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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00523
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 07-14-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00523


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WEEKLY NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


A I


Apathy may lead to Island storm director position


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Looking out for the Island in the event of a disas-
ter was supposed to be a shared task among the fire
district and the three Island cities. It was a good idea
that isn't working, according to Fire Chief Andy Price.
Last week Price lamented the lack of interest
elected officials have shown for the Island Emergency
Operations Center (IEOC), and at Monday night's
meeting he suggested a solution pay a full-time
emergency management director to oversee IEOC.
Price says the proposed emergency management po-
sition, including a $25,000 annual salary, benefits and
operating expenses, would run about $48,000 a year. This
amount would be divided among the three cities and the

No

Holmes Beach

roundabouts?
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
At the suggestion of Mayor Rich Bohnenberger,
the Holmes Beach City Council agreed last week to
draft a resolution opposing a roundabout at the inter-
section at Manatee Public Beach.
The 789 Task Force, which studied Gulf Drive
from Manatee Avenue to the Longboat Key Bridge,
recommended a roundabout to improve traffic flow at
the intersection. The group's recommendations will be
presented to the Metropolitan Planning Organization
(MPO) for approval before being sent to the Florida
Department of Transportation for funding.
If approved, the work would probably be con-
ducted in the years 1999-2000.
"I don't know what council's feelings are regard-
ing the roundabout proposed for SR 789 and SR 64,"
said Bohnenberger, "but all through this process, it's
been emphasized that there's been a large number of
accidents at that location. They (task force) quoted
dollar figures and in their report it says, 'Holmes
Beach, while encouraging alternative utilization of
roadway systems, experienced the largest number of
accidents along SR 789 of the three municipalities."
The report said there were 78 accidents between
Jan. 1, 1993, and Oct. 31, 1993, noted Bohnenberger,
involving 145 vehicles. However, according to Holmes
Beach Police reports, there were only four accidents at
that location and none appeared to have been serious.
"That's their basis for putting in the roundabout,"
said Bohnenberger. "If this goes to the MPO and this
is not what this council wants, if you don't pass a reso-
lution either pro or con, it will automatically go through
as being approved by the city council."
Council members Pat Geyer, Billie Martini and
Luke Courtney said they oppose the roundabout Coun-
cilwoman Carol Whitmore said she likes the round-
about and would not sign a resolution opposing it.
Council Chairman Mary Ellen Reichard was absent.
Courtney then objected to a letter Bohnenberger
sent to Pierrette Kelly, executive director of the Anna
Maria Island Community Center (AMICC) concerning
the city's donation to the center. Courtney said the
council should consider the center's request to increase
its donation for 1994/95.
"I understand the mayor has written the center a
letter saying that no additional funds will be granted,"
said Courtney.
"I didn't say that," retorted Bohnenberger.
Courtney read from the letter, "Based on the availabil-
ity of funds I was unable to honor your request for $30,000
for fiscal year 1994/95.1 I was able to maintain the $15,000
awarded last year with a three percent COLA."
"That's exactly what is in the proposed budget,"
replied Bohnenberger. "We won't vote on the budget
until September.
In other business, there will be only be a council
meeting Aug. 2 in the city, council members decided.


fire district, with each entity paying $12,000 a year.
Fire Commissioner John Van Ostenbridge said
every year new people are elected to the three city gov-
ernments and when representatives assigned to IEOC
change, all the training his department provides is
wasted. Price added that most city officials are already
overburdened with responsibilities and being asked to
help run IEOC is not a practical request.
"The problem is, we all have our own jobs to do -
especially the staff people of the cities," Price says.
"Just finding time to do something is very hard, but to
do it collectively is even harder."
After consulting with other public safety officers
on the Island, Price said it was apparent that the best
solution was for the fire district to provide emergency


management services on a contract basis to the three
cities. Anna Maria and Holmes Beach have expressed
support for the idea, and Bradenton Beach officials are
in the process of being polled, Price says.
"Either the cities are going to have to say, 'Okay,
let's go with it,' or as far as I'm concerned drop the
whole program," Van Ostenbridge said. "If we're not
going to do it right, don't do it."
Van Ostenbridge said volunteer members of the
IEOC are doing the best they can, but it's still not enough.
The commission unanimously voted to approve the
position in concept and to find out whether the three
municipalities will back it as well. It was agreed no
action would be taken to create the position unless there
was unified approval from the cities.


S...' ., o... ***
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o -.. ,o '.. ,; :
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*1


73~. .~


B.B. proposes

36% budget hike
Bradenton Beach City Council members are pro-
posing a tax hike of almost 27 percent next year, with
a budget increase of almost 36 percent, for next year.
Increases are due in part to funds budgeted this year
that will be reimbersed in future years for such things
as grants and capital uses for the recently approved sales
tax increase for schools.
In order to cover the proposed 1994-95 budget of
$1,412,596, a millage rate of 3.4457 is expected a 27.4
percent increase. City officials say this is only a projection,
and the actual millage could change. The current fiscal
year's budget is $1,041,864, with a millage of 2.7026.
A mill is $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value of
property after deducting the homestead exemption.


Although dwarf
tossing has been
outlawed in some
jurisdictions, the
little people (also
known as kids) who
attend the Anna
Maria Island
Community Center's
day camp happily
line up to have Mick
Koczersut, a camp
counselor, hurl them
into the water on
beach day. Here we
see Koczersut
launching camper
Alex Brown into
orbit.

Islander Photo:
Mark Ratliff


WE HAVE LIFTOFF!


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Alaska ................................................... 5
Opinions.............................. ............... 6
Those Were the Days ............................ 7
AIDS ......................................................... 8
Announcements .................................. 10
Stir-it-up ................................................. 13
Streetlife .............................................. 18
Anna Maria tides .......................... 21
Real estate ......................................... 22


ISLANDER


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


JULY 14, 1994






JIi PAGE 2 M JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Turtle populations looking good, experts say


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Years of efforts to protect endan-
gered loggerhead turtles are beginning
to pay off. That's the word from Chuck
Shumard, director of the Anna Maria
Island Turtle Watch.
It looks like we're running quite a
bit ahead of last year," Shumard says of
the number of turtle eggs that have been
laid on Island beaches. "We've got 64
nests in the Anna Maria hatchery and 17
at Coquina beach and we've got al-
most two months to go yet."
Shumard says that between the two
hatcheries the Turtle Watch is keeping
an eye on more than 8,000 eggs.
"I'd say we're 1,500 to 2,000 eggs
ahead of last year."
Although there is no hard evidence,
many believe the greater number of
turtle eggs shows that more turtles are
living to maturity one of the goals of
the endangered species protection the
turtles enjoy.
"I think what is being done now is
starting to pay off," Shumard says.
"We've been in the program since 1981,
and we think that some of the turtles we
released back then are now egg bearing
and coming back. They could be egg
bearing after eight to 10 years, so we
think we're starting to get some of ours
back along with others."
Shumard says that in years past,
about one-percent of baby turtles sur-
vive, but now the estimate is up to two-
and-a-half percent. About one in 1,000
turtles reaches maturity.
A somewhat different approach to
protecting the eggs is being applied


In good hands Islander Photo: Joy Counney
Any loggerhead sea turtle is special, but when the occasional white hatchling
comes on the scene it's a unique showing for this endangered species. It's against
the law for anyone other than officially authorized persons to handle logger-
heads.


now, Shumard says. Instead of relocat-
ing all turtle nests to a hatchery, only
those which may be in danger are
moved.
"If they're in a protected area, we'll
leave them. That's up in the sea oats
where people don't walk and high tide
can't get them. We'll mark them with a
sign."
Shumard says 25 nests are "out in
the natural."
As always, Shumard warns that no
one should molest a sea turtle, its eggs


or its nest. With the federal endangered
species protection comes some stiff pen-
alties for people who may be tempted to
take one of these creatures home or
even pick one up. A fine of up to
$10,000 per occurrence can be levied,
and prison time is also a possibility for
violators.
Shumard calls attention to the case
of an Illinois man who two years ago
took home six baby loggerheads. The
turtles soon became sick, and realizing
he was unable to take proper care of the


animals, the man anonymously left them
at a Chicago aquarium. Employing sting
tactics, authorities lured the man back to
the aquarium sometime later where he
was arrested. Last month he was sen-
tenced to 70 days in jail and slapped
with $14,455 in fines. The judge said he
would have been even tougher on the
man had he not brought the sick turtles
to the aquarium.
Should you see anyone appearing to
bother a sea turtle or its nest, call
Shumard at 778-1156. If you forget the
number, simply call the Manatee
County sheriff's office and they will get
in touch with the Turtle Watch.
In his attempt to provide the best
possible protection for sea turtles,
Shumard was expected to introduce an
ordinance on the creatures' behalf at
Tuesday night's Anna Maria City Com-
mission work session. If adopted, the
ordinance would allow police to compel
homeowners living near the shoreline to
dim their lights. This is important, since
turtle hatchlings will tend to crawl to-
ward light rather than where they should
be going the open sea.
"Lights on the beach would have to be
dimmed or turned out at a certain hour
during nesting season," Shumard explains
the intent of the ordinance. "We've had
real good cooperation with our requests
for homeowners to turn down their lights,
but we felt we needed a backup just in case
someone says they won't turn them off.
Then we could get the police to make sure
they get turned off."
One of the big events of the summer
the first release of hatchlings is ex-
pected within a week or so, Shumard says.


CRA splits, makes no recommendation on


Bradenton Beach Marina expansion proposal


By Paul Roat
A split vote means no recommendation by the
Bradenton Beach Community Redevelopment Agency
either for or against Allan Bazzy's proposal to expand
his Bradenton Beach Marina.
The five-member CRA board could not get enough
votes to make a recommendation on the marina expan-
sion proposal last Tuesday after board member John
Chappie declared a conflict of interest and did not vote
on the matter.
CRA Chairman Clem Dryden and Peggy Berger
favored the $1.1 million project just south of the Cortez
Bridge. CRA members Ida Cuthbertson and David
Beaton objected to Bazzy's plan.
Bazzy hopes to receive a favorable vote from the city
council later this summer on his marina expansion plan.
The city's planning and zoning board was discussing the
matter at presstime. The P & Z board recommendation


Anna Maria's building inspector is looking for a
new place to hang his hat. At a special work session
of the Bradenton Beach City Council to consider ap-
plicants for the position of building inspector, a re-
sume from Anna Maria's public works director Don
Tarantola came to the city's attention.
More than 50 people applied for the job, but only
16 made the first cut. Bradenton Beach Councilman
Jim Kissick tossed Tarantola's name into the ring
and, although he didn't make it to the list of four fi-'
nalists, Tarantola was hopeful that his interest in be-
coming Bradenton Beach's next building official
would remain a secret.
"Dollars" was the only reason Tarantola gave


will be made to the city council later this month.
The city council will hear Bazzy's request Aug. 4.
Bazzy is requesting the city council rezone property
he owns south of the marina from R-3 (residential) to C-
2 (commercial). He hopes to erect an 84- by 200-foot boat
storage facility on the property and increase parking.
He is also requesting vacation of 100 feet of Bay
Drive South, as well as vacation of a small portion of
Church Street, to accomplish the marina remodeling.
Also proposed for the site is a pair of docks, one
125 feet long, the second 135 feet long, stretching into
Anna Maria Sound, relocation of the existing boat stor-
age racks and boat work stations and replacement of the
controversial six-foot-high wooden fence that borders
the property.
Residents in the area have objected to the proposed
marina expansion, stating the change in zoning from
residential to commercial would adversely impact their


when The Islander Bystander asked why he was look-
ing to change jobs. Tarantola said he would prefer that
his job search remain confidential.
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches said he was not
surprised to hear that Tarantola had the urge to wander.
"I wish him all the luck in the world if that's what
he wants to do," Simches said. "Don's looking for op-
portunities it's all part of people starting a career."
Although Kissick suggested Tarantola as a replace-
ment for former Bradenton Beach Building Official Joe
Romano, he also made note of the fact that Tarantola was
not nearly as qualified as other applicants.
The search for a Bradenton Beach building offi-
cial will resume July 14 at 10 a.m.


neighborhood.
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce has
gone on record favoring the project, stating the im-
provements would "beautify the doorway" to the city
and generate additional revenue to the Island.

CRA comments
CRA Chairman Dryden said he favored the project
Dryden said City Planner Bill Brisson had worked with
Bazzy and Bazzy's architect, and said Brisson believed
the zoning change was compatible with the area. "I will
support the project on the assumption that we will all
work together," Dryden said.
He added that "if we don't come up with some
compromise, we will get into a big court battle."
CRA member Berger said she "believed the project
would provide for the betterment of the blighted area
(in Bradenton Beach) as a whole. I don't believe that
if we deny some type of compromise for the use of the
property we would legally have a leg to stand on."
CRA member Cuthbertson, reading from a pre-
pared statement, said the marina project as proposed
was not consistent with the Community Redevelop-
ment Action Plan for the city, the city's Comprehensive
Plan, and that "there is no justification for government
officials to give away assets of our city," regarding the
street vacations.
She said, "In order for the applicant to implement
his plan, the city would need to grant: comprehensive
plan amendment, rezoning on seven lots, special excep-
tion permit, vacation of one street, and zoning variance.
The extent of the essential council action illustrates the
extent of the incompatibility of the proposal in this
neighborhood."
CRA member Beaton said, "If we agree with the
zoning change, it calls for the removal of a currently
standing house, and I don't believe we should destroy
existing housing for expansion of commercial uses.
Traffic will increase. I am open to the development of
the property, but not at the intensity proposed."


Anna Maria building official

considered, rejected for

Bradenton Beach job






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 3 BIB

Five take long, long swim after boat conks out


Five Manatee County residents narrowly escaped
disaster last Thursday when the engine of the boat they
were on died just south of Egmont Key.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Police Department told
of the department's plans to participate in the
National Night Out Against Crime on Aug. 2.
At a recent community police meeting, Sgt.
Dale Stephenson said the program is in its 11th
year and 9,000 communities across the country
participate. He said he hopes all three Island
communities will join in the event.
"There will be a block party in the Holmes
Beach field from 6 to 8 p.m.," explained
Stephenson. "The Rotary Club and Island restau-
rants will have food booths. The Manatee
County Sheriffs Department will do a crime
prevention program. The Florida Highway Pa-
trol will be there to talk about vehicle safety, and
the Anna Maria Fire Department will have a fire
safety program. After 8 p.m. people are asked to
go home, turn on their lights overnight and lock
their doors."
Stephenson said the program is designed to
heighten crime and drug prevention awareness,
generate support for and participation in local
anti-crime efforts, strengthen neighborhood
spirit and police relations and send a message to
criminals by letting them know neighborhoods
are organized and ready to fight back against
crime.
Police Chief Jay Romine added, "We need
to get everybody together and show unity against


After two hours and no other boats appearing to
make a rescue, two of the group Chris Ankrim, 25,
and Shane Smith, 21, decided to swim to Anna Maria


the criminal element."
Stephenson said tables and chairs are
needed for the event. Anyone willing to loan
them should contact him at the police depart-
ment.
During the forum, Romine recognized Skip
Nunn of the police auxiliary, DeL Nancy Rogers
and Sgt. Chuck Anderson. Nunn was awarded the
rank of lieutenant in the auxiliary for 20 years of
service to the city. Rogers was recognized for aid-
ing in the capture of a robber and Anderson was
recognized for capturing four fugitives from In-
diana.
Romine also gave residents an update on
the department's activity in April. He said the
department had 374 cases during the month.
Activity included: investigative referral cases,
47; accidents, 20; alarms, 14, assists, 74; bat-
tery, 4; aggravated battery, 1; burglary, 8; civil
cases, 40; domestic disturbances, 18; larceny,
15; lewd and lascivious, 3; missing persons, 6;
service calls, 57; suicide attempt, 1; suspicious
activity, 66; traffic, 15; trespass, 5; vandalism,
5; warrant arrests, 2; and weapons, 1.
The department's officers wrote 33 traffic
citations and 28 parking tickets and made 14
arrests. They patrolled 5,561 miles or an aver-
age of 185 miles per day.
The next community police forum in June
will be a program on bike safety, regulation
and registration.


Police to sponsor

National Night Out.

Against Crime


Island for help, leaving the other three boaters on board
the disabled 25-foot-long pontoon boat.
But the pontoon boat soon began to break apart and
sink in the rough seas, forcing the trio Brian Burke,
21, Karen Price, 21, and Tim Vella, 25, to head to-
ward Egmont Key. Burke and Vella towed Price, who
was astride another disabled craft, this one a water
scooter.
Ankrim and Smith reached the Island after swim-
ming about four-and-a-half hours, where they received
aid from Marge and Bob Ebel from Anna Maria.
Burke, Price and Vella reached Egmont Key after
swimming about five hours, where they received aid
from the Tampa Bay Pilot station and the U.S. Coast
Guard.
None of the five was seriously injured, although all
complained of dehydration.




ANNA MARIA CITY
7/14, 10 a.m., Budget Coinmittee work session
7/20, 9 a.m., Planning Commission
subcommittee
7/20, 7:30 p.m., Planning Cbmmission

BRADENTON BEACH
7/19, 10 a.m., Budget Committee work session

HOLMES BEACH
7/19, 3 p.m., Planning Commission
7/19, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting
OF INTEREST
7/15, 10 a.m., Island Elected Officials
personal watercraft committee,
Holmes Beach City Hall
7/18, 10 a.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall
7/20, 10 a.m., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Holmes Beach City Hall.


ANNA
Pwiw


MARIA
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Island 778-1925
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-7pm
SALE ITEMS FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 14 thru 18
I While Supplies Last Plus Lots of Unadvertised Specials


Fresh Cooked Creamy Imported
Steve's Cole SlC or Domestic
Roost Beef Cole S W Swiss Cheese
$5.99 3 99' u 2.99U3


Rold-Gold Bud, Bud Lite, PEPSI
Pretzels Bud Dry Products
10 o bag994ns $7 9 6pk cons 99


Come meet Patrick, our new produce manager, and look for new sliced melon
displays and easy, quick stir-fry vegetables, pre-cut for your convenience.
SORRY WE DO NOT ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS.







[I' PAGE 4 4 JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Audubon: laws provide good bird protection


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Whether they know it or not, birds are pretty well
off on the Island. According to the National Audubon
Society in Tampa, even though none of the three Island
municipalities has enacted ordinances specially pro-
tecting birds, other ordinances accomplish this as a side
effect.
"I would think that ordinances against hunting and
the discharging of firearms within city limits would
provide significant protection," said Ann Schnapf, as-
sistant sanctuary manager, Tampa Bay Sanctuary. "But
people can do things against birds without guns, so it
might prove useful to include an actual ordinance (to
protect birds). Ordinances are clubs, of course, and you
have to beat someone over the head with them to make
them work."
The subject of bird-protecting ordinances came up
most recently as a new sign for the City of Anna Maria
has been discussed. The sign, which will be placed on
Gulf Drive at the city limits, will welcome motorists to
the city. It has also been suggested that a smaller sign
be hung below this one,. stating that the city is a bird
sanctuary. When brought up recently at a city meeting,
the question of whether the city is truly a bird sanctu-
ary was raised.,
The answer was no no official action has been
taken to officially declare the city a bird sanctuary,
despite an old metal sign just north of the Baptist
Church which says, "This community is a bird sanctu-
ary."
The best answer The Islander Bystander could
come up with concerning the origin of the sign, is that
more than 20 years ago a sign company, wishing to sell
its wares to the city, sent the sign as a sample of its
work. Figuring it couldn't hurt anything to put it up,
then Public Works Director Charlie Kehm was in-
structed to install it.
Schnapf says even if the sign, whether it's the old
one or the proposed new one, has no teeth behind it,
announcing that Anna Maria is a community that likes
its birds might help discourage those who might have


Islander Photo courtesy Rosemary Carter
ideas of harming them.
"I think it's to the benefit of their citizens and
certainly it's to the benefit of the birds if they ad-
vertise the fact they're very interested in protecting the
wildlife within the city's boundaries. I think that's very
useful."
Schnapf says that beyond using guns, there are a
number of ways birds can be hurt by modern Island


living.
"Pesticide use can be really negative," Schnapf
says. "Then there are problems with monofilament
fishing line. Some people, in order to discourage gulls
and so forth around the area, will string monofilament
across the sky. Birds quickly learn about that, but in the
meantime there can be some mishaps."
Injuries are possible with monofilament, and until
birds learn where the line is in an area and take steps
to avoid it, it's a persistent problem, Schnapf says.
"Particularly young birds they're awfully
dumb."
Schnapf says some state laws automatically pro-
vide protection for birds.
"All of the birds we have around here are protected
during their nesting season, so you don't need to write
extra ordinances to prohibit people from bothering
nesting birds, like mockingbirds and so on, because
they are protected by state and federal law."
If birds aren't actively using an area for nesting,
they are not protected, Schnapf notes.
Although there is no state agency that gives offi-
cial recognition that an area is a bird sanctuary, Schnapf
says that should a municipality decide it wants such
protection, it can enact it by passage of an ordnance.
"Where there are efforts to extend protection we'd
be real interested in talking to (the city governments)."
The Islander Bystander asked Schnapf about a ru-
mor that if a municipality declares itself a bird sanctu-
ary this would also end up prohibiting the live trapping
of raccoons and squirrels, two animals that are peren-
nially bothering Island homeowners.
Schnapf says the rumor is untrue, but current state
law already prohibits the trapping of these animals.
"Those animals are already protected by state law.
It's probably illegal, because my understanding is in
order to do trapping of any sort, you need a permit from
the state. People are breaking the law even when they
live trap."
"Our job is to make sure that the colonial
waterbirds are protected specifically cormorants,
pelicans, herons, egrets, ibis, gulls and terns."


Holmes Beach to help Center find funds


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger has assured representa-
tives of the Anna Maria Island Community Center
(AMICC) that Holmes Beach will spearhead a drive to
establish a dedicated funding source to help support the
center in the future.
The pledge came when AMICC representatives
came before the council at last week's work session to
seek an increase in the city's annual donation. The
council agreed that to double the donation from
$15,000 to $30,000, as requested, would be impossible.
"Everyone on the council supports the community
center," said Council Chairman Mary Ellen Reichard,
"because we all know you're doing an excellent job.
We are also here to represent the 4,800 taxpayers in the
city, and I don't think any of us up here are about to
raise the millage rate in order to donate an extra
$15,000 to the community center. We'd be willing to
help you in any other ways we can volunteer time,
personal contributions."
AMICC board member Alan Bobo said, "Holmes
Beach is a small town but the community center is virtu-
ally the only game in town. I understand there's a budget
crunch but we don't think $30,000 is unreasonable. The
city of Holmes Beach provides five percent of the budget
and uses almost 50 percent of the services."
If the city could not increase its donation, Bobo
asked, would the mayor or council give some other
commitment?
Bohnenberger said in addition to working to estab-
lish a perpetual fund, the city would offer the services
of the its grants committee and hold fund raisers for the
center during the months the center is forbidden to do
so by the United Way.
Holmes Beach resident Ursula Stemm said the city
spends too much on the police department and should
spend more on kids to keep them from getting into
trouble. She also asked why the city needs to purchase
more police cars when there are two or three cars
'parked at the police station every day.
Bohnenberger said the purchase of the cars is part of
the city's five-year rotation plan. He pointed out that all


police cars are used but cannot be used 24 hours per day.
"If we didn't maintain the number of vehicles we
have, the number of replacement vehicles would be
more," he said. "If we only had one police car, we'd
have to replace it twice a year."
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore added, "If you're
robbed at your house in the middle of the night, you'd
better hope they (the police) have the right equipment
and the car gets there."
"What makes a residential community are things
like the little theater, the library the churches, the com-
munity center for those kinds of activities that show a


concern for the people who live in the community,"
said Holmes Beach resident Gabe Simches. "If this
happens every year, then we're doing it the wrong way,
because if we're continually arguing over the cost of
the physical maintenance of our community, we won't
have a community."
Bohnenberger said he placed the issue on the
agenda for the next meeting of Island elected officials
on July 20. Reichard invited all interested residents to
the meeting to work on ideas to raise additional funds
for the center this year and discuss methods of estab-
lishing a funding source for future.


Coming at ya! Islander Photo: Bonner Presswoot
With the U.S. hosting the 1994 World Cup Finals, there's no better time to be playing soccer in America than
today. That is, unless you can play it at the beach. This group of youngsters practicing their skills were bused
to Coquina Beach for the day from Nick Bollettieri's soccer camp. Islander Ken Bowers, left, assists Camp
Director Dan Mitchell with coaching duties. For information on the summer long schedule of junior soccer
camps, call 755-1000 and ask for Danny Mitchell.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 5 EI


Getting familiar with Alaska


By David Futch
Islander Reporter
The first few days in Goodnews Bay at the Alaska
River Safari fish camp are eventful, if eventful means
scrubbing the lodge floors on hands and knees and
scraping river mud from comers filled in over the year.
Eventful too because on day two we play host to
our neighbors who live 25
miles upstream.
Three women and two
men in their 20s who work
for U.S. Fish and Wildlife I
came by for dinner. Chef
Michael makes chicken
thighs in a sweet oriental
sauce with green peppers,
pineapple, carrots and water
chestnuts. Soup is corn
chowder with potatoes. We Futch
have fresh baked bread and
an outrageous chocolate pudding with chocolate
brownies mixed in and walnuts and raisins. Chef
Michael calls it "Death by Chocolate." Yum. To die
for.
We talked about what the Feds do and they said,
"Mostly we teach people how to camp sensibly. Leave
no trash behind. Even bury or burn your toilet paper."
Good work if you can get it.
Two of the women said they work for Alaska De-
partment of Fish and Game. They count fish for a liv-
ing.
What they do is build a 15-foot tower along a part
of a river. Then they place 4x8-foot sheets of plywood,
painted white and weighted, in the river on the bottom.
As the salmon (five species) pass over the white back-
ground, Fish and Game folks take a counter and log
species and quantity. Better work if you can get it.
On this day, all guides jockey for position to deter-
mine if there is any chance of a romantic tryst at some
later date. Their tongues were dragging the floor and
they stepped on them with each word.
Mike Gorton, the camp manager, tells us after our


guests leave that there are two camp rules:
One, never say, "Boy, a beer would sure taste good
right now." (No drinking allowed in camp.)
Two, "No story telling about sexual encounters
with wives, girlfriends, or any talk of sex at all." (We
will be without for at least 100 days.)
At dinner, or any free time for that matter, discus-
sions center entirely on:
#1, fishing;
#2, fishing, and;
#3, fishing.
And some times we talk about FISHING!
We talked about how one goes about describing
this place and we all decided it was
impossible.
All of us have such respect for the All of us h
sheer beauty of our spot that no one sheer beau
throws even the smallest scrap of pa- sheer beai
per on the ground. one throws
A cigarette butt would be tanta- ofpaper o0
mount to treason, with the offender
tarred and feathered, then drawn and rette butt w
quartered. treason. Pi
Please tell all my friends and and cigar
cigarette litterers at the pier on Anna
Maria about this it takes 10,000 on Anna A
years for cigarette butts to decompose. takes 10, O0
After dinner everyone but Mark,
one of the guides, heads back to our butts to de(
pseudo cabins (8x10-foot Quonset
hut) with two cots each and no other significant room
to move.
Mark hits the river and catches a beautiful three-
pound rainbow trout on fly line.
We are all excited because the king salmon (Chi-
nook) have yet to start biting, and Mark's fish is the
first fish for the camp.
The kings jump in the river on a regular basis.
They're 30- to 50-pound weight, and make splashes
like tarpon. We are all antsy and are planning an em-
ployee fishing trip on Sunday.
Several days later and it has been raining now for


E'S .aME S..


a)
ft)
I s
n
,o
te
,tt

D0


five days, temperature between 35 and 42 each day. No
higher. No lower.
Someone mentions this is the Alaska Riviera.
The mosquitoes are unbelievable. When it rains,
they are never-ending, swarming around your head like
locusts. One of the Fish and Game people had over 100
bites on one arm.
Another day, the fog was so thick you couldn't see
across the river, which is 75 yards wide. It wasn't so pretty.
Then, just like Alaska, the fog lifts and it's noth-
ing but blue skies.
We have this very strange bird, the Wilson Snipe,
that makes a very strange sound as it flies in circles.
It's some-
thing like woo-woo-
ve such respect for the woo-woo-woo, but
20 times as fast.
of our spot that no As for the
even the smallest scrap routine, we're all
the ground. A ciga- getting tired of fixing
and cleaning, clean-
)uld be tantamount to ing and fixing. The
ase tell all my friends owner, Ron Hyde,
e litterers at the pier comes Monday for
e itterers at the pier inspection.
iria about this it Hyde fancies
)years for cigarette himself a great
American sports-
)mpose. man. He hunts
brown bears with a
bow and arrow.
I would be hard pressed to kill a mammal, espe-
cially a bear. It just doesn't make sense to me to con-
tinue depleting animals to the point of extinction, all in
the name of taming this wild country or testosterone.
I hope no Alaskan sees the previous paragraph.
They'll probably want to shoot me.
Next: Futch gets a taste of salmon.

David Futch is an Islander reporter and Boca
Grande tarpon guide, writing now from a summer job
in Alaska at a remote fish camp.


3170 Gulf of Mexico Drive Longboat Key 383-2288


NOW IN PROGRESS


Our 28th

Annual


for


1


Women's Swimsuit Sale*



LAST WEEK Stable
Sale Ends July 16th RESORT
Higher Price of 2 Prevails. WEAR
Monday Saturday
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Sunday 10:00-5:00
SERVING THE ISLAND SINCE 1966


SADDLE UP
AND HIT THE
TRAIL TO ... ji

VACATION
BIBLE SCHOOL
Island Baptist Church
8605 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria
Rev. James M. Metts, Jr. Pastor
Please fill this out and mail or bring with you to VBS.


Mon., July 25 Fri., July 29
9:00 AM 12:00 Noon
(please arrive 8:30 Monday
for registration)

/ For: Ages 3 Grade 6
/ All children are welcome
/ Free transportation.
If required, call 778-0719.
/ All materials and supplies
provided without any charge.


NAME 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

r VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL REGISTRATION CARD
(Church VBS, Mission VBS, and Backyard Bible Clubs)
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PIM PAGE 6 M JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



Now is the time


to start talking
Allan Bazzy wants to improve his business, the
Bradenton Beach Marina.
Neighbors are opposed to Bazzy's plans, saying
the marina expansion is not in keeping with the neigh-
borhood.
The Bradenton Beach Marina is at one of three
doorways to Anna Maria Island, lying adjacent to the
Cortez Bridge. The marina dates back to the 1930s, a
long-standing fixture in the city. Very few of the neigh-
bors pre-date the marina operation, weakening or elimi-
nating arguments that the use is not in keeping with the
area.
Like the city, the Bradenton Beach Marina has
grown over the years. Boat storage racks, docks and
parking have been added over the years.
Bazzy wants to further expand his business, this
time by constructing a huge enclosed boat storage
building south of the existing marina on residential
property he has acquired. To accommodate his con-
struction plans, he needs city permission to rezone the
adjoining property to commercial, as well as have the
city vacate portions of two streets.
He said he is willing to work'with the city and
neighbors to provide aesthetically pleasing landscaping
for the site, as well as developing a facade for the build-
ing that is in keeping with Island ambiance all ad-
mirable points.
The question remains whether construction of a 34-
foot-tall, 200-by-84-foot building for commercial use
on land right next to single-family homes is the best
plan for Bazzy, the neighbors and the city.
Good planning principles dictate that some type of
"step-down" use take place between commercial and
residential land uses. Planners like to have a buffer
between dissimilar zoning tracts.
We aren't sure a flat-sided, warehouse-type build-
ing that arguably would block view, air flow and pas-
sive enjoyment of Anna Maria Sound is anywhere near
the buffering technique land use planners envision.
Bazzy has said the expansion will benefit his busi-
ness and the city as a whole. His figures indicate a 400-
plus-percent increase in his taxes as a result of new
construction.
Neighbors remain doubtful, saying the expansion
is too much, too big, and in no-way good for them in
their neighborhood.
Both sides are adamant. And both sides should step
back, stop arguing, and start talking.
Perhaps a 16,800-square-foot, three-story building
is not in keeping with the neighborhood. Would a

ISLANDERS= L'I
JULY 14, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 34
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
Heather Jacobsen
V Distribution
Mike Carver
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 01994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK
smaller structure keep Bazzy in business and still ap-
pease the neighbors?
Bazzy "threatens" the alternative to the marina
expansion is for him to build 14 duplexes on the resi-
dential property. The new duplexes would likewise
contribute to the tax base, perhaps increasing the value
of older residential properties in the area as well. Built
on stilts and in keeping with "old Bradenton Beach's
fishing village atmosphere," new rental units would
certainly increase the rent base and still allow for a
view of the water from throughout the area.
Most significant, duplexes would eliminate the
need for a zoning change and street vacations. Any
further destruction of residential property in the rede-
velopment area would be a serious loss.
Both sides of the dispute are busy drawing lines in


By Egan
the sand, daring the other to cross. The threat of law-
suits exists on both sides---if the project as envisioned
is approved or denied by city council.
Lawsuits only benefit lawyers. We don't believe
Bazzy wants to delay his project for the months and
months it would take to battle the neighbors or the city
if a negative vote is cast on his proposal.
We don't believe the neighbors want their tax dol-
lars used in a lengthy legal battle over an issue, either.
To date, all we've heard is extremes. Now the pro-
cess, hearings at both planning and zoning board and
the council level will begin to take shape. How about
hearing some give-and-take from both Bazzy AND
the neighbors on how residents, businesses and the
Island as a whole can benefit from Bazzy's commit-
ment of $1.1 million.


Haven't seen the honky tonk yet
Here I come, a brand new resident of Anna Maria
Island, priding myself into thinking I have excellent
taste (people pay me for it) and I specifically chose to
live and open a new business in the place my neighbors
call a "honky tonk."
My Webster says, "Honky tonk a cheap noisy
bar or dance hall."
You could have fooled me. I have spent a great
deal of hard-earned money remodeling a storefront and
adding a charming garden entry on Bridge Street only
to find out I am considered a honky tonk.
Let's analyze this offensive slang. What do I hear
that is "noisy"?
There's the surf, heron gulls, the little green par-
rots, the dive bombing splashes of the pelicans, the
wind as it blows through the pines, the trilling bell as
the Cortez bridge goes up, the laughter from a family
bicycling, thunder from the magnificent towering cloud
scapes and oh, yes at night, sitting on my
screened veranda I listen to the soft sound of wonder-
ful live music coming from the Beach House patio
(thanks, guys).
My house is across the street from a bar and I
haven't heard a peep.
Thanks to the efforts of those who have literally
brought icing and candles to a wonderful cake by in-
stigating the "renovation" movement, a warm and in-


viting historic community is coming into its own. Traf-
fic moves through the roundabout; the landscaping is
beautiful; businesses and homeowners are investing
and giving new life, value and charm to their property.
It's called pride. It's called attitude. Whether it's a
new pot of geraniums bracketed from a trailer home or
a $100,000 remodeling, we've got a positive future full
of promise.
This Island is a big, extended family surrounded by
water.
As my grandmother used to say, "If you can't say
something nice about your neighbor, you don't know
him well enough."
You fellows on the north end, have you been down
our way lately? Well, come on down and we'll help
you get the shoe polish off your lips.
Emily Anne Smith, Bradenton Beach

Thanks for fireworks on Fourth
This letter is to compliment Ed Chiles and the
Sandbar restaurant for the fireworks display on the
Fourth of July.
It was spectacular and enjoyed by thousands of
people lined up along the Gulf of Mexico.
It is a nice service that he provides for Anna Maria
Island residents and friends.
Thanks again, Ed.
Evelyn Mitchell, Holmes Beach


9 ll: *]l3 l9]










THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 2, The Homesteaders
by June Alder


a stroll up the beach was a matchless pleasure.


FOUR WISE MEN


In the beginning God created an is- a music teacher.


land at the mouth of
a gleaming bay and
planted thereon a
garden which
brought forth abun-
dantly of grass and
herbs and trees; and
all manner of crea-
tures abounded
there, on land and in
the waters and in the
firmament above.


These were the folks who
dared to make their homes
on our Island in the days
before electric lights,
telephones, running water,
plumbing and sewers,
roads and bridges.


God looked upon this shining green
gem of an island in its setting of aqua-
marine and gold and saw that it was
good.
. So, too, did three wise men from the
North and one from the East who came,
not bearing treasure, but seeking fulfill-
ment of their dreams.
It was a century ago that they ar-
rived, the first homesteaders of Anna
Maria Key: a sea-faring Connecticut
Yankee; an Irish lawyer and mariner
from Canada; a young Scottish ship-
builder from New Jersey; and a fisher-
man born in the Canary Islands.
George Emerson Bean (namesake
of New England's famous poet-philoso-
pher) was 54 years old and a widower
when he built a Cape Cod-style house
on the wild north shore of the key (as the
island was then termed). It had been in-
tended for his wife. But she died in the
terrible yellow fever epidemic that
struck Tampa in. 1887.
Bean moved in with his four teen-
aged children (the youngest of seven
Abbie Bean had borne him) in 1893.
Daughter Mary never forgot the date, be-
cause it was the year she turned 16 and
the year she met the man she was to marry.
The other pioneers came in the
spring of 1895, settling on side-by-side
tracts a mile or so down the key from
Bean's farm.
Captain John R. Jones was 43 when
he established his homestead in what is
now Sportsman's Harbor, having it all to
himself much of the time. His French-
born wife Sophia and his four children
commuted from Tampa where she was


Jones was a man of
many talents and
somewhat of a maver-
ick. An ordained priest
in the Church of En-
gland who converted
to Catholicism in
Canada, he was also a
harbor pilot, an attor-
ney, a politician and a
horticulturist. He
thought Anna Maria


Key would be a fine place to pursue his
hobby.
Twenty-eight-year-old Scotsman
Samuel Cobb, whose homestead took in
all of what is now downtown Holmes
Beach, was foreman of a carriage and
wagon works in Tampa. An infant son
had died while Cobb was trying his hand
at farming up the Manatee River. After-
wards his wife Annie came down with a
bad case of typhoid fever. It was while
Annie was recuperating in the home of
her friend Mary Bean that Annie and
Sam decided Anna Maria Key was the
place for them.
The oldest of the four pioneers was
Jose Casanas, whose fishing camp was
in the vicinity of today's Manatee
Beach. The 66-year-old Casanas and
Jones were long-time friends and asso-
ciates in a fishing business which gave
employment to a good many men of
Spanish and Cuban descent. The His-
panic influence is still strong on Anna
Maria Island today.
These were the folks who dared to
make their homes on our Island in the
days before electric lights, telephones,
running water, plumbing and sewers,
roads and bridges. But they all helped
one another. They got along famously,
I'm told by my long-time friends, descen-
dants of Mary Bean Hall.
In coming weeks I'll be highlight-
ing each of the four Centennial pioneer
families, beginning with the Beans.

Next: George
Bean's dream


In the 1890s, as now,


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 7 H


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mail you the news! j

We mail The Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year.
It's the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria
Island. Over 800 paid, happy, eager-for-Island-news subscribers are al-
: ready receiving The Islander Bystander where they live ... from Alaska
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We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
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Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
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(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
(813) 778-7978
*NEUUUl EUn nUUEEUEUUEEi nUUUn u U1N E.l







i- PAGE 8 JULY 14, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

ALM 11 er~i


Dave Suddreth hopes to get


Islanders behind AIDS effort


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Social notes welcome! News about social events, clubs, anniversaries and
special gatherings are always welcome at The Islander Bystander.
Call 778-7978 to find out how to include your news.


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
There's good news and bad news about AIDS.
The good news is, this fatal affliction could possibly
become a manageable disease before the end of this
decade. The bad news is, AIDS is more prevalent on
the Island than many people care to admit.
"Ten years ago, if you met someone who was
diagnosed with AIDS, you could probably plan a fu-
neral in six months," says
Dave Suddreth, a Holmes
Beach nurse who has just
been elected to the board of
directors of AIDS-
Manasota. "Shortly after
the advent of the anti-viral
drugs and a lot of the drugs
combating the opportunis-
tic infections, you're find-
ing people living quality
Suddreth lives six to 10 years."
Suddreth, who
stresses his opinions are his own and do not necessar-
ily reflect the position of AIDS-Manasota, believes
medical research may be in sight of a turning point
where a diagnosis of AIDS will not be synonymous
with being handed a death sentence.
"We're far from the end of the fight," Suddreth
says, "but there is progress being made. The goal is,
if they can't find a cure, to make it a manageable
chronic illness such as diabetes instead of a fa-
tal illness."
Suddreth notes there are other medical profession-
als who do not share his personal optimism.
"There are people who would disagree."
According to Suddreth, the media may have given
short shrift in its reporting of some of the more hope-
ful news concerning AIDS, but this could be due to
fears that over-optimism at this point could tend to
derail research before it reaches its final destination.
"I think the manageability of the disease has pro-
gressed a little bit further than some feel comfortable
publishing, because if people become 'comfortable'
with the disease, it will stop the efforts and prevent the
possibility of it becoming a manageable chronic ill-
ness. I think the good news is sometimes downplayed
to keep the funding from being cut off."
"But there is some good news," the bachelor's de-
gree-holding RN says. "There are a lot of drugs that
have come along that have prolonged and enhanced
peoples's lives, and I feel optimistic our country is
very capable of finding a solution."

AIDS is an Island problem, too
While the war on AIDS continues around the
world, Suddreth is dedicated to helping those people
with AIDS (or PWA's as they are known), who are
our neighbors in the local community. He says consid-
erable funds from AIDS-Manasota have been ex-
pended on behalf of Islanders afflicted with AIDS, but
very little money in the organization's fund-raising
efforts has ever come from the Island. To a large ex-
-tent, Suddreth thinks this is because Islanders may not
know or want to believe that PWAs exist in sig-
nificant numbers within the Island citizenry.
"The PWA population on the Island is probably
older than you would expect and heterosexual,"
Suddreth says. "That doesn't mean there aren't drug
users or homosexuals who are positive on the Island,
but people think they're immune to the disease but
everyone else can get it, and that is not the truth."
Suddreth says confidentiality concerns prevent
him from being more specific as to the demographics
of PWAs and HIV-positive people living on the Is-
land, but the statistics find a niche for just about ev-
eryone.
"No one is one-hundred-percent safe."
Suddreth then stated a fact which may give pause
to many Island parents.
"The fastest-rising group right now is hetero-
sexual teenagers young adults -let's say 15 to 25
years of age. The growth of the disease has slowed in
the homosexual community because that community
realized the risk factors early and attacked it'early."
Suddreth says the primary avenue of infection for
Island teenagers is through sexual activity as opposed


'The goal is, if
they can't find a
cure, to make it a
manageable
chronic illness -
such as diabetes
- instead of a
fatal illness.'


"I think it's due to lack of knowledge and oppor-
tunity. We have a Chinese auction every September to
raise funds, and I would like to generate some Island
support. Last year I noticed we got support from Ft.
Meyers to Orlando, but there wasn't one thing donated
off of Anna Maria Island for the auction."
"I think it's a lack of opportunity rather than an
uncaring attitude. People just don't realize there is a
need here on the Island."
AIDS-Manasota is a non-profit (501 C-3) volun-
teer-based organization established in 1988 to provide
services and advocacy for PWAs and their friends in
Manatee, Sarasota and surrounding counties. Anyone
wishing to contribute to the organization may contact
Dave Suddreth at the address and phone number listed
below. All contributions are tax-deductible.
Any person with AIDS or who is HIV-positive
may receive help by contacting AIDS-Manasota, Inc.,
2080 Ringling Blvd., Suite 302, Sarasota, FL 34237, or
by calling 954-6011


to intravenous (IV) drug use, which is more common
in large cities. However, even though local young
people are not as enamored with the high-risk attrac-
tions of IV drugs, they are just as susceptible to the
seductions of sexual activities as any of their metropoli-
tan counterparts, he says.
But it's not teenagers' sexual encounters per se
that's putting them at risk, Suddreth warns, but the of-
ten careless ways in which they satisfy their passions.
"It is a common thing for teenagers to think they
are invincible. It's just a part of the psyche of that age
group to say it can't happen to me it happens to
someone else. That's why you have reckless driving
and all the other risk factors in that age group that lead
to death," Suddreth says.
"But I personally feel no one deserves to die over
one stupid mistake, and that's all it takes one stupid
mistake."
Though it's been said a thousand times before,
Suddreth restated the well-known message concerning
sexual activity and the avoidance of AIDS: There is no
100-percent protection against the disease except total
abstinence. Suddreth says it's not a practical way to
look at things, though, and those who preach only ab-
stinence as a public health policy are naively sticking
their heads in the sand.
"There is no such thing as safe sex that doesn't
exist. But knowing it is the nature of the animal king-
dom to participate in sex, if you choose to do so, you
should protect yourself. Sex is great, but it's not worth
dying for."

Islanders must look out
for their own
Beyond educating people how to fight the disease,
AIDS-Manasota's mission to is to help those who have
received the heart-stopping diagnosis that they have
AIDS, to be able to live more productively with the
disease. The non-profit organization lends assistance
not only through counseling, but in providing drugs and
nursing care for the patient, and supportive services for
the patient's family.
AIDS-Manasota turns away no person seeking as-
sistance, Suddreth points out, and because of this, fund-
raising is a continuous challenge. Although almost
entirely staffed by volunteers, the organization has sub-
stantial expenses due to its assistance programs which
absorb the costs of items not covered by insurance and
governmental entities. These things range from food to
housing to skilled care, and Suddreth says it is now
time for the Island to start picking up some of the tab


r


for its own people.
"Because I'm aware
of the fact there are more
cases of people receiv-
ing assistance on Anna
Maria Island than people
would like to think, I've
also been made very
aware that a lot of funds
come to the Island, but
when we have our fund
raiser there are very lim-
ited funds going off the
Island into the budget,"
Suddreth says.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 0 PAGE 9 JfI


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
"Sex is great, but it's not worth dying for." That's
the advice of Dave Suddreth, a Holmes Beach nurse
who says when it comes to sex, people are going to do
it, but they can do so with a greater degree of safety by
following a few precautions.
Suddreth, who is on the board of directors of
AIDS-Manasota, says it is impossible to make sex 100-
percent safe, and it only takes "one stupid mistake" to
contract the fatal illness.
Although everyone is at risk, no matter what their
age or sexual preference, Suddreth says heterosexual
teens are the fastest-growing group of people becom-
ing infected with AIDS. For them (and everyone else
who is sexually active), Suddreth recommends these
precautions be followed to avoid that one stupid mis-
take:
Use a spermicidal lubricant with nonoxynol-9.


The lubricant needs to be water-soluble because oils
and lotions, or anything with an oil base, will dete-
riorate a condom.
The spermicidal lubricant needs to be placed on
the inside of the condom, NOT the outside. Several
companies, including Lifestyles, offer condoms with
nonoxynol-9 in them.
Use a latex condom, not an animal-skin
condom, because an animal skin doesn't have any
more natural barriers to the HIV virus than your own
skin.
Use condoms EVERY TIME you have sex. "It
only takes one time to die," Suddreth says.
If you feel you can't afford condoms, they are
available free of charge from the county health de-
partment and organizations such as AIDS-Manasota
and Sarasota AIDS Support. "The price is not an
excuse for not using them, because they're free,"
Suddreth says.


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Don't fight over it, just bowl Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood
Billy O'Connor, left and his brother George surely fought over plenty growing up. But the Island's infamous
twins will be on fair grounds for the Third Annual O'Connor Bowling Challenge on Saturday, July 23, at Galaxy
Lanes, Bradenton. Participants may pre-register at The Islander Bystander office or register on tournament night
at Crabby Bill's restaurant between 5:30 and 7p.m. Bowling begins at 7:30 p.m. with awards, a prize raffle and
party with entertainment by the Hammerheads to follow the games back at Crabby Bill's. Last year 185 bowlers
raised $1,500 for the Anna Maria Island Community Center. The goal this year is to raise $2,000. The $10 fee
includes three games of bowling and shoes. Proceeds from the tournament and party will go toward recreational
equipment, a facsimile machine and furnishings for the new teen counseling room. For more information call Billy
at 778-1500 or George at 778-4812. To pre-register, stop by The Islander Bystander office at 5408 Marina Drive,
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach.

Two bids opened on Lake LaVista project


Bids were opened last week as two hopeful marine
contractors vied for the job of dredging the Lake LaVista
channel and other improvements.
The bid specifications included four categories of
work to be performed, including sand-tightening and
repair of the existing jetties, dredging of the channel,
water quality turbidity monitoring, "fillet" excavation
on the west jetty (a shallow hole that it is hoped will fill
with sand, keeping water-borne sand from going into
Tampa Bay)..
The contractors were required to bid on the job as
a whole as well as provide unit prices for the individual
tasks. This was done to allow the city commission flex-
ibility during the upcoming budget process.
"Due to the budget, we may not be able to do any


or all of it," says Assistant Public Works Director
Anne Beck. "That's why we broke it down that way."
The high bid for the entire project from Florida
Dredge and Dock was $115,100 while the low bidder
was Premier Dredge and Marine at $84,420.
The two companies shared the honor of being
lowest bidder on individual items. The break down is
as follows (Florida Dredge and Dock's price is listed
first, followed by Premier Dredge and Marine's bid
on the same aspect of the job: Jetty repair $84,000
and $18,600, channel dredging $25,800 and
$54,318.50, turbidity monitoring $4,500 and
9,001.50, fillet excavation $800 and $2,500.
The city commission was expected to award a con-
tract to do the job at a special city meeting Tuesday.


The Holmes Beach Planning Commission is invit-
ing all city residents and business owners to share their
ideas on the future of their city at a meeting to be held
on July 26 at 7 p.m.
People will be asked to tell commissioners what
they want their city to be like 10 to 20 years in the fu-


ture with respect to construction, business, infrastruc-
ture, parks and recreation, transportation, etc.
The forum is a part of the planning commission's
evaluation and review of the city's comprehensive plan.
The review is to begin this fall and be completed by
1996 and will address all elements of the plan.


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The Islander Bystander wants your
social and club news. Call Tomara Kafka,
Features Editor, to find out how your story
can become news! 778-7978.


Teenagers

(and everyone else),

read this about AIDS!


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Planning commission seeks input on 'vision'






I13 PAGE 10 0 JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


IA I ] fkJ


Workshop to discuss
depleted bay scallops
The Marine Fisheries Commission will hold a pub-
lic workshop on the Florida Gulf coast's depleted bay
scallop fishery on Wednesday, July 20, from 6 to 8 p.m.
in the Martin Selby Education Center at Mote Marine
Laboratory, 1600 Thompson Pkwy., City Island.
A total harvest closure for bay scallops is in effect
statewide for the 1994-95 season except in northwest
Florida north and west of the Suwanee River where the
season has been reduced to three months starting July 1.
The commission is now considering long-term
management for the bay scallop fishery that may in-
clude reduced bag limits, size limits, altered seasonal
or area closures and other measures.


Jewish Family Service
opens Bradenton office
The Jewish Family Service has opened a
Bradenton-area satellite office on the campus of Mana-
tee Community College, 34th Street West, Bradenton.
Eleanor Kratter, M.Ed., is available to provide indi-
vidual, marital and family counseling.
Today's complicated life often causes problem
situations which are difficult to solve alone. This ser-
vice is made possible through a grant from the Conti-
nuity and Identity Committee of the Sarasota-Manatee
Jewish Federation. Fees are based on a sliding scale.
For more information call 366-2224.

Veteran's Service
officer available
The Manatee County Veteran's Service Officer
will be available to interview clients, by appointment
only, on two Mondays, July 18 and 25, between 1 and
4 p.m., at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach.
For more information or to make an appointment
call 749-3030.


Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff
'Weigh good' for Center
Although $15,000 in cash and merchandise was
awarded to lucky anglers in the recent Fishing the
Islands tournament, the big winner was the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, recipient of a
$3,000 check proceeds of the tourney.
George O'Connor (left) and Chris MacNamara
weigh in an entry at the Anna Maria City Pier.


Horseshoe scores
Winners in the weekly horseshoe games held Sat-
urday at Anna Maria City Hall were Gene Snedeker
and George McKay.
Runners up were Ed Schroeder and John Stevens.


Boat show to be held
July 29-31
Nautical Extravaganza, Southwest Florida's premier
boat sale and show, will be held Friday through Sunday,
July 29-31, at the Manatee Civic Center, Palmetto.
Admission is free to view new and used boats,
watercraft and special exhibits. Dealers from Ft. Myers
to St. Petersburg will display 1995 models and 1994
inventories will be reduced. Boat owners may sell their
boats at the show or trade-up for the special dream boat.
Among participating dealers and vendors will be Island
businesses Galati Marine, Five O'Clock and
Cavanaugh's Marine Engine Repair.
For more information call 745-7020.

Herb garden workshop
for kids
Sheila Hurst will present an herb garden workshop
as part of the Roser Memorial Community Church
summer program on Saturday, July 16, at 10 a.m. in the
Fellowship Hall, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. The free
program includes discussion about what herbs are, how
they can be used and how to plant an herb garden.
Kids as well as adults are welcome.

Inter-denominational
service to be held
Sing to God, a praise and worship service, will be
held on Monday, July 18, 7 p.m., at Roser Memorial
Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. The
informal inter-denominational service is led by a con-
temporary musical group with keyboards, guitars and
vocalists. Sponsored by Harvey Memorial, Roser Me-
morial Community Church, St. Bernard Catholic
Church and the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation,
the service is held on the third Monday of each month
arid is open to everyone.
For more information or for transportation call
778-0414.


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 11 lJ
4 9


LBK Chamber conducts
membership drive
The theme of the Longboat Key Chamber of
Commerce's Annual Membership Drive is "The
Chamber Is Your Best Tool." The membership drive
will be from Tuesday, July 19, at 9 a.m. through
July 21, at 4 p.m.
Six teams of 10 people will help build the
Chamber's membership during the three days. Team
captains are Steve Doster of First Union Bank, Andrew
Vac of Key Club Realty, Jo Ann Wolverton of Pruden-
tial Preferred Financial Services, Sandy Tull of Barnett
Bank, Lu Files of Advertising Specialties and Promo-
tions and Susie Eager.
The "Tool Time" kick-off breakfast for the teams,
sponsored by Arvida's Grand Bay, will be Tuesday,
July 19, 7:45 a.m. at the Hunt Club.
The 'Top Out" victory party at the end of the drive
will be held on Thursday, July 21, 5:30 p.m. at the
Holiday Inn-Longboat Key where a Power Network-
ing Seminar, "How to Make Money through the
Chamber," will be held for new members.
For more information call 383-2466.

Red Cross to hold
'SnowBall'
The first annual Red Cross "SnowBall" will be
held at the Holiday Inn Riverfront, in Bradenton, Fri-
day, July 22, from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Guests will be transported into the winter wonder-
land snow theme several thousand cubic feet of real
snow will fill the courtyard. The black-and-white
theme includes dress and black tie is optional.
Entertainment is by the Eddie Owens Orchestra
with guest vocalist Marian Gillette Robinson.
Tickets are $30 each or $50 per couple and in-
cludes a light buffet. A cash bar is available. To pur-
chase tickets or for more information call 792-8686 or
stop by the Chapter office at 2905 59th St. W.,
Bradenton.



HOME TS
HARDWARE IASO

To serve you better, we are now open 12 p.m. to
4 p.m. on Sundays. See you after church!
Island Shopping Center 778-2811
OPEN : MONDAY thru SATURDAY 9 TO 5





RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
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Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce

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0 7


Volunteering at the
library
Library volunteers perform an invaluable service for
their library and community. Whether the task is shelving
books, filing, typing or one of a multitude of other jobs,
volunteers enhance the services the library provides.
Every department and branch of the Manatee
County Public Library System utilizes volunteers in
one capacity or another in all likelihood a job exists
to suit your particular talent.
If you have time to give and would like to help
your library, call 748-5555.

Chrysler offers junior
golf scholarships
Educational scholarships are available through the
Chrysler Junior Golf Scholarship Program. The pro-
gram, which offers $1,000 scholarships to 40 of
America's most deserving and promising junior golf-
ers, ages 12 to 18, is operated in conjunction with the
American Junior Golf Foundation.
Scholarship applications are available at profes-
sional golf shops, Chrysler-Plymouth dealerships or by
calling the Chrysler Junior Golf Scholarship Program
headquarters at 1-800-856-0764. Completed applica-
tions must be postmarked by Sept. 1 and recipients will
be announced in November.


Artists wanted for LBK
art show
The Longboat Key Art Center is accepting reser-
vations for space in the Sixth Annual Art on the Av-
enue, a juried fine arts show, to be held Nov. 19, from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Avenue of the Flowers shop-
ping center.
For an application form, artists may call 383-2345
or write to the Longboat Key Art Center, 6860
Longboat Dr. S., Longboat Key, FL 34228.


Time Is Running Out
If you have filed for an extension on your
1993 TAX RETURN
(DUE AUGUST 15TH)
For Individuals, corporations and
partnerships. Call for appointment now.
Otey & Associates
3909 E. BAY Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
Shirley Otey, Enrolled Agent
(Enrolled to practice before the I.R.S.) 778-6118


Just Received Super Summer Specials.
Announcing Europe Deal Of The Year!
15 night trans-Atlantic cruise Genoa, Italy, Malaga, Spain,
Funchal, Madeira, Barbados, Antigua, Tortola, Nassau and
Miami. PLUS FREE a 6 night
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a 5 night cruise from
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Venice & Bari, Italy, Corfu,
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Blood center needs
volunteers
The Manatee Community Blood Center, 216 Mana-
tee Ave. E., Bradenton, is looking for adult volunteers to
help a few hours each week to call donors, drive the van
to HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital and Manatee Memorial
Hospital mornings and afternoons, work in the donor
room at the Blood Center and help on the bloodmobile.
Callers usually work one or two half-days during
the week, scheduling donors to come in, especially
when certain blood types are needed.
Van drivers who provide a vital link between the
Blood Center and the two hospitals must have valid
Florida driver licenses, good driving records and the
ability to lift heavy containers.
In donor services or on the bloodmobile, volunteers
help by talking with donors, serving refreshments and
assisting in the final steps of phlebotomy procedures.
If you are interested in volunteering your time this
summer, call Pam Doolittle at 746-7195.

Volunteers needed
The American Littoral Society is looking for volun-
teers to help plant native plants and to remove exotic veg-
etation on Palmer Point, in Little Sarasota Bay, on Satur-
day, Aug. 6, from 8 to 11 a.m. Information call 951-0884.

Applications being
accepted at MCC
New students may now apply for Fall Term 1994
classes at Manatee Community College (MCC). Day
and evening classes begin Monday, Aug. 22, and the
term ends Friday, Dec. 16.
Proof of immunization for measles and rubella is re-
quired for those born after 1956. Admission office hours
are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. on Friday. MCC campuses are at 5840 26th
St W., Bradenton, and 8000 S. Tamiami Tr., Venice.
For more information call the MCC admissions
office at 755-1511, ext. 4234.


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[il PAGE 12 K JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

The Johnson family chronicles travels in book


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
The Johnson family sold their busi-
ness in 1984 with the intent of taking a
year off to travel. Although their deci-
sion was met with skepticism and doubt
by family, friends and business associ-
ates, the Johnsons wanted to travel.
The Johnsons found they were so
good at it that one year turned into 80
months and 80 countries and became the
theme of their book.
"Around the World in Eighty
Months" was self-published by the
Johnson family last month who worked
with a local Bradenton printer.
The book is available in two ver-
sions at the Brain Gym bookstore in
Holmes Beach.
One version with color.photographs
sells for $18. The simpler version with
no pictures sells for $13.
"It's amazing," says Gene Johnson,
"but so far most people would rather pay
the $18 to get the pictures."
The book chronicles the Johnson
family's Gene, wife Terry and
daughter Michelle travels in the eight
years and how they budgeted their ex-
penses.


"We detail in the book," says Gene,
"how to travel on a strict budget of $300
a week without compromizing on our
standards."
Johnson also says the book details
the family's transition from workaholics
to world travelers.
The Johnsons, after viewing the
world for nearly eight years, decided to
'settle in Holmes Beach two years ago.
Michelle had two years left of
schooling and her parents, who had
taught her themselves all those years,
wanted her to experience some time in
the public school system.
"We were concerned with how she
would turn out as compared to other
kids her age," says Johnson.
Michelle graduated from Manatee
High School this spring at the top of her
class.
Ten years after giving up everything
in order to travel, the Johnsons feel they
made the right choice.
"We feel we made the right deci-
sion," the Johnsons write in the forward
of the book. "We have experienced tre-
mendous personal growth, exposed our-
selves to a variety of cultures and cre-
ated a network of friends worldwide."


The Johnson family (from left to right) Terry, Gene and Michelle -
look at their original manuscript. Their self-published book, "Around
the World in Eighty Months," is available at the Brain Gym bookstore
in Holmes Beach.

Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 M PAGE 13 KI'


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Okay, I admit my eyes were glued to the O.J.
Simpson pretrail hearings on CNN last week. It's ab-
solutely fascinating to watch how our legal system and
the media are taking us into the 21st century.
And I was delighted to see some of our Island res-
taurants advertising on cable. Rotten Ralph's (with its
great dockside atmosphere), the Anchorage (featuring
their new gourmet buffet), the Hunt Club (with a
unique British ambiance) and Mar Vista (historical
village setting on the'Water). The funniest commercial
was Oma's, where the cooks throw pizza dough on
each other and mnisplace the spaghetti on the counter
instead of the plate". It may not be the best of commer-
cials no Cleo award here but it's hilarious.
A few weeks ago, a business story about how our area
restaurants deal with summer heat and summer tourism
appeared locally. Among those interviewed were Gulf
Drive Cafe, Beach Bistro, Rotten Ralph's and Moore's
Stone Crab restaurant. How do they do it?
Tony Pirillo and Tom Chaipan of Gulf Drive Cafe
say they add lighter menu items, more salads and fresh
sea food.
Sean Murphy of the Beach Bistro says he's added
extra salads, appetizers and lighter-portioned entrees to
the menu. His diners often eat a couple of appetizers
with a salad for dinner during the summer. Murphy also
offers a special free bottle of wine to Island residents
with dinner.
Ralph Russell of Rotten Ralph's says he keeps the
same menu but makes his fish-and-chips special an all-
you can-eat deal.
Mary Moore of Moore's Stone Crab serves lots
of king crab whichis available only during the summer
and special combination dinners at a lower price.
The Drift In has some great July happy hour spe-
cials Monday through Friday (and perhaps the longest
happy hour in the history of happy hours, 8 a.m to 2


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
on our casual outside patio."
P.S. We have the very best sunsets.


Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautfuld Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!

Just visiting? Don't forget to sign up for your subscription to The Islander
Bystander before you leave! We're in the Island Shopping Center,
right next to Chez Andre and D.Coy Ducks.

SURF & TURF Gourmet Dinner Buffet
Gourmet Dinner Buffet includes:
Oysters Rocke-feller, Clams Casino,
Zuppa Di Clams, Huge Anchorage
Anti Pasta, Peel-N-Eat Shrimp,
.Carved Top Roundof Beef, Veal
SMarsala, Veal Siciliano,
.Roast Pork, Calamari, Lobster Fra
Diablo, Eggplant Rollitini, Chicken
-Marsala, Pasta, Fruit and much more.
Desserts too! Menu may vary slightly.
[- a.--- Nightly $995
-.... 4 pm t1l Close


Kids help to keep Island clean Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka
Island kids pick up trash on Fridays as an environmental service project which is part of the Roser Memorial
Community Church summer program. Patrick and Andy McCarrick, Eloise and Chad Dingler, Sara Kafka
and Nichole Miller recently helped clean up the bay front beside the Anna Maria City Pier.


a.m.). Draft beer is 65 cents, domestic beer is $1.20 and
well drinks are $1.25. Thursday nights they have a
"Sweet Nothings" lingerie show.
Turtles Bar & Grill will have Lifeguard at this
Sunday's Beach Bash. But beginning on July 24, Blind
Side (the newly formed band with members of the
former DTs) will be playing every Sunday thereafter.
And every Thursday is now alternative night. This
week and next, Troubled Bliss, an alternative band
from Bradenton, will play. Turtles will close for a mini-
vacation July 28 and reopen Wednesday, Aug. 3 with
the reggae band Democracy.
At the Island Branch Library you can view Velma
Jackson's watercolors and detailed decoys carved by Dick
Motzer during the month of July. You can also view sculp-
ture by Woody Candish all year long.
Here's a note of trivia from the researchers at the
University of Florida. They're developing a crawfish
rivaling Louisiana's Cajun goodness to be commer-


SLANDER


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never call
or write?
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news on the Island ...
see our subscription
form on page 7.


cially harvested in the Everglades. Louisiana produces
the state's famous red swamp crawfish by the thou-
sands in commercial ponds and Florida now is looking
into doing the same thing here.

Stir-it-up is a weekly column covering events,
newsy items and fun things to do for Islanders, most on
the Island, some off-island. We encourage those who
provide food, drink and entertainment to send us infor-
mation of your upcoming event or tell us what's new.
You may FAX, mail or drop by The Islander By-
stander with a press release. The deadline is noon Fri-
day for the following week's column.
The office is located at 5408 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217, and the FAX number is 778-9392.
Make sure you include the following information:
the name of your business or organization and the name
of the event, the address, the name of a contact person
and a phone number.


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i.f PAGE 14 A JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Last year John
Green played the
small part of an
assistant director
in Role of a
Lifetime, a post-
graduate Florida
State University
film project.
There was a line
in that film, says
Green, that
really struck a
chord for him.
Eve the make-up
artist says to a
young, beginning
actor, "We all
have lots of
dreams. The
trick is not to let
the big one kill
off the little
ones."


Big and sr
By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
"We all have lots of dreams. The trick is not to let
the big one kill off the little ones," Eve tells Roland
Chase in Role of a Lifetime.
John Green says that quote meant a lot to him
when he played the role of an assistant director in the
movie Role of a Lifetime, filmed last year at Sarasota's
Asolo for the Florida State University Film School.
This philosophy not only applies to his own life, but
Green feels it sums up the recent crisis at the Asolo and
the high-profile appeal to the community to raise an esti-
mated $500,000 by June 30 just to keep its doors open.
And Green, who has lived in Holmes Beach for
five years and is a real estate agent with Neal and Neal
on the Island, knows of what he speaks..

John Green's big dream
In 1978, Green graduated with a masters in fine
arts in professional theater from the Asolo-FSU Con-
servatory of Acting.
FSU in conjunction with the Asolo
State Theater began the post-graduate pro-
gram in 1970, but transferred it perma-
nently to Sarasota in 1973.
The program was seven hours a day, -
six days a week. Students not only attended
classes but became active members of the
Asolo State Theater Company where they
had a chance to work alongside profes-
sional actors and directors. Their education
became proactive their work was as-
sessed through a mix of plays, in a variety
of roles, by different directors.
"Our day would start with classes at 8
a.m.," says Green. "We had voice in the
afternoon. And at 7 p.m., we had to be back
at the theater to be in the plays. We worked
all day and did theater at night."
As active associate members of the
Asolo, graduate students played minor and
major roles, they had understudy roles of the
professional company members and were
fully prepared to go on stage at any time.
"It was crazy," says Green, "but after Green in ti


you left, there wasn't anything you couldn't do."
The year Green graduated, 1978, was the same
year he left for New York to make it big.
Between jobs driving a taxi cab, working as an
usher at Lincoln Center and eventually becoming a vice
president of an oil and gas company, Green managed
to do four off-Broadway plays and get parts in soap
operas such as "All My Children" and "Ryan's Hope."
He also met, worked and became friendly with
other New York actors some of whom have gone onto
big successes including Bruce "Bruno" Willis, John
Goodman, Robin Williams and Mickie Rourke.
"About 1983 or so," says Green about his time in
New York, "I began to question whether I wanted to do
this another 10 years."

Green's little dreams
By 1985, Green had met and married his wife Dallas.
He was still getting some acting work and his professional
life at the oil company was successful but unfulfilling.
And Green was getting tired like many of the


other actors he knew of the grind. /
Leaving New York was a hard decision for Green
to make.
"I felt defeated," says Green. "But my wife got
pregnant and the price of oil dropped."
By the mid-'80s, Green says, many New Yorkers
were talking about relocating to Longboat Key. Green,
who had grown up in Bradenton, was more than famil-
iar with the area and decided to move to Anna Maria
Island right next door so to speak.
Green made a conscious decision to give up his big
dream to pursue his little dreams: his family which now
includes wife Dallas and "two little dreams" son
Hunter, 8, and daughter Tierney, 4.
Green says acting for him now is an occasional TV
show or commercial and goes something like this:
The director instructs, "Say 'I like it It's crunchy.'"
Green says the line.
"Can you say it slower?"
Green says it slower.
"Can you think about it, say it, then think about it
again?"
Green gets a thoughtful look on his
face, says the line, then seriously contem-
plates what he has just said.
"Okay," yells the director. "Next."
"Acting never changes," says Green.
"I don't care who you are. There's always
a director who asks, 'Can you say that
slower?'

The Asolo's little dreams
"Somehow," says Green about doing
commercials and the occasional bit part,
"the art went ouit of it. Whereas the Asolo
was art."
In those days, says Green, there was a
,,B down-to-earth, community feeling about
the Asolo.
"It had a 'Let's do it ourselves' kinda
feeling," Green says.
In those days, the Asolo had a resident
company who everybody in the com-


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


nail for man and--Asolo






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 15 IjS


John Green


and some of his dreams


In "She Stoops to Conquer," Green played the character Robert (left) in the 18th century restoration comedy.


John Green in a few of
his roles. From top
right: as a first-year
student, performing in
a children's play; an
Indian prince in
"Royal Family;" part
of the rotating reper-
toire in 1978; a young
lover in the 1976
"Scapino; in his
masters thesis por-
trayal of John Wilkes
Booth in "Portrait of
an Assassin."


Green took this photo of a party in 1982 or '83 in his New York City
apartment. His friend and fellow actor John Goodman, says Green, "was
really drunk and trying to pick up this girl whose name I can't even
remember."


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
munity knew performing a rotating repertoire.
"The thing that was amazing about the Asolo,"
says Green, "was the pace like a bullet train like
jumping onto that train. I've never seen that pace
since."
At that time, the Asolo also had the understudy
program which allowed the student actors direct con-
tact with professional actors and performances.
And the Asolo had Robert Strane, founding artis-
tic director, who has recently returned to Sarasota to
direct the Florida Studio Theater production of "The
Play's the Thing" running now through Aug. 7.
"I idolized Bob Strane," says Green. "What he
loved, I loved. He inspired me to be bigger and better
than was required."
Many of the current critics of Asolo agree.

Asolo's big dream
For 34 years, the Asolo was the community's the-
ater. But critics feel that has changed in recent years
with its new $13 million Asolo Center, its inconsistent-
in-quality shows with actors who nobody knows and
a $2.4 million debt.
When the new theater was completed in 1989, its
definition changed.
That's when they started packaging all the shows in
New York City, Green says. "They hire the director and
all the actors in New York who come here to do the show
- but nobody knows who any of these people are."
The same year -1989 the theater decided to


sponsor the French Film Festival with the backing of
then-Sen. Robert Johnson of Sarasota, who predicted
it would be a tremendous financial windfall for the
Asolo.
While the Asolo has never turned a profit on the
annual festival, officials say it has never lost money.
Critics say that it is just another move towards the
alienation of many regular Asolo supporters.
Records show a consistent loss of local, devout
supporters and a failure to attract new ones.
While the community came through financially for
the Asolo by the June 30 deadline, critics continue to ques-
tion the direction needed to keep Asolo successful.
The Asolo started with a little dream which may
have become too big to handle. John Green started with
a big dream which he carefully weighs against the im-
portant considerations of his little dreams.
"This is what I studied so hard for so I can put
my face in people's armpits?" Green asks himself
about a recent deodorant commercial.
"Art is something you carry around inside yourself.
I can pretend this is France or Japan. I can create the
mood. You make your own reality. You carry it in
you."
Real estate for Green has become an extension of
his acting training in the way that he creates his own
reality.
"I am constantly selling myself and it's only natu-
ral. It affords me the ability to support my family and
my two little dreams. I wouldn't trade places with
Bruno or Goodman."
The question is, will Asolo realize its dreams?






I[! PAGE 16 m JULY 14, 1994 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Bob Jones' bri
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
"I was one brick short of a load, so I went to Iowa
to get one," said Holmes Beach resident Bob Jones,
with tongue in cheek.
Jones, a member of the International Brick Collec-
tors Association, just returned from the group's annual
meet held in Adel, Iowa, this year. He left home with
30 bricks and returned with 109.
"It's in the by-laws of the organization that mem-
bers cannot sell bricks," explained Jones. "All bricks
must be swapped. Anyone who has duplicate bricks
gives them away to other members."
His first brick, said Jones, was a piece given to him
by his father when he was a young boy.
"About five years ago, I found my great, great
grandfather's family cemetery in a cotton field in Tennes-
see," he explained. "His grave was dated 1852.1 I found a
piece of brick from his fireplace and kept it. About two
years ago, I wondered if there was a brick collectors club.
I called a company in Sarasota that sold bricks and they
referred me to a collector in Sarasota. I called him and he
invited me to his home, showed me his collection and gave
me an application form for the club."
Because he is new to the hobby, Jones said he still
has much to learn. He said there are many.types of
bricks, each with distinctive characteristics. Fire bricks,
used in fireplaces, are made to withstand a great deal
of heat. Street bricks are larger than regular bricks and
weigh eight-and-a-half pounds each. Sidewalk bricks
usually have designs in them.
"The oldest bricks I have are the ones from my
family," noted Jones, "but the oldest dated brick is one
from the Colombian World Exposition. It is dated 1893
and was found in the Manatee River."
Other interesting bricks in Jones collection include
those made by prisoners in Texas with a star on the face;
bricks from the Old St. Augustine Road which was built
80 years ago and recently replaced; and a set of six inter-
locking bricks and a brick with the name in script.
Jones' driveway is filled with bricks in various
stages of cleaning. Some soak in muratic acid to dis-
solve the cement on them. Some are in the freezer as


cks make a weighty collection


Brick collector Bob Jones
shows a brick that ex-
ploded in the kiln due to
the presence of impurities.

Islander Photos: Pat Copeland


L<^':


an experiment to see if the asphalt on them can be more
easily chiseled off after freezing.
Jones said he looks for bricks everywhere he goes and

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Wednesday: BBQ Baby Back Ribs
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with baked beans, half ear of corn, baked potato.
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One shank, potato or rice & vegetable.
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friends and neighbors bring him bricks from their travels.
"I've got 150 bricks in my collection," said Jones,
"and I'm trying to decide how to catalog and store them."

















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Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 17 EB


Islander Bystander
assists vote
registration drive
Potential voters may register in time to vote in the
Sept. 8 primary election at The Islander Bystander on
Saturday, Aug. 6.
The newspaper will assist the county elections of-
fice in their voter registration drive throughout the fall
election schedule.
Voters must register by Oct. 11 to vote in the Nov.
8 general election.
Any person who is 18 years of age, a citizen of the
United States and a legal resident of the state and
county in which he registers is eligible to register. Resi-
dents no longer need to show two forms of identifica-
tion to register. A registrar will fill out your voter reg-
istration record and you will be asked to take an oath
to protect and defend the U.S. constitution. Voters may
register with with major parties, minor party affilia-
tions, as well as a non partisan status.


BIUSI
BREF


Islanders honored as
Prudential's top
producers for June
The Prudential Florida Realty has announced the
company's top listers and sellers for the month of June.
Among top listers is Deborah Thrasher, Anna
Maria Island office. Karin Stephan, Anna Maria Island
office, is among Prudential's top sellers for June.










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Not even a nibble from this one
Anyone can catch a live fish, but it takes a real
talent (and considerable youthful ingenuity) to
hook a dead one. When Jackie Carter, 9, (in
foreground) and her brother, Chuck, 6, spotted
this lifeless fish floating near the Anna Maria
City Pier, they decided they had to land it. Jackie
dangled a hook and after a number of patient
tries managed to hook the creature. Reeling it in
required a little extra help, and Corey)' Whiting,
11, (left) lent a hand as everyone joined in a
valiant effort to get the fish on deck. Alas, it got
away, breaking the line and taking a new hook
and sinker as retribution for the violation of its
watery grave.


Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


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[iM PAGE 18 E JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports

Bradenton Beach
July 2, criminal mischief, 2601 Gulf Dr. N., Sand-
piper Mobile Home Park. A person unknown broke off
a weather vane valued at $30.
July 3, attempted automobile burglary, 107 Gulf
Dr. S., Key West Willy's. The officer responded to a
report of a burglary in progress, observed three juvenile
subjects and stopped them. He located a witness who
identified the subjects.
The witness said she was going into the restaurant
and heard the subjects talking about what they could see
inside the vehicles and pulling on the door handles to
try and get inside the vehicles. The officer took the sub-
jects into custody, questioned them and released them
to their parents.
July 3, retail theft, 2513 Gulf Dr. N., Circle K. A
witness reported that two juveniles drove up to the
pump, sat there for 20 minutes, pumped $5.02 in gaso-
line into their vehicle and drove off without paying.
July 4, criminal mischief, 200 block of Bay Drive
South. A person unknown damaged a vehicle by scrap-
ing the paint.
July 4, criminal mischief, theft, 2400 block of
Avenue A. A person unknown damaged a chain block-
ing a dock, bent a pole valued at $10 and removed a
wind sock valued at $50.
July 4, abandoned vehicle, Coquina Beach.
July 5, DUI with property damage, Bridge Street
and Gulf Drive. The officer responding to a vehicle
crash located the driver, Cynthia Blush, 42, of
Bradenton, a block from the site. He detected the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage, according to the report.
She told the officer she was driving north on Gulf Drive
at the intersection of Bridge Street and drove over the
curb, striking three wooden poles and tearing up bushes.
The officer administered field sobriety tests and placed
Blush in custody.

Holmes Beach
July 1, burglary of a purse containing two credit
cards from the trunk of an automobile, 4000 Gulf Dr.,
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Manatee Public Beach.
July 1, burglary of a purse containing $150 in
cash, four credit cards and a checkbook from the trunk
of an automobile, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Public
Beach.
July 1, service, 500 block of 72nd Street. The
complainant reported finding a snake skin in her resi-
dence. The officer checked the residence.
July 1, drunk, 100 block of 30th Street. The com-
plainant reported a white male subject sitting in a ve-
hicle. The officer spoke to the subject and he agreed to
take a cab home.
July 1, traffic, 200 block of 43rd Street. The com-
plainant reported that a red Ford Explorer was being
operated in a reckless manner. It was not found.
July 1, noise from a loud party, 2900 block of
Avenue B.
July 2, suspicious, 3007 Gulf Dr., Anchor Inn. The
complainant advised the officer that, while cleaning the
women's restroom, she was stuck with a needle in a sy-
ringe wrapped in a paper towel behind the trash can. The
officer took the syringe to the fire department for disposal.
July 2, found property a blue men's bicycle
with a basket, 77th Street and Gulf Drive.
July 3, found property a Reebok cloth bag
containing clothing and personal papers, 2900 block of
Avenue E.
July 4, warrant arrest, 3000 block of Avenue C.
July 4, warrant arrest, 5353 Gulf Dr., Circle K.
July 4, found property a driver's license, 5702
Marina Dr., Turtle's Club and Cafe parking lot.
July 4, petty larceny of a bicycle, 300 block of
72nd Street.
July 4, fireworks, 46th Street beach. The officer
responded to a report of illegal fireworks and located
a group of subjects with bottle rockets. He confiscated
and disposed of the fireworks.
July 5, noise, 2800 block of Gulf Drive. The com-
plainant reported that a person unknown threw a fire-
cracker at his vehicle.
July 5, burglary, 503 Manatee Ave., Medical
Center. A person unknown forced open a jalousie win-
dow, turned of the power at the main fuse box and ran-
sacked the business. A metal drug cabinet was opened
but no narcotics were taken. The petty cash box con-
taining $65 was removed from the desk drawer.
July 5, found property two keys, one with a







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yellow diaper pin on a key chain tagged "Mom's
Keys," 78th Street beach..
July 5, found property ladies prescription sun-
glasses with red and white frames, 32nd Street beach
access.
July 5, suspicious, Key Royale Bridge. The of-
ficer investigated a report of youths jumping off the
bridge. They were not found.
July 6, found property prescription sunglasses,
49th Street beach access.
July 6, harassing phone calls, 6800 block of Palm
Drive.
July 6, petty larceny, 3232 East Bay Dr., Subway.
The complainant and her family were eating in the shop
and she left her purse in the booth. Later in the day an
employee found the purse in a trash can in the women's
rest room. Missing was $30 in cash.
July 6, assistance, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Pub-
lic Beach. The officer responded to assist the lifeguard
with an unruly person. An English man, who said he
did not like to be told what to do while spending money
in the United States, was told not to jump off the pier.
He left the beach.
July 7, burglary, 5306 Holmes Blvd., Florida
Permitting. The officer on patrol observed a window
slightly open and found a fresh shoe print in the mud
below the window. The key holder responded and, in
checking the interior of the business, the officer found
mud on the corner of the desk and books and papers
knocked off the desk.
July 7, disturbance, 5353 Gulf Dr., Circle K. The
complainant reported a white male subject was swear-
ing in front of the customers and would not leave when
asked. The officer gave him a trespass warning.
July 7, suspicious vehicle, 34th Street and 6th
Avenue. The complainant reported that he was almost
struck by a white Honda Accord while walking. The
vehicle was not found.
July 7, harassing phone calls, 500 block of
Bayview Drive.
July 7, noise, 100 block of 66th Street on the
beach. The complainant reported a live band on the
beach. The officer found a wedding reception in
progress and the subjects said they would shut down.
July 7, disturbance, 100 block of 72nd Street. The
officer found a large group of loud juveniles and told
them to go to the causeway.


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Wednesday, July 13 "Stole The Pow Wow"
Thursday, July 14 "Trouble Bliss"
Fri. Sun., July 15, 16 & 17 "Lifeguard"
Wednesday, July 20 "Democracy"
Thursday, July 21 "Trouble Bliss"
Fri. Sat., July 22, 23 "Fat Cat"
Sunday, July 24 "Blindside"
Closed Mondays for the Summer





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 19 i[[


Baseball card show big business for kids of all ages
More than 100 people mostly kids- turned up for the Island Community Baseball Card Club sponsored by
the Concerned Island Parents on Saturday, July 9, at Roser Memorial Community Church. Club leaders were
calling the show a great success and hope it continues into a regularly scheduled event for the Island's kids.
The next show will be Saturday, July 23.


FIRE CAL


May, 1994


Incident/calls $ loss Value
Structure fires, 1 $500 $80,000
Brush fires, 2
Vehicle fires, 0
Miscellaneous fire calls, 0
Investigations, good intent, 2
False calls, 0
Fire alarm, alarm calls, 3
Power line calls, 0
Emergency medical calls, 44
Rescue calls, 0
Service calls, 0
Motor vehicle accidents, 14
Hazardous materials calls, 2
Mutual aid calls, 1
Total calls, 72 $500 $80,000
Year to date, 399 $35,040 $1,863,350
Average number of personnel per call: 4.13
Average response time: 5.73 minutes


SW..-O "W


Next time you're boating in the bay, cruise on in to our new, 12-slip
boat dock! By land, or by sea, discover one of Longboat Key's hidden
treasures, Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant.
Fresh catches and specials daily. On the deck
or in our Old Florida style dining room, you'll *
find a favorite spot for superb seafood and
good times. Lunch and dinner daily.
Carribean barbecue Sunday 5-10 pm,
Italian night Tuesday 5-10 pm.
760 Broadway Street Channel Marker 39
Longboat Key, Florida 34228 \ ^ /
(813)383-2391 4 i


Fletcher-Guild wed
Karen Ann Guild and Richard Stephen Fletcher, both
of Gainesville, were married June 4, 1994, at Palma Sola
Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Phillip Makari officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Robert C. Guild of
Bradenton Beach and Margaret A. Guild of Bradenton
Beach. He is the son of Oliver K. Fletcher of Bradeniton
and Marlene J. Fletcher of Bradenton.
Matron of honor was Diana Clark, sister of the bride,
of Orlando. Bridesmaids were Becky DeJonge of
Gainesville; Janet Rabi-Meyer of Gainesville; Cynthia
Slayter of Bradenton; Amy Moseman of Palm Harbor.
Best man was Frederick Meyer of Gainesville.
Groomsmen were Charles DeJonge of Gainesville;
Scott Edwards of Washington, D.C.; Todd Hunt of
Bradenton; and Glen Riddle of Palm Harbor.
A reception followed the ceremony at Bradenton
Elks Lodge No. 1511. The couple honeymooned in
Europe. They live in Gainesville.

Daily Specials:
MON: Goulash, Salad, Roll ...................... $5.25
TUES: Meat Loaf, M. Potato, Gravy, Veg. .....$5.25
WED: Hot Turkey Sandwich, Mashed Potato,
Gravy, Vegetable........................... $4.95
THUR: Prime Rib, Potato, Veg., Salad, Roll .... $6.95
FRI: Seafood Specials, Potato, Cole Slaw.. $5.75
PLUS many other specials for Breakfast & Lunch.
Our regular menu: Cheese Blintzes, Homemade
Soup, Pies, and Biscuits.

fIslandInn

Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3031
S-. 1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


The Island Poet
To me it always seems such a pity,
That most of our dogs are raised in the city,
For dogs should have the fields to roam,
And not be bottled up inside a home.
They pull their owners out at a very fast gait,
As they run each morning to the park to
eliminate,
And force men who wouldn't change their
own child's diapers,
To parade down the street with a pooper
scooper,
And a couple of wipers.
Bud Atteridge



ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
V
EVERY MONDAY JAM NIGHT 9PM-1AM
(ALL MUSICIANS WELCOME)
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION EVERY TUESDAY
DISCOUNT DRINKS 10PM-1AM
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY JULY 13 & 14
FEATURING "BLINDSIDE" 9:30PM-1:30AM
WINTERS GHOST
FRI & SAT JULY 15 & 16 10PM-2AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


ENJOY SUMMER
"SANDBAR STYLE"
There's nothing better than summer
at the Sandbar. Come on down ...
we'll make it worth the trip.
127) D\ Monday is Dom night!
Guess the time of sunset.
The closest guess wins a bottle
of Dom Perignon.
r/ .Tuesdayis
"Sandbar Sunset" night!
That's our new, frozen
S. 1 specialty drink, and
it's two-for-one!
Wednesday is
Native Night!
Show your Bradenton,
Sarasota or Island ID when
you order, and we'll
knock 20% off the price
"' of your entree!


100 Spring Avenue Anna Maria Island
778-0444


Is S. hu hu 4:0 *30M -Cloed *ona.s
rive-orh. Badntn eac 77-LNA(562







[ia PAGE 20 0 JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Some new rules and some real bargains


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspective
Mote Marine Laboratory executives have agreed to
pay $9,750 for illegally cutting about 12,000 square
feet of mangroves at their City Island complex. Will-
iam Mote cut a check for the money last week.
Mote also agreed to not trim any of the mangroves
for five years. After that time, they can prune the hardy
soil-grabbing shrubs if they receive a permit.
Thus ends that story.
Probably few issues other than harvesting mul-
let roe have divided commercial fishermen from the
general public more than the turtle excluder devices
(TEDs). Introduced five years ago to cries of dismay
from shrimpers, TEDs don't seem to have ended the
shrimping industry after all.
But neither were they used very generally either,
despite the law.
That's changing.
The number of TED violations has declined for five
straight years, according to John Stevely, the Sea Grant
Marine Agent The Florida Marine Patrol and other polic-
ing bodies reported 384 cases of TED violations in 1989,
and that number dropped to 128 last year.
In addition, the number of cases made per number
of boardings of shrimp trawlers has gone down, another
indicator of better compliance.
And I hope you've noticed the increased number
of turtle nests on our beaches. It's a slow process, but


it's working and we're seeing more turtles than in any
kind of recent memory.
Sarasota County has put out a nifty map of the
Intracoastal Waterway, showing not only the general
navigation points (though surely you're not supposed
to use this booklet for navigation and clearly none of
us ever will) but equally important these days the
speed limits.
It's just a phone call away, and that's dirt cheap in
these days of $20 charts that don't even show speed
limits.
Cleverly designed by someone I don't even know,
the thrice-folded single sheet of paper gives you lots of
information. For example, there are the numbers to call
for "Free Public Boating Courses" though the closest
they come to the Island is Longboat Key.
The folded chart also has phone numbers of the
Florida Marine Patrol and other waterborne policing
agencies.
Open up the map and you'll find a chart. A chart of
the Intracoastal Waterway from mid-Longboat to
Englewood. With speed limits. Interesting details, too.
For example, once you get down to Roberts Bay,
(that's how they spell it), the entire bay is "Slow Speed,
Minimum Wake," except in the Intracoastal channel,
where it's 25 miles-an-hour. That's along, thin line. It
also shows you the various speed limits around various
parts of upper Sarasota Bay, which is largely "Normal
Safe Operation."


Boaters, Anglers Pledge offered
In an effort to educate everyone to do their part to our part to reduce garbage in Florida's waters."
limit littering on the waters off Anna Maria Island, the Mail the pledge to:
Marine Extension Service is offering a Boaters and Florida Sea Grant Extension Program
Anglers Pledge form in cooperation with Keep Florida University of Florida, P.O. Box 110405
Beautiful and the Center for Marine Conservation. Gainesville, FL 32611.
According to Marine Extension Agent John Prizes will be awarded from drawing from the
Stevely, "boaters and anglers are certainly not the pledge forms later this year.
sole cause of this problem, but all of us need to do
I PLEDGE:
To do my part in keeping Florida's waters free from trash.
To properly dispose of garbage when I reach shore.
To remove garbage from Florida's waters and shores.
To always be an example of the stewardship and pride which Florida boaters and anglers share statewide.
To encourage fellow boaters, anglers, family and friends to take the pledge and help protect Florida's
boating environment.

Signature
Name (print)
Address


Snook Trout Redfish Flounder

LIGHT TACKLE
SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
V2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


ABOVE


BOARD


PROTECT YOUR BOAT ...
J Monthly Maintenance & Restoration
"We provide the professional protection
your boat needs."
MONTHLY MAINTENANCE PROGRAM
SINTERIOR/EXTERIOR DETAILING
GEL COAT REPAIR & RESTORATION
TEAK RESTORATION
STAINLESS POLISHING
... Free Estimates Plus
Demonstrations & References
Call Andrew Brush 745-9390.(
Local Island Resident
UCENSEA0391 INSURED
ACTIVE MEMBER AMI CHAMBER (044


S Tz to Green Golf
Custom Clubs Club Repair New & Used Clubs
New Golf Balls In Stock!
The Longest Balls"
STO T/rE
SChoose The Right Ball
For Your Game.
778-5184
Open Mon thru Sat 9 to 5 (Sunday by appointment only)
2501 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach

10 YEAR ALL PARTS AND LABOR
WARRANTY
You want it? We've got it!
Because Amana gives you quality at a price
you can afford. "

EXTENDED SERVICE PLAN
AMANA MEANS QUALITY SINCE 1934.


That makes sense, especially considering they raced
their "offshore" powerboats there just two weekends ago.
The back cover is even a little map of the Water-
way all the way down past North Port though it's
clearly "not intended for navigation."
So pick up the phone and call for a free copy. John
Stevely is recommending it in his Manatee County Co-
op Extension Service Newsletter and I do, too. Dial the
Sarasota County Natural Resources Department at 378-
6113 and tell them you want a copy of the new "Boat
Speed Limits" brochure.
You'll be glad you did.
If you do any boating at all in the Sarasota County
sections of Sarasota Bay, let your fingers bring you a
handy little chart with speed limits.
Just a reminder: If you fish for real red snapper
anymore in other words, you're probably fishing out
in federal waters the National Marine Fisheries Ser-
vice has announced an increase in the minimum size.
Minimum size for real red snapper is now 14 inches, up
from 13. Over the next five years the minimum size is
going up to 16 inches, with 15 coming in 1996.
Oh yes, the new rules apply to both recreational
and commercial fishers.
BAIL, the Boater's Action & Information League,
now has its first edition of "A Guide to Anchorages in
Southwest Florida" available. I've seen this book and,
if you boat up and down the coast, you need a copy of
this one.
Aerial photographs (no kidding), make this 96-
page book invaluable. There's lots of information you
need to know, and the cost of this whole thing is $9.49.
Giving credit where it's due, the East Coast Inland
Navigation District put money into this thing, and so
did the Sea Grant folks like John Stevely. It's a well-
needed book put out by local folks who know what
they're writing about. Spend the money. It's dirt cheap
and worth many times the price.
For your own copy, look around. "The Guide" is
available at lots of marinas and some marine supply
stores. You can also just send a check to BAIL, P.O.
Box 15014, Sarasota, FL, 34277.
It's another case of doing the right thing. I know
we sound like the Home Shopping Channel today, but
this really is good stuff, much of the cost paid for with
our tax dollars. We should be so lucky to have the rest
of it used so wisely and well.
See you next week.

SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
-- ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.





OFFSHORE FISHING
ALL BAIT, TACKLE & EQUIPMENT INCLUDED
NO LICENSE REQUIRED
Fishing Diving Island Excursions


Anna Maria Island


('13) 77S-54g9


C'.
C
C.
.9
C
C


~TJJ


REFRIGERATION "

I @@ACD44365@
CAC044360 rT


778-9622 Holmes Beach
WE SERVICE FPL
PARTICIPATING
ALL MAKES & MODELS CONTRACTOR


SHARK

SUPPLIES




,ISL[ A *RFods & Reels



Anna Maria Island Center 7 8H e688
Holmes Beach 778768






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 21 IBi


Reds, trout still backwater fishing best bets


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Fishing action remains hot and heavy. Backwater
anglers are reporting good catches of reds and trout -
perhaps too good for redfish, as a number of anglers are
catching spotties that are too big for the legal size lim-
its. Offshore, action is centering around snapper and the
occasional big amberjack.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said anglers there
have been catching snapper, sand perch, some big redfish,
black drum and some night-time catch-and-release snook.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishers
there have been catching mackerel, mangrove snapper
and a couple of reds that were too big to keep.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II said Joey and Daniel
Schram, ages 14 and 12, respectively, of Greensboro,


N.C.,boated 25 redfish up to 14 pounds, as well as 20
trout in the 22-inch range last week. On another of
Capt. Zack's charters, Charlie Robinson, 7, West Vir-
ginia, and Dave Bouzanie, 12, Bradenton, boated 20
reds up to 14 pounds in size as well as a catch-and-re-
lease snook.
Capt. Phil Shields on the Reef Reacher said his cli-
ents have been catching yellow tail snapper, a couple of
grouper and a few big amberjack in the 40-pound size
range while fishing in about 120 feet of water offshore.
Lee at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said his cus-
tomers have been finding a lot of redfish and trout on
the flats. The reds have been too big to keep, but the
trout have been in the 24- to 28-inch range. Lee also
said he's received reports of some anglers catching a





S Bounding barracuda
takes the bait
Emmy Frost got an unexpected pleasure
while fishing with Dad, Reid, last week -
a 50-pound barracuda. The pair were
$>:"h".- fishing near Passage Key when the 12-
year-old got the strike. The fish jumped
about seven feet up in the air, and
traveled about 30 feet, before being
brought to the boat. Good work Emmy!
Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood


Huffine AUTO SERVICE CENTER
WE USE GENUINE NAPA PARTS
5424 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-1771

"Friendly Service With A Guarantee" 24-HOUR
WRECKER
CAR and TRUCK REPAIR SERVICE
including major overhauls

* TUNE UPS and OIL CHANGES
and general maintenance


N GLA
o.. .. .....

SUN GLASSES


OPEN AND COVERED BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE!
... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
(7, OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION ,,
.** OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 TO 5 ,9 .*.
e I6:' : 1171111


Fish Tales
Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and
pictures are welcome!
Just give us a call at
778-7978 or stop by
our office in the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


few cobia, using pinfish as bait. Further offshore, there
are reports of a few grouper, snapper and amberjack in
the 70- to 120-foot depth.
On my boat Magic, we've been fishing offshore of
late, bringing in good catches of red grouper in the eight-
pound size, a few mangrove snapper and some small
sharks. Backwater fishing is producing trout and reds.
Capt. Tom Chaya said his charters are bringing
plenty of trout back to the dock, as well as a few nice-
sized redfish. Mackerel fishing is good on the artificial
reefs offshore.
Rick at Island Discount Tackle said mackerel are
the best bet early in the mornings off the local piers and
other structures. There are still a few small sharks in
Sarasota Bay. Offshore, grouper and snapper are biting
hooks in about 100 feet of water.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's catching lots of
small trout, a few flounder and limit catches of redfish
on almost every trip.
Good luck and good fishing.


Little League
season over for 1994
The Anna Maria Island Community Center
had two all-star teams representing it this in the
Little League tournament in Sarasota. The nine-
and 10-year-old team was eliminated after two
games, as was the 11- and 12-year-old team.
The roster for this year's 9- and 10-year-old all-
star team includes: Dusty Andricks, Mike Bernas,
Johnny Cicero, Preston Copeland, Mark Huber, Alan
Jenkins, Jeremy LeGrand, JasonLoomis, Adam Pear,
Mark Rudacille, Ben Sato, Josh Sato, Kris Sato and
Stephen Yencho. The coaches were Lou Florentino
and Gib Bergquist.
The 11- and 12-year-old all-star team fielded
these players: Michael Armstrong, Scot Atkinson,
Taylor Bernard, Robby Douglas, Paul Feeney,
Greg Granstad, Tim Hasse, Greg LaPensee, Derek
Pettigrew, Evan Purcell, Michael Smith, Dusty
Wagner, Justin Wall and Travis Wicklund.
Coaches were Gary Wagner, Rob Douglas and
Garnet Atkinson.



AMERICAN CAR WASH

& DETAILING

BOATS TRAILERS CARS
Self service or personal service
Pick up and delivery service available
Buff, Seal and Polish Dress Rims and Tires
778-1617 5804 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


SALES & SERVICE J
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
4 "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. 0. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu7/14 4:48 2.1ft 10:26 1.0ft 4:36 1.9ft 10:24 0.8ff
Fri7/15 5:28 2.2ft 11:52 0.8ft 6:06 1.6ft 10:56 1.0ft
Sat7/16 6:18 2.4ft 11:28' 1.2ft 8:06 1.4ft 1:28 0.6ft
Sun 7/17 7:10 2.5ft -- --- 2:54 0.4ft
Mon 7/18 8:11 2.6ft 4:07 0.2ft
Tue 7/19 9:10 2.7ft -- 5:09 0.0ft
Wed 7/20 10:06 2.8ft 6:00 -0.1ft
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later low tides 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


GALATI
YACHT BASIN






iE PAGE 22 0 JULY 14, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


CITY

Anna Maria


Bradenton Beach


Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot

209 Coconut
52x100
212 Gladiolus
85x89
230 Lakeview Dr
56x49x92x71x99
235 Willow
107x148 canal
607 Gladiolus
50x113
407 S Bay Blvd
73x105
817 N Shore Dr
45x125x50x125
821 N Shore Dr
45x125x50x125
1007 Gulf Dr N
102 Summer Sands
105 8th St S
50x100
601 Gulf Dr N
101 Gulf Watch
105 6th StN
75x87
2501 Av B
50x100
611 Gulf Dr N
27C Imperial House
611 Gulf Dr N
17C Imperial House
206 67th St
75x105
218 S Harbor Dr
74x96x96x124 canal
3603 4th Av
45x100 approx
3801 4th Av
5 La Playita
508 Key Royale Dr
96x100 canal
513 58th St
80x93 canal
2 Palm Harbor Dr
80x100


213 70th St
90x102


302 73rd St
107x90x70x85
3214 & 3216 Gulf Dr
3214 3bed/2bath
3216 3bed/2bath


STYLE/rooms

2 story house
3bed/2.5bath
ground home
2bed/2bath/lcp
ground home-canal
3bed/2bath/1.5car
ground home
2bed/2bath/lcp/pool
residential lot

ground home
2bed/lbath/lcar
residential lot gulf
5/30/94 / auction
residential lot gulf
5/30/94 / auction
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
2 story duplex
4bed/2bath
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
ground home
3bed/2bath/lcar
elevated home
3bed/2bath/2cp
condo
2bed/2bath
condo
2bed/lbath
ground home
4bed/2bath
ground home
3bed/2bath/lcar
townhouse
3bed/3bath/2car
elevated condo
2bed/2bath
ground home
3bed/2bath/lcar
ground home
2bed/2bath/lcar
elevated home
3bed/2bath/2car
ground home
2bed/2bath/lcp
ground home
3bed/2bath/lcar
2 bldgs,2 story,3


AGE/size

1930
2617 sfla
1967/93
1066 sfla
1969
1424 sfla
1974
1027 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when...

Angell/Enmmings
5/23/94
Krall/Zediker
5/23/94
Grenzabach/Burnett
5/23/94
Mahar/Demott
5/23/94


Albert/Burkly
5/23/94


1957
1170 sfla


1984
1602 sfla
1957
1339 sfla
1986
1200 sfla
1959
1529 sfla
1990
1728 sfla
1969
754 sfla
1969
754 sfla
1958
1970 sfla
1957
1272 sfla
1992
2640 sfla
1981
950 sfla
1963
1429 sfla
1954
1230 sfla
1993
2101 sfla
1959
1230 sfla
1969
1933 sfla


1972


duplex
Compiled by Doug Dowling, licensed real estate broker, 7781222


Ryker/Case
5/30/94
Reasoner/McComas
list $259,000
Reasoner/Hallman
list $259,000
Zediker/Wiley
5/23/94
Larson/Hinnebusch
5/23/94
City Nat'l/Lisella
5/23/94
VanMaaren/Vandevrede
5/30/94
Jones/Valerio
5/30/94
Crayton/Compagnoni
5/16/94
Tedhams/Thatcher
5/16/94
Meredith/Gordon
5/23/94
Cunningham/Lataille
5/23/94
Davis/Csizinszky
5/23/94
Leech/Stark
5/23/94
Tymeson/Churchill
5/23/94
Blatherwick/Hinkle
5/23/94
Arnold/Moss
5/30/94
Ayers/Innis
5/30/94
Berggren/Hellem
5/30/94
Forker/Caron
5/30/94


SALE$S/LIST$

$161,500
list $169,700
$142,500
list $159,900
$160,000
list $165,000
$160,000
list $169,000
$78,900
list uk


$117,000
list $163-$125,000
$220,000

$202,400

$161,500
list uk
$143,500
list uk
$117,500
list uk
$143,000
list $158-$149,000
$159,000
list uk
$69,000
list $71,900
$69,000
list uk
$140,000
list $149,900
$185,000
list uk
$299,500
list $299,500
$83,000
list $85,000
$155,000
list $169,500
$135,000
list uk
$162,000
list $182,000
$143,000
list uk
$146,500
list uk
$419,800
list $650,000


We offer liquid CDs with
competitive rates from around the
country. To learn more,
call us today.
ABRAYNIOND JAMES
Clu w I y I e !

Elizabeth C. Bertelsen
Financial Consultant
3639 Cortez Rd. West, Ste. 140 Bradenton, Fl. 34210
(813) 755-6272 Toll Free 800 247-3011 Fax (813) 758-4542
Concerned about you and your financial well-being.










STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS


READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.



I ;Aj Islanbd Pobiatr I
I ^^^^^BL.r- ---- I


CLARE H. STARRETT,
D.P.M.


PODIATRIC MEDICINE
and
SURGERY
A convenient Isla
104 Crescent Dr.,


and location
Anna Maria


Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Dally Home Visits by Appointment
if .U" W^W.


FUNERAL HOMES

KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager

BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813)748-1011 FAX 746-6459


MASSAGE THERAPY


Specializing in Corrective Muscle Therapy
Rachel Barber, LMT #MA0015167 MM0004539 778-8575
By Appointment Most Insurance Accepted




MASSAGE CAN HELP:
* Arthritis (non-inflammatory) Joint Immobility
* Back, Neck & Shoulder Pain Poor Circulation
* Chronic Headache & Migraine Sciatica &'Tendinitis
* Hip, Knee, Leg & Foot Pain Sport Injuries
* Fibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
* Insomnia And More
Gift Certificates 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza
i






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 23 JiE


Sale of the Week
The home at 8021 Marina Isles, Holmes Beach, was owned
by architect Gene Aubry. It is an architectural rendering of
luxurious Tidewater living. It was sold by Barbara Sato of
Betsy Hills Real Estate, Anna Maria.


i~-~ L~I~I


(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sato ................. 778-3509
Christine T. Shaw ............ 778-2847 Marcella Cornett................ 778-5919
Nancy Gullford .................. 778-2158 Michael Advocate ............... 778-0608
S, jtg-dy ,:udE itat P-ofzstona,
ASpaeafnyiq Itn d l mtmUsk EwpiafajFd yfiz
Call or stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the use of
professional videotape.
Exclusive
Waterfront ONE YEAR
Estates "E WARRANTY
Video Collection MLS ----....-

Anna Maria City at Bean Point


I REALTORS
U^ ^ = ^ = -

I.**^Hgf^T


ISLAND 6-PLEX
2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and
shopping. Pool and laundry facilities. $450,000.
Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 __. MLS


Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner.
Links
a Buyers and Sellers
Together and Provides
Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
Exceptional Service
Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation


SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR


When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


* *


V BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER
C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


- RENTAL Call Julie ... SALES
SMANAGEMENT to rent your property quickly SERVICE
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
S. when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.
778-6665
Julie 1-800-749-6665 Eliot


neaL mnannausa
ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS

JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria
Island. You don't want to miss THE BEST news on the Island. You
may also call to stop home delivery if necessary. Mail subscriptions
are also available (form on page 7.)
Sorry, Individual unit delivery Is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.


ANNUAL RENTALS
GULF FRONT CONDOS Efficiencies,
1 BR, 1 BA and 2BR, 1 BA. From $525 to
$700 mo. plus utilities.
SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR, 2BA, furn.
$1000 plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX 2BR,
1 BA, $575 mo. plus utilities.


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


810 N. Shore Drive
Across the street from best beach on the Island,
5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large garage, 2,900 s.f.
living area. $420,000. 1-800-694-2221.


OPEN SUNDAY JULY 17 1-4 PM
PLAYA ENCANTADA
6006 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
* Unit 212 Gulf Front Complex, 2 bedroom,
2 bath, heated pool & spa, clubhouse, excel-
lent rental. Gulf view. $178,000.
Call Helen White, 778-6956
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325
605-C Manatee Avenue Holmes Beach, FL 34217
i.MLS ar


DICK
WAGNER
REALTY INC.







jRj PAGE 24 A JULY 14, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


DIRECT GULF FRONT!
Enjoy the sunsets from your balcony overlooking the
beach. Three bedroom, two bath, cathedral ceilings,
spacious rooms and livable kitchen makes this condo
a home. $187,000.
Hfl d-^^ wsw


A SPECIAL PLACE
Very large 3 bedroom, 4 bath home with pecan & wal-
nut paneling. Hardwood floors beneath carpet. Extra
large lot with pool & gazebo. 35' open porch, Across
from beach. $239,000.

.. "N


BRIDGE STREET COMMERCIAL
3 STORE FRONTS
Be part of the renaissance of Bridge street in
Bradenton Beach. Two or three store fronts plus 2
workshops, plus a one bedroom house. This is a spe-
cial opportunity to get in on the ground floor. $199,000.


HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX
Lots of possibilities here! Great location on quiet street.
Short walk to shopping center and beach. Two bed-
rooms, one bath and the other side features a one
bedroom, one bath. $108,000.


GULF FRONT
Brand new 3BR, 2BA beauty directly on wide white
beach. No hallways, wide open for casual beach living.
Beautifully furnished, surrounded by windows and
water vista.


GULF FRONT BUNGALOW
Older beach house with large lot, hardwood floors,
rooftop deck and detached garage in Holmes Beach.


GULF FRONT RARITY
Very large 2 family. 3BR, 2BA each side with lofts
for kids. Big deck and storage rooms, separately
divided.

Mike

Norman

Realty inc.

(813) 778-6696
1-800-367-4364 FAX: 778-4364
3101 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.


QUALITY
BUILDERS
-oo]le. o: 1 ll


* OTHER HOMESITES
AVAILABLE
778-7127
Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915


IMPERIAL HOUSE
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath, fully furnished. Just
steps to the beach and bay. $79,900.
Call Marilyn Trevethan
REALTORS ASSOCIATE
ML.S Anytime 792-8477 Office 778-2261
i__ Toll-Free 1-800-422-6325


9.DAYS FROMISTING TOCON TRACT


AT PERICO BAY CLUB
A GORGEOUS VIEW, 2 bedroom, 2 bath with
many upgrades. Security, covered parking, pool,
spa, tennis. Must see to appreciate. Owner is local
and will be happy to show.
Call 794-5085 $89,500.



cffyrn*?


Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTOR0
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Karin Stephan
REALTORG
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844
Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


OWNER SELLING!


Yes, we listed and found a buyer for 501 68th
Street in just 9 days. Through our extensive out-
of-area marketing program we have other quali-
fied buyers wanting to purchase Anna Maria Is-
land property. So, If you want
to sell your home or condo,
please give us a call.
RE/MAX PROPERTIES
FLORIDA'S #1 RE/MAX OFFICE
KAREN and DON
SCHRODER
Talk to Us ... We Listen
Phone: 778-2200 Anytime FAX: 778-7581









PALMA SOLA BAY Estates! Imagine living
here w/cathedral ceilings, tile floors in foyer, hall
& kitchen, lots of ceiling fans, fine Pella win-
dows. Lush landscaping. Sunken living room
and family room have pool access via sliding
doors. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, dining room, eat-in
kitchen. $159,900. #58265. Call T. Dolly Young
today! 778-5427.
ELEGANT HOME, ELEGANT LIVING ... Very
spacious builder's home. Brand new & charm-
ing 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Fireplace in family room.
Caged pool overlooking bayou. $289,000. Call
T. Dolly Young today! 778-5427.
ELEVATED DUPLEX, North Holmes Beach.
Each with 2 bedroom, 2 bath, parking for 2
each below, close to beach, shopping, restau-
rants, library, churches. Excellent investment,
positive cash flow. $165,000. Call T. Dolly
Young today! 778-5427.
IMPERIAL HOUSE!
... Bay view,
turnkey furnished
2 BR condo!
$89,000.


ATTRACTIVE three bedroom home with 1.5
baths on a corner lot in central Holmes Beach.
many new updates including root and wiring.
$118,900. Call to see this one today. Zee
Catanne. 794-8991 eves.


POOLSIDE CONDO JUST STEPS TO GULF:
Two bedroom, 1.5 bath ground floor unit. Turnkey
furnished with light Florida furnishings. Recently
updated with new appliances, countertops, ceiling
fans and carpeting. Glassed and screened Florida
room doubles as extra bedroom, dining area or
den. $124,900. Call Judy Duncan, 778-1589 eves.


ENJOY PANORAMIC VIEWS OF INTRA-
COASTAL: from this 5 year young duplex situated
1/2 block from bay and new beach! Superior con-
struction built on 25' pilings. Extras too numerous to
list, this rare find on Anna Maria is reduced to
$223,500. Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.


ENJOY A CAREFREE LIFESTYLE: in this three
bedroom, two bath home with a caged pool and
deep water canal. Other amenities include boat
dock, sprinkler system, 70% stone lawn, fruit
trees, double garage. Room for expansion. Now
reduced to $224,000. Please call Carol Williams,
778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS


L&n L
REACTORS@


[snuoti1










BACK ON THE MARKET
205 57th St. Holmes Beach
2BR/1 BA Home Large Lot
Close to Beach Duplex Zoning
Central Air/Heat Laundry Room
Screened Porch Carport
$112,000. Please Call For Appointment
778-4642
Owner is Lic. Real Estate Broker


7704 20th Ave. N.W., Bradenton
IN SHAWS POINT


BY OWNER Southern charm, all brick, 4 bed-
room colonial home with a detached brick build-
ing. Immaculate condition. Best schools. Owner
financing available, $159,000. Call 795-8169.




SGulf Bay Realty
of Anna Maria Inc.






. . . . .- _-- .



SIGN OF THE MERMAID
Gourmet restaurant, prime location in
charmingly restored beach house. Sale in-
cludes business, equipment, furnishings and
leasehold on property.
Great income now and enormous poten-
tial to earn more. Owner/chef will train.
Robin Kollar, Broker
778-7244 Eves: 778-2151 -


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JULY 14, 1994 PAGE 25 I
,I -U.J.^H :~HH. a.Il -aMT


Serving Anna Maria Since 1939 CALL (813) 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive ASSOCIATES AFTER H OURS8 1
DICK Bradenton Beach- 0 RS
Dave Moynihan ................... 778-79761
WAGNER 778-7976
Licensed Ed Oliveira .......................... 778-1751
REALTY INC. Real Estate 113 91
77 75
Bill Wagner, Broker ............ 778-5914
Broker 77:8 5 4


Priced at $94,900. Call Dave Moynihan. '
. ..a '' I '

RUNAWAY BAY 2BR/2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT The views go on
for ever from this fully furnished 2BR/2BA top
floor, end unit. Cathedral ceilings, covered park-
ing, boat dock, short walk to prime beach and
possible owner financing add to the extras of the
condo. Priced at $125,000. Call Dave Moynihan.


MAGNIFICENT GULF VIEWS excellent design
with open floor plan for a DNR approved/permit-
ted 3BR 2BA home just a few steps from beach.
Buyer would have final selections. Priced at
$238,500. Call Dave Moynihan for further details.


BAYFRONT LOT Central Holmes Beach location
with deep water dockage and fabulous view. Lot
is cleared and measures 85' x 130'. Offered at
$189,500. Call Dave Moynihan.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL
BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


NICE OPPORTUNITY! Create the City's only "mini-resort"
with investment in these three duplexes located on West side
of Gulf Dr. only 250 ft. from great beach! Beautifully main-
tained and excellent potential to receive additional income.
Call Marie Franklin for info and ideas! Owner financing. Ask-
ing $650,000. By Appt., 778-2259.

OkAA MAR

MARIE LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250


: 'o" lk.',
. M : zs .'v B ...-S.


Just Steps to GULF
Lovely 1 bedroom, 1 bath condo in desirable GULF
FRONT complex. A pristine beach is just steps
away from this fully furnished condo. Only $79,000.
Call today. Rosemary Schulte, 794-6615 eves.



S LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS ,
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717* Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
'_ (813) 778-1450 or 778-2307


Imu


SUNBOW BAY CONDOMINIUM
3805 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Furnished unit
This conveniently located complex is within walking
distance to everything shopping, Gulf beach and
more. Tennis Court, Two Pools. Excellent Investment
potential. $94-e000 Reduced to $89,990.
(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216
S. .,


- A ''^-^^*^ K ='?^-. -,





QUALITY HAS ITS PRICE ... AND ITS REWARDS
Key Royale, 631 Foxworth Lane. $525,000.


DOUG
DOWLING
REALTY
409 Pin. Av.
Anna Mwra
778-1222


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extend-
Ing both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction &
Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis,
Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Manage-
ment and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Expe-
rience AND Smiles!
0-INy I #:141h6 :r.19a a =111a1







ijS PAGE 26 E JULY 14, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


CCommercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy s Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
tw Hauling* By the cut or by the month.
1i Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
3 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
f 7-31"45' AND SATISFACTION








Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 Lic.No. 4467


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC "
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


Everyone can keep up

on Island news ...
send a subscription,
so they can
read what
we all read.


IS ANDER C ASSFID

I TM F-SLEITANPRAT- I ONA


WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales
call 778-3880.
JACUZZI, 8' x 8', seats 8 with double lounger. Blue
interior with cedar. 2 yr. old. $3,00 new, will take
$1,250. 778-7187.
TOY STORE OPEN. Playmobile, castle set, video
systems, telescope & bikes. All perfect condition.
778-1635.
WANTED. Precious Moments porcelain dolls and
figurines. 795-1115.
BEDROOM SET antique, dbl. bed, birdseye maple
complete. $375; white twin bed set, complete $175;
couch, loveseat, chair, dark floral pattern. $225;
dining table extra thick glass, w/6 brewer chairs.
$275; 2- end tables, black $30 each; glass coffee
tables $75. 778-4330.
BLONDE OVAL dining room set, white wash pine,
Queen Anne, country Victorian, 2 arm & 2 side
chairs, 2 leafs. $1,200 new, sell for $390. Leave
message, 778-8221.
BASSETT BABY CRIB, honey color. $95. Leave
message, 778-8221.
QUEEN SIZE BED with headboard & frame. Al-
most new. $100 O.B.O. 778-1131.
QUEEN SIZE BEDROOM set. Pedestal bed w/box
spring mattress, 2 side tables, large dresser. Off
white/black laminate. $500. 778-0150.
AMSTRAD COMPUTER. 80mg, desk, high chair,
infant girls toys. Please call after 6:00. 778-6498.
HIGH BACK executive office chair. Like new, only
$125. Call Ed, 778-2246.
MOVING SALE. Brand new furniture, bedroom set,
tables, free standing unit, dinette set, recliner,
breakfast set, TV, etc. 778-4515


3 FAMILY YARD SALE. 304 68th Street, Holmes
Beach. Sat., July 16 only. Housewares, tools, fish,
dinghy, antiques, art, mullet net and other.
GARAGE SALE. 218 85th Street, Holmes Beach.
Fri. ,July 15, 8-4. Sat., July 16, 8-12. Stereo &
speakers, computers, bed & misc. fix-up items.
YARD SALE. 209 54th Street, Holmes Beach. Sat.,
July 16, 9-1. Furniture, clothes, toys, priced right.
No early birds please.
DRIVEWAY SALE. Fri. & Sat., July 15 & 16.7:30-
1:00. Household items, lots of miscellaneous. 116
White Ave., Holmes Beach.
ESTATE SALE. 1407 Gulf Dr. S. #202, Bradenton
Beach, Coquina Moorings. Sat., July 16, 8-4. Com-
plete condo rattan LR $200, rattan DR $125,
sleeper/sofa $200, W/D $100 for pair, TV's, twin
beds w/bedding, misc. furniture, pictures, lamps,
dishes and accessories.
GARAGE SALE. 518 71st Street, Holmes Beach.
Sat., July 16. 9-4.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island Only). Cats included. 778-1012.
STUDENT offers dog walking service. Experi-
enced. Call Sky Beard, 778-2923.
"CRITTER SITTER" Going away, your pets have to
stay? Daily visits to your home to provide food and
water and lots of TLC for all! 778-6000.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.
ISUZU 85 DIESEL P/UP, MPG plus AC, cruise, full
bed liner & cap original condition, sunroof, wiper
delay, tinted glass all round, 5 speed and new tires.
$3,500. Plichter, 107 1st St. N., Bradenton Beach.
322-1263, after 6 PM.


28 FT, 78 MIDAS. Low mileage, generator, 6 new
tires, cruise, new batteries, air bags and many extras.
$7,000. 778-2574 or 778-4457.


FREE USE OF 27' BUCCANEER
FIBERGLASS SLOOP
Standing headroom thruout, draws only 27", spa-
cious interior with head & separate shower. In good
condition, though it's about due for bottom paint. You
provide a place to keep it and the labor for mainte-
nance. I provide all supplies, parts and of course the
boat itself. Enjoy the pleasures of sailing without any
of the expenses! Call 1-706-896-1864, Sundays &
evenings except Friday evening. No Sat. calls,
please. July 18-21, call 813-778-1206.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic, 1/2 & full day. Reservations. Call 778-1990.


FULL-TIME Marine yard help. Fork lift operator, boat
detailer, gas dock attendant, etc. Call Ken at 778-5577.
DISHWASHER WANTED: full or part-time. Apply in
person, Rotten Ralph's, 902 S. Bay Blvd, AnnaMaria.
RENTAL AGENT needed immediately. Must be licensed
real estate agent. Call Horizon Realty, 778-0426.

PARTY ALL THE TIME. Jolee International needs 9
representative to promote fabulous skin care line. Top
commissions paid. 813-773-2606 or 813-773-4400.

PART TIME PROFESSIONAL Retiree's, House-
wives. Commercial janitorial work. Weekends.
$6.00+ hr., will train. 778-9189.
TEENS 18 yrs+ Janitorial. Must have transportation.
$5.00/hr. 778-9189.
PART TIME office help. Good typist, some computer
& bookkeeping skills. 20 hrs. wk., $5 per hr. AM's or
PM's, retirees welcome. Call Robin at 778-7244.
NEEDED CNA for 2 elderly people in their home.
Nights 5:30PM-7:OOAM, Mon., Tues., Wed. & Sat
nights, $50 a night. Also Sat. & Sun. days 8:00AM-
3:00PM, $50 a day. Some lifting. Call, 778-2961.
PART TIME, 20 hrs per wk. Cleaning and light yard
work, includes weekends and holidays. Haley's Mo-
tel. 778-5405.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath. Also handicap con-
versions: ramps, handrails, etc. Island resident, 23 yrs
experience, local references. Call Mark at 778-5354.
ISLAND PAINTER: fast, neat, reasonable. Call Big
Jim, 778-5587.
NO JOB TOO SMALL! College student, father of three,
trying to make ends meet. Lawns, tree trimming, etc.
Lifelong resident, references. Keith, 778-6438.
ISLAND HOME MAINTENANCE. Carpentry to paint-
ing. 20+ yrs. experience. Island resident, Island ref-
erences. 779-2129.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local refs. Call Brewers 778-7790.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, home repairs. Also
handicap conversions: ramps, handrails, etc. Island
resident, 23 years experience, local references. Call
Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING Residential/Commercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.


Over 850 happy, paid
subscriptions ...
and growing every week.

SubscriptioANDE form on page 7, this issue.
Subscription form on page 7, this issue.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JULY 14, 1994 A PAGE 27 iK


MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 yrs. Call today for free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free es-
timates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repair. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-5183.
CUSTOM REMODELING/ADDITIONS. Design as-
sistance. No charge for consultation. Our promise:
lowest price for true quality. Lic. CGC 037608. Call
Mickey, 957-5042.
DRY CLEAN YOUR CARPET! Many Island refer-
ences. Call Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning, 778-2882.


COMMERCIAL STUDIOS 1sm/1lg. Gulf view. Gulf
Drive ideal for small business, office, crafts. Neg.
Anna Maria. Call Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.
WE HAVE GREAT RENTALS! Short term & long
term! Gulf-front, condos, canal homes, duplexes. Call
Debbie Thrasher for all your Rental needs, now at
The Prudential Florida Realty. 778-0766 or 778-3395.
ISLAND CONDO, 2BR/2BA, 2 lanais, pool, walk to
beach, washer/dryer. $900 per month. Call Martha
Williams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
MARINERS COVE, annual, 2BR/2BA, loft, fireplace,
jacuzzi tub, boat slip, pool, tennis, views of inter-
coastal. $1,300 per month. Call Martha Williams at
islandd Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNUAL single family home, 2BR/1 BA, oversized 1
car garage, roof-top deck with beautiful views of Gulf,
private fenced yard, sunny family room. $1,000 per
month. Call Martha Williams at Island Real Estate,
778-6066.
SEVERAL 5 to 7 month rentals available. Call Martha
Williams at Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
ANNA MARIA Gulf and Bay views. 1 or 2 bedroom,
patio, pool, W/D. Furnished or unfurnished. $550, in-
cludes utilities or $650. 211 So. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
SMUGGLERS LANDING CONDO, beautifully fur-
nished, 2BR/2BA, pool, tennis, sailboat water slip
available. $900 per month. Call Martha Williams at
Island Real Estate, 778-6066.
BRADENTON BEACH efficiency. Newly remodeled,
furnished, steps to Gulf. Available July, August and
September. $550 per month includes utilities. Pets
maybe. 813-963-0539.
ANNUAL: 309 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 2BR/1BA,
zoned for residential or commercial use. Call Robin
Kollar, Gulf Bay Realty, 778-7244.


GULF FRONT fall special! 3BR/2BA vacation rental,
best on beach in Anna Maria. Vacancy: Aug. 22,
Sept., Oct. & Nov. $600-$800 per week. Reserve
now. 778-3171.

VACATION RENTAL, 201 S. Bay. 100' from Anna
Maria City Pier. Pool, spa, etc. $125/week, $35/
night. Call 778-9188.

ANNUAL single family home 2BR/1 BA. Newly re-
molded, ceramic tile, carpet, stove, ref., W/D, sunny
family room 1 car garage, roof-top deck, fenced yard,
patio and beautiful Gulf views. $900 month plus utili-
ties. Sept. 1, 1994. Call Jim, 778-6221.
LARGE FURNISHED EFFICIENCY with kitchen,
Holmes Beach. $435 monthly includes utilities. $300
Security deposit. $175 weekly. No Pets! 778-0794 or
407-846-8741.
CANAL FRONT, Anna Maria. Furnished 2BR/1 BA
duplex. Ground floor, nice, dock available, no pets or
smoking. $550. 778-6350 or 778-7206.
BRAND NEW! 2BR/2BA, yearly, bayfront complex
with pool, covered parking. $675. to $725 mo. incl.
water/sewer, trash & cable. 778-4777.
BEAUTIFUL Gulf view, steps to beach, 2BR/2BA, 1
car garage, pools, tennis, complete turnkey. August
thru May. 813-265-1766 or 884-0222.
1 BEDROOM furnished apartment for rent. Weekly
or monthly. Across the street from beach. $600 per
month plus electricity. 778-5035.


FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's comput-
erized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-U-Sell
- Realty Counselors. 795-0616.
BEAUTIFUL Gulf views, steps to the beach, 2BR/
1 BA home, oversized 1 car garage, fenced yard and
patio, sundeck, ceramic tile, fresh paint, sunny family
room. $135,000. Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real
Estate, 778-6066.

VACATION RENTAL APARTMENT COMPLEX
6 units 2, 2 bedroom 4, 1 bedroom apartments
overlooking the Gulf, 25 feet to Beach! Gorgeous
view, strong building in a quiet neighborhood. Could
be annual rentals. Drive by 201 35th St. Phone 778-
7373 for appt. $535K.,

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Private party, cash buyer,
quick closing. Anna Maria and Holmes Beach area.
798-3981.
BEACH HOUSE right on the Gulf of Mexico in the
City of Anna Maria. Enjoy the splendid wide beach.
This charming home has 2BR/1 BA, tile and parquet
floors, a large kitchen, screen porch and garage.
$530,000. Jeanette Rampone, 747-2244 for informa-
tion. Michael Saunders & Company.
WATERFRONT LOT By Owner. Cleared 90'xl 10'
seawalled on deep water canal. Prime Holmes
Beach location. 505 83rd St. House plans available,
includes soil test. 778-2975.
BY OWNER S. Bay Blvd. Elevated 2BR/2BA home.
Large enclosed garage & shop. Rear deck with ca-
nal view. Many extras. 813-778-7070.
BUY IT AND SELL IT FAST in The Islander Bystander.


wIS rANDE CiLASSIFIEDS
I-ERICSCOTIUD- RNALI


778-2586 , MAR I KAy Eve: 778-6771

25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 7/20/94 j

M ANATEE
S0 WIOWERS
c ^ ISLAND LAWN SERVICE
Donnie Rivera (813) 778-7508






UNCOMMON
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548

Cherie A Deen L[MT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Gift Cerriticates Available
-N792-3758 o001-6






SABAL PALM *
CARPENTRY Painting
A FLORIDACOMPANY Interior/Exterior
SMALL HOME REPAIRS 20 Years
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING Experience
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS Husband/Wife
ODD JOBS Team
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates Free Estimates
778-7603 e Estimates
Rick Lease 778-2139
32-YTear Island Resident 7782139



I(IM1BALL
HOME REPAIll CIO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
ALL HANDICAP CONVERSIONS:
Rails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience* Island Resident Local References
778-5354


MOST CARS $85

and we come to you!



^^y C!^ a


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

DEADLINE NOON MONDAY EVERY WEEK
Classifieds must be placed in person and paid in advance at our office we do not invoice or accept
credit card charges. Our office is located at 5408 Marina Drive, in the Island Shopping Center, Holmes
Beach, between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday Friday, Saturday 10 to 2.
CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED: Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines- 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for Information and assistance.


AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
We do it all for one low price.
Top to bottom, ashtray to engine!
Hand Wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal &
Polish, Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires,
Shampoo Carpets & Seats, Dress
Interior, Satin-Black Under Carriage,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected.
Everything included for $85 -
on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office.
Call mobile service number: 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.


611YS


I SLANDER




EO PAGE 28 K JULY 14, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


lan


5C 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
w OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JULY 19, 1994


goodss


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


e DELICIOUS -
Ground Turkey
' lMs ONLY


V TENDER
Turkey Breasts


990


LB.


".. .


JIMMY DEAN
ROLL SAUSAGE


U.S.D.A. CHOICE PEELED
Beef Tenderloin


WHOLE


$799


BONELESS SKINLESS
Chicken Breasts


25LB.
LB.^^^


a Peppers


4


FOR


$o00


SWEET
JUICY
Canta


$1.00
OFF
ANY 9" HAND
DECORATED
BAKERY CAKE


464 4l 1 tax A
SPEPSI I
I I
79 2 LTR.T


h DELI DEPARTMENT
Muenster
Cheese


SAVERS CHOICE
BUTTER


-K WITH THIS COUPON THRU JULY 19 | JULY 19. LIMIT TWO PER ||j lii| WITH THIS COUPON THRU JULY 19
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE -' CUSTOMER PLEASE M | LIMITTWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAN SD FOOS
THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11A.M. to NOON


Gr