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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00531
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00531

Full Text


WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE SEPTEMBER 15, 1994


,:: -; l
>111?' .
_____________ ___i~L1 Ate~


Commission pay

raises dominate

AM budget talks
By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The subject at Anna Maria's Sept. 7 budget hearing
was a pay raise for elected officials. The commissioners
say they deserve the money. The mayor agrees, but says
they shouldn't get it, arguing that making money isn't the
reason anyone should seek office in Anna Maria City.
Although other line items including the amount
the city will pay the county for police protection -
were discussed, none got the attention of the $250 a
month salary the four city commissioners receive for
their legislative and administrative functions (the
mayor is paid $500 a month). Back and forth the argu-
ments went, with Mayor Ray Simches standing
staunchly opposed to pay raises, and the remainder of
the commission supporting, in various degrees, the
notion that their paychecks should be a little fatter.
As adamant for the raises as Simches was against,
was Vice Mayor Max Znika. Ironically, when the ques-
tion was called, both men ended up on the same side
of the voting Simches saying nay to a pay raise on
"principle," and Znika casting a no vote because the
compromise raise that was offered wasn't enough.
The commission voted 3-2 in favor of giving the
mayor and commissioners a 20 percent raise in the next
fiscal year, meaning the mayor will go from $500 a
month to $600, and the commissioners will go from
$250 a month to $300. Because the city charter prohib-
its sitting commissioners from voting themselves a pay
raise, only those who gain (or retain) seats in follow-
ing elections will receive the higher salaries.
In February 1995, two seats those currently held
by commissioners Doug Wolfe and Dottie McChesney
- will be up for reelection, and will therefore be the
first seats eligible for the $300 a month salary. The
seats of the mayor and the remaining commissioners
will be up for grabs in Feb. 1996, at which time who-
ever is elected to fill them will start taking home the
larger paychecks. Some say that isn't fair.
Since the budget talks began in July, there has been
a consensus among the four commissioners that when
pay raises are approved, everyone on the commission
should receive them at the same time. The only way
that could happen is for the charter to be changed
through referendum.
Not surprisingly, Simches is against this idea as well.
"I resent when Congress in Washington votes to give
itself raises, because there is no accountability," Simches
said. "By not permitting a commissioner to raise his own
salary it's some sort of a safeguard. It's a very wonderful
principle. This way, you have to be reelected to take ad-
vantage of the salary increase you proposed."
In other budget business, the commission dis-
cussed the amount the Manatee County Sheriff s Office
wants to provide police protection for the coming year.
A figure of $303,000 had been originally proposed, up
7.3 percent from the current fiscal year's $282,303.
Znika questioned this increase, noting that in years
past the sheriff's contract usually increased only by the
amount of cost of living about three to four percent.
Col. Al Dennison, the sheriffs chief deputy, said
$7,500 of the new figure was due to salaries, and he
explained that training costs are also quite high.
Znika asked Dennison to reduce the bottom line fig-
ure by up to two percent, but Dennison said this was not
possible. "But I'll do what I can with it," Dennison said.
About 20 minutes later he stuck his head inside the meet-
ing room door and made them his best offer. "$299,999,"
Dennison announced. "One buck under $300,000."
The meeting ended with the commission agreeing
the city would spend $898,778 to keep the municipal-
ity running for another year. That's up from last year's
budget of $859,900 a 4.5 percent increase.
The commission unanimously adopted the millage
rate of 1.41 mills, which is the rate the city has taxed
homeowners for the past six years.The final public
hearing on the budget is Sept 27.


Holmes Beach
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
With a minimum of comment from the public
and the council, the Holmes Beach village and bud-
get ordinances passed first reading last week.
The millage rate for the 1994/95 budget year will
be 1.75, the same as the previous budget year.
Budget revenues include: balance forward,
$163,000; ad valorem taxes, $679,678; state and county
receipts, $519,203; other sources, $453,704; transfer
from unappropriated reserves, $0; and infrastructure sur-
tax (restricted), $365,594 for a total of $2,181,594.
Departmental expenditures are as follows:
General government: salaries, $75,298; services
and charges, $217,341; and capital outlay, $6,800 for


Despite citizen opposition, Bradenton Beach City
Council members Tuesday night tentatively adopted a
budget for the 1994-95 fiscal year 13.6 percent above
current tax "rollback" rates.
With little debate, the three council members
present Vice Mayor Herb Dolan and Councilmen
Bill Campbell and Jim Kissick approved a budget
for next year of $1,272,198.
Final adoption of the budget is set for Tuesday,
September 20, at 7 p.m.
The budget reflects a $219,649 increase from last
year's budget.
Ad valorem, or property, taxes increase from 2.7026
mills to 2.9762 mills under the proposed budget, a 2.10
percent increase, while the "rollback" rate is 2.6196.
"Rollback" rates are what the taxes would be taking into
account the increased taxable evaluation of property. A
mill is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value of a piece of
property, less the homestead exemption.
City officials estimated that a home valued at
$100,000 would see a $27 increase in the proposed tax
rate above the current assessment.
Ad valorem taxes make up about one-third of the
city's revenue base. The projected budget calls for
$342,366 to come from property taxes, up from the
1993-94 figure of $301,018.


budget passes
a total of $299,439.
Police department: salaries, $451,279; services
and charges, $312,220; and capital outlay, $57,443
for a total of $820,942.
Public works department: salaries, $231,877;
services and charges, $455,327; and capital outlay,
$20,000 for a total of $707,204.
Other expenditures include: emergency contin-
gency fund, $20,000; capital improvement fund,
$3,0000; and infrastructure surtax (restricted),
$330,594.
The total appropriated expenditures and reserves
are $2,181,594.
The second reading of the millage and budget or-
dinances will be at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 20.


A number of property owners and residents opposed
the increase, citing previous tax hikes placed the city at the
top of the revenue chart for Anna Maria Island.
Property owner Mike Hodges led the charge against
the budget hike. "If council impliments anywhere near
their advertised increase, Bradenton Beach citizens will be
paying 140 percent more in taxes than their Annma Maria
friends with the same valued property, and 94 percent
more than our Holmes Beach neighbors," he said.


READING THE WRITING ON THE WALL


Ellen Marshall was delighted upon seeing the wall mural at the north end of Home Hardware in the Island
Shopping Center. She was surprised to note that the gentleman in the painting is "reading" her original
Island newspaper, Anna Maria Key Notes. Marshall was delighted to have her newspaper, the first on the
Island, so honored. For more on Marshall, see page 12. Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood

Bradenton Beach okays big budget

hike; final hearing set for Tuesday


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions ..................... ............ ............ 6
Those Were the Days .................................... 7
Announcements ........................................... 10
School Daze........................................ .......... 13
Stir-it-up .................................... ........... 14
Anna Maria tides ............................... .... 19
Business................................................... .. 20
Real estate ....................................... .. 20


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND







IED PAGE 2 I SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Holmes Beach resident seeks airplane relief


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Resident Ron Robinson asked the Holmes Beach
City Council to address the problem of noise from air-
plane flights over the Island from Sarasota Bradenton
Airport.
"I've had a problem with noisy airplanes over my
house for the last year," explained Robinson. "I went
to the airport and complained about it and they said a
committee was working on it and the problem would
be alleviated."
Robinson said he learned that the Noise Abatement
Advisory Committee was formed to address such con-
cerns but the Island has no members on the panel. He
said the panel has members from both Sarasota and


Manatee counties, one is from North Port, four are from
Bradenton and four are from Longboat Key.
"I read in the Longboat Observer that one of the
airlines wanted all of the airplanes to come up and turn
west and fly straight across Longboat, out over the Gulf
and then turn north out over the water. One of the
people on the committee talked the rest of the commit-
tee into asking the airlines to fly straight out from the
runway and head straight north, which is right up here."
Robinson said he is awakened by airplanes at 6 and
7 a.m. and from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.
"It makes no sense to me that you've got all this
water out here and airplanes don't go out there but they
come up and turn and fly directly over Anna Maria Is-
land," he said.


Council Chairwoman Mary Ellen Reichard said the
council could send a resolution to the airport authority
requesting that airplanes don't fly over the Island and
also request a member on the panel. She asked if the
city could get representation on the panel, would
Robinson serve as the city's representative and he
agreed.
In other business:
The final contract for bids on the Key Royale
Bridge repairs is nearly complete.
Council will discuss the procedure for appointing
its city attorney at the work session on Sept. 22.
Nine hazardous docks on T-end canals in the city
were posted by the city. This is the first step in having
them removed.


Leffis Key improvements underway


Work is underway to add an additional 800 lin-
ear feet of boardwalk to the habitat restoration
project at Leffis Key in Bradenton Beach.
About 300 feet of boardwalk has already been
constructed at the 30-acre key east of Coquina
Beach, Manatee County Environmental Action
Commission Project Coordinator Jack Gorzeman
told The Islander Bystander.
The work boardwalk will stretch from the


northeast section of the Leffis Key westward to tie into
an existing trail near the entrance of the nature park.
Volunteers with the Native Plant Society have also
been planting a variety of upland shrubs at the site.
Another planting to place a total of 500 plants is sched-
uled September 24 from 9 a.m. to noon.
Included in the native species are red cedar, Florida
privet, sea grape, golden creeper and green button-
wood, Gorzeman said. Already at the site is extensive


growths of native mangrove and spartina altiflora,
or marsh grass.
Gorzeman said information and interpretive
signage will be installed at Leffis Key by the end of
the year.
Leffis Key is a cooperative effort to restore native
habitat to the Sarasota Bay area. Federal, state, regional
and local funds totaling more than $300,000 will be
spent on the site when the project is completed.


Bohnenberger says if it's not Edwards,


it shouldn't be Courtney, either


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger and City
Councilman Luke Courtney agree on one thing nei-
ther can understand the intensity of the flap over
Courtney's representation of the city on the board of
directors of the Anna Maria Island Community Center
(AMICC).
The two men don't see eye-to-eye on much else
regarding this issue, though.
"I don't consider it newsworthy," Bohnenberger
told the Islander Bystander last week. "This issue is
getting very distorted Luke Courtney was never
appointed to the (AMICC) board by the City of Holmes
Beach. It's as simple as that."
According to Bohnenberger, Courtney was ap-
pointed as the city's liaison with the Center, but not its
representative on the board of directors. The distinction
is important, as the liaison merely attends Center board
meetings and reports back to the city council, while a
Center board member votes and helps determine Cen-
ter policy.
As far as Bohnenberger is concerned, when the
discussion comes around to liaison versus board mem-
ber, never the twain shall meet at least not while he's
running the City of Holmes Beach.
"I wouldn't consider appointing any elected offi-
cial to any board that receives city funding,"
Bohnenberger said when asked if he might appoint
Courtney to the AMICC board rather than Lee
Edwards, the man the mayor last week said he is con-
sidering for the post. "I think it's unethical and a con-
flict of interest."
Edwards, who earlier this year ran unsuccessfully
against Courtney for a seat on the Holmes Beach City
Council, last month asked to be appointed to the
AMICC board of directors. When the board met Aug.
10 to consider applicants to fill out the 17-member
voting body, it declined to give Edwards a seat, decid-
ing he should serve on a Center subcommittee first and
prove himself.
If phone calls received last week by city council
members are any indication, there is a lot more support
for Courtney remaining on the board than there is for
Edwards taking his place. In fact, council members say
not a single person has called them urging support for
Edwards.
"I think I got four calls, and they told me Luke did
a good job with the Center, and they don't believe Lee
Edwards would be the same," Councilwoman Pat
Geyer said.
Councilwoman Billie Martini said she's received


Bohnenberger


Courtney


"a number" of phone calls, and they were also express-
ing support for Courtney.
"The sentiment was against the way it was done
and the appointment," Martini said. "I'm not saying
that (Bohnenberger) was right or wrong in what he did
I'm just telling you what the phone calls were."
Martini, as well all of the other council members
contacted by the Islander Bystander, declined to com-
ment on how they personally felt about the issue.
"I got three calls supporting Luke in continuing to
represent the Community Center for Holmes Beach,"
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore said.
Council Chairwoman Mary Ellen Reichard said the
nature of her phone calls was consistent with those re-
ceived by Geyer, Martini and Whitmore.
"I got two phone calls," Reichard said. "(One man)
said he was upset Luke was going to lose his seat on the
(AMICC) board, and the other said he was upset to read
in the paper that 'Rich threw Luke off the Community
Center.' "
"But my understanding is this: Luke was made the
liaison to the Community Center, but he was already on
the board when he was elected (to the city council) -
it had nothing to do with the city appointing someone
to represent Holmes Beach."
"I don't think it was his (Bohnenberger's) intention
to have Luke removed," Reichard said. "It wasn't a re-
placement, it's just that he had never appointed anyone (to
the AMICC board). That position was vacant when Pat
Geyer was the mayor, as far as I can remember."
Bohnenberger said he's gotten no phone calls.
"I haven't heard anything from anybody at all,"
Bohnenberger said. "I haven't had any citizens call me
and say this isn't the right thing to do."
Although the phone calls to the city council mem-
bers would indicate some level of public support for
Courtney, Bohnenberger is steadfast in his resolve that
elected officials, who make decisions regarding city
donations to the Center, shouldn't also be the people
who decide how that money will be utilized.


"You can't watch the taxpayers' dollars on one hand
and then go somewhere else and figure out how to spend
it," Bohnenberger said. "I just don't think it's proper."
According to the city charter, Bohnenberger has
the authority to appoint or remove persons to appointed
boards, but the council must concur with his decision
for it to become effective. In an earlier interview,
Bohnenberger said he could see no reason why the
council wouldn't agree with his planned appointment
of Edwards, and last week he told the Islander By-
stander, in essence, it's either Edwards or no one at
least for a while.
"I'd consider the seat vacant until they concur with
some appointment," Bohnenberger said.
As far as Courtney is concerned, until he's told
otherwise by his fellow council members, he is and
has been that appointment.
"No, the seat is not vacant," Courtney said. "I am
the city liaison, and therefore the (AMICC) board
member for Holmes Beach until the council removes
me, and I will continue to work as a Center board mem-
ber until the vote is taken."
Courtney is dismayed the issue has gone as far as
it has.
"This is all so unbelievable," Courtney said. "The
city has a lot of other problems that are more pressing
than this that need the mayor's attention."
Ditto, says Bohnenberger.
"This thing seems to be totally distorted and out of
reality," Bohnenberger said, blaming the Community
Center in large part for the flap. "I think there has to be
some dialogue between the Community Center and me
- who decided (Courtney) was supposed to be the
Holmes Beach representative? I don't know the answer
to that question."
According to Courtney, he (Courtney) was ap-
pointed to the AMICC board in November, and as-
sumed the post in January for a one-year term. He was
then elected to the Holmes Beach City Council in
March, and in April the council voted its approval that
he be the city's liaison to the Center. In April he was
shifted from "member at large" to "city representative"
by the Community Center.
"Is it worth getting into a big argument over? I
don't think so," Bohnenberger says. "I'm not trying to
deal with Luke, I'm trying to deal with (the issue of)
elected people (serving on the AMICC board). I still
don't know how Luke got to be the representative from
Holmes Beach, but it's not a major issue I've got a
lot more important things to deal with than this."
The matter is set to come before the city council for
discussion at its Sept. 22 work session.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 I PAGE 3 Ji


Capt. Howard Smith


celebrates

,+ 1 v


Let them eat cake
Capt. Howard Smith, accompanied by his companion
Lois Bond, cuts his birthday cake to serve to friends
at a party in his honor on the Rod and Reel Pier.
Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Birthday
Capt. Howard Smith of Anna Maria was surprised
by family and friends with a 90th birthday party atop
the Rod and Reel Pier on Sept. 2.
Smith is well known to Islanders from his 18 years
at the Rod and Reel Pier with eccentric owner Frank
Cavendish and three terms as city commissioner. Un-
der Mayor Harry Cole, Smith served as vice mayor.
"Frank thought I'd make a good commissioner,"
explained Smith of his entry into politics. "He got me
into it. I liked it but after six years it was enough. We
got paid $1 per year. After I left they put in the sala-
ries."
Smith said one of highlights of his years as a com-
missioner was the dedication of Anna Maria City Hall.
"Before we had the city hall," he recalled, "the city
office was in the old ice house that is now the histori-
cal museum. Our city meetings were held in the Island
Players theater."
Smith and his long-time companion, Lois Bond,
still make their daily evening visit to the pier, some-
times carrying along a fishing pole.
Of his days at the pier Smith said, "I'm still wait-
ing to get paid! Actually, I could have anything I
wanted and I never really had any responsibilities."
Smith received birthday congratulations from
President Bill Clinton and Rep. Dan Miller, who also
sent a U.S. House of Representatives mug.


Historical Society wins two county awards


The Anna Maria Island Historical Society was the
winner of two prestigious awards for the third consecu-
tive year. The Historical Society was the recipient of a
Golden Gavel Award presented by the Sarasota Her-
ald-Tribune at the 29th Annual Golden Gavel Award
Coffee held Sept. 7, at Michael's on East, in Sarasota.
The Island Historical Society was awarded top honors
in Sarasota and Manatee Counties in the Public Infor-
mation category.
Later the same day the Island historical organiza-


tion received the Bradenton Herald Award for Foster-
ing Civic Pride at the 37th Annual Community Club
Awards held at the Manatee Convention in Palmetto.
Carolyne Norwood, president of AMIHS, con-
gratulated all the devoted workers in the historical
group.
"It's the teamwork that makes the difference.
That's what makes it possible for us to do all these
great things. Both newspapers recognized our recent
centennial which was a great success," said Norwood.


The Anna Maria Fire Department
team, circa 1950
Thanks to mail subscriber John Holmes, Sr., we now
have the identities of the three players who were not
known when this picture was originally published
two weeks ago. The photo is from the Cagnina
family album and was featured in a "scrapbook"
along with others chronicling the life of Ernie
Cagnina following his death at age 84 on Aug. 23.
Front row, left, Ernie, Bob Prentiss, Melvin Davis,
bat boy Jack Fiske, Ed Fogarty, Tom Larson and
Dale Barton. Back row, left to right, Charlie Jones,
Percy Arnold, Richard Wiggins, Hugh Holmes, John
Holmes and Jimmy Selman.


Anna Maria City
9/21, 9 a.m., Planning and Zoning Commission
sub-committee
Bradenton Beach
9/20, 1 p.m., Council work session on
the city pier
9/20,7 p.m., Council meeting for
second budget hearing
Holmes Beach
9/16, 1 p.m., Board of Adjustment
9/20, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting and
second budget hearing
Of Interest
S9/19, 10 a.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall
9/21, 10 a.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach City Hall


ANNA

MARIA
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
SALE ITEMS FOR THE WEEK OF 9/15 thru 9/19
While Supplies Lost Plus Lots of Unodvertised Specials


GROCERY *
Clo White Bleach ........ 89
1 Gallon Regular
Folgers Coffee ........ $3.39
13 oz Bag Regular or ADC
Crystal Springs Water .... 594
1 Gallon
Down Dish Liquid .... $1.19
22 oz Bottle Regular
Soft & Gentle Bath Tissue
4-Roll Pack ................. .. 79

DAIRY *
Florida Natural Jukes.. $1.79
64 oz Carton Selected Varieties
Country Line Chunk Cheese
8 oz Pack ................. $1.39
Jell-o Pudding ......... $2.39
6-Pack Selected Flavors
Kraft Quality Dips...... 994
8 oz Containers Selected Flavors


0t FILET MIGNON 6
CHOICE 2 DAYS ONLY Ib
SFRI. & SAT. SEPT. 16 & 17
SOARY WE DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.


FROZEN *
Budget Gourmet Entrees
10 oz Packages ........ 2/$3.00
Banquet Breast Tenders
9 oz Package .............. $1.99
Banquet Macaroni & Cheese
28 oz Family Size ......... $1.99
Klondike Ice Cream Bars
Pack Assorted Varieties $3.13

* MEAT & DEU
SUPER BUYS *
Boneless Choice Chuck Roast
Ib .......................... $1.69
Boneless Shoulder Roast
Ib .......................... $1.99
Lean Beef Stew
Ib .......................... $1.99
Steve's Deli Roast Beef
Ib .......................... $5.99






EI] PAGE A SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

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Dining out
Crabby Bill's is seeking permission from the City of Holmes Beach to offer outdoor dining in this grassy area
at the rear of the restaurant. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Crabby Bill's wants to


increase dining, dock space


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nance prohibiting patio restaurants that would have to
be repealed or amended.
Courtney told Zalla, "What we're saying is that we
will entertain the notion but there will be restrictions
on it."
City Clerk Peg Nelson of Anna Maria said accord-
ing to her recollection, the city has no ordinances to
permit or prohibit outdoor dining.
Bradenton Beach Building Official Whitey Moran
said an amendment to the city's land development
code was passed last year to permit open air dining in
the historic district.
On past problems with Stepp's Pub referred to by
Geyer, Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine noted,
"It was not any worse than any place else. I don't know
that outdoor dining was the cause of the problems. Out-
side drinking has to be controlled by the management,
because if the management doesn't control it, it be-
comes our problem."

Docks
Zalla also sought approval for increasing the
restaurant's dock space. This would include extending
six docks along the seawall abutting Marina Drive,
adding nine docks along the seawall abutting the res-
taurant on the Marina Drive side and modifying seven
docks along the seawall at the rear of the restaurant.
The docks will be of a modernistic design and made of
light gray polyvinyl chloride.
Fernandez said the request is "a rather large exte-
rior modification" and he felt it needed a site plan re-
view by council.
Zalla said the docks will be for the use of restau-
rant patrons and will not be rented. They will also be
used to accommodate entrants in four annual fishing
tournaments to be sponsored by the restaurant.
Reichard asked about residential property in the
area. Zalla said he is purchasing two duplexes at the
rear of the restaurant property.
Martini expressed concern over the distance between
the ends of the docks. Zalla said the normal distance is 25
feet but these will have 50 to 74 feet between ends.
Council complained that the drawing they received
was not the one being used in the presentation. Zalla
agreed to provide a corrected drawing to city hall for
council review prior the to the next meeting.

Crabby Bill's hopes
to extend the length
Cs-ia of its docks along
B" the seawall abutting
Marina Drive and
1 A~&i add nine docks
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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council is considering
requests from Bill Zalla, owner of Crabby Bill's Sea-
food Restaurant, for an ordinance to permit outdoor
dining and approval of a site plan to add and extend
docks in the surrounding boat basin.

Outdoor dining
Council Chairwoman Mary Ellen Reichard agreed
last week to draft or modify an ordinance to provide for
a special exception for outdoor dining, which has been
banned in the city since the early 1980s. A special excep-
tion, which is granted on an individual basis, requires the
petitioner to meet specific criteria, including approval of
a site plan and notification of neighbors.
Councilman Luke Courtney asked where the din-
ing would take place and what type is being proposed.
Zaila said it would be in the grassy area at the rear
of the restaurant, which is surrounded by boat docks.
He said he would like to install a Tiki bar to be open
until 1 or 2 a.m.
Councilwoman Pat Geyer said outdoor dining was
banned in the early 1980s due to problems with noise
and unruly behavior on an outdoor patio at Stepp's
Pub, now the site of the Anchor Inn.
"It was quite a problem," she noted. "The police de-
partment has a long record of it. If people are drinking
until 1 or 2 a.m., you can't keep them quiet. And if we
change it for you, we have to change it for everybody."
Geyer said the dining area backs up to residential
property and the Sandbar in Anna Maria, which has an
outdoor patio, is the subject of many noise complaints
from residents. Zalla pointed out that problems at the
Sandbar are due to outdoor music and he does not plan
to offer that.
Reichard suggested an amendment to provide for
a special exception.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore listed places on
the Island that serve outdoors and noted, "They all
close their outdoor patios at 10 p.m. and the people go
inside. I don't think this is a bad idea. We need to stay
current with tourism. I think the special exception is
a good idea."
Martini asked the planned seating capacity and
Zalla said 75 to 100 seats.
Zalla said boaters have been using the area for
outdoor dining for years, but "we don't want to be the
new guy in town that does something he's not sup-
posed to do. We would rather be right up front."
Public Works Supervisor John Fernandez said Zalla
has made no formal proposal but "is trying to find an
ordinance that would accommodate outside dining."
Reichard said she would research ordinances from
Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach and draw up a pro-
posed ordinance for council to discuss at a work ses-
sion. City Clerk Leslie Ford said the city has an ordi-


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Hardware

memories of an

Island past
By Paul Roat
Another chapter of Island history is ending this
month with the closure of the Bradenton Beach Hard-
ware Store on Bridge Street.
The store probably wasn't much different than
thousands of other hardware. A cornucopia of mis-
cellaneous goods were scattered on the shelves, mak-
ing the services of a knowledgeable clerk or salesman
almost mandatory.
This hardware store seemed to have everything. I
remember the annual Spring pilgrimages to stock up
on hooks, new fishing line and lures for snook and
redfish. A less pleasant task was the occasional pur-
chase of gallons of paint and wide wooden-handled
brushes because I knew I'd be pressed into service to
help paint the house.
Then there was the time I needed nails to finish a
treehouse. Lloyd Hansen was working, and after the
obligatory chat he asked what I needed. I guess I was
about 10 at the time, and Mr. Hansen and I went back
to the huge tin bins that held all the nails.
"How many nails do you need, Paul?" he asked.
"A pound?"
"How many are in a pound?" I asked.
He took the big scoop off a hook and dipped out
an enormous pile of galvanized nails.
"That's about a pound," he said.
"How many are in a quarter-pound?" I asked,
reaching in my pocket to feel my small handful of
change.
Mr. Hansen sifted out the nails until there were
what still seemed a huge amount left.
He must have seen the look on my face, because
he reached up, took down a small brown paper bag,
and dumped in about 20 nails exactly the number
I needed to finish the tree house.
"Don't hurt yourself now, hear?" he said as he
waved aside my proffered fistful of change and sent
me back to my hammering and sawing.
I remember my father buying me my first pock-
etknife from the big glass case that was the first thing
you saw when you walked in the doors, and watching
him sharpen the biggest blade on the whetstone that
was on top of the case. I couldn't figure out how he
could get the blade so sharp on a whetstone that
bowed, but I followed his example and I always gave
the blade a few swipes every time I went in the store.
When I went off to college, my mother talked to
Bert and got a job working as clerk at the hardware
store. Mom opened a special bank account with just
her and me as signatories, and she put her pay check
in the account each week for me to draw upon for
books and tuition and my other college expenses.
I guess you could say the Bradenton Beach Hard-
ware Store helped put me through school.
When Bert sold the store, I wandered down the
aisles and looked at the tools and paint and fishing
tackle and all the other odds and ends that had accu-
mulated during the years.
I remembered all the times of going there with my
folks to buy this or that, and I remembered Mr. Hansen
and Bert and all the other people that I'd seen in the
place as I grew up in Bradenton Beach.
And I couldn't figure out why a store that now
seemed to me to be so small could hold so much stuff
and so many memories.


Showboat

cruise to 'Save

the nets'
A Save the Nets cruise will set sail on the Sea-
food Shack Showboat on Saturday, Sept. 17, from
8 to 11 p.m. Music is by Bill Rice. Cost is $20 for
individual or $35 per couple. Mullet snacks, smoked
mullet and mullet spread will be served and a cash
bar is available. Space is limited to 300.
For more information and tickets call 794-
1249.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A PAGE 5 iG


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j PAGE 6 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


eE3


Why not make it easier

to be eco-friendly?
As Islanders, we are closely attuned to the whims
of nature.
We know what it's like to watch the sun rise over
the bay and gently dip into the Gulf at night. We are
accustomed to our environment and have learned to
live with it.
Perhaps more than most we understand what it's
like to deal with and adapt to our environment, with all
the changes Mother Nature offers in the winds, waves
and flooding during storms.
So it should come as no surprise that we have a
great respect for things environmental. We deplore
mangrove destruction because of the trees importance
to the bay ecosystem. We respect the needs of baby sea
turtles, turning out lights at our beachside homes and
businesses to allow the little critters to use the reflec-
tion of stars on the sea to find their way. We avoid
trampling sea oats, knowing the hardy plants help re-
tain sand and protect our beaches from the huge waves
of a storm surge.
Our respect for the environment reaches off the
Island as well, as demonstrated in the last few weeks
in front of The Islander Bystander office.
At a political forum two weeks ago, a question was
asked two county commission candidates about trash
recycling. Specifically, why is it that telephone book
recycling has been neglected on the Island?
The candidates said they would look into the mat-
ter, and went so far as to promise that a bin would be
provided to allow old phone books to be collected and
recycled.
In the meantime, we offered to hold old phone
books at our offices. Just drop them off, we mentioned
in the paper, and we'll see that they get recycled.
The results were staggering, and the mound of old
telephone books grew and grew.
As we tried to peer out our windows past the
stacks, we wondered why our county officials couldn't
make it easier for us to recycle our cans, bottles and
newspapers.
True, there are recycling bins in each of the cities.
But the bins are either located near city hall, for Anna
Maria and Holmes Beach, or at the north end of Co-
quina Beach for Bradenton Beach sort of out-of-the-
way destinations for most of us.
Why not place a set of recycling bins where we all
commonly go at the grocery stores, we mused? It
would be so much easier to return our recyclables to
their "source."
Why not?


jISLANDEREXmi|I
SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 43
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


a


With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


Youth will miss Ernie
We sure will miss you, Mr. Ernie. Thanks for all
those wonderful lollipops. We love you.
Hunter and Chandler Hardy, (ages 3 and 1)
Anna Maria

Enjoys 'Those Were the Days'
Just a note to tell June Alder how I enjoyed her
series "Those Were the Days," especially the Seminole
War and Anna Maria. We vacation on the Island
each winter and subscribe to The Islander Bystander
which keeps us informed all year.
Alder's articles gave me many weeks of additional
enjoyment. I'm doing a genealogy which includes the
Bunce name and hope to discover I'm related to that
Capt. William Bunce.
Carole Vanden Langenberg, Green Bay, WI

Another satisfied reader
I have enclosed your subscription coupon which I
cut from the Aug. 4 issue of your good newspaper.
We took the Islander for years to keep in touch
with our favorite "home away from home" and felt
abandoned when it gave up.
After three years away from Florida, I returned for
a three-week stay and was delighted to find The Is-
lander Bystander which has the flavor of the other one.
Thank you for your publication and please put me
on your mailing list. Please start it right away.
Mrs. John W. Pullen, Park Ridge, Ill.

Can't see city hall for the trees
As an Anna Maria resident and property owner, I
want to protest the terrible conditions at the city hall
grounds and parking lot.
I have often cut through the area between city hall
and the Island Players on my way to the post office and
no longer feel comfortable doing that. It is so over-
grown and ugly. The palm trees are a mess. They
should be trimmed. Not only do they look awful, but
they are a haven for rodents, roaches and snakes.
You can hardly see our once-beautiful city hall.
Everyone wonders what is the matter.
Harriet Ross, Anna Maria


Likes to read about the Island
I read The Islander Bystander with pleasure and in-
terest, even though I must make a small effort to ac-
quire it.
The reporting gives a nice sense of the pains and
pleasures of small town living to say nothing of the
boredom of all those hair-splitting meetings. I also like
the ads more than once I've felt that they are a nice
backup to the editorial side, full of useful information.
June Alder's Anna Maria pieces are excellent and
give a real sense of living people.
Betty Blue Moodie, Bradenton
Leave beaches alone
To Mayor Simches:
Thanks for helping Anna Maria maintain its iden-
tity. No dredges at our shoreline, no artificial beach and,
hopefully, no rakes on our sandy shore. Birds feed on
the tiny micro-organisms buried in the sea weed.
Mother Nature is doing just fine. Thanks.
Marge Kennedy, Anna Maria

Don't walk in my shoes!
This letter is to the person who stole my Eastland
sandals from the beach on Sunday, Sept. 11.
Never in my life has anybody ever wanted to walk
a mile in my shoes! In my circle of friends, I'm known
as a hard-luck guy. Obviously my bad luck followed
when I moved to Anna Maria a month ago.
I wonder if there is any truth to the saying about not
knowing how a person feels until you've "walked a
mile in his shoes." Hope so.
If things get to tough for you, try returning the san-
dals to the same place you found them.
D. W. Simmons, Anna Maria
Have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and encourages
your letters to the Editor.
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to edit let-
ters for length. Letters must be signed, and include the city
you reside in anonymous letters will not be printed.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Editor,
The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.


r


=-- --.- - -- I














TSE WERE TE AYS
Part 2, The Remarkable Captain Jones
by June Alder





p Pretty
schoolmarm
Sophie about the
time she married
Irishman John R.
Jones in
Toronto.


A SHOCK


Canadian John R. Jones was in for
an unpleasant shock when he arrived
with his family on the wild Pinellas pen-
insula in 1882 to manage a 50-acre cit-
rus farm for wealthy "Gen. Johnson" of
Detroit.
Jones perhaps had pictured a ver-
dant paradise where he could delight in
pursuing his avocation of horticulture.
In a way it was an Eden but the dark
side, with an elderly Adam, an Eve-like
seductress and a passel of Cain-and-
Abel-type sons.
The Joneses had already heard, on
the boat crossing the bay from Tampa,
how Johnson had divorced his wife to
marry a showgirl and had banished his
own sons from his Florida estate in fa-
vor of her son.
This is what John P. Jones, the
captain's eldest son (then age 7), wrote
about the situation a half-century later:
"A sad-looking character with a
bandage on his arm met us with a mule
and wagon and introduced himself as
Jack Hodge, the hired man from the
Johnson place. He said that the Old
Man's step-son had already gone and he
was leaving himself in the morning.
"It seemed that the night before,
while driving home from the post office,
someone took a shot at them (the venge-
ful brothers, no doubt). The bullet
passed through Hodge's arm and into
the mule, who made record time back to
the ranch but none too fast for the
frightened pair.
"All this was related while the
wagon bumped along over palmetto-
roots in the sandy road and the mule
plodded wearily toward our new home.
My two brothers St. Clair (Clair for
short), two years younger than I; and
Francis, not yet two years old lay
asleep in the bottom of the wagon.
Mother and I sat together on the one seat
while Father and Mr. Hodge trudged
along at the side."
Now, Sophia Jones was a delicately
brought-up Frenchwoman, who was
music teacher at a Church of England
school in Toronto when she married
John R., a popular young priest at the
parish. Her heart must have sunk when
it turned out that the manager's home in
the weedy orange grove was nothing but
a three-room, white-washed shack with
no glass in the windows, a hand-pump in


the yard for water and a couple of
mangy hounds yelping in the barn.
With no hired help and the two
trigger-happy Johnson boys on the
loose, Jones had his work cut out for
him. He got some help from neighbors
at Mirror Lake, and he helped them out
by dispensing remedies (quinine,
calomel and salts were the usual ones)
from his medicine chest. He even ex-
tracted teeth with what was called "the
pullikins."
John P. wrote: "We children had a
wonderful time, as it seemed like fairy-
land to us; and Father loved to hunt and
fish. But it was tough on poor Mother,
though she never complained, even
when bats (of which she was terrified)
got in through the unsealed eaves and
flew around the house at night. I re-
member seeing her saying her prayers
with an umbrella over her head as pro-
tection from these creatures.
"Mother became quite a proficient
mule-driver. We had two of these ani-
mals, Kittie and Kate. The latter kicked
and bit but Kittie was gentle and doc-
ile, stood quietly while being harnessed
up, and took us on lots of drives in the
two-wheeled cart with no springs,
Mother cracking the whip and calling,
'Get up there, what's the matter with
you?' in the most approved fashion."
Captain Jones sometimes had to be
gone overnight on business. On one
occasion the boys were awakened by a
terrible screaming.
"We thought it must be a panther,"
J.P. remembered. "Mother was scared
of mice and bats, but not of snakes or
wild animals, so she took down the old
revolver that had been left her for de-
fensive purposes, but it went off and
blew a hole through the kitchen table.
So she sallied forth with an ax to do
battle. Luckily, it proved to be one of
the hounds which had contracted the
blind staggers."
The Joneses stuck it out for six
months. Then they packed up and re-
crossed the bay to Tampa, the only
town of any size (about 700 people
then) on Florida's west coast. Jones
thought he'd best go back to lawyering.

Next: City on
the make


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 a PAGE 7 JIm



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It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
Island. Over 800 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free to the Island and surround-
ing areas. But if you don't live here and you would like to subscribe, or if
you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please fill out the form
below and mail or drop off at our office with a check in the proper amount.

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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978


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IR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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Planning commission suggests


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A piano lesson takes about an hour but getting
permission to teach one in the City of Holmes Beach
has dragged on for more than a year.
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission made a
number of revisions last week in a proposed ordinance
to provide a special exception for in-home artistic
teaching.
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches
said that although there is a limit in the proposed or-
dinance on the number of students that can be in-
structed at one time, there is no limit on how many can
receive instruction in a 24-hour period.
Commissioner Mike Faarup said to have more
than six students per day would be a business.
Member Gene Aubry pointed out, "The intent of
an artistic license is for someone who is an artist to
help out a few kids who want to take lessons. If you
start raising this to 12 and they charge $50 an hour, that
is a flat out business."
The members agreed on six students per 24-hour
period.
Simches noted that although hours of instruction
cannot extend past 9 p.m., there is no starting time in
the ordinance. He suggested 9 a.m. and other members


agreed.
Another concern was over the parking stipulations
in the proposed ordinance, which provides for a mini-
mum of two off-street spaces for students and two for
residents.
Aubry said that should be a maximum instead of
minimum. Faarup added that parking should be limited
to what's available in the resident's driveway. The oth-
ers agreed.
Simches noted that a 1,000-foot distance must be
maintained between adult day care facilities, between
family day care facilities and between after school fa-
cilities in the city.
"You could have one of each within 1,000 feet," he
noted. "I don't know if that was given any thought
when the ordinance passed. If you stick a couple of
artistic licenses in there, you can have a busy block."
Members had some discussion on whether or not
to define the term artistic but agreed it would be a
nearly impossible task.
Aubry said, "The thing that scares me is that I'm
really for the betterment of the community if some
child can take a piano lesson from someone down the
street but when you start writing rules, there's 100
people out there trying to figure out how to get around
them."


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Islanders turn out to vote
Poll workers at Bradenton Beach said voter turn-out was slow in the morning but picked up in the late
afternoon for the Sept. 8 primary. Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


Anna Maria final: Zimmerman's it


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Bill Zimmerman will start work Sept. 16 as Anna
Maria's public works director, building inspector and
code enforcement officer. Recommended by a city-ap-
pointed screening committee, Zimmerman received a
unanimous endorsement by city commissioners Sept. 1.
"We've gone through all the applications and ended
up with one we feel is great," Vice Mayor Max Znika
reported at the special city commission meeting. Znika
was also a member of the committee that selected
Zimmerman from a field of nearly 40 applicants.
From a short list of three candidates, the screen-
ing committee selected Zimmerman, 49, to assume the
post Don Tarantola will be vacating on Sept. 16. The
committee, which consisted of Znika, Doug Wolfe,
Harry Boothe, Tom Turner, Luanne Collins, Steve
Kring and Dale Woodland, voted unanimously to rec-
ommend Zimmerman for the job.
Although Znika and Wolfe were both members of
the committee, only one of them was present when-
ever the committee met, Znika said, because there
might be problems with the Sunshine Law since both
men are also members of the city commission.
The screening committee recommended that
Zimmerman be started at a salary of $28,500 and be


on probation for six months, and that he receive $500-
a-year raises every six months until he reaches an an-
nual salary of $30,000. Zimmerman asked if he could
be raised to the higher figure immediately after com-
pleting his probation, and the commission agreed.
In budget discussions in July, the commission set
aside $12,000 a year to pay a code inspector, the idea be-
ing to remove this responsibility from the public works
director/building inspector. At that time, the commission
talked about reducing the public works director salary to
$28,000 a year because of the projected lesser workload.
That idea was scrapped, and Zimmerman will wear all
three hats, just as Tarantola does now.
Currently, Zimmerman works as a building inspec-
tor for the City of Bradenton and is being paid $22,800.
A resident of Palmetto, Zimmerman plans to relocate
to Anna Maria and live on his boat at Galati's Marina.
The commission also agreed that Harry Boothe, a
consultant the city has used before, will work with
Zimmerman and familiarize him with the way things
are done in Anna Maria City.
"For as long as need be," Znika said of Boothe's tem-
porary employment, "but we're not talking about four,
five or six weeks with the qualifications Mr. Zimmerman
has."
Boothe will be paid $200 a week for his services.


Z* 5 LTO'









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A PAGE 9 IE

A-MY
Formerly of
Headquarters
, IS NOWA T...

1The Hair
Cottage, etc...
5500 Marina Dr. FULL SERVICE SALON
5500 Marinach 778-68Dr.
S Holmes Beach 7 7 8-6868


Ron Crowder, right and manager Mark Hagman are ready to sell Islanders everything from awls to zinc-plated
nails at Crowder Brothers' sixth store, scheduled to open this week in Holmes Beach. Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


Crowder Brothers Hardware set to

open Island store this week


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The new sign is up, the hardware is in and the pa-
per on the windows is about to come down. If all goes
according to plan, Crowder Brothers Hardware will
open Sept. 15 in Anna Maria Island Center, continuing
a local hardware success story as another Island land-
mark closes its doors.
Bradenton Beach Hardware on Bridge Street has
announced that it will be shutting down as of the end
of the month. The venerable establishment has been
around more than half a century, and is one of the last
of the old-style hardware stores to be found anywhere.
Although many Islanders will miss Bradenton
Beach Hardware, Crowder Brothers' owner, Ron
Crowder, says he hopes folks who have found his
family's Bradenton store to their liking will make the
new store at 3352 East Bay Dr. a part of their lives.
Although a mainland store, Crowder Brothers has
been well known to Islanders for nearly four decades.
The second of the chain's six stores opened at Westgate
Shopping Center in Bradenton in 1955 and has been in
business there ever since. Lots of Island customers
have made the trek down Manatee Avenue to pick up
this or that item, but it was always the intent of the
company that the Island should have its own Crowder
Brothers.
"My dad wanted to move out here for probably the
last 25 years, but the rent factors were prohibitive," says
Ron Crowder, who co-owns the family business with his
brother, John, wife, Jina, and mother, Grace. "The people
who now own the shopping center contacted me and of-
fered us favorable rent conditions, so we felt like it would
make a profitable venture. This ended up being perfect. I
think they went after a hardware store because there was
a hardware store here before, and the space kind of lends
itself to a hardware store."
An Ace Hardware used to occupy the north end of
the shopping center (right next door to Harlan's 1-Hour
Photo), but it didn't last long, and the building has been
empty for about four years. Crowder says he isn't wor-
ried about moving into a space where another hardware
store has died, because he says the previous owner re-
ally didn't know how to manage that type of business.
Besides, Crowder says the new store is right in the
center of everything.
"We feel it's a great location, because we'll be able
to pull from south and north before they go over the
bridge, and we're hoping they'll stop here and see if we
have it before they make the drive into town."
Beyond the fact that many Islanders cringe at the
thought of having to cross the bridge (even a low one)
and leave the Island for anything, Crowder thinks his
Holmes Beach store will offer other incentives for folks
to stay on this side of the Intracoastal Waterway.
"We've got a great reputation for having hard-to-
find items, a really nice gift department along with a
good line of hardware," Crowder says. "That's a
unique situation in the hardware industry not many
stores have hardware and gifts it's a hard thing to


mix. I think that will be our stronghold."
The Westgate store will also be a plus for Islanders,
Crowder says, and no one except his employees will
have to battle tourist season traffic to make use of it
"We're going to have our big store in town to
pull out of we're going to be shuttling everyday.
If we don't have enough of something, or if we don't
have what a customer needs but we have it in town,
we'll be able to get it out here within a day's time.
Other stores have to be dependent on their ware-
house, which are like once-a-week delivery."
In addition to variety, Crowder says his store can
also offer competitive prices because it is part of the
HWI hardware buying co-op, which has 3,400 dealer
stores.
"We group together to make our purchases, so
we get better prices," Crowder explains.
Crowder says he's aware of the special needs of
Island hardware customers, and although people who
know his Westgate store will discover a familiar feel-
ing in the Island store, this one will be unique and
evolving all the time.
"One of the things we're going to be able to do
is respond to what the people are asking. If they start
asking for something that we have not put in, we'll
get it in," Crowder says. "We might have something
here now we don't need on the Island and we'll get
rid of it. So we'll be adjusting our inventory mix as
we go along."
"As people respond to us we will adjust every-
thing to fit whatever we can into the store to take care
of the Island."
As an example of how Crowder Brothers will
customize the Island store, Crowder points out that
his mainland stores sell both galvanized and
ungalvanized nails, but that the Island store will only
stock the galvanized variety.
"We didn't bring any nails out that weren't gal-
vanized, because I've been told by people out here
you don't need the others they'll rust."
"Island time," that often-quirky, hard-to-
define lifestyle and its attendant variations on mainland
time-keeping, has also not escaped the notice of
Crowder, and he says his store will work well with it.
"We've never had a store on a beach we've al-
ways had mainland stores so this is different,"
Crowder says. "As I've been working here during the
day and watching the parking lot, it seems like a lot of
people stop on their way home from work. That may say
to us that we need to stay open until seven. We'll adapt
We understand it's the customers who control us. A lot
of people in the business community try to control the
customers, but we don't feel that way."
To begin with, Crowder says the store hours will
be 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.
"But if we have a hard time closing up at night,
we'll stay open later."
For more information about the new store, call
778-0999.


ISLANDERS


Well don't leave
without visiting us ...
take time to
subscribe now to the
best news
on the Island.
Or use the subscrip-
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OH PAGE 10 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

WA0mwz[a1iL,[]:Iazi


Coastal Cleanup to be
held Saturday
The Seventh Annual Florida Coastal Cleanup will
be held Saturday, Sept. 17, from 9 a.m. to noon.
Those interested in helping should contact Keep
Manatee Beautiful the annual event by calling 795-8272.
Susan Hancock, Manatee County coordinator, says
for those who decide to help that Saturday morning can
- by just pitching in at any of the sites which are dot-
ted all along the Island.
"Response has been great," says Hancock. "But I
want people to know that if they come to help they need
to wear old shoes, sun block, hats, work gloves and bring
some water to drink. We will be providing drinks, too."
A command post will be set up at Kingfish ramp
by 8:30 a.m. Other sponsored sites are set for Bean
Point, Bayfront Park, Manatee Public Beach, Coquina
Beach and many spots in between. A coastal cleanup
dive site has been set for the one-mile reef. Those with
boats are needed.
Hancock wants people to know that this year
"Keep Manatee Beautiful" T-shirts will be available to
volunteers at cost for $5 each.
Last year more than 1,000 volunteers from Manatee
County helped to rid shorelines of unsightly and danger-
ous litter and debris. Hancock hopes this year will bring
more volunteers to help with the beautification project.

Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held at
Anna Maria City Hall for Sept. 10, were Ruth
Foehrkolb and Florence Spain.
Runners up were Gene Snedeker and George
McKay. The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday.
All are welcome.
All players get
traded here
Bill Goldschmidt and his wife,
Peggy, at left in back row, take
time out with some of the young
volunteers who worked at last
Saturday's sports card show at
Roser Memorial Community
Church. About 100 Island youths
showed up to trade cards of their
favorite baseball heroes, and to
meet Detroit Tiger catcher Milt
May. May signed autographs and
delivered an anti-drug message to
the Island Community Baseball
Club, which meets once a month at
the church. The club is sponsored l
by Concerned Island Parents,
Roser Church and many Island
businesses. For information, call
Goldschmidt at 778-7918. Is-
lander Photo: Mark Ratliff

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS


READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Catholic Women to
meet in Sarasota
Sept. 25
Florida Council of Catholic Women members will
meet at the Hyatt, Sarasota, for the 11th Biennial Con-
ference Sunday, Sept. 25, through Tuesday, Sept. 27.
A Bishop's mass will be held on Sunday, 5 p.m. at
St. Mary Star of the Sea Church, Longboat Key. Ladies
of the Northern Deanery of the Diocese, Venice, will
host the reception in the activity center.
Business sessions begin Monday featuring noted
speakers followed by "Fun Night."
Women interested in attending should call North-
ern Deanery Director Marian Van Winkle at 778-7865
or Roslyn Corrigan at 349-1241.


H Kids helping
Skids
Following the final perfor-
mance of the Roser Chapel
Players' "Belles On Their
Toes, cast members Katie
McDonald, center, and
J Forest Beall, left handed
', ^ L Anna Maria Island Commu-
nity Center board member
Luke Courtney a check for
$200. The donation to the
AMICC came from a special
performance held Aug. 24
and was the decision of the
16 cast members. Islander
Photo: Tomara Kafka


Island youth to meet
at Gloria Dei
All Island Youth, sponsored by a group of Island
churches, will meet at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in
Holmes Beach during September on Wednesdays from
6 to 8 p.m.Youth from 7th through 12th grades are in-
vited for food, fun, thought and worship.

Free tickets available
for Van Wezel concert
The Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall will present
a free concert by the Command Band of the Air Force
Reserve at 3 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 16 as part of the 25th
Anniversary Season. Free tickets, two per person, will
be distributed at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 1.
Founded in 1941, the Command Band of the Air
Force Reserve is one of the two oldest bands in the Air
Force. Its 60 members perform everything from origi-
nal band compositions to popular Broadway show
tunes and patriotic marches. The band performs exten-
sively throughout the Southeastern United States.
For more information 953-3366.

Open auditions to be
held in Bradenton
The Manatee Players will hold open auditions for
their upcoming production of Neil Simon's comedy,
"Rumors," at 7 p.m., Sunday, Sept.18, at the Riverfront
Theatre, 102 Old Main St, Bradenton. Possible call backs
will be on Monday, Sept 19. Roles are available for men
and women in age ranges of mid-20s to mid-60s.
Actors will read from the script, so prepared pieces
are not required. Actors interested in reading the script
prior to auditions may obtain one from the theatre for a
$5 refundable deposit Rehearsals for the production will
be evening hours through October, leading up to the Nov.
4 opening. Performances run through Nov. 20.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 N PAGE 11 IJI


Island Garden Center offers advice, supplies
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Last in a series W LCO
Jim Rossi of the Island Garden Center in Holmes
Beach offered numerous tips for Island vegetable garden- /A
ers and said his store will carry a complete selection of
supplies, plants and seeds for the home gardener. 2Ji
"The Island's soil is very sandy," noted Rossi, "and
garden beds must be built up with good peat, cow ma-
nure and top soil. If you have been making your own
compost, that is great for vegetable gardening."
Rossi said rows can be bermed to promote good /
drainage and aid in weed control and rows should be
spaced about two feet apart. However, he does not rec-
ommend mulching because it mixes with the soil and
takes a long time to break down.
"It is just about time to plant and I'll have veg-
etables plants coming in this week," he said.
Plants include green peppers, tomatoes, broccoli,
Brussels sprouts, lettuce, cauliflower, strawberries and
a variety of herbs. Rossi will also have a seed rack of
vegetable seeds for gardeners.
"A lot ofpeople are growing their vegetables in pots," Plants enhance new sign
he noted, "especially if they don't have much space. Pots Jim Rossi of the Island Garden Center donated plants and labor to complete the new sign at the entrance to
are also good for condominium owners. Tomatoes, straw- the City of Anna Maria. Plants include dwarf alamanda, variegated lirope and white pampas grass. Rossi said
berries and green peppers do well in pots." he plans to add periwinkles for more color. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


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Use a potting mix for container gardening, he ad-
vised, because top soil is too heavy and does not pro-
mote good drainage. Some manure can be mixed with
the potting soil. He said plastic, terra cotta and grow
pots are all acceptable.
Rossi also had a few tips for insect control in the
vegetable garden.
"Chop or mash garlic cloves, let them sit in water
for awhile and spray the mixture on the plants to repel
insects," he said. "Another trick to keep insects away
is to plant society garlic and marigolds around the gar-
den bed."
He said insects are a big problem and there are

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many sprays for their control. He mentioned an insec-
ticidal soap, Safer Soap, that is environmentally safe.
He also confirmed Ernest Kreher's recommendation of
thuricide, a bacterial spore, for caterpillars.
"The fall planting season is also coming for annu-
als geraniums, impatiens, petunias, etc.," he noted.
"Get your beds ready now and it will be cool enough
for planting in a couple of weeks."
Now is a good time to plant citrus, advised Rossi,
before the weather gets cool. They like the sandy en-
vironment but a little cow manure or composted cow
manure can be added. He carries a full line of container
grown citrus up to 25 gallons.





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IIE PAGE 12 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Past seems to catch up to forward-moving


Island editor, activist Ellen Marshall


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Ellen Marshall was pleasantly surprised when she
saw the rendering of the Anna Maria Key News in a
mural, painted by members of the Artists Guild of
Anna Maria, on the wall of the Island Shopping Cen-
ter in Holmes Beach.
After all, Marshall was the writer, editor, publisher
and owner of the first newspaper on Anna Maria Island
which began in 1949 and published for about a year. Her
friend Harriet Williams was the advertising manager.
The newspaper was "published semi-monthly" and
an annual subscription cost $2.
"It was a bona fide newspaper," says Marshall. "It
was never less than eight pages. Can you imagine the
nerve I had? It was a lot of fun and very unusual."
Marshall laughs at the idea.
She says she styled the layout of the Key News af-
ter the Christian Science Monitor even though it was
the New York Times that she read faithfully.
Marshall smiles a smile that is easy and pleasant.
Her white hair matches the white shirt and jeans she wears
which makes her look like some angelic crusader.
And a crusader might well describe Marshall who
has led a full and adventurous life.
Marshall first came to visit the Island in 1947. By
the time she moved here in 1949, she was already a
young World War II widow.
Born in New York and raised in Manhattan and
Long Island, Marshall says she loved Anna Maria be-
cause it reminded her of the island she grew up on.
"I'm a workaholic," says Marshall. "I've worked
all my life."
Marshall says that as soon as she met Harriet Wil-
liams, "we hit it off."
Harriet Williams Blair now lives in Georgia and
still comes to visit, says Marshall.
"Harriet had started a mimeographed newsletter,"
says Marshall. "I said to her, 'We need to have a decent
newspaper on this Island.' And when we began the Key
News, it was written on a typewriter, so your choice
was upper or lower case."
Marshall recalls when the two women had to bor-
row a truck to pick up the press they had bought.
"Hugh Holmes loaned Harriet and me his truck,"
she says. "We made arrangements to go to Dade City.
The press weighed over 2,500 pounds and we had to
drive it over the wooden bridge on Cortez."
The paper lasted about a year.
"It got to the point where I couldn't afford to run
that paper anymore," Marshall laughs. "It was costing
us too much money.


After she sold the paper to Art Riles, Marshall went
on with her life. She married and divorced another Is-
lander before she met Jack Marshall, an Island real es-
tate agent, the love of her life.
"We were married for 27 years," she says. "It was
a very fine marriage."
Eventually, Harry Varley bought the newspaper
and renamed it the Islander.
The rest is history.
The public is invited to hear
SMarshall speak about how
she started the Anna Maria
Key News at the Thursday,
Sept. 19, meeting of the Anna
Maria Island Historical Soci-
1 ety, at 7:30 p.m., at Anna
Maria City Hall.
"I think Ellen is a most re-
Ellen Marshall markable woman," says
Carolyne Norwood, presi-
dent of the Anna Maria Island Historical Society for
four years.
"As far as the Key News, I know it was the only
publication on the Island and it was the forerunner of
the Islander."
Norwood jokes, "From what I've heard, you didn't
dare not read it there might be something in there
about you."
But Norwood remarks on Marshall's other accom-
plishments, too.
"Do you know that she raised her great-grandson?"
Norwood queries. "And she is active with the Guard-
ian Ad Litem program."
Marshall has lived with her 22-year-old great-
grandson Shae Corrigan since he was two years old and
she has been a Guardian Ad Litem for 14 years. A con-
nection seems to exist for Marshall between the two.
S "I've always liked children," admits Marshall. "I've
spent my whole life raising other people's children."
Marshall and Corrigan share a duplex in Anna Maria
and a good relationship, but the Guardian Ad Litem pro-
gram is what Marshall wants to talk about these days.
The state-mandated program began in 1981. That was
when Marshall read about it in the League of Women
Voters of Manatee's newsletter. The 12th Judicial Circuit
Court was looking for volunteers to be trained to act as
advocates for children caught up in the court system.
Marshall was one of the first to join.
"It was wonderful for me," admits Marshall. "Jack
had recently died and I didn't want to be involved in
real estate anymore. I had to have something to do. I
got really involved because it had just started."


Back in 1981, the perhaps 15 Guardian Ad Litem
volunteers worked the three counties of the 12th Judi-
cial Circuit: Manatee, Sarasota and DeSoto counties.
"We were all running around like crazy," Marshall
remembers.
The program has grown to retain currently more
than 200 trained volunteers in the three-county district,
all working to help children.
"The judges really use us in the criminal, civil and
juvenile courts," says Marshall. "One of the things that
keeps a volunteer program like this going is there re-
ally is the possibility for a near miracle. We can do a
bang-up job for a child or a family the court system
is so complicated. Children really can fall through the
cracks. Judge Adams has called us his eyes and ears."
Marshall, who has led a fulfilling life, doesn't see
herself slowing down because of lack of energy or age.
As a matter of fact, Marshall, the opportunist, keeps
learning new ways to get along in life.
"One of the advantages of being older," she says,
"is you can tell people off and get away with it."
Marshall laughs about her new-found expertise.
"It's wonderful in court," she says. "because I can
go up to all the young lawyers and say, 'Don't you ever
do that again,' and wag my finger at them."


Editor of first

Anna Maria Island

newspaper to speak
Ellen Marshall, the founder of the first Anna
Maria Island newspaper, will speak at the Thurs-
day, Sept. 19, meeting of the Anna Maria Island
Historical Society, at 7:30 p.m., at Anna Maria
City Hall. The public is invited to attend.
Marshall, who started the Anna Maria Key
News in 1949 with her friend Harriet Williams
Blair, will speak on "How the First Island News-
paper Originated."
When she came to the Island in 1947, Marshall
was a war widow and stayed at the Anglers Lodge on
the bay. She became friends with Harriet and together
they published the weekly newspaper.
"We were young and had a lot of energy,"
says Marshall. "We soon became secretaries for all
the organizations on the Island. Then we got the
idea to produce a newspaper. I didn't know much
about it but I was gifted with intestinal fortitude."
The forerunner of the now-defunct Islander, the
Key News was an immediate success.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 N PAGE 13 Kj


I SAnna Maria
School Menu


Birthday bonanza
Summer birthday babies enjoy a birthday party in Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade class. "We summer babies
never have our class fuss over us or hear them sing 'Happy Birthday,'" said Ellis. "This party is for all of
us 'Old Buzzards' of summer." "Happy birthday" to Mike, Marika, Justin, Sarah, Andy, Allison,
Teacher's Aide Mrs. Shields, and Mrs. Ellis. P.S: Mrs. Ellis, Islander school reporter Joy Courtney and
the country's endeared comedian, the late Lucille Ball, all share the same summer birthday wonder if
there's a message in there?


Please visit our pre-school.
302 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-2210
Monday thru Friday 7 am to 5:30 pm
18 mo. thru 10 Years

I r


Monday, 9/19/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
S Lunch: Chicken Patty on Bun or Toasted Cheese
Sandwich, Potato Rounds, Fresh Fruit, Juice Bar
Tuesday, 9/20/94
SBreakfast: Peanut Butter Cup or Cereal, Toast, Pears
SLunch: Nachos & Cheese or Cheese Pizza, Carrot &
Celery Sticks w/Low Fat Dip, Pears,
Jello w/Topping
Wednesday, 9/21/94
Breakfast: Pancakes w/Syrup or
Cereal &Toast, Peaches
S Lunch: Beef-a-roni or Mini-Chef Salad, Green
Beans, Fresh Baked Whole Wheat Roll, Fruit Juice
Thursday, 9/22/94
Breakfast: Scrambled Egg w/Turkey Bacon or
Cereal, Fruit Juice
S Lunch: Tuna Fish Sandwich or Burrito, Broccoli
w/Cheese Sauce, Strawberry Fruit Cup, Cookie
Friday, 9/23/94
Breakfast: Fresh Baked Soft Pretzel
or Cereal, Pineapple
Lunch: Sausage Pizza or Hot Dog, Corn,
Applesauce, Bar Cookie
All meals served with milk.
* S S S S S S S 5*5 S


Joy Courtney
Joy Courtney


Growing up together at
school for constructive play


Right, Lori and
Mickey, age 4.


MANATEE WEST SHOPPIiN CENTER
MANATEE fVE. WEST fT 75TH STREET, BRfDENTON

Convenient
SShopping Next
/ bIto Alertsons...

MANATEE AVE. WEST

BASKETS CARDS GIFTS Alt,on s2-ti
PRE-SEASON
I "Your first
S A L E-- Mainland Stores...
Thurs, Fri, Sat Sept 15, 16, 17 just off the
I -o0/. (r ff QC rrMlA., ilA l beaches."


..S..L


BEWARE ...
There have been reports of telephone
solicitation coming onto the Island
again. We strongly suggest you get a second
opinion and estimate on your air conditioning
or duct cleaning needs. Our opinion and
estimates are totally FREE services.
We live here, we work here, the Island is our
business.
Always remember "you get what you pay for."




WE RECOMMEND
AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING SALES & SERVICE RHEEM PRODUCTS
DUCT CLEANING FPL PARTICIPATING
8-0773 SINCE 1982 INDEPENDENT
778-0773 CACO 56298 CONTRACTOR


, .


I


L off. mw 0 m low


I ,






EB PAGE 14 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
The Anchorage won the "Wood-Eye" trophy in
this year's final game of the Island restaurant softball
league, an informal gathering of teams who have
played for years and years, according to Anna Maria
Island Community Center's Scott Dell, who umpires
the games. Participating in this year's league with the
Anchorage was the Beach House, the Sandbar and the
Beach Ducks (that's a combo team of Beach Bistro
and D.Coy Ducks).
On Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 9 a.m., it's the Anchor-
age vs. Tip of the Island this year's winner versus
last year's winner. The game will be held at the Holmes
Beach city field.
Speaking of the Anchorage, I hear the late night
dart games are getting to be popular along with the free
late night buffet. The 99-cent margaritas served in huge
hurricane glasses are the "hot item."
A cruise to benefit Save the Nets will set sail on the
Seafood Shack Showboat on Saturday night, Sept. 17.
Music is by Billy Rice. Cost is $20 for one person or

Bridge Tender Inn-
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn

CLOSED FOR REMODELING -9 *
RE-OPEN
Monday, Sept. 19
Lunch Dinner Spirits
OPEN 11:30AM 10PM DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
immmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmml
COUPON LBOS P
I EXPIRES
9/20/94 /
I 10519 Cortez Road I
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
* I
I LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I
S .99 / SECOND2.99
39 / BUFFET$2.99
I I
DINNER PIZZA BUFFET H
* U
i $A4.49/^ ET 2.99 C
$4m49/ BUFFET 9
hammmmmu COUPON ImmmmmIll


CELEBRATE OUR 1st YEAR

WITH A FREE
GLASS OF CHAMPAGNE
WITH ENTREE, FROM SEPT. 12 51.



qfieMiutinInn


Intimate Dinner For Two
Including Wine
$39.95
BLACK ANGUS BEEF SELECTIONS
THE FRESHEST GULF CATCHES
Prepared 10 Ways Nightly
Exotic Grains & Wide Selection of Pastas
Hours
Serving Dinner 5:00 10:00
Monday thru Saturday
jservations Suggested
Available for Private Parties
t 605Manatee Avenue at East Bay Dr.
iolmtes Beachi
(813) 778-5440


$35 per couple. Lots of mullet varieties will be served
and a cash bar is available. Info and tickets: 794-1249.
Lots of Island restaurants close for vacations, re-
modeling and cleaning around this time of the year.
Among those with their doors temporarily closed are
Bortell's, Ches's Pasta Plus, Chez Andre, Euphemia
Haye, Ivo's, Isabelle's and the Bridge Tender Inn
among others. Thankfully, that leaves us with a very
long list of places that aren't closed.
Turtles Bar & Grill celebrated their first anniversary
with a big Labor Day bash before closing for some paint-
ing and cleaning. They reopen Sept. 21, with the regular
Wednesday night fare: reggae. Blindside will play Sept.
23 to Sept. 25 and Rocky and the Beatheathens, from
Tampa, will be perform Sept. 29 through Oct. 1.
The Crown & Thistle, also closed for a short va-
cation, reopens Thursday, Sept. 15, with a big celebra-
tion for their two-year anniversary starting Friday,
Sept. 16 and continuing through the end of the month.
Congratulations go to the Anna Maria Island Histori-
cal Society and Carolyne Norwood, president for four
years, for winning both the Sarasota Herald-Tribune
and Bradenton Herald club awards. This is the third
consecutive year they have won the civic awards.
You can get some good deals on meals on the Is-
land. Golden Star is giving diners a 10 percent dis-
count on meals through October. On Wednesdays, the
Sandbar gives locals a 20 percent discount on entrees.

ANCIIOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR



BLIND SIDE
FRI & SAT SEPT 16 & 17 10PM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, $6
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


Island Inn

SRestaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3051
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach




Eh%4h p4upe?-



94h444) 9ty(C I


Monday
Dom Night
Guess the time of sunset.
The closest guess wins a
bottle of Dom Perignon!

Wednesday
Native Night!
Show your Bradenton,
Sarasota, or Island ID when
you order and we'll knock
20% off your entree!


Every night enjoy
early bird
specials inside
from 4-6 p.m.


Tuesday
"Sandbar Sunset" Night!
That's our newest frozen
specialty drink, and
its two-for-one!

Thursday
Island Night!
Join the "South Seas" festivities
as you sway to the music
of Tropical Steel.


100 Spring Avenue l Anna Maria, Florida 1 778-0444


Just show your "Island ID."
R.P.M. is playing on the
Sandbar deck, Tuesdays
through Saturdays, except
Thursday when Tropical
Steel plays in September.
Where, you ask, are
Chuck and Lloyd?
The Tropicats, better
known to some as Chuck
Gregg Allman and Lloyd, are playing on
the deck at the Beach
House. Tropical Steel is scheduled to play on Saturday,
Sept. 24. Dixieland Jazz is the score for Tuesday nights
through September.
Don't forget this Sunday, Sept. 18, is the Fourth
Annual Sarasota Blues Festival at the Sarasota Fair
Grounds starring Gregg Allman and Friends. The line-
up of friends looks great: John Prestia will host the
event and provide back-up for many of the performers
and other musicians include Junior Wells, the Toler
Brothers, Schascle, Derek Trucks, L'il Ed and the
Blues Imperials and Richy Kicklighter. Tickets are $10
in advance, $15 at the gate.
Starting this week, seafood markets and grocery
stores are required to warn consumers about the dangers
of eating raw oysters. However, never fear, the oyster is
perfectly safe to eat when steamed, baked or fried.


S EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, toast,
home fries and coffee ... 6nly $1.75


ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT *
SEAFOOD BUFFET $10 5
Mon-Thur 5 to 10 PM
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
RWEII BEA 9D \ A L D
BAMDWI(EIH IDIERMU

(g C3PM 6PM DAILY |
500 Drafts *1 00 Well Drinks

9PE EK w Rm UJ11Ecc & DIMmE

5325 MARINA DRIVE AVE A 5872 14T' ST. WEST
(formerly Pete Reynard's) (U.S. 41)
Holmes Beach CIAIiBY Bradenton
778-9566 \"DAY! 751-3070


Mon.th uFui






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 I PAGE 15 I1


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Sept. 2, alcohol citation, 800 block of North
Shore Drive.
Sept. 6, lost property, 500 block of Spring Av-
enue. The complainant reported that upon returning to
her residence with groceries during a rainstorm, she
hurried inside and left the groceries inside the door. The
next morning while putting the items away, she discov-
ered her purse was missing.
Sept. 8, alcohol citation, Bean Point.
Bradenton Beach
Sept. 1, burglary, 900 Gulf Dr. N., Gulf Drive Cafe.
The complainant reported that a person unknown pried
open a storage shed at the rear of the building and removed
an 80-pound cylinder of nitrous oxide, valued at $250.
Sept. 3, animal, 1400 block of Gulf Drive South.
The complainant reported a sick raccoon in his back-
yard. After determining the animal was very sick and
could become dangerous, the officer destroyed it with
his service revolver and disposed of the body.
Sept. 3, warrant, 100 block of Bridge Street.
Sept 4, DUI, Gulf Drive and Cortez Road to the
12400 block of Cortez Road. The officer was sitting at the
red light at Cortez Road facing south and observed a red
vehicle pull into the turn lane to turn east on Cortez Road.
The driver then turned against the red light, almost strik-
ing several vehicles, said the report. The officer tried to
stop the vehicle as it traveled across Cortez Bridge and
crossed the center lane several times. When the officer got
the vehicle to stop, he spoke to the driver, Carol G. Frey,
49, of Bradenton and noticed the strong odor of an alco-
holic beverage, he reported. Frey was given field sobriety
tests and placed in custody.
Sept. 6, lost property a waist pack valued at $5,

:s iCE NEW
STACO NACHO
Take Ou iwiches & TACO SALAD
For t ach BAR.
"All You Can Eat"
SWi $495
E Taco-To-Go 99e

Always Freshly Cut & Made To Order
Deli Sandwiches & Soups
Fresh Bagels Ice Cream Cakes
Everything Homemade!
Mon-Thurs 10AM-3PM Fri-Sat 10AM-9PM
Sunday NOON 6PM
EAT IN OR TAKE -OUT
ISLAND SHOPPING CENTER 5318 MARINA DRIVE
HOLMES BEACH 778-7386


a wallet valued at $20, $15 in cash and credit cards -
Coquina Beach.
Sept. 6, criminal mischief, 2400 block of Avenue
A. The complainant, who is the owner of a car lot, re-
ported that after repossessing a vehicle he found a cor-
rosive substance on the outside painted surface and
possibly on the interior.
Sept. 7, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams,
possession of paraphernalia with drug, driving an unreg-
istered motor vehicle, attached tag not assigned, 200 block
of Gulf Drive. The officer stopped Kurt AStapleton, 29,
of Bradenton for driving without headlights. Stapleton told
the officer he recently purchased the vehicle and switched
the tag without taking care of the paperwork. He was
placed in custody and the officer called to have the vehicle
towed. While searching the vehicle for inventory pur-
poses, the officer found a black nylon bag containing two
bags of marijuana and rolling papers.
Holmes Beach
Sept. 2, 3000 block of Gulf Drive. The complainant
reported juveniles throwing rocks at passing vehicles.
Sept. 2, DWLS, 8200 block of Palm. The officer on
patrol recognized the driver as one he had arrested for DUI
in the past and he knew her license was revoked.
Sept. 3, burglary to an automobile, 700 block of
Manatee Avenue. The complainant reported a person
unknown broke the passenger window on his van and
removed $180 in cash, credit cards and keys.
Sept. 4, disturbance, 3610 East Bay Dr., Dry
Dock. An employee told the officer he could not get an
unruly patron to leave. The officer did.
Sept. 6, assistance, 7000 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported thathis power was shut off by the
subject in the lower apartment. The subject advised the
officer that the complainant's washing machine leaks and
water comes through the ceiling and onto her refrigerator.
She said she shut the power off to stop the washing ma-
chine. The officer notified the rental agent who said she


Yes,We're Open!!

Deli Z
Catering C 1
Restaurant

Complete Seafood Dinner for Two
Including Wine $48.00

RYS 383-0777
j J;d e-fS- Tuesday thru Sunday
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. LBK (Behind Circle K)


GREAT FOOD. GREAT BEACH.
GREAT SUMMER SPECIALS.

Half-Price Lunch.

Half-Price Dinner.
Buy one lunch and get the second equal or lesser
value at half price until 4 pm! Every Day!
(With this ad, through September 30,1994.)
-OR-
SBuy oie dinner and get the second of equal or
lesser vaie at half price' until im!
Sundg through Thrsday!
(With this ad, e per couple, through
Septesber 3019.)
Come on out to the Beachhouse. Great deck.
Great playground. Great entertainment nightly,
with Dixieland on Tuesday eveningsp.




b
great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach, (813) 779-2222


would take care of it He told the subject that she could not
shut off the power again or she would be arrested.
Later in the day, the subject reported another leak
and the officer responded and put a bucket under it. The
rental agent arrived and said she would call a plumber.
Sept. 7, damage, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The
victim and his wife were eating in a restaurant when
they were confronted by his ex-wife and her boyfriend
and an argument ensued. The victim and his wife went
to their car and attempted to leave and the boyfriend
blocked his exit. The victim said the boyfriend then
reached into the vehicle's window and grabbed him by
the shirt and words were exchanged. The victim said he
tried to close the window and the boyfriend broke it.
Sept. 7, suspicious, 8400 block of Marina Drive.
The complainant reported that he returned to his resi-
dence after being away overnight and noticed the chain
locks removed from the doors and a bracket broken
from one lock. Nothing was moved or missing, he said.
Sept. 7, suspicious persons juveniles skate-
boarding in the parking lot, 248 S. Harbor Dr., St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church.
Sept. 7, suspicious person, 2900 block of Avenue
B. The complainant reported that a white male had
been walking around his home in the darkness and
when he turned on the light, the subject quickly
knocked on the door. The subject said he was looking
for someone and the complainant responded that he did
not know the person.
The subject walked east on Avenue E and the com-
plainant called the police. The subject was not found.
Three similar incidents were reported. The subject is
described as having long, dark, curly hair and wearing
white shorts and a white muscle shirt.
Sept. 8, damage, 5500 Marina Dr., Hair Cottage.
The complainant reported that a person unknown put roof-
ing nails in the parking lot where one of her employees
park. Two nails punctured the complainant's tire.


Joe's Eats & Sweets


The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge


SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Oysters Rockefeller, Top Round of Beef, Veal Oscar, Shrimp Supreme, Roast Pork,
Shrimp Scampi, Scallops, Lobster, Huge Antipasta Salad, Fresh Fruits, Pasta,
More Salads ... and much more... Desserts too!
Nightly $ 195 Early Bird seated by 5:30 $1 95
Nightly from 4 PM, Sunday from 2PM
Summer Early Bird Specials ............... from $4.95
NIGHTLY SPECIALS ........................ from $7.95
HALF CHICKEN ............................................ $7.95
Oven Roasted or BBQ with choice of potato, salad and dessert.
FILET MIGNON ............................................ .95
8 oz. Filet Mignon cooked to perfection. Served with potato and
salad or ... add a 2-4 oz. Lobster tail for just $12.95.
STUFFED SHRIMP ........................................ $9.95
Six, large Gulf Shrimp with lobster stuffing, broiled or fried,
with salad and potato.


RESTAURANTS


DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY


lluiA
MUS'~'


OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543


I








II PAGE 16 E SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ir-] I : I I


Marguerite T. Bradford
Marguerite T. Bradford, 82, of Holmes Beach died
Sept. 5 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Litchfield, Ky., Mrs. Bradford came to
Holmes Beach from Logan, W.Va., in 1943. She was
a homemaker. She was a member of Roser Memorial
Community Church. She was a volunteer for more than
25 years for the American Red Cross in Logan, W.Va.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home was in charge of ar-
rangements.

Karl Wayne Futch
Karl Futch died Sept. 4 at age 64 on Boca Grande.
Born in Arcadia on Dec. 5 1929, Futch was raised
in the Charlotte Harbor area on Boca Grande.
He served at age 21 as the youngest ever Florida
Highway Patrolman. After five years, that career was
replaced by one in banking and finance. He was owner
of the Pink Elephant restaurant and bar in Boca Grande
during the mid-70s, and also worked in real estate there
as an appraiser, broker and investment consultant. He
moonlighted as a professional fishing guide in the wa-
ters around Boca Grande and in the Bahamas.
He is survived by three sons, David of Holmes
Beach, Mark of Boca Grande, Danny of Los Angeles,


"Tia Lena's menu is a
dream come true."
Pat Benson
Bradenton Herald










Tia Cena's Restaurant
1325 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach
Tuesday Sunday Open 4:30


and three grandchildren, Matt and Rey Futch of Boca
Grande and Cheyenne Futch of Denver, Colo.
A private memorial service is to be held Sept 17 in
Boca Grande. Lemon Bay Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to
the Boca Grande Health Clinic, P. O. Box 517, Boca
Grande, Fla. 33921.
Lynda Purcell
Lynda Purcell, 46, of Anna Maria died Sept. 7 at
home.
Born in Cleveland, Ms. Purcell came to Anna
Maria from Jacksonville in 1980. She was general man-
ager for Cafe Robar in Anna

She is survived by a
daughter, Sabra Drenning of
Bradenton; two sons, Rich-
ard of Anna Maria and John
Drenning of Bradenton; her
mother, Wanda Powell of
Bradenton; her father, Harry
Oliver of Fort Worth, Texas;
and three sisters, Angel LyndaPurcell
Lynda Purcell
Powell and Maya Powell,
both of Sarasota, and Sue Oliver of Fort Worth, Texas.
Memorials may be made to the American Cancer
Society, Parkwood Professional Building, P.O. Box
10459, Bradenton, FL 34282-0459 or Hospice of South-




SILVER QUEEN CORN
FRESH DAILY


^ -- t Mon-Fri 4-7 PM

795-8083
SUNDAY:
' -, HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY
WITH NASCAR RACES
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT
KARAOKE
Wednesday & Thursday Nights 8 12 Midnight

TIM BAMBOO.
Friday & Saturday Sept. 16 & 17 9PM 1AM

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST
Sunday 9-12
Also $1.00 Vodka Day
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise "

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
on our casual outside patio."
P.S. We have the very best sunsets


Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


west Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home was in charge.
Jacquelyn 'Jackie' Romeo
Jacquelyn "Jackie" Ann Romeo, 63, of Anna
Maria died Sept. 11 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Grand Rapids, Mich., Mrs. Romeo came to
Anna Maria from Tampa in 1975. She was a member of
St Francis Episcopal Church, Tampa, and a homemaker.
She is survived by her husband, Joseph A. of Anna
Maria; a daughter, Kim Causey-Conroe Texas; two
sons, Chris and Mark, both of Bradenton; and a brother,
Gordon T. Johnson of San Francisco.
Memorial services were held at Roser Memorial
Community Church in Anna Maria with the Rev. Frank
Hutchison officiating. Memorial may be made to the
American Cancer Society, Parkwood Professional Cen-
ter, P.O. Box 10459, Bradenton, FL 34282-0459.
The Island Poet
I had some pains and aches, and couldn't sleep at night,
So I went to the doctor so he could set me right.
He couldn't solve my problems, but wouldn't let it rest,
He sent me to the hospital where they gave me every
test.
Oh! They stuck me with needles, and pushed and poked
around,
And to prove that I was living they wired me for sound.
I paid a bundle for the bill, that went from page to page,
And all it showed is I'll die some day from a thing
they call old age.
Bud Atteridge
EDITORS NOTE: Bud is recuperating at home from a
recent heart attack. We all wish him well and you may
send him your regards in care of The Islander Bystander.


OORR



S ONE CRAB

RESTAURANT

KING CRAB DINNER $1 69
WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish.............'12.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop.................12.95
Fri. Combo: Kingcrab & Bulldozer Lobster Tail.........'13.95
Sat. Swordfish (Grilled)..................................... 2.95
ON THE BAY END SUNDAY-THURSDAY
OF BROADWAY- VISA & 11:30 AM 9:00 PM
LONGBOATKEY MASTERCARD FRIDAY & SATURDAY
383-1748 NOW ACCEPTED 11:30 AM 9:30 PM


Sir









ji PAGE 17 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISL7\NcfEL


$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST

PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL ITOUT-NOW!

Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
* Name Address/City Phone


FOR SALES
& RENTALS
778-4800
Arizona vs. Cleveland









ROD 4,lEL

Mini-Resort
SBest Fishing *
ISLAND
COOKING
Beer and Wine
Breakfast
S Lunch-Dinner
Reasonable *r
Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *k
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

Monday Night
Football
SGreen Bay vs. Philadelphia
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay BIvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953





AMERICAN

CAR


& TILING

BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
I New England vs. Cincinnati
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617





Free Estimates



AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Re-Roofs Repairs
*Built-Ups Shingles
Single Ply Tile
Roofing LICESEDISURE
Systems co1sI |
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Quality


748-9362
Washington vs. NY Giants


-U. m
OUmAT r gF IKE LA I h
OUEST
nL. Li- .B
Shp'. Shp St
SBonom. Pantin
SBoat Slt
SCon.ignmJnt/BrcS ta
SBulk Oil-in yotu ron in
Eto* Roul
Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
778-5577
Johnson. Evinrnde. OMC
Sea Dvoe & OMC Cobra Stern Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
Indianapolis vs. Pittsburgh



0


HAPPY HOUR
MON Fri 4 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KitchEN OpEN DAily I I AM
BANTAM PLAZA BRAdENtON
10104 CoRTEZ Rd. W.
New Orleans vs. Tampa Bay






Tee
TO


G760Lf
Regripping
Repairing
SRe-finishing
NEW!
948 Midsize Irons
Try Our Demo!
Maximum Accuracy
and Control
778-5184
Florida vs. Tennessee


PURPLE
PARROT


Custom T-Shirts
Full Line of
Collegiate & NFL
T-Shirts & Hats
778-0540
LA Raiders vs. Denver
Anna Maria Island Centre




L 0. 1"7


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast,
Professional Service
from Island Ownersi
Same Day or Next Day Price
332 EastBayDr -HoaknelBeech
778-4277
Mnr. to Fd. 13s0 Io SL :0 to
Nebraska vs. NCLA


Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
Remodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
San Diego vs. Seattle


LaPensee 4 ::
Plumbing, Inc.
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach





THE
RUNT
CLUB
RESTARA
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6 pm

Happy Hour Everyday
SKansas City vs. Atlanta
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


4m







BIB PAGE 18 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Pick a fundraiser, partner: name your cause


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
First, let's straighten out a misunderstanding. In
this space two weeks ago I quoted Cuban sailboat race
organizer Bob Winters as saying he loaned some
money to reporter Patty Ryan of The Tampa Tribune.
That's what he said to me, and I quoted him.
It turns out that Ms. Ryan borrowed $500 from
Isabel Pinon, a friend of Mr. Winters, after the
reporter's wallet was stolen. They've got the promis-
sory note to prove it.
Here's hoping this straightens out that matter.

Cuba redux
Speaking of Cuba, Sarasotan Mark Christner sits in
a Key West jail even as you read this, charged with try-
ing to take his sweetheart out of Cuba to Mexico.
You probably know the story. Mark races to Ha-
vana in the sailing event last June, falls in love with a
Cuban lady and goes back to rescue her.
Being smarter than your average sailor, Mark sets out
for Mexico (not the U.S.) with the lucky lady and another
Cuban aboard. Just a few miles off the Cuban coast they're
stopped, boarded and arrested by the U.S. Coast Guard.
So our government impounds his 28-foot Out Is-
lander, sends Mark to jail and whisks the two Cubans
off to our camp at Guantanamo. Obviously something
is wrong with this picture.
Our government got in the habit of stopping any
old boat on the high seas back in the heydays of the
"War on Drugs." Now, we're doing the same stuff to
ward off destitute refugees while, at the same time,
claiming we support the right to people's free move-
ment in this world.
Poor Mr. Christner sits in a Key West jail, another
victim of confused policy and a bureaucracy "just trying
to follow orders." Our current Cuba policy clearly de-
serves laughter, and some scorn, too. I just wish I could
blame the policy on either the Democrats or Republicans,
but both sides seem to act pretty stupid on this one.

Fundraising feuds
It's the battle of the fund-raising events.
As the Save Our Sealife campaign continues to
heat up, both sides are trying to raise money because
money is what it takes to win political campaigns. And
SOS is clearly a political campaign that's going to be
won or lost in the media.
So pick your side and pick your event. Here's hop-
ing you have some fun.
The Seafood Shack Showboat is the scene of a
Save the Nets cruise September 17. There'll be plenty
of great local food most of which was netted locally
such as smoked mullet and mullet spread. There'll
also be a cash bar.
Live music by Billy Rice will be singing his heart
out to benefit the net fishers. You can join the fun for
$20 a person or $35 a couple. The cruise, eats and
music run from 8 to 11 p.m.
Information and tickets can be found at 794-1249.
On the other hand, the Sarasota Chapter of the Save
Our Sealife committee is holding a fundraiser Septem-



Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center ;'f"
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 ......


ber 23 in Sarasota at Michael's-on-East restaurant.
Food there includes a light buffet and two cocktails.
Highlight of the event will be the chance to "buy a
piece of Florida history a net cork." They'll sell from
$100 for a plain one to $2,500 for a platinum one. Cost is
$25 per person in advance, $30 at the door.
Call 952-1700 for more information.

Panic to smiles:
TV yacht-spots make the point
Ever watch a cop do CPR on a blue-green drown-
ing victim? Stay tuned.
Sarasota County has arranged a series of six differ-
ent public-service announcements on safe boating that
may change your attitudes. These spots, which have
already begun airing on WWSB-TV Channel 40, are
easily the best I've ever seen anywhere.
A little story behind the new spots is that they
originated in the Minnesota Department of Natural
Resources, produced by a talented guy named Tim
Smalley. (Interestingly, his parents live on Siesta Key.)
Sarasota County had the scripts rewritten to reflect lo-
cal concerns, with area TV personality Jim Jackson
doing the new voice-overs.
Each of the spots is radically different from the
others, yet each is very strong you'll know what I'm
talking about when you see one.
And the cop? The one with the blue-green drown-
ing victim?
As the paramedics rush up and the officer looks up
in despair, the voice-over says, "Last year 473 boaters
failed to pass THIS breath test."
Sometimes humor and horror are mixed, as when
you watch a boater's body drift by and a voice an-
nounces, "If you're going to drink like a fish, be pre-
pared to sleep with them."
My own favorite is a close-up shot of a baby in the
water. It's bobbing up and down, up and down, each
time getting a little deeper and looking a little more
afraid. Suddenly, two hands reach down into the pic-
ture, scoop up the baby, and the voice-over says, "Re-
member, when your child is near the water...you
should be near your child."
A mini-drama in 30 seconds. I grin when it's over,
but 10 seconds earlier I was feeling panicked. Mr.
Smalley is obviously very good at his job, and we're
lucky Minnesota is big enough to share with us.
Thank you, Minnesota.

Tie-on this fly school
A pair of Orvis-endorsed fly-fishing schools are
scheduled for October 1 and 2 at Mr. CB's Bait and
Tackle in Sarasota. Both sessions will taught by Orvis
instructor Frank Catino with assistance by local guides.
Tuition at each of the one-day sessions, limited to 12
students, is $95 and includes lunch. Catino will cover
a variety of subjects including fly-casting terminology,
equipment, flies, knots and leader construction. The
sessions are designed for anglers of all skill levels and
will offer plenty of one-on-one instruction. To register
or for information, call 349-4400.

... and clean up your act!
Please remember the Florida Coastal Clean-up on


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
4 -- ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lie. Capt.

SSnook Trout Redfish Flounder

SLIGHT TACKLE
I \ SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
V2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


Saturday. It only takes a couple of hours, and you'll
feel good about it afterward.
From 9 am. until noon, join with about 17,000 other
Floridians to help spiffy up abit of Florida's 1,200 miles
of shoreline. To volunteer, just call Ingrid McClellan at
Mote Marine for more information, an assignment and
supplies. McClellan can be reached at 388-4441.

Dirt bikes of the water?
What about those Jet-skis, anyway?
Waterfront homeowners are continually complain-
ing to public officials about the noise of the speedy
personal watercraft. I happen to know of several in-
stances of major complaints in the south Bay alone, not
to mention the weekend confrontations near the Island.
I've always regarded Jet-ski-type watercraft as dirt
bikes for the water. Noisy as can be, but probably fun,
too. They seem to be gadgets that badly need good
mufflers like too many power boats.
But Sunday I watched mothers and daughters, fa-
thers and sons along with just folks in general do
their thing on the water, as some 15 or 20 Jet-skis were
launched and landed. These folks were just having
good clean waterborne-motorhead fun.
They weren't even noisy, in my opinion. But then,
I don't actually live on the water.
I've talked with dealers who all tell me "there's no
problem, until kids monkey with the mufflers." And
their demonstrator models do seem quiet.
Anyway, the Barrier Island Elected Officials Fo-
rum has set up a subcommittee to study the "problem
of Jet-skis." The subcommittee is made up of officials
from the various Anna Maria communities. Stay tuned
to see how palatable the solution is to all.

Fish story
Got a quick fishing story.
Steve Gibson, outdoor editor at the Sarasota Her-
ald-Tribune, says he was wade-fishing on the Ringling
flats in central Sarasota Bay one day last week, stalk-
ing tailing redfish with his flyrod. At one point he
looked over at a sand patch in the flat and, yes, there
indeed was a bonefish.
No hookup, according to Steve, but the Florida Keys
gamefish are here, just like Capt Jonnie Walker and some
of the other local guides have been saying all along.

A view of the Keys
Speaking of the Ringling seagrass flats, I had oc-
casion to watch a sunset over that spot recently. Look-
ing across Sarasota Bay and the keys beyond, I couldn't
help thinking of John Ringling, whose view I was shar-
ing (and, I hope, not blocking).
When John Ringling walked out onto the west ter-
race at Ca'd'Zan and looked across the Bay, every bit
of land he could see he owned. Ringling-the-circus-
man became Ringling-the-real-estate-developer in
Sarasota.
John Ringling was certainly one of the two or three
people who put Sarasota on the map. Certainly nobody
else did more to shape the character of the community.
Mr. John, as he was called, certainly had a view both
of and for the area
See you next week.


DOLPHIN
DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
nofishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND


BE A

GOOD

SPORT!


Buy your distant friends and relatives a gift
subscription to the "Best News on Anna Maria
Island.' A subscription form for The Islander
Bystander is available on page 7.


((
(((






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A PAGE 19 IQ


And you thought it was too late for tarpon


By Capt. Mike Heistand
You can't ask for much better fishing that what
we've got right now. Snook and redfish reports are
excellent, big amberjack are offshore, and there are
even some big late-season tarpon rolling in the bays.
Enjoy the fishing now while it lasts!
Capt. Mark Bradow is fast becoming the area's
premier fly-rod fisher, bringing back several redfish
this week using the long rod. He is also catching sharks
and a late-season tarpon.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said
catches on the four-hour trip averaged 80 head of Key
West grunts. The six-hour trip averaged 125 head of
Key West grunts, vermilion snapper, porgies, lane
snapper and red grouper. The nine-hour trip averaged
35 head of red grouper, lane snapper, porgies and man-
grove snapper.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said J. Hill,
visiting from Batavia, Ohio, has been averaging two
snook per outing at the pier. Dave also said the rest of
the jealous anglers are "making do" with snapper, co-
bia and some gag grouper reaching 23 inches in length.
Karen at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching nice-sized flounder in the 18-inch
range. Kevin, who runs the bait and tackle shop there,
caught a 36-inch snook Saturday, and popular angler Jim
there landed a 35-incher the morning before. Other catches
include black drum, mackerel and a few whiting.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said Mar-
tin Laubach, Jr., fishing off Bean Point, caught a four-
foot barracuda that tipped the scales at 18 pounds.
Pretty good for a 10-year-old, eh! Wade fishers have
been doing good bringing in catches of snook and red-
fish, using live shiners or shrimp as bait.
Capt. Dave on the Neva-Miss said grouper action
is picking up offshore, with both gag and red grouper
coming on strong in about 100 feet of water. Snapper
and barracuda continue to be good catches near the
artificial reefs and, closer to shore, there are still big
mackerel two to nine miles out.
Capt. Zack on the Dee-Jay II said his charters are
catching a slew of reds in the 34-inch range. Snook
action is hot in the passes and near the beach, but the
linesiders are poised to move into the bays when the
water temperature starts to drop later this fall. There are
some bay bluefish around, a few 24-inch trout and,
offshore, big mackerel.
And don't scratch tarpon season as over just yet:
the folks at Annie's Bait & Tackle said some of their
customers have been reporting tarpon rolling in
through Longboat Pass, and there was a report of one
fisher catching a six-footer.


A course in coastal navigation will begin Friday,
Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m., at the Flotilla #81 Training Cen-
ter, 4208 129th St. W., Cortez .
The six-week course is conducted by certified


IMMEDIATELY
released
Mark Slivinski kept this
150-pound jewfish just
long enough for the
picture to be snapped
before releasing the big
fish. Capt. Glenn Corder
brought Mark onto the
fish about 80 miles off
Ft. Myers. They were
fishing off Russ Otto's
boat "Interlude" in the
Stump Pass Marina Blue
Water Unlimited Tourna-
ment, which they won.
Jewfish are protected
from harvest, can live up
to 50 years and can grow
to weigh 800 pounds.


On my boat, Magic, we trekked out about 50 miles
from Anna Maria last week and caught some 50-pound
amberjack, yellow tails and mangrove snapper. Back-
water fishing produced lots and lots of redfish and a
few keeper snook.
Capt. Todd Romine said he's bringing back good
catches of snook and lots of reds.
Capt. Rick Gross said his charters are producing
lots of snook, mostly on the small side, but he predicts
the big ones are coming soon.


Capt. Tom Chaya said trout, reds and snook are
the best bets in the backwater.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said fishing is ex-
cellent now, both offshore and in the bays. In the Gulf,
red and black grouper, mangrove snapper, amberjack
and yellow tails are the best fish to hunt. Backwater
fishing is bringing in big redfish and lots of snook.
Capt. Phil Shields said he's bringing back to the
docks good-sized grouper, snapper and barracuda.
Good luck and good fishing.


Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors. Except for a nomi-
nal fee for materials, the class is free.
For more information call Walter Grace at 778-
5800 or John Hughes at 778-4555.


r ALREADY
INI
GALATI
Perico Harbor
Marina
19' Cobalt, 1979 '
mechanical. Only
E__Dealers For:



19' '93 ChrisCraft 115 HpOB $9,995 24' '91 Kayot Pc
19' 79 Cobalt 260 HP I/O $995 18' '87 Bayliner


witn trailer. Neeas minor
$99511



insr N POWR RoIAS 0r --
ontoon 70 Hp Mere $6,995
Fish&Ski 140HpJohnson$4,995


L1


FISH TALES WELCOME!
Got a great catch? Rare catch? The biggest catch of your life? Your fish
stories, and pictures are always welcome at The Islander Bystander. Just give
us a call at 778-7978 or stop by our office in the Island Shopping Center.


SALES & SERVICE 2 .
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


OMC r-faT~r
!"A'TU l1^ QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD
BOAT GROUP
'.""- "[ -- -
_,' ,, ,y .


Starting at $6439.


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'

Starting at $325.


Five O'Clock Marine
."Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" 5
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave .
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND


DAY
Thu 9/15
Fri 9/16
Sat 9/17
Sun 9/18
Mon 9/19
Tue 9/20
Wed 9/21


AMHIGH
9:09 2.3ft
10:22 2.3ft
11:17 2.3ft
12:08 1.8ft
12:23 1.9ff
12:38 2.0ft
12:53 2.1ft


AMLOW
3:27 1.5ft
3:44 1.3ft
4:37 1.1ft
5:18 0.9ft
5:57 0.7ft
6:32 0.5ft
7:04 0.4ft


TIDE TABLES


PMHIGH
11:37 1.7ft
11:53 1.8ff

12:03 2.3ft
12:48 2.2ft
1:26 2.2ft
2:02 2.1ft


PMLOW
4:23 0.4ft
5:05 0.5ft
5:44 0.6ft
6:09 0.7ft
6:31 0.9ft
6:48 1.0ft
7:06 1.1ft


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
" Boat Storage
" Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


Tennis for kids on Fridays at Center
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is other adults and teens with some experience are
offering a beginners tennis practice for children and needed to help. Tennis rackets, especially those with
youth on Fridays, from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. a wide hitting area, are needed.
Leadership is provided by Roy McChesney, and For more information, call 778-1980.


Navigation course offered Sept. 23

by Coast Guard Auxiliary


----- --- ----- --------- -~----------'






IEf PAGE 20 a SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER B



Business is alarming
Emergency Security Systems, a local burglar and
fire alarm company, announces a new location at 501
C Manatee Ave., Holmes Beach.
Due to an increase in crime in Manatee and Sarasota
Counties, mirroring nationwide trends, a growing number
of homeowners are installing alarm systems in their
homes. What was once affordable only to the elite or to
commercial properties is now surprisingly affordable to all


SUPPLY

&

DEMAND
We have the DEMAND but the
SUPPLY is quickly being depleted.
Our 1995 winter rentals are
virtually all booked.
CAN WE HELP YOU RENT YOURS?
Call Ann or Sally at:

Mike
No n 778-6696
Norm an 1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217

MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS TOP 900!
Thanks to our loyal readers, this issue of The
Islander Bystander will be mailed to a record
number of PAID out-of-town subscribers -
OVER 900! Thank you all!


11


YSTANDER
- generally $20 to $30 per month.
With the technology available today, the systems
also notify the local fire and ambulance services in
emergencies.
Deborah Sponce, an Anna Maria Island resident
and employee of Emergency Security Systems, adds,
"Not only do we help people protect their homes, but
more importantly, we protect their families, too. And
unlike some of the nationwide companies, we provide
local service that is unbeatable. The least favorite part
SEE BUSINESS, NEXT PAGE


Spo --- -ured -f hr p d
Sponse, pictured with one of her protected 'homes.


HOLMES BEACH $108,000
Lots of possibilities here! Great location and quiet
street. Short walk to shopping center and beach.
Two bedrooms, one bath and the other side fea-
tures a one bedroom, one bath.
I -, .


TWO GULFFRONT HOMES
Side by side, these two homes both feature 3 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, with lofts, big decks and huge
storage/work shops.

Mike 6
Norman 778-6696
Norman g 1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


ENJOY A CAREFREE LIFESTYLE: in this three
bedroom, two bath home with a caged pool and
deep water canal. Other amenities include boat
dock, sprinkler system, 70% stone lawn, fruit
trees, double garage. Room for expansion. Now
reduced to $220,000. Please call Carol Williams,
778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


REDUCED-HOLMES BEACH-WATERFRONT:
carefully kept top-notch 3BR/2BA home with ex-
pansive water view. Amenities include boat dock
with water and electric, vaulted ceilings, 3 walk in
closets, 7 ceiling fans, Jacuzzi, 15 x 16 workshop,
3 car carport and many other extras. Reduced to
$209,000. Call Carol R. Williams, 778-0777 or
778-1718 after hours.


ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT: Well maintained
three bedroom, two bath canal front home with a
sweeping view of the mangroves bordering the
canal close to Bayfront Park. Homeowner's war-
ranty. $179,500. Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504.

i REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK M LS 0-


IMPERIAL HOUSE CONDO ... Spacious,
light, bright & cheerful 2 bedroom, 1 bath with
some Bay view. Dramatic eat-in kitchen, turn-
key furnished! Heated pool, dock right of
Intracoastal. L-o-w maintenance fees.
$89,900. #56982. Carol Heinze, 792-5721.
MANATEE RIVERFRONT Historical down-
town location, the River Condominium. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath. View of river. Pool, tennis, fish-
ing pier, shuffleboard, courtyard. Small pets
welcome. $59,500. #59299. Call T. Dolly
Young, 778-5427 today!
SUN CAY CONDOS ... in heart of Anna Maria
Island. 3 (2) bedroom and 3 (1) bedrooms.
Pool. Excellent investment: potential 10% re-
turn on investment. $549,000. #57712. Ask for
Karin Stephan, 388-1267.
MARTINIQUE ...
Miles of white sand
& blue Gulf waters.
Bright & cheerful!
2BR/2BA, w/garage.
$154,900!
Carol Heinze, CRS
- REALTOR"
Million Dollar Club
778-7246

Karin Stephan
REALTORD
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche "
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844 ,

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


:



U






















It


The rudetia


I









THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 0 PAGE 21 I
I-I 1 .I- ^=.6lU6* .I:.H *e1T-Tl


Business
FROM PRECEDING PAGE
of my job is when a family calls me after they've been
broken into. They feel violated and do not ever want to
go through anything like that again."
Emergency Security Systems is locally owned by
J.W. Schaefer.

Prudential's Island office
announces top associates
The Prudential Florida Realty Anna Maria Island
office has announced the company's top listers and
sellers for the month of August. Among top listers is
Karin Stephan. Horace Gilley is among Prudential's
top sellers for August.
The office announces Deborah Thrasher has joined
its Anna Maria Island office. Thrasher is among 12
sales professionals who have joined The Prudential
Florida Realty in the Sarasota/Manatee area.

LBK Chamber sets tax seminar
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce is spon-
soring a seminar on new sales tax rules for transient


Exclusive
d Waterfront
Estates
Video Collection


rentals and changes in reporting requirements on
Wednesday, Sept. 28, 8:30 a.m., at Zachary's Cafe, 23
Ave. of the Flowers, Longboat Key.
The seminar is geared toward real estate agents,
brokers and development companies. Guest speaker is
Robert Norring, taxpayer assistance specialist with the
Florida Department of Revenue.
The cost is $5 and includes a continental breakfast.
For more information or to make reservations call 383-
2466.
Loefgren to serve on
state Chamber board
Gail Loefgren, executive director of the Longboat
Key Chamber of Commerce, has been elected to a
three-year term on the Florida Chamber of Commerce
Executives (FCCE) Board of Directors.
The FCCE is a state organization of chamber ex-
ecutives which offers seminars, conferences, network-
ing opportunities and publications for chamber execu-
tives and staff.
Loefgren will oversee the publication of the FCCE
Membership Directory and will serve on the commit-
tee which organizes regional conferences for small
chambers.


Mountain Ch
Space and light abound
2 bath, contemporary
knotty pine paneling is
dral ceilings and cust
Fixed panes of glass
There are 2 fireplaces
a spiral staircase lead
Gulf views. A truly un
located just steps from


M Sti A yedI e aIitatszye wfilonaU


ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS:
Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847
Marceita Comett...778-5919 Nancy Guilford...778-2158
Michael Advocate.. .778-0608
ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


e/ Watch for our
0 listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.

ialet by the Sea
d in this delightful 3 bedroom,
y home. Tongue-in-groove,
featured in the soaring cathe-
om made kitchen cabinets.
are filled with sky and light.
adorned with red brick, and
s up to the gigantic loft with
ique and very special home
I Bean Point. $259,000.




~1~


&.


I


Island Re


GREAT GULF BEACH!
BREATHTAKING VIEW & ONE-OF-A-KING describes this
custom-built estate on the Gulf! Over 1/2 acre and includes
3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, PLUS Master Suite! Complete pri-
vacy, tropical landscaping & great open decks surround this
home. Asking $950,000 with terms. Call Marie Franklin, 778-
2259


Since
MARE LC. REAL ESTATE
RANKL,, REALTY BOKERn
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250











GULFSIDE SPLENDOR This glamorous architecturally designed home
has the best of everything. A short walk to the beach is just one of the
many attributes of this charming 4 bedroom, 3 bath home. Spacious
decks, central vac system, intercom, security system, and a large fire-
place are just a few of the extras In this beautiful home. The upscale
Master suite has 24k gold fixtures and a Jacuzzl tub In the bath. This suite
also has a 10' xl 0'walk-in closet, vaulted ceilings and a private deck. Call
today for an appointment. Agnes Tooker 778-5287 or Kathy Tooker
Granstad 778-4136. Only $299,000. Call now.


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di- GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy walk-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex ing beach enhance this turnkey furnished 2BR/
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide 2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with pool, cov-
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and ered parking, and storage room. Excellent rental
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details. Moynihan.


DIRECT GULFFRONT Fully furnished 2BR -
1BA apartment on wide, sandy walking beach.
Perfect investment property or second home.
Offered at $99,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ... 85 x
130' ... deep water and spectacular views
... $189,500.
* HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ... 90
x 109' ... deep water and view of Bayou
... $159,500.
* WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach and zoned
for 1 to 4 units ... $129,900.


STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


Palaces have their concealed rooms. My grandmother's
house in Hyde Park (Tampa, not New York) had a neat
Asset of hidden stairs leading from a pantry to the mid-land-
ing of the front stairs. 631 Foxworth has one of these
neat mysteries, too. I know it's there; I just don't know
exactly what it is or where it is. I guess the present owner
intends to tell the new owner in secret. Maybe at the clos-
ing. Probably after $525,000 has exchanged hands. Do
not call Doug Dowling Realty at 778-1222 about this. We
know nothing.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services in New Con-
- structlon & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilesl


IIII--- It


REALTOR
MLS


OSefs 9M&ls fWeal &tatt
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(813) 778-2291 P Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


eA oo .


S erving Anna Maria Since 1939 CALL (813) 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
DICK Bradenton Beach Dave Moynihan ................... 778-7976

W AGNER Licensed Ed Oliveira .......................... 778-1751
REALTY INC. Real Estate Bill Wagner, Broker ............ 778-5914
Broker


-~LTL-~3L


r II I


I


i;d






I3] PAGE 22 a SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy s \ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
LaWn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
7781 345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
SAND SATISFACTION





5608 MAR IN A DR *HLEB EC



ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
# COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SSMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
SFASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


I I

J.R.

Painting

Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


NU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX0065455
WINDOW
REPLACEMENT
S* VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH
ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!







AUTO DETAILING
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine, inside & out!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Our mobile
service means no one has to drive your car. And
we are eco-friendly utilizing only 100 percent
bio-degradable products. By appointment,
at your home or office. We come to you!
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.


AI a AL D CLA S F


3 CUSHIONED brown couch $325. Octagon shaped
wood end table $20. Pro-form auto Incline Treadmill
$250. 779-2129.
-GE REFRIGERATOR. 20.8 cubic feet, almond, no
frost w/ice maker. Excellent condition. $125. 778-5628.

LIKE NEW metal indoor/outdoor Ping Pong table,
$100. Water skis. 778-3234.
GARAGE DOOR with opener, heavy wood with
glass windows. $75. 792-9366.
WASHER & DRYER good condition, $75 for both.
778-3267.
DISHWASHER, portable apt. size, wood butcher
block top. Used twice, 25.5x18.5xH35.5, $100. Out-
door wood chair & glider chair set, $30. 778-3408.

YAMAHA STEREO SYSTEM Bose speakers.
$3,000 new. Low, low price. Has to be heard. Sound
and ranges. 778-6035.
CAMERAS & PHOTO EQUIPMENT: Nikon FM#
with motordrive, 50 mm lens and 75-205 mm zoom
lens for $500. Mamiya with handle, 80 mm lens,
hood attachment and 2 ext. rings for $350. Call 778-
7187 for more info.


SAT., SEPT. 17. 9-1. 874 N. Shore Dr., Anna Maria.
Couches, chairs, tables, washer, dryer, wall A/C,
stroller, kitchen, appliances, etc.
SAT., SEPT. 17. 9-3. 206 69th St., Holmes Beach.
Books, clothes, housewares, lots of miscellaneous.

FRI. & SAT., SEPT. 16 & 17. 9-3. 303 74th St.,
Holmes Beach. Sofa, exercise bike, vacuum, set of
dishes, much misc.
SAT., SEPT. 17. 8-2. 222 Harbor Dr., Holmes
Beach. TV, small fumiture, housewares, Christmas,
fish gear, etc.


Thank You St. Jude for prayers answered. A.M.P.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House
calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


1977 BUICK SKYLARK, 4dr, good body, V-6, AT,
AC, runs well. Good beach car. $600. 778-3880.


'86 15' FIBERGLASS BOAT with 55 horse Suzuki
outboard. Good condition, Coast Guard Decal. Call
778-5820.
SAILBOAT 1985 HUNTER. 25.5' Yanmar inboard
diesel; autopilot, 3 sails; AM/FM stereo system; VHF
Pulstar 550; stove; transom ladder; boom vang;
sternrail grill; storage; port-a-head; much more
equipment. Ex. cond. $14,900. Ralph Jones 813-
375-3200.
BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


PART TIME $6 to $8 per hr., 5.5 hrs. a day. No
nights or weekends. Work out of our office selling
office supplies. Call 761-0092 8am-3pm.

SUN COAST STAFFING. We need office profes-
sionals. Receptionist, secretaries, and general cleri-
cals. Long/short term and permanent positions avail-
able. 957-3111.
NEW OPPORTUNITY for owner operators.
Landstar Ligon needs 12 OTR flat and van operators
out of Central Florida. For more information contact
Tony or Pat at 800-605-0999 or 813-864-9100.
RETIRED? There are service organizations on Anna
Maria Island that need volunteers. Volunteer soon.


COUPLE, RN & HHA, will provide elderly care and
assistance in our Holmes Beach Duplex, 2 blocks
from Gulf. 778-7686.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to paint-
ing. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island ref-
erences. 779-2129.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs exp. Call Bradenton
Fiberglass for free estimate 755-1550.
LAWNMOWING reasonable rates. 252-6402 pager.
HATE TO IRON? Try "Pressed for Time" pick-up and
delivery. Reasonable rates and many Island refer-
ences. 778-1767.
FAIRS WALL DESIGN Wallpaper, paint, mural and
light repair. Call KD at 778-1032.
PURCHASED A NEW AUTO? need your phone re-
moved and installed in your new car? Ask about the
new digital phones. Call David 778-6407 or mobile #
730-1608.
I LOVE DOING DISHES! If you don't want to do
dishes, call 778-1032. Treat yourself to regular or
one-time dishwashing. No commercial rates.
AUTO SECURITY SYSTEMS Excalibur K9-K1 & K2.
Complete alarm systems, with or without voice. Life
time warranty. Starting at $149 installed. Call David
778-6407 or mobile # 730-1608.
NEED YOUR HOME cleaned? Call 778-4116. "We
like what we do ... and it shows!" We're reliable, rea-
sonable and ready to Go!
PURCHASED A COMPUTER? Are you having a
problem understanding how to use Windows, and
DOS? Training services available, to your home, or
office. Call David 778-6407 or mobile # 730-1608.

NEED A PICKUP to move a load? Appliances, brush
piles, construction debris, junk ... whatever your
hauling needs. Call Eddie O. 705-0221.
CLEANING ON ISLAND, residential work for over 15
years. Excellent references. Call Barbara, 779-2024.


VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 A PAGE 23 IJr


JIkLAN~MDJ 4RNCLASSIFIEDS 4 'F~
I H M E I M R O E M N T 9O T 9 R E T A S


SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpentry,
roof coating & repairs, drywall repairs. Work guaran-
teed. Low prices. 778-0410.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fireplace,
jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
Intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Williams
at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully fumished condo,
2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip available.
$900 per month. Call Martha Williams at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida beach
house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished, close to
Laundromat. No street to cross on a short walk to
beach. 778-1576.
MAINLAND, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, close to shop-
ping, screened lanais. $650 per month. Call Island
Real Estate, 778-6066.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck, pri-
vate beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone, micro-
wave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-813-988-
1344.
SEASONAL, month or week. 2BR/1 BA upstairs apt.
Fully furnished, walk to beach. 778-5908.
DUPLEX 2BR/1BA. 1/2 blk from beach. Available
Oct thru April. $1200 per month. Call 813-681-9656
leave message, will return call.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA and 1BR/1BA duplex.
Furnished, two blocks to beach and covered parking.
778-6583.
GULFFRONT FALL SPECIAL 3BR/2BA, immaculate,
steps to beach. October $600 per week, reserve now.
778-3171.
UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA, upstairs apt. $550 per
ronth plus electric. 1st, last and security. Anna Maria
Realty, Inc. 778-2259.
2 BEDRooM HOME, 1/2 block from Gulf of Mexico.
A/C, cable, microwave. Available Nov. thru April. Pre-
fer minimum 2 month during prime months. Call in am
1-616-754-6349.
SEASONAL, 2BR/1BA home, screened porch, cable
TV, W/D, garage, close to beach. 813-689-0925.
EFFICIENCIES- Starting at $140 per week plus tax.
Completely furnished, including utilities. A/C, cable,
near beach. Haley's Motel 778-5405.
SEASONAL OR YEARLY. 1BR/1 BA, furnished, W/D,
garage, no pets. 116 White Ave., Holmes Beach.
813-985-6765.
WANTED! 3BR/2BA unfurn. house, duplex or condo.
Annual lease. $850/month. Call Sandy 778-4904.


2BR/2BA, Fla. room, enclosed garage. Seasonal
Nov. thru April. Within Block of Gulf. 813-792-8340.
WESTBAY COVE Large 1 BR/1BA. Tastefully fur-
nished & decorated. $850/mo. No Pets. T.D. Young,
778-0766. Prudential Florida Realty.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX. Annual, 2BR/2BA, nice
location. $600 per month plus electricity. 778-0217.
BEST BEACH VALUE! Fully furnished 1BR Florida
style home. 2 blks from Gulf beaches. Close to at-
tractions and shopping. Holmes Beach. A paradise
hideaway. $250 per wk. Rent by week or month.
813-778-4229.
PROF. WOMAN seeks furnished room in exchange
for: massage (Lic. #9921), It. housekeeping, pet/
house sitting, errands, cooking. 813-977-8302.
LOVELY 2BR/2BA condo. W/D, pool, unfurnished,
annual. $725. Call Gulf Bay Realty of Anna Maria,
Inc. 778-7244.
NEEDED office space for non-profit organization.
Will rent or share. $50-$100 per month. Call Mike,
779-2314.


4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
624 FOXWORTH Key Royale. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3Br/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dinging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $224,500. 778-7837.
WEST BRADENTON. 3Br/2BA home, excellent fam-
ily neighborhood, new roof. $79,900. Seller will help
buyer with closing costs. Call Yvonne Higgins at Is-
land Real Estate 778-6066.
BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call Quality Builders today, 778-7127.
BRADENTON PINEBROOK CONDO. 2BR/2BA,
enclosed lanai, under bldg. parking, on golf course,
many improvements. $91,900. Owner, 795-2226.

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash buyer,
quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes Beach area.
798-3981.

COZY DUPLEX near Gulf. Detached garage. 1BR/
1 BA each side. Room to expand or convert to home
on extra large lot and a half. Owner financing
$96,000. Call 795-0873.
ANNA MARIA Bayfront home with fantastic view!
$350,000. Owner fill finance. Call Yvonne Higgins at
Island Real Estate 778-6066.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

NOON MONDAY for WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IISLANDE


778-2586 jMA RV/ KA Eve: 778-6771

10% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 9/21/94

PERSONAL TRAINING
Walk/Jog Step/Circuit Aerobics
Body Sculpting Stretching Exercise
By Appointment: Call 779-2129

PIANO & KEYBOARD
^ LESSONS
Beginner to College LevelsSS
778-3539


HCherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MMOOO399S
2-3758MA0012461


T KIMA
HOME REPAIR CO. "^
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior& Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Handrails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident Local References
778-5354


Don't

forget!
We mail over 900
out-of-town subscrip-
tions every week.
If you want to keep
in touch with what's
happening on Anna
Maria Island, please
use the form on
page 7 in this issue.
ISLANDERIRI Dt
5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 34217
(813) 778-7978


OLMES
BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


PLEASE JOIN US!


FLORIDA

COA UP














cntc fr o Marinc Conserva(lon
For more information or to sign up:
Keep Manatee Beautiful, Inc.
795-8272
A community service advertisement
courtesy of The Islander Bystander.


I






IB PAGE 24 0 SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 n THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I


PERICO BAY CLUB Gorgeous view over
tidal basin & spoonbill Bay. 3BR/2BA with whirl-
pool in master bath. Ceramic tile on lanai & bal-
cony. Many upgrades. $164,900. Marilyn
Trevethan 778-2261 or 792-8477.


BEACH FRONT HOME Recently reduced
to $229,000. Lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
located directly on Gulf in quiet area of Holmes
Beach. Call Dick Maher off: 813-778-2261 or
eves: 813-778-6791.


GREAT VIEW OF BAY Downstairs corner LARGE TOWNHOUSE has dock on la-
unit 2Bed/2Bath, ceramic tile & Berber carpet, goon. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, kitchen upgraded
glassed entry, ceiling fans. $142,500. Bob or in 1991 all appliances & cupboards. Berber
Lu Rhoden. Off: 813-778-2261 or eves: 813- carpet, fans. $136,000. Call Bobye Chasey 778-
778-2692. 2261 or 778-1532.


DEEP WATER CANAL 3Bed/2Bath home w/
boat dock. covered porch & patio. Ceramic tile in
great room, kitchen & dining room. Community
pool, tennis courts $329,900. Helen White or Mary
Ann Schmidt 778-2261.




BOBYE
CHASEY
EVENINGS
778-1532


Bobye is the only remaining Char-
ter Member of Neal & Neal's Anna
Maria office. She has earned her
GRI designation and Broker sta-
tus. She has been a consistent
million dollar plus producer and
active in community affairs.


FABULOUS BAYFRONT views of Anna NORTH POINT HARBOUR 3Bed/2.5Bath
Maria Island & Bridge from this 2BR/2BA unit in home on deep water canal with boat dock.
most south-westerly bldg. in Perico Bay Club. Vaulted ceilings, pastel colors thru-out. 40'
Beautifully furnished. $153,000. Call Rose heated pool & spa. $449,000. Call Mary Ann
Schnoerr 778-2261 or 778-7780. Schmidt 778-2261 or 778-4931.


ISLAND CONDOS

SUMMER SANDS..........................from $142,900
PLAYA ENCANTADA ....................from $178,000
COQUINA BEACH CLUB ............from $185,000
IMPERIAL HOUSE.........................from $78,000
SUNBOW BAY ...............................from $136,000
WESTBAY COVE ..........................from $142,500
WESTBAY COVE SOUTH .............from $130,000
WESTBAY PT. & MOORINGS...... from $134,500



___ ... -. T _T


BOATING COMMUNITY 2Bed/2Bath on
Intracoastal waterway. Boat dock & great sun-
set views. Cathedral ceilings, coral fireplace,
hot tub, 24 hr security. $205,000. Dick Maher
778-2261 or 778-6791.


FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
"Open Six Days Weekly"
Specializing on Anna Maria
Island, our services include:
... Total Property Management!
.. Wide variety of fine vacation rentals!
... Unfurnished annual rentals!
PROFESSIONAL,
PERSONALIZED
SERVICE

neaL-&neaL. Rentals, Inc.
Call (813) 778-9477 or
Toll Free 800-422-6325
" 1^--_sfz~?'~a.^^.^^HgaE~a3


r-.i'- -
.1' s~~ fST-~j-~S~


The Islander Bystander news es" love bringing you the best news on the Island. For free, guaranteed home delivery, call 778-7978.
S 1 d9, ..:8 _".~.
























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