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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00536
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00536

Full Text

OCTOBER 20, 1994


WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Historical Society remodels museum;


roof on old Anna Maria City Jail next?


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Island Historical Society's mu-
seum will soon have a new look at least on the in-
side. As for the outside ... well, that remains to be seen.
Historical Society members heard a plan Monday that
their board of directors approved last week. The member-


Administrative


hearing set for


'mega-bridge'

battle
By Paul Roat
The latest battle in the war against the replacement
span replacing the Anna Maria Bridge is set for Dec. 19.
An administrative hearing on what some have called
"specious" hearings last October has been set for the pre-
Christmas date. The move is the result of action by attor-
ney Claflin Garst on behalf of Save Anna Maria (SAM).
The administrative hearing is tentatively scheduled
to last three days. Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie
Martini, an opponent of the proposed big bridge, said
she believed that date may be changed due to a conflict
with the Christmas holidays.
Garst said the administrative hearing was sched-
uled as a result of his June 1993 request. The original
request was based on lack of proper notice to property
owners within 300 feet of the proposed construction
site, improper notice of hearings, and an improper
number of hearings.
Garst said he received verbal denial of his request
but never received notice in writing. He petitioned the
court of appeals for a review and then received notice
from DOT that it would grant a hearing.
The Administrative Hearings office in Tallahassee
will provide an independent and impartial hearing officer.
Garst said that in filing his petition and an amendment
to the petition, "I made it as broad as I could make it."
The hearing will not be limited to the original re-
quest for proper hearings. It will also address the ques-
tion of whether the Florida Department of Transporta-
tion should build a 65-foot, fixed-span bridge to replace
the Anna Maria Island Bridge.
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
officials have blocked permits for Florida Department
of Transportation construction of the bridge, citing
environmental damage to seagrass beds and mangroves
in the area if the bridge were built.
Islanders have also objected to the proposed
"mega-bridge" due to quality of life and safety ques-
tions the big bridge would pose.
DEP officials appeared to relent to DOT officials'
requests last July, conceding their earlier contentions
of a northern alignment would cause significant navi-
gation impacts. At the time, DEP District Director Dr.
Rick Garrity said, "We will now work for a successful
mitigation project for a south-side bridge."
Still an issue are the mitigation efforts DOT prom-
ises to use to restore seagrasses damaged by the bridge.
Like all plants, seagrasses need light to grow, and the
new bridge will shade the submerged plants, reducing
light and eventually killing the plants. Replacement
seagrasses will have to be planted, and the exact
amount of restored seagrass acreage, as well as where
those plants will be placed, has been a topic of discus-
sion between the DOT and DEP in the past few months.
Scientists have viewed the proposed site of the big
bridge recently to view seagrass beds. A preliminary
decision was reached to attempt a seagrass planting
pilot project, perhaps in the spring, to determine


ship seemed enthusiastic about interior space planning
from Bradenton Beach architects Emily Anne Smith and
Tom Eatman that will provide more room for displays and
make the museum space more efficient.
Eatman and Smith would like to do a lot more than
just refurbish the inside. They hope to add an entry
gazebo, more parking spaces and landscaping outside.


seagrass growth effectiveness in the area.
"It's very difficult to do a successful mitigation of
seagrasses," Garrity has told The Islander Bystander.
Other concerns about the big bridge, which would
have a roadbed clearance of about 74 feet above Anna
Maria Sound, center around wind effects on motorists
at that height. Hurricane experts have said the wind
forces at that altitude are much greater than at lower
heights, posing the concern that cars would be swept
off the span during storms.
And a continuing concern lies in the fact that long-
range plans for the area still call for a second high
bridge to be constructed, effectively making the north-
ern route to Anna Maria Island four-lane.
Island cities have been asked by SAM to assist in the
hearing by having each cityS attorney attend the hearing,
and the Bradenton Beach City Council has unanimously
agreed to have City Attorney Alan Prather join Garst at the
table during the administrative hearing.


They also unveiled a proposal to put a roof on the
old city jail, restoring it to what they believe to be its
original look during the 1920s.
Society members said they would have to think
about that portion of the proposal and get back to the
PLEASE SEE SOCIETY, PAGE 2


... AND THE GAZEBO
ENTRANCE PROPOSED FOR
THE HISTORICAL MUSEUM
The Anna Maria City Jail, built in the early 1920s, is a
landmark in the city. A picture postcard of the jail was
featured just recently on the cover of the travel section
of the Kansas City Star. A proposal by Island architects
Smith and Eatman calls for adding a roof to the building
and turning the shell of a structure into offices.
No decision has been made by the Historical Society
on the proposal The gazebo entry, at right, is proposed
for the new entrance to the museum.


Candidate profiles
Page 12


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ......................................................... 6
Those Were the Days ................................... 7
C o rtez ........................ ....... ...................... .. 16
School Daze.................................................. 19
Stir-it-up ................................... ...... 20
S treetlife ................................... ................... 22
Anna Maria tides ......................... ........... 25
Real estate ......................................... ........... 26


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND








JIl PAGE 2 E OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Holmes Beach slammed over Key Royale Bridge


Holmes Beach officials and Key Royale residents
received a double whammy this week, with bids for the
repair of the bridge leading to the neighborhood com-
ing in almost three times higher than expected and
word coming down that state financial assistance
would not be forthcoming any time soon.
The City of Holmes Beach received two bids for
the repair of the Key Royale Bridge Monday. Lowest
bid was for $430,000; the second was $480,000. The
city budgeted $160,000 for the project.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger received a letter from
Florida Department of Transportation District Secre-


tary David May Friday. In it, May said, "Unfortunately,
funding for the construction of the project is not cur-
rently available in the adopted five-year work program.
The Department is unable to consider any advancement
reimbursement agreement for projects which are un-
funded in the work program."
Bohnenberger had requested state funding for ap-
proaches to the bridge in September, with the hope that
the city would pay for the work and then get reim-
bursed at a later date from the state.
Ironically, that loan-payback approach has been
approved by the DOT for Longboat Key's revetment


project along Gulf of Mexico Drive.
"May said in his letter to me that they couldn't re-
imburse the city for the Key Royale bridge because is
isn't in the five-year workplan," Bohnenberger said.
"Now, he says he can do this for Longboat Key even
when their project isn't in the five-year workplan?"
Metropolitan Planning Organization Executive
Director Mike Guy said the reason Longboat got the
special inclusion in the plan instead of Holmes Beach
was probably due to Gulf of Mexico Drive being a state
road. The Key Royale bridge project is a city project,
what DOT planners call "off-system."


Anna Maria Fire Station
holds open house
Fire Station #1 in Holmes Beach held its annual open
house on Saturday to an estimated crowd of around
300 spectators who turned out for demonstrations,
raffles, health checks and to meet with representa-
tives from the fire fighters, police, emergency medics,
Coast Guard, marine rescue, forestry service and the
Red Cross. The Jaws of Life demonstration drew a
crowd as rescue workers literally take the car apart.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


Anna Maria to hold fall clean-up
Anna Maria will hold its Fall Clean-up on Satur- up. The Anna Maria Recycle Yard at Pine Avenue is
day, Oct. 22, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Gulf Drive next open seven days a week.
to the Anna Maria Post Office Plaza. For any questions about recycling call Commis-
Yard waste must be separated from other refuse. sioner Max Znika at the Anna Maria City Hall, 778-
No batteries, tires or paint will be accepted at the clean- 0781.


Fire board hears tax appeals


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Fire District Commission
heard two appeals and denied one at last week's tax
appeals hearing.
The first appeal came from Harry and Deborah
Howey of 4415 125th St W. in Cortez. The Howeys
had an antique business in their home in the past but
the home had been returned to residential use. The
board voted to return the home to a residential rate.
The second appeal came from Hugh Holmes
Sr. and concerned a lot in Marina Isles that had
never been improved. The board voted to return the
lot to a vacant lot rate.


Society
CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE
architects at a later date.
"We're delighted to be working with the Historical
Society," Smith greeted the large crowd at Anna Maria
City Hall. "We're very excited about being partners with
you in what we hope will be the creation of one of the fin-
est museums of its kind and size in the state."
According to Smith, the Historical Society has the
money about $5,000 to accomplish the interior
renovations to the museum. Smith's design fee is
$1,600.
Smith proposed a 12-week series of fundraising
events to provide funding for her proposed exterior
renovations all of which she promises to deliver.
The membership agreed the fundraising program
should kick off on Nov. 1. According to Smith, the
campaign would include everything from a chili cook-


The third appeal came from William and
Marianna Holm and concerned a vacant lot at 115
6th St. N. in Bradenton Beach. The Holms own the
vacant lot which is adjacent to their residential lot.
They asked that the vacant lot be considered a part
of the residential lot and the $4 fee be removed.
Fire Chief Andy Price noted, "We reviewed it
and have no reason to remove the $4 fee. It's a va-
cant lot just like every other vacant lot."
Administrative Secretary Mary Stephens said the
lots have two separate parcel identification numbers.
Commissioner Sandy Haas added, "It's a separate
piece of property and they can sell it on its own."
The board denied the appeal.


off to a kite flying contest. Judges, she says, would be
the three Island mayors.
"But they don't know that yet," Smith said, bring-
ing a chuckle from the crowd.
Another unknown commodity is the cost of the
exterior renovations. Smith gave no indication of what
that price tag will be to the board or the membership.
When told The Islander Bystander it was difficult
to put a dollar amount on the project since she expects
much of the labor to be donated.
"We can do as much as the fundraising campaign
brings in," Smith said.
The interior remodeling Eatman and Smith pro-
pose include:
Enlarging the floor space of the museum, incor-
porating the area currently occupied by the Sheriff.
The addition of a receptionist area.
New scrapbook desks that will offer 40 lineal feet
of book storage space.


Dowling blows


whistle on


German duo


Anna Maria real estate agent Doug Dowling alerted
local real estate agents, as well as German police and
immigration authorities, about two visitors from Nurnburg
who recently practiced what he called a confidence
scheme against several Island rental agents.
According to Dowling, the couple, Elke and Tho-
mas Eskofier, would call on a real estate company,
make an offer on an expensive piece of property and
say the money was being wired from Germany. In the
mean time, the couple would ask if the company had
a nice rental they might stay in while they waited for
their money. They would agree to pay for the rental
when the money arrived.
Dowling said the money never arrived, the couple
was evicted and they moved on to another real estate
company. Because some agents were too embarrassed
to alert others to the scheme, said Dowling, the couple
continued their scam until he became a victim and
alerted others.


Glass display cases.
A retail display for the sale of T-shirts, caps and
other promotional items.
Modification of the restroom to meet the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act requirements.
Here's what the Smith and Eatman propose to do
to the exterior and grounds, if their fundraising is suc-
cessful:
New access to the parking lot.
A gazebo at the entrance which will house
benches.
Landscaped parking lot with at least eight park-
ing spots.
General landscaping incorporating the park north-
east of the museum.
Fencing to separate the museum from the city's
public works lot northwest of the building.
Any exterior changes would have to receive the
approval of the city commission.


I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 M PAGE 3 Im


Sheriff seeks help finding hit-and-run driver


Anna Maria sheriffs deputies are asking for Is-
landers' help in finding a hit-and-run driver whose
vehicle dragged an Island teenager 32 feet on Oct. 8.
Returning from the beach, Aaron Alan Boyd, 16,
of Anna Maria was crossing North Shore Drive west of
Fern Street about 11:30 p.m. when he heard what he
thought was a vehicle. As he turned toward the south,


Commissioner o

to protect liv
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
At last week's commission work session, Anna
Maria Commissioner Dottie McChesney introduced a
resolution requesting that the Florida Marine Fisheries
Commission (FMFC) propose a special law to prohibit
the taking of any live shellfish within city limits.
"The resolution can be presented to the FMFC as
our wish," said McChesney. "If they think we qualify,
they write the law. It takes about six months."
The process includes a public hearing and the rule
would be enforced by the Florida Marine Patrol (FMP),
said McChesney.
The rule will be
the same as one
passed by the
FMFC on Oct. 7 for .
the City of Sanibel.
McChesney said
any of the Island cit- ---'
ies could have been
included in that rule
if they had acted
sooner, but will now .
have to seek their
own rule. She said
she sent copies of
her resolution to the other two Island cities in hopes
that they will pass similar resolutions.
"I urge people to call their city hall if they support


he was struck by a slow moving vehicle without head-
lights.
According to Sgt. Jim Tillner, Boyd placed his hands
on the vehicle's hood as if to try and stop it. The vehicle
stopped briefly, then continued to move. Boyd was
knocked down by the impact, then caught by the vehicle's
bumper and dragged under the vehicle, said Tillner.


offers resolution

re seashells
a ban," said McChesney.
McChesney, who faces some skepticism from her
own commission on the ban, said Anna Maria residents
can also call their city hall to indicate their support for
the resolution.
According to Jim McCallister of the FMP, the only
protection for live shells at the present time is bag lim-
its.
"Florida sets bag limits for many saltwater spe-
cies," he said. "If you harvest more than the bag limit,
then you are considered to be harvesting for commer-
cial purposes. You are also considered to be harvesting
for commercial purposes if you harvest more than 100
pounds per person per
day of any species that
- does not have a bag limit

He continued, "A
person that is harvesting
a saltwater product for
Commercial purposes

"- Products License. This is
Resou--- A 1-800-342-5637.
not the Saltwater Fishing
License, which is a rec-
reational license."
McCallister said if
you have any doubts about what you can take, call 1-
800-DIAL FMP. To report an offender, call the FMP
Resource Alert at 1-800-342-5637.


The vehicle dragged Boyd about 32 feet then
stopped again. Boyd quickly rolled out from under the
vehicle, stood and got a good look at the driver before
the vehicle left the scene.
Boyd received numerous abrasions and scrapes to
his eyebrow, right cheek, right elbow, right forearm,
right wrist, right hip and both knees.
The driver is described as a white male in his late
30s or early 40s with a dark full mustache, dark hair,
glasses and weighing about 250 pounds. The vehicle is
described as a 1985 to 1990 model, large white or
beige, four-door sedan. The vehicle has a marker light
mounted on the outer door post between the front and
rear doors. Tillner said it could be a Mercury Marquis
or Ford Crown.
Anyone with information concerning this incident
is asked to call Tillner at 778-4711.



Anna Maria City
10/24, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning Com-
mission
10/25, 7:30 p.m., Commission meeting
10/26, 9 a.m., Planning and Zoning
Sub-committee

Bradenton Beach
10/20, 1 p.m., Council meeting
10/21, 1 p.m., Council meeting on
pier concession
10/25, 7 p.m., Adjustment Board

Holmes Beach
10/20, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
10/26, 5 p.m., Equity Study Commission

Of Interest
10/22, 9:30 a.m., Meeting of interested
residents to form a support group for the Anna
Maria Island Community Center,
Holmes Beach City Hall.


FACE-OFF


Island Issues

Island Voices

The following political races and issues will be
featured in a question and answer format.

Fire Commission Seat 3 *
George M. Jackson and Larry Tyler, Jr.
Fire Commission Seat 4 *
J.M. (Marty) Duytschavcr and Deborah A. Marks
State Representative, Dist. 68 *
Julie McClure (Dcm.) and Mark G. Flanagan (Rep.)
" Constitutional Amendment 3 Net Ban *
John Kocck (FCA) and Karen Bell (Save the Nets)
When: WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26
Meet & Greet at 5:30 p.m. 6 p.m. Forum
Where: ST. BERNARD HALL
at St. Bernard Catholic Church,
248 So. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach
All local Manatee County candidates will be invited to
attend and meet voters prior to the forum. Forms for
questions will be available at the door.
Sponsored by


ISLANDER


II


I









j PAGE 4 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Citizen asks Anna Maria commission


for reversal of variance decision


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Claiming that the Anna Maria City Commission
had no good reason to grant a variance to building set-
back requirements last month, a resident asked the
commission to rethink what it had done and undo it.
Anna Maria resident Bill Worth suggested that the
commission had acted in undue haste when it granted
a variance to minimum setback requirements for a
home to be constructed at 825 North Shore Drive.
Worth then urged the commissioners to rescind their
approval of the variance in the same speedy manner.
"In the best interest of the general public, please,
someone make a motion to reverse the action taken Sept.
15," Worth said. "Just go ahead and make a motion while
you've got this railroad train rolling tonight."
In a letter presented to the commission, Worth re-
iterated his objections to the granting of the variance
which took place at a work session. Worth had objected
at the time, arguing that such action should not be taken
except at a regular commission meeting. The commis-
sion responded by explaining that this was the way
matters like this have been handled for a long time.
According to the commission, once the city's plan-
ning and zoning board has recommended a variance for
approval (the case with this property), if the commis-
sion had no problem with the recommendation and
needed no further information, there was no reason it
should not be granted in a work session. The
commission's reasoning was essentially that if it
planned to approve a variance at the next regular ses-
sion anyway, why not do it at the work session and save


the property owner an unnecessary two-week wait.
Worth was not impressed by this argument, for he
believes variances should be given a great deal of
thought before they are approved and the public should
have the opportunity of the additional time in which to
provide input to the process.
"One commissioner was absent and the (requested
variance) was not scheduled for a vote at that workshop
meeting," Worth wrote in his letter. "I am appealing the
hasty action taken by the commission because it discrimi-
nates in favor of the land owner and against the public."
Worth's main objection to the variance being
granted is that he says it cuts drastically into the right-
of-way which extends from the end of North Bay Bou-
levard to the beach at Bean Point. Worth also alleges
that because the city's right of way extends into the
sand past the point the pavement stops, the property at
825 North Shore Drive becomes a corner lot.
City codes require a 20-foot setback from each
right of way for homes on corner lots, but the city gave
its approval for setbacks of only 10 feet. That was a big
mistake, according to Worth.
"(This) action will have the effect of narrowing
the airspace between the buildings and conse-
quently the view by 20 feet, since the owner of
the other side (of the right of way) will certainly
want a 10-foot variance also."
Worth contends that because the buildings in this area
will have to be tall to meet flood insurance requirements,
and because they will be relatively close together, the re-
maining city right of way between them will no longer be
an attractive path to the beach for the public.


New firefighter
begins Oct. 24
Brian Braun was recently selected by the Anna
Maria Fire Commission for the ftdl-time
position added in the new budget. Braun and
his wife, Donna, came to the area four years
ago and both joined the fire district volunteers
six months later. Both are state certified
firefighters and Emergency Medical Techni-
cians. The couple is expecting their first child
in December. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Equity study commission to review

occupational licenses


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The City of Holmes Beach revived its Equity Study
Commission last week to revise its occupational license
fees and review classifications for such licenses.
The commission was created last year as the result
of reforms to the state's occupational license tax stat-
ute. Florida statutes require the appointment of the
commission to determine rate and/or classification
changes. The commission then makes recommenda-
tions to the city council.
The statute also set maximum increases for license
fees. The statute allows "a one-time increase of up to 10
percent of the sum of the total revenue generated by the
municipality in either the preceding fiscal year or the
amount of revenue that would have been generated in the
preceding fiscal year had the municipality enacted the
maximum tax increases authorized in 1980 and 1982,


whichever is greater, including any revenues remitted by
the county during the preceding fiscal year."
Guidelines are given in the statute for maximum
percentages; however, any license may be increased up
to a rate of $25 and not be bound by percentage maxi-
mums. Future rate increases of up to five percent ev-
ery two years may be implemented with a majority plus
one affirmative vote of the city council.
The statute also provides for civil actions and penal-
ties against any business that does not pay its required
occupational tax within 150 days of initial notice of tax
due. Any increases in the tax rates must be imple-
mented by Oct. 1, 1995.
The commission met last week to begin reviewing
occupational license fees in other Florida cities of similar
size. They will also review the city's current occupational
license structure and all businesses that receive such li-
censes. Discussion will continue Nov. 26 at 5 p.m.


"The canyon-like access that the public uses be-
tween these tall buildings to reach Bean Point will be
narrowed," Worth argues. "The view of Bean Point, the
view of the water, the sky, the trees, the dunes and sea
oats is important to the public."
"Also," Worth continues, "looking southward the
scene of the Island's ambience is important to the pub-
lic." Worth says any new buildings using the variance-
allowed 10-foot setbacks will be out of alignment with
the existing structures on North Bay Boulevard which
were required to have 20-foot setbacks.
Worth emphasized his protest by reminding the
commission that variances should only be granted for
verifiable hardships. He questioned what the hardship
was in this case.
"The rules were established to protect the public,
and they should not be changed for the few," Worth
said. "I don't see any hardship with the landowner in
this case. That lot looks like a football field out there,
and there should be plenty of room for a good, single-
family dwelling to fit on this large lot without chang-
ing the rules."
Not so wrong on every point, countered Plan-
ning and Zoning Chairman Tom Turner.
"The planning and zoning board spent hours re-
viewing (the variance request), Turner said. "When
(the applicant) came to us for the variance there wasn't
a soul in the audience. These are all public meetings
and they're publicized."
Addressing Worth, Turner told him that since he
did not attend the planning and zoning board meeting
and had not raised his objections to the variance then,
he was too late now.
"I think that after we've made our recommenda-
tions and the city commission has passed them, for you
to come back weeks later and ask for it to be rescinded
is kind of ridiculous."
Turner then went on to rebut Worth's other allega-
tions.
"There is not just one walkway to Bean Point,"
Turner said. "The 50-foot right of way will never be
taken away."
Perhaps not, but Worth was not the only person
who questioned what the hardship was that convinced
Turner's planning and zoning board to recommend the
variance.
"Could you tell me what that hardship was?" asked
resident Dan Hardy.
"Like 99 percent of the hardships that are passed in
this city," Turner responded, "most of them are due to the
way the existing land development regulations are writ-
ten." Turner heads a subcommittee which is now in the
process of reviewing those regulations, including setback
requirements, with the stated hope of modifying them to
make them less restrictive and more in keeping with the
practical needs of the city and its residents.
Turner said that the property owner wanted the
variance so the house he plans to build will fit better on
the lot a reasonable request according to Turner,
since he says he's never really seen a "hard hardship"
presented by anyone asking for a variance.
"They (the variances) are for the people's conve-
nience we're here for the peoples' convenience,"
Turner says.
Hardy again took the floor, saying the city's codes
require that for a variance to be granted, a hardship
cannot be created by the homeowner. Hardy said the
owner of the 825 North Shore property created his own
problem by insisting on building a house on one por-
tion of the lot although there was plenty of room to
choose to build elsewhere on the parcel.
"The owner bought the lot, paid an architect to design
(the house) and he should have said, 'I'm sorry, this won't
work' and not bought the lot," said Hardy, an architect
himself. "I think you're setting a dangerous precedent here
by giving away green space that the residents have fought
so hard to keep. I think these codes should be followed
until they are re-written."
That's all well and good, Turner indicated, but to
take the variance away now that it has been granted
could prove to be costly to the city, he said.
"I feel the city commission should stand on the
recommendation," Turner said. "If we reverse it, we'll
probably face a lawsuit."


I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 5 lH

Holmes Beach code board levies three fines


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Board ruled
on three cases Friday, levying fines in all three cases.
One case involved a home occupation license and two
concerned care of premises.
In the first case the board cited Richard Riley
Conarroe of 8404 Marina Dr. for failing to obtain a
home occupation license for his business, International
Friendship Search. Conarroe filled out the application
for a license but twice did not attend council work ses-
sions when his application was to be discussed, as is
required by the ordinance.
According to Conarroe's application, his business
"helps individuals in other countries, notably the
former Soviet Union and Thailand, establish friend-
ships with Americans and to help marriage-minded
Americans to meet wife candidates from other coun-
tries."
Code Enforcement Officer Mike Heistand ex-
plained, "We have the phone number through an ad.
We have a tape recording of a call we made to him stat-
ing that he is still in business. Someone called yester-
day and identified herself as an employee of his, his
secretary, and he's not supposed to have any employ-
ees. When I got on the phone, she denied she's an
employee."
Board member Art Ballman said that Conarroe is
out of the country at the present time. Heistand noted
that the problem has continued for over six months and
that Conarroe himself set the dates to appear before
council.
Board member Bill Saunders said, "We need to do
something to make him respond. I think we need to
send him a letter saying he has three days to comply


II


Don't miss
your chance to
meet local
candidates as
they face-off
and answer
your
questions.
Anna Maria
Fire Commis-
sion Candi-
dates, Florida
House of Rep-
resentatives
District 68
Candidates
and
representatives
from FCA and
Save the Nets
on Amendment
No. 3 to "Ban
the Nets" ...
THE
ISLANDER
BYSTANDER
POLITICAL
FORUM
Wednesday
Oct. 26
5:30 p.m.
St. Bernard
Hall


[COPES
|5e;


or a $250 a day fine starts."
Heistand said three days is not sufficient time for
Conarroe to come to council and apply for a license.
Ballman suggested a week because of the distance in-
volved.
City Attorney Patricia Petruff pointed out, "He's been
given the opportunity to come in but he has not availed
himself of that opportunity. If you give him further oppor-
tunity to come into compliance, are you just postponing
the inevitable? If you tack on a fine if he doesn't take af-
firmative action by a date certain, maybe that would be
enough to make him sit up and take notice."
Board member Roger Lutz made the motion to
"send Conarroe a letter ordering him to cease and de-
sist with operation of a business within a week of re-
ceipt of the notice and if he fails to do so a fine of $25
per day will be levied." The motion passed unani-
mously.
The Pirate Beach Club Partnership of 305 Gulf Dr.
was cited in the first case of care of premises. Heistand
said the yard growth is more than three feet high in the
vacant lot and he has received complaints from both
adjoining property owners.
"We wrote several letters last year on the same
property and went through the whole process," said
Heistand. "We offered them the lot mowing program
and they did it on a one-time basis. This year we did the
same thing and have received no response."
Lutz made the motion to "fine the property owner
$100 today and $100 every Friday until he complies."
The motion passed unanimously.
W.G. Smith of 613 Emerald Lane was cited in the
second case of care of premises. Heistand said Smith
was also cited last year for the same infraction.
Explained Heistand, "Mr. Smith wrote the city a


letter stating that the word 'overgrown' does not appear
in the city's care of premises ordinance. It does not but
the ordinance does state 'including but not limited to
weeds and growth.' We have received more than one
complaint about the property."
Three neighbors complained to the board saying
the overgrown property is "an embarrassment to the
community" and a "fire hazard."
Saunders said, "There is nothing in the code about
overgrown lawns or any specification whatever about
mowing one's yard."
Saunders replied, "By these pictures, you don't
have a lawn, you have a bunch of weeds."
Smith said he is letting his grass go to seed because
"I want the seed to mature. I'm attempting an experi-
ment in xeriscape. In xeriscape one tries to use native
grasses and bushes instead of having sod put down and
sprinklers put in to use a lot of water. I'm attempting
to use Mother Nature."
Petruff said, "I disagree with Mr. Smith. This has
been in the ordinance for quite some time and has
worked well for us in the past. We cited him for care
of premises. There is some discretion the code enforce-
ment officer has to utilize with his investigative work
but it is a reasonable community standard issue. That's
a matter for you to determine based on the evidence."
Ballman made the motion to fine Smith "$100 now
and $100 every Friday until he mows the lawn." The
motion passed unanimously.
Smith asked if he has a means of appeal. Lutz said
the board cannot give legal advice. Ballman told Smith
to read the code to find the appeal process.
In other business, the board agreed to set a regular
meeting date. It will be the last Friday of the month at
9 a.m. beginning in November.


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IBG PAGE 6 M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


F


The sky is falling
Residents in Anna Maria are surely spending sleep-
less nights in total fear, aghast at the thought of what many
are already claiming a sacrilege a roof on the jail.
For the benefit of newcomers, or would be comers
to Anna Maria Island, let us explain. The jail was built
in 1923 or 1924 and it functioned only for a short time
as a jail before the roof burned.
The landmark jail cries out for one of those high-
way signs, "scenic photo opportunity." Certainly many
a visitor has had his picture taken there, as did Anna
Maria's first mayor, Captain Mitch Davis.
Davis was mayor from 1923 to 1927. He posed like
so many visitors in snap shots in so many forgotten
albums tucked away in attics standing in the door-
way of the jail with the signs painted on the building,
signs that are still visible today.
"No roof. No doors. No windows. No bars. No
guests for yrs n'yrs."
The jail is at the museum. The museum and the jail
are on city property and are operated by the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society. The sheriff has had an
office in the back of the building for some years, but
they're now moving to the newly expanded city hall.
The Historical Society wants to remodel the inte-
rior, expanding their display space and making room
for additional exhibits in the future. They talked to ar-
chitects Emily Anne Smith and Tom Eatman of
Bradenton Beach about their plans. They went so far as
to agree to pay $1,600 for architectural services.
Shock waves went out after the first presentation
to the board. Never mind great plans for the interior
space the proposal includes a roof on the jail.
Smith's whole plan calls for a 13-week fundraising
campaign that she says is totally dependent on the Is-
land newspapers. It's up to us, in other words, for her
plan to succeed.
We don't understand. Won't the Historical Society
be ultimately responsible for the success or failure of
their fundraising program, not Smith or The Islander
Bystander?
This newspaper is dedicated to Anna Maria Island.
Our pages are full every week with news and an-
nouncements important to everyone. We do what we
can to fulfill the needs of the community.
Although we haven't been consulted about plans
for the jail or Smith's fundraising "media plan," it
probably would be better to talk to someone like
Pierrette Kelly at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center about how to raise money through donations.
We make money the old fashioned way we sell
advertising.


ISLANDER


OCTOBER 20, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 48
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
T Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Judy Miller
Advertising Services
andAccounting
Judy Miller
V Production
Darla Tingler
Bill Edmond
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


ljefJ :* e M


BB meeting changed to Oct. 27
As residents of Bradenton Beach are no doubt aware,
our city council is considering changes in the city's land
development code. On Thursday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m. the
council will consider "Beach Related Issues" (this is a
change from the previously announced date).
One of the issues will be the permitting and opera-
tion of "individual water craft" Jet-skis.
Anyone having a position either pro or con should
plan to attend this meeting.
Please well thought out, concise statements will
be of more value than loudness.
The planning consultant's recommendations are
available at city hall.
John Sandberg, Bradenton Beach

Remember to vote on Nov. 8
Kent Chetlain's gracious letter of thanks to Island-
ers who supported him should remind us all the we
have a special responsibility to get out and vote on
Nov. 8.
The Island needs us. It is politicians who determine
its future. We should make it known to the people who
ask for our votes that our very valid concerns must be
addressed. A large Island turnout will send a clear
message to candidates that we care, that we have fol-
lowed their platforms or voting records and that we will
vote accordingly for the sake of Anna Maria Island.
This will also send a message to future candidates
for future elections, especially vital ones like seats on
the county commission. Perhaps then the strength of
our vote will equal the power of the affluent.
Exercise a cherished right on Nov. 8 and vote to
save our Island as well. Remember that absentee bal-
lots count equally with the others.
Kay Hoey, Bradenton Beach

It's time to protect the shellfish
I went to a town meeting again on Oct. 14 and I am
always amazed at these meetings. It seems to me the
land owners are always against the other community
members. I was very upset with a few of the comments
made by members. Not all of us can attend regular
town meetings but it doesn't mean that we don't care


or we're not interested.
I personally think Bean Point is a disaster zone. I
can't understand how the city, state and the DNR could
let that happen. I would like to see an environmental
impact asset done on this area. But then I do remem-
ber that the owner proved "hardship."
I wish I had his hardship where I could buy a big part
of property to have a new big house built on it. There was
a comment made that this will increase the property value
thus lowering taxes. Well I always thought it was the other
way around. One of the commissioners said all the laws
were followed. Well, I guess a law is a law especially
when you are a land owner.
The other topic (and the main reason why I went
to the meeting) was the proposal to have a ban placed
on the amount of live shellfish taken from our waters.
Anyone who knows anything about natural resources
understands that if we keep taking and taking and do
not give back, what is left? Think about the rain forest
and look at Bean Point. Then think about boat loads of
shellfish being removed from the water.
When was the last time you found a sand dollar
bigger than a quarter? We may not be Sanibel, but we
do have a problem. I invite Commissioner Wolf to go
to the Rod and Reel Pier on a hot summer afternoon to
see how many buckets full of starfish, sand dollars and
other shellfish are being removed not for pleasure
or for souvenirs but removed because they found them.
They started to smell and mom said get rid of them.
This is what we are talking about this and boats in
the canals with nets taking everything in sight.
If we had a ban it probably would be as effective
as the no dogs on the beach or the no alcohol laws. But
then again, let someone get caught, then we'll see how
effective it can be. We need to do something before our
children only know what a sand dollar looks like from
a book. We protect the manatees and the sea turtles.
Now it is time to protect the shellfish.
Sheila Hurst, Anna Maria


For more of Your Opinions,
see page 8


\IYS'NwR













THOSE WERE TE BAYS
Part 7, The Remarkable Captain Jones
by June Alder


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Ballycarney, John R. Jones's little cottage on the bayou (about where the Island
school is today), was named after his birthplace in County Wexford, Ireland.


AT EASE IN EDEN


In 1894 Tampa could boast of its
grandiose Tampa Bay Hotel with tele-
phones and arty electric lamps, its thriv-
ing port and trolley line. But it also had
labor troubles in its cigar factories, gam-
bling dens and thriving bordellos.
Tampa was getting entirely too citi-
fied for John R. Jones's liking.
A yen to pursue his avocation of
horticulture was what had drawn him to
Florida from Canada in 1882. Circum-
stances conspired against him then. But
now he began to think once more of
closing his law practice and moving to
Anna Maria Key, his favorite hunting
and fishing haunt.
What clinched his decision was the
terrible freeze of the winter of 1894-95.
Twin freezes, actually, in December
and February, when ice and snow and
temperatures in the 20s and below de-
stroyed the citrus crop of north central
Florida, sending ruined grove owners
and unemployed workers southward to
Tampa Bay where damage was slight.
Jones was delighted to discover that
the trees he had casually planted on Anna
Maria Key through the years seemed to
have been stimulated to bring forth an ex-
traordinary crop of golden fruit.
Another gladsome tiding was that
federal government dredges had fin-
ished digging a new shipping channel
from Tampa down to Sarasota. This
meant coastal steamers like the Mistle-
toe and the Manatee could stop regularly
.I I. I


d -


Captain Jones was proud of this
papaya tree, one of the many plant
species he experimented with on Anna
Maria Island.


at Anna Maria.
Jones foresaw a role for himself in
developing Anna Maria as an impor-
tant farming and citrus growing center.
The Idate of his settlement on the
Island was recorded as Feb. 28, 1895,
when he established an experimenta-
tion station under license of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture. At first,
while his three younger children were
attending Catholic schools in Tampa,
his wife Sophia remained in Tampa.
On Sept. 12, 1895, the Tampa
Times (where elder son John Patrick
was working) reported:
"Capt. John R. Jones enjoys life to
the full improving his place on Anna
Maria Key, raising vegetables and
chickens and working by turns on his
book." (Recording his data, presum-
ably.)
Jones had virtually the whole is-
land to test out weather-and soil condi-
tions conducive to producing fruits and
vegetables "grown to perfection." He
not only developed superior specimens
of pineapples, figs, grapefruit and ba-
nanas but exotic ornamental plants of
many kinds, some of which later prolif-
erated all over the Island.
One that fortunately did not seed
itself, was the so-called "stink tree"
whose luscious blooms smelled like
rotten garbage. Another species was a
wide-spreading tree with long dangling
fruit which looked for all the world like
sausages hanging in a butcher shop
window. (There is a sausage tree grow-
ing today on the grounds of the Anna
Maria City Hall.)
In November the Tampa newspa-
per quoted the captain: "I have settled
permanently on Anna Maria Key, and
can truthfully say that for health,
beauty of location and productiveness
in agriculture the Manatee section of
the state is ahead of any district ever
visited by me."
Like G.E. Bean, his friend up on
the North Point, Captain Jones had
found his Paradise. Unfortunately,
Bean died in 1898. But Jones would
live happily at ease in Eden for 40
years until his death in 1935 at the age
of 82.

Next:: The Coming of
the Cobbs


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 7 iK



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Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
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Fire District
Supported by the current volunteers

PLEASE VOTE FOR
MARTY DUYTSCHAVER ON NOV. 8

PD. POL. AD. PAID FOR BY THE CAMPAIGN TO ELECT MARTY DUYTSCHAVER


POLITICAL FACE-OFF
Wednesday, Oct. 26 5:30 PM
at St. Bernard Hall, St. Bernard Catholic Church, Holmes Beach
Island fire district candidates, Florida House of Representatives District
68 candidates and both sides of the Net Ban Amendment
will answer questions from Islander voters and "face-off."
Sponsored by "The best news on Anna Mariai Island"
The Islander Bystander



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Top Island water users


According to the Manatee County
Public Works Department (MCPWD),
these were the top ten commercial and
residential consumers of water on the
Island for the month of September.
MCPWD says the average residential
customer uses about 6,000 gallons per
month.
Abbreviations used: AM=Anna


Maria, HB=Holmes Beach,
BB=Bradenton Beach, and IRR indi-
cates the customer is on an irrigation
meter, which measures water used pri-
marily for lawn and garden watering.
On the Island, there is no reclaimed
water available, thus all water used for
irrigation purposes is potable (drinking)
water.


Top ten commercial users
Account name
(1) The Anchorage Restaurant
(2) ELRA, Inc.
(3) Sandbar Restaurant
(4) Crabby Bills
(5) Gaston Wacker
(6) Eckerd Corp.
(7) Theresa A. Wickwire
(8) ELRA, Inc.
(9) Gulf Drive Cafe
(10) Derderson Development

Top ten residential users
Account name
(1) Baywood Builders, Inc.
(2) Gulf Drive, Inc.
(3) Shell Point Condo
(4) Sun Plaza West Condo
(5) M.E. Resh
(6) Water's Edge Condo
(7) Runaway Bay
(8) Anna Maria Island Co.
(9) VROOM Developments
(10) Bali Hai, Inc.


The Manatee County Extension
Office will hold a public information
meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 25, at 4
p.m., at Kendrick Auditorium, Agri-
cultural Center/Fairgrounds in Pal-
metto. The topic concerns Florida
Power and Light Company's plans to
convert to orimulsion fuel at the


Vote 'no' on #3
Amendment #3 concerning the ban-
ning of nets is to be put to the voters. The
future of a major Florida tax-paying in-
dustry is at stake along with its subsidiary
industries. Many Florida families are de-
pendent, directly or indirectly, upon the
commercial fishing industry, as are Flo-
ridians who enjoy freshly-caught fish.
There are less fish and the commer-
cial fishermen are being blamed al-
though they are using nets, as they have
been for generations, when there were
no shortages.
Why then, are there less fish?
Our human population has multi-
plied in recent years and our sewage
treatment cannot keep pace, so the par-
tially-treated effluent is dumped into
our bays where it does the most harm to
our fish nurseries. Buildings have been
erected along our shorelines where pre-
viously there were fish nurseries.
Let's stop blaming our fishermen
whether they be commercial or sport and
let's stop poisoning our remaining fish
nurseries. The fish will quickly come back
if we let them. Our fishing industry is hav-
ing a hard time but they will hang on un-
less we destroy them by our vote.
Why buy our fish from the Japa-
nese? Vote "no" on Amendment #3.
George D. Huist, Bradenton


Address
101 S. Bay Blvd., AM
206 Gulf Dr. N., BB
100 Spring Ave., AM
5325 Marina Dr., HB
875 North Shore Dr., AM
5313 Gulf Dr., HB
5400 Marina Dr., HB
202 Gulf Dr. N., BB
900 Gulf Dr. N., BB
3200 East Bay Dr., HB


Address
610 North Point Dr., HB
5400 Gulf Dr., HB
6300 Flotilla Dr., HB
5608 Gulf Dr., HB
402 28th St., HB
5806 Gulf Dr., HB
1801 Gulf Dr. N., BB
2602 Gulf Dr. N., BB
7000 Gulf Dr., HB
6900 Gulf Dr., HB


Gallons used
343,100
248,900
241,300
170,800
121,500
111,300
108,800
89,400
82,600
79,400


Gallons used
325,600 (IRR)
212,400 (IRR)
145,200 (IRR)
140,400 (IRR)
131,500
96,400 (IRR)
94,000 (IRR)
93,800 (IRR)
80,000 (IRR)
79,900 (IRR)


Manatee Power Plant near Parrish.
The meeting is in response to in-
quiries from agriculturists and wide-
spread public interest in FPL's re-
quest to burn the relatively new fuel.
FPL will present its conversion plans
and respond to questions. For more
information call 722-4524.


Save the wetlands
I am concerned about the protection
of Florida's environment and sea life.
Jeb Bush wants to redefine the word
"wetland," which would spell trouble.
More than 43 percent of Florida's
wetlands from coastal areas have al-
ready been lost. Some say 75 percent of
the commercial landings and nearly 90
percent of the sport fisheries in the
United States depend on in-shore waters
for survival.
We are losing billions of dollars in
lost revenue because of this continual
destruction of fish habitat.
We need to protect the environment
without the loss of jobs or revenue that
commercial fishing, tourism and sport
fishing provide.
Every time a homeowner sprays
pesticides in his yard, or farmers spray
crops or the county sprays for
mosquitos, the waterways become pol-
luted.
A broad plan is in the making to re-
store the Everglades. The federal
government's proposal would try to re-
store the natural flow of water across the
terrain, reversing a half-century of engi-
neering. This will require some sweep-
ing changes. We must continue this pro-
tection for our environment.
Martha Carncs, Holmes Beach


September 1994


Public meeting to address

FPL's orimulsion plans


a ll *- l Il9]





















Above, Katarina and Doris Stey, formerly of East Berlin, wowed the audience
with professional acrobatics while dancers enjoyed the authentic German music
of Ann and the Bavarians. Everyone ooom-pah-pahed the evening away at the
Privateer's Octoberfest event at the Island Community Center last weekend.


Library to close for
Veteran's Day
The Manatee County Public Li- branch library, will close on Friday,
brary System, including the Island Nov. 11, for Veteran's Day.

Mayor to form support
group for community center
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Beach City Hall, 5901 Marina Dr.
Bohnenberger has called a meeting of Bohnenberger requested that all vol-
interested residents to form a support unteers be fully paid members of the cen-
group for the Anna Maria Island Com- ter or come prepared to pay the $25
munity Center. The meeting will be held membership fee. The meeting is ex-
Saturday, Oct. 22, 9:30 a.m., at Holmes pected to last approximately one hour.

The Island Poet
Did you ever watch the children play and see them romp around?
It seems that nowhere on earth could more energy be found.
And as they giggle and squeal the whole day through,
It seems their laughter overflows and brings a smile to you.
For they are having much more fun than anyone else on earth,
And their energy seems unlimited from the day they were given birth.
But wouldn't it be great if they could go through life, happy every day,
And store up some of that energy 'til they are old and grey?
Bud Atteridge
v] : 1 I


Marion J. Roth
Marion J. Roth, 83, Bradenton Beach,
died Oct. 12 in Freedom Care Village.
Born in Conneaut Township, Pa.,
Mrs. Roth came to Bradenton from
Linesville in 1974. She was a home-
maker. She was a member of Harvey
Memorial Church.
She is survived by a daughter, Mary
Jane Messina of Bradenton Beach; a sis-


ter, Mildred Mitchell of Linesville; a
brother, Maurice Campbell of
Linesville; three grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.
Memorial service will be held at a
later date. Burial will be in Linesville,
Pa. Memorial contributions may be
made to Harvey Memorial Church,
300 Church Ave., Bradenton Beach,
Fla. 34217. Brown and Sons Funeral
Home is in charge of arrangements.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 9 JI]
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3] PAGE 10 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


No consensus by planners

on residential rental duration


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Despite two hours of discussion, the Holmes Beach
Planning Commission couldn't reach a consensus on the
length of stay for rentals in the city's residential zones.
At last week's meeting, commissioners' recom-
mendations ranged from having no restrictions to a 30-
day restriction. Board members agreed to think over the
options and try to reach a consensus this week.
The question came to the commission last year
when it was directed by the city council to review rent-
als in the city's residential districts and determine if
there were problems that might warrant restricting the
duration of those rentals. However, other business took
the attention of the commission and discussion of the
rental issue was delayed until last week.
Commissioner Dr. Frances Smith-Williams
opened the discussion by advocating a 30-day rental
restriction in all residential districts.
"I think hoteliers and the resort condos have not al-
ways been well treated on this subject and that many of
the residential rentals draw business from them," she said.
Commissioner Bruce Golding cited a survey devel-
oped by the commission that was mailed to every prop-
erty owner in the city last year. (See survey results on
this page.)
"About 25 percent (of the 1,200 respondents) went
for a 30-day restriction," he noted, "but 75 percent want
something less."
Commission Chairman Gabe Simches said the city
has never had such restrictions and felt the board
should have a reason, such as complaints from resi-
dents or property deterioration, to change that policy.
"Why did we make the expenditure of sending out a
survey unless we pay attention to it?" asked Smith-Will-
iams. "The majority were either for 30 days or one week."
Simches replied, "I think there's a concern for the
rental issue but I don't think it's an overwhelming
mandate for a 30-day restriction."
Commissioner Bruce Golding offered another pro-
posal.
"I think we should permit rentals of any period of
at least seven days or more, but the residence can be
rented only once a month," he said. "They can rent for
one week, two weeks, three weeks or a month. If there


are no restrictions, I could have 52 neighbors a year."
Simches said Golding's proposal is, in essence, a
30-day restriction, if renters can rent for any period
during the month but only once.
Commissioner Gene Aubry said, "I don't have a
problem with the way it is currently."
Commissioner Mike Faarup advocated a two-week
rental duration.
"I have a problem with letting residents rent for any
period they want," he said, "when our hotels and mo-
tels are in the business. I feel there needs to be some
duration throughout the city."
Resident Dave Vande Vrede of"A" Paradise Rent-
als said, "If you start playing with the rental restrictions
without a cause, you'll create a problem. You'll elimi-
nate rentals and a lot of income and taxes for your com-
munity. People like to rent in a relaxed, community
atmosphere. I don't sense a reason why you're talking
about restricting what I do with my property."
Faarup asked Vande Vrede the duration of his
average rental period. Vande Vrede said one and two
weeks, because most people cannot afford to rent for
one month.
Resident Maureen Dowd of Island Real Estate
noted, "I don't see that any of the real estate agents are
in direct competition with motels. I don't believe any
of us rent for less than a week. Winter people are here
for one to five months. Summer people are our con-
cern. There are not enough motel units on this Island
to accommodate them and we fill that need by provid-
ing a week or two in a homey atmosphere that they are
willing to pay for."
Golding said, "You want to give them a homey
atmosphere but 52 turn-overs a year is not homey."
Dowd replied that the majority of weekly rentals
come in the 12-week summer season.
Simches asked for a consensus. Aubry said he saw
no reason for any restrictions. Faarup and Smith-Wil-
liams advocated a two-week restriction. Golding stuck
with his proposal of one rental period a month of any
duration. Simches said he could live with a one-week
restriction.
In other business the commission postponed its
discussion of four citizen requests for rezoning residen-
tial property to commercial until Nov. 1 at 3 p.m.


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APPAREL FOR MEN
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1. Do you think that presently there is a problem with
residential rentals in the City of Holmes Beach?
Yes 386
No 602
Other 57
2. Do you believe the City of Holmes Beach should
establish rental duration periods in the city's residen-
tial districts?
Yes 491
No -512
Other 35


Ringling opens

shows
Sarasota's Ringling Museum of Art an-
nounces three exhibits, one of which is new to the
United States.
"A Golden Harvest: Paintings by Adam
Pynacker," a 20-canvas collection devoted en-
tirely to the artist's landscapes, has never been
seen before in America. "Life Reflected: 17th
Century Holland" involves portraits and scenes
from the museum's permanent collection, as well
as private Florida collections. The third exhibit is
called "A Selection of Recent Acquisitions."
The shows run through Dec. 31. Admission
is $8.50, $7.50 for seniors, under age 12 is free.
Galleries are free on Saturdays.
Lectures on Dutch baroque art will be held
on Thursday, Oct. 20 and 27, at 10:30 a.m. The
talks are free but tickets are required. Send a self-
addressed, stamped envelope to Karen Gallagher,
Visitor Services, Ringling Museum of Art, 5401
Bay Shore Rd., Sarasota, 34243.
For more information call 359-5700, ext. 0.


3. If you answered yes to the above question, check the
appropriate duration for each type of residential prop-
erty identified below.
A. single family dwelling
Overnight 2
At least seven days 101
At least two weeks 56
30 days or more 415
Any period the owner may wish 87
Other 41
B. Duplex
Overnight 10
At least seven days 122
At least two weeks 86
30 days or more 371
Any period the owner may wish 82
Other 29
C. Multi-family residential dwelling
Overnight 15
At least seven days 143
At least two weeks 87
30 days or more 342
Any period the owner may wish 81
Other 27
D. Condominium
Overnight 9
At least seven days 148
At least two weeks 77
30 days or more 359
Any period the owner may wish 86
Other 25
4. Do you think rental duration periods should be uni-
form throughout the city's five residential districts?
Yes -576
No 377
Other 38
This accounting was done from 1,176 surveys with
approximately 51 left to calculate.


... and the survey says


--I









Fishing's good for kids at


annual Fishathon


The 30th Annual Kids Fishathon Tournament was
held Saturday morning on the Bradenton Beach City
Pier. Kids from both the Island and the mainland
showed up early and stayed late hoping for some great
prizes. The free tourney, sponsored by Anna Maria's
VFW Post 8199, encourages the sport of fishing. The
days activities included free hot dogs, sodas and prizes
for the kids including:
Best Sportsman: Nicholas Almerico
Most Fish, first: Kyle Jacobson


Most Fish, second: Ben Sato
Most Fish, third: David Schafer
Longest Fish, first: Tyler Krauss
Longest Fish, second: Trisha McKee
Longest Fish, third: Jonathan Hurt
Heaviest Fish, first: Cory Schafer
Heaviest Fish, second: Victoria Hannan
Most Unusual Fish, first: Mike Little
Most Unusual Fish, second: Eddie Whitamore
Most Unusual Fish, third: John Huntington


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m OCTOBER 20, 1994 M PAGE 11 liI


Commander Bob De
Vane of Bradenton
Beach has been in
charge of the annual
event for the past nine
years. De Vane arranged
over 50 sponsors of
prizes and donations for
the tournament.


John Huntington, 8, left, with Nicholas Almerico, 11, and Tommy Huntington, 10, all of Holmes Beach, were
among the winners. Almerico won the "Sportsmanship" award and John won third place for his "Most
Unusual" blowfish. Islander Photos: Tomara Kafka


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Pi PAGE 12 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



Selected candidate profiles



for Nov. 8 general election


Florida House of

Representatives,
District 68
Mark Flanagan
Republican Mark Flanagan is seeking election to
the the Florida House of Representatives for District
68.
Flanagan, 31, is married and has three children. He
is a financial consultant. He is a graduate of Manatee
High School and has a B.A. in United States history
from the University of San Francisco. He is involved
with local boys and girls clubs and is a Little League
coach.
"As a financial consultant, I deal will people every
day," Flanagan said. "They are all from different per-
spectives and have different objectives. With that back-
ground, I believe I have unique qualities.
"I understand the importance of financial planning,"
he said. "I believe Tallahassee has abdicated their respon-
sibility over wealth," he said, pointing to last year's
Florida Health and Rehabilitative Services computer foul-
up that overpaid clients more than $230 million.
"There is a limitless future in our part of Florida,"
Flanagan said, "but power hungry and unethical poli-
ticians could ruin it all. Our streets could become more
crime ridden, the quality of education could be dimin-
ished, health care security for our seniors could be
threatened if we do not begin to demand that Tallahas-
see respond sincerely to our needs."

Julie McClure
Florida Rep. Julie McClure, Democrat, is seeking
re-election to the District 68 seat.
McClure, 49, has been in office since 1992. She is
a personal property appraiser. She is involved with the
Manatee Chamber of Commerce, is on the board of
directors for the South Florida Museum and Bishop
Planetarium, and is past president of the Manatee
County Girl's Club. She has two children.
"I have a lot of community experience I've accumu-
lated over the years," McClure said to her background.
"I've been on the farm bureau for more than 20 years, I've
been involved with the chamber of commerce for more
than 10 years and I'm the only freshman member of the
House who holds a chairmanship [Florida Advisory
Council on Environmental Education]."
McClure said she views safety as the number one
issue in her re-election campaign. She said the state
must target repeal offenders and juvenile crime, adding
that there are 14,000 new prison beds in Florida and
that "by locking up prisoners, we are giving a good sign
to youthful offenders."
Florida is the 44th-lowest taxed state in the coun-
try, McClure said, but she said it is important that taxes
remain low. "I am convinced Florida does not need any
more state taxes," she said.

County Commission,

District 6 (at-large)
Patricia M. Glass
Pat Glass is seeking re-election to the at-large Dis-
trict 6 seat on the Manatee County Commission. She is
a Republican.
Glass has been a Manatee County resident for 34
years. She was first elected to county commission in
1978, was re-elected in 1982 but resigned in 1984 to
run for the U.S. House of Representatives against then-
incumbent Andy Ireland (Glass was unsuccessful in
that bid). She was reappointed to the county commis-
sion in 1986 by Gov. Bob Graham. After reapportion-
ment of county, two at-large seats were added, and in
1990 Glass was the first person to be elected to the
four-year seat which she now holds. Her husband,
Henry, just retired from Loral American Beryllium as
senior vice president. Glass has five children and four
grandchildren.
"My career has been one of hard work, and I've
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Anna Maria Fire Control

District, Seat 3
George M. Jackson
George M. Jackson is seeking re-election to the
Anna Maria Fire Control District, Group 3.
Jackson has been an Island resident for 33 years. He
is the former owner/opera-
Stor of an Island plumbing
'''-: '' business, and is currently a
firefighter-paramedic for
the City of Sarasota. The
last appointed member of
the fire commission, he has
served on that board for
about one-and -half years.
Jackson is married and has
one son.
Jackson "I feel my current
occupation qualifies me to
assist the board in their decisions as to how they want to
go in fire and rescue," Jackson says. He believes there
is great value in his being a firefighter-paramedic.
Topping Jackson's list of priorities for the district is
"continued improvement in manpower and emergency
medical services capabilities." Jackson says the Island
has "very minimum life support (capabilities) right now,
and we would like to proceed into more advanced equip-
ment and training." Jackson says about half of the
district's calls are medical in nature.
He says a long-term goal is to have more paid
firefighter-paramedics on duty 24 hours a day. Currently,
there is at least one paid person on duty at all times at
Station One in Holmes Beach, with the remainder of the
shift being rounded out by volunteers. Station Two, near
Cortez, has no regular contingent of paid personnel at
this time. To bring both stations up to the level Jackson
would like would require the hiring of nine additional
firefighter-paramedics, for a total of 12.
"That would be expensive, of course," Jackson says,
"but whether we staff it with volunteers or paid person-
nel, as long as we have 24-hour coverage, that's the
goal."
Jackson says the fire commission board isn't sure
how it could fund such an increase in manpower with-
out raising taxes, "but that's not our intent, either. We're
looking into alternatives at this point. We need to deter-
mine if the people really want that service. But by no
means are we trying to eliminate volunteers we intend
on keeping the volunteers. The volunteers are icing on
the cake, and we depend on them."

Lawrence C. Tyler
Lawrence Tyler is seeking election to the Anna
Maria Fire Control District, Group 3. He has lived in the
fire district (on Cortez Road West) for more than 10
years. Tyler owns and operates Tyler's Ice Cream in
Cortez. He is married and
has five children.
STyler says he has 25
years experience as a per-
u sonnel director and spent 15
years with a large company,
10 with a Wisconsin mu-
A nicipality where he was re-
S- sponsible for "the adminis-
tration of its workers comp,
unemployment and liability
Tyler insurance along with all the
other usual entities that go
with personnel work. As a part of that duty, I was also
assigned to the police and fire commission." He says that
as a member of that board, which was responsible for
hiring, firing, promotions and disciplinary actions, he
"basically did all of (the city council's) work for them (as
it related to fire and police matters) and brought it to them
mainly for them their approval."
"I liked the service," Tyler says of his fire commis-
sion experience in Wisconsin, "and ever since I've been
down here, I've known a lot of the guys (in the fire de-
partment). Basically, Ijust have a desire to run and I feel


that with those administrative qualities, and with run-
ning a business here for over 10 years, I'm qualified for
the position."
Tyler says he envisions making no sweeping
changes in the way the fire district is currently being run.
"I'm not trying to be a rabble rouser I just feel
if I can lend my expertise, that's just fine," he says. "I
want to work to get the best possible fire protection and
the best-trained personnel in firefighting and rescue, in
the best economic package we can put together."

Anna Maria Fire Control

District, Seat 4
Marty Duytschaver
Marty Duytschaver is seeking a seat on the Anna
Maria Fire Control District Commission, Group 4. He
has been an Island resident for 34 years. Duytschaver
has served on the board of
directors of Holmes Beach
Homeowners in the early
S 1970s. He owns and oper-
ates the Sand Dollar Gift
Shop and Sand and Surf
Beach Shop in Holmes
Beach, and was a member
of the Anna Maria Fire De-
Spartment for more than six
years as a volunteer. He is
Dutyschaver married and has two chil-
dren and one grandchild.
"The fire district's needs for protection and the
complexity for providing that have grown im-
mensely over the past few years, and I believe it will
continue to grow as the population grows out here,"
Duytschaver says. He believes his experience as a
homeowner, a business owner and as a former volun-
teer fireman will "help the commission use our tax dol-
lars to the maximum benefit of the Island communities."
Duytschaver says he "doesn't have an ax to grind
with anybody," and plans no sweeping changes in the
way fire commission business is conducted. "I'd just
like to get back in and do a little community service."

Deborah A. Marks
Deborah Marks is seeking a seat on the Anna Maria
Fire Control District Commission, Group 4. She has
lived in the fire district (on
Cortez Road West) for
more than 10 years. Marks
works for the City of
Sarasota as a senior plan-
ning technician. She is mar-
ried and has one son, and
both she and her husband
Shave served as volunteer
firefighters for eight years.
"This is my second
Marks attempt," Marks says of her
campaign for the commis-
sion. "I ran unsuccessfully against John
VanOstenbridge in 1992. I'm back at it to try again
because I still feel as I did before that the community
and the residents need to have a say in how their tax
dollars are being spent. From what I can see, there has
not been a change in the policy of that board."
Marks criticizes the current commission, alleging
that there is a solid 3-2 block of power that consistently
votes in a predictable way. She says she differs with fire
commissioners John VanOstenbridge, George Jackson
and Ralph Fulford.
"It seems that whatever the board wants is the way
it goes, regardless of what the public might be saying,"
Marks says. "They don't seem to take into consideration
what's being said or questioned."
Marks takes exception to the commission raising
taxes and then giving a number of employees raises.
"I'm not saying the employees weren't due the
raises, I'm just saying that maybe it should have been
studied a little more and maybe redistributed in a differ-
ent manner."


I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 a PAGE 13 EI


Candidate profiles
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
been chairman (of the commission) five times," Glass
says. "My perception of leadership is that it's not the
spotlight job people think it is, but it's making things
happen I think that's important."
Giving an example of what she believes is her abil-
ity to "make things happen," Glass says she was the
person who implemented the county's Environmental
Action Commission, which she says she would like to
see "grow and flourish."
Glass says she has devoted the last two years to
what she calls "the water issue," and the challenges of
finding enough water for a growing county is the
"single most important issue in the 21st century." Glass
notes she came up with the plan for water re-use for
agricultural concerns.
Among other achievements, Glass says she
founded the county's Human Relations Council as well
as the AIDS Council, and says she "helped the taxpay-
ers and citizens by raising large amounts of money to
help these services."

Michael Alan Stern
Michael Stem is seeking the position of Manatee
County Commissioner, District 6 at-large. He is run-
ning as a Democratic write-in candidate.
Stern has been a Manatee County resident for
seven years. A teacher's aide, tax preparer and self-
defense instructor, Stem's government experience in-
cludes 10 years with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service,
two years with the Forrest Hills Community School
board in Queens, New York, and two years with the
Reagan administration in the Department of the
Interior's National Parks Service as a member of the
North Country National Scenic Trail Advisory Coun-
cil. He is a member of the National Rifle Association,
Stop Turning Out Prisoners and the Sarasota-Manatee
Jewish Federation. He is married.
"I feel the voters should vote for me over Pat Glass
because she is the voice, the mouth and the instrument
of all the special interests," says Stern. "She's what's
wrong with this county she's part of the problem


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instead of part of the solution."
Stern is particularly critical of Glass on environ-
mental issues.
"She voted for Florida Power and Light's (in-
creased) emissions after she said she was against it, and
she's for Nutri-Cycle putting the sludge up there by the
River Wilderness. She voted for all the developments
that are now threatening the Bradenton and Manatee
County water supplies."
"Her Environmental Action Commission she cre-
ated has gotten a very bad report from an auditor (say-
ing) it lacks teeth and lacks direction. That's basically
why I'm running against her we need to put the
county commission in the right direction."
Stern says he would be tough on crime, promising
increased use of boot camps for juvenile offenders. He
would also like to see the amount of traffic tickets and
other fines increase.
"I'd give the sheriff anything he wants under a
'Manatee County Safe Streets Act,' Stern, who calls
himself a "conservative Reagan Democrat;' says. "And
no parole."
Ster is firm on his position regarding the contro-
versial subject of flying the Confederate flag at govern-
ment buildings.
"I think it's an insult they don't adhere to South-
ern history and heritage," Ster says. "I support flying
the Confederate flag in Manatee County on Confeder-
ate Memorial Day and all Confederate holidays. It
should fly over the county courthouse in downtown
Bradenton."
Last but not least, Ster says he can give Islanders
something they want that Glass won't deliver.
"She's for these new (fixed-span, high-rise)
bridges, and I'm not," he says. "Those new bridges are
absolutely insane."

Circuit Court Judge,

Group 16
Nancy K. Donnellan
Nancy Donnellan is seeking election to the newly
created position to the 12th Circuit Court, encompass-
ing Manatee, Sarasota and DeSoto Counties.
Donnellan is a 1979 graduate of DePaul Univer-


VI '. I I I B I
9 'II I
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Sririu,]ric thL NeN,,' .- m I, r 1 o enii Oft U Ur


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full-service branch bank at 'HolmcsBcach,
on Gulf Drive, just across from Eckerd's.


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*Annual Percentage Rate 5.02


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all transactions
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our main bank on
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Minimum deposit of $1,000 required. Compounded daily.
Penalties for early withdrawal. Rates subject to change.

First National Bank
Member FDIC
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
Main Bank: 5817 Manatee Avenue West (813) 794-6969


Your news about Island happenings and special events is always
welcome at The Islander Bystander. If it's interesting to your friends,
it's interesting to us too. Just call 778-7978 to be included.


sity. She is a member of bar associations in Florida,
Texas, Illinois, the American Bar Association, the
Academy of Trial Lawyers of American, the Florida
Association for Women Lawyers and the Sarasota
County Bar Association.
She is one of 19 women in the United States who
is a nationally Certified Civil Trial Advocate and is the
only female attorney in the 12th Judicial District who
is certified as a civil trial lawyer by the Florida Bar.
Donnellan is married and has four children. She is
active in a number of civic organizations, including
serving as president of the Suncoast Women's Politi-
cal Caucus.
"Everything I have accomplished in the last 15
years, both in my legal career and in my community
activities as a volunteer, have been in preparation to be
of service to the people as a circuit judge," she said.

Ed Ford
Ed Ford is seeking a seat as judge on the newly
created 12th Circuit Court, encompassing Manatee,
Sarasota and Desoto Counties.
A former president of the Sarasota County Bar
Association and former chair of the Lawyer Referral
Service of the same group, Ford is a graduate of Seton
Hall University, NJ, and American University Law
School in Washington, D.C.
Ford is a former captain in the Strategic Air Com-
mand of the U.S. Air Force and served three tours of
duty in Southeast Asia.
He has received the endorsement of the Southwest
Florida Chapter of the Florida Police Benevolent As-
sociation, and is an attorney with a Sarasota law firm,
Dart, Ford & Spivey. He is a director of the Sarasota
Chamber of Commerce and the United Way of
Sarasota County.
In describing the PBA endorsement, Ford said the
group "recognized that my experience as an attorney
and mediator makes me uniquely qualified to handle
tough criminal cases."

Next week: Florida senate,
school board, county judge and
amendments profiled


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Oct. 22


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1E PAGE 14 E OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

'Flea in Her Ear' opens with fast pace for Players


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Both the cast and set get quite a workout in the Is-
land Players' play "Flea in Her Ear," written by
Georges Feydeau, which opens the 46th season, run-
ning through Oct. 23.
And many in the audience will leave the theater as
tired as the actors from laughing so hard. The hilar-
ity of this play is contagious and it contains all the el-
ements of a good comedy: plenty of clever lines, lots
of physical movement, great facial expressions and
pratfalls, and a suspenseful build-up of intrigue and
plot complications all around that wonderfully
amusing comedy as-only-the-French-can-do theme of
sex, frank and farcical mixed with innuendo.
Gayle Kimball and Michele Strauss, playing
Raymonde and Lucienne, two wives who in the begin-
ning suspect infidelity and land up as being the sus-


pects, are delightfully funny and give the play the pro-
fessional cohesiveness to carry it through to the almost-
sane conclusion.
The plot, of course, is ridiculous. Even Director
Kelly Winn Woodland admits, "The people in 'A Flea
in Her Ear' are silly people."
Woodland is a new director to Island Players. She
is young, vibrant and has worked hard to make this
opening play a success. But she comes to the Players
with great credentials. Woodland teaches drama and
directs plays for Manatee Community College. She has
acted in such local productions as "Quilters,"
"Godspell" and "Les Liaisons Dangereuses." Wood-
land performs and directs with Sarasota's Random Acts
theater company. Let's hope she returns to Players
sometime.
The cast is superlative, working with this early
French 1900s script that has as much relevance to


today's crazy pace and modern relationships as it must
have had back then. Other participants in the race
through the many doorways and plot twists are John
Durkin, K.D. Fairs, David B. Haynes, Chris Kelley,
Debbie Keller-McCartney, Stefanie Lambrinidis, Sam
McDowell, Bob Offenhauer, Leonard Ross, Chris
Vallejo, Jr., Bill Ward and Mark Woodland.
Peter Strader is the set designer, Joseph Oshry di-
rects lighting, Pat Russell handles the costumes and
Anne Fasulo is stage manager.
The Island Players Theatre is located at the corner of
Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. All shows
begin at 8 p.m. except for the Sunday matinee on Oct. 23,
which begin at 2 p.m. No shows on Mondays.
The $10 tickets are available at the theater or by
calling 778-5755. The box office is open daily from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m., except Sunday, and one hour before
show time.


4vl [I9GZ03 i =i I=I: s


Kids need volunteers on
election day
Anna Maria Elementary School PTO needs com-
munity volunteers to man "Kids Voting" booths at Is-
land precincts Anna Maria City Hall, Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, St. Bernard Catholic Church and
Bradenton Beach City Hall on election day, Nov. 8.
The purpose of the Kids Voting program is to in-
crease young peoples' awareness and interest in the
electoral process by actually voting and to encourage
family discussion and participation in the process.
Shifts of adults are needed especially during the
day when most people with children are working.
Training will be provided and shifts will be pre-as-
signed.
Call Millie Torres at 778-6767 for information and
to volunteer.

St. Bernard to hold
pancake breakfast
St. Bernard Catholic Church in Holmes Beach will
hold a pancake breakfast on Sunday, Oct. 30, from 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Breakfast includes pancakes, sausage,
orange juice and coffee. Tickets are $2.50 for adults and
$1 for children. Baked goods will also be for sale.


Safe boating course
offered
A course in boating safety will begin Tuesday,
Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m., at the Flotilla 81 Training Center,
4208 129th St. W., Cortez.
The three-week course is conducted by certified
Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors and includes boat
handling, navigation, legal requirements, weather and
VHF radio. The class is twice a week on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings. Except for a nominal fee for ma-
terials, the class is free.
For more information call Walter Grace at 778-
4951 or Shirley Northrop at 722-6971.


Theater benefits
orchestra
Manatee High School Orchestra
students Glenn Ewing and
Rebecca Roback have all the
ingredients for an evening office
food and music at the orchestra's
annual Dinner Theater on Oct.
27. Dinner will be served in the l
Manatee High School Cafeteria,
from 5:30 to 8:30p.m. The
dinner will be catered by Meals
on Wheels and includes spa-
ghetti bread, salad and beverage
for $5 for students and adults
and $2.50for children under 5.
There will be musical perfor-
mances throughout the evening.
Proceeds will support the
orchestra. Islander Photo: Pat
Copeland


Sew what?
Every Saturday afternoon, kids can learn the basics
of sewing in Laura Beard's sewing class. Sarah
Thomas, front, tries out the sewing machine, while
Beard works with Genna Douglas. The ongoing class
is held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Art
League. Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka

Rotary dinner to feature

guest speaker
The Rotary Club dinner will be held on Monday,
Oct. 24, 6:15 p.m., at Crabby Bill's, 5325 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach.
Guest speaker Buddy Keen, who is actively in-
volved in Palmetto agribusiness, will discuss the im-
pact of NAFTA in Manatee County.
Club members, visitors and guests are welcome.


Artists Guild to open
season with Thornburg

reception and show
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will open
its new season with a reception and show featuring the
works of local well-known artist Jon A. Thornburg on
Sunday, Oct. 23, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Guild Gallery,
5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
The reception is free and open to the public. The
show, featuring original drawings and prints, runs
through Nov. 12. Thornburg, who specializes in cap-
turing historical Island landmarks in his works, will
unveil a new work of Island interest at the reception.
The Guild's season schedule includes monthly re-
ceptions and openings of member artists from Novem-
ber through June featuring a wide variety of original art
in watercolors, oils, photography, jewelry and pottery.
Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information call 778-6694.


LBK Art Center to hold

reception and shows
The Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr.
S., will hold a reception for the "Women's Caucus for
Art" show on Sunday, Oct. 23, from 2 to 4 p.m. The
reception is open to the public. The exhibit runs
through Nov. 13.
Receiving for the "Annual Members Show" will be
Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 7 and 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information call 383-2345.


LBK Art Center offers
November classes
The Longboat Key Art Center is taking reserva-
tions for the following classes in November.
Monday and Fridays: Portrait/still life in oil pas-
tel, taught by F. Murphy.
Tuesday: Relief collagraph printmaking, taught by
J. Coburn; sculpture/metal fabrication, taught by J.
Fiorello; and clay pottery, taught by H. Thompson.
Wednesday: Watercolor, taught by A. Bishop.
Wednesday and Thursdays: Watercolor, taught by
H. Thompson.
Class fees are $50 for five sessions for members.
The Longboat Key Art Center is located at 6860
Longboat Dr. S., Longboat Key. For more information
call 383-2345.

Community center to
present fashion show
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Mag-
nolia Ave., Anna Maria, is looking for five to 10 girls,
ages 13-18, to help out with a Back-to-School Thrift
Shop Fashion Show scheduled for mid-November.
Volunteers are needed to help with concessions and
backstage work as well as modeling outfits in the show.
No prior experience necessary.
If interested or for more information call Susan
Montgomery at 778-1908.


I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 15 IO


AW


Key Royale women to
meet Oct. 24
The Women's Association of the Key Royale
Club will hold its first meeting of the 1994-95 sea-
son on Monday, Oct. 24, in the clubhouse.
Tea will be served at 12:30 p.m. and the meet-
ing will convene at 1 p.m. The program will feature
a make-up demonstration by an Estee Lauder repre-
sentative.

Island Garden Club to
meet Oct. 20
The Island Garden Club will hold its first meet-
ing of the fall season on Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6:30
p.m., at the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation
in Holmes Beach. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Island Low Vision
Group to meet Oct. 25
The Anna Maria Island Low Vision Group will
meet Tuesday, Oct. 25, at 1:30 p.m., in the meeting
room of the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach.
The Magnifying Center of Sarasota will hold a
seminar on visual aids to improve independent liv-
ing. The meeting is open to the public.
For more information call 778-3391.

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Manatee High School Marchin' Cane members pose with the 1995 Chevrolet Camaro which will be given
away at a drawing at the MHS versus Gainesville football game on Friday, Nov. 11. Pictured are from left,
Cara Dickman, Ana Shaw, Brett Pettigrew, Leah Boston, David Falcone, Julie Tyson, front, Megan Fredrick
and Marcie Wakeman, right. Ticket donations are $10. A limit of 3,000 chances will be sold and a minimum of
2,000 are needed to guarantee the Camaro as grand prize. Proceeds will benefit the Manatee High School's
music department including the marching band, Sugar Canes, flag core and concert bands. Tickets may be
purchased at Hawkins Stadium during the games or call 798-9994. Islander Photo: courtesy of Gene Page.



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I






IB] PAGE 16 M OCTOBER 20, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Gill net ban:




saving sealife, or turf warfare?


By David Futch and Bob Ardren
Islander Correspondents
Five generations of Fulfords have fished Cortez
waters to put food on the table and clothes on their
backs.
In the process, they have supplied fresh seafood to
millions of Floridians and visitors to the state.
But the Fulford way of life the way of tides,
winds and waters in and around Sarasota Bay may
come to an abrupt halt after the election on Nov. 8.
That's because a proposal to amend the state's con-
stitution to ban commercial net fishing within Florida
waters Amendment No. 3 is on the ballot.
If approved, about 6,000 commercial net fishermen
will be out of work. And the supply of fresh finfish
could be drastically cut. Mullet, the staple of Cortez
fishermen, has been caught in abundance over the years
and sold at a low price, feeding mostly lower income
families.
Opponents to Amendment No. 3 say the issue is
merely a means for the "haves" the booming sport
fishing industry to take from the "have-nots" the
commercial fishers and their customers. Marine biolo-
gists and scientists have repeatedly published reports
that the decline in habitat, not overfishing, is the rea-
son for less and less fish being caught. Organized Fish-
ermen of Florida (OFF) is the moving force behind
blocking the amendment.
Proponents of the net ban amendment say that only
by taking such a drastic step can marine life in the state
be saved. They petitioned for signatures to place the
amendment on the ballot by asking the question,
"Would you like to save Florida's sealife?" The Florida
Conservation Association (FCA) and Florida Sports-
man magazine are the moving force behind the amend-
ment and are responsible for gathering the signatures
required to put it on the ballot.
If the proposal passes and a recent Mason/
Dixon political poll indicates 66 percent of those polled
favor the ban the Fulfords and netters statewide will
become another part of Florida's forgotten past.

Opponents say
Netters like the Fulfords believe concerted efforts
by many people who never knew Florida until moving
here threaten to end their way of life.
They claim that declining marine habitat loss of
seagrass beds and mangrove coastlines has caused
the declines in fisheries. They claim the industry is well
regulated by the Marine Fisheries Commission and that
continued restrictions are the answer to the problem,
not a constitutional amendment banning all nets..
The issue is one of allocation, they maintain, with
sportsfishermen trying to remove any competition from
their recreational field.
Approximately 35,000 people who directly or in-
directly make their living from the work of the 6,000
netters also are expected to be affected by the ban, ac-
cording to the commercial fishing industry.
Thomas "Blue" Fulford says tinkering with the
commercial fishermen's way of life is "a horrible, bru-
tal, evil atrocity."
In 1882, William, Nathan and Sanders Fulford ar-
rived in Manatee County and pioneered the net fishing
industry. They were among the first to buy land in
Cortez, then called Hunter's Point.
"For 114 years we have worked the waters of
this central Florida area," Blue Fulford said. "We're
professional fishermen and proudly admit to it. We
are proud of our heritage. We are proud of our cul-
ture. We are proud of our care and concern for our
waters and the creatures in it."
Sportsfishermen charge that commercial net fish-
ermen are to blame for the decline in fish populations.
"Not so," says Fulford and a host of scientists.
Fulford claims they should give blame where
blame is due on sheer, unchecked growth in a state
that has gone from approximately one million people
in 1950 to nearly 14 million today.
"The fantastic growth and development Florida has
experienced has made it hard on fishermen and the crea-
tures in the sea," the 63-year-old Fulford says. "In my fish-


ing career, I have seen untold major housing develop-
ments that viciously attacked the fisheries habitat."

Proponents say
The FCA has the money and numbers to push the
amendment and have used their resources in a number
of ways.
They launched a slick media campaign to push the
net ban amendment led by Florida Sportsman maga-
zine. They portrayed commercial fishers as brutal kill-
ers of marine life. Much of the rhetoric espoused by
FCA and Florida Sportsman magazine says that com-
mercial fishermen not only are wiping out mullet, trout,
redfish and snook but are to blame for killing sea turtles
and dolphins.
Amendment supporters have distributed photographs
of dead porpoises, turtles and snook wrapped in nets.
Florida Sportsman magazine went so far as to
chronicle the life cycle of "Martha the mullet" from her
birth to eventual death in a gill net to get their message
across.
The Sarasota chapter of FCA advised in their Sep-
tember newsletter against debating the opposition.
"They are impossible to debate with, as they, shall we
say, get very creative with truth and facts." And they
state, "About the netters: They only have one message,
'Don't take away my job.' Try arguing depleted fish
stocks to that one ..."
FCA executive director Ted Forsgren said charges
of his group producing staged photos is an "outright
and total lie and the commercial industry is desperately
trying to hide these incidents."
Forsgren said his group has documented photo-
graphs of dead fish in nets, fish dumped on beaches and
dead dolphins and sea turtles in nets.
Should the amendment pass, Forsgren said the
commercial netters can stay in business but will have
to restructure the way they fish by using smaller shrimp
trawls and going to hook and line or large cast nets.
Although scientists maintain the commercial fish-
ermen is not to blame for declining fish populations,
Forsgren said the scientists are just being gullible.


Goin' fishing
Net fishers on their way
S out Longboat Pass to the
Gulf Proponents of the
S ban on commercial gill
net fishing state commer-
S.cial fishing is responsible
for declines in fisheries
stock. Opponents state
that development and
habitat loss are the cause
of the lack offish. Voters
.a will decide the debate
Nov. 8. Islander Photo:
-. ~ Paul Roat


















"The net scientists," Forsgren said, "have bought
the lingo of the commercial fishermen."
With less than three weeks left before voters go to
the polls, Forsgren said he believes the fight will heat
up between sportsfishermen and commercial netters.
Forsgren said, "We're going to crank up our cam-
paign a few more notches. "This is the most important
marine conservation law in Florida history."

Scientists say
Fulford's assertion that destruction of mangroves
and seagrass beds are to blame for the drop in fish
populations is backed up by research. Marine scientists
have presented statistics and facts in the net contro-
versy, stating the figures should speak for themselves.
Dr. Randy Edwards, senior scientist with Mote
Marine Laboratory, conducted a fishery survey for the
Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program.
In his report, Edwards says, "... declines in spot-
ted-seatrout landings are probably not due to overfish-
ing. Environmental alteration and degradation of the
bay system is the most likely cause of the spotted-
seatrout fishery decline, with the fishery declines par-
alleling, in timing and magnitude, the declines of im-
portant fishery habitats such as seagrasses, mangroves
and natural shorelines."
Both seagrass and mangroves are considered the
basis of the food chain and the key element of the life
chain in the oceans and bays.
Dr. David Tomasko, senior scientific researcher with
the Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program, says roughly
10 percent of the recreational fishermen catch roughly 50
percent of the fish. This is contrary to what FCA and
Florida Sportsman magazine contend.
The Sarasota Bay Program came up with these fig-
ures through interviews at area docks and commercial
fish houses, Tomasko said.
From 1990-1992, Tomasko and his colleagues did
surveys on commercial mullet and sea trout landings.
The same researchers also did 400 interviews with
sportsfishermen at both Sarasota and Manatee county
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE








Commercial vs.
sportfishing
debate to be
decided by voters
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16
docks. Researchers also trawled at seven
locations and seined at 17 others every
two months for a year, Tomasko said.
In addition, the group mapped out
sea grass beds in Sarasota Bay and the
surrounding wetlands including the
mangrove system.
Since 1950, these habitats have de-
clined approximately 39 percent,
Tomasko said. Mangrove loss in Sarasota
county is 80 percent of what was found
along the shore 45 years ago, he said.
Almost 30 percent of the seagrass
beds are gone, Tomasko said with the
remaining 70 percent producing only70
percent of what they did 40 years ago.
"That means the grass beds in
Sarasota Bay are only half as productive
as they were in 1950," Tomasko said.
"I'm not stressing an opinion and nei-
ther is the (Estuary) program. People are
free to interpret this information as they
see fit."

Supreme Court
comments
Supreme Court of Florida Justice J.
McDonald said in a June 1994 opinion
that the proposed amendment was an inap-
propriate way to solve the issue of declin-
ing fish populations and regulations of the
net fishing industry. Three other Florida
justices agreed with McDonald.
"I am concerned," McDonald said,
"that the net fishery amendment is more
appropriatefor inclusion in Florida statute
books than in the Florida constitution."
Mitchell A. (Mickey) Newberger, a
Florida Marine Fisheries commissioner
from 1987-1994, also disagrees with the
net ban amendment.
Newberger, a third generation na-
tive of Hillsborough County and life-
long fisherman, said the constitution is
no place to regulate fishermen.
"Florida coastal fishermen, both
recreational and commercial, should
continue to be regulated by the Marine
Fisheries Commission based on the best
available biological and scientific data,"
he said, "not by a popularity contest
based on who has the most players and
the best advertising campaign."

Cortez comments
Fulford and others like Karen Bell
of A.P. Bell Fish Co. in Cortez argue
that conservation of a way of life and
people is what is at stake.
However, combating the FCA's
wealthy membership and advertising
campaign has been a struggle, Bell said.
For example, Tampa television Chan-
nel 13 showed a dead dolphin in a net The
culprits were supposed to be Florida com-
mercial fishermen. The problem with the
footage stems from the fact that the net is
not the kind that any commercial netter in
Florida uses, Bell said.
"These are the kinds of things we're
trying to counteract," she said. "But it's
really difficult because the FCA has so
much money behind them. We have about
$250,000 for television time over the next
three weeks but it's nothing compared to
what the FCA is likely to spend over the
next few weeks."
Life as Fulford knows it and the
lives of thousands of other Florida com-
mercial fishermen -is expected to come
to an abrupt halt if the amendment passes.
But Blue Fulford is a one-man


Proposed Constitutional
Amendment No. 3,
Article X, Section 16
Ballot Title:
Limiting Marine
Net Fishing
To be voted on Nov. 8, 1994

Ballot Summary: Limits the use
of nets for catching saltwater fin-
fish, shellfish, or other marine ani-
mals by prohibiting the use of gill
and other entangling nets in all
Florida waters, and prohibiting the
use of other nets larger than 500
square feet in mesh area in
nearshore and inshore Florida wa-
ters. Provides definitions, admin-
istrative and criminal penalties,
and exceptions for scientific and
governmental purposes.

The proposed amendment
states no gill nets or entangling
nets shall be used in Florida wa-
ters. In addition the amendment
prohibits the use of nets containing
more than 500 square feet of mesh
area in nearshore or inshore wa-
ters. Nearshore and inshore waters
are described in the amendment as
those waters within three miles of
the Florida coastline.
The amendment demands the
halting of any net fishing. An excep-
tion would allow for fish and bait
caught with a cast net or small purse
seine, trawl or other bag type net.
Article X, Section 16 goes on
to describe a gill net as an entan-
gling net that captures finfish,
shellfish and other marine animals
by causing all or part of the body
to become ensnared in the mesh of
a net. However, a hand thrown
cast net is not a gill net, according
to the amendment.
The mesh area of a net means
the total area of the netting with
the mesh open to comprise the
maximum of square footage.
Use of entangling nets for sci-
entific research or governmental
purposes is allowed.
Should voters approve,
Amendment X, Section 16 would
take effect July 1, 1995.

wrecking crew, fighting for the com-
mercial fishermen's survival.
He has spent close to $6,000 of his
own money writing 2,500 or more let-
ters, printing up material and traveling
and talking to people in an effort to
defeat the amendment, he said.
Fulford said he has sent a letter to
each state legislator, the governor and
Cabinet and has received little or no
encouragement they will help defeat
the amendment.
Many lawmakers have distanced
themselves from the issue for fear of a
backlash from contributors who pay
for their campaigns.
"The few who responded told me it
was up to me to explain and stop the
amendment from passing," Fulford said.
"Most of the people I've talked to know
nothing about the amendment or what it
will do. But once I explain it to them they
tell me they'll vote against it.
"I think this thing is going to
snowball and we're going to win."
Fulford stops the interview to talk
to some visitors walking down a
Cortez street. He explains the impor-
tance of voting against the issue with a
line he's used before.
"Hello, folks. I'm in this election
and I'm running for my life."


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m OCTOBER 20, 1994 U PAGE 17 IE


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relationships with customers who rely on professional and gracious
service at our independent, locally-owned bank.
Now it's your turn. Your favorite brand of friendly, TUESDAY
full-service neighborhood banking is waiting on the 1St
other side of our new welcome mat. Step on it. / .
We open November 1. NOVEMBER

As Independent As The Island Itself.

F First National B k
Member FDIC (I
5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-4900
Bradenton: 5817 Manatee Avenue West (813) 794-6969









1D3 PAGE 18 m OCTOBER 20, 1994 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLA T\NER


I'0'AW -f I IL



$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST

PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystander judge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL IT OUT NOW!

Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
* Name Address/City Phone


FOR SALES
& RENTALS
778-4800
S Bear at Lons

1-0023-25


ROD ~TELEL

SMini-Resort
Sk Best Fishing -*
ISLAND
C COOKING
S Beer and Wine
SBreakfast
Lunch-Dinner
Reasonable
k Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *r
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier





Joe
Ungvarsky
Construction
& Remodeling
778-2993
Experience
You
Can
Rely
On.
CRCO35261

Miami at West Va.


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
SBengals at Browns
OPEN 7 DAYS* 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


AMERICAN

CAR

WASH

& DETAILING
BOATS
TRAILERS
*CARS
Bucs at49ers
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617


Free Estimates _



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
* Re-Roofs Repairs
SBuilt-Ups Shingles
* Single Ply Tile
Roofing LICENSEoINSUREOD
Systems I .... BS
Working for the people o(
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Quality


748-9362
Clenison at FSU


F-1 -U BakP-i

ShBo Sto.ae
* ConsignmertlBroker ge
Bulk Od ilY_
Bo. R-Ul
Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
SAnna Maria
778-5577
Johnson. Evinrude. OMC
Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stern Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
S Ramns at Saints












HAPPY HOUR
MON Fni 4 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KirchEN OpeN DAily I AM
BANIAM PlazA BRAdENTON
10104 ConRTE Rd. W.
SCowboys at Cardinals






Tee
TO

GReeN
TGOLf
Regripping
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NEW!
948 Midsize Irons
Try Our Demo!
Maximum Accuracy
and Control
778-5184
Riceat Texas A&M


puRkf POOr



$995 each
Fruit of the Loom
eBest White T-Shirt
(One-Side Printing)
While You Wait
Steelers at Giants
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL
Anna Maria Island Centre




L \77


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast,
Professional Service
from Island Owners!
Sane Day or Next Day Priced
332 Eet BIa Dr *Homae Bech
778-4277
Meiasn. to F. 1:0 k l: to
Mississippi at Alabama


PVP



Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
Broncos at Chargers


LaPensee z "
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach





THE


REST2AUlA
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6 pm

Happy Hour Everyday

[Kansas State at Colorado
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


I


.4


1









Oct. 29 is Fall Festival Time


at Anna Maria School


It's finally here. Saturday, Oct. 29, is the date
set for Anna Maria Elementary PTO's annual Fall
Festival. The day includes a costume parade,
games, food, music, and fun.
The scheduling for all events follows:
All students are to be in costume, separated
by class, behind Holmes Beach City Hall prior to
10:30 a.m. Costume judging will begin promptly
at that time. At 11 a.m., the parade, led by Grand
Marshal Anna Maria Fire District Chief Andy
Price, will leave the city hall walking up Marina
and Gulf Drives to the Anna Maria Elementary
School. As soon as all of the paraders are as-
sembled in front of the school, at approximately
11:30 a.m., costume prizes will be awarded by
Principal Jim Kronus.
The Fall Festival opens at noon, ends at 3
p.m. with clean-up from 3 to 4 p.m.
The festival will feature fun for all ages.
Come play at the dunk tank, moon walk, slam
toss, or the face painting, button making, hand-
print making, bean toss, pick-a-pop booths, and
the pumpkin patch. Pony rides, a walk through
the Haunted House, and more will add to the fun.
For lunch, enjoy food prepared by Island restau-


rants: Beach Bistro, Sandbar, Beach House, Ato's,
Sign of the Mermaid, and the Mar Vista. Hot dogs
and sodas will also be available. Music will be pro-
vided by the Tropicats featuring Chuck & Lloyd.
Save a lot of time and pre-purchase tickets.
Tickets are 25 cents each and will be on sale in
the school cafeteria prior to the festival on Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. and from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday,
Oct. 28, is an early release day with tickets sold
from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Tickets will also be available during
the festival at two locations the school office
and on the festival grounds.
The Fall Festival is a major fundraiser of the
PTO for the benefit of the students of our Island
school. See you there.


Joy Courtney
Joy Courtney


L : K -
I .. 1


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 19 IMI


Anna Maria

School menu
Monday, 10/24/94
No School Inservice Day
Tuesday, 10/25/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Croissant Sandwich w/Sliced Ham or
Chicken Patty, Vegetable Soup, Fresh Fruit w/
Washington Apples, Ice Cream Cup
Wednesday, 10/26/94
Breakfast: 1/2 Slice Pizza or English Muffins,
S"Pineapple
Lunch: Sloppy Joe or Burrito, Cauliflower w/Cheese
Sauce, Strawberry Fruit Cup
Thursday, 10/27/94
S Breakfast: Scrambled Egg or Oatmeal, Toast,
Fruit Cup
S Lunch: Buffalo Wings or Nacho Cheese & Chips,
S Vegetable Sticks w/Low Fat Dip, Fresh Baked Corn
Meal Roll, Applesauce, Orange Juice
Friday, 10/28/94
Early Release Day
Breakfast: Fresh Baked Soft Pretzel or Cereal &
Toast, Pears
Lunch: Hamburger on Bun, Lettuce, Pickle, Carrots,
Apples, Cookie
All meals served with milk.


a a 0****ca*a * 0 00 a 00 a06666

~ m


Na m~ -~l


F, ,
/ -


Praiseworthy performance
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week
ending Sept. 30. Kneeling is Jimmy Pears. First row, left to right, are Joshua Huffine,
Shayna Whitaker, Steven Faasse, Tahlia Byers, Emma Curry and Sam Lott. Middle
row, left to right, are Joshua Armstrong, Joshua Sankey and Lindsey Talarino. Back
row, left to right, are Kiley Murphy, Melissa Eddington, Rachelle Brockway, Ashley
Chiles and Brittany Parker. Last week's Islander Bystander misidentified the students.


Yellow bag of safety
Firefighters and volunteers of the Anna Maria Fire District work together to
make up over 400 Fire Prevention and Safety packets to be handed out to the
students ofAnna Maria Elementary during Fire Prevention Week. The packet
included a lot of information for children and adults such as a "Safety Always
Matters" Fire Safety Activity Book, afire fact sheet, a bookmark with severe
weather tips, crayons and more.


Great Job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending Oct. 7. Front
row, left to right, are Julia Lalli, Brooke Travato-Brown, Jessica Brickse, Rachel Brugger, Stewart Moon and
Jake Corby. Back row, left to right, are Mario Torres, Lorraine Stanick, Lindsay Lane, Shawna Rigney, Katie
Holmes, Sarah Thomas, Robbie Dial and Christopher Lee.


Shrill of life
What is inexpensive, made of plastic, screams its
head off if it smells danger and can save your life?
That's right a smoke alarm. Anna Maria Fire
District Inspector Jane Guthrie, left, and Captains
Dennis Dotson and Robbie Bennett talkfire preven-
tion and safety to Maureen Loveland's kindergarten
class during the District's annual school-wide
seminars for Fire Prevention Week. Among the many
things the children learned was the importance of
having working smoke detectors in the home.


~II


--






I PAGE 20 ,M OCTO BER 20, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
BIj PAGE 20 K OCTOBER 20, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Dining notes ...
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Chez Andre hopped on the Octoberfest band-
wagon this week. Andre has created special lunch and
dinner menu items, some including wine, perfect for
German taste buds.
Kathy Eubanks from Bridge Tender Inn and Jody
Lanius, the new manager at the Bradenton Beach Pier
and Cafe, helped to fix and serve lots of hot dogs and
sodas on Saturday to kids who turned out for the 30th
Annual Fishathon sponsored by Anna Maria VFW Post
#8199.
Mutiny Inn is gearing up for the season with Chef
Ken creating new culinary delights, adding to his al-
ready ambitious menu. Randy Butler joined the Mutiny
team, bringing with him a New Orleans flair to the din-
ing room. The fall special, "Intimate Dinner for Two,"
includes appetizer, entree and bottle of house wine.
Early dining prices are offered between 5 and 6 p.m.

On the spooky side ...
Bortell's will hold its annual Halloween party and
a hay ride on Monday, Oct. 31. Al Tate will steer the

0VAlwWlSn".


U U


John Deere from the Anna Maria City parking lot
around 8 p.m. You don't have to be in costume to ride
- but, come on now ...
And just a reminder. The Anna Maria Fire and
Rescue Volunteers will hold the 30th Annual Hallow-
een Dance, Saturday, Oct. 22, starting at 9 p.m., at St.
Bernard Catholic Church. Debra Jean and the
MeloTones will perform.

Musically speaking ...
Hank McDermott is back at D.Coy Ducks Bar &
Grill, Thursdays through Saturdays, for the early set.
Hanks friends sit in from time to time but not on a regu-
lar schedule, says owner Steve Lardas.
Connie and Dave, who are performing at Crabby
Bill's for the next three weekends, have expanded their
act to TV. "Senior America," a brand new regional
show airing in Florida, parts of Georgia and Alabama,
is filmed at Sarasota's Channel 40 with host Art
Fleming (from the old Jeopardy show).
Connie and Dave will appear Sunday, at 1:30 p.m.,
locally on channel 12, and are to be semi-regulars on
the show. Each show will feature a song and they've
taped four so far.

Embibbing pleasures
Being the beachy types we are, we want to share
the news that Sarasota County's only outdoor beach
bar, the Azure Tides on Lido Beach, is reopened after
extensive remodeling. All they really needed to do was
add more blenders, but the work included a new bar top

S 5702 MARINA DR.
HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
OPEN DALY AT 4 PM
S CLOSED MONDAYS
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 'til Midnight)
*Tuesdays: QUARTER BEER NIGHT, 6 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT- REGGAE
SThursdays: LADIES NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wednesday, Oct. 19 Reggae "Democracy"
Fri. & Sat., Oct. 21 & 22 "Hammerheads"
Sunday, Oct. 23 Beach Bash "Blindside"
Wednesday, Oct. 26 Reggae "Democracy"
HALLOWEEN PARTY ALL WEEKEND
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Oct 27, 28, 29 "Einstein's Attic"
Sunday, Oct. 30 Beach Bash "Blindside"
COSTUME CONTESTS SATURDAY & SUNDAY







HIMTCLT

RESTAURAWr

DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY


.USI i


Lou turns the big five-oh
When bartender Lou Forentino discovered his 50th
birthday was on Sunday, he asked his boss Steve
Lardas at D. Coy Ducks for the day off. Lardas told
Forentino no one would cover for him, so he had to
come in. Lardas, center, and friends, from left, Anna
and Layla Copeland, with Lou, Doug Copeland and
Sophie Lardas surprised Lou with a cake and afew
rounds from the bar. Happy birthday, Lou. Islander
Photo: Tomara Kafka
and remodeled restrooms we're told.
Anna Maria Liquors and Party Shoppe is hav-
ing a "closing-the-doors" sale. Bargains abound on li-
quor, wine, party and barwares. Take advantage now
for your holiday parties.
The liquor license is moving to Beach Bistro where
owners Sean Murphy and Jeff Park are busily scurrying
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE






GOURMET GULF FRONT DINING



FRESH CATCH CRAB CAKES
SCALLOPS VEAL FRANCHISE
TEMPURA BATTERED SHRIMP
Soup or Salad, Cuban Garlic $129
Bread and Choice of Entree: $12.95



41^- 5$s^C F14 ...
Tax not included, 15% gratuity added.
No dining club programs, certificates or discount
programs honored on Sunset Specials.
SUNDAY thru THURSDAY 4:30 to 6:30
Reservations Suggested
778-LENA (5362)
OPEN 4:30 CLOSED MONDAYS



"I have a theory

that food

tastes better at

the beach"
EdC'













And we're proving it right here on beautiful
Bradenton Beach. At the Beachhouse. Lunch
and dinner. Nightly entertainment. Volleyball.
Great deck. Great playground. Bring the family.


ShouSe/
great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Anna Maria Island. 813-779-2222


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT *
SEAFOOD BUFFET $I0O"
7 Days a Week 5 to 10 PM
HOLMES BEACH LOCATION ONLY
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
BEACH ATrIRlE OK
* Isfil HAIFoDd slyns
* AMDDWH10g 9DIMIKEBS
CRABBY HOUR
3PM 6PM DAILY
58 Drafts *110 Well Drinks
* ENTERTAINMENT & I)ANCING *
Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8PM to 12 AM
NFL SATELLITE *


OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 21 EI


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
to make all the arrangements to begin serving cocktails at
the restaurant. Should be a nice addition.
At Euphemia Haye on Longboat Key, liquor sales
seem to have done wonders for business, with the new
dessert room and bar busy nightly, even out of season.

A nod to the arts ...
The Artists Guild will have an opening reception
for Island artist Jon Thornburg on Sunday, Oct. 22,
from 1 to 4 p.m. at its Holmes Beach Gallery. The show
features his original drawings and prints and runs
through Nov. 12.
You might want to check out the open-air arts fes-
tival at St. Armands Circle on Saturday and Sunday,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 200 artists will gather for
the sixth annual gallery event.
Autumn DeFrank, Anna Maria jewelry artist, has
had her work accepted in the Festival of the Masters at the
Disney World Village Market Place, Nov. 12 and 13. The
annual festival features the top artists in the country. And
DeFrank's works are now for sale in the Tampa Museum
gift store. She told me one of her customers walked into
the museum wearing one of her pins and when the staff
inquired, the customer handed over one of DeFrank's
business cards. The rest is history.
Richard Thomas was honored with eighth place
in the 1994 Florida Watercolor Society Awards for
"The Clown," which was also chosen for the Society's
year-long statewide tour. Only 25 works were chosen
among the 100 winners for the tour.

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BKEDThursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, 6.95
ISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


W\ t W LW W \IL I 'M a I 1
This family reunion is good for business
The Vergason family has held its family reunion for the last four years on Anna Maria Island. While this photo
of the Vergasons was taken at the Anchorage for the July 1994 reunion, Anchorage Manager John Home says
the family members are patrons of many of the Island's restaurant and are a boon for all Island businesses. At
the head of the Vergason family is 94-year-old patriarch Al, who has three children, five grandchildren and
10 great grandchildren.


SILVER QUEEN CORN
.^e'"FRESH DAILY'
. BANANAS- .
Always "VINE RIPE" ^" '
S19 TOMATOESi

SLF ( AMBROSIA
SHRIMPI__iL /MELONS

DELI SALAD & SANDWICHES
5 M . r
OPE 8A M:3P D A ILY-Icldin Suda o 49-78


DON'T FORGET TO COMPLETE YOUR ISLANDER FOOTBALL CONTEST
ENTRY THIS WEEK. YOU COULD BE THE WINNER OF $501


DRIFT-IN PACKAGE
PCAS foOC 19 5


|IAW EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, toast,
home fries and coffee ... Only $1.75


Islandlinn

V f1~Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH &


Wednesday Pig Roast
Friday Fish Fry
Sunday Bar-B-Que
P.S. We have the best sunsets!
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!
|


Mon. thru Fri. 7-9AM
(excluding holidayO I








jIj PAGE 22 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Oct. 5, dog at large, Fern and Gladiolus.
Oct. 7, stolen tag, 8605 Gulf Dr., Island Baptist
Church parking lot.
Oct. 9, grand theft of an 1981 Morgan sloop, 800
block of South Bay Boulevard.
Oct. 9, larceny of a bicycle, 400 block of Magnolia.

Bradenton Beach
Oct. 7, driving with license suspended, reckless
driving, expired tag, 5300 block of Gulf Drive N. The
officer observed the driver traveling north at an exces-
sive speed and followed. The officer noted that the
driver lost control in the turn and the vehicle slid across
the southbound lane and went onto the road's opposite
shoulder. The vehicle continued north at a high rate of
speed with the tires squealing and drifted over the road-
way almost crashing several times. The officer caught
up with the vehicle in the 7500 block of Gulf Drive
North. The driver was placed in custody.
Oct. 8 battery, trespass, 100 block of Fourth Street
S. The victim reported that the suspect came to the resi-
dence to speak to a girlfriend. The girlfriend did not want
to leave with the suspect and the victim told him to leave.
immmmmmmmmmmmimam q
COUPON JBO |
EXPIRES p.,O I
10/25/94 >
S10519Cortez Road I
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12-00 Noon 8 PM

* LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I

$3.99/ FFE2.99

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET
* I
, $.99/SECOND mn
S .49/ BUFFET .99
hLim .ml COUPON miimm l I

SICK ofDINING OUT?
TIRED of COOKING?
CHEF MIKE'S
A PERSONAL CHEF SERVICE
Provides you with your own Personal Chef!
A TWO WEEK SERVICE INCLUDES:
Customized Menu's
Complete Grocery Shopping
The Finest Meats and Produce
Special Diet Considerations
Healthy, Tasteful Meals
We use the Freshest and Highest Quality Foods
to prepare our delicious, preservative free meals.
Call now and experience this affordable luxury.
CHEF MIKE'S
For information phone
795-7045
Bradenton, FL


S Where Longboat Key History Began

OOReS



S'ONE CRAB

RESTAURANT

< FRESH

Stone Crabs
Purveyors of Quality Stone Crabs
Since 1924. Fresh Daily.
Experience Makes Us #1
Regular Hours: Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am 9 pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30 am 10 pm
383-1748
ON THE BAY END OF BROADWAY ST.
LONGBOAT KEY
mmc mm-mvrmmylyyanyymmmm


The suspect called the victim outside, an argument ensued
and the suspect attempted to grab the victim's throat, said
the report. Neighbors broke up the fight,
The victim went into the residence and the suspect
followed him and began fighting again. The apartment
manager witnessed the suspect attacking the victim.
The suspect fled the scene and the manager signed a
trespass complaint. The suspect returned to the scene
and the officer issued a written trespass warning.
Oct. 8, disorderly intoxication, 100 block of Third
Street S. The complainant advised the officer that a
white male suspect had been standing in a vacant lot
next door yelling obscenities to another address where
a battery and trespass call occurred earlier. The suspect
jumped the fence and went onto a house.
The officer went to the house and was met by the
suspect who was visibly intoxicated, said the report.
The officer reminded the suspect he was to stay away
from the house on Fourth Street and the suspect began
raising his voice. The officer repeatedly told the sus-
pect to quiet down but was ignored. The suspect was
placed in custody.
Oct. 8, theft, 2513 Gulf Dr., Circle K. The victim
reported that her sweatshirt, cash and food stamps were
taken from her place of employment.
Oct. 8, burglary to an automobile, Leffis Key. A
person unknown removed a wallet from the dashboard
of a car. The victim and other witnesses reported see-

The Only
c Authentic Greek Restaurant
Between Bradenton & Sarasota
BREAKFAST SPECIALS Mon-Thurs 10AM-2PM
EARLY BIRDS *Mon-Sat 11AM-6PM
HAPPY HOUR Lounge Only 11AM-6PM
LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BRIAN BEEBE
Tues, Wed & Thurs 6-10 pm Fri & Sat 7-11 pm


795-7065
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM
CLOSED SUNDAY
1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton


Nicki 's .es.t5


-Bridge Tender Inn-
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn
NOW FEATURING i- is
LIGHTER PORTIONS
3:30 to 5 PM
I------------------- kiv| l *
TUESDAY OUR FAMOUS
PRIME RIB ... $8.95 Dinner Spirits
NEW HOURS: 3 to 11 DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach



Y'S




*Deh tuDini g...

Gourmet ir -C ...

Styf'h Catiffg. ..

5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key
For Reservations 383-0777 (Behind Circle K)





CJ(HAPPY HOUR 18 4\
4to 6 PM

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4 to 6 PM 4
Fish & Chips Roast Pork $5.95
Shepherds Pie and More to *6.95
Lunch or Dinner SPECIAL with this ad
Buy one lunch or dinner at regular NOTGOOD
WITH ANY
price -get second at 1/2 PRICE OTHER OFFER
Authentic British Atmosphere with
8 British Drafted Beers on Tap.

-i V Mon.-Thurs. 4 to 10

RESTAURANT Serving Breakfast 8 'til
RESTAURANT Pub Hours 'Til ?

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


ing three suspicious persons in the area.
About an hour later, the victim received a call from
the Discover Card Company. The caller stated that a white
male in his early 20s made two transactions with the
victim's credit card at Circuit City in Bradenton. The
transactions were for $251.37 and $1,305.19. The caller
said the suspect was in the store again trying to charge
another $1,556.50 but when a Circuit City employee
asked him to wait for confirmation, he fled the store.
Oct. 9, theft of a blue backpack from a picnic
table, Coquina Beach.
Oct. 9, retail theft, 100 Gulf Dr. N., Circle K. The
complainant reported that a suspect removed three cans
of whipping cream valued at $10.77 by concealing
them in his shorts. The suspect is described as a white
male juvenile with long blond hair and wearing a flan-
nel shirt and shorts. The suspect fled with three other
male juveniles in a blue Ford Tempo.
Oct. 10, 2601 Gulf Dr. N., Sandpiper Mobile
Home Park. The complainant reported that her purse
was removed from the floorboard of her vehicle parked
in front of the park. The purse contained checks, credit
cards and identification.
Oct. 11, criminal mischief, 2400 block of Ave
B. A person unknown did $222 worth of damage to
the property.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Social notes welcome! News about social events,
clubs, anniversaries and special gatherings are
always welcome at The Islander Bystander.
Call 778-7978 and ask for Features Editor Tomara
Kafka to find out how to be included in the news.



JOe'S Eats &-Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge

ON THE CITY PIER
BRADENTON BEACH
*FISHING PIER
& CAFE
200 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach 779-1706
SOPEN: Sun. Thurs. 8 AM to 7 PM
Fri. & Sat. 8 AM to 8 PM
BREAKFAST 990
Serving HOME
Breakfast, OF THE /
Lunch
& Snacks 1 5
Cafe Dining CUP OF
Out Over COFFEEz
Sarasota Bay COFFEE

ALSO LIVE BAIT SHOP
OPEN DAILY 8 TO 7 FRI. & SAT. 8 TO 11



Join the

Lunch Bunch

At the Sand.y- r.; f


-Aq
a ir-

S fressea breezes while dining otn 4
finest of food under the shade of our ive
umbrellas. It's the most beautiful time of year
to get together with friends
and family at the Island's 'A1NTr A
traditional favorite restaurant: SAw BAR[
the Sandbar. Join the lunch sAroo
bunch! (We serve dinner, too.
Entertainment nightly.)


100 Spring Avenue 0 Anna Maria, Florida 0 778-0444


i


REC^S MUZMB


I


I I


I
1R1T'






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 23 IE3


STREETLB


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
Holmes Beach
Oct. 7, found property a homemade dual axle
boat trailer with yellow and green padded bunkers,
Kingfish Ramp.
Oct. 8, disturbance, 5353 Gulf Drive, Circle K. A
customer was causing a disturbance and was asked to
leave.
Oct. 8, burglary, 200 block of 83rd Street. The
complainants returned home and found a rear door
open. They later discovered that an outside door on a
bedroom on the front of the house was ajar. In the bed-
room a drawer was opened and a curtain over the out-
side door was pulled. A used hypodermic needle was
found lying outside the door.
Oct. 8, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
45th Street. The complainant went to the 45th Street
beach and upon returning found her vehicle opened and
her purse removed. The purse was later found behind
a Holmes Beach business and turned in to the police.
Missing from the purse were a wallet containing credit
cards and $140 in cash.
Oct. 8, DUI, 3700 block of Gulf Drive. The of-
ficer observed John Casavant, 33, of Anna Maria, trav-
eling north in the 3700 block of Gulf Drive driving
about three feet off the side of the road. The report said
Casavant was weaving and swerving, crossed the cen-
ter line and ran off the right side of the road three times
before being stopped by the officer. He was given field
sobriety tests and placed in custody.
Oct. 9, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee County Public
Beach. The complainant reported a person unknown
smashed her driver's side window and removed a purse
containing credit cards, a driver's license and $6 in
cash.
Oct. 9, burglary to an automobile, 3208 East Bay
Dr., Shell's parking lot. The complainant reported that
he parked his vehicle behind the business and went to
work. When he came out, his vehicle had been burglar-
ized. A checkbook, teller card and cassette tape box
valued at $15 were removed. The radio was tampered
with in an attempt to remove it.



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0-P,

Oops
Newspaper boxes at the Holmes Beach Post Office did double duty last week, serving as car bumpers when a
motorist apparently decided to get just a little too close to the wall. Damage to the three newspaper boxes was
estimated at more than $1,000. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Oct. 12, lewd, 6600 block of Holmes Boulevard.
The victim reported a that an older, white male suspect
riding a bicycle had exposed his genitals to her while
she was walking. The suspect was stopped by the de-
tective and identified by the victim.
Oct. 12, burglary, 400 block of Bay Palm Drive.
While doing yard work at a residence, the complainant
found a piece of glass that had been removed from a
window in the entry door. The complainant investi-
gated and found that the screen had been cut, the door
opened and entry made into the residence. The inves-
tigating officer found the house had been ransacked
and numerous items of jewelry, radio equipment and





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Cajun Spiced Fried Oyster
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remoulade...$ 6.95
Fried Gator Bites with
a spicy red sauce...$4.95
En trees
Fried Pecan & Cornmeal Crusted
Catfish with hushpupples and remoulade
sauce for dipping...$10.75
Bayou Jambalaya with crawfish
tails, oysters, andoullle sausage & alligator...$13.75
Crawfish Boil, one pound of whole crawfish steamed
In beer and hot & spicy crab boll served with hot
mustard sauce & butter...$13.75
Cajun Sampler, cajun fried oysters, blackened catfish
and a grilled shrimp & andoullle kabob served with
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money had been taken. Two safes were broken into.
One was.a large type that had taken a lengthy time to
force open with tools, said the report. Among the miss-
ing items were a Bose stereo valued at $1,250, a
Minolta camera valued at $350 and Smith and Wesson
SS 357 valued at $250.
Oct. 13, 5346 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach Post Office.
The complainant reported that when he arrived to put
newspapers in the boxes, two of his boxes were damaged
beyond repair. It appeared that a vehicle jumped the curb
and ran into them, said the report. A box belonging to The
Islander Bystander was also damaged beyond repair. The
three boxes were valued at $1,150.

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ITB PAGE 24 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

We're all called on this hand


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
The chips are down, the cards are dealt, and in fur-
ther poker parlance, it's time to call. We're going to
vote Nov. 8 on whether to end another piece of Florida
history local commercial gillnet fishing.
"The people," the polls say, want to vote it out of
existence.
You'll find it as Amendment 3 on the your ballot.
The Bradenton Herald last Sunday went to bat for
local commercial fishers. In a long editorial, the paper
recommended voting no on what it called (in the head-
line), a "misleading net-ban proposal."
Now it's no secret that I find Amendment 3 a
quasi-fascist proposal wherein the majority simply
eliminate a minority in our society in this case, the
commercial fishers. Sorry, but that's simply how I re-
ally believe it is.
But the Herald was cooler than that. It took apart
the arguments of groups like the Florida Conservation
Association. And it gets in some licks at the Organized
Fishermen of Florida too.
The editorial concludes:
"There is room for commercial fishing in Florida
as well as sports fishing. But both industries need to
work together to protect a resource upon which they
both depend.
"That means all should share the sacrifice instead
of fighting for the right to the last fish in the Gulf.
"How much better it would be if the commercial
fishing industry gave up the roe market in return for
keeping its nets, and sportfishermen joined in to restore
the habitat.
"We encourage a no vote on Amendment 3. Send
both fishing industries a strong message that a consti-
tutional amendment is not the solution to a very com-
plex problem."
Like virtually all the political campaigns this year,
this one is dirty. At one point the Organized Fishermen
of Florida send out a fundraising letter copying the
basic design of the anti-net folks. Meanwhile, FCA and
Florida Sportsman magazine use ugly pictures of un-

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This aerial photograph shows Tidy Island, once an expanse of lush mangroves and seagrasses, as a develop-
ment. Commercial net fishers and scientists believe habitat loss is the prime culprit of declining fishery stocks,
not overfishing as sportsfishermen claim. Islander Photo courtesy Jack Elka


certain origin to paint net fishers as wanton killers of
turtles and dolphins.
And that's simply not true, either. The handful of
marine biologists I know say it isn't true and nearly all
of them plan to vote against Amendment 3.
But the larger issue, one of some moral and ethical
importance, is whether it's fair for a majority to tear away
a minority's way of life. The Herald spoke to that too:
"We agree marine life is in danger because of
failed attempts to enforce regulation not wisely written.
"But using the Florida Constitution to ban com-
mercial nets is not the solution because regulation



Problem with


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Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253


should be a function of the Legislature and Marine
Fisheries Commissions.
"Further, banning nets through a constitutional
amendment is permanent, which makes it unfair."
So know that you're going to be subjected to even
more political "messages" between now and the elec-
tion, but also know that the issue is simple:
Do we let the big money developers win another
one?
It's time to call, as they say in poker. And a high
stakes poker game it is, too. Big money is singing the
old siren song again and let's promise ourselves "we
won't be fooled again."
See you next week.




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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 U PAGE 25 E]


It doesn't get much better than this for fishing


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Even living in paradise, October is one of the most
wonderful of months. The weather is still warm yet
cooling, the waters cooling yet still warm, and the fish-
ing is spectacular. We've been finding fish with more
and more frequency as the month wanes and more
finned critters are looking for a tasty morsel on the tip
of a hook.
Katie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said anglers on
the four-hour trip averaged 100 head of Key West grunts.
The six-hour trip averaged 125 head of lane and vermillion
snapper, porgies and three red grouper. The nine-hour trip
averaged 200 head of lane, mangrove and yellowtail snap-
per as well as red and black grouper.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers had been reporting good catches of snook in the
coves by Perico Island, as well as a few mackerel.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier reports that Blake
caught a 42-inch cobia off the docks Sunday morning.
Sunday was a good day for the rest of the pier regulars,
too, with good catches of keeper snook, mackerel, jacks
and redfish.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there have been catching snook, a lot of small flounder,
a few good-sized mackerel and an occasional cobia.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II reports that snook ac-
tion is really starting to pick up, not only in number but
also in size some up to 10 pounds. Redfishing contin-
ues to be good, but the spotties are somewhat scattered of
late. The best catch of trout this week was a 28-incher.
Offshore, kingfish are starting to hit hard, as well as co-
bia, Spanish mackerel and mangrove snapper.
Capt. Dave Pinkham says mackerel are out there,
ranging from one to seven miles from the beaches.
Cobia are starting to move in, too, particularly around


Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held
at Anna Maria City Hall for Oct. 15, were Ruth
and Rich Foehrkolb.
Runners up were John Johnson and Gene
Snedeker.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday,
and all are welcome.


Snook Trout Redfish Flounder

b LIGHT TACKLE
IN SPORTFISHING

S CAPT. RICK GROSS
/2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS .
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308 ,
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


the artificial reefs, and grouper are there waiting for the
right bait.
Capt. Tom Chaya said cobia are starting to move,
and he's been able to get his charters on a few of the
big ones this week.
Capt. Rick Gross said he's able to keep his char-
ters happy with plenty of redfish legal-sized, keeper
snook.
That offshore-fishing aficionado Capt. Phil
Shields said the best bet he's found is kingfish. He's
been able to get his charters onto plenty kings in the
eight- to 10-pound range, with a few up to 25 pounds.
Most of the kingfish action is about 12 miles out, with
live bait producing the best action. Farther offshore, in
about 120 feet of water, Capt. Phil is finding lots of
those plentiful mangrove snapper and grouper some
in the 20-pound weight class.


AMICC Soccer

League standings
League standings as of Oct. 14


Division I
Team Record
Hayo-Meyer Construction 6-1-1
LaPensee Plumbing 5-1-2
Power Pros 1-5-1
School for Constructive Play 0-5-2


Division II


Team
Beach Barn
Mr. Bones
Uncle Dan's Place
Dowling Park
Island Pest Control
Island Real Estate

Division III
Thursday, Oct. 20


Record
4-0-1
4-1
2-1-2
1-2-2
1-3-1
0-5


Points
32
29
7
4


Points
22
20
14
9
7
0


scheduled games


Island Animal Clinic vs, Holmes Beach Mini Stor-
age at 6 p.m., followed by Pettigrew Sharks vs.
Galati Marine at 7 p.m.


SAILING CHARTERS

Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.


Capt. Mark Bradow said he's been able to get his
clients onto a lot of trout, some big redfish and a few
snook. He's also seeing more and more signs of cobia
coming closer to shore.
On my boat Magic we're bringing back to the dock
limit catches of reds every day, a few trout and more
and more flounder. Offshore, those tasty yellowtail are
plentiful, as are a lot of amberjack.
Reports from Island Discount Tackle provide a
best bet of mackerel near the Island's piers, reds in the
backwater and kings and cobia offshore.
Good luck and good fishing.


I I -, ', I- I. : q w __,- I -A
Soccer, soccer everywhere
The Island soccer season is in full swing, keeping
two fields at the Community Center hopping with
action. Last week a couple of the big match-ups saw
Island Animal Clinic take on Holmes Beach Mini
Storage in Division III play, while Dowling Park
faced the formidable Mr. Bones team in Division II.
The foot bone is about to be connected to the soccer
ball as Mr. Bones brings it down field against the
defending Dowling Park squad. Islander Photos:
Mark Ratliff


SCUBA INVENTORY

REDUCTION SALE
45% OFF MARES, B.Cs, Regulators,
49 /9 'o FOctopus, Guages, Bags,

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CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE






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Boats up to 31' or 10,000 lbs.
$3,800.00 Installed (Limited Time Offer)
OTHER LIFT SIZES AVAILABLE DOCKS FROM $6 PER SQ. FT.
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Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-77


ANNA MARIA


DAY
Thu 10/20
Fri 10/21
Sot 10/22
Sun 10/23
Mon 10/24
Tue 10/25
Wed 10/26


AMHIGH
12:04 2.3ft
12:26 2.3ft
12:54 2.4ft
1:30 2.4ft
2:06 2.3ft
2:54 2.2ft
3:51 2.1ft


ISLAND TIDE TABLES


AMLOW
6:53 0.1ft
7:28 0.0ft
8:07 0.0ft
8:45 0.1ft
9:33 0.1ft
10:28 0.2ft
11:28 0.3ft


PMHIGH
2:06 1.7ft
2:44 1.7ft
3:27 1.6ft
4:16 1.5ft
5:15 1.5ft
6:24 1.5ft
7:26 1.6ft


PMLOW
6:10 1.3ft
6:29 1.3ft
6:54 1.3ft
7:26 1.3ft
8:06 1.4ft
9:05 1.4ft
10:46 1.4ft


North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


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ble Prices" s

8-5577


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Ship's Store
Bottom Painting
Boat Storage
Bulk Oil
Consignment/
Brokerage
BOAT RENTAL


~a~F~i~a~i~i~p~






[E PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


CITY
Anna Maria


Bradenton Beach


ADDRESS/lot
105 Mangrove
50x110
Holley & Jacaranda
160x160x121
101 Tern
150x100x32x162 canal
314 Iris
75x110 canal
406 S Bay Blvd
60x85 bay
8806 Gulf Dr
50xl00-Gulf view
107 1st St N
100x106
2413 Av C
50x100
2600 Gulf Dr
44 AMIsl Clb
501 Gulf Dr N
109 Bridgeport
1801 Gulf Dr
175 Runaway Bay
2308 Av B
50x100
301 23rd St
50x100
2202 Av B
75x100


STYLE/rooms
ground home
2bed/2bath/lcp
residential lot

residential lot

residential lot

residential lot

elevated home
2bed/lbath/2car
commercial lots

elevated duplex
4bed/2bath/4cp
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
ground condo
2bed/2bath
residential lot

ground home
2bed/lbath
2 story 3-plex
6bed/3bath/3car


AGE/size
1975
936 sfla


8/22/94


1976
1000 sfla


1978
1680 sfla
1984
1171 sfla
1982
1150 sfla
1978
1080 sfla


1953
1038 sfla
1968
3066 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when
Wallace/Lott
9/12/94
Picchiello/Anderson
9/12/94
Lach/Garcia
list $99,000
LaFrenz/Leto
8/22/94
Leonardo/Weatherly
8/22/94
Yanulavich/Zubero
8/22/94
Plichter/City BB
9/12/94
Smithpeters/Guenther
9/12/94
Hanke/Healy
9/12/94
McDonough/Wagner
9/12/94
Moricz/Murrell
9/5/94
Moyer/Keith
9/5/94
Northfield/Johnson
9/5/94
Shockley/Shishido
8/22/94


SALE/LIST price.,...
$193,500
list $197,500
$100,000
list uk
$92,000

$108,000
list uk
$160,000
list $175,000
$128,000
list $129,000
$100,000
list uk
$102,000
list $108,900
$200,000
list $220,000
$82,000
list uk
$94,500
list $94,500
$35,000
list uk
$99,800
list uk
$163,000
list uk


ore than a mullet wrapper,




~- C--~ -----


gISLANDERIM IS'S
NEWI Islander T-shirts: $10
Black on White 100% Cotton Sizes: M, L, X-L
Catch your mullet at the Island Shopping Center
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-7978






Tour of Fine Homes
Sunday, October 23
1- 4 PM
5400 Gulf Dr. #34, Holmes Beach........ $229,000.
What a view! Direct Gulf front condo, turkey fur-
nished. Very spacious 2BR/2BA unit. Inside laundry,
covered parking. Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
5400 Gulf Dr. #13, Holmes Beach........ $124,900.
Poolside condo just steps to Gulf. 2BR/1.5BA
ground floor unit with Florida Rm. Turnkey fur-
nished. Darcie Duncan 778-1589 eves.
603 North Point Dr., Holmes Beach ..... $339,000.
Keywest style waterfront home with wraparound
deck. 4BR/2.5BA with water view from all window.
Boat lift, dock. A very special home. Carol Williams
778-1718 eves.
514 75th Street, Holmes B, ............ $299,900.
Southem comfort. LE-..aterfront home. Oak
floors, 10 fi, lt4, ,u ft. dock & many more luxu-
ries. Judy Mancan 778-1589 eves.
116 White, Holmes Beach .................... $350,000.
Close to beach. Spacious 2BR/1BA home plus a
1BR/1BA income producing apartment. Owner fi-
nancing. Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.
447 63rd Street, Holmes Beach.............. $85,000.
Seaside Gardens 2BR/2BA villa within walking
distance of boat ramp & tennis courts. Private back
yard. Sandra Greiner 778-2864 eves.
701 Manatee Av. W. #11, Holmes Beach $128,900.
Westbay Cove South -watch the sunrise from this
2BR/2BA condo. Park like setting, steps to pool.
Jane Schulz 746-0937 eves.
3916 Coconut Terrace, Bradenton ....... $137,900.
San Remo Shores 2BR/2BA home on deep sail-
boat water. Open floor plan, darkroom, den, boat
dock. Jennifer Jones 795-2865 eves.


USA SALLY ANN
Mike 1 778-6696
Norman -s' 1-800-367-1617
N or ma n "31010Gulf Drive
Realty inc. Holms Beach, FL34217


See the beauty of Anna Maria's
properties, beaches and canals
by boat. Call me today!


Karin Stephan
REALTOR*
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


Anna Maria Island Clubl One of a kind!
Beautiful sunsets from balcony. Charmingly
furnished. Large 2BR/2BA. Pool, saunas,
spa. $255,000. #KS59362. Karin Stephan; or
388-1267 evenings.
Tidy Island condo Fantastic skyline view of
Sarasota across Bay! 2BR/2BA, cathedral
ceilings, marble fireplace, 2 car garage, 24hr
security. $229,000. #KS59041. Call Karin
Stephan or Carol Heinze today!
Sun Cay ... 6 unit condo: (3) 2 bedroom & (3)
1 bedroom apts. In heart of Anna Maria, just
steps to beach. Excellent rental history,
approx. 10% ROI. $549,000. MLS#KS59331.
Karin Stephan, 388-1267 evenings.



Th Prdnil0 FoiaRat


SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
i EDOLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


U U


I -

B"


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_,^ ,g H;_


4 PLEX NEAR BEACH Each apt, in newly re-
stored top-top condition. Two 2 bedroom and two
1 bedroom. Licensed for motel rentals across
from Gulf.


WESTBAY COVE
Surrounded by the nicest landscaping on the Is-
land. This tranquil one bedroom unit overlooks the
pool from a second story. $89,500.


OLDIE & GOODIE
They didn't knock this one down for a condo! It was
too cute. Great view of the Gulf, this old frame home
features 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and has a great rental
history, with beach just across the street.


Mike ,
Norman
Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617
FAX: 778-4364


3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


TPLY THE BEST
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT1
TFAM ON THE I.SIAND


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS _


[snun


,/'
., '






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 M PAGE 27 I33


CITY
Holmes Beach


Compiled by Doug
Dowling, licensed
real estate broker,
exclusivelyfor
The Islander
Bystander.
01994
Information:
778-1222.


ADDRESS/lot
2714 Av C
50x100
315 58th St
The Palms #B
405 73rd St
99x85
4255 Gulf Dr
129 Island Village
5616 Gulf Dr
3bed/2bath-Gulf
202 Haverkos Ct
80x98
501 65th St
100x100 canal
620 Hampshire Ln
100x105 canal/golf
6250 Holmes Blvd
63 No.Beach Village
6811 Palm Dr
big lot
8321 Marina Dr
100x94 canal
208 Peacock Ln
92x87
213 65th St
100xl00
3000 Gulf Dr
4 Palm Cay
310 60th St
5x100
3601 E Bay Dr
208 Sandy Pointe 4D2
3601 E Bay Dr
201 Sandy Pointe A


STYLE/rooms
ground home
2bed/1.5bath
elevated condo
2bed/lbath/lcar
duplex lot


elevated condo
2bed/2bath/lcp
elevated condo
1400 sfla
ground duplex
4bed/2bath/lcp
ground home
2bed/2bath
ground home
3bed/2bath/2car
elevated condo
2bed/2.5bath/lcar
ground duplex
4bed/3bath/2cp
ground home
3bed/2bath/lcar
ground duplex
4bed/4bath
ground duplex
3bed/3bath
condo
Ibed/lbath
attached villa
2bed/2bath
elevated condo
2bed/2bath/lcar
elevated condo
2bed/2bath/lcar


AGE/size
1960
1100 sfla
1979
800 sfla



1981
1478 sfla
1980
9/12/94
1953
1863 sfla
1973
2232 sfla
1966
1845 sfla
1990
1224 sfla
1958
2300 sfla
1974
2009 sfla
1976
1738 sfla
1970
2000 sfla
1980
750 sfla
1973
1221 sfla
1994
1048 sfla
1986
1048 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when
Muenchow/MaGee
9/12/94
Barbour/Kielian
9/12/94
Rowe/Pear
9/12/94
Holmes/Gordon
9/12/94
Taylor/Edwards
list uk
Black/Frint
9/5/94
Duvall/Kalajainen
9/5/94
Sackett/Michaels
9/5/94
Constanzo/Bryant
9/5/94
Austin/Post
9/5/94
Bailey/Fineout
9/5/94
Barreda/Lach
8/22/94
Murphy/Stoike
8/22/94
Talbot/Juday
8/22/94
Moyer/Kratzert
8/22/94
FlIIome/Cunnighaun
8/22/94
Garrison/Lisicki
8/22/94


SALE/LIST price.....
$92,500
list $109,000
$50,000
list $57,500
$60,000
list $67,500
$103,500
list $109,500
$150,000


$137,500
list uk
$147,000
list$195-179,000
$275,000
list uk
$135,000
list $159,000
$142,000
list $158,000
$263,000
list $275,000
$130,000
list $135,000
$161,000
list $170,000
$47,500
list uk
$92,500
list $102,900
$105,000
list $104,950
$91,000
list uk


S7 ^- .
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r: --.-.-.
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rr
,i N ^ ^ FV l^- S." '* 1: , .- ;* ',-- *** .-'-' t. _'-i* . -r.l ,..


WHY YOU BUY IN FLORIDA This 2Bed/
2Bath home has all that Florida means. It's light
& bright w/high ceilings, just steps to beach,
palm trees, hibiscus hedge. $169,900.
MLS57385. Call Lu Rhoden eves: 778-2692.


BAYFRONT VACANT LAND 2.15
acres, includes singe family home. Zoned R-3.
Possible 18 units. 200' E. of Gulf Dr. in
Bradenton Beach. $450,000. Call Nick Patsios
778-2261.


DIRECT BAY VIEW This great condo has
two bedroom two and a half baths, pool,
jacuzzi, elevator, boat dock, security entry, 2-
car garage. Must see. $142,900. Call Bowman
778-4619.


PERICO BAY CLUB Bayfront 2/2 condo.
Outstanding views from your lanai. Show like a
model, mint condition. 24-hr security. Heated
pool & spa, tennis. $142,900. Marilyn Trevethan
813-792-8477.


TRULY A BOATING COMMUNITY GREAT GET-AWAY BUNGALOW 2Bed/
2Bed/2Bath upgraded 2nd floor unit w/cathedral 2Bath nestled in quiet town of Anna Maria. Nice
ceilings, coral fireplace,jacuzzi, 24-hr security. yard just a short walk to beaches and fine res-
Great views of intra-coastal waterway, taurants. $128,900. MLS#59277. Call Rose
$205,000. Call Dick Maher 778-6791. Schnoerr off: 778-2261 or eves: 778-7780.


PAUL
F i1 42
MARTIN 4- 12!

Broker 62
Salesman 61
06
794-0049 2E,.
60
Paul and his wife Gilda moved to 51
this area 12 years ago from Ohio. E
Paul has been in real estate for the 40
past 11 years and is a graduate of 60:
the REALTOR Institute. Paul is a
member of the Neal & Neal, REAL-
TORS million dollar club. ,


l I -,
9,_ '


DEEP WATER CANAL WITH DOCK 3Bed/
2Bath w/vaulted ceiling in great room. Ceramic in
great room, kitchen & dining room. Community pool
& tennis. $329,900. MLS#59209. Call Mary Ann
Schmidt or Helen White. 778-5956 or 778-6956.


ISLAND SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
)06 Avenue C HB 1122 S '
20 Spring A,.r-nj AM.1 2 l :)f::
25 4 7(11 S rf l H6 I[ 16' ',,
31 Soulh Harbor H8 ll.6.9 -: i
20 Fox Sitree LBK ii w) ;"i
1 Foxworlh Lane 3.219 999y
02 Hamprhire Lane. HB i:35':,
.00 Gulf Dri.e EB 6 I ::
I7 1.arhoe Lane HB ""_'
L7 rjorlh Pc,,r,I r,.e 3.32j '0
3 LoquJal Drive, AM 1,.3.0 CI~.L,
6 Crei.olw.od Road HB i390 :o'-o
0,' G rull of M.1e. .:j Dr LB i ,:'.- ,. "'
9 rlortlh Por.l Dr..e HB 14 9 i_i


- .._ . . . I


i I


i 1
.1


KING-SIZED TOWNHOUSE with lovely wa-
ter views, boat slips, tennis & heated pools, turn-
key furnished. $134,500. Call John Green for a
personal tour! Off: 778-2261 or eves: 778-3167.


Premiere Properties in
Prime Locations throughout
AManatee County
T.:.i31 FP'r,, ri,' M anagerrein i
Wide .rlrl i,, t f lne vacaiion renisl '
IJr,ijrrirhed arinnija rent 3ls
Pr..lfe;:. r:nral Personalized Ser. ice

Call (813) 778-6665 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


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:: . -- : '"+ "-- ". -,--' = m r
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r~i:
L'n;~
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~-~- i!
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FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week


-~CYI~-TC ~ 11~ ~ii- ii~- ~-~-il~i I~IC~. ~Y-~~_Y1--I r-~- ~-I~---- L- 1--- ---I


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7;_


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)







-II PAGE 28 M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT





Looking for someone to manage your
property? Contact Lisa Varano or
Denise Langlois to discuss your needs.

DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


SECLUDED WATERFRONT


This fabulous waterfront residence with Bayou
and Canal Frontage creates a uniquely tropical
setting with spectacular views. Spacious 4BR/
4BA home with open floor plan, cathedral ceilings,
and gourmet kitchen. Pool, large deck and dock
surrounded by lush landscaping make this resi-
dence a rare offering. Offered at $410,000. Call
Dave Moynihan for details.


-I


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


U


m-l







SAILBOAT WATERS
Dock your boat at your doorstep on a beautiful deep
water canal. Located on an extra wide lot, in a quiet
subdivision of Holmes Beach, this 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath
home can be yours for $189,000. Call today. After
hours Agnes Tooker 778-5287 or Kathy Granstad 778-
4136.


SEASONAL RENTAL
AVAILABLE JANUARY, FEBRUARY, AND MARCH
Beautiful home on North Bay Blvd. nestled among palm
trees with magnificent view of Tampa Bay. 2 bedroom, 2.5
bath $1,800 per month plus tax and utilities per month.


^ ^ (813) 778-0426
i HORIZON REALTY
of Anna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216
Toll Free 800 434-0426 FAX 778-1929

Welcome

Northern

Visitors!
JUST LISTEDI Several rental properties
NOW AVAILABLE for this season. Let us
accommodate you in one of these choice
Gulf or canal homes. Make your reservation
TODAY


( 5C .Since t
197 1957
MURIE LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
*We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gul Drive PO Box 835 Ana Maia. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250












SThe front door to 631 Foxworth. The lock. Strange. I can
never find the key hole. You won't either. Because it has
none. Granted, Foxworth is a street of no crime and beauti-
ful lawns but just because 631 has a fire house is no excuse
to do without a front door lock. And there really is one. Just
punch in a few numbers at the key pad and presto, the door
Opens. Punch in the wrong numbers, though, and... Reason
7 of 15 why we value 631 Foxworth as the house on Key
Royale with the most fun. Doug Dowling Realty. 778-1222.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists ex-
tending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construc-
tion & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market
Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Prop-
erty Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs.
Combined Experience AND Smlesl
[_j -1 1 wi ijlb A : N i .I& i1^ i i


Usa Varano


Denise Langlois


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
L 9-701 GurlDdve P0 Bo 77* Amu Maia FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307









JUST LISTED
Bay breezes are yours from this beautiful bayside home.
Gorgeous oak floors, a fireplace and superior fixtures are
just a few of the extras in this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Enjoy a view of the bay as you sit on your deck. This Is-
land home can be your for just $200,000. After hours call
Agnes Tooker 778-5287 or Kathy Granstad 778-4136.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Oranstad, Janice Tresler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Kay Kay Hardy and Darlene Hughes
-slandeot WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M.
-i /a iSATURDAYS 9A.M. to NOON .






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 29 Ii


El~s


.1'
'Up1


New pet grooming

business opens in

Bradenton Beach
Irish Rover Island Grooming, formerly Island
Grooming, opened Oct. 15 with new owners Colleen
Monihan and Bill Hunt at 107 7th St. N., Bradenton
Beach.
Irish Rover offers grooming, pet portrait photography
and mobile pet services. Store hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Tuesday through Saturday; and Sunday by appointment.
For more information call 778-2095.
New homes slated for
NW Bradenton
Home Stead Homes has purchased 25 acres at 75th
Street West and Palma Sola Boulevard in Northwest
Bradenton for $725,000. The Resolution Trust Corpo-
ration was the seller. Burt Zupa of Neal-Mannausa, Inc.
was the listing and selling broker.


If it ain't broke ...
Julie Drummond and Pete Stewart, known around
the Island as "Pete the Plumber," are the new
owners of Broken Glass in Holmes Beach.
Drummond and Stewart, full partners, took over
Friday, Sept. 30. They bought out former owner
David Austin, who will remain a consultant. In
addition to window and glass repair, Broken Glass
will carry a full line of stained glass materials.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


A L IN R e l Ett

Nl


SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT The views go on
for ever from this fully furnished 2BR/2BA top
floor, end unit. Cathedral ceilings, covered park-
ing, boat dock, short walk to prime beach and
possible owner financing add to the extras of the
condo. Priced at $125,000. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy
walking beach enhance this turnkey furnished
2BR/2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with
pool, covered parking, and storage room. Excel-
lent rental opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call
Dave Moynihan.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.



.. .





DIRECT GULFFRONT Fully fumished 2BR -1 BA
apartment on wide, sandy walking beach. Perfect
investment property or second home. Offered at
$99,900. Call Dave Moynihan.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


BUN
BRIEFS


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
For all the Island news that's fit to print, you
can count on The Islander Bystander.


HOLMES BEACH MOTEL 6 units, just steps
from beach! State & city licensed. (4) 2 bed-
room & (2) 1 bedroom; fully furnished. Excel-
lent ROI. $430,000. #59894. Ask for T. Dolly
Young; 778-4327 eves.
CONTEMPORARY two-story home in a
newer Bradenton area. Three (or 4) bed-
rooms, 3 baths. Fireplace. Large screened
area Southern exposure. 2 car garage. Light
and bright! $128,900. #59959. Call Horace T.
Gilley; or 792-0758 eves.
MARVELOUS MARTINIQUE with incredible
Gulf views! Super condo living in 2 bedroom,
2 bath unit. Storm shutters, 2 car garage,
heated pool, tennis, secured lobby, elevator.
$159,900. #57185. Call Carol Heinze today;
792-5721 eves.
Martinique
Super 2BR/2BA.
Garage, storm
shutters & miles
of sandy beaches!
$139,900.

Carol Heinze, REALTOR*/CRS
Certified Residential Specialist
Million Dollar Club
778-7246
Charming Island home
Steps to beach.
3BR/3BA
117 81st Street
$209,000


T. Dolly Young, REALTOR/IMS
Multi-Million Sales
21+ Yrs. Experience
778-5427
Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


0










S







CL


Th )B e Plrudent Im~liaF ''mml, FI P.lr
FloridaReal..y







13 PAGE 30 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


j', Commercial Residential Free Estimates
any' Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
LaWn Hauling By the cutorby the month.
SfService 13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
3AND SATISFACTION








ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
1HCI D Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
SAdditions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468


AI II I I

STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
i MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


Custom Communications
Let us help you customize your home or business computer to fit
all your needs. We install phone jacks and modern hookups.
-- We offer FREE Prodigy trial with
:'"'' modem hookup. Back up important
Sdata! With our external tape drive
system, we can store or restore any
important data! Free trial Prodigy,
free shareware, tape back up of your
\ -- complete hard drive and important
data ... what have you got to lose?
S-- Give us a call!
- David Billings 730-1608 or 778-6407


lore than a mullet wrapper!

-




1ISLANDERR l n
NEW! Islander T-shirts: $10
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach



MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!



6 7e)





AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to en ine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal& Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products.
By appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.


S A D "*ASF


BROWN COUCH excellent condition $300. Pro-
Form auto incline treadmill $200. Wood octagon
shaped end table $20. 779-2129.

2 GOLF PULLCARTS, like new $40 each, originally
$89.99 each. 2 golf bags with club covers $35 each.
778-4874.

MENS BIKE 12 speed Fuji $100 or will trade for
beach bike. 778-9392.

20" COLOR TV, 3 yrs old $95. Brass and glass
coffee table, exc. cond. $100. 778-2960.

BEAUTIFUL 5 month old pastel loveseat $160. 5
month old coordinate swivel chair, It. green $100.
792-6958.

ONE WAY airline ticket. Sarasota to Manchester,
NH. Nov. 1, female $95. 778-7709.

MICROWAVE Kenmore $75. Air conditioner
Kenmore $100. Excellent. LBK, 383-9071.

LIKE NEW 2 drawer desk. Oak finish. Computer
ready with keyboard retractable platform. New
$230, will sell for $100. 778-4582.

MARY KAY COSMETICS, at reduced prices.
Please contact Susan Barnes 778-6407.

WASHER & DRYER full sized, good condition.
$150 for both. 778-1475

FREEZER, Sears Coldspot. 5 cu. ft. chest type with
basket. Originally over $200, asking $65. 778-4877.

PINBALL MACHINE Bally "Old Chicago." $350.
See at the Islander Bystander office. No phone calls
please.


GARAGE SALE. Fishing tackle, mower and misc.
Sat., Oct. 22. 9-1. 420 Magnolia, Anna Maria.

GARAGE SALE. Furniture, housewares, misc.
Right prices! Fri. & Sat., Oct. 21 & 22. 9-2. 2202
Ave. A., Bradenton Beach.

DRIVEWAY SALE! Deacon's bench, Explorer run-
ning boards, rattan swing, clothes, lots of misc. Sat.,
Oct. 22. 8-12. 116 White Ave., Holmes Beach.
GARAGE SALE. Antiques, furniture, fishing equip-
ment, tools, household items, lots more. Sat., Oct.
22. 9-12. Rain or shine. 217 Chilson, Anna Maria.


FOUND FERRET, vacinity of 71st and Gulf Drive.
778-2935.


HERITAGE DAYS FESTIVAL of arts and crafts.
Sat. & Sun., Nov. 12 & 13 at the Anna Maria Com-
munity Center. Booths available $35. 9-5. Phone
778-1908 for application.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.

CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


SEAMSTRESS wanted for piece-work. Good po-
tential pay. 761-0048.

NOW HIRING cooks, part and full time also cash-
iers position open. Apply between 2-4. Shells, 3200
E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach.

MAINTENANCE WORKER City of Anna Maria.
Duties vary widely, including mowing & gardening
of city property, cleaning & repair of buildings,
equipment, etc. Must be able to understand, follow
directions, also work independently. Apply to: City
of Anna Maria, 10005 Gulf Drive, PO Box 608,
Anna Maria, FL 34216 by 4:30 pm 10/28/94. EOE
& BAND drugfree workplace


LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST needed. 778-
4055.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.

ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.

HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.

NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances,
brush piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever
your hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.

FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.

AUTO REPAIR, mobile service. We come to you.
Oil changes $20, free lube. A/C specialty 29 yrs exp.
As always free estimates. 778-4659.

NO TIME TO CLEAN? Homes, apts., rentals, etc.
I'm fast reliable and reasonable. "I like what I do ...
and it shows!" References available. 778-4116.

THE TURF SURFER'S Lawn Service. Cut & trim
service for Anna Maria Islanders only. For estimate
call 778-9493.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs. exp. Call
Bradenton Fiberglass for free estimate 753-9621.



VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentiaVCommercial, Inte-.
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455..

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.

BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers
& concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.

DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.

HOME MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS. Experienced,
reliable, small jobs preferred. Don Staples 778-
0225.

CUSTOM RENOVATIONS by Paul Beauregard. All
home improvements. Specializing in kitchens & bath-
rooms. 20 yrs. experience as an industrious highly-
skilled, dependable carpenter and finishing contractor.
My work also includes; counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, drywall repairs, fine finish painting, wall coverings,
etc. 387-8066, beeper #252-6528.

Classified ads work great in The Islander Bystander!






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 20, 1994 A PAGE 31 [IB


SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, drywall repairs, tile & formica work. Work guar-
anteed. Low prices. 778-0410.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.
GULFFRONT Best in Anna Maria! 3BR/2BA, im-
maculate, steps to water Nov., Dec. & March $600
per week, reserve now. 778-3171.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
SEASONAL OR YEARLY. 1 BR/1 BA, furnished, W/
D, garage, no pets. 116 White Ave. Holmes Beach.
813-985-6765.

COMPANION. Pleasant alternative to living alone;
educated, traveled, non-smoker, references. Reply
to: PO Box 5154 Sarasota, FL 34237.
WANTED TO RENT: Tastefully furnished, 2BR,
close to Holmes Beach. Jan. 15 to Mar. 15. Under
$1,000 per month. 319-332-8912.

SECLUDED TROPICAL PARADISE, spectacular
views of Skyway Bridge to Sarasota Bay. 2 blocks
from Gulf beaches. Double lot on dead end w/boat
dock. 3BR/2BA with 2.5 car garage, new appli-
ances, furnished or not, Annually or seasonally. Call
778-7901 or 778-4560.
SEASONAL duplex on Holmes Beach. 1BR, en-
closed porch, carport, furnished, 2 blocks from
,beach. Available from Nov. 1 through Jan. 15. No
pets or smokers. 746-3376.

-1BR/1BA-APT. 2 blks to beach. Walk to stores, li-
brary. $400/mo. includes utilities. Available Nov. 1
778-6700.

BEACHFRONT 2BR/2BA available Nov. thru Dec.
No pets or children. Clean, everything furnished.
$1,200/mo. 778-2884.
ANNA MARIA Island Club, seasonal condo avail-
able March & April 95. $850/wk. Gulf front. 813-
949-3713.

ANNUAL 2BR/1BA, liv.-din,. kit. w/dishwasher,
deck, undercover parking, and laundry facilities.
778-1392.

ROOM FOR RENT Holmes Beach. $275/mo plus
half utilities. Call Steve, 778-5148.
WESTBAY COVE Large 1 BR/1BA. Tastefully fur-
nished & decorated. $800/mo. T.D. Young, 778-
0766. Prudential Florida Realty.

SEASONAL, 2BR/1BA home, screened porch, cable
TV, W/D, garage, close to beach. 813-689-0925.


4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
WEST BRADENTON. 3BR/2BA home, excellent
family neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will
help buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins
at Island Real Estate 778-6066.
DREAM VIEW of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
3 Bedrooms, fireplace. $350,000. Owner will fi-
nance. Yvonne Higgins, Island Real Estate 778-
6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3BR/2.5BA, split-design, southerly
exposure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dinging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $229,500. 778-7837.


HOLMES BEACH Town house arranged as two
separate apts. with own entrances. Connecting door
can be unlocked to make seven room dwelling. First
floor has one bedroom and one bathroom. Second
floor has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Full A/C.
Part of small complex of ten with heated pool and
nice gardens. 100 yards from new beach. Com-
pletely refurbished less than two years ago. Excel-
lent rental history. For sale as whole for $105,000.
Telephone evenings 813-954-1110.

BY OWNER. Drive by this 8-year-old stilted duplex,
fully landscaped with outside lighting and sprinkler
system. Each unit 2BR/2BA, laundry room, dining,
ceiling fans, central air, lots of storage and decks to
enjoy great Gulf view with famous FL sunsets. All for
only $189,500. 3210 West 6th Ave., Holmes Beach.
Call 778-1516, ask for Gene or Katharina.
REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash buyer,
quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes Beach area.
798-3981.
LBK updated 3BR/2BA, sailboat water, 110 ft. to
Bay. Appointment 383-6560. $273,000.
TIDY ISLAND on Sarasota Bay. Preconstruction
prices on waterfront townhouses, $219,900. Lots
available from $74,900. Call Tidy Island Properties,
Inc. 761-8439.
EXTRA LARGE Anna Maria lot across street from
community center. Quiet, family area. $79,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for
details.
CANALFRONT lot in Key Royale across street
from golf course. Deep water bay access.
$175,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
ADORABLE Anna Maria home close to beach.
3BR/2BA with possible 4th BR or den. Two sepa-
rate entrances make this property unique!
$147,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
KEY WEST styled canalfront home in Anna Maria -
3BR/2BA easy maintenance shell front yard.
$234,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066 for details.
ONE OF A KIND deep water canalfront home in
Holmes Beach 6BR/4BA inground pool -
$386,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066 for details.
OWNER WILL FINANCE this Anna Maria bayfront
home with a dream view, 3BR and fireplace.
$350,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate,
778-6066 for details.

INVESTMENT property steps to the beach. Call
Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for
details.
WEST BRADENTON 3BR/2BA home in excellent
family neighborhood. New roof, 9-94. Seller will help
with closing costs, $79,900. Call Yvonne Higgins at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for details.

ISLAND DUPLEX 2BR/2BA, 1BR/W1BA mother-in-law
apt. 2 blks to beach. 304 56th St., Holmes Beach.
$149,900/offers. By owner 778-6700.

IN HISTORIC CORTEZ village. Charming 2BR/1.5BA
cottage. Nice oaks, quiet street, island atmosphere, in-
land price! $62,500. 723-3616 or 794-1221.

OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, October 23. 2 to 4. 812
South Bay Blvd., Anna Maria. Southeast of fishing
pier. Waterfront on Anna Maria. Marvelous beach
and spectacular water views. 3BR/2BA home has
family room, stone fireplace, deck, garage, fruit
trees. Well maintained. $425,000. Call Jeanette
Rampone, Michael Saunders & Co., for informa-
tion. 813-747-2244.



DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for Wed. publication.
UP to 3 line minimum includes approximately 21
words $4.50. Additional lines $1.50 each. Ads must
be paid in advance. Stop by 5408 Marina Dr., Island
Shopping Center. More information: 778-7978.


A EVIE ONIUD RALESA TECNIUD I
9 9


NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Call
David Parrish
792-5207


DO-IT-YOURSELF
SUPPUES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call
798-3095


7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"



HOW TO

ADVERTISE
DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for
WEDNESDAY publication every week.
Minimum size, up to 3 lines includes
approximately 21 words $4.50. Ad-
ditional lines $1.50 each.Boxed ad plus
$2.00. Classified ads for businesses
and business services are minimum
$6.50 for up to 21 words. $2.00 per
additional line. Place and pay in person
in advance. Stop by 5408 Marina
Drive, between D. Coy Ducks and
Chez Andre in the Island Shopping
Center. More information: 778-7978.


778-2586 -A. MARY KAY Eve: 778-6771


15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 10/26/94

Darrin Wash CARPENTRY
"A DOOR EXPERT"
Serving the Island communities for
7 years with Island references.
DRY WALL AND
TEXTURE REPAIR 778-1353


PK Personal Fitness

N TRAINING 0Q.
_LGERI
Cardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
SMuscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis
Nationally Certified 779-2129


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MMooo3995
MA0012461






SABAL PALM Painn
CARPENTRY
A FLOACOMPAN Interior/Exterior
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS 20 Years
CUSTOM FENCES
*DECKS SIDING Experience
FASCIA. SOFFITS Husband/Wife
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS Team
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates Free Estimates
778-7603
Rick Lease 778-2139
32-Tear Island Resident


- COMMUNITY ELECTRIC


i


I ,




ID PAGE 32 M OCTOBER 20, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island Fo
*YOUR LO, o1.DOINDrMSI 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
HOMETOWN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK *7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
PiKfJD We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, OCT. 25, 1994


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


PEPSI
DIET PEPSI or
MOUNTAIN DEW

990
2 LITER. BTLS.


Tropicana
\ ORANGE JUICE
Pure Premium, Homestyle
Grovestand & Regular


Tomato
Sauce
8 OZ. CANS
5 FOR
$100


Bounty
PAPER
TOWELS
WHITE OR DESIGNER

690ROLL


U.S.D.A. BEEF ROUND BONELESS
TOP ROUND


TANGERINES
5 FOR

$00


BAKER
POTATOES

49 .
LB. '
v" ^ '** * ,' .- :


BAKERY DEPARTMENT
SPICE BARS
$*99
BUY ONE
GET ONE EiCI
FREE -


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


PLp p


!.


DELI DEPARTMENT
American
Cheese
WHITE OR YELLOW
S, SLICED TO ORDER

\2 4. $249
./i;, i '* 6LB.


-/ r Lse


1


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