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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00538
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00074389:00538


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA M


__ ii.


'ARIA ISLAND WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE NOVEMBER 3,1994




--6-i


Candidate consensus on many issues in debate


By Paul Roat
Consensus rather than controversy marked The
Islander Bystander political forum held last week for
selected political races for the Nov. 8 general election.
Candidates for Florida House of Representatives
District 68, Anna Maria Fire Control District and rep-
resentatives on the constitutional amendment banning
gill net fishing in Florida waters discussed their plat-
forms and answered questions posed by Islander By-
stander Publisher Bonner Presswood.

Florida House of Representatives
Republican Mark Flanagan is challenging Demo-
cratic incumbent Julie McClure for the Florida House


of Representatives District 68 seat.
"I'm not satisfied with our representation in Talla-
hassee," Flanagan said. "We have a continuing crisis
in crime, and we continue to rank in the bottom quartile
in education.
"Tallahassee sorely needs to respond like a busi-
ness. Less government is the best government," he said.
McClure pointed to a number of local actions she
has taken as a state representative as proving her effec-
tiveness in office, specifically action toward maintain-
ing the integrity of the county's many fire control dis-
tricts. She proposed a coalition of representatives to
provide input for enactment of regulation of personal
watercraft, and said she co-sponsored legislation to


change the Supreme Court ruling that prescribes land
use changes be conducted as "quasi-judicial" proceed-
ings rather than legislative actions.
Responding to a question on state action that could
be taken to aid local governments when property as-
sessments are frozen next year and cities and counties
are forced to either cut back on spending or increase
taxes, McClure said she was not in favor of any new
taxes except for local option sales tax increases ap-
proved by voters.
Flanagan said he did not support raising taxes, add-
ing that raising taxes is not a solution to financial prob-
PLEASE SEE DEBATE, PAGE 2


Holmes Beach

seeks $500,000

state grant

Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach is seeking a $500,000 grant to alle-
viate its stormwater runoff problems and meet federal
mandates, said Mayor Rich Bohnenberger Friday.
"The rules changed for the Community Develop-
ment Block Grant (CDBG)," said Bohnenberger, "and A
we are now eligible to apply for at least $500,000 in
state funds. Tuesday we will begin advertising for a
consulting firm to administer the grant application and -
implement the grant The RFPs (Request for Proposal)
are due back in 30 days." .
In 1992, Bradenton Beach received a $500,000 r .
CDBG to clean up Bridge Street and the surrounding area. -. -
Bohnenberger said the grant funds will be used to
implement recommendations being developed by the
Southwest Florida Water Mangement District for ad-
dressing flooding and drainage problems in the city.
Funds will also be used to meet a federal mandate to
clean up stormwater runoff before it drains into sur-
rounding waters. The county is currently developing -
fee structure to manage and operate a stormwater man-
agement system to meet the federal mandate.
"The county is looking at $1.50 per month per house-
hold in the unincorporated areas," said Bohnenberger. "I
would like to enter into an agreement with the county to
have the fee collected on our water bills."


Trolley ad sales rolling right along


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
As of last week, Island businesses had committed
$3,200 in advertising to a trolley that will run the length
of the Island, said Darcy Lee Migliore, executive direc-
tor of the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
(AMICC).
The trolley, a private enterprise, would be funded
by advertising outside and inside and cost about $6,000
to operate, said Gary Cremeans of Trolley Systems of
America, Inc. Cremeans said he needs a 60 percent
commitment from local businesses in order to pursue
the project.
If Island businesses are willing to make a commit-
ment by the first part of November, said Cremeans, a
trolley could start carrying passengers by January of
1995. He suggested a four-month trial period from
January to April of 1995.
"Some business owners are beaming with enthusi-
asm about the trolley," said Migliore, "and have said
they plan to come in and sign up for advertising. The
trolley is a new concept and if the business owners feel
it's a viable means of advertising and they can afford
it within their revenues, it's a workable situation."
Advertising costs for the trolley are $200 to $500
per month for outside signs and $75 per month for in-
side signs. In addition to advertising on the vehicle, a
business can pay a monthly "stop charge" of $100 for


the trolley to stop at the business to load and unload
passengers.
If enough advertising is sold to support one trolley,
it will run between Anna Maria's Bayfront Park and
Coquina Beach, with an additional stop at Manatee
County Public Beach. Each trip will take approximately
one hour.
If enough advertising is sold to support two trol-
leys, both will run from Manatee County Public Beach.
One will go north to Bayfront Park and one will go
south to Coquina Beach. Each trip will take approxi-
mately a half hour.
A trolley can carry 34 passengers and the fee to ride
is $1. Passengers showing a receipt from participating
advertisers will receive their return ride free. Passen-
gers staying in motels that pay a "stop fee" will ride
free.
AMICC Director Luke Courtney said the trolley
would run from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday through Sat-
urday with Sunday and Monday reserved for mainte-
nance and charter trips.
Cremeans currently services Siesta Key, Lido
Beach and St. Armands Circle with two trolleys. He
said if the trolley is successful, he could also run one
from Coquina Beach down Longboat Key to connect
with his trolley at St. Armands Circle. This would give
Islanders trolley service from Anna Maria south to Si-
esta Key.


Fall Festival
looks a lot
like
Halloween
Saturday's Anna Maria
Elementary PTO Annual
Fall Festival and Parade
drew a big crowd despite
early morning rains. As the
sky began to clear, umbrel-
las changed to sunny faces
and the parade proceeded
from Holmes Beach City
Hall to Anna Maria
Elementary School for the
Festival. According to PTO
Treasurer Joy Courtney,
the dollar amount raised is
nearly double that of last
year's festival. She cred-
ited the increased revenue
to the Sandbar and Beach
Bistro restaurants gener-
ous donation of food. The
big, tall pumpkin-headed
ghoul led Mrs. Thomas'
second grade class in the
parade. Islander Photo:
Tomara Kafka.


New York Times
puzzle begins in
Islander Bystander
Puzzle lovers take note: what has been termed
the best crossword in the world appears in The Is-
lander Bystander this week as a regular feature.
The New York Times crossword is on page 27
of this week's newspaper. We will publish the an-
swers to the puzzle in the following week's news-
paper. If you get stumped and can't wait a week, we
offer a phone number to call for answers but there
is a charge for the call of 75 cents per minute.







SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ...................................................... 6
Those Were the Days ................................. 7
Island architect ........................................... 12
Announcements ......................................... 16
Football contest.......... ........................... 19
Anna Maria tides ........................................ 23
Real estate ................................................ 24
Political endorsements..... 14








IJ] PAGE 2 E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Debate
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
lems. "I believe we can re-allocate money and cut the
fat from government."
Asked about their respective views on the proposed
65-foot, fixed-span bridge to replace the Anna Maria
Island Bridge at Manatee Avenue, Flanagan said, "I
like things the way they are, and don't see how there
can be room for more traffic. I think this is a classic
example of Tallahassee government knowing
what's best for you."
McClure said she has always supported a 45-foot
drawbridge to replace the current span, stating that such
a structure would eliminate two-thirds of the current
bridge openings. She said Islanders should lobby
Florida Sen. John McKay, who sits on the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee. "John McKay is in a position
to pull that funding," she said.
"You're the chairman of the local legislative del-
t nation," Flanagan retorted. "You should work within
tl delegation to let them know how the constituents
fe ."
Asked about their respective stands on abortion,
McClure said she is pro-choice and has supported lo-
cal health departments with health planning.
Flanagan said government money should not be
used to support abortions, and said he was pro-life.
Both candidates said they were opposed to an edu-
cational voucher system.
Both candidates supported the constitutional
amendment to ban commercial gill net fishing in
Florida waters.
"For the protection of our natural resources, I will
vote for Amendment 3," Flanagan said.
"It is not an appropriate constitutional amend-
ment," McClure said of Amendment 3, "but I think this
is going to pass and I've endorsed it."

Anna Maria Fire Control District
George Jackson and Larry Tyler are vying for the
district 3 seat on the Anna Maria Fire Control District;
Marty Duytschaver and Deborah Marks are seeking the
district 4 seat. Duytschaver was not present at the can-
didate forum due to a previous commitment.


Incumbent Florida Rep. Julie McClure, left, and challenger Mark Flanagan agreed the constitutional amend-
ment banning gill net fishing in Florida waters was an inappropriate means to regulate fisheries, but both
agreed they would vote in favor of the proposal. Islander Photo: David Futch


Jackson said he grew up on the Island and has 15
years experience in running a business here. He is a
firefighter-paramedic with the City of Sarasota.
Tyler is a businessman in Cortez. He is a former
personnel director of a city in Wisconsin where he
worked closely with police and fire department. He
said he believed the biggest issue facing the department
was to have fully trained staff and volunteers as well
as good relations with the Island cities.
Marks is a former volunteer with the district. She
said she believed maintaining a corps of trained volun-
teers is critical for the department. She is a planner with
the City of Sarasota.
All three candidates agreed to the advisability of
keeping volunteers out of the internal politics within
the department, and all agreed that it was a difficult task
to accomplish.
All concurred that the district's hefty tax hike last
year was unfortunate, but they all agreed that the dis-
trict has to maintain its equipment and training levels


and takes money. All said they would work to keep the
taxes down in the future.
All questioned the need for a full-time emergency
management director for the district.
All agreed that consolidation of the fire district
with other districts in the county would be an inevitable
event as soaring costs and expenses make independent
fire districts financially distressing for taxpayers.

Gill net ban proposal
Karen Bell, a Cortez native and opponent of the
constitutional amendment banning gill net fishing in
Florida waters, spoke on the issue.
Representatives from Save Our Sealife, the group
advocating the passage of the amendment, declined
from attending the forum.
Bell said commercial fishers have more than 200
more regulations now that they did a few years ago.
"Scientific data indicates that it is a healthy stock,"
Bell said of the mullet fishery in Florida.


Vote Nov. 8




CRAIG J.





TRACE



for
Manatee River Soil & Water Conservation
As a wholesale grower and nursery owner for 12 years,
I practice conservation 365 days a year.

I'm a doer not a talker: I use micro irrigation,
I.P.M. and other environmental practices.

Graduate of Palmetto High 1974
BBA Stetson University 1978
5 year Committee Member of the Manatee County
Extension Advisory Council
Member of Florida Nurserymen & Growers Association
Active in FFA. 4-H Club Little League
Conservationist A Concerned Citizen


I'LL WORK TO PROTECT OUR RESOURCES
I'd appreciate your vote on Nov. 8
Pd. Pol. Adv. Campaign for Craig J. Trace


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 3 HIU


Katie gets a park
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola was honored last Friday morning at the dedication ceremony of the
new Katie Pierola Sunset Park at the 2200 block of Gulf Drive North. Mike Norman opened the ceremonies
while Manatee County Commissioner Pat Glass and State Rep. Julie McClure each added a few more words
complimenting Pierola's hard work and successful efforts in the recent beach restoration project.


Anna Maria City

pooh-poohs

doggie beach

concept
The Anna Maria City Commission decided it will
not pursue a suggestion that a small section of beach
near the Anna Maria City Pier be set aside for the walk-
ing of dogs. Had the idea won commission approval,
it would have been the only portion of beach within
Anna Maria City exempt from an ordinance that pro-
hibits dogs on the beach.
As it turned out last week the commission buried
the notion after learning that a vocal number of resi-
dents had a bone to pick concerning the possibility of
a doggie beach.
"A few weeks ago the question was raised to the city
commission about the feasibility of having a doggie beach
in the City of Anna Maria," City Commissioner Doug
Wolfe said, noting that at that time he had asked the Island
newspapers to mention the idea in print with the hope it
would encourage citizen comment.
Apparently the appeal for input worked, with a num-
ber of residents unleashing a collective howl of opposition,
muzzling any further discussion of a doggie beach.
"We're kicking that idea under the rug," Wolfe said.


Ed and Elaine Mihm of Anna Maria City
Bradenton Beach watch 11/9, 9 a.m., Codification Committee
the final touches of the
chickee construction at Bradentn Beach
Katie Pierola Sunset Park 11/3, 7 p.m., Council meeting
prior to opening ceremo- Holmes Beach
.Holmes Beach
nies last Friday. Islander None scheduled
None scheduled
Photo: Tomara Kafka
Of Interest
11/10, 10 a.m., Island Emergency Operations
Center, Fire Station 1, Holmes Beach


Paid Political Advertisement donated by Cortez Fishermen to Save Our Seafood campaign.


Residents of Manatee County:

We the Bell family and the fishermen of Cortez, need your

help. After fifty years of providing fresh quality, locally-
harvested seafood to the citizens of Manatee County and
beyond, our livelihoods are being threatened.
On November 8th, you will be asked to vote on an amendment to
Florida's Constitution that, if passed, will devastate this village.
Amendment 3, entitled "Limiting Marine Netting," in reality will wipe
out net fishing now and forever. Without nets,
the economic viability and environ-
mental sustainability of Cortez .
will disappear.-.
If this was based on scien- "------ '
tific evidence that nets are bad for the
environment, or dangerous to marine birds
and mammals, it would be justifiable. This is not so. The scientists of
our state agencies and universities have stated that there is no need to
ban gill nets in Florida. They believe that the emphasis should be
placed on minimizing the impacts of the mushrooming human popula-
tion in Florida. At the present, our fisheries are being reasonably man-
aged by the Florida Marine Fisheries Commission. There are no signs
of impending doom, except those imagined by FCA activists.
We understand and support the need to protect our resources.
Amendment 3 is not the answer. Cortez residents have always been
proud to be able to provide Florida seafood to all Florida citizens.
Please let us continue the tradition by voting NO on Amendment 3.
Sincerely,
The Bell family of Cortez.









II PAGE 4 E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Wolfe says he'll back protection of live seashells


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Lovers of live seashells may want to sound the
conch when they hear what Anna Maria City Commis-
sioner Doug Wolfe did last week.
After standing stalwart against a proposed resolu-
tion asking Governor Lawton Chiles and the Florida
Cabinet to institute a ban on the harvesting of live sea-
shells in city waters, Wolfe made a surprising about-
face and says he will now support the idea.
For weeks, every time City Commissioner Dottie
McChesney brought up the subject the debate became
heated, with Wolfe criticizing the notion as being un-
needed and unworkable. Undaunted, McChesney con-
tinued to push for some form of protection that would
guard against the possible depletion of live seashells -
particularly sand dollars and starfish. According to
McChesney, too many of the creatures are being taken
by tourists and commercial harvesters, and she feels the
natural resource may be in danger.
Each time, Wolfe responded by saying there was
no proof that great numbers of live seashells are being
taken, and if they are, proof is also lacking that shell-
fish populations are being adversely affected. Wolfe's
opposition reached a peak at the commission's Oct. 25
regular meeting after McChesney moved to accept the
resolution.
"I understand the groundswell of emotion," Wolfe
said, "but I would like to see one factual statistic that
would show there are less shellfish or less of anything
along the shore because people are taking them."
"I think this (proposed resolution) is a gross waste
of taxpayers' time and energy, and I think it is a gross
waste of this commission's time and energy," Wolfe
said. "It is an absurd waste of the funds of the rest of
the taxpayers of Florida."
"I am against this resolution," Wolfe continued. "I
shall vote against this resolution, and I shall not sign
this resolution."
McChesney responded by saying that Wolfe had
not attended some of the meetings she had which con-
cerned the subject, but she conceded that the kind of
scientific reports Wolfe wants have not been done.
"Data on this is very difficult to get," McChesney
said. "There's no money to do scientific studies on the
effects of anything on live shellfish."


McChesney said the only information currently
available is in the form of state-produced reports of the
numbers of certain types of live shellfish taken by com-
mercial harvesters.
McChesney then recited a few figures prepared by
the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
"The reported commercial landings for southwest
Florida during 1993 were 312,620 pounds of sand dol-
lars," McChesney said. "I computed the difference be-
tween 1992 and 1993, with the landings of sand dollars
up nearly 400 percent and starfish are up 300 percent."
Wolfe remained unimpressed.
"The fact that 5,000 sand dollars were taken
doesn't mean anything, because there are probably 500
million of them out there," Wolfe said, dismissing citi-
zens' letters supporting the resolution. He said the let-
ters are expressions of "fear and emotions we're not
dealing with any scientific data."
One resident in the City Hall audience suggested
that, if nothing else, restrictions be put on the commer-
cial harvesters of live shellfish who take the animals for
sale as souvenirs at tourist curio shops.
Wolfe thought that approach was like a solution in
search of a problem.
"Why must we even address the curio harvesters if
no harm is being done?" Wolfe said. "Why try to cure
a disease that isn't affecting anyone?"
McChesney's motion failed by a 2-2 vote, since
Mayor Ray Simches was not at the meeting to break the
tie. McChesney and City Commissioner Chuck
Shumard supported the resolution, with Vice Mayor
Max Znika joining Wolfe in opposing it.
Two days later, Wolfe's view had changed radi-
cally. After speaking with a city resident, Wolfe de-
cided he would support the resolution if it ever comes
before the commission again.
"I'm doing a whole lot of analyzing of the whole
situation," Wolfe told The Islander Bystander. "You
see, I really had no input from any of the citizens and
taxpayers of the City of Anna Maria. All we had was
Commissioner McChesney's idea no one had spo-
ken to me about it, so I had to go with just my own
ability, my own research and my own political attitudes
toward it.
"However," Wolfe says, "I did meet someone at
the post office a lovely lady, grandmotherly type,


who said, 'Doug, please reconsider.'"
The woman said she did not object to the expendi-
ture of tax money to protect live shellfish, and if the law
would be as Wolfe claims unenforceable, that
would be all right with her, too.
"She was just relying only on the fact that it would
be a law if we ever needed it," Wolfe said. Wolfe said
the woman said that when her grandchildren visit they
are told, "If it's alive, leave it in the water."
"That's relatively simple," Wolfe said, "so I sug-
gested that perhaps what we should do is place cour-
tesy signs at three logistic places in the city, saying
something to that effect, that if it's alive leave it."
Wolfe said that the signs would not be backed up
by law, "but that would be a beginning."
However, the woman said she still wanted the leg-
islation from the governor and cabinet to be pursued,
and Wolfe agreed.
So if the resolution comes up at the next meeting?
"I will say aye," Wolfe said.
That's a nice thing to say, but McChesney's not so
sure she believes all she's hearing now.
"With Mr. Wolfe's attitude that it didn't matter
how many letters I had from people who want it, that
he would never put his signature to it, and that it's a
bunch of junk, well, I can't exactly get thrilled and
walk on my hands because he says now he's going to
change his mind," McChesney told The Islander By-
stander when informed of Wolfe's decision.
"However, I'm keeping my options open,"
McChesney said. "If I feel that it will pass in Anna
Maria and pass unanimously I think that's the
only way now I'll have any leverage with (the state)
and the other Island communities."
McChesney says if she feels the resolution will not
be approved by her city commission she will strive to
have the Island Elected Officials support a petition or
resolution.
"Of course, that would be great to have in addition
to each city passing a resolution saying they are for a
total ban (on the harvesting of live shellfish),"
McChesney said.
"The more weight we have the more commis-
sioners we have saying that we do want this and it is
important to our citizens the more likely we are to
get it through."


Don't forget to vote Tuesday, Nov. 8!


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 5 ED

New buildings receive OK in Bradenton Beach


By Paul Roat
Queen's Gate and Key West North Condominium
have received variances from the Bradenton Beach
Adjustment Board.
Queen's Gate, 1101 Gulf Drive N., received a vari-
ance to slightly expand the office of the approximately
11-unit motel, formerly the Banana Beach Resort. The
office variance amounts to a 1.3-foot expansion toward
Gulf Drive and will increase the size of the office by


21 square feet.
"It's a tiny office," architect Emily Ann Smith said,
"and you can't get a desk, chair and customer in with-
out keeping the door open."
Key West North Condominium, 1201 Gulf Drive
N., received a variance to extend the building into the
side setback area near 12th Street North.
Architect Tom Walters said the city's codes are
vague about setback requirements along the street, with


some references requiring 20 feet and others 10 feet.
His request was for the building to have an over-
hang at a nine-foot setback at some points.
The project includes four condominium units on
the site, with parking under the structures. Entrance to
the site will be from 12th Street North.
Board of Adjustment Chairman John Burns and
members Barbara Daniels and Leroy Arnold all voted
in favor of variances on both projects.


Kids

with

voters

can cast

vote too
It works for the
McDonald's fast food
chain. It's a stop-gap in the
war against drugs. Three-
year-olds now call 911 in
emergency situations. Now
it is reaching into the soul
of our democracy.
What is it? Kid
power.
Be it the War Against
Drugs or fire prevention
or a marketing ploy to sell
a hamburger, society has
learned that if it gets a
message across to kids,
adults will follow, and on
top of that, society will
produce a future of
knowledgeable adults.
This is the foundation
for Kids Voting Manatee, a
community-based program
offering children in grades
kindergarten through 12
the opportunity to parallel
the adult voting experience
by casting their vote on
Election Day, Tuesday,
Nov. 8.
In the classroom, chil-
dren have registered to vote
and the discussion of issues
and candidates has been
encouraged. On election
day, Kids Voting booths
will be set up in each pre-
cinct on the Island Anna
Maria City Hall, Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, St. Ber-
-nard Catholic Church and
Bradenton Beach City
Hall.
Children will vote,
from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.,
alongside adults at booths
manned by Kids Voting
volunteers, members of
the Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School Parent/
Teacher Organization.
Kids Voting election re-
sults will be tabulated and
conveyed to the media
and students.
Program sponsors be-
lieve election day 1994
will prove to be as suc-
cessful as election day
1992. The 1992 program
was an overwhelming
success. There was an in-
crease in the number of
adults voting and a very
high percentage of stu-
dent turnout.


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[IG PAGE 6 E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Picks and pans
The full text of our recommendations on races and is-
sues of local interest in the Nov. 8 general election appears
on page 14.
Please remember to vote.
We believe John McKay is the best choice for Florida
Senate.
Based on her record and experience, we endorse Julie
McClure. Although we've heard her endorse the DOT's plan
for a 65-foot bridge in the past, she said loud and clear at our
political forum that she would support a 45-foot drawbridge
to replace the Anna Maria Island Bridge at Manatee Avenue.
For what we believe will be a fine judicial temperament
we support Nancy Donnellan for circuit court judge.
For greater legal experience and community involve-
ment, we endorse Doug Henderson for county judge.
Based on her experience and knowledge, we endorse
Bemiece Scott for the district 1 school board seat. We be-
lieve Trumbull's experience within the school system sets
him apart as the more qualified candidate for the district 5
seat on the school board.
Due to his experience and knowledge of the area, we
endorse George Jackson for the Anna Maria Fire Control
Board. We hope Larry Tyler will lend his expertise to the
district now in the form of volunteerism and come back as
an even more qualified candidate in a future election.
Based on his long-standing knowledge of the Island and
the fire district, we endorse Marty Duytschaver for the Dis-
trict 4 seat of the Anna Maria Fire Control Board.
We believe the proposed changes are good, and recom-
mend approval of the Anna Maria Charter change.
We support Constitutional Amendment 1, changing
dates for the annual 60-day legislative session.
We support Constitutional Amendment 2 to limit rev-
enue collections.
We believe that Amendment 3 sets a bad precedent for
one group attempting to lure voters to endorse a plan to put
a competing group out of business particularly by means
of an amendment to our constitution. We strongly urge vot-
ers to cast a "no" vote against this bad amendment. An emi-
nent legal battle to overturn the passage of the amendment
will be costly for everyone as would be the buy-out over
many years of fishermen and fisheries and the economic de-
velopment of new fisheries for offshore fishing.
Single-issue constitutional changes should be continued.
We recommend voting against Amendment 4.
Amendment 8 would provide for 11 casinos in Florida.
We fear that casinos would beat condo developers to the
waterfront in Cortez (if the fisheries are indeed shut down
by amendment 3) and there could be no business more in-
appropriate to the shores of Manatee County. We urge a no
vote to the casino amendment.
Unfortunately, there is no spot on the ballot to cast a vote
against a 65-foot bridge to Anna Maria Island and no one to
elect to work zealously for the desires of the majority on
Anna Maria to that endeavor.
Please vote early and as often as the law allows.

ISLANDER M l 11
NOVEMBER 3, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 50
V Publisher and Editor


Bonner Presswood
7 Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Tingler
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


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By Egan


Annual Fishathon is for the kids
I wish to thank each and every donor who helped
make the Fishathon on Saturday, Oct. 15, successful.
I'm sorry but due to lack of space I could not name
each individual donor. I do thank you all from the bot-
tom of my heart. A big thanks from the children also.
God bless you all for the kids.
Robert E. DeVane, Chairman, VFW Post 8199

'Splinter' groups
no help to center
To Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger:
As an active supporter of more than 20 years of the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, I commend you
for showing interest in forming a support group for the
center.
While we are fortunate to now have the most pro-
ficient and compassionate administrative staff ever to
be employed by the center and an extremely dedicated
board of directors, we are always in need of volunteers
for the various on-going activities and fundraisers.
I would like to bring to your attention the fact that
on Monday, Oct. 18, a group of 15 volunteers met at
the center as a result of the SHARE program. I am cer-
tain anyone who showed up at your scheduled meeting
on Oct. 22 was welcome to join this already established
group of volunteers who know the needs and aims of
the center.
Why not work directly with the AMICC instead of
organizing a "splinter group?"
I also wish to inform you that the annual member-
ship fee for those over 55 is only $5 and $10 for those
under 55 not $25. However, the AMICC welcomes
volunteers on fixed incomes who find it easier to do-
nate their time and talents instead of money.
If you and your city council members are not al-
ready familiar with the many programs and activities
taking place at the center, I personally invite you to stop
by so that you do not duplicate efforts already under-
way.
By working together I believe the entire Island
community will benefit Thanks again for your inter-
est in helping the AMICC.
Marcia Powers, Anna Maria City


Signs should be posted
Editor's note: This letter is in response to the letter
of complaint published last week from the woman in-
jured by a stingray.
I have been to your city several times to enjoy the
serenity. On my last visit, I was struck on the side of
my vehicle by a powder-blue, late-model Cadillac
driven by a white-haired lady in her 80s.
My wife took me to the hospital in excruciating
pain from the injuries sustained. I am now unable to
work and support my family and my medical bills were
in excess of $60,000. I now have a fear of old ladies in
powder blue Cadillacs.
Your city should have posted signs on the road-
ways warning out-of-towners of the older drivers in
your city. Had those signs been posted I would never
have driven there.
Give it up. Do the fire ants in your back yard, the
neighbor's dog, wasps, black widow spiders or maybe
even bats cause you trauma also?
This is a vast marine environment and the waters have
many potentially dangerous creatures in it. When we
choose to enter that environment the potential is present
(however insignificant the odds) to possibly get stung.
The story of my accident is untrue, of course. I made
it up to make the point that to blame your one-in-500,000
or greater trauma on the idea that you weren't warned is
ridiculous. We certainly don't wish pain or injury on any-
one but, let's face it, you choose to be in the water.
Jim Taylor, Holmes Beach
Vote 'no' to Florida gambling
We have heard it all!
We were in New Jersey when they started the lot-
tery. We were still there when they started gambling
in Atlantic City.
We were in Florida when it began its lottery.
We have never seen one benefit or fiscal advan-
tage to any of the three promises of pots of gold. If
there are any, someone else is getting them, not us.
Vote no to gambling in Florida.
Eileen and Richard Suhre, Bradenton Beach
For more of Your Opinions,
see page 8


~~~~


4


v


-p


AV) 10 NIOTC













THOSE WERE I THE BAYS
Part 2, Sam and Annie Cobb
by June Alder


This palmetto shack, a replica of Sam and Annie Cobb's cookhouse, was once
the abode of Cobb relative "Uncle Ike," then a real estate office and a popular
subject for tourists' snapshots in the 1940s. The First Union Bank stands on the
site today.


ANNIE GET YOUR GUN


In the fall of 1895 Sam Cobb took his
ailing wife to Anna Maria Key for rest and
a change of scene. Annie's 5-year-old boy
Eddie, her firstborn, had died in Tampa of
typhoid fever, and she had nearly died of
it, too.
Anna Maria was a
wild, isolated place The last nan
then with only two or so scholar
homesteaders: lawyer little Island s
John R. Jones, either Cobb
watching it in his
newly built cottage at
mid-Key while his wife was still in
Tampa, and widower George Bean with
his four teen-aged children.
Jones, who had befriended Cobb in
Tampa, had arranged accommodations
for Annie and her two tots at the Bean
boarding house. It was a good-sized
place in a fine location on the sunny,
wind-swept north tip of the island where
Mazie and Louis Cobb could play in the
sand and Annie could sit under an um-
brella on the seashore with the soothing
sea water lapping at her toes.
Her hostess was 18-year-old Mamie
Bean who did all the cooking and clean-
ing for her father and 20-year-old
brother Will besides mothering Hal and
Edith, 16 and 14. (Their mother had died
of yellow fever in 1887.)
The two young women hit it off fa-
mously. Within three weeks Annie re-
gained her customary liveliness and de-
clared she wanted to make Anna Maria her
home. Mamie was delighted of course.
By year's end, with the help of the
Jones and Bean men folk, Sam had put
up a two-story house on the bayou just
north of the Jones property. In this house


ne
rs
sch
or


on May 1, 1897, another Cobb came
into the world a baby girl Annie
named Anna Maria. It was the first
birth of record on the Island.
Sam kept his job at a Tampa
boatyard for several
years, so Annie was
of the score on her own much of
at the first the time, her friend
tool was Mamie Bean having
Hall.left home to marry a
Salvation Army


evangelist.
Paying tribute to her mother years
later, Anna Maria wrote:
"Mama was a small-town girl from
New Jersey who had never before ex-
perienced anything like the life on the
island, never had hitched a horse to a
wagon or rowed a boat. But she soon
learned. With her .22 rifle she even
killed raccoons that attacked her chick-
ens and shot rats that invaded our
house. She was a very good shot -
I've seen her drill a rat racing along a
beam in our dining room. Papa was
always putting in new shingles because
of the bullet holes in the roof."
In accordance with her father's
deathbed request, in 1898 Mamie re-
turned to the homestead with husband
Wilbur Hall. The first night there
(Sept. 1) Wilbur, following directions
in one of his father-in-law's medical
manuals, delivered Mamie's second
child. Bertha's was the second re-
corded Island birth.
The two girls would spend their
childhood years together on the island,
attending the first little Island school
where the last name of the score or so
scholars was either Cobb or Hall.
In time the Cobbs became quite a
clan children and grandchildren,
uncles and aunts and cousins populat-
ing "Cobbs' Corners," where Gulf
Drive now turns southward in down-
town Holmes Beach. The only Cobbs
living hereabouts now are Dorothy
Raymond Whittaker of Holmes Beach,
a second cousin once-removed of
Anna Maria Cobb Riles (who died in
1992); and Margery Cobb of
Bradenton, widow of Louis M. "Hum-
bug" Cobb, a grandson of Samuel and
Annie and first cousin to Anna Maria.

Next: The Spanish
influence


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 7 I!



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We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year.
S It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
S Island. Over 875 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
S to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
S happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free locally. But if you don't live
here and you would like to subscribe, or if you want to mail the paper to a
friend or relative, please fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our
office with a check in the proper amount.
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S MAIL TO:
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* THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
. Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
UUU***UU**U**U*Ui U*U*i U***U*i *i iii *Uii ii*


Anna Maria Cobb Riles, 1969








JiG PAGE 8 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


9 e/ : //


Historical Society grateful to city
The following letter was sent to Anna Maria Mayor
Ray Simches and Commissioners in response to the
mayor's letter to the Anna Maria Island Hisorical Society:
I feel there is no reason for the city to be so alarmed
about the society's "takeover." The plans to change the
area near the museum were the ideas of Eatman and
Smith, the firm we hired to redesign the interior of the
museum. Emily Anne Smith explained to me if that the
outside changed, people driving by would know some-
thing was happening on the inside. We liked the new look,
but we knew from the start everything would have to be
approved by the board, the membership and the city.
The entire package was presented to the membership
at the last meeting to kick off the overall project. We
wanted people to get interested, enthused and enlist as
workers. It worked almost everyone attending volun-
teered. The board has unanimously approved the redesign-
ing of the interior of the museum as presented by Eatman
and Smith. We are ready and anxious to start as soon as
the police move to city hall, the lease is signed and build-


ing permit issued.
Several positive things have happened during the last
weeks. Interest in the museum has grown. More people
visited the museum recently than during all the summer
months. A man from England said he had to see the old
jail after reading all the controversy in the paper. The origi-
nal idea to restore the jail and ice house to the original look
was to qualify for a $50,000 grant and have both buildings
entered in the National Registry of Historic Places.
In closing, I would like to reiterate we want our
campaign program to raise funds and add artifacts to the
museum to be an upbeat experience for the entire Island.
We want everyone involved, pulling together as a team.
It is my hope that working on the museum will bring
residents of the three Island cities closer, proud of their
Island Historical Museum, in order that Anna Maria Island
heritage will be preserved for generations to come.
The Historical Society is very grateful to the City of
Anna Maria for providing the Historical Ice House (circa
1920) which serves as the museum.
Carolyne Norwood, President, Island Historical Society


Neglect kills not TV
I recently read an article about the murder of a five-
year-old girl in Norway. She was killed by her five- and
six-year-old playmates. The TV show, "The Mighty
Morphin Power Rangers," the article said, played a role
in her death. The show was quickly dropped from
broadcasts in Norway, Sweden and Denmark.
Yes, let's blame a TV show, then we can comfortably
go back to our lives, safe with the knowledge the "bad
show" won't be on. Therefore, the children will be safe.
How insane! The TV show isn't to blame, the adults are.
And not because they allowed their children to watch TV,
but because TV is all the children have. The "Power Rang-
ers" are their role models.
What children need are real-life role models. They
need responsible adults to spend time with them. The role
model can be a parent, grandparent, older sibling, teacher,
coach, or neighbor or anyone who cares about the child.
Until today's children have real-life role models, they
will look to TV for them. And that is a truly scary thought!
Lisa Rivera, Anna Maria


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on page 19 in this issue. You could be the winner of $50!


Do You Want

Experience

Action and
THE
Integrity!! DEMOCRATIC
Integrty .. PARTY
(Chiles accepts no more than
$100 in campaign contributions)
OR
Do You Want Inexperience, Promises,
and a Family Name????


CHILES ACCOMPLISHMENTS BU
* CRACKING DOWN ON CRIME
~ 28,000 more prison cells
~More prison time served
~ New juvenile justice measures
~ Deported alien criminals
* FLORIDA LEADS IN NEW JOBS
~ Enterprise Florida program working
-~ Reformed Workers' Compensation
* CUTTING BILLIONS IN
GOVERNMENT WASTE
~ Merged Six State Agencies into Three
-~ Saved $2.7 billion in State Budget
~ Slowed growth in State spending
* ACHIEVED BETTER AND
SAFER SCHOOLS
~ Local school Advisory Councils
~ Youth Crime Watch Program
* CREATED MODEL FOR
NATIONAL HEALTH
~ Community Health Purchasing Alliance
~ Healthy Start for Kids
* FORCED NEW NATIONAL
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 9 iE

City ties approval of museum fix-up to lease signing


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Before the Anna Maria Island Historical Society
can lay down chalk lines for planned interior renova-
tions at its Pine Avenue museum, the City of Anna
Maria wants the not-for-profit organization to sign on
the dotted line.
City Commissioner Dottie McChesney has con-
vinced fellow commissioners that as the owner of the
building, the city has certain responsibilities. To be
prudent, McChesney said, no modification to the build-
ing should be done until the city has a lease in hand
signed by both parties.
Although the city's planning and zoning board said
last week that the Society's plans for interior remodel-
ing could be solely approved by the city's building in-
spector, Bill Zimmerman, that advisory board was look-
ing at the question primarily from the standpoint of com-
pliance with municipal building and zoning codes. When
the subject came up at the city commission's Oct. 25 regu-
lar meeting, McChesney approached the matter as a con-
tract issue between landlord and tenant after Zimmerman
asked the commission for a firm statement of approval for
the Society to proceed.
"I would like the city commission to give a formal
motion that the interior renovations the interior only
- are in fact approved," Zimmerman said, "not be-
cause it's a question of planning and zoning, but be-
cause it is a city building."
A motion was made and there was some confusion
among the commissioners as to just how it should be
worded.
"The motion should be that the city commission is
giving permission for interior renovations,"
Zimmerman stated. "That's all."
Well, that wasn't quite all.
"I don't think we should allow any changes inside
there unless we have a lease agreement," McChesney


said. "Why should we allow people to redo the inside
of a city building when there's no legal lease yet?"
The Society, which is renting the building for a
dollar a year without a written agreement, is currently
negotiating the terms of a lease with the city. Vice
Mayor Max Znika who has been meeting with So-
ciety President Carolyne Norwood says a proposed
lease will be discussed during the commission's Nov.
15 work session meeting.
"I just think we should approve the lease before we
approve any plans," McChesney said.
"Well, they (the Historical Society) have been
there two years I trust they're going to stay there,"
City Commissioner Doug Wolfe said. "I believe the


City of Anna Maria can trust the Historical Society to
go ahead and start some of the..."
"Ha!" interjected McChesney. "Excuse me for
laughing, but after their presentation (on Oct. 17) I
would not go along with that statement They may have
far-reaching ideas for the property, and I think we
should definitely see what they plan to do with the in-
side of that building."
After further discussion and several restatements of
the original motion, the commission agreed by a 4-0
vote that the Society's proposed plans for interior reno-
vations of the museum will be approved as submitted
contingent upon the signing of a lease. Mayor Ray
Simches was not present at the meeting.
'Vanishing
Culture'
Cortez artist/historian
Wayne Nield presents a
S. special exhibit at his
j. 'studio, 4508 124th St. W.,
S"in Cortez. The exhibit,
"Vanishing Culture:
Images and Voices of
Cortez Fishing Folk," is
sponsored by the Florida
Institute for Saltwater
Heritage, Florida Hu-
manities Council with
additional support from
the Library of Congress
"American Folklife Center.
The exhibit may be seen
daily through Tuesday,
Nov. 8, from 4 to 6 p.m.
Information: 795-4596.


Islander photo courtesy of Betsy Reed


PRAISE


WITHOUT


uSI

Subscribe to
The Islander
Bystander.
Over 900 Island-
lovers are already
on our out-of-
town list. It's the
best news on
Anna Maria
Island!
Use the
subscription
form on page 7
of this issue.

ISLANDER


Anna Maria, your new island bank

opened just in time for the holidays,

and you've been very, very good this year.


"iFL di


'Sr


Reward yourself. With our new Holmes Beach address, there's suddenly
a lot less standing between you and very personal, independent banking.


Make 1995 the greatest year ever, and join us at
your new island bank.
The officers and directors of First National Bank
of Manatee are lined up behind the commitment to
serve the island community with the same devotion
to highly-personal and gracious service that has
made locally-owned First National so successful
in Manatee County since 1986.


Glen W. Fausset John J. Ogilby
President President
P Col-Lee Groves, Inc
p f?


Francis I."Rip" duPont, III
Chairman & C.E.O. Beverly Beall
Beall'v Depaitment Stores
-.,I


Dr. Wm. J. Thompson/ Allen J. Butler Stephen Korcheck
Robert G. Blalock Orthodontst / Preident / Pre rent
Blalock. Landers, H Bultd r Fo o,twnear I n / Manatee C o.,,,,unity Colle
Walters, & agler, PA. William Nowak Raymond A. Weigel, III
Ad -i ',trator President
ttCA L W Blake ,Ho ptal CLB Consuhnng, InI


Now we are proud to be a caring, dedicated citizen
of Anna Maria Island. It's these special attitudes and
loyalties among island residents that make the island
itself so very, very good, year after year.





rD

First Nationa01


Member FDIC
s, As Independent As The Island Itself.


First National Bank of Manatee 5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 (813) 778-4900 Susan O'Connor, Manager
Main Office: 5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton, Florida 34209 (813) 794-6969


'dmw









[]! PAGE 10 E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

AutmnDI rn


Beach activity debate


continues Thursday in


Bradenton Beach


F OPEN
Wed-Sat 11:30-5
Sun. Noon-5
(Also open by
Appointment)
CALL A


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Susan O'Connor
Branch Manager


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announces the opening of our full-service
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Pa rri,ia




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Dedicated to Achieving The
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Patricia Petruff, Democrat


Just what SHOULD be allowed to take place on
the beach?
That question may be answered Thursday, as
Bradenton Beach Council members continue to
wrestle with changes to the city's land development
code, including beach activities and a fee schedule.
In the wake of two public hearings on the 30-plus
pages of modifications drafted by City Planner Bill
Brisson, council members are expected to vote on the
issue at the regular city council meeting Nov. 3.
Among the proposed changes to the city's laws are
modifications permitting limited rental of sailboats and
personal watercraft such as Jet-skis as well as beach
chairs, umbrellas and other beach-related supplies.
Beach-related activities have been a particularly hot
issue in the city. Two businesses began renting Jet-skis
earlier this year. Then-Building Official Joe Romano
determined they were in violation of city codes. The busi-
nesses appealed: one case was later dismissed by current
Building Official Whitey Moran; the other case went to
the city's code enforcement board, which determined the
business could continue to operate until Sept. 30, 1994,
then would have to seek special exception permission
from city land use laws.
The proposed changes to the land use laws allow
rental of motorized boats or watercraft with 12 special
conditions. The conditions are very strict, including no
refueling of Jet-skis on site at all, no gasoline storage
on site at all, markings visible from at least 100 yards
identifying the vessel as a rental boat, and a provision
of one parking space be available for every two rental
boats permitted.
All rental of boats may also only take place at
commercially zoned property.
Another issue to be addressed are fees for con-
struction. Bradenton Beach has no established fees for
a variety of land-use changes and instead relies on an
informal arrangement for amendments to the compre-
hensive plan or the land development code.
City officials also utilize the services of City Plan-


ner Brisson on a developer-pay basis: if a large devel-
opment was proposed, the developer would pay for the
services Brisson provides in writing code changes or
other planning needs.
Some residents have questioned that practice, stat-
ing that the city planner should not be paid by the de-
veloper for recommending changes in the city.
If approved by the city council, Brisson's services
will now be paid by the city. Fees will be assessed
against the developer to offset the charges.
The proposed fee schedule includes:
Citizen-initiated comprehensive plan amendment, $2,500
Citizen-initiated small comp plan amendment, $1,500
Citizen-initiated property rezoning, $1,000
Citizen-initiated land development amendment, $500
Minor development application (residential), $150
Minor development application (non-residential), $250
Major development application, $2,000
Major development plus comp plan amendment, $3,500
Major development plus rezoning, $2,750
Variance, $150
Tree removal, $25
Developers must also meet the public meeting re-
quirements and pay for those costs, including advertis-
ing, under the proposed new fee schedule.
The proposed changes also reflect:
Inclusion of home occupation licenses within the
code.
Amendments to the code to limit fence height and
setbacks.
A rule that any enlargement of floor area in an
existing building will require the entire building to
meet the requirements of a new development in regard
to landscaping and vehicular use.
Inclusion of Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District requirements for stormwater retention
and treatment for developments.
The city's planning and zoning board recom-
mended approval of the changes in the land develop-
ment codes.


Survey will identify Island needs, issues


Dates have been set for a survey to assess the
needs of Islanders in various age groups. The survey
is being sponsored by the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center.
The purpose of the assessment is to determine the
needs of the Island's residents and to identify the three
most pressing needs in five age categories 0-12,
13-18, 19-35, 36-60 and 61 and older. The goal of the
assessment is to resolve these identified needs.
The timetable for the assessment is as follows:
October the steering committee will define is-
sues for the survey.
November survey forms will be compiled.
December interviewers will be selected and
trained. The sample interview population will be iden-
tified.
January the survey will be printed and door-
to-door interviews will begin.
February interview data will be input into


County

responsible for

park maintenance
Homes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger
has discovered that the county is responsible for
maintenance of the city's tennis and basketball
courts and rest rooms off 62nd Street.
"I found an agreement with the county
signed 19 years ago," said Bohnenberger. "They
are responsible for the maintenance and utility
bills. All we're responsible for is the mainte-
nance of the baseball field."
Bohnenberger said he will pursue the issue
with the county and if the county does not want to
maintain the recreation area, it can reimburse the
city for doing so.


computers and analyzed.
March The steering committee will determine
action necessary to resolve identified needs.
The Needs Assessment Steering Committee, made
up of residents from the three island cities as well as
teen representatives, met recently to define a list of is-
sues to be used on survey forms. These will include
questions about chemical dependency, counseling and
social services, stress, family life, disease, public health
services, medical care, after school care, day care, preg-
nancy, parenting skills, public transportation, personal
safety, abuse, crime victimization, juvenile problems,
urban maintenance, educational opportunities, library
materials, physical fitness, educational resources, di-
saster education, suicide, bicycle paths, cultural re-
sources and recreational activities.
The committee will meet again on Dec. 5 to final-
ize the list.

New season
The Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and
Chorus, Inc., rehearsals for the 1994-95 season are
being held on Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon, at the
Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria, in
the Fellowship Hall and the Bayless building.
Singers who wish to participate should join by
Tuesday, Nov. 15. Formal auditioning is not required,
but some music and choral experience is helpful. Al-
tos who wish to sing tenor may join, too.
Concerts will be held on Sundays, Nov. 20, Jan. 29,
March 12 and April 30, from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Choral parts include Vivaldi's Magnificat and
Bach's Cantata No. 55. The orchestra will play Sym-
phony No. 6 by Mozart, Organ Concert No. 13 by
Handel, Flute Concert by Boccherini and various
works by Bolzoni, Rameau, Nardini and Telemann.
The Anna Maria Island Community Orchestra and
Chorus conductor is Alfred Gershfeld and choral master
is Elizabeth Bharucha. For information call 778-6517.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m NOVEMBER 3, 1994 W PAGE 11 Iij


Island Turtle Watch concludes

another successful season


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The 1994 loggerhead sea turtle nesting season
ended last week as the last of the eggs hatched and
Turtle Number 12,145 crawled off into the sunset surf.
Of 13,074 eggs that
were laid, 93 percent
hatched and were released
in the nearly-nightly ritual '.
that drew crowds of curious ,
onlookers throughout the
summer and into the early .
fall.
"I think it was good,"
Turtle Watch Director
Chuck Shumard character-
ized the success of this
year's turtle season. "Last
year we had 16,651 eggs
with 14,791 hatchlings, but
we knew we got a number
of turtles from Longboat." '
Shumard explained that
Longboat Key's beach
renourishment project last
year drove some mother
turtles north to the Island, ::
therefore last year's figures .. ,
were not really valid in de- .
termining whether local
nesting-turtle populations
are increasing.
"So I like to compare
1994 with 1992, which was
before the beach
renourishment," Shumard
says. "In 1992 we had
11,311 eggs and released.
7,668 hatchlings."
Not only did the Turtle
Watch score successes in
numbers this season, but
the health of the hatchlings appears to have been bet-
ter. Last year some anomalies were seen albino
turtles and hatchlings with only three flippers but
this year nothing like was noted.
"I think those (last year's anomalies) were partly
due to our ignorance, so to speak, because we weren't
aware that we had to relocate our hatcheries in rotations
of every two years, or three years at the outside,"
Shumard says. "Otherwise the sand gets contaminated
and it will affect the baby turtles.
"Several years ago we had a lot of blind turtles and
we couldn't figure out what the heck we did wrong,"
Shumard says. The Turtle Watch has since learned that
eggs should not be buried for incubation in the same
place year after year, and that the sand will cleanse it-
self in about a year if left alone.
Shumard says the Turtle Watch has approximately
60 members, but beyond walking the beaches every
morning looking for "crawls" the tell-tale tracks
leading to and from that water that may indicate eggs
have been laid overnight the organization also plays
an important role in educating the public about the pro-
tected species and what can be done to help the crea-
tures.
"This year we got a lot of cooperation from the
public," Shumard says, noting that folks seem to be
getting the message he delivers every evening before
the day's hatchlings are released.
"I think my talk gets a little boring for the people


who've already heard it, but I do think it's getting a
message across and people are much more aware,"
Shumard says.
Among some of the information Shumard imparts
about loggerhead sea turtles during his talks are these
facts:


moved.
"If they're in a protected area, we'll leave them.
That's up in the sea oats where people don't walk and
high tide can't get them. We'll mark them with a
sign."
Look but don't touch! Shumard warns that
no one should molest a sea turtle, its eggs or its nest With
the federal endangered species protection comes some
stiff penalties for people who may be tempted to take one
of these creatures home or even pick one up. A fine
of up to $10,000 per occurrence can be levied, and prison
time is also a possibility for violators.
Should you see anyone appearing to bother a sea
turtle or its nest, call Shumard at 778-1156. If you
forget the number, simply call the Manatee County
sheriff s office and they will get in touch with the
Turtle Watch.
Keep turtles in the dark. Turtle hatchlings will
tend to crawl toward light rather than where they
should be going the open sea.
"Lights on the beach need to be dimmed or turned
out at a certain hour during nesting season," Shumard
said, explaining the intent of an ordinance he introduced
and got passed by the Anna Maria City Commission this
past summer. "We've had real good cooperation with
our requests for homeowners to turn down their lights,
but we felt we needed a backup just in case someone says
they won't turn them off. Then we could get the police
to make sure they get turned off."


Heritage Days to be held in November


The Fifth Annual Heritage Days Festival of Arts
and Crafts Show co-sponsored by the Artists Guild of
Anna Maria Island and the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center will be held Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12
and 13, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the AMICC, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Admission to the show is free and will feature more
than 80 artists' booths, a boutique with treasures from
the past and present, a raffle, food vendors including
natural foods for special diets, cotton candy, dipped
apples and balloons for the kids.
"In the Mood," a 1940s style USO variety musical


show featuring the Sophisticates, a 17-piece orches-
tra, will be Friday, Nov. 8, at 8 p.m. Come in 1940s
dress. Prizes will be awarded for best costumes. Tick-
ets are $5 for adults, $2 for students, and available at
the Artists Guild Gallery, Holmes Beach Shopping
Center.
A Children's Galleria for Island children will be
held on Monday, Nov.14, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., with fun
hands-on art projects with guidance from professional
artists and teachers.
For more information or for show tickets call the
Guild at 778-6694 or AMICC at 778-1908.


Although there is
no hard evidence, many be-
lieve the greater number of
turtle eggs shows that more
turtles are living to maturity
- one of the goals of the
endangered species protec-
tion the turtles enjoy.
"I think what is be-
ing done now is starting to
pay off," Shumard says.
"We've been in the pro-
gram since 1981, and we
think that some of the
turtles we released back
then are now egg-bearing
and coming back. They
could be egg-bearing after
eight to 10 years, so we
think we're starting to get
some of ours back along
with others."
In years past,
about one-percent of baby
turtles survived, but now
the estimate is up to two-
and-a-half percent. About
one in 1,000 turtles reaches
maturity.
A somewhat differ-
ent approach to protecting
the eggs is being applied
now, Shumard says. Instead
of relocating all turtle nests
to a hatchery, only those
which may be in danger are


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II PAGE 12 E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Aubry to design Florida's university of future


* Noted Island architect
studies future renovations of
Van Wezel in Sarasota, too
By David Futch
Islander Reporter
Gene Aubry of Anna Maria Island believes Florida
Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers will look like no
other university in the state.
Aubry should know. He's designing the newest
school in the state university system.
Gulf Coast will be born of its surroundings, ac-
cording to the design director for the $25 million
project.
The architect envisions the school's first phase
being built with material available on the 760-acre site,
a former limerock quarry near the old Fort Myers Air-
port south of downtown.
Buildings will be fashioned from the dense, white
rock that composes Florida's underground.
And unlike any other state college, palmettos and
slash pines will be left alone and the university will be
carved out around them.
A selection board for the Florida Board of Regents
chose Aubry and his firm Pierce Goodwin Alexander
& Linville, Florida Inc., over 30 applicants from
around the country.
Awarded the contract Friday, Aubry said PGAL
will have conceptual designs ready by the end of De-
cember.
PGAL is headquartered in Houston with offices in
Tampa, Orlando and Anna Maria. Aubry said he ex-
pects to open an office in Fort Myers by December and
will share design responsibilities with an international
firm, Post, Buckley, Schuh and Jernigan.
"I have no pre-conceived notions of what it will
look like aesthetically," Aubry said. "We would like
the buildings to look as if they've always been there
and in a place where we're not going to change any of
the landscape. We're not going to be mowing any
lawns."
Aubry, an internationally known designer of mu-
sic halls and libraries, says he has his hands full.
Gulf Coast is scheduled to open in late 1997, and
the four main buildings must be completed months
before that target date, he said.
Because the completion date is so near, Aubry said
he sees the school beginning with two-story structures
housing two classrooms, a library and a student union.
Administrative offices will be in the library until
that too is expanded and administration is shifted to a
new home.
Although no gymnasium or ball fields are planned
for the first phase, there remains plenty of room for ex-


pension.
"I think the unique
thing about this school is
that its new president, Dr.
Roy E. McTarnaghan,
wants an electronic univer-
sity that gives many people
access," Aubry said. "It's
likely there will be many ab-
sentee students using com-
puters to tap into the school.
It will be computerized like
nothing you've ever seen."
A school of virtual real-
ity?
"Anything is possible
with this school," he said.
"People should be able to
tap into it right from their
home."
Library design alone
will allow students to use
computer E-mail to draw
from banks of computerized
information stored in main-
frames.
"Architecture is all
about being honest and hav-
ing no pre-conceived no-
tions," Aubry said. "What I
want to do is set a precedent
with this university."
PGAL has designated


'We would

the building

look as if

they've

always beei

there and ii

place when

we're not g

to change a

of the land-

scape. We'r

going to be

mowing an

lawns.'


New
B1commissions,
new
challenges
Island architect Gene
Aubry faces a pair of
high-profile challenges:
designing the new
Florida Gulf Coast
University near Ft.
Myers, and developing
a plan to allow for
expansion ofSarasota's
Van Wezel Performing
Arts Hall without chang-
. 1 ing the original Frank
Lloyd Wright design.
Islander Photo:
David Futch.


15 people to work on the project with four chief archi-
tects who will take responsibility as "captains" for each
of the four buildings to be built.
Aubry exemplifies his own diversity in architec-
ture with his appointment to conduct a charrette for the
City of Sarasota on the future of the Van Wezel Per-
forming Arts Hall, the 25-year-old jewel of Sarasota on
the bayfront.
Aubry just recently completed the charrette, a se-
ries of think-tank type meetings to develop new designs
for the expansion of the hall and will present a 50-page
study to Van Wezel and the City of
li* Sarasota, owners of the purple scal-
lik~e loped-shaped center, and list rec-
ommendations for change.
gs to Aubry assembled designers
of music centers from around the
country at the hall to meet and col-
lect input from Van Wezel user
groups. The intense study took two
days to come up with a list of reno-
vations and recommendations.
n Originally designed by Will-
iam Wesley Peters of the Talliasean
ft a Group of Scottsdale, Ariz., the Van
Wezel is outdated and needs the ad-
ditions to bring in the more grandi-
-' ose plays and musicals that now
won't fit on its small stage.
going Peters was Frank Lloyd
Wright's right-hand man, oversee-
Vny ing many of the projects whose gen-
esis occurred at Wright's retreat in
the red hills outside Scottsdale.
For those concerned about
what Aubry and others would like
Ae not the hall to become, no need to
worry.


Y


According to Aubry, alter-
ations will be subtle while still be-
ing able to accommodate compli-
cated set designs that give the audi-
ence a better venue with respect to
sight, sound and staging.


Initial costs will be in the $5 million range and
Aubry said the money could be raised through an or-


ganized fund
drive.
Renovation
is expected to in-
clude a new air-
conditioning sys-
tem, lighting and
sound, perhaps a
new glass-en-
closed foyer on
the back of the
building and,
most impor-
tantly, expansion
of the stage.
Aubry, a fel-
low in the
American Insti-
tute of Archi-
tects, designed
the Naples Phil-


'We're not try-

ing to add

bells and

whistles. We

want to make

Van Wezel

more func-

tional.'


harmonic and the
Wortham Theater Center in Houston.
He and his associates also are planning design
changes that will better accommodate the physically
impaired.
There is talk of building a 250-seat rehearsal hall,
he said, a project that could cost millions more.
Plans call for more than doubling the size of the
stage in order that modern, touring shows can give
patrons the feel of seeing a Broadway show in all its
glory.
"The Van Wezel cannot handle the road shows that
bring their own stage, sound and lights, mirrors and
smoke and on and on. If they do come, a lot of the set
and equipment is left on the trucks because the stage
can't handle it.
"We're not talking about renovation that can
handle something like 'Phantom of the Opera' but
changes that could handle something like 'The Wiz.'
We're not trying to add bells and whistles. We want to
make Van Wezel more functional."


- - I - I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 13 E





NANCY


DONNELLAN

.I Mi .FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE


S&e


DONNELLAN OPPONENT


- Former Prosecutor YES NO
> Prosecuted Hundreds of Cases YES NO
> Nationally Certified Civil Trial Advocate YES NO
> Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney YES NO
> 15 Years of Trial Experience YES NO


EDOR D ;
Fraternal Order of Police District 13
5,500 + members
International Association of Firefighters Local 3508
American Association of University Women
Bradenton Chapter
American Association of University Women
Sarasota Chapter
Suncoast Women's Political Caucus


"Because she has a proven record of convicting criminals. ."
Fraternal Order of Police
"Board Certified attorneys possess special knowledge, skill and proficiency
in their areas of practice. Certification is the highest level of recognition by
the Florida Bar concerning the competency and learning of attorneys in
the areas for which it is approved by the Florida Supreme Court."
Florida Bar
Pd. Pol. Ad. Campaign Account of Nancy K. Donnellan.


Remember to exercise your right to vote on November 8. Every vote counts.
A message from The Islander Bystander.


Julie McClure. Because a Promise Worth


Making is a Promise Worth Keeping.

Julie McClure is an effective voice in the Legislature because she hears the concerns of Manatee County and keeps the
promises she makes. Her record speaks for itself...


Fighting Crime...
* House sponsor of the STOP (Stop Turning Out
Prisoners) bill at request of the Sheriff's Association.
* Passed a strong juvenile justice bill which keeps repeat
offenders in custody and holds delinquents and their
parents accountable for their actions.
* Fulfilled her promise to make convicts serve longer
portions of their sentences.
* Law enforcement officials support McClure because
of her strong commitment to making our streets and
neighborhoods safer.
Managing Water...
* Created a Water Management Review Commission to
rein in appointed SWFMD bureaucrats. SWFMD has
increased its budget by 400% in ten years.


Pd Pl M.oadfo y b Tl eM~lr Cmaio Dmcrt


Stopping Government Waste...
* Passed a law requiring performance based funding for
state agencies. If state bureaucracies can't, or won't,
get the job done effectively, their funds will be cut off.
* Supports reform which limits the time a person can
spend on welfare and encourages welfare recipients
to get a job.
Improving Our Schools...
* Fought, and will fight, to make sure Manatee County
gets its fair share of state dollars for our schools.
State funding for Manatee's schools is up $15.6
million from two years ago.


Nov. 8, Vote for Julie McClure.

She Keeps Her Promises.


TRIAL EXPERIENCE


JUICALQALIIATN.


Endorsed By: Fed. of Mobile Home Owners Association
* Fraternal Order of Police Florida Teaching Profession
* Florida Police Benevolent Association Southwest Florida Police Benevolent
* Florida Sheriffs' Committee for Association
Good Government *Florida Association of CPAs
* Manatee Education Association *Manatee Board of Realtors


juite
se
P.du l d.pi o yteJl


e McClure Campaign, Democrat.


7(t6.


Wei








li PAGE 14 I NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Islander Bystander political picks,


pans for Nov. 8 ballot


The Islander Bystander makes the following
recommendations on races and issues of local
interest in the Nov. 8 general election.
Please remember to vote.

Florida Senate District 26
Incumbent Republican John McKay is facing op-
position from Democrat Robert Hertig for the Florida
Senate District 26 seat. In the Senate, seniority is ev-
erything, but even with only a few years under his belt
McKay has proven to be a key player in education and
juvenile justice reform.
Although we don't approve of McKay's stance on
some environmental issues, particularly his assistance in
gutting state mangrove pruning laws, we believe he is the
best choice and endorse John McKay for Florida Senate.

Florida House of
Representatives, District 68
Incumbent Democrat Julie McClure is facing Re-
publican challenger Mark Flanagan for the District 68
seat of the Florida House.
In her two years in office, McClure has worked to
maintain order among the county's fire districts. She
has also been effective state-wide on issues such as
education, crime and welfare.
Flanagan is proposing fiscal responsibility in state
government, but is vague on specifics.
McClure has been reluctant to offer much aid to
Islanders in the fight to halt construction of the pro-
posed 65-foot, fixed-span bridge to replace the Anna
Maria Island Bridge. Flanagan has said he would side
with Islanders who oppose the "mega-bridge" but has
no ideas for how he would go about enacting a change.
Both favor the constitutional amendment banning
gill and entanglement nets for fishing in Florida waters,
despite the fact that District 68 includes the village of
Cortez an area that would be adversely impacted if
the amendment passes.
We are sorely disappointed that Flanagan and
McClure, a member of the legislature, both recognize
that the net ban should not be a constitutional amend-
ment but will vote for it anyway.
Flanagan managed to do some homework on the
Island's bridge issue but his limited campaign rhetoric
is rehearsed and lacking in background and substance.
Based on her record and experience, we endorse
Julie McClure.

12th Judicial Circuit Court
Nancy Donnellan and Ed Ford are both vying for
this vacant circuit court judgeship.
Both candidates serve in a number of judicial and
community organizations. However, we believe
Donnellan to be the best choice for election due to her
extensive educational background, court and legal ex-
perience and her temperament and endorse Nancy
Donnellan for circuit court judge.

County Judge, Group 2
Doug Henderson and Rebecca Little are both seek-
ing election to this vacant county judge seat.
Henderson has a varied background and 12 years
experience in the legal profession, serving as an assis-
tant state attorney and working in private practice.
Little has also worked in the public sector five years
and a private practice for one year.
Based on his experience and community service,
we endorse Doug Henderson for county judge.

School Board, District 1
Democrat Berniece Scott and Republican Chuck
Wilhoit are both seeking election to the school board
representing district 1.
Wilhoit is employed in the Manatee School system
in a non-instructional capacity; Scott has an extensive
background in administration and child-advocacy.
Based on her experience and knowledge, we en-
dorse Berniece Scott for the district 1 school board
seat.


School Board, District 3
Independent Joyce Morange, Democrat Patricia
Petruff and Republican Larry Simmons are all seeking
election to the school board district 3 seat.
Simmons has more than 31 years experience in the
school system; Petruff is an attorney and former
teacher; Morange has worked in drug and alcohol re-
habilitation centers in Central America.
We believe Petruff's varied background, legal ex-
pertise and community involvement will be an asset to
the school board, and endorse Patricia Petruff for
school board.

School Board, District 5
Republican Joe Miller is facing Democrat Leon
Trumbull for the district 5 seat on the school board.
Miller has an extensive background in administra-
tion within Manatee County, serving as the director of
the parks and recreation system. Trumbull retired from
his position as a guidance counselor with the Manatee
County school system.
We believe Trumbull's experience with the school
system sets him apart as the more qualified candidate,
and endorse Leon Trumbull for school board.

Anna Maria Fire Control District 3
George Jackson and Deborah Marks are both seek-
ing election to the District 3 seat on the Anna Maria
Fire Control Board.
Jackson, the incumbent, was named to the board to
fill an unexpired term. He is a firefighter/paramedic
with the City of Sarasota. Marks, a planner with the
City of Sarasota, has sought the office before unsuc-
cessfully.
Although Marks would bring planning expertise to
the board and has pledged to help develop long-range
goals for the district, Jackson brings day-to-day expe-
rience from a larger fire department to the district,
which includes the Island and Cortez.
Due to his experience and knowledge of the area,
we endorse George Jackson for the Anna Maria Fire
Control Board.

Anna Maria Fire Control District 4
Marty Duytschaver and Larry Tyler are both vying
for the District 4 seat on the Anna Maria Fire Control
Board.
Duytschaver is a long-time Island resident and re-
tail merchant who has served as a volunteer for the dis-
trict. Tyler, an ice cream shop owner, is from Cortez
and brings firefighting budget experience from a Wis-
consin city as a contribution to the district.
Based on his long-standing knowledge of the Is-
land and the fire district, we endorse Marty
Duytschaver for the District 4 seat of the Anna Maria
Fire Control Board. We hope Tyler will lend expertise
as a volunteer and run again in the future.

Anna Maria City charter
amendment
Anna Maria City voters will have a decision to
make whether to amend the charter to provide the
mayor with more authority as well as a host of other
modifications.
Most of the additional mayoral authority comes
with the concurrence of the commission. If approved,
the mayor may also have greater latitude in emergency
spending. All of the changes have been recommended
by the city's charter review committee.
We believe the proposed changes are good, and
recommend approval of the Anna Maria Charter
Amendment.

Constitutional Amendment 1,
Legislative Session
This amendment would call for the Florida legis-
lature to begin the 60-day regular session in March.
The change will provide more time for the state bud-
get to be incorporated within local budgets.
We support Amendment 1.


Constitutional Amendment 2,
Limitation of Revenue
Collections
This amendment would limit state revenue collec-
tions to the previous year's collections plus the increase
of personal income based on the previous five years.
Excess collections would be deposited in a special fund
and would be refunded to taxpayers. The legislature
may increase the limit by a 2/3 vote.
We believe this is a good step toward limiting state
revenue collections and endorse Amendment 2.

Constitutional Amendment 3, Net
Fishing Limitation
This amendment would prohibit commercial fish-
ing with gill and entanglement nets in nearshore and
inshore state waters, and limit the size of all other types
of nets.
Amendment 3 has become the focus of an intense
controversy between commercial and recreational fish-
ers. Placed on the ballot by sportsfishermen under the
guise of protecting sealife, the Florida Conservation
Association has argued that only such a total ban on
commercial fishing harvests will restore depleted fish
stocks.
Commercial fishers response that shoreline devel-
opment, including dredge-and-fill activities and
stormwater run-off, has destroyed marine habitat and
contributes to fishery loss is acknowledged by marine
scientists as the major cause for depletion of fish
stocks. Recreational fishing overharvest has also con-
tributed to declines in some species.
The amendment, commercial fishers say, takes the
role of fishery management out of scientific realms and
places it before the voters as a popularity contest be-
tween the more than 1 million recreational fishers ver-
sus 7,000 commercial netters.
We do not believe that the "right to fish" deserves
to become a part of our state constitution.
We believe that Amendment 3 sets a bad precedent
for one group attempting to lure voters to endorse a
plan to put a competing group out of business par-
ticularly by means of an amendment to our constitu-
tion. We strongly urge voters to cast a "no" vote
against this bad amendment.

Amendment 4, Multiple
Constitutional Amendment
This amendment would change the current practice
of having constitutional changes be single-issue to al-
lowing multiple-subjects to be incorporated in one
question.
We believe this proposal would be a bad move.
Unrelated issues some good, some bad could be
lumped together in a single amendment. The fact that
some of the larger lobbying interests in Florida are
backing this proposal also makes us question its viabil-
ity.
Single-issue constitutional changes should be con-
tinued. We recommend voting against this Amend-
ment 4.

Amendment 8, Casino Gambling
This amendment would provide limited casino
gambling facilities in the state. If approved, 11 casinos
would be established in the state, with limited-size ca-
sinos permitted at each pari-mutuel facility, including
the Sarasota Kennel Club.
Proponents say existing, non-regulated casino
gambling takes place in the state now at Seminole In-
dian and cruise boat operations.
Opponents point to increased organized crime ac-
tivity in Florida if the casinos are permitted.
Voters have rejected casino gambling in Florida
several times in the past few years.
We fear that casinos would beat condo developers
to the waterfront in Cortez (if the fisheries are indeed
shut down by amendment 3) and there could be no
business more inappropriate to the shores of Manatee
County. We urge a no vote to the casino amendment.


DON'T FORGET TO VOTE TUESDAY, NOV. 8!






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 15 Pl2]

Election Day blues: what half the candidates

will face next Wednesday morning


By Katharine Wight
Islander School Correspondent
I'm going to invent a board game.
Oh, it's not going to be the typical Scrabble or
Monopoly board game that makes you think. It's going
to be a game of luck, because that's exactly what elec-
tions are like.
My game will be called On the Path to Becoming
a Middle School President. It will help you discover the
joy of victory and the bitterness of defeat without ever
having to leave the comfort of your home. A fine alter-
native to attending middle school I might add.
You will roll the dice and move your game piece
the appropriate amount of squares around the board and
follow the guides and phrases printed on them, such as:
Decide to run for school president and fill out
an application. Get seconds on dessert from your


proud parents.
Forget to write your speech until five minutes
before you go on stage. You must im-
provise and wind up sounding like an
idiot.


barrassed for two hours.
My game can end one of two ways:
You can rejoice in the glory of win-
ning or console yourself with second place.
But there's only one way to find out call


Put up your posters in the school 1-800-WIN-OR-LOSE and purchase me
hallway before the glue dries. Stay after, game for a low, low introductory offer of just
school to scrub the dribbles of glitter $129.95.
rivulets from the wall. vr a Believe it or not this is a good deal for
Twenty people return the survey / virtual reality. And if you act quickly, you
you hand out asking for suggestions on could receive your game board in color!
how to improve the school. But eighteen So what are you waiting for? Order
of the replies are obscene. Treat yourself today! I need to build up my college funds.
to a fifteen minute nap. Katharine Wight
Discover the large portrait of you Islander Katharine Wight is a 13-year-old
proudly displayed on your campaign poster now has a eighth grade student at King Middle School in
large purple mustache. Hide in your room, deeply em- Bradenton.


ELECT


Larry Tyler, Jr.


Anna Maria
Fire

Commissioner
SEAT #3

Ten years administrative
experience with a police
and fire commission.
Pd. Pol Adv. Larry Tyler Jr. Campaign Fund


Marty Duytschaver
For
Seat 4
FIRE COMMISSIONER
* Island resident for over 34 years
* Successful Island businessman
(owner of Sand Dollar Gift Shop,
and Sun & Surf)
* Former volunteer with Anna Maria
Fire District
* Supported by the current volunteers

PLEASE VOTE FOR
MARTY DUYTSCHAVER ON NOV. 8
PD. POL. AD. PAID FOR BY THE CAMPAIGN TO ELECT MARTY DUYTSCHAVER

I II IT


PLEASE
SUPPORT
GROUP
FOUR


MANATEE
RIVER
CONSERVATION
DISTRICT


JOHN CHAMBERLAIN
During the last four years much has been achieved.
1 60% of Manatee and Braden River watershed lands now have conservation
programs.
2 We have joined the Sarasota Bay, Tampa Bay & Gulf of Mexico coastal
and water protection programs.
3 We have restored mangrove and wetland areas on Emerson Point.
4 We have begun urban conservation programs.
5 We will be implementing the new federal coastal zone management program.
My opponent has never been to a single meeting of this board, opposed several
conservation initiatives and represents the interests of the industry he serves.
Paid Political Ad Paid for by the Campaign Accl. of John Chamberlain


PLEASE
VOTE
GROUP
TWO


MANATEE
RIVER
CONSERVATION
DISTRICT


George Goodman
(20-Year Air Force Veteran)
During my term in office the following has been accomplished:
1 One million dollar federal grant to study pollutants in river.
2 60% of Manatee & Braden River watershed lands have conservation plans.
3 Restoration of wetlands on Emerson Point.
4 Expanded environmental education programs with the schools.
5 Joined the federal Sarasota Bay, Tampa Bay & Gulf of Mexico Projects.
My opponent has never attended a meeting of this board and has opposed Swiftmud Programs.
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO WILL CONTINUE TO PROTECT OUR RIVER.
Paid Political Ad Paid for by the Campaign Acct. of George Goodman


VOTE FOR
GEORGE M. JACKSON

FIRE COMMISSIONER SEAT 3

LOCAL RESIDENT over 33 years. jliab
INFORMED the only candidate employed
in the fire fighting and paramedic field.
ACTIVE member of the Anna Maria fire r
department as a volunteer over 15 years.
CARING wants to ensure quality emer-
gency medical care and provide dependable (
fire protection service. /
PROFESSIONAL owned and operated a successful plumbing
business prior to becoming a full time fire processional.
Endorsed by Anna Maria Island Fire Dept. Volunteers
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT


Gar


Reeder


Manatee River Soil & Water Conservation
District Group 4
Dear Manatee County Voters:
As a fourth generation Manatee County grower, I've worked
with our conservation service by developing, testing and
refining soil and water conservation practices that are now
being implemented statewide. Because of my hands-on
experience, I have seen the positive Impact of good
conservation efforts; but I believe we can find even better
ways to utilize our vast natural resources.
Manatee County needs someone who can integrate the
agricultural, environmental and urban concerns of our
district. I know I can.
Please vote for me November 8th.


S 1990 T.J. Carter
"Outstanding Conservationist
of the Year" Recipient.


Lpaign


Pd. Pol. Adv. Cam
for Gary Reeder


I









IE PAGE 16 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


EA 300/500

GEORGE F. BIANCHI MASTERS
SALES & LEASING
Island Resident 5th Year Member
BILL GRAHAM FORD COMPANY
Aftk 3400 14th Street West
9- Bradenton, FL 34205
(813) 747-3711 Office
(813) 747-0471 Fax




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formerly of Bridge Street Barber
NOW AT
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Appointments Available
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Licensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.


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EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
We are aa DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce


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First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

10 YEAR ALL PARTS AND LABOR
WARRANTY
You want it? We've got it!
Because Amana gives you quality at a price
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PARTICIPATING
ALL MAKES & MODELS CONTRACTOR


Lane to close on
Key Royale Bridge
John Fernandez, superintendent of public works
for Holmes Beach, has received notification from the
Florida Department of Transportation that the Key
Royale Bridge will be closed to one lane of traffic on
November 7 and 8.
DOT will be conducting soil borings and testing
on the bridge.
Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held Oct.
29 at Anna Maria City Hall were Artie Hobson and
John Kosatschkow.
Runners up were Herb Ditzel and Gene Snedeker.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday, and
all are welcome.
AMICC cosponsors
parenting workshops
The Anna Maria Island Community Center and
the Manatee Children's Services BRIC (Building
Resiliency in Children) Program have teamed up to
offer Parent Skills Training workshops on each
Wednesday in November at 5:45 p.m.
The Parent Leadership workshops focus on self
esteem and how sometimes we feel as if our lives
control us instead of the other way around. Partici-
pants have input into the workshops' discussions.
Extended child care provided.
A pot luck dinner is scheduled for the Nov. 30
meeting. For more information call 778-1908.

AIDS conference to be
held in December
The Sixth Annual Conference on Living with
AIDS will be held on Dec. 2 and 3, at the Manatee
Civic Center, Palmetto.
The conference is for people living with AIDS/
HIV (PWAs), health care professionals, care givers
and educators and will cover AIDS education, fam-
ily issues, medical updates, nutrition, spirituality and
treatment strategies as well as many other areas of
concern.
Full scholarships are available for PWAs and
partial scholarships are available for health care work-
ers and care givers. Deadline for scholarships and
discounts is Saturday, Nov. 5.
For registration or information call AIDS-
Manasota at 954-6011.
St. Bernard Guild to
hold Poinsettia Bazaar
The St. Bernard Guild will hold its annual Poin-
settia Bazaar on Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12 and
13, in the Welsmiller Activity Center.
Plan to Christmas shop for hand-created knitted
items, small gifts, baked goods, potpourri, plants and
lots more. Lunch will be served by excellent cooks.
Financial seminar to be
held at Island Library
"Are you paying too much in taxes," is the topic
of a free educational seminar presented by Alan
Lavoie, financial consultant, and Paul R. Pavich, ac-
countant, on Thursday, Nov. 10, in the meeting room
of the Island Branch Library, from 10:30 to noon.
The seminar will focus on how the new tax law
changes affect you and how you may reduce your
taxes through tax-free and tax-deferred investments.
The seminar is open to the public.
Artists Guild to present
program on Monday
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will present
a free program featuring Gretchen Edgren, retired Play-
boy senior editor, on Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m., at the
Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
Edgren, who has been featured in The Islander
Bystander, joined Playboy in 1967 and was named se-
nior editor in 1974. Edgren will share interesting sto-
ries from from her career.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. and a
general meeting will follow the program at 8 p.m.
The program is open to the public.


Free jazz concert at
Ringling Nov. 5
The Jazz Club of Sarasota will feature the Yellow
Dog Jazz Band in a free concert Saturday, Nov. 5, at
Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota.
The concert will last from noon to 1 p.m. Fans are
invited to bring chairs and a lunch.
For information, call the Jazz Club at 366-1552

Taste of Manatee Nov. 6
in Bradenton
A Taste of Manatee, the eighth annual Bradenton
food and fun festival, is Sunday at the Rossi Waterfront
Park in downtown Bradenton from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The event is sponsored by the Manatee Chapter of the
Florida Restaurant Association and more than 25 restau-
rants will offer tastes from their menus.
The free event includes live entertainment, games,
pony and carnival rides, ice carving, crafts booths and a
Corvette corral.

Meet Author/Illustrator
Frank Remkiewicz
The Brain Gym book store in Holmes Beach is
sponsoring a free presentation by author/illustrator
Frank Remkiewicz on Saturday, Nov.12, from 10:30
a.m. until noon.
With more than 20 years of experience in the
children's book field, Remkiewicz brings outrageous
characters and animals to life in humorous adventure
stories with unlikely endings. His lively presentations
include original artwork plus examples of projects that
illustrators confront including school books, golden
books, greeting cards, posters and flash cards.
Remkiewicz will demonstrate methods for "thinking
up a book," using spider outlines, story boards and
"dummy" books. Two of his picture books, "Froggy Gets
Dressed" and "The Last Time I Saw Harris" were featured
in this summer's award-winning PBS series "Storytime."
The event will include a reading, question-and-an-
swer period and book signing. Remkiewicz's books will
also be available for purchase. Information call 778-5990.

Anything Goes to hold
open house
Anything Goes, an antique doll and bear collect-
able shop located at 9801 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria, will
hold an open house on Monday, Nov. 7, from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Special guests will be doll artists Robert
Tonner, Patricia Rose and Marilyn Bolden.
For more information call 778-4456.

AMI Forever Young to
meet Monday
The AMI Forever Young, a group for seniors and
retirees on Anna Maria Island, will meet on Monday,
Nov. 7, 12:30 p.m., at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Guest speaker is Kathy Tooker-Granstad, an art
teacher for 20 years, a member of both the Anna Maria
Island Art League and the Artists Guild of Anna Maria
Island and director of the children's Galleria for three
years, who will demonstrate how to create potpourri
glass Christmas ornaments, miniature wreaths and eu-
calyptus floral design sprays.
All seniors are invited to attend. For more informa-
tion call the community center at 778-1908.
Anna Maria VFW to hold
garage sale
The Anna Maria VFW Post 8199 will hold a ga-
rage sale on Saturday, Nov. 5, beginning at 9 a.m., at
the Bradenton Beach Fire House behind city hall.
Pelican Man to hold wild
bird rescue training
A wild bird rescue training and volunteer orienta-
tion will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at 10:30 a.m., at
the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thomp-
son Parkway, City Island, Sarasota.
The class is free, pre-registration is not necessary
and is open to all persons 18 years and older.
For more information call 388-4444.


W-NIk,[I ,] ZLtj =( I iI Z


i


I









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 W PAGE 17 II


Billie W. Coles
Billie W. Coles, 51, of Bradenton, died Oct. 29.
Born in Broadford, Va., Mrs. Coles came to Mana-
tee County from Rich Valley, Va., in 1963. She worked
for 15 years at Anna Maria Elementary School as a
teacher and curriculum specialist. She owned Planes
Things Hobby Shop in Bradenton. She also served as
director of the Palma Sola Presbyterian Church Preschool
for seven years. She was a member of the Manatee
County Radio Controllers Club.
She is survived by three daughters, Deborah S. of
Melbourne, Kimberly of Tampa and Catherine L. Hines
of Bradenton; a son, E. Richard Coles IV of Bradenton;
a sister, Judith Franklin of Fort Pierce; two brothers,
Charles Webb, Jr. of Smithfield, Va., and Michael Webb
of Norcross, Ga; and three grandchildren.
Memorial services were held at the Palma Sola
Presbyterian Church. Bradenton Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements. Memorials may be made to
the American Cancer Society, 4806 26th St. W.,
Bradenton, Fla. 34205.
C. Frank Harrison
C. Frank Harrison, 75, of Bradenton died Oct. 24
in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Marion County, Ind., Mr. Harrison came to
Bradenton from Indianapolis in 1985. He was employed
in sales at Nora Wholesale Supply Co., and Bradenton
Beach Hardware store. He was a Protestant. He was a
member of the Loyal Order of the Moose No. 2188,
Anna Maria, and Hoosier Heart No. 27, Indianapolis.
He is survived by his wife, Dorothea A.; three
daughters, Mary Ann Blount of Pendleton, Ind.,
Cynthia Nave of Brownsburg, Ind., and Raelene
Carlton of Indianapolis; three sons, James R., of Nash-
ville, Ind., William J., of Celiana, Tenn., and Stewart
L., of England; two brothers, Forrest, of Martinsville,
Ind., and Charles, of Indianapolis; 16 grandchildren;
and 13 great-grandchildren.
Service and burial will be in Indianapolis. Memorial
contributions may be made to Hospice of Southwest
Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Suite C, Bradenton, Fla. 34209.
Lawrence McGuan
Lawrence McGuan, 84, of Holmes Beach died
Oct. 24 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Chicago, Mr. McGuan came to Holmes
Beach from there in 1978. He was a retired executive
secretary for the Railroad Trade Association.
He was a member of St. Bernard Catholic Church.
He was a member of the Key Royale Club in Holmes
Beach. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II,
serving from 1943 to 1946.
He is survived by his wife, Eileen; a son, Don of
South Holland, Ill.; and three grandchildren.
Services were held at St. Bernard Catholic Church
in Holmes Beach with the Rev. Benjamin Gorr officiat-
ing. Griffith Cline Funeral Home is in charge.
Anastasia (Tassa)
Stephanidis Vejrostek
Anastasia (Tassa) Stephanidis Vejrostek of
Holmes Beach died November 1 at home.
Mrs. Vejrostek was born and educated in New
York City and came to Florida in 1958. She moved to
Holmes Beach from Seminole in 1989.
Mrs. Vejrostek had a long association with
Gayport, a retail business in Indian Rocks Beach, and
as manager and fashion merchandiser for Empire at
Tyrone Square Mall in St. Petersburg. She exhibited
her paintings locally for several years and was active
in the Artists Guild of Anna Maria, serving as execu-
tive director of the Artists Guild's Gallery in the Island
Shopping Center, Holmes Beach, since 1993.
A memorial service will be held Thursday, Nov.
3, at Roser Memorial Community Church in the
chapel, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
Memorial donations may be made to the Tassa
Vejrostek Memorial Fund in care of the Artists Guild
of Anna Maria Island, 5414 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach, Fla. 34217.
Mrs. Vejrostek is survived by her husband Frank,
two daughters; Yvonne Rogers of Madison, Wisc.,
and Flora O'Brien of Durham, N.C., a son, JohnDietz
of Indian Shores and three grandchildren.
Oops
In a photo caption in the Oct. 20 issue, Perico Is-
land was identified as Tidy Island.


IK E R'' C


Ellen Marshall says
Rebecca Little will make
a terrific Judge!


ELLEN MARSHALL


Rebecca Little is my personal
choice for Manatee County Judge.
"She knows the job."


Paid political advertisement. Paid for by the campaign account of Rebecca Uttle.


I wholeheartedly endorse
Rebecca Little for Manatee County
Judge. "She knows the job."


SJ




REBECCA LITTLE
for Manatee County Judge
Qualified Leadership for Manatee County
Endorsed by the
Florida Police Benevolent Association.
NON-PARTISAN


BUYING SELLEVG
For Appointment or Consultation Call Fred Vandergraff at
VALDERGRAFF'S Cortez Coins and Antiques
The "Original" Cortez Coins operated by the Vandergraff Family since 1976. (Not affiliated with anyone else.)
COLLECTIONS, ESTATES, SILVER DOLLARS, PROOF SETS,
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PAT GEYER

- -- ( ':: .
" r%


We need a full-time Senator!

VOTE FOR FLORIDA STATE SENATE DEMOCRAT DISTRICT 26


Robert L. Hertig H

Why vote for Robert L. Hertig? Because we need a full-time Senator!
The reason I am running for the State Senate is simple. I care about the future of our
community.
I am dismayed with the direction our State government is heading. Our taxes are con-
tinuously increasing and there is no discipline or accountability in our State budget. If we
had a program in the budget last year, it is automatically renewed, with an increase, this
year. This is nonsense.
While we shouldn't stop trying to give people a hand-up, we need to reign in our bloated
system of hand-outs. To solve this problem, we need to go into the community and deter-
mine what is effective and what is not. To do this, I propose to be a FULL-TIME SENATOR.

What do I mean by being a FULL-TIME SENATOR?
To answer that, we have to look at how our State Government is set up. The State Leg-
islature is only in session two months out of the year. Our representatives go to Tallahas-
see for those two months and pass legislation that affects all of us. Then they return to their
regular jobs or businesses. This part-time schedule forces our legislators to learn about the
bills they will be voting on from lobbyists and/or other legislators. I propose to be a FULL-
TIME SENATOR, working for Florida citizens all year not just for two months.

What would I be doing for the other ten months of the year?
I intend to travel through my entire district, holding workshops on various issues. Ex-
perts will be invited to cover different sides of an issue or specific problem, along with indi-
viduals in the community who wish to participate. I feel that getting all this input and shar-
ing ideas will give me and my constituents a clearer view and better direction on how to
solve the problems facing us. This would give the people not the lobbyists a direct in-
fluence on their senator's decisions.

Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Robert L. Hertig II Campaign Fund (D)


JL-









JEi PAGE 18 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Lots of tasteful news
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor

Some food news ...
Tia Lena's served up a great lunch last week fol-
lowing the ceremony to dedicate Katie Pierola Sunset
Park. The menu included empanada, black bean soup,
Liberty salad, Cuban sandwiches and Key Lime cheese
pie for dessert.
Sonnydaze Coffee House opened with a roar on
Halloween weekend with the "Point" radio, 102.5 FM,
broadcasting live Saturday night. Reggae bands per-
formed all weekend. The new coffeehouse will offer a
wide variety of music along with poetry readings on
Sunday and an open mike on Fridays.
Sandy and David Austin sold the Island Inn in
Bradenton Beach on Tuesday to a couple from Tennes-
see, Robert and Sharon Williams. Sandy says she will
stay on for a while to help the new owners. Let's hope
they keep some of Sandy's great specials on the black-
board. David recently sold his other business, Broken
Glass, and word is that he is going back to contract and
cabinet work. Never mind retirement in sunny Florida.

Some good news ...
Beach Bistro co-owner "J.P." Jeffrey Park married
Julia Mattimoe in a beautiful ceremony on Sunday after-
noon at Cannons by the Sea cottages on Longboat Key.
Chuck and Lloyd provided the music for the reception and
the food was reported to be exceptional. Of course.
Jane and Norm Chessmore of Ches's Pasta Plus


made another donation to the Anna Maria Elementary
School last week as they have done twice a year for
four years now. Norm tells me that he and Jane have
now donated more than $2,000.
Rotten Ralph's celebrates their sixth anniversary
this weekend. The ever-popular and successful water-
front restaurant opened on Nov. 1, 1988. Jay Crawford
will be on hand to entertain the masses and Ralph has
extended his special all-you-can-eat fish and chips din-
ner special to include the weekend. It should be a fun
weekend for the regulars around the docks at the Anna
Maria Yacht Basin. Ralph normally closes and folds up
the sidewalk at his end of
the marina around 10 p.m.
but Crawford will play and
the party will go on until -
midnight on Friday and Sat- "
urday.
Pat Geyer of Duffy's
Tavern (and member of the
Holmes Beach City Coun-/ /
cil) came back from her va- *
cation cruise a changed
woman. Her new nickname "Bahama Mama" Pat
is "Bahama Mama" the
result of braids and beading in her hair i la one-
braided Mary Ellen Reichard, also a council member.

Down to business ...
Cafe on the Beach manager Dennie Kidd says
they are doing some remodeling, concentrating on the
inside dining room with new flooring, paint, new en-
try and added sliding glass doors for an improved view
of the patio and beach. On the outside, they expanded
the grill area where they produce their all-you-can-eat
pancake breakfasts. They now barbecue chicken, ribs
and pork chops.
Old Hamburg Tavern started opening for lunch this
week from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop in for some of that


great homemade sauerkraut and German cuisine.

Smile of the week ...
It's not the smell of fresh paint wafting at D.Coy
Ducks Bar & Grill that alerted patrons to recent im-
provements. Word of mouth has spread news of the
new, unusually bright color combinations in the
restrooms.
For the men's room, it's a very bright blue and
kelly green. For the women's room, owner Steve
Lardas chose shocking pink with kelly green. Yikes -
that'll wake you up.

On the music scene ...
Turtles Bar & Grill has reggae every Wednesday
night. On Friday and Saturday, 606 is playing.
Blindside plays every Sunday in November.
Playing at the Dry Dock Inn this weekend is
Winter's Ghost, the Bradenton band which performs
acoustic originals.
DNA, a relatively new band with former DTs musi-
cian Dean, will play at the Anchor Inn on Friday and
Saturday night. With prices at the door creeping up to
between $3 and $5 at bars-with-live-bands, owner Bobby
Tingler says he's taking a radical turnabout and will only
charge $1 all weekend. He's bound to make a hit, sell a
few more beers and hear a lot less complaining.
At the Sandbar, RPM plays on the deck Tuesdays
through Sundays in November.
The Sons of the Beach play on the deck at the
Beach House Tuesday evenings in November. Tropi-
cal Steel featuring Fabian plays through the weekend.
The Silver King Band with Rock Bottom, Flo
Mingo, Barry Cuda and a few extra stand-in musicians
took the sold-out crowd of 100 on a sea cruise last Sat-
urday night on the Miss Cortez Fleet's Booze Cruise.
The boat was rockin' and it wasn't from choppy waters.
This versatile and energetic band tours Florida only
once a year, so if you missed them, wait for next year.


IDS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC.
America's Leading Financial Planning Company
Retirement Investment Planning
Portfolio Reviews
Estate Planning
Educational Seminars
Call us for a free introductory consultation


Cynthia Olcott, CFP
3653 Cortez Road West


Jonn onarp
Bradenton 755-7000


VOTE














MOSQUITO CONTROL



Supports Ecologically Sound

Biological Control


Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Campaign Acct. of Ralph Garrison


VIUUlAKIL MtUIUINt *
and
SURGERY
|A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
0G


New!

New

news!
Now you can do
the Sunday Mefuv
orkE 'imes
crossword puzzle
in The Islander
Bystander.
"It's the best news
on the island."


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


I~ L I -~lt1 19 1 --I


IIMt






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 19 E]


ISLA TDER1


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL IT OUT- NOW!

Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
* Name Address/City Phone


FOR SALES
& RENTALS
778-4800
Colts at Dolphins









RODETECEL

Mini-Resort
Best Fishing *
4! ISLAND
COOKING
1 Beer and Wine
8, Breakfast
Lunch-Dinner
> Reasonable *
Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier





Joe
Ungvarsky
Construction
& Remodeling
778-2993
experience
You



CAOO35M

Bengal at Seahawks


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
Monday Night
Football
Bears at Bucs
OPEN 7 DAYS FROM 11 AM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


AMERICAN

CAR
WASH
& ETAIIUNG
BOATS
*TRAILERS
CARS
49ers at Redskins
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617




Free Estimates


AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
* Re-Roofs Repairs
* Bulft-Ups Shingles
* Single Ply Tile
Roofing IUCrNSEDISUrRE
System' | I IC00s414
Wording for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtusy Quaity


748-9362
S Broncos at Rams


OUARY

QULJEST

Boar Rule

Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
778-5577
Johnon. Evinrude. OMC
Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stem Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
S Lions at Packers


WEIGHT
MANAGEMENT
* No exercise No Diet
* No Drugs Costs Less
* All Natural Products
Free Counseling
813/387-9509
| Patriots at Browns J


Tee
TO


G60Lf
Regripping
Repairing
Re-finishing
NEW!
948 Midsize Irons

r50 OFF RE-GRIP''
IL (PER CLUB) __
778-5184
Raiders at Chiefs


poif 0 kkol



$995 each
Fruit of the Loom
"Best7 White T-Shirt
(One-Side Printing)
While You Wait
Saints at Vikings
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL
Anna Maria Island Centre


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast.
Professional Service
from Island Ownersl
Sme Day or Next Day Priced
3332 EaMtey Dr.Hl... ..ea
778-4277
SMiami at Syracuse


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
1 Steelers at Oilers \







Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
Bills at Jets I

LaPensee Z
Plumbing, Inc. .'
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach




THE


RESTA'a
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4-6pm
Happy Hour Everyday

FSU at Georgia Tech
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


.4


0







- 1QI PAGE 20 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994


* THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
F----


Tim Carden points out some of the finer elements of
a computerized math teaching program to lan
Douglas, 4.


This is the way we string our beads...Amber Wright,
4, and her sister, Alex 2, show their mom, Angie, the
kid-approved method for constructing edible fashion
accessories out of Fruit Loops.


ON THE CITY PIER
BRADENTON BEACH
FISHING PIER
S -CAFE
200 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach 779-1706
OPEN: Sun. Thurs. 8 AM to 7 PM

BREAKFAST 990
Serving HOME
Breakfast, OF THE
& Snacks 5"15
Out Overov O
Sarasota Bay
ALSO LIVE BAIT SHOP
OPEN DAILY 8 TO 7 FRI. & SAT. 8 TO 11


I


School for Constructive Play turns six
Most kids think they are pretty hot stuff when they turn six, and when the School for Constructive Play in
Anna Maria reached that landmark age recently, it was pretty happy, too. In addition to a nice cake
being served up, the school had an open house and invited kids, parents and everyone else to come in and
take a look at what goes on there. Direct interactive tactile stimulation, also known as playing with
gooey stuff, is what some little (and not so little) hands enjoyed at the open house, as pictured above.
Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


Where Longboat Key History Began




SmONECRAB
RESTAURANT

F FRESH

Stone Crabs
Purveyors of Quality Stone Crabs
Since 1924. Fresh Daily.
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY


'... A little treasure of a restaurant ...
inventive, fresh, well executed ...'
Fat Benson Bradenton Herald
'Proof that great things come in small packages.'
Kristy Nichols Sarasota Herald Tribune



Mfie Mutiny lInn


Try Our $39.95 (2) Dinner Special
includes appetizer & a bottle of wine
Entrees Include:
Fresh Gulf Catches: Prepared Ten
(10) ways nightly.
Black Angus Filet Mignon Au Poivre
The Island's Finest Crab Cakes and a
wide selection of Pastas & Exotic Grains

"The Mutiny Inn' on the comer of
Manatee Ave. & Gulf Dr.
Serving Dinner
Monday thru Saturday 5:00 10:00pm
Closed Sunday
f sservations Suggested
Avaia6li for Private Parties
605 Manatee Avenuee, Holmes'Beacfi
(813) 778-5440


ROD4VEL


1/2 mile
* North of City Pier *
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida"TM
ISLAND
COOKING
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA


"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
* Open Sat. & Sun. *
"DOWNSTAIRS"
Coffee Shop
Open Daily *
7:30 am to Closing
A Full Breakfast *
Lunch & Dinner
Beer & Wine
Car Parking
PLUS
50 Bike Racks!


A -YOU-CAN-EAT
SE H)I) I BUFFET 1
7 s a Week 5 to 10 PM
WMES BEACH LOCATION ONLY
Great ily Fun & Atmosphere
CH ATTIRE OK
TIE URTFIE RMmB (CLTO
ER3IE D SALDMU
[F lelIID D IyMER^
CRABBY HOUR *
3PM 6PM DAILY
504 Drafts $100 Well Drinks
CHUCK SENRICK
At the Piano Bar 7 Days A Week
CONNIE & DI)AVE
Friday & Saturday Nov. 4 & 5 8PM to 12 AM
NFL SATELLITE *

Restaurant Hours: Mon. Thurs. 11:30AM 10PM
Fri. & Sat. 11AM -11 PM Sunday Noon 10 PM
325 MARINA DRI" HAVE A IATE NIGHT
formerly Pete Reynard's',
Holmes Beach CIIABBY LOUNGE
778-9566 DAY! OPEN


"I have a theory
that food
tastes better at
the beach:'












And we're proving it right here on beautiful
Bradenton Beach. At the Beachhouse. Lunch
and dinner. Nightly entertainment. Volleyball.
Great deck. Great playground. Bring the family.


houge/
great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Anna Maria Island, 813-779-2222































Praiseworthy performance
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week e
21. First row, left to right, are Travis lacovelli, Kyle Reynolds, Curtis Sankey, Meredit,
Ayla Strickroth, Heather Murray and Brett Milks. Back row, left to right, Lindsey Wick
Max Gazzo, Amanda Parsels, Ditra Paloski, Holly Lillis, Ginny Mazza, Justin Weng, S
and Jeffrey Comkowycz. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 21 i
o* . * * * . a

Anna Maria

School Menu
'Monday, 11/7/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets & Sauce or Fiestado, Potato
I fRounds, Green Peas, Frozen Fruit Juice Bar
Tuesday, 11/8/94
WBreakfast: Bagel & Jelly or Oatmeal & Toast,
Applesauce
Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese & Sausage Link or Burrito,
Spinach, Fruit Crisp
Wednesday, 11/9/94
Breakfast: French Toast & Syrup or Cereal & Toast,
Pineapple
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy over Mashed Potatoes or
J Mini-Chef Salad, Mixed Salad, Fresh Baked Blueberry
Muffin
6 Thursday, 11/10/94
Breakfast: Two Cinnamon Toast or Oatmeal & Toast,
Apple Slices
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Hot Dog, Corn, Peaches, Bar
O tCookie
endingg Oct. Friday, 11/11/94
h Durkin, Schools Closed
.ersham, Veteran's Day
'ky Beard All meals served with milk.

-i-- ii--.----- i-l~lml
leart of Longboat Key I Eat In or FREE I
SO ERTakeOut OFFDE yI I
I / ANY SIZE PIZZA! I

S ONIMA PIZZA
Continental Cuisine & ITALIAN RESTAURANT
o Scafa, Proprietor Specializing in Veal. Chicken Fish Pasta
B r., Makers of the World's Largest Pizza
Winds Beach Resort "/ Open 7 Days* 11AM to Midnight.
ort on the Gulf of Mexico 3 201 N. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach
io Drive Longboat Key 78-0771 or 78-0772
dco Drie, Lo! LM----=MM ---M=--
r The Only Authentic Greek RestaurantBetween Bradenton & Sarasota
HAPPY HOUR in the lounge Only 11AM-6PM
Join us Tues thru Sat. in the lounge with
BRIAN BEEBE 7 to 11 PM
MOMTHURS SPECIALS We also offer
BREAKFAST EARLY BIRDS Fresh Seafood
10AM-2PM Mon-Sat 11AM-6PM Steaks Rbs
495 &a 8595 cVeal Chops
$___ 29s5 495 & $595 Racks of Lamb

Nicki's wes9t

* 1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton
MION-SAT 10 AM-11 PM- CLOSED SUNDAY BANQUETFACILITIES AVAILABLE 795-7065
IT'S THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN!
DON'T FORGET TO COMPLETE YOUR ISLANDER FOOTBALL CONTEST ENTRY
THIS WEEK. YOU COULD BE THE WINNER OF $50!


2. FO $.0


DIFIP
The Leader it~nDiscou nt[1'']Li uoNfor 37'Year
WEBA LLLQ 0SL D


VO KC*A -
POPOV VODKA BENTLEY'S VODKA MR. BOSTON
,7$1100 175 $9 I 7S ^VODKA LTR$5.99
LTR 1.1 $9,9
-R $11.99O R $9.758 R$
2-FOR-*23.00 80-PROOF m M*


RICH & RARE BLACK VELVET SEAGRAM'S V.O. CANADA HOUSE OR
CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN RESERVE
i. 5 7,;1: 5 $ 16.99 ,.75 $11.99
LTR Net 8.99 T Net 11.99 SUPER BUY LTR YOUR CHOICE

ANCIENT AGE JIM BEAM TEN HIGH BOURBON EVAN WILLIAMS
BOURBON 80-PROOF BOURBON '15.99 *12.99 BOURBON 90-PROOF
1.75 MI'3.00 175 MIR 3.00 1.75 MIR 4.00 1.75 $ Q
LTR Ne -10.- I LTR Net'12.99 LTR Net *8.99 LTR 14.99


SCHENLEY RESERVE
BLENDED WHISLEY
L $1279 7


/ OLD THOMPSON KESSLER'S
I BLENDED $11.99 BLENDED WHISKEY
S.7 WHISKEY M,,3.00 1.75 $15.39
I 8 99 SUPER BUY


-Bridge Tender Inn-
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn
NOW FEATURING ;
LIGHTER PORTIONS
3:30 to 5 PM
TUESDAY OUR FAMOUS '
PRIME RIB ... $8.95 Dinner Spirits
NEW HOURS: 3 to 11 DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach


The soul of Europe in the h




Award winning Italian
383-8898 Iv
Adjoining Four I
An elegant rest
2605 Gulf of Mex


,1 SPECIAL
FULL COURSE SELECTIONS
$21.95
(Wine Not Included)
Our Regular Menu Also Available
NORTH END OF LONGBOAT KEY OPEN MONDAY-S4ATURDAY
NORTH END OF LONGBOAT KEY OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY


"A Wonderful Experience."

CAFE ON THE BEACH

Home of the Delicious
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
PANCAKE BREAKFAST
(includes Sausage & Coffee)

$+ tax
Served Daily (Waffles too!)
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!






IB- PAGE 22'"1 NOWVMBER 3, ': 1'WA~ 'TIFE'l$LAlKDR W~ TAtIiER'


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Oct. 21, theft of a bicycle, 100 block of Crescent
Drive.
Oct. 22, warrant arrest, 5800 block of Marina
Drive.
Oct. 22, alcohol citation, Bayfront Park.
Oct. 23, no diver-down flag, Lake LaVista Chan-
nel. Three persons were cited for diving without dis-
playing a flag.
Oct. 25, criminal mischief, 100 block of Los
Cedros. A person unknown entered a house under con-
struction and damaged 20 to 30 tiles by pouring quick
set concrete and water over them.

Bradenton Beach
Oct. 26, recovery of stolen property, 2100 block
of Avenue B. A bicycle stolen in Holmes Beach was
recovered and returned to its owner.
Oct. 27, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown entered the vehicle and re-
moved a CD player valued at $300, a 9 mm handgun
with a full 13-round magazine valued at $500 and an
additional magazine. The vehicle was ransacked caus-
ing $400 in damage.
Oct. 28, disturbance, 2200 Gulf Dr. N., El
Bandito Motel. The owner reported that he rented a
room to two subjects who were playing loud music and
lammmi-mmmimmmmi--q
EXPIRES Ir BOS po0
S11/8/94 0 *1'0 1
C 10519Cortez Road
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I
SECOND
$3.99/ UFFE2.99

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET


hmmmmM I COUPON IiMMMMMMMi i




YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET"


LARGE FRESH DAILY
WATERMELON GULF SIL EA RD
$199 *^ 'QUEEN 0
$1 SHRIMP CORN


.516 Manatee Asve.W. (Cyrner51wst &Mace ate


Celebrate

Florida

Cuisine 0

with a

Spanish

Flair ;
fresh fish paella pasta *
tapas black bean soup *
stuffed veal chop duck *
tequila steak pork nueva *
homemade sangria *
cuban coffee tiramisu *

Tia Lena's Restaurant
1325 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach
Tuesday Sunday Open 4:30


I^'^ STREETL-B fI ^


'The best hamburgers an
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven."~OIis
Tuffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. \. -
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501

5702 MARINA DR.
pT jTo .HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
S CLOSED MONDAYS
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 'til Midnight)
Tuesday: QUARTER BEER NIGHT, 6 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT REGGAE
Thursday: LADIES NIGHT- $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wednesday, Nov. 2 Reggae "Jam-iya"
Fri. & Sat, Nov. 4 & 5 "606"
Sun, Nov. 6 Beach Bash, 7 PM "Blindside"
Wednesday, Nov. 9 Reggae "Democracy"
Fri. & Sat, Nov. 11 & 12 "Willy Steele"
Sun, Nov. 13 Beach Bash, 7 PM "Blindside"
Wednesday, Nov. 16* Reggae "Democracy"
Fri. & Sat, Nov. 18 & 19 -"DNA"


throwing things around. The pair was asked to leave
and did so.

Holmes Beach
Oct. 21, water violation, 3010 Ave. C, Island Pest
Control. The officer responded in reference to a water
violation and found four juveniles spraying each other
with hoses. He advised the business owner to turn off
the hoses.
Oct. 22, grand larceny, 5501 Marina Dr.,
Captain's Marina. The complainant reported a person
unknown removed a 1991 15 hp Yamaha outboard
motor valued at $1,800 and a six gallon gas tank val-
ued at $35 from his boat.
Oct. 22, robbery, 6500 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported she parked her rental car and
exited her vehicle when a white male juvenile ap-
proached her and told her to freeze. She screamed and
the juvenile grabbed her purse, knocking her to the
ground, and ran to a waiting car.
The vehicle was described as an older model, com-
pact hatchback with a white towel hung out the back to
cover the license plate. The driver was described as a
white male with dark hair. The juvenile suspect was
described as weighing about 75 pounds with long,
blonde hair pulled back.
On Oct. 23 a complainant reported finding the
purse on a vacant lot in the 4500 block of 58th Street.
The victim's driver's license and car keys were inside
but $5 in cash was missing.
Oct. 23, drunk, 4900 block of Gulf Drive. The




Enjoy a Northern Italian Cuisine in a relaxed
casual atmosphere at affordable prices

Baked Ziti ............................................ $7.95
Tender Fried Chicken FF .................... $7.25
Cheese Ravioli.................$7.75
M anicotti.............................................. $7.95
Homemade Lasagna........................... $8.25
Chicken Parmesan & Spaghetti...... $8.95

Hours: Open TuesSun Sam-2pm/4:30-o10pm
Free Delivery Closed Monday Take Out Available
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach


795-8083
- 'MONDAY NIGHT
A'- .'s "- FOOTBALL
LOUNGE PACKAGE LIQUOR DRINK & FOOD SPECIALS
SUNDAY NFL SATELLITE FOOTBALL
KARAOKE WED & THURS 9 to 1
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT
GENERATIONS
Fri. & Sat. Nov. 4 & 5 9pm to 1 am
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.




HAPPY HOUR
4 to 6 PM

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4 to 6 PM ~
Fish & Chips Roast Pork $5.95
Shepherds Pie and More to $6.95
Lunch or Dinner SPECIAL with this ad
Buy one lunch or dinner at regular oOD
price- get second at 1/2 PRICE OTHER OFFER
" Authentic British Atmosphere with
8 British Drafted Beers on Tap.
r 5


BRITISH PUB
&
RESTAURANT


Mon.-Thu. 4 to 10
Friday 11:30 to 10
Sat., Sun. Sam to 10pm
Serving Breakfast 8 til
Pub Hours T'd ?


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


BANANAS Me/ica
Always RUSKIN
190LB. TOMATOES


complainant reported an intoxicated male passed out
in a vehicle in his driveway. The officer spoke to the
subject who said he was here from New York for his
brother's wedding and the celebrating got out of hand.
He said he was in no condition to drive and thought he
would sleep it off. The officer took him to his brother's
house. The complainant said the subject could leave
his vehicle in the driveway until morning.
Oct. 23, retail larceny, 3900 East Bay Dr., Island
Foods. An employee observed a white male place a
$10 steak and a pack of cigarettes in his pants and
leave the store. The employee followed the suspect
and confronted him and he gave back the items. The
suspect is described as five-foot, 10 inches in height,
muscular, about 35 years old and wearing a black
sleeveless T-shirt, aqua shorts and a hat with a black
and white checked design on the bill. The employee
said the man appeared to be intoxicated.
Oct. 24, suspicious person, 2900 block of Gulf
Drive and 400 block of 28th Street. Two complainants
called within a few minutes of each other and reported
that a white male driving a blue pickup truck was
sneaking around outside their homes. He is described
as being in his early 20s with long black hair and a
slim build.
One complainant said the subject appeared at her
front door and was trying to look inside before he
drove away.
The other complainant said the subject drove up
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE





THE IS4ANDERcBYSTANDER 'NOVEMBER'3, 1994 *M-PAGE 23 IH"


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
and down his street before getting out of the truck and
approaching his house. His house guest said she saw
the subject in the front yard and told him to go away.
The complainant said he opened the door and repeated
the request but the subject began to approach the house.
The complainant produced a hand gun and told the
subject to "get lost" and he complied.
Oct. 23, larceny, 5108 Gulf Dr., Driftwood Mo-
tel. The complainant reported that one of her pumpkins
was missing from her Halloween display. The pump-
kin is described as being small, somewhat round,
weighing about five pounds and orange in color.
Oct. 24, traffic, 100 block of 74th Street. The
officer responded to a report of a large tree limb in the
street. He called the public works department to re-
move the limb.
Oct. 24, petty larceny of $10.01 in gasoline, 3015
Gulf Dr., Citgo.
Oct. 24, grand larceny of a bicycle valued at
$400, 3300 block of Gulf Drive. On Oct. 26 the bicycle
was found by a Bradenton Beach police officer and
returned to its owner.
Oct. 25, burglary, 300 block of 29th Street. The
complainant reported that a person unknown removed
a screen from a window, entered the residence and re-




The Best Homemade Ice Cream and.
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South. Bradenton Beqch 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortes Bridge


moved a Star Super 9 mm handgun loaded with eight
rounds of ammunition and a two gallon plastic jug
filled with change and bills.
Oct. 26, suspicious person, 7200 block of Gulf
Drive. The complainant reported a white male asleep
in his car with the car running and the doors locked.
The officer awoke the subject who said he had a fight
with his girlfriend and spent the night in the car.
Oct. 26 suspicious incident, 200 block of 64th
Street. The complainant reported he found two bullet
holes in his apartment garage.
Oct. 27 damage, 5804 Marina Dr., American Car
Wash. The complainant reported a person unknown
entered the wash bay and bent a wand used for regu-
lating the wash.
Oct. 27, burglary to an automobile, 3304 East Bay
Dr., Island Bazaar. The complainant reported a person
unknown entered his vehicle parked behind the busi-
ness and removed a tote bag containing credit cards and
identification items.
Oct. 27, petty larceny, 3200 East Bay Dr., Shell's
restaurant. An employee's bicycle valued at $100 was
stolen from the rear of the restaurant while he was
working.
Oct. 28, 3000 block of Avenue E. The complain-
ant reported that a male came to the door and rang the
bell. She asked who it was through the door. He said
he had car trouble and wanted to use the phone. She
refused to open the door and he left.

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Two officers to

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Holmes Beach
Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine an-
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week. The promotions will be effective Nov. 5.
Detective Nancy Rogers will be promoted to
the position of Detective Sergeant. Sergeant
Dale Stephenson will be promoted to the posi-
tion of Lieutenant and will assume the respon-
sibilities of Assistant Chief of Police.
"These employees have served the depart-
ment well in their former positions," said
Romine, "and I am sure they will continue to do
so in their new areas of responsibilities."


Oct. 28, 4500 block of Second Avenue. The com-
plainant reported that a white male came to her door
and she asked him what he wanted through an open
window. He said he was having car trouble and wanted
to use her bathroom. She refused to open the door and
he left. He is described as having long blond hair and
a slim build and wearing a light blue shirt.


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liM PAGE 24 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Shell shellacking; and don't forget

how much y'all like them claws


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
It's a real shame to have to tell you Anna Maria
Commissioner Dottie McChesney's resolution to help
save our live shells was voted down last week.
McChesney simply wanted the commission to en-
dorse a resolution to bring Anna Maria under the same
rules on gathering live shells as are now in effect on
Sanibel. That is, no taking of live shells.
This has nothing to do with folks stooping along on
the beach and gathering the beautiful shells brought in by
wave action- as long as those shells are empty or dead.
But taking shells with the critter still living in them or "be
them" obviously makes no long-term sense.
At least, that's how they think down on Sanibel
Island. And I believe it's hard to disagree with them.
But here on Anna Maria at least one commissioner
wanted "scientific proof" taking live shells was harm-
ful. I guess that's just what we need another govern-
ment study, buddy, to uncover the obvious.
It was especially frustrating to be standing in St.
Bernard's meeting hall and hearing about
McChesney's defeat this last week.
Think of it. If "scientific proof' was what ran the
world, St. Bernard's wouldn't even exist.
Some things we just "know." And the simple fact that
killing live shells although I certainly might excuse it
if you're going to eat them is wrong-headed.
By the way, all edible creatures such as sun ray
clams, oysters and the like would be exempted from the
proposed ban. Anybody want to buy a pick-up truck
full of sand dollars?
We all know where you can get 'em.



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Claw harvest slow,
but picking up
Now that we're in our third week of the stone crab
season, I wondered how the harvest is going.
Karen Bell over at the A.P. Bell Fish Co. tells me
they've had to bring in some claws from the Cedar Key
area because the local harvest is off to a slow start.
"We're waiting for the weather to cool down and,
when it does, crabbing should improve," she tells me.
"But it's starting to get better already."
Karen and some other folks tell me the catch up
near Cedar Key is great this year much like it was
off our shores last season, when we had the biggest
stone crab harvest in recent memory.
Paul Moore of Moore's Stone Crab fame his
grandfather pretty much started the stone crab business
around here says he doesn't think the harvest is
down much. "But of course everybody thought last
year was great and actually I guess it was."
Did you ever notice how commercial fishers are
just like farmers in that the hardest thing in the world
for them to admit is that everything just might be OK?
Anyway, Moore says the crabs are still "spread out
and we're waiting for some cold fronts.
"There's a lot of things affect crabbing, you know
- clarity of the water, stage of the moon and water
temperatures of course. I think it's going to be a decent
season, especially as it goes along," Moore concluded.
By the way, Karen Bell couldn't help but give me
a little lecture on the use of mullet as crab bait along
with her report on the season.
"Everything we use for crab bait is gill netted," she
said. "In fact, don't forget mullet is the bait we use for
fishing both grouper and snapper."
Karen's message was clear: if you like to eat fish,
you'd better not put gill net fishers out of business
come election day next Tuesday.

Cuba calling
Cuba called this afternoon and I've got some fresh
news on the upcoming holiday regatta in Havana. This
comes directly from Bob Winters, the sailor Sarasota




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politicians love to hate.
The "Regatta Feliz Navidad en La Habana," is sched-
uled for December 23-29. If you want to leave here after
Christmas and arrive a few days late, Winters says that's
just fine. Free dockage begins when you arrive.
Winters also says that, once again, you won't have
any problems with the U.S. Treasury Department because
the Cubans won't be charging American sailors any
money to bring their boats there. In fact, it will be even
easier than the procedures for the race last June.
This time you just have to show up at Marina
Hemingway and tell the customs folks you're with the
Regatta. No need to get a visa ahead of time, and
there'll be no charge for visas, either.
In addition, all American sailors arriving will re-
ceive six days of dockage at the Marina free of any
charge. Hey, that's more than last time when we only
got four days which, truth be told, was plenty.
Winters tells me he has boats scheduled to arrive
from all over Florida and hopes to have 80 boats tak-
ing part in the event. '
My bet is President Clinton will have lifted the
embargo on Cuba by years-end. You saw it here first.
See you next week.


AMICC Soccer
League standings
League standings as of Oct. 28
Division I
Team Record Points
LaPensee Plumbing 8-1-2 44
Hayo-Meyer Construction 8-2-1 42
School for Constructive Play 1-7-2 9
Power Pros Pressure Cleaning 1-8-1 7


Division II
Team
Mr. Bones
Beach Barn
Dowling Park
Uncle Dan's Place
Island Pest Control
Island Real Estate


The big game of the week
The Oct. 27 match-up between LaPensee
Plumbing and Hayo-Meyer Construction was
something to see, with LaPensee beating Hayo-
Meyer 3-1. Hayo-Meyer has led Division I since
the beginning of the year until this upset.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 25 Ir

Kingfish are the crown jewel of this week's fishing


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Kingfish are the best bet for the week, with anyone
with a running boat being able to catch the big fish. In
fact, after "baiting" my hook with what was left with
one of the 10-pound kings, I hauled in a 50-pound bar-
racuda last week. Talk about bait! Backwater fishing
highlights include lots of redfish and trout.
Libby, owner of Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle,
took a brief break last week to go wade fishing and
caught and released two real nice snook her first
linesiders of the year. Way to go! Other action from the
popular tackle store include good reports of trout and
redfish, with trout running through the passes. The
word from here is that wade fishers are out-fishing boat
anglers.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip is averaging 125 head of Key West
grunts. The six-hour trip is averaging 125 head of lane
and vermillion snapper, porgies and red grouper. The
nine-hour trip is averaging 45 head of lane and man-
grove snapper and rudder fish.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said Larry
Sweetin of Island Discount Tackle caught a 90-pound
tarpon this week on a #1 hook. Wow! Other action at
the pier includes a few snook at night, black drum, lots
of sheepshead, flounder and a couple keeper redfish.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there are catching good-sized redfish, lots of snook and
more and more small grouper.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said trout with a few
snook mixed in are being reported caught around the grass
beds in the bay, with the trout being kind of small. Sheep-
shead are showing up around the bridges and at the pilings
at the Skyway Bridge since the weather cooled.
Capt. Phil Shields on the Reef Reacher is bring-
ing in some nice-sized kingfish from his offshore ex-
cursions.
Capt. Dave Pinkham reports kingfish, some up to
30 pounds, snapper and grouper are all being caught on
his charters. There are also lots of cobia on the local
reefs and lots and lots of Spanish mackerel.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said his customers are
catchingmixed bags ofredfish, snook, flounder and trout.
Snook seem to be preferring large shrimp as bait, by the
'way. Offshore, there are sporadic catches of king mack-
erel, Spanish mackerel, cobia, snapper and trigger fish.
On my boat Magic we've been catching kingfish,
up to 12 pounds, as well as mangrove snapper, a 50-
pound barracuda and enough redfish to make all my
clients very, very happy.
Capt. Rick Gross reports good kingfish about
eight miles offshore. Backwater fishing includes all the
reds you could want and a few keeper snook.
Capt. Mark Bradow said kingfish are every-
where, with limit catches on every trip. He's also re-
porting good catches of mackerel and mangrove snap-
per on the offshore artificial reefs.
Capt. Tom Chaya said the best bet right now is
kings.
Rick at Island Discount Tackle said he's hearing


That's a big-un
Logan Bystrom, Connor Bystrom and Ben Rigney take a look at a 30-pound stringray caught off the Bystrom's
dock in Holmes Beach. The huge ray was released after having the photo session.


Going, going, gone ...
While the Anna Maria Island Privateers promised to sell smoked mullet from 9 a.m. to 3p.m. but they couldn't fulfill
the demand. According to Privateers President Andy Toombs, their 800 pounds of smoked mullet was sold out just
before noon. The sale was held in the parking lot in front of Shell's restaurant at the Anna Maria Island Centre.
Proceeds from the sale go toward the Privateers scholarship fund. Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


reports of good kingfish action daily. Try using live
bait, spoons or plugs for the best action. Grouper fish-


ing in about 100 feet of water is also excellent.
Good luck and good fishing.


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ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu 11/3 10:44 2.7fft 5:19 -0.4ft 12:46 1.6ft 4:06 1.3ft Ship's Store
Frill/4 11:21 2.7fft 6:08 -0.5ft 1:47 1.6ft 4:35 1.4ft Bottom Painting
Sat 11/5 --- 6:56 -0.5ft 2:51 1.5ft 4:53 1.4ft Boat Storage
Sun 11/6 12:04 2.7ft 7:49 -0.4ft -- --* Bulk Oil
Mon 11/7 12:52 2.6ft 8:43 -0.3ft - Consignment/
Tue 11/8 1:44 2.4ft 9:40 -0.1ft 6:11 1.5ft 8:07 1.4ft Brokerage
Wed 11/9 2:53 2.1ft 10:39 0.1ft 6:47 1.6ft 10:20 1.4ff BOAT RENTAL
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 rnirtiles later low tides 1:06 later. J |


- I~


00) e






JI PAGE 26 0 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

UFOs? Elvis? Would you believe Gilligan, little buddy?


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It was a dark and stormy night. Somewhere a wolf
howled.
Then the story gets strange.
It had been an amazingly quiet night on the Anna
Maria City beat, so I decided to get to bed early -
about 3 a.m. Before retiring however, I tuned my scan-
ner over to the marine channel. Just call it a hunch.
Doing what I do best according to one dis-
gruntled reader I was asleep when the radio crack-
led to life (not the brass ensemble that does such a great
rendition of The Star Spangled Banner, but that range
of frequencies set aside for communications between
boats and shore).
"This is Coast Guard Station St. Petersburg," the
disembodied voice ripped through the darkness. "All
mariners are asked to be on the lookout for the 32-foot
boat, Minnow, which is reported overdue. The Minnow
has seven people on board."
Through the fog of my fatigue I began to come
awake, rubbing my eyes which felt like a couple of
ping-pong balls desperately trying to escape the hell
holes of my skull. I glanced at the clock.
It was 4 a.m., but if you were a cow, a bat or an-
other creature of nature that doesn't recognize the re-
turn to Standard Time, it was 5 a.m. I decided to split
the difference and call it 4:30.
The voice repeated the message, and I couldn't
believe my ears. After all, as a dissatisfied reader re-
cently pointed out, seeing is believing, not hearing from
some source. (Mengele also claimed he was a victim of
bad press, so what are you going to do?)
The Minnow was reported overdue. Seven people
on board. My mind began to race. Could it be? Was it
possible? Could it be that Minnow? Did I really know

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the names of those seven on board? Was Gilligan just
offshore in the Gulf of Mexico?
What were those names? How did that song go?
Like a nightmare whose rights had been sold into na-
tional television syndication, it all started to come back.
"Now sit right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a
fateful trip, that started from this tropic port aboard this
tiny ship. The mate was a mighty sailing man, the skip-
per brave and sure, five passengers set sail that day for a
three-hour tour (a three-hour tour). The weather started
getting rough, the tiny ship was tossed, if not for the cour-
age of the fearless crew the Minnow would be lost (the
Minnow would be lost). The ship set ground on the shore
of this uncharted desert isle, with Gilligan, the skipper too,
the millionaire and his wife, the movie star, the professor
and Mary Ann, here on Gilligan's Isle."
My instincts told me it had to be a hoax some-
one was pulling a fast one on the Coast Guard. After
all, for season after season the castaways were never
able to get away from that island, so how could it pos-
sibly be true that they had finally managed to do so on
the eve of Halloween and end up in Tampa Bay?
About an hour-and-a-half later the radio voice re-
turned. The Minnow was now reported to be safe in port.
Mariners could stand down. The search for Mary Ann's
secret Clearwater condo hideaway could begin, led by
journalists who grew up with fantasies of being marooned
with her... Well, that's a story for another publication.
The next day I put on my detective hat, a hat that now
fits better since I got a haircut and gave up the Apache
headband. My call to the Coast Guard turned up little in-
formation (about the Minnow, not Mary Ann's where-
abouts). The Coast Guard didn't have much more to say
about the incident since they claimed the boat had not been
towed, but had turned up in port on its own.
Now, I know what you're thinking, but it happened


Lisa Varano


Denise Langlois


just that way. This is a true story and you can believe
it or not. It really doesn't matter to me.
Epilogue: A lot of time has passed since that night
(about 16 hours to be exact), and some of the details are
becoming a little fuzzy. One thing's for sure though -
for a while a boat called the Minnow was really re-
ported overdue, and there were seven people aboard
just like on Gilligan's Island.
Trying to put this whole thing into perspective, I con-
sulted a journalist friend, Tom Vaught. He's one of those
hard-boiled types who pounds a typewriter until it screams
when he's working on a big story (he writes on a word
processor, but in the back of the office he keeps an old
Smith-Corona and a big hammer to pound it with).
Vaught proved invaluable in dredging up the first
part of the Gilligan's Island theme when my memory
failed, and I learned that he had other trivial knowledge
up his sleeve as well.
"Bet you don't know the character names of the skip-
per and the professor," Vaught said, obviously relishing
the twist he was putting on the knife of Gilligan's Island
trivia which he had just plunged into my back.
I shook my head. He had me.
"The skipper was Jonas Grumby, and the profes-
sor was Roy Hinckley," he said. "If you'd paid atten-
tion to the first episode you'd have known that."
I left Vaught, taking no particular pleasure in the
knowledge that the grin on his face would fade like a
bad suit when Wednesday morning would dawn and he
would see that I had revealed his tidbits of knowledge
to the general public in my newspaper.
It's a treacherous business, I thought as I walked
away. Unless you can distort the news with the big
dogs it's best to stay on the porch. At that moment I
knew that my place was on the street, close to the gut-
ter (driveways) where we throw it each week.


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT


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We are in need of annual and sea-
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to discuss renting your property.

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2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


DON'T FORGET TO VOTE NOV. 8!


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Florida 34217


a U I -


WANTED:


oOLMES
BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


-rD-IC-K-L
7R


-r



-J L.








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 3, 1994 U PAGE 27 IjD


JUST FOR OPENERS 3 5 ,1
BY R. M. HOPKINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 1 2 1 1 !1


ACROSS
1 Cheese in a
mousetrap
5 Rider Haggard
romance
8 David
Stockman's
dept., once
11 Dickens alias
14 Cheerless
18 "Moses" author,
1951
19 Circle
21 One who has the
hives
23 "In the evening
when I sit alone
a-dreaming..."
25 Arm of the sea?
26 Kind of tea
27 "Oh, give me
land, lots of land

29 Bruiser
30 Beethoven
dedicatee
31 Org. for the
20-Down
32 Excel
35 Landslide
detritus
37 Carve across the
grain
41 Lincoln in-law
42 Selects
43 Popular sports
car
44 Like versatile
appliances





STUMPED?
1-900-420-5656 A
(750 per minute) th


48 Each
49 Call it-
50 Tax evaders'
bugbears
51 Turn about
52 Noted castaway
54 Iranian desert
55 Handbills
57 Gulf north of
Somalia
58 Mummer, at
times
60 Start, in a way
61 Trifled
63 Top dog at the
zoo
64 Some canines
65 cropper
66 Bracelets
67 Spring
68 Seconds
70 M.I.T. grads,
perhaps
71 Least clear
75 Gallimaufry
76 Spray
alternative
78 Nut cases?
79 Wipe out
80 Cult film "- 9
From Outer
Space"
81 Protective rings
82 Where eagles
gather
83 Kids' stuff?
84 Not well
85 Paid (up)
86 Hamlet's father,
e.g.
87 Composed
90 Milk: Prefix
92 Where to go for
a spell?


93 "Trailer for sale
or rent..."
97 Salad bar item
101 Introductory
offer
102 "Alas! My love,
you do me
wrong..."
105 Court official
106 Anomalous
107 Legendary
gunfighter
108 They've earned
their stripes:
Abbr.
109 German spa
110 Common
pluralizer
111 Stephen Foster's
Nelly
112 "Let us- "
DOWN
1 Do
2 "... -- forgive
our debtors"
3 Petit four
finisher
4 "Casey would
waltz with a
strawberry
blonde..."
5 Map info
6 Bricklayer's
burden
7 Printemps
follower
8 1983 World
Series champs
9 Paul Bunyan's
wife
10 Borscht base
11 Restrain
12 U.S.-
13 Wurtzite
ingredient


14 Playhouse fare
15 Kitchen gadget
16 Have-- of the
tongue
17 One of a vitamin
complex
20 Seniors, with
"the"
22 Special forces
unit
24 End of the race
28 Malodorous
32 Kind of horn or
line
33 Snake dancers
34 Pop star
35 Nubian Desert
locale
36 Family
38 Prospective taxi
fare
39 Out-and-out
40 Tabula -
42 Pent up
43 Changes
44 "Stormy the
night and the
waves roll high

45 Anti-slip device
46 Reagan
nickname
47 "-- a rire" ("It
is to laugh"): Fr.
50 "As the
blackbird in the
spring...
53 Flawless
54 Gifts
56 Kind of accident
58 Groaner
59 Computer
software abbr.


61 "... and -- a
good-night!"
62 vincit
amor
63 Informal
64 Laconic
65 Hatchet job?
66 Sit on
67 Like
supermarket
tabloids


69 Madame
Bovary
71 Entomb in a wall
72 Dollar prefix
73 Car-roof items
74 Words
77 Vogue
78 Happens to
82 "Invincible"
victim of
Hercules


84 Dries, in a way
85 Nuts
86 Personality
determinant
87 Kind of duty
88 -trump
89 Monsters
91 Bicker
92 Food processor
93 City south of
Duiisseldorf


94 Rage
95 Stratford
streetcar
96 Plymouth
Rocks, e.g.
98 Basso
Andresen
99 Actress Miles
100 Spot
103 Crux
104 -- ammoniac


answers to this week's puzzle will appear in next week's newspaper. You can get answers to any
iree clues by touch-tone phone: 1-900-420-5656. There is a charge of 750 per minute for the call.


, ^ .-,' !" .. - ... ," .' ...' : >, ^ ':.: ... .^ *,,^*^ ''' ^^

i 4- .... . .. ..... ..... ...... * ... : ....-- : _ ", :_ : !- .. . --- .--,-:,
-*. ...i.. .. .' - ': : :---'- .,_ ., ---- _l ,
I ,,. . -- : : : . .~ j.
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DIRECT GULF VIEW & BEAUTIFUL
SUNSETS 2Bed/2Bath unit has pool, sauna,
elevator, under unit parking plus on-site man-
ager. Excellent rental unit. $167,000. Bill Bow-
man 778-4619.


PRESTIGIOUS KEY ROYALE Canal front
3/2 Island executive home. Split plan w/large
family room & glassed lanai. In quiet area across
from golf course. $279,000. Call Hal Gillihan Ofc:
778-2261 Eves: 778-3294.,


BOATING COMMUNITY 2Bed/2Bath on LOVELY BAY VIEW FROM GLASSED-IN
Intracoastal waterway. Boat dock & great sun- PORCHES. 2Bedroom/2Bath downstairs cor-
set views. Cathedral ceilings, coral fireplace, hot ner unit. New carpet & vinyl throughout. 3 ceil-
tub, 24 hr security. $205,000. Call Dick Maher ing fans. $152,900. Call Bob or Lu Rhoden Ofc:
778-2261 or 778-6791. 778-2261 or Eves: 778-2692.


A PAIR OF DUPLEXES IN HOLMES
BEACH Well maintained 4 units, fully occupied
@ $500/mo rents. Each has central AC/Heat.
One block to sandy beaches. $259,000. Call
Rose Schnoerr 778-2261or 778-7780.












ELEVATED ISLAND HOME 2Bed/2Bath
split plan w/vaulted ceilings, 8' bar, indoor util-
ity, lots of storage, workshop, double carport.
$122,900. Call Janis VanSteenburgh 778-4796.


LARGE TOWNHOUSE HAS DOCK ON
LAGOON Lower level finished to 2Bedrom &
laundry. 4Bed/2Bath, upgraded kitchen, Berber
carpet & fans in every room. $136,000. Call
Bobye Chasey Ofc: 778-2261 or Eves: 778-1532.


KEY ROYALE COMMUNITY 3Bed/2Bath
canal front home w/large screened lanai, open
kitchen, lots of storage space, 2 car garage.
$219,999. Call Evelyn Mitchell 778-1952.


NICK
PATSIOS,
REALTOR
"Nick at Night"

i 778-4642


LI

; Over 16 Yrs. of proven i
' know-how has distingui
as an experienced pro
k you can trust and coun
your Real Estate needs
*a.!,r-r- "-* = .-j..._-- .-* ,.*.'.~s*~ :_.J


real estate
shed Nick


WATERFRONT HOMES
606 Crest Elood 3/2
611 FoAworlh 3/2
2500 Gull Dr 2/2
4000A Gulf of M.,eico Dr 3/2
607 ,varnhoe 3/2
513 Loqual Dr 53': 5
607 IJuorihpoini Dr 3/2
609 [lorrhpoini Dr 312 5
1624 Palma Sola Blvd 3/2
103 Palm Ave 4/4 5

WATERFRONT LOTS
1, 517 lue Heron Drive
i, 4000B Gull of .leico Dr LBK
40:' C ill 01 .1e... Dr LBKI


133: 0.10
1213 9999
1.285.o000
1425 00O
1,279 000
135S 000l
1.329 0,30
14439 OO
1429 '300
$435 030


$500 000
I150.000
SK",CMDOo


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week


V
'1


ofessional i B, -y c .-. .. ri. n o.. =_ |
t onforall '- _, - -- - : .
S.



."N--,..


Premiere Properties in
Prime Locations throughout
Manatee County
ToIal Propery Marnagemeni'
MVde vanrely of ne \acah:on ,entai'
Unrurrish.ed annual renials'
Prcfe-'sional Personalized Sericze

Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


*1


i






lJl PAGE 28 m NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER







SINCE 1939
Al. Island Relocation
Specialist
r ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your I
Island Dream come true! ilr


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217 Office


USA SALLY ANN
Mike M. 778-6696
Norman ie 1-800-367-1617
rma 3101 GulfDrive
Realty inc. Holmes Beach, FL 34217

Don't forget to vote on Nov. 8


II


JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want
to miss THE BEST news on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary.
Mail subscriptions are also available (form on page 7.)
Sorry, Individual unit delivery is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.


PREMIER PROPERTIES
* 1106 18th St. W., Bradenton, Duplex $39,900
* 2311-13 Gulf Dr., Two lots $49,900 each
* 2209 10th St. W., Palmetto, Palmetto lot
$47,500
* 1102 18th St. W., Bradenton, 3BR/2BA Home
$68,900
* Ice Cream Store, $79,000
* 404 Magnolia Ave., Large Vacant Lot $79,000
* 3801 31st Ave. W., Bradenton, 3BR/2BA
Home $79,900
* 3601 East Bay Dr., 2BR/2BA Sandy Pointe
$84,900
* Local Liquor Store, $89,900
* 208 54th St., Duplex $129,000
* 401 Alamanda Rd., Duplex $129,000
* 5808 Gulf Dr., 2BR/2BA Waters Edge
$135,900
* 308 Palm Ave., 3BR/2BA Home $147,000
* 4204 126th St., 2BR/2BA Smugglers Landing
Condo. $149,000
* 705 North Shore Dr., Gulffront Lot $159,000
* 404 71st St., Duplex $169,000
* 613 Ivanhoe Ln., Key Royale Canalfront Lot
$175,000
* 720 Key Royale Dr., Key Royale Canalfront
Lot $199,000
* 7216 Holmes Blvd., 3BR/3BA Pool Home
$214,900
* 3045 Mariners Cove Dr. #114, Cortez, 2BR/
2BA Condo $225,000
* 313 Hardin Ave., 3BR/2BA Canalfront
$234,500
* 3920 Mariners Way #311, Cortez, 3BR/2.5BA
Condo $239,900
* 510 South Bay Blvd., 3BR/1.5BA Bayfront
$350,000
* 3045 Mariners Cove Dr. #123, Cortez, 3BR/
2BA Condo $350,000
* 405 28th St., 6BR/4BA Canalfront $386,000
* 226 Oak Ave., Canal front Luxury Home.
$449,000
* 201 35th St., 6-Plex, $499,500
* 206 Oak Ave., 3BR/2.5BA Custom Home,
$525,000


Architecturally-designed Island home on 3
lots for lush, tropical seclusion. Totally refur-
bished. 4 bedroom, 4 bath. Multi-level living
room, fireplaces. Sailboat water on canal with
boat dock and launch. Water views from most
rooms. M-a-n-y built-ins! Security system &
lights. Designed for entertaining! $389,000. Ask
for Karin Stephan; or 388-1267 evenings.
Lots of Possibilities Here! 100' frontage on
Intracoastal Waterway is what you have with
this duplex! Total of 4 bedrooms, 2 baths.
$269,000. #60202. To discuss or for appt,
please call Roni Price; or 778-5585 eves.
Pleasant W. Bradenton area for fine, very
clean home! 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Fenced back
yard. Near everything schools, shopping,
beaches! This is a N-I-C-E home! $73,500.
#57085. Call Horace T. Gilley; or 792-0758 eves.


MARTINIQUE ... miles of
white sand & blue Gulf
waters.Tastefully
furnished, 2BR/2BA
turnkey-ready!
$179,900


Carol Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Certified Residential Specialist
Holmes Beach Motel
6-unit, state/city license.
Fully furnished. Call me!
$430,000
WILD OAK BAY Condo
Views all the way to
Sarasota! 3 BR, 2.5 BA
$214,000


778-7246


T. Dolly Young
REALTORN/IMS


Multi-Million Sales
778-5427
Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


%MPLY THE BES7,
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
TEAM ON THE ISLAND


EVERYONE SAYS
Everyone says they love those big old
beachouses they remember from their childhood.
Guess what? Here it is! Three bedrooms and two
baths, big porch, high ceilings, tongue in groove
paneling throughout and two car garage. If you're
into old you'll be in love.









CUSTOM CONTEMPORARY
Located in prestigious North Point Harbor this 3
bedroom 2 bath home features deep water canal
with dock, 8' heated Jacuzzi, eat-in kitchen with
Corian countertops, magnificent master suite with
walk-in closet, garden tub and separate 2 head
shower, formal dining room, lots of tile, glass sky-
lights, thermopane windows, central vac., alarm
system, professional landscaping and many more
extras. Community pool and tennis. $339,000.

Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


NEW LISTING-LONGBOAT VILLAGE: Well kept, 3
bedroom, 2 bath elevated home. Great room design
with cathedral ceiling, skylight, screened lanai, all ap-
pliances and heat pump with recovery system. Priced
at $162,500. Please call Carol R. Williams, 778-0777,
778-1718 after hours.


EASY CARE VILLA just 2 short blocks to the beach!
Elevated for under building parking & sitting area.
Perfect Get-A-Way! $72,900. Call Judy Duncan
778-1589 eves.


HERE'S YOUR HOME AT THE BEACH Charming 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath home with large screened porch
perfect for catching breezes. Only 2 blocks to the Gulf
or Bay!. $82,500. Call Judy Duncan 778-1589.
HOLMES BEACH MOTEL within walking distance of
beach, restaurants and shopping. 4 efficiencies, 1 -
one bedroom apartment plus owner's 2 bedroom
apartment. Furnished turnkey except owner's unit.
Very neat & clean. $395,000. Call Carol R. Williams
778-1718 eves or Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.

I REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 29 [jl


A L ND RCASAIFIEDS


MARY KAY COSMETICS, at reduced prices.
Please contact Susan Barnes 778-6407.

FIVE ROLL DOWN canvas awnings. Footage:
7.75x5, 3.25x5, 8x5.25, 2.75x5.25, 3.75x5.25. Blue,
good condition. 778-1274.

GE NO FROST Refrigerator/freezer w/ice maker,
like new $300. Frigidaire washer/dryer, full size al-
mond $200. Exercise bike, triple action airwaves
$75. Queen size bed, headboard, Sealy mattress/
box springs, 9 drawer dresser, 2 drawer nightstand
$350. Excellent condition. 778-1952.

FOUR VENETIAN BLINDS Dusty rose. 64-inch
drop. Fits 2 X 4 ft, 1 X 5 ft & 1 X 6 ft. $60. 792-7828.
Will deliver.

PINBALL MACHINE Bally "Old Chicago". $350.
Collector's item, an old-style machine. See at the Is-
lander Bystander Office. A very unusual and unique
Xmas gift! No phone calls please.

WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.

EXERCYCLE Like new. Never used with paper-
work, instructions, etc. $60. 778-9392.


TRASH & TREASURE SALE! 9am-3pm, Saturday,
November 5, 1994. AMI Chamber of Commerce
Parking lot. 501 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach.
Rain date, Sun., Nov. 6.


SExclusive 419Pin
WatEstatese EALTO (813)77
Video Collection MLS EVENINGS





ism





ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS: Barbara A
Marcella Cornett..:778-5919 Nancy Gu


GARAGE SALE- 8am. Saturday, November 5.659
Key Royale Dr. A little something for everyone.

PLANT & GARAGE SALE Sat., Nov. 5. 8am. Vari-
ety of plant, orchids, crotons, ficus, hibiscus, Bos-
ton ferns and much more. 208 A & B 82nd St.,
Holmes Beach.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


85 OLDS. DELTA 88. V-8, 4 door, power steering.
Runs great. $1,800. 778-2971.

MOTOR HOME Excellent 1994 Cummings diesel
vectra. 35.5 ft., cherry cabinetry, central air, loaded.
Retail price $119,000. Sale $80,000. 778-5832.


OLDER BOSTON WHALER. $450 with trailer. As
is. 778-1461.

TWO ACE BOAT DAVITS Electric. 4,000 lb each.
Approx. 3 years old. $1300. 778-3649.

CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.

CLASSIFIEDS continue on the next page ...


e Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
78-2291 P0O Box 2150
S 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


Watch for our
listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.


WHITE GLOVE RESTORATION
Beautifully refurbished 2 bedroom, 2 bath home
on deep, seawalled canal in quiet Anna Maria
Village. Amenities include soaring cathedral
ceilings, brick fireplace, newly remodeled
kitchen with glass front hickory cabinets, white
tiled floors, and expansive piggy-back-styled
double car garage. Bright, spacious, and light
throughout. Impeccable landscaping with many
citrus trees. A MUST SEE! $239,000.


lA StbeCiauzin9 in Zimelet -AJ~O ifCZLLlesh i.
A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847
llford...778-2158 Michael Advocate...778-0608


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


I 1 lI!


SevigAnnaMaiaSine 99 AL 81)77-24 AX784 8
21GufDiveASSCATESAFTERHOUR


W AG ERDav Mynian...............78.97


GULF VIEW TRIPLEX Recently renovated, taste-
fully furnished units that offer a flexible floor plan.
Large common sundeck with great view of the
Gulf. Laundry on premises. Now operated as va-
cation rentals. Priced at $272,000. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.
' .. ~ w- wT,,: I


- I -
- -- -gpE' .S L .-. *' '--- -
RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.

ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ...
85 x 130' ... deep water and spectacu-
lar views ... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ...
90 x 109' ... deep water and view of
Bayou ... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach & zoned
for 1-4 units ... $129,900.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


Let Alice

Zoller or

Peggy

Nash

help you

rent or sell your

property.

(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216
Toll Free 800 434-0426 FAX 778-1929


GULF FRONTI A spectacular estate with direct beach loca-
tion! Offering a uniquely designed home consisting of three
structures which has the living area and Master suite Gulf
front and the remaining three bedrooms in third structure.
Lush tropical landscaping surrounds this private compound.
Call Marie Franklin, 778-2259. Asking $950,000 & terms.


GULF FRONT CONDO
Just steps to a beautiful beach. Panoramic GULF
views from the living room window. Quiet, mani-
cured complex. This 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo must
be seen to be believed. $225,000. After hours call
Rosemary Schulte 792-6615.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717* Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


Reason #13 why 631 Foxworth ... excuse me, the phone
is ringing. "Yes sir. Yes sir. I understand completely, sir.
Right away, sir. Good-bye." Mmmmm. Appears the owner
has just done something to 631 that has added $20,000
value to the house. The upgrades to an already perfect
home just seem to never stop. Would someone please
buy this house before it is worth a million dollars? Now
listed at $545,000 with Doug Dowling Realty. 778-1222.

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND Smilesl
PIH 1 l.N I=1l* :MIJ. HA;l: WAC101TTTJi


p.. ~ ~'W~ -~~--~ -1 .~.


K!


ISLAN REALTYfnfi GROUP ISLAND EALTY ROUP,


m..r.s -,


;?'u = -. '.






j RM PAGE 30 1 NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
J Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353

Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
It 778-5594 778-3468

I L I II I

STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
A LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SSINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558



I Id kH IInX


Jell.

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


AEPWAT ED IIHMI MR V


S Commercial Resildential Free Estimates
Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
W n Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
t 778.1v345' GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
AND SATISFACTION


HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for beachfront motel.
Part-time, some weekends, start immediately. Sand
& Sea Motel, 778-2231.
GENERAL OFFICE, light bookkeeping, computer
experience preferred. Part-time. 778-1626 or 778-
6477.
REALTY OFFICE seeks responsible person as sec-
retary/receptionist. Record keeping ability helpful.
Send resume to PO Box 8224, Longboat key, FL
34228. Confidentiality assured.
HOUSEKEEPER needed immediately. Must be de-
pendable 30-40 hours per week. Apply in person.
BWBC, 6306 Gulf Dr. M-F, 9-2.
GRANDMOTHER NEEDS loving daycare for 2 chil-
dren (3 months and 1.5 year old). 6 day week. Call
after 4:00 or LMOM 778-0488.
PART TIME Waitress and part-time cook needed.
Call Tip of the Island after 2pm. 778-3909.
BOOKKEEPER FULL CHARGE Immediate open-
ing for permenat resident. Dependable & congenial.
Good computer skills & experience in A/R, A/P, pay-
roll and sales tax reports. Form 1040 prep a plus.
Otey & Assoc. 778-6118.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you
interested in learning the history of Anna Maria Is-
land? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Dorothy Steven, 795-0148 if you
can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


COMPANION. Pleasant alternative to living alone;
educated, traveled, non-smoker, references. Long
time area resident. 924-8802.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.
AU-. 0 DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon on
mobile number 356-4649. Please leave a message
for quick reply if not available.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.
HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.
NO TIME TO CLEAN? Homes, apts., rentals, etc.
I'm fast reliable and reasonable. "I like what I do ...
and it shows!" References available. 778-4116.

CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs. exp. Call
Bradenton Fiberglass for free estimate 753-9621.

THE TURF SURFER'S Lawn Service. Cut & trim for
Anna Maria Islanders only. For estimate call 778-
9493.
NEED HELP with your errands or shopping? Also do
odds and install telephone jacks, repairs. Reason-
able rates. 794-5767.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever your
hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodel-
ing specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Is-
land references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional
installation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co.
resident 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-
1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving
the Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic.
#RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resi-
dent.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers
& concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
HOME MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS. Experienced,
reliable, small jobs preferred. Don Staples 778-
0225.
CUSTOM RENOVATIONS by Paul Beauregard. All
home improvements. Specializing in kitchens &
bathrooms. 20 yrs. experience as an industrious
highly-skilled, dependable carpenter and finishing
contractor. My work also includes; counter tops,
ceramic & vinyl tile, drywall repairs, fine finish
painting, wall coverings, etc. 387-8066, beeper
#252-6528.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, drywall repairs, tile & formica work. Work guar-
anteed. Low prices. 778-0410.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!



1 LG/1 SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.

SEASONAL 2BR/2BA. Old-style Florida beach
house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished. No pets. No
smokers. $1,100 month inclusive. 778-1576.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! ISLANDER CLASSI-
FIED.
ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo avail-
able March & April 95. $850/wk. Gulf front. 813-
949-3713.
WESTBAY COVE Large 1 BR/1 BA. Tastefully fur-
nished & decorated. $800/mo. T.D. Young, 778-
0766. Prudential Florida Realty.
CANALFRONT home, 3BR/2BA, new tile floors,
screened lanai, $1,200 per month plus utilities.
Unfurnished. Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
CANALFRONT home, 2BR/2BA, enclosed garage,
Holmes Beach. $950 per month. Unfurnished. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
1BR/1 BA DUPLEX apt, unfurnished, $425/mo. Ef-
ficiency apt., unfurnished, $350/mo. Call Fran
Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307 or 778-1450.


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!








AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price. Everything is
included for $85 on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Our mobile service means no one
has to drive your car. And we are eco-friendly
utilizing only 100 percent bio-degradable
products. By appointment, at your
convenience, home or office.
NEW mobile service number: 320-0110.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I NOVEMBER 3, 1994 A PAGE 31 j[,


JIISYL'ERN4 CLUWT1SN L4
IRNASCnd.RA 5 STATE ont.


STILL AVAILABLE for January 1995. Deluxe beach
2BR/2BA apt., central H/A, W/D. Call Betty Cole,
779-1213.
STUDIO, 100 ft. to beach. Holmes Beach. Jan.,
Feb. & March $500 monthly all utilities paid. Call
778-0727 or 355-0450.
CANALFRONT duplex, 2BR/1 BA bayview, unfur-
nished. $650. Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ON WATER next to Anna Maria City Pier. Heated
pool, spa. Weekly or monthly. 1 BR apts $250-$350
weekly or $800 monthly. 778-9188.
1 YEAR NEW, detached house, 2BR/1 BA, walk to
library & shopping. Includes W/D hookup, garbage
dis., Dish washer, window cov., ceiling fans, deck,
lawn main. and pest control. 778-4068 after 7pm for
appointment.
STEPS TO BEACH Holmes Beach, 3BR/3BA
beach house. Available Dec., Jan. & Feb. Sea-
sonal, fully equipped includes WD. Call 778-4468.
ANNUAL RENTAL. Newly renovated 2BR/2BA
duplex in Holmes Beach. Will allow an indoor pet.
$750/mo. Mike Norman Realty 778-6696.

2BR/1 BA DUPLEX 1/2 blk from beach. $1,200 mo.
Available Nov., Dec., March, April. Call 1-813-681-
9656. Leave message, will return call.

100 FT TO BEACH Holmes Beach 2BR apt. $1400
monthly. Call 778-0727 ro 355-0450.
1BR APARTMENT Bradenton Beach across from
the beach. $500 month includes utilities. 778-5035.
EXCHANGE COURCHEVEL FRANCE European
couple will exchange their ski vacation condo Feb.
or March 1995 for your lovely beach/waterfront
home. Anna Maria Island or vicinity. 779-2229.
Leave message.
EXCHANGE LONDON ENGLAND European
couple will exchange their lovely central London flat
Feb. or March 1995 for your beach/waterfront
home. Anna Maria Island or vicinity. 779-2229.
Leave message.


FOUR-PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condi-
tion, location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
WEST BRADENTON. 3BR/2BA home, excellent
family neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will
help buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins
at Island Real Estate 778-6066.
DREAM VIEW of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
3 Bedrooms, fireplace. $350,000. Owner will fi-
nance. Yvonne Higgins, Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
ICE CREAM CAFE near beach. $12,500. 792-
8991.


REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981.

TIDY ISLAND on Sarasota Bay. Preconstruction
prices on waterfront townhouses, $219,900. Lots
available from $74,900. Call Tidy Island Properties,
Inc. 761-8439.

EXTRA LARGE Anna Maria lot across street from
community center. Quiet, family area. $79,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
CANALFRONT lot in Key Royale across street from
golf course. Deep water bay access. $175,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
ADORABLE Anna Maria home close to beach.
3BR/2BA with possible 4th BR or den. Two sepa-
rate entrances make this property unique!
$147,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
KEY WEST styled canalfront home in Anna Maria
- 3BR/2BA Direct deep water access. $234,500.
Call Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-
6066 for details.
ONE OF A KIND deep water canalfront home in
Holmes Beach 6BR/4BA inground pool -
$386,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
OWNER WILL FINANCE this Anna Maria bayfront
home with a dream view, 3BR and fireplace.
$350,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066 for details.
INVESTMENT property steps to the beach. Call
Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for
details.
WEST BRADENTON 3BR/2BA home in excellent
family neighborhood. New roof, 9-94. Seller will
help with closing costs, $79,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for details.
IN HISTORIC CORTEZ village. Charming 2BR/1.5BA
cottage. Nice oaks, quiet street, island atmosphere at
inland price! $62,500. 723-3616 or 794-1221.

S. BAY BLVD. Elevated 1450 sq. ft. 2BR/2BA with
900 sq. ft. garage/storage, back deck w/water view,
fruit trees. Many extras. 778-7070.
OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 2-4. 629 Kingfisher,
LBK, sailboat water, 110 ft. to Bay, deeded beach,
updated 3BR/2BA. $273,000. 383-6560.
BOATERS! Fabulous Anna Maria canalfront lot
with Tampa Bay access. One of the few left! Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate,
778-6066.

ISLAND DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, 1BR/1BA plus
mother-in-law apt., 2 blks to beach. 304 56th St.,
Holmes Beach, $149,900/offers. By owner.
778-6700.


I.


778-2586 MA RyKAy Eve: 778-6771


15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 11/9/94


DANCE EMPORIUM
Anniversary Special
9 Sessions for $5.(
F New Students Only Please! Exp. 11/15/94
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 761-0102
4332 PALMA SOLA BLVD. 761-0102

KT'S with STYLE ........
A Jewelry Store For All Ages .
Specializing in Sterling Silver r
111 7th Street N., Bradenton Beach 779-1308
... . . . . . . . . . . . . .
II


Custom Communications
- Installation and Repair of All Electronics
S* SPECIALIZING IN PC COMPUTER SERVICE
"-- Call Dave for answers to any technical questions
and for free estimates. 730-1608 or 778-6407


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
C. ll FREE EXPERT ADVICE


wan
David Parrish
792-5207


Call
798-3095


-I
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


More than a mullet Wrapper!


SPersonal Fitness

STRAINING CI

Cardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis 779-2129
Nationally Certified 779-2129


UNCOMMON :3p
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS
30 COPIES COPY YOUR FLYERS HERE!
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548


IRISHT ROVER
S PET SERVICES formerly Island Grooming
-' --I SANTA'S COMING NOV. 14 19
: Get Your Christmas Photo Cards
-- Taken with Santa & Your Pets & Family
- Instant Prints Also Available
50% of Profits go to Anna Maria Island Community Center
107 7th St. N., Bradenton Beach 778-2095


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office
in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located
next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS. Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS. Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or
two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IYSAnDE


ISLANDER


I SLANDER T A11
NEW! Islander T-shirts: $10
Adult Sizes: M, L, XL, XX
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-7978




_ UM PAGE 32 N NOVEMBER 3, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


land


O IU ixrAi,-N i'M I,sni K' J
HOMETOWN
PRf#ID


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1994


CHUCK SHOULDER
LONDON BROIL


WHOLE, UNTRIMMED
TENDERLOIN


P $599
SLB.


COUNTRY STYLE
RIBS


BONELESS
Chicken Breasts


CORONET
PAPER


1/2 Gallon
Assorted
Flavors


BREYERS
ICE
CREAM
2$ 00
OR 5


---EN -U


APPLE or
CHERRY


FLORIDAGOLD
ORANGE
JUICE
Reg & Old Fashioned


ASSORTED
SQUASHLB.
law-ombLB.


Carnation
Evaporated
Milk
Reg., Lite, Low Fat
2 $100
FOR

Peppers


DELI DEPARTMENT
SLICED TO ORDER
Honey Baked.
HAM


BAKERY DEPARTMENT
FRESH, SPLIT TOP ,w.


'ods


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


Yj ~u~lJ ~Right here on Anna Maria Island!


Coke, Diet Coke


DELI DEPARTMENT
8-PIECE FRIED


139
LB.