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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00534
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00534

Full Text


WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


Island trolley

could start

rolling by Jan. 1
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
If Island businesses are willing to make a commit-
ment, a trolley could start carrying passengers the
length of the Island by January of 1995, said Gary
Cremeans of Trolley Systems of America, Inc.
Cremeans will bring one of his trolleys to the Anna
Maria Island Chamber of Commerce (AMICC) office
at 501 Manatee Ave. W. in Holmes Beach on Oct. 18
from 3 to 7 p.m. for AMICC members to inspect. He
will be there to answer questions concerning advertis-
ing rates.
Cremeans met with AMICC President Mary Ann
Sipe and Director Luke Courtney last week for a pre-
sentation on the trolley. Cremeans currently services
Siesta Key, Lido Beach and St. Armand's Circle with
two trolleys.
The trolley would be funded by advertising outside
and inside, said Cremeans, and he needs a 60 percent
commitment from local businesses in order to pursue
the project. The trolley would cost about $6,000 per
month otoperate. A business can also pay a monthly
"stop charge" for the trolley to stop at the business to
load and unload passengers.
Sipe said she is concerned that the trolley would
take advertising dollars from other forms of advertis-
ing that the businesses do.
"You're going to advertise in some way," said
Cremeans. "We say give it back to your community in
some form. (On the trolley) your advertising is working
for the community. We become an extension of the cham-
ber and try to become part of the community. We give as
much as we take and do a lot of volunteer work."
Courtney asked who solicits the advertising.
Cremeans said he does but if the chamber would like
to do the work, it would receive a percentage of the
revenue. Cremeans said he has already gotten inquir-
ies from several Island businesses.
Sipe asked if any advertising dollars would come
back to the chamber. Cremeans said the trolley will be
available for chamber social events. He said on Siesta
Key he donates his time to take groups of tourists
around the Island in the trolley and show them motels,
restaurants, gift shops, etc.
Cremeans suggested a four-month trial period from
January to April of next year. He said the amount of
advertising sold would determine the number of trol-


leys. Each trolley can carry 34 passengers.
"The perfect thing would be two trolleys running
every half hour from Rotten Ralph's to Coquina Beach
and then connecting with the public transit at Coquina
Beach," he pointed out.
He said if the trolley is successful, he could also run
one from Coquina Beach down Longboat Key to connect
with his trolley at St. Armand's Circle. This would give
Islanders trolley service from Anna Maria to Siesta Key.
Courtney asked about days and hours of opera-
tions. Cremeans suggested Tuesday through Saturday,
with Sunday and Monday reserved for maintenance
and charter trips and said the towns could determine the
hours of operation. Sipe said the trolley should run
through the dinner hour.
Courtney said he would like to have a commitment
from local businesses by the first of November.


Islanders fight fires in Western states
Three firefighters from the Island journed to Montana to fight wildfires last month. For more information
about the Florida Strike Team, see page 8. Photo courtesy of the Anna Maria Fire District


Beach concessionaire
wants to serve beer and
wine with meals
Lorna Dee Percifield, who operates the Cafe on the
Beach at Manatee Public Beach with her partner Gene
Schaeffer, asked the Holmes Beach City Council for a
special exception to serve beer and wine with food.
"Hundreds of people have asked for beer and
wine," said Percifield, "but we felt we had to prove
ourselves to be reliable and in control first."
She said parks and recreation officials said they
have also received many requests for the beverages.
In a Sept 21 letter to the mayor, Percifield asked for
an exception to Section 4-3 of the Holmes Beach Code
which states, in part, "It shall be unlawful for any person
to drink or consume any alcoholic beverage in or upon any
public street, alley, sidewalk, publicly owned park, or
publicly owned recreation area within the city..."
Percifield noted that the county's parks and recre-
ation department has already granted this exception to
park and golf course concession businesses.
The county ordinance states, "At certain specifi-
cally designated recreation centers where meals or
lunches are served under concession privileges the sale
of alcoholic beverages by such concessionaire may be
permitted ..."
Percifield said she has no intention of selling indi-
vidual drinks to patrons other than with their meals
because she "doesn't want people here just to drink."
The request has not been placed on a council agenda.
F1


WIND AND WAVES POUND AND

FLOOD ANNA MARIA ISLAND


Wash over on Gulf Drive
The Gulf of Mexico overflowed its bounds across Gulf Drive where dead fish and debris washed down
side streets to the bay in Bradenton Beach. Flooding of the state road occurred Monday at Smuggler's
Cove at 15th Street North and at several of the typical "hot spots" including Gulf Drive from 10th to
12th Street North and at 12th Street South. Hopefully, the mail carrier wore waders.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ...................................... ............ 6
Those Were the Days .................................. 7
Announcements .................................... 14
School Daze ....................................... .......... 16
Streetlife ..................................... ............ 19
Anna Maria tides ........................ ............ 21
Real estate ......................................... ........... 22


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OCTOBER 6, 1994


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND








UM PAGE 2 i OCTOBER 6,1994 i THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

McChesney seeks support to ban live shell harvest


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Commissioner Dottie McChesney wants
help from other Island elected officials in seeking a ban
on the harvesting of live shells in Island waters.
At a recent meeting of the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, McChesney said, "Things are happen-
ing in southwest Florida that are impacting greatly on our
shores. Sanibel Island has gone for a complete ban on the
taking of live shells. I am concerned about the amount of
shells being taken out of our waters."
According to statistics supplied by the Department
of Environmental Protection, the taking of live shells
by commercial operators in southwest Florida has in-
creased greatly, she said. From 1992 to 1993 the tak-


ing of live sand dollars increased 400 percent and star-
fish 300 percent.
"We're seeing more in Anna Maria now than
ever," she warned. "People have reported seeing pick-
up trucks filled with sand dollars leaving the city."
McChesney said the ban does not include dead
shells and she wants tourists to continue to be permit-
ted to collect dead shells that wash up on the beaches.
"We had a workshop with the Florida Marine Fish-
eries Commission (FMFC) that showed people are
concerned but that I am the only official that has ex-
pressed concern," she explained. "People from all three
cities are calling me asking for some regulation, but
unless I get more support from other elected officials,
it is not likely the FMFC will include us (in the Sanibel


Shells Rule)."
McChesney said the FMFC is holding the final
public hearing on the Sanibel Shells Rule on Oct. 7 in
Ft. Myers. The rule will prohibit the harvesting or
possession of live shellfish in the City of Sanibel.
She said if she has support from the three cities, she
can request that Anna Maria be included in the rule.
She asked that each city council vote on the matter and
provide her with a letter to take to the hearing.
If she does not get enough support in time for the
Island to be included in the Sanibel Shells Rule, the
three cities can request that the FMFC make a rule for
the Island, she said. The process would take about six
months and includes a public hearing. The rule would
be enforced by the Florida Marine Patrol.


Public beach

improvements
Manatee County workers lined the parking lot of the
Public Beach last week with large parking bumpers.
The purpose, say workers, is to keep people from
driving on the beach. Islander Photo: Tomara Kajka


First wave of red tide debris removed from Island


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Had Shakespeare's Marcellus visited the Island last
week, he might have remarked that something is rotten
along the beaches. Fortunately, most of the stinking
players responsible for the smelly scene have taken
their curtain call and are long gone.
But an encore appears to be waiting in the wings
- or waves.
Red tide, that occasional "bloom" of algae that kills
fish by the millions, was reported active along the
coastline south of the Island some time ago. With gen-
erally southerly winds it finally made its appearance
here around the weekend of Sept. 23.
Many people who are especially sensitive to the
algae began sneezing and coughing several days before
any visible signs of the red tide dead fish made
it to shore. Shortly thereafter, the effects of the bloom
were evident to anyone with eyes and a nose.
Although this first bout with red tide was not nearly
as severe as those in years past, the county did shut
down its beaches for a while so that the decaying fish
which had washed up on shore could be removed.
Mother Nature effectively shut down the remainder of
the Island's private beaches, since few beachgoers
found the notion of baking in the sun alongside dead
fish appealing.


Reynold Glanz will get his day in court next
month. The state attorney's office has charged the
Holmes Beach developer of Sandy Pointe Condo-
miniums with two misdemeanor counts of illegally
cutting mangroves at the project on East Bay
Drive.
Glanz and contractor John Chasey were both
charged in the wake of an investigation begun by
Florida Marine Patrol officers and investigators
with the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection last April.
Court date is set for Nov. 10.


Last week's potential fish sandwich is today landfill
fodder: deadfish on the beach in Anna Maria. Is-
lander Photo: Bonner Presswood
Between the county crews and personnel from Is-
land municipalities, the fish carcasses were taken care
of fairly quickly, but for a while there was a little con-
fusion about how the situation could be handled.
In years past, Islanders have seen tractors and
backhoes on the beach raking the fish into piles, then
burying them in the sand. This time, state officials said
then burial-at-beach approach stinks.
"We started burying the fish on the beach as we
have for the past 20 years, and the state came along and
said we couldn't do it, and that we had to truck off the


Glanz has said he did nothing wrong, and was
legally clearing land in preparation of a new phase
of the development.
Investigators disagreed, stopped the project
and last week charged Glanz and Chasey.
Also involved in the matter is Florida Rep.
Julie McClure, who criticized state officials for
what she called a too-vigorous, arrogant investiga-
tion of Glanz. An internal investigation within the
DEP is on-going. DEP high-level officials have
said there was nothing improper about the inves-
tigation.


dead fish," said Mike Hiestand, public works foreman
and code enforcement officer for the City of Holmes
Beach. "So we made arrangements to get dumpsters in
and get the fish hauled off."
Hiestand says the state's objections were two-fold.
regulators didn't want the fish to be buried on the
beach, and they wanted to minimize the use of heavy
equipment on the beach.
Hiestand says city crews spent two days getting the
fish into neat piles so they could be picked up, then
another public agency the county accidentally
undid all their work.
"We piled everything up so we could just go along
with a tractor and pick them up and throw them in the
dumpster," Hiestand says. "Then the county came
along with its beach rake and scattered everything from
one end of the beach to the other, all the way from
Manatee Public Beach north."
"They ruined everything we'd done for two solid
days," Hiestand says of the city's clean-up effort which
began Sept. 26.
Although there's no such thing as a good red tide,
this first wave wasn't all that bad, many agree.
"I've seen a lot worse," Hiestand said. "This time,
probably 90 percent of the fish were grunts and shin-
ers. There were very few big fish or gamefish like red-
fish or drum. I've seen years where it's been bad
enough to kill six-foot-long sharks, grouper and like
that it didn't do that this year."
Conditions are looking pretty good in Bradenton
Beach, according to Whitey Moran, the city's building
official. Moran said Friday the clean-up was underway
and the county was taking care of thejob for the entire city.
"Compared to what I've heard in Holmes Beach
and Anna Maria, we've actually had very few fish,"
Moran said of Bradenton Beach's beaches. "There are
some, but most of them are very small."
Bill Zimmerman, Anna Maria's public works di-
rector, also reported that as of last Friday the clean-up
job was "pretty much done."
While the dead fish that washed ashore during the
first wave of red tide are pretty much gone, there may
be more to come. As of press time, scientists with
Manatee County and Mote Marine Laboratory were
reporting red tide remained strong along the shoreline.
Islanders with respiratory sensitivities were quick to
confirm that the infamous algae is still blooming.


Sandy Pointe developer charged

with illegal mangrove trimming





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 6, 1994 PAGE 3 RI

Restaurant owner responds to residents' concerns


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
After hearing from residents near Crabby Bill's,
restaurant owner Bill Zalla addressed their concerns
over his recent request for outdoor dining.
"They are all worried about music or amplified
sound outside and late hours," explained Zalla. "I want
to clear up any misconceptions or rumors and let every-
one know our closing time is 11 p.m. Monday through
Thursday and midnight Friday through Sunday. If we
get permission to have outdoor dining, the hours will
not go past our regular closing time."
Zalla said there will be no music offered in the
outdoor dining area, nor will there be any loudspeak-
ers to call people to tables.
"It would be our preference that this be stipulated
in any approvals that the Holmes Beach City Council
may grant," he stressed.
Zalla said the focus of Crabby Bill's is family din-
ing and the emphasis is on food, not alcohol.
"Eighty-three percent of our sales is in food," he
said, and 17 percent is alcohol. Anything we do is
geared to a family atmosphere. We cater to people with
children and many of them, especially those with small
children, prefer to eat outside."
Zalla said boaters are another group that would be


No padding planned
in this city budget
Regular spectators to the Bradenton Beach City
Council meetings had high hopes that the budget would
receive a little extra "padding," but the matter got
pushed behind.
Mayor Katie Pierola had taken the cushy job of
getting price quotes for replacing the folding metal
chairs in the council chambers with padded chairs in an
effort to bring a softer, gentler ambiance to their
lengthier meetings.
But at $20 a chair delivered and with a need of 75
seats for the chambers, the bottom-line price of $1,500
was deemed too hard a stance er, sit? for the
council to take in a lean budget year.


... and the

survey says
Two feet of the docks along the seawall on
Marina Drive at Crabby Bill's yacht basin are city
property said Holmes Beach Superintendent of
Public Works John Fernandez on Monday.
Fernandez explained, "I did some research
and found a survey that shows the property line
stops two feet short of the seawall in the water.
That two-foot strip is the domain of the City of
Holmes Beach."
The restaurant's owner, Bill Zalla, recently re-
ceived approval from the city council to extend and
add docks around the basin to give boaters more
access to the restaurant Docks along the seawall on
Marina Drive were slated for extension.
Fernandez said the city cannot give approval to
any docks that would overlap onto city property
because "we would expose ourselves to liability."
Fernandez notified Zalla of the situation by
letter Monday. Zalla's options include asking the
city to purchase the land or deed him the prop-
erty, said Fernandez.

attracted to an outdoor facility.
"The city is allowing us to remodel the boat slips
which we feel will create a larger need for outdoor din-
ing," he noted. "Boaters dress casually and sometimes
don't wear shirts and shoes. They might feel uncom-
fortable coming into the restaurant in their bathing
suits, but will be able to enjoy the same menu at tables
outside. We want to be able to cater to that portion of
our clientele."
Zalla said when the restaurant was Pete Reynard's,
boaters were permitted to dine at outside tables. The prac-
tice continued for 44 years even though it was not ad-
dressed in any exception to the city's ordinances, he said.
"We would like to stress that it is our company
policy to play by the book," he said, "and even though
it's been going on for years, we would like everything
to be done through the proper channels. We are here for


the long haul and would not do anything to jeopardize
our standing in the community. As a family
restaurant,we feel we must set a good example."
He also noted that the city's problems with an outdoor
bar in the early 1980s has some residents worried that such
problems could recur if an outdoor facility is permitted. To
prevent this, he encouraged the city to make any special
exception to the ordinance an annual renewal, so if there
are problems the license can be revoked.
Zalla invited any concerned neighbors to call him
at the restaurant, 778-9566, and express their concerns.
He said he'd be happy to meet them at the restaurant,
take them on a tour and explain his plans.
"We believe if people understand what we want to
do, no one will be opposed," he noted. "We're very
surprised that we're being judged on what others have
done in the past. All we're really asking is for people
to give us the opportunity to earn their trust before they
judge us."




Anna Maria City
10/11, 7:30 p.m., Commission work session
10/12, 9 a.m., Planning and Zoning
Commission sub-committee

Bradenton Beach
10/6, 1 p.m., Council work session,
fishing pier lease
10/6, 7 p.m. Council meeting
10/12, 7 p.m., Council meeting, land
development code amendments

Holmes Beach
10/6, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
10/11, 3 p.m., Planning Commission
10/12, 5 p.m., Equity Study Committee

Of Interest
10/12, 10 a.m., Island Emergency
Operations Center


ANNA


MARIA
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
SALE ITEMS FOR THE WEEK OF 10/6 thru 10/10
While Supplies Last Plus Lots of Unodvertised Specials
Come In and Try Our Delicious Cardini Salad Dressings


GROCERY.
Duracel Batteries .......... $2.00
2 ct. pkg, sizes C. D or 1 ct. 9 Volt
Hefty Bags .............. 2/$3.00
Lawn & Leaf 1 Oct. Package
Northern Both Tissue ......... 994
4-Roll Package Assorted
Gala Paper Towels.......... 594
Big Roll Assorted
9 Lives Cat Food.......... 4/$1.00
5.5oz. Cons Assorted Varieties
Twin Pet Dog Food...... 4/$1.00
14oz. Can Beef, Liver, Chix or Reg.
Arm & Hammer Detergent
PowerFresh 14-18 Load ... 2/$5.00

DAIRY *
Sorrento Ricotta ............. $1.29
15oz. Cont. Fat Free or Whole Milk
Florida Gold OJ ............ $1.19
64oz. Crtn. Reg. or Old Fashioned
Tropicana Pure Premium.. $1.99
Grapefruit Juice 64 oz Crtn.


Shurfine Epson Salts .... 2/$1.00
SPRODUCE 16oz.Crtn.
Head Lettuce ea. ............. 89 Suave Hair Products .......... 994
5-15 oz.
Vine Ripe Tomatoes Ib. ..... 79 Cosmetic Puffs ............ 2/$1.00
Farm Fresh Cukes......... 5/$1.00 200ct. Pkg.

SOARY W DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.


*MEAT
USDA CHOICE
Chicken Breasts
Family Pack Split Ib........... $1.09
Smaller Packs Ib................ $1.59
Center Cut Pork Loin Chops
Ib .................................. $2.59
Center Cut Pork Rib Chops
Ib .................................. $2.49
Center Cut Pork Thick Chops
Ib ................................ $2.59

FROZEN
Healthy Choice Dinners
10-12oz. Packages ............. 2/$5.00
Mrs. Pauls Seafood ..... 2/$3.00
Deviled Crabs, Fried Clams,
Crispy Fish Fillets or Sticks
Totino's Party Pizza..... 4/$5.00
9.8-10.9oz. Pkg. Assorted Var.

HEALTH *
BEAUTY AIDS






1f PAGE 4 A OCTOBER 6, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


With rain comes mosquitos


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Lots of rain, low mangrove areas,
high tides all can add up to lots of
mosquitos.
And with a summer and now fall full
of rainy days and nights, Manatee
County Mosquito Control checks daily
for mosquito infestation problems.
"If you have a problem, give us a
call," says Mark Latham, director of .
Manatee County's Mosquito Control r
District. "We will send an inspector to
verify and find out where the problem is
coming from."
In Florida, says Latham, there exist
about 75 different species of mosquitos.
Manatee County houses 41 or 42 species
and of those, says Latham, about 20 spe-
cies cause problems.
"We don't do routine spraying," says The Manatee
Latham. "We'd be applying pesticides two office stt
needlessly. Pesticides are not residual inspectors, t
only active at the time we spray." Manatee Co
Latham, 36, may be new to Manatee
County, but he is no novice to his field of study. An en-


Keeping down the mosquito population is a never-
ending job during the rainy days of summer, and
after the big afternoon storms have rumbled through
our area, county mosquito control workers spraying
larvaecide on standing water is a common sight on
the Island. Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


e County Mosquito Control crew: Mark Latham in the center
aff, two maintenance workers, three surveillance entomologi
wo helicopters, one plane and a few more trucks. Photos Co
unty Mosquito Control

tomologist from England, Latham graduated from
Cambridge University with a master's degree. He has
led a three-month expedition into the rainforest of Bra-
zil and served as a mosquito specialist for four-and-a-
half years in the Caymen Islands.
Latham has been in the United States since 1985.
He comes to Manatee County from Miami, where his
family still resides until he can sell his house there and
move his family to Manatee County. He met his wife,
Charlotte, while he was working in Jamaica.
His new job as director of Manatee County Mos-
quito Control District began about six months ago, in
March; Latham was found in a nationwide search. He
worked in Miami for nine years in the Dade County
Mosquito Control District before seeking the type of
job he has taken on in Manatee County as director.
"I was looking for an opportunity where I would be
allowed to use my expertise," says Latham. "I wanted
the freedom to be able to mobilize and get things
done."


While mosquito season can last all
year long in Florida, the peak season is
when it rains between May and Octo-
ber.
"Mosquitos can be a problem any time
of year," Latham says, "depending on
rainfall, temperature and tides."
The biggest misconception, Latham
says, is the caller who says, "I haven't
seen the (Mosquito Control) truck
around, when are you due to come and
spray?"
-- While Mosquito Conrol inspects
daily, they stopped regular spraying
years ago.
"We only spray when there's a need,"
i says Latham.
"It's an environmental issue," Latham
says. "Pesticides are a poison. When
used correctly they are not harmful. We
r, two pilots, don't apply pesticides to the environ-
ists, six ment unless we have to. We keep spray-
urtesy of ing.to a minimum."
It's the adult mosquitos who bite. And
it's stagnant water from boats to bird-
baths, from puddles to pools which breeds
mosquitos, according to experts at the Manatee County
Mosquito Control.
Typically, the "yard" or domestic mosquitos fly
and bite during the day and take shelter at night.
"Floodwater" mosquitos fly and bite at night.
For environmental and safety reasons, Mosquito
Control sprays at night which controls the night-flying
"floodwater" mosquitos, but night spraying rarely af-
fects domestic mosquitos.
According to the literature, the most effective way
to control the domestic mosquito is to remove or flush
stagnant water in the yard at least once a week, which
is what an inspector from the Mosquito Control will
most likely tell you when you call.
But that may be not be as easy as it sounds in light
of the rainy, wet weather Island residents have experi-
enced this year.
If you have any questions or wish to talk to the
Manatee County Mosquito Control call 746-8641.


Zoning board hears novel approach


to retain 'grandfathered' land use


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
When it comes to complying with Anna Maria's
zoning laws, there are a couple of ways a person might
try to live in a home in a commercial district.
One is to get a variance. The other is to build a
house and shove another house into it.
Though the variance idea is apparently the one the
city's planning and zoning board is leaning toward, the
house-within-a-house approach got a serious airing last
week before it lost its appeal.
Builder Brent Whitehead proposed the novel ap-
proach on behalf of William F. Nally, who wants to
retire soon to Anna Maria. Nally owns a small home
at 110 Spring Ave., but he wants something larger and
more modern. The problem is, due to federal flood in-
surance laws, if remodeling exceeds 50 percent of the
current value of the home he'll be forced to tear it down
and build a new structure on stilts.
But that's not really Nally's problem. Truth is, he
really doesn't mind having to build a new house except
for the fact that under current zoning regulations he
wouldn't be allowed to live in it after it was finished,
since Nally's property is zoned commercial.
According to the regulations, it is unlawful for
commercial property to be utilized for residential pur-
poses. Nally's present house is okay because it was in
existence prior to that zoning stipulation taking effect.
Whitehead says Nally's concern is that if he tears
down the current structure to build a new one, it may
be interpreted that he has abandoned the
"grandfathered" residential use of the commercial
property, thereby making the lot forever unusable for
anything but commercial purposes. Thus the idea of
building the new house and keeping the old one that
is, keeping it inside the new one.


"There's an issue perhaps, that if they (the Nallys)
pull the residence off of this property there might be
some problems with continuing it as a residential use,"
Whitehead said to the board. "The Nallys felt we might
utilize this house and slide it into the (new) floor plan."
"Frankly, this is not very cost effective,"
Whitehead said. "From a structural standpoint I can
make it work, but it's not ideal."
Whitehead then offered another approach.
"What we would prefer to do is leave the house
where it is so that we can show that we're starting a
new structure, and then move the little house off the
property and out of the city of Anna Maria."
Chairman Tom Turner quickly pointed out that the
city's codes prohibit moving houses.
Board member Doug Copeland added that no matter
how it might be accomplished, what was being proposed
would ultimately result in the expansion of a nonconfor-
mity something the code book doesn't allow.
"The nonconformities are both the flood elevation
and the fact that it's residential in a commercial zone,"
Copeland said of the current house. Copeland said the
proposed new structure would solve the elevation prob-
lem, but the non-conforming residence on commercial
property would remain.
"There are two zonings which would allow you to
build this ROR (retail-office-residential) or residen-
tial," Copeland noted.
By this point the board had before it essentially
three options: recommend that the city rezone the prop-
erty to residential or ROR, grant a variance that would
allow the Nally's to have a residence within commer-
cial zoning, or deny the building of the new home the
Nally's hope to live out their retirement in.
The last idea was one no one wanted, and the first
idea was questioned by some planning commissioners


as being unacceptable because it would constitute "spot
zoning." That left the variance idea, and though the
board didn't come to a final decision, it seemed to like
this approach best.
Although the Nally's planned retirement home is
centrally located between the Sandbar Restaurant and
Bortell's, Whitehead says the couple has no problem
with the high traffic of the area.
"They (the Nally's) like their neighbors and they
don't want to move," Whitehead said.
Turner told Whitehead that even if a variance for
the nonconforming use of the property were granted,
the building itself would have to meet all commercial
construction standards. Generally, those standards are
more stringent than those used for residential buildings,
and therefore result in more expensive structures.
The board agreed to continue the matter until
Whitehead could develop plans showing how compliance
with commercial codes would be accomplished.
The next regular meeting of the planning and zon-
ing board will be Oct. 24 at 7:30 p.m.


German exchange rates
As a public service for the many Germans
who visit the Island, The Islander Bystander
will occasionally publish the exchange rates
between deutsche marks and U.S. dollars. The
information is supplied by First Union Bank in
Holmes beach, and is current as of the Friday
afternoon prior to the current publication date.
As of Sept. 30, one deutsche mark was
equal to: $.6250 (cash), and $.6273 (checks).
Conversely, one U.S. dollar was equal to:
DM1.6 (cash), and DM1.5941 (checks).


~ltn~








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E OCTOBER 6, 1994 A PAGE 5 JH3

AM one step closer to ordinance simplification


In a marathon session Monday morning, Anna
Maria's Planning and Zoning Board moved one step
closer to a revised codification of the city's ordinances.
For more than three hours, the seven-member
board heard from a subcommittee which has been
working for four months to simplify the city ordinances
and get them ready for codification, a process of tak-
ing lengthy, complicated ordinances and turning them
into plain English for laymen.
The subcommittee, chaired by Tom Turner, recom-
mended changes to Chapters 5 and 9 of the city's cur-
rent code book, which was last updated in 1986. The
chapters deal with building regulations and flood pre-
vention, and the most significant change deals with the
way building plans are certified.
The old code allowed engineers and architects to cer-
tify plans as meeting city and state building requirements,
but the P and Z Board agreed with subcommittee recom-
mendations that this section of the city's building codes
be rewritten to mandate that only an engineer be allowed
to put a final seal of approval on plans.
"It takes a professional engineer to certify that


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
What a resident can or can't do in his home below
the base flood elevation was a question the Holmes
Beach City Council wasn't prepared to answer last
week. Council agreed that Council Chairman Mary
Ellen Reichard will work with City Attorney Steve Dye
to develop recommendations.
The question surfaced during a code enforcement
board hearing concerning an office in the ground floor
of an elevated home. The code board asked council for
clarification on what activities, if any, can take place
below base flood elevation.
.In a letter to council Dye said, "most cities' flood
plain management and building regulations address the
type of structures that can be legally constructed, but
do not clearly address use below the base flood line
elevation. I would recommend that additional language
be inserted into the code that makes it clear what activi-
ties are permitted or prohibited below the base flood
line elevation."
Dye pointed out there is no prohibition on conduct-


drawings meet the Federal Emergency Management
Agency specifications, Department of Environmental
Protection regulations and Southern Building Codes,"
Turner explained. "The architect draws, but he can't
certify the detail of the structural strength."
Turner says this and other changes will bring the
city's ordinances into line with requirements of the
Southern Building Codes, and eliminate the city's own
building code manual which was published in 1968.
Monday's P and Z meeting was the first in what is
likely to be a series of extended meetings to discuss
changes in the city's ordinances prior to codification.
The current code book has a total of 31 chapters,
Turner says, with 29 remain to be reviewed. After each
series of chapters has been looked at by the subcommit-
tee, they then go to the P and Z Board for review. If P
and Z passes the changes, the documents then come
before the city commission for approval, then on to a
private company that specializes in the writing of mu-
nicipal code books.
"This is to turn the ordinances into 'laymen's' lan-
guage so that any person can come in, pick them up and


ing a home occupation outside the livable area of the
residence, yet city regulations prohibit such activities.
He recommended an amendment to the home occupa-
tion ordinance to prohibit home occupation activities in
the non-livable area and each person seeking renewal
of a home occupation license show evidence that the
use conforms with the city's ordinances.
City Clerk Leslie Ford said every year each applicant
for a home occupation license must sign a letter certify-
ing he/she continues to comply with the city's regulations.
Reichard asked Public Works Superintendent John
Fernandez if his department has the manpower to in-
spect the home of each person with a home occupation
license. Fernandez said he has no idea how many there
are and it would generate a lot of work.
Reichard said council should be cautious about
specifying permitted activities. Councilwoman Pat
Geyer noted that a washer and dryer are not even per-
mitted below the base flood elevation.
Fernandez said according to his interpretation such
space can only be used for storage of minor items such
as lawn mowers, bicycles and yard tools.


understand them," Turner explained the purpose of
codification. "It takes a lot of the 'whereases' and
'wherefores' out of it."
Turner says the city will meet with Municipal Code
Corporation on Nov. 2 to discuss the rewritten ordinances
as done by the P and Z subcommittee, and whether they
will have to also be reviewed by the city attorney.
A retired attorney volunteered time to the subcom-
mittee, and Turner hopes this approach will effectively
address any legal questions as well as save the city a
substantial amount of money.
"What I'm trying to do is short-cut one step and
save hundreds of dollars in attorneys' fees and plan-
ners' fees," Turner says. He says that a review by an
attorney of a single ordinance can require from three to
10 hours.
Turner believes having Municipal Code Corpora-
tion write the city's new code book will be easier on the
city's budget and easier for the public, which will ul-
timately be the book's user. He says the company has
extensive expertise in taking lengthy and complicated
passages and making them more understandable.
"They take the ordinances and put them together,
proof read them and make sure there is no duplication
from one ordinance to another," Turner says. "It's just
a more legible, readable document."
Turner estimates it will be at least six months be-
fore the Municipal Code Corporation will really have
a handle on the project. He says the company has to
first give the city an estimate of how much it will
charge to do the work and then the city commission
must approve a contract. The city has budgeted
$12,000 for codification purposes.
Turner says Jhat once the new code book is writ-
ten, it will remain current because Municipal Code
Corporation will be sent all new ordinances so they
may be codified and the book revised.
"This will be an ongoing thing," Turner says. "The
last time this was done was in 1986, and it's never been
done since then. That's the reason our code of ordi-
nances is in such a deplorable condition."
Turner says the next element of the code book his
subcommittee and the P and Z Board will be looking
at is Appendix A, which deals with the zoning regula-
tions. The most significant change Turner expects in
that section has to deal with setback requirements.
The recommendations which came out of Monday's
meeting are set for discussion by the city commission
when it meets for a work session on Oct. 11.


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[i] PAGE 6 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



They're back


Slowly but surely, as the saying goes, our friends
the "snowbirds" are returning.
Just during the past two weeks, familiar faces have
popped by our office on their way to and from their
familiar places to say hello.
"What's new?" is their theme song.
Some tell us how nice it has been to get the news-
paper at their summer home up north, wherever that
may be.
Some are pleased to once again have the football
contest in The Islander Bystander to match wits with
sporting friends and family. "It's the only game in
town," said a regular entrant last week.
They ask about the rainy weather, red tide, fishing,
voting, politics and much more.
They ask what's happening with "the bridge."
And so it goes.
You can read all about it this week, and every week
in what we're all proud to claim as the "best news on
Anna Maria Island."
It's so nice to see "y'all."

Of fish and fishing
Someone said it's hard to be a fisher of men when
you have to compete with red tide.
Over the next few weeks we'll take a look at an
amendment on the Nov. 8 ballot which in effect will
change fishing and commercial fishing in Florida.
The amendment will ban nearly all net fishing and
end a way of life for many Cortezians and Islanders if
adopted. Generations of fishing families in Cortez will
reel in the wake of a net ban.
We're in favor of fishing. All fisning.
Every week we print a sport fishing report com-
piled by Capt. Mike Heistand from other sport fishing
captains, marinas, bait and tackle stores, city piers and
head boats.
We support Cortez and the families there that live
the only life they know, harvesting a bounty of fresh,
local seafood for our tables.
We'll attempt to explain the issue of net fishing in
Florida and particularly in Cortez, the historical fishing
village just across the bay from Bradenton Beach. We'll
look at results of the net ban in Texas. Talk to all sides.
We'll look at the history of fishing in Cortez and the pos-
sible economic impact to businesses and families there.
Commercial fishermen in Cortez are fighting for
more than the right to fish. It's their way of life that's
at stake.
Fishermen here have more formidable foes to fight
than red tide.



OCTOBER 6, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 46
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V ClassifiedServices
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Tingler
Bill Edmond
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


OOt4'T LOOK tOv,4....
B'UT L. TW~N I T4E
SCNOWPARDe ARM
eRfCl< !/


SLICK By Egan


aYk e9 l I /


Wanted: A responsive city
council for Bradenton Beach
At the city's final budget hearing citizens repeated
their pleas to cut the budget in order to lower the pro-
posed village rate and ad valorem tax. Yet there was
not one bit of discussion among councilors and the
mayor regarding those cuts.
Apparently there is an unwritten law that one coun-
cil member should not suggest a cut in the budget of
another council member's area of responsibility. Nor
was there any discussion about increasing taxes other
than the ad valorem tax.
That lack of discussion occurred in spite of presenta-
tion of 21 items, ranging from $50 to $3,199 and totaling
$20,335, that could be cut to reduce operating expenses,
thereby reducing the ad valorem tax. Council members
and the mayor merely accepted reductions brought by de-
partment heads related to health insurance premiums.
The council and mayor ignored the pleas of citi-
zens to reduce the huge tax increase. Now smaller
Bradenton Beach will spend more dollars than larger
Anna Maria City.
To add insult to injury, two councilors complained
petulantly that not many citizens came out to the bud-
get hearings, although a dozen people spoke against the
tax increase. Apparently those councilors prefer count-
ing citizens to counting dollars.
Is there a numerical threshold that must be met
before citizens' comments are taken seriously?
Citizens had been demeaned earlier this month
when council scheduled and held a public hearing on
the budget in the full knowledge that the mayor and one
councilman would be absent. What message did that
send to citizens?
Frustrated, discounted and ignored Bradenton
Beach citizens will not forget.
Ida D. Cuthbertson, Bradenton Beach

Coastal Cleanup a big success
thanks to volunteers
Allow me to publicly thank and congratulate all the
wonderful civic-minded men, women and children who,
so enthusiastically, contributed to the Coastal Cleanup.
Without your help, it could not have been the success it


was. Although, I would like to see the day when we unite
in this effort and not find one piece of trash.
It is impossible for me to name each one of you but
special thanks must go to Anna Maria Elementary
School for its student/parent volunteers families
working together. The Island Foods sign-up table was
an inspiration along with their "fliers."
I hesitate in naming specific names for fear of
omission but must take that chance in saying thanks for
a job well done to our bay boat captains Bob Defort,
Bob Van Wagner and Tommy Grant. Also to my site
captains Jim Gloth, Bob Stone and C.J. Martin.
Remember, if we pick up after ourselves, Coastal
Cleanup won't be necessary. In doing this we can
"Keep Manatee Beautiful" year round.
Billie Martini, Holmes Beach
Blessed are the mothers
Someone asked me the other day what I thought
about O.J. Simpson. "Not much," I replied. I received
a puzzled look and my friend asked what did I mean?
"I'm not sure," I answered. "Let me think on it for
a while."
Well, I did, and since I'm a writer, I've decided to
answer her question in print.
Personally, O.J. Simpson means nothing to me -
his guilt or innocence is irrelevant. To society, I see
O.J. Simpson as a wake-up call to all mothers.
Nicole Brown Simpson means something to me.
She is a dead mother, unable to touch, hold or love her
children. The children will have to grow up without her
- a terrible burden for the children to bear.
To me, Nicole Brown Simpson is a hero because
through her death, I have a deeper appreciation of my
own children. I see how blessed I am to be here with
my children, to be able to touch, hold and love them.
I also see how blessed my children are to have me,
a mother, to watch over them.
Lisa Rivera, Anna Maria


For more of Your

Opinion, see page 9













THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 5, The Remarkable Captain Jones
by June Alder


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 0 PAGE 7 II



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It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
Island. Over 875 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
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We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
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UEEE i i E me i en U iEn Ei UU nU..U.uU I1UU nU


The rivalry between the Weekly Tribune where John P. Jones worked and the
Tampa Journal on Franklin Street was fierce in the 1890s.


PRINTER'S DEVIL


Tampans must have thought rail-
road baron Henry Plant had lost his
mind. In the midst of the terrible yellow
fever epidemic of 1887 he announced he
was going ahead with his plans for an
Arabian Nights-style hotel on the
swampy west bank of the Hillsborough.
Yet it was the construction of
Plant's minareted Tampa Bay Hotel and
his mile-long "million dollar" wharf on
Old Tampa Bay that put Tampa back on
its feet.
For a while times were tough for the
Jones family. Shaky from his bout with
yellow jack, lawyer John R. Jones post-
poned his long-cherished plan to home-
stead Anna Maria Key (he had filed pre-
emption papers in 1886). And his eldest
son, 13-year-old John Patrick, decided
to get a job to help out.
It was the beginning of a long news-
paper career that J.P. described in his
memoirs years later. Here are excerpts:
* *
Father obtainedfor me a job at the
Tribune, a weekly paper edited by an old
Confederate captain. The paper was
printed on a old cylinder press housed in
a lean-to behind the office which had a tin
roof Some of the wheels that carried the
bed back and forth were slightly flattened
from lack of lubrication and when in mo-
tion it sounded as if the building was com-
ing down. The motive power was supplied
by a fellow named Mascot who turned a
wheel at the side while Ifed the press. On
a hot day the smell of sweat andprinter's
ink was overpowering.
After the edition was off I had to de-
liver it to all the city subscribers (about
400). My other duties were to sweep out
the office, fill the water cooler from a
pump a block away, clean the presses and
learn to set type (also to carry notes to the
foreman's numerous girlfriends). I usually


John P. Jones at 20.


worked 10 hours a day. My salary was $2
a week, the two compositors got $8 and
the foreman $10.

The editor's office was a scene of
picturesque confusion. Pictures of Gen.
Robert E. Lee and other Confederate
officers adorned the walls and the floor
was littered with piles of books and
newspapers. The room at times re-
sembled a wholesale grocery store, as
many of the country folk paid for their
subscriptions with farm produce.
Here, seated in a swivel chair with a
cow-hide bottom, before a desk covered
with papers, cigar butts and other assorted
debris, the Captain held conversation
with his numerous callers. The stock of a
double-barreled derringer protruded from
one of the pigeon-holes.
Arguments waxed hot at election
time, but I don't recollect any violence
in that particular office, though later on
I witnessed it in others. One newspa-
perman I knew was terribly beaten up
by a real estate dealer and his brother to
whom he had referred as "unscrupu-
lous land-sharks," which cost the writer
a month in bed and a broken nose.
* *
Rival papers indulged in bitter edi-
torial duels. Among the epithets used
"liar," "scoundrel," "lick-spittle pimp"
and "fugitive from justice" are
samples. The antagonists wrote scurril-
ous poems about each other. My boss,
replying to a gentle reproof from one
rival publisher about his abuse of an-
other, wrote this gem:
"Things have come to a pretty pass
When a fellow can't wallop his
own jackass."

And J.P. wrote of a little paper that
appeared during "a hot wet and dry
election":
The new daily was financed by a
liquor dealer named R. Mugge. It was
named The Review and was edited by
my father. Its motto appeared to be,
like that of the Irishman at the fair,
"Whenever ye see a head, hit it"
It had a short but hectic career
and suspended publication after a few
months.

Next: Old Man Jackson







IM3 PAGE 8 N OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Islanders return from fighting Montana fires


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When Island firefighters Capt. Rich Losek, Larry
Revell and Brian Braun volunteered to be a part of the
Florida Strike Team fighting wild fires in the Western
states, they expected an interesting adventure. By all
accounts, they were not disappointed.
"It was a great learning experience," said Revell,
"I would definitely go again."
Revell said the three left the Island on Sept. 8 and
were flown to Atlanta, Ga., then to Knoxville, Tenn.,
which was the staging area for the strike teams. He said
the three had no idea where they were to be sent. The
next leg of the trip took them back to Atlanta for a plane
to Salt Lake City, Utah, then to Kalispell, Mont.
Their first fire site was in the Kootenai National For-
est in the northwest corer of Montana. Revel said they
could see the Canadian mountain ranges from the site.
"We got up about 5:30 or 6 in the morning, got on a
bus and rode for an hour-and-a-half up winding mountain
roads," recalled Revell. "The terrain was rough and
bumpy and when we got to where the bus couldn't go on
any more, National Guard vehicles took us up steeper ter-
rain for another hour-and-a-half. Then we had to hike for
an hour-and-a-half. By the time we got to the site, we had
to eat and drink to get our energy back."
He said rains put out most of the fires before their
arrival and their job was to mop up. The team would
carve out a line in the brush around the perimeter of the
fire and put out any smoldering fires inside the line.
They would place water bars timbers or rocks -
throughout the area to prevent erosion and keep the ash
from being washed down the mountain.
"We worked until 5:30 or 6 in the evening, then
hiked down the side of the ridge to meet the buses," he
said "The first day it took us two hours. We got a lot
of blisters and ended up having to buy better boots."
Revell said the federal government provided every-
thing for the volunteers from issuing shirts and pants
daily, to sleeping bags, tents and food. Hot breakfasts
and dinners, from salad bar to dessert, were prepared
in semi-trailers converted to kitchens and lunches were
packed for the volunteers to take each day.
Camp sites were like small cities, he said, with
command tents for every phase of the operation. Show-
ers were in semi-trailers with dressing rooms in tents
attached to the trailers. There were sinks and mirrors set
up outside the trailers for shaving.
Temperatures ranged from 28 degrees in the morn-
ing to the 70s or low 80s in the afternoon. Some team
members had to bundle up in quilts during the morn-
ing bus ride, he said.
"We were at Kootenai for five days, then we were
put on a private bus to Wilsall in the Gallatin National
Forest," said Revell. "There were 40 summer homes
there and we were the first strike team to arrive. Fires
approaching the homes were put out by helicopters and
we mopped up, making sure all the fires were out.
There were people with infra-red cameras who
searched for hot spots around the homes."
One of the most interesting aspects of the opera-


Capt. Rich Losek manages a quick smile while heading back down the mountain after a day offighting smoul-
dering fires in Montana. Photos courtesy ofAnna Maria Fire District


While hiking to a work area in the Gallatin National Forest, firefighters encountered a burned out forest from
a past fire.


tion, he said, was helicopters that dropped huge fold-
ing tanks, then filled them with buckets of water. Fi-
nally, the helicopters dropped miles of hose for the
firefighters to connect to the tanks. Pressure was sup-


w..s^.^ , .

S. .' : .
,q* ,,*5%- ^- *' *^ ... ::-g'j
From left Island firefighters Brian Braun, Larry Revell and Capt. Rich Losek relax in front of their tent at their
camp site near the Kootenai National Forest in Montana.


plied by gravity.
"Before we got there, helicopters dropped red ex-
tinguishing agent," he recalled. "We could see it all
over the trees and ground. It was so heavy that it
knocked the trees down."
Local departments brought their trucks and equip-
ment to help the team, said Revell, and the terrain was
so steep that team members had to be constantly vigi-
lant for falling boulders.
"The views from the mountain were beautiful," he
said. 'We saw a lot of wildlife a mule, elk, deer and
moose. In one day, we saw 12 deer. They came right up
to us because they had never learned to be afraid of man."
Another interesting aspect of the trip was working
with people from all over the United States, said
Revell, particularly Eskimos and American Indians.
"Most of the Indians were from Montana," he noted.
"Many of them, as well as college students and teachers,
spend the whole season fighting fires. They go out for 21
days, take a break, then go back out again. Sometimes they
are out in the wilderness for five days at a time and food
is dropped to them from helicopters."
After their two weeks, the Florida team was given
a day of R and R before returning home, he said.
"It was really great to be a part of a disaster relief
operation," noted Revell, "and see the incident com-
mand system work on that big of a scale. It would be
a good experience for disaster relief managers, because
they could use the same system in a hurricane."
Braun added, "It was hard work, but I enjoyed it
The overall experience from the camaraderie to the
fire fighting was great."








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 6, 1994 0 PAGE 9 IEM


I YOUR PINI


Hats off to helpers
To all those responsible for the prompt clean up of
Holmes Beach after red tide: A job well done. It was
much appreciated.
Bill McDonald, Holmes Beach
Please say no to orimulsion
Please speak out against Florida Power and Light's
plans to burn orimulsion at its Parrish plant.
Burning this very dirty, toxic fuel from Venezuela
was made possible by your county commissioners low-
ering the air quality standards in Manatee County in
1993. Commissioners McClash and Chetlain were the
only ones to vote against weakening the air code.
Orimulsion is an untested high sulphur fuel. The
following is a paragraph from the "Manasota 88" news-
letter, September 1994:
"Residents of our area will be affected by large in-
creases in the amounts of pollutants, such as nitrogen ox-
ides (NOx), emitted into the air. NOx from power plants
causes respiratory disease in both normal and asthmatic
people. NOx also mixes with oxygen and unburned hydro-
carbons to produce ozone, nitrates, ethers, acids and other
compounds. This mixture will produce smog, further
threatening human health and the environment."
To speak out against this, write or call your county
commissioners at 745-3700. They are scheduling an-
other meeting concerning this matter.
Elizabeth P. Moss, Anna Maria
Mural's dog reflect older times
This letter is in reply to your editorial about the dogs
"Muffy" and "Hurricane" who were drawn as part of the
Artists Guild mural. These pictures are meant to depict
scenesTeminiscent of days past, exemplified by the tour-
ist reading a copy of the Island's first newspaper.
In researching Anna Maria records, we found that
the law prohibiting dogs on the beach was not enacted
until 1984.
Genevieve Alban, Holmes Beach

Yard waste pick-up delayed
until Nov. 1
The county notified Island public works depart-
ments this week that a state-mandated separate pick up
of yard waste is being delayed until Nov. 1 The date
was given as Oct 1 in last week's Islander Bystander.


More than one Woodstock
reunion
I am writing to The Islander Bystander concerning
the article on Woodstock '94 written by Whitney
Goldsen. Just to let your readers know the original
Woodstock held on Aug. 15-17, 1969, was not held in
Saugerties, N.Y. The original Woodstock was held in
Bethel, N.Y., approximately 40 miles from Saugerties.
The concert was held on Max Yasgur's farm.
I went to the original site the day before the show
at Saugerties to see what it was like. The feeling there
cannot be described in words not only being happy
to be alive but being happy to be at the original site. It
was almost as if you could feel the "ghosts" of the past
Woodstock. If they weren't there (which many of them
were) their spirits definitely were.
The next day I went to the Saugerties site and I was
very disappointed. I spent one day there and the feel-
ings I felt in Bethel were nowhere in Saugerties. There
were fights, broken bones and numerous incidents that
did not happen at all in Bethel. The only medical event
at Bethel was the birth of a beautiful baby. The
Saugerties show wasn't about peace, love and happi-
ness. It was merely another concert.
I went back to Bethel for three more days. The
people there were great not only kind and consid-
erate but the whole thing wasn't about money like it
was in Saugerties. If you needed something there
was someone there that was more than happy to help
you out.
Like someone said on Sunday when asked if he
thought it was a good day, he replied, "It's a great day."
That's exactly the way it was the whole time at
Woodstock in Bethel.
Melissa Cordivano, Bradenton

Native plantings make sense
This letter is to Mike Miller:
Congratulations on the "environmentally correct"
Anna Maria City Hall landscape project. We should all
follow suit and rid ourselves of burdensome lawns and
hedges. Replacing them with native and salt-tolerant
plants it's where we live would make life a lot
easier.
Thanks for the great job you're doing.
Flo Curtis, Anna Maria


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needs, no matter how big or small."
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Susan O'Connor welcomes you and her many long-time friends
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Resolution

against casino

gambling folds

at coalition level
By Pat Copeland
Islander Bystander
Former state legislator Ed Price urged Island
officials not to gamble with their cities' future and
pass ajoint resolution opposing casino gambling.
However, officials at last week's meeting of
the Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials
said they are an information sharing body and it
is not their place to take such a position.
Price, representing No Casinos, Inc., told of-
ficials, "This latest group for casino gambling in-
terests have already spent $4 million trying to
change Florida's constitution. They said they will
spend up to $12 million to persuade the voters to
legalize casino gambling in 47 locations through-
out the state. Most of this money comes from out-
of-state casino gambling interests and a few spe-
cial interest groups in Florida."
He asked Island officials to pass a joint reso-
lution opposing the legalization of casino gam-
bling and warned officials of the increase of all
types of crime that comes with casino gambling.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore asked which
of the 47 locations is closest to the Island.
Price said gambling would be permitted at all
pari-mutuels in the state. The closest is the
Sarasota Kennel Club; however, he noted that the
club's owner is opposed to casino gambling.
Whitmore said, "If it's going to be on the bal-
lot, I don't feel as a governmental body we should
be signing resolutions. I don't feel we should be
dictating to the people."
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger
agreed.
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches said, "I
question whether or not this body should take a
position without going back to their councils. The
purpose of this group is to talk about desired is-
sues, investigate and share information."








PE PAGE 10 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Land-development fees, beach use


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changes proposed
The cost of changing the future may be going up
in Bradenton Beach.
Changes in the city's land development regula-
tions, including the establishment of a fee schedule for
amendments to the city's comprehensive plan and a
host of other development-related charges, have been
approved by the Planning and Zoning Board. The pro-
posed changes will go to the city council for a public
hearing Oct. 12 at 7 p.m.
Probably most controversial are the fee increases.
Bradenton Beach has no established fees for a variety
of land-use changes, and instead relied on an informal
arrangement for amendments to the comprehensive
plan or the land development code.
City officials also had utilized the services of City
Planner Bill Brisson on a developer-pay basis: if a
large development was proposed, the developer would
pay for the services Brisson in writing the code
changes or other planning needs. Some residents have
questioned that practice, stating that the city planner
should not be paid by the developer for recommend-
ing changes in the city.
If approved by the city council, Brisson's services
will now be paid by the city. Fees will be assessed
against the developer to offset the charges, including:


Citizen-initiated comp plan amendment,
Citizen-initiated small comp amendment,
Citizen-initiated property rezoning,
Citizen-initiated LDC amendment,
Minor development (residential),
Minor development (non-residential),
Major development application,
Major development plus comp plan,
Major development plus rezoning,
Variance,


$2,500
$1,500
$1,000
$500
$150
$250
$2,000
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$2,750
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in Bradenton Beach
Developers must also meet the public meeting re-
quirements and pay for those costs, including advertis-
ing, under the proposed new fee schedule.
Most of the proposed changes to the land develop-
ment code outlined in Brisson's 33-page memo of rec-
ommendations are technical in nature. Many give more
authority to the Building Official to determine whether
a permit should be issued or not as well as waiver of
certain conditions for issuance of a permit.
The proposed changes also reflect:
Inclusion of home occupation licenses within the
code.
Amendments to the code to limit fence height and
setbacks.
A rule that any enlargement of floor area in an
existing building will require the entire building to
meet the requirements of a new development in regard
to landscaping and vehicular use.
Inclusion of Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District requirements for stormwater retention
and treatment for developments.
Another controversial element of the proposed
changes provides a mechanism for special exception
permits to be issued for rental of watercraft on the
beach in commercial-zoned districts.
Currently, Building Official Whitey Moran has de-
termined there is no means for a special exception to
be issued to rent personal watercraft, such as Jet-skis,
on the beach.
Although planners endorsed the changes, they of-
fered a number of suggestions to the city council to
strengthen the land development codes, including limi-
tations on the size of personal watercraft, specifying the
number of people who ride the craft and establishing
idle speed and use corridors from the beach to the Gulf.


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AFTER
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By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It's a nice "do," but it needs a little off the sides and
back. That's Allen Garner, coordinator of Florida's
Yards and Neighborhoods program says about the
landscaping at Anna Maria City Hall.
In recent weeks, the lush plantings put in several years
ago by Mike Miller have been the subject of impassioned
discussion. Many people like the healthy growth of green-
ery that fills the space between city hall and the Island
Players building, while others especially representa-
tives of the Players say it's too much and it's causing
a problem for them and their patrons.
Trying to resolve the dispute, City Commissioner
Dottie McChesney called in some outside help, and that's
how Garner entered the chlorophyll-colored picture.
"I was impressed with the overall plan of the land-
scape, and the plant selections were generally outstand-
ing," Garner wrote in a letter to McChesney following
his Sept. 18 visit to the site. "It is quite obvious that the
people who created this landscape are in tune with
Florida's natural systems and the concepts of
sustainability."
Critics of the landscaping aren't complaining about
the types of plants so much as they are about the size
of them. They claim they can't see the Players' mar-
quee, that undergrowth near the building is inviting
insect infestations and that the unloading of automo-
biles on Gulf Drive is difficult for patrons because of
the amount of growth that has taken place.
"The few problems that exist can nearly all be at-
tributed to maintenance issues," Garner says. "It is a
common problem this time of year that many landscap-
ers appear to be overgrown simply because a healthy


Medicare assistance
available at
Island Branch Library
Medicare assistance will be available on Fri-
days, Oct. 7, 14,21 and 28, between 10:15 a.m. and
12:15 p.m., at the Island Branch Library, 5701
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.


growing season is pitted against a reduced availabil-
ity of both employees and volunteers."
To a certain extent, Miller agrees. Miller says that
before she died in August, he could depend on former
city commissioner Mary Ross to volunteer hours of
her time every week to help him groom the city's
garden. Now it's all up to him, and he concedes that
with the heavy summer rains, there's been more work
than manpower.
On the other hand, Miller says he put in the land-
scaping with the idea he would control how it was main-
tained. He says the city has the ultimate say on what goes
on its city hall front yard, but that he must be present to
make sure any trimming is done correctly.
"I can't turn people loose in the landscape who
don't even know what they're trampling when they're
doing it," Miller told The Islander Bystander a couple
of weeks ago.
Recently the Players provided two volunteers
who trimmed plants under Miller's direction. He says
that maintaining the garden in this fashion doesn't
bother him.
"I am more than willing to have anybody who
who wants to clip things come and do it under my
guidance," Miller said. "It's merely a way to keep
order in the process."
At its Sept. 27 regular meeting, the city commis-
sion approved a one-time expenditure of $275 to have
the landscaping professionally trimmed.
Among other things Garner recommended, he
said a screw pine near the Players building should be
removed. The commission decided this should not be
done, because two other landscapers had advised this
would probably kill the tree.
In other business, the commission:
Approved raising the city's mowing fees for
vacant lots from a minimum of $35 to $40.
Approved the first reading of an ordinance that
would allow the city to charge $200 as a permit fee
for film production companies filming within the city.
Heard a proposal that a portion of beach perhaps
near the humpback bridge on North Bay Boulevard be
set aside as an area where dogs would be allowed, much
as the Palma Sola Causeway which is popularly known
as "Dog Beach" among animal lovers.








I Ht LANDER BYSTANDER U OCTOBER 6, 1994 PAGE 11 I[]

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Resort upgrade receives OK by

Bradenton Beach planners


The Banana Beach Resort is changing. Gone will
be the pink-and-purple facade, replaced with an old-
Florida style cupola, a 31-foot-high pitched tin roof and
35 Queen cocoanut palms in what is being described as
a "heavily landscaped" scene.
The Bradenton Beach Planning and Zoning Com-
mission unanimously approved the plans for the re-
vised motel last week. When construction is complete,
the business will re-open as "Queen's Gate" in the 1100
Block of Gulf Drive N.
Most of the work planned will encompass changes
to the facade, Building Official Whitey Moran said,
although a minor enlargement of the office will be in-


cluded in the construction.
Among the aesthetic alterations to the motel will be
a cupola, addition of a picket fence, extensive landscap-
ing including the 35 mature Queen palms for which
the new motel will be named and the turret-like
pitched roof, reminiscent of houses in the Keys.
The motel is comprised of six units, two duplexes
and a single-family home.
"This sounds terrific," Planning and Zoning
Commissioner Dan Goodchild said as he moved ap-
proval of the project.
A variance to expand the office will be requested
by the Board of Adjustment later this month.


Applicants seek firefighter position


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria Fire District received 15 applica-
tions for the position of fire fighter which is provided
for in the recently passed budget.
"Four of our volunteers have applied," said Chief
Andy Price. "The majority of applicants are local but
we have received applications from all over Florida."
Price said applicants are evaluated in five areas -
fitness, training, experience, personal evaluation and
oral interview.
"The fitness assessment is tough," he explained. "It
is administered by a certified fitness expert, Mike
Tyrell. The candidates have to take numerous tests that
measure their body composition in percent of fat, flex-
ibility, aerobic capacity, muscular endurance and
muscle strength in both grip and bench press. Based on
those five tests, they receive an overall fitness score."
In the evaluation for training, the candidates re-
ceive points for the different types they have taken and
experience includes volunteer or career. The personal
interview is given by Price a id the oral interview is in
front of a panel of three.
"Two of the panel members are firefighters and one


is a person outside of the fire service in order to give a
good balance," said Price. "Our third person is Holmes
Beach Police Chief Jay Romine. The panel asks the can-
didates a series of 15 questions developed by a fire fight-
ing expert. The questions are designed to reveal the core
person and whether that person is adaptable to our de-
partment."
Price said based on the overall scores, he will have
a recommendation on a candidate for the Anna Maria
Fire Commissioners to consider Oct. 10.

Island Players to hold
auditions
Auditions for "Murder Among Friends," acom-
edy thriller by Bob Barry, will be held Sunday, Oct.
16, at 7:30 p.m. at the Island Players Theatre.
The play, which runs from Dec. 2 through 11,
requires a cast of four males and two females, age
ranging from 30 through 40ish, all elegant. The
play may be read at the Island Branch Library.
The Island Players is located at the corer of
Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. For
more information call 794-2188.


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I







Jm PAGE 12 N OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I BITlfAIA


Cindy Browne-Hageman
Cindy Browne-Hageman of Bradenton Beach died
Sept. 19 at HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Ms. Browne-Hageman lived in Manatee County
for more than 25 years. She was a resident of
Bradenton Beach and was known affectionately as
"Olive Oil."
Ms. Browne-Hageman was an artist. She attended
the San Miguel de Allende Institute of Artists outside
of Mexico City, the Institute of Arts of Ancient City in
St. Augustine and the Ringling School of Art and De-
sign in Sarasota, studying under Herbie Rose. She re-
ceived a master's degree in psychology from Harvard.
Her works are on display at Key West Willy's in
Bradenton Beach and the Whistle Stop in Holmes
Beach.
She is survived by her mother in Bradenton, a sis-
ter and a brother.
A memorial service was held on Saturday, Oct. 1,
by friends at the Drift-In in Bradenton Beach.

Tony P. Garcia
Tony P. Garcia, 81, of Holmes Beach, died Oct. 2,
in Heritage Park Nursing Home.
Services were held graveside at Garden of Memo-
ries Cemetery, Tampa, with Rev. John H. Kaack offi-
ciating. Curry & Son Funeral Home, Tampa was in
charge of arrangements.
Memorials may be made to the American Cancer
Society, 1001 S. MacDill Ave., Tampa, Fla. 33629.
Born in Tampa, Mr. Garcia came to Manatee
County in 1986. He was the retired owner/operator of
Tampa Brake and Supply Co. He was Catholic.
He is survived by longtime companion, Bella D.
Duran of Holmes Beach; and three sisters, Bertha
Maurico, Mary Ramm and Ida, all of Tampa.

Pearl M. Gilley
Pearl M. Gilley, 89, a winter resident of Holmes
Beach, died Sept. 30 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Augusta, Maine, Mr. Gilley was a winter


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resident of Holmes Beach since 1993. He was owner
and operator of Barb and Gil's Diner and was a secu-
rity guard at New England Apple Products, both in
Littleton, Mass.
He is survived by two daughters, Carol Gilley
Cagnina of Holmes Beach, and Dorothy A. Surette of
Londonderry, N.H.; and four grandchildren.
There will be no visitation. Services will be held at
a later date in Maine. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home is
in charge of local arrangements.

Daniel R. Ossman
Daniel Ralph Ossman, 72, of Holmes Beach died
Aug. 9 in Greenbriar Nursing Center.
A memorial service will be held Sunday, Oct. 9, at
11:30 a.m., at Roser Memorial Community Church,
with the Rev. Frank Hutchison officiating. Memorials
may be made to Roser Church Music Fund, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria, Fla. 34216, or Island Branch Li-
brary, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217.
Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Ossman moved to
Holmes Beach in 1990 from Crystal Lake, Ill. He was
a self-employed bindery operator for J. Came, Inc., in
Chicago for 20 years. He was a past president of High
12, a past president of the Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria
Island and a member of Sahib Shrine Temple in
Sarasota. He was a member and a church deacon of
Roser Memorial Community Church. He was a retired
U.S. Navy captain and active in the Naval Reserve.
He is survived by his wife, Elaine B.; a daughter,
Marian R. Collins of Framingham, Mass.; a son David
R. of Crystal Lake, Ill.; and five grandchildren.

Virgil C. Squires
Virgil C. Squires, 73, of Holmes Beach died Sept.
27 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Fort Wayne, Ind., Mr. Squires came to
Holmes Beach from there in 1972. He was a cabinet
maker. He was a member of Redeemer Lutheran Church.
He was a U.S. Air Force veteran of World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two daughters,
Cheryl Womack of Ossian, Ind., and Karolyn Kim
Hoffmann of Bradenton; five sons, Jerry L. of Fort
Wayne, Larry of Greencastle, Ind., Rick Hoffmann of

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Tampa, Jeff Hoffmann of Port St. Joe and Greg
Hoffmann of Palmetto; three sisters, Virginia Peek of
Winter Haven, Marilyn Savio of Columbia City, Ind.,
and Martha Bendel of Fort Wayne; two brothers,
Clarien of Fort Wayne and Kenneth of California; and
three grandchildren.
Memorial service will be at a later date at Re-
deemer Lutheran Church. Memorial contributions may
be made to Redeemer Lutheran Church, 6311 Third
Ave. W., Bradenton, Fla. 34209. Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, Island Chapel, is in charge of arrangements.

Paula K. White
Paula K. White, 45, of Anna Maria, died Sept. 29,
1994, at home.
Services were at St. Bernard Catholic Church,
Holmes Beach. Memorials may be sent to Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Suite C,
Bradenton, Fla. 34209.
Ms. White was born in New Prague, Minn., and
came to Manatee County from Atlanta in 1986. She
was an administrator at Martin Marietta in Lakeland.
She was Catholic.
She is survived by a daughter, Laura Elizabeth
Walsh of Miami; three sisters, Patti King of Aspen,
Colo., Bonnie Pitchford of Apollo Beach, and Leslie
King of Atlanta, a brother Brian Swicegood of Atlanta;
and her parents, Joyce and Bobby Swicegood, both of
Anna Maria.

Edward James
Wilkinson, Jr.
Edward James Wilkinson, Jr., 86, of Holmes Beach
died Sept 28 at Freedom Care Pavilion, Bradenton.
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Wilkinson came to
Manatee County from Northport, Long Island, N.Y., in
1964. He was a retired executive for Exxon Corp. He
was a member of the Republican Club and the Sound
Surf Club, both of Northport.
He is survived by a daughter, Lois Howard of
Holmes Beach.
There will be no visitation or service. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home Island Chapel is in charge of ar-
rangements.

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I OCTOBER 6, 1994 A PAGE 13 jP


IA Dy E PI


Making a birthday wish
Bud Atteridge, official Island poet for The Islander Bystander, turned 93 years old on Sunday, Oct. 2.
Atteridge says he had visitors and callers all day. "After my 92nd birthday," says Atteridge, "I think I've
gotten a little sick and tired of them." Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


Huntsinger-Brooks wed


Marilyn Ann Brooks and Donald Eugene
Huntsinger III, both of Holmes Beach, were married
Aug. 27, 1994, at Longboat Island Chapel. The Rev.
Charles Jim Marsh officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Thomas Brooks of Port
St. Lucie and Sandra Brooks of Holmes Beach. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Huntsinger of
Bradenton.
Matron of honor was Mary Stockmaster, cousin of


the bride, of Holmes Beach. Bridesmaid was Chris
Maria of Port St. Lucie.
Best man was Dale Palucki of Anna Maria.
Groomsmen were Micheal McCauley of Holmes
Beach and Zach Stockmaster, cousin of the bride, of
Holmes Beach.
A reception followed the ceremony at the Anchor-
age restaurant and lounge. The couple honeymooned in
Key West. They live in Holmes Beach.


The Island Poet
I'm coming to the end of a very full life and I
am sure you will agree,
That somewhere in this mixed up world, the
Lord has smiled on me,
For when I married I lost my job and it was an
uphill fight.
I am sure He must have guided me, for things
turned out all right.
For we had two great boys whom I tried to
teach right from wrong,
And it was the greatest pleasure in my life, how
those two came along.
And there were grandchildren, some married
and out the door,
And others at the stage where they still crawl
around the floor.
In my retirement the Lord gave me the gift of
writing poems,
That made so many friends, 'cause they went
into their homes.
And now that I am along in years, it's very
clear to me,
Whenever the good Lord calls I'll be as ready
as I can be.
Bud Atteridge


American Littoral Society
to cruise Sarasota Bay
The Carefree Learner Cruise sponsored by the
American Littoral Society will be held Wednesday,
Oct. 26, from 2 to 4 p.m.
The cruise, leaving from Bayfront Park, Sarasota,
is to learn about the creatures of the bay and ways to
protect the shoreline, see bird nesting, grass flats and
mangrove habitats. Marine Biology teacher Steve
Cloud will conduct the tour. Cost is $10 for members
and $15 for non-members.
Information call Gloria Nathansen at 922-0493.


We Have
A Full
Hardware
Selection
* Custom
Millwork
* Formica
Tops and
Cabinets
* Fiberglass
Screening
* Paints and
Stains
* Roofing
Materials


ISLAND LUMBER
AND HARDWARE
213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082
-- .


"Why go into town and risk losing your
load, when we can deliver it for you!"
If we don't stock it we can get it for you.
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12


Many
Types Of
Wood
Pressure
Treated
Pine
Spruce
& Cedar
Hardwoods
Doors and
Trim
Lattice
Panels
Plywood


BUYING SELLING
For Appointment or Consultation \ Call Fred Vandergraff at
VADERGRAFF'S Cortez Coins and Antiques
The "Original" Cortez Coins operated by the VandergraffFamily since 1976. (Not affiliated with anyone else.)
COLLECTIONS, ESTATES, SILVER DOLLARS, PROOF SETS,
ALL GOLD COINS, ANTIQUE JEWELRY, AND STAMP COLLECTIONS
at 673 r. aroCortez Plaza East r) s6
10 -a (Walmart Shopping Ctr. across from Cortez Theatre) 7- 1L


See Glittering Pagodas, Sparkling Resorts & Vibrant Cities ...
Special BURMA & SIAM Cruise/Hotel Tour.
Cruise 18 days Yangon, Penang, Kuala Lumpur. Spend
3 nights in Hotels in Bangkok, 2 nights in Singapore
and much more. Air from New York only $99.
Dec. 2 and Jan. 19 only.................... $2,995
Unheard of until today, combined i
East/West. 14 Day Caribbean Special. This
is a special offer for certain weeks only and
outside staterooms are guaranteed.
Super Fall Value on Nov. 26 only... $1,224
7 Day Southern Caribbean Cruise. San Juan,
Barbados, Martinique, St. Marten & St. Thomas.
Outside cabins start as low as............. $800

A ^ [r


a


a


"The difference is
comfort!"
ippie.s
ANGEL II: Colors
Navy, Black
White and
Taupe


RESORT SHOE
I (ex t Alerso's toes


ISLANDER



What,
you never
call or
write?
Send your distant
friends and relatives
the best news on the
Island.Use the
subscription
form on page 7.


SAnna Maria Laundromat
I.
Open 24 Hours
S"' 7 Days a Week
S --f_ 9906 GULF DRIVE
S _--- -, r ANNA MARIA
Laundry i
facllltles In the Anna Maria
you will\ P
appreciate. Post Office Plaza
r F V A & A- A, A, A,


THE CANAL
Ask for our special
group fares ...
for the March 17 sail-
ing Acapulco Ft.
Lauderdale. That in-
cludes 2 extra nights
in Acapulco. This will
be a trip you'll not
forget, includes air.


ii I-c-' Irre ~r L


I PI I I~lr


1.


Ir-


11


JL-


11









E]] PAGE 14 M OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A I I[l] 4 I k


Register now for
Nov. 8 election
Voters must register by Oct. 10 in order to vote in
the Nov. 8 general election.
Islanders can register at Barnett Bank, at the cor-
ner of East Bay Drive and Manatee Avenue, all three
Island city halls and the tag office.
Any person who is 18 years of age, a citizen of the
United States and a legal resident of the state and
county in which he wishes to register is eligible to reg-
ister to vote. Any person who will become 18 on or
before the date of any election and meets the above
qualifications may pre-register on or after his 17th
birthday to vote in any election occurring on or after his
18th birthday.
The registrar will fill out your voter's registration
record and you will be asked to take an oath to protect
and defend the United States Constitution and swear
that you are qualified to register, are a citizen of the
United States and a resident of the county.
Absentee registration is available to the following:
Members of the armed forces, while in active
service, and their spouses and dependents.
Members of the Merchant Marine of the United
States and their spouses and dependents.
Citizens of the United States who are permanent
residents of the state and are residing outside of the
territorial limits of the United States and the District of
Columbia and their spouses and dependents when re-
siding with or accompanying them.
Citizens of the United States who are permanent
residents of the state and are temporarily residing out-
side the state, or who are residing within the state but
temporarily outside of the country of their permanent
residence.
Residents of the state who are physically disabled
and unable to register in person.
Residents of the state who are unable to register
in person.

Help the needy for
Thanksgiving
Your help is needed to assure a "Happy Thanksgiv-
ing" for more than 500 local migrant families. A coa-
lition of churches and individuals, founded by Sister
Nora of Holy Cross Church in Palmetto, would appre-
ciate donations of funds to help cover the cost of pur-
chasing two chickens for each family basket and food
such as sugar, flour, canned corn, dry pinto beans,
white rice, sweetened condensed milk, coffee and pow-
dered hot chocolate.
The food drive begins Monday, Oct. 17, and con-
cludes on Nov. 5. Barrels will be posted at all branches
of Barnett Bank. For financial contributions, checks
should be made out to Sts. Peter and Paul Church, ear-
marked "For the Migrant Thanksgiving Food Collec-
tion."

AMI Forever Young to
meet monthly
The AMI Forever Young, a group for seniors and
retirees on Anna Maria Island, will hold a meeting on
Monday, Oct. 10, 12:30 p.m., at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Following refreshments, a guest speaker from
Ringling Museum of Art will talk about the legacy of
Mable and John Ringling, sharing glimpses into their
lives and early Sarasota years with a slide presentation.
All those interested are invited to attend. For more
information call the community center at 778-1908.

Island youth to meet at
Longboat Key Chapel
All Island Youth will meet at Longboat Island
Chapel, 6200 Gulf of Mexico Dr., Longboat Key dur-
ing October on Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m.
Young people from Anna Maria Island will meet
at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Holmes Beach at 6
p.m. to carpool in vans to the Longboat Chapel. Youth
will be returned to their homes following the meetings
around 8:30 p.m.
All Island Youth, sponsored by a group of Island
churches, welcomes all youth from 7th through 12th
grades for supper, fun, thought and worship.


Preparing herb-flavored
vinegars is topic at
library program
The Island Family and Community Education Club
will meet at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach, on Monday, Oct. 10, at 1:30 p.m.
Guest speaker Brenda Rogers, Manatee County
Extension home economist, will talk about "Alterna-
tive Seasonings," which includes low or no-sodium
alternatives to food seasoning and preparing herb-fla-
vored vinegars.
The program is open to the public. For more infor-
mation call 722-4524.

LBK Art Center offers
classes
The Longboat Key Art Center is taking reserva-
tions for the following classes beginning in October.
Oil and Acrylic, taught by M. DuCharme, will be
held on Wednesday and Saturday.
Jewelry Fabrication, taught by M. Rubinow, will
be held on Wednesday through Friday.
Jewelry Casting, taught by M. Rubinow, will be
held on Wednesday.
Glass on Metal Techniques, taught by J. Garrison,
will be held on Tuesday and Thursday.
Sculpture in Stone, Wood and Wax, taught by L.
Johnson, will be held Tuesday through Thursday.
Photography, taught by B. Hively, will be held on
Wednesday.
Pottery, taught by W. Hoebel, will be held on
Wednesday.
Pottery, taught by S. Benson, will be held on
Thursday.
Painting/All Media, taught by L. Sherwood, will be
held on Tuesday through Thursday.
Class fees are $50 for five sessions for members.
The Longboat Key Art Center is located at 6860
Longboat Dr. S., Longboat Key. For more information
call 383-2345.

MHS Anchor Club to
hold spaghetti dinner
The Anchor Club of Manatee High School will
hold a spaghetti dinner on Friday, Oct. 7, in the high
school's cafeteria. The kick-off begins at 5 p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults and $4.50 for children
aged 12 and younger. Tickets are available from any
Anchor member, in the MHS bookkeeping office or at
the door. Proceeds go toward the service club.

Off Stage Ladies to hold
luncheon Oct. 12
The Off Stage Ladies will hold its first fall meet-
ing and luncheon on Wednesday, Oct. 12, at Crabby
Bill's in Holmes Beach. A social hour will begin at 11
a.m. followed by luncheon at noon.
The directors for the Island Players' upcoming
plays of the 1994-95 will be honored guests and will
speak briefly about their shows.
For more information call 792-3631.


Julie Barth, Anna Maria,
brought daughters
Lauren, age 4, and
S". -n Donna, age 2, with her to
Sthe special Island regis-
tration drive at The
Islander Bystander office
Saturday. Registrar (and
Features editor) Tomara
SKafka administered the
oath. Two first time
registrants and 10 new
county voters bring the
total number of voters
registered for the current
elections by Kafca to over
40.




Fire station to hold open
house Oct. 15
The Anna Maria Fire District is sponsoring an open
house on Oct. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Station 1,
6001 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Island firefighters and police officers as well as
personnel from EMS (emergency medical services),
Florida Highway Patrol, Bayflite, U.S. Coast Guard,
Marine Rescue, U.S. Forestry Department, Manatee
County Blood Bank and American Red Cross will
make presentations. Smokey the Bear will make an
appearance.
Demonstrations will include the "Jaws of Life,"
proper use of a fire extinguisher, Florida Highway
Patrol's seat belt crash machine and the Bayflite heli-
copter.

Veteran's Service
officer available
A Manatee County Veteran's Service Officer will
be available to interview clients, by appointment only,
on Monday, Oct. 10, 17, 24 and 31, between 1 and 4
p.m., at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach.
For more information or to make an appointment
call 749-3030.

St. Bernard Guild to
meet Oct. 13
Members of St. Bernard Guild will meet at the
Welsmiller activity center of St. Bernard Catholic
Church, Holmes beach, on Thursday, Oct 13, at 1 p.m.
Light refreshments will be served prior to the meet-
ing. Guests speakers are Barbara Cuva of Absolutely
Anywhere Travel Service and Vicki Breneman, who
will present a short program on "Travel Tips." Guests
are always welcome.

Seventh Annual

Springfest accepting
applications
The Anna Maria Island Art League is now accept-
ing applications for the Seventh Annual Anna Maria
Island Springfest to be held on March 11 and 12, 1995,
in Holmes Beach.
The juried fine arts festival features original works
of art and crafts. Completed applications must be re-
ceived by Dec. 15. To request an application write to
The Anna Maria Island Art League, 5312 Holmes
Blvd., Holmes Beach, FL 34217, or call 778-7125.

Telephone pioneers to
meet Oct. 12
The DeSoto Life Member Club of the Telephone
Pioneers of America will hold its monthly meeting and
luncheon on Oct. 12 at the Bradenton Elks Club, 2511
75th St. W., Bradenton.
All visiting Pioneers are invited. Social hour begins
at 11 a.m. and lunch is at noon.
For reservations call Charlie Kimberlain at 792-
2744 by Wednesday, Oct. 5.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 6, 1994 M PAGE 15 mIB


Wine and dine


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
The sleepy summer months are coming to a close
- has it cooled off yet? and many of our area res-
taurants are gearing up for a fast-paced snowbird sea-
son to come.
Among those recently re-opening after much de-
served vacations: Bridge Tender Inn, Ches's Pasta
Plus, Mutiny Inn, Isabelle's Southern Eatery,
Euphemia Haye, Harry's Continental Kitchens and
Ivo's Fine Dining.
Tia Lena's debuts their new wine list next month.
They've been working on their offerings of domestics
and imports including some fun wines such as Shiraz,
a line of robust red wines from Australia meant to be
enjoyed with spicy foods.
The Silver King Band is coming back! The three
silvers include Bradenton's all-time great harp-player/
singer Rock Bottom (David York) who is currently liv-
ing in St. Pete, Flo Mingo (Angela Altieri) now living
in Neuenkirchen, Germany, and Barry Cuda (Kent
"Twig" Smith) from Key West.
The band has a new CD release and will host sev-
eral "release parties" including take a Blues Cruise on
Saturday, Oct. 29, aboard the Miss Cortez.
The CD is titled "Blues, Shuck & Jive" and fea-
tures the band's trademark style, a rowdy combination
of jump blues, swing, barrelhouse and classic blues
from the '20s to the '50s as well as band originals.
The Silver King Band starts their Florida tour at
Gulfport Casino in Gulfport (just over the Skyway and


left) and will be at Skipper's Smokehouse in Tampa on
Saturday, Oct. 23. They'll also be at St Pete's
home of the blues, the Ringside Cafe,
somewhere uptown, on
Oct. 27. For more info,
call Rock Bottom at
813-895-6633.

It's getting'
spooky here
Anybody have any
special Halloween plans?
Let me know soon and
I'll be glad to list your activ-
ity in Stir-it-up.
The Drift-In tells me
they'll be having a Halloween
costume party with lots of prizes
and fun on Saturday, Oct. 29, start-
ing at 9 p.m. It will also serve as a
celebration birthday party for cus-
tomers' October birthdays.
At Turtles, the Halloween bash
will last the weekend, Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 28 and 29, with costume contests and cash prizes,
drink specials and entertainment by Einstein's Attic.
Blindside plays for the "Beach Bash" on Sunday and,
in fact, every Sunday in October.
The Anna Maria Fire and Rescue Volunteers will
hold the 30th Annual Halloween Dance, Saturday, Oct.
22, starting at 9 p.m., at St. Bernard Catholic Church.
Debra Jean and the Melotones will perform.
Don't forget to make plans to attend Fall Festival,
the big annual benefit outdoors at Anna Maria El-
ementary School on Saturday, Oct. 29. Besides games
and a haunted house, there's food, food and more food
(cake walk anyone?) and lots of fun for children of all
ages. Members of the PTO are taking orders for pump-
kins which will be available on Oct. 27 for pick up at


The Silver King Band will
J come to town Oct. 29,
performing on the Miss
Cortez.














the school. Pumpkin
orders are also taken
at the school office. Call 778-
1125 for information.

On the arts
The Island Players Theatre box office is open for
its 46th season debuting with a French comedy, "A
Flea in Her Ear." The play runs Friday, Oct. 14, and
through Oct. 23. Tickets are $10 at the theater, located
at the corner of Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue in Anna
Maria. Call the box office at 778-5755 between 10 am.
to 3 p.m. everyday except Sunday and one hour before
show time. Performances begin at 8 p.m. except for
Sunday matinees on Oct. 16 and 23, which begin at 2
p.m. No shows on Mondays.
Bren Jackson, owner of Phoenix Frame, is leav-
ing for Houston, Texas, to try out a new job opportu-
nity: setting up trade fairs for artists. Meanwhile, she
is looking for someone to run the frame shop in her
absence. If you're interested give her a call.


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're in for a very pleasant surprise.

CAFE ON THE BEACH




Wednesday Pig Roast
Friday Fish Fry
7',1 Sunday Bar-B-Que
A P.S. We have the best sunsets!

Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!

"IT'S THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN!"
Play "Islander Football" and you could win $50.
Turn to page 18 for contest entry and rules.


1.7
LT $ 09


TH LADR*N ISCUNT LIUORSTRE
SINC[ 1955 I-' 39 YEARSf


1 A


SMIRNOFF POPOV VODKA RELSKA VODKA ABSOLUTE
VODKA 75IMPORTED SWEDEN VODKA
$ 15.99 LTR 11.95 s$10.99 '" *13 59
-FOR-*30.50 2-FOR-23.00 .- L 1
CANADIAN CLUB CANADIAN MIST RICH & RARE FLEISCHMANN'S LTD
CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY
LTR $18.99 LT9 R $13.99 1.71 $12.75
1.75 LTR 314.59 2-FOR-'27.00 LTR

ANCIENT AGE JIMBEAM EARLY TIMES EVAN WILLIAMS
BOURBON BO O WHISKEY BOURBON 90-PROOF
U1.75 $13E99 1I751
2-FOR-'2700 15.69 $13.99 1 $14.99
IMPERIAL LOUNGE HAPPY HOUR ANCIENT AGE
BLENDED WHISKEY 4-7 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY BLENDED WHISKEY
'12.99 2 FOR PRICES $g
1.75 MIR'4.00 2 WELL DRINKS $2.00 1.75 12.99
LTR Net '8.99 2 CALL DRINKS $3.00 LTR 2-FOR-'25.00

SOLD SMUGGLER MUIRHEAD MARTIN'S V.V.0. CUTTY SARK
SCOTCH SCOTCH SCOTCH 86-PROOF SCOTCH
LTR $15.99 2-FO-13.29 $17.99 1 24.99
,.R-'2.OO ,, s_.

WHITESIDE JOHNNIE WALKER RED RON CARLOS RUM BACARDI RUM
SCOTCH 86-PROOF 1.7s $ LT
175 1 n LTR 27.99 'R 11.39'TR I$1. $7,
LTR 17.59 750ML 15.99 LIGHT OR DARK LTR1 99 99
POPOV GIN BOOTH'S GIN SCHENLEY OFC PHILADELPHIA
1.7 11 .99 90 PROOF CANADIAN WHISKEY .14.69 BLENDED WHISKEY
LTR I LTR 1.5 LTR 1.75 LTR 3. 1. $601 7 1 88
ITR QQ 9 $9.99 $15.85 1.75 LTR 11.69 LTR $ 1.88


RESTAURANT
COME & CELEBRATE WITH US

-ERMAl OKHOLEoRfESZ
Starting: Saturday, Sept 24
On Tap: Oktoberfest Draft
AUTHENTIC GERMAN SPECIALTIES
Sauerkraut, Bratwurst, Blutwurst
Weisswurst, Liverwurst ...
OPEN 4:30 10PM Mon Sun
Located in the Anna Maria Shopping Centre (We're right next to Walgreens)
3246 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island
778-1320









- IE] PAGE 16 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


School


Daze


1 l l


Anna Maria

School Menu
Monday, 10/10/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Corn Dog or Ham Patty on Bun, Tater
Tots, Fruit Juice, Juice Bar
Tuesday, 10/1194
Breakfast: Bagel & Jelly or Cereal & Toast,
Pears
Lunch: Roast Turkey Gravy or Hamburger Gravy
or Breaded Beef Patty, Mashed Potatoes &
Gravy, Fresh Baked Roll, Washington Cinnamon
Apples
Wednesday, 10/1294
Breakfast: Scrambled Egg w/Melted Cheese on
Toast or Cereal, Grape Juice
Lunch: Taco Salad w/Roll or Tacos with Lettuce
& Tomato Cup, Refried Beans, Fruit, Peach
Turnover
Thursday, 10/13/94
Breakfast: Pancakes w/Syrup or Oatmeal,
Pineapple
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Hot dog, Corn,
Peaches, Bar Cookie
Friday, 10/14/94
NO SCHOOL
All meals served with milk.
............................ *BBS


B
S
S
S
S
6
0
0
5- 0
0
S
0
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
0
S
0
6
S
S
S
S
S
0
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S

S
OS


rammmmmmmmmmmmmmmq
EXPIRES O I

C/ 010519 Cortez Road
: 792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

PIZZA BUFFET
ANYTIME

ALL YOU 2.99
CAN EAT 2.99
WITH THE PURCHASE OF SOFT DRINKS
ONE COUPON FOR ANY SIZE PARTY
hlmmmmMl COUPON Memmmmllm


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT *
SEAFOOD BUFFET *IO"5
7 Days a Week 5 to 10 PM
HOLMES BEACH LOCATION ONLY
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
BEACH ATTIRE OK
~FRlEB HEAD * MLDS
mDTECRE0 fDEHIRD

CRABBY HOUR *
3PM 6PM DAILY
500 Drafts $100 Well Drinks
ENTERTAINMENT & LANCING *
Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8PM to 12 AM
NFL SATELLITE *
WMPE 9TM LmUmEl & mmmDEB

5325 MARINA DRIVECERIF AA 572 14 ST. WEST
(formerly Pete Reynard's' 0 It Iy (U.S. 41)
Holmes Beach (iC 1ABBY Bradenton
778-9566 7DAY! 751-3070
-- NMEEM%


Y'S






Goamet I -...

Sty& h CAaerig...

5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key
For Reservations 383-0777 (Behind Circle K)


Something innovatively new at...


ie fMutiny Inn



Try Our $39.95 (2) Dinner Special,
includes an appetizer & a bottle of wine
Entrees Include:
Fresh Gulf Catches: Prepared (10)
ways nightly.
Black Angus N.Y. Strip Au Poivre
Fresh Gulf Shrimp & Blue
Crabmeat Alfredo on "Angel Hair" or
Spinach Fettucine
The Island's Finest Crab Cakes
"The Mutiny Inn" on the corer of
Manatee Ave. & Gulf Dr.
Serving Dinner
Monday thru Saturday 5:00 10:00pm
Closed Sunday
z Peservations Suggested
Available for Private Parties
605 Manatee Avenuee, Holmes Beach
(813) 778-5440
^l~y ^^--B^^^ ^^^


Enjoy a Northern Italian Cuisine
in a relaxed casual atmosphere
at affordable prices
featuring
LARGE SELECTION OF PASTA DISHES
THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI


TASTY SPANISH SPECIALTIES
Hours: Open Tues-Sun Bam-2pm /4:30-10pm
Free Delivery Closed Monday Take Out Available
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach




THE



RESTAURANT

DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY


* MUSi'


Great job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School
for the week ending Sept. 23. Front row, left to right, are Wyndham Riter,
Christin Chiles, Patrick Cole, Brian De Bellevue, Kevin Hennessey, Katie
O'Neill and Nick DeWick. Back row, left to right, are Kris Smith, Ben Sato,
Billy Malfese, Taylor Manning, Vanessa Atwood, Kim Schenk, and Katie
Lindahl.


SJoy Courtney


OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 6, 1994 A PAGE 17 ID


Yes, we're back from vacation and ready to serve you.




Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
SAdjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key





The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR



WILLY STEELE
FRI & SAT OCT7 & 8 10PM

3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085




SILVER QUEEN CORN
FRESH DAILY

BANANAS TENNESSEE T
Always "VINE RIPE" w
190LB. TOMATOES


Ambrosi
Melon *


S Planet of the
projects
S All the wonders of the
solar system came to life
in Marcia Brockway's
fourth-grade class. Josh
Sato, left, chose the planet
Pluto for his project
because he was impressed
Sby the fact that Pluto is
3,682,600,000 miles from
the sun. Rachel Bell,
center, wears her unique
project. Bell attached all
Sthe planets to a beret to
" show their relationship to
her hand-held sun, while
Lindsey Geeraerts, right,
shows off her project, the
planet Venus.

Spiders are a
wonder
Robbie Dial, left, and
Jordan Bowers work on a
word puzzle dedicated to
the spider world in Debbie
Brady's third-grade class
at our Island school. "I
like spiders," said Jordan.
"They shoot venom into
insects and eat bugs. "
Boy, that must be one
exciting puzzle.




Joy Courtney


The Only
Authentic Greek Restaurant
Between Bradenton & Sarasota
BREAKFAST SPECIALS Mon-Thurs 10AM-2PM
EARLY BIRDS. Mon-Sat 11AM-6PM
HAPPY HOUR Lounge Only 11AM-6PM
LOUNGE PROUDLY PRESENTS
BRIAN BEEBE
Tues-Thurs 6-10 pm Fri & Sat 7-11 pm


795-7065
MON-SAT 10 AM-11 PM
CLOSED SUNDAY
1830 59th St. W. In Blake Park Bradenton


NiCki' W.est59th


jo
\ osed o' "

"The best hamburgers ana Ca\ooe B
the coldest mugs of beer \ va Al
this side of Heaven." ffIe Oct -
ixuffu, Pat Geyer, Owner. ,
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


Open J.,, -
Daily '. This Area's Only Full
Noon Service lea Cream Shoppe
to
10 p.m. 11904 Cortez Road West
794-5333 SURFING WORLD VILLAGE
--- -- i-------n---
S10th Anniversary COUPON
I Cones BUY ONE
Shakes
SSundaes GET SECOND
Sodas AT 1/2 PRICE
SFloats OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
WITH THIS AD NOW THRU OCT. 12 '94
L -----------


Two helps out of one
Brian Fasse, a student in Toni Lashway's third-
grade class at Anna Maria Elementary School,
works at feeding the hungry and helping the school
at the same time. The Campbell Soup labels Brian is
taking off soup cans will be donated to the school's
Campbell Soup Label Program to earn sports
equipment. In turn, the remarked cans of soup are
part of the class's donation to the City of Bradenton
"Mayor's Feed the Hungry Program." The collected
food will restock the pantry shelves of organizations
such as Meals on Wheels, Salvation Army and Safe
Place.


-Bridge Tender Inn-
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn
NOW FEATURING -
LIGHTER PORTIONS 7
3:30 to 5 PM jhj
TUESDAY OUR FAMOUS
PRIME RIB ... $8.95 Dinner Spirits
NEW HOURS: 3 to 11 DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, Q
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $ .95
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


Isandrinn

Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


ON THE CITY PIER
BRIDGE STREET
PIER CAFE
200 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach 779-1706

Meet our staff: Jodi, formerly with Cortez Cafe
and Jenny, formerly with The Sweet Spoon.

OPEN: Sun. Thurs. 8 AM to 7 PM
L Fri. & Sat. 8 AM to 8 PM
BREAKFAST 990
Serving HOME
Breakfast, OF THE
SLunch 1
& Snacks 15
Cafe Dining CUP OF
Out Over COFFEE
Sarasota Bay


EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs. toast,
'Nq home fries and coffee ... Only $1.75


LARGE GULF SHRIMP
7" LB
DELI Salads & Sandwiches


IMonFriB








. Ei PAGE 18 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Blessed are the

pets of the Island
Tuesday, Oct. 4, was the Feast of St. Francis, a tra-
ditional Catholic celebration which incorporates the
glorification of St. Francis' work and his love of ani-
mals. Rev. Donald Baler blessed the Island's pets on
Sunday afternoon, Oct. 2, outside St. Bernard Catho-
lic Church in Holmes Beach, in honor of the saint who
devoted his life to the sick and poor, yet loved and
celebrated nature and animals.


Julia McDonald of Bradenton, left, watches while
Father Baier blesses her three-year-old son Sean's
three stuffed dogs and Stu their "live" cat in the Pet
Waggin' box Islander Photos: Tomara Kafka


SICK of DINING OUT?
TIRED of COOKING?

CHEF MIKE'S
A PERSONAL CHEF SERVICE
Provides you with your own Personal Chef!
A TWO WEEK SERVICE INCLUDES:
Customized Menu's
Complete Grocery Shopping
The Finest Meats and Produce
Special Diet Considerations
Healthy, Tasteful Meals
We use the Freshest and Highest Quality Foods
to prepare our delicious, preservative free meals.
Call now and experience this affordable luxury.
CHEF MIKE'S
For information phone
795-7045
Bradenton, FL






GOURMET GULF FRONT DINING



FRESH CATCH CRAB CAKES
SCALLOPS VEAL FRANCHISE
TEMPURA BATTERED SHRIMP
Soup or Salad, Cuban Gorlic 1
Bread and Choice of Entree: Y I 2.




Tax not Included, 15% gratuity added.
No dining club programs, certificates or discount
programs honored on Sunset Specials.
SUNDAY thru THURSDAY 4:30 to 6:30
Reservations Suggested
778-LENA (5362)
OPEN 4:30 CLOSED MONDAYS


Michael Paler, visiting from Clearwater, brought Parko, his terrier-mix dog to be blessed by Father Baier.
Paler said "He now has a sense of inner peace."

Snooty's Fourth Annual

Party in the Park planned for Oct. 23


Snooty's Fourth Annual Party in the Park will be
held Sunday, Oct. 23, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., at Wa-
terfront Rossi Park, Bradenton.
The day's events include all-day musical entertain-
ment plus the Sarasota Ski-A-Rees water stunt show,
the Misty Blues Sky Diving Team, an antique car
show, flag procession, health fair, antique car show,
more than 75 arts and crafts exhibitors and food ven-
dors. There will be games, pony rides, a moon walk,
putt-putt golf, a train and petting zoo for kids. A fire-





^ HAPPY HOUif j
4 to 6 PM
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4 to 6 PM

Sct imerfis


(Thicken schnitzel sauerbraten
Sratwurst Rnockwurst
and Special (ctoberfest Peers
OPEN: Authentic British
Mon.-Thurs. 4 to 10 Atmosphere
Friday 12 to 10 with 8 British
Sat., Sun. 8 to 10 Draft Beers
PUB HOURS 'TIL ? on Tap.

2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173

S5702 MARINA DR.
HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 'til Midnight)
STuesdays: QUARTER BEER NIGHT, 6 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT REGGAE
SThursdays: LADIES NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wed Oct 5 Reggae "Democracy"
Fri & Sat Oct 7 & 8 "DNA Band"
(Dean from former DT's)
Sun Oct 9 Beach Bash 7 to 11PM
with "Blindside" (formerly DT's)
Wed Oct 12 Reggae "Jam-iya"
Fri, Sat & Sun Oct 14, 15 & 16 "Blindside"
CLOSED MONDAYS


works display over the Manatee River will close the
celebration.
Visitors can go see Snooty at the South Florida
Museum at a discount admission of $2 for adults and
$1 for children. The Art League of Manatee County, on
the grounds of Rossi Park, will hold an open house.
Admission is free, but on-site parking is $2.
Proceeds go to benefit Snooty the manatee, the
South Florida Museum and Manatee Area Retarded
Citizens (MARC).



OPENING SOON

sonnydaze
110 bridge st., bradenton beach 778-3344
A REAL
COFFEE HOUSE
OPEN MIC NIGHTS
POETRY READINGS
C ART ( MUSIC
BILLIARDS

delicious gourmet
coffee, tea & snacks


'^
S -l
-gS"''


LOUNGE PACKAGE LIQUOR DRINK & FOOD SPECIALS
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT
KARAOKE
Wednesday & Thursday 8 to Midnight

DAN CRAWFORD
Friday & Saturday Oct. 7 & 8 9PM 1AM

Now Serving Breakfast
Sunday 9 -12
Also $1.00 Vodka Day
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 A PAGE 19 I-


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Sept. 23, larceny, Cypress Street beach. The com-
plainant reported that he left a beach bag and a gold
watch on his beach towel. Upon his return, the watch
was missing.
Sept. 23, burglary, 300 block of South Bay Bou-
levard. A person unknown entered the residence and
removed various items.
Sept. 28, battery, 600 block of Rose Street. The
complainant reported that the subject came to his door,
rushed into the residence, pushed him down and spat
into his face.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 21, burglary to an automobile, criminal
mischief, 100 block of Bridge Street. The complainant
reported that she parked her vehicle and went to the
Sports Lounge. After exiting the business, she found
an insult scratched into the paint on her vehicle, a
sweater and school book removed and mace sprayed
on the steering wheel and driver's seat. The book was
found with pages ripped out. Damages were $400.
Sept 24, criminal mischief, 107 Gulf Dr. S., Key
West Willy's. Upon leaving the business, the subject
pulled the Key West Willy's dummy away from the
wall causing its head to break. The subject fled the
scene. The officer located the vehicle in which the sub-
ject fled and the driver said he would pay damages.
Sept. 24, property damage, 2100 block of Gulf
Drive North. The officer responded to a traffic crash at
the S-curve and observed that a vehicle had spun out
and made contact with the guard rail. The driver fled
the scene.
Sept 25, battery on a law enforcement officer, re-
sisting with violence, 100 block of Bridge Street While
on patrol, the officer observed the subject, who appeared
to be asleep, sitting on a public bench. The officer called
out as he approached the subject and the subject opened
his eyes and looked at the officer. The officer asked for
his identification and the subject stated he was an Ameri-
can and didn't have to put up with this. The officer told
the subject that he needed the information so he could call


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From Subway I THESECOND I
During Happy Hour I AT I
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10OPM-Close Draft Specials I
MONDAY I EVERY DAY! I
4-9PM 500 Drafts I Valid only with this ad I
$1.25 Beers, 2 for 1 Wells I through 10-15-94
TUES Ladies Night One ad per couple;
All Drinks & Beers $1 I One offer per ad. I
4-9PM 500 Drafts Lower Priced Entree I
$1.25 Beers, 2 for 1 Wells is Half Price
WED Free Pool I ANDBA I
All Day & Night s _
4PM-Close sEAFwOD 'iilr
2 for 1 Well Drinks I --
THURS (some) I I
Free Juke Box
8PM-12AM I 100 Spring Avenue I
$1.50 Ice Beers I Anna Maria, Florida I
8PM-Close 0 0V s
Draft Specials I (813) 778-0444
FRIDAY & SATURDAY I Call ahead for preferred seating. I
Shooter Specials and Lunch and dinner daily.
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someone to take the subject home.
The subject gave the officer his name and said the
officer was harassing him. The subject clenched his
fist The officer noted that the subject smelled strongly
of an alcoholic beverage and was impaired. The officer
asked the subject to sit down and told him if he did not
give the information, the officer would have to place
him in custody under the Marchman Act
The subject again refused to give the information,
stood up and pushed the officer. The officer grabbed
the subject's shirt to keep from falling, but both fell on
the bench with the subject on top. The subject began
punching the officer in the ribs. The officer pushed the
subject back and they both fell to the ground. The of-
ficer called for backup and the subject began swinging,
knocking the officer's radio and flashlight loose. After
a considerable struggle, the officer placed the subject
in handcuffs.
Sept. 27, domestic battery, possession of mari-
juana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia,
200 block of Church Street. The victim reported that
she and Shawn K. Hotoff, 32, of Bradenton Beach,
argued as he was moving out of the residence. Accord-
ing to the report, she said Hotoff threw a glass tea pot
at her, just missing her head, and punched her in the
mouth. While placing Hotoff in custody, the officer
performed a pat down and found a small bag of mari-
juana and a pipe.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 21, larceny, 3009 Gulf Drive, Anchor Inn
parking lot. The band was loading their equipment and
a sub woofer valued at $700 was removed by a person
unknown.
Sept. 23, battery, 200 block of 77th Street. Two
intoxicated subjects were fighting.
Sept. 23, grand larceny of a 15 hp outboard mo-
tor valued at $2,300, 2700 block of Avenue B.
Sept. 23, petty larceny of a bicycle valued at
$130, 3600 block of Gulf Drive.


New Options to hold
luncheon Oct. 13
New Options Center at Manatee Vo-Tech,
Bradenton, will hold a support luncheon for single
parents and displaced homemaker students on
Thursday, Oct 13, from 11:30 am. to 12:30 p.m.
Reservations must be made by Tuesday, Oct
11, by calling 751-7922.

Sept. 23, burglary to an automobile, 4200 block
of Gulf Drive. A glove box was pried open.
Sept 24, code violation, 3000 block of Avenue
F. The complainant reported that a catamaran left on
the beach has not been used since June and young
people use it to party and drink. The abandoned boat
was turned over to code enforcement and the officer
said patrol would monitor the young people.
Sept. 25, trespass, disorderly conduct, 3009 Gulf
Dr., Anchor Inn. The officer responded with regard to
a white male creating a disturbance. The subject was
gone upon the officer's arrival but returned after the
officer left and refused to leave the business. The of-
ficer returned and advised the subject to leave. The
subject raised his hand to strike the officer and the
back-up officer grabbed him. The subject scuffled with
officers before being handcuffed.
Sept 26, Marchman Act, 5300 block of Marina
Drive. The officer found the subject passed out in his ve-
hicle. He was lying on the back seat hanging out the ve-
hicle. The officer noted he was unable to care for himself
and had no one to care for him. He was placed in custody.
Sept. 27, found property a large green and
white raft with "Island Fun" written on it, 6700 block
of Gulf Drive on the beach.
Sept..28, animal, 400 block of Clark Drive. The
complainant found a black dog, part poodle, with no
identification. It was taken by an animal control officer.


KING CRAB DINNER $1 69
WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo; Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish.............S12.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop............1.....12.95
Fri. Combo: Kingcrab & Bulldozer Lobster Tail.........'13.95
Sat. Swordfish (Grilled)........................................ 95
ON THE BAY END SUNDAY-THURSDAY
OF BROADWAY VISA & 11:30 AM 9:00 PM
LONGBOAT KEY MASTERCARD FRIDAY & SATURDAY
383-1748 NOW ACCEPTED 11:30 AM- 9:30 PM


GREAT FOOD. GREAT BEACH.
GREAT SUMMER SPECIALS.

Half-Price Lunch.

Half-Price Dinner.
Buy one lunch and get the second f equal or lesser
value at half price until 4 p! Every Day!
(With this ad, one per couple through October 16,1994.)
-IOR-

Buy one inner and get the second.jual or lesser
S valuit half priceaifll i
Su through ThuEi
(WiMlithisoee rlpl BiereiA

Come ofout to the Beachhouse. Greateck.
Great playground. Great entertainment ligdly,
with Dixieland on Tuesday eveningI




Ehoue?
great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach, (813) 779-2222








[B PAGE 20 E OCTOBER 6, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Floating islands, big fish and guest privileges


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Chippewa Flowage is a strange and wondrous area of
northern Wisconsin where islands float around, legends
abound and it's very, very easy to get very, very lost.
Classic Wisconsin roadhouses, with old Blatz or
Old Style signs out front, seem to be the only depend-
able point of reference in the area. There's only one
reason non-Indians go there to hunt muskies. My
excuse last week was a simple visit to my birthplace,
with my kid brother as a guide.
I've long ago forgotten most of the roads, road-
houses and other important landmarks. My brother, on
the other hand, is a local.
You can find muskie hunters in any of those road-
houses places with names like "Dun Rovin'" or
"The Snug," generally sipping their third glass of beer.
They're quietly trading tales of the morning's fishing,
or "hunt," as they call it. The muskie is a Wisconsin
version of our tarpon, and they take the hunting of their
silver kings very seriously indeed.
Formally known as the Muskellunge, the giant of
the pike family, serious muskies seem to start at about
25 pounds and run up to something over 40. Easily the
biggest and toughest freshwater fish up in the cold-
water area of our country, muskies attract a cult of
hunters with big shoulders who stand and cast huge
plugs or foot-long suckers for hours at a time.
Trolling for muskies is prohibited by law. Eating
one is unheard of.
My father was a muskie hunter and as is true for
many fathers and sons that may explain my personal
lack of interest in the sport. He used to show me how to
rig a bait, tell me what he thought were the only hours to
hunt, and always finished with a the same little story.
"Now, it won't be a hard hit," he'd say. "More like
a bump, and you have to drop your retrieve right then.
Don't touch the reel once you feel that bump. Just flip
off the drag, sit back, light a cigarette and smoke it.
"If you're lucky, the bait will start to move, very
slowly, but it will move. That means the muskie is eat-
ing it. Only after the cigarette is gone do you set the

Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held
at Anna Maria City Hall for Oct. 1, were Ed
Callen and Bob Tranthem.
Runners up were Bill Starrett and George
McKay.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday,


Snook Trout Redfish Flounder *

<| LIGHT TACKLE -
I SPORTFISHING

CAPT. RICK GROSS
S /2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS .
S Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308 .
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia *




Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 .....*


hook and then set it hard and hang on."
Dad didn't land a lot of muskies, but then, like tarpon,
landing the creature isn't really what it's all about In both
cases, once you've set that hook, it's all about the battle.
Some winters I'd hear the stories of last season's
hunting so often I couldn't remember if I'd actually
gone along or just felt as though I had from hearing the
stories so many times.
So, as usual, I didn't actually fish for muskies last
week, I just went to the roadhouses and heard about
them roadhouses with whiffs of hot vinegar and
heavily-smoked meat drifting out from the kitchen. At
the least, the dark bars had a simmering pot of
bratwursts behind the bar, adding a little spice to the air
and the appetite. Nobody ever even asks if you want


AMICC Soccer

League standings
(League standings as of Sept. 30)
Division I


Team
Hayo-Meyer Construction
LaPensee Plumbing
Power Pros
School for Constructive Play


Team
Mr. Bones
Beach Barn
Dowling Park
Island Pest Contro
Uncle Dan's Place
Island Real Estate


Division
Record
2-1
1-0-1
1-0-1
1 1-1-1
1-1-1
0-3


Record Points
4-0 20
2-1 10
0-3-1 2
0-2-1 2

II
Points
10
7
7
7
7
0


Some teams did not play this week in either divi-
sion due to rain, therefore their standings as shown here
have not changed since last week.
Make-up games will be scheduled.


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. LieUc. Capt.


DOLPHIN
DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
nofishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND




t AIRDBOAT

RIDES
Perico Harbour Marina
Manatee Avenue West
(Leverocks & Galati Marine)
S 10 per person
Continuous Runs
730-101 1


kraut on it that comes automatically as does
wonderful homemade mustard.
There is some good fishing news out of the Flow-
age you might find interesting. Muskie hunting is good
this year and most hunters think there's a reason.
Catch and release.
Well into its second decade among muskie hunters,
the catch-and-release ethic in Wisconsin isn't even
enforced by requiring tags, such as we do with tarpon
here in Florida. Among Wisconsin muskie hunters,
catch and release is the norm. Quiet Scandinavians
don't talk about it much, if at all. They just agree on it.
Finns, Swedes and even the stray Chicagoanjust regard
catch and release as a rule of life. (The Chippewas and
Winnebagos in the back room or roadhouse-next-door
play by their own rules, but that's not considered a
valid topic for discussion either. Most non-Indians here
consider and conduct themselves as guests.)
Bring in a fish and you'd better have a good rea-
son if you want to stay part of the crowd. Believe me,
there isn't another crowd just down the road just
another roadhouse with another part of the same crowd.
People are sparse in this part of the country.
The Chippewa Flowage and neighboring St. Croix
are hundreds, maybe thousands, of square miles that
have always reminded me of our Everglades. The
plants are different, of course, but the water and usu-
ally illusionary land are what they do have in common.
Somehow I've always found the people of Wisconsin
and the 'Glades alike, too.
They're quiet, mostly solitary and deadly serious
about their business whatever that may be in
addition to fishing.
So though thousands of miles apart geographically,
the real sportsmen in both places share common ethics.
They know their common quest is a limited one. They
know they're probably capable of destroying it, and
they know that only through good management will it
still be there next year.
So that's what they do. And excuse me, we'll take
another Old Style over here. This one's for Dad.
See you next week.


CHRISTIES OPEN
PLUMBNG CO NO


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REPAIRS EMERGENCY SERVICE WATER HEATERS
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LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-it-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
We are DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce




*



Fish Tales Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your fish stories, and pictures are
welcome! Just give us a call at 778-7978 or stop by
our office in the Island Shopping Center.
ISLANDERIMl M

10 YEAR ALL PARTS AND LABOR
WARRANTY
You want it? We've got it!
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EXTENDED EIV)E PLAN
AMANA MEANS QUALITY SINCE 1934.


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Weather, red tide

takes its toll on

local fishing
By Capt. Mike Heistand
Weather, not a lack of fish, has produced the poor
fishing reports in the past few days. Red tide hasn't
helped the angling scene either, what with the bloom
looming closer and closer to shore.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade
fishers are reporting nice catches of redfish and trout
using live shrimp as bait.
Katie at Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said offshore
anglers on the four-hour trip averaged 80 head of Key
West grunts. The six-hour trip averaged 50 head of lane,
vermillion and mangrove snapper, Key West grunts, por-
gies and scamp. The nine-hour trip averaged 60 head of
mangrove snapper and red and black grouper.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said backwater fish-
ing has featured redfish, trout and a few snook. In the
Gulf, cobia action is picking up, as is fishing for man-
grove snapper and Spanish mackerel, as well as a few
kingfish. Capt. Zack said that wind and rain, not red
tide, have kept him off the water in the past few days.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said anglers there
have been catching black drum, a few mackerel, snook
and a 40-inch redfish, as well as a few snook.
Marty at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there have been catching a lot of flounder, mackerel,
mangrove snapper and snook. Saturday's highlight was
a 47-inch redfish. There has been a big red hanging out
under the pier all week that tips the scales at about 40
pounds, she added.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said the weather re-
ally hampered fishing in the past week, but for those
brave fishers willing to risk the red tide and high seas
the mackerel hunting in the nearshore Gulf was worth
the risk. Backwater anglers fared better, with good
catches of trout and redfish on the seagrass flats.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said offshore fishing for gag
grouper remains good, especially near the artificial
reefs. For those willing to go further into the Gulf, red
grouper are in the 100-foot depths and amberjack are
starting to be found near the reefs.
Good luck and good fishing.

30th Annual Fishathon
to be Oct. 15
The 30th Annual Fishing Tournament for kids
aged six to 12 will be Saturday, Oct. 15, from 8 a.m.
to noon, on the Bradenton Beach City Pier.
The free event is sponsored by Anna Maria's VFW
Post 8199 and encourages the sport of fishing. Free hot
dogs and drinks will be served at noon and great prizes
will be awarded at 1 p.m. Children must be accompa-
nied by an adult. For more information call 778-4400.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 A PAGE 21 j

a Li" ":ee


Ron Moore of Clearwater
was one happy fisher with
his 30-pound cobia caught
while fishing with Capt.
Phil Shields on the Reef
Reacher.


It was all Jack Sparn of Tampa could do to weigh his John Plamer's 30-pound barracuda was almost as
32-pound grouper, caught about 40 miles offshore. long as he is tall.


Corey Lee, age 9 of Holmes Beach, was able to
get this 75-pound, four-foot-long black tip
shark on the boat while off Bean Point.


HARLAN'S ONE HOUR PHOTO
S- 3332 East Bay Dr Holmes Beach 778-4277
In the Anna Maria Island Centre


OPEN AND COVERED
GALATI BOAT SLIPS
YACHT BASIN
S^ AVAILABLE

TO ALL CUSTOMERS
GAS & DIESEL PUMP DISCOUNTS
10 O FF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN 7 DAYS WEEK 8 TO 5 0
(83)77-055-90 S. AYBLD* ANAMRI


-iEI


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


. .. .


- .




J Five O'Clock Marine
5 "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577

ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu 10/6 12:24 2.5ft 7:06 -0.1ft 2:14 1.9ft 6:27 1.3ft Ship's Store
Fri 10/7 12:56 2.6ft 7:57 -0.1ft 3:14 1.7ft 6:53 1.3ft Bottom Painting
Sat 10/8 1:31. 2.7ft 8:50 -0.1ft 4:24 1.6ft 7:14 1.4ft Boat Storage
Sun 10/9 2:14 2.7ft 9:53 0.0ft - -- Bulk Oil
Mon 10/10 3:03 2.5ft 11:02 0.1ft -Consignment/
Tue 10/11 4:07 2.3ft 12:18 0.2ft Brokerage
Wed 10/12 5:38 2.1ft 9:47 1.6ft 1:36 0.4ft BOAT RENTAL
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


Instead of taking your film to
town, bring it to Harlan's. They honor
all coupons for 4 x 6 prints!


di .,
-ml.-
sa^LS^


Lich


i 1 ~L






ED PAGE 22 M OCTOBER 6, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


ISLAIITDER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST

PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
* The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
* All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
* All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL OUT15 -NOW!
FILL IT OUT NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
*Name Address/City Phone


ROD -I;L

Mini-Resort
*k Best Fishing *A
ISLAND
COOKING
S Beer and Wine
Breakfast
S Lunch-Dinner
k Reasonable k
Prices*
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU' FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
Bucs at Falcons
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


AMERICAN

CAR

WASH

& DETAILING
BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
I Cardinals at Cowboys
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617


Free Estimates --



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
* Re-Roofs Repairs
* Bulft-Ups Shingles
Single Ply Tile
Roofing UESUID
Systems I RCM |,u
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Quality


748-9362
Redskins at Eagles


MUALTY I S1S lPA SINEO51 ARD
OLJE
Ship' Sie
Ba P.uIqtoI
*Bort Stwage
Bulk Oil-in Y.r .Auin-
Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
S778-5577
Johnon. Evinrude. OMC
Sea Drive OMC Cobra Stem Driv
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
S Colts at Jets


HAPPY HOUR
MON FRi 4 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KiTchkE OpEN DAily I AM
BANIAM PIAzA BRAdENION
10104 CoTEz Rd. W.
Broncos at Seahawks






STee
TO


GOLF
Regripping
Repairing
Re-finishing
NEW!
948 Midsize Irons
Try Our Demo!
Maximum Accuracy
and Control
778-5184
LSU at Floida


$995 each
Fruit of the Loom
"Best" White T-Shirt
(One-Side Printing)
While You Wait
Notre Dame at Boston Cl.
3228 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach, FL
Anna Maria Island Centre




- --7 1


You don't
have to pay more for
Friend, Fast.
Professional Service
from Island Ownersl
Sme Day or Nxt Day Prcal
2is EUs DraDr* H Belic
778-4277
MlFSU l. t Miamio
S FSU at Miami


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
Rams at Packers


Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
SChiefs at Chargers I


LaPensee -m^
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach





THE

CLUB
RESTAURANT
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4-6 pm

Happy Hour Everyday
[Texa at Oklahoma
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


1 1i00


E






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M OCTOBER 6, 1994 M PAGE 23 Ifl


ICC nominations due
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce's
Nominating Committee has named the following
chamber business members for positions on the board
of directors: Tom Nelson, Anna Maria; Bob Hinds, At
Large; Frank Davis, T. Dolly Young and Jack Elka,
Holmes Beach; Joanne Spallino and Thomas G.
Chipain; Bradenton Beach.
Any individual wishing to petition the chamber for
a directorship needs to complete the form and return it
to the chamber office, 501 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes
Beach, no later than Friday, Oct. 7.
For more information call 778-1541.


Uniglobe honored as

outstanding
Uniglobe Far Away Places Travel Service of
Holmes Beach was named "Highest Producing Cruise
Vacation Agency" at the Florida Uniglobe Travel In-
ternational Regional Conference recently.
Uniglobe Far Away Places Travel is owned by Is-
land residents Jack and Janice Bergbom. Mrs.
Bergbom, a certified travel counselor, and Victoria
Young, agency manager, accepted the award.

Andi's Ice Cream opens

in Bradenton Beach
Andi's Ice Cream Cafe has opened at 103 7th St.
N., Bradenton Beach. The store offers the popular
Edy's Grand Ice Cream as well as sugar-free, low-fat


ice cream and frozen yogurt. Andi's carries many fla-
vors that are not available at retail grocers.
"We are pleased to join the Edy's family of excel-
lent ice cream and frozen yogurt products," say Bill and
May Donohue, owners of Andi's Ice Cream Cafe. "We
know our customers will love our new variety and
commitment to quality." Andi's also serves donuts,
English muffins, coffee and sandwiches.

Manatee Chamber to

hold Fall Trade Fair
The Manatee Chamber of Commerce will hold its
1994 Fall Trade Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 11, from 4 to 8
p.m., at the Manatee Convention Center in Palmetto.
The trade fair will feature 150 booths, food, cash bars,
entertainment and more than 100 door prizes. For more
information call 748-4842, ext 21.


KEY ROYALE Sailboat water & golf course
view. Spacious well maintained 3BR/2BA home
in lush tropical setting. Family room & large
lanai. $289,000. MLS#56764. Call Hal Gillihan
778-2261 or eves 778-2194.


LAKEFRONT VILLA -Just listed lakefront 2/ BAYFRONT IN KEY ROYALE Spacious
2 villa. Western views from your private sundeck 3BR/2BA split design. Large lanai, well land-
and lanai. Courtyard entry, 1 car garage. Like escaped with auto sprinkler and well pump. A
new and priced to sell at $107,000. Call Marilyn beauty! $390,000. Call Dick Maher or Dave
Trevethan 778-2261 or eves 792-8477. Jones 778-2261 or eves 778-6791 or 778-4891.


OSPREY AT PERICO This 2BR first floor
waterfront condo has covered parking, pools,
tennis, nature walks, 24 hour security and more!
$82,500. MLS#57037. Call Lynn Toombs 778-
2261 or eves 794-5966.


LARGE TOWNHOUSEPDOCK ON LAGOON
- Lower level is finished to 2BR and laundry
room. Kitchen upgraded in 1991 (all appliances
and cupboards). Berber carpet, fans in every
room. 4BR/2BA. Only $136,000. MLS#57855.
Call Bobye Chasey 778-2261 or eves 778-1532.


PLAYA ENCANTADA 2BR/2BA, top floor
view of Gulf, prime beach, verticals, all appli-
ances. Pool, spa, clubhouse, tennis, parking
garage and security shutters. $178,000.
MLS#58146. Call Helen White 778-2261 or eves
778-6956.


GULF FRONT CONDO 2BR/2BA in Co-
quina Beach Club. Ceramic tile thru-out and
comes turnkey furnished. Directly on beach
and has a pool. Great rental. $185,000.
MLS#58348. Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-2261
or eves 778-4931.


MOST SOUTH-WESTERLY BUILDING
IN PERICO BAY CLUB Fabulous bayfront
view from this 2BR/2BA condo. Beautifully fur-
nished with light and bright colors and mirrors.
$153,000. MLS#59326. Call Rose Schnoerr
778-2261 or eves 778-7780.


M ---"-.-- -_-- - -. - -. -*... .
LOTS & ACREAGE
DAVE B 810 12th A.enue ............. ........ $ 15.000
JONES ]4000 Gull of Ivlexico Dr. .......... ...... 150.000
JONES 4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr ..... ......... 325.000
REALTOR 5600 Lock.cood Ridge Rd .............. ..329.000
ASSOCIATE 107 Bay Blvd. ...................... ....................... 395,000
EVENINGS 17th & Gulf Drive .................................... 450,000
778-4891 517 Blue Heron............................................. 500,000
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT
6709 45th Avenue ....................................... $ 84,900
Dave and his wife, Pat, are resi- 6404 Manatee Ave. W.................................... 95,900
dents of Holmes Beach and are 314 Pine Avenue ......................................... 219,000
"transplants" from New England to 2112 First St. W. ......................................... 350,000
the Island. We welcome Dave to the 3100 Gulf Drive............................................. 450,000
NEAL & NEAL family of profession- 4000 Gull of Mexico Dr ............................... 750,000
als in the Anna Maria office.
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr ............................... 850,000
"-' -- '- .- --- ---
~ :-~"'. ,. .. ,_, -. ..
---. - -- _. __-___ -- _


.,

FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Open Six Days a Week

Premiere Properties in
Prime Locations throughout
Manatee County
Total Property Management!
Wide variety of fine vacation rentals!
Unfurnished annual rentals!
Professional, Personalized Service

Call (813) 778-9477 or
Toll Free 800-749-6665


.- ._.....' --
S. .,


P q






R PAGE 24 M OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
m I -


PROPERTY
OWNERS
Worry-free leasing of your
property with our professional
management program. For
details on receiving the
highest possible income
and the extensive services
provided both owners
and guests, contact the
Anna Maria specialists,
DEBBIE (813) 778-2275,
DIAor call toll-free
S1-800-881-2276.


EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTIES

I
& EXCEPTIONAL SERVICES

3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217

Enter The Islander Bystander football
contest, page 14 this issue. Win $50!











REDUCED SOUTHERN COMFORT: Enjoy the
quality and formality of yesterday with today's conve-
nience. 10 ft. ceilings, decorative moldings, oak floors,
fireplace, butler's pantry, and ole-fashioned wrap-
around porch. High hip metal roof and 70 ft. dock. Now
$304,000. Call Judy Duncan. 778-1589 eves.


Your news about happenings and
special events is always welcome at
The Islander Bystander. Just call
778-7978 to be included.







SUCCESSFUL restaurant business in West
Bradenton with 4 COP license. Seats 150. All
equipment & furnishings inc. Excellent lease
terms. High traffic location. $350,000.
#59686. For information, call T. Dolly Young,
or 778-5427 evenings.
FLAMINGO CAY CONDO! Wide, deep wa-
ter canal! Ground floor, 2 bedroom, 2 bath w/
screened lanai overlooking water. Close to
pool & tennis court. Kids & pets OK. Conve-
nient to shopping & bus lines. Excellent value!
$89,900. #59378. Call Horace T. Gilley, 792-
0758 today!
"THE CROSSINGS"! Splendid home, won-
derful condition, great landscaping! Fireplace
in living room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Quality-
built features in this "Geartz" home. Many up-
grades. $135,000. #57635. Ask for Sally
Schrader, or 792-3176 eves.
MARTINIQUE CONDO ...
Bright & cheerful!
2BR/2BA,
2 car garage.
$154,900!
Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Karin Stephan
REALTOR4
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844 ~, '

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory. I
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


Gentiluomo Enterprises
STATE LICENSED CONTRACTOR CRCO17380

New Home Construction
And Remodeling

778-3544 SIMATES


SAMPLY THE BEST
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
TFAM ON THI-I INI ANn


LISA SALLY ANN
Mike 778-6696
Norman a' 1-800-367-1617
-l in. -3101 Gulf Drive
Realty inc. Holmes Beach, FL 34217








SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
i ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


Read The Islander Bystander ... It's the
best and most complete news about
Anna Maria Island and it's FREE.
h.


POOLSIDE & STEPS TO BEACH
Ground level condo in Holmes Beach. Perfectly
kept grounds. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. com-
pletely furnished. $117,500.
I I iya I


PERFECT LITTLE HOME
Truly a pleasure to see, this home has just had a
first class paint job inside & out, as well as new
carpet. Only steps to the beach with 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, large utility room, garage and sits on a lot
and a half. Only $125,000.


77 A0

TWO GULFFRONT HOMES
Side by side, these two homes both feature 3 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, with lofts, big decks and huge
storage/work shops.


Mike
Norman
Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617
FAX: 778-4364


3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


REDUCED COCONUTS CONDO: 1 bedroom, 1
bath condo in a Gulf front complex. Excellent rental
opportunity for the investor or absentee owner. Turn-
key furnished. Now reduced to $90,900. Call Carol
Williams 778-0777 or 778-1718 eves.
.f :.,, |


NORTH POINT HARBOUR ESTATE: Keywest
style, 4 bedroom home. Open floor plan with wa-
ter views from most every window. Amenities in-
clude, his and hers master baths, skylights, wrap
around deck, security system, boat lift and dock.
Homeowner's Association provides lawn care, ten-
nis, pool and spa. Priced at $339,000. Call Carol
R. Williams, for appointment,778-0777, 778-1718
after hours.


NEW LISTING BAYFRONT CONDO: Watch the
sunrise from this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, ground floor
corner condo. Park like setting, steps to pool and
tennis, furnished turnkey. Outstanding value at
$128,900. Call Carol R. Williams, 778-0777, 778-
1718 after hours.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS


c[rmit








THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 U PAGE 25 -II


Lsa Varano


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


Exclusive 419 Pine Avenue,
WEsate EAsTO (813) 778-2291
Video Collection MLS EVENINGS 778-2632

ENCHANTING GULF
FRONT BUNGALOW
This captivating 3 bedroom, 2 bath getaway is a true
work of art! Tucked away on the private north end
with miles of sugar white walking beach, this lovingly
remodeled residence offers unrivaled views of the na-
ture reserve on Passage Key and Egmont Key light-
house. Barefoot living is made easy with Mexican
tiled and hardwood floors. French doors open to the
beckoning beach, while teal colored Bermuda shut-
ters shield the street side windows. There is a wood
burning fireplace and private patio off the elevated
master suite. Lush, tropical landscaping and a hidden
courtyard with fountain complete the picture perfect.
Only $469,000.










4'-
x~|


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT






Looking for someone to manage your
property? Contact Lisa Varano or
Denise Langlois to discuss your needs.

DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


fZeal t& tate
Anna Maria, Florida
P Box 2150
FAX (813) 778-2294


EM 7tir#fy
ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS:
Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847
Marcella Comett...778-5919 Nancy Gullford...778-2158
Michael Advocate...778-0608


S n n r i 1 A 8 7 2 A 8
21 Gulf-Dr ive ASSOCIATESAFTERHOURS

DICKBradntonBeac


GULF VIEW TRIPLEX Recently renovated, taste- GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
fully furnished units that offer a flexible floor plan. rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
Large common sundeck with great view of the with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
Gulf. Laundry on premises. Now operated as va- sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
cation rentals. Priced at $272,000. Call Dave restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details. Moynihan for details.
I ., L


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA or 1 BR/1 BA fully fur-
nished, second floor units in complex with pool,
tennis, club-house, sauna and on site manage-
ment. Deeded beach access and excellent rental
program. 2BR priced at $94,500 and 1 BR priced
at $78,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULF FRONT APARTMENTS Unique offering of
9 gulf front apartment with outstanding views and
excellent investment opportunity. Offered at
$950,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


"li??--^---^^BB~-
NICE OPPORTUNITY!
Create the City's only "mini-resort" with investment in these
three duplexes located on West side of Gulf Dr. only 250 ft.
from great beach! Beautifully maintained and excellent po-
tential to receive additional income. Call Marie Franklin for
info and ideas! Owner financing. Asking $650,000. By Appt.,
778-2259. _- fti -


New to Seasonal Rental Market
Outstanding Canal Front Home.
Please call for particulars.


couc
DOWL1NG
REALTY
409 Pin AV.
Ann- marla
T77-12n2
'-o"


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services in New Con-
struction & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smiles!
.I I .H :]i I. l i Mti


Denise Langlois


I


I PI IFA I to: I :F I I & MLIA ;t I I I


I


,,


J[L- n FLiT GROUP|I -ILAND RI E GO I1| rn | i M ili


I


i


rr


.CFI~F~Re(

~sf~trr i


a
I
liY r
n






PIM PAGE 26 0 OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Jfit Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Samn y Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
t 7 A 1)4AND SATISFACTION








ECONOMY CONSTRUCTION
ROOF AND HOME REPAIR
Hurricane Resistant Home Designs
SAdditions and Remodeling
Call Don Tarantola RC0045125-RG0058589 PE002374 778-9244


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


More than a mullet wrapper!


ij-~-_-- -~-




ISLANDERi '^ I'

NEW! Islander T-shirts: $10
Black on White 100% Cotton
Adult sizes: M, L, X-L
Catch your mullet at our office in the Island
Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-7978



MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!








AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom; ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal& Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products.
By appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.


S A A


BUNK BEDS, dark pine, sheets included $95.
Child's desk, unusual space saving design, teak
$35.
TWO SAUER oak finish book cases, doors on bot-
tom shelf $30 each or $50 for both. 778-3606.
SARASOTA TO MINNEAPOLIS air ticket. One way
Oct 18th 1 PM. $190 OBO. 779-2052.
BROWN COUCH excellent condition $300. Pro-
Form auto incline treadmill $200. Wood Octagon
shaped end table $20. 779-2129.
LARGE GLASS bead or sand blaster $995. Golf
cart, good condition $495. Antique slot machines
50, 100, 25o, 500 and $1, $1,895 up. 778-7837.
KING SEALY perfect rest regent mattress, double
box spring and frame $390. Queen size sofa bed,
pastel flower print. Linens included $390. 778-4636.
WORLD BOOK. The best learning tool for your chil-
dren, 1994 edition clearance sale now. Contact
Arnold Rumph, 794-0567.
"ULTRA CLEAN II" water filtration from Regal now
available. 5 year guarantee. For a free presentation
call Arnold Rumph, 794-0567.
CEILING FANS 3 white fans with lights, 1 woodtone
with lights. $30 each or $100 for all. 778-9392.


GARAGE SALE Fri., Oct. 7. 9-2 rain or shine. 60
North Shore Dr., Anna Maria. Washer, dryer, file
cabinets, misc., everything must go!

RUMMAGE SALE Fri., Oct. 7. 9:30-2:00. St. Ber-
nard Activity Center. 43rd St., Holmes Beach.



BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


FORD CROWN VICTORIA 87 LTD, one owner,
less than 50,000 miles. Reasonable. 778-8410.
1977 FORD LTD 4-door, AC, power. Big, white and
runs good. Cheap, cheap, cheap. 778-9392.


BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
SEEKING garage, carport or lawn for 17' boat &
trailer. Use of running water necessary. Fee nego-
tiable. 778-3702.
BOATING

CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


VOLUNTEERS! Get involved with the Anna Maria
Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria. Call Dorothy Steven, 795-0148 if you can
give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for beach front motel.
Part time 15-20 hrs per week. Start immediately.
Sand & Sea Motel, 778-2231.

WAITSTAFF NEEDED, knowledge of wines pre-
ferred. Call the Mutiny Inn, 778-5440 and ask for
Ken or Tina.
SALES REPS, part or full time, flex hours for de-
signer waterless cookware, china and crystal. Ideal
for homemakers. Galaxy 727-9447 or 794-0567.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.


ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.
HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.
KD FAIRS WALL DESIGN Wallpaper, paint, mural
and light repair. Call KD at 778-1032.
NEED YOUR HOME cleaned? Call 778-4116. "We
like what we do ... and it shows!" We're reliable,
reasonable and ready to Go!
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances,
brush piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever
your hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.
OLD-FASHIONED MAID efficient trustworthy ser-
vice tailored to your needs. Attention to seniors,
children and pets. Excellent cook/housekeeper.
Sterling references. 778-1521.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
DREAM CLEANERS residential or commercial. We
do windows too! Call Gregg or Shannon 778-3679.
HOUSECLEANING of all sorts. Very thorough and
fast. Will accept weekly or bi-weekly regulars. Good
references, call KD 778-1032.

FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers &
concrete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott,
778-5183.

DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
HOME MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS. Experi-
enced, reliable, small jobs preferred. Don Staples
778-0225.
AUTO DETAILING Average size car is fully de-
tailed, including the engine, shampoo carpet and
upholstery, door jams, wheel wells ... everything
... for just $85. We come to you at your home or
office with a fully equipped trailer. We even bring
our own water! Call mobile service #356-4649 and
leave a message if we're not in the truck.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.

MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fireplace,
jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
Intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Will-
iams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N OCTOBER 6, 1994 M PAGE 27 I[E


SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully furnished
condo, 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.
MAINLAND, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, close to shop-
ping, screened lanais. $650 per month. Call Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
GULFFRONT 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck, pri-
vate beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone, mi-
crowave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-813-
988-1344.
GULFFRONT Best in Anna Maria! 3BR/2BA, im-
maculate, steps to beach. Nov., Dec. & March $800
per week, reserve now. 778-3171.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
STEPS FROM BEACH! 3BR/3BA Beach house.
Washer, dryer, dishwasher, garage, disposal, cov-
ered carport. $600 week or $2200 month. Available
Oct./Nov./Dec./Jan./Feb. Call 778-4468
SEASONAL RENTAL- Shell Pt. Condo, 2BR/2BA,
reduced rate for longer stay. Call Old Florida Realty,
778-3377.

WEEKEND SPECIAL: Fri., Sat. & Sun. $160.1BR/
1BA Gulf front condo. Beautiful beach, beautiful
sunsets. Weekly, $300. 778-2832.

SEASONAL OR YEARLY. 1BR/1 BA, furnished, W/
D, garage, no pets. 116 White Ave. Holmes Beach.
813-985-6765.
HOLMES BEACH, nice and clean 2BR/1BA, cen-
tral air, W/D hookup. Annual $600/mo plus electric-
ity. 778-0217.
CANADIAN couple previous residents require 1
bedroom apt. with KS bed on ground floor on the
Island, not on beach, from mid-Dec. to mid March.
Modem facilities, reasonable. Principals only write
John Kelly, 337 Amsterdam Rd., Dollard des
Ormeaux Que. Canada H9G1 P3 or 514- 626-9762.
FURNISHED studio apt., $400/mo, one person.
House, nice, different, for 1 or a couple. Short or
long term. $800/mo plus utilities. Holmes Beach.
Neg. 778-5832.
IBR/IBA duplex apt., unfurnished, $425/mo. Effi-
ciency apt., unfumished, $350/mo. Call Fran Maxon
Real Estate, 778-2307 or 778-1450.


MATURE FEMALE seeks furnished 2BR/1BA or
2BR/2BA with years lease. 778-1372.
SECLUDED TROPICAL PARADISE, spectacular
views of Skyway Bridge to Sarasota Bay. 2 blocks
from Gulf beaches. Double lot on dead end w/boat
dock. 3BR/2BA with 2.5 car garage, new appli-
ances, fumished or not, yearly $1,500/mo, seasonal
$2,750/mo. Call 778-7901.
LUXURY 4BR/4BA home on water, deck, boat
ramp. Will lease with option. $2,000/mo. 778-2277
Coconuts Management.


4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, BR/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dipging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $229,500. 778-7837.
WEST BRADENTON. 3BR/2BA home, excellent
family neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will
help buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins
at Island Real Estate 778-6066.
BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call Quality Builders today, 778-7127.
FIXER UPPER DUPLEX. 2BR/1BA apts. Near
beach, lot and a half. will finance. 795-0873.
DREAM VIEW of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
3Bedrooms, fireplace. $350,000. Owner will finance.
Yvonne Higgins, Island Real Estate 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH Townhouse arranged as two
separate apts. with own entrances. Connecting door
can be unlocked to make seven room dwelling. First
floor has one bedroom and one bathroom. Second
floor has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Full A/
C. Part of small complex of ten with heated pool and
nice gardens. 100 yards from new beach. Com-
pletely refurbished less than two years ago. Excel-
lent rental history. For sale as whole for $105,000.
Telephone evenings 813-954-1110.
BY OWNER. Drive by this 8 year old stilted duplex,
fully landscaped with outside lighting and sprinkler
system. 2BR/2BA, laundry room, dining, lots of stor-
age and decks to enjoy great Gulf view with famous
FL sunsets. All for only $189,500. 3210 West 6th
Ave., Holmes Beach. Call 778-1516, ask for Gene
or Katharina.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD


DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY
for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (as needed).

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.

Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IISLANDER


IBYS


- SyANDER CASSIFyE. 9


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX006545S
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
S VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
S/ ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074


Custom Communications
SInstallation of Phone Jacks
Computer Repair
Data Back-Up
i CONTACT DAVE for
S answers to any technical
Questions or for
an appointment.
730-1608


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Tear Island Resident


J. R

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


778-2586 MARV Y KA Eve: 778-6771

15% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 10/12/94 J


.y Personal Fitness
STRAINING 0%,

Cardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis, Nationally Certified 779-2129
316 Magnolia, Anna Maria FL 7 '


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
MassageTherapist
Now AcceptingAppoinrments
Gift Certiicares Available
792-3758 MMOOoD39S
MA0012461


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
-j





IQ PAGE 28 M OCTOBER 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


i Islan


YOLT LOCAL INDEPENDENWSUfERMARKEr
HOMETOWN
PRID


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM- PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1994


U.S.D.A. BOTTOM
ROUND $99
ROAST LB.
.4A :,.._..- -


Idaho 490
Bakers LB.

.* *.." ' I. H



DELI DEPARTMENT
Corned Beef


DELI
SLICED
TO
ORDER


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!

GRADE "A"
CHICKEN
BREASTS

$ 429i",
LB.


JUICY, EXTRA LARGE
WASHINGTON
RED DELICIOUS


APPL


LB.


BAKERY DEPARTMENT
FRESH, SPLIT TOP
WHITE BREAD


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


IGA
FIELDCREST
MILK


G99
FIELDCREST 9
MILK
M-IL 1/2 GALLON
ALL VARIETIES
WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU OCT 11
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE


DA VINCI
SPAGHETTI
16 OZ. PACKAGE


3


FOR$100


WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU OCT 11
LIMIT THREE PER CUSTOMER PLEASE


Foods


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


U.S.D.A. BOTTOM
Sirloin $299
Sizzlers LB.


DELI DEPARTMENT
PASTRAMI