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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00527
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 08-11-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00527


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WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE AUGUST 11, 1994


In the red, Center makes last pitch for money


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
With the Holmes Beach budget nearing finaliza-
tion, the Anna Maria.Island Community Center is pre-
paring to make one more appeal for increased funding.
So far, Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach have indi-
cated a willingness to give the Center more than they
did last year, but the mayor of Holmes Beach is indi-
cating he will continue to hold out.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger, who earlier presented
a budget to his city council for approval, indicated he
did not favor donating any more money to the Center
in the coming fiscal year than the Island's largest city
contributed in the current budget year. At least one city
council member has taken exception to that position
from the beginning.
"We're very happy with the7 20 percent increase
from the City of Anna Maria, and very thankful-for the
50 percent from Bradenton Beach," says Luke
Courtney, a member of the Holmes Beach City Coun-
cil as well as the board of directors of the Center.

Executive power

expansion proposed

in Anna Maria
By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Should the mayor of Anna Maria be allowed a 430
percent increase in emergency discretionary funding?
Should residents be allowed to amend city laws by
city-wide referendum?
Residents of Anna Maria City will be asked to give
their approval to those and several other changes to the
city's charter during the general election Nov. 8.
The Anna Maria Charter Review Committee has
recommended changes in 12 areas of the charter, rang-
ing from minor corrections of typographical errors to
adding further definitions of the powers of the mayor.
In condensed form, these are some of the more sig-
nificant changes the Charter Review Committee is rec-
ommending:
Modifies Section 4.06 (emergency action) estab-
lishing a sliding scale for the expenditures the mayor
may authorize in emergencies when it is not practicable
to call a meeting of the city commission. Currently the
mayor is limited to $1,000, but the proposed amend-
ment would allow the mayor to make expenditures that
do not exceed "1/2 of 1 percent of total city budget."
Using the 1993/94 city budget of $859,900 as an ex-
ample, the mayor's limit of emergency discretionary
PLEASE SEE ANNA MARIA, PAGE 4


"We're thankful for $15,000 from Holmes Beach, but
I think they could donate more."
The Center is currently $7,000 short, but Center
Director Pierrette Kelly is optimistic that some funds
that were budgeted but not yet received will soon come
through.
"We're hopeful of amending our contract with the
county to call down the money they owe us," Kelly
says. The county has promised the Center $30,000, and
if it can be received soon, the Center will be $23,000
ahead of the game. That's important, Kelly says, be-
cause the money will be needed to carry the Center
until the end of the year.
But will it be enough?
"I hope so," Kelly says. "It's not a lot of money, but
hopefully the money that comes in through the small
amounts we charge for our programs will supplement it.
"This is why city funding would be so important.
When something like this happens, and we have a grant
but the grant is slow in coming through or doesn't
work, then we need continuous support."


Kelly says that a significant portion of Center
money comes through its own fund raisers, but these
events can't be held from August through November or
money due to restrictions imposed by the United Way
"That's their fund raising period," Kelly says.
Kelly says people should support the United Way, but
reminds them when they make contributions to that
organization they can specify the Community Center as
the beneficiary. This year United Way contributions to
the Center totaled $19,000.
As of June, the Center had received an income of
$318,673, with expenditures of $326,045.
Courtney was asked by The Islander Bystander to
comment on an apparent perception by a number of citi-
zens that a larger municipal contribution to the Center will
have to be funded by increased ad valorem taxes.
"The City of Holmes Beach is not raising its mill-
age rate, and the donations made to the Community
Center will not affect the taxes of the citizens of
PLEASE SEE CENTER, PAGE 4


Disappointed German student seeks Island lodging


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Ed
When the Wageners visited Ann
summer, the German family though
paradise and immediately made pl
summer.
"We vacationed here last
year," says Ellie Wagener, "and
fell in love with it."
Dennis, 17 years old, told
Ellie, his mother, that he would like
to go to Manatee High School for a
year as an exchange student. His
mother made arrangements last
summer through a local church
with a Bradenton family who were
willing to accept Dennis for the
school year.
When Ellie and Dennis arrived
they found was disappointing.
"The family that was going to t
says Ellie. "The parents are going th
While the Wageners say they
through German organizations to m


a for Dennis, it is now too late for that. They chose not
litor to do that originally because they felt those organiza-
la Maria Island last tions charge a large fee that the sponsoring family
ht they had found doesn't receive for help with housing or expenses.
plans to return this Part of Ellie's arrangement with the local family
was to help with the expenses.
A.. Dennis and Ellie are urgently seeking a new
temporary home for Dennis for the coming school
year. They have only until Aug. 17 to find one.
Dennis, a blue-eyed blond, is an 11th grader
'who loves basketball and heavy metal music such
ias Metallica (and promises not to play it too loud).
He has taken six years of English in school and
understands and speaks the language well.
Ellie, a single parent who has owned her own
Dennis Wagener gas station, car repair and car wash in Muelheim,
Germany, for 14 years, says she will help contrib-
ute financially toward food and extra expenses for Den-


d last week, what

ake him in can't,"
rough a divorce."
could have gone
,ake arrangements


Ellie would also like to extend her home in Ger-
many for a student who wants to see that part of the
world for a year. ,
"Dennis has an open return ticket," says Ellie. "I go
back a weekfrom Wednesday and if things don't work


out I will take him along."
If you are interested in helping the Wagener fam-
ily, they are staying at the Sunset Beach Motel and can
be reached at 778-7900, room 9.


AUG. 10, 1993: TRAGIC MISHAP IN TAMPA BAY


Islander Photo: Paul Root
Islanders were faced with a potential environmental disaster at this time last year, as three ships collided
at the mouth of Tampa Bay, less than a mile from Egmont Key. Two of the vessels were carrying petro-
leum: one burst into flames, the other ended up disgorging more than 300,000 gallons of heavy crude oil
into the water. For more about the events following the Aug. 10, 1993 collision, seepage 10.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinions.............................. 6-
Those Were the Days ................................. 7
Chapel Players......................................... 8
S tir-it-up ...................... ; ........... .................. 12
Streetlife ..................................................... 14
Outdoors ....................................................... 16
Soccer ........................................................ 17
Anna Maria tides .......................... 17
Real estate .....................:.............................. 18.
Obituaries................................................... 19
Classified ........................................; ......... 22


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


ISLANDER


BYW.






[] PAGE 2 0 AUGUST 11, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Manatee County says better maintenance of


facilities at Manatee Public Beach not possible


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Thousands of people use Manatee Public Beach
every week without a complaint, but not everybody is
happy with this sandy, county-run park. Unpaved park-
ing lots, untrimmed trees and a lack of pretty plants
have some folks asking just how their tax dollars are
being used.
According to Jim Cole, division manager for
Manatee County Parks Maintenance, it's not a question
of how, but how much. He says his department has a
relatively limited budget with which to take care of
eight county beach parks, and that his five-man crew
can only do so much in the course of a day.
"They keep very busy it's a seven-day-a-week
operation out there (at Manatee Beach), and the num-
bers don't mesh together," Cole says. "The only thing
we don't do out there is maintain the concession build-
ing or the lift station that is associated with that area.
Every thing else is ours."
Every day maintenance crews sweep the area around
the concession building, empty the garbage bins and clean
the restrooms, Cole says. This is done early in the morn-
ing and again at mid-afternoon. Once a week the beach is
cleaned with a tractor-driven beach rake.
Cole says he receives occasional complaints about
the restrooms, but these are usually limited to reports
of toilets that don't shut off and other periodic main-
tenance items.
The restrooms are thoroughly cleaned each morn-
ing and checked once in the afternoon just before the
county crews quit for the day, Cole says.
"If there's a major mess we clean it up, but if


... while County to

get blanket dune

planting permit
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
So, you want to put plants on the renourished beach
but you were overcome by the maze of permits and
restrictions.
There's good news.
Beachfront property owners who procrastinated on
getting a state permit to plant dune plants on the
Island's renourished beaches will benefit from a blan-
ket permit the county will receive for all beachfront
property owners within the next week or two.
Mike Sole, environmental specialist for the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation (DEP), said last
week, "I expect it to be issued in the next couple of
weeks. Right now we are deciding what caveats to add
to the permit."
However, said Sole, planting will not be permitted
during turtle nesting season, May 1 through Oct. 31.
In the past, private property owners had to take it
upon themselves to wade through the bureaucracy of
the DEP to obtain permits for beach dune planting. In
addition, property owners had to develop a design for
planting and pay a fee.
Once the blanket permit is in hand, the county
will schedule a workshop for property owners, said
Jack Gorzeman, the county's environmental projects
coordinator.
"When it does come, we hope to establish an infor-
mation meeting on the Island sort of a how-to-do-
it type class to instruct people on what the guidelines
are, where to obtain plant material that's suitable and
how they go about planting the material."
Gorzeman said the state has been very receptive to
the blanket permit proposal.
"We feel it would be a real benefit to the property
owner, as well as benefit the beach environment," said
Gorzeman. "We feel it is a win-win situation."
Gorzeman said the county is moving forward with
plans to plant the public beach areas.
"We're in the design phase," said Gorzeman. "We
had to do survey work, which will lead in to the con-
struction drawings. Then we will be going out to bid for
the project In the latter part of September. Hopefully,
we'll have a bid award by Thanksgiving and begin
construction in December,"


there's just a little bit of sand on the floor we don't
bother with it."
"We've had complaints that the area should be
landscaped and beautified," Cole says, "but that's re-
ally all the complaints we get out there." And while
Cole concedes that some nice
plants would make the park-
ing lot and the area around the
concession building more at-
tractive, there's just no money
in the budget to do anything
about it. ---
Even if the funding could
be found to buy and putin some
plantings, the challenge would
be keeping them healthy and
looking nice, Cole says.
"The problem is not neces-
sarily doing the plantings, it's
the budget to maintain them.
That's the biggest long term
thing people want to see the
place beautified."
Although Cole offers very
little hope that the funding of Some areas were desig
his department will improve landscapinging, but lac
enough for his department to
maintain landscaping, he thinks there may be a glim-
mer of hope from the private sector.
"We're working with the Island beautification
committee, and they're looking at getting citizen vol-
unteers to help to not only install landscaping but to
maintain it in some of those areas."
That's something Cole says the county could eas-
ily live with.
"We'd be more than happy to work with any citi-
zen volunteer group, providing supplies," Cole says.
"But labor is the big issue." Cole says organizations
who want to roll up their sleeves and work to prettify


ne
ok


The jewel of
Manatee
SCounty?
g tCounty maintenance
crews say they're doing
the best they can on a
limited budget but as
these pictures show,
_- . s there's a lot of room for
improvement at the
Manatee Public Beach.
Concrete-lined planters,
trees and curbing in the
parking lot show
signs of neglect.

Islander Photos:
Bonner Presswood

the county's facilities are welcome helpers, but they've
got to make a commitment that they'll always be there
to take care of the new plants.
"We just don't have that kind of manpower," Cole
says. "If the citizen group makes a firm commitment
and sticks to it on the long range,
that's terrific."
Cole says that although he hasn't
personally heard any grumbling
about the unpaved parking lots, he
/ concedes that some modernization is
called for -although there is again
n the problem of taking care of the im-
provements if and when they ever
get made.
"We're strapped for resources just to
maintain what's out there. What's out
there is 20 years obsolete as far as the
parking lot goes. You've got a shell
o ha, parking lot, and those kinds of facilities
are substandard. Even though it's nice
a as far as not being a concrete jungle
Like Ft. Lauderdale where I come from,
we're barely able to maintain what we
d for have right now."
plants or sod. A question has also been raised
about the mowing of the parking lot,
and while Cole says every effort is made to keep the
weeds and grass under control, this is another area he
admits is not as good as many might desire. On the
other hand, looking at practical considerations, it's
about as good as it's going to get.
"We mow about every seven to 10 days, but a lot
of times that's contingent upon weather and manpower
allocations." He says that the popularity of the beach
also hinders his crews' attempts to mow sometimes.
"A lot of that parking lot gets filled up espe-
cially at this time of year so it's very difficult for us
to get in there and mow."


... and additional beach raking requested


If a proposed line item survives the county's bud-
get hearings, the county will be raking seven miles of
Gulf beaches during the height of the tourist season
next year.
According to County Commissioner Stan
Stephens, he made the budget request in response to
letters from Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach offi-
cials. In the letters, officials acknowledged that the
county currently rakes the public beach areas and asked
that the raking be extended to the entire Gulf beach
from Coquina Beach to the Holmes Beach border with
Anna Maria.
The City of Anna Maria made no request for addi-
tional raking. Bayfront Park is raked as requested by
the city or during a red tide fish kill but Mayor Ray
Simches has told county officials that his residents pre-
fer the natural beach rather than a raked beach.
Holmes Beach has maintained that raking along the
tide line is the county's responsibility because the land
is public land, the rake was purchased with resort tax
funds, the resort tax is generated by businesses scat-
tered throughout the city and tourists drawn to the clean
beaches will increase the county's tax revenue.
Jim Cole of the county's park maintenance depart-


ment, said the budget request of $10,000 will fund rak-
ing the entire seven miles twice a month during the
months of January through March. He said the public
beach areas, a total of 2.6 miles, are currently raked
weekly or more often, depending on the season and
usage, at a cost of $28,803.
To rake the entire seven miles year 'round, said
Cole, would be too costly. The county would need to
purchase an additional rake at a cost of $50,000 and
operating costs would be another $50,000.
The county follows raking regulations mandated
by the state Department of Environmental Regulation
(DEP). These include the following:
Beach cleaning equipment shall not penetrate
more than two inches into the surface of the beach.
Beach cleaning shall be confined to daylight
hours.
Beach cleaning shall be confined to light-weight,
low-pressure tired vehicles with a maximum ground
pressure of 10 psi.
During the (turtle) nesting season, May 1 through
Oct. 31, beach cleaning with mechanized equipment
shall be limited to areas seaward of the previous day's
high tide mark or debris line.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 11, 1994 M PAGE 3 m1

Two Circle K managers charged with grand theft


Bettye Jane Sossamon, 49, and Audrey M. Wilkes,
46, both of Bradenton, were arrested by Bradenton
Beach police Aug. 5 and charged with grand theft.
Sossamon was manager of the Circle K at 2518
Gulf Dr. N. where $20,235.64 was reported missing.


Wilkes was manager of the Circle K at 100 Gulf Dr. N.
where $17,127.81 was reported missing, said
Bradenton Beach Det. Matt Duffy who described the
pair as friends prior to their arrest.
According to the report, the pair's troubles began


Sparks fly after fire budget vote


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When Anna Maria Fire District Commissioners
Sandy Haas and Glenn Bliss voted against the 1994/95
budget, Vice Chairman George Jackson asked why.
The response touched off 30 minutes of heated argu-
ment Monday.
"For the life of me I can't understand about this
budget," sighed Jackson. "When you (the chairman)
asked for any opposition or any questions there were
none. We had no opposition or questions at the last
work session. I think we deserve a reason for the op-
position. I just think you're grandstanding and I don't
believe in it and I think there's something wrong here."
When Haas and Bliss remained silent, Commis-
sioner John VanOstenbridge introduced another ques-
tion for the pair regarding a July 28 article in a daily
newspaper concerning hiring a manager for Island
emergency operations.
"We discussed that at our meeting and it was my
belief that this board voted 100 percent to pursue this
project," said VanOstenbridge. "Now, I pick up the
newspaper and read big headlines where two of our
commissioners are dead set against this thing. What
amazes me is they voted for this and one made the
motion to go ahead."
Bliss replied, "I agreed to the concept that
means researching it. Everything I'm getting back is
that this is a done deal. When I get called by a news-
paper, I'm going to tell them exactly how I feel. We
have been told that nobody has time to do this job, but
no proof has been brought up here to show that a full-
time position is needed. I don't think it's necessary.
And I don't appreciate being accused of grandstanding
when what you just did is a bigger grandstand."


Jackson said the vote was only to pursue the concept.
Haas said she agreed with the concept and ex-
plained to the reporter that if the position is created, it
must be grant funded because the fire district cannot
afford to help fund a paid position.
Bliss said he is waiting for Fire Chief Andy Price to
bring back proof that the position is necessary and that he
has the approval of the three Island cities on the concept.
VanOstenbridge replied, "You jumped the gun before
he had a chance to do it." Jackson added, "You had noth-
ing to base your answers on. We haven't even met since
the meeting where you made the motion to approve it."
"You'll take any shot at me you can," retorted
Bliss. "I am against hiring a full-time person. I'm will-
ing to approve the concept to research the problem to
see if they can change my mind on that. Why didn't we
discuss this in a work session?"
"If you want a work session on this, let's call one,
but don't do it in the newspaper," said Jackson.
Fire Inspector Tony Bailey appealed for calm.
"The game you're playing is very dangerous to the
people of our community," he cautioned. "I'm talking
about myself and the people who have to live with the
decisions you make. It's beyond me to figure out why
you can't get along. If there's a problem, you should be
able to get together and solve it."
Debbie Marks, commission candidate, noted, "The
newspaper is going to try an stir up as much as they can
out here. That's probably why they called the two com-
missioners."
Volunteer President Jane Maddox pointed out that
the volunteers' fundraising efforts have suffered due to
bad publicity at the commission level.
Jackson appealed for commissioners to air their
grievances in the meetings and not in the newspaper.


in April when Wilkes told Sossamon she could not
make her deposit and asked to borrow $3,000.
Sossamon loaned the money to Wilkes from her store's
receipts. Sossamon stated that Wilkes borrowed $400
from the store's deposits on two other occasions.
After loaning Wilkes the money, Sossamon told
Duffy she could not meet her daily deposits and would
wait until she had enough money and make each de-
posit four or five days after it was due in the bank.
After an inventory of the store's receipts, Duffy
found that Sossamon made no deposits on July 28, 29,
30 and 31. These totaled $20,235.64
Wilkes gave the same details, according to Duffy's
report. Wilkes stated she attempted to return the money
she had borrowed from Sossamon a little at a time but
could not meet her store's daily deposit and would
make the deposit four or five days after it was due.
Duffy inventoried receipts and found that Wilkes
made no deposits on July 28, 29, 30 and 31 and Aug.
1. The missing deposits totaled $17,127.81, with the
Aug. 1 amount unknown at the time of the report.
Duffy said he checked the store's receipts back to
June and is waiting for the corporate headquarters to
send receipts from Jauifiary to June in order to complete
the investigation.




Anna Maria City
8/15, 9 a.m., Planning Commission
sub-committee
Bradenton Beach
None scheduled
Holmes Beach
None scheduled
Of Interest
8/15, 10 a.m., Island Transportation
Planning Organization,
Bradenton Beach City Hall
8/17, 10 a.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Bradenton Beach City Hall


ANNA



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Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
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I-G PAGE AI AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Center
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Holmes Beach. Any tax increases are coming from
other entities. As a (city) councilman, I think there is
enough money in our budget to donate more to the
Center."
Courtney, who would like to see Holmes Beach's
current $15,000 contribution to the Center's effort double,
says the money is readily available. He says that savings
on a recent paving project could go a long way toward
increasing his city's donation to the Center.
"Through some great management; Public Works
Director John Fernandez just saved the city $12,500. I
would say a portion of that could go towards the Center."
Holmes Beach's first public hearing on the budget
is Sept. 7.
While the city governments debate how much they
can give to the Center, Kelly says she will continue to
pursue a number of grants. Unfortunately, one grant -
which was suggested by Bohnenberger as a possible
way to fund Center efforts turned out not to be
workable, Kelly says.
"It's a wonderful program" that Bohnenberger sug-
gested, Kelly says, explaining that the grant would fund
a job training program aimed specially at women re-
entering the job market and high school dropouts who


Anna Maria
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
spending would increase to $4,300.
A change to Section 3.12 (initiative and referen-
dum) which will allow the city commission to amend
an adopted ordinance if compelled to do so by the vot-
ers. The current charter only allows for the total repeal
of an ordinance in such circumstances.
Change Section 3.02 (qualifications) to define an
elector as one "defined by general law."
Simplify and clarify Section 3.03 (election and
terms), specifying that "on the odd years, two commis-
sioners shall be elected and on the even years the other
two commissioners and the mayor shall be elected."
Further defines the authority of the mayor in Sec-
tion 3.06 (appointments and removals) to state that the


need to get an equivalency diploma.
"Mayor Bohnenberger wanted me to apply for that
program, and I thought it was an excellent idea," Kelly
says. When she took a closer look she says it was evi-
dent the program was not practical for the Center. For
one thing, she says the Center would have to provide
the money for the program up front, and that reim-
bursement would only come after every participant had
gotten a diploma and was working in a job paying more
than $6 an hour.
"Most of my beginning staff members don't make
more than $6 an hour, but I had to guarantee that the
people who finished the program would do that," Kelly
says. "I don't have the space to provide that program."
Kelly also says that there were other very specific
criteria which had to be met to get the funding, and that
if even one of those elements was not met no grant
money would be approved -regardless of the success
of all other aspects of the program.
"While it is a wonderful program, the grant would not
be money to help programs already in the works, but
money to create a new program," she says. "All grants
have strings attached, and they're all for something spe-
cific. Grants are not for lights, electricity and continuing
staff. People who don't know about grants wouldn't un-
derstand that they would think, 'Why don't they get
some federal money to support them?' "


mayor, among other powers, shall be able to appoint,
suspend and fire administrative officers. In the current
charter, the word "administrative" is not specified.
Also further defines the authority of the mayor in
Section 3.06 (appointments and removals), giving the
mayor the power to make assignments or appointments
to outside boards or committees with the approval of
the city commission. The current charter givers this
power to a majority of the city commission.
Simplification of Section 3.08 (filling of vacan-
cies), to read: "A vacancy on the commission (includ-
ing mayor) shall be filled by the remaining members of
the commission (including mayor) until the next regu-
lar city election."
Clarifies Section 4.04 (vacancy in office of
mayor) to state that when the vice mayor is sworn in as
mayor he/she shall be paid at the mayor's rate of com-
pensation.


A portion of the cleared area at Sandy Pointe
condominiums in Holmes Beach.

Decision expected

soon on mangrove

issue at Sandy

Pointe
State attorneys should make a determination this
week on whether to pursue prosecution in an alleged il-
legal mangrove cutting case at Sandy Pointe Condo-
miniums in Holmes Beach.
Florida Marine Patrol Investigator Marty Cham-
ibers said the case has been turned over to the State
Attorney's office. He said a decision on whether to
:prosecute should be made by Friday.
Investigators have been looking into the matter for
several months. Ren Glanz, owner of the condominium
complex at 3601 Bay Drive East, has said he did not
harm any mangroves.
Mangroves are protected by state law from pruning
without permits. The trees provide an important source of
food and shelter for juvenile marine life.
Also involved in the controversy between Glanz
and the state is Florida Rep. Julie McClure, who wrote
letters to state officials regarding the matter on behalf
of Glanz.
Earlier this summer, Mote Marine Laboratory's
founder, Bill Mote, paid $10,000 in fines for illegally
pruning mangroves at the lab in Sarasota.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N AUGUST 11, 1994 I PAGE 5 ijB

No decision yet on Bradenton Beach Marina expansion


By Paul Roat
Five and a half hours after Allan Bazzy began to dis-
cuss his proposal to upgrade the Bradenton Beach Marina,
city council members decided they needed a break to as-
sess the information received from residents and experts.
Last Thursday's marathon meeting is scheduled to
conclude Aug. 23 at 7 p.m., with council members
expected to vote on whether Bazzy may begin about $1
million worth of improvements to the marina, located
just south of the Cortez Bridge.
The postponement will allow council members
time to pore over the 106 letters and cards submitted by
residents on the project, as well as mull over the com-
ments of the score of people who spoke at the public
hearing on Bazzy's plans.

The plan
Bazzy, owner of the marina, hopes to upgrade the
marina. The most controversial aspect of his renovation
plans is the erection of a huge covered boat storage
shed to accommodate 74 boats. The shed would be 200
feet long, 84 feet wide, and 34 feet high.
To build the shed, Bazzy needs city approval to re-
zone six residential lots just south of the existing marina
to a commercial use. He also needs the city to vacate 100
feet of Bay Drive South and a smaller stretch of Church
Street, as well as grant him a variance from setback rules
to place the building closer to the water.
Also involved in the process is an amendment to
the city's comprehensive plan to change the land use.
Existing boat racks will be removed, Bazzy said,
and encroachments of two city buildings on his prop-
erty will be deeded to the city. He also hopes to build
two docks, 125 and 135 feet in length, into Anna Maria
Sound. The dock decision will be made by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection.
Bazzy said he will also donate playground equip-
ment to a city park on Highland Avenue, pave or resur-
face 100 feet of a city street to offset the Bay Drive
South vacation and provide public access and use of the
two docks.
"This is being heard of as an expansion of the
marina," Bazzy told the council and the 100 or so


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people in attendance during the public hearing, "but it's
more than an expansion. The question at hand is about
the six vacant lots and how they will be used."
Bazzy said the six lots had been vacant for 10
years, and "the best use of the property I can think of
is a boat use, with a passive, quiet buffer to serve as a
transition into the neighborhood."
Bazzy showed several artist's renderings for the
boat storage shed, including one with a mansard-style
siding, another with a design similar to the 1922
Bradenton Beach Bath House, and a rendering similar
in appearance to the former Albion Inn in Cortez.
A number of experts in the fields of land planning,
architecture, traffic and economics offered comments to
the impact the building would have to the neighborhood,
Bradenton Beach and the Island at the bequest of Bazzy.
Economist Catherine Cobb offered the topic that
seemed of most interest to council members: marina
renovations would more than quadruple the tax base of
site. She said current property taxes are about $6,000
a year. The improvements to the property would caused
taxes to increase to about $28,000 annually.

The people speak
A total of 22 people spoke on the Bradenton Beach
Marina project. Deputy City Clerk Sarah Kaufmann added
that 106 cards and letters had been received on the project,
with 24 favoring expansion and 82 opposing it.
Among those who spoke were attorney Bill
Merrill, representing 10 property owners who live near
the marina and oppose the expansion.
Merrill, accompanied by land planner Bruce Franklin,
offered a number of procedural questions on Bazzy's ap-
plications. Many of Merrill's objections centered on what
he called a lack of information provided by Bazzy for his
expansion plans, including a lack of soil samplings, lack
of environmental lands assessments, no building plans
submitted and a question of proper notice being given at
the planning and zoning hearing.
"This entire process is a travesty of justice,"
Merrill said.
City Planner Bill Brisson said Merrill's objections
either had no bearing on the matter, had been resolved,


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or had been properly waived.
Franklin was more direct in his comments.
"The question is, what is right about this project,"
he asked, "if it needs a comprehensive plan amend-
ment, the rezoning of six lots, a variance, vacation of
two public streets, and off-site parking which is not
even mentioned in the petition?"
Resident comments on the marina were mixed, with
nine appearing to support the project, seven opposing, and
three offering mixed opinions. Among the comments:
"I support the marina project," John Sandberg said.
"We should work to have this be a win-win situation.
If you don't keep increasing the tax base, very few
people will be able to afford to live here."
"This project will downgrade our property very
much," said Doris Howard Hall. "How can one man
destroy a residential area, tear down two houses, build
a parking lot and take away our bay breezes?"
"I view the marina as another amenity to our com-
munity," said John Kaufmann. "I have the sense that
what he is trying to do is definitely an asset to the city.
This is a worthwhile project he is offering."
"My family is opposed to the expansion of the
marina," said Larry Hines. "We have a small-town
fishing village environment here now, and I'm con-
cerned about having a large-scale commercial storage
building here and that it will have a negative impact on
our property value."

Council decision
Of the five-member council, only Mayor Katie
Pierola commented on the marina request during
Thursday's meeting.
"I definitely don't want to lose this project," she
said. "There has been so much bad blood and misinfor-
mation about this project, and I want to get all of us to
work together on it.
"You love Bradenton Beach," Pierola told the audi-
ence, "I love Bradenton Beach, we all love Bradenton
Beach. I know I'm going to make a lot of people mad, but
I've got to worry about the tax base. Holmes Beach, Anna
Maria and Bradenton all can get by without raising taxes,
but they've got a lot of money saved up, and we don't."

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JiD PAGE 6 E AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
9law-


Getting things done
When you drive by the Manatee County Public
Beach, you probably notice the hundreds of cars parked
out to the edge of the road, over the berms and in ev-
ery conceivable nook and cranny that an ingenious
driver can find.
You may have overlooked the cars to gaze on the
white sandy beach and turquoise waters of the Gulf.
You may have strolled up to the concession, Cafe
on the Beach, and been oblivious to other surroundings
as you sat in the shade of an umbrella and enjoyed a
tasty meal.
But if you visit the Manatee Public Beach early morn-
ings, like many Islanders do, you surely noticed the con-
dition of the parking areas when the lot is empty. Or did
time create apathy that made you unaware? After all, it's
been in this condition for a long time.
When storms blow sand across the driveways, the
resulting mounds migrate across the asphalt like drift-
ing snowbanks for weeks and months. Dead branches
on trees and oleanders are left from last winter's
storms. Rows of parking spaces turn into canals of
water after every storm.
Dee Purcifeld has done more than meet her contrac-
tual agreement with Manatee County in making improve-
ments to the building. A fresh coat of paint on the pavil-
ion went a long way to making things look spiffy and
shop, restaurant and patio are meticulously maintained.
Condition of the pavilion isn't the problem. The
deplorable state of the grounds is.
Dee can't begin to mask the condition of the park-
ing lot, the sorrowful condition of meager landscaping
or maintenance. A new sign at the entrance from Mana-
tee Avenue is surrounded by scrub. The lift station
alongside the other entrance is a welcome sight for
sorry eyes in comparison.
County workers are limited in budget and staff to
keep walkways cleared and restrooms clean. They do
what they can and, thankfully, they do it often.
Manatee County Commissioner Kent Chetlain
thinks there may be funds left over from the county
share of the one percent "tourist" bed tax that was ap-
plied to beach renourishment. He's willing to look into
using that money, as provided in the enabling legisla-
tion, to apply to improvements dare we say beauti-
fication? for our most precious commodity.
It is, after all, the gateway to the Gulf of Mexico.
Chetlain can't do it quickly enough. Winter season
will be here before we know it. Almost every season is
tourist season now on Anna Maria, and the political
season is heating up.
That always helps get things done.


lISLANDERU IiA MON
AUGUST 11, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 38
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


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SLICK By Egan


City council is raising taxes and
subsidizing business
Who does the mayor and council represent in
Bradenton Beach? I thought they were elected to serve
the people.
During the Aug. 4 council meeting the marina's
team of professionals, including our own city planner,
were given one-and-a-half hours to argue their case.
Citizens were given two minutes each to speak. Nearly
100 cards and letters of protest were presented to the
city clerk 22 favored the project. Who knows where
these cards came from?
The same arrogance was displayed when buying a
$100,000 parking lot to serve the businesses on Bridge
Street. Why not have them form an association, buy
their own parking lot and save the city $100,000?
Bradenton Beach will receive more than $100,000 per
year for the next five years from the 1-cent school sales
tax money. This money can be used for police cars, repair-
ing roofs, street repair, etc. The $100,000 applied to the
parking lot purchase could be used to implement the em-
ployee salary step plan and other budget needs.
All the other Island cities are holding the line on
the 1994-95 budgets. Property values in Bradenton
Beach have gone up $30 million in the last four years
and will continue to rise. Now Bradenton Beach is rais-
ing property taxes 36 percent. Why?
The general public has had no input in the taxing pro-
cess. Budget workshops are open to the public, however,
they are run like a kangaroo court complete with the "gag
rule" to silence the public. Why not take a survey and find
out what the public's priorities are? Why not have infor-
mal rap sessions and allow the public to speak?
It has become increasingly clear to most citizens
that the mayor and council are more interested in us-
ing our tax dollars to subsidize business interests than
serving the needs of the people.
The council delayed the marina decision to a later
date. Contact your ward councilperson and let them
know how you feel about the marina project: Council-
man William Campbell, 778-4631; Councilman Dick
Suhre, 778-3030; Councilman Herb Dolan, 778-3749;
Councilman James Kissick, 778-1154.
Howie Herman, Bradenton Beach


Imagine there's no center
I wonder how it happens that publicly elected of-
ficials become short-sighted and overly cautious to the
detriment of their electorate? The case in point: the
Anna Maria Island Community Center's request for
increased funding from our cities.
All personalities aside, the AMICC is the single
most important venue on the Island for people under 18
years of age. It is and has been a magnet for our youth:
there they play, learn and just "hang out" in a reason-
ably wholesome environment. If we do not support our
Center, our youth will be looking for other places and
"activities" to fill their days and nights.
As you know there is a delicate balance necessary
in an area such as ours between the local population
and our tourists. Picture, if you will, March, the Cen-
ter is closed and groups of kids are hanging around -
no jobs, no little league, no after school care program.
Our elected officials cannot make our youth population
go away, but they can make our Center disappear if
they do not support it financially.
I hope you will contact your city hall, as I have
done, and let your feelings be heard before it is too late.
Janice Bergbom, former AMICC board member,
Holmes Beach

Sharing a helpful hint
I just wanted to share a helpful hint (that my
momma gave me) to housekeepers who have pets with
fleas. Before you vacuum your carpet or floor, sprinkle
some moth ball crystals around. Then the fleas and
eggs are sucked up and shriveled up and come 'round
no more at least until the next week, when you'll
have to vacuum again. This seems to work for me.
Lisa Rivera, Anna Maria




For more of

Your Opinions,

see page 8


-WIe ,











THOSE WERE THE DAYS
Part 6, The Homesteaders
by June Alder


I &. ".- ".- .'-:/ --. "=
Soldiers lived in camps like this on Egmont Key and in Tampa while awaiting
shipment to Cuba during the Spanish-American War of 1898.

WARTIME


On Feb. 15, 1898, the battleship
Maine exploded in Havana harbor and 260
American sailors lost their lives. War with
Spain now was certain even though the
cause of the blast was not.
The day the hospital ship Olivette
landed the survivors in Tampa half the
city waited to cheer them as they walked
or were carried down the gangplank.
That night Ybor City was ablaze with
torches and Chinese lanterns.
Fact is, America was itching for a
fight with Spain especially the people
of Tampa Bay who had relatives and
friends among the Cuban rebels.
"Remember the Maine! To hell with
Spain!" was the cry all over the nation.
Long before President William
McKinley declared war on April 19,
Tampa railroad magnate H.B. Plant had
succeeded in selling Washington on us-
ing his Port of Tampa, with its magnifi-
cent, mile-long railroad pier, as the em-
barkation point for the assault on Cuba.
Like everyone else on Tampa Bay,
the homesteaders on Anna Maria Key
were caught up in the excitement.
Will and Hal Bean joined up imme-
diately as did other Anna Maria lads. By
this time Will was engaged to the
daughter of the Port of Tampa postmas-
ter. Mabel Williams worked at the small
storefront post office and engaged in
undercover work to try to catch sus-
pected Spanish spies.
But most of the local belles 17-
year-old Edith Bean among them, no
doubt were content to roll bandages and
serve refreshments to "the boys" at Clara
Barton's Red Cross headquarters. It was
next to the elegant Tampa Bay Hotel
where future President Teddy Roosevelt
and other top brass bunked in style.
Tampa was overwhelmed by 25,000
troops. Roosevelt's Rough Riders
wheeled their horses on the plains of
Tampa Heights. The soldiers in their
John Wayne-style uniforms enjoyed the
hospitality of the gamblers, saloon-
keepers and brothel madames. But they
hated the cesspools the encampments
became when the summer rains swept in
from the Gulf.
When the 36 troop ships trimmed
with red-white-and-blue bunting
steamed off on June 14, people came
from miles around in their launches and
sailboats to see the spectacle. The sol-


diers and sailors waved from the rig-
gings as bands played "There'll Be A
Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight"
and wild cheers filled the blue skies.
Anna Marians, of course, had ring-
side seats.
It was almost anticlimactic when
the war ended in less than two months.
The Rough Riders got all the credit for
storming San Juan Hill, though other
unsung soldiers including black
troopers also surged up the slope
dodging bullets, barbed wire and Span-
ish bayonets.
But the most formidable enemy
was the mosquito whose number mul-
tiplied a million-fold in the torrid, rain-
soaked summer weather. Of the 5,000
men who died during and after the war,
10 times as many perished from mos-
quito-borne yellow fever, malaria and
dysentery than of war wounds.
From his vantage point on Anna
Maria Key, George Bean watched anx-
iously as ship after ship landed the ill at
the Egmont hospital and quarantine sta-
tion, wondering if Will or Hal were
among them. He was mostly alone now
except for his hired man, his beloved
Kentucky-bred horse Bonnie and.his dog
Buster. As much as he loved Anna Maria
Key, there were times when thoughts of
his dead wife Abbie and his estranged
daughter Mamie were unbearable.
Some time in late August he was
found on the beach, felled by a stroke.
Edith took charge, moving her fa-
ther to the marine hospital in Tampa.
Older sister Lula arrived from Lake
Alfred. Frank and Cecil, who worked
at Port Tampa, were at the bedside with
their wives and children. Will and Hal
had not yet returned from the war.
But it was Mamie George called
out for.
A telegraph message had been sent
to her in Ohio at the side of her Salvation
Army evangelist husband of two years.
But she was pregnant with her second
child, and Wilbur hesitated to subject her
to the weary train trip to Tampa.
When George took a turn for the
worst Edith sent another wire "If
you want to see Papa again, you had
best come."
Next: A new life
for Mamie


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 11, 1994 N PAGE 7 EB


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It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
Island. Over 800 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
to Germany and California to Canada.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is distributed free to the Island and surround-
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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
i i i i i In u n i i n i n i






K- PAGE 8E AUGUST 11, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Au ni ern


David Jones appointed as

Bradenton Beach Building Official


27 inA e A e I, na Ma


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Coming to town with 18 years experience in the
building official profession from Hillsborough County is
David Jones, Bradenton Beach's new Building Official.
"I feel I need a change," Jones said, adding he was
looking forward to a smaller office and a more hands-
on approach to issuing permits and conducting inspec-
tions than the more administrative duties he has had
in the past few years.
Jones, 63, will begin duties in Bradenton Beach

Chapel Players
presents 'Belles on
Their Toes'
The Chapel Players of Roser Memorial Commu-
nity Church presents "Belles on Their Toes," a sequel
to "Cheaper by the Dozen."
Performances will be Aug. 19 to 21 and 24 to 28 in
the Chapel Theatre, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. All
shows are at 8 p.m. except for the final matinee on Sun-
day, Aug. 28, at 2 p.m. A special performance is sched-
uled for the 8 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 24, show which
benefits the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Dorothy McChesney, director of "Belles on Their
Toes," has double cast many of the children's roles in
order to give more "new faces" some early stage ex-
perience. The Gilbreth family children are played by
Melody and Ted Ajmo, Forest Beall, Marisa
Bergquist, Ashley Chiles, Lucina Courtney, Genna
Douglas, Jessica and Ryan Headrick, Jeanie
Hutchison, Krystal Kafka, Paul Kauffman, Michael
Maietta, Jenny and Katie McDonald, Laura Nelson,
Megan Shimandle and Jennifer Vogel.
The children's mother is played by Sylvia
Hutchison and other adults roles are played by Art
Ballman, Joy Courtney, John Durkin, Magnus Hines,
Frank Hutchison, Michael Kinsella and James Lewis.
Tickets are $6 for adults, $3 for students. The box
office (the door next to the Chapel) is open Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more informa-
tion or to make reservations call 778-6756.


Sept 6, although he will spend one or two days a week
here in the interim to issue building permits and con-
duct site inspections.
Jones has spent the.past three years as construction
manager for the Hillsborough County Building Depart-
ment, where he supervised 52 people. His biggest du-
ties currently is the inspection and oversight of the,
under-construction Brandon Mall, which he said in-
volves issuance of 115 permits alone.


Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff
Art Ballman plays Tom and Joy Courtney plays
Cousin Leora in the coming Chapel Players produc-
tion of "Belles on their Toes," Aug. 19-21 and 24-
28. The play is the sequel to "Cheaper by the
Dozen," the story of Frank and Lillian Gilbreth and
their 12 children, which the Players produced two
years ago. The current production uses more than a
dozen local young people as well as eight adults.


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Holmes Beach police
warrant thanks
I think the citizens of Holmes Beach should be re-
minded of how very efficient, professional and cour-
teous our officers in the police department are.
As an example: On Friday, Aug. 5, at approxi-
mately 6 p.m. my "designer" bicycle was stolen from
the beach. I reported the theft to Sgt. Dale Stephenson
around 6:45 p.m. and returned home.
The phone was ringing as I entered and it was Sgt.
Stephenson, who had apprehended the culprit, re-
trieved the bike and was about to return it to my home.
Within minutes, Sgts. Stephenson and Anderson ar-
rived with my unharmed bicycle.
This entire incident, from theft to return, took con-
siderably less than one hour.
I am most grateful to the Holmes Beach Police
and wish to commend Sgt. Stephenson and Sgt.
Anderson for their wonderful work.
John Hughes, Holmes Beach

These are a few of my favorite '
things ...
My favorite things in life are fine wine, fine
women and airplanes; you.guess the order. My least
favorite things are governments,-crooks and robbers
and doggy doo-doo; in precise order.
I'm changing priorities due to the thoughtful con-
sideration afforded me by the Holmes Beach Police
and Public Works Departments. To these people,
please accept my public thanks.
Holmes Beach Police and Public Works will now
be scratched from the top of my least favorite list
(they're part of government, you see) and put in my
likable list.
The reason for my thanks?
The Holmes Beach Police in cooperation with our
Public Works people placed a "Clean up after your
dog" sign on the street where I live. Since I am occa-


sionally afflicted with foot-in-mouth disease, perhaps
I need not worry as much about doggy doo-doo cling-
ing to the inserted foot. Ugh!
Thanks folks.
Robert Corkery, Holmes Beach

Democracy is late, loud and long
Democracy in Bradenton Beach a hot August
evening, no air-conditioning in the council room and a
meeting whose time limit was extended hour by hour.
The room was filled with citizens and experts. Coun-
cil was being asked to change zoning, amend the com-
prehensive plan, vacate streets. (The vacating of streets
was recommended in a letter from former Mayor Dick
Connick, hardly a recommendation at all for citizens with
memories of past abuses of government.)
The petitioner was Allan Bazzy, who should have
been asking but was instead demanding.
Many citizens were heard but many had to leave
as the hours dragged on and the heat became more
oppressive. Residents of the area who oppose the
project had experts to testify on their behalf. But
whereas experts supporting the marina had been given
an hour and a half to present their side early in the
evening, the opposing views were given (grudgingly)
little time, at a late hour, when only a few hardy citi-
zens remained.
Common sense dictated that the meeting adjourn
at midnight at the very latest and be continued to a
later time so all could be heard, not just those who
could "hold out." But Mr. Bazzy grabbed the micro-
phone, thumped and threatened and, with the assis-
tance of Councilman Dolan, the meeting dragged on
until 1 a.m. when it was finally, mercifully ended.
Democracy seemed to be available for him who
could shout the loudest, demand the most and endure
the longest not for the people.
If this is such a wonderful project, why must such
bullying tactics be employed?
Kay Hoey, Bradenton Beach


GIFT SHOP
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For the Beach Bound!
T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
Decorative Accessories Jewelry Pewter Miniatures
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Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 778-1645






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N AUGUST 11, 1994:- PAGE 9 IEH


Council protests proposed

school board village increase


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council is the first Island
city to register a protest against the Manatee County
School Board's 7.59 percent proposed increase in mill-
age.
Last week the council autho-
rized Councilman Luke Courtney to Holmes Beacd
write letters to the school board and
the state Department of Education Mara have w
concerning the increase, requesting Lo
Courtney said when the school join the Coali
board came to Holmes Beach seek- Island ElecteJ
ing support for their one-cent sales
tax for capital improvements, offi-
cials said if the sales tax were passed they would not
request an increase in millage. He said he had spoken
to the school board's acting director of finance who
told him that 70 percent of the increase is mandated by
the state and the other 30 percent was to generate op-
erating capital to support the 1,200 new students com-
ing into the county.
The mayor and council directed Courtney to write
a letter to the school board opposing the increase and
a letter to the state Department of Education asking
why the 70 percent is mandated.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger told council that Anna
Maria Mayor Ray Simches wrote Longboat Key Mayor
Bob Farber concerning the town's withdrawal from the
Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials.
"He's made a suggestion to them that if we can all


h a
rit
ng
tio
1C


agree that the Island elected officials will not take a
position on anything unless it's unanimous that per-
haps they would consider coming back (into the
group)," explained Bohnenberger.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore noted, "There's
a lot of common problems. Longboat Key has helped
us a lot and they seem to have a lot
indAnna of clout. There are common issues
that we need to work together on. I
ten letters sympathize with Longboat and I un-
,boat Key re- derstand why they are upset. I think
n of Barrier Mayor Simches has a good idea."
officials Council agreed to write a
similar letter.
Council voted four to one
on a resolution opposing the proposed roundabout at
Manatee Beach and asking for a traffic light instead.
Whitmore, who cast the dissenting vote, rea-
soned, "The roundabout slows traffic down. I remem-
ber when there weren't any traffic lights (on the Is-
land) and I remember I was devastated when the one
came up here (corner of Gulf and Marina Drives).
Everybody keeps saying they want to keep the char-
acter and ambiance of the Island and now we're go-
ing to put up another traffic light. I don't agree at all."
Council approved a bid from Apac of Florida for
$49,150 for repaving and striping a previously ap-
proved list of city streets.
Councilwoman Billie Martini asked for volun-
teers for the Coastal Cleanup scheduled for Sept. 17.
Those wishing to volunteer may call her at 778-2549.


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Bradenton Beach beach

activities law adopted


A modified law prohibiting a host of activities has
been adopted for the public portion of the beach in
Bradenton Beach.
City Council members approved an ordinance
Thursday that restricts some beach activities from the
area westward of the erosion control line to the water.
The significant modification centered around a
portion of the law that called for it to be illegal to
"throw, propel or push any objects, stones, balls, ar-
rows, javelins, kites or model aircraft which disturbs
the public peace, or endangers or unreasonably inter-
feres with the activities of other persons in the enjoy-
ment of the public beach and recreation areas."
The adopted law simplifies the clause, calling for
it to be illegal to "disturb the public peace, or endan-
ger or unreasonably interfere with the activities of other
persons in the enjoyment of the public beach and rec-
reational areas."
The ordinance calls for offenders to face a second-
degree misdemeanor, which carries up to a $500 fine
and 60 days in jail, or a citation for non-criminal vio-
lations with a $75 fine.
The ordinance has 24 clauses of prohibited activi-
ties. Probably the most controversial is a prohibition in
operation of Jet-skis on the public beach without a spe-
cial exception to the zoning code. Several businesses
have operated or requested permits to operate Jet-ski
rentals in the city.
Current laws prohibit most of the beach-side activi-
ties in Coquina and Cortez Beach. The new law would
extend the prohibited acts to all of the public beach in
the city.
The public portion of the beach is the strip of land
between the erosion control line and the water.
Included among the proposed prohibited activities:
Carry, possess or discharge a firearm, firecracker
or similar device without a permit;
Disturb any tree, shrub, plant, vegetation exclud-
ing noxious vegetation, seawall, groin, fence or sign
without a permit;
Catch, molest, injure, capture or kill any wild
birds or wildlife except poisonous reptiles, rats or ver-
min and fish of legal size and season;
Distribute, post, erect, solicit or place any adver-
tising materials without a permit;
Start or kindle any fires unless in designated areas;
Camp or sleep overnight either on the beach or in


parking lots;
Indulge in riotous, boisterous, threatening or in-
decent conduct or behavior or disturb the public
peace and tranquillity;
Sell, offer for sale, lease, rent or otherwise dis-
tribute any merchandise, goods, products, articles or
other things within the nature of retail, commercial
or business activities or enterprises unless associated
with Manatee County's approved franchise opera-
tions at Coquina Park. The possession of a city occu-
pational license relating to activities occurring on
adjacent or contiguous private property does not al-
low, qualify or extend any special right, authority or
permission to carry on such activity;
Litter;
Clean any fish;
Discharge any wastewater or sewage;
Drive any vehicle in speeds. greater than 15 mph
off the paved surface of city or state roads;
Park motor vehicles that would block a beach
access or another vehicle, or park any semi-trailer or
tractor-trailer rig without a permit;
Construct any building or locate any public
utilities without permits;
Remove any rip-rap, rock or other erosion con-
trol materials without permits;
Conduct any type of organizational special
event without written permission from the city or a
permit;
Possess or consume any alcoholic beverages
whether on the beach or in any public parking areas;
Disturb the public peace or endanger or inter-
fere with activities of other persons enjoying the
beach;,
Fish from any area of the beach designated only
for swimming;
Jump from any jetty or pier, or launch a surf-
board from any groin or jetty;
Drive or operate any vehicle, including bi-
cycles, within any area of the beach, piers or groins,
except for city-approved vehicles;
Pets on the beach, although they are permitted
within the parking areas if on a leash, are prohibited;
Being on the beach between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
except for night fishing on the piers;
Store any type of equipment or recreational
paraphernalia which are not in actual use.


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liJ PAGE 10 M AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Tampa Bay disaster anniversary Aug. 10


By Paul Roat
Islanders lined the north shore of Anna Maria a year
ago, looking with a kind of fascinated horror at what en-
vironmentalists had feared would happen for years:
A collision of three ships in the mouth of Tampa
Bay ruptured tanks containing millions of gallons of oil
which was leaking into the fragile marine environment.
A huge plume of fire and smoke from a burning tanker
marked the spot just south of Mullet Key.
Would the oil be blown onto Anna Maria's shore?
Could the oil be contained?
Would the gooey mess cause an environmental
disaster the likes of the Alaskan catastrophe caused by
the Exxon Valdez?
Environmental regulators all agree damage to ma-
rine life, although extensive, could have been much,
much worse. Favorable winds and tides carried most of
the crude oil out to sea. Although heavy winds and seas
still bring the brownish tar balls ashore on Pinellas
County beaches, damage to the more environmentally
important areas of the bay have been slight.
Anna Maria Island was spared from damage, as
were Anna Maria Sound, Sarasota Bay and most wet-
land areas of Tampa Bay.

Who was responsible?
A year and $50 million later, most of the oil and
damage claims have been cleaned up. Decisions on just
who was to blame remain unresolved, although most
believe that all three pilots aboard the three ships share
in the responsibility of the crash.
Here is what happened.
At around 5:30 a.m. Aug. 10, 1993, the phosphate
freighter Balsa 37 was leaving Tampa Bay, piloted by
Capt. Thomas Baggett.
A tug, the Seafarer, pushing a barge, was heading
into Tampa Bay, piloted by Capt. Charles Chapman.
Behind the Seafarer was another tug, the Capt. Fred
Bouchard, piloted by Capt. Robert West.


Inter-denominational
service to be held
Sing to God, a praise and worship service, will be held
on Monday, Aug. 15, 7 p.m., at Episcopal Church of the
Annunciation in Holmes Beach. The informal inter-de-
nominational service is led by a contemporary musical




Island
puppeteers
"Wiley and the Hairy
Man," a puppet show .
performed by elementary
school-aged kids last
week, is part of the ongo-
ing children's summer
program at the Island
Branch Library. In the
puppet stage are Melody
Ajmo, left, age 9, and
Shauna Kim, age 9. Krista
Skee, 11, Lucina Courtney,
11, and Sarah Thomas, 10,
are seated left to right in
front of the stage which
was donated by Friends of
the Library.
Islander Photo:
Joy Courtney


The tug Seafarer and barge Ocean 255 burst into flame after the collision. Islander Photo: Paul Roat


West began to pass Chapman. Midway into the
passing maneuver, there was a collision with B aggett's
freighter.
The freighter, heavily damaged, limped to the
shoals near Egmont Key. Chapman's barge, carrying
aviation fuel, burst into flame, sending a tower of fire
nearly 100 feet into the air.
West's barge, carrying No. 6 crude oil and suffering
ruptured tanks, anchored near the scene of the accident.
Environmental regulators estimate about 330,000
gallons of crude oil and 32,000 of aviation fuel ended
up into Tampa Bay.
After months of hearings, Baggett pled no contest
to charges, was fined $5,000, received a nine-month
suspension of his pilot's license and was placed on a
20-month probation.
Chapman received a six-month suspension of his
pilot's license. West received a letter of warning



group with keyboards, guitars and vocalists. Sponsored by
Harvey Memorial, Roser Memorial Community Church,
St. Bernard Catholic Church and the Episcopal Church of
the Annunciation, the service is held on the third Monday
of each month and is open to everyone.
For more information call 778-0414.


from the U.S. Coast Guard.

Will the luck last?
The tide was going out that morning, and carried
the oil and fuel with it. The outgoing tide was a criti-
cal and unexpected bit of luck that clean-up crews cited
for easing the problem of oil containment, providing
them several valuable hours to marshal their forces and
put in place oil retention booms to keep the oil from
mangroves and seagrasses in the area.
Another factor that kept damage slight was a multi-
agency task force that had just completed plans for
coping with a disaster such as what occurred Aug. 10.
Their "test" after meeting for many months: a three-
vessel boat collision in the mouth of Tampa Bay that
caused a rupture of an oil tanker.
About 5 billion gallons of petroleum products still
enter the Tampa Bay channel each year.


AARP offers
work program
The American Association of Retired Persons'
Senior Community Services Employment Program has
positions open for persons aged 55 and older with lim-
ited financial resources.
The program gives clients the opportunity to work
20 hours per week at minimum wage in a non-profit or
public service host agency. During the temporary em-
ployment, workers receive on-the-job training and as-
sistance in achieving permanent employment goals.
For more information call 366-9039.

Historical Museum
offerings
The Anna Maria Island Historical Museum, 402
Pine Ave., Anna Maria, is open in August on Tuesdays
through Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Admission is free.
On Wednesday, Early Settlers Bread, similar to
English Muffins and baked by members of the Anna
Maria Island Historical Society, is available.
Featured in the museum for the centennial year is
the genealogy chart of the Bean family. George
Emerson Bean, who arrived in 1894, was the first
homesteader on Anna Maria Island.
On display is a loggerhead turtle exhibit and a shell
collection. Books, photographs, documents and maps
tracing the history of Anna Maria Island may also be
found in the museum. Gift shop items include histori-
cal and centennial T-shirts, history books, tote bags,
hats and stationary. Historical calendars have been re-
duced to $2.
Volunteers are needed to help in the museum. If in-
terested call Dorothy Stevenhagen at 795-0148. Society
membership is $10. All donations are tax deductible.
Meetings will resume on Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Anna Maria City Hall. For information call 778-0492.
Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held Satur-
days at Anna Maria City Hall were Ruth Foehrkolb and
Bill Starrett. Runners up were: Richard Foehrkolb and
Jack Kruger. The games are held at 9 a.m.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 11, 1994 A PAGE 11 -I


DOT proposes changes for Palma


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Most motorists agree Palma Sola Causeway is not
a particularly fun place to drive, especially on week-
ends when traffic often backs up past 75th Street on the
mainland side, and snakes cars back to Crabby Bill's
on the Island side. Ever-popular with beachgoers who
don't want to make the trek all the way to the Island -
or those who want to bring their dogs or horses the
causeway is the bane of any driver who has hopes of
getting into Bradenton in less than an hour during pe-
riods of congestion.
The Florida Department of Transportation (DOT)
has heard the complaints and offered what it sees as
solutions. Actually, it's come up with two sets of plans,


Free school

immunizations,

physical available
School immunizations will be offered free of
charge to students up to age 18 at the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Friday,
Aug. 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., by the Manatee County
Public Health Unit. These immunizations are available
to any child who needs them, but no physical will be
done at this location.
Free school physical, which are available to chil-
dren up to age 18 from low-income and Medicaid-eli-
gible families, will be given by the county health unit
in a mobile clinic located at St. Mary Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 1006 1st St. West, Bradenton, on Saturday
Aug. 13 between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Proof of a physical must be provided for any child
entering school, as well as for children who will be en-
rolled in day care or preschool. The health department
does not provide sports physical.
Appointments are not necessary, but county health
officials ask that you bring your child's immunization
records with you. For more information, call the health
department at 748-0666, ext. 1424.


but the first one drew such criticism that the agency is
now pushingan alternative.
Originally, DOT wanted to repave the road and add
four-foot paved shoulders. That didn't bother too many
people, but when it was proposed that a guard rail be
constructed eight feet from the edge of the pavement
- and running the length of the causeway causeway
lovers saw red.
The original DOT plan also called for two traffic
signals to be installed on the causeway, and it would be
here where the only breaks in the guard rail would be
- one on the east side of the bridge, one on the west.
In other words, these two points would be the only way
to get on or off the causeway beaches.
Since mid-month that plan has appeared dead.
DOT is still proposing to repave the road and include
four-foot paved shoulders, but there will be no guard-
rail or traffic lights. This plan does call for the construc-
tion of a sidewalk along the north side of Manatee


Sola Causeway
Avenue and a pedestrian bridge to link the east and
west portions of the causeway.
Although DOT has the final say as to what's done
at the causeway because it's a state road, it has sought
the approval of the Bradenton City Council. That body
was set to discuss the matter July 27, at which time it
was expected to approve the alternative plan.
According to DOT officials, the question of what to
do with the causeway must be settled soon, prior to the
beginning of the Cortez Bridge rehabilitation, because
Manatee Avenue will be the detour during construction.
-Although the second plan is finding much greater
acceptance by those who pull off the road to enjoy the
causeway, motorists who are just passing through
should not expect too much relief from traffic jams.
"It will be just about the status quo," Bradenton
Planning Director Jerry West told The Islander By-
stander when asked how the alternative project would
affect driving times to and from the Island.


Brownies camp at zoo Photo Courtesy of Joanne Trovato-Brown
Anna Maria Island Brownie Troop #40 took an unusual field trip to Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa where they had
a pizza party and spent the night beside the manatee tank. The visit included a behind-the-scenes tour of the
zoo to learn about the South American rain forest. Guide Sherri Brown, center, explained endangered species
and showed the Brownies an illegal snake skin from the rain forest.


Happy 70th Birthday...


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wrapperl"







IQE PAGE 12 K AUGUST 11, 1994 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
I'm still waiting for things to quiet down on the
Island. Sure, the roads don't resemble a huge parking
lot like they do in April, but most of our restaurants and
hot spots are remaining consistently busy, busy, busy.
Chez Andre in Holmes Beach is celebrating its
fifth anniversary on Thursday, Aug. 18, with a very
special dinner. Reservations are suggested, of course.
Congratulations to Andre and Francois and the entire
family and crew. We wish you many more years of
croissants in the oven and wonderful French cuisine.
D.Coy Ducks Bar & Grill has a new line-up of
entertainment. Steel Pan Dan plays on Tuesday, Hank
McDermott tingles the keyboard early evenings,
Wednesday through Saturday, and Reid Frost enter-
tains Wednesday night. Howie Banfield and the Anna
Maria String Band play Thursday and Tim Bamboo
plays Friday and Saturday night. While you're there,
make it a point to check out the display case ducks.
The Mutiny Inn is offering a summer dining spe-
cial. A couple may choose any two entrees served with
an appetizer and a bottle of house wine for just $39.95.
If you haven't tried the Mutiny Inn, you have no excuse
with this officer. It's a good way to give a wonderful
restaurant a try.
The Anchor Inn will host the John Prestia Group on
Friday and Saturday beginning at 10 p.m. Prestia has had
lots of press recently for his big hit "No One to Run With,"



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recorded by the Allman Brothers Band and featured in the
movie, "Cowboy Way." Get there early for a seat or join
the standing room only crowd around the bar.
Euphemia Haye has been honored with the presti-
gious Dirona award from the Distinguished Restaurants
of North America in 1994, exemplifying the highest stan-
dards in all aspects of the dining experience. Both Chef
Ray and D'Arcy Arpke, husband and wife owners, say
they're proud to be among only 75 recipients of the award.
Mote Marine Aquarium is feeding more than
sharks these days. A new concession, located next to
the gift shop, has opened in conjunction with the Ba-
gel Factory and Deli of Bradenton. The new snack bar
will offer such items as the "Mote" dog, "Lido" and
"Manatee" specials as well as fresh baked bagels, ba-
gel sandwiches, salads, cookies, ice cream and drinks.
Another Blooze Cruise will leave the Cortez dock
on Saturday, at 7:30 p.m. for a night of rock-a-billy and
R & B with the Bigg Wigg Boogie Woogie Band on the
Miss Cortez Fleet. The cost is $12 at the dock. A cash
bar and drink specials are available on the cruise.
And now a nod to the 25th anniversary of
Woodstock and a chance for Islanders to take in two
great summer music festivals coming up:
"Groove Fest '94" is in St. Petersburg this weekend
with some original Woodstock performers at the Pinellas
Park Fairground featuring musicians such as Richie Ha-
vens, Melanie, Iron Butterfly, John Sebastion, John Prestia

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Francois and Andre Gotti, with frequent diner, Fusz
Thatcher of Holmes Beach, prepare to celebrate
Chez Andre's fifth anniversary Aug. 18.

Group and Schascle. $20 covers the three-day, Aug. 12-
14, concert. Info: 1-800-476-6833.
Make plans now for the Fourth Annual Sarasota
Blues Festival is Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Sarasota Fair-
grounds starring Gregg Allman and Friends. This music
festival is always "a gas." The line-up of friends looks
great: John Prestia (yes, he really gets around) will host the
event and other musicians include Junior Wells, the Toler
Brothers, Schascle, Derek Trucks, L'il Ed and the Blues
Imperials and Richy Kicklighter. Tickets are $10 in ad-
vance, $15 at the gate. Proceeds from the event will go to
the John Ringling Towers Rehabilitation.


TY R Old Fashioned
81, I 'ce Cream
Waffle Cones


This Area's Only Full
Ice Cream Pies & Cakes Soft Serve
Ijf -"'" Colombo Yogurt Diabetic
Surfing World Village
11904 Cortez Road W. Daily Noon to 10 p.m. 794-5333


'A little treasure of a restaurant...
inventive, fresh, well executed.'
Pat Benson Bradenton Herald
This week at...


ihe Mutiny Inn




We'll be offering ...
Maine Lobster Tails
Fresh Gulf Catches
(Prepared (10) Ways Nightly)
Black Angus NY Au Poivre
... in addition to our Creative Menu
already featuring the area's finest Angus
Steaks, the widest selection of pastas,
and an imaginative wine list.
"The Mutiny Inn" on the Corner of
Manatee Avenue & Gulf Drive.
N9w Summer Hours
Serving Dinner 5:00 10:00 Monday thru Saturday
'Early Dinner 5-6 p.m. ngfhit(y
Same dinner menu, smaller portions, aod $9.95
Reservations Suggested
Availabk for Private Parties
605Manatee Avenue at'East'Bay Dr.
S \ Homnes 'Beach
(813) 778-5440


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
LUNCH
AND
DINNER

CRIBBAGE
TOURNAMENT
EVERY SUNDAY NOON TIL?

BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS
ALL YOU $:95
CAN AT
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY


OPEN 7 DAYS IAM TO 10PM
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


"The Best News"


THELEAER IN ISCUN IQUORTORE
LWSLIQURPRCS NTONFO 9 ER
SPECIALS FRAU.I t HUAGS16h I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 11, 1994 I PAGE 13 -0]


Kindergarten bound
Christen Franklin is joined by teachers Maria Richards, left, and Holly Davies
as she celebrates graduating from the School for Constructive Play.


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR



JOHN PRESTIA
FRI & SAT-AUG 12 & 13 *10OPM-2AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


Roser Vacation
Bible School helps
Guide Dogs for
the Deaf
Last week Roser Memorial
Community Church celebrated
100 years of Bible school with a
new record of 110 Bible school
students. They also donated the
week's offering of approximately

Arlene Dickenson, executive
director of Florida Dog Guides
Wfor the Deaf, gave Vacation
Bible School students a demon-
stration using sign language
with Tar, a two-year-old guide
dog. Volunteer Courtney Taylor,
age 7, helped Dickenson demon-
strate how trained dogs help
deaf owners by responding to
smoke alarms, a ringing tele-
phone and even an alarm clock.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafca


Joe's Eats & Sweets
Od a ioe m a
The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
Ifyou-can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge

COUPON
EXPIRES 'C ,-j I
S8/16/94 N O S- s I
1 10519 Cortez Road
1 792-5300 I
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
I LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET
3.99 /BUFFET 2.99I

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET
$ @ /SECOND
*4.49/BUFFET299
lmmmmmil COUPON *mlmmlI









SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Oysters Rockefeller, Top Round of Beef, Veal Oscar, Shrimp Supreme, Roast Pork,
Shrimp Scampi, Scallops, Lobster, Huge Antipasta Salad, Fresh Fruits, Pasta,
More Salads ... and much more... Desserts too!
Nightly $1 I95 Early Bird seated by 5:30 $995
SUMMER "EARLY BIRD SPECIALS"
AVAILABLE DAILY UNTIL 6 PM
Open Faced Hot Roast Beef Sandwich $4.95
Nutty Scrod Lobster Cakes Fried Shrimp $5.95
Grouper All You Can Eat BBQ Pork Ribs $7.95
NIGHTLY SPECIALS "MADE FRESH DAILY"
Lobster Cakes Coquille St. Jacques Fried Flounder $7.95
Grouper Oscar $8.95
Small Rack of Lamb Veal Oscar Shrimp Supreme $9.95
Filet & Lobster $12.95 Chateaubriand (for 2) $24.95
SUNDAY $795 ]
BRUNCH
BUFFET 10 AM 2 PM
Over 30 Breakfast and k
Dinner Items RESTAURANT
Mimosa Bloody Marys, $1 00 I LOUNGE
Screwdrivers *.Seabreezes J
101 S. BAY BLVD. *
ANNA MARIA
Oyster Bar on
HAPPY HOUR DAILY til 6pm Anna Mada
$125 HOUSE COCKTAILS Pier
Late Night Happy Hour Starts 10pm 778-0475
2 for 1 Well Drinks
$1.00 Drafts and FREE Hot Buffet


ISLANI)
SEAFOOD
SPECIALTIES -

VACATION TIME
See ya in October!
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333

Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch
Specials on the Island!
FRESH BAKED Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
PIES & Full cut, potato, ( ,
BISCUITS vegetable, salad, rolls $6.95
EGGS BENEDICT All Day ... 7 Days a Week
VtAI EYE OPENER._2 eggs.toast,
[ '.J home fries and coffee ... 6nly $1.75 -

lIslandInn
f ,Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


GREAT FOOD. GREAT BEACH.
GREAT SUMMER SPECIALS.

Half-Price Lunch.

$9.99 Dinner.
Buy one lunch and get the second of equal or lesser
value at half price until 4 pm! Every Day!
(With this ad, through August 31,1994.)
Monday is Grouper Night just $9.99
Tuesday is Prime Rib Night from $9.99
Wednesday is Shrimp Night-o4l$9.99
Thursday niit enjoy Italian Seafood $9.99
Drink specials daily from 4 to 6 pm.
Guess the time of sunset to win a bottle of Korbel
chalmplge.
Great deck. Great playground.
Great steel drum band nightly, with Dixieland on
Thursday evenings.





great food. great beach.
200 Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach, (813) 779-2222


RESTAURANT
OFFERS SUMMER SPECIALS
"JUST FOR YOU"
Monday: Catfish Fry ... $6.95
"All you can eat" Catfish, fries,
hush puppies and cole slaw.
Tuesday: Prime Rib ... $9.95
8 oz cutprime rib, potato or rice & vegetable.
Wednesday: BBQ Baby Back Ribs
1/2 rack $6.95 Full $11.95
with baked beans, half ear of corn, baked potato.
Thursday: Braised Lamb Shank ... $7.95
One shank, potato or rice & vegetable.
Friday: Crab Cakes Dinner ... $10.95
Two crab cakes, fries, potato or rice & vegetable.
Monday thru Thursday:
Fish & Chips "All-You-Can-Eat" ... $6.95
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4-6 pm
HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 4-7 pm
2 FOR 1 DRINKS
Join Us For Dinner & Dancing
Duane Dee Tues. Sat.
Big Mama & Eddie Sun. & Mon.
OPEN AT 4 PM DAILY
IN THE CENTRE SHOPS ON LONGBOAT KEY
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Longboat Key 383-0543







l[] PAGE 14 A AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

J;--- hs ,!,Ooz.-


Venice's Third Annual Sharks
Tooth Festival this weekend
These children are hunting for fossilized sharks'
teeth at the annual Sharks Tooth and Seafood
Festival held at the Venice Pier, Caspersen Beach in
Venice, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 13 and 14, from
10 a.m. to 6p.m. Gate admission is $3, children
under 12 years old are free. For more information
call 1-800-940-7427.


Wicker Inn to hold open house
The Wicker Inn on Longboat Key invites the pub-
lic to an open house on Monday, Aug. 15, from 5 to 7
p.m. The event celebrates the completion of the new-
est renovation of the oldest small resort the key. The
Wicker Inn is located at 5581 Gulf of Mexico Dr.

,ai -P 5702 MARINA DR.

%778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
CID M OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5. NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 'til Midnight)
Tuesday: QUARTER BEER NIGHT, 6 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT- REGGAE
Thursday: LADIES NIGHT- $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wednesday, Aug. 10 Reggae "Democracy"
Thurs., Aug. 11 Alternative "Knucklehead"
Fri. & Sat., Aug. 12 & 13 "Hammerheads"
Sunday, Aug. 14 Beach Bash 7 to 11 PM
with "Blindside" (formerly DT's)
Wednesday, Aug. 17 Reggae "Ambush"
Thurs. Sat., Aug. 18 20 "Lifeguard"
Closed Mondays for the Summer












Monday
Dom Night Tuesday
Guess the time of sunset. "Sandbar Sunset" Night!
The closest guess wins a That's our newest frozen
bottle of Dom Perignon! specialty drink, and
its two-for-one!
Wednesday
Native Night! Thursday
Show your Bradenton, Island Night!
Sarasota, or Island ID when Join the "South Seas" festivities
you order and we'll knock as you sway to the music
20% off your entree! of Tropical Steel.


Every night enjoy SANDBAR
early bird sAFO PIRIT
specials inside
from 4-6 p.m.
100 Spring Avenue I Anna Maria, Florida 1 778-0444


Island Police reports
Anna Maria City
July 29, theft of bicycle, 101 S. Bay Blvd., An-
chorage restaurant.
July 31, theft of firearm, 100 S. Bay Blvd.,
Anna Maria City Pier. The complainant reported
that a person unknown removed a revolver from his
tackle box while he was fishing on the pier.
Aug. 2, lost/stolen tag, 200 block of Peri-
winkle.
Aug. 3, theft of bicycle, 100 S. Bay Blvd.,
Anna Maria City Pier.

Bradenton Beach
July 28, burglary to an automobile, Coquina
Beach. A person unknown forced open a vent win-
dow and removed $16 in cash and a credit card.
July 30, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3000
block of Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. The officer re-
sponded to the location on a follow-up investigation of
a burglary case and upon entering the residence, he
observed a partially burned marijuana cigarette. The
officer asked Isaac Luke Prince, 19, of Holmes Beach,
if he had more marijuana or paraphernalia and Prince
produced a glass water pipe from behind the television
set. The officer then located a water pipe inside the
television stand and a chamber pipe on top of the
dresser. Prince produced two more pipes and was
given a notice to appear ticket.







M NW
W B The BESTPIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
L Internationally Famous Strombbli
W | 2 for 1 Early Bird Specials BW
4:30-6:00 p.m.Daily L
W P Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials A W


K K
w z WENSA IS
GA W


ED S


Hours: OPEN WED.-SUN. 8:00 AM-2:00 PM/4:30 10PM
M CLOSED MON. & TUES. FOR THE SUMMER M
h S & S PLAZA 5348 GULF DRIVE, HOLMES BEACH


July 30, criminal mischief, 100 block of Bridge
Street. The complainant reported that a person un-
known threw a bar glass at the windshield of his ve-
hicle.
July 31, inhalation of a harmful chemical,
criminal mischief, Cortez Beach. The officer on pa-
trol observed Timothy D. Waldrup, 34, a transient,
sitting on the beach after hours and sniffing some-
thing out of a bag and called him over. Waldrup
tucked the bag into his shorts and walked over to the
officer with a duffel bag in his hand.
The officer asked Waldrup what was in the bag
and Waldrup said it was his medicine, according to
the report. The officer asked to search the bag and
found a can of spray paint containing toluene. The
officer asked Waldrup for the bag he had hidden and
Waldrup pulled it out of his shorts and slammed it
down on the trunk lid of the patrol car, causing it to
break and paint to leak onto the car. Waldrup was
placed in custody.
Aug. 3, Marchman Act, 100 block of Gulf
Drive North. The officer on patrol observed a sub-
ject lying in the grass and noticed the strong odor of
alcoholic beverage on the subject. The subject did
not know where he was or where he was going and
could barely stand up, according to the report. He
was placed in custody for his safety.
Aug. 4, theft of a bicycle,-2300 block of Gulf
Drive North.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE



-Bridge Tender Inn
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn

HAPPY HOUR
4 PM to 6 PM
DRAFT
BEERS R m


SPECIALil
ICE CREAM
DRINKS
2 FOR 1 -
WELL DRINKS -
GREAT SNACKS

LIMITED TIME ONLY With any LUNCH
ORDER you recieve $10.00 OFF
a fun Parasail ride out over the Gulf.

-un 2lnnt il.
Call for Reservations 778-4849 Closed Mondays
Convenient Docking come by land or by sea (Marker 49)
Bridge Street Bradenton



Mon-Fri 4-7 PM

795.8083
SUNDAY:
HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY
WITH NASCAR RACES
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION NIGHT
KARAOKE "
Wednesday '""' '" '
&Thursday Nights
S8 to Midnight

The Salt
Water
Cowboys
Fri & Sat
August 12 & 13
9 PM 1 AM

The Best Burgers and
The Best Phillie Cheese Steaks
in Manatee County
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


IZZY BREAKFAST SPECIALTIES
FRITTATA ALA VEGGIE Fresh seasonal veggies,
fluffy scrambled egg and assorted cheeses served atop
a bed of steamy homefries. Served with salsa 4.95
MEXI FRITTATA Homemade chili, fluffy
scrambled egg, melted cheddar cheese and green
onion atop a bed of steamy homefries ........ 4.95
HuEVEROS RANCHEROS IZZY's VERSION 2
Warm flour tortillas topped with chili, eggs your
way, cheddar cheese, diced tomato and green onion.
Served with sour cream and salsa ............... 4.95
COUNTRY BENEDICT An open faced biscuit
topped with 2 sausage patties, farm fresh eggs, and
country gravy. Served with homefries ...... 4.50O
BISCUITS AND GRAVY ............................. 2.95
S\\'./ Sunrise Special
|-i 5 r'2. $1.99
I. > : ". 2 Farm Fresh Eggs,
.Homefries orGrits, Toast & Fruit
I ^\ / s-"' Preserves and Coffee.
L '. -,6 6:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Mon.-Fri.
3 f HRS.: MON.-SAT.
383-0689 6:30AM-2:30PM SUN.8AM-1PM
-6836 Gulf of Mexico Dr. Whitney Beach Plaza







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I AUGUST 11, 1994 U PAGE 15 iD


Aug. 4, theft, 2500 block of Avenue B. The
complainant reported that a person unknown cut a
fuel filter and line from her vehicle.

Holmes Beach
July 29, found property,12-speed Sovereign bi-
cycle, dark red with a black seat and a small, black
plastic basket in front.
July 29, suspicious person, 100 block of 81st
Street. The complainant reported that a white male
in his mid-20s wearing a white T-shirt and a navy
blue baseball cap came to his door. When the com-
plainant answered the door, the man ran.
July 29, suspicious person, 100 block of 81st
Street. The officer on patrol observed a nude subject
running eastbound on 81st Street, stopped him and
placed him in custody. The subject said he took off
his swimsuit, left it on the beach and could not lo-
cate it. He said he was trying to get back to his mo-
tel. The officer issued him a summons for exposure
of sexual organs.
July 30, theft of an automobile, 3700 block of
East Bay Drive. The automobile was located by the




SILVER QUEEN CORN
...... .. FRESH DAILY


WATERMELON SALADS and
S$499 SANDWICHES
_ Made to Order


Hillsborough County Sheriff's Department and a
suspect was placed in custody.
July 31, exposure of sexual organs, 52nd Street
beach. The victim was sunning herself and looked up
to see Karim Ali, 39, of Sarasota, fondling himself
as he sat on the wooden stairs. When the victim
spoke to him, Ali left the beach, got in his vehicle
and drove away. Based on the victim's description,
Ali was stopped by an officer of the Bradenton
Beach Police Department and identified by the vic-
tim.
Aug. 1, petty larceny of two bicycles, 400
block of Clark Lane.
Aug. 1, burglary of two skim boards, 100 block
of 72nd Street.
Aug. 2, burglary to an automobile, 2716 Gulf
Dr., Gulf Cabins. A person unknown entered a ve-
hicle, rifled through the glove box, threw papers

ISLANDERS WZOtO


around and popped the trunk open. Four other un-
locked vehicles were also entered,
Aug. 2, missing persons, Kingfish Ramp. The
complainant reported that four persons on a boat
were overdue. The four were found by the U.S.
Coast Guard. They had experienced engine trouble.
Aug. 2, petty larceny of a bicycle, 3700 block
of East Bay Drive.
Aug. 2, stolen tag, 200 block of 54th Street.
Aug. 4, operating a vehicle with tag not as-
signed, 3900 block of East Bay Drive.
Aug. 4, harassing phone calls, 100 block of
29th Street.
Aug. 4, DWLS, 1500 block of Gulf Drive.


RODgA.eL

Mini-Resort
Best Fishing *
ISLAND
COOKING
Beer and Wine
Breakfast
Lunch-Dinner
Reasonable *
Prices *
"Upstairs."
"Dramatic View"
* Air Conditioned *
50 Guarded
Bike-Racks
S 1/2 mile
North of City Pier



Just







I a 1


Subscribe
now to
the best news
on the Ileand.
See the sub-
secription form
on page 7.
Don't miss a
week of newsel


Cftez rAndre
Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast Daily Special
Luncheon Intimate Dinner





Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France
Tues thru Sat Thur, Fri & Sat
8AM-2:30PM 6-10PM
Sunday 8AM-1:30PM Sunday 5:30-9PM Member American
Reservations Suggested for Dinner Culinary Federation
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Celebrate

Florida

Cuisine

with a

Spanish



fresh fish paella pasta *
tapas black bean soup *
stuffed veal chop duck *
tequila steak pork nueva
homemade sangria *
cuban coffee tiramisu *
if
Tia Lena's Restauranut
1325 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach
Tuesday Sunday Open 4:30


r niosAun ANX

KING CRAB DINNER $1 695
WEEKDAY SPECIALS
Mon. Combo; Kingcrab & Grilled Swordfish..............12.95
Wed. Combo: Kingcrab & Grilled Scallop .................12.95
Fri. Combo: Kingcrab & Bulldozer Lobster Tail......... 13.95
Sat. Swordfish (Grilled)................................ 12.95
ON THE BAY END SUNDAY-THURSDAY
OF BROADWAY VISA & 11:30 AM 9:00 PM
LONGBOAT KEY MASTERCARD FRIDAY & SATURDAY
383-1748 NOW ACCEPTED 11:30 AM 9:30 PM


I I


Try Harry's Expertly Prepared Seafood Today!
5600 Block Gulf of Mexico Dr. (behind Circle K) Longboat Key*383-0777
Restaurant -Lunch & Dinner-Gourmet Take-Out*Catering*Gift Baskets


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
S *.,..- on our casual outside patio."
SP.S. We have the very best sunsets.


Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!






[[ PAGE 16 E AUGUST 11, 1994 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Rainfall, artificial reefs and the question of authority


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
It's been a great summer if you're a duck. And
most of us, having learned to appreciate any rain we
can get, are learning to think like ducks.
According to the Weather Bureau at the Tampa
Airport, this past month was the wettest July in 34

Turtle decals to aid
protected species
For the most part, the best way to help loggerhead
sea turtles a protected species is to leave them
alone. Don't pick them up, bother them when they are
laying eggs,
and if you live
along the beach
don't leave
e, w h your outdoor
Ss lights on dur-
g ing their egg-
hatching sea-
son.
So much for the don't, now there's something
more active you can do to make sure these gentle
creatures are always a part of our Island ambiance.
Late last month, the state began selling a new
version of its turtle decals for $5, with the proceeds
going to help turtles. The stickers say they benefit
green turtles, which is another protected species,
but some of the money raised is earmarked for log-
gerheads -the kind the Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch takes care of.
The turtle decals can be purchased at any
Manatee County tax collection office, and are usu-
ally offered for sale when boaters renew their li-
censes for their vessels. But anyone can buy the
decals at any time, and the state says that in each
of the two years it has been selling the stickers it
has raised about $60,000 to aid the state's turtle
protection program. The program has an annual
budget of $330,000.


o0
^^^s.


* 0
0

^P??70


Fish Tales Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your fish stories, and
pictures are welcome! Just give us a call at
778-7978 or stop by our office in the
Island Shopping Center.





Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253


years. Total rainfall for the month was 11.31 inches
versus a normal July rainfall of 6.58 inches.
You have to go all the way back to 1960 to find a
wetter July than this year, and even that year was
skewed because most of the slightly more than 20
inches of rainfall that year came in just two days. Hur-
ricane Brenda passed just north of Tampa and ac-
counted for the big dump of water.
Even June rainfall ran a little bit above normal
summer, coming in at a 5.69 inches versus a normal
June of 5.48 inches.
That means that for June and July, rainfall totaled
a flat 17 inches, versus a normal 12.06 inches. So call
it five inches above normal so far this summer.
But the hard truth is that for the entire calendar
year, Tampa is running a third of an inch under normal,
so there really isn't much to celebrate. Our overall
freshwater table continues to sink, and more and more
people continue to demand more and more water.
But it's sobering to learn just how local our wet
summer really is.
I was talking by telephone with my daughter Traci
in the Yucatan last week, where she's working on an
archaeological dig. She said they're having another
terrible drought again this summer and what few crops
haven't died are in wretched condition.
"For the third year in row the corn crop has failed
and the Mayans face an even worse food shortage," she
said. Food never seems to be plentiful in that part of the
world, and the Mexicans desperately need some of the
wonderful rain we're enjoying here in Florida.
The Sarasota Bay Program is having great suc-
cess with its experimental reefs attached to seawalls.
These mini-reefs are being evaluated at four locations
on Longboat Key, where they're providing food and
shelter for "hundreds of juvenile fish."
Since Sarasota County has managed to lose some-
where around 80 percent of its natural Bay shoreline
to seawalls, these seawall reefs could be a huge im-
provement in fish habitat. Baywide if you include
the Manatee County portion 39 percent of the natu-
ral shoreline has been lost to seawalls.
Dr. David Tomasko, senior scientist for the Bay


Tee 1to0 Grn Golf
Custom Clubs Club Repair New & Used Clubs
New Golf Balls In Stock!
SThe Longest Balls*

Choose The Right Ball
For Your Game.
778-5184
Open Mon thru Sat 9 to 5 (Sunday by appointment only)
2501 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach

SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
4 ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.I


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Plumbin Inc.l
HAPuingl Rlear
" isposal


Tesing &ReparigCst'~
778-5622






5348B-Gulf Dr.
Holmes.. .B...eah
jState Cet #F0049191^
Stat Bak^lo Teh A0-89139


BUY IT!
SELL IT!
FIND IT!


The classified
section in
The Islander
BUY-stander
really works.
You get fast
results for little
buck$.


Program, says that while "very few fish are found
around bare seawalls, we have found 300-400 juvenile
fish hanging around the artificial reefs."
About five feet long and two- to three-feet wide,
the artificial reefs are made of a row of PVC pipe and
Vexas, a plastic material used by plumbers to line wa-
ter pipes. Four different types of reef designs are being
used in the study.
One design mimics a mangrove prop root fringe,
while others look like a tree without leaves. The reefs
are attached near the bottom of the seawalls so they
won't hinder boat navigation or water flow, according
to Tomasko.
Mojarras, a type of bait fish, gray snapper and
sheepshead have been observed using the reefs. Bar-
nacles, algae and other marine life form on the reefs,
providing food for the baby fish.
The reefs are also designed to give the young fish
hiding places from larger predator fish.
While each of these reefs was pretty much hand-
built, and so far as I know nobody is marketing them
yet, if you have a seawall you just might want to take
a look at these reefs. There's no question they'll im-
prove local fishing conditions.
But there is a hook in this. At this time, the permit
to drop an artificial reef runs somewhere between $300
and $350. Why? you might ask, if you're just trying to
improve the environment for the fish. Well, the Florida
Department of Environmental Protect has that license
fee in place and, thus far, it's unwilling to change it.
Anyway, the Bay Program is working on this prob-
lem too, and hopefully they'll soon have that fee dras-
tically lowered or eliminated all in the name of im-
proving Sarasota Bay.
Speaking of the DNR, I see that DEP Secretary Gin-
ger Wetherall and her husband, former House Speaker
T.K., have a new six-acre lake on their 1,000-acre ranch.
They scooped out a wetland to build the lake, then got a
permit (I wonder who from?) to pump up to 13.6 million
gallons a year to keep the new lake filled.
It's hard to maintain much respect for that crowd,
isn't it?
See you next week.


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* ^-Tfftri







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 11, 1994 0 PAGE 17 [Qi


World class soccer players taught by Holmes Beach coaches


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
It was eight weeks into the 10-week summer soc-
cer camps. The sun beat down on the heads of kids and
coaches alike. It was hot.
The soccer field was filled with large, steaniing,
muddy puddles from the previous day's rain, but that
didn't deter campers from giving the game their 100-
percent effort.
Kids of different ages and abilities get a chance to
work on their game and improve necessary skills, says
coach Danny Mitchell of Holmes Beach.
Bollettieri Soccer Stars Junior Soccer Camps was
designed in part by Mitchell and has become a highly
successful summer camp at the Nick Bollettieri Tennis
Academy in Bradenton.
"The summer camps are a progression toward the
advanced and elite players," says Mitchell. -
One parent ardently watches his daughter at the far
end of the field. This is his child's third year playing
soccer and he says the scholarships offered for soccer
players in the next few years in colleges and universi-
ties are worth working toward.
"That's true," says Mitchell. "Soccer provides an
opportunity to go to college for boys and girls -
thanks to the gender equity law, universities and col-
leges must give scholarships to girls as well."
In the last 10 years, says Mitchell, "Soccer is and
has been the largest growing participatory sport in this


Islander Photo: Tomara Kajka
Darryl Quinn, a 14-year-old, participated in one of
the advanced level week-long summer soccer camps.
"By the time Darryl is 17 or 18 years old, predicts
Danny Mitchell, camp director, "he'll be on the U.S.
National Team."
country. It's number one in the world."
The name of Nick Bollettieri has long been asso-
ciated with tennis, but what began as a summer camp


program for kids has now evolved into a full-time pro-
gram for the training of world-class professionals.
The Schulz Academy, which began this year at
Bollettieri, is the first of its kind in the U.S. or any-
where, says Mitchell. "It's a full-time program for the
elite soccer players of America and the world. These
players are here for one reason and one reason only -
to get in shape for the game."
Mitchell explains that Adidas, the world's largest
soccer supplier of equipment and clothing, has entered
into a joint venture with Bollettieri and Dr. Josef
Schulz, an Austrian manager, coach and respected soc-
cer player, to do exactly the same thing that Bollettieri
has done with tennis: develop world class talent.
Summer camp staff coach Ken Bowers, who grew
up playing soccer on the Island, hopes he will move
over to the full-time program when summer is over.
"I love giving something back to the kids," says
Bowers, who recently returned to this area. Bowers had
been working in both men's and women's soccer as an
assistant college coach.
Bowers, who loves soccer and working with kids,
will coach a soccer camp next week at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.
"Soccer really is a grassroots sport," says Mitchell,
who encourages kids to get their interest and talent
started young. "Americans are becoming more and
more professional. And some of these summer camp
players will be moving over to the academy."


... and soccer camps to be held at AMICC


The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
hold a soccer camp, Aug. 15 to 19,.5:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
with instructor Ken Bowers, a semi-pro player and
coach. Campers will receive an individual player analy-
sis compiled by coaches which includes player devel-
opment during the week, playing strengths and weak-
nesses, areas of improvement and a camp T-shirt. Cost


for the week-long camp is $15.
A free soccer clinic for kids ages 8 to 13, will also
be held Aug. 15 to 19, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., directed
by Kathy Granstad. Stop by the center to register. Soc-
cer players who participated last year will be mailed
registration forms.
A clinic for Island soccer coaches will be held Sat-


urday, Aug. 20, from 9 a.m. to noon.
Season registration will be held from Aug. 15 to 26
at AMICC.
AMICC is located at 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. Hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m., or Saturday from noon to 9 p.m. For more
information call Scott Dell at 778-1908.


Grassbed trout starting to grow in size, number


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Fishing reports are terrific this time of year. Back-
water fishers are catching all the redfish they want,
trout are starting to get big and catch-and-release fun
is there to be had with snook. Offshore, snapper and
grouper fishing is starting to really peak. And don't
forget the hot barracuda action near the reefs.
Rich at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching a few ladyfish, redfish and
Spanish mackerel.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier reported fishing
has been great. Fishers at the pier are catching mack-
erel, redfish, a lot of mangrove snapper and drum.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip averaged 150 head of Key West grunts.


The six-hour trip averaged 225 head of Key West
grunts, vermillion snapper, lane snapper and porgies.
The nine-hour trip averaged 38 head of red and black
grouper, mangrove snapper, porgies and scamp.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said he and Bret
Fortenberry caught a 100-pound tarpon during the
Tierra Verde Tarpon Tournament last weekend. Bret
ended up with a third-place award while fishing on the
Team Galati boat. For other fishing action, Chris sug-
gested trying for some of the big trout on the Key
Royale grass flats, or some of the whopper redfish that
are in the shallows. Offshore, grouper are the best bet
in about 60 feet of water.
Capt. Zack with the


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numerous right now, with one charter catching and re-
leasing a 25-pounder. Redfish are out there, too, with
some up to 33-inches in length. Capt. Zack suggests for
offshore action try for some of the numerous mangrove
snapper, barracuda or cobia. There are also a few spot-
ted mackerel offshore, but they are big about 27
inches in length.
Capt. Dave on the Neva Miss said his charters are
bringing back lots of red and gag grouper in about 70
feet of water. There are also plenty of mangrove snap-
per, big barracuda and a lot of little tuna, all found in
about 80 feet of water.
Good luck and good fishing.





SALES & SERVICE i)
.enter Console
18' to 25'
-. I


1a


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
S P. 0. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


DA
Th
Fr
Sa


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
AY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
1u8/11 3:08 2.2ft 9:05 U.7ft 3:35 2.1ft 9:00 0.9f
18/12 3:44 2.4ft 10:14 0.6ft 4:46 1.8ft 9:28 1.1f
t 8/13 4:29 2.5ft 11:33 0.6ft 6:24 1.5ft 9:50 1.3f


Sun 8/14
Mon 8/15
Tue 8/16
Wed 8/17


5:22 2.5ftf
6:26 2.5ft_
7:45 2.6ft
9:04 2.6ft_


1:06 0.5ft
2:42 0.4ft
3:57 0.3ft
4:55 0.2ft


~-8


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later. I I


. F-.. rff IIF _


tf
t







jf[ PAGE 18 E AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


1007 Gulf Dr N
217 Summer Sands
104 2nd St N
150x103
1407 Gulf Dr S
202 Coquina Moorings
2208 Gulf Dr
50xl00-Gulf
2212 Gulf Dr
50xl00-Gulf
2600 Gulf Dr
33 AM Island Club
1101 & 03 Gulf Dr N
107x210 + 50x100
1201-03 Gulf Dr
100x100


2205 Gulf Dr
50x100


305 Gulf Dr N
52x100
214 82nd St
90x90
4255 Gulf Dr
114 Island Village
209 65th St
113x100
219 84th St
90x100

3701 5th Av
4 Gulf View Twnhse
3704 6th Av
2bed/2bath
4255 Gulf Dr
115 Island Village
521 74th St
100xl21-canal
5608 Gulf Dr
204 Sun Plaza West
6300 Flotilla
92 Shell Point 3


6300 Flotilla
97 Shell Point


CITY
Anna Maria


ADDRESS/lot
309 Pine Av
52x145


Banana Beach Resort 1947-66
4 buildings ground level 4430 sfla
multi-family lots
6/20/94


house
3bed/lbath
ground home
2bed/lbath
residential lot


elevated condo
2bed/2bath
ground home
2bed/lbath
ground home
2bed/lbath/lcp

elevated condo
2bed/2.5bath
elevated condo
1160 sfla
elevated condo
3bed/2bath
ground home
3br/2ba/1 car/lcp/pool
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
upstairs condo
2bed/2bath


condo
2bed/2bath


1950
1456 sfla
1944
720 sfla



1981
1288 sfla
1958
1116 sfla
1960
1135 sfla

1984
950 sfla


1984


1981
1450 sfla
1960
1700 sfla
1981
1080 sfla
1973
1200 sfla
1973
1200 sfla


STYLE/rooms
ground cottage
2bed/lbath/loffice
ground home
3bed/2bath
two story duplex
5bed/3bath/2cp
elevated condo
2bed/2.5bath
ground home
2bed/lbath/2car
elevated condo
2bed/2bath-bay
residential lot

residential lot

elevated condo
2bed/2bath gulf


MacDonald/Rup
6/20/94


AGE/size
1915
828 sfla
1940
1056 sfla
1951
3664 sfla
1982
1500 sfla
1974
960 sfla
1982
1143 sfla






1984
1171 sfla


703 Fern
50x100


874 N Shore Dr
50x98


Bradenton Beach


SELLER/BUYER/when
Ward/Proctor
6/27/94
Jorgensenfl'homas
6/27/94
Fasbinder/Gibbons
6/27/94
Walker/Glozewski
6/27/94
Holmes/Goodworth
6/27/94
Vesely/Tojek
6/27/94
Braithwaite/IITF
6/27/94
Seabreeze/FIIT
6/27/94 -
Guergis/Forkel
6/27/94
Voigt/New Wave
6/20/94
Dholakia/Bennett
list $125,000
Quaderer/Adams
6/20/94
Vigeant/Cornett
6/20/94
Dillon/Porter
6/27/94
Bare/Matecun
6/27/94
Arnold/Mathieu
6/20/94
Van Ostenbridge/Kent
6/20/94

Gulf View/Steinhaeuser
6/20/94
St Lawrence/Puhaly
6/20/94
Bormann/Lege
6/20/94
Molter/Belsito
6/20/94
Hagen/Sunderland
6/20/94
James/Fowler
6/20/94


Real estate transactions are compiled exclusively for The Islander Bystander by Doug Dowling,
licensed real estate broker, 778-1222. The Islander Bystander 1994.


Don't forget to order your subscription, use the form on page 7, this issue. Don't miss an issue!


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS
-------- ~* ----

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


MASSAGE THERAPY


Specializing in Corrective Muscle Therapy
Rachel Barber, LMT #MA0051i67, MM1004539 778-8575
By Appointment Most Insurance Accepted




MASSAGE CAN HELP:
* Arthritis (non-inflammatory) Joint Immobility
* Back, Neck & Shoulder Pain Poor Circulation
* Chronic Headache & Migraine Sciatica & Tendinitis
f Hip. Knee. Leg & Foot Pain Sport Injuries
SFibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
* Insomnia And More
Gift Certificates 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza


O FUNERAL HOMES

KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager

BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459



[Ia-1 b san Poifatrv 1


D.P.M.


/ nMAThir &ArrPIrImr


rILUP I M. MI CINLiiiiE I
and .1 1
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
110e


SALE$S/LIST$
$120,000
list $130,000
$116,000
list $124,900
$175,000
list $195-192,000
$137,000
list uk
$200,000
list uk
$158,000
list uk
$52,000
list uk
$52,000
list uk
$215,000
list uk
$500,000
list uk
$120,000


$123,000
list uk


$70,000
list $89-79,000
$61,000
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$91,000
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$129,900
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$122,000
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$95,000
list $99,900
$127,500
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$225,000
list $274-259,000
$150,000
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$105,000
list $128,000
$98,000
list uk


Holmes Beach


Palma i lil mnI n
Solo I=k
Square 5815 Manatee Ave. W.
(Next to Film Works)
opticians 792-1777
WE NOW OFFER
Complete Eye Exam ONLY
Plus One Complete* 0000*
Pair of Eyeglasses $99-
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9 to 5 M-F I I I I I I I I I
9to12Sat. I 1 I I I I II Il LM gm


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


A :1J






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 11, 1994 0 PAGE 19 I(]


Virginia Helen Case
Virginia Helen Case, 87, of Cortez died Aug. 3 in
HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
There will be no visitation. Requiem Mass, Vigil
Services and visitation were held at the Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation, Holmes Beach, with the
Rev. Richard Fellows officiating. Memorial donations
may be made to the Church of the Annunciation, c/o
Virginia Case Memorial Fund, 4408 Gulf Dr., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217. Griffith-Cline Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Born in Chicago, Mrs. Case came to Cortez from
Dowagiac, Mich., in the late 1950s. She was retired from
Heath Corp. in Michigan. She was a member of the Epis-
copal Church of the Annunciation. She was a member of
the Order of the Eastern Star in Benton Harbor, the White
Shrine of Benton Harbor, the Post Office Clerks Auxil-
iary, the Lena Hannon Guard Team of the Twin City,
Macabees and the Daughters of the King, Saint Mary Our
Blessed Mother Chapter. Mrs. Case loved watching the
boats, birds and the people around Cortez.
She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, Bar-
bara and Jim Berry of Cortez; two grandchildren, Jamie
and Jadeana Berry of Cortez; and a great-grandchild,
Derek Berry of Cortez.

Alan S. Christner
Alan S. Christner, 88, of Holmes Beach, died Aug.
4 at home.
There will be no visitation. Memorial services were
held at Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Island Chapel,
with the Rev. Bill Hull officiating. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the American Diabetes Associa-
tion, 1334 Main St., Suite 414, Sarasota, FL 34236.
Born in McKeesport, Pa., Mr. Christner came to
Holmes beach from Pittsburgh in 1970. He retired as
a vice president of real estate at Mellon Bank in Pitts-
burgh and practiced law in Holmes Beach. He was a
retired member of the Florida and Pennsylvania Bars.
He is survived by his wife, Alice; two sons, Alan


bna o eafelent P
Islanders love social news and so do we!
Call 778-7978 or stop in the office at 5408 Marina
Drive to find out how you can be included.

ISLANDEi


S. Jr. of Seminole and Richard S. of Harrisville, Pa.;
two daughters, Mary C. Mullins of Lajunta, Colo., and
Ellen C. Linsley of Pittsburgh; 13 grandchildren; and
eight great-grandchildren.
Rhonald C. Gupton Jr.
Rhonald C. Gupton Jr. of Bradenton died Aug. 3 in
Bay Pines Veterans Administration Hospital.
Born in Nashville, N.C., Mr. Gupton was a resident
of Bradenton for several years. He was a salesman and
most recently worked in banking. He was a Baptist. He
was a U.S. Coast Guard veteran of the Korean War. He
was a member of the Elks and American Legion.
He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons,
Rhonald C. III and Richard C., both of Holmes Beach;
a daughter, Victoria Rees of Sarasota; a brother, Rob-
ert F. of Tennessee; and a grandchild.

Michael M. McGee
Michael M. McGee, 38, of Bradenton Beach died
Aug. 5 at home.
There will be no visitation or service. Bradenton
Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.
Born in Warren, Ohio, Mr. McGee came to Mana-
tee County from Washington, N.J., in 1993. He was a
landscaper. He served in the U.S. Army.
He is survived by his wife, Theresa; four daugh-
ters, Tabatha Perez of Bradenton Beach, Theresa M. of
Danbury, Conn., Marie of Bradenton and Shawnna
Aigotti of Bradenton; two sons, Michael H. of Vermont
and John of Fisher, N.Y.; and his adoptive Imother,
Martha of Ohio.

Marian E. Oates
Marian E. Oates, 88, of Anna Maria died Aug. 5 in
Freedom Care Pavilion.
There will be no visitation or service. Griffith-
Cline, Island Chapel, is in.charge of arrangements.
Born in Bay City, Mich., Mrs. Oates came to
Manatee County from Farmington, Mich., in 1968. She
was a homemaker.
She is survived by a daughter, Judith 0. Pennell of
Anna Maria and Ferndale, Mich.; two grandchildren,


HOLMES
BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


Susan Fischbach of
Anna Maria and Patricia
Pennell of Caledonia,
Mich.; and three great-
grandchildren.


Eric W. Paessler
Eric W. Paessler, 86, of Holmes Beach died July 31.
Services were held at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church.
Griffith Cline, Manatee Avenue Chapel, is in charge of
arrangements. Memorials may be made to the American
Diabetes Association, 1343 Main St., Sarasota, FL 34236.
Born Feb. 6, 1908, in Germany, Mr. Paessler
moved to this area in 1971 from Parsippany, N.J.
Mr. Paessler was an engineer for Bell Telephone
Laboratories in New Jersey. He was a member of Bell
Telephone Pioneers. He was a Lutheran.
He is survived by his wife, Katherine of Holmes
Beach; a daughter, Ellen Quigley of Holmes Beach; three
grandchildren.

Dorothy Daisy Spuller
Dorothy Daisy Spuller, 90, of Holmes Beach died
Aug. 8.
Memorial services will be held Thursday, Aug. 11,
6:30 p.m., at Roser Memorial Community Church, 512
Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Memorial donations may be
made to the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, FL 34216.
Born in Fairmont, W. Va., Aug. 8, 1904, Ms.
Spuller moved to this area 22 years ago from Akron,
Ohio. She was a rubber worker for Goodyear Tire and
Rubber Co. in Akron, Ohio, for 38 years. She was a
member of Goodyear Retiree's Club. She attended
Roser Memorial Community Church.
She is survived by a sister, Mezzie M. Carter of
Holmes Beach; a nephew, Richard Carter of Bradenton
Beach; two nieces, Nancy R. Bennett and Deloris Carden,
both of Holmes Beach; and great nieces and nephews.

The Island Poet
There are so many things we take for granted as we always
rush about,
That would throw us for a loop if we had to do without.
Suppose all the lights went out as we were watching our
TV,
And as we sat there in the dark how miserable we would
be.
Or in the morning if we turned the faucet and found that it
was dry,
Without our morning coffee we could sit right down and
cry.
And if we found by chance the john would fail to flush,
Good Lord, I am sure that would be the very end of us.
But the calamity most housewives seem to dread,
Is that they might pick up the phone and find it dead.
Bud Atteridge


RENTAL Call Julie ... SALES
MANAGEMENT to rent your property quickly SERVICE
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.
778-6665
Julie 1-800-749-6665 Eliot

neaL mannausa

ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS


THE ISLAND'S NEWEST WATERFRONT COMMUNITY

Sandy pointe

S ","Enjoy "Island Living" at it's Finest
S2BR/2BA Flats & 3BR/3BA
Townhome Units
i. Private & Secluded Location
Covered Parking
Pool & Tanning Deck
Walking Minutes to Pristine
Sandy Gulf Beaches, Shopping,
oi nte Restaurants & Entertainment
p O1int Low Monthly Association Dues
Priced As Low As $99,900
Only 7 Left
Call (813) 778-4777 For Information & Brochure
3601 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217






[I( PAGE 20 m AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




PERICO BAY CLUB m
^A SPECIALIST
4 Marilyn has the
KEYS

Maiy rvta m~'


Marilyn Trevethan
Realtor@ Associate
Call anytime 792-8477 Office 778-2261
Toll-Free 1-800-422-6325
__ MLS


6-UNIT COMPLEX
201 35th St. Gorgeous Gulf views. Strong
building in quiet neighborhood. Could be
annual rentals. $535,000.
Call 778-7373




I-^^^^^^^^^B^^^


STEPS TO GULF
2BR/2BA unit with easy access to and from Island. Spec-
tacular sunsets. Turnkey furnished, clean and very afford-
able. Views of Bay. $90,900. Lynn Hostetler, 778-4800.
A LOT FOR A LITTLE This 2BR/2BA condo offers
1464 sq. ft. of turnkey furnished waterfront living. Ameni-
ties include a boat dock, pool room, workout room, heated
pool, tennis court and clubhouse. This is an unbelievable
buy at $89,900. Call Ken Rickett, 778-3026.
BEST VALUE ON ISLAND Direct Gulf front. No bet-
ter view on the Island. 2BR/2BA new carpet, furnishings.
Amenities include tennis, heated pool, elevator, security
entry. All this for $239,900. Call Lynn Hostetler, 778-4800.
FOURPLEX Located in pleasant area near center
Holmes Beach. Can walk to shopping, churches, etc. Fully
rented with annual tenants. Good income property, low
maintenance. Three units turnkey furnished. $175,000. Call
Stan Williams, 795-4537.
GULF FRONT 2BR/2BA turnkey furnished, top floor
unit. Walking beaches, heated pool, lighted tennis court,
sauna, new stove, side by side refrigerator, carport. Great
rental. $144,900. Call Stan Williams, 795,4537.

DON'T MISS A BARGAIN!
Read The Islander Bystander classified.


HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX
Lots of possibilities here! Great location on quiet street.
Short walk to shopping center and beach. Two bed-
rooms, one bath and the other side features a one
nrimn~m nnAhnh .tk ii(o Ann


GULF FRONT BUNGALOW
Older beach house with large lot, hardwood floors,
rooftop deck and detached garage in Holmes Beach.


GULF FRONT RARITY
Very large 2 family. 3BR, 2BA each side with lofts for
kids. Big deck and storage rooms, separately divided.


~.


BRIDGE STREET COMMERCIAL
3 STORE FRONTS Be part of the renaissance of
Bridge street in Bradenton Beach. Two or three store
fronts plus 2 workshops, plus a one bedroom house.
This is a special opportunity to get in on the ground
floor. $199,000.


Mike
Norman
Realty inc.


778-6696
1-800-367-1617
FAX: 778-4364


3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


SISLANDERIS A0 j%
The Islander Bystander mails over
875 PAID subscriptions weekly -
Out-of-town and out-of-state!
Get yours on page 7.


Westbay Cove ... one of the Island's most
popular Bayside condo complexes! Desirable
downstairs unit. 1BR, 1 BA. Attractively deco-
rated. Pool, tennis courts. Close to beaches,
shops, restaurants! $89,900. #58710. Call today
for appointment! T. Dolly Young, 778-5427.
Island home ... gated entrance, 3BR, 2BA,
eat-in-kitchen, formal dining room, caged pool
& garage! Located on natural canal. $159,900.
#56670. Ask for Carol Heinze, 792-5721.
Gulf Beach Place... just steps to the Gulf! Turn-
key furnished! 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Large kitchen
with breakfast nook. Enclosed balconies, roof
top deck, pool, garage. $130,000. #56901. to
see today, please call Karin Stephan, 778-0766.
MARTINIQUE ...
Miles of white sand
& blue Gulf waters.
Bright & cheerful,
S2BR/2BA. Garage.
$154,900 ...!
S Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR*
Million Dollar Club
778-7246
Karin Stephan
REALTORG
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche ,
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844
Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


2708 Ave. C., Holmes Beach 3BR/2BA apart-
ment upstairs. Turnkey furnished, workshop, stor-
age room & carport. Close to beach & restau-
rants. $116,900. Call Harold Small 778-2261.


Harold Small
Realtor@/Associate
Million Dollar Club Member
Ofc. 778-2261 Evenings 792-8628


Toll Free
1-800-422-6325


. MLS


ANNA MARIA WATERFRONT: Well maintained
three bedroom, two bath canal front home with a
sweeping view of the mangroves bordering the ca-
nal close to Bayfront Park. Homeowner's warranty.
$179,500. Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.


ENJOY A CAREFREE LIFESTYLE: in this three
bedroom, two bath home with a caged pool and
deep water canal. Other amenities include boat
dock, sprinkler system, 70% stone law, fruit trees,
double garage. Room for expansion. Now re-
duced to $224,000. Please call Carol Williams,
778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


F.li wi.^i.


ATTRACTIVE three bedroom home with 1.5 bath
on a comer lot in central Holmes Beach. Many new
updates including roof and wiring. $118,900. Call to
see this one today. Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


Congratulations
to Sandy Greiner
for recently
obtaining her
Broker's License.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS Et--i


s 0n





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 11, 1994 M PAGE 21 [


ANNUAL

RENTALS
GULF FRONT CONDOS Efficiencies,
1 BR, 1 BA and 2BR, 1 BA. From $525 to
$700 mo. plus utilities.
SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR, 2BA, furn.
$1000 plus utilities.


U


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


I ANNA MARIA ISLAND


* One of the LAST REAL Beach Houses on the
Gulf for Sale!
* REAL because you are not in a row of houses,
you are in front of the row and can see UP and
DOWN the beach.
* 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Living/Panorama Room.
* Garage with utility room and shower.
* All windows and garage with German Roll-
Shutters.
* Recent Building Inspection on hand.
* House, installations, utilities, kitchen in TOP
condition.
At this price it's a "steal."
$278,000
LET YOUR SUN SET ON THIS
UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY!
Please call Dick Maher REALTOR/ASSOCIATE
(813) 778-2261 Business
(800) 422-6325 Toll Free
,O,. c


HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE Well maintained
Island home with good central Holmes Beach loca-
tion. Two bedroom, two bath with large garage and
storage area. One block to Gulf beaches. Priced at
$109,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. 0. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato ................. 778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............. 778-2847 Marcella Cornett ................ 778-5919
Nancy Gulfford ............... 778-2158 Michael Advocate ............... 778-0608
E7F ginid idtat fTo/eiionaL
ebaciaLizin0 in JimdcF.ss DJo#iLoifLifttyfl,
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the use of
professional videotape.
Waterfront [ ONE YEAR
Estates W ARRAN -Y
Video Collection LS -.. .


ISLAND 6-PLEX
2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and
shopping. Pool and laundry facilities. $450,000.
Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 W_ MIS L.

Buy it and sell it FAST with an
Islander classified ad.

Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links


S .Buyers and Sellers
Together and Provide,
Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
Exceptional Service
Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation


s
n


ThePru ential0 Flrida ealt


RA T IN.R al & Estate
Bo rillWan e r ,B . -


" i ; -- '1_ .


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, second
floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, clubhouse,
sauna and on site management. Deeded beach
access and excellent rental program. Priced at
$94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


We Welcome ...
Alice Zoller
as the new rental agent and
associate for Horizon Realty.
Alice is a native of
Bradenton and has lived on
the Island for eleven years.
Let Alice help you attain
your goals in real estate to-
day.


$179,900 ... will buy a seawalled canal front lot
in an area of beautiful homes in prestigious North
Point Harbour. Exclusive listing.

ex (813) 778-0426
*, HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE-* BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216


ONLY 150 ft. to GULF BEACH!
Charming two bedroom, two bath turnkey furnished home.
Beautifully maintained & excellent potential to expand so as
to enjoy Gulf view! Great second home or retirement home &
excellent rental history. Call Marie Franklin. Asking $197,500.



Since
1957
MARIE C. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN EA LTY BROKER
We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria. Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250










SOUNDS OF THE SEA The sounds of the sea await you
in this gorgeous Bayfront home. Panoramic bayfront views
of sparkling water are yours from every window. This el-
evated 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath house on the north end of Anna
Maria Island is of exceptional quality. See this home supe-
rior style and charm today. After hours call Agnes Tooker
778-5287 or call Kathy Tooker Granstad 778-4136.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717- Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


0*.'..


GULFFRONT! Great views and wide sandy walk-
ing beach enhance this turnkey furnished 2BR/
2BA unit. Well-maintained complex with pool, cov-
ered parking, and storage room. Excellent rental
opportunity. Priced at $159,900. Call Dave
Moynihan.


DIRECT GULFFRONT Fully furnished 2BR/1 BA
apartment on wide, sandy walking beach. Perfect
investment property or second home. Offered at
$99,900. Call Dave Moynihan.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL
BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


Overhead sprinkler systems in private homes have this ten-
dency to go off at the damedest time ... like when your hav-
ing a cocktail party. 631 Foxworth has a better idea. Remem-
ber your school days and the neatly folded fire hose inside
the glass case you always wanted to grab and spray some-
one with? Look in the garage. Great for those boat fires too.
Or use it at that cocktail party that has grown boring. Rea-
son #4 of 15 that we at Doug Dowling Realty value this home
at $525,000. Doug Dowling Realty. 409 Pine Ave. Anna
Maria. 778-1222.

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extend-
ing both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction &
Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis,
Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Manage-
ment and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Expe-
rience AND Smilest
I9 lCl=Iall,!=m I 'Oll


*k IIgel : I; l l


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I






iiK PAGE 22 E AUGUST 11, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


7Sand 1 Commercial Residential Free Estimates
S T any Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service *13 YEARS EXPERIENCE* INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
t 774--3 4AND SATISFACTION








POWER PROS
Pressure Cleaning, Inc.
Complete Exterior Cleaning Free Estimates
778-8355

PERSONAL TRAINING
^ Walk/Jog Step/Circuit Aerobics
Body Sculpting -.Stretching Exercise
By Appointment: Call 779-2129


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468


STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
i MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


l wi r


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resideht


JelRe
J. I

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


JACUZZI, 8' x 8', seats 8 with double lounger. Blue
interior with cedar. 2 years old. $3,000 new. Will
move to your place for $1,100. 778-7187.
DARK ROOM equipment. Black & white. 2 enlarg-
ers, timers, trays, lights, etc. $300 firm. 778-1032.
COUCH, 3-cushion, brown, excellent condition,
$300. Octagon shaped end table, $30. Pro-Form
T70 auto incline treadmill, $400. Call 779-2129
QUEEN SIZE BED. Mattress still in plastic. 779-
2787.
FURNITURE Traditional solid wood Hunt Buffet
(like new). Solid oak day bed/trundle. Lady's
lazyboy, quality wicker. 778-5427. 117 81st St.
MOVING TO EUROPE. Everything for sale. Fine
furniture, art, miscellaneous. Call for appointment,
779-1611.
BABY ITEMS Crib, $35. Bassinet, $30. Swing
$10. Humidifier and infant seat, $3 each. 778-7320.
19" ZENITH COLOR TV. Table model. $50. 506 N.
Bay Blvd., Anna Maria.


GARAGE SALE new merchandise from store close-
out. Sandbar, Beachhouse misprints. One day only!
Sat., Aug. 13. 8 AM. 104 75th St., Holmes Beach.
YARD SALE Blonde dining rm set, honey-colored
Basset crib, TV, full oval mirror, lots more. Sat., Aug.
13. 2909 Ave. E., Holmes Beach or call 778-8221.

YARD SALE Refrigerator, dishes, small appliances,
garden tools, baskets, miscellaneous. Sat., Aug. 13.
8 AM-1 PM. 209 69th St., Holmes Beach. 778-3404.
GARAGE SALE Coca-cola items, pinball machine,
household misc. Fri. & Sat., Aug. 12 & 13. 9 AM TO
5 PM. 1105 Gulf Dr. S., Bradenton Beach.
ANNUCEET


URGENTLY NEEDED! Host family for 17 year old
German Boy (exchange welcome) for 3 to 6 month
period. Muelheim An Der Ruhr (northwest Ger-
many near Dusseldori). 778-7900 room 9.
QUILTERS! I'm new to the Island and would like to
meet some local quilters. Call Laura, 778-4876 af-
ter 6 PM.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home
with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.
STUDENT offers dog walking service. Experi-
enced. Call Sky Beard, 778-2923.


SCUBA SCRUB mobile underwater hull cleaning at
your dock or marina. Free brochure and coupon.
778-5841.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. Half & full day. Call 778-1990.


DISH WASHER Part-time. Isabelles, North
Longboat Key. 383-0689.
BOOKKEEPER/GENERAL OFFICE. Must be able
to work with minimal supervision. Excellent phone
etiquette and customer service skills a plus. Must
be computer literate and willing to work in Holmes
Beach (non-smoking office). Call Tom at 778-4229
or fax resume to 778-3964.
NEW OPPORTUNITY OWNER OPERATORS
Landstar Ligon needs 12 OTR flat and van op-
erators out of Central Florida. For more informa-
tion contact Tony or Pat at 800-605-0999 or 813-
864-9100.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck.) 778-9217.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home repairs.
Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails, etc.
Island resident, 23 years experience, local refer-
ences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to
painting. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island
references. 779-2129.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
K.D. FAIRS will do painting or wallpapering very rea-
sonably! 778-1032.
PERSONAL ASTROLOGY In-depth, detailed, per-
sonality profile $25. Predictive life analysis for any
5yr. period stated $30. Past life lessons carried over
to present life & part of fortune $25. Send birthdate
& time, birth city & state, w/check or m.o. to "Hope
Star" 3781 Osage St. Stow, Ohio 44224.
PLAN AHEAD! Before & after school care, with
snacks in safe, fun environment. Lisa, 778-6438.
References available.
NO JOB TOO SMALL! College student, father of
three, trying to make ends meet. Lawns, tree trim-
ming, etc. Lifelong resident, references. Keith, 778-
6438.
CALLIGRAPHY by James R. Thompson. Not self-
trained, have studied with the best. Poems, quotes,
certificates, address envelopes. Name plates & ID
badges. Will work on location if needed..Call 753-
4487 or 747-1277.

CHILD CARE 2-3 openings. Daycare setting.
Planned activities. Bradenton Beach location. Call
Lynne, 778-4657. Reasonable rates.
PURPLE PANTHER MOWING. Exp. teenagers look-
ing for jobs. Reasonable rate, quality mowing, garden-
ing, trimming, etc. (We have our own tools) 778-0099.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen, bath and all home repairs.
Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails, etc.
Island resident, 23 years experience, local refer-,
ences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-
dent 25 yrs. Call for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-5183.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Furniture repair. Danish
craftsman. Free estimates, pick-up & delivery. 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.778-4335.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.
SCREEN REPAIRS, ceiling fans, painting, carpen-
try, roof coating & repairs, drywall repairs. Work
guaranteed. Low prices. 778-0410.
KITCHEN TUNE-UP. Adjust & recaulk doors, install
rollout trays & trash cans. Replace door & drawer
fronts. Repair chips, scratches & burn spots. Call the
Cabinetman, 794-2246.
Buy it and sell it fast in The Islander classified!


A DC A

I9-ES ORSAE ERICS ONINE


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you with
complete mobile service!









AUTO DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Everything included for $85 -
on a normal size car. And our mobile service
means no one has to drive your car. By
appointment, at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649
or 778-9392.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 11, 1994 M PAGE 23 IEE


- CAS IF ED


ISLAND CONDO, 2BR/2BA, 2 lanais, pool, walk to
beach, washer/dryer. $900 per month. Call Martha
Williams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fire-
place, jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of
intracoastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Will-
iams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SEVERAL 5 to 7 month rentals available. Call
Martha Williams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
SMUGGLERS LANDING beautifully furnished
condo, 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
WE HAVE GREAT RENTALS! Short & long term!
Gulf-front condos, canal homes, duplexes. Call
Debbie Thrasher for all your Rental needs at The
Prudential Florida Realty. 778-0766 or 778-3395.
BRAND NEW! 2BR/2BA, yearly, bayfront complex
with pool, covered parking. $675. to $725 mo. incl.
water/sewer, trash & cable. 778-4777.
BEAUTIFUL GULF VIEW, steps to beach, 2BR/
2BA, 1 car garage, pools, tennis, complete turn-
key. August thru May. 813-265-1766 or 884-0222.
SEASONAL OR ANNUAL. 1BR/1BA, electric &
utilities included, fully furnished in quiet neighbor-
hood. No pets, no kids. 778-9413.
SEASONAL Anna Maria City. New Island home.
3BR/2BA, large porch, W/D, cable TV, micro & more.
No smokers or pets. 813-447-8094 or 778-0729.
LOVELY Anna Maria Gulffront vacation apts. Fur-
nished 2/3BR, sundeck, porch, cable, microwave,
weekly plus & no pets. 778-3143.
COZY 1BR/1BA steps from Gulf beach in
Bradenton Beach. Nice yard, close to everything!
$450/mo and utilities. Call Property Rentals of
Anna Maria Island, 778-1011.
ANNUAL 2BR/2BA. Charming old-style Florida
beach house, Anna Maria City. No street to cross
on a short walk to beach. 778-1576.
GULF FRONT Fall special! 3BR/2BA vacation
rental! Best on Beach in Anna Maria. Vacancy:
Aug. 22, Sept., Oct. & Nov. $600 $800 per week.
Reserve Now: 778-3171.
UNFURNISHED 2BR/1BA unit in Bayou Condos.
Upstairs & Partial view of Bay. $550/mo plus elec.
Call Marie Franklin, Anna Marie Realty, 778-2259.
APARTMENT, nice 1BR/1BA, large deck, across
from Gulf. $550 per month, plus electricity. No
pets. 778-0019.
PROFESSIONAL (non-smoker/non-drinker) seeks
reduced rent aptJcondo (near water) in exchange for
services. Ex-owner resort B&B. Can do front desk,
computer cons., sales, marketing, maint., house-sit-
ting, whatever. Great people skills. 755-6366.
LOVELY 2 bedroom apartment to share. Bayside,
1 block to beach. $75 weekly. Call 778-1480, leave
-message. Ladies only.

ANNUAL 2BR/2BA, garage, new carpet. $575.
8002 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. 723-6176.
UNFURNISHED HOLMES BEACH. 2BR/1BA, 1
block to beach, central air & heat. 3007 Ave. E.
Day, 794-6864. Evening, 778-2704.
WANTED TO RENT 2 or 3 bedroom house on
deep water canal. Arriving Sept. 3. Job transfer, no
children, no pets. Up to $800 per month, annual.
Ask for Don, 810-673-9675.
THE BEST BEACH VALUE! Fully furnished 1 bed-
room Floridian style home. 2 blocks from Gulf
Beaches. Located in Holmes Beach. A paradise
hideaway. $199 per week. Rent by week or month.
Call for more information, 813-778-4229.
ANNUAL North Holmes Beach location. Charm-
ing, clean and quiet, 2BR/1 BA, upper duplex. $600
per month, plus $600 security includes water &
cable. Call 778-6198 or 748-4842 ext. 23.
ANNA MARIA CITY, canal front, 2BR/1BA apart-
ment. $550, annual. Dock available. No pets. 778-
6350 or 778-7206.


REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash
buyer, quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes
Beach area. 798-3981

BY OWNER. S. Bay Blvd. Elevated 2BR/2BA
home. Large enclosed garage & shop. Rear deck
with canal view. Many Extras. 813-778-7070.
"PERICO BAY CLUB" 1 bedroom condo near pool
& spa. Only $79,900. Call anytime. Marilyn
Trevethan, Neal & Neal Realtors. 813-778-2261.
WATERFRONT LOT- By Owner. Cleared 90' x
110' seawalled on deep water canal. Prime
Holmes Beach location. 505 83rd St. House plans
available, includes soil test. 778-2975.
HOLMES BEACH. 3.5 year old tri-level
townhouse. 2 master bedrooms, 2.5 baths. 2 car
garage, fenced yard, immaculate. 779-1068.
CASH BUYER. Real Estate wanted. Confidential,
private party, quick closing. Anna Maria, Holmes
& Bradenton Beach. 800-468-4443.

BY OWNER 2BR/1BA furnished condo with
garage. Centrally located near Holmes Beach City
Hall. Only $54,900! Call 778-3519.
OWNER FINANCE. 1 BR/1 BA duplex fixer-upper.
Lot & half, separate garage, near beach. $96,000.
795-0873.
KEY ROYALE, 624 Foxworth. 100ft new seawall
& boat dock, 3 bedroom, split-design, 2.5 baths,
southerly exposure, manicured landscaped with
automatic sprinkler system, living room, dinging
room, eat-in kitchen, 2 car garage, 1880 sq. ft.
$219,500. 778-7837..
BEAUTIFUL new home located on North Anna
Maria, 3BR/2BA, large double garage, 1590 sq. ft.
Call 778-7127 today.

BY OWNER 4 unit rental complex two buildings
- oversized lot. 150 ft. from beach, flowing well for
watering. Owner operated for 25 years. $365,000.
111 & 113 36th St., Holmes Beach. 778-2071.


UNFURNISHED RENTALS
KEY ROYALE, 3BR/2BA, pool, dock, bayfront,
657 Key Royal, $1,500. FLAMINGO CAY, 3BR/
2BA, 10212 Spoonbill, pool, deep water, $1,200.
ISLAND IN THE SUN, 2BR/2BA, 3100 Gulf Dr.,
townhouse, pool, $600. WEST BAY POINT &
MOORNGS, 2BR/2BA, 6500 Flotilla, bayfront,
$840. NEAL & NEAL RENTALS, 778-9477 & 800-
422-6325.


AUCTION ON THE BEACH
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
Gulf Coast Real Estate wanted. Unbeatable op-
portunity to convert Real Estate into cash. Feature
your home, condo, rental or lot in the Auction held
at the Beach House Restaurant, Bradenton
Beach. 11am, Sat., Sept. 3. Brokers protected.
Higgenbotham Auctioneers Int'l Ltd. Inc. Licensed
Real Estate Broker. AU305AB158. 800-257-4161.

FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's com-
puterized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-
U-Sell Realty Counselors. 795-0616.
WATERFRONT LOT, Holmes Beach canal, view
of skyway. 66' on excellent seawall, ready to build.
$35,000. 778-0019.


DEADLINE: MONDAY NOON for WEDNESDAY
publication. UP to 3 line minimum includes
approximately 21 Words $4.50. Additional
lines $1.50 each. Box: $2.00. Classified ads for
businesses are $6.50 for up to 21 words. $2.00
per additional line. Box: $2.00. Place and pay in
person in advance. Fax or mail in advance.
Sorry, no ads taken over the phone. Stop by
5408 Marina Drive, between D. Coy Ducks and
the Laundromat in the Island Shopping Center.
More information: 778-7978.


778-2586 A M Ry KAV Eve: 778-6771


15% OFF
S WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 8/1-7/94 1--


PIANO & KEYBOARD
LESSONS
All Ages All Levels
778-3539


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist

Gift Certificates Available
792-3758 MM0003995







UNCOMMON P
COLLECTARL ES & GIFTS
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548


KIMBALL
HOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Rails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident Local References
778-5354






PRESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
REMODELING WATER HEATERS
NEW CONSTRUCTION GARBAGE DISPOSALS
EMERGENCY SERVICE BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
FREE ESTIMATES LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
We are DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce


NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Call
David Parrish
792-5207


- COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
DO-IT-OURSEL


DO-IT-YOURSELF
SUPPUES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call
798-3095


7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"



More than 1 mullet Wrapper!



.-" -s:s-.--_-:. --_


g!IBli


ISLANDER


NEW! Islander T-shirts: $10 Folks are wearing
Islander tees from Alaska to Boca Grande.
Catch your mullet at our office!
B & W 100% Cotton Adult sizes: M,L,X-L.
5408 Marina Drive Holmes Beach




E[ PAGE 24 1 AUGUST 11, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


^Q 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
w OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994


TOP SIRLOIN
, STEAKS


'oods


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!

SHOULDER
LONDON BROIL


"- FAMILY PACK
CHICKEN
DRUMSTICKS --
AND THIGHS -


ONIONS
3 LB. BAG sa


DELI DEPARTMENT
8-Pieces of
Fried Chicken
d ONLY
2 Breasts O -Y
2 Thighs s$ 5
.2 Drumsticks
2 Wings 3


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 AM to NOON


f-;.


IDAHO BAKING
POTATOES ..
5 LB. BAG .-

________ *_______.,_______,.^^ ,,,.,: <.,


FRESH BAKED IN
WHITE
BREAD
99 .LOAF
99;lLOAF


HELLMANN'S
Mayonnaise