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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00532
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00532

Full Text



WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE SEPTEMBER 22, 1994


Island or Longboat? Decision expected Monday


Island or Longboat? Decision expected Monday


By Paul Roat
A decision is expected Monday by regional trans-
portation planners to determine who gets to keep how
much money for roadway work and drainage: Anna
Maria Island or Longboat Key.
The Metropolitan Planning Organization has re-
ceived a request by officials from Longboat Key to take
a $717,000 revetment construction project located just
north of the Gulf Drive-Cortez Road intersection-
planned but probably not needed in light of the success
of the beach nourishment project and transfer the
funds to Longboat Key to bolster that island's failing
beach nourishment efforts. Longboat Key officials say
they want to extend a seawall that protects Gulf of
Mexico Drive.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola is opposed to
the funding transfer, citing drainage problems at Cortez
Beach and the Gulf Drive-Cortez Road intersection as
taking precedence over Longboat's 1 Ith-hour request


Pierola has received the endorsement of MPO Ex-
ecutive Director Mike Guy, who has said he believes
the Longboat project would be better served drawing
from Florida Department of Transportation safety
funding categories rather than gutting the Bradenton
Beach project.
Longboat Key officials are plagued with widespread
erosion less than one year after the key's touted beach
nourishment project was completed. Particularly hard-hit
is a narrow stretch of the key near the Bayport Condo-
minium at mid-key, where about 80 feet of sand have
washed away, leaving scant sand to protect the road.
Longboat Key Town Commissioner and MPO
member Bob Drohlich has said the matter is one of
safety for Longboat Key residents, explaining that the
key's evacuation route would be breached if Gulf of
Mexico Drive was overwashed by waves during a
heavy storm.
Ironically, his announcement last month of the


problems of Longboat Key came on the heels of a state
of emergency declared by DOT officials for the Gulf
Drive-Cortez Road intersection also an evacuation
route for Longboat Key.
At the insistence of Bradenton Beach City Coun-
cilman Jim Kissick, DOT crews discovered the
intersection's drainage system dead-ended into the
newly nourished beach, providing rainfall from heavy
storms no place to go. Pierola said the funds allocated
for a revetment in Bradenton Beach should be used to
repair drainage problems at Gulf Drive-Cortez Road,
as well as perennial flooding problems at Cortez Beach.
The revetment was placed in the DOT workplans
several years ago, prior to the Island's beach nourish-
ment project. DOT officials repeatedly promised
Pierola that the revetment money would be allocated to
another project on the Island, she said.
The matter is expected to be resolved Monday during
the 9:30 am. MPO meeting at Sudakoff Center, Sarasota.


Soccer season r l
kicks off at
Community
Center
Soccer season got off to a great
start at the Anna Maria Island .
Community Center last Friday
as 17 teams and a truck-load of R N'
parents got together to give two
soccer fields a whale of a
workout. Teams would play each
other for 15 minutes, then
relinquish the field to two more
contenders, with the action
continuing well into the evening.
Pictured is some of the action "
between teams sponsored by the '" "
Beach Barn and Uncle Dan's.,
Islander Photo: Mark Ratliffi'l t ,,




Bradenton Beach Jet-ski rental code violation withdrawn


Bradenton Beach Building Official Whitey Moran
has withdrawn charges that Bradenton Beach Sailboat
Rental and the Catalina Beach Resort have expanded
commercial use of the property specifically a Jet-ski
rental business without city approval.
Moran's predecessor, Joe Romano, had charged
Ralph Cole at the business, 1325 Gulf Drive, with a
code violation of operating a Jet-ski rental business
without receiving city permission. Cole is authorized
to rent sailboats, Romano said at the time, but not the
controversial motorized personal watercraft.
Romano's violation was reversed by Moran.
"I am withdrawing the ... violation until I have the
opportunity to inspect the operation, research the ap-


propriate codes and ordinances and, if warranted, file
the appropriate notice of violation," Moran wrote in a
memo to Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola and
city council members.
Cole's Bradenton Beach Sailboat Rental is located
on the grounds of the Catalina Beach Resort, owned by
Pierola and her husband, Gil.
It's not the first time the violation against the busi-
ness has either been dismissed or withdrawn.
The first citation was dismissed by the city's code
enforcement board last spring due to a technical mis-
phrasing of the language of the document. Romano
then had said the business was in violation of city codes
for "operating boats for hire from a zoning not appro-


'Incredibly intensive' red tide bloom in

Gulf; movement uncertain


A bloom of red tide micro-organisms has been re-
ported off New Pass at Longboat Key, and scientists
predict it will move to the north later this week.
Dr. Rich Pierce, senior scientist at Mote Marine
Laboratory, said aerial mapping of the fish-killing red
tide will take place later this week, but sampling of the
area Monday revealed "the highest levels of red tide
I've ever seen in the Gulf.
"This is an incredibly intensive bloom," Pierce said.
Red tide counts number about 140 million cells per
liter of water near the bloom. Shellfish are dangerous
for human consumption when counts reach 5,000; fish
begin to die at red tide levels in excess of 100 million
cells per liter.


The organisms that make up red tide tend to absorb
the available oxygen in the water, killing other marine life
in the vicinity of the red tide "bloom." The red tide organ-
isms also emit a gas, called an aerosol, that causes respi-
ratory problems to those who breathe the chemical.
Red tide, Gymnodinium breve, is a naturally occur-
ring dinoflagellate that "blooms" offshore and is car-
ried by wind and waves onto shore. The one-celled
organism is both animal and plant-like; it possesses
both chlorophyll, like a plant, and swims freely through
the water, like a fish.
The red tide bloom was about one mile west of
New Pass Monday. Southwesterly winds were ex-
pected to push the red tide to the north.


private for this type of operation."
The Bradenton Beach Code Enforcement Board
unanimously voted to dismiss charges that "operating
boats for hire from a zoning not appropriate for this
type of operation" at the business after Romano said he
believed the action was permitted through the action of
previous city councils.
Romano then issued a citation on his last day as
building official prior to his resignation June 30 for
expanding a non-conforming use without proper city ap-
proval. That citation was withdrawn by Moran Sept. 8.
Another Jet-ski rental business, Wet Willie's, Inc.,
was granted permission to operate until Sept. 30 by the
Bradenton Beach Code Enforcement Board.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ..................................... ......... 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Announcements .......................................... 10
Rotary........................................ ............ 12
Murals ...................................... ............. 14
Football contest........................................... 17
Stir-it-up ................................................. 17
Streetlife ...................................... ......... 20
Anna Maria tides ....................................... 23
Real estate .................................... .... .. 24


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND






UE PAGE 2 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Players on landscaping: 'It's a jungle out there!'


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It's too much of a good thing. At first it was pretty,
now it's a pain, say representatives of the Island Play-
ers about the landscaping at City Hall which includes
their building. According to the Players, some plants
are now so tall that people can't see their sign, getting
in and of cars on Gulf Drive is difficult, and the land-
scaping mulch is encouraging termites to eat away at
the old playhouse.
The Players took their gripe to City Hall last week
when the city commission had its monthly work session.
"Due to the heavy rains we've had, our garden
out front here has become unmanageable," City
Commissioner Dottie McChesney said. She went on
to say that the lush plantings are a good idea, but that
there just isn't enough volunteer help to keep things
trimmed properly.
The beautification project was started about five
years ago, and follows a plan set down by local horti-
culturist Mike Miller. Until her illness, the late Mary
Ross was Miller's right hand, and the two were seen
every Saturday tending to plantings.
McChesney says the job is just too big for Mike
Miller to be expected to handle alone.
"But Mr. Miller has not really asked for help from
anyone," McChesney said, "and the city's public works


department has pretty much let him do what he wanted."
McChesney says the city has received "a num-
ber" of letters from citizens, with complaints about
the garden.
"They say they don't like the fact you can't see city
hall anymore," McChesney said.
"The original plan submitted in 1990 called for low
ground cover," said Helen White, speaking on behalf
of the Players. "Now we feel like we're in the middle
of an Everglades fish camp. We don't have the man-
power or the funds to maintain or clip it."
Besides not having the wherewithal to trim the
plants, White said that Miller had told her not to touch
a leaf without his permission.
"Exactly," Miller confirmed for The Islander By-
stander Saturday. "One of the conditions of my doing
thousands of hours of work for free is that I have con-
trol of the landscape, until and unless the city commis-
sion gives an order to change it."
Miller says that within limits he will do what the
city wants, but if it goes against what he considers the
best interest of the landscape, he'll refuse.
"If the city commission orders me to do something
that is contrary to the entire principle of the landscape,
I can always leave," Miller said. "It's a very simple
thing. I request no money for the work that I do I
only request that I make the decisions until and unless


they are contravened by the city commission."
Miller says that basically means that he doesn't
want the Island Players or anyone else taking it
upon themselves to work on the landscaping around
city hall and the playhouse. He says this is to protect
plantings from people who may mean well, but none-
theless don't have the horticultural knowledge to know
what kind of damage they might be inflicting.
"I can't turn people loose in the landscape who
don't even know what they're trampling when they're
doing it," Miller said.
Miller says that following last week's meeting, the
Players provided two volunteers who trimmed plants
under his direction. He says that maintaining the gar-
den in this fashion doesn't bother him.
"I am more than willing to have anybody who who
wants to clip things come and do it under my guid-
ance," Miller said. "It's merely a way to keep order in
the process."
In a letter to Miller from Mayor Ray Simches dated
Sept. 16, the mayor commended Miller for his "spirit,
commitment and dedication to this worthwhile
project." The letter also stated it is the city's position
that all plantings on city property will be maintained
under the direction of the city's public works director
and McChesney, who is the chairwoman of the beau-
tification committee.


Coastal Cleanup '94 a

successful volunteer effort
More than 1,200 volunteers turned out for the 7th Annual Florida Coastal Cleanup
Saturday to help pick up 10,000 pounds of trash and debris from Manatee County shores.


Teamwork
How many people does it take to clean up a beach? Well, sometimes the answer
is three. At the Gulf end of Magnolia Avenue in Anna Maria, this trio of volun-
teers made an efficient team with, left to right, Terrylee Freeland documenting
what's found, Rill Evans picking it up, and eight-year-old Gretchen Evans
holding the bag. Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


Government dune plantings moving

ahead; private plantings stymied


Design finalization is taking place to create sand
dunes and pedestrian walkovers at many of the pub-
lic beach access points in Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach.
Manatee County Environmental Action Com-
mission Project Coordinator Jack Gorzeman said
construction drawings for the project the last
phase of the beach nourishment effort on Anna
Maria Island should be completed by the end of
this month. He said he hoped to go out to bid on the
project by mid-October. Construction should start by
January, Gorzeman said.
The $450,000 project calls for planting of sea oats
and other native beach vegetation at Cortez Beach, the
700 block of Gulf Drive, Katie Pierola Sunset Park and
a number of beach access points in Holmes Beach.
Also included in the plans are dune walkovers, or
boardwalks, to allow beachgoers to travel over or
through the fragile plants without damaging them.


But a problem has arisen for private beachfront
property owners who wish to create similar stretches of
plantings in front of their Gulffront homes.
Gorzeman said state officials have balked at issu-
ing a blanket planting permit for the Island, as had been
previously discussed, and instead have said they would
be willing to delegate authority for such permission to
Manatee County.
For the permission, Manatee County officials must
enact resolutions, ordinances and prove that a local
level of expertise exists to oversee individual plans for
beach plantings. Gorzeman said county commissioners
would need to decide if that is a tact they wish to take.
No date has been set for such a deliberation.
"It doesn't look like anything will happen in the
near future," Gorzeman said.
Individuals who wish to create their own beach
landscapes may do so, but a $250 permit fee is assessed
by state officials for the plantings.


At Leffis Key in south Bradenton Beach, volunteers Allisa Ross, left; Michael
Jeanes, 11; and Carl Keeler, center, site coordinator, weighed-in 352 pounds of
trash for statistical purposes. They were among 58 Manatee Community College
students, faculty, family and friends who in conjunction with The Isaak Walton
League was the site sponsor for Leffis Key. Among their finds were a syringe and
a five-foot derelict flasher buoy. Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka.


Housekeeper

charged with

grand theft
Holmes Beach Detective Nancy Rogers solved
a mystery involving the disappearance of two valu-
able rings when she checked pawn records Friday.
The mystery began several weeks ago when
a Key Royale woman reported that two rings,
valued at $1,800 and $600, were missing from
her home. She told police she was unsure if she
had misplaced the rings or if they were stolen.
She told police the only persons who have access
to the home are the person who cleans the pool
and her housekeeper.
Rogers checked the pawn records and found
that the woman's housekeeper, Cathy Sligh, 45,
of Holmes Beach sold one of the rings to South-
ern Pawn. Sligh was placed in custody and
charged with grand theft.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 3 iD

City briefs new public works director on duties


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
One thing the City of Anna Maria wants its new pub-
lic works director to know, and that's what he's expected
to do. In an administrative meeting with all city commis-
sioners and staff, Bill Zimmerman got an earful.
The meeting was held Monday, which was
Zimmerman's first day at his $30,000 a year job of pub-
lic works director/ building inspector/ code inspector.
Mayor Ray Simches opened the meeting by mak-
ing it clear who is in charge him. Though he ac-
knowledged the contributions of the other commission-
ers in seeing any number of city tasks completed, he
reminded them and Zimmerman that everything
in the city is ultimately the mayor's responsibility.
"I want to continue for us to work as a team, although


Bradenton Beach honors civic pride
The Bradenton Beach Civic Association started a
beautification and rehabilitation campaign. Every
three months, they will present three awards to
owners who are painting, remodeling, landscaping
and improving their properties.Don Brown of the
Bradenton Beach Civic Association, left, presents
Aileen and Tim Murphy with the first place award -
a $100 gift certificate from the Bridge Tender Inn.
Second place went to Elwood and Linda Yarger, who
won. a $50 gift certificate to the Beach House. Third
place winners were John and Leslie Butler, who
received a $25 gift certificate to Key West Willy's.


our charter states very clearly that only the mayor, as the
chief administrative officer, issues direct commands,"
Simches said. "If you have too many cooks in the kitchen
you're going to get some sort of a stew."
Trying to keep the city from getting in a stew is
what Simches hopes to accomplish in laying down the
rules in no uncertain terms as Zimmerman takes the
reins as public works director.
"I don't want you (commissioners) to give any di-
rectives to Bill Zimmerman without conferring with
me," Simches said.
Simches then went on to say that Zimmerman must
know and follow the city's list of priorities. Topping
the list was Simches' desire that Zimmerman concen-
trate on whipping the organization of the public works
department into shape.
"Over the years we've had several directors of pub-
lic works," Simches said. "It's been in constant transition."
Simches said that part of the turmoil in that depart-
ment was due to volumes of rules and regulations the
public works director must follow, many of which are
difficult to interpret or to apply.
"Our land development regulations and our com-
prehensive plan have never been written with the kind
of clarity that is necessary," Simches said. "That may
be so because lawyers write them instead of school
teachers." Simches is a former educator.
Simches told Zimmerman the city has several priori-
ties the new public works director should consider as equal
holders of the number-one position. These include:
Organizing the public works department
Street paving
Sidewalks
Bridges
The Lake LaVista Channel
FEMA (Federal Emergency Management
Agency) considerations
Drainage
Beach accesses
Code enforcement
As to the last item, Simches reminded Zimmerman
that the way the city views violations of its ordinances, the
public works director is primarily responsible for finding


problems and letting people know they are not in compli-
ance, while the city's code enforcement board is respon-
sible for levying fines and other corrective actions.
In a related matter, a Sept. 19 memo from the
mayor to staff revoked two earlier memos which estab-
lished Anne Beck the code enforcement officer for al-
leged code violations at the Sandbar Restaurant. Al-
though that responsibility would have normally fallen
to the public works director, then-director Don
Tarantola asked that someone else be assigned to the
case as he felt there might be a conflict of interest since
his wife is an employee of the Sandbar.
"In view of our new public works director begin-
ning on Sept. 19, the previous memos are no longer in
effect," Simches wrote.


Anna Maria City
9/26, 7:30 p.m., Planning and Zoning
Commission
9/27, 7 p.m., second budget hearing followed
by Commission meeting
9/28, 9 a.m., Planning and Zoning
Commission sub-committee

Bradenton Beach
9/22, 1 p.m., Council meeting
9/28, 7 p.m., Planning and Zoning Board

Holmes Beach
9/22, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
9/27, 3 p.m., Planning Commission

Of Interest
9/26, 9:30 a.m., Metropolitan Planning
Organization, Sudakoff Hall,
USF New College campus, Sarasota.
9/26, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Commission
tax appeals hearing, Station 2, Holmes Beach.
Correction: The meeting of Barrier Island
Elected Officials will be held at 10 p.m. on
Sept. 21 in Anna Maria City Hall.


ANNA

MARIA

9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
SALE ITEMS FOR THE WEEK OF 9/22 thru 9/26
While Supplies Lost Plus Lots of Unodvertised Specials


GROCERY *
Gotorade .............. $1.99
64 oz Bottle Selected Var.
McCormick's Bag & Season
Mixes 1-2 oz Size ........... $1.19
Dial Bath Soap ....... $1.79
3-Bar Pack 5 oz Size
Ultra-Tide............... $2.99
Reg., Unscented or with Bleach
42-46 oz Box
Quaker Instant Oatmeal .. $2.89
12-15 oz Box Asst. Var.
Savers Choice Dog and Cat Food
14 oz Can Asst. Flavors .... 3/99V

DAIRY *
Tropicana Seasons Best OJ
64 oz Crtn Selected Var. $1.49
Land O'Lakes Butter... $1.99
16 oz Qtrs. Salted or Unsalted
Di Giorno Pastas ..... $1.99
9 oz Container

* PRODUCE *
Head Lettuce ......... Each 894
Sliced Cantaloupe .... Pk 69V
Sliced Honeydeu .... Pk 894


FROZEN *
VIP Vegetable Combo
16 oz Poly Bag............ $1.19
Ore-Ida Tater Tots
32 oz Bag .................. 2/$3.00
Stouffer Lean Cuisine..... $159
Chix Chow Mein or Angel Hair Pasta
Bridgford Parker House Rolls
25 oz Package ........... $1.39

* MEAT & DEU
SUPER BUYS *

USDA Choice Porterhouse
and T-Bone Steaks
While Supplies Last
Ib ........................... $3.99
Whole Boston Butts
Cut & Wrapped Free
Ib ................................... 99
Family Pack Pork Steaks
Ib ................................ $1.29
Fresh, Delicious Islanders
Seafood Croquettes
Each (Crab Roll) ............... 994


SORRY WE DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.







Iml PAGE 4 a SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Bike accident makes Island girl helmet believer


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Bicycle accidents may be relatively rare, but it only
takes that one time. Jessica Hoffmann, 9, found that out
the hard way last month.
Until the day when Jessica and her nine-year-old
friend, Lindsey Geeraerts, took a short ride down the
street from Jessica's Holmes Beach home, both girls
had always worn helmets. This time they didn't, but
Jessica has no idea why this critical piece of safety
equipment got left back.
"I guess I just forgot to, and we didn't think we
were going to go that far," Jessica says. "I didn't think
anything would happen to me."
Jessica spent the next three-and-half days in the
hospital with a fractured skull, while her parents,
Harold and Cheryl Hoffmann, agonized over the pos-
sibility that the full extent of her injury might not mani-
fest itself for a while.
"We're very fortunate," Cheryl says. "We spent a
long night in prayer, and our prayers were answered,
because they didn't know just what it (the injury) was
going to do. It was pretty much two days before we
would know whether it was going to get worse. There
was dizziness and she had blurred vision a lot of
things came and went."
AAA motor club says each year 500 children die in
bicycle accidents, and most of those deaths are from head
injuries. Sitting with her mom and Lindsey, Jessica told
The Islander Bystander what happened that day that
turned a Saturday bike ride into a close brush with death.
"We were on our bikes," Jessica recalls. "I was
going back toward my house and I was following
Lindsey. She was turning and I was going to turn with
her, but I knocked into her. She jumped off her bike and
I fell down and hit my head and then I don't remem-
ber. When I woke up I was in my house on the couch."
"I started feeling sleepy," Jessica continues, "but
my dad told me not to go to sleep."
Cheryl got the call from her husband while she
was at work.
"I joined him at the hospital," she says. "They had
done x-rays and a CAT scan. That's when we saw the
fracture and the blood clot."
Hoffmann says Jessica had a lump on her head, but
that the skin was not broken the only bleeding was
internal. She says a blood clot had developed on the
fracture.
"They had to monitor her for 24 to 48 hours to
make sure the situation hadn't worsened," Hoffmann
says. "The clot was on the inside nothing broke
outwardly. With the clot there, they were watching for
swelling inside the skull."
Though the Hoffmanns will never forget those
tense hours awaiting the hoped-for good news from the
doctors, what Jessica remembers most is the intense
physical pain she suffered.
"It hurt really bad," Jessica says. "It was continu-


ous for the night that I got hurt, then it came and went.
It hurt so bad."
"I guess the pain was excruciating," Cheryl says,
"and they can't give you anything for pain with a head
injury, of course."
After half a week in the hospital, Jessica came
home. The worst is now behind her, but the ordeal is
not entirely over. Jessica has headaches once or twice
a day, and the blood clot the thing that had the doc-
tors worried the most is still there. The good news
is that it's beginning to go away.
"That's what we're watching now," Cheryl says.
"We're watching for the blood clot to dissolve into the
bloodstream and that's what it's eventually doing."
Although she always encouraged the use of hel-
mets, the accident has renewed Hoffmann's zeal to see


Cycling buddies
Jessica Hoffman, 9, left, is joined by her friend, Lindsey Geeraerts, 9. The two girls were bicycling last month
when Jessica bumped into Lindsey's bike, sending it to the ground and sending Jessica to the hospital with a
fractured skull. Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


Looking up
Jessica Hoffmann, 9, and
her mother, Cheryl, are
all smiles now that the
worst of Jessica's ordeal
with a bicycle accident
are behind her. The
Holmes Beach fourth-
grader suffered a skull
fracture last month when
she took a fall while
riding her bike. It was the
first time she had not
worn her helmet, but as
Cheryl points out, "It
only took this one time."



















all bike-riding children wearing them. Toward that end,
she says she will only vote for political candidates who
support a proposed law which will require young bicy-
clists and skateboarders to wear helmets.
But law or not, her message to parents is: Insist
your child wear a helmet.
"It only took this one time," Hoffmann cautions.
The effort to protect children from bicycle-related
head injuries may be an uphill battle, Hoffmann con-
cedes, due to that age-old obstacle of peer pressure.
"One emergency room nurse told me she has a
little boy who's seven years old, and he rides with chil-
dren who are one or two years older. He won't wear his
helmet because his friends don't," Hoffmann says.
Luckily, within Jessica's circle of young bicyclists,
her hard-learned lesson has made its point.
"When we see Jessie's friends riding they always
have their helmets on."
Beyond the skull fracture, perhaps the cruelest injury
for an active nine-year-old is that since the accident, bike
riding has become a spectator sport for Jessica.
"I don't want to do it anymore," Jessica says.
It's hard to keep a youthful spirit down, though,
and by the time she had finished her interview with the
newspaper, Jessica decided it was time to get back in
the saddle again.
For the first time in a month she mounted her bike
and took it for a slow ride down the street in front of
her house while her mom and Lindsey cheered her on.
Taking no chances, she even put her foot down for
extra balance while making wide, tentative turns.
And of course, she wore her helmet.
Like her mother, Jessica has become somewhat of
a crusader for helmets herself. Her message to other
children touts the advantages of wearing helmets in a
very practical, easy-to-understand way.
"Well, I think they should wear their helmet be-
cause if they don't, and they fall, it really hurts," Jes-
sica says. "It hurts bad."
A family friend has set up an account for persons
wishing to help with Jessica's uninsured medical bills.
Contributions should be dropped off or mailed to
American Bank, 4702 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton,
34210. Contributions should include either the account
number (4068789) or state they are for the "J.H. ac-
count. For more information, contact Mary Ann Jus-
tice at the bank at 795-3050.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 5 iE


Safety tips for

bike riders
There are a number of safety tips the AAA motor
club has put together for bicyclists, and it is no coin-
cidence that wearing a helmet tops the list. According
to AAA, 500 children die from bicycle injuries each
year, with head injury the most common cause of
death.
Last month's accident involving a nine-year-old
Holmes Beach girl brings that statistic painfully close
to home. Although she survived and is well on the way
to a complete recovery, things could've just as easily
turned out worse.
Getting children to wear helmets is essential, the
AAA says, but the organization concedes it's not al-
ways easy.
"Your kids may not think helmets are cool," a
AAA brochure states. "You might think they cost too
much. But a helmet can save a child from serious head
injury or even death in a fall or collision."
The AAA brochure then makes an important
point: "Children copy adults, so if you ride, wear a
helmet."
When shopping for a helmet, look for a safety
sticker from the Snell Memorial Foundation or ANSI
(American National Standards Institute), says AAA.
Here's how the AAA says bicycling can be made
a safer sport:
Always wear an approved bicycle safety helmet
- protect your head from serious injury by wearing
a helmet while riding.
Stop and check look and listen for traffic be-
fore you enter a street from a driveway, parking lot or
sidewalk.
Avoiding riding after dark or if the weather is
bad all cyclists are at risk during the hours of dark-
ness.
Obey traffic signs, signals and pavement mark-
ings obeying the law can keep you out of many
hazardous driving situations. (And the police can
ticket bicyclists for violations, just as they do motor-
ists.)
Drive on the right-hand side of the street -
move with the flow of traffic.
Be extra careful turning left vehicles ap-
proaching or following you don't expect you to go left
and often don't see left-turning cyclists.
Slow down reduce speed when approaching
intersections, and stop and listen at stop signs. Walk
your bike across busy intersections and streets.
Give pedestrians the right-of-way it's an act
of courtesy, and it's safer, too.
Avoid broken pavement litter, loose gravel,
mud and leaves can also be a problem for cyclists since
they can cause you to lose control of your bike.
Help other drivers see you wear light or brightly
colored clothes. A "Day-Glow" flag on a six-foot flexible
staff on your bike warns motorists of your presence.
Watch for doors opening on parked cars on
streets where cars are parked, pay particular attention
to the possibility someone may open a door onto the
roadway.
When riding with a group, form a single line -
there should be one bike length between each cyclist,
and the line should ride on the right-hand side of the
roadway.
Carry packages safely packages should be
carried in a basket, carrier or backpack so that both
hands can be kept on the handle bars.
Keep your bike in good repair check and ad-
just loose parts and tire pressure weekly. Clean and
lightly oil moving parts regularly. Store your bike in-
doors if possible.
Don't take chances watch what is going on
around you.


Register to vote at
Islander Bystander
Islanders may register to vote, change address
or party affiliation on Saturday, Oct. 1, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, located in the Island
Shopping Center.
Tuesday, Oct. 11, is the last day to register to
vote in time for the Nov. 8 general election.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS
----------- ------

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


ENJOY YOUR HOLIDAYS
THIS YEAR ON A GREAT CRUISE.
YUCATAN DEC. 24-27; Tampa to Playa del
Carmen & Cozumel .......................................... $515.
TRANSCANAL DEC. 17-31; San Diego, Puerto
Vallarta, Acapulco, Costa Rica, Panama Canal,
Cartagena, Ocho Rios & Montego Bay................ $1466.
* 0 CARIBBEAN DEC. 19-26; San Juan, Antigua, Martinique,
St. Croix, Barbados, St. John & St. Thomas............. $757.
CANARY ISLAND DEC. 17-28; Malaga, Funchal,
La Palmas, Tenerife, Lanzarote, Casablanca and
Gibraltar ......................................................... $3,485.
A m


Take your chance to win $50 in The Islander football contest on page 16, this issue.


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10AM to 4PM Sundays
Island Shopping Center 778-2811


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IfI PAGE 6 E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 W THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Ir]1r]


Artsy Schmartsy
First came the artist and the art, then came the in-
evitable afterbirth, the art critic.
A new mural in Holmes Beach was a collective
effort by a group of artists associated with the Anna
Maria Island Art Guild.
Since our office is opposite Home Hardware in the
Island Shopping Center, we're lucky enough to look
out our windows across the parking lot to gaze upon the
art project featured in this week's story.
It's been a great asset as a photo backdrop for the
many occasions when we take pictures of kids with fish,
politicians, entertainers and the like. Used to be, we lined
them up against the nearest white wall. Now these occa-
sional photo opportunities all have blue skies, Gulf waters
and sandy beaches in the background.
We watched the mural take shape over many
weeks, with different artists each day making contribu-
tions and additions.
With their progress came the inevitable the critics.
Visitors to the office began remarking on their likes
and dislikes as the scenes on the wall unfolded. Shells,
sailboats, sea grape tree, man reading newspaper, dogs
on the beach.
Dogs on the beach?
That addition to the mural drew the most comment.
Nearly everyone that has lived here for any length
of time was eager to point out, "That's illegal."
Someone else pointed out that the dogs in the mu-
ral send the wrong message to visitors and newcomers
who don't know dogs are not welcome on our beaches.
And they're both right.
It may not have been the best choice to depict dogs
on the beach, but hey, it's art.

Danger! Danger!
A red tide outbreak, the largest in recent history,
looms just offshore to the south of us.
With tides, storms, and winds what they have been,
we can scarcely expect to be spared from the ill effects
of the water-borne micro-organism that kills many spe-
cies of fish, large and small.
The stench on the beach as the dead carcasses wash
ashore is bad enough, but the only direct effect on hu-
mans is nagging cough and raspy throat caused by the
atmospheric toxins.
The real threat is in the mysteries that surround red
tide. What causes it? How long will it last? What kills the
fish? And, most important:
Who will clean the dead fish off our beaches when
the red tide abates?


TStANI)ERMMli
SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 VOLUME TWO,. NUMBER 44
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813778-7978


SLICK By Egan


a 9(*j 1 f^tj M e e


Worked four years on
landscaping at city hall
In four years working on the Anna Maria City Hall
landscape project, I have been overwhelmed by praise and
donations supporting my attempt to give it a natural look
of barrier island dunes with sea oats and grasses.
I hope Harriet Ross's letter toThe Islander By-
stander criticizing the project will encourage more
constructive criticism.
It would be silly, of course, to believe -on an island
developed with manicured lawns and boxed Ixora hedges
- that everyone would like this rambunctious, ragged-
edged style. Having heard so little from the dissatisfied,
however, I can only assume theylhave been restrained by
some unwarranted sense of politeness.
I work on the grounds most Saturdays starting at 11
a.m. and the best way to make requests is to discuss
them with me there. I am keenly aware that a public
landscape project is more a medley than a theme song
and I have made many changes over my own prefer-
ences. I hope critics will bring that same spirit of com-
promise and tolerance with them.
Concerning the specific complaints of Harriet
Ross, the current overabundant growth is seasonal. It's
like having too many leaves on a Toledo lawn in au-
tumn. As tropical summer rains diminish, she will see
much of it disappear.
There are many reasons for allowing the cabbage
palms to grow their natural, full head of fronds. Func-
tionally, they now create four times the shade, have
more seeds for the birds and save taxpayers about $800
per year in maintenance. Rats and bugs dwell less in the
fronds than in the boots which are on trimmed trees as
well. And virtually all snakes on this Island are harm-
less and beneficial and should be left alone.
Aesthetically, the untrimmed cabbage palms recap-
ture that gracious "Old Florida" look, soften the land-
scape and give us one of the most beautiful and texture
gradations in all of nature: from the weathered grays to
aging browns of the skirts, through the golds and olives
of mature fronds, to brash and spikey young greens at
the tops a visual metaphor for the cycles of life.
I invite all doubters to come sit a few moments


with me in the shade of our palm forest and listen to the
delicious sound of breezes rustling in these fronds.
Mike Miller, Anna Maria

'Island Cup' soccer as good
as World Cup
No, it wasn't the World Cup but it was certainly
just as exciting. I'm talking about the Annual Soccer
Jamboree held last Friday night at the Anna Maria
Community Center.
There was pizza and soda, laughter and tears,
moans and groans, applause and cheers, lots of friendly
faces and best of all, no rain.
My team, Galati Marine, played with the finesse
and gusto that belied their young age. Dakota Whitaker
scored four goals, including one from the position of
goalie! That's quite a feat. Zach Schield made several
impressive shots, always a part of the action. Kelsea
Bachman defended the goal with nerves of steel, punt-
ing the ball solidly up the field. Kevin Greunke was
quick to kick and slow to tire. And newcomer Cory
Stewart shed his inhibitions, took a kick-off and was
chasing the ball with the best of them.
Veteran Jessica Cramer stood her ground as defender
and took some very professional throw-ins. Lorenzo
Rivera's powerful goal kicks had the opposition ducking
for cover. Erik Stahr not only headed the ball, he put to use
one of a soccer player's most valuable weapons his
mouth. Daniel Costa started off strong and aggressive but
was sidelined due to an injury. And although Andrea
Bruce didn't see much play time, her strong, accurate
kicking indicates great potential.
Assistant Coach Jack Bachman earned my respect
for his stamina and his uncanny ability to keep track of
the "Galati" balls. Thanks, Jack. Thanks also go to
team mom Dina Stewart and to all the parents who
came and showed their support.
If you enjoyed watching World Cup Soccer this sum-
mer, then come to the Community Center any Tuesday or
Thursday night between 6 and 8 p.m. to catch some "Is-
land Cup' soccer. It's just as exciting and free.
Lisa Rivera, Coach of the Galati Marine Team,
Anna Maria


LADy, I DOO'T CAtME A.U .VT'S
"PAtMNrTE ON T Choit-.O'S
ALAL-.... DOCtS ST-L.L. ARE
NOT rAL.A-O%.oED ON "TE"
PACkl* ( .f


I


S" / .v----II


....r._ ....'* * *


N.











THOSE WERE THE DAYS
Part 3, The Remarkable Captain Jones
by June Alder


I - /
1,880 viewY~ ofsuhFaki tetfo h o fteTmacutos.Jh


1880's view of south Franklin Street from the top of the Tampa courthouse. John
R. Jones had his law office across from courthouse square.


CITY ON THE MAKE


In 1884 Henry Plant brought his
railroad to Tampa, starting the cowtown
on its way up and giving 32-year-old
newcomer John R. Jones a market for
his dormant attorney skills.
Born in County Wexford, Ireland,
Jones like his father before him -
was ordained a priest in the Church of
England. After seminary in Edinburgh,
the young man was sent to a prestigious
parish in Toronto, Canada. But his heart
wasn't in it. He forsook his promising
career and turned Catholic. (When
asked about it in later life, he would say,
"Any Christian who reads history must
be a Catholic."
He then put his seamanship skills to
use supporting his family as a St.
Lawrence River pilot, and was content
with this role until he had a bout with
pneumonia. He decided to read for the
law and was doing well at it until he got
a yen for Florida to which he emigrated
in 1882. After a brief stab at growing
oranges, he settled in Tampa, opening a
law office near the courthouse.
It was the beginning of four golden
years for Tampa which rapidly became
an international port and capital of the
transplanted Cuban cigar industry. The
Joneses hobnobbed with the likes of the
McKays (famous cattle and shipping


John R. Jones as a young Anglican
priest, about 1878.


dynasty), the Walls (family of physi-
cians and lawyers) and the Mitchells
(Judge Henry Mitchell was elected
governor in 1892).
It was also an exciting time for the
three Jones boys. The building of the
railroad afforded them endless enter-
tainment. Elder son John Patrick, then
9, later wrote about the day train ser-
vice was inaugurated:
"When the diminutive wood-
burning locomotive with its wooden
coaches came puffing into Tampa the
entire populace lined the tracks, cheer-
ing and firing guns and revolvers. The
buildings were festooned with bunting,
while several barrels of liquor were
placed in the courthouse with tin cups
attached, to add to the general hilarity.
A banquet was given that night in the
new opera house by Mr. Plant where
champagne was served in abundance."
By 1886 the Joneses there were
now four youngsters, daughter Kathleen
having been born the year before had
a house in the new suburb of Hyde Park
on the west side of the Hillsborough. The
boys were enrolled in a new school there.
A highlight of the summer of 1887
was the closing exercises of the school
year. During the solemn occasion the
Jones boys had a hand in pulling a
prank on a newspaper reporter (Lamont
Bailey, later a resident of Anna Maria
Island). A note was passed up to the
podium saying that Bailey wished to
say a few words. To his surprise he was
called forward and had to stammer out
an impromptu speech "while the boys
in the back stuffed handkerchiefs down
their throats to keep from squealing."
Afterwards there was a big picnic
followed by games and foot-races "for
young and old." Captain Jones was
close to winning the men's foot race,
when he tripped over a tree root and
fell headlong, occasioning "much
laughter and joshing."
It was probably Johnny Jones's last
pleasant memory of that year. For
within a few months the worst yellow
fever of the century struck Tampa.
There was hardly a family untouched
by it including the Joneses.

Next: Yellow jack
strikes


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 7 l[


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ISLANDER .i"imL)H

THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre) U
(813) 778-7978
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::







IIM PAGE 8 K SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Motel density dominates planning meeting


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Increasing the density of motels in the A-1 district
continues to dominate Holmes Beach Planning Com-
mission hearings as proponents line up on opposite
sides of the issue.
The purpose of last week's hearing, said Planning
Commission Chairman Gabe Simches, was for resi-
dents to offer suggestions for revisions or changes to
the future land use element of the comprehensive plan.
Simches told the 20 residents in attendance that the
element's goals "address in a broad way what the land
use is about."
However, the subject quickly turned to the A-i
district and a recent request by district hoteliers in-
crease the density from 10 units per acre to 28.
Joy Courtney of Haley's Motel, a legal non-con-
forming motel in the R-2 or 4 district, said the density
should stay at 10. She said proponents of a change cite
a changing market "where visitors are suddenly stay-
ing for a shorter period of time and now travel in small
groups that no longer need large units."
She read statistics for air and automobile travelers
which she said indicate very little fluctuation over a 10-
year period and show an average stay of just over a
week and very little change in group size. She also re-
futed the claim that increased density would pull visi-
tors back from the residential zones into the hotel zone,
because data show a decrease in seasonal rental li-
censes has already occurred in the residential zones.
"I know the citizens of Holmes Beach looked long
and hard into the future of our city," she said. "They
decided in 1989 they wanted to see the future of
Holmes Beach to include a motel density of 10 units
per acre. As a motel business person on Anna Maria
Island, I believe this determination is prudent and prof-
itable. More tourists are coming to our unique commu-
nity because they cannot find what our Island offers
anywhere else and they are willing to pay."
Bob Van Wagoner endorsed Courtney's statements
and added, "Land use is probably the most vital goal of
the total plan. It dictates a lot of other things that are


While attempting to stop a woman from jumping
off the Rod and Reel Pier, an unidentified man was at-
tacked by Charles William Webster, 24, Bradenton
Beach.
The incident occurred about 10:30 p.m. Sept. 9,


going to happen. It tells us the type of community we
will have. If it's opened up we don't know what might
happen."
Shirley Romberger, a new resident from Stone Is-
land, N. J., said the charm of that barrier island was
destroyed because the land became so valuable.
She pointed out, "We were searching for the past
and we thought we found that here. As we travel
through our life, we see little spots that are special
places that are losing their past in the name of progress.
It's a snowball. Once it starts it takes on a life of its own
and no one can control it anymore."
David Romberger added, "Whatever has been done
in the past has worked. Look to that and try to preserve
those elements. The main driving force that defines a
community is density. Be very careful to tinker with
what has historically been an effective way to create a
lovely community."
Mary Kay Adams urged commissioners to con-
sider that an increase in density would result in wider
Roads, increased traffic, pollution, garbage and sewers.
"This is a family community," she said. "It works.
Keep it that way."
Mary Ann Sipe of the Coconuts Beach Resort said
although the Coconuts will not benefit from a density
change, she felt obligated to speak out for the hoteliers.
"All we want to do is have the right to make our
large units smaller by putting in a wall or door," she
explained. "We are stuck with 1,000 to 1,300 square
feet units that we can do nothing with. We can't rent
them for one night. Those are larger than some of the
homes on this island. We want to keep this island the
way it is. This island started out as a tourist island and
it has to be a tourist island or none of us can afford to
live here."
Jim Meena urged commissioners to give hoteliers
some relief.
"I want to keep this place like it is and I don't be-
lieve you're going to change it if you let them have 28
units per acre. I don't think we ought to be that strict.
Let then get the units they can within their four walls."
Bob Jones asked how many units would result


when the unidentified man reported he grabbed the fe-
male to keep her from jumping into the bay. Webster
attacked the man and pounded his head into the wooden
deck of the pier, seriously injuring the cornea of his left
eye. Webster was charged with aggravated battery.


from a change. Frank Davis of the Harrington House
said 34 additional units of which only six or eight will
be new. The remainder would come from splitting ex-
isting units.
"This whole issue has become emotional rather
than looking at the facts," said Davis. "We all have
come here for the same reason. I wouldn't want it to
change. We're not changing the density of all of
Holmes Beach, only eight motels in the A-1 district."
However, Commissioner Bruce Golding noted,
"We can't just spot re-zone the motels. It has to be the
district-wide. There's the possibility for a lot more
units than 34."
He said there are a couple of large pieces of prop-
erty in the district.
Davis said 60 percent of the district is in condo-
miniums and it is unlikely they would tear down to
build 28-unit motels because the cost of the land would
be prohibitive. He added that it is also unlikely that an
individual property owner would tear down a $160,000
home to build two units.
Don Howard of the Island Plantation said, "Each
unit is a product we can sell for one day. I can take that
1,300 square foot unit and pack people into it or if I
break it up into two units, it makes a difference of four
people. But it makes a tremendous difference in in-
come. Let us grow within our confines. That's all we're
asking for."
Paul Bobrek expressed strong opposition to any
change.
"There's not a spot of beach in Florida that hasn't
been hit by a hurricane in the last 100 years," he said.
"Any zoning change you must make with the assump-
tion that those properties may get liquidated. To con-
sider anything else would be short-sighted and irre-
sponsible."
David Romberger said the only way to determine
the full impact of the proposal is to project 100 percent
development of what will be permitted.
City Attorney Patricia Petruff said that if the entire
36-acre A-I district was converted to motels at 28 units
per acre, it would result in 1,008 rooms.


Art League to hold

arts and crafts fair
The Anna Maria Island Art League will hold an
arts and crafts fair in conjunction with its annual Christ-
mas Secret Shop on Saturday, Nov. 26, at the League,
5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach.
Artisans and craftspeople may reserve a $15 booth
space for the non-juried show by calling 778-2099.


Holmes Beach bank to get three drive-up windows
The First National Bank of Manatee received a
setback variance from the Holmes Beach Board of i
Adjustment last week in order to increase the number ,
of drive-up windows on its property, the former ,
Crossland property. ,
Public Works Superintendent John Fernandez said /
the planned teller windows have a canopy top sup-
ported by columns. In order to get the necessary
amount of space for three windows, a corner of the .
building would encroach into the required setback.
"Our ordinance allows for a variance to be sought
for 20 percent of a required setback," he explained. -
"The required setback in that district is 25 feet. They're
asking for 20 percent of that, which is five feet."
The drive-up windows will be in the same location
as the previous drive-up window. The area fronts the
52nd Street side of the property. "-
Architect Jerry Zoller said the building "was origi- I '
nally designed and operated as a savings and loan. The
First National Bank of Manatee is a bank and they --' ll"E.
would like to add two additional drive-up windows. ..
The hardship is that the site has three front yards, each ,. ..
with a 25-foot setback. We're asking for a variance on . --
one side, the local street side."
Zoller said the new owners will be bringing the park-
ing lot up to ADA (American Disabilities Act) standards
and repaving it, moving trees to other sites, adding land-
scaping, putting in new sidewalks and adding a new roof. New bank in town
Fernandez said property owners had expressed no Work began last week on the parking lot and sidewalks of the former Crossland property. The new owner, the
opposition to the proposal. The board voted unanimously First National Bank of Manatee, will be bringing the parking lot up to ADA standards, adding new sidewalks,
to grant the request, a new roof and landscaping. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Man injured while trying to aid

woman at Rod and Reel Pier






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 9 R j

Emergency planners must tie up loose ends, says chief


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Andy Price, Anna Maria fire chief and chief of the
Island Emergency Operations Center (IEOC), implored
members to report to their cities on the group's actions
and to complete projects that have dragged through the
summer.
"We've gotten a lot of phone calls (at the fire station)
concerning the issues that should be handled at the city
level," said Price. "There's been questions about billing
referred to us. I think part of your responsibility as an
IEOC representative is to let city hall know what we're
doing. Too many times questions arise on issues that have
already been discussed and decided on here."
The cities must check their charters to see if their
councils can meet outside of city limits in the event of
an emergency, said Price. Bradenton Beach's city at-
torney has already drawn up an emergency meeting
provision for its charter.
Don Tarantola, Anna Maria public works supervi-
sor, said its charter allows commissioners to meet any-
where.
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Billie Martini said
her city's charter must be consulted.
Price asked members to add another provision to
their charter one to allow payment of overtime to
salaried employees and payment to council members in
the event of an emergency. He said if there is such a
provision, the city can recoup those expenses from the
Federal Emergency Management Agency.
Martini said she had information concerning the
purchase of MREs (Meals Ready to Eat) for the
group's use in the event of an emergency. She said the
MREs are available at the Federal Surplus Center at
Marianna, Fla., for $10 per case of 12, but they are


wPE:N7
ApD YS


IcoIs


em-
I


TOU


Reg. $8.95


I


currently out of stock.
Price said the group can sustain itself at the fire
station because it has cooking facilities, a generator and
a fuel supply.
Mike Heistand, Holmes Beach code enforcement
officer, asked how the city should distribute its sandbags,
recently purchased for each IEOC member agency.
Price said they are for each city to have on hand for
emergencies and each city should decide how to dis-
tribute them. Price said the fire district is keeping theirs
to protect public buildings.
Sgt. Jon Cosby of the Bradenton Beach Police
Department said his city is also keeping them to pro-


The Anna Maria Fire Commission will seek a grant
from the state to purchase emergency management
equipment. The equipment will be for the use of the
Island Emergency Operations Center (IEOC) but will
be owned by the fire district because the district is the
applicant.
"There are three different types of grants avail-
able," explained Fire Chief Andy Price. "The first one
is renewing a grant the county is already receiving, but
the money only goes to the county. The other two are
competitive grants and every year you have to apply.
They are $50,000 each and we can put in for both
grants."
Price said if the fire district applies for a grant for
an emergency manager for the IEOC, the funds would
have to be applied for annually. He believed it was
unfair to be able to guarantee a manager only one


tect city buildings. Tarantola said the sandbags are
being sold to residents in Anna Maria and asked if more
could be made available for residents to purchase.
Price said the company that supplied the sandbags
is no longer located in Florida. Getting the sandbags
locally would be much more expensive and they would
not be on pallets.
"The general purpose of getting them was for our
use, not providing them for the public," he noted. "The
problem is that public has no outlet to get the sand-
bags."
Price asked members to find out how much each city
has budgeted for the IEOC in the 1994/95 fiscal year.


year's employment.
The board agreed to apply for the two $50,000
grants for emergency equipment. Price said the county
will assist in writing the grants. Equipment could in-
clude radios, a computer, materials for building safety
such as exterior roll-up doors and a television to moni-
tor the Weather Channel.
"If we get it, there are no strings attached and no
matching funds," said Price. "If we don't get it we're
not out anything."
Price said the Island cities can discuss the possibil-
ity of hiring an emergency manager for next year.
Commissioner Sandy Haas asked when the grants
funds will be available. Price said next year.
The board also agreed to pursue a grant to purchase
800 MHz radios for the district. The grant is a 25 per-
cent matching grant, said Price.


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]i3 PAGE 10 E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

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Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held at
Anna Maria City Hall for Sept. 17, were Gene
Snedeker and Herb Ditzel.
Runners up were Ed Callen and Florence Spain.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday, and
all are welcome.

Learn to prevent home
break-ins in program
Manatee County Central Library is sponsoring a
program on residential security presented by Jake Parrish
of the Manatee County Sheriff s Department on Thurs-
day, Sept. 29, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the auditorium.
The program will focus on ways to improve secu-
rity, discourage burglars and protect your property. A
question and answer session will follow the presentation.
The program is free and open to the public.
Manatee County Library is located at 1301
Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton. Information call 748-5555
and ask for the Information Services Department.


Safe boating course
offered Oct. 4
A course in boating safety will begin Tuesday,
Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m., at the Flotilla #81 Training Center,
4208 129th St. W., Cortez.
The three-week course is conducted by certified
Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors and includes boat
handling, navigation, legal requirements, weather and
radio. The class is twice a week on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings. Except for a nominal fee for ma-
terials, the class is free.
For more information call Bill Sysak at 795-4195
or John Hughes at 778-4555.

Run to save a life
The Fourth Annual Breast Cancer Awareness 5-
K Run and Walk will be Saturday, Sept.24, at 8 a.m.,
at Manatee Memorial Hospital in Bradenton.
Whether you run or walk, you are invited to dedi-
cate your effort in memory of a loved one who died
of cancer or to a loved one battling cancer. Proceeds
benefit financially disadvantaged Manatee County
women who need mammograms, the best early detec-
tion of breast cancer. Prizes will be awarded.
The event is sponsored by Altrusa International of
Bradenton and the Manatee Center for Women's Health.
For more information call Altrusa member Bar-
bara Huffman at 755-7000.

'Florida Then and Now'
is new museum exhibit
The South Florida Museum opens a new exhibit
on Tuesday, Oct. 4., "Florida Then and Now," a pho-
tographic reflection covering the diversity of elements
and unique qualities of Florida which have inspired
the State's phenomenal growth.
The exhibit, continuing through Dec. 4, consists
of 89 framed panels containing historical and contem-
porary photographs. The labels are presented in five
languages English, French, Italian, Spanish and
Serbo-Croatian and interpret the many facets of
Florida's history, environment, geography and
economy that have contributed to its world-wide
mystique.
The South Florida Museum and Bishop Plan-
etarium is located at 201 10th St. W., Bradenton. The
admission is $5.50 for adults, $5 for senior citizens,
$3.50 for children 5 to 12, and those under 4 are free.
For more information call 746-4131.

American Littoral
Society to meet
The American Littoral Society will hold its first
membership meeting of the year at 4 p.m. on Sunday,
Sept. 25, at the Southgate Plaza Community Room, in
Sarasota.
The purpose of the gathering is to share the hopes
and dreams of the organization and to determine the
effect it can have on local environmental concerns.
For more information call 951-0884.


Open auditions to be
held in Sarasota
Theatre Works, 1247 First St., Sarasota, will hold
open auditions for "Beau Jest," an off-Broadway com-
edy written by James Sherman and directed by
Marceline Decker, on Sunday and Monday, Oct. 16
and 17, at 7 p.m.
Roles are for two females and four males. Females
are needed for roles in the age ranges of 20s to 30s and
50s to 60s. Male roles are for age ranges of 30s to 60s.
Show dates are Jan. 6-28, 1995.

Tampa Bay Lightning
strikes Seafood Shack
Showboat
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will
hold its monthly membership reception on Thursday,
Sept 22, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., on the Seafood Shack
Showboat cruising Longboat Key's waterways.
Tampa Bay Lightning personnel will be on hand
to help with contests and giveaways. Hors d'oeuvres
are complimentary and a cash bar is available. The
reception costs $5 for members and $10 for guests.
Reservations are required.
To make reservations or for more information call
383-2466.

Oct. 1 dinner to help
day care center
First Baptist Church of Palmetto will sponsor the
Fourth Annual Spaghetti Dinner to benefit Rubonia
Day Care Center on Saturday, Oct. 1. Dinner will be
served from 4:30 to 7 p.m. in the Christian Life Cen-
ter, 1021 5th St. W., Palmetto. Donation is $3.50 per
dinner and take-outs are available.

Library program on
spouse, child abuse set
Manatee County Central Library is sponsoring a pro-
gram, Spouse and Child Abuse, presented by Ashley
Leonard, director of Hope Family Services, on Saturday,
Oct. 8, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the auditorium.
Domestic violence claims a life in Florida every 36
hours and last year there were about 10,000 reports of
domestic violence in Hillsborough County alone, the sec-
ond highest in the state. Learn to recognize stop this cycle
of violence. A question and answer period will follow.
The program is free and open to the public.
Manatee County Central Library is located at 1301
Barcarrota Blvd. W., Bradenton. For more information
call 748-5555 and ask for the Information Services.

Blood Center now open
seven days
The Manatee County Blood Center announces that
it has opened its doors seven days a week for blood
donations. Saturday hours are 8 am. to noon and Sun-
days are from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Bloodmobile locations are scheduled five days a
week, generally Monday through Friday. Exceptions will
be made only for special events in the community. Restric-
tions for donors with medical histories of heart conditions
or cancer have been eased.
Donors or blood drive coordinators should contact
MCBC with any medical questions or for further details
at 745-5883.

Boats part of Snooty's
Party in the Park
Boats and boaters are needed for the boat parade,
led by Anna Maria Island Power Squadron and other
sponsors of Snooty's Party In The Park, to be held on
Sunday, Oct. 23.
Trophies will be awarded to the best decorated
boat. Dress your vessel with flags for a parade of flags
for Snooty.
Boats will assemble at marker 14, at 59th Street
and the Manatee River, at 12:15 p.m. The parade will
start at approximately 12:30 p.m., proceeding east un-
der the Green Bridge.
Registration deadline is Thursday, Oct. 13. Foi
more information call Dan Tyrrell at 778-4338.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 0 PAGE 11 Ij

AMY
Formerly of
Headquarters
IS NOWAT...
The Hair
Cottage, etc...
5500 Marina Dr. FULL SERVICE SALON
Holmes Beach 778-6868
U U


The envelope, please
Islanders should be receiving their tickets to the 30th Annual Halloween Dance this week, sponsored by the Anna
Maria Fire and Rescue Volunteers, Inc. About 30 firefighters, volunteers and family members gathered at the fire
station in Holmes Beach Thursday to stuff envelopes with tickets and information on the dance. Letters will be sent
to individual owners of 9,020 parcels of property, including 375 in foreign countries and half of the 50 states. Two
thirds of the letters are destined for owners living in Florida. The dance, to be held at St. Bernard's Hall from 9
p.m. to 1 am. on Oct 22, will feature costume contests, door prize and the music of Debra Jean and the
Melotones. It is the volunteers' annual fundraiser. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Island low vision group
to meet
The Sight Support Group will meet Tuesday, Sept.
27, at 1:30 p.m., in the meeting room of the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
A discussion will focus on new ideas for better
vision. The meeting is open to the public.

Applicants needed for
arts and crafts show
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island and the
Anna Maria Island Community Center are accepting
applications for the non-juried Fifth Annual Heritage
Days Arts and Crafts Show to be held Saturday and
Sunday, Nov. 12 and 13, at the AMICC.
Outside spaces only are available for $35. To make
reservations call 778-1980 or 778-6694 or write to the
AMICC, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, Fla. 34216
or the Artists Guild, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach,
Fla. 34217.


Correction
The Kirkwood Toastmasters meets every Tuesday
at the Kirkwood Presbyterian Church, 4408 60th
St.W., Bradenton, at 7 a.m. A published cutline stated
otherwise.


LBK Chamber to
sponsor open golf
tourney
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce is
sponsoring the 6th Annual Amateur Open Golf Tour-
nament on Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Longboat Key
Club Islandside Course.
Golf consists of an 18-hole scramble with prizes
for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place; closest to the pin; longest
drive and many other contests. A "Halloween" put-
ting contest begins at noon. Golf begins at 1 p.m.
sharp with a shotgun start.
Dinner is served at 5:30 p.m.
Entry fee for a single golfer is $75 plus tax. The
cost to sponsor a hole is $100. For further informa-
tion on fees or reservations call the Longboat Key
Chamber of Commerce at 383-2466.

Writing class to be held
at AMICC
Helen Nettleton, freelance writer and journalist,
will resume her fall class, "Writing to Publish," on
Tuesday, Sept. 27, at the Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. The
eight-week class runs through Nov. 8, from 9:30 to
11:30 am. and costs $5. Pre-registration is required.
For more information or to register call 751-6940.
4


Privateers help the Community Center
The Anna Maria Island Privateers presented a check for $1,500 to the Anna Maria Island Community Center
on Aug. 24. Pierrette Kelly, AMICC executive director, (center) received the proceeds from the Privateers'
July Fourth Barbecue Picnic, and, in turn, presented a plaque to the Privateers "In Recognition of Your
Generosity and Support on Behalf of All Island Children." Privateers on hand were, in the front row, Terry
Tibbits, left, and Will Stokes; and, in the back row, from the left Grant Beer, Jim Hungerford, Gary Krauss,
Barry Garland, John Swager, Rick Maddox, Andy Toombs and Larry Hand.


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l~ PAGE 12 E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island Rotary Club says, 'We care!'


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
With 17 members, the Anna Maria Island
Rotary Club may not be the largest service
club around, but according to its president,
John Coyle, it makes up in commitment to the
community what it lacks in size. In that re-
spect, it reflects the hopes and dreams of its
founder.
Rotary began in 1905 in Chicago when
attorney Paul Harris decided he ought to get
together with other professionals and see what
they could do for their community.
"It grew to an international organization
from that humble beginning of a just a few
people getting together," Coyle says. "We're
in practically every country, and we're one of
the few service clubs that is international."
Coyle says Rotary's main goal is "to fos-
ter the ideals of service. The slogan on the Ro-
tary wheel changes each year, and the one for
1994-95 is 'Be a Friend.' However, the gen-
eral logo, the one which never changes, is
'Service Above Self.' "
Coyle says the meaning of the club's
easily-recognized wheel symbol is simple: "The
Rotary cog wheel makes everything go. The cog
wheel in anything makes it go."
One thing that sets Rotary apart from other service
clubs is that its membership is carefully selected to
represent a cross section of the local business and pro-
fessional community. Coyle says the tenets embraced


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by the club are hopefully fostered in each member's
business dealings with the community at large.
"Rotary tries to have a mixture of all kinds of pro-
fessional and business people, and we try not to have
too many of each classification. Ideally, we'd like to
have one of each."
Business and professions represented by the cur-


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rent membership include banking, tax ser-
vice, linen service and air conditioning con-
tracting. Sadly, the classification of grocery
store proprietor is now open due to the recent
death of Ernie Cagnina, the last original
founding member of the club.
Of the various classifications in the local
club, Coyle says a good number are known as
"senior-active."
"That means they're older people who are
no longer in their professions we have a lot
of retired people here." Coyle says there is no
upper age range for members, and there is no
minimum age range, either.
The club is also co-ed, and has one fe-


male member.
"We're looking for more," Coyle says.
It's not the easiest thing in the world to be-
come a Rotarian, because even if you are invited
to join, you've gotto prove yourself to the mem-
bership before you may join its ranks.
"Usually, a member would invite you to come
to a meeting, or maybe several meetings,"
Coyle says. "At the meetings you would see
what we're doing, hear our reports and hear our
speakers. And you'd meet the other members.
"At some point the member would submit your
name to the board for approval to join. A letter then
goes out to the membership, and each member is given
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 N PAGE 13 EI


Rotarians
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE

10 days notice of a proposed member to come on
board. If there are no objections, the new member is
accepted.
"However," Coyle says, "in order to have a classifi-
cation in Rotary you must be in a position of authority
relative to your work. You must be the owner or manager
- a decision maker." Coyle says the reasoning behind this
is the club wants members who will be in a position to put
Rotary tenets to use within the work place.
Coyle is a former director of the United Way in
Will County, Illinois, and his own professional classi-
fication is fundraising.
Coyle's vocation is fortuitous for the Island Rotary,
since the club spends a lot of its time trying to raise
money for community projects.
The Rotary tent is seen often at the various Island
art fairs, as well as at numerous Anna Maria Island
Community Center events, where the proceeds of hot
dog and soft drink sales directly benefit the Center.
When the Rotary raises money for itself, it's often
earmarked for a college scholarship fund, Coyle says. It's


something the club takes very seriously, for not only are
donations received from the community, but many mem-
bers make considerable contributions themselves.
"We have what we call Paul Harris Fellows, named
for the founder of Rotary," Coyle says. "Those mem-
bers sign up with a commitment to give $1,000." More
than half the Island's Rotarians are Paul Harris Fellows
and all members pay $160 a year in dues.
Because it is an international organization, Rotary's
efforts are felt beyond the shores of the Island, Coyle says.
As an example to which he is particularly proud -
he mentions the project known as Polio Plus. With money
raised from the thousands of Rotary chapters around the
world -including the Island chapter $235 million has
been raised to help eradicate the disease.
"The United States government only committed
$12 million," Coyle says by way of illustrating the
depth of commitment Rotarians show when there is a
big problem to be tackled.
He says since the program began, reported cases of
polio have dropped 50 percent world-wide.
The Anna Maria Island Rotary Club meets every
Monday at Crabby Bill's at 6:15 p.m. For more infor-
mation call John J. Coyle at 778-3203.


Join the All American Team.

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2424 Manatee Avenue West
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s a Rotarian engaged in a business
or profession, I am expected to:


1) Consider my vocation to be another opportunity to serve;
2) Befaithfulto the letter and to the spirit of the ethical codes of myvocation,
to the laws of my country, and to the moral standards of my community;
3) Do alf in my power to dignity my vocation and to promote the highest
ethical standards in my chosen vocation;
4) Befair to my empoer, employees, associates, competitors, customers,,the
public and aff those with whom I have a business or professional relationship;
5) Recognize the honor and respect due to aLf occupations which are useful
to society;
6) Oer my vocationaLtaents: to provide opportnitiesfor youag people, to
wor for the relief of the special needs of others, andto improve the quality of fe
in my community;
7) Adhere to honesty in my advertising and in aff representations to the pubic
concerning my business or profession;
8) Neither seef rom nor grant to a feLow Rotarian a privilege or advantage
not normally accorded others in a business or professional relationship.


Assets

Loans

Earnings

Capital

Deposits


EARNINGS
600-
500-
400
S300-
( 200-
0 100-
12/89 12/90
S 0-
(100)-[12/91 12/92 12/93 8/94

(200) -
(300)-
(400) -
(500)-
(600) 59-
5/89


DEPOSITS


m_ E m


I


1 .1 .







i~ PAGE 14 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Local artists' group committed to beautifying Island


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
While it seems the paint is barely dry, a few finishing
touches remain for the wall of the Home True Value Hard-
ware in the Island Shopping Center in Holmes Beach.
The artists still have to sign their work. It will then
be sealed to protect the artistic rendering of Island life:
A man sits in a beach chair wearing argyle socks and
reading the Anna Maria Key News newspaper. Two dogs
sit comfortably in the shade of a Gulf-front tree and birds
languidly look for food by the water's edge.
The Island's big, blank, empty walls seem to in-
spire Louise Harris.
The Homes Beach mural is only the first in a series
of planned Islandwide art on the walls. Harris has mu-
rals planned for many sites on the Island.
Artists have already started a new one on the side of
Key West Willy's on Bridge Street in Bradenton Beach.
"I've lived here 18-and-a-half years" says Harris,
"and I adore it but I've always thought it was a little
drab because the shopping centers are just there. I al-
ways thought we could do something to liven them up."
What Harris did was to organize the Artists Guild
of Anna Maria Island into working on the big projects
as a group.
"I'm so proud of them," says Harris of the artists.
Art Ballman is the president of the Artists Guild
and the architect of the group. Harris asked him to work
up the schematics of the grid to keep the large murals
in the proper perspective. He also helped to paint the


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Standing in front of the completed mural in Holmes Beach are some of the artists who worked on it. Art
Ballman, left, with his dog Hurricane; Russ and Genny Alban with their dog Muffy; Louise Harris, seated;
Letizia Galvin and Lois Lietz. Missing are Peggy Potter and Sue Benevento.


Holmes Beach mural.
Harris, who is a china painter, has never thought
about selling her art. Her job, she says, is to research,
plan and organize.
"Part of what I do is research," says Harris.
Harris' research accounts for the Anna Maria Key
News and the man wearing the argyle socks in the mural.
"I went to the Central library and looked at the old


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Bystander.
Over 900 Island-
lovers are already
on our out-of-
town list. It's the
best news on
Anna Maria
Island! A
subscription form
with mail rates is
on page 7
of this issue.
ISLANDER
I1 1 liI


issues they have in the Eaton Room. We used the sec-
ond issue because it had the picture on the front page
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 15 I[j


Louise Harris, who organized the mural project through the Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island, plans for the
next mural-in-progress at Key West Willy's in Bradenton Beach. Islander Photos: Tomara Kafka


Murals
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE

and the first issue didn't."
Because the newspaper dated the mural in the year
1949, Harris and Peggy Potter talked about the kinds
of clothes people wore then. Potter, who painted the
gentleman sitting in the wooden beach chair reading
the paper, decided to paint the argyle socks because she
had knit her husband a pair around that time.
Russ Alban painted the dogs. The cocker spaniel is


Alban's and his wife, Genny's, dog Muffy. The other
dog is Hurricane II, Art Ballman's dog.
Once the major work was finished on the Holmes
Beach mural, Harris began to work on the next one she
had in mind Key West Willy's in Bradenton Beach.
Owner Clem Dryden liked the idea right away.
"Clem and I have been working on this since
March," says Harris. "I suggested a pier scene because
its location is on Bridge Street."
Other murals are planned for Bridge Street the
Sports Lounge wants a sports scene, the new coffee
house next to Key West Willy's will have a flowers and


MCC offers non-credit
art courses
The Open Campus of Manatee Community
College in Bradenton is offering:
Advanced Studio Ceramics will be offered
Wednesday, Oct. 19 through Dec. 7, from noon to
3 p.m. Emphasis will be placed on the aesthetic of
clay rather than traditional forming techniques. Cost
is $97.50.
Creative SLR Photography is a six-week
course designed to help the photographer get the
most from the 35mm camera. It will run Thursday,
Sept. 29 through Thursday, Nov. 3, from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Cost is $36.
Exploring the World of Watercolor is
scheduled for Thursdays, Sept. 29 through Nov.
3, in three sections: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; 2 to
4:30 p.m.; and 6 to 8:30 p.m.. The class is de-
signed for experienced painters. Cost is $45.
For more information or to register call MCC
at 755-1511, ext. 4669.


wicker furniture scene, and perhaps a ceramic mural for
an apartment building.
In Holmes Beach, murals are planned for the side of
the Post Office and the facing canvas shop wall. Harris
also wants to do an old-fashioned dentist's scene on the
dentist's office wall. Then there are the four or five mu-
rals they have planned for Anna Maria School.
In Anna Maria a "Field of Dreams" theme is
planned for the walls of the Community Center's en-
trance to the baseball field.
This long-term project has become a group com-
mitment for the Artists Guild.
"We want this to be our contribution to make this
Island more attractive more arty looking," says
Harris. "What we do fits right in with what the Island
Beautification Committee is trying to do."


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117 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach *


778-2335


IT'S THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN!
You can win $50 if you play The Islander Bystander
Football Contest! Page 16, this issue.



M P Parents A
SGrandparents .
choCl OO Neighbors ;
school Childrn
for Island Reidentsl
constructive I Bil p ha l
play It's Our Snacs

6h Birthday \ b seredi
come and help us celebrate
Thursday, September 29th
from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
All areas of the school will be open for you
and/or your children to play in, including: block-
building. dress-up, housekeeping, grocery store,
puzzle room, drawing center, library, computers,
outdoor play equipment, art activities, water table,
sensory stimulation (messy), along with our2 year
old's classroom filled with toys!

Find out what really goes on at Preschool and Day Care
while Mommy and Daddy are at home or workl!
302 Pine Ave, Anna Maria (half way between Cafe Robar and the Anchorage
Restaurant on the comer of North Shore Dr. and Pine Ave.)


Nj N



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Is the air you breathe
in your home
making you sick?

Air & Energy's new DUCT
CLEANING SERVICE is dedicated
to bring you quality indoor air ...


IMPORTANT NEWS FOR YOU TO KNOW


Family members who suffer from
allergies, asthma, or other respiratory
ailments as well as children and the eld-
erly are especially vulnerable to the ef-
fects of indoor air pollutants. These ef-
fects usually produce symptoms such as
stuffy nose, sneezing, dry cough, tight-
ness in the chest, sore throat, fatigue,
headaches, nausea, skin irritations, burn-
ing/itching eyes and difficulty sleeping.
Now acknowledged as a major al-
lergy and disease causing problem by
leading medical authorities, poor indoor
air quality has prompted doctors and al-
lergists to commonly prescribe air duct
cleaning as a remedy.
Modern air conditioning systems
work best in a closed environment. This
requires building to be tightly sealed.
The inside air, germs and all, are simply
recycled; fresh air is minimized and may
be eliminated completely. Worse yet, the
standard throw-away fiberglass filters
remove less than 7% of these particles,
the rest settles in your air ducts.
Today, more than ever, there is an
urgent need for clean air ducts and effi-
cient air filtration. And, an efficient
clean air system will reduce heating and





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DUCT CLEANING
778-0773


cooling costs.
The technicians at Air & Energy are
qualified experts. They are provided
with the most advanced equipment and
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The process involves the use of an
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Rf PAGE 16 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


ISLAlN.IDER


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
* The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
* All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
* All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6FILL OUT NOW
FILL IT OUT- NOW!
Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
* Name Address/City Phone


ROD AWEEL

Mini-Resort
Best Fishing -*
ISLAND
COOKING
a Beer and Wine
Breakfast
Lunch-Dinner
*r Reasonable *
Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier





Joe
Ungvarsky
Construction
& Remodeling
778-2993
Experience
You
Can
Rely
On.
CRC035261

Bucs at Packers


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
SBengals at Oilers
OPEN 7 DAYS 11AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953





AMERICAN
CAR

WASH

& DETAILING
BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
Saints at 49ers
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617


Free Estimates



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
* Re-Roofs Repairs
* Built-Ups Shingles
* Single Ply Tile
Roofing CESEINSURED
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Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy OQuallty


748-9362
Bears at Jets


QAL MEn- SNDAh -

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Bulk Oil-inya tamn f
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Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,



SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
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HAPPY HOUR
MON FRi 4- 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
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Steelers at Seahawks





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Try Our Demo!
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Custom T-Shirts
Full Line of
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778-0540
Dolphins atVikings
Anna Maria Island Centre


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332 Ea BDr Ho-h- B.e.
778-4277
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778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach



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Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6 pm
Happy Hour Everyday

SColorado at Michigan
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 M PAGE 17 Eij


$18,000 fundraising

whopper
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Big Mama, who is an entertainment "fixture" at
The Hunt Club, raised a whopping $18,000 for the
Muscular Dystrophy Association at this year's tele-
thon. This was the first time the event was hosted by
The Hunt Club and it was the largest amount ever
raised by Big Mama, including the many years her
annual fund raiser was held at the fallen icon of
Longboat Key, Shenkel's restaurant.
Susan Vaught, general manager of the Hunt Club,
said lots of people pitched in to help including John
Hill of Channel 40, who assisted with emcee duties,
and '60s recording artist Duane Dee, who stopped in
to sing a few songs. The Hunt Club staff all donated
their time.
Congratulations toTheHunt Club for a fantastic
effort and for its three year anniversary, Sept. 9.
Speaking of anniversaries, the Mutiny Inn is cel-
ebrating its first. You can help them celebrate by join-
ing them for a complimentary glass of champagne with
your entree through the month of September. A special
dinner for two at $39.95 includes wine.

Flocking in for Fall
October 1 signals the return of lots of friends and
familiar faces to Anna Maria our Island snowbirds.
It's also Oktoberfest time and a couple of celebra-
tions are worth mentioning as we usher in the first days
of Fall. The Old Hamburg Restaurant, with authen-
tic German specialties, will begin Oktoberfest specials
on Sept. 24, with all the wursts weisswurst,
bratwurst, blutwurst, and more sauerkraut and


schnitzels. Co-owner Henrick Bubik tells me they have
set no ending date on their Oktoberfest, just a begin-
ning. And congrats for yet another anniversary, as the
Old Hamburg turned one year old on Sept. 1.
Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant and Pub will
celebrate Oktoberfest from Sept. 28 through Oct. 2.
with sauerbraten, North Sea lunch and dinner specials
and lots of festivities throughout the month.
We're happy to hear that Jimmy the Greek of
Bortell's is out of the hospital and looking much better.

Art & tunes
Fresh from a club in Port Charlotte and the Sarasota
Blues Fest, The Toler Bros. will be stirring up the week-
end for rock fans at The Anchor Inn. Danny and Frankie
Toler are sometime Islanders between travels on the road.
They've both played with some really big names, i.e.
Allman band and Marshall Tucker, but we like their style
in the local clubs. Mo' fun.
Talisman plays at D.Coy Ducks on Friday and
Saturday night. They are a family band Sherry
Southern and Kenny Haynes, mom and dad, with son
Sean Haynes recently moved to the Island from
New Mexico. They mix '50s, '60s and '70s rock 'n'
roll with country and they do lots of standards. "It all
depends on the crowd," Sherry tells me, and they'll be
playing often through the season at Ducks.
AMIart?, a local group of "anti-artists" will host
another sandy, hands-on exhibit outside the Beach
House on Oct. 1 from noon to 4 p.m. The last outdoor
exhibit, at the Beach Bistro beach, was both entertain-
ing and clever. Not your stuffy gallery opening at all.
This group's art events are definitely a casual affair -
bathing suits and barefoot is just fine.
At Beach Bistro, Sean Murphy tells me he is busy
working on an event to benefit All Children's Hospi-
tal in St. Petersburg. It will be held at the Bistro on
Thursday, Nov. 10 and we'll let you know more details
as plans come together. Sean could use some volun-
teers to help and hopes local artists will donate art-
works for the auction.
Volunteers should call f/f y


Talisman is a family band with Sherry Southern
and Kenny Haynes, middle, with son Sean playing
at D. Coy Ducks on Friday and Saturday nights,
from 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. through the season.

Sean at 778-6444 and artists can contact Woody
Candish at 778-1908.
Things are happening just over the bridge in
Bradenton. Two restaurants are on the verge of open-
ing and worth mentioning: the Stockyard Steakhouse
("no bull, no bones") is remodeling the former Brady's
Irish pub and Safari Joe's is set to go this week in the
same Promenade Plaza.

Sinking away
Bradenton Beach Hardware, the 40-some-year-
old Island hardware icon on Bridge Street in Bradenton
Beach is soon closing its doors forever. The close-out
sale is a big success, I'm told, but there are still a few
nice odds and ends left. They still have lots of screws
and housewares. Most of the fishing stuff is gone, ex-
cept for sinkers.


* FO 39YEAS S
SPECILS FO SEPT 21 tru 2


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise "

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
p i, on our casual outside patio."
S. P.S. We have the very best sunsets


Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


RESTAURANT
COME & CELEBRATE WITH US

jERMAtl OHKOBERfES
Starting: Saturday, Sept 24
On Tap: Oktoberfest Draft
AUTHENTIC GERMAN SPECIALTIES
Sauerkraut, Bratwurst, Blutwurst
Weisswurst, Liverwurst ...
OPEN 4:30 10PM Mon Sun
Located in the Anna Maria Shopping Centre (We're right next to Walgreens)
3246 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island
778-1320






lJm PAGE 18 N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
0O 00 0 a 00 g ae .. * 0 0o Coooo0 o o SSo*o on o0oa o o


C


C
C
C




C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C


Anna Maria School Menu
Monday, 9/26/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Hot Ham Patty on Bun or Pizza, Hash Brown Potato w/Melted Cheese &
Bacon Bits, Baked Beans, Juice Bar
Tuesday, 9/27/94
Breakfast: Cereal or 1/2 Slice Pizza, Pineapple
Lunch: Italian Sausage on Bun or Nachos & Chips, Peas, Applesauce, Cake
Square
Wednesday, 9/28/94
Breakfast: Sausage Link or Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Oven Roasted Chicken or Chicken Gravy, Green Beans, Fresh Fruit,
Seasoned Rice
Thursday, 9/29/94
Breakfast: Cheese Toast or Cereal, Strawberry Fruit Cup
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy over Mashed Potatoes or Burrito, Mixed Vegetables,
Fresh Baked Blueberry Muffin, Juice
Friday, 9/30/94
Breakfast: Scrambled Egg, Toast or Cereal, Raisins
Lunch: Fiestada Pizza or Cheese Croissant, Corn, Fruit Cup, Chocolate Brownie
All meals served with milk.


Hi, hi, birdie
Samatha Myetta, left, and Ashly Zakazeski make time before Patricia Wagner's first-grade class at Anna
Maria Elementary starts its day to take care of class pet, Tweety. Tweety, a finch, stays in class during the
week and is taken home on weekends by a student who has earned the honor. "He keeps us company and is
cute and pretty," said Ashley about Tweety's contribution to the class. How do the students know Tweety is
a boy? "Mrs. Wagner told us," answered Samatha.

SBest Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!

FRESHBAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $6.95
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls

rm 1 A L W W Q1 A I I L EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


Tia Lena's Restaurant
1325 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach
Tuesday Sunday Open 4:30


/ Islandinn

S(Restaurant
i OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
-U 1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach




OPENING SOON

sonnydaze
110 bridge st., bradenton beach 778-3344
A REAL
COFFEE HOUSE

OPEN MIC NIGHTS

I POETRY READINGS
ART MUSIC

BILLIARDS
&
delicious gourmet
coffee, tea & snacks
U U


Pain relief
Amy Slicker is Anna Maria Elementary's new clinic
support technician, better known as the school's very
important boo-boo fixer. Slicker will be in the clinic
Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
will be the one to call parents if their child is too ill
to stay in school.


Hat switch
Ann Floto, Anna
Maria Elementary's
former clinic
support aide, is now
a teacher's aide.
She has taken over
the reins from Judy
Arnold who moved
to Tennessee over
the summer. The
classes of Deborah
Thomas, Debbie
Brady, Lynn
McDonough and
Michele Gabriele
will benefit from
Floto's support as
well as have
someone around
who will always
know how to make
any "ouchie"
better.


EI EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, toast
Some fries and coffee ... Only $1.75


Mon.thnuFri


..a.O...O...o. .... ..o.......O...OOOO. ..OaO O 0o






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 19 IE]


Roots
Casey Rygiel knows his roots thanks to a class
project in Vicki Small's fourth and fifth-grade split
class at our Island school. Rygiel displays his
"timeline," a pictorial of all the important events
and relationships in his lifetime all nine years of
it. "We are learning about humans and human
relationships," said Rygiel "That includes my
sister."


Joy Courtney


FREE GLASS OF CHAMPAGNE
WITH ENTREE, FROM SEPT. 12 31.


Mutiny, Inn


Try Our *39.95 (2) Dinner Special,
includes an appetizer & a bottle of wine
Entrees Include:
Fresh Gulf Catches: Prepared (10)
ways nightly.
Black Angus N.Y. Strip Au Poivre
Fresh Gulf Shrimp & Blue
Crabmeat Alfredo, on "Angle Hair" or
Spinach Fettucine
"The Mutiny Inn" on the corner of
Manatee Ave. & Gulf Dr.
Hours
Serving Dinner Mon. Sat. 5:00 10:00pm
Closed Sunday
Ar servations Suggested vaiable for Private Parties
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(813) 778-5440


Back-to-school night at Anna
Maria Elementary
PTO President Millie Torres conducted the business
of Anna Maria Elementary at the Open House and
Back-to-School night last Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the
auditorium. PTO officers were installed, the 1994-95
budget was approved...
meanwhile ... outside the auditorium the over-
capacity crowd listened to the PTO business in the
auditorium while students exercised their knowledge
of tree climbing and playing on the playgrounds.
Islander Photos: Tomara Kafka


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Ei PAGE 20 N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Sept. 8, alcohol citation, 100 S. Bay Blvd., Anna
Maria City Pier beach.
Sept. 10, battery, 600 block of Rose. The victim
reported that while she was a passenger in the subject's
vehicle, he made advances toward her.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 9, possession of marijuana less than 20
grams, possession of paraphernalia with drug, Cortez
Beach. The officer observed a vehicle parked illegally
at Cortez Beach after hours. While checking the vehicle
With his flashlight, the officer observed several partial
marijuana cigarettes in the ashtray and a 9 mm hand
gun. The vehicle's owner, Scott Robert Bell, 26, of
Sarasota, and his girlfriend approached and the officer
told them the beach was closed.
The officer asked Bell to unlock the vehicle and
step away for officer safety because of the gun. The
officer entered the vehicle to secure the weapon and
seize the marijuana. He also found a bag of marijuana,
a pipe with marijuana residue and rolling papers in the
center console and a tool to roll cigarettes, medical
scissors and three cigarette packs, each containing a
partial marijuana cigarette. Bell was placed in custody.
Sept. 14, grand theft, 100 block of 11th Street. The
complainant discovered numerous items missing after a
tenant moved out. Missing items included a microwave
oven valued at $250, a blanket valued at $50, a vacuum
cleaner valued at $50 and a cable box valued at $80. The


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Sat., Sept. 24 Swordfish (Grilled)
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complainant was also advised by FPL that there was an
outstanding bill of $313 owed to them.
Sept 14, violation of driver's license restriction,
possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of
paraphernalia with drug times two, 2400 through 2700
blocks of Gulf Drive. The officer stopped Benjamin
Michael Dean, 28, of Bradenton, for speeding 47 mph in
a 35 mph zone. When asked if the address on his driver's
license was correct, Dean said it was not. Dean was also
shown to have a restriction on his license for corrective
lenses, said the report. Dean told the officer he had con-
tact lenses. The officer asked him to remove one and he
told the officer he lied about the lenses.
The officer asked Dean if he had anything illegal in
his truck or possession and Dean said no. The officer said
in the report he was suspicious because Dean was acting
nervous. He asked Dean if he could search the vehicle and
Dean consented. The officer found a film canister contain-
ing two partial marijuana cigarettes, a bag of marijuana,
a set of alligator clips with residue and a pack of rolling
papers. Dean was placed in custody.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 9, burglary to an automobile, 6800 block of
Gulf Drive. A person unknown entered the vehicle by
prying the trunk locks and driver's door and attempted
to steal the vehicle.
Sept. 9, suspicious, 400 block of 28th Street. The
officer responded to a complainant who reported find-
ing two small bags, which he thought contained blood
plasma, in a field. The officer determined the substance
was catsup.
Sept. 9, suspicious persons, 100 block of 72nd

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Street. The officer responded to a complaint of two
white male juveniles trespassing on a patio. The officer
ran a check and found one of the juveniles was a run-
away. The parents were notified and picked up their
son.
Sept. 10, vandalism, 5901 Marina Dr., police sta-
tion parking lot. A county employee reported that a
person unknown loosened all the lug nuts on the left
front tire of his vehicle and the rim was damaged.
Sept. 10, Marchman Act, 3910 East Bay Dr., Dry
Dock. The officer on patrol observed the subject roll-
ing on the ground unable to stand. The subject was
placed in protective custody.
Sept. 12, traffic, Anna Maria Island bridge. The
officer responded to a report of a tire in the road and
removed it.
Sept. 14, possession of marijuana less than 20
grams, possession of paraphernalia, 400 block of
Manatee Avenue. The officer on patrol observed James
Hightower, 31, of Holmes Beach, riding a bicycle with-
out a head light and stopped him to ask.why he was
riding through a business area during early morning
hours. Hightower appeared nervous, said the report,
and could not produce any identification. The officer
noticed a bulge in Hightower's left front shorts pocket,
did an external pat down and seized a marijuana pipe
and three-and-a-half grams of marijuana.
Sept. 14, aggravated battery, domestic battery,
resisting without violence, 100 block of 52nd Street.
The victim reported that his daughter was intoxicated
when he and his wife arrived home and a verbal alter-
cation began. The daughter ran into the kitchen and
obtained a butcher knife with a seven-inch blade and
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 21 EB

=~I A


Alicia Adams
Alicia Adams, 53, of Anna Maria died Sept 18
at HCA Blake Hospital.
Adams was born in Tallahassee and came to
Anna Maria in 1946. She was a member of Roser
Memorial Community Church and a member of
Children Haven and Adult Center.
She is survived by a sister, Mary McGrath of
Bradenton Beach, three brothers, John of Holmes
Beach, Jim of Anna Maria and Richard of Dallas,
Tex.
Visitation is Wednesday, Sept. 21, from 7 to 8
p.m. at Griffith-Cline Island Chapel, 6000 Marina
Dr., Holmes Beach.
Service is Friday, Sept. 23, at 2 p.m. at Roser
Memorial Community Church.
Memorial donations may be made to Children's
Haven and Adult Center, Inc., 4405 Desoto Rd.,
Sarasota, Fla. 34235. Griffith-Cline Island Chapel is
in charge of arrangements.

Fred Bird
Frederick C. Bird, of Robbinsville, N.C. and
formerly of Holmes Beach, died September 16 in
New York.
Bird, 69, was a mechanic and troubleshooter
for Chrysler Corp. He worked at a number of ma-
rinas as a master marine mechanic. He was a vet-
eran of the U.S. Marine Corps, and served in World
War II.
Born in Raquette Lake, N.Y., Bird moved to
Holmes Beach in the early 1970s. He and his wife,
Janet, moved to North Carolina from the Island
several years ago.
Beside his wife, Bird is survived by daughters


Mary, Candy and Brenda; sons Bill, Joe and Ed; 11
grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Paul Jackson McGraw
Paul Jackson McGraw, 63, of Cortez died Sept. 13
at home.
Born in Evansville, Ind., Mr. McGraw came to the
area from Colorado Springs, Colo., in 1989. He was a
Protestant.
He was a volunteer with the American Red Cross
and the Peace Corps. He served in the U.S. Army.
He is survived by two daughters, Linda Johnson of
Colorado Springs and Anne of Denver; two sons,
David and Stephen, both of Colorado Springs; a sister,
Marilyn De Kime of St Petersburg; a brother, Ronald
C. of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; and three grandchildren.
A memorial service was held at Brown and Sons
Funeral Home, Bradenton, with the Rev. Warren
Wasson officiating.

Ruth E. Rowley
Ruth E. Rowley, 74, of Holmes Beach died Sept 13.
Born in Kalamazoo, Mich., Mrs. Rowley moved to
this area 10 years ago. She was a homemaker. She was
a member of Roser Memorial Community Church. She
was a volunteer for Glen Oaks Hospital and the
Longboat Key Art Center.
She is survived by her husband, Thomas G.
Rowley of Holmes Beach; a step-daughter, Christie of
Miami; a step-son, Thomas K. of St. Petersburg; a sis-
ter, Beatrice Niewoonder of Largo; a brother, Gerald
Somers of Richland, Mich.; and seven grandchildren.
A memorial service was held at Roser Memorial
Community Church. Griffith-Cline, Island Chapel, was in
charge of arrangements. Memorials may be made to Hos-
pice, 406 43rd St. W., Suite C, Bradenton, FL 34209.


I STEETL


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE

came at the victim.
She grabbed him by the shirt collar with her left
hand and held the knife in her right hand, threatening
the victim, said the report. She put the knife down af-
ter she learned that the police had been called. She was


On vacation ... see you October 4!







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placed in custody and had to be subdued to be hand-
cuffed and placed in the patrol car.
Sept. 14, traffic, 66th Street and Holmes Boule-
vard. The complainant reported roofing nails in the
street. The officer found six or seven piles of roofing
nails from 65th to 66th Streets and east on 66th Street
to Marina Drive.


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RE-OPEN Saturday, Oct 1
HRS.: MON.-SAT.
383-0689 6:30AM-2:30PM SUN. 8AM-1PM
':6: 836 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Whitney Beach Plaza


Janice Lea Suddreth
Janice Lea Suddreth, 25, of Deerhaven Lane,
Lenoir, died Sept. 11 at her home.
She was born Nov. 10, 1968, in Caldwell
County to J.P. and Betty Richmond Suddreth of
Lenoir.
Ms. Suddreth was a paralegal secretary with the
law firm of Todd, Vanderbloemen, Respess and
Brady, PA, in Lenoir.
Survivors are her parents; and four brothers,
Michael P. of Hickory, David W. of Homes Beach,
Bryan Keith of Drexel and Kevin S. of Lenoir.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to the National Kidney Foundation, P.O.
Box 2383, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514.



The Island Poet
I used to buy my batteries one at a time
but not anymore,
'Cause now they are all sealed up in pack-
ages of four.
I have a clock that runs on one battery for
a year before I change,
So I use one battery and throw the rest
away. Isn't that quite strange?
And how about men's underwear? They
way they are packaged makes me sick.
You can't buy them one at a time 'cause
each package contains six.
And if you want to buy a certain pair of
socks, don't give it a tumble,
You have to buy a bunch, 'cause they are
tied up in a bundle.
To me it's a shame, the way they want you
to get more is a crime.
But thank the Lord they haven't changed
the way babies come, usually one at a time.
Bud Atteridge



SSept. 15, suspicious persons, 8300 block of Ma-
rina Drive. The officer responded in reference to sev-
eral people and vehicles in front of a vacant residence.
They advised the officer they were waiting for an es-
tate sale to begin.


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Lightly breaded leal. pan rhed, sen'ed vith, lrmon and
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flB PAGE 22 N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'Family feud' on Sarasota Bay does no good


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
ManaSota-88 wants the Sarasota Bay National
Estuary Program gone. The relationship between the
two groups, one private and the other governmental,
just seems to continue to deteriorate.
A real heavyweight among local conservation
groups, ManaSota-88 has long regarded the Sarasota
Bay Program as "too political." In particular,
ManaSota-88 has argued that by allowing the City of
Sarasota to dump treated effluent into the Bay, "gov-
ernment continues to preside over the death of the
Bay."
Manasota-88 continues with, "The solution being
proposed to remedy this problem is to make the
Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program, a program that
has cost alot and contributed very little, a permanent
government entity," according to the September news-
letter.
"Considering the pressing money needs of area
environmental regulatory agencies, the taxpayers
would realize more for their dollars and the environ-
ment would be improved if moneys proposed to extend
the life of the Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program
were divided among area regulatory agencies," the
newsletter concludes.
Whoa. We've all seen just how vicious family
fights can become, but this is getting absurd. The
Sarasota Bay Program has problems, that much I'll
admit. But the facts are that same program has pro-
duced more information about the Bay that we've ev-
ery had before. From those facts are coming dozens of
proposals (some of them already being put into effect)
that will continue to improve the Bay.
Lots of different groups have lots of different opin-
ions about what they think is best for Sarasota Bay. It's
too bad some of them don't keep their eye on the real
enemies of the Bay, and be willing to concede that
maybe, just maybe, they don't have all of the truth.

Red tide a'coming
As we go to press, red tide appears to be slowly
working its way up the coast. Here's hoping it doesn't
get this far.
First reported locally late last week off Manasota
Key, the outbreak seems to have started in the Gulf off
Lee County. By Monday it had worked its way as far
north as Sarasota. It was found in New Pass Monday
noon, and officials at Mote Marine Laboratory said it's
"pretty intensive just a mile or two offshore of
Sarasota."
Recent southwesterly winds are expected to push
the bloom onshore this week.
Boy, we go one year without a red tide and we al-
most forget about it.
All shellfishing is closed in most of both Charlotte
and Lee counties as a result of the outbreak, and might
be here too by the time you read this. Be sure to check
should you be planning any shellfishing.

Alcee had a good time, too
So did more than 200 other people last Saturday



Problem with


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Alcee and
friends
Alcee Taylor, left, was on
the Showboat last week-
end with a few friends
visitingfrom Chicago.
Islander Photo: Bob
Ardren.


night aboard the Seafood Shack's Showboat. Karen
Bell said more than 260 tickets for the fundraiser were
sold, and nearly 230 people showed up to benefit "Save
the Nets."
There was great music by Billy Rice, and dancers
took up both upper and lower decks of the boat. As
usual, dancers were having the most fun.
But then again, Alcee Taylor of the Cortez
Boatworks and Historical Museum found a table on the
upper deck with six visiting tourist ladies from Chi-
cago. Although they were all a little younger then
Alcee, he didn't seem to mind and was clearly having
a good time, too dancing or no dancing.

Fly$ and rod$ spell $
Our news editor has long thought I'm a little hard
on fly fishers, what with calling them "yuppies with
sticks" from time to time. I'm well aware there are


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Mr. Bones
Beach Barn
Dowling Park
Island Pest Contro
Uncle Dan's Place
Island Real Estate


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Record
1-0
0-0-1
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plenty of fly fishers out there who aren't yuppies, but
there's this whole new crop that appeared about the
time the movie "A River Runs Through It" came out
two or three years ago.
Our editor thought I was being a little tough on fly
fishers, that is, until he ran into an old friend last week.
Over a cold beer the friend was telling our news edi-
tor about teaching fly fishing.
Seems an Orvis shop in Sarasota hired Jim to teach
a class on fly fishing one afternoon. Afterwards, he
reported the shop sold some 18 outfits to the beginning
fly fishers.
Eighteen Orvis fly fishing outfits.
Now, assuming each outfit totaled $1,000 or so -
and that's no exaggeration for an Orvis outfit that
means $18,000 in the cash drawer in that little shop in
just one day.
Obviously, not every day is that kind of a "fly-by"
day, but I think you might understand why I'm a little
skeptical about the new rage in fly fishing.
There was a time when fly fishing was simple and
elegant. Now it' seems to be extremely expensive and
almost elegant.
See you next week.



Volunteers needed for
Littoral Society Palmer
Point plant project
The American Littoral Society is looking for vol-
unteers to help plant native plants and to remove exotic
vegetation on Palmer Point, in Little Sarasota Bay, on
Saturday, Oct. 1, from 8 to 11 a.m. John Sarkozy is the
leader and the goal is to restore the barrier island to its
pristine state.
If you wish to participate or would like more infor-
mation call 951-0884 or 966-7308.


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
S ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.


DOLPHIN
DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
no fishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Fish Tales Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your fish stories, and pictures are
welcome! Just give us a call at 778-7978 or stop by
our office in the Island Shopping Center.









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 23 iE


Snook fishing slows, but redfish action still strong


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Although the weather has slowed the offshore fish-
ing a little, those who are willing to brave the seas and
squalls are coming back to the docks with good catches
of grouper, amberjack and snapper. In the backwaters,
snook catches remain on the small side, but hot redfish
action seems to keep fishers content.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said an-
glers on the four-hour trip are averaging 70 head of Key
West grunts. The six-hour trip averages 100 head of
mangrove snapper, lane snapper, Key West grunts,
porgies and vermillion snapper.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there are catching a few mackerel, mangrove snapper,
a few snook, some too-big redfish, pompano and a few
sharks at night.
Jack at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier anglers
have been catching lots and lots of mackerel, black
drum weighing 10-12 pounds and some keeper snap-
per and snook.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said redfish continue to
be the big fishing deal, with the spotties in the 14- to 34-
inch range. Snook are still not feeding much during the
day, Zack said, but trout, flounder and bluefish. Spanish
mackerel in the Gulf are also popular catches, as well as
a few mangrove snapper and some small cobia.
Capt. Dave on the Neva-Miss said offshore best
bets include grouper, both gag and red, in 70-110 feet
of water. Snapper and barracuda are around the off-
shore reefs and other structures, and there are big
mackerel about 10 miles off the beaches.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper are off-
shore in about 80 feet of water. Chris' wife, Kelly,
landed a 19-pound red grouper just last week, he said,
and they were able to catch a couple of schooling dol-
phin that were under the boat, too. Here's a moon tip:
snapper seem to like the full moon if recent big catches
are any indication.
Capt. Phil Shields on the Reef Reacher said he
just got back from an all-night trip offshore, where they
hooked up with a lot of snapper.
On my boat Magic we've put clients onto a lot of
redfish and trout in the backwaters. Amberjack, man-
grove snapper and yellow tail are the best bets offshore.
Capt. Mark Bradow has still been catching a few
sharks while sight-casting in Tampa Bay just east of Pas-
sage Key. In the backwater, he's pulling in lots of trout.
:Capt. Rick Gross said snook are still hard to find,
but there are plenty of big redfish out there to keep the
clients happy.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he has been getting his
charters on a few big trout in the backwater on the flats.


Grouper snap to
the bait
A Galati offshore fishing
trip brought back to the
dock a bunch offish: 16
grouper, two dolphin, and
a lot of small beelines,
too. Pictured is Chris
Galati, wife Kelly, Kelly's
brother Chris and An-
thony Manali. The
catches were made about
25 miles offshore.


. -
__..___., -_:..- r -. ..

Linesider lunker
J.C. Diem of Bradenton, fishing with Capt. Tom Chaya on the boat Dolphin Dreams, caught this 45-inch
snook recently.


Offshore, mangrove snapper and mackerel are hungry.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said the reports are
good for big snook off some of the fishing piers, but
mostly at night. In the bay, Bill said he's hearing lots
of reports of big reds, while offshore grouper fishing is


still strong, mostly in about 100 feet of water.
Capt. Todd Romine said he has brought in a few
nice reds and trout, and offers a tip: expect flounder
fishing to really pick up in the next few weeks.
Good luck and good fishing.


OPEN AND COVERED
GALATI BOAT SLIPS

S AVAILABLE

TO ALL CUSTOMERS
GAS & DIESEL PUMP DISCOUNTS
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK 8 TO 5
(813)778-755 S 902SO. BAY iBLV -ANNA MARIA:4


'U c h JsO" thnsm J hnse a,


SALES & SR VICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'
F -, -_ _"_._ -- Ij


Five O'Clock Marine
S "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" 5
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577

ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu9/22 1:14 2.2ft 7:40 0.3ft 2:41 2.0ft 7:25 1.2ft Ship's Store
Fri9/23 1:39 2.3ft 8:19 0.3ff 3:23 1.8ft 7:50 1.3ft Bottom Painting
Sat 9/24 2:11 2.3ft 9:04 0.3ft 4:13 1.7ft 8:12 1.3ff Boat Storage
Sun 9/25 2:50 2.3ft 9:56 0.4ft 5:16 1.6ft 8:44 1.4ft Bulk Oil
Mon 9/26 3:35 2.3ft 11:02 0.5ft 6:42 1.5ft 9:23 1.4ft *Consignment/
Tue9/27 4:32 2.2ft 10:38 1.4ff 8:19 1.5ft 2:17 0.5ft Brokerage
Wed 9/28 5:49 2.1ft - 9:25 1.6ft 1:33 0.5ft BOAT RENTAL
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


Got a big fish? Give us a call or a photo we're looking
for all the great catches.


II"
ycH







EI PAGE 24 a SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
il


Lisa Varano


Denise Langlois


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT





Looking for someone to manage your
property? Contact Lisa Varano or
Denise Langlois to discuss your needs.

DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


$OLMES
BEACH

BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want
to miss THE BEST news on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary.
Mail subscriptions are also available (form on page 7.)
SSorry, Individual unit delivery is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.


DIRECT GULFFRONT CONDO with a spec-
tacular Gulf view. Spacious two bedroom, two
bath end unit with indoor laundry. New ceramic
tile in kitchen and hallway. Storm shutters on all
windows. Turnkey fumished. Priced at $229,000.
Call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.
A* R.saR


CAR COLLECTORS DELIGHT! Room for 10
cars including (2) 2 car garages come with this
four bedroom, two bath home located 3 blocks to
beach and 1 block to Bay. Family room, spacious
screened porch. Duplex zoned. $239,000. Call
Marion Ragni 778-1504 eves.


MARTINIQUE CONDO: Original owner never
rented two bedroom, two bath condo with Gulf
views from almost every room. Bright and peachy
clean with many updates plus garage. Priced at
$165,000. Please call Carol R. Williams for show-
ing, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


-.am...'-. 1
DIRECT GULF VIEW: Minimum maintenance for
maximum enjoyment in this 2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo overlooking courtyard pool with direct Gulf
view from most rooms. Amenities include: heated
pool and spa, tennis, elevator, covered parking ga-
rage, clubhouse, sauna and on site management.
Priced at $185,000. Please call Carol R. Williams for
appointment, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS LIM


HISTORIC DISTRICT
Ready for some imaginative upgrades, these
three apts. presently bring in over $2,000 month
rental. Asking $152,000.








OLDIE & GOODIE
They didn't knock this one down for a condo! It
was too cute. Great view of the Gulf, this old
frame home features 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and
has a great rental history, with beach just across
the street. $129,000.

Mike
MikNoe 778-6696
Norman -1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217









MARTINIQUE ...
Miles of white sand
& blue Gulf waters.
Bright & cheerful!
2BR/2BA, w/garage.
$154,900!
Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR*
Million Dollar Club
778-7246

Karin Stephan
REALTOR"
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


Islander mail
subscriptions top 900
We mail The Islander Bystander every week to
OVER 900 PAID OUT-OF-TOWN SUBSCRIBERS.
They are all "Islanders at heart," in desire of keep-
ing in touch with Island news and in particular, the Is-
land real estate market. Only The Islander Bystander
provides all the information they seek. A mail subscrip-
tion form appears on page 7, this issue.
Everyone on Anna Maria Island gets the paper free,
either delivered to their driveway, from a newspaper
rack, a shop, a resort or condo. If you would like to re-
quest free home delivery, please call 778-7978. And al-
though we can not deliver to single units at condos and
mobile home parks, we do deliver bulk copies there.
You may also call if you need to stop home deliv-
ery during vacations.






SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
i ED OLIVEIRA
SREALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


[ 1_;



DIRECT GULF FRONT
Two bedroom, two bath TURNKEY FURNISHED -
Great walking beaches, beautiful sunsets, protected park-
ing. All this for $175,000. Call Stan Williams 795-4537.
WATERFRONT BARGAIN Luxury at bargain price
describes this spacious two bedroom, two bath condo.
Enjoy canal front living with boating, tennis, pool, hot tub
and much more ... all at a great location. Live like a King
for just $79,900. Call Ken Rickett 778-3026.
FOURPLEX Located in pleasant area near central
Holmes Beach. Can walk to shopping, churches, etc. Fully
rented with annual tenants. Good income property low
maintenance. Three units TURNKEY FURNISHED.
$175,000. Call Stan Williams 795-4537.
STEPS TO GULF TURNKEY FURNISHED! Two,
two bath unit, clean and very affordable. Views of the
Bay. Spectacular sunsets. $90,900. Call Lynn Hostetler
778-4800.
GULF FRONT Two bedroom, two bath TURNKEY
FURNISHED top floor unit. Walking beaches, heated
pool. lighted tennis court, sauna, new stove, side by side
refrigerator, carport. Great rental! $144,900. Call Stan
Williams 795-4537.
o 4 .M: $IW


I li





(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato ................ 778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............ 77-2847 Marcella Cornett ............... 778-5919
Nancy Guliford ................. 778-2158 Michael Advocate .............. 778-0608
ETAL 7^rnclii J~za P SsLatd c Pofewionai't
Sc#.dafiin.g in E7imEf.i s.opJEifeJ.
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use ofprofessional videotape.
SExclusive
Waterfront
V Estato MLS con .
Vido Collection .


I

CJ~aR


[snun t






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 25 IM[


Manager announced for
new Island bank
First National Bank of Manatee announces the
addition of Susan A. O'Connor to their staff. O'Connor
will be branch manager and assistant vice-president at
the Holmes Beach office when it opens in November
following extensive renovations.
O'Connor was with Crossland Savings Bank for
10 years and was their branch manager at the Island
office. She participates in various fund raising activi-
ties at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. She


What's
the
best
news
anywhere on
Anna
Maria Island?

ISLANDER


778-7978


RENTAL
MANAGEMENT


Julie


is treasurer of the Anna
Maria Island Art League.
O'Connor has a bachelors
degree in business and per-

SEckerd College.
Susan is a 13 year Island
President and is married to
George O'Connor. They
have one son.
Susan O'Connor O'Connor said she looks
forward working on the Is-
land with an experienced staff. Also appointed to serve
at the Island branch bank are Tracy Smith, Debbie
Walton and Angie Nichols.


Call Julie ...
to rent your property quickly
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.
778-6665
1-800-749-6665


SALES
SFRVICF


neaL nannausa
ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS


SUNBOW BAY CONDOMINIUM
3805 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach
2 Bedroom 2 Bath Furnished Unit
Impressive tile floors upon entry lead to a spa-
cious living/dining combo. Dazzling view from
porch of pool, bay and landscape. Very conve-
nient location. Reduced to $89,990.


Siii

,.3- ^B


COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY!
One of our current Island businesses may be overlooking this
great location! Adaptable to many occupations, this property
includes five garages, two office/retail spaces and a rental apart-
ment upstairs. Zoned for light repair business, retail etc. and you
may also live on premises. 100% occupancy. Asking $275,000
& Owner Financing. -


STP Y NDSE U lFR A F1II .T'[ REE MAP AND NEW ISLAND POSTCAR
S r ing Anna Mari a i nc 1 3 C L I-) 78 2 46 F X 7 -4 7

2217! GulfDrie ASOCATE AFER OUR
DICK Badento Beac


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


DIRECT GULFFRONT Fully furnished 2BR -
1BA apartment on wide, sandy walking beach.
Perfect investment property or second home.
Offered at $99,900. Catl Dave Moynihan.


ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ... 85 x
130'... deep water and spectacular views
... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ... 90
x 109' ... deep water and view of Bayou
... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach and zoned
for 1 to 4 units ... $129,900.


STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


Swimming pools (according to myather-in-law, any-
way) are like the old boat joke: you're only happy with
them the day you buy and the day you sell. Did I say
that right? Anyway, if you want a pool at 631
Foxworth, you can have one very easily. Lap pool?
How about a personal record of 250 feet in length for
Key Royal. Demand better; it's your money. That and
$525,000. Because 631 Foxworth is a better home.
Doug Dowling Realty 409 Pine Ave. 778-1222.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services In New Con-
struction & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND SmilesI
l = : JI. = .a






Ii PAGE 26 I SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


l Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
LaWv Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Serice .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
77f8.345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
S AND SATISFACTION








PIANO & KEYBOARD
^ LESSONS A
All Ages All Levels
S778-3539


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468

I-

STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
F SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


L* R

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


KSANDE CLAS^ SIIDS
9-MSFO ALEINHOEARE


3 CUSHIONED brown couch $325. Octagon
shaped wood end table $20. Pro-form auto incline
treadmill $250. 779-2129.
REFRIGERATOR Nearly new Maytag side-by-
side with ice & water in door. White on white. Size
23.5 cu. ft. Must sell, only $350. 779-1801.
CAMERAS & PHOTO EQUIPMENT: Nikon FM#
with motordrive, a 50 mm lens, and a 75-205 mm
zoom lens for $500. Mamiya with handle, an 80 mm
lens, hood attachment and 2 ext. rings for $350. Call
778-7187 for more info.
WATERBED, queen size, headboard, drawer-base.
Complete package only $200. Move it, only $150.
Call Suzi 778-9106. Great condition!
TWIN BEDS, very good condition, $100. New
kitchen table and 2 chairs, $75. New Bureau, $60.
All for $200 OBO. 778-6112.
SOFA, CHAIR & OTTOMAN, light beige with dark
pin stripes. Like new, excellent condition, $250. 9-
5PM 778-0426, after hours 778-2464 ask for Alice.
RATTAN ETAGERE with four shelves. Excellent
condition. $150. 778-1368.
NEW QUEEN SIZE hide-a-bed. Peach and white
strip. Paid $630, sell for $400 firm. 794-3190.
80" SOFA & LOVESEAT. Beige floral print, revers-
ible, excellent condition. $250 OBO. 753-0203.
"GUIDE TO HOME EMPLOYMENT." Rush $1.00
and SASE to: New Horizon PO Box 194 Longboat
Key, FL 34228.


NEW HANDMADE German Cuckoo-clocks at
wholesale price. Sat. & Sun., Sept. 24 & 25. 9:30-
3:00. 409 74th St., Holmes Beach. 779-1039.
CHAIN SAW, MICROWAVE, twin bedding, lots
more. Sat., Sept. 24. 9-1. 612 Foxworth Lane, Key
Royale.


BEN & IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


SAILBOAT 1985 HUNTER. 25.5' Yanmar inboard
diesel; autopilot, 3 sails; AM/FM stereo system; VHF
Pulstar 550; stove; transom ladder; boom vang;
sternrail grill; storage; port-a-head; much more
equipment. Exc. cond. $14,900. Ralph Jones 813-
375-3200.
BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
16' BAYLINER, 75 HP, and new trailer. $3,500. 792-
1554.
13.5' BOSTON WHALER. 40 HP Mariner, Magic Tilt
trailer, 6' tower. $2,500. 778-5986 leave message.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


PART TIME $6 to $8 per hr., 5.5 hrs. a day. No
nights or weekends. Work out of our office selling
office supplies. Call 761-0092 8am-3pm.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.
WE NEED YOU! Secretaries, receptionist, CSR's,
general clericals. Short/long term & perm. positions.
Sun Coast Staffing, 957-3111.
EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER, full time needed
immediately for Gulf front resort. Apply in person
Thurs.- Tues., 9-2. Blue Water Beach Club. 6306
Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
PART-TIME MAINTENANCE person needed.
Weekends and vacation fill-in. Island condo project.
Pool & general maintenance experience required.
Must be dependable. Call 746-4998, for interview.


ASSISTED LIVING Couple, RN & HHA, will pro-
vide elderly care and assistance in our Holmes
Beach Duplex, 2 blocks from Gulf. 778-7686.
HOME ASSISTANCE, cleaning cooking, shopping
and doctor appointments. Call 778-6902.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs exp. Call
Bradenton Fiberglass for free estimate 755-1550.
LAWNMOWING reasonable rates. 252-6402
pager.
HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up
and delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island
references. 778-4680.
KD FAIRS WALL DESIGN Wallpaper, paint, mural
and light repair. Call KD at 778-1032.
I LOVE DOING DISHES! If you don't want to do
dishes, call 778-1032. Treat yourself to regular or
one time dishwashing. No commercial rates.
NEED YOUR HOME cleaned? Call 778-4116. "We
like what we do ... and it shows!" We're reliable,
reasonable and ready to Go!
NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances,
brush piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever
your hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.
ELECTRONIC INSTALLATIONS OF: All home and
automotive accessories, television antennas, com-
puters, and telephones. Anna Maria Island contact
Dave for answers to any of your technical questions
or to schedule an appointment. 778-6407.


VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentiaVCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional
installation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co.
resident 25 yrs. Free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resi-
dent.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-
5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, roof coating & repairs, drywall repairs. Work
guaranteed. Low prices. 778-0410.
SELL IT OR FIND IT Fast in The Islander.


ft


SABAL | PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-ear Island Resident


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!











AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal& Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned &
Silicone Protected. Our mobile service
means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100
percent bio-degradable products.
By appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 A PAGE 27 I3


I-RENTALS I RT C O TINUD I


1 LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fire-
place, jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
Intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Will-
iams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully furnished
condo, 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished,
close to Laundromat. No street to cross on a short
walk to beach. 778-1576.
MAINLAND, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, close to shop-
ping, screened lanais. $650 per month. Call Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck,
private beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone,
microwave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-
813-988-1344.
SEASONAL, month or week. 2BR/1BA upstairs
apt. Fully furnished, walk to beach. 778-5908.
DUPLEX 2BR/1BA. 1/2 blk from beach. Available
Oct thru April. $1200 per month. Call 813-681-9656
leave message, will return call.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA and 1BR/1 BA duplex.
Furnished, two blocks to beach and covered park-
ing. 778-6583.
GULF FRONT Fall Special 3BR/2BA, immaculate,
steps to beach. October $600 per week, reserve
now. 778-3171.
UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA, upstairs apt. $550 per
month plus electric. 1st, last and security. Anna
Maria Realty, Inc. 778-2259.
2 BEDROOM HOME; 1/2 block from Gulf of
Mexico. A/C, cable, microwave. Available Nov. thru
-Aprit. Prefer minimum 2 month during prime
months. Call mornings: 1-616-754-6349.
EFFICIENCIES Starting at $140 per week plus
tax. Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C,
cable, near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
2BR/2BA, Fla. room, enclosed garage. Seasonal
Nov. thru April. Within block of Gulf. 813-792-8340.
BEST BEACH VALUE! Fully furnished 1BR. Florid-
ian style home. 2 blks from Gulf Beaches. Close to
attractions and shopping. Located on Holmes
Beach. A paradise hideaway. $250 per wk. Rent by
week or month. 813-778-4229.
PROF. WOMAN seeks fumished room in exchange
for: massage (Lic. #9921), It. housekeeping, pet/
house sitting, errands, cooking. 813-977-8302.
STEPS FROM BEACH! 3BR/3BA Beach house.
Washer, dryer, dishwasher, garage, disposal, cov-
ered carport. $600 week or $2200 month. Available
OctJNovJDecJJan./Feb. Call 778-4468

ONE ROOM APT. Furnished, full kitchen & bath.
Across from beach. One bedroom furnished apt.
Across from beach. Call 778-5035 10am to 6pm.
ISLAND DUPLEX. 1 BR/1BA ground floor unit, an-
nual. $425 per month plus electricity and security.
No pets. 794-3196.
STUDIO, 100 ft. to beach. Holmes Beach. $120
weekly, 2 wk minimum. $440 monthly. Call 778-
0727 or 355-0450.
GULFFRONT BEACH HOUSE 2BR/1BA fur-
nished. Weekly (Sun.-Sun.) $325. Season
(monthly) $1,700. 748-1600.
SUN BOW BAY- 2BR/2BA, Holmes Beach. Open
Oct. thru Dec. 792-1554.
NEWLY ARRIVED 50s couple with quiet 9 year old
Lab mix seek annual 2BR rental. 778-6254.
HOLMES BEACH Duplex 1BR/1BA, porch, car-
port, unfurnished near school and beach. $475 per
month, annual, deposit & utilities. 746-3376.


FEMALE ROOMMATE Share furnished apt., 1/2
rent and utilities. Call Nancy 778-5086.
SEASONAL RENTAL Shell Pt. Condo, 2BR/2BA,
reduced rate for longer stay. Call Old Florida Realty,
778-3377.
HOLMES BEACH 3BR/2BA furnished home.
Backyard, Intracoastal waterway, spectacular view
from every room. Private street, tropically land-
scaped, many amenities. Call 794-2964.
WANTED: Persons interested in sharing apartment/
condo, living on the Island. Call 778-6112. Leave
message and number.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 3BR/1BA private home.
Central air, covered parking, sun deck and big
kitchen. 2 blocks to beach. Washer & dryer hookup.
$750 a month. Available Oct. 1. Call 778-5434.


4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3Br/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $224,500. 778-7837.

WEST BRADENTON. 3BR2BA home, excellent
family neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will
help buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins
at Island Real Estate 778-6066.

BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call Quality Builders today, 778-7127.
BRADENTON PINEBROOK CONDO. 2BR/2BA,
enclosed lanai, under bldg. parking, on golf course,
many improvements. $91,900. Owner, 795-2226.

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981

DREAM VIEW of Tampa Bay and Skyway Bridge.
3Bedrooms, fireplace. $350,000. Owner will finance.
Yvonne Higgins, Island Real Estate 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH Town house arranged as two
separate apts. with own entrances. Connecting
door can be unlocked to make seven room dwell-
ing. First floor has one bedroom and one bathroom.
Second floor has two bedrooms and one bathroom.
Full A/C. Part of small complex of ten with heated
pool and nice gardens. 100 yards from new beach.
Completely refurbished less than two years ago.
Excellent rental history. For sale as whole for
$105,000. Telephone evenings 813-954-1110.


778-2586 ' MARV KAV Eve: 778-6771


10% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 9/28/94


SPersonal Fitness
BY
< TRMRINING 0%,

Cardiovascular Exercises Nutritional Advice
Muscle Toning & Body Sculpting Stretching Program
Geri Travis, Nationally Certified 779 1
316 Magnolia, Anna Maria FL7792129

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MM0003995
792375 MA0012461


NU-Weatherside
aof Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX0065455
WINDOW
k REPLACEMENT
VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
S/ ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074
You can find a "Fixer-Upper" in The Islander


KIMBALL
HOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Handrails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident Local References
778-5354




9'1



COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
\._______________


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, Saturday 10 to.2 (as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IBYaS


ISLANDER





I]] PAGE 28 0 SEPTEMBER 22, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


I


4.,7 t,,,,. ., -,, -" ^ } -


LIVE ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND, Key OUTSTANDING WATERFRONT HOME, 3
Royale Community, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, canal bedroom, 2 bath, split design, automatic sprin-
front home, large screened lanai, open kitchen, kler on private well, boat dock with water &
lots of storage, 2 car garage. $219,999. Call power. Addnl. boat slip available. $248,900. Call
Evelyn Mitchell off: 778-2261 or eves: 778-1952. Dick Maher off: 778-2261 or eves: 778-6791.


BAY VIEW & DOCK This two bedroom, two WESTBAY COVE SOUTH Lovely 2BR/2BA
& half bath has Bay view overlooking pool and 2nd floor unit with view of Intra-coastal over the
Jacuzzi. Elevator, garage, and boat dock. pool. Watch morning sunrise over bay.
$142,900. Call Bill Bowman off: 778-2261 or Homeowners warranty. $130,000. Call Bobye
eves: 778-4619. Chasey off: 778-2261 or eves: 778-1532.


GREAT VIEWS IMMACULATE! This two GULF FRONT COMPLEX 2Bed/2Bath,
bedroom, 2 bath has carport, community pool, very nice top floor unit. Verticals, all appliances,
clubhouse, lake view, too many upgrades to under bldg. parking, well maintained grounds,
mention! Located in Perico Island. $99,900. Call pool. $178,000. Call Helen White off; 778-2261
Paul Martin 778-2261 or eves: 794-0049. or eves: 778-6956.


JUST REDUCED! $78,000. Cozy fumished
2Bed/1Bath condo just steps from beach and
Gulf. Great vacation hide-away. Pool, laundry
room. Walk to restaurant & shops & "shelling."
Call Marilyn Trevethan 778-2261 or 792-8477.


KEY ROYALE! 3Bed/2Bath home on sailboat
water & across street from 2nd fairway of Golf
course. Great open plan w/glass enclosed lanai
& split bedroom design. Boat dock. $289,000.
Call Hal Gillihan 778-2261 or 778-2194.


"UNFURNISHED ANNUAL RENTALS"
PERICO BAY CLUB 11701 Manatee Ave.
3/2 923 Sandpiper, Carport .... $925/mo
2/2 930 Waterside, Carport..... $825/mo
2/2 504 Sanderling, Garage.... $800/mo
ISLAND IN THE SUN 3100 Gulf Drive
2/2 townhomes, covered parking, pool,
laundry room, walk to beach.... $600/mo
WEST BAY POINT & MOORINGS
2/2 6500 Flotilla, #168, bayfront. $840/mo
neaL S neaL. Rentals, Inc.
Call (813) 778-9477 or Toll Free 800-422-6325


.-.......... .
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A-,'



.... -st :.n" "' s F r

The Islander Bystander 'newsies' love bringing you the best news on the Island. For free, guaranteed home delivery, call 778-7978.


PERICO BAY CLUB
802 Audubon Dr., Osprey Model................... $79,900
864 Audubon Dr., Overlooking lake .............. $88,500
876 Audubon Dr., Shoreline Terrace .............. $88,500
881 Audubon Dr., 1st Floor ........................... $86,900
706 Estuary, Walking & Bike paths................. $94,500
969 Waterside Lane, recently reduced ......... $113,000
1255 Spoonbill Landing Cir., Antigua Model. $129,900
1105 Edgewater Cir., Edgewater Cove......... $129,900
1241 Edgewater Cir., Overlooking Palma Sola Bay $142,900
1371 Perico Point Cir., Edgewater Pt. .......... $153,000
1305 Perico Point Cir., Building "M".............. $155,000
1269 Spoonbill Ldgs. Cir., Large Villa......... $159,900
1230 Spoonbill Ldgs., "Grand Cayman"........ $162,900
624 Estuary Dr., Overlooking Spoonbill Bay. $164,900


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