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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00535
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00535

Full Text




WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


. . ... ,."


I.


Mayors seek 100-yard no-wake zone off Island


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
In response to recent complaints about motorized
water craft endangering swimmers, the Island's may-
ors are seeking a no-wake zone within 100 yards of
Manatee County's beaches.
The process was initiated by Holmes Beach Mayor
Rich Bohnenberger, who wrote to State Rep. Julie


Holmes Beach

special exception

OKs booze at

outdoor events
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
After permitting the historical society to serve al-
cohol at May's Centennial Street Dance, the Holmes
Beach City Council found there is no provision in the
city's ordinances to do so.
Last week the council drafted a special exception
provision to permit the serving and consumption of
alcoholic beverages at special events. Requirements
include:
Adequate toilet facilities shall be provided by the
applicant, with a minimum of one for every 100 people
in attendance.
The event shall be limited in time commencing no
earlier than noon and ending no later than 10 p.m.
The applicant must provide for police protection,
contracted with the Holmes Beach Police Department
at the applicant's expense, or at the discretion of the
chief of police.
No establishment, organization or applicant may
apply for more than two special exceptions for alcohol
per year.
Councilwoman Billie Martini objected to the last
requirement.
"This could become a snowball and we could end
up having a party every week," she said.
Councilwoman Pat Geyer replied, "It's so much
work. All our organizations are small and there's only
a certain amount of people that do the work that you're
not going to have that many."
'Ihey should have the ability to do so," said Coun-
cilman Luke Courtney. "We can say no to anybody."
Courtney asked if the exception would be limited
to non-profit organizations and Council Chairman
Mary Ellen Reichard, who authored the special excep-
tion, said that was not her intent.
Concerning a provision banning such events on the
beach or a public street, sidewalk or right-of-way, resi-
dent Sean Murphy said that would eliminate neighbor-
hood street dances or block parties.
Council agreed to allow such events on public
streets, sidewalks or right-of-ways if approved by the
chief of police.
Resident Bob Van Wagoner said, "There are a lot
of for profit organizations that will be very interested
in that (special exception). Don't you think that what
you're proposing to do is going to change the charac-
ter of this town? There are reasons why we don't have
language like that in our ordinances and why we have
restrictions on the use of alcohol on the beaches and on
the streets. It is under those restrictions that you built
the city that you have."
Former Councilman Don Howard took exception
to Van Wagoner.
"I get a little upset when I keep hearing 'changing
character.' The Island used to have an awful lot of ac-
tivities and it used to have several large pavilions that
were the center of dancing and fun. Let's give our
neighbors and ourselves a little bit of credit that we
know how to control ourselves."
Howard said the Island is a tourist destination,
tourists want to have fun and many of us first came here
as tourists.


McClure seeking the creation of the no-wake zone.
Bohnenberger was joined by the mayors of Anna
Maria, Bradenton Beach and Longboat Key.
McClure suggested that the mayors meet with the
two at-large county commissioners, as well as their
commission representative Stan Stephens,to request
that the county prepare a local bill.
"This would need to be approved by the Board of


County Commissioners (BOCC) and presented to the
(local) delegation at its public hearing,\tentatively
scheduled for late November, early December this
year," said McClure in a letter to Bohnenberger.
On Friday, Bohnenberger received a letter from
Stephens suggesting that the matter be discussed at a
meeting of the full BOCC to save time. He said a
meeting will be scheduled for the near future.


The village of Cortez is one of the oldest fishing settlements on Florida's west coast, established in the
late 1800s. The Islander Bystander begins a series on Cortez, its people and the impacts of changes
being proposed on the Nov. 8 ballot in this issue, beginning on page 8 Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Candidate qualifying starts Monday

for Bradenton Beach city election


Candidate qualifying begins Monday for the Dec.
6 city council election in Bradenton Beach.
Candidates for three council seats will be on the
ballot: Ward 1, currently held by Councilman Dick
Suhre, is a one-year term; Ward 2, currently held by
Vice-Mayor Herb Dolan, is a two-year term; and Ward
4, currently held by Councilman Jim Kissick, is a two-


Boat missing in Anna
Maria City;
theft suspected
Robert Sullivan received the kind of shock all
boat owners dread Sunday: when he went for a sail
on his 32-foot Morgan sailboat, the vessel was gone.
Sullivan, 42, of Land of Lakes, kept the "Miss
Tarapam" at 840 Bay Blvd. in Anna Maria. He had
last seen the vessel Aug. 27, according to Manatee
Sheriffs spokesman Dave Bristow.
The vessel is valued at $44,000.

"If you think we're going to come here and crawl in
our shells and die, we wasted a lot of time coming here,"
he noted. "We came here to have some fun, to walk the
beaches, to enjoy life. Sure there should be some regula-
tions but let's not worry about regulating ourselves to
death. Let's not regulate out having some fun."
Reichard added, "I don't think a few events a year
will affect the peacefulness and quietness that I enjoy
here."
Deputy City Clerk Teri Kirkpatrick said following
the centennial street dance she had numerous calls from
people praising the event.


year term.
Candidates must receive signatures of 10 registered
voters in Bradenton Beach attesting to the candidates
residency, petition signatures of 10 registered voters,
payment of $45, and completion of several loyalty and
candidate qualification forms.
Qualifying period is from noon Monday, Oct. 17
to noon Friday, Oct. 21.
Ward 1 and 2 are in the northern sections of the
city. Ward 4 is in the southern part.
New residents have until Nov. 7 to register to vote
in the Bradenton Beach City Council election. Regis-
tration may be done in city hall, 107 Gulf Drive.
Suhre, Dolan and Kissick are all expected to run
for re-election.


SIGNAL OF THE FUTURE OR SIGN OF PAST?


SKIMMING THE NEWS ..
Opinions ..................................... ...... .. 6
Those Were the Days ..................... ........ 7
Cortez: unchanged......................................... 8
Announcements ....................................... 10
School Daze................................................. 13
Stir-it-up ...................................................... 16
Streetlife .................................... 18
Anna Maria tides .......................................... 21
Business briefs........................................... 24


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


OCTOBER 13, 1994






IB PAGE 2 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Bradenton Beach pier debate continues


By Paul Roat
Is it a simple modification or a dramatic overhaul
of a lease between Bradenton Beach and the current
concessionaire at the city's fishing pier?
That question has prompted attorneys from both
parties to huddle to determine an outcome, expected
later this month.
At issue are financial terms in the existing lease
with the Bridge Tender, Inc. and the city to manage the
pier at the foot of Bridge Street Bridge Tender attor-
ney Jeff Hamilton has requested the lease be modified
for the city to collect revenue of 12 percent of the gross
less labor and food costs.
The current lease calls for the city to receive 12
percent of the gross.
Mike Norman, a partner in the Bridge Tender, Inc.,
has said the current language in the lease makes it im-
possible for a concessionaire to make a profit operat-
ing the restaurant and tackle shop.
Norman and major Bridge Tender, Inc, partner
Fred Bartizal took over the pier concession in mid-June
from Mickey Mims, who sold her interest in the pier
concession due to poor health.
Norman and Bartizal operate the Bridge Tender
Restaurant on Bridge Street. Although the restaurant is
for sale for $900,000, Hamilton has said the sale of that
restaurant has no bearing on the pier concession.
Records indicate that revenue generated from the pier
operation under the Bridge Tender has netted the city a
significant increase above previous years. The city re-
ceived the following annual revenue from the pier:
1990 ............. $3,648
1991 ............... $3,815
1992 ............$4,024
1993 ............-$3,539.
For 1994, the city received $410 per month in
rent from the pier concession from January to May.
When the Bridge Tender took over the operation,






A lone beach
raker
Jack McCartney of Holmes Beach
said he got tired of waiting for
county workers to clean up all the
dead fish on the beach resulting
from red tide, so he decided to get
a head start in front of his little
piece of shoreline. Mote Marine -
Laboratory scientists report most
of the bloom has disappeared from "-
the near-shore area. Islander
Photo: Tomara Kafka


totals jumped dramatically:
July --.....$1,248
Aug. .- .. $838.
Terms of the lease call for the concessionaire to pay
the city "$410 per month or 12 percent of the gross re-
ceipts of the concession franchise operation, whichever is
larger." The concessionaire also is responsible for paying
the electric bill for the pier, with 30 percent of that bill
being deducted from the monthly rent to offset city
official's desire to have the pier lit at all times.
At least one other group is waiting in the wings to
take over or at least bid on the pier concession.
Richard Lenerise, Sandy Greiner, Shirley Greiner and
H. Richard Greiner have sent the city a letter request-
ing a chance to manage the pier.
"We feel that a 12 percent payment to the City of the
gross receipts is fair," they wrote in an Oct. 1 letter to
Mayor Katie Pierola. "The key here may be that since the
pier operation is a small-scale business, it would function
more profitably as a family operated business, such as it
was for Ms. Mims. It is more difficult to show a profit
when you have to pay someone to manage the business for
you, as an out-of-state investor.
"We are concerned about the statement... suggest-
ing that any future concessionaires would have to
'steal' in order to make a living," they continued. "This
blanket statement infers that any future concessionaires
would have to be dishonest to survive, but unfortu-
nately suggests that the previous concessionaires did
the same."
City officials are planning almost $300,000 in im-
provements to the pier in the coming months. Work is
expected to begin by the end of the year on repairs to the
pier approach, removing the existing rubble and replacing
it with a sloped revetment to prevent erosion. Work is also
planned to repair benches and guardrails on the pier.
Most of the work is being done through state or
federal grants.


Bank, condo projects receive Holmes Beach council OK


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
A new branch bank will open soon with two addi-
tional drive-through windows, and a new condominium
project has passed its first hurdle in becoming a reality. At
its regular meeting Oct. 4, the Holmes Beach City Coun-
cil gave its seal of approval to both proposals.
First National Bank of Manatee, 5324 Gulf Drive,
is planning a Nov. 1 opening. The bank, which is lo-
cated across the street from Eckerd, is in the building
which used to be CrossLand Savings. The fact that the
proposed use of the building is similar to what was
there previously helped move things along from a per-
mitting standpoint.
"It meets our zoning regulations because it was a
bank before," said John Fernandez, superintendent of
public works and building official for Holmes Beach.
As Fernandez unfurled plans for the new bank, he
explained that some renovations are already underway,
but the addition of two drive-throughs for a total of
three requires council approval because the improve-


ments change the exterior configuration of the building
"It's now undergoing some remodeling, which is not
part of this site plan review as most of it was interior and
handicap accessibility modifications to the building,"
Fernandez said. "The site plan review is necessary as it is
an exterior modification of the building."
Fernandez explained that the new drive-throughs
would encroach upon current setbacks, but that the bank
had applied for and received a variance without objection.
"The drive-up windows are basically at the 52nd
Street side ... and the proposed structure is typical of
drive-throughs with a pitched roof over an open area,"
Fernandez said. "Basically, the structure is 90 percent
open for visibility."
The council approved the site plan unanimously.
A new six-unit condo project also breezed through
the council's site plan process, receiving unanimous
approval.
The builders of Hidden Cove Condominium, 5612
Gulf Drive, still have to obtain permission from the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection be-


fore they can begin construction.
"The site plan we have in front of us depicts six
buildings," Fernandez said. "The site area is approxi-
mately .78 acre, and by our regulations (which stipu-
late) 10 units per acre, they could have seven units.
They are proposing six."
Fernandez explained that the buildings will be stag-
gered to allow each a view of the Gulf, and that the en-
trance to the new project will be very close to Guava
Street
"Provisions have been made for water retention on the
property, and the building meets our height and setback
requirements," Fernandez said. About the only major
question remaining, he said, will come from the state.
"This project is going to have to go to DEP for
permitting," Fernandez said, "because it is seaward of
the control line."
"That's another hurdle they'll have to clear,"
Fernandez said, "but I believe they've done some
homework on that and gotten some of their problems
ironed out with DEP."


... while design of pier

improvements tabled
Bradenton Beach City Council members are
faced with a design dilemma:
Do they choose the architectural firm who de-
signed the renovations to Bridge Street to enhance the
look of the city's fishing pier, or do they choose a new
architectural firm who has offices on Bridge Street?
The dilemma forced council members to table
a decision last week on the selection of either
Swan, Moody & Associates the firm which, in
conjunction with Richard Fawley Architects, de-
signed the new look of Bridge Street or Eatman
& Smith, located adjacent to the pier.
Moody's architectural plans for redesign of the
pier would cost $3,500. Eatman & Smith estimate
costs totalling $4,000. The city does not have to
take the lowest bidder.
Work on the pier is expected to include new
handrails, benches and a new gazebo-like structure
at the end of the pier. There may also be boat moor-
ing facilities, new lighting and signage.
Council members were obviously split on the two
firms' proposals. The fact that Eatman & Smith were
local architects with an office on Bridge Street
weighed that group in the favor of Councilman Bill
Campbell, while Vice Mayor Herb Dolan indicated
that he liked the work Moody had done on Bridge
Street in the past and thought continuation of the "Old
Florida" theme on the street onto the pier would weigh
heavily in that firm's favor.
Design and construction work for the pier is
being funded through a $50,000 state grant.
Selection of an architect is expected at the Oct.
20 council meeting.


----- He '-'""*^*'^i

... ''**ac.. .;?. "

c-c





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 3 lD

Holmes Beach planners to discuss rezonings


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission will
tackle the controversial A-1 district density issue, as
well as several requests from residents for rezoning
properties Oct 18 at 3 p.m.
Recently hoteliers in the A-1 district asked the
commission for an increase from 10 units per acre to


The "Best Friend" didn't quite turn out to be that
for owner Russell Lesser of Sarasota Friday night
Lesser and three other people were on board his
44-foot cruiser about a mile out in the Gulf offshore off
Bradenton Beach when the boat began taking on wa-
ter in the engine compartment
Lesser radioed the U.S. Coast Guard station in


Moments after approving the largest budget in the
history of Bradenton Beach, council members began
discussing ways to offer rebates to senior citizens on
next year's tax bills.
Vice Mayor Herb Dolan said he hoped to begin
work on a subsidy program for senior citizens who re-
side in the city in an effort to keep their taxes and sani-
tation expenses down.
Although Dolan was sketchy about details of the
proposed program, he said it appeared legal to offer a
partial financial return to some residents.
"After the first of the year, I'd like to have some
private individual come up with a means that we can
freeze peoples taxes, especially for senior citizens,
maybe people over 70 years old, who own property,"
Dolan said, adding that sanitation charges should also
be included in the proposed program.
"I love the idea very much," Mayor Katie Pierola


28. They argued that the market is changing. Visitors
are staying for shorter periods of time and no longer
need the large suites that make up many of the Island's
older motels. The younger, more affluent visitors also
expect more amenities and higher quality facilities, but
if motels upgrade to fit the market, they are limited to
10 units per acre.
A density of 28 units per acre would result in an


Cortez, requesting assistance. Petty Officer Coral said
a crew responded, boarded the vessel with a pump, and
were able to get out enough water for the boat to pro-
ceed to the Coquina Beach boat ramp.
With water continuing to pour into the vessel, Sea"
Tow was called to keep the boat afloat until repairs could
be effected. No injuries were reported.


said. "I don't believe it would be difficult [to do] at all."
Bradenton Beach City Council members finalized
an 11.2 percent tax increase to help fund a $1.265 mil-
lion budget for the 1994-95 fiscal year. The vote on the
budget was unanimous, and made after no citizen com-
ment on the budget the highest in the city's history.
The tax increase in property taxes will mean an
owner of a $100,000 home will pay about $21 more in
ad valorem taxes this year than last.
The 1993-94 budget for Bradenton Beach was
$L053 million.
Council members and staff were able to whittle the
budget down from a proposed 36 percent increase ear-
lier this summer by changing city employee health care
providers and making other budget cuts.
Millage rate for the 1994-95 fiscal year is 2.9149
mills, up from the current 2.7026 mills. A mill is $1 for
every $1,000 of assessed value of property.


increase from 171 to 205 rooms, hoteliers maintained.
Of the 34 additional rooms, only eight would be new
construction. All other changes would be internal -
dividing large suites into two rooms and the infra-
structure is already in place. Any construction would
be governed by land development regulations concern-
ing land coverage, parking spaces, height, etc.
Rezoning requests from residents include:
The corer of Manatee Avenue and Gulf Drive
next to Duffy's Tavern, from residential to commercial,
owner Rita Clark.
SLots 1 through 4 in 21 Casanas Subdivision on
Sixth Avenue behind Island Foods, residential to com-
mercial, owner John Rekkas.
Lots 2 through 4 in 10 Casanas Subdivision at the
corer of 6th and Manatee Avenues adjacent to
Westbay Cove I, residential to commercial, owner
Stephen C. Floyd.
6101 Marina Drive adjacent to the fire station
property, residential to commercial, owner Maureen
Dowd.



Anna Maria City
10/19,9 a.m., Planning and Zoning Commis-
sion sub-committee

Bradenton Beach
No meetings scheduled

Holmes Beach
10/14,9 am., Code Enforcement Board
10/14, 3 p.m., Planning Commission
10/18, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting

Of Interest
10/17, 10 am., Island Transportation
Planning Organization,
Bradenton Beach City Hall
S10/19, 10 am., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Holmes Beach City Hall


Boat takes on water, rescued

in Gulf off Bradenton Beach


Budget finalized; rebates under

discussion for next year


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RM PAGE 4 N OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Organization Zimmerman's top priority at AMC


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Organization.
That's the key to getting things done in the City of
Anna Maria according to Bill Zimmerman, the city's
new public works director/building official/code in-
spection officer. After two weeks on the job,
Zimmerman says it's apparent to him that how the
city's business gets done is the most important thing he
must think about for a while.
"I think the main thing is getting organized and
getting focused on a straight-forward approach to the
various processes," Zimmerman said. "What I've tried
to do in this office, as an example, is to get my work-
ing surfaces back to working surfaces and not being
storage surfaces." Zimmerman was referring to the old
public works office where often a code manual or some
other document would have to be moved from a
counter top to make room for a blueprint to be unrolled.
Zimmerman says he's aware he's inherited some
ongoing challenges in the new job, but he says it would
be unwise to assume he can solve all them in short order.
"We know there are a number of fires to be put out
here," Zimmerman says, "and I don't pretend at this
point to have a firm handle on...the many individual
situations. So I'm concentrating on trying to develop a
process that will be appropriate for every situation in
the various areas."
Asked about criticisms that the former building
inspector sometimes took what seemed to be an inor-
dinate amount of time to approve building permits for
contractors, Zimmerman said the public could expect
improvement in this area.
"I don't want to make any specific promises in
terms of time, because my duties here are extremely
varied...but let me just say that I would hope that
within a couple of months we will be able to (issue a
permit) for anything small in a couple of days, and
within a week or so for a new single-family residence."
"That's my goal," Zimmerman adds, but he cau-

Ordinance on

artistic teaching

goes to attorney
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
At last week's work session, the Holmes Beach
City Council accepted its planning commission's revi-
sions to an ordinance creating a special exception for
artistic in-home teaching and sent the revision to the
city attorney for review.
Council Chairwoman Mary Ellen Reichard noted
that City Attorney Patricia Petruff "does not recom-
mend that we go through with it at all because of the
traffic impact it would cause."
Councilman Luke Courtney disagreed.
"Years ago when I took piano lessons, you walked
down the street to a home and took them," he said. "I
think we should have that ability in Holmes Beach."
The planning commission's recommendations in-
clude limiting the number of students to six per day and
the hours of instruction from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Piano teacher Paulette Kilts, who made the request
for the ordinance change in 1993, said some students
who take lessons before school could not do so if les-
sons could not start before 9 a.m.
Reichard replied, "A neighbor may not want to lis-
ten to it at 8 a.m. if the windows are open. The plan-
ning commission's trying to protect the residential
quality of our city."
Council discussed the planning commission's con-
cern that the ordinance might be challenged.
"These licenses have been denied in the past if
there was any intrusion of pedestrian or vehicular traf-
fic," said the commission's memo.
"If even a limited number of vehicular traffic is al-
lowed for an artistic license, how can it be denied for
other home occupation licenses?"
"I see it as two licenses a home occupation li-
cense and a special exception," reasoned Reichard.
"For the special exception, the applicant pays $250 and
has to come before council for approval."
"Someone with a home occupation license is go-
ing to take exception to the way you manipulated it,",
warned Planning Commissioner Gabe Simches.


tions, "I'm not going to make, at any time, specific
promises on that because of the ebb and flow of the
responsibilities of this position."
Part of those responsibilities include
attending city meetings, including the two r
commission meetings at which
Zimmerman's presence is required.
"Those meetings are standard,"
Zimmerman says, "but then there are the
codification meetings which are currently
going on, there's the Metropolitan Plan-
ning Organization, the Island Elected Of-
ficials Committee, and a number of ad hoc
meetings that come up with the state and Zimmerma
federal government."
Zimmerman says there is talk of forming a new
committee of all the public works directors in the
county. Although time-consuming, Zimmerman be-
lieves these meetings serve a useful purpose.
''All of these are basically aimed at getting every-
one on the same page and focused in the same direc-
tion, which I think is a good idea. There is a lot of com-
munication that needs to happen for the benefit for ev-
erybody in the jurisdiction."
In addition to his jobs as building inspector and
public works director, Zimmerman is also the city's
code enforcement inspector.
"My responsibility in that area is to make inspections,
and if there is an apparent violation, to write a letter to the
property owner requesting their cooperation in correcting
the violation if there is one," Zimmerman says. "I don't
make a decision I'm not the chief code enforcement of-
ficer." Zimmerman says if the property owner doesn't
bring things into compliance, the matter is then turned
over to the city's code enforcement board which will de-
termine the nature of the violation and the possible correc-
tive measures to be taken.
Up to now, he says, just bringing a possible viola-
tion to a person's attention has been all that was nec-
essary.


"So far, everybody I've spoken to has been very
cooperative," Zimmerman says. "People out here are
very cooperative about these things, and I
think once we get a very clear focus it's
really just a question of communication."
On his first day on the job,
Zimmerman was given a laundry list by the
mayor noting items that were of top prior-
ity for the new public works director to ac-
complish. The Islander Bystander asked
Zimmerman which of all of these from
a practical standpoint would have to be
the real "Job One."
"I think it's very important for the citi-
zens of Anna Maria to realize we are in the
midst of an engineering study of the drainage situa-
tion," Zimmerman said, referring to an Island-wide
study being conducted by the Southwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District "I think it's very clear to any-
body who's been here when it's raining that there are
some serious drainage problems here that need to be
addressed."
Zimmerman says a number of major city public
works projects hinge on the study's completion.
"It's very important that (drainage) be addressed
carefully, so that whatever work we do is done in con-
junction with the overall picture of the needs.
"That is kind of like the linchpin right now,"
Zimmerman says, "in that I do not want to repave the
streets now, then six months down the line go dig them
up to put in drainage pipes."
Zimmerman says he is also in contact with Mana-
tee County to make sure whatever streets are paved by
the city will not be torn up by county crews when in-
stalling water and sewer pipes.
"Where I'm coming from is to try and get this thing
properly focused so, number one, we do the right thing,
and number two, we do it in the right sequence. That's
where I'm starting out not just in this particular is-
sue, but in every issue."


WHEN YOU BUILD YOUR CASTLES IN THE SAND,
AND A STORM COMES IN OFF THE GULF ..



A A.-















A -+
i. '" -' ~ *'?-



1-M-





Omnipresence
The afternoon rain comes inevitably and puts a soft wash on the sandcastles found on our beaches almost
every weekend The trick is tofind the location selected by the group whose trademarks in design are
unmistakable. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Kilts noted, "You already have these other occu-
pations listed under special exceptions and I don't see
that this one would provide much more of a challenge
than the others."
Council also agreed to amend the ordinance to in-
clude instructional tutoring.
Reichard asked about the planning commission's
final suggestion to define the term "artistic."
Courtney said, "To define artistic or instructional
leaves too much to interpretation. If we allow this type
of activity to go on, we have plenty of other ordinances
which would limit anything that gets out of hand."


"I think that will have to be decided as each appli-
cant comes to council," said Reichard.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said, "Once you allow
activities within the home and if you're going to open
it up to other types of artistic tutoring and council re-
serves the right to make a case-by-case decision, you're
going to have a discrimination problem."
Councilwoman Pat Geyer said she has a problem
with creating additional traffic in residential neighbor-
hoods but agreed to wait for the attorney's opinion
slated for council discussion at their regular meeting
Oct. 20.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 5 IB


Holmes Beach appointment

creates dissension


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The mayor's procedure in appointing board
members came under fire at last week's Holmes
Beach Council work session.
When Mayor Rich Bohnenberger sought con-
currence on his appointment of Walter Zahn to the
Citizen's Advisory Committee to the Island Trans-
portation Planning Organization, council persons
Luke Courtney and Billie Martini protested. Both
felt council should see all applications for a board
position before making a decision.
Courtney, whose wife Joy had also applied for
the appointment, said, "I feel that in order for council
to concur, we should be given all of the facts and all
of the applications. How can we make a logical de-
cision if we don't have all the information?"
Bohnenberger replied, "In that case, council
would be making the decision and that is not allowed
by charter. Some members of this council seem to
have a difficult time with the interpretation of the
charter."
Courtney said past mayors have put forth all the
applicants but former Mayor Pat Geyer objected.
"When I was mayor," she recalled, "I would go
over any applications, pick the one I felt was well
qualified and bring it before council. And that was
done by the two previous mayors. It's the mayor's
job to appoint somebody."
Council Chairwoman Mary Ellen Reichard said


she saw no reason why council should not see all the
applications. Bohnenberger said the applications are
public record and available for anyone to review
prior to the appointment.
Martini said in the previous administration,
each council person received copies of all the appli-
cations but Bohnenberger said he's trying to cut
costs on duplicating. He said in the future he could
make a copy of each application and put it in a
folder in the council room.
Resident Russ Olsen pointed out, "'Iss is like
the president appointing a Supreme Court justice.
You don't ask him, 'Who are the other applicants?'
You get him (the applicant) up there and it's up or
down. It's the same as this. If you think the appli-
cant is not qualified you vote no and make the
mayor come up with someone else."
Courtney said he felt the mayor should also
notify applicants not selected for a board position
and tell them they were not selected and why. He
asked why his wife was not considered for the ap-
pointment.
Bohnenberger replied, "I consider the appoint-
ment of an elected official's relative inappropriate."
Former Councilman Don Howard added, "His-
torically, wives and children of elected officials
have not been on committees."
Resident Bob Van Wagoner noted, "If it's im-
portant enough to ask people to volunteer, it's im-
portant enough to recognize they have done so."


Council okays day

care, preschool

site plan
The site plan for Dolphin Day Care and Preschool,
5354 Gulf Dr., is slated for approval at the Oct. 18
Holmes Beach City Council meeting.
Council had no concerns last week over the plans
for the school to be located in the old Captain Conve-
nience building after receiving information from Su-
perintendent of Public Works John Fernandez.
Fernandez, who was on vacation, left his assessment of
the project in memo form for council review.
In his memo, Fernandez noted the following:
The property is located in the C-2 district Child
care facilities would be allowed in that district with a
site plan review..
The site is not located in a velocity flood zone.
The facility has enough indoor floor space to al-
low for 51 children.
The outdoor area exceeds the requirement for 45
square feet per child.
The outdoor play area is surrounded by a fence
four feet in height.
The area is surrounded by fencing and shade trees
will be planted.
Minimum off-street parking is provided. Two are
required and seven are proposed.
A certificate of occupancy will be issued after
HRS (Health and Rehabilitative Service) and Manatee
County Health Department regulations are met, fire
district approval is received and the city's final inspec-
tion is completed.
The school is owned by Shirley McNulty and
Melanie Smith.


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I[ PAGE 6 E OCTOBER 13, 1994 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

9 0,


Clang, clang ... again
The on-again off-again effort to have trolley ser-
vice on Anna Maria Island appears to be on.
A private company based on Siesta Key, presently
operating trolleys there and in Venice, has proposed to
run a trolley here. Owner Gary Cremeans says he'll sell
advertising inside and outside the trolley and charge
riders $1. There will be no cost to the Island cities and
the route may include trips down Longboat Key, con-
necting at St. Armands Circle with Cremeans Siesta
Key trolley route.
The whole idea is dependent on Cremeans success
in selling advertising and "stops." On Siesta, con-
dominiums and motels purchase regular, scheduled
stops at their establishment for a fee. On the pre-pay
plan, a complex with less than 50 units pays $50 and
all their riders ride "free."
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce has
jumped on the trolley project, hoping to sell ads and
stops and share the revenues. Cremeans is so busy on
Siesta Key, he's delighted to have the chamber do his
selling. Chamber President Mary Ann Sipe said she
was concerned that the trolley would take advertising
revenues from other forms of advertising that busi-
nesses do with the chamber.
Cremeans says he wants to give ad dollars back to
the community in some form. On the trolley, he says,
advertising works for the community. The signs will
sell for $200 to $250 per month, for four months of op-
eration but he says he makes his money on ridership.
Well, we all compete for advertising dollars in the
publishing business and sometimes businesses are hard
pressed to find enough ad dollars in their budget to go
around. The advertising you see represented in this
newspaper is what allows us to provide the newspaper
free to the community. Advertising pays the salaries of
four full-time reporters, the production and office staff,
plus freelance writers and even the printing bill and
rent. We're grateful for it. But when we first joined the
chamber of commerce we didn't expect to compete
with them, too.
Will the chamber limit trolley participation to
chamber members or open it up to any business? How
will their portion of the revenues be spent? Will they
invest in the purchase of a permanent trolley for Anna
Maria Island?
We hope the trolley idea will fly here. Cremeans'
offering a good deal for everyone and we want in for
the ride.


ISLANDER


IBIWIiIKnNDE]


OCTOBER 13, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 47
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Tingler
Bill Edmond
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. O 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


YOUR OPe- e


Out-going commissioner
says thanks
I wish to take this opportunity to thank all those
wonderful people who devoted their time and money
supporting me along with the many thousands who
voted for me in my recent campaign for re-election to
the Manatee County Commission.
It is always disappointing to lose but if there is a
measure of victory in defeat it was receiving the en-
couragement and help from so many friends and sup-
porters and their kind and generous words of condo-
lence.
I particularly want to thank The Islander Bystander
for the loyal support. It paid dividends. I carried every
precinct on Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key.
Thank you, Islanders.
If it is any consolation to my supporters, I garnered
more votes in Manatee County (10,236) than Jeb Bush
(10,029) or Lawton Chiles (9,333), one of whom will
be our next governor.
Kent Chetlain, Manatee County Commissioner

Holmes Beach
civic association, anyone?
There's an awkwardness, a curtness and a flailing-
about between the mayor of Holmes Beach and the city
council these days all of which is difficult to watch,
let alone to take a part in.
Even allowing good intentions, city council meet-
ings have become as much a "bloody pulpit" for the
mayor as properly a legislative forum among the coun-
cil members with public and professional input. The
mayor interjects dubious interpretations of distant stat-
utes which leave the council and audience without re-
course or a sense of logic.
All of this might be relatively small potatoes except
some volunteer applicants for city commission boards
have been left discourteously "hanging in the winds"
while arbitrary appointments are made with mayoral
disdain as to whether the council concurs with them (as
it legally must) or not. It's not pretty. And the confu-
sion leads to risky ventures.
The mayor and council fell under the spell of a new
restaurateur and just about gave away our side of the


quay in the center of town. Now they're about to ap-
prove an ordinance change which will permit profit and
non-profit organizations to hold two "special events"
a year, each with the ban against public-area alco-
hol consumption lifted. The mayor also got them to
throw in block parties with alcohol. What do the resi-
dents get for all this fracturing of the city's traditional
quiet? A few Port-o-lets and security police. All of this
with practically no public input.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore sensibly suggests
the citizens themselves can put a lid on density in-
creases in a city charter amendment referendum,
like Longboat Key has successfully done. But the
mayor is already throwing up roadblocks. Another cri-
sis (remember A-I) looms.
Maybe this is our fault. Council meeting rooms are
bare except for those there pleading special cases. The
meetings stretch on and are boring, most of the time.
Holmes Beach does not have a civic club like our
Island sister cities. We need a good one, organized by
neighborhoods and a forum for just plain residents; not
the businesses, not the special interests just plain
residents. Where leadership can be developed and is-
sues defined.
We're the center and the largest city on the Island.
The other clubs may need us too. Right now there's a
vacuum out there. We just might be able to fill it and
help the mayor and the council and the city in the
process. It should start soon. Those interested may call
me at 778-6553.
Bob VanWagoner, Holmes Beach


Have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and encour-
ages your letters to the Editor.
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to edit
letters for length. Letters must be signed, and include
the city you reside in anonymous letters will not be
printed. All letters to the Editor will remain on file in
our office and available to the public.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Edi-
tor, The IslanderBystander, Island Shopping Center,
5400A Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.










THOSE WERE TtHE fAYS
Part 6, The Remarkable Captain Jones
by June Alder


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 7 IE



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I SLAND IER EiE"lf

THE BESTNEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
i I W W iiWlilH IEW Wi W W U U N n i U I i il l ill


John P. Jones drew this cartoon to illustrate his story about Editor D.B. McKay
and "the wonderful sort" ofprinting press that gave them grief in the 1890s.


JOHNNY AND D.B.


Before we get Captain John R.
Jones settled on Anna Maria Island, here
is one more newspaper tale from the pen
of his son, John P. Jones. And a tale re-
counted about the elder Jones by J.P.'s
mentor, journalist/politician D.B.
McKay, one of the great characters in
Tampa Bay's history.
* *
Mr. D.B. McKay (later mayor of
Tampa) and Captain G.M. Mathes
started a paper named the Tampa Daily
News. The force consisted of Old Man
Jackson as foreman (he used to edit a
little four-page paper called "The Daily
Kicker"), a female compositor and my-
self. This girl was rather good-looking,
could drink as much whiskey as any
man and swear fluently.
I was now 15 and a pretty fast type-
setter.
The shop was located on Lafayette
Street [now Kennedy Boulevard] be-
tween the city hall and Hancock's sa-
loon. The paper was a four-page affair
and we printed it on a wonderful sort of
cylinder press run by foot-power.
It took two to operate it, one to kick
the press and feed in the sheets and the
other to pull them off the cylinder and
keep plenty of ink on the disc. Every so
often a paper got stuck on the rollers and
had to be pulled off with much inking of
fingers and profanity.
At least once a month Old Man Jack-
son would begin to pay frequent visits to
the back door of Hancock's saloon and by
three or four o'clock he'd be sitting on a
box sunk in silent meditation.
I would say to him then: "Mr. Jack-


son, it's time for the paper to go to press."
The invariable answer would be:
"Johnny, I don't care a damn if it ever
comes out or not."
Then it would be up to Mr. McKay
to pull off his coat, roll up his sleeves,
make up the paper and he and I would run
it off together on that horrible press. The
edition was about 500 and I have never
heard a man curse with such deep feeling
and expression I might say prayerful-
ness as Mr. McKay did when a sheet
got tangled up in the rollers.

D.B. McKay relished the following
story about John R. Jones and Judge
Henry Mitchell which he recounted in
his long-running column in the Tampa
Tribune. Judge Henry Mitchell was
elected governor of Florida in 1893:
* *
While Henry Mitchell was serving
as circuit judge, Capt. John R. Jones, a
witty Irish lawyer, wrote and published
in a local paper he edited for a short
time a humorous poem entitled "The
Sword of Antietam," in which he made
slighting reference to the sabre the
judge had carried during his [Civil
War] military service.
A few days after the publication of
the poem, Captain Jones appeared be-.
fore the judge in chambers to present a
motion in a case in which he was en-
gaged as counsel. The judge was read-
ing a document as the lawyer entered.
To attract his attention the lawyer laid
a paper on the desk and began to speak.
"Your Honor" but he got no further
than that
Judge Mitchell looked up from the
paper he was reading, recognized Jones,
stood up and reached for the old sabre.
"I'll teach you not to make fun of
my sword!" he exclaimed but by
that time Jones was going out the door
in a hurry.
The judge chased after him, hatless
and brandishing his weapon. The chase
continued for several blocks on
Franklin street but the old judge got
tired and gave it up.
When his anger cooled he laughed
heartily about the incident.

Next: Captain Jones
finds his Eden






EG PAGE 8 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



Cortez an unchanged village



but for how long?


By Paul Roat and Bob Ardren
First of a series
For anyone who's spent time on the water or shores
near Anna Maria Island, commercial fishermen are as
common as pelicans. Bedecked with white rubber
boots and leathery faces, squint-eyed commercial fish-
ers both men and women have been a fixture of
Island life since well before Anna Maria, Holmes
Beach or Bradenton Beach were more than developers'
dreams.
Commercial fishing in this part of Florida is based
from the village of Cortez. Originally named Hunters
Point, the village dates back to at least 1879, when the
first U.S. Fish Commission officer documented 28 fish-
ermen there: "Many are natives of the Bahamas, and
are called here, as also at Key West, 'conchs:' the rest
are Americans."
Many fishers then were transients to the area, re-
maining in the region from October to January to reap
the harvest of mullet and its roe for Cuban markets. It
wasn't until almost a decade later, in 1896, that settlers
from Carteret County, North Carolina founded the vil-
lage of Cortez and began the history of commercial
fishing that is found in the region today.

Founders of Cortez
Fishing was the way of life then as it is today in
Cortez. Early settlers comprised about 20 extended
families: Fulfords, Guthries, Taylors, Lewises,
Adamses, Garners, Joneses, Culbreaths, Bells,
McDonalds, Capos, Greens, Coarseys, Moras, Carvers,
Drymonds, Homes, Williamses, Browns, Fews and
Pringles. Todays family trees for the village find rela-
tives within all of those early families everyone in
Cortez seems to be a distant cousin of someone else.
Beyond bloodlines, though, is the common thread
of life for Cortez. Fishing is what everybody has in
common, predominately fishing for mullet, as their
fathers and grandfathers did.
As Ben Green describes it in his book "Finest
Kind:"
"The immigrants had found what they were look-
ing for Sarasota Bay, sheltered from the Gulf by Anna
Maria Island and Longboat Key, provided miles and
miles of fishing grounds that were teeming with mul-
let, redfish, trout, bluefish, snook, sheepshead and
flounder. Just beyond Anna Maria, with easy access
through Longboat Pass, lay the Gulf of Mexico, which
had huge schools of mullet running along its beaches
during roe season and, in the spring, a wealth of mack-
erel and kingfish.
"It was all there within easy reach of young men
and women with strong backs and a determination to
work hard. The beautiful pristine environment must
have looked like heaven, or something close to it, since
at dusk the mosquitoes surely reminded them that it
wasn't But the fish were there in abundance and, other
than a few fishermen from Fogartyville up the Mana-
tee River and a few other small villages scattered fur-
ther south towards Punta Gorda and Charlotte Harbor,
it was theirs for the taking."

Hard times
Although there were fish to be had, life was hard
in Cortez. Water was scarce, found mostly in rainwa-


A close-up of part of the mural.


Cortez and the nearby areas as remembered from the village's 'old
timers.' The map is on the side of the A.P Bell Fish Company.


ter-filled cisterns or sulfur-tasting groundwater carried
to the village in horse-drawn barrels. Mosquitoes were
thick, sometimes covering the screens so that the view
of Sarasota Bay was misted when it wasn't obscured
totally. A hurricane Oct. 23, 192 destroyed the water-
front: docks, fish houses, fish camps, both grocery
stores, the post office, even the half-completed bridge
to Anna Maria Island.
But Cortezians are nothing if not survivors, and the
village was rebuilt.
Even 1929's Great Depression didn't faze Cortez,
and villagers even today boast theirs was the only place
in the country that didn't get a dollar of federal assis-
tance.
One of the worst periods of Cortez history was in
1947, when a 13-month bloom of red tide decimated
fishing in the region. Another bloom hit in 1953. But
again the village survived.

A way of life
Life in Cortez was far from the American dream of
the man going off to work while the wife stayed home
with the children. True, the men went out onto the
water almost every day to fish, and the women took
care of the kids, but the women and even the kids
worked, too.
As Green describes it:
"Until pollution closed Sarasota Bay to scalloping
in the 1970s, many women in Cortez went scalloping
every day during the summer.
"Armed with an old No. 2 washtub and a wooden
scallop box -a square plywood box with a sheet of plate
glass in the bottom so they could see scallops on the bay
floor -the women would pole out to 'The Kitchen' in old
skiffs or little rowboats. They would wade through the
waist-deep water, pushing their scallop box in front of
them and dragging their washtub behind them. When
they'd spot a scallop buried in the sand, they'd reach
down, grab it, and flip it into the washtub. Hours later, after
filling several washtubs, they would pole back to Cortez
and sit hunched over the tub for hours more, prying open
the shells, scooping out the scallops, and cleaning and
packing them in quart jars. For many years, the price was
14 cents a quart."

Fighting for their lives
Blue Fulford carries the name and continues the
tradition of one of the founding families of Cortez. He


served for eight years as executive director of the Or-
ganized Fishermen of Florida, and has been a commer-
cial fisherman all his life. This is again from Green's
"Finest Kind," during a drive back from delivering a
load of Spanish sardines to Ruskin:
"As we passed a new subdivision on the outskirts
of Bradenton, Blue pointed at two elderly Yankee
gentlemen fishing in the canal behind their house and
said ruefully, 'Yeah, the first thing a Yankee learns to
say after moving down here is "What are they doing out
there catching my fish?" That's the first thing they ex-
propriate the fish.
"The modern era for Florida fishermen began in
1967. That was the year that a group of developers,
politicians and some neighborhood associations tried to
do away with commercial fishing altogether. It looked
so bleak in the late 1960s that I didn't encourage my
two sons to become fishermen. I figured if the bays
weren't declared off-limits by law, then dredge-and-fill
would get us anyway. I thought within five years our
way of life would be gone forever. But we had to do
something. We'd been here too long and too many
people were dependent on these bays."
As Fulford see it, things have changed a lot in the
past few years. He told The Islander Bystander:
"I am 63 years old and I've been net fishing since
I was 13. My grandfather, William (Capt Billy), came
to Manatee County with his brothers Nathan and Sand-
ers in 1882. They were all pioneers in the net fishing
industry.
"In 1887 they were among the first to buy land in
Cortez (Hunters Point). The Fulford name, and others,
are well known in fishing circles. For 114 years, five
generations of us have worked the waters. We're pro-
fessional fishermen and proudly admit it.
"We are proud of our heritage. We are proud of our
culture. We are proud of our care and concern for our
waters and the creatures in it. The fantastic growth and
development Florida has experienced has made it hard
on fishermen and the creatures in the sea.
"In my fishing career I have seen untold major
housing developments that viciously attacked the fish-
eries habitat. But we had our nets and we survived.
They built ports, sewer plants and bridges. But we had
our nets and we survived. We survived the Great De-
pression of the late 1920s, too. Robert Ripley [of

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE








History of Cortez

colorful as its

residents

"Ripley's Believe It Or Not"] says Cortez was the only
village in the United States that received no federal aid.
We had our nets. We traded fish for produce to people
two, three and four counties away, as well as our town
(anyone remember?) and we survived. I'm proud of
this, too. Manatee County has been a good place to
live."
Attacks against commercial netting have been
waged for years. Stop-netting a technique that for
the most part catches every fish of every size in an area
- was outlawed after a bitter fight even among com-
mercial fishermen themselves. Size limits on many fish
are now law, as are certain sizes of net. And as far back
as 10 years ago, Fulford and others within OFF were
working toward establishment of fishing limits. Estab-
lishment of the Marine Fisheries Commission was a
good step, Fulford said in "Finest Kind:"
"There will probably be some places where we
can't fish at certain times of the year, but it will have
to be done for biological and environmental reasons.
That will be a great thing because we've never had any
sort of planning in Florida regarding fishing. We're
going to have to take everybody's needs into account
- the commercial fishermen and the sportfishermen
and everybody else. And fishermen are going to have
to be reasonable, too. We can't have commercial fish-
ermen up there in some finger canal banging and
hollering and waking people up at night.
"If the sportfishermen had their way, there
wouldn't be any net fishing within three miles of shore,
and only then with a hand-dip net," Fulford said in
1984.
"And the only difference I can see between a com-
mercial fisherman and a lot of these sportfishermen is
the sportfisherman takes a picture of his fish before he
sells it."

Way of life ending?
Cortez is one of the oldest settlements on the west
coast of Florida. It is also one of the areas that has re-
mained relatively unchanged in the past 50 years. True,


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 9 EI

IMAGES OF CORTEZ VILLAGE


f
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4





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Hanging nets at dawn.


What will the future hold for Cortez?


outboard engines have replaced the skipjacks of the
past, monofilament has replaced the cotton-and-linen
blend line in fishing nets, and Polaroid glasses instead
of a leathery squint are now used to spot schools of fish.
But the way of life for Cortezians is still the way
of the water, of bright sun, pummeling heat, drenching


thunderstorms and callused, cracked hands bent from
hauling hundreds of thousands of miles of net.
All that may change after Nov. 8.

Next week: Constitutional amendment to ban com-
mercial net fishing in Florida's waters.


On November 1,

It's Ah Going To Happen.


"We look forward to serving all your banking
needs, no matter how big or small."
First National Bank of Manatee proudly announces
the opening of our full-service branch bank on Anna Maria Island.
Susan O'Connor welcomes you and her many long-time friends
as manager of your new island bank, opening November 1.

Located on Gulf Drive, just across from Eckerd's

3F First National Bank
Member FDIC /

5324 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
Main Bank: 5817 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton (813) 794-6969






Ilj PAGE 10 M OCTOBER 13, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I ANNOU9CEMEN


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AM Public Works has
new hours
The Anna Maria Public Works Department has
new hours 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through
Friday. The public works/building department is lo-
cated in the newly-renovated northeast section of
Anna Maria City Hall, with a new entrance facing
Spring Avenue. The department can be reached at
778-7092.
Cortez community
forum to focus on
Amendment 3
The residents of Cortez Fishing Village will hold
a community forum on Monday, Oct 17, at 7:30 p.m.,
at the Volunteer Fire Department, on 123rd Street
Court, Cortez. Parking is available across the street
and along the waterfront.
The public is invited. The forum will focus on the
grassroots campaign to defeat Amendment 3 on the
November ballot. A panel discussion will be followed
by a question and answer session.
Volunteer workers are needed. If interested call
794-1249 or 794-2455 for more information.
Contributions may be sent to Organized Fisher-
men of Florida, Attn: Karen Bell, Treasurer; P.O. Box
606, Cortez, Fa. 34215.
Musical inter-
denominational service
to be held Oct. 17
Sing to God, an interdenominational praise and wor-
ship service, will be held at 7 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 17,
at Harvey Memorial Church in Bradenton Beach.
The contemporary musical group with keyboards,
guitar and vocalists has changed to include more tra-
ditional and familiar hymns and prayer time.
Sponsored by the Episcopal Church of the Annun-
ciation, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, Harvey Memo-
rial Church, Roser Memorial Community Church and
St. Bernard Catholic Church; the service is held on the
third Monday of each month and is open to everyone.
For more information or for Island residents who
need transportation, call 778-0414.
Public reception
celebrates Vanishing
Culture Project
The culmination ofthe Vanishing Culture Project:
Images and Voices of the Cortez Fishing Village will
be celebrated Friday, Oct 14, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., with
a free reception.
The event will commence at Fulford Fish Com-
pany, 4600 123rd St. W., Cortez. Guests will tour
project sites throughout the village including interpre-
tive stations, the completed wall mural at A.P. Bell
Fish Company, N.E. Taylor Boatworks, and the reno-
vation of Kurt's camp.
A brochure highlighting the project accomplish-
ments will be available. Refreshments, including Wanda
and Blue Fulford's "famous" mullet spread, will be
served at Wayne Nield's studio at 4506 124th St. W.
The event is funded by the Florida Institute for Salt-
water Heritage and the Forida Humanities Council.

Haunted house in
Bradenton Beach
The Anna Maria Fire and Rescue Volunteers will
hold the Third Annual Haunted House Friday-Sunday,
Oct. 28-30, from 7-11 p.m., at Bradenton Beach Fire Sta-
tion #3, 107 2nd St N., Bradenton Beach. Admission: $1.

Historical Society to
meet Oct. 17
Emily Anne Smith and Tom Eatman of the
Bradenton Beach architectural firm of Eatman and
Smith, will outline plans for expansion of the Island
Historical Museum at a meeting of the Anna Maria
Island Historical Society, Monday, Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m.,
at Anna Maria City Hall. The public is invited.


Ceramic artist Elizabeth Brissenden, well known for
her mythical beasts, works with stoneware, porcelain
and bone china in her Anna Maria Island studio.
Artist Brissenden
exhibits in Island
Gallery West
Elizabeth Brissenden, Anna Maria ceramic artist,
is displaying her work in the Island Gallery West,
Holmes Beach.
Brissenden, who has been working in stoneware,
porcelain and bone china for 20 years, is well-known
for her mythical beasts. Each figure is entirely hand
made and kiln fired no moulds are used, making
each figure unique.
She has exhibited at the British Crafts Center, the
Cecilia Colman Gallery in London as well as many
other art galleries and museums in the United King-
dom. Her work has been commissioned worldwide.
Brissenden, who is traveling to England in Octo-
ber, will be returning soon to Anna Maria Island.
LBK Art Center seeks
artists for juried show
The Longboat Key Art Center is taking final space
reservations for the Sixth Annual Art on the Avenue to be
held on Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Avenue of the Fowers
Shopping Center, Longboat Key, from 10 am. to 5 p.m.
The fine art show is juried. A few spaces are still
available.
Interested artists may call 383-2345 or write to
Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr.,
Longboat Key, Fla. 34228.

Audubon Society meets
The Manatee County Audubon Society will hold
its first meeting of the year at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
20, at the Emmanuel United Methodist Church, 5115
Cortez Rd., Bradenton.
A representative of the Sarasota Bay Estuary Pro-
gram will present a slide show.
For more information call 792-0963.

AAUW to meet at
Seafood Shack
The American Association of University Women,
Bradenton branch, will hold a dinner meeting begin-
ning at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 18, at the Seafood Shack,
4110 127th St. W., Cortez.
Guest speaker is Dorothy Ridings, publisher of the
Bradenton Herald. Cost is $15 and reservations are
required by calling 753-3861 or 792-8372.

AM Garden Club begins
new season
The Anna Maria Garden Club will hold its first
meeting of the season on Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 1:30
p.m., at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria.
The guest speaker is Carolyne Norwood, executive
director of the Anna Maria Historical Society. Refresh-
ments will be served and the public is welcome.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 11 jfi


The Anna Maria Island Community Center
(AMICC) has announced five new programs for fall
including classes in oil painting, dance, aerobics and
self defense.
Oil painting Taught by Marietta Lee, a gradu-
ate of the Ringling School of Art and Design and an in-
structor at Manatee County Vo-Tech, the first 10-week
session starts Oct. 24 with classes held every Monday
from 10 am. until noon. The cost is $40 for each 10-
week session for AMICC members, $45 for non-mem-
bers.
Dance lessons Professional dance instructor
Bob Schrienk is back at the Center teaching two new
ways to cut a rug (or a gym floor, as the case may be).
Country-western line dance Classes are every
Saturday night from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Ballroom/Latin/big band dance lessons -
Classes are every Saturday from 8-9 p.m., and Mon-
days from 8-9 p.m.
Tae Kwon Do Learn self-defense, self-confi-
dence and discipline under instructor Sean Willard.
Willard is a certified World Tae Kwon Do Federation


first-degree black belt, and has three years experience
as a teacher and tournament fighter.
Classes begin Nov. 3, and will be held Monday and
Thursday nights from 6-7:30 p.m. Cost is $30 a month
(eight classes) for AMICC members, $35 a month for
non-members. The first two lessons are free. For more
information call 778-7599 or call the Center.
Low-impact aerobics Low impact aerobics
will be the Jazzercize alternative this fall at the Cen-
ter. Westbay Athletic Club instructor Gerl Travis will
hold classes Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7-8 p.m.,
and on Saturdays from 9-10 am. These classes are
for all ages and can be done with or without weights.
Classes begin Nov. 1. Cost for AMICC members
is $5 for one class, $17 for four classes, $28 for eight
classes and $32 for 12 classes. Cost vary for non-
members. For more information call 779-2129 or call
the Center.
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is a
non-profit organization located at 407 Magnolia Ave.
in Anna Maria. For information on any program,
please call the Center at 778-1908.


Community Center has five new

programs starting this fall


Anna Maria Island Community Center

1994-95 activity schedule


Youth programs
Before- and after-school care TLC (time for
learning creatively) provides transportation to and
from Anna Maria Elementary School, a healthful snack
and activities galore supervised by a super staff. For
grades kindergarten through 5th.
Teen program A variety of activities, Tuesday
through Friday, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Dance lessons Miss Lisa Gallo (795-1816)
teaches the following dance classes:
Jazz/acrobats 5-6 year olds on Mondays at 4
p.m.; 7-9 year olds on Mondays at 5 p.m.; 10-12 year
olds on Thursdays at 3:30 p.m.; 13 years and up on
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Tap/acrobats 3-4 year olds on Tuesdays at 4
p.m.; 5-6 year olds on Tuesdays at 5 p.m.; 7-9 year olds
Tuesday at 6 p.m.; 10-12 year olds on Wednesdays at
4 p.m.
Ballet/acrobats 3-4 year olds on Mondays at
3 p.m.
Ballet/tap 3-4 year olds on Wednesdays at 3
p.m.
Ballet: 7-9 year olds on Thursdays at 4:30 p.m.
Tennis lessons Roy McChesney works with
kids on Fridays at 4:30 p.m.
Flag football For ages 11-16. Play starts Nov.
21.
Basketball league For ages 5-16. Registration
is Nov. 7-19, and tryouts are Nov. 19.
Little League Call the Center for information
about playing next season. Registration will be in Jan
1995, with tryouts in Feb. 1995.
Computertots For children of all ages. Held
Friday, more information can be obtained by calling
Susan at the Center.
Tae Kwon Do classes Begins Nov. 3 and
meets Mondays and Thursdays from 6 p.m. to 7:30
p.m.

Adult programs
Gentle aerobics Instructor is Tanya Slack,
795-4799. The classes meet Mondays at 10:30 am. and


LBK Art Center seeks final
applicants for kids' art
program
The Longboat Key Art Center is taking fi-
nal reservations for the Children's Scholarship
Program to be held on Saturday mornings from
November through March.
The program is for elementary school chil-
dren, grades 3 through 5, and supplements vi-
sual art education in the public schools. Parents
must provide transportation.
To receive an application form and schedule
of classes call 383-2345. Enrollment is limited.


Friday at 9 am.
Bridge Club Regular bridge, and all are wel-
come. Meets Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m.
Writing to Publish Instructor is freelance
writer Helen Nettleton, 778-9384. Meets Tuesdays at
9:30 am. for two hours. Call for class reservations.
Crafts and sewing Create and socialize with
Naomi Vaught, 722-9774. Meets Wednesdays at
9:30 am.
Line dancing For guys and gals, no partner
needed. Meets Tuesdays at 11 a.m. for one hour. In-
structor is Tanya Slack, 795-4799.
Country-western line dancing Professional
instruction by Bob Schrienk, 778-2988. Meets Satur-
days at 6:30 p.m. for one hour.
Ballroom/Latin/big band dance lessons In-
structor Bob Schrienk. Monday at 8 p.m. for one
hour.
Anna Maria Chess Club All are welcome.
Meets Thursdays at 11:30 am.
Open basketball Wednesdays from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m.
Open volleyball Tuesdays form 8:15 p.m. to
10 p.m.
Tennis play Adult round-robin matches ev-
ery weekday from 8 am to 10 am. Pay daily, or be-
come a tennis member.
Oil painting Monday's from 10 am. to 12
p.m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. A ten-week session
starts Oct. 24, with a second session beginning Jan.
9, 1995.
AMI Forever Young The Community
Center's social organization for active retired people.
Meets the second Tuesday of every month at 12:30
p.m. Call the Center for details.

Programs for the entire family
Low-impact aerobics For all ages, classes
start Nov. 1 and meet Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7
p.m., and on Saturdays at 9 a.m.

Counseling and support groups
Youth family counseling Margo Burchim, a
licensed mental health counselor, and Susan Mont-
gomery, MSW, are available free of charge by ap-
pointment.
Adult and family counseling Margo
Burchim, a licensed mental health counselor, and
Susan Montgomery, MSW, are available free of
charge by appointment.
Support for Women Help is available for
women who need help facing or coping with certain
stressful areas. Counseling provided through the
Center's Women's Peer Counselor Program. Call the
Center for details.

The Anna Maria Island Community Center is a
non-profit organization located at 407 Magnolia
Ave. in Anna Maria. Phone 778-1908.


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'l PAGE 12 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Cadets help build haunted house
These are some of the many scenes sure to "scare
your socks off" at the Anna Maria Fire and Rescue
Volunteers Haunted House at Bradenton Beach Fire
Station 3, 107Second St. N. It's the group's joint
annual project with the department's cadets. The
Haunted House will be open Oct. 28 and 29, from 7
to 11 p.m., and Oct. 30, from 7p.m. with closing yet
to be determined. Drinks and snacks will be avail-
able. Islander Photos: Pat Copeland


Kids' puppet workshop
set at library
In celebration of National Children's Book Week,
the Friends of the Island Branch Library will sponsor
a free all-day puppet workshop on Saturday, Nov. 19,
from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the library, 5701 Ma-
rina Dr., Holmes Beach.
The program will be conducted by Gerald Little
and Joan Joffa of Acme Puppet Co. of Tampa. Partici-
pants will design and create puppets as well as write,
rehearse and perform in a show. The performance is
open to family members and program sponsors.
Participation is limited to the first 25 children from
second grade and older.
A lunch break is from noon to 1 p.m. Children
should bring a lunch or arrangements should be made
by parents to pick up the child for lunch.
For more information call Mary Kay Clune at 778-
6341.



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OCTOBERFEST Q
Saturday, October 15th
S5~11 pm Q
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Music by
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Dinnerenu Cash'Bar
Wurst or Hot Dog Imported Beer
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SGerman Potato Salad Mixed Drinks
Pumpernickel Bread Wine & Sodas
Dinner Served Serving
6-9pm only 5-10:45 pm
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Admission Without Dinner Is Free
Bar Drinks Sold Separately
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Extras needed for
filming of PSA
The Manatee County Chapter of the Ameri-
can Red Cross is looking for approximately 100
"extras" for the production of a public service
video on Saturday, Oct 15, at 2 p.m. at Manatee
High School.
The Red Cross is working with Manatee High
School's advanced video class and Manatee
County Community Affairs to produce the pub-
lic service announcement which will be used to
recruit volunteers to work in the 30 public shel-
ters in Manatee County.
The "extras" will star in the production which
calls for a long line of people to be waiting to
enter a shelter. Those interested should park along
32nd Street West in front of Manatee High
School's administration building.
For more information call 792-8686.




I RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES CONOS
REPAIRS A REMODELING FREE ESTIMATES SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
NEW CONSTRUCTION WATER HEATERS BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
EMERGENCY SERVICE GARBAGE DISPOSALS LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
*We are a DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce


Doubles Tennis Tourney
to benefit
Special Olympics
Champs Sports and Nick Bollettieri Tennis Acad-
emy and Center are sponsoring a doubles tennis tour-
nament to benefit the Manatee County Special Olym-
pics on Oct. 13-16, Thursday-Sunday.
The weekend includes the doubles tennis tourna-
ment, a tennis exhibition by Stan Smith with Special
Olympic athletes, a memorabilia auction and raffle.
For more information call 792-8757.

Anything Goes to hold
open house
Anything Goes, an antique doll and bear collect-
able shop located at 9801 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria, will
hold an open house on Monday, Nov. 7, from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Anything Goes also announces the opening of a
kiosk at Southgate Plaza, Sarasota, during the month of
October only.
For more information call Carmen or Frank Pedota
at 778-4456.

MCC offers writing
courses
Manatee Community College Open Campus offers
non-credit writing courses this fall.
"Write Your Life Story" is a practical step-by-step
class to help participants write about their own unique
lives. The class meets Tuesdays, Oct. 18 to Nov. 29,
from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The cost is $40.
Creative Writing, offered Mondays, from Oct. 31
to Dec. 5, from 7 to 9 p.m., will help you get started or
with a work in progress. The course fee is $36.
For more information or to register call 755-1511,
ext. 4669.

Goodwill offers free
classes
Goodwill Industries-Manasota, Inc. offers free
classes on GED preparation, adult basic education and
employability skills training. These sessions are open
to the public.
For the nearest Goodwill Training Center and class
schedules call 355-2721.

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Great job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary Schoolfor the week ending Sept.
23. Front row, left to right, are Wyndham Riter, Christin Chiles, Patrick Cole, Brian De Bellevue,
Kevin Hennessey, Katie O'Neill and Nick DeWick. Back row, left to right, are Kris Smith, Ben Sato,
Billy Malfese, Taylor Manning, Vanessa Atwood, Kim Schenk, and Katie Lindahl.


Madam President
Katie Jenkins ofHolmes Beach won King Middle School's
recent election for president of the Student Council. Jenkins is a
graduate of Anna Maria Elementary and is now an eighth-grade
student. As president Jenkins will oversee the council's service
projects such as collecting Christmas presents for needyfoster
children and sponsor school dances. The council's main goal,
said Jenkins, is to earn the remaining $1,500 needed to purchase
an outside event sign for the school


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 13 Il

: Anna Maria School Menu :
Monday, 10/17/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
: Lunch: Dinosaur Nuggets w/Sauce or Cheese Croissant,
Dinosaur Potatoes, Fresh Fruit, Jelly
Tuesday, 10/18/94
SBreakfast: Cheese Toast or Cereal, Strawberry Fruit Cup
Lunch: Boneless Pork Chop Shape or Barbecued Pork on
SBun, Sweet Potato Topped w/Marshmallows, Seasoned
Rice, Washington Apple Cobbler, Grape Juice
Wednesday, 10/19/94
Breakfast: English Muffin & Jelly or Cereal, Fruit
Lunch: Cheeseburger or Hot Dog, Baked Beans, Hash
Brown Potatoes, Peaches
SThursday, 10/20/94
S Breakfast: Waffles & Syrup or Cereal, Pears
Lunch: Chef Salad w/ Fresh Baked Roll or Jr. Cuban
SSandwich w/Italian Salad, Blueberry Tart w/Whipped
Cream
Friday, 10/21/94
Elementary School Early Release
: Breakfast: Oatmeal w/Brown Sugar or Cereal, Washing- :
ton Cinnamon Apple Slices
Lunch: Hamburger Patty on Bun, Banana, Cookie Juice .
SAll meals served with milk.
*... ...... ........00 *


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l First National Bank of Manatee proudly
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Main Bank: 5817 Manatee Avenue West (813) 794-6969


City of Anna
10005 Gulf Dr. P.O. Box 608 Anna Maria,


Maria
FL 34216 778-0781


RECYCLE PUBLIC NOTICE
City of Anna Maria #1 in Manatee County

FALL CLEAN UP

SATURDAY, OCT. 22

8:00 A.M. TO 3:00 P.M. GULF DR. NEXT TO
THE ANNA MARIA POST OFFICE PLAZA
Plus ... our RECYCLE YARD at Pine Ave. F
is open 7 days a week
For any questions about recycling,
call Commissioner Max Znika at City Hall 778-0781 c


E RECYCLE


I Lm


Problem with

Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
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Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


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5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center .
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 **


YARD WASTE
MUST BE
SEPARATED
FROM OTHER
REFUSE.
worry, no batteries, tires
or paint will be ac-
epted at this clean-up.


_,I


,,I


CUB" ^






pf PAGE 14 A OCTOBER 13, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLANDER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST

PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner 'in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 1L IT OT-
FILLITOUT-NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
*Name *Address/City Phone


RODOLbE L

Mini-Resort
*r Best Fishing *r
ISLAND
COOKING
i Beer and Wine
1 Breakfast
" Lunch-Dinner
Reasonable *
-_ Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier





Joe
Ungvarsky
Construction
& Remodeling
778-2993
Experience
You
Can

On.
CRC035261

S Aubrn at Florida


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
Canrdinals at Redskins
OPEN 7 DAYS* 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


AMERICAN

CAR

WASH

& DETAILING
BOATS
TRAILERS
SCARS
Giants at Rams
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617





Free Estimates



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Re-Roofs Repairs
Built-Ups Shingles
.Single Ply *Tile
Roo ICENSED-INSURED
Syslems icasiw
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Quality


748-9362
Penn atMichigan


BotP Sti or
*Bo*SRontJ
Five O'Clock Marinie
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
778-5577
Johnson. Evinde.. OMC
Se Drive & OMC Cobra Stm Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
I Baenga at steelers





cO-E OL^Qe


HAPPY HOUR
MON Fi 4 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KitchEN OpEN DAily I AM
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10104 C8RItE Rd. W.
Eagles at Cowboys





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Fruit of the Loom
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While You Wait
Colts at Bills
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL
Anna Maria Island Centre


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast.
Professional Service
from Island OwnersI
Sm Day or Next Day Price
3U32 EBfyDr-*HohesBd
778-4277
*oebska at Kansa S t. i
SNebraska at Kansa St.


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
Patriots at Jets


Prompt Professional
Service
SAll Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
*Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
Chargers at Saints


LaPensee 4;
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach




THE

CLUB
RESTAURA
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6 pm
Happy Hour Everyday

Ohio St. at Mich St.
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


' s


0






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m OCTOBER 13, 1994 I PAGE 15 Ij


Italo Charamella
Italo Charamella, Holmes Beach, died Aug. 27,1994.
Mr. Charamella was a staff physician for the Uni-
versity of Delaware's Student Health Department. He
was police surgeon for the Wilmington Bureau of po-
lice and a member of the New Castle County Medical
Society, the Delaware Medical Society and the Ameri-
can Medical Association. He earned his bachelor's and
medical degrees from the University of Virginia. He
was an army veteran of World War II.
Survivors include his wife, Cecil; a daughter,
Beverly Driver of Newark, Del.; a son, John of
Bedford, N.H.; a brother, Leigh of Wilmington; two
sisters, Mary Pellicome and Theresa Boys, both of
Wilmington; and six grandchildren.
Memorial donations may be made to the Univer-
sity of Virginia Medical School, do University of Vir-
ginia Fund, Box 3446, Charlottesville, Va. 22903.
Isabelle K. Cook
Isabelle K. Cook, 84, of Longboat Key died Oct.
3 at home.
Mrs. Cook was a 1993 graduate of Temple Univer-
sity and was a world traveler. She attended and was an
associate member of the Longboat Island Chapel. She


/1ore than a mullet wrapper!


,r ( \ -, .


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


was active at the Ambler Presbyterian Church in
Ambler, Pa. She organized Girl Scout troops at several
churches and was the head of several women's groups.
She is survived by her husband, Winfield C.; a
daughter, Barbara; two sons, Thomas and Roger; 10
grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to American Cancer Society, 4806 26th St. W.,
Bradenton, Fla. 34207. Palmetto Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

Judith Spitzer
Judith Spitzer, 52, of Palmetto died Oct. 4 in Re-
gency Health Care Center.
Born in Pontiac, Mich., Mrs. Spitzer came to Pal-
metto from Lake Havesu City, Ariz., five years ago.
She was an architectural draftsperson. She was a mem-
ber of Anna Maria Island Baptist Church.
She is survived by two sons, Scott of Lake Stevens,
Wash., and Richard of Idaho; her parents, Marlin J. and
Irene "Bobbi" Best of Lake Havesu City; and a com-
panion, Larry Larson of Palmetto.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of Southwest
Florida, 73 Palm Ave., Suite 222, Sarasota, Fla. 34236.
Shannon Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Lorne Campbell Wilkin
Lorne Campbell Wilkin, 55, of Cortez died Oct. 5

Christian Science Services
First Church-of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Your Local Agent
Serves You Best ...
Progressive offers preferred
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or call us today.


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John P. uth Insurance, INc.
"Your One Stop Insurance Agent"
5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL.


in Freedom Care Pavilion.
Born in Manatee County, Mr. Wilkin was a life-
long resident of the area. He worked for Annie's Bait
and Tackle in Cortez.
He is survived by a daughter, Leanne M. of
Boynton Beach; a son, Alexander C. of Boynton
Beach; and a brother, Donald of Toronto.
Private memorial services will be held. Toale Broth-
ers Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

The Island Poet
All the folks up north are raving about their fall,
And claim the colors of the leaves are the
greatest sight of all.
But this doesn't tell the whole story as you
might have guessed.
When all those leaves come tumbling down
they are in a great big mess.
'Cause they don't come down all at once and
you must rake them every day.
And there is no place to burn them, you must
cart them all away.
But here in Florida our flowers are in bloom
and skies are never gray,
And we don't have to worry about frost on the
pumpkin or snow on the way.
Bud Atteridge


Professional Medical Center
Walk-In Clinic 778-0711
Family Practice Mario Vega, M.D.
NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 31, '94
FLU SHOTS $1000
New Patients Welcome
Medicaid/Medicare Approved
503 Manatee Ave. Suite E, Holmes Beach


Tslandd
Jane Caroian DVM Animal Clinic
5343 Gulf Drive Suite 900 Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-2445
14 YEAR SERVICE TO THE
ISLANDS AND WEST
BRADENTON
SDiagnostics
Bathing
Boarding
Dentistry
Medicine
Surgery
Limited Grooming
Gentle. Compassionate, Care
24 Hour Emergency
APalma Sola
Animal Clinic William V. Bystrom DVM
6116 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton. Florda 34209 794-3275


DON'T


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The Islander
Bystander.
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Island! Use the
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page 7 of this issue.

ISLANDER
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I






- l PAGE 16 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Eating-and-Entertainment
side of town
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Hank McDermott & Friends are back at D.Coy
Ducks Bar & Grill playing cool jazz for the early set
each evening, Thursday through Saturday.
Beach House started up a happy hour from 4 to 6
p.m. daily with drink specials on well drinks, domes-
tic beer, piflas and margaritas.
Wednesday night is always "Reggae Island Night" at
Turtles Bar & Grill. Check your attitude at the door for
this band. Comprised of mostly former DTs, Blindside
plays Oct. 14, 15 and 16. They're as popular and rowdy
as ever packing 'em wherever they go. A group of lo-
cal, Island musicians, The Hammeheads, play Friday and




SILVER QUEEN CORN
amT'FRESH DAILY'

ANANAS "VINE RIPE ,.
19. TOMATOES

G ULF AMBROSIA'
SSHRIMP99 MELONS
DELI SALAD & SANDWICHES


SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Oysters Rocdeller, Top Round of Beef, Veal Oscar, Shrimp Supreme, Roast Pork
Shrimp Scampi, Scallops, Lobster, Huge Antpasta
Salad, Fresh Fruits, Pasta, More Salads... Nghtly 195
ad much more... Deserts tool
Early Bird thru Buffet by 5:30 $1095
Nightly from 4PM, Sunday from 2PM



SFried 6e66o'd .
.2- IL. rrtmn .***


ALL SERVEDAY T FOTBA L
SUNDAY 9595

FILET MIGNON oz Filet Mignon $99
cooked to your liking served with potato OR
and salad.. or add a 2 or 4 oz Lobster
Tail for only $3.00 more!$1
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL
T-Shirt Giveaways Every Quarter! 10PM Buffet FREE


LO00 2-9EACH W 77K9ON11 *
SUNDAY $79D SP DAn

BUFFETMignon 995
ooved t yr lng set andh a
ner teams
Tail for onloody May $3.00 more!&




Screwdriver Seabways Every Quater! 10PM Buet FREE
SUEntertainment 101 S DAY LVD.
BRUNCH'




SONS OF THE BEACH A
SundayM 4 PM ...
DnnerOyster Bar on

HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 6 pm Anna Maria
$125 HOUSE COCKTAILS Pier
SONS O THEBEAH


Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10 pm 780475
2 for 1 Well Drinks
$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet -


Saturday, Oct. 21 and 22. Blindside plays again for Beach
Bash on Sunday, Oct. 23 and 30.
I hear that the Dry Dock Inn is playing the juke
box for free on Thursday nights from 8 p.m. to mid-
night when there isn't a live band scheduled to play.
The late night happy hour with lots of cheap, giant
99-cent margaritas and free food buffet has made the
Anchorage into quite a popular night spot It starts late,
at 10 p.m., and we're told some hard cores are taking
naps, setting the alarm, and embibbing late. Mike Mi-
ser, who was injured while playing softball in the res-
taurant league, is doing well and is back to work.
The daytime bar scene is so lacking in Anna Maria
that former regulars at Cafe Robar and Anchorage
have been seen meeting out-of-the-city-limits at
Crabby's. Seems Robar and Anchorage don't open 'til
4 p.m. Relax guys, that'll probably change with season.
Chez Andre is re-opened after an extended vaca-
tion. Andre brought back a popular audio tape from
Paris of vocals with guitar, "Gypsy Kings." You won't
have much trouble coaxing him to pop it in the cassette
while you dine on his fresh, buttery croissants and other
Continental creations.
On the spooky side
Crabby Bill's is having a Halloween party on Sat-
urday, Oct. 29, with prizes for the best and worst cos-


Jes Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 GulfDrive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge

S ICt NEW
; TACO NACHO
T' & TACO SALAD
`5R* BAR*
'"All You Can Eat"
$495
AND DELI Taco-To-Go 99e
Always Freshly Cut & Made To Order
Deli Sandwiches & Soups
Fresh Bagels Ice Cream Cakes
Everything Homemade!
Mon Sat 10AM 9PM Sunday 12 6PM
Eat In or Take -Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-7386


Island Players

audition schedule

set for season
The Island Players auditions are open to any-
one interested in acting. All auditions are held at the
Island Players Theatre, located at the corner of Gulf
Drive and Pine Avenue, Anna Maria.
Auditions for "Murder Among Friends" will
be held Sunday, Oct. 16, at 7:30 p.m.
Auditions for "And the World Goes
Round," a musical, will be held Sunday, Dec. 4,
at 7:30 p.m.
"Other People's Money" auditions will be
held on Sunday, Jan. 22, at 7:30 p.m.
"The Cemetery Club," auditions will be held
on Sunday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m.

tumes from 8 p.m. to midnight Drink specials will in-
clude Planter's punch and dumpster punch 153
proof grain alcohol with a special green tint it's
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

The soul of Europe in the heart of Longboat Key




Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key



Chez Andre


"We're Back!"
Come Dine
With Us
Breakfast
Luncheon
Daily Specials
Intimate Dinners
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


CMederyAweriam
Culinary Federama


Reservations Suggested for Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT *
SEAFOOD BUFFET SO195
7 Days a Week 5 to 10 PM
HOLMES BEACH LOCATION ONLY
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
BEACH A'rIRE OK
IIEM IE~D UMl
ODDHWOII I9 DDEMIg
CRABBY HOUR *
3PM 6PM DAILY
500 Drafts $100 Well Drinks
ENTERTAINMENT & DANCING *
Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8PM to 12 AM
NFL SATELLITE *
PTIME TiM2 1LHJAEU DM R

5325 MARINA DRIVE A ~5872 14Tr ST. WEST
(formerly Pete Reynard's H A i t (U.S. 41)
Holmes Beach CRABB Bradenton
778-9566 DAY! 751-3070


RE$ARAar


DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY


* g S .4i%


OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I OCTOBER 13, 1994 m PAGE 17 Em


STIR-IT-UP
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
great, says manager Dusty Miller. The Connie and
Dave "orchestra" will be playing that weekend and the
two weekends following.
The Anna Maria Fire and Rescue Volunteers, with
help from the fire cadets, will host its Third Annual
Haunted House, Friday through Sunday, Oct 28 to 30,
from 7 to 11 p.m., at Bradenton Beach Fire Station.
Admission is $1.
Mr. Bones BBQ is going to be spookier than usual
- they have what amounts to Halloween decorations
up all year long when the staff will wear costumes.
You might want to start your spooky evening in the
right frame of mind with some excellent barbecue.
They won't mind your costume.

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES& Full cut, potato, $6.95
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


lQ EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs. toast,
home fries and coffee ... nly $1.75


Islandinn
Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3051
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


Have any special Halloween plans? Let me know
and we'll be happy to include your event in Stir-it-up.
On the side
of the politically correct
Jim Mixon Insurance in Holmes Beach gave its
office staff Friday off last week in honor of Secretary's
Week. We give the Mixons a "two thumbs up" for that
one. If we had a secretary, we'd do the same.
And on the arts
Two Island artists, Sydney McKenna and Richard
Thomas, were awarded honorable mentions at the
"Anything Goes" show at the Art League of Manatee
County.
Don't forget the Island Players 46th season opens
Friday with the French comedy "A Flea in Her Ear"


'The best hamburgers an -- losa O
the coldest mugs of beer vae\Ja A
this side of Heaven.'ffiai Oct 4 tk
Iuaffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. .
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


which runs through Oct. 23. Tickets are $10.
Bren Jackson of Phoenix Frame told me she re-
ceived a lot of nice calls after we announced her plans
to leave for a job in Houston in last week's column.
Karly Carlson, a fine arts photographer from Holmes
Beach, will be running the shop for Bren during her six
month absence.
How you can Stir-it-up
Stir-it-up is a weekly column covering events,
newsy items and fun things to do for Islanders, most on
the Island, some off-island.
You may FAX, mail or drop by The Islander By-
stander with a press release. The deadline is noon Fri-
day for the following week's column. The office is lo-
cated at 5408 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, FL 34217,
and the FAX number is 778-9392.


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH



Wednesday Pig Roast
Friday Fish Fry
Sunday Bar-B-Que
P.S. We have the best sunsets!
Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!
DON'T FORGET TO COMPLETE YOUR ISLANDER FOOTBALL CONTEST
ENTRY THIS WEEK. YOU COULD BE THE WINNER OF $501

NIL $O. 1


PRICES GOOD OPEN MON THRU SAT 8 to 6
THRU TUESDAY
OCT. 25 1994THE



5906 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton 794-MEAT




PACKAGE OF 10 PACKAGE OF 10 (CAMERON'S)
SIRLOIN NY STRIP PASTIES
SIZZLERS STEAKS $2.49 EACH

$1795 $3990 E

Boar's Head Our Famous
OVEN ROASTED HOME BAKED
TURKEY$99 HAM $199
BREAST .LB LB

(CAMERON'S) BONELESS BABYBACK
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PIE BREASTS RIBS
$199 $279 $299
1 EACH LB LB

TENDER JUICY BONELESS

PRIME$499 PORK $399

RIB LB ROAST LB

Dubuque 299
BRAUNSCHWEIGER
Buy 1LB Get 1LB FREE

WINE TASTING SATURDAY
OCTOBER 15 1PM TO 4PM
FREE (CHOP SHOP'S GOURMET SEASONING)
with any purchase of$20.00 or more.


Nion hB





__IB PAGE 18 E OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Sept. 30, alcohol citation, 100 block of Beech
Avenue.
Oct. 1, theft of a bicycle, 10002 Gulf Drive,
Bortell's Lounge.
Oct 4, burglary, 700 block of North Shore Drive.
A person unknown entered a locked residence, turned
over a mattress on an upstairs bed and removed a gold
ring from the dining table.
Oct. 5, theft, 500 block of Pine Avenue. A per-
son unknown removed an antique cast iron table base
from an open patio.

Bradenton Beach
Oct. 1, battery, theft, 100 block of First Street N.
The complainant reported that the suspect walked into
his back yard and asked whose white bicycle was in the
r TYLER'S 794-533
I ICE CREAM SHOPPE I
SURFING WORLD VILLAGE -11904 Cortez Road West
I C ons 10th Anniversary
I Cones
* .c"* BUY ONE II
SShakes B O
S-* Sundaes GET SECOND '
Sodas AT 1/2 PRICE ;
II O OF EOUAL OR LESSER VALUE I
WITH THIS AD- NOW THRU OCT. 19 94
L = COUPON mmmm-mm-
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GREAT SUMMER SPECIALS.

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front yard. When the complainant said it was his, the
suspect walked up to him and hit him on the left side
of the face causing swelling, discoloration and a
chipped tooth, said the report. The suspect took the
bicycle and fled. Numerous witnesses observed the
offense.
Oct. 4, grand theft auto, grand theft, 2103 Gulf
Drive N., Tropic Isles Resort. The complainant re-
ported that a suspect took possession of his vehicle
without his permission. There were tools valued at
$2,000 in the vehicle.
Oct. 4, burglary to an automobile, Cortez Beach.
A person unknown smashed the window of the vehicle,
removed a wallet and damaged a radio while trying to
remove it.
Oct. 4, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown entered a vehicle and re-
moved a purse containing credit cards and a check-
book.
Oct. 6, burglary, 2400 block of Avenue A. The

ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
V
DRINK SPECIALS
Friday & Saturday Nites
3 POOL TABLES
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


complainant reported that a person unknown entered a
garage and removed a bicycle valued at $169, a bicycle
valued at $219, a portable CD player valued at $162,
a 19-inch portable television set valued at $199, an
automobile polisher valued at $49, four fishing rods
and reels valued at $400 and four 14-inch tires valued
at $282.
Oct. 6, theft, 100 block of Third Street S. A per-
son unknown removed a three-inch statue, valued at
$300.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 30, DWLS, 7800 block of Gulf Drive.
Sept. 30, DWLS, 77th Street and Palm Drive.
Sept 30, found property, Island Shopping Cen-
ter. The complainant turned in a wallet she found in
front of the Home Hardware. The wallet was returned
to the owner.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Bridge Tender Inn-
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn
NOW FEATURING s
LIGHTER PORTIONS
3:30 to 5 PM .
TUESDAY OUR FAMOUS
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OPEN 4:30 CLOSED MONDAYS

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1994 0 PAGE 19 Ij]


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
Sept. 30, suspicious vehicle, 400 block of 63rd
Street
Oct. 1, code violation, parking, 100 block of White
Avenue. The complainant reported vehicles belonging
to young surfers were parked on her lawn. She also
reported she was concerned about the youths using
drugs and alcohol.
The officer observed that all the vehicles were
parked on the right-of-way and a three-foot wall sepa-
rated the right-of-way from private property. He saw
no signs of drug or alcohol use on his arrival, nor did
any of the young people appear to be creating a prob-
lem, said the report.
Oct 1, service, Seaside Court. The officer as-
sisted an elderly, wheelchair-bound woman replace a
light bulb.
Oct 2, disturbance, 5600 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported a subject she met at a bar
refused to get out of her vehicle. The officer reported
that the subject was asleep and intoxicated when he
arrived. The subject exited the vehicle at the officer's
request and the officer called a cab to take him home.
Oct. 2, found property, 100 block of 34th Street
beach. The complainant reported he found a catamaran





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WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo; Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish............. 12.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop...... '1..........12.95
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Sat. Swordfish (Grilled).................................. 12.95
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without a sail, rudder, serial number or identification
number. The catamaran is 16 to 18 feet in length with
white pontoons.
Oct. 4, traffic, Gulf Drive and Manatee Avenue.
The complainant reported a truck being operated by a
juvenile who appeared to be under the influence. The
truck was not found.
Oct. 5, petty larceny of a garden hose valued at
$15, 300 block of 62nd Street.
Oct. 6, DWLS, Gulf Drive and 49th Street.
Oct. 6, warrant, 4400 block of Gulf Drive.


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HIDDEN
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I ri --bL i


Putting it on
the line
Bradenton Beach
Councilman Dick
Suhre saved the city
about $600 by striping
six of the city's police
cars. Suhre received a
framed certificate of
appreciation from
Police Chief Jack
Maloney for his
volunteer service.
Islander Photo: Pat
Copeland

Oct. 6, petty larceny, 3800 block of Gulf Drive.
The complainant reported that a person unknown en-
tered her yard and removed an orchid valued at $100
that has been there for 30 years.
Oct. 6, suspicious, 63rd Street boat ramp. The
police department received numerous complaints con-
cerning loud music. The officer located a man with a
radio and he agreed to turn down the radio.
Oct. 6, petty larceny of a license plate sticker, 500
block of 57th Street.
Oct. 7, warrant, 3000 block of Avenue C.

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IME PAGE 20 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Prepare yourself, Menippi mercenaria are coming


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Traps are in the water "soaking" as they say -
and come Saturday crabbers will be pulling them, too,
once again offering us that most delectable treat of the
sea, the stone crab claw. Some say the harvest may be
as good as last year, the very best in many memories.
Sliding water temperatures mean the fall migration
of Menippi mercenaria (the "real" stone crab) is get-
ting underway again. As they have since long before
man's arrival in Florida, stone crabs leave the deep
waters surrounding our state and move into the shallow
of our bays and near-shore areas.
Nobody seems exactly sure why the crabs make
this trip, but we're all glad they do it After all, fresh
stone crab claws are one of the major seafood treats of
the year.
Here in on the Island we're smack in the middle of
stone crab territory on the west coast, as the
crustacean's range is generally from Cedar Key to the
north down to the Florida Keys. On the east coast,
they're sometimes trapped as far north as Hollywood.
Another species of the stone crab that looks iden-
tical to our local variety but is slightly smaller resides
in the Keys. Lucky us we've got the big ones.
The late Jack Moore, whose name still graces: a
restaurant on Longboat Key, started the local stone crab
industry back in 1928 when he sold his catch, body and
all, for 19 cents a pound wholesale. Only the claws are
harvested today, and the crab is returned to the water
to grow new pincers. Scientists tell me that, with proper
handling, the crabs can be relieved of their claws a half-
dozen times.
For many years it was assumed that if you took
both claws from the crab assuming they were of
legal size the crab would starve to death. Now we
know that's not true, and the crab simply grows two
new claws. Sans big "hands" it eats with its many


Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held
at Anna Maria City Hall for Oct. 8, were Ruth and
Rich Foehrkolb.
Runners up were John Johnson and Gene
Snedeker.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday,
and all are welcome.

-i-0


AIRBOAT "

RIDES

Perico Harbour Marina
Manatee Avenue West
(Leverocks & Galati Marine)
$10 per person
Continuous Runs
730-1011 BMnt
__ FrnC flk,


smaller hands around its mouth.
It was in 1928 that the state of Florida established
open and closed seasons for stone crabs seasons
now closed each year from May 16 to October 14.

Take a walk
The culmination of the Vanishing Culture Project,
"Images and Voices of Cortez Fishing Village," is
scheduled for Friday, Oct. 14 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. A
reception and walking tour, the event will focus on the
recently completed mural on the east side of A.P. Bell
Fish Company, the newly constructed interpretive sta-
tions, the N.E. Taylor Boatworks and the renovation of
Kurt's Camp.
Jointly funded by the Florida Institute for Saltwa-
ter Heritage and the Florida Humanities Council, the
gathering is a wonderful opportunity to see the last real
fishing village on the Suncoast, some real Florida heri-
tage, and many of the people who still live it.
Visitors will meet at the Fulford Fish Company,
4600 123rd Street W., along the south shoreline in the
Village of Cortez. Later you'll have an opportunity to
enjoy some of Wanda Fulford's famous mullet spread
and beverages at Wayne Nield's Studio, 4506 124th
Street W., where a special presentation of original art
about Cortez may be seen.
For further information, just call Karen Bell at 794-
5267 or 794-1249.

Be careful out there
An alligator somewhere between six and eight feet
long showed up at Hart's Landing's dock in downtown
Sarasota last week, probably brought downstream with
all the heavy rains we've had recently. "Hey, I took it's
picture and got out of there," one witness told me. "And
for sure I'm not going wade fishing in that Bay for
awhile."
Wade fishers in the north beware: them critters
may be up here, too.

Islander Bystander
adds to iis collection
There's a new addition to the office decor at The
Islander Bystander, and it's quite a sight. Rescued from
a "curb-side locale" by an observant staffer and gifted
to the office is an old-fashioned skin-mount tarpon.
Somewhat the worse for wear which probably
accounts for it being deposited curb-side the five-

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foot tarpon is of indeterminate age, bad color and some
say it has a slight aroma. Nonetheless, the silver king
is a representation of times past when live fish were
dragged to the taxidermist and "stuffed."
The tarpon is being revived and renovated by Ken
Bowers of Holmes Beach and should be on display at
the office soon.
A local charterboat captain who shall remain
anonymous for obvious reasons tells me his charters
demand "their" fish be brought to the local taxidermist
for mounting. Of course, the taxidermist measures the
critter, pulls out the mold two or three inches longer
than the original fish, and ends up with a very happy,
if also somewhat poorer, customer.
All modern fish mounts are done in plastic, and
I've heard lately that taxidermists are charging about
$100 a foot for 'em. If you've heard of a better deal
than that, give me a call, 'cause I've got this eight-foot
grunt in the freezer ...
See you next week.


AMICC Soccer

League standings
(League standings as of Oct. 7)
Division I
Team Record Points
Hayo-Meyer Construction 5-0 25
LaPensee Plumbing 3-1-1 17


Power Pros 1-4-1
School for Constructive Play 0-4-2


7
4


Division II


Team
Mr. Bones
Beach Barn
Dowling Park
Uncle Dan's Place
Island Pest Control
Island Real Estate

Division III
Thursday, Oct. 13


Record
3-1
2-0-1
1-0-2
1-1-2
1-2-1
0-4


Points
15
12
9
9
7
0


scheduled games


Air & Energy vs. Island Animal Clinic at 6 p.m., fol-
lowed by Holmes Beach Mini Storage vs. Galati Ma-
rine at 7 p.m.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1994 0 PAGE 21 B -

Amberjack action offshore is great right now


By Capt. Mike Heistand
With the red tide mostly dissipated and the cooler
weather beginning, fishing is really starting to pick up.
Offshore best bets include amberjack and grouper,
while backwater fishers are still bringing in good
catches of whopper redfish, lots of small snook and
some big trout.
By the way, the 30th Annual Fishing Tournament
for kids aged six to 12 will be Saturday, Oct. 15, from
8 a.m. to noon, on the Bradenton Beach City Pier.
The free event is sponsored by Anna Maria's VFW
Post 8199 and encourages the sport of fishing. Free hot
dogs and drinks will be served at noon and great prizes
will be awarded at 1 p.m. Children must be accompa-
nied by an adult. For more information call 778-4400.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said an-
glers on the four-hour trip averaged 60 head of Key
West grunts, porgies, lane snapper and three red grou-
per. The six-hour trip averaged 125 head of lane,
vermillion and mangrove snapper, Key West grunts,
porgies, trigger fish, scamp and eight red and black
grouper. The nine-hour trip averaged 85 head of red
and black grouper, mangrove and lane snapper, Key
West grunts, porgies and rudder fish.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said fishers
frequenting the shop are reporting lots of grouper
catches, mostly from the 50-to-60-foot depths offshore.
He said kingfish are staying close to the bottom around
rocks and ledges hanging out with the grouper. In
the backwater, there are some nice-sized trout and a
few snook to be had.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said landside fish-
ers are catching black drum, a few flounder, jacks, la-
dyfish and a few mackerel. He added that early morn-
ing fishing is producing snook and a couple of keeper
redfish.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching a few mackerel and reds, a lot
of flounder and a few snook.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said offshore grouper action

Snook Trout Redfish Flounder *

< LIGHT TACKLE
2N SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
V DAY o FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


is very good right now, with gag grouper showing up
on just about all the ledges and reds being caught in
about 80 feet of water. There are also some big Span-
ish mackerel out there, as well as a few cobia near the
offshore reefs.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper are the
best bet right now, with hot action in about 100 feet of
water. On the way offshore, he said he spotted a lot of
top-water black fin tuna. Kings and bonita are staying
near the bottom at about 120 feet. For backwater an-
gling, Chris advised hunting for trout and redfish. He
was able to hook a snook, though, using a jig. Look
near the mangroves for linesiders.
We also have to congratulate Chris and Team
Galati for taking a first and third in a Tierra Verde fish-
ing tourney last week.
On my boat Magic we've been having some excel-
lent charters, bringing back a boatload of amberjack,
some up to 60 pounds, and a few good-sized grouper.

SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Uc. Capt.


SAmberjack
action
Capt. Mike Heistand and
Dennis Seaavey, owner of
the Mutiny Inn, a Holmes
1- Beach restaurant,
Proudly show offa recent
catch ofamberjack and
yellowtail snapper while
fishing on Heistand's
boat "Magic."





In the backwater, redfish action still is hot, although we
were able to bring back some snook and a few 25-inch
trout.
Capt. Rick Gross said there are plenty of snook
out there, although they aren't real big, and lots and lots
of redfish. Capt. Rick suggests that you should be able
to measure the fishing improvement by the day as the
weather and water cools.
Capt. Mark Bradow continues his excellent run
of success with redfish using a fly rod.
Capt. Phil Shields said there are still dolphin off-
shore, with plenty of red and black grouper in the
deeper waters. While you're out in the depths, expect
to catch about all the amberjack you want, he added.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's been able to get his
charters onto some nice trout and snook and lots of
reds. The red tide didn't seem to affect the white bait,
which Capt. Tom is still finding very plentiful.
Good luck and good fishing.

DOLPHIN
DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
nofishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND


BE A GOOD SPORT!
Buy your distant friends and relatives a gift
subscription to the "Best News on Anna Maria
:1: Island.' A subscription form for The Islander
Bystander is available on page 7.



Island Marine Construction
SPECIALIZING IN BOAT LIFTS & DOCKS
Repairs and Installation
CUSTOM BUILT LIFTS AVAILABLE










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OTHER LIFT SIZES AVAILABLE DOCKS FROM $6 PER SQ. FT.
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P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
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ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu 10/13 7:28 2.0ft 1:13 1.5ft 10:02 1.7ff 2:41 0.5ft Ship's Store
Fri 10/14 9:04 2.0ft 2:51 1.2ft 10:25 1.8ft 3:34 0.6ft Bottom Painting
Sat 10/15 10:17 1.9ft 3:53 0.9ft 10:47 1.9ft 4:13 0.7ft Boat Storage
Sun 10/16 11:17 1.9ft 4:35 0.7ft 11:05 2.0ft 4:45 0.9ft Bulk Oil
Mon 10/17 11:24 2.1ft 5:14 OAft 12:08 1.9ft 5:12 1.Oft *Consignment/
Tue 10/18 11:42 2.2ft 5:50 0.3ft 12:52 1.9ft 5:32 1.1ft Brokerage
Wed 10/19 - 6:21 0.1ft 1:30 1.8ft 5:52 1.2ft BOAT RENTAL
North and tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later- low tides 1.06 later.






BMI PAGE 22 M OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island Players, Off
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
It was Helen Peters, director of many plays at the Is-
land Players Theatre during her 12-year association in the
1960s and early '70s, who suggested it would be a won-
derful thing for the theater to have a support group.
That was in 1972, says Jane Adam, Island historian
and member of the Off Stage Ladies.
And while the Island Players was founded in 1949,
the Off Stage Ladies, the theater's support group, was
founded in 1972.
The Off Stage Ladies not only to provides finan-
cial support for the theater but, says Norma Markham,
immediate past president, "Many of our members build
sets, costumes, help in the box office, work in the the-
ater behind the stage, sometimes on the stage, and we
provide the long-day dinner on Sunday before a play
opens. We brought the Welsh Players here and we've
held three Off Stage Ladies Follies."
It was the Off Stage Ladies who raised the money
for recent renovations to the theater located at the cor-
ner of Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue: a new curtain, new
seating and lighting.
"The Off Stage Ladies are backstage and onstage,"
says Ruth Stevens, president of Island Players.
In 1979, when the organization was seven years
old, there were 35 members of the Off Stage Ladies.
The organization has now grown to more than 100
members.
The Off Stage Ladies and the Island Players now
work hand-in-hand to produce an October-through-
May season of theater on the Island.
"We have never been in the red," says Ruth
Stevens, Players president for two years, about the Is-
land Players Theatre, "which I don't believe can be said
about any other theater in the area."
The area Stevens refers to runs south from as far as
Venice and north to St Petersburg.
In a center culturally rich with theater professionals
and amateurs, the Island Players is ranked in area maga-
zines amongst notables such as the Asolo in Sarasota.
"We have actors come from as far as St. Pete,
Venice, Bradenton, Sarasota and Longboat Key," says
Stevens, "not just local talent."
Current two-year president of the Off Stage Ladies
is Dorothy Simches, a member for about five years.
She became involved, she says, when her husband
Gabe acted in "Mornings at Seven" in 1989.
"Dorothy has managerial skills and a wonderful

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pare for 46th season
With the season opening this week with the French
farce, "A Flea in Her Ear," the Off Stage Ladies have
not planned too far in advance yet. Markham suggests
they may do another Follies this year.
The Off Stage Ladies held its first meeting of the
season this week, a luncheon at Crabby Bill's in
Holmes Beach. Guest speakers were the 1994-95
season's directors for the Island Players' upcoming
plays, who spoke about their shows.
Always looking for more members, the Off Stage
Ladies meets the second Wednesday of the month,
from October through May. Guests are welcome to
attend two meetings.
The Players have made some changes this year.
For instance, the single ticket price has risen to $10 -
it was $9 last season and have added another mati-
nee to make two Sunday daytime performances.
But other things won't change, says Stevens.
The season ticket price remains at $45, which now
gives subscribers a 10 percent discount.
The commitment to quality is the other offered
consistency.
"What will not change is our desire to offer qual-
ity theater at a reasonable price," says Stevens. "Where
else can you go and get entertainment this good for the
money?"


Judy Adam, left a member of Off Stage Ladies, and
Ruth Stevens, president of Island Players, browse
through an Island Players scrapbookput together by
Adam at the Anna Maria Island Historical Society.
The Island Players and the OffStage Ladies, the
theater's support group, work hand-in-hand to keep
the theater alive and well on the Island. Islander
Photo: Tomara Kafka

background for this job," says Stevens,"as the princi-
pal of an elementary school."
Most of the money raised by the Off Stage Ladies
comes from the $15 dues. But the organization has
raised funds with such projects as silent auctions, card
parties and raffles. They are always looking for new
ways for fund raisers.
"We don't just raise money, though," says
Markham. "We have a ball."
"We're always looking for new fund raisers," says
Simches, "because when you do the same things year
after year, they get stale."





(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. 0. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato ................ 778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............ 778-2847 Marcella Cornett ............... 778-5919
Nancy Gulford ................. 778-2158 Michael Advocate .............. 778-0608
E7mf. gjY dnsandI n s. f -ktof-fionat,
_/ficlahzlng in giLMnctl E7W#toh fiit~talCf
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use of professional videotape.


SExclusive
Waterfront
Estate*
Video Collection


MLS [R 1ll -J'
,L--M-


The Island Playhouse is an historically significant
Island building. Originally it was the home of the
William H. Gillett family ofParrish and moved to Anna
Maria by barge up the Manatee River around 1912. It
was named the Anna Maria Community Hall and was
used as a school and city halL It was the meeting center
for church groups, women's and gardening clubs, even
a service club during World War II.


* BUY IT! *
SELL IT!
^ RENT IT! *
All in the pages of your community newspaper.



SECLUDED WATERFRONT


This fabulous waterfront residence with Bayou
and Canal Frontage creates a uniquely tropical
setting with spectacular views. Spacious 4BR/
4BA home with open floor plan, cathedral ceilings,
and gourmet kitchen. Pool, large deck and dock
surrounded by lush landscaping make this resi-
dence a rare offering. Offered at $410,000. Call
Dave Moynihan for details.


U


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT


Usa Varano

Looking for someone to manage your
property? Contact Usa Varano or
Denise Langlois to discuss your needs.

DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Denise Langlois Serving Anna Maria since 1939


Don't

forget!
We mail over 900
out-of-town subscrip-
tions every week.
If you want to keep
in touch with what's
happening on Anna
Maria Island, please
use the form on
page 7 in this issue.
IISANDE rmnan
5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 34217
(813) 778-7978






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 23 iD


Island Players season begins with 'Flea' Friday


A French farce, a murder mystery, a musical, a
social drama and a comedy make up the 1994-95 pro-
gram of the Island Players, now in its 46th season.
"A Flea in Her Ear," by Georges Feydeau opens
Oct 14 and continues through Oct. 23. There are two
versions of the play, translated by Barnett Shaw and
John Mortimer; the Players will blend the two. A pe-
riod (circa 1910) bedroom farce, it is fraught with mis-
understandings, mixed-up letters and misplaced char-
acters, working up to a madly comic brouhaha. Di-
rected by Kelly Woodland.
"Murder Among Friends," a comedy thriller by
Bob Barry with a New Years Eve background, runs
from Dec.2 to 11. It involves double-dealing murder
plots involving two couples outwardly friends at
cross purposes, with the planned outcome falling apart
and resulting in an unplanned murder. Directed by
Geoffrey Todd.
The musical offering is "And the World Goes
Round," Jan. 20 through Feb. 4, a revue of songs by
John Kander and Fred Ebb, creators of "Cabaret,"
"Chicago," "Zorba" and the current "Spider Woman."
It promises a musical evening of gems from the Broad-
way and TV careers of these two American
songwriters, a satisfying mix of sugar and spice, sen-
timent and contemporary jazz. Directed by Peter
Strader.
March 17 to April 2 brings the much-discussed
"Other People's Money," a topical tale of Main Street
vs. Wall Street. A charmingly rapacious financier plots
the takeover of a vulnerable stock, planning to liquidate
the company, take the money and run. The play gives
its audience an inside view of what sometimes goes on
in the financial life of the country. Directed by
Geoffrey Todd.


Island Players open season with 'A Flea in Her Ear'
Georges Feydeau's "A Flea in Her Ear" opens the 46th season of the Island Players, located at the corner of Gulf
Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria, with afine French flair on Friday, Oct. 14, and running through Oct. 23.
All shows begin at 8p.m. except for the Sunday matinees on Oct. 16 and 23, which begin at 2p.m. No shows on
Monday. Participants shown in the race through the doors of this smartly-paced comedy are John Durkin, from
left back row, Bill Ward, Debbie Keller-McCartney, David B. Haynes, Sam McDowell, Leonard Ross, Mark
Woodland and Bob Offenhauer; Stefanie Lambrinidis, kneeling, Michele Strauss and Gayle Kimball, both seated
and Chris Vallejo, Jr., front Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


"The Cemetery Club," a comedy by Ivan
Manchell, opens May 12 and closes the season May 21.
It concerns three Jewish widows who meet once a
month for tea before visiting their husbands' graves.
The women, all decidedly different in style and tem-


perament, are close friends.Then an attractive widower
comes on the scene, causing a crisis in their relation-
ship. Directed by Phyllis Elfenbein.
Tickets are $10 per play, season subscriptions are
$45. For more information call 778-5755.


,,.., ,,

F. I,. -


..* :. .. .. .. : :_- -- .,-.., .,. .-^ :^.^-^ .'_-, ; /.
. - -.* .. .-


.^I
.. ~ ~ -' I" ,', -


_- _... -.
MOST SOUTH-WESTERLY BUILDING IN KEY ROYALE COMMUNITY 3BR/2BA ca-
PERICO BAY CLUB Fabulous bayfront view nal front home, large screened lanai, open
of Anna Maria Island and Anna Maria Bridge. 2 kitchen, lots of storage space, 2 car garage.
bedroom, w bath, beautifully fumished with light Enjoy living on Anna Maria Island. $219,999.
& bright colors & mirrors. $153,000. MLS#59330. Call Evelyn Mitchell 778-2261 or
MLS#59326. Call Rose Schnoerr. 778-1952.


WATCH THE BOATS ON THE INTRA-
COASTAL This 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath has secu-
rity entry, elevator, pool, garage parking,
jacuzzi, boat dock & private beach on the Gulf.
$142,900. MLS#59334. Call Bill Bowman 778-
2261 or eves: 778-4619.


DONT MISS TMS ONE! Spacious well main-
tained home on salboat water & directly across
street from 2nd fairway of Key Royale Gol Course.
3/2 open floor plan wlglass enclosed lanai. Tile
roof & boat dock. $289,000. MLS#56764. Call Hal
Gillihan 778-2261 or eves: 778-2194.


ELEGANT TAMPA BAYFRONT HOME
Perfectly maintained & landscaped, 3BR/2BA w/
atrium in living room. 2 car garage, large lanai,
attached 14 x 23 studio/workshop. Call Dick
Maher or Dave Jones 778-6791 or 778-4891.


PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! Only $107,000
for 2BR/2BA condo overlooking wide lake. West-
erly private sundeck & lanai, courtyard entry, 1
car garage, in prestigious Perico Bay Club.
MLS#59680. Call Marilyn Trvethan 792-8477.


I -


PLAYA ENCANTADA Turnkey fumished,
2BR/2BA tennis condo. On-site manager, cov-
ered parking, all amenities of Gulside Playa.
$129,900. Call Mary Ann Schmidt or Helen
White. Office: 778-2261 or eves: 778-6956.


REDUCED! $235,000 for this outstanding 3BR/
2BA water front home. Split design, auto sprin-
kler on well, boat dock w/water & power. Addi-
tional boat slip available. MLS#53863. Call Dick
Maher 778-6791.


DICK
MAHER

REALTORP
ASSOCIATE

778-6791


Dick has been a major player in
the Island Real Estate Industry
for over 10 years, and is avail-
able for consultation.


ISLAND CONDOS


Imperial House ..................................
Playa Encantata.................................
Westbay Cove South .......................
Wesibay Point & Moorings .............
Sunbow Bay..... .............................
W estbay Cove .............. ....................
Summer Sands .............................
Coquina Beach Club ......................


from...... $78.000
from.... $129.900
from.... $130,000
from.... $134.500
from.... $136.000
from.... $142,500
from.... $142.900
from.... $185.000


-.- .- _.. ',_.-# *, '
J *


I.
FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Premiere Properties in
Prime Locations throughout
Manatee County
Total Property Management!
Wide variety of fine vacation rentals!
Unfurnished annual rentals!
Professional, Personalized Service

Call (813) 778-9477 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


z~~ :~,~,
-t
~1 6 _J
___I ~ ~1" "i '' ~TI
~;.~-
- _L~1-~lr~~.i


~..... .""''"'''f:T"I: ~I:' r.~n~~jr;*~-~- .i.-:.-i. -ii~5:ll-~~i p: I y -JI1


-1






BP PAGE 24 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Eatman joins Bradenton

Beach architecture firm
Tom Eatman, member of the American Institute of
Architects, announces his partnership with Emily Anne
Smith of Bradenton Beach.
The new firm, Eatman and Smith, is located at 129
Bridge Street in the historic
district and offers services
including architecture, plan-
ning and landscaping.
Eatman's back-
ground includes an empha-
sis on rehabilitation of his-
toric structures, working on
projects such as the James
Madison Library of Con-
gress and the Capitol Build-
Eatman ing in Washington, D.C.,




I m


BETTER THAN NEWI Refurbished 2 bedroom, 1
bath home within walking distance of beach. New
kitchen, bath, central A/C, Mexican tile floors and
many other new features. This home also has a den,
screened porch and 1 car garage. All this for
$123,500. Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.


FALL IN LOVE with this convenient ground floor
condo! Completely re-decorated. The enclosed
lanai has views of the water and greenbelt area.
New A/C, close to pool. $137,500. Call Judy
Duncan 778-1589 eves.


-H- m


MOUNT VERNON: Retire in style for only
$82,500. This two bedroom, two bath turnkey fur-
nished condo is only 5 minutes from Gulf
Beaches. Active +55 community offers pool, ten-
nis, putting green, nature trail and even boat dock-
age. Call Sandy Greiner 778-2864 eves.
PERICO BAY CLUB
DELIGHTFUL 1ST FLOOR two bedroom, two
bath condo with a great view of two lakes. 24 hr.
security community, tennis courts, clubhouse,
swimming pools, minutes to beach. $95,900.
Please call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
MOVE IN TODAY first floor Osprey unit with wa-
ter views, freshly painted. 24 hour security, com-
munity pool and tennis and 5 minutes from Gulf
Beaches ... $89,500. Call Sandy Greiner, 778-
2864.
PASTEL COLORS will wrap you in Southem Hospi-
tality when you enter this Perico Bay Club unit. This
two bedroom, two bath unit has direct Palma Sola Bay
view, pool, tennis, and security access. $141,500. Call
today to see: Sandy Greiner 778-2864 eves.
STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN! Upgraded and im-
pressive 3BR/2BA first floor corner unit with unlim-
ited designer touches. Breathtaking view of natu-
ral estuary, wildlife and Palma Sola Bay. Lanai has
been glass enclosed to give this unit 2000 sq ft of
living area. One car detached garage with door
opener. Top quality at $204,900. Call Sandy
Greiner 778-2864 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-00-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS Jni9 I


and Emory University and Georgia Tech in Georgia.
His planning credits include Central City Park in At-
lanta, Jekyll Island, Stone Mountain Park, Callaway
Gardens and various resort developments in Georgia.
Eatman has won numerous awards for his planning
work with small-town storefront development and
main street rehabilitations in Georgia.
A retired Naval Reserve captain with more than 27
years of service, Eatman has also worked overseas in
areas such as the United Kingdom, Pakistan and the
Middle East.
Eatman, a native Floridian, has owned property in
Bradenton and Bradenton Beach since 1979.
"I grew up in a Florida that was very different than
today," he says. "As a result of my professional activi-
ties, I would like to think that in some way my contri-
butions will be for the future improvement of the
Florida I know and love."

Harrington House

receives national award
The Harrington House, a bed and breakfast in
Holmes Beach, received recognition, certification and
listing in the American Bed and Breakfast
Association's consumer guidebook, "Inspected, Rated
and Approved Bed and Breakfasts and Country Inns,"
with a three-crown "excellent" rating a rating which
designates the inn has far exceeded national standards.
The Harrington House is among less than 5 percent








TARAI Lush, relaxed golf-course living on
12th fairway. Cathedral ceilings, formal din-
ing, den, caged pool & spa. 2 bedroom, 2
bath. $167,500. #54308. Ask for Don
Pampuch, 778-3111 eves.
GULF BEACH PLACE Fabulous view from
roof deck. Enclosed balconies. Steps to
beautiful, white sandy Gulf Beach. Turnkey
fumishedl 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Large kitchen
w/breakfast nook. Garage. $130,000!
#56901. Karin Stephan, 388-1267 eves.
PERFECT FOR EMPTY NESTERS ... Sugar
Creek Country Club! Choice location on
creek! Pleasantly furnished & decorated mo-
bile home w/1 bedroom, 1 bath. Pool, shuffle-
board, tennis. $34,900. #57449. Call Bruce
Skorupa, 795-0303, eves.
BAYFRONT TRI-PLEX ...
(3) 1 BR units.
Neat & clean.
Boat dock!
$329,000

Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR*
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Karin Stephan
REALTOR*
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844
e' .E T~ i


ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB One of a kind!
Beautiful sunsets from balcony. Charmingly
furnished! Large 2BR/2BA. Pool, saunas,
spa. $255,000. #KS59362. Karin Stephan,
778-0766 anytime!

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


of the 10,000 licensed bed and breakfasts or inns in the
country that voluntarily underwent a rigorous inspec-
tion by the AB&BA in an effort to improve the qual-
ity of accommodations and increase guest satisfaction.
The new AB&BA rating system assures travelers
of an excellent "three crown" award in Florida equiva-
lent in quality and services to those in any other state.
Personal hospitality, delicious home-made break-
fasts and uniquely decorated guest rooms are a few of
the reasons bed and breakfasts nationwide continue to
gain favor with travelers.

Islanders honored

among Prudential's
top producers
The Prudential Florida Realty has announced the
company's top listers and sellers for the month of Sep-
tember. Among top listers is Karin Stephan, Anna
Maria Island office. Carol Heinze, Anna Maria Island
office, is among Prudential's top sellers.
In addition, Karin B. Stephan of The Prudential
Florida Realty, Anna Maria Island office, attended an ad-
vanced international training and orientation workshop in
August for selected representatives to work with the Ger-
man clients of Dr. Strange International (DSI).
Stephan was among selected German-speaking
sales representatives who are designated as the "A"
team of DSI. The group will work with German buy-
ers looking for vacation homes and investment prop-
erties in Florida.


-"~


ruf(D










ISLANDER


Business "briefs" and social
"notes" are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander ... call us
at 778-7978 to find out how you
can be included.


YOU CAN FIND THE HOME OF YOUR DREAMS ...
Dozens of rental listings, lots of stuff for sale, employment and volunteer opportunities.
It's all in THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER. Call 778-7978 for information.






B-ro riW n o r...


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 13, 1994 M PAGE 25 li
I.EI r. ,UU. -El--- ...7 II.L W,91.U.i-I-rl .~ ~.4.1


---- -


GULF VIEW TRIPLEX Recently renovated, taste- RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA or 1 BR/1BA fully fur-
fully furnished units that offer a flexible floor plan. nished, second floor units in complex with pool,
Large common sundeck with great view of the tennis, club-house, sauna and on site manage-
Gulf. Laundry on premises. Now operated as va- ment. Deeded beach access and excellent rental
cation rentals. Priced at $272,000. Call Dave program. 2BR priced at $94,500 and 1BR priced


Moynihan for details. at $78,500. Call Dave Moynihan.





. _



GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy BAYFRONT LOT Central Holmes Beach loc
walking beach enhance this turnkey furnished with deep water dockage and fabulous view
2BR/2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with is cleared and measures 85' x 130'. Offer
pool, covered parking, and storage room. Excel- $189,500. Call Dave Moynihan.
lent rental opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
Dave Moynihan. AND CALENDAR


nation
r. Lot
ed at


New to Seasonal Rental Market
Outstanding Canal Front Home at 501 65th St,
Holmes Beach. Please call for particulars.


DOUG
DOWUHG
REALTY
409 Pin. A.
Anna UIa
77s-1222
'0')' '


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The 0 LY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES1 Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Con-
struction & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket An lysls, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Cpmblned Experience AND Smllesl


HISTORIC DISTRICT
Ready for some imaginative upgrades, these
three apts. presently bring in over $2,000 month
rental. Asking $152,000.


DIRECT GULF FRONT
End unit on prime beach. Heated pool & upgraded
landscaping. Spacious unit with spectacular view
of Gulf. Turnkey furnished. $172,000.









CUSTOM CONTEMPORARY
Located in prestigious North Point Harbor this 3
bedroom 2 bath home features deep water canal
with dock, 8' heated Jacuzzi, eat-in kitchen with
Corian countertops, magnificent master suite with
walk-in closet, garden tub and separate 2 head
shower, formal dining room, lots of tile, glass sky-
lights, thermopane windows, central vac., alarm
system, professional landscaping and many more
extras. Community pool and tennis. $339,000.

Mike Va
ikeNo n 778-6696
Norma1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


IBYSTA.NDRI






jE PAGE 26 E OCTOBER 13, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercal Reddntlal Fr EsUimates
y't Lawn Mowing Trianlng Edging
LA III Hauling By B~e qt orby the monlh.
SlSeIftei 013 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
5 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
778 34 AND SATISFACTION







ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
/ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
1- Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
SAdditions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125 RG0058 PE002374 778-9244


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC004374a0
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
.* ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED- INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
S* MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


9-LN E -C 9 9ST S


BROWN COUCH excellent condition $300. Pro-
Form auto incline treadmill $200. Wood Octagon
shaped end table $20. 779-2129.
LARGE GLASS bead or sand blaster $995. Golf
cart, good condition $495. Antique slot machines 50,
100, 250, 500 and $1, $1,895 up. 778-7837.
WORLD BOOK. The best learning tool for your chil-
dren, 1994 edition clearance sale now. Contact
Arnold Rumph 794-0567.
"ULTRA CLEAN II" water filtration from Regal now
available. 5 year guarantee. For a free presentation
call Arnold Rumph 794-0567.
CEILING FANS 3 white fans with lights, 1 woodtone
with lights. $30 each or $100 for all. 778-9392.
2 TWIN BEDS, good condition. 778-0138.
2 GOLF PULLCARTS, like new $40 each, original
$89.99. 2 golf bags w/club covers $35 each. 778-4874.
APPLIANCES: Tappan washer & gas dryer, 4 yrs
old, almond $275. Roper dishwasher, undercounter,
3 yrs old, almond $125. Frigidaire refrigerator, 18 cu.
ft. frost free w/ice-maker $175. All in exc. cond. Re-
modeling. 778-7216.
SOFA & LOVESEAT mauve, excellent cond. $300
both or will split. Designer hi-back chair $50. Body by
Jake Firmflex new $100. 778-0015.
ADMIRAL full size 4-bumer electric stove, almond,
self cleaning oven $100. 6 ft. pool table & sticks $100
OBO. 778-0024.
MENS BIKE for sale $60. 778-7471.
20" COLOR TV, 3 yrs old $95. Brass and glass cof-
fee table, exc. cond. $100. 778-2960.
SOLID OAK DAYBED w/trundle/beauty rest, like
new $200. Other furniture too! 778-5427.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
SEEKING garage, carport or lawn for 17' boat &
trailer. Use of running water necessary. Fee nego-
tiable. 778-3702.
11' FIBERGLASS row boat with small 6 or 12 volt
electric motor. $175. 778-5183.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for beach front motel.
Part time 15-20 hrs per week. Start immediately.
Sand & Sea Motel, 778-2231.
SALES REPS, pt or ft, flex hrs for designer waterless
cookware, china and crystal. Ideal for homemakers.
Galaxy 727-9447 or 794-0567.
HOUSEKEEPER/ASST. MANAGER at Pelican Post
Motel. 15-20 hrs/wk, days. Apply in person at 202 1st
N., Bradenton Beach, from 10 to 4.
HOUSEKEEPER needed for Duncan House Bed &
Breakfast. 778-6858.
WAITRESS NEEDED part time. Tip Of The Island,
call 778-3909.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.
KD FAIRS WALL DESIGN Wallpaper, paint, mural
and light repair. Call KD at 778-1032.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to paint-
ing. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island ref-
erences. 779-2129.


HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances,
brush piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever
your hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.
DREAM CLEANERS residential or commercial. We
do windows tool Call Gregg or Shannon 778-3679.
HOUSECLEANING of all sorts. Very thorough and
fast. Will accept weekly or bi-weekly regulars. Good
references, call KD 778-1032.
TAROT CARD READINGS: 12 yrs experience at
leading Boston tea house. Appointment, 778-4657.
BABYSITTER for hire. 13 yrs old. Experienced.
Available after school and on weekends. Call Jes-
sica, 778-7019.
AUTO REPAIR, mobile service. We come to you.
Oil changes $20, free lube. A/C specialty. 29 years
exp. As always free estimates. 778-4659.
NO TIME TO CLEAN? Homes, apts., rentals, etc.
I'm fast reliable and reasonable. "I like what I do ...
and it shows!" References available. 778-4116.
WANTED: Houses to clean on Island. 778-4659.
TURF SURFER'S Lawn Service. Cut and trim ser-
vice for Anna Maria Islanders only. For estimate call
778-9493.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERYS CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resi-
dent.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS BLOCK, stone, stucco, tile, pavers
& concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
HOME MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS. Experienced,
reliable, small jobs preferred. Don Staples 778-0225.
CUSTOM RENOVATIONS by Paul Beauregard. All
home improvements. Specializing in kitchens & bath-
rooms. 20 yrs. experience as an industrious highly-
skilled, dependable carpenter and finishing contractor.
My work also includes; counter tops, ceramic & vinyl
tile, drywall repairs, fine finish painting, wall coverings,
etc. 387-8066, beeper #252-6528.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, drywall repairs, tile & formica work. Work guar-
anteed. Low prices. 778-0410.


1 LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
GULFFRONT Best in Anna Maria! 3BR/2BA, im-
maculate, steps to beach. Nov., Dec. & March $800
per week, reserve now. 778-3171.


I" BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
u Imwd


JUST

CALL
778-7978
for free home
delivery anywhere*
on Anna Maria
Island. You may also
call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
Sorry, individual unit
delivery is not avail-
able at mobile home
parks or condos but
bulk drops can be
arranged.


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!








AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff SeaF& Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products.
By appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A PAGE 27 IR


IR N A LS I A IE T LS C N
AI-W II~~I~ 9 A 9 9~


ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck,
private beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone,
microwave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-
813-988-1344.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
STEPS FROM BEACH! 3BR/3BA Beach house.
Washer, dryer, dishwasher, garage, disposal, cov-
ered carport. $600 week or $2200 month. Available
Oct.Nov.DeclJanJFeb. Call 778-4468

WEEKEND SPECIAL: Fri., Sat. & Sun. $160.1BR/
1BA Gulf front condo. Beautiful beach, beautiful
sunsets. Weekly, $300. 778-2832.

SEASONAL OR YEARLY. 1BR/1BA, furnished, W/
D, garage, no pets. 116 White Ave. Holmes Beach.
813-985-6765.
HOLMES BEACH, nice and clean 2BR/1BA, cen-
tral air, W/D hookup. Annual $600/mo plus electric-
ity. 778-0217.
FURNISHED studio apt., $400/mo, one person.
House, nice, different, for 1 or a couple. Short or
long term. $800/mo utilities included. Holmes
Beach. Neg. 778-5832.
ISLANDER WITH PETS looking for reasonable 1 or
2 bedroom accommodation. Will repair, clean and
decorate. 778-9133.
COMPANION. Pleasant alternative to living alone;
educated, traveled, non-smoker, references. Apply
to: PO Box 5154 Sarasota, FL 34237.
2BR/2BA ISLAND VILLAGE condo. Nicely fur-
nished. Pool, tennis, walk to beach. $850 annual,
available Dec. 1 or SeasonaV5 months. 778-4698
after 6pm.
STUDIO, 100 ft. to beach. Holmes Beach. $120
weekly, 2 wk minimum. $440 monthly. Call 778-
0727 or 355-0450.
SECLUDED SPACIOUS Holmes Beach condo.
2BR/2BA, pool, covered parking, storage, W/D
hookup, annual lease. $750 per month. 778-3007.
WANTED TO RENT: Tastefully furnished, 2BR,
close to Holmes Beach. Jan. 15 to Mar. 15. Under
$1,000 per month. 319-332-8912.


"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, BR/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dinging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $229,500. 778-7837.


HOLMES BEACH Town house arranged as two
separate apts. with own entrances. Connecting door
can be unlocked to make seven room dwelling. First
floor has one bedroom and one bathroom. Second
floor has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Full A/
C. Part of small 10-unit complex of with heated pool
and nice gardens. 100 yards from new beach. Com-
pletely refurbished less than two years ago. Excel-
lent rental history. For sale as whole for $105,000.
Telephone evenings 813-954-1110.
BY OWNER. Drive by this 8-year-old stilted duplex,
fully landscaped with outside lighting and sprinkler
system. Each unit 2BR/2BA, laundry room, dining,
ceiling fans, central air, lots of storage and decks to
enjoy great Gulf view with famous FL sunsets. All for
only $189,500.3210 West 6th Ave., Holmes Beach.
Call 778-1516, ask for Gene or Katharina.
REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981.
OPEN SAT. 2-4. LBK sailboat water, 110 ft. to Bay,
FL room, fireplace, screen patios, lush landscaping,
deeded beach, OBO $273,000. 383-6560, 629
Kingfisher Ln. Broker Co-op.
TIDY ISLAND on Sarasota Bay. Preconstruction
prices on waterfront townhouses, $219,900. Lots
available from $74,900. Call Tidy Island Properties,
Inc. 761-8439.
EXTRA LARGE Anna Maria lot across street from
community center. Quiet, family area. $79,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
CANALFRONT lot in Key Royale across street from
golf course. Deep water bay access. $175,000. Call
Richard Freeman at Island Real Estate, 778-6066
for details.
ADORABLE Anna Maria home close to beach.
3BR/2BA with possible 4th BR or den. Two sepa-
rate entrances make this property unique
$147,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
KEY WEST style canalfront home in Anna Maria -
3BR/2BA easy maintenance shell front yard.
$234,500. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
ONE OF A KIND deep water canalfront home in
Holmes Beach 6BR/4BA inground pool -
$386,000. Call Richard Freeman at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066 for details.
OWNER WILL FINANCE this Anna Maria bayfront
home with a dream view, 3BR and fireplace.
$350,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Es-
tate, 778-6066 for details.
INVESTMENT property steps to the beach. Call
Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for
details.
WEST BRADENTON 3BR/2BA home in excellent
family neighborhood. New roof, 9-94. Seller will help
with closing costs, $79,900. Call Yvonne Higgins at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066 for details.
BUY IT or SELL IT with a classified in The Islander.


778-2586 .- M A RV KAV Eve: 778-6771


15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 10/19/94 j


Are you ready for
some football?!
Play The Islander's
football contest and 4
you could win $50. w isue.


S^ Personal Fitness
TRAINING

SCardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
SMuscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis
Nationally Certified 779-2129

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
a r Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MM0003o"
MA0012461


UNCOMMON
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS
S3 COPIES COPY YOUR FLYERS HERE!
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548


I I O



Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX006S455
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
M ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
S778-7074


Custom Communications
Let us help you customize your home or business computer to fit
all your needs. We install phone jacks and modern hookups.
We offer FREE Prodigy trial with
modem hookup. Back up important
data With our external tape drive
system, we can store or restore any
important data! Free trial Prodigy,
free shareware, tape back up of your
complete hard drive and important
... what have you got to lose?
Give us a callI
David Billings 730-1608 or 778-6407



'Your Satis action is Our Intention"-

* Professional Interior & Exterior Work
* Free Estimates
" Insured
* References Available
OFFICE: 761-0 29
PAGER: 569-292 7
L -------------------------------


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Ried Leas
32-Year Isldnd ResidCt


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our office
in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217. We are located
next to D. Coy Ducks. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (usually).

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines -21 WORDS. Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS. Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or
two line headlines, line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.

IiSLANDRlKi





- l] PAGE 28 0 OCTOBER 13, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


land Foods


HOMETOWN
PRBID


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1994


T~nrU


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


SIRLOIN TIP
STEAKS


RUBY RED
GRAPEFRUIT


EACH


FRESH SQUEEZED,
Grapefruit
U I1


DELI DEPARTMENT
FREE 1 Ib. Potato
Salad or Cole Slaw
71 With the
pu rchase
._, .^of our
C8-piece
"' }Fried
Chicken
Dinner


DELI DEPARTMENT
SLICED ROAST
TO ORDER
T, ROAS


BEEF


29


LB.


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...
n .o I, .LANDFOD.S. | C ,I P& SAVE ,il


Ir =


mmmmmmmm-


- -m-II


GRADE A LARGE

EGG


5


DOZ.


Ime WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU OCT 18
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
---m-m------ .


SUNNY DELL
ORANGE
JUICE
1/2 GAL.
CARTON 9
WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU OCT 18
LIMIT THREE PER CUSTOMER PLEASE


--- -----------I E


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


BONELESS
PORK $s
ROAST '


BAKERY DEPARTMENT
FRESH BAKED
BROWNIES

$ 5,

16 OZ. TRAY
PACKAGE


I I


r-


I


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--
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~;~;


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