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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00537
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00537

Full Text


WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


I I


Mayor to Historical Society: no

outdoor renovations to museum


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Anna Mayor Ray Simches has settled some of the
discussion concerning what the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Society may do with the building it rents from
the city on Pine Avenue.
In no uncertain terms the mayor told the society's
board of directors they could proceed with plans to
renovate the interior of the building, but to not even
think about touching the outside.
The Historical Society says that's fine with them,
adding that a grand proposal unveiled by Bradenton
Beach architect Emily Anne Smith last week a pro-
posal that included an entrance gazebo, landscaping


and possibly even the roofing of the old city jail was
the brainchild of the architect and not what the Society
had initially contracted for.
"What we had asked her (Smith) originally for was to
design the inside of the museum," said Historical Society
President Carolyne Norwood. "That was all period."
At a meeting last week, Smith showed Society
members and the public her idea for a more efficient
floor plan for the museum, including a proposal to re-
move portions of partitions separating the museum
from the soon-to-be-vacated sheriff's substation. That
would give the museum more space, and the members
PLEASE SEE HISTORICAL, PAGE 2


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island elected officials told County Commissioner
Stan Stephens that the county should have cleaned
dead fish off all the Island's beaches during the recent
red tide outbreak.
Stephens said private land is not the county's re-
sponsibility.
The issue was raised at last week's meeting of the
Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials when
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said the
county's cleanup was "uncoordinated and could have
been handled more efficiently. A lot of the motel own-
ers suffered early checkouts and demands for refunds.
I hope we can do a lot better in the future."
Stephens responded, "I think the county bent over
backwards working on that. We provided dumpsters,
work release people and trucks and waived the fee at
the landfill. The other part of it is whose responsibil-
ity is it when it's on a private beach the city, the
county, the hotelier? In some cases, it's certainly not
our responsibility to be cleaning the beaches in front of
motels on private property and we can't expend pub-
lic funds to do that"


Bohnenberger said his city had many problems
with the county cleanup including having to rent its
own dumpsters, not having access to the county's
dump trucks and work crews not showing up. He asked
if the Environmental Action Commission (EAC) could
aid in red tide cleanup but Stephens said the EAC has
no personnel to do so.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola, owner of
the Catalina Resort, said in the past the motel took re-
sponsibility for the cleanup but the new wider beach
makes that impossible.
"The county has the equipment," she noted "They
are cleaning the public areas. I don't see why they can't
continue up and down the beach."
Stephens replied, "You want the county in some
respects but not in other respects. You want the county
here when you have a red tide outbreak but on other
issues you don't want the county making decisions."
Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim Kissick said,
"The primary objective of cleaning the beach is not for
the residents but for the people who come out here from
the county and the state. Our geographical limits extend
PLEASE SEE DEAD FISH, PAGE 2


Islander Bystander

political forum

Wednesday, Oct. 26
A political forum featuring selected issues of
interest to Islanders will be held Wednesday, Oct.
26,beginning at 5:30 p.m. at St. Bernard Activity
Center, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
The following political races and issues will be
featured in a question-and-answer format.
Fire Commission Seat 3
George M. Jackson and Larry Tyler, Jr.
Fire Commission Seat 4
J.M. (Marty) Duytschaver and Deborah A. Marks
State Representative, Dist. 68
Julie McClure (Dem.) and Mark G. Flanagan
(Rep.)
Constitutional Amendment 3 Net Ban
Save-our- Sealife and Karen Bell, A.P. Bell Fish Co.
All local Manatee County candidates will be
invited to attend and meet voters prior to the forum.
Forms for questions will be available at the door.


Dolan, Kissick

bow out of public

office; Suhre

unopposed
Bradenton Beach's two "elder statesmen" on the
city council are stepping down from their elected po-
sitions.
Vice Mayor Herb Dolan and Councilman Jim
Kissick are not seeking re-election to the city council.
Kissick cited health reasons for his decision; Dolan said
business interests are taking more of his time.
Councilman Dick Suhre will automatically be re-
elected to his Ward 1 position in December as the only
candidate to qualify for the seat.
Ward 2 Dolan's former district will have a
face-off between David Beaton and Walt Grace.
Ward 4 Kissick's former district will see
John Kaufmann and Ed Peters on the ballot Dec. 6.
A debate between the candidate will be sponsored
by The Islander Bystander in November.



Spring ahead,
fall behind.
Don't forget
to set your
clocks for
Island time.


Time to change the
clocks Sunday
Daylight Savings Time ends on Sunday, Oct.
30, at 2 a.m. This Sunday, turn your clocks back
one hour as we return to Eastern Standard Time.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Bazzy files third suit ........................................ 4
O pinions .................................... ............. 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7.
Anna Maria tides ........................................ 2.
Real estate ................................................26


CLICKING' COSTUMES FOR HALLOWEEN
agggaggsrr--gpmer lrpaoqa


Fire District fright
Lead by the devil himself (Fireman Jack Williams), a parade of costumes took place during the Anna
Maria Fire District's annual Halloween costume party held at St. Bernard Catholic Church in Holmes
Beach last Saturday night. The event was attended by approximately 150 people. For more on the dance
and about Halloween, see pages 8 and 20. Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


Dead fish cause stink

between cities, county


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


OCTOBER 27, 1994







i[] PAGE 2 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


. v ...... .. ji H K '".
,


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Chickees

come to

Bradenton

Beach's newest

park
Improvements are coming to Katie Pierola Sunset
Park, in the 2300 block of Gulf Drive in Bradenton
Beach. Bobby Clay will be at work this week install-
ing eight Indian chickees modeled from a traditional
Native American design found in South Florida circa
1700. The covered structures are just some of the
improvements to the Gulfside park, which will
feature a volleyball net, benches, a sign and other
park-side amenities. There will even be a plaque in
honor of Mayor Katie Pierola and her efforts which
successfully resulted in the beach nourishment
project on the Island. Bradenton Beach plans to
spend about $13,000 on parks in the city this year.
Pictured are Randy Clay and Troy Clay. Islander
Photo: Mark Ratliff


Historical

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
indicated they thought it was a good idea. The $5,000
to accomplish the remodeling is in the bank, the Soci-
ety says.
Smith then showed her proposed plans for the out-
side of the building, including the gazebo and an ex-
panded parking area. Although conceding there is not
currently enough money in the Society's budget to pay
for such renovations, Smith said the money could be
generated during a 12-week fundraising blitz engi-
neered by Smith.
From a nearly packed City Hall audience made up
almost entirely of Society members, Smith recruited
several committees to handle everything from solicit-
ing items to be donated for display to public relations
responsibilities. Practically everyone in attendance
volunteered for a committee, with some people offer-
ing to serve on more than one.
Smith also told the members that she would volun-
teer her services to design a roof for the old city jail, re-
storing the seven-decades-old landmark to what it
probably looked like in the 1920s before it was gutted
by fire. The Society said it would have to think about
that idea for a while.
This week the Society's board of directors met and
said it will not pursue the idea. In fact, despite the fact
that last week the membership had agreed to kick off
the fundraising program on Nov. 1 and had manned
the necessary committees the Society said it has no
plans to do anything at all to the outside of the museum
property.
Island architect Gene Aubry has been helping the
museum and the city with remodeling jobs in Anna
Maria for more than a year at no charge. Aubry said he
was willing to continue to work with the Society and
the city and said he was surprised to read of the
Society's association with Eatman & Smith.
Norwood says Smith came up with the outside
renovation plan on her own after realizing a newly re-
modeled interior wouldn't attract much attention unless
something were done to the exterior as well.
"Her (Smith's) idea is, if you change the inside of
the museum nobody is going to know it as they go
past," Norwood said. "So you change the outside, too."
"But you see, Emily is relatively new to the Is-
land," Norwood said. "She didn't realize that (a portion
of the land included in the proposed outside renova-
tion) is a park that (people) have given their lifeblood
fixing up, and that the city owns all that land."
Norwood says that when Smith and her partner,
Tom Eatman, looked over the property they visualized


the possible outside improvements without consulting
the Society.
"She (Smith) was not with us," Norwood said.
"She wasn't with any member of the Historical Soci-
ety when she did all of this."
Norwood went on to say that though Smith pre-
sented the larger outside plan in addition to the con-
tracted-for interior proposal, there was never any set
date when that plan might be accomplished.
"This was part of (Eatman and Smith's) overall
plan, whether it be this year, next year or 10 years from
now," Norwood said."They wanted to present this as
the whole plan to the membership, and that's how this
was presented at the meeting.
"But the board of directors had only approved the
inside of the museum," Norwood said, "and that's what
it all boils down to. Nobody said it had been approved
or that we were starting on it right away. It was just
looking toward the future."
That future probably won't include a gazebo or a
change in the parking area if Simches has anything to
say about it.
"The city is not interested in any changes or additions
outside the present building," Simches wrote in an Oct. 20
letter to the Society's board of directors. "There just is not
room. Much of the space is used by the public works de-
partment and the other space is committed to the park."
Simches then went a little further. While not men-
tioning that the Society rents the property from the city
for a dollar a year, he intimated that as a landlord the
city had done just about as much for the Society as it
could, and if that's not good enough the Society can go
elsewhere.
"The Anna Maria Historical Society represents all
three Island cities," Simches wrote. "If the Anna Maria
Historical Society desires to go beyond the space of-
fered by the city and wishes to deal with spaces beyond
the present building that will infringe upon present use
of such spaces, it may be in your best interest to look
at other locations on the Island that will allow accom-
modations to your expansion needs.
"I believe the city has been most accommodating
to the all-Island Historical Society as far as the use of
space," Simches said. "Once again, the board of direc-
tors may wish to consider relocating the museum so
other activities you are concerned about may be devel-
oped."
According to Norwood, one thing the city does not
have to be worried about is problems with its Histori-
cal Society tenant.
"We don't do anything without consulting the city,"
Norwood said. "We would not even start to think about
doing anything before we take it up to City Hall "


Dead fish
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
to the high water mark but the state has domain over
that sand."
Stephens said the county's legal staff told him the
county cannot expend public funds to clean private
beaches but the county is working with the Department
of Environmental Protection on the issue of cleaning
the new beach.
In a related matter, Anna Maria Commissioner
Dottie McChesney asked officials to respond to a let-
ter received by the City of Anna Maria from a woman
who was stung by a stingray.
In the letter, Linda S. Groff of Frostproof, Fla., said
she was taken to the hospital in "excruciating pain," has
been treated by her doctor four times and by a derma-
tologist three times and has spent $437 on the wound.
"I now have a dreaded fear of the ocean," she
wrote. "You should have posted signs on the beaches
warning the public of how numerous stingrays were
this year and of the pain and suffering a person could
have if stung. Had there been signs on the beaches I
would never have gone into the water."
"I think it's a health issue," said McChesney.
"People are innocent when they come down here. I'm
asking if you have any ideas about this."
Stephens noted, "You can put it in the newspaper, but
people don't read the newspaper because they're on va-
cation. We can create a bureaucracy so big that we can
cover every issue but I don't think it solves the problem."
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie Martini said a
warning could be added to the "no" signs posted at the
beach, but McChesney said that would scare people.
Bradenton Beach Councilman Dick Shure si -
gested that the chamber of commerce produce flyers
warning visitors about things such as stingrays, no al-
cohol on the beach, the 25 mph speed limit in Anna
Maria and put them in the Island's rental rooms.
The cities agreed to present resolutions to their
councils to ban the taking of live shells on the Island's
beaches, as requested by McChesney. Stephens said the
resolutions should be forwarded to the county commis-
sion and the local delegation for further action.
Martini said she is concerned about access to the
beach by people in wheelchairs and Stephens recom-
mended that she contact a local group currently work-
ing to improve accessibility for the handicapped.
Kissick said there is a large increase in the number
of sandspurs growing on the Island's beaches and
asked officials to think about solutions to the problem.
Pierola proposed a meeting between the Island cit-
ies and the county concerning beach issues.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 27, 1994 A PAGE 3 ii


Yard waste creates garbage rate
increase in Holmes Beach, Anna Maria


Residents in Anna Maria and Holmes Beach
will pay $1.70 additional for garbage collection to
Waste Management of Manatee County as soon
as collection of yard waste begins.
Although not officially approved by the cities, the
collection fee is mandated by Waste Management.
Yard waste collection includes garden trash,
limbs, brush and palm fronds and may not weigh
more than 40 pounds or be longer than four feet. It
must be tightly bundled and placed in a container
for collection. The waste may not exceed the height
of each container. Logs and limbs may not exceed
six inches in diameter.
Containers or bundles must be placed at
curbside no later than 6 a.m. on the designated day.
Residents of Bradenton Beach have been no-
tified of new sanitation regulations that become
effective Nov. 1. The fee for collection by the city
has not increased.
Additions to the regulations include provisions


for yard waste and white goods (appliances).
All yard waste will be picked up on Saturday
only.
Yard waste collection is limited to grass clip-
pings, tree trimmings, leaves, brush, pine needles,
etc. It may not be mixed with garbage or other
trash. Loose yard waste must be bagged or placed
in cans. Tree trimmings must be bundled in "man-
ageable bundles" not to exceed four feet long and
no more than 40 pounds.
Condominiums, apartments and businesses
may follow the same regulations or designate a
dumpster for yard waste only.
At the discretion of the Bradenton Beach sani-
tation supervisor, an extra charge may be made for
large piles.
White goods, including such items as refrig-
erators, stoves, hot water heaters and air condition-
ers will be picked up by appointment only for a fee
of $65 per item.


Councilman

eludes battery

charge
The State Attorney will not file battery charges
against Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim Kissick in
a Sept. 3 incident because attempts to contact the vic-
tim were unsuccessful.
Bradenton Beach Police Chief Jack Maloney said
he received a letter from the State Attorney's Office
last week stating a letter sent to the victim, Todd
Aigott, 24, of Bradenton Beach was returned to their
office as undelivered.
The incident occurred on the pier in the 500 block
of Coquina Beach where Aigott was fishing. He said he
did not know the activity was illegal and Kissick con-
fronted him, yelled at him and struck him open handed
in the face, according to the police report.
Kissick told police that when he approached Aigott
to tell him that fishing is not permitted, Aigott verbally
harassed him and spit in his face.


Holmes Beach council protests plane fly-overs


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council is expected to
pass a resolution on Nov. 1 objecting to the routing of
flight paths to and from the Sarasota Bradenton Airport
over the city.
The proposed resolution is the result of a request
by resident Ron Robinson, who brought the problem to
the council's attention. Robinson said he has noticed an
increase in flight paths over the Island, especially in the
past year, and he is awakened by airplanes at 6 and 7
a.m. and 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.
The resolution, introduced at last week's work ses-
sion, said this routing "significantly lowers the quality
of our lives with noise pollution, air pollution and the
danger of accidents which could result in loss of life
and property damage."


The resolution also requests a representative from
the city on "all existing and future committees formed
to address issues regarding flight paths, noise abate-
ment, etc. that directly affect our citizens."
Public Works Superintendent John Fernandez told
council that he was "quite taken aback" by the bids to
repair the Key Royale Bridge approximately
$430,000 and $480,000. The engineering firm had es-
timated the repairs at $160,000, the amount budgeted
by council.
"We should get with our attorney and see if there's
a negotiation procedure we may be able to enter into
with the two contractors that bid to see if we can do
something about the cost," he explained.
"This is something the attorney has to get involved
in because we don't want to jeopardize the bidding pro-
cess."


Anna Maria City
11/1, 10 a.m., Commission meeting on
maintenance position
11/2, 8 a.m., Codification committee
11/2, 1 p.m., Commission meeting with
codification attorney
Bradenton Beach
10/27, 7 p.m., Council meeting on land
development code
Holmes Beach
11/1, 1 p.m., Planning Commission
11/1, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting


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[IM PAGE 4 a OCTOBER 27, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Bazzy sues 18, City of Bradenton Beach,


others in marina dispute


By Paul Roat
Allan Bazzy has made good on his promise to sue
Bradenton Beach in the wake of a denial of his request
to expand his Bradenton Beach Marina operation.
In fact, his promise was made in triplicate.
Bazzy last week filed his third lawsuit against the
city. In it, he is seeking undetermined damages against
a host of city officials and residents, including:
Council members Bill Campbell and Jim Kissick,
the City of Bradenton Beach, Mike Norman, Fred
Bartizal, A. Frank Banyas, Mickey Banyas, Lee
Myczkowski, Charles Webber, Ward Hinds, Mabel
Hinds, Larry Hinds, Laura Gray, George Howell, Tom
Hoey, Kay Hoey, Ida Cuthbertson, Joe Kane, Leroy
Arnold and "certain persons presently unknown."
Bazzy states in his most-recent suit, "Shortly after
Bazzy's application was filed with Bradenton Beach,
Kissick, Campbell, Defendants and others conspired,
reached a meeting of the minds, and commenced their
scheme to defeat Bazzy's application. In so doing, the
defendants deprived Bazzy of his legally protected
rights, including his civil rights.
"Additionally, several of the Defendants caused or at-
tempted to cause personal gain for themselves or others
who had commercial and financial interests located in the
same area of Bradenton Beach as Bazzy's marina."
Bazzy claims:
The group organized "so that they would have
more power to coerce and influence the outcome of
Bradenton Beach's actions on Bazzy's application."
The group decided upon a common course of
action to defeat Bazzy's application.
The group solicited money to fund a "war chest"
to defeat the application, hiring an attorney and private


investigator and "conducted anonymous mass mailings
through the United States mail for the purpose of so-
liciting opposition to Bazzy's application, and for other
purposes to further their scheme."
The group "engaged in a pattern of intimidation
and harassment by threatening employees of Bradenton
Beach that the employees would be terminated from
their jobs if they favored Bazzy's application; by hav-
ing the private investigator spend days staking out
Bradenton Beach City Hall and Bazzy's marina; by
having the private investigator videotape the daily op-
erations at Bazzy's marina; by having the private inves-
tigator follow Bazzy's marina vehicle when it left the
marina premises."
Also, "By threatening to sue Bradenton Beach's
clerk and attorney; by threatening to report Bradenton
Beach to the State of Florida; by falsely calling Bazzy
a liar during his public presentation about the proposed
project; by falsely publishing that Bradenton Beach's
planner had illegally accepted money from Bazzy with
regard to the applications and proposed project; by
falsely claiming Bradenton Beach's clerk destroyed
public records regarding Bazzy's applications; by
threatening criminal prosecution; by reporting a non-
existent fuel spill at Bazzy's marina; and by telling
Bradenton Beach officials Bazzy was a 'son-of-a-bitch'
and threatening to 'blow him out of the water.'"
Bazzy said in the suit that Bridge Tender Inn, Inc.,
principals Mike Norman and Fred Bartizal "obtained a
special exception from Bradenton Beach without com-
plying with any applicable ordinance to convert three
docks owned by the Bridge Tender Inn, Inc.,from pri-
vate use to commercial use in order to benefit their
pecuniary interests."


The suit maintains that Campbell and Kissick at-
tended numerous "secret meetings" with the other de-
fendants and indicated they would vote against the
marina expansion proposal. Before the city council
voted on the expansion, Bazzy said in the lawsuit,
"Kissick and Campbell admitted on the record that they
had knowingly engaged in ex parte communications
and stated that they were basing their votes upon their
estimation of public opinion which they had received
through ex parte communications."
The Florida Supreme Court ruled last year that land
use changes such as proposed by Bazzy for the marina
expansion were "quasi-judicial" in nature rather than leg-
islative, and the hearings would be conducted in a simi-
lar fashion to court proceedings. In a related case, the
Supreme Court ruled that "ex-parte communication," or
communication outside of the public view, would not be
permitted in the course of a land-use change.
Bazzy claimed: "Kissick's and Campbell's votes on
Aug. 23, 1994, (when the council turned down Bazzy's
request) violated Bazzy's procedural and substantive due
process rights because the votes were arbitrary and capri-
cious; were based upon purely political or personal rea-
sons and not any legitimate public purpose; and resulted
from violations of the Sunshine Law and unlawful system-
atic ex parte communications."
Bazzy wraps up his suit by stating:
"Kissick, Campbell, Defendants and Bradenton
Beach acted intentionally, willfully, knowingly, reck-
lessly, wantonly, maliciously, fraudulently and with
flagrant disregard for the interests and rights of Bazzy."
Bazzy has demanded a jury trial before Circuit
Judge Scott Brownell. The date for the proceedings has
not yet been set.


Braden
property o
Allan Baz:
lice and pu
In a lam
city "has f
property to


... demands city buildings off his property
nton Beach has illegally encroached onto a result, Bazzy is entitled to judgment for possession of the public works building.
occupied by the Bradenton Beach Marina, of the property and damages suffered, including inter- Bazzy had proposed deeding the encroachments to
zy has claimed, and he wants the city's po- est." the city if his proposal to expand the marina was favor-
iblic works departments off his land. He is seeking damages in excess of $15,000. ably approved. However, council members in August
suit filed in circuit court, Bazzy has said the A corner of the police station measuring about denied the marina expansion request.
ailed or refused to deliver possession of the three feet by 10 feet encroaches onto a part of the ma- No date for the hearings have been set by Judge
rBa77V nr nav Rz77v thep nrfits from it As rina nrooertv. Bazzv has said, as well as a 30-foot strip Brownell.


... and sues for reversal of decision on marina


The colorful and controversial former mayor of
Bradenton Beach, Dick Connick, has reappeared as a
central character in Bradenton Beach Marina owner
Allan Bazzy's lawsuit against the city.
Bazzy has requested Circuit Court Judge Scott
Brownell to reverse a decision by the Bradenton Beach
City Council denying his request for a rezoning, spe-
cial exception and street vacation
near six lots Bazzy owns near the
marina, located just south of the
Cortez Bridge on Anna Maria Sound.
Bazzy sought permission by the
city to expand the marina by building
a boat storage shed on the lots, cur-
rently zoned for residential use. His
request was denied by the city coun-
cil in August.
A key element in Bazzy's suit.is
the nature of the proceedings. The ,
Florida Supreme Court in 1993 ruled
that land-use changes such as pro-
posed by Bazzy were "quasi-judicial"
in nature: the proceedings were to be Connick
conducted as in a courtroom, with
evidence presented, witnesses examined and cross-ex-
amined, and the decision reached to be based only on
the evidence presented publicly.
Bazzy is challenging the city council decision "be-
cause the record is devoid of evidence sufficient to
support a denial."
City Planner Bill Brisson recommended the
changes were in keeping with the city's land develop-
ment laws and comprehensive plan.
Bazzy also had four experts testify to traffic, land
use, property values in the area and aesthetics of the
project. All four experts agreed the proposed expansion
would be an asset, not a detriment, to the area, Bazzy's
lawsuit states.


In addition, Bazzy provided evidence that the area
near the property had historically been used for com-
mercial uses, specifically commercial fishing, commer-
cial boat storage and maintenance, and a commercial
diving operation.
The testimony was made by Dick Connick, who
served as mayor of the city for 19 years.
Connick's testimony, according to the
lawsuit, "documented the pre-existing com-
mercial uses of the property and other prop-
erty in the neighborhood, as well as
SBradenton Beach's determination to permit
the commercial uses on the residentially
zoned property despite objections dating
back to 1982."
SConnick also provided testimony re-
:' garding street vacations within the city.
Bazzy had requested vacation of a portion of
Church Street and 100 feet of Bay Drive
South as a part of his marina expansion
plans.
"According to Mr. Connick," the law-
suit states, "Bradenton Beach's rule or
policy was to vacate a street or alley when
the applicant owned on all sides of the right of way and
the vacation would not landlock any other property
owner. Mr. Connick stated that he reviewed
petitioner's application for street vacation and that it
met the criteria for approval which had long been es-
tablished and followed by Bradenton Beach."
As Connick said it in his sworn testimony to
Bazzy, "I was a member of the city council and mayor
of Bradenton Beach for 19 years and during the time
was involved in numerous vacations. I have reviewed
Allan Bazzy's application and in my opinion this va-
cation application would meet the criteria that we had
previously established for vacations."
Bazzy is basing his lawsuit on grounds that the


Allan Bazzy
expansion of the marina complies with the land devel-
opment rules, is consistent with the city's comprehen-
sive plan and that the Supreme Court has ruled that
"opinions of residents are not factual evidence and not
a sound basis for denial of a zoning change applica-
tion."
The suit states that Councilmen Bill Campbell and
Jim Kissick, the two dissenting members on the marina
expansion issue, "did not rely upon a single legitimate
public interest. The basis of their actions were clearly
stated on the record as being founded upon the general
public opinions held by their constituents."
Bazzy is requesting a reversal of the decision and
damages and costs in his lawsuit. No date for trial has
been set.


L) JLdYl y V Pa "a"Y ul"Flux-'a xlv"' I Lo


------r- -r ---~






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 U PAGE 5 ii0

Ten architects submit qualifications to Holmes Beach


In preparation for bids to remodel Holmes Beach
City Hall, 10 architectural firms responded to the city's
request for certification and qualifications.
The architect chosen will be required to consult
and advise the city regarding the remodeling and/or re-
construction of City Hall as well as the public works
and police department buildings.
Applicants were required to furnish certifications,
registrations and licenses; evidence of adequacy in-


cluding a list of three completed projects with refer-
ences; a statement of qualifications and personnel;
seven copies of the proposal; and certification that they
are a Drug Free Workplace.
Proposals for services were received from Fawley
Bryant Architects, Bradenton; Jerry N. Zollar Architect/
Planner, Bradenton; Hunnington Dreher, Sarasota; Design
Matrix, Inc., St. Petersburg; PGAL, Anna Maria; Richard
Bedford, Architects, Bradenton; H. Patterson Fletcher,


Bradenton Beach parasail

business OK may not be


Bradenton Beach City Council members
stopped just short of admitting they may have
goofed last May when they approved a commercial
use of a dock adjacent to the Bridge Tender Inn on
Bridge Street.
Council members last Thursday agreed to re-
consider the action of permitting a parasail business
on the dock.
The decision came after Building Official Whitey
Moran told council members, "The procedures fol-
lowed by the council in the granting of the Bridge
Tender's request for the Parasail operation... was not
in compliance with Land Development Code[s] ..."
"My suggestion to council is to go back and fix
it," Moran said. "I've listened to the tape [the re-
corded tape of the proceedings May 19, 1994] three
or four times and I'm not sure what was granted or
who it was granted to."


IcaIs


Council members directed Darrell Konecy,
owner of the parasail business, to submit an appli-
cation for a special exception to conduct his busi-
ness, Fun and Sun Sports, Inc., at 135 Bridge
Street. Fees for the special exception were waived
after he said he had already paid about $1,000 to
City Planner Bill Brisson in consultation charges.
Councilman Dick Suhre said he understood the
decision was possible under the special "historic
Old-Town" designation of Bridge Street. Moran
said his review of the laws governing the area did
not allow such a special exception without the ap-
plicant appearing before the Planning and Zoning
Board, city council and having all meetings pub-
licly noticed.
Konecy will be allowed to continue to operate
the parasail business until the matter of issuance of
a special exception is decided later this year.


Architect, Bradenton; W.R. Frizzel, Architects, Palm
Beach Gardens; Gee & Jenson, Engineers, Architects,
Planners, Inc., Sarasota; and, Schmidt, Garden & Erikson,
Inc., Architects, Engineers, Planners, Sarasota.

Residents a 'no

show' at meeting
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger ex-
pressed disappointment that no residents from his city
showed up for a meeting he called to form a support
group for the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
The idea for the group came out of a meeting in
August in which county and Island officials met to
brainstorm ways to raise funds for the Center. At that
meeting Bohnenberger suggested forming a "Friends
of the AMICC" group to coordinate with the Island
cities and spearhead fund raisers.
However at Saturday's meeting two Anna Maria
residents, both regular AMICC volunteers, Marcia and
Dale Powers, came to request that Bohnenberger join
with the established volunteer program at the center
rather than establish another group.
Bohnenberger said he was trying to get more
people involved.

Flu shots a success
The AMI Forever Young Organization, the
center's social activity group for Island and Manatee
County retired persons, provided flu shots on Monday,
Oct. 17, for 245 people.
The cost was free with Medicare, $6 sans Medicare.
If there is enough interest, a second program can
be set up. Call the center at 778-1908.


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m







liB PAGE 6 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Its-I] 'f ;


Look out below
Jack Egan, Islander cartoonist, forgot one item on
his warning sign this week: no glass bottles. How he
could forget is hard to understand since he rides right
by this little "warning" on Gulf Drive every time he en-
ters the City of Anna Maria.
Of course, it's on the "NO" list of all the Manatee
County signs at public beaches and fishing areas.
No this and no that.
At the most recent meeting of Island Elected Of-
ficials, the discussion centered around a letter from a
visitor who suffers from the sting of a ray last summer.
Indeed, it can be a serious injury, but more appropri-
ate signs than "beware the rays" at every beach access
would be "enter at your own risk."
Liability being what it is these days, the sign would
be more prudent on the approach to Anna Maria Island
along the Palma Sola Causeway. Once the unknowing,
unsuspecting visitor has arrived on Anna Maria, it's too
late.
The real danger, according to Island "crackers," is
that everyone will return and stay.


Connick's back
With Halloween just around the corner, it was just
a little spooky to have Dick Connick's name surface in
the form of a deposition contained in the lawsuit filed
last week by the foiled-marina-expander Allan Bazzy.
Connick was mayor of Bradenton Beach from Dec.
6, 1973,to Dec. 12, 1986. Connick was widely recog-
nized as a strong mayor who frequently got what he
wanted for his "cronies" and constituents. He now lives
in the Englewood area south of Venice.
In his deposition, Connick says that Bazzy should
get the street vacations he wants because "that would
meet the criteria we had previously established."
An overwhelming number of residents in the area
of the marina are clear and consistent in their desire to
maintain their neighborhood atmosphere and oppose
any further expansion of the marina. Some of them
have lived there long enough to remember Connick's
reign.
The lots that Bazzy bought adjacent to his marina
are zoned residential and they should remain that way.
We don't believe he had a right to expect to have them
re-zoned or the streets vacated when he bought them,
Connick or no Connick.
The council in Bradenton Beach represents the
residents who live there now, not in 1973 or even 1986.


ISLANDERS aI11
OCTOBER 27, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 49
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
Y Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Tingler
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


IJX1TCH Our &FLOWI/


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~Alny COnYTell^
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TOM-WM SEASHLAw
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By Egan


SLICK


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Sting signs needed
We have been to your beautiful city on numerous
occasions to fish and shell in the past.
We were there in July of this year. This is when I
received a wound from a sting ray.
My husband took me to the hospital in excruciat-
ing pain. I have been under a doctor's care since. To
date, I have seen my doctor four times. He has referred
me to a dermatologist whom I have seen three times
with another appointment Nov. 3. Already my medical
bills total $437.
I now have a fear of the ocean.
You should have posted signs on the beaches warn-
ing the public of how numerous the sting rays were this
year and of the pain and suffering a person could have
if stung.
Had there been signs on the beaches, I would never
have gone into the water.
Please put warning signs up. This has really been a
trying experience for me and I am sure there are others.
Linda Goff, Frostproof, Fla.
Editorial pops top off
historical society
In regard to the Islander Bystanders Oct. 20, "Our
Opinion The Sky is Falling," the first seven sentences
were true. I will admit the plans looked mind boggling
when the board first viewed them, but were somewhat
subdued at the general meeting.
The changes for inside the Anna Maria Historical
Museum, gazebo entrance, handicapped bathroom, land-
scaping are sorely needed. The roofing of the jail and res-
toration inside as it once was, was suggested as something
to think about. Perhaps we should have a write-in contest
after people see the plans. I always thought "seeing is
believing," not hearing from some source.
A community expects local papers to stand beside
the Historical Society, in this case, in its endeavor to
make the museum "a wonderland of the past." We can't
sell advertising, but we will appeal to the generosity of
Islanders and tourists when they visit the museum and
hopefully "the papers" when we start our quest.
Jane Adam, vice-president,
Anna Maria Island Historical Society


Keep our open space
As a resident and property owner in the city of
Anna Maria, I would like to commend Bill Worth for
standing up for our best interests. In the Oct. 20 issue
of The Islander Bystander there was an article about a
variance granted that was not a hardship.
I was completely amazed to learn that Planning and
Zoning Chairman Tom Turner defended the decision
by saying "when [the applicant] came to us there was
not a soul in the audience." Does this mean if I am not
present I cannot expect the codes to be upheld?
Mr. Turner further stated that he's never really seen
a "hard hardship" and that variances are for "people's
convenience." Many would agree with architect Dan
Hardy that they are "setting a dangerous precedent" and
"these codes should be followed until they are re-written."
I am also distressed that Tom Turner heads the codi-
fication committee and, as chairman of the planning and
zoning committee, votes on his own changes. This seems
redundant and gives too much power for a man who was
appointed and never elected by the people.
Mr. Turner, by his own admission, is working hard to
make the codes less restrictive. There is very little open
space left in Anna Maria and we must stop the paving over
and giving away of our precious green space.
Gloria Hall, Anna Maria

'Buddy-up' businesses, center
I have a suggestion to offer to the City of Holmes
Beach: "Business Partnerships" with the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
The "Partnership Program" can work in at least
two ways:
a. Local businesses will offer discounts to members
of the center. Or,
b. Local businesses will donate a portion of "the sale"
in the name of the AMICC member back to the AMICC.
This will be a win/win/win program for all concerned
as the AMICC will sell memberships, the businesses in-
volved will see increased volume from the "free advertis-
ing" and goodwill, and members can reap the benefits of
discounted goods and services. Of course, the mechanics
of this program need to be worked out.
Janice Bergbom, CTC, Far Away Places Travel











THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 1, Sam and Annie Cobb
by June Alder


Anna Maria Island youngsters had a great time on Captain John R. Jones's
launch at the turn of the century.


JUST PLAIN SAM


George E. Bean and John R. Jones,
the first two homesteaders on Anna
Maria Island, were Yankees and seafar-
ing men. And so was the third -


Samuel C. Cobb.
But whereas Bean
and Jones were
middle-aged, flamboy-
ant dreamers with lit-
erary leanings, Sam
Cobb was in his 20s,
plain-spoken, steady
and practical.
It was poor health
his "bad heart" had
prevented him from
following his father's
trade as a sea captain
- that brought Sam
from the cold and
damp of New Jersey to
fabled Florida in 1892.
Tall, sandy-haired
Sam was 25 when he


arrived in Tampa with his lively young
wife Annie, also a New Jersey native,
their son Eddie, 3, and daughter Mazie,
only six months old.
By pre-arrangement they took a
steamer down Tampa Bay, past the
Palma Sola, Braidentown and Palmetto
wharves, past the riverfront village of
Manatee (about a dozen stores, two saw-
mills, one cigar factory, a couple of
boarding houses and one church, a Ma-
sonic Hall, a newspaper office and one-
room school) and on up the Manatee and
the Braden rivers to a place called Rye.
Here they threw in their lot with a
Swiss-speaking German farming "com-
mune."
But their stay was short. Evidently
they didn't fit in. Some time in 1893
Sam took his little family back to Tampa
to start over again.
Work was hard to find in Tampa.
The country was in what we'd call a "re-
cession" due to Wall Street shenanigans.
There was labor unrest throughout the
nation and Tampa had its share, with
strikes and violence in the railroad yards
and the cigar factories.
But Sam, a skilled carpenter and
boat-builder, finally got ajob with the car-
riage and wagon works of Binkley & Co.


The Cobbs' third child, Louis, was
born on Feb. 7, 1894, and shortly there-
after Sam was promoted to foreman at
the Binkley boatworks.
Things were looking up for the


Cobbs.
Then their world
crashed in. Annie and
5-year-old Eddie both
came down with ty-
phoid fever in the
summer of 1895.
(Tampa's swampy lo-
cation and its proxim-
ity to Henry Plant's
international port
made it a locus for
contagious diseases.)
Annie pulled
through but Eddie did
not.
In his sorrow, Sam
was desperate to get
Annie and Mazie and


baby Louis away from Tampa. But he
could not afford to leave his job at the
boatworks. He didn't know what to do.
Then Sam met up with the Jones
boys. Perhaps it was at the newspaper
office where 18-year-old Johnny Jones
worked that Sam got to talking with
him and his brother Clair, 16, about his
problems.
Their father had only recently
given up his law practice to farm on
Anna Maria Island. Johnny and Clair
were just as fond of Anna Maria as
Captain Jones was and credited the
healthful climate and curative powers
of the waters there for helping him re-
cover from the yellow fever bout
which had nearly killed him in 1888.
Cobb's younger daughter (not yet
born) said years later that Clair made
the suggestion: "Why don't you pack
them off to Mr. Bean's boarding house
on our Island? It'd do them a world of
good."
It was probably the best advice
Sam Cobb ever got.


Next: A change
for the better


Whereas Bean and Jones
were middle-aged, flam-
boyant dreamers with
literary leanings, Sam
Cobb was plain-spoken,
steady and practical. Tall,
sandy-haired Sam was 25
when he arrived in Tampa
with his lively young wife
Annie, also a New Jersey
native, their son Eddie, 3,
and daughter Mazie, only
six months old.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A PAGE 7 E[I



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1il PAGE 8 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Spooks abound this Halloween


Every year it's the same question for Halloween.
No, it's not "trick or treat?" it's "what do I wear?"
TV cartoon characters Mighty Morphin Power
Rangers have replaced Teenage Ninja Turtles for the
playground set as the "in" costume for this year. But if
one longs for "cute and cuddly," don't give up -
Simba, the young lion from Disney's The Lion King
and characters from the popular movie The Flintstones
are also proving to be favorites.
Little did Jim Carrey, star of the summer hit movie
The Mask, know his character's influence would be in-
stalled into the hallowed halls of Halloween, but The
Mask disguise atop a yellow jacket, pants, rumba shirt,
and hat is hot for older children and adults. And let us
not forget the infamous, bloody, and refuses-to-die
Freddy Krueger. His razor-tipped fingers are slicing off
merchants' shelves due to the recent release of Wes
Craven's New Nightmare.
Add Bill and Hillary Clinton masks, a renewed


interest in medieval times coupled with classics such
as ghosts to Frankenstein, should add to the fun of this
year's Halloween celebration.

When to 'Trick or Treat'
Island police, residents, and vehicle drivers will
expect all ghosts and goblins to be roaming the streets
the evening of Monday, Oct. 31.
Trick or treaters, play it safe remember flash-
lights, light-color clothing, and to look both ways be-
fore crossing the street. Be especially careful after dark.
All the scary things that "go bump in the night"
should be "dead" in their beds by 10 p.m.

Household items hide fright
Any home can be turned into a haunted house for
Halloween.
Attach fishing line to an old rocking chair or a
hobby 'horse. Sprinkle it with baby powder (to give it


the cobwebbedd look") and set it on your porch. As
treat or treaters come to the door, guess what moves for
no reason in the night.
How about gathering dead tree branches and ar-
ranging them in pots around the front door. Add dime-
store spiders to the branches and stand back the
shrieks will be deafening.
Shred old work clothes and hang them from tree
branches or place a mannequin or dress form dressed
in gauzy sheer material outside with a vacuum cleaner
blower billowing the ghostly garb.
Want to see fright first hand? Place a stuffed, scary
looking dummy in one chair and a person, dressed ex-
actly the same, in another chair.
Need blood? Clear corn syrup mixed with red food
coloring will do the trick. Looks great in bathrooms -
blood can be dripping down the tiles. Easy clean up, too.
Last but not least, remember the horror power of
the ... "tape recorder." Dogs howling and people
screaming never fail.


No blues
Jeff and Sally Tyson of Bradenton, dressed as the
Blues Brothers, tookfirstplace in the Anna Maria
Fire District's annual Halloween costume contest.
The evening was another landmark event for the
Tysons Jeff shaved off his mustache which he had
worn since 1981 just for the party. Family reaction?
"The kids didn't recognize me," said Jeff.




The Island Poet

meets

Halloween
Years ago the goblins that you met on Hal-
loween,
Were always the biggest guys you have ever
seen.
When they soaped your windows 'twas a
work of art,
And if you didn't treat them they took the
house apart.
But the goblins you see today are really, oh,
so small,
That if you don't look down you won't see
them at all.
The young mothers who watch from across
the street,
Are proud to have raised these goblins that
really are so sweet.
Bud Atteridge


In the spirit
Island visitors Guchrun Schymanekfrom Berlin, Germany, and Dedlef Hischerfrom Hanover, Germany,
definitely got into the spirit of our American Halloween.



Halloween history runs deep


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
The modern traditions that we celebrate on Hal-
loween- trick-or-treat, jack-o'-lanterns, pranks and
practical jokes can be traced to Ireland.
It was during the wave of Irish and Scottish
immigration to America in the middle of the 19th
century that hundreds of thousands of new citizens
helped to make the ancient Celtic celebration what
it is today.

How trick-or-treating began
Modern trick-or-treating has its origins among
the Celtic people of Scotland, Wales and especially
Ireland.
The ancient Celtic new year began on Nov. 1,
and new year's eve was marked by the festival of
Samhain, the Lord of Death. Part of the Celtic tra-
dition was to light bonfires. Families would let
their household fires go out and then light a new
one from the village bonfire to signify hope for
prosperity in the coming year.
The Halloween tradition as we know it today
began in America around 1840 with Irish and Scot-
tish immigrants. As years passed, the tradition
changed to a younger celebration.
Households began to offer candy, cookies and
apples to children going from home to home on
Halloween evening in exchange for a promise to
not perform pranks and mischief.
The practice eventually evolved into the tradi-
tion of trick-or-treat.


Be safe and be seen on
Halloween
Ghosts and goblins may fly through the night
without being seen, but that isn't such a good idea
for little trick-or-treaters.
To be more visible at night to motorists, chil-
dren should wear light-colored costumes.
"Adding patches or strips of reflective material to
a costume and trick-or-treat bags makes small children
easier to see, especially from a distance," says Dr.
Raymond Pierie, Florida Optometric Association presi-
dent.
Children should also have clear vision through
masks and costumes.
"Masks should have eye holes large enough that
a child's peripheral vision is not reduced," Pierie ad-
vises. "If vision is restricted, a child may not see a
car approaching. It is also a good idea to remove the
mask when crossing a street."
A safer alternative to a mask is to paint a child's
face with non-allergic make-up.
Wigs and hats which may also block a child's
vision, Pierie warns, should be fastened securely.
Another safety measure is for children to carry
a flashlight and stay on well-lighted streets.
Younger children who may need help crossing
streets should be accompanied by an adult or older
brother or sister.
Information for this article was provided by the
Florida Optometric Association and from "The
Great Halloween Book, by Mark Walker, available
from the Island Branch Library.














By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
A hay ride may be a good, old-fash-
ioned tradition on Halloween, but Anna
Maria Mayor Ray Simches says it's not
for the streets of his town. It's a nice
idea, he says, but there are too many
possible safety problems especially
for children.
Bortell's Lounge has asked the city
commission for its approval to conduct
a hay ride on Halloween between 8 p.m.
and 11 p.m.
"Our intention is to use Al Tate's
1949 John Deere tractor pulling his 18-
foot trailer around Anna Maria City,"
Marie A. Palella of Bortell's Lounge
wrote in an Oct. 5 letter to the city. "The
tractor and trailer have all the required
equipment and insurance for legal road
use. We have used this tractor and trailer
in both the Fourth of July and Priva-
teers' parades for the past five years.
This would be the first year for a hay
ride."
Palella said the intended route
would start at the city hall parking lot
where passengers would load and un-
load. From there the ride would proceed
down Pine Avenue, then take a left on
North Shore Drive, past the Rod & Reel
Pier to North Bay Boulevard. Continu-
ing down North Bay to Spring Avenue,
the ride would conclude back at city
hall, turning into the parking lot off of
Spring Avenue.
Palella said Bortell's hoped to re-
peat the trip six times if there was
enough interest.
"My immediate concerns are those of
safety, potential for liability and the factor
of noise nuisance," Simches wrote in an
Oct. 21 memo to the city commissioners.
Simches, who knew he would be unable to
attend the Oct. 25 regular commission
meeting, wrote the memo to express his
questions and indicate that he would be
against the proposal.
"I would be opposed to such an
event," Simches wrote, "and I believe
the parents of children who are trick-or-
treating would agree."
"The idea of a hay ride on Hallow-
een is a wonderful one for children and
parents, but the idea of a hay ride from
8 p.m. to 11 p.m. in our residential area
I find testing the realities of safety," the


Jean B. Campbell, 85, of
Bradenton Beach, died Oct. 21,
1994, in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Service will be at 11 a.m.,
Thursday, at Griffith-Cline Island
Chapel, 6000 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. Rev. Bill Hull will officiate.
There will be no visitation.
Memorials may be made to the
Pinellas Association for Retarded
Children, Curry Villa, 3100 75th St.
N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 33710 or the
American Heart Association,
Suncoast Chapter, Manatee County
Branch, 6028 26th St. W.,
Bradenton, Fla. 34207.
Born in New Castle, Pa., Mrs.
Campbell came to Manatee County


mayor said.
Simches' letter stressed his con-
cerns for the city's children, and he
suggested a possible compromise the
city might find acceptable.
"I am sure there should be an ac-
commodation made for children, which
would include the hay ride occurring
during daylight hours," Simches said.
"As the request is presented in the let-
ter of Oct. 5 from Bortell's Lounge, I
would vote to deny the request."
Simches asked the commission to
explore several alternatives:
Conducting the hay ride during
daylight hours and gearing it to chil-
dren and families.
Taking the hay ride to Bayfront
Park in the early evening and having
activities available there.
Working with the Community
Center to coordinate the hay ride and
focus on children and family activities
at that location.
Palella says that children have not
been figured into the hay ride plans for
a very specific reason.
"We're a lounge," Palella says.
"It's an adult business." She says the
hay ride is to drum up business for the
bar, that as far as she knows it will not
violate any city ordinance or state traf-
fic law, and there's really nothing the
city can do legally to stop it.
So why tell the city about it, The
Islander Bystander asked Palella Mon-
day afternoon.
"We thought it was the right thing
to do, and we're using the city parking
lot it was just for consideration,"
Palella said.
In his memo, Simches reminded
the commission that the draft of a tem-
porary use permit ordinance was on the
agenda for Tuesday night's meeting.
He said such a permit process would
spell out the criteria for parades and
other one-time activities (such as the
hay ride) and would be an "equitable
way of dealing with these requests."
"I have confidence in the commis-
sion and its commitment to the health,
safety and welfare of the citizens of
Anna Maria, and know that you will
make a decision that meets the needs of
the general population of our city," the
mayor concluded his letter.


from Nazareth, Pa. in 1960. She was
a draftsman for the U.S. Naval Tor-
pedo Station in Newport, R.I., and
served as chief of ammunition divi-
sion, Aberdeen Proving Ground in
Maryland. She was a Presbyterian.
She was secretary treasurer of
Riverview Condominiums in
Bradenton. She was a member of the
Bradenton Duplicate Bridge Club
and an alumni of Lafayette College,
Easton, Pa.
She is survived by a son, Will-
iam, a city council member from
Bradenton Beach, and a sister, Vir-
ginia Beach of St. Petersburg; one
grandchild and three great-grand-
children.


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il PAGE 10 M OCTOBER 27, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


AL I -l ern


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Bridge Tender, Inc.,has received a one-year exten-
sion to operate the restaurant and tackle concession on
the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier.
Bradenton Beach City Council members agreed
last week to the extension, but unanimously denied a
request by the concessionaire to modify the contract
to provide less revenue to the city.
Jeff Hamilton, an attorney representing Bridge
Tender, Inc., had requested a number of modifications
to the contract between the group and the city. Among
those modifications was the change in the amount of
money the concessionaire pays to the city from 12
percent of gross receipts to 12 percent of the receipts
less costs for food and labor.
"It states in the lease that the concessionaire
should pay 12 percent of the gross receipts," Council-
man Dick Suhre said. "To deviate from that is to sub-
Ssidize private business with public dollars, and I am
opposed to that." Other council members agreed with
Suhre.
The council did approve a revenue change to the
contract, agreeing to waive 40 percent of the revenue
generated from the sale of 50-cent fishing fees on the
pier. The revenue will be used to offset the hiring of
an additional person to work at the pier. Based on pre-
vious revenue, the financial waiver would amount to
about $3,400 annually.
"I can't pay someone to collect the fishing fee,"
fishing pier manager Jodi Lanius said, "but I'll have
to hire someone." She had originally proposed that she
and the city split the cost of hiring an extra person,
which would have totaled about $5,000 per year for
the city.
Vice Mayor Herb Dolan proposed the compro-
mise of deducting 20 cents per ticket from the pay-
ment to the city.
The city has received $6,787 from January to
August of this year in revenue from the fishing license
fee from the pier.
Another modification of the contract approved by
city council members was the concessionaire to have
the right "to prevent excessive consumption of alco-
holic beverages by pier patrons on the pier."
Attorney Hamilton had originally proposed that
no food or beverages be brought onto the pier. Suhre
opposed that blanket prohibition, stating he was wor-


ried that fishers would be searched prior to admittance
to the pier to ensure they did not have any food or drink
with them.
Lanius said her intent in the modification was to
limit people from bringing cases of beer onto the pier
and leaving the empty cans strewn on the deck. "I want
this to be a family operation," she said.
Other modifications to the pier contract include:
The concessionaire is the sole purveyor of the
sale of food, drinks and alcoholic beverages upon the
pier.
The concessionaire may use the deck area imme-
diately adjacent to the restaurant for tables and chairs.
Within the confines of the Bradenton Beach noise
ordinance, entertainment may be provided with prior
council approval.
The concessionaire may close the pier with prior
written notice to city officials during the pier recon-
struction early next year.
The concessionaire may erect additional signage
on the pier, as long as the signs are compatible with the
overall "Old Town" theme of Bridge Street.
The contract extension was approved 3-1, with
Suhre voting against the extension and Councilman
Bill Campbell absent. Suhre said he favored opening up
the contract for competitive bids in lieu of the renewal.
This is the final extension of the pier concession
lease, which is a three-year lease with two one-year
extensions permitted. The original contract was with
Mickey Mims, who transferred the lease to Bridge Ten-
der, Inclast June.
Questions had been raised by four people regard-
ing the ability of the concessionaire to request modify-
ing the lease agreement. Richard Lenerise, Sandy
Greiner, Shirley Greiner and H. Richard Greiner have
indicated a desire to take over operation of the pier
concession.
Hamilton and City Attorney Alan Prather agreed
that the contract allows the city and the concessionaire
to enter into negotiations concerning the further terms
of the one-year extension agreements. Prather said ne-
gotiations would only be limited to extending the term
of the lease, and all other areas would be open for dis-
cussion.
Principals in the Bridge Tender, Inc., are Dr. Fred
Bartizal and Mike Norman.


Council divided on requiring


referendum to
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council was divided last
week on the need for an amendment to the city's char-
ter requiring a referendum for density changes.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger and Councilwoman Pat
Geyer, as well as several citizens in the audience, felt the
council would be abdicating its responsibility if it passed
the question to the voters. Council persons Luke
Courtney, Billie Martini and Carol Whitmore favored
the proposed amendment. Council Chairwoman Mary
Ellen Reichard said she has concerns about the cost to the
city but does not oppose the proposed amendment.
The amendment, proposed by Whitmore, states
that "the density limitations provided in the existing
comprehensive plan of the City of Holmes Beach, as
adopted in May, 1989, shall not be increased without
the referendum approval of the electors of the City of
Holmes Beach." If approved by council, the amend-
ment would be put to a vote of the electors at the next
general election.
Whitmore said "the public needs to be making
that decision" versus the five council members and
she wants to know how other council members feel.
Reichard said, "If it would make the citizens of
this city sleep easier at night to know that any time
there's a density increase it would have to come to a
vote and they would be willing to spend the $3,000
every time, that's fine by me. My first concern was the
money."
Geyer pointed to the history of the city to decrease
density rather than increase it.
"We've never increased it," she said. "If the
people elect me to sit here, they want me to make that
hard choice and they let me know what they think


change density
about it. I think it's unnecessary."
"Pat, I don't think you trust the voters," replied
Whitmore. "There's been a lot of people up here in the
past who I felt made decisions (based) on their own
special interests. I feel you have to trust the residents."
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches
said he feels the proposed amendment is an outcome of
an issue being considered by the commission a re-
quest to increase density in the A-1 district.
"There is already a democratic process for that," he
noted. "You're saying that you mistrust the delibera-
tions of the council. I don't think you could ever sneak
by the public because I trust their interest and concern.
I have a problem with building more things into law
and not trusting people or the elected representatives."
Bohnenberger agreed with Simches.
"This is an elected form of government," he noted.
"Everybody here was elected to make tough decisions.
I think you're abdicating your responsibility by trying
to put it back to the voters who elected you to make the
decision."
Courtney said he favors the amendment but it
should also include density decreases.
Resident Ron Robinson said, "You've got six
people here that were elected to make decisions and the
best decision you can make is an informed decision.
You all devote the time and effort to get the informa-
tion you need to make the decision. Are the people
going to have the opportunity or spend the time to be-
come as informed as you are to make that decision?"
Resident Bob Jones asked how other communities
address the issue. Reichard said she would contact the
Florida League of Cities. She also asked for citizen
comment on the issue.
Discussion will resume in December.






THE ISLAN

Council says no, then maybe to

alcohol at Holmes Beach Gulf-

front concession


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
There's no place for alcohol at the family oriented
public beach, maintained the Holmes Beach City Coun-
cil at Thursday's work session. However, after continued
discussion, council agreed to do further research on a re-
quest to serve alcohol at the beach and bring it back to the
December work session.
Lorna Dee Percifield of P. S. Beach Associates re-
cently made the request to serve beer and wine with meals
at the Cafe on the Beach at Manatee County Public Beach.
In a letter to Mayor Rich Bohnenberger, Percifield said
there's been "significant public request for it" and the
county has already granted an exception for serving the
beverages at park and golf course concessions.
City Clerk Leslie Ford said the city's Alcoholic Bev-
erage Ordinance would have to amended.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore was the first to raise
her objections.
"I don't support serving alcohol at any public beach,"
she said. "I feel it's a liability to the city and the county.
It's probably the most family oriented restaurant on the
Island. I don't want the kids exposed to it. It's a tempta-
tion we don't need."
She also had concerns about people wandering out on
the beach with glasses and bottles and the possibility of
someone getting cut by glass.
Councilwoman Billie Martini noted that the conces-
sion attracts more patrons than it ever has before and con-
cessionaires don't need alcohol to attract people. She was
also concerned about people wandering on the beach with
alcoholic beverages in hand.
"Council decisions are supposed to be based on facts
and not personal opinions," Bohnenberger reminded
council. "As an example, the malls in this area are very
family oriented and the food courts have beer and wine."
Council Chairman Mary Ellen Reichard said person-
ally she is not opposed to the serving of beer and wine at
the beach concession but the possible repercussions dis-
turb her.
"It could attract a whole new element to our beaches
that right now don't cross over the bridge and choose to
stay on the causeway beaches where alcohol is allowed,"
she said. "We are a family residential community and our
major industry is family oriented tourism. I'm afraid if we
allow this change, we'll be opening Pandora's Box and
creating a situation that may permanently change the char-
acter of the city."
Councilman Luke Courtney said he had numerous


calls concerning the council's consideration of chang-
ing an ordinance to allow the serving of alcohol at spe-
cial outdoor events and citizens do not favor serving al-
cohol outdoors.
"Do you think we're not smart enough that we
would use glass?" asked Percifield. "We would use plas-
tic. We do not have people under age that would serve
it. We have made that establishment a million times
better. This county and this city will get revenue from
that You're acting like we do not have the sense to run
it. We feel we have established ourselves as honorable
and good business people."
Courtney said he is concerned about future conces-
sionaires who might not be as responsible.
Gene Schaeffer, Percifield's partner in the business,
said 300,000 people a year visit the concession and the
beach and the vast majority are not from Holmes Beach.
Many have requested beer and wine both from the con-
cessionaires and at the county level.
Schaeffer stressed, "We're bringing people in here
from all over the world and you're saying, 'We don't
care. This is Holmes Beach and you'll do as we say. We
don't care what you want or what you think you want.
We think it's more important to our citizens, of which
I'm one, that we should dominate the county.' You're
looking very myopic at this. People want it and we're
supposed to provide a service to the public."
Martini retorted, "We have people come out here
from all over the world. Just because they would like
something doesn't mean they're going to get it here. I
can think of several things they do in Europe that are
illegal on our beaches."
Resident Gabe Simches also responded to
Schaeffer, "I get concerned with 'us and them' kinds of
phraseologies. I don't think that's an issue and doesn't
help to resolve a situation. This is a tourist/residential
Island and I don't know how many more people it can
absorb. There has to be careful attention to whatever is
to be passed."
He noted that the open container law would still be
in effect and anyone walking out on the beach with al-
cohol would be in violation.
Councilwoman Pat Geyer suggested the council
contact the City of Sarasota to find out how the serving
of alcohol is handled at Lido Beach. Reichard appealed
for citizen input on the question and Whitmore said she
wants input from county commissioners.
Resident Ed Fisher asked how the council wants
citizens to respond, Reichard said in.the form of letters.


Eatman & Smith get pier design job


The architectural firm of Eatman & Smith have
received the contract to renovate the Bradenton Beach
Fishing Pier. The contract is for $4,000.
City Council members voted unanimously in favor
of the firm, which is located on Bridge Street in the
city. One other bidder, Swan & Moody in association
with Richard Fawley Architects, Inc., had a lower bid
$3,500 on the project.
Council members had delayed a decision earlier
this month, referring the matter to Building Official
Whitey Moran for his review. Moran said Eatman &
Smith's plans for the pier "were more advantageous to
the city's needs" than Swan & Moody.
Design for the fishing pier, as envisioned by Tom
Eatman and Emily Anne Smith, include:
Site and parking plans for the pier entrance.
Landscape plans at Bay Drive.
New gazebos at the end of the pier.
New bench seating designs and details.
Boat access via a water-level dock and stairs.
New railings.
Lighting.
Signage.
Color schemes for all of the designs.
What the architectural duo proposes is a "turn-of-
the-century village-style of architecture with the his-
toric derivatives of classic revival, Queen Ann and
Victorian touches."As to signage, "the word 'no' will
not be used," according to the design objectives, while
continuing the general theme of the renovated Bridge
Street as to lights, plants and brickwork.


"Its design can positively set our future city's
image," Smith wrote in a letter to the city. "Our de-
sign statement will shout history, warmth and wel-
come and all in good taste!"
Revenue for the work on the Bradenton Beach
Fishing Pier comes from a $50,000 grant by the state
of Florida.


Local resident
named to Hiram
College court
Holmes Beach resident Laura Dart was
named as one of three 1994 Senior Class fe-
male Homecoming attendants at Hiram Col-
lege in Hiram, Ohio.
A communications major and theatre arts
minor, Dart was chosen from approximately
100 senior women on the college's campus.
Dart is involved at Hiram as the captain of
the cheerleading team, president of the Com-
munications Club, a student senator, and as
social chair of Delta Chi Lambda. She is also
an inductee of Alpha Lambda Delta, Omicron
Delta Kappa and the Alpha Society.
A 1991 graduate of Reynoldsburg High
School in Reynoldsburg, Ohio, Dart is the
daughter of Jim and Jan Dart, also of Holmes
Beach.


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IJT.-PAGE1.2, OCTOBER 27,- 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER -


Candidate profiles for



Nov. 8 general election


Florida Senate,
District 26
John McKay
John McKay, Republican, is seeking re-election to
the Florida Senate, District 26. The district includes
Manatee, Hardee, DeSoto, Sarasota and Highlands
counties.
McKay, 46, is a real estate and mortgage broker.
He was elected to the Florida Senate in 1990. He is a
past chairman of the Bradenton Downtown Develop-
ment Authority and the Bradenton Community Rede-
velopment Agency. He has served on the board of di-
rectors for Habitat for Humanity and is a member of the
Manatee Chamber of Commerce and the Kiwanis Club.
McKay also served as an aide to then-U.S. Sen. Lawton
Chiles. McKay is married and has three children..
"I'm running on my record," McKay said. "I was very
involved in the juvenile justice reform, criminal justice
reform and health care reforms in the Florida Legislature,
and I want to continue the changes we've started.
"I want to accelerate the de-centralization of edu-
cation in Florida," McKay said. "Blueprint 2000 [a
long-range state planning document] sounds very nice,
but too much educational control still rests in Tallahas-
see. I believe there are too many departments in the
Department of Education that perform nonsensical
functions. Education rests in teachers and parents, yet
the system in Florida has 40 to 45 percent of its person-
nel in non-instructional personnel."
McKay said he and his opponent differ primarily
on issues of a full-time legislator (McKay is opposed),
the constitutional amendment banning gill nets in
Florida waters (McKay favors the ban) and Gov.
Lawton Chiles' proposed health care plan ("I just re-
ceived the document, which is about nine inches thick,
and haven't fully digested it yet, but my opponent has
wholeheartedly embraced it").

Robert L. Hertig, II
Robert L. Hertig, II, Democrat, is seeking election
to the Florida Senate, District 26. The district includes
Manatee, Hardee, DeSoto, Sarasota and Highlands
counties.
Hertig, 29, is a fork-lift mechanic at Tropicana in
Bradenton. He has lived in Florida since 1983 and is
married.
Hertig said he wants to be a full-time senator. "The
state legislature is only in session two months out of the
year," he said. "Our representatives go to Tallahassee
for those two months and pass legislation that affects
all of us, then they return to their regular jobs or busi-
nesses. This part-time schedule forces our legislators to
learn about the bills they will be voting on from lobby-
ists and/or other legislators."
He said he intends to spend his time traveling
through the district, holding workshops on the issues.
"I feel that getting all this input and sharing ideas will
give me and my constituents a clearer view and better
direction on how to solve the problems facing us. This
would give the people not the lobbyists a direct
influence on their senator's decisions."
Hertig said crime is the biggest issue facing Flo-
ridians.
"We must reinforce our embattled police forces,
adding officers in our highest crime areas," Hertig said.
"After arrest and conviction, the violent prisoners must
be required to serve their full sentences. We need to
identify at-risk children and provide programs to pre-
vent their becoming criminals. Early intervention is
cheaper, by far, than building more prisons."

County Judge, Group 2
Doug Henderson
Doug Henderson is seeking the vacant position of
Manatee County Judge.
Henderson, 42, is a graduate of the University of
South Florida and the South Texas College of Law. He is
a member of the Florida, Manatee County and American
Bar Associations, the Association of Trial Lawyers of
America, the Florida Academy of Trial Lawyers and the


In addition to the political races, voters in Anna
Maria City will be asked to vote for or against
amending the city's charter.
The ballot question reads: "Shall the Charter of the
City of Anna Maria, Florida, be amended to revise and
clarify the authority and duties of the Mayor and City
Commissioners with regard to filling vacancies, ap-
pointment and removal powers, and emergency spend-
ing; qualifications, elections, and terms of the Mayor
and City Commissioners; and referendum procedure to
reconsider ordinances."
The Anna Maria Charter Review Committee
recommended changes in 12 areas of the charter,
ranging from minor corrections of typographical
errors to adding further definitions of the powers of
the mayor. In condensed form, these are the most
significant changes that will take place if voters ap-
prove the amendment:
Further define authority of the mayor in Section
3.06 (appointments and removals) to state that the
mayor, among other powers, shall be able to appoint,
suspend and fire administrative officers. In the current
charter, the word "administrative" is not specified.


Florida Council on Crime and Delinquency.
He was an Assistant State Attorney for six years.
Currently, he is an attorney with Price, Price, Prouty
and Whitaker. Henderson is married and has three sons.
Henderson is a current director of the YMCA, the
Manatee Community Blood Center, past director of the
local chapter of the American Red Cross and member
of the Manatee Historical Society.
Henderson said he "received more preference votes
for County Judge than all of the other candidates com-
bined" in a judicial poll mailed to all local attorneys.

Rebecca A. Little
Rebecca Little is seeking the vacant county judge
seat, Group 2, previously held by Judge Walter Talley.
Little holds a degree of Criminal Justice from Au-
burn University, and is a graduate of Cumberland
School of Law, Birmingham, Ala. She has worked with
the law firm of Montgomery & Wilhoit, Chartered,
formed Rebecca A. Little, P.A., and subsequently
joined the office of State Attorney for this circuit.
With the State Attorney's office, Little prosecuted
crimes within Manatee County dealing with misde-
meanors, felonies and juvenile crimes.
She is a member of the Manatee County Bar As-
sociation, the Florida Association of Women Lawyers,
the Junior League of Manatee County, and the Mana-
tee County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Mana-
tee class of 1993-94.
Little is also a former instructor of legal research
and writing at Manatee Community College.
Little is married and has one child.

School Board, District 1
Berniece Scott
Berniece Scott is a Democrat seeking the School
Board, District 1 seat. The election is county-wide.
Scott, 68, is a Bradenton native. She is a real estate
salesperson and a retired public health nurse and admin-
istrator from New York. She served in the U.S. Air Force
Nurse Corps, is a former member of the Bradenton Hous-
ing Authority, and is a member of the Manatee County
Children's Advisory Board. She is a graduate of the New
York University's School of Education, and has a master's
degree in public health supervision. She is a single parent
of two adopted daughters.
Scott points to her background in administration
and her work with children as her strongest assets for
election to the school board.


Also further defines the authority of the mayor
in Section 3.06 (appointments and removals), giv-
ing the mayor the power to make assignments or
appointments to outside boards or committees with
the approval of the city commission. The current
charter gives this power to a majority of the city
commission.
A change to Section 3.12 (initiative and refer-
endum) which will allow the city commission to
amend an adopted ordinance if compelled to do so
by the voters. The current charter only allows for the
total repeal of an ordinance in such circumstances.
Modifies Section 4.06 (emergency action) es-
tablishing a sliding scale for the expenditures the
mayor may authorize in emergencies when it is not
practicable to call a meeting of the city commission.
Currently the mayor is limited to $1,000, but the
proposed amendment would allow the mayor to
make expenditures that do not exceed "1/2 of 1 per-
cent of total city budget." Using the recently-ap-
proved 1994/95 city budget of $898,778 as an ex-
ample, the mayor's limit of emergency discretion-
ary spending would be $4,494.


C.V. 'Chuck' Wilhoit
Chuck Wilhoit is a Republican seeking the School
Board, District 1 seat. The election is county-wide.
Wilhoit, 44, has been a Bradenton resident since
1973. He is employed by the school system as a dish
cook. He attended Murry State University in Kentucky.
He has a son.
"As a citizen, a taxpayer and a parent, and with my
background in the school system, I feel I can make a
difference," Wilhoite said. He said he will be a full-
time school board member.
He said he wanted to see discipline restored in the
classroom, favoring identification of juvenile offend-
ers early and placing them in an alternate educational
program to avoid disruption of other students.
"We also need to fine-tune the system from top to
bottom to ensure we get the most effective use of our
dollars the biggest bang for the buck," he said.

School Board, District 3
Joyce Morange
Joyce Morange is seeking election to the Manatee
School Board representing District 3. She is running as
an Independent.
Morange is a Manatee Community College gradu-
ate and a senior at Eckerd College. She developed and
implemented a literacy program for the Manatee
County Jail. She has worked in drug and alcohol reha-
bilitation centers in Honduras, and taught English in
elementary schools there.
Morange is running as a nonpartisan candidate
because she believes "politics should not have a place
on the school board."
She advocates being a full-time school board mem-
ber with set office hours and frequent visits to schools
and Parent-Teacher Organization meetings. She also
favors reducing class sizes, school-based management
and alternative vocational education.
"I will work together with parents, teachers and
community leaders to insure that our children receive
the best possible education," Morange said. "Children
only pass through our system once. Let's give them our
very best."
Patricia A. Petruff
Patricia Petruff is seeking election to the Manatee
School Board representing District 3. She is a Democrat.
Petruff is a native Floridian and a Bradenton resi-
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Anna Maria city charter


amendment on ballot








Candidate profiles
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
dent for 16 years. A former special education teacher,
she is a partner with the law firm of Dye & Scott. She
is a graduate of the University of Florida. Petruff is a
past board member of the Manatee County Chamber of
Commerce, past president of Just for Girls and the
Manatee County Bar Association, past chair of the
Manatee Center for Women's Health Advisory Com-
mittee, the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Committee
and the Human Rights Advocacy Committee.
She supports the goals of Blueprint 2000, expand-
ing the use of technology to enhance the educational
process, developing business partnerships with schools
and using schools as community centers.

Larry Simmons
Larry Simmons is seeking election to the Manatee
School Board representing District 3. He is a Repub-
lican.
Simmons, 53, is principal of Tara Elementary
School. He is a graduate of Ohio University and West
Carolina University, and moved to the area in 1963. He
is married and has two grown children.
"I have been in the school system for more than 31
years," Simmons said, "and I believe I have the proven
leadership and consensus-building skills needed. A
school is a complex system with a lot involved."
Simmons said reducing class sizes and concern for
tax dollars were important issues to be addressed.

School Board, District 5
Josepth C. Miller
Joe Miller, Republican, is seeking a seat on the
District 5 school board.
Miller, 40, is a sales representative for an outdoor
recreation equipment manufacturing company. He is a
former director for the Manatee County Parks and Rec-
reation Department and was the former administrator
for the Portsmouth, VA parks and recreation depart-
ment. He is a graduate of Fairmont State College, and
attended the University of Georgia. He is a member of
the Seabreeze Elementary PTO. He is married and has
two children.- ..,,
"We need to insure that educational funding is uti-
lized for its primary purpose, educating our children,"
Miller said. "It's time to get back to basics."

Leon B. Trumbull
Leon Trumbull is seeking election to the Manatee
School Board representing District 5. He is a Demo-
crat.
Trumbull is retired from the Manatee School Sys-
tem, where he was a counselor at Bradenton Middle
School. He has degrees from Georgia Tech, Stetson
University, Florida State University and Nova.Univer-
sity. He is past president of the Manatee Counselors'
Association and the Gulf coast Counselors' Associa-
tion. A World War II veteran, he is married and has five
children.
Trumbull said major issues facing school board
members are violence in the schools, providing skill
training to students who are not college bound, devel-
oping partnerships with parents, teachers and the com-
munity, and providing appropriate uses of funds while
reducing class sizes and developing more community
input in education.

Constitutional
amendment proposals
No. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 3
Start of Regular Sessions of the Legislature
Proposing an amendment of the State Constitution,
effective upon approval, to provide that the annual 60-
day regular sessions of the Legislature begin on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday in March.

NO. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 1,
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 21
Limitation on State Revenue Collections
Limits state revenue c elections to the prior year's
allowed revenue plus an adjustment for growth based


r


Check your Voter ID for Precinct and Polling Location

SAMPLE VOTER ID
SVoter Identific\ TEE COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION 1/108I/
Voter ......dentification CONGRESSIONAL


Soupervmsor Of Eecins

Vernon T. Voter XXX
1234 Main Street
Manatee, FL 342XX XX

XXXXXX XX/XX/XXlXX/XX/x X X
ASSISTANCE
REQO S N-lED S, / .,-
[ i H ==3F l'^i]7
^ES~aZ3E3 X L4a-H77HHU


Your County Polling
is listed here.


Location


If you live in a Municipality,
the Polling Location will be
listed here. J

If you live in Anna Maria, your precinct is 91
and your polling location is Anna Maria City Hall,
10005 Gulf Drive.
If you live in Bradenton Beach, your precinct
is 94 and your polling location is at Bradenton
Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.
If you live in Holmes Beach, Precinct 92, your
polling location is at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
6608 Marina Drive or if you live in Precinct 93,
your polling location is St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive.
Check your Voter ID and take it with you to the
polls on election day.


on the growth rate of state personal income over the
preceding five years, with excess collections deposited
in the budget stabilization fund until fully funded and
then refunded to taxpayers. Defines "state revenues."
Allows the Legislature to increase this limit by 2/3
vote. Requires adjustment of the limitation to reflect
transfers of responsibility for funding governmental
functions.

NO 3 CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 16
Limiting Marine Net Fishing
Limits the use of nets for catching saltwater fin-
fish, shellfish, or other marine animals by prohibiting
the use of gill and other entangling nets in all Florida
waters, and prohibiting the use of other nets larger than
500 square feet in mesh area in nearshore and inshore
Florida waters. Provides definitions, administrative
and criminal penalties, and exceptions for scientific
and governmental purposes.

NO. 4 CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE XI, SECTION 3
Revenue Limits: May People's Amendments Lim-
iting Government Revenue be Allowed to Cover
Multiple Subjects?
This provision would expand the people's rights to
initiate constitutional changes limiting the power of
government to raise revenue by allowing amendments
to cover multiple subjects. This provision is effective
immediately after voter approval for amendments ef-
fective thereafter.

NO. 8 CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 7
Limited Casinos
Authorizing a limited number of gaming casinos
in Broward, Dade, Duval, Escambia, Hillsborough,
Lee, Orange, Palm Beach and Pinellas Counties, with
two in Miami Beach; and limited-size casinos with


UNITED STATES SENATOR Vote for One
SHUGH E. RODHAM (Dem) > +
CONNIE MACK (Rep) > +
(Write-in) > +
STATE
SGOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
Vote for One Group
LAWTON CHILES (Gov.) (Dem) ) +
BUDDY MACKAY (Lt. Gov.)
JEB BUSH (Gov.) (Rep) +
TOM FEENEY (Lt. Gov.)
(Write-in) > +
SECRETARY OF STATE Vote for One
RON SAUNDERS (Dem) +
SANDY BARRINGER MORTHAM (Rep) >- +
ATTORNEY GENERAL Vote for One
BOB BUTTERWORTH (Dem) > +
HENRY FERRO (Rep) +
COMPTROLLER Vote for One
GERALD LEWIS (Dem) >* +
BOB MILLIGAN. (Rep) > +
TREASURER Vote for One
BILL NELSON (Dem) +
STIM IRELAND (Rep) > +
(Write-in) > +
COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION Vote for One


BOB CRAWFORD (Dem) > +
JIM SMITH (Rep) > +


LEGISLATIVE
STATE SENATOR, 26TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT
Vote for One
ROBERT L. HERTIG, II (Dem) > +
JOHN MC KAY (Rep) > +
(Write-in) > +


existing and operating pari-mutuel facilities; and if
authorized by the legislature up to five limited-size
riverboat casinos in the remaining counties, but only
one per county. Mandating implementation by the Leg-
islature. Effective upon adoption, but prohibiting ca-
sino gaming until July, 1. 1995.


Other local elections
District Court of Appeals
(Retain or not)
John R. Blue
Monterey Campbell
Jack R. Schoonover
Edward F. Threadgill, Jr.

Manatee River Soil & Water
Conservation
Group 2
George Goodman
Craig Trace


Group 4


John Chamberlain
Gary Reeder


Mosquito Control Board
Group 1
Ralph C. Garrison
George E. Mendez


Group 3
G. Michael Garrott
Geroge Herman Kendall
Tim Matthews


Special note
Campaigns for Florida House of Representatives, Dis-
trict 68, Circuit Court, County Commission District 6
At-large and the Anna Maria Island Fire Control Dis-
trict were profiled in last week's issue of The Islander
Bystander.


DOUG JAMERSON (Dam) > +
FRANK T. BROGAN (Rep) +


Gc MMISSIONER OF AGR E Vote for One


THfi6SMW &?^WL M6iEW % ^"f3ti7f


f


:.-4







Ei2 PAGE 14 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLA DER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
* The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
* All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
* All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 15,, ,
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ IL I ---------------___________-1 I I LJ JIM-IT tl~'VV


Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
*Name Address/City ___ Phone


FOR SALES
& RENTALS
778-4800
SCowboys at Bengals

:ssl


ROD %

Mini-Resort
Best Fishing *
ISLAND
COOKING
SBeer and Wine
4 Breakfast
1 Lunch-Dinner
*k Reasonable *-
Prices *-
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *r
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
Lions at Giants
OPEN 7 DAYS* 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953





AMERICAN
CAR

WASH

& ETIING
BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
Browns at Broncos
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617





Free Estimates



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Re-Roofs Repairs
Bultt-Ups Shingles
Single Ply Tile
Roofing CESEISURED
Systems | n[cmI A |
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Qualty


748-9362
SGeorgia at Florida


F-d Li'.eBi
ShipV. Stor?
: Bo ,,.,= ,'
Bo Sltola 2


Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
*1 778-5577
Johnson. Evinrude. OMC
Sea Driv & OMC Cobra Stm Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
Chiefs at Bills


WEIGHT
MANAGEMENT
* No exercise No Diet
* No Drugs Costs Less
a All Natural Products
Free Counseling
813/387-9509
Oilers at Raiders





Tee
TO


GOLF
Regripping
SRepairing
Re-finishing
NEW!
948 Midsize Irons

500 OFF RE-GRIP
L -(PER CLUB) _
778-5184
Duke at FSU


$995 each
Fruit of the Loom
"Best" White T-Shirt
(One-Side Printing)
While You Wait
SEagles at Redskins
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL
Anna Maria Island Centre


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast,
Professional Service
from Island Ownersl
Sam Day or Next Day Pric
3332EaseBa DrHoahnreBadh
778-4277
VaL 1Tec0 b a S& I to S
Va. Tech at Miami


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
Dolphins at New England








Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
SSeahawks at Chargers

LaPensee s
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach




THE
HUNT
CLUB
RESTAAIT
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6 pm
Happy Hour Everyday

Colorado at Nebraska
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


I


T IL LIF OUT- NOWI


.4


1






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 27, 1994 M PAGE 15 0I]


MiZ/lMH!M:Ldl,:L


AMI Chamber to hold
trash and treasure sale
The Anna Maria Chamber of Commerce will hold
a "Trash and Treasure" sale on Saturday, Nov. 5, from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the chamber parking lot, 501 Mana-
tee Ave. W., Holmes Beach.
Chamber members may drop off donations at the
chamber office any time prior to the sale, except for
large, bulky items such as furniture and mattresses.
Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 6.
For more information call Carolyn Whitney at 778-
6016 or Darcy Migliore at 778-1541.

Sports Card Show at
Roser Nov. 5
Concerned Island Parents is sponsoring a free
Sports Card Show for kids of all ages on Saturday,
Nov. 5, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Roser Memorial
Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria City,
in the Fellowship Hall.
Enjoy watching sports videos while cards are
traded and sold. Comic traders are welcome also.
To reserve a trading table in advance, call Bill
Goldschmitt at 778-7918.


Hi-12 picnickers do it again
There were so many participants (106 to be exact) at last week's annual Hi-12 picnic at Anna Maria's
Bayfront Park, the only way to squeeze them all into the picture was to shoot it from the top of the park's
playground equipment. There was lots ofpickin' and grinnin,' with guitarist Carol Nelson, right, doing the
pickin' while drummer Laura Bolch, left, kept the beat and Hi-12 picnic organizer John Lasson looked on and
,did the grinnin.' Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff .- -. 9


SHARE food program at community center


SHARE, a non-profit food distribution and com-
munity building program, is now available at the Anna
Maria Community Center.
Under the SHARE program, for $14 cash or food
stamps and two hours of community service participants
can earn $25 to $35 worth of wholesome, nutritious food
including meats, fresh fruits, vegetables and staples.


300/500
[j FORD
GEORGE F. BIANCHI MASTERS
SALES & LEASING
Island Resident-- 5th Year Member
BILL GRAHAM FORD COMPANY
S3400 14th Street West
Bradenton, FL 34205
(813) 747-3711 Office
(813) 747-0471 Fax





,VOC i T-O4f TM

$995each
Fruit of the Loom

"Best" White T-Shirt
(ONE SIDE PRINTING)
WHILE YOU WAIT
778-0540
3228 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach, Florida

I Crowder Bros.
HARDWARE

Electric Shaver

CLINIC
9 AM to 2 PM
Thursday, October 27
3352 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach 778-0999

Put New Life in your Electric Shaver
CLEAN, OIL & ADJUST
FREE ESTIMATE
ALL
BRANDS $ 99
SERVICED Parts
Reg. '4.95 Parts Extra
H ------------------ A'I~t .0 ^ J~t .<


SHARE is not a government program. Anyone
may participate and there are no eligibility or income
requirements
Registration will be held Wednesday, Nov. 2, from
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call the center at 778-1908 or Nancy
Baldwin, volunteer coordinator at 778-9409 for infor-
mation.


0


We're Celebrating the GRAND OPENING of our
2nd Bradenton Location and 43rd ANNIVERSARY

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[I'I PAGE 16 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

PLEASE MANATEE
VOTE RIVER
GROUP CONSERVATION
TWO I DISTRICT


George Goodman
(20-Year Air Force Veteran)
During my term in office the following has been accomplished:
1 One million dollar federal grant to study pollutants in river.
2 60% of Manatee & Braden River watershed lands have conservation plans.
3 Restoration of wetlands on Emerson Point.
4 Expanded environmental education programs with the schools.
5 Joined the federal Sarasota Bay, Tampa Bay & Gulf of Mexico Projects.
My opponent has never attended a meeting of this board and has opposed Swiftmud Programs.
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO WILL CONTINUE TO PROTECT OUR RIVER.
Paid Political Ad Paid for by the Campaign Acct. of George Goodman


PROTECT~H ING '#l1 ~i OUR IVATE IY& COASTAL RESOURCES lii ~kIS TOO11


PLEASE
SUPPORT
GROUP
FOUR


MANATEE
RIVER
CONSERVATION
DISTRICT


JOHN CHAMBERLAIN
During the last four years much has been achieved.
1 60% of Manatee and Braden River watershed lands now have conservation
programs.
2 We have joined the Sarasota Bay, Tampa Bay & Gulf of Mexico coastal
and water protection programs.
3 We have restored mangrove and wetland areas on Emerson Point.
4 We have begun urban conservation programs.
5 We will be implementing the new federal coastal zone management program.
My opponent has never been to a single meeting of this board
and has opposed several conservation initiatives.
Paid Political Ad Paid for by the Campaign Acct. of John Chamberlain




Marty Duytschaver

For
Seat 4

FIRE COMMISSIONER
* Island resident for over 34 years
* Successful Island businessman
(owner of Sand Dollar Gift Shop, '
and Sun & Surf)
* Former volunteer with Anna Maria
Fire District
* Supported by the current volunteers

PLEASE VOTE FOR
MARTY DUYTSCHAVER ON NOV. 8

PD. POL. AD. PAID FOR BY THE CAMPAIGN TO ELECT MARTY DUYTSCHAVER


Gary Reedl

Manatee River Soil & Water Conservation
District Group 4
Dear Manatee County Voters:
As a fourth generation Manatee County grower, I've work
with our conservation service by developing, testing and
refining soil and water conservation practices that are no
being implemented statewide. Because of my hands-on
experience, I have seen the positive impact of good
conservation efforts; but I believe we can find even bette
ways to utilize our vast natural resources.
Manatee County needs someone who can integrate the
agricultural, environmental and urban concerns of our
district. I know I can.
Please vote for me November 8th.

qw Q Reede'
1990 T.J. Carter
"Outstanding Conservationist
of the Year" Recipient.



Pd. Pol. Adv. Campaign
for Gary Reeder


ed







I A
ri


Local diver/writer


finds sea creatures


key to understanding


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Sue Barreda was seeking informa-
tion for the novel she is writing when
she met Selma "Soaring Paw 'N
Hooves Cawley" Scholl.
Now Barreda has combined her
writing with a personal quest.
"I started writing the book in
April," says Barreda. "One of the char-
acters in my book is a Native American
medicine woman. I didn't even know if
there was such a thing."
Barreda visited the Apache Springs
Wellness Center in Pebble Springs
shopping center in Bradenton to re-
search the subject.
"The first thing I found was a flyer
telling about a medicine wheel class
taught by a medicine woman," says
Barreda.
Selma "Soaring Paw 'N Hooves
Cawley" Scholl teaches Native American
classes, traditional beliefs from ancient
tribes, at the Apache Springs Center.
Selma, as everyone calls her, is
known as "Grandmother," Navajo and
"Elder." Working out of her home on
the edge of the Ocala National Forest,
Selma is a leader of the Ocali Intertribal
Nation a gathering of tribes, or "rain-
bow" tribe, says Barreda.
Grandmother Moon, Barreda's fic-
tional character, is a teacher, an elder, a
respected person in her early to mid-
50s. Selma seemed exactly like the per-
son Barreda had imagined.
Barreda decided to take the two-
and-a-half days workshop for research
purposes and finished the workshop
with a better understanding of herself,
she says.
One of the things Barreda learned is
that the whale is her power totem ani-
mal a spiritual Native American des-
ignation of identity.
Barreda said she could relate to that
immediately she loves the sea.
Barreda, who has been diving for six
years, is a certified diving master.
When Mote Marine Laboratory res-
cued two pigmy sperm whales in Au-
gust, Barreda became a volunteer for
the Marine Mammal Institute.
Barreda felt she wanted to spend
time with the very animals that were
named as a mystic source of her per-
sonal power.
"I worked with the whales every
weekend since Mote got them," says
Barreda. "They have bigger brains than
we do who's to say how smart they
are compared to us?"
Richey, the adult pigmy whale res-
cued from the New Port Richey area, re-
mained under 24-hour watch during the
time he spent in the critical-care tanks at
Mote and died a few weeks ago.
"I was sorry Richey died," says
Barreda. "He was a big influence on me."
Meanwhile, Juno, the baby sperm
whale rescued near West Palm Beach,
continues to improve and has gained 20
pounds, says Barreda.
Barreda discovered that other sea
animals are her protector animals: the
manta ray, snook and nurse shark.
These sea animals also triggered a per-
sonal recognition for Barreda.
"Every time we go out in the boat
now, we see a ray," says Barreda. "My
husband will say, 'Look, Sue, there's
another ray.' And we'll see one jump


Sue Barreda says she discovered new
facets of self-knowledge after she
enrolled in a Native American medi-
cine wheel workshop in Bradenton.
Barreda, who was researching
material for a book she is writing, has
embarked on a spiritual vision quest.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka
out of the water."
Barreda says she is learning at the
same time she is writing her book. When
finished it will be penned in her new
Native American name: Epic "Coral
Seal" Visionary. Barreda has found her
life changing with her new journey.
"The circle of life helps you make
connection to yourself and to others,"
says Barreda. "It's learning practical
tools ancient tribal tools."
Apache Springs Co-owner Rachel
Carter says Selma has been teaching
workshops and seminars at her shop for
about a year.
Carter first met Selma socially, sev-
eral years ago, through mutual friends
who live in Ocala.
"I began to experience things,"
says Carter, "and Selma would explain
them to me."
Carter asked Selma if she would
come to Bradenton to teach. Selma
agreed and has been conducting semi-
nars and workshops at the Bradenton
store since February.
One half of the Apache Springs
Wellness Center is books, says Carter;
the other half leaves room for a
wholistic range of classes, workshops
and healing sessions including hypnosis,
massage therapy, yoga meditation,
beading, Native American traditions and
craniosacral therapy body work
based on principles of osteopathy which
is Carter's trained specialty.
Carter shies away from the "New
Agey stuff," she says. "We're not a
Kmart of metaphysics, we're more di-
rected, more traditional," which is why
she says she was interested in Selma
teaching classes.
"Selma is actually very traditional,"
says Carter.
Barreda says she will continue in
the medicine wheel series of seminars.
"I originally did this for research for
my book," Barreda says, "but have since
found out it's a big part of me. Selma
told me that wisdom comes at the right
time natural and simple."
The Medicine Wheel Circle of Life
seminars are ongoing at the Apache
Springs Wellness Center, 5917 Manatee
Ave. W., Bradenton.
"I think this world is going to have to
become spiritual in order to make it," says
Barreda, "If our real families were spiritual
families, we'd have world peace."








I eN


Off Stage Ladies
to meet at
Dancing Bear
Members of the Off Stage Ladies, a
support group for the Island Players, will
meet on Wednesday, Nov. 9, at the Danc-
ing Bear restaurant, located at Manatee
Avenue and 75th Street in Bradenton.
A social hour will commence at
11:30 a.m. followed by lunch at 12:30
p.m. and a meeting. The guest speaker
will be Bill Ballman.
For details and reservations, call Pat
Russell at 778-3014.

Privateers hold
mullet smoke
The Anna Maria Island Privateers
will hold a mullet smoke on Saturday,
Oct. 29, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Anna
Maria Island Centre in front of Shells
Restaurant.
Freshly smoked mullet will be
priced at one for $3 and two for $5. A
free recipe book will be available with
a variety of ideas for enjoying mullet.
All mullet will be wrapped to take
home and can be frozen.
Proceeds will benefit the Priva-
teers' support of youth programs and its
scholarship fund.
Call 778-5934 for information:

Episcopal Church
Women to meet
The November meeting of the Epis-
copal Church Women of the Church of
the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Dr.,
Holmes Beach, will be held Thursday,
Nov. 3, at 10:15 a.m. in Lowe Hall.
Final plans will be made for the
Holly Berry Bazaar on Nov. 19.
Ladies are asked to bring toys for girls
and boys to donate for migrant children.
Call the church at 778-1638 or sign
up in Lowe Hall by Monday, Oct. 31, if
you plan to attend.

Writing class at
Education Center
Helen Nettleton, free-lance writer
and journalist, will resume fall classes
in "Writing to Publish," on Thursday,
Nov. 3, at the Education Center,
Longboat Key.
To register, call 383-8811.

Journalist to
speak Nov. 7
The Gulf Coast Writers Group will
meet at the Island Branch Library, 5701
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, on Monday,
Nov. 7, at 10:15 a.m. The guest speaker
is Don Maloney, a journalist whose
credits include the Wall Street Journal
and the Japan Times. Maloney will dis-
cuss mixing humor and travel writing.
Visitors are welcome.

Manatee
Libertarian Party
to meet Nov. 1
Curtis Holmes, representing the
Taxpayers' Association, will speak on
the "Just One Tax" initiative at the
monthly meeting of the Manatee Liber-
tarian Party affiliate on Tuesday, Nov. 1.
The meeting begins at 7 p.m. at the
Central Library, 1305 Barcarrota Blvd.,
Bradenton. The public is invited to attend.


Art League to
hold artists'
reception
The Anna Maria Island Art League
will host an opening reception for the ex-
hibition of watercolor paintings by artists
Joan Abrahamson Voyles and Carl
Voyles on Friday, Nov. 4, from 6 to 8
p.m., at the Art League, 5312 Holmes
Blvd., Holmes Beach.
Joan Abrahamson Voyles grew up
"with the smell of turpentine and an
appreciation for the colors of nature,"
she says. Following in her mother's
footsteps, she became an art teacher
after obtaining her master's degree in
art education from Northern Illinois
along with studies at Purdue, Ball
State and John Heron Art School.
Voyles is president of Dunhill in
Bradenton, where she conducts execu-
tive nursing recruiting, and is active in
local organizations such as the Mana-
tee County Cultural Alliance, Art
League of Manatee County, American
Association of University Women,
Anna Maria Island Art League and
Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island.
Carl Voyles' interest in art devel-
oped later in life. He is now a semi-
retired physician, consulting part-time
for the Manatee County Public Health
Department in Bradenton. A graduate
of Duke and Johns Hopkins Universi-
ties, Voyles was a cardiologist in St.
Petersburg and served as a Navy flight
surgeon in many parts of the world in-
cluding Vietnam, Okinawa, the Philip-
pines, Iceland, California, New En-
gland and Washington, D.C.
The exhibit by the Voyles, hus-
band and wife, will continue through
November.
For more information call the Anna
Maria Island Art League at 778-2099.

Free medical
care for children
A no-cost screening clinic will be
held to identify children who can ben-
efit from expert orthopaedic and burn
care provided by Shriners Hospitals on
Saturday, Oct. 29, from 8 a.m. to 12
noon at Sahib Temple, 600 N. Beneva
Rd., Sarasota.
Children under 18 with problems
of the bones, joints or muscles, or
problems associated with healed burns
will be evaluated for eligibility for free
treatment.
For further information, call
955-2494 between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m.
weekdays.


Canine Fall
Festival to help
Florida Dog
Guides
The Florida Dog Guides for the
Deaf, Inc., will hold a Canine Fall Fun
Festival on Sunday, Oct. 30, 9 a.m. to
6 p.m., at the South County Youth
Center, 3675 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton.
Admission is one canine partner -
alive or stuffed. Activities include the
second annual canine Halloween cos-
tume contest, games, face painting, a
raffle and food. Events are $1 each with
proceeds to benefit Florida Dog Guides
for the Deaf, Hearing Dog Program.
For more information call 748-
8245.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER n OCTOBER 27, 1994 0 PAGE 17 jiE



The following political races and issues will be featured
in a question and answer format.
Fire Commission Seat 3 *
George M. Jackson and Larry Tyler, Jr.
Fire Commission Seat 4 *
J.M. (Marty) Duytschaver and Deborah A. Marks
State Representative, Dist. 68 *
Julie McClure (Dem.) and Mark G. Flanagan (Rep.)
Constitutional Amendment 3 Net Ban *
Save-our- Sealife and Karen Bell, A.P. Bell Fish Co.
When: WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26
Meet & Greet at 5:30 p.m. 6 p.m. Forum
Where: ST. BERNARD HALL
St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 So. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach
All local Manatee County candidates will be invited to attend and meet voters prior to the forum.
Forms for questions will be available at the door.



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rI PAGE 18 OCTOBER 27, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Principal point man
Anna Maria Elementary Principal Jim Kronus leads the fire-fighting pack during station. Fireman Rich Losek helps Kronus out of his fire-fighting gear to the
afire truck and hose demonstration put on by the Anna Maria Fire District at the roar of the school's student body as they recognized their principal. Anna Maria
school. Dressed as a real firefighter and unknown to the children, Kronus leaped Fire District gave Kronus his very own firefighting hat identified on the back in
off the fire truck with members of the fire district and participated in the demon- big red letters, "MR KRONUS."


Helping paws
Bradenton resident Sue Harden, who is blind, and her guide dog, Penny, a Golden Labrador, visited
Vicki Small's fourth and fifth-grade split class at Anna Maria Elementary. Under the siege of a
verbal Gatling gun, Harden visited for over 30 minutes and answered all the questions the children
had. The students wanted to know everything from, "What is it like to be blind?" to "Can Penny tell
the difference between a 'walk' and 'do not walk' sign?'" Harden explained she had been blind
since birth and though Penny cannot read signs, she is trained to stop at any street curb and con-
tinue only if no cars are sighted.


Professional Medical Center
Walk-In Clinic 778-0711
Family Practice Mario Vega, M.D.
NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 31, '94
FLU SHOTS $1000
New Patients Welcome
Medicaid/Medicare Approved
503 Manatee Ave. Suite E, Holmes Beach


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Now Open on WEDNESDAY
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Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

MASSAGE THERAPY
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SFibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
SInsomnia And More
Gift Certificates 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza


I


(4


CUB^T ^































Commendable job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending
Oct. 14. Kneeling, left to right, are Ben Rigney and Doug Swanson. First row, left to right, are
Kahla Feimis, Alex Murphy, Lauren Brickse, Melissa Wolfe, Kaitlyn Moore, Amber Barth and
Whitney Price. Back row, left to right, are Chris Nelson, Zackery Stockmaster, Travis Rice,
Tommy Bucci and Carly Douglas.


Sea science
Shauna Steger made a paper mache turtle as her
science project for Debbie Brady's third-grade
class at Anna Maria Elementary. The Bradenton
Beach resident said she used a lot of chicken
wire, paint and time to complete her display of a
loggerhead turtle. Does she think she'll get an
"A?" "Yes," said Shauna. Then, with a glint in
her eye she added, "It's heavy enough. "


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I OCTOBER 27, 1994 I PAGE 19 im


Anna Maria

School Menu
Monday, 10/31/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon Toast or
English Muffins, Fresh Fruit
S Lunch: Grilled Chicken Breast on Bun or Burrito,
Hash Brown Potato, Banana, Ice Cream Cup
Tuesday, 11/1/94
S Breakfast: 1/2 Slice Pizza or Cereal, Peaches
Upside Down Breakfast for Lunch Day
Lunch: Waffles w/Syrup, Sausage Link or
Canadian Bacon, Grape Juice, Applesauce
Wednesday, 11/2/94
Early Release Day
Breakfast: Oatmeal or Waffles, Juice
Lunch: Corn Dog, Carrot & Celery Sticks,
Crunchy Chinese Noodles, Fresh Fruit
Thursday, 11/3/94
S Breakfast: Scrambled Egg & Toast or Cereal,
Strawberry Fruit Cup
S Lunch: Junior Sub Sandwich or Sloppy Joe, Carrot &
Celery Sticks with Ranch Dressing, Peaches, Cake Square
Friday, 11/4/94
SBreakfast: Peanut Butter Cup & Toast or Waffle w/Peanut
Butter & Syrup, Orange Juice
S Lunch: Cheese Pizza or Nacho Cheese & Chips, Corn,
Strawberry Fruit Cup, Cookie
All meals served with milk.






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We honor most new & used car warranty service contract
Look for our other advertisement under "Automobile"

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First National Bank of Manatee proudly
announces the November 1 opening four
Susan o'Connor full-service branch bank at Holmes Beach,
Branch Manager on Gulf Drive, just across from Eckerd's.
t ;TI I +' 0 +


9 MONTH CD
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*Annual Percentage Rate 5.02


Until November 1,
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can be made at
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Minimum deposit of $1,000 required. Compounded daily
Penalties for early withdrawal. Rates subject to change.

First National Bank
F Member FDIC .'ml/a^V,
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach '
Main Bank: 5817 Manatee Avenue West (813) 794-6969




Problem with


Insurance?


Call 778-2253

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years experience in the optical pro- '-
fession. My goal is to uphold and .i '
improve upon the tradition of excellence and value that
Bradenton Optical is known for.
In the interest of our customers we are making some ex-
citing changes. Kathy Gross, our Optical Technician, for-
merly of the Eye Associates, is assisting me. We now have
two physicians, independent Doctors of Optometry, to pro-
vide more convenient scheduling for eye exams. We have
extended our regular business hours and now are open on
Saturday. We can even schedule private appointment after
hours. For your selection, we have increased our quality in-
ventory with hundreds of beautiful frames. Our emphasis is
on fashion tastefully suited to the individual and quality to
the last detail.
Come in and visit with us at the Manatee West Shopping
Plaza. Ask for a free lens cleaner and let us adjust your eye-
glasses at no charge. We invite you to experience the differ-
ence between the chain stores and Bradenton Optical, where
personalized service and customer satisfaction is the very
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IifiPE^' btER^ H994c. 4'THE mIS U[MBlrAki4iEa? 1-


You can't miss having
some fun on Halloween
By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
Although Halloween is traditionally reserved for cel-
ebration by devils, goblins and vampires, don't let that
frighten you. Put on your best "spooky" face and join the
fun activities planned around the Island and in town.
Don't forget to put your jack-o-lantern in the win-
"dow before you take off on the town.

For everyone:
The Anna Maria Fire and Rescue Volunteers, with
help from the fire cadets, hosts its Third Annual
Haunted House, Friday through Sunday, from 7 to 11
p.m., at Bradenton Beach Fire Station 3, 107 2nd St. N.
Admission is $1. Drinks and snacks are available.
It's spooky and fun but mild enough for all ages.

ST. BERNARD CATHOLIC CHURCH
Pancake Breakfast
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30
8:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Homemade Pancakes, Sausage,
OJ & Coffee. Adults $2.50. Children
$1.00. Also-there will be a Home-
made Bake Sale. Come and enjoy.
4 Activity Center, 43rd St. Holmes Beach
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Saturday, Oct. 29, is the date set for Anna Maria
Elementary PTO's annual Fall Festival. The day in-
cludes a costume parade, games, food, music, and fun.
The scheduling for all events follows:
All students are to be in costume, separated by
class, behind Holmes Beach City Hall prior to 10:30
a.m. Costume judging will begin promptly at that time.
At 11 a.m., the parade, led by Grand Marshal Anna
Maria Fire District Chief Andy Price, will leave the city
hall walking up Marina and Gulf Drives to the Anna
Maria Elementary School. As soon as all of the
paraders are assembled in front of the school, at ap-
proximately 11:30 a.m., costume prizes will be
awarded by Principal Jim Kronus.
The Fall Festival opens at noon, ends at 3 p.m. with
clean-up from 3 to 4 p.m.
For lunch, enjoy food prepared by Island restau-
rants: Beach Bistro, Sandbar, Beach House, Ato's, Sign
of the Mermaid, and the Mar Vista. Hot dogs and so-
das will also be available. Music will be provided by
the Tropicats featuring Chuck & Lloyd.
Save a lot of time and pre-purchase tickets. Tickets are
25 cents each and will be on sale in the school cafeteria
prior to the festival on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thurs-
day from 8:30 am. to 9:30 am. and from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30

,S RESTAURANT
sg-dbfea6-Gourmet Take-Out & Catering
Are You Suffering From Pescaphobia?
If You Resist Cooking Fish at Home,
Come to Harry's for
Expertly Prepared Seafood!
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0777


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FRESHBAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
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p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, is an early release day with tickets
sold from 8:30 am. to 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 am. to 12:30
p.m. Tickets will also be available during the festival at
two locations the school office and the festival grounds.

For children:
"Boo Buddies" from the Red Cross will escort kids
aged 12 and under on a trick-or-treat tour through the
Manatee Red Cross' West Bradenton neighborhoods
on Halloween, Monday, Oct. 31. The Youth Volunteer
Corps will serve as Boo Buddies, ensuring that kids
observe safety procedures. Information, 792-8686.
DeSoto Square Mall will hold its annual trick-or-
treat party inside the mall on Monday, Oct. 31, from 5
to 8 p.m. Mall merchants give away candy and treats
to trick-or-treaters.

For adults:
Ralph Russel has put together Halloween parties at
both of his restaurants, Rotten Ralph's in Anna Maria
and The Hunt Club on Longboat Key. The "Rotten"
party is a repeat of last year's success with Jay
Crawford entertaining and lots of prizes. At the Hunt
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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FRI & SAT
OCT 28 & 29 10PM
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TOMATOES;


V ~IsandiInn
f restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


DON'T FORGET TO COMPLETE YOUR ISLANDER FOOTBALL CONTEST
ENTRY THIS WEEK. YOU COULD BE THE WINNER OF $50!


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Home of the Delicious
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THE.ISLANDER BYSTANDER m OCTOBER 27, 1994 PAGE.21 I3 -.


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
Club, 1960s recording star ("Before the Next Teardrop
Falls") Duane Dee will perform. Prizes are offered for
best costume there too.
The Drift-In in Bradenton Beach will hold a Hal-
loween costume party with prizes Saturday night. It's
also a celebration birthday party for customers' Octo-
ber birthdays.
At Turtles' Bar & Grill in Holmes Beach, the
Halloween bash lasts the weekend, Friday through
Sunday, with costume contests on Saturday and Sun-
day; cash prizes, drink specials and a new-to-the-Island
band, Einstein's Attic, playing on Friday and Saturday.
"Blindside" will provide entertainment on Sunday.
Crabby Bill's in Holmes Beach is having a Hal-
loween party Saturday night with prizes for the best
and worst costumes. Drink specials include a Dumpster
punch 153 proof grain alcohol with a special green
mix -it's great, say crabby folks. "Connie and Dave"
perform that weekend and the two weekends following.
Bortell's in Anna Maria will hold its annual Hal-
loween party and if all goes well with permit ap-


Mar Vista
Ragin Cajun Night
Sunday 5 10 pm
Appetizers
Pan-Fried Crawfish X
Cakes with a spicy hot
mustard sauce...$5.95
Cajun Spiced Fried Oyster
served with a bourbon spikers
remoulade...$6.95
Fried Gator Bites with
a spicy red sauce...$4.95
Entrees
Fried Pecan & Cornmeal Crusted
Catfish with hushpupples and remoulade
sauce for dipping...$10.75
Bayou Jambalaya with crawfish
tails, oysters, andouille sausage & alligator...$13.75
Crawfish Boil, one pound of whole crawfish steamed
in beer and hot & spicy crab boil served with hot
mustard sauce & butter...$13.75
Cajun Sampler, cajun fried oysters, blackened catfish
and a grilled shrimp & andoulle kabob served with
remoulade sauce...$14.75
Above entrees served with the choice of Hoppin' John or Cheese Grits, Stewed
Tomatoes with Okra & Corn and a side of Cole Slaw, Cornbread & Squaw Bread
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street, Channel Marker 39
383-2391


proval from City Hall a hay ride on Monday, Oct.
31. Al Tate will be driving the John Deere. Join up at
the Anna Maria City parking lot around 8 p.m. You
don't have to be in costume to ride but if you don't
wear a costume, folks will recognize you.
Sonnydaze, "a real coffee house" in Bradenton
Beach, is celebrating its opening Halloween weekend
with reggae music on Saturday and Monday. Saturday
nights party kicks off at 8 p.m. with "Groovers." The
"Point" radio station, 102.5, will broadcast live and
there will be a costume contest with prizes and draft
beer specials. Monday night the Halloween party con-
tinues with another Reggae group, "Democracy."
The Dry Dock Inn is also having two parties and
two costume contests, both Saturday and Sunday
nights. "King Louie" will perform.
The Anchor Inn will rock with the sounds of
"Blindside," a popular band that includes several members
of the former DTs group. Their Halloween event is more
low-key, with just good rock 'n' roll to entertain you.
Club Olivers will party and offer prizes on Satur-
day night with "Chandler & Wilson" entertaining.
The first annual "Fly-By-Night" Halloween Ball to
benefit ARTarget, a Sarasota artsy group, will be held
Saturday, Oct. 29, at Dolphin Aviation's hanger next
door to the Bradenton/Sarasota Airport, from 8 p.m. to
2 a.m. Food will be served and music by the "Bohe-
mian Swingers" and "Magadog" will be featured. For
ticket information, call 953-2482.



Cfez Andre


"We're Back!"
Come Dine
With Us
SBreakfast
Luncheon
SDaily Specials
Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


Member American
Culinary Federation


Reservations Suggested for Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Boo band
Einstein's Attic will rock in the Halloween spirits at
Turtles' Bar & Grill in Holmes Beach on Saturday
and Sunday, Oct. 29 and 30. Costume contests, cash
prizes, and drink specials will add to the bash.

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SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Oysters Rockefeller, Top Round of Beef, Veal Oscar, Shrimp Supreme, Roast Pork,
Shrimp Scampi Scallops, Lobster, Huge Antipasta
Salad, Fresh Fruits, Pasta, More Salads ... Nightly 1
and much more... Desserts too!ig ly
Early Bird thru Buffet by 5:30 S1095
Nightly from 4PM, Sunday from 2PM


"THIS WEEKS SPECIALS"
Fried Seafood Combo..... $995
Grouper, Shrimp, Scallops
10 Fried Shrimp ............... $895
Lobster Fra Diavolo......... $995
ALL SERVED WIPOTATO & SALAD
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS DAILY .. $495

ARRIVING DAILY:
FRESH FLORIDA
STONE CRABS!

Lunch Buffet and Full Lunch
Menu in the Dining Room
11:30 AM to 4 PM
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL!
T-Shirt Giveaways Every Quarter! 10PM Buffet FREE

SUNDAY $795 (T
BRUNCH 0
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Over 30 Breakfast and
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Mimosa Bloody Mary $100 & LOUNGE
Screwdriver Seabreeze J1
Entertainment! 0 S. BAY BLVDm
SONS OF THE BEACH ANNA MAA
Sunday 4 PM 778-9611
Oyster Bar on
HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 6pm Ann Maria
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Late Night Happy Hour Starts10 pm 778-0475
2 for 1 Well Drinks
$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffa t I a i


RESTAURANT


Halloween Party
with Duane Dee!
Monday Oct 31 Dinner & Dancing
Prizes for Best Costumes
OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543


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SEAFOOD) BUFFET IO"W5
7 Days a Week 5 to 10 PM
HOLMES BEACH LOCATION ONLY
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
BEACH ATrrlRE OK

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Friday & Saturday 8PM to 12 AM
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Holmes Beach CRABBY
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fl3 PAGE 22 i' OlCOBEEt 7, 19' i liHE ILANDEi AYSTANDIR


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Oct. 14, DWLS, 9000 block of Gulf Drive
Oct. 14, criminal mischief, 500 block of Kum-
quat. A person unknown threw water balloons at the
residence, breaking a window.

Bradenton Beach
Oct 14, disturbance, criminal mischief, 100 block
of Bridge Street. The officer responded to a disturbance
between a father and son. The son refused to go with
his father and began kicking the father's vehicle caus-
ing $900 in damage, said the report.
Oct. 16, grand theft, 2412 Gulf Drive N., Sand
and Sea Motel. A person unknown removed clothes
valued at $491.50 from a dryer in the laundry room.
Oct. 16, burglary (two counts), criminal mischief,
1501 Gulf Drive N., Gulf Stream Condominiums.
Upon arrival on a suspicious circumstances call, the
officers parked a block away and walked to the scene.
They saw four people leaving the area of three con-
struction trailers and stopped them. Then they saw a
juvenile hiding behind a fence. He came out from be-
- Eat In or --------- I
* .. Eat In or h .


hind the fence and the officer noticed he had paint on
his pants and shoes. The four said they had been chas-
ing the juvenile and another person.
The officers investigated further and found a tele-
vision and three telephones behind a portable toilet.
The four said they found the items lying there and left
them. The officers found smashed windows in two of
the trailers. The owner of the construction company
arrived and said the television and telephones had been
in the trailers. The officers also found $150 in paint
damage to a unit under construction and three boats
broken into. Items were missing from the boats.
The juvenile and another youth admitted to caus-
ing the damages and removing the items, said the re-
port. The were placed in custody.
Oct. 17, criminal mischief, 2300 block of Canasta
Drive. The complainant reported that a person un-
known placed roofing nails under two of his vehicle's
tires causing $60 in damage.
Oct. 17, burglary, 800 block of Gulf Drive S. The
complainant reported a person unknown entered her
mother's residence by crawling through a window and
removed a VCR and remote control valued at $250.
Oct. 18, disorderly conduct, 100 block of Gulf
Drive N. The officer observed a subject run from his

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vehicle to another vehicle stopped to make a turn. The
irate subject began yelling and pounding on the
vehicle's window with extreme force. The officer se-
cured the subject but backed-up traffic forced the
victim's vehicle to continue. Witnesses stated the sub-
ject instigated the encounter. The subject was very ar-
rogant and showed no remorse, said the report. He was
placed in custody.
Oct. 18, criminal mischief, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
Beach City Hall. The complainant reported a person un-
known threw a rock through a enclosure at a bus stop.
Oct. 21, reckless driving, 2500 block of Gulf
Drive N. The officer was in the Circle K parking lot and
observed a vehicle traveling south at approximately 50
mph. The officer said the driver looked at him when he
passed and punched down the accelerator, rapidly in-
creasing his speed to 75 mph.
The suspect made a left turn onto Cortez Road and
while turning, drifted into the extreme right side of the
road, said the report. The suspect got stuck behind traf-
fic on the bridge and began straddling the solid yellow
lines causing a hazard to westbound traffic. The officer
caught up with the suspect, stopped him at 121 Street
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE





Enjoy a Northern Italian Cuisine in a relaxed
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LARGE SELECTION OF PASTA DISHES
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THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
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TWO Costume Contests!
Sat Night Oct 29
with King Louie
and Sunday
Oct 30 4 PM


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ISLANDER
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Wednesday & Thursday 9PM to 1AM
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Sat. Oct. 29 9pm-lam
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Friday *Oct. 28 *9pm-lam
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


I








THE- ISLANDER BYSTANDER OCTOBER 27,-1994 I PAGE 23 [IE


CONTINUED FRBM PRECEDING PAGE
Court W. and placed him in custody.

Holmes Beach
Oct. 14, damage, 2800 Gulf Drive. The complain-
ant reported she was awakened by a loud noise and
found a window pane cracked.
Oct. 14, fire, 700 block of Manatee Avenue. The
complainant reported she was operating a vehicle when
it became disabled. She left the vehicle to get help.
While she was gone, the officer drove up to the vehicle
and observed the vehicle to be on fire. He called the fire
department and the fire was extinguished. The vehicle
was a total loss. Fire department personnel said the fire
started in the carburetor and was not suspicious.
Oct. 15,2800 block of Avenue E. The complain-
ant reported that a person unknown cut all four of his
vehicle tires valued at $400.
Oct. 15, service, 200 block of 84th Street. The
officer responded to a report of a vicious snake and
disposed of the snake.
Oct. 15, retail larceny, 3242 East Bay Dr., Wave
Zone. The owner reported that two white male juve-

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If you can dream it,
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6 Blocks South of Correz Bridge


niles entered the store and one kept him busy while the
other placed a pair of Airwalk shoes under his shirt and
fled the store. The owner chased the juvenile and ob-
served both juveniles enter a vehicle and drive away.
The next day, the officer observed two white male
juveniles matching the description given by the owner
of the Wave Zone. The juveniles were in the described
vehicle. One juvenile was wearing the shoes described
in the theft. The juvenile was placed in custody.
Oct. 16, damage, 5500 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported that a person unknown spray
painted his boat orange.
Oct. 16, assist EMS, 29th Street and Avenue C.
The complainant reported an intoxicated person who
appeared to have fallen off his bicycle. The officer
found the subject lying in the street complaining of a
shoulder injury. The subject was transported to the
hospital by EMS.
Oct. 17, damage, 100 block of 36th Street. The
complainant reported that a seawall and two large rocks
were spray painted.
Oct. 17, grand larceny ofa camcorder, 4700 Gulf
Drive, Anna Maria Elementary School.


Oct. 17, found property, 4700 Gulf Drive, Anna
Maria Elementary School. A student found a wallet on
the playground and turned it in to the principal. The
wallet was returned to the owner.
Oct. 19, suspicious person, 5702 Marina Dr.,
Turtle's Bar and Grill. An employee reported a white
male trying to open doors in the parking lot. He was run
out of the lot and went to Grooms Motors and was try-
ing doors there. The officer located the subject and
asked him what he was doing. He said he only tried one
door at Grooms because he was thinking of buying a
car and wanted to see how many miles it had on it. The
officer advised him to shop for cars in the daytime.
Oct. 20, fire, 4100 block of Gulf Drive. The of-
ficer responded to a report of a fire. A neighbor said
smoke was coming from the apartment. The officer
observed a pan on the stove on fire. The resident was
not home and the residence was locked. The officer
pushed in a screen on the door, entered the apartment
and removed the pan. Fire department personnel
checked the apartment and the officer locked the door.
Oct. 20, vandalism, 3015 Gulf Dr., Citgo station.
Graffiti was spray painted on the rear of the building.


Celebrate Halloween with

o o Jay Crawford

HALLOWEEN NIGHT
R ETTcN Monday Oct. 31 8 to Midnight r"
ROTTEN
RALPH'S Prizes for "Best Costume"
OPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH AND DINNER OPEN FROM 11AM
""oNToRES" 901 S. Bay Blvd in Anna Maria Anna Maria Yacht Basin 778-3953


RESTAURANT

S FRESH .
Stone Crabs
Purveyors of Quality Stone Crabs
Since 1924. Fresh Daily.
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am -10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY



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DiRiNA A ward


I& //he 'e oft


Hours Nightlly'.
Lounge & Lighter Bites 5:00 1:00
Dessert Room 6:00( 12:00
Restaurant 5:00 10:30
5540 Gulf of lMeico Drive
Longboat Key, FL
Dinner Reser'atiiims:
813.383.3633
Live Entertainment Nig'hrily


Join the

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1 ---


5;


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fres sbea breezes while dining on "
finest of sAfood under the shade of our f.ire
umbrellas. It's the most beautiful time of year
to get together with friends
and family at the Island's SANTBADA
traditional favorite restaurant: _
the Sandbar. Join the lunch sEAo
bunch! (We serve dinner, too.
Entertainment nightly.)


-100 Spring Avenue I Anna Maria, Florida I 778-0444

... A little treasure of a restaurant ...
inventive, fresh, well executed ...
Pat Benson Bradenton Herald
'Proof that great things come in small packages."
Kristy Nichols Sarasota Herald Tribune



je Mutiny Inn



Try Our $39.95 (2) Dinner Special,
includes appetizer & a bottle of wine
Entrees Include:
Fresh Gulf Catches: Prepared (10)
ways nightly.
Black Angus Filet Mignon
Lobster, Shrimp & Blue Crabmeat
Provencale
The Island's Finest Crab Cakes

"The Mutiny Inn" on the comer of
Manatee Ave. & Gulf Dr.
Serving Dinner
Monday thru Saturday 5:00 10:00pm
Closed Sunday


reservations Suggested
Avaia6ble for Private Parties
605 Manatee Avenuee, Holmes Beach
(813) 778-5440


I


I
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E 1




GOURMET GULF FRONT DINING



FRESH CATCH CRAB CAKES
SCALLOPS VEAL FRANCHISE
TEMPURA BATTERED SHRIMP
Soup or Salad, Cuban Garlic $12 I
Bread and Choice of Entree: I $ .95




Tax not Included, 15% gratuity added.
No dining club programs, certificates or discount
programs honored on Sunset Specials.
SUNDAY thru THURSDAY 4:30 to 6:30
Reservations Suggested
778-LENA (5362)
OPEN 4:30 CLOSED MONDAYS


;1






ilU PAGE 24 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Save the shells and that's not the least of problems


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Anna Maria Commissioner Dottie McChesney is
deadly serious about saving the Island's shells. The live
ones, at least.
Dead shells are no problem because that's what the
tourists should be carrying away anyway.
"I'mjust trying to save what shell beds we have left,"
McChesney told me earlier this week. "I'm going to the
city commission meeting Wednesday asking for their sup-
port, but if I don't get it, I'll just go ahead and propose the
ban on collecting live shells to the Island Elected Officials
Forum representing all the Island."
McChesney has done her research and it certainly
looks as though she's onto something. "We've got eye-
witnesses swearing they've seen people leaving with
trucks full of sand dollars," she says.
"In the last couple of years alone, according to fig-
ures turned into the State of Florida by people with li-
censes to harvest shells, we've seen increases of 600
percent in sand dollar harvests and 400 percent in-
creases in the taking of starfish.
"And these are just the people who report their
harvests to the state, not the ones who don't bother,"
McChesney continues.
The commissioner isn't alone in her concern.
The Florida Marine Fisheries Commission earlier
this month passed a special rules amendment prohib-
iting the harvest of all live shells in the City of Sanibel.
That action came at the request of the residents of
Sanibel who are watching their beaches being denuded
to ever-increasing hordes of visitors practicing the
"Sanibel stoop."
The folks in Sanibel passed a rule a couple of years
ago limiting anyone to possession of two live shells. Hey,
anybody can make a mistake and, in Sanibel, the reason-
ing went that you can make two and still not get arrested.
It didn't work. Frankly, some folks can't tell a live
shell from a dead one, and others simply flaunted the
rule in every possible way. You know, take two and put
them in your room then go get two more.
When the locals on Sanibel asked the Florida Ma-
rine Patrol for help, it was suggested to them they sim-
ply ban the gathering of all live shells.
(To get technical about this, the ban doesn't in-
clude oysters, hard clams, sunray venus clams, co-
quinas or the already-banned bay scallops.)
Up and down the coast, from Sanibel to Anna


AIRBOAT


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Manatee Avenue West
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Continuous Runs
730-1011


Alcee Taylor holds up one of the vandalized Save Our
Seafood signs. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood
Maria with several communities in between, folks are
beginning to ask for control of live shell collecting. I'm
hearing mutterings about this on Siesta and Lido Keys,
and McChesney tells me Bradenton Beach plans to
bring it before their council, too.
Petitions are being circulated on the Island, and
McChesney says she's pretty confident her resolution
to the Marine Fisheries Commission is going to pass.
"Elections are coming up early next year, and commis-
sioners have to see that most people support this con-
servation measure," she said.
Again, technically, what has to happen is for the
local communities to ask the MFC to pass a rule
amendment putting special rules into effect locally.
It's at least a six-month process once the formal
request is made, so not much is going to happen soon,
but McChesney is sure the rule change is needed to
save the local shell population. Passing it, she says, is
just a matter of time.

Fiery feelings on the net ban
Feelings on the proposed net ban are obviously
running high, and things are getting dirty.
The latest episode involves somebody unable to
control their feelings who's going around setting fire
to "Save Our Sealife" signs. The latest incident took
place in Cortez, a place you'd never catch me doing
something as stupid as that.
Don't forget to vote November 8.

Early snowbirds hit our beaches
Early snowbirds Nebraska's Least Terns -


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OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


SAILING CHARTERS
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Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
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U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.


L L ~-1 - - - ~ -- - - -- - -


n


I R


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~cY-r


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NXN XNNN\


~G;ic~t
FIIISTINFDYIII~D~T urrlr


have arrived for the winter. Actually, some of them will
be winging it on further south, but many spend their
winters right here along the west coast of Florida.
Migrating from their nesting grounds on the sand
bars of the Missouri and Platte rivers in Nebraska, least
terns are a species in some trouble.
Small, swallow-like birds, these terns have black
heads, white foreheads and yellow bills nicely set off
by their pale gray bodies. They catch their food, small
fish, by diving into the water.
Protected by the federal endangered Species Acts,
these little winter visitors are the subject of much effort
and some controversy, particularly along the Missouri
River. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has begun
drawing down water levels each spring and summer to
expand the creatures' nesting grounds the sandbars.
There was a time when the major rivers of the Mid-
west had plenty of sand bars, but that was in the days be-
fore the big dams. It may be late, but hopefully not too late
to save what few terns are left and even expand their now-
small population.
Meanwhile, barge lines and the electrical utilities fight
the conservation efforts, but the tide seems to have swung
over to the terns.
So although least terns may seem common on our
beaches this time of the year, they are really quite rare
anymore. Welcome them as honored guests.

Calling all dogs
I'm not sure if the boss is trying to tell me some-
thing here or not, but I've received a notice of the "41st
Annual Ken-L Ration Dog Hero of the Year Contest"
deadline of Dec. 31, 1994. Seems if you've got a "dog
that has gone beyond the call of duty, that heroic pooch
deserves to be nominated for this prestigious award,"
as the press release states.
Top prize winners receive a "Dog of the Year"
award plus "commemorative bowl and a year's supply
of Kibbles 'n Bits dog food," according to the release.
I sort of think the publisher is giving me a response
to my request for a raise by asking me to mention this
item, but despite that personal problem the press re-
lease does seems legit and, if you're as interested in
responding as I, fire off your very own story of your life
with or as a dog to: Ken-L Ration Dog Hero of
the Year, P.O. Box 1370, Barrington, IL 60011.
Arf.
See you next week.



RV, BOAT & CAR
STORAGE
LOW RATES: $25 per month plus tax
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8 STORAGE, INC. 7568454




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.1 .: '3-






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N OCTOBER 27, 1994 A PAGE 25 i-B


How much longer will this great fishing last?
@"


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Fishing is still improving day by day. Backwater
fishers are bringing in good catches of flounder, snook,
trout and redfish. In fact, Nicholas Almerico, 11-year -
old from Holmes Beach and Tampa, was out with his
folks last week and brought back seven redfish, one
almost 30 inches long. Offshore, look for about as
many snapper and grouper as you want to catch.
Katie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said offshore
anglers on their four-hour trip are averaging 125 head
of Key West grunts. The six-hour trip is averaging 200
head of lane and vermillion snapper, porgies, red and
black grouper. The nine-hour trip is averaging 100 head
of lane, mangrove and vermillion snapper, porgies,
scamp and red and black grouper.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
are catching a lot of flounder, mackerel, a few snook
and redfish and a lot of shark at night. He added that
the time is just about right for night-time snook as the
full moon wanes.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said it's been
a mixed bag this week, with everything from mackerel
and jacks to snook and sheepshead being caught. Dave
said that he did see one pier fisher pull up a four-pound
sheepshead as a harbinger of things to come.
Capt. Zack with the Dee Jay II said his customers
are bringing in good Gulf catches of cobia some up
to 35 pounds as well as Spanish mackerel, man-
grove snapper, grouper and trigger fish. In the backwa-
ter, good days are producing snook, reds and trout,
some up to 23 inches in length. Best bets for bait in-
clude white bait, big shrimp and gold spoons.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said offshore fishing is
bringing back to the docks good-sized kingfish, some
up to 25 pounds in size, mostly caught from about 10
miles out. Red grouper are farther from shore and, for
those willing to go out to about 20 miles, look for man-
grove snapper and tuna.
On my boat Magic we're still finding plenty of
redfish, a few mackerel, trout, mangrove snapper and
snook.
Capt. Phil Shields said he's finding kingfish about
12 miles off the beaches, red grouper about 30 miles


Team
Hayo-Meyer Construction
LaPensee Plumbing
School for Constructive Play
Power Pros Pressure Cleaning


Team
Beach Barn
Mr. Bones
Dowling Park
Uncle Dan's Plai
Island Pest Conti
Island Real Estat


Record
7-1-1
6-1-2
1-6-2
1-7-1


Division II
Record
5-0-1
5-1
2-2-2
ce 2-2-2
rol 1-4-1
:e 0-6


Points
37
34
9
7


Points
27
25
14
14
7
0


Division III scheduled games
Thursday, Oct. 27
Holmes Beach Mini Storage vs. Pettigrew Sharks at
6 p.m., followed by Longboat Observer vs. Ben
Webb Landscaping at 7 p.m.


Island Marine Construction
SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE


KYZER ALUMINUM & STAINLESS STEEL LIFT
Boats up to 31' or 10,000 lbs.
$4,200.00 Installed (Limited Time Offer)
ACE LIFT GALVANIZED STEEL
Boats up to 31' or 10,000 lbs.
$3,800.00 Installed (Limited Time Offer)
OTHER LIFT SIZES AVAILABLE DOCKS FROM $6 PER SQ. FT.


Holmes Beach (813) 778-5902
YfS/ir777T /f ,zs /* f I II f L Lf Tyfy*!


Lj 21


= M


Big and grumpy
Nicholas Galati, "almost two-years-old," doesn't
look like a very happy fisher perhaps because he
can't brag about catching the 23-pound grouper.
The prize-winner fish was landed by Mark Slivinski
of Team Galati. The took first and third place in last
weekend's tournament at Tierra Verde to benefit All
Children's Hospital. Islander Photo: Bonner
Presswood.


Horseshoe scores from
Island pitchers
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held at
Anna Maria City Hall for Oct. 22, were Bill Starrett and
John Kosatschkow.
Runners up were John Johnson and Herb Ditzel.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday, and
all are welcome.


SALES & SERVICE J
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'

OMC CrarnT
1mmm BOAT GROUP QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD

II^ ....LIC'iPI '^


Starting at $6439.


- --.._ --


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'

Starting at $325.


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" ( 5
P. 0. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577
ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu 10/27 5:02 2.0ft 8:15 1.6ft 12:31 0.4ft Ship's Store
Fri 10/28 6:32 1.8ft 12:35 1.3ft 8:50 1.7ft 1:27 0.5ft Bottom Painting
Sot 10/29 8:02 1.8ft 2:00 1.1ft 9:19 1.9ft 2:20 0.6ft Boat Storage
Sun 10/30 8:27 1.8ft 2:04 0.8ft 8:44 2.0ft 2:03 0.7ft Bulk Oil
Mon 10/31 9:39 1.8ft 2:59 0.5ft 9:12 2.2ft 2:38 0.9ft Consignment/
Tue 11/1 10:43 1.7ft 3:45 0.1ft 9:38 2.4ft 3:13 1.1ftBro r
Wed 11/2 11:46 1.7ft 4:33 -0.1ft 10:08 2.5ft 3:41 1.2ft Brokerage
North* BOAT RENTAL
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes lalter-- low tides 1:OC later.
7Lri-- -- r
77:3- -. .7 7r ',, 6 : a ..


Alum-A-Vator Boat Lifts

S-


Il MARINE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
(813)79225685_
Mobile Phone: 742-0396
TIMBER DOCKS BARGE SERVICE
PILINGS BOAT HOUSES DAVITS
S* RIP RAP REPAIRS SEAWALLS/DOCKS
S SEAWALLS *WOOD BULKHEADS
VERTICAL BOAT LIFTS FREE ESTIMATES
SCORTEZ, FLORIDA STATE RX0050998, MANATEE CO. #01125
S- -Since 1985-.


FISH TALES
WELCOME ...
just drop your photo off
at The Islander
Bystander office,
5408 Marina Drive.
(next door to
D.Coy Ducks)


d


offshore and, nearer to shore, snapper on the artificial
reefs.
Capt. Rick Gross said snook fishing has vastly
improved in the past few days as the weather cooled
down, with some charters bringing in catches in the 30-
inch range.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's bringing in lots of
trout from the grass flats and cobia near the channel
markers in Anna Maria Sound. Redfish seem to be
everywhere, he added.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said anglers are
reporting good catches of mackerel near the piers in the
morning, with silver spoons the best bet as a lure. Bar-
racuda are hanging off the Rod and Reel Pier, Bill said,
as well as redfish. Offshore fishers are bringing back
good catches of grouper, mostly in less than 100 feet
of water.
Capt. Tom Chaya said fishing has really im-
proved in the past few days, with mackerel, redfish,
trout, snook and snapper all being popular and plenti-
ful catches.
Good luck and good fishing.



AMICC Soccer

League standings
League standings as of Oct. 21
Division I







Ii3 PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

New items go with new image at Islanders' Market


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Walk into Islander's Market and ask if they have
any Grey Poupon and they'll give you the polite tele-
vision commercial response, "But of course!"
They'll probably also point you in the direction of
six other gourmet mustards that are among many new
items to be found on the shelves of the former Anna
Maria IGA.
Throughout the years since 1946 to be exact -
the IGA was an Island landmark, known more popu-
larly by the locals as Ernie's. Its founder, Ernie
Cagnina, died in August, but his store lives on under
the command of his son and daughter, John Cagnina
and Carmen Cagnina Shea.
The Islander Bystander caught up with John
Cagnina recently and asked him about what directions
the store would now take. Cagnina said basic food
items will still form the backbone of the business, but
he will be constantly adding new items especially
gourmet foods to the inventory.
A new name has also been put on the sign, and
Cagnina explained why the nearly half-century-old
establishment is no longer an IGA affiliate.
"For years and years we purchased from Super
Foods Services and IGA," Cagnina said, noting that
both organizations are very large wholesale houses.
"Albertson's decided to build their own warehouse,
and as a result they terminated their agreement with
Super Foods, and then Super Foods ended up pulling



-i9D I


out of the state of Florida. That meant there were only
two IGA warehouses in the state."
Cagnina said those warehouses were in Miami and
Quincy, both being too far away to justify buying from
them.
"So several years ago when Super Foods left we went
with Affiliated of Florida, which is a large co-opout of
Tampa," Cagnina says. "It's worked out good for us, but
when we made that switch IGA gave us two years to
change our name we'd been an IGA store for so long
it was integrated within our full name."
The question then became what the store would be
called.
"We just hit on this name, Islanders' Market,"
Cagnina said, explaining he feels the Island locals have


Lisa Varano


Denise Langlois


Good stuff
S: Steve Gianiotes, meat
.. manager for Islanders'
S \ Market, whips up some
Sandwiches in the deli of
0- the nearly-half-century-
old store which is taking
a new direction in
stocking new lines of
i\ gourmet products.
SIslander Photo: Mark
e Ratliff




more of an identity with this area than people living
elsewhere.
"Anna Maria Island has certain unique character-
istics. I think people on Anna Maria consider them-
selves Islanders, as opposed to people on Longboat
Key, I'm not sure if they consider themselves 'Keyers.'
I just think there's something unique about people liv-
ing on Anna Maria, so that's why we call it Islanders'
Market it's who we are and what we are out here."
One thing many Islanders are is conscious of the
best in gourmet foods, and Cagnina says he will try to
make this portion of the market happy. Toward this
end, he's added several foods that before now were not

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE



4ore than a mullet wrapper,






ISLANDERS
NEW! Islander T-shirts: $10
Black on White 100% Cotton Sizes: M, L, X-L
Catch your mullet at the Island Shopping Center
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beagf, 778-7978






(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato ................ 778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............ 778-2847 Marcella Cornett ............... 778-5919
Nancy Gulfford .................. 778-2158 Michael Advocate ............. 778-0608
94 _5 1iEndfy tRndeial soJLLfidionat
,Spsctafizlny in EJimsldii E7woiccafi Alyttl,
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use ofprofessional videotape.


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT


WAG NE
*k EAT Y atc.ff 3


WANTED:


We are in need of annual and sea-
sonal rentals. Contact Lisa or Denise
to discuss renting your property,

DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
SSorry, individual unit
delivery is-not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.


SIAPLY THE BEST
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
TEAM ON THE ISLAND


LISA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
Realty in. o 3101GulDrve
Reacltly inc. Holmes Beach, FL 34217


NEW LISTING KEY ROYALE: Spanish design 3
bedroom, 2 bath split home on sailboat water. Mosaic
walk leading to 27 x 14 Garden entry. Open floor plan
with family eat in kitchen. Florida room, 2 walk in clos-
ets, sprinkler system and 1 year Buyer's Home War-
ranty. priced at $215,000. Please call Carol R. Williams
778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


WHY PAY RENT? COLLECT INSTEAD Three bed-
room, one bath and a one bedroom ,one bath. Enjoy
one side and rent the other. Within walking distance to
beaches and shopping. Excellent rental history.
$110,000. Call Darcie Duncan 778-1589 eves.





... .- ,


ATTRACTIVE Three bedroom, home with 1.5 baths on
a corner lot in central Holmes Beach. Many new up-
dates including roof and wiring. $118,900. Call to see
this one today. Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


REDUCED HOLMES BEACH WATERFRONT:
Carefully kept top-notch 3BR/2BA home with expansive
water view. Amenities include boat dock with water and
electric, vaulted ceilings, 3 walk in closets, 7 ceiling
fans, jacuzzi, 15 x 16 workshop, 3 car carport and many
other extras. Reduced to $209,000. Call Carol R. Wil-
liams, 778-0777 or 778-1718 after hours.


SREALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK M#S PIS ~


Exclusive
Waterfront
V oEstaten
Video Collection


MLS [t Is "L -7


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 0 PAGE 27 IjM


Market
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE

carried in the store, and has expanded the brand-name
product line of items that have long been familiar to
patrons of the old IGA's aisles.
"We still have the staples and the standbys we've
always had," Cagnina says, noting that the available
sizes of these items have been tailored to meet the
smaller-than-average family sizes found in Anna
Maria. "But now we've decided to bring in more spe-
cialty and imported items."


Although Cagnina buys gourmet foods from
wholesale houses specializing in these products, he
says he also buys direct from the processors, allowing
him to stock some items not available otherwise.
"One of the advantages of being a small store is
that you can deal with these different processors di-
rectly, and the chain stores can't carry these products
because these processors can't supply the chains,"
Cagnina says.
"If you want to get things that are unique, you're
not going to find them at a chain store."
As an example of the new variety to be found at


Islanders' Market, Cagnina says it includes everything
from Washington salmon by Kasilof Fish Co. to
Dassant gourmet bread mixes, and from YZ biscotti to
imported Balsamic pasta sauces and vinegars to
Buckmaster's naturally-low-in-caffeine Arabica
coffees grown in the mountains of Oregon.
Islanders' Market also has Frank Sinatra's own
pasta sauces as well as mustards including Inglehoffer,
Colman's, Maple Grove Farms, Mister Mustard, Bea-
ver Brand and Dry Creek Vineyard.
And Grey Poupon?
But of course!


City
Anna Maria

Bradenton Beach

Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot
525 Kumquat
80x115-canal
303 Gulf Dr N
52x100
6323 Gulf Dr
small
6700 Gulf Dr
13 Gulf Place
3601 E Bay Dr
103A Sandy Pointe 1
3801 E Bay Dr
09 Sunbow Bay 4
4255 Gulf Dr
103 Island Village
5326 Gulf Dr
400x172
5416 Gulf Dr
5400 Gulf Dr 16


STYLE/rooms
elevated house
3bed/2bath/2car
2 story duplex
5bed/2bath
elevated attached villa
3bed/2bath/2car
elevated condo
3bed/2bath
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
elevated condo
3bed/3bath/2car
bank
various
elevated condo
Ibed/lbath


AGE/size
1987
2283 sfla
1944
1660 sfla
1988
1206 sfla
1976
1400 sfla
1986
1048 sfla
1981
1100 sfla
1981
1915 sfla
1973
3641 sfla
1970
900 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when
Hurt/Carrera
9/19/94
Boyce/Reedy
9/19/94
Stampler/Newport Market
9/19/94
Bethia/Kuechler
9/19/94
GE Capital/Adams
8/22/94
Rissmann/Michala
8/22/94
McElfatrick/Zeppi
8/22/94
Crossland/lst Nat'1
8/22/94
Stucky/Steacy
8/22/94


SALE$/LIST$
$295,000
list $345,000
$140,000
list uk
$128,300
list $145,000
$186,500
list uk
$73,900
list uk
$76,000
list $79,900
$124,900
list $159,900
$600,000
list uk
$73,000


Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate broker, exclusivelyfor The Islander Bystander. 1994.


Ri~i
-, .__ .,,r ..&.--.--k
,_! t ..' ...
-;; ... F-'. '. j ---: g ~


__--_., ., -- ... -
0 - -', -i' ,-. -." .:. : -.. .. -, _.. . .e
'' ', _-_ .--: "-: '.! :., -L z:.,;,. !,_, .-. ?'.-- :' -I,,.. _. ,.,.-.- -. ..-.---. ; I.f;- <;;- .-'.:.
L. -:b-., ._ "- .....


FULL SERVICE
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
"Open Six Days Weekly"
Specializing
on Anna Maria
Island
PROFESSIONAL
PERSONALIZED
SERVICE
OUR SERVICES
INCLUDE:
... Total Property
Management!
... Wide variety of
fine vacation rentals!
... Unfunished
annual rentals

Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6325


HOMES ISLAND
2906 Avenue C., HB ..................... .......
420 Spring Ave., AM .... ...... ..............
231 South Harbor, HB.....................
125 47th St., HB ................................
611 Foxworth Lane, HB ....................
602 Hampshire, HB.................................
607 Ivanhoe Lane, HB .............................
2500 Gulf Drive, BB .................................
607 North Point Drive, HB ........................
513 Loquat, AM....................... ...........
606 Crestwood Road, HB ........................
4000 Gulf of Mexico Drive, LBK................
609 North Point Drive, HB ........................


$122,900
$128,900
$169,900
$169,900
$219,999
$235,000
$279,000
$285,000
$329,900
$350,000
$390,000
$425,000
$449,000


HOMES OFF THE ISLAND
5688 25th St. Circle, Bradenton................. $78,500
7304 13th Avenue, Bradenton ............... $127,500
6003 10th Ave. W., Bradenton ............... $129,900
7211 41st Ct. E, Sarasota ........................ $129,900
3707 Plumosa Terr., Bradenton ............. $154,225
6709 88th Street, Bradenton.................... $189,000

DUPLEXES
120 57th Ave. E, Bradenton....................... $60,000
103 Palm Avenue, AM....................... $495,000


CONDOS ISLAND
6005 Gulf Drive, #216, HB .......................
701 Manatee Ave. #26, HB ...................
6500 Flotilla Dr., #232, HB ....................
3701 East Bay Dr., #9-B, HB ...................
3803 East Bay Dr., #7-A, HB ...................
600 Manatee Ave. #113, HB...................
1007 Gulf Drive N., #215, BB..................
600 Manatee Ave., #139, HB...................
6400 Flotilla Dr., #65, HB .......................
1800 Gulf Drive N., #215 .........................
6006 Gulf Drive, HB ...............................
1906 Gulf Drive, HB .................................


$129,900
$130,000
$134,500
$134,900
$136,000
$142,500
$142,900
$152,900
$159,000
$167,000
$178,000
$185,000


CONDOS OFF THE ISLAND
5884 Garden Lane ..................................... $25,900
313 108th Street......... .............................. $99,900
11025 Jasmine Circle ........ .................. $123,700
3920 Mariner's Way ........................... $205,000
55 Tidy Island ................................. .. $359,000
CONDOS PERICO BAY CLUB
881 Audubon Drive .................................... $86,900
864 Audubon Drive .................................... $88,500
876 Audubon Drive .................................... $88,500
903 Sandpiper Circle ................................. $89,500
982 Sandpiper Circle................................. $89,900
720 Estuary ..................... .................... $94,500
969 Waterside Lane ................................. $113,000
1255 Spoonbill Landings ......................... $129,900
1105 Edgewater Circle ............................ $129,900
1241 Edgewater Circle ............................ $142,900
1371 Perico Point Circle .......................... $152,000
1118 Roseate Court ................................. $153,900
1305 Perico Point Circle .......................... $155,000
624 Estuary Drive..................................... $159,500
1230 Spoonbill Landings ......................... $162,900
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT
6709 45th Avenue...................................... $84,900
807 18th Ave. W., Bradenton ................... $154,900
710 60th St. Ct. E, Bradenton .................. $180,000
2112 First Street W, Bradenton................ $350,000
3100 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach ............. $450,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK .................. $750,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK .................. $850,000
LOTS & ACREAGE
810 12th Avenue, Bradenton ................... $15,000
10205 Old Tampa Road, Ellenton.............. $70,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK .................. $150,000
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK .................. $325,000
5600 Lockwood Ridge Road, Sarasota ... $329,000
107 Bay Blvd., Anna Maria ...................... $395,000
17th & Gulf Drive, BB ............................. $450,000
517 Blue Heron, Anna Maria.................... $500,000


CALL 778-2261 Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


.j, ,. . .- -.: '-
-t -. .li't
--:-~~~. ... ''-- L---- ~~ ~~~Ii~.:~ -~~


----------


|







lQli PAGE 28 M OCTOBER 27, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
.., .au.a ar.IrJ .Ia,, rar,,


SECLUDED WATERFRONT


m


This fabulous waterfront residence with Bayou
and Canal Frontage creates a uniquely tropical
setting with spectacular views. Spacious 4BR/
4BA home with open floor plan, cathedral ceilings,
and gourmet kitchen. Pool, large deck and dock
surrounded by lush landscaping make this resi-
dence a rare offering. Offered at $410,000. Call
Dave Moynihan for details.


DICK
WANE
NRATYIC


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


BAYFRONT SPLENDOR REDUCED TO $419,000
Indulge in panoramic sunrises and waterfront views in this
exceptional, quality built home. 3 bedrooms 2.5 baths, this
home is perfect for anyone who loves the sounds of the sea.
Extras include a dumb waiter, large storage area, and high
energy efficiency. Must see. NOW $419,000. Call Agnes
Tooker 778-5287 or Kathy Tooker Granstad 778-4136.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 Ana Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


WE NEED
RENTALS

WE NEED
LISTINGS


Let Alice Zoller or Peggy Nash
help you rent or sell your property.


*m r --' : ; --. --" ,.. l
"I wish I was in the land of cotton ..." is seldom heard these
days. BUT, if you insist, you can program your door bell at
631 Foxworth and hear it every time the delivery "person"
brings you a Domino pizza. I recall with fond memory be-
ing able to get bar-b-que ribs and a six pack delivered.
Now you get Pepsi. So change the chimes to play "How
Dry I Am" and leam to put up with progress. "Shave and
a hair cut, two bits!" Or for this house, $525,000. Doug
Dowling Realty. 778-1222.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND Smilest
.=*-


JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want
to miss THE BEST news on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary.
Mail subscriptions are also available (form on page 7.)
Sorry, Individual unit delivery Is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.

Sri I^r l:AnnaMariaSince1939CAL(813)778-226FAX78-
2217 Gulf DriveASCAE i lFTR HUR
DICK BradentonB'each
^*ktDave Moynihan ................... 778-7976wB^^
WAGNER^^^^^B^S^^P^^^^&Aua&^^^^^^^mli^
LicensedB Ed OlHiveira.................77-15


GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE Well maintained
walking beach enhance this turnkey furnished Island home with good central Holmes Beach lo-
2BR/2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with cation. Two bedroom, two bath with large garage
pool, covered parking, and storage room. Excel- and storage area. One block to Gulf beaches. Priced
lent rental opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call at $109,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
Dave Moynihan.
SI ISLAND LOTS


y'- I. | I ., i
*Il, .i i,-I, i "I :
RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ...
85 x 130' ... deep water and spectacu-
lar views ... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ...
90 x 109' ... deep water and view of
Bayou ... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach & zoned
for 1-4 units ... $129,900.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


NEW DUPLEX LISTING
An old Florida charmer, this duplex is located just
1 block from a pristine beach. Each unit has 1
bedroom, and 1 bath. Great location With a good
rental history. Call today, Ken Jackson 778-6986
or Pat Jackson 778-3301. Priced at $134,900.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Kay Kay Hardy and Darlene Hughes
-taly WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M.
SATURDAYS 9A.M. to NOON ..







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 27, 1994 A PAGE 29 I..-


*ISLAMERZ4I;LA SS IF IEE*DZS
I EMS ORSAE GRAE ALE CN INE


BROWN COUCH excellent condition $300. Pro-
Form auto incline treadmill $200. Wood Octagon
shaped end table $20. 779-2129.
3-SPEED ladies trail-mate bike with coaster brake.
Original $335, asking $100. 778-2374.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.
MARY KAY COSMETICS, at reduced prices.
Please contact Susan Barnes 778-6407.
SOFA BY BASSETT, beach style, light colors with
bent.wood cane. $300. 778-1135.
2 BENCH CRAFT recliners. 792-6965.
WASHER/DRYER Frigidaire, deluxe stack unit.
Almond like new. $375. 778-3474 evenings.
BICYCLES. 1 ladies and 1 mans. Older bicycles,
but newer seats & handle bar grips. $50 for both
OBO. 778-9112.

LONGBOAT RESORT liquidation sale. Brass
lamps, artwork, and chaise lounges available. Call
Dan at 778-5945.
VCR, go dual deck system (play on one record or
other) cost $750 sell $400. 778-3171.
METAL GAS TANK w/pump. 100 gallons on new
trailer. 813-779-2005.

PINBALL MACHINE Bally "Old Chicago". $350. See
at The Islander Bystander Office. No phone calls
please.


GARAGE SALE. Sat., Oct. 29. 7 am. 104 75th St.,
Holmes Beach. Sale includes new merchandise
from Beach Style Boutique in Anna Maria.
GARAGE SALE. Sat., Oct. 29. 9-1. Sunbow Bay,
#7-B, 3701 E. Bay Blvd., Holmes Beach. Everything
goes! Appliances, furniture, misc.


GARAGE SALE. Sat., Oct. 29. 9-1. 403 72nd St.,
Holmes Beach. Washing Machine, patio lounger
and rocker, coffee table, double bed, motorcycle
helmet, housewares, clothing, misc.
MOVING SALE. Fri., Oct. 28, 8-4. Sat., Oct. 29, 8-
1. 303 Apt. A 61st. St. Full bed, brass headboard,
dining room set, 6 chairs, lamps, end table, recliner,
books, nice misc. collection.


AKC COCKER SPANIEL puppies. Females,
blonde, ready in 2 weeks. $300. 778-0167.
BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


1987 BUICK, 4-door, tan, Park Avenue, full power,
69,000 miles. Call 813-779-2005.
1990 SUZUKI SAMARAI convertible. Fun beach
car. White, 5 speed, A/C, stereo, low miles, great
gas mileage. $5,900 OBO. 778-9112.
91 CHEVY S-10 pick-up truck. Like new. 7900
miles, Cap., A.C. $9,200. 778-2971.
85 OLDS. DELTA 88. V-8, 4 door, power steering.
Runs great. $1,800. 778-2871.
1988 TOYOTA COROLLA DX. One owner, excel-
lent condition. 61K miles. $5,800 or make offer. 778-
4698 after 6 pm.


SCUBA SCRUB. Mobile underwater hull cleaning at
your dock or marina. All work done by hand, no
chemicals or machinery. 778-5841.
BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.


See the beauty of Anna Maria's
properties, beaches and canals
by boat. Call me today!

Karin Stephan
REALTOR
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY-
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766 k
Mobile:
813-350-5844


H^Tfc'^BB


Anna Maria Island Clubl One of a kind!
Beautiful sunsets from balcony. Charmingly
furnished. Large 2BR/2BA. Pool, saunas,
spa. $255,000. #KS59362. Karin Stephan; or
388-1267 evenings.
Edgewater Cove at Perico Bay Club! Splendid
views of Palma Sola Bay & Anna Maria from this
beautiful upstairs condo! 3 bedroom, 2 bath, ga-
rage. Many upgrades, excellent condition. Pool,
tennis, clubhouse, 24-hr security gate. $196,900.
#KS59052. Call Karin; 388-1267 eves.
Sun Cay ... 6 unit condo: (3) 2 bedroom & (3)
1 bedroom apts. In heart of Anna Maria, just
steps to beach. Excellent rental history,
approx. 10% ROI. $549,000. #KS59331.
Karin Stephan, 388-1267 evenings.


PALMA SOLA HARBOUR condo with best
water view around! Corner unit on canal.
Bright & clean, 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Club-
house, pool. $124,900. #57807. Bruce
Skorupa, 792-0303 eves.
FLAMINGO CAY condo. Fabulous opportu-
nity for beautiful canalfront, w/boat dock. 2
bedroom, 2 bath. Pets ok. Huge storage/fun
room. Overlooks bird sanctuary. $112,500.
#58953. Horace T. Gilley; or 792-0758 eves.
COUNTRY-STYLE living! 4 bedroom, 3 bath
home. sitting on 1+ acre, wood burning fire-
place, wood floors, large outdoor deck. Se-
cluded, yet close to everything perfect for
families. Near Morgan Johnson Rd.
$142,000. #58406. Call Bruce Skorupa; or
792-0303 eves.
BAYFRONT
TRI-PLEX...
Charming,
Neat & clean.
Gorgeous Bay views.
Boat dock!
$329,000


Carol Heinze
REALTOR/CRS
Certified Residential Specialist
Successful W. Brad.
Restaurant. Seats 150,
4COP. $350,000. Call me!
Gulf Dr. Restaurant!
Prime corner, attractive
decor. Seats 65+ inside.
$520,000. Call today!


778-7246


T. Dolly Young
REALTOR/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
778-5427


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory. Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


POOLSIDE & STEPS TO BEACH
Ground level condo in Holmes Beach. Perfectly
kept grounds. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. completely
furnished. $117,500.
:Y- --- IM


PERFECT LITTLE HOME
Truly a pleasure to see, this home has just had a
first class paint job inside & out, as well as new
carpet. Only steps to the beach with 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, large utility room, garage and sits on a lot
and a half. Only $125,000.








GULF FRONT
3 bedroom, 2 bath beauty directly on wide white
sandy beach. No hallways, wide open for casual
beach living. Beautifully fumished, surrounded by
windows and water vista.

like n 778-6696
Norman1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


ypje






RM PAGE 30 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
SHurricane Resistant Home Designs
Additions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
t 778-5594 778-3468


I'k-I II wI
STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
.LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
m MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SSINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


J. R.

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


SAN C ASI
I:OAS BATNGCo HMEI--OEMN


Sand l" Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy Lawn Mowing Trimmlng Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby themonth.
S Serve .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
\ 77 .1 345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
S1 AND SATISFACTION


BOAT TRAILER, load write 5,000 Ib g.w., tandem
axle, surge brakes. $700. 778-3171.

CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


MAINTENANCE WORKER City of Anna Maria.
Duties vary widely, including mowing & gardening
of city property, cleaning & repair of buildings,
equipment, etc. Must be able to understand, follow
directions, also work independently, apply to: City
of Anna Maria, 10005 Gulf Drive, PO Box 608,
Anna Maria, FL 34216 by 4:30 pm 10/28/94. EOE
& BAND drugfree workplace.
DOLPHIN DAYCARE opening soon, needs expe-
rienced and/or qualified teachers/caregivers full-
time and part-time available. Must be education
and creativity oriented. Please call Melanie Smith,
778-1868.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for beachfront motel.
Part-time, some weekends, start immediately.
Sand & Sea Motel, 778-2231.
HOUSEKEEPING POSITION. 20-30 hrs. a week.
The Coconuts Beach Resort. 100 73rd Street,
Holmes Beach. 778-2277.

GENERAL OFFICE, light bookkeeping, computer
experience preferred. Part-time. 778-1626 or 778-
6477.
REALTY OFFICE seeks responsible person as
secretary/receptionist. Record keeping ability help-
ful. Send resume to PO Box 8224, Longboat key,
FL 34228. Confidentiality assured.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to
meet interesting people from around the world? Are
you interested in learning the history of Anna Maria
Island? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
WE NEED YOU! Call Dorothy Steven, 795-0148 if
you can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


COMPANION. Pleasant alternative to living alone;
educated, traveled, non-smoker, references. Long
time area resident. 924-8802.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.

AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon
on mobile number 356-4649. Please leave a mes-
sage for quick reply if not available.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Is-
land references. 779-2129.
HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.
NO TIME TO CLEAN? Homes, apts., rentals, etc.
I'm fast reliable and reasonable. "I like what I do ...
and it shows!" References available. 778-4116.

CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs. exp. Call
Bradenton Fiberglass for free estimate 753-9621.

ISLANDER Classified ads really work for you!


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodel-
ing specialist. State licensed and insured. Many
Island references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving
the Island 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resi-
dent.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers
& concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.

HOME MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS. Experienced,
reliable, small jobs preferred. Don Staples 778-
0225.
CUSTOM RENOVATIONS by Paul Beauregard.
All home improvements. Specializing in kitchens &
bathrooms. 20 yrs. experience as an industrious
highly-skilled, dependable carpenter and finishing
contractor. My work also includes; counter tops,
ceramic & vinyl tile, drywall repairs, fine finish paint-
ing, wall coverings, etc. 387-8066, beeper #252-
6528.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, drywall repairs, tile & formica work. Work guar-
anteed. Low prices. 778-0410.


1 LG/1 SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.

GULFFRONT Best in Anna Maria! 3BR/2BA, im-
maculate, steps to water Nov., Dec. & March $600
per week, reserve now. 778-3171.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! ISLANDER CLASSI-
FIED ADS REALLY WORK.

1 BR/1 BA APT. 2 blks to beach. Walk to stores, li-
brary. $400/mo. includes most utilities, 1st and last.
Available Nov. 1. 778-6700.

ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo avail-
able March & April 95. $850/wk. Gulf front. 813-
949-3713.
WESTBAY COVE Large 1 BR/1 BA. Tastefully fur-
nished & decorated. $800/mo. T.D. Young, 778-
0766. Prudential Florida Realty.
SEASONAL, 2BR/1BA home, screened porch, cable
TV, W/D, garage, close to beach. 813-689-0925.

CANALFRONT home, 2BR/2BA, enclosed garage,
Holmes Beach. $950 per month. Unfurnished. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.CANALFRONT
home, 3BR/2BA, new tile floors, screened lanai,
$1,200 per month plus utilities. Unfurnished. Call
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Tear Island Resident


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!











AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned &
Silicone Protected. Our mobile service
means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100
percent bio-degradable products.
By appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 27, 1994 M PAGE 31 EI -.


GULFFRONT, 2BR/1 BA. Private beach, nice W/D,
garage: Now thru April. $2,200 monthly, 778-9486.
1BR/1BA DUPLEX apt, unfurnished, $425/mo.
Efficiency apt., unfurnished, $350/mo. 1BR/1BA
duplex apt., with W/D hookup, unfurnished, $475/
mo. Call Fran Maxon Real Estate, 778-2307 or
778-1450.
STILL AVAILABLE for January 1995. Deluxe beach
2BR/2BA apt., central H/A, W/D. Call Betty Cole,
779-1213.
"LETS MAKE A DEAL" Wish to acquire a residence
or commercial maintenance-care taker position in
exchange for modest living quarters on Anna Maria
Island area beach. Call 778-1617 ask for John.
2BR/2BA furnished doll house. One lot from pristine
beach. Illness makes November available. Call for
price, 778-4372.
STUDIO, 100 ft. to beach. Holmes Beach. Jan.,
Feb. & March. $500 monthly all utilities paid. Call
778-0727 or 355-0450.
ANNUAL RENTAL. North end of Anna Maria. 1 BR/
1BA with porch. 1 block from beach. $500 per
month. 778-1868.
CANALFRONT duplex, 2BR/1BA bayview, unfur-
nished. $650. Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.


4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
WEST BRADENTON. 3BR/2BA home, excellent
family neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will
help buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins
at Island Real Estate 778-6066.
DREAM VIEW of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
3 Bedrooms, fireplace. $350,000. Owner will fi-
nance. Yvonne Higgins, Island Real Estate
778-6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 1 00ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3BR/2.5BA, split-design, southerly
exposure, manicured landscaped with auto sprin-
kler system, living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen,
2 car garage, 1880 sf. $234,500. 778-7837.
BY OWNER. Drive by this 8 year old stilted duplex,
fully landscaped with outside lighting and sprinkler
system. Each unit 2BR/2BA, laundry room, dining,
ceiling fans, central air, lots of storage and decks to
enjoy great Gulf view with famous FL sunsets. All
for only $189,500. 3210 West 6th Ave., Holmes
Beach. Call 778-1516, ask for Gene or Katharina.
REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981.
LBK updated 3BR/2BA, sailboat water, 110 ft. to
Bay. Appointment 383-6560. $273,000.


IISLANDER


TIDY ISLAND on Sarasota Bay. Preconstruction
prices on waterfront townhouses, $219,900. Lots
available from $74,900. Call Tidy Island Properties,
Inc. 761-8439.

EXTRA LARGE Anna Maria lot across street from
community center. Quiet, family area. $79,000.
Call Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-
6066 for details.
CANALFRONT lot in Key Royale across street
from golf course. Deep water bay access.
$175,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
ADORABLE Anna Maria home close to beach.
3BR/2BA with possible 4th BR or den. Two sepa-
rate entrances make this property unique!
$147,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
KEY WEST styled canalfront home in Anna Maria
- 3BR/2BA easy maintenance shell front yard.
$234,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
ONE OF A KIND deep water canalfront home in
Holmes Beach 6BR/4BA inground pool -
$386,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
OWNER WILL FINANCE this Anna Maria bayfront
home with a dream view, 3BR and fireplace.
$350,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066 for details.
INVESTMENT property steps to the beach. Call
Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
WEST BRADENTON 3BR/2BA home in excellent
family neighborhood. New roof, 9-94. Seller will
help with closing costs, $79,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for details.
IN HISTORIC CORTEZ village. Charming 2BR/
1.5BA cottage. Nice oaks, quiet street, island at-
mosphere inland price! $62,500. 723-3616 or
794-1221.
S. BAY BLVD. Elevated 1450 sq. ft. 2BR/2BA with
900 sq. ft. garage/storage, back deck w/water
view, fruit trees. Many extras. 778-7070.
OPEN SAT. & SUN. 2-4. 629 Kingfisher, LBK, sail-
boat water, 110 ft. to Bay, deeded beach, updated
3BR/2BA. $273,000. 383-6560.
ANNA MARIA residential lot for sale. 744 Jacar-
anda Rd. 2 minute walk to beach. Can see the
ocean from elevation. Call (713) 271-5744. Dr.
Mikles.
BOATERS! Fabulous Anna Maria canalfront lot
with Tampa Bay access. One of the few left! Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.

ISLAND DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, 1BR/1 BA plus mother-
in-law apt., 2 blks to beach. 304 56th St., Holmes
Beach, $149,900/offers. By owner. 778-6700.


IR A C d AL E AT


778-2586 MAR / KA Eve: 778-6771

15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 11/2/94

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
S Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353


Personal Fitness

STRAINING GRI
SCardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
SMuscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis
Nauonally Certified 779-2129


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
~ Massage Therapist
.-. i- Now AcceptingAppointments
Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MM0003995
-MA0012461


Custom Communications
Installation of Phone Jacks
Computer Repair
Data Back-Up


CONTACT DAVE for
answers to any technical
questions or for
S an appointment.
730-1608 or 778-6407


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RXOO65455
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
S* VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
S7 ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074


Don't

forget!
We mail over 900
out-of-town subscrip-
tions every week.
If you want to keep
in touch with what's
happening on Anna
Maria Island, please
use the form on
page 7 in this issue.

5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 34217
(813) 778-7978


$oLMES

BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office
in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located
next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines -21 WORDS. Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS. Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or
two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


6"IB


4ore than a mullet wrapper!







BiSIANDER i
NEWI Islander T-shirts: $10
Adult Sizes: M, L, XL, XX
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-7978


I:
--
.---\
"
---
-., r




[J( PAGE 32 0 OCTOBER 27, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


HOMETOWN
PRVD


Islan


Foods


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1994


K~rff~1K~


CHUCK ROAST I BEEF STEW


Right heron Anna Maria Island!I


GROUND CHUCK


Nabisco Premium
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GRANULATED
SUGAR


U 5 LB
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Musselman's
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59 'LB
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FREE BLOOD
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Every Friday
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