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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00569

Full Text



H:URR1ICANESPEI ALV dTI-)E G lh'.ON eJ E. 1


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND




^-; 1.*


FREE WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


JUNE 1, 1995


Pierola revives beach parking fee idea


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The possibility of establishing parking fees at Co-
quina Beach has been raised again by Bradenton Beach
Mayor Katie Pierola.
Parking fees would be a way of funding the
beach's renourishment, Pierola told officials at a recent
meeting of the Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Of-
ficials. The renourishment is part of the project's main-
tenance. It will be needed in about eight years and is
expected to cost $6 to $8 million.
"There's a gold mine waiting to happen at Coquina
Beach," stressed Pierola. "We had 35,000 cars on Eas-


Truck
meets
bridge
A crash early Saturday
morning on the Anna
Maria Island Bridge sent
the driver of a Nissan
pickup truck, Holmes
Beach resident Kevin
Blumhagen, to Bayfront
Medical Center in St.
Petersburg. Damage to
the bridge was substan-
tial, including the loss of
nearly 15feet of railing
and a steel door from the
first-floor equipment
room. Blumhagen was in
the neurological inten-
sive care unit at the
hospital Tuesday.
Story on page 2.
Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood


ter Sunday. At $1 per car, can you imagine what we
could do? It could help pay for some of the things we
need on our beaches."
The county developed a beach parking fee plan in
1991 which could be updated, said Pierola.
"The problem they had is the amount of money
they would collect would be spent to collect it," said
County Commissioner Stan Stephens. "I'm not sure
there's strong community support for that because
it's one of the few things that's free. Families can go
out and enjoy a day at the beach and they don't have
to spend money."
Parking fees will also cause many beach goers to


Search still on for public works


director in Anna Maria


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
A committee headed by Anna Maria City Commis-
sioner Chuck Shumard is still working hard to find a
new public works director, with a recommendation
expected by the end of this week.
Shumard reports that Robert Willis of Connecticut
and Anna Maria was the most recent candidate whose
experience and qualifications met with committee ap-
proval. However, a possible health condition may de-
lay Willis' availability.
In the meantime, says Shumard, there are three
additional applicants to contact.
Also on the search committee are Planning and


Zoning Board member Jimmy Nichols, Code En-
forcement Board member Dale Woodland and city
residents Harry Boothe and David Miles. Frank
Tyndall, former public works director, continues to
:serve as acting director.
At the May 23 City Commission meeting, Com-
missioner George McKay suggested the possibility
of an interlocal agreement with a sister city for a
building official. Discussion also centered on addi-
tional advertising.
The committee will first research the remaining
applicants.
The last two public works directors left their posi-
tions with the city after run-ins with the mayors.


park on the city's side streets to avoid the fee, he noted.
If the side street parking is heavily restricted or elimi-
nated, the city could be sued for not providing access
to the beach.
"You have to look at the entire picture before you
make the decision," warned Stephens.
Officials agreed to get a copy of the 1991 study for
further discussion at the next meeting.

Transit committee
Carl Gates, the county's new transit manager, told
officials a transit committee is looking at ways to en-
hance the Island's Route 5 to provide one-hour service
during commuting hours. One suggestion is to use two
buses one running up and down the Island and the
other connecting to the mainland at Blake Hospital.
"I rode our bus on a two-hour run and met some of
our clients," said Gates. "Everyone genuinely appreci-
ated our service and wanted more frequent or more
direct service to wherever they were going. This is
what we hope to do."
Bradenton Beach Councilman Walt Grace said
committee members also discussed a park and ride
service.
"We've done these numbers on park and ride,"
noted Stephens. "We looked at working out an agree-
ment with Beachway Shopping Center. We did not
support this at the county level because it meant
$300,000 worth of operating money in the future,
which we knew you didn't have and we didn't have. It
didn't make economic sense."
According to Stephens, the bus service is not
funded by the riders, who generate only a small amount
of the operating costs, but by the federal government
in an effort to encourage mass transit
There should be a ridership initiative for children
and youths, said Anna Maria Mayor Dottie
McChesney. Stephens said there is a student program
but it has not been very effective.
There is a program through the Easter Seal Soci-
ety to teach people how to ride the bus, either individu-
ally or in groups, said Peter Gajdjis, transit planning
engineer
In other business, Stephens said the county has
requested that the Florida Marine Patrol and the Mana-
tee County Sheriff s Department step up marine patrols
around the Island during weekends and holidays.
McChesney said Anna Maria and Holmes Beach
are also working on having extra patrol for the holidays
using the Holmes Beach Police Department boat.



.;; .foCusot 'animal
activists wrath, page 11



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Needs ssessme .. ..

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Little league.;.... ...................... ........ .... 21
School Daze...........................................23
Real estate ................................................ 26
Crossword puzzle....................................... 27







fl PAGE 2 K JUNE 1, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Fire chief speaks on taxes, disasters and EMS


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Fire Chief Andy Price spoke to the Holmes Beach
Civic Association last week about the fire district's
taxing process, the importance of the Island Emergency
Operations Center and the recent controversy concern-
ing the Emergency Medical Service.
"As a governmental agency, we have taxing au-
thority," he explained. "We tax you directly. The way
we tax is much different from the cities. The cities tax
by ad valorem, which means they use a percentage of
the value of your home. We're a flat rate assessment."
Each residential home pays the same base rate plus
a square footage rate based on the size of the home, he
said. A tax increase was recently approved for next
year. The base fee will be $65, and the square footage
rate will be 3 cents per square foot over 1,000 square
feet.
"All our funding comes from taxation," Price said,
"unlike the cities which receive about half from other
sources. What you pay in fire taxes is what we have to
operate on. There are no other ways for us to generate
money."
The fire district has saved residents and businesses
money over the years through their rating from the In-
surance Services Office, said Price.
"We have the best rating in Manatee County,
which means you have the lowest fire insurance rates,"
he noted. "On a scale of ten, we are a five. We went
from a nine to a five by bettering our department and


T^^ i


saved the taxpayers about $3 million in insurance pre-
miums over five years."
Resident Joy Courtney asked Price about the level
of cooperation from the cities on the IEOC.
S"Being a barrier Island, we need to be properly
prepared for a hurricane," Price responded. "That's
something that needs to come from the citizens, the
cities and the fire district"
The cities are not consistent in budgeting money
for IEOC, he said, and city officials are so busy running
the city that they do not put a high priority on partici-
pating in the IEOC.
"Preparedness is our business in the fire depart-
ment," he noted. "We are prepared to respond for ev-
erything. But we have to have people, resources and
money to be able to properly provide emergency man-
agement. In the last five years, emergency prepared-
ness has become a whole different animal."
Residents can help by having their checklist of
essentials ready to go if an evacuation is called, he said,
and by heeding the evacuation order.
Resident Bob VanWagoner asked Price to explain
the recent controversy over the EMS.
"You have to understand how the EMS operates in
this county," said Price. "Manatee County has the li-
cense to be the provider for EMS. They have the para-
medics and they own and operate the ambulances.
They have to provide for all the residents in the county
and they haven't increased the number of ambulances
in quite a few years."


m 'zt*4,( 'I -; -- I ID(L-AI -
This pig has papers
Yes, that is a smile on 5-month-old Ned's snout Not only does he get plenty of leftovers "down home" at
Geraldson Farms of Perico Island but his pen is far outside the Holmes Beach city limits, making his life
behind the produce market on Manatee Avenue legal. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


i.


1.


The bridge tender's "shack" shows significant
damage buckled concrete walls and broken
windows from the impact of the crash. Islander
Photo: Bonner Presswood


Truck wreck rams

bridge building
Holmes Beach resident Kevin Blumhagen, 31, was
returning to Anna Maria Island at approximately 3 a.m.
Saturday when his 1986 Nissan pickup truck struck the
north curb and veered sharply to the left, rotating coun-
terclockwise and striking the curb and guardrail on the
south side of the bridge, according to Florida Highway
Patrol Trooper R.B. Highsmith.
According to the trooper's report, after striking the
guardrail, the truck then struck the bridge tender's
building and spun around again, ejecting Blumhagen.
Damage to the bridge was substantial, including the
loss of nearly 15 feet of railing and a steel door from the
first floor equipment room, apparently lost in the bay.
Florida Department of Transportation maintenance
engineer Hendrik Ooms was at the bridge Tuesday morn-
ing to evaluate the damages. He said DOT would start
repair work immediately on the railing and to weather-
proof the bridge tender's building in the event of a storm.
Ooms said the damages have no effect on the
bridge mechanically or the bridge tender's ability to
perform his functions.
Blumhagen was taken by helicopter to Bayfront
Medical Center in St. Petersburg where he remains in
the neurological intensive care unit.


The ambulance that is stationed at the fire station
in Holmes Beach goes off the Island quite often, said
Price. When there are a lot of calls in other parts of the
county, the unit must be taken into town.
"I have the feeling that the issue with EMS will be
discussed quite a bit because the nature of the business
will be changing over the next five years," he said.
"People in the know say we'd better be prepared. Our
board is extremely concerned and we are going to be
watching it. We don't want the level of service for Is-
land residents to be affected."

City report
VanWagoner reported on Holmes Beach council
and planning commission action.
He told of the planning commission's review of the
comprehensive plan and noted, "They're trying to get
a comprehensive plan where we have more input and
that addresses the needs of the city."
He also commented on recent lengthy city council
meetings.
"The citizens stay around for maybe an hour or so,
then they start drifting off," he noted. "By the time
council gets down to the bottom half of the agenda,
nobody's there but the council. The civic association
should make sure the meetings are attractive to the
public and are frequent enough so the agendas don't go
past 10 p.m. We want to encourage participation."
He also told members that the city is beginning the
1995-96 budget process and asked them to be alert for
budget meetings.

bCouncil report
Councilman Luke Courtney gave members a report
from the city council.
He said the council hired architect H. Patterson
Fletcher to do a feasibility study and recommend sev-
eral approaches to upgrading city buildings. Fletcher's
report is due Sept. 1.
"It is not the intent of the council to build a Hilton,"
he explained. "The intent is to meet ADA (American
Disabilities Act) compliance. A person in a wheelchair
cannot get into the police or public works departments.
There are no handicapped bathroom facilities. Public
buildings have to be accessible by the handicapped."
Courtney outlined three options. The first is to add
ramps and bathrooms where needed. The second is to
expand with additional buildings in-between existing
buildings. The third is to build new city buildings.
Money for any improvements will come from the
city's share of the one-cent school tax which must be
used for infrastructure. Other priorities for the tax
money are stormwater drainage and the Key Royale
Bridge.
"Most of the council members don't want to spend
any more than they have to, he said. "But if we do not
comply with ADA, the city can be sued and the city
cannot get federal grant funds."
Courtney also spoke about the attorney general's
recent opinion that the city's proposed charter amend-
ment to require a city-wide referendum for any density
increase is a preemption of state statute, making it Il-
legal. The attorney general said Florida Statute pre-
scribes the exclusive method for amending the compre-
hensive plan.
There are three ways to change the plan, explained
Courtney. An individual can seek a change through a
comprehensive plan amendment. There is a fee of
$1,000 for costs to start the process. Next the proposed
amendment goes to the planning commission and there
are two public hearings. The planning commission
makes a recommendation to the council.
The council holds a public hearing and makes the
final recommendation. If the proposed amendment is
rejected the petitioner can take the matter to court. If
the amendment is approved by council, it must be sent
to the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council and the
Florida Department of Community Affairs for their
approval.
The second method is for the council to seek an
amendment using the same process. The third way is
through the evaluation and appraisal process, which the
planning commission is currently engaged in.
In other business, the association officers reported
it has 61 members and a balance of $374.50 in its
checking account The next meeting is set for June 24,
at 10:30 a.m., at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Ma-
rina Drive, Holmes Beach.


: F
I
f-






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER [ JUNE 1, 1995 M PAGE 3 JU


Pier safety not all it's cracked up to be


By Paul Roat
The risk to the public or the rustic atmosphere of
the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier are being weighed by
city council members.
At issue is the decking inside the restaurant at the


In the wake of two boat-pier collisions, Bradenton
Beach City Council members are contemplating a new
law to ban boats from the area of the city's fishing pier
at Bridge Street
A draft ordinance will be written by City Attorney
Alan Prather to keeps boats 30 to 40 feet away from the
fishing pier.
"With the Bay as big as it is, I don't see any rea-


pier near Bridge Street. Building Official Whitey
Moran has said that, although the deck is structurally
sound, the gaps between the planks some more than
one Inch wide present a hazard to customers and
could place the city in legal problems if someone


son why boats need to be so close to the pier," Vice
Mayor Dick Suhre said.
Two men were injured earlier this spring when
their boat slammed into the pier, causing more than
$3,000 damage to a pier piling. Another accident took
place at the pier last month.
No date has been set for ratification of the pier
boat-ban ordinance.


Artist
donates to
Historical
Society
Sissy Quinn ofAnna
Maria, right, pre-
sents a stained-glass
window of the Anna
Maria Island Histori-
cal Society's logo for
its museum to
President Cathi
O'Bannon. The
society still requests
historical artifacts
for its new display
cases.
Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.


... and boats may be banned near

Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier


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slipped or tripped.
There is also a three-quarter-inch elevation differ-
ence between the inner and outer dining rooms, pre-
senting an accessibility problem for handicapped res-
taurant patrons, Moran said.
Not so, according to pier manager Georgia McKee.
The customers like to look at the water through the
cracks as well as slip bits of food o the fish. If the deck-
ing were covered, as proposed by Moran, her business
would fall off, claimed McKee.
"I don't see a problem there," she said of the po-
tential liability issue.
"Just because no one has been hurt doesn't mean
someone couldn't be hurt some day," Vice Mayor Dick
Suhre said.
Other council members seemed to agree with the
safety issue presented by the wide cracks in the deck,
but balked at Moran's proposed solution of screwing
sheets of plywood over the deck.
Moran was charted with reviewing other options to
solve the matter to get the city out of the liability crack.



Anna Maria City
None scheduled

Bradenton Beach
6/8, 7 p.m., Council meeting

Holmes Beach
6/6, 2 p.m., Planning Commission
6/6, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting

Of Interest
6/3, 10:15 a.m., Save Anna Maria, Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
6/8, 7:30 p.m., Island Needs Assessment
Study Task Force organizational meeting, Anna
Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia, Anna Maria.


I
1 i" I 1 .






Ij PAGE 4 M JUNE 1, 1995 T THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Planners begin discussions on comp plan changes


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Planning Commissioners are get-
ting to the meat of their mission to review and recom-
mend changes to the city's comprehensive plan.
Each commissioner is reviewing two sections of
the plan and suggesting changes for discussion by the
commission. Recommended changes will be presented at
two public hearings.

Future land use element
A suggestion that is sure to provoke lively discus-
sion is one made recently by Planning Commission
Chairman Gabe Simches, who reviewed the future land
use element of the plan.
Simches suggested that existing hotels, motels and
bed and breakfast establishments in the A-1 district be
permitted to have a density of 28 units per acre, pro-
vided that all other standards are met.
The A-1 district is designated multi-family residen-
tial/ seasonal tourist with a density of 10 units per acre.
It extends from the Martinique condominiums at 52nd
Street north to 74th Street and from Gulf Drive west to
the Gulf of Mexico.
"Section 9J 5.0053 of the Florida Statutes defines
density as 'an objective measurement of the number of
people or residential units allowed per unit of land,
such as residents or employees per acre,"' wrote
Simches. "Under that definition hotel/motel units can-
not be considered synonymous with residential units as
used in the comprehensive plan or city ordinance.
"The state does not consider hotel/motel units a
factor when density is considered. Therefore, the den-
sity restriction established within the A-1 district
should not apply to hotel, motel or bed and breakfast
facilities within that district."
Simches said he talked to officials at the state
Department of Community Affairs and they do not feel
that motel units are a density issue.
'To me, there's no justification of it being a den-
sity issue," he said.
Two officials at DCA told her it is a density issue,
said Commissioner Frances Smith-Williams.
"Florida Statute 163 stipulates that we take popu-
lation away from the coastal high hazard area," she
stressed. "When we say to build up the motels, we're
building up the population."
"Is an increase in tourism adding population?"
asked Simches. "Then I find an inconsistency in F.S.
163, because no one talks about increasing tourism.


The people I spoke to said if you turned your present
motels into condos, then there would be a density con-
cern, because they're permanent population."
"A resident is a permanent resident," said Commis-
sioner Mike Faarup. "A person who rents a motel unit
for a night or two or three is not a permanent resident."
"A person is a person," countered Commissioner
Bruce Golding. "He's still using water and he's still
here."
"Then do it as a motel unit and not as a residential
unit," responded Simches, "and restrict them for that
purpose. If the city wants to keep them at 10 units per
acre, that's okay, but I can't accept the density factor
or the state saying no."
Other suggestions from Simches included:
The city shall identify all natural and man-
made resources and facilities within its boundaries
and identify standards of use, care and maintenance
in order to establish criteria that may serve as a
guideline in determining when such resources may
be or may have been impacted by action taken out-
side or within the city's jurisdiction.
The city shall replace all existing definitions per-
taining to public lodging establishments with those in
F.S. Chapter 509.
The city shall ensure the identification and pres-
ervation of historical sites, artifacts and records through
the adoption and enforcement of ordinances.
The city council shall review all land develop-
ment codes for clarity of language and consistency.
The city council shall establish a clear definition
as to when the rental of residential property is consid-
ered a business or when a property is being used for
commercial purposes.

Transportation element
The transportation element was reviewed by
Smith-Williams. In her absence, resident Bob
VanWagoner presented the following potential goals:
To plan for a multimodal, multi-option trans-
portation system which places new emphasis on


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public transportation systems in a manner that pro-
motes energy-efficient development patterns, pro-
tects air quality and provides more efficient mobil-
ity of residents, visitors and goods, while reducing
traffic congestion and respecting land-use restric-
tions in the Island communities.
To enhance traffic safety and emergency evacu-
ation by addressing traffic control at key intersections,
improved planning and signage, speed limits, alternate
routings during flooding and alternate transportation
during flooding.
To expand bike and pedestrian pathways through-
out the city, addressing both practical and recreational
attractions to encourage bike and other non-mechani-
cal transit (but including handicapped use of motorized
cars) and to investigate a city sponsored bike-rental
operation and locations.
To provide intermodal terminals within the city
and to investigate park-and-ride on the mainland to
feed the county beach and other attractions.
To work in concurrency to limit additional private
and commercial traffic coming over arterials from the
east and south; to work in concurrency to retain the
Anna Maria Island drawbridge as an appropriate gate-
way to the traffic circulation patterns (proposing a
bridge rehabilitation and addition of a breakdown lane),
but to improve and share bridge operation policies and
emergency responses; to work in concurrency to reha-
bilitate or replace the Key Royale Bridge.
To protect the city's environment from being
threatened by transportation trends, such as noise from
airplane fly-overs, unnecessary commercial use of the
city's streets or arterials as an entryway onto the Island
for communities to the south, authorizing special
events which draw high numbers of visiting cars, use
of the city's streets to transport personal water craft to
launching or rental sites on the Island.
To develop a program to alleviate congestion
during peak, winter season, seeking cooperative car-
sharing and other alternatives by residents and visitors.
Discussion on these suggestions is not slated until
all commissioners have presented their ideas.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JUNE 1, 1995 M PAGE 5 E[


Lights out could mean saving a turtle's life


Turn out the light!
That refrain is the watchword for the Anna Maria
Island Turtle Watch Program this year, as volunteers
patrol the Island's beaches to watch for female sea


Save Anna Maria
to meet
Save Anna Maria, Inc., will meet on Saturday,
June 3, at 10:15 am. in the Walker-Swift Meeting
Room of the Island Branch Library in Holmes
Beach.
All members and their guests are invited.
Members will receive an update on the bridge
hearing and discuss the organization's involve-
ment in the debate over orimulsion, the alternative
fuel source sought by Florida Power and Light.


turtles coming ashore in the evenings to lay dig nests
in the sand and lay eggs.
Beachfront property owners who leave outside
lights on distract or attract the turtles.
Turtle Watch Director Chuck Shumard said one fe-
male turtle came ashore last week at 51st Street in Holmes
Beach. She laid her eggs but became disoriented by the
lights at the Martinique Condominium and began to
trudge down the beach toward the illumination.
Four blocks, a rock revetment and a set of stairs
later she finally found the Gulf of Mexico, Shumard
said, setting some sort of turtle record for the longest
turtle "crawl" on the Island.
All three Island cities have ordinances prohibiting
outside lights during the turtle nesting and hatching
season from May to October.
Turtle volunteers are urging all beachfront property
owners to turn out the lights, and are conducting patrols
of the beach in the evening and noticing residents of the


improper illumination.
Shumard said the following addresses have left
outside lights on.
102 72nd Street, Holmes Beach
101 73rd Street, Holmes Beach
Coconuts Beach Resort, Holmes Beach
104 74th Street (alleyway), Holmes Beach
102 74th Street (alleyway), Holmes Beach
Railroad House, Anna Maria
101 Maple, Anna Maria
Beach house on Park Avenue, Anna Maria
102 Willow, Anna Maria
102 Palmetto, Anna Maria
Martinique Condominium, Holmes Beach
Sun Plaza West, Anna Maria
Harrington House, Holmes Beach
Playa Encantada, Holmes Beach
Beach Bistro, Holmes Beach
Nautilus, Holmes Beach







11 PAGE 6 2 JUNE 1, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Turn 'em out
Turtle Watch volunteers are taking numbers and
turning them in to city hall. They're walking their sec-
tions of beach regularly, looking for beachfront lights
that inevitably cause nesting loggerhead turtles and
their hatchlings to become disoriented.
Yes, you will be reported, in the hope that publish-
ing lists of violators of the three cities "lights out for
turtles" ordinances will be ample encouragement to get
the lights turned out during nesting season.
The turtles return year after year to the same stretch
of beach to lay their eggs. Scientists speculate they re-
turn to the very beach where they were hatched and so
It goes for centuries and generations.
The turtle crawls ashore to find an appropriately
soft, sandy spot where she can burrow to lay her eggs.
Afterward, she uses her flippers to cover the eggs with
surrounding loose sand and head back to the Gulf.
That's where the turtle's problems begin.
The mother turtle finds her way back to the water
by seeking the luminescence of the water the glim-
mer of moonlight and the reflection of the stars.
It's their guiding light
Approximately 80 to 100 hatchlings do the same.
Lights on buildings, street lights and other man-
made luminary interventions can cause the turtle to get
lost, as evidenced last week when a turtle crawled
ashore at 51st Street in Holmes Beach, laid her nest and
crawled up to 55th Street, over rocks and stairs at the
Martinique condominiums, before finally finding her
way back to the Gulf.
According to Turtle Watch Director Chuck
Shumard, it's the longest crawl witnessed on Anna
Maria and it's "a darn shame."
Of equal importance is the protection of the nests
on the beach during the incubation period. In past
years, Anna Maria turtle volunteers moved the eggs to
two beach hatcheries and released the baby turtles up
and down the shore at the appropriate time, assuring a
safe trek to the Gulf.
This year the state has asked the Turtle Watch to
leave nests in place on the beach unless they are in a
high-traffic, dangerous locale.
For Shumard, it's an experiment one that he
reluctantly agreed to participate in. For the state, it's
mandatory that the nests be left alone. They've decided
it's best to let nature take its course.
With that in mind, we ask all beachfront and
near beachfront owners, renters and businesses to
turn off outdoor lights or shield them after dark.
To avoid breaking the law, turn out lights from 11
p.m. to 7 am., May 1 to Oct. 31. To make Turtle Watch
happy, turn them out at 8 p.m.

I S L A N D E R IN W 1 61,11
JUNE 1, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 28
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Laura Ritter
Darla Tingler
V Advertising Services
Classified Advertising
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production Graphics
David Clough
V Distribution
Mike Carter
Mary Stockmaster





With a lot of help from our friends. O 1995
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 941 778-9392 PHONE 941 778-7978


Island friend will be missed
An old friend of the Island passed away on
Mother's Day with hardly a notice.
Barbara Blevins, affectionately known as "Big
Barb," died unexpectedly of a cerebral hemorrhage
on a day when mothers are celebrated and thanked
by their children.
Many Islanders have been saddened by this sud-
den death and have expressed their condolences for
the loss of this friendly woman who always had a
smile and a joke for many of us who happened to
stop by at her workplace.
For many years we have seen Barb at the
Foodway, as cashier and deli manager. More re-
cently she was a cashier at Eckerds on the Island and
at Manatee Hospital.
Barb would be surprised if she realized how many
lives on the Island she has touched. Her son, Jeff, knows
that we all grieve with him for his special mother.
We will miss her.
Carol Whitmore, Holmes Beach

Islander helps success
of Mums for Mom
Thank you The Islander Bystander for the fabu-
lous coverage you gave the Mums for Mom
fundraising campaign.
We raised over $6,000 for the Manatee Marchin'
Canes. The location on the Island was as successful as
the locations in Bradenton.
The excellent publicity in The Islander was a ma-
jor~part of making this so successful. A heartfelt thank
you from all of us in the Band Boosters, the Marching
Band, the Sugarcanes and Color Guard.
We appreciate your supporting our kids!
Christine Shaw, Manatee Band Boosters

Bohnenberger does bidding of
county, not city
Two matters:
1. Bridge resolutions Holmes Beach Mayor
Rich Bohnenberger tends to distort and belittle inaccu-
rately those resolutions about the Anna Maria Island
bridge project that he'd like to derail in favor of his own


agenda of accommodation to the Metropolitan Plan-
ning Organization and the Manatee County Commis-
sioners ... a perilous path at best
However, the three resolutions on the table (includ-
ing his) are not in conflict and together offer a package
of three approaches deserving of support. Anna Maria
City and Bradenton Beach, no strangers to bridge mat-
ters, have approved all three. Holmes Beach should
have the savvy to do the same.
The mayor sits in the MPO seat, not on his own
title, nor as a representative of Holmes Beach, but as
the Island elected official, representing the opinions
and needs of all three Island cities, as voiced in consen-
sus or majority vote at Island Transportation Planning
Organization meetings.
If he doesn't fairly represent that consensus, he can
be replaced at ITPO with an elected official who will.
2. Holmes Beach density and the State Attorney
General's opinion advising against a referendum -
There are some conflicts between the question put by
the city's legal counsel to the Attorney General's Of-
fice and the perspective of the attorney general's re-
sponse. One has to do with content; the other with pro-
cess. They are not necessarily or automatically related.
There is also the matter of the long-standing
Longboat Key charter provision, exactly in the same
context; the major thrust of State Statute Chapter 163,
Part II, giving more authority to local populations to
determine their own future land-development policies;
the 163.3211 provision allowing for conflicts of this
nature, and the missing arguments advanced by the
Holmes Beach general counsel to persuade the Attor-
ney General's Office.
These questions will have to be resolved and per-
haps a new opinion sought, with all due respect to ef-
forts of the Attorney General's Office to aid the city.
It is admittedly a thin line but constitutionally a
significant one which goes to the heart of the
public's rights of determination. It may also again raise
the question of the legal status of the city's "attorney/
general counsel," himself/herself, and whether the
Holmes Beach City Council may be forced to engage
its own legal counsel.
Bob VanWagoner, Holmes Beach


Lights out for turtles on Anna Maria Island


e Y e U K J I I N U


I -











THOSE WEE THE AYS
Part 10, The Conquistadors
by June Alder


Ornate title page of
Cabeza de Vaca's
"Relation" of his great
adventure.


TREK TO MEXICO


For the four survivors of the
doomed Panfilo de Narvaez Florida ex-
pedition of 1528, their status as "medi-
cine men" was their ticket to freedom.
After five years living with the
Charucco Indians of Texas and becom-
ing revered as healers, they persuaded
their hosts to allow them to go on a sort
of traveling clinic southward towards
Mexico.
They set out in September of 1533
- tall, red-bearded, 53-year-old Alvar
Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, the highest
ranking of four in the lead, followed by
his black friend Esteban, whom Cabeza
affectionately called Estebancito -
"Little Steve," and the two grizzled cap-
tains, Alonso del Castillo and Andres
Dorantes.
Barefoot and "naked as their moth-
ers bore them," they walked the parched
plains under the wide, blue Texas sky
from place to place, often accompanied
by throngs of "satisfied customers" will-
ing to give testimonials to the people of
the next village.
At each stop they might treat a hun-
dred or more people, listening sympa-
thetically to their woes, praying for heal-
ing and saying Ave Marias in genuine
sincerity at least that was the case
with Cabeza, a pious, caring and, some
might say, straitlaced man.
"No one whom we treated but told
us he was left well," he wrote in his
memoirs.
Despite their fame, the healers were
still expected to do heavy work wherever
they went and Cabeza wrote that the loads
of wood they had to carry produced sores
on their chests and shoulders.
"In these labors," Cabeza said, "my
only solace and relief was in thinking of
the sufferings of my Redeemer Jesus
Christ, and in the blood He shed for me,
in considering how much greater must
have been the torment He sustained."
Crossing a "wide and deep river"
(probably the Colorado) they struck off in
a westerly direction, traversing the treeless
terrain and vast deserts of southernmost
Texas. By this time, not hundreds but
"three or four thousand people" accompa-
nied them. Beyond the Pecos River they
entered "rough mountains (probably the
Santiago chain) in which they suffered
much from hunger."
In the Rio Grande Valley they were


thankful to encounter Indians who
grew a few crops such as corn and
beans, and wove cotton cloth. These
compassionate souls gave the Span-
iards "shawls" to keep them from
freezing in the treacherous Sierra
Madre mountains.
They knew they were near Spanish
settlements when they came upon na-
tives who had fled to the mountains to
escape slave catchers. Cabeza and his
companions felt sorry for them "The
sight was one of infinite pain to us; a
land very fertile and beautiful, abound-
ing in springs and streams, the villages
deserted and burned, the people thin
and weak, all fleeing or in conceal-
ment."
At one place the people could offer
them nothing but leaves and prickly
pear fruit to eat. Yet, Cabeza noted,
"They did this with kindness and good
will and were happy to be without any-
thing to eat, that they might have food
to give us."
When Cabeza met up with the first
Spaniard from home he had seen for
nearly a decade, it wasn't an altogether
happy experience. For the fellow was
leading a slave-hunting party. Cabeza de
Vaca had to argue him out of rounding up
their escorting Indians as well as 600 lo-
cal Indians who had befriended them.
Finally they reached the Pacific. At
Compostela in New Spain the governor
provided Cabeza and his three col-
leagues with clothes and beds. But, said
Cabeza, "We could not wear any
(clothes) for some time, nor could we
sleep anywhere but on the ground."
Soon the three Spaniards were
back in Lisbon enjoying their fame as
survivors of eight years among the In-
dians of America. Castillo and
Dorantes eventually returned to
Mexico where both became rich men.
And Cabeza de Vaca sat down to write
a book about his adventures.
As for Esteban, he signed on as an
interpreter and guide for an expedition
to find the "Seven Cities of Cibola" in
the southwest. He died at the hands of
the Zunis in 1542 the same year
Cabeza's book about the amazing
Florida-to-Mexico hike was published.
Next: What became of
Cabeza?


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 1, 1995 0 PAGE 7 i]
I U


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Stripes earn dollars for MDA
Thirty-nine Island professionals participated in a Muscular Dystrophy Associa-
tion lock-up fundraiser at the Beach House restaurant May 18. Transported by
limo for an hour of dialing, those who helped raise $8,700 included, from left,
Laura VanWinkel, Kitty DeGraves and Fire District Chief Andy Price. Islander


Photo: Cynthia Finn.

Registration for
Chapel Player
summer program
Registration for the Chapel Players
Music Theater Workshop for children,
June 12 through June 30, is $15 per
child and $12 for each additional child
registered from the same family by
Saturday, June 3.
Parents may register their children
at Roser Memorial Community Church
chapel, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria
City, from 9 am. to 4 p.m. weekdays or
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday,
June 3.
Registration at the door on the first
day of the program is $18 per child.

Auxiliary offers
sailboating and
seamanship class
A course in sailboating skills and
seamanship conducted by Coast Guard
Auxiliary instructors will begin at 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday, June 6, at Flotilla 81
Training Center, 4208 129th St., Cortez,
north of the Seafood Shack restaurant
Registration will be conducted prior
to beginning of the first session. The
course includes legal requirements, boat
handling skills, navigation, weather and
VHF radio. Classes will run for three
weeks on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Tuition for the course is free and
materials and textbooks are available at
the training center for a nominal cost
For further information about
Coast Guard Auxiliary courses or for
the sailboating class, call Dave Cadden
at 751-4031.

Blood center has
display at Branch
Library
The Manatee Community Blood
Center will have a display at the Island
Branch Library during the month of June.
Valerie Vale of the Marketing/
Community Relations Department, or-
ganized the exhibit and has scheduled
the Bloodmobile to be in the Island
Branch Library parking lot on Thurs-
day, June 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
No appointments to donate blood
are necessary.
The Island Branch Library is located
at 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
For information call 778-6341.


Little League
Baseball Camp at
Island center
The Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center will offer a week-long
Baseball Camp for Little League play-
ers ages 8 to 12.
The camp will begin Monday, June
12, and run through Friday, June 16, from
9 am. to noon. Players may be dropped
off atthe center between 8 to 9 am. Cost
is $25 per player for the week.
The camp will offer one-on-one
hitting instruction with slow motion
video taping analysis, proper fielding
and throwing techniques, base running
tips, pitching and catching instruction.
The camp will be directed by Little
League President Scott Dell and Little
League coaches.
For additional information call
Scott Dell at the center at 778-1908.

Young tennis
lessons at Island
Center this summer
Group tennis lessons will be avail-
able for youth ages 5 to 15 every Tues-
day night from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., and for
youth ages 14 and up every Wednesday
night from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., throughout
the summer at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, Anna Maria City.
The cost is $5 per class for children
under 16; $7 for Anna Maria Island
Community Center tennis members 16
years and up; and $9 for non-tennis
members 16 years and up.
Group lessons will be based on abil-
ity and taught by Dennis Hendrickson, a
former nationally ranked Junior NCAA
Division I collegiate player.
Private lessons are available for $20
per hour.
For more information call Scott Dell
at the center at 778-1908. For class res-
ervations call Dennis Hendrickson at
778-7189.

Guild holds
Saturday rummage
sales
St Bernard Women's Guild will hold
"Every Saturday in June" rummage sales
in the activity center of the church from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning Saturday, June 3.
St. Bernard Catholic Church is located
at 248 S. Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach. New
items will be added each week


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I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 1, 1995 M PAGE 9 IM


ISLAND NEEDS ASSESSMENT STUDY


Part III: How the
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Island Needs Assessment Study, a random
survey of Island residents in six age
groups and in three professional
groups, was designed to identify
residents' most pressing so-
cial service needs or per-
ceived problems.
The study was under-
taken by the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center aided
by professional volunteers to:
Determine the priorities of so-
cial service needs in the community.
Establish task forces of community volunteers to
resolve the major problems identified in the survey.
Aid the Center in making financial allocation
decisions.
Justify the Center's requests for funds to expand
social service programs.
Aid the city governments, schools, community
organizations and service clubs in planning for the fu-
ture.
"I have called a meeting of all those interested in


data will be used
serving on task forces related to the issues identified
in the study, and professionals who may be knowl-
edgeable in those areas, on June 8 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Center," said Executive Director
Pierrette Kelly.
Each task force will focus on
an issue or a group of related
issues, set goals and estab-
lish a timeline to address the
issues, Kelly explained.
"We welcome volunteers in
all age groups, because we
would like to address as many
issues as possible," Kelly noted. "We
would especially like for youths to join the
task forces focusing on problems involving young
people."
Study results will be presented to the Island city
governments, community and service groups and
schools upon request. They have been presented to the
Center's board of directors. The City of Bradenton
Beach has requested a presentation on May 31 and the
Democratic Party on June 5.
"It involves the whole community," Kelly said.
"A lot of good will come out of this."


Request tabled pending FEMA opinion


The Anna Maria City Commission has tabled a
variance request from Luther Sasser to construct
ground-floor resting quarters at his Magnolia Avenue
home pending an opinion from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA). -
The city's Planning and Zoning Board Chairman
Tom Turner wrote to FEMA May 11 at the request of
the commission.
Turner's letter said in part: "The commission re-
quested further information consisting of guidance
from your office if such a variance could be granted
with certain conditions for removal and so forth. It is
the feeling of the Planning and Zoning Board that when
a variance is granted it goes with the land and once
granted it becomes a permanent variance to that par-
cel."
Commissioners are hoping to have word in time for
discussion at their June 13 work session. Turner and
Commissioner George McKay both said there is noth-
ing unusual about a 30-day response time from FEMA
in Atlanta.
Sasser has severe heart problems and wishes to
eliminate climbing stairs during the day to his living
area. Based on strict FEMA guidelines regarding flood-
elevation variances, the Planning and Zoning Board
recommended denial of the variance.
McKay told the commission May 23 that he had
spoken with some FEMA people connected with the
Manatee County Building Department "This particu-
lar scenario would be a denial in their eyes," McKay
said.
McKay also cautioned the commission "to con-


sider repercussions" if FEMA officials are pressed to
visit the city. "Let's just wait to see what FEMA
says," he said.
Mayor Dorothy McChesney and Commissioner
Chuck Shumard again expressed a desire to invite the
FEMA official to the Island. Commissioner Mark
Ratliff said he'd like to have the city's legal staff re-
view the matter if there is no "clear-cut answer" from
FEMA within the 30 days.
The item was tabled but came up again during
public comments at the end of the meeting.
Code Enforcement Board member Dale Wood-
land said that over a number of years the FEMA regu-
lations have been "the sole reason for denial" of many
requests.
"Nobody's doing anything," said Woodland.
"We're just sitting here and letting FEMA run our
lives."
McChesney said it bothers her, too, and that's
why she'd like to get a representative to the Island. "If
he (Sasser) wants to take his chance of being flooded
_,
"This is why we need to get the man from FEMA
down here," said Shumard.
Planning Board Chairman Turner rose again. "I
think all interested people should read the FEMA
guidelines," he said. "It gives alternatives stairs or
an elevator."
"I sympathize," said Turner. "But we are a land
of laws."
"I'm tired of hearing that answer," said Sasser
from the back of the commission chambers.


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The Island Poet
They gave Grandma a birthday party and all the relatives showed up,
And one precious little darling even brought her little pup.
And all the boys were running and jumping on her lawn,
Like a school of pregnant salmon going up the stream to spawn.
And everyone ate hearty and were in very good cheer,
'Cause someone had remembered to bring a keg of beer.
And everyone left happy that Grandma had her wishes,
But Grandma would have been so pleased if they stayed to wash the dishes.
Bud Atteridge


1. OB AIES 1


Lois Howard
Lois Howard, 60, of Holmes Beach, died May 9 in
Venice.
Mrs. Howard came to Manatee County from Long
Island, N.Y., in 1964. She was a homemaker.
Memorial contributions may be made to the char-
ity of your choice.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home was in charge of the
arrangements.


Helen S. Weber
Helen S. Weber, 92, formerly of Holmes Beach,
died May 26.
Mrs. Weber came to the area from Miami in the
1970s. She was a retired professional mezzo soprano
and a church organist. She also taught rug hooking.
Survivors include a stepdaughter, Helen Diehl of
Stuart. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home was in charge of
the arrangements.


Pull out and save the Hurricane Section this
week. The Islander Bystander wants you to
be prepared in the event of a storm
FISLAENDEMNSM


I

I


I






1l PAGE 10 0 JUNE 1, 1995 u THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Climbing mountains to the class of '95


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
When David Tyree of Anna Maria attended the
Manatee High School senior awards ceremony in late
May, his mother Diane already knew that David's years
of hard work had paid off.
But she didn't tell him. She wanted her son to ex-
perience the elation and surprise of being honored
among his peers, the thrill of knowing that dreams do
come true, mountains do get climbed.
David, who will graduate with a 3.7 average on
June 3, found out that evening that he had been
awarded enough in scholarship money to become part
of the University of South Florida honors program in
Tampa come August.
David is still waiting to hear about one more big
scholarship, but the bulk of this particular climb is be-
hind him. He did it!
On the face of it, David may not seem all that
unique among other successful class of '95 graduates
at Manatee High School, or in any other graduating
class across the country.
But to Diane, a long-time single parent with two of
four children classified as "special needs," David's
success is a tribute to his own determination and a
mighty example of how the hands dealt can be played.
As a toddler, David was diagnosed as speech and
hearing impaired. Doors might have shut. But the
Tyrees were then living in Boulder, Colo., and David
and his younger brother, similarly impaired, received
two years of one-on-one therapy at the University of


Colorado Speech and
Hearing School.
Diane also received
training and learned a lesson
she has never forgotten: to
look for the gifts in a child, -
not the problems.
The family moved back
to Georgia and in elemen-
tary school it was discov-
ered that David also suf- Tyree
fered from dyslexia. His
reading didn't really take off until the fourth grade,
Diane says.
When it did, David's choice of reading materials
- engineering books and Civil War history re-
vealed that he was a child who exhibited an extremely
high aptitude in engineering. The thirst for engineering
has never paled.
David looks around his living room. "I've disas-
sembled just about everything in this house," he says
with a smile. And, yes, reassembled.
When the family moved to Anna Maria five years
ago, David started working with boat engines. Then
came the building, fixing and programming of comput-
ers.
"He'd get hold of a part from this old computer, a
part from that one. He'd trade up," Diane explains,
"and then he's got a whole system without hardly
spending a dime."
The dimes are an issue for the family and ingenu-


ity is a big part of their lifestyle, says Diane.
About the time of their move to the Island, David
realized that there would be no money for college and
he started working really hard. Part of his motivation,
he says, is that he is "really interested in school things
- history, math, science, computers, drafting."
That interest and the years of applying him-
self have earned him the chance to go on in en-
gineering.
He says he's going for his doctorate degree in
either computer sciences, electrical engineering or
mechanical engineering.
Acceptance in the USF honors program and the
enabling scholarship awards will mean small classes
and extra instructors. The first two years will entail
more liberal arts courses than David would like, but
he'll be aiming toward his specialization.
Diane's smile is genuine as she talks of "the
mountains we've climbed they told us we couldn't"
"It was his determination," she says of her son.
"He's clawed his way up. It can be done."
What would David tell another special-needs
child?
"That there will be a lot of bad times," he says
softly. "But if you just work through them, everything
will be OK. Don't get discouraged."
Diane puts her arms around David and younger
brother Greg. They're a team not willing to give in to
any odds.
"Under plenty of adverse conditions," says Diane,
"these guys are fighters. They will succeed."


Mighty kids' murals at Island Foods


Fifth-grade mural will be dedicated to Island birds. Students Matt Losek, left,
Tracy Powell and Maggie Van Wormer are working to finish the last mural.


Kindergarten/first-
grade mural dedicated
to fish.


Third-grade mural dedi-
cated to "A Day at the
Beach.


Fourth-grade mural dedicated to Island foliage.

Island Foods provided the space, the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island pro-
vided the paint, mom Susan Curry provided the idea and the students at Anna Maria
Elementary are providing the work, all in an effort to make our Island more beau-
tiful.
Five murals are being painted on wall space outside of Island Foods in Holmes
Beach. Each mural has its own theme with designs created by a specific grade level
at our Island school.


Islander Photos: Joy Courtney






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 1, 1995 M PAGE 11 Im


Beyond the knee-jerk rhetoric of dolphin 'activists'


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Randy Wells was 15 when his family moved to
Siesta Key from Illinois. "Honestly, we wanted to help
get Randy close to saltwater," says his dad, Jack Wells.
It was a move that ended up enriching the field of
marine biology.
One of those rare youngsters who seems to know,
almost from the moment they can walk and talk, ex-
actly what they want to do in life, Randy Wells wanted
to be a marine biologist. Most folks would say that's
an unusual career choice for a school boy growing up
in Peoria, Ill.
Fortunately for Wells, his family took his interest
seriously. By the time he was 11 years old they even
arranged a special Florida vacation trip to include vis-
iting the first Sea Lab up in Panama City. Sea Lab of-
ficials were so impressed with the young man's inter-
est and knowledge that they provided him with a full
tour of the facility.
"As we were leaving Sea Lab that day," the elder
Wells relates, "Randy pointed out to me that all the
personnel were wearing T-shirts, shorts and thongs
while all the white lab coats were hanging neatly on
their hooks."
"If this is how they do this," the son said to the
father, "I could like this."
To say he "likes it," is an understatement. Today,
Randall S. Wells, Ph.D., is recognized world-wide as
the force behind mankind's basic scientific studies of
wild dolphins. His work in Sarasota Bay is the oldest
continual study of wild dolphins in the world.
Bring up the subject of dolphins to a marine biolo-
gist almost anywhere, and they'll start quoting Wells.
Now, however, a self-appointed "guardian" of
wildlife, Ben White of Friends of Animals in Port
Townsend, Wash., wants to end Wells' work. White
has called for volunteers to join him in trying to stop
Wells' annual survey of the dolphins of Sarasota Bay.
White has called for "everything from filming to
driving to direct-action interference. We wish to con-
duct our own experiment to measure the toxins, aging


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Bottlenose dolphins have
been studied in Sarasota
Bay more extensively than
anywhere else in the
world, led by Dr. Randy
Wells. Animal rights
activists plan to boycott a
portion of the research
effort later this month,
prompting Wells' group to
file an injunction to halt
the boycott. A judge will
decide the matter June 1.
Islander Photo: Courtesy
Capt. James Lee


and genetics in Mr. Randy Wells and see how he reacts
to pursuit, capture and the pulling of a blood and tooth
sample." That's White's "action alert" as posted on the
Internet.
"Our premise is that scientific research on wildlife
must provide some direct benefit to the individual stud-
ied. Harassing wildlife just to obtain more human
knowledge is just not a good enough reason," White
concludes.
Wells believes "Mr. White is confused. He thinks
we're just doing the same experiments over and over.
When we began" back when Wells was working on
his Masters thesis at the University of Florida "we
didn't know how dolphins lived."
His Masters thesis was written entirely on the dol-
phins of Sarasota Bay. 'Two-thirds of my doctoral dis-
sertation at the University of California/Santa Cruz was
on the dolphins of Sarasota Bay," Wells explains.
During the 1970s, for example, members of the
National Marine Fisheries Commission, charged with
protecting whales and dolphins, didn't even know if
dolphins moved around, migrated or what. "Our work
showed they do live in a localized populations and

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residents of a local area," Wells said.
"Once that was established," he continued, "that
opened many doors to learning more. Until the mid-
1980s we were studying the structure and dynamics of
the dolphin population in Sarasota.
"In order to protect the species, you have know
what the normal range of a population is its abun-
dance and its birth and death rates and the social
structure of the animals as well."
But then everything changed. Suddenly Wells'
work began taking on real life-and-death significance
for the dolphins.
"By the late 1980s, big die-offs of dolphins began
in many parts of the world. So now our main thrust is
understanding the health of the animals and the threats
that are facing them."
Wells says dolphins face two main threats, envi-
ronmental degradation and pollution.
"Now we're trying to learn what features of their
habitat are critical to their survival, so we're doing
health assessment studies.
PLEASE SEE DOLPHINS, NEXT PAGE


411 1 11 z[Ali


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Anna Maria Island Tides

DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PULOW
Thu6/1 3:56 1.3ft 6:30 1.2ft 1:43 2.5ft 9:11 0.0ft
Frd6/2 4:38 1.4ft 7:20 1.2ft 2:25 2.ft 9:52 0.1ft
Sat 6/3 5:21 1,5ff 8:20 1.3ft 3:14 2.3ft 10:35 0.1ft
Sun 6/4 6:03 1.6ft 944 1.3ft 4:09 2.1ft 11:17 0.3ft
Mon6/5 6:48 1.7ft 11:15 1.2ft 5:15 1.9ft -
Tue6/6 7:26 1.8ft 12:03 0.4ft 641 1.7ft 12:50 1.1ft
Wed 6/7 8:02 2.0ft 1246 0.6ft 8:16 1.6ft 2:14 0.8ft
SCotez High Tides 7 minutes later low 1068 later


-2


0






EB" PAdE'1T2'" JUNE 1, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Meeting hurricane standards ... plus


By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
Elevated homes have a tendency to lift up and turn
over in hurricane-force winds, says Island contractor
Pierre Renaldo.
"Everything we do is designed to counter those
forces," says the builder.
Renaldo has built thousands of homes in western
New York and Florida during his 40-year career. In
1986 he settled on Anna Maria Island to specialize in
barrier-island construction.
Requirements for that construction have become
stricter since Hurricane Andrew struck south Florida in
1992. New structures are to be designed to resist sus-
tained winds of at least 110 mph.
"The new codes kind of caught up with what I'd
already been doing," says Renaldo. "We saw a need for
the way things were tied together and anchored to the
ground a long time before it became a requirement."
Two of Renaldo homes on Marco Island lost only
a few roof shingles when 140-mph winds from Andrew
swept through.
Those homes are anchored the same way as Joe
and Delores Porter's new home on 82nd Street in
Holmes Beach, Renaldo's 10th Island project.
"Structural integrity is the name of the game," says


Trains, planes and
By Jim Hanson
Islander correspondent
The phenomenon that makes locomotive horns
sound funny when they go by is the same one that
warns us of stormy weather.
Put in terms of less nostalgia, the same principle
lets police nail you for speeding.
It's the Doppler effect, by which sound waves
seem to change frequency as the source approaches
and departs. It has charmed generations of kids
standing along railroad tracks and hearing the
engine's whistle change as it sped past. The sound
waves compress as they travel ahead of the horn,
stretch as they linger behind it.
It has been applied to radar for several years, such
as a police speed gun. Like most technology, it gets
more and more sophisticated and versatile.





By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Station Chief, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
May 20, Search and rescue /assistance.
Station Cortez received a report of an 18-foot
pleasure craft disabled near Marker 10 in Terra
Ceia Bay. The station requested the assistance
of Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel 19085025,
which provided a tow to port.
May 20, Search and rescue /assistance.
Station Cortez received a report of a 16-foot
pleasure craft disabled in Terra Ceia Bay. The
station requested the assistance of Coast Guard
Auxiliary vessel 23081005, which provided a
tow to the nearest port.
May 21, Search and rescue /assistance.
Station Cortez received a report of a 23-foot
pleasure craft disabled near Marker 57 in Anna
Maria Sound. The station assisted the vessel
by relaying a communication to a friend, who
provided a tow to port.
May 21, Search and rescue /assistance.
Station Cortez received a report of a 19-foot
pleasure craft overdue from a trip near the
Lido Beach area. A communications check
was made with negative results. A short while
later, a citizen reported the vessel aground on
Longboat Key. Longboat Key Police assisted
the grounded vessel.
May 24, Boarding. A pleasure craft was
boarded and issued a boating safety warning
for not having a sound-producing device on
board and having inadequate ventilation into
the engine compartment due to a split ventila-
tion hose.
May 24, Boarding. A commercial vessel
was boarded and found to have no violations.


the builder.
That means construction as nearly "one piece" as
you can get, Renaldo says. It means being "anchored
at every potential place to withstand the uplift forces of
the winds."
Renaldo points to the posts on the porch of the
Porter residence that go from the ground all the way up .
to the roof. .
He says the concrete columns and beams are cast
right on the job, so all are tied together into the foot-
ing and anchored to the ground.-
He describes how the floor joists are anchored with
at least 160 anchors that are each designed to hold
down 1,672 pounds.
"Nobody knows how bad the Big Storm will be,"_
says Renaldo, "so structurally we put the icing on the
cake, trying to cover every conceivable base." j
Solid construction is what sold Joe Porter, a retired
General Electric engineer with the grade of fellow. His
wife fell in love with the design.
Aesthetically the home has "all the flavor and
embellishments of an old-Florida style home," says
Renaldo.. -.
"Structurally," he says, "we meet and/or exceed all
the codes. This home conforms to the new hurricane Joe and Delores Porter flank contractor Pierre
standards plus." Renaldo.


even cows benefit from Doppler radar


Top of the line
The newest of the new is the National Weather
Service's new radar line centered at Ruskin, says Roy
Leep, the weatherman's weatherman and head of it all
at television station WTVT-13 in Tampa.
Leep had the first full Doppler weather radar in the
area, putting it into service in 1988. He describes the
new system at Ruskin as "the most sophisticated in the
world."
Radar has been around since World War II. It sends
out radio waves which bounce off objects and back into
the radar receiver with information which operators
translate into pictures that are clear to them.
That was a giant step for finding and tracking ob-
jects in the atmosphere. It was a tremendous boon to
meteorologists, but it was limited.
Now Doppler has taken radar another step, as
described by Dan Sobien, National Weather Service
meteorologist at Ruskin. Measuring the return sig-
nals, he says, the complex equipment shows almost
instantly and from miles away which way a storm is
moving, how fast, how much rain it is dropping in
what size droplets, whether it has hail, how strong its
winds and from what direction, whether they are
rotating as in tornado.
Although storms "are like people, no two alike,"
the new system gives weather experts a better handle
on storms with "more and much better information


Dolphins
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
'It's easy to say pollution is bad," Wells explains, "but
that doesn't tell us very much. We want to know which of
the hundreds of pollutants are damaging dolphins, and that
way we may be able to identify the sources."
For starters, scientists know female dolphins eas-
ily outlive the males.
And that leads to a fascinating new theory about
dolphins.
"It appears," Wells relates, "the females are able to
purge some of the pollutants by passing them on to
their calves through their milk." One study shows fe-
male dolphins dump 80 percent of their pollutant load
into their milk."
But what happens then?
"We know that most first-born calves here die,"
Wells relates, adding that most dolphins first calve
upon reaching eight years of age eight years of pol-
lutants to purge.
"Then, if she calves again in two years, the survival
rate is much higher.
"We'd like to know which chemicals are being
transferred and we'd like to know how these chemicals
really affect the dolphins," Wells adds.
And that's where the studies are right now.
So as you read about the controversy of capture and


than we've ever had," he says.

Bring in the cows
"We can put it over river basins and see if there is
danger of a flood," Sobien says. "We can let a farmer
know an hour ahead of a storm to get his cattle off a
flood plain."
And aviation, which has been the principal benefi-
ciary of radar since its inception, benefits again from
Doppler. "The Weather Service does all aviation fore-
casting, although major airlines have their own weather
departments too," says Sobien.
"We will start local aviation meteorology out of
Ruskin in a year or so. Now it's done out of Miami."
As for maritime weather, the Ruskin station's
"warning area" is 50 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico,
with a marine forecast good for 50 miles offshore plus
a high seas forecast Next year its range will double to
100 miles.
Channel 13's Leep recalls just how handy Doppler
is by citing Hurricane Andrew, the South Florida killer
of 1992. His radar machinery is mounted 200 feet
above the ground, he said, and it picked up Andrew
when the storm was still in the Bahamas.
When Andrew's winds destroyed Miami radar and
cut off communication with Key West's, Leep's re-
mained the only land-based radar able to hang onto the
storm as it crossed Florida and moved up the Gulf.


release of local dolphins during the next few weeks,
now you know what scientists like Randy Wells are
trying to learn, both for the dolphins and for us.
People like Mr. White have their own agendas, of
course, but Professor Kenneth S. Norris at the Univer-
sity of California probably put it best when he called
people like White involved in "mindless activism."
"This threat is symptomatic of mindless activism,
quite prevalent these days, in which people of the great-
est good intentions but with simplistic and usually un-
informed views of the problems involved end up at-
tacking their friends. Dr. Wells' work, which has ex-
tended over nearly three decades, has given us the
clearest idea of any study in the world of how bottle-
nose dolphins live, how their societies are built, and of
the potential threats they face (which are many, but not
from Wells' program). Dr. Wells is an almost ferocious
defender of his dolphins against loss of food resources,
loss of habitat to Jet-skis and pleasure boats and a good
many other real threats.
"He knows his dolphins better than anyone in the
world knows a population of dolphins. He knows their
family histories, how many babies have been born, how
manly lost, why, and so on.
"If I were to choose the leading defender of dol-
phins from among the scientists of the world, it would
be Dr. Wells' group."
See you next week.





THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


ISLANDER


:-2' ,I r ..

. . . . ., ...? .-...
"..- ,~ , . "I -
T' ;; ; b'. ;': ... ."' = '"
.._- .~ '. ._,, :- _, _, _


II I


...- -.

-I- /I -


Storm surge spells
submergence for Island
Storm surge is a "dome" of water that sweeps
ahead of the center of a hurricane. The storm surge can
inundate the Island and cause massive, devastating de-
struction to property and lives of those who have
elected to weather a hurricane in their homes.
For more information about storm surges and high
winds, see inside this special hurricane section.



.-, --- '.








"We looked out on the flooded golf course and saw
one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirming,
wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the tee
was covered with snakes trying to get out from the
flooded roughs onto higher ground."
For more hurricane tales and tips, see inside this
special section.


Fido need not apply for
hurricane shelter
admission
Hurricane shelter officials prohibit your taking
your dog or cat with you in the shelter if a hurricane
threatens. Make plans now to board or kennel Spot or
Socks during a big storm, or find a friend on the main-
land that will shel-
ter both
you and

V animals
in times
of heavy
weather.
For details,
see inside.


'About average' storm season for 1995


A hurricane prediction expert says the next few
months will be about average as far as the number of
big storms are concerned.
But during the next two to three decades there will
be some of the most destructive hurricanes ever re-
corded.
That's the prediction from Dr. William Gray, a
Colorado hurricane researcher who has a 90 percent
success rate for his prognostications on bad storms.
Gray says six hurricanes, with two of the hurri-
canes being severe, is what the Atlantic region can look
forward to this year during the summer hurricane sea-
son.
Global climate changes and an increased knowl-
edge of the cyclical patterns of hurricanes has caused
the prediction that more and worse storms are brewing
for the next 30 years.
Patterns are now being discovered that indicate we


have been through a "mild" period during the past few
decades a pattern that will shift for the early 21st
century.
Gray bases his prediction on three factors: a 20-
year drought in Africa that appears to be ending, a dy-
ing El Nino system in the Pacific Ocean and strato-
spheric winds.
Gray believes that a wetter west-African region
produces more tropical fronts that move off the coast,
cross the Atlantic and become tropical storms. "After
20 years of drought, close to normal rainfall means it
will be pretty wet," Gray said. "When it's wet there,
intense hurricane activity goes way up."
Another pattern that may cause greater Atlantic
Ocean storms in 1995 has its foundation in the Pacific
Ocean. An abnormality known as El Nino has been occur-
ring for the past few years. Barometric pressure aberra-
tions off Peru's coastline cause warming of the Pacific


Ocean across two-thirds of the body of water, heating up
wind currents. The warm winds heading east keep storms
from forming over the Atlantic and coming west.
With El Nino declining, greater storms are possible
here. The question is how much and how soon El Nino
will wane.
The pressure changes occur around the Christmas
season, hence the name El Nino, or "The Child." Some
scientists believe the cause of El Nino is molten erup-
tions at the ocean floor, causing massive increases in
water temperature.
The third factor Gray uses in hurricane predictions
is winds in the stratosphere. The winds run in 18-month
cycles and should be heading east during hurricane
season, shearing off the tops of strong storms and
weakening them. However, forecasters admit that the
high winds are the least of the factors working for, or
against, storms.


S" *A"P L AT A& KEEP S"E o S"E S"E


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Don't wait for the last minute to
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inside for what you should have.


--


- I


SAVE PULL-OUT SECTION SAVE


JUNE 1, 1995





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* Three-stop elevator servicing all living levels of
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* Maintenance-free vinyl siding, soffits and facia
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* Victorian restoration trim on front windows and doors
* Ceramic tile entrance foyers, lower and mid-level
* Air conditioner with S.E.E.R 11 HEAT PUMP
* 26 gauge metal roof (Galvalume 5 V-CRAMP)
* Ceramic tile floors in kitchen, laundry, entry hall,
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* Parquet flooring in dining room
* Jacuzzi tub in master bath
* Ceramic tile showers with designer enclosures
+ Woodburning fireplace with colonial mantle &
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* Downdraft cooktop with interchangeable modules
* Self-cleaning 27" wall oven/microwave combina-
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* Five cycle programmable dishwasher


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Don't weather

these storms here
Hurricanes are placed into categories by the Na-
tional Hurricane Center based on the strength of the
storms. Storm categories allow emergency manage-
ment officials to determine time and need of evacua-
tion of areas of the coastline.
The Manatee County Division of Emergency Man-
agement notes that "a Category 1 hurricane will kill
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
more water."
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely dif-
ficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 mph -
24 miles an hour less than even a Category 1 storm.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale" to assign storms into five categories. From least
to most powerful, the five categories and damage po-
tential are as follows.

Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
signs. Storm surge is expected from four to five feet
above normal. Flooding is expected on barrier islands.
Low-lying coastal roads are expected to be inundated.
Expect minor pier damage and small craft to be torn
from exposed anchorages.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in damage.

Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by wind is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age is expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly
constructed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings is expected. Expect considerable
damage to piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected
anchorages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight
feet above normal with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage.

Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will probably be
toppled. Practically all poorly constructed signs will be
blown down. Structural damage is expected to small
buildings, and many mobile homes are expected to be
destroyed. Storm surge nine to 12 feet above normal. Se-
rious flooding along barrier islands and coastal areas.
Large exposed buildings will be damaged, and smaller
structures will be destroyed by waves and floating debris.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.

Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.
Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected of mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Hurri-
cane Donna.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992, as a Category 4 storm. Sustained
winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than 175 mph.
More than 60,000 homes were destroyed, 200,000 people
left homeless, more than 2 million people evacuated, 15
people died and damage was estimated at $20 billion.
Hurricane Andrew was the third most intense hurricane
this century, and caused the greatest loss of property of any
hurricane in the United States.

Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge more than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane.





1995 IE SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION L THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISAVi SAVEoPULL iH'iTAKEPU SAVESVE


IISLANDER


1995


Tracking Chart


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ISAVAE o.S'AVE o PLLOUT&KEEP S-AVESAVE


OMA PIZZA
I & TALIAN RESTAURANT I
* 778-0771 |
SOr 778-0772
$71.00 O FF
J i ANY PIZZA OR DINNER!
NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS
Pasta Chicken Veal Seafood
'Hfome of The World's Largest Pia. 1991
I DINE IN OR ENJOY I
\ OUR FREE HOME DELIVERY
201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
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This is not the
flood coverage you need!
If you live or conduct business in a flood prone area,
you need flood insurance coverage, not water coverage.
You're all wet if you think your homeowners or business
insurance policies provide flood coverage. It must be
purchased separately.
Your local independent agent who represents Auto-
Owners Insurance is the person to see for flood insur-
ance. And, with Auto-Owners, you get "no problem"
service when you need it.
Flood coverage will be "no problem" if you have your
flood insurance coverage with Auto-Owners, so see your
Auto-Owners agent today.
Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.
Island Shopping Cr., Holme Beach, FL 7782253 7AsAA6/l&-


Serving Manatee County since 1972
795-4277
Design through Construction

PETER J. SHEA
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR
ER0010542
Specializing in: Restaurants
Service Changes Health Care
Residential & Marine Electrical
Commercial Special Occupancies
Ph. (941) 748-8822 Pager 333-6767


HOME
AHRDAWAE STORE
HARDWARE


O Lanterns & Fuel
O Flashlights
U Batteries
O Candles
U Tapes
U Plastic Bags
U Nails


LIST OF SUPPLIES
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:
O Hand Tools
U Non-electric can
openers
0 Portable Radios
O Coolers
O Propane Cylinders
for Stoves & Grills


When preparing for a storm, come in and we'll help
you with all the supplies you need.
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 8 to 6 Sunday 10 to 4


- *1.


Lik 119lim


HENIDRIZ CONSTRTUTION
Additions & Renovations


* Kitchens
* Baths
* 2nd Stories


CALL 1-800-530-1188
Physician Referral Service
or
To receive a Free Guide to Active
Medical Staff & Services Brochure,
call 798-6140
L. W. BLAKE HOSPITAL
COLUMBIA HEALTHCARE
2020 59th St W., Bradenton, FL 34209
OUR FAMILY CARING FOR YOUR FAMILY


NOTICE:
BE SURE TO GET AN
EVACUATION
VEHICLE STICKER
AT YOUR LOCAL CITY HALL.


PUBLIC NOTICE
EVACUATION
& RE-ENTRY
RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation
needs, medical problems or need transporta-
tion off the island, you need to be registered.
BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on
Anna Maria Island that provides essential ma-
terials or services to the community you may
be given preferential return privileges after a
hurricane evacuation. Submit a request to your
city hall. If approved, you will receive a letter
authorizing your early return. Your request
should include a list of employees you would
need to return early.
EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on
or off the island, they must have written autho-
rization from your city hall to come on the is-
land to work after a hurricane evacuation.
To register, orfor further information ...
call your city hall.
Anna Maria City Hall.......... 778-0781
Bradenton Beach City Hall ..... 778-1005
Holmes Beach City Hall .......... 778-2221
Emergency Operations Center.. 778-6621


CROWDER BROS. I]S"
HARDWARE IC
Your Hardware Store And Much, Much Morel I EAC_

We Fill

Propane

I Tanks.

7 DAYS

S A WEEK
3352 EAST BAY DR. *HOLMES BEACH
778-0999 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER Fa SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION [I 1995


our 23nd Year
serving the Island communities.
There must be a reason!
During any emergency, we're there to serve you!

WEUT @A T
REFRIGERATION
D013 9@[M[DOVO@)M0Ma

CAC044365
778-9622 Holmes Beach



BUY DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND SAVE
FIND US IN THE SARASOTA YELLOW PAGES


'U ., 778-7777
"We Sell The Island.. Worldwide!"
5600 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach




iAprsca teUd

As Independent As The Island Itself.
kMemberFDIC e/v l'i

5324 Culf Dr. Holmes Beach (941) 794-6969

14 IT IW I H Tl I T llhlt VT~lfOM


941 / 779-1422


* EMERGENCY UJRTER EXTRACTION
* CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
* SCOTCHGARDTM PROTECTION
* PET DEODORIZATION TINTING
* SPOT DYEING CARPET DYEING
10 YERRS EXPERIENCE


~t~--------- -- ----------------- ---------
~2~, ca.;sA ~jaN ~~ 't '~ :s
j ~ t i~ s;
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Charleston


Hurrica ne, Tracki r) Char
S Baton Rouge ulfport ensacoa ---- r
Tallahassee 'j *
I Jacksonville
H New Orleanlahicola
Galveston I


100099 98 97 96 950 94 93 92 91 900 89 88 7 86 850 4 83 82 81 800 79


WAGNEDR DEALTY

-^ aacti, [I

SALES ~ VACATION RENTALS
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach, FL 34217


(941) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978


TELCOMTEK SERVICE
Telephone Data Communications
Telephone and Computer Network Systems Wiring
Telephone Systems Installation
Adds Changes Moves Repairs
Buy & Sell New and Used Equipment
Home/Office Fax & Modem Connections
Long Distance Savings
Manuel F. Pruneda 41
Tel. Comm. Tech. (941) 792-4521


Q L SERVICE
NO \ Superior Equipmentl
UMINIMUM Competitive Pricesl
Professional Management
20%* Bonded Insured
OFF
FOR NEW -M kho WE I
ICUSTOM- rl Iu llOc.
S ERS 5726 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton
751-4140


KEY INCOME TAX
& Business Services, Inc.
Condominium Accounting
& Fiscal Management
CMA Lic #3549
5500 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
FOR APPOINTMENT 778-5710
"Same Island Location Since 1971"


Family Owned and Millwork
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size







We specialize in custom cabinetmaking:
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213.54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just West of the Island Shopping Center


-Since 1936 -
New Construction
Remodeling
Docks & Seawalls
Commercial Residential
778-2924

Holmes Beach CGC012233


The best hamburgers an
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." fits
f~ffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. -
Across from Manatee Public Beac Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


Gulfstream


I ~-- -.-----~ ..-c------


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1995 IE~ SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION IE THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Otey & 1
COMPLETE
COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING
BOOKKEEPING
AND
YEAR-ROUND
TAX SERVICE
IndividualCorporation
Partnerships and Estates


Associates




N1


Shirley Otey, Enrolled Agent
Licensed by the U. S. Government to represent
taxpayers before the IRS.


778-6118


3909 E. BAY DRIVE
(SUITE 110) HOLMES BEACH


Kflagic
FISHING CHARTERS
FULL DAY OR HALF DAY
Pleasure Cruises Egmont Excursions
Backwater Offshore


Fast, Clean, Safe -
with Capt. Mike Heistand
Reservations 7 -1
Please 778-1990


Bermuda


------- - -


ama

D Great Abaco

leuthe Bahama Islands

Cleuthera I
Ca t Wan%


Acklins Island


Great Inagua


Guanlanamo I
| '-r\ Dominican
Haiti,. Republic
Z; ,ro"a4-Pr;nce'f -r[tl
Ka gso.Pr.nc 'Santvo
JKomingo
Kingston


I I I
Virgin Islands
I a i


-" - -


-i- 4-f- +- -


Iigua


San Juan
e V Anguilla
Puerto Rico
St. Christopher[ Ant


Guadeloupe-
Guadeloupe I 1|
V a..--~I- ---


Caribbean Sea


Dominica
Martinique
St. Lucia-
St. Vincent 0

Grenada


arbados
Barbados
O


34

33

32

31

300

29

28

27

26

250

24

23

22

21

200

19

18

17

16

150
14

13


Tobago


(Trinidad
~\- - L- --~ -


Colombia


8 77 76 750 74


10
9
8


Venezuela


73 72 71 700 69


68 67


66 650 64


63 62 61 60059


58 57 56


Marty Scherpf DEL Tom Perreira


1 8 -

FULL SERVICE A WET STORAGE
FACILITY DRY STORAGE
BOATS HAULED UP TO 17' WIDE
POWER & SALE HI & DRY SERVICE
35 TON TRAVEL LIFT e MECHANIC ON DUTY
LIMITED DO IT YOURSELF WORK
WET SLIPS LOCATED IN NORTHWEST BRADENTON
AVAILABLE AT THE MOUTH OF THE MANATEE RIVER
5 12 Draft At 2504 88th Street Ct. N.W.
Low TidACCESS Bradenton, FL 34209
No Bridges (941) 792-9610
24-Hour Security Open Monday thi Saturday

NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX00o64o6
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
VINYL. SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
9 PORCH
ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
Goamn Windowsa neytoe de. 778-7074


LaPensee Plumbing
9P Repairs Remodeling
Ao Sewer & Drain
S Cleaning
S E Fixture Showroom
d f Reasonable Rates
J Reliable Service
778-5622
LIC. #RF0049191 5348 B Gulf Drive Holmes Beach





Ship's Store BOAT RENTAL
Bottom Painting
Wet/Dry Storage
Consignment/Brokerage
Bulk Oil-in your container



Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave., Anna Maria
S 778-5577
tJohnsan" I AuTHORIZED SERVICE:
.JoLhnson. Evnrude. OMC
OUTBOARD SALES Sea Dri & OMC Cobra Stem DOnve



i Z.: ad


Weekly Maintenance
Planting Trimming Edging
Removal & Hauling


David Bannlgan
778-6972


VIELTI



SERVICE IS OUR FIRST NAME
COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
3014 AVE. C HOLMES BEACH 778-6566
Doyle Douglas President ER0005043


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
One of ieOldest Real Estate Copanple on ihet Ild
SIFounding MeMber of IMland CoiUng SarV
778-2307 or 778-1450 T77-703o
Broker Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte,
Mike Schulte, Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell
9 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M. TO NOON
9701 GULF DR., P.O. BOX 717 *ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA 34218


Digital Pager
798-1960


NAUTICAL BUT NICE
SHIPS CHANDLER

Good Used Equipment
Marine Consignments

Marine electronics
Boat hardware
Sailboat equipment.
SFishing gear
SPower & sailboat
-accessories
Antiques
SCollectibles
Gifts

We Purchase, Sell and Consign
12304 Cortez Road Cortez 794-8997


i I I I i


i i -


I I


--- --


- ---q


-
/





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION I]l 1995


778-7774
Full Service
Electrical
Licensed* Insured
Residential
& Commercial
After Hours Emergency
Call 778-7774
Uc. #ER0010206



I ,lInc.
FREE GIFT& MAIL WRAP
HOLMES BEACH 778-2024




778-2169

Cavanag i
1 4ii ine
*pair
Complete Service
... at your dock
or in our shop
727-7905

BRADENTON
BEACH
POUCE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311 POULCE
If you need further
information call
778-1005 crvYHA,.

To stay in touch with
all the news on
Anna Maria Island,
including coverage of
major storms, you need
a subscription to
The Islander
Bystander.
Call (941) 778-7978 to
charge by phone.


Kessler's

Plumbing
* New Construction
Remodeling
Service Calls
RF-o 00666
741-8900


The Island


Property
Maintenance Co.
* Complete property
maintenance on a
regular basis
Inspections weekly or
more
Immediate repairs when
necessary
Weekly & monthly rates
Written reports sent to
you each month
Insured, Island Resident,
References
If you are planning to go
back to cooler weather or
live here year round & need
dependable maintenance...
Call 779-2129 Jim Travis


Hurricane Safety Tips
Right now, before hurricane season begins:
Enter each hurricane season prepared. Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable foods and
other equipment you will need to secure your home and prepare yourself for evacuation from the area, if necessary.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit The kit should include: medicines (at least a two-week sup-
ply); special dietary foods that are non-perishable; blankets, pillows, sleeping bags; flashlight and batteries; por-
table radio and batteries; extra clothing; lightweight folding chairs, cots; personal items; infant necessities; quiet
game or favorite toys for children; important papers; and snacks.
Develop a plan for where you will go if you need to leave the Island. Friends on the mainland or hurricane
shelter locations should be identified and a route to the safe shelter plotted.

If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a threatened region:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline, check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to small windows
is mostly caused by wind-driven debris; damage to larger windows may come from debris as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings, lawn ornaments and anything that can be easily moved. Secure
outdoor objects that can't be taken inside. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture and a number of
other harmless items become missiles in hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs, bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water. Remember, water
service may be disturbed for days or longer after a hurricane. You should have one gallon of water per person per
day, and you should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember that electricity may be off for days or longer and cooking may
be difficult, so make plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to make sure that you have a
can opener that can be operated without electricity.
Check all battery-powered equipment and stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts are recommending you not
use candles for light due to the threat of fire and advise you to use flashlights instead. An untended flashlight won't
start a fire, but a candle or lantern might
Stock up on clean-up materials: mops, buckets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will have to be
kept with friends or at a vet.

If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a possible landfall
for a hurricane, begin making preparations for the storm:
Board all windows, or secure with tape or security shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hurricane
authorities predict upwards of 12 to 17 hours to evacuate the Island, so plan ahead and plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for shelter openings.

If officials order an evacuation:
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and superchlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Let your friends and relatives know where you are going.
o Check with neighbors to make sure they have a safe, timely ride out of the area.

After the hurricane passes:
Be patient Access to damaged areas will be limited, and you may not be able to return to your home immediately.
Roads may be blocked by trees and live power lines, and emergency crews will need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you have valid identification showing your proper local address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open windows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the house.
Assess and photograph damage to structure and contents.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power, water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


ne Le L(91)77-26


MARY ANN
SCHMIDT
Eves. 778-4931


IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER!
We're here all year,
however the four winds blow.
Nobody, but nobody, sells more
Anna Maria Island Real Estate than
Neal & Neal, REALTORS. Nobody!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
TOLL FREE 1-800-422-6325
BE MIS 0


HELEN WHITE
Eves. 778-6956


When it comes to service,
everything matters.



)N


First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
941 798-2708


I


SCaptains

- t y Marina, Inc.
w 5501 Marina Drive
S Holmes Beach
778-1977

Storm Preparedness
* Is the bilge pump operating correctly?
* Is your battery fully charged?
* Do you have sufficient dock lines to moor your
boat correctly for extremely high tides?
* Is your boat lift high enough? Check often
during tide changes.


* COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL
RESIDENTIAL







ROLL-OFF CONTAINERS



BARRICADES weR,

PORTABLE
TOILETS

753-7591
6120 21st STREET E.
BRADENTON, FL 34203

HOLMES BEACH
POUCE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-0791 PouCE
i you need further
information call
778-2221 crY HALL



J. R
Painting
& Pressre
Cleaning
Private
& Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139

"The best
news on
Anna Maria
Island"

ISLANDER

778-7978


Got a
problem?


"We can elpl"
Fat CCat
Carpet and
Upholstery Cleaning
Dry extraction
Tile, wood and
terrazo cleaned
We never
use steam.
Call Jon Kent,
Island resident.
778-2882


I


I






1995 M SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION [ THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Leave, and avoid becoming a statistic


By Paul Roat
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Elena or Andrew and everyone has common
ground to tell a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing, wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get out from the
flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch
the storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the build-
ing and washed onto the road in a rush of swirling
water."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves -
against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the status of the storm
and, going out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep
water. One more inch and it would have been inside the
house and this was a storm that no one expected to
amount to anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too many vul-
nerable places.
We've been playing Lotto with our houses on the
beaches, going against the odds year after year with our
property and our savings on a barrier island unsuited
for habitation in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead

Cleaning & i I Chemicals
Chemicals S"L Only
Residential Personal
Chemical ALnY POOL CARE ic. Quality
Delivery Service
First Month Price
778-6742
134 Hammock Road, Anna Maria
Lic.# RP0059715 Insured Bonded


nw HIX 'i

INTERIORS

"We Do Windows"
Shades, Blinds. Vertical. Pleated & Wood
27 Years Family Owned
6008 Cortez Road 792-8088


Damage in the aftermath of 1992's Hurricane Andrew in the Homestead area of Florida totaled more than
$20 billion and left 15 dead. This picture, taken after the storm, shows what is left of some of the more expen-
sive homes in the area. Most of the less expensive houses were completely destroyed. Islander Photo: Courtesy
Andrew Carnegie.
Andrew Carnegie.


and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell Hurricane Andrew came ashore in 1992.
The $20 billion in damages, 200,000 left homeless and
15 dead are a grim reminder of what can happen here.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will
look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, your belongings, your
priceless mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years of living are
scattered across what is left of your neighborhood.
But don't let objects or property take the place of
lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.


Don't think to stay and save your property.
Your home.
Your precious "stuff."
Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those remaining.
And names of next of kin, so they can be contacted
to identify the remains.
When hurricane warnings come to this part of the
coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.


THE ULTIMATE PROTECTION AGAINST...
* Hurricanes & high winds Flying debris
STheft & vandalism Extensive noise
* Sun rays & water damage Metro-Dade Approved
Enjoy security & privacy. Installed on
windows, sliding glass doors, patios, etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
ROLLSHUTTER
ESP" CORPORATION |
- Serving Florida Since 1981 -
778-5773
Manufactured in Palmetto, FL 8__


Finally ... A Window Film

That Protects You From

More Than Just Sun


SAFE-GARD SAFETY &
SECURITY FILMS HELP
PROTECT AGAINST.
0 Hurricanes
O Glass Related Injuries
3 Smash-N-Grab
D Accidental Glass
Shattering
3 Sudden Storms


SFading of Artwork,
Fabrics, Carpets &
Furnishings
3 Burglary
3 Theft/Vandalism
3 Forced Entry


ASK ABOUT OUR FREE IN-HOME
ESTIMATES & DEMONSTRATIONS

Glass Protection Services Inc.
Call Toll Free 1-800-483-SAFE (7233)


Just
visiting
paradise?

Don't leave the island
without taking time to
subscribe to the best
news the only paper
with all the news on the
Island. Charge your
subscription to
Mastercard or Visa
by phone or visit us at
5408 Marina Drive.
Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.
813-778-7978


Island 778-5646

Marine

Construction Inc.


---


SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE
Also Patio Decks Barge Service Seawall Caps Pylons
Holmes Beach (941) 778-5646


i II aI I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIAIIIIIIIIaIIIII I I I I I I a I a I a a


i





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION MI 1995

Regulations, insurance, building to meet big storms


The onset of hurricane season brings up an onslaught
of insurance fever for many barrier island residents.
Perhaps angst is a better term, as most residents
usually have too little or outdated insurance for their
homes and belongings.
Remember that new television set you just got?
How about the computer? The new watch and brace-
let? Chances are, you haven't modified your insurance
policy to reflect the new purchases and, in the event of
a loss, only minimum amounts may be paid for your
new acquisitions.
Insurance is basically the transfer of risk. For a
small premium, you transfer the risk for a larger loss to
an insurance company. Even if your insurance is very
high- say $1,000 a year you would have to pay the
premiums for 100 years before you would approach the
replacement value of an average Island home.
Insurance agents advise all property owners to re-
view their insurance polities annually to make sure the
coverage is adequate. An increase in a few dollars a
year could mean a savings of tens of thousands of dol-
lars if your home is destroyed.
You don't want to pay more in premiums? Insur-
ance agents offer a cost-cutting suggestion by increas-
ing the amount of the deductible you would pay after
a disaster.
Another strong suggestion insurance carriers make
is to photograph your home and belongings. For insur-
ance to be paid in many instances, both proof of pur-
chase and value should be provided, and a photograph
will take care of both those requirements.

Changes in insurance after
Hurricane Andrew
Insurance providers in Florida have been rocked in
the wake of Hurricane Andrew's 1992 landfall south of
Miami. An estimated $20 billion in damage resulted
from the storm.
Many insurance companies have gone out of busi-
ness in Florida, financially unable to withstand the cost
of restoring people's homes and property. Many oth-
ers have limited policies in some areas, such as barrier
islands. And some people have had their policies can-
celed because the risk of coverage is deemed too great
from actuarial standards.
Very few insurance companies, if any, will write
new homeowner policies for houses within 1,000 feet
of the water most of Anna Maria Island.
In an effort to provide insurance to all, former
Florida Insurance Commissioner Tom Gallagher insti-
tuted an insurance "pool." The Florida Residential
Property and Casualty Joint Underwriters Association
allows agents to write policies, with the companies
paying out of the pool the amount of money they have
in coverage for a region of the state after a hurricane or
other disaster.
Although the state insurance pool has only been in
existence for three years, it currently is the third larg-
est insurer in Florida, accepting properties other insur-
ance companies deem too dangerous.
The days of "one-stop shopping" for insurance
appear to have ended for most homeowners in Florida.


Confused between gale force and hurricane force
winds? The definitions below may help you keep your
terminology straight this hurricane season.
Flash flood warning a flash flood has been
reported or is Imminent. Take immediate action.
Flash flood watch flash flood conditions are
possible. Be alert.
Gale warning storm conditions are expected
that include winds of up to 54 mph and heavy rain.
Hurricane a central low-pressure system with
very strong and pronounced circulation, winds in ex-
cessof 74 mph, heavy rain, high seas and a storm surge.
Hurricanes can generate winds of more than 200 mph
and create up to 40-foot waves.
Hurricane eye the area of relative calm in the
center of a hurricane. Expect winds to come from the
opposite direction when the eye passes.
Hurricane warning hurricane conditions may be
expected within 24 hours in the area. Begin making prepa-
rations for a hurricane when a hurricane warning is issued
Hurricane watch hurricane conditions are a real
possibility in the area within 36 hours. When a hurricane
watch is issued, be prepared for a hurricane.
Small craft cautionary statements boaters are


Besides the state insurance pool, carriers have also
pooled coverage for wind damage and flooding.
But even with the new insurance pool, state offi-
cials have agreed that were an intense hurricane to
strike a highly populated area with a large number of
homes, insurance claims would decimate the state in-
surance program. The state pool will need several years
to build up enough financial reserve to handle a big hit
like Hurricane Andrew.
If Andrew had swerved a little more to the north,
striking Miami or Fort Lauderdale instead of Home-
stead, upwards of $50 billion in damages would have
occurred, hurricane experts predict.
"We don't have enough money to cover a $50 bil-
lion storm," Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund Chief
Operating Officer Jack Nicholson has said.

Federal intervention, too
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is also
involved in hurricanes, both before and after the fact.
FEMA has imposed strict guidelines for home con-
struction and reconstruction. The most apparent of the
FEMA rules governs home repair in high-hazard areas,
such as barrier islands. If you plan to remodel your
home at more than half of its appraised value, you will
have to meet current FEMA regulations regarding el-
evation and construction.
FEMA rules are designed to offset the massive
amounts of money the federal government would have to
pay for repairs in an area struck by a natural disaster. Un-
fortunately, the rules also strike at the social structure of
neighborhoods. Many land planners criticize FEMA for
disrupting neighborhoods by causing some houses to loom
over older homes. How can an area retain its residential
character when some residents have huge, elevated "sky-
scrapers" looming over their neighbors? is the question
many architects and planners ask.
FEMA has also been attacked in the past for its
reconstruction practices. There is little or no method
the lumbering bureaucracy can use to allow residents
in high-risk areas to be relocated. During the Midwest
floods of the past few years, many communities and
residents agreed they would prefer not to rebuild in a


advised to remain in port when a small craft caution-
ary statement is issued due to strong winds and rain.
Storm surge a dome of water pushed ahead of
the eye of a hurricane, often reaching 20 feet in height.
The storm surge height is in addition to the high waves
generated by the hurricane.
Tropical depression a low-pressure system
generally characterized by closed circulation and winds
of less than 38 mph.
Tropical disturbance a moving area of thun-
derstorms in the tropics that maintains its identity for
24 hours or more, generally characterized by slight cir-
culation and no strong winds.
Tropical storm a low-pressure system generally
characterized by strong circulation, winds of less than 73
mph, large amounts of rain and waves. Tropical storms are
named by the National Hurricane Center.
Tropical storm warning storm conditions are
expected when there is a threat of a tropical storm
making landfall within 24 hours.
Tropical storm watch storm conditions are
expected when there is a threat of a tropical storm
making landfall within 36 hours.
Tropical wave a line of weak low pressure.


Damage in South Florida
in the wake of Hurricane
Andrew devastated
houses, hi-rise buildings
m and the entire region's
infrastructure. Scenes like
this picture appear more
m in keeping with an explo-
sion than a major storm,
but wind damage and
.. construction that was not
,adequate for the big blow
took a serious toll on
buildings and insurance
companies. Islander

Carnegie.

flood zone. FEMA, though, would not release funds for
relocation and only paid out money on the condition
that residents rebuild their homes smack in the way
of future flooding.
National Hurricane Center officials have pointed out
that many home builders do not take natural conditions
into account when they build high-hazard-area houses.
Wind and flooding are two of the biggest problems
residents face in Florida during hurricanes. Flooding
can be alleviated by elevating the house, as is required.
But constructing a house to withstand high winds
is often ignored by builders. Eves, gables, porticos -
all become wind traps during hurricanes, concentrating
the wind and causing massive destruction.
The solution: hurricane shutters, reinforced doors
and internal barricades on garage doors.
Straps and clips often are not used by builders to
affix trusses firmly to beams, although the expense of
the straps and clips adds only a few dollars to the over-
all cost of the house.
Pierre Renaldo, a local builder, has said changes in
building standards in Floridarequire all high-risk areas of
the state to have buildings designed to resist winds of at
least 110 mph on the islands, 90 mph on the mainland.
'The geometric shapes of buildings will be an im-
portant consideration in designing to conform to code
requirements," Renaldo said. "Hip roofs will be looked
upon more favorably than gabled styles because they
resist high winds more efficiently than gables. More
vertical wall area requires additional structural appli-
cations that help to resist wind force more effectively.
"Just as a large sail on a boat catches more wind,
so do walls and roofs," he said. Renaldo urged every-
one contemplating building a new house to discuss
wind safety with their architect or builder before con-
struction begins.
"All of these new requirements will undoubtedly
result in additional expense for your building program,
but it is probably the cheapest insurance you can buy
and it will stay with you," Renaldo said.
"Sooner or later, those of us who insist on build-
ing and living in the coastal areas are going to be put
to a tough test by nature," Renaldo said. "Let's hope we
get a passing grade."


1995 hurricane names
Every year, the National Hurricane Center
names the tropical storms that become hurricanes.
The naming is done to avoid confusion in the
event that more than one hurricane is in the Atlan-
tic Ocean at one time.
The practice of naming intense storms has
been going on for several hundred years.
Women's names were used before the end of the
19th Century and, in 1953, were continued by the
U.S. weather services. In 1978, men's and
women's names were used to name Pacific
storms. A year later, the same practice was used
in hurricane lists for Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic and
Caribbean storms.
The 1995 names of Atlantic hurricanes are:
Allison Humberto Opal
Berry Iris Pablo
Chantal Jerry Roxanne
Dean Karen Sebastien
Erin Luis Tanya
Felix Marilyn Van
Gabrielle Noel Wendy


Storm, hurricane terms to save









Anna Maria Little League


By Scott Dell
AMICC Little League President
A tie for second-half champions has brought an
element of excitement to the minor league. Jim Boast
Dodgers and Manager Elmo Torres had a must-win
situation Thursday night: if the Dodgers defeated Qual-
ity Builders, they could be in a tie for second-half
champs and force a play-off. They did it.
The two teams played Tuesday night at press time. If
Quality Builders defeated Jim Boast, then the all-star
game will be played Wednesday, May 31, starting at4:45
p.m. for minor leaguers; 7 p.m. for major leaguers. The
awards presentation will be Thursday, June 1 at 6 p.m. for
tee-ball; 7 p.m. for minors; 8 p.m. for majors.
If Jim Boast Dodge defeated Quality Builders,
there will be a winner-take-all championship between
the two teams Wednesday night, with the all-star games
Thursday and the awards presentations Monday, June
5, at the times listed above.

Major league all-stars: Barry Andricks, Mike
Armstrong, Taylor Bernard, Randy Blancet, Ricky
Buckelew, Preston Copeland, Justin Dries, David
Evans, Bill Floto, Evan Goldsen, Casey Gonsmart,
Greg Granstad, Tim Hasse, Charles Kyle, Jason
Loomis, Mike Patterson, Adam Pear, Jeremy Purvis,
Mark Rudacille, Ben Sato, Josh Sato, Jim Sebastiano,
Adam Wall, Travis Wicklund.

Minor league all-stars: Christian Bax, Peter Birch, Eric
Bobo, Nicole Bollettleri, Allison Chewning, Amanda
Cicero, David Cramer, Chris Erickson, Jessie Foraker,
Bobby Lee Gibbons, Tyler Krauss, Billy Malfese, Tay-
lor Manning, Ryan Mijares, Ben Miller, Melissa
Mixon, Chris Nelson, Serglo Recanati, Kaelan
Richards, Cory Schafer, Sarah Thomas, Mario Torres,
Debbie Tyson, Suzanne Wight.


AMICC Little League
Week ending May 25


2nd Half
Major League W L
D.Coy Ducks (champs) 8 1


Haley's Motel
AMFD 4
Kiwanis
W. Bay Athletic


Minor League
Jim Boast Dodgers
Quality Builders
Ball-Hai
Tip of the Island
Uncle Dan's Place
Betsy Hills


7 3
6 9
3 6
1 7

2nd Half
W L
8 2
8 2
5 4
4 6
3 6
1 9


Major League leading stats
Name Team G
Mike Patterson Ducks 18
Mike Armstrong Ducks 18
Taylor Bernard WAC 14
Ricky Buckelew Haley's 18
Tim Hasse Haley's 18


Year
W
16
14
11
5
4

Year
W
15
16
7
12
6
3


RBI
17
16
12
15
19


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 1, 1995 1 PAGE 21 Bm
A "


L
3
6

14
14


L
5
4
12
8
13
17


Avg.
.552
.480
.469
.414
.412


Silk art smooth program
Anna Maria artist Snoopy Gates will demonstrate
her technique of handpainting silk on Monday, June 5,
at 7 p.m. at the Artists Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr.,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. Refreshments
will be served beginning at 6:30 p.m..
The public is invited to attend. For additional in-
formation call the gallery at 778-6694.

Arts and crafts summer
workshop at Island center
The on-going Arts and Crafts Workshop at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center has resumed its
summer classes held the first and third Thursday of
each month from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. The June 1 class
will experiment with painting floral designs with
sponges. The fee is $2 per class.
Call 778-6685 to register.


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH

Home of the Delicious
AU.-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage)
$350

Served Daily (Waffles too!)

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!





RESTAURANT & MARINA
FWATURZGW :
OTWE SUaDMfM OF FUVD
WEEKDAY EVENING SPECIALS
TUESDAY NIGHT PRIME RIB 1 )INNER....S9.95
WED NIGHT BBQ CIIICKEN & RIBS I)INNER........95.

FRIDAY NIGHT POOLSIDE COOKOUT 6 9PM $14.95
STEAKS, FISH, & KABOBS, RIGHT OFF THE GRILL!
SATURDAY NIGHT POOLSIDE LUAU 6- 9PM $14.95
GRASS SKIRTS, ROAST PIG, & ALL THE TRIMMINGS!
SUNDAY AFTERNOON BBO $8.95
POOLSIDE WITH $1.00 DRAFTS
Live Entertainment
Dance to the Sounds of
Irian Veebe
'Cues Sat 8pm to Midnight
595 Dream island ooad 383-5565
6000 Flock of gulf of Mexico Drive "* J


Be sure to save the hurrkane section in this issue of The Islander Bystander -
t's all you need to know for storm preparedness on Anna Maria Island.


* SPEIALSGoodFrom *MA31t, 6


Indoor soccer starting
The Anna Maria Island Community Center
will offer an indoor Soccer League this summer
for ages 5 to 7, 8 to 10, 11 to 13, and 14 to 16.
Registration is currently going on and will
end Wednesday, June 7. League practice will be
held once a week starting Monday, June 12.
The cost is $20 per player and $15 for each
additional child in a family. Information, call
Scott Dell at 778-1908.






BI PAGE 22 M JUNE 1, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Good ol' summertime ahead for children


There are just a few weeks left in the school year
before summer vacation. A variety of children's sum-
mer-program activities will be available throughout the
area.
The following is a partial list of offerings.
The Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, will run a full-time "Discov-
ery Summer" camp for children in kindergarten through
fifth grade. The program will run from June 12 through
Aug. 18, Monday through Friday. Camp will open at 9
a.m., with a 7 am. early drop-off available by request;
pickup is between 5 and 6 p.m. Weekly fees will be $50
for one child, $45 for each additional child.
Activities will include arts and crafts, sports and
cooking; prevention, computer fun and gardening; and
partial-day and daylong field trips, to name a few.
Some of the major field trips scheduled are to Lowry
Park, Adventure Island and the new Florida Aquarium.
Applications, schedules and more information are
available by calling 778-1908.
Also for ages 5 through 12, the Center will be of-
fering week-long baseball, basketball, soccer and ten-
nis camps for the first time. Dates and fees are to be
announced, as are the activities planned for teenagers.
Another first this summer at the Center will be the
Anna Maria Music Camp, sponsored by the Center
in cooperation with the Anna Maria Island Community
Orchestra and Chorus. Courses will be given by musi-
cians under the direction of Alfred Gershfeld, Commu-
nity Orchestra music director and conductor. Among
the offerings will be symphony participation for winds,
strings and percussion; choral ensembles; music theory
and history; and private lessons.
Two three-week sessions are scheduled: from June
12 through June 30 and July 10 through July 28. Mu-
sic camp will run from 8:30 am. to 12:30 p.m., with the
option of participating in arts and sports activities from
1 to 5:30 p.m. Interested students must be in at least
fifth grade by August 1995. All levels of experience are
welcome. Applications are due by June 1.
For more information, call Ana Shaw at the Cen-
ter, 778-1908.

outdoor catering all occasions poolside





open flame roasted smoked rotisserie
SOUTHERN STYLE CARIBBEAN POLYNESIAN
call to discuss your menu
DENNIE KIDD 778-3170


The Island's two licensed preschools will also be
offering summer activities for a variety of ages.
The School for Constructive Play, 304 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria, 778-2210, is open 7 am. to 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday, for ages 18 months to 10 years. Fees
are $85 per week for preschoolers, $75 per week for kin-
dergarten age and up, or $20 per day, with pre-registration
required. If there is enough response in the older age
bracket, off-premises trips and activities will be scheduled.
Reading tutoring will also be provided.
In Holmes Beach, Dolphin Daycare and Pre-
school, 5354 Gulf Drive, 778-2967, has openings for
ages 2 through 12 years. Summer camp will run from
June 12 through Aug. 18, with local-area field trips or
beach activity planned daily. Fees will be $65 weekly
or $15 per day, not including field-trip costs. Children
are welcome on a daily basis.
Several vacation bible schools on the Island will
include a July 31 to Aug. 4 Roser Church program,
"Awesome Adventures," in cooperation with Gloria
Del Lutheran Church, 778-0414 or 778-1813; the Is-
land Baptist Church, July 24 through 28,778-0719; and
the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, dates to be
announced, 778-1638. Programs will also include arts
and crafts and recreational activities.
The Chapel Players of Roser Church will offer a
three-week session, 1 to 3 p.m. Monday through Fri-


No.m Jane Staf IS


) 11


Casual Dining
Appetizers, Pizzas
Soups, Salads
and more.


Hours Nightly:
Lounge & Lighter Bites
5:00 1:00
Dessert Room
6:00 -12:00
Restaurant
5:00 -10:30

The Haye Loft
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key, FL
813.383.3633

Live Entertainment


Florida Trend's
Golden Spoon Award
DiRoNA Award



FABULOUS
Dining







AND THE HAYE LOFT

Hours Nightly:
Lounge & Lighter Bites
5:00 1:00
Dessert Room
6:00 12:00
Restaurant
5:00 10:30

Euphemia Haye
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key, FL
813.383.3633
live Entertair:nent


Appetizers
Cajun Fried Mahi Nuggets............... $4.95
Blackened or Grilled Mahi Skewers...... $3.95
Salad
Blackened orChar-grilled Mahi Caesar..$5.95
/ Dinners
Grilled Mahi Combo.... .... ..............$10.95
Blackened or Char-grilled Mahi .... $9.95
Blackened Mahi Pasta...................... 8.95
Grilled Mahi Primavera........... .........$8.95
Fried Mahi Medallions.............. .....$7.95
S Grilled Mahi Italiano choirgr Moh,, mpp.
Cahf I
rde $9.95
For the lighter Appetite A smaller poron ol Mohl I/nl
$7.95
SSHELLS Mahi Parmigiana ,,,,i,hily bird
fIrs hted n 100% cholesteol free vPgetable oil, topped w-th
SHELIS sty Itoion red sauce and reshly grated Parm-gnna /o
hee ,e (Thls ,rh ,, DtCIGaoso)' $8.95

Add a 5 oz. Skewer of Char-grilled r
S Blackened Mahi to any order $3.95


Only at... Of(
The Freshest Seafood at Dockside Prices!
*MAr 7hWh e and SwwwB ffei arlA Wr- e Reader's Choice
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Dr. 778-5997
Happy Hour Daily 4 to 7 PM
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10 Fri & Sat 4 to 11


Why chain yourself to a hot kitchen? '
Harry's Restaurant has Summer
specials that will delight you for
brunch, lunch or dinner!
Little Dinners & Big Salads for Summer
Thursday Nite is Sushi Nite!

Harry's Take-Out has gourmet dinners,
succulent summer sandwiches,
salads and crisp cold bottles of wine
to make summer living cool and easy

,0 Take the heat off your entertaining.
o-. Sit back and relax. Let Harry's
cater your next party! C,-


383-0777
Open Wednesday thru Sunday
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.(Behind Circle K)
On Beautiful Longboat Key
--Ilrp-t wn~Narnnw


~L~a~~


day, from June 12 through June 30, on the art of sing-
ing Broadway hits for children ages 8 to 16. Cost will
be $18 for the first child, $15 each additional. Regis-
tration is requested by June 1. Information, 778-0414.
The Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, 778-6341, will offer preschool story
times Wednesday evenings June 21 and 28 and July 19
and 26. For children grade 2 and up, seven arts and
crafts and reading/listening programs will be offered in
June and July. Call after June 12 to register.

Off Island
Opportunities on the other side of the bridges run
the gamut. We have chosen just a few.
Off 59th Street in Bradenton, Manatee County's
G.T. Bray Park offers full-time summer camp for ages
5 to 13; off-site recreational programs for ages 10 to 16
in the Great Outdoors Adventure Camp; and all-skills
tennis camp at the C.V. Walton Racquet Center.
Also in Bradenton, the Junior Science Musuem
will hold weekly programs all summer for preschoolers
through sixth graders. For ages 5 through 7, the South
Florida Museum will offer Dinosaur and Fossil Fun
and Friendly Manatees, and for ages 8 through 10, In-
dian Life and Lore and Space Camp.
Ellen Meade Studios will offer performing arts
programs for ages 2 through 10, modeling for ages 5
through teens, and dance, ages 3 through teens. The Art
League of Manatee County will hold fine arts and crafts
sessions in June and July for ages 6 through 12.
Going south, Longboat Key's Bayfront Recreation
Center will offer a full-time summer camp program for
elementary-school ages and Mote Marine Laboratory
will hold six one-week morning sessions for ages 6
through 13.
On Saturday, June 3 through September 30, the
Sarasota Ski-A-Rees Ski School will offer four four-
class sessions for ages 7 and up at the Ski-A-Rees
home site on City Island behind Mote Marine. In-
struction will be for beginners, intermediate and
advanced levels.
All in all, summer should be fun!
Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $7.25
BISCUITS vegetable, rolls $
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week

1! N Ghome frles andrioffeeZ.. nly $.75
Island Inn Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach
































Commendable job
These are the "Students of the Week" for Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending May 19.
Kneeling, left to right, AJ. Stevens, Eric Anton. First row, Christina Zash, James Snider, Steven Faassee,
Eric Whitley and Catarina Klotz Back row, David Lanzillo, Brian Faassee, Lorraine Stanick, Michael
Maietta, Sarah Thomas and Morgan Cramer. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


4'A
OK


pt ii' I -
.,cA"-- .
(r '-


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 1, 1995 0 PAGE 23 EI


Anna Maria

SElementary menu
Monday, 6/5/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Fruit or Fruit Juice
S Lunch: Pizza or Baloney & Cheese Sandwich
Tuesday, 6/6/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Fruit or Fruit Juice
SLunch: Fish on a Bun or Ham & Cheese Sandwich
Wednesday, 6/7/95
Breakfast: Cereal, Fruit or Fruit Juice
S Lunch: Barbecue Pork over Noodles or Pizza
E xThursday, 6/8/95
Early release
Expect students home approximately 2 hours early
Breakfast: Cereal, Fruit or Fruit Juice
Lunch: Pizza or Hot Ham & Cheese Sandwich
Friday, 6/9/95
Start of summer vacation
Have a safe and happy summer -
The Islander Bystander
All meals served with milk.
All lunches include a vegetable and fruit.



City Hall hosts future leaders
Nine Bradenton Beach fifth-graders participated in
their city's first Student Government Day May 23. The
theme was "Future Leaders in Today's Environment"
and each student got "real-time experience" with a
city official or staff member. Taking part, front from
left, were Michael Martin, Chrystalyn Roach, Justin
Weng, Matt Losek, Randy Blancet, Ashley Eannarino,
Andy McCarrick, Sergio Recanati and Kyle Bachman;
and rear, Councilman John Kauffman, Library
Representative Mollie Sandberg, Councilman Walter
Grace, Vice Mayor Dick Suhre, Building Official
Whitey Moran, Councilman Bill Campbell, Police
Chief Jack Maloney, Police Officer Sam Speciale, City
Clerk Alice Baird and Director of Parks and Mainte-
nance Buddy Watts. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


v HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER
We now serve Cocktails "

F: r Lunch or .
I Dinner Special
I WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER
| ENTREE GET SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE.
Not good with any other coupon or offer-- Expires 6/30/95
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
RITISH PUB Mon.-Thur. 4 to 10
Friday Noon to 10
&1 !S l StL, Sun. Sam to 10pm
RESTAURANT Seving Breakfast 8 ti
Pub Hours Til?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


Congratulate your
S Graduate with
Dinner at
Stacey's Buffet
Bring thefamily
\Small or Large Groups
CHOOSE FROM
OVER 100 ITEMS!
ONE LOW PRICE
\ includes beverage
& dessert!
Mon. Sun.
4848 14th St. W.
The Fountains
cornerr of 49th Ave. & US 41)
0 755-3766 =


RESTAURANT
Now Featuring

I KING CRAB

LEGS
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
gmmg mmmmumcmm^''omanx\


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I[l PAGE 24 N JUNE 1, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 22, vehicle theft, 200 block of Lakeview.
Officer responded in reference to the theft of a motor-
cycle. The complainant reported that the suspect bor-
rowed the motorcycle a week earlier for a test ride and
did not return it
May 23, domestic disturbance, 800 block of
North Shore. The officer responded in reference to a
domestic disturbance. Both parties were engaged in a
verbal disturbance and there were no injuries to either,
said the report. The male subject chose to stay at a
motel for the night.

Bradenton Beach
May 16, petty theft of a cable box, 100 block of
First Street North.
May 18, warrants, prowling, obstruction by false
information, 2201 Gulf Drive, Sunset Beach Resort
The officer on patrol was advised by two complainants
that they observed a white male wearing a ball cap and
no shirt behind the resort pulling on the windows of one
of the rooms. The officer checked the area and ob-
served the subject crouched behind a small wall at the
corer of the property in the shadows.

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The subject stood up and began walking toward 22nd
Street North The officer stopped him and asked for his
identification, which he did not have. The subject gave the
officer a false name and birth date and was placed in cus-
tody. The backup officer from Holmes Beach who was on
the scene recognized the subject from a prior incident and
found his name and birth date. A warrant check revealed
outstanding warrants for the subject in Sarasota.
May 18, domestic battery, 2400 block of Avenue C.
The suspect and the victim had a verbal argument and the
suspect grabbed the victim by the throat and pinned him
against the wall, said the report. The suspect left the scene.
Witnesses corroborated the account The officer later lo-
cated the suspect and placed him in custody.
May 19, reckless driving, DWLS, 1400 block
through 100 block of Gulf Drive North. The officer on
patrol observed the subject traveling south at a high rate
of speed, swerving and driving in the northbound lane.
While trying to catch up to the subject's vehicle, the
officer observed the subject nearly strike another
southbound vehicle.
The subject turned on his left turn signal upon ap-
proaching a construction sign at Bridge Street,
slammed on his brakes, drove over the sidewalk,
jumped the curb nearly striking a light pole, then skid-
ded to a stop nearly striking a vehicle backing out of a
parking lot, said the report. The officer approached the
subject's vehicle and did a driver's license check which


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showed three active suspensions. The subject was
placed in custody.
May 20, burglary, 2501 Gulf Drive N., Island
Plaza. The officer observed the front door of a unit had
been pried open and cabinets opened and gone through.
The resident said nothing appeared to be missing. Dam-
age was $100.
May 20, criminal mischief, 2501 Gulf Drive N.,
Island Plaza. The officer observed the front door of a
unit had been pried open. The unit was vacant Dam-
age was $100.
May 21, burglary, 300 block of Highland. The
complainant reported that when he returned to his resi-
dence he found the window in the bedroom had been
taken out and two black powder pistols valued at $125
each, two holsters valued at $40, a knife with a seven-
inch blade valued at $20 and a kit for the black pow-
der pistols valued at $100 were missing.
May 21, Baker Act, Coquina Beach. The com-
plainant, a counselor, reported that the subject in his
care tried to strangle himself with the seatbelt and was
stabbing himself with sticks. The officer contacted the
subject's physician who told the officer to transport the
subject to the hospital to be admitted.
May 22, burglary, 1101 Gulf Drive N., Queen's
Gate condominiums. The complainant reported that when
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE



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YOU CAN
BUY IT!
SELL IT!
FIND IT!
FAST!
The Islander
Bystander
classified ads really
work. Place your
ad by noon
Monday for
Wednesday paper
at the office next
to Chez Andre in
the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


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IM0 lvil11aH


Mon-Fri 7 to 3 Sat 7 to 1 Sun 7 to 11
778-9803 5340 Gulf Drive., S&S Plaza
a ______________


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FABULOUS FOOD and GREEK WINE!!
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CHOOSE YOUR FAVORITE ENTREE FROM THESE
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 1, 1995 M PAGE 25 BI


I TET I


he returned to his unit he found the rear door open and a
shaving bag and hygiene items valued at $10, a pair of
binoculars valued at $150, two bottles of prescription
medicine and a half bottle of liquor missing.

Holmes Beach
May 19, assist EMS, 300 block of 61st Street. The
officer responded to assist EMS on a call of a child
stuck in a washing machine. Upon the officer's arrival,
the two-year-old was free.
SMay 21, automobile theft, 3100 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported that his vehicle was parked
under his condominium and, when he went to go to work,
it was missing. The vehicle was found later at the corner
of 28th Street and Avenue E with the keys in the ignition
and the engine hot. The victim responded to take posses-
sion of the vehicle. He said the keys were his spare set and
he had no idea how they got there.
May 21, petty theft of a recycling bin valued at
$25, 500 block of 77th Street.
May 22, suspicious persons, 3700 Gulf Drive.
The officer observed three subjects around a pool area


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1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


and, when he confronted them, they admitted they did
not live there. They were asked to leave the area.
May 23, disturbance, 5313 Gulf Drive, Eckerd's
Drug Store. The complainant took offense at the
subject's use of profanity in the presence of several
elderly ladies and told him so. Words were exchanged
before the complainant left the store. He told the officer
that the subject made threats to find out who he is and
take care of him, according to the report.
SMay 24, animal, 76th Street and Palm Drive. The
complainant reported a dog barking continuously. The
officer found a brown and black female shepherd
puppy attached to a long broken chain wrapped around
a stop sign. The officer freed the puppy and placed her
in the shelter area at the police station. He noted that
he would attempt to locate the owner through the Island
Animal Clinic.
May 24, found property a bicycle, 28th Street
and Avenue B.
May 24, damage, 6500 Flotilla, Westbay Pointe.
The complainant reported that a person unknown van-
dalized screens in a unit.
May 25, suspicious persons, 30th Street beach.
The complainant reported a group of juveniles hang out
on the beach in the evening drinking and possibly us-

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Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


DISCOVER A HIDDEN
I TREASURE


Island Democrats meet
The Anna Maria Island Democratic Club will
meet on Monday, June 5, at noon at Crabby Bill's
in Holmes Beach.
The recently completed needs assessment study
for Anna Maria Island will be the topic of discussion
by guest speaker Pierrette Kelly, executive director of
the Anna Maria Island Community Center.

ing drugs. A patrol request was initiated.
May 25, suspicious person, 2710 Gulf Drive,
Cedar Cove. The complainant reported the subject re-
fused to leave and had not paid for three days. Upon the
officer's arrival, the subject was gone. He told the com-
plainant to secure the subject's belongings until he re-
turns and makes arrangements to pay.
May 25, traffic, 300 block of 59th Street. A mo-
torist reported a vehicle driving erratically and believed
the driver might cause an accident. The officer stopped
the vehicle and the driver said the air conditioning was
broken and he had to hit it or shake the wires to make
it work. The officer informed him to get it fixed before
he caused an accident.

EXPIRES 00
617/95 ^ ^BO'S P S
I -- 10519 Cortez Road I"
C792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12.00 Noon 8 PM
II
PIZZA i*
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: $3.49 *
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I "Thank you to all our local patrons"
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ISLAND RM1iaI
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for mullet shirts, subscription orders and
classified advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)


Call 813-778-7978
FAX 778-9392


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OPEN 7 DAYS CALL FOR RESERVATIONS
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i~ PAGE 26 M JUNE 1, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real

estate sales
1007 Gulf Dr, Bradenton Beach, 105 Summer Sands,
an elevated 2bed/2bath/2car condo of 2195 sfla, built in
1982, was sold 4/24/95, Miller to Woodruff, for $165,000;
list $172,900.
1801 Gulf Dr, Bradenton Beach, 139 Runaway Bay,
a 2bed/2bath downstairs condo on the bay, 1114 sfla, built
in 1973, was sold 4/24/95, Gropp to Alien, for $112,000;
list unknown.
3210 6th Av, Holmes Beach, an elevated 4bed/4bath/


2car duplex of 2240 sfla, built in 1987 on a 50x100 lot, was
sold 4/20/95, Eckert-Spear to Radick, for $175,000; list
unknown.
326 Tarpon, Anna Maria, an elevated canal front 3bed/
2bath/2car/pool home of 2194 sfla, built in 1990 on a
75x115 lot, was sold 4/28/95, Moon to Field, for $400,000;
list $395,000.
4909 Gulf Dr, Holmes Beach, #2B, an elevated
townhouse of 2bed/l+bath/2cp with 852 sfla, built in 1985
on a 35x75 lot, was sold 4/21/95, Carper to Harris &
Northam, for $67,400; list $74-70,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate bro-
ker, exclusively for The Islander Bystander. 1995


5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach,
FL 34217
(941) 778-0766


SMUGGLER'S LANDING ... Peaceful setting
overlooking canal. Two bedrooms, 2 baths with
expanded kitchen and 2 screened lanais. Ca-
thedral ceiling, skylights and 40 ft. dock.
#64016. $136,000. Call Carol Heinze, eve-
nings at 792-5721.
MARTINIQUE ... Desirable corner unit! Three
bedrooms, 3 baths, all new paint and updated
decorating. Carpet allowance w/contract. Origi-
nal owners ... minimal use. Owner financing.
#60737. $196,900. Call T. Dolly Young, evenings
at 778-5427.
FLAMINGO CAY ... Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath
on deep water canal, in-ground caged pool,
minutes from the Intercoastal Waterway. Split
bedroom design, circle drive, boat dock.
#61456. $180,000. Call Horace Gilley anytime
at 792-0758.


Westbay Cove pool view 1 bed,
furnished $89,900. #DY 58710
Restaurant Facility ... Seats
85+ outdoors. 2,000 s.f. 2 COP,
furnishings + 900 s.f. 2 bd apt.
$450,000. #DY 52792
Sun Plaza West ... 2 bd, 2 ba,
with Gulf view. Turkey fur-
nished. $167,500. #DY 63126
Motel ... 6 apts Holmes Beach.
Location! Potential 18% ROI.
$430,000. #DY 63227


Wr ri -. 9
T. Dolly Young
REALTOR*/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
778-5427


IMPERIAL HOUSE...
SWell maintained Gulf to Bay
community with heated pool,
clubhouse, fishing dock and Gulf
access. Low maintenance fees. 2
bedroom $89,900; 2 bedroom -
$79,900; 1 bedroom $69,900.


Carol Heinze
REALTORO/CRS
Multi-Million $ Club
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist

Karin
Stephan
REALTOR* '
PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
Office:
941-778-0766
Mobile:
941-350-5844
140 FEET OF BAYFRONTI Rare bayfront home with
million dollar view. Fine investment. 2BR/2BA, great for
entertaining. $389,000. #KS 62765
KEY ROYALE DRIVE ... beautiful 3BR/3BA home,
large living room. Excellent condition on a comer lot w/
pool and boat dock. $445,000. #KS 63811
60 NORTH SHORE DRIVE ... Totally refurbished on 2
lots for tropical seclusion. 4BR/4BA, boathouse and slip.
$289,000. #KS 63806
PERICO BAY CLUB ... Beautiful upstairs unit overlook-
ing Palma Sola Bay. 3BR/2BA, in excellent condition.
Pool, tennis. $187,100. #KS 59052
ARBOR OAKS DRIVE ... 3BR/2BA, energy efficient
home. Corian counters and European cabinets.
Screened deck with spa. $174,900. #KS 63839
GULF BEACH PLACE ... steps to the beach. 2BR/2BA,
turnkey furnished. $130,000 to $172,000. #KS 61202
ISLAND PARADISE CONDOS ... Elegant waterfront
condos with panoramic view of Gulf. Private balcony and
excellent walking beach. 2BR/2BA units with excellent
rental history. $299,000. #KS 58899
YOUR BEST CONNECTION TO GERMANY...
ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH


ProdecrpoatespnsrsofMoe arneLaoatory. Call.us for a brochurea.ddicon cupn


U NT WII IN TA ION WVITHI


ACROSS FROM BEACH They didn't knock this
one down for a condo It was too cuteGreat view
of the Gulf, this old frame home features 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and has a great rental history, with
beach just across the street. $129,000.








HOLMES BEACH $108,000 Lots of possibilities
here! Great location and quiet street. Short walk
to shopping center and beach. 2BR/1BA and the
other side features a 1BR/1 BA.









CANAL HOMES BEACH Situated in a tidy
neighborhood of fine homes. This impeccably
kept split design home features 3 spacious bed-
rooms, 2 baths, family room, glassed porch, 2-car
garage and a picture perfect lawn. Sailboat canal
& large lot. $249,000.

Mike

Norman

Realty inc.

778-6696
1-800-367-1617 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JUNE 1, 1995 0 PAGE 27 E

PLUSHTT GAFFNEY / EDD BY WL S Z 1
BY MATT GAFFNEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ I ErI JI IE I


ACROSS
I Bearded world
leader
7 "-- Poems"
(Sandburg's first
book)
14 Overstate one's
case
18 Vatican II pontiff
19 Unpleasant
sentiment
20 One of the
Horae
21 BAY
23 An Allman
brother
24 "...-- o'clock
scholar"
25 Boot one
26 "Unbelievable"
rock band
27 1992 Clinton
rival
29 Like most music
sold nowadays
31 -- marshal
(British officer)
33 Tons
35 Effortlessness
36 Rear, informally
38 Twisted, as a
bulb
41 "Encore!"
44 DOUG
46 Asian coin
49 Statement
51 In the wee hours
52 Really nice


54 Re religious
meetings
56 Norman
Chandler's
paper, briefly
60 Controversial
execution of
1927
61 Some Spanish
religious
paintings
63 Assyrian capital
65 Token
66 Soundhole
shape
67 Rap star/actor
69 Dotty
70 German article
71 Free-trade
measure of '94
72 Straight for
76 Stupor
79 Meanies
81 Nods
83 -- support
(alimony)
84 Coat materials
86 Some tides
88 Altogether
89 Men
90 MARC
95 Graycoat
96 Lucy's love, in
the comics
98 Italian opera
house
100 Zoophilist's org.
102 Bugs
103 "Raiders of the
Lost Ark"
creatures
104 Pronto
107 Scarring events


109 TV schedule
letters
111 Sault Marie
113 Sudden noise
115 Dissect, in a way
116 PERT
121 "Doe,--, a
female..."
122 Connected
123 Australis
(southern
constellation)
124 Tops, e.g.
125 Colleague of
Calliope
126 Scarlet letter
wearer
DOWN
1 Samoan capital
2 Sought support
from
3 Frost
contemporary
4 Draw back
5 Rock video
award
6 Spearer, of sorts
7 "All-American
Girl" star
Margaret
8 "A Private View"
playwright
9 Entry
10 Writer who
co-founded
Random House
11 "Atlas
Shrugged" name
12 Muck
13 Play set in
Grover's
Corners
14 Country on
Borneo


15 BUS
16 Trollope lady
and namesakes
17 Simpletons
19 King Arthur's
mother
20 Familiar vow
22 Sphere of
struggle
28 Mount
30 Infamous
French soldier
32 Splendid
33 Mannequin part
34 Felis-- (lion)
37 Backdoor
38 l.ong-time
Windy City
orchestra leader
39 "It's a -
shame"
40 Salon supplies
41 Groundwork
42 Kind of
education
43 MARIA
45 QB Tarkenton
47 Denounce
harshly
48 Vegasgas
50 Beat
53 Arrayed
55 Shade of brown
57 One of the "Little
Women"
58 Welsh "John"
59 Not Nintendos
62 Ices, with "up"
64 Angel, perhaps
68 Helpers of profs.
71 "Holy cow!"
73 Spanish railway
company


74 Kiev's river
75 Guiding light?
77 80's guerrilla
78 Bachelor,
stereotypically
80 Third son of
Adam
82 Descries
85 Neighbor of
Turkey
87 Accelerates


91 Fast wheels
92 Cry of alarm
93 Has too much,
informally
94 Some bridge
players
97 Subjects of
investigations
99 Spring event
100 March 17
honoree


101 It has many
61-Across
103 Grocery chain
105 Set aside
106 "Common
Sense".
pamphleteer
108 --des
Canraibes
(Martinique
locale)


109 Young'un
110 Oktoberfest
serving
112 Work like
Diurer
114 Comic Jack
117 Bettor's note
118 Young'un
119 Consonantless
German city
120 Wade opponent


STUMPED?


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


-- I-

Ii .
-~ 'I 4


;-- :: : ....: ~ i. -:.
..... '..i .FFh .: :, ... ..
I ;- :5 .. : -- ='-.-7. :: 'r+,',.jZ : - ,


-..: ,... .,
r' "-' . .. . .. .. ... . .. . ;.4 i -x -. - ) : "
,4 :: .... : . -:-:, : .,-. :- ; .,.., --+ I ''? .'. ::::.-::?'. =,,t x,


DICK
MAHER
REALTORF
ASSOCIATE I

778-6791



Dick has been a major player
in the Island Real Estate In-
dustry for over 10 years, and
the Top Producer for April of
1995. Call anytime for a con-
sultation.






FULL SERVICE PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week
Weekly Rentals From $450

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club
from $700 mo.
Westbay Point
Moorings- 3/2
with boat dock
$900 mo.
2501 Gulf Drive -

Julie 2/2 with Gulf view
$700 mo.


Call (941) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


HOMES ISLAND


609 Ambassador Lane ....................... $165,000
412 Bay Palms Dr...............................$149,900
620 Fox Street ..................................... $189,000
4000A Gulf of Mexico Dr .................... $425,000
513 Loquat Drive ................................ $320,000
268 South Harbor Dr........................... $249,000

HOMES OFF THE ISLAND
3207 17th Ave. W .......... ..................$69,000
7208 19th Ave. N.W ...................... $429,900
1612 38th Ave. W ................................ $34,900
5147 41st St. W ............................. $114,900
4902 64th Dr. W ........... ................... $595,000
4310 Hebrides Ct .......................... $149,500
4511 Mangrove Point Rd .................... $135,000


CONDOS ISLAND
1007 Gulf Dr. N. #215......................... $142,900
1906 Gulf Dr. N. #203......................... $185,000
5400 Gulf Dr. #39.............................. $250,000
6005 Gulf Dr. #216...........................$124,900
6006 Gulf Dr. #212..............................$174,900
6700 Gulf Dr. N. #14........................... $224,900
6804 Gulf Dr........................................ $186,900
4800 Gulf of Mexico Dr. #303............. $138,900
3701 East Bay Dr. #9B ..................... $134,900
3805 East Bay Dr. #201 ........................ $84,900
3805 East Bay Dr. #304........................ $94,900
3805 East Bay Dr. #310 ...................... $121,900
600 Manatee Ave. #113......................$142,500
600 Manatee Ave. #114....................... $79,900
6400 Flotilla Dr. #25 ............................ $129,900
6500 Flotilla Dr. #203.......................... $134,900
6500 Flotilla Dr. #225.......................... $149,000


CONDOS OFF THE ISLAND
435 30th Ave. W. #411D ....................... $62,900
206 Pine Needle Dr. #206 .................... $72,500


LOTS & ACREAGE ISLAND
107 Bay Blvd. N .......... .................... $395,000
17th St. & Gulf Dr. ................................ $650,000
370 East Bay Dr ........................... $225,000
517 Blue Heron ................................... $500,000
Lot #2 400B GOM Dr. .....................$150,000
4000B GOM Dr. Lot 3 ......................... $325,000


LOTS & ACREAGE
OFF THE ISLAND
5600 Lockwood Ridge Rd. ............... $329,000
10205 Old Tampa Rd ........................... $70,000


COMMERCIAL
3100 Gulf Dr........................................$399,000
4000 GOM Dr......................................$850,000
4016 GOM Dr......................................$750,000


PERICO BAY CLUB
831 Audubon Dr. ................................$120,000
870 Audobon Dr ................................... $99,900
876 Audubon Dr ................................... $83,400
1105 Edgewater Cr.............................$126,500
1241 Edgewater Cr............................. $139,900
706 Estuary Dr ...................................... $89,900
1341 Perico Pt. Cr...............................$163,000
1115 Roseate Ct. ................................$142,900
509 Sanderling Cr ............................... $129,900
513 Sanderling Cr...............................$129,900
1261 Spoonbill Landings.................... $149,900


I CALL 778-2261 Toll Free Io80O422.6325


... .. --,__ .-- _ .. .... ..'.. . .... .... .


I


___j


I






ID PAGE 28 M JUNE 1, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


If You Need
A Latitude
Adjustment
Call Jennifer
Office: 778-7777
or
Eve: 795-2865



GULFSTREAM REALTY
S Call Jennifer Jones,
CWdREALTOR*
eves 795-2865.
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217

Only The Islander Bystander gives you complete Island news.
Over 900 paid out-of-town subsaibersl The IslanderBystanderis the
best news on Anna Mario Island. Use the moil order form on page 7 or call
(941) 778-7978 to charge it on Visa or MasterCard.


1 I


COCONUTS CONDO: 1 bedroom, 1 bath condo
in a Gulf front complex. Excellent rental opportu-
nity for the investor or absentee owner. Turnkey
furnished. Now reduced to $88,500. Call Carol
Williams 778-0777 or 778-1718 eves.


SPLY THE BES
ISLAND VACATION
RENTALS







USA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
Iv I3101 Gulf Drtive
Realty inc. HomB uFL 34217 "

All the best news about Anna Maria Island is in The
Islander Bystander. For helpful information on hur-
ricane preparation for your home, boat, car and
family, save the center pull-out section in this
week's paper. "It's all you need to know."


PEDDLING FOR
WATERFRONT PROPERTY?
Then call the Real Estate
Professional willing to go the
,, "Extra Mile" for you!
When you demand excellence
Bin Real Estate Service
*t BUYING OR SELLING


Just
visiting
paradise?

ISLANDER

Don't leave the Island
without vsteng us at
5408 Marina Drive In
the Island Shopping
Center. Holmes Beach.
Take time now to
subscribe. Don't miss a
week of the best news
on Anna Maria Islandl


l-----, n tlll:l:::9 rll I
GREAT INCOME PROPERTY: 6-plex, 3 buildings
(#1-2 efficiencies, #2-1BR/1BA, #3-1 BR/1BA and
studio) on 2 building lots. All apartments recently re-
furbished. Currently fully rented to annual tenants.
Just steps away from the Gulf. OWNER FINANC-
INGI POSITIVE CASH FLOW AFTER EXPENSES!
Low maintenance for absentee ownership. 2707 &
2705 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. $350,000. Call
Michael Advocate 778-0608 eves.


LUSH & TROPICAL: Close to beach, what a rare
opportunity to own a two bedroom, home plus a
one bedroom, one bath income producing apart-
ment within walking distance to prime beach.
Owner financing, impeccable condition and qual-
ity construction makes this property desirable.
Priced at $350,000. Call for extras & details,
Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
CAPETOWN VILLAGE: Better than new, 3 bed-
room, 2.5 bath two story home in a lovely wooded
setting. This home is less than a year old and has
many upgrades, ceramic tile throughout the 1st
floor, designer wallpaper, jacuzzi tub, brick drive-
way and many other extras. Kitchen with planning
desk and breakfast nook, family room, screened
porch plus deck, a must see home $176,900.
(May be purchased turnkey furnished.) Call Zee
Catanese 794-8991 eves.
MOUNT VERNON: Private 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
2nd floor unit with a great view of Bay and nature
park along bay. Active community, elevator, boat
docks, tennis and heated pool. $72,000. Call Zee
Catanese 794-8991 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-372 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


SWAGNEQ REALTY
E 2217 Gulf Drive North Bradenton Beach, FL 34217 3
--- Phone (941) 778-2246 Fax (941) 778-4978 *
Dave Moynihan ............ 778-7976 Ed Oliveira .................. 778-1751
Bill Alexander .............778-0609 Jackie Jerome............... 792-3226


LAGOON VIEW from this 1BR/1BA Runaway GULF FRONT Exceptional value for these 2BR
Bay unit with washer/dryer, extra closet space, direct Gulf front apartments in small ten-unit
all new appliances and close to the pool. Across complex with quiet Holmes Beach location.
the street from the beach, second home or great Pool, wide sandy beach and walking distance to
rental with on-site rental management all for shops and restaurants. Starting at $124,500.
$78,900. Call Ed Oliveira. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


TWO GREAT ISLAND VILLAGE CONDOS Spa- GREAT HOLMES BEACH LOCATION Nicely
cious 2BR/2BA, top floor units in prime Holmes decorated, turnkey fumished 2BR/2BA unit at
Beach location. Open floor plans, lovely views. Large Ocean Park Terrace. Great Gulf view from master
screened porches. Walk-in closets, two pools, ten- BR and screened porch. Pool, secured lobby, eleva-
nis courts, garage parking and steps to great beach, tor, walking beach enhance this vacation home or
From $109,900 to $119,500. Call Dave Moynihan. great rental. Priced at $169,000. Call Ed Oliveira.



J'- .
I 1" w I F1


APARTMENT MOTEL Five-unit Island apartment
motel, fully renovated and tastefully decorated. Lo-
cated across the street from beach. Complex in-
cudes 2 pools, courtyards, jacuzzi and laundry. Of-
fered at $359,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


ISLAND FOURPLEX Four fully furnished 2BR
apartments on large 100 x 100 corner lot. Short
walk to wide, sandy walking beach. Offered at
$299,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


Exceptional ServiCe
Informal Approach
.: BARBARA TURNER
-' REALTOR
778-7777 or 778-4399


4"'GULFSTREAM REALTY
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
1-800-894-9587

R6M ,GULFSTREAM REALTY


Call &
T. Yvonne
S778-7777
I ,le'' 1-800-318-5752
MA MMM.


[ffi t ?






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 1, 1995 0 PAGE 29 I3


AL A N D- E R-

ITEMS______ FOR____SALE ____ o__ANNUNEMNS .TANSPORATINCntne


WANTED- Good condition queen size sofa beds and liv-
ing room chairs. Light soil OK. Will pick-up. 778-5405.
WANTED faceting machine and lapidary equipment.
813-779-2201, leave message.
BICYCLE Girls 24" 12 speed. Excellent condition $50.
778-5405.
MOVING SALE Coral color leather 4-pc sectional w/
queen sleeper $1,200. Queen softside waterbed $150.
Fax machine Panasonic KXF-90 (hardly used.) Modem
executive desk & computer stand w/oak finish $100. All
excellent 778-3171.
KING COMFORTERS (1 satin,) electric juicer new,
Cuisinart processor, 2 thermo blankets, voice control
remote control, all excellent condition. 778-6267.
$125 for all.


RUMMAGE SALE Sat., June 3.9 am 1 pm. St. Ber-
nard Activity Center. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.


LOST: Gray tiger stripe female cat. Vicinity 51st and
Gulf Dr. 5/21/95. 778-1807.




FREE *4FREE FREEE

SUMMER JOB

ADS FOR KIDS

& BUSINESS
If you're under 16 years of age and looking
for work, or if you're a business willing to hire a
teen we've got a deal for you. Your classified
ad is free.
Just write up your ad, up to 21 words, and
fax, mail or bring it to The Islander Bystander
office. Deadline each week is Monday noon.
Your ad will run for up to three weeks free
under a special "Student Work" heading in The
Islander Bystander classified ad section.
Call 778-7978 for information. FAX copy to
778-9392. Stop in or mail: 5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 34217.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center. Motivated theme classes each month:
Salsa, 60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme,
etc. All classes include muscle conditioning. Classes
are: Tuesday & Thursday 7:00-8:00PM. For info call
Geri 779-2129.

WANTED WW II, Korea, Vietnam and other veterans
of Foreign War to join Island VFW Post. Call NOWI Bob
DeVane 778-4400.
ARTIST NEEDS WORK For a unique and different
kind of gift why not a Charcoal pencil portrait? a pet
portrait? house portrait? or an oil painting? Can work
from your favorite photo! 778-1560.
REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5408
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center. Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


YELLOW SUBMARINE 76 Lincoln Continental. Good island
car needs a good home. Zuck, 778-8617. Mega miles.


REMODELING


XACT

ARPENTRY

SERVICES


* ADDITIONS
* RENOVATIONS
* KITCHENS BATHS
* DECKS & MORE
CALL KIT WELSCH

778-5230
UC #RR0053399


'95 CHEVY S-10 Blazer. Burgundy, auto, air, PW, PB,
power locks, fully loaded & over $2,000 in after factory
extras. Only 10K miles. Just reduced to $21,000. Call
Anytime 320-0110.
1980 FORD PINTO (for parts) many new parts and good
tires. $200 or best offer. Call 779-1200 and leave message.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
SPRING SALE NEW 1995 BOATS 20' Fiesta pon-
toon boat, 60 hp, loaded, fish or cruise, call for low
price. 17' Allison center console, "dealer cost" $3,995.
19' Gulfcraft center console "unbelievable" $3,295. 15'
Allison "salt water flats boat" w/40 hp galv. trailer,
loaded $6,995. 17' Pro-sports center console w/85
Yamaha Galv. trailer, loaded $10,995. 18' Tremblay
"pro-flats" lowest price ever $4,995. 19' Carolina Skiff
"hull only" special $2,595. 21' Carolina Skiff "hull only"
Special $3595. Capt. John's 792-2620.




,Sqeqt^SrW& ealtate4 S^
(941) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (941) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216









GULF FRONT CONDO
Take advantage of this opportunity to own and
enjoy beach living at a reasonable price! Only 10
units in building. New air conditioner, and many
new appliances. Heated pool. All this and much
more for only $165,000.
-s acnJdy cRtva[,Eta.sPoff iond
aficalaizin n sinLd 7&lAs t [fsl
Associates After Hour
Barbam A. Sato ................. 778-3500 Nancy Gulord .................778-2158
Excklusi
Estate o MLS [
Video Collection ,


Island Really Group Oll


aLI~3~J T1E


WIDE ISLAND CANAL!
Outstanding waterfront home is versatile as a
family home of two bedrooms with Mother-in-
law Suite. The 17 x 23 Master suite includes
dressing room, large walk-in-closet & Master
bath plus a lovely comer fireplace & private
patio. Two large guest bedrooms are on op-
posite side of home plus three baths. Lving
room, dining area & customized kitchen relate
to the Florida room which has a built-in stereo
system & wet bar & opens onto wonderful
pool & jacuzzi with stone garden & waterfall
plus built-in BBQ for great Island entertaining.
Newly replaced seawall, full service dock,
newly landscaped & resurfaced circular drive.
Reduced price $390,000. Call Marie Franklin.


W 10 REAL ETATE
Ba REALTY 'BKE
We ARE the iland
M Oui Odv. PO B= A Meadl Ftlolda 3421
1400845-9573 (813)778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending
both Personal AND Professional Services in New Construction & Design,
Existng Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty,
Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Management and Annual &
Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilesl


"OWNER ANXIOUS"
Direct GULF-FRONT Condo in 5400. Ground floor unit
in impeccable complex. Enjoy panoramic views from
this tastefully decorated unit. Reduced to $219,000.
Call Rosemary Schulte eves. at 794-6615.
F,. MW7 --


LOVELY MODERN HOME
This 3BR/2BA home has it all! Vaulted ceilings, large
screened porch and boat dock. Convenient Island
area of newer homes. Won't last long at $199,000.
Call Ken Jackson eves. at 778-6986 or Pat Jackson
eves. at 778-3301.

Fran Maxon
UCENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
0 701 GuilN ud-. POBx717. ArN MaMa, FL34216
FAX# 778-7035
(941) 778-1450 or 778-2307


SOUTHERN CHARM AND CANALFRONT This 3BR/
2.5BA elegant quality built home has it all Oak floors with
10' ceilings, formal living and dining rooms, breakfast
nook, family room, fireplace plus a wrap-around porch
with a lovely view of canal. 70' dock and deep water
makes perfect location for yachts. $329,000.

(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778.1929
II


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2-car, 3,895
sq.ft. under roof home including caged pool. Unique
origami roof line and walled solarium. $265,000.

Doug
DOUG Doug
ow A Dowling
Anna Marie
m 0Pnd. Realty
778-1222
A.7 -


M WTI m* aVA a 5.I M10 4 r elz.l A ZIMI A 1Ael I VAe


7-111 M. F-aI. WTI. . ., 1.2. a l ti o A 5. A,I bIV C E N


Anna Maria Laundromat
Open 24 Hours
7 Days a Week
9906 GULF DRIVE
ANNA MARIA
la limb In the Anna Maria
appreate Post Office Plaza
A AA. AA &-AA-AAA


m







B l PAGE 30 M JUNE 1, 1995 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
lk


Sndya Commercal Residential Free Estimates
S Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling* By the cut or by th month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
1778-1345 / GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
ANDSATISIFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353


Kessler's Plumbing
New Construction
Remodeling Service Calls
741-8900 RF- 006664

I' I I I
State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Fd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


Now you can charge it!

re than a mullet wrapper!
N 8ft- f.n


ISLANDER


The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for subscription orders and classified
advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)


Call 813-778-7978
FAX 778-9392


VISA


HEP ANTDHOEIMPRVEMNT ontnue


COOK NEEDED Bradenton Beach area. Experience
necessary. Full or part-time. Call 957-7970.
HOUSEKEEPER/CHILDCARE 20 25 hours a week
in our home, mature caregiver for 3 year old and new-
bom due in July. Non-smoker, must have own transpor-
tation, must have excellent references. $10 per hour.
Prefer island resident. Sent resume and references to
PO Box 1248, Anna Maria 34216.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you in-
terested in learning the history of Anna Maria Island?
Get involved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOUI Call
Dorothy Stevenhagen, 795-0148 if you can give a few
hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


"RELIABLE daytime health care Mon.-Fri. for disabled
and memory impaired adults through Manatee Council
on Aging. Transportation available. 748-6974."

NEW, FANTASTIC weight loss product (natural), eat
regular, also improves health, provides an opportunity
if interested call 922-2031.


DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL Holmes Beach.
Now taking reservations for our summer program ages
2-10 yrs. Also a few openings for fall registration ages
2-6 yrs. Come by and visit with us. 778-2967.

CLEANING SERVICE: Fast and complete cleaning.
Island resident, 25 years experience, references, hon-
est, guaranteed satisfaction Free estimates. 778-4587.

JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

HANDYMAN carpentry, painting, pressure washing,
repairs of all kinds. Commercial or residential. 25 yrs.
exp. Call Rich 778-4881.
CRIBSI BEDSI BIKES! We fill your rental needs. Small
family business striving to serve you best. Ask about va-
cation child care and personal lawn service too. Island
residents with excellent references. See ad. 778-6438.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

DESIGN 2000 FOR HAIR. Offering excellence in hair
design and color expertise. We invite you to experience
the finest in personal service. North end of LBK at 6400
Gulf of Mexico Dr. 387-9807, evenings by appointment.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town and the
best results from classified ads and service advertising!
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your conve-
nience. Complete detailing includes wash, wax, shampoo,
engine & underbody cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned,
tires & trim dressed and much more. Protect your invest-
ment. Call Damon on mobile number 320-0110. Please
leave a message for quick reply if not available.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware. Holmes Beach: 778-0999.
Bradenton: 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody, sham-
poo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm & hall, $34.95.
11 years in the business. No hidden prices. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERYS CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.


ALUMINUM -VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Fumiture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK / GLASS BLOCK / stone I pavers / custom
homes / fireplaces / planters / decorative walls. Lic #MC-
00318. 778-5183.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.

THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase
of home repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs ex-
perience. Insured, island resident, references
available. Jim 779-2129.

DON COLEMAN PAINTING Residential, commercial,
interior, exterior. Free estimates, 30 yrs experience.
778-2356.


GULF FRONT EXCEPTIONAL 2BR/2BA. Furnished
residence at 102 77th St. with spectacular views. Avail-
able June-Sept 95. Call Dave Moynihan Realtor 778-
2246 or evenings 778-7976.
1,000 S.F. of Retail/Commercial space. 5508 Marina
Drive. Ask for Dennis, 778-3924.

VACATION RENTALS Week or month. Call Denise or
Lisa, Wagner Realty. 778-2246.

ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views, 1BR, patio, pool, W/D,
furnished. Annual. 211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.

ANNUAL RENTALS 2BR/2BA condo has washer
& dryer, $750/mo. Call Denise or Lisa, Wagner
Realty 778-2246.
MINI-VACATION SPECIAL 25% discount either Sun.-
Wed. or Mon.-Thurs. 2 people/4 nights $135. Kitchens.
500 ft. to beach. Free bikes. Haley's Motel & Resort
Complex 778-5405/800-367-7824.
FURNISHED one and two bedroom rentals available
until December. $550 and $750/mo. Anna Maria Realty,
778-2259.
ANNUAL: Great 1BR/1BA condo Unfumished, immacu-
late with tile floors and huge private garage with washer-
dryer. $550/mo. Efficiency, quiet street, all utilities in-
cluded $400/mo. *SEASONAL: Great old Florida House
and right on the beach. 1110 Gulf Dr. 1BR/1BA $300/
wk. 2BR/1BA $400/wk or rent both units for $675/wk. *
GORGEOUS GULF-FRONT just remodeled, beautiful
oak floors and panoramic Gulf-view, large private pool.
1BR/1BA $600/wk. Gulf-Bay Realty 778-7244 309
Pine Ave., Anna Maria.


E. Burkly
778-0720
LESSONS
e COACHING
VOICE AUDITIONS
PREP

SOLFEGIO






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CHAR LIECHAP L P I I TLA TYER
CB0 LPLRY NUIT L _A 0 E AT E
T0 K EN T AP E Y 0 WI PR I NITS


AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.


DOI BYS N ER'







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 1, 1995 1 PAGE 31 I~ ,


PERICO BAY CLUB unfurnished 2BR/2BA, pristine
bayfront, carport, appliances. $850/mo plus $850 se-
curity. No pets. Prudential Florida Realty T. Dolly
Young 778-0766.
ANNUAL, 3BR/2.5BA, north end of island. $1,000/
month. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL, SEASONAL and summer rentals available
from $300/week. Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARTINIQUE CONDO 2BR/2BA direct ocean view,
pool, tennis court. Turnkey $1,500 plus electric and
phone. Will rent yearly 813-884-0222.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA sleeps 4-6. Beautiful sunsets.
Private beach, cable telephone. Available Now-Nov.
$395/wk. Also 1996 season $1,400/monthly. 778-1135.
HOLMES BEACH Gulf view from your balcony. 2BR apt.
turnkey furnished. Available now thru Dec, at off season
rates. 778-4368.
ANNUAL GULF-FRONT 4 bedroom, 3 bath beach
house on N. Shore Drive. Steps to water. Must seel
Hurry! $1,400/mo. 778-3171.
VACATION RENTAL by owner. Resort 66, weeks in
June & July, poolside $500, Beach front $600. 1-800-
977-0803.
GENT, 53, wishes to rent a room on Anna Maria Island
10/20 to 12/20, 1995 (local refs.) Write to: A. Branson,
10 N. 4th St., So. Bethany Beach, Delaware 19930.
ONE BEDROOM BAYFRONT apartment, Bradenton
Beach. Partially fumished $475/mo. 778-7980.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT with screened porch and
private entrance. 778-7039.
BEAUTIFUL NORTH END, annual, darling country
cottage. Lg 1BR/1BA, charming 2BR/1BA. Steps to
beach. Exceptional permanent residences, won't last
From $550. 778-2126.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
PRIVATE PARTY is looking to buy an island lot, rental
or income property with 10% down seller financing. Fax
info. to 414-332-4898.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1 BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of Anna
Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/3 acre
w/house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young after hours.
778-5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.


INVEST! Several Island 2-plexes & 4-plexes available.
Get all the facts from Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX
Gulfstream, 778-7777.
DEEP WATER CANAL. Walk to beach from newly re-
modeled 4BR/2BA home, 222 Oak Ave., Anna Maria,
by owner. $219,500. 778-2681.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1 BR/1BA
each unit, close to shopping center $119,000. 404
71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit $159,000.
* 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to Gulf -
$169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.
BRADENTON MAINLAND minutes from beaches. Just
off 75th Street. Country Village, 55 + community. 1400 s.f.
villa. 2BR/2BA, den, 1-car garage, new carpet, paint, ver-
ticals, maintenance free living. 105K. 794-8792.
NEED MORE ROOM? 4BR/2.5BA family home on canal
with boathouse, 3-car garage and over 3200 s.f. of living
area. Call Sandy Greiner Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
GORGEOUS GULF VIEW, Holmes Beach. 2BR/2BA or
3BR/2BA custom-built, award winning home. Pool,
jacuzzi, fireplace. For rent, possible lease purchase or
sale. Owner financing. 813-778-3777 or 813-965-2158.
CANAL LOT for sale in Anna Maria by owner with 32 ft.
dock.'129 Hammock Rd (Lot #9 Coconut Bayou Sub.)
$145,000. 603-635-2033.
EXCELLENT LOCATION very large duplex on beauti-
ful lot. Short walk to beach. Both units are need, clean,
airy and bright. $170,000. Yvonne Higgins Re/Max Gulf
stream 778-7777 (24 hr #)
ISLAND HOMES AND CONDOS UNDER $100,000.
Call Sandy Greiner Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
$89,900 NORTHWEST BRADENTON 2BR/2BA, 2-car
garage on heavily wooded lot plenty of shade to keep you
cool. Yvonne Higgins Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Beautiful Gulf front 2BR/
2BA condominium. Offers a gorgeous view of the
beach. $210,000. Harry E. Robbins Assoc. Inc., Real-
tor. 921-5351.
STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN to the sounds of nature while
sitting on the dock of this lovely Holmes Beach home lo-
cated near open end of canal. Completely remodeled and
ready for immediate occupancy. Only $189,900. Call
Sandy Greiner Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.
SOUTH COUNTY 3BR/2BA, fireplace, ceramic tile,
berber carpet, family room, screened porch, on double
lot. Neat and clean. $114,500. Yvonne Higgins Re/Max
Gulfstream 778-7777.
WEST BAY POINT AND MOORINGS CONDO with
owner financing. Only $129,500. Call Sandy Greiner
Re/Max Gulfstream 778-7777.


JSANDE CASSFIDS
I ENALSCotiue 0-RE AL SAECotne


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
* Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


I I01
J.R.
Painting
46Pmresu Meaxinf
Private &
Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife Team
Free Estimates
778-2139

ISLANDER


THE BEST NEWS!


QU AL--iS FO


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
~ ROOFING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
SAdditions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola R00o46125s RGo00os585PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991

KAREN CLERKIN
Independent Sales Representitive
778-8624
S* Gift Certificates Available
AVO n Fundraisers Skin So Soft on hand

Pack &fShip
^^ ,We pick-up We deliver
delicate heirlooms to large fumiture
SUNSHINE SHIPPING 727-7447

SMobile Home Sales
Think Buying vs Renting
As Low As $1,500 Down
VA%- L e* Experienced Thoughtful
813-753-6363 Professionals
Stop by Our Office for a 1504 53rd Ave. W.
Free Bradenton Map Bradenton, FL


BEACH RENTALS
c Bikes Cribs Beds
Mobile Services:
'. Free Delivery & Pick-up
,.. 24-Hour Service
\Q 778-6438 "


Personal Fitness
TRAINING O
4 One On One In Your Home
t Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
SFitness & Nutritional Guidance
V Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
SDeep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises
Ber d Travis 779-2129
B.S., Ph. Ed., Fitness Specialist79-2129


CLASSIFIED AD FORM
DEADUNE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in person and
paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL
34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).

CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines, extra line rate ($1.50) plus 250 per word.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: If your ad is for a business, the minimum rate us $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional
words: $2 for each 7 words, Box: $2, One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.

WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone. To
place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry, we can
not take classified ad copy over the telephone.

USE THIS FORM FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE: (For 21 word minimum, use one word for each blank space)







THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER


Run issues)
Amt. pd Date Ck. No. Cash


More information: 778-7978
More information: 778-7978





B] PAGE 32 I JUNE 1, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY
WE'RE GROWING T8AM-5PM



SISAND GARDEN CENTER


JIM'S BYE BUY SALE


Jim Rossi has
been an Island
Residentfor
0Oyears. He
started the
?:- Island Garden
S" i center in
" . " 1990.

The business has grown
and the venture worthwhile
thanks to the support of the
local residents. That's why
Jim is holding this outra-
geous sale. To thank all the
Island community for their
patronage and support.
Jim is also semi-retiring
but don't panic, he'll still be
around on a part-time basis.
He will be training the new
owners to do business the is-
land way!
Lots of new plans for the
new & improved Island Gar-
den Center. It's truly going
to be a full-service garden
center.
Our services
include:
Landscaping
Tree Trimming
Tree Removal
Lawn Maintenance
Service
Fertilizing & Spraying
FREE SMILES
In addition, we're set-
ting up a particular area in
the Island Garden Center
called the HOSPITAL.
FREE consultation will be
given on what's ailing your
plants. Bring them in for a
check-up. Also our hot-
lines are open Monday
through Saturday to an-
swer any questions.
Just give us a call!

778-4441


POTTED 1-GALLON PLANTS &
SHRUBS: BUY TWO GET ONE FREE


GREEN GIANT ............ $2.99
HEATHER .................. $2.49
INDIAN
HAWTHORNE ............*3.99


BLUE DAZE ...............2.49
PURSLANE ................2.49
PENTAS ..................... 2.49
(also known as Butterfly Plant)


40 lb BAGS $1.99 each
*COW PLUS *ORGANIC PEAT ]
PLAY SAND POTTING S(


CITRUS TREES:
BUY TWO GET ONE i"r


7 GALLON
15 GALLON
25 GALLON


Included with our new landscaping service -
a One-Year Guarantee on Plants that we plant.
Let us do the dirty work... You go to the beach!

FREE LANDSCAPING ESTIMATES
FREE DELIVERY* FRE ADVICE

FREE SMILES

CONVENIENCE ON THE ISLAND
Why Spend More Money & Time Elsewhere
When You Can Save Both Here!


land G n *


"Just Across the Bridge from Higher Prices!"
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-4441


.................................$89.99
000. .................... $189.00


20 LAWNS
ISLAND GARDEN CENTER'S NEW
PERSONALIZED LAWN SERVICE
HURRY! HURRY! HURRY!


---~I- -. ~-- -~-..- ------------


~tN~EDr~i~ii~S~6 ~