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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00570

Full Text


JUNE 8, 1995


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Stop light proposal stopped at Coquina Beach


By Paul Roat
Manatee County Commissioners listened to Island-
ers Tuesday and agreed not to install a traffic signal at
the Coquina Beach-Gulf Drive intersection in
Bradenton Beach.
The traffic signal was opposed by Bradenton
Beach Mayor Katie Pierola, the city's police chief, Jack
Maloney, and Longboat Key Police Chief Wayne


Bradenton Beach

Marina permits

issued
Allan Bazzy has received permits to expand the
Bradenton Beach Marina and work on the project is
expected to begin soon.
Building Official Whitey Moran told The Islander
Bystander he had issued five permits for the marina
project. Those permits will allow work on the interior of
the existing building, construction of a new enclosed stor-
age shed, a new dock into Anna Maria Sound (pending
state environmental agency approval), site work includ-
ing a parking lot and both on- and off-site signage.
Bazzy plans to spend more than $1 million to reno-
vate the marina, located just south of the Cortez Bridge.
The lengthy process involved with the permit issuance
last week included:
Appearing before the Bradenton Beach Planning
and Zoning Board, which recommended approval of
the project;
Appearing before the Bradenton Beach City
Council, which rejected his proposal;
Taking the council's rejection to court on grounds
that it was an improper decision, where a circuit court
judge ruled the city should approve the project;
Taking the court decision back to the city coun-
cil, which approved the expansion;
Requesting and receiving variances for signs,
setbacks and height for the marina.
Highlights of the marina renovation and expansion
effort include construction of a 200-by-80-foot boat
storage shed. The 34-foot-high shed will be constructed
in an "old town" architectural style, complete with
porches, windows and peaked roof.
The existing boat storage racks on the north side of
the property will be removed. Marine repair facilities
will be relocated on that site, and extensive landscap-
ing is proposed around the perimeter of the property.
Bazzy has also filed suit in federal court against 19
residents in the city for speaking out against his project
Preliminary hearings on that case were held Monday.


McCammon due to the likelihood of increased traffic
snarls as beachgoers leave the Island.
Commissioners agreed to a raised median and
landscaping in the area. County staff will present the
final plans to the Bradenton Beach City Council for
review before work starts. No date for construction is
scheduled, although funding for the project could be-
come available later this summer.


County engineers had recommended a traffic signal
as an option for the area. A special task force charged with
studying much of Gulf Drive had recommended a traffic
circle, or roundabout, for the intersection last year.
Bradenton Beach City Council members unani-
mously approved a resolution objecting to the light and
urging some other alternative to a traffic light at the
beach be investigated last month.


I I
Privateers Kids' Day is Saturday
The Anna Maria Island Privateers will sponsor the
41st annual Snooks Adams' Kids' Day from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 10, at Bayfront Park in
Anna Maria. Free food, fun, games and prizes will
be included. Former Holmes Beach Police Chief
Adams, right, accepts honors from Privateers
President Andy Toombs at last year's festivities.
Islander Photo: Courtesy of Charlotte McKelvey.


FEMA official

to answer

questions Friday

in Anna Maria
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Brad Loar of the loss prevention department of the
Federal Emergency Management Agency will be at
Anna Maria City Hall on Friday, June 9, at 2 p.m.
Loar will give a one-hour presentation, then re-
spond to questions from the audience. The forum was
planned for contractors, builders and residents doing
remodeling, but all residents with questions are invited.
Written questions may be submitted in advance to the
city clerk and Loar will respond to them at the forum.


HURRICANE ALLISON BRUSHES ISLAND


S.. ..-. .




Hurricane Allison spared the Island -
and much of the state -from any real
. damage Monday but did provide an
early wake-up call for all residents to
the dangers of the summer hurricane
season. Beginning as an area of low
pressure off Mexico last week, the
storm quickly became a named
tropical storm and, on Sunday, a
hurricane with more than 75 mph
winds. Damage to Anna Maria Island
was slight, with downed tree branches,
heavy surf and beach erosion provid-
ing most of the damage reports.
Hurricane season lasts until Novem-
ber. Pictured above is Dave
Westerman checking the beach
erosion along Holmes Beach near
75th Street Monday. At left is an
awash boat in Anna Maria Sound.
Islander Photos: David Futch
and Paul Roat


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ..................................... ............ 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Retiring .................................... ............. 10
Turtle Watch............................................. 12
Streetlife ................................... ............ 18
Coastlines ............................................. 19
Fishing...................................... ............. 20
Anna Maria tides ........................................... 21
School Daze............................................. 22
Real estate .............................................. 23
Crossword puzzle...................................... .. 28


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND








IID PAGE 2 0 JUNE 8, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Pierola seeks discussion of 1991 beach parking fees


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola recently
revived her request for beach parking fees to generate


The third annual Fishing the Islands Tourna-
ment sponsored by Island Discount Tackle of
Holmes Beach will take to the waters Saturday, June
17. Profits from the event will be donated to the
Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Fishing the Islands is an all-species tournament
with winners determined by a point system. The
first-place award will be $5,000.
Keeping the flavor of a two-day tourney, fish-
ing may begin at 6:30 a.m., with weigh-in open un-
til midnight.
With that schedule, says tourney chairman Bill
Lowman, "Boats can fish offshore until dark and


money for beach improvements and renourishment.
Pierola first made the request for breach parking
fees in 1990. In January 1991, Manatee County offi-
cials presented the following plan designed to gener-


still have 4 or 5 hours to get to the weigh-in station,
or backwater fishermen can try under the lights for
those big trout and snook."
A captain's meeting will be held at the Commu-
nity Center on Friday, June 16. At least one repre-
sentative from each boat must attend. The Center
will also host a barbecue banquet starting at noon
Sunday, June 18.
The entry fee will be $170 per boat through
June 10, $200 after that date. Up to five people per
boat will be permitted.
For registration and information, call Island
Discount Tackle at 778-7688.


oESA to wid


Enter KINSA to win.


1995 Official Rules:
1) The Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards (KINSA)
contest is strictly for amateur photographers An Amateur
Photographer is anyone who derives less than 5% of their income
from photography.
2) International winners will be selected by an independent panel
of judges based on some or all of the following criteria human
interest, general appeal, uniqueness, composition and quality
Kodak reserves the right to reject entries that are considered harmful
or offensive Decisions of the judges will be final. International
Judging will take place October 16, 17, 1995. eligible entries must
have been received from the sponsoring newspaper and postmarked
no later than August 25,1995.
3) Black-and-white and color photographs taken alter January 1, 1993,
are eligible. This allows lor a two-year eligibility Photos previously
published or entered in any KINSA or other competitions are not
eligible.
4) Entrants are permitted to submit pictures to only one newspaper
participating in the KINSA contest.
5) Snapshots may be taken with any make of camera, but all entries must
be taken on Kodak film AND printed on Kodak paper. No retouching
or other alteration (except cropping) is permitted of negatives or prints;
no composite pictures or multiple printing can be submitted.
6) Entrant's name and address must be written clearly, in ink. on the back
of each print or transparency mount. Mail entries to the KINSA Contest
Editor, care of this newspaper
7) Entrants by their entry agree that the Newspaper may publish their pictures
for local promotion of the contest. Entrants must be able to furnish the
original negative or transparency, it requested, by the Contest Editor. All
photos submitted become the property of the sponsors and none will be
returned The sponsors assume no responsibility for negatives, transparencies,
or prints
To be eligible for the Intermaional Judging of the KINSA contest, each entrant
must irsl satisfy the requirements of the local Sponsoring Newspaper, e.g
be a local winner, and must then sign a Prize Winner's Agreement. Thi
Agreement attests the photo was taken by the entrant and assigns to Easlmal,
Kodak Company the original negalive/transparency of their picture. It grants
Eastman Kodak Company and other with Kodak's consent, he exclusive ..
right to copy and use the picture, in whole or part, for any purpose r ,'
(including advertising, display, and publication) for at least five (5)
years; and to use tlhe entrant's name and likeness in connection with
any use of the picture, or with any promotion of this or any other contest.
Entrant must know the names and addresses of any recognizable persons ap- .,,,,.j .,
the picture. In order to be a local winner and to be eligible, entrant must prc. r. II, i.,-
consent of such persons) to permit use of the picture by Kodak and other .,.. i ,,if
consent, for any purpose including advertising, display, and publication. By sE. ,, ..y I. I
Winner's Agreement, entrant also agrees that the picture, or another closely similar picture
of the same subject or situation has not, and will not be entered in any other contest and will
not be offered for publication elsewhere. Failure to sign and return the Agreement within 20
days of its receipt may result in forfeiture of the local prize and selection of a new winner.
8) Cash prizes totaling $52,500 will be awarded in International Judging as follows.
Grand Prize $10,000
2 First Prizes $5,000 each
2 Second Prizes $3,000 each
2 Third Prizes $2,000 each
50 Honor Awards $250 each
200 Special Merit Awards $50 each
Honor Awards may include the Categories of:
SAbstract Still Life
Landscape & Scenic Humor
SSpecial Moments Grown-ups
SCandids Action
Animals Portrait

ISLIANDERi
In addition to suggested KINSA categories, The Islander
Bystander judges will look for pictures with an Anna Maria
Island theme and a depiction of the Island's July 4 holiday.


9) Employees and Iheir immediate family members ol participating newspapers, of Eastman Kodak
Company, and of its subsidiaries are not eligible to enter the contest For he purpose of this
contest, immediate family is anyone residing in the same household
10) Any taxes on prizes are the sole responsibility ol the winners. Any cash prize won by a minor
will be awarded to a parent or guardian Prize rights are not Iransferable.
11) This contest is void where prohibited and subject to all applicable laws and regulations.
12) Additional local rules (if any)'


Entries may be delivered or postmarked by the deadline date
to: The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, FL 34217 Information: 778-7978
Entry Deadlines:
June 22 Issue / Deadline June 16, 5 p.m.
June 29 Issue / Deadline June 23, 5 p.m.
July 6 Issue / Deadline June 30, 5 p.m.
July 13 Issue / Deadline July 7, 5 p.m.
July 20 Issue / Deadline July 14, 5 p.m.
July 27 Issue / Deadline July 21, 5 p.m.


-OA (Inte~rnaiorT~nal.Nespapr S 1napshot Awrds


Fishing the Islands

Tourney is June 17


ate $291,250 annually from parking fees at Coquina
Beach:
Approximate annual visitors = 1,000,000
At three person per auto = 333,000 auto visits
Residents comprise 33 percent of auto visits =
111,000
50 percent of residents purchase annual passes =
55,000
Average of 20 visits by pass holders = 2,750
passes
2,750 passes at $5 each = $13,750
Parking fees at $1 for 277,500 visitors = $277,500
$13,750 + $277,500 = $291,250.
The county plan figured $165,000 in operational
costs including $100,000 for personnel, supplies and
printing and $65,000 for additional park maintenance.
This would leave an annual net revenue of $126,000.
At that time, the parking fee revenues were to be
used to fund a three-phase beach improvement plan at
a cost of $1,565,000. However, some of the improve-
ments recommended in that plan, such as plantings and
walkovers, have already been completed as part of the
beach renourishment.
Pierola plans to ask the county to discuss its 1991
plan at a future meeting of the Coalition of Barrier Is-
land Elected Officials.



Picture-takers,

take note: contest

with big pay-off
Any local amateur photographer who enters the
upcoming contest sponsored by The Islander By-
stander could win as much as $10,000 in the 1995
Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards
(KINSA).
The 60-year-old amateur photo competition is re-
puted to be "the largest annual amateur photo contest."
It offers 257 cash awards, totaling $52,500.
The local photo contest, which will send eight
photos to the international judging, will run six weeks.
Weekly winners, as well as the eight finalists, will re-
ceive local prizes from Kodak, The Islander Bystander
and others to be announced.
According to Eastman Kodak Company, previous
KINSA winners have been snapped by picture-takers
as young as seven and as old as seventy-something.
(There are no age limits!)
Winning photos have emerged from all kinds of
cameras from the simplest to the most sophisti-
cated. The experience level of the person clicking the
shutter button has ranged from as little as two months
to more than 50 years.
Photos taken since Jan. 1, 1993, are eligible to
compete in KINSA'95. Entries can be black-and-white
or color snapshots but must be taken with Kodak film
and printed on Kodak paper.
In addition to suggested KINSA categories, The
Islander Bystander judges will look for pictures with
an Anna Maria Island theme and a depiction of the
Island's July 4 holiday.
The contest which runs for six weeks will begin on
June 22 and end July 27. Complete rules and entry
forms are available from The Islander Bystander,
5408 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217. If you
are unable to come to the office you may request an
entry form by sending The Islander Bystander a
stamped, self-addressed envelope but remember, we
sponsor the local contest only.
Deadline for each week's contest is 5 p.m. on Fri-
day preceding the weekly Thursday issue date. Dead-
line for the issue week of June 22 is June 16. Deadline
for the issue week of June 29 is June 23 and so on until
the final issue of July 27, deadline July 21.
Local winners will be published weekly following
the deadline for each week's entries.
Entries judged best at the end of the contest will
be forwarded to Kodak for international judging where
your photo will win $50 if it simply attracts the atten-
tion of one of five judges.
If The Islander Bystander's winner becomes one
of the top 57 photos, it's assured of winning at least
$250. The top seven awards include $2,000, $3,000,
$5,000 and, yes, $10,000 for Best of Show!






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 U PAGE 3 I[


Think about thinking next week


By Paul Roat
The history of every major civilization tends to pass
through three distinct and recognizable phases, those of
Survival, inquiry and Sophistication, otherwise known as
the How, Why and Where phases. Thefirstphase is char-
acterizedby the question "How can we eat?", the second
by the question "Why do we eat?" and the third by the
question "Where shall we have lunch?"
Douglas Adams (slightly paraphrased)
Ditch digging in the heat of August or mullet
shucking in the face of an icy northerly is hard work,
but Ben Johnson is challenging people to do what may
be the hardest task of any human:
He wants us to think.
Dr. Johnson, a Holmes Beach resident, is the mov-
ing force behind the Sarasota Thinks Festival June 11-
17. The point of the festival is to "develop, encourage,
recognize and celebrate good thinking," he says.
There will be 190 "thinking events" taking place
during the week, with more than 250 different present-
ers or thinkers involved in myriad programs aimed at
challenging people to consider more than just "where
shall we have lunch?"
"According to nearly every poll or survey taken
lately, we are rapidly becoming a nation of nitwits,"
Johnson says. "All of us, but especially our children,
are moving rapidly and happily toward 'dumb and
dumber,' a dumbing down of thinking, planning, learn-
ing, reasoning and creating.
"It is apparent to most of us that our children don't
value good thinking, not because they are not being
taught to think in school, but because they don't value
good thinking, but because they don't see examples or
models of good thinking being celebrated and rewarded
in the community," Johnson continues.
"As far as they are concerned, the people who
make the world go around are rock stars, movie stars
and professional athletes. We need to remind children
somehow that is the thinkers, the nerds, the intellectu-
als, the brains, the inventors, the creative, the logical,
the thoughtful who have given us world leadership."
Johnson said he sees good thinking taking place in
the schools, but it is a practice that is not carried over


into the community. To bring a greater community
emphasis on the practice of thinking, Sarasota Thinks
will bring some intellectual heavyweights to the area.
Among the talent participating in the thoughtful
festival is:
Gen. William Westmoreland, June 11, 7:30 p.m.,
Robarts Arena, Ringling Blvd., Sarasota;
Dr. Joyce Brothers, psychologist, June 12, 7:30
p.m., Robarts Arena, Ringling Blvd., Sarasota;
Brian Mattimore, business innovation consultant,
June 13, 7:30 p.m., Robarts Arena, Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota;
Dr. William Renfro, futurist, June 14, 7:30 p.m.,
Robarts Arena, Ringling Blvd., Sarasota;
Marilyn vos Savant, columnist and highest
known global IQ holder, June 15, 7:30 p.m., Robarts
Arena, Ringling Blvd., Sarasota;
Dr. Robert Jarvik, artificial heart inventor, June
16, 7:30 p.m., Robarts Arena, Ringling Blvd., Sarasota;
Dr. Richard Paul, Center for Critical Thinking
and Moral Critique director, June 17, Pine View
School, Sarasota.
Tickets for the speakers are $2.50 or $3.50. For
ticket information, call 955-5405. Johnson said tickets
will not be available at the door for the lectures.
The events range from the bizarre to the sublime. For
example, Selby Five-Points Park in downtown Sarasota
will be transformed for several days into a speaker's fo-
rum where anyone can climb onto their own soapbox -
literally and vent their rage against anything.
There will be contests and games to allow the creative
juices to flow. Health and wellness forums will offer cre-
ative approaches to feeling better. State officials and work-
ers including lottery secretary Marcia Mann will
attend a day-long forum titled "Sarasota Thinks About
Florida," with representatives from more than 30 differ-
ent state agencies represented to answer questions about
anything from taxes to the environment.
There's even a session on teaching computer illiter-
ates how to become computer geniuses sort of- and
explain the workings of electronic and silicon brains.
For information about the events, Johnson said
there is a special "thinking" hotline that can give call-


ers as much detailed information about what is happen-
ing and where as anyone could want.
The "Think Line" is a computerized phone system
that allows callers to get maps faxed to them for events,
receive program information, leave messages for the
speakers and even comment on what they liked or
didn't like about "Sarasota Thinks."
The "Think Line" number: 954-4699.
As Johnson sums up the week of thought:
"We need to look for occasions to point out good
thinking at work in our community and use every op-
portunity to identify, honor, celebrate and reward re-
flective, disciplined, logical thinking whenever we
see it."



Anna Maria City
6/7, 10:30 a.m., Homecoming Committee
6/9, 2 p.m., FEMA representative to respond to
residents' questions
6/13, 7:30 p.m., Commission work session

Bradenton Beach
6/8, 7 p.m., Council meeting
6/13, 1 p.m., Council meeting
6/15, 1 p.m., Pre-construction meeting on city
pier revetment with Army Corps of Engineers

Holmes Beach
6/13,2 p.m., Planning Commission
6/13, 5 p.m., Equity Study Commission

Of Interest
6/12, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Commission,
Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
S6/13, 10 am., Citizens' Advisory Committee to
Island Transportation Planning Organization,
Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
6/14, 10 am., Island Emergency Operations
Center, Fire Station 1, 6001 Marina Drive,


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EB PAGE 4 a JUNE 8, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Civic association to

co-sponsor Citizens

Police Academy
The Holmes Beach Civic Association voted to
co-sponsor the Citizens' Police Academy being
offered by the Holmes Beach Police Department.
The academy will give residents an inside look at
police procedures.
Classes will be held one night a week at the au-
ditorium at the Anna Maria Elementary School,
said Police Chief Jay Romine. Classes will be two
hours per night and run for eight weeks.
Applications for the academy are now available
at the Holmes Beach Police Department, 5901 Marina
Dr. Class size is limited to 20 participants age 18 and
older with preference given to city residents and busi-
ness owners. There will be a fee for materials.


Donations help
beautify Anna
Maria bayfront
New and repainted benches
thanks to area Lions clubs
and palm trees from the
Bradenton Kiwanis Club on
Better Manatee Day are
helping to spruce up
bayfront stretches on either
side of the Anna Maria City
Pier. Mayor Dorothy
McChesney said a special
thanks goes to the city's
public works employees for
their tree arrangements.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


Bradenton Beach residents offer goals for city


By Paul Roat
Sidewalks to beach clean-up, citywide central plan-
ning to a sense of community those goals and more
came from a series of workshops among citizens, commu-
nity leaders and council members in Bradenton Beach.
The sessions were geared to provide council mem-
bers with an idea of what the citizens of the city want
from their city. Council members will meet June 7 at
1 p.m. to discuss the matter and, it is expected, trans-
late what goals are possible into reality in the next
year's budget cycle.
Councilman John Kaufmann came up with the
idea of the goal-setting workshops. He was lauded
by Mayor Katie Pierola for the sessions. "This is the
first time any of the Island cities have conducted this
sort of thing," Pierola said.
Anna Maria Island Community Center Director
Pierrette Kelly urged council members and the public
to attend the task force meeting Thursday, June 8, to
discuss the Islandwide needs assessment survey con-
ducted by the Center.
Kelly said the survey identified a number of con-
cerns among Islanders. In no particular order, she said
Island residents perceived needs included accessible
public transportation, affordable medical care, drug and
alcohol counseling programs, affordable recreational
opportunities and fear of being a victim of a crime.
"There are about 3,000 people involved in programs
at the Center," Kelly said, "yet only 700-800 are from
Bradenton Beach. The problem is transportation to the
Center, and we're looking at doing more programs here
in conjunction with the Tingley Memorial Library."
Anna Maria Island Historical Society past presi-
dent Carolyne Norwood decried the lack of participa-
tion in the Society by Bradenton Beach.
"No one in Bradenton Beach is an active member
of the historical society," she said. "Bradenton Beach
is the oldest city and had the Island's first and only
bridge," Norwood said, "and we would like more in-


formation on Bradenton Beach in our museum."
Bradenton Beach Business Association's Emily
Anne Smith said council members should place their
emphasis in the coming years on aesthetics and beau-
tification of the city.
"Beauty pleases and satisfies a great many senses,"
she said. "Beauty affects behavior and attitude."
Smith's ideas for city goals included developing a
concept for Bradenton Beach. "We have started with
palm tree-lined streets," she said. "Try to imagine a
change in Bradenton Beach to a well-kept, completely
cleaned right of way with trees lining all the streets,
with a network of sidewalks along every street."
Smith also urged the city council find the money
to complete all the phases of remodeling of the city
fishing pier at Bridge Street, coordinated architectural
designs for all the city buildings, an open-air pavilion
to provide a gathering point for city residents, creation
of a Gulf pier and pavilion there with rental space for
shops and renovation of the Harvey Memorial Church.
Kay Hoey, representing Bridgeport condominium,
said the city is unique for its climate and ambience and
has a "terrific potential."
She said the city is suffering from a noise problem.
"Night noise is now intolerable," Hoey said, with loud
radios in cars blasting through the city at all hours of
the day and night. She urged the city council set forth
a goal of additional police presence to serve as a deter-
rent to noise.
"We have people willing to spend $2,000 a month
to rent here, but they don't come back because of the
loud noise," Hoey said.
Dick Griffin, representing the Moose Lodge, of-
fered the meeting facilities at the lodge for any group
wishing to utilize the space. He commended the mayor
and council for their efforts to improve Bradenton
Beach, adding "this city has come a long ways."


Connie Drescher, representing the Pines Trailer Park,
said more and more people are walking or riding bikes in
the city, yet there is a lack of sidewalks citywide. "The
sidewalks that are there are in terrible disrepair," she said,
"and I'd like to see wider sidewalks, too."
She said the city has two "beautiful children's
parks with nice equipment, but there are no benches, no
place for grandparents with rickety bones to sit" '
Drescher also said she would like to see the golden
thorn tree near the city fishing pier preserved when the
pier improvements take place, and the lights near the
pier particularly near the Bridge Tender Inn -
turned off at night to provide park residents with an
unobstructed view of Anna Maria Sound.
Bridge Street, with its three bars and two restau-
rants, has five liquor dispensing establishments,
Drescher said. The accompanying noise and litter
should be limited, she said.
Drescher said she also saw a large number of un-
supervised children playing in the city, and urged resi-
dents to supervise their children's play.
Francis LaSpina who, with her husband Joseph man-
age the Sandpiper Mobile Resort, urged city police to
make an effort to get to know the widows and widowers
in the park, many of whom "would feel better knowing the
police are around if they hear a strange sound."
She also asked city council members to come to the
park for a meeting with residents to explain hurricane
evacuation procedures to them. "We need to have
someone other than ourselves tell them they have to
leave if a hurricane is coming," LaSpina said.
Leroy Arnold said a tour with a duty police officer
would be a learning experience for all the council mem-
bers. "I wonder how many of you have been out on
Bridge Street at night?" he asked. "Last weekend the
area was packed. Bridge Street is a natural beauty, but
it is a different street at night."


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER P JUIIE 8, 1995 I PAGE 5 1B

Police telephone solicitors are at it again on Island


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Phone solicitors are active again, only this time its
for police instead of fire agencies.
Residents have reported calls from the Police Be-
nevolent Association on behalf of the Highway Patrol
Chapter and the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 70 in
Bradenton. Letters from the American Federation of


Tingley Library offers
youth summer program
Tingley Library offers young people a way to
beat the summer heat during its Summer Junior
Library Program every Tuesday and Friday from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Activities include working with
new CD-ROMs on computers.
For more information call 778-1208.


Police have also been received by residents.
Lt. Dale Stephenson of the Holmes Beach Police
Department said he received two complaints recently
about organizations claiming the funds they raise will
benefit the city's department.
"To determine if the call is legitimate, ask for the
name of the organization and the name of the individual
that's placing the call," said Stephenson. "Tell them
you are going to call the Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment to check on the organization."
If the call is legitimate, the caller will do as asked,
he said. If not, the caller will attempt to convince you
to part with your money.
A manager for the PBA in Bradenton said the
group represents individual officers within the various
law enforcement agencies, not the agencies.
"We are now raising funds for the Highway Patrol
Chapter," he said.
Stephenson said all the department's officers be-


long to the PBA because of the death benefits offered
and access to the organization's attorneys.
Anyone wishing to make a donation to benefit the
city's police department may bring or send it to the
police station, said Stevenson.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Jack Maloney said he
has received complaints recently about FOP solicitation.
"The calls are made by professional solicitors and
they give the impression the money will benefit our
department," he explained.
Maloney said one resident brought him a letter she
received from the American Federation of Police. The
letter asked for support for its "Bradenton Beach Area
Annual Campaign for the Police Family Survivors
Fund." However, the letter did not claim the funds
would benefit the city's department.
For financial and registration information on any
group that solicits donations, call the Division of Con-
sumer Services at 1-800-435-7352.







OG PAGE 6 M JUNE 8, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Fr


Goals for all
Councilman John Kaufmann and the officials in
Bradenton Beach are to be commended for their efforts
to provide workshops to gather resident opinions for
the future of the city.
All too frequently, elected officials go blindly forth
with their own personal or communal agendas for a
community without getting any real feel for what the
citizens as a whole want for their city.
Public meetings usually bring out only the naysayers
or those supportive of a program or project the general
population usually doesn't get involved in things unless
it threatens to personally impact them, often appearing too
late to make any real change in a proposal other than try-
ing to shoot the whole thing down.
But Bradenton Beach officials last week held an
old-fashioned town hall meeting, inviting the commu-
nity to attend and sound off about what they like and
what they don't like in the city.
There was nothing really unique or unusual men-
tioned during the meeting. Sidewalks and sidewalk repairs
are needed. A unified approach to the city's architectural
scheme would be nice, as would an open-air pavilion and
a public pier jutting into the Gulf of Mexico. Seniors are
concerned about their safety and would like additional
police reassurance these are all things every city on the
globe wants, needs and should have.
But there is something about Bradenton Beach in
particular and the Island as a whole that needs to be
protected, nurtured and allowed to grow.
A sense of community.
With 1,800 residents, Bradenton Beach is also home
- briefly to 2.5 million visitors each year at Coquina
and Cortez Beaches. The beachgoers turn the sleepy resi-
dential community into a sardine-packed beach resort,
snarled with traffic, overwashed with litter and seriously
stretching the small police force to maintain the peace.
.The sense of community within the city is under-
going an ongoing threat from visitors to the city, tax-
ing municipal resources and residents' patience.
The solution to the problem of too many people in too
little space is not one that will go away. Too much of the
city's and the Island's economy is based on the in-
flux of dollars that come from visitors' wallets. Yet main-
taining the unique character of a small community is al-
ways threatened when millions of people who don't al-
ways share the same beliefs as residents enter a city.
Bradenton Beach, and the Island, should guard
against losing the small-town, big-hearted flavor with
which we are all justly proud.
Last week's town hall meeting was a good first
step, something that should be emulated regularly by
all the cities on Anna Maria Island.

ISLANDER MMAI
JUNE 8, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 29
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
Darla Tingler
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1995
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


I 9 -YU elIN


Thanks for the memory
I would like to express my thanks and gratitude to
everyone who helped make Sarah Thomas's journey to
her speech victory at the state finals a wonderful memory.
Great thanks go to the 4H/Tropicana sponsors who
made it first rate in Orlando at the Contemporary Re-
sort. Thanks go to Mary Hamilton at 4H for all of her
help and to Joyce Ellis, Sarah's fifth-grade teacher at
Anna Maria Elementary School, for all her support,
coaching and kind words.
Thanks to all our friends and family for their sup-
port and to my mom for her special help. A special
thanks to my husband and Sarah's father, Richard, who
was a great sport and made a perfect speech subject. It
was a wonderful experience for Sarah.
Susan Thomas, Anna Maria City
No strong currents here
The following letter was addressed to Florida Department
of Environmental Protection District Secretary Dr. Rich-
ard Garrity.
On Jan. 10, 1994, Manatee County Commissioner Joe
McClash wrote you claiming "need for legitimate ratio-
nale" to preclude any intent to reestablish the Florida
Department of Transportation bridge project for the Anna
Maria Island Bridge northern alignment. In that letter he
alludes a 40-foot channel is "not safe" due to straying
currents and seagrass may be scarred from drifting boats.
In a letter to Mr. George Craciun of your staff dated
March 13,1995, from DEP Maj. James. H. Green, citing
"potential impact" a northern alignment would have to
boating safety, alludes to "hazard to navigation" inherent
to any channel less than 60 feet in width on a northern
alignment He, further, states of becoming "keenly aware
of the effect this term has on the approval or denial o this
project..."
In a public notice, the Commander, Seventh Coast
Guard District, in citing the Cortez and Anna Maria
Bridges, states, "... strong cross winds, heavy currents and
extensive shoaling near the bridge ... etc." In personal
representation and in documentation this federal agency
has openly supported the 79 1/2-foot-high replacement
proposal by DOT in direct conflict with Coast Guard's own
mandate for bridge heightsappearingin theFederal Register.
In earlier correspondence I made you aware that Na-


tional Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration
Intracoastal Waterway charts display a graph of current
data which includes one location in Anna Maria Sound.
That site, just north of Cortez Bridge, was obviously cho-
sen as representing the most swift (hazardous) current
within the inner estuary, located at the narrowest part of
the venturi within the Bay. It documents velocity at (flood)
of.6 knot and (ebb) .1 knot As with strong crosswinds and
extensive shoaling, according to NOAA, these factors are
obviously the product of politically motivated imagination.
However, keeping in mind that the Anna Maria Island
Bridge Final Preliminary Engineering Report, two subse-
quent DOT document and a DOT video (offered as fact
to some 900 trusting citizens) stated the existing span has
a nonconforming "navigational clearance" of only 17 1/
2 feet when, in reality, it is a conforming 25 feet, and con-
sidering countless other related examples of deceit, we
conducted personal current flow tests in the immediate
vicinity of the disputed channel. It, having been the focus
of the debate concerning hazardous currents, proved to be
one more monumental falsehood.
Our findings were similar to the nearby bridge being
politically remanufactured by DOT 7 1/2 feet lower than
factuality. At what we concluded to be the most swift flow
across the disputed channel, the hazardous currents moved
our marker exactly 100 feet in 15 minutes and 13 seconds
(about 1/15th of a knot). We will be happy to repeat the
test before Mr. McClash, the Florida Marine Patrol, the
DEP, DOT and/or Miami's Seventh Coast Guard Bridge
Section officials, or loan any of them the canoe and equip-
ment! We feel we have, indeed, once again satisfied the
"need for legitimate rationale."
James W. Kissick, Jr., Bradenton Beach
Bird baby shower a success
We wish to thank all the wonderful people who came
to the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary Baby Bird Shower
and brought gifts of food, cleaning supplies and money.
It was gratifying to see so many visitors come in spite
of the heat to see how the sanctuary cares for the hundreds
of orphaned baby birds it receives each spring.
We were so touched by the love and concern
shown for these tiny helpless creatures and all the birds
we care for at the sanctuary.
Stella Kelley, The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary











THOSE WERE THtE AYS
Part 11, Conclusion, The Conquistadors
by June Alder


Romanticized depiction of the conquistadors bringing civilization to the people
of the New World.


CABEZA'S FATE


Back in Spain, the stories Alvar
Nunez Cabeza de Vaca told to King
Charles V "in confidence" about his
eight-year odyssey in "La Florida"
caused a sensation when they got out.
Especially his tales of the fabulous
Seven Cities of Cibola immensely
rich, the Indians had told him. (These
disclosures sparked Francisco Vazquez
de Coronado's exploration of the
American southwest in 1540.)
Cabeza very much wanted to re-
turn to Florida; he was certain he could
avoid the awful blunders that ruined
Panfilo de Narvaez's 1528 expedition.
But someone already possessed a
charter from the king to try again to
colonize Florida. He was Hernando De
Soto, who invited Cabeza to go with
him. But Cabeza had already gone that
route, playing second banana to
Narvaez. He said no thanks, but good
scout that he was, he advised some of
his relatives to sign on with De Soto.
(That wasn't much of a favor as it
turned out because De Soto's foray was
almost as bad a disaster as Narvaez's.)
Instead, Cabeza was sent to South
America. Wild Brazil and Peru were to
be his new stamping grounds. He had
great success in extending Spanish influ-
ence, without using the cruel methods of
most other conquistadors. Unhappily his
principles would be his undoing.
It was the habit of his predecessors
in the River Plate region to play fast
and loose with the natives, especially
the women. Gurani chieftains provided
the girls and pandering became big
business. One leading conquistador in
Asuncion married all seven daughters
(the eldest aged 18) of the principal
chief. No wonder that the city became
known as "Mohammed's Paradise."
Sixty-year-old Cabeza didn't ap-
prove of such behavior, not at all. He
declared it illegal to enslave Indians
and tried to correct all manner of other
abuses. Two friars at Asuncion ran
what they called a "nunnery" for native


girls. Cabeza abolished it.
Cabeza's outrageous restrictions
gave rise to a rebellion among the en-
trenched Spanish establishment in
which laymen and clerics were in ca-
hoots. They decided to return to Spain
to lay their grievances before the gov-
ernment and have Cabeza de Vaca re-
called. When they tried to take some 35
"nuns" with them the girls had com-
plained to their parents about being
flogged Cabeza clapped the friars in
jail and sent the young women home.
The upshot was that Cabeza was
imprisoned himself by the rebel leaders.
After 10 months in an Asuncion prison,
he was hustled to Spain kept chained
to a ring-bolt and fed on bread and wa-
ter during the voyage.
Found guilty of malfeasance, he
was sentenced by the court to six more
years in prison, after which he was ex-
iled to Oran.
King Charles V revoked his banish-
ment in 1551 and in 1555 gave him a
small grant to live on. But this remark-
able man's stout heart and spirit finally
gave out. The author of the first literary
work about America his "Relation"
of the great long-distance marathon
from Florida to Mexico died poor
and forgotten in 1556 at the age of 76.
********
Thus endeth this series on "The
Conquistadors." I left out De Soto, fig-
uring most readers of this column know
enough about this rascal already. Any-
way, it's now vacation time and for the
next several weeks this space will, like
our TV channels, feature reruns. I've
selected some of my most popular col-
umns meaning ones someone told
me he or she liked.
See you soon. God willing, I plan to
spin you some tales about turn-of-the-
century Anna Maria Island featuring
the Beans, the Joneses, the Cobbs and
various other early Island characters not
so well known.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 M PAGE 7 iJ



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Bf[ PAGE 8 0 JUNE 8, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Anna Maria vote split


on employee raise


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By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission voted 3-to-2
May 23 to grant a $500 raise to public-works em-
ployee Bud Bailey. Discussion leading to the vote
became somewhat heated.
Commissioner Chuck Shumard, public-works li-
aison, moved for the increase in Bailey's $19,464
salary.
Shumard said he had an April review with the
four-year employee and considered him "very dedi-
cated" and deserving of the increase. Commissioner
Mark Ratliff seconded.
Commissioner George McKay said the city is on
the smaller side in size in League of Cities' compari-
sons, but the raise would put Anna Maria on the larger
side, salary-wise.
McKay said "a lot of city employees are doing a
bang-up job," but salary reviews should be done
citywide at budget time.
Mayor Dorothy McChesney called Bailey "a real
rock" during public-works-director turnovers. "This
is a vote of confidence," she said.
Commissioner Doug Wolfe said Bailey was not
the only city employee "to receive a burden" due to
public-works turmoil and that based on his experience
as a former school administrator, "You never award
raises in the middle of the year."
"At this time," said Wolfe, "it is not good busi-
ness to give any employee a raise."
McKay agreed. "It's not about his work," he said


of Bailey. "It's the way we're going about it"
Ten to 15 minutes into the discussion, acting Pub-
lic Works Director Frank Tyndall asked to be recog-
nized from the back of the room.
Tyndall objected loudly to use of the word "raise."
Going back to 1989, said Tyndall, the city has granted
only two raises. Everything else has been cost-of-liv-
ing increases, he said.
"It's sickening to hear what you're saying right now,"
Tyndall continued. "I hate mentioning names," he said,
"but you know who you are, George and Doug."
McKay said cost-of-living increases are a raise.
Wolfe said again, "The proper procedure is at the
next budget hearing."
McChesney said, "I think $500 is a very small sum
to pay when the ship of Anna Maria needs a positive
person out there."
"We're dealing with other people's funds," said
McKay.
Then Wolfe initiated discussion about the legality
of a mid-year increase. Tyndall left the room.
Ultimately, the motion was amended, "pending
legality," to award the $500 spread out over the remain-
der of the year. Shumard, Ratliff and McChesney said
yes to the raise. McKay and Wolfe said no.
Minutes later, the commission voted unanimously
to raise the salary of the city's other maintenance
worker, Rick Lonzo, from $15,200 to $16,000.
Lonzo was hired last November with the stipula-
tion that the increase would take effect after six suc-
cessful months on the job.


... and commission can't agree in private


Disagreement over an employee raise at the
May 23 Anna Maria City Commission meeting
ended on a light note.
During pre-vote discussion of the item, city
resident Fred Haul chastised commissioners for
their lack of harmony. "This makes all of you look
terrible," he said.
Just before adjournment, Haul brought the subject


up again. He suggested that the commission learn how
"to agree on things first or don't bring it to the table."
Four commissioners and the mayor spoke in uni-
son, "Sunshine Law." Government in the sunshine pro-
hibits elected officials from private discussion with
each other on public matters.
"I know all about the Sunshine Law," Haul re-
sponded. "I don't want to hear about it"


Blumhagen condition improves

after bridge accident


Kevin Blumhagen, 31, met the Anna Maria
Island Bridge last week in an early morning acci-
dent that nearly totaled his pickup truck, took out
15 feet of railing and crushed walls and windows
on the bridgetender's shack.
According to the accident report,
Blumhagen's truck was westbound when the
wheels struck the north curb, sending the truck
spinning into the curb and guardrail on the south
side of the bridge and then into the bridgetender's
building. The truck spun again, ejecting
Blumhagen from the truck.
The bridgetender found no one in the truck
and then saw Blumhagen on the north side of the
bridge near the curb. He reportedly put cones


around Blumhagen and called 911.
State troopers that investigated at the crash site
were so certain Blumhagen would not survive they
filled out a report in advance stating he was a fa-
tality.
Much to the contrary, relatives now report that
Blumhagen is improved and recovering at Bayfront
Medical Hospital in St Petersburg where he was taken
by helicopter following the accident He is expected
to start physical therapy prior to release from the hos-
pital although he is reported to ask frequently, "Can
I go home yet?"
The accident had no effect on the operation of
the bridge and repairs are expected to begin imme-
diately.


SAM requests more technical

research on Orimulsion fuel


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
After hearing a presentation on Orimulsion by Kit
Fernald, members of Save Anna Maria passed a mo-
tion to request that more research be done on the con-
troversial new fuel before a final decision on its use
is made.
Florida Power and Light wants to use the fuel at
its Parrish plant. FPL's request is currently being re-
viewed by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection.
SAM members voted to send letters of request for
more study to county commissioners, the DEP, FPL
and local newspapers.
The Holmes Beach Civic Association was asked
to sponsor a forum for Island residents on the pros and
cons of the fuel. Representatives of FPL and environ-


mental groups will be invited. Time and date will be
announced.
In "mega-bridge" news, members of SAM have
packets of postcards pre-addressed to state Sen. John
McKay; Gov. Lawton Chiles; Mike Guy, executive
director of the Metropolitan Planning Organization;
state Rep. Mark Flanagan and Ben Watts of the Florida
Department of Transportation. The packets are avail-
able to residents who wish to write in protest of the
construction of a 65-foot-high fixed-span bridge at
Manatee Avenue.
In other business, the group is $6,000 short of its
goal of raising of $30,000 for legal fees to fight the pro-
posed bridge construction. Several fundraisers are
planned including the sale of SAMsational sandwiches
for Father's Day this month, a barbecue in July and a
garage sale in August.


Snooks Adams

KIDS' DAY
Sponsored Annually By The i
ANNA MARIA ISLAND PRIVATEERS
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 N PAGE 9 1[



puPePlE -itor


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We also carry KINO'S SANDALS
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Girl Scout Brownies at bat
The Pittsburgh Parrot, mascot for the Pittsburgh Pirates professional baseball team, joined Island Brownie
Troop #40 at McKechnie Field during a troop visit. The scouts were the guest of the Pirates for a day offine
play. Seated, left to right, are Brownies Brooke Trovato-Brown, Clare Hapner and Oceanna Beard. Stand-
ing, left to right, are Gracie Beard, Amy Smith, Jessie Brickse, Emily Smith, Lauren Brickse and Christin
Chiles. Islander Photo: Courtesy of Joanne Trovato-Brown


Officials serve dinner

to prove they're 'all heart'


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how "o be included.


Some of Manatee County's best-known citizens
will don aprons and order books to serve heart-healthy
dinners at the American Heart Association's "Celebrity
Celebration for Heart" to be held at the Beachhouse
Restaurant on Wednesday, June 14.
The hearty waiters and waitresses include
Florida state Rep. Mark Flanagan; Rip DuPont of
First National Bank; Bill Galvono of Grimes,
Goebel, Grimes & Hawkins, P.A.; Bob Hogue of
First Union; Diane Latour of Remax Realty; and
Terry McGannon of Northern Trust.
"It could be our best opportunity to watch
Manatee's celebrities act as crazy as they can to raise


money for a good cause," said Caleb Grimes, chair-
person of the event.
'The waiters and waitresses will earn tips based
on the quality or lack of service. They hope to
convince their guests that they're the best and most
entertaining waiters. They'll perform antics such as
singing, dancing, magic tricks, and more. Anything
goes on this fun-filled evening," said Grimes.
The evening will also include a silent and live auc-
tion and a contest for the favorite waiter. The event ben-
efits the research, public education and community ser-
vice programs of the American Heart Association.
For more information call 358-8911.


Middle school students have

own Island program


"All Island Middlers" (AIM) is a new Island pro-
gram formed specifically for middle school students.
AIM is endorsed by All Island Denominations with
leadership from the participating churches: Roser Me-
morial Community, Gloria Dei Lutheran, St. Beranrd
Catholic and Longboat Island Chapel.
The program will be held Wednesdays from 6 to 8
p.m. at the different churches beginning Wednesday,


June 14, at Roser Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria
City.
Each night will include supper, games, a topic
and brief worship. Plans will also be made for special
activities. All interested young people going into the
sixth, seventh or eighth grade are welcome.
For further information call Carolyn McDonald at
778-8262.


Everyone can't get into THIS pool
Paul Mitchell Bobby Tingler, owner of team sponsor Anchor Inn, Mike Melahon, Sam Allen and Larry Foley
displayed their first prize trophies after the Midwest Regional Pool Champships last week at Gallery Billiards in
Sarasota. The group will go to Las Vegas to compete in the finals in August Islander Photo: Darla Tingler


Treat the Bride & Groom with a
romantic picnic basket for two.


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M3 PAGE 10 0 JUNE 8, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


RETIRED BUT NOT RETIRING


Haas trades banker's suits for shorts, sandals


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When word of Sandy Haas' retirement leaked out,
well-wishers began streaming into First of America to
say their good-byes.
They brought hugs, tears and laughter and remi-
nisced about Haas' 26 years as a banker on the Island,
starting at First Federal Savings and Loan, now Repub-
lic, and ending at First of America.
"I started in banking in 1967," she recalled, "and
moved to the Island branch in 1969 as head teller. The
office was where the ladies' section of Mr. Roberts is
now. Then First Federal moved to the corner (now the
home of First National of Manatee)."
Haas became the branch's executive assistant in
1973, then branch manager in 1975. In 1982, she
moved to Palmetto Federal, now First of America, as
branch manager.
"The names of the banks can get confusing," she
laughed. "I've only worked in two banks but they've
each had several names through the years."
She never set out to be a banker, said Haas, the
oldest of 12 children.
"I thought about going into nursing," she said. "I
graduated from high school in 1964 and was
babysitting for my brothers and sisters, working part
time and taking night classes. One of my teachers heard
about a teller's job at the bank. She told me about it and
I applied and was hired. It was my best friend's job -
she was getting married and moving away."
Also well known for her community service,
Haas said the first group she joined was the
Bradenton Junior Women's Club, for which she
served as secretary and treasurer.
The next group was the Women's Council of Re-
altors. There she also served as secretary and treasurer
and chaired the group's Christmas luncheons. In 1981
she was honored as the council's Woman of the Year.
In 1980, Haas joined the Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce, one of the organizations Islanders
most associate her with, and was immediately elected
to the position of director. She has been an officer or
director since joining the organization and served as
president in 1983, 1984 and 1988.
"When I became president, we didn't have an of-
fice," she said. "The president got a box with all the
documents in it. We got our first office in 1986 or 1987


where the dentist's office is in Holmes Beach. In 1988
we moved to the present location but we've been in
three different offices there."
The early days of the chamber were filled with
events, said Haas. The chamber sponsored street
dances, the annual old timers reunion, Hobie Cat regat-
tas, the Chamber Chase races, Fun in the Sun, the
Fourth of July fireworks and parade and New Year's
Eve parties.
"The events took a lot of time, but we did many of
them for no profit because we wanted to raise awareness
about the chamber," she said. "We also donated money
from many of our activities to the community center."
Haas began her involvement with Island Rescue in
1986, another organization in which her participation
is well-known.
"They came to me and said they were having prob-
lems with their account, which was a mess," she re-
membered. "I told them they needed someone who's
well organized to keep their books. They asked me to
be their treasurer."
The three Island cities originally made annual do-
nations to help fund Island Rescue but that changed in
1987, said Haas. Successful fundraisers, coupled with


SReminiscing
Sandy Haas looks through
one of the Anna Maria
Island Chamber of Com-
merce scrapbooks. Haas
retired last Friday as
branch manager of First
of America. As part of her
work with the chamber,
she made scrapbooks of
the organization's accom-
plishments. Islander
Photo: Pat Copeland







private donations, enabled the group to purchase a ve-
hicle and equipment.
"Island rescue was brought under the auspices of
the fire district and we signed the vehicle over to them,"
she explained. "They agreed to pay for the upkeep of
the vehicle. We raised all our money for equipment and
training through fundraisers and donations."
In 1991, the fire and rescue volunteers merged and in
1992, Haas resigned as the organization's treasurer to run
for a seat on the district fire commission. She won the seat
and was re-elected in 1994 to a four-year term.
"I really enjoyed working with the fire and rescue
personnel," said Haas, "They're a hard-working bunch
of people. I enjoyed what we did. That's why I ran for
commissioner.
In addition to being a fire commissioner, Haas is
treasurer of the Manatee County Fire Commissioners'
Association and a member of the Holmes Beach Equity
Study Commission. She said she will also continue
working with the chamber.
"I'll still stay involved in the community," she said,
"but I'm going to become a lady of leisure. I plan to do
some traveling and boating whatever the mood hits.
I'm going to have a life!"


Bennett leaves varied career in law enforcement


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Nancy Bennett has her retirement itinerary planned
- at least for the first six weeks.
After eight years as clerk for the Holmes Beach Po-
lice Department, Bennett traded a computer for a sewing
machine to make bridesmaid and flower girl dresses for
her daughter's wedding. Her daughter, Kelly, will wed the
department's lieutenant, Dale Stephenson, on July 22 at
Roser Memorial Community Church.
Bennett, who began her career as a social worker
in Akron, Ohio, said she was drawn into police work
by the chief probation officer with whom she worked.
"My father was in politics and the chief probation
officer was running for election as sheriff," she re-
called. "He said if he won the election he would make
me one of the first two female road officers. He was
elected and I became a police officer."
The two female officers rode together in Car 54,
laughed Bennett, at the same time the television show,
"Car 54, Where are you?" was popular.
"We felt we had to prove ourselves," she noted.
"We worked school patrol for two hours in the morn-
ing and then changed into plainclothes and worked
with juveniles and mental patients."
Bennett met her husband, Mel, who was a deputy in
the same department The pair wed and Bennett contin-
ued as a full-time police officer until her daughter, Leslie,
was born. She then worked part-time for the department
and Mel went to work for the Ford Motor Company.
"I worked communications for the sheriffs depart-
ment at Kent State when the students were shot by the
National Guardsmen," she said. "As I was driving back
to the sheriffs office in a marked car, I was shot at.


Right then, I made a promise to myself that I would
never drive a marked car in full uniform again. I had
my kids to think about."
The Bennetts, now with three children, began to think
of moving to Anna Maria Island, where they had often
vacationed. Her parents and brother, Bradenton Beach
attorney Richard Carter, had already made the move.
Bennett got a job selling classified ads and doing
layout for the Island Herald, a weekly Island newspa-
per published by the Bradenton Herald. Mel became a
mechanic for Sears. Bennett then moved to the Mana-


SGood luck!
I Holmes Beach Police
Clerk Nancy Bennett is
S" surrounded by flowers
.. .. from friends and family
wishing her well in her
retirement. Last Friday
Swas her final day of work.
She was honored by co-
workers and city officials
at a dinner. Islander
P Photo: Pat Copeland








tee County Sheriffs Department, working in person-
nel and coordinating training.
"Mel had a heart attack and I quit the MSO,"
Bennett explained. "I saw an ad in the newspaper for
the position of police clerk in Holmes Beach. I applied
and got the job in May of 1987. Dale Stephenson, Rick
Maddox, Jay Romine, Rick Pentecost, Rob Velardi and
Jim Cumston were all here when I started."
In addition to being police clerk, Bennett taught inter-

PLEASE SEE BENNETT, NEXT PAGE






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JUNE 8, 1995 0 PAGE 11 li]


4 9~~i/MiW f^


SAM-wiches for
SAM-sational Dads
Take your SAM-sational dad out to lunch on
Father's Day weekend, June 17 and 18, without taking
him away from his easy chair.
Members of Save Anna Maria, Inc., will deliver a
fresh piled-high Cuban or low-fat turkey SAM-wiches
to your door from 11 am. to 1 p.m. on either Saturday,
June 17, or Sunday, June 18.
The donation is $7 for one; $12 for two; $16 for
three or $20 for four hoagies. Orders must be pre-paid.
Proceeds are dedicated to SAM's legal fund to pay
its attorney fees for the upcoming hearings opposing
the mega-bridge at Manatee Avenue. Checks are to be
made out to Save Anna Maria, Inc.
To order or for information call Joy Courtney at
Haley's Motel at 778-5405.

Roser changes worship
service hours for summer
Roser Memorial Community Church will hold
only one Sunday service at 10 a.m. beginning Sun-
day, June 4.
Interim pastors will be the Reverends Jan P. and
Michael Smith, both graduates of Chandler School
of Theology in Atlanta. Both are ordained in the
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). They will
serve until early July.
Roser Church is located at 514 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria City. Call the church office at 778-1404 for ad-
ditional information.

Pastel portraits at library
Nita Saidoo of Holmes Beach will have a display
of her pastel portaits at the Island Branch Library, 5701
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, during the month of
June. Retired from Davison, Mich., Saidoo creates her
work from photographs.
For more information, call 778-6341.

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If you are being non-renewed or if you
are presently insured by the Florida
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Show ski tournament
this weekend
The 1995 Southern Regional Show Ski Tourna-
ment, hosted by the Sarasota Ski-A-Rees, will be held
Saturday and Sunday, June 10 and 11, behind Mote
Marine Laboratory.
The event is free to the public.
The schedule of events for Saturday, June 10:
8 am. Swivel Competition
10 am. Gatorland Water Ski Team,
Gainesville, Fla.
11:30 am. Lakeland Water Ski Team, Lakeland,
Fla.
1 p.m. Goldcoast Water Ski Club, Delray
Beach, Fla.
2:30 p.m. Diamond Water Ski Club, Orlando,
Fla.
4 p.m. Barefoot elimination

The schedule of events for Sunday, June 11:
9 am. Doubles Competition
11 am. Gulfcoast Skimmers, Naples, Fla.
12:30 p.m.SarasotaSki-A-Rees, Sarasota, Fla.
2 p.m. Tampa Bay Water Ski Team, Odessa,
Fla.
3 p.m. Free Style Jump Competition.

Historical society names
new officers
Anna Maria Mayor Dottie McChesney installed
the officers for 1995-96,season during a meeting held
recently at Anna Maria City Hall.
The officers are: Cathi O'Bannon, president;
Martha Stewart, vice president; George McKay, trea-
surer, Pat Copeland, recording secretary, and Sarah
Bicknell, corresponding secretary.
Appointments to the board were Dr. John Deam,
Paula Tripp, Jane Adam, Doug Wolfe, Carolyne
Norwood and Marguerite Thompson.
Anna Maria Island Historical Society meetings will


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our 23nd Year
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resume in September.
The Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria City, will be open during the summer on
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.


Bennett
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
personal skills, stress management, radio procedures,
ethics and professionalism and report writing for the
police academy at Manatee County VoTec. She is
also a member of the Critical Incident Stress Debrief-
ing Team.
"The CISD team is made up of firemen, law
enforcement officers and paramedics," she said.
"We deal with those involved in emergency inci-
dents. It can be anything from a hostage situation
to a sudden infant death anything that's abnor-
mal and the people involved are placed under a lot
of stress."
She will keep up her certification as a law en-
forcement officer and her membership in the
department's auxiliary, she said. She also plans to
do some volunteer work with the elementary
school, the community center and the Neighbor-
hood Watch program.
"I'll miss working here there's never a day
the same and you never know what the next phone
call will bring," she noted. "But I'm looking for-
ward to doing some of the things that I haven't had
time to do. I'm going to do some serious fishing
and travel and Mel and I will continue with our
ballroom dancing."
In addition to daughters Leslie and Kelly, the
Bennetts have a son, Robbie, a fireman with
Sarasota County and a volunteer captain with the
Anna Maria Fire District, and two grandchildren,
Kymberli and Jeremy. Kelly is a volunteer with
the Anna Maria Fire District and Bennett is a
member of the fire auxiliary.


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in PAGE 12 M JUNE 8, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Turtle Watch performs labor of love


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Early on a weekday morning, the Gulffront stretch
of beach off Willow Avenue in Anna Maria is quiet.
Sunlight falls in splotches onto the sand inside the cage
tall enough for a man to stand in. Calf-high neon-col-
ored flags wave in the shore breeze.
Beneath each flag is a loggerhead turtle nest, av-
eraging 100 to 110 eggs, two currently holding 147 and
151 eggs. When the incubation period of 50 to 60 days
is done, tiny hatchlings will begin the journey sea
turtles have been making for some 70 million years.
With the eggs buried in a two-foot-deep bed and no
one around, it's hard to know how many man-hours,
how much specially trained handling and beyond-the-
call care has already been donated to each and every
egg from May through October year after year.
"None of us minds the time," says Anna Maria Is-
land Turtle Watch Director Chuck Shumard, who is
also vice mayor of the city of Anna Maria. "It's a true
labor of love."
Shumard, in his fifth season as Watch director,
became involved with the group in 1984, three years
after its establishment. He works closely with longtime
former director Ed Callen.
The gentlemen are joined by about 60 other Turtle
Watch volunteers who share a single purpose: the sur-
vival of as many turtle hatchlings as possible.
That survival rate was 93 percent in 1994, mean-
ing the Turtle Watch oversaw and documented the re-
turn of more than 12,000 hatchlings to the sea. So far
this season 69 crawls and 35 nests have been counted.
The Turtle Watch divides the Island into nine sec-
tions, each about one mile long. Each section has a leader
and walkers who are out on the beach from 6 to 8 a.m.
daily. They search the shore for signs of turtle crawls (at-
tempts to dig body pits to lay eggs) and successful nests.
Not all nighttime attempts by the female turtles are
successful. They may be frightened away by people or
disoriented by lights. Shumard even describes a recent
documentation of three tries by a mother to lay eggs in


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Trying to follow new rules from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the Turtle
Watch has reluctantly left most of the nests where laid on the beach. At press time, reports were still
coming in about how many nests and eggs were lost in high seas generated by Hurricane Allison.
"This is exactly what I was afraid of," says Chuck Shumard Islander Photos: Cynthia Finn.


hard, renourished sand near 78th Street No nest was
found and her crawl tracks led back to the Gulf.
Each female has three egg chambers which are all
fertilized at once. From mid-May through mid-August
she will attempt to lay all three batches on the stretch
of beach where she herself was probably born.

Permitted handling
Turtle Watch walkers notify their section leaders
of crawls and nests. Aware and interested citizens have



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also been known to notify the police or the Turtle
Watch in the middle of the night.
Shumard or Callen then investigates the nest to
determine the safety or danger of the location. That
determination is based on how close to the water the
nest is extended saltwater immersion can kill the
porous eggs or how much in danger the nest is from
human tampering.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER r JUNE 8, 1995 M PAGE 13 li


Turtle Watch
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
If the eggs are to be moved to one of two Island
group restraining areas, the relocation is done within
the first 12 hours. Turtle Watch members permitted by
the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
handle the eggs and dig a simulated body pit 20 to 25
inches deep, spreading the eggs around as the mother
did and making sure that the eggs found on top are re-
settled on top.
Within-the-nest layout is important because tem-
perature controls the ultimate sex of the hatchlings.
Shumard believes the bottom eggs, which stay cooler,
become males.
Relocated nests are marked by date, where found,
by whom, number of eggs and hatchllng due date. The
Turtle Watch member who found the eggs is usually on
hand some two months later for delivery of "his or her
babies."
At 50 days, turtle watchers begin looking for the
sand to drop around the flagpole, indicating hatch ac-
tivity. Sometimes the hatchlings remain under the sand
for two to three days before they venture out into the
cool of night.
When first relocated the rubbery, ping-pong-ball-
size eggs are pinkish, turning white during develop-
ment The babies have a little hook on their snout to
tear open the egg which they lose right after birth.
Shumard sounds like a father as he describes the
hatchlings pouring out of the nest. They are about 2 and
1/2 inches long, 1 inch wide. "They look like they're
all front flipper," says Shumard.
As the hatchlings pour out, turtle watchers retrieve
the babies, count them, dig the nest for any stragglers
and release the newborns about 15 feet from the water.
A similar close-watch-and-release method is used
for nests which have been left on the beach where
made. Beachgoers are urged to be on the lookout for
nests that are marked off- please stay away.
These "unrestrained" hatchlings are in particular
danger when they emerge, says Shumard, because of
lights that attract the babies away from the Gulf. He


Beneath eachflag lies an average of more than 100
sea turtle eggs whose original nests were determined
to be in danger.

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describes the scramble by turtle watchers to retrieve
more than 75 "lost" hatchlings at any one nest.

Program maverick?
Under a new DEP program this season, the major-
ity of the nests are to be left unrestrained on the beach.
Additionally, the DEP wants the Turtle Watch to stay
away from hatched nests for 72 hours, "and then count
the dead," says Shumard.
"The way we do it," says a serious Shumard, "we
don't have any dead turtles to count."
Shumard says he's been outspoken against the new
rules. "They probably consider me a maverick."
But he doesn't believe DEP really asked for input
from those who have devoted years to the Turtle-Watch
effort, and he feels that Anna Maria Island with its
many condominiums and outdoor lights doesn't fit
the DEP bill. "This might have worked 40 or 50 years
ago," Shumard suggests.
"Lighting is our biggest problem on this Island,"


Around 11 p.m. on the evening of Wednesday,
May 31, Mote Marine Laboratory rescued a stranded
loggerhead sea turtle from the area near Hidden La-
goon condominium on Siesta Key. Since sea turtle
nesting season began May 1, it is common to see fe-
male turtles on the beach at night.
But this turtle was different.
"She was lethargic and being washed around in the
surf," stated Jerris Foote, Mote senior biologist and Sea
Turtle Program manager.
The approximately 250-to-300-pound animal was
brought to Mote and held until she could be taken to a
veterinarian Thursday morning. Dr. Ron Hines, of
Bradenton, performed exams to try to determine what
could have caused her to strand.
Preliminary results show that the cause is most
likely a blockage of the gastrointestinal tract caused by


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l Protective boards have
been placed against the
north-end restraining
cage to ensure the safety
of those nests already
relocated.










says Shumard.
He also points to seaweed deposits not many yards
from the Willow Avenue site. He remembers a storm
two seasons ago that created extremely high tides. "We
tried to chase down the eggs" from an unrestrained
nest, he says, but the eggs were lost to the high sea.
His arm outstretched toward the beach, Shumard
says, "What they say is a safe location isn't always the
case. Even without a storm."
The full effects of high water from Hurricane
Allison on the nests left on the beach so far this season
were not known at press time. Reports of eggs rolling
in the surf and nests washed out were disheartening to
Shumard and all Turtle Watch volunteers.
They will be documenting all losses and reporting
them to the DEP.
"The bottom line," says Shumard, "is saving as
many of these gorgeous creatures as we can. I'm afraid
that the ones who are suffering under these new regu-
lations are the turtles."


some sort of foreign object.
"She's showing all the classic signs of an impacted
animal," stated Foote. Plastic bags and other debris in
the ocean are often mistaken by sea turtles as food ob-
jects, like jellyfish.
Until the turtle's exact problem is determined, she
is being tube fed and receiving an electrolyte solution
every four hours to keep her from becoming dehy-
drated and weakened.


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Bl PAGE 14 m JUNE 8, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER"
I 1 Ri


Early warning
Islanders got an early taste of the threat of hurri-
cane season. Bottled water and batteries sold like hot
cakes while most stayed home and watched the weather
channel for tidbits of information on the tropical storm
that formed just south of the Yucatan Peninsula and
quickly thrust into the Gulf of Mexico.
While some watched for information others reacted
with surfboards in hand, ready to catch the ferocious
waves generated by the bands of squalls and westerly
winds on the southern side of Allison.
It's a frightening prospect, having a category one
hurricane lurking in the Gulf, but surfers make the best
of it. They have to. There's almost never waves on the
Gulf coast any other time. We suspect lots of Island
dudes are missing work and skipping school until this
Is over.
Not that I would ever bend the laws of school at-
tendance, but when my kids were young, it was ac-
cepted in our household to take one "personal" day off
from school as long as Mom was informed.
The day off was always used for surfing and prop-
erly reserved for what would turn out to be the biggest
storm each year.

Beach and turtles the losers
We lost some beach and a lot of turtle nests all up
and down the coast to Allison.
What is really a shame is that in years past Turtle
Watch volunteers were allowed to remove nests on
Anna Maria to a hatchery. They took the hatchlings to
different areas of the beach for a safe release and an
overwhelming opportunity for residents and visitors to
witness the event the scampering of hundreds of
baby turtles to the Gulf.
This year the state demanded that nests be marked
and left alone unless they were in immediate danger.
Unfortunately, they didn't take hurricanes, result-


fhmJ~









ataU(


U


J,
.p.


A .r .~


ing high tides and wave action across the expanse of the
beach, into account.
For hard-lobbying turtle watchers, armed with the
resulting tally of nests lost to Hurricane Allison, maybe
the rules can be changed.

Out with the old
One almost walks in fear to the door of restaurants
these days for fear they're closed.
Several establishments are "closed for good" while
others are closed for summer fix-up, vacations and a
little biding of time until the Island population in-
creases in the fall. Some places cut back hours so, "let
your fingers do the walking," as the old phone adver-
tisement goes.
On the closed-for-good-list, we have L'Auberge du
bon Vivant on Longboat Key and the Anchorage in
Anna Maria although Anchorage owners, the Seay
brothers, are maintaining their lease on the Anna Maria
City Pier and are serving lunch and dinner seven days
a week for now.
Closed for a reported month of fix-up is the Hunt
Club on Longboat Key, operated by Ralph Russell of


Fond farewells
Charles and Phyliss
Savidge, left, hosted a
reception in their Gulf
front home on Longboat
Key honoring Ralph and
Claire Hunter for their
service to the community
while owners and publish-
ers of the Longboat
Observer. The Hunters
sold the publication
: recently and plan to do
some traveling as well as
Serious remodeling to their
Longboat Key home -for
"more retiring comfort. "
Islander Photo: Bonner
Presswood


Rotten Ralph fame. Ralph's son Paul, who was man-
aging the Hunt Club until it closed, is moving to
Canada with his future bride, Kari Ruocco. No word on
a re-opening schedule since Ralph's is closed this
week for fix-up but Paul and Kari will return to the
Island for the October 7 wedding.
Duffy's is closed for vacation until June 21.
Chez Andre is closed for the week, re-opening on
June 13 after a visit to Florida's oldest city, St. Au-
gustine. Norm and Jane Ches have just returned from
their annual summer hiatus to re-open Ches's Pasta
Plus. Kay's Korner Diner, formerly the Sweet
Spoone, is back serving breakfast and lunch follow-
ing a little vacation time.
Ed and Andrea Spring report they'll re-open Sign
of the Mermaid's deli on November 1. Thankfully,
with the deli closed for the summer they have time to
open for Sunday brunch every week at the same-name
restaurant. I hope they still have poached salmon with
soft-scrambled eggs and blue crab hollandaise. I've
missed it but no more.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


I OPEN DAILY 11:30 AM '- iYA-33L I
9915 Manatee Ave. W. Reservations Accepted B

You get complete news of three island cities in The Islander Bystander -
it's all you need to know on Anna Maria Island.


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH

". Home of the Delicious
^ ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)

35 + ax
Served Daily (Waffles too!)

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


RESTAURANT & MARINA
FA7VATURGW :
"TIE SUMMR OF FUWr
WEEIKDAY EVENING SlPECIIALS
TUESDAY NIGHT PRIME R I) DINNERl....S9.95
WED NIGIT BBQ CIIICKEN & RIBS )INNEIl .....S8.95

FRIDAY NIGHT POOLSIDE COOKOUT 6 9PM S14.95
STEAKS, FISH, & KABOBS, RIGHT OFF THE GRILL!
SATURDAY NIGHT POOLSIDE LUAU 6- 9PM $14.95
GRASS SKIRTS. ROAST PIG, & ALL THE TRIMMINGS!
SUNDAY AFTERNOON BBO $S.95
POOLSIDE WITH $1.00 DRAFTS
Live Entertainment
S Dance to the Sounds of
vrian Veebe
'tues Sat 8pm to midnightt
595 Dream island Road 383-5565
6000 !?lock of gulf of )Mexico Drive -- .


., .*I ---






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 0 PAGE 15 r


Iced kegs of beer and Islanders awaited their turn at Kingfish boat ramp for a ride to a private party on
Gilligan's Island, a spit of land inhabited by Australian Pines and not much else just a little north of
Galati's Perico Harbor Marina along the Intracoastal. The event was an anniversary celebration for David


and Rene Bannigan. Islander Photo: Paul Roat
In with the new
Nancy Cripe comes to the deli rescue with Le Pic-
nic Basket Her new gourmet deli offers "pigwiches"
(tres gourmet-type sandwiches) and salads including
smoked salmon on a bed of greens, surrounded by fresh
fruits and veggies, stuffed avocado or tomato with tuna
or turkey salad, Caesar salad and much more. Prices
range from $4.95 and up.
Cripe also offers customized picnic baskets to suit
any occasion hence the name and party trays. She
is a former owner of the forerunner of Chez Andre on
the Island, and then at Manatee West Shopping Center,
Cuisine de France.
Le Picnic Basket is located at 103 7th St. North in
Bradenton Beach just behind Golden Star. Basket
accepts phone or fax orders at 778-5657.

Celebrating style
Wedding bells will be ringing at the Crown &


SimlyThe Bst
~T~TiF~ ~U
S U


a . F I


Thistle British Pub & Restaurant in Bradenton Beach
when owners Alby and Norah Henzell celebrate their
30th wedding anniversary this week. They'll also be
ringing for the engagement of daughter Maxine Luke
to John Calandra.
Jack (Islander cartoonist) and Judy Egan cel-
ebrated 35 years of marriage with The Islander By-
stander at the summer staff party. (How do they do 35
years?)
The Dry Dock is celebrating the month of June
with music the blues. Who wouldn't have the blues
over the prospect of 90 days of summer and tempera-
tures 90 plus degrees?
On June 9 and 10 you can shuffle to King Louie.
Dry Dock Inn's Kelly Zimmer celebrated her 29th
birthday on May 30.
Congrats to all.
by Bonner Presswood


Take Out Sandwiches
For the Beach

AND DELI
Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach


Fat Free, Sugar Free
Ice Cream!
Fresh Made Deli
Sandwiches & Soups
Fresh Bagels
Eat-In or Take-Out
Mon-Sat 10AM 9PM
Sunday 12-6PM

* 5318 Marina Drive
* 778-7386


The Island Poet
The whole house is jumping like it never has before,
For the kids are running everywhere and slamming
every door.
And sister and brother have started a big fight,
That folks are sure will last right on through the night
And mom is busy picking up things the kids have
thrown about,
And wonders just how long it will be before her
nerves give out.
And all the kids are running crazy or acting like a fool,
For it's vacation time and those kids are out of school.
Bud Atteridge



Illah M. Morningstar
Illah M. Morningstar, 92, of Bradenton died May
31 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Mayville, Mich., Mrs. Morningstar was a
resident of Manatee County. She was a Methodist.
She is survived by a son, Robert, of Orlando; a
brother, Bert Blow of Holmes Beach; two grandchil-
dren; and several great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held at a later date.
Inurnment was in Mayville, Mich.


Date Low High Rainfall
May 28 76 92 .0
May 29 76 94 .0
May 30 77 94 .0
May 31 77 93 .0
June 1 78 94 .0
June 2 74 78 2.2
June 3 74 80 .8
Average Gulf water temperature 85



POCO LOCO
C MEXICAN CUISIMN




Inside & Outside Dining 387-0161
|awg y pa a ^j'a^P^^^^Fsill^^


Nicki's West 59th


I -Tho y ueiG eRrena I


Nicki's West 59th Restaurant Welcomes You To Join Us
HAPPY HOUR in the lounge only 12PM-7PM


LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BARBARA JOHNSEN
Monday Saturday 6PM-IOPM


EARLY BIRDS
$595
MON-SAT
11AM-6PM


* 1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM* CLOSED SUNDAY


MON-SAT 10 AM.11 PM' CLOSED SUNDAY 795-7065


Temps

& Drops

on A.M.L.


BREAKFAST
SPECIAL
MON-THURS
10AM-2PM


CATERING &
BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE


I


I


795-7065


DRIFT414 PAllkAGE


`C: . '~


~t _t~r






IE PAGE 16 0 JUNE 8, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Summer activities list increases


Under the title "All Island Summer 1995," a large
variety of cultural, recreational and sporting activities
for children, youth and adults will be offered through-
out the summer thanks to a cooperative effort of indi-
viduals and organizations on and around the Island.
For a comprehensive list of all daily, weekly and
longer-session events scheduled, those interested may
call the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 778-
1908; Barbara Amador, 778-6110; or Roy McChesney,


778-0414. Older teens and adults are also invited to
volunteer to help with children's programs.
Among the immediately upcoming events not previ-
ously reported will be a baseball camp at the Center for
ages 5-12 years, 9 a.m.-noon, June 12-16, and tours of the
Island Historical Society Museum, ages 5-8, 10-11:30
a.m., ages 9 and older, 1-3 p.m. Monday, June 12.
The society will also sponsor a tour of historic sites
for ages 9 and up from 9-11 am. Friday, June 16. To


register for either activity, call 778-0492.
The Anna Maria Island Art League, 778-2099, will
offer the following children's classes in 10-week ses-
sions: crafts, 1:30-3 p.m. Monday starting June 12; ce-
ramics, 1:30-3 p.m. Wednesday starting June 14; and
drawing, noon-2 p.m. Thursday starting June 15.
Registration will be on a first-come-first-served
basis. Special rates will apply to those registered in the
All Island Summer program.


Watercolor demonstration at
Gallery West
The Island Gallery West will host two free dem-
onstrations on Saturday, June 10, from 10 am. to 2 p.m.
Velma Jackson will work in watercolor and Nancy
Huss will work in acrylic.
The public is invited to attend.
The gallery is located at 5348E Gulf Dr., Holmes
Beach.

League announces adult and
children classes
The Anna Maria Island Art league will hold summer
classes for adults and children through the summer.
Children
Starting Monday, June 12, and every Monday
thereafter Laura Beard will offer a craft class from 3:30
to 5 p.m. Cost is $7 per class. Julie Stewart continues


with her on-going Prisma Color Pencil classes on
Wednesday from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Adult
Monday Adult and Young Adult Oil Painting
with Anna Gunn, 10 to noon.
Tuesday Stained Glass with Sandra French, 10
am. to noon.
Wednesday Drawing from the Right Side of the
Brain with Rachel Kaufman, 10 am. to noon. Prisma
Color pencils with Julie Stewart, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Thursday Prisma Color Pencils with Julie
Stewart, 10 am. to noon.
Friday Watercolor/Drawing with Barbara
Singer, 10 a.m. to noon.
Contact the league at 778-2099 for cost of adult
programs and for registration. The Anna Maria Art
League is located at 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes
Beach.


Mote Marine

offers summer

camp
Mote Marine Laboratory on City Island just
south of Longboat Key will offer a variety of
children's summer activities for three age groups.
For ages 6 through 9 years old, week-long
morning sessions will run from June 19-Aug. 4
covering natural marine toxins and chemical pol-
lutants, the truth about sharks and hurricanes, and
a Sarasota Bay boat trip.
During those same dates, children 10 through
13 can participate in an overview of Mote's re-
search including cooperative learning activities and
outdoor experiences.
For ages 14 through 18, Marine Science I will
be offered in two-week sessions from June 19-30 or
July 31-Aug. 11. Marine Science II will run June
19-30, June 26-July 7, July 10-21 or July 24-Aug.
4. Week one will be at Mote; week two in the
Florida Keys.
For those with current scuba certification, Ma-
rine Science III will run from July 3-14 or July 17-
28, with one week at Mote and one in the Keys. The
marine science curriculums are designed to satisfy
the Florida summer-school requirements for one-
half credit in the natural sciences.
For fees and information, call Mote at 388-4441.


DiP'S

Old Fashioned Penny Candy
& Ice Cream Shop
Celebrating Our 1 Year Anniversary
Thanks to all of Anna Maria Islandl

S1.00R ootbeer Floats
ALL DAY
4" V Fri, Sat & Sun June 9. 10 &11
Open Mon-Sun 1 pm 10 pm
9801 Gulf Drive Anna Maria 778-1706

"The Bounty"
An appetizing trio of:
Filet, N.Y. Strip and
Lobster under Au Poivre,
Key lime bearnaise and
Florentine sauces.





Entrees Starting
at $9.95, Including a
wide selection of
Fresh Area Seafood,
Black Angus Steaks
& Erotic Grains
& Pastas.

"Intimate dinner for two $39.95"
Dinner Tues. Sat. 5-10pm
Early Dinner Hour 5-6pm
Champagne Sunday Brunch
S10am 2pm Sundays
S ... on the corner of
Manatee Avenue & GulfDrive.
(813) 778-5440


Summer programs set at library
Registration will open June 12 for a variety of sum- dian daisy beading, 2-3:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 20; and
mer programs for children in grade two and up at the Is- Laura Beard, mystery craft program, 2-3 p.m. Thurs-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. day, June 29. Four July programs are also scheduled.
June activities will include an evening of Preschool story times for ages 4 to 6 will be held
storytelling with Windell Campbell, 7-8:30 p.m. from 7-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 21 and 28, and
Wednesday, June 14; Irene Murphy and American In- July. 19 and 26. For more information, call 778-6341.


CII





frehoriinl secals ppulr talat
seecins ncuingradtinalma







Open:~y 5 PM , -0Tusda -Suda
.. .m 0 m---m-0 m
.""~ 'i ,l
.,


WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails
r- ------------- --i
Lunch or
i Dinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER
I ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE.
Not good with any other coupon or offer -- Expires 6/30/95
Wednesday Nights
Blind Draw Darts 8 P.M.
Food & Drink Specials
Free Giveaways.
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thurs. 4 to 10
Friday Noon to 10
& Sat., Sun. Sam to 10pm
RESTAURANT Serving Breakfast 8 'til
519 GfPub Hours 'Til 7

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 0 PAGE 17 liJ


Rory Block to perform at
Sarasota Players
The Players of Sarasota will present an evening
with Rory Block on Sunday, June 11, at 8:15 p.m.
Block's performance will include Delta blues, folk
songs and original compositions.
Tickets are $14 and available at the Players Box
Office, 838 N. Tamiami Trail.
For phone orders and further information call
365-2494.


Events
SThe Manatee Coin Club Coin Show will be
held Saturday and Sunday, June 10 and 11, at the
Ramada Inn on U.S. 41 across from the airport from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. The 1995 Lincoln,
Doubled Die Cent will be featured. Appraisals made
on coins will be free. Admission: Free. Information:
Fred Vandergraff, 756-0186.
The Manasota Weavers Guild has opened a for-
mal showing of members' work at the Selby Gardens'
Museum of Botany and Arts, 811 S. Palm Ave.,
Sarasota. The exhibit will run through Sept. 2 and in-
cludes weaving and spinning demonstrations. Informa-
tion: 366-5731, ext 10.

Fundraisers
The Arthritis Foundation will present its First
Annual Auction Saturday, June 10, at Tavern on the
Green, 1000 Circus Blvd., Sarasota, in conjunction
with the foundation's First Annual Golf Outing at
Bobby Jones Golf Complex. Cost: $45 per person for
Golf Outing. Information: 739-2729.

Business
The Longboat Chamber of Commerce will hold


Joe's Eats & Sweets


Homemade Soups, Salads
& Deli Sandwiches
Homemade Ice Cream & Yogurts
T MADE ON LOCATION
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge 778-0007
Sun. & Mon. 12-9:30/Wed-Fri. 6-10pm/Sat. 12-10


its 37th annual Awards Dinner on Saturday, June 17
at the Island House at the Longboat Key Club. Cock-
tails will begin at 6:30 p.m. with dinner served at
7:30 p.m. Cost: $50 per person. Reservations and
information: 383-2466.
SThe Longboat Chamber of Commerce will hold
the June Business After Hours at Savings of America,
2891 S. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, on Tuesday, June 13,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Door prizes will be given away.
Cost: $5 for members/$10 for guests. Reservations and
information: 383-2466.


State artists schedule events
The Florida Artist Group, a statewide visual arts
organization, will hold its 45th annual symposium June
9-11 at the Sarasota Hyatt Hotel. Art historian Kevin
Costello will speak at a members luncheon June 10.
An exhibit of members' works will be on display
at the Sarasota Visual Arts Center, 707 N. Tamiami
Trail, from June 12-30.
For further information, call Connie Heller, 383-
3547.


A THE AE


Studio 84 offers comedy
Manatee Community College theater students will
exercise a wide array of comedic skills in the summer
production of "The Dining Room" by A.R. Gurney, Jr.
Each cast member will play between four and six
characters in a comedy involving a typical well-to-do
household.
Performances are at 8 p.m. Wednesday through
Saturday, June 14 to 17, in Studio 84, 5840 26th St. W.,
Bradenton.
General admission is $6. For more information call
755-1511, ext 4240.

for
SAMsational
Dads!o
OJ- ,Fresh & Piled High
O 0 Cuban or Low-Fat Turkey
Delivered To Your Dad's Door
s7.00 ea / 2 for $12.00 / 3 for $16.00 / 4 for $20.00
proceeds to Save Anna Maria No Mega Bridge Legal Fund
Call Joy at Haley's 778-5405


Where Longboat Key History Began





s i'ONE CRAB I
RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

Summer Menu

NEW...

CreateYour-Own Platter
Ao 0 O
Specialty Salads

Lite and Hearty Dinners

King Crab Legs

Daily Specials
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
SLONGBOAT KEY
.


Operetta opens at
Sarasota Players
"The Merry Widow, an operetta by Franz Lehar,
opens on Thursday, June 8 and plays through Sunday,
June 18, at the Sarasota Players, 838 N. Tamiami Trail.
An added performance gala by the Zonta Club of
Sarasota will take place on June 18 at 7:30 p.m.
All seats are reserved and tickets are $14.
Call the Players' box office at 365-2494 Monday
through Friday, 10 am. to 4 p.m. for ticket information.

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, 7 -sW
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls $7025
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


OPEN DAILY
for Lunch & Dinner from 11:30 am
Full menu plus daily specials including,


Monday:
Tuesday:

Wednesday:
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:
Sunday:


but not limited to:
Veal or Lasagna
Mexican with Margaritas
& Coronas $1.25 each
Greek
BBQ Ribs
Prime Rib (dinner only)
Stir Fry
Chicken, Peppercorn or Pecan
Bloody Marys at $1.25


All stars face off in
Little League
finales
All star teams from Anna Maria Island
Little League majors and minors faced off this
week. It was gray versus blue in both leagues
with coaches representing each league's win-
ning teams.
For the winning majors gray team, D.Coy
Ducks' assistant coach, Larry Armstrong, filled
in for had-to-work Coach Lou Fiorentino and
Haley's Motel was represented by Coach Gary
Wagner for the blue team.
The Grays won 4 to 0 with one-hit, shut-out
pitching by Taylor Bernard, Mike Patterson and
Mike Armstrong. Hitting for the Grays was led
by Bernard, Armstrong and Justin Dries.
For the minors, Elmo Torres of the Dodg-
ers coached the Blues and Gary Miller, coach
of Quality Builders led the winning Grays.
Torres reported fielding a "history-making
all girl infield" during the fifth inning. With a
tie game heading into the final sixth inning, the
Grays pulled ahead with a hit by Allison
Chewning to drive in the winning run. The fi-
nal score was Grays 7, Blues 6.


i EYE OPENER... 2 eggs, t
home fries and coffee... On


9t Island Inn Restaurant
\/,' OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
& 1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach


Delightful Dining 0,
Brunch, Lunch & Dinner
Sushi at Harry's
Join Us Thursday Night!

Gourmet Take-Out & Catering

NBA Playoffs
Don't Miss the Tip Off!
Dinner Specials at Harry's Deli, 617 thru 6/14
,^ Beef Bourguignonne, $9.95
5' Chicken Provencal, $9.95 .
Eggplant Parmigiana, $9.95 o- '

383-0777
Open Wednesday thru Sunday
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
On Beautiful Longboat Key


P1y5175


- I






EU PAGE 18 0 JUNE 8, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 28, trespass warning, 512 Spring, Castaways
Motel. The officer was summoned to assist in the evic-
tion of a tenant who had not paid rent and issued the
tenant a trespass warning.
June 1, larceny of a lawn chair, 900 block of
North Shore Drive.

Bradenton Beach
May 26, grand theft auto, 2000 block of Avenue
B. The complainant reported the subject took her ve-
hicle to his place of employment to fix the brakes and
did not return. When she called his employer the next
day, she found the subject had not been to work.
May 26, information, 2500 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported two vehicles were following him.
The officer located one of the vehicles and the driver said
he is a private investigator following the complainant He
said he has a partner in another vehicle.
May 27, criminal mischief, Coquina Beach con-
cession. An employee reported she found five plastic
chairs broken in pieces when she reported for work.
Damage was $25.
May 27, criminal mischief, 200 block of Gulf Drive
S., Beach Barn. The complainant reported a person un-
known broke a window on the side of the building. The
window and art work on it were valued at $500.
May 27, loitering and prowling, resisting without
violence, 1300 block of Gulf Drive N., Catalina Resort.
The victim and witness reported a heavy-set suspect
wearing shorts and a green shirt looked in their motel
room window, pulled out a knife, cut the victim's bath-
ing suit from the balcony, put it in his pants and ran into
a wooded area.
The officer located the suspect and placed him in
custody but did not find the knife. The suspect refused
to answer any questions. The next day, the complain-
ant located the knife in the wooded area and called
police to take possession.

COUPON
SEXPIRES6 I
. _.6 O 'S ..
I* 10519 Cortez Road I
* 792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12-00 Noon 8 PM

S PIZZA *
. BUFFET n

S$3.49 *
I I
I Per person all day with purchase of soft drink.
I "Thank you to all our local patrons" I
-mmmmM COUPON mmmmmMi


HAPPY h
HOUR ^-*
11:30
Sto P







FPOZEN -
0, s6:00










** By lnd C
2 or by sea. b
cheik 3
? oTout
oour












OPEN 7 DAYS
RESERVATNS 135 Blridge Seet
778-4849 77or8-by484
PQ AlZ^A luL~blMark" 49. O








77814849 7711~ 814849


May 28, Marchman Act, Coquina Beach. The
officer reported the subject had a strong odor of an al-
coholic beverage, was staggering and could not stand.
The subject did not know how he got to the park. The
officer placed him in custody.
May 28, Baker Act, 100 block of Sixth Street.
The officer reported the subject broke two glass win-
dows, took a piece of glass and attempted to slash her
wrist. She was placed in custody and transported to
Manatee Memorial Hospital.
May 28, criminal mischief, 200 Bridge Street,
Bradenton Beach City Pier. The complainant reported a
person unknown broke the hinges off the shrimp tanks.

Holmes Beach
May 26, drugs, 3010 East Bay Drive, Subway.
The complainant reported she found marijuana on the
floor next to the soda machine. The marijuana was
turned over to the officer who destroyed it.
May 27, vandalism, 5304 Holmes Boulevard, J
and J Graphics. The complainant reported persons un-
known had consumed hot dogs. Upon finishing them,
they discarded the packages and smashed condiment
packages, splattering catsup on the building. There was
no damage.
May 27, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $150,
2900 block of Gulf Drive.
May 27, disorderly intoxication, 5325 Marina
Drive, Crabby Bill's restaurant. The officer reported
two subjects were apparently causing a disturbance
after becoming very intoxicated. When the officer ar-
rived, they were both in front of the restaurant.
One subject would not respond to the officer when
the officer asked his name. After patting the subject
down to obtain his identification, he grabbed the
officer's wrist and refused to let go. The officer placed
him in handcuffs and he refused to get into the patrol
vehicle. The officer had to place him in the vehicle.
May 28, damage, 200 block of South Harbor
Drive. The complainant reported a person unknown
knocked his mailbox off its post and two planters off
their platforms.
May 28, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $50,
75th Street beach.
May 29, DWLS, 8400 block of Gulf Drive. The


795-8083


CORTEZ ROAD
CONSTRUCTION IS
FINALLY OVER!!
NOW IT'S TIME FOR
HAPPY HOUR
Mon.-Sat. 11-7
& All Day Sunday


Rich

| Kendall
JUNE 8, 9 & 10
THURS 8-12
FRI & SAT 9-1

Tuesday's
--A | Restaurant
3 \Lg Appreciation
f1 Night
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
With Daily Lunch Specials
BANTAM PLAZA *10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


officer observed the subject's vehicle leave its lane and
almost run into his patrol vehicle. The officer stopped
the vehicle, did a driver's license check and found the
subject's license to be suspended. He was given a ci-
tation for failure to maintain a single lane. His sister
drove the vehicle home.
May 29, found property bicycle, 6000 block
of Holmes Boulevard.
May 29, found property bicycle, 3700 block
of Sixth Avenue.
May 29, petty larceny of a canoe, 3000 block of
Avenue F.
May 30, damage, 6300 block of Flotilla Drive.
The victim reported he parked his vehicle at
Albertson's and when he returned, he found a person
unknown had scratched an obscenity on the trunk. He
returned home and when he got up the next day, he
found the same obscenity was scratched on the hood.
The next day he got up and found words scratched into
the roof of the vehicle.
May 30, Marchman Act, 31st Street and Gulf
Drive. The officer found the subject intoxicated and
passed out at the corner and woke him. He said he had
no one to come and get him and the officer placed him
in custody.
May 29, vandalism, 5702 Marina Drive, Turtle's
Club and Cafe. Upon leaving the business, the com-
plainant observed a person unknown had kicked the
side of the vehicle causing damage.
May 31, petty larceny, 7100 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported she left a blanket, towel,
sunscreen, and visor in a beach bag on a chair on the
patio. During the night, a person unknown took the bag
to the beach, emptied it, took the blanket and towel
valued at $30 and left the other items on the beach.
June 1, suspicious, 200 block of 64th Street. The
officer responded in reference to a domestic dispute.
Upon arrival he heard loud music but no yelling and
screaming. The officer spoke to the resident who said
he plays his music loud to get back at his neighbors
who play theirs loud. The officer advised him to turn
the music down and call the police department when
the neighbor's music is loud.
June 1, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $65,
7400 block of Palm Drive.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 8, 1995 0 PAGE 19 IJ


By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
Please note that, according to Federal regula-
tions, "the negligent or intentional operation of an
aircraft or vessel, the doing of any other negligent or
intentional act which results in disturbing or molest-
ing a marine mammal; feeding or attempting to feed
a marine mammal in the wild" is a direct violation.
The Coast Guard is authorized to enforce this federal
regulation and will do so.
Also remember that all recreational vessels less
than 16 feet in length will no longer be allowed to
county Type IV throwable personal flotation devices as
part of a boat's compliment of PFDs. New regulations
require all boats, even canoes and kayaks, to have one
wearable PFD for each person aboard the vessel, and
the life jackets must be easily accessible.
May 27, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 19-foot pleasure craft dis-
abled near Marker 72 in Roberts Bay. The station re-
quested the assistance of Coast Guard Auxiliary ves-
sel 26084231, which provided a tow to port.
May 27, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a passenger suffering
from stomach pains on board a 44-foot sailing ves-
sel near Marker 17 in Sarasota Bay. The station di-
verted its 25-foot boat to investigate and also re-
quested Sarasota Fire Rescue to assist. Both vessels
arrived on scene and Sarasota Fire Rescue trans-
ported the passenger to shore.
May 27, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued a boating safety violation for not having an
FCC license on board for a VHF-FM radio.

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May 27, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 16-foot pleasure
craft near Stump Pass. The station requested the assis-
tance of Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 25087039,
which provided a two to port.
May 27, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 25-foot pleasure
craft near Marker 23 in New Pass. The station re-
quested the assistance of Coast Guard Auxiliary ves-
sel 26084231, which provided a tow to port.
May 28, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a disabled 25-foot pleasure
craft near Marker 17 in New Pass. The station re-
quested the assistance of Coast Guard Auxiliary ves-
sel 26084231, which provided a tow to port.
May 28, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of five people stranded on
Egmont Key. The station relayed the information to the
group's point of contact on Anna Maria Island, and the
people were removed from the island.
May 28, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued a boating safety violation for not having a
certificate of registration on board, for not having a
sound-producing device on board and for not having
proper visual distress signals on board.
May 28, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 19-foot pleasure craft
overdue from the Longboat Pass area. The station com-
menced a communications check with negative results.
The vessel returned to port unaided with all passengers
accounted for.
May 28, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued a boating safety warning for not having per-
sonal flotation devices readily available.
May 28, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 27-foot sailing vessel

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aground near Longboat Pass. The station launched its
25-foot boat, which located the disabled sailboat The
Coast Guard does not free vessels from being
grounded, but does provide assistance in the form of
setting the vessel's anchor in good water or removing
passengers if requested. The vessel's captain had al-
ready contacted a commercial firm to free his vessel,
which occurred a short while later.
May 28, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued an enforcement action report for feeding
dolphins near the Venice area.
May 28, Boarding. A pleasure craft was boarded
and issued a boating safety violation for not having a
certificate of registration on board, for not having a
sound-producing device, for not having proper visual
distress signals and for not having a serviceable fire
extinguisher. The vessel's voyage was terminated due
to the lack of a working fire extinguisher.
May 29, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a sailing vessel with a bro-
ken mast 300 yards off Bradenton Beach. The vessel
required no assistance and safely reached port.
May 29, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of two 15-foot inflatable
boats overdue from the Anna Maria Sound area. The
station conducted a communications check with
negative results. The boats safely reached port a
short time later.
May 29, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 19-foot pleasure craft
Overdue from a trip from the Palmetto Boat Ramp to
Egmont Key. The station conducted a communications
check with negative results. The boat returned safely to
port a short time later.
May 29, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 24-foot pleasure craft
overdue from a trip between the Manatee River to Shell
Island. The station conducted a communications check
with negative results. the boat returned safely to port a
short time later.


VT






ij~ PAGE 20 M JUNE 8, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Hurricane Allison aftermath: superb fishing this week


The arrival of Allison put a damper on fishing near
the Island, but the storm promises to provide a great
upcoming weekend for angling. Low barometric pres-
sure usually means the fish stop eating and find a place
to wait out the storm, so when the storm blows past the
fish are hungry and willing to take just about any type
of bait. Look for some of those big legal sized, of
course redfish in the backwater, mackerel near the
passes and grouper offshore when the waves abate.
Bill at the Rod and Reel Pier said they celebrated
Allison's near-arrival with a hurricane party complete
with some of the finest root beer on the Island. Fishing
was naturally slow with the high winds and waves, but
Bill said a few hard-core fishers were able to land a few
redfish, a bunch of mackerel, some trout and flounder.
The prediction is for this weekend to be a great time to
go fishing as the fish begin to hungrily surface.
John at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching a lot of reds, a few catch-and-
release snook and some mackerel.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 50-80 head of Key West grunts,
vermilion snapper and porgies. The six-hour trip aver-
aged 80-90 vermilion snapper, Key West grunts, grou-
per and a few dolphin the fish, not the mammals.
The nine-hour trip averaged 40-60 head of red and
black grouper, mangrove snapper and scamp.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said the hurricane
kept most offshore anglers inshore catching lots of reds
near the potholes on the flats. There are also some scat-
tered catches of flounder and trout in Sarasota Bay.
Chris said the next few days should produce some ter-


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Mail or deliver your registration with the
$20 fee to The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 '
Information: 778-7978


1995 Ray Simches
Memorial
S Island Cities
Horseshoe
Tournament
Anna Maria City Hall June 24 8:30 a.m.
Registration fee is $20 per team (two players)
Deadline for registration is June 19
SName:
Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:
Age: Phone
Signature: Date
(2) Name:
Mail Address:
City/State/Zip:
Age: Phone
Signature: Date
This waiver must be signed before participation In any Islander Bystander spon-
sored activity. Players must be 18 years of age. In consideration of your ac-
cepting my/our registration fee, I hereby, for myself, my dependents) and minor
children, and our executors and administrators, wave and release any and all
rights and claims for damages I or my dependents) or minor children have or
may have against The Islander Bystander and It's representatives, successors,
assigns, employees, contractors, or volunteers (collectively The Islander By-
stander) for any and all injuries or death suffered by myself, my dependents)
or minor children at any activity sponsored or monitored by the The Islander
Bystander, held upon Its property, or through the use of it's equipment If I or
my minor children or dependents) should suffer any Injury, Illness, or death
while participating In an activity, I authorize Instructors to use their sole discre-
tion in having me or my dependents) and minor children transported to a medi-
cal facility and I take all responsibility for this action, including costs. Also, I un-
derstand that no refunds are given unless the activity is canceled or a doctor's
release of all claims of any nature whatsoever for myself, my minor children
or dependents including but not limited claims arising due to the sole Joint, con-
tributory, concurrent or gross negligence of The Islander Bystander.


rific fishing as the barometric pressure rises and the
hungry fish start to gobble down anything even re-
motely resembling food.
Island Discount Tackle folks remind everyone about
the Fishing the Islands tournament June 17. It's a good
thing the tourney wasn't last weekend with the big blow
moving through! Despite the wind, there have been good
reports of lots of redfish, some nice trout, cobia, some
dolpiin caught about 40 miles offshore (pre-hurricane),
some sailfish about the same distance out in the Gulf and
some tarpon action near the beaches.


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Catch-and-
releast time for
snook
With the June I end of
snook season, linesiders
may now only be caught
and released. Donna Mills
from Ohio did just that
with this 35-inch, 15-
pound snook while fishing
with Capt. Mike Heistand.













Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said fish
have been scarce since the storm started chugging up
the Gulf, but wade fishers have been able to bring in a
few nice-sized redfish, some catch-and-release snook,
a few trout and a prediction that things will get much,
much better later this week.
By the way, Capt. Joe Webb from "Old Florida"
got his asking price for his boat and will be shopping
for a new boat in North Carolina. He promises to be re-
fitted and back on the water again soon.
Good luck and good fishing.





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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 8, 1995 M PAGE 21 li[


Hurricanes, caviar and Corinthians


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
The fly-by of Allison was one heck of a kickoff to
our hurricane season. Here's hoping it caught
everyone's attention and, if you weren't ready, now's
your free (we didn't get hit, remember) second chance
to make ready for the next storm.
Don't be caught ill-prepared a second time.

Allison delays Wells' research
One effect of Hurricane Allison's passing through
is a delay on Dr. Randy Wells' research project on
Sarasota Bay dolphins. The combination of high winds
and choppy water made for poor visibility early in the
week, thus delaying the capture-and-release program to
check on the critters' health.
Activities were re-scheduled to get underway by
mid-week, and let hope all goes well and the animal
rights folks have figured out Randy and his fellow sci-
entists are really on their side.

Return of the Gulf sturgeon
Sometime back I mentioned the one-time commer-
cial fishery for sturgeon in this area. Back in the shad-
owy times around the turn of the century both smoked
sturgeon and caviar were big business on the Gulf
Coast, and the industry centered around Tampa Bay
and the Hillsborough River.
The earliest numbers I've seen show 42,500
pounds of sturgeon landed in 1887, with a peak of
351,823 pounds in 1902. It was all downhill from there,
and with the damming of the rivers, overfishing and
water degradation, the sturgeon population plummeted
and was finally completely halted in 1984.
According to my fish sources, Atlantic sturgeon
have remained virtually unchanged for about 200 mil-
lion years. Related to sharks, sturgeon eat mollusks,
crustaceans and worms. The average Atlantic sturgeon
is about three feet long, although the record was a
1,500-pounder caught in 1911.
Sturgeon spend much of their time in saltwater,
although they enter rivers and streams to spawn.
One of the interesting things about sturgeon is that,
unlike mullet, they can be stripped of their roe and re-
leased to grow more. The Russians have been doing
that for a long time. Wholesale prices for good caviar
can hit $300 a pound.
A University of Florida researcher thinks the stur-
geon can make a comeback, but only if some of the
laws protecting the creatures are loosened or at least
if he's allowed to get the necessary permits. You see,
sturgeon is protected by the Endangered Species Act
right now, and according to Frank Chapman at UF, that


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means state and federal regulators won't let him start
an artificial spawning program to restock sturgeon.
The same rules forbid growing sturgeon on fish farms
until the research can show it can be done. But there's not
money for research, so Chapman is in a bind.
This sounds like the sort of thing "Rash" Limbaugh
would love to hoot and holler about.
Chapman figures that by starting an artificial spawn-
ing program and releasing young sturgeon in local waters
a whole industry can be re-created. He has already helped
set up sturgeon farms in northern California, but hasn't
been able to get permits to do so in Florida.
Walter Bell of the A.P. Bell Fish Co. in Cortez
told me that, as a young boy, he'd sometime catch a
sturgeon in local waters, but that was long after the
heyday of the local fishery. His recollection was that
way back then most of the sturgeon fishing was go-
ing on in north Florida.

Island shell request surfaces
Anna Maria Island's request to the Florida Marine
Fisheries Commission to control harvest of live shells
has at last surfaced and was scheduled to be taken up
at their meeting Wednesday in Sebring. The subject
was long delayed by the fisheries group because, they
said, they were deeply involved with implementation
of the net ban.
We'll let you know what action, if any, the group
took on the request, although the matter is expected to
be delayed until later this year.

Record snook and bullhead
Who says fishing isn't getting better? We've had
two new state records set in the past month.
First of all, in case you haven't heard, it looks as
though a new state snook record was set just days be-
fore the season closed June 1. Captain Dave Pomerleau
landed a 44-pound, 11-ounce snook off Pine Island
using a 14-inch mullet for bait.
The previous record was 44 pounds, 3 ounces.
Somewhat less interesting to us mostly salt fishers
is a new state bullhead record. Robert Bengis of Jack-
sonville landed a 5-pound, 7-ounce brown bullhead
from Cedar Creek in Duval County.
Measuring 20 inches in length, the new record had
a girth of 15-and-a-half-inches and was caught on
worms. The old bullhead record wasn't even close at
3 pounds, 4 ounces.

Corinthian Fund established
In a ground-breaking move, members of the
Sarasota Sailing Squadron have pledged $5,000 in seed
money to establish the Corinthian Fund. Proceeds will


be used to help talented and qualified sailors from
Sarasota and Manatee counties compete in national,
international and Olympic sailing events.
One definition of a Corinthian is "amateur
yachtsman."
Investment and management of the fund's assets will
be provided by the Community Foundation of Sarasota
County, meaning donations will be tax deductible and all
money will be used strictly for grant purposes.
Funds will help defray the substantial costs of ac-
commodations and travel to distant events. These costs
often prohibit young, talented, local sailors from par-
ticipating and furthering their sailing careers. Now
there is a mechanism to help them.
Establishment of the fund is "ground-breaking"
because the Squadron is the first American club to ever
establish an independent fund using community sup-
port. The club provided financial support to an Olym-
pic Laser team member, an Olympic Boardsailing can-
didate and a U.S. Optimist Pram team member.
If you'd like to support the fund in a modest way,
stop by the Squadron clubhouse the weekend of June
16-18 and spend a couple of bucks at the Sarasota
Corinthian Sailfest. Food and drink will be cheap, fel-
lowship friendly and the event is being sponsored by
SAIL magazine, the Corinthian Fund, Sarasota Youth
Sailing Program and the Squadron.
For more information about the event, call Cindy
Clifton at 365-5694. For more information about the
Fund, call Stewart Steams at the Community Founda-
tion, 955-3000.

Finding the tanks
You'd think it wouldn't be hard to spot an M-60
main battle tank, but that's not true if it's sitting on the
bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. You'll recall I men-
tioned about a month ago that five tanks were placed
on the M-8 reef and five more on the M-9.
One of the tanks on M-8 (60-65 feet of water) is
marked by buoy (#6) and can be found at 27012.51' by
82048.26'. These coordinates are GPS-generated Lat/
Longs and have been confirmed.
See you next week.

Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu6/8 8:38 2.2ft 1:28 0.8ft 9:50 1.5ft 3:20 0.5ft
Fri6/9 9:15 2.4ft 2:08 1.0ff 11:15 1.4ft 4:19 0.2ft
Sat6/10 9:52 2.6ft 2:46 1.2ft - 5:11 -0.1ft
Sun6/11 12:35 1.4ft 3:18 1.3ff 10:31a2.7ft 6:03 -0.2ft
Mon6/12 1:44 1.4ff 3:50 1.3ft 11:14a2.8ff 6:52 -0.4ff
Tue 6/13 2:42 1.4ft 4:29 1.3ft 11:59a2.9ff 7:40 -0.4ft
Wed 6/14 3:38 1.4ft 5:14 1.3ft 12:44 2.9ft 8:26 -0.3ft
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later

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EH PAGE 22 M JUNE 8, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


School Daze ..


.- M:, : . S : -W l .., .
Praiseworthy performance
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary for the week ending May 26. Kneeling, left to
right, are Katie Lindahl and Jennifer Sayko. First row, left to right, are Emily Smith, Curtis Sankey, Heather
Gainous, Johanna Cannon and Timmy Beuziane. Back row, left to right, are B.J. Keim, Jessica Cramer,
Lindsay Lane, Katie Frushour, Jordan McCullough and David Branning.


The big start
These pre-school children
from Dolphin Pre-School in
Holmes Beach are corralled
by Anna Maria Elementary
School Principal Jim
Kronus during the school's
"Kindergarten Round-up. "
Forty-four new kindergart-
ners were registered which,
according to Kronus, is
approximately 10 more then
the average. When asked
what they were looking
forward to when they started
school, the little ones
shouted "homework,"
"math" and "playground,"
in that order. Pictured with
Kronus is Ludka Ottenfeld,
pre-kindergarten teacher at
the day care center.


Islander says

'congratulations' to

top grade earners
The fifth-grade students at our Island school who
maintained a 4.0 average and received the All A's
Award for this school year are:
Ryan Allis, Sky Beard, Star Beard, Melissa
Eddington, Katie Lindahl, Sarah Loveland, Amanda
Parsels,Cara Perinetti, Travis Rice, Shawna Rigney,
Ben Sato, Jennifer Sayko, Lauren Shuford, Sarah Tho-
mas and Lisa Troutt.
The fifth-grade students who maintained a 3.5 av-
erage and received the Presidential Award are:
Ryan Allis, Marika Barrett, Sky Beard, Star Beard,
Rachelle Brockway, Akela Collins, Chad Dingier,
Patricia Domke, Ashley Eannarino, Melissa Eddington,
Sarah Fazioli, Katie Holmes, Hannah Jensen, Misty
Kinney, Mark Lathrop, Kate Lindahl, Matt Losek, Sa-
rah Loveland, Nichole Miller, Amanda Parsels, Cara
Perinetti, Travis Rice, Shawna Rigney, Ben Sato, Jen-
nifer Sayko, James Sebastiano, Lauren Shuford, Kris
Smith, Sarah Thomas and Lisa Troutt.

Student lawmakers
lauded
The City of Holmes Beach sponsored a Design-a-
Law Contest open to all fifth-grade students at Anna
Maria Elementary. The intent of the program is to help
young people understand the law-making process.
Six $50 U.S. Saving Bond were awarded for top
student law makers. They are:
Kirsten Faasee "Nobody can ride in the back of
a pickup truck."
Shawna Rigney "All dogs and cats must have
collars with the animal's name and its owner's name
and phone number."
Jennifer Sayko "It shall be unlawful to pick any
flowers growing in public areas."
Kristopher Smith "It shall be unlawful for any
person to operate a boat without being properly li-
censed."
Lisa Troutt "Recycling should be made manda-
tory, therefore empty cans and bottles should be taken
to stores in exchange for five to 10 cents per can or
bottle."
McKenzie Wilkins "Parents must watch kids
while swimming at all times."
Honorable Mention winners were: Jennifer
Burgner, Vaughn James, Misty Kinney, Michael Little,
Ben Sato and Lauren Shuford.


The tale of a special rabbit
"The Velveteen Rabbit," a book by Margery William and adapted for the stage by Anna Maria Elementary
School teacher Anne Russell was recently presented to the student body of our Island school by Mrs. Russell's
fifth-grade class and Maureen Loveland's kindergarten class. "The Velveteen Rabbit," played by Jennifer
Sayko, seated center, is being "sniffed over" by the "real" rabbits one of which "The Velveteen Rabbit"
desperately wants to become.


Bank on summer fun
Sandy Haas, back left, branch manager of First
of America Bank Florida in Holmes Beach, presents
the student council ofAnna Maria Elementary
School and council coordinator Jacque Fallon with
enough discount tickets to Busch Gardens and
Adventure Island for the entire student body to use
this long and hot summer.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 U PAGE 23 Ij


Ni N
N


Bradenton Beach business
owners form association
The first meeting for a new non-profit Association
of Bradenton Beach Business Owners was held Mon-
day, June 5, at Bradenton Beach City Hall.
The meeting was dedicated to organizing a struc-
ture for the association to benefit all of Bradenton
Beach. For information about the new association,
call 778-3113.

Island chamber welcomes
new members
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
welcomed new members during the month of May.
The new members are Dan Goodchild of Island
Therapy, Bradenton Beach; Dr. Diane Michaels,
Chiropractor of Access to Health, Holmes Beach;
Alan Lavoio Financial & Insurance Consultant,
Holmes Beach; Umbrella Beach Resort, Holmes
Beach; George Kyer of Island Concierge, Bradenton,
and The Longboat Observer, Longboat Key.





I -I I


GREAT STARTER OR RETIREMENT HOME.
2 bedroom, 2 bath with family room and screened
porch. $142,900. Call Carla Price 778-0770.


REDUCED: POOL HOME ON SAILBOAT WA-
TER: Key Royale three bedroom, two bath home
with boat dock, 70% stone lawn saving time and
dollars for leisure activities. Sprinkler system,
double garage, room for expansion. Now priced
at $212,000. Please call Carol R. Williams,
778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


DIRECT GULF FRONT CONDO with a spectacu-
lar Gulf view. Spacious two bedroom, two bath unit.
New ceramic tile in kitchen and hallway. Storm shut-
ters on all windows. Tumkey fumished. Priced at
$225,000. Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


ISLAND VILLAGE: lovely decorator perfect condo.
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Spacious open floor plan
with a view of Tampa Bay, new ceramic tile & wall
paper, within walking- distance of the beach.
$119,900. Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


1 1 REALTORS"
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (941) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1400-741-a772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK M S


5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach,
The Piudential FL 34217
nFoddRy (941) 778-0766


ON THE WATER ... 100' frontage on the
Intracoastal Waterway. This 4 bedroom, 2 bath
home has lots of potential. Oversized carport.
#60202. $269,000. Call Roni Price, evenings
778-5585.
SPECTACULAR ... energy efficient home with
carpet and ceramic tile throughout. Kitchen fea-
tures Corian counters and European cabinets.
Screened deck with spa. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths
and oversized garage. #63839. $174,900. Call
Karin Stephan, evenings at 388-1267.
ANNA MARIA ... untouched Gulf-front with na-
ture abounding plus Florida "cracker-style house"
with detached garage. 2 bedrooms, one bath plus
guest quarters. Wrap-around porch, fireplace,
high ceilings and hardwood floors. Approx. 1/2
acre. Owner financing. #64092. $450,000. Call
Dolly Young, evenings 778-5427.
Westbay Cove pool view 1 bed,
furnished $85,900. #DY 58710 H
Restaurant Facility ... Seats
85+ outdoors. 2,000 s.f. 2 COP,
furnishings + 900 s.f. 2 bd apt.
$450,000. #DY 52792
Sun Plaza West ... 2 bd, 2 ba,
with Gulf view. Turnkey fur- -. ,- ..
nished. $167,500. #DY 63126 T. Dolly Young
Motel ... 6 apts Holmes Beach. REALTOR/IMS
Location! Potential 18% ROI. Multi-Million Sales
$430,000. #DY 63227 778-5427

PRICED REDUCED...
Gulf-front living at its finest. Bright and
cheerful end unit, 2 bedrooms, 2
baths, turnkey furnished. Tennis,
swimming pool, elevator, garage, stor-
age and secured lobby. #CH55723.
1-54;900 Now only $145,0001
Carol Heinze
REALTOR0/CRS
Multi-Million $ Club
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

Karin Stephan
REALTOR o
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Office:
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
140 FEET OF BAYFRONTI
Rare bayfront home with
million dollar view. Fine
investment. 2BR/2BA, great
for entertaining. $389,000. #KS 62765


And there's the
Island's rub ...
Massage therapist Dan Goodchild and his wife, Jo-
Ann, hosted a grand opening reception following the
ribbon-cutting ceremony at their new business, Island
Therapy, last week Darcy Migliore, executive
director of the Anna Maria Chamber of Commerce,
Bradenton Beach Councilman Dick Suhre, Dan and
Jo-Ann and Chamber President Don Howard did the
honors. Goodchild was therapist to the "stars" -
the cast and crew of the television series "In the
Heat of the Night" and was staff therapist for the
Federation Cup tennis tournament prior to moving
to Anna Maria Island three years ago. Island
Therapy is located at 2501 Gulf Drive North in
Bradenton Beach.
Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood






RI PAGE 24 M JUNE 8, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real

estate sales
503 77th St, Holmes Beach, a ground level 3bed/
2bath/lcar canal front home of 1437 sfla, built in 1958
on a 114x109 lot, was sold 4/24/95, Marsh to Guildner
et al, for $220,000; list unknown.
510 75th St, Holmes Beach, an elevated 3bed/3bath/


2car canal front home of 1550 sfla, built in 1979 on a
90x120 lot, was sold 4/28/95, Toms to Minton, for
$265,000; list $295-279,000.
5808 Gulf Dr, Holmes Beach, 206N Waters Edge,
an elevated 2bed/2bath condo of 1080 sfla built in 1975,
was sold 4/13/95, Schmitz to Blair, for $129,000; list
$139,900.
6250 Holmes Blvd, Holmes Beach, 35 North Beach
Village 2, an elevated 3bed/2+bath/2car townhouse
condo of 1650 sfla, built in 1991, was sold 4/21/95,


WAGNER REALTY6,ne939

SE Bill 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978
Dave Moynihan ............ 778-7976 Ed Oliveira .................. 778-1751
Bill Alexander .............. 778-0609 Jackie Jerome ............... 792-3226


LAGOON VIEW from this 1BR/1BA Runaway
Bay unit with washer/dryer, extra closet space,
all new appliances and close to the pool. Across
the street from the beach, second home or great
rental with on-site rental management all for
$78,900. Call Ed Oliveira.


APARTMENT MOTEL Five-unit Island apartment
motel, fully renovated and tastefully decorated. Lo-
cated across the street from beach. Complex in-
cudes 2 pools, courtyards, Jacuzzi and laundry. Of-
fered at $359,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


BRIDGEPORT Gulf view from this top floor unit
with pool, covered parking, elevator and steps to
beach. Located close to shopping and restaurants.
Offered at $89,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for these 2BR
direct Gulf front apartments in small ten-unit
complex with quiet Holmes Beach location.
Pool, wide sandy beach and walking distance to
shops and restaurants. Starting at $124,500.
Call Dave Moynihan for details.


GREAT HOLMES BEACH LOCATION Nicely
decorated, turnkey fumished 2BR/2BA unit at
Ocean Park Terrace. Great Gulf view from master
BR and screened porch. Pool, secured lobby, eleva-
tor, walking beach enhance this vacation home or
great rental. Priced at $169,000. Call Ed Oliveira.


ISLAND FOURPLEX Four fully furnished 2BR
apartments on large 100 x 100 corner lot. Short
walk to wide, sandy walking beach. Offered at
$299,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


Minton to Kandetzki, for $170,000; list unknown.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate
broker, exclusively for The Islander Bystander. 1995

E X C E P T I O N A L


ANNUAL & VACATION RENTALS
OWNERS...
Secure the highest caliber tenants
Realize the highest income from
your properties
Contact our Rental Specialists:
Debbie Dial or Brenda Reddy,
941-778-2275


RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY TWO LOCATIONS: Robert
, 3007 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton 758-7777 24 hour number 758-7777 SR. Jan
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 778-7777 24 hour number 778-7777 "FRENCHY"


S "We Sell The Island... Worldwide" 7-646


SPACIOUS DUPLEX with caged pool within walking
distance to Gulf beaches 2BR/2BA each side. New
siding, lovely deck and beautifully landscaped.
Plenty of room and plenty of possibilities here! Call
Barbara Turner 778-7777.


ISLAND DUPLEX FIXER-UP: 5BR/3BA/3-Car spa-
cious, close to beach, newer roof and exterior paint,
some owner financing is available. $212,000. Call
Robert St Jean at 778-7777 or 1-800-894-9606.


JUST LISTEDI Unobstructed Gulf view from this large
2BR/2BA unit. Master bedroom in loft overlooking living
area. New carpet. Private beach, pool and jacuzzi. Two
car garage parking, elevator and stair security. Priced to
sell at $152,900. Call Jennifer Jones 795-2865.


Ron Travis David Coupland
BROKER/OWNER BROKER/OWNER


Karen Johnson
MANAGER


Weibke Bentley
REALTOR


Sandy Greiner Yvonne Higgins
BROKER/REALTOR BROKER/REALTOR


a1)
171
Lid


I -~ --- ~~-- I I II -- I


Y

Cs.
u







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E JUNE 8, 1995 0 PAGE 25 EI


ALI AEA [ '-.,SI-F1EDII.-S


MATCHING SOFA & LOVESEAT 3 cushion sofa, 2
cushion loveseat. Mauve, teal & cream plaid. Exc. con-
dition. 794-5888.
SOFA BEDS good condition $25. 778-5405.
GE WASHER & DRYER $150 for pair. Good condition.
792-0973.
MARLBORO POCKET BILLIARD table, collectors item,
brand new regulation size 3/4 thick diamond-honed
slate, solid exotic hardwood, comes with balls, triangle,
brush, bridge head, chalk and 4 cues... $2,750. or best
offer, or trade for boat. 778-3111.
MOVING SALE Colonial sofa, chest-o-drawers,
Hitchcock chair, swivel chair, card table and chair, lots
of misc. 778-6273.


BIG YARD SALE Sat., June 10. 8-3.750 North Shore.
The good stuff is going now! Antiques, collectible, fish-
ing gear, housewares, sheets, furniture and oddities.
RUMMAGE SALE Sat., June 10. 9 am 1 pm. St.
Bernard Activity Center. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.
GARAGE SALE Sun., June 11. 9-3.
2413 Avenue B., back of house. Baby crib, children's
toys & clothes. Household items, fishing items.


WANTED WW II, Korea, Vietnam and other veterans
of Foreign War to join Island VFW Post. Call NOW! Bob
DeVane 778-4400.


I PLY THE BEI 7_
ISLAND VACATION
.RENTALS








USA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
al101tyGul Drive
Realty inc. .Bach.,FL 34217


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. Motivated theme classes each month:
Salsa, 60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme,
etc. All classes include muscle conditioning. Classes
are: Tuesday & Thursday 7:00-8:00PM. For info call
Geri 779-2129.
HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT: The Islander
Bystander's 1995 Ray Simches Memorial Island Cities
Horseshoe Challenge is June 24, 8:30 a.m. Hurry in to
register at The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping
Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach no later than
June 19. $20 for two-person team.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


'95 CHEVY S-10 Blazer. Burgundy, auto, air, PW, PB,
power locks, fully loaded & over $2,000 in after factory
extras. Only 10K miles. Just reduced to $21,000. Call
Anytime 320-0110.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
Find the key to the home of your dreams in the pages
of The Islander Bystander. Don't miss a week!


Come ride with me!



FI


Island Realty Group A f
*60^ftemWWW^W^


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALESAND RENTALS
9701 Gul Drive P 0 Box 717 .Anna Marta, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


DON'T MAKE A MOVE
WITHOUT US
25 years of dependable Real Estate Service
on Anna Maria Island.
Don't miss out on Qualified Buyers this Summer!
Because of our Strong Rental Program we have
clients all summer long.

LIST WITH US TODAY
Our associates sell the majority of our own listings.
"Multi-Million dollar producers"
We have a large inventory of rental property
weekly/monthly/seasonally/annually
WE ARE YOUR
ISLAND SPECIALISTS

Broker Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte,
Mike Schulte, Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell


We'll find your place in paradise.


SINCE 1939
778-1751
Evenings


ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling,
Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!

2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Bradenton Beach
FL34217 Office


U -


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending
both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction & Design,
Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty,
Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Management and Annual &
Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilest


WIDE ISLAND CANAL!
Outstanding waterfront home is versatile as a
family home of two bedrooms with Mother-in-
law Suite. The 17 x 23 Master suite includes
dressing room, large walk-in-closet & Master
bath plus a lovely comer fireplace & private
patio. Two large guest bedrooms are on op-
posite side of home plus three baths. Living
room, dining area & customized kitchen relate
to the Florida room which has a built-in stereo
system & wet bar & opens onto wonderful
pool & jacuzzi with stone garden & waterfall
plus built-in BBQ for great Island entertaining.
Newly replaced seawall, full service dock,
newly landscaped & resurfaced circular drive.
Reduced price $390,000. Call Marie Franklin.


9606 Gun Drive PO Box 836 Anne Maria* Florida 3421
1-800-845-9573 (941) 778-2259 Fax (941) 778-2250


SUPER VALUE AT A SUPER PRICE!
412 Bay Palms Dr. 3 bedroom/ 2 bath, large lot,
tile roof, dbl. garage, perfect location, great value,
ideal family home! $149,900.
Call John Green 778-2261
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 _., MIS [A


SUMMER
VACATION
B ,.RENTALS ...
S weekly/monthly
with panoramic
views as this one
located on the Gulf
in north end of Anna
Maria. For details
call Alice at Horizon
Realty, 778-0426.



(941) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY


of Anna Maria, Inc.
- 420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA. FL 34216-FAX 77-1929


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2-car, 3,895
sq.ft. under roof home including caged pool. Unique
origami roof line and walled solarium. $265,000.

Doug
DOWUNQG Dowling
REALT Dowling
M"0Pln.A. P AV.
Anna Maria Realty
77-Realty
778-1222
-. 78-22


1-1 IVA Z I IA A ij 1AA: A I A All IN A V 1 111:111 VA lua*i -.1011]:M 'N WA I DI A 41.1 A I A -tll] N1


SPRING SALE NEW 1995 BOATS 20' Fiesta pon-
toon boat, 60 hp, loaded, fish or cruise, call for low
price. 17' Allison center console, "dealer cost" $3,995.
19' Gulfcraft center console "unbelievable" $3,295. 15'
Allison "salt water flats boat w/40 hp galv. trailer,
loaded $6,995. 17 Pro-sports center console w/85
Yamaha Galv. trailer, loaded $10,995. 18' Tremblay
"pro-flats" lowest price ever $4,995. 19' Carolina Skiff
"hull only" special $2,595.21' Carolina Skiff "hull only"
Special $3595. Capt. John's 792-2620.

FREE *1 FREIE FIRE

SUMMER JOB

ADS FOR KIDS

& BUSINESS
If you're under 16 years of age and looking for
work, or if you're a business willing to hire a teen
we've got a deal for you. Your classified ad
is free.
Just write up your ad, up to 21 words, and
fax, mail or bring it to The Islander Bystander
office. Deadline each week is Monday noon.
Your ad will run for up to three weeks free
under a special "Student Work" heading in The
Islander Bystander classified ad section.
Call 778-7978 for information. FAX copy to
778-9392. Stop in or mail: 5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 34217.



n L & neaL~I


A ^iA 11 A I1 A .^vi* A I A .1 A I A .1 A I A I A


vwqwc- grt


II- --


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OI PAGE 26 E JUNE 8, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


S CommnwRal* Reldential* Free Estimates
~an dI 's Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
L31Wf11 \Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Services 1 13 YEARS EXPERIENCE. INSURED
77.135 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
t 7780-1345 AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
S Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL, TEXTURE
& POPCORN REPAIR 778-1353


Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900 F-006644

ISLAND LUMBER
,gd HARDWARE
213 54th St. Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


I
State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


*S E.

Painting
fPressue Cleanritn
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
SHusband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


I UHPNi


SHELLS SEAFOOD hiring all positions. Apply between
2-4 PM. 3200 E. Bay Drive.


EXPERIENCED BIG SISTER, graduate of Safe Sitters
course, has openings for baby sitting in Holmes Beach
area. Call 778-0511.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults through Manatee Council
on Aging. Transportation available. 748-6974."


DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Holmes Beach.
Now taking reservations for our summer program ages
2-10 yrs. Also a few openings for fall registration ages
2-6 yrs. Come by and visit with us. 778-2967.
HANDYMAN carpentry, painting, plywood storm shut-
ters, repairs of all kinds. Commercial or residential. 25
yrs. exp. Call Rich 778-4881.
JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
DESIGN 2000 FOR HAIR. Offering excellence in hair
design and color expertise. We invite you to experience
the finest in personal service. North end of LBK at 6400
Gulf of Mexico Dr. 387-9807, evenings by appointment.
HOUSECLEANING will accept regular weekly & bi-
weekly. Wallpapering, painting and small repairs.
778-2862.
I WILL DRIVE you to the store, doctors, shopping or I'll
go for you. 778-4881.
HURRICANE window tint cars, homes, boats. Hurri-
cane screen service, greenhouses etc. Pro music and
modeling, private parties by "Bash Buck and the
Babes." 795-6268.
MAN WITH SHOVEL... Planting, mulching, trimming,
clean-up, shell, odd jobs. Hard-working and respon-
sible. Excellent references. Call Edward 778-3222.
VACATION CARE on island: will feed and tend to your
pets and plants, etc. Reasonable, experienced with
references. Call Barbara at 778-1608.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody,
shampoo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm & hall,
$34.95. 11 years in the business. No hidden prices.
794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK / GLASS BLOCK / stone / pavers / custom
homes / fireplaces / planters / decorative walls. Lic
#MC-00318. 778-5183.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.


INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.
THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of
home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experi-
ence. Insured, island resident, references available.
Jim 779-2129.
DON COLEMAN PAINTING Residential, commercial,
interior, exterior. Free estimates, 30 yrs experience.
778-2356.
GLENN MASONE home improvements. Many island ref-
erences. Handyman services also available. 798-9286.


1,000 S.F. of Retail/Commercial space. 5508 Manna
Drive. Ask for Dennis, 778-3924.
ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views, 1 BR, patio, pool, W/D,
furnished. Annual. 211.S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.
FURNISHED one and two bedroom rentals available
until December. $550 and $750/mo. Anna Maria Re-
alty, 778-2259.
PERICO BAY CLUB unfurnished 2BR/2BA, pristine
bayfront, carport, appliances. $850/mo plus $850 secu-
rity. No pets. Prudential Florida Realty T. Dolly Young
778-0766.
ANNUAL, 3BR/2.5BA, north end of island. $1,000/
month. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARTINIQUE CONDO 2BR/2BA direct ocean view,
pool, tennis court. Turnkey $1,500 plus electric and
phone. Will rent yearly 813-884-0222.
VACATION RESORT 66 by owner., weeks in June &
July, poolside $500, Beach front $600. 1-800-977-0803.
GENT, 53, wishes to rent a room on Anna Maria Island
10/20 to 12/20, 1995 (local refs.) Write to: A. Branson,
10 N. 4th St., So. Bethany Beach, Delaware 19930.
ONE BEDROOM BAYFRONT apartment, Bradenton
Beach. Partially furnished $475/mo. 778-7980.


0OIMES
BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


AIRIAIFIAIT C IAG BRAG
PAUV I U I HI T EA Y .TU IENE
I N D I I-A IN A 6G 0V E R N_ 0R D L N S.
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ESCHR 0 E R iNTEATRQ
SPCA IRKS ASPS ASAP
T R AU S TBA ST LA AP
P AR S EHC TIY T INAUISST R IA L IA
A iE -E R H 0 0 K E|ED|UP C|IO|R 0 NA
T 0 Y S E1UT E P IE IS T


LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.
Repairs & Remodeling
778-5622
#RF0049191

)




KOHLER.
S6io o 6vi

5348-B f Dr. Holmes each
5348-8 GuK Dr. Holms* Beach


REMODELING
R ADDITIONS
RENOVATIONS
XACT KITCHENS BATHS
DECKS & MORE
ARPENTRY CALL KIT WELSCH

ERVICES 778-5230
LIC #RR0053399


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
SSorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.


AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 8, 1995 M PAGE 27 IE


JS AND- -CL SSIFIED


EFFICIENCY APARTMENT with screened porch and
private entrance. 778-7039.
GULF-FRONT beach house! Firecracker special on N.
Shore Drive in Anna Maria. 3BR/2BA in perfect condi-
tion. July 1 July 8, 1995. $900.778-3171.
UNIQUE OFFICE STUDIO space over Islander's Mar-
ket (old IGA) in Anna Maria. Possible shared secretarial
with Gene Aubry, Architect. Possible furnished. Call
Jody at 778-4300.
ANNUAL: 1BR/1BA unfurnished condo. Very nice.
Large garage with W/D. $550/mo. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-
7244 309 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
ANNUAL: 3BR/2BA unfurnished townhouse. Large 2-
car garage and storage. Comm. pool. North Beach Vil-
lage. $1,100/mo. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244 309 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria.
ANNUAL 3BR/2BA unfurnished home, caged pool on
canal with dock. Key Royale Dr. near Gloria Dei. Pet
OK. $1,400/mo. Available 7/1. 778-5405.
SEASONAL Gulf front bargain! Cute & cozy Florida
beach house. 2BR/2BA $400/wk. 1BR/1BA $300/wk.
Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244 309 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
SUMMER & FALL RENTALS direct Gulf-front, 2 week mini-
mum. 3BR/2BA, pool, jacuzzi, sauna, tennis. 794-8877.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX 2BR/1BA, all appliances,
1.5 blocks to beach, available 6/1, $600/mo, annual plus
deposit. 778-5793.
BEAUTIFUL NORTH END, annual, darling country cot-
tage. Lg 1 BR/1 BA, charming 2BF/1BA. Steps to beach.
Exceptional permanent residences, won't last! From
$525. 778-2126.
ANNUAL RENTAL 1/2 block to Gulf, large 2BR/1BA apt.,
just repainted, tropical landscaping, rear unit has back-door
to fenced shaded backyard. No pets. $650/mo. 778-9289.
HOMES BEACH DUPLEX, very nice, 2BR/1BA, annual
rental. First, lt, and security. $625/mo plus utilities. 778-0217.
oANNUAL RENTAL Elevated 1 BR/1 BA house. Peakview
of the Gulf 1/2 block away. $500/mo. No pets. 778-9289.
CHARMING BAY FRONT vacation cottage. Beautifully
furnished and landscaped, private patio, steps to Gulf
beaches, fishing pier and historic village. $75/night.
$400/week. 779-1131.
HOLMES BEACH Gulf view from your balcony. 2BR apt.
turnkey furished. Available now thru Dec. at off season
rates. 778-4638.
HOLMES BEACH nice 1BR/1BA seasonal or annual.
Short walk to beach. 778-4368.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
from $400/wk. 778-1135.
WESTBAY COVE 2BR/2BA. Furnished or unfurnished.
Call Sharon 778-3377 or 778-3730.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.


PRIVATE PARTY is looking to buy an island lot, rental
or income property with 10% down seller financing. Fax
info. to 414-332-4898.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of
Anna Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/
3 acre w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young af-
ter hours. 778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
INVEST! Several Island 2-plexes & 4-plexes available.
Get all the facts from Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX
Gulfstream, 778-7777.
DEEP WATER CANAL. Walk to beach from newly re-
modeled 4BR/2BA home, 222 Oak Ave., Anna Maria,
by owner. $219,500. 778-2681.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/
1BA each unit, close to shopping center $119,000.
404 71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit -
$159,000. 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to
Gulf $174,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
BRADENTON MAINLAND minutes from beaches. Just
off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community. 1400 s.f.
villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1-car garage, new carpet, paint, ver-
ticals, maintenance free living. 105K. 794-8792.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Beautiful Gulf front
2BR/2BA condominium. Offers a gorgeous view of
the beach. $210,000. Harry E. Robbins Assoc. Inc.,
Realtor. 921-5351.
MOTEL MINDED? Going business with 6 income pro-
ducing units, heated pool & gorgeous courtyard. One
half block to beach in residential area. Priced to sell
$375,000. For additional information, call Connie L.
Carberry, Realtor. RE/MAX ACTION GROUP, INC.
800-735-4190 or 813-522-4122.
GORGEOUS GULF VIEW year old award winning cus-
tom built home. Heated pool, 2-car garage. Can be
used as 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 bath, jacuzzi tub, fireplace,
completely furnished. Long term lease or will work with
qualified buyer on lease purchase. Owner financing.
813-778-3777 or 813-965-2158.
WANT TRUE WATERFRONT! This 3 bedroom home
offers beautiful open Bay views from most rooms. Won-
derful pool & spa, recently updated, a true value in
today's market. Offered at $219,900. #63308 -
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. 383-5543.
FOR SALE BY OWNER charming older home in ex-
cellent condition, 2BR/2BA, fenced yard. One lot from
beach, good rental history, great potential. 778-4372.
DISCOVER PERICO SHORES! Be one of only 9 lucky
homeowners to live just 5 minutes from beach and 5 min-
utes to town. All lots have water views! 3BR/3BA model
home is open this weekend! 12-4pm. Must see! Call
Wedebrock Real Estate Co. for more info! 383-5543.
OPEN HOUSE Sun., June 11, 1-4.
306 56th St., Holmes Beach. Completely renovated 3BR/
2BA split, large family room w/fireplace, 100x1 17 lot, walk
to beach, library, shopping. $160,000. 778-6700.


CLASSIFIED AD FORM
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in
advance or mailedto our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL34217. We are located
next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line
headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2
for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. To place an ad
by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry, we can not take classified ad copy
over the telephone.

USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: (For 21 word minimum, use one word for each blank space)


3

THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER

Run issues)


Amt. pd Date _Ck. No._

II SLANDEformation: 778
More information: 778-7978


Cash

I m-


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
S Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola Rco0o4s25*RGoosssa- PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991

KAREN CLERKIN
Independent Sales Represenftitve
778-8624
Gift Certificates Available
AVO fl Fundraisers Skin So Soft on hand

Pack & Ship
We pick-up We deliver
-/'S delicate heirlooms to large furiture
SUNSHINE SHIPPING 727-7447


PIANO & KEYBOARD
LESSONS
4 All Ages All Levels
778-3539


E. Burkly
778-0720


VOICE


* LESSONS
* COACHING
* AUDITION
PREP
* SOLFEGIO


[ Mobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
S.e.., mI As Low As $1,500 Down
Experienced Thoughtful
941-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


BEACH RENTALS
SBikes Cribs Beds
Mobile Services:
Free Delivery & Pick-up
,- 24-Hour Service
vC778-6438


Personal Fitness

TRAINING GR
4 One On One In Your Home
j VT Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
i V Fitness & Nutritional Guidance
V Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
V Deep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises
Geri Travis
B.S., Ph. Ed., Fitness Specialist 779-2129

The Island Property Maintenance Co.
Complete property maintenance on a regular basis
Inspections weekly or more
Immediate repairs when necessary
Weekly & monthly rates
Written reports sent to you each month
Insured, Island Resident, References
If you are planning to go back to cooler weather or live
here year round & need dependable maintenance...
Call 779-2129 Jim Travis








Raiy eaonis ea CllNo
Isan efrecs








lB PAGE 28 JUNE8, 1995 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

ONE UP 234 1 6
BY BRYANT WHITE / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 20


ACROSS
I Ticks off
7 Gunlock catch
11 Pythias's friend
16 Halfofa
Samoan port
20 1950's terrorist
21 Cankerous
23 Ran "Ran" e.g.
24 Viscera
25 "Cat's Eye"
novelist?
27 Sugar suffix
28 Pupilwatcher
30 Showoffs
31 Ale holder
32 One of a dozen
33 Treebeard and
others of
Middle-earth
34 Kapow!
35 Pope Paul Il's
successor?
41 1971 Fonda-
Sutherland
thriller
42 Hanoi holidays
43 Land of
Evangeline
49 Straight, to
Stradivari
52 Dweller along
the Platte
54 Roman
rhetorician who
wrote "Institutio
Oratorla"
55 "I'm c-c-c-cold!"
56 Slaves of the
Morlocks, in
fiction
57 Normandy
department
58 Timeless, in
poesy

sLLn-


59 In wild
confusion
60 Hook's opposite
62 "Eat at -"
63 Oscarwinnerin
"The Big
Country"
64 Picks out
65 Old German
coin: Var.
66 LAX letters
67 Subjects to
abusive tricks
69 Many buttons
70 Segar's Olive
71 Fine
73 Cousin of a
truffle
74 Acclaimed Philly
conductor
75 Kindergartner's
trio
78 Courteous guy
79 Navigational aid
80 Slob's home
81 Semisheer
fabric
83 Scanty
86 "The Kinsman
Saga" author
Ben
87 Highlands
tongue
88 Chou-
8!) Opinion.
forward or
backward
90 Townships near
Johannesburg
92 June bug
93 Dart
94 Brightest star in
Lepus
95 Gumption
97 1920'sjazz
dance
99 It's good in
Mexico


100 Fifth-century
B.C. philosopher
101 Prefix with
glider
102 Victor in music
104 "Funeral in
Berlin" author?
107 "Eugen Onegin"
girl
108 Prankish person
112 Like
Tchaikovsky's
Symphony No. 1
113 Penpoint
115 Judicious
118 Gunpowder
alternative
123 "Foucault's
Pendulum"
penman
124 Noted
mountaineer?
126 Kittenish
128 Respected
member
129 Emphasize
130 Like lightning
131 Littoral fliers
132 Bassoonlike
133 Blackmailed
134 They're loath to
come out of their
shells
DOWN
1 --Hawley
Tariff Act of
1930
2 Foot segment
3 Four-time
Pulitzer-winning
playwright?
4 Spock's org.
5 Corrida
luminary
6 Film genre
7 Japanese
entertainment
8 Susa was its
capital


9 Israel's Bay of

10 Mil. unit
11 "Splish Splash"
hitmakerof 1958
12 Controversial
explosion
13 Gumshoe's
hands
14 Genetic lab
materials
15 Willeml's land:
Abbr.
16 Temporary
lodgings: Var.
17 Of a liquid's
specific gravity
18 Mercator's field:
Abbr.
19 Tout's concern
22 Exceptional
23 Onetime British
Prime Minister?
26 Quite a joke
29 Jigger of rum,
e.g.
36 Queen of the
Adriatic
37 Citer's end word
38 Deteriorated, as
relations
39 Slow climbers
40 Ryder rental
41 See45-Down
44 Jeanne d'Arc,
e.g.: Abbr.
45 Classic 1941
film, with
41-Down
46 British
secondary
school exam
47 They thrive on
inflation
48 Actor Holm et al.
50 Sulky contest
51 Items for the
disposal


52 Rigatoni sauce
53 Soothe
57 Pilot's decision
61 Best Actorof
1955?
64 Crimson crawler
67 "I am dead.--
Wretched
queen, adieu!"
68 Star-studded
altar
69 Mongolia
72 Chemical
conclusion
73 Take up new
residence at


74 Interpret
wrongly
75 1960 World
Series hero?
76 Demand
77 Mercury, e.g.
78 Bar supply
79 fat (diet
phrase)
80 Verified
82 Lit
83 Poke with a pike
84 Aymara is
spoken here
85 Elizabeth I's
mother


86 Small 109 Pressed upon
concession 110 Careful
87 Circus Maximus III Bow, e.g.
V.I.P. 114 Singers Bill and
90 Tag info Jimmy
91 Numbskull 115 Endingwirh
96 Commercial centi- or milli-
prefix with star 116 Swan genus
97 "Frasier" and 117 Basil. for one
"Maude," e.g.
98 Followerhow
103 Pick up 120 Even, to Yvonne
105 Ending with beat 121 Crown
or peace 122 Used binoculars
106 Kind of plate 125 Tray material
108 Puerto Rico's 127 European mil.
third-largest city grp.


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


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L. . - -. - .: ...


TERRIFIC 5 BEDROOM, 3.5 bath el-
evated family home on sailboat water
canal. Lot 95x117 on cul-de-sac street..
View of Skyway bridge from deck. Call
Rose Schnoerr 778-7780. $320,000.


DIRECT GULF VIEW On a clear day
you can see all the way to the North end
of the Island. 2BR/2BA, upgraded and
updated throughout. Call Bobye Chase
778-1532. $250,000.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORING Rare
3BR/3BA located on canal with private
dock and carport. Park like setting in quiet
part of Anna Maria Island. Call Dick Maher
or Dave Jones 778-6791 or 778-4891.
$149,000.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND HOME This
charming 2BR/2BA island home is nearly
new. Elevated, open plan, over 2,100 s.f.
Bay view, close to the beach. Many up-
grades elevator, too. Janis Van
Steenburgh 778-4796. $249,000.


S11w w .i W"
OVERLOOKS INTRACOASTAL EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2BA
This 2BR/2BA has security entry, eleva- just a short walk from DeSota Square
tor, pool, garage parking, jacuzzi, boat mall, on a lake with winding paths. Cov-
dock & private beach on Gulf. Call Bill ered parking, all appliances. Call Paul
Bowman 778-4619 $142,900. Martin 794-0049. $62,900.


PERICO BAY MODEL HOME 2BR/ ONE OF A KIND! 3BR/2BA, turnkey fur-
2BA with mirrored wall. 2nd floor unit nished. Gulf views, large screened lanai,
overlooking lake. Turnkey furnished. Call excellent walking beach, lucrative rental
Harold Small 792-8628. $99,900. history, no minimum for guests, pool, ten-
nis. Call John Green 778-3167. $224,900.


PAUL

MARTIN -

Broker
Salesman

794-0049

Paul and his wife Gilda moved to
this area 12 years ago from Ohio.
Paul has been in real estate for the
past 11 years and is a graduate of
the REALTOR Institute. Paul is a
member of the Neal & Neal, REAL-
TORS million dollar club.
-" "h=7- .'


~ --

Summer Sands ...................................... 142,900

Coquina Beach Club ................................... 185,000

5400 Condos ............................................... 250,000

Playa Encantada ................... 24,900 & '174,900

Gulf Place Condo ..................................... 224,900

West Winds Condo................................... 186,900

Sunbow Bay Condos............. 84,900 to *134,900

Westbay Cove Condos............. 79,900 & '142,500

Westbay Point & Moonngs ....'129,900 to '149,000


i-- i?- - - I
= -' : = ; -.....
., -- '. 2 ~_ i. ._.-. __.t,.,. ,:.2:, ,_.~l---~- j~ ...2 .-.. . ..


'I '' -
,~1


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Weekly Rentals From $450


ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club from $700 mo.
2501 Gulf Drive 2/2 with
Gulf view $700 mo.


Julie 1
Call (941)778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


-.- . I-. I ,... .


STUMPED?


- -- -- --~-