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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00546
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00551

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND



^ i N ....Ni :


WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


- i


Bazzy receives go-ahead for marina


Allan Bazzy has received permission to renovate
the Bradenton Beach Marina from the city council.
By a4-1 vote Monday, council members approved
a rezoning of six residential lots just south of the ma-
rina to commercial use, accepted a special exception
with a number of stipulations to build a commercial
boat storage shed on the property, and vacated portions
of Church Street and Bay Drive North.
The council vote was in response to an order by Cir-
cuit Court Judge Scott Brownell, who ruled last month the
council wrongly denied Bazzy's petition to rezone adjoin-
ing residential lots for commercial in August 1994.
"We're ready to pull permits and start work immedi-
ately," Bazzy said. He has said he will spend more than
$1 million in remodeling the marina, located south of the


Bradenton Beach

Fishing Pier

face-lift proposed
By Paul Roat
A four-faced clock tower, a new pavilion, 34 new
benches 11 of them covered and 476 rod hold-
ers are just part of the improvements proposed for the
Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier.
Architects Emily Anne Smith and Tom Eatman
received Bradenton Beach City Council approval of
preliminary first-phase plans for renovations to the 20-
year-old pier east of Bridge Street last week. Council
members also approved the master plan for the pier.
Smith and Eatman proposed five phases of con-
struction for the project. The first phase, which will be
paid from a $50,000 grant from the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection, will include repair and
replacement of damaged deck planking and railing,
demolition of the pavilion at the east end of the pier,
construction of the new benches and installation of
three fish-cleaning stations complete with fresh water.
New lighting will also be put in place on the pier.
Lights will be similar in design to those throughout
Bridge Street and, as Smith put it, "should gather
baitfish like gangbusters."
Councilman John Kaufmann's suggestion that the
pavilion demolition be an "add-on" to the construction
bids was approved by council members. First-phase
construction will go out to bid soon.
Although other phases of the project are currently
unfunded, Community Redevelopment Agency Chair-
man Clem Dryden said he was confident money could
be secured for the work later this year through an ad-
ditional grant from the Florida Department of Commu-
nity Affairs. Bradenton Beach officials hope to receive
a second Community Redevelopment Block Grant
from the DCA this spring.
Other highlights of the pier renovations, as outlined
by Smith, include:
A new pier entrance portico and new roof design
for the tackle shop and restaurant within Phase 2.
Construction of a new pavilion and new signage



Plans for the renovations
for the Bradenton Beach
Fishing Pier include a
clock tower and several
covered cabanas along
the length of the pier.
Other renovations
include 34 benches, 476
rod holders and addi-
tional lighting that
architect Emily Anne
Smith said would "attract
baitfish like
gangbusters." "


Cortez Bridge. His plans call for removal of the existing
open-air boat storage racks, replacing the structure with a
34-foot high, 200-foot by 84-foot enclosed storage shed
that could accommodate up to 74 boats.
Bazzy also hopes to build two docks, one 125-feet
long, the other 135-feet long, into Anna Maria Sound;
demolish an existing house; construct a duplex; relocate
boat work stations; and do overall remodeling of existing
marina buildings.
Councilman Walt Grace cast the only negative vote
during the proceedings. He said Brownell's ruling was an
improper use of the checks and balance system between
legislative, executive and judicial branches of government
Council members Aug. 23 voted 3-2 in favor of
Bazzy's request, but city laws require at least four af-


via a 34-foot-high tower at the east end of the pier
within Phase 3.
Construction of a 34-foot-high tower featuring
clocks facing in four directions, extensive landscaping
featuring sable and royal palms at the approach to the
pier and a boardwalk within Phase 4.
Construction of three covered cabanas staggered


firmative votes for such a request. Councilman Bill
Campbell and former Councilman Jim Kissick cast the
negative votes.
Bazzy has filed two other cases against Bradenton
Beach. One case, involving encroachments onto
Bazzy's marina by the city police station and streets
and roads buildings, will be dropped. No hearing date
has been set for the other case, which names 18 resi-
dents who opposed Bazzy's marina expansion plans.
Among stipulations within the plan is public access
to the marina, landscape approval by the city council, no
direct lighting from the marina onto nearby property, an
$8,100 payment to the city's park fund by Bazzy, paving
of Church and Bay Drive by Bazzy and a two-year time
limit on construction, among other stipulations.


along the pier's 665-foot length within Phase 5.
Although costs for all phases of the work on the
pier have not been finalized, Dryden said he expected
the work to cost about $200,000.
Smith said the overall theme of the pier improve-
ments would be a old fishing style design.


GUNMAN TAKES HOSTAGE AT CITY PIER (NOT)


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ............................................. ........... 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Announcements ........................................... 15
'Snooks' Adams remembers ....................... 16
Stir-it-up ........................................................ 18
School Daze........................................ .......... 20
Streetlife .................................... ............ 22
Serenity ........................................................ 24
Anna Maria tides .......................................... 25
Real estate .................................................... 26


JANUARY 26, 1995







fB PAGE 2 N JANUARY 26, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Holmes Beach to recycle nine items at curb


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach residents will soon be able to place
nine recyclables at the curb for a weekly pick-up in-
stead of taking the items to dumpsters at city hall.
The city's new contract with Waste Management is
slated for a vote by city council on Feb. 7. The contract
will add the curbside pick-up of three types of plastic -
soda, milk and detergent bottles; aluminum and tin cans;
and clear, brown and green glass for an extra cost of 96
cents. Newspapers are already picked up curbside.



--"~"


Councilwoman Pat Geyer asked about commercial
accounts and condominiums. Robert "Bub" McKinney
of Waste Management said the same service is avail-
able to both. For commercial customers, the fee is
based on volume, he said.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger expressed his concern if
the county decides to sign a contract with Amerecycle for
recycling. The Amerecycle plan calls for customers to co-
mingle garbage and recyclables which will be separated
at a plant to be built by the company.
"Should they do that, where do we stand with the


Wheel broke, or real bwoke?
When the ball joint went out on the front left wheel of the southbound Anna Maria Trolley, passengers re-
ported the driver did an excellent job holding the trolley in their lane, avoiding a collision with oncoming
traffic. Another trolley came swiftly to carry the passengers on their journey to St. Armands. The first tow
truck on the scene alongside the Longboat Key Club golf course wasn't able to pull the weight of the trolley,
but managed to pull it into the center turn lane where it waited for another "lift" to the shop. Passenger
Victor Dashiell hopped off the hampered trolley and snapped this picture at the scene of the trolley accident
last Tuesday with other passengers waiting roadside while Longboat Key police directed traffic. Trolley
operator Gary Creamans has said he suspects someone sabotaged the trolley and caused the accident. The
trolley has been under fire from Longboat Key officials since it began operating earlier this month. Islander
Photo Courtesy: Victor Dashiell


contract that has curbside recycling? he asked.
The attorney for Waste Management said the con-
tract gives the city the right to control the service pro-
vided and the curbside recycling can be discontinued
at any time the city desires.
Public Works Director John Fernandez asked if the
recycling dumpsters will remain at city hall and
McKinney said that's up to the city council. He said
they could still be used by commercial entities.
Resident Mary Ann Jones asked if the company will
provide bins and what days items will be picked up.
"We would offer a 24-gallon blue bin to put the glass,
cans and plastic into for a once a week pick-up," replied
McKinney. "We believe it will be a Thursday pick-up.
Your newspapers will be the same as you do now."
McKinney said there will be two solid waste, one yard
waste and one recyclable pick-up per week. The total cost
of all pick-ups will be $10.96 per month per household.

Garbage pick-up

changes proposed

in Bradenton Beach
Changes may be coming to the garbage pick-up
schedule in Bradenton Beach.
Public Works Chief Buddy Watts said several resi-
dents have complained that the Saturday pick-up of yard
trash is becoming an unsightly problem. With most of
Bradenton Beach's residents working during the week,
gardening is done on the weekends. Yard waste is then left
at the curb for a week before it is picked up, he said.
Watts said the proposed change would have yard
waste picked up on Mondays throughout the city. For
southern Bradenton Beach, regular garbage pick-ups
would change from the current Monday and Thursday to
Tuesday and Friday. Northern residents would have cur-
rent Tuesday and Friday pick-ups changed to Wednesday
and Saturday.
Watts said he would like to hear from residents
regarding the change in garbage service. He may be
reached at the Bradenton Beach City Hall, 778-1005.


Bay crossing charrette could start in April


By Paul Roat
A study to determine the feasibility of building an
additional bridge between the mainland and the barrier
islands between Cortez Bridge and the Ringling Cause-
way should take place in April.
The study, called a charrette by transportation plan-
ners, was approved by the Metropolitan Planning Or-
ganization Monday. Cost of the charrette is budgeted
for $50,000.
The charrette, according to MPO's Bob
Herrington, will bring together all interested people and
groups to discuss the merits of building an additional
bridge across Sarasota Bay.
Florida Department of Transportation District Sec-


retary David May said the traffic counts on the exist-
ing three bridges warranted the new bridge, but envi-
ronmental prohibitions may halt its construction. The
charrette should solve the social, political, financial and
environmental concerns prior to spending any more
money on further studies.
The MPO board approved the charrette by an 8-4
vote. Among the opponents of the Bay crossing study
are officials on Longboat Key, who have steadfastly
opposed any bridges to that barrier island.
To date, Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach officials have indicated a charrette is a
good approach to take.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola, also the


chairwoman of the Island Transportation Planning
Organization, said an additional bridge is needed and
the charrette is a good first step.
"If you don't realize what is happening," Pierola said,
"just look at the growth in eastern Manatee County or
eastern Sarasota County. There are lots of people out there,
and there will be lots more in five years, and they're all
going to want to go the beach here or on Longboat Key."
Herrington said the charrette would probably take
place in April, with results expected to be released in July.
As many as 100 people could take part in the charrette, he
said, which could last as long as three days.
A special meeting facilitator will be retained to
organize and conduct the charrette.


Holmes Beach mayor reports on no-wake ordinance
An ordinance to establish a no-wake zone along the ernment and since the state is not down here in person vessels may be regulated or prohibited. and in which
county's beaches is still being held up at the county to enforce the safe boating rules that currently exist, it's swimming, water skiing, skin-diving and other water ac-
level, said Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger at the county's responsibility, not ours," noted tivity, or any of them, may be prohibited or regulated."
last week's city council meeting. Bohnenberger. The ordinance further states that vessel operators
"City Attorney Chip Rice said the county has a The county's current ordinance declares that the pub- shall maintain idle speeds when in areas of regulated
100-yard no-wake ordinance on the books but it is only lic health, safety and welfare of its citizens "requires des- water activity that are posted with signs designating the
enforceable in unincorporated areas of the county," ignation of specific areas within which the operation of boundaries of the areas.
said Bohnenberger. "Rice said they could amend the
ordinance to cover the barrier island cities but the cit- Plants by the
ies will have to draw up an interlocal agreement to
empower the local police departments with enforce-
ment authority. The cities would also have to adopt the The City of Holmes Beach
ordinance to their books." obtained a truck load of
Bohnenberger said County Commissioner Stan plantsfrom the county
Stephens will bring a proposal to the Coalition of Bar- nursery for beautification
rier Island Elected Officials when it is completed. purposes. The boxwood,
Bohnenberger also noted that the county did not take oyster plants and lantana
the legislation to the local legislative delegation be- _.i will be planted along Gulf
cause "the state legislature is reluctant to pass a special HOLMES BEACH Drive at the Martinique
act if they think local governments can take care of the PUB, PIIW S ~ PT condominiums, said Public
problem on their own." Works Supervisor John
"My position has always been that the county gov- Fernandez. Islander
ernment is nothing more than a local arm of state gov- Photo: Pat Copeland






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 26, 1995 M PAGE 3 EI

Island's first fair queen reigns for one year


'"Wow!" was the first
comment from the 17-
year-old Queen of the
Manatee County Fair
after cutting the ribbon
at the gates to the event
in Palmetto.
But Tracy Moynihan
is not only beautiful,
she's articulate, fo-
cused and excited
about the opportunities
that lie ahead of her.
1995 Manatee County Fair She's been a contes-
Queen Tracy Moynihan tant before, so the fam-
ily was relaxed at Sat-
urday night's pageant, watching the Manatee High
School senior calmly go through the paces and in-
terviews "with tremendous poise," according to fa-
ther, David Moynihan.
Why did she enter, we asked. "When I started ap-


plying to college, my dad said 'get
every scholarship dollar you can,'
and this pageant puts $1,000 into
my college fund."
In addition, Tracy earned a
$1,000 scholarship to Ellen Meade
Studios. "I've already done the mod-
eling classes so I'm planning on using
that to study nutrition," said Tracy.
Tracy hopes to enter Florida
Southern College and have a career
in broadcasting. She has already no-
ticed the doors of opportunity open-
ing for her as a result of the fair pub-
licity. A local television station
called her school and offered an in-
ternship.
Selected from over 70 partici-
pants, Tracy will reign over the
week-long fair and then represent
the fair association at other events


Eight qualify in Holmes Beach
Three council members will be elected to vacant Mike Faarup, a member of the Holmes Beach Planning
seats on the Holmes Beach Council on March 14 from Commission; Heathcliff J. Kryszczuk; Roger Lutz, a
a field of eight candidates. The terms are for two years member of the city's code enforcement board; Don
with an annual salary of $1 per month plus $300 per Maloney, a member of the city's board of adjustment;
month expenses for a total of $3,061 annually. incumbent Councilwoman Billie Martini and Deborah
Incumbent Councilman Luke Courtney qualified Spence.
for re-election last week. He is joined by seven other Councilwoman Mary Ellen Reichard will not seek
candidates Lee Edwards, special Holmes Beach re-election for her seat which also expires this term.
liason to the Anna Maria Island Community Center; Qualifying ended at noon, Jan. 24.

Doyle drops out of Anna Maria election
The field of candidates for the Feb. 14 Anna Maria Anna Maria, at this time," Doyle said in a Jan. 9 letter
City commission election has been reduced by one. to Anna Maria City Clerk Peggy Nelson.
Mike Doyle announced he was dropping his name Candidates for three vacant commission seats in-
from the ballot for business reasons. clude incumbent Doug Wolfe, former commissioner
"Due to personal business matters that have come George McKay, Mike Bartles and Mark Ratliff.
up, I do not feel I would be able to allot the time and Also on the ballot on Feb. 14 in Anna Maria are
effort I had planned, and therefore do not feel I would candidates for the office of mayor, Max Znika and Dor-
be of benefit to the elected office, nor to the citizens of othy McChesney.


Anna Maria City
2/1, 7 p.m., Candidates' Night
sponsored by the Dolphin
2/2, 7 p.m., Candidates' Night
sponsored by The Islander Bystander
Bradenton Beach
1/31, 1 p.m., Police department appeal hearing
Holmes Beach
1/31, 10 a.m., Planning Commission work
session with the Tampa Bay regional Planning
Council on the comprehensive plan review
1/31, 7 p.m., Council work session on
T-end canal docks
Of Interest
S1/30, 10 a.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall


Quality Service, Products
and People What More Could
The Island Ask For
778-6964 383-3692


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Junior Miss Rachel Guth, 14, Darcy Thorton,9, and Tracy Moynihan cut
the ribbon to officially open the Manatee County Fair Monday evening.
Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood
throughout the year, and ride on their float in the annual Desoto Parade.









Ij PAGE 4 a JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Net ban battle far from over; buy-outs considered


By Paul Roat
How much guilt will the Florida Legislature bear
in light of a decision by voters last November to put
7,000 commercial net fishers out of business?
The question of compensation for commercial gill
netters is being asked throughout the state in a series of
20-some public hearings by a legislative task force.
At least one lawmaker, Rep. Allen Boyd of
Monticello, has vowed to introduce legislation to com-
pensate the soon-to-be-out-of-work commercial netters
when the gill net ban takes effect July 1. Terms of that
bill or amounts to be paid will be decided in Tallahas-
see during the legislative session in March and April.
The task force came to Bradenton last week to try
to determine how much or if-- money will be paid
to commercial fishermen reeling after last fall's deci-
sion to abolish their way of life inshore netting.
The score or so of commercial gill net fishers, fish
wholesalers or fish house employees in attendance
were bitter about the outcome of the constitutional
amendment which put them out of work.
"It would make me feel better to have recreational
fishing banned, too," Karen Bell said. "If the fish are
so stressed, we should take all the pressure off the re-
source."
Recreational fishermen, led by the Save Our
Sealife group headed by Florida Sportsman magazine
publisher Karl Wickstrom, were the moving force be-
hind the successful voter drive banning commercial gill
net fishing in the nearshore waters of Florida. SOS rep-
resentatives portrayed commercial fishers as wholesale
killers of fish, a picture contested by most marine bi-
ologists and scientists who said overdevelopment and
habitat loss, among other causes, was the reason for
diminishing fish catches.
"You want to talk about compensation?" Ruskin
commercial fisher Robert Fletcher asked the legislative
task force. "I should be getting a percentage of every
hook that's sold in Florida."
Fletcher said he was not enthusiastic about the idea
of compensation to commercial fisher. "If you run over
a guy on the street with your car, what do you do? Say
to him 'hey, buddy, do you want a Coke?' That's what


Commercial fishing boats, nets even the docks may become a thing of the past in the wake of the decision
by Florida voters last November to prohibit nearshore gill net fishing in the state. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


you're doing to us.
"Fair compensation? How do I take your life from
you and make it fair to you?" he asked.
Fletcher said he feared the outcome of the net ban
would be an increase in illegal fishing. "To do this,
you've gotta go buy up all the nets you can, because I
know people who make $100,000 a week on illegal fish
right now. All you're doing is making more outlaws,"
Fletcher said to a chorus of nods from the audience.
Equipment buy-outs has been viewed as an avenue to
consider by lawmakers. Florida Marine Fisheries Com-
mission members have been told that a commercial net
ban enacted in Texas in the late 1980s did not include an
equipment purchase provision. The results, according to
Texas officials, were disastrous, with marine law enforce-


ment costs reaching staggering levels.
Marine fisheries commissioners will offer their
suggestions to Gov. Lawton Chiles and the Florida
Cabinet next month, with a final public hearing sched-
uled Feb. 16 in West Palm Beach to adopt final rules
to implement the net ban.
The legislative task force report will be submitted
to the Florida Legislature Feb. 1.
Commercial fishers have indicated their next
course of action will be the courts, not the legislature
or the voters. As Fletcher said, "If you think this is
gonna be easy, no sir, you're wrong."
And Bell vowed that the abolition of a way of life
for some Cortez residents is far from over. "This will
be a national issue," she said.


Cities, county to share costs of stormwater fix


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Island cities have agreed to enter into
interlocal agreements with the county in order to file a
joint application for a permit to meet requirements of
the Federal Clean Water Act.
The act requires counties and municipalities to
monitor and clean stormwater discharged into the
sewer system and local waters. The City of Palmetto


Juno, the pygmy sperm whale calf that died Jan.
11 at Mote Marine Laboratory, left a legacy of
knowledge which will aid not only Mote scientists
as they care for mammals in the future, but will
assist other marine mammal stranding facilities and
federal agencies which oversee mammals.
Research and treatment breakthrough include de-
velopment of a formula for non-bottlenose dolphin calf
mammals; analysis of breathing pattern for the federal
agencies; growth rate data; techniques for non-tradi-
tional training of a calf for husbandry; and much was
learned about cognitive abilities of the species.
During Juno's 147 days at Mote, she was cared
for by more than 2,000 volunteers who assisted
Mote staff in 24-hour care of the whale. This long-
term care was a major test of Mote's new Ann and
Alfred Goldstein Marine Mammal Research and
Rehabilitation Center.
Mote staff and volunteers conducted a necropsy
on Juno. A necropsy provides only about 10% of in-
formation through gross examination with the re-
mainder coming from bacteriology, histopathology,
contaminant analysis, immunology, etc. Prelimi-
nary findings show cause of death to be respiratory
arrest, pulmonary edema and virtual collapse of
both lungs. The necropsy gave indications of wide-
spread systemic infection, a build-up of fluid in the


and the Florida Department of Transportation will also
be partners in the agreement.
At last week's meeting of the Coalition of Barrier
Island Elected Officials, Charles Hunsicker, representing
the county, said the move will substantially decrease the
cost of obtaining the permit and the county will bear the
burden of responsibility in preparing the application.
Bradenton Beach Councilman Dick Suhre asked,
"Why is the federal government forcing this down our


abdomen and acute necrosis of the pancreas and in
the adjacent lymph nodes.
Though Juno's medical condition was never
considered to be better than "fair," and downgraded
to "poor" a week before her death, there was no in-
dication of the seriousness of her condition from be-
havior, weekly blood work, ultrasonography, or
weekly physical examinations. This is consistent
with the ability of marine mammals to hide medical
problems until they become extremely serious.
'The outpouring of financial and volunteer support
from the community to care for Juno was heart-warm-
ing and appreciated. We've been able to add a new
chapter in our understanding and knowledge of this
species," said Jay Gorzelany, Mote's stranding coordi-
nator.


throats?"
"We all share Anna Maria Sound and Sarasota Bay
as an asset for our area," Hunsicker replied. "People
live here, visit here and return year after year because
of our water and environment. We offer something
special as a coastal area. The protection of that inner
shore water the Manatee River, the Braden River
and Sarasota Bay which is fed by the Manatee River -
is an asset we control."
Hunsicker said the area is fortunate because the
water quality is good and no cleanup is required before
executing the permit application.
"I believe that our permit will be directed towards
our commitment to continue to maintain the quality of
water that we have," he said. "It's an agreement with
the federal government that says we have good water
and will take steps to keep it that way."
Holmes Beach Public Works Supervisor John
Fernandez asked what the cost of the permit applica-
tion will be per city.
Hunsicker said the cost is based on population.
Figures are as follows: Anna Maria, $2,220;
Bradenton Beach, $2,081; Holmes Beach, $6,127;
Palmetto, $11,673; unincorporated county,
$189,357; and FDOT, $26,135. The cost per person
is $1.26. The total cost of the contract with Camp
Dresser and McKee, Inc., to perform the services
required in the permit application is $237,135.
Fernandez asked when the cities' shares are due.
Hunsicker said 30 days after the interlocal agreements are
completed. The permit application is due June 12, 1995.
Services to be performed by Camp Dresser and
McKee, Inc., include mapping local waters and iden-
tifying the outfalls within each applicant's jurisdiction,
preparing a description of each major watershed, char-
acterizing the quality of each major surface water body,
conducting a dry weather field screening program of
outfalls and monitoring storm water runoff in order to
identify pollutants.
In other business, elected officials recommend the
appointment of Holmes Beach Councilman Luke
Courtney to the county's Tourist Development Council.


Juno's legacy


m"M





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 5 iJm

Holmes Beach special event alcohol law has flaws


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A Holmes Beach ordinance to permit the serving
of alcohol at special events has gone back to the draw-
ing board. The ordinance would allow the activity by
special exception as a temporary use.
The ordinance came about after the city council
granted the Anna Maria Island Historical Society permis-
sion to serve alcohol at the Centennial Street Dance last
May, then discovered that there is no provision in the
city's ordinances to do so. The council asked the city at-


The Holmes Beach City Council agreed with its
attorney last week that code enforcement board
member should not discuss cases outside of meetings.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said the attorney rec-
ommended a change in the city's ordinances to prohibit
board members from discussing code enforcement
cases with any other person outside of an official code
enforcement board meeting.
"What has occurred here recently is that some
members of the code enforcement board met with in-
dividuals prior to the hearing and visited the site of the
original complaint," he explained. "The code enforce-
ment board, in my opinion, is like a judicial body and
if it wanted to visit the site, it should have adjourned
the meeting and gone to the site en masse to review the
property."
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore noted, "It's get-
ting to where you can't even talk to anybody."
Bohnenberger said the attorney felt such action by
the board was unethical.
"There's no problem with driving by and eyeballing


torey to draft an ordinance to address the problem.
The ordinance was last discussed and refined at the
October work session. At that time, a resident objected
to the provision banning special events at which alco-
hol was served on the beach or a public street, sidewalk
or right of way because it would eliminate neighbor-
hood street dances or block parties.
Council instructed the attorney to revise the ordi-
nance to allow such events on public streets, sidewalks
or right of ways if approved by the chief of police. Last
week, the amended draft came back to council accom-


the site," said Bohnenberger. "The problem is in meeting
with the individual outside of the code enforcement board
hearing. By the time the person is cited, he's had several
meetings with the code enforcement officer and had time
to comply. By the time it goes to the code enforcement
board, the person is in defiance. If you want to view the
code enforcement board as a court-type situation, it should
be treated as such."
The council also agreed to ordinance changes that
would regulate the parking of travel trailers on city
streets, which would include lawn service trailers and
boat trailers, and amend the nuisance ordinance to in-
clude a height requirement for overgrown lots.
In other business, council reviewed site plans for
a new fellowship building for the Island Baptist Church
and a new sign for Gloria Dei Lutheran Church.
Council also listened to a resident's complaint about
the canal between 67th and 68th Street, which is becom-
ing clogged with sediment at the Marina Drive end. Pub-
lic Works Supervisor John Fernandez said he is working
on a long-term plan for dredging the city's canals.


panied by a letter of concern from the attorney.
"...I have eliminated the strict prohibition on the
sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages at the
public beach because I can find no rational basis to
make a distinction between an event which utilizes the
public beach as opposed to a special event which uti-
lizes other public recreational areas or city owned prop-
erty," wrote City Attorney Patricia Petruff.
Petruff said the council could add additional standards
for events on the beach such as restricting the used of glass
containers or requiring the applicant to post a bond to in-
sure that the area is cleaned up after the event.
Another issued Petruff brought to the council's
attention was the fact that the ordinance requires the
applicant to obtain not only a temporary use permit but
also a special exception.
"It should be noted that if the council wishes to
require a special exception, the district regulations for
the various zoning districts would need to be amended
to add as a special exception use the temporary sale and
consumption of alcoholic beverages at special events
to the districts in which such uses would be allowed,"
she pointed out. "In order to do this, council would
have to determine the specific zoning districts where
this special exception use would be allowed."
As an alternative, Petruff said the council could
amend the ordinance to allow the sale and consumption
of alcoholic beverages at special events through the
granting of a temporary use permit and place standards
for the permit in the land development code. This type
of permit could be approved or disapproved by the
mayor or submitted to council for review and approval
Petruff said.
Council agreed to place the item on the Feb. 21
work session. At the same work session, council is
slated to discuss the planning commission's recom-
mendation that there be no further restrictions on the
duration of residential rentals in the city.


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Ei PAGE 6 K JANUARY 26, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

e -


The day they got away
Steve Gianiotes must be relishing in the pleasure
of knowing he got away.
Gianiotes, who Islanders should recognize as "the
meat man" at Islanders' Market (formerly Ernie's IGA)
in Anna Maria, played the bad guy, even took hostages,
in a training scenario involving members of the Mana-
tee County Sheriffs Department and other local law
enforcement agencies.
Just like the racoons that make off with your gar-
bage week to week, the bad guys pulled a fast one and
escaped the Anna Maria City Pier. All the hostage ne-
gotiators and officers involved were left to watch as the
get-away boat swept bad guys and hostages off to "safe
waters," heading toward Egmont Key.
No one planned for the escape route by boat and
the bad guys got away this time.
In real life, of course, this can't happen. At least,
law enforcement will be prepared for this "scenario"
in the future.
A hill of beans
Anna Maria Islanders may be likened more to
counting beans, bean bag chairs and L.L. Bean than our
Geoffrey Beene neighbors on Longboat Key.
While we epitomize a sloven, casual Island style
our southern neighbors are trodding the links in
Claiborne and Gucci.
They'll undoubtedly use the recent trolley accident,
caused by a broken ball joint, as added ammunition to
prevent the trolley service from linking Anna Maria to
points south via Longboat Key.
Is this a majority opinion or are we just hearing the
ranting of Longboat Key Commissioner Al Green, a
man who once called the village on the north end of his
island a "shanty town," and in nearly the same breath
called Anna Maria residents "white trash."
It is so very hard to imagine anyone objecting to
the quaint, wood-trimmed trolley car filled with happy,
shop-and-eat eager passengers.
The trolley has the support of business interests on
both Anna Maria and Longboat Key. It has been long
established on Siesta Key with a successful route to St.
Armands and Lido Keys without so much as a sour
note on its record there.
Admit it, Commissioner Green, this trolley busi-
ness is stuck in your craw and you have nothing better
to complain about but tee times.
Come on, Longboat, get off your beans and let
Green know he's out of line once and for all.
This is the neatest thing since sliced pumpernickel.
Commissioner Green's number is 383-4674 and he
needs to hear from you.



JANUARY 26, 1995 VOLUME THREE, NUMBER 10
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Mark Ratliff, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Katharine Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Lisa Cleveland
Darla Tingler
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


YOUR. OPINION.


Council unfair to beach
restaurant
In The Islander Bystander's article in regard to
serving alcohol at Cafe on the Beach, Councilwoman
Carol Whitmore stated, "People that drink beer and
wine at the beach will be getting in their cars and driv-
ing with some degree of impairment"
Well, I guess its OK to drink beer, wine and heavy
alcohol at the Sandbar (which is on the beach) without
some degree of impairment. And what about all the
other establishments on the whole Island and the rest
of the United States?
As for Councilwoman Mary Ellen Reichard, she
states Cafe on the Beach is not a restaurant. The dic-
tionary defines a restaurant as, "A place where meals
can be bought and eaten." I guess this definition does
not apply to Cafe on the Beach.
I think the councilwomen are hiding their heads in
the beach sand. They should look at the advertisements
in their own Island newspaper.
Joseph Mammina, Bradenton

Mr. Bones butts baby out
It was New Year's Eve night when my sister,
brother-in-law, daughter and I stopped at Mr. Bones for
an evening meal. We had called earlier to inquire about
the availability of a highchair for my 16-month-old
daughter. Someone on the phone stated that they didn't
have any highchairs. We asked if we could bring our
own. The reply from the employee was "sure."
When we got to Mr. Bones, we were greeted with
rudeness and lack of consideration. As we stood with
our highchair, we were told they had no room for it.
From my view I could see at least five tables open.
I suggested we sit in a corner table and put the
highchair in the corner. This was unacceptable they
said there was no room.
I then suggested we remove a chair and put the
highchair in its place. No, they said, that would not
work either. Finally, in exasperation, my sister said,
"So you're telling us you won't serve us?" The two
rude women shook their heads. We walked out.
What if I had a wheelchair and tried to get into
Mr. Bones for dinner? Would I be turned away at the


door by rude people?
"Happy New Year Mr. Bones."
Rened Nordbye, Holmes Beach
... then apologizes
We would like to extend our sincere apologies to
Ms. Nordbye and her family for their unpleasant expe-
rience at Mr. Bones on New Year's Eve.
After looking into our reservations and discussing
the situation with our staff, it is clear that with a little
extra effort we could have seated the party. The situa-
tion was handled very poorly.
Since taking over Mr. Bones nearly two-and-a-half
years ago, we've worked hard to improve the public per-
ception of our restaurant We have contributed to several
Island charities, provided food and labor to support the
Island Little League, sponsored an Island soccer team and
have been a Chamber of Commerce member since 1992.
We also serve good food and try at all times to be
courteous and friendly. Needless-to-say, it is not our in-
tention to drive people away. Because our dining room is
small and gets very crowded, we encourage people with
special requirements to come early to help us provide the
nicest possible experience. There is no policy to deny ser-
vice to anyone we can reasonably accommodate. We also
recognize that local patronage is the lifeblood of our busi-
ness, and only hope more Island residents will try Mr.
Bones in the future.
Since being made aware of this complaint, we have
clarified our policies and expectations to our staff, stress-
ing, of course, the twin virtues of courtesy and grace un-
der fire, and we intend to always try to improve our ser-
vice. Again, our apologies to Ms. Nordbye, her sister,
her daughter and her brother-in-law. We hope to have
the opportunity to do better next time.
Mr. Bones BBQ, Holmes Beach

League appreciates donations
We at the Anna Maria Island Art League would
like to thank everyone who made a donation to the
league in memory of our founder, James. L. Pay.
Also, a special "anonymous" thank-you goes to a
certain "anonymous" donor for the wonderful, much-
needed office gift
Anna Maria Art League, Holmes Beach










THOSE WERE THE fAYS
Part 11, The War of 1898
by June Alder
A1ma.3 I


Men in Tampa's sodden army camps slept in hammocks to keep out of the water.


SHOOT-OUT AT

THE IMPERIAL


Tampa was terrified of epidemics. It
had suffered more than its share of
deaths from yellow fever and other
tropical diseases over the years. No
wonder local officials panicked when
soldiers fighting Spanish troops in Cuba
began to fall ill in large numbers and the
U.S. Army decided to ship them back to
Tampa.
The Florida board of health hurried
to set up a quarantine station on Egmont
Key and decreed that every sick returnee
would be detained there at least 10 days.
This was not a proper hospital. It
amounted to a couple hundred pup tents
propped upon the muddy environs of the
Egmont lighthouse.
Despite the quarantine, typhoid,
malaria and dengue fever swept through
Tampa's crowded army camps. By now
there were some 25,000 men in them,
mostly new recruits eager to fight in
Cuba. Few would ever get there, for a
peace pact was signed in August.
These were the "forgotten men" of
the war with Spain. It's said that some of
the Rough Riders were dogged all their
lives by the question, "Are you one of
the ones who stayed behind with the
horses?"
As lonely soldiers do when they are
far away from home, some of the troop-
ers sought solace for their miseries in
wine, women and song. Their escapades
worsened as time went on, and Tampans
began to complain to Washington.
The most notorious episode started
out one sultry night in the Imperial The-
ater, the gaudiest gambling palace in
Fort Brooke. This strip of saloons and
bordellos had been around since the
early 1800s when it grew up at the gates
of the old Fort Brooke garrison.
Soldier John P. Jones, son of Anna
Maria Island pioneer John R. Jones, re-
called that night vividly:
"The troops had just been paid off,
and the Imperial was a sea of campaign
hats. The long bar at the end of the
building was crowded with patrons,
while a troupe of girls rendered a pro-
gram of songs and dances on the stage.
"During brief lulls in the general
hurly-burly there could be heard the
whir of roulette wheels and rattle of
dice, indicating that the gambling room
next to the theater also was doing a rush-
ing business, but there was nothing to


indicate that anything unusual was
brewing.
"I have never been able to find out
what started the riot, but the first inti-
mation of trouble was a fusillade of
shots outside, followed by the scream-
ing of women in a resort across the
street. The show-girls paused in their
act, then fled into the wings. As if at a
signal, the whole audience rose to its
feet-and then the shooting really
started!
"After wrecking the theater and
gambling joint the crowd surged out-
side and proceeded to shoot up the
whole street. By the time a reinforced
provost guard reached the scene, every
saloon, sporting house and gambling
hell in Fort Brooke was completely
wrecked."
"Next day the place looked like a
ghost town and it never regained its
former 'grandeur.'"
Here's a detail Jones didn't men-
tion. The story goes that one of the hun-
dreds of bullets fired off went through
the ceiling and struck a "working girl"
upstairs in the buttocks.
By mid-July, what with heat, rain,
illness and so much dissolution, the
boys stuck in Tampa were clamoring to
go home. The first train-load of troop-
ers left town on July 22. The last unit
was gone by August, to the relief of the
respectable folks of Tampa.
There were just a few companies
left behind to look after the moun-
tains of stores moldering in ware-
houses-and 4,000 mules and horses
still penned up in the corrals around
the town.
"A splendid little war," Secretary
of State John Hay called that three-
month spat with Spain in the summer
of '98. It signaled America's emer-
gence as a great world power at a cost
of less than 400 soldiers killed in
battle.
But few realize that wartime dis-
eases killed 10 times that number. No-
body knows how many of the survi-
vors' lives were shortened.


Next:
Final installment,
Honeymoon in Cuba


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 E PAGE 7 [li



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Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
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(Between D.Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978






E PAGE 8 JANUARY 26, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Sheriff's negotiating team holds drill at City Pier


It was just another perfect day in paradise until
Steve took the hostages.
Distraught over a recent divorce, child custody
problems and a load of unpaid bills following a lay-off,
Steve spent most of the day drinking as he worked up
his courage to commit a desperate act. After a grouper
sandwich and a pitcher of beer at the Oyster Bar at the
end of the Anna Maria City Pier, Steve made his move.
Brandishing a 9mm semi-automatic pistol, Steve
told Dave, the restaurant's manager, to empty the cash
register into a paper bag. Dave set off the hold-up alarm
under the counter, which Steve saw. It was then that a
bad situation quickly turned into a crisis.
Grabbing Dave and Gundula, a German tourist,
Steve pushed the hostages out of the restaurant and saw
the Manatee County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) deputies
who were waiting for him at the foot of the pier. Steve
forced Dave to open the door to the bait shop, and it
was there that the three spent the rest of a very tense
afternoon.
But it wasn't for real. The whole thing was part of
a training exercise to help the sheriff s hostage nego-
tiating team stay sharp.
At about 4 p.m. on Jan. 18, the negotiating team's
mobile response unit rolled up to the foot of the pier
and set up the forward position. Just down the street at
Roser Memorial Community Church, a negotiation
command post was being established.
And the press? We had the privilege of being "in-
visible," meaning that reporters had total access to
observe all parts of the drill. What follows is an account
of an imaginary Dog Day Afternoon that went down
last week as curious onlookers watched law
enforcement officers honing critical life-saving skills.

The crisis is assessed
J. Stephen Litschauer, an MCSO commander, was
in charge of the situation. Busily setting up two teams,
one in a truck at the foot of the pier and the other at the
church, he said that the first step was to decide who
would be the primary and secondary negotiators. It was
determined that MCSO's Crime Scene Technician
Dave Hodgdon would be the main person on the phone
with the bad guy, and that Holmes Beach Police Detec-
tive Nancy Rogers would back him up.
While Hodgdon and Rogers donned headphones
down the street, Litschauer explained that in a real-life
situation reports to the press in the first few minutes of
the hostage standoff would be sketchy.
"We are here on a possible barricade situation," is
what Litschauer said officials would likely be telling
the press. "We wouldn't tell you very much, because
at this point we would not know very much. We would
tell you that the area is being sealed off and that the
SWAT team is being called in."
"We do not go to real situation without calling out
the SWAT team," Litschauer explained. "We do not
even make a phone call without the SWAT team in
position, because once you do that you never know
what the bad guy is going to do. Is he going to come
storming out shooting everybody? Is he going to set fire
to the house or start shooting hostages? If the SWAT
team is not in position, then you can have a real trag-
edy. Other than getting set up, we do not do anything
without the SWAT team."
He said the press would be told where the forward




Dave the Hostage, por-
trayed by Dep. Jules
Dengler, appears con-
cernedfor his safety as
Steve the Criminal takes
the phone to make known
his demands to negotia-
tors.


The Manatee County Sheriff's Office hostage negotiating team arrives at the pier and begins to discuss its
strategy. At left is Commander J. Stephen Litschauer, and at center is Deputy Gary Sellito, who is a negotiator
as well as one ofAnna Maria City's on-the-street law enforcement officers.


command post was established, but probably not the
location of where the negotiations would be conducted.
"It's very important to have that in a quiet, se-
cluded area," Litschauer said. "Even on a true call-out,
high-ranking brass don't go in where that's going on."
He explained that a remote speaker would be run from
where the negotiators are located to an area where the
sheriff and under-sheriff can hear what's happening.
Taking advantage of our "invisible" status, the
press treks out to the bait shop to see what's going on.
Stepping inside we find Steve holding a gun to the neck
of Gundula as he talks on the phone.
Dave, who in real-life is MCSO Deputy Jules
Dengler, is afraid to try anything for fear of getting
Gundula (Holmes Beach Police dispatcher Gundula
Coleman) killed. From this end of the pier, it appears
that Steve (also known as Islanders' Market's butcher,
Steve Gianiotes) has the upper hand.
He is demanding money and a boat, and he's very
specific about the terms of the arrangement he's trying
to forge with Hodgdon.
"You stay off this pier or I'm going to dust one of
these hostages," Steve yells into the phone. There is a
short pause, then Steve erupts, obviously angered at
whatever Hodgdon has just said to him.
"You got two guys at the end of the pier, because
I can see them now!" Steve says, pressing the gun
harder into Gundula's neck. "If you don't do what I tell
you to, I'm going to just start dusting people!
"Get busy on that money!" Steve emphasizes be-
fore he slams down the receiver.

'Time is on our side'
Back on shore, Litschauer tells reporters that the
longer negotiators can keep Steve talking, the better. As
long as some kind of communication is happening,
other things aren't.


"Even if the person had killed two or three people
prior to our arrival, we will still negotiate," Litschauer
said. "But once violence and injuries occur after we
begin to negotiate, the negotiations are over. Then it's
a tactical assault to get the job done. You can't wait any
longer because people are being injured."
Fortunately, although Steve is making bold threats,
he's still talking. In the church, Hodgdon is talking on
a boom microphone attached to his headset, while oth-
ers in the room follow the conversation with Steve on
a loudspeaker.
"Take a deep breath and calm down," Hodgdon
says as Steve begins to shout once again, repeating his
demand for money and commenting on the cases of
beer he has discovered in the bait house.
"Take it easy on that," Hodgdon says concerning
the beer.
"I'm starting to feel pretty good," Steve says con-
fidently.
"You don't want to start feeling too good isn't
that how this started in the first place?" Hodgdon says.
The conversation veers off in another direction as
Steve starts to complain about the court system and the
problems he's having with getting custody of his chil-
dren. Hodgdon doesn't argue with him.
"Yeah, you're right about that they pretty well
hear it one way," Hodgdon says. "But you can't give
them any additional ammunition to work with when
you go in there."
Steve gets really agitated, and Hodgdon and
Rogers exchange concerned glances, apparently wor-
ried that Steve may lose control and harm one of the
hostages.
"Steve? Steve?" Hodgdon says as the phone line
goes ominously silent for a moment.
"What?!" returns Steve.
"Stay calm now," Hodgdon counsels. "Stay cool
out there."
Hodgdon then attempts to negotiate the release of
Gundula, the German-speaking hostage.
"You've got that German lady out there, she
doesn't understand you and you don't understand her,"
Hodgdon tries to reason with Steve. "She's making you
nervous and you're scaring her to death, even though
you don't mean to. Why don't just let her go while
we're working on getting that boat out there."
As this is going on, Rogers passes a note to
Hodgdon, suggesting tactics he might try. Nearby,
MCSO Detective Dan Curry is writing on a chalk-
board. Among other items, he has made two columns,
one labeled "trigger," the other "hook." As he listens
to Hodgdon's questions and the responses they get
from Steve, he writes on the board.
Little by little, the negotiating team is learning
about Steve's triggers those things that set him off,
upset him and threaten to cause a breakdown in com-
munications. Under that column are these words: wife,
divorce, and court system.

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER X JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 9 [I-


Hostage negotiation
at the City Pier
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE


Steve's hook, the subject that calms him down and
generally helps build a rapport with the negotiatorsis
not a surprising one for a father upset about losing his
children in a custody battle, and there is but a single
word under this heading: kids.

Sunset and a turning point
In real life, it would now be three to four hours into
the crisis. Electricity to the pier would have been cut,
and the telephone lines would long ago have been
rigged so that Steve could only call Hodgdon and could
receive no calls but from the little room at the church
where a team of law enforcement personnel represent-
ing various disciplines conferred on a strategy to avert
a tragedy.
"If this were a real situation what I'd be wanting to
do now, with the sun the way it is, is to draw it out as
long as possible to get the darkness," Litschauer says.
"With darkness the SWAT team can get close."
A boat approaches the pier, and Litschauer ex-
presses his concern about the vessel.
"If the boat gets through, how do we keep those on
board from getting injured," Litschauer muses. "And
how do we not let the bad guy injure the hostages if he
panics, thinking the boat is part of a trap."
The boat pulls up to the pier and Steve is no longer
on the phone. The bait shop door flies open and Steve and
his hostages spill out onto the pier. At gunpoint they are
forced aboard the boat which speeds off into the bay, head-
ing in the general direction of Egmont Key.


The Sheriffs helicopter is notified, as are several
marine units of area law enforcement agencies. The
drill is over.

Aftermath
In the debriefing which follows the drill, the par-
ticipants critique their performances.
"We try to think of issues that can happen so we
can be prepared for them," Litschauer explains the
purpose of the monthly drills to the press. "There's no
way we can be prepared for everything, so we try to


The bad guy's accom-
plices, who helped him
make his escape, are, in
front, Chris Galati, and
back, left to right, Kellie

















the water.
"In a real-life situation we woulati and Chris Conboy.had either






think of ones thatrolling the uniquwaters or our marine unit or
As to the bad guy apparently making a good es-
cape, Litschauer said that the SWAT team has some
personnel with experience in making rescue from on
the water.
"In a real-life situation we would have had either
a helicopter patrolling the waters or our marine unit or
the Coast Guard," Litschauer said.
"It was a well-planned scenario," Hodgdon said
smiling, giving credit to Dep. Dengler's surprise escape
plan for the drill's bad guy.


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I[] PAGE 10 M JANUARY 26, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

A Traffic trauma? Look to these


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By Bob Ardren
High bridges or low, new roads or no, all these
decisions are made by the MPO formally known as
the Sarasota/Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organi-
zation. And starting Monday, it's Sarasota's turn to
chair this area-wide organization little understood by
the public.
Sarasota County Commissioner David Mills was
elected chair of the MPO, replacing outgoing 1994
chair Joe McClash, a Manatee County Commissioner.
But for many citizens, the question is "Run what?
Who are these people? I didn't elect them." Ah, but
you did.
Fifteen of the 16 members on the MPO board are
elected officials from either Sarasota or Manatee
County. The 16th member, a representative of the
Florida Department of Transportation, is non-voting.
Founded in 1978 by federal mandate and funded
by the federal and state governments, the MPO has an
eight-member staff operating out of offices on old
U.S. 301 in north Sarasota County. The group is one
of 25 such organizations in Florida.
Federal law requires every urban area with a
population of more than 50,000 establish a metropoli-
tan planning process and an MPO. All state and fed-
eral transportation money, including road-building
funds, is then funneled through the MPO. Without
such a group, you don't get state or federal funding,
according to Mike Guy, executive director of the lo-
cal MPO.
Put simply, the MPO coordinates all transporta-
tion planning in the two counties. Put another way,
"the MPO brings local government into full partner-
ship with state and federal governments in the plan-
ning and implementation of transportation plans for
metropolitan areas," according to MPO documents.
Manatee County members of the MPO include
one representative from Anna Maria Island (currently
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola, although next
month the representative will rotate to Holmes Beach
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger), one Longboat Key com-
missioner (Bob Drohlich), one council member from
Bradenton (Fred Runnells), one council member from
Palmetto (Jim Biggins) and and three Manatee County
commissioners (John Gause, Maxine Hooper and Joe


McClash).
Sarasota County members of the MPO board include
two Sarasota City commissioners (David Merrill and Nora
Patterson), three county commissioners (Eugene
Matthews, David Mills and Jack O'Neil), along with one
commissioner each from North Port and Venice.
There is also one member representing the
Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority (Greg Young )
and non-voting DOT member, David May.
Perhaps the group's most recent decision attract-
ing wide public attention was mandating a 65-foot-high
bridge for the John Ringling Causeway between Bird
Key and downtown Sarasota. The MPO also decided
on the controversial high bridge to Anna Maria Island.
In both cases local officials railed against the decisions.
Both City of Sarasota officials and all three cities
on Anna Maria Island continue to oppose high bridges
in their communities.
But the MPO decides many more things thanthe
height of bridges. It is also responsible for the "SMATS
2010," the area study covering transportation through
the year 2010. Interestingly, that plan is required to be
"financially feasible," meaning every improvement in
it must be based on "the projection of future resources,"
according to the MPO.
"Revisions to the plan are made whenever such
action is indicated as a result of shifting land patterns,
changing financial trends and updated information on
travel patterns and characteristics." The latest schedule
calls for the plan to be updated beginning this summer
with completion about 18 months later.
The MPO and its staff also meets regularly with
various citizens' groups, neighborhood organizations,
business interests and civic associations. Input from
each of these areas is then plugged into the area-wide
planning process.
In addition to the obvious areas of road and bridge
building, the MPO also is concerned with such matters
as mass transit systems, car pooling, bicycle and hik-
ing trails and the airport.
So high bridge or low, new roads or no, this blend-
ing of local governments making up the MPO hope-
fully insures an area-wide view in planning that will
save taxpayers from many future transportation head-
aches.


Violinists reunite this Sunday in Island

orchestra after 40 years apart


What are the chances that two violinists from dif-
ferent parts of the country, who played together in an
Army orchestra 40 years ago, who hadn't seen each
other since then, would take winter vacations in
Florida (one in Bradenton, the other on Longboat
Key), and would end up on Anna Maria Island to play
in a concert this Sunday?
If you could express it numerically it would prob-
ably be a pretty good number to play in the Lotto, but
whatever the odds, such a thing has happened.
In 1955, Jim Lienhard and Dick Massmann mus-
tered out of the Army and said good-bye to each other.
For more than a year they had sat next to each other
playing violin in the 7th Army Symphony Orchestra
which played to appreciative audiences throughout
Europe. Little did they know that four decades later
they would turn up at a rehearsal of the Anna Maria
Island Community Orchestra and Chorus and be rein-
troduced to each other.
But that's how it happened.
"We were stationed in Stuttgart," says Lienhard,
"and we toured all around Europe, in Germany, Italy,
France and even the British Isles, giving concerts pri-
marily to the civilian populations in those concerts -
we gave just a few concerts to the GIs who were still
over there at that time. It was a goodwill type of thing.
We were under the auspices of the U.S. Information
Service at the time, so it was like we were goodwill
ambassadors.
"We both attended rehearsal Jan. 7, just getting
our instruments out, when the concert master of the or-
chestra, Paul Chalfant, said, 'Jim, I'd like you to meet
Dick Massmann,'" Lienhard says. "We both turned
around and we were in shock. We were tremendously
surprised, shocked and pleased."


Massmann was equally astounded.
"I was amazed," Massmann says. "It was really a
surprise to see him."
Massmann says the Army orchestra survived and
flourished in Europe for many years after he and
Lienhard left it, and that in the years since he has met
a significant number of musicians with major orches-
tras in the United States who had stints with the over-
seas military symphony.
"The musicians's world is a small one," Massmann
says. "You run into people, like I ran into Jim, every
once in a while."
If you save your dollar rather than spend it on Lotto
tickets, here are a few sure bets. Admission is free to
concerts of the Community Orchestra and Chorus, but
a freewill offering will be accepted.
Mark your calendar for the upcoming concerts of the
Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and Chorus:
Jan. 29 Features: Vivaldi, Violin Concerto by
Nardini, parts of Oboe d'Amore Concerto by
Telemann, and works by Rameau and Bolzoni.
Mar. 12 Features: Cello Concerto in C major
by Haydn, Cantata No. 161 by Bach, Romance for
Violin and Orchestra by Beethoven and Symphony No.
6 by Sorkocevic.
April 30 Features: Mass in G by Schubert,
Cantata No. 51 by Bach, and Symphony No. 9 by
Mozart.
All concerts are led by Conductor Alfred Gershfeld
and Chorus Master Elizabeth Bharucha.
The concerts are held at Island Baptist Church,
8605 Gulf Dr., and begin at 2 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and
Chorus president and founder, Willem Bartelsman, at
778-6517.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 26, 1995 PAGE 11 I]l


Oates leaves Holmes Beach police


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Friends and colleagues bid farewell to Pat Oates,
Holmes Beach police clerk for more than five years.
Oates and her husband are moving to
Panama City Beach to be near their
daughter and two grandchildren.
I'm sad but happy, too," said Oates.
"It's hard leaving but when I hear those
little voices on the phone calling for
grandma, I know I'm doing the right
thing."
Oates, who is also trained in dis-
patch, recalled with a laugh how she
landed the job in the police department. Oates
"I came in to file a report for my
brother. When I came back to pick up a
copy of the report, I was talking with Nancy (police


clerk Nancy Bennett) and Bonnie (dispatcher
Bonnie Lalos) because all of us are from Akron,
Ohio. I had just moved here and told them I was
looking for a job. They told me they needed a po-
lice clerk, so I put in my application."
Oates interviewed with Lt. Jay
Romine, now the department's chief,
and was hired.
"When you've stayed at a job this
long, that tells you how nice it is," she
noted. "I've really enjoyed it and
learned a lot."
"We're sorry to see her go," said
Chief Romine. "She's done a terrific
job over the years. Any time you lose
someone who's been on the job for five
years, you lose a lot of experience and
knowledge."


Mark your calendar


by Bonner Presswood
It must be coming up on watch day.
It won't be on your Hallmark calendar, but it's a
day I remember.
I was heading down Main Street in downtown
Sarasota with a friend our destination Smith's
Watch Shop.
I wanted affirmation on my choice of a gold antique
watch as a gift to my daughter, Kendra. Something I se-
cretly and not so secretly to her lusted for.
Mr. Smith had loads of them. In the past, Kendra and
I had both drooled over the counter filled with Hamiltons,
Bulovas, and French names we never heard of.
On the way, my friend and I chanced a look in a
pawn shop and bought an official "Moose" watch for
another friend. What a deal we got. This Moosehead
beer-loving friend was gonna love this watch whether
it ran or not.
Next stop, Mr. Smith's shop. We wrangled over
the purchase and came away with the best deal and the
most beautiful gold wrist watch in the shop, of course.
I plotted my course back down Main, past Norton's
camera store to pick up essentials at the drug store next
to the Granary.
An older couple ran a sidewalk blockade with the
oncoming traffic all but preventing my passage. You


know how couples walk like staggered soldiers, de-
liberately preventing you from passing.
It was obvious they were headed on the same path
so as we got to the drug store door, I stepped ahead
and held the door open for them in the interest of ex-
pediency.
The woman passed through the door and the
gentleman following her commented, "You're so
kind. We seldom see this kindness anymore."
I was stunned. Stopped in my tracks. It was a voice
I knew but I knew no little old couple such as this.
I entered the store on my mission for some trivial
matter. I looked up at the usual plethora of merchan-
dise but Timex watches confronted me.
Then it hit me. It was John Cameron Swayzee.
What a voice. What a day.
I skipped the cold medicine and the Timex dis-
play, happy with the watches and the coincidence.
Will Kendra and my Moose-loving friend have
such an appreciation for time and as much fun shar-
ing the coincidences that led me to refer to the expe-
rience as "watch day?"
Likely not, until now.
Happy birthday Kendra. I am truly blessed with
two great children who are also the two best friends
any person could ever know.


Woman's Club presidents enjoy luncheon
The Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island celebrated the centennial of the Florida Federation of Women's Clubs
with a luncheon recently. Present and past club presidents enjoying the festivities included from left Sarah
Maloney, 1994-95; Marian VanWinkle, 1992-94; Eleanor Trout, 1959-61; Janice Searl-Kolch, 1971-72; Ruth
Leitch, 1976-78; Kathryn Miller, 1980-82; and Bette Carr, 1986-88 and 1990-92. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland

International luncheon Woman's Club holds
sponsored by Woman's Club annual rummage sale
The Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island, Inc., will
The Woman's Club of Anna Maria Island, a
hold an "International" covered dish luncheon ona ad G l F n
member of the Florida and General Federation of
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at noon at the Anna Maria Commu- Women's Clubs will hold itsnnual Ru age
Women's Clubs will hold its annual Rummage
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria City. Sale on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Anna Maia Is-
Sale on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Anna Maria Is-
Members are requested to bring their own luncheon land Community Center, from 9 am. to 2 p.m.
land Community Center, from 9 am. to 2 p.m.
service. The program will include poetry readings by All proceeds will provide funds for the
local actes Marilyn H k. All proceeds will provide funds for the
local actress Marilyn Hawkins. club's scholarships, charities and Florida Fed-
The juried items created by club members for en- ration projects and charities.
try in a district arts and crafts festival will be on display. Donations of items for the sale will be ac-
All club members are urged to participate. Mem- ee e ,
bership inquires may be made by contacting Sarah cted at 47 Magnoia Ae., Ana Maria
Maloney, president, at 778-4865. ter located at 407 Magnoa Ave Anna Maia


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[IM PAGE 12 M JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Players' musical

With no less than 17 numbers in the first act and 13
in the second (that's a total of 30 in any language,
folks), it's fair to say that you should be a fan of musi-
cal revues if you want to get the most out of the Island
Players' "And the World Goes 'Round." And if you
happen to like the works of songwriters John Kander
and Fred Ebb, well, so much the better.
"And the World Goes 'Round" is one of those pro-
ductions that requires a nuclear power plant's energy
from its cast, and fortunately the three men and three
women who pull it all together in this one have what
it takes.
On the other side of the curtain line, it also requires
a little energy from the audience since the production
tends to run a touch long. That's the fault of the show's
original New York producers and not of the present
company and directors, for everyone involved here
keeps it moving right along.
But there's so MUCH to move! Unlike Rodgers
and Hammerstein, who wrote wonderful lyrics and in-
credibly hummable melodies, Kander and Ebb are not
particularly known for penning volumes of really
memorable stuff, and when you stick in 30 numbers -
well, you get the picture.
But here's the good news: There are some really
fine songs and terrific production numbers in "And the
World Goes 'Round," and these are worth the ticket
price to enjoy.
"Coffee in a Cardboard Cup" is a humorous lament
of things modern, and the first lighthearted number fea-
turing the entire company. For the most part, it is the more
comedic numbers that prove enjoyable here, though there
are a couple of exceptions.
"Sara Lee" is a song, as you might have guessed,
about a man's love affair with the queen of ready-to-
eat supermarket pastries. Island Players' perennial fa-
vorite, Sam McDowell, is great in this number as he
sings of the virtues of empty calories while a chorus
line of Sara Lee four-color, waxed-for-your-freezer
packaging dances around him.
Next on the roster is "Arthur in the Afternoon," an
interesting number that showcases Sharon Murphy as
a woman who finds the cure for her ills through infi-
delity. Kander and Ebb's work is not so remarkable,
but what director Peter Strader has done with it is worth
mention in that he effectively casts Murphy opposite
Brain Osman, a Manatee High School sophomore who
plays the much-desired Arthur. It's an interesting


native stuff to stage


touch, and all we can say is: "Way to go, Brian they
didn't cast 'em like that when I was a kid!"
Act one ends with a very upbeat number entitled
"The Rink," in which you'll see most of the six-person
company actually roller skating on stage. The number
is inventively choreographed by Becky Holahan, and
the cast apparently really has fun with the material,
with a seeming spontaneity that is infectious for the
audience.
Several other numbers again, mostly humorous
- are notable in the show, though two serious pieces,


A world of fun
in their hands
Hamming it up in the
Island Players' presenta-
tion of "And the World
Goes 'Round, are left to
right, Harold Dull, Brian
Osman and Sam
McDowell. The show
runs through Feb. 5 at
the Island Playhouse in
Anna Maria. Other cast
members include Sharon
Murphy, Judy Webb, and
Arlene Greene. The
Island Players Theatre is
located at the corner of
Pine Avenue and Gulf
Drive. Tickets are $10,
and can be reserved by
calling the box office at
778-5755.

















"My Coloring Book" and "Isn't This Better," come in
with worthy sentimental and thought-provoking lyrics,
respectively.
All in all, "And the World Goes 'Round" is a very
polished production in every aspect, and will give you
an enjoyable evening at the theater. That it could have
been twice as good with half the musical numbers
shouldn't deter you from getting yourself down to the
old theater at Pine Avenue and Gulf Drive, but rather
encourage you to see for yourself what the Players' fine
ensemble company has done. Enjoy!


STREET TRANSLATIONS 1 12 1 5 l 11 9 10 11 1l 13 1516 117 1
BY FRANCES HANSEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ I


ACROSS
I Certain reporters
5 Slip
10 Nickname for
Haydn
14 Monastery
manuscript
19 Kind of arch
20 Religious author
Philip
21 "-- blue as I
can be..."
22 Ocher green
23 Pain?
26 Sheltered, as
bees
27 Nationality since
1948
28 -eye
(tinstone)
29 British Labor
leader Ernest
30 Heavy farm cart
31 Prefix with
active or grade
32 Pyromaniacs'
delights
33 Dead Sea
fortress
36 Toned down
37 Party clothes
and such
40 Fragrances
41 Mayan?
43 Writer-
Winslow
44 Plangent
45 Corrida
performer





STUMPED?
1-900-420-5656
(75 per minute)


46 The Great
Commoner
47 Nabokov book,
1957
48 Prince Valiant's
eldest
49 Please?
53 Intoxicate
54 Spring harbinger
56 Sea arm
57 Explorer of
Florida, 1539
58 Poetic feet
59 Part of M.O.
60 -- Galilee
61 Pioneerof
Dadaism
63 Conductor--
Maazel
64 U.S.S.
Enterprise, e.g.
67 Bach music
maker
68 Lunges?
70 "A Chorus Line"
song
71 Conference start
72 Ship plank
73 Came down
74 Tallow source
75 Opposite of "la,"
in French
76 Leis?
80 Haute, on
the Wabash
81 Ersatz art
83 Buddies
84 Dines a la
Lucullus
85 Make an effort
86 100 groszy
87 Auto racer
Graham


88 Like many
interviews
89 Rears its ugly
head
90 Had a life
94 It can be cured
95 Pals?
98 Came up
99 -- cheese
100 European
dormouse
101 Gossip column
squib
102 Airport center
103 Nurse's -
104 Blackmore's
Lorna
105 See 38-Down
DOWN
1 Mozart's"-
fan tutte"
2 Grunts of
distaste
3 Suds
4 Harrison Ford's
"Fugitive"
co-star
5 lago's wife
6 Made a collar
7 Toupee,
informally
8 Conquistador's
quest
9 Send by a
designated path
10 Historical
French region
11 Writer Jorge
12 Head-'em-off
site
13 Shade of blonde
14 Sticks
15 1963 Broadway
smash
16 Mince?


17 Uniform
18 Struck out
24 Police hot line
calls
25 Schlepped
29 Big name in I.Q.
tests
31 the green
(inks luck)
32 Dukes
33 Wisdom tooth,
e.g.
34 Put on a pedestal
35 Moon?
36 "Anyone who
disagrees with
me," in a saying
37 Send
come-hither
looks
38 With
105-Across, a
Kevin Costner
role
39 Domingo
41 "-- the Hour"
(1948 Crosby
hit)
42 Fencing
equipment
45 Brindled cat
47 Peons' pay,
perhaps
49 Miller's
salesman Willy
50 Icy waterway:
Var.
51 AshleyWilkes
sister, in
"G.W.T.W."
52 Bobbin lace
53 Baylor athletes
55 --aves
nonpareilss)
57 Gave everybody
a hand


59 Calvin Klein
employee
60 Splotch
61 Recurrent
melody
62 Tropical palm
63 Trills
lightheartedly
64 1991-92 U.S.
Open tennis
champ


65 Sluggish
66 "For sake!"
68 "Olympia"
painter
69 Jolson song
subject
72 Grotesque
74 Eskimo's wrap
76 Less trained
77 Pastoral poem
78 Defeat, and how!


79 Peddled better
than
80 Purposive
82 Blow the whistle
on
84 Get stuck (on)
86 Like city real
estate
87 Cousin of the
egret
88 Tropical tuber
89 Caron film, 1953


91 Place for a
chapeau
92 Noisy-le-Sec
summers
93 Mil. awards
94 Casey's club
95 Cops'org.
96 Classic prefix
97 Harlem
Brundtland
(Norwegian
leader)


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 26, 1995 M PAGE 13 jI]


SLA D ES


Prayers prove worthwhile
to Alex
Two weeks ago we asked you to reserve thoughts
and prayers for 8-year-old Alex Murphy, who was
scheduled to undergo tests in a Boston Hospital related
to heart problems.
Alex, brother Ben, and mom and dad, Susan and
Sean, are back and the trip went well.
Susan said the surgeon decided inexplicably at the
last moment not to go through a surgical procedure. It
wasn't necessary after all and all is well with the fam-
ily back at home in Holmes Beach.
Susan attributes the good fortune to all the thoughts
and prayers that were sent up to Alex in Boston from
Anna Maria Island and sends her thanks to you all.


Loughs celebrate 50th
anniversary
Jim and Jinny Lough, now residents of
Palmetto, recently celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary. The Loughs discovered
Anna Maria Island during World War II. At
that time, Jim, a pilot, was stationed at the
former Drew Field in Tampa. The Loughs
decided to take a chance and visit Anna
Maria when Jim got permission to take a
short leave. Since then, the Loughs have
spent a lot of time on Anna Maria, including
many visits to old Gulf Park Hotel in
Bradenton Beach.


For A Touch of The
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Mom's a nursing grad
Pat Kennedy ofHolmes Beach graduated from Vo-
Tech Nursing School on Jan. 13. Kennedy's family
would like her to know that they are very proud of
her accomplishment.


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i] PAGE 14 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


eM-:]i-lf ail


Carl G. Mattson Sr.
Carl G. Mattson Sr., 93, of Holmes Beach, died
Jan. 17, in Cheshire, Conn.
Born in Waterbury, Conn., Mr. Mattson was a
former resident of Manatee County. He worked for the
New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad for 20
years before starting his civil engineering and land sur-
veying firm in Wolcott. He was a former tax collector
and town meeting moderator and a state representative,
both in Wolcott.
He was chairman of the Wolcott Republican Town
Committee. He was chairman and a member of the
building committee that built many of the Wolcott
schools. He was a member of Mill Plain Union Church,
where he was a past deacon and chairman of the offi-
cial board. He was a member of Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church, where he was a member of the Board
of Trustees and the Men's Club. He was a former coun-
cilman and vice mayor of Holmes Beach. He was a
member of Liberty-Continental Lodge No. 76 Ancient
Free and Accepted Masons of Waterbury. He was a
member of the Scottish Rite bodies of Waterbury and
Bridgeport, the Sahib Temple Shrine of Sarasota and
the Anna Maria High Twelve Club.
He is survived by three sons, Carl G. Jr., and Ri-
chard T., both of Cheshire, and Jon E., of Southington;
seven grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.
There will be no local services held. Memorial
contributions may be made to Shriners Burn Institute,
Boston Unit, 51 Blossom St., Boston, Mass. 02114, or
Roser Memoiral Community Church Van Fund, P.O.
Box 247, Anna Maria, Fla. 34216.


Professional Medical Center
Walk-In Clinic 778-0711
Family Practice Mario Vega, M.D.
NOW THROUGH JANUARY 31, '95
FLU SHOTS $500
New Patients Welcome
A Medicaid/Medicare Approved
503 Manatee Ave. Suite E, Holmes Beach


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Our ESP* (ENERGY SAVINGS PLAN)
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NO unneeded parts replacement
NO phone solicitations
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Marie S. Uttendorfer
Marie S. Uttendorfer, 75, of Bradenton, died Jan.
21, 1995 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
A Christian wake service was held at Griffith-Cline
Funeral Home, Holmes Beach. Mass of Christian burial
will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25, at St. Bernard
Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach,
with Rev. Benjamin Gorr officiating. Burial will be in
Fogartyville Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to St. Bernard Catholic
Church, Project Light, 248 South Harbor Drive,
Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217.
Mrs. Uttendorfer was born in Passaic, N.J.,and
came to Manatee County from Long Island in 1980.
She was corporate secretary at Moran Corp. in New
York, retiring in 1980.
Mrs. Uttendorfer was past president of Ladies Or-
der of Hiberians; past president of the Off Stage Ladies;
past president of St. Bernard Guild; past president of
Women's Club of Anna Maria Island; Northern Dean-
ery Director and a first vice president of Venice Dio-
cese Council of Catholic Women; a past member of St.
Bernard Parrish Council; and a member of St. Bernard
Finanace Committee.
Mrs. Uttendorfer was a valued contributor to The Is-
lander Bystander for as many as five community service
organizations at a time, always providing timely an-
nouncements and information of interest to Islanders.
She is survived by her husband, Ernest; a daugh-
ter, Kathlene Busick of Kaneohe, Hawaii; a sister,
Kathleen of Bradenton; three grandchildren; and one
great-grandchild.


mI A


The Islander Bystanderwants your social and club news.
Call to find out how your story can become news!
We're waiting to hear from you ... 778-7978.


As Independent As The Island Itself.
First National Bank 1
MemberFDIC (Jmai
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach (813) 778-4900
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West


Tucker and Burke to wed
George and Sandi Burke of Bradenton announce
the engagement of their daughter, Angela Danielle
Burke, to Robert Leslie Tucker of Bradenton, son of
Steve and Nina Tucker of Anna Maria. The couple will
wed Feb. 18 at Palma Sola Baptist Church.
Miss Burke is a 1991 graduate of Perry Hall High
School, Perry Hall, Md., and is attending Manatee Com-
munity College. She also works at The Learning Tree.
The bridegroom-elect is a 1990 graduate of Mana-
tee High School and is attending Manatee Community
College. He also is the deck kitchen manager at the
Sandbar Restaurant.

Where is SAM?
In last week's cover story, Bunny Garst issued a
challenge to the community to help Save Anna Maria
raise funds for a legal battle to fight the proposed 65-
foot-high bridge at Manatee Avenue.
The address for donations was omitted from the story.
Please send contributions to: SAM, Inc., P.O. Box 906,
Anna Maria, Fla. 34217. For information or to donate
anonymously, call 778-6824 or 778-2079.

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


KEY INCOME TAX
& BUSINESS SERVICES, INC.

Individual, Partnership and Corporate
TAX PREPARATION

5500 Marina Drive Holmes Beach, FL
FOR APPOINTMENT 778-5710
"Same Island Location Since 1971"
' '


CHRYSLER 4
- d


Plymouth


ANNOUNCES
"CARE FREE AUTO
SHOPPING SERVICE"


Bunner Smith
Bunner Smith


Test drive your next car in hassle free comfort
at your home or office! Call us and the vehicle
of your choice will be driven to your home or of-
fice. Please call Islander BUNNER SMITH at
748-6510 to schedule an appointment.
2700 First Street Bradenton, Florida 34208


The Island Poet
There's a gal down the street who you must know,
She always seems to be on the go.
Thereby hangs my lowly tale,
'Cause she's always at some garage sale.
Her closets are full, her garage is a mess,
But at bargain hunting, she is the best.
Now some of her bargains need a slight repair,
A bend over here and a stitch over there.
But I am afraid these things will never get done,
For there's a sale down the street and she's on the run.
Bud Atteridge


OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEPING
AND YEAR AROUND TAX SERVICE < -
Individuals Corporations Partnerships
Now Accepting New Clients '
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
S'i& S Oty, nolM E4nt 778-6118
Licensed by the U.S. Goverment to represent taxpayers before the IRS.


I F RKI


IISLANDE:







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 15 1F


A I


Another candle for
Pelican Man's cake
Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary invites everyone to
celebrate the birthday of Dale Shields, the Pelican
Man, on Thursday, Feb. 2. Cake cutting will be at
noon followed by a sanctuary tour. The event is free.
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary is located in Ken
Thompson Park, adjacent to Mote Marine Labora-
tory, Sarasota. Call 388-4444for information.


Offstage ladies hold
Valentine luncheon
The Offstage Ladies, a support group for Island
Players, the playhouse in Anna Maria City, will hold
a "Sweetheart Valentine Luncheon" on Wednesday,
Feb. 8, at Chart House restaurant on Longboat Key at
11:30 am.
Entertainment will be provided by John Patterson,
an Irish storyteller.
Call Mary Lasson at 778-0115 or Roberta Barbour
at 778-3519 for reservations.


Love is the doctrine
of this church;
The quest of truth
its sacrament;
And service is its prayer
Worship
Services
9 am and 11 am
Nursery Available
Church
School
Ages 3 -16 at 9 am
Adult Study Group
10 am
All Island
Youth Group
Wed 5:30 pm
Ages 13-18
Minister
Charles Jim Marsh
6200 Gulf of Mexico Drive
383-6481


Kohler pedestal lavatories are
sculptured of brilliant vitreous
china and available in a wide
range of Kohler colors.
Contemporary or nostalgic, high
fashion or traditional, create your
own personal look with pedestal
lavatories--by KOHLER.
THE BOLD LOOK
OF KOHLER.
LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348-B Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach


ITSLANDERw


"The Best News"


Tax collector to speak at
Kiwanis meeting
Manatee County Tax Collector Ken Burton will be
the featured speaker at the Kiwanis Club's meeting on Jan.
30. The club meets weekly at 6 p.m. at Key West Willy's.

Garden club seeks plants
The Island Garden Club is appealing for donations
of plants, furniture, all types of household items, and
women's and men's clothes for its annual sale to be
held Saturday, Feb. 4.
Proceeds will benefit the club's work to support its
Anna Maria Island Community Center Scholarship
Fund, Manatee Vo-Tech Scholarship Fund, Anna
Maria Elementary School projects as well as beautifi-
cation of the Island.
Call Marguerite Carrick at 778-0256 or Margaret
Miller at 778-5182 for pick-up.

Learn rug craft
at Island Center
SELFHELP, a nonprofit job creation program of
the North American Mennonite and Brethren in Christ
churches, will offer an Oriental Rug Crafts program at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center on Friday,
Jan. 27, from 10:30 am. to noon.
The community is invited to attend and learn about
the artisans of oriental rugs made in Pakistan.

Brain Gym offers sign
language course
The Brain Gym bookstore, 5340 F Gulf Dr.,
Holmes Beach, will offer a beginning sign language
course for four weeks, each Saturday morning in Feb-
ruary, from 10:30 am. to 11:30 am.
The fee is $35 per person or $30 per person to those
who register with a friend or family member. Children
over the age of seven may enroll with an adult.
Pre-register by calling the Brain gym at 778-5990.

Yoga classes start at
Island center
Yoga classes at beginner and intermediate levels
will begin Tuesday, Jan. 31, at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, Anna Maria City.
Instructor Dolce Little will hold four-week ses-
sions. The cost per session for community center mem-
bers is $20 and $25 for non-members.
For more information call Dolce Little at 778-2081
or the center at 778-1908.


wf W \ 9 .

STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


CLARE H, STAR
D.P.M.


PODIATRIC MEDICI
and
SURGERY


Pobiat-r

REIT,


INE I


A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Dally Home Visits by Appointment


Literacy Council needs
volunteers to tutor
The Literacy Council of Manatee County is seek-
ing people who would like to volunteer their time to
teach adults how to read and write.
An orientation will be held from 9 a.m. to 12 noon
on Saturday, Jan. 28, at the United Way Building, Suite
3, 1701 14th St. W., Bradenton.
Two subsequent training workshops will be held
from 9 am. to 3 p.m. on Feb. 11 and 25.
To register for the February sessions, tutors should
call 746-8197 by Wednesday, Feb. 1.

Register for 'Writing to
Publish' class
Free-lance writer Helen Nettleton will present
"Writing to Publish" classes at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, Anna Maria City, Tuesday morn-
ings, Feb. 7 to March 28, from 9:15 am. to 11:15 a.m.
There is a fee of $45 per student and registration is
required. Call 751-6940 for information.
Travel Club to meet at
Community Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center Travel
Club will meet Thursday, Feb. 2, at 9:30 a.m. at the
center in Anna Maria City.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Discussion and plans for a wide variety of things
to do and see will take place.
The Travel Club meets the first and third Thursday
of the month at 9:30 a.m. at the center.

Oils and acrylics exhibit at
Island Branch Library
During the month of February, the Island Branch
Library will display an exhibit of oils and acrylics by
retired dentist Dr. Allan Weissman of Perico Island.
The subject of the exhibit reflects the artist's life-
long fascination with baseball.
The library is located at 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach.
County church women to
meet on Island
Church Women United in Manatee County will
meet Friday, Feb. 3, at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
Palm and Marina Drives, Holmes Beach.
Coffee hour will begin at 9:30 am.
The program includes a presentation by Jim Boyer
entitled "Peter, the Big Fisherman."
All women are invited at attend.

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we're moving to
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. Bradenton, FL 34205 Bradenton, FL 34205
(813) 748-4161 (813) 747-1881
C%" r11-1um0n m







I2 PAGE 16 M JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Snooks' always has a tale ready to tell


The thing about "Snooks" Adams is that he's not
just one story but many. Hang out with him for a couple
of hours and you've barely scratched the surface, with
some of his tales being ones you've heard or read about
in one form or another before (he's been written about
a lot in these parts) and some being brand new.
When The Islander Bystander visited with Snooks,
we picked up some tidbits about the 77-year-old former
Holmes Beach police chief that we believe haven't
been told before.
Like what a mischievous 10-year-old Snooks did
to his grandfather's cane one day.
It seems that Snooks' granddaddy, Capt. Billy
Fulford of Cortez fishing fame, had suffered a stroke.
Fulford was sitting in his chair with his cane resting
nearby when Snooks took out his knife and carved
away enough wood to form a chain-like link.
"How in the world can I walk with that thing?"
asked Fulford when he spied the boy's handiwork.
Snooks said, "Well, you don't use it anyway, because
someone has to help you."
After Fulford died in 1937, Snooks carved other
links, creating a cane made out of a wooden chain.
Prior to Snooks' interest in creating objects of
questionable utility, he employed himself at a
Bradenton Beach bathhouse.
"I worked there when I was only about 8 1/2 years
old," Snooks remembered. And his wife, Elizabeth,
began to laugh as the reporter inquired what he did at
the bathhouse.
"Well, for 75 cents, you got a bathing suit, a towel
and a locker," Snooks explained. "I'd take them back
and give them a locker it had a key, and they'd put
their clothes in and when they came back I'd open
up the locker for them."
Yes, but there must be more to this story, judging
from Elizabeth Adams' laughter, and as is usually the
case with a Snooks story, there was.
"Anyway, one day they were real busy, and some
of the girls over at the ladies' side didn't show up, so
they put me to work over there, and I quit," Snooks
says. "Those old women came walking by me in the
nude, and with their towels wrapped around them, so
I went back and told Old Man Tichenor, 'I quit.'
"Those old women, they were probably middle-
aged," Snooks further elaborated. "Probably between
20 and 21."
"They made you nervous," observed Elizabeth
Adams.
Sure. Anyone can understand how that could hap-
pen.
"I've changed a lot since then," Snooks added, re-
storing the reporter's faith in an Island institution.
As the photos show, despite the stresses of Snooks'
early employment, he found some creative ways to


Snooks at work on another creation.


relax in his adult life, making artistic creations out of
found objects particularly Australian pine cones and
palm fronds.
"I just got tired of stepping on them," Snooks says
of the little pine cones he uses to make everything from
poodles to spiders to reindeer. "I sit around all summer
making this stuff, then I give it away at Christmas."
Guess it beats working at the bath house.


Snooks carved this Cortez
fishing boat when he was
about 18. "Inever did
complete it, Snooks says,
"because my sister
wanted it, so I gave it to
her, and her kids had it
until they all moved
away. "








In his 1977 hardbound book, Wonders ofRaccoons,
Wyatt Blassingame penned, For Snooks and Liz with
thanks for the coon stories and the picture. Wyatt. The
asterik notation reads: "See picture credits."
On the picture credit page, among the many
credits listed, is "Snooks" Adams, 57. Snooks' credit
is listed first although many credits appear in the list.


'*;*


Early Snooks, from his mischievous period. As a
young boy, Snooks carved his grandfather's cane
into an interesting, albeit non-functional, wooden
chain.


Snooks picture of wild raccoons was taken in his back yard next door to Blassingame where they were fed
nightly. The photo was resurrected recently when Snooks had reprints made for a special gift. He framed a copy
and had a T-shirt made for Florida Gov. Lawton Chiles to commemorate his recent election victory. Snooks claims
the raccoon in the center, standing upright is the he-coon of the Anna Maria Island pack.































The men behind Gulf Stream's "endless vacation" plans are Frank Buskirk, left,
Jim Valente and Steve Summers. Jeff Gravely is not pictured. Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood

Tourist information center

complements vacation sales


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 17 [I[


O'kNE4E MEETHE ANDIATES

SWho: Anna Maria City Mayor and
Commission Candidates
What: Campaign Face-off
S Where: Anna Maria City Hall
OR 1 When: Thursday, Feb. 2, 7 p.m.
Sponsored by The Islander Bystander


Dorothy McChesney
For Mayor of Anna Maria
Please Vote
February 14, 1995
Paid political advertisement Paid for by the
campaign account of Dorothy McChelsey


"I am committed to the
Rights of our citizens,
to listen to their concerns
and to act upon them
quickly and fairly."


At the recent grand opening of the
Anna Maria Island Tourist Information
and Welcome Center it was apparent
visitors are going to get the royal treat-
ment from the Gulf Stream Beach Re-
sort sales team.
Gulf Stream Beach Resort at 1501
Gulf Drive North in Bradenton Beach is
marketing the "endless vacation" pur-
chase option or vacation ownership.
A family can purchase a specific pe-
riod of exclusive use at Gulf Stream and
weeks owned here may be exchanged for
vacation time periods at thousands of re-
sort destinations worldwide.
The villa-style units are designed with
luxurious furnishings, a large master suite
and second bedroom, wet bars, remote
controlled cable television with video cas-
sette recorders and much more pampering.
Jim Valente, managing partner of
Gulf Stream, explained that his resort is
a member of Resort Condominiums In-
ternational, the world's largest vacation
ownership exchange organization. In
fact, according to Valente, Gulf Stream
is rated in the top 5 percent of RCI's
immense collection of vacation resorts.
The principals in putting together the
resort project include Valente, who suc-


cessfully sold Gulf Stream's sister project,
Smuggler's Cove in Bradenton Beach.
Frank Buskirk is president in charge
of construction. He was a partner in some
of the area's most successful residential
communities including Perico Bay Club
and Perico Harbor Marina.
Jeff Gravely is vice president and
chief financial officer at Gulf Stream
and is a principal in a real estate ap-
praisal and consulting firm, Entreken,
Moore, Gravely & Robinson, with of-
fices in Bradenton and St. Petersburg.
Gravely will oversee buyer financing.
Steve Summers recently retired
from 23 years with Champion Home
Builders Company including three
years as President and CEO. He will
focus on marketing, sales and manage-
ment at Gulf Stream.
At the tourist information center,
Gulf Streams sales representatives in-
vite you to a presentation on vacation
ownership where qualified parties may
receive a free gift as well as offering a
full complement of visitor information.
The sales office/welcome center is
located in Anna Maria Island Centre
Shops, between Shells and Walgreens,
at 3214 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.


* Debt of Honor
by Tom Clancy
Jack Ryan be-
comes the President's
National Security
Advisor and finds
himself faced with
military, economic and political crises
involving Japan. This latest novel by
Clancy is good reading if you like ex-
tremely technical narration. As in all
Clancy novels, the first approximately
100 pages require close attention as the
characterizations for the complex plot
are established. Currently on the best
seller list.
Reviewed by John Sandberg


Horseshoe
scores
Winners in the Jan. 21 horseshoe
games were Herb Puryear and
Arthur Moore.
Runners-up were George
Landraitis and Al Norman.
The weekly contests get underway
every Saturday at 9 am. at Anna Maria
City Hall, 10005 Gulf Dr.


NEWI ON THE LIBIART SHELF

Pale Gray for Guilt by John D.
MacDonald
Once again Travis McGee, a famil-
iar name for MacDonald fans, salvages
a personal tragedy for a friend and
scuttles the wrong doers. (A complete
collection of the late Sarasota author,
John D. MacDonald, is available in pa-
perback.)
Reviewed by Lee Hornack.
4 Don't Stand too Close to a
Naked Man by Tim Allen
This book was on the New York
Times Best Seller List and the author's
name was known to me by way of his
TV show which I have watched a few
times, so I decided to read it.
Well, I very soon decided that in
this book I did not share the author's
idea of humor. He has a fixation on a
certain part of male anatomy. Maybe
I'm "over the hill", but I can better use
my time reading something else.
Reviewed by Gladys Kloko







miE PAGE 18 N JANUARY 26, 1995 M THE ISLANDER BY:







See food, eat it
By Bonner Presswood
What's the first thing your northern visitors want
to do before they can even unpack? Eat? Seafood, sea-
food and perhaps, some fresh seafood.
From classically prepared English Dover sole to
peel-and-eat shrimp boiled in beer, Islanders are big
seafood consumers.
We all like it fresh, and once the company tires of
their craving for shrimp, we look for variations and inno-
vations in preparation, sauces and cooking methods.
From the blue collar blue crab to the elite (spell that
expensive) stone crab, Gulf and bay waters surround-
ing Anna Maria are brimming with crustaceans. With
access to the bay, especially from a dock or pier, you
can drop a spring trap loaded with chicken wing bait
into the water and pull in a good harvest. In clear wa-
ter you can see the crabs take the bait and pull up the
trap. In not so clear water, you might try tying a string
to the bait so you can feel the crab make his grab.
If all else fails, call a wholesale market like Star
Fish Company in Cortez.
I used to wonder why any fisherman would come
home empty-handed when all he had to do was take a
swing by Star on the way home. What's the harm in a
little fish story?
Thanks to our surroundings, seafood restaurants
are prolific here. Like some cities, with a gas station or
a bar on every corner, we've got great seafood every-
where you look.
Since we mentioned Dover sole, we should tell you
where to look for the very best, classically prepared and
de-boned tableside. Ivo Scafa is the classic, old-world
style maitre d8 and owner of the restaurant on Longboat
Key that bears his name. His promotions bear a slogan,
"the soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key," and
everyone who enters and dines discovers the truth in
the message. You won't believe how great his Caesar
salad can be until you taste it, and you get to view the
. mmmmmmm =mm mmmmmmm q
COUPON -
EXPIRES 1L O \
1/31/95 N%-' BO I 'S I
10519 Cortez Road <
792-5300 "
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

I LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I
I I
S$3.99/ BUFF 2.99
I :
DINNER PIZZA BUFFET

$4.49/ECOND E 2.99
LImm mil COUPON Immmmmma

Champagne Sunday Brunch
Benedicts, Omelettes
Belgian Waffles & More
1Oam-2pm Sunday .


entire preparation at your tableside.
On Anna Maria, I've made a particular science of
taste-testing grouper sandwiches. It's the first thing I
want to try at a new establishment, figuring that if that's
good, I'll work my way up the menu scale.
I'm happy to report, there is not a bad grouper
sandwich anywhere on Anna Maria, but among the
tops are the Sandbar in Anna Maria and at the far other
end of the spectrum, Mar Vista Restaurant and Pub in
the village at the north end of Longboat Key. Very
good, and very fresh and the Mar Vista credits that to
their volume. They go through a lot of grouper, fast. It's
starting to look like the fish in their aquarium, Oscar,
is better than sandwich-size.
What's really fun is introducing a visitor from the
north to the wonders of seafood. Some have never
heard of our most prolific varieties. They often marvel
at the delicious, white, moist tender taste of grouper.
Since stone crabs are almost unique to the Gulf
of Mexico, your average "upstater" won't have tried
them either.
If you try them at home, here's a tip for moist, hot,
delicious stone crab meat: microwave. Most instruc-
tions, if you get any at all, are to re-boil the claws but
if you put them in a shallow glass dish, cover with a wet
kitchen towel and cook two to three minutes for 8 to 10



Joe's Eats & Sweets


DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
Sandwiches
Homemade Soups & Salads
Homemade Ice Cream & Cakes
Sugar Free & Fat Free Sundaes
Gourmet Coffees
New & Larger Dining Room
Kitchen Open 'til 7:30pm
Closed Tuesday' Wed 6-10
219 Gulf Drive South. Bradenton Beach
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge 778-0007


Down the Hatch "South"
is preparing for opening
with signs at the restau-
rant seeking persons who
seek employment. The new
owners of the past location
e of the High Seas,
Docker's, Roaster's and
Zoomerz promise a quality
establishment and from the
looks of the extensive
remodeling, they'll de-
liver. Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood




claws, they'll retain all the flavor that you would have
washed away in the boiling pot.
More novice information: stone crabs are not har-
vested whole. They regenerate claws and state law pro-
hibits the removal of the crab from Gulf waters. Skilled
crabbers snap off the claws and toss back the crab to
grow another harvest. Tear-jerking environmentalist
take heart, the stone crab is a bottom scavenger with a
"hard as hell" shell. He doesn't need his claws for de-
fense or to feed.
The stone crabs' biggest predator appears to be the
octopus. They leech on to the crab claw until they can
eat through the shell with acid-like tentacle adhesions
and suck the jelly-like fluid "meat" from the claw. The
crabbers harvest is boiled at the fish house before they
enter the market to preserve the meat, which is a peach-
colored, luke-warm, Jello-like substance raw but
rich, rich, rich tasty white flesh when cooked.
What? You didn't know there are octopus in our
Gulf waters.
Not in the proportion of "10,000 Leagues Under
the Sea," but they're there. Local fishers don't harvest
them though. It is apparently difficult, time consuming
and besides, most fishermen and crabbers hate them for
CONTINUED ON NEAXT PAGE


Charming Intimate,
Casual Atmosphere
Fresh, Inventive,
."' Unique Cuisine
I ^

Imaginative Lunches
Mon-Sat I1 am 2pm
Early Dinner Hour
Including $3995 Dinner for 2
With wine 5-6pm nightly
Dinner Mon. Sat. 5-10pm
... on the corner of
Manatee Avenue & Gulf'Drive.
) (813) 778-5440


CAFE ON

THE BEACH
Where Manatee Ave Meets The Gulf
Presents
In addition to our regular menu
Beach Dee-Lights
Monday thru Thursday 3-6 pm
Hot Turkey and Dressing
Mouth Watering Pork Roast
Meatloaf Supreme
All of the above served with mashed potatoes,
gravy, vegetable and rolls
Shrimp and Fries
With vegetable and roll
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
With salad and garlic bread

Five Choices at $549 .x
Beverage Extra
Colorful Inside or Outside Dining Plenty of Parking
4000 Gulf Drive Open 6 am 7 Days 778-0784


%^
%,








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 19 [!


Stir-it-up
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
their slimy, poaching ways.
They have to be packed in wood barrels in their
own ink and are apparently more desirable for research
than a food product here. They have the largest brain,
proportional to body size, of any creature on earth.
Every restaurant has something really great to of-
fer in the way of seafood. Ideally, we'd plan a progres-
sive dinner to last over the average two-week vacation,
hop-scotching from one great dish to another.
Kay's Korner Diner (formerly Sweet Spoone) re-
cently reported running out of food for their Friday
night all-you-can-eat dinner. They apologized for
which we gladly take the blame and advertised their
apology in the classified advertising section. I'm sure
they're stocked up now. The special is continuing.

Musical chairs, part two
The rumor mill churs away on Anna Maria. Word
is Marty Moery, former D.Coy Duck owner who re-
cently took the reins at the Bridge Tenderis no more.
Where art thou Marty?
Perhaps he headed south to the Buccaneer on
Longboat Key where a March opening is heard to be
in the works for new proprietor, Anna Maria developer
Reynold "Ren" Glanz. We hope to tell you more about
this in the future.
The atmosphere was always great at this marina
restaurant where the menu was priced in dubloons and
pieces of eight. In years past a for-real peg-legged pi-
rate greeted you at the door and valet parked your car.
We remember them for wood grilled prime rib and
the make-your own sundae cart that the pirate or piratress
pushed over to your table after the main course.
Meanwhile Bob Slicker is back at Key West


The for sale sign still hangs on Gulf of Mexico Drive
at Sleepy Hollow Lane where you turn to go the
Buccaneer on Longboat Key. Islander Photo:
Bonner Presswood
Willies in Bradenton Beach and Billy O'Connor
headed over the bridge, off the island, and into sports
bar territory at Ron Racki's new pub, Alligatorspon
Manatee Avenue at Pebble Springs Plaza.
Mutiny Inn, at Manatee Avenue and East Bay in
Holmes Beach, was inadvertently omitted from a
breakfast tour of Anna Maria Island two weeks ago in
this column. They serve Champagne brunch on Sun-
days with three styles of eggs Benedict, a creative ar-
ray of omelettes and Belgian waffles.

ALLIGATORS
SPORTS BAR &
':; RESTAURANT


761
Sun.-Thur
Fri. & Sat
5917 Man
(Next To


OF GREAT FOOD
Fresh Cut To Order French Fries
Real Buffalo Wings Steaks & More!
SUPER BOW PARTY

nty of TV's plus Big Screen
-0611 Sunday
. 11am-12am ." Jan. 29
t. 11 am- am Food & Drin
iatee Ave. W.
Burger King) Specials


Island community orchestra &
chorus performs
The Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra &
Chorus will perform a concert on Sunday, Jan. 29, at
2 p.m. at the Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Dr.,
Anna Maria City.
Under the direction of Music Director Alfred
Gershfeld and Chorus Master Elizabeth Bharucha the
concert will include Magnificent by Vivaldi, Violin
Concerto by Nardini, and works by Telemann, Bolzoni
and Rameau. Admission is free.
Longboat Chapel hosts artist
concert series
The Longboat Island Chapel will host a Special
Artist Concert Series.
The first of three concerts presented will be held on
Sunday, Jan. 29, at 1:30 p.m. at the chapel, 6200 Gulf
of Mexico Dr., Longboat.
Principals from the Florida West Coast Symphony
will perform an afternoon concert of chamber works
featuring Paul Wolf on violin, Betsy Hudson on flute
and Yuri Vasilaki on viola.
The concert is free to the public.
Big Band Dance at Island Center
A Big Band Dance, sponsored by the Island
Kiwanis for the benefit of the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center, Anna Maria City, will take place on
Thursday, Feb. 9, from 8 to 11 p.m.
Music will be provided by the 18-piece band Se-
nior Sound. The cost is $10 per person. This is a
B.Y.O.B. event with set-ups available.
Tickets are available at the center or by calling
778-6746 or 794-3459.





I PRIME RIB g
I With Purchase
Of Beverage
Includes Soup ON LY
Or Salad, Potato, $ 97
Vegetable & Roll
After 4:00 p.m.
Coupon Expires Jan. 31, 1995
OPEN MON.-SAT. 11 AM-9 PM
74:Z ... .A *, *4 a. 7 58147 -


You can find the home of your dreams ... dozens of rental listings, lots of stuff
for sale, employment and volunteer opportunities. It's all in The Islander
classified ads, pages 25-27 this issue. Call 778-7978 for information.


U V ff~ ~ ~.U -.J .1 .-i~ W.U ~..


SMIRNOFF MR BOSTON BURNETTS
80-PROOF 1.75 LTH 80-PROOF VODKA
VODKA $15.59 "" VODKA 9.85 LTR 11.59
LITERS $9.95 I$ 1LTB 1.75 LTR

CANADIAN RESERVE CANADA HOUSE RICH & RARE oR
CANADIAN '11.99 CANADIAN BLACK VELVET
WHISKEY M 3.0 WHISKEY 11 95
1.75 LTR NET '8.99 1.75 LTR I 1.75 LTR 13.95

ANCIENT AGE JIM BEAM CABIN STILLoR
BOURBON 3 5 BOURBON '15.99 HEAVEN HILL
1.75 LTR 13 1.75 LTR NET 12.99 OURBON 12.99
SEAGRAM'S ANCIENT AGE IMPERIAL
7-CROWN 15.59 BLENDED BLENDED 12.75
MIR 3.00 WHISKEY 9 WHISKEY MIR 14.00
1.75 LTR NET '12.59 1.75LT$H 12a9 1.75 LTR NET 8.75

CLAN MACGREGOR OLD SMUGGLER USHERS GREENSTRIPE
SCOTCH $4. q SCOTCH SCOTCH
1.75 LTR 14.99 175LTh 15.88 1.75sLT 17.95
135 IN 1SUPERTSPECIALS


VAT-69 SCOTCH
GOLDLABEL 15.69
1.75 LTR IJ.D3


CUTTY SARK
SCOTCH 2359
1.75 LTR $2 .59


J&B SCOTCH
,7i,-Q $26.99
m "lrl284- o


"A Wonderful Experience"

CAFE ON THE BEACH

S. Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
1 s" ,f I(includes Sausage & Coffee)

$350 +tX
Served Daily (Waffles tool)

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


-* xffdMSCAIm*


kn


k


I









fI3 PAGE 20 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria
SElementary menu
Monday, 1/30/95
* Breakfast: Cereal or Two Cinnamon Toast,
Fresh Fruit
* Lunch: Boneless Rib Shape on Bun or Hamburger,
* Potato Rounds, Fruit Juice, Sherbet
Tuesday, 1/31/95 "
* Chinese New Year
* Breakfast: Oatmeal or Cereal, Toast,
* Cinnamon Apple Slices
* Lunch: Grilled, Boneless Chicken Breast or Pork
SChop Shape, Carrot Coins, Pineapple, Fresh Baked
. Hot Roll, Fortune Cookie
Wednesday, 2/1/95 *
Breakfast: Cheese Toast or Cereal & Toast,
Potato Triangles
School Secretaries' Choice Day
* Lunch: Baked Chicken or Corn Dog, Salad,
Mashed Potatoes, Cinnamon Rolls
Thursday, 2/2/95 *
S Breakfast: Toast & Sausage Link or Cereal, *
* Fruit Juice S
* Lunch: Spaghetti w/Meat & Tomato Sauce, Green *
Beans, Peaches, Fresh Baked Roll
* Friday, 2/3/95
Breakfast: Cereal & Toast or Pretzel, Pineapple
SLunch: Sausage Pizza or Chicken Patty on Bun,
* Corn, Pears, Jello w/Whipped Topping
All meals served with milk.
*d a a a0 0 0 S a O S C 00


Cc
The
Joy Courtney Fr
Bri
rigid


School daze..


commendable job
ese are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending Jan. 13.
ont row, left to right, are Sarah Troutt, Travis Weng and Amanda Nelson. Middle row, left to right, are
ttany Znaczko, Andrew Prudente, April Berra, Jordan Bowers and Nicole Fletcher. Back row, left to
ht, are Kellie Cobb, Laura Potter, Kirsten Faasse, Jennifer Burgner and Johnny Cicero.


Old Fashioned
.k T JYLERtS Ice Cream
and
Waffle Cones
[C, Made on
Location

OPEN This Area's Only Full
Daily Service Ice Cream Shoppe
Noon
to 10 p.m. 11904 Cortez Road West
794-5333 SURFING WORLD VILLAGE


Gourmet Pizza Thin Crust Pizza
SUPER BOWL SPECIAL"
O- Order Medium or Large Pizza
Get FREE Scoop of Ice Cream or
S22 oz. Soft Drink
S16 Wings for $4.95
VAUD W/COUPON ONLY EXP. 2/1/95

FREE DELIVERY 778-4408
S OPEN EVERY DAY 11AM TO 10PM
SAnna Maria Shopping Centre Next to Walgreens
3244 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach, FL


,UJ r_,,a-M.AO 1 -
BUFFET
WITH THIS AD
Saturday and Sundays Only 1 PER PERSON
7:00 AM to 10:30 AM EXP. JAN.29, 95
Cinnamon Rolls 0 Hash Browns
Variety of Muffins Biscuits & Gravy
Cereal French Toast
Honey Dew Pancakes, Grits
Watermelon Fruit Toppings
Cantaloupe 0 Scrambled Eggs
Strawberries with Bacon,
Bananas Pepper & Onion
Pork Chops 0 Dessert Bar
Beef Patties Coffee, Tea &
Sausage & Bacon Milk included
OUR FAMOUS LUNCH& DINNER BUFFETS
ARE SERVED DAILY- WITH OVER 100 ITEMS
NEW LOCATION Breakfast
Sat-Sun. 7-10:30
4848 14th St. W. Lunch
THE FOUNTAINS Mon.-SaL 11:00-3:30
Dinner
755-3766 Mon.-Thurs. 3:30-8:00
(comer of 49th FrI.-Sat 3:30-8:30
Ave. & US 41) Sun. 11:00-8:00


I-


REATAUPRANT
OPEN FOR LUNCH 11AM
$3.95 to $6.95
"Check Out Our New, Lower Priced Menu!"
Dinner & Dancing 7 Nights
Sunday Night:
TOMMY RENAUD 7 to 11 PM
Monday Night:
TOMMY RENAUD TRIO 7 to 11 PM
Tues. thru Sat. Nights:
DUANE DEE
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543


Mar Vista -c
Ragin Cajun Night -
Sundays 5 10 pm
Appetizers
Pan-Fried Crawfish
Cakes with a spicy hot
mustard sauce...$ 5.95
Cajun Spiced Fried Oyster \
served with a bourbon spikers
remoulade...$6.95
Fried Gator Bites with
a spicy red sauce...$4.95
Entrees
Fried Pecan & Cornmeal Crusted
Catfish with hushpupples and remoulade
sauce for dipping... $10.75
Bayou Jambalaya with crawfish
tails, oysters, andoullle sausage & alligator...$13.75
Crawfish Boil, one pound of whole crawfish steamed
In beer and hot & spicy crab boil served with hot
mustard sauce & butter...$13.75
Cajun Sampler, cajun fried oysters, o:ackened catfish
and a grilled shrimp & andoullle kabob served with
remoulade sauce...$14.75
Above entrees served with the choice of Hoppin' John or Cheese Grlts, Stewed
Tomatoes with Okm & Corn and a side of Cole Slow, Cornbread & Squaw Bread
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street, Channel Marker 39
383-2391


*OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK *
DAILY SPECIALS 4 PM 9 PM
DINNER MENU Cr
STARTING AT $f.50
ALSO NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH AT 11:30
E .. n .... I ICOUPONnI u E uI....
* BUY I DINNER CET SECOND DINNER
2 ONLY VALID ON
S /2 PRIC REGULAR MENU
SNOT VALD WITH DAILY SPECIALS OR ANY OTHER DISCOUNT OK SPECIALS 0
E ONE COUPON EPER RSON EXPIRES 2/1/95 U
mU. Emas .. ...EU EE . .
ANP
SidekickS
S I 0 0 N
OPEN 7 DAYS *11:30 AM TIL?
2 FOR 1 WELL DRINKS & DRAFT
11:30 AM -7 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY
Sports Bar with Pool Tables
Call 739-2375 for reservations for our...
5 UPER BOWL
CGALA PARTY
SUNDAY* JAN. 29



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
5105 14TH ST. W. BRADENTON
739-2375






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 U PAGE 21 lIJ
mmmm mm mmmmemesuma


Essay success
Anna Maria Elementary School produced the top
three fifth-grade winners in the Osceola Chapter,
National Society Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion (NSDAR) American History Essay Contest. The
essay theme this year was "Living in America in
Colonial Days, 1607 1776." Competing with their
peers at Anna Maria and Palma Sola Elementary,
Andy McCarrick, left, earned first place; Benjamin
Sato, center, placed second; and Sarah Loveland
was awarded third place. The students and their
families will be the guests of the NSDAR at its annual
American History Month Luncheon to be held in
February at the Bradenton Country Club.


COUNTRY A
PRODUCE
SEAFOOD & DELI
S "Sweet Charlies"
"THE BEST STRAWBERRIES
AT THE BEST PRICE"
VINE RIPE SILVER QUEEN
coRN
TOMATOES GR a
ALWAY BANANAS 19 LB -'
LARGE GULF' TONE CRAB
SHRIMP CLAWS
8.49/Lb. ONIONS 7.99/Lb.
'YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET" ati 4adion qua~nteed
016 MANATEE AVE.W. (CORNER OF iST MANATEE) 749-1785


Backing up literature
Sara Thomas, left, and classmate Katie Lindahl put
their backs together to illustrate a poem entitled "Me
and Him, Him and Me during a study unit on
poetry in Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade class at our Island
School.






ROD4 rREL ROD4 teEL
~-LYS~iC3'U!e ! Pip


1/2 mile
* North of City Pier *
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "TM
ISLAND
COOKING
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA


"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
* Open Sat. & Sun. *
"DOWNSTAIRS"
Coffee Shop
Open Daily *
7:30 am to Closing
Full Breakfast *
Lunch & Dinner
Beer & Wine
Car Parking
PLUS
50 Bike Racks!


One cents sales tax pays off
Anna Maria Elementary School second-grade
student Aaron Windrem sits among afew boxes
containing $130,000 worth of computers and related
equipment the school recently received. The comput-
ers were paid for by the recent one-cent increase in
sales tax. Each classroom received two computers
including laptop computers for the teachers' use.


oil Subs Bagels




S Best Prices In Town!
-- Across the street from the Gulf
next to the Chinese Restaurant
103 7th St. North
U Bradenton Beach


%ks-&P A^ H




SURF & TURF BUFFET
You Wanted More Seafood ...
You Got It at the Anchorage
Our Surf-N-Turf Buffet features Oysters Rockefeller Grouper (Baked & Fried)
* Salmon Tuna Shrimp Scampi Fried Shrimp Scallops Mussels Carved
Beef Roast Pork Chicken Veal Salads Desserts... Nightly
and Much Much More
Early Bird thru Buffet by 5:30 10 $1195
Nightly from 4PM, Sunday from 2PM
FEATURING GROUPER $995
Oscar, Florentne, Broiled, Blackened or Fried
1/2 Lb. Top Sirloin ................................. $7.95
2 Double Thick Pork Chops .................$7.95
2 Lb. Ribs ............................................ $7.95
Lamb Shanks ........................................ $7.95
Surf & Turf ............................................. $9.95
Early Birds $1.00 Lessl Same Portions
Early Bird Specials from $495
Nightly Specials from 595
Lunch Buffet and Full Lunch
Menu in the Dining Room
11:30 AM to 3 PM
_________________________------------------------ A'.'V


SUNDAY $795 q J
BRUNCH J0
BUFFET
10AM -2PM
Over 30 Breakfast and
Dinner Items R
Mimona Bloody Mary $1 00
Screwdriver Seabreeze l
Entertainment 101 S. BAY BLVD.
SONS OF THE BEACH ANNA MAMA
Sunday 4 PM 778-9611
Oyster Bar on
HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 530 pm Anna Maria
$1.25HOUSE COCKTAILS Per
Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10 pm 778-0475
2 for 1 Well Drinks
$1.00Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet Q m


"I have a theory

that lunch

tastes better at

the beach."














And we're proving it right here on beautiful
Bradenton Beach. At the Beachhouse. Lunch
and dinner. Nightly entertainment. Volleyball.
Great deck. Great playground. Bring the family.


ShoUSe/7
great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North. Anna Maria Island. 813-779-2222


,JV IV ... -.-. -- I .


U







IB PAGE 22 E JANUARY 26, 1995 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I STREETLI


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Jan. 17, lost property, unknown location. The
complainant reported that he went to the Islander's
Market, his local residence and Cafe Robar. When he
reached to retrieve his money to pay the bill at Cafe
Robar, the money was gone. He said it was in a carry
pouch that never left his person.

Bradenton Beach
Jan. 13, hit and run, 900 block of Gulf Drive
North. The complainant reported that she was crossing
the road when she was hit in the shoulder by the mir-
ror of a cream-colored Ford van. She said the subject
driving the van then stopped and yelled at her. The
subject was not found.
Jan. 16, found property a blue, Huffy Savan-
nah, 10-speed, girl's bicycle with a red pouch on the
handlebars, 2500 block of Avenue C.
Jan. 18, criminal mischief, 200 block of Second
Street North. The complainant reported that a person
unknown punctured the tires on the passenger side of
his vehicle.
Jan. 19 assault, 1800 block of Gulf Drive North.
The complainant came to the police department and
reported being assaulted.

Holmes Beach
Jan. 13, vandalism, 81st Street beach. The com-
plainant reported that a person unknown damaged a tiki
hut and turned over a picnic table.
r -----*-----------"**
Eat In or FRE I
S TakOFF oEUVf Y
I ANY SIZE PIZZA!
I i

SOMA PIZZA
& ITALIAN RESTAU RAV
Specializing in Vead Chicken Fish Pasta
Makers of the Wois Lagest Pizza
Open 7 Days*11 AM to Ldnight-
201 N. GufDr, Bradenton Beach
L778-0771 or 778-0772

Tired of Supermarket Shopping?
Not able to find special items?
Try our small town flavor!



ID~ia MWA


Friendly, Family Service and
a Variety of Specialty and Imported Items.
Fresh Cut Meats & Deli Items
Homemade Sausage & Sauces
Imported Cheeses Wines
ORDER YOUR SUPERBOWL PLATTER TODAY!
We're in your neighborhood
778-1925
9807 Gulf Drive City of Anna Maria



I REE Bir^ ^All You Can Eat

AT CAPALBO'S
wih dhpe pwrhame ofa adu orseniorfare tkc onthe
EGMONT
KEY CRUISE
Tuesday, Thrsday & Sunday 1 PM to 5 PM




CORTEZ FLEFT

12Faes C.rte. Road We.t.
Se io s ...................... 1


Jan. 13 DUI, 3200 block of East Bay Drive. The
officer observed Bruce Raber, 39, of Bradenton Beach,
swerving in two lanes and clocked Raber at 52 mph in
a 35 mph zone. After stopping the vehicle, the officer
administered field sobriety tests to Raber and placed
him in custody.
Jan. theft, 4255 Gulf Dr., Island Village. The vic-
tim reported that he hired a subject to install new
shower doors and issued the subject a check to pay for
the doors to be ordered from Home Depot. The check
was cashed but the subject did not return. The victim
called Home Depot and learned that the doors were
never ordered. The victim attempted to contact the sub-
ject but the subject's phone was disconnected.
Jan. 14, disturbance, trespass warning, 5325 Gulf
Dr., Crabby Bill's. The subject was fired by the
restaurant's manager and went to the bar and began to
drink. The manager told the subject to leave and the
subject threw a beer on the manager. The subject was
forcibly removed by the manager with the assistance of
customers. The officer arrived and issued a trespass
warning to the subject.
Jan. 15, damage, 100 block of 68th Street. The
complaint reported that a person unknown entered the
property and removed the apartment numbers, broke an
emergency stair light, broke plants and removed a
planter.
Jan. 15, damage, 6800 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported that a person unknown entered
the property and destroyed 22 border lights.
Jan. 15, assistance in removing a snake from a
garage, 700 block of Key Royale Drive.
Jan. 16, suspicious person, 100 block of 52nd
Street beach. The officer responded to a report of a

1ANCH.OR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
V
Lifeguard
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
January 26 & 27 & 28 10pm
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


SUPER BOWL
SUSTENANCE!!






Gourmet Dinners to Go
Fresh Salads & Delicious Sandwiches
Party Platters & Hors d'oeuvres
Full Service Catering
RESTAURANT OPEN LUNCH & DINNER

383-0777
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr.
(Behind Circle K) Longboat Key
I I I


Anna Maria Fire District


summary of
Type of call
Structure fire
Brush fire
Vehicle fire
Miscellaneous fire
Investigations/ good intent
False
Fire alarm/alarm
Power line
Emergency medical
Rescue
Service
Motor vehicle accidents
Hazardous material
Mutual aid


1994 calls
Number $ amt
20 $124,650
10
15 $43,210
17
56
2
107
26
491
37
4


Average personnel per call: 4.52
Average response time : 4.92 minutes

suspicious subject wading in the water. The officer
located an intoxicated subject on the beach who said he
was trying to get home. The officer transported the
subject home.
Jan. 16, burglary to an automobile, 3705 block of
East Bay Drive, Sunbow Bay. The complainant re-
ported that she returned home and found a light in her
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Where Longboat Key History Began
OOR^



STONE CRAB
RESTAURANT

4 FRESH H

Stone Crabs
Purveyors of Ouality Stone Crabs
Since 1924. Fresh Daily.
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY


Get

Hooked

On

Fresh

Native

Seafood

At

The

Sandbar


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
OOOOOOOOO000
OPEN FOR
LUNCH
AND
I)INNER
7 DAYS
A WEEK

901 S. Bay Blvd Anna Mari
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953

What's the
best news
anywhere on
Anna Maria
Island?

778ER7978
778-7978


LOUNGE *PACKAGE LIQUOR "r rnrU. I..I
BLUEHEARTS
Wed. thru Sat. Jan. 25 28 9 PM -1 AM
* SUPER BOWL PARTY *
S Sunday January 29 12 noon
thru end of game
y 20* Wings
75 Drafts 99* Hamburgers
1.50 Wells 50* Hot Dogs
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 PAGE 23 li


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
vehicle which was parked under the residence in the
garage. She observed a white male juvenile hiding in
the vehicle and he told her he was hiding from his
friend's mother. When the complainant left to call the
police, the juvenile left the scene.
Jan. grand larceny, 5508 Marina Dr., Christie's
Plumbing. The complainant reported that one of his
employees did not return equipment valued at $450
from a company truck.
Jan. 17, bad check, 3007 Gulf Dr., Anchor Inn.
The bar manager reported that he cashed a check for a
subject and the check was from the business Pary, Inc.
Later the bar manager learned the business has been
out of operation for three years.
Jan. 17, fraud, 5418 Marina Dr., Sun and Surf.
The complainant reported a customer attempted to pay
for a purchase with an invalid credit card.
Jan. 17, DUI, suspended driver's license, disor-
derly intoxication, resisting, battery on a law enforce-
ment officer, corner of Gulf Drive and Peacock Lane.
The officer observed John Rawlings, 42, of Bradenton,
accelerate rapidly in the 600 block of Manatee Avenue,
straddle the center line, weave in and out of traffic and
drive into the opposite lane.
Rawlings made a sharp right turn onto Peacock
Lane and stopped the vehicle in a private driveway.
According to the report, Rawlings was staggering
when he exited the vehicle, smelled strongly of an al-
coholic beverage, had a flushed face, bloodshot eyes
and dilated pupils and said he was too drunk to take
field performance tests. He was placed in custody and
was found to have a suspended driver's license.
The passenger, Bonnie Williams, 43, of
Bradenton, exited the vehicle and the officer noted that
she smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage. The
officer attempted to get Williams to call her daughter


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $6
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $6.
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs toast,
S\ Iq home fries and coffee ...Only $1.75


V


Island Inn Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach


Bridge Street Pier 0 Cafe
Home-Made Specials Daily
BREAKFAST (All Day)
Lunch and Dinner
New Seafood Menu
*World Famous Hamburgers
Cafe Dining On Intracoastal Waterway
Open: Mon.- Thurs. 7AM 8PM
Fri.- Sun. 7AM 10PM
200 Bridge Street
BRADENTON BEACH 779-1706
BAIT & TACKLE
LIVE SHRIMP $1.25DozJ3Doz. $3.00



1oV01 7i&rhi
pNB & REST /,
HAPPY HOUR 4 TO 6PM
WELL DRINKS & IMPORTED DRAFT BEER

We now serve Cocktails
Lunch Served Daily Noon 'til ?
Early Bird Dinner Specials 4 to 6
Breakfast Sat & Sun 8 am 'til ?
Authentic British Atmosphere with
L Cocktails & 8 British Drafted Beers on Tap
Live Entertainment Mon. thru Wed.
8 PM TO Midnight
"Danny Ellis"
from Dublin Ireland
L Monday-Friday
& Sat.,Sun. 8 amto 10pm
RESTAURANT I3R7 Serving Breakfast 8 'til
2519 Gulf D. N., B n Pub Hours til77 7

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


December 1994
Anna Maria City
32 permits
$455,209 value of work
$3,897 permit fees collected
New home construction:
Larry & Linda Albert, 711 Gladiolus, $92,000
Steven & Delores Carter, 508 Spring, $115,000
Sam Costelleno, 111 Willow Ave., $150,000

Bradenton Beach
16 permits
$79,379 value of work
$2,000 permit fees collected
No new home construction

Holmes Beach
20 permits
$188,855 value of work
$1,200 permit fees collected
New home construction:
LaGore, 2804 Gulf Drive, $95,000


for a ride home but she refused. The officer said he was
going to place her in custody under the Marchman Act
due to her condition.
Williams became very upset, said the report, and at-
tempted to let a large black dog out of the vehicle. She was
using profanity and began screaming and kicking when the
officer attempted to place her in custody. He had to forc-
ibly take her to the patrol car. At this point, Rawlings also
began screaming at the officer. Both continued to scream
all the way to the jail, said the report.
Jan. 17, battery on a law enforcement officer,
4500 block of Gulf Drive. The officer and a back-up
officer responded to a domestic dispute and found the
intoxicated husband outside the house yelling at his


Br I Tender Inn
old Florida Atmosphere"'~













NOW OPEN FOR
S S'

SATRDAS *SUNAY

11:0 M.o IP


Genealogical society to meet
The Manasota Genealogical Society will hold a
meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 10 a.m. at the Cen-
tral Main Library, 1303 Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton.
Roy Baither will speak on "Finding Your Civil
War Ancestor."
Everyone is invited to attend.

Sea Turtle expert speaks at Mote
Sea turtle expert Jeanne Mortimer will speak at
Mote Marine Laboratory on Monday, Jan. 30, at 6:30
p.m. in the Martin-Selby Education Center at Mote.
Mortimer will discuss turtle conservation programs.
The lecture is open to the public. The cost is $6 for
adults and $4 for students, ages 4 to 17. Members of
Mote Laboratory are admitted at no charge.
Call 388-4441 for details.

Iowa dinner offers taste of home
The 30th Annual Iowa Potluck dinner will take place
on Saturday, Jan. 28, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Trailer
Estates Recreation Hall, 1903 69th Ave. W., Bradenton.
Participants are asked to bring their table service, a
covered dish and salad or dessert. An entertainment pro-
gram is planned and prizes will be awarded.



wife. The wife said she would let him come into the
house if he stopped causing problems. The officers
stayed outside the door for a few minutes and the hus-
band began to yell again.
The wife told the officers that she wanted to stay with
a friend. As she was gathering her belongings, the husband
jumped up from the couch and charged at the officers,
pushing them off balance. He was placed in custody.
Jan. 17, burglary, 500 block of 59th Street. The
complainant reported a person unknown entered the
residence and removed two gold necklaces and two
gold rings valued at $1,000.


NEW
TACO NACHO
& TACO SALAD
*BAR*
"All You Can Eat"


STake Out Sandwiches $ 95
For the Beach
S Taco's To Go 991 each
AND DELI
Always Freshly Cut & Made To Order
Deli Sandwiches & Soups Fresh Bagels
Everything Homemade!
Mon Sat 10AM 9PM Sunday 12 8PM
Eat In or Take -Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386


For your listening pleasure while you dine.
Wednesday thru Sunday Doug Heale B

NIGHTLY SPECIALS
Monday Pasta Primavera........................ $8.95
Tuesday Spanish Picadillo ............ $7.50
Wednesday Spaghetti "All You Can Eat"...... $4.95
Thursday Rotini Bolognese.................... $7.50
Friday Prime Rib w/Baked Potato........ $9.95
Grouper Filet ............................. $8.25
Saturday Prime Rib w/Baked Potato....... $9.95
Veal Marsala w/Linguine......... $10.95
Sunday Chicken Marsala w/Linguine ..... $8.50
THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI
Il Ia ; 1.11 l

Breakfast* Lunch Dinner
Open 7 Days
Hours: Mon-Sun 8:00 AM 10:00 PM
S&S Plaza 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach
S *


M.Frii M-9AM


m-111


L









IE3 PAGE 24 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Serenity is a long way from home


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
It's a long way to Pina del Rio from Anna Maria
Island, but you can get there from here.
The trick is getting back.
Peter and Judy Mansfield of Holmes Beach loved
Serenity, their 42-foot Irwin center-cockpit sailboat.
Big, fast enough and comfortable, but it just became
irrelevant to their life in Holmes Beach. They sold it
last December.
And that's where our tale begins.
Purchased from the Mansfield's by Joseph
Stephens of Batesville, Ala., Serenity quickly disap-
peared. Tom Johnson of Carson Yacht Brokerage in
Palmetto, who handled the sale, said he thought
Stephens and his son Derek would take the boat north
for refitting. "Like all used boats, Serenity needed a
little work," he told me.
But Wayne Manley, dockmaster at Marina Jacks in
Sarasota, says he recalls the boat arriving at his marina
earlier this month, staying a short time and then leav-
ing.
A week ago Tuesday evening my telephone rang.
It was the infamous Bob Winters calling from Havana.
"Something very serious has happened," he said. "The
Cuban Coast Guard has found Serenity abandoned and
washed up at Pina Del Rio. That's about 70 miles west
of Havana."
Winters told how the two Stephens showed up at
Marina Hemingway in Havana a week or two earlier
and had left the previous Friday for Isla Mujeres,
Mexico enroute to Guatemala. A vicious front moved
through the area Friday night (gusts to 80 knots) and
now there was no sign of the Serenity's owner and his
son.
"Would you notify the U.S. Coast Guard please,"
Winters asked. "Everyone here fears for the lives of the
Stephens. At the least, we'd like to contact their fam-
ily and tell them what we know."
An immediate call to Coast Guard/Cortez resulted
in my being treated as a crank caller. They obviously
had no interest in the matter. When I asked to speak to
the officer in charge, I was warned "not to hassle me,"
by whoever answered the phone and who refused to
identify herself as she hung up the phone.
I called Coast Guard/St. Petersburg. They quickly
had Coast Guard/Miami back to me within minutes.
After telling Miami everything I knew, I gave them
a phone number in Havana and suggested they call
there for further details. "That's impossible," Don
McNeil of Coast Guard/Miami told me, "We're not
605-A Manatee Ave. W. Holmes Beach
813-778-5883


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allowed to call Cuba
without permission from
Washington. Could you
call them back, please,
and relay the information
to us?"
Sure. So I did.
Miami called back
the next day and said Se-
renity and another sail-
boat named Sundance
were taken under tow by i .'-
a banana boat named
Geminy enroute to
Tampa. Unfortunately,
Serenity broke her tow
line and was lost in heavy
seas. The two Stephens
were reported safely
aboard the ship.
Friday the phone Serenity in better days, pit
rang again, this time from
Joseph Stephens in Batesville with his tale. It includes
high drama, stark terror and a very suspicious fishing
boat that may have had a little piracy in mind.
Stephens said he was enroute to Guatemala to buy
a marina and stopped in Cuba for some rest. While in
Havana, he said, he received permission from Cuban
officials to stop along the north coast should he encoun-
ter bad weather along the way.
"All was well at Rio Honda," he wrote in an eight-
page report faxed to Coast Guard/Key West earlier this
week. "Fifteen miles out from Maria la Gorda we
needed to come to port on a bearing of 158 degrees, the
best I can remember, but were unable to because of an
intolerable south wind that hit us within minutes.
Seas built to 8-10 feet at the blink of an eye it
seemed.
"My mizzen blew out immediately," he writes.
Then the main sail blew out as his son Derek was try-
ing to reef it, and "we reefed the jib just as the motor
went out."
Derek Stephens then made a radio call for help. "A
ship hauling bananas named the Courtney L came
about to assist us. The only help she could offer was
abandonment of Serenity. I hold her I could not afford
that."
Courtney L and a nearby fishing boat named
Danielle "made calls to Group Key West Coast Guard.
I also asked if they would also call the Mexican Coast
Guard in Isla Mujeres. Both answered affirmatively,
but I received no response from either."
The elder Stephens then collapsed from exhaustion

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$20 per person Sunset Cruise
$25 per person 1/2 Day Cruise or
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Swim Picnic Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks
Coolers Welcome
Ed Hartung 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.
Located at Galati Marine Basin




OFFSHORE
FISHING CHARTERS
_jalanatee County's Longest
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:tured here at her berth in Holmes Beach.


and "Derek kept her afloat and battling the seas for a
time that I was not aware of. He began to beat on the
floor of the cockpit ... he could see blackness behind
him and knew terror winds were on the way.
"The wind was so severe that the boat was being
moved along by the bimini, so I cut it free with my
knife so we could remain relatively still. My son and I
closed ourselves into the cabin.
"After awhile I got up and looked out because I
knew were in a shipping lane. There in the darkness
was a ship headed toward us. I went to the radio and
advised it of our position and the condition of our boat.
This ship was named the Geminy and let me know they
were changing course."
At dawn Stephens was awakened by a "MAY-
DAY" blaring from their radio. "A ship responded,
asking for location. The location was given. The ship
responding was Geminy and with the close proximity
assumed it was responding to Serenity. The people of
the other vessel [actually sending the MAYDAY] kept
cutting with MAYDAY and a position, but never with
their name.
"Finally I broke through and obtained
MAYDAY's name, Sundance.
"Once Geminy got a line to Sundance we heard a
very interesting transmission. Geminy told Sundance,
now that we've got a line to you, you have a choice to
come aboard or we will tow you to the nearest safe port.
Sundance chose the tow.
"I told Derek this was whole new ballgame, so do
not have a motor and of four sails we could only use the
jib. Do you want to ask them to give us a tow? Gleam-
ing, he [Derek] said yes. I called the Geminy and asked
if they'd give us a tow too. Geminy asked for bur po-
sition and said they would be over as soon as they se-
PLEASE SEE SERENITY, PAGE 27




PRESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS & REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
We are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce







( R P L 0P-! r

C Choose from over
1,000 T-Shirts

$395 to$995

We also carry KINO'S SANDALS
778-0540
3228 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach
ANNA MARIA ISLAND CENTRE









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 M PAGE 25 Jim

Grouper groping best bet offshore; sheepies strong near shore


By Capt. Mike Heistand
We're at that time of year when fishing is pretty
much dependent on the fronts moving across the state.
When the weather is good, the fishing is, too. When the
weather turns nasty, stay close to shore. This week's
top catch continues to be sheepshead and redfish in the
backwater, while grouper are the best bet offshore.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said anglers there
have been catching flounder, redfish, black drum, small
gag grouper and sheepshead.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said pier fish-
ers have been hitting on redfish, sheepshead and a few
large grouper.
Katie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip is averaging 80 head of sea bass, sand perch
and Key West grunts. The six-hour trip is averaging 70
head of mangrove and vermilion snapper, porgies, Key
West grunts, red and black group. The nine-hour trip
is averaging 20 head of mangrove and yellow tail snap-
per, red and black grouper and amberjack. Also, the
Fleet's new "Bay Fishing Trip" provides anglers a
chance to fish the backwater. That trip averaged 20
head of sand perch and sea bass.


Registration for Little League at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center is currently going on.
The last day to register is Wednesday, Feb. 1. Af-
ter Feb. 1, registration will be closed no exceptions
can be made.


Auxiliary schedules
sailing, seamanship course
A course in sailing and seamanship conducted by
certified Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors will begin
at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7, at the United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 81 Training Center.
The course includes legal requirements, boat
handling, navigation, weather and VHF radio. The
classes will run for three weeks on Tuesdays and
Thursday and are free except for a nominal charge
for materials.
The training center is located at 4208 129th SL,
Cortez, north of the Seafood Shack Restaurant.
For information call Walter Grace at 778-5800,
Jerry Stodola at 729-5815 or Bill Sysak 795-4195.


CAPT. FOR HIRIE
if you have a boat but need help catching fish, call
me. I am third-generation Florida fishing guide, U.S.
Coast Guard licensed. Versatile, experienced in
tarpon fishing in Boca Grande; marlin and dolphin
in the Florida Keys; and offshore grouper and
snapper in Sarasota, Manatee, Pinellas waters.
Good numbers for reefs and barges.
Capt. David Futch ... 778-1102






CHARTER BOAT
REEF REACHER
Deep Sea Sports Fishing
Dive Charters
P.O. Box 594 Captain Phil Shields
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (813) 778-2727


IM--
\ BOAST
DODGE E


Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said the front slowed
fishing some, but before the cold weather hit the fish
were hitting, featuring 30-inch redfish, mangrove snap-
per, flounder, trout and small gag grouper. Capt. Zack
said he was also able to get his charters on a lot of
sheepies, some up to seven pounds in weight.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said offshore fishing for
grouper remains good, mostly in the 50-foot depths. In the
backwater, he suggests hunting for trout, reds or flounder.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said he's been getting his cus-
tomers lots of hook-ups of keeper red grouper and man-
grove snapper in about 110 feet of water offshore, some
small tuna in the 10-pound range and, farther from shore
in about 120 feet of water, black fin tuna.
Capt. Phil Shields said his charters are bringing
back lots of good-sized red grouper, mangrove and
yellow tail snapper as well as porgies and triggerfish.
Capt. Rick Gross said sheepshead fishing remains a
good standby, with redfish still producing good catches.
Capt. Mark Bradow has been catching and re-
leasing snook hooked in the Manatee River and in the
canals.
On my boat Magic we've been able to land lots


Little League rules require players who are not
currently assigned to a major or minor league team to
attend at least one try-out. Try-outs will be held on
Saturday, Feb. 4, and Saturday, Feb. 11. A schedule of
try-out sessions based on age groups is available at the
center. T-ball players do not have to try-out.
Call the center at 778-1908 for information.

Basketball all-star games,
awards scheduled Jan. 30
The Anna Maria Island Community Center bas-
ketball league all-star games will be Jan. 30 as fol-
lows: Division III at 6 p.m.; Division II at 7 p.m. and
Division I at 8 p.m.
The times are subject to change in the event of
play-offs in any of the divisions.
The awards presentations for all age divisions will
be Feb. 3 at 6:30 p.m. No food will be available. Im-
mediately following the awards will be the coaches
game at approximately 8 p.m.


DOLPHIN
DREAMS

CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
nofishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND


BUY IT!

SELL IT!

FIND IT!
The Islander
BUY-stander


is proud to announce
a New Member and
Long-Time Island
Resident to Our Staff


Elmo will be in charge of our Volkswagen Operations for Manatee and
Sarasota Counties. He will also be Assistant Sales Manager for our New
Dodge Cars & Trucks and our Used Car Department.
We invite all of Elmo's island friends and neighbors
to stop by and say Hello!
Jim Boast Dodge, VW 755-8585 Home 778-6767
4827 14th St. W., Bradenton (2 blks So. of Cortez Rd.)


and lots of mangrove snapper, a few sheepshead and
some reds.
Capt. Tom Chaya said redfish, trout and a few
five-pound sheepshead were his catches for the week.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said sheepshead
are the backwater best bet for the week. Offshore,
grouper are moving closer to shore, most within sight
of the Island. The new artificial reef by the Skyway
Bridge is also starting to produce excellent catches of
mangrove snapper.
Good luck and good fishing.


AMICC basketball
standings
(For the week ending Jan. 21)
Division I
(11-13 years old)


Record
6-2


Division II1
(8-10 years old)
Team Record
Dowling Park 6-1
A Paradise Realtor 4-3
Beach House 4-3
Haley's Motel 4-3
Dips Ice Cream 3-4
General Propeller 0-7


Division III
(5-7 years old)
Team
Island Animal Clinic
Air & Energy
Cafe on the Beach
Debellevue Dragons
Crowder Brothers Hardware


High scorers
Division I, Pam Taylor (10 pts.)
Division II, Jason Loomis (14 pts.)
Division III, Courtney Taylor (9 pts.)


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA
DAY AMHIGH
Thu 1/26
Fr 1/27
Sat 1/28
Sun 1/29 10:22 2.2ft
Mon 1/30 11:14P 2.1ft
Tue 1/31 12-000 2.0ft
Wed 2/1


ISLAND TIDE TABLES


AMLOW
2:31 -0.3ft
3:34 -0.5ft
4:26 -0.6ft
5:11 -0.7ft
5:50 -0.6ft
6:22 -0.5ff
6:52 -0.3ft


PMHIGH
7:26 2.2ft
8:28 2.2ft
9:30 2.2ft
1:00 1.2ft
1:17 1.2ft
1:30 1.3ft
1:50 1.4ff


PMLOW


3:35 1.1ft
4:38 0.9ft
5:31 0.8ft
6:24 0.6ff


North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later- low tides 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


Record
6-2
4-3
4-3
4-3
0-7


Team
Westbay Athletic Club
Island Real Estate
Cavanagh Marine Repair


Little League registration ends Feb. 1 at Center


AMERICAN CAR WASH

Your Car Wash & Detail Center

Valet Washing Full Detailing
Also
Complete Self-Serve Facilities
(813) 778-1617
5804 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217


IVrS7Q


-_---
.~-r .y:I i;

i":
-a


I


e~g~g~-~L~-~j~i~i~~L---- ~----L I -'li







Ei3 PAGE 26 0 JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island real estate transactions
for week ending Dec. 22, 1994
* 200 Bay Dr North, BB, a two story 4-plex of 4bed/
4bath, built some time ago on a 51x80 lot with 1880 sfla,
was sold 11/17/94, Harring to Frint, for $160,000. List
$189-174,900.
* 2816 Avenue E, HB, a Gulffront estate of two buildings,
one of 2082 sfla with 2baths & 1cp built in 1940 of wood, the
other of 1730 sfla with 2baths and built in 1940 of block, all
sitting on 4 lots measuring 120x150, was sold 11/17/94,
Sanford to O'Connell, for $458,400. List unknown.


* 300 23rd St, BB, a ground level cottage of wood with
2bed/lbath, built in 1944 on a 50x100 lot, was sold 11/16/
94, Smith to Bacon, for $55,000. List unknown.
* 303 Highland Av, BB, an elevated duplex of 4bed/
4bath/2car, built in 1985 on a 51x100 bay view lot, was
sold 11/17/94, Lapham to Mohr, for $160,000. List
$179,000.
* 601 Gulf Dr N, BB, Gulf Watch Condo #208, a 2bed/
2bath elevated unit with 1200 sfla built in 1986, was sold
11/15/94, Johnson to Brown, for $95,000. List unknown.
* 622 Dundee, HB, a ground level 3bed/2bath/2car ca-
nal front home of 2000 sfla, built in 1968 on a 115x95 lot,


~-r w -= wC T w Zw
OetWy d Iasl &Atte Watch for our
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida [- listings on
(813) 778-2291 P Box 2150 Classivision,
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294 channel 19.

S'NOSTALGIA FOR SALE
This charming, updated 2 bedroom, 1 bath cottage
is situated on 2 beautifully landscaped lots with
loads of room for parking and 104' frontage on
perkyy Pine Avenue. Zoned retail or residential, this
historic (Circa 1902) and picturesque property
would make a wonderful studio art gallery, or retail
place of business. Amenities include central air and
heat, storm awnings, roomy 1 1/2 car garage plus
storage shed, and many magnificent Grecian Urn
Royal Palms and live oak tree. $250,09G NOW
ONLY $219,500 with terms available.

Ic fwto ionaL S ta S -7 izn in iuinL.u71i laelfsaiLcat NE IAR
*to...778-3500 *Christin T. Shaw...778-2847* Nancy Guilford...778-2158 Michael Advocat....778-0608 WARRANTY


U U


Karin Stephan
REALTORO
PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
fld fl 77l Qn'9,e


81

81


3-778-U/076
Mobile:
3-350-5844





'i:i-el3
(,ll m !


ISLAND PARADISE! Just reduced!
$3+9,9.9- $299,000! Luxury living. Very at-
tractive direct Gulf-front condos with that ex-
pansive, spacious feeling. Either 3BR/2BA or
2BR/2BA. Beautifully decorated units. Gour-
met kitchen w/curved breakfast bar. Pan-
oramic views of beach & Anna Maria's spec-
tacular sunsets. Private balcony. Heated pool
& spa. Undercover parking. #KS58991. Ask
for Karin Stephan anytime; 388-1267 eves.
Excellent at $299,000


The-Prde* FlrdaR al


SSCTES AFER S BaEa
ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS: Bailbara A. S


was sold 11/16/94, Wyneken to Martin, for $180,000. List
$239-210,000.
* 626 Hampshire, HB, Key Royale, a ground level 3bed/
2bath/2car canal front home of 2151 sfla, built in 1973 on
95x105 lot facing the golf course, was sold 11/14/94,
Gould to Galati, for $250,000. List unknown.
* 726 N Shore Dr, AM, a Gulf view lot of about 55x85,
was sold 11/15/94, Leto to Waldmueller, for $135,000. List
unknown.
* 901 Gulf Dr S, BB, Pelican Cove Condo #7 Ph 1, a
2bed/2bath elevated unit of 1175 sfla and built in 1983 with
Gulf view, was sold 11/14/94, Egan to West, for $111,000.
List $120,000.
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate bro-
ker, 778-1222.






BUILDING LOT: GUNDSTUCK: Blick aufden
Golf, 50x100 Fuss. Bauen Sie Ihr Traumhaus am
Strand. $49,500.
CLOSE TO BEACH! Enjoy yourselves in this
beautiful 2Br/2Ba home, nice workshop, enclosed
porch with berber, and much more. Home Warranty
provided. $153,000.
JUST A FEW REPAIRS: Call for details, 3Br/
2.5Ba, pool, room for small boat. Central Holmes
Beach, 2 car garage. Home Warranty. Near shops
and library. $164,000.
CONDO IN RUNAWAY BAY: 2 Schlaf/2
Badezimmer, mit Blick auf See und Pool. Ein Sprun
zum Strand. Home Warranty. $99,500.
SHOREWALK CONDOS: One of Bradenton's fin-
est vacation accommodations. Nous parsons Francais ici.
Four units. From $69,000/$75,900 available.


Icn Sprecne Deutcn
_ Nous, Parlons Francais SI

CALL ROBERT ST. JEAN 813-778-6467




Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 GulfDrtve PO Box 717 Anna Madra, FL 34218
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
.V







F -- .

OWNER FINANCING
Buildable lot located in the heart of Anna Maria
City. Close to the Bay, Gulf and restaurants. 52
x 145. Priced to sell at $79,500. Call Agnes
Tooker at 778-5287 or Kathy Tooker Granstad
at 778-4136.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Agnes Tooker, Kathleen Tooker Granstad,
Pat Jackson, Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte,
Mike Schulte, Darlene Masone, Stephanie Bell MLS
isolandAeltal WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M.
Sl L SATURDAYS 9A.M. to NOON


*i
.. I 1


,,






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 26, 1995 U PAGE 27 f ]


SERENITY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24


cured Sundance.
"Derek spotted Geminy
off our post stern about one
hour later. He fired off a
flare. She came about,
tossed us a line, we tied it
off and for the first time
were happily on our way.
"After awhile our line
broke. We rerigged the lines
... after another hour it
broke again.
"Derek and I were
making ready as she
[Geminy] came about


the fishing boat The Geminy quickly came about and fi-
nally got a line onto the Serenity.


'I had been up now, I think, three
days with cat naps, Derek almost
as long, and the crew of Geminy
was frustrated and weary. Later
we checked, no Serenity. This time
the Captain had not seen her
leave. Did not know the direction
to look. I woke at 0745 the next
morning, went to the bridge, sure
enough, no Serenity.'


again. When I turned to look to see how much time
we had to go, I was shocked at the Geminy's posi-
tion. I had to look up at her bow. She hit our main
mast and as it crumbled in half," both men jumped
into the water.
Both men then swam to the Geminy and were taken
aboard.
"I was inside changing into dry clothes and when
I returned another boat was out there. A fishing vessel
named Rebecca Page. I did not request her assistance
and furthermore had no idea where she came from.
Rebecca Page was in the process of retrieving the line
(from the Geminy). Her effort failed. Her captain was
complaining about sore hands and being in a danger-
ous situation, which I could agree with. I wondered
why she didn't back off."
Darkness fell as the Rebecca Page tried again and
again to take a line from the Geminy to Serenity. Finally
things got suspicious. The first mate of Geminy turned to
Stephens and said, "The Rebecca Page is a fishing ves-
sel, they throw lines all the time, I do not understand."
Finally it was suggested Stephens radio "thanks" to


"I had been up now, I think,
three days with cat naps, Derek al-
most as long, and the crew of
Geminy was frustrated and weary. I
believe all thought Serenity was se-
cure to the tow line. Ten minutes
later we checked, no Serenity. This
time the Captain had not seen her
leave. Did not know the direction to
look. I woke at 0745 the next morn-
ing, went to the bridge, sure enough,
no Serenity.
"When I last spoke with [the
officers of Geminy], it was the opin-
ion of each one of them that Rebecca


Page foiled every attempt to rescue Serenity. I must
admit, it was my opinion, too."
Geminy then took the Stephens and the Sundance
and her crew as far as Key West and dropped them in
the shipping channel to sail into the port.
"In summation of my dealing with the Coast
Guard," Stephens wrote, "I was proud of our Coast


Guard responding quickly to save as many of the na-
tive Cubans [fleeing Cuba] as possible. I did not think
they should stand with folded hands and watch and do
nothing. BUT nor did I think as Joe and Derek
Stephens found themselves in the midst of that same
Florida Straits the Coast Guard should stand by and
watch and LISTEN, yes listen, as they struggled for
their lives.
"I am not naive. When I called several times on my
VHF, I know you heard me. Yet you did nothing. Noth-
ing is said in that Gulf that you don't hear.
"I can forgive and forget. Even if, as some say,
Rebecca Page foiled the rescue so she could have Se-
renity for salvage, I can forgive her if she only returns
to me the boat and things that are mine. If she did her
best and foiled honestly, which is possible, then I beg
her forgiveness for my thoughts."
But Serenity is not in the hands of salvers, but is in
custody of the Cuban Coast Guard. They report the hull
is fine and the boat needs only rerigging.
Stephens told me by telephone recently he intends to
travel to Cubato recoverSerenity and, who knows, maybe
we'll see her back in Anna Maria one of these days.
See you next week.



Ask Capt. Mike
Capt Mike Heistand offers information
and shows informative videos on
fishing in local water at his booth at
the Manatee County Fair. Meet Capt
Mike at the fair every day through
closing on Sat, Jan. 28. Islander
Photo: Bonner Presswood


=~~~~~-~~ t---- " "~:: .~i~~
; i -- --::. ... ... .. - .. .. .. ..-
. . . .. ..- . :
". .,. .
..~~~~~... ... :. ,- -- o
1 ... i. !- ; : ':i -:!, ,
i~~~~~~~~~~~'r2' ' P "" "'/:7"' ;.. ,., :-,
T 'T ,-:: I "-" ,.' :-- - .. .
a 2 ,. .. I . . : - -' - '. : . . _r . = o _
'#. .E: -:.' "i',. '.:," a = e :=' =:, L,-} . -'


DAVE
JONES
REALTOR@ '
ASSOCIATE
EVENINGS
778-4891

Dave and his wife, Pat, are
residents of Holmes Beach
and are "transplants" from
New England to the Island. We
welcome Dave to the NEAL &
NEAL family of professionals
in the Anna Maria office.



-- L-

FULL SERVICE
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
"Open Six Days Weekly"

SEASONAL RENTALS
STILL AVAILABLE
Perico Bay Club and Island
from $1,200 mo.

ANNUAL RENTALS
Perico Bay Club $850 mo.
Island In The Sun
1/2 mo. FREEI $600 mo.
West Bay Cove
Bay View 2/2 $850 mo.

Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665
-.


! .: . ,- I : .


HOMES ISLAND
420 Spring Aveue, AM ...................................... $117,900
413 Bay Palms Drive, HB ................................ $139,900
125 47th St., HB ................................................ $149,900
609 Ambassador Lane, HB............................... $185,000
620 Fox Street, LBK........................................... $189,000
611 Foxworth Lane, HB ..................................... $189,999
622 Dundee Lane, HB..................................... $209,900
110 49th Street, HB ........................................... $209,900
607 Ivanhoe Lane, HB .................................... $275,000
2500 Gulf Drive, B ................................. $285,000
607 North Point Drive, HB ................................. $329,900
513 Loquat, AM ........ .................................. $350,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK............................ $425,000
609 North Point Drive, HB ................................. $449,000

HOMES OFF ISLAND
6910 18th Ave. W., Bradenton .......................... $114,900
7211 41st Ct. E., Sarasota.............................. $129,900
909 24th Ave. W., Palmetto ............................ $139,000
4317 Hebrides Ct., Bradenton ..................... $141,500
4907 Mangrove Pt. Rd., Bradenton .................. $155,000
6818 Pleasant Hill, Bradenton ........................... $167,500
6709 88th Street, Bradenton ........................... $189,000
1624 Palma Sola Blvd., Bradenton ................... $429,900
4902 64th Drive W., Bradenton .............;........... $595,000

DUPLEXES
120 57th Ave. E., Bradenton ............................... $60,000

PERICO BAY CLUB
876 Audubon Drive .................................... .. $88,500
706 Estuary .................................................... $94,500
969 Waterside Lane .......................................... $113,000
831 Audubon Drive ........................................... $120,000
1105 Edgewater Circle...................................... $129,900
509 Sanderling Circle........................................ $129,900
1241 Edgewater Circle...................................... $142,900
1371 Perico Point Circle .................................... $152,000
1341 Perico Point Circle.................................... $168,000


COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT
807 18th Ave. W., Bradenton ........................ $154,900
710 60th St. Ct. E. Bradenton ......................... $180,000
3007 & 3009 Avenue E, IHB ............................ $259,000
2112 First St W., Bradenton ........................... $350,000
3100 Gulf Drive, HB................................. $450,000
4016 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK............................ $750,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK............................ $850,000

CONDOS ISLAND
6005 Gulf Dr.. #216 ....................................... $129,900
6500 Flotilla Dr., #235 ..................................... $133,500
600 Manatee Ave., #128 ........................... #134,900
6500 Flotilla Dr.. #232 ....................................... $134,500
3701 East Bay Dr., #9-B.................................. $134,900
3803 East Bay Dr., #7-A .................................... $136,000
600 Manatee Ave., #115 ................................. $141,900
600 Manatee Ave., #113 ................................... $142,500
1007 Gulf Dr. N., #215 .................................... $142,900
1800 Gulf Dr. N., #215 ...................................... $167,000
6006 Gulf Dr., #212......................................... $178,000
6700 Gulf Dr., #14 ........................................... $224,900

CONDOS OFF ISLAND
5942 7th Avenue, Bradenton ............................ $47,500

LOTS & ACREAGE ISLAND
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK.......................... $150,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK............................ $325,000
3700 East Bay Drive, HB................................. $225,000
107 Bay Blvd., AM ........................................... $395,000
17th & Gulf Dr., BB ........................................... $450,000
517 Blue Heron, AM .......................................... $500,000

OFF ISLAND
10205 Old Tampa Rd., Ellenton........................ $70,000
708 44th Ave. E., EUenton ................................. $74,900
5600 Lockwood Ridge Rd., Sara...................... $329,000


CALL 778-2261 Toll Free 1-800-422-6325
_.. ... _. . ... .. .. ... .. .. -.. ... .... -._, _- _ -






m PAGE 28 M JANUARY 26, 1995 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




S* Nick Patsios REALTOR
"Nick at Night"
778-4642
Over 16 yrs. of proven Real Estate know-
how has distinguished Nick as an experi-
enced professional you can trust and count
on for all your REAL ESTATE needs.
neaMI&neaI Ofc: 778-2261



Come ride with me!
With new carpet and furniture this du-


-. --r
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling,
Ed can make your
Island Dream come true
SINCE 1939
778-1751 2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Bradenton Beach
Evenings FL 34217 Office

What's the best news on Anna Maria Island?
The Islander Bystander gives it to you every week.


STEPS TO THE BEACH
3 homes off the Gulf, 110 49th St. Holmes Beach. Spa-.
cious 3BR/2.5BA custom crafted home includes a fire-
place, 4 ceiling fans, sprinkler and much morel By Ap-
pointment only. Hurry, please call Nick Patslos anytime
for an escorted tour of your next home! 778-4642.
.MLS II neaL&neaL Ofc: 778-2261

Looking for a home on Anna Maria Island? The Islander
Bystander offers the key to your dreams every week.


CrJ^^^^^^^^r^ X I^^


Anna Maria City at Bean Point


810 N. Shore Drive
Across the street from best beach on the Island,
5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large garage, 2,900 s.f. living
area. $440,000. Call 778-4349 or 1-800-694-2221.


BAYFRONT Perfect setting in Holmes Beach.
Looks off to the Skyway Bridge. 3BR/2BA. Large
lot with established landscaping. $349,000.
GULF FRONT PRIVACY Located in North
Holmes Beach. This older home features 2BR/
2BA, den, large living room. Hardwood floors,
fireplace and huge deck on the beach.
COMMERCIAL LOT in historic "Old Town" on
Bridge St. 100 x 100.
CANAL FRONT 4-PLEX Probably the only one
of its kind in Holmes Beach. Nice 2 story main
house overlooks Sportsman's Harbor.
TRI-PLEX Handy man's special. Brings in over
$2,000 month income. $152,000.
FOUR-PLEX Across from beach. Fully fur-
nished and a turn key operation. $177,500.
WESTBAY COVE Lovely Bayfront condo com-
plex. One bedroom, pool tennis. $89,500.
5400 CONDO Fully furnished 2BR/1.5BA, Gulf
front complex. $117,500.
OLDER BEACH HOUSE across from Gulf.
2BR/1.5BA rustic and charming with great view
of Gulf. $129,900.
SEASIDE CONDO Directly on the Gulf. 2BR/
1.5 BA, fully furnished, pool. $172,000.
VERY LARGE home on a double lot with 3BR/
4BA, swimming pool, hardwood floors, 35' open
porch across from Gulf. Just reduced $225,000.
GULF FRONT HOME Huge old cracker house.
Kick back to yester year and enjoy the high ceil-
ings, paneled walls, big porch, 3BR/2BA. Right
on the Gulf. $350,000.
GULF FRONT HOME Newer 3BR/2BA, tiled
floor, fully furnished elevated home. $385,000.
MOTEL Mom and Pop operation directly on the
Gulf. A mix of studio, one bedroom and two
bedroom apts. 6 total. $549,000.
HANDY MAN SPECIAL Non-conforming 3BR/
2BA single family home near Gulf with 3 rental
apts. Priced low to allow rehab. $165,000.

Mike

Norman

Realty inc.
778-6696
1-800-367-1617 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


624 Foxworth is one of those "run of the ca-
nal" homes where every room except the din-
ing room and the three baths face the water.
Very serene. Very much worth $234,500.


LONGBOAT VILLAGE: Well kept, 3 bedroom,
2 bath elevated home. Great room design with
cathedral ceiling, skylight, screened lanai, all
appliances and heat pump with recovery sys-
tem. Priced at $159,500. Please call Carol R.
Williams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


BRAND NEW LISTING IN PERICO! Attractively
decorated Jasmine unit with vaulted ceilings,
skylights and view of estuary and Palma Sola
Bay from spacious screened lanai. Won't last
long at this price $122,000. Call Dick Rowse
778-2003 eves.


VALUE A VIEW? Bayfront condo with direct
view of Skyway Bridge and Tampa Bay. One
bedroom, one bath, "great room" design with
breakfast bar, walk-in closet, appliances includ-
ing washer & dryer, fans, window treatments
and ceramic tile. 2 pools, tennis, close to beach
and shopping. Priced at $129,500. Call Carol R.
Williams 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


B REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS ii






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 26, 1995 M PAGE 29 eD3


MARY KAY COSMETICS, at reduced prices. Please
contact Susan Bames 778-0061.
MAZUNO GOLF CLUBS, 2 thru PW, #9. Graphite
shafts, 1 yr old. $475. 778-7197.
COCKTAIL & END TABLES, hand vac, fishing lines,
gaff, bumpers, etc. 778-5581.
SPA ABOVE GROUND with cover, 8' square, built-in
recliner. new $2,995, will sell $995. 761-0616.
6 PERSON JACUZZI, heater, timer, like new $700. 1990
Ford Bronco rims. evenings 778-4715.
DINNING TABLE and 6 chairs, two leaves, very nice.
$275. For info call 778-5057.
COMPUTER CD GAMES, never used. Day Of The Tentacle,
Indiana Jones, StarWars, Rebel Assault. $75.778-0019.
BABY GRAND PIANO, excellent condition, made by
Baldwin. Call after 6. 778-6427.
2 DOUBLE (58" wide) custom covered Futon chairs, art
deco pattern on black material w/3 adj. positions &
matching custom bolster pillows. Almost new $450.
OBO. 778-9660.



FLEA MARKET- Anna Maria Island Privateer's Thieves
Markets, February 11 & March 11, 8-3, (rain-Sun. the
12th.) New location at Crabby Bill's, Marina & Gulf Dr.
Rent a space $10. 778-5934.


GARAGE SALE Sat., Jan. 28. 8-3. 201 72nd St.
SUPER ESTATE cash & carry. Jan. 27 Jan. 30. 9-4.
110 49th St., Holmes Beach.
2 FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., Jan. 27 & 28.9-
4. 312 66th St., Holmes Beach.
From trash to treasure, you can buy & sell it in classified.


MOVING SALE Sat., Jan. 28. 10-5. 119 46th St. #W,
HB. Rattan, sofa, 2 chairs, 2 hassocks, baby grand pi-
ano, Sears 42" cut riding mower.

RUMMAGE SALE Fri., Feb. 3. 9-2. St. Bernard Activ-
ity Ctr. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.

2 FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat., Jan. 28.9-? 306 73rd St.
HB. Something for everyone. No early birds please.
GARAGE SALE Sat., Jan. 28. 8-2. 410 80th St., Holmes
Beach. Hand and power tools, dinghy, boat accessories,
electric typewriter, sectional wall display board, household.



LOW IMPACT AEROBICS Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center. Class incorporates hand-held weights (1-2
lb.) with low impact movements to burn fat while toning.
Can participate without weights. Classes are: Tuesday
& Thursday 7:15-8:15PM; Thursday 10:30-11:30AM and
Saturday 9-10AM. For info call Geri 779-2129. Also per-
sonal fitness training, lectures/workshops on fitness top-
ics, reasonable rates.



BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home
with constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House
calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away & your pets have to
stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food, water, ex-
ercise, TLC! Excellent references, 778-6000.
FOR SALE pure Schnauzer puppies. Black, male & fe-
male, shots. 778-0196 or 813-291-4934.


1991 CAPRICE CLASSIC, 4dr, all power options, 6-way
seats, AM/FM/tape, A/C, cruise control, Keyless entry.
Excellent condition. $9,500. Key Royale 778-2387.


86 MERCURY MARQUIS, low miles, has everything in-
cluding lighted vanity mirrors on both sides. See at 424
62nd St.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-1990.
PRIVATE BOAT SLIP 50', water, elec., private entrance.
825 South Bay Blvd. No live-aboards. Call Bailey 601-
287-2404.
PRIVATE BOAT SLIP for rent. HB enters Bimini Bay, dock
water meter, $65/mo. Orlando 1-407-851-5858.
BOAT SLIP for rent on end of Key Royale canal between
Baronet and Concord. Deep water & electricity. Reason-
able. 778-6449.
IF YOU HAVE A BOAT but still have trouble catching
fish, you need to call me. Third-generation Florida fish-
ing guide for hire. U.S. Coast Guard licensed. Versatile
and capable of tarpon fishing in Boca Grande, marlin and
dolphin in the Florida Keys or offshore grouper and snap-
per. Have good numbers for offshore reefs and barges.
Ask for David Futch. 813-778-1102.


NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for full time cash-
ier positions. Pick up applications at Crowder Bros. Hard-
ware Holmes Beach or Bradenton.
EXPERIENCED WAIT STAFF wanted. Fine dining. Eve-
nings only. Call for appointment 383-8898.
MAID WANTED Would you like to make some extra
money occasionally filling in for our maid? Call Mrs. T.H.
Cole 779-1213 for particulars.

WANTED: retired teacher, to edit, and retype my typewrit-
ten manuscript. Must be grammarian, and have computer
and printer. The script is very clean. Mr. McLean 778-6974.


WALK TO THE BEACH! Unique 3 bedroom,
3 bath bayfront with boat dock. Like newly
Completely updated tri-plex within walking
distance to Gulf beach and shopping on his-
toric Bridge Street. $329,000. #61612. Ask
for Carol Heinze; 792-5721 eves.
BAYFRONT ESTATE BEAUTIFUL TERRA
CEIAI 5+ acres, 4 bedroom, 3 bath home.
Magnificent pristine bayviews from open floor
plan. 2 boat docks. Nature abounds with pri-
vacy. Great to entertain or hide away!
$462,000. #61365. Ask for T. Dolly Young;
.778-5427 eves.
IMMACULATE LAKE FRONT HOME 2
bedroom, 2 bath with tile and berber carpet.
Great view Extra large storage shed/work-
shop area, also has large attached garage.
Great location. $84,900. #61610. Ask for
Carol Heinze; 792-5721 evenings.

MARVELOUS MARTINIQUE ...
2 bedroom, 2 bath Gulf
front condo. Turnkey fur-
nished. Elevator secured
lobby, tennis, swimming
pool. $154,900. #55723.

Carol Heinze
REALTORo/CRS
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


MARTINIQUE ... 3BR/3BA
GULF VIEW! $209,000.
WESTBAY POINT...
2BR/2BA WATERVIEWI
$132,500.
WESTBAY COVE ...
1BR/1BA POOL VIEW!
$89,900.
SUCCESSFUL RESTAURANT
located in W. Brad.l Seats 150,
all equip. & furnishings, very
high traffic location, well managed
and tastefully furnished.
4 COP license. $350,000


.f *i- Yg
T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
778-5427


"0








0
2.






CL


WAG


.a. . W .- - -- -l L '
RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, sec- GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy walking
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club- beach enhance this turnkey furnished 2BR/2BA unit.
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded Well-maintained complex with pool, covered park-
beach access and excellent rental program. Just ing, and storage room. Excellent rental opportunity.
reduced to $89,900. Call Dave Moynihan. Priced at $159,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


TWO GULF FRONTS Fully furnished, 2BR/1BA
apartments on wide, sandy walking beach. Close
to shopping and restaurants. Perfect investment
property or second home. Offered at $99,900 and
$105,000. Call Dave Moynihan.


SF--~a~ rP~






OCEAN PARK TERRACE Enjoy sunsets from your
own roof top patio when you buy this centrally lo-
cated, turkey furnished, 2BR/2BA condo with a Gulf
view. Includes pool, balconies, storage, secured
building, elevator, great location on new beach.
Priced at $229,000. Call Ed Oliveira for details.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR direct
Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex with
quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide sandy beach
and walking distance to shops and restaurants. Of-
fered at $129,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


GULF VIEW TRIPLEX Recently renovated, taste-
fully furnished units that offer a flexible floor plan.
Large common sundeck with great view of the
Gulf. Laundry on premises. Now operated as va-
cation rentals. Priced at $255,000. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


--i


I


rI
5340-1 G






iM PAGE 30 M JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SanILs Commercial Residential Free Estimates
y Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .14 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
4AND SATISFACTION

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353





50MRAR OMB,.AC


BOBBYKRONENBERG
CORTEZ CONCRETE & MASONRY
Cement Slabs
Block & Brick Stucco
749-3905 Stone Flower Boxes Welding
If No Answer 753-1716 Indur.- Uc. 14-0493-1 s

NU-Weatherside
SINCE
1948 of Florida, Inc. xoo,6

Quality Workmanship
to replace or repair < '< .
SOFFITS &
FASCIAS
Call Today
778.7074 1 iil0
Financing Available



State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
: LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
*' MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY

A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Ratea
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


.R.

Painting
Private
& Commercial
* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
SFree Estimates
778-2139


Subscribe to The Islander Bystander for out-of
town friends and family on page 7, this issue.



SAIMIBA A CHH FL IP CAD0S
ALIEIRT I T RII SE O EE
LT EWI N NURSE AIL S MI E
THIEIGO IDIFATHE AUNT MAR Y
SAIDIA RIAT EV NICE EASES
D A D N LJRA SME E S
NAl 0 O I L S E N l TI
DADDY Y L 0 0 NNFjGL G SLDE GES
UIR ELUTE E V IS E LI
T 0 SA Y WEE EEN ERAYs
ACHTEARIY LIT PAS AI LE
F U RDAU G HU0 TIERS SAT ANi C
AN E RING 0 EEDS R 0 0
REY .NARID K ISS COUSINS
E= W0 S SE T O S 0 RTE
ERAIT E-S 0IN N E A RAM
M ON ..N.CLE S N F DRA ULA
BIL I P HA I P E K 0 E C 0 B\BS
ALTE AIN NE" STAR T E ET
6- A VNN 6- G Q v S S E SISEI


e -R 'L S IF E


HELP WANTED Lawn Service, 778-1348.


WAITRESS/DISHWASHER Tip of the Island. Part-time.
NEED CLUB HOUSE help, counter/kitchen. Apply in
person, Key Royale Golf Course. 700 Key Royale Dr.,
Holmes Beach.
FULL TIME & part time hours! For certified HHA's &
CNA's. PC/Respite Care/Alzheimer Care/Staffing. Call
923-5488 or 756-4008, Mon.-Fri. 9-5. For your opportu-
nity to join one of the largest health care providers in the
country, Nurse's House Call. 401K, vacation, strong
team support & ADA/EOE.


RESPONSIBLE LOCAL COUPLE Rental Agent/Man-
ager for your condo/apt./resort property. Live in or out.
Excellent references. FL brokers license. 813-778-5555.


MONEY FOR HOMEOWNERS. Hurry, this won't last
long! Buy a home, pay bills, home repairs. It doesn't get
any easier than this. Slow credit no problem, bad credit
just a little problem. Call today, 813-379-9988, Equity
Loan Group Financial, Licensed Mortgage Brokerage
Business.



CLEANING & MORE I'll clean your home or rental
plus...do those jobs you just don't want to tackle. De-
pendable. Ref. available. Lynn 778-5183.

LET US DRIVE YOU! Shopping, medical appointments,
airports, cruise ports or to the golf course. Flat rates. Sun-
shine Cab. Serving the Islands. 778-5476 or 705-1302.
"HATE TO IRON?" Reasonable rates and many Island
references. Pick-up and delivery. Also alterations. No
smoke environment. 778-4680.
CLEANING WEEKLY or bi-weekly on island or near vi-
cinity. 17 year island resident. Good references. Call
Barbara at 779-2024.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all types
of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable, Island
resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.


JEWELRY REPAIRS custom designs. We can turn your
old gold into beautiful new jewelry. Golden Isle Jewelers
401A Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 778-4605.

HOUSE CLEANING, laundry, weekly home or apt.
check. Open or close your home or apt. Thorough &
dependable. for estimate call 779-1402.


CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4 hours.
Crowder Bros. Hardware Holmes Beach 778-0999.
Bradenton 748-8551.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island references.
Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
NEED YOUR CARPETS cleaned right! Call Cody, sham-
poo-steam, deodorize, living rm, dining rm & hall, $34.95.
11 years in the business. No hidden prices. 794-1278.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling spe-
cialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island refer-
ences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident 25
yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving the Island 17
years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal 778-
1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types. New
installation and repairs. Insured and references. Lic.
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish crafts-
man. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121 Bridge St.,
Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
Find the home of your dreams in The Islander/Bystander.


BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers &
concrete. In business since 1978. Lic #MC00318. Dave
Elliott, 778-5183.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to painting.
20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island references.
779-2129.

PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $40. Crowder
Bros. Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-0999. Bradenton
748-8551.

HANDYMAN No job too small. Experienced in home re-
pairs. Appliances to yard work. Island areas. Ref. avail-
able. 387-0078.

SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, formica & ceramic tile,
carpentry & painting. Full line of home repairs & mainte-
nance, low prices. 778-0410.
INDUSTRIOUS, highly-skilled, meticulous, sober prompt,
finish carpentry, counter tops, ceramic & vinyl tile, fine
finish painting, wall coverings, repairs. Paul Beauregard
387-8066.
A-NEW LOOK minor household repairs and how to ad-
vice. Pool deck and patio mildew removal. Pressure
washing, gutter cleaning. 792-4659.



ISLAND BUSINESS for lease. Turn-key operation. Just
$1,600 per month. Includes rent. 778-4441.
The Islander Bystander ads work for you!









COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
. _____________J


Family Owned and
Operated for Over
12 Years


Millwork &
Wood Cut
To Size


* We specialize in custom cabinet making *
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center


- BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
* Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 26, 1995 N PAGE 31 jIj


FISHING PIER, bait business & restaurant, Anna Maria
Island. Includes business & real estate. $395,000. Call
Fred Katz, Towne & Shore Realty 778-7980, 779-2044.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive ideal
for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal, etc.. Neg.
Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
SEASONAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida beach
house, Anna Maria City. No street to cross on short walk to
beach. Located at 118 Palmetto Ave. (corner of Gulf Dr and
Palmetto Ave.) No pets, no smokers. Close to Laundromat.
$1,100 permo., includes utilities and taxes. 778-1576.
ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo available
March & April 95. $850/wk. Gulf front. 813-949-3713.

HOLMES BEACH 2/2 and 1/1. Close to beach and shop-
ping. Completely fumished. From $500 mo. 704-683-1188.

OFFICE SPACE for rent in Holmes Beach Professional
Building. $200 per month and up. Call Mike Norman
Realty. 778-6696.

WANTED GULF FRONT house 2 or more beds, on/near
beach, last half of march for quiet non-smoking family of
4. References. 508-336-2201.

LUXURY CANAL FRONT one story home with pool. 2/3
bedroom, 3 baths, 3/4 blocks from beach. $3,400 mo.,
weekly rates available. 1-800-223-4472.
HOLMES BEACH Turnkey furnished ground floor one
bedroom apartment 100 yds to Gulf. No Pets. 778-5246.
STILL AVAILABLE for Jan, Feb and March. 1 & 2 bedroom
weekly/monthly rentals from $400 weekly $1,300 monthly
and up. Call Lisa or Denise, Wagner Realty 778-2246.
GREAT LOCATION 1BR condo, fully furnished, heated
pool, walk to Gulf beaches and Bay. 3 month min. Towne
& Shore, 779-2044.
SEASONAL: gulf front bargain, charming old Florida
beach house 2BR/1 BA for $450/wk or $1,400/mo. 1 BR/
1BA for $300/wk or $900/mo. G.B. Realty 778-7244.
ANNUAL: beautiful view down canal from this 2 story,
2BR/1.5BA unit. $700/mo. G.B. Realty 778-7244.
SEASONAL across from Coquina Bch. 3 rms & Ba. Every-
thing fum. $250 wk or $800 mo. March is open. 778-7197.
1 BR APT. in Holmes Beach. Fully furnished. Jan. $300/
wk, Feb. & March $400/wk. 778-2833.
HIDE-AWAY lovely view on Bay. Charming, completely
furnished, 1st fl., 2BR, on quiet dead-end street. Walk to
beach. Available Feb., March, April & May. $1,500/mo,
utilities included. 778-7107.

RETAIL OFFICE SPACE commercial approx. 700 sq. ft.
5704 Marina Dr. $850 per month. 778-4441, 778-9252.

RETAIL OR PROFESSIONAL Charming historic beach
house, completely renovated, high visibility location. 850
sq. ft., long or short term. Call Robin at Gulf-Bay Realty
of Anna Maria 778-7244.
GULF FRONT 3BR/2BA immaculate, perfect beach
house, 20' from the water, on North Shore Drive. Sunset
views from all rooms and step-down to sand from huge,
private patio. Available monthly/weekly on the following
dates: April 15 through May 21, 1995; June 15 through
July 7, 1995; August 5 through August 25, 1995. $800
per week including utilities. Discount in May and slightly
higher week of July 4, 1995. 778-3171.


RUNAWAY BAY 2/2, direct bayfront, furnished, great
value. $115,000. Call Marilyn Trevethan at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 & 3BR units
with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call Dick Maher for addi-
tional info. From $131,900. Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261.
OPEN SAT. & SUN. 315 58th St. HB Condo. New carpet,
paint, wallpaper, verticals. $72,900. Owner, 798-3981.
BEST BUY on the water! Extraordinary views of Egmont
and Passage Keys. Owner financing available. Call Paul
Collins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SAVE $12,000 by owner. Newer 3BR/2BA, pool, 3 car
garage, boat ramp. Prime location. $169,900. 778-7486.

BEAUTIFUL, BRIGHT & SPARKLING. North Beach Vil-
lage, 3BR/2BA townhouse. Robin Kollar, Gulf Bay Realty
of Anna Maria. 778-7244.


WILL FINANCE with $20,000 down. Duplex 2-1 BR/1 BA
near Gulf. Separate 2 car garage, fixer-upper, room to
expand 1 and 1/2 lots wide. $97,000. 795-0873.
PERICO BAY CLUB Grand Cayman Villa. $156,000.
Call Jack Monahan at Ron Baldwin & Assoc. 383-9501.
READY TO BUILD duplex lot $50,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins Re/Max Gulfstream Realty, 778-7777.
OPEN HOUSE Sun. Jan 29. 1-4. 1230 Spoonbill Land-
ings, Perico Bay Club. Jack Monahan at Ron Baldwin &
Assoc. 383-9501.
POOL, 1BR apt., jacuzzi, plus more come with this ex-
cellently located 3BR/2BA home. $195,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins Re/Max Gulfstream Reatly. 778-7777.

3/2 SPLIT PLAN, living, Ig kitchen, new family room with
fireplace, beautifully remodeled. A must to see inside.
306 56th St., HB. 778-6700.

DUPLEX BY OWNER Walk across to beach or stay on
your deck to enjoy the magnificent view of the Gulf and
soak in the colorful Fl sunsets. This stilted duplex is on
the market for only $179,000. Each unit has 2BR/2BA,
kitch, din, laundry, deck. Storage galore in 2 large stor-
age rooms and extra closets. The yard is prof. land-
scaped, with motion detector, garden lights and sprinkler
system. 778-1516
FOR SALE by owner. Get this one before we list it! 2BR/
1.5BA charmer in Cortez Village. Ready to sell! $62,500.
723-3616.
DUPLEX Intracoastal, 2 story, 2BR & 1BR, Bradenton
Beach, Key West styled, sea-walled and sailboat water.
$175,000.778-7980.

NICE TRAILER 2 blocks to beach, add on room, could
be 2nd bedroom. Must see to appreciate. Pines Park,
Bradenton Beach. 778-5853.

WATERFRONT ON Anna Maria. Marvelous beach and
spectacular water views. 3BR/2BA home has family
room, stone fireplace, deck, garage, fruit trees. Well
maintained. $425,000. Call Jeanette Rampone, Michael
Saunders & Company 747-2244.
BAYFRONT Anna Maria home. 3 bedrooms, fabulous
views, fireplace. Owner financing. Just reduced to
$325,000. Yvonne Higgins Re/Max Gulfstream Realty
778-7777.
DUPLEX LOT ... ready to build. Can build 3500 sq. ft.
elevated home and have water views! A rare find at
$50,000. Sandy Greiner Re/Max Gulfstream Realty
778-7777.
OPEN HOUSE Sunday, 2 pm to 4 pm. 3948 Mariners
Drive. Cortez Rd & turn north on 127 St. Dock your sail-
boat at this 3 bedroom 2 bath elegant condominium at
Mariners Cove. Fully furnished, right down to teacups
and spoons. Spectacular view of Palma Sola Bay from
the screened lanai, gourmet kitchen, fireplace, tennis
courts, covered parking and pets welcome. $228,900.
Call Jeanette Rampone, Michael Saunders & Company
for information 747-2244. Your hostess Sandra
Marchinetti.
3 BEDROOM HOME with apartment, solar heated pool,
oversized 2 car garage, fireplace, cathedral ceilings.
Excellent location. Owner ready for offers. $195,500.
Yvonne Higgins Re/Max Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.
ZWEI-FAMILIENHAUS (duplex)) 2406 Quadratfuss,
Zwei Minuten Gehwegzum Strand. Grosse Terrasse und
grosse Raeume. $136,000, Wiebke Bentley Re/Max
Gulfstream Realty 778-7777.


HOW TO ADVERTISE

DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for WEDNESDAY
publication every week.
Minimum size, up to 21 words $5. Additional 7
words $1.50. Boxed ad, plus $2.
Classified ads for businesses and business services
are minimum $6.50 for up to 21 words. Additional 7
words $2.00. Boxed ad, plus $2.
Payment Is expected when you place the ad -
in person or by mail. The office is located at 5408 Ma-
rina Drive, between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre, in
the Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
More information: 778-7978.


B S N S O O T N I S o t n dR N A S o II


Geri Travis
Nationally Certified


779-2129


ARCHITECTURAL
DESIGN SERVICE
call TONY PEDUZZI


* Coastal Design Specialists
* Custom Luxury Homes
* Additions & Alterations


Call
778-1529
35 Years Experlence


NU-Weatherside
I of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX0065455
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074



Over 30 Years Experience
Custom Design & Installation
SSOD SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
BRICK PATIOS & WALKS
DECORATIVE STONE
& GRAVEL YARDS
Owner: Ed Murphy 748-0445

Deffenbaugh Painting by Elaine
LOCK & SECURITY Deffenbaugh
LOCKED OUT? 'Professional Excellence'
HOME AUTO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INTERIOR
ALL TYPES OF LOCKS C & EXTERIOR
Installed Rekeyed Repaired .l RESIDENTIAL
Bonded Licensed Insured &
Serving Anna Maria, Longboat COMMERCIAL
Key. Cortez, West Bradenton
-EMERGENCY SERVICE We repair popcorn ceilings.
RADIO DISPATCHED
SPECIALTY KEYS Serving the Islands Since 1969.
LUGGAGE REPAIRS Ucensed and Insured
778-5594 778-5594 778-3468

#-080,2YA EPR











.Y


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
f ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola Rc0045125* RoG005859 PE002374 778-9244


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service
Bruce Collins Since 1991

778-2586 MA RV KIAA Eve: 778-6771


10% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 2/1/95
..................... .........
KT'S with STYLE
A Jewelry Store For All Ages
Specializing in Sterling Silver
111 7th Street N., Bradenton Beach 779-1308


4% Personal Fitness

S TRAINING G ERI
Stretching & Cardiovascular Exercises
SNutritional Advice Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting
Lectures /Workshops On Fitness Topics


s I




B PAGE 32 M JANUARY 26, 1995 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


dFE


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1995


goods


SPLIT
Chicken Breasts
WITH RIBS ".

9^LB

SIRLOIN
SIZZLERS


ASSORTED


POTATO
CHIPS
6 OZ. BAG

990


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!

SIRLOIN TIP
STEAK


MEDIUM
SHRIMP


BREAKSTONE
SOUR CREAM


16 OZ
PACKAGE


990


ASSORTED
VARIETY


S^ HEAD
MARZETTI'S $ 69
VEGGIE DIP p
DELI DEPARTMENT
"SLICED TO ORDER" -_
COOKED<


APPLES


DELI DEPARTMENT
Superbowl Special
8 Pc. FRIED CHICKEN


INCLUDES:
2 BREASTS *2 THIGHS
2 LEGS *2 WINGS
1 LB. POTATO SALAD
and 1 LB. BAKED BEANS


FRE Mushrooms


8 OZ
PACKAGE
129


ANY LARGE
OR MEDIUM


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


y( II XAI, INi)I'IM ."'sIN III.iMA Iii J
HOMETOWN
PRVIID


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 AM to NOON


SIRLOIN TIP
ROASTa#t~~-z


SUNNYLAND
Meat Franks


I ,


U%2S7,1,01,