Orbiter
(1960's craft)
87 Captain Nemo
90 Barbra's "Funny
Girl" co-star
91 So-so
92 Sports org.
93 Bundle of money
94 Be behind
96 Days-old
97 Muffs


101 Less of a
struggle
104 It should be even
105 Pocket liner
106 "Captain Blood"
111 Manifest
113 Docked, in a
way
114 Without a doubt
115 Bygone flag
symbol
116 Keeps in
117 "Mean Streets"
director .
118 Whole bunch
DOWN
1 Browning's
"- Ben Ezra"
2 Flu variety
3 Obsolescent
contraction
4 Famed
horseman
5 "Be" conjugate
6 Forewent
7 Connections in
old Rome
8 Fluff
9 Cheated on
10 Denture part
11 Tots: Var.
12 Take away, in a
way
13 Double-hook
shape
14 Erwin of old TV
15 Fab
16 Captain Cook
17 Balletic bend
18 Sleep like--


19 Swan's
neighbor, in the
night sky
25 Is friendly, with
"around"
30 1988 Tim Rice
musical
31 It comes after
Easter
32 Fictional
mariner from
York
33 Word in a
street-corner
sermon
34 "The Divine
Comedy"
creatures
35 "Stop it!"
38, Vaudeville
offering
40 Manchurian
river
41 Settled
42 Actress Sommer
43 Baryshnikov, to
friends
44 Road-
45 Shuts up
46 Mortimer the
dummy
47 It's never played
in school
48 Of equal size
54 Captain Queeg
56 Schnozzes
57 Cravings
59 Early English
historian
63 Student's
declaration.
maybe


64 "Good -!"
65 Cost --and...
66 Airline exec
Carl
67 "Sesame Street"
regular
68 More of a boor
70 It may be
mechanical
71 About
72 Repairman's
reading


73 Marine biology
subject
75 Stick: Sp.
76 Styptic
substance
77 1934 film
seductress
78 Kenyan
native
80 Lord of poetry
83 Step up
84 Breaches


88 "ER" sights
89 Emphatic type
91 Croft
95 Splits
96 Passover feast
98 Stoolies
99 Tom or Sam. e.g.
100 Bluish-gray
101 Report card
woes
102 Got off


103 Au!d !ang -
104 Instrument with
13 strings
107 Mini-albums, for
short
108 Varnish base
109 Metric volumes:
Abbr.
110 "Yes, sir!"
111 Wordless
-communication
112 Through


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


.. -~. ..-,,---- ,.... .
..- -- -.-. _- ,--- '-- _ .
"ii1 . I.. -." ....'' '"' -' % -?- " .- r-. 'h"
- -.... ... ..'".'... . ..-" "'" '
T' - j-
-- -' _-___._

-_~ :i .. j-,' , i :",,. -' "= t '_ 'k ..
..
. ,. ,
iV2 a.s
i'. n.. :-- .- '- .:-; .. _.-- .". . ., ..... - -. :' . -'-.. --. ,
: z '_' l : ; :.._.' .;..,. . ..
.. .. 1 ........ ...... -. .. .: .... =. ... -- -.- ;i : ,=: o1 -,. = ,.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME
$249,000. This charming 2 bedroom 2
bath home is nearly new. Elevated, open
plan, over 2100 sq. ft. Bay view, close to
the beach. Many upgrades and elevator,
too. Call Janis Van Steenburgh 778-4796.


PREMIER ISLAND LOCATION 1
bedroom, 1 bath overlooking heated
pool. Lush landscape, excellent price
$79,900. Westbay Cove Condo. Call Bob
or Lu Rhoden 778-2692.

* IB


Evelyn K.
Mithcell
REALTOR@
Associate
778-1952


Evelyn moved to Anna Maria Is-
land in 1976 and has been in Real
Estate Sales since 1981.

She would be very happy to talk to
you about buying or selling Real
Estate.


CORNER LOT on quiet secluded street
in Holmes Beach. Cozy, appealing, and in
immaculate condition. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
tile roof, oversized 2 car garage, screened
porch, room for a pool. $149,900. Call
John Green 778-3167.










DIRECT GULF VIEW. On a clear day
you can see all the way to the North end
of the Island. 2 bedrooms 2 bath, up-
graded and updated throughout.
$250,000. Call Bobye Chasey 778-1532.


i _- I-. L.- i 3 .. "





COQUINA BEACH CLUB 2 bed-
room, 2 bath directly overlooking wide
beach. Gorgeous sunsets. Turnkey fur-
nished. Great rental opportunity.
$185,000. Call Dick Maher, or Dave
Jones. 778-6791 or 778-4891.

.r. .. ia -q n;II4- .. ria


EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2BA
just a short walk from DeSoto Square
Mall, on a lake with winding paths. Cov-
ered parking, all appliances. $62,900.
Call Paul Martin. 794-0049.


PERICO BAY CLUB

831 Audubon Dr. ................... ............. $120,000
870 Audubon Dr ........................ ...........$99,900
876 Audubon Dr............... .. ............. ...... $83,400
1105 Edgewater Circle ................ .$126,500
1241 Edgewater Circle .......................... $139,900
706 Estuary Dr. .......................................... $89,900
1341 Perico PI. Cir ................................. $163,000
1115 Roseate Court ...... ........................ $142,900
509 Sanderling Circle ............................ $129,900
513 Sanderling Circle ..... ...................... $129,900
1261 Spoonbill Landings ....................... $149,900
7, -. .'
'., ,I-'
[.: ,, -. ,_ . _ _ ....:, ..


PLAYA ENCANTADA Turnkey fur-
nished Tennis-side with all the ameni-
ties of Gulf-side complex. Heated pool
& spa, clubhouse, on-site manager,
covered parking. $124,900. Call Helen
White 778-6956.


PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA 2nd floor
unit. View of large lake and lush landscap-
ing. Swimming pool, lighted tennis courts,
clubhouse, sidewalks, convenience.
$83.400. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-7780.


-:. I -*i '-^ ._, ,--'- '- '-- '" l ; t


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

SWeekly Rentals From $450

ANNUAL RENTALS
S, Perico Bay Club from $700 mo.
2501 Gulf Drive 1/1 with den
& Gulf view $700 mo.


Julie
Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


. . .. .. .. . . .. .... ... -- r^^^ .^ .^r ... ==. ... -, . . ..... : -''A.^ ^ '3

i' -:,.! -Z :'- *,a..-- ,6B gf a;'.;- :..-,-. ^ i"--' --: : -,. -_ -, . .-- . .".; . '.. :,. .........-^h S^ ; j -. J. ^ a a a e~i J -^- . - - ^ .-- .. .... .^- ..... ..-^ -.-- ...,;':-.---.,- ^ '
5 -- rr~r~_~t~ ~I:L I-XI
31. -


Ir I