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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00562

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND FREE WEEKLY I



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VIEWS HAPPENINGS DINING *

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SPORTS REAL ESTATE


APRIL 13,1995


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Gill net buy-out offering: $20,000 per lifestyle


By Bob Ardren and Paul Roat
Ever wonder what your life, or your way of life, is
worth?
Try $20,000.
That's the maximum dollar amount the Florida
Legislature has suggested a commercial net fisherman
should be paid in the wake of last year's decision by
voters to do away with nearshore gill netting.
A bill sponsored by Rep. Allen Boyd offers compen-
sation, retraining and purchase of limited equipment to
qualified commercial gill net fishers, who will be legis-
lated out of work July 1 when the gill net ban takes effect.
"There's no place to run, no alternatives anymore,"
is how Mark Taylor describes the upcoming ban on
inshore netting in Florida. Taylor is president of the
Cortez chapter of Organized Fishermen of Florida.


A proposal to buy fishing boats was struck from
the bill by the House Commerce Committee.
"The nets and the boats go together," Taylor said,
referring to the latest Tallahassee idea of just buying
the fishers' nets and maybe offering some "retraining"
money. Taylor said he would like to see the state buy
both boats and nets and pay fishers at least one year of
documented income.
"The smart thing for the legislators to do is also the
right thing for them to do," Taylor said. "Our guys
aren't too tickled about anything right now, so you'd
think the government would take the opportunity to
buy up the gear."
As proposed in Boyd's bill, commercial fishers
must have held a saltwater products license at some
period of time from July 1, 1991, to June 30, 1995,


to qualify for the compensation. Anyone convicted
of more than two violations of any Marine Fisheries
Commission rule in a single year, or having more
than four violations in the last four years, is not eli-
gible for financial aid.
The amount of money doled out to gill net fishers
is dependent on annual income, or average annual in-
come. The maximum amount of money to be paid a
fisher is $20,000.
Retraining of soon-to-be out-of-work commercial
gill netters is also funded in the legislation.
"I think we'll be lucky to get 10 cents on a dollar,"
lifelong commercial fisherman Blue Fulford said, "but
you've got to remember that I'm pretty pessimistic
PLEASE SEE NETS, PAGE 2


Just before "the plunge" off Splash Mountain in Disney's Magic Kingdom. Maximum thrill. HO0 plus a
45 degree angle, plus gravity, plus 40 mph, plus a five-story plunge. For some tips to visiting Disney or
the other theme parks in Florida, see the article on page 19. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Public works director to be hired

by May 1: Mayor McChesney


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
Anna Maria may get another run at two of its
former public works directors who left when they ran
into mayor troubles.
Dominick Tarantola has applied for the job he held
briefly last year before he encountered problems with
the late Mayor Ray Simches. And Bill Zimmerman has
picked up an application form for the job he vacated
just weeks ago after a controversy with Mayor Dottie
McChesney.
McChesney says she hopes "to start May with the
new public works director," selected from a field of
eight and growing.
City Commissioner Chuck Shumard is putting to-
gether a committee of volunteers to sift through the ap-
plications and shorten a list he will refer to the city
commission for final selection.
In addition to the eight active applications submit-
ted thus far, said City Clerk Peggy Nelson, the city will
contact "the good ones" among applicants who sought
the job six months ago when Zimmerman was hired.
Those still interested in the job will be added to the list
for consideration by Shumard's group.
The position was advertised in Manatee County
newspapers, said Mayor McChesney. The executive


search "went over budget" last time when ads were
placed in Tampa and St. Petersburg papers as well.
Application deadline is April 17.
The position opened up when Zimmerman's resig-
nation was accepted, first by the mayor and then by the
city commission at its meeting April 4.
The mayor had accused Zimmerman of overstep-
ping his authority when he advised a public works
employee to look for other work. From that, the con-
troversy expanded into accusations of harassment,
abuse and an anti-woman attitude. A meeting of com-
missioners to evaluate the director's job performance
turned into a bitter confrontation between the mayor
and Commissioner Doug Wolfe.
Mayor McChesney hired Frank Tyndall, another
ex-director of public works, to fill in until a new full-
time director can be found.
"Frank is doing a good job," the mayor said. "He
is experienced and knowledgeable. But he has ex-
pressed no interest in taking it on again permanently."
Tyndall has applied for state certification under a
law enacted subsequent to his holding the position in
years past, she said.
Nelson said the job calls for "high qualifications and
pretty broad experience," requiring knowledge of all
phases of construction, building codes and related matters.


Holmes Beach

draft ordinance

addresses

residential


rentals
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Unhappy with the planning commission's recom-
mendation, Holmes Beach Councilwoman Carol
Whitmore has drafted an ordinance to limit rentals in
three of the city's residential zones.
After a year-and-a-half of debate, which included
a city-wide survey and input from property owners and
rental agents, the city's planning commission could not
come to a consensus. Its recommendation was to place
no further restrictions on residential rentals.
Whitmore's draft ordinance places a one-month
minimum on rentals in the R-l district, a two-week
minimum in the R-2 district and a seven-day minimum
in the R-3 district. The R1AA district (Key Royale)
currently has a one-month minimum and the R-4 dis-
trict is governed by an overlay with a minimum of one
week.
According to the proposed ordinance, "the city will
grant non-conforming status if the property owner can
prove that the proper taxes have been paid, including
bed taxes, as of the effective date of this ordinance."
The burden of proof is on the property owner.
Originally, Whitmore said she would draft an or-
dinance to limit residential rentals to one-month peri-
ods in all residential districts but said as she studied the
issue, the solution became more complex.
The city has received numerous letters from prop-
erty owners opposed to rental limitations.
The council will discuss the ordinance at its April
18 work session.


Happy Easter!
The Islander Bystander will have regular
office hours Friday and Saturday.








SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions .................................. ............... 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Crossword puzzle................................... ..... 12
Streetlife .................................. ............... 29
Anna Maria tides ........................................ 31
Real estate ................................. ............ 32


YEA AAAA AaAAA AAA...

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Ifl PAGE 2 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Eco-ed center planned for Leffis Key


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
If an enthusiastic group of Islanders has its way,
the Island will have a new Environmental Education
and Visitor's Center at Leffis Key within two years.
Heading the group is Holmes Beach Mayor Ri-
chard Bohnenberger who said he's dreamed about
the idea for a long time. He held two meetings with
group members before holding the first public meet-
ing last week.
"We have a unique environment here," he said.
"People come here because they like what they see.
They like the Island the way it is. We feel it's our re-
sponsibility to inform them as to what we have and
through their awareness they can help us protect it."
The center will be available to local schools as an
environmental educational resource, said Bohnenberger.
It will also serve as a referral center for environmentally
related locations for visitors such as Mote Marine Science
Center and Selby Gardens. Later, programs such as beach
walks, lectures and field trips can be added
"We felt the project would get off the ground faster
as a private entity," said Bohnenberger. "We will start
a non-profit corporation and go to the public for fund-
ing. We will also seek grant funding."
Attorney Steve Dye has volunteered to file the
group's papers for non-profit status free of charge, said
Bohnenberger. The group will establish a three-mem-
ber board immediately, then expand the board member-
ship,write bylaws, have a charter membership drive,
create a brochure and begin fundraising.
"This is really exciting for me because being a
classroom teacher, I have watched ideas take forever to
blossom," said Dawn Howard. "This one's taken less
than nine months to start to hatch. Not only are we
doing it for the community, we're doing it for the thou-
sands of people who visit here and we're also linking


Don't plan to get there from here very quickly for
the next few months.
Extensive traffic delays are being projected for mo-
torists trying to navigate Gulf of Mexico Drive on
Longboat Key this summer as resurfacing and landscap-
ing of the entire of the length of the Key takes place.
Work on the 10-mile project will begin Monday,
April 17, and should be completed by mid-July.
Besides the resurfacing, four-foot-wide bike
lanes will be added to both sides of the highway. An


up with the biggest asset we have the children."
"We at EAC, especially Jack Gorzeman and I, are
really interested in this," said Lucy Mattern of the county's
Environmental Action Commission. "We think this is
absolutely wonderful and it's in the perfect place."
Howard and Mattern are working on the group's
first grant application.
The center will be good for Island businesses, said
Bohnenberger. Don Howard said he will take the idea
to the Island chamber of commerce.
"We also have an immediate project we'd like to
undertake which would be the erection of a lookout on
the beach in Anna Maria City." said Bohnenberger.
"There's a county-owned lot on the beach front and
with permission from the county and private funding,
we believe we could do that project first. It's easily
achievable and it will give people something to see. "


additional 11 turning lanes will be added to the road-
way as well.
Two contractors received the bids for the project.
Both will start construction at mid-key; one will work
north, the other south. Work is to be completed in 90
days with a three-week "cushion" for weather or other
delays.
Longboat Key Town Manager Griff Roberts has
said that "there will definitely be some inconvenience
to motorists" during the highway face-lift.


Two Holmes Beach special meetings

set for T-end canals, city hall updates


The Holmes Beach City Council has set two spe-
cial meetings in April.
A meeting will be held on ownership of the T-
end canal docks from the 72nd to the 75th street
blocks of Marina Drive on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. City
Attorney Patricia Petruff will present her research


Nets

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
these days."
In order to pay out the estimated $30 million in
compensation and retraining, saltwater fishing license
fees would increase $3 for the next eight years.
Wonder what outlawed fishing gear will be worth?
State officials are proposing to buy only nets that
are capable of catching fish. Net buy-back programs
are contingent upon annual income for the four-year
period from 1991-95. The top-end fishers, those who
made more than $30,000 annually for that time period,
may sell no more than 10 nets to the state.
The purchased nets will be destroyed, according to
the legislation.
Proposed net prices are:


and a report from the surveyors.
A meeting with H. Patterson Fletcher, architect,
will be held on April 26 at 9 a.m.
The council will discuss options for the renova-
tion of city buildings or the construction of new city
buildings.


Deepwater gill nets at least 600 yards in length
with greater than 50 mesh, $1,000.
Shallow water gill nets at least 600 yards in length
with less that 50 mesh, $1,000.
Trammel nets at least 600 yards in length, $1,000.
Beach, purse and seine nets at least 600 yards in
length, $3,500.
Shrimp trawls of at least 500 square feet, $500.
Nets of less than the above length will be valued
proportionately.
The "Seafood Workers Economic Assistance Trust
Fund" must have the blessing of members of two more
committees before reaching the floor of the House of
Representatives. A similar bill has been offered by Sen.
Pat Thomas in the Florida Senate. That bill is co-spon-
sored by Sen. John McKay of Bradenton.
The House bill is expected to pass that chamber in
light of Boyd's chairmanship of the powerful Rules


Plaques to identify wildlife would be a part of the
lookout, he said. Further plans call for a beach lookout
in each Island city.
The area planned for the lookout has a problem
with parking, said Anna Maria Commissioner Chuck
Shumard. He suggested that it be designed for people
walking on the beach. Don Howard suggested apply-
ing for funds from the Tourist Development Council to
build it.
"I hope to have the center built in the next year-
and-a-half," said Bohnenberger. "We're going to just
take the bull by the horns and establish this."
Holmes Beach Councilman Don Maloney pledged
$200 of his first council salary check to the project.
Anyone interested in becoming a board member or
member, donating funds or volunteering on the project
is asked to call Bohnenberger at 778-0355.


Legal fees increase,
law firm retainedin
Anna Maria
The Bradenton law firm of Daniel, Harrison,
Woodward and Hendrickson will continue to pro-
vide legal services to the City of Anna Maria -
for the next year at least.
City commissioners agreed to the $125-per
hour litigation charge and $115-per-hour general
consultation charge with the law firm last week.
Although the per-hour rates have gone up, Mayor
Dottie McChesney said, the rate increase is the
first the law firm has requested in seven years of
service to the city.
Planning and Zoning Board Chairman Tom
Turner endorsed continued utilization of the firm's
services due to comprehensive plan updates.
"The existing firm has been working on the land
development regulations," he said, adding that a new
attorney would probably spend a long time becom-
ing familiar with the city's laws and zoning rules.
Acting Public Works Director Frank Tyndall
concurred, but suggested other firms be contacted
to submit proposals to handle the city's legal ser-
vices in the future. Commissioners appeared to
concur, and "shopping" for a new attorney will
probably take place this summer.


Committee. Senate passage and Gov. Lawton Chiles'
approval is less certain, although the Florida Legisla-
ture and the governor have generally taken an attitude
of favoring commercial fishing interests in the past.
The compensation and retraining measures are a
reaction to last November's decision by voters to halt
gill netting for fish within three miles of shore in the
Gulf and one mile from shore in the Atlantic.
Recreational fishers successfully changed the
Florida Constitution to halt the netting, claiming the
ban was needed to maintain juvenile fish stocks, de-
spite powerful scientific data indicating overdevelop-
ment along the bays and destruction of mangroves and
seagrass beds was the culprit for any fishery decline.
"We're old Florida," Taylor said. "We represent
the old values and ways, and times are changing. This
country just seems to keep making the same mistakes
over and over again."


Massive road work starts


Monday on Longboat Key






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U APRIL 13, 1995 U PAGE 3 II

Eviction ordered for two unsafe apartments


Tenants in two "apartment complexes" in
Bradenton Beach will be evicted next week for a bar-
rage of code violations in the apartments.
The buildings have been remodeled without per-
mits, according to building officials, and enlarged. The
apartment at 100 Fourth St S. has five units, but codes
allow only one. The apartment at 105 Fourth St. S. has
six units, but codes allow for only two.


Both buildings are held in trust by a Sarasota attor-
ney for the estate of the late Terry Whited, a former
Bradenton Beach City Councilman who died last year.
Building Official Whitey Moran said it appeared
the units had been rented for at least eight years. He
began the eviction process in January.
"My inspection showed both properties were re-
modeled without permits and remodeled without reli-


Houses on Fourth Street South in Bradenton Beach have been issued
citations and the tenants ordered to be out by Tuesday in the wake of
numerous safety and code violations. The houses, zoned for one and two
units, have 11 combined units. Electrical violations are also present,
Bradenton Beach officials said. Islander Photos: Paul Roat


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ance to codes," Moran said.
Moran issued a notice of unsafe structures Jan. 16.
On March 17, he issued a notice to vacate the proper-
ties within 30 days, citing life and safety issues.
Among the problems Moran found at the prop-
erties were: inadequate tenant separation and not
having fire-resistant material separating the units;
habitable areas too small; only one means of egress
to some units; inadequate smoke detectors; and
shared electrical service for units.
Asked if the units were potential fire hazards,
Moran replied "you better believe it."
Moran said one of the units was six square feet in size.
Another was five feet wide and 35 feet long. Several of the
11 units had only one way in or out, posing a serious safety
problem in the event of a fire. Electric service to some of
the units was provided by extension cords.
Both houses are for sale.



Anna Maria City
4/13, 10 a.m., Commission budget review

Bradenton Beach
4/13, 7 p.m., Council meeting
4/20, 1 p.m., Council meeting

Holmes Beach
4/18, 7:30 p.m., Council work session

All city offices will be closed for Good Friday,
April 14.

Of Interest
4/13, 9 a.m., Meeting on Sarasota Bay
National Estuary Program comprehensive plan,
Holmes Beach City Hall.
S4/17, 10 am., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Holmes Beach City Hall
4/19, 9 am., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach City Hall;
11:30 am., field trip to Leffis Key


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l[j PAGE4 A APRIL 13, 1995 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Council takes care of business


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council's first order of
business last week was taking care of business.
It was the first meeting of council since the re-elec-
tion of members Luke Courtney and Billie Martini and
the election of Don Maloney. Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger appointed council liaisons, Courtney es-
tablished the procedure for meetings and council dis-
cussed changing the number of meetings and work ses-
sions per month. Council also appointed a new plan-
ning commissioner.

Council appointments
Liaison appointments are as follows: Courtney -
Tourist Development Council, shores and beaches and
Anna Maria Island Elementary school; Councilwoman
Pat Geyer buildings and grounds and public relations;
Martini recreation, beautification and parks, Keep
Manatee Beautiful and Sarasota Bay National Estuary
Program; Maloney- Island Emergency Operations Cen-
ter (IEOC), roads, bridges, drainage, canals, erosion and
recycling and solid waste; Councilwoman Carol
Whitmore community affairs, intergovernmental rela-
tions, legislative matters and IEOC alternate.
Whitmore and Martini were voted as alternatives
to the Island Transportation Planning Organization.
There was a disagreement over whether the coun-
cil should appoint a liaison to the Anna Maria Island
Community Center Board of Directors.
"A citizen approached me a couple months ago and
asked to be appointed to the community center board,"
said Bohnenberger. "I was told today that the cities
don't appoint board members any longer."
Courtney said the Center's bylaws were amended
to allow the cities to make appointments.
"The three Island cities will each have a represen-
tative with full voting rights on the board of directors,"
he said. "The city representatives will be appointed by
their mayors to act as liaisons between the board and
the municipalities. The representatives are to be may-
ors or city commissioners and are subject to the same
attendance requirements as other board members."
Bohnenberger said he felt the Center does not have


the right to place a requirement on the cities and that
it is not proper for an elected official to sit on the board
of an organization that receives funds from the city.
"I don't like being told to do it but I think we
should have some representation there," noted
Whitmore. "I feel it should be Luke."
Courtney replied that he is currently a Center board
member but not the official city representative.
Bohnenberger said he would discuss the issue with
the Center's board chairman.

Number of meetings per month
Courtney told council he would like to return to the
practice of having two meetings and two work sessions
per month. This was changed to one meeting and one
work session per month by the previous council.
"We have a tremendous amount of work ahead of
us in different areas," he said. "There's too much of a
time delay between meetings and work sessions."
Whitmore said the council made the change four
months ago and that's not enough time to test its effec-
tiveness. Council should be more productive in meet-
ings and work sessions, she maintained.
The mayor said one of the problems is that some of
the meetings have turned into work sessions, adding to
their length. Meetings can be added any time, he said.
Martini agreed with Courtney.
"There are too many topics on the agenda and we
don't have enough time to thoroughly investigate what
we're going to be voting on," she said. "And we can't
talk outside of meetings without getting into trouble."
Courtney said the council could go back to daytime
meetings. The mayor disagreed and noted that atten-
dance has increased with night meetings and it gives
working people an opportunity to attend.
Resident Bob Jorgenson suggested having two
work sessions and one meeting per month. Maloney
suggested an additional single-subject work session per
month which would be more likely to attract people
concerned with the issue at hand.
"One business meeting per month is a big stretch
when you're trying to pass an ordinance," noted resi-
dent Bob VanWagoner. "I think you need two work
sessions when the public can come before you and hear


you discuss the issues and have a say. But both you and
the public have to be more businesslike during the
meeting when you're going to take the vote and not
repeat what went on in the work session."
Council agreed to continue the discussion at the
next work session, so the public can participate.

Procedure for meetings
Robert's Rules of Order and the city's legislative
procedures act will govern procedure at all meetings,
said Courtney.
"When we have an item on the agenda, I will open
discussion on this item," he explained. "This means
council members, the mayor and the public may dis-
cuss this item. After all the discussion is completed, a
motion will be made. The council members will be able
to debate the motion. The public will not have a say in
the debate of the motion. We then vote on the motion."
VanWagoner said the motion should be made
when the agenda item comes up for discussion.
"The legislative procedures act states that when a
motion is made and there's debate, there will be no
public comment," replied Courtney. "I can see both
sides of the coin. Sometimes council members have not
made up their minds what type of motion will be made
on a specific issue. I would rather have input from the
public as to which way we should go."

Planning commission
appointment
The council voted to appoint Ron Robinson to fill
the planning commission vacancy left by the resigna-
tion of Gene Aubry. Other applicants included Charles
Staley and Scott Richie.
Robinson was a county commissioner in Boone
County, Ky., for seven years, a fiscal court representative
on the Boone County Board of Health, a Boone County
representative on the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana Re-
gional Planning Council, a Cincinnati Bell representative
on the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, a
member of Leadership Northern Kentucky, a member of
the charter class of Leadership Kentucky and appointed
by three governors to the Kentucky Development Dis-
abilities Planning Commission.


New Longboat park features .. .
native landscaping, gazebo :
The first two phases are complete and Joan M. v "
Durante Community Park on Longboat Key is open
to the public. Dedication ceremonies last Friday
drew about 200 residents and dignitaries to the park.
located east of Gulf of Mexico Drive in the 5550 '- ''I ii ..
block. The development of the park was the result of I '
a gift of $750,000 to the Town of Longboat Key by -" ,
Jim Durante in honor of his late wife, Joan. _Z i a
The park features winding nature trails amid
native cedar, mangroves, buttonwood andpalm .
trees. A retention pond with a 30-foot geyser of
waterfronts a open-air gazebo. Parking is staggered ,
throughout the park. Later phases of construction
will include additional nature trails, botanical,
gardens and boat docks on Sarasota Bay.
"All the cares and worries and troubles must be 4
placed on Gulf of Mexico Drive before entering the
park," Jim Durante told the crowd during the grand
opening ceremony. "This park is a shrine for tran-
quillity." Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Local opposition mounts for proposed beach funding cuts


By Paul Roat
Resolutions opposing federal cutbacks in beach
restoration and pass dredging are moving through Is-
land cities.
President Clinton has proposed dramatic reductions
in federal funding for beach restoration and inlet main-
tenance dredging. Affected could be maintenance
dredging of Longboat Pass, the Intracoastal Waterway
and future Island beach renourishment.
A resolution opposing Clinton's budget request has
been unanimously approved by Anna Maria City Com-
missioners. Bradenton Beach City Council members
will discuss a similar resolution Thursday, and Holmes
Beach council members are expected to discuss the
matter later this month.
President Clinton has suggested gutting the federal


share of paying for beach renourishment projects across
the country. Currently, up to 75 percent of the cost of
a beach renourishment project comes from federal cof-
fers. The proposal would slash that share to 25 percent
at the best; zero percent for most such as the Island.
The President's proposal would call for the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to only be involved in
projects that are of "national significance."
The Island's new, wide beach is estimated to re-
main on shore for eight to 10 years, coastal engineers
predict, before the sand washes back into the Gulf of
Mexico. Another renourishment project would then be
needed.
As Florida Shore and Beach Preservation local
chapter head John Adams said, '"Taxes on Anna Maria
would double" to pay for the new sand without the fed-


eral assistance.
The sand picture gets even gloomier in light of a
policy by the State of Florida that states that beach
funds generally are not given to projects without a fed-
eral financial blessing.
Chuck Listowski, executive director of the West
Coast Inland Navigation District, the multi-county
agency responsible for coordinating dredging of passes
and the Intracoastal Waterway, said it was too early to
determine what Congress may do with the presidential
proposal.
"It's too early in the game to determine what could
or may happen," Listowski said, "but it could have a
tremendous impact if we had a cataclysmic event like
a hurricane and had to dredge all the passes and the
Waterway."





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 5 HI


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jIm PAGE 6 I APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



250 kinds of crackers
On the Sunday Morning TV show, a visit to the
Smithsonian revealed the institution's experts on top-
ics like crackers, peanut butter and marshmallows.
They really do study these things. An annual "con-
ference on stuff' was first held on Jell-O.
It is a light-hearted means for serious scholars to
find the real joy in their work. Revitalization.
One scientist counted over 250 varieties of crackers
at the local supermarket. They had awards with one of the
winners being those cute little cheesy goldfish snacks in
- what else a fish bowl entitled "age of aquarium."
We should all have so much fun.

Humorous weather
A sense of humor at our office last week would
have been refreshing.
Over the course of the past two-and-a-half years,
we've certainly had our moments at The Islander By-
stander.
We first found ourselves in the role of "Island lost
and found" when a woman brought in a set of dentures
she'd found, upper plate to be exact, and wanted to
leave them with us. We promptly sent her and the den-
tures to the proper department the Holmes Beach
Police Department.
Stranger than fiction? Not so. A few weeks later a
woman came to place a "lost" ad for her husband's
dentures. Lost while swimming in the Gulf. Believe it
- we have witnesses.
Monday this week, same deal someone found den-
tures in Anna Maria and placed a found ad in the
classified. (We perform this public service at no charge.)
As the community's newspaper, we found our role
vastly expanded. We are Island information central.
Where's the tag office? Why is our power out?
When is the next shuttle launch?
It's hard to imagine we'll be doing this in 20 years
- but hopefully we will.


Taming tourism, or save
the whales
We hope the Island will still be here in 20 years and
of course, there's very little we'd like to see changed.
This is paradise after all.
But change happens without our realizing it. The
character of our Island is bending more toward tourism.
Economics and real estate sales are dictating our future.
It's a vicious cycle buy, sell and rent to make the
money and the property pay for itself. People are in-
vesting in the Island as if time were running out.
Long ago, in the 1970s, the City of Anna Maria


I SLANDER MD 60 N,0 1
APRIL 13, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 21
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Cynthia Finn
David Futch
Jim Hanson
V Contributors
Bud Atteridge
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
David Clough
Darla Tingler
V Distribution
Mike Carter
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1995
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


opted for a residential character, zoning nearly all the
undeveloped property single family. Nay sayers were
proved wrong in their prediction of doom and lost prop-
erty values.
The Holmes Beach Council will wrestle this week
with rental limitations in residential neighborhoods.
The encroachment of nightly tourist rentals in neigh-
borhoods of homes and duplexes is rampant.
Meanwhile, some motel owners want to increase
their density by converting their two-bedroom units to
single motel rooms. They claim their businesses suffer
from a shift to shorter term rentals and smaller parties.
Imagine how their business would be doing if ev-
eryone who rents a home, mother-in-law apartment or
duplex as "seasonal" weren't competing with them. As
short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods have
blossomed, long-term annual rentals for "residents"
have disappeared.
And the motel owners may see that the change in
tourism is really due to competition from mom and pop
renters. There are, after all, more and more tourists.
Ordinances and zoning exist to protect the resi-


dents in a community and unfortunately, the proposed
restriction on rentals in Holmes Beach doesn't go
nearly far enough.
Once a Holmes Beach councilman/motel owner,
now satisfied to sit on the other side of the dais said,
"Someone has to represent the tourists."
But no tourist ever elected anyone in Holmes
Beach.
Sure we want tourism and all the benefits it affords
our community and its businesses. We just don't want
to give away the farm.
We'd like to see a strong ordinance limiting rental
durations to 30 days in all residential zones and at the
same time allowing the existing motels with two bed-
room units to convert to two, one-bedroom motel
rooms. Same, same really.
Thirty-day minimum rentals, restricted to a single
family use in a residential neighborhood, is the most
long-term residential families should have to bear.
Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach would be wise to
protect their residential neighborhoods as well.
Anyone for "save our neighborhoods?"


Island visitors need not
be insulted
In reference to "Native Survival."
Now we know that we are all bad drivers who
crowd the roads obnoxiously, according to Paul Roat,
March 30 issue, and that we are simply tourist dollars,
according to Darcy Migliore, April 6 issue.
What else do we do?
Some of us do the same as local residents. We like
to stay away from crowds. Why wait in long lines when
stores, restaurants open early and close late and when
the beaches are always open?
Some of us want to learn more about Florida and
Floridians and visit local book shops and libraries for
this purpose. Some of us are also volunteers in commu-
nity service, do a little conservation work, and take our
recycling to those centers.
In other words we are also as human as local
residents. Why not talk with us and find out?


Sheila Buffin, winter resident and property tax-
payer since 1984

Roat's rath gives Florida bad rep
I usually enjoy reading The Islander Bystander but
your issue of March 30 was an exception.
I found Mr. Roat's article and attempt at humor to
be very mean-spirited.
I never knew Florida was a mystical state where
upon crossing its border normal people were trans-
formed into geeks or doofuses.
Beware, Mr. Roat. Alas, perhaps if you venture out
of your native habitat and stray across the border you
too may be transformed.
The article made Florida sound like those foreign
countries where your money is welcome, but you're not.
Roberta Dieterman, Kentwood, Mich.

For more of Your Opinions, see Page 8


I YOU9INI










THOSE WER THE AYS
Part 3, The Conquistadors
by June Alder


Far-flung Florida, as the early explorers saw it, from a 1605 atlas.


GOLD SEEKERS


Juan Ponce de Leon, credited with
the discovery of Florida in 1513, died
trying to plant a colony here. But his
"little secret" was out. Various adven-
turers were in and out of Tampa Bay
several decades before DeSoto's famous
trek up Florida in 1539.
The early decades of the 16th cen-
tury saw a frenzied search for gold and
other treasure to go into King
Ferdinand's treasury and enrich his
noble-born explorers. There also was
another motive: to catch Indians and sell
them as slaves in Cuba and Spain.
In 1516 the year of Ferdinand's
death Diego Miruelo sailed up the
Gulf for some distance to a bay that
could very well have been Pensacola.
The Indians were friendly and Miruelo
came back with some gold and silver,
whetting the appetites of other adventur-
ers for a taste of Florida.
After Miruelo came Francisco
Hernandez de Cordoba in 1517, another
slaver. Starting at Key West he circled
around the Gulf of Mexico to the Yucatan.
He had trouble with the natives all along
the way. In one battle, more than 50 Span-
iards were killed, five more drowned and
Cordoba was struck by no less than a
dozen arrows. But he lived to give other
gold-hungry opportunists an exciting de-
scription of the ornate stone temples and
the enormous wealth of the Yucatan.
The next year Diego Velasquez,
governor of Cuba, sent his nephew Juan
de Grijalba in command of four ships to
further explore the Mexican coast.
Young Juan picked up an Indian girl at
Cozumel and made her his mistress -
and tourists have been cruising to
Cozumel ever since.
At the end of that same year, 1518,
Alonso Alvarez de Pineda landed some-
where on the lower west coast of
Florida, getting a violent reception from
the natives. So he decided to continue on
the route Cordoba had taken, passing by
the mouth of a mighty river. Pineda was
the unsung discoverer of the Father of
Waters, the Mississippi. Not LaSalle or
DeSoto.
Pineda got along fine with the Indi-
ans along the Mississippi, but was un-
fortunate in his dealings with the Aztecs
of Mexico. They burned all but one of
Pineda's ships, then killed him and most
of his men. I hate to tell you this, but


they ate some of the Spaniards and
hung their skins as trophies on the
walls of their shiny temple.
There were some explorers who
still subscribed to Christopher
Columbus's theory that fabled Cathay


(China)
was just
around the
next bend
in the
bayou. Un-
deterred by
Pineda's
bad luck,
Francisco
de Garay
poked
about in the
Gulf of
Mexico
looking for
that myste-
rious pas-
sage, which
never was


Undeterred by
Pineda's bad
luck, Francisco
de Garay poked
about in the Gulf
of Mexico look-
ingfor that mys-
terious passage,
which never was
until the Panama
Canal was dug in
the 20th century.


until the Panama Canal was dug in the
20th century.
Meanwhile, Hernando Cortez was
having stunning success in stealing
gold and the land of Mexico from the
magnificent Aztec potentate
Montezuma, who for some reason
bought the idea that Cortez was a god.
Cortez put the poor man in chains, then
released him so he could make his
fierce fighters give up. Montezuma was
killed trying to do so.
The conquest of Mexico set the
stage for Florida to take the limelight,
so that Spain could be made even
wealthier.
Emperor Charles V granted a
patent to one of Cortez's comrades-in-
arms to take Civilization to the wilder-
ness ofFlorida and all the other territo-
ries bordering the Gulf of Mexico. It
would be a large expedition of some
600 people, well equipped to establish
Florida's first permanent settlement.
Unhappily, their leader, a huge,
red-bearded fellow named Panfilo de
Narvaez, would prove to be the stupid-
est Conquistador of all.

Next: Doomed
from the start


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 7 IQ



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We'd love to mail


you the news!

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $30 per
year. It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on
Anna Maria Island. Over 9.00 happy, eager-for-Island-news paid sub-
scribers are already receiving The Islander Bystander where they live
... from Alaska to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, commu-
nity happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest
real estate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that
you need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the
only newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
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tive, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office
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I[] PAGE 8 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Easter Week


worship


services
The Island churches will offer the following wor-
ship services during Easter Week through Easter Sun-
day, April 16.
Easter sunrise service on beach
The Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island will
present its 31st annual Easter Sunrise Service at 6:30
a.m. Easter Sunday at the Manatee County Public
Beach pavilion at the west end of Manatee Avenue in
Holmes Beach.
The Rev. Frank W. Hutchison of Roser Memorial
Community Church will deliver the Easter message. Bob
LoPiccolo, Cecelia and Jim Meena, and Norm McKelvey
will participate in the music offerings. A collection to
support all seven Island churches will be taken. Those
attending are asked to bring their own seats or blankets.
Harvey Memorial Community Church, 300
Church St., Bradenton Beach, 753-1543. Maundy
Thursday: Supper 6 p.m. followed by Communion
Service. Easter Sunday: Worship, 10:30 am.
St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Dr.,
Holmes Beach, 778-4769. Holy Thursday: Mass of the
Lord's Supper, 7 p.m. Good Friday: Good Friday Ser-
vices, 3 p.m. Holy Saturday: Easter Vigil, 7 p.m. Eas-
ter Sunday: 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Mass. Confessions:
Thurs., Fri., Sat., 4 p.m.
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach, 778-1638. Maundy Thursday:
Prayer Group, 9 am.; Holy Eucharist with Holy Unction,
9:30 am.; Foot Washing, Holy Eucharist and Stripping of
the Altar, 7:30 p.m.; Prayer Vigil at the Altar of the Re-
pose, 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 am. Good Friday: Prayer Vigil,
6 am. to noon; Mass of the Pre-Sanctified and Solemn
Collects, noon; Stations of the Cross, 1 p.m.; confessions,
1:30 p.m. Easter Eve: The Great Vigil of Easter, 8 p.m.
Easter Sunday: Celebrations of the Holy Eucharist, 7 am.,
Rite I; 9 am., Rite II; and 11 a.m., Choral Rite I.
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 6300 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach, 778-4266. Wednesday meeting,
7:30 p.m. Easter Sunday: Service,10:30 am.
Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach, 778-1813. Maundy Thursday: Foot
Washing and Holy Communion, 10:30 a.m. and 7:15
p.m. Good Friday: Tenebrae Services, 2 and 7:15 p.m.
Easter Sunday: Holy Communion, 8 am.; Holy Com-


union and Choral Feast, 10:30 a.m.
Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Dr., Anna
Maria, 778-0719. Easter Sunday: Choral Worship Ser-
vices, 8:30 and 10:55 am.
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria, 778-0414. Good Friday: Worship
Service, noon. Saturday: Seaside Service, 5 p.m. Eas-
ter Sunday: Worship Services featuring adult choir,
handbell choir and Ramblin' Rosers choral ensemble,
8:45 and 10:45 am.
Longboat Island Chapel, 6200 Gulf of Mexico
Dr., Longboat Key, 383-6481. Thursday: Holy Com-


What's the deal
By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The question's been posed: Why is it a fluffy white
bunny that promotes England's famed Cadbury's
Creme Eggs, and not a feathery yellow chick?
The egg is one of the most ancient symbols of
spring. The same shape as a raindrop or a seed, the
egg was viewed by early peoples as a promise of new
life. After the cold dark winter, the hatching of birds
and reptiles from eggs confirmed renewal and hope,
a true cause for celebration.
Exchanging eggs became a part of many spring
feasts. The Hebrews included the Paschal egg at the
feast of Passover. The ancient peoples of Egypt, Per-
sia, Greece, Rome and China dyed and decorated
eggs for their friends and families at spring festivals.
And the Easter rabbit? In their book, "It's Time
for Easter," Elizabeth Hough Sechrist and Janette
Woodsey trace the Easter rabbit back to Egyptian
mythology, in which the hare is a symbol of the
moon. They say the hare's significance at Easter is
associated with the date of the festival, which is de-
termined by the moon.
Since the year 325, and a ruling by the early


union, Sarita Roche soloist, 7 p.m.; Good Friday:
pageant presenting the seven last words of Christ in
scripture and song, featuring the Chapel Choir with Joe
Roche, violinist, and Jim Marsh, soloist, noon; Easter
Sunday: Worship Services, with children's choir,
Chapel Choir, handbells and string quartet from the
Florida West Coast Symphony, 9 and 11 a.m.
Palmetto First Baptist Church, 1020 4th St. W.,
Palmetto, 722-7795. Easter Pageant, musical drama
with costumes and orchestra featuring 200 people in
cast and choir: Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3 and 7
p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m.


with the bunny?
Christian fathers at the Council of Nicea, the Eas-
ter feast, celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Christ, has been held on the first Sunday after the
date of the first full moon on or after March 21.
The hare, representing the moon, came to be
affiliated with the Easter celebrating. Hence, it is
the rabbit, not the chicken, that fills our baskets.
Some say that nowhere in the world are the
Easter eggs as intricate and beautiful as in the vil-
lages of the Ukraine. For generations, villagers
have hand-painted unique designs using homemade
tools and natural dyes from onion skins, flowers,
herb juices and the like.
One of my personal favorite tales about the ori-
gin of the decorated Easter egg also comes from the
Ukraine. It is said that a humble farmer was carry-
ing his eggs to market in a basket when he came
across a man in a boisterous crowd, carrying a
heavy crucifix to his own death.
The farmer laid down his basket to help the
wounded stranger with his load. When the farmer
returned for his basket of eggs, the white of the
shells had turned to swirls of intricate design in all
the colors of the universe.


e 9 M


Tourist article an insult
Paul Roat's article "Native Survival : A Guide for
the Season" in the March 30 issue was a disgrace for
the people of Florida and an insult to all tourists.
To be so insensitive to all the serious tourist trag-
edies in recent months in this state, by suggesting that,
"We should be able to shoot 'em since it is a season"
- is intolerable. It saddens me to think that Mr. Roat
may think his article was humorous when in actuality
it was sick. I feel sorry for him and for his ignorance
and intolerance.
I would also like to inform him that I have not
spent the year on the planet Neptune, but in the beau-
tiful state of Massachusetts.
I too live in a tourist town called Stockbridge, the
home of the late famed illustrator Norman Rockwell;
the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra;
home of the late sculptor Daniel Chester French, the
creator of the statue of Lincoln in the Lincoln Memo-
rial in Washington, D.C.; and the home of astronaut Dr.
Story Musgrave. I do not consider myself a "doofus"
or a funny conversation piece for Mr. Roat to poke fun
at with his friends.
I take pity on him. How little he must have to do
and how easily he is amused.
I wish to thank Mr. Roat for his hospitality and
inform him that he has been duped because we don't
leave the contents of our wallets or purses behind.
There is a lot more where that came from going
north! Mr. Roat grow up!
Susan Bonak, a 30-year tourist to Anna Maria

No high bridge for me
Who needs a 65-foot bridge not me.
I've been or Anna Maria Island since 1955. Twice


we had to get off because of possible hurricanes. We
had friends who waited too long. The water came up so
high they couldn't get on the bridges.
I have heard that back in the early 1920s a terrible
hurricane came. It washed away the south end of Anna
Maria Island. They said the water was so high you
could sail a boat over our Island. For years there was
not a bridge to Longboat Key. Finally, the state rebuilt
the area and it is now Coquina Beach.
If the wind and waves come again to flood the Is-
land, what good is a 65-foot bridge with water all
around it no one could use it.
Put a low bridge in the middle of Longboat Key to
save the people.
Janice L Searl-Kolsch, Anna Maria Island

Clarification
A word of clarification. In the article on "The price
of public office," (The Islander Bystander, March 30),
it was reported that Mayor Dottie McChesney "contrib-
uted more than $1,000 for her election bid." In fact, the
McChesney's advanced $950 for early campaign ex-
penses. At the end of the campaign, however, her sup-
porters had contributed all but $419.16 of the money
spent for the election.
Sheila Hurst, treasurer, McChesney Campaign


'Coastlines' is great feature
I would like to express my gratitude to Master
Chief J.D. Arndt of the U.S. Coast Guard and The Is-
lander Bystander for confirming my belief in the im-
portance of this governmental agency through "Coast-
lines."
Recently, I learned that the thousands of tax dol-


lars used to fund the Coast Guard's state-of-the-art
Cortez facility go in part for the boarding of docu-
mented vessels in search of some type of violation. In
addition, our U.S.C.G. enforces laws requiring oper-
able ventilation blowers in boats and operators' li-
censes for VHF radios.
Speaking on behalf of the area's boat operators, I
applaud the efforts of the Coast Guard to keep our
waters safe and hope to learn more about the role of this
agency through "Coastlines" in future editions of The
Islander Bystander.
David Murphy, Holmes Beach


Stock in bridge is right campaign
We read about the campaign to raise funds for the
"Save Our Island and Save Our Bridge" in your March
30 issue and we want to contribute.
From its beginning, we have been opposed to
FDOT's plans to replace the Manatee Avenue bridge
with a 65-foot-high, fixed-span bridge. The money
should be spent to either fix the real bottleneck along
Manatee Avenue the causeway, or even better to
build a new bridge to Longboat Key!
At any rate, being owners and summertime dwell-
ers of a home on Anna Maria, we would like to help
save our draw bridge. Please find a check enclosed for
our "piece" of that fine structure.
Also enclosed is a self-addressed, stamped enve-
lope in order for you to return the certificate.
Good Luck with your effort.
Keep up the good work in publicizing the fight to
"Save Our Bridge."
Anita & Wayne Henriquez and children, Jill and
Wesley, Tampa







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 a PAGE 9 IjG


No fire department consolidation expected soon


By Jim Hanson
Islander Correspondent
The Anna Maria Fire Control District is a long way
from being broke, and as far from being fixed at
least by consolidation.
So says Ralph Fulford, 41 years in fire service, 20
of them as a district fire commissioner until retiring
from the board last year.
"There's a lot of talk about consolidating with
other fire services," he said. "Manatee County wanted
to take over awhile back, but backed off. There was a
move to consolidate with Cedar Hammock, but that
faded.
"It's just talk. This is an efficient district with good
coverage. Good fire insurance rating. The response
time here is faster than the Bradenton Fire Department.
And we're mostly volunteers."
Much of the case for consolidation comes from
people who see how well it works in Sarasota County,
he said.
But Manatee County's case is much different, ac-
cording to Sarasota County Fire Chief John Albritton.
"Manatee County doesn't have a fire department and
Sarasota County has, so you can't really compare the two.
Manatee gets its fire protection through independent fire
districts" such as the Anna Maria-Cortez district
Several former independent districts have been
consolidated into the county department and operate
under the county commission, Albritton said.
"And in late April or early May the Sarasota city
and county commissioners will have a joint meeting"
to get the report from the joint commission appointed
to study consolidating the city fire department with the
county.
The demographics contrast between the two coun-
ties, he pointed out. "The Sarasota urban core includes
most of Sarasota County," he said. "The Manatee/
Bradenton situation is far different."


Fulford stressed 'round-the-clock coverage of the
larger Anna Maria district stations to dampen argu-
ments for consolidation.
"We've got eight paid people in the district, and
they provide the core for fast response. They roll im-
mediately with one engine, and volunteers are right
behind them with another. The response time is excel-
lent, both paid firefighters and volunteers."
That goes for emergency medical technicians, too,
he said. "The rescue squad is mostly volunteer EMTs,
and some firefighters are paramedics."
Actually, the fire district has been expanded over
the years through consolidation.
Bradenton Beach started it all by organizing a fire
district in 1951. Then came Anna Maria, and in 1953
both consolidated with Cortez. Voters formed them
into the present district in 1956.
Before the early organizations, "they just let 'em
burn where nothing could be done," said Fulford.
"People just trying to help their fellow man would
run down with buckets to fight a fire. I remember hear-
ing about one house that was burning next door to a
house with a big rain tank on the roof. They chopped
a hole in the tank and the water ran down on the house
and it never caught fire. The other one burned down."
Later fires that especially impressed him included
Trader Jack's restaurant in Bradenton Beach, which
burned completely, he said. "I was laid up with a bro-
ken foot from another fire and couldn't go. We always
suspected arson in that one."
A definite arson, he said, was another major fire
that burned an uncompleted two-story house in Holmes
Beach just south of Manatee Avenue "it burned
everything right down to the concrete."
His foot injury was one of the few firefighter inju-
ries in the history of the district. No firefighter has ever
died at a fire. Even non-fire accidents are limited to
one: "A driver got too anxious and took off before one


man got a good hold on the truck, and he broke an
arm."
The department sometimes needs help from ad-
joining firefighting units, and sometimes lends assis-
tance to them under mutual aid agreements.
Encompassing all of Anna Maria Island and Cortez
to 86th Street and Tidy Island, the district shares bor-
ders with Longboat Key, Cedar Hammock and West
Side districts.
Assistance, yes. But consolidation? Not for a long
time, said Fulford.
"All these consolidation talks don't pan out," he
said. "There are problems, including a lot about turf -
whose authority stays and whose goes. Most of the
problems are lack of communication. That's never
been a major deal in this district."
What seems to be communicated right now is that
consolidation could happen sometime the future. But
certainly not now.


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iQ] PAGE 10 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Mega-bridge' hearing


delayed again


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The administrative hearing on the proposed
"mega-bridge" to replace the Anna Maria Island
Bridge has been postponed again.
David Levin, the attorney representing Save
Anna Maria, told The Islander Bystander the admin-
istrative hearing officer, William Cave, delayed the


hearing to allow status re-
ports from two state agen-
cies to be filed.
The reports are due in
early May.
An administrative
hearing had been sched-
uled for late March, and
was then delayed to May
6. No date has been set
for the hearing.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation is
attempting to build a 65-
foot-high center-clearance,
fixed-span bridge to
Holmes Beach from the
mainland. The Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection has withheld the
issuance of permits for the
bridge, citing adverse im-
pacts on seagrass beds and
mangroves.
Residents of nearby
Westbay Cove and Moor-
ings condominiums and
SAM have filed a request
for an administrative
hearing, citing inadequate
notice was given them by
the DOT prior to proceed-
ing with plans for the big
new bridge.
"If the DEP stands by
its denial of permits, then
the DOT will go forward


during storms. Wind velocity on the bridge which
is estimated to have a roadbed 74 feet above Anna
Maria Sound is many times greater than the wind
velocity on a lower bridge, SAM documents contend,
and the bridge would therefore be closed to motorists
attempting to evacuate the Island prior to a hurricane.


City to initiate
conflict resolution
process on bridge
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council last week
authorized its planning commission to proceed
with the conflict resolution process as another
method of fighting the proposed 65-foot-high
fixed-span bridge proposed for Manatee Avenue.
The process is mandated in state statute and
is part of the Intergovernmental Coordination
Element of the comprehensive plan. The element
gives a municipality the power to contest devel-
opment projects it feels could have a negative
impact on the city.
"This is a procedure to allow for resolution of
issues when there is an extra-jurisdictional prob-
lem," explained Planning Commission Chairman
Gabe Simches. "The commission feels that con-
cerns for the bridge's impact on our resources is
an unresolved question."
Planners said the proposed bridge does not
deal with the increase in traffic during tourist sea-
son, will have a negative impact on the city's re-
sources and threaten the city's quality of life.
Simches said he will contact the other Is-
land cities to see if they would like to join in
the request. The Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council and the Florida Department of Com-


munity Affairs are the
hearing the request.


with a request for an administrative hearing," Levin
said. "If the DEP changes its mind and issues a per-
mit, we'll go forward with our request for a hearing."
Levin said the hearing officer realized the DEP
and DOT hearings would be very similar and was
convinced to consolidate the hearings.
Central to SAM's case, Levin said, are environ-
mental, growth management and public safety issues.
The new bridge is estimated to severely impact
about three acres of seagrass beds. Although the DOT
has said it would mitigate the seagrass loss through
replantings, seagrass replantings have not had a high
survival rate in many parts of the state.
Levin said SAM had won a major point earlier
this year with a reversal of the DEP's position on
safety issues of the big bridge.
A major point of contention for SAM has been
the question of safety for motorists on the high bridge


agencies involved in


DEP attorneys had stated
that safety issues should be
under the purview of other
state agencies and the depart-
ment should only address im-
pacts the bridge would have
on the environment. How-
ever, Levin was able to suc-
cessfully argue that safety is-
sues are part of the DEP's ju-
risdiction, and the wind ve-
locity and motorist safety
matter will be allowed as a
part of DEP arguments.
Bridge battles have been a
way of life on Anna Maria Is-
land for the last five years.
First, DOT officials an-
nounced plans to replace the
Cortez Bridge with a high-rise
bridge, effectively gutting the
village of Cortez. Residents
and officials successfully
blocked those plans.
Then, DOT officials an-
nounced plans to build a
"mega-bridge" to replace the
Anna Maria Island Bridge. A
straw ballot was cast by resi-
dents in 1992, with voters
overwhelmingly rejecting the
proposal.
Undaunted, the DOT con-
tinued its plans for the big
bridge. Save Anna Maria was
formed to block the bridge,
and successfully lobbied for a


pair of public hearings on the issue. More than 900
people appeared at the hearings, with almost all oppos-
ing the structure.
Still undaunted, the DOT continued its plans and
expanded its scope of big bridges, announcing it would
build a 65-foot bridge in Sarasota to replace the
Ringling Causeway bridge as well as a big bridge near
Treasure Island in Pinellas County. Residents of both
areas also opposed the big bridges.
Ironically, DOT officials approved a $300,000
study to determine feasibility, permitability and loca-
tion for an additional bridge from the mainland to the
barrier islands between Cortez and Ringling Bridges.
That study, called a charrette, is scheduled to take place
in the next few months.
City officials on the Island are expected to request
plans for the Anna Maria Island Bridge be tabled until
the results of that study are finalized.





Mystery writer
appears on Island
Sarasota novelist Lary Crews, author of the
Veronica Slade mystery series, addressed 30 mem-
bers and guests of a recent Gulf Coast Writers
session at the Island Branch Library. For more
information about the writers group, call 778-6879
or 729-2399. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 11 IM]


Sit a spell
From left, Wayne
VanderMolen and Bill
Kepping of the Holmes
Beach Public Works
Department are building
benches for the city's
street ends that will save
the city hundreds of
dollars. Islander Photo:
Pat Copeland


Public works department


saves city money


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger is proud
of the public works department's in-house work that is
saving taxpayers a great deal of money.
"They're the nuts and bolts of the city," he said,
"and they've really been taking the initiative to do
projects that save money as well as beautify the city."
Wayne VanderMolen and Bill Kepping have been
constructing benches for the city's street ends.
VanderMolen initiated the project by making concrete
ends for a few of the city's benches and it took off from
there.
'The benches cost the city less than $40 each ver-
sus hundreds of dollars if we bought them," said the
mayor.
He also praised Kepping for constructing steps to
the city's emergency generator and doing other carpen-
try work.
Gary Blunden was cited by the mayor for his ac-
tive participation in the safety program.
Blunden and Lt. Dale Stephenson of the police
department work with the mayor and department heads
sitting as the city's safety committee.
One of Blunden's projects was the construction of
a hose hanger by the city's gas pump.
"Two police officers tripped on the hose while
getting gas," explained Blunden, "One twisted his
ankle so badly he had to take sick time. I built the hose
hanger and painted a warning on the step to make the
area safer."
Other safety projects include stickers to remind
employees to wear seat belts, installation of safety
equipment in the department's trucks and training all
the department's employees in CPR (cardiopulmonary
resuscitation).
Another department project is the construction of
concrete lids for the city's drains, said the mayor.
"We have metal covers on the drains," he ex-
plained. "They only have a life span of two years be-
cause of rust and they cost $85 each. We are replacing
them with concrete ones."
The concrete covers, which would cost $100 if
purchased, are built in-house for a cost of $20 each.


'

Ak
^ :. .: mf.= ':. .- .. 'e :. .- -.;..-. .I




Safety first
Gary Blunden of the Holmes Beach Public Works
Department stands by the hose hanger he made as
part of the city's safey program. Islander Photo:
Pat Copeland

The covers are placed on bricks to elevate them and
create better drainage flow.
The mayor said he is exploring the possibility of
getting some public works employees certified in pest
control and herbicide application so those tasks can be
done in-house.
He will also seek passage of an ordinance man-
dating the use of plastic golf balls on the practice
range by the public works department and plant a
barrier of shrubbery between the practice range and
the fire station.


Grasscycling saves environment, money


Millions of Americans reduce, reuse and recycle -
but grasscycle?
Grasscycling is a new form of recycling that's
gaining ground make that popularity among lawn
care professionals and homeowners alike in an effort to
reduce the millions of tons of clippings discarded into
municipal landfills each year.
Clippings make up more than 10 percent of the
total municipal waste dumped in landfills annually.
Many areas have already passed laws to change the
way we dispose of yard waste.
Grasscycling is a natural process of decay and re-
newal that recycles the nutrients present in grass blades.
You can grasscycle by simply leaving short clippings
on your lawn. Since grass is 85 percent water, short
grass clippings decompose quickly, returning up to 20
percent of their nitrogen to the soil. This creates a valu-
able food supply for your lawn's root system.
Proper mowing is the key to effective grasscycling.


Specially-designed mulching mowers make
grasscycling easy by chopping clippings into tiny
pieces and blowing them into the turf. This is particu-
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If you use a standard walk-behind or riding
mower, follow the "one-third" rule: Mow your lawn
often enough so that you cut only one third of the
grass blade at any one time.
And university research shows that grasscycling
doesn't add to a thatch problem. Thatch is mostly
dead grass roots caused by improper mowing, water-
ing or fertilizing.
Grasscycling can also save you money. One
season's worth of clippings is roughly equivalent to
an application of commercial fertilizer.
Most importantly, by recycling a natural resource,
you can take pride in your efforts to preserve the en-
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EIl PAGE 12 M APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Easter messages from our Island pastors


In the Christian faith, Easter is the principal feast
of the church year. For this holiday issue of The Is-
lander Bystander, we asked each of our Island pastors
to impart the meaning of Easter.

Dr. J. Clement Walker, Pastor
Harvey Memorial Community Church
As with other holidays, Easter has different mean-
ings for many people. Some of us remember the child-
hood joys of egg hunts, egg rolls and Easter baskets.
Our next awareness is of new clothes, and all that has
to do with Easter finery and
the coming of spring. We
may never have marched in
the Easter parade, but we
surely sang it.
We went with family
p -and friends to church to sing
"Christ the Lord is Risen
Today" and listened to min-
S sisters who assured us that
Walker death is not the end of ev-
erything; that cemeteries are
not dead-end streets but thoroughfares. Because of
Christ's resurrection, we have hope of immortality.
This robs death of its grimness. Christian hope
cannot cancel loss and pain of grief, but to have faith
that the best we know of love and friendship can con-
tinue beyond death is deeply satisfying and joyful.
Years ago, President William Harper of the Uni-
versity of Chicago lay on his deathbed. He was still and
quiet so long that the close friends who had gathered
thought he was dead.
One of the friends said, "Feel his feet. No one ever
died with warm feet."
To everyone's amazement, Dr. Harper was alive
and alert enough to respond, "Joan of Arc did."
Such humor at such a time spoke of deep faith and
an abiding assurance that death itself is not grim.

The Rev. Donald E. Baier,
Associate Pastor
St. Bernard Catholic Church
Itis sometimes very challenging for us to bring the joy
of the resurrection of Jesus into our homes, schools or
workplaces. It seems remote, separate from us in time and
place. But what happened to Jesus is real. We really can-
not fathom the depth of the meaning of the Resurrection.


All we know is that Jesus died because he was
publicly crucified. We know that Jesus is now alive, ac-
tive and present in the lives of his followers. We be-
lieve that he has gone before
us to enjoy perfect union '
with God who sent him
forth to take on our human- .
ity.
The Gospel of Matthew
reveals to us what might be
considered the "gossip" of
the day. The chief priests
and the Roman authorities
concocted a story to cover Baier
themselves from being
blamed for the body of Jesus being missing. In the Acts
of the Apostles, we hear Peter addressing the apostles.
He reminds them of the prophet's words, that the
Messiah's would not "undergo corruption." Peter and
the apostles are to be witnesses to all that has happened.
The bottom line is that Jesus is alive and active in
our lives today. We can imagine what this realization
must have done to the lives of those who were close
followers of Jesus. Once we have a realization of what
has been made possible through God's power, let us
examine how our lives will be different because of it.
Easter is only the beginning.

The Rev. Fr. Richard G. Fellows, SSC
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation
Death is final. Death is the end. Death is extinction.
For many people, these words are true. We who have
faith in Jesus Christ live by another reality and that's
what Easter is all about.
On Good Friday, the
sin, evil and wickedness of
the world did its best, took
its best shot, and killed the
Son of God. Easter and the
resurrection of our Lord
Jesus Christ proved that was
still not enough to defeat the
Love of God. God's love
cannot be defeated even by Fellows
the worst the world has to ___
offer. It can be ignored, de-
nied, forgotten, even scoffed at, but it cannot be de-
feated.
We who have been baptized have been given the


precious gift of eternal life. God has promised that
nothing will ever separate us from him including
death. For God's faithful people, life is changed, not
ended, and when our mortal body lies in death, there is
prepared for us a dwelling place eternal in heaven.

C. Vincent Wright, Trustee
First Church of Christ, Scientist
Take up thy cross!
If we would follow Christ Jesus, we must be will-
ing to bear the cross; that is, to understand that disciple-
ship requires the self-sacrifice he demonstrated in life
and on the cross.
Truly, the events at Golgotha were tragic: the best
man who had ever lived
convicted like a common
criminal and crucified. But
his Resurrection gave proof
that man is created and
maintained by God. His E
great sacrifice and even
greater victory which fol-
lowed showed us how to
become what God made us
to be: the pure, perfect, pur-
poseful image of God. Wright
Not only did the Master
admonish us to take up his cross, but also promised:
"Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden,
and I will give you rest...For my yoke is easy, and my
burden is light."

The Rev. Danith L. Kilts, Pastor
Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
For me, the resurrection of Jesus Christ means new


possibilities and new hopes
in all of life.
Jesus Christ's death on
the cross looked like just
another tragedy. Another
human life was snuffed out.
It looked like God lost that
round in the battle against
evil and death. However,
through the resurrection
from the dead the Lord
Jesus Christ proved that


Kilts


Kilts


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 13 UI


nothing will ever separate me from God's gracious
presence.
I know that forgiveness is a resurrection moment.
To be forgiven means I can rise up and live again; a
chance to start over in life. My guilt does not keep me
from hiding in a corner somewhere hoping no one
would see me, or wishing to die. And the good news is
that this forgiveness is a constant daily process.
I know that when horrible and tragic things happen,
the Lord Jesus Christ will be there to make sure that I
will somehow get through them. If God can turn the
tragedy of the cross into a victory through the Resur-
rection, what is to prevent God from doing that for me?
I know that I can take risks in my life. I don't al-
ways have to carry an umbrella and rubber boots in
case of rain. In other words, I don't have to always be
concerned about me, me, me. I am free to enjoy the life
that God has given me and to love and care for others
around me, regardless of who they are. Obviously, this
is easier said than done. That is why I need forgiveness
every day and every moment.
Ultimately, I know that when I die young, old
or for whatever reason I still have life. On my death-
bed I know I will miss my family and friends, but I do
have hope. Because Jesus rose from the dead, I dare to
believe that I will too! Thanks be to God!

The Rev. James M. Metts Jr.,
Pastor
Island Baptist Church
Easter is God's eternal exclamation point of victory
flung against the black cloud
of death! Without the resur-
rection of Christ, there is no
meaning to Easter! The
apostle Paul said, "If Jesus did
Snot arise from the dead, we
S are of all men most foolish."
To those of us who
S have accepted Jesus Christ as
our personal savior, God's
Metts word assures us that because


he lives, we too shall live.
As Christians worship this Easter, we will be
thanking God for loving us so much that he gave his
only begotten Son that whosoever believes in him shall
be saved.
To God be the glory!

The Rev. Frank W. Hutchison,
Pastor
Roser Memorial Community Church
Easter means that I am free to live for the glory of
God. Christ's glorious resurrection following his hor-
rendous death on Calvary's Cross has released me from
any dread of my own physical death, and from my
heart's bondage and tyranny to the acknowledged and
unacknowledged sin in me.
The Easter event has so dominated and subdued me
that I can do nothing else than turn and respond in self-
less, unconditional love to- ''" .


ward my earthly sisters and
brothers, plants and animals,
sea, land and sky.
Easter, or Christ alive in
my heart, did not enter
through mathematical
knowledge or scientific and
empirical data. Easter, God's
most dramatic act of salva-
tion, came into my heart
through faith, through a deep
and abiding trust.


Hutchison


The freedom that Christ, the victor over death and
sin, has given me does not make me perfect I am a sin-
ner, continually being rescued, shaped and saved by the
spirit of Christ.
And so I have lived 17 glorious years among you
in the reality and expectation of yet more love, joy,
peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, faith-
fulness and self-control. As I retire from the pastorate
of Roser Church, I thank all of you. May we continue
to live in peace (and not pieces!) and may the Easter
victory renew our lives again!


Easter messages from Islanders


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Bridge Street

comes alive for

outdoor festival
Plans are firming up for the April 22 and 23
Bradenton Beach Festival on Historic Bridge Street,
organizers report.
Additional arts-and-crafts and food vendors are
still invited to join up and volunteers are needed for the
setup and manning of children's games booths. Other-
wise, all is full speed ahead for the third annual festi-
val sponsored by the Bradenton Beach Downtown
Business Association.
Starting at'l11 a.m. Saturday, the 22nd, Bridge
Street and the Gulf beach at the end of Bridge Street
will be abustle with activities for all ages.

Kids, kites and kung fu
Downtown fun will include a 1 p.m. martial arts dem-
onstration by Lee's White Leopard Kung Fu School, a 3
p.m. children's fishing tournament at the Bridge Street
Pier, and a full variety of children's game booths. Stroll-
ing clowns and mimes, cloggers, artisans and food ven-
dors will flood the blocks with fun and festivity.
Several live bands, including the Thirsty Birds, will
cap off the day with a street dance from 8 to 11 p.m.
Saturday beach events will include the all-day Castle
Masters giant castle and children's sandcastle building
contests under the direction of Big John Swager, who took
over the privilege from Chuck Senrick. The Islander By-
stander will sponsor the castle events.
Kite flying demonstrations and the donation of 50
kites for children by the Beach Barn will color the
coastal skies around 2:30 p.m. The Anna Maria Island
Privateers will hold a beach treasure hunt for children
at 5 p.m. Just down the beach at The Beach House res-
taurant, daylong volleyball contests will be the fare.
The fun will resume at 11 a.m. Sunday, with all-
day kite shows on the beach, volleyball challenges, and
the Privatateers' final capture/clash of the season with
those mainland Conquistadors at 1 p.m.
For information, call 778-2627 or 778-3565.





lU PAGE 14 a APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Community Center auction
By Cynthia Finn
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will be
transformed into Bourbon Street elegance Saturday
evening, April 29, for "A Night in New Orleans," the k
Center's 11th annual spring auction benefit.
From original artworks and resort packages to
fishing excursions, media advertising and a custom-
built marine dock, more than 250 items have been
donated for the Center's most important fundraiser
of the year.
Harry's Continental Kitchens of Longboat Key
will provide a French Creole buffet dinner, with back-
ground entertainment offered by jazz pianist Sam Lane.
Professional auctioneer Bobby Smith, son of
Marcia and Dale Powers of Anna Maria, will handle
the bidding duties for the eighth time in 11 years.
For the third year in a row, Christine Holmes of
Holmes Beach and Linda Loken of Anna Maria are
teamedup as benefit co-chairwomen. They promise an
entertaining evening of fine dining and socializing, plus
a chance to bid, silent and live, on the Island's best
yearly values.

New Orleans or bust
Two separate prize drawings will be held as part of
the '95 benefit. Holmes Construction Co. and Westbay
Athletic Club have donated a three-day two-night stay
in New Orleans. Jim Boast Dodge-VW has given a
powder-blue 1977 AMC Hornet. Chances go for $1
apiece or six for $5. Winners need not be present to
claim prizes.
Admission to the auction will be $20 per person,
dinner included. Tickets are on sale now at the Com-
munity Center and Penny's Petunia Patch in Anna
Maria; The Islander Bystander, The Sand Dollar Gift
Shop, First National Bank of Manatee and Island Dis-
count Tackle in Holmes Beach; Harry's Continental
Kitchens on Longboat; and Westbay Athletic Club in
Bradenton.
For more information, call 778-1908, 778-3484 or
778-0018.


April 29







One of the hottest yearly
items at the Community
Center auction is the
custom-built dock do-
nated by Taylor-Made
Marine Construction of
Holmes Beach. Standing
proud on the dock they
won in last year's bidding
are Dr. and Mrs. Stephen
Pelham and son, Mark.
Islander Photo: Cynthia
Finn.


La Laine's
BEAUTY SALON
SINCE 1977
"Happy Easter to
All Our Friends!"

A ,- *I 792-6919


EVENINGS
BY APPOINTMENT


Don't leave paradise without a subscription to the best news on the island.
SThe Islander Bystander is the only newspaper that covers all three Island
cities and reports the news plus all the events and happenings in Islander
lives. Our office is in the Island Shopping Center right next door to
EMEENT D.Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. See you soon!
of Call 778-7978 to charge your subscription on MasterCard or Visa.
ints
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 M PAGE 15 i~E


=A1, "


Privateers on board for
April activities
Those fun-loving civic-minded Anna Maria Island
Privateers appear to have given up their day jobs for the
month of April, considering the full slate of events in
which they are participants.
As longtime foes of the Conquistadors, a.k.a. the
Hernando de Soto Historical Society Crewe, the Priva-
teers will next clash with the Crewe as part of the
Florida Heritage Festival at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday,
April 19, at Crabby Bill's seafood restaurant, 5325
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
On Saturday morning, April 22, our favorite pirates
will be on hand for the festival's Plastic Bottle Boat
Regatta on the Palma Sola Causeway.
Later that Saturday, the Privateers will be back on
the Island for the Bridge Street Festival in Bradenton
Beach, hosting a children's treasure hunt. On Sunday,
the 23rd, at the Bridge Street fest, a morning mullet
smoke is in the works, with a final sword clash with the
Conquistadors booked at 1 p.m.
On April 28 and 29, the pirate lads will add their
color to the Heritage Festival's closing events, the
Grande Ball and the Grande Parade.

Horseshoe scores
Winners in the April 1 horseshoe games were John
Johnson and Gene Snedeker. Runners-up were Bub
Babcock and Walt Swift.
Winners in the April 8 games were Harry Freeman
of Holmes Beach and George landraitis of Anna Maria.
Runners-up were George McKay of Anna Maria and
Gene Snedeker of Holmes Beach.
The weekly contests get underway every Saturday
at 9 am. at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive.


Doctor to speak to
historical society
"Beach Medicine" will be the topic of Dr. John
Deam's talk at the Monday, April 17, meeting of the
Anna Maria Island Historical Society.
Dr. Deam practiced medicine at the former Island
Medical Center in Holmes Beach from 1960 to 1988.
The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be held
at Anna Maria City Hall, Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue,
Anna Maria City. The public is invited to attend.
Free estate planning
program at branch library
A free educational seminar on "Estate & Retire-
ment Planning, Trusts & Taxes" will be held at the Is-
land Branch Library, Holmes Beach, on Thursday,


Calling middle
school girls
I High school senior Ana
Shaw, left, Beth Home,
and ninth grader Meredith
SBuckelew wish to hear
from girls in grades 6, 7
and 8 who want to be part
\ of the Girls Afternoon
Club through the Commu-
r nity Center. A variety of
activities are in the works.
The club will next meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, April
17. For information, call
Deana at the Center, 778-
1908. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.
April 20, from 10:15 am. to noon in the Walker-Swift
Meeting Room. The public is invited to attend.

'Arsenic and Old Lace' to
be performed on Island
The Chapel Players of Roser Memorial Church
will present "Arsenic and Old Lace" by Joseph
Kesselring opening Friday, April 21.
Evening performances are at 8 p.m. and will be held
on April 21,22,26,27,28 and 29. Matinee performances
will be performed on April 23 and 30 beginning at 2 p.m.
Tickets cost $6 for adults and $3 for students. Ad-
vance tickets are on sale at the Roser chapel, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria City, from 10 am. to 2 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Tickets will also be available one half
hour before each performance on a first-come-first-served
basis. For more information call 778-6756.


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Ef PAGE 16 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Over one-fourth of

bridge stock sold
Sales of stock certificates in the existing Manatee
Avenue bridge topped 190 last week, according to The
Islander Bystander.
The Island's newspaper office is the point-of-sale
and sponsor for an issue of only 496 stock certificates
which offer the bearer the "imaginary rights and privi-
leges of ownership" in a 12-foot section on the exist-
ing bridge at Manatee Avenue at a cost of $10.
The sale of the certificates, suitable for framing, is
a fundraiser for Save Anna Maria, Inc. SAM is raising
funds to pay attorney fees to fight against Florida De-
partment of Transportation's proposed 65-foot fixed-
span bridge at Manatee Avenue.

April 19 turtle meeting may
decide fate of hatcheries
Turtle Watch members and the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection will duke it out Wednes-
day, April 19 in Anna Maria City Hall over the fate of
turtle hatcheries on the Island.
DEP officials have said they want to keep a more
natural atmosphere and do not want the turtle nests
disturbed. Chuck Shumard, the turtle watch director on
the Island, has vowed to drop out of the program if the
hatcheries are not continued, maintaining the survival
rate is far higher with the man-managed hatcheries.
The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m.

Citizens Police Academy
offered
The Holmes Beach Police Department will offer a
Citizens' Police Academy to give residents an inside
look at police procedures.
Classes will be held one night a week at the audi-
torium at the Anna Maria Elementary School, said
Police Chief Jay Romine. Classes will be two hours per
night and run for eight weeks.
Applications for the academy are now available at
the Holmes Beach Police Department, 5901 Marina Dr.



If you are being non-renewed or if you
are presently insured by the Florida
JUA pool, you may be eligible for pre-
ferred rates and better coverage
through our licensed Florida com-
pany. Call John P. Huth Insurance.


778-2206


John P. Huth Insurance, INC.
"Your One Stop Insurance Agent"
5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL.


New times announced for masked men
Thanks to the prompting of native Canadian Dr. Steve Pelham, roller hockey is the latest rage at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center. Youth play is Saturday afternoon: ages 6-9, 12:30p.m.; ages 10-12, 1:30 p.m; and ages
13-16, 2:30p.m. Men skate Thursday nights from 815 to 10. Roller blades, knee pads and helmets, preferably with
a cage orface-mask, are mandatory. For more information, call 778-1908. Ready for action are, clockwise from
top, Jesse Ferguson, Dusty Allen and Mark Rudacille. Islander Photo: Cynthia Finn.


Class size is limited to 20 participants age 18 and up
with preference given to city residents and business
owners. There will be a nominal fee for materials.

Registration for new
students begins at MCC
Registration begins Monday, April 24, for new and
returning students who wish to attend Summer A, B or
Fall Term 1995 classes at Manatee Community Col-
lege campuses in Bradenton and Venice.
Day and evening classes for Summer Term A be-


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Gift Certificates

792-3758
In Season Special $30 Swedish massage thru April 15.
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Love is the doctrine
of this church;
The quest of truth
its sacrament;
And service is its prayer
Worship
Services
9 am and 11 am
Nursery Available
Church
School
Ages 3 16 at 9 am
Adult Study Group
10 am
All Island
Youth Group
Wed 5:30 pm
Ages 13-18
Minister
Charles Jim Marsh
6200 Gulf of Mexico Drive
383-6491


gin Monday, May 8, and end June 19.
Admissions and Registration offices are open 8
a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Offices close
at 4:30 p.m. on Friday. MCC campuses are located at
5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, and 8000 S. Tamiami
Trail, Venice.
Proof of immunization for measles and rubella is
required for those born after 1956.
For more information call the MCC Admissions
office on the Bradenton Campus at 755-1511, ext.
4234.
At the South Campus, call 493-3504, ext. 2163.

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Gy Yatros, D.M.D.
FAMILY DENTISTRY
Now Accepting
New Patients

3909 East
Bay Drive
Suite 205
Holmes Beach
778-2204 A a
MONDAY thru THURSDAY 8:30 to 5:30
FRIDAYS by APPOINTMENT


(Z~






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13. 1995 0 PAGE 17 11B
0 I ;


One-stop
hopping at
Island Foods
Seventy-five eager-
beaver Island children
and visitors scrambled
for eggs and gifts at the
Island Foods annual
Easter egg hunt last
Saturday. The grand-
prize golden egg
winners were, left to
right, Evan Lewis,
Brian Pocino and '
Samantha Maietta. The
big guy in the back was
identified only as E.
Bunny of East Bay
Drive. Islander Photo:
Cynthia Finn.
















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Getting ready
to meet the bunny
Kaci Kennedy and Lori Manali, both age 5, are
getting ready for Easter at the School for Construc-
tive Play. Islander Photo Courtesy Marie Richards.


..I I I


Islad Fotwea
RESORT SHOES *.-U.~







JI PAGE 18 M APRIL 13, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Samuel S. Johnson
Samuel S. Johnson, 73, of Holmes Beach, died
April 8 at HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Tazwell, Va., Mr. Johnson came to Mana-
tee County from Trenton, Mich., in 1977. He was a
supervisor of Monsanto Chemical Co., retiring in 1974
after 23 years of service. He was Protestant. He was a
member of the American Legion Kirby Stewart Post
No. 24, Bradenton, and a member and past post com-
mander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 4230,
Gibraltar, Mich. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World
War II.
He is survived by his wife, Annelies; a daughter,
Sandra Betts of Buchanan, Va.; three sons, Gary of
Farwell, Mich., Jeffrey L. of Rockwood, Mich., and
Christopher R. Pfaff of Holmes Beach; a brother,
Walter of Bradenton; and six grandchildren.
A memorial service was held at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, Holmes Beach, with the Rev. Danith
Kilts officiating. Memorials may be made to Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, 6608 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach,
Fla. 34217. Griffith Cline Funeral Home was in charge
of the arrangements.

Frances True Moss
Frances True Moss, 88, of Bradenton, died April 6
in Freedom Village Nursing Center.
Born in Mankato, Minn., Mrs. Moss came to
Manatee County from Wichita, Kansas, in 1962. She
was a homemaker. She was a Episcopalian. She was a
volunteer at Freedom Village Health Center and was
recently named Volunteer of the Year.


As Independent As The Island Itself.
First National Bank.
Member FDIC
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (813) 778-4900
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West
v y


She is survived by two sons, Wiley "Gene" of
Anna Maria and James L. of Bradenton; two sisters,
Beth Pinkley of Monett, Mo., and Pauline Van Horn of
Medford, Ore.; five grandchildren; and 14 great-grand-
children.
A memorial service was held at Freedom Village
Inn with Revs. Richard Fellow and Frank Hutchison
officiating. Burial was in Mansion Memorial Park.
Memorial contributions may be made to Roser Memo-
rial Community Church, c/o the Van Fund, P.O. Box
247, Anna Maria, Fla. 34216. Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home was in charge of arrangements.

Karl Sondermann
Karl Sondermann, 74, of Holmes Beach and
Huebingen, Germany, died April 1 in Germany, the
day before his 75th birth-

The owner of the Blue ''
Water Beach Club for sev- -
eral decades, Sondermann
was known for his hard
work and kindness, and was
a close friend to many Is-
landers. "-
He is survived by a
daughter, Maja Korff, of Sondermann
Germany; a son, Karl-
Friedrich Sondermann, of Germany; a sister, Liselotte
Thymian, of Germany; and four grandchildren.
A memorial Holy Mass was held at St. Bernard
Catholic Church on April 6.


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The Island Poet
It's Easter week and there's a celebration,
By everyone in our great nation.
The kids are decked out in their best clothes,
Mom puts on a new hat and her sheerest hose.
Dad has washed and waxed the car,
And we're the sharpest group in town by far.
But have we lost the reason for this great event?
To please each other was not the Lord's intent.
'Cause on this the holiest of weeks, you see,
God laid down his life for you and me.
And I'm sure He wouldn't be too hard to please,
Just say a simple prayer of thanks upon your knees.
Bud Atteridge


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I


Ire] -I Jy! T ;j /


Liebsch, Olbertz announce
engagement
Bernice and Norman Liebsch of Bowlus, Minn.,
announce the engagement of their daughter, Lynne
Liebsch of Bradenton Beach, to Colin Olbertz of
Bradenton Beach, son of Margarette and Dan Olbertz
of Belmont, N.H.
The couple will wed in May in a sunset ceremony
on the Seafood Shack Showboat.
Miss Liebsch is a critical-care registered nurse at
HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
The bridegroom-elect is an engineering supervisor
at Flowers Baking Company of Bradenton, Inc.


Mueller of Holmes Beach
to wed
Mr. and Mrs. Clay A. Mueller of Holmes Beach
announce the engagement of their daughter, Alecia, to
Lawrence Spillane, son of Arlene Spillane of
Bradenton and the late Donald Spillane.
The couple will wed Oct. 19, 1996.
Miss Mueller is a 1991 graduate of Manatee High
School. A cosmetologist, she is a hairstylist at First
Choice Haircutters.
The bridegroom-elect is a 1991 graduate of Mana-
tee High School. He is a commercial cleaner for
Bentley Resources.


Kirkpatrick, Curry wed
Cynthia Ann Curry and Brian Noel Kirkpatrick,
both of Bradenton, were married Feb. 18 in Saints Pe-
ter and Paul The Apostles Catholic Church. The Very
Rev. Edward D. Moretti officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Holace and Jeanetta
Smith of Bradenton. He is the son of Sherman and Teri
Kirkpatrick of Anna Maria.
Matron of honor was Mellisa German of
Bradenton. Bridesmaids were Charlie Woffard of
Tampa, Heather Brady of Bradenton and Jolie Boulet
of Holmes Beach.
Allison Bilderback of Bradenton was flower girl.
Ring bearer was Cory Ryan Kirkpatrick of Marietta,
Ga.
Best man was Brad Kirkpatrick of Marietta, Ga.
Groomsmen were Wayne Sexauer of Bradenton; Jeff
Fourance of Tampa; and Jeff Kredris of Bradenton.
A reception followed the ceremony at the
Bradenton Yacht Club. The couple honeymooned in
Manhattan, N.Y. They live in Sarasota.


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND VISITOR INFORMATION ISLAND STREET MAP


ISLANDER


.I an I


Do da Mouse da easy way, Kong too


By Bonner Presswood
and David Futch
We knew we were in trouble when
we had to park in Pluto.
Sunday 9:30 a.m. in the heart of
tourist season and the Pluto parking sec-
tion seems miles from the gate to the pa-
gan God of youth, Mickey Mouse, and his
man-made Mecca in Orlando.
We planned, we debated, we knew
we had to go. For both of us, it was a third
visit to Mouse-dom, the Magic Kingdom
at Disney World. It's been about 15 years
since the last visit for us both, a 20-year-
new Floridian and a seventh generation
native.
Futch's 11-year-old son, Cheyenne,
the eighth generation Floridian visiting
from Denver, was the cause for our
disembarkment from our senses and from
the peace, calm and secure shores of Anna
Maria Island.
We could have picked a better week,
something or other besides a few short
weeks before the peak of season would
have been preferred. On the average
weekend, 60- to 70,000 folks plow
through the turnstiles at Mickey-land.
By 2 p.m. the walkways were shoul-
der to shoulder with hordes of people.
But we have advice for you if you're


planning to make a day or two of
Orlando's attractions.
Lots of tourist guidebooks have tips
on "how to do" Disney. But we have the
nitty gritty, the real skinny, the absolute
truth of the matter.
Don't go.
Just kidding.
Plan ahead
If you venture, as soon as you are on
the tram-train or ferry (these come after
parking, between ticket purchase and your
first of many turnstiles into the park) de-
cide on what ride you want to do the ab-
solute, very most.
At the gate, insist that one person
needs a wheel chair. Your whole group
will get in short lines and get preferential
treatment on all but the dangerous, thrill-
ing rides. For those rides, ditch the wheel-
chair by the nearest restroom and rough it
in line. Just kidding again, but it was
Cheyenne's idea.
Next, head for that first-choice ride.
Pass up all the shops and enticements on
Main Street. Even if you're the first group
to arrive for the day, chances are the wait
at any of the popular attractions is already
a half hour.
Do your second and third choices next.


Month to Month (No Contracts)
Single Membership, $39 the 1st month, $29 each month after
Couples Membership, $69 the 1st month, $49 each month after
Senior Special (65 or older) 15 visits for $30


visit


FITNESS CENTER
Vitamins and Supplements Available
We are located in the Holmes Beach Business Center.
2 blocks west of Eckerd Drugs.
5345 Gulf Dr. #100, Holmes Beach.


Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6:30 AM 8 PM
Saturday 8 AM-2 PM


TO

KEY WEST
Takeoff from the St. Pete/Clearwater
Airport for a spectacular low flying narrated
FunFlight skimming along the coast to Key
West Upon arrival, take in the sights and
sounds of Duval Street or escape to azure
waters for diving, fishing, or sailing.
ITS PLANEFUN8I2

CI IAIRLIN ES.
813-531-8520


778-5446


CET-AWAYS INCLUDE
I Low roundtrip fares
Ground transportation to
Mallory Square
'-Discounts to attractions
-" Freequent FunClub
T Free hotel reservations &
much more!
'Ask about our money saving
Sneak-A-Way packages


Just when you thought it was safe to go to the theme park. Futch rescues Chey-
enne from Jaws at Universal Studios. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood.


Forget the Haunted House because the line
there is twice as long as any other.
Remember, some of the rides are
worth a wait. Some aren't worth think-
ing about. Like the Small World exhibit.
It is a brain-washing of a trip through
stacks of dolls thousands of dolls -
all singing a repetitive song that stays
with you for life. Believe us, it stays
with you for life, and it ain't pretty. We
circumvented the area where this attrac-
tion is located to avoid any possibility
of contact.
Cheyenne's top choice was Splash


Mountain. Gooooood choice. Half-hour
wait. Maximum thrill. H2O plus a 45-de-
gree angle, plus gravity, plus 40 mph, plus
a five-story plunge.
There's a surprise waiting for you at
the end of this ride. They take pictures
during the "drop" and your boat-load is on
a video screen where you disembark;
$9.95 for the most embarrassing photo of
yourself ever taken.
Next stop for our entourage, Thunder
Mountain, almost next door to the "splash
of terror."
PLEASE SEE MOUSE, PAGE 22


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 19 lE3






[i] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 M PAGE 20


"You'll have to call us ...
or we'll never meet"


REFRIGERATION


CAC044365 Af -


778-9622 Holmes Beach


eB41


4anal


FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


I .
';>y E` p


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, 7 .2
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $7.25" ,
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


ast,
$ n1.75 t F. 1 -. .


OPEN Island Inn Restaurant
EASTER
SUNDAY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach


EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, to
home fries and coffee ... Only


DEEP SEA

FISHING
4, 6, & 9 HOUR TRIPS


0


BAY FISHING
FISH THE CALM WATERS OF TAMPA OR
SARASOTA BAYS

EGMONT KEY

CRUISES
INCLUDES "FREE" ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
"BUFFET" AT CAPABLO'S

CORTEZ FLEET
forfurther information and reservations call
794-1223
S 12507 Cortez Road West


82





RESTAURANT
& LOUNGE
101 South Bay Boulevard Anna Maria 778-9611
and Anchorage Oyster Bar Historic City Pier




Mary Ann Schmidt
REALTOR* GRI
778-4931
Office: 778-2261
Toll Free: 1-800-422-6325
S~~E. MIS 5


Age Has Its Benefits


Unforgettable Service
for over 50 years


We know the Island
We know real estate
We know how to help
... and you benefit from our experience.
5910 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Sales (813)778-0777 Rentals 778-0770 Fax 778-6944


DiP'S A
Old Fashioned Penny Candy
& Ice Cream Shop
Now Serving Cappuccino
Open Mon-Sun 1pm- 10pr
778-1706
Alexis Plaza 9 9801 Gulf Drive Anna Maria



Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
19 9\0701 Gulf Dtve-P O Box 717 Anna Mad&, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell
tsloan d WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4:30PM
=- ^ //i- SATURDAYS 9AM to tO0ON


B When it comes to service,
everything matters.



FJIN First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
813 798-2708


I


7


The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
!his side of Heaven."f li
,uffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. M.... a? &
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 1am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


ree Bafet Not Valid With Any Other Discounu


II-fol Mft4


[i urt


\


I :
I ~
I


Mario Vega M.D. |B |
Family Practice
Free Blood Pressure Checks
Medicare & Medicaid Approved
Call ahead for appointment
or "Just Walk-In."
"The Island's Only Walk-In Clinic"



503 Manatee Ave. W., Suite E, Holmes Beach







PAGE 21 0 APRIL 13, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER Bi


UNCLE DANS PLACE
ON WHITNEY BEACH
383-0880/383-0881
Sunday-Thursday 4PM-11 PM
'. Friday & Saturday 4PM-1AM
featuring
CHICAGO STYLE THIN CRUST
HOMEMADE PIZZA
BBQ BABY BACK RIBS
In our Own Special Sauce
FISH & CHIPS 21 SHRIMP
HOT SANDWICHES:
ITALIAN BEEF ITALIAN SAUSAGE
ITALIAN GRINDER MEATBALL
Salads Garlic Bread & Cheese Bread
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
to furthest reaches of Anna Maria Island and
Longboat Key (Delivery Charge: $1.50)


C C i C C? C? C i i C? -
cn C -1 al 0- -, C _

; ;:: : : :
r^^ -, -,
~-~
cmc


-I i


S 0 --.
NOW
The*Prudentia
Florda Ralt


5340-1 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Fax: 813-778-3035


f -m t\m


An hadpe1de ,Owd aYd OpwdUMeMwbwr d The Pmdmidl Re E*sid AIm, Im .


S ICE




Take Out Sandwiches
For the Beach

AND DELI


Fat Free, Sugar Free
Ice Cream!
Fresh Made Deli
Sandwiches & Soups
Fresh Bagels
Eat-In or Take-Out
Mon Sat 10AM 9PM
Sunday 12- 8PM
CLOSED EASTER SUNDAY


Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386 L


B BROWN PEL C[


GIFT SHOP

VARIETY OF EASTER
CARDS, GIFTS & DECORATIONS
T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
Decorative Accessories Jewelry Pewter Miniature
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 Sunday 12 to 5 778-1645


The shop with the "Island Attitude"
in apparel and gifts.


--
--u--- eS


"each Shop
CASUAL APPAREL
Island Shopping Center 5418 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-2169

p------, i COUPON N -----,
$1.00 DISCOUNT OFF REGULAR
ADMISSION up to (6) Persons. Must
present ad at time of purchase. Exp. 6/30/95.
BIRD & LIVE REPTILE SHOWS* JUNGLE ANIMALS
I JUNGLE TRAILS GIFT SHOP
KIDDIE PLAYGROUND
SSNACK BAR
ANNUAL PASSES
3701 Bayshore Rd
Sarasota, Florida 34234
2 Blocks West of U.S. 41
1 Mile South of Airport
* 355-5305 Open Daily 9 to 5






SALES ANNUAL RENTALS
VACATION RENTALS
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939

B1 E --.0 (813) 778-2246
Lic. Real Estate Broker
2217 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach FAX 778-4978


Joe's Eats & Sweets


DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
Great Ruebens & Sandwiches
S Homemade Soups & Salads
Homemade Ice Cream & Cakes
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
Gourmet Coffees
New & Larger Dining Room
Kitchen Open 'til 7:30pm
Closed Tuesday Wed 6-10
219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge 778-0007


M First National Bank
MemberFDIC

"As Independent As The Island Itself"

Susan A. O'Connor
Assistant Vice President
and Branch Manager

5324 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217, 813/778-4900


I


s


m i 9 c.i r~,
c~
I ij!
iii i..;
_,


C-j i5 i -' L c-j"r %o '- :--



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FM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 22
MOUSE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19


This ride is a small roller coaster
shaped like a train through mountains and
hairpin turns. High speed. Medium thrill
factor. Fun and over too quick.

Trouble
The line for Thunder was our first
encounter with Trouble. That's trouble
with a capital "T." Synonym of toddler.
Even Cheyenne is beyond the age of
dealing with a toddler who threw-up in line.
Next stop, the ski-lift across the King-
dom to Tomorrowland and Space Moun-
tain. Another half-hour line. Another tod-
,dler.
This 4-or-so-year-old had one of those
:shiny, helium balloons on a string and an
uncontrolling, all-ignoring parent.
This miniature hellion batted the bal-
loon into faces of bystanders like Mike
Tyson working a punching bag. We put
up with it some. Finally a glare at
"mom" put the balloon to rest. Bored with
life and Disney he began a howl/screech
combo like a smoke detector in the
Towering Inferno.
Enough already we barked back.
Mom was insulted but we got to
Tomorrowland with our sanity. Sorta.
Yes. Space Mountain. The quintessen-
tial ride. Not for the timid, pregnant women
or motion-sick whimps. The climb "up the
mountain" is interesting but nothing pre-
pares you for this extraterrestrial, extra-co-
lossal, sensory overload.
In pitch-black darkness you hurl into
space as stars whirl about. The warp-
speed ride takes you down down like a
roller coaster but much more like a
space capsule on re-entry of earth's atmo-
sphere. Fast. Twirling. Blackness. Drop-
ping. Climbing. Off the edge into terror.
This ultimately makes the pricey en-
try to the Magic Kingdom worthwhile.
Done in and done for the day, we


The Back to the Future Car was the object of at least a half-a-roll offilm for
every 11-year-old male at Universal. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood.


head for sustenance. If you can find a way
to avoid eating anywhere in Disney, do it.
Back to the hotel and the whirlpool
for a soaking.
Credit now where credit is due. Our
path to glory and our path of least re-
sistance through this theme park excur-
sion was thanks to our 11-year-old
companion. His plan: Do what's worth-
while, and worth the wait. With this in
mind, we were prepared for ...

Day two. Attack Kong.
You won't know it when you get to
Universal Studios, but the very best part
of your Kongfrontation is the valet park-
ing. $11 and the best money you'll
spend in Orange County.
We avoided 45 minutes of line-
waiting via our "Welcome to Universal"
doorman.
On to New York City. The
Guggenheim, the Empire State Building,
the New York City Public Library and
Macy's!
The only disappointment in the faux


painted skyscrapers and realistic street
scape the bars and shops are not open.
Macy's is not real. No shopping except in
souvenir stores.
Kong. Big, screaming loud, real
sparks and fire. Now you see him and now
you don't. This "L-ride" over a typically
scuzzy New York street scene at night is
over fast.
On to Earthquake. Footage from the
making of the movie and actual scenes ex-
plained how the earthquake was re-created.
Adult stuff mostly.
In the subway car, we entered the sta-
tion as the earthquake reached a maxi-
mum on the attraction Richter scale.
Benches tumbled, a gasoline tanker
crashed and slid within inches of us. The
fire was real. Real hot! Water gushed
through the subway and up to the door of
our BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit). It
was an exciting moment and just as
quickly everything started to recede back
into place.
Next stop Jaws. But the line was too
long and we weren't all that anxious to


experience the threat of terror that lurks
offshore at home.
We wanted a ride that was "worth the
wait."
Back to the Future.
This ride puts you in the driver's seat,
crashing through the universe, through the
time-space continuum.
This ride is only for the brave, the thin
and the reckless. There are more warnings
here than on a nuclear warhead.
You cannot (not should not) ride if...
you are pregnant or possibly pregnant,
claustrophobic, prone to dizziness, fainting
or motion sickness, have heart problems or
... if your body shape is "too large."
You enter a mock-Delorean with
seven other healthy time travelers. The
lights come down. A fog of dry ice covers
you. You are thrust into a bigger-than-life
scene from the movie. It envelops you as
the car careens over, around and through
the town, exploding through the city hall
tower clock.
The sensation of speed overcomes
you. You drop into a black hole down
into a cavern, spinning out of control. You
encounter T-Rex down the gullet and
back out again with teeth chomping.
The car never leaves the garage but
your mind takes leave of your body.
The warnings were real. Keep your'
grandmother away from this ride!
With that done, we headed to Mel's
Diner for a real diner cheeseburger replete
with circa 1950s hot rods, low-riders and
"greaser" singers. Cool.
Out of the park, under a two-minute
wait for the valet to retrieve our rental car
and we're headed for the Grand Prix race
track to try our skills behind the wheel of
50 mph go-carts.
Had enough excitement? Click your
heels and head back home to the beach.
Reality on planet Anna Maria never
felt so good.
We vow never to return to Pluto.


EASTER SUNDAY

April 16


will be featuring...
from 12 Noon til...

Roast Stuffed Leg of Lamb ............................... 850


includes vegetable, roasted new potatoes & salad.


Baked Country Ham with Fresh Pineapple SauceS6.95
includes vegetable, choice of rice or potato & salad

Roast Chicken..................................................... 795
includes vegetable, choice of rice or potato & salad

Creme of Asparagus Soup ................................ 2.25







Daily breakfast, J a wonderful selection of
lunch and homemade soups and
dinner specials. delicious deLsserts.


(


0




O
0

'R



0.jG
0


900 GULF DRIVE BRADENTON BEACH 778-1919
OPEN 7 AM-9:30 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK


Jus-t;
visiting
paradise?


Subscribe nowto the
beet news on the Island.
Subecrlpt.on form, page
7. Don't mlse a week of
Anna Maria Island newel

U -Ei3G
1.75 TR $0.9
.0 LT~R59


CRYSTAL PALACE POPOV VODKA BARTON'S VODKA
VODKA '1" 11.99 ,1 s9.69
1.75 $ 8 LTR
LTRA 985 2-FOR-$23.00 LTR. $6.99 2-FOR-$19.00

FLEISCHMANN'S LTD CANADIAN RESERVE RICH & RARE or CANADIANMIST
CANADIAN CANADIAN '12.39 CANADIAN WHISKEY
WHISKEY 1299 WHISKEY MIR 5.00 $13.99
1.75 LTR I$ 1.75 LTR NET'7.39 1.75 LTR

ANCIENT AGE JIM BEAM OLD CROW orHEAVEN HIL
BOURBON $13.99 BOURBON 15.99 BOURBON
1.75 LTR 2-FOR-$27.00 1.75 LTR NET *12.99 1.75 LTR I$2.
PHILADELPHIA IMPERIAL SEAGRAM'S 7-CROWN
BLENDED LTR7.99 LENED BLENDED WHISKEY
WHISKEY LTR. 57.99 BLENDED $12.99 1.75 LTR LTR.
WHISKEY 75 WHISKEY MIR4.00 A15 .49 '11.69
1.75SLTRa 11.75 1.75 LTR NET '8.99 5.49 11.69

INVERHOUSE MUIRHEAD SCOTCH LAUDER'S SCOTCH
SCOTCH *14.59 175 LTR 1388 .99
MIR *3.00 $1.- 3.-88 007 MIR 4.9OO
1.75 LTR NET 11.59 2-FOR-$27.00 1.75 LTR NET $8.99


DUGAN'S DEW
SCOTCH
86-PROOF $16.88
1.75 LTR $ .


GORDON'S VODKA 2.
'12.99
MIR '2.00
1.75 LTR NET '10.99
SCHENELEY OFC
CANADIAN WHISKEY
1.75 LTR '14.99
MIR '3.00
NET'11.99


DEWAR'S
WHITE LABLE
SCOTCH 2795
1.75 LTR


RON CARLOS RUM
LIGHT OR DARK
LTR.
1.75 LTR$11.95 ,6.99
MR r.fr,0Bm 61N.


CLAN MACGREGOR
SCOTCH 1.76 LTR $15.88
LTR. 8.99


KAHLUA
COFFEE '14.39
LIQUEUR MIR '4.00
750 ML NET 10.39
JOSE QUERVO
TEQUILA GOLD
75 11.99
UL g g


DRFTI PCKG
Th eae in icut iurfo 9Y


mmmmmmlm


; I


-~-~~~~~~ -~~~~~-


'RYTA PAAC






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER -4 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 23 IU]


Green eggs and ham
Easter can easily remind one of the Dr. Seuss book
Green Eggs and Ham, if you're focused on Easter din-
ner.
Leg of lamb is the main focus at many Easter din-
ners and ours is no exception.
This recipe has been passed along to many friendly
carnivores over the past 10 years. This version of Julia
Child's original from her "The Art of French Cooking,
volume 1, has become a classic.
It's perfect for Florida it's grilled. Potato salad
and cold asparagus spears are perfect accompaniments.
Never mind heating up the kitchen although potatoes
au gratin with fresh chopped rosemary was one of the
most delicious dishes I've ever enjoyed with the lamb.


First tip: Ask the butcher to de-bone and
butterfly the leg of lamb for you and be -
sure to confirm removal of a gland that
makes the lamb taste too "gamy" if left ,
in. .-. --
Tip 2: Get fresh rosemary. Drive to '
town if you have to, or buy a plant. It's
that important.
Next step: Prepare the marinade/
basting sauce.

1/2 cup Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 minced clove of garlic
1 teaspoon rosemary
1/4 teaspoon ginger
2 tablespoons olive oil

Blend all but the oil. Add the oil and whip or beat
until you achieve a mayonnaise-like texture.
Place the lamb in a roasting pan and pour half the
marinade over the fat side and sprinkle with garlic salt.
Turn and repeat. Marinate at room temperature at least
one hour.
Transfer the lamb from the roasting pan to a cook-
ing sheet and paint the fat side with basting sauce, turn
and repeat.
Grilling! Prepare coals as if you were preparing
thick, juicy steaks. When the coals are ready, place
lamb fat side down and cook about 15 minutes or
until the fire gets too hot. No big flames. Turn
lamb over for another 15-20 minutes. Turn it back
to the fat side, cooking for a few additional min-
utes.
Repeat until done to your liking but keep
in mind, it's best on the medium rare side.
Guests who want something a little more
done should opt for 20 seconds in the micro-
wave rather than overcooking the entire leg.
To test for doneness, cut into the thickest part
before removing from the grill. Let stand for eight
minutes before carving into thin slices.
Tip 3: Double the recipe for the marinade/basting
sauce because it's great as a sauce with the lamb.
As Julia Child's would put it ... "Bon appetite "


Wine fest for Bistro
The fifth annual Florida Winefest & Auction takes
place at the Resort at Longboat Key Club April 20 to
23.
It is a premier gathering for buyers, sellers, collec-
tors and connoisseurs from around the country.
One highlight is an all-day auction on Saturday
featuring rare, donated wines.
Another highlight will be the addition of Anna
Maria's Beach Bistro at the Friday afternoon Showcase
Luncheon and Seminar. In all, 25 restaurants and 40
vintners will participate under a huge tent at the resort.
This event runs from 10:30 am. to 3 p.m. and the cost
is $40.
Owner winemaker Bob Cooley from Landmark
Vineyard in California will pair up his oak bar-
rel fermented chardonnay and wine ex-
Oe % pertise with Bistro owner Sean
Murhpy on "food and wine pairings."
Murphy said he'll prepare and
serve salmon grilled with maple
S syrup and rosemary; sauteed red
snapper dijonnaise; and his signa-
B ture dish, salmon Benjamin a
seared salmon wrapped in thin-
sliced potato parchment, topped with
Sdiced leek and garnished with lemon
dill butter.
."-* Proceeds from Winefest benefit 14
Sarasota children's charities but with the in-
volvement of Beach Bistro in the events we hope the
scope of donations will widen to include youth pro-
grams at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.


SEjOO1) RESTAURANT
YOUR FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Casual Dining Great Appetizers Great Entrees
Seafood Steaks Burgers Oysters & More!

EASTER SUNDAY BRUNCH & DINNER BUFFETS
10am-8pm Sunday April 16
Adults $11.95
Children 12 & Under $5.95
Includes: All You Can Eat Breakfast Items e Eggs Florentine *
Carved Ham Roast "Tom" Turkey Roast Pork
Plus More!
Ask About Our Lamb Special
Regular A La Carte Menu Available 12 noon 10pm

EASTER DRINK $1.

SPECIAL 1 w
Absolut Bloody Marys & Mimosas


1 Children Easter Egg Hunt
2pm Eggs & Prizes for
S All participating children age 12 & under

5325 Marina Drive (formerly Pete Reynards) Holmes Beach
Open For Dinner 11 am-O1pm Fri & Sat 11 am-11 pm
Lounge Open 11:00-?
778-9566


Sunday April 16 11:30AM to 10:00

Roast Leg of Lamb Served with rosemary
and Dijon mustard sauce................................. 14.25

Grilled Salmon With sun dried tomato and
saffron hollandaise. ........................... ........ 15.75

Seafood Newburg Shrimp, Bay Scallops and
Grouper in a rich sherry cream sauce, served
layered with puff pastry. ................................. ..... 14 .25

Prime Rib 10 oz. Slow roasted and served with roasted
garlic and mushroom Au Jus ......................... $15.75







Dinner menu And Specials Served All Day
Please Call For Preferred Seating
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broad way Street
Channel Marker 39
383-2391


III IIL


r I r


- --- -- --- - ----






- IB PAGE 24 0 APRIL 13, 1995 T THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Reasons to celebrate at Island libraries


Just in time for National Library Week, April 9-15,
Tmgley Memorial Library is the recipient of audio/video
donations that add to the efficiency and enticement of
Bradenton Beach's sun-filled, educational establishment
Tingley Board Chairman John Sandberg of
Bradenton Beach reports that a brand new television
and VCR have been donated by long-time library sup-
porter Gertrude H. Oderwald of Bradenton.
"We are so grateful," says Sandberg. "This is just
one more reason that Tingley has become the best place
to hang out in our little city."
As if the new equipment available to all library
members under supervision of library volunteers isn't
enough cause for celebration, there is also Paragon Cable's
community-outreach donation: free installation, wiring
and monthly service to Tlngley Memorial.
As an educational partner in its viewing commu-
nity, Paragon offers a similar arrangement to all pub-
lic and private schools and public libraries. The Island
Branch Library is connected for free, and Tingley is the
newest cable neighbor.

Computers, puzzles and smiles
Tingley is privately funded, but its doors are open
to the public. Sandberg says there are more than 750
members this first year in operation. A member's card
costs a minimal $1 per year.
Some 40 smiling, happy-to-help volunteers assist
Librarian Carol Sandidge with the Tuesday through
Saturday operations at Tingley. The library houses
more than 4,000 volumes, with room for plenty more
to come.
In addition to the jigsaw puzzles that are always set
up for fun, Tingley offers access to two Macintosh
computers, one for adults and one in the children's
room, plus a color printer.
The children's computer is identical to the systems
at Anna Maria Elementary School and Tingley also
houses a number of CD ROM programs, including
maps and an encyclopedia.
All this for a dollar a year? "You just can't beat it!"
says Sandberg.


Showing off the newest donations to Tingley Memorial Library are, from left, volunteers Betty McGregor and
Nancy Lorimer, Board Chairman John Sandberg, and Michael F. Mrazik, Paragon Cable's Commercial
Development Engineering Coordinator.


ftI


Island Branch Library's Mary Kay Clune, left, gets
ready for artist Laura Beard's kite-making class for
grades 2 through 5 this Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. as
the branch's celebration of National Library Week.
For registration, call 778-6341. Islander Photos:
Cynthia Finn.


Nicki's


eBaked Ham
oLeg of LamI
D Roast Duck
e 12 oz Prime


West 59th


COME JOIN US!
EASTER SUNDAY
For Our All-Day


Dinner Specials
served from 11:00 am thru 8:00 pm
$8.95 eBroiled Black Grouper $13.95
b $9.50 0 Stuffed Flounder $10.95
$12.95 e Stuffed Shrimp $12.95
Rib $12.95 e Greek Feast $12.95


ONY Strip $14.95 eFilet Mignon
SBaked Chicken with Stuffing $8.95
All Entries served with your choice of Soup or Salad
and your choice of Potato or Rice.
Apple Cobbler will be served for Dessert.


$15.95


Now Apprearing in the Lounge
Rich Kendall Apr. 12-15 7pm-11pm


204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-6969


"Attend Easter Sunrise Service," then...

CAFE ON THE BEACH

SHome of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
i J -l(includes Sausage)
., $350

Served Daily (Waffles too!)
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


Cafe Robar



EASTER SUNDAY SPECIALS
Sunday April 16 4pm-10pm

ROAST TURKEY with
PECAN STUFFING
Served with Mashed Potatoes & Giblet Gravy ... $8.95
ROAST LEG of LAMB

PRIME RIB AU JUS
served with Baked Potato ............................ 10.95

Regular A La Carte menu also available.
Reservations Requested Not Required


I RESTAURANT I


- -


795-7065


* 1830 59th St W. In Blake Park Bradenton


I


? -

AIMf





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 25 II


... while library demos
drew steady flow
Scores of residents and visitors took part in eight
hands-on arts and crafts demonstrations organized
by Library Assistant Marian Humphrey at the Island
Branch Library last week. At right, Bradenton
Beach Vice Mayor Dick Suhre shared his passion for
model boat building. He restored this three-masted
beauty from the old Trader Jack's restaurant for Key
West Willy's eatery. Suhre's available to restore the
ship in your attic by calling 778-3030.


Irene Murphy taught the art of making paper
beads. Concentrating, from left, are Wyndham
Riter, Murphy, Kristen Little, Judy Rieke, Rita
Wencel and Anthony Skowronek. Islander Photos:
Cynthia Finn.


10519 Cortez Road!
792-5300 "
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH
PIZZA BUFFET

$3.99 0
DINNER
PIZZA BUFFET 0

$449



Evey. .1khtSpecials

aon at...

/ JCol/ecfonof eto
Shel/ffish ~4 Sefood'Dishes
S BieFish Dish ...................................... 7.95
Alaskan whitefish, fileted and fried then topped
with fresh tomatoes and onions, sauteed in alight
sauce of California white wine, olive oil & garlic.
Smoked Salmon Pasta.......................... 9.95
Thlinly sliced, smoked Salmon sauteed with
linguini in a cream sauce with a hint of garlic.
Crawfish Jamalaa ......................... 7.95
A Bayou blend of Cajun spices, sweet sausages
and vegetable with Crawfish, simmered for
hours and served over seasoned rice.
Blackened Crawfish Pasts ............... 8.95
'^l ii,,/ Crawfish blackened with a blend of Cajun
[ 0 peppers and sauteed with linguini in SHELLS'
[L '- ,I pasta cream sauce.
__'l Godfathers
Pasta with Scallops............................. 9.45
Sweet, tender scallops, sauteed in a blend of
olive oil, California white wine. linguini with
fresh vegetables & onions.





The Freshest Seafood at Dockside Prices!
*Tam7npa &u'ibune and Sararo/ollera/d-Y'ibutne Reader's Choice
HOLMES BEACH 3200 East Bay Dr. 778-5997
Happy Hour Daily 4 to 7 PM
Hours: Sun Thurs 4 to 10 Fri & Sat 4 to 11


RESTAURANT
& LOUNGE




40"

OR TRY THESE SPECIALS
1/2 lb. Top Sirloin ......................................... $7.95
2 Dbl. Thick Pork Chops .................................. $7.95
Surf & Turf (1/2 lb. Top Sirlion & 4 Shrimp).... $10.95
2 lbs. BBQ Pork Ribs ......................................... $7.95
Grouper (Your way) ................................................. $9.95
12 Fried Shrimp .................................... $8.95
Sliced Sirloin of Beef ......................................... $6.95
Come Early 3-00- 5:30 PM and They're $1.00 Less!
Early Birds from $5.95

The Island's Largest
SURF & TURF BUFFET
You Wanted More Seafood ... You Got It at the Anchorage
Our Surf-N-Turf Buffet features Oysters Rockefeller Grouper (Baked & Fried)
Salmon Tuna Shrimp Scampi Fried Shrimp Scallops Mussels Carved
Beef Roast Pork Chicken Salads Desserts...
andMudcMuch Mor Nghtly
Early Bird Buffet before 5:30 1095 95
Nightly from 3PM, Sunday from 2PM





Make Your Easter Reservation Now.
Lunch Buffet and Full Lunch Menu
MONDAY thru SATURDAY 11:30 AM to 3 PM
SUNDAY BRUNCH BUFFET $795
10 AM 2 PM
Over 30 Breakfast and Dinner Itemr PLUS... $100
Mimosa Bloody Mary Screwdriver Seabreeze




HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 5:30 pm
$1.25 House Cocktails, Martinis & Manhattans
101 BAY BLVD. B OYSTER BAR ON
ANNA MARIA ANNA MARIA PIER
778-9611 778-0475


HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER

~~-


Serving begins from 2 PM
ROAST LAMB with Mint Sauce
BAKED HAM with Pineapple
TURKEY with Sage & Onion Dressing
All with choice of potato, vegetable, soup or salad.

We now serve Cocktails
Lunch Served Friday, Saturday
and Sunday Noon 'til 4
Breakfast Sat & Sun 8 am 'til 1
Dinner Served Nightly
Live Entertainment
Friday & Saturday starting at 7 PM
JIM McCARTY
Authentic British Atmosphere with
Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap

BRITISH PUB J Monday-Friday
& S Noon to 10 pm
SSat, Sun. 8 am to 10pm
RESTAURANT Breakfast 8 till
-PubHours 'til ?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173







i-E PAGE 26 0 APRIL 13, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A
Fundraisers
The American Cancer Society is "Swinging into
Spring"with its 1995 Big Book of Golf Discounts. It
offers discounts at 12 golf courses throughout Mana-
tee and Sarasota Counties and more than 340 in
Florida. Cost: $25 donation or by three get one for free.
To order: 753-6471 or 1-800-ACS-2345 (outside
Manatee County).

Clubs
The Federation of Manatee County Community
Associations will meet Thursday, April 20, at 6:45 p.m.
at Central Library, 1391 Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton.
Members of any community association are welcome.
The Bradenton Branch of the American Associa-
tion of University Women will hold its April meeting
at the Elks Club, 2511 75th St., Bradenton, on Tuesday,
April 18, at 6 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Mona Jain. Cost: $15
for dinner. Reservations: 792-8371.

Volunteers
The American Cancer Society needs drivers to
help drive cancer patients to treatment centers and
home again. Information: 753-6471. The society also
needs cans of Ensure for their cancer patients. Ensure
may be dropped of at the society office, 4806 26th St.
W., Bradenton, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
Volunteers Services of America needs a variety
of volunteers to help with children and adult programs
and especially to work on April 22, Earth Day, by
manning activity booths, reading to children, break
down, trash pick-up, etc. Call 746-1034.

Religion
The Seder Service for the first night of Passover will
be conducted at Temple Beth Israel on Friday, April 14,
at 5:15 p.m. The Passover Festival morning service will
take place on Saturday, April 15, at 10 a.m. The temple
is located at 567 Bay Isles Rd., Longboat Key.



THE



RESTAURANT

Come Enjoy Easter With Us!
Sunday Brunch 11 am 3 pm
SDinner from 4 pm
Prices from

$8.95 $14.95
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543








olFor a A














N trgt edfp
COUPON


Events
The fifth annual Florida Winefest & Auction will
take place Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 20- 23,
at The Resort at Longboat Key Club. Ticket prices for
individual 1995 Winefest events range from $10 to
$150. Information: 952-1109.
Each Saturday in April a theatrical program for
children, "A Barnyard of Stars," will be offered at
10:30 a.m. at the Bishop Planetarium, 201 10th St. W.,
Bradenton. After the show, the Florida Museum pro-
gram "Cracker Life" will enlighten the children on
barnyards in early Florida. Information: 746-4131.
"Spring Celebration" will be observed on Easter
Sunday, April 16, at Selby Gardens, 811 S. Palm Ave.,
Sarasota. The day includes a fun-fill program of fam-
ily activities and entertainment. Information: 366-5731.

Business
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce is spon-
soring "Issues and Eggs" on Wednesday, April 19, at
Cedars Cafe, 545 Cedars Court, Longboat Key, and will
hold its April "Business After Hours" from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Holiday Inn-Longboat Key, 4949 Gulf of
Mexico Dr. Reservations and information: 383-2466.


ITHE.ATERI


Female stand-up comic
at Van Wezel
Paula Poundstone, one of today's top female stand-
up comics, will perform at the Van Wezel Performing
Arts Hall on Thursday, April 20, at 8 p.m.
The Van Wezel is located at 777 N. Tamiami Trail,
Sarasota. For ticket information call the box office at
953-3368.

Manatee Players announces
1995-96 season
The Manatee Players, Riverfront Theatre,
Bradenton, has announced its slate of shows for its
1995-96 season.


GULF SHRIMP SALADS
MED. 7.49/~b. SANDWICHES
LG. 8.49/lb. ONIONS COLDCUTS
"YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET" Satiaction uauanteed!
5016 MANATEE AVE. W. (CORNER OF 51ST & MANATEE 749-1785


1:11Y SCK INN
CALL FOR
NIGHTLY
DRINK SPECIALS
778-7034
***
JAMES CODY
BAND
APR. 13-15
000
Mon & Tues
APRIL 17 & 18
SALTWATER
COWBOYS
SAT. & SUN.
$1.00 BLOODY MARYS
7 AM 12 NOON

SUNDAY NITE
8-10PM
$1.00 VODKA DRINKS
&
10PM Close
Draft Specials


ROD ,R-EL
.pi pie
NEW MENUS!
"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
OPEN DAILY. *
"DOWNSTAIRS"
Coffee Shop
Open Daily *
7:30 am to Closing
Full Breakfast *
Lunch & Dinner
Beer & Wine
Car Parking
PLUS
50 Bike Racks!


ISLANDER


"The Best News"


The season will begin with two prelude offerings
"Murder at Cafe Noir" by David Landau, July 21 to 30,
and "Season Opening Night Dinner," Sept. 7.
The Players regular season will include:
"The Mikado," by W.S. Gilbert, Sept. 7 24.
"Lettice and Lovage," by Peter Shaffer, Oct. 26
-Nov. 12.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream," by William
Shakespeare, Nov. 30 Dec. 17.
"Song of Singapore," by Allan Katz, Erik
Frandsen, Michael Garin, Robert Hipkens, Paula
Lockheart, Jan. 25 Feb. 11, 1996.
"The Caine Mutiny Court-martial," adapted by
Herman Wouk from his novel, March 7 24.
"The Will Rogers Follies, A Life in Review,"
book by Peter Stone, May 2 19.
Season tickets are on sale now and can be pur-
chased by call the Players' box office at 748-5875, 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Musical open at
Sarasota Players April 20
The Stephen Sondheim musical, "Company"
opens on Thursday, April 20, at The Players of
Sarasota, 838 N. Tamiami Trail.
The show will run through Saturday, April 29. All
seats are reserved and tickets are $14.
Call The Players box office at 365-2949 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday or on Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for ticket information.


MCC students showcase year's
best art work
The Annual Art Student Exhibition will open Mon-
day, April 17, with a reception from noon to 2 p.m. in
the Manatee Community College Fine Art Gallery, Art
Building 2000, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton.
Refreshments will be served at the free reception.
The exhibit will continue through April 28, and can
be viewed between 9 am. to 4 p.m. Monday Friday.


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
Have A Happy Easter
OPEiN FO1
LUNCH
AND
WINNER
7 DAYS
A I V 1.,KE? I (

901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953
m


ROD AReC-EL

NEW MENUS!

1/2 mile
* North of City Pier *
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "m
ISLAND
COOKING
Daily Specials *
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA
































Dinos we saw and more
Adam Bouziane, left, a second-grade student in
Michele Gabriele's class at our Island school, with
classmates Kelsea Bachman and Doug Swanson
show off their three-dimensional dinosaur projects.
The class's study of dinosaurs included a written
report, typed on the computer, the compiling of a
book and a 3-D project. Adam's favorite dinosaur is
the Pterosaurs, Kelsea worked with the oviraptors
and Doug found the egg-eating Struthiomimus
interesting.


1 cent tax at work
The Bradenton assembly crew from
Spectrum Inc. out of Chippewa Falls,
Wis., work to assemble $20,000 of
computer furniture for our Island
School. The. equipment includes desks
and printer modulars designed just for
schools and computer stations. A total
of $35,000 worth offurniture will be
installed at Anna Maria. The money to
pay for the furniture is part of the
additional 1-cent sales tax passed by
voters last year.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 N PAGE 27 I-D


Anna Maria

Elementary menu
Monday, 4/17/95
Breakfast: Cereal or Bagel
Lunch: Fish or Pizza
Tuesday, 4/18/95
Breakfast: Eggs or Cereal
Lunch: Taco or Pizza
Wednesday, 4/19/95
Breakfast: Waffles or Cereal
Lunch: Baked Chicken or Burrito
Thursday, 4/20/95
Breakfast: Cereal or Pancakes
S Lunch: Junior Sub or Hamburger on Bun
Friday, 4/21/95
Breakfast: Peanut Butter or Cereal
Lunch: Pizza or Hot Dog
All meals served with milk.
SAll lunches include a choice of vegetable and fruit.








Joy Courtney


YWi. W street

Come See The Difference

NOW SERVING IMPORTED & DOMESTIC BEER & WINE!


u G

$II.
BI B OS
COMBO


L


BDJ


COMBO'S INCLUDE: MED. FRIES & DRINK


Don't Forget Our All You $
Can Eat Pizza Buffet 399


BUFFET INCLUDES: PIZZA PASTA SOUP SALAD DESSERT PIZZA
5630 Cortez Rd. W. 795-8787 Fax 795-8785
(Located In Cortez Commons Shopping Center)
Hours: Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm* Frl & Sat 11am-10 pm


"Intimate...an evening of
relaxation and Fine Dining."
...Longboat Observer J ,


'4%,

Li


' V Entrkes Starting
at $9.95, Including a
wide selection of
Fresh Area Seafood,
Black AngusgSteaks
& Exotic Grains
& Pastas.
Dinner Tues. Sat. 5-10pm
Early Dinner Hour 5-6pm
Champagne Sunday Brunch
10am 2pm Sundays
... on the corner of
Manatee avenue & Qulf Drive.
) (813) 778-5440


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
11
CONNIE & DAVE
Wednesday eApril 12 10 pm

LIFEGUARD
Thurs, Fri & Sat April 13 15 10 pm
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085

_ ,R^TO LIVE MUSIC
- / '^ Reggae Every Wed
S9:30 PM "Democracy"
SFri & Sat "Stryker"
SEvery Sun "No Exit Band"
TERRY HELM & STEVE VANDERGRIFF
FORMERLY OF BLINDSIDE 7 PM
Happy Hour 4-8 Tues-Sun
We've got the Nightlife & Great Food too!
5702 Marina Dr Holmes Beach 778-5075










RESTAURANT
FAMOUS AUTHEIYTIC GERMAN CUISINE
@ HAPPY EASTER
EASTER DINNER
Roulade with
Red Cabbage & Spatzle

$11.90
serving from 11:30 am ?
Located in the Anna Maria Shopping Center
(We're right next to Walgreens)
3246 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island
778-1320


L


BIG.$36

C : CHICKEN







rmj PAGE 28 0 APRIL 13, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ANNA MARIA WOMAN'S CLUB GOES


FOR STYLE
The Woman's Club of
Anna Maria Island's April
meeting included the
annual luncheon fashion
show at the Bradenton
Yacht Club. Ninety
members were dazzled by
the wearable fashions of
joAnn of St. Petersburg,
with Bob LoPiccolo
adding piano accompani-
ment. Models were, from
left, Nina Compton,
Margaret Art, Delores
Lopac, Jean Stanley,
Marian VanWinkle,
Maggie Wilkinson and
Inez Hansen.


Among those enjoy-
ing the afternoon
were, left to right,
Petey Pratt, Julia
Dirocco, Katy Dunn,
Loretta Galvin and
Arylis Miller.
Islander Photos:
Cynthia Finn.


Poetry night at guild
Coffee and poetry will be offered Thursday, April
20, at 7 p.m. at the Artists Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina
Dr., Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.
Favorite poems and original works will be pre-
sented by local artists and residents poets. An "open
mike" will be available for aspiring poets.
Poets should register before 7 p.m. the evening of
the event or call Zoe at 778-7216.

Last craft show set
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island and the



POCO LOCO
MEXICAN CUISINE
AUTHENTIC ENTREES
HOUSE WINE SANGRIA
SMEXICAN BEERS
387-0161
Open Mon-Sat 11-9
TRY OUR OUTSIDE DECK Sunday 11-3



Where Longboat Key History Began
OOR II



S 'ONE CRAB

RESTAURANT

e FRESH

Stone Crabs
Purveyors of Quality Stone Crabs
Since 1924. Fresh Daily.
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY


Anna Maria Island Art League, will sponsor their last
joint craft sale on Saturday, April 15, from 10 am. to
2 p.m. between the guild's location in the Island Shop-
ping Center and the league's location at 5312 Holmes
Blvd., both in Holmes Beach.
Easter items and unique gifts will be available.
There will also be a bake sale and hot dogs and drinks
available for purchase.

Watercolor classes begin April 8
Jackie Clark will offer watercolor classes at the
Artists Guild Gallery, Holmes Beach, on Tuesday
mornings for a five- week session beginning Tuesday,
April 18. The cost is $50. Barbara Singer will continue
her on-going watercolor class each Wednesday morn-


Bridge Street Pier Cafe
Ea D O Home-Made Chowder & Chili
7 to1, Breakfast Only BREAKFAST (All Day)
w/Easter Specails
^ i 7 Lunch and Dinner
New Seafood Menu
S World Famous Hamburgers
Cafe Dining On Intracoastal Waterway
Open: Mon. Thurs. 8AM 9PM
Fri.- Sun. 7AM 10PM
S200 Bridge Street (at end of Bridge St. on pier)
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706
"Best Grouper Sandwich
On The Island!"


HAPPY HOUR
Mon-Sat 3-7 PM
All Day Sunday!
Plus on Sundays:
NASCAIl RACES

795-8083


TUESDAY'S
Restaurant Appeciation Night
Talisman "Trio"
Apr. 13-15 Thurs 8-12
Fri-Sat 9-1
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


By Master Chief J.D. Arndt
Chief of Station, U.S. Coast Guard, Cortez
March 30, Boarding. A pleasure craft was
boarded and issued a boating safety warning for
not having a pollution placard posted.
March 30, Boarding. A pleasure craft was
boarded and found to have no violations.
March 30, Boarding. A pleasure craft was
boarded and issued a boating safety violation for
not having a valid certificate of registration on
board and not having a serviceable fire extin-
guisher. The vessel's voyage was terminated due
to unsafe conditions due to the lack of a fire extin-
guisher and escorted back to port.
March 31, Search and rescue/assistance. Sta-
tion Cortez received a report of an overturned ves-
sel with one person in the water in Sarasota Bay.
The crew of the station's 21-foot vessel investi-
gated and found that the report was spurred by a
board sailor and there was no one in distress.
March 31, Search and rescue/assistance. Sta-
tion Cortez received a call from a citizen report-
ing a friend overdue from a boat trip from Key
Largo to Venice. An extensive communication
check for the vessel produced negative results.
The citizen called the station again to report that
the individuals were safe in port but had run out
of fuel and run aground, causing the late arrival.
April 1; Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 24-foot pleasure craft
disabled near marker 66 in Roberts Bay. The station
requested assistance of Coast Guard Auxiliary ves-
sel 26084231, which provided a tow to port.
April 4, Search and rescue /assistance. Station
Cortez received a report of a 21-foot pleasure craft
overdue from Gulf Harbor Marina. The station con-
ducted an extensive communications check with
negative results. The station launched its 41-foot boat
to investigate, with negative results. Continued com-
munications checks subsequently located the vessel
and crew at Fishermans Village, Punta Gorda.

ing in five-week sessions at a cost of $45. Information
call 778-6694.

Award-winning exhibit at league
Award-winning local artists will have their work on
exhibit at the Anna Maria Island Art League, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, during the month of April.
The work of Carrie Price, Suzanna Spann, Sydney
McKenna, Jay Cantabury, Linda Molto, Julie Stewart,
Hannah Price and Richard Thomas are included. The
league is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through
Thursday and from 9 am. to 1 on Fridays.


Have A Happy Easter
CLOSED EASTER SUNDAY
HRS.: MON.-SAT.
383-0689 6:30AM-2:30PM. SUN. 8AM-1PM
**:6836 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Whitney Beach Plaza


Social notes welcome! News about social events, clubs,
anniversaries and special gatherings are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander. Call 778-7978 to be in the news.

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key










Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


614p_


cv.\ B







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m APRIL 13, 1995 m PAGE 29 Fm


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
March 28, grand theft, 200 block of South Bay
Boulevard. No further information given.
April 1, burglary, 100 block of Gull. The complain-
ant reported that a person unknown entered the residence
and removed items from an antique wash stand.

Bradenton Beach
March 29, burglary to an automobile, Leffis Key.
The complainant reported that when she returned to
her vehicle the lock on the passenger side was pulled
out and a camera bag valued at $15, $300 in traveler's
checks, a video camera battery valued at $70, a check-
book and binoculars valued at $70 were removed.
March 31, theft of an American flag valued at
$40, 2500 block of Gulf Drive North.
April 2, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams,
possession of drug paraphernalia, Coquina Beach. The
officer was called to the location by a lifeguard who found
a purse. Upon the officer's arrival, the lifeguard had given
the purse to its owner but he told the officer he thought
he saw ajar of marijuana inside.
The officer approached Michelle Lee Combs, 19,
of Ruskin, and asked to search the purse. She con-
sented and the officer found ajar of marijuana inside.
The officer then asked William Timothy
McRoberts, 26, of Ruskin if he could search his ve-
hicle and he consented. The officer found a marijuana
cigarette, a bag containing marijuana and a pipe con-
taining marijuana residue inside the center console.
Both were placed in custody.
April 2, DUI, DWLS, Cortez Road and Gulf
Drive North. The officer was parked at the intersection
of Cortez Road and Gulf Drive North. His patrol ve-
hicle had its emergency lights on and he was directing
traffic away from Cortez Road because it was blocked
due to construction.
The officer observed David Andrew Wallace, 44,
of Cortez turn left onto Cortez Road into the lane that
was blocked. Wallace drove over the construction
cones and up onto the median to avoid hitting the
officer's patrol vehicle, said the report.
The officer administered field performance tests to
Wallace and placed him in custody. A check of his
driver's license showed it to be suspended. Wallace
was also cited for making an improper turn and hav-
ing an open container in his vehicle.
April 3, DUI, Cortez Bridge. While on a traffic
stop on the bridge the officer observed Martin F.
Hickey, 38, of Bradenton nearly collide with the rear
of the patrol vehicle. The officer administered field
sobriety tests to Hickey and placed him in custody.


ISTREETL


April 3, criminal mischief, 1200 block of Gulf Drive
South. The complainant reported that while in his rental
residence he heard a loud crash and observed a four-inch
hole in the window behind him. There was small steel ball
on the window track. Damage was $200.
April 3, petty theft, 110 Gulf Dr. S., Moose
Lodge. The complainant reported that he placed his
wallet in the back room while working and later he
noticed the wallet missing. The wallet was valued at
$30 and contained $35 in cash, credit cards and iden-
tification.
April 3, disorderly intoxication, 100 block of
Fourth Street South. The officer responded to the report
of a bicycle theft and found the complainant extremely
intoxicated and irrational. He said he was going to look
for the bicycle and the officer warned him not to go in
people's yards or he would be arrested.
The officer later found the complainant in
someone's yard with his bicycle. The complainant then
began riding up and down the street The officer told
him several times to go home but he refused and began
hollering and cursing. He was placed in custody.
April 4, grand theft of a bicycle valued at $600
and a trailer hitch valued at $100, 1100 block of Gulf
Drive South.
April 6, disorderly conduct, 110 Bridge Street,
Sonny Daze. The officer was dispatched to the business
to ask the subject to leave from in front of the business
where he was causing a disturbance. The subject left.
Later the subject returned, went inside the business
and was causing a disturbance. He refused to leave. The
officer observed him jumping around and yelling
loudly, escorted him outside and told him to leave.
Later while driving down Bridge Street, the officer
observed the subject inside the business again scream-
ing loudly. When he saw the officer, the subject ran.
The officer stopped him and placed him in custody.

Holmes Beach
April 1, burglary, 2800 block of Avenue E. The
officer responded to a report of a subject breaking win-
dows. The victim and two witnesses described the sub-
ject and the officer went to his home and placed him in
custody. The officer took him back to the scene where
he was identified by the witnesses.
April 2, burglary, 5318 Marina Dr., Peaches. The
complainant reported that she arrived at work and left the
rear door open. She said she placed her purse in the office
on a chair by the desk and went in front to wait on a cus-
tomer. When she returned, her purse was missing. The
purse was valued at $60 and contained $100 in cash.
April 2, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at $100
and a bait bucket and a rod and reel valued at $65.
April 2, found property a bicycle, 7400 block
of Gulf Drive.
April 2, petty larceny, 66th Street beach. The com-

Serving a -at
New Menu. 1P
Dinners ine fining In ienna
Starting at O @pen tPaily
$4.95. pinner 5pm to 10pm
[ine Selection
(Serman pines & Beer emnnan
Glomfortable Atmosphere Austrian
reservations Suggested K restaurant
9 813-778-6189 W
101 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach





HAPPY EASTER TO ALL
FOR YOUR BREAKFAST PLEASURE
12 Choices of Omelets
S 6 Choices of Pancakes
Belgian Waffles
Eggs Benedict
Egg Beater Specials

LARGE SELECTION OF PASTA DISHES
SEAFOOD & POULTRY SELECTIONS
HOMEMADE SOUPS & DESSERTS
THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI




Free Delivery OPEN 7 DAYS Take Out Available
Open 8am-lOpm Straight thru the Afternoon
8&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmee Beach


Three new

police

officers

join forces
Bradenton Beach's
newest officer is Stanley
Raymond House who
started with the depart-
ment several weeks ago.
House is a graduate of the
Police Academy at Mana-
tee VoTec. A June 24 wed-
ding is planned for House
and his fiancee, Rachel
Yow.
The Holmes Beach
Police Department wel-
comed two new officers,
Henry "Chip" Frappier
and Dave Giddens.
Frappier, a Manatee
County native, joined the
department after 10 years
with the Palmetto Police
Department. Frappier and
his wife, Beth, have a
son, Cory, 13.
Giddens is an 18-
year veteran of the Pal-
metto Police Department
where he was a sergeant
for seven years. He has
four children. He and his
wife live in Palmetto.


Frappier


Giddens


plainant reported that she fell asleep at the beach and when
she awoke she discovered her purse was missing. The
purse contained $20 in cash and identification.
April 4, suspicious person, 4000 Gulf Dr., Mana-
tee County Public Beach. The officer on patrol came
upon an intoxicated subject asleep in his vehicle with
the keys in the ignition and the radio playing. The of-
ficer awoke the subject who said he had a fight with his
girlfriend and drove to the beach. The officer contacted
the subject's father who responded to take him home.
April 4, burglary, 5300 block of Sunrise Lane.
The complainant reported that she returned home to
discover that a person unknown had entered the resi-
dence and removed $3,000 in jewelry.
April 5, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
White Avenue. The complainant reported he returned
to his truck and discovered $1,230 in tools missing.


DELIGHTFUL DINING
"...one tremendous place to eat"

GOURMET TAKE-OUT

to enjoy by candlelight in your own home"

STYLISH CATERING
"catering is a class act, dramatic
Presentation, faultless preparation"


5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. (Behind Circle K)


Chez undre
Open Easter Sunday April 16


Serving Easter Breakfast
8 AM 1:30 PM
Serving Easter Dinner
5:30 9 PM
Reservation Suggested
for Dinner
Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France c.UY C F ,."..
Tues thru Sat Thur, Fri & Sat
8AM-230PM 6-10PM
Sunday 8AM-1:30PM Sunday 5:30-9PM
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


House






ED PAGE 30 I APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Butterflies and bureaucrats


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Catching early services on the Ringling mansion
flats last Sunday morning, a buddy and I decided to do
a little exploring after it became clear the trout weren't
going to cooperate. So we motored into the old Crosley
estate boat basin in northeast Sarasota Bay, and found



Little League

baseball

schedule
Major League games
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Thursday, April 13, 7 p.m., Haley's Motel vs.
Kiwanis
Friday, April 14 None scheduled
Monday, April 17, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Dis-
trict vs. Westbay Athletic Club
Tuesday, April 18, 7 p.m., Kiwanis vs. D. Coy
Ducks
Wednesday, April 19, None scheduled end of
first half

Minor League games
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Thursday, April 13,4:45 p.m., Bali-Hai vs. Betsy
Hills
Friday, April 14, None scheduled
Monday, April 17,4:45 p.m., Jim Boast Dodge vs.
Tip of the Island
Tuesday, April 18, 4:45 p.m., Uncle Dan's Place
vs. Betsy Hills
Wednesday, April 19,4:45 p.m., Jim Boast Dodge
vs. Quality Builders
Wednesday, April 19, 7 p.m., Tip of the Island vs.
Uncle Dan's Place

Tee Ball games
Anna Maria Island Community Center
None scheduled Games resume April 22.
Check next week's issue of The Island Bystander
for times and teams.




CHRYSLER 4I Plymouth


AUTO SHOPPING
SERVICE Bunner Smith
Test drive your next car in hassle free comfort at
your home or office! Please call Islander BUNNER
SMITH at 748-6510 to schedule an appointment.
2700 First Street Bradenton, Florida 34208




Problem with


Insurance?

Cal 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center .-
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 ..*L....


an amazing sight.
Now owned by Manatee County, which can't seem
to figure out what to do with it, the Crosley estate was
home to thousands of Zebra butterflies that morning. A
favorite in my own back yard, Zebras love to fly along
the edges of light and shadow, patrolling a sector of
whatever size, and then returning along the same route.
A medium-sized butterfly, black with bright-yel-
low stripes, Zebras are among the longest-living of all
local butterflies, often breeding and laying eggs for six
months or more.
We'd obviously come upon a fresh hatch Sunday.

No place to run anymore
"There's no place to run, no alternatives anymore,"
is how Mark Taylor describes the upcoming ban on
inshore netting in Florida. As president of the Cortez
chapter of Organized Fishermen of Florida, Taylor
finds himself presiding over the end of his profession
and a way of life for himself and his members.
The way the politicians are playing around with the
proposed compensation bill for commercial fishers
doesn't help either. One week they're proposing to buy
back boats and nets, then it's only nets, and who knows
what they'll be proposing next week. Meanwhile, Tay-
lor says, he's looking at years of payments on a boat
that's essentially worthless come July 1.
"The nets and the boats go together," Taylor says,
referring to the latest Tallahassee idea of just buying
the fishers' nets and maybe offering then some "retrain-
ing" money. He'd like to see the state buy both boats
and nets and pay fishers a year of documented income.
"The smart thing for the legislators to do is also the
right thing for them to do," Taylor told me. "Our guys
aren't to tickled about anything right now, so you'd
think the government would take the opportunity to
buy up the gear."
"We're old Florida," Taylor said. "We represent
the old values and ways, and times are changing. This
country just seems to keep making the same mistakes
over and over again."
"Good fisheries management and co-existence is
how it should have gone, instead of coming to this."

Marine Fisheries Commission
under fire
It may be "the commercial fishermen's revenge,"


"Oldest Used Car Business In Manatee County"

TERRY BENSON
Island Resident for 30 yrs.
Personal Service
Call 751-3303
For All Your auto Needs
We Will Deliver To Your Home
5420 15th St. East Bradenton, FL 34203
Got a great catch? Don't forget to shoot it. (With a
camera!) And bring us a picture to publish.
The Islander Bystander loves fishing!


Island Marine Construction Inc.
In Conjuction With Welch & Clark Construction Inc.









SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE
Full Size Demo for Operational Viewing
Available 9am-4pm Mon.-Fri.
at Holmes Beach Marina
Holmes Beach (813) 778-5646
ttmt tn tin n ttttt~ tnl~lt nt m nn TIr'


as some accuse or it may more likely be just be an old-
fashioned Tallahassee power struggle, but the Marine
Fisheries Commission (MFC) is in danger of having its
entire staff striped away by legislators.
Now under the control of the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection (DEP), the MFC is a target for
takeover by the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion. The problem is that the MFC is charged with
implementing the recently approved inshore net ban
and according to the Florida Conservation Association,
this battle is "another assault by a handful of legislators
and commercial fishing lobbyists, this time under the
guise of cutting government spending."
Regardless of who's behind it and whatever their
motivations are, it's time to let our legislators know we
don't want the MFC "filleted and released" at the very
moment its responsibilities are heaviest.
I may not have voted for the constitutional amend-
ment, but a big majority did, and it's time their wishes
are respected and not toyed with by the politicians and
bureaucrats in Tallahassee. The commercial fishers I
know -the folks most affected by the ban-are trying
to put new lives together and move on with them now
that the deadline of July 1 is approaching.
The scheming politicians should do the same. Let
them hear from you.

Local knowledge beats dredging
It's pretty surprising how blase many local boaters
are about the prospect of New Pass losing its federal
dredging. One local captain, who uses the pass almost
daily on various size vessels, says he really doesn't care
whether they dredge it again or not.
"Three months later it's pretty much back to the
way it is now anyway," he says. "I can understand their
need for sand to renourish the beaches, but otherwise
it's just a futile spending of money.
"There's always five or six feet of water some-
where in that pass," says the bashful captain-who
admits it's politically incorrect not to care about dredg-
ing New Pass, and so doesn't want his name used. "It
just takes local knowledge to find it."
In a highly unscientific poll of other local boaters,
I've found that a lot of them really don't care if the
pass is ever dredged again or not. Like Big Pass, the
feeling seems to be, New Pass is always tricky, butit's
also always open.
See you next week.


DOUG HUGENBERG MARINE CONST., INC.
MARINE SPECIALTY CONTRACTOR MC00105
D/B/A
BRADENTON
SBOATLIFT & SUPPLY
SBUS. 792-5685 FAX: 795-4329 MOB: 742-0396


POB 7326 BRADENTON, FL 34210


U.S. AUTO SALES
Buy Here/Pay Here Rent To Own
SWe Finance Anyone Low Down Payments
We Buy Cars
"After you check the rest, buy from the best!"
MATT GENTILE ISLAND RESIDENT

755-6203
5415 Old 301 Blvd. Bradenton, FL 34203

Beach Fishing tor 1arpon in Boca
Grande May, June & July
Native Anna Maria Captain-J.D. WEB.BR("
778-3885 or 778-2075
ft l
T Ia iW fl











Anna Maria Little

League
By Scott Dell
AMICC Little League President
It was a week of upsets for the Anna Maria
Little League teams. Monday set the tone for the
week when AMFD defeated D. Coy Ducks 5-3.
AMFD's defense proved to be the difference,
leaving 11 Duck players stranded on the base
path, as well as good pitching by Greg Granstad
and Travis Wicklund.
On Tuesday night, Kiwanis picked up its first
win of the year, defeating Haley's 5-2. Bill Floto
pitched all six innings, only giving up five hits. He
got lots of help in the early innings on offense, with
players like Barry Andricks who had three RBIs in
the first three innings and scored a run to help the
Kiwanis victory.
Great job, everyone, and keep on having fun.

AMICC Little League
Standings ending April 6


Major League
D. Coy Ducks
Haley's Motel
AMFD
Kiwanis
W. Bay Athletic

Minor League
Tip of the Island
Quality Builders
Jim Boast Dodgers
Betsy Hills
Uncle Dans Place
Bali Hai


Team G
Ducks 6
WAC 5
Haleys 6
Kiwanis 5
Ducks 6'
WAC 5
Ducks 6


Name
M. Patterson
T. Bernard
J. Mousseau
B. Andricks
M. Armstrong
A. Pear
P. Copeland


W L
5 1
6 2
5 2
2 4
2 5
1 6


RBI Avg.
2 .438
5 .385
3 .375
6 .364
4 .353
3 .333
4 .316


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 31 liM

Snook best bet in the backwater;

kings still king offshore


By Capt Mike Heistand
Calm days, warm temperatures, good fishing... what
could be better! Offshore anglers are finding the kingfish
run excellent this year, while backwater fishers report
snook season coming into top form right about now. And
don't forget the pompano, flounder, trout, snapper and
grouper. Is this a great place to fish or what?
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching pompano, sheepshead, a few floun-
der, redfish, a lot of jacks and a couple of snook at
night.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said pier an-
glers have been having a good week catching pom-
pano, a few flounder, and sheepshead. J.D. Hapner
landed a good-sized snook Saturday from the pier.
Jamie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 100 head of Key West grunts, por-
gies and a few grouper. The six-hour trip averaged 50-
80 head of vermilion and mangrove snapper, Key West
grunts and a couple of grouper. The nine-hour trip av-
eraged 30-60 head of red and black grouper, mangrove
snapper and a few porgies.
Carl at Perico Island Bait & Tackle said wade


fishers are doing a good job catching snook and some
nice-sized trout on the flats near Perico Island. Boaters
are catching a slew of kingfish offshore, Carl added.
Capt. Phil Shields said he's been getting his char-
ters onto a lot of grouper and snapper.
Capt. Rick Gross has been putting his customers
onto good catches of snook, some more than 10 pounds
in size.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's been catching a
few keeper cobia, as well as some trippletail in the
backwaters. He's also been getting onto some nice reds
and snook.
On my boat Magic we've been spending some
time offshore, bringing back good catches of black
grouper and mangrove snapper.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's managed to get some
limit catches of snook, a few trout and some catch-and-
release reds.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said there are very
good kingfish reports offshore now. In the backwater,
snook hunting is reaching its peak, while sheepies are
starting to slack off.
Good luck and good fishing.


Happy fishers
with a huge
linesider
Bill Jacobs is all smiles
with this 39-inch snook
caught while fishing with
Capt. Tom Chaya.


I -... ,. -r .y












'.i - ,, .
.;
s~s~s^





flOGSEE~t^


SIN
CA


4Happy
Easter
from the
Island
Easter

Bunny!


It 's Hard To
CE 1982 Stop A Trane.
co %. 29


:j~z


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'
SVe oto JnBot


-Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'
ALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD Starting at 325.

--~~~z


Staring at
$6439.


DAY
Thu 4/13
Fri 4/14
Sot 4/15
Sun 4/16
Mon 4/17
Tue 4/18
Wed 4/19


S Five O'Clock Marine
5()5 "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" (
1 P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577
ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES a


AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
11:22 1.8ft 4:48 0.4ft 12:00 1.6ft 5:25 0.2ft
11:44 2.0ft 5:13 0.5ft - 6:07 -0.1ft
12:51 1.6ft 5:38 0.7ft 12:12 2.2ft 6:52-0.3 ft
1:46 1.4ft 6:00 0.8ft 12:41 2.3ft 7:41 -0.4ft
2:42 1.3ft 6:23 0.9ft 1:17 2.4ft 8:33 -0.4ff
3:50 1.2ft 6:44 1.0ft 1:56 2.5ft 9:32 -0.4ft
5:20 1.1ft 6:59 1.0ft 2:42 2.4ft 10:35-0.3ft
* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes laler lows 1:06 later


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (813) 778-2727


"SPICE" SAILING CHARTERS
$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
1/2 Day Cruise to Egmont Key
Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin


AIR CONDITIONING DUCT CLEANING
778-0773/383-9766
ANNA MARIA ISLAND LONGBOAT KEY


II ,ILIII I -


Dh-r~ar~CICTdP9~Br~~R- IC~a~--- -- __ L






IE PAGE 32 0 APRIL 13, 1995 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


F


II ER

i D Ri-


-

WHAT A VIEW!
I"


I E 1


H "





DESIRABLE ISLAND VILLAGE Spacious 2BR/2BA top
floor unit in prime Holmes Beach location. Open floor plan,
lovely views, large screened porch, walk-in closet, two
pools, tennis court, garage parking and short walk to great
beach. Priced at $119,500. Call Dave Moynihan.



Ir I EI WIs U .




OCEAN PARK TERRACE Enjoy the sunsets from you
own roof top patio when you buy this centrally located,
turn key furnished, 2BR/2BA condo with a Gulf view.
Includes pool, balconies, storage, secured building, el-
evator, great location and the great new walking beach.
Priced at $229,000. Call Ed Oliveira for details.








PINE BAY FOREST Outstanding 3BR/2BA end unit
with 1,650 sq. ft. Vaulted ceiling, interior atrium, fire-
place, covered parking, pool, tennis and only minutes to
the beach. Priced at $115,000. Call Dave Moynihan for
details.


BAY VIEWS and mouth
of canal frontage from
deep water lot in prime
Holmes Beach location.
Quiet residential area
within walking distance
to beach. Just reduced
to $147,500. Call
Dave Moynihan
for details.


BEACH PLAZA Affordable Island living with excellent
Gulf views in the 2BR/1BA unit in small complex, across
the street from wide walking beach. Good central loca-
tion, close to shopping and restaurants. Strong rental
opportunity. Priced at $77,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULF FRONT Ekceptional value for these 2BR direct
Gulf front apartments in small ten unit complex with
quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide sandy beach
and walking distance to shops and restaurants. Starting
at $124,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


DIRECT GULF FRONT unit in Anna Maria Islands finest
complex. Prime unit with tiled floors throughout, heated
pool, spa, elevator w/secured lobby, covered parking
and spectacular view. Offered at $229,500. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.








BRIDGEPORT Gulf view from this top floor unit with
pool, covered parking, elevator and steps to beach. Lo-
cated close to shopping and restaurants. Offered at
$89,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


ISLAND LIVING FOR $65,0001 Well-maintained
2BR-1BA condo across the street from walking
beach. Great private patio for lounging and cook-
outs. Close to shopping and restaurants. Call Pat
Thompson eves. 778-6439.


Just Moved
to our
S Island
.r,. Office
CALL ME!
Barbara
FTurner
REALTOR@
778-7777
or 778-4399


GULFSTREAM REALTY
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
1-800-894-9587


PLAYA ENCANTADA
Where miles of powder-white sand meet the sparkling
Gulf of Mexico. 2BR/2BA top floor condo View of Gulf
from balcony, elevator, on-site manager, parking garage,
heated pool & spa. PRICE REDUCED $174,900.
Call Helen White 778-6956 or
S Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
MLS NEAL & NEAL REALTORS778-2261 __.
MWNE


SFran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf brtve PO Box 717
Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


"Wishing You a

Happy and Blessed

Island Easter"
Broker. Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, siaon1, eaI H--
Mike Schulte, Darlene Masons, Stephanie Bell m -J .


GENE
AND


SGene Rossano ... New Associate hails from Boston, Massachusetts
and has lived in Salem, New Hampshire and Buffalo, New York. A resi-
dent of the Island, Gene is a master mason, member of the Ancient Ac-
cepted Scottish Rite, The Shrine and the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flo-
tilla 81. member of the Manatee county Board of Realtors and island Co-
Listing Service ... a boating enthusiast and professionally a REALTOR.
Gene, along with the entire SMITH TEAM, wants to serve you better
than anyone on the Island. If what you need has anything to do with selling, buying, renting or manag-
ing real estate, call Gene at 778-2615 evenings.
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-0777
Rentals 778-0770
REALTORS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK


This 2BR/1BA condo sits across from the Gulf.
Beautiful sunsets from the balcony. New carpet &
ceramic tile.
JUST REDUCED $73,900
CALL CHUCK WILEY at 792-1163
AFTER HOURS 795-2717 -. MLS LI


Now you can charge it!
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for subscription orders and classified
advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
Call 813-778-79783
FAX 778-9392 i


- I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 33 [IG


OL- |
c0 6^ |


CANAL FRONT HOME
Deep water canal in boating community. 2BR/2BA lo-
cated in quiet area of Holmes Beach. Walking distance
to beach and shopping.
PRICE REDUCED *179,900
Call Dick Maher 778-6791 or
0I Dave Jones 778-4891
MLS NEAL & NEAL REALTORS 778-2261 8__


epK RVMKt
-.- GULFSTREAM REALTY
5600 MARINA DR. STE 8
HOLMES BEACH
(813) 778-7777


CUSTOM BUILT HOME:
2BR/2BA, workshop/hobby area downstairs, clean
and bright only steps to beach. Reduced to $149,500.
CALL ROBERT ST. JEAN 813-778-6467


Come ride with me!

| m


we'll nd your place in paraalse.

REALTOR
When Buying or Selling,
Ed can make your
SS 5 Island Dream come true!
SINCE 1939


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


I --,-1-


KE CLARKE
AND


Clarke Williams has returned to Smith, Realtors. Clarke, an Is-
S.4, land resident is not only a professional in assisting you in buying and
selling residential, commercial and investment property, he is a spe-
cialist in the sale of real estate using the auction alternative method,
a member of Manatee County Board of Realtors and The Island Co-
Listing Service and professionally a REALTOR.
Clarke, along with the entire SMITH TEAM, wants to serve you bet-
ter than anyone on the Island. If what you need has anything to do with selling, buying, auctioning,
renting or managing real estate, call Clarke at 778-1718 evenings.
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
im (813) 778-0777
Rentals 778-0770
REALTORS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK


RICHARD FRuEMAN
REALTORF


PEDDLING FOR
WATERFRONT PROPERTY?
Then call the Real Estate
Professional willing to go the
"Extra Mile" for you!
S When you demand excellence
in Real Estate Service
BUYING OR SELLING
REACH RICHARD FOR RESULTS!!


S* IISLANDREALESTE78-0
6 1 r DeH e
-B I .1i X1--^l l


* -"


,2 :>I"


FHA ASSUMABLE DUPLEX Fully
rented, stable tenants. Walk to Gulf.
Plenty of storage. Great investment
property. $137,500. Call Dick Maher or
Dave Jones 778-6791 or 778-4891


PERICO BAY CLUB 3BR/2BA on
cul-de-sac. Ceramic tile in kitchen &
foyer. New carpeting. Pools, tennis &
security. $142,500. Call Rose Schnoerr
778-7780.


"''lltll~llh ,.l., ==' .. . "" '- .




RARE OPPORTUNITY 2BR/1.5BA
Gulf view unit. Turnkey furnished.
$115,900. Won't last at this price. Call
Bobye Chasey 778-1532.


PLAYA ENCANTADA 2Bed/2Bath
tennis-side unit with all amenities of Gulf-
side complex. heated pool & spa, club-
house, on-site Mgr., covered parking,
washer/dryer, storage. $129,900. Helen
White 778-2261 or 778-6956.


PERICO BAY CLUB MODEL 2BR/
2BA with mirrored wall. Second floor unit
overlooking lake. Turnkey furnished.
$99,900. MLS#62295. Call Harold Small
Ofc: 778-2261 or eves: 792-8628.
1i1


Janis
Van
Steenburgh
REALTOR@
778-2261
778-4796


Janis moved from Brandon, FL with
her family. Her husband Ed works
for the Post Office and they are re-
tired military. Janis has over 10 yrs.
experienced in real estate. Call her
for your Real Estate needs.
_._C - : ..., ._ ",--C ,=,S ,= .'_, -i----I--


hi
Is


VILLAGE GREEN 2BR/2BA split de- SHELL P
sign, move-in condition, screened porch complex ir
w/spa. Many extras. A must see! Price distance o
reduction to $114,900. Call Nick Patsios turnkey fun
778-4642. Dick Mahe


WESTBAY POINT &
SRllnnInmnll


'OINT CONDO Top quality
Secluded area, within walking
f shops & beach. 2Bed/2Bath
nished. $109,000. MLS#61970.
r or Dave Jones, 778-2261.


imuuninuw, o,

6500 Flotilla #203....$134,9001 .

6500 Flotilla #235....$129,900 !

6500 Flotilla #225....$149,000!

6400 Flotilla #25 .... $129,900
:_______ ;", Julie
.a ...--- ; . .- .-


;. ? - ',- : t -- _. --


DIRECT GULF VIEW & BEAUTIFUL
SUNSETS. This 2Bed/2Bath has pool,
sauna, elevator, under unit parking. Excel-
lent rental unit. $159,900. MLS#60094. Bill
Bowman 778-4619.
' .-- -- .; :_--,---- ._ "- ;


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week


Weekly Rentals From $450

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club from $700 mo.
Westbay Point Moorings 3/2
with boat dock $900 mo.
2501 Gulf Drive 2/2 with
Gulf view $700 mo.


Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


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IOB PAGE 34 0 APRIL 13, 1995 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Dear Property Owners:
Would you like more personal
care and involvement for your
rental property? As a rental
S agent for Horizon Realty in
Anna Maria, I am committed to
give your property the T.L.C. it
deserves. Please call today!


7,' Sincerely,
L L Alice Zoller,
HORIZON REALTY
of Ann Maria Inc.


Rental Agent
(813) 778-0426
420 Pine Av. Box 155
Anna Maria, FL 34216


PERICO BAY CLUB
PREMIER GATED COMMUNITY


ANTIGUA MODEL built in 1991. Beauti-
fully turnkey furnished. Vacant and ready to
show. $129,900.


IPlis llil .M ..- i IIII R~Bu:, l.. '4WWiil. .- I
GRAND CAYMAN 3 bedroom, 2 car ga-
rage. Vacant and ready to show. $153,500.






REDUCED TO $139,900 Gorgeous view.
Beautiful appointments. Easy to show.
Call Rose Schnoerr for details.
Rose Schnoerr
REALTORF GRI LTG
778-2261 OR 778-7780
TOP PRODUCER
S' & LISTER
of Anna Maria E-
Island Office 1994 --
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 MLS


GREAT PROPERTY
INVESTMENT

!NkX . -c I


These two duplexes, located west of Gulf Dr., each
have two 2BR/1BA apartments. All four units have
an excellent rental history and are only two block
from shopping and one block from the Gulf. Storage,
laundry, center courtyard and more. 3007 & 3009
Ave. E., Holmes Beach. $239,00 for both! Call 778-
6427 or your local Realtor.


The home has 2BR/2.5BA w/2 car garage and
the apartment has 2BR/1BA. This excellent lo-
cation is on a quiet street, in a great neighbor-
hood west of Gulf Dr. The Gulf is only one
short block away. 119 46th St., Holmes Beach
$188,000. Call 778-6427 or your local Realtor.


Now you can charge it!
The Islander Bystander accepts MasterCard and
Visa for subscription orders and classified
advertising. Just give us a call.
(Classified "charge" customers must be prepared to fax copy.)
*Mi Call 813-778-7978 ISA
FAX 778-9392 ISA






Ili;v

'' w---- -----^n~~



Contemporary Island Home- Enjoy views of the bay
from this spacious open and airy 2 bedroom home.
Tons of storage. Large master suite. This custom de-
signed home even has an elevator. In an area of newer
homes, walk to beach. Asking $259,000.
Rare Anna Maria Waterfront Duplex Direct
bayview from a unique home with income. Upstairs is
a "like new"2 bedroom, 2 bath owners quarters. Down-
stairs is a good sized 1 bedroom apt. plus a large stor-
age area. all this on an oversized SEAWALLED
CANALFRONT LOT. $269,500. A must see!

Happy 1
Easter
to all our
friends and '
customers.

Dolores M. Baker
Licensed Real Estate Broker 778-7500


SUCCESS...


Frank Davis
Broker
Premier Circe Member
778-6335
Rochester,
New York


Jean Lee Sears
Realtor Associate
778-5045
Massachusetts
South Shore


Richard Freeman
Realtor Associate
Island Key Specialist
Premier Circle Member
Boulder,
Colorado


Wendy Foldes
Broker Salesperson
Premier Circle Member
755-0826
Binghamton,
New York


Tom Nelson
Realtor Associate
778-1382
Marshall,
Michigan


LAS -arjIpWKL8
Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor Associate
Premier Circle Member
792-8477
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin


... these associates know well the meaning of success all have produced over $1 million in sales for 1994.
Their dedication to professionalism, customer service and integrity has greatly influenced their success as well
the continued growth and success of ISLAND REAL ESTATE.


aSESLANDSSSE


HOLMES BEACH
HOME W/APARTMENT


n






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 35 IU


- h.-

Westbay Point & Moorings
REDUCED!








2BR/2BA recently redecorated, updated appliances,
domed kitchen, fans in every room. Deeded carport &


boat dock. Located on canal in a park-like setting.
REDUCED TO '123,900
[ Dick Maher 778-6791
MLS NEAL & NEAL REALTORS 778-2261 _.|

What's the best news on Anna Maria Island?
The Islander Bystander gives it to you every week.


RARE CANALFRONT OPPORTUNITY! 3
bedroom, 2 bath, quiet cul-de-sac street. Fur-
nished turnkey, ready to move in today. Call
Roni Price, 778-5585 eves. #63125.
$165,000.
RARELY AVAILABLE! Gulf view from this
tastefully decorated/furished condo. 2 bed-
room, 2 baths, heated pool, sauna, secured
lobby, tennis and much more. Call T. Dolly
Young, 778-5427 eves. #63126.
STEPs TO SHOPS AND BANKING! 2 bed-
room, 2 bath, condo overlooking pool. Appli-
ances including washer and dryer, walk-in
closets, all for $47,000. For more information
call Sally Schrader 792-3176 eves. #61862.


MARTINIQUE... 3
bedroom, 3 bath,
Gulf views! 2-car
garage. Owner
financing. $19o,ooo
WESTBAY COVE...
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
pool view. Only
$89,900.


T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
778-5427


GULF TO BAY COMMUNITY.
Walk the beach, relax
in heated pool. fish
from private dock, and
low maintenance fees.
$69,900. Call Carol
Heinze 778-7246

Carol Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist
5400 GULF DR ...
Enjoy beautiful sunsets from
this 111 turnkey furnished unit
overlooking pool. Priced
to sell $84,000.
DUPLEXI Just steps to the Gulfl
3BR/2BA down, 2BR/1BA up
with panoramic view GREAT
rental for investor; assumable
Deborah M. mortgage. Possible owner
Thrasher financing. $198,500.
REALTOROASSOC.
778-3395

Bruce Skorupa.
REALTOF
795-0303
"Linking
Buyers and
Sellers
Together"
ToP SELLER FOR THE
MONTH OF FEBRUARY
Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


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Island Real

Estate Sales
3601 E Bay Dr, HB, 114 B Sandy Pointe, a
bayfront townhouse condo of 3bed/3bath/2car with
1600 sfla, built in 1994, was sold 3/10/95, Rasmussen
to Johnson, for $130,000; list unknown.
505 83rd St, HB, a 90x108 canal front lot, was
sold 3/7/95, Martinek to Clark, for $148,000; list




Smith, REALTORS
Welcomes
Michael Advocate L .


l:I


ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT HOME. Well cared
for home on a natural canal and just steps to the
beach. This home has a new roof, has been freshly
painted inside and out and new floor covering
throughout the house. A must see home $187,500.
Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


--an~a '~ R ..-=--- ---- II
REDUCTION AT NORTH POINT HARBOUR ES-
TATE: Key west style, 4 bedroom home. Open floor
plan with water views from most every window. His
and hers master baths, skylights, wrap around deck,
security system, boat lift and dock. Homeowners
Association provides lawn care, tennis, pool and
spa. Now priced at $329,000. Call Carol R. Williams
778-0777 or 778-1718 after hours.


I B$J SI t I d" IIBR,

LUSH & TROPICAL: Close to beach, what a rare
opportunity to own a two bedroom, home plus a
one bedroom, one bath income producing apart-
ment within walking distance to prime beach.
Owner financing, impeccable condition and qual-
ity construction makes this property desirable.
Priced at $350,000. Call for extras & details,
Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
CONDOS
Two bedroom, 2 bath condo with spectacular Bay
views plus 30' boat slip. Decorator perfect with
dome ceilings in kitchen and baths, wall paper, ce-
ramic tile, updated appliances including heat & a/
c unit. Priced at $149,900. Please call Carol R. Wil-
liams 778-0777 or 778-1718 after hours.
DIRECT GULF FRONT CONDO with a spectacu-
lar Gulf view. Spacious two bedroom, two bath unit.
New ceramic tile in kitchen and hallway. Storm
shutters on all window. Turnkey furnished. Priced
at $229,000. Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
ESTATE SALE REDUCED: Bayfront 2 bedroom,
2 bath comer ground floor condo in park like set-
ting. Steps to pool and tennis. Furnished turkey.
Outstanding value at $118,000. Call Carol R. Will-
iams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.
ISLAND VILLAGE: Lovely decorator perfect condo.
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Spacious open floor plan
with a view of Tampa Bay, new ceramic tile & wall
paper, within walking distance of the beach. $119,900.
Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS LI


$159,500.
802 Flotilla, HB, a ground level canal front
3bed/2bath/2car home of 1581 sfla, built in 1972 on
a 100x102x20(canal)x100x85 lot, was sold 3/7/95,
Guillou to Evans, for $148,000; list unknown.
606 Crestwood, HB, a ground level bayfront 3bed/
2bath/2car home of 1949 sfla, built in 1967 on a 100x108
lot, was sold 3/7/95, Ellis to Brewin & Evans, for
$380,000; list $390,000.
* Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate bro-
ker, exclusively for The Islander Bystander. @ 1995
U IT


n~ ~npa~
I ~
I
~k~'


Mike

Norman

Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Esnuk


I


EXCEPTIONAL OFFERING
With over 255' fronting on Key Royale Pass. This
artist's home captures the essence of island living
with it's 4 or 5 bedrooms and 3/5 baths. Add a fire-
place, oak & tile floors and an art studio with sky-
lights. Two boat docks, mooring whips and davits
complete with a knockout view. $415,000.
BAYFRONT Gorgeous view with 120' on the wa-
ter. Three bedroom, two baths with a fireplace in
the living room and a comfortable study/den. Al-
most all the room have a panoramic view of the
Skyway. Loads of Privacy.
JUST REDUCED GULFRONT Step back into
history in this old-time 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
with hardwood floors, high ceilings and big porch.
Detached 2 car garage, large lot with mature
trees and beautiful beach. $350,800. $325,000.
DUPLEX Shortwalk to beach and shopping cen-
ter in Holmes Beach. Priced to go at $108,000.
DUPLEX Near beach, clean and neat. 2 bed-
room, 2 baths each side. Only $129,000.
DIRECTLY ON THE GULF Choose your floor
covering and appliances on the brand new 3BR/
2.5BA home. The view is spectacular from every
room in the house. Tremendous income poten-
tial. $395,000.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB One of Anna
Maria's nicest condo complexes. This furnished
2 bedroom, 2 bath unit is beautiful. Elevators,
pool and covered parking. $224,900.
BAYFRONT Perfect setting in Holmes Beach.
Looks off to the Skyway Bridge. 3BR/2BA. Large
lot with established landscaping. $349,000.
HANDYMAN SPECIAL Ready for some imagi-
native upgrades, these three apts. presently bring
in over $2,000 month rental. View of Gulf. Asking
$152,000.
HOLMES BEACH $108,000 Lots of possibilities
here! Great location and quiet street. Short walk
to shopping center and beach. Two bedrooms,
one bath and the other side features a one bed-
room, one bath.
VERY LARGE home on a double lot with 3BR/
4BA, swimming pool, hardwood floors, 35' open
porch across from Gulf. Just reduced $225,000
TRI-PLEX INVESTMENT PROPERTY Brings in
over $2,000 month income. 4152,000.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Gorgeous and
spacious 2 bedroom/2 baths directly on the Gulf,
elevator, pool. $225,000.
SUNSET TERR. CONDO Directly on the Gulf,
elevator, pool. $164,900.
SEASIDE BEACH HOUSE CONDO Prime lo-
cation. Directly on the beach. 2BR/2BA.
$172,000.
GULF FRONT HOME Now under construction. 2
story 3BR/2.5BA. Pick your cabinets & floors.
$395,000.
CANAL FRONT 4-PLEX Probably the only one
of its kind in Holmes Beach. Nice 2 story main
house overlooks Sportsman's Harbor.
GULF FRONT PRIVACY Located in North
Holmes Beach. This older home features 2BR/
2BA, den, large living room. Hardwood floors,
fireplace and huge deck on the beach.







BD3 PAGE 36 0 APRIL 13, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
It


Lisa Varano


Denise Langlois


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT





'Do you have any vacancies left?

We don't! So why don't you let us fill
your rental needs, so you too can have
a successful season.

2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


P' BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


IL


Anna Maria City at Bean Point




-z .'.*,] is ^.. 1 '"i l l l l l" *:, fii ", -
II. jiin,




810 N. Shore Drive
Across the street from best beach on the Island,
5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large garage, 2,900 s.f.
living area turnkey furnished. $419,000. Call
778-4349 or 1-800-694-2221.


Karin Stephan
REALTOR" E
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


.1
.6riaa


140 FEET OF
BAYFRONT! Boat
dock, Million-Dollar
View. Totally reno-
vated 2BR/2BA.
White tile, open,
aI rn nnourmet


k kitchen, great for
entertaining.
2 ; $389,000.

ARCHITECTURALLY DESIGNED home on
large (3) lots. Elegant 4BR/4BA. Waterviews!
Multi-level living room, fireplaces, built-ins,
perfect for entertaining! Security system. Se-
cluded deepwater canal. come see, stay and
make offer! $389,000.


I


5301GufD., Holms BeachFL3421
(81377807661-80-77-848 Evs: 95-,303


["~{6.l I ,] ; ;T ". 6{.6 .- _"


Island Realty Group
-------


SHELL POINT CONDOMINIUM
1BR/1 BA ground floor unit directly on the Bayou
with a beautiful view. Well maintained complex in
quiet area of Holmes Beach. Asking $92,500. Call
Agnes Tooker eves. 778-5287 or Kathy Granstad
778-4136.


Beautiful
Wooded Lot ...
Extra large residential lot close to Gulf on
the north end of Anna Maria City. Drive by
710 Holly at the corner of Jacaranda.
Only $125,000. Call Agnes Tooker eves.
778-5287 or Kathy Granstad eves. 778-
4136.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
( SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717* Ama Made, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY land Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ESTATE
SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extending both Personal
AND Professional Services In New Construction & Design, Existing Property
Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other
Areas, Best Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND SmilesI


Extraordinary Canal Home Impressive 3BR/4BA home
surrounds a caged free-form pool featuring a "tropical" stone
garden with waterfall, jacuzzi and BBQ offering "Island" liv-
ing. Customized kitchen & pantry, spacious 17x23 Master
Suite. DEEP SAILBOAT WATER & DELUXE BOAT DOCK!
$390,000. Call Marie Franklin.

'_7


Magnificent Gulf Front Estate Spectacular sunsets from
this custom-designed home offers three structures, con-
nected by wrap-a-round decks. Direct Gulf front location,
quality construction and gorgeous tropical foliage. One
and only Island Gulf retreat. $950,000. Call Marie
Franklin. MA M A


ABIE LIC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the island.'
9805 Gulf Drve PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250


CANALFRONT HOME WITH LOTS OF
SOUTHERN CHARM!
3BR/2.5BA with oak floors and 10' ceilings,
formal living and dining, breakfast nook, fam-
ily room and fireplace. Wrap-around porch,
pool with privacy and lovely landscaping. Ideal
for entertaining. $329,000.
ANNA MARIA LOT FOR SALE
North end of island, near beaches. Price in-
cludes state approved plans for a 3 bedroom,
3 bath elevated new home that will have some
beautiful water views. $145,000. Call Peggy or
Alice 778-0426.


Ifz


(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216 FAX 778-1929


A BIG HOUSE ON KEY ROYALE
611 Gladstone. 4BR/3.5BA/2 kitchen/2-car, 3,895 sq.ft.
under roof home including caged pool. Unique origami
roof line and walled solarium. $265,000.


DOUG
DOWULING
REALTY
409 PinAv.
Anna Marl
778-1222
1. * * * I


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


:1 V& 1 M6 11W6 N I Pm I I N :N A & 1 N I


. % b I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N APRIL 13, 1995 W PAGE 37 liG


IS A a -. S IF*e- -

ITM O SL NOUCMN Cniud TASORAINCotne


PACKARD BELL 386 computer w/monitor, 14-4 mo-
dem, CD-ROM drive, lots of extras. $800 OBO. For
more info call Bill 778-5455.
2 WHITE LEATHER COUCHES, 1 card table w/glass
top & 4 chairs, 1 folding cot and 1 fan. 778-4526.
AC, 3 TON. Ruud central AC. Make offer, 778-7990.
BEDS LIKE NEW: Bunkbed, double on bottom & single
on top, $250. Double white with brass trim, beautiful
$225. 77801663 or 778-0729.
ANTIQUES Oak ice-box, all original, $500. 54" round
oak table w/beautifully carved claw feet, 8 leaves,
$1,400. 778-0171 before 8pm.
2 2 DRAWER standard file cabinets, $15 each. 2-
steel letter boxes, $5 each. 519 71 St., Holmes Beach.
ANYONE interested in fresh bagel delivery from the
Bagel Factory? Deliveries Fri. & Tues. $2.50 charge +
order. 778-1538.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get rid
of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


YARD SALE 228 Oak Ave., Anna Maria. Fri. & Sat.,
April 14 & 15. 9-2. Little bit of everything, carseat bed,
bed ,dresser, dishes, everything must go.


FOUND DENTURES (uppers).on beach in Anna Maria
Gulf side near Bean Pt. 778-1645, 10 to 5.

REGISTER TO VOTE: Pick up forms for simplified mail-
in registration at The Islander Bystander office, 5408
Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center (between D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre restaurants), Holmes Beach.



neaL & n,


--mb & Lu
Rhoden.
REALTOR
Associates
778-2692

E3MAS UL


WESTBAY COVE
PREMIER ISLAND LOCATION
* 79,900 1/1 First floor, fur-
nished, overlooking heated pool.
* 129,900 2/2 First floor, corner
unit, dome ceiling in kitchen, fresh
paint, new carpet, pool view.
* 142,500 2/2 First floor corner
unit w/view of bay dome ceiling
in kitchen, berber carpet and ce-
ramic tile, glass entry, extended
living room.
Enjoy iho pool. tennis, lush land-
scape and great location. Close to
shopping, restaurants, banks,
churches and just steps to the
beach. Call Bob or Lu Rhoden -
Ofc: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-2692.


LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center. Motivated theme classes each month: Salsa,
60's oldies, 70's, Circuit Training, Sports theme, etc. All
classes include muscle conditioning. Classes are: Tues-
day & Thursday 7:00-8:00PM; Thursday 10:30-11:30AM
and Saturday 9-10AM. For info call Geri 779-2129. Two
classes will be canceled in April: Thur. 10:30-11:30 am on
4/20 and Sat. 9-10AM on 4/29.

WANTED WW II, Korea, Vietnam and other veterans
of Foreign War to join Island VFW Post. Call NOW! Bob
DeVane 778-4400.

AN OFFER YOU cannot refuse. You may wish the
Godfather a Happy Birthday on Sunday, April 16.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog sitting service. House calls. Cats
or dogs. Day-Week-or Month. Reasonable Rates. (Is-
land only). 778-1012.


'95 CHEVY S-10 Blazer. Burgundy, auto, air, PW,
PB, power locks, fully loaded & over $2,000 in after
factory extras. Only 10K miles. Asking $23,000. Call
Anytime 320-0110.
'78 OLDS station wagon. High mileage, odometer
stopped at 12,000 miles 8 years ago, speedometer
doesn't work, ac doesn't work, radio doesn't work, lost
door key, lights work sometimes, looks horrible -
sounds worse. Very dependable, runs well on most of
8 cylinders. $295. 778-5405.


1987 DODGE ARIES LE station wagon. 4 cyl, A/T, air,
good mileage. Very good condition, looks like new!
Must see. $3,000. 778-5189.
1984 DODGE CHARGER, runs great, looks great. Must
see! $1,200 or best offer. 778-4680.
FORD ESCORT station wagon. 1984, 91,300 miles,
good condition. $1,000 or best offer. 778-5908


CHARTER FISHING with Capt Mike Heistand aboard Magic.
Half & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-1990.
DIVE CHARTERS Leave from island. Two-tank dive
$50, includes tanks. Sea Trek Divers, Inc. 105 7th St. *
N., Bradenton Beach. 779-1506.
SCUBA SCRUB Mobile underwater hull cleaning. Let
us remove those unwanted barnacles today. Monthly
service or one time cleaning available. 778-8681.


Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you in-
terested in learning the history of Anna Maria Island?
Get involved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Dorothy Stevenhagen, 795-0148 if you can give a
few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


DESIGNER ENHANCED 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath Island home.
Spacious 27 x 21 foot Master suite luxury appointments.
$345,000
Call Marilyn Trevethan Realtor* anytime 792-8477
0] '^~~~~J ^^~~.V~i1 .1~i FI belu'.Mi


Weibke


RE/MAX GULFSTREAM REALTY. TWO LOCATIONS:
3007 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton 758-7777 24 hour number 758-7777
5600 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 778-7777 24 hour number 778-7777


FI ,' Bentley
If you want your home SOLD, call a RE/MAX professional. Reaitoh
We bring more buyers and sellers together than any Spreche
other office in Manatee County. Deutsch
Figures compiled from manatee County Board of Realtors on res style properties. RE/MAX Gulfstream solely or In participation and co-operation with other MLS members were Involved In the above sales.


RU M' il tlBi JJ -119 A, 18 A I MHf, r


20 STEPS TO POOLSIDE from ground floor end unit condo at
Westbay Point and Moorings. Fresh paint, new carpet and tiled
entry welcome you home. Peek at bay from living room/dining
room Two bedrooms, two baths and deeded carport Priced at
$137,500. and owner will finance! Call Sandy Greiner RE/MAX
Gulfstream for terms and appointment 778-7777.


Ron Travis
Broker/Owner


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE just across from the
beach, 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage. Turnkey furnished. Like
new, never rented. Low maintenance fee of $85, in-
cludes cable TV. Close to heated pool. Balconies on 3
sides, one screened. Reasonably priced for this area
at $159,900. Terri Robertson 778-7777.


)avia .oupiana
Broker/Owner


UNIQUE DUPLEX 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, peek-
a-view of Gulf and Bay, plenty of storage, large
deck for entertaining. $136,000. Yvonne
Higgins 778-7777.


--I I I IA


I I I I --q







Ij PAGE 38 0 APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


S Commercial *Residential Free Estimates
Sandy s Lawn Mowing* Trimming* Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778 1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
j Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
1 TTEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353


ISLAND LUMBER
ad HARDWARE
213 54th St. Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED- INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
m MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558



-1&B IlotE


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY

A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-ear Island Resident




T0
BEACH
RENTALS

BIKES
BABY NEEDS
AND MORE

Mobile Service
Deivery & Pick up
at No Charge

778-6438


J. Il

Painting
Private
& Commercial
Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
Free Estimates
778-2139





DON'T

FORGET!
We mail over 900
out-of-town subscriptions
every week. If you want
to keep in touch, use
the form on page 7,
this issue. And, you
can charge it on
Visa or MasterCard.
N(813) 8-7978
(813) 778-7978


SSAND CL ASS I


CLEANING and light yard work 20 hours per week. In-
cludes weekends and holidays. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, Anna Maria Island
Community Center. Bookkeeping, computer, corre-
spondence and coordinating skills. Public relations with
all ages. 778-1908 or fax, 778-9551.
PART TIME MAINTENANCE person pool experience
helpful but not necessary. Island Condo Complex. Re-
ply in writing to Martinique Condo Assn. 5200 Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.


NEED HELP?
"Call with confidence." Manatee Home Health Care. We
offer experience/dependability, and quality care. We
help in assisting people to stay in the comfort of their
own home. Companion/sitters live-ins, housekeepers,
errands/appointment, escorts, transportation. Reason-
able rates. Call 745-9377.


LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical app., airports,
cruise ports or prescription delivery. Flat rates. Sun-
shine Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL places available
for ages 2 thru 6. Individual attention in small groups.
5354 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach. 778-2967.
MANATEE MOWERS Island Lawn Service. Respon-
sible, reliable and reasonable. Call Donnie Rivera 778-
7508 for free estimate.
INCOME TAX SERVICE and accounting. 25 years ex-
perience. Your neighborhood representative Pat
Kenney; Kenney Tax Service; phone 778-6024. ,
ANNA MARIA Glass & Screen in addition to all your glass,
screen and stained glass needs now introduces window
and screen washing. Call 778-2022 for appointments.
JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn
your old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle
Jewelers 401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
SEAWALL MAINTENANCE Joint sealing erosion con-
trol, commercial diving. Best work in town at the right
price. Local resident of 12 years. Work guaranteed, lo-
cal references. Cliff Kryszczuk, 779-2522.
"HATE TO IRON & CLEAN?" Reasonable rates and
many Island references. Pick-up and delivery. Also al-
terations. No smoke environment. 778-4680.
HOMEWATCH Protect your investment, local couple
will check your house when your away. Reasonable
rates. 704-1372.
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your conve-
nience. Complete detailing includes wash, wax, shampoo,
engine & underbody cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned,
tires & trim dressed and much more. Protect your invest-
ment. Call Damon on mobile number 320-0110. Please
leave a message for quick reply if not available.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody, sham-
poo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm & hall, $34.95.
11 year in the business. No hidden prices. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.
MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Cal Jim Bickal 778-1730.
Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.


ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers &
concrete. In business since 1978. Lic #MC00318. Dave
Elliott, 778-5183.
PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40.
Crowder Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober
prompt, finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, fine finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul
Beauregard 387-8066.
THE ISLANDS HOME Maintenance Co. All phase of home
repairs, carpentry to painting. 20+ yrs experience. Insured,
island resident, references available. Jim 779-2129.
LOCAL HANDYMAN can take care of your screen re-
pairs, window cleaning, small paint jobs, lawn & yard.
Thorough & careful. References. Peter 778-8436.


OFFICE SPACE, professional building with elevator in
centrally located Holmes Beach. $200 and up. Call Mike
Norman Realty. 778-6696.
GULF FRONT EXCEPTIONAL 2BR/2BA. Furnished
residence at 102 77th St. with spectacular views. Avail-
able April 95 and June-Sept 95. Call Dave Moynihan
Realtor 778-2246 or evenings 778-7976.
VACATION RENTALS by the month or week. Call Is-
land Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL-SEASONAL, 1BR/1BA fully furnished, quiet
neighborhood, private yard, 1/2 block to beach. 778-9413.
GULF/BAYFRONT North Shore Dr., Anna Maria.
2BR/2BA, large enclosed porch. Wk/Mo/Sn. Book
now for '96. 778-0340.
BEAUTIFUL CONDO 2BR/2BA Sunbow Bay. HB. Two
heated pools, tennis, prime area to shopping/beaches.
No pets. Avail Jan & Feb 1996. Evenings 792-1554.
ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo available
Winter 1996. $850/wk. gulf front. 813-949-3713.
1000 SQ FT of Retail/Commercial space. 5508 Marina
Drive. Ask for Dennis, 778-3924.
ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views, 1BR, patio, pool, W/D,
furnished. Annual. 211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
95-96 SEASONAL non-smoking beach area waterfront
townhome, 2BR/2BA, pool, dock, pool, 3 month for
$5,000 or 4 months for $6,000. Owner/broker 1-407-
263-5454 extension 2220. No smokers please.
FURNISHED 2BR/1BA available April 1 thru Nov.
30. $650/mo plus utilities. No pets. Call Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
BAYVIEW with boat dock, furnished 2BR/1BA
rental available April 1. $1,000/mo includes utili-
ties, washer/dryer, enclosed garage. No pets. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.



4ore than a mullet Wrapper!


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P A T E A RE I E CIR O A T- L A V A
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IISLANDER


AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
induded for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products. By appointment, at
your convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.


I


IBYSTAMRii






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M APRIL 13, 1995 0 PAGE 39 IME


*ISLANDER DECLASSIFIED
RENALS.Cntined RAL SATECotiue


HOLMES BEACH Gulf view from your balcony. 2BR
apt. turnkey furnished. Available now thru Dec, at off-
season rates. 778-4368.
SEASONAL studio apt. near beach, Bay. $675 monthly
includes all. Need one month to reserve, available Nov.
95-April 96.778-4184 10:00 am-9:30 pm.
OFFICE SPACE, 100 to 1,000 sq. ft., 501 B Mana-
tee Ave., Holmes Beach, next to Chamber of Com-
merce. 778-6996.
JUST RENOVATED HOME 3BR/2BA fully equipped, all
new appliances in quiet neighborhood, lovely shaded
yard. Two blocks from Gulf. 813-931-8888 or 230-2828.
HOLMES BEACH, one bedroom, fully furnished, 100
yds to Gulf. No pets. 778-5246.
ANNUAL, 2BR/2BA, unfurnished. No pets. 778-1952.
2BR/2BA, large deck. $600 mo. Yvonne Higgins RE/
MAX Gulfstream, 778-7777.
WANTED! 2BR rental from May 1 thru August and pos-
sibly Sept. Prefer northside of Anna Maria near Gulf.
Have references. Scott, 813-683-2811.
SEASONAL ONLY Holmes Beach rental. Furnished
2BR/2.5BA, Florida room, washer & dryer, enclosed
garage. Near Gulf. Owner/Realtor 792-8340.
1995-96 SEASON, 1BR apartment near Rod & Reel
Pier. 778-2153.
WANTED TO RENT! Single or covered carport. May
through Nov. Rent negotiable. Call 778-1806 evenings.
WATERFRONT COTTAGE with dock on Bay. fully
furnished, turn-key, W/D. Clean, quiet, breezy.
Available now, by week $250 or month $600. Per-
fect for retired person. 794-5980.
ANNA MARIA 1BR/1BA available now! $450
month. 778-4010.
HOLMES BEACH, fumished 1 bedroom, ground level
apartm,,t, 100 yds. to Gulf. No pets. 778-5246.


WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR
units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher
for additional information. From $131,900. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
PERICO BAY CLUB Grand Cayman Villa. $156,000.
call Jack Monahan at Ron Baldwin & Assoc. 383-9501.
PRIVA'1ltARTY is looking to buy an island lot, rental
or income propeny-,".i 10% down seller financing. Fax
info. to 414-332-4898.
BY OWNER: Luxury townhouse on Anna Maria Island.
Lots of open space, 5/3, cathedral ceilings, wet bar,
private deck, heated pool, tennis court, steps to the
beach. 2,100 a/c square foot. Priced to sell. Going out
of country. Call: 778-7377.
OPEN SAT & SUN. 315 58th St. Holmes Beach condo.
Completely updated, 2BR/1BA, garage, W/D, available
immediately. $72,900. To see anytime 798-3981.


BY OWNER: Clean, ready to live in 2BR/1BA home in
Anna Maria! $134,900. Call 778-7127.
DUPLEX Intracoastal, 2 story, 2BR & 1BR, Bradenton
Beach, Key West style, sea-wall, sailboat water.
$175,000. 778-7980.
FISHING PIER, bait business & restaurant, Anna Maria
Island. Includes business & real estate. $395,000. Call
Fred Katz, Towne & Shore Realty 778-7980, 779-2044.
BAYFRONT CONDO one of a kind! Close to beach and
in-town shopping. $139,500. Call Richard Freeman,
Island Real Estate 778-6066.
PRICE REDUCED! Totally updated 3BR/3BA canalfront
home with private dock and elevator. $279,900. Call Ri-
chard Freeman, Island Real Estate 778-6066.
REDUCED! Anna Maria canalfront home with updated
appliances and views. $169,500. Call Richard Free-
man, Island Real Estate 778-6066.
KEY ROYALE Exceptional waterfront residence, 3BR/
21BA w/2 car garage, caged 40" pool & deck, deep wa-
ter dock. Immaculate. $325,000. Owner 778-2041.
GULFFRONT. Almost 1 acre on white sand beach of Anna
Maria. Possible split: Home+ lot; vacant lot: and 2/3 acre w/
house 100' beach front. Call T. Dolly Young after hours. 778-
5427. Prudential Florida Realty 778-0766.
REDUCED! Island cottage with one car garage.
Now only $79,900. Call Richard Freeman at Island
Real Estate 778-6066.
TOWN HOUSE, yards from beach, use as family home
or two separate apts 1BR/1BA and 2BR/1BA, pool,
garden. $110,000. 954-1110.
CANAL LOT for sale in Anna Maria by owner with
32 ft. dock. 129 Hammock Rd (lot #9 Coconut
Bayou sub.) 1-603-635-2033.
BRIDGES A PROBLEM? 2BR/2BA, 2-car garage Vil-
las, 1600-1800 sq. ft. from $100M. Max Beaty 792-
1163, 792-0074 Neal & Neal REALTORS.
PRESTIGIOUS WESTBAY COVE CONDOS Convenient
to; beach, shopping, restaurants & churches. 1BR/1BA
with pool view from $79,900. 2BR/2BA pool view & Bay
view from $129,900. Call Bob or Lu Rhoden, Neal & Neal
REALTORS, 778-2261 or after hours 778-2692.
NEW HOME 3BR/2BA, 1,800 sq. ft. on large lot, assumable
loan 725%, 405 73rd St. Dock rights, 2.5 blocks to beach.
$215,000. Realtors welcome. 778-1966.
INVEST! Several Island 2plexes & 4plexes available.
Get all the facts from Yvonne Higgins RE/MAX
Gulfstream, 778-7777.
EVERYDAYS A BEACH day in this light & bright, pretty as
a picture, 3BR/2BA across from the beach! This immaculate
home features 10' ceilings, new ceramic tiled bathrooms, pick-
led oak foyer, inside laundry, storage galore, lush landscap-
ing, white picket fenced with walk thru gazebo welcomes all.
Call now, won't last! $168,500.778-1165.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
3 duplexes all in Holmes Beach. 208 54 St., 1BR/
1BA each unit, close to shopping center $119,000.
404 71St., 2BR/1BA each unit, large front unit -
$159,000. 203 76 St, 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA, close to
Gulf $169,000. Call for appointment, 778-3757.


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
SHurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC045125 .RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991


422 26th St W., Bradenton, FL 34205 (NW Corner of 26th St. & Manatee Ave.)

Personal Fitness

TRAINING o.
One On One In Your Home
4 Al Ages
I Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
SFitness & Nutritional Guidance
I Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
V Deep Breathing & Relaxation Exercises
Geri Travis
B.S., P.H., ED, Fitness Specailist 779-2129

Deffenbaugh Painting by Elaine
LOCK & SECURITY Deffenbaugh
LOCKED OUT? "Professional Excellence"
HOME AUTO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INTERIOR
ALL TYPES OF LOCKS & EXTERIOR
Installed Rekeyed Repaired RESIDENTIAL
Bonded Licensed Insured &
Serving Anna Maria. Longboat COMMERCIAL
Key. Cortez, West Bradenton
EMERGENCY SERVICE We repair popcorn celllngs.
RADIO DISPATCHED
SPECIALTY KEYSATCHED Serving the Islands Since 1969.
LUGGAGE REPAIRS Licensed and Insured
778-5594 I778-5594 778-3468

The Island Property Maintenance Co.
* Complete property maintenance on a regular basis
* Inspections weekly or more
* Immediate repairs when necessary
* Weekly & monthly rates
* Written reports sent to you each month
* Insured, Island Resident, References
If you are planning to go back to cooler weather or live
here year round & need dependable maintenance...
Call 779-2129 Jim Travis


"Due to societal trends and obvious medi-
cal risks, we are rapidly becoming a nation
of voyeurs "
of voyeurs." Squeaky -
( quoted in the key note speech.
National Window Washer's Federation)
Window Cleaning Carpet & Upholstery
SDeep Cleaning Tile & Marble
Squeaky's Window Cleaners
952-9617 or 383-7729


IISLANDER


Looking for a bite to eat, a day of fun, a
ray of sunshine? Look no further -
it's all in The Islander Bystander.
Don't miss a week!










-CallTDon FIotr AFreeWrttnl

FnnigAalb
^^^*BTIsland Re'C~ferences^^^


Bruce D. Leckey, CPA


Income Tax
and accounting services

747-2961


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

2

3
DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER: Classified advertising must be placed in
person and paid in advance or mailed to our office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday- Friday, Saturday
10 to 2 (usually).
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $5 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $1.50 for each 7 words, Box: $2,
One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: Minimum $6.50 for up to 21 WORDS. Additional words: $2 for each 7 words, Box:
$2, One or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
WE NOW ACCEPT MASTERCARD AND VISAI Charge your classified advertising in person or by phone.
To place an ad by phone, please be prepared to FAX your copy with your charge card number. Sorry,
we can not take classified ad copy over the telephone.

THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER

Run issues)
Amt. pd Date Ck. No. _Cash


VISA


MISLANDEoe i:
More information: 778-7978


I YTA 'D


I


9DC4
anA




iE PAGE 40 A APRIL 13, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SIsland Foods
-- 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach FREE BLOOD
OMETO N PRESSURE CHECK
MHO;METOWN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM- PHONE 778-4100 Every Friday
We Welcome Food Stamps Every Fr yON
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1995 __ _____



RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!

LARGE COOKED SHOULDR STANDING
SHRIMP LONDON BROIL RIB ROAST
-SHRIMP


E .M
i'I


a1/2 GALLONS


TOMATOES
VINE
.4 9RRIPE


SEALTEST ASSORTED FLAVORS
ICE CREAM
&2 for


I -