<%BANNER%> Package Processing Log
.logFileName { font-size:x-large; text-align:center; font-weight:bold; font-family:Arial }
.logEntry { color:black; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
.errorLogEntry { color:red; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
.completedLogEntry { color:blue; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
Package Processing Log
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM Error Log for UF00074389_00530 processed at: 2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM -
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'level' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'order' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'level' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'order' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'level' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM The 'order' attribute is not declared.
2/28/2013 8:54:05 AM -


STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00530
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 09-08-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00530


This item has the following downloads:

( HTML )


Full Text

WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS e REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


Restaurateur's ex-accountant admits embezzlement


Figures don't lie, but liars will figure, according to
Manatee County Sheriff's Office deputies, who ar-
rested Andrew Hankin Sept. 1.
Hankin, Island restaurant owner Ed Chiles' former
accountant, was charged with grand theft following a
six-week investigation.
Hankin, 32, has admitted stealing from Chiles over
a period of three year and is accused of embezzling


Holmes Beach

hoteliers seek

density hike
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Frank Davis, representing the hoteliers in the A-l
district, asked the Holmes Beach Planning Commission
last week to consider a change from 10 units per acre
to 28 units per acre for hotels/motels in the district.
The district's motels include Bali Hai, Bluewater,
Harrington House, Island Plantation, Resort 66, Sunset
Beach, White Sands and Coconuts to total 171 rooms.
Citing a changing market, Davis said visitors are stay-
ing for shorter periods of time and no longer need the large
suites that makeup many of the Island's older motels. The
younger, more affluent visitors also expect more ameni-
ties and higher quality facilities, but if motels upgrade to
fit the market, they are limited to 10 units per acre.
Davis of Harrington House pointed out that mar-
ket rates on rooms are very competitive but hoteliers
can't raise their rates as fast as costs are rising. They
also face increased competition from motels in
Bradenton Beach due to the newly renourished beach.
"The increase in density would allow motels to
take advantage of high demand during peak times by
having one or two more rooms available," noted Davis.
"We would be pulling people back into the motel zone
from the residential areas. By having the extra rooms,
we can help the Holmes Beach economy, because visi-
tors will eat and shop here."
A density of 28 units per acre would result in an
increase from 171 to 205 rooms, he said. Of the 34
additional rooms, only eight would be new construc-
tion. All other changes would be internal dividing
large suites into two rooms and the infrastructure is
already in place. Any construction would be governed
by land development regulations concerning land cov-
erage, parking spaces, height, etc.
"I think when you see it in this light, you'll see that
by changing the density, you'll help the community,"
said Davis. "I think we ought to look at it and say if the
impact is this small, maybe we ought to consider it.
You're not changing the character of the community -
none of us want to do that."
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches said
if all eight motels were destroyed by a natural disaster and
rebuilt at 28 units per ace, there would be 224 rooms.
Commissioner Bruce Golding said it would be
unfair to restrict the change to motels.
Davis said hoteliers have no problem with the en-
tire district being included. He noted that it is unlikely
that condominium or home owners would tear down
their buildings to build 28-unit motels.
Golding asked about increased parking from addi-
tional units. Davis said parking requirements for mo-
tels will take care of that. Aubry said there will still be
the same number of cars because presently when a
group of people rent a large unit, they bring four cars.
Councilman and hotelier Luke Courtney said the
seven motels in the R-2 and R-4 districts should also
be included in the density change. Simches said the city
would have to spot zone to do so.
Commissioner Gene Aubry stressed, "Zoning is
wonderful, but zoning is an ever-changing thing. Our
choice is either to deal with it or not to deal with it but
if you don't you'll end up with the damnedest mess you
ever saw."


more than $300,000 from the Sandbar and the Beach
House restaurants, which Chiles owns.
According to Brett McIntosh, Hankin's attorney,
Hankin told Chiles what he had been doing as the chief
accounting officer for the restaurants when he learned
that an outside audit was planned. Hankin became
worried that the audit would reveal the alleged em-
bezzlement, so he elected to confess to Chiles.


Sheriff's reports indicate Hankin was responsible
for the loss from the company's accounts before he was
caught. McIntosh says Hankin took cash and wrote
checks for cash to spend on gambling, almost exclu-
sively at the dog track.
Hankin has admitted to a problem with gambling
and says none of the money is recoverable.
Hankin was released on $10,000 bail.


There are many approved building techniques for constructing sand castles, and Heather Huber seems to
have found the dribble method to her liking. Heather is one of the Anna Maria Island Community Center's
day campers who enjoyed a recent trip to the beach. For a last look at summer fun, see page 14. Islander
Photo: Mark Ratliff


Postal Service: 'We don't need

building permits'


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It's a fact of modern life if you do almost any-
thing, you need a permit. In the City of Anna Maria it's
no different, but the United States Postal Service
(USPS) says that when it comes to getting building
permits for the $65,000 remodeling of the Anna Maria
Post Office, "We're special."
Basically, the USPS position is that since the Postal
Service was established by Congress to "establish post
offices and postal roads," and acts as "an independent
establishment of the executive branch of the govern-
ment of the United States," the Anna Maria Post Office
renovation project "is not subject to control by munici-
pal governments such as that apparently contemplated
by the City of Anna Maria."
The quotes come from an Aug. 29 letter from a
USPS attorney in the Atlanta field office, as part of the
response to questions raised by the city.
According to Alfred J. Zwettler, the USPS attor-
ney, even though the Anna Maria post office is a leased
facility and not owned by USPS, the federal exclusion
concerning local building permits applies.
"Our position is that the Anna Maria building per-
mit requirement is not applicable," Zwettler writes.
"However, so that the city is better able to understand
the Postal Service legal position, we have prepared this
memorandum of law. Since our goal is to avoid a dis-
pute and to cooperate fully we of course invite your
response."


The letter cites a number of sections of United
States law and several court rulings involving lawsuits
filed against the USPS by municipalities over the ques-
tion of whether the USPS had to obtain building per-
mits. According to the letter, the courts
"unhesitatingly" dismissed these suits.
Among the various cites, Zwettler included a rul-
PLEASE SEE POSTAL BUILDING, PAGE 2


Thursday is
Election Day
Information, page 4







SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
O pinions ...................................................... 6
Those Were the Days .................... .... 7
Firefighters .................................................. 8
D olphin s ...................................................... 9
Football contest.............................. 16
Anna Maria tides ........................... 23
Real estate ................................................ 23


CASTLES IN THE SAND


/


V\ *:
- \ ,f.


SEPTEMBER 8,1994


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


-DE






l[] PAGE 2 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Courtney off, Edwards on Center board: Bohnenberger


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach City Councilman Luke Courtney
may soon be off the board of directors of the Anna
Maria Island Community Center if Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger has his way.
Bohnenberger says he's not trying to oust Courtney
from the Center board, but merely appointing another
person to it.
"It is my intention to ask Mr. Lee Edwards to be the
representative from Holmes Beach," Bohnenberger wrote
in a Aug. 30 letter to Center Executive Director Pierrette
Kelly. The letter noted that a copy had been sent to
Edwards. Courtney got the news from Kelly herself.
"I was surprised to learn that the mayor was plan-
ning on replacing me," Courtney told The Islander
Bystander. "I am the appointed Community Center
Board member from the City of Holmes Beach, and I
see no grounds for my removal."
Bohnenberger says it isn't final, but he sees no rea-
son why his wish to see Edwards on the AMICC board
will not be granted.
"I'm going to ask the city council's concurrence,"
Bohnenberger says. "I was unaware that we had the
right to make a board member appointment ... but I
think it's the responsible thing to do, to make a board


New plants


beautify city

The City of Holmes Beach is sprucing up with plants
and trees as a part of the city's beautification effort.
Plantings include: palms at 53rd Street and Marina
Drive, Washingtonian palms at 56th Street and Marina
Drive, sea grapes at the beach walkway between the
Martinique buildings and at the Key Royale triangle,
oyster plants in the 81st Street triangle and palms in the
median at the intersection of Gulf and Marina Drives.
"We requested the plants from the county nursery,"
explained Public Works Superintendent John
Fernandez, and there was no charge for them. We
used our labor to pick them up and plant them, so the
costto the city was minimal."
Fernandez said he has been especially concerned
about the median at the intersection of Gulf and Marina
Drives where trees have been planted several times in
the past and then killed by flooding.
"I hope they'll survive this time," he said. "We've


appointment rather than to just let it ride."
If council does not concur, Bohnenberger says,
"They would have to have just reason for not going
along with it. As far as I can tell, Edwards meets all of
the qualifications."
The city roster of council member responsibilities
shows Courtney as the liaison to the AMICC board.
Bohnenberger says it's his intent for Courtney to con-
tinue as liaison to the council concerning AMICC
board activities, but that Edwards become the voting
member of the board from Holmes Beach.
Bohnenberger says the two responsibilities are sepa-
rate.
"At the time the liaison appointments were made,
Luke was already an AMICC board member he was
a board member when he was elected," Bohnenberger
says. "But now that I find each city on the Island has
the option of appointing a board member ... I person-
ally feel better that the board member who is named
from the city is not an elected official."
Bohnenberger says he asked Edwards to take the
AMICC board position because he knew that Edwards
had already expressed interest in the job and had filed an
application for it. Last month, when the AMICC board
considered Edwards' application, it decided he should not
be given a seat on the board, but first serve on an AMICC


subcommittee as a sort of proving ground.
Bohnenberger says that if Edwards who ran
unsuccessfully for city council against Courtney earlier
this year ever becomes an elected official, he will
have to resign his AMICC post.
Although Bohnenberger says it is not his intent to
remove Courtney from the AMICC board, his desired
appointment of Edwards would have that effect, notes
AMICC Board Chairman George O'Connor.
"As it stands now, since Mayor Bohnenberger has
asked Lee Edwards to be on it, that would mean Luke
is off the Center's board," O'Connor says. "He
(Courtney) would have to fill out another application
to get back on the board."
It may have been a move by the AMICC board
earlier this year that indirectly may cause Courtney's
removal from the board if only for a short time.
Courtney says he was appointed to the AMICC
board in November, "based on my service with the
Center since 1990, participating in fundraising, Little
League and other Center activities." Courtney assumed
the post in January for a one-year term.
Following Courtney's election to the council in
March he shifted by the Community Center board from
"member at large" to "city representative"to allow a full
complement of 17 members.


New trees wave in the breeze
The City of Holmes Beach has planted several sites, such as this median at the corner of Gulf and Marina
Drives, with trees and plants in an effort to beautify the city. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


gotten quite a few inquiries from the public about the area"
Councilwoman Billie Martini, who is in charge of
the city's beautification effort, noted, "I've been trying
to get these things done but they take time. Anything


Councilman Kissick may be charged

with battery after weekend incident


Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim Kissick of
105 Fifth Street S. may be charged with battery af-
ter a weekend incident in which Todd Aigott, 24, of
Bradenton Beach, reported being struck in the face
by Kissick
According to Police Chief Jack Maloney, the in-
cident occurred on the jetty in the 500 block of Co-
quina Beach about 1:15 p.m. Saturday. Aigott was
fishing on the pier but said he did not know the ac-
tivity was illegal. Kissick approached Aigott and
yelled at him, said Aigott. He told Kissick he would
leave the area and began to gather his equipment.


Kissick again approached Aigott, yelled at him and
struck him open handed in the face, reported Aigott.
Aigott then called the police. Three witnesses
corroborated Aigott's story, stating that Kissick ver-
bally harassed Aigott and struck him with no reason.
Kissick told police that when he approached
Aigott to tell him that fishing is not permitted, Aigott
verbally harassed him.
Maloney said because the incident did not occur
in an officer's presence, all reports and statements
will be sent to the State Attorney's Office for a de-
cision on whether Kissick will be charged.


Decision expected soon on

Holmes Beach postal contract


"Soon" is when U.S. Postal Service officials expect
to announce the new station manager for the Holmes
Beach Post Office.
The post office has been operated by postal em-
ployees since April, when then-managers Tom and
Janice Huffine lost the contract under a cloud of alleged
misappropriation of about $45,000.
Federal authorities are investigating the Huffines.
No comment has been given as to the status of that in-
vestigation.
June Sokolowski, a spokesperson with the U.S.
Postal Service in Memphis, Tenn., told The Islander
Bystander Friday, "We are not finished with the review


process, but we will be shortly."
She declined to say when the contract would be
awarded.
Bradenton Beach Postmaster Bob Willis said he
expected the contract to be announced within a week.
Willis said the new manager should take over the of-
fice by October.
Postal investigators have been going over the
books at the Holmes Beach station in an effort to de-
termine what happened to funds there.
Tom Huffine is a former Holmes Beach City Coun-
cilman. He also ran unsuccessfully for the Manatee
County Commission.


anyone can do to beautify the city is helpful. This sort
of thing makes people alert to beautification."
Martini said the ones who deserve the most credit are
the public works employees who are planting the trees.


No Postal building
permits, but as for
FEMA rules...
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
ing by the U.S. Supreme Court.
"It is necessary for uniformity," the court ruled,
"that the laws of the United States be dominant over
those of any state." The decision goes on to explain the
reasoning for this is to "avoid a breakdown of admin-
istration through possible conflicts arising from incon-
sistent requirements."
Zwettler ends his letter on a confident note, suggest-
ing that the City of Anna Maria "refrain from attempting
to enforce its permit requirements with respect to the reno-
vations for which the Postal Service has contracted."
Even if the city is mollified, the USPS may have
problems with another federal agency.
According to City Attorney Jim Dye, the USPS
may be subject to Executive Order 11988, which made
all federal executive agencies, including the Postal
Service, subject to floodplain laws.
"Postal Service attorneys and FEMA (Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency) attorneys are now discuss-
ing whether the Postal Service floodplain regulations ex-
empt the Postal Service from the mandate of Executive
Order 11988," Dye wrote in a Sept 1 letter to the city.
FEMA's involvement in the flap is significant be-
cause that agency requires that if the improvements to a
ground-level structure exceed 50 percent of the current
value of the structure, the building must be elevated.
Whether or not the $65,000 remodeling of the 30-year-old
building exceeds that level; and especially whether FEMA
has anything to say to the USPS, remains to be seen.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 3 I

Resident questions responsibility for dock


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
An inquiry to the mayor concerning the status of a
dock at 7606 Marina Dr. in Holmes Beach may open
up a can of worms.
In the letter, William S. Mullon wants to know who
is the owner of tle structure and who is responsible for
its maintenance. He said the dock is in a state of disre-
pair and is a hazard.
Mullon wrote, "I lay claim to the water which con-
sists of one boat slip, immediately to the south of the
mentioned structure, but since I did not build the struc-
ture nor was it conveyed to me by lease or title, I ac-
knowledge no responsibility for its ownership or main-
tenance."
Public Works Superintendent John Fernandez said
he is researching the problem.
"He doesn't lay claim to the dock, but his address


Emu0


is on it," said Fernandez. "It seems to be part of an is-
sue raised eight years ago, which was before I was with
the city."
Fernandez said he has discovered that on three T-
end canals, parties do not have deeds to the docks they
are using and do not pay taxes on them. However, on
docks at 85th Street and Marina Drive, for example,
parties have deeds for the docks and are paying taxes
on them.
"There was a verbal order from the mayor and
council four or five years ago not to issue permits for
docks to be rebuilt or repaired in that area," noted
Fernandez. "Technically, all docks are on city property
and we have enforcement powers that suggest we can
post them for violations and order people to remove
them."
He will follow the city's code in dealing with un-
safe docks, said Fernandez.


* -.--


A~'" ~
,-
J
* *k i~tM


., .


* .. a -. -* .''-
.. ? .,, t..- ~'" .A' ,' .t "" -".,
4 -'t" ." ., "


City warns dock users
The City of Holmes Beach has posted the entire area of docks between 75th and 76th Streets on Marina Drive
to warn users of the potential hazard. Mullon's dock is among them. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


According to the code, "Should an existing dock,
pier, piling, private slip or structure or cover over a
private slip located within the city limits be deemed to
be unsafe by the superintendent of public works, then
said facility shall be posted as unsafe for use and the
superintendent of public works shall notify the user of
said facility as to the unsafe conditions and be given a
reasonable time to have said facility brought into con-
formity with city codes or be demolished.
"After being posted, such facility shall not be utilized
by any user except for the purpose of bringing such facil-
ity into conformity with city codes or to demolish same.
If the superintendent of public works cannot determine
who the user of such facility is or said facility remains
unclaimed for at least 30 days, then the facility will be
demolished and may not be reconstructed without obtain-
ing a permit from the superintendent of public works in
accordance with section 6-17."


Anna Maria City
9/13, 7:30 p.m., Commission work session
9/14, 9 a.m., Planning and Zoning
Commission sub-committee

Bradenton Beach
9/13, 7 p.m., Council meeting and first
budget public hearing

Holmes Beach
9/8, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
9/13, 3 p.m., Planning Commission meeting
9/13, 7 p.m., Planning Commission meeting
for public input on the future land use element
of the comprehensive plan.

Of Interest
9/12, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Control
Commission meeting, Station 1,
Holmes Beach"
9/14, 10 a.m., Island Emergency
Operations Center


ANNA

MARIA
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
SALE ITEMS FOR THE WEEK OF 9/8 thru 9/12
While Supplies Last Plus Lots of Unadvertised Specials


GROCERY *
Charmin Bath Tissue ... $1.69
Assorted 6-Roll Package
Banana Nut Crunch Cereal
Post 15.5 oz Box........ $3.29
Spam Luncheon Meat
12 oz Can ............... $1.79
Lipton Rice & Noodles or
Sauce ...................... 994

PRODUCE *
Bananas................ Ib 394
Mushrooms
Large & Medium ........ Ib $1.39
California Carrots
Jumbo........................ Ib 394

DAIRY *
Philadelphia Cream Cheese
8 oz PkgRegularor Lite ...... 994
Breyers Yogurt...... 2/$1.00
8 oz Cups Assorted Flavors
Light-N-Lively Cottage Cheese
24 oz Cup ............... $1.99
Florida Gold OJ ...... $1.39
64 oz Carton Regular or Old Fashion


FROZEN *
Stouffers French Bread Pizza
10.25 12.38 oz Pkg ........ $2.39
Sara Lee Layer Cakes.. $2.59
22.25 22.75 oz Pkg. Asst. Flavors
Birds Eye Vegetables .. 694
9-10 oz Pkg. Selected Varieties
HSagen Dazs Ice Cream Bars
3-Paock ......................... $2.99

* MfAT & DEU *
SUPER BUYS *
Family Pack Leg Quarters
Ib ................................... 394
101b Bagged Leg Quarters
Ib ...................................... 354
Boneless Butterfly Pork Chops
Ib ............................... $3.29
Boneless Center-Cut Pork Roast
lb ............................... $3.09
NEW ... Steve's Marvelous
Fresh-Baked Turkey Breast
Glazed & Baked Here ... Only
lb ................................ $5.99


SORRY WE DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.






E13 PAGE 4 A SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Islanders (those with opinions) like Jeb, Lawton


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
If the very informal, highly unscientific "on-the-
street" poll conducted by The Islander Bystander Labor
Day weekend is any indication, it will be Republican can-
didate Jeb Bush challenging incumbent Democratic Gov.
Lawton Chiles for the Governor's seat in November.
Although a good number of the folks we spoke to
hadn't quite made up their minds as to who they would
cast their ballots for in the Sept. 8 primary, Bush and


Chiles topped the list whenever a definite opinion was
expressed.
As can be seen here, the independent voters are out
in force, though with the exception of the non-partisan
races they can't vote in the primary. Nevertheless,
some of them know who they'd prefer to vote for in
November after the party regulars have decided who
will be the combatants in the big fall match-ups.
In conducting this poll, The Islander Bystander asked:
"Who will you be voting for in the primary?"


The respondents chose which races they would talk
about, and even those who said they would not be voting
(for various reasons) are included here as they form a rep-
resentative sampling of the people we talked to.
Interestingly, for every person who appears on this
page, there were at least five who refused to participate
in our poll.
Some were just camera shy, while others simply
told us the answer to our question was, "None of your
damned business!"


"I'm voting for Julie
McClure, and in the
governor's race I'm
going to vote for Gov.
Chiles, I think. I don't
think he's done too
many things wrong, and
I like the way he
handled the situation
with the Cuban people
- I think he made a
stand for us, and we
needed someone to
make a stand for us."
- Dee Boothe
Anna Maria


"I've been away, so I
really don't know who
I'm going to vote for -
I'm studying the news-
papers. I haven't missed
an opportunity to vote
since I was able."
- Marguerite Carrick
Holmes Beach


rw"C


"Right now I don't really
know I haven't even
looked at it I'm a
Republican, but I haven't
studied it yet as to who
among the Republicans
I'll vote for. I usually do
it the night before I
read about them and then
decide."
- Emma Cayo
Hohnes Beach


.m .L]
"I'm not voting in the
primary because I'm not
registered in this area. I
moved here three years
ago, but I failed to
register."
- Pat Crawford
Perico Bay Club


"I probably won't make
the primary an issue,
because although I'm an
independent, I've
committed myself to
Gov. Chiles."
- Donna Howell
Holmes Beach


"I'm a Republican, and "I haven't quite decided
I've been looking at yet, but between now
them, but I really don't and the primary I'm
know any of them." going to try and do my
- Tootie Jeffries homework."
Holmes Beach Sandra Ramirez
Flamingo Cay


"I couldn't tell you my
vote, because my candi-
date is not on the ballot,
this is why we go door to
door to preach God's
kingdom in the hands of
Jesus Christ. I feel sorry
for the candidates
nowadays, because they
try hard but they can't
fulfill all their promises
- mankind's govern-
ments keep leading to
wars, and only God can
put a stop to that. We
(Jehovah's Witnesses)
aren't against authority
- according to Romans
13 we respect totally the
political authorities on
earth they are keeping
order here."
- Lynn Sayko
Anna Maria


"I'm an independent,
but I think you should
be able to vote anyway
for the man, because I
feel I'm voting for the
man and not for the
party. I would like to
vote for Jeb Bush. If he
follows through with his
ideas concerning crime
- I think they're great
- I'm all for what he
says he's going to do. I
hope he gets in. And I
like Mark Gillner for
judge he's a wonder-
ful guy. Very honest and
very reliable."
- Dolores McComb
Holmes Beach


Candidate profiles for Thursday, Sept. 8 primary


School Board, District I
Berniece Scott
Berniece Scott is a Democrat seeking the School
Board District 1 seat. The election is county-wide.
Scott, 68, is a Bradenton native. She is a Realtor
and a retired public health nurse and administrator from
New York. She served in the U.S. Air Force Nurse
Corps, was a member of the Bradenton Housing Au-
thority, and is a member of the Manatee County
Children's Advisory Board. She is a graduate of the
New York University's School of Education, and has
a master's degree in public health supervision. She is
a single parent of two adopted daughters.
Scott points to her background in administration
and her work with children as her strongest assets for
election to the school board.

Johnn J. Searles, Jr.
Johnn Searles, Democrat, is seeking election to the
District 1 seat of the School Board.
Searles, 45, is a Manatee County native. He is a bus
driver with the school system. He is a graduate of Mana-
tee Community College and attended the University of
South Florida. He is an ordained minister and associate
pastor at St. Paul's Missionary Baptist Church.


He formerly was in retail sales and management
with J.C. Penney, Bond Clothing and Sears. He is on
the executive board for the local chapter of the Ameri-
can Federation of State, County and Municipal Em-
ployees, past president of another chapter of the orga-
nization, a member of the Bashaw Elementary Advi-
sory Council and a Southeast High School Athletic
Booster. He is married and has two daughters.
Searles sees better communication as the biggest
challenge to the school board.

School Board, District 5
Joseph C. Miller
Joe Miller, Republican, is seeking a seat on the
District 5 school board.
Miller, 40, is a sales representative for an outdoor
recreation equipment manufacturing company. He is a
former director for the Manatee County Parks and Rec-
reation Department and formerly was administrator for
the Portsmouth, Va. parks and recreation department.
He is a graduate of Fairmont State College, and at-
tended the University of Georgia. He is a member of
the Seabreeze Elementary PTO. He is married and has
two children.
Miller points to his government experience as his


strongest asset to election to the school board.

Karen Van Ness
Karen Van Ness, Republican, is seeking re-election
to the District 5 school board seat.
I Van Ness, 48, has been on the school board since
1987, and is currently the board's vice chairwoman. She
is assistant administrator at a retirement residence and is
a partner in a real estate venture group. She owned sev-
eral businesses in the area. She is the former chairwoman
of the Manatee County Republican Executive Committee.
A graduate of Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., she at-
tended classes at the University of Toledo and the Univer-
sity of South Florida. She has two sons.
Van Ness points to her experience on the board as
her greatest asset to re-election.

Airport Authority, Seat 3
Christopher D. Daly
Christopher Daly is seeking re-election to the
Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority, Seat 3. The race
is non-partisan.
Daly, 67, is a retired executive with the Polaroid

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


-1

























Helping to get out the vote
Sally Schrader of The Prudential Florida Realty is a
deputy registrar of the Supervisor of Elections and the
Manatee County Board of Realtors. Schrader helped
out in the recent countywide voter registration drive on
Saturday, Aug. 6, at the Winn Dixie, Beachway Plaza,
Bradenton. Schrader is available at The Prudential
Florida Realty, 5340-1 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, to
register voters or change address or party affiliation
during office hours. J

Candidates to focus
on water at forum
Candidates and representatives in the Florida
legislature will discuss their positions on water is-
sues at a public information meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 15, at 7 p.m., in the Kendrick Auditorium,
Palmetto Fairgrounds.
The educational meeting is open to the pub-
lic and co-sponsored by Advocates for Sound
Water Policy, a local citizens interest group, and
the Manatee County Extension Service.
For more information call 722-4524.

Candidate profiles
Daly, 67, is a retired executive with the Polaroid
Corp. He is a former owner of a local pest control
company. He was with the British Royal Air Force and
the U.S. Naval Air Reserve. He is a graduate of the N
University of South Florida, and is a.member of the
American Legion and the Elks. He is married, has six
children and three grandchildren.
Daly points to his four years of experience as a ,
member of the Airport Authority as a significant as-
set to the community.

Edward Stanley
Edward Stanley is seeking election to the
Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority, Seat 3.
The race is non-partisan.
Stanley, 69, has worked in the aviation field for 38
years. He is a representative for a Canadian charter
flight service, and is based at the Sarasota-Bradenton
International Airport. He served in the U.S. Army Air
Corps. He attended John Marshall Law School, and is
attending school to become a certified travel consult-
ant. He is a member of the Bradenton Runner's Club
and several aviation and travel professional organiza-
tions. Stanley is married.
Stanley points to his tenure within the aviation
profession as his strong point in his election campaign.

Woody Wolverton
Woody Wolverton is seeking election to the
Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority, Seat 3.
The race is non-partisan.
Wolverton, 60, is an executive with Prudential
Securities, is a stockbroker and investment executive,
and has been a commercial pilot since 1958. He is a
former owner of a furniture and appliance store and a
former professor at the University of Oklahoma,
where he taught management training for senior Fed-
eral Aviation Administration employees. He is a
former member of the Lawton Airport Authority, the
Lawton Town Commission, and the Longboat Key
Town Commission. He is married, has four children
and eight grandchildren.
Wolverton cites his investment and aviation back-
ground as his strongest assets for election to the airport
authority.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 5 Jf!


ust visiting paradise? Don't forget to order your subscription to "the best news on Anna Maria Island." A
mail order form is on page 7, or you visit our office in the Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.


Yl a eiSSvuSes


Open youCnwnd l lresea


VOTE FOR PRESERVING

OUR QUALITY OF LIFE

SI* Voted against towering bridges

Your accessible commissioner

He listens and responds

V Won Extra $5 million on sale of hospital.
V Led effort to recover thousands of dollars
KENT in lost sales tax going to Sarasota County.
ENT A V Fought to lower garbage bills.
CHETLAIN V Won fight to have meetings on TV.
FOR COUNTY V Led effort to build more sidewalks and
COMMISSIONER bike paths.
AT LARGE DISTRICT 6
MANATEE COUNTY V Supported beach renourishment.
RE-ELECT KENT CHETLAIN SEPT. 8 Republican Primary
Paid Political Ad. Paid For By Kent Chetlain Campaign Fund


I I






[i] PAGE 6 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

-AF.,


Who's in charge?
All three Island cities have a plethora of ordi-
nances providing for what you can't do on the beach.
The county has its rules in addition to all the city regu-
lations, such as no T-back bathing suits.
So what happens when a Jet-ski buzzes danger-
ously close to your family and friends while they're
cavorting in the Gulf of Mexico?
Who do you call if you're offended by the
beachgoers in the skimpy suits?
Why is it against the law to bike on the beach?
What can you do about a dog hanging out in the
water with inconsiderate owners?
Who's in charge? You certainly can't expect the
lone marine patrol officer from the sheriff's office to
respond in time to find an offender. The city police
departments have no regulation over what happens
below the high water mark and they lack enforcement
power if the offender is "in the water."
Can dogs get away with drinking cocktails and
wearing T-backs on the beach? Can they Jet-ski over
your kids in the water, cruise up onto the beach and
hop on a beach bike, adding insult to injury as they
depart the scene, pedaling across your picnic blanket?
It's open season.
We need reasonable, enforceable ordinances to
protect people on the beach.
Please vote
On Thursday, you have some important choices to
make at the election booth.
Many of the races are non-partisan, including the
judicial and airport authority seats. Everyone votes in
these races but, in the case of the at-large seat on the
Manatee County Commission, the only two candidates
are both Republicans.
Only Republicans will decide who represents us in
this race; there is no Democratic opponent. In an odd
twist of redistricting, the candidates are both incum-
bents. Both have represented the Island in the past with
zeal and enthusiasm. Either way, Republicans have a
hard choice, a final choice, and no matter the outcome
Thursday we lose one well-respected commissioner.
Pat Glass can best be described as professional,
thorough and 100 percent dedicated to her office. She
has been sensitive to Island issues, often taking a role
as mediator on issues rather than grasping a position.
Kent Chetlain, Glass's opponent for the at-large
seat she has held since 1990, finds himself in the race
as the result of a district line that excluded his home
from his former district. He readily admitted, before
the cat-and-dog fight of their campaign was underway,
he would have preferred not to run against Glass.
Chetlain has a long, strong history of involvement

|ISLANDERt8 iaki
SEPTEMBER 9, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 42
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan


with Island issues. As a writer for the now defunct Is-
lander newspaper, Chetlain is keenly aware of "Island
attitudes" and has kept an ear to the ground on issues.
For the history between Anna Maria and Chetlain,
we vote for Kent Chetlain.
For Florida House of Representatives, Dist. 68,
Republicans have a choice between Mark Flanagan and
Roy Meyer. The Republican choice will face Demo-
cratic incumbent Julie McClure in November.
Both men are likable newcomers to the political
scene, but we believe Flanagan has the savvy to do well
in Tallahassee. How he will tackle Island problems
with the Florida Department of Transportation remains
to be seen. We endorse Mark Flanagan.
For County Court Judge, Group 2, our choice is
Chris Pratt. It is a tough job to sit in judgment, and
Pratt has gained wisdom and insight from youth, com-
munity and judicial involvement.
Our choice for Circuit Court Judge, 12th Judicial
Circuit is Nancy Donnellan. Donnellan is highly quali-
fied and will bring both her experience and knowledge
of the community to the bench.




We care
This letter is in response to one from Beverly Cioffi
of Bradenton appearing in The Islander Bystander on
Aug. 25.
I too am a tax paying citizen of the Anna Maria
Fire District and I feel I get a lot for my tax dollars.
I am also a volunteer with the Anna Maria Volun-
teer Fire Dept., so I know how much the gear I wear
costs, and the cost of the equipment we use.
Bad publicity has definitely hurt the fundraising ef-
forts of the volunteers, but it didn't come from the way
board members Glenn Bliss or Sandy Haas voted. It is the
result of commissioners fighting amongst themselves and
accusations in the newspapers. It should be taken care of
at meetings, not in a hostile environment
The volunteers put in a lot of time in standby, train-
ing, schooling, running calls and just being there for the
community.
You see us at community events such as the circus,
the Fish-a-thon, Bridge St. festival, street dances and ben-
efits for people in need, the MDA boot drive and more.


We work all of these on our own time, for no pay,
and we do it gladly because we care about the poeple
in the community where we live.
As for where the money that we raise goes, it does not
go to paid employees of the district. Money raised by
volunteers goes to building maintenance at two volunteer
stations, one in Cortez Village and one in Bradenton
Beach. It goes to extra schooling, extra equipment and
sponsorship of a Little League team on the Island.
Volunteers who complete schooling and become
an active member receive one golf-type shirt. We put
a lot of time into what we do and we buy our own
jumpsuits and dress uniforms.
Being a volunteer is very rewarding 99 percent of
the time but it hurts me deeply when someone writes
a nasty letter and we have to answer it.
It is a great feeling when our patients and their
families werite us a note or tell us in person on scene
how much they appreciate us being there for them.
I hole this clarifies why we raise money and where
it goes. We hope you won't throw away invitations to
our dance and join us in a good time for all.
Jane E. Maddox President, A.M. V.F.R., Cortez

Lots of groups help the
community
It is not my intention to negate the good work of.
the Anna Maria Island Community Center and the posi-
tive impact it has on our Island youth. I would, how-
ever, like to call attention to the many other viable pro-
grams that are dedicated to the development, life en-.
hancement and care of our children.
There are a lot of great people involved in youth1
activities sponsoring Scouts, the Baseball Card Club,
the Chapel Players Theatre, arts and crafts sessions,
school counseling, Bible schools, PTSA and church,
youth groups the list goes on and on.
Reau The Islander Bystander. You will discover,
as I did, there are a lot of unselfish, devoted commu-'
nity members involved in worthwhile projects for kids.
You will also learn that the AMICC is not the only act
in town. There are many who quietly serve and work
hard to fill the needs of our children.
The letter is to applaud the efforts of these wonder-
ful volunteers who give their time and talents so gen-
erously. Thank you and bless you one and all.
Betsy Smith, Anna Maria











THfSE WERE THE AYS
Part 1, The Remarkable Captain Jones __
by June Alder


John P. Jones arrived in Tampa Bay with his parents, John R. and Sophie Jones,
and his two younger brothers in 1882. In 1949 he wrote a memoir about his
family's early days in Florida just before Anna Maria Island was settled. Never
before published, it will be excerpted here in coming weeks with the permission of
J.R. Jones's great grandson, Arthur D. Jones, Jr., of Lakeland.


A DUBIOUS VENTURE


John Patrick Jones was a lad of 7
when his family journeyed from Canada
to Tampa Bay in 1882; 13 when he went
to work as a printer's devil at a Tampa
newspaper; and 19 when his Irish-born
father, Captain John R. Jones, settled on
Anna Maria Key in 1895 the island's
second homesteader.
Both father and son wrote memoirs.
The remarkable Captain Jones -
harbor pilot, lawyer, former Church of
England clergyman and avid horticultur-
ist throughout his long life in 1927
penned a brief sketch of the colonization
of Anna Maria in the 1890s. In 1949 son
John P. produced a long but lively tale
of the family's early days in Florida
which will be the basis of this series of
columns.
John R. was 30, his son tells us,
when he gave up a good law practice in
Ontario for a dubious venture managing
a Florida citrus farm owned by a
wealthy Detroiter, "General Johnson."
At least it was dubious as far as his wife
Sophie was concerned.
Young Johnny (the eldest of three
boys) didn't like the idea of leaving
Canada for the U.S. much either, judg-
ing from his rather grumpy account of
their trip to Tampa Bay.
"The train trip was tiresome and
uneventful, with the exception of a
shooting affray at the station in a little
town in Kentucky. There being no rail-
road to Tampa at that time, we were
compelled to take a steamer at Cedar
Keys."
At Tampa Captain Jones found out
that the farm was 22 miles away across
the Bay at Big Bayou (later the site of St.


Petersburg). He hired a young man by
the name of Gene Haskins to take them
there in his sloop.
Haskins was quite a talker and for
the first time on the journey Johnny
Jones was impressed.
"He knew all about the Johnson
family and my childish ears took in ev-
ery word he said," J.P. wrote.
"'That old Yankee bastard,"'
Haskins exclaimed. "'He'd steal gar-
bage from a blind buzzard and put it on
the wrong road home. He and his old
lady had a bust-up awhile back and he
got a divorce and married a show-
woman who has a growed-up son. His
boys is sore at their step-brother 'cause
the old man chased 'em out and put him
in charge of his property. They're all
meaner 'n rattlesnakes.'
"All of which was very interesting,
but not too encouraging to the new farm
manager."
J.P. went on: "The wind failed and
we were late getting to Big Bayou. As
we approached Gene blew a loud blast
on a conch-shell and soon a fire ap-
peared on the beach to guide us to the
dock where the entire population of the
settlement had gathered [the postmas-
ter, store owner, the captain of the mail
boat and their families and assorted
fishermen]. They were all kind, hospi-
table people who welcomed us with
undisguised pleasure."
But for the Joneses, unfortunately,
there was trouble ahead.

Next: An unpleasant
shock


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 m PAGE 7 11


Why get
soaked?







FAT CAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning

Dry Foam, Dries=FastI
We never use steam!

We have happy customers ...

"... it looks so bright and clean; just
like new and I was amazed at
how DRY it was!"
Gerry Carlsen, Cortez

Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer

i k For fast, thorough, friendly service -
call me Jon Kent, Island resident and
owner of Fat Cat. Call 778-2882, 8 AM
to 5 PM.
CALL TODAY!

MEMBER: ANNA MARIA ISLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE



We'd love to .


mail you the news!
* U]

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year.
It's-the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
Island. Over 800 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
ready receiving The Islander Bystatider where they live ... from Alaska
to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free to the Island and surround-
ing areas. But if you don't live here and you would like to subscribe, or if
you want to mail the paper to a friend or relative, please fill out the form
below and mail or drop off at our office with a check in the proper amount.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS (allow 2 weeks for delivery)
S One Year: $26 E 6 Months: $18 0 3 Months: $10
U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
El One Year: $125 El 6 Months: $75 0 3 Months: $42
MAIL TO:
.ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP _
START DATE: ___


IISLANDERR if "i a

THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
..===E......**...E..........***..............






[IM PAGE 8 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Firefighters to head out West to fight wild fires


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island firefighters Capt. Rich Losek, Larry Revell
and Brian Braun, along with forest ranger Jeffery
Smith, have volunteered their skills to fight the wild
fires that have plagued the Western states throughout
the summer.
"We can be called up any time between now and
Sept. 8," said Losek. "We have our bags packed to go
at an hour's notice."
Losek said the idea of volunteering for the trip
started when they were taking an incident command
class at Manatee VoTec. The incident command sys-
tem is used by the forestry service nationwide.
"The fires out West were brought up in class," said
Losek. "We called Andy Lee (senior ranger for the U.S.
Division of Forestry). He said it was too late because
the teams were already made up in January. Then he
got a call to qualify more people."
The trio took a step test, to determine how fast they
recover their oxygen, one of the criteria for the trip.
"We had to step on a step 16 inches high, then our
pulse was taken 15 seconds later," explained Losek. "It
had to be within a certain range."
The trio then took a six-hour class on hand tools
used to fight wild fires and watched videos on subjects
such as wind currents.
"We learned how to put on the emergency shelter
in 20 seconds," said Losek. "It's made of aluminum
and reflects 95 percent of the heat. If you're overcome
by fire, it can get up to 150 degrees inside, but you can
still breathe because the air is dry."


Each firefighter is permitted to take a duffel bag of
not more than 35 pounds. Other gear for the trip in-
cludes a backpack for food, water and a change of
clothes in the field, a forestry hard hat, leather boots,
and gloves. Pants, shirts and the emergency shelter are
provided by the.government.
Because there is no room to take a tent, Losek said,
they were advised by others who have made the trip to


FOR A DIFFERENT KIND OF CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
try Christkindl Markets in Germany. On Dec. 6 fly from
Orlando to Luxembourg. Shop in Trier, UIm, Munich,
Numberg, Rothenburg, Heidelberg and return from these
great shops on Dec. 13. A great shopping trip ... $1,069
ARUBA SPECIALS. Includes air from Miami & rooms at
the beautiful Holiday Inn Beach Resort & Casino, also
includes service charges, Hotel tax and welcoming
drink. Departure and taxes not included.
3 Nights ... $364 4 Nights ... $463
Christmas & New Year Cruises are going fast.
Book now while cabins are still available!


VEGAS
4 days 3 nights includes air
from St. Petersburg
and rooms at the
beautiful Aladdin.
$395
I


Are you ready for some football? The Islander Bystander football contest is a
real winner. See page 16 to enter. Take your chance on winning big bucks!


Mark Hagman
ANNA MARIA
STORE
MANAGER


.'" OPENING'"-*

MID
-*.SEPTEMBER..*


Bringing you the same high
quality products and service
you have come to expect
from Crowder Bros.


Dick Griffin
FORMERLY WITH
BRADENTON BEACH
HARDWARE


PAINTS TOOLS PLUMBING SUPPLIES GLASS SPRINKLERS
LAWN & GARDEN SUPPLIES ... AND MANY HARD TO FIND ITEMS
HOUSEWARES CARDS GIFTS RUSSELL STOVER CANDY
SINCE 1954


OPEN
7 DAYS_


Go west, young
man
Left to right, Brian Braun,
Larry Revell and Capt.
Rich Losek are ready to
travel west to fight wild
fires at an hour's notice.
Islander Photo: Pat
Copeland


find a large cardboard box once they get there. The box
covered with plastic becomes the firefighter's bed for
the duration. Depending on where they are sent, show-
ers may or may not be available.
Firefighters are using their own vacation and leave
time for the trip. Their wages, medical expenses and
workman's compensation are covered by the federal
government.

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKEEPING o' "
AND YEAR AROUND TAX SERVICE : Individuals Corporations Partnerships -__
Now Accepting New Clients 4
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
Sl &iy tly,&,uofdegewt 778-6118
Ucensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Isafb Pobiaty)

CLARE H. STARRETT, I
D.P.M.


PODIATRIC MEDICINE
and
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting MedicareAssignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
'r'feM S *64


PICKUP STATION
3352 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach COPIES 5 4


F-


SrRAVL em 77&2283






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 9 FM3

Florida will most likely lose


Ocean World dolphins


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
When Ocean World in Fort Lauderdale closed last
week, concerns were raised about the fate of its 12
dolphins and other marine life.
"We have been monitoring that situation very
closely," says Virginia Haley, spokeswoman for Mote
Marine Laboratory.
The park, which reportedly succumbed to both a
decline in tourist dollars and lack of room to expand,
has not had an easy time of it in the past few years.
In 1991, according to an Associated Press story, fed-
eral officials cited the park with keeping its performing
dolphins in an undersized pool with overchlorinated wa-
ter. The dolphins suffered with peeling skin and three of
the dolphins died that year. And earlier in 1990 the pet-
ting pool was closed by the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture when it was also found to be too small.
Even Florida Gov. Chiles, who wrote to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's division of Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service (ASPHID) in a letter
dated Aug. 24, voiced concerns for the fate of the 12
dolphins in relation to the 1972 federally mandated
Marine Mammal Protection Act.
In his letter, Chiles says: "I am gravely concerned
about the fate of 12 Atlantic bottlenose dolphins cur-
rently owned by Ocean World, a marine park in Fort
Lauderdale."
"I'm not sure if we could take the dolphins even if
we had the facility," says Haley.
Haley refers to Mote's in-progress Marine Mam-
mal Institute on City Island. Only the first of the three-
phased project is completed.
The finished first phase two critical care tanks
is where Richey and Juno, the recently rescued
pigmy sperm whales, are currently residing and doing
well according to updated reports.
Phase two is the $1.2-million rehabilitation lagoon for
. those mammals who will be rereleased back into the wild.
Phase three is a million-gallon lagoon for both the
rehabilitation and care for those sea mammals too old
to go back to the wild, which will cost an estimated
$1.5 million.
Mote Marine Laboratory, a highly respected non-
profit agency, relies on private donations and grants to
survive. Neither of the two final phases has the fund-
ing to begin construction at this time.
The possibilities of relocating the dolphins in
Florida remains limited, if not impossible.
One group, the Dolphin Freedom Foundation,
wanted the dolphins relocated to the Sugarloaf Dolphin
Sanctuary in the Florida Keys.
"There was an interest in Sugarloaf Key," says
Estus Whitfield of the Governor's Environment Policy
Office in Tallahassee. Whitfield says he has been in
contact with Washington, D.C., about the dolphins.
"According to APHIS, the facility isn't capable of tak-
ing care of that many dolphins."
The care of dolphins remains the center of concern.
"The governor is concerned foremost that the well-
being of the dolphins be taken into account," says
Whitfield. "It is my understanding that the Department
of Agriculture and Ocean World are insisting that the
dolphins all be kept together as a big family."
At last word before presstime, the dolphins have
unofficially been sold to a theme park out of the coun-
try Anthony's Key Resort in Roatan Bay Islands in
Honduras.
While he has had only phone conversations with a
representative of APHIS and still waits for written
confirmation Whitfield confirms "that the dolphins
will be moved to Honduras which has a large display
park and the concentration is on education and not
show where the dolphins will live in free-flowing
sea water and not an aquarium."
Gov. Chiles expresses in his letter the concern felt
by many others.
"These gentle and intelligent animals are an inher-
ent part of Florida's natural heritage. We need to do all
we can to insure their continued well-being," he writes
to ASPHIS.
"That's true," confirms Haley. "There is always an
outpouring response from the public, offering and giv-
ing their time to help" with Mote's Marine Mammal
program.


VOTE
CHRIS


PRATT
for
Manatee
County Judge
Group 2
EXPERIENCE, ENERGY, AND TEMPERAMENT
[A 10 years trial experience [A Local high school graduate
[ 10 years private practice 36 year Manatee County resident
representing the citizens [A Graduate Stetson University
of Manatee County College of Law
-[ "Ask A Lawyer" volunteer Attorney [A Earth Day volunteer
[A Member Florida Bar -[ Former Little League Umpire
[ Manatee County Bar Association Palmetto Little League
[A Associate Legal Council Jaycees E[ Attends 1st United Methodist
of Florida Church of Palmetto
QUALIFIED TO HANDLE THE VARIETY AND VOLUME
OF CASES BEFORE THE MANATEE COUNTY COURT.
NON-PARTISAN
Pd. Political Adv. paid for by the Chris M. Pratt Campaign for County Judge, Betty Pratt, Treasurer






Yuand *m a


Senjoyexeiec
-stability....*


* If you are a conservative investor who is
concerned about maintaining your lifestyle 9
amid ever-changing interest rates, we offer
I an alternative for increased stability. For '
details, at no obligation, please call today.
* Elizabeth C. Bertelsen. .
Financial Consultant
RAYMOND JAMES
*,& -S. cDE ratesS ir-.C:. I ..
PMember New York Stock Exchange/SIPC '
3639 Cortez Road, West, Suite 140 .J
Bradenton, Florida 34210
m (813) 755-6272 (800) 247-3011
Fax (813) 758-4542 ....
I Concerned about you and your financial well-being.
I--mmmmmm- mmmmmmm m.mm m mmmm mm m mmm






FM PAGE 10 W SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I 9NNOUNCEMEN


RA ^Style Artist
A LAi- SAL- Style/Image Consulting

00o00 r %% Photography Make-Up/Hair
0o000 0 / ~ Private Studio Atmosphere
11ooo0% C .' "A Drive Worthwhile"
0000 00 00J \ _o_




IDS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC.
America's Leading Financial Planning Company
Retirement Investment Planning
Portfolio Reviews
Estate Planning
Educational Seminars
Call us for a free introductory consultation






Cynthia Olcolt, CFP 'John Sharp
3653 Cortez Road West Bradenton 755-7000





RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
REMODELING WATER HEATERS
NEW CONSTRUCTION GARBAGE DISPOSALS
EMERGENCY SERVICE BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
FREE ESTIMATES LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
*We are DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce




10 YEAR ALL PARTS AND LABOR
WARRANTY
You want it? We've got it!
Because Amana gives you quality at a price
you can afford.

EXTENDED SERVICE PLAN
AMANA MEANS QUALITY SINCE 1934.

M METP @LR\ @
REFRIGERATION


CAC044365

778-9622 Holmes Beach
WE SERVICE FPL
PARTICIPATING
ALL MAKES & MODELS CONTRACTOR


oiW AutUmn DeFrank
Award Winning Jeweler
L. I I


-~-'~. -,-'


Sophisticated scam
targets travelers
Plan your vacations well ahead, but be aware of
pitfalls that exist before you pack your bags.
"In a typical travel scam, victims are convinced
to pay a deposit of several hundred dollars for a fu-
ture trip," says Island travel agency owner Janice
Bergbom. "The date of the trip is postponed several
times and by the time the victim catches on, the
scammer is long gone with the deposit money."
Travel fraud has become a $12 billion a year in-
dustry dedicated to separating consumers for their
hard-earned cash, according to Bergbom.
Bergbom, owner of Uniglobe Far Away Places
Travel in Holmes Beach since 1983, says the easiest
way to avoid being ripped off is to deal with a travel
agent.
For instance, when offered a vacation as a prize,
advises Bergbom, ask for written material that out-
lines costs you will have to bear such as deposits, reg-
istration fees, membership fees and port taxes.
A free tip-sheet on avoiding travel fraud is avail-
able at Uniglobe, 3236 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach.

AME Back-to-School
Night is Tuesday
Anna Maria Elementary will hold an open house
Back-to-School night on Tuesday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m.
in the auditorium.
PTO officers will be installed, the 1994-95 bud-
get will be approved and parents may visit the class-
rooms. Brownie troop #40 will sell home-made cook-
ies, with proceeds to go to All Children's Hospital.


AMICC to hold
volunteer orientation
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
hold a volunteer orientation meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 15, at 10 a.m.
The AMICC is seeking volunteers to help with a
variety of tasks. The Share program will also be dis-
cussed.
For more information call 778-1908.


AHS to hold hibiscus
show in Bradenton
The 31 st Annual Hibiscus Show sponsored by the
American Hibiscus Society (AHS), Norman Reasoner
Chapter, will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Bradenton Municipal Auditorium, 100 10th St. W.,
on Sunday, Sept. 11. The show including parking is
free and open to the public.
Hundreds of award-winning blooms will be ex-
hibited by growers from all parts of Florida compet-
ing for four "Best of Show" prizes as well as prizes
in 18 other categories.
Commercial growers compete in their own cat-
egory as do amateur, collector, and open-collector
categories.
In the amateur category anyone can enter hibis-
cus blooms taken from their own landscape from
one bloom to two dozen more each bloom must be
a different variety. To qualify in the amateur class by
AHS rules, entrants may have competed in the pre-
ceding two years and presently possess less than 25
types of hibiscus, each a different variety. Amateur
growers are encouraged to enter and should bring
blooms to the south entrance of the auditorium be-
tween 8:30 and 11:15 a.m. for registration.
Visitors to the show may view the prize-winning
blooms, the hibiscus arrangement display and shop
for hibiscus plants or a variety of arts, crafts and gifts.
"Mr. Hibiscus" will be available at the informa-
tion table to answer questions and an education ex-
hibit of printed panels and colored sketches will dem-
onstrate in step-by-step detail instructions for graft-
ing and hybridizing.
The show, as proclaimed by Bradenton Mayor
Evers as "Hibiscus Queen for a Day," is sponsored by
the American Hibiscus Society, Century Bank,
Charlie Jones Wholesale Nursery, Nations Bank,
Reasoner Nursery and Tropicana Products, Inc.
For more information call 748-1971.


New officers installed for
Kirkwood Toastmasters
The Kirkwood Toastmasters recently elected new
officers. They are (left to right) Shirley Talley, vice
president of membership; Del Olson, vice president
of education; Cynthia Olcott, president; George
Herman Kendall, sergeant at arms; and Hilliard
Paul, secretary/treasurer. Toastmasters, which meets
weekly at the Kirkwood Presbyterian Church, 4408
60th St.W., Bradenton, at 7p.m., works toward
developing communication and leadership skills.
Meetings are open to the public. For more informa-
tion call Cynthia Olcott at 755-7000.

AMI Forever Young to
meet monthly
The AMI Forever Young, a group for seniors and
retirees on Anna Maria Island, will hold its first meet-
ing for the fall season on Monday, Sept. 12, 12:30 p.m.,
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Suggestions for future topics and activities will be
discussed. Refreshments will be served.
Guest speaker is Gerald S. White, Manatee County
Human Services coordinator, who will speak on ser-
vices available to the elderly in Manatee County and
present a video at 1:30 p.m.
All those interested are invited to attend. Meetings
are held monthly. For more information call the com-
munity center at 778-1908.

Artists Guild to present
program Sept. 12
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will
present a free program featuring the Bradenton Herald
columnist Howard Hall on Monday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m.,
at the Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. and a
general meeting will follow the program.
The program is open to the public.

Museum, planetarium
offer programs
The South Florida Museum and Bishop Plan-
etarium offer a variety of events and programs.
Laser Fantasies, featuring musical groups such as
the Doors, Pink Floyd and Rush, are shown Fridays and
Saturday at 7:30, 9, 10:30 p.m. and midnight, and
Sunday at 4:30 p.m., in the planetarium. Admission is
$5.50, children 12 and under are $3.50. For more infor-
mation call 746-STAR.
The observatory is open Fridays and Saturdays at
9 p.m., weather permitting. Cost is 50 cents.
Solar observing is offered every Saturday from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., weather permitting, to view sun-
spots through the Museum's telescope. Admission is
included with museum and planetarium ticket.
Planetarium star shows are offered Tuesday
through Sunday at 1:30 and 3 p.m. Admission is in-
cluded with museum and planetarium ticket.
"Dinosaur and Fossil Fun" is the topic of the Sat-
urday Morning Children's Program beginning Sept 17
through Oct. 29, at 10:30 a.m. The program is included
in the admission price to the museum and planetarium.
"Dinosaurs in Florida?" is the museum's current
exhibition which reveals why there were no dinosaurs
in Florida.
Admission to the museum and planetarium is $5.50
for adults and $3.50 for children ages 5 to 12.
The South Florida Museum and Bishop Plan-
etarium is located at 201 10th St. W., Bradenton. For
more information call 746-4132.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 11 BDU


Everyone is getting to know Elsie
Elsie Vejrostek, 85, can be found wherever the dance music is playing on the Island the louder, the faster
and the hotter, the better Elsie likes it. She and her nephew Frank were seen dancing the night away recently
to the sounds of the Sons of the Beach at the Anchorage. Photo Courtesy of Tassa Vejrostek


Community Youth
Chorus to meet
The Roser Community Youth Chorus, under the
direction of Cliff Burgeson, resumes weekly practice
on Wednesday, Sept. 14, from 3:15 to 3:50 p.m., at
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria.
The program is open to all interested youth in 2nd
to 5th grades. With parents' permission, children may
be picked up at Anna Maria Elementary School by the
church van. Parents may pick up students at 4:15 p.m.
or they may ride home in the van.
Children learn to sing fun, patriotic and spiritual
songs. Following practice a snack is provided. The
Community Youth Chorus is scheduled to sing for the
St. Bernard Women's Guild in December.
For more information call Roy McChesney or
Molly Parks at 778-0414.
Littoral Society to
present shark program
As part of an environmental lecture series, the
American Littoral Society will feature David Bulloch
presenting the video "Sharks," narrated by Peter
Benchley (author of "Jaws") on Wednesday, Sept. 14,
at 7 p.m., in the environmental library of the Gulf Gate
Library, Curtiss Avenue, Sarasota. The program is free
and open to the public.
For more information call 951-0884.

LBK Art Center seeks
applicants for kids"
scholarship program
The Longboat Key Art Center is accepting appli-
cations for the Children's Scholarship Program to be
held on Saturday mornings from November through
March.
The program is for elementary school children,
grades 3 through 5, and supplements the visual art edu-
cation in the public schools. Parents must provide
transportation.
To receive an application form and schedule of
classes send a written request with grade level of the
child to the Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat
Dr. S., Longboat Key, FL 34228. Deadline for appli-
cation requests is Oct. 1. Enrollment is limited.

Writers invited to read
original works Sept. 12
The Gulf Coast Writers Group will meet at the Is-
land Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach,
on Monday, Sept. 12, at 10:15 a.m. Writers are encour-
aged to bring original works and poetry to read. Visi-
tors are welcome.
For more information call 778-6879.


Share food co-op
comes to AMICC
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
have a program to discuss the Share program on
Thursday, Sept. 15, at 10 a.m.
Save up to 60 percent on groceries. For $13 a
month, families receive meats, fresh fruits and veg-
etables, staples and more every month. In order to
qualify you must bring $13 to the Share meeting and
donate two hours of volunteer time to a community
activity per month.
The AMICC is located at 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria. For more information call 778-1908.

Horseshoe scores
History was made in the weekly Island horseshoe
games last Saturday, when three players made two
ringers each, back to back. Those players were Ruth
Foehrkolb, Ed Callen and George McKay.
Perhaps the change of scenery had something to
do with the level of play (road games sometimes have
that effect), for the competition was held at Holmes
Beach this time. Usually, the action gets going every
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Anna Maria City Hall.
Winners for Sept. 3, were Ruth Foehrkolb and Pat
McGrath.
Runners up were Gene Snedeker and George
McKay.
The games are held at 9 a.m. every Saturday, and
all are welcome.


Telephone Pioneers to
meet Sept. 14
The DeSoto Life Member Club of the Telephone
Pioneers of America will hold the first monthly meet-
ing and luncheon of the season on Wednesday, Sept.
14, at El Conquistador Country Club, 4350 El Con-
quistador Pkwy., Bradenton. Social hour is at 11 a.m.
and lunch begins at noon.
All visiting Pioneers are invited to attend.
Make reservations by Wednesday, Sept. 7, by
calling Harry Flagg at 792-6916.

Selby offers a week of
free admission
Selby Gardens will admit all visitors at no cost
during its annual "Fiee Days at Selby Gardens," from
Saturday, Sept. 10 through Friday, Sept. 16.
An exhibit of traditional oil and pastel paintings
by Sarasota artist Frederic Murphy will be on display
in the museum beginning Friday, Sept. 9.
Visitors are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch
and spend the day. Selby Gardens is located at 811 S.
Palm Ave., at U.S. 41, Sarasota. For more informa-
tion call 366-5731.


AAMY
Formerly of
Headquarters
IS NOWAT...


Cottage, etc...
5500 Marina Dr. FULL SERVICE SALON
Holmes Beach 778-6868


J Far Away Places Travel
HOLLAND Lowest American COSTA
AMERICA AIR FARES HAWAII Cruise Line
from Tampa Every Day! CRUISES AIR from Tampa
2 FREE nights
J748 778-0715 plus car .878
Christmas HOLLAND BRITANIS Royal
CRUISE AMERICA BRI S l
Oceanbreeze Trans Canal Prom398 Caribbean
Snis w/alrfrom San Francisco to HOLIDAY
Miami Tampa17days 7 Night CRUISE
F.om* 845 Fo,.*2499 Cruise R.om$998
1995 CARNIVAL, NORW1 IAN
ALASKA/ Cruise I CI l~l c,.. Line II
CANADA CRUISESoo Theme Cruises
Crul- Tour w/fre 5% OFF evorydayl BMMBBMSock HopoCounlry
.air from.TPA from 7 .HT m NIGHTS m Big Band
$1699 $595 om 589
3236 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217






1M PAGE 12 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Geraldson's Farm: how the pros do it


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Third of a series
Geraldson's Farm on 9th Avenue N. W. in Palma
Sola is one of the few remaining small farms in the
area. Brothers Eric and Greg Geraldson farm 20 of the
family's 30 acres there. At a satellite site on Perico Is-
land, they lease five acres from the Manatee Fruit Com-
pany for additional crops.
The brothers take advantage of the good weather
to plant fall, spring and summer crops to supply locals
with fresh produce.
"The fall season is starting," explained Eric.
"We're planting tomatoes, lettuce, cauliflower, broc-
coli, strawberries, green peppers, green beans, eggplant
and cucumbers. We try to plant those vegetables that


Knee high by the Fourth of July
Eric and Greg Geraldson, left to right, stand in a
field of corn ready for harvest at their Palma Sola
farm. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


are in the most demand. The four most popular are
strawberries, tomatoes, cantaloupes and corn."
He said a variety of herbs is being added to the fall
planting because of customer demand.
Spring crops include cantaloupe, watermelon, cu-
cumbers, tomatoes, green beans, garden peas, eggplant,
sugar snap peas. Summer crops are corn, okra, black
eyed peas, watermelon and cantaloupe.
"There are certain things that thrive in the sum-
mer," said Greg."For example, corn likes long, warm
days and lots of moisture."
They like to try keep an ample supply of favorite
varieties, such as silver queen sweet corn, but also try
new varieties, said Eric.
"Some of the good varieties are archaic because
they don't have a good shelf life," he explained. "But
we have an advantage because we are selling direct."
The brothers do not use the solarization method
recommended to home gardeners. In soil solarization
plastic is placed over the garden bed for six to eight
weeks and the heat from the sun kills weed seeds, soil
diseases and nematodes. Instead, they use a chemical
to sterilize the soil under the plastic which covers the
rows because it is more effective for the large amount
of planting they do. The plastic is left in place through-
out the growing season.
"We use black plastic in the winter, because it
draws the heat to the plants and makes them grow
faster," explained Greg. "In the summer we use white
plastic to cool the soil and the plants. We put enough
fertilizer for two or three crops under the plastic."


Many plants are started from seed in the green-
house and transplanted to the field. This is effective if
the seeds have a low germination rate, said Eric. Seeds
with a high germination rate are directly seeded into the
rows in the field.
The fields are watered using an artesian sulfur well
and drainage is through a system of tiles installed by a


previous owner.
Drainage has become
an increasing problem
due to the large
amount of develop-
ment taking place in
the area, said Eric.
"Development has
imposed on the drain-
age," he said, "and we
have suffered some
loss from it. The fields
used to flood after ten
inches of rain and now
they flood after three
inches."
Changes due to
development are not
new, he said. Eighty
years ago,, the entire


"The fall season is
starting. We're plant-
ing tomatoes, lettuce,
cauliflower, broccoli,
strawberries, green
peppers, green beans,
eggplant and cucum-
bers. We try to plant
those vegetables that
are in the most de-
mand. The four most
popular are strawber-
ries, tomatoes, canta-
loupes and corn.'


Palma Sola area was filed with small farms. As the land
became more valuable, the small farms began to disap-
pear.
"My parents came here in 1951 from their dairy
farm in Wisconsin," recalled Eric. "Dad had a doctor-
ate in soils chemistry and got a job with the extension
service. Then he found the farm and began growing
tomatoes."
All crops were direct sales to grocery stores and all
were pre-sold.
"In the '60s and '70s, two things changed," he
noted. "Farming was being eliminated from the coast
due to the increasing price of land and grocery stores
went from purchasing from the farmer to purchasing
from warehouses."
After completing college, the brothers bought the
farm from their parents. At this point, they had two strikes
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


It's Very Simple ...

VOTE FOR

NANCY

DONNELLAN

FOR

CIRCUIT JUDGE


She Wins ... We Win!


The only candidate who is a:

* Nationally Certified Civil
Trial Advocate.
* Board Certified Civil Trial
Attorney
* Certified Circuit Court
Mediator
* Former Prosecutor


Has devoted countless
hours working with:
* Suncoast Women's
Political Caucus
* Florida Association of
Women Lawyers
* Sarasota County Bar
Association
* Girls Incorporated of
q;rc---f1


To resolving issues facing
the court in the areas of:
* Juvenile Crime
* Domestic Violence
* Early Release
* Child Support
Enforcement


* Member of the Judicial oaruasta
Evaluation Committee of Volunteer Center of
the Florida Bar Sarasota
* and has Extensive Civil Guardian Ad Litem
and Criminal Trial Program
Experience
Paid Political Ad Paid for by the Campaign Account
of the Committee to Elect Nancy Donnellan. Non-partisan.
1275 Southport, Sarasota, Florida 34242
(813) 349-0518


Please visit our pre-school.

school for constructive play
Monday thru Friday 7 am to 5:30 pm
18 mo. thru 10 Years
304 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-2210

Don't forget to vote on Thursday, September 8.
You don't have a choice in November if you don't vote in the primary election.


II
*I i I


"Growing up together is fun







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 13 I~I


Tools of the trade
This antique farming implement is one of several on
display outside Geraldson's Barn. The implements
were found in the barn when the family purchased
the 10-acre parcel from Blazer's Nursery many
years ago. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


How the pros do it
against them -they couldn't compete with brokers and
warehouses due to their small volume and they started
with a deficit due to the high priced real estate.
"We could have moved out east and gone to large
scale farming," he reasoned, "but growing green toma-
toes to gas was not what we wanted."


The brothers came up with their winning formula by
opening their barn at the Palma Sola site in the early 1980s
and concentrating on direct sales to the public. In 1989,
they opened the Perico Island site on the causeway.
"Six or eight years ago," Eric noted, "we began
selling produce to school cafeterias. Now we service 11
to 15 schools. We also have a few restaurant accounts."
Another addition was farm tours for local elementary


students. Anna Maria Elementary students have an annual
Halloween tour to pick out pumpkins for carving.
"We just grow enough for our stands, restaurants
and schools and a little extra," said Eric.
Both sites also offer U-pick. Between the two, you
can find strawberries, tomatoes, eggplant, green beans,
sweet onions, zucchini, cucumbers, yellow squash,
rhubarb and spinach.


Take a little'
off the sides, please
These mangroves at the entrance to the
Anna Maria Island Centre were trimmed
last week after a citizen complaint. The
mangroves growing over the wall were
creating a traffic hazard. The driveway
was blocked off until permission for the
work was obtained from the Florida
Department of Environmental Protec-
tion. Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


CHRISTOPHER DALY,
:FOR
AIRPORT AUTHORITY
-SEAT 3
I am a family man, college graduate,
veteran, and now a retired
businessman, willing to serve you.
I want and need your support.
Thank you.
Campaign of
CHRISTOPHER DALY
Paid Political Ad. Paid For By Christopher Daly Campaign Fund


On Thursday, September 8th ...
VOTE FOR PROVEN
EXPERIENCE AND ABILITY

Edward Stanley

CANDIDATE SEAT #3

AIRPORT AUTHORITY
"38 Years In The Airline Industry!"
Pd. Pol. Adv. Pd. By Campaign Fund For Edward Stanley


I- -U


I Ii!!


-11


X FUNERAL HOMES

V Havw A Free GitFor You.
A Valuable Emergency Planning Portfolio.
It provides the answers your family needs... When they're needed the most.
Vital Personal Statistics Can You Answer These
Emergency Numbers Important Questions?
Family History 1. Do you know the exact location of
your VITAL information and papers?
Social Security/Veterans Info 2. Do you know what your Social
Memorial Instructions Security or Veteran's benefits are and
EXACTLY how to collect them?
InsuranceWill Information 3. Do you know the 124 things that
No Obligation MUST be done on the most difficult
No Purchase Necessary day of your Family's life?
Mail This Coupon to: Griffith-Cline Funeral Homes
P.O. Box 9420 Bradenton, FL 34206-9420
Or call Today 748-1011 or 778-4480
F-7 -.-- --- -- - -
YES, I am interested In receiving the FREE Emergency Planning Portfolio.
I would also like information on:
13 Pre-planning funeral arrangement D Out-of-state arrangements
D A living Will D Funeral costs
Name _____._____ Phone _____
Address _: .i
SClty : State -:, Zip 1
Sl ,. .=-'" '"- 'j
1 01_ __


I





IR PAGE 14 A SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



Labor Day festivities




signal summer's end

Almost every day is like a lazy day of summer here on Anna Maria
Island, but with a touch of fall in the air, here's a look at some of the
summertime Island fun we've enjoyed during the past few months.

This year
it's on to
middle
school
A group offifth
grade graduates
of Anna Maria
Elementary got
together this
summerfora
little celebration
at the Beach F
House restaurant.
The new middle
schoolers are
(front row, left to.....
right) Melissa
Mixon, Lisa
Jenkins, Kaelan
Richards, (back /
row) Jennifer
McDonald and
Kelsey Lashway.
Photo Courtesy of
Maria Richards







.... .... . .. . _-.... '
,i '

%..




Hey, take our picture!
This line isn't guaranteed to work, but depending on how much work the
photographer has to do yet (and how much film he's got in his camera),
sometimes gets results. Anyway, who could turn down this trio of smiling
faces? Pictured left to right is Denille Smallwood, 7, Michael Wojculew.
7, and Kristen Otey, 9. Denille, Michael and Kristen were some of the m
children who enjoyed the last day of the Community Center's day camps
Bayfront Park last week. Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


Nobody knows the trouble I've seen...
Eight-year-old Peter Dowling ponders the sky and plays a contemplative tune on his har-
monica while enjoying himself on a recent sunny day at Anna Maria's Bayfront Park. Islander
Photo: Mark Ratliff


A shoulder to lean on
One-year-old Amber Reed finds the shoulder of her aunt, Karen Burns, the perfect
place from which to watch the recent graduation festivities at The School for Construc- -
tive Play. Amber's sister, Jasmine, was one of the preschool graduates who started 1,
kindergarten at Anna Maria Elementary this week. Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff -,






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 15 1




Sleepy's head
/ An evening visit to the
JAnna Maria City Pier
avow-, with dad is always a
special treat, but some-
-' .times it's hard to keep
your eyes open after a
w,.busy summer day, so
three-year-old Alana
Feldman found a conve-
nient place to rest as her
father Dave strolled the
boardwalk Islander
Photo: Mark Ratliff





















Give me the beat, boys... Summer vacation on Tipsico Lake
_.~~~~~' -.1...4,. .







Give.e... .bea, by.. u me aato n is oLk






Four-year-old Timmy Villars is lost in his rock and roll (or whatever munchkin music While Charlene Anderson, 7, of Holmes Beach helps her dad sail the family
may be playing on his personal radio) as he soaks up the sun. Timmy was at Bayfront sailboat in Florida waters, when she visits her grandparents, Ron and
Park with a bunch of his friends from the Anna Maria Island Community Center day Helen Anderson, in Holly, Mich., she gets to be the captain of her
camp. With that bushy, bushy blond hairdo, we wonder if Timmy and his buddies grandfather's pontoon boat on Tipsico Lake. Photo Courtesy of Helen
might form a band and call it the "Little Beach.Boys." Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff Anderson
.....-,,





















it

aky
any
~zt


Summer Joy
After enjoying a wonderfully sunny day at Manatee
Public Beach, Michele Kelman, 8 (left), and her
cousin, Heather McLaughlin, 7, rinse off before
taking their babies, Summer Joy and Autumn Joy,
home. Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


The height of hyperactivity
Makenna Hoatland, 2 years old, could
barely contain her energy and excitement
during the Privateer's Fourth of July Picnic
at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center. Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood






i3 PAGE 16 .1 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER









THE WINNER
S .Sept 1Contest:
Pat Lawrence






$50 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS WIN $50 EVERY WEEK ALL SEASON
The Islander Bystander will present $50 to The names of all of the advertisers must be Winner Advertiser
the person with the most correct game winner in the entry to be eligible to win. 7
predictions. Only one entry per person, per week. The de- 8
All entries must be postmarked by Friday or cision of The Islander Bystanderjudge is final. 9
hand delivered to The Islander by noon Sat- Winner Advertiser 10
urday the week the contest is published. 1 11
All entries must be submitted on the form 2 12
provided or a copy. Be sure to include your 3 13
name, address and phone number. 4 14
In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 5 15
from the tying entries. 6 FILL IT OUT-NOW!

Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5408 Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach FL 34217
Name *Address/City_ Phone


FOR SALES
& RENTALS
778-4800
Buffalo at New England

1-0023-25


ROD A.EEL

SMini-Resort
S*Best Fishing*
ISLAND
COOKING
s Beer and Wine
S Breakfast
Lunch-Dinner
" Reasonable k
Prices *
"Upstairs Dramatic View"
Air Conditioned *-
50 Guarded Bike-Racks
1/2 mile North of City Pier


CRCO35261

Seattle at LA Raiders


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU* FULL BAR
Monday Night
Football
i Ccicinnati at San Diego
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


AMERICAN
CAR
S WASH

& ETAIUING
BOATS
TRAILERS
CARS
Pittsburgh at Cleveland
5804 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach
778-1617


Free Estimates


AND ROOF MAINTENANCE
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
SRe-Roofs Repairs
SBullt-Ups Shingles
Single Ply Tile
Roofing LI.ENSENSURED
Systemrs cos |
Working for the people of
Manatee County for 32 years.
Courtesy Ouality


748-9362
ashington at New Orlea


-I
,.-i



11
.Boe.P.Tenlg -
]BoMStorngW

Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
-Y- 778-5577
Johnson. Evlnjde,. OMC
Sea DOve & OMC Cobra Stern Drive
SALES AUTHORIZED SERVICE
Denver at NY Jets





0^8\3


HAPPY HOUR
MON -, FRi 4 7 PM
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
795-8083
KirchEN OpeN Daily 11 AM
BANTAM PlAZA BRAdENTON
10104 CoRTEz Rd. W.
Miami at Green Bay


Play the game and
advertise here!
There's a space left
for your business in
the Island's most
talked about
football contest!
NY Giants at Arizona
Call 778-7978
to feature your
business here!


PURPLE

PARROT


Custom T-Shirts
Full Line of
Collegiate & NFL
T-Shirts & Hats
778-0540
Detroit at Minnesota
Anna Maria Island Centre


You don't
have to pay more for
Friendly, Fast,
Professional Service
from Island OwnersI
Sune Day or Next Day Pdc.W
3332 EastBDayDr HolHne ee-dl
778-4277
bn. toFr8. 30 toISeL 30 lto
Kentucky at Florida


ANCHOR
INN
WATCH ALL THE
GAMES HERE
3 Pool Tables
Sunday Euchre
(9:30 am)
Entertainment Fri & Sat
3007 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
778-3085
Houston at Dallas \







Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
-- Water Heaters. -Disposals
SRemodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
Colts at Tampa Bay

LaPenseeA -5
Plumbing, Inc. ..
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach




THE

CLUB
RESTAUIVaT
Daily Specials
Early Bird Specials
4- 6pm
Happy Hour Everyday
|Michigan at Notre Dame
Open 4 pm Daily
at the Centre Shops
Longboat Key
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
383-0543


ED


0


ET0






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 17 li


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
On the artsy side
One of the exhibits this month at the Island
Branch Library is art works by the late Darcie Holton
Smith. The multi-media collection has been put to-
gether by. her parents, George and Eileen Holton of
Holmes Beach, with the help of Bren Jackson at Phoe-
nix Frame.
The story of Darcie and this exhibit is hauntingly
intriguing.
Darcie died in a car wreck last November on a
"rainy, nasty night," her mother said. "The accident
was not Darcie's or anybody's fault."
Darcie, 44, lived in San Diego and had just begun
a whole new phase of her life creating a whole new
career. She graduated from the Advertising Art College
in San Diego and started her own commercial art busi-
ness and she was engaged to be married.
Her dad tells me Darcie's interest in art surfaced at
age 39. Previously she'd had a fulfilling life working
in publishing and as a script revisionist on movies such
as "Cabaret," "Papillon" and "The Man Who Would
Be King."
She was a superlative athlete, especially tennis, and
loved animals she trained thoroughbred horses.
"We didn't even know about the paintings until we
went to her home and found them," says George
Holton, a retired physician.
"Her friends didn't know about them either," says
Eileen.
Her parents found crates filled with art at Darcie's
home and shipped them back to Holmes Beach where
Bren Jackson began to help organize and frame the
collection. It was Jackson who suggested the exhibit at
the library.
While Darcie's collection at the library shows her
excellent use of bold color and composition, there is
also an exhibit of her work nudes and eclectic sub-
jects on the walls of Phoenix Frame which will
probably continue into October.
The two other exhibits at the Branch Library are
Jeanne Blassingame's collection of dog ceramics min-
iatures and Daughters of the American Revolution: A


Celebration of the U.S. Constitution.
The patriotic exhibit, organized by Mrs. Charles
W. Wood of the Manatee Chapter of DAR, is to high-
light Constitution Week, Sept. 17-23. A 20-minute
video, "We the People: the United States Constitution,"
will be shown in the Walker-Swift Meeting Room on
Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 1 and 3 p.m.

On the hungry side
Both the Beach Bistro of Holmes Beach and
Euphemia Haye of Longboat Key were honored as
two of Florida's finest in Florida Trend's annual res-
taurant awards. Euphemia Haye is the winner of an-
other Golden Spoon award which rates this wonderful
restaurant among its top 20. Beach Bistro is rated in the
top 200. Congratulations to both restuarants.
Crabby Bill's is offering a quick lunch for those
on the go. (Who doesn't want lunch faster for a few
extra minutes in the sun?) The deal is for 15 items
served to you in 15 minutes. It's a good selection and
the Caesar salad is tasty.


An untitled nude portrait
by Darcie Holton Smith
is part of an exhibit this
month at Island Branch
Library and Phoenix
Frame and Gallery.
Islander Photo:
Tomara Kafka.


Smith


Count Harry's Continental Kitchens among
some of the area's finer eateries offering a special sum-
mer dining package. At Harry's the deal is for a com-
plete seafood dinner for two including wine for $48.
Reservations are always a good idea.

Stir-it-up is a weekly column covering events,
newsy items and fun things to do for Islanders, most
on the Island, some off-island. We encourage those
who provide food, drink and entertainment to send
us information of your upcoming event or tell us
what's new.
You may FAX, mail or drop by The Islander By-
stander with a press release.
The deadline is noon Friday for the following
week's column.
The office is located at 5408 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217, and the FAX number is 778-9392.
Make sure you include the following information:
the name of your business or organization and the name
of the event, the address, the name of a contact person
and a phone number.


SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Oysters Rockefeller, Top Round of Beef, Veal Oscar, Shrimp Supreme, Roast Pork,
Shrimp Scampi, Scallops, Lobster, Huge Antipasta Salad, Fresh Fruits, Pasta,
More Salads ... ad much ore... Desserts tool
Nightly $ 195 Early Bird seated by 5:30 $1 O95
Nightly from 4 PM, Sunday from 2PM
Summer Early Bird Specials .............. from $4.95
NIGHTLY SPECIALS ............................ from $7.95
GROUPER OSCAR- Fresh Gulf Grouper with white
asparagus with a creamy champagne sauce with crabmeat and $995
mushrooms, topped with provolone cheese, baked to perfection....
LOBSTER OSCAR l/21b. Lobster meat baked over
white asparagus, crabmeat and mushrooms with a creamy $10.95
champagne sauce topped with provolone cheese...................... 1U.




SUNDAY $795 e
BRUNCH
BUFFET
10 AM 2 PM
Over 30 Breakfast and
Dinner Items RESTAURANT
Mimosa Bloody Marys, $ 00 & LOUNGE
Screwdrivers Seabreezes 1
Entertainment 101 S. BAY BLVD.1
SONS-OF-THE-BEACH ANNA MARIA
Sunday 4 PM 778-9611
Oyster Bar on
HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 6 pm Anna Mara
$125 HOUSE COCKTAILS Pler
Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10 p T778-0475
2 for I Well Drinks
$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet







EI PAGE 18 E SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


School Daze...


Anna Maria

School Menu


* 0


Monday, 9/12/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Toasted Cheese Sandwich or Hot Dog on
Bun, Chili, Fruit Juice, Vanilla Ice Cream Cup
Tuesday, 9/13/94
Principal's Choice Day
Breakfast: English Muffin & Jelly or Cereal,
Orange Juice
Lunch: Dinosaur Nuggets or Chicken Fried Beef,
Potato Tots, Broccoli, Juice Bar
Wednesday, 9/14/94
Breakfast: Waffle w/Syrup or Cereal, Cinnamon
Apple Slices
Lunch: Lasagne or Hamburger Patty, Tossed
Salad, Fresh Baked Roll, Strawberry & Banana
Cup
Thursday, 9/15/94
Breakfast: Cheese Toast or Cereal &Toast, Two
Hash Brown Patties
Lunch: Sliced Turkey Sandwich or Mini Chef
Salad, Tater Triangles, Applesauce, Cinnamon
Cookie
Friday, 9/16/94
Breakfast: Pancakes w/Syrup or Cereal, Orange
Juice
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Nachos & Cheese,
Corn, Fresh Fruit, Cake Square


a
a
0

U
S
U
U
0
6
U
S
U
U
U
S
U
0
U
U
S
0
U
U
a
0
0
S
a
a
6
U
U
U
0
S
a
U
U
U
U
U
U
6
U
a
0
a


..... ..0 a...00000 a. W.........


..mlllmlmmlmlmmmmmq.
COUPON
EXPIRES I
9/13/94 1 BOIS
S' 10519Cortez Road
792-5300 1
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

I LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I

S3.99/1 ET$2.99

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET

4 / $SECOND I
4.49/BUFFET 2.99
Immmmml COUPON mmmmmmMI


Green light special
When students in Joyce Ellis's fifth-grade class at
Anna Maria Elementary School are greeted on a
random school day by a big green flashing arrow,
they know it's a double merit day. During the
course of the school week, the students can earn
merit straws to be redeemed for cool behavior
awards such as eating lunch outside or a few more
minutes of recess. On Green Light Special Days, the
incentive-driven students earn two straws instead of
one what a deal. Being cool in school are
students Kyle Bachman (left), Kirsten Faasee and
Marika Barrett.


Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
S Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2605 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, Q$6
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $6.95
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week


'"' EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs toast
| 99 home fries and coffee ... nly $1.75


V Islandinn
SRestaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. M Bradenton Beach


"Ifyou haven't tried it yet, you're I
in for a very pleasant surprise "

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
,. 1 ., on our casual outside patio."
P.S. We have the very best sunsets


Old-Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting) Big Playground
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


Don't forget to
vote Sept. 8!


I'm present
Curtis Sankey, a student in Melanie Moran's kinder-
garten class, tells his teacher he's present for a new
day of school at Anna Maria Elementary by clipping
his personally painted likeness on to the attendance
board. The colorful board teaches discipline and
helps keep order.


Seen the new Islander t-shirt?
4ore than a mullet Wrapper





IISLANDERI X 1 r
All cotton $10. Adult sizes: M, L, X-L
Island Shopping Center 778-7978



OOOR S




S ONE CRAB

RESTAURANT

KING CRAB DINNER $1695
WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo; Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish.............112.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop................2.95
Fri. Combo: Kingcrab & Bulldozer Lobster Tail.........113.95
Sat. Swordfish (Grilled)...................................... 2.95
ON THE BAY END SUNDAY-THURSDAY
OF BROADWAY VISA & 11:30 AM 9:00 PM
LONGBOAT KEY MASTERCARD FRIDAY & SATURDAY
383-1-748 NOW ACCEPTED 11:30 AM 9:30 PM
Sg^gO ^


Mon. thru Fri, 7-')AM
Y')
(,xt during, 11,114h I





'THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 19 Ej


New lunch deal
Ever want to snitch that hot, gooey-looking dessert
right off your buddy's cafeteria tray instead of
enjoying (?) the two crushed cookies wallowing in
the bottom of your lunch sack? Well you can and
without getting into trouble with your buddy. In
addition to purchasing a complete lunch for $1.30 a
day, all lunch items served by the Anna Maria
Elementary cafeteria can now be purchased ala
carte. The prices are: main dish, $1; fruit/vegetables,
-35 cents; dessert, 35 to 50 cents; hot rolls, 10 cents.
With all these choices, as school cafeteria staffers
look on, student Mic Cripe, right, tries to decide how
hungry he'll be by lunch time.


Summer baby boom
The McDonough family are proud to introduce the
newest member of their family. Molly was born June
14 to Ron and Lynn McDonough. Molly has an
older brother, Matthew. Lynn McDonough is Anna
Maria Elementary's Kindergarten and First Grade
Split-Class teacher.


0
Joy Courtney


-Bridge Tender Inn Joe's Eats & Sweets
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn I


There's a 'first' everything
Doing their very best to stay in this thing the teacher
keeps calling a "line," these Anna Maria Elementary
School kindergarten students participate in their first
fire drill. As the noise from sirens and horns filled
the air, the kindergartners join their school's student
body of 403 students safely outside.

ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


JOHN PRESTIA
FRI & SAT SEPT 9 & 10 10PM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


Cafe Robar



HAPPY HouR EVERYDAY
4-7 PM
2 FOR 1 DRINKS
In The Lounge Only
Early Bird Specials 4- 7 Daily


Piano Bar Nightly
Tuesday Sunday
Featuring:
BERNI ROY


~~-2
i$~


Dining Room Open Tues. Sun. 4 PM 10 PM
Lounge Open Tues. Sun. 4 PM 'til? closed Mondays
Reservations Requested, Not Required
204 Pine Ave. Anna Maria 778-6969


* PEIASFO SP. 7t S 1


POPOV VODKA
1.75 $11.8
LTR LTRS$6.9


-K VODK SFS


SCHENLEY VODKA
LTR $11 59
80-PROOF


17 14.99 *9.99


CAINY Ey CANADIAN CLUB FLEISCHMANN'S LTD SEAGRAM'S
CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN WHISKEY CANADIAN HUNTER
S,.7 13.99 98 9 K9Y N12.H99 A12.99
ANCIENT AGE JIM BEAM OLfe -ER YELLOW STONE
BOURBON BOURBON BOURBON
$513.99 *15.69 15.69 LTR12.99
ANCIENAG


ANCIENT AGE
BLENDED WHISKEY
LTR $12.99
CUTTY SARK
SCOTCH
1 *$24.99


j Iq I SPECIALS-*


u-'12HUU I-
1 $12.75


DEWAR'S
WHITE LABEL SCOTCH
u1 $27.99
SOUTHERN COMFORT
80-PROOF
/TR $16.99


EAGRAM'S 7-CROW CALVERT EXTRA
BLENDED WHISKEY BLENDED WHISKEY
. 1 $15.49 T 12.99


MARTIN'S V.V.O.
SCOTCH 86-PROOF
;T $17.99


BACARDI RUM
1, $17.69
LTR *10.49


WHITESIDE
SCOTCH 86-PROOF
1a 16.99


J.CLUNY
SCOTCH WHISKEY
5 $13.99


POPOV GIN
L $11.95


SEAGRAM'S GIN
Sp$15.75
KAHLUA
COFFEE UQUEUR

1" $13.99


CLOSED FOR REMODELING
SEPT. 6 thru 18 fh
Lunch Dinner Spirits
OPEN 11:30AM 10PM DAILY OPEN 7 DAYS
778-4849 135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach


The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
I Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
SSugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 GulfDrive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge


SCOTCH
1 $15.99


J & B SCOTCH
1. $26.99


BAILEY'S
IRISH CREAM
750 $14 -


J


.;W


^aa- i 11 1 .........-1.1. .i .. -... ....-


STOYLICHNAYA
IMPORTED RWIAN VODKA
so -
R 0
LTR F $16.99


, ,


I


I I


--L


00 1- A- nli I-







II PAGE 20 E SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports

Anna Maria City
No reports

Bradenton Beach
Aug. 25, warrant arrest, 2200 block of Avenue A.
Aug. 26, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown smashed out the driver's
side window of the vehicle. Nothing was taken.
Aug. 26, grand theft, 1501 Gulf Dr., Smuggler's
Cove. A person unknown removed two double-wide
beach chairs valued at $258, four single beach chairs
valued at $356, and two flags valued at $80.
Aug. 27, grand theft, 107 Gulf Dr. S., Key West
Willy's. The victim reported that a person unknown
removed scuba equipment valued at $3,895 from the
bed of his truck.
Aug. 28, Marchman Act, Cortez Bridge. The of-
ficer observed the subject passed out in the middle of
the bridge. He woke the subject and smelled the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage. The subject didn't know
where he lived and was placed in protective custody.
Aug. 29, attempted burglary to an automobile,
1800 block of Gulf Drive. The victim reported that a
person unknown attempted to enter his vehicle.
Aug. 29, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown punched out the trunk lock
and removed a leather pack valued at $45, $200 in cash,
$200 in Canadian currency, two airline tickets valued
at $600, credit cards, bank cards and two check books.
Aug. 31, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
A person unknown entered a vehicle through an open
window and removed a book bag valued at $10, school
books valued at $60, a wallet valued at $15, a driver's li-
cense, social security card and birth certificate.





SILVER QUEEN CORN_
'FRESH DAILY'

BANANAS "VINE RIPE'
,^ 190LB. TOMATO
LIVE BEST CUBAN SHRIMP
BLUE
CRABS AROUND OYSTERS
01s/6 Mfa nae Arnve. /W.(fCor/nrS /at St.& antee )




CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED
"roof that great things comn e in
small packages.' Knsty Nichols,
Sarasota Herald-Tribune
"Intimate ... an evening of relaxation and fine
dining.' Longboat Observer
"Superb ... sensational ... I want to tell the
world." Pat Benson Bradenton Herald




&Mfu tiny, Inn



Intimate Dinner For Two
Including Wine
$39.95
BLACK ANGUS BEEF SELECTIONS
THE FRESHEST GULF CATCHES
Prepared 10 Ways Nightly
Exotic Grains & Wide Selection of Pastas
ON VACATION REOPENING MON. SEPT. 12
COME CELEBRATE OUR FIRST YEAR
Hours
Serving Dinner 5:00 -10:00 Monday thru Saturday
fPKservations Suggesttd
_AvailaBle forPrivate Partits
\ ^ 605M anatee Avenue at 'East Bay 'Dr.
H \ onm es Beaci
s(813) 778-5440


Aug. 31, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown entered a locked vehicle by
smashing a window and removed pants and a shirt val-
ued at $82, a wallet valued at $75, credit cards, a
driver's license and a social security card belonging to
one victim and a CD case valued at $15 and 15 CDs
valued at $200 from a second victim.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 26, warrant arrest, 5300 block of Marina
Drive.
Aug. 26, suspicious vehicle, 100 block of 73rd
Street. The officer, responding to a report of a sus-
picious vehicle parked in the roadway, found a ve-
hicle on the side of the road with its doors locked
and ignition on. The officer gained entry, turned off
the ignition and checked the registration. The ve-
hicle was found to be registered to a subject who was
staying at the Coconuts Resort. The officer contacted
the vehicle's owner who said he did not realize he
left the vehicle running.
Aug. 27, fleeing to elude and possession of mari-
juana, Sixth Street and Manatee Avenue. The officer
reported that while traveling south in the 3700 block of
Gulf Drive, he observed a vehicle driven by Charles
Braun, 21, of Bradenton, without headlights. When
Braun saw the patrol car, according to the report, he put
on his headlights, accelerated and drove off the right
side of the road. The officer turned around and pursued
the vehicle over the causeway.
Braun attempted to turn south on Palma Sola
Boulevard, skidded into the grass and came to a stop.
He then recovered control of the vehicle and fled
south on Palma Sola Boulevard, running several stop
signs, the report stated. The officer radioed other
officers that he was unable to continue the pursuit.
A Bradenton Beach officer advised the Holmes
Beach officer that Braun had crashed the vehicle in
the 700 block of Palma Sola Boulevard and was


placed in custody. When Braun was searched, the
officer found a bag of marijuana.
The two passengers in the vehicle said they repeat-
edly asked Braun to stop but he would not They were
not charged.
Aug. 27, disturbance family members argu-
ing, 600 block of Hampshire Lane.
Aug. 27, petty larceny of two bicycles, 300 block
of 61st Street.
Aug. 27, burglary to an automobile, 4000 Gulf
Dr., Manatee County Public Beach. A person unknown
broke the driver's side window of the vehicle after an
unsuccessful attempt to "jimmy" the door and removed
a purse containing a driver's license, a check book and
a credit card as well as a diaper bag valued at $80 and
$150 in cash.
Aug. 27, found property a Sony CD player for
an automobile, 400 block of Bay Palms Drive.
Aug. 28, damage, 400 block of 28th Street. A
person unknown shattered the windshield of an auto-
mobile.
Aug. trespass, 6504 Gulf Dr., White Sands. The
complainant reported juveniles swimming in the pool.
He chased them away.
Aug. 29, found property a set of keys to a GM
automobile, 5900 block of Marina Drive.
Aug. 30, suspicious, 200 block of 84th Street.
The complainant reported four juveniles walking
around a construction site.
Aug. 31, traffic reckless driver, 2700 block of
Gulf Drive.
Aug. 31, disturbance two friends arguing,
3300 block of Sixth Avenue.
Aug. 31, retail larceny of $20 in gasoline, 3015
Gulf Dr., Citgo.
Aug. 31, burglary, 6900 block of Palm Avenue. A
person unknown forced the lock on the door, entered the
residence and removed jewelry valued at $1,000, $40 to
$50 in cash and coins and a camera valued at $75.


"The best hamburgers ana --.,
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." ffiss
2uffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. e
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501

The Islander Bystander ... it's the best
news on the Island ... and it's free!







Summer Seafood
'N Extravaganza!/

Dinner for Two $48.00
Appetizers
Grilred BronzedSrinp witi 'Honey Mustard Sauce
Nowa Scotia Salmon Mousse
creamed Herring with Appres and Onions
crispy garden Salad
Entrees
Salmon with StrawferryVfiuagrette Sauce
SauteedSoft ShelfCrab6 Afredo over Angeifair Pasta
Grouper Maryland witiLwrup Cra
S"imp & Sca[fop gyon over Angeltfair mzsta
Desserts
Harry's famous Key L ime ie
Cfocofate Mousse with Raspberry Sauce
Coffee or Tea
Wine
LouisLatour French Chardonnay
Belvedere Wfite Zyinfandef

Tuesday thru Sunday 383-0777
525 St. Judes Dr. LBK (Behind Circle K)


Monday .)
Dom Night Tuesday
Guess the time of sunset. "Sandbar Sunset" Night!
The closest guess wins a That's our newest frozen
bottle of Dom Perignon! specialty drink, and
its two-for-one!
Wednesday
Native Night! Thursday
Show your Bradenton, Island Night!
Sarasota, or Island ID when Join the "South Seas" festivities
you order and we'll knock as you sway to the music
20% of your entree! of Tropical Steel.


Every night enjoy SANDBAR
early bird YAF00aSPoo
specials inside
from 4-6 p.m.
100 Spring Avenue I Anna Maria, Florida I 778-0444






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 21 1G3


I ANNOUNCEMENT


Firefighter phone
solicitation
again causes problems
Once again, local phone solicitors are causing
problems for the Anna Maria Fire District. Callers
are imploring Islanders to purchase tickets to a coun-
try & western dance.
"It's the Sarasota/Manatee Firefighters Union," ex-
plained Fire Chief Andy Price. "The callers are misrep-
resenting who they are, saying they are from Holmes
Beach and that the money will benefit our fire depart-
ment and emergency personnel. Don't be fooled by
them. They do nothing for us and none of the money
comes back to us."
Price stressed that his department does not do any
phone solicitation but is preparing for its annual benefit
Halloween Dance. Tickets for the dance will be mailed to
every Island household. "If you want to donate to our
firefighters, buy tickets to the dance," he said.

Free immunizations for
kids at AMICC
The HRS Manatee County Public Health Unit's
Mobile Unit will offer free immunizations to children up
to 18 years old on Friday, Sept. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center (AMICC).


While appointments are not necessary be sure to
bring shot records with you.
For more information call AMICC at 778-1908 or
the Manatee County Public Health Unit at 748-0666,
ext 1424 or 1269.

Dog Obedience, Agility
classes taught by 4-H
An orientation meeting for youth interested in 4-H
Dog Obedience and Agility Classes is set for Thursday,
Sept. 1, from 7 to 9 p.m., at the Manatee County Agri-
culture Complex, 1303 17th St. W., Palmetto.
Beginning classes cover basic obedience com-
mands. All work is on a lead and dogs should be at least
four months old. Owners must bring a photocopy of
dog's up-to-date inoculation record, a properly fitting
metal or nylon training collar and six-foot lead.
Intermediate classes teach control of dogs on lead
and start-off lead work. Dogs should have completed
a basic class to move onto intermediate level.
Advanced classes are for those who have completed
basic and Intermediate levels and cover exercises for
Novice, Grad-Novice, Open and Utility levels.
The fall classes run for 10 weeks on Thursdays
beginning in September at the Agricultural Center in
Palmetto. The basic class is 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., interme-
diate is from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., and advanced classes
are 7:30 to 9 p.m. Graduation will be held on Nov. 10.


Dog Agility Classes are also being offered on the
first and third Fridays each month to teach dogs to
jump, climb and crawl through obstacles. Class times
vary depending on time of year, but usually start at 6:30
p.m. 4-H competitions are held at various times during
the year and there are also opportunities for competi-
tion in AKC, TNCKA, and USDAA trials.
Those interested in 4-H Dog Obedience and Agil-
ity classes can register for the fall sessions by calling
the 4-H office at 722-4524.

Telephone book
recycling solution
New telephone books are arriving on the Island, how-
ever, Manatee County left it up to Islanders to drive to
Bradenton for the nearest recycling drop-off location for
their old phone books.
At the recent campaign face-off between county com-
mission candidates Pat Glass and Kent Chetlain, The Is-
lander Bystander asked for assistance in providing a drop-
off location more convenient to Islanders.
At press time last week, there was no reply from
the candidates. Several phone calls made by The Is-
lander to Manatee County Solid Waste Division re-
sulted in a drop-off location at Holmes Beach City Hall
from Sept. 10 to 18. /
Islanders may continue to recycle phone books this
week at the newspaper office.


Beach Attire OK
We Accommodate Large Parties
with 2 locations to serve you ...
Great Family Fun & Atmosphere
IEEM? SIAMF D *.MAULDM
W ICIVII11S Ien M1ER

o-CIABBY HOURJ-1
3PM 6PM DAILY )
50 Drafts *1" Well Drinks

(PMT TONB E MO CB & DAIMME
5325 MARINA DRIVF AVE A5872 14 S. WEST
(formerly Pete Reynard's (US. 41)
Holmes Beach CABB Bradenton
778-9566 DAY! 751-3070




c,' B O HAPPY HOURI
:--- [- Mon-Frid 4-7 PM

795-8083
SUNDAY:
L'.-_.. HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY
WITH NASCAR RACES
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT

Wednesday u s
I &Thursday Nights -
8 to Midnight

The
Chandler
Bros.
Fri & Sat
September 9 & 10
9 PM 1 AM

I Sundays
Now Serving Breakfast 9 12
Also $1.00 Vodka Day
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


Trol



RESTAURAITW
DAILY SPECIALS
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 P.M.
HAPPY HQUR EVERYDAY


M U OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.* Longboat Key *383-0543


I





j1 PAGE 22 E SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Time to tithe, Toots: clean up your shoreside act


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
Come on it's time to spend a couple of hours
paying your tithe for the beautiful Manatee County
shoreline. Yep, it's the annual Coastal Clean-up, and
it's scheduled for September 17, 9 a.m. to noon.
That's a Saturday.
Last year nearly 1,100 Manatee County good citi-
zens contributed a couple of hours of their time I say
"contributed" because it's always a pleasure to get
down to the waters' edge and the results were im-
pressive.
In Florida, 17,000 people picked up 360,000
pounds of trash from more than 1,200 miles of shore-
line. World-wide, 190,000 people in 55 countries took
part in the now five-year-old program.
If you're willing to help and meet some people
who, like yourself, value our precious shoreline, give
a call to Susan Hancock at Keep Manatee Beautiful.
Hancock is available Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at 795-8272. She'll assign you
an area and provide any supplies you'll need to take
part.

More than just beautification
We can all appreciate how our enjoyment of the
waterfront is diminished by trash, but remember this
trash also poses a threat to Florida's wildlife. Lots of
birds and fish suffer when they become entangled in
discarded fishing line and other plastic debris like those
stupid six-pack rings.
So this is your chance to do something, and maybe
make some new friends along the way. And don't for-
get, the Good Lord credits you with a full one every
time you pick up somebody else's empty can off the
shore.
Give Susan a call. It's one of those "guaranteed to
make you feel better events" that doesn't come by of-
ten enough.

Racing: a feast for
spirit and stomach
Entries were up sharply this year at the Sarasota
Sailing Squadron's Labor Day Regatta. More than
1,000 people in 266 boats, ranging from tiny prams to
35-foot racers, jammed the club last weekend. The
throng heard some fine jazz music and raced them-
selves silly.

SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person "
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lie. Capt.


Racing sailors round a mark during the Labor Day Regatta, sponsored by the Sarasota Sailing Squadron.


The air was especially good Saturday and, interest-
ingly, it seemed to be blowing better on Sarasota Bay
than out in the Gulf, where the big boats were racing.
Regardless of where the racers were, everybody
seemed to have a wonderful time especially the kids.
About a ton of barbecue was wolfed down at the
prerequisite after-race feast. As the old man on Mallory
dock in Key West used to sing, "If you don't get none,
don't blame me."

Killer zebras are coming!
John Stevely, Sea Grant Extension Agent in Palmetto,
says the pesky zebra mussel is headed Florida's way.
The zebra mussel has a yellowish or brownish D-
shaped shell with alternating dark and light bands of
color (thus the name "zebra"). It can grow up to two
inches in length and usually grows in clusters with
many other zebra mussels. It is the only freshwater
mussel that firmly attaches itself to solid objects like
rocks and boat hulls. They don't seem to be very good
eating.
Why is it important you know about this creature?
An exotic species, the zebra mussel poses a multi-
billion-dollar threat to drinking-water supplies, clogs
water-intake pipes, forms clumps that can damage
boats, kills native clams and fouls beaches with razor-
sharp shells.
Cities drawing drinking water from the Great
Lakes are already experiencing big problems with the

Snook Trout Redfish Flounder *

| LIGHT TACKLE .
i / IN& SPORTFISHING i
SCAPT. RICK GROSS
V2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS -
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia *


little mussel as it's causing big problems with their
piping systems.
The critter was accidentally introduced into the
Great Lakes through the discharge of international
ships' ballast water.
First discovered in Lake St. Clair, north of Detroit,
in June 1988, zebra mussels have since spread through-
out the Great Lakes and the entire northern river sys-
tem in the United States. The pesky critters have been
found as far south as New Orleans.
The larvae of the zebra mussel can be carried in
boat bilge water (that's how it got here), or even some-
thing as mundane as bait buckets. In addition, both ju-
venile and adult mussels can hitchhike on boat hulls,
engine drive units and even boat trailers.
It was initially thought (hopefully), that Florida's
waters'were too warm for the zebra mussel.
But no such luck.
We are sure, however, that the critter only lives in
freshwater, and can survive in up to eight parts per
1,000 salinity.
That means the St. Johns River on the east coast
near Jacksonville is the most-likely place the creature
will find a home in Florida. But from then on, it's just
a matter of time before it works its way south into our
local freshwater systems.
Oh well, it's just another little challenge for those
of us lucky enough to live in paradise.
See you next week.


Y Tzz to Green Golf

New Golf Balls In Stock!
The Longest Balls*
T TOV-^FLITE
Choose The Right Ball
For Your Game.
778-5184
Open Mon thru Sat 9 to 5 (Sunday by appointment only)
2501 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach


Please remember to vote in the Sept. 8 primary election.
Your choice is important.


BUY IT!
SELL IT!
FIND IT!


The classified
section in
The Islander
BUY-stander
really works. You
get fast
results for little
buck$. Visit our
office in the Island
Shopping Center
to place your ad.


BEWARE ...
there have been reports of telephone so-
licitation coming onto the Island again.
We strongly suggest you get a second opinion
and estimate on your air conditioning or
duct cleaning needs. Our opinions and esti-
mates are totally FREE services.
We live here, we work here, the Island is our
business.
Always remember "you get what you pay for."




igAL OF uRmF y
WE RECOMMEND
AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING SALES & SERVICE RHEEM PRODUCTS
DUCT CLEANING FPL PARTICIPATING
7780773 SINCE 1982 INDEPENDENT
7 I0 CACO 56298 CONTRACTOR


Problem with

Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon
Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center -':
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 .......






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 23 1i3

Snook season brings small, hungry linesiders


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Snook season is here at last Early reports indicated
the linesiders are on the small size, but hungry and re-
sponding well to local anglers. Offshore, snapper and
mackerel are the best bets. And Capt Bradow has a fish
story for the week: a cobia that he estimates at better
than 50 pounds took his hook and put up a fight-and-
a-half before it broke off.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there are catching mangrove snapper, mackerel, a
couple of big out-of-season redfish, cobia and a few
legal-sized snook.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching black drum and a couple of snook.
Bob Kilv landed a snook that tipped the scales at 22
pounds, and stretched out to 42 inches. Kevin said
morning mackerel fishing is especially good.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said a lot of redfish
are being caught naturally, since the season just
closed. Offshore, grouper are a good catch in about 85
feet of water, as are dolphin, bonito and mackerel.

Jamboree kicks off

Island soccer
The Third Annual Island Soccer Kick-off Jamboree
starts at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 9, at the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, 407 Magnolia, Anna Maria.
Domino's pizza and soda are available for purchase.
Uniforms are provided for players except for black shorts
which can be purchased at the AMICC for $10.
All teams will play mini-games.
Division I teams are LaPensee Plumbing, School
for Constructive Play, Power Pros Pressure Cleaning,
and Hayo and Meyer Construction. Division H teams
are Island Pest Control, Dowling Park, Island Real Es-
tate, Mr. Bones, Beach Barn and Uncle Dan's. Division
III teams are Air and Energy, Ben Webb Landscaping,
Holmes Beach Mini Storage, Island Animal Clinic,
Galati Marine, Pettigrew and The Longboat Observer.
Island baseball card
club meets Saturday
The Island Community Baseball Card Club will
hold a Sports Card Show on Saturday, Sept. 10, from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Roser Memorial Community
Church, 514 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
Kids of all ages are welcome to either trade cards
or learn about the hobby. Comic book collectors are
invited, too. Free popcorn, drinks and pizza provided
by Dominos Pizza while it lasts.
To reserve a free table or for more information call
778-7918.


Trolling is the best bet for the fast-swimming fish.
Capt. Zack with the Dee Jay II said snook season
is off to an "average" start, with a lot of small linesiders
coming to the bait. Trout hunting is above average,
though, and offshore mangrove snapper, Spanish
mackerel and cobia are good bets.
Capt. Dave on the Neva-Miss said grouper action
is picking up offshore, with gag and red grouper com-
ing to the hook in 70-110 feet of water. For reef fish-
ers, snapper and barracuda are there, as are some BIG
mackerel less than 10 miles from shore.
Toni at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip averaged 150 head of Key West grunts, sand
perch, sea bass and porgies. The six-hour trip averaged
110 head of vermilion snapper, land snapper, mangrove
snapper, porgies, Key West grunts, scamp, a couple of red
grouper and a queen trigger fish. The nine-hour trip av-
eraged 40 head of mangrove snapper, yellow tail, banded
rudder fish, porgies, scamp, red and black grouper.
On my boat Magic we went to Pine Island to do
some backwater fishing, bringing back good catches of


trout, snook and mangrove snapper. One day we caught
and released 20 redfish.
Capt. Rick Gross said snook is the best bet, with
most running small but a few in the 10-pound range.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he has caught several
cobia, with one whopper that he estimated at more than
50 pounds before it broke off. Trout and reds are also
good catches.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said there are good
reports of snook, plenty of redfish and mackerel being
caught near the piers. Bill suggests using white jigs and
silver spoons for those mackerel.
Capt. Phil Shields said there are plenty of dolphin
being caught offshore, with most of the bigger fish
coming from about 30 miles off Anna Maria.
Capt. Todd Romine said his charters are catching
snook, redfish and trout.
Capt. Tom Chaya said snook and reds are his best
bets too, with offshore action featuring mackerel and
mangrove snapper.
Good luck and good fishing.


Pretty fish
Rusty Carter holds up a six-pound yellowtail snapper caught offshore recently with Capt. Phil Shields on the
Reef Reacher.


OPEN AND COVERED
GALATI BOAT SLIPS
YACHT BASIN
< AVAILABLE

TO ALL CUSTOMERS
GAS & DIESEL PUMP DISCOUNTS
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN DAYS A WEEK 8 TO5 e*



We Have ISLAND LUMBER Many
A Full AND HARDWARE Types Of
Selection 213 54th St., Holmes Beach 778-3082 Wood
S Custom 0 Pressure
Millwork Treated
Pine
* Formica Spruce
Tops and I & Cedar
Cabinets 0 Hardwoods
* Fiberglass
Screening 0 Doors and
* Paints and
Stains "Why go into town and risk losing your Lattice

* Roofing load, when we can deliver it for you!" Panels
Materials If we don't stock it we can get it for you.
OPEN: MONDAY thru FRIDAY 7:30 to 5 SATURDAY 8 to 12 Plywood


SALES & SEKVICU
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


~5aa)
~


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW Fuel Live Bait
Thu9/8 1:41 2.4ft 7:59 0.3ft 2:53 2.0ft 7:45 1.1ft Ship's Store
Frl 9/9 2:13 2.5ft 8:55 0.3ft 3:53 1.8ft 8:10 1.2ft Bottom Painting
sat9/10 2:52 2.6fft 10:01 0.3ft 5:10 1.6fft 8:32 1.4ft Boat Storage
Sun 9/11 3:38 12.6ft 11:17 0.3ft -- -- Bulk Oil
Mon9/12 4:38 2.5ft - 12:47 0.4ft Consignment/
Tue 9/13 5:58 2.4ft - 2:19 0.4ft Brokerage
Wed 9/14 7:33 2.3ft --- 11:20 1.7ft 3:30 0.4ft BOAT RENTAL
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.

Don't forget to vote on Thursday, September 8.
The primary election is important. You don't have a choice
if you don't exercise your right and vote.







RID PAGE 24 K SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Kenneth L. Killian
Kenneth L. Killian, 88, of Holmes Beach died Aug.
31 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Killian came to this area
from New York in 1974. He was a retired restaurant man-
ager. He was a Catholic. He served in the U.S. Army.
Arrangements were by Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, Holmes Beach. Burial was in Manasota Memo-
rial Park, Oneco.
Carmen Costa Vda.
Ramos
Carmen Costa Vda. Ramos, 53, of Holmes Beach
died Sept. 1 at home.
There is no visitation. Memorial Mass will be at 10
a.m., on Saturday, Sept. 10, at St. Bernard Catholic



|I-fll?


FALL IN LOVE with this convenient ground floor
condo! It's completely re-decorated with tasteful
colors in furnishings and window treatments. The
enclosed lanai has views of the water and
greenbelt area. New A/C, close to pool, come see
how nice it would be to live here! $137,500. Call
Judy Duncan 778-1589 eves.


THE BAYOU: Two bedroom, 1 bath condominium
with a water view completely refurbished in 1991.
Just steps to bay, beach and Anna Maria fishing
pier. Tumkey furnished. $86,500. Call Mimi Wilde
755-7752.


CATCH A BARGAINI Now it's your turn to own
your own home. Two bedroom, 1.5 bath villa
close to everything in central Holmes Beach the
gulf, bay, shopping, churches, school (easy walk
for the kids). $74,500. Call Mimi Wilde for an ap-
pointment 755-7752 eves.


m REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS -


Church, Holmes Beach, with the Rev. Benjamin Gorr
officiating. Toale Brothers Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements.
Born in Humacao, Puerto Rico, Mrs. Ramos came
to Holmes Beach from San Juan, Puerto Rico, six years
ago. She was an academic librarian. She was a mem-
ber of St. Bernard Catholic Church. She received a
master of arts degree from the University of Puerto
Rico and worked toward a doctorate at the University
of London.
She is survived by two daughters, Annette M. of
Boston and Patricia V. of Highland Park, N.J.; a son,
Pedro Antonio Ramos Costa of Holmes Beach; her
mother, Carmen T. Quinland of San Juan; two sisters,
Ines Norman of Bradenton Beach and Teresa M. Costa
of Holmes Beach; and a brother, Agustin R. Costa of
San Juan.

Islander out-of-town, paid
subscriptions top 900!
Thanks to our loyal readers who want to
keep up on Island news and happenings
while they are away, the Sept. 1 issue of The
Islander Bystander will be mailed to a record
number of out-of-town and out-of-state
subscribers! More mail subscribers than any
other paper distributed on Anna Maria Island
during the last 10 years!
Thank you all!


INSTANT ATTRACTION
All the charm of Gulf front Anna Maria is wrapped up
in this historic 4 bedroom, 3 bath beach home. The feel
of early 1900's downstairs is complimented by a modern
over 700 sf suite upstairs. Come and see! You won't
want to leave! $395,000. Call Ken Rickett 778-3026.
DIRECT GULF FRONT 2BR/2BA turnkey fur-
nished, great walking beach, beautiful sunsets, protected
parking. All for $175,000. Call Stan Williams 795-4537.
STEPS TO GULF Two bedroom, two bath unit with
easy access to and from Island. Spectacular sunsets. TURN-
KEY FURNISHED, clean and very affordable. Views of
Bay. $90,900. Lynn Hostetler 778-4800.
ISLAND BUSINESS Well established Island diner for
sale. Excellent location! Unlimited potential! Call Den-
nis McClung for details. 778-4800.
WATERFRONT BARGAIN Luxury at bargain price
describes this spacious two bedroom, two bath condo.
Enjoy canal front living with boating, tennis, pool, hot
tub and much more, all at a great location. Live like a
King for just $79,900. Call Ken Rickett 778-3026.


MARVELOUS MARTINIQUE! Wonderful 2
bedroom, 2 bath Gulffront corner unit with
southern view. Turnkey furnished! Storage
areas, heated pools, tennis, secured lobby.
$179,900. #59241. Call Carol Heinze, 792-
5721.
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME HERE! Rare
vacant lot in Anna Maria City directly across
from most desirable beach. This lot affords
direct Gulf view & 75' frontage! $170,000.
#59178. Ask for Roni Price, 778-5585.
BRADENTON CHURCH with seating for 110,
plus building next door as office. For further
details, please ask for Carol Heinze, 792-
5721. $119,900. #59130.


ISLAND HOME ...


3BR/2BA on
canal with
caged pool!
$159,900.
Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR*
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


(D
M

CL
CD
3

"n

CL
2)
m
m



(D

(D
"n

CL


Loefgren to serve on

state Chamber board
Gail Loefgren, executive director of the Longboat
Key Chamber of Commerce, has been elected to a
three-year term on the Florida Chamber of Commerce
Executives (FCCE) Board of Directors.
The FCCE is a state organization of chamber.
executives which offers seminars, conferences, net-
working opportunities and publications for cham-
ber executives and staff.
Loefgren will oversee the publication of the
FCCE Membership Directory and will serve on the
committee which organizes regional conferences
for small chambers.









SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!
778-1751 2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
BradeEiton Beach
Evenings FL 34217 Office


The Prudential
Florida Realty
5340-1 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217
-(813) 778-0766





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 25 ID


EVERY BEST

ISLAND VACATION RENTALS







Ann Harmon Sally Grieg

VERY BES'
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Mike 778-6696
Norman 1-800-367-1617
Realty inc. __E
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


RENTAL
MANAGEMENT


Julie


Call Julie ...
to rent your property quickly
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.
778-6665
1-800-749-6665


Sale of the week
by Doug Dowling
This 4 bedroom, 2 and a half bath home at 417 28th
St. in Holmes Beach was listed by Dave Moynihan of
Dick Wagner Realty in Dec. 1993 for $379,000.
Moynihan sold it last month for $355,000. It was built
in 1978 with water frontage on Sarasota Bay and a
canal. The tropical setting includes numerous coconut
palms. The home features natural cedar, cathedral
ceilings, 2,550 square feet of living area
and a heated pool.






(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. 0. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216


Associates After Hours
Christine T. Shaw ............ 778-2847
Nancy Guliford ................ 778-2158


E7& Uijncdfy L'EaffItat9PwfF ilonafl
,Sftc2afWztnin inimdfl SFiWPaoa lfsdibjZts1
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use of professional videotape.


SExclusive
r Waterfront
I j CEstates
Video Collection


ISLANDER


'The Best News"


SALES


ElIOt


neaL mannausa
ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS


Barbara A. Sato .................. 778-3509
Marcella Cornett ................778-5919
Michael Advocate ............... 778-0608


M L S I -MR
MILS 1 U! AfAT


BUSINESS
CENTER


RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


SeringAnn Maia inc-199 ALL(1) 7-24 A 7847
21GufDive ASSOIAESAFERHOR


GULF FRONT Exceptional value for this 2BR di-
rect Gulf front apartment in small ten unit complex
with quiet Holmes Beach location. Pool, wide
sandy beach and walking distance to shops and
restaurants. Offered at $129,900. Call Dave
Moynihan for details.


HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE Well maintained
Island home with good central Holmes Beach loca-
tion. Two bedroom, two bath with large garage and
storage area. One block to Gulf beaches. Just re-
duced to $109,500. Cal Dave Moynihan for details.


GULFFRONTI Great views and wide sandy walk-
ing beach enhance this turnkey'fumished 2BR/
2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with pool, cov-
ered parking, and storage room. Excellent rental
opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call Dave
Moynihan.

ISLAND LOTS
* HOLMES BEACH BAYFRONT ... 85 x
130'... deep water and spectacular views
... $189,500.
- HOLMES BEACH CANALFRONT ... 90
x 109' ... deep water and view of Bayou
... $159,500.
- WOODED HOLMES BEACH LOT ...
100 x 200' ... close to beach and zoned
for 1 to 4 units ... $129,900.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


Custom manufactured furniture for 631 Foxworth ...
from North Carolina. It starts at the fireplace mantel,
custom built by the present owner, and sort of mend-
ers around a portion of the great room south wall to
the west wall. It's there if you want it; if you don't want
it, you can have a cocktail party and instead of get-
ting out the secret fire hose, you can have one of the
most expensive fire known to Key Royale right in your
own fireplace. Value #8 to contemplate. Doug
Dowling Realty. 408 Pine Ave. 778-1222.
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL
ESTATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists
extending both Personal AND Professional Services in New Con-
struction & Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Mar-
ket Analysis, Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best
Property Management and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75
Yrs. Combined Experience AND Smilesl
a~i.;I.=IJHA'^MIIiH>l~ll=





Oj3 PAGE 26 N SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


1c e7 Comnwclal Residential Free Estimates
a ndy y' Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
LaI Wf \Hauling By the cut orby the month.
I II Service 1 *13 YEARS EXPERIENCE .*INSURED
\ I .345 / GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
it\g -"AND SATISIFACTION_-





MV-03599


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



S STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
- ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
S* LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
l MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558

log~a~


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


J.I.

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


*S A AC9SI I D


3-CUSHION brown couch $350. Octagon shaped
end table $20. Pro-form auto Incline Treadmill $400.
Fun Island Raft with oars $25. 779-2129.
LARGE WELL-MADE walnut desk and matching
typewriter table. Best offer. 778-9454.
14K DIAMOND engagement ring and wedding
band. Wedding band has 4 small diamonds. $300
for both. Colt radar detector $75. 778-5323.
TWIN BEDS, box springs, mattresses, frames, $100
both. Round kitchen table, 2 chairs, new $75. Chest
of drawers, new $60. $200 takes all 778-6112.
DOUBLE MATTRESS, box springs, frame, like
new, sheets, pillow cases and ruffle included $75.
Two bikes $20 each. 778-5551.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


MTN BIKE, 10 speed bike, furniture, lamps, clothes,
misc. 516 72nd St., Holmes Beach. 9 am. Saturday,
Sept. 10.


FOUND Female, peach colored, older Golden
Retriever. Brown leather collar. Vicinity of Anna
Maria School, 8/25. 778-5412.

LOST Shih-tzu, black and white male. 8/15/94.
Vicinity of St. Bernards Church. 778-5086.
LOST I've lost my dog. White Pomeranian.
Friendly, fluffy, missed terribly. Any information
please call 778-2162.


ST. JUDE NOVENA May the Sacred Heart of Jesus
be adored, glorified, loved and preserved through-
out the world, now and forever. Sacred Heart of
Jesus, have mercy on us! St. Jude worker of
miracles, pray for us! Say this prayer 9 times a day,
by the 8th day your prayer will be answered. It has
never been known to fail. Publication must be prom-
ised. Thank you St. Jude and Sacred Heart of
Jesus. C.H.
CREDIT CARD PROCESSING, small businesses
can offer credit card processing for low rates. Mer-
chants Bank card, please ask for Hal. 800-882-
5469.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House
calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


MOTORHOME 1978 Midas. Low mileage, 6 new
tires, generator, air, power steering, air suspension,
lots of storage, good condition. $6000.778-2574 or
778-4457. 0


BOAT SLIP for rent, Holmes Beach. 778-7039.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


EXPERIENCED Retail Sales. Apply in person.
10010 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria.

EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER 35-40 hrs week.
Excellent atmosphere, salary and benefits. Apply in
person Thurs, Fri, Sat from 8am-2pm. Blue Water
Beach Club, 6306 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.
STATE FARM Insurance Agent needs customer
service representative to be a team player. Salary
open. Apply at 5500 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota.
LABOR needed for lawn service. Call 778-1345 af-
ter 9:00 AM.
WANTED YOUNG MAN for odd jobs and yard work.
$5 per hour. Own transportation needed. Call T.H.
Cole, 779-1213.


Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you
interested in learning the history of Anna Maria Is-
land? Get involved with the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE
NEED YOU! Call Dorothy Steven, 795-0148 if you
can give a few hours of community service.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-6247.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home re-
pairs. Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails,
etc. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO DETAILING at your home or office, at your
convenience. Complete detailing includes wash,
wax, shampoo, engine & underbody cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon on
mobile number 356-4649. Please leave a message
for quick reply if not available.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
K.D. FAIRS will do painting or wallpapering very
reasonably! 778-1032.
CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs exp. Call Bradenton
Fiberglass for free estimate 755-1550.
HOUSEWORK, YARD WORK, run errands, miscel-
laneous jobs. 795-5098.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home re-
pairs. Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails,
etc. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. 778-4335.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-
5183.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
SELL your boat fast in The Islander Bystander.


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!










AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Everything is included for $85
on a normal size car.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal& Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned &
Silicone Protected. And our mobile service
means no one has to drive your car.
By appointment.
at your home or ofice.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 A PAGE 27 I[(


SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, roof coating & repairs, drywall repairs. Work
guaranteed. Low prices. 778-0410.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, bookkeeping, legal,
ect. Neg. Call Frank at 778-6126, eves. 778-6127.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fireplace,
jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
Intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Williams
at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully furnished
condo, 2BR/2BA; pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA.. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. Fully furnished, close
to aundromat. No street to cross on a short walk to
beach. 778-1576.

WEEKEND SPECIAL: Fri., Sat. & Sun. $160. 1BR/
1BA Gulf front condo. Beautiful beach, beautiful
sunsets. Weekly, $300. 778-2832.

GULF FRONT, 2BR/1BA large duplex, sundeck,
private beach. Cable, telephone, fully equipped.
$350/week. 1-813-988-1344.
BRADENTON BEACH, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, walk
to beach. Available now, $550 per month. No pets.
Call Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MAINLAND, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished, .close to shop-
ping, screened lanais. $650 per month. Call Island
Real Estate, 7786066.
GULF FRONT 2BR/1 BA large duplex, sundeck, pri-
vate beach, fully equipped. Cable, telephone, micro-
wave. $1400/month. Seasonal Nov-April. 1-813-
988-1344.
WANTED ROOMMATE to share 2BR/I1BA apt.
$295 plus 1/2 utilities. Call Don 778-7843.
ONE ROOM APT with bath and screened porch.
Separate entrance. Close to shopping center.
Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
SEASONAL, month or week. 2BR/1 BA upstairs apt.
Fully furnished, walk to beach. 778-5908.
DUPLEX 2BR/1 BA. 1/2 blk from beach. Available
Oct thru April. $1200 per month. Call 813-681-9656
leave message, will return call.
MARINA DRIVE, 5 rooms-2BR, 2 blocks to beach.
Annual, $650 per month. Includes storage room,
water & trash. $400 security. Call 778-5391.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR/2BA and 1BR/1BA duplex.
Furnished/unfurnished, covered parking. 778-6583.
NEED A JOB? You can find it in The Islander.


GULF FRONT Fall Special, 3BR/2BA, immaculate,
steps to beach. October $600 per week, reserve
now. 778-3171.
UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA, upstairs apt. $550 per
month plus electric. 1st, last and security. Anna
Maria Realty, Inc., 778-2259.
NEW ISLAND HOME -3BR/2BA, large great room,
pool, rec room, 2-car garage, no pets. Call Smith
Realtors, 778-0777.
PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA, upstairs unit. $750
per month includes water/sewer, trash, cable, pool,
tennis. Call Smith,Realtors 778-0777.
ISLAND DUPLEX 1BR/1BA ground floor unit.
$425 per month plus utilities. Call Smith Realtors,
778-0777.
2 BEDROOM HOME, 1/2 block from Gulf. A/C,
cable, microwave. Avail. Nov-April. Prefer minimum
2 mth in prime months. Call in AM 1-616-754-6349.
SEASONAL, 2BR/1BA home, screened porch,
cable TV, W/D, garage, close to beach. 813-689-
0925.
Buy it or sell it fast! ISLANDER classified work great.



4 PLEX. Steps to the beach. Excellent condition,
location, and income. $225,000. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate for details. 778-6066.

"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
KEY ROYALE, 624 Foxworth. 100ft of new seawall
& boat dock, 3Br/2.5BA, split-design, southerly ex-
posure, manicured landscaped with auto sprinkler
system, living room, dinging room, eat-in kitchen, 2
car garage, 1880 sf. $219,500. 778-7837.
BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call Quality Builders today, 778-7127.
GORGEOUS MOUNTAIN VIEWS. Cool country liv-
ing, 2 homes for sale 1 in Hayesville, NC and 1 in
Hiawassee, GA. Call 706-896-1348.
BRADENTON PINEBROOK CONDO. 2BR/2BA,
enclosed lanai, under bldg. parking, on golf course,
many improvements. $91,900. Owner, 795-2226.

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981

BEACH HOUSE Directly on the Gulf, located in
Holmes Beach, 3BR/2BA with garage. Just reduced
to $229,000. Call Dick Maher, Neal & Neal, Realtors
778-2261 or 778-6791.


MBYSTAL


1SA N E CLASSIF-AIED


ISLAND TAXI
778-6201
Dependable, Courteous Service


_ 792-3758 MM0003995
MA0012461


KIMBALL-.
i HOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair* Interior&Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Handrails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident Local References
778-5354


INU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
SINCE 1948 RX006oo455ss
e WINDOW!''
REPLACEMENT
VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT & FASCIA
PORCH ''
ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
778-7074







COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


778-2586 MA RY KAy Eve: 778-6771

10% OFF
S WITH TIS AD ONLY- EXP. 9/14/94

PERSONAL TRAINING
Walk/Jog Step/Circuit Aerobics
Body Sculpting Stretching Exercise
By Appointment: Call 779-2129

PIANO & KEYBOARD
LESSONS
F ,Beginner to College Levels
778-3539


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appoinrmenrs
Gift Certificates Available


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

DEADLINE:
NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classified advertising must be placed in person and paid in advance or mailed to our
office in the Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.
We are located between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday -
Friday, Saturday 10 to 2 (as needed).
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,,
line rate plus 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines,
line rate plus 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


ISLANDE]


JUST CALL

778-7978
for free home delivery
anywhere* on Anna Maria Island.
You may also call to stop home
delivery if necessary.
* Sorry, individual unit delivery is not available
at mobile home parks or condos but bulk
drops can be arranged.


I





IE PAGE 28 E SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


The Islander Bystander "newsies" love bringing you the best news on the Island.


For free, guaranteed home delivery, call 778-7978.


e a ta L OL FEE -80142-32
m

OPN7 AS AWE 65Mnte vnu etHomsBacF341
t *S a


It*


Bill
Bowman
Evenings '
778-4619


Bill has been an Island resi-
dent for 7 years and has 24
years experience as a Real
Estate Broker. Bill formerly
owned his own real estate
business and we're pleased
he is now with Neal & Neal,
REALTORS.


Island Luau &
Polynesian Show
Sponsored by
Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce
Saturday Sept. 24
6:30 "Social"
7 PM Dinner Buffet
& Polynesian Show
Tickets Available
At Our Office
778-2261


HOMES ISLAND
2906 Avenue C, HB .......................... $122,900


6811 Palm Drive, HB .........................
231 South Harbor, HB .......................
125 47th St., HB ................................
602 Hampshire HB ............................
3110 Avenue F, HB ...........................
2500 Gulf Dr., BB...............................
607 Ivanhoe Lane, HB.......................
607 North Point, HB............................
512 Loquat Dr., AM............................
609 North Point, HB...........................
4000 Gulf of Mexico Dr., LBK ...............


$158,000
$169,900
$169,900
$248,900
$229,000
$285,000
$289,000
$329,900
$350,000
$449,000
$425,000


HOMES MAINLAND
5688 25th St. Circle ............................. $78,500
7304 13th Ave.................................... $127,500
3707 Plumosa Terrace ...................... $154,225
6709 88th Street, E............................... $189,000

DUPLEX
103 Palm Ave., AM ............................ $495,000

LOTS
12th Ave............................................... $15,000
67th Ave............................................ $63,900
Gulf of Mexico Dr............................... $150,000
Gulf of Mexico Dr............................... $325,000
Lockwood Ridge Rd........................... $329,000
Bay Blvd., N ....................................... $395,000
Gulf Dr................................................ $450,000
Blue Heron........................................... $500,000
CONDOS ISLAND
1801 Gulf Dr., BB................................. $72,500
611 Gulf Dr., BB................................... $79,900


CONDOS ISLAND
611 Gulf Dr., BB................................... $79,900
701 Manatee Ave., HB ...................... $130,000
6500 Flotilla Dr., HB ............................. $134,500
3803 East Bay Dr., HB ......................... $136,000
600 Manatee Ave., HB ......................... $142,500
600 Manatee Ave., HB ...................... $152,900
6400 Flotilla Dr., HB .......................... $159,000
6006 Gulf Dr., HB .............................. $178,000
1906 Gulf Dr., BB............................... $185,000
CONDOS MAINLAND
5884 Garden Lane............................... $25,900
802 Audubon Dr., PBC ........................ $79,900
864 Audubon Dr., PBC ........................ $88,500
876 Audubon Dr., PBC ........................ $88,500
706 Estuary, PBC ................................ $94,500
313 108th St. Perico Isl. ....................... $99,900
969 Waterside, PBC.......................... $113,000
11025 Jasmine Circle, Perico Isl ........ $123,700
1255 Spoonbill, PBC ......................... $129,900
1105 Edgwater, PBC ......................... $129,900
1241 Edgewater, PBC .......................... $142,900
1305 Perico Point, PBC..................... $155,000
1269 Spoonbill, PBC ......................... $159,900
3920 Mariners Way............................ $205,000
55 Tidy Island .................................... $359,000
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT
Manatee Ave. W.................................. $95,900
Pine Ave ............................................. $219,000
1st St. W ............................................... $350,000
45th Avenue......................................... $84,900
Gulf Dr ................................................ $450,000
Gulf of Mexico Dr............................... $750,000
Gulf of Mexico Dr............................... $850,000


i v i--i i,,, N N lD-, -., U Ii, r ree I Ol


I'~AI U 77a')')~4 TUE ~u d flI'~I~ A~P ~