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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00540
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 11-17-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00540

Full Text


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE NOVEMBER 17,1994








Trolley service for Island 99 percent certain


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Gary Cremeans of Trolley Systems of America,
Inc., said Monday the trolley planned for Anna Maria
Island is "99.9 percent certain. All I have to do is go
over the contract."
Cremeans said he is leasing a trolley for six months
to run the Island route from Anna Maria's Bayfront
Park to Coquina Beach in Bradenton Beach to see if it
is feasible. The trolley, a private enterprise funded by
advertising, will begin running its route on Jan. 1, 1995.
"I need $6,000 to run the trolley," he said, "to pay
gas, a driver, the lease payment and insurance. The
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce has sold


Fire dance funds

gutted; phone

solicitors blamed
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Fire Chief Andy Price reported that
funds raised by this year's Halloween Dance sponsored
by the department's volunteers have been cut in half
due to phone solicitation by the Sarasota/Manatee
Firefighter's Union and a firefighter's' foundation.
"They've been soliciting for the past three or four
years," he said, "and our dance proceeds have declined
each year. We usually net about $8,000 to $12,000 and
this year we netted $4,200. I can remember when the
dance brought in $14,000 to $15,000."
Price said solicitors for the union are selling tick-
ets to a country western dance and people who were
called thought they were contributing to Anna Maria's
Halloween Dance. Another problem is businesses who
usually contribute items to be used for door prizes at
the dance contributed to the solicitors' causes and also
thought they were donating to the Anna Maria District.
Volunteer Lt. Bruce McKenzie, who approached
local business for donations of gifts, said, "I had 11 or
12 business owners say they already gave. Other vol-
unteers had the same results. I usually have a three or
four page list of gifts for the dance and this year I had
one-and-one-quarter page."
Price said since last week's article in the Islander
Bystander concerning the phone solicitors he has gotten
eight complaints from residents called by solicitors.
"I've had three dozen complaints in the past couple
of weeks." revealed Price. "Some called to complain
because they thought it was us who called and they felt
the callers were too pushy."
After reading the article, one complainant said
when a solicitor called she asked four or five times who
he was representing and he said the Bradenton Beach
Fire Department, said Price.
"It's not the soliciting that's the problem," he said,
"it's the misrepresentation."
At Monday's fire commission meeting, the board
voted to instruct their lawyer write a letter to the solici-
tation company concerning the matter.

Islanders invited to
Neighborhood Watch
meeting Tuesday
The Holmes Beach Police Department has planned
a meeting Nov. 22 to revive the Neighborhood Watch
program on the Island. The meeting will be held at 7
p.m. in Holmes Beach City Hall. Residents from all
three Island cities are invited.
"We want to make it a unified effort," explained Lt.
Dale Stephenson of the Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment. "Unless we coordinate in all three cities, it will
be half-hearted. In community policing we have to rely
on people in the neighborhoods to tell us what's going
on. We'll need people who know the neighborhood to
sign up to be block captains."


$4,000 in advertising so far and I don't think it will be
a problem to get the rest. I just have to think positive."
Cremeans said the trolley is a little different style
than the ones he now has on Siesta Key.
"It's more like a San Francisco trolley and has lots
of wood on it," he noted.
Advertising charges for the trolley are $200 to $500
per month for outside signs and $75 per month for inside
signs. In addition to advertising on the vehicle, a business
can pay a monthly "stop charge" of $100 for the trolley
to stop at the business to load and unload passengers.
The trolley route from Bayfront Park to Coquina
Beach, with an additional stop at Manatee County Pub-
lic Beach, takes about an hour. The trolley would run


Islander Bystander's

Holiday Wish Book

in production
The Islander Bystander's 1994 Holiday Wish Book
is now in production and will be published as a supple-
ment to the Dec. 1 edition of the paper.
The Wish Book is devoted to Islanders and Island
community service organizations and their special
needs for improving assistance to visitors and residents
of Anna Maria Island. As with last year's edition, the
1994 Wish Book will highlight needs wishes -
ranging from small to large.
This week, Islander Bystander staffers will be con-
tacting various individuals and organizations to deter-
mine what they need to improve their service to the
community. Then comes the most fulfilling part of the
assignment, when wishes are granted and Islanders
once again realize the joy of giving.
The Wish Book is our way of saying thanks to the
community for the support we have received for the
past year. The first edition of the Wish Book proved to
be a huge success, and we look forward to making it a
holiday tradition.


from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, with
Sunday and Monday reserved for maintenance and
charter trips.
A trolley can carry 34 passengers. The fee to ride
is $1. Passengers showing a receipt from participating
advertisers will receive their return ride free. Passen-
gers staying in motels that pay a "stop fee" will also
ride free.
Cremeans currently services Siesta Key, Lido
Beach and St. Armands Circle with two trolleys. He
said if the trolley is successful, he could also run one
from Coquina Beach down Longboat Key to connect
with his trolley at St. Armands Circle, providing Island-
ers trolley service from Anna Maria to Siesta Key.


Heritage
Days
Arts and
Crafts Fest
success
for all
One of the most-antici-
pated events of the year
is the Artists Guild of
Anna Maria Island's
Heritage Days Arts and
Crafts Festival at the
Community Center.
Although for a while it
looked as if gloomy
weather would chase
people away, there was
just enough sun and cool
breezes to make the two-
day event a real pleasure
for artists and art aficio-
nados alike this past
weekend. Pictured, Becky
Russo paints a traditional
design on a terra cotta
pot. For more pictures,
see inside. Islander
Photo: Mark Ratliff.


HAPPY BIRTHDAY
TO US!
The Islander Bystander
is two years old this issue








SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions.................................................... 6
Those Were the Days ................................. 7
Vanishing culture.......................................12
Crossword puzzle....................................... 12
Stir-it-up ..................................................... 18
Streetlife ......................................... ......... 22
Anna Maria tides ........................................ 25
Football contest.......................................... 26
Real estate................................................ 26






* NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Deadline extended again for DEP permit


for Anna Maria Island Bridge


The latest of a series of "drop-dead" deadlines has
come and gone again in the feud between two state agen-
cies on whether to issue a permit to build a 65-foot, fixed-
span bridge to replace the Anna Maria Island Bridge.
The Florida Department of Transportation unex-
pectedly requested and received a time extension for
issuance of a permit to from the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
The latest drop-dead date is now Feb. 1, 1995.
No reason for the request was given, according to
DEP's George Craciun. He speculated that the holidays
and an administrative hearing in December probably
prompted the DOT request.
DOT officials and Save Anna Maria will have their
"day in court" Dec. 19 before an administrative hear-
ing officer.
Attorney Claflin Garst, representing SAM, will
present opposition to the "mega-bridge." He will be


assisted by attorneys from the three Island cities.
Islanders have steadfastly opposed the construction
of the replacement bridge, citing aesthetic and safety
reasons.
The bridge, which would have a roadbed clearance
of about 74 feet above Anna Maria Sound, has raised
questions about wind effects on motorists at that height.
Hurricane experts have said the wind forces at that al-
titude are much greater than at lower heights, posing
the concern that cars would be swept off the span dur-
ing storms.
A continuing concern lies in the fact that long-
range plans for the area still call for a second high
bridge to be constructed, effectively making the north-
ern route to Anna Maria Island four-lane.
DEP officials have blocked permits for DOT's pro-
posed construction of the bridge due to possible envi-
ronmental damage to seagrass beds and mangroves in


the area if the bridge were built.
DEP officials appeared to relent to DOT officials
requests last July, conceding their earlier contentions
of a northern alignment would cause significant navi-
gation impacts. At the time, DEP District Director Dr.
Rick Garrity said, "We will now work for a successful
mitigation project for a south-side bridge."
Also an issue is mitigation efforts DOT promises
to use to restore seagrasses damaged by the bridge.
Like all plants, seagrasses need light to grow, and the
new bridge will shade the submerged plants, reducing
light and eventually killing the plants. Replacement
seagrasses will have to be planted, and the exact
amount of restored seagrass acreage, as well as where
those plants will be placed, has been a topic of discus-
sion between the DOT and DEP in the past few months.
"It's very difficult to do a successful mitigation of
seagrasses," Garrity has told The Islander Bystander.


... while Sarasota mega-bridge opposition builds


By Bob Ardren
Islander Correspondent
Islanders have been fighting the plan to replace the
Anna Maria Island Bridge with a 65-foot, fixed-span
structure for more than a year.
Now, there's company to the south Sarasota
residents are coming together to combat the Florida
Department of Transportation plan to replace the
Ringling Causeway with a 65-foot, fixed-span bridge.
Sarasotans opposed to the proposed 65-foot-high
bridge over Sarasota Bay found a rallying point earlier
this month. A new non-profit group dedicated to stop-
ping the project has been founded by Bird Key resident
Piero Rivolta.
Calling itself "The Bridge Too High Committee,"
the group wants "a better bridge, not a bigger one."
Rivolta is an international businessman who's
lived on Bird Key for 15 years. "I think we can win this
fight," he says. He's against the proposed bridge be-
cause "the Bay is beautiful, and you can't put this
monster in the middle of it."
Sarasota Commissioner Mollie Cardimone was
quick to praise the new efforts, saying that in her recent
visits to city neighborhoods she's found strong oppo-
sition to the new bridge.
"What's going to happen when those new pilings go
in?" she said. "It's going to look like a concrete rainbow."
Rivolta says he "put the committee together, and
we're finding a lot of community support people


'Florida can never really come to grips
with saving the environment because a
very large percentage of the population at
any given time just got here. So why fight
to turn back the clock? It looks great to
them the way it is. Two years later as they
are beginning to feel uneasy, a few thou-
sand more people are just discovering it
for the first time and wouldn't change a
thing. And meanwhile, the people who
knew what it was like 20 years ago are an
ever-dwindling minority, a voice
too faint to be heard.'
From 'The Empty Copper Sea' by
John D. MacDonald




willing to put in both their time and their money.
"It's a committee of 20 at the moment, but with lots
more supporters."
At this point The Bridge Too High group has even
retained the services of former Sarasota County Attorney


Dick Smith to research its legal position and options.
Rivolta maintains that people in favor of the pro-
posed high bridge simply don't understand that it isn't
needed and that the design is clearly a matter of "bad
scale" at the least.
"I believe if you're going to the beach, you can
wait five minutes for a bridge. Nobody is so important
they can't wait five minutes.
"In a big bay like Tampa, you can put up a big
bridge, but not here," he adds. "Not in this jewel that
makes Sarasota such a wonderful place."
The renowned Italian automobile builder and local
developer said safety on the existing bridge is really no
problem because the present bridge will not open if an
emergency vehicle needs to get through. "We only
need a better bridge, not a bigger one," he laughs. "One
that won't break down."
As for the businesses on St. Armands that want the
fixed-span bridge, Rivolta says, "If you make a big high-
way, you don't get more business. That's just wrong. The
proposed bridge just doesn't make any sense."
The Sarasota City Commission voted unanimously
against construction of the planned higher bridge, but
its decision was ignored by the Metropolitan Planning
Organization. That group of area elected officials ap-
proved the concept, thus implementing the DOT plan
to design and build the new structure. The Ringling
Bridge is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year
1999-2000.


... and no action soon on third-bridge study


A study to determine the feasibility of building an ad-
ditional bridge between the mainland and the barrier islands
between Cortez Bridge and the Ringling Causeway has
been delayed at least until after the first of the year.


The study, called a charrette by transportation
planners, has been delayed due to delays by the Florida
Department of Transportation to release funding, ac-
cording to Metropolitan Planning Organization's Bob


Herrington.
He said the MPO board would have to approve the
study, something that probably would not take place
until late January. The MPO, Herrington said, histori-
cally does not meet in December, and the November
meeting agenda does not include the proposal.
The charrette would bring together all interested
parties to review feasibility and location of a new
bridge.
"Our intent is to get the right people together in one
room and determine an answer to the question of
should we pursue an additional bridge across the bay
or not," MPO Executive Director Mike Guy has said.
To date, Anna Maria, Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach officials have indicated a charrette is a
good approach to take. Longboat Key officials have
opposed both the Bay crossing study and the charrette,
adamantly opposing any bridge to that barrier island.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola, also the
chairwoman of the Island Transportation Planning Or-
ganization, said an additional bridge is needed and the
charrette is a good first step.
"If you don't realize what is happening," she said,
"just look at the growth in eastern Manatee County or
eastern Sarasota County. There are lots of people out
there, and there will be lots more in five years, and
they're all going to want to go the beach here or on
Longboat Key."
MPO officials have indicated the cost of the
charrette would be about $10,000. They have also said
about 100 people would take part in the charrette,
which could last as long as three days.


IT'S JUST A PRANK... EVERYONE'S OKAY!


Since the end of
October, drivers on
Anna Maria's North
Bay Boulevard near
Bayfront Park have
seen these ominous
body outlines in the
street. Not to worry,
for there have been
no reports of vio-
lence in Anna Maria
City, and the ghostly
images are surely
the work of a
Halloween prank-
ster. Islander Photo:
Mark Ratliff.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 I PAGE 3 I[

Center board approves $5,000 raise for executive director


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
By a unanimous vote at its monthly meeting last
week, the board of directors of the Anna Maria Island
Community Center (AMICC) approved a $5,000-a-year
raise for Pierrette Kelly, the Center's executive director.
Although Kelly's salary will now be $31,000 a
year, board chairman George O'Connor says that
Kelly's services to the Center would be a bargain at
twice the price.
"She is drastically underpaid," O'Connor said,
explaining the board's rationale in approving the raise.
"We personally see what she does for the Center, but
in itself that's not a good enough answer to the public
because it is public money."


Believe it or not
"Don't move the car honey, there's a chicken under
it." And the woman who warned her mate wasn't
kidding. A chicken and rooster scampered across the
parking lot at the Circle K store at 2513 Gulf Dr. in
Bradenton Beach and ducked under the couple's car.
Rumor is they escape captivity from a nearby resi-
dence and frequent the convenience store but, since
farm animals are prohibited in Bradenton Beach,
these fowl weren't talking. Islander Photo: Bonner
Presswood


In considering Kelly's
raise a raise she did not
request O'Connor said
he met with Jerry Koontz,
director of the United Way,
in order to get some sense of
what the standard of pay is
for persons in positions such
as Kelly's.
"I explained the situa-
tion to him," O'Connor re- Kelly
calls. "I said, 'I personally
think and so does the board of directors that
Pierrette is not getting enough money.' He kind of
smiled and said, 'We've thought that for a while.'"
The Center raises about 55 percent of its annual
$325,000 budget on its own, while the United Way is
one of several major sources of funding making up the
balance. Requiring the Center to follow strict guide-
lines concerning raising funds and making expendi-
tures, the opinion of the United Way has, for years,
been a significant factor the Center board has consid-
ered in setting policy.
In his conversation with Koontz, O'Connor says
that not only was the United Way chief executive ame-
nable to the idea of increasing Kelly's salary, but he
offered figures that would tend to support an argument
that Kelly is underpaid as judged by the contemporary
standards of her field.
"He pulled out all of his figures," O'Connor said,
"which shows that her job is very comparable to that of
the directors of the Boys Club, et cetera, all the way down
the line and they're getting in the mid-$50,000 range."
O'Connor said that Koontz gave him a copy of a
United Way study of all charitable organizations the
United Way contributes to. According to O'Connor,
the United Way's study showed that the average salary
of executive directors of agencies comparable to the
Center was $35,689 in 1993.
"She's still under the average of what she should re-
ceive," O'Connor said. "The United Way agrees with us."
But where is the money going to come from?
"That question came up at the board meeting, and
the answer is that we're just going to go down to the


line-item on the budget for Pierrette's salary and in-
crease it by $5,000, then go down to the donations -
which is the responsibility of the board and increase
it by $5,000," O'Connor said.
"We're going to get it," O'Connor said. "If we
have to have a special fundraiser, trust me, I'll make
sure we get it."
In other business, the board approved the nomina-
tions of five new directors to take the seats of six mem-
bers who are leaving.
The departing board members are George
O'Connor, Barbara Sato, Hugh Holmes, Chris
McNamara, Jeanette Cashman and Tom Huffine.
The new board members are Andy Price, Nancy
Baldwin, Lee Edwards, Frances Szarzynski and Sue
O'Connor.
Of the 17 seats on the AMICC board, 16 are cur-
rently filled. Board members serve three-year terms
and are not paid for their services.


Anna Maria City
11/22, 7:30 p.m., Commission meeting
11/23, 9 a.m., Codification Committee

Bradenton Beach
11/17, 1 p.m., Council meeting

Holmes Beach
11/22, 7 p.m., Community police meeting on
Crime Watch program

Of Interest
N 11/21, 10 a.m., Island Transportation
Planning Organization,
Bradenton Beach City Hall
N 11/22, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Commission
swearing in of commissioners and election of
commission officers, Station 1, Holmes Beach

All city offices will be closed Nov. 24 and 25
in honor of Thanskgiving


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i] PAGE 4 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Free Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook available


People interested in doing their part to restore and
protect Sarasota Bay need to get a copy of a just-off-
the-press publication from the Sarasota Bay National
Estuary Program.
"Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook: A
Guide to Environmentally Friendly Landscaping" is an
easy-to-read, 60-page publication packed with infor-
mation on what residents can do to transform their
yards into landscapes that use more native plants and
trees and less water, fertilizers and pesticides.
A classic example of a typical "Florida Yard" may
be found at the Tingley Memorial Library in Bradenton
Beach, site of one of a number of model projects in the
area where landscape design has combined with low-
maintenance plantings to produce an attractive and
environmentally friendly design.
The booklet is only the start of what is being offered
in the way of free help to residents in the area concerned
about improving the condition of Sarasota Bay.
Florida Yard advisors are available at no charge to
help people plan new Florida yards, helping plan alter-
ations to landscape patterns that dramatically reduce
the amount of stormwater runoff entering Sarasota
Bay.
The Sarasota Bay Program has identified
stormwater runoff-- the water than runs from the land
into the water during thunderstorms and other showers
- as a leading cause of Bay productivity decline. The
stormwater carries with it harmful chemicals from
yards, streets and other sources that adversely impact
marine live.
Scientists have found that reducing the amount of
chemicals used in residential yards significantly re-
duces the harmful effects of excess chemicals that en-
ter Sarasota Bay. Landscape modifications are one very
important way to help save Sarasota Bay from chemi-
cal pollutants.
By reducing the flow and improving the quality of


Volunteers landscape library
From left: Walter Grace, Ray Wilson, Richard Suhre, John Sandberg, Lynn and Lee Hornack, William Arnold
and Alan Garner, coordinator of the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods program, have volunteered many
hours to landscaping the Tingley Memorial Library in Bradenton Beach. Garner has guided the group in
xeriscaping and using native vegetation. Photo courtesy: Eileen Suhre.


stormwater runoff, residents can make a very important
difference in restoring Sarasota Bay.
The Sarasota Bay Program booklet, and the volun-
teer residential assistance program associated with it,
will help residents reduce stormwater runoff into the
Bays, according to Sarasota Bay Program Director
Mark Alderson.


The booklet is sponsored by the Sarasota and
Tampa Bay National Estuary Programs, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District and Florida Sea
Grant.
For a free copy of "Florida Yards & Neighbor-
hoods Handbook: A Guide to Environmentally
Friendly Landscaping," call 742-5986 or 951-4240.


Anna Maria, your new island bank

opened just in time for the holidays,

and you've been very, very good this year.


Reward yourself. With our new Holmes Beach address, there's suddenly
a lot less standing between you and very personal, independent banking.


Make 1995 the greatest year ever, and join us at
your new island bank.
The officers and directors of First National Bank
of Manatee are lined up behind the commitment to
serve the island community with the same devotion
to highly-personal and gracious service that has
made locally-owned First National so successful
in Manatee County since 1986.
Francis I."Rip" duPont, III
Glen W. Fausset John J. Ogilby Chairman & C.E.O. Beverly Beall
President C P ,esidr,,. Bea 'sDepartnentStores
Col-Lee Goves. In. e a


Dr. Wm. J. Thompson / Allen J. Butler Stephen Korcheck
Robert G. Blalock Orthodmi.l / Prtdenr / Pre.ldlnIt
Blalock. Landers. I Butler Footwear. I Manatee CCommuniv College
waiters & vog'er. P.A William Nowak Raymond A. Weigel, I
Adntrator mond A. Weigel, III
IICA LW Blake Ho pital CLB Coultdong, ln,


Now we are proud to be a caring, dedicated citizen
of Anna Maria Island. It's these special attitudes and
loyalties among island residents that make the island
itself so very, very good, year after year.







First National

Bank 1)
Member FDIC


As Independent As The Island Itself.


First National Bank of Manatee 5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 (813) 778-4900 Susan O'Connor, Manager
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton, Florida 34209 (813) 794-6969


DON'T


LEAVE


PRADISE


WITHOUT


US!

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Bystander.
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on our out-of-
town list. It's the
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Anna Maria
Island!
Use the
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form on page 7
of this issue.

ISLANDER
f "i ki






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A PAGE 5 IUm

Holmes Beach civic association closes gap


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Fifteen Holmes Beach residents called together by
Bob Van Wagoner met Saturday at the Island Branch
Library to form a civic association. The group will
close the gap between the Anna Maria and Bradenton
Beach Civic Associations.
Van Wagoner told the group, "Our community has
gotten more and more involved in what's going on in
the city over the last year or so. We've had a lot of is-
sues. I go to a lot of the city council meetings and a lot
of us leave shaking our heads some times. There are
people out there who think we need a forum for the
residents."
He said another problem is a lack of concern for
Island issues and opinions at the county level.
"We're not very well heard," he said. "One of the
purposes I have in mind is to make our voice heard over
the bay and not just here."
He asked for ideas on what a civic association can do.
Joy Courtney said the group has a choice of whether
to be a watchdog at city meetings or bring perceived prob-
lems to city hall or take on specific projects.
"I think what direction we want to head is the main


question," she noted.
Councilwoman Billie Martini said in-
put from a civic group on issues the coun-
cil is considering would be very helpful to
council.
Dr. Frances Smith-Williams said she
would like to see the group become a fo-
rum to gain more in-depth understanding
of issues coming before the city.
Clark Leips agreed with Smith-Will-
iams.


'I go to a lot of the city
council meetings and a
lot of us leave shaking
our heads some times.
There are people out
there who think we
dP ,1,on W fah )j r thof


Barbara Lacina said the group could ',i'e"
poll residents on issues and share results r
with the council.
Ed Fisher noted, "We've got a big or- Bob
der to try and organize and be really rep-
resentative of the community and not just
ourselves."
Ursula Stem suggested having neigh-
borhood representatives to bring input
back to the group. Van Wagoner said that would work
well with people who are interested but will not attend
meetings or people who are shy about speaking up on
issues.


residents. '

VanWagoner


Leips asked how the group
can learn about issues before
they are discussed and voted on
by the city council. Martini said
council agendas are always
available in city hall the Friday
prior to a meeting or work ses-
sion.
Sarah Nicholas pointed out,
"As our concerns start to polarize,
there will be more than one goal."
Courtney asked each person
in attendance to bring a friend to
the next meeting. She also felt a
social meeting might draw more
people.
Leips said the group can have
many functions besides being a
government watchdog and sug-
gested having the president of a


successful civic association as the guest speaker at the
next meting. The others agreed.
The meeting was set for Dec. 3 at 10:30 a.m. at the
Island Branch Library.


Not guilty
pleas
entered in
Holmes
Beach
Sandy
Pointe
mangrove
case
Ren Glanz and John
Chasey have pled not
guilty to accusations
they illegally cut down
mangroves on the Sandy
Pointe Condominiums
development in Holmes
Beach.
The pleadings before
County Judge George
Brown will start the trial,
which will be heard by a
jury.
Glanz, the developer
of the condo project on
East Bay Drive, and
Chasey, the project's
contractor, have said
they did nothing wrong
regarding mangroves,
that any clearing was
done by a previous
owner and that they had
permits for what trim-
ming was done. Florida
Marine Patrol and
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion investigators dis-
agree.
The matter came to a
head last April.
A member of the
Florida Legislature even
became involved after
Glanz complained to
Rep. Julie McClure that
investigators were heavy
handed in their dealings
with him and his staff
during their review of the
charges. McClure sent a
sharply worded letter to
DEP officials in Talla-
hassee on Glanz's be-
half, prompting an inter-
nal investigation that is
still pending resolution.


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Ej PAGE 6 E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Save the shells,

Island-style
Jane Fonda wanted to save the whales of the world
and right here in Anna Maria City Dottie McChesney
wants to save the shells. Live shells.
It shouldn't be hard to ask your children or your
friends to be considerate of living things by letting
them live.
And we've been behind the rest of the state in plan-
ning for growth and tourism. Here it just happened. But
on Sanibel Island, near Ft. Myers, they planned their
development and restricted their growth and in the pro-
cess they provided for preservation of their natural sur-
roundings and environment. The ordinance proposed
by Commissioner McChesney was modeled after one
in Sanibel.
In effect, the limiting of live shell fish and sand
dollar harvesting in the City of Anna Maria will mean
little to the big picture, the expanse of Gulf and oceans
that remain open for "hunters."
But along with ordinances that prohibit activities
of a commercial nature should come steps and proce-
dures for licensing legitimate business. The city will
then have the opportunity to limit and control shell
harvesting and in so doing, discover how much or how
little activity really exists.

Now we are two
Some days it seems like we just got started. Some
days it seems like we've been at it for 10 years.
With this issue, we complete our second year of
publishing the "best news on Anna Maria Island."
We too have experienced a great deal of growth
and changes in just this short time. Our circulation has
nearly doubled. We started by printing 8,500 a week.
Last year in November we increased our guaranteed
circulation to 12,000 a week. This year we guarantee
our advertisers 15,000 papers a week. But we'll be way
over that figure by season.
How did we do it? The answer to the rhetorical
question is: Did we do it? We all did the best job we
could producing the newspaper but you really did it.
You read it You subscribed. You gobbled it up at news
stands, resorts and businesses here, on Longboat Key,
in Cortez and, yes in town too.
And just like perpetual motion, next week begins
our third year. We hope for many more issues and
years.
Thank you for reading The Islander Bystander.


IBY A '


NOVEMBER 17,


1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 52


V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Mark Ratliff, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Tingler
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


LOOK ALIVE, HERE
COMQEp~-Sto^3/


SLICK By Egan


niey -Ii/Z


Live sea life ban good
Doug Wolfe, as a city commissioner in Anna
Maria City, lives in a "fishbowl" and his opinions and
decisions are scrutinized by the public. I was disap-
pointed when I read about his vote against banning the
harvesting of live sea life.
A good sales person knows that a "no" is not neces-
sarily bad, often it means someone has not had enough
information to be able to say yes or concur. I commend
the person that spoke to Doug and gave him additional
information that resulted in changing his vote.
In my opinion, it takes a bigger person, a "more
advanced" person, to admit that they have changed
their mind as he did.
Bravo for Doug Wolfe!
My husband, Carl, and I have been concerned about
the declining numbers of sand dollars and star fish that we
have witnessed. We have been swimming several times
a week with a snorkel for the past three to four years. The
large sand dollars are fewer and fewer.
All too often our country continues to be reactive in
its protection of something when it is already in a crisis
stage. I believe in expanding the sanctuary concept of
Anna Maria Island and the city to more than birds.
I urge the commissioners to keep their vigilance in
looking at other seeming small steps for other oppor-
tunities to leave legacies for our children.
Carl and I have spoken several times to Dotty
McChesney about our enthusiastic support of her lead-
ership in these efforts. Hooray to both Dottie and Doug
and the other commissioner who voted to protect the
sea life aggressively.
Joan Abrahamson Voyles, Anna Maria City

Live sea life ban bad
I've sat on the sidelines listening to Anna Maria
City Commissioner Dottie McChesney remarks and
actions against the taking of live sand dollars and
shells. I've been in the shell business out here for 15
years and find there are as many sand dollars around
today as there were back when I started.
I understand that a sand dollar reproduces twice a
year, so they are constantly replenishing themselves.
Sand dollars are more healthy now than years before.


Harvesting has created this.
Over the years, I've watched shells come and go
and reappear again. Ten years ago, after a bout of red
tide, it was uncommon for big arrowhead sand dollars
to be in our area. Now they are just as thick as before.
Fighting conchs were gone and now they are back.
Pollution and acts of nature are our biggest problems.
When people come into my shop, the sand dollar
is their biggest interest. It tells the story of Christ's
Resurrection. Shells and sea life go hand-in-hand as a
part of coming to Florida. We make items with sand
dollars that go all over the world.
Some of the people objecting to the taking of sand
dollars and shells are the very ones from years past who
were taking them themselves.
Nothing makes me feel worse than to see people
taking live sea life and pitching them or purposely gath-
ering them to let them die. I am not in favor of that, but
I don't see how a few people can stop others from en-
joying the shells as much as in years past
I don't know why they keep comparing our com-
munity to Sanibel. We are not Sanibel! We don't ask
people for $3 to cross our bridge and on the other side
say, "Don't touch or take anything." I don't see how a
few people can just change the Island from what it was.
I feel very fortunate to have settled here in
Bradenton and the Island. I love it all. People work hard
for a chance to vacation here or move here. I feel they
deserve our Island as it is, just as much as we do, and
they deserve the same benefits.
Until we can be served with scientific proof that
our sand dollar population is unhealthy or diminishing,
it is a shame to let a few people make decisions like this
that will affect everyone.
Beverly Rader Chouinard, Rader's Reef,
Holmes Beach
Have your say
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to edit
letters for length. Letters must be signed, and include
the city you reside in anonymous letters will not be
printed.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Editor,
The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.


_I_


ISLANDER













THOSE WERE THE AWYS
_________ Part 1, The War of 1898 _________


by June Alder


Cuban independence leader Jose Marti whips up support from immigrant cigar
workers in Tampa.

'REMEMBER

THE MAINE'


Since before he was 10 years old,
Francis Jones had heard talk of a revo-
lution in Cuba. It got so it was all any-
one talked about when Anna Maria Is-
land men folk got together.
Francis's father was an ardent Cuba
Libre ("Free Cuba") man. So were
Francis's older brothers Johnny and
Clair, as well as next-door-neighbor
Sam Cobb and their North Point neigh-
bors, Will and Hal Bean. Their father,
George Emerson Bean, recalling the
Civil War unpleasantness, was none too
keen on war talk. But he was getting old
and crotchety too, since his daughter
Mamie upped and got married.
Francis remembered the day in
1891 when a fiery orator named Jose
Marti came to Tampa the Joneses
hadn't settled on the Island yet. "The
Maestro" they called him. He declared
his people were going to fight and fight
and get rid of the Spanish. All the kids
at the Sacred Heart school, especially
the Cuban kids, were excited about what
was going on.
That was the beginning of it all.
People sent money to Cuba to help,
and some of the men who made cigars in
Ybor City started drilling with their guns;
and quite a few went off to fight with the
rebels. At the same time people were arriv-
ing in Tampa from Cuba because they had
been cruelly treated by the Spanish au-
thorities who didn't want them to be free
and have their own country.
Francis listened eagerly to tales of
the "filibusters" who smuggled boat-
loads of guns, ammunition and supplies
to the Cuban fighters. Though it was
against the law because the United
States was supposed to be neutral, lots
of respectable people were smugglers.
Francis found out that his father's good
friend, Captain James McKay, was a
filibuster. (He and his famous father of
the same name had smuggled food and
guns past the Union blockaders into
Tampa Bay during the Civil War.)
As far as Francis knew, his brothers
John and Clair, were not involved, at
least not directly. But he did suspect
wily Will Bean. He had a hot romance


going with a girl in Port Tampa where
he worked. He would go to see her and
get back to the Island in the wee hours
of the morning, if at all. Nobody
thought he was just spooning with his
sweetheart all the time.
One time his brother Johnny, who
was nearly 20 and working in Tampa,
told Francis that he had seen with his
own eyes the schooner Mallory, loaded
to the gunwales with armed men and
ammunition, sail off from Palmetto
Beach near Tampa in broad daylight.
And he swore he witnessed the launch-
ing of a little cigar-shaped thing called
a submarine that shot off underwater
with two men in it! It never did get to
Cuba, though.
There were awful stories in the New
York newspapers about people being tor-
tured and executed. And men and women
taken off their fields with the children and
made to stay in barbed wire camps. And
when a journalist named Richard
Harding Davis wrote about three young
women being strip-searched by Spanish
officials aboard the "Olivette" the
pride of Mr. Plant's steamship line, and
built by Captain McKay why, that was
too much!
Not just Tampa Bay but it seemed
all the American people were clamor-
ing for an invasion of Cuba.
On Feb. 15, 1898, an explosion
split open the hull of the U.S. Battle-
ship Maine (paying a "courtesy call" at
Havana), sending the ship and its crew
of 264 sailors to the bottom of Havana
Harbor. Though the cause of the blast
was never determined, it led to a dec-
laration of war in April.
Not long afterwards young Francis
Jones came rushing into the Jones
home, grabbed up a comb and tooth-
brush and, informing his astonished
mother that he was on his way to Cuba,
dashed out again.
Sophie Jones would not hear from
her impetuous 16-year-old son again
until the war was over.

Next: A time of frenzy


I


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 0 PAGE 7 i[D



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It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
S Island. Over 875 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al- U
ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only :
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't live
here and you would like to subscribe, or if you want to mail the paper to a
friend or relative, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our .
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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
* (Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
................m.m..mmm........mm.n...m..m







I1[ PAGE 8 I NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Mayor: authority comes from charter, code


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
He's just playing by the book, says Holmes Beach
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger, when questioned about his
managerial style.
Bohnenberger who has butted heads with a
couple of his council members recently over the bud-
get, the re-appointment of the city attorney, and board
appointments said he is just following the city char-
ter and administrative code.
"I'm not trying to be at odds with council," he ex-
plained, "I just think they're not accustomed to doing
things by the book. The charter clearly defines the au-
thority of the mayor and it is the mayor's responsibil-
ity to see that the council abides by the charter. I take
direction from the charter and then go to the adminis-
trative code for further direction."
Another problem, said Bohnenberger, is that council
members in the other two Island cities have more power.
Holmes Beach is the only Island city with a strong mayor
form of government in which the mayor is the adminis-
trative head of the city. The mayor cannot vote on legis-
lation but has veto power over any legislation. The coun-
cil is the legislative body which adopts ordinances and
resolutions and conducts hearings/appeals but has no au-
thority over administrative matters.
The first time Bohnenberger cited the charter to
council was at the presentation of the 1994/95 budget
in June. Bohnenberger told council members their only
role was to settle disputed issues between themselves
and the department heads.
Councilwoman Billie Martini asked if council
could have anything to say about the budget, to which
Bohnenberger replied that according to the city attor-
ney, it would be interference with the administrative
function.
"I think the budget presentation was somewhat of
a shock," said Bohnenberger. "The administrative code
says any recommendations or disputes are to be re-
ferred to council for further consideration. They have
a right to question items and demand explanations The
budget is an ordinance and it's the legislative body's
authority to adopt it."
The next disagreement came during the same meet-
ing when a council member pointed out that the city's
donation to the Anna Maria Island Community Center
(AMICC) increased only $450, even though the




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AMICC requested the city double it's
previous donation of $15,000. De-
spite pleas from AMICC advocates,
Bohnenberger, backed by other coun-
cil members, said the city must be
responsible to all its citizens and
other services would suffer if the do-
nation were increased.
"My thoughts are simple," said
Bohnenberger, "to what degree
should the cities pay (to help fund the
center's operating budget)? The prop-
erty owners are the ones who are pay- ,
ing. They are taxed three times for the
community center."
Bohnenberger said Islanders pay Mayor Bohnenb
$187,000 to the Children's Services
Tax of which the AMICC gets $36,000. The county
helps fund the AMICC with ad valorem tax revenues,
plus the three Island cities also make annual donations
to the AMICC.
"They (AMICC advocates) say more people from
Holmes Beach use the center than any other city, but
it's still only one-fifth of our population," he noted.
"What about the other four-fifths? It's a matter of eco-
nomics. I'm responsible to the city and the taxpayers
of Holmes Beach."
In August, after a council member asked how the
attorney serves, the mayor surprised council when he
told the board he has sole authority to select the city's
attorney. He told council their authority is limited to
approval or disapproval of the termination or appoint-
ment of the attorney. Some council members also felt
the attorney must be reappointed on an annual basis.
"The city attorney is a city officer just like the chief
of police," maintained Bohnenberger. "We don't reap-
point any city officer on an annual basis or with the instal-
lation of a new mayor. There's nothing in the charter or
code that sets a term on that particular office or makes that
city officer's position any different from the others."
Another flap came over appointments to city boards.
When the mayor asked for council concurrence of an ap-
plicant to the Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) of the
Metropolitan Planning Organization, some council mem-
bers felt they should see all applications and participate in
the selection process. Bohnenberger said its the mayor's
job to go through the applications, select a candidate and


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present the name to council for
concurrence.
"The charter says 'the mayor
shall' appoint board members
with the concurrence of coun-
cil," said Bohnenberger. "They
( wanted me to give them a list of
the applicants. That would hand
over the selection process to
? council, which is not permitted
in the charter. They're reading
too much into this. The concur-
rence process is a safeguard."
He also questioned council's
-?- grilling of applicants, particu-
ger larly about their personal lives,
which occurred on several occa-
sions.
"When you have a citizen volunteer to offer free
service to the city and that person's a registered voter
and community member in good standing, I see no rea-
son to turn anybody down," he said. "What else do they
need to know?"
Whether or not a relative of a council member
should serve on a board created another disagreement,
because one of the CAC applicants is the wife of a
council member.
"Appointing relatives has never been city policy,"
noted Bohnenberger. "I made that clear at the begin-
ning. It could create a Sunshine problem. Legally it
would probably be okay if it's a fact finding group, but
personally I don't even think that's appropriate."
Bohnenberger said providing for a city manager in
the charter would solve a lot of problems.
"We will not always have a mayor with the admin-
istrative experience and time to do the job," he said.
"The benefits of having a city manager would far out-
weigh the salary."
He said a city manager could aggressively seek
grants, which would free a portion of the budget to
accommodate the salary. A manager would also be able
to do research on issues coming before council, thus
reducing council's study load.
"You have to get out and get involved with people
in similar positions and discuss problems," he stressed.
"I don't think you can be effective if you stay within
the confines of your city."


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 17, 1994 H PAGE 9 JiE


Increased interest =
increased revenue for
Tingley Library
John Sandberg and Dick Suhre have concocted a
scheme to net the Tingley Memorial Library an addi-
tional $16,500 a year in revenue.
How? By investing the balance of Bertha Beula
Tingley's bequest for a new library in U.S. Govern-
ment Bonds instead of the low-interest account in
which the money currently rests.
Sandberg, a member of the library board, and Suhre,
a Bradenton Beach councilman and the city's liaison to the
library, recently received city council approval of their
plan. The city is the overseer of the funds.
Suhre said the current interest rate of 4.1 percent
could be enhanced to 7.5 percent by investing the ap-
proximate $500,000 left from the late Mrs. Tingley's
gift in government bonds. That would mean the city
would receive $37,500 a year in interest on the funds,
up from the current $21,000.
"Actually, the library has more money than the city
has to spend," Suhre said with a smile.
Part of the extra revenue will go toward the hiring of
a part-time library worker to enhance volunteer efforts at
the library, located behind city hall in Bradenton Beach.


Ratliff named
Features Editor
With this issue of The Islander Bystander,
reporter Mark
Ratliff has been
promoted to Fea-
tures Editor.
Tomara Kafka,
who formerly held
tharpost, is pursu-
ing other writing
opportunities.
"I'm looking
forward to doing
the people stories Ratliff
and photos that Is-
land folks seem to enjoy," Ratliff says. "I hope
our readers will keep me informed as to what's
going on around the Island."
Ratliff, who has been with The Islander By-
stander since May, has been a journalist for more
than 12 years, and was editor of former Island
newspapers The Island Sun and Island Free Press.


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home or office! Call us and the vehicle of your choice will
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Take your chance to win $50 in The Islander football contest
on page 26, this issue. "It's the only game in town!"


YARD WASTE

PICK UP NOTICE

CITY OF ANNA MARIA

CITY OF HOLMES BEACH


Attention customers of Waste
Management of Manatee County


Florida's Solid Waste Management Act requires
that garden trash (yard waste) must now be
separated from regular household garbage.
Waste Management will collect.your yard waste
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usual twice per week household garbage pickup.
Those residing North of Manatee Avenue West
will receive yard waste service on THURSDAY
each week. Those residing south of Manatee Av-
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748-1829
Installation offer available in cable areas only, for residential applications only. Other restrictions may apply.
FCC regulations may affect prices, Installation on interior walls may be additional charge. You must ask for this offer to receive it.


Mayor Simches
better after
surgery
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches is on the mend
following surgery Oct. 24.
"The mayor is progressing and getting stronger on a
daily basis," said City Clerk Peggy Nelson last week. "He
calls city hall and speaks to me and with Public Works
Director Bill Zimmerman to get progress reports."
Oops
Florida Department of Transportation clarified that
road widening on the Cortez Road project will extend
only to 119th Street. New sidewalks will extend be-
yond 119th Street to 123rd Street.
Plant sale by garden
club Friday at Roser
The Anna Maria Garden Club will hold its annual
Plant Sale on Friday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
at Roser Memorial Community Church, Anna Maria.
The public is invited to make selections from a
wide variety of inexpensive plants.


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i[ PAGE 10 E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Murder Among Friends

December 2-11 8:00 PM
Matinees Dec. 4 & 11 2:00 PM
Box Office opens November 21
Open 10 AM to 3 PM daily except Sunday
Visa and Mastercard Accepted
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Free KidCare Photo ID
kits are available at the
Anna Maria School
Saturday. Sponsored in
part by Island Real Estate
in Holmes Beach, the kits
provide valuable assis-
tance to law enforcement
agencies if a child is lost
or abducted.


Protect your child get free ID


Island Real Estate in Holmes Beach is joining the
national campaign by the National Center for Missing
and Exploited Children by sponsoring a free KidCare
Photo ID Event at Anna Maria Elementary School on
Saturday, Nov. 19, at 9 a.m.
The purpose of KidCare Photo ID Event is to provide
parents with a free, standardized, high quality instant
photograph of their child to be mounted in a handy pass-
port-like booklet containing space for current vital statis-
tics. The event also offers "peace of mind" for parents to
know that they have appropriate information in their pos-


session if their child is lost or abducted.
Though parents have pictures of their children,
most do not have suitable photographs for release to
law enforcement officials and the press should their
children become missing. The type of photo which Is-
land Real Estate will provide during-the KidCare Photo
ID Event will be an unobstructed head and shoulders
shot of the child alone.
All Island children and parents are encouraged to
take advantage of the event. Call Paul Collins, Island
Real Estate, at 778-6066 for more details.


Fire chief seeks feasibility study

for emergency manager position


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Fire Chief Andy Price has called a
meeting of representatives of the three Island cities and
the fire district to conduct a feasibility study on hiring
an emergency manager.
At last week's meeting of the Island Emergency
Operations Center, Price asked each city to have a rep-
resentative at a meeting set for 10 a.m. Nov. 30 at the
fire station in Holmes Beach.
"It is time to conduct a feasibility study to see if this
position is needed and if the public agencies on the Island
will fund it," explained Price. "We've got a whole year
to look at it There's been a lot of confusion over this. It
was a concept that got viewed as a proposal."
Price also revived the idea of having one account
for the IEOC to draw from for purchases of items such
as sandbags. Each city and the fire district would be
asked to make an equal contribution to the account.
The idea was proposed last year but never pursued by
the cities.
In their 1994/94 budgets, Anna Maria budgeted
$3,000; Holmes Beach, $1,500 and the fire district,
$2,500 for the IEOC. Bradenton Beach did not include
a line item for the IEOC, said Price.
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Carol Whitmore
asked what the group spent last year.
Price replied, "Last year we spent a lot of money,



Pretty bazaar
stuff a
Gert Claypool, center,
and Kay Wohlford, right,
admire an afghan which
was part of the handi-
work Florence Polito,
left, put up for sale to
help St. Bernard Catholic
Church during its annul .
Poinsettia Bazaar. ". .
Despite rather uncoop- .
erative weather this past "" "
weekend, the bazaar
attracted many exhibitors
and buyers. Islander 'i ,' "
Photo: Mark Ratliff. ,


because it took two years to get the sandbags, video-
taping and other items approved. We actually overspent
what we budgeted because they all got approved at one
time. In the years before we hardly spent anything."
Price said all the funds could be funneled through
the fire district in a separate line item in its budget or
a separate account could be opened. He said he would
send a memo to each city to re-open discussion on the
proposal.
Price also stressed the importance of off-site stor-
age of city records during a hurricane. Bradenton
Beach and the fire district have arranged for a rental
truck to take their records to a site in DeSoto County
but Anna Maria and Holmes Beach have yet to make
arrangements.
"I would strongly urge you to get together and do
it," Price told the officials of the two cities. "I think
you're making a mistake if you don't predetermine
where you are going and have a vehicle ready. When
the hurricane is coming and you only have two hours,
you will spend a lot of time deciding what to do with
your records."
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Jack Maloney said
he would have Cpl. John Cosby of his department, who
made the arrangements with DeSoto County, see if the
other two cities could also use the site.
The group agreed not to have a meeting in Decem-
ber. The next meeting will be Jan. 11, 1995.









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m NOVEMBER 17, 1994 3 PAGE 11 [ii


-7 3- And now,
a I! -- direct from
I- Camp
*: Harrington...
S. .Island performers Rose
Barrett, Jack Elka and
Linda Greig will be
featured at In the Mood,
._ a 1940s USO variety
T l. show Friday at 8p.m. at
.the Community Center.
TiThe producers welcome
the audience to come
/ dressed in 1940s attire
C- or World War II military
uniforms to lend an
extra element of realism
to the period theme of
the evening.



After the ball, stay in the mood


If the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island has anything
to say about it (and they're making it their business to do
just that), there's no reason the fun of Friday night's ex-
travaganza, In the Mood, has to end when the show does.
"The Gala Gallery Night" will be from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. on Sunday, and the Guild promises it will be a


"fun-filled evening of fine art, good food, and great
entertainment in a French cabaret atmosphere." The
Guild says it's their way of saying thank you to ev-
erybody for making Heritage Days a success.
The Guild is located at 5414 Marina Drive in
Holmes Beach. For more information call 778-6694.


4 9 ",W l 1,1


Mullet for sale
at Privateer smoke
The Anna Island Privateers will hold another mul-
let smoke on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. until sold
out, at Anna Maria Island Centre in front of Shells
Restaurant in Holmes Beach.
The freshly smoked mullet will be priced at one for
$3 and two for $5. All mullet will be wrapped to take
home. A free recipe book will be available during the sale.
Proceeds will benefit the Privateers' support of youth
programs and the organization's scholarship fund.

Historical speaker to spin
tall tales Nov. 21
Long-time Island resident John Adams will speak
to the Anna Maria Historical Society and the public
during the society's meeting to be held Monday, Nov.
21, at 7:30 p.m., at Anna Maria City Hall, Pine Avenue
and Gulf Drive, Anna Maria City.
Adams moved to the Island with his parents, the
late Sam and Alice Adams, in 1946. The subject of his
talk will be "Tall Tales: Coming of Age on Anna Maria
50 Years Ago." His talk will also include tidbits about
the little-known Anna Maria Air Force, among other
amusing anecdotes of the past.

Rotary Club to meet
Dr. Phillip Makari, assistant minister at Palma Sola
Presbyterian Church, will discuss the differences and
similarities between the United States and Egypt at the
Rotary Club meeting to be held Monday, Nov. 21, at
6 p.m., at Crabby Bill's restaurant in Holmes Beach.
All Rotarians are welcome. Call Jack Koyle at 778-
3203 for information.

Low Vision Group
meets Tuesday
The Island Low Vision Group will meet Nov.22 at
1:30 p.m. in the meting room of the Island Library.
The meeting's theme is "Conversation Piece,"
an exchange of members' new ideas. Hobbies will
also be shared.

Audubon Society to meet
The Manatee County Audubon Society will meet
at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 17, at the Emmanuel
United Methodist Church, 5115 Cortez Rd., Bradenton.
Member J.S. McCullough will present a slide pre-
sentation on birds in their native surroundings: where
to find them and their distinguishing features.
For more information call 792-0963.


Community Center
announces new programs
The Anna Maria Island Community Center
(AMICC) has announced two new programs as well
as the return of the very popular basketball program.
For more information, call the Center at 778-1908.
Basketball For ages 5-16, registration is un-
derway and will continue through Nov. 18. Tryouts
are mandatory and will be held Nov. 19 as follows:
Ages 5-7 at 3 p.m., ages 8-10 at 4 p.m., and ages 11-
13 at 5 p.m. Players in the 14-16 age range will be
placed on a team without tryouts.
The cost for this program is $25 for AMICC
members, $30 for non-members.
Flag football Both boys and girls are wel-
come to participate in this non-contact activity. Reg-
istration is underway and will continue through Nov.
18, with play beginning the week of Nov. 21.
Cost is $5 for AMICC members and $7 for non-
members.
Adult tap lessons Miss Lisa Gallo will be in-
structing adults in tap dancing on Wednesdays from 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. The lessons are underway, but aspiring
tapsters can join at any time. For more information, call
Miss Lisa at 795-1816 or contact the Center.
Low-impact aerobics Led by instructor Geri
Travis, this class incorporates small, handheld
weights (1-2 lbs.) with low-impact movements to
burn body fat while toning. Beginners may participate
in this class without weights if they desire. Classes are
held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Information, call Geri Travis at 779-2129.
Snowbirds: horseshoers
make a pitch for you
The horseshoe players who get together every
week for friendly match-ups want returning winter
visitors to be aware that the competition is still going
on. Just like before, anyone who has a yen to pitch
horseshoes is welcome to participate in the contest
which gets underway every Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Dr.
Winners of the Nov. 12 games, were Jerry
Martinek and Bill Starret.
Runners up were John Johnson and Gene
Snedeker.

Thanksgiving service at
Christ Scientist
First Church of Christ Scientist will hold a
Thanksgiving Day service at 10:30 a.m. on Thanks-
giving Day, Thursday, Nov. 24. The public is wel-
come to the church, 6300 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.


SCbrcb of the Annunciation
,,, HOLLY BERRY
BAZAAR
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
9 am to 2 pm
Christmas Gifts of Decorations,
Jewelry, PLANTS, Baked Goods,
Cutlery, Toys & Handcrafts, Christmas
Boutique & Raffle. Donuts & coffee in
A.M. Hot Dogs & Dessert in P.M.
4408 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH

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Everything Under "Creation"
6011 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton 794-6196
"CASH & CARRY" SPECIAL
A Colorful, Fresh Flower
THANKSGIVING $1498
CENTERPIECE
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cy3EAUTY
AND THE FEAST!
For Thanksgiving, November 24
The FTD ,
Autumn Harvest" Bouquet '. -:--
Send this "feast for the eyes tI: am .... ,_- -
and friends across the city ....";
or the country!
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Our Hards


ORDER THE
TODAY
778-4751
ISLAND SHOPPI G CENTER
5312 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
Owned and Operated by Island Resident for 20 Years.


v






IDM PAGE 12 E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Attempting to retain Cortez's 's vanishing culture


By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
While Wayne Nield explained the 18-piece art
exhibit that overwhelms his home and honors Cortez
and its inhabitants, it seemed appropriate that Aaron
Copeland's masterpiece "Celebration of the Common
Man" played in the background.
Visual artist/historian Nield calls his "inventory of
artifacts," woven into a story of Florida pioneers, "Van-
ishing Culture."
It is a testimony to people who founded a special
part of Florida.
Besides pointing out the erosion of cultural heri-
tage, Nielcs two-year project pays homage to the hard-
working, salt-of-the-earth folks who for generations
fished Sarasota and Tampa Bays.
The exhibit actually is an outcropping of a study
begun two years ago by Nield and maritime anthro-
pologist Michael Jepson.
In addition to Nield's artwork, the two men have
put together photo panels flanked by interpretations
that follow the village's history from the time the first
settlers came in the mid-1800s.
A mural on the side of A.P. Bell Fish Co. depicts
local waters and islands but familiar names were
changed to those used by fishermen of 100 years ago.
One of the highlights of the overall project is the
old Taylor Boat Works where people can see and feel
what it was like to build a vessel with nothing but hand
tools.
Nield calls the "Vanishing Culture" exhibit at his
home a "photo installation." It is a compilation of old
photographs, shards of wood and nets from fishing
boats, fish traps and words gleaned from turn-of-the-
century books.
It is a hands-on monument to a dying breed. Nield
said he is talking to museums about displaying his art
to bring notice to the plight of Cortezians.
"It's my visual response to the tragedy of Cortez,"
Nield said. "Unless these people get help, they will
disappear. Fishing villages all along the Florida coast
are dropping like flies. Fishing is what these people are.
It's what they do."
Nield, who has lived in Cortez five years, said he
has witnessed the slow demise of the village, a prob-
lem familiar to other Florida fishing villages and its
people who either are preyed upon by government or
greedy developers eager to get their mitts on choice


Wayne Nield and his
"Letter to Dearest. It
portrays a photo of the
"Kitchen" an area of
seagrass beds just south
of Cortez that provided
food for the villagers for
more than 100 years.
Islander Photo: David
Futch.


waterfront property.
The beginning of the end for Cortez started with
the unsympathetic destruction of the old Albion Inn by
the U.S. Coast Guard, a bureaucracy seemingly hell-
bent on building a new home for itself despite protests
from villagers.
In recent years, battles with the Florida Department
of Transportation over the widening of Cortez Road
have created a rift between villagers and the state.
And with the passing of a Constitutional amend-
ment banning the nets Florida's commercial fishermen
use to harvest seafood, Cortezians feel they've been
kicked in the teeth again.
"These are proud people. They know who they are
and they know what they do. They are more in tune
with nature than those of us who study it," Nield said.
"Now they're being treated like they are a menace.
They're being devalued. They're being told (because
of the net ban amendment) that what they did had no
value.
"They are the people who feed us. We are totally
dependent on them and we just sent them packing."
Nield's home is a traditional Florida Cracker build-
ing that he said once was a bar. Built around 1920, it be-
came "Charley Guthrie's Jook" complete with pool table.
It was hit by a tornado in 1936, rebuilt and later became
home to different Cortezian families, Nield said.


A tour of the house and the exhibit fosters eerie
feelings. Nield's playing of ancient "chant" music sung
by monks adds a peculiar atmosphere and mood.
"I play this music because I wanted a sense of an-
tiquity, a sense of the sacred," he said. "(The exhibit)
is about the sacredness of our food and the importance
of the people who feed us."
The first "artifact" is called "letter to Dearest" and
is a window frame and window through which the
viewer sees a photo of what Cortezians refer to as the
"Kitchen." It is a body of water that literally fed the
people of Cortez, supplying them fish and scallops.
The most imposing piece is "Reliquary: Main Al-
tar" and combines many of the things fishermen use in
their work. It combines nets, traps and photos to form
an altar dedicated to their work.
"These people have a sense of the sacred. Sacred
places, sacred structures," Nield said. "They may not
call them sacred, but that's what these places are to
them."
Nield and Jepson have tried to convince Tallahas-
see bureaucrats to get behind their effort to place
Cortez on the National Register of Historic Places as
a "traditional cultural property."
Their pleas have fallen on deaf ears, Nield said.
"This isn't calling a mule a race horse," he said.
"This is the race horse."


FROM THE DEPT. OF REDUNDANCY DEPT.
BY FRANK A. LONG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ


ACROSS
I Fortuneteller's
aids
7 Fraternal fellow
10 Magnetic flux
symbol
13 People with
flashlights
19 Farthest point
20 "- Dance"
(Pointer Sisters
hit)
22 Sartre play
23 Sot, perhaps
24 Strands
25 Half of a nursery
rhyme name
26 Congregates?
29 Overpermissive
30 Family girl
31 Tax
32 Rainbow: Prefix
34 Upholstery
fabric
39 Poseidon's
realm
42 Admitted
45 Introverts
47 Complain, in a
way
49 Beat, as grain
50 Collectibles?
53 majesty
55 Devoted
56 Music critic
Downes





a
STUMPED?
1-900-420-5656
(750 per minute)


57 probandi
(legal doctrine)
58 Geyser sight
59 Madres' kin
60 Abbr. for Jesse
Jackson
61 "Put Your Head
on My Shoulder"
singer
62 Erupting
64 Storm or
Tracker
65 Lanka
66 Novelty?
69 Preteen
72 Liquor-free
74 Iroquois tribe
75 Not give --
76 Lady in a garden
77 Rakehell
79 Lepidopterans
80 Swell suffix?
81 At another time
82 Arkin of
"Catch-22"
83 River near
Kassel
84 Halve?
87 Produce
additional
interest
89 In a sleeping
position
91 Engraving
instrument
92 Candidate
94 Ethyl acetates
97 Susquehanna
River town
98 Hugh Hefner's
Muse?
99 Branch


100 It fits in a lock
102 Terminal abbr.
104 AB C's?
113 Make a fresh
mix?
115 People who
want to lose
116 Open house,
perhaps
117 International
language system
118 Spellbind
119 Forte
120 They may be
glazed over
121 Pepper, for one:
Abbr.
122 Archaic
exclamations
123 Cover
DOWN
1 Home of ancient
Irish kings
2 Copyists
3 Small deer
4 Look up and
down
5 Overflow
6 Some Tuzla
residents
7 Tangle up
8 Bucolic settings
9 Late rocker
Cobain
10 Show
11 Dear
12 Technical sch.
13 Shaded part of
a plant
14 Tart


15 Fringe
16 Erupt?
17 Actress Moreno
18 Charon's river
21 Horns
27 Soused
28 Lose no time
33 Reduce taxes, in
Britain
34 Overwhelms
35 Swelling wave
36 Human being?
37 Hollywood's
Penn
38 Directional
suffix
40 Zoo attractions
41 Not be a passive
victim
42 It prohibited
slavery
43 Agcy. once
headed by
Edward R.
Murrow
44 Some scholars,
for short
46 "Sliver" star
48 Extreme
51 Soapberry tree
52 Most charming
54 Full of parody
58 Fiji's capital
61 day now
62 Black cuckoos
63 Physique
64 Commerce stat.
67 "Toward
Freedom"
autobiographer


68 Brewery
fixtures
70 Deponent
71 Mean
73 Impressive
Impressionist
77 --avis
78 Corrida cheers
79 Soldiers
80 "Uh-huh"


81 Author Seton 96 Baseball 107 1962 film villain
84 Its atomic Hall-of-Famer 108 Noted ark-itect
number is 83 Crawford 109 Patio
85 Savings-account 99 Handily component
abbr- 101 Lullsg 110 Geometry topic
86 My ty" 102 Like the Negev Ill Easter ends it
88 Expertin 103 Start from 112 Mr. Pecksniff of
Mideast culture scratch "Martin
90 10, to a gymnast 105 Time of danger Chuzzlewit"
93 Vetoes 106 Country crooner 114 Germanic war
95 Family dinners McCoy god


Answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
three clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.








I t IbLANL)K YbIANUtK N NUYVtMItK I/, IYY4 t r'Ab IJ II1


Van Wezel Hall guided tours
resume for season
Guided tours of the Van Wezel Performing Arts
Hall are now being offered until April 12, 1995.
The tours are available from 10 a.m. to noon, and
2 to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on mati-
nee performance days.
The hall is located at 777 N. Tamiami Trail,
Sarasota. Call 953-3366 for information about the tour
and the Van Wezel's upcoming season.

British musical at Theatre Works
"The Hired Man," Melvyn Bragg and Howard
Goodall's great British musical, is currently featured at
the Theatre.Works in Sarasota. The show will run
through Saturday, Dec. 10.
Performances are at 8 p.m., Tuesday through Sat-
urday, with matinees on Sunday at 2 p.m.
Call 952-9170 for ticket information.

College students present Gilbert
& Sullivan opera
Manatee Community College music students will
present "Trial by Jury," a Gilbert and Sullivan opera,
in free workshop performances Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 18 and 19., at 8 p.m. in room 3802 of the Music
Building on the MCC Bradenton Campus, 5840 26th
St. West.
For information, call the MCC Department of
Music, 755-1511, ext. 4351.

Fun for all ages at Van Wezel
One adult and one children's event will fill the Van
Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota Saturday, Dec. 3
"The Animal Band," one of today's hottest
children's entertainment stars, will perform for one
show only at 10:30 a.m., followed by the adult humor
of comedian Howie Mandel at 8 p.m.
Tickets are on sale now for both performances.
Call the Van Wezel box office at 953-3368 for ticket
information.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.









STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


MCC Theatre presents
'Lend Me a Tenor'
Mistaken identities and comic situations abound in
"Lend Me a Tenor," a Tony award-winning play,
which opens Saturday, Nov. 19, at Manatee Commu-
nity College Studio 84,5840 26th St. West, Bradenton.
Performances are scheduled for Nov. 19, 22, 23, 25,
and 26. A matinee will be held Sunday, Nov. 20 at 3 p.m.
Tickets are on sale at the Neel Auditorium Box
Office. Call the box office at 755-1511, ext., 4240, for
ticket information.




Art League Secret Shop Nov. 26
The Annual Christmas Secret Shop will be held in
conjunction with an arts and crafts fair on Saturday,
Nov. 26, at the Anna Maria Art League, 5312 Holmes
Blvd., Holmes Beach, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
"Santa's Elves" will help four- to 10-year-old shop-
pers choose and purchase the hand-crafted gifts priced
from 25 cents to $2.50. Gifts are wrapped and tagged. The
shopping experience gives children an opportunity to do
some holiday gift buying on their own.
While waiting for their little shoppers, parents may
want to shop at the Art League's arts and crafts fair
going on at the same time outside.
For information call the Art League at 778-2099.

Junior art show entries wanted
The Anna Maria Island Art League will sponsor its
fourth annual Junior Arts Show, "Young at Art," as
part of its annual "Festival of Fine Arts," Dec. 3 and 4,
at Holmes Beach City Park.
All Island students and non-resident students regis-
tered in classes at the Art League, ages 4 to 18, are eligible.
Entries will be received at the Art League, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, on Saturday, Nov. 26, from
1 to 5 p.m., and on Monday, Nov. 28, from 1 to 5 p.m.
The divisions are: Drawing and Painting, Photog-
raphy, Sculpture/Pottery and Jewelry.
Final judging will take place on Saturday, Dec. 3, at
10 am. Call the Art League at 778-2099 for information.


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Helen Joan Brown
Helen Joan Brown, 63, of Holmes Beach,
died Nov. 9, at home.
Born in Illinois, Mrs. Brown came to Mana-
tee County from Rock Falls, Ill., in 1973. She was
a private business owner and a Catholic.
She is survived by her husband, John L.; two
daughters, Rebecca, and Kimberly Herman, both
of Bradenton; one son, John G., of Bradenton;
and six grandchildren.
A funeral mass was said at St. Joseph Catho-
lic Church in Bradenton with the Rev. Carmelo
Cadarso officiating. Burial took place in
Manasota Memorial Park. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Hospice of Southwest
Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209 or
St. Joseph Catholic Church Fund, 2704 33rd Ave.
W., Bradenton, FL 34205

Harry Greene Harris
Harry Greene Harris, 73, of Holmes Beach,
died Nov. 10 at home.
Born in Dayton, Ohio, Mr. Harris came to
Manatee County from there in 1976. He was a re-
tired chief of accounting and finance with Wright
Patterson Air Force Base for 16 years. He was a U.
S. Air Force veteran of World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Louise; two
daughters, Harriett Harrison of Louisville, Ky.,
and Suellen Skeen of Rehobeth Beach, Del.; two
stepdaughters, Patricia Dunn of Largo and Mary
Misner of Bradenton; a sister, Marion Arnette of
Granbury, Texas; his father, Harry H., of Leba-
non, Ohio; and nine grandchildren.

Islander out-of-town
subscriptions top 900
We mail The Islander Bystander every week to
more than 900 out-of-town subscribers. To subscribe, see
the order form on page 7 or, if you would like to request
guaranteed, free home delivery, please call 778-7978.


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BEWARE OF TELEPHONE
SOLICITORS BEARING OFFERS TOO
GOOD TO BE TRUE
THEY USUALLY ARE!
BE SURE YOU KNOW WHO YOU'RE
DEALING WITH BEFORE YOU ALLOW
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IE PAGE 14 A NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Winners/losers in last week's general election


Want to compare how the Island voted versus the rest of the county or state?
Below are the break-outs for each of the four voting precincts on Anna Maria
Island, as well as the overall winners with the percentage of their support.


Overall winners
U.S. Senate
Mack (R) 70 percent
Rodham (D) 30 percent
Governor
Chiles (D) 51 percent
Bush (R) 49 percent
Secretary of State
Mortham (R) 52 percent
Saunders (D) 48 percent
Attorney General
Butterworth (D)58 percent
Ferro (R) 42 percent
Comptroller
Milligan (R) 51 percent
Lewis (D) 49 percent
Treasurer
Nelson (D) 52 percent
Ireland (R) 48 percent
Education Commissioner
Brogan (R) 53 percent
Jamerson (D) 47 percent
Agriculture Commissioner
Crawford (D) 51 percent
Smith (R) 48 percent
Florida Senate, District 26
McKay (R) 72 percent
Hertig (D) 28 percent
Florida House, District 68
Flanagan (R) 53 percent
McClure (D) 47 percent
County Commission
Glass (R) 94 percent
School Board, District 1
Wilhoite (R) 56 percent
Scott (D) 44 percent
School Board, District 3
Simmons (R) 49 percent
Petruff (D) 33 percent
Morange (I) 19 percent
School Board, District 5
Miller (R) 62 percent
Trumbull (D) 38 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 1
Garrison 70 percent
Mendez 30 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 3
Matthews 43 percent
Garrott 34 percent
Kendall 23 percent
Soil & Water, Group 2
Goodman 60 percent
Trace 40 percent
Soil & Water, Group 4
Reeder 51 percent
Chamberlain 49 percent
Circuit Judge
Donnellan 53 percent
Ford 47 percent
County Judge
Henderson 55 percent
Little 45 percent
Amendment 1, Legislative session start
change
Yes 74 percent
No 26 percent
Amendment 2, State revenue linked to
growth
Yes 60 percent
No 40 percent
Amendment 3, Net ban
Yes 71 percent
No 29 percent
Amendment 4, Multiple constitutional
issues on ballot
Yes 59 percent
No 41 percent
Amendment 8, Legalizing limited casino
gambling
Yes 37 percent
No 63 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 3
Jackson 55 percent
Tyler 45 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 4
Duytschaver 50.3 percent
Marks 49.7 percent
Anna Maria City charter amendment
Yes 76 percent
No 24 percent


City of Anna Maria
U.S. Senate
Mack 73 percent
Rodham 27 percent
Governor
Chiles 56 percent
Bush 44 percent
Secretary of State
Mortham 55 percent
Saunders 45 percent
Attorney General
Butterworth 55 percent
Ferro 45 percent
Comptroller
Milligan 60 percent
Lewis 40 percent
Treasurer
Ireland 55 percent
Nelson 45 percent
Education Commissioner
Brogan 56 percent
Jamerson 44 percent
Agriculture Commissioner
Smith 52 percent
Crawford 48 percent
Florida Senate, District 26
McKay 70 percent
Hertig 30 percent
Florida House, District 68
McClure 54 percent
Flanagan 46 percent
County Commission
Glass 94 percent
School Board, District 1
Wilhoite 50.4 percent
Scott 49.6 percent
School Board, District 3
Simmons 45 percent
Petruff 38 percent
Morange 17 percent
School Board, District 5
Miller 55 percent
Trumbull 45 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 1
Garrison 65 percent
Mendez 35 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 3
Matthews 45 percent
Garrott 30 percent
Kendall 25 percent
Soil & Water, Group 2
Goodman 59 percent
Trace 41 percent
Soil & Water, Group 4
Chamberlain 52 percent
Reeder 48 percent
Circuit Judge
Donnellan 69 percent
Ford 31 percent
County Judge
Little 55 percent
Henderson 45 percent
Amendment 1
Yes 83 percent
No 17 percent
Amendment 2
Yes 59 percent
No 41 percent
Amendment 3
Yes 68 percent
No 32 percent
Amendment 4
Yes 51 percent
No 49 percent
Amendment 8
Yes 28 percent
No 72 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 3
Jackson 60 percent
Tyler 40 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 4
Duytschaver 51 percent
Marks 49 percent
Charter amendment
Yes 76 percent
No 24 percent
Anna Maria voter turnout: 67 percent


The percentage totals for "Overall winners" are for the overall returns total-
ling the entire district, county or state. Party affiliation is designated by (D) for
Democrat, (R) for Republican.

Holmes Beach, Holmes Beach,
Precinct 92, Gloria Dei Precinct 93, St. Bernard
Lutheran Church Catholic Church


U.S. Senate
Mack 80 percent
Rodham 19 percent
Governor
Chiles 50.1 percent
Bush 49.8 percent
Secretary of State
Mortham 59 percent
Saunders 41 percent
Attorney General
Butterworth 48 percent
Ferro 52 percent
Comptroller
Milligan 64 percent
Lewis 36 percent
Treasurer
Ireland 58 percent
Nelson 42 percent
Education Commissioner
Brogan 63 percent
Jamerson 37 percent
Agriculture Commissioner
Smith 56 percent
Crawford 44 percent
Florida Senate, District 26
McKay 76 percent
Hertig 23 percent
Florida House, District 68
McClure 47 percent
Flanagan 53 percent
County Commission
Glass 95 percent
School Board, District 1
Wilhoite 59 percent
Scott 41 percent
School Board, District 3
Simmons 54 percent
Petruff 31 percent
Morange 14 percent
School Board, District 5
Miller 65 percent
Trumbull 35 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 1
Garrison 67 percent
Mendez 33 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 3
Matthews 46 percent
Garrott 28 percent
Kendall 26 percent
Soil & Water, Group 2
Goodman 62 percent
Trace 38 percent
Soil & Water, Group 4
Chamberlain 53 percent
Reeder 47 percent
Circuit Judge
Donnellan 63 percent
Ford 37 percent
County Judge
Little 48 percent
Henderson 51 percent
Amendment 1
Yes 82 percent
No 18 percent
Amendment 2
Yes 55 percent
No 45 percent
Amendment 3
Yes 68 percent
No 32 percent
Amendment 4
Yes 48 percent
No 52 percent
Amendment 8
Yes 25 percent
No 75 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 3
Jackson 57 percent
Tyler 44 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 4
Duytschaver 55 percent
Marks 44 percent
Holmes Beach Precinct 92 voter turn-
out: 66 percent


U.S. Senate
Mack 74 percent
Rodham 25 percent
Governor
Chiles 57 percent
Bush 43 percent
Secretary of State
Mortham 53 percent
Saunders 47 percent
Attorney General
Butterworth 55 percent
Ferro 45 percent
Comptroller
Milligan 59 percent
Lewis 41 percent
Treasurer
Ireland 53 percent
Nelson 47 percent
Education Commissioner
Brogan 56 percent
Jamerson 44 percent
Agriculture Commissioner
Smith 49 percent
Crawford 51 percent
Florida Senate, District 26
McKay 71 percent
Hertig 28 percent
Florida House, District 68
McClure 52 percent
Flanagan 48 percent
County Commission
Glass 97 percent
School Board, District 1
Wilhoite 52 percent
Scott 48 percent
School Board, District 3
Simmons 48 percent
Petruff 35 percent
Morange 17 percent
School Board, District 5
Miller 61 percent
Trumbull 39 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 1
Garrison 65 percent
Mendez 35 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 3
Matthews 44 percent
Garrott 32 percent
Kendall 25 percent
Soil & Water, Group 2
Goodman 59 percent
Trace 41 percent
Soil & Water, Group 4
Chamberlain 56 percent
Reeder 44 percent
Circuit Judge
Donnellan 72 percent
Ford 28 percent
County Judge
Little 50.4 percent
Henderson 49.6 percent
Amendment 1
Yes 84 percent
No 16 percent
Amendment 2
Yes 54 percent
No 45 percent
Amendment 3
Yes 62 percent
No 38 percent
Amendment 4
Yes 48 percent
No 52 percent
Amendment 8
Yes 33 percent
No 67 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 3
Jackson 61 percent
Tyler 39 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 4
Duytschaver 54 percent
Marks 46 percent
Holmes Beach precinct 93 voter turn-
out: 63 percent


_ I I _I_ _






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A PAGE 15 lJm


Islanders mostly follow
regional voting trends
By Paul Roat
With only a few blips on the record, Island voters
followed county, district and state trends during the
Nov. 8 general election.
Island voters re-elected George Jackson to the
Anna Maria Fire Control District over Larry Tyler.
Voters elected Marty Duytschaver to the Fire District
over Deborah Marks, despite the fact that Marks outspent
him by almost nine times. Duytschaver, as of the Nov. 3
campaign contribution report filing, had spent $187;
Marks had spent $1,834 by the same deadline.
Anna Maria City voters overwhelmingly supported
changes to the city charter that generally give more
authority to the mayor. Voters okayed the charter
changes by a better than 3-1 margin.
Voters on the Island also passed the controversial net
ban amendment to the Florida Constitution. State-wide
percentages were 71 percent in favor, 29 percent opposed;
Islanders were apparently more sympathetic in
Bradenton Beach it passed by a 54-46 percent margin -
but still voted for the amendment that will put about 7,000
commercial gill netters out of work.
There were a few blips in the returns, though.
Islanders went against the county trend, generally
supporting Julie McClure to the Florida House of Rep-
resentatives. Challenger Mark Flanagan, a Republican,
won the seat by a 53-47 percent margin.


Bradenton Beach
U.S. Senate
Mack 68 percent
Rodham 32 percent
Governor.
Chiles 59 percent
Bush 41 percent
Secretary of State
Mortham 48 percent
Saunders 52 percent
Attorney General


Butterworth
Ferro
Comptroller
Mi ligan
Lewis
Treasurer
Ireland
Nelson


60 percent
40 percent

51 percent
49 percent

53 percent
47 percent


Education Commissioner
Brogan 50.2 percent
Jamerson 49.8 percent
Agriculture Commissioner
Smith 48 percent
Crawford 52 percent
Florida Senate, District 26
McKay 66 percent
Hertig 33 percent
Florida House, District 68
McClure 56 percent
Flanagan 44 percent
County Commission
Glass 96 percent
School Board, District 1
Wilhoite 48 percent
Scott 52 percent


School Board, District 3
Simmons 42 percent
Petruff 39 percent
Morange 19 percent
School Board, District 5
Miller 54 percent
Trumbull 46 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 1
Garrison 67 percent
Mendez 32 percent
Mosquito Control, Group 3
Matthews 51 percent
Garrott 26 percent
Kendall 23 percent


Soil & Water,
Goodman
Trace


Group 2
62 percent
38 percent


Soil & Water,
Chamberlain
Reeder
Circuit Judge
Donnellan
Ford
County Judge
Little
Henderson
Amendment 1
Yes
No
Amendment 2
Yes
No


-ru medet.


Group p4
53 percent
47 percent

69 percent
31 percent

58 percent
42 percent

81 percent
19 percent

54 percent
46 percent


Amendment J
Yes 54 percent
No 46 percent
Amendment 4
Yes 52 percent
No 48 percent
Amendment 8
Yes 39 percent
No 61 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 3
Jackson 57 percent
Tyler 43 percent
Fire Commission, Seat 4
Duytschaver 45 percent
Marks 55 percent
Turnout: 55 percent


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m NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 E


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[4d







- i[] PAGE 18 a NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER






Everybody's talking' turkey
Island Foods will have fresh turkeys and baked
turkeys this year. Be ye gourmet or be ye not.
The restaurants are all outdoing themselves with
voluptuous offerings of turkey and trimmings, buffets i
and specials.
Sandbar and Beach House restaurants include sec- i
onds with their holiday dinner, just like home. -
At Cafe on the Beach, celebrate Thanksgiving in a
truly Island atmosphere turkey dinner on the deck.
Tia Lena's offers turkey and all the trimmings
"with a gourmet flair," while the Anchorage will appro-
priately provide a special turkey buffet in place of the
popular all-you-can-eat surf and turf variety.
A special roast turkey dinner is planned at Crown :
& Thistle, The Mutiny Inn, Cafe Robar, Nicki's Cafe "
West 59th restaurant in Bradenton.
Only a few local restaurants observe the holiday
quietly closing to allow employees a day with their
families. Rotten Ralph's and Mar Vista plan to close on The a
Thanksgiving day. plants and
Whatever you plan, make plans early. Make reser- people con
vations and order your turkey now. If you plan to dine The c:
out, you need r-e-s-e-r-v-a-t-i-o-n-s. ticket price
Of note not turkeys. dined" as
Beach Bistro will pour their first cocktail this basketballs
The b.
weekend. The fine dining establishment has a great and was d
wine list, but some diners apparently want more embel-
lishment with their meal. Now they will get it. A newly of one-ye"
Chandler
acquired liquor license makes it all possible but the tiny an er
three wee
facilities prohibit much of a bar. Owner Sean Murphy He'llpro
says they'll be serving mostly for their dining clientele.
finds outs
Turtle's Bar and Grill has dropped the door charge The t
on Sunday for the rest of 1994. McCarth
Sonnydaze is bustling every night. Reggae, tarot
card readings, pool tournaments, open microphone. he parin
They advertise they're a coffeehouse but it's more like e es
ceeds still
a fun house. It's a young crowd, but we're all young at Tce ft
heart, right? .The f
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On stage for a presenta-
tion of toys donated to the
hospital with funds raised
at a troop bake sale are
Brownies Amy Smith,
Ashley Lane, Emily Smith,
Claire Hapner, Brook
Travato/Brown, Nicki
Taylor and Alex Murphy.
Front, Chandler and mom,
Kay Kay Hardy,
Chandler's father Dan
with Shaquille O'Neal
signature basketball and
host Sean Murphy.
Islander Photo: Bonner
Presswood


Benefit with a heart


ffair was held in a huge white tent, with
1 trees, lovely table settings and beautiful
itributing to a cause dear to their hearts.
cause was All Children's Hospital and for a
e of $100 a person, guests were "wined and
they bid on auction items that ranged from
s to fine art.
basketball was signed by Shaquille O'Neal
)nated by Kay Kay and Dan Hardy on behalf
ar-old son Chandler. The ball was a gift to
when he was at All Children's Hospital at age
ks for open heart surgery. Kay Kay said,
bably hate his daddy when he grows up and
what he did, but it's for a very good cause."
basketballl sold for $900 to Dr. Owen
who is rumored to have dribbled the ball in
g lot on the way to his car.
evening was a tremendous success, with pro-
being calculated in the range of $30,000.
indraiser was organized by Sean Murphy,
Beach Bistro, with help from Dan Hardy of
er Construction, Ed Chiles and the Sandbar
House restaurants.


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Mar Vista
Ragin Cajun Night
Sunday 5 10 pm
Appetizers
Pan-Fried Crawfish
Cakes with a spicy hot
mustard sauce...$5.95
Cajun Spiced Fried Oyster
served with a bourbon spikers
remoulade...$6.95
Fried Gator Bites with
a spicy red sauce...$4.95
Entrees
Fried Pecan & Cornmeal Crusted
Catfish with hushpupples and remoulade
sauce for dipping...$10.75
Bayou Jambalaya with crawfish
tails, oysters, andouille sausage & alligator... $13.75
Crawfish Boil, one pound of whole crawfish steamed
in beer and hot & spicy crab boll served with hot
mustard sauce & butter...$13.75
Cajun Sampler, cajun fried oysters, blackened catfish
and a grilled shrimp & andouille kabob served with
remoulade sauce...$14.75
Above entrees served with the choice of Hoppin' John or Cheese Grits, Stewed
Tomatoes with Okra & Corn and a side of Cole Slow, Cornbread & Squaw Bread
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street, Channel Marker 39
3183-2391


Honorary hosts for All Children's Hospital benefit
included Manatee County Commissioner Stan
Stephens, Congressman Dan Miller, Glenda Miller
and Stu Gregory.




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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 U PAGE 19 irm


I music I


Accomplished flutist performs
with Island orchestra Sunday
Bradenton resident Lita Tyler will be among the
featured soloists at a concert of the Anna Maria
Island Community Orchestra & Chorus to be held at
the Island Baptist Church on Sunday, Nov. 20, at 2
p.m. Tyler is the principal flutist of the community
orchestra, and flute soloist and a member of the
Chancel Choir at Trinity United Methodist Church
in Bradenton.

Island orchestra, chorus perform
The Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra &
Chorus, conducted by Alfred Gershfeld, will perform
at the Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Dr., Anna
Maria City, on Sunday, Nov. 20, at 2 p.m.
A sampling of the music to be featured are Con-
certo for Organ No. 13, "The Cuckoo and the Nightin-
gale," by Handel; Concerto for Flute in D, Op. 27 by
Boccherini; Symphony No. 6 in F (K. V. 43) by
Mozart, and Cantata No. 55, "Poor wretched man, a
slave of sin," by Bach.
Instrument solos will also be featured.
Admissions free with donations requested.


New chorus master for orchestra
Elizabeth Bharucha of Bradenton has joined the
Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra & Chorus
as its new chorus master. She has a bachelor's
degree from Michigan; a master's degree from.
Hunter College (Ethnomusicology), and is a fellow
of the American Guild of Organists. Bharucha has
studied music worldwide and has been active as
choral director, organist, teacher, and chamber
music player. The community will meet Bharucha at
the Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra &
Chorus performance set for Saturday, Nov. 20, 2
p.m., at the Island Baptist Church.


Van Wezel resounds
with country and classic
The original country music outlaw, Waylon
Jennings, makes his Van Wezel Performing Arts hall
debut at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 25, direct from the suc-
cess of his newest album, "Waymore's Blues (Part II)."
Jennings will be followed by a performance by the
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra at 8 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 1., under the direction of conductor
Esa-Pekka Salonen. The orchestra will perform La Mer
by Debussy, Piano Concerto in G major by Ravel, and
Concerto for Orchestra by Bartok.
Tickets for both events are on sale now at the Van
Wezel box office, 777 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. Call
the box office toll-free at 1-800-826-9303 for information.


"No clownin' I-
Darla is 30!"
Nov 16,I ES A
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THANKSGIVING DAY SPECIALTIES
Served 4-10 PM Thursday Nov. 24
OVEN ROASTED TURKEY
with pecan cornbread stuffing, mashed potatoes,
giblet gravy, vegetable and cranberry sauce.
SLOW COOKED PRIME RIB
with Au jus, horseradish sauce, baked potato and vegetable.
MAHI MAHI PROVENCALE
served with wild rice and vegetable.


$7.95


$9.95

$7.95


All specials come with a salad, hot bread & choice of dessert.
Regular Menu Also Available
Book Holiday Parties Now!
Dining Room open Tues. Sunday 4pm -10pm
Lounge open Tues. -Sun. 4pm -til?
Closed Mondays Reservations requested not required


Island library offers new displays
The Sharing Quilters have a display of 37 hand-
crafted quilts, including festive Christmas patterns, and
wall hangings in the Walker-Swift Meeting Room at
the Island Branch Library. The exhibit will be open to
the public through the month of November.
Concurrently, a mixed media display of woven
wall hangings by Anna Maria City resident Gloria Hall
is also featured.
Island Branch Library is located at 5701 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach.

Children's holiday craft program
at Island Library
Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach will offer
a special holiday program for adults and children, third-
grade and older, on Saturday, Dec. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m.
Rosemary Tyrrell will teach a crafts class on mak-
ing Christmas decorations from natural materials. No
fee will be charged for materials. Registration must be
done in person at the branch. Class size is limited to 15
participants.

Snooty gala black tie affair
The second Annual Snooty Gala, Bradenton's pre-
miere black tie event, will be held on Saturday, Nov.
19, in the Spanish Courtyard at the South Florida Mu-
seum and Bishop Planetarium.
Cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and a lavish dinner will
be enjoyed along with dancing and entertainment un-
der the stars to the tunes of the Hot Chilly band.
Cost is $125 per person, with proceeds to benefit
the educational programs and exhibits at the museum
and planetarium. Call Jessica Ventimiglia at 746-4131,
ext. 16, for more information.

Longboat art center offers
holiday sale
The Longboat Key Art Center will hold its annual
"Holiday Craft House" sale of hand-crafted gift items on
Sat., Nov. 26, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
The center is located at 6860 Longboat Dr. South,


I


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204 Pine Ave., Anna Maria


778-6969








- "f PAGE 20 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Super intent interview
Manatee County Superintendent of Public Schools
Dr. Gene Denisar, left, enjoys a pre-tape laugh with
the cast and crew of Anna Maria Elementary
School's morning news television program "Anna
Maria AM." During the broadcast, Dr. Denisar said
his major challenge was to bring everyone together 'I
in a positive way to make our schools "the highest
quality that we can have." He also addressed the "'\'
issue of over-crowded classrooms. He stated he was 1 -
going to move forward with the school system's
Capital Improvement Plan, which would help ease
the problem. "Anna Maria AM" signing off.





Election results
The students in Joyce
Ellis's fifth-grade class
recently held elections for
its classroom leaders.
Seated, left to right, are
Katie Lindahl, president;
Alan Jenkins, vice presi-
dent; Travel Rice, trea-
surer, and Vaughan
James, historian. Akela
Collins, not pictured, was
elected secretary. Back
row, left to right, are
alternates Sarah Thomas,
Nichole Miller, Marika
Joy Courtney Barrett and Tricia
Domke.

7 7 Where Longboat I


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EntertainmentA MARIA DAILY SUNSE
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Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10pm 778-0475
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$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet 3S


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. EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4 to 6 PM
Chicken Curry Fish & Chips
Shepherds Pie and More $509
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SSoup or salad. Roast turkey 9 95
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and pie. Regular menu available.
BRITISH PUB Mon.-Thurs.4 to 10
Friday 11:30 to 10
&- Sat., Sun. 8am to 10
RESTAURANT Q Serving Breakfast 8'til
Pub Hours 'Til ?

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Cfwez Andre

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Beaujolais
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Special Five-Course Dinner
Thursday, November 17 NOUVEAU
Entertainment by Annie m
Reservations 6 & 8 PM Only

\I Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner
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._,9' ^ ,, a la carte Served 2 to 8 PM
'.[ 1* Reservations recommended
Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat 8AM-2:30PM Sun 8AM-1:30PM
Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat 6-10PM Sun 5:30-9PM
Fine Selection of Imported French Wines
Reservations Suggested for Dinner
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Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A PAGE 21 ElI


Punt, pass, and kick
Anna Maria Elementary School's Coach Gene Burr
held the school's annual Punt, Pass, and Kick Contest
Each student in second to fifth grade had two tries each
in each category to make the furthest punt, pass and kick.
Scores were averaged for overall performance
Teachers' names are capitalized followed by the
name of the winning students. Congratulations go to:
Second grade. GABRIELE Skylar Purcell and


Taylor Manning; THOMAS Denielle Smallwood
and Ryan Bebernitz; BRADY Amanda Kyzer tied
with Courtney Taylor and Chase Parker.
Third grade. BRADY Brittany Parker and
Aaron Lowman; LASHWAY John Cicero and
Shawn LaPensee; PAUL Stephanie Chewing and
Josh Fleming.
Fourth grade. BROCKWAY Mark Rudacille and
Kellie Cobb; DAVIS Stephan Yencho and Vanessa
Atwood; SMALL Tom Bucci and Raven Greco.

",- *:



I - ,.. S. .





OW N


Great Job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending Nov.
4. First row, left to right, are Matthew McDonough, Brick Barlow, Thomas Tarman, Grace
Sawyer, Alissa Willard, Kara Kennedy and Kate Gazzo. Back row, left to right, are Jessica
Cramer, Cindy Connelly, Misty Kinney, Star Beard Stephen Yencho, Bobby Cooper, Daniel Van
Andel and Ashley Allgire.


Fifth grade. SMALL Matt Losek and Hannah
Jansen; ELLIS Preston Copeland and Misty Kinney;
RUSSELL Mark Rasmussen and Jennifer Sayko.
Women's longest pass Amber Johnson, 18 yds.
Men's longest pass Ben Sato and Mark Rasmussen, 30
yds. Women's longest punt Allison Chewing, 27 yds.
Men's longest punt Adam Wall, 33 yds. Women's
longest kick- Misty Kinney, 22 yds. Men's longest kick
Scott Redden, 33 yds. Overall winners: Mark
Rasmussen, 90 yds. total; Misty Kinney and Jennifer
Sayko, 58 yds. total.


Anna Maria School
Menu
Monday, 11/21/94
Breakfast: Cereal & Toast or French Toast,
Orange Juice
Lunch: Hot Dog or Ham & Cheese Sandwich,
Sweet Potatoes, Pears, Chocolate Ice Cream
Tuesday, 11/22/94
Breakfast: Waffles w/Syrup or Cereal & Toast, Pears
Lunch: Chicken w/Noodles or Baked Chicken,
Peas, Oranges, Roll
Wednesday, 11/23/94
Breakfast: Warm Pretzel or Cereal & Toast,
Pineapple
Lunch: Fiestado or Sloppy Joe, Corn,
Cinnamon Apple Slices, Pumpkin Cake
Lunch: Sausage Pizza or Corn Dog, Corn,
Pineapple, Pudding
Thursday, 11/24/94
Thanksgiving Day No School
Friday, 11/25/94
No School
All meals served with milk.
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SALTWATER -
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Nov. 18 & 19
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KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
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1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


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Bring your old Patio pictures & memories.
Wear a Patio or Scalawag shirt for a free draft beer.

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8 pm Friday & Saturday. .
Rich Kendall 1 .
Donny & Lori Bostic .
Dan Crawford & friends.
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GREAT BEACH.
GREAT THANKSGIVING.











Come on out for a great Thanksgiving Pinner
at the Beachhousel Enjoy a superb ham or
turkey dinner from our special menu with all
the fixin's. Full Thanksgiving dinner is just
$9.95 for adults; $4.95 for children. Call
ahead for preferred seating. Special hours:
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great food. great beach.
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IISLANDER






L; PAE22 M 1ViEBE 17 994t~'11W IStNDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Nov. 5, two alcohol citations, Bayfront Park.
Nov. 7, found property automobile tag, 9800
block of Gulf Drive.

Bradenton Beach
Nov. 5, resisting without violence, disorderly intoxi-
cation, parking, Cortez Beach. The officer on patrol ap-
proached an illegally parked motor home and knocked on
the door in an attempt to locate the owner to move the
vehicle. Mercedes Eve Callahan, 40, of California, began
screaming at the officer while walking toward him from
Gulf Drive. The officer told her to quiet down and she
screamed obscenities at him, said the report.
The officer again asked Callahan to quiet down and
she continued screaming and said he was trying to
break into her motor home. He explained he was a
police officer and the vehicle was parked illegally. She
continued screaming so loudly that she woke up resi-
dents across the street.
The officer noted that Callahan was extremely intoxi-
cated and unsteady on her feet. As he placed her in cus-
tody, she resisted the handcuffs and refused to walk to the
patrol car. She continued screaming as the officer placed
her in the vehicle and spat all over the inside of the vehicle.
Nov. 6, burglary to an automobile, 2500 block of
Avenue C. The complainant reported that a person
unknown entered the vehicle and removed a Sony por-
table CD player valued at $250.
Nov. 7, DWLS, 700 block of Gulf Drive.
Nov. 8, grant theft, 1501 Gulf Dr., Smuggler's
Cove. The complainant reported that a person unknown
removed a boat and motor valued at $1,000 and fish-
ing equipment valued at $400. The boat was a 1974,
15-foot, fiberglass Sea More with gray and white seats.
The motor was a six hp Evinrude.
Nov. 8, found property a bicycle, 100 block of
Bridge Street.
Nov. 8, theft of a cooler valued at $20, Coquina
Beach.
Nov. 9, grand theft, 2601 Gulf Dr. N., Sandpiper
Mobile Home Park. The complainant reported that
sometime between May and July a person unknown
entered the mobile home and removed a sewing ma-
chine valued at $100 from a closet in the rear bedroom.

Holmes Beach
Nov. 5, battery, 3009 East Bay Dr., Island Foods


parking lot. The complainant reported that he saw an
adult male yelling at three juveniles at the rear of the
store. When he approached the subject's vehicle, the
subject told him to mind his own business and hit him
on the side of the head.
Nov. 5, service, 6900 block of Gulf Drive. The
officer opened a vehicle for German tourists who had
locked their keys inside.
Nov. 5, assist Anna Maria Fire Department, 5200
block of Gulf Drive. The officer observed a gallon can
of motor oil in the road and oil was spilling in the road
making it slick.
Nov. 5, Marchman Act, 4000 Gulf Drive, Mana-
tee County Public Beach. The officer found the subject
passed out. The subject had no one to care for him. The
officer placed him in custody under the Marchman Act.
Nov. 6, larceny, 5353 Gulf Dr., Circle K. The
complainant, an employee, advised the officer that two
male juveniles stole two 24-can cases of beer valued at
$28. The subjects were wearing baseball hats, white T-
shirts and jeans. They were last seen traveling west on
Gulf Drive in a gray compact vehicle.
Nov. 6, burglary to an automobile, 2900 block of
Avenue C. The complainant reported that a person
unknown entered the vehicle and removed a bag val-
ued at $10, two hair dryers valued at $160, a curling
iron valued at $30, a T-shirt valued at $10- and two
cases of shampoo.
Nov. 6, noise, 5600 Guava. The complainant re-
ported loud noise coming from a residence. The officer
spoke to the subject who had been playing a musical
instrument He said the didn't realize he was disturb-
ing anyone and would stop playing for the evening.
Nov. 8, vandalism, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee County
Public Beach. The complainant reported that a Coke ma-
chine was turned over. Damage was estimated at $50.
Nov. 8, lost property, 100 block of 76th Street
beach. The complainant reported she lost a small, dark
red wallet containing $200 in cash and a credit card on
the beach.
Nov. 8, DWLS, 600 block of Key Royale Drive.
Nov. 9, larceny, 3000 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported that a person unknown came onto
her second floor porch and removed a stereo tape
player valued at $100. The subject also destroyed an
aluminum chair valued at $20. The complainant also
reported a person unknown has been leaving porno-
graphic books on her porch steps.
Nov. 9, found property, 3500 block of East Bay
Drive. A public works employee found a small plastic
bag containing three vehicle keys, three luggage keys
and 1993 dog tags from a veteran in Wyoming. Later,


Don't forget to play Islander Football. You could win
$50. Page 26 this issue. "It's the only game in town."

"A Wonderful Experience."

CAFE ON THE BEACH

Join US




WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS
$795 plus tax
SERVED FROM 1 PM
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
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On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


Ihe
finest in
Thanks-
giving
traditions
Dinner at
the Sandbar
Restaurant
Enjoy a traditional
Thanksgiving feast of
plump roast Turkey, ham
or prime rib, all served
with our bountiful
array of culinary
delights. And just like
home, seconds are on
the house.
Special Thanksgiving
dinner prices starting
at $9.95 for adults,
$4.95 for children.
Reservations suggested.
Special Thanksgiving
hours: Noon to 8 pm.


Bailey to become
Parrish chief
Anna Maria Fire District's Battalion Captain
Tony Bailey has been selected to become the first
chief of the Parrish Fire District beginning Dec. 19.
Bailey will be the only paid member of the 12-man
volunteer department.
"At first I didn't even consider applying for the
position but I was persuaded to by friends," he said.
"It was a very hard decision to make. The hardest
part will be leaving here."
Bailey has been with the Anna Maria Fire District
for 11 years six as a volunteer officer and five in fire
prevention/inspection. Prior to joining the fire service,
Bailey was manager of the Fulford Fish Company in
Cortez for 20 years. Bailey and his wife, Sylvia, have
three children Brian, 25; Troy, 18; and Jenee, 14.
"It will be extremely hard to think about replac-
ing him," Anna Maria Fire Chief Andy Price said.
"We're really going to miss him."
Bailey said he has a year in which to move his
family to Parrish. He said he would like to remain
with Anna Maria as a volunteer.


while on patrol, the officer observed a Jeep with Wyo-
ming tags in a driveway. The officer approached the
driver to see if the found items belonged to her and
learned that they did.
Nov. 9, grand larceny, 2900 block of Avenue B.
The complainant reported that a person unknown re-
moved a video camera and recorder valued at $900.





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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U NOVEMBER 17, 1994 PAGE 23 .EI

Build it and they will come


Island artist Woody Candish organized an outdoor
art happening, found sponsors and donors, constructed
large plywood "canvases" from found materials and
invited kids to share his 16-quart palette on the grounds
of the Island Branch Library. Candish conceived the
event in honor of the 75th anniversary of National
Children's Book Week. Sponsors included Porter Paint


of Bradenton, Home True Value Hardware of Holmes
Beach and Friends of the Island Library. Frank Perkins
helped build the assortment of fish, waves, boats and
palm trees that approximately 50 kids showed up to
paint. An autographed placard accompanies the exhibit
that will remain on the library lawn for approximately
a month at 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


An overview of the "canvases." Islander Photo Courtesy of Stephen Bell

Height determines horizon distance


Here's one of those questions most often asked
while basking in the sun on the beach:
How far is it to the horizon?
The answer lies in how high you are.
As a general rule of thumb, according to Dr. David
Tomasko of the Sarasota Bay Program, take the square
root of your height and multiply it by 1.23 to find the
distance to the horizon.
For those of us who can't tell a square root from a



SILVER QUEEN CORN
BANA'.FRESH DAILY'
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Plan ahead for Thanksgiving ...
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Monday............ Reggae Night
Tuesday............... Movie Night
Wednesday ........ College Night
Thursday.......... Karaoke Night
Friday.......... Open Mike Night
Saturday......... Poetry Reading,
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FOR DETAILS CALL 778-3344
Delicious gourmet coffee, tea,
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rutabaga, Tomasko worked out some conversions. If
you're six feet above sea level in other words, stand-
ing at the water's edge the horizon is three miles away.
If you're 12 feet above sea level, it's 4.3 miles away. Eigh-
teen feet above sea level, the horizon is 5.2 miles distant,
and if you're 24 feet above sea level, it's six miles away.
Of course, anything tall stands well above the ho-
rizon and is visible from a greater distance and atmo-
spheric conditions play a part in the calculations.


Nicole Murray helped Woody Candish with cleanup
duties while sister Heather put her "Jackson Pol-
lack" on the artist's plaque. Islander Photo: Bonner
Presswood

The Island Poet
It's November and our winter friends are all com-
ing down,
'Cause it's getting too cold up north and there is
snow on the ground.
Soon our streets will be crowded and there will
be nowhere to park,
'Cause our beautiful weather and beaches will set
them all on a lark.
And there won't be any place for you to have
your morning cup,
For our winter friends will fill every seat over at
Linda's Sunnyside Up.
But all Island chums will be smiling from ear to
ear,
When, once again, we can enjoy each other for
another precious year.
Bud Atteridge
gammmmmmmmm*m*mmm*q
COUPON o f
EXPIRES I
11/22/94 B O S
10519 Cortez Road
792-5300 1
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

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DINNER PIZZA BUFFET

.49/ UFFET 2.99
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HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
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CLOSED MONDAYS
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 'til Midnight)
Tuesday: QUARTER BEER NIGHT, 6 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT REGGAE
Thursday: LADIES NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wed., Nov. 16 Reggae "Democracy"
Fri. & Sat, Nov. 18 & 19 "DNA"
Sun., Nov. 20 Beach Bash, 7PM "Blindside"
WITH NO COVER CHARGE
Wed., Nov. 23 Reggae "Jamiya"
Thurs., Fri. & Sat, Nov. 24, 25 & 26 "Lifeguard"
Sun., Nov. 27 Beach Bash, 7PM "Blindside"
WITH NO COVER CHARGE
Wed., Nov. 30 Reggae "Stole He Powwow"


$1.99


WATER M EL






IUI PAGE 24 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Let's get out of town this week


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
The elections are long over now and I for one need
to lift my eyes beyond local issues for a while. Let's
take a look at some outdoor subjects well off the Island.
Fishers in St. Pete are celebrating the new North
Skyway Fishing Pier and well they should. Built at
a cost of $2.4 million from the old Skyway Bridge, the
new pier might well be the finest fishing facility of its
ilk anywhere.
But only for a while. Come Friday the south fish-
ing pier will close and, 430 days later, re-open as the
South Skyway Fishing Pier. At that time the south pier
will probably take on the "world's best" title.
The north pier is 3,000 feet long and has a total of
18 artificial reefs along its sides. The south pier will
measure 8,250 feet long and will have 65 reefs within
casting distance from the rail.
It's true the north pier will probably have a restau-
rant and bait shop and wouldn't it be great to see a
branch of Skyway Jack's out there? providing the
state can find someone to build and operate 'em. But
with nearly three times the length, the south pier is still
going to be the place for serious fishers to go.
And of course the south pier is going to be a lot
more convenient for folks in our area.
So don't hold your breath 430 days is a long
time, after all but the world's finest fishing pier is
coming to our area.

Take a hike at 'Big 0'
We "coasties" tend to forget about the beauty of the
interior of Florida. So you should know that the "Third
Annual Big 0 Hike" is scheduled to get underway
come Saturday.
The 107-mile hike along the Hoover dike around
Lake Okeechobee, sponsored by the Florida Trail As-
sociation, is open to all. Hey you don't even have
to walk the entire distance that's a promise.
Approximately 150 walkers are expected to show
up for the event, and it's important to know that this is
no wilderness trek. The group will simply walk from
town to town along the dike and camp each evening.
You don't even have to carry your camping gear.
Last year just 17 people actually walked the entire
distance, so there's no shame in just joining up for a
day or two. There's also no charge for registration -
you only pay your own camping and eating expenses.
They even have a "wimp walk" on the first day of
just 3.5 miles should you just want a taste of the event.
Most days, however, the distance walked will average
about 10 miles until you meet up with a daily shuttle
to transport walkers back to their cars and camping gear
so they can drive to that night's campground.
The entire amble takes a total of nine days and gets
underway Saturday at the Pahokee Marina and Camp-
ground and eventually ends there Nov. 27.
For a daily schedule and lots more information, call
Sunny Piskura at (407) 588-1595 anytime or Gordon
Johnson at (407) 684-1168 evenings.
If you've never spent a night at Caloosa Lodge or
some other fish camp at Lake Okeechobee and seen the




Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
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interior of Florida up-close, this is a wonderful oppor-
tunity to do so.

Cuban fame and fortune and
schedule, too
You probably noticed all the newspaper and radio
stories about Bob Winters and his upcoming December
regatta in Havana this past weekend. It's nice to know the
Associated Press reads The Island Bystander- and even
picks up a story idea from us now and then.
Well, if they're interested, we've now received the
full schedule for the regatta as follows:
Friday, December 23 is arrival and registration for
yachts and crew participating in the regatta.
Saturday, December 24 is a skippers meeting and
a chance for all participants to rest and prepare for their
Christmas activities.
Sunday, December 25 is a marina-wide Christmas
party.
Monday, December 26 is Race 1. The race will be
from Marina Hemingway eastward to Morro Castle in
downtown Havana and return. Happy hour to follow.
Tuesday, December 27 is Race 2, same course. Of
course, happy hour will follow again.
Wednesday, December 28 is a day-long tour of
Hemingway landmarks. These landmarks include his
various residences in Cuba and probably a few of his
watering holes, too.
Thursday, December 29 is departure day, weather
permitting.
As I mentioned last week, each boat receives six
days of free dockage and all participants receive free
visas, so there is no requirement that any American
sailor spend any money, in compliance with U.S. Trea-


sury Department regulations and requirements.

Mosquitoes again?
Used to be that mosquitoes really bothered some
people and didn't seem to cause much trouble for oth-
ers. But now, in the past couple of years, they seem to
be bothering everybody and there's a reason.
Entomology professor George O'Meara at the
University of Florida says Florida's mosquitoes have
gotten a lot bigger and meaner in the last couple of
years. Well, actually they're not Florida's mosquitoes
at all, and that's the problem.
The Asian tiger mosquito "has made the most re-
markable spread of any creature I ever heard of,"
O'Meara says. A native of Asia and the Pacific Islands,
the tiger is believed to have first entered Florida less
than a decade ago 1986 to be exact.
Believe it or not, they think it arrived in a shipment
of used tires shipped to Jacksonville. But by 1992 the
critter had spread to 64 counties and, in an update last
week, O'Meara said it now can be found in all 67 coun-
ties of Florida.
Just our luck.
"It's a lot more annoying than the species it re-
places," O'Meara says, and I guess we can expect it to
take several years before Floridians will become
adapted to the newcomer's bite. Meanwhile, those of
us not bothered much by the local mosquitoes can ex-
pect to be bothered plenty and those already bothered
plenty can expect ever bigger welts.
O'Meara also says that eventually we'll all build
up an immunity to the newcomer and everything
should get back to normal. And on that happy note:
See you next week.


High winds slam local fishing

hold onto your rod!-


By Capt. Mike Heistand
With Tropical Storm Gordon churning up the Gulf
and possibly heading this way, both fishers and fish
have hunkered down to wait out the storm. For the few
hardy types willing to drop a line in the water,best
backwater bets appear to be redfish, trout and snook,
with mackerel and mangrove snapper being caught
offshore.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's bring his charters to
good catches of snook and reds in the backwaters,
mackerel and mangrove snapper offshore.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's able to get his cus-
tomers onto just about everything out there: trout, red-
fish, mackerel and snook.
On my boat Magic we've caught lots and lots of
redfish some days as many as 30. We've also been
able to catch some huge five-pound flounder and a few
legal-size snook.
Capt. Phil Shields says he's been doing well with
red groupter caught within 20 miles from shore, some
days catching producing limits on the tasty fish. He
adds that as long as the weather holds not a likely
chance this week kingfish will still be caught.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's catching a lot of


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trout and redfish. He too is able to get a boatload of
kings when the weather permits.
Good luck and good fishing.

Soccer League standings
(League standings as of Nov. 11)
Division I
Team Record Points
LaPensee Plumbing 10-1-3 56
Hayo-Meyer Construction 10-2-2 54
Power Pros Pressure Cleaning 2-10-1 12
School for Constructive Play 1-10-2 9
Division II
Team Record Points
Mr. Bones 8-1 40
Beach Barn 6-1-2 34
Dowling Park 3-2-4 23
Uncle Dan's Place 2-4-3 16
Island Pest Control 2-5-2 14
Island Real Estate 0-8-1 2
End-of-season events
On Nov. 17 the All-Star games will be held. The
Division II match-up will begin at 6 p.m., followed by
the Division I contest at 7:30 p.m.
The Coaches' Game will be at 6 p.m. on Nov. 22.
The awards presentations will be Nov. 22 at 6 p.m.
for Division III, 7 p.m. for Division II and 7:30 p.m. for
Division I. Parents are asked to bring a dessert to share.



? Alum-A-Vator Boat Lifts


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SMobile Phone: 742-0396
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U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M NOVEMBER 17, 1994 W PAGE 25 iI


Holmes Beach football star ready


for e

By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Chris Bilkie is the consummate team player.
The starting fullback for the University of Florida
hates to miss practice in fact, Bilkie relishes every
chance he gets to play his brand of smash-mouth football.
As part of an 11-piece cog in the complicated pro-
style offensive machine of coach Steve Spurrier, Bilkie
is the unnoticed, unselfish man clearing paths for high-
profile tailbacks or cutting down a linebacker
headhunting a Gator quarterback.
"Fullback is not a big part of our pro-style offense
at UF," Bilkie said. "My job is to block and catch and
I accept that role."
Bilkie, who's from Holmes Beach, says he loves
the game so much he'd run through a brick wall for his
coaches.
At six-foot-two-inches and 235 pounds, he's likely
to do it.
His is a love affair with football, so much so that
he hopes to play in the National Football League.
Bilkie looks at football as an opportunity and a
privilege and offers that he can't understand why play-
ers hold out for millions of dollars while jeopardizing
a chance to play football for a living.
The way he feels about it, $100,000 or so for six
months working at something you love is a blessing.
So dedicated is Bilkie to football that he graduated
early in the spring with a bachelor's degree in sports
administration to concentrate on helping the Gators win
another Southeastern Conference championship.
Yet Bilkie is more than just a football player. The
former Manatee High School star is a multi-faceted,
disciplined 22-year-old who drives himself as much in
the classroom as on the field.
Four years in a row Bilkie has made the SEC aca-
demic honor roll. As a fifth-year senior in post-gradu-
ate studies, he's in the running for the Hitachi Aca-
demic All-America team.
"The only pressure I have originates with football.
School never gave me much trouble," he said. "I'm a
good student and have a good memory. I don't think I
ever studied more than two hours for a test in my whole
life."
The following accolades come from Manatee High
head football coach Joe Kinnan.
"Chris Bilkie's character, work ethic and discipline
are beyond reproach," Kinnan said. "Football is the
ultimate team sport and Bilkie is the ultimate team
player."
As a Manatee High senior, Bilkie rushed for
more than 1,000 yards and scored all three touch-
downs in the Hurricanes 1989 Class 5A state cham-
pionship game victory.
As a Gator for third-ranked Florida, Bilkie's job is




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ven bigger leagues
;. ,' !


Chris Bilkie in his parents' home in Holmes Beach. The Gator fullback hopes to play in the NFL. Islander
Photo: David Futch.


to block and sometimes catch passes. Still, Kinnan
believes blue-collar blockers and Tom Rathman clones
like Bilkie have much to offer NFL teams.
"There are places in the NFL for the 240-pound
back who can catch and block and Chris Bilkie is good
at both of those tasks," Kinnan said. "Chris focuses on
a task and accomplishes it. His family instilled disci-
pline, we at Manatee High just nurtured it."
Ed and Judy Bilkie recognized early their son had
talent, but his skills needed some fine tuning. Ed, a
former tight-end at Ohio State, retired from his com-
puter system's job of 37 years at Chrysler Corp., and
the family moved from Michigan to Florida.
Chris became part of the dynasty at Manatee High.
"We were familiar with Manatee football and Joe
Kinnan's success," Ed said. "The whole Bradenton-
Manatee High experience has been wonderful. We
haven't missed one of Chris' games since he played
Little League."
Bilkie said he committed to the Gators partly be-
cause of Spurrier and because he felt Florida was go-
ing to be a great success.
According to Bilkie, "We've accomplished a lot of
never-dones at Florida."
Never dones as in never won a conference cham-


Fish Tales
Welcomel
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and pictures
are welcome! Just give
us a call at 778-7978 or
stop by our office in the
Island Shopping Center,
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pionship until head coach Steve Spurrier showed up in
1989.
The team had never won 10 games in a season and
the prestigious Sugar Bowl, both of which they did by
whipping West Virginia 41-7 last New Year's Day.
"Spurrier is a thinker. I sit back and watch and you
can hear the gears turning in his head," Bilkie said.
"He's always trying to do something better and settles
for nothing less than perfect."
Football, however, is not everything. Bilkie gives
back to the Gainesville community by speaking at lo-
cal schools on behalf of the "Say No to Drugs" cam-
paign.
As an ambassador for the "Goodwill Gators" pro-
gram, he speaks at nursing homes and visits the
Veteran's Administration hospital in Gainesville.
Like any college student ready to take on the real
world, Bilkie has some apprehension about the future.
"I'm not sure what I'm going to do after college.
I know I'm going to play it by ear," Bilkie said. "I feel
I have an outside shot at pro-football. All I need is the
opportunity and I'd play for anybody."
Based on his work ethic, dedication and heart,
some NFL team would be lucky to have Chris Bilkie
on their squad.


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ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu 11/17 10:23 2.3ft 5:14 -0.1ft 12:45 1.5ft 3:53 1.3ft
Fri11/18 10:54 2.3ft 5:48 -0.2fft 1:23 1.5ff 4:11 1.3ft
Sat11/19 11:26 2.4ft 6:19 -0.2ft 1:59 1.4ft 4:40 1.3ft
Sun 11/20 6:54 -0.2ft 2:35 1.4ft 5:15 1.3ft
Mon 11/21 12:05 2.3ft 7:33 -0.2ft 3:14 1.4ft 5:57 1.3ft
Tue 11/22 12:44 2.3ft 8:11 -0.1ft 3:56 1.4ft 6:53 1.3ft
Wed 11/23 1:32 2.2ft 8:55 -0.1ft 4:38 1.5ft 8:08 1.3ff
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


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Z~;"f~t~;i~~







flfl PAGE 26 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLAND ISTDER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
* The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
* All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
* All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL IT OUT- NOW!

Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
* Name Address/City Phone


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A PAGE 27 UE


New Travel Club
to form on Island
The first meeting of the AMICC Far Away
Club will be held on Thursday, Dec. 1., at 9:30
at the Anna Maria Island Community Centei
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
The travel club, co-sponsored by the Anna Mi
land Community Center and Uniglobe Far Away
Travel, will benefit both AMICC and residents with
mation and super group rates. The club's travel co
lor is Barbara Leips. Information, 778-1908.


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Wedebrock Real Estate
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Michael E. Nink and James D. Layfield, owners of
HFI Real Estate Co., Inc., headquartered in St. Louis, Mo.,
have purchased Wedebrock Real Estate, Co., and the
property at 6350 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key.
Cathy Meldahl will remain as broker/sales and
Travel Sharon Catt will continue as rental manager. Sandra
) a.m., Layfield has been appointed office manager.
r, 407 Nink, who has lived and worked on Longboat Key

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for 14 years and is a graduate of the Realtors Institute
designation (GRI), is assembling a sales team.
Layfield, who has worked in real estate for 12 years
and heads development, is currently working on plans
for a gulf-front complex.

Prudential's top
producers for October
The Prudential Florida Realty has announced the
company's top listers and sellers for the month of Oc-
tober. Among top listers is Horace Gilley, Anna Maria
Island office. T. Dolly Young, Anna Maria Island of-
fice, is among Prudential's top sellers.

Lavoie joins Washington
Square Securities
Alan Lavoie, financial consultant and Anna Maria
resident, announces his affiliation with Washington
Square Securities, Inc., a registered broker-dealer,
member of NASD and SIPC, headquartered in Minne-
apolis, Minn. Lavoie has more than 20 years of expe-
rience in investment counseling.
Through the affiliation, Lavoie is now able to pro-
vide high quality financial products and services in-
cluding Money Market Funds, CDs, stocks, Mutual
Funds, Municipal Bonds, Treasuries, Annuities, IRAs,
pension roll-overs, retirement and estate planning.





Tour of Fine Homes
Sunday, Nov. 20
1 -4PM
603 North Point Dr., Holmes Beach.. $339,000
Keywest style waterfront home with wraparound
deck. 4BR/2.5BA with water view from all window.
Boat lift, dock. A very special home. Carol Will-
iams 778-1718 eves.
6108 Marina Dr., Homes Beach....... $118,900
Attractive 3BR/1.5BA home with many updates.
Corner lot. Close to everything. Zee Catanese
794-8991 eves.
CONTRACT PENDING........ $179,000
New Listing A doll house! 2BR/2BA canalfront
home totally refurbished. Great room concept with
a water view from most every room. Bill Donnelly
778-6392 eves.
104 6th St., Bradenton Beach ......... $215,000
Duplex 2BR/2BA and 1BR/1BA with view of
Intracoastal & 1/2 block from Bay and Beach.
Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
4818 Independence Dr., Bradenton .... $82,500
Mount Vernon 2BR/2BA condo turnkey furnished
with a Lake & Bay view. 5 minutes from Gulf
Beaches. Sandy Greiner 778-2864 eves.
1269 Edgewater Cir., Bradenton .... $141,500
Perico Bay Club 2BR/2BA unit with direct Palma
Sola Bay view. Dick Rowse 778-2003 eves.


1-800


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
* Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.


SREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS d9


I







I~ PAGE 28 K NOVEMBER 17, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


n. L & neaL


THANK YOU!
Call me
anytime.
(813) 792-8477
Specialist
Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor@ Associate


"MY GRATITUDE"

For Your Business

Past and Future MLS

bF Office: 813-778-2261 0


The Islander Bystander ... it's the best
news on the Island ... and it's free!

See the beauty of Anna Maria's
properties, beaches and canals
by boat. Call me today!


Karin Stephan
REALTORO
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


Sun Cay ... 6 unit condo: (3) 2 bedroom & (3) 1
bedroom apts. In heart of Anna Maria, just steps
to beac"Sun Cay" of Anna Maria. 6 unit condo:
(3) 2 bedroom & (3) 1 bedroom apts. Just
steps to miles of white sandy walking beach!
Excellent rental history w/approx. 10% ROI.
$549,000. #59331. Ask for Karin Stephan today!


Tropical seclusion with architecturally de-
signed Island estate, but created for entertain-
ing if you wish! Totally refurbished. 4BR/4BA.
Multi-level living room, fireplaces. Built-in fea-
tures. Security system & lights. Sailboat wa-
ters w/boat dock & ramp. Water view from
most rooms! $389,000. #KS60248. Ask for
Karin Stephan.
Anna Maria Island Club! One of a kind!
Charmingly furnished. Large 2BR/2BA. Beauti-
ful sunsets from balcony. Pool, saunas & spa.
$225,000. #KS59362. Karin Stephan, anytime!
Tidy Island condo! Fantastic skyline view of
Sarasota! 2BR/2BA, cathedral ceilings,
marble fireplace, 2 car garage, 24-hr security.
$229,000. #KS59041. Call Karin Stephan or
Carol Heinze today!
Edgewater Cove at Perico Bay Club! Out-
standing view of Palma Sola Bay & Anna Maria
from beautiful upstairs condo! 3BR/2BA w/ga-
rage. many upgrades, in excellent condition. Pool,
tennis, clubhouse, 24-hr security gate. $196,900.
#KS59052. Call Karin, 388-1267 eves.




(837806 1-800-778-8448 Eves: 388-126


*J^-~~ _- e



(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. 0. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato .................778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............ 778-2847 Marcella Cornett................ 778-5919
Nancy Gullord ................ 778-2158 Michael Advocate ............... 778-0608
4 Z l5nd4fY Sc. aLtxng9 in .tmA sopdaLifi[i,,te.
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use of professional videotape.
Exclusive
Waterfront m
Estates MiS oIc .. r
Video Collection

SPLY THE B ES,

FrPROPERTY MANAGEMENT1
TEAM ON THE ISLAND


USA


SALLY


Mike : 778-6696
Norman 'j 1-800-367-1617
Realty n. Holmes Bea3101 Guch, FL 3 Drve
Realty inc. Holm.es Beach% FL 34217


ISL ANDERII ALI
JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want
to miss THE BEST news on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary.
Mail subscriptions are available (form on page 7.)
Sorry, Individual unit delivery is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.


Come ride with me! I


We'll find your place in paradise.


SINCE 1939


778-1751
Evenings


ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling,
Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


MULTI-FAMILY on Anna Maria. Exceptional
views of Skyway & Tampa Bay! 8 bedrooms, 6
baths. Swimming pool, heated spa, gazebo,
party deck & privacy fence. $525,000. #60486.
Ask for Don Pampuch; or 778-3111 eves.
DIRECT BAYFRONT & INTRACOASTAL
views with 475' seawall! Enjoy privacy of Is-
land home with courtyard, gate & perimeter
wall. 3 bedroom, 3 bath. Updated kitchen.
Oversized 2 car garage. $399,00. #60526. Call
Horace T. Gilley (792-0758 eves.) or T.Dolly
Young (778-5427 eves.) today!
SHOREWALK CONDO available! Nicely fur-
nished, 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit. So close to pool,
tennis club, shops, beaches & bus line! $75,900.
#58263. Ask for Sally Schrader; 792-3176 eves.

Imperial House ...
Gulf-to-Bay complex!
Large, freshly painted
1BR/1BA.
$69,900

Carol Heinze
REALTOR*/CRS
778-7246
Certified Residential Specialist


"Immaculatel" family
dwelling. 3BR/2BA.
Beautiful grounds & pool.
$149,900.
"Old Florida" style
home: Secluded & private,
one acre. 3BR/3BA
$94,500.


T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
778-5427


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


-e Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717* Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307
7-7,- .- ---_


BEACHSIDE BEAUTY
Gorgeous 4 bedroom, 3 bath home near the beaches is
architecturally designed. many extras including a fire-
place, spacious decks, central vac system, and security
system. This lovely home also has a master suite with
jacuzzi tub, 24K fixtures, and a 10' x 10' walk in closet.
Call today for an appointment. Agnes Tooker 778-5287 or
Kathy Granstad 778-4136. Just $299,000.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Kay Kay Hardy and Darlene Hughes MLS
Wana--ealyte -WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M.
B--,ga,7u-5= / SATURDAYS 9AM. to NOON L


GULF FRONT
Two bedroom, two bath TURNKEY FURNISHED top floor
unit. Walking beaches, heated pool, lighted tennis court,
sauna, new stove, side by side refrigerator, carport. Great
rental! $144,900. Call Stan Williams 795-4537.
FOUR UNITS Located in convenient central Holmes
Beach. Two efficiencies and two one bedroom. Fully rented,
good income, all this for $175,000. For more information,
call Stan Williams 795-4537.
ISLAND BUSINESS Well established Island Diner for
sale. Excellent location! Unlimited potential! Call Dennis
McClung for more information call Dennis McClung for
more information 778-4800.
ISLAND CHARMER You will love this 2BR/2BA
charming Homes Beach, Richmond built home. Lots of ex-
tras, including ceiling fans, officelhobby room, private
screened porch with spa, motion lights and privacy fence.
Asking $134,900. Call Ken Rickett 778-3026.
PERICO BAY CLUB 3BR/2BA condo, beautifully deco-
rated, lake views, pools, tennis, clubhouse, 24-hr security.
Everything it takes to make a home. $109,900. Call Stan
Williams 795-4537.
M~~TnrTrHf'PT WM.: Isi


vl


7-7







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 17, 1994 E PAGE 29 I[M


li'SLANDE.4CLASSIFIEDS
& BOTIN


MARY KAY COSMETICS, at reduced prices.
Please contact Susan Barnes 778-6407.

4 VINYL PANELS & screens. 1 door to fit 17' 6" H
X 19' 4" W opening. Tracks & filler strips included.
$150. 794-3793.
EXECUTIVE DESK Light grain wood color, 36 X 72,
with center drawer. $100 or offer. 778-1011.
PINBALL MACHINE Bally "Old Chicago". $350. See
at the Islander Bystander Office. No phone calls,
please.

VITAMASTER EXERCYCLE Like new, used very
little. Black with arm motion, computerized mileage,
etc. 778-1102.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-
7978.


RETIRED MAINTENANCE MAN garage clean out.
Tools, surf board, clothes, furniture, etc. Sat., Nov.
19 & Sun., Nov. 20. 102 17th N., Bradenton Beach.

YARD SALE 202 76th St., Holmes Beach. Sat.,
Nov. 19. Patio furniture, household goods, antiques
and collectibles. Don't miss it.

GARAGE SALE 518 71st St., Holmes Beach. Sat.,
Nov.19. 8 am. Clothes, kitchen things, misc.

GARAGE SALE Sat., Nov. 19. 9 am to 2 pm. 420
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Fishing tackle, tools
and misc.

RUMMAGE SALE Sat., Nov. 19 & Sun., Nov. 20.7 am
to 3 pm. Boat w/trailer, scuba gear, moped, hardware
and general junk. 503 59th St., Holmes Beach.
FOUR FAMILY garage sale. Oriental rug, furniture,
clothes & misc. Sat., Nov. 19. 8 am to 2 pm. 301
North Shore Drive, Anna Maria.


MISSING CAT "Maui" is a white Persian with green
eyes and is declawed. Holmes Beach area. Re-
ward. 778-0229.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


TEACHER/COUNSELOR wanted. Beginning $5.25
hr. Experience preferred. Drug-free workplace. 778-
1908.

ROTTEN RALPH'S Part and full time dishwasher/
prep. Part and full time wait staff. Apply in person.
902 S Bay Blvd.

TAX PREPARER Experienced. Jan. thru Apr.
Please send resume to Otey & Associates, 3909 E.
Bay Dr., Ste.
110, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS fur full time
retail positions. Pick up applications at Crowder
Brothers Hardware Holmes Beach or Bradenton.

YOUNG MAN WANTED for odd jobs part-time.
Start $5 hour. Call T.H. Cole 779-1213.

WAITRESS & KITCHEN staff needed. Breakfast
and lunch. Apply before 2:30 pm.6836 Gulf of
Mexico Dr., Longboat Key.

HOUSEKEEPER for beachfront motel. Permanent
position. Approx. 25 hours per week. Apply Mon-
Fri 10 am to 2 pm. Start immediately. Sand & Sea
Motel. 778-2231.

Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Get involved with the
Anna Maria Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU! Call Dorothy
Stevenhagen, 795-0148 if you can give a few hours
of community service.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


COMPANION/HOME health aide. British male, 35,
available for private duty, friendly, understanding,
flexible and Island home owner. Personal care, driv-
ing, travel, trips, shopping, etc. Island Companions.
FL Lic #02432. 778-7686

COMPANION First class service. Personal care.
Customized to meet your needs. Organizing, shop-
ping, banking, appointments, transportation pro-
vided. 753-5343.
CLASSIFIED ADS continue on the next page ...


Serving" n ri-4


ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ...
85 x 130' ... deep water and spectacu-
lar views ... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ...
90 x 109' ... deep water and view of
Bayou ... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach & zoned
for 1-4 units ... $129,900.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


V- = .. .. -- -


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA or 1 BR/1 BA fully fur-
nished, second floor units in complex with pool,
tennis, club-house, sauna, on site management.
Deeded beach access and excellent rental pro-
gram. 2BR priced at $94,500 and 1 BR priced at
$78,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULF VIEW TRIPLEX just reduced to $255,000.
Recently renovated, tastefully furnished units that
offer a flexible floor plan. Large common sundeck
with great view of the Gulf. Laundry on premises.
Now operated as vacation rentals. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


Welcome

Northern

Visitors
JUST LISTED! Several rental properties
NOW AVAILABLE for this season. Let us
accommodate you in one of these choice
Gulf or canal homes. Make your reserva-
tion TODAY!




Since
MARIE 1957 LIC REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REA LTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250








- -- N --.. .
Privacy can be your on this extra large lot in Marina
Isles. This canalfront lot is located in an area of ex-
clusive, architecturally designed homes. See it to-
day. Call Kathy Tooker Granstad 778-4136 or
Agnes Tooker 778-5287. Yours for just $189,000.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 *Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


Seasonal rentals like this one avail-
able weekly or monthly November,
December and Spring 1995. For more
information call Alice Zoller.


-.M


(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY


of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216
Toll Free 800 434-0426 FAX 778-1929


- -

-. S --,... -5r.




The final, last, and perhaps best reason for
buying 631 Foxworth is because you want to
own the best house on arguably the best
street on Key Royale. If 631 is too hug for
you, might we suggest 624 Foxworth, a mod-
est 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage home
at $234,900? Doug Dowling Realty 409 Pine
Ave. 778-1222.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
t lion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. *
Combined Experience AND Smilest
N 11Fl.:1 1A41 h A a1.;.:I.^ t.~i







[M PAGE 30 N NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353

ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RGOOS8589 PE002374 778-9244


Deffenbaugh
LOCK & SECURITY
LOCKED OUT?
HOME AUTO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
ALL TYPES OF LOCKS
Installed Rekeyed Repaired
Bonded Licensed Insured
Serving Anna Maria, Longboat
Key, Cortez, West Bradenton
EMERGENCY SERVICE -
RADIO DISPATCHED
SPECIALTY KEYS
LUGGAGE REPAIRS
778-5594


Painting by Elaine
Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence'
/-Q INTERIOR
& EXTERIOR
S RESIDENTIAL
&
COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings.
Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Ucensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468


State Registered Contractor State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
= ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


^.1ILIHILX


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY

A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


J.* B

Painting
Private
& Commercial
* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


IS AND9 -C ASSFID

SEVIE--OE 9MROE.ET onine


*j Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Lawn Mowing Trimming Edgingi
Lawn Hauling* By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE -INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
1 1AND SATISFACTION


ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Is-
land references. 779-2129.

PRESSURE WASHERS for rent starting at $30.
Crowder Brother Hardware, Holmes Beach 778-
0999. Bradenton 748-8551.
"HATE TO IRON?" Reasonable rates and many
Island references. Pick-up and delivery. Also alter-
ations. No smoke environment. 778-4680.

CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gel coat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs. exp. Call
Bradenton Fiberglass for free estimate 753-9621.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

MOBILE SERVICE We come to you. Oil changes
$20 w/lube. Tune-ups, brakes, A/C specialty. 29
years exp. 778-4659.
THREE MAIDS CLEANING 10 years experience.
Reliable, reasonable, professionally trained. Homes
and offices. 795-1705 anytime.

NO TIME TO CLEAN Home, apts., rentals, etc. I'm
fast reliable and reasonable. "I like what I do...and
it shows!" References available. 778-4116.
NEED A PICKUP for light moving? Appliances,
brush piles, junk...whatever...odd jobs, carpentry,
painting. Call Eddie 0 anytime. Cellular phone line
705-0221.
RELIABLE ISLAND COUPLE will tackle your
household chores, painting, re-screening or clean-
ing screens, windows & blinds. House cleaning and
gardening. Please call Peter or Barbara. 778-7616.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon
on mobile number 320-0110. Please leave a mes-
sage for quick reply if not available.
CARPET DIRTY? Rent a Rug Doctor. $12 for 4
hours. Crowder Brothers Hardware Holmes Beach
778-0999. Bradenton 748-8551.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24-hour service. Serving
the Island 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resi-
dent.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers
& concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.

HOME MAINTENANCE, CARPENTRY & RE-
PAIRS. Experienced, reliable, small jobs preferred.
Don Staples 778-0225.


DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.

CUSTOM RENOVATIONS by Paul Beauregard. All
home improvements. Specializing in kitchens &
bathrooms. 20 yrs. experience as an industrious
highly-skilled, dependable carpenter and finishing
contractor. My work includes; counter tops, ceramic
& vinyl tile, drywall repairs, fine finish painting, wall
coverings, etc. 387-8066, beeper # 252-6528.


1 LG/1 SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
etc.. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
SEASONAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. No street to cross
on short walk to beach. Located at 118 Palmetto
Ave. (corner of Gulf Drive and Palmetto Avenue.)
No pets, no smokers. Close to laundromat. $1,100
per month, includes utilities and taxes. 778-1576.

EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! ISLANDER CLASSIFIED

ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo avail-
able March & April 95. $850/wk. Gulf front. 813-
949-3713.

STILL AVAILABLE for January 1995. Deluxe beach
2BR/2BA apt., central H/A, W/D. Call Betty Cole,
779-1213.

STEPS TO BEACH Holmes Beach, 3BR/3BA
beach house. Available Dec., Jan. & Feb. Sea-
sonal, fully equipped includes W/D. Call 778-4468.

2BR/1 BA DUPLEX 1/2 blk from beach. $1,200 mo.
Available Nov., Dec., March, April. Call 1-813-681-
9656. Leave message, will return call.

ANNUAL Beachside elegance. Beautifully refur-
bished apartments. Only steps to the Gulf. 2/2
$750. 1/1, $550. Robin Kollar, Gulf Bay Realty of
Anna Maria. 778-7244.
COMMERCIAL RENTAL 800 sq. ft. Office/retail
space. Pine Ave., Anna Maria. $600 month. 778-
5796.

GULFFRONT THANKSGIVING on the beach in vil-
lage of Anna Maria. Perfect 3/2 only steps from the
water. Nov. & Dec. Must see! $600 week. 778-3171.
GULFFRONT EXECUTIVE monthly term rental on
exclusive North Shore Drive in the village of Anna
Maria. One-of-a-kind perfect 3/2 beach house with
all amenities. Steps from water...sunset view from
every room. Now reserving prime winter months
(1,2 or 3 year term). Rent tomorrow's vacation at
today's prices ($3,500 to $10,000 includes all taxes
& utilities). Guarantee your place in the sun on best
beach on Island. Now! Hurry! Prime months (Jan.
thru Apr.). Won't last long. 778-3171.

TWO POLICE WIDOWS seek reasonable priced
seasonal rental for Feb. & March. Call Frank at
778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
RENTALS continue on the next page ...


gal 11A[


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!








AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Our mobile service means no one
has to drive your car. And we are eco-friendly
utilizing only 100 percent bio-degradable
products. By appointment, at your
convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number. 320-0110.


L MANI T E T HH M AD
U AVE R |E E H IA TT E
M I IC C CIN ATEH B 0 E R I




PV\ 0cj PART THUD REA *
S E E M BIOLO UN I T
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A PAGE 31 [IB


I-ENALSCotiue RAL SATCotne 9


ANNA MARIA 2BR house available Dec., Jan. 15-
31, Mar. 1-7 and April. Located 1/2 block from
shore. 616-754-6349 call am.
HOME TO SHARE Bradenton Beach. Furnished
$400. Responsible persons only. 778-3494.
SEASONAL 3/1 Remodeled ground home. Every-
thing included. Across street from beach. Available
thru April $1200 month. 217-5555 leave message or
813-859-2857.
LARGE STUDIO APT Brand new with peek of
Gulf. Available thru April. Includes utilities, turn-
key ready. $700 month. 217-5555 leave message
or 813-859-2857.
ANNA MARIA Gulf & Bay views. 1BR, patio, pool,
W/D. Furnished. Season or annual. 211 S Bay
Blvd., Anna Maria. 778-2896.
1BR FURNISHED apartment on the bay. $500
month. 778-7980.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT with bath. Screened
porch, private entrance. Close to shopping. 778-
7039.
HOLMES BEACH Annual 2/1 duplex apartment.
One block from beach. Available Dec 1. $500 de-
posit/$500 month plus utilities. 778-6427 after 7 pm.
HOLMES BEACH West of Gulf Dr! 2/2, seasonal
$1200 month. T.D. Young, 778-5427. Prudential
Florida Realty. 778-0766.
HOLMES BEACH CONDO Available Dec.
Equipped, spacious 2/2. Large screened lanai, laun-
dry, pool and tennis. Close to beach & churches.
Covered parking. $1400. 778-5899.
PLAYA ENCANTADA Gulf condo. 2/2, W/D, heated
pool, spa, sauna, tennis and elevator. Available Jan.
$2500 montVh$1500 2 weeks. 778-3725.
1BR 604 North Shore, Apt #2, Anna Maria. $475
month. 778-2202 or 792-0030.
BEAUTIFUL BEACH HOUSE with tropical garden,
large deck & front lanai, 3BR/2BA. Available from
Nov. 12 thru winter season. $2200 month. Drive by
108 Peppertree. 778-7153.


"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.

EXTRA LARGE 52 X 145 lot in Anna Maria. Great
family area. $79,000. Call Richard Freeman at Is-
land Real Estate, 778-6066 for details.

CANALFRONT lot in Key Royale across street from
golf course. Deep water bay access. $175,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
ADORABLE Anna Maria home close to beach.
3BR/2BA with possible 4th BR or den. Two sepa-
rate entrances make this property unique!
$147,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
KEY WEST styled canalfront home in Anna Maria.
3BR/2BA. No bridges to Bay. $234,500. Call Rich-
ard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for
details.
ONE OF A KIND deep water canalfront home in
Holmes Beach 6BR/4BA inground pool -
$386,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
S. BAY BLVD. Elevated 1450 sq. ft. 2BR/2BA with
900 sq. ft. garage/storage, back deck w/water view,
fruit trees. Many extras. 778-7070.
BOATERS! Fabulous Anna Maria canalfront lot with
Tampa Bay access. One of the few left! Call Rich-
ard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Featuring 2 &
3BR units with tennis, pools and boat dock. Call
Dick Maher for additional information. Neal & Neal
Realtors 778-2261.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA and 1BR/1BA duplex.
Sell all or part. $169,500. 704-683-1188.


ANNA MARIA BAYFRONT home. Fabulous view!
Owner financing. $350,000. Yvonne Higgins, Island
Real Estate. 778-6066.
LOW INTEREST RATES won't last forever Buy
your investment property now! Several prime du-
plexes available from Island Real Estate. Ask for
Yvonne Higgins, 778-6066.
ANNA MARIA RESIDENTIAL lot for sale. 744
Jacaranda. 2 minute walk to beach. Can see the
gulf from elevation. 713-271-5744. Dr. Mikles.

ISLAND DUPLEX Each unit offers 2/2, dining, liv-
ing and laundry. Sundeck overlooking the Gulf. Get
ready for breathtaking sunsets from either unit. This
stilted duplex come with A/C, huge storage rooms,
extra closets, covered parking, automatic sprinkler
systems, security and garden lighting. Yard has
been professionally landscaped. By owner for only
$179,800.

REAL ESTATE WANTED Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981.

NORTH BEACH VILLAGE Top of the line! 2 large
BR/2.5BA. Beautifully decorated (never rented),
pool view, 2 blocks from beach, includes all appli-
ances. $179,000. 810-645-1865.

PERICO BAY CLUB bayfront condo. 2/2, enclosed
garage and all amenities. $139,500. Call Richard
Freeman at Island Real Estate 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH CONDO Steps to beach. 1 BR,
glass enclosed porch overlooking pool. Fur-
nished. $86,900. Green, Kesten & Assco. N997-
JW. 747-2045.
OPEN HOUSE
Nov. 20 Sunday 2 to 4
812 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria
Southeast of Fishing Pier
WATERFRONT ON ANNA MARIA. Marvelous
beach and spectacular water views. 3/2 home has
family room, stone fireplace, deck, garage, fruit
trees. Well maintained. $425,000. Call Jeanette
Rampone, Michael Saunders & Company. 813-
747-2244.

ITS THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN.
Play The Islander Bystander Football contest and
you could win $50.





HOW TO


ADVERTISE

DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for
WEDNESDAY publication every week.
Minimum size, up to 21 words (three
lines) $4.50. Additional 7 words
(one line) $1.50. Boxed ad, plus $2.00.
Classified ads for businesses and busi-
ness services are minimum $6.50 for
up to 21 words. Additional 7 words
(one line) $2.00. Boxed ad, plus $2.00.
Payment is expected when you place
the ad in person or by mail.The of-
fice is located at 5408 Marina Drive,
between D. Coy Ducks and Chez
Andre, in the Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
More information: 778-7978.


KT'S with STYLE
A Jewelry Store For All Ages
Specializing in Sterling Silver
111 7th Street N., Bradenton Beach 779-1308
.......................... * .. *

Custom Communications
Installation and Repair of All Electronics
SPECIALIZING IN PC COMPUTER SERVICE
V -. Call Dave for answers to any technical questions
.-- and for free estimates. 730-1608 or 778-6407


PIANO &] KEYBOARD
S LESSONS
All Ages All Levels
778-3539 -


ISLAND LUMBER
AN HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12

Don't forget to play The Islander
Football Contest. Page 26 this issue.




Cardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis
Nationally Certified 792

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
On Premise Appointments Available
Gift Certificates
MM0003995
792-3758 MA0012461
Please mention that you saw this ad in The Islander Bystander.

SANTA'S HERE!
'TIL SATURDAY FOR VISITS AND PHOTOS
WITH YOUR PETS AND FAMILY
50% of Profits go to Anna Maria Island Community Center

IRISH u ROVER
PET SERVICES formerly Island Grooming
107 7th St. N., Bradenton Beach 778-2095



Custom Designs
Repairs
778-4605
On Pine Ave. across from the
Historic Anna Maria City Jail


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX006545S
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
lBII ll 1 \ *VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
1M ) ENCLOSURES
-/ Financing Available
778-7074




-U --


H COMMUNITY ELECTRIC-
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


ISLANDER
i VV~






EB PAGE 32 E NOVEMBER 17, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER





Now, we are two!




























Two years, 104 weekly issues ... and counting.

Thanks to you for reading, advertising, subscribing and caring about your Island
newspaper. The staff and all the contributors to The Islander Bystander thank you.
We look forward to many happy returns. Next week: Volume 3, No. 1.


__,71-. ,:0 ,.


.[] .', ,. .,_, ,.... I , :.:. .... : . . ... : . .. .. .. ..::.,.i..:

~ t I [,, It. . . ."1 -- Z


OVERLOOKS INTRA-COASTAL This 2
bedroom, 2.5 bath condo has security entry,
elevator, pool & jacuzzi, garage parking, boat
dock, & private beach on Gulf. Call Bill Bowman
Ofc: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-4619. $142,900.


PERICO BAY CLUB Furnished & view!
2Bed, 2Bath, beautifully furnished in light oak
and glass. Fabulous view of Intracoastal wa-
ters reduced $149,000. Call Rose Schnoerr
Olc 778-2261 or Eves 778-7780



Mary Ann ,
Schmidt
Realtor, GRI -
778-4931



Mary Ann Schmidt has been
successfully selling Florida |
Real Estate for 10 years. She I
and her family love their Island
: lifestyle. Call her to find yours.

, ,-- .


DEEP WATER CANAL WITH DOCK 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath home with ceramic tile in
greatroom, kitchen & dining room. Community
pool & tennis. $329,900. Call Mary Ann Schmidt
or Helen White 778-4931 or 778-5956.


DESIRABLE WESTBAY COVE 2Bed/
2Bath corner unit. Lush landscape, heated
pool, tennis. Anna Maria's most convenient lo-
cation. Call Lu Rhoden Ofc: 778-2261 or Eves:
778 .2692


LARGE TOWNHOUSE HAS DOCK ON
LAGOON 4 bedroom, 2 bath, kitchen has all
new appliances & cupboards. Berber carpet,
fans in every room, laundry room. $136,000. Call
Bobye Chasey Ofc: 778-2261 Eves: 778-1532.
K 1- B T .,-.. ..'; -."


LIVE ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND in Key
Royale Community. 3Bed/2Bath canal front
home. Large screened lanai, open kitchen, 2
car garage, storage. $219,999. Call Evelyn
Mitchell Ofc: 778-2261 Eves: 778-1952.


kit


BOATING COMMUNITY 2Bed/2Bath on
intracoastal waterway. Boat dock & great sun-
set views. Cathedral ceilings, coral fireplace,
hot tub, 24-hr security. $205,000. Dick Maher
Ofc 778-2261 Eves 778-8477


ISLAND CONDOS
' PLAYA ENCANTADA .... From $129.900
WESTBAY COVE .. .. From $142,500
WESTBAY COVE SOUTH ... From $130,000
SUNBOW BAY .. .. From $134,900
WESTBAY PT & MCOORINGS ... From $134.500
SUMMER SANDS .. From $142.900
i LA COSTA ...... .... From $167,000
CCOQUINA BEACH CLUB .. From $185.000
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday November 20 1 to 4 PM
6006 Gulf Dr #212 Playa Encanlada
$178.000 2/2 Top Floor, Gulf front
complex Your Hostess Helen White


I- ,~~* -' -.


PERICO BAY CLUB "ANTIGUA" MODEL
- 2Bed/2Bath fully decorator furnished. Lake
front with 1 car garage, large lanai & sun deck,
courtyard entry. $129,900. Marilyn Trvethan Ofc:
778-2261 Eves 792-8477


~
. . -. .. - ' '.; '
- FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Premiere Properties in
Prime Locations throughout
Manatee County
Total Properly Management'
Wide variety of fine vacation rentals'
Unfurnished annual rentals'
* Profe-sionsl, Personalized Service

Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665 "N


-~ ..


i "